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  1. 5D CNS+ Software for Automatically Imaging Axial, Sagittal, and Coronal Planes of Normal and Abnormal Second-Trimester Fetal Brains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzo, Giuseppe; Capponi, Alessandra; Persico, Nicola; Ghi, Tullio; Nazzaro, Giovanni; Boito, Simona; Pietrolucci, Maria Elena; Arduini, Domenico

    2016-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to test new 5D CNS+ software (Samsung Medison Co, Ltd, Seoul, Korea), which is designed to image axial, sagittal, and coronal planes of the fetal brain from volumes obtained by 3-dimensional sonography. The study consisted of 2 different steps. First in a prospective study, 3-dimensional fetal brain volumes were acquired in 183 normal consecutive singleton pregnancies undergoing routine sonographic examinations at 18 to 24 weeks' gestation. The 5D CNS+ software was applied, and the percentage of adequate visualization of brain diagnostic planes was evaluated by 2 independent observers. In the second step, the software was also tested in 22 fetuses with cerebral anomalies. In 180 of 183 fetuses (98.4%), 5D CNS+ successfully reconstructed all of the diagnostic planes. Using the software on healthy fetuses, the observers acknowledged the presence of diagnostic images with visualization rates ranging from 97.7% to 99.4% for axial planes, 94.4% to 97.7% for sagittal planes, and 92.2% to 97.2% for coronal planes. The Cohen κ coefficient was analyzed to evaluate the agreement rates between the observers and resulted in values of 0.96 or greater for axial planes, 0.90 or greater for sagittal planes, and 0.89 or greater for coronal planes. All 22 fetuses with brain anomalies were identified among a series that also included healthy fetuses, and in 21 of the 22 cases, a correct diagnosis was made. 5D CNS+ was efficient in successfully imaging standard axial, sagittal, and coronal planes of the fetal brain. This approach may simplify the examination of the fetal central nervous system and reduce operator dependency.

  2. Imaging anatomy of the head and spine. A photographic color atlas of MRI, CT, gross and microscopic anatomy in axial, coronal, and sagittal planes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book presents a correlative display of horizontal, coronal, and sagittal sections of the head and spine with a wide array of MRI images, CT scans, and conventional radiographs. Superb full color illustrations of serial dissections emphasize such clinically important areas as the temporal bone, orbit, and cervical spine. The MRI images included are state of the art, and only the highest resolution CT scans appear

  3. Effect of alignment changes on sagittal and coronal socket reaction moment interactions in transtibial prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Toshiki; Orendurff, Michael S; Zhang, Ming; Boone, David A

    2013-04-26

    Alignment is important for comfortable and stable gait of lower-limb prosthesis users. The magnitude of socket reaction moments in the multiple planes acting simultaneously upon the residual limb may be related to perception of comfort in individuals using prostheses through socket interface pressures. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of prosthetic alignment changes on sagittal and coronal socket reaction moment interactions (moment-moment curves) and to characterize the curves in 11 individuals with transtibial amputation using novel moment-moment interaction parameters measured by plotting sagittal socket reaction moments versus coronal ones under various alignment conditions. A custom instrumented prosthesis alignment component was used to measure socket reaction moments during walking. Prosthetic alignment was tuned to a nominally aligned condition by a prosthetist, and from this position, angular (3° and 6° of flexion, extension, abduction or adduction of the socket) and translational (5mm and 10mm of anterior, posterior, medial or lateral translation of the socket) alignment changes were performed in either the sagittal or the coronal plane in a randomized manner. A total of 17 alignment conditions were tested. Coronal angulation and translation alignment changes demonstrated similar consistent changes in the moment-moment curves. Sagittal alignment changes demonstrated more complex changes compared to the coronal alignment changes. Effect of sagittal angulations and translations on the moment-moment curves was different during 2nd rocker (mid-stance) with extension malalignment appearing to cause medio-lateral instability. Presentation of coronal and sagittal socket reaction moment interactions may provide useful visual information for prosthetists to understand the biomechanical effects of malalignment of transtibial prostheses.

  4. Brief communication: age and fractal dimensions of human sagittal and coronal sutures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lynnerup, Niels; Jacobsen, Jens Christian Brings

    2003-01-01

    The fractal dimensions of human sagittal and coronal sutures were calculated on 31 complete skulls from the Terry Collection. The aim was to investigate whether the fractal dimension, relying on the whole sutural length, might yield a better description of age-related changes in sutural morpholog...

  5. Measuring Fractional Anisotropy of the Corpus Callosum Using Diffusion Tensor Imaging: Mid-Sagittal versus Axial Imaging Planes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Eung Yeop; Park, Hae Jeong; Kim, Dong Hyun; Lee, Seung Koo; Kim, Jin Na [Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-10-15

    Many diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) studies of the corpus callosum (CC) have been performed with a relatively thick slice thickness in the axial plane, which may result in underestimating the fractional anisotropy (FA) of the CC due to a partial volume effect. We hypothesized that the FA of the CC can be more accurately measured by using mid-sagittal DTI. We compared the FA values of the CC between the axial and mid-sagittal DTI. Fourteen healthy volunteers underwent MRI at 3.0 T. DTI was performed in both the mid-sagittal and axial planes. One 5-mm mid-sagittal image and twenty-five 2-mm axial images were obtained for the CC. The five regions of interest (ROIs) that included the prefrontal (I), premotor and supplementary motor (II), motor (III), sensory (IV) and parietal, temporal and occipital regions (V) were drawn along the border of the CC on each sagittal FA map. The FA values obtained from each region were compared between the two sagittal maps. The FA values of all the regions, except for region V, were significantly increased on the mid-sagittal imaging. The FA values in region IV were significantly underestimated on the mid-sagittal image from the axial imaging, compared with those in the regions I and V (p = 0.037 and p = 0.001, respectively). The FA values of the CC were significantly higher on the midsagittal DTI than those on the axial DTI in regions I-IV, and particularly in the region IV. Mid-sagittal DTI may provide more accurate FA values of the CC than can the axial DTI, and mid-sagittal DTI may be more desirable for studies that compare between patients and healthy subjects

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging of skeletal muscle in patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy; Serial axial and sagittal section studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagao, Hideo (Ehime Univ., Matsuyama (Japan). Faculty of Education); Morimoto, Takehiko; Sano, Nozomi; Takahashi, Mitsugi; Nagai, Hironao; Tawa, Ritsuko; Yoshimatsu, Makoto; Woo Young-Jong; Matsuda, Hiroshi

    1991-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging of skeletal muscles in thirteen patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy was performed to estimate pathological changes. Serial axial and sagittal sections of the right lower extremity were recorded. In the early stage, the T{sub 1} values of gastrocnemius and soleus muscles were slightly lower than the control values, and in the late stage, the values were much lower in all muscles examined. In sagittal sections, the gastrocnemius muscle in the early stage showed a high density area at the distal region adjacent to soleus muscle, and the soleus muscle showed a high density area adjacent to the gestrocnemius muscle. In serial axial sections, high density areas of the anterior and posterior tibialis muscles appeared first at their proximal and peripheral regions. It was concluded that the sequence of appearance of pathological changes was different not only among individual muscles but also among various regions of each muscle; the high density changes appeared first at myotendon junctions. (author).

  7. Comparison of the Multidetector-row Computed Tomographic Angiography Axial and Coronal Planes' Usefulness for Detecting Thoracodorsal Artery Perforators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong Gyu Kim

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Background During the planning of a thoracodorsal artery perforator (TDAP free flap,preoperative multidetector-row computed tomographic (MDCT angiography is valuablefor predicting the locations of perforators. However, CT-based perforator mapping of thethoracodorsal artery is not easy because of its small diameter. Thus, we evaluated 1-mm-thickMDCT images in multiple planes to search for reliable perforators accurately.Methods Between July 2010 and October 2011, 19 consecutive patients (13 males, 6females who underwent MDCT prior to TDAP free flap operations were enrolled in this study.Patients ranged in age from 10 to 75 years (mean, 39.3 years. MDCT images were acquired ata thickness of 1 mm in the axial, coronal, and sagittal planes.Results The thoracodorsal artery perforators were detected in all 19 cases. The reliableperforators originating from the descending branch were found in 14 cases, of which 6 hadtransverse branches. The former were well identified in the coronal view, and the latter in theaxial view. The location of the most reliable perforators on MDCT images corresponded wellwith the surgical findings.Conclusions Though MDCT has been widely used in performing the abdominal perforatorfree flap for detecting reliable perforating vessels, it is not popular in the TDAP free flap.The results of this study suggest that multiple planes of MDCT may increase the probabilityof detecting the most reliable perforators, along with decreasing the probability of missingavailable vessels.

  8. First Simultaneous Views of the Axial and Lateral Perspectives of a Coronal Mass Ejection

    CERN Document Server

    Cabello, I; Balmaceda, L; Dohmen, I

    2016-01-01

    The different appearances exhibited by coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are believed to be in part the result of different orientations of their main axis of symmetry, consistent with a flux-rope configuration. There are observational reports of CMEs seen along their main axis (axial perspective) and perpendicular to it (lateral perspective), but no simultaneous observations of both perspectives from the same CME have been reported to date. The stereoscopic views of the telescopes onboard the $Solar$-$Terrestrial$ $Relations$ $Observatory$ (STEREO) twin spacecraft, in combination with the views from the $Solar$ $and$ $Heliospheric$ $Observatory$ (SOHO) and the $Solar$ $Dynamics$ $Observatory$ (SDO), allow us to study the axial and lateral perspectives of a CME simultaneously for the first time. In addition, this study shows that the lateral angular extent ($L$) increases linearly with time, while the angular extent of the axial perspective ($D$) presents this behavior only from the low corona to $\\approx\\,$5 $R_...

  9. An imaging protocol for dynamic contrast-enhanced breast MRI with 3.0T, using sagittal sequence interleaved between axial sequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Ji Eun; Lee, Jee Eun; Cha, Eun Suk [Dept. of Radiology, Ewha Womans Un:iversity School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)], e-mail: escha@ewha.ac.kr; Hwang, Ji-Young [Dept. of Radiology, Kangnam Sacred Hospital, Hallym Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-07-15

    Background: B1 transmission-field inhomogeneity has been reported at 3.0 Tesla (T) breast imaging. Enhancement measurements of breast cancers at 3.0T may be insufficient for some patients and improvements in imaging protocols are needed. Purpose: To quantify B1 inhomogeneities in normal tissue and malignant masses at 3.0T breast MR imaging and to evaluate effect of an imaging protocol using an interleaved sagittal sequence in dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI). Material and Methods: A total of 76 patients were included who underwent DCE-MRI of the breast at 3.0T with an imaging protocol consisting of 1st, 2nd, and 4-6th bilateral axial sequences, and 3rd and 7th unilateral sagittal sequences. Signal intensity (SI) of normal breast tissue was measured at nipple level in four bilateral locations (anterior, posterior, medial, and lateral). Mean whole breast and location specific SI were calculated and compared between right and left breast using a paired t-test. All malignant masses were classified into three groups according to tumor size on MRI ({<=}2 cm, 2-4 cm, >4 cm). SI of malignant masses was measured independently on axial and sagittal sequences. The axial-sagittal SI gap in each mass was calculated and difference between right and left breast was compared using the t test. Size of each malignant mass was compared with pathologic findings to assess performance of the imaging protocol. Results: SI of normal breast tissue were lower for the right breast (R-L difference, -91.9; P < 0.0001) and in all four locations (anterior, P < 0.01; posterior, P < 0.01; medial, P < 0.0001; lateral, P < 0.0001). SI of malignant masses were lower for the right breast among same size of the lesions (P < 0.0001), particularly < 4 cm (P < 0.0001). Decreased right to left difference in SI was produced with an interleaved sagittal sequence, as axial-sagittal gap of malignant masses was significant when tumor locates on the right side (P < 0.001). The concordance rate in

  10. First Simultaneous Views of the Axial and Lateral Perspectives of a Coronal Mass Ejection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabello, I.; Cremades, H.; Balmaceda, L.; Dohmen, I.

    2016-07-01

    The different appearances exhibited by coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are believed to be in part the result of different orientations of their main axis of symmetry, consistent with a flux-rope configuration. There are observational reports of CMEs seen along their main axis (axial perspective) and perpendicular to it (lateral perspective), but no simultaneous observations of both perspectives from the same CME have been reported to date. The stereoscopic views of the telescopes onboard the Solar-Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO) twin spacecraft, in combination with the views from the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) and the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO), allow us to study the axial and lateral perspectives of a CME simultaneously for the first time. In addition, this study shows that the lateral angular extent (L) increases linearly with time, while the angular extent of the axial perspective (D) presents this behavior only from the low corona to {≈} 5 R_{⊙}, where it slows down. The ratio L/D ≈ 1.6 obtained here as the average over several points in time is consistent with measurements of L and D previously performed on events exhibiting only one of the perspectives from the single vantage point provided by SOHO.

  11. Why helicity injection causes coronal flux tubes to develop an axially invariant cross-section

    CERN Document Server

    Bellan, P M

    2002-01-01

    It is shown that electric current flowing along an axially non-uniform magnetic flux tube produces an associated non-linear, non-conservative axial MHD force which pumps plasma from regions where the flux tube diameter is small to regions where it is large. In particular, this force will ingest plasma into the ends of a fat, initially potential flux tube and then pump the ingested plasma towards the middle bulge, thereby causing mass accumulation at the bulge. The ingested plasma convects frozen-in toroidal magnetic flux which accumulates at the middle as well. Flux accumulation at the bulge has the remarkable consequence of causing the bulge to diminish so that the flux tube becomes axially uniform as observed in coronal loops. Stagnation of the convergent plasma flow at the middle heats the plasma. A small number of tail particles bouncing synchronously between approaching fluid elements can be Fermi-accelerated to very high energies. Since driving a current along a flux tube is tantamount to helicity injec...

  12. First Simultaneous Views of the Axial and Lateral Perspectives of a Coronal Mass Ejection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabello, I.; Cremades, H.; Balmaceda, L.; Dohmen, I.

    2016-08-01

    The different appearances exhibited by coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are believed to be in part the result of different orientations of their main axis of symmetry, consistent with a flux-rope configuration. There are observational reports of CMEs seen along their main axis (axial perspective) and perpendicular to it (lateral perspective), but no simultaneous observations of both perspectives from the same CME have been reported to date. The stereoscopic views of the telescopes onboard the Solar-Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO) twin spacecraft, in combination with the views from the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) and the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO), allow us to study the axial and lateral perspectives of a CME simultaneously for the first time. In addition, this study shows that the lateral angular extent ( L) increases linearly with time, while the angular extent of the axial perspective ( D) presents this behavior only from the low corona to {≈} 5 R_{⊙}, where it slows down. The ratio L/D ≈ 1.6 obtained here as the average over several points in time is consistent with measurements of L and D previously performed on events exhibiting only one of the perspectives from the single vantage point provided by SOHO.

  13. Detection rate and efficiency of lymph node assessment with axial and coronal image reading based on 16 row multislice CT of the neck

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: multislice CT (MSCT) has the advantage of isotropic volumetric data acquisition which allows high resolution data reconstruction in the axial and coronal plane. We evaluate the accuracy and efficiency of coronal reconstruction compared to axial reconstructions of a routinely performed CT scan exemplary in neck lymph node assessment performed on a 16 row MSCT. Material and methods: contrast enhanced neck MSCT of 24 patients with known lymphoma were evaluated prospectively for lymph node assessment. 4 blinded readers evaluated the axial and coronal reconstructions of the same patient. Neck lymph nodes larger than 10 mm were evaluated by their anatomical region (deep jugular chain, submandibular, nuchal). Time for axial and coronal image evaluation was assessed. Detection rate was compared with consensus reading as gold standard. Results: in consensus reading 169 enlarged lymph nodes in the deep jugular chain were found. Detection rate for axial image interpretation was 36.1% with 54.9% in coronal reading. Assessing the submandibular lymph nodes (n = 45) axial interpretation revealed 53.9% with 36.1% in coronal reading. Evaluation time for axial reading was in all but one reader significantly longer (mean 176 seconds) than in coronal reading (mean 129 seconds). (orig.)

  14. Shoulder magnetic resonance arthrography in the sagittal oblique plane: pictorial essay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shoulder magnetic resonance (MR) arthrography is the imaging study of choice for investigating glenohumeral instability. The axial and coronal oblique planes have traditionally been used because it is on these planes that the glenoid labrum, as well as the biceps anchor and rotator cuff, are thought to be best evaluated. The purpose of this illustrative review is to demonstrate the diagnostic utility of the sagittal oblique plane in shoulder MR arthrography. Images identifying the normal and abnormal appearance of the labral, ligamentous, myotendinous and osteocartilaginous structures are presented, and comparisons to the axial and coronal oblique planes are made. (author)

  15. Comparison of the Accuracy of Panoramic Radiography, Coronal and Axial Ct Scan in Diagnosis of Mandibular Fractures

    OpenAIRE

    HR Mansourian; AR Sadr-Arhami; F Ezoddini-Ardakani; Sh Azari; P Dabirmoghadam

    2006-01-01

    Introduction: Mandibular fracture is the most common facial bone fracture due to facial trauma. A variety of imagings have been used for diagnosis of mandibular fractures. However, the choice of imaging for diagnosis of mandibular fractures is controversial.Present study compares the accuracy of the three most common imaging methods in mandibular fracture diagnosis; panoramic radiography, coronal CT and axial CT scan. Methods: This cross sectional diagnostic study was performed on 45 patients...

  16. The feasibility of axial and coronal combined imaging using multi-detector row computed tomography for the diagnosis and treatment of a primary spontaneous pneumothorax

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Do

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The preoperative detection of emphysema like changes (ELCs is necessary for the successful treatment of pneumothorax. High resolution computed tomography (HRCT has been used for the preoperative detection of ELCs. However, the traditional HRCT method uses only the axial view, which is perpendicular to the distribution of ELCs. This is not an ideal diagnostic method for the evaluation of ELCs. Methods Forty-eight patients with pneumothorax had multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT reconstruction using the coronal view. ELCs were evaluated in the axial and coronal view by a radiologist. A surgeon performed intra-operative examinations of the ELCs. The sensitivity of the different views was compared. Results The detection sensitivity was 74.4% (70/94 for the axial view and 91.5% (86/94 for the axial-coronal combined view. The intra-operative detection rate was 95.7% (90/94. The preoperative detection of ELCs on the axial-coronal combined view was significantly higher than on the conventional axial view alone (p Conclusions Evaluation of ELCs on the axial and coronal combined HRCT improved the sensitivity of preoperative detection of ELCs compared to the conventional single axial HRCT. This increased sensitivity will help decrease the recurrence with VATS.

  17. Comparing of image quality of axial and coronal CT scan of temporal bone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghanaati H

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available CT image quality has been affected by many factors such as KVP, ma, exposure time, alogorithm and section thickness. Gantry tilt has the main role in visualization of the temporal bone anatomic structures. In this study, we tried to optimize these factors to determine the best gantry tilt. This study was performed on the human skull phantom and then extended to 15 patients. The phantom was made by inserting a normal human dry skull into a water- filled radiolucent cylindrical container. A lateral scout view was obtained and the OMBL (orbitomeatal baseline was used as the anatomical landmark.The phantom was scanned in 9, 15 , 30 , 45, 60 , 75, 90,105, 120 degree in relation to OMBL and 24 important anatomical structures were evaluated in each. Kilovoltage of 80, 120, 140 millimeters of 40, 70, 100, 120, 140, 170, 200, 240, exposue time of 2, 2, 4 second , algorithm of smooth, soft, standard, detail, bone adge and section thickness of 1.5, 3,5 millimeter were studied separately. In general, most of the anatomical structures are well demonstrated in 0 or 30 degrees of axial scans and 90 or 105 degrees in coronal scans. The best imaging techniques in Kv=140, Ma=100, S=2 seconds, algorithm of edge or bone, section thickness of 1.5 millimeter for small structures and 3 millineters for greater ones.The best 3-D image is provided by 3 millimeter slice thickness without overlapping but they couldn’t assist in diagnosis of our patient’s diseases. In indirect sagital reformatted images, the greater anatomical structures such as vestibule and cochlea are also shown, but they are recommended due to the slight degradation of the images and some loss of resolution.

  18. Coronal Diffusion-weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Kidney: Agreement with Axial Diffusion-weighted Magnetic Imaging in Terms of Apparent Diffusion Coefficient Values

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hai-Yi Wang; Jia Wang; Ye-Huan Tang; Hui-Yi Ye; Lin Ma

    2015-01-01

    Background:Coronal diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW-MRI) and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values have gradually become applied (following conventional axial DW-MRI) in the renal analysis.To explore whether data obtained using coronal DW-MRI are comparable with those derived using axial DW-MRI,this preliminary study sought to assess the agreement in renal ADC values between coronal DW-MRI and axial DW-MRI.Methods:Thirty-four healthy volunteers were enrolled in the study; written consents were obtained.All subjects underwent respiratory-triggered axial and coronal DW-MRI using a 1.5-MR system with b values of 0 and 800 s/mm2.The signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) of the two DW-MRI sequences were measured and statistically compared using the paired t-test.The extent of agreement of ADC values of the upper pole,mid-pole,and lower pole of the kidney; the mean ADC values of the left kidney and right kidney; and the mean ADC values of the bilateral kidneys were evaluated via calculation of intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) or Bland-Altman method between the two DW-MRI sequences.Results:The SNR of coronal DW-MR images was statistically inferior to that of axial DW-MR images (P < 0.001).The ICCs of the ADC values of each region of interest,and the mean ADC values of bilateral kidneys,between the two sequences,were greater than 0.5,and the mean ADCs of the bilateral kidneys demonstrated the highest ICC (0.869; 95% confidence interval:0.739-0.935).In addition,94.1% (32/34),94.1% (32/34),and 97.1% (31/34) of the ADC bias was inside the limits of agreement in terms of the mean ADC values of the left kidneys,right kidneys,and bilateral kidneys when coronal and axial DWI-MRI were compared.Conclusions:ADC values derived using coronal DW-MRI exhibited moderate-to-good agreement to those of axial DW-MRI,rendering the former an additional useful DW-MRI method,and causing the ADC values derived using the two types of DW-MRI to be comparable.

  19. Fixed Sagittal Plane Imbalance

    OpenAIRE

    Savage, Jason W.; Patel, Alpesh A.

    2014-01-01

    Study Design Literature review. Objective To discuss the evaluation and management of fixed sagittal plane imbalance. Methods A comprehensive literature review was performed on the preoperative evaluation of patients with sagittal plane malalignment, as well as the surgical strategies to address sagittal plane deformity. Results Sagittal plane imbalance is often caused by de novo scoliosis or iatrogenic flat back deformity. Understanding the etiology and magnitude of sagittal malalignment is ...

  20. Sagittal Plane Analysis of Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis after VATS (Video-Assisted Thoracoscopic Surgery) Anterior Instrumentations

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Hak-Sun; Lee, Chong-Suh; Jeon, Byoung-Ho; Park, Jin-Oh

    2007-01-01

    Radiographic sagittal plane analysis of VATS (video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery) anterior instrumentation for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis. This is retrospective study. To report, in details about effects of VATS anterior instrumentation on the sagittal plane. Evaluations of the surgical outcome of scoliosis have primarily studied in coronal plane correction, functional, and cosmetic aspects. Sagittal balance, as well as coronal balance, is important in functional spine. Recently, scoli...

  1. Functional CT imaging of the lung in the axial and coronal plane after single-lung transplantation; Computertomographische Funktionsuntersuchung der Lunge nach einseitiger Lungentransplantation mit axialer und koronarer Akquisition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kauczor, H.U. [Mainz Univ. (Germany). Klinik fuer Radiologie; Buchenroth, M. [Mainz Univ. (Germany). 3. Medizinische Klinik - Pneumologie; Heussel, C.P. [Mainz Univ. (Germany). Klinik fuer Radiologie; Mayer, E. [Mainz Univ. (Germany). Klinik fuer Herz-, Thorax-, Gefaesschirurgie

    1996-05-01

    After single-lung transplantation in a patient suffering from obstructive emphysema lung function parameters worsened during follow-up. To conplement the routine high-resolution CT (HRCT) scans acquired in inspiration, additional scans were obtained to evaluate regional lung function. The comparison of HRCT scans acquired in inspiration and in expiration revealed different ventilation conditions of both lungs, continuous acquisition in a single slice (dynamic multiscan acquisition) in the axial and coronal plane demonstrated mediastinal shifting and the movement of the diaphragm during the whole breathing cycle. Both modalities can provide important information concerning regional differences of ventilation after single-lung transplantation. Expiratory HRCT should be applied on a regular basis in the follow-up of patients after single-lung transplantation. Expiratory HRCT should be applied on a regular basis in the follow-up of patients after single-lung transplantation. The application of axial and coronal dynamic multiscan acquisitions will be helpful in particular clinical conditions, like increasing hyperinflation, mediastinal shifting or bronchial collapse within the region of the anastomosis. (orig.) [Deutsch] Nach Einzellungentransplantation wegen eines obstruktiven Emphysems wurden bei einem Patienten in der Nachsorge zur Abklaerung einer Verschlechterung der Lungenfunktionsparameter neben einer hochaufloesenden CT (HRCT) in Inspiration zusaetzliche Aufnahmen zur Funktionsbeurteilung durchgefuehrt. Der Vergleich von HRCT-Aufnahmen in In- und Exspiration zeigte die unterschiedlichen Ventilationsverhaeltnisse bei beiden Lungen; kontinuierliche Aufnahmen in einer Schicht (Multirotationsaufnahmen) stellten bei axialer und insbesondere bei direkter koronarer Akquisition die Mediastinal- und Zwerchfellbewegung waehrend des gesamten Atemzyklus dar. Beide Verfahren koennen wichtige Zusatzinformationen ueber regionale Ventilationsdifferenzen nach einseitiger

  2. Lumbosacral transitional vertebra and S1 radiculopathy: the value of coronal MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bezuidenhout, Abraham Fourie; Lotz, Jan Willem [Stellenbosch University, Division of Radiodiagnosis, Department of Medical Imaging and Clinical Oncology, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Tygerberg (South Africa)

    2014-06-15

    The association of a lumbosacral transitional vertebra with accelerated degeneration of the disc above has been described. Lumbosacral transitional vertebrae have also been reported as a cause of extraforaminal entrapment of the L5 nerve root between the transverse segment of the transitional vertebra and the sacral ala optimally demonstrated by coronal MRI. The association of the lumbosacral transitional vertebra pseudoarthroses and S1 nerve root entrapment due to degenerative stenosis of the nerve root canal has never been described. We present 12 patients with lumbosacral transitional vertebrae that were referred for symptoms and signs of S1 nerve root radiculopathy in which the sagittal and axial MRI sequences failed to identify a plausible cause for the patients' S1 nerve root symptoms. A coronal T1-weighted imaging (T1WI) MRI sequence was consequently added to the investigation. The coronal T1WI MRI sequence demonstrated hypertrophic degenerative stenosis of the S1 nerve root canal at the level of the lumbosacral transitional vertebra pseudoarthrosis, with entrapment of the respective S1 nerve root in all patients. We emphasize the value of coronal T1WI MRI of the lumbosacral junction and sacrum if the cause for S1 radicular symptoms was not identified on conventional sagittal and axial MRI sequences in patients with lumbosacral transitional vertebrae. (orig.)

  3. Fixed sagittal plane imbalance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savage, Jason W; Patel, Alpesh A

    2014-12-01

    Study Design Literature review. Objective To discuss the evaluation and management of fixed sagittal plane imbalance. Methods A comprehensive literature review was performed on the preoperative evaluation of patients with sagittal plane malalignment, as well as the surgical strategies to address sagittal plane deformity. Results Sagittal plane imbalance is often caused by de novo scoliosis or iatrogenic flat back deformity. Understanding the etiology and magnitude of sagittal malalignment is crucial in realignment planning. Objective parameters have been developed to guide surgeons in determining how much correction is needed to achieve favorable outcomes. Currently, the goals of surgery are to restore a sagittal vertical axis Sagittal plane malalignment is an increasingly recognized cause of pain and disability. Treatment of sagittal plane imbalance varies according to the etiology, location, and severity of the deformity. Fixed sagittal malalignment often requires complex reconstructive procedures that include osteotomy correction. Reestablishing harmonious spinopelvic alignment is associated with significant improvement in health-related quality-of-life outcome measures and patient satisfaction.

  4. Additional merit of coronal STIR imaging for MR imaging of lumbar spine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranjana Gupta

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Back pain is a common clinical problem and is the frequent complaint for referral of lumbar spine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. Coronal short tau inversion recovery sequence (STIR can provide diagnostically significant information in small percentage of patients. Materials and Methods: MRI examinations of a total of 350 patients were retrospectively included in the study. MR sequences were evaluated in two settings. One radiologist evaluated sagittal and axial images only, while another radiologist evaluated all sequences, including coronal STIR sequence. After recording the diagnoses, we compared the MRI findings in two subsets of patients to evaluate additional merit of coronal STIR imaging. Results: With addition of coronal STIR imaging, significant findings were observed in 24 subjects (6.8%. Twenty-one of these subjects were considered to be normal on other sequences and in three subjects diagnosis was changed with the addition of coronal STIR. Additional diagnoses on STIR included sacroiliitis, sacroiliac joint degenerative disease, sacral stress/insufficiency fracture/Looser′s zones, muscular sprain and atypical appendicitis. Conclusion: Coronal STIR imaging can provide additional diagnoses in a small percentage of patients presenting for lumbar spine MRI for back pain. Therefore, it should be included in the routine protocol for MR imaging of lumbar spine.

  5. Sagittal Balance in Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xi-Ming; Wang, Fei; Zhou, Xiao-Yi; Liu, Zi-Xuan; Wei, Xian-Zhao; Bai, Yu-Shu; Li, Ming

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The relationship between spinal sagittal alignment and pelvic parameters is well known in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis. However, few studies have reported the sagittal spinopelvic relationship after selective posterior fusion of thoracolumbar/lumbar (TL/L) curves. We evaluated the relationship between spinal sagittal alignment and the pelvis, and analyzed how the pelvic sagittal state is adjusted in Lenke type 5C patients. We conducted a retrospective study of 36 patients with Lenke type 5C curves who received selective posterior TL/L curve fusion. Coronal and spinopelvic sagittal parameters were pre and postoperatively compared. Pearson coefficients were used to analyze the correlation between all spinopelvic sagittal parameters before and after surgery. We also evaluated 3 pelvic morphologies (anteverted, normal, and retroverted) before and after surgery. Preoperatively, the mean pelvic incidence was 46.0°, with a pelvic tilt and sacral slope (SS) of 8.2° and 37.8°, respectively, and 25% (9/36) of patients had an anteverted pelvis, whereas the other 75% had a normal pelvis. Postoperatively, 42% (15/36) of patients had a retroverted pelvis, 53% (19/36) had a normal pelvis, and 2 patients had an anteverted pelvis. Logistic regression analyses yielded 2 factors that were significantly associated with the risk for a postoperative unrecovered anteverted pelvis, including increased lumbar lordosis (LL) (odds ratio [OR] 4.8, P = 0.029) and increased SS (OR 5.6, P = 0.018). Four factors were significantly associated with the risk of a postoperative newly anteverted pelvis, including LL at the final follow-up (OR 6.9, P = 0.009), increased LL (OR 8.9, P = 0.003), LL below fusion (OR 9.4, P = 0.002), and increased SS (OR 11.5, P = 0.001). The pelvic state may be adjusted after selective posterior TL/L curve fusion in Lenke 5C adolescent idiopathic scoliosis patients. It is difficult to improve an anteverted pelvis in patients who have

  6. Effect of pedicle subtraction osteotomy and Smith-Peterson osteotomy on coronal and sagittal balance restoration in patients with degenerative kyphoscoliosis%比较经椎弓根与Smith-Peterson截骨对退变性侧后凸畸形冠矢状面平衡重建的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱锋; 鲍虹达; 邱勇; 刘臻; 毛赛虎; 朱泽章; 何守玉; 王斌

    2014-01-01

    Objective To compare the restoration of both coronal and sagittal balance following pedicle subtraction osteotomy (PSO) and Smith-Petersen osteotomy (SPO) for degenerative kyphoscoliosis.Methods Data of 47 patients with degenerative kyphoscoliosis,who underwent PSO or SPO from May 2007 to November 2011 in our center,were retrospectively analyzed.There were 25 cases of PSO and 22 of SPO.Long-cassette standing upright postero-anterior and lateral radiographs of the spine and pelvis were taken before,two weeks after surgeries and during follow-ups.The pre-,post-operative and follow-up parameters including Cobb angle,trunk shift (TS),apical vertebra translation (AVT),sagittal vertical axis (SVA),thoracic kyphosis (TK),lumbar lordosis (LL),pelvic incidence (PI),sacral slope (SS) and pelvic tilt (PT) were measured.Results The pre-operative parameters were matched between SPO and PSO groups except significantly larger TS in PSO group.Only SVA showed significant difference between the two groups postoperatively.No significant differences in parameters were observed between the two groups at the last follow-up.Significant differences were observed in terms of the improvement of Cobb angle,AVT,SVA,LL,PT and SS.TS in PSO decreased from 37.21 mm preoperatively to 24.67 mm postoperatively and it decreased to 21.69 mm at last follow-up.TS in SPO increased from 18.91 mm preoperatively to 37.43 mm postoperatively and it decreased to 17.84 mm at last follow-up.Conclusion Coronal and sagittal balance of patients with degenerative kyphoscoliosis can be well restored by both SPO and PSO despite different indications.Overcorrection of SVA is often seen in PSO group while the coronal balance in SPO group may not be well restored post-operatively which may attribute to post-operative posture.The postoperative imbalance of both coronal and sagittal plain could be corrected spontaneously during follow-ups.%目的 比较经椎弓根椎体截骨(pedicle subtraction osteotomy

  7. Usefulness of lateral radiographs for detecting tuberculous lymphadenopathy in children – confirmation using sagittal CT reconstruction with multiplanar cross-referencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Savvas Andronikou

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Background. Diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB in children remains difficult. Lateral chest radiographs are frequently used to facilitate diagnosis, but interpretation is variable. In this study, lateral chest radiographs (CXRs are evaluated against sagittal CT reconstructions for the detection of mediastinal lymphadenopathy. Aim. To correlate suspected lymphadenopathy on lateral CXR with sagittal CT reconstructions and determine which anatomical group of lymph nodes contributes to each lateral CXR location. Methods and materials. Thirty TB-positive children’s lateral CXRs were retrospectively reviewed for presence of mediastinal lymphadenopathy in 3 pre-determined locations in relation to the carina: retrocarinal, subcarinal and precarinal. Findings of the CT sagittal reconstructions were then correlated with the CXRs for the presence of lymphadenopathy in the same 3 pre-determined areas across the width of the mediastinum. Axial and coronal CT crossreferencing confirmed the position of the lymphadenopathy. Results. The most frequent locations for lymphadenopathy were the subcarinal (28 and right hilar (25. Sensitivity and specificity values of the CXRs were moderate, with the precarinal region having the best sensitivity and specificity for presence of lymphadenopathy. Contribution to each zonal group on lateral CXR were from multiple anatomical lymph node sites. Conclusion. The precarinal zone on CXR had the best specificity and sensitivity, and represented mainly subcarinal and right hilar lymph node groups. Attention should be paid to this area on lateral CXRs for detecting lymphadenopathy in children with suspected PTB.

  8. Determination of contact force at facet joint with different sagittal orientation under shearing loads:a finite element analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘耀升; 陈其昕; 刘蜀彬

    2008-01-01

    with different facet joint angle.[Conclusion]The spatial orientation and geometric forms of the coronal facet articular surfaces are more effective in restricting motion in transversal and sagittal planes while assuming a minor role in resisting axial force or motion than sagittal facet articular surface.It Was presumed that anterior shear force play a more prominent contribution on the degeneration of the facet joint with coronal articular surface compared with posterior shear force.

  9. 磁共振斜冠状位扫描对正常膝关节前交叉韧带的显示作用%The displaying value of thin scan of oblique coronal MR images on anterior cruciate ligament

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    梁有禄; 韦骏; 黄永杰; 王效柱; 韦健; 周建飞; 邓忠奎; 汪勤; 陈琪

    2013-01-01

    目的 探讨磁共振斜冠状位扫描对膝关节前交叉韧带的显示价值.方法 对60例正常膝关节行常规扫描,包括斜矢状位、冠状位、横断位.所有病例均行在斜矢状位图像基础上平行于前交叉韧带FSE序列斜冠状位薄层无间隔质子密度加权扫描,分析斜冠状、斜矢状、冠状及横断位对前交叉韧带的显示情况.结果 斜冠状可清楚全程显示前交叉韧带于一幅图片上,显示率为100%(60/60),斜矢状位显示率为86.7%(52/60),而横断及冠状位则分段显示前交叉韧带,即不能在一幅图中完整显示前交叉韧带.结论 斜冠状位扫描符合前交叉韧带解剖走向,可明显提高前交叉韧带的完整显示率,有利于其损伤后评价.%Objective To investigate the value of oblique coronal MR images in visualization of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL).Methods Conventional scan was performed in 60 normal knees,including axial section,coronal section and median sagittal section.Then thin scan of oblique coronal which was paralled to ACL,based on FSE conventional oblique sagittal images,was acqired.The visualization of ACL on thin scan of oblique coronal,axial,coronal and obligue sagittal were analysed.Results The clear visualization of the whole ACL was 100%(60/60) shown on one image of the thin scan of oblique coronal,86.7 % (52/60) on one of the Conventional oblique sagittal images while it was sectionally shown on the images of axial section and coronal section,that is,it can't be completely shown on one image.Conclusion The thin scan of oblique coronal agrees with the dissect trend of anterior cruciate ligament and significantly improves the complete display rate of anterior cruciate ligament,benefiting its assessment after it is damaged.

  10. MR imaging of the anterior cruciate ligament. Value of thin slice direct oblique coronal technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katahira, Kazuhiro; Yamashita, Yasuyuki; Takahashi, Mutsumasa [Kumamoto Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine; Otsuka, Nobuko; Koga, Yukunori; Fukumoto, Tetsuya; Nomura, Kazutoshi

    2001-02-01

    The value of the thin slice direct oblique coronal technique, which is parallel to the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL), was assessed in the evaluation of ACL injury in comparison with conventional oblique sagittal and coronal images. A thin slice direct oblique coronal technique was developed and applied clinically to 62 patients after conventional oblique sagittal and coronal images had been obtained. MR images of these 62 patients (24 with tears and 38 without tears) with an arthroscopic correlation were evaluated by three radiologists who were unaware of the arthroscopic results. The diagnostic accuracy of these new images was compared with that of oblique sagittal and coronal images by ROC analysis. Conventional oblique sagittal and coronal images for the diagnosis of ACL tears revealed accuracies of 82%, 84%, and 84%, sensitivities of 92%, 92%, and 96% and specificities of 76%, 79%, and 76% for the three reviewers, respectively. On thin slice direct oblique coronal images, specificities of 97%, 97%, and 97%, sensitivities of 96%, 96%, and 96%, and accuracies of 97%, 97%, and 97% were obtained, respectively. Diagnostic ability was significantly better with direct oblique coronal images (mean area under the ROC curve [Az]=0.99) than with conventional oblique sagittal and coronal images (Az=0.91) (p<0.05). The addition of thin slice direct oblique coronal images significantly improved specificity and accuracy in the diagnosis of ACL tears. (author)

  11. Grading Anterior Cruciate Ligament Graft Injury after Ligament Reconstruction Surgery: Diagnostic Efficacy of Oblique Coronal MR Imaging of the Knee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective : The purpose of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic efficacy of using additional oblique coronal MRI of the knee for grading anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) graft injury after ligament reconstruction surgery. Materials and Methods : We retrospectively reviewed 51 consecutive MR knee examinations of 48 patients who underwent both ACL reconstruction and follow-up arthroscopy. The MR examinations included the orthogonal axial, sagittal, coronal images and the oblique coronal T2-weighted images, which were oriented in parallel with the course of the femoral intercondylar roof. Two radiologists independently evaluated the status of the ACL grafts with using the routine knee MRI and then with adding the oblique coronal imaging. The severity of ACL graft injury was graded using a 3-point system from MR images as intact, partial tear or complete tear, and the results were compared with the arthroscopic results. Weighted kappa statistics were used to analyze the diagnostic accuracies of the knee MRI with and without the additional oblique coronal imaging. For each evaluation, the observers reported a confidence level for grading the ACL graft injuries in the two imaging groups. Result : The weighted kappa values according to the routine knee MRI were 0.555 (reader 1) and 0.515 (reader 2). The inclusion of additional oblique coronal imaging increased the weighted kappa values to 0.666 (reader 1) and 0.611 (reader 2). The mean confidence levels by each reader were significantly higher (p < 0.01, paired t-test) with the additional oblique coronal imaging than by using the routine knee MRI alone. Conclusion : The additional use of oblique coronal MRI of the knee improves both the diagnostic accuracy and confidence for grading ACL graft injury

  12. Grading Anterior Cruciate Ligament Graft Injury after Ligament Reconstruction Surgery: Diagnostic Efficacy of Oblique Coronal MR Imaging of the Knee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, Sung Gyu; Hong, Sung Hwan; Choi, Ja Young; Jun, Woo Sun; Choi, Jung Ah; Park, Eun Ah; Kang, Heung Sik; Kwon, Jong Won [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-04-15

    Objective : The purpose of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic efficacy of using additional oblique coronal MRI of the knee for grading anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) graft injury after ligament reconstruction surgery. Materials and Methods : We retrospectively reviewed 51 consecutive MR knee examinations of 48 patients who underwent both ACL reconstruction and follow-up arthroscopy. The MR examinations included the orthogonal axial, sagittal, coronal images and the oblique coronal T2-weighted images, which were oriented in parallel with the course of the femoral intercondylar roof. Two radiologists independently evaluated the status of the ACL grafts with using the routine knee MRI and then with adding the oblique coronal imaging. The severity of ACL graft injury was graded using a 3-point system from MR images as intact, partial tear or complete tear, and the results were compared with the arthroscopic results. Weighted kappa statistics were used to analyze the diagnostic accuracies of the knee MRI with and without the additional oblique coronal imaging. For each evaluation, the observers reported a confidence level for grading the ACL graft injuries in the two imaging groups. Result : The weighted kappa values according to the routine knee MRI were 0.555 (reader 1) and 0.515 (reader 2). The inclusion of additional oblique coronal imaging increased the weighted kappa values to 0.666 (reader 1) and 0.611 (reader 2). The mean confidence levels by each reader were significantly higher (p < 0.01, paired t-test) with the additional oblique coronal imaging than by using the routine knee MRI alone. Conclusion : The additional use of oblique coronal MRI of the knee improves both the diagnostic accuracy and confidence for grading ACL graft injury.

  13. Radiographic Parameters in Adult Degenerative Scoliosis and Different Parameters Between Sagittal Balanced and Imbalanced ADS Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Changwei; Yang, Mingyuan; Chen, Yuanyuan; Wei, Xianzhao; Ni, Haijian; Chen, Ziqiang; Li, Jingfeng; Bai, Yushu; Zhu, Xiaodong; Li, Ming

    2015-07-01

    A retrospective study. To summarize and describe the radiographic parameters of adult degenerative scoliosis (ADS) and explore the radiological parameters which are significantly different in sagittal balanced and imbalanced ADS patients. ADS is the most common type of adult spinal deformity. However, no comprehensive description of radiographic parameters in ADS patients has been made, and few studies have been performed to explore which radiological parameters are significantly different between sagittal balanced and imbalanced ADS patients. Medical records of ADS patients in our outpatient clinic from January 2012 to January 2014 were reviewed. Demographic data including age and sex, and radiographic data including the coronal Cobb angle, location of apical vertebra/disc, convexity of the curve, degree of apical vertebra rotation, curve segments, thoracic kyphosis (TK), lumbar lordosis (LL), thoracolumbar kyphosis (TL), sacral slope (SS), pelvic tilt (PT), pelvic incidence (PI), sagittal vertical axis (SVA), and PI minus LL (PI-LL) were reviewed to make comprehensive description of radiographic parameters of ADS. Furthermore, patients were divided into 2 groups according to whether the patients' sagittal plane was balanced: Group A (imbalanced, SVA > 5 cm) and Group B (balanced, SVA  ≤ 5 cm). Demographic and radiological parameters were compared between these 2 groups. A total of 99 patients were included in this study (Group A = 33 and Group B = 66; female = 83 and male = 16; sex ratio = 5:1). The median of age were 67 years (range: 41-92 years). The median of coronal Cobb angle and length of curve was 23 (range: 10-75°) and 5 segments (range: 3-7), respectively. The most common location of apical vertebra was at L2 to L3 (81%) and the median of degree of apical vertebra rotation was 2° (range: 1-3). Our study also showed significant correlations between coronal Cobb angle and curve segments (r = 0.23, P < 0.005) and degree of apical vertebra rotation (r

  14. 3.0 T MR imaging of the ankle: Axial traction for morphological cartilage evaluation, quantitative T2 mapping and cartilage diffusion imaging—A preliminary study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Axial traction is applicable during high resolution MR imaging of the ankle. • Axial traction during MR imaging oft the ankle improves cartilage surface delineation of the individual tibial and talar cartilage layer for better morphological evaluation without the need of intraarticular contrast agent application. • Coronal T1-weighted MR images with a driven equilibrium pulse performed best. • Axial traction during MR imaging of the ankle facilitates compartment discrimination for segmentation purposes resulting in better reproducibility. - Abstract: Purpose: To determine the impact of axial traction during high resolution 3.0 T MR imaging of the ankle on morphological assessment of articular cartilage and quantitative cartilage imaging parameters. Materials and Methods: MR images of n = 25 asymptomatic ankles were acquired with and without axial traction (6 kg). Coronal and sagittal T1-weighted (w) turbo spin echo (TSE) sequences with a driven equilibrium pulse and sagittal fat-saturated intermediate-w (IMfs) TSE sequences were acquired for morphological evaluation on a four-point scale (1 = best, 4 = worst). For quantitative assessment of cartilage degradation segmentation was performed on 2D multislice-multiecho (MSME) SE T2, steady-state free-precession (SSFP; n = 8) T2 and SSFP diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI; n = 8) images. Wilcoxon-tests and paired t-tests were used for statistical analysis. Results: With axial traction, joint space width increased significantly and delineation of cartilage surfaces was rated superior (P < 0.05). Cartilage surfaces were best visualized on coronal T1-w images (P < 0.05). Differences for cartilage matrix evaluation were smaller. Subchondral bone evaluation, motion artifacts and image quality were not significantly different between the acquisition methods (P > 0.05). T2 values were lower at the tibia than at the talus (P < 0.001). Reproducibility was better for images with axial traction. Conclusion

  15. 3.0 T MR imaging of the ankle: Axial traction for morphological cartilage evaluation, quantitative T2 mapping and cartilage diffusion imaging—A preliminary study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jungmann, Pia M., E-mail: pia.jungmann@tum.de [Department of Radiology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Ismaninger Strasse 22, 81675 Munich (Germany); Baum, Thomas, E-mail: thomas.baum@tum.de [Department of Radiology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Ismaninger Strasse 22, 81675 Munich (Germany); Schaeffeler, Christoph, E-mail: schaeffeler@me.com [Department of Radiology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Ismaninger Strasse 22, 81675 Munich (Germany); Musculoskeletal Imaging, Kantonsspital Graubuenden, Loestrasse 170, CH-7000 Chur (Switzerland); Sauerschnig, Martin, E-mail: martin.sauerschnig@mri.tum.de [Department of Trauma Surgery, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Ismaninger Strasse 22, 81675 Munich (Germany); Department of Orthopaedic Sports Medicine, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Ismaninger Strasse 22, 81675 Munich (Germany); Brucker, Peter U., E-mail: peter.brucker@lrz.tu-muenchen.de [Department of Orthopaedic Sports Medicine, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Ismaninger Strasse 22, 81675 Munich (Germany); Mann, Alexander, E-mail: abmann@onlinemed.de [Department of Radiology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Ismaninger Strasse 22, 81675 Munich (Germany); Department of Orthopaedic Sports Medicine, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Ismaninger Strasse 22, 81675 Munich (Germany); Ganter, Carl, E-mail: cganter@tum.de [Department of Radiology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Ismaninger Strasse 22, 81675 Munich (Germany); Bieri, Oliver, E-mail: oliver.bieri@unibas.ch [Division of Radiological Physics, Department of Radiology, University of Basel Hospital, Petersgraben 4, 4031 Basel (Switzerland); and others

    2015-08-15

    Highlights: • Axial traction is applicable during high resolution MR imaging of the ankle. • Axial traction during MR imaging oft the ankle improves cartilage surface delineation of the individual tibial and talar cartilage layer for better morphological evaluation without the need of intraarticular contrast agent application. • Coronal T1-weighted MR images with a driven equilibrium pulse performed best. • Axial traction during MR imaging of the ankle facilitates compartment discrimination for segmentation purposes resulting in better reproducibility. - Abstract: Purpose: To determine the impact of axial traction during high resolution 3.0 T MR imaging of the ankle on morphological assessment of articular cartilage and quantitative cartilage imaging parameters. Materials and Methods: MR images of n = 25 asymptomatic ankles were acquired with and without axial traction (6 kg). Coronal and sagittal T1-weighted (w) turbo spin echo (TSE) sequences with a driven equilibrium pulse and sagittal fat-saturated intermediate-w (IMfs) TSE sequences were acquired for morphological evaluation on a four-point scale (1 = best, 4 = worst). For quantitative assessment of cartilage degradation segmentation was performed on 2D multislice-multiecho (MSME) SE T2, steady-state free-precession (SSFP; n = 8) T2 and SSFP diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI; n = 8) images. Wilcoxon-tests and paired t-tests were used for statistical analysis. Results: With axial traction, joint space width increased significantly and delineation of cartilage surfaces was rated superior (P < 0.05). Cartilage surfaces were best visualized on coronal T1-w images (P < 0.05). Differences for cartilage matrix evaluation were smaller. Subchondral bone evaluation, motion artifacts and image quality were not significantly different between the acquisition methods (P > 0.05). T2 values were lower at the tibia than at the talus (P < 0.001). Reproducibility was better for images with axial traction. Conclusion

  16. Coronal magnetometry

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Jie; Bastian, Timothy

    2014-01-01

    This volume is a collection of research articles on the subject of the solar corona, and particularly, coronal magnetism. The book was motivated by the Workshop on Coronal Magnetism: Connecting Models to Data and the Corona to the Earth, which was held 21 - 23 May 2012 in Boulder, Colorado, USA. This workshop was attended by approximately 60 researchers. Articles from this meeting are contained in this topical issue, but the topical issue also contains contributions from researchers not present at the workshop. This volume is aimed at researchers and graduate students active in solar physics. Originally published in Solar Physics, Vol. 288, Issue 2, 2013 and Vol. 289, Issue 8, 2014.

  17. Coronal Holes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven R. Cranmer

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Coronal holes are the darkest and least active regions of the Sun, as observed both on the solar disk and above the solar limb. Coronal holes are associated with rapidly expanding open magnetic fields and the acceleration of the high-speed solar wind. This paper reviews measurements of the plasma properties in coronal holes and how these measurements are used to reveal details about the physical processes that heat the solar corona and accelerate the solar wind. It is still unknown to what extent the solar wind is fed by flux tubes that remain open (and are energized by footpoint-driven wave-like fluctuations, and to what extent much of the mass and energy is input intermittently from closed loops into the open-field regions. Evidence for both paradigms is summarized in this paper. Special emphasis is also given to spectroscopic and coronagraphic measurements that allow the highly dynamic non-equilibrium evolution of the plasma to be followed as the asymptotic conditions in interplanetary space are established in the extended corona. For example, the importance of kinetic plasma physics and turbulence in coronal holes has been affirmed by surprising measurements from the UVCS instrument on SOHO that heavy ions are heated to hundreds of times the temperatures of protons and electrons. These observations point to specific kinds of collisionless Alfvén wave damping (i.e., ion cyclotron resonance, but complete theoretical models do not yet exist. Despite our incomplete knowledge of the complex multi-scale plasma physics, however, much progress has been made toward the goal of understanding the mechanisms ultimately responsible for producing the observed properties of coronal holes.

  18. Conjoined lumbosacral nerve roots compromised by disk herniation: sagittal shoulder sign for the preoperative diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective was to determine the importance of the ''sagittal shoulder sign'' on magnetic resonance (MR) images for the diagnosis of conjoined lumbosacral nerve roots (CLNR) that are compromised by herniated disks. Magnetic resonance images of 11 patients (6 men and 5 women; age range, 25-71 years; average age, 48.7 years) with surgically proven CLNR, which was compromised by herniated disks, were retrospectively evaluated by two musculoskeletal radiologists. MR images were evaluated for the presence or absence of the sagittal shoulder sign - a vertical structure connecting two consecutive nerve roots and overlying disk on the sagittal MR images. The radiologists noted the type of accompanying disk herniation and bony spinal canal changes, as well as other characteristic MR features of CLNR, the common passage of two consecutive nerve roots through the neural foramen on axial MR images. The sagittal shoulder sign was identified with a mean frequency of 90.9% by the two observers (in 10 of 11 patients). The common passage of two consecutive nerve roots through the neural foramen on axial MR images was identified with a mean frequency of 59.1% (in 7 and 6 out of 11 patients, by observers 1 and 2, respectively). Good interobserver agreement for the sagittal shoulder sign was present (k = 0.621, p < 0.05). Observation of the sagittal shoulder sign may prove helpful for diagnosing CLNR in patients with disk herniation. In particular, this sign appears to be useful when there is no evidence of CLNR on axial MR images. (orig.)

  19. Reproducibility of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Diameter Measurement and Growth Evaluation on Axial and Multiplanar Computed Tomography Reformations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dugas, Alexandre; Therasse, Eric; Kauffmann, Claude; Tang, An [University of Montreal, Department of Radiology, Centre Hospitalier de l' Universite de Montreal (CHUM) and CHUM Research Center (CRCHUM) (Canada); Elkouri, Stephane [University of Montreal, Department of Surgery, Centre Hospitalier de l' Universite de Montreal (CHUM) (Canada); Nozza, Anna [Institut de Cardiologie de Montreal, Montreal Heart Institute Coordinating Centre (Canada); Giroux, Marie-France; Oliva, Vincent L.; Soulez, Gilles, E-mail: gilles.soulez.chum@ssss.gouv.qc.ca [University of Montreal, Department of Radiology, Centre Hospitalier de l' Universite de Montreal (CHUM) and CHUM Research Center (CRCHUM) (Canada)

    2012-08-15

    Purpose: To compare different methods measuring abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) maximal diameter (Dmax) and its progression on multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) scan. Materials and Methods: Forty AAA patients with two MDCT scans acquired at different times (baseline and follow-up) were included. Three observers measured AAA diameters by seven different methods: on axial images (anteroposterior, transverse, maximal, and short-axis views) and on multiplanar reformation (MPR) images (coronal, sagittal, and orthogonal views). Diameter measurement and progression were compared over time for the seven methods. Reproducibility of measurement methods was assessed by intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) and Bland-Altman analysis. Results: Dmax, as measured on axial slices at baseline and follow-up (FU) MDCTs, was greater than that measured using the orthogonal method (p = 0.046 for baseline and 0.028 for FU), whereas Dmax measured with the orthogonal method was greater those using all other measurement methods (p-value range: <0.0001-0.03) but anteroposterior diameter (p = 0.18 baseline and 0.10 FU). The greatest interobserver ICCs were obtained for the orthogonal and transverse methods (0.972) at baseline and for the orthogonal and sagittal MPR images at FU (0.973 and 0.977). Interobserver ICC of the orthogonal method to document AAA progression was greater (ICC = 0.833) than measurements taken on axial images (ICC = 0.662-0.780) and single-plane MPR images (0.772-0.817). Conclusion: AAA Dmax measured on MDCT axial slices overestimates aneurysm size. Diameter as measured by the orthogonal method is more reproducible, especially to document AAA progression.

  20. Continence after posterior sagittal anorectoplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langemeijer, R A; Molenaar, J C

    1991-05-01

    Posterior sagittal anorectoplasty (PSARP) was introduced in 1982 by Peña and De Vries as a new operation for patients with a high anorectal malformation. The degree of postoperative continence is reported to be high. During the past decade, too, new insights have been gained into the embryology of anorectal malformations. Evaluation of PSARP in relation to current understanding of the development and anatomy of the anorectum and the pelvic floor has led us to conclude that optimal continence cannot be expected. Fifty patients with a high anorectal malformation underwent PSARP between June 1983 and May 1990. Postoperative follow-up consisted of anamnesis (subjective) and electrostimulation, defecography, and anorectal manometry (objective). All patients are alive, and all but one are being evaluated regularly. Subjectively, the majority of patients were more or less incontinent, with soiling of pants at least once a day. On the basis of objective criteria, virtually all patients appeared to be incontinent, and in only one patient was the mechanism of defecation almost unimpaired after PSARP. From this study, we conclude that although PSARP provides a good aesthetic result, patients will never acquire normal continence.

  1. Ponderomotive Acceleration in Coronal Loops

    CERN Document Server

    Dahlburg, R B; Taylor, B D; Obenschain, K

    2016-01-01

    Ponderomotive acceleration has been asserted to be a cause of the First Ionization Potential (FIP) effect, the by now well known enhancement in abundance by a factor of 3-4 over photospheric values of elements in the solar corona with FIP less than about 10 eV. It is shown here by means of numerical simulations that ponderomotive acceleration occurs in solar coronal loops, with the appropriate magnitude and direction, as a "byproduct" of coronal heating. The numerical simulations are performed with the HYPERION code, which solves the fully compressible three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic equations including nonlinear thermal conduction and optically thin radiation. Numerical simulations of a coronal loops with an axial magnetic field from 0.005 Teslas to 0.02 Teslas and lengths from 25000 km to 75000 km are presented. In the simulations the footpoints of the axial loop magnetic field are convected by random, large-scale motions. There is a continuous formation and dissipation of field-aligned current sheets...

  2. Dynamic sagittal flexibility coefficients of the human cervical spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivancic, Paul C; Ito, Shigeki; Panjabi, Manohar M

    2007-07-01

    The goal of the present study was to determine the dynamic sagittal flexibility coefficients, including coupling coefficients, throughout the human cervical spine using rear impacts. A biofidelic whole cervical spine model (n=6) with muscle force replication and surrogate head was rear impacted at 5 g peak horizontal accelerations of the T1 vertebra within a bench-top mini-sled. The dynamic main and coupling sagittal flexibility coefficients were calculated at each spinal level, head/C1 to C7/T1. The average flexibility coefficients were statistically compared (p<0.05) throughout the cervical spine. To validate the coefficients, the average computed displacement peaks, obtained using the average flexibility matrices and the measured load vectors, were statistically compared to the measured displacement peaks. The computed and measured displacement peaks showed good overall agreement, thus validating the computed flexibility coefficients. These peaks could not be statistically differentiated, with the exception of extension rotation at head/C1 and posterior shear translation at C7/T1. Head/C1 was significantly more flexible than all other spinal levels. The cervical spine was generally more flexible in posterior shear, as compared to axial compression. The coupling coefficients indicated that extension moment caused coupled posterior shear translation while posterior shear force caused coupled extension rotation. The present results may be used towards the designs of anthropometric test dummies and mathematical models that better simulate the cervical spine response during dynamic loading. PMID:17140545

  3. A new method for sudden mechanical perturbation with axial load, to assess postural control in sitting and standing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claus, Andrew P; Verrel, Julius; Pounds, Paul E I; Shaw, Renee C; Brady, Niamh; Chew, Min T; Dekkers, Thomas A; Hodges, Paul W

    2016-05-01

    Sudden application of load along a sagittal or coronal axis has been used to study trunk stiffness, but not axial (vertical) load. This study introduces a new method for sudden-release axial load perturbation. Prima facie validity was supported by comparison with standard mechanical systems. We report the response of the human body to axial perturbation in sitting and standing and within-day repeatability of measures. Load of 20% of body weight was released from light contact onto the shoulders of 22 healthy participants (10 males). Force input was measured via force transducers at shoulders, output via a force plate below the participant, and kinematics via 3-D motion capture. System identification was used to fit data from the time of load release to time of peak load-displacement, fitting with a 2nd-order mass-spring-damper system with a delay term. At peak load-displacement, the mean (SD) effective stiffness measured with this device for participants in sitting was 12.0(3.4)N/mm, and in standing was 13.3(4.2)N/mm. Peak force output exceeded input by 44.8 (10.0)% in sitting and by 30.4(7.9)% in standing. Intra-class correlation coefficients for within-day repeatability of axial stiffness were 0.58 (CI: -0.03 to 0.83) in sitting and 0.82(0.57-0.93) in standing. Despite greater degrees of freedom in standing than sitting, standing involved lesser time, downward displacement, peak output force and was more repeatable in defending upright postural control against the same axial loads. This method provides a foundation for future studies of neuromuscular control with axial perturbation. PMID:26968087

  4. The anterior cruciate ligament; the value of thin-section proton density oblique sagittal MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate the usefulness of thin-section proton density oblique sagittal MR imaging in the diagnosis of tear involving the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). In 61 arthroscopically confirmed cases (29 patients with ACL injury and 32 normal subjects), thin section proton-density images (TSPDI) were obtained and compared with conventional oblique sagittal PDI and T2-weighted images (T2WI). In TSPD imaging, the scan plane was parallel to the course of the ACL, based on a coronal scanogram; the parameters used were TR/TE 2000 msec/20-33 msec, 2-mm slice thickness, 16 x 16 cm FOV, 256 x 192 matrix, two excitations, and no intersection gap. We evaluated the sensitivity and specificity of MR images for diagnosing ACL tear, and their quality, on the basis of whether or not they successfully visualised the anterior/posterior margin of the ACL and linear signal intensities within the ACL fascicles. We also investigated the effects of partial volume averaging between the proximal portion of the ACL and the lateral femoral condyle. The sensitivity/specificity of TSPD imaging for diagnosing ACL tear were not significantly different from those of conventional oblique sagittal PDI and T2WI. In the ACL injury group, TSPDI was better in detecting increased signal intensity, ACL thickening, and visualization of torn ACL than conventional oblique sagittal PDI and T2WI. In normal subjects, image quality was constantly better on TSPDI than on conventional oblique sagittal PDI and T2WI. TSPDI clearly revealed the anterior margin in 31/32 cases (97%) and linear signal intensities within the ACL fascicles in all 32 (100%), and also markedly reduved the partial volume effect of the proximal ACL and lateral femoral condyle. In evaluating the ACL, the use of TSPD imaging is likely to lead to improved image quality. In addition, where routine MR imaging reveals indeterminate ACL injury, TSPDI can provide additional clues to diagnosis

  5. The anterior cruciate ligament; the value of thin-section proton density oblique sagittal MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sang Tae; Han, Chun Hwan; Kim, Young-Hoon; Cho, Seong Whi [Kangnam General Hospital Public Corporation, Inchon (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-11-01

    To evaluate the usefulness of thin-section proton density oblique sagittal MR imaging in the diagnosis of tear involving the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). In 61 arthroscopically confirmed cases (29 patients with ACL injury and 32 normal subjects), thin section proton-density images (TSPDI) were obtained and compared with conventional oblique sagittal PDI and T2-weighted images (T2WI). In TSPD imaging, the scan plane was parallel to the course of the ACL, based on a coronal scanogram; the parameters used were TR/TE 2000 msec/20-33 msec, 2-mm slice thickness, 16 x 16 cm FOV, 256 x 192 matrix, two excitations, and no intersection gap. We evaluated the sensitivity and specificity of MR images for diagnosing ACL tear, and their quality, on the basis of whether or not they successfully visualised the anterior/posterior margin of the ACL and linear signal intensities within the ACL fascicles. We also investigated the effects of partial volume averaging between the proximal portion of the ACL and the lateral femoral condyle. The sensitivity/specificity of TSPD imaging for diagnosing ACL tear were not significantly different from those of conventional oblique sagittal PDI and T2WI. In the ACL injury group, TSPDI was better in detecting increased signal intensity, ACL thickening, and visualization of torn ACL than conventional oblique sagittal PDI and T2WI. In normal subjects, image quality was constantly better on TSPDI than on conventional oblique sagittal PDI and T2WI. TSPDI clearly revealed the anterior margin in 31/32 cases (97%) and linear signal intensities within the ACL fascicles in all 32 (100%), and also markedly reduved the partial volume effect of the proximal ACL and lateral femoral condyle. In evaluating the ACL, the use of TSPD imaging is likely to lead to improved image quality. In addition, where routine MR imaging reveals indeterminate ACL injury, TSPDI can provide additional clues to diagnosis.

  6. Unenhanced MDCT in Suspected Urolithiasis: Improved Stone Detection and Density Measurements Using Coronal Maximum-Intensity-Projection Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corwin, Michael T.; Hsu, Margaret; McGahan, John P.; Wilson, Machelle; Lamba, Ramit

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The purpose of this study was to determine whether coronal maximum-intensity-projection (MIP) reformations improve urinary tract stone detection and density measurements compared with routine axial and coronal images. MATERIALS AND METHODS Forty-five consecutive patients who underwent MDCT for suspected urolithiasis were included. Two radiologists independently determined the number of stones on 5-, 3-, and 1.25-mm axial, 5- and 3-mm coronal, and 5-mm coronal MIP images. The reference standard was obtained by consensus review using all six datasets. Stone density was determined for all calculi 4 mm or larger on all datasets. RESULTS There were a total of 115 stones. Reader 1 identified 111 (96.5%), 112 (97.4%), 97 (84.3%), 102 (88.7%), 99 (86.1%), and 85 (73.9%) stones and reader 2 identified 105 (91.3%), 102 (88.7%), 85 (73.9%), 89 (77.4%), 89 (77.4%), and 76 (66.1%) stones on the MIP, 1.25-mm axial, 3-mm axial, 3-mm coronal, 5-mm coronal, and 5-mm axial images, respectively. Both readers identified more stones on the MIP images than on the 3- or 5-mm axial or coronal images (p < 0.0001). The mean difference in stone attenuation compared with the thin axial images was significantly less for the MIP images (44.6 HU) compared with 3-mm axial (235 HU), 3-mm coronal (309 HU), and 5-mm coronal (329.6 HU) or axial images (347.8 HU) (p < 0.0001). CONCLUSION Coronal MIP reformations allow more accurate identification and density measurements of urinary tract stones compared with routine axial and coronal reformations. PMID:24147474

  7. Significance of sagittal reformations in routine thoracic and abdominal multislice CT studies for detecting osteoporotic fractures and other spine abnormalities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, Dirk; Bauer, Jan S.; Zeile, Martin; Rummeny, Ernst J. [Klinikum Rechts der Isar, TU Muenchen, Department of Radiology, Muenchen (Germany); Link, Thomas M. [Musculoskeletal and Quantitative Imaging Research, UCSF, Department of Radiology, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    2008-08-15

    The purpose was to assess osteoporotic vertebral fractures and other spinal lesions in sagittal reformations obtained from routine multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) studies of the thorax and abdomen, to compare sagittal reformations with axial images in detecting these lesions and to investigate how frequently they were missed in the official radiology report. Routine abdominal or thoracoabdominal MDCT using a standard protocol was performed in 112 postmenopausal women. Axial images and sagittal reformations were analyzed separately by two radiologists in consensus and were compared in order to evaluate how often spinal lesions could be detected. In addition the official radiology reports were assessed to determine how many of those abnormalities were identified. Spine abnormalities were visualized in 101/112 postmenopausal women. In 27 patients osteoporotic vertebral deformities were found; 6 of these were shown in the axial images, but none of these were diagnosed in the official radiology report. Additional abnormalities included degenerative disc disease, osteoarthritis of the facet joints, scoliosis, hemangiomas and bone metastases. In only 9/101 patients spine abnormalities were mentioned in the radiology report. Sagittal reformations of standard MDCT images provide important additional information on spinal abnormalities; in particular, osteoporotic vertebral deformities are substantially better detected. (orig.)

  8. Ellis-van Creveld Syndrome with Sagittal Craniosynostosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Andrew S; Weathers, William M; Wolfswinkel, Erik M; Bollo, Robert J; Hollier, Larry H; Buchanan, Edward P

    2015-06-01

    Ellis-van Creveld syndrome (EVC) is a rare disorder (the incidence is estimated at around 7/1,000,000) characterized by the clinical tetrad of chondrodystrophy, polydactyly, ectodermal dysplasia, and cardiac anomalies. Sagittal synostosis is characterized by a dolichocephalic head shape resulting from premature fusion of the sagittal suture. Both are rare disorders, which have never been reported together. We present a case of EVC and sagittal synostosis. We report the clinical features of a Hispanic boy with EVC and sagittal craniosynostosis who underwent cranial vault remodeling. The presentation of this patient is gone over in detail. A never before reported case of EVC and sagittal synostosis is presented in detail.

  9. Surgical management of a transosseous meningioma with invasion of torcula, superior sagittal sinus, transverse sinus, calvaria, and scalp

    OpenAIRE

    Mazur, Marcus D.; Jayson A Neil; Cori Agarwal; Jensen, Randy L.; William T Couldwell

    2015-01-01

    Background: Meningiomas involving both intradural and extradural structures are rare tumors. We report the complete resection of a massive complex transosseous meningioma that had invaded the torcula, superior sagittal sinus, occipital bone, and scalp. Case Description: A 48-year-old male presented after 3 days of worsening headaches and blurry vision. Preoperative imaging demonstrated an 11 × 5-cm extra-axial mass that avidly enhanced with gadolinium in the region of the torcula. Angiogr...

  10. The posterior sagittal trans-sphincteric approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peña, A; Hong, A

    2004-01-01

    The posterior sagittal, transphincteric approach to treat different pelvic problems has been known since last century. Although some surgeons have embraced it and have enthusiastically advocated it s use, it has never become an overly popular technique. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the advantages and disadvantages of the approach, both from an historical perspective and from the authors experience. The international literature on the subject was reviewed since 1877 up to the present date. A retrospective evaluation of the authors experience was conducted, and the results reviewed. Specific attention was paid to the final result obtained in the treatment of the original condition, surgical complications and the effect of the surgical approach on bowel and urinary control. The experiential review included 114 cases. They were divided into two groups. A included 85 patients who underwent a posterior sagittal transphincteric approach that included 49 cases of Hirschsprung s disease (primary 21, secondary 28), 15 presacral masses; 10 rectaltumors; 7 acquired recto-genito-urinary fistulae; and 4 cases of idiopathic rectal prolapse. Group B included 29 patients who underwent a posterior sagittal trans-anorectal approach, in which the anterior wall of the rectum and the sphincter was divided as well.. This group included 12 cases of urogenital sinuses; 8 acquired urethral stricture or atresia after trauma; and 9 posterior urethral masses. Post-operative bowel control was normal all cases except in those patients whose basic condition had resulted in fecal incontinence, or who had sustained an irreversible injury prior tothe operation. Urinary control was normal except in cases with pre-operative incontinence. Complications included recurrence of recto-genitourinary fistulae in 3 cases, recto-cutaneous fistula in 3 Hirschsprung s patients and 2 partial wound dehisences. The posterior sagittal trans-sphincteric approach represents a useful technical alternative

  11. Can coronal hole spicules reach coronal temperatures?

    OpenAIRE

    Madjarska, M. S.; Vanninathan, K.; Doyle, J. G.

    2011-01-01

    We aim with the present study to provide observational evidences on whether coronal hole spicules reach coronal temperatures. We combine multi-instrument co-observations obtained with the SUMER/SoHO and with the EIS/SOT/XRT/Hinode. The analysed three large spicules were found to be comprised of numerous thin spicules which rise, rotate and descend simultaneously forming a bush-like feature. Their rotation resembles the untwisting of a large flux rope. They show velocities ranging from 50 to 2...

  12. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the usefulness of T 2-weighted oblique coronal MR imaging in anterior cruciate ligament injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jeong Seok; Shim, Jae Chan; Lee, Ghi Jai; Park, Seo Young; Kim, Ho Kyun; Han, Chang Yul [Seoul Paik Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the usefulness of T2-weighted oblique coronal imaging in the diagnosis of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury. The MRI findings of 12 patients with ACL injury and a group of 12 with normal ACL were respectively reviewed in terms of nonvisualization or focal defect, morphologic change and increased signal intensity of ACL. Diagnosis accuracy in the conventional sagittal or coronal plane and in the T2-weighted oblique coronal plane was also compared. T2-weighted oblique coronal scanning was performed, with the imaging plane parallel to the direction of the intercondylar roof. (author). 19 refs., 1 tab., 4 figs.

  13. Contribution of thin slice (1 mm) oblique coronal proton density-weighted MR images for assessment of anteromedial and posterolateral bundle damage in anterior cruciate ligament injuries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gokalp, Gokhan, E-mail: drgokhangokalp@yahoo.com [Department of Radiology, Uludag University Medical Faculty, Gorukle, Bursa (Turkey); Demirag, Burak, E-mail: bdemirag@uludag.edu.tr [Department of Orthopedy, Uludag University Medical Faculty, Gorukle, Bursa (Turkey); Nas, Omer Fatih, E-mail: omerfatihnas@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, Uludag University Medical Faculty, Gorukle, Bursa (Turkey); Aydemir, Mehmet Fatih, E-mail: fatiha@yahoo.com [Department of Orthopedy, Uludag University Medical Faculty, Gorukle, Bursa (Turkey); Yazici, Zeynep, E-mail: zyazici@uludag.edu.tr [Department of Radiology, Uludag University Medical Faculty, Gorukle, Bursa (Turkey)

    2012-09-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the diagnostic efficacy of using additional oblique coronal 1 mm proton density-weighted (PDW) MR imaging of the knee for detection and grading anterior cruciate ligament (ACL), anteromedial bundle (AMB) and posterolateral bundle (PLB) injuries. Materials and methods: We prospectively assessed preoperative MR images of 50 patients (36 men, 14 women; age range, 18–62 years). First, we compared the diagnostic performance of routine sagittal (3 mm) and additional oblique coronal images (1 mm) for ACL tears. Then, we compared the tear types (AMB or PLB) and grade presumed from oblique coronal MR imaging with arthroscopy. Results: Arthroscopy revealed ACL tear in 24 (48%) patients. There was significant difference between sagittal images and arthroscopy results for ACL tear recognition (p < 0.001). No significant difference was detected for oblique coronal images when compared with arthroscopy results (p = 0.180). Sensitivity and specificity values for ACL tear diagnosis were 37.04% and 95.65% for sagittal images; 74.07% and 91.30% for oblique coronal images. There was no significant difference between arthroscopy and oblique coronal MR images in grading AMB and PLB injuries (p > 0.05). Conclusion: Addition of thin slice oblique coronal images to conventional sequences could better contribute to better verifying the presence of ACL tear and in determining its grade.

  14. Can coronal hole spicules reach coronal temperatures?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madjarska, M. S.; Vanninathan, K.; Doyle, J. G.

    2011-08-01

    Aims: The present study aims to provide observational evidence of whether coronal hole spicules reach coronal temperatures. Methods: We combine multi-instrument co-observations obtained with the SUMER/SoHO and with the EIS/SOT/XRT/Hinode. Results: The analysed three large spicules were found to be comprised of numerous thin spicules that rise, rotate, and descend simultaneously forming a bush-like feature. Their rotation resembles the untwisting of a large flux rope. They show velocities ranging from 50 to 250 kms-1. We clearly associated the red- and blue-shifted emissions in transition region lines not only with rotating but also with rising and descending plasmas. Our main result is that these spicules although very large and dynamic, are not present in the spectral lines formed at temperatures above 300 000 K. Conclusions: In this paper we present the analysis of three Ca ii H large spicules that are composed of numerous dynamic thin spicules but appear as macrospicules in lower resolution EUV images. We found no coronal counterpart of these and smaller spicules. We believe that the identification of phenomena that have very different origins as macrospicules is due to the interpretation of the transition region emission, and especially the He ii emission, wherein both chromospheric large spicules and coronal X-ray jets are present. We suggest that the recent observation of spicules in the coronal AIA/SDO 171 Å and 211 Å channels probably comes from the existence of transition region emission there. Movie is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  15. Nonlinear Processes in Coronal Heating and Slow Solar Wind Acceleration

    CERN Document Server

    Rappazzo, A F

    2010-01-01

    This work consists of two parts: the first devoted to the study of the heating of the magnetically confined Solar Corona, and the second to the acceleration of the Slow Solar Wind. Direct 3D reduced MHD simulations are presented. They model the heating of coronal loops in the solar atmosphere via the tangling of coronal field lines by photospheric footpoints motions within the framework of the "Parker scenario". We have derived scalings of physical quantities with loop length, and the ratio of photospheric to coronal Alfven velocities. The development of a turbulent dynamics makes the dissipation rate independent of the Reynolds number. The dynamics in physical space are desribed by weak turbulence, which develops when an MHD system is embedded in a strong axial magnetic field. The slow wind originates in and around the coronal streamer belt. The LASCO instrument onboard the SOHO spacecraft has observed plasma density enhancements forming beyond the cusp of a helmet streamer. Previous theoretical models for t...

  16. Turbulent Coronal Heating Mechanisms: Coupling of Dynamics and Thermodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Dahlburg, R B; Rappazzo, A F; Velli, M

    2012-01-01

    Context. Photospheric motions shuffle the footpoints of the strong axial magnetic field that threads coronal loops giving rise to turbulent nonlinear dynamics characterized by the continuous formation and dissipation of field-aligned current sheets where energy is deposited at small-scales and the heating occurs. Previous studies show that current sheets thickness is orders of magnitude smaller than current state of the art observational resolution (~700 km). Aim. In order to understand coronal heating and interpret correctly observations it is crucial to study the thermodynamics of such a system where energy is deposited at unresolved small-scales. Methods. Fully compressible three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations are carried out to understand the thermodynamics of coronal heating in the magnetically confined solar corona. Results. We show that temperature is highly structured at scales below observational resolution and nonhomogeneously distributed so that only a fraction of the coronal mass and ...

  17. Coronal Waves and Oscillations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nakariakov Valery M.

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Wave and oscillatory activity of the solar corona is confidently observed with modern imaging and spectral instruments in the visible light, EUV, X-ray and radio bands, and interpreted in terms of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD wave theory. The review reflects the current trends in the observational study of coronal waves and oscillations (standing kink, sausage and longitudinal modes, propagating slow waves and fast wave trains, the search for torsional waves, theoretical modelling of interaction of MHD waves with plasma structures, and implementation of the theoretical results for the mode identification. Also the use of MHD waves for remote diagnostics of coronal plasma - MHD coronal seismology - is discussed and the applicability of this method for the estimation of coronal magnetic field, transport coefficients, fine structuring and heating function is demonstrated.

  18. Mechanisms of Coronal Heating

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S. R. Verma

    2006-06-01

    The Sun is a mysterious star. The high temperature of the chromosphere and corona present one of the most puzzling problems of solar physics. Observations show that the solar coronal heating problem is highly complex with many different facts. It is likely that different heating mechanisms are at work in solar corona. Recent observations show that Magnetic Carpet is a potential candidate for solar coronal heating.

  19. Contribution of thin slice (1 mm) oblique coronal proton density-weighted MR images for assessment of anteromedial and posterolateral bundle damage in anterior cruciate ligament injuries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate the diagnostic efficacy of using additional oblique coronal 1 mm proton density-weighted (PDW) MR imaging of the knee for detection and grading anterior cruciate ligament (ACL), anteromedial bundle (AMB) and posterolateral bundle (PLB) injuries. Materials and methods: We prospectively assessed preoperative MR images of 50 patients (36 men, 14 women; age range, 18–62 years). First, we compared the diagnostic performance of routine sagittal (3 mm) and additional oblique coronal images (1 mm) for ACL tears. Then, we compared the tear types (AMB or PLB) and grade presumed from oblique coronal MR imaging with arthroscopy. Results: Arthroscopy revealed ACL tear in 24 (48%) patients. There was significant difference between sagittal images and arthroscopy results for ACL tear recognition (p 0.05). Conclusion: Addition of thin slice oblique coronal images to conventional sequences could better contribute to better verifying the presence of ACL tear and in determining its grade

  20. Can coronal hole spicules reach coronal temperatures?

    CERN Document Server

    Madjarska, M S; Doyle, J G

    2011-01-01

    We aim with the present study to provide observational evidences on whether coronal hole spicules reach coronal temperatures. We combine multi-instrument co-observations obtained with the SUMER/SoHO and with the EIS/SOT/XRT/Hinode. The analysed three large spicules were found to be comprised of numerous thin spicules which rise, rotate and descend simultaneously forming a bush-like feature. Their rotation resembles the untwisting of a large flux rope. They show velocities ranging from 50 to 250 km/s. We clearly associated the red- and blue-shifted emissions in transition region lines with rotating but also with rising and descending plasmas, respectively. Our main result is that these spicules although very large and dynamic, show no presence in spectral lines formed at temperatures above 300 000 K. The present paper brings out the analysis of three Ca II H large spicules which are composed of numerous dynamic thin spicules but appear as macrospicules in EUV lower resolution images. We found no coronal counte...

  1. Exploring the utility of axial lumbar MRI for automatic diagnosis of intervertebral disc abnormalities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Subarna; Chaudhary, Vipin; Dhillon, Gurmeet

    2013-03-01

    In this paper, we explore the importance of axial lumbar MRI slices for automatic detection of abnormalities. In the past, only the sagittal views were taken into account for lumbar CAD systems, ignoring the fact that a radiologist scans through the axial slices as well, to confirm the diagnosis and quantify various abnormalities like herniation and stenosis. Hence, we present an automatic diagnosis system from axial slices using CNN(Convolutional Neural Network) for dynamic feature extraction and classification of normal and abnormal lumbar discs. We show 80:81% accuracy (with a specificity of 85:29% and sensitivity of 75:56%) on 86 cases (391 discs) using only an axial slice for each disc, which implies the usefulness of axial views for automatic lumbar abnormality diagnosis in conjunction with sagittal views.

  2. Occlusion of the pig superior sagittal sinus, bridging and cortical veins: multistep evolution of sinus-vein thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fries, G; Wallenfang, T; Hennen, J; Velthaus, M; Heimann, A; Schild, H; Perneczky, A; Kempski, O

    1992-07-01

    Cerebral sinus-vein thrombosis may lead to severe hemodynamic changes, elevated intracranial pressure (ICP), and brain edema. It is supposed that progression of the thrombus from the sinus into bridging and cortical veins plays a key role in the development of these pathophysiological changes, but this hypothesis lacks experimental proof. The aim of this study, using a novel animal model of sinus-vein thrombosis, was to evaluate the effects of a standardized occlusion of the superior sagittal sinus and its bridging and cortical veins on hemodynamic alterations, on brain water content, and on ICP in domestic pigs. In 10 animals, the middle third of the superior sagittal sinus was occluded with a catheter-guided balloon. Five of these pigs received an additional injection of 1 ml fibrin glue into the superior sagittal sinus anterior to the inflated balloon, leading to an obstruction of bridging and cortical veins. In five control animals the balloon was inserted but not inflated. Five pigs underwent cerebral angiography. Four hours after occlusion, the brains were frozen in liquid nitrogen, and coronal slices were examined for Evans blue dye extravasation, regional water content, and histological changes. Occlusion of the superior sagittal sinus alone did not affect ICP or cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP). The additional injection of fibrin glue caused an obstruction of cortical and bridging veins as well as severe increases in mean (+/- standard deviation) ICP to 49.4 +/- 14.3 mm Hg, compared with 8.3 +/- 4.5 mm Hg in sham-treated controls and 7.1 +/- 3.9 mm Hg in animals with occlusion of the superior sagittal sinus alone. There was also a steep fall in the mean CPP to 34.2 +/- 19.6 mm Hg compared with 96.4 +/- 13.8 mm Hg in the control group. White-matter water content anterior to the occlusion site was elevated to 81.9 +/- 3.7 gm/100 gm frozen weight in the fibrin group as compared to 70.7 +/- 2.2 gm/100 gm in controls. Posterior to the occlusion site, water

  3. Sagittal Balance Correction in Lateral Interbody Fusion for Degenerative Scoliosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallizzi, Michael A.; Sheets, Charles; Smith, Benjamin T.; Isaacs, Robert E.; Eure, Megan; Brown, Christopher R.

    2016-01-01

    Background Sagittal balance restoration has been shown to be an important determinant of outcomes in corrective surgery for degenerative scoliosis. Lateral interbody fusion (LIF) is a less-invasive technique which permits the placement of a high lordosis interbody cage without risks associated with traditional anterior or transforaminal interbody techniques. Studies have shown improvement in lumbar lordosis following LIF, but only one other study has assessed sagittal balance in this population. The objective of this study is to evaluate the ability of LIF to restore sagittal balance in degenerative lumbar scoliosis. Methods Thirty-five patients who underwent LIF for degenerative thoracolumbar scoliosis from July 2013 to March 2014 by a single surgeon were included. Outcome measures included sagittal balance, lumbar lordosis, Cobb Angle, and segmental lordosis. Measures were evaluated pre-operative, immediately post-operatively, and at their last clinical follow-up. Repeated measures ANOVAs were used to assess the differences between pre-operative, first postoperative, and a follow-up visit. Results The average sagittal balance correction was not significantly different: 1.06cm from 5.79cm to 4.74cm forward. The average Cobb angle correction was 14.1 degrees from 21.6 to 5.5 degrees. The average change in global lumbar lordosis was found to be significantly different: 6.3 degrees from 28.9 to 35.2 degrees. Conclusions This study demonstrates that LIF reliably restores lordosis, but does not significantly improve sagittal balance. Despite this, patients had reliable improvement in pain and functionality suggesting that sagittal balance correction may not be as critical in scoliosis correction as previous studies have indicated. Clinical Relevance LIF does not significantly change sagittal balance; however, clinical improvement does not seem to be contingent upon sagittal balance correction in the degenerative scoliosis population. The DUHS IRB has determined this

  4. Sagittal Balance Correction in Lateral Interbody Fusion for Degenerative Scoliosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallizzi, Michael A.; Sheets, Charles; Smith, Benjamin T.; Isaacs, Robert E.; Eure, Megan; Brown, Christopher R.

    2016-01-01

    Background Sagittal balance restoration has been shown to be an important determinant of outcomes in corrective surgery for degenerative scoliosis. Lateral interbody fusion (LIF) is a less-invasive technique which permits the placement of a high lordosis interbody cage without risks associated with traditional anterior or transforaminal interbody techniques. Studies have shown improvement in lumbar lordosis following LIF, but only one other study has assessed sagittal balance in this population. The objective of this study is to evaluate the ability of LIF to restore sagittal balance in degenerative lumbar scoliosis. Methods Thirty-five patients who underwent LIF for degenerative thoracolumbar scoliosis from July 2013 to March 2014 by a single surgeon were included. Outcome measures included sagittal balance, lumbar lordosis, Cobb Angle, and segmental lordosis. Measures were evaluated pre-operative, immediately post-operatively, and at their last clinical follow-up. Repeated measures ANOVAs were used to assess the differences between pre-operative, first postoperative, and a follow-up visit. Results The average sagittal balance correction was not significantly different: 1.06cm from 5.79cm to 4.74cm forward. The average Cobb angle correction was 14.1 degrees from 21.6 to 5.5 degrees. The average change in global lumbar lordosis was found to be significantly different: 6.3 degrees from 28.9 to 35.2 degrees. Conclusions This study demonstrates that LIF reliably restores lordosis, but does not significantly improve sagittal balance. Despite this, patients had reliable improvement in pain and functionality suggesting that sagittal balance correction may not be as critical in scoliosis correction as previous studies have indicated. Clinical Relevance LIF does not significantly change sagittal balance; however, clinical improvement does not seem to be contingent upon sagittal balance correction in the degenerative scoliosis population. The DUHS IRB has determined this

  5. Sagittal Abdominal Diameter: Application in Clinical Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thaís Da Silva-Ferreira

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Excess visceral fat is associated with cardiovascular risk factors. Sagittal abdominal diameter (SAD has recently been highlighted as an indicator of abdominal obesity, and also may be useful in predicting cardiovascular risk. The purpose of the present study was to review the scientific literature on the use of SAD in adult nutritional assessment. A search was conducted for scientific articles in the following electronic databases: SciELO , MEDLINE (PubMed and Virtual Health Library. SAD is more associated with abdominal fat (especially visceral, and with different cardiovascular risk factors, such as, insulin resistance, blood pressure, and serum lipoproteins than the traditional methods of estimating adiposity, such as body mass index and waist-to-hip ratio. SAD can also be used in association with other anthropometric measures. There are still no cut-off limits established to classify SAD as yet. SAD can be an alternative measure to estimate visceral adiposity. However, the few studies on this diameter, and the lack of consensus on the anatomical site to measure SAD, are obstacles to establish cut-off limits to classify it.

  6. Early proximal junctional failure in patients with preoperative sagittal imbalance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Micah W; Annis, Prokopis; Lawrence, Brandon D; Daubs, Michael D; Brodke, Darrel S

    2013-10-01

    Study Type Retrospective review. Introduction Sagittal imbalance has been associated with lower health-related quality of life outcomes, and restoration of imbalance is associated with improved outcomes.123 The long constructs used in adult spinal deformity have potential consequences such as proximal junctional kyphosis (PJK). Clinically, the development of PJK may not be as important as failure of the construct or vertebrae at the proximal end. As PJK does not lead to worse clinical outcomes,45 we define the term early proximal junctional failure (EPJF) as fracture, implant failure, or myelopathy due to stenosis at the upper instrumental vertebra (UIV) or UIV + 1 within 6 months of surgery. Objective The purpose of this study is to report the incidence of EPJF in patients who are sagittally imbalanced preoperatively and to identify risk factors postoperatively that correlate with EPJF using commonly reported sagittal balance parameters. Methods We reviewed 197 patients with preoperative sagittal imbalance by at least one of the following: sagittal vertical axis more than 5 cm, global sagittal alignment more than 45 degrees, pelvic incidence-lumbar lordosis more than 10 degrees, or spine-sacral angle less than 120 degrees. Radiographic measurements also included proximal junctional angle, thoracic kyphosis, lumbar lordosis, pelvic parameters, and sagittal balance parameters/formulas, as well as UIV angle, UIV spinosacral angle, and UIV plumb line to assess as potential risk factors. EPJF incidence was calculated postoperatively for each of the accepted sagittal balance parameters/formulas. Results EPJF was observed in 49 of 197 patients (25%) with preoperative sagittal imbalance and was more common in fusions with UIV in the lower thoracic spine (TS) (35%) than in those with UIV in the upper TS (10%) or lumbar (25%) (p = 0.007). Of the 49 EPJF patients, 16 patients (33%) required revision surgery within the first year, for an overall early revision

  7. Global Coronal Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, P F

    2016-01-01

    After the {\\em Solar and Heliospheric Observatory} ({\\em SOHO}) was launched in 1996, the aboard Extreme Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (EIT) observed a global coronal wave phenomenon, which was initially named "EIT wave" after the telescope. The bright fronts are immediately followed by expanding dimmings. It has been shown that the brightenings and dimmings are mainly due to plasma density increase and depletion, respectively. Such a spectacular phenomenon sparked long-lasting interest and debates. The debates were concentrated on two topics, one is about the driving source, and the other is about the nature of this wavelike phenomenon. The controversies are most probably because there may exist two types of large-scale coronal waves that were not well resolved before the {\\em Solar Dynamics Observatory} ({\\em SDO}) was launched: one is a piston-driven shock wave straddling over the erupting coronal mass ejection (CME), and the other is an apparently propagating front, which may correspond to the CME frontal...

  8. Episodic coronal heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study is made of the observational consequences of the hypothesis that there is no steady coronal heating, the solar corona instead being heated episodically, such that each short burst of heating is followed by a long period of radiative cooling. The form of the resulting contribution to the differential emission measure (DEM), and to a convenient related function (the differential energy flux, DEF) is calculated. Observational data for the quiet solar atmosphere indicate that the upper branch of the DEM, corresponding to temperatures above 100,000 K, can be interpreted in terms of episodic energy injection at coronal temperatures. 22 refs

  9. Episodic coronal heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturrock, P. A.; Dixon, W. W.; Klimchuk, J. A.; Antiochos, S. K.

    1990-01-01

    A study is made of the observational consequences of the hypothesis that there is no steady coronal heating, the solar corona instead being heated episodically, such that each short burst of heating is followed by a long period of radiative cooling. The form of the resulting contribution to the differential emission measure (DEM), and to a convenient related function (the differential energy flux, DEF) is calculated. Observational data for the quiet solar atmosphere indicate that the upper branch of the DEM, corresponding to temperatures above 100,000 K, can be interpreted in terms of episodic energy injection at coronal temperatures.

  10. The relationship between sagittal curvature and extensor muscle volume in the lumbar spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meakin, Judith R; Fulford, Jonathan; Seymour, Richard; Welsman, Joanne R; Knapp, Karen M

    2013-06-01

    A previous modelling study predicted that the forces applied by the extensor muscles to stabilise the lumbar spine would be greater in spines that have a larger sagittal curvature (lordosis). Because the force-generating capacity of a muscle is related to its size, it was hypothesised that the size of the extensor muscles in a subject would be related to the size of their lumbar lordosis. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data were obtained, together with age, height, body mass and back pain status, from 42 female subjects. The volume of the extensor muscles (multifidus and erector spinae) caudal to the mid-lumbar level was estimated from cross-sectional area measurements in axial T1-weighted MRIs spanning the lumbar spine. Lower lumbar curvature was determined from sagittal T1-weighted images. A stepwise linear regression model was used to determine the best predictors of muscle volume. The mean lower lumbar extensor muscle volume was 281 cm(3) (SD = 49 cm(3)). The mean lower lumbar curvature was 30 ° (SD = 7 °). Five subjects reported current back pain and were excluded from the regression analysis. Nearly half the variation in muscle volume was accounted for by the variables age (standardised coefficient, B = -3.2, P = 0.03) and lower lumbar curvature (B = 0.47, P = 0.002). The results support the hypothesis that extensor muscle volume in the lower lumbar spine is related to the magnitude of the sagittal curvature; this has implications for assessing muscle size as an indicator of muscle strength. PMID:23600615

  11. Mid-sagittal plane and mid-sagittal surface optimization in brain MRI using a local symmetry measure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stegmann, Mikkel Bille; Skoglund, Karl; Ryberg, Charlotte

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes methods for automatic localization of the mid-sagittal plane (MSP) and mid-sagittal surface (MSS). The data used is a subset of the Leukoaraiosis And DISability (LADIS) study consisting of three-dimensional magnetic resonance brain data from 62 elderly subjects (age 66 to 84......, the mid-sagittal plane is not always planar, but a curved surface resulting in poor partitioning of the brain hemispheres. To account for this, this paper also investigates an optimization strategy which fits a thin-plate spline surface to the brain data using a robust least median of squares estimator...... years). Traditionally, the mid-sagittal plane is localized by global measures. However, this approach fails when the partitioning plane between the brain hemispheres does not coincide with the symmetry plane of the head. We instead propose to use a sparse set of profiles in the plane normal direction...

  12. Coronal Waves and Oscillations

    OpenAIRE

    Nakariakov Valery M.; Verwichte Erwin

    2005-01-01

    Wave and oscillatory activity of the solar corona is confidently observed with modern imaging and spectral instruments in the visible light, EUV, X-ray and radio bands, and interpreted in terms of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) wave theory. The review reflects the current trends in the observational study of coronal waves and oscillations (standing kink, sausage and longitudinal modes, propagating slow waves and fast wave trains, the search for torsional waves), theoretical modelling of interactio...

  13. Percutaneous sagittal plane closing wedge osteotomy of the first metatarsal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2014-02-01

    Osteotomy of the first metatarsal in the sagittal plane is useful in correction of numerous deformity of the foot. Plantarflexion osteotomy of the first metatarsal can be used to treat hallux rigidus, hallux limitus, forefoot varus in flatfoot deformity and iatrogenic metatarsus primus elevates. Dorsiflexion osteotomy of the first metatarsal is an important component in surgical correction of pes cavus. It is also indicated in recalcitrant diabetic neuropathic ulcers at the first metatarsal head. We described a minimally invasive technique of sagittal plane corrective osteotomy of the first metatarsal, which can be either a plantarflexion or dorsiflexion one. PMID:23412315

  14. Diffraction crystal for sagittally focusing x-rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ice, Gene E.; Sparks, Jr., Cullie J.

    1984-01-01

    The invention is a new type of diffraction crystal designed for sagittally focusing photons of various energies. The invention is based on the discovery that such focusing is not obtainable with conventional crystals because of distortion resulting from anticlastic curvature. The new crystal comprises a monocrystalline base having a front face contoured for sagittally focusing photons and a back face provided with rigid, upstanding, stiffening ribs restricting anticlastic curvature. When mounted in a suitable bending device, the reflecting face of the crystal can be adjusted to focus photons having any one of a range of energies.

  15. Diffraction crystals for sagittally focusing x-rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ice, G.E.; Sparks, C.J. Jr.

    1982-06-07

    The invention is a new type of diffraction crystal designed for sagittally focusing photons of various energies. The invention is based on the discovery that such focusing is not obtainable with conventional crystals because of distortion resulting from anticlastic curvature. The new crystal comprises a monocrystalline base having a front face contoured for sagittally focusing photons and a back face provided with rigid, upstanding, stiffening ribs restricting anticlastic curvature. When mounted in a suitable bending device, the reflecting face of the crystal can be adjusted to focus photons having any one of a range of energies.

  16. Observational features of equatorial coronal hole jets

    OpenAIRE

    Nisticò, G.; V. Bothmer; S. Patsourakos; Zimbardo, G.

    2010-01-01

    Collimated ejections of plasma called "coronal hole jets" are commonly observed in polar coronal holes. However, such coronal jets are not only a specific features of polar coronal holes but they can also be found in coronal holes appearing at lower heliographic latitudes. In this paper we present some observations of "equatorial coronal hole jets" made up with data provided by the STEREO/SECCHI instruments during a period comprising March 2007 and December 2007. The jet e...

  17. Coronal reconstruction of unenhanced abdominal CT for correct ureteral stone size classification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berkovitz, Nadav; Simanovsky, Natalia; Hiller, Nurith [Hadassah Mount Scopus - Hebrew University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Jerusalem (Israel); Katz, Ran [Hadassah Mount Scopus - Hebrew University Medical Center, Department of Urology, Jerusalem (Israel); Salama, Shaden [Hadassah Mount Scopus - Hebrew University Medical Center, Department of Emergency Medicine, Jerusalem (Israel)

    2010-05-15

    To determine whether size measurement of a urinary calculus in coronal reconstruction of computed tomography (CT) differs from stone size measured in the axial plane, and whether the difference alters clinical decision making. We retrospectively reviewed unenhanced CT examinations of 150 patients admitted to the emergency room (ER) with acute renal colic. Maximal ureteral calculus size was measured on axial slices and coronal reconstructions. Clinical significance was defined as an upgrading or downgrading of stone size according to accepted thresholds of treatment: {<=}5 mm, 6-9 mm and {>=}10 mm. There were 151 stones in 150 patients (male:female 115:34, mean age 41 years). Transverse stone diameters ranged from 1 to 11 mm (mean 4 mm). On coronal images, 56 (37%) stones were upgraded in severity; 46 (30%) from below 5 mm to 6 mm or more, and ten (7%) from 6-9 mm to 10 mm or more. Transverse measurement on the axial slices enabled correct categorization of 95 stones (63%). Transverse calculus measurement on axial slices often underestimates stone size and provides incorrect clinical classification of the true maximal stone diameter. Coronal reconstruction provides additional information in patients with renal colic that may alter treatment strategy. (orig.)

  18. Coronal Mass Ejections: Observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David F. Webb

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Solar eruptive phenomena embrace a variety of eruptions, including flares, solar energetic particles, and radio bursts. Since the vast majority of these are associated with the eruption, development, and evolution of coronal mass ejections (CMEs, we focus on CME observations in this review. CMEs are a key aspect of coronal and interplanetary dynamics. They inject large quantities of mass and magnetic flux into the heliosphere, causing major transient disturbances. CMEs can drive interplanetary shocks, a key source of solar energetic particles and are known to be the major contributor to severe space weather at the Earth. Studies over the past decade using the data sets from (among others the SOHO, TRACE, Wind, ACE, STEREO, and SDO spacecraft, along with ground-based instruments, have improved our knowledge of the origins and development of CMEs at the Sun and how they contribute to space weather at Earth. SOHO, launched in 1995, has provided us with almost continuous coverage of the solar corona over more than a complete solar cycle, and the heliospheric imagers SMEI (2003 – 2011 and the HIs (operating since early 2007 have provided us with the capability to image and track CMEs continually across the inner heliosphere. We review some key coronal properties of CMEs, their source regions and their propagation through the solar wind. The LASCO coronagraphs routinely observe CMEs launched along the Sun-Earth line as halo-like brightenings. STEREO also permits observing Earth-directed CMEs from three different viewpoints of increasing azimuthal separation, thereby enabling the estimation of their three-dimensional properties. These are important not only for space weather prediction purposes, but also for understanding the development and internal structure of CMEs since we view their source regions on the solar disk and can measure their in-situ characteristics along their axes. Included in our discussion of the recent developments in CME

  19. POINT OF MAXIMUM WIDTH: A NEW MEASURE FOR ANTHROPOMETRIC OUTCOMES IN PATIENTS WITH SAGITTAL SYNOSTOSIS

    OpenAIRE

    Gangopadhyay, Noopur; Shah, Manjool; Skolnick, Gary B; Patel, Kamlesh B; Naidoo, Sybill D.; Woo, Albert S.

    2014-01-01

    The aesthetic success of sagittal synostosis reconstruction is measured by cephalic index (CI). This limited measure does not fully account for the abnormal head shape in sagittal synostosis. In this retrospective study, we investigate a new objective measure, point of maximum width (PMW) of the skull from a vertex view, to determine where the head is widest for children with sagittal synostosis as compared to normal controls. Preoperative CT scans of 27 children with sagittal synostosis and ...

  20. The Coronal Solar Magnetism Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomczyk, S.; Landi, E.; Zhang, J.; Lin, H.; DeLuca, E. E.

    2015-12-01

    Measurements of coronal and chromospheric magnetic fields are arguably the most important observables required for advances in our understanding of the processes responsible for coronal heating, coronal dynamics and the generation of space weather that affects communications, GPS systems, space flight, and power transmission. The Coronal Solar Magnetism Observatory (COSMO) is a proposed ground-based suite of instruments designed for routine study of coronal and chromospheric magnetic fields and their environment, and to understand the formation of coronal mass ejections (CME) and their relation to other forms of solar activity. This new facility will be operated by the High Altitude Observatory of the National Center for Atmospheric Research (HAO/NCAR) with partners at the University of Michigan, the University of Hawaii and George Mason University in support of the solar and heliospheric community. It will replace the current NCAR Mauna Loa Solar Observatory (http://mlso.hao.ucar.edu). COSMO will enhance the value of existing and new observatories on the ground and in space by providing unique and crucial observations of the global coronal and chromospheric magnetic field and its evolution. The design and current status of the COSMO will be reviewed.

  1. Spinal pedicle subtraction osteotomy for fixed sagittal imbalance patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyun, Seung-Jae; Kim, Yongjung J; Rhim, Seung-Chul

    2013-01-01

    In addressing spinal sagittal imbalance through a posterior approach, the surgeon now may choose from among a variety of osteotomy techniques. Posterior column osteotomies such as the facetectomy or Ponte or Smith-Petersen osteotomy provide the least correction, but can be used at multiple levels with minimal blood loss and a lower operative risk. Pedicle subtraction osteotomies provide nearly 3 times the per-level correction of Ponte/Smith-Petersen osteotomies; however, they carry increased technical demands, longer operative time, and greater blood loss and associated significant morbidity, including neurological injury. The literature focusing on pedicle subtraction osteotomy for fixed sagittal imbalance patients is reviewed. The long-term overall outcomes, surgical tips to reduce the complications and suggestions for their proper application are also provided. PMID:24340276

  2. Spinal pedicle subtraction osteotomy for fixed sagittal imbalance patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyun, Seung-Jae; Kim, Yongjung J; Rhim, Seung-Chul

    2013-11-16

    In addressing spinal sagittal imbalance through a posterior approach, the surgeon now may choose from among a variety of osteotomy techniques. Posterior column osteotomies such as the facetectomy or Ponte or Smith-Petersen osteotomy provide the least correction, but can be used at multiple levels with minimal blood loss and a lower operative risk. Pedicle subtraction osteotomies provide nearly 3 times the per-level correction of Ponte/Smith-Petersen osteotomies; however, they carry increased technical demands, longer operative time, and greater blood loss and associated significant morbidity, including neurological injury. The literature focusing on pedicle subtraction osteotomy for fixed sagittal imbalance patients is reviewed. The long-term overall outcomes, surgical tips to reduce the complications and suggestions for their proper application are also provided.

  3. Spinal pedicle subtraction osteotomy for fixed sagittal imbalance patients

    OpenAIRE

    Hyun, Seung-Jae; Kim, Yongjung J.; Rhim, Seung-Chul

    2013-01-01

    In addressing spinal sagittal imbalance through a posterior approach, the surgeon now may choose from among a variety of osteotomy techniques. Posterior column osteotomies such as the facetectomy or Ponte or Smith-Petersen osteotomy provide the least correction, but can be used at multiple levels with minimal blood loss and a lower operative risk. Pedicle subtraction osteotomies provide nearly 3 times the per-level correction of Ponte/Smith-Petersen osteotomies; however, they carry increased ...

  4. Traumatic Thumb Radial Sagittal Band Injury Mimicking EPL Rupture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dissanayake, Ravi M; Moore, Peter; McCarten, Gregory M

    2016-06-01

    We present the case of a closed traumatic disruption of the thumb radial sagittal band (RSB) that sonographically mimicked rupture of the extensor pollicis longus (EPL) tendon. This injury was treated with primary repair of the RSB and lead to a good functional outcome for the patient. This case report highlights how early recognition and treatment can lead to a good functional outcome. PMID:27454647

  5. Sagittal Spinal Morphology in Highly Trained Adolescent Tennis Players

    OpenAIRE

    Muyor, José M.; Estefanía Sánchez-Sánchez; David Sanz-Rivas; López-Miñarro, Pedro A.

    2013-01-01

    Sports with a predominance of forward-bending and extension postures have been associated with alterations in the sagittal spinal curvatures and greater risk of spinal injury. Because, the tennis players adopt these postures, the aims of this study were: 1) to describe spinal curvatures and pelvic tilt in male and female highly trained adolescent tennis players during relaxed standing posture and with thoracic spine corrected (in prone lying on the floor); and 2) to determine the frequency of...

  6. Dynamical behaviour in coronal loops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haisch, Bernhard M.

    1986-01-01

    Rapid variability has been found in two active region coronal loops observed by the X-ray Polychromator (XRP) and the Hard X-ray Imaging Spectrometer (HXIS) onboard the Solar Maximum Mission (SMM). There appear to be surprisingly few observations of the short-time scale behavior of hot loops, and the evidence presented herein lends support to the hypothesis that coronal heating may be impulsive and driven by flaring.

  7. Solar Coronal Plumes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giannina Poletto

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Polar plumes are thin long ray-like structures that project beyond the limb of the Sun polar regions, maintaining their identity over distances of several solar radii. Plumes have been first observed in white-light (WL images of the Sun, but, with the advent of the space era, they have been identified also in X-ray and UV wavelengths (XUV and, possibly, even in in situ data. This review traces the history of plumes, from the time they have been first imaged, to the complex means by which nowadays we attempt to reconstruct their 3-D structure. Spectroscopic techniques allowed us also to infer the physical parameters of plumes and estimate their electron and kinetic temperatures and their densities. However, perhaps the most interesting problem we need to solve is the role they cover in the solar wind origin and acceleration: Does the solar wind emanate from plumes or from the ambient coronal hole wherein they are embedded? Do plumes have a role in solar wind acceleration and mass loading? Answers to these questions are still somewhat ambiguous and theoretical modeling does not provide definite answers either. Recent data, with an unprecedented high spatial and temporal resolution, provide new information on the fine structure of plumes, their temporal evolution and relationship with other transient phenomena that may shed further light on these elusive features.

  8. Numerical Simulation of DC Coronal Heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlburg, Russell B.; Einaudi, G.; Taylor, Brian D.; Ugarte-Urra, Ignacio; Warren, Harry; Rappazzo, A. F.; Velli, Marco

    2016-05-01

    Recent research on observational signatures of turbulent heating of a coronal loop will be discussed. The evolution of the loop is is studied by means of numerical simulations of the fully compressible three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic equations using the HYPERION code. HYPERION calculates the full energy cycle involving footpoint convection, magnetic reconnection, nonlinear thermal conduction and optically thin radiation. The footpoints of the loop magnetic field are convected by random photospheric motions. As a consequence the magnetic field in the loop is energized and develops turbulent nonlinear dynamics characterized by the continuous formation and dissipation of field-aligned current sheets: energy is deposited at small scales where heating occurs. Dissipation is non-uniformly distributed so that only a fraction of thecoronal mass and volume gets heated at any time. Temperature and density are highly structured at scales which, in the solar corona, remain observationally unresolved: the plasma of the simulated loop is multi thermal, where highly dynamical hotter and cooler plasma strands are scattered throughout the loop at sub-observational scales. Typical simulated coronal loops are 50000 km length and have axial magnetic field intensities ranging from 0.01 to 0.04 Tesla. To connect these simulations to observations the computed number densities and temperatures are used to synthesize the intensities expected in emission lines typically observed with the Extreme ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) on Hinode. These intensities are then employed to compute differential emission measure distributions, which are found to be very similar to those derived from observations of solar active regions.

  9. A reflection on radiographic cephalometry: the evaluation of sagittal discrepancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duterloo, Herman S

    2014-09-01

    A critical review is presented of the basic properties and applications of cephalometry as a clinical tool with a focus on the evaluation of sagittal discrepancy. Diagnostic cephalometric assessments are subjective and not based on evidence. To assess individual skeletal and/or facial soft tissue form subjectively, selected norms are used. Norms have been developed for various ethnical groups to improve clinical applicability, but subjectivity remains. That subjectivity precludes application of a modern review system, making the present review a personal account. The cephalometric evaluation of sagittal discrepancy finds its historic origin in the Angle classification. Recent publications try to improve accuracy in classifying sagittal discrepancy. It remains unclear in what sense such efforts influence treatment decisions and/or treatment effect. Almost all selected landmarks are located on or dependent upon periosteal/endosteal bone image contours. Their homology is based on circumstantial reasoning and stability over time, which is implicitly assumed. However, implant growth studies and histological investigations show most landmarks to be unstable, as they are involved in displacement and bone remodelling. These landmarks are therefore heterologous when used for individual evaluation of change over time. Notwithstanding the above-indicated limitations, diagnostic cephalometric assessments are clinically useful and help to develop perceptions of balance and harmony and communication between colleagues and patients. There is no evidence-based method to prefer one particular diagnostic method. Landmark location accuracy and geometric issues do not play a decisive role. The subjective characteristic of diagnostic evaluations limits their power to size/shape comparisons. Structural superimposition is the valid biologically evidence-based method to provide advanced insight in individual growth and/or treatment changes and their variations. PMID:24521748

  10. Mandibular nerve schwannoma resection using sagittal split ramus osteotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmood, Laith; Demian, Nagi; Weinstock, Yitzchak E; Weissferdt, Annikka

    2013-11-01

    A case is presented of a unique presentation and treatment of a mandibular nerve schwannoma. Its uniqueness stems from the fact that it consisted of 2 distinct tumors along the same nerve: one within the body of the mandible and the other within the ipsilateral pterygomandibular space. Rather than the standard approach of lip split and hemimandibulectomy, a unique approach of a sagittal split ramus osteotomy was used that allowed access to the 2 lesions and avoided the added morbidity of the former approach. The 2 portions of the lesion were successfully removed and the patient was satisfied with the result. Recurrence has not been detected after 6 months. PMID:23891013

  11. Diagnosis and evaluation of esophageal atresia by direct sagittal CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tam, P.K.H.; Saing, H.; Chan, F.L.

    1987-01-01

    Direct sagittal CT is possible in newborns because of their small body-size. With this noninvasive investigation, we were able to establish a correct diagnosis in two neonates with esophageal atresia. Moreover, the demonstration of the air-filled proximal pouch and distal tracheoesophageal fistula along their whole lengths allowed exclusion of the possibility of a proximal pouch fistula and gave knowledge of the exact distance of the two segments of the esophagus needed to be bridged to allow anastomosis, thus providing additional valuable information for the surgeon preoperatively..

  12. Bilambdoid and posterior sagittal synostosis: the Mercedes Benz syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, M H; Abbott, A H; Netherway, D J; Menard, R; Hanieh, A

    1998-09-01

    A consistent pattern of craniosynostosis in the sagittal and bilateral lambdoid sutures is described in three patients. The external cranial ridging associated with fusion of these sutures produces a characteristic triradiate, or "Mercedes Benz," appearance to the posterior skull. Locally marked growth restriction is evident in the posterior fossa with compensatory secondary expansion of the anterior fossa manifesting a degree of frontal bossing which mimics bicoronal synostosis. Although this appearance could lead to inadvertent surgery in the frontal region, attention to the occipital region with wide early suture excision and vault shaping is indicated. PMID:9780908

  13. Mandibular nerve schwannoma resection using sagittal split ramus osteotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmood, Laith; Demian, Nagi; Weinstock, Yitzchak E; Weissferdt, Annikka

    2013-11-01

    A case is presented of a unique presentation and treatment of a mandibular nerve schwannoma. Its uniqueness stems from the fact that it consisted of 2 distinct tumors along the same nerve: one within the body of the mandible and the other within the ipsilateral pterygomandibular space. Rather than the standard approach of lip split and hemimandibulectomy, a unique approach of a sagittal split ramus osteotomy was used that allowed access to the 2 lesions and avoided the added morbidity of the former approach. The 2 portions of the lesion were successfully removed and the patient was satisfied with the result. Recurrence has not been detected after 6 months.

  14. Sagittal Spinal Morphology in Highly Trained Adolescent Tennis Players

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muyor, José M.; Sánchez-Sánchez, Estefanía; Sanz-Rivas, David; López-Miñarro, Pedro A.

    2013-01-01

    Sports with a predominance of forward-bending and extension postures have been associated with alterations in the sagittal spinal curvatures and greater risk of spinal injury. Because, the tennis players adopt these postures, the aims of this study were: 1) to describe spinal curvatures and pelvic tilt in male and female highly trained adolescent tennis players during relaxed standing posture and with thoracic spine corrected (in prone lying on the floor); and 2) to determine the frequency of thoracic hyperkyphosis and lumbar hypo/hyper lordosis in these postures. Forty adolescent tennis players (24 male and 16 female) aged 13-18 years, participated voluntarily in this study. The Spinal Mouse system was used to measure sagittal spinal curvatures and pelvic tilt. The mean values in the relaxed standing posture were 43.83° ± 7.87° (thoracic kyphosis), - 27.58° ± 7.01° (lumbar lordosis), and 13.38° ± 5.57° (pelvic tilt) for male tennis players, respectively; and 36.13° ± 6.69° (thoracic kyphosis), - 32.69° ± 5.06° (lumbar lordosis), 20.94° ± 5.36° (pelvic tilt) for female tennis players (p tennis players showed a frequency of 62.5% and 93.8% (p = 0.032) for neutral thoracic kyphosis, and 83.3% and 93.8% (p = 0.062) in neutral lumbar lordosis, respectively. In conclusion, due to the high percentage of neutral spinal curvatures in both male and female tennis players, to practice tennis in these levels does not alter sagittal spinal morphology in the relaxed standing posture in adolescent highly trained tennis players. Key Points This study evaluated thoracic and lumbar spinal curvatures and pelvic tilt during several postures in young highly trained tennis players. Female tennis players showed statistically significant greater anterior pelvic tilt, lumbar lordosis and lower thoracic kyphosis than male tennis players. The high percentage of neutral thoracic kyphosis and lumbar lordosis posture in both groups of young tennis players in relaxed standing

  15. Coronal Mass Ejections An Introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Howard, Timothy

    2011-01-01

    In times of growing technological sophistication and of our dependence on electronic technology, we are all affected by space weather. In its most extreme form, space weather can disrupt communications, damage and destroy spacecraft and power stations, and increase radiation exposure to astronauts and airline passengers. Major space weather events, called geomagnetic storms, are large disruptions in the Earth’s magnetic field brought about by the arrival of enormous magnetized plasma clouds from the Sun. Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) contain billions of tons of plasma and hurtle through space at speeds of several million miles per hour. Understanding coronal mass ejections and their impact on the Earth is of great interest to both the scientific and technological communities. This book provides an introduction to coronal mass ejections, including a history of their observation and scientific revelations, instruments and theory behind their detection and measurement, and the status quo of theories describing...

  16. [Sagittal Balance of the Spine--Clinical Importance and Radiographic Assessment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decker, S; Müller, C W; Omar, M; Krettek, C; Schwab, F; Trobisch, P D

    2016-04-01

    Sagittal deformities of the spine frequently result in back pain, as patients have to expend much energy in compensation. The sagittal alignment of the spine is defined by its curvatures (lordosis and kyphosis) relative to the position of the pelvis. Diagnostic assessment is based on full spine a. p. and lateral X-rays. The sagittal balance is primarily described by different angles that can be measured, e.g. lumbar lordosis, pelvic incidence, pelvic tilt and thoracic kyphosis. The quality of life can best be estimated by subtracting lumbar lordosis from the pelvic incidence. However, initial evaluation of the sagittal balance can also be based on the sagittal vertical axis. The severity of imbalance can be described by the sagittal vertical axis and the pelvic tilt, but surgical therapy necessitates a more profound analysis, which can be based on the SRS-Schwab classification.

  17. Coronal Fourier power spectra: implications for coronal seismology and coronal heating

    CERN Document Server

    Ireland, Jack; Inglis, Andrew R

    2014-01-01

    The dynamics of regions of the solar corona are investigated using Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) 171\\AA\\ and 193\\AA\\ data. The coronal emission from the quiet Sun, coronal loop footprints, coronal moss, and from above a sunspot is studied. It is shown that the mean Fourier power spectra in these regions can be described by a power law at lower frequencies that tails to flat spectrum at higher frequencies, plus a Gaussian-shaped contribution that varies depending on the region studied. This Fourier spectral shape is in contrast to the commonly-held assumption that coronal time-series are well described by the sum of a long time-scale background trend plus Gaussian-distributed noise, with some specific locations also showing an oscillatory signal. The implications of this discovery to the field of coronal seismology and the automated detections of oscillations are discussed. The power law contribution to the shape of the Fourier power spectrum is interpreted as being due to the summation of a distribution ...

  18. Axial Halbach Magnetic Bearings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichenberg, Dennis J.; Gallo, Christopher A.; Thompson, William K.

    2008-01-01

    Axial Halbach magnetic bearings have been investigated as part of an effort to develop increasingly reliable noncontact bearings for future high-speed rotary machines that may be used in such applications as aircraft, industrial, and land-vehicle power systems and in some medical and scientific instrumentation systems. Axial Halbach magnetic bearings are passive in the sense that unlike most other magnetic bearings that have been developed in recent years, they effect stable magnetic levitation without need for complex active control.

  19. Axial static mixer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandrock, H.E.

    1982-05-06

    Static axial mixing apparatus includes a plurality of channels, forming flow paths of different dimensions. The axial mixer includes a flow adjusting device for adjustable selective control of flow resistance of various flow paths in order to provide substantially identical flows through the various channels, thereby reducing nonuniform coating of interior surfaces of the channels. The flow adjusting device may include diaphragm valves, and may further include a pressure regulating system therefor.

  20. Surface nanoscale axial photonics

    OpenAIRE

    Sumetsky, M.; Fini, J. M.

    2011-01-01

    Dense photonic integration promises to revolutionize optical computing and communications. However, efforts towards this goal face unacceptable attenuation of light caused by surface roughness in microscopic devices. Here we address this problem by introducing Surface Nanoscale Axial Photonics (SNAP). The SNAP platform is based on whispering gallery modes circulating around the optical fiber surface and undergoing slow axial propagation readily described by the one-dimensional Schr\\"odinger e...

  1. A Solar Coronal Jet Event Triggers A Coronal Mass Ejection

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Jiajia; Shen, Chenglong; Liu, Kai; Pan, Zonghao; Wang, S

    2015-01-01

    We present the multi-point and multi-wavelength observation and analysis on a solar coronal jet and coronal mass ejection (CME) event in this paper. Employing the GCS model, we obtained the real (three-dimensional) heliocentric distance and direction of the CME and found it propagate in a high speed over 1000 km/s . The jet erupted before and shared the same source region with the CME. The temporal and spacial relation- ship between them guide us the possibility that the jet triggered the CME and became its core. This scenario could promisingly enrich our understanding on the triggering mechanism of coronal mass ejections and their relations with coronal large-scale jets. On the other hand, the magnetic field configuration of the source region observed by the SDO/HMI instrument and the off- limb inverse Y-shaped configuration observed by SDO/AIA 171 A passband, together provide the first detailed observation on the three-dimensional reconnection process of large-scale jets as simulated in Pariat et al. 2009. ...

  2. Effects of Coronal Mass Ejections on Distant Coronal Streamers

    CERN Document Server

    Filippov, B; Srivastava, A K; Martsenyuk, O

    2014-01-01

    The effects of a large coronal mass ejection (CME) on a solar coronal streamer located roughly 90 degrees from the main direction of the CME propagation observed on January 2, 2012 by the SOHO/LASCO coronagraph are analyzed. Radial coronal streamers undergo some bending when CMEs pass through the corona, even at large angular distances from the streamers. The phenomenon resembles a bending wave traveling along the streamer. Some researchers interpret these phenomena as the effects of traveling shocks generated by rapid CMEs, while others suggest they are waves excited inside the streamers by external impacts. The analysis presented here did not find convincing arguments in favor of either of these interpretations. It is concluded that the streamer behavior results from the effect of the magnetic field of a moving magnetic rope associated with the coronal ejection. The motion of the large-scale magnetic rope away from the Sun changes the surrounding magnetic field lines in the corona, and these changes resembl...

  3. Anterior sagittal anorectoplasty: An alternative to posterior approach in management of congenital vestibular fistula

    OpenAIRE

    Man Mohan Harjai; Navdeep Sethi; Naveen Chandra

    2013-01-01

    Background: Better exposure, possibility of extension if needed and precise placement of the anal canal within the external sphincter complex have made the posterior and anterior sagittal approaches more popular and established for the correction of anovestibular fistula. The mini posterior sagittal anorectoplasty (PSARP) was the procedure of choice for female ARM at our center till date. As an alternative surgical option, we performed anterior sagittal anorectoplasty (ASARP) in 15 cases of a...

  4. Microsurgical Treatment of Meningiomas Invading the Sagittal or Transverse Sinuses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To analyze our management strategy and results of treating patients affected by meningiomas invading the sagittalor transverse sinuses.METHODS Review of data from 35 patients with pathologically confirmed meningiomas(29 of the sagittal sinus and 6 of the transverse sinus)surgically treated between from July 1999 and June 2003, including clinical manifestations, mode of diagnosis and curative effect of microsurgery etc.For our surgical decision-making, meningiomas were classified into six types based on the degree of sinus involvement.RESULTS A Simpson's Grade I resection was achieved in 27 cases (77.1%), Grade Ⅱ in 6 (17.1%) and Grade Ⅲ in 2 (5.7%). No patients died after the operations. The recurrence rate in the study overall was 2.9%, with a follow-up period from 3 to 6 years.CONCLUSION Application of microsurgical techniques, protection of the sinus, avoidance of damages to the cerebral cortex, veins of the central sulcus, as well as other veins from the tumor, are the major factors for increasing the rate of total resection, reducing complications and improving the quality of life for the patients with meningiomas invading the sagittal or transverse sinuses.

  5. Analysis of sagittal condyl inclination in subjects with temporomandibular disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dodić Slobodan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacground/Aim. Disturbances of mandibular border movements is considered to be one of the major signs of temporomandibular disorders (TMD. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the possible association between disturbances of mandibular border movements and the presence of symptoms of TMD in the young. Methods. This study included two groups of volunteers between 18 and 26 years of age. The study group included 30 examineers with signs (symptoms of TMD, and the control group also included 30 persons without any signs (symptoms of TMD. The presence of TMD was confirmed according to the craniomandibular index (Helkimo. The functional analysis of mandibular movements was performed in each subject using the computer pantograph. Results. The results of this study did not confirm any significant differences between the values of the condylar variables/sagittal condylar inclination, length of the sagital condylar guidance, in the control and in the study group. Conclusion. The study did not confirm significant differences in the length and inclination of the protrusive condylar guidance, as well as in the values of the sagittal condylar inclination between the subjects with the signs and symptoms of TMD and the normal asymptomatic subjects.

  6. Exploring Coronal Structures with SOHO

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Μ. Karovska; Β. Wood; J. Chen; J. Cook; R. Howard

    2000-09-01

    We applied advanced image enhancement techniques to explore in detail the characteristics of the small-scale structures and/or the low contrast structures in several Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) observed by SOHO. We highlight here the results from our studies of the morphology and dynamical evolution of CME structures in the solar corona using two instruments on board SOHO: LASCO and EIT.

  7. An equatorial coronal hole at solar minimum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bromage, B. J. I.; DelZanna, G.; DeForest, C.; Thompson, B.; Clegg, J. R.

    1997-01-01

    The large transequatorial coronal hole that was observed in the solar corona at the end of August 1996 is presented. It consists of a north polar coronal hole called the 'elephant's trunk or tusk'. The observations of this coronal hole were carried out with the coronal diagnostic spectrometer onboard the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO). The magnetic field associated with the equatorial coronal hole is strongly connected to that of the active region at its base, resulting in the two features rotating at almost the same rate.

  8. Non-inductive current driven by Alfvén waves in solar coronal loops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elfimov, A. G.; de Azevedo, C. A.; de Assis, A. S.

    1996-08-01

    It has been shown that Alfvén waves can drive non-inductive current in solar coronal loops via collisional or collisionless damping. Assuming that all the coronal-loop density of dissipated wave power (W= 10-3 erg cm-3 s-1), which is necessary to keep the plasma hot, is due to Alfvén wave electron heating, we have estimated the axial current density driven by Alfvén waves to be ≈ 103 105 statA cm-2. This current can indeed support the quasi-stationary equilibrium and stability of coronal loops and create the poloidal magnetic field up to B θ≈1-5 G.

  9. Observational Signatures of Coronal Loop Heating and Cooling Driven by Footpoint Shuffling

    CERN Document Server

    Dahlburg, R B; Taylor, B D; Ugarte-Urra, I; Warren, H P; Rappazzo, A F; Velli, M

    2016-01-01

    The evolution of a coronal loop is studied by means of numerical simulations of the fully compressible three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic equations using the HYPERION code. The footpoints of the loop magnetic field are advected by random motions. As a consequence the magnetic field in the loop is energized and develops turbulent nonlinear dynamics characterized by the continuous formation and dissipation of field-aligned current sheets: energy is deposited at small scales where heating occurs. Dissipation is non-uniformly distributed so that only a fraction of the coronal mass and volume gets heated at any time. Temperature and density are highly structured at scales which, in the solar corona, remain observationally unresolved: the plasma of our simulated loop is multi-thermal, where highly dynamical hotter and cooler plasma strands are scattered throughout the loop at sub-observational scales. Numerical simulations of coronal loops of 50000 km length and axial magnetic field intensities ranging from 0.01...

  10. Superior Sagittal Sinus Thrombosis Complicating Typhoid Fever in a Teenager

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. O. Okunola

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral venous sinus (sinovenous thrombosis (CSVT is a rare life-threatening disorder in childhood that is often misdiagnosed. CSVT encompasses cavernous sinus thrombosis, lateral sinus thrombosis, and superior sagittal sinus thrombosis (SSST. We present an adolescent girl who was well until two weeks earlier when she had a throbbing frontal headache and fever with chills; she later had dyspnoea, jaundice, melena stool, multiple seizures, nuchal rigidity, and monoparesis of the right lower limb a day before admission. Urine test for Salmonella typhi Vi antigen was positive, and Widal reaction was significant. Serial cranial computerized tomography scans revealed an expanding hypodense lesion in the parafalcine region consistent with SSST or a parasagittal abscess. Inadvertent left parietal limited craniectomy confirmed SSST. She recovered completely with subsequent conservative management. Beyond neuropsychiatric complications of Typhoid fever, CSVT should be highly considered when focal neurologic deficits are present.

  11. Removal of Deeply Impacted Mandibular Molars by Sagittal Split Osteotomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isler, Sabri Cemil

    2016-01-01

    Mandibular third molars are the most common impacted teeth. Mandibular first and second molars do not share the same frequency of occurrence. In rare cases the occlusal surfaces of impacted molars are united by the same follicular space and the roots pointing in opposite direction; these are called kissing molars. In some cases, a supernumerary fourth molar can be seen as unerupted and, in this case, such a supernumerary, deeply impacted fourth molar is seen neighboring kissing molars. The extraction of deeply impacted wisdom molars from the mandible may necessitate excessive bone removal and it causes complications such as damage to the inferior alveolar nerve and iatrogenic fractures of the mandible. This case report describes the use of the sagittal split osteotomy technique to avoid extensive bone removal and protect the inferior alveolar nerve during surgical extruction of multiple impacted teeth. PMID:27429810

  12. Sagittal synostosis: II. Cranial morphology and growth after the modified pi-plasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guimaraes-Ferreira, J.; Gewalli, F.; David, L.;

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to characterise the postoperative cranial growth and morphology after a modified pi-plasty for sagittal synostosis. The shape of the skull of 82 patients with isolated premature synostosis of the sagittal suture ( SS group) operated on with a modified pi-plasty was studi...

  13. Subtotal cranial vault remodelling in anterior sagittal suture closure: impact of age on surgical outcome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engel, M.; Hoffmann, J.; Muhling, J.; Castrillon-Oberndorfer, G.; Seeberger, R.; Freudlsperger, C.

    2012-01-01

    Isolated fusion of the sagittal suture is usually treated before 1 year of age, but some patients present at a later age. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of children's age on the surgical outcome. The authors investigated 46 patients with isolated nonsyndromic sagittal craniosynosto

  14. Direct coronal computed tomography of the lumbar spine: A new technical approach in supine position

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schnyder, P.; Uske, A.; Mansouri, B.

    1986-11-01

    Computed tomography (CT) was carried out on 46 subjects with L5-S1 disk hernia. All the patients had a L5-S1 angle equal or greater than 40 degrees. Coronal sections of the disk were obtained with a rostral angulation of the gantry, having placed the lumbar spin in a hyperlordotic position. Results are discussed and compared with those obtained from para-axial transverse sections and multidirectional reformated images.

  15. Catastrophe of coronal magnetic flux ropes in fully open magnetic field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI; Guoqiang(李国强); HU; Youqiu(胡友秋)

    2002-01-01

    The catastrophe of coronal magnetic flux ropes is closely related to solar explosive phenomena, such as prominence eruptions, coronal mass ejections, and two-ribbon solar flares. Using a 2-dimensional, 3-component ideal MHD model in Cartesian coordinates, numerical simulations are carried out to investigate the equilibrium property of a coronal magnetic flux rope which is embedded in a fully open background magnetic field. The flux rope emerges from the photosphere and enters the corona with its axial and annular magnetic fluxes controlled by a single "emergence parameter". For a flux rope that has entered the corona, we may change its axial and annular fluxes artificially and let the whole system reach a new equilibrium through numerical simulations. The results obtained show that when the emergence parameter, the axial flux, or the annular flux is smaller than a certain critical value, the flux rope is in equilibrium and adheres to the photosphere. On the other hand, if the critical value is exceeded, the flux rope loses equilibrium and erupts freely upward, namely, a catastrophe takes place. In contrast with the partly-opened background field, the catastrophic amplitude is infinite for the case of fully-opened background field.

  16. Intrinsic Instability of Coronal Streamers

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Y; Song, H Q; Shi, Q Q; Feng, S W; Xia, L D; 10.1088/0004-637X/691/2/1936

    2009-01-01

    Plasma blobs are observed to be weak density enhancements as radially stretched structures emerging from the cusps of quiescent coronal streamers. In this paper, it is suggested that the formation of blobs is a consequence of an intrinsic instability of coronal streamers occurring at a very localized region around the cusp. The evolutionary process of the instability, as revealed in our calculations, can be described as follows: (1) through the localized cusp region where the field is too weak to sustain the confinement, plasmas expand and stretch the closed field lines radially outward as a result of the freezing-in effect of plasma-magnetic field coupling; the expansion brings a strong velocity gradient into the slow wind regime providing the free energy necessary for the onset of a subsequent magnetohydrodynamic instability; (2) the instability manifests itself mainly as mixed streaming sausage-kink modes, the former results in pinches of elongated magnetic loops to provoke reconnections at one or many loc...

  17. MICA Observations of Coronal Transients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenborg, G.; Schwenn, R.; Srivastava, N.

    1999-10-01

    Dynamical processes are well known to occur in the inner solar atmosphere, many of them giving origin to spectacular eruptions known as coronal mass ejections. The projected velocity of propagation of these events ranges from less than 100 km/sec to greater than 1200 km/sec. In order to study the initial evolution of the faster processes it is necessary to image the inner corona at a very high cadence. Although ground-based observations of the corona are strongly affected by sky conditions they allow imaging at a high temporal resolution as compared to coronagraphic observations from space. In the recently inaugurated German-Argentinean Solar-Observatory at El Leoncito, San Juan, Argentina, a mirror coronagraph (MICA) daily images the inner solar corona with high temporal and spatial resolution in two spectral ranges: the well known green (~1.8 MK) and red (~1.0 MK) coronal lines at 5303 A and 6374 A respectively. It is essentially similar in design to LASCO-C1 on board SOHO, its field-of-view ranging from 1.05 to 2.0 solar radii from the sun center. Thus, it is ideally suited to observe the hot material and reveal the fast processes that occur in the coronal plasma. In the last year MICA has recorded several fast and not so fast green line transients at a high temporal resolution. In this work we will present observations of a few such events. This study would allow us to have a better understanding of the conditions that trigger the coronal mass ejections and their propagation in the inner solar corona.

  18. Low-latitude coronal holes, decaying active regions and global coronal magnetic structure

    CERN Document Server

    Petrie, Gordon

    2013-01-01

    We study the relationship between decaying active region magnetic fields, coronal holes and the global coronal magnetic structure using Global Oscillations Network Group (GONG) synoptic magnetograms, Solar Terrestrial RElations Observatory (STEREO) extreme ultra-violet (EUV) synoptic maps and coronal potential-field source-surface (PFSS) models. We analyze 14 decaying regions and associated coronal holes occurring between early 2007 and late 2010, four from cycle 23 and 10 from cycle 24. We investigate the relationship between asymmetries in active regions' positive and negative magnetic intensities, asymmetric magnetic decay rates, flux imbalances, global field structure and coronal hole formation. Whereas new emerging active regions caused changes in the large-scale coronal field, the coronal fields of the 14 decaying active regions only opened under the condition that the global coronal structure remained almost unchanged. This was because the dominant slowly-varying, low-order multipoles prevented opposin...

  19. On renormalization of axial anomaly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is shown that multiplicative renormalization of the axial singlet current results in renormalization of the axial anomaly in all orders of perturbation theory. It is a necessary condition for the Adler - Bardeen theorem being valid. 10 refs.; 2 figs

  20. EUV Coronal Dimming and its Relationship to Coronal Mass Ejections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, James

    2016-05-01

    As a coronal mass ejection (CME) departs from the inner solar atmosphere, it leaves behind a void. This region of depleted plasma results in a corresponding decrease in coronal emissions that can be observed by instruments tuned to measure the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) part of the electromagnetic spectrum. These coronal dimmings can be observed with EUV imagers and EUV spectral irradiance instruments. Onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO), the EUV Variability Experiment (EVE) and Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) provide complementary observations; together they can be used to obtain high spatial and spectral resolution. AIA provides information about the location, extent, and spatial evolution of the dimming while EVE data are important to understand plasma temperature evolution. Concurrent processes with similar timescales to mass-loss dimming also impact the observations, which makes a deconvolution method necessary for the irradiance time series in order to have a “clean” mass-loss dimming light curve that can be parameterized and compared with CME kinematics. This presentation will first provide background on these various physical processes and the deconvolution method developed. Two case studies will then be presented, followed by a semi-statistical study (~30 events) to establish a correlation between dimming and CME parameters. In particular, the slope of the deconvolved irradiance dimming light curve is representative of the CME speed, and the irradiance dimming depth can serve as a proxy for CME mass. Finally, plans and early results from a more complete statistical study of all dimmings in the SDO era, based on an automated detection routine using EVE data, will be described and compared with independently derived dimmings automatically detected with AIA data.

  1. SAGITTAL DIAMETER OF FORAMEN MAGNUM IN NORMAL POPULATION: AN MRI STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lakshmi

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Lower position of cerebellar tonsils was frequently noticed in Western studies. In some of the studies, sagittal diameter of foramen magnum was found to be larger in cases of Chiari malformation. However, there are no Indian studies for comparison. Our study was proposed to determine the standard values for sagittal diameter of foramen magnum in various age groups and both sexes. This gives a guideline for further studies in pathological conditions like Craniovertebral Junctional (CVJ anomalies, and Chiari malformation. The sagittal diameter of foramen magnum was measured in 515 patients during MRI investigation directly on the MR images on the MR monitor in mid sagittal sections of head and cervical spine. The patients underwent the MR investigation for various vague complaints at the Radiology Department of SCTIMST, Trivandrum. They were found to have normal brain and spinal cord. They ranged from 2 months to 80 years of age in both sexes. Established cases of CVJ anomalies and raised intracranial tension were excluded. The results showed a mean sagittal diameter of 35.57 ± 3.72 mm with a range of 15 to 45 mm. The sagittal diameter increased up to 15 years, then remained static thereafter. Females showed smaller diameter compared to males. ANOVA showed a high statistically significant P-value of 0.001 for males and 0.004 for females. The study resulted in standard values of sagittal diameter of foramen magnum for different age groups in both sexes.

  2. Association between CYP19A1 genotype and pubertal sagittal jaw growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Shushu; Hartsfield, James K.; Guo, Yujiao; Cao, Yang; Wang, Si; Chen, Song

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Sagittal jaw growth is influenced during puberty by a ratio of androgens and estrogens. The CYP19A1 (formerly CYP19) gene encodes the cytochrome P450 enzyme aromatase (estrogen synthetase), which converts testosterone to estrogen. Genetic variations including single nucleotide polymorphisms might regulate CYP19A1 gene expression or the function of the aromatase protein and thus influence sagittal jaw growth. Methods The annual sagittal jaw growth in 92 pubertal orthodontic patients was determined by using pretreatment and posttreatment cephalometric radiographs. Single nucleotide polymorphisms rs2470144 and rs2445761 were genotyped and haplotypes constructed. Associations between genotypes or haplotypes and the annual sagittal growth were estimated by using JMP (version 9.0; SAS Institute, Cary, NC). Results Two single nucleotide polymorphisms were significantly associated with average differences in annual sagittal jaw growth in boys. Haplotype analysis demonstrated that haplotypes Trs2470144Trs2445761 and Crs2470144Trs2445761 had significant effects on annual sagittal maxillary growth and on mandibular growth in boys. No association was found in girls. Conclusions A quantitative trait locus that influences male pubertal sagittal jaw growth might exist in the CYP19A1 gene, and single nucleotide polymorphisms rs2470144 and rs2445761 might be inside this quantitative trait locus or be linked to it. PMID:23116507

  3. Sagittal sinus thrombosis due to L-asparaginase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nisar A Wani

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral Sinovenous Thrombosis (CSVT is a serious complication of L-asparaginase chemotherapy for leukemia in children. Clinical features of headache, altered consciousness, focal neurological deficit, and seizures developing during or immediately after treatment with L-asparaginase should alert the treating physician to the possibility of CSVT. Immediate imaging of the brain should be done using CT and MRI and the veins should be visualized noninvasively by CT and MR venography. We report two children on induction therapy for acute leukemia who presented with seizures, headache, and altered consciousness. Venous infarcts with and without hemorrhage were seen on CT in one patient and the empty delta sign was seen after contrast injection; however, the early changes were missed by CT. MRI detected dural sinus thrombosis relatively earlier in another patient, while the CT findings were equivocal; in this patient, contrast-enhanced MRI showed the empty delta sign and MR venography confirmed absent flow in the superior sagittal sinus, which was diagnostic of sinus thrombosis. Rapid anticoagulation was started with heparin and maintained with warfarin. The child with a unilateral small nonhemorrhagic infarct made a complete recovery while the other, with bilateral hemorrhagic infarcts, did not survive. We stress the importance of early diagnosis of CSVT using CT and MRI in children with leukemia being treated with L-asparaginase; this will permit timely treatment.

  4. Sagittal venous sinus thrombosis after cesarean section: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farideh Keypour

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT is uncommon after cesarean section. Although it can be a leading cause of maternal mortality. CVT may occur during pregnancy because of hypercoagulable states such as preeclampsia, thrombophilias, antiphospholipid antibody syndrome and sepsis.Case presentation: A 31 years old woman G2 Ab1 at 37 weeks gestational age with  premature rupture of membrane underwent cesarean section because breech presentation and preeclampsia. Spinal anesthesia was done for emergent cesarean section. On the second day after cesarean section, she developed headache, vomiting, focal neurologic deficits, paresthesia, blurred vision. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI showed thrombosis in anterior half of superior sagittal sinus. Treatment consisted of anticoagulation.  Conclusion: Thrombophilias, pregnancy-related hypertension and cesarean section are the predisposing factors for thromboembolism. Unfractionated heparin and low molecular weight heparin (LMWs are effective drugs for thromboprophylaxis. It is vital to prevent venous thrombosis to reduce mortality during both intrapartum and postpartum periods. Consideration of cerebral venous thrombosis in similar cases is recommended.

  5. The Contribution of Trunk Axial Kinematics to Poststrike Ball Velocity During Maximal Instep Soccer Kicking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fullenkamp, Adam M; Campbell, Brian M; Laurent, C Matthew; Lane, Amanda Paige

    2015-10-01

    To date, biomechanical analyses of soccer kicking have focused predominantly on lower-extremity motions, with little emphasis on the trunk and upper body. The purpose of this study was to evaluate differences in trunk axial kinematics between novice (n = 10) and skilled (n = 10) participants, as well as to establish the relationship of trunk axial motion and sagittal plane thigh rotation to poststrike ball velocity. Three-dimensional body segmental motion data were captured using high-resolution motion analysis (120 Hz) while each participant completed 5 maximal instep soccer-style kicks. The results demonstrate that skilled participants use 53% greater axial trunk range of motion compared with novice participants (P soccer athletes. PMID:26099160

  6. Identification of IGF-I in the calvarial suture of young rats: histochemical analysis of the cranial sagittal sutures in a hyperthyroid rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akita, S; Hirano, A; Fujii, T

    1996-01-01

    staining of IGF-I was markedly increased in the suture margins of the T3-treated group. There were no significant differences observed either in the skull base measurements or in the histologic and histochemical findings of the skull base or the coronal suture between the groups. More significantly, excess administration of thyroid hormone enhanced the cranial sagittal suture closure; therefore, it was proposed that local IGF-I plays an important role in sagittal sutural bone formation. PMID:8532765

  7. From Forbidden Coronal Lines to Meaningful Coronal Magnetic Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Judge, Philip G; Landi, Enrico

    2013-01-01

    We review methods to measure magnetic fields within the corona using the polarized light in magnetic-dipole (M1) lines. We are particularly interested in both the global magnetic-field evolution over a solar cycle, and the local storage of magnetic free energy within coronal plasmas. We address commonly held skepticisms concerning angular ambiguities and line-of-sight confusion. We argue that ambiguities are in principle no worse than more familiar remotely sensed photospheric vector-fields, and that the diagnosis of M1 line data would benefit from simultaneous observations of EUV lines. Based on calculations and data from eclipses, we discuss the most promising lines and different approaches that might be used. We point to the S-like [Fe {\\sc XI}] line (J=2 to J=1) at 789.2nm as a prime target line (for ATST for example) to augment the hotter 1074.7 and 1079.8 nm Si-like lines of [Fe {\\sc XIII}] currently observed by the Coronal Multi-channel Polarimeter (CoMP). Significant breakthroughs will be made possibl...

  8. Methods of Temperature and Emission Measure Determination of Coronal Loops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cirtain, J. W.; Schmelz, J. T.; Martens, P. C. H.

    2002-05-01

    Recent observational results from both SOHO-EIT and TRACE indicate that coronal loops are isothermal along their length (axially). These results are obtained from a narrowband filter ratio method that assumes that the plasma is isothermal along the line of sight (radially). However, these temperatures vary greatly from those derived from differential emission measure (DEM) curves produced from spectral lines recorded by SOHO-CDS. The DEM results indicate that the loops are neither axially nor radially isothermal. This discrepancy was investigated by Schmelz et al. (2001). They chose pairs of iron lines from the same CDS data set to mimic the EIT and TRACE loop results. Ratios of different lines gave different temperatures, indicating that the plasma was not radially isothermal. In addition the results indicated that the loop was axially isothermal, even though the DEM analysis of the same data showed this result to be false. Here we have analyzed the EIT data for the CDS loop published by Schmelz et al. (2001). We took the ratios of the 171-to-195 and 195-to-284 filter data, and made temperature maps of the loop. The results indicate that the loop is axially isothermal, but different temperatures were found for each pair of filters. Both ratio techniques force the resultant temperature to lie within the range where the response functions (for filters) or the emissivity functions (for lines) overlap; isothermal loops are therefore a byproduct of the analysis. This conclusion strengthens support for the idea that temperature and emission measure results from filter ratio methods may be misleading or even drastically wrong. This research was funded in part by the NASA/TRACE MODA grant for Montana State University. Solar physics research at the University of Memphis is supported by NASA grant NAG5-9783.

  9. Post Caesarean Sagittal Sinus Thrombosis after Spinal Anaesthesia: A Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Gaurav Tomar; Neeraj Narang; TC Kriplani; Ashish Sethi

    2010-01-01

    Central venous thrombosis, although rare, is a recognized cause of puerperium stroke. We present a case of successfully managed sagittal sinus thrombosis (SST) developed in a parturient after Caesarean delivery under spinal anaesthesia.

  10. Clinical evaluation of the lateral sagittal infraclavicular block developed by MRI studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koscielniak-Nielsen, Zbigniew J; Rasmussen, Henrik; Hesselbjerg, Lars;

    2005-01-01

    Lateral sagittal infraclavicular block by single injection has a faster performance time and causes less discomfort than does axillary block by multiple injections. This prospective, descriptive, multicenter study assessed block effectiveness, onset time, and incidence of adverse events...

  11. Critical Axial Load

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walt Wells

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Our objective in this paper is to solve a second order differential equation for a long, simply supported column member subjected to a lateral axial load using Heun's numerical method. We will use the solution to find the critical load at which the column member will fail due to buckling. We will calculate this load using Euler's derived analytical approach for an exact solution, as well as Euler's Numerical Method. We will then compare the three calculated values to see how much they deviate from one another. During the critical load calculation, it will be necessary to calculate the moment of inertia for the column member.

  12. Sacroperineal mobilization versus posterior sagittal anorectoplasty: A study on outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sivakumar K

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The two main surgical procedures for high and intermediate anorectal malformations (ARM, namely, Stephens′ and Peρa′s procedure, are compared in terms of their outcome. Materials and Methods: Fifty-eight patients who had Stephens′ procedure and 28 patients who had posterior sagittal anorectoplasty (PSARP are clinically analyzed in terms of associated anomalies, procedural complications, anatomical reconstruction and functional results. Functional results were assessed by Kelly score, voluntary bowel movements and sensation. Statistical analysis of data was done by Chi-square test. Results: There were 34 high and 52 intermediate ARM. Associated anomalies were noted in 32%. Procedure-related complications of urethral injury, bladder injury, neurogenic bladder, anal stenosis and mucosal prolapse were seen in both procedures. Ectopic positioning of anus was seen in 25% of PSARP and 19% of sacroperineal mobilization (SPM. Good circular sphincter creation was seen in 43% of PSARP and 40% of Stephens′. Noncontractile sphincter was found more with SPM. In functional results, when assessed by Kelly score, VBM and sensation, there was no difference for high ARM, whereas results were better with SPM for intermediate anomalies. Discussion: A few reports are available in literature comparing PSARP and SPM. Procedural complications of urethral injury and neurogenic bladder are slightly more with PSARP. Ectopic positioning, poor contraction of sphincter are associated with poor results, and creation of good circular sphincter with good squeeze is associated with good results. Functional assessment by Kelly score, VBM and sensation doesn′t reveal any difference between two procedures for high ARM, whereas for intermediate anomalies, Stephens′ procedure seems to give better functional results.

  13. The Role of Proprioception in the Sagittal Setting of Anticipatory Postural Adjustments During Gait Initiation

    OpenAIRE

    Pereira Marcelo P.; Pelicioni Paulo H. Silva; Gobbi Lilian T.B.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. Previous studies have studied the role of proprioception on the setting of anticipatory postural adjustments (APA) during gait initiation. However, these studies did not investigate the role of proprioception in the sagittal APA setting. We aimed to investigate the role of proprioception manipulation to induce APA sagittal adaptations on gait initiation. Methods. Fourteen healthy adults performed gait initiation without, and with, vibration applied before movement onset, and during m...

  14. Blind Stereoscopy of the Coronal Magnetic Field

    CERN Document Server

    Aschwanden, Markus J; Malanushenko, Anna

    2015-01-01

    We test the feasibility of 3D coronal-loop tracing in stereoscopic EUV image pairs, with the ultimate goal of enabling efficient 3D reconstruction of the coronal magnetic field that drives flares and coronal mass ejections (CMEs). We developed an automated code designed to perform triangulation of coronal loops in pairs (or triplets) of EUV images recorded from different perspectives. The automated (or blind) stereoscopy code includes three major tasks: (i) automated pattern recognition of coronal loops in EUV images, (ii) automated pairing of corresponding loop patterns from two different aspect angles, and (iii) stereoscopic triangulation of 3D loop coordinates. We perform tests with simulated stereoscopic EUV images and quantify the accuracy of all three procedures. In addition we test the performance of the blind stereoscopy code as a function of the spacecraft-separation angle and as a function of the spatial resolution. We also test the sensitivity to magnetic non-potentiality. The automated code develo...

  15. EIT waves and coronal magnetic field diagnostics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Magnetic field in the solar lower atmosphere can be measured by the use of the Zeeman and Hanle effects. By contrast, the coronal magnetic field well above the solar surface, which directly controls various eruptive phenomena, can not be precisely measured with the traditional techniques. Several attempts are being made to probe the coronal magnetic field, such as force-free extrapolation based on the photospheric magnetograms, gyroresonance radio emissions, and coronal seismology based on MHD waves in the corona. Compared to the waves trapped in the localized coronal loops, EIT waves are the only global-scale wave phenomenon, and thus are the ideal tool for the coronal global seismology. In this paper, we review the observations and modelings of EIT waves, and illustrate how they can be applied to probe the global magnetic field in the corona.

  16. Network Coronal Bright Points: Coronal Heating Concentrations Found in the Solar Magnetic Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falconer, D. A.; Moore, R. L.; Porter, J. G.; Hathaway, D. H.

    1998-01-01

    We examine the magnetic origins of coronal heating in quiet regions by combining SOHO/EIT Fe xii coronal images and Kitt Peak magnetograms. Spatial filtering of the coronal images shows a network of enhanced structures on the scale of the magnetic network in quiet regions. Superposition of the filtered coronal images on maps of the magnetic network extracted from the magnetograms shows that the coronal network does indeed trace and stem from the magnetic network. Network coronal bright points, the brightest features in the network lanes, are found to have a highly significant coincidence with polarity dividing lines (neutral lines) in the network and are often at the feet of enhanced coronal structures that stem from the network and reach out over the cell interiors. These results indicate that, similar to the close linkage of neutral-line core fields with coronal heating in active regions (shown in previous work), low-lying core fields encasing neutral lines in the magnetic network often drive noticeable coronal heating both within themselves (the network coronal bright points) and on more extended field lines rooted around them. This behavior favors the possibility that active core fields in the network are the main drivers of the heating of the bulk of the quiet corona, on scales much larger than the network lanes and cells.

  17. Shear Photospheric Forcing and the Origin of Turbulence in Coronal Loops

    CERN Document Server

    Rappazzo, A F; Einaudi, G

    2010-01-01

    We present a series of numerical simulations aimed at understanding the nature and origin of turbulence in coronal loops in the framework of the Parker model for coronal heating. A coronal loop is studied via reduced magnetohydrodynamics simulations in Cartesian geometry. A uniform and strong magnetic field threads the volume between the two photospheric planes, where a velocity field in the form of a 1D shear flow pattern is present. Initially the magnetic field which developes in the coronal loop is a simple map of the photospheric velocity field. This initial configuration is unstable to a multiple tearing instability which develops islands with X and O points in the plane orthogonal to the axial field. Once the nonlinear stage sets in the system evolution is characterized by a regime of MHD turbulence dominated by magnetic energy. A well developed power law in energy spectra is observed and the magnetic field never returns to the simple initial state mapping the photospheric flow. The formation of X and O...

  18. Recent advances in coronal heating

    CERN Document Server

    De Moortel, Ineke

    2015-01-01

    The solar corona, the tenuous outer atmosphere of the Sun, is orders of magnitude hotter than the solar surface. This 'coronal heating problem' requires the identification of a heat source to balance losses due to thermal conduction, radiation and (in some locations) convection. The review papers in this Theo Murphy meeting issue present an overview of recent observational findings, large- and small-scale numerical modelling of physical processes occurring in the solar atmosphere and other aspects which may affect our understanding of the proposed heating mechanisms. At the same time, they also set out the directions and challenges which must be tackled by future research. In this brief introduction, we summarize some of the issues and themes which reoccur throughout this issue.

  19. Axial skeletal CT densitometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since the discovery of the Roentgen ray a precise and accurate assessment of bone mineral content has been a challenge to many investigators. A number of methods have been developed but no one satisfied. Considering its technical possibilities computed tomography is very promising in determination of bone mineral content (BMC). The new modality enables BMC estimations in the axial skeletal trabecular bone. CT densitometry can be performed on a normal commercially available third generation whole body CT scanner. No dedicated device in a special clinical set-up is necessary. In this study 106 patients, most of them clinically suspected of osteoporosis, were examined. The new method CT densitometry has been evaluated. The results have been correlated to alternative BMC determination methods. (Auth.)

  20. FORWARD: A toolset for multiwavelength coronal magnetometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah eGibson

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Determining the 3D coronal magnetic field is a critical, but extremely difficult problem to solve. Since different types of multiwavelength coronal data probe different aspects of the coronal magnetic field, ideally these data should be used together to validate and constrain specifications of that field. Such a task requires the ability to create observable quantities at a range of wavelengths from a distribution of magnetic field and associated plasma -- i.e., to perform forward calculations. In this paper we describe the capabilities of the FORWARD SolarSoft IDL package, a uniquely comprehensive toolset for coronal magnetometry. FORWARD is a community resource that may be used both to synthesize a broad range of coronal observables, and to access and compare synthetic observables to existing data. It enables forward fitting of specific observations, and helps to build intuition into how the physical properties of coronal magnetic structures translate to observable properties. FORWARD can also be used to generate synthetic test beds from MHD simulations in order to facilitate the development of coronal magnetometric inversion methods, and to prepare for the analysis of future large solar telescope data.

  1. Observational features of equatorial coronal hole jets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Zimbardo

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Collimated ejections of plasma called "coronal hole jets" are commonly observed in polar coronal holes. However, such coronal jets are not only a specific features of polar coronal holes but they can also be found in coronal holes appearing at lower heliographic latitudes. In this paper we present some observations of "equatorial coronal hole jets" made up with data provided by the STEREO/SECCHI instruments during a period comprising March 2007 and December 2007. The jet events are selected by requiring at least some visibility in both COR1 and EUVI instruments. We report 15 jet events, and we discuss their main features. For one event, the uplift velocity has been determined as about 200 km s−1, while the deceleration rate appears to be about 0.11 km s−2, less than solar gravity. The average jet visibility time is about 30 min, consistent with jet observed in polar regions. On the basis of the present dataset, we provisionally conclude that there are not substantial physical differences between polar and equatorial coronal hole jets.

  2. Space weather and coronal mass ejections

    CERN Document Server

    Howard, Tim

    2013-01-01

    Space weather has attracted a lot of attention in recent times. Severe space weather can disrupt spacecraft, and on Earth can be the cause of power outages and power station failure. It also presents a radiation hazard for airline passengers and astronauts. These ""magnetic storms"" are most commonly caused by coronal mass ejections, or CMES, which are large eruptions of plasma and magnetic field from the Sun that can reach speeds of several thousand km/s. In this SpringerBrief, Space Weather and Coronal Mass Ejections, author Timothy Howard briefly introduces the coronal mass ejection, its sc

  3. Sagittal plane analysis of the spine and pelvis in adult idiopathic scoliosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Wei-shi; LI Gang; CHEN Zhong-qiang; Kirkham B Wood

    2010-01-01

    Background There has been an increasing recognition of the importance of sagittal spinopelvic alignment in patients with scoliosis as it relates to clinical outcomes. However, the changes seen in sagittal spinopelvic alignment in adult idiopathic scoliosis patients is poorly defined. This study was conducted to evaluate the sagittal alignment of pelvis and spine in adult idiopathic scoliosis patients.Methods The sagittal parameters of the spine and pelvis were analyzed in lateral standing radiographs of 124 patients (mean age 47.4 years) with adult idiopathic scoliosis, including thoracic kyphosis (TK), thoracolumbar junction kyphosis (TLJ), lumbar lordosis (LL), pelvic incidence (PI), sacrum slope (SS), pelvic tilt (PT) and C7 plumb line (C7PL). The patients were divided into three groups according to the age: 20-40 years, 41-64 years, and ≥65 years. The parameters were compared with those in normal adults and adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) patients. The relationship between all parameters as well as age and sagittal parameters were analyzed.Results The PI in patients with adult idiopathic scoliosis was 58.1°±13.0°, which was significantly higher than that in normal adults. The PT (19.9°±10.6°) was also higher than that in both normal adults and AIS patients, while the SS (38.1°±12.0°) was similar or smaller. As age increased, C7PL, PT and TJL increased while LL decreased. There was no relationship between age and both PI and TK. PT had the strongest statistical association with the C7PL.Conclusions PI is higher in adult idiopathic scoliosis than normal subjects. The PT is the most relevant pelvic parameter to the global sagittal alignment of the spine. Age significantly influences sagittal parameters of the spine and pelvis except the PI and TK.

  4. Spinal sagittal imbalance in patients with lumbar disc herniation: its spinopelvic characteristics, strength changes of the spinal musculature and natural history after lumbar discectomy

    OpenAIRE

    Liang, Chen; Sun, Jianmin; Cui, Xingang; Jiang, Zhensong; Zhang, Wen; Li, Tao

    2016-01-01

    Background Spinal sagittal imbalance is a widely acknowledged problem, but there is insufficient knowledge regarding its occurrence. In some patients with lumbar disc herniation (LDH), their symptom is similar to spinal sagittal imbalance. The aim of this study is to illustrate the spinopelvic sagittal characteristics and identity the role of spinal musculature in the mechanism of sagittal imbalance in patients with LDH. Methods Twenty-five adults with spinal sagittal imbalance who initially ...

  5. Multidimensional modeling of coronal rain dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Fang, X; Keppens, R

    2013-01-01

    We present the first multidimensional, magnetohydrodynamic simulations which capture the initial formation and the long-term sustainment of the enigmatic coronal rain phenomenon. We demonstrate how thermal instability can induce a spectacular display of in-situ forming blob-like condensations which then start their intimate ballet on top of initially linear force-free arcades. Our magnetic arcades host chromospheric, transition region, and coronal plasma. Following coronal rain dynamics for over 80 minutes physical time, we collect enough statistics to quantify blob widths, lengths, velocity distributions, and other characteristics which directly match with modern observational knowledge. Our virtual coronal rain displays the deformation of blobs into $V$-shaped like features, interactions of blobs due to mostly pressure-mediated levitations, and gives the first views on blobs which evaporate in situ, or get siphoned over the apex of the background arcade. Our simulations pave the way for systematic surveys o...

  6. Microwave Enhancement in Coronal Holes: Statistical Properties

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ν. Gopalswamy; Κ. Shibasaki; Μ. Salem

    2000-09-01

    We report on the statistical properties of the microwave enhancement (brightness temperature, area, fine structure, life time and magnetic field strength) in coronal holes observed over a period of several solar rotations.

  7. MHD Waves in the coronal holes

    CERN Document Server

    Banerjee, D

    2015-01-01

    Coronal holes are the dark patches in the solar corona associated with relatively cool, less dense plasma and unipolar fields. The fast component of the solar wind emanates from these regions. Several observations reveal the presence of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves in coronal holes which are believed to play a key role in the acceleration of fast solar wind. The recent advent of high-resolution instruments had brought us many new insights on the properties of MHD waves in coronal holes which are reviewed in this article. The advances made in the identification of compressive slow MHD waves in both polar and equatorial coronal holes, their possible connection with the recently discovered high- speed quasi-periodic upflows, their dissipation, and the detection of damping in Alfven waves from the spectral line width variation are discussed in particular.

  8. Extra-axial brain tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapalino, Otto; Smirniotopoulos, James G

    2016-01-01

    Extra-axial brain tumors are the most common adult intracranial neoplasms and encompass a broad spectrum of pathologic subtypes. Meningiomas are the most common extra-axial brain tumor (approximately one-third of all intracranial neoplasms) and typically present as slowly growing dural-based masses. Benign meningiomas are very common, and may occasionally be difficult to differentiate from more aggressive subtypes (i.e., atypical or malignant varieties) or other dural-based masses with more aggressive biologic behavior (e.g., hemangiopericytoma or dural-based metastases). Many neoplasms that typically affect the brain parenchyma (intra-axial), such as gliomas, may also present with primary or secondary extra-axial involvement. This chapter provides a general and concise overview of the common types of extra-axial tumors and their typical imaging features. PMID:27432671

  9. Build Axial Gradient Field by Using Axial Magnetized Permanent Rings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Axial magnetic field produced by an axial magnetized permanent ring was studied. For two permanent rings, if they are magnetized in the same directions, a nearly uniform axial field can be produced. If they are magnetized in opposite direction,an axial gradient magnetic field can be generated, with the field range changing from -B0 to B0. A permanent magnet with a high axial gradient field was fabricated, the measured results agree with the PANDIRA calculation very well. For wider usage,it is desirable for the field gradient to be changed. Some methods to produce the variable gradient field are presented. These kinds of axial gradient magnetic field can also be used as a beam focusing for linear accelerator if the periodic field can be produced along the beam trajectory. The axial magnetic field is something like a solenoid, large stray field will leak to the outside environment if no method is taken to control them. In this paper, one method is illustrated to shield off the outside leakage field.

  10. Dissipative Axial Inflation

    CERN Document Server

    Notari, Alessio

    2016-01-01

    We analyze in detail the background cosmological evolution of a scalar field coupled to a massless abelian gauge field through an axial term $\\frac{\\phi}{f_\\gamma} F \\tilde{F}$, such as in the case of an axion. Gauge fields in this case are known to experience tachyonic growth and therefore can backreact on the background as an effective dissipation into radiation energy density $\\rho_R$, which which can lead to inflation without the need of a flat potential. We analyze the system, for momenta $k$ smaller than the cutoff $f_\\gamma$, including numerically the backreaction. We consider the evolution from a given static initial condition and explicitly show that, if $f_\\gamma$ is smaller than the field excursion $\\phi_0$ by about a factor of at least ${\\cal O} (20)$, there is a friction effect which turns on before that the field can fall down and which can then lead to a very long stage of inflation with a generic potential. In addition we find superimposed oscillations, which would get imprinted on any kind of...

  11. MULTIDIMENSIONAL MODELING OF CORONAL RAIN DYNAMICS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, X.; Xia, C.; Keppens, R. [Centre for mathematical Plasma Astrophysics, Department of Mathematics, KU Leuven, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium)

    2013-07-10

    We present the first multidimensional, magnetohydrodynamic simulations that capture the initial formation and long-term sustainment of the enigmatic coronal rain phenomenon. We demonstrate how thermal instability can induce a spectacular display of in situ forming blob-like condensations which then start their intimate ballet on top of initially linear force-free arcades. Our magnetic arcades host a chromospheric, transition region, and coronal plasma. Following coronal rain dynamics for over 80 minutes of physical time, we collect enough statistics to quantify blob widths, lengths, velocity distributions, and other characteristics which directly match modern observational knowledge. Our virtual coronal rain displays the deformation of blobs into V-shaped features, interactions of blobs due to mostly pressure-mediated levitations, and gives the first views of blobs that evaporate in situ or are siphoned over the apex of the background arcade. Our simulations pave the way for systematic surveys of coronal rain showers in true multidimensional settings to connect parameterized heating prescriptions with rain statistics, ultimately allowing us to quantify the coronal heating input.

  12. Observational features of equatorial coronal hole jets

    CERN Document Server

    Nistico', G; Patsourakos, S; Zimbardo, G

    2010-01-01

    Collimated ejections of plasma called "coronal hole jets" are commonly observed in polar coronal holes. However, such coronal jets are not only a specific features of polar coronal holes but they can also be found in coronal holes appearing at lower heliographic latitudes. In this paper we present some observations of "equatorial coronal hole jets" made up with data provided by the STEREO/SECCHI instruments during a period comprising March 2007 and December 2007. The jet events are selected by requiring at least some visibility in both COR1 and EUVI instruments. We report 15 jet events, and we discuss their main features. For one event, the uplift velocity has been determined as about 200 km/s, while the deceleration rate appears to be about 0.11 km/s2, less than solar gravity. The average jet visibility time is about 30 minutes, consistent with jet observed in polar regions. On the basis of the present dataset, we provisionally conclude that there are not substantial physical differences between polar and eq...

  13. Influence of implant rod curvature on sagittal correction of scoliosis deformity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salmingo, Remel A.; Tadano, Shigeru; Abe, Yuichiro;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND CONTEXT: Deformation of in vivo–implanted rods could alter the scoliosis sagittal correction. To our knowledge, no previous authors have investigated the influence of implanted-rod deformation on the sagittal deformity correction during scoliosis surgery. PURPOSE: To analyze the changes...... of the implant rod’s angle of curvature during surgery and establish its influence on sagittal correction of scoliosis deformity. STUDY DESIGN: A retrospective analysis of the preoperative and postoperative implant rod geometry and angle of curvature was conducted. PATIENT SAMPLE: Twenty adolescent idiopathic...... scoliosis patients underwent surgery. Average age at the time of operation was 14 years. OUTCOME MEASURES: The preoperative and postoperative implant rod angle of curvature expressed in degrees was obtained for each patient. METHODS: Two implant rods were attached to the concave and convex side...

  14. The Global Coronal Structure Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golub, Leon

    1998-02-01

    During the past year we have completed the changeover from the NIXT program to the new TXI sounding rocket program. The NIXT effort, aimed at evaluating the viability of the remaining portions of the NIXT hardware and design, has been finished and the portions of the NIXT which are viable and flightworthy, such as filters, mirror mounting hardware, electronics and telemetry interface systems, are now part of the new rocket payload. The backup NIXT multilayer-coated x-ray telescope and its mounting hardware have been completely fabricated and are being stored for possible future use in the TXI rocket. The H-alpha camera design is being utilized in the TXI program for real-time pointing verification and control via telemetry. A new H-alpha camera has been built, with a high-resolution RS170 CCD camera output. Two papers, summarizing scientific results from the NIXT rocket program, have been written and published this year: 1. "The Solar X-ray Corona," by L. Golub, Astrophysics and Space Science, 237, 33 (1996). 2. "Difficulties in Observing Coronal Structure," Keynote Paper, Proceedings STEPWG1 Workshop on Measurements and Analyses of the Solar 3D Magnetic Field, Solar Physics, 174, 99 (1997).

  15. OBSERVATIONAL SIGNATURES OF CORONAL LOOP HEATING AND COOLING DRIVEN BY FOOTPOINT SHUFFLING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dahlburg, R. B.; Taylor, B. D. [LCP and FD, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Einaudi, G. [Berkeley Research Associates, Inc., Beltsville, MD 20705 (United States); Ugarte-Urra, I. [College of Science, George Mason University, Fairfax, VA 22030 (United States); Warren, H. P. [Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Rappazzo, A. F. [Advanced Heliophysics, Pasadena, CA 91106 (United States); Velli, M., E-mail: rdahlbur@lcp.nrl.navy.mil [EPSS, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States)

    2016-01-20

    The evolution of a coronal loop is studied by means of numerical simulations of the fully compressible three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic equations using the HYPERION code. The footpoints of the loop magnetic field are advected by random motions. As a consequence, the magnetic field in the loop is energized and develops turbulent nonlinear dynamics characterized by the continuous formation and dissipation of field-aligned current sheets: energy is deposited at small scales where heating occurs. Dissipation is nonuniformly distributed so that only a fraction of the coronal mass and volume gets heated at any time. Temperature and density are highly structured at scales that, in the solar corona, remain observationally unresolved: the plasma of our simulated loop is multithermal, where highly dynamical hotter and cooler plasma strands are scattered throughout the loop at sub-observational scales. Numerical simulations of coronal loops of 50,000 km length and axial magnetic field intensities ranging from 0.01 to 0.04 T are presented. To connect these simulations to observations, we use the computed number densities and temperatures to synthesize the intensities expected in emission lines typically observed with the Extreme Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer on Hinode. These intensities are used to compute differential emission measure distributions using the Monte Carlo Markov Chain code, which are very similar to those derived from observations of solar active regions. We conclude that coronal heating is found to be strongly intermittent in space and time, with only small portions of the coronal loop being heated: in fact, at any given time, most of the corona is cooling down.

  16. Observational Signatures of Coronal Loop Heating and Cooling Driven by Footpoint Shuffling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlburg, R. B.; Einaudi, G.; Taylor, B. D.; Ugarte-Urra, I.; Warren, H. P.; Rappazzo, A. F.; Velli, M.

    2016-01-01

    The evolution of a coronal loop is studied by means of numerical simulations of the fully compressible three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic equations using the HYPERION code. The footpoints of the loop magnetic field are advected by random motions. As a consequence, the magnetic field in the loop is energized and develops turbulent nonlinear dynamics characterized by the continuous formation and dissipation of field-aligned current sheets: energy is deposited at small scales where heating occurs. Dissipation is nonuniformly distributed so that only a fraction of the coronal mass and volume gets heated at any time. Temperature and density are highly structured at scales that, in the solar corona, remain observationally unresolved: the plasma of our simulated loop is multithermal, where highly dynamical hotter and cooler plasma strands are scattered throughout the loop at sub-observational scales. Numerical simulations of coronal loops of 50,000 km length and axial magnetic field intensities ranging from 0.01 to 0.04 T are presented. To connect these simulations to observations, we use the computed number densities and temperatures to synthesize the intensities expected in emission lines typically observed with the Extreme Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer on Hinode. These intensities are used to compute differential emission measure distributions using the Monte Carlo Markov Chain code, which are very similar to those derived from observations of solar active regions. We conclude that coronal heating is found to be strongly intermittent in space and time, with only small portions of the coronal loop being heated: in fact, at any given time, most of the corona is cooling down.

  17. Benefits of sagittal-oblique MRI reconstruction of anterior cruciate ligament of the knee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: MRI examination of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) of the knee gives valuable information for conventional, physiatrist and/or arthroscopic microinvasiv treatment. three planar MRI examination and 3D reconstructions are highly precise in the analysis of the intra and periarticular structures, with exceptions of anterior cruciate ligament. Direct contact with the roof of the intercondilar fossa (in the full extension during the examination) and its specific orientation makes visualization of ACL diagnostically problematic. In a one year period precise protocol for MRI visualization of ACL was tested and applied as “Sagittal Oblique MRI Reconstruction”. In short, it has been Angled biplanar reconstruction in the parasagital and paratransversal planes (patientrelated and arbitrary selected in full extension), on T2, 2mm slice and 0,2 mm gap. 153 MRI examinations of the patients with lesions of the ACL were included in the study in the Clinical Center of Montenegro during 2005 year. Beside standard Knee MRI protocol all patients had the Sagittal Oblique MRI reconstruction of ACL and the Flexion MRI examination, to compare with. The Sagittal Oblique MRI reconstruction of ACL it is adapted to the concrete morphology of the patients ACL and it does not depend of the volume of the examined knee. In comparison with the Standard Knee MRI protocol and with the Flexion MRI examination, the Sagittal Oblique MRI reconstruction of ACL takes less time to perform, and the ligament is shown in fool length at three to five slices, which is more than with the both compared protocols. Sagittal Oblique MRI Reconstruction of ACL is therefore patient dependable, orientated in shape of concrete ligament of the patient’s knee. In combination with age, occupation, physical activity and level of patients while to contribute in healing process, the Sagittal Oblique MRI reconstruction of ACL contribute to scholastic approach, as highest benefit to patients with

  18. Characterization of Multiflux Axial Compressors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the present work the results of analytical models of performance are compared with experimental data acquired in the multi flux axial compressor test facility, built in The Pilcaniyeu Technological Complex for the SIGMA project.We describe the experimental circuit and the data of the dispersion inside the axial compressor obtained using a tracer gas through one of the annular inlets.The attained results can be used to validate the design code for the multi flux axial compressors and SIGMA industrial plant

  19. Study of axial magnetic effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braguta, Victor [IHEP, Protvino, Moscow region, 142284 Russia ITEP, B. Cheremushkinskaya street 25, Moscow, 117218 (Russian Federation); School of Biomedicine, Far Eastern Federal University, Ajax 10 Building 25, Russian island, Vladivostok, 690922 (Russian Federation); Chernodub, M. N. [CNRS, Laboratoire de Mathématiques et Physique Théorique, Université François-Rabelais Tours, Fédération Denis Poisson, Parc de Grandmont, 37200 Tours, France Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Gent, Krijgslaan 281, S9, B-9000 Gent (Belgium); School of Biomedicine, Far Eastern Federal University, Ajax 10 Building 25, Russian island, Vladivostok, 690922 (Russian Federation); Goy, V. A. [School of Natural Sciences, Far Eastern Federal University, Sukhanova street 8, Vladivostok, 690950 (Russian Federation); Landsteiner, K. [Instituto de Física Teórica UAM/CSIC, C/ Nicolás Cabrera 13-15, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Molochkov, A. V. [School of Biomedicine, Far Eastern Federal University, Ajax 10 Building 25, Russian island, Vladivostok, 690922 (Russian Federation); Ulybyshev, M. [ITEP, B. Cheremushkinskaya street 25, Moscow, 117218 Russia Institute for Theoretical Problems of Microphysics, Moscow State University, Moscow, 119899 (Russian Federation)

    2016-01-22

    The Axial Magnetic Effect manifests itself as an equilibrium energy flow of massless fermions induced by the axial (chiral) magnetic field. Here we study the Axial Magnetic Effect in the quenched SU(2) lattice gauge theory with massless overlap fermions at finite temperature. We numerically observe that in the low-temperature hadron phase the effect is absent due to the quark confinement. In the high-temperature deconfinement phase the energy flow is an increasing function of the temperature which reaches the predicted asymptotic T{sup 2} behavior at high temperatures. We find, however, that energy flow is about one order of magnitude lower compared to a theoretical prediction.

  20. Axial gap rotating electrical machine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2016-02-23

    Direct drive rotating electrical machines with axial air gaps are disclosed. In these machines, a rotor ring and stator ring define an axial air gap between them. Sets of gap-maintaining rolling supports bear between the rotor ring and the stator ring at their peripheries to maintain the axial air gap. Also disclosed are wind turbines using these generators, and structures and methods for mounting direct drive rotating electrical generators to the hubs of wind turbines. In particular, the rotor ring of the generator may be carried directly by the hub of a wind turbine to rotate relative to a shaft without being mounted directly to the shaft.

  1. 低场 MR 斜冠状位 GRE T2∗WI 序列对急性前交叉韧带损伤的诊断价值%Diagnostic value of GRE T2 * WI sequences in low field strength MR with oblique coronal plane in acute anterior cruciate ligament injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李杰; 陈京美; 陈钰辉; 王永述

    2015-01-01

    Objective To explore the diagnostic value of GRE T2 ∗ WI sequences in low field strength MR with oblique coronal plane in patients with acute anterior cruciate ligament (ACL)injury.Methods 68 cases of acute traumatic hemarthrosis of the knee joint proved surgically were reviewed.The cases were divided into two groups:conventional MR group (axial image,standard coro-nal image and sagittal oblique image),and conventional with oblique coronal MR group.The diagnostic results with surgical and path-ological results were compared.The diagnostic accuracy of two images were evaluated respectively.Results For conventional MR group and conventional with oblique coronal MR group,the sensitivities in diagnosing ACL were 72.9% and 97.9%,the specificities were 80% and 85%,the positive predictive values were 89.7% and 94%,the negative predictive values were 55.2% and 85%,the accuracies were 52.9% and 82.9%,the misdiagnosis rates were 20% and 1 5%,the missed diagnosis rates were 27.1% and 2.1%, and the coincidence rates was 75% and 94.1%,respectively.The difference in diagnosis rates between two groups were statistically significant(P <0.05).Conclusion GRE T2 ∗ WI sequences with oblique coronal plane can significantly improve the diagnostic rate of anterior cruciate ligament injury.%目的:探讨低场 MR 梯度回波(GRE)T2∗ WI 序列斜冠状位扫描对急性前交叉韧带(ACL)损伤的诊断价值。方法对68例经手术证实的膝关节急性损伤病例进行回顾性分析,将病例分为常规扫描组(轴位、冠状位、斜矢状位)及常规+斜冠状位扫描组,将成像结果与手术结果对比,分别评价常规扫描与常规+斜冠位扫描对 ACL 有无损伤诊断的准确性。结果常规扫描组诊断ACL 损伤的敏感度为72.9%,特异度为80%,阳性预测值为89.7%,阴性预测值为55.2%,正确指数为52.9%,误诊率为20%,漏诊率为27.1%,诊断符合率为75%;常规+斜冠状位扫描组诊断 ACL 损伤的敏感度为97.9%,

  2. Cross-point coronal plasma dynamics in two- and four-wire x-pinches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studies of the late time diode gap formation in two- and four-wire tungsten x-pinches using an 80 kA, 50 ns current pulse are presented. Quantitative measurements of the coronal plasma density are recovered using interferometry simultaneously with laser shadowgraphy. Axial expansion of the gap occurs at ∼106 cm/s for both two- and four-wire systems and is likely to be driven by an axial JxB force resulting from radial current flow in the plasma minidiode ''electrodes.'' Radial density profiles suggest repinching of the low density plasma occurs after the main pinch resulting in secondary x-ray emission peak >10 ns after the first, which is recorded with a pair of pin diodes.

  3. Ectopic folliculosebaceous units at the coronal sulcus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Flores, Angel

    2014-12-01

    Tyson glands were described in the 17th century as modified sebaceous glands of the coronal sulcus of the penis. However, this description and other early texts supporting the existence of Tyson glands were not accompanied by illustrations. The existence of such glands has been passing through the literature without adequate graphical demonstration, which has contributed to controversial debates. Herein we present a case of a partial penectomy performed on a 65-year-old man with a squamous cell carcinoma of the penis. In this case we identified sebaceous glands as well as folliculosebaceous units in the coronal sulcus. We also comparatively examined 12 cases of partial penectomy to search for sebaceous glands or folliculosebaceous units in the coronal sulcus or the preputium. We found neither sebaceous glands nor folliculosebaceous units at the coronal sulcus or the mucosal aspect of the prepuce. We conclude that: (1) folliculosebaceous units are possible in the coronal sulcus, as the current case illustrates for the first time in literature and (2) the current case is an oddity, probably induced by the accompanying squamous cell carcinoma, and therefore it may represent an ectopic folliculosebaceous unit rather than an anatomic variation.

  4. The redshifted footpoints of coronal loops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. E. Dammasch

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available The physics of coronal loops holds the key to understanding coronal heating and the flow of mass and energy in the region. However, the energy source, structure maintenance and mass balance in coronal loops are not yet fully understood. Observations of blue- and redshifted emissions have repeatedly been used in the construction of loop models. But observations and interpretations of line shifts have been widely debated. Here we present detailed SUMER observations, which clearly show a steady downflow in both footpoints of coronal loops observed at transition region (TR and lower corona temperatures. We also show and quantify a correlation existing between this Doppler shift and the spectral radiance. Our results indicate a strong correlation which holds from the chromosphere to the lower corona. We suggest that the downflow in the footpoints may be a common phenomenon on all scales, which could explain, why on a statistical basis bright pixels tend to be more redshifted. We conclude by presenting interpretation of such results and their implications in the light of a viable coronal loop model. The observation of steady downflow in redshifted footpoints seems to be in conflict with impulsive heating.

  5. Estimation and Perturbation of the Mid-Sagittal Plane and its Effects on Corpus Callosum Morphometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skoglund, Karl; Stegmann, Mikkel Bille; Ryberg, Charlotte;

    2005-01-01

    callosum (CC), the white-matter nervous tissue bridging the left and right cerebral hemisphere. A multitude of papers (e.g. [2]) report on measurements performed on the two-dimensional cross-section of the CC defined by the mid-sagittal plane (MSP) which separates the left hemisphere from the right...

  6. Long term stability of mandibular advancement procedures : bilateral sagittal split osteotomy versus distraction osteogenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baas, E. M.; Pijpe, J.; de Lange, J.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the postoperative stability of the mandible after a bilateral lengthening procedure, either by bilateral sagittal split osteotomy (BSSO) or distraction osteogenesis (DO). All patients who underwent mandibular advancement surgery between March 2001 and June 2004 w

  7. Stability of mandibular advancement procedures : Bilateral sagittal split osteotomy versus distraction osteogenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, M. D.; Baas, E. M.; de lange, J.; Bierenbroodspot, F.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the postoperative stability of the mandible after a bilateral lengthening procedure, either by bilateral sagittal split osteotomy (BSSO) or distraction osteogenesis (DOG). All patients who underwent mandibular advancement surgery between March 2001 and June 2004

  8. Association of lip pasture and the dimensions of the tonsils and sagittal airway with facial morphology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trotman, CA; McNamara, JA; Dibbets, JMH; van der Weele, LT

    1997-01-01

    The specific contribution of enlarged tonsils or adenoids to craniofacial growth remains unknown, and there is no agreement in the literature as to the significance of lip posture. This study assessed the separate associations of lip posture, sagittal airway size, and tonsil size with selected cepha

  9. Anterior sagittal anorectoplasty: An alternative to posterior approach in management of congenital vestibular fistula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Man Mohan Harjai

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Better exposure, possibility of extension if needed and precise placement of the anal canal within the external sphincter complex have made the posterior and anterior sagittal approaches more popular and established for the correction of anovestibular fistula. The mini posterior sagittal anorectoplasty (PSARP was the procedure of choice for female ARM at our center till date. As an alternative surgical option, we performed anterior sagittal anorectoplasty (ASARP in 15 cases of anovestibular fistula and compared them with 12 cases of vestibular fistula operated by PSARP technique. Patients and Methods: Fifteen female infants with vestibular fistula who had anterior sagittal anorectoplasty (ASARP procedure were reviewed. The procedure and its outcome were evaluated. Results : The manoeuvering during anesthesia and operative access were quite easier in ASARP compared to PSARP. Delineation of plane in ASARP between rectum and vagina was easier and clearer in comparison to PSARP. Rent occurred in the posterior vaginal wall in three cases of ASARP and two cases of PSARP. There were two cases of wound infection in each group. Three cases of PSARP group developed anal stenosis and constipation while one in the ASARP group developed constipation. Conclusion : Anesthesia and access in ASARP makes it an easier alternative option to PSARP in the management of anovestibular fistula in girls.

  10. Pneumatized articular eminence in a cohort of orthodontic patients with different sagittal skeletal anomalies. A retrospective cone beam computed tomography study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence and characteristics of pneumatized articular eminence (PAE) in dental patients using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) with respect to age, sex, and type of skeletal anomaly. The results were then compared to prevalence studies regarding PAE in the literature. A retrospective study of 603 orthodontic patients aged between 6 and 24 years was performed using sagittal and coronal CBCT images at the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology (Erzurum, Turkey). The age, gender, skeletal anomaly, and lateral were recorded for all patients, and the types were noted for cases of PAE. The chi-squared test was used for statistical analyses. Sixty-four PAEs were found in 39 orthodontic patients, representing a prevalence of 6.47%. No significant differences in sex (p=0.153), age (before and after puberty, p=0.389), and type of skeletal anomaly were observed (p=0.271). A higher frequency of PAE was detected among dental patients aged 6-24 years when compared to previous studies, most likely because of the use of CBCT images. No significant relation was observed between PAE and the type of skeletal anomalies. One, however, must be aware of these structures to avoid complications in cases for which surgical treatment is planned due to the occlusion and recognize its role in the onset or perpetuation of temporomandibular joint dysfunction. (author)

  11. DIRECT OBSERVATION OF SOLAR CORONAL MAGNETIC FIELDS BY VECTOR TOMOGRAPHY OF THE CORONAL EMISSION LINE POLARIZATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kramar, M. [Physics Department, The Catholic University of America, 620 Michigan Avenue NE, Washington, DC 20064 (United States); Lin, H. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii at Manoa, 34 Ohia Ku Street, Pukalani, Maui, HI 96768 (United States); Tomczyk, S., E-mail: kramar@cua.edu, E-mail: lin@ifa.hawaii.edu, E-mail: tomczyk@ucar.edu [High Altitude Observatory, 3080 Center Green Drive, Boulder, CO 80301 (United States)

    2016-03-10

    We present the first direct “observation” of the global-scale, 3D coronal magnetic fields of Carrington Rotation (CR) Cycle 2112 using vector tomographic inversion techniques. The vector tomographic inversion uses measurements of the Fe xiii 10747 Å Hanle effect polarization signals by the Coronal Multichannel Polarimeter (CoMP) and 3D coronal density and temperature derived from scalar tomographic inversion of Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO)/Extreme Ultraviolet Imager (EUVI) coronal emission lines (CELs) intensity images as inputs to derive a coronal magnetic field model that best reproduces the observed polarization signals. While independent verifications of the vector tomography results cannot be performed, we compared the tomography inverted coronal magnetic fields with those constructed by magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations based on observed photospheric magnetic fields of CR 2112 and 2113. We found that the MHD model for CR 2112 is qualitatively consistent with the tomography inverted result for most of the reconstruction domain except for several regions. Particularly, for one of the most noticeable regions, we found that the MHD simulation for CR 2113 predicted a model that more closely resembles the vector tomography inverted magnetic fields. In another case, our tomographic reconstruction predicted an open magnetic field at a region where a coronal hole can be seen directly from a STEREO-B/EUVI image. We discuss the utilities and limitations of the tomographic inversion technique, and present ideas for future developments.

  12. Sunquake Generation by Coronal Magnetic Restructuring

    CERN Document Server

    Russell, Alexander J B; Leake, James E; Hudson, Hugh S

    2016-01-01

    Sunquakes are the surface signatures of acoustic waves in the Sun's interior that are produced by some but not all flares and coronal mass ejections (CMEs). This letter explores a mechanism for sunquake generation by the magnetic field changes that occur during flares and CMEs, using MHD simulations with a semiempirical FAL-C atmosphere to demonstrate the generation of acoustic waves in the interior in response to changing magnetic tilt in the corona. We find that Alfv\\'en-sound resonance combined with the ponderomotive force produces acoustic waves in the interior with sufficient energy to match sunquake observations when the magnetic field angle changes by the order of 10 degrees in a region where the coronal field strength is a few hundred gauss or more. The most energetic sunquakes are produced when the coronal field is strong, while the variation of magnetic field strength with height and the timescale of the tilt change are of secondary importance.

  13. SUMER Observations of Coronal-Hole Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilhelm, Klaus

    2012-11-01

    Observations of emission lines in the vacuum-ultraviolet spectral range with calibrated instrumentation provide crucial information on the prevailing plasma temperatures in the solar atmosphere. Coronal-hole temperatures measured by the SUMER spectrometer on SOHO will be presented in this contribution. Electron temperatures can be estimated from the formation temperatures of the observed emission lines. Line-ratio and emission-measure analyses, however, offer higher accuracies. Typical electron temperatures at altitudes of H<200 Mm in coronal holes are below 1 MK in bright structures—the coronal plumes—with higher values in darker areas—the inter-plume regions. Line-width measurements yield effective ion temperatures, which are much higher than the electron temperatures. Observations of line profiles emitted from species with different masses allow a separation of the effective temperatures into ion temperatures and unresolved non-thermal motions along the line of sight.

  14. Free Magnetic Energy and Coronal Heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winebarger, Amy; Moore, Ron; Falconer, David

    2012-01-01

    Previous work has shown that the coronal X-ray luminosity of an active region increases roughly in direct proportion to the total photospheric flux of the active region's magnetic field (Fisher et al. 1998). It is also observed, however, that the coronal luminosity of active regions of nearly the same flux content can differ by an order of magnitude. In this presentation, we analyze 10 active regions with roughly the same total magnetic flux. We first determine several coronal properties, such as X-ray luminosity (calculated using Hinode XRT), peak temperature (calculated using Hinode EIS), and total Fe XVIII emission (calculated using SDO AIA). We present the dependence of these properties on a proxy of the free magnetic energy of the active region

  15. The Fundamental Structure of Coronal Loops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winebarger, Amy; Warren, Harry; Cirtain, Jonathan; Kobayashi, Ken; Korreck, Kelly; Golub, Leon; Kuzin, Sergey; Walsh, Robert; DePontieu, Bart; Title, Alan; Weber, Mark

    2012-01-01

    During the past ten years, solar physicists have attempted to infer the coronal heating mechanism by comparing observations of coronal loops with hydrodynamic model predictions. These comparisons often used the addition of sub ]resolution strands to explain the observed loop properties. On July 11, 2012, the High Resolution Coronal Imager (Hi ]C) was launched on a sounding rocket. This instrument obtained images of the solar corona was 0.2 ]0.3'' resolution in a narrowband EUV filter centered around 193 Angstroms. In this talk, we will compare these high resolution images to simultaneous density measurements obtained with the Extreme Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (EIS) on Hinode to determine whether the structures observed with Hi ]C are resolved.

  16. Comparison of accuracy of uncorrected and corrected sagittal tomography in detection of mandibular condyle erosions: An exvivo study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asieh Zamani Naser

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Radiographic examination of TMJ is indicated when there are clinical signs of pathological conditions, mainly bone changes that may influence the diagnosis and treatment planning. The purpose of this study was to evaluate and to compare the validity and diagnostic accuracy of uncorrected and corrected sagittal tomographic images in the detection of simulated mandibular condyle erosions. Methods : Simulated lesions were created in 10 dry mandibles using a dental round bur. Using uncorrected and corrected sagittal tomography techniques, mandibular condyles were imaged by a Cranex Tome X-ray unit before and after creating the lesions. The uncorrected and corrected tomography images were examined by two independent observers for absence or presence of a lesion. The accuracy for detecting mandibular condyle lesions was expressed as sensitivity, specificity, and validity values. Differences between the two radiographic modalities were tested by Wilcoxon for paired data tests. Inter-observer agreement was determined by Cohen′s Kappa. Results: The sensitivity, specificity and validity were 45%, 85% and 30% in uncorrected sagittal tomographic images, respectively, and 70%, 92.5% and 60% in corrected sagittal tomographic images, respectively. There was a significant statistical difference between the accuracy of uncorrected and corrected sagittal tomography in detection of mandibular condyle erosions (P = 0.016. The inter-observer agreement was slight for uncorrected sagittal tomography and moderate for corrected sagittal tomography. Conclusion: The accuracy of corrected sagittal tomography is significantly higher than that of uncorrected sagittal tomography. Therefore, corrected sagittal tomography seems to be a better modality in detection of mandibular condyle erosions.

  17. Sagittal synostosis in X-linked hypophosphatemic rickets and related diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Currarino, Guido [Texas Scottish Rite Hospital, Department of Radiology, Dallas, TX (United States)

    2007-08-15

    The recent observations of two new cases of X-linked hypophosphatemic rickets associated with premature closure of the sagittal suture prompted a review of similar cases seen in this institution. To review the clinical records and skull radiographs of 28 children with hypophosphatemic rickets in order to investigate the frequency and type of craniosynostosis and other cranial vault changes seen in these conditions and to review the literature for relevant findings. Clinical and imaging records were reviewed on 28 patients with hypophosphatemic rickets, all younger than 18 years. Most patients had X-linked hypophosphatemic rickets and a few had autosomal-dominant hypophosphatemic rickets or were non-familial cases. Of the 28 patients, 13 had sagittal synostosis. Dolichocephaly was present in ten patients. The configuration of the cranial vault in some of these ten patients with dolichocephaly varied somewhat from that seen in nonsyndromic sagittal synostosis. In one patient, a Chiari I malformation was demonstrated by MRI. In another patient with increased intracranial pressure the sagittal suture closure was associated with lambdoidal synostosis. Dolichocephaly was not present in three patients, suggesting that the synostosis started later than in the other patients, probably in the second year of life, a period of slower brain growth than in the first year. The two patients in this group of three showed thickening and sclerosis of the cranial vault of uncertain etiology. There is an increased risk of sagittal synostosis in hypophosphatemic rickets and related diseases in children. The appearance of the cranial vault in this type of synostosis can vary from that seen in nonsyndromic synostosis. In this setting, careful clinical and imaging follow-up is warranted. (orig.)

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging of vascular compression in trigeminal neuralgia and hemifacial spasms; The efficacy of oblique sagittal view

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagaseki, Yoshishige; Horikoshi, Tohru; Omata, Tomohiro; Sugita, Masao; Nukui, Hideaki; Sakamoto, Hajime; Kumagai, Hiroshi (Yamanashi Medical College, Tamaho (Japan)); Sasaki, Hideo; Tsuji, Reizou

    1991-06-01

    We show how neurosurgical planning can benefit from the better visualization of the precise vascular compression of the nerve provided by the oblique-sagittal and gradient-echo method (OS-GR image) using magnetic resonance images (MRI). The scans of 3 patients with trigeminal neuralgia (TN) and of 15 with hemifacial spasm (HFS) were analyzed for the presence and appearance of the vascular compression of the nerves. Imaging sequences consisted of an OS-GR image (TR/TE: 200/20, 3-mm-thick slice) cut along each nerve shown by the axial view, which was scanned at the angle of 105 degrees taken between the dorsal line of the brain stem and the line corresponding to the pontomedullary junction. In the OS-GR images of the TN's, the vascular compressions of the root entry zone (REZ) of the trigeminal nerve were well visualized as high-intensity lines in the 2 cases whose vessels were confirmed intraoperatively. In the other case, with atypical facial pain, vascular compression was confirmed at the rostral distal site on the fifth nerve, apart from the REZ. In the 15 cases of HFS, twelve OS-GR images (80%) demonstrated vascular compressions at the REZ of the facial nerves from the direction of the caudoventral side. During the surgery for these 12 cases, in 11 cases (excepting the 1 case whose facial nerve was not compressed by any vessels), vascular compressions were confirmed corresponding to the findings of the OS-GR images. Among the 10 OS-GR images on the non-affected side, two false-positive findings were visualized. It is concluded that OS-GR images obtained by means of MRI may serve as a useful planning aid prior to microvascular decompression for cases of TN and HFS. (author).

  19. Coronal Fractures of the Scaphoid: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slutsky, David J; Herzberg, Guillaume; Shin, Alexander Y; Buijze, Geert A; Ring, David C; Mudgal, Chaitanya S; Leung, Yuen-Fai; Dumontier, Christian

    2016-08-01

    Coronal (or frontal plane) fractures of the scaphoid are distinctly uncommon. There are few published reports of coronal fractures of the scaphoid. This fracture is often missed on the initial X-ray films. A high index of suspicion should exist when there is a double contour of the proximal scaphoid pole on the anteroposterior X-ray view. A computed tomography scan is integral in making the diagnosis. Early recognition is key in salvaging the scaphoid fracture and in preventing articular damage. Level of Evidence IV. Retrospective case series. PMID:27574573

  20. Magnetohydrodynamic Simulation of a Streamer Beside a Realistic Coronal Hole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suess, S. T.; Wu, S. T.; Wang, A. H.; Poletto, G.

    1994-01-01

    Existing models of coronal streamers establish their credibility and act as the initial state for transients. The models have produced satisfactory streamer simulations, but unsatisfactory coronal hole simulations. This is a consequence of the character of the models and the boundary conditions. The models all have higher densities in the magnetically open regions than occur in coronal holes (Noci, et al., 1993).

  1. MR imaging of anteromedial and posterolateral bundles of anterior cruciate ligament of knee joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To improve the visualization of anteromedial and posterolateral bundles of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) and investigate the optimal MRI plane for the bundles at a 3.0 T MR scanner. Methods: MR images of 149 knee joints were reviewed retrospectively. Display rates of AMB, PLB and their different parts (the top portion,the middle portion and the low portion) on MR different planes including axial, sagittal and coronal planes were analyzed and their differences were compared with the χ2 section method. Results: There was no statistical difference in the display rates of two bundles of ACL between axial plane (115/149, 77.2%) and coronal plane (103/149, 69.1%) (χ2=2.4606, P>0.0125). Statistical differences were found between axial and sagittal plane, coronal plane and sagittal plane (21/149, 14.1%) (χ2=119.5138, 92.8695 respectively, P<0.0125). There was a statistical difference for the top portion of ACL between axial plane (104/149, 69.8%) and coronal plane, sagittal (0/149,0) and coronal planes (7/149, 4.7%) (χ2=135.081, 159.7526 respectively, P<0.0125), between sagittal and coronal planes (χ2=7.1684, P<0.0125). For the middle portion of ACL, there was no statistical difference between axial plane (108/149, 72.5%) and coronal plane (94/149, 63.1%) (χ2=3.0120, P>0.0125), while statistical differences were found between axial and sagittal plane,coronal planes and sagittal plane (10/149, 6.7%) (χ2=134.7454, 104.2173 respectively, P<0.0125). For the low portion of ACL, there was no statistical difference between axial plane (103/149, 69.1%) and coronal plane (101/149, 73.8%) (χ2=0.8065, P>0.0125), while statistical differences were detected between axial and sagittal plane,coronal planes and sagittal plane (18/149, 12.1%) (χ2=100.5300, 115.9132, P<0.0125). The different parts of ACL displayed low intensity on different MR planes and normal morphology. Conclusions: ACL can be displayed on conventional MR planes at a 3.0 T MR scanner to some extent

  2. Simulation of an Axial Vircator

    CERN Document Server

    Tikhomirov, V V

    2013-01-01

    An algorithm of particle-in-cell simulations is described and tested to aid further the actual design of simple vircators working on axially symmetric modes. The methods of correction of the numerical solution, have been chosen and jointly tested, allow the stable simulation of the fast nonlinear multiflow dynamics of virtual cathode formation and evolution, as well as the fields generated by the virtual cathode. The selected combination of the correction methods can be straightforwardly generalized to the case of axially nonsymmetric modes, while the parameters of these correction methods can be widely used to improve an agreement between the simulation predictions and the experimental data.

  3. Coronal bright points associated with minifilament eruptions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Junchao; Jiang, Yunchun; Yang, Jiayan; Bi, Yi; Li, Haidong [Yunnan Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming 650011 (China); Yang, Bo; Yang, Dan, E-mail: hjcsolar@ynao.ac.cn [Also at Graduate School of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China. (China)

    2014-12-01

    Coronal bright points (CBPs) are small-scale, long-lived coronal brightenings that always correspond to photospheric network magnetic features of opposite polarity. In this paper, we subjectively adopt 30 CBPs in a coronal hole to study their eruptive behavior using data from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) and the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory. About one-quarter to one-third of the CBPs in the coronal hole go through one or more minifilament eruption(s) (MFE(s)) throughout their lifetimes. The MFEs occur in temporal association with the brightness maxima of CBPs and possibly result from the convergence and cancellation of underlying magnetic dipoles. Two examples of CBPs with MFEs are analyzed in detail, where minifilaments appear as dark features of a cool channel that divide the CBPs along the neutral lines of the dipoles beneath. The MFEs show the typical rising movements of filaments and mass ejections with brightenings at CBPs, similar to large-scale filament eruptions. Via differential emission measure analysis, it is found that CBPs are heated dramatically by their MFEs and the ejected plasmas in the MFEs have average temperatures close to the pre-eruption BP plasmas and electron densities typically near 10{sup 9} cm{sup –3}. These new observational results indicate that CBPs are more complex in dynamical evolution and magnetic structure than previously thought.

  4. Observing coronal nanoflares in active region moss

    CERN Document Server

    Testa, Paola; Martinez-Sykora, Juan; DeLuca, Ed; Hansteen, Viggo; Cirtain, Jonathan; Winebarger, Amy; Golub, Leon; Kobayashi, Ken; Korreck, Kelly; Kuzin, Sergey; Walsh, Robert; DeForest, Craig; Title, Alan; Weber, Mark

    2013-01-01

    The High-resolution Coronal Imager (Hi-C) has provided Fe XII 193A images of the upper transition region moss at an unprecedented spatial (~0.3-0.4 arcsec) and temporal (5.5s) resolution. The Hi-C observations show in some moss regions variability on timescales down to ~15s, significantly shorter than the minute scale variability typically found in previous observations of moss, therefore challenging the conclusion of moss being heated in a mostly steady manner. These rapid variability moss regions are located at the footpoints of bright hot coronal loops observed by SDO/AIA in the 94A channel, and by Hinode/XRT. The configuration of these loops is highly dynamic, and suggestive of slipping reconnection. We interpret these events as signatures of heating events associated with reconnection occurring in the overlying hot coronal loops, i.e., coronal nanoflares. We estimate the order of magnitude of the energy in these events to be of at least a few $10^{23}rg, also supporting the nanoflare scenario. These Hi-C...

  5. Coronal Behavior Before the Large Flare Onset

    CERN Document Server

    Imada, Shinsuke; Kusano, Kanya

    2014-01-01

    Flares are a major explosive event in our solar system. They are often followed by coronal mass ejection that has a potential to trigger the geomagnetic storms. There are various studies aiming to predict when and where the flares are likely to occur. Most of these studies mainly discuss the photospheric and chromospheric activity before the flare onset. In this paper we study the coronal features before the famous large flare occurrence on December 13th, 2006. Using the data from Hinode/EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS), X-Ray Telescope (XRT), and Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) /Extreme ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (EIT), we discuss the coronal features in the large scale (~ a few 100 arcsec) before the flare onset. Our findings are as follows: 1) The upflows in and around active region start growing from ~10 to 30 km /s a day before the flare. 2) The expanding coronal loops are clearly observed a few hours before the flare. 3) Soft X-ray and EUV intensity are gradually reduced. 4) The upflows are f...

  6. Magnetic Topology of Coronal Hole Linkages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titov, V. S.; Mikic, Z.; Linker, J. A.; Lionello, R.; Antiochos, S. K.

    2010-01-01

    In recent work, Antiochos and coworkers argued that the boundary between the open and closed field regions on the Sun can be extremely complex with narrow corridors of open ux connecting seemingly disconnected coronal holes from the main polar holes, and that these corridors may be the sources of the slow solar wind. We examine, in detail, the topology of such magnetic configurations using an analytical source surface model that allows for analysis of the eld with arbitrary resolution. Our analysis reveals three important new results: First, a coronal hole boundary can join stably to the separatrix boundary of a parasitic polarity region. Second, a single parasitic polarity region can produce multiple null points in the corona and, more important, separator lines connecting these points. Such topologies are extremely favorable for magnetic reconnection, because it can now occur over the entire length of the separators rather than being con ned to a small region around the nulls. Finally, the coronal holes are not connected by an open- eld corridor of finite width, but instead are linked by a singular line that coincides with the separatrix footprint of the parasitic polarity. We investigate how the topological features described above evolve in response to motion of the parasitic polarity region. The implications of our results for the sources of the slow solar wind and for coronal and heliospheric observations are discussed.

  7. Coronal bright points associated with minifilament eruptions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coronal bright points (CBPs) are small-scale, long-lived coronal brightenings that always correspond to photospheric network magnetic features of opposite polarity. In this paper, we subjectively adopt 30 CBPs in a coronal hole to study their eruptive behavior using data from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) and the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory. About one-quarter to one-third of the CBPs in the coronal hole go through one or more minifilament eruption(s) (MFE(s)) throughout their lifetimes. The MFEs occur in temporal association with the brightness maxima of CBPs and possibly result from the convergence and cancellation of underlying magnetic dipoles. Two examples of CBPs with MFEs are analyzed in detail, where minifilaments appear as dark features of a cool channel that divide the CBPs along the neutral lines of the dipoles beneath. The MFEs show the typical rising movements of filaments and mass ejections with brightenings at CBPs, similar to large-scale filament eruptions. Via differential emission measure analysis, it is found that CBPs are heated dramatically by their MFEs and the ejected plasmas in the MFEs have average temperatures close to the pre-eruption BP plasmas and electron densities typically near 109 cm–3. These new observational results indicate that CBPs are more complex in dynamical evolution and magnetic structure than previously thought.

  8. Role of Magnetic Carpet in Coronal Heating

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S. R. Verma; Diksha Chaudhary

    2008-03-01

    One of the fundamental questions in solar physics is how the solar corona maintains its high temperature of several million Kelvin above photosphere with a temperature of 6000 K. Observations show that solar coronal heating problem is highly complex with many different facts. It is likely that different heating mechanisms are at work in the solar corona. The separate kinds of coronal loops may also be heated by different mechanisms. Using data from instruments onboard the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) and from the more recent Transition Region and Coronal Explorer (TRACE) scientists have identified small regions of mixed polarity, termed magnetic carpet contributing to solar activity on a short time scale. Magnetic loops of all sizes rise into the solar corona, arising from regions of opposite magnetic polarity in the photosphere. Energy released when oppositely directed magnetic fields meet in the corona is one likely cause for coronal heating. There is enough energy coming up from the loops of the “magnetic carpet” to heat the corona to its known temperature.

  9. Using coronal seismology to estimate the magnetic field strength in a realistic coronal model

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Feng

    2015-01-01

    Coronal seismology is extensively used to estimate properties of the corona, e.g. the coronal magnetic field strength are derived from oscillations observed in coronal loops. We present a three-dimensional coronal simulation including a realistic energy balance in which we observe oscillations of a loop in synthesised coronal emission. We use these results to test the inversions based on coronal seismology. From the simulation of the corona above an active region we synthesise extreme ultraviolet (EUV) emission from the model corona. From this we derive maps of line intensity and Doppler shift providing synthetic data in the same format as obtained from observations. We fit the (Doppler) oscillation of the loop in the same fashion as done for observations to derive the oscillation period and damping time. The loop oscillation seen in our model is similar to imaging and spectroscopic observations of the Sun. The velocity disturbance of the kink oscillation shows an oscillation period of 52.5s and a damping tim...

  10. Standing sausage modes in curved coronal slabs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascoe, D. J.; Nakariakov, V. M.

    2016-09-01

    Context. Magnetohydrodynamic waveguides such as dense coronal loops can support standing modes. The ratios of the periods of oscillations for different longitudinal harmonics depend on the dispersive nature of the waveguide and so may be used as a seismological tool to determine coronal parameters. Aims: We extend models of standing sausage modes in low β coronal loops to include the effects of loop curvature. The behaviour of standing sausage modes in this geometry is used to explain the properties of observed oscillations that cannot be accounted for using straight loop models. Methods: We perform 2D numerical simulations of an oscillating coronal loop, modelled as a dense slab embedded in a potential magnetic field. The loop is field-aligned and so experiences expansion with height in addition to being curved. Standing sausage modes are excited by compressive perturbations of the loop and their properties are studied. Results: The spatial profiles of standing sausage modes are found to be modified by the expanding loop geometry typical for flaring loops and modelled by a potential magnetic field in our simulations. Longitudinal harmonics of order n > 1 have anti-nodes that are shifted towards the loop apex and the amplitude of anti-nodes near the loop apex is smaller than those near the loop footpoints. Conclusions: We find that the observation of standing sausage modes by the Nobeyama Radioheliograph in a flaring coronal loop on 12 January 2000 is consistent with interpretation in terms of the global mode (n = 1) and third harmonic (n = 3). This interpretation accounts for the period ratio and spatial structure of the observed oscillations.

  11. Sagittal plane compensations for artificially induced limitation of the first metatarsophalangeal joint: a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Christine; Nester, Christopher J

    2004-01-01

    This study was undertaken to establish whether reduced dorsiflexion at the first metatarsophalangeal joint affects sagittal plane kinematics at the ankle, knee, and hip. Twenty individuals with symptom-free metatarsophalangeal joints were studied as they walked with and without an insole designed to restrict first metatarsophalangeal joint dorsiflexion. Sagittal plane kinematics at the ankle, knee, and hip were compared in the two conditions. When walking with the insole, the ankle was more dorsiflexed during late midstance and less plantarflexed during propulsion, the knee was more flexed during midstance, and the hip was less extended during late midstance. This evidence of a link between the first metatarsophalangeal joint and the kinematics of the proximal joints demonstrates the potential for the clinical entities of hallux rigidus and hallux limitus to influence gait and justifies more detailed study of this relationship. PMID:15153589

  12. The Specific Sagittal Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Intradural Extra-Arachnoid Lumbar Disc Herniation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatsuro Sasaji

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Intradural extra-arachnoid lumbar disc herniation is a rare disease. Few MRI findings have been reported. We experienced an intradural extra-arachnoid lumbar disc herniation. We reviewed the preoperative MRI findings. Lumbar spine T2-weighted sagittal MRI showed that one line of the ventral dura was divided into two by a disc herniation. We speculated that the two lines comprised the dura and arachnoid and that a disc herniation existed between them. We believe that division of the ventral dural line on T2-weighted sagittal images is a characteristic finding of intradural extra-arachnoid lumbar disc herniation. The division of ventral dural line seemed to be a “Y,” and, thus, we called it the “Y sign.” The “Y sign” may be useful for diagnosing intradural extra-arachnoid lumbar disc herniation.

  13. Scanogram for sagittal imbalance of the spine: low dose alternative for a safer diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisz, George M; Albury, W R; Houang, M D; Matucci-Cerinic, Marco

    2014-01-01

    The diagnosis of Fixed Sagittal Imbalance (FSI), previously known as Flat Back Syndrome, requires the measurement of spinal curvatures on a lateral radiograph in the standing position (C7-S1). It can be difficult to position a spastic patient, sometimes repeated exposure are required, at separate thoracic and lumbar levels, increasing the radiation dosage. CT Scanography is suggested as an alternative radiological diagnostic method since it is rapid to perform. The patient is comfortably positioned (horizontal) and it combines both prone and supine positions, therefore acting as a functional examination. This test was performed on 34 consecutive patients with fractured vertebrae (lumbar, dorsal) and with back pain persisting beyond the bone healing period. The functional scanogram was found to be accurate in diagnosing sagittal imbalances, but more importantly it offered reduction in radiation: in Entrance dose; in Effective dose and Absorption dose. Scanogram is therefore proposed as an alternative method for the diagnosis of FSI.

  14. Maxillomandibular Advancement in Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome Patients: a Restrospective Study on the Sagittal Cephalometric Variables

    OpenAIRE

    Paolo Ronchi; Valentina Cinquini; Alessandro Ambrosoli; Alberto Caprioglio

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives The present retrospective study analyzes sagittal cephalometric changes in patients affected by obstructive sleep apnea syndrome submitted to maxillomandubular advancement. Material and Methods 15 adult sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) patients diagnosed by polysomnography (PSG) and treated with maxillomandubular advancement (MMA) were included in this study. Pre- (T1) and postsurgical (T2) PSG studies assessing the apnea/hypopnea index (AHI) and the lowest oxygen saturation (L...

  15. Electromyography-Based Quantitative Representation Method for Upper-Limb Elbow Joint Angle in Sagittal Plane

    OpenAIRE

    Pang, Muye; Guo, Shuxiang; Huang, Qiang; Ishihara, Hidenori; Hirata, Hideyuki

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a quantitative representation method for the upper-limb elbow joint angle using only electromyography (EMG) signals for continuous elbow joint voluntary flexion and extension in the sagittal plane. The dynamics relation between the musculotendon force exerted by the biceps brachii muscle and the elbow joint angle is developed for a modified musculoskeletal model. Based on the dynamics model, a quadratic-like quantitative relationship between EMG signals and the elbow joint...

  16. The Specific Sagittal Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Intradural Extra-Arachnoid Lumbar Disc Herniation

    OpenAIRE

    Tatsuro Sasaji; Kiyoshi Horaguchi; Noboru Yamada; Kazuo Iwai

    2012-01-01

    Intradural extra-arachnoid lumbar disc herniation is a rare disease. Few MRI findings have been reported. We experienced an intradural extra-arachnoid lumbar disc herniation. We reviewed the preoperative MRI findings. Lumbar spine T2-weighted sagittal MRI showed that one line of the ventral dura was divided into two by a disc herniation. We speculated that the two lines comprised the dura and arachnoid and that a disc herniation existed between them. We believe that division of the ventral du...

  17. Correlation between sagittal plane changes and adjacent segment degeneration following lumbar spine fusion

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar, Malhar; Baklanov, Andrei; Chopin, Daniel

    2001-01-01

    Adjacent segment degeneration following lumbar spine fusion remains a widely acknowledged problem, but there is insufficient knowledge regarding the factors that contribute to its occurrence. The aim of this study is to analyse the relationship between abnormal sagittal plane configuration of the lumbar spine and the development of adjacent segment degeneration. Eighty-three consecutive patients who underwent lumbar fusion for degenerative disc disease were reviewed retrospectively. Patients ...

  18. Cheiloscopy: A new role as a marker of sagittal jaw relation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narayan Kulkarni

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: It has been proved that lip prints are analogous to thumb prints. A correlation between thumb prints and sagittal dental malocclusion has already been established. Soft tissue is gaining more importance in judgement of deformity or identity of a patient. Aim: To find a correlation between sagittal skeletal jaw relation and lip prints. Settings and Design: Descriptive, cross-sectional, comparative, single-blind, hospital-based study. Materials and Methods: A total of 90 patients were categorized into skeletal class I, class II, and class III, comprising 30 patients in each group with equal gender distribution. Dolphin imaging (10.5 software was used for analyzing sagittal jaw relation. Lip prints obtained from these 90 patients were analyzed. Statistical Analyses Used: Karl Pearson′s correlation coefficient, Chi-square test, t-test, Spearman′s co-efficient, analysis of variance (ANOVA. Results: It was observed that angle ANB (Angle formed between points nasion[N] to Subnasal[A] and nasion[N] to supramental [B] and beta angle were statistically significant, revealing a strong negative correlation (-0.9060 with different classes of jaw relation. Significant difference was observed between genders in all the three classes. Significant difference was observed in relation to lip print and the quadrants of upper and lower lips. A statistical significance was noted on the right side of both upper and lower arches. Conclusion: This study shows that lip prints can be employed for sagittal jaw relation recognition. A further study on various ethnic backgrounds with a larger sample size in individual group is necessary for comparing lip prints and malocclusion.

  19. Non-thrombotic superior sagittal sinus occlusion with intracranial hypertension following metastatic Burkitt′s lymphoma

    OpenAIRE

    Ankur Wadhera; Prasant Peter; M Joseph John; Rajesh Chakravarti

    2013-01-01

    Intracranial metastasis is a known complication of Burkitt′s lymphoma, however, superior sagittal sinus invasion by dural metastasis from Burkitt′s lymphoma is rare. We report a young adult, known case of Burkitt′s lymphoma, who presented with features of raised intracranial pressure secondary to dural sinus invasion from metastasis. Prompt radiotherapy to these lesions can bring about recanalization of the sinus with elevation of symptoms.

  20. Influence of neck pain on cervical movement in the sagittal plane during smartphone use

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Man-Sig

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] Smartphone use reportedly changes posture. However, how neck posture is altered in smartphone users with neck pain is unknown. This study examined changes in the posture of young adults with and without mild neck pain (MNP) when using a smartphone. [Subjects] Thirteen control subjects and 14 subjects with MNP who used smartphones were recruited. [Methods] The upper cervical (UC) and lower cervical (LC) angles in the sagittal plane were measured using an ultrasound-based motion analy...

  1. Differences of Sagittal Lumbosacral Parameters between Patients with Lumbar Spondylolysis and Normal Adults

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jin Yin; Bao-Gan Peng; Yong-Chao Li; Nai-Yang Zhang; Liang Yang; Duan-Ming Li

    2016-01-01

    Background:Recent studies have suggested an association between elevated pelvic incidence (PI) and the development of lumbar spondylolysis.However,there is still lack of investigation for Han Chinese people conceming the normal range of spinopelvic parameters and relationship between abnormal sagittal parameters and lumbar diseases.The objective of the study was to investigate sagittal lumbosacral parameters of adult lumbar spondylolysis patients in Han Chinese population.Methods:A total of 52 adult patients with symptomatic lumbar spondylolysis treated in the General Hospital of Armed Police Force (Beijing,China) were identified as the spondylolysis group.All the 52 patients were divided into two subgroups,Subgroup A:36 patients with simple lumbar spondylolysis,and Subgroup B:16 patients with lumbar spondylolysis accompanying with mild lumbar spondylolisthesis (slip percentage <30%).Altogether 207 healthy adults were chosen as the control group.All patients and the control group took lumbosacral lateral radiographs.Seven sagittal lumbosacral parameters,including PI,pelvic tilt (PT),sacral slope (SS),lumbar lordosis (LL),L5 incidence,L5 slope,and sacral table angle (STA),were measured in the lateral radiographs.All the parameters aforementioned were compared between the two subgroups and between the spondylolysis group and the control group with independent-sample t-test.Results:There were no statistically significant differences of all seven sagittal lumbosacral parameters between Subgroup A and Subgroup B.PI,PT,SS,and LL were higher (P < 0.05) in the spondylolysis group than those in the control group,but STA was lower (P < 0.001) in the spondylolysis group.Conclusions:Current study results suggest that increased PI and decreased STA may play important roles in the pathology of lumbar spondylolysis in Han Chinese population.

  2. Age-Related Changes in Cervical Sagittal Range of Motion and Alignment

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Moon Soo; Moon, Seong-Hwan; Lee, Hwan-Mo; Kim, Tae-Hwan; Oh, Jae Keun; Nam, Ji Hoon; Riew, K. Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective cohort study. Objective To compare sagittal cervical range of motion (ROM) and alignment in young versus middle-aged adults. Methods One hundred four asymptomatic adults were selected randomly out of 791 subjects who underwent lateral cervical radiographs in neutral, flexion, and extension positions. They were divided into two groups: young (age 20 to 29, 52 people) and middle-aged adults (age 50 to 59, 52 people). We determined the ROMs of upper cervical (occipital...

  3. Periodic Variations in the Coronal Green Line Intensity and their Connection with the White-light Coronal Structures

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Milan Minarovjech; Milan Rybansky; Vojtech Rusin

    2000-09-01

    We present an analysis of short time-scale intensity variations in the coronal green line as obtained with high time resolution observations. The observed data can be divided into two groups. The first one shows periodic intensity variations with a period of 5 min. the second one does not show any significant intensity variations. We studied the relation between regions of coronal intensity oscillations and the shape of whitelight coronal structures. We found that the coronal green-line oscillations occur mainly in regions where open white-light coronal structures are located.

  4. Automatic extraction of the mid-sagittal plane using an ICP variant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fieten, Lorenz; Eschweiler, Jörg; de la Fuente, Matías; Gravius, Sascha; Radermacher, Klaus

    2008-03-01

    Precise knowledge of the mid-sagittal plane is important for the assessment and correction of several deformities. Furthermore, the mid-sagittal plane can be used for the definition of standardized coordinate systems such as pelvis or skull coordinate systems. A popular approach for mid-sagittal plane computation is based on the selection of anatomical landmarks located either directly on the plane or symmetrically to it. However, the manual selection of landmarks is a tedious, time-consuming and error-prone task, which requires great care. In order to overcome this drawback, previously it was suggested to use the iterative closest point (ICP) algorithm: After an initial mirroring of the data points on a default mirror plane, the mirrored data points should be registered iteratively to the model points using rigid transforms. Finally, a reflection transform approximating the cumulative transform could be extracted. In this work, we present an ICP variant for the iterative optimization of the reflection parameters. It is based on a closed-form solution to the least-squares problem of matching data points to model points using a reflection. In experiments on CT pelvis and skull datasets our method showed a better ability to match homologous areas.

  5. WAVELET ANALYSIS AND NEURAL NETWORK CLASSIFIERS TO DETECT MID-SAGITTAL SECTIONS FOR NUCHAL TRANSLUCENCY MEASUREMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppa Sciortino

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available We propose a methodology to support the physician in the automatic identification of mid-sagittal sections of the fetus in ultrasound videos acquired during the first trimester of pregnancy. A good mid-sagittal section is a key requirement to make the correct measurement of nuchal translucency which is one of the main marker for screening of chromosomal defects such as trisomy 13, 18 and 21. NT measurement is beyond the scope of this article. The proposed methodology is mainly based on wavelet analysis and neural network classifiers to detect the jawbone and on radial symmetry analysis to detect the choroid plexus. Those steps allow to identify the frames which represent correct mid-sagittal sections to be processed. The performance of the proposed methodology was analyzed on 3000 random frames uniformly extracted from 10 real clinical ultrasound videos. With respect to a ground-truth provided by an expert physician, we obtained a true positive, a true negative and a balanced accuracy equal to 87.26%, 94.98% and 91.12% respectively.

  6. Biomechanical Comparison of Single- and Double-Leg Jump Landings in the Sagittal and Frontal Plane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Jeffrey B.; Ford, Kevin R.; Nguyen, Anh-Dung; Shultz, Sandra J.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Double-leg forward or drop-jump landing activities are typically used to screen for high-risk movement strategies and to determine the success of neuromuscular injury prevention programs. However, research suggests that these tasks that occur primarily in the sagittal plane may not adequately represent the lower extremity biomechanics that occur during unilateral foot contact or non–sagittal plane movements that are characteristic of many multidirectional sports. Purpose: To examine the extent to which lower extremity biomechanics measured during a jump landing on a double leg (DL) after a sagittal plane (SAG) movement is representative of biomechanics measured during single-leg (SL) or frontal plane (FRONT) jump landing tasks. Study Design: Controlled laboratory study. Methods: Lower extremity biomechanics were measured in 15 recreationally active females (mean age [±SD], 19.4 ± 2.1 years; mean height, 163.3 ± 5.9 cm; mean weight, 61.1 ± 7.1 kg) while performing SAGDL, SAGSL, FRONTDL, and FRONTSL jump landing tasks. Repeated-measures analyses of variance examined differences in lower extremity biomechanics between the 4 tasks, and linear regressions examined the extent to which an individual’s biomechanics during SAGDL were representative of their biomechanics during SAGSL, FRONTDL, and FRONTSL. Results: Lower extremity kinematics and kinetics differed by condition, with the SAGDL task generally eliciting greater hip and knee flexion angles and lower hip and knee forces than the other tasks (P sports.

  7. The Role of Proprioception in the Sagittal Setting of Anticipatory Postural Adjustments During Gait Initiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pereira Marcelo P.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Previous studies have studied the role of proprioception on the setting of anticipatory postural adjustments (APA during gait initiation. However, these studies did not investigate the role of proprioception in the sagittal APA setting. We aimed to investigate the role of proprioception manipulation to induce APA sagittal adaptations on gait initiation. Methods. Fourteen healthy adults performed gait initiation without, and with, vibration applied before movement onset, and during movement. In addition, the effects of two different vibration frequencies (80 and 120Hz were tested. Vibration was applied bilaterally on the tibialis anterior, rectus femoris and trapezius superior. The first step characteristics, ground reaction forces and CoP behaviour were assessed. Results. Vibration improved gait initiation performance regardless of the moment it was applied. CoP velocity during the initial phase of APA was increased by vibration only when it was applied before movement. When vibration was applied to disturb the movement, no effects on the CoP behaviour were observed. Manipulation of vibration frequency had no effects. Conclusions. Rather than proprioception manipulation, the results suggest that post-vibratory effects and attentional mechanisms were responsible for our results. Taken together, the results show that sagittal APA setting is robust to proprioception manipulation.

  8. Forced axial segregation in axially inhomogeneous rotating systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, S.; Windows-Yule, C. R. K.; Luding, S.; Parker, D. J.; Thornton, A. R.

    2015-08-01

    Controlling segregation is both a practical and a theoretical challenge. Using a novel drum design comprising concave and convex geometry, we explore, through the application of both discrete particle simulations and positron emission particle tracking, a means by which radial size segregation may be used to drive axial segregation, resulting in an order of magnitude increase in the rate of separation. The inhomogeneous drum geometry explored also allows the direction of axial segregation within a binary granular bed to be controlled, with a stable, two-band segregation pattern being reliably and reproducibly imposed on the bed for a variety of differing system parameters. This strong banding is observed to persist even in systems that are highly constrained in the axial direction, where such segregation would not normally occur. These findings, and the explanations provided of their underlying mechanisms, could lead to radical new designs for a broad range of particle processing applications but also may potentially prove useful for medical and microflow applications.

  9. View of the Axial Field Spectrometer

    CERN Multimedia

    1980-01-01

    The Axial Field Spectrometer, with the vertical uranium/scintillator calorimeter and the central drift chamber retracted for service. One coil of the Open Axial Field Magnet is just visible to the right.

  10. Magnetic Topology of Coronal Hole Linkages

    CERN Document Server

    Titov, V S; Linker, J A; Lionello, R; Antiochos, S K

    2010-01-01

    In recent work, Antiochos and coworkers argued that the boundary between the open and closed field regions on the Sun can be extremely complex with narrow corridors of open flux connecting seemingly disconnected coronal holes from the main polar holes, and that these corridors may be the sources of the slow solar wind. We examine, in detail, the topology of such magnetic configurations using an analytical source surface model that allows for analysis of the field with arbitrary resolution. Our analysis reveals three important new results: First, a coronal hole boundary can join stably to the separatrix boundary of a parasitic polarity region. Second, a single parasitic polarity region can produce multiple null points in the corona and, more important, separator lines connecting these points. It is known that such topologies are extremely favorable for magnetic reconnection, because they allow this process to occur over the entire length of the separators rather than being confined to a small region around the...

  11. Geometrical Properties of Coronal Mass Ejections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cremades, Hebe; Bothmer, Volker

    Based on the SOHO/LASCO dataset, a collection of "structured" coronal mass ejections (CMEs) has been compiled within the period 1996-2002, in order to analyze their three-dimensional configuration. These CME events exhibit white-light fine structures, likely indicative of their possible 3D topology. From a detailed investigation of the associated low coronal and photospheric source regions, a generic scheme has been deduced, which considers the white-light topology of a CME projected in the plane of the sky as being primarily dependent on the orientation and position of the source region's neutral line on the solar disk. The obtained results imply that structured CMEs are essentially organized along a symmetry axis, in a cylindrical manner. The measured dimensions of the cylinder's base and length yield a ratio of 1.6. These CMEs seem to be better approximated by elliptic cones, rather than by the classical ice cream cone, characterized by a circular cross section.

  12. Sinonasal polyposis: investigation by direct coronal CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To demonstrate the typical clinical and CT features of sinonasal polyposis, we reviewed the clinical records and preoperative direct coronal CT scans of 35 patients with surgically proven disease. Symptoms included progressive nasal stuffiness (100 %), rhinorrhea (69 %), facial pain (60 %), headache (43 %) and anosmia (17 %). We found associations with rhinitis (46 %), asthma (29 %) and aspirin sensitivity (9 %). Coronal CT features included polypoid masses in the nasal cavity (91 %), partial or complete pansinus opacification (90 %), enlargement of infundibula (89 %), bony attenuation of the ethmoid trabeculae (63 %) and nasal septum (37 %), opacified ethmoid sinuses with convex lateral walls (51 %) and air-fluid levels (43 %). The latter feature correlated with symptoms and signs of acute sinusitis in only 40 % of patients. Recognition of sinonasal polyposis is important to the endoscopic surgeon since it can be the most troubling sinonasal inflammatory disease to manage due to its aggressive nature and tendency to recur despite appropriate treatment. (orig.)

  13. Sunquake Generation by Coronal Magnetic Restructuring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, A. J. B.; Mooney, M.; Leake, J. E.; Hudson, H. S.

    2015-12-01

    Solar flares and coronal mass ejections are powered by major restructurings of the coronal magnetic field, which appear to strongly perturb the magnetic field in the photosphere as well. Could the associated Lorentz forces generate sunquakes, as suggested by Hudson et al. 2008? Here, we present the first MHD simulations of sunquake generation by magnetic field perturbations, and explore the details of this mechanism. The downgoing magnetic field change is modelled as an Alfven wave, which propagates into the lower atmosphere. When it reaches the vicinity of the beta=1 layer (where the Alfven and sound speeds are equal), non-linear coupling excites a downgoing acoustic wave, which we interpret as a sunquake. The amplitude of the acoustic wave increases nonlinearly with the amplitude of the magnetic perturbation, reaching a limit where around 35% of the injected Poynting flux is transferred to the seismic wave - enough energy to match sunquake observations.

  14. Solar Coronal Jets: Observations, Theory, and Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raouafi, N. E.; Patsourakos, S.; Pariat, E.; Young, P. R.; Sterling, A. C.; Savcheva, A.; Shimojo, M.; Moreno-Insertis, F.; DeVore, C. R.; Archontis, V.; Török, T.; Mason, H.; Curdt, W.; Meyer, K.; Dalmasse, K.; Matsui, Y.

    2016-07-01

    Coronal jets represent important manifestations of ubiquitous solar transients, which may be the source of significant mass and energy input to the upper solar atmosphere and the solar wind. While the energy involved in a jet-like event is smaller than that of "nominal" solar flares and coronal mass ejections (CMEs), jets share many common properties with these phenomena, in particular, the explosive magnetically driven dynamics. Studies of jets could, therefore, provide critical insight for understanding the larger, more complex drivers of the solar activity. On the other side of the size-spectrum, the study of jets could also supply important clues on the physics of transients close or at the limit of the current spatial resolution such as spicules. Furthermore, jet phenomena may hint to basic process for heating the corona and accelerating the solar wind; consequently their study gives us the opportunity to attack a broad range of solar-heliospheric problems.

  15. Solar Energetic Particles: Sampling Coronal Abundances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reames, Donald V.

    1998-05-01

    In the large solar energetic particle (SEP) events, coronal mass ejections (CMEs) drive shock waves out through the corona that accelerate elements of the ambient material to MeV energies in a fairly democratic, temperature-independent manner. These events provide the most complete source of information on element abundances in the corona. Relative abundances of 22 elements from H through Zn display the well-known dependence on the first ionization potential (FIP) that distinguishes coronal and photospheric material. For most elements, the main abundance variations depend upon the gyrofrequency, and hence on the charge-to-mass ratio, Q/A, of the ion. Abundance variations in the dominant species, H and He, are not Q/A dependent, presumably because of non-linear wave-particle interactions of H and He during acceleration. Impulsive flares provide a different sample of material that confirms the Ne:Mg:Si and He/C abundances in the corona.

  16. Solar coronal observations at high frequencies

    CERN Document Server

    Katsiyannis, A C; Phillips, K J H; Williams, D R; Keenan, F P

    2001-01-01

    The Solar Eclipse Coronal Imaging System (SECIS) is a simple and extremely fast, high-resolution imaging instrument designed for studies of the solar corona. Light from the corona (during, for example, a total solar eclipse) is reflected off a heliostat and passes via a Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope and beam splitter to two CCD cameras capable of imaging at 60 frames a second. The cameras are attached via SCSI connections to a purpose-built PC that acts as the data acquisition and storage system. Each optical channel has a different filter allowing observations of the same events in both white light and in the green line (Fe XIV at 5303 A). Wavelet analysis of the stabilized images has revealed high frequency oscillations which may make a significant contribution on the coronal heating process. In this presentation we give an outline of the instrument and its future development.

  17. On Tripolar Magnetic Reconnection and Coronal Heating

    CERN Document Server

    Pandey, K; Lohani, N K; Pandey, Kumud; Narain, Udit

    2003-01-01

    Using recent data for the photosphere-chromosphere region of the solar atmosphere the magnetic reconnection in tripolar geometry has been investigated through the procedure of Sturrock (1999). Particular attention has been given to the width of the reconnecting region, wave number of the rapidly growing tearing mode, island length scales, frequency of MHD fluctuations, tearing mode growth rate, energy dissipation rate and minimum magnetic field strength required to heat chromospheric plasma to coronal temperatures. It is found that small length scales are formed in the upper chromosphere. The maximum growth rate of tearing mode instability coincides with the peak in the energy dissipation rate both of which occur in the upper chromosphere at the same height. It is realized that the distribution of magnetic field with height is essential for a better understanding of the coronal heating problem.

  18. Solar Coronal Jets: Observations, Theory, and Modeling

    CERN Document Server

    Raouafi, N E; Pariat, E; Young, P R; Sterling, A C; Savcheva, A; Shimojo, M; Moreno-Insertis, F; DeVore, C R; Archontis, V; Török, T; Mason, H; Curdt, W; Meyer, K; Dalmasse, K; Matsui, Y

    2016-01-01

    Coronal jets represent important manifestations of ubiquitous solar transients, which may be the source of significant mass and energy input to the upper solar atmosphere and the solar wind. While the energy involved in a jet-like event is smaller than that of "nominal" solar flares and coronal mass ejections (CMEs), jets share many common properties with these phenomena, in particular, the explosive magnetically driven dynamics. Studies of jets could, therefore, provide critical insight for understanding the larger, more complex drivers of the solar activity. On the other side of the size-spectrum, the study of jets could also supply important clues on the physics of transients close or at the limit of the current spatial resolution such as spicules. Furthermore, jet phenomena may hint to basic process for heating the corona and accelerating the solar wind; consequently their study gives us the opportunity to attack a broad range of solar-heliospheric problems.

  19. Damped transverse oscillations of interacting coronal loops

    CERN Document Server

    Soler, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Damped transverse oscillations of magnetic loops are routinely observed in the solar corona. This phenomenon is interpreted as standing kink magnetohydrodynamic waves, which are damped by resonant absorption owing to plasma inhomogeneity across the magnetic field. The periods and damping times of these oscillations can be used to probe the physical conditions of the coronal medium. Some observations suggest that interaction between neighboring oscillating loops in an active region may be important and can modify the properties of the oscillations compared to those of an isolated loop. Here we theoretically investigate resonantly damped transverse oscillations of interacting non-uniform coronal loops. We provide a semi-analytic method, based on the T-matrix theory of scattering, to compute the frequencies and damping rates of collective oscillations of an arbitrary configuration of parallel cylindrical loops. The effect of resonant damping is included in the T-matrix scheme in the thin boundary approximation. ...

  20. Chemical Fractionation and Abundances in Coronal Plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Drake, J J

    2003-01-01

    Much of modern astrophysics is grounded on the observed chemical compositions of stars and the diffuse plasma that pervades the space between stars, galaxies and clusters of galaxies. X-ray and EUV spectra of the hot plasma in the outer atmospheres of stars have demonstrated that these environments are subject to chemical fractionation in which the abundances of elements can be enhanced and depleted by an order of magnitude or more. These coronal abundance anomalies are discussed and some of the physical mechanisms that might be responsible for producing them are examined. It is argued that coronal abundances can provide important new diagnostics on physical processes at work in solar and stellar coronae. It seems likely that other hot astrophysical plasmas will be subject to similar effects.

  1. Current Sheets in Stressed Coronal Magnetic Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labonte, B. J.

    2003-12-01

    The extrapolation of magnetic fields into the solar corona generally assumes that the fields are fully relaxed - all possible reconnection has occurred. This assumption is in conflict with the low magnetic diffusivity in the corona. I will present initial results on extrapolation based on stressed magnetic fields - those for which no reconnection has occurred. As an opposite extreme to traditional methods, stressed fields offer a different view of coronal fields. The locations of current sheets between flux systems are directly determined. Observational evidence of coronal reconnection can test the completeness of the extrapolation, as the field lines spanning flux systems must be in contact prior to reconnection. This work is supported by NASA SEC GI grant NAG5-13020.

  2. Microflares as Possible Sources for Coronal Heating

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Meera Gupta; Rajmal Jain; Jayshree Trivedi; A. P. Mishra

    2008-03-01

    We present a preliminary study of 27 microflares observed by Solar X-ray Spectrometer (SOXS) mission during July 2003 to August 2006. We found that all 27 microflares show the Fe-line feature peaking around 6.7 keV, which is an indicator of the presence of coronal plasma temperature ≥ 9 MK. On the other hand, the spectra of microflares showhybrid model of thermal and non-thermal emission, which further supports them as possible sources of coronal heating. Our results based on the analysis show that the energy relapsed by the microflares is good enough for heating of the active corona. We discuss our results in the light of the hybrid model of microflares production.

  3. How do metacarpophalangeal joint extension, collateromotion and axial rotation influence dorsal surface strains of the equine proximal phalanx at different loads in vitro?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, Ellen; Garcia, Tanya; Stover, Susan

    2013-02-22

    The biomechanical circumstances that promote sagittal fracture of the equine proximal phalanx (P1) are poorly understood. In order to improve our understanding of equine metacarpophalangeal joint (MCPJ) biomechanics and potential aetiologies of sagittal P1 fractures, the study objectives were to quantify P1 bone strains, collateromotion and axial rotation during MCPJ extension under controlled loading circumstances. Unilateral limbs from six cadavers were instrumented with bone reference markers for measurement of P1 movement relative to third metacarpal bone positions during axial limb loading to 10,500N. Bone reference markers recorded by video were digitized and the movement analyzed during MCPJ extension. Concurrently, dorsoproximal P1 surface strains were measured with one uniaxial and one rosette strain gauge. Strain gauge data was reduced to determine principal and shear strain magnitude and direction. External axial rotation and collateromotion increased with increasing MCPJ extension. Maximum principal strain increased linearly as load increased from 2000 to 10,500N. Minimum principal and maximum shear strains had curvilinear relationships with limb loading, with negligible strain magnitude until approximately 6000N load, after which strain increased rapidly. The direction of P1 minimum principal strain shifted approximately 30-40° as load increased from 5400N to 10,000N, moving from proximolateral-distomedial to a nearly proximodistal direction. At near maximal MCPJ extension, with concurrent axial rotation and collateromotion, a rapid increase in dorsoproximal P1 bone strain and a change in principal strain direction occurred. The alterations in principal strain magnitude and direction associated with maximal MCPJ extension may support a biomechanical theory for sagittal P1 fracture occurrence in horses. PMID:23246042

  4. Relationship of EUV Irradiance Coronal Dimming Slope and Depth to Coronal Mass Ejection Speed and Mass

    CERN Document Server

    Mason, James Paul; Webb, David F; Thompson, Barbara J; Colaninno, Robin C; Vourlidas, Angelos

    2016-01-01

    Extreme ultraviolet (EUV) coronal dimmings are often observed in response to solar eruptive events. These phenomena can be generated via several different physical processes. For space weather, the most important of these is the temporary void left behind by a coronal mass ejection (CME). Massive, fast CMEs tend to leave behind a darker void that also usually corresponds to minimum irradiance for the cooler coronal emissions. If the dimming is associated with a solar flare, as is often the case, the flare component of the irradiance light curve in the cooler coronal emission can be isolated and removed using simultaneous measurements of warmer coronal lines. We apply this technique to 37 dimming events identified during two separate two-week periods in 2011, plus an event on 2010 August 7 analyzed in a previous paper, to parameterize dimming in terms of depth and slope. We provide statistics on which combination of wavelengths worked best for the flare-removal method, describe the fitting methods applied to t...

  5. Axially symmetric rotating traversable wormholes

    CERN Document Server

    Kuhfittig, P K F

    2003-01-01

    This paper generalizes the static and spherically symmetric traversable wormhole geometry to a rotating axially symmetric one with a time-dependent angular velocity by means of an exact solution. It was found that the violation of the weak energy condition, although unavoidable, is considerably less severe than in the static spherically symmetric case. The radial tidal constraint is more easily met due to the rotation. Similar improvements are seen in one of the lateral tidal constraints. The magnitude of the angular velocity may have little effect on the weak energy condition violation for an axially symmetric wormhole. For a spherically symmetric one, however, the violation becomes less severe with increasing angular velocity. The time rate of change of the angular velocity, on the other hand, was found to have no effect at all. Finally, the angular velocity must depend only on the radial coordinate, confirming an earlier result.

  6. Coronal Mass Ejections of Solar Cycle 23

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Nat Gopalswamy

    2006-06-01

    I summarize the statistical, physical, and morphological properties of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) of solar cycle 23, as observed by the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) mission. The SOHO data is by far the most extensive data, which made it possible to fully establish the properties of CMEs as a phenomenon of utmost importance to Sun–Earth connection as well as to the heliosphere. I also discuss various subsets of CMEs that are of primary importance for their impact on Earth.

  7. Spectroscopic Diagnostics of Polar Coronal Plumes

    CERN Document Server

    Wilhelm, K; Dwivedi, B N

    2009-01-01

    Polar coronal plumes seen during solar eclipses can now be studied with space-borne telescopes and spectrometers. We briefly discuss such observations from space with a view to understanding their plasma characteristics. Using these observations, especially from SUMER/SOHO, but also from EUVI/STEREO, we deduce densities, temperatures, and abundance anomalies in plumes and inter-plume regions, and discuss their implications for better understanding of these structures in the Sun's atmosphere.

  8. Simulation of an Axial Vircator

    OpenAIRE

    Tikhomirov, V. V.; Siahlo, S. E.

    2013-01-01

    An algorithm of particle-in-cell simulations is described and tested to aid further the actual design of simple vircators working on axially symmetric modes. The methods of correction of the numerical solution, have been chosen and jointly tested, allow the stable simulation of the fast nonlinear multiflow dynamics of virtual cathode formation and evolution, as well as the fields generated by the virtual cathode. The selected combination of the correction methods can be straightforwardly gene...

  9. Eyecciones coronales de masa observadas en cuadratura exhibiendo sus perspectivas axial y lateral

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabello, I.; Cremades, H.; Balmaceda, L.; Dohmen, I.

    2016-08-01

    Observations from different viewpoints provided by STEREO and SOHO allow us to simultaneously study the lateral and axial perspectives of a given coronal mass ejection. Following the exhaustive analysis of a case study, this work focuses on the analysis of similar events which exhibit the two perspectives as seen by the different instruments. Angular width estimates for both, the lateral and axial directions obtained in an indirect way, i.e. applying the graduated cylindrical shell model, allowed us to obtain a ratio / in agreement with results previously obtained in a direct way, i.e. when and were measured either separately for different events or when they were estimated for a single event from multi-point observations.

  10. A Mechanism for Coronal Hole Jets

    CERN Document Server

    Mueller, D A N

    2008-01-01

    Bald patches are magnetic topologies in which the magnetic field is concave up over part of a photospheric polarity inversion line. A bald patch topology is believed to be the essential ingredient for filament channels and is often found in extrapolations of the observed photospheric field. Using an analytic source-surface model to calculate the magnetic topology of a small bipolar region embedded in a global magnetic dipole field, we demonstrate that although common in closed-field regions close to the solar equator, bald patches are unlikely to occur in the open-field topology of a coronal hole. Our results give rise to the following question: What happens to a bald patch topology when the surrounding field lines open up? This would be the case when a bald patch moves into a coronal hole, or when a coronal hole forms in an area that encompasses a bald patch. Our magnetostatic models show that, in this case, the bald patch topology almost invariably transforms into a null point topology with a spine and a fa...

  11. EIT Observations of Coronal Mass Ejections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurman, J. B.; Fisher, Richard B. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Before the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO), we had only the sketchiest of clues as to the nature and topology of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) below 1.1 - 1.2 solar radii. Occasionally, dimmings (or 'transient coronal holes') were observed in time series of soft X-ray images, but they were far less frequent than CME's. Simply by imaging the Sun frequently and continually at temperatures of 0.9 - 2.5 MK we have stumbled upon a zoo of CME phenomena in this previously obscured volume of the corona: (1) waves, (2) dimmings, and (3) a great variety of ejecta. In the three and a half years since our first observations of coronal waves associated with CME's, combined Large Angle Spectroscopic Coronagraph (LASCO) and extreme ultra-violet imaging telescope (EIT) synoptic observations have become a standard prediction tool for space weather forecasters, but our progress in actually understanding the CME phenomenon in the low corona has been somewhat slower. I will summarize the observations of waves, hot (> 0.9 MK) and cool ejecta, and some of the interpretations advanced to date. I will try to identify those phenomena, analysis of which could most benefit from the spectroscopic information available from ultraviolet coronograph spectrometer (UVCS) observations.

  12. Coronal Heating Observed with Hi-C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winebarger, Amy R.

    2013-01-01

    The recent launch of the High-Resolution Coronal Imager (Hi-C) as a sounding rocket has offered a new, different view of the Sun. With approx 0.3" resolution and 5 second cadence, Hi-C reveals dynamic, small-scale structure within a complicated active region, including coronal braiding, reconnection regions, Alfven waves, and flows along active region fans. By combining the Hi-C data with other available data, we have compiled a rich data set that can be used to address many outstanding questions in solar physics. Though the Hi-C rocket flight was short (only 5 minutes), the added insight of the small-scale structure gained from the Hi-C data allows us to look at this active region and other active regions with new understanding. In this talk, I will review the first results from the Hi-C sounding rocket and discuss the impact of these results on the coronal heating problem.

  13. Optical coronal polarization and solar dust ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Observations of the outer solar corona on the Java island were carried out on June 11, 1983, at a 30-km altitude using a B-15 balloon. At 5325, 5965, 7200, and 8015 A, data on polarizations in a field of 5 deg x 5 deg centered nearly on the sun were obtained. Our contour maps of polarization are the first of the two-dimensional polarization distribution covering wide area. An excess of polarization at the four wavelengths was found in the ecliptic plane and at the location of a coronal streamer. High polarization at the coronal streamer is caused mainly by coronal electrons, but dust grains in the region out of the ecliptic plane contribute also in a few percent to the high polarization degree in this streamer. It is confirmed by additional data that there is a peak in the polarization excess in the ecliptic between 4(R solar) and 5(R solar) as already reported by Isobe et al. (1985; AAA 40.074.053). This excess is considered to be due to an enhanced distribution of dust in a ring or a thick wide band around the sun. (author)

  14. Towards a Data-Optimized Coronal Magnetic Field Model (DOC-FM): Simulating Flux Ropes with the Flux Rope Insertion Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalmasse, K.; DeLuca, E. E.; Savcheva, A. S.; Gibson, S. E.; Fan, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Knowledge of the 3D magnetic filed structure at the time of major solar eruptions is vital or understanding of the space weather effects of these eruptions. Multiple data-constrained techniques that reconstruct the 3D coronal field based on photospheric magnetograms have been used to achieve this goal. In particular, we have used the flux rope insertion method to obtain the coronal magnetic field of multiple regions containing flux ropes or sheared arcades based on line-of-sight magnetograms and X-ray and EUV observations of coronal loops. For the purpose of developing statistical measures of the goodness of fit of these models to the observations, here we present our modeling of flux ropes based on synthetic magnetograms obtained from Fan & Gibson emerging flux rope simulation. The goal is to reproduce the flux rope structure from a given time step of the MHD simulations based only on the photospheric magnetogram and synthetic forward modeled coronal emission obtained from the same step of the MHD simulation. For this purpose we create a large grid of models with the flux rope insertion method with different combinations of axial and poloidal flux, which give us different morphology of the flux rope. Then we compare the synthetic coronal emission with the shape of the current distribution and field lines from the models to come up with a best fit. This fit is then tested using the statistical methods developed by our team.

  15. Standing Slow-Mode Waves in Hot Coronal Loops: Observations, Modeling, and Coronal Seismology

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Tongjiang

    2010-01-01

    Strongly damped Doppler shift oscillations are observed frequently associated with flarelike events in hot coronal loops. In this paper, a review of the observed properties and the theoretical modeling is presented. Statistical measurements of physical parameters (period, decay time, and amplitude) have been obtained based on a large number of events observed by SOHO/SUMER and Yohkoh/BCS. Several pieces of evidence are found to support their interpretation in terms of the fundamental standing longitudinal slow mode. The high excitation rate of these oscillations in small- or micro-flares suggest that the slow mode waves are a natural response of the coronal plasma to impulsive heating in closed magnetic structure. The strong damping and the rapid excitation of the observed waves are two major aspects of the waves that are poorly understood, and are the main subject of theoretical modeling. The slow waves are found mainly damped by thermal conduction and viscosity in hot coronal loops. The mode coupling seems ...

  16. Coronal heating in coupled photosphere-chromosphere-coronal systems: turbulence and leakage

    CERN Document Server

    Verdini, Andrea; Velli, Marco

    2011-01-01

    Coronal loops act as resonant cavities for low frequency fluctuations that are transmitted from the deeper layers of the solar atmosphere and are amplified in the corona, triggering nonlinear interactions. However trapping is not perfect, some energy leaks down to the chromosphere, thus limiting the turbulence development and the associated heating. We consider the combined effects of turbulence and leakage in determining the energy level and associated heating rate in models of coronal loops which include the chromosphere and transition region. We use a piece-wise constant model for the Alfven speed and a Reduced MHD - Shell model to describe the interplay between turbulent dynamics in the direction perpendicular to the mean field and propagation along the field. Turbulence is sustained by incoming fluctuations which are equivalent, in the line-tied case, to forcing by the photospheric shear flows. While varying the turbulence strength, we compare systematically the average coronal energy level (E) and dissi...

  17. Recent VLA Observations of Coronal Faraday Rotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kooi, Jason E.; Fischer, P. D.; Buffo, J. J.; Spangler, S. R.

    2014-01-01

    Proposed mechanisms for coronal heating and acceleration of the fast solar wind, such as Joule heating by coronal currents or dissipation of Alfvén waves, depend on the magnetic field structure and plasma characteristics of the corona within heliocentric distances of 5 solar radii. Faraday rotation observations can provide unique information on the magnetic field in this region of the corona. We report on sensitive full-polarization observations of the radio galaxy 3C228 through the solar corona at heliocentric distances of 4.6 - 5.0 solar radii. The observations were made with the VLA in August of 2011. We performed these observations at 5.0 and 6.1 GHz (each with a bandwidth of 128 MHz), permitting measurements deeper in the corona than previous VLA observations at 1.4 and 1.7 GHz. While the measured Faraday rotation was lower than our a priori expectations, we can understand the magnitude of the observed Faraday rotation in terms of observed properties of the corona on the day of observation. For coronal remote sensing, an advantage of using extended extragalactic radio sources such as 3C228 is that such observations provide multiple lines of sight through the corona. Our data provide two lines of sight (separated by 46″, 33,000 km in the corona), one to a northern hotspot and the other to a southern hotspot with fractional polarizations of 14% and 8% respectively. We detected three periods over the eight-hour observing session during which there appeared to be a difference in the Faraday rotation between these two closely spaced lines of sight. These measurements yield an estimate of 2 - 4 GA for coronal currents. We did not directly detect rotation measure fluctuations. Our data impose upper limits on rotation measure fluctuations caused by coronal waves. The observed upper limits were 3.3 and 6.4 rad/m2 and are comparable to and not inconsistent with some models for Alfvén wave heating. This research was supported at the University of Iowa by grants ATM09

  18. Segmentation of Coronal Holes Using Active Contours Without Edges

    CERN Document Server

    Boucheron, L E; McAteer, R T J

    2016-01-01

    An application of active contours without edges is presented as an efficient and effective means of extracting and characterizing coronal holes. Coronal holes are regions of low-density plasma on the Sun with open magnetic field lines. As the source of the fast solar wind, the detection and characterization of these regions is important for both testing theories of their formation and evolution and from a space weather perspective. Coronal holes are detected in full disk extreme ultraviolet (EUV) images of the corona obtained with the Solar Dynamics Observatory Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (SDO/AIA). The proposed method detects coronal boundaries without determining any fixed intensity value in the data. Instead, the active contour segmentation employs an energy-minimization in which coronal holes are assumed to have more homogeneous intensities than surrounding active regions and quiet Sun. The segmented coronal holes tend to correspond to unipolar magnetic regions, are consistent with concurrent solar wind ...

  19. Axial Force at the Vessel Bottom Induced by Axial Impellers

    OpenAIRE

    I. Fořt; P. Hasal; A. Paglianti; F. Magelli

    2008-01-01

    This paper deals with the axial force affecting the flat bottom of a cylindrical stirred vessel. The vessel is equipped with four radial baffles and is stirred with a four 45° pitched blade impeller pumping downwards. The set of pressure transducers is located along the whole radius of the flat bottom between two radial baffles. The radial distribution of the dynamic pressures indicated by the transducers is measured in dependence on the impeller off-bottom clearance and impeller speed.It fol...

  20. The role of active region coronal magnetic field in determining coronal mass ejection propagation direction

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Rui; Liu, Ying D.; Dai, Xinghua; Yang, Zhongwei; Huang, Chong; Hu, Huidong

    2015-01-01

    We study the role of the coronal magnetic field configuration of an active region in determining the propagation direction of a coronal mass ejection (CME). The CME occurred in the active region 11944 (S09W01) near the disk center on 2014 January 7 and was associated with an X1.2 flare. A new CME reconstruction procedure based on a polarimetric technique is adopted, which shows that the CME changed its propagation direction by around 28$^\\circ$ in latitude within 2.5 R$_\\odot$ and 43$^\\circ$ ...

  1. Golimumab for treatment of axial spondyloarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rios Rodriguez, Valeria; Poddubnyy, Denis

    2016-02-01

    Axial spondyloarthritis comprises two forms: nonradiographic (nonradiographic axial spondyloarthritis) and radiographic (better known as ankylosing spondylitis), which are often considered as two stages of one disease. Historically, all currently available TNF-α inhibitors were first investigated in ankylosing spondylitis and later on in nonradiographic axial spondyloarthritis. This year, EMA has granted golimumab approval for the treatment of active nonradiographic axial spondyloarthritis based on the recently published data from the GO-AHEAD study. This article summarizes recent data on efficacy and safety of golimumab in the treatment of ankylosing spondylitis and nonradiographic axial spondyloarthritis.

  2. 3D Coronal Slow Modes: Towards 3D Seismology

    OpenAIRE

    Marsh, M. S.; Walsh, R. W.; Plunkett, S.

    2009-01-01

    On 2008 January 10, the twin Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO) A and B spacecraft conducted a high time cadence study of the solar corona with the Extreme UltraViolet Imager (EUVI) instruments with the aim of investigating coronal dynamics. Observations of the three-dimensional propagation of waves within active region coronal loops and a measurement of the true coronal slow mode speed are obtained. Intensity oscillations with a period of approximately 12 minutes are observed t...

  3. [The influence of proprioceptive insoles (Bourdiol) on the sagittal curvature and inclination of the trunk].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller-Gliemann, C; Drerup, B; Osada, N; Wetz, H H

    2006-11-01

    Proprioceptive insoles rely on the concept of Réné-Jaques Bourdiol, a French neurologist. The aim is to modulate plantar surface sensibility and to influence posture and statics of patients: it is hypothesized that the effect of modified afferent sensory input through proprioceptive stimulation of terminal muscle chains will have either a relaxing or stimulating effect on the whole body, which may be realized by affecting the posture. Small pads with a thickness of typically 1-3 mm are embedded into the insole to provide a specific stimulation. In fitting the insoles selectively to the individual patient the effect of the insoles on the trunk posture is taken as a feedback. This study investigates the influence of proprioceptive insoles on the sagittal curve in 20 selected patients. The protocol used a repeated measures research design. The measures of the sagittal curve were obtained using raster stereography. The four different conditions were: (1) barefoot, (2) convenient shoes without the insoles, (3) the same shoes with a placebo insole, and (4) the same shoes with neurological insoles. Evaluation of raster stereographs provided the kyphotic angle between T4 and T12 and lordotic angle between T12 and S1. Statistical evaluation was performed with the t-test for paired measurements. No significant differences were found in the sagittal profile. Only trunk inclination in normal posture was found to yield a significant difference (0.38 degrees) between placebo and neurological insoles. However, no clear statement on the efficiency of neurological insoles can be made.

  4. Utility of coronal oblique slices in cervical spine MRI. Improved detection of the neuroforamina; Nutzen der halbkoronaren Schichtung im MRT der Halswirbelsaeule. Verbesserte Erkennbarkeit von Neuroforamina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freund, W.; Hoepner, G. [Universitaetskliniken Ulm, Klinik fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie, Ulm (Germany); Klessinger, S. [Nova Clinic Biberach, Neurochirurgie, Biberach (Germany); Universitaetskliniken Ulm, Neurochirurgie, Ulm (Germany); Mueller, M. [Universitaetskliniken Ulm, Klinik fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie, Ulm (Germany); Universitaetskliniken Aachen, Diagnostische und Interventionelle Neuroradiologie, Aachen (Germany); Halatsch, M.E. [Universitaetskliniken Ulm, Neurochirurgie, Ulm (Germany); Weber, F. [Bundeswehrkrankenhaus Ulm, Neurologie, Ulm (Germany); Schmitz, B. [Universitaetskliniken Ulm, Neuroradiologie, Ulm (Germany)

    2015-11-15

    Angulated projections are standard in conventional radiography of the cervical spine, but rarely used in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). As neuroforaminal pathology plays an important role in the etiology of radicular syndromes and may influence an operative approach, the utility of coronal oblique slices in MRI is explored. In a retrospective setting, 25 consecutive patients with neurologically diagnosed cervical monoradiculopathy were identified. T2-weighted sagittal, coronal oblique, and transversal slice orientations were anonymized. Two radiologists and two neurosurgeons independently assessed the cases. Criteria were site, cause, and grading of the neuroforaminal stenosis and the level of confidence on a 100-point visual analog scale (VAS). We computed interrater agreement, sensitivity, and t tests. Using only one slice orientation, the sensitivity in detecting the relevant neuroforamen was 0.40 for transversal, 0.68 for sagittal, and 0.64 for coronal oblique scans. A combination of the different angulations increased sensitivity and in 4 cases only the coronal oblique scans proved diagnostic. The readers felt significantly more confident in attributing the cause of the pathology on coronal oblique planes (a mean of 72 VAS points, p = 0.0003 vs 58 (sagittal) vs 64 (transversal)). Interrater agreement was significantly better for experienced (kappa 0. 48) than for inexperienced readers (0.32, p = 0.02). Adding coronal oblique planes in cervical spine MRI increases sensitivity and confidence in attributing the cause of neuroforaminal pathology. They are regarded as useful by all the readers. (orig.) [German] Im Gegensatz zur Magnetresonanztomographie (MRT) sind in der konventionellen Roentgendiagnostik der Halswirbelsaeule (HWS) Schraegaufnahmen Standard. Da neuroforaminale Pathologien wichtige Ursachen von radikulaeren Syndromen sind und die Operationstechnik moeglicherweise beeinflussen, wird der Nutzen halbkoronarer Schichten in der MRT untersucht. In

  5. A clinico-radiographic analysis of sagittal condylar guidance determined by protrusive interocclusal registration and panoramic radiographic images in humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D Krishna Prasad

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To evaluate the correlation between sagittal condylar guidance obtained by protrusive interocclusal records and panoramic radiograph tracing methods in human dentulous subjects. Materials and Methods: The sagittal condylar guidance was determined in 75 dentulous subjects by protrusive interocclusal records using Aluwax through a face bow transfer (HANAU™ Spring Bow, Whip Mix Corporation, USA to a semi-adjustable articulator (HANAU™ Wide-Vue Articulator, Whip Mix Corporation, USA. In the same subjects, the sagittal outline of the articular eminence and glenoid fossa was traced in panoramic radiographs. The sagittal condylar path inclination was constructed by joining the heights of curvature in the glenoid fossa and the corresponding articular eminence. This was then related to the constructed Frankfurt′s horizontal plane to determine the radiographic angle of sagittal condylar guidance. Results: A strong positive correlation existed between right and left condylar guidance by the protrusive interocclusal method (P 0.000 and similarly by the radiographic method (P 0.013. The mean difference between the condylar guidance obtained using both methods were 1.97° for the right side and 3.18° for the left side. This difference between the values by the two methods was found to be highly significant for the right (P 0.003 and left side (P 0.000, respectively. The sagittal condylar guidance obtained from both methods showed a significant positive correlation on right (P 0.000 and left side (P 0.015, respectively. Conclusion: Panoramic radiographic tracings of the sagittal condylar path guidance may be made relative to the Frankfurt′s horizontal reference plane and the resulting condylar guidance angles used to set the condylar guide settings of semi-adjustable articulators.

  6. The Venetian blind technique: modification of the Pi procedure for the surgical correction of sagittal synostosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wexler, Andrew; Cahan, Leslie

    2012-11-01

    Numerous methods of surgical repair for scaphocephaly (sagittal synostosis) have been reported in the literature, from strip craniectomies to more complex methods of calvarial vault remodeling. While good cosmesis and restoration of a normal anteroposterior diameter may be obtained with these methods, a more rounded contour of the biparietal areas is often more difficult to achieve. We describe a modification of the Pi technique, described by Jane in 1976, that results in a more rounded contour of the biparietal areas. We report our experience on cranial vault remodeling for the correction of scaphocephaly in 51 patients from 1998 to 2011. PMID:23154346

  7. Volume measurement by ultrasonic transverse or sagittal cross-sectional scanning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basset, O; Gimenez, G; Mestas, J L; Cathignol, D; Devonec, M

    1991-01-01

    A technique is described that provides an accurate estimation of the volume of an organ from its ultrasonic cross-sectional images. The technique is applied to two types of ultrasonic investigation, one providing transverse and the other sagittal images. The organ outline has to be traced on each scan. The computer first calculates the area and then the volume from the vector areas and the centroids of a series of sections. The technique has been tested with phantoms of various shapes and volumes made with agar gel. These experiments show that the error in the volume estimation is less than 10% and the variability of measurements is less than 2%. PMID:1887514

  8. MxCSM: A massively-multiplexed coronal spectropolarimetric magnetometer for spaced-based coronal magnetometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Haosheng

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents the conceptual design of a new coronal spectropolarimeter that employs large-scale multiplexing strategy to enable small coronagraphs to perform high-sensitivity measurements of the polarizations of multiple coronal emission lines (CELs) of the whole corona. The massively multiplexed coronal spectropolarimetric magnetometer (mxCSM) is a 25 cm catadioptric off-axis Gregorian coronagraph equipped with two 3-wavelength, 100-slit spectrographs to measure the polarization of six CELs simultaneously at 100 slits over a 1.2 degree x 1.0 degree (2.4 Rsun x 2.0 Rsun ) field of view. The large multiplexing capability of this design allows small coronagraphs to perform high sensitivity spectropolarimetric observations over a large FOV that until now is possible only with large aperture telescopes. Therefore, this design is ideally suited for space missions in which payload size and weight are important considerations. Future space missions with multiple mxCSMs in circumsolar orbits can provide polarization measurements of CELs from multiple lines of sight to enable true tomographic inversion of the coronal magnetic fields.

  9. The role of active region coronal magnetic field in determining coronal mass ejection propagation direction

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Rui; Dai, Xinghua; Yang, Zhongwei; Huang, Chong; Hu, Huidong

    2015-01-01

    We study the role of the coronal magnetic field configuration of an active region in determining the propagation direction of a coronal mass ejection (CME). The CME occurred in the active region 11944 (S09W01) near the disk center on 2014 January 7 and was associated with an X1.2 flare. A new CME reconstruction procedure based on a polarimetric technique is adopted, which shows that the CME changed its propagation direction by around 28$^\\circ$ in latitude within 2.5 R$_\\odot$ and 43$^\\circ$ in longitude within 6.5 R$_\\odot$ with respect to the CME source region. This significant non-radial motion is consistent with the finding of M$\\ddot{o}$stl et al. (2015). We use nonlinear force-free field (NLFFF) and potential field source surface (PFSS) extrapolation methods to determine the configurations of the coronal magnetic field. We also calculate the magnetic energy density distributions at different heights based on the extrapolations. Our results show that the active region coronal magnetic field has a strong ...

  10. Solar jet-coronal hole collision and a related coronal mass ejection

    CERN Document Server

    Zheng, Ruisheng; Du, Guohui; Li, Chuanyang

    2016-01-01

    Jets are defined as impulsive, well-collimated upflows, occurring in different layers of the solar atmosphere with different scales. Their relationship with coronal mass ejections (CMEs), another type of solar impulsive events, remains elusive. Using the high-quality imaging data of AIA/SDO, here we show a well-observed coronal jet event, in which part of the jets, with the embedding coronal loops, runs into a nearby coronal hole (CH) and gets bounced towards the opposite direction. This is evidenced by the flat-shape of the jet front during its interaction with the CH and the V-shaped feature in the time-slice plot of the interaction region. About a half-hour later, a CME initially with a narrow and jet-like front is observed by the LASCO C2 coronagraph, propagating along the direction of the post-collision jet. We also observe some 304 A dark material flowing from the jet-CH interaction region towards the CME. We thus suggest that the jet and the CME are physically connected, with the jet-CH collision and t...

  11. SOLAR JET–CORONAL HOLE COLLISION AND A CLOSELY RELATED CORONAL MASS EJECTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Ruisheng; Chen, Yao; Du, Guohui; Li, Chuanyang, E-mail: ruishengzheng@sdu.edu.cn [Shandong Provincial Key Laboratory of Optical Astronomy and Solar-Terrestrial Environment, and Institute of Space Sciences, Shandong University, 264209, Weihai (China)

    2016-03-10

    Jets are defined as impulsive, well-collimated upflows, occurring in different layers of the solar atmosphere with different scales. Their relationship with coronal mass ejections (CMEs), another type of solar impulsive events, remains elusive. Using high-quality imaging data from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly/Solar Dynamics Observatory, we show a well-observed coronal jet event, in which the part of the jet with embedding coronal loops runs into a nearby coronal hole (CH) and gets bounced in the opposite direction. This is evidenced by the flat shape of the jet front during its interaction with the CH and the V-shaped feature in the time-slice plot of the interaction region. About a half-hour later, a CME with an initially narrow and jet-like front is observed by the LASCO C2 coronagraph propagating along the direction of the post-collision jet. We also observe some 304 Å dark material flowing from the jet–CH interaction region toward the CME. We thus suggest that the jet and the CME are physically connected, with the jet–CH collision and the large-scale magnetic topology of the CH being important in defining the eventual propagating direction of this particular jet–CME eruption.

  12. Coronal Loops: Evolving Beyond the Isothermal Approximation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmelz, J. T.; Cirtain, J. W.; Allen, J. D.

    2002-05-01

    Are coronal loops isothermal? A controversy over this question has arisen recently because different investigators using different techniques have obtained very different answers. Analysis of SOHO-EIT and TRACE data using narrowband filter ratios to obtain temperature maps has produced several key publications that suggest that coronal loops may be isothermal. We have constructed a multi-thermal distribution for several pixels along a relatively isolated coronal loop on the southwest limb of the solar disk using spectral line data from SOHO-CDS taken on 1998 Apr 20. These distributions are clearly inconsistent with isothermal plasma along either the line of sight or the length of the loop, and suggested rather that the temperature increases from the footpoints to the loop top. We speculated originally that these differences could be attributed to pixel size -- CDS pixels are larger, and more `contaminating' material would be expected along the line of sight. To test this idea, we used CDS iron line ratios from our data set to mimic the isothermal results from the narrowband filter instruments. These ratios indicated that the temperature gradient along the loop was flat, despite the fact that a more complete analysis of the same data showed this result to be false! The CDS pixel size was not the cause of the discrepancy; rather, the problem lies with the isothermal approximation used in EIT and TRACE analysis. These results should serve as a strong warning to anyone using this simplistic method to obtain temperature. This warning is echoed on the EIT web page: ``Danger! Enter at your own risk!'' In other words, values for temperature may be found, but they may have nothing to do with physical reality. Solar physics research at the University of Memphis is supported by NASA grant NAG5-9783. This research was funded in part by the NASA/TRACE MODA grant for Montana State University.

  13. Coronal Heating versus Solar Wind Acceleration

    OpenAIRE

    Cranmer, Steven R.

    2004-01-01

    Parker's initial insights from 1958 provided a key causal link between the heating of the solar corona and the acceleration of the solar wind. However, we still do not know what fraction of the solar wind's mass, momentum, and energy flux is driven by Parker-type gas pressure gradients, and what fraction is driven by, e.g., wave-particle interactions or turbulence. SOHO has been pivotal in bringing these ideas back to the forefront of coronal and solar wind research. This paper reviews our cu...

  14. Deficits in Sagittal and Frontal Plane Mechanics during Drop Jump in Young Athletes with Recent Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pace, James Lee; Brophy, Christopher; Mueske, Nicole; Katzel, Mia; Healy, Bitte S.; Wren, Tishya

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: While the vertical drop jump (VDJ) is an established predictor of ACL injury risk, most studies have focused on frontal and transverse plane assessment in young adult athletes. This study assessed sagittal as well as frontal plane biomechanics during VDJ in adolescent athletes following recent anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR). Methods: 29 limbs with unilateral ACLR (69% female, mean age 15.8 ± 1.6 years, 5 to 12 months post-surgery), 29 contralateral non-operative limbs, and 19 control limbs (53% female, mean age of 15.5 ± 1.8 years) were evaluated during VDJ. Lower extremity three-dimensional kinematic and kinetic data from initial contact to peak knee flexion were compared among groups using analysis of variance with Bonferroni post-hoc tests. Results: The operative limbs had significantly lower peak ground reaction forces (GRF) than both control and contralateral limbs (ACLR: 1.7 body weights (BW), Contralateral: 2.1 BW, Control: 2.1 BW; p≤0.01) along with lower average external knee flexion moments (ACLR: 0.7Nm/kg, Contralateral: 0.9Nm/kg, Control: 1.1Nm/kg; p≤0.05) and reduced power absorption at the knee (ACLR: 0.9Nm/kg, Contralateral: 1.5Nm/kg, Control: 1.2Nm/kg; p≤0.01). Operative limbs had lower peak knee flexion (ACLR: 96.8°; Contralateral: 100.7°; p=0.001) and knee flexion excursion (ACLR: 75.0°, Contralateral: 82.5°; p=0.003) than contralateral limbs, but did not differ from controls in these measures. Both operative and non-operative limbs had greater peak hip flexion (ACLR: 98.9°, Contralateral: 99.8°, Control: 83.5°; p≤0.006), hip flexion excursion (ACLR: 60.8°, Contralateral: 65.6°, Control: 49.6°; p=), and power absorption at the hip (ACLR: 1.0Nm/kg, Contralateral: 1.2Nm/kg, Control: 0.7Nm/kg; p<0.03) compared with controls. In the coronal plane, both the operative and non-operative limbs demonstrated higher peak knee valgus moments compared to controls (ACLR: 0.5Nm/kg, Contralateral: 0.4Nm

  15. The structure of fast sausage waves in current-carrying coronal loops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bembitov, D. B.; Mikhalyaev, B. B.; Ruderman, M. S.

    2014-09-01

    We study fast sausage waves in a model coronal loop that consists of a cylindrical core with axial magnetic field and coaxial annulus with purely azimuthal magnetic field. The magnetic field is discontinuous at the tube and core boundaries, and there are surface currents with the opposite directions on these boundaries. The principal mode of fast sausage waves in which the magnetic pressure perturbation has no nodes in the radial direction can exist for arbitrary wavelength. The results for the fundamental radial mode of sausage waves are applied to the interpretation of observed periodic pulsations of microwave emission in flaring loops with periods of a few tens of seconds. Radial plasma motion has opposite directions at the tube and core boundaries. This leads to the periodic contraction and expansion of the annulus. We assume that the principal mode of fast sausage waves in the current-carrying coronal loops is able to produce a current sheet. However, the nonlinear analysis is needed to confirm this conjecture.

  16. Relationship of EUV Irradiance Coronal Dimming Slope and Depth to Coronal Mass Ejection Speed and Mass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, James Paul; Woods, Thomas N.; Webb, David F.; Thompson, Barbara J.; Colaninno, Robin C.; Vourlidas, Angelos

    2016-10-01

    Extreme ultraviolet (EUV) coronal dimmings are often observed in response to solar eruptive events. These phenomena can be generated via several different physical processes. For space weather, the most important of these is the temporary void left behind by a coronal mass ejection (CME). Massive, fast CMEs tend to leave behind a darker void that also usually corresponds to minimum irradiance for the cooler coronal emissions. If the dimming is associated with a solar flare, as is often the case, the flare component of the irradiance light curve in the cooler coronal emission can be isolated and removed using simultaneous measurements of warmer coronal lines. We apply this technique to 37 dimming events identified during two separate two-week periods in 2011 plus an event on 2010 August 7, analyzed in a previous paper to parameterize dimming in terms of depth and slope. We provide statistics on which combination of wavelengths worked best for the flare-removal method, describe the fitting methods applied to the dimming light curves, and compare the dimming parameters with corresponding CME parameters of mass and speed. The best linear relationships found are \\begin{eqnarray*}{v}{CME} ≤ft[\\displaystyle \\frac{{km}}{{{s}}}\\right] & ≈ & 2.36× {10}6 ≤ft[\\displaystyle \\frac{{km}}{ % }\\right]× {s}\\dim ≤ft[\\displaystyle \\frac{ % }{{{s}}}\\right]\\ {m}{CME} [{{g}}] & ≈ & 2.59× {10}15≤ft[\\displaystyle \\frac{g}{ % }\\right]× \\sqrt{{d}\\dim } [ % ].\\end{eqnarray*} These relationships could be used for space weather operations of estimating CME mass and speed using near-real-time irradiance dimming measurements.

  17. Modified transversal sagittal maxillary expander for correction of upper midline deviation associated with maxillary arch deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maspero, C; Giannini, L; Galbiati, G; Farronato, G

    2015-04-01

    The transversal sagittal maxillary expander (TSME) is a fixed device designed to develop arch form in patients with constricted dental arches. The present article describes a modified TSME appliance, the activation method, the therapeutic benefits as well as clinical advantages. The appliance has two molar bands, a Hyrax-type transverse expansion screw, one 0.045-inch wire extending from the molar band to the palatal surface of the central incisor in the emiarch crossbite and an 8 mm-Hyrax-type screw attached to this wire between the molar band and the incisor. A buccal arm with a terminal loop is welded to the band in the emiarch and it is extended to the labial surface on the central incisor on the side opposite to the crossbite and the maxillary midline deviation. The modified TSME appliance described in this paper are specifically designed for anteroposterior and transverse development. It has a sagittal effect on the maxillary alveolar process and at the same time allow to restore the correct transverse maxillary diameters. PMID:25747426

  18. Measuring the Reliability of Sagittal Facial Anthropometric Measurements under Soft Tissue Displacement Using a Modified Ruler

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faramarz Mojtahedzadeh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Despite the current use of radiography for quantifying sagittal skeletal measurements, it is an unsuitable way for screening or epidemiologic purposes. Although not fully approved, anthropometric measurements have been suggested as a substitute, and considering displacement of soft tissues, could possibly lead to more consistent results. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the reliability of anthropometric anteroposterior facial measurements under soft tissue compression using a special ruler.Material and Methods: Anthropometric measurements were done with a specifically designed sliding ruler twice on 36 adult patients with a 14 day lag between two measurements. The ruler measured the distance between the external acoustic meatus and the nasion (Na, subnasal (Sn point and the soft tissue pogonion (Pog. The soft tissue was displaced during measurements only to the extent that the underlying hard tissue resistance was felt subjectively by each assessor. The intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC was calculated for both inter- and intra- rater measurements using SPSS software.Results: All measurements had inter- and intrarater agreements above 0.9, with only a few parameters having lower bound confidence intervals below 0.9, but more than 0.8.Conclusion: Sagittal facial anthropometric measurements under soft tissue displacement using the specific ruler are valid and reliable and could possibly aid orthodontists in chairside craniofacial assessments.

  19. Incomplete oblique sagittal fractures of the dorsal cortex of the third metacarpal bone in six horses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To describe incomplete oblique sagittal dorsal cortical fractures of the equine third metacarpal bone, their surgical repair, and subsequent performance of the horses. Retrospective examination of medical records and racing performance. Six Thoroughbred race horses, 2 to 4 years of age. Radiographic confirmation of all fractures preceded general anesthesia and surgical correction. Three fractures were treated by intracortical compression using screws placed in lag fashion, and five fractures were treated by osteostixis. Race records were reviewed for each horse to determine performance after surgery. Fractures were best observed on palmarodorsal radiographic projections. Three horses treated by intracortical compression returned to racing, but fracture recurred in one horse and was treated by osteostixis. This horse and the other three horses treated by osteostixis raced after surgery. Horses with incomplete oblique sagittal fractures of the dorsal cortex of the third metacarpal bone can race after surgical management of the fracture by screws placed in lag fashion or osteostixis. The authors' preferred surgical procedure for managing this fracture is osteostixis. Palmarodorsal radiographic projections of the third metacarpal bone are recommended in young Thoroughbred race horses suspected of having dorsal metacarpal stress fractures

  20. Normal development of brainstem in childhood. Measurement of the area on mid-sagittal MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Developmental abnormality of brainstem is shown in pediatric patients with mental retardation, autism, periventricular leukomalacia, neurodegenerative disease, and so on. Our purpose here is to clarify the normal developmental pattern of the brainstem. We measured the area of tectum, midbrain tegmentum, pons, basis pontis and pontine tegmentum on mid-sagittal MR images in 111 children (newborn to 20 year old). Different growth patterns were shown in all parts of the brainstem. Tectum showed a subtle increase in area from the newborn to adult period, while midbrain tegmentum and pontine tegmenturn showed a mild and gradual increase in area. Pons and pontine tegmentum showed a rapid and prominent increase in area from newborn to infant period and gradual increase in area until the adult period. These different growth patterns seemed to be consistent with differences in the myelination cycles of the neuronal fibers, maturation of the nuclei and proliferation of glial cells in each part of the brainstem. Mid-sagittal MR imaging of the head is accurate and reproducible and is used conveniently in routine head MR study, making it very useful for the diagnosis of many central nervous diseases and anomalies. We believe that this new milestone provided in this study will be helpful in distinguishing normal children from those that have neurodegenerative disorders. (author)

  1. Bilateral lambdoid and sagittal synostosis (BLSS): a unique craniosynostosis syndrome or predictable craniofacial phenotype?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hing, Anne V; Click, Eleanor S; Holder, Ursula; Seto, Marianne L; Vessey, Kyle; Gruss, Joseph; Hopper, Richard; Cunningham, Michael L

    2009-05-01

    Multisutural craniosynostosis that includes bilateral lambdoid and sagittal synostosis (BLSS) results in a very characteristic head shape with frontal bossing, turribrachycephaly, biparietal narrowing, occipital concavity, and inferior displacement of the ears. This entity has been reported both in the genetics literature as craniofacial dyssynostosis and in the surgical literature as "Mercedes Benz" syndrome. Craniofacial dyssynostosis was first described in 1976 by Dr. Neuhauser when he presented a series of seven patients with synostosis of the sagittal and lambdoid sutures, short stature, and developmental delay. Over the past 30 years nine additional patients with craniofacial dyssynostosis have been reported in the literature adding to the growing evidence for a distinct craniosynostosis syndrome. The term "Mercedes Benz" syndrome was coined by Moore et al. in 1998 due to the characteristic appearance of the fused sutures on three-dimensional CT imaging. In contrast to the aforementioned reported cases of craniofacial dyssynostosis, all three patients had normal development. Recently, there have been several case reports of patients with BLSS and distinct chromosomal anomalies. These findings suggest that BLSS is a heterogeneous disorder perhaps with syndromic, chromosomal, and isolated forms. In this manuscript we will present the largest series of patients with BLSS and review clinical, CT, and molecular findings. PMID:19396832

  2. Sagittal and Frontal Plane Evaluation of the Whole Spine and Clinical Outcomes after Vertebral Fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Topalidou

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Although it is known that a change in any level of the spine alters biomechanics, there are not many studies to evaluate the spine as a whole in both sagittal and frontal planes. This prospective cohort study evaluates the morphology and mobility of the entire spine in patients with vertebral fractures. The Treatment Group consisted of 43 patients who underwent percutaneous balloon kyphoplasty or percutaneous balloon kyphoplasty plus fixation. The Control Group consisted of 39 healthy subjects. Spinal Mouse was used for the assessment of the curvatures and the mobility of the spine. Clinical outcomes were evaluated by Visual Analogue Scale and Oswestry Disability Index. The measurements were recorded at 15 days and 3, 6, and 12 months postoperatively. Regarding the curvatures and mobility in sagittal plane, a statistically significant increase appeared early at 3 months, for lumbar curve, spinopelvic angulation, and overall trunk inclination. In the frontal plane, most of the improvements were recorded after 6 months. Patients with osteoporotic fracture showed statistically significant lower mean value than patients with traumatic fracture. Pain and disability index showed early improvements. This study provides a comprehensive and complete picture of the functionality of the spine in patients treated with percutaneous balloon kyphoplasty.

  3. Segmentation of Coronal Holes Using Active Contours Without Edges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boucheron, L. E.; Valluri, M.; McAteer, R. T. J.

    2016-10-01

    An application of active contours without edges is presented as an efficient and effective means of extracting and characterizing coronal holes. Coronal holes are regions of low-density plasma on the Sun with open magnetic field lines. The detection and characterization of these regions is important for testing theories of their formation and evolution, and also from a space weather perspective because they are the source of the fast solar wind. Coronal holes are detected in full-disk extreme ultraviolet (EUV) images of the corona obtained with the Solar Dynamics Observatory Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (SDO/AIA). The proposed method detects coronal boundaries without determining any fixed intensity value in the data. Instead, the active contour segmentation employs an energy-minimization in which coronal holes are assumed to have more homogeneous intensities than the surrounding active regions and quiet Sun. The segmented coronal holes tend to correspond to unipolar magnetic regions, are consistent with concurrent solar wind observations, and qualitatively match the coronal holes segmented by other methods. The means to identify a coronal hole without specifying a final intensity threshold may allow this algorithm to be more robust across multiple datasets, regardless of data type, resolution, and quality.

  4. Segmentation of Coronal Holes Using Active Contours Without Edges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boucheron, L. E.; Valluri, M.; McAteer, R. T. J.

    2016-09-01

    An application of active contours without edges is presented as an efficient and effective means of extracting and characterizing coronal holes. Coronal holes are regions of low-density plasma on the Sun with open magnetic field lines. The detection and characterization of these regions is important for testing theories of their formation and evolution, and also from a space weather perspective because they are the source of the fast solar wind. Coronal holes are detected in full-disk extreme ultraviolet (EUV) images of the corona obtained with the Solar Dynamics Observatory Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (SDO/AIA). The proposed method detects coronal boundaries without determining any fixed intensity value in the data. Instead, the active contour segmentation employs an energy-minimization in which coronal holes are assumed to have more homogeneous intensities than the surrounding active regions and quiet Sun. The segmented coronal holes tend to correspond to unipolar magnetic regions, are consistent with concurrent solar wind observations, and qualitatively match the coronal holes segmented by other methods. The means to identify a coronal hole without specifying a final intensity threshold may allow this algorithm to be more robust across multiple datasets, regardless of data type, resolution, and quality.

  5. Axial Vector $Z'$ and Anomaly Cancellation

    CERN Document Server

    Ismail, Ahmed; Tsao, Kuo-Hsing; Unwin, James

    2016-01-01

    Whilst the prospect of new $Z'$ gauge bosons with only axial couplings to the Standard Model (SM) fermions is widely discussed, examples of anomaly-free renormalisable models are lacking in the literature. We look to remedy this by constructing several motivated examples. Specifically, we consider axial vectors which couple universally to all SM fermions, as well as those which are generation-specific, leptophilic, and leptophobic. Anomaly cancellation typically requires the presence of new coloured and charged chiral fermions, and we argue that the masses of these new states must generally be comparable to that of the axial vector. Finally, an axial vector mediator could provide a portal between SM and hidden sector states, and we also consider the possibility that the axial vector couples to dark matter. If the dark matter relic density is set due to freeze-out via the axial vector, this strongly constrains the parameter space.

  6. Mass Effect on Axial Charge Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Guo, Er-dong

    2016-01-01

    We studied effect of finite quark mass on the dynamics of axial charge using the D3/D7 model in holography. The mass term in axial anomaly equation affects both the fluctuation (generation) and dissipation of axial charge. We studied the dependence of the effect on quark mass and external magnetic field. For axial charge generation, we calculated the mass diffusion rate, which characterizes the helicity flipping rate. The rate is a non-monotonous function of mass and can be significantly enhanced by the magnetic field. The diffusive behavior is also related to a divergent susceptibility of axial charge. For axial charge dissipation, we found that in the long time limit, the mass term dissipates all the charge effectively generated by parallel electric and magnetic fields. The result is consistent with a relaxation time approximation. The rate of dissipation through mass term is a monotonous increasing function of both quark mass and magnetic field.

  7. Interplanetary Propagation of Coronal Mass Ejections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalswamy, Nat

    2011-01-01

    Although more than ten thousand coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are produced during each solar cycle at the Sun, only a small fraction hits the Earth. Only a small fraction of the Earth-directed CMEs ultimately arrive at Earth depending on their interaction with the solar wind and other large-scale structures such as coronal holes and CMEs. The interplanetary propagation is essentially controlled by the drag force because the propelling force and the solar gravity are significant only near the Sun. Combined remote-sensing and in situ observations have helped us estimate the influence of the solar wind on the propagation of CMEs. However, these measurements have severe limitations because the remote-sensed and in-situ observations correspond to different portions of the CME. Attempts to overcome this problem are made in two ways: the first is to model the CME and get the space speed of the CME, which can be compared with the in situ speed. The second method is to use stereoscopic observation so that the remote-sensed and in-situ observations make measurements on the Earth-arriving part of CMEs. The Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO) mission observed several such CMEs, which helped understand the interplanetary evolution of these CMEs and to test earlier model results. This paper discusses some of these issues and updates the CME/shock travel time estimates for a number of CMEs.

  8. Energetics of Solar Coronal Mass Ejections

    CERN Document Server

    Subramanian, P; Subramanian, Prasad; Vourlidas, Angelos

    2007-01-01

    Aims: To investigate if solar coronal mass ejections are driven mainly by coupling to the ambient solar wind, or through the release of internal magnetic energy. Methods: We examine the energetics of 39 flux-rope like coronal mass ejections (CMEs) from the Sun using data in the distance range $\\sim$ 2--20 $R_{{\\o}dot}$ from the Large Angle Spectroscopic Coronograph (LASCO) aboard the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO). This comprises a complete sample of the best examples of flux-rope CMEs observed by LASCO in 1996-2001. Results: We find that 69% of the CMEs in our sample experience a clearly identifiable driving power in the LASCO field of view. For these CMEs which are driven, we examine if they might be deriving most of their driving power by coupling to the solar wind. We do not find conclusive evidence in favor of this hypothesis. On the other hand, we find that their internal magnetic energy is a viable source of the required driving power. We have estimated upper and lower limits on the power th...

  9. Coronal Heating versus Solar Wind Acceleration

    CERN Document Server

    Cranmer, S R

    2004-01-01

    Parker's initial insights from 1958 provided a key causal link between the heating of the solar corona and the acceleration of the solar wind. However, we still do not know what fraction of the solar wind's mass, momentum, and energy flux is driven by Parker-type gas pressure gradients, and what fraction is driven by, e.g., wave-particle interactions or turbulence. SOHO has been pivotal in bringing these ideas back to the forefront of coronal and solar wind research. This paper reviews our current understanding of coronal heating in the context of the acceleration of the fast and slow solar wind. For the fast solar wind, a recent model of Alfven wave generation, propagation, and non-WKB reflection is presented and compared with UVCS, SUMER, radio, and in-situ observations at the last solar minimum. The derived fractions of energy and momentum addition from thermal and nonthermal processes are found to be consistent with various sets of observational data. For the more chaotic slow solar wind, the relative rol...

  10. SAUSAGE OSCILLATIONS OF CORONAL PLASMA STRUCTURES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakariakov, V. M.; Hornsey, C. [Physics Department, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Melnikov, V. F., E-mail: V.Nakariakov@warwick.ac.uk [Central Astronomical Observatory at Pulkovo of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 196140 St Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    2012-12-20

    The dependence of the period of sausage oscillations of coronal loops on length together with the depth and steepness of the radial profile are determined. We performed a parametric study of linear axisymmetric fast magnetoacoustic (sausage) oscillations of coronal loops modeled as a field-aligned low-{beta} plasma cylinder with a smooth inhomogeneity of the plasma density in the radial direction. The density decreases smoothly in the radial direction. Sausage oscillations are impulsively excited by a perturbation of the radial velocity, localized at the cylinder axis and with a harmonic dependence on the longitudinal coordinate. The initial perturbation results in either a leaky or a trapped sausage oscillation, depending upon whether the longitudinal wavenumber is smaller or greater than a cutoff value, respectively. The period of the sausage oscillations was found to always increase with increasing longitudinal wavelength, with the dependence saturating in the long-wavelength limit. Deeper and steeper radial profiles of the Alfven speed correspond to more efficient trapping of sausage modes: the cutoff value of the wavelength increases with the steepness and the density (or Alfven speed) contrast ratio. In the leaky regime, the period is always longer than the period of a trapped mode of a shorter wavelength in the same cylinder. For shallow density profiles and shorter wavelengths, the period increases with wavelength. In the long-wavelength limit, the period becomes independent of the wavelength and increases with the depth and steepness of the radial profile of the Alfven speed.

  11. Particle Heating Resulting from Coronal Mass Ejection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Suman; Sundar De, Syam; Guha, Gautam

    2016-07-01

    Coronal Mass Ejection (CME) is a continuous phenomena occurring from the entire solar coronal zone responsible for the outflow of solar masses, viz., protons, electrons, neutrons and solar wind in the form of plasma. These perturb the Earth's atmosphere via magnetopause. Very high temperature plasma generator in the solar atmosphere produces huge magnetic dipoles with intense magnetic field. It traps the energetic charged particles released from the solar corona. These particles gyrate along the magnetic field lines and are gradually elongated outwards from the Sun. Due to this, the field lines get detached at some critical limit thereby enhancing the magnetic reconnection with the interplanetary magnetic field releasing huge energy in the form of X-rays and γ-rays. This perturbs the Earth's atmosphere. In this work, the situation has been investigated by momentum balance equation, energy balance equation along with the equations of continuity and states. From the analyses, the dispersive nature of the thermospheric medium is studied. Variation of normalized electron temperature with dimensionless time has been critically contemplated. The altitude dependent electric field in the medium is also investigated.

  12. Ultraviolet spectroscopy of narrow coronal mass ejections

    CERN Document Server

    Dobrzycka, D; Biesecker, D A; Li, J; Ciaravella, A

    2003-01-01

    We present Ultraviolet Coronagraph Spectrometer (UVCS) observations of 5 narrow coronal mass ejections (CMEs) that were among 15 narrow CMEs originally selected by Gilbert et al. (2001). Two events (1999 March 27, April 15) were "structured", i.e. in white light data they exhibited well defined interior features, and three (1999 May 9, May 21, June 3) were "unstructured", i.e. appeared featureless. In UVCS data the events were seen as 4-13 deg wide enhancements of the strongest coronal lines HI Ly-alpha and OVI (1032,1037 A). We derived electron densities for several of the events from the Large Angle Spectrometric Coronagraph (LASCO) C2 white light observations. They are comparable to or smaller than densities inferred for other CMEs. We modeled the observable properties of examples of the structured (1999 April 15) and unstructured (1999 May 9) narrow CMEs at different heights in the corona between 1.5 and 2 R(Sun). The derived electron temperatures, densities and outflow speeds are similar for those two ty...

  13. A Moreton Wave and its Coronal Counterparts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francile, Carlos N.; Mandrini, Cristina H.; Long, David; Cremades, Hebe; Lopez, Fernando M.; Luoni, Maria Luisa

    2016-07-01

    On 29 March 2014, a Moreton wave was detected in AR 12017 with the Halpha Solar Telescope for Argentina (HASTA) in association with an X1 flare. Several phenomena took place in various regimes in connection with this event, such as low coronal waves and a coronal mass ejection (CME). We investigate their role and relationship with the Moreton wave to shed light on issues so far under debate. We analyze its connection with waves observed in the low corona with the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly aboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO/AIA), as well as with the ensuing CME, via kinematics analyses. We build stack plots from sequences of images obtained at different wavelengths to track wave fronts along several directions and find links between the features observed in the chromosphere and low corona, as well as in the associated CME. We also derive the shock front properties. We propose a geometrical model of the wave to explain the observed wave fronts as the photospheric and chromospheric traces of an expanding and outward-traveling bubble intersecting the Sun.

  14. Roles of Sagittal Anatomical Parameters of the Pelvis in Primary Total Hip Replacement for Patients with Ankylosing Spondylitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Minghui; Zhang, Zhiqi; Kang, Yan; Sheng, Puyi; Yang, Zibo; Zhang, Ziji; Liao, Weiming

    2015-12-01

    We examined the correlation between acetabular prostheses and sagittal anatomical parameters of the pelvis for the preoperative evaluation of total hip arthroplasty in 29 patients with ankylosing spondylitis between April 2004 and November 2011. No implant dislocation or subsidence was observed at 4.18 years. The relationship between sagittal parameters conformed to the equation Pelvic incidence (PI)=Pelvic tilt (PT)+Sacral slope (SS). Better outcomes were achieved in the SS>PT group, postoperative function was positively correlated with SS/PI. Functional abduction and anteversion were positively correlated with PT but negatively correlated with SS. Due to the compensatory changes in the pelvis and spine of patients with AS, the preoperative assessment of sagittal parameters plays pivotal roles in placing acetabular prostheses in optimal positions and preventing postoperative impingement and dislocation. PMID:26164560

  15. Solar Wind Associated with Near Equatorial Coronal Hole

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M. Hegde; K. M. Hiremath; Vijayakumar H. Doddamani; Shashanka R. Gurumath

    2015-09-01

    Present study probes temporal changes in the area and radiative flux of near equatorial coronal hole associated with solar wind parameters such as wind speed, density, magnetic field and temperature. Using high temporal resolution data from SDO/AIA for the two wave-lengths 193 Å and 211 Å, area and radiative flux of coronal holes are extracted and are examined for the association with high speed solar wind parameters. We find a strong association between different parameters of coronal hole and solar wind. For both the wavelength bands, we also compute coronal hole radiative energy near the earth and it is found to be of similar order as that of solar wind energy. However, for the wavelength 193 Å, owing to almost similar magnitudes of energy emitted by coronal hole and energy due to solar wind, it is conjectured that solar wind might have originated around the same height where 193 Å line is formed in the corona.

  16. Solar Magnetic Carpet III: Coronal Modelling of Synthetic Magnetograms

    CERN Document Server

    Meyer, K A; van Ballegooijen, A A; Parnell, C E; 10.1007/s11207-013-0272-1

    2013-01-01

    This paper is the third in a series of papers working towards the construction of a realistic, evolving, non-linear force-free coronal field model for the solar magnetic carpet. Here, we present preliminary results of 3D time-dependent simulations of the small-scale coronal field of the magnetic carpet. Four simulations are considered, each with the same evolving photospheric boundary condition: a 48 hr time series of synthetic magnetograms produced from the model of Meyer, Mackay, van Ballegooijen and Parnell, 2011, Solar Phys., 272, 29. Three simulations include a uniform, overlying coronal magnetic field of differing strength, the fourth simulation includes no overlying field. The build-up, storage and dissipation of magnetic energy within the simulations is studied. In particular, we study their dependence upon the evolution of the photospheric magnetic field and the strength of the overlying coronal field. We also consider where energy is stored and dissipated within the coronal field. The free magnetic ...

  17. Stellar Coronal Response to Differential Rotation and Flux Emergence

    CERN Document Server

    Gibb, G P S; Jardine, M M; Yeates, A R

    2016-01-01

    We perform a numerical parameter study to determine what effect varying differential rotation and flux emergence has on a star's non-potential coronal magnetic field. In particular we consider the effects on the star's surface magnetic flux, open magnetic flux, mean azimuthal field strength, coronal free magnetic energy, coronal heating and flux rope eruptions. To do this, we apply a magnetic flux transport model to describe the photospheric evolution, and couple this to the non-potential coronal evolution using a magnetofrictional technique. A flux emergence model is applied to add new magnetic flux onto the photosphere and into the corona. The parameters of this flux emergence model are derived from the solar flux emergence profile, however the rate of emergence can be increased to represent higher flux emergence rates than the Sun's. Overall we find that flux emergence has a greater effect on the non-potential coronal properties compared to differential rotation, with all the aforementioned properties incr...

  18. Observational Characteristics of CMEs without Low Coronal Signatures

    CERN Document Server

    D'Huys, E; Poedts, S; Berghmans, D

    2014-01-01

    Solar eruptions are usually associated with a variety of phenomena occurring in the low corona before, during, and after onset of eruption. Though easily visible in coronagraph observations, so-called stealth coronal mass ejections (CMEs) do not obviously exhibit any of these low-coronal signatures. The presence or absence of distinct low coronal signatures can be linked to different theoretical models to establish the mechanisms by which the eruption is initiated and driven. In this study, 40 CMEs without low coronal signatures, occurring in 2012, are identified. Their observational and kinematic properties are analyzed and compared to those of regular CMEs. Solar eruptions without clear on-disk or low coronal signatures can lead to unexpected space weather impacts, since many early warning signs for significant space weather activity are not present in these events. A better understanding of their initiation mechanism(s) will considerably improve the ability to predict such space weather events.

  19. Origin of axial current in scyllac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The origin of the axial current observed in Scyllac (a high beta stellarator experiment) is discussed. A shaped coil and/or helical winding produce rotational transform which links magnetic lines of force to the plasma column and the axial current is induced electromagnetically. This phenomenon is inherent in a pulsed high-beta stellarator. The rotational transform produced by the induced axial current is much smaller than that associated with the l = 1, 0 equilibrium fields. The effect of the axial current on the equilibrium and stability of the plasma column is thus small. It is also shown that the magnetic field shear near a plasma surface is very strong

  20. Reliability of the Radiographic Sagittal and Frontal Tibiotalar Alignment after Ankle Arthrodesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madeleine Willegger

    Full Text Available Accurate measurement of the tibiotalar alignment is important in radiographic outcome assessment of ankle arthrodesis (AA. In studies, various radiological methods have been used to measure the tibiotalar alignment leading to facultative misinterpretation of results. However, to our knowledge, no previous study has investigated the reliability of tibiotalar alignment measurement in AA. We aimed to investigate the reliability of four different methods of measurement of the frontal and sagittal tibiotalar alignment after AA, and to further clarify the most reliable method for determining the longitudinal axis of the tibia.Thirty-eight weight bearing anterior to posterior and lateral ankle radiographs of thirty-seven patients who had undergone AA with a two screw fixation technique were selected. Three observers measured the frontal tibiotalar angle (FTTA and the sagittal tibiotalar angle (STTA using four different methods. The methods differed by the definition of the longitudinal tibial axis. Method A was defined by a line drawn along the lateral tibial border in anterior to posterior radiographs and along the posterior tibial border in lateral radiographs. Method B was defined by a line connecting two points in the middle of the proximal and the distal tibial shaft. Method C was drawn "freestyle"along the longitudinal axis of the tibia, and method D was defined by a line connecting the center of the tibial articular surface and a point in the middle of the proximal tibial shaft. Intra- and interobserver correlation coefficients (ICC and repeated measurement ANOVA were calculated to assess measurement reliability and accuracy.All four methods showed excellent inter- and intraobserver reliability for the FTTA and the STTA. When the longitudinal tibial axis is defined by connecting two points in the middle of the proximal and the distal tibial shaft, the highest interobserver reliability for the FTTA (ICC: 0.980; CI 95%: 0.966-0.989 and for the

  1. Blockade of calcitonin gene-related peptide release after superior sagittal sinus stimulation in cat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knight, Y E; Edvinsson, L; Goadsby, P J

    1999-01-01

    . Avitriptan and CP122,288 both have strong binding affinities for 5HT(1B/1D)receptors, but only CP122,288 is a potent inhibitor of PPE. In this study we sought to compare the effects of CP122,288 and avitriptan on jugular vein CGRP release after stimulation of the superior sagittal sinus (SSS) in the cat....... In eleven anaesthetized cats external jugular vein blood samples were analyzed by radioimmunoassay for CGRP levels in three settings: a) control, b) 1 min after SSS stimulation and c) 1 min after SSS stimulation in presence of drug. Stimulation of the SSS resulted in release of CGRP from the external...

  2. Macrocephaly-capillary malformation syndrome in a newborn with tetralogy of fallot and sagittal sinus thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ercan, Tugba Erener; Oztunc, Funda; Celkan, Tiraje; Bor, Meltem; Kizilkilic, Osman; Vural, Mehmet; Perk, Yildiz; Islak, Civan; Tuysuz, Beyhan

    2013-01-01

    Macrocephaly-capillary malformation syndrome is characterized by cutaneous vascular malformations with associated anomalies as macrocephaly, macrosomia, hemihypertrophy, hypotonia, developmental delay, lax joints, loose skin, polysyndactyly, and neuroimaging abnormalities. We present a newborn with a prenatal diagnosis of macrosomia and tetralogy of Fallot. He also had macrocephaly; a high forehead; capillary hemangioma on the forehead, upper lip, and philtrum; generalized loose skin; postaxial polydactyly of both hands and feet, with neuroimaging findings of polymicrogyria and thrombosis in sagittal sinus and sinus rectus. His condition was diagnosed as macrocephaly-capillary malformation syndrome in the neonatal period and he died suddenly during sleep at 6 months of age. The clinical course in this syndrome is not as benign as was previously thought. Careful follow-up of these patients with particular emphasis on neuroradiologic and cardiologic evaluation might help decrease the risk of sudden death and to improve long-term outcome. PMID:22451530

  3. Emergency surgical management of traumatic superior sagittal sinus injury: An unusual case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudhansu Sekhar Mishra

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Head injuries following fall of heavy objects are not very uncommon in developing countries. However, compound depressed skull fracture with superior sagittal sinus (SSS laceration caused by a flying asbestos fragment in a stormy afternoon is an unusual mode of head injury. We report such an unusual case of compound depressed skull fracture by an asbestos fragment injuring the middle third of SSS and its successful surgical management in a 14-year-old child. The role of computed tomography (CT scan of head with 3D reconstruction is highlighted. Early steps taken in this case to check the profuse bleeding, which helped save the life of this boy is interesting to note.

  4. Effect of sagittal plane positioning errors on measurement of the angle of inclination in dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angles of inclination were calculated from ventrodorsal (VD) and caudocranial horizontal beam (CaCrHB) radiographs of 17 anesthetized dogs, and from radiographs of left femurs of the same dogs positioned 0 degree, 10 degrees, 15 degrees, and 20 degrees from the cassette in the sagittal plane. Angles of inclination also were measured directly from radiographs of the bones rotated to correct for anteversion. Calculated angles of inclination from the bones at 10 degrees, 15 degrees, and 20 degrees from the cassette were significantly different from the 0 degree values obtained by calculation and direct measurement. Inclination angles from live dogs were consistently larger than those from 0 degree bones. Differences between angles of inclination calculated from VD and CaCrHB radiographs of live dogs were not significant

  5. Influence of neck pain on cervical movement in the sagittal plane during smartphone use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Man-Sig

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] Smartphone use reportedly changes posture. However, how neck posture is altered in smartphone users with neck pain is unknown. This study examined changes in the posture of young adults with and without mild neck pain (MNP) when using a smartphone. [Subjects] Thirteen control subjects and 14 subjects with MNP who used smartphones were recruited. [Methods] The upper cervical (UC) and lower cervical (LC) angles in the sagittal plane were measured using an ultrasound-based motion analysis system while the seated subjects used a smartphone for 5 min. [Results] During smartphone use, the MNP group exhibited greater UC and LC flexion angles than the control group. [Conclusion] These findings suggest that young adults with MNP are more careful and more frequently utilize a neutral neck posture than young adults without MNP when using a smartphone while sitting. PMID:25642027

  6. Moyamoya disease and sagittal sinus thrombosis in a child with Down's syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Del-Rio Camacho, G.; Leal Orozco, A.; Camino Lopez, M.; Ruiz-Moreno, M. [Dept. of Paediatrics, Fundacion Jimenez Diaz, Madrid (Spain); Perez-Higueras, A.; Al-Assir, I. [Dept. of Neuroradiology, Fundacion Jimenez Diaz, Madrid (Spain)

    2001-02-01

    A girl with Down's syndrome, moyamoya disease and sagittal sinus thrombosis is described. She was diagnosed after acute neurological deterioration by MRI and angiography. Recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (r-TPA) was injected locally to recanalise the thrombus. The patient's condition significantly improved and she was discharged. After 2 years of follow-up the child remains asymptomatic. Moyamoya syndrome and cerebral venous thrombosis should not be overlooked as a cause of acute neurological deterioration in a child with Down's syndrome. MRA appears to be a safe and accurate alternative to traditional angiography for the diagnosis of moyamoya disease. Local fibrinolysis with r-TPA is the treatment of choice for cerebral venous thrombosis due to its safety and efficacy. (orig.)

  7. Anomalous absorption of bulk shear sagittal acoustic waves in a layered structure with viscous fluid

    CERN Document Server

    Gramotnev, D K; Nieminen, T A; Gramotnev, Dmitri K.; Mather, Melissa L.; Nieminen, Timo A.

    2003-01-01

    It is demonstrated theoretically that the absorptivity of bulk shear sagittal waves by an ultra-thin layer of viscous fluid between two different elastic media has a strong maximum (in some cases as good as 100%) at an optimal layer thickness. This thickness is usually much smaller than the penetration depths and lengths of transverse and longitudinal waves in the fluid. The angular dependencies of the absorptivity are demonstrated to have significant and unusual structure near critical angles of incidence. The effect of non-Newtonian properties and non-uniformities of the fluid layer on the absorptivity is also investigated. In particular, it is shown that the absorption in a thin layer of viscous fluid is much more sensitive to non-zero relaxation time(s) in the fluid layer than the absorption at an isolated solid-fluid interface.

  8. Health and imaging outcomes in axial spondyloarthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Machado, P.M.

    2016-01-01

    This thesis focuses on the assessment and monitoring of health and imaging outcomes in axial spondyloarthritis (SpA) and the relationship between these outcomes. Four major contributions to the understanding and management of axial SpA were made: 1) the improvement and facilitation of the assessment

  9. COMBINING PARTICLE ACCELERATION AND CORONAL HEATING VIA DATA-CONSTRAINED CALCULATIONS OF NANOFLARES IN CORONAL LOOPS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We model nanoflare heating of extrapolated active-region coronal loops via the acceleration of electrons and protons in Harris-type current sheets. The kinetic energy of the accelerated particles is estimated using semi-analytical and test-particle-tracing approaches. Vector magnetograms and photospheric Doppler velocity maps of NOAA active region 09114, recorded by the Imaging Vector Magnetograph, were used for this analysis. A current-free field extrapolation of the active-region corona was first constructed. The corresponding Poynting fluxes at the footpoints of 5000 extrapolated coronal loops were then calculated. Assuming that reconnecting current sheets develop along these loops, we utilized previous results to estimate the kinetic energy gain of the accelerated particles. We related this energy to nanoflare heating and macroscopic loop characteristics. Kinetic energies of 0.1-8 keV (for electrons) and 0.3-470 keV (for protons) were found to cause heating rates ranging from 10–6 to 1 erg s–1 cm–3. Hydrodynamic simulations show that such heating rates can sustain plasma in coronal conditions inside the loops and generate plasma thermal distributions that are consistent with active-region observations. We concluded the analysis by computing the form of X-ray spectra generated by the accelerated electrons using the thick-target approach. These spectra were found to be in agreement with observed X-ray spectra, thus supporting the plausibility of our nanoflare-heating scenario.

  10. Relationship Between a Coronal Mass Ejection-Driven Shock and a Coronal Metric Type II Burst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y.; Luhmann, J. G.; Bale, S. D.; Lin, R. P.

    2009-02-01

    It has been an intense matter of debate whether coronal metric type II bursts are generated by coronal mass ejection (CME)-driven shocks or flare blast waves. Using unprecedented high-cadence observations from STEREO/SECCHI, we investigate the relationship between a metric type II event and a shock driven by the 2007 December 31 CME. The existence of the CME-driven shock is indicated by the remote deflection of coronal structures, which is in good timing with the metric type II burst. The CME speed is about 600 km s-1 when the metric type II burst occurs, much larger than the Alfvén speed of 419-489 km s-1 determined from band splitting of the type II burst. A causal relationship is well established between the metric and decametric-hectometric type II bursts. The shock height-time curve determined from the type II bands is also consistent with the shock propagation obtained from the streamer deflection. These results provide unambiguous evidence that the metric type II burst is caused by the CME-driven shock.

  11. Coronal Mass Ejections: From Sun to Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patsourakos, S.

    2016-06-01

    Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) are gigantic expulsions of magnetized plasmas from the solar corona into the interplanetary (IP) space. CMEs spawn ~ 1015 gr of mass and reach speeds ranging between several hundred to a few thousand km/s (e.g., Gopalswamy et al. 2009; Vourlidas et al. 2010). It takes 1-5 days for a CME to reach Earth. CMEs are one of the most energetic eruptive manifestations in the solar system and are major drivers of space weather via their magnetic fields and energetic particles, which are accelerated by CME-driven shocks. In this review we give a short account of recent, mainly observational, results on CMEs from the STEREO and SDO missions which include the nature of their pre-eruptive and eruptive configurations and the CME propagation from Sun to Earth. We conclude with a discussion of the exciting capabilities in CME studies that will soon become available from new solar and heliospheric instrumentation.

  12. Magnetic structure of Coronal Mass Ejections

    CERN Document Server

    Lyutikov, Maxim

    2012-01-01

    We present several models of the magnetic structure of solar coronal mass ejections (CMEs). First, we model CMEs as expanding force-free magnetic structures. While keeping the internal magnetic field structure of the stationary solutions, expansion leads to complicated internal velocities and rotation, while the field structures remain force-free. Second, expansion of a CME can drive resistive dissipation within the CME changing the ionization states of different ions. We fit in situ measurements of ion charge states to the resistive spheromak solutions. Finally, we consider magnetic field structures of fully confined stable magnetic clouds containing both toroidal and poloidal magnetic fields and having no surface current sheets. Expansion of such clouds may lead to sudden onset of reconnection events.

  13. Kinematical properties of coronal mass ejections

    CERN Document Server

    Temmer, Manuela

    2016-01-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are the most dynamic phenomena in our solar system. They abruptly disrupt the continuous outflow of solar wind by expelling huge clouds of magnetized plasma into interplanetary space with velocities enabling to cross the Sun-Earth distance within a few days. Earth-directed CMEs may cause severe geomagnetic storms when their embedded magnetic fields and the shocks ahead compress and reconnect with the Earth's magnetic field. The transit times and impacts in detail depend on the initial CME velocity, size, and mass, as well as on the conditions and coupling processes with the ambient solar wind flow in interplanetary space. The observed CME parameters may be severly affected by projection effects and the constant changing environmental conditions are hard to derive. This makes it difficult to fully understand the physics behind CME evolution, preventing to do a reliable forecast of Earth-directed events. This short review focusing on observational data, shows recent methods which w...

  14. Coronal Neutrino Emission in Hypercritical Accretion Flows

    CERN Document Server

    Kawabata, R; Kawanaka, N

    2007-01-01

    Hypercritical accretion flows onto stellar mass black holes (BHs) are commonly considered as a promising model of central engines of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). In this model a certain fraction of gravitational binding energy of accreting matter is deposited to the energy of relativistic jets via neutrino annihilation and/or magnetic fields. However, some recent studies have indicated that the energy deposition rate by neutrino annihilation is somewhat smaller than that needed to power a GRB. To overcome this difficulty, Ramirez-Ruiz & Socrates (2005) proposed that high energy neutrinos from hot corona above the accretion disk might enhance the efficiency of energy deposition. We elucidate the disk corona model in the context of hypercritical accretion flows. From the energy balance in the disk and the corona, we can calculate the disk and coronal temperature, Td and Tc, and neutrino spectra, taking into account the neutrino cooling processes by neutrino-electron scatterings and neutrino pair productions. Th...

  15. Bayesian Magnetohydrodynamic Seismology of Coronal Loops

    CERN Document Server

    Arregui, Inigo

    2011-01-01

    We perform a Bayesian parameter inference in the context of resonantly damped transverse coronal loop oscillations. The forward problem is solved in terms of parametric results for kink waves in one-dimensional flux tubes in the thin tube and thin boundary approximations. For the inverse problem, we adopt a Bayesian approach to infer the most probable values of the relevant parameters, for given observed periods and damping times, and to extract their confidence levels. The posterior probability distribution functions are obtained by means of Markov Chain Monte Carlo simulations, incorporating observed uncertainties in a consistent manner. We find well localized solutions in the posterior probability distribution functions for two of the three parameters of interest, namely the Alfven travel time and the transverse inhomogeneity length-scale. The obtained estimates for the Alfven travel time are consistent with previous inversion results, but the method enables us to additionally constrain the transverse inho...

  16. A magnetohydrodynamic theory of coronal loop transients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, T.

    1982-01-01

    The physical and geometrical characteristics of solar coronal loop transients are described in an MHD model based on Archimedes' MHD buoyancy force. The theory was developed from interpretation of coronagraphic data, particularly from Skylab. The brightness of a loop is taken to indicate the electron density, and successive pictures reveal the electron enhancement in different columns. The forces which lift the loop off the sun surface are analyzed as an MHD buoyancy force affecting every mass element by imparting an inertial force necessary for heliocentrifugal motion. Thermal forces are responsible for transferring the ambient stress to the interior of the loop to begin the process. The kinematic and hydrostatic buoyancy overcome the gravitational force, and a flux rope can then curve upward, spiralling like a corkscrew with varying cross section around the unwinding solar magnetic field lines.

  17. Waiting Time Distribution of Coronal Mass Ejections

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chin-Teh Yeh; Ming-De Ding; Peng-Fei Chen

    2005-01-01

    Inspired by the finding that the large waiting time of solar flares presents a power-law distribution, we investigate the waiting time distribution (WTD) of coronal mass ejections (CMEs). SOHO/LASCO CME observations from 1996 to 2003 are used in this study. It is shown that the observed CMEs have a similar power-law behavior to the flares, with an almost identical power-law index. This strongly supports the viewpoint that solar flares and CMEs are different manifestations of the same physical process. We have also investigated separately the WTDs of fast-type and slow-type CMEs and found that their indices are identical, which imply that both types of CME-5-originate from the same physical mechanism.

  18. Quiet Sun coronal heating statistical model

    CERN Document Server

    Krasnoselskikh, V V; Lefebvre, B; Vilmer, N

    2002-01-01

    To describe statistical properties of solar coronal heating by microflares, nanoflares, and even smaller events, we consider a cellular automata model subject to uniform small scale driving and dissipation. The model consists of two elements, the magnetic field source supposed to be associated with the small scale hydrodynamic turbulence convected from the photosphere and local dissipation of small scale currents. The dissipation is assumed to be provided by either anomalous resistivity, when the current density exceeds a certain threshold value, or by the magnetic reconnection. The main problem considered is how the statistical characteristics of dissipated energy flow depend upon characteristics of the magnetic field source and on physical mechanism responsible for the magnetic field dissipation. As the threshold value of current is increased, we observe the transition from Gaussian statistics to power-law type. In addition, we find that the dissipation provided by reconnection results in stronger deviation...

  19. 鼻咽癌颅底侵犯冠状位CT扫描应用价值分析%Analysis on value of CT coronal scan in diagnosis of invasion of skull base in nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    骆忠华

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To discuss the clinical value of CT coronal scan in diagnosis of invasion of skull base in nasopharyn-geal carcinoma (NPC). METHODS 233 patients with NPC were given CT coronal and axial scan, then compared the results of the two positions. RESULTS In the 233 cases of NPC, CT coronal scan showed bone invasion in 4 cases in 16 cases that had not been recognized by axial scan. By CT coronal scan, the invasion of skull base was confirmed in 4 and excluded in 6 of 10 cases in which the invasion was uncertain by axial scan. Wider and deeper invasions were recognized in 23 cases (12.3%) by coronal scan, though obvious invasion had been diagnosed after axial scan. Accordant invasion was displayed in 35 cases (18.8%) by CT coronal and axial scan. By CT coronal scan, the invasion of skull base was in 21 patients witch had not been showed destruction of bone. And there was destruction of bone in 21 cases by axial scan, only 12 cases could be recognized in coronal scan, and with different locations. CONCLUSION CT scan is valuable for invasion of skull base in NPC, combining CT axial with coronal scan can improve diagnostic accuracy.%目的 探讨冠状位CT扫描在鼻咽癌颅底侵犯诊断中的应用价值.方法 对233例鼻咽癌患者进行轴位及冠状位CT扫描,比较两种体位对鼻咽癌颅底侵犯的检出情况.结果 轴位扫描所见肿瘤侵袭、转移灶中173例经冠状位扫描证实;轴位扫描无骨质侵袭及转移者16例中,经冠状位扫描见4例骨质破坏;轴位扫描所见10例难以确定是否骨质破坏者,经冠状位扫描证实4例骨质破坏,6例正常;另外,冠状位扫描显示了21例轴位扫描未发现的骨质破坏;同时有21例患者轴位扫描可见骨质破坏,但冠状位仅显示12例,且位置不同.结论 CT扫描在鼻咽癌颅底侵犯影像诊断中具有重要意义,但单纯轴位扫描具有一定局限性,联合应用轴位与冠状位的扫描,可提高诊断准确率.

  20. Maxillomandibular Advancement in Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome Patients: a Restrospective Study on the Sagittal Cephalometric Variables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Ronchi

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The present retrospective study analyzes sagittal cephalometric changes in patients affected by obstructive sleep apnea syndrome submitted to maxillomandubular advancement. Material and Methods: 15 adult sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS patients diagnosed by polysomnography (PSG and treated with maxillomandubular advancement (MMA were included in this study. Pre- (T1 and postsurgical (T2 PSG studies assessing the apnea/hypopnea index (AHI and the lowest oxygen saturation (LSAT level were compared. Lateral cephalometric radiographs at T1 and T2 measuring sagittal cephalometric variables (SNA, SNB, and ANB were analyzed, as were the amount of maxillary and mandibular advancement (Co-A and Co-Pog, the distance from the mandibular plane to the most anterior point of the hyoid bone (Mp-H, and the posterior airway space (PAS.Results: Postoperatively, the overall mean AHI dropped from 58.7 ± 16 to 8.1 ± 7.8 events per hour (P < 0.001. The mean preoperative LSAT increased from 71% preoperatively to 90% after surgery (P < 0.001. All the patients in our study were successfully treated (AHI < 20 or reduced by 50%. Cephalometric analysis performed after surgery showed a statistically significant correlation between the mean SNA variation and the decrease in the AHI (P = 0.01. The overall mean SNA increase was 6°.Conclusions: Our findings suggest that the improvement observed in the respiratory symptoms, namely the apnea/hypopnea episodes, is correlated with the SNA increase after surgery. This finding may help maxillofacial surgeons to establish selective criteria for the surgical approach to sleep apnea syndrome patients.

  1. A Model for Stealth Coronal Mass Ejections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Benjamin J.; Masson, Sophie; Li, Yan; DeVore, C. Richard; Luhmann, Janet; Antiochos, Spiro K.; Fisher, George H.

    2016-05-01

    Stealth coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are events in which there are almost no observable signatures of the CME eruption in the low corona but often a well-resolved slow flux rope CME observed in the coronagraph data. We present results from a three-dimensional numerical magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) simulation of the 2008 June 1-2 slow streamer blowout CME that Robbrecht et al. [2009] called “the CME from nowhere.” We model the global coronal structure using a 1.4 MK isothermal solar wind and a low-order potential field source surface representation of the Carrington Rotation 2070 magnetogram synoptic map. The bipolar streamer belt arcade is energized by simple shearing flows applied in the vicinity of the helmet streamer’s polarity inversion line. The slow expansion of the energized helmet-streamer arcade results in the formation of a radial current sheet. The subsequent onset of expansion-driven flare reconnection initiates the stealth CME while gradually releasing ~1.5E+30 erg of stored magnetic energy over the 20+ hour eruption duration. We show the energy flux available for flare heating and flare emission during the eruption is approximately two orders of magnitude below the energy flux required to heat the ambient background corona, thus confirming the “stealth” character of the 2008 June 1-2 CME’s lack of observable on disk signatures. We also present favorable comparisons between our simulation results and the multi-viewpoint SOHO-LASCO and STEREO-SECCHI coronagraph observations of the pre-eruption streamer structure and the initiation and evolution of the stealth streamer blowout CME.

  2. Analysis of the sagittal plane after surgical management for Scheuermann's disease: a view on overcorrection and the use of an anterior release.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hosman, A.J.F.; Langeloo, D.D.; Kleuver, M. de; Anderson, P.G.; Veth, R.P.H.; Slot, G.H.

    2002-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN: A historic cohort study was conducted to investigate surgical correction and sagittal alignment in 33 patients with thoracic Scheuermann's disease. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate kyphosis correction, correction loss, sagittal balance, and the effect of an anterior release. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUN

  3. Magnetohydrodynamic waves and coronal seismology: an overview of recent results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Moortel, Ineke; Nakariakov, Valery M

    2012-07-13

    Recent observations have revealed that magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves and oscillations are ubiquitous in the solar atmosphere, with a wide range of periods. We give a brief review of some aspects of MHD waves and coronal seismology that have recently been the focus of intense debate or are newly emerging. In particular, we focus on four topics: (i) the current controversy surrounding propagating intensity perturbations along coronal loops, (ii) the interpretation of propagating transverse loop oscillations, (iii) the ongoing search for coronal (torsional) Alfvén waves, and (iv) the rapidly developing topic of quasi-periodic pulsations in solar flares.

  4. Case report: pre-eruptive intra-coronal radiolucencies revisited.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Counihan, K P

    2012-08-01

    Pre-eruptive intra-coronal radiolucency (PEIR) describes a radiolucent lesion located in the coronal dentine, just beneath the enamel-dentine junction of unerupted teeth. The prevalence of this lesion varies depending on the type and quality of radiographic exposure and age of patients used for assessment. The aetiology of pre-eruptive intra-coronal radiolucent lesions is not fully understood, but published clinical and histological evidence suggest that these lesions are resorptive in nature. Issues around the diagnosis, treatment planning and clinical management of this lesion are explored using previously unreported cases.

  5. Correlations between sagittal plane kinematics and landing impact force during single-leg lateral jump-landings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aizawa, Junya; Ohji, Shunsuke; Koga, Hideyuki; Masuda, Tadashi; Yagishita, Kazuyoshi

    2016-08-01

    [Purpose] The correlations of peak vertical ground reaction force and sagittal angles during single-leg lateral jump-landing with noncontact anterior cruciate ligament injury remain unknown. This study aimed to clarify the correlations between kinematics and impact force during lateral jump-landing. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty active males were included in the analysis. A sagittal-view movie camera and force plate were time synchronized. Trunk and lower extremity sagittal angles were measured 100 ms before initial contact and at peak vertical ground reaction force. Peak vertical ground reaction force, time between initial contact and peak vertical ground reaction force, and loading rate were calculated. [Results] The mean sagittal angle was 40.7° ± 7.7° for knee flexion during the flight phase and 16.4° ± 6.3° for pelvic anterior inclination during the landing phase. The mean peak vertical ground reaction force was four times the body weight. The median time to peak vertical ground reaction force was 63.8 ms. The knee flexion during the flight phase and pelvic anterior inclination angles during the landing phase were related to the peak vertical ground reaction force. [Conclusion] Increasing knee flexion and decreasing pelvic anterior inclination might reduce the impact during single-leg lateral jump-landing. PMID:27630422

  6. Long-lasting neurosensory disturbance following advancement of the retrognathic mandible : distraction osteogenesis versus bilateral sagittal split osteotomy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijbenga, J. G.; Verlinden, C. R. A.; Jansma, J.; Becking, A. G.; Stegenga, B.

    2009-01-01

    Neurosensory disturbance (NSD) of the inferior alveolar nerve (IAN) is the most common complication after bilateral sagittal split osteotomy (BSSO) and distraction osteogenesis (DO) of the retrognathic mandible. It is suggested that the risk is lower after DO than after BSSO. This retrospective stud

  7. Skeletal Stability after Large Mandibular Advancement (> 10 mm) with Bilateral Sagittal Split Osteotomy and Skeletal Elastic Intermaxillary Fixation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schwartz, Kristoffer; Rodrigo, Maria; Jensen, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The aim of the present study was to assess the skeletal stability after large mandibular advancement (> 10 mm) with bilateral sagittal split osteotomy and skeletal elastic intermaxillary fixation and to correlate the skeletal stability with the vertical facial type. MATERIAL AND METHO...... to distraction osteogenesis in large mandibular advancements....

  8. Transpalatal screw traction: a simple technique for the management of sagittal fractures of the maxilla and palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, D; Guo, X; Yao, H; Chen, J

    2014-12-01

    Sagittal fractures of the maxilla and palate are uncommon in clinical practice. Current methods for the management of such fractures have advantages and limitations. The authors present the simple and practical technique of bilateral transpalatal screw traction to manage this fracture type.

  9. Correlations between sagittal plane kinematics and landing impact force during single-leg lateral jump-landings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aizawa, Junya; Ohji, Shunsuke; Koga, Hideyuki; Masuda, Tadashi; Yagishita, Kazuyoshi

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The correlations of peak vertical ground reaction force and sagittal angles during single-leg lateral jump-landing with noncontact anterior cruciate ligament injury remain unknown. This study aimed to clarify the correlations between kinematics and impact force during lateral jump-landing. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty active males were included in the analysis. A sagittal-view movie camera and force plate were time synchronized. Trunk and lower extremity sagittal angles were measured 100 ms before initial contact and at peak vertical ground reaction force. Peak vertical ground reaction force, time between initial contact and peak vertical ground reaction force, and loading rate were calculated. [Results] The mean sagittal angle was 40.7° ± 7.7° for knee flexion during the flight phase and 16.4° ± 6.3° for pelvic anterior inclination during the landing phase. The mean peak vertical ground reaction force was four times the body weight. The median time to peak vertical ground reaction force was 63.8 ms. The knee flexion during the flight phase and pelvic anterior inclination angles during the landing phase were related to the peak vertical ground reaction force. [Conclusion] Increasing knee flexion and decreasing pelvic anterior inclination might reduce the impact during single-leg lateral jump-landing. PMID:27630422

  10. Comparison of the Sagittal Spine Lordosis by Supine Computed Tomography and Upright Conventional Radiographs in Patients with Spinal Trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samy Bouaicha

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Study Design. Retrospective data analysis. Objective. To compare the sagittal lordosis of the lumbar spine by supine computed tomography (CT and upright conventional radiographs. Summary of Background Data. There is sparse data about position and modality dependent changes of radiographic measurements in the sagittal lumbar spine. Methods. The anatomical and functional Cobb angles of the thoracolumbar spine in 153 patients with spinal injury were measured by conventional upright sagittal radiographs and supine CT scans. Patients were assigned either to group A (n=101, with radiologically confirmed vertebral fractures, or to group B (n=52, without any osseous lesions. The interchangeability of the two imaging modalities was calculated using a ±3° and 5° range of acceptance. Results. Group A showed a mean intraindividual difference of −3.8° for both the anatomical and the functional Cobb angle. Only 25.7% and 27.7% of the 101 patients showed a difference within the tolerated ±3° margin. Using the ±5° limits, only 46 and 47 individuals fell within the acceptable range, respectively. In the patients in group B, the mean intraindividual difference was −2.1° for the anatomical and −1.5° for the functional Cobb angle. Of the 52 patients, only 14 and 13 patients, respectively demonstrated an intraindividual difference within ±3°. With regard to a threshold of ±5°, both the functional and anatomical values were within the defined margins in only 25 (48% patients. Conclusion. The use of supine CT measurements as a baseline assessment of the sagittal lordosis of the injured thoracolumbar spine does not appear to be appropriate when upright conventional sagittal plane radiographs are used for follow-up measurements.

  11. How is sagittal balance acquired during bipedal gait acquisition? Comparison of neonatal and adult pelves in three dimensions. Evolutionary implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tardieu, Christine; Bonneau, Noémie; Hecquet, Jérôme; Boulay, Christophe; Marty, Catherine; Legaye, Jean; Duval-Beaupère, Geneviève

    2013-08-01

    We compare adult and intact neonatal pelves, using a pelvic sagittal variable, the angle of sacral incidence, which presents significant correlations with vertebral curvature in adults and plays an important role in sagittal balance of the trunk on the lower limbs. Since the lumbar curvature develops in the child in association with gait acquisition, we expect a change in this angle during growth which could contribute to the acquisition of sagittal balance. To understand the mechanisms underlying the sagittal balance in the evolution of human bipedalism, we also measure the angle of incidence of hominid fossils. Fourty-seven landmarks were digitized on 50 adult and 19 intact neonatal pelves. We used a three-dimensional model of the pelvis (DE-VISU program) which calculates the angle of sacral incidence and related functional variables. Cross-sectional data from newborns and adults show that the angle of sacral incidence increases and becomes negatively correlated with the sacro-acetabular distance. During ontogeny the sacrum becomes curved, tends to sink down between the iliac blades as a wedge and moves backward in the sagittal plane relative to the acetabula, thus contributing to the backwards displacement of the center of gravity of the trunk. A chain of correlations links the degree of the sacral slope and of the angle of incidence, which is tightly linked with the lumbar lordosis. We sketch a model showing the coordinated changes occurring in the pelvis and vertebral column during the acquisition of bipedalism in infancy. In the australopithecine pelves, Sts 14 and AL 288-1, and in the Homo erectus Gona pelvis the angle of sacral incidence reaches the mean values of humans. Discussing the incomplete pelves of Ardipithecus ramidus, Australopithecus sediba and the Nariokotome Boy, we suggest how the functional linkage between pelvis and spine, observed in humans, could have emerged during hominid evolution. PMID:23838060

  12. A comparison of the oblique sagittal view obtained by magnetic resonance imaging and the intraoperative findings of vascular compression in cases of trigeminal neuralgia and hemifacial spasm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagaseki, Yoshishige; Horikoshi, Tohru; Omata, Tomohiro; Ueno, Takehiko; Uchida, Mikito; Nukui, Hideaki (Yamanashi Medical Coll., Tamaho (Japan)); Sasaki, Hideo; Tsuji, Reizou

    1992-06-01

    We show how neurosurgical planning can benefit from the better visualization of the precise vascular compression of the nerves provided by the oblique sagittal and gradient-echo method (OS-GR image) using magnetic resonance images (MRI) and by comparing these results with the findings of microvascular decompression. The scans of 5 patients with trigeminal neuralgia (TN) and 18 with hemifacial spasm (HFS) were analysed for the presence and appearance of the vascular compression of the nerves; all these 23 patients were operated on. Imaging sequences consisted of an OS-GR image (TR/TE: 200/20, 3-mm-thick slice) cut along each nerve shown by the axial view, which was scanned at the angle of 105 degrees taken between the dorsal line of the brain stem and the line corresponding to the pontmedullary junction. The rate of correspondence between the OS-GR images and the intraoperative findings was 80% in the TN's and 89% in the HFS's. In all these OS-GR images, the vascular compressions of the REZ of the trigeminal or facial nerve were well visualized as curvilinear high-intensity lines and/or spots. Furthermore, the relationship between the vascular compressions and nerves could be foreseen preoperatively in 40% of the TN's and in 55.6% of the HFS's. It is concluded that OS-GR images obtained by means of MRI may serve as useful planning aids prior to microvascular decompression for cases of TN and HFS because of the corresponding operative view along the approach. (author).

  13. A comparison of the oblique sagittal view obtained by magnetic resonance imaging and the intraoperative findings of vascular compression in cases of trigeminal neuralgia and hemifacial spasm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We show how neurosurgical planning can benefit from the better visualization of the precise vascular compression of the nerves provided by the oblique sagittal and gradient-echo method (OS-GR image) using magnetic resonance images (MRI) and by comparing these results with the findings of microvascular decompression. The scans of 5 patients with trigeminal neuralgia (TN) and 18 with hemifacial spasm (HFS) were analysed for the presence and appearance of the vascular compression of the nerves; all these 23 patients were operated on. Imaging sequences consisted of an OS-GR image (TR/TE: 200/20, 3-mm-thick slice) cut along each nerve shown by the axial view, which was scanned at the angle of 105 degrees taken between the dorsal line of the brain stem and the line corresponding to the pontmedullary junction. The rate of correspondence between the OS-GR images and the intraoperative findings was 80% in the TN's and 89% in the HFS's. In all these OS-GR images, the vascular compressions of the REZ of the trigeminal or facial nerve were well visualized as curvilinear high-intensity lines and/or spots. Furthermore, the relationship between the vascular compressions and nerves could be foreseen preoperatively in 40% of the TN's and in 55.6% of the HFS's. It is concluded that OS-GR images obtained by means of MRI may serve as useful planning aids prior to microvascular decompression for cases of TN and HFS because of the corresponding operative view along the approach. (author)

  14. Axial force measurement for esophageal function testing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Flemming H Gravesen; Peter Funch-Jensen; Hans Gregersen; Asbjφrn Mohr Drewes

    2009-01-01

    The esophagus serves to transport food and fluid from the pharynx to the stomach. Manometry has been the "golden standard" for the diagnosis of esophageal motility diseases for many decades. Hence, esophageal function is normally evaluated by means of manometry even though it reflects the squeeze force (force in radial direction) whereas the bolus moves along the length of esophagus in a distal direction. Force measurements in the longitudinal (axial) direction provide a more direct measure of esophageal transport function. The technique used to record axial force has developed from external force transducers over in-vivo strain gauges of various sizes to electrical impedance based measurements. The amplitude and duration of the axial force has been shown to be as reliable as manometry. Normal, as well as abnormal, manometric recordings occur with normal bolus transit, which have been documented using imaging modalities such as radiography and scintigraphy. This inconsistency using manometry has also been documented by axial force recordings. This underlines the lack of information when diagnostics are based on manometry alone. Increasing the volume of a bag mounted on a probe with combined axial force and manometry recordings showed that axial force amplitude increased by 130% in contrast to an increase of 30% using manometry. Using axial force in combination with manometry provides a more complete picture of esophageal motility, and the current paper outlines the advantages of using this method.

  15. Axial force measurement for esophageal function testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gravesen, Flemming H; Funch-Jensen, Peter; Gregersen, Hans; Drewes, Asbjørn Mohr

    2009-01-14

    The esophagus serves to transport food and fluid from the pharynx to the stomach. Manometry has been the "golden standard" for the diagnosis of esophageal motility diseases for many decades. Hence, esophageal function is normally evaluated by means of manometry even though it reflects the squeeze force (force in radial direction) whereas the bolus moves along the length of esophagus in a distal direction. Force measurements in the longitudinal (axial) direction provide a more direct measure of esophageal transport function. The technique used to record axial force has developed from external force transducers over in-vivo strain gauges of various sizes to electrical impedance based measurements. The amplitude and duration of the axial force has been shown to be as reliable as manometry. Normal, as well as abnormal, manometric recordings occur with normal bolus transit, which have been documented using imaging modalities such as radiography and scintigraphy. This inconsistency using manometry has also been documented by axial force recordings. This underlines the lack of information when diagnostics are based on manometry alone. Increasing the volume of a bag mounted on a probe with combined axial force and manometry recordings showed that axial force amplitude increased by 130% in contrast to an increase of 30% using manometry. Using axial force in combination with manometry provides a more complete picture of esophageal motility, and the current paper outlines the advantages of using this method. PMID:19132762

  16. The coronal magnetic field reversal observed by the SOLARC instrument

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    High-sensitivity measurements for mapping coronal magnetic field have become possible since the recent development of infrared detection techniques. One urgent task that arises from the routine infrared observations is to interpret what the Stokes signals could indicate for coronal magnetic fields. It is the first time for us to successfully reveal the coronal field structure above a simple and stable sunspot on the photosphere using profiles of full Stokes parameters. In this paper, the author further points out the deficiency in any conclusions/judgements just based on incomplete polarization data. A magnetic flux reversal feature, observed from circular polarization data, may correspond to one or more coronal tubes with their front or farside arching apex there, more complicated than people imagined before. To exactly locate the infrared radiation sources, we need both circular and linear polarization data for an integrated analysis of them.

  17. 3d Nonlinear-Wave Heating of Coronal Loops

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poedts, S.; Goedbloed, J. P.

    1994-01-01

    The heating of solar coronal loops by the resonant absorption or phase-mixing of incident wave energy is investigated in the framework of 3D nonlinear magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) by means of numerical simulations.

  18. Anticipating the Geoeffectiveness of Coronal Mass Ejections Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) are responsible for some of the most severe space weather at Earth. Major geomagnetic storms arise when CMEs carry large amounts of...

  19. Standing sausage modes in coronal loops with plasma flow

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Bo; Xia, Li-Dong; Yu, Hui

    2014-01-01

    Magnetohydrodynamic waves are important for diagnosing the physical parameters of coronal plasmas. Field-aligned flows appear frequently in coronal loops.We examine the effects of transverse density and plasma flow structuring on standing sausage modes trapped in coronal loops, and examine their observational implications. We model coronal loops as straight cold cylinders with plasma flow embedded in a static corona. An eigen-value problem governing propagating sausage waves is formulated, its solutions used to construct standing modes. Two transverse profiles are distinguished, one being the generalized Epstein distribution (profile E) and the other (N) proposed recently in Nakariakov et al.(2012). A parameter study is performed on the dependence of the maximum period $P_\\mathrm{max}$ and cutoff length-to-radius ratio $(L/a)_{\\mathrm{cutoff}}$ in the trapped regime on the density parameters ($\\rho_0/\\rho_\\infty$ and profile steepness $p$) and flow parameters (magnitude $U_0$ and profile steepness $u$). For e...

  20. Cyclical Variation of the Quiet Corona and Coronal Holes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Takashi Sakurai

    2000-09-01

    Recent advances in the understanding of the quiet corona and coronal holes are reviewed. The review is based on long-term accumulation of data from eclipse observations, coronagraph observations, helium 10830 Å spectroheliograms, and X-ray observations.

  1. Standing Slow MHD Waves in Radiatively Cooling Coronal Loops

    CERN Document Server

    Al-Ghafri, Khalil Salim

    2015-01-01

    The standing slow magneto-acoustic oscillations in cooling coronal loops are investigated. There are two damping mechanisms which are considered to generate the standing acoustic modes in coronal magnetic loops namely thermal conduction and radiation. The background temperature is assumed to change temporally due to optically thin radiation. In particular, the background plasma is assumed to be radiatively cooling. The effects of cooling on longitudinal slow MHD modes is analytically evaluated by choosing a simple form of radiative function that ensures the temperature evolution of the background plasma due to radiation coincides with the observed cooling profile of coronal loops. The assumption of low-beta plasma leads to neglect the magnetic field perturbation and eventually reduces the MHD equations to a 1D system modelling longitudinal MHD oscillations in a cooling coronal loop. The cooling is assumed to occur on a characteristic time scale much larger than the oscillation period that subsequently enables...

  2. MRI of the shoulder joint with surface coils at 1.5 Tesla

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High spatial resolution magnetic resonance images of the shoulder were obtained in axial, sagittal and coronal orientations using a 1.5 T imaging system and anatomically shaped, wrap-around surface coils. Variations in scapular position induced by patient positioning change the relationship of the planes to the shoulder anatomy and make reproducibility of sagittal and coronal planes difficult. We, therefore, use - after axial orientation - image-oblique planes perpendicular and parallel to the glenoid fossa. In this manner MRI can visualise the anatomic structures of the shoulder including rotator cuff, long biceps tendon, articular capsule, articular cartilage, muscles and bones due to the high soft tissue contrast of MRI. (orig.)

  3. Coronal Activity and Extended Solar Cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altrock, R. C.

    2012-12-01

    Wilson et al. (1988, Nature 333, 748) discussed a number of solar parameters, which appear at high latitudes and gradually migrate towards the equator, merging with the sunspot "butterfly diagram". They found that this concept had been identified by earlier investigators extending back to 1957. They named this process the "Extended Solar Cycle" (ESC). Altrock (1997, Solar Phys. 170, 411) found that this process continued in Fe XIV 530.3 nm emission features. In cycles 21 - 23 solar maximum occurred when the number of Fe XIV emission regions per day > 0.19 (averaged over 365 days and both hemispheres) first reached latitudes 18°, 21° and 21°, for an average of 20° ± 1.7°. Other recent studies have shown that Torsional Oscillation (TO) negative-shear zones are co-located with the ESC from at least 50° down to the equator and also in the zones where the Rush to the Poles occur. These phenomena indicate that coronal activity occurring up to 50° and higher latitudes is related to TO shear zones, another indicator that the ESC is an important solar process. Another high-latitude process, which appears to be connected with the ESC, is the "Rush to the Poles" ("Rush") of polar crown prominences and their associated coronal emission, including Fe XIV. The Rush is is a harbinger of solar maximum (cf. Altrock, 2003, Solar Phys. 216, 343). Solar maximum in cycles 21 - 23 occurred when the center line of the Rush reached a critical latitude. These latitudes were 76°, 74° and 78°, respectively, for an average of 76° ± 2°. Applying the above conclusions to Cycle 24 is difficult due to the unusual nature of this cycle. Cycle 24 displays an intermittent "Rush" that is only well-defined in the northern hemisphere. In 2009 an initial slope of 4.6°/yr was found in the north, compared to an average of 9.4 ± 1.7 °/yr in the previous three cycles. This early fit to the Rush would have reached 76° at 2014.6. However, in 2010 the slope increased to 7.5°/yr (an increase

  4. New Anomaly of the Axial-Vector Current

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Han-Xin

    2001-01-01

    By computing the axial-vector current operator equation, we find the anomalous axial-vector curl equation besides the well-known anomalous axial-vector divergence equation (the Adler-Bell-Jackiw anomaly) and discuss its implication.``

  5. Exploración del modelo coronal MHD de Uchida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francile, C.; Castro, J. I.; Flores, M.

    We present an analysis of the MHD model of an isothermal solar corona with radially symmetrical magnetic field and gravity. The solution in the approximation "WKB" was presented by Uchida (1968). The model is ex- plored for different coronal conditions and heights of initial perturbation to study the propagation of coronal waves and reproduce the observed char- acteristics of phenomena such as Moreton waves. Finally we discuss the obtained results. FULL TEXT IN SPANISH

  6. The Multithermal and Multi-stranded Nature of Coronal Rain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antolin, P.; Vissers, G.; Pereira, T. M. D.; Rouppe van der Voort, L.; Scullion, E.

    2015-06-01

    We analyze coordinated observations of coronal rain in loops, spanning chromospheric, transition region (TR), and coronal temperatures with sub-arcsecond spatial resolution. Coronal rain is found to be a highly multithermal phenomenon with a high degree of co-spatiality in the multi-wavelength emission. EUV darkening and quasi-periodic intensity variations are found to be strongly correlated with coronal rain showers. Progressive cooling of coronal rain is observed, leading to a height dependence of the emission. A fast-slow two-step catastrophic cooling progression is found, which may reflect the transition to optically thick plasma states. The intermittent and clumpy appearance of coronal rain at coronal heights becomes more continuous and persistent at chromospheric heights just before impact, mainly due to a funnel effect from the observed expansion of the magnetic field. Strong density inhomogeneities of 0\\buildrel{\\prime\\prime}\\over{.} 2-0\\buildrel{\\prime\\prime}\\over{.} 5 are found, in which a transition from temperatures of 105 to 104 K occurs. The 0\\buildrel{\\prime\\prime}\\over{.} 2-0\\buildrel{\\prime\\prime}\\over{.} 8 width of the distribution of coronal rain is found to be independent of temperature. The sharp increase in the number of clumps at the coolest temperatures, especially at higher resolution, suggests that the bulk distribution of the rain remains undetected. Rain clumps appear organized in strands in both chromospheric and TR temperatures. We further find structure reminiscent of the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) thermal mode (also known as entropy mode), thereby suggesting an important role of thermal instability in shaping the basic loop substructure. Rain core densities are estimated to vary between 2 × 1010 and 2.5× {{10}11} cm-3, leading to significant downward mass fluxes per loop of 1-5 × 109 g s-1, thus suggesting a major role in the chromosphere-corona mass cycle.

  7. Quantitative analysis of disc degeneration using axial T2 mapping in a percutaneous annular puncture model in rabbits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chai, Jee Won; Kim, Su Jin [Dept. of Radiology, SMG-SNU Boramae Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Heung Sik; Lee, Joon Woo [Dept. of Radiology, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Sung Hwan [Dept. of Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-02-15

    To evaluate T2 relaxation time change using axial T2 mapping in a rabbit degenerated disc model and determine the most correlated variable with histologic score among T2 relaxation time, disc height index, and Pfirrmann grade. Degenerated disc model was made in 4 lumbar discs of 11 rabbits (n = 44) by percutaneous annular puncture with various severities of an injury. Lumbar spine lateral radiograph, MR T2 sagittal scan and MR axial T2 mapping were obtained at baseline and 2 weeks and 4 weeks after the injury in 7 rabbits and at baseline and 2 weeks, 4 weeks, and 6 weeks after the injury in 4 rabbits. Generalized estimating equations were used for a longitudinal analysis of changes in T2 relaxation time in degenerated disc model. T2 relaxation time, disc height index and Pfirrmann grade were correlated with the histologic scoring of disc degeneration using Spearman's rho test. There was a significant difference in T2 relaxation time between uninjured and injured discs after annular puncture. Progressive decrease in T2 relaxation time was observed in injured discs throughout the study period. Lower T2 relaxation time was observed in the more severely injured discs. T2 relaxation time showed the strongest inverse correlation with the histologic score among the variables investigated (r = -0.811, p < 0.001). T2 relaxation time measured with axial T2 mapping in degenerated discs is a potential method to assess disc degeneration.

  8. Coronal Dynamics at Recent Total Solar Eclipses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasachoff, J. M.; Lu, M.; Davis, A. B.; Demianski, M.; Rusin, V.; Saniga, M.; Seaton, D. B.; Lucas, R.; Babcock, B. A.; Dantowitz, R.; Gaintatzis, P.; Seeger, C. H.; Malamut, C.; Steele, A.

    2014-12-01

    Our composite images of the solar corona based on extensive imaging at the total solar eclipses of 2010 (Easter Island), 2012 (Australia), and 2013 (Gabon) reveal several coronal mass ejections and other changes in coronal streamers and in polar plumes. Our resultant spatial resolution is finer than that available in imaging from spacecraft, including that from SOHO/LASCO or STEREO. We trace the eruptions back to their footpoints on the sun using imaging from SDO and SWAP, and follow them upwards through the corona, measuring velocities. The high-resolution computer compositing by Miloslav Druckmüller and Hana Druckmüllerová (2010 and 2013) and Pavlos Gaintatzis (2012) allows comparison of our images with those taken at intervals of minutes or hours along the totality path. Williams College's 2013 eclipse expedition was supported in part by grant 9327-13 from National Geographic Society/Committee for Research and Exploration. Our work on the 2012 eclipse is supported in part by grant AGS-1047726 from Solar Terrestrial Research/NSF AGS. V.R. and M.S. were partially supported by the VEGA grant agency project 2/0098/10 and 2/0003/13 (Slovak Academy of Sciences) and Grant 0139-12 from NG/CRE, and Hana Druckmüllerová by grant 205/09/1469 of the Czech Science Foundation. M.L. was supported by Sigma Xi. C.M. was a Keck Northeast Astronomy Consortium Summer Fellow, supported at Williams College by REU/NSF grant AST-1005024. Partial support was provided by U.S. Department of Defense's ASSURE program. J.M.P. thanks Caltech's Planetary Sciences Department for hospitality. Support for D.B.S. and SWAP came from PRODEX grant C90345 managed by ESA in collaboration with the Belgian Federal Science Policy Office (BELSPO) in support of the PROBA2/SWAP mission, and from the EC's Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007-2013) under grant 218816 (SOTERIA project, www.soteria-space.eu). SWAP is a project of the Centre Spatial de Liège and the Royal Observatory of Belgium funded by

  9. The Contribution of Coronal Jets To The Solar Wind

    CERN Document Server

    Lionello, R; Titov, V S; Leake, J E; MikiĆ, Z; Linker, J A; Linton, M G

    2016-01-01

    Transient collimated plasma eruptions in the solar corona, commonly known as coronal (or X-ray) jets, are among the most interesting manifestations of solar activity. It has been suggested that these events contribute to the mass and energy content of the corona and solar wind, but the extent of these contributions remains uncertain. We have recently modeled the formation and evolution of coronal jets using a three-dimensional (3D) magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) code with thermodynamics in a large spherical domain that includes the solar wind. Our model is coupled to 3D MHD flux-emergence simulations, i.e, we use boundary conditions provided by such simulations to drive a time-dependent coronal evolution. The model includes parametric coronal heating, radiative losses, and thermal conduction, which enables us to simulate the dynamics and plasma properties of coronal jets in a more realistic manner than done so far. Here we employ these simulations to calculate the amount of mass and energy transported by coronal j...

  10. Evolving Coronal Holes and Interplanetary Erupting Stream Disturbances

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Rajendra Shelke

    2006-06-01

    Coronal holes and interplanetary disturbances are important aspects of the physics of the Sun and heliosphere. Interplanetary disturbances are identified as an increase in the density turbulence compared with the ambient solar wind. Erupting stream disturbances are transient large-scale structures of enhanced density turbulence in the interplanetary medium driven by the high-speed flows of low-density plasma trailing behind for several days. Here, an attempt has been made to investigate the solar cause of erupting stream disturbances, mapped by Hewish & Bravo (1986) from interplanetary scintillation (IPS) measurements made between August 1978 and August 1979 at 81.5 MHz. The position of the sources of 68 erupting stream disturbances on the solar disk has been compared with the locations of newborn coronal holes and/or the areas that have been coronal holes previously. It is found that the occurrence of erupting stream disturbances is linked to the emergence of newcoronal holes at the eruption site on the solar disk. A coronal hole is indicative of a radial magnetic field of a predominant magnetic polarity. The newborn coronal hole emerges on the Sun, owing to the changes in magnetic field configuration leading to the opening of closed magnetic structure into the corona. The fundamental activity for the onset of an erupting stream seems to be a transient opening of pre-existing closed magnetic structures into a new coronal hole, which can support high-speed flow trailing behind the compression zone of the erupting stream for several days.

  11. Ultrahigh-Resolution Combined Coronal Optical Coherence Tomography Confocal Scanning Ophthalmoscope (OCT/SLO): a pilot study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate clinical images from a prototype ultrahigh resolution (UHR) combined coronal optical coherence tomography/confocal scanning ophthalmoscope (OCT/SLO) and to compare them to standard-resolution OCT/SLO images on the same patients. Cross-sectional pilot-study. Sixty-six eyes of 42 patients with various macular pathologies, such as age-related macular degeneration, macular edema, macular hole, central serous retinopathy, epiretinal membrane and posterior vitreous traction syndrome. Each subject was first scanned with a standard-resolution OCT/SLO that has an axial resolution of ∼ 10 micron. Immediately following, patients were scanned with the prototype UHR OCT/SLO device. The UHR system employs a compact super luminescent diode (SLD) with a 150 nm bandwidth centered at 890 nm, which allows imaging of the retina with an axial resolution of 3 microns. Both coronal and longitudinal OCT scans were acquired with each system, and compared side-by-side. Scan quality was assessed for the observer's ability to visualize the vitreo-retinal interface and retinal layers - in particular of the outer retina/RPE/choroidal interface, increased discrimination of pathological changes, and better signal intensity. Ultrahigh and standard-resolution coronal and longitudinal OCT/SLO images of macular pathologies. In the side-by-side comparison with the commercial standard-resolution OCT/SLO images, the scans in the Ultrahigh resolution OCT/SLO images were superior in 85 % of cases. Relatively poor quality images were attributed to lower signal-to-noise ratio, limited focusing, or media opacities. Several images that had a better signal intensity in the standard-resolution OCT/SLO system were found to show more retinal detail in the UHR system. In general, intraretinal layers in the UHR OCT/SLO images were better delineated in both coronal and longitudinal scans. Enhanced details were also seen in the outer retina/RPE/choroidal complex. The UHR OCT/SLO system produced better

  12. Coronal seismology of flare-excited longitudinal slow magnetoacoustic waves in hot coronal loops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, T.; Ofman, L.; Sun, X.; Provornikova, E. A.; Davila, J. M.

    2015-12-01

    The flare-excited longitudinal intensity oscillations in hot flaring loops have been recently detected by SDO/AIA in 94 and 131 bandpasses. These oscillations show similar physical properties (such as period, decay time, and trigger) as those slow-mode standing waves previously detected by the SOHO/SUMER spectrometer in Doppler shift of flare lines formed above 6 MK. The multi-wavelength AIA observations with high spatio-temporal resolution and wide temperature coverage enable us to measure both thermal and wave properties of the oscillating hot plasma with unprecedented accuracy. These new measurements can be used to diagnose the complicated energy transport processes in flare plasma by a technique called coronal seismology based on the combination of observations and MHD wave theory. From a detailed case study we have found evidence for thermal conduction suppression in hot loops by measuring the polytropic index and analyzing the phase relationship between the temperature and density wave signals. This result is not only crucial for better understanding the wave dissipation mechanism but also provides an alternative mechanism to explain the puzzles of long-duration events and X-ray loop-top sources which show much slower cooling than expected by the classical Spitzer conductive cooling. This finding may also shed a light on the coronal heating problem because weak thermal conductivity implies slower cooling of hot plasma in nanoflares, so increasing the average coronal temperature for the same heating rate. We will discuss the effects of thermal conduction suppression on the wave damping and loop cooling based on MHD simulations.

  13. Axial Thermal Rotation of Slender Rods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dichuan; Fakhri, Nikta; Pasquali, Matteo; Biswal, Sibani Lisa

    2011-05-01

    Axial rotational diffusion of rodlike polymers is important in processes such as microtubule filament sliding and flagella beating. By imaging the motion of small kinks along the backbone of chains of DNA-linked colloids, we produce a direct and systematic measurement of axial rotational diffusivity of rods both in bulk solution and near a wall. The measured diffusivities decrease linearly with the chain length, irrespective of the distance from a wall, in agreement with slender-body hydrodynamics theory. Moreover, the presence of small kinks does not affect the chain’s axial diffusivity. Our system and measurements provide insights into fundamental axial diffusion processes of slender objects, which encompass a wide range of entities including biological filaments and linear polymer chains.

  14. Axial force measurement for esophageal function testing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gravesen, Flemming Holbæk; Funch-Jensen, Peter; Gregersen, Hans;

    2009-01-01

    force (force in radial direction) whereas the bolus moves along the length of esophagus in a distal direction. Force measurements in the longitudinal (axial) direction provide a more direct measure of esophageal transport function. The technique used to record axial force has developed from external...... force transducers over in-vivo strain gauges of various sizes to electrical impedance based measurements. The amplitude and duration of the axial force has been shown to be as reliable as manometry. Normal, as well as abnormal, manometric recordings occur with normal bolus transit, which have been...... documented using imaging modalities such as radiography and scintigraphy. This inconsistency using manometry has also been documented by axial force recordings. This underlines the lack of information when diagnostics are based on manometry alone. Increasing the volume of a bag mounted on a probe...

  15. Magnetic resonance diagnosis of posterior horn tears of the lateral meniscus using a thin axial plane: the zip sign - a preliminary study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savoye, P.Y.; Ravey, J.N.; Dubois, C.; Barbier, L.P.; Ferretti, G. [CHU Grenoble, Clinique Universitaire de Radiologie et d' Imagerie Medicale, B.P 217, Grenoble Cedex 09 (France); Courvoisier, A.; Saragaglia, D. [CHU Grenoble, Clinique Universitaire de Chirurgie Orthopedique et Traumatologique, Grenoble (France)

    2011-01-15

    The ''zip'' sign is a newly described form of meniscal tear progressing from the distal insertion of menisco-femoral ligaments (MFLs) through the lateral meniscal wall; the tear occurs during anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the zip sign on knee MRI within the context of ACL injuries. From a series of 261 MR examinations for acute knee injury, we selected 97 patients with both MR and arthroscopic data for a retrospective blinded review. The zip sign was defined on axial thin MR sections as a straight line from the distal insertion of MFLs in association with five sagittal images lateral to the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) where the MFLs were identified. Sensitivity and specificity in detecting lateral meniscal tears before and after having defined the zip sign were calculated. Sensitivity in detecting the tears of the posterior horn of the lateral meniscus (PHLM) reached 87.5% (CI 0.68-0.97) after zip sign criteria were defined. The zip sign has excellent inter-observer agreement, K > 0.90. The zip sign indicates a lesion at the insertion site of MFLs into the PHLM on thin axial images associated with sagittal MR sections that may improve MR sensitivity in detecting PHLM tears. (orig.)

  16. Nonperturbative features of the axial current

    CERN Document Server

    Kopeliovich, B Z; Siddikov, M

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we study the nonperturbative structure of the axial current and evaluate the two-point distribution amplitudes $\\int d\\xi\\, e^{-iq...\\xi}$ in the framework of the instanton vacuum model in the leading order in $\\mathcal{O}(N_{c})$. We perform a direct numerical test of the relations between the axial current and the pion distribution amplitudes, imposed by PCAC, and found excellent agreement.

  17. Nonperturbative Aspects of Axial Vector Vertex

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZONG Hong-Shi; CHEN Xiang-Song; WANG Fan; CHANG Chao-Hsi; ZHAO En-Guang

    2002-01-01

    It is shown how the axial vector current of current quarks is related to that of constituent quarks within the framework of the global color symmetry model.Gluon dressing of the axial vector vertex and the quark self-energy functions are described by the inhomogeneous Bethe-Salpeter equation in the ladder approximation and the Schwinger Dyson equation in the rainbow approximation,respectively.

  18. Axial Vircator for Electronic Warfare Applications

    OpenAIRE

    L. Drazan; R. Vrana

    2009-01-01

    This paper deals with a high power microwave generator with virtual cathode – vircator in axial release for electronic warfare applications. The classification of directed energy weapons microwave (DEWM) is introduced together with basic block diagrams of a particular class of DEWM. In the paper, methods for designing vircator pulsed power supply, axial vircator structure, measurement methods and experimental results are presented. The vircator in electromagnetic ammunition is powered b...

  19. Surface Flux Emergence and Coronal Eruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Fang

    2016-05-01

    Among various active regions, delta-sunspots of aggregated spots of opposite polarities, are of particular interest due to their high productivity in energetic and recurrent eruptive events, such as X-class flares and homologous eruptions. We here study the formation of such complex magnetic structures by numerical simulations of magnetic flux emergence from the convection zone into the corona in an active-region scale domain. In our simulation, two pairs of bipolar sunspots form on the surface, originating from two buoyant segments of a single subsurface twisted flux rope. Expansion and rotation of the emerging fields in the two bipoles drive the two opposite polarities into each other with apparent rotating motion, producing a compact delta-sunspot with a sharp polarity inversion line (PIL). The formation of the delta-sunspot in such a realistic-scale domain produces emerging patterns similar to those formed in observations, e.g. the inverted polarity against Hale’s law, the curvilinear motion of the spot, strong transverse field with highly sheared magnetic and velocity fields at the PIL. Strong current builds up at the PIL, giving rise to reconnection, which produces a complex coronal magnetic connectivity with non-potential fields in the delta-spot overlaid by more relaxed fields connecting the two polarities at the two ends.

  20. Why are halo coronal mass ejections faster?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qing-Min Zhang; Yang Guo; Peng-Fei Chen; Ming-De Ding; Cheng Fang

    2010-01-01

    Halo coronal mass ejections(CMEs)have been to be significantly faster than normal CMEs,which is a long-standing puzzle.In order to solve the puzzle,we first investigate the observed properties of 31 limb CMEs that clearly display loopshaped frontal loops.The observational results show a strong tendency that slower CMEs are weaker in white-light intensity.Then,we perform a Monte Carlo simulation of 20000 artificial limb CMEs that have an average velocity of~523 km s-1.The Thomson scattering of these events is calculated when they are assumed to be observed as limb and halo events,respectively.It is found that the white-light intensity of many slow CMEs becomes remarkably reduced when they turn from being viewed as a limb event to being viewed as a halo event.When the intensity is below the background solar wind fluctuation,it is assumed that they would be missed by coronagraphs.The average velocity of"detectable"halo CMEs is~922 km s-1,very close to the observed value.This also indicates that wider events are more likely to be recorded.The results soundly suggest that the higher average velocity of halo CMEs is due to that a majority of slow events and some of narrow fast events carrying less material are so faint that they are blended with the solar wind fluctuations,and therefore are not observed.

  1. Multiscale Modeling of Solar Coronal Magnetic Reconnection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antiochos, Spiro K.; Karpen, Judith T.; DeVore, C. Richard

    2010-01-01

    Magnetic reconnection is widely believed to be the primary process by which the magnetic field releases energy to plasma in the Sun's corona. For example, in the breakout model for the initiation of coronal mass ejections/eruptive flares, reconnection is responsible for the catastrophic destabilizing of magnetic force balance in the corona, leading to explosive energy release. A critical requirement for the reconnection is that it have a "switch-on' nature in that the reconnection stays off until a large store of magnetic free energy has built up, and then it turn on abruptly and stay on until most of this free energy has been released. We discuss the implications of this requirement for reconnection in the context of the breakout model for CMEs/flares. We argue that it imposes stringent constraints on the properties of the flux breaking mechanism, which is expected to operate in the corona on kinetic scales. We present numerical simulations demonstrating how the reconnection and the eruption depend on the effective resistivity, i.e., the effective Lundquist number, and propose a model for incorporating kinetic flux-breaking mechanisms into MHO calculation of CMEs/flares.

  2. Coronal activity from the ASAS eclipsing binaries

    CERN Document Server

    Szczygiel, D M; Paczynski, B; Pojmanski, G; Pilecki, B

    2008-01-01

    We combine the catalogue of eclipsing binaries from the All Sky Automated Survey (ASAS) with the ROSAT All Sky Survey (RASS). The combination results in 836 eclipsing binaries that display coronal activity and is the largest sample of active binary stars assembled to date. By using the (V-I) colors of the ASAS eclipsing binary catalogue, we are able to determine the distances and thus bolometric luminosities for the majority of eclipsing binaries that display significant stellar activity. A typical value for the ratio of soft X-ray to bolometric luminosity is L_X/L_bol ~ a few x 10^-4, similar to the ratio of soft X-ray to bolometric flux F_X/F_bol in the most active regions of the Sun. Unlike rapidly rotating isolated late-type dwarfs -- stars with significant outer convection zones -- a tight correlation between Rossby number and activity of eclipsing binaries is absent. We find evidence for the saturation effect and marginal evidence for the so-called "super-saturation" phenomena. Our work shows that wide-...

  3. Radio-quiet Fast Coronal Mass Ejections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalswamy, N.; Aguilar-Rodriguez, E.; Kaiser, M. L.; Howard, R. A.

    2004-12-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) drive shocks in the interplanetary medium that produce type II radio emission. These CMEs are faster and wider on the average, than the general population of CMEs. However, when we start from fast (speed > 900 km/s) and wide (angular width > 60 degrees), more than half of them are not associated with radio bursts. In order to understand why these CMEs are radio quiet, we collected all the fast and wide (FW) CMEs detected by the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) mission's Large Angle and Spectrometric Coronagraph (LASCO) and isolated those without associated type II radio bursts. The radio bursts were identified in the dynamic spectra of the Radio and Plasma Wave (WAVES) Experiment on board the Wind spacecraft. We also checked the list against metric type II radio bursts reported in Solar Geophysical Data and isolated those without any radio emission. This exercise resulted in about 140 radio-quiet FW CMEs. We identified the source regions of these CMEs using the Solar Geophysical Data listings, cross-checked against the eruption regions in the SOHO/EIT movies. We explored a number of possibilities for the radio-quietness: (i) Source region being too far behind the limb, (ii) flare size, (iii) brightness of the CME, and (iv) the density of the ambient medium. We suggest that a combination of CME energy and the Alfven speed profile of the ambient medium is primarily responsible for the radio-quietness of these FW CMEs.

  4. The Coronal Abundance Anomalies of M Dwarfs

    CERN Document Server

    Wood, Brian E; Karovska, Margarita

    2012-01-01

    We analyze Chandra X-ray spectra of the M0 V+M0 V binary GJ 338. As quantified by X-ray surface flux, these are the most inactive M dwarfs ever observed with X-ray grating spectroscopy. We focus on measuring coronal abundances, in particular searching for evidence of abundance anomalies related to First Ionization Potential (FIP). In the solar corona and wind, low FIP elements are overabundant, which is the so-called "FIP effect." For other stars, particularly very active ones, an "inverse FIP effect" is often observed, with low FIP elements being underabundant. For both members of the GJ 338 binary, we find evidence for a modest inverse FIP effect, consistent with expectations from a previously reported correlation between spectral type and FIP bias. This amounts to strong evidence that all M dwarfs should exhibit the inverse FIP effect phenomenon, not just the active ones. We take the first step towards modeling the inverse FIP phenomenon in M dwarfs, building on past work that has demonstrated that MHD wav...

  5. Computer axial tomography in geosciences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Computer Axial Tomography (CAT) is one of the most adequate non-invasive techniques for the investigation of the internal structure of a large category of objects. Initially designed for medical investigations, this technique, based on the attenuation of X- or gamma-ray (and in some cases neutrons), generates digital images which map the numerical values of the linear attenuation coefficient of a section or of the entire volume of the investigated sample. Shortly after its application in medicine, CAT has been successfully used in archaeology, life sciences, and geosciences as well as for the industrial materials non-destructive testing. Depending on the energy of the utilized radiation as well as on the effective atomic number of the sample, CAT can provide with a spatial resolution of 0.01 - 0.5 mm, quantitative as well as qualitative information concerning local density, porosity or chemical composition of the sample. At present two types of axial Computer Tomographs (CT) are in use. One category, consisting of medical as well as industrial CT is equipped with X-ray tubes while the other uses isotopic gamma-ray sources. CT provided with intense X-ray sources (equivalent to 12-15 kCi or 450-550 TBq) has the advantage of an extremely short running time (a few seconds and even less) but presents some disadvantages known as beam hardening and absorption edge effects. These effects, intrinsically related to the polychromatic nature of the X-rays generated by classical tubes, need special mathematical or physical corrections. A polychromatic X-ray beam can be made almost monochromatic by means of crystal diffraction or by using adequate multicomponent filters, but these devices are costly and considerably diminish the output of X-ray generators. In the case of CT of the second type, monochromatic gamma-rays generated by radioisotopic sources, such as 169 Yb (50.4 keV), 241 Am (59 keV), 192 Ir (310.5 and 469.1 keV ) or 137 Cs (662.7 keV), are used in combination with

  6. The value of the sagittal-oblique MRI technique for injuries of the anterior cruciate ligament in the knee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Complete rupture of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) does not represent a diagnostic problem for the standard magnetic resonance (MR) protocol of the knee. Lower accuracy of the standard MR protocol for partial rupture of the ACL can be improved by using additional, dedicated MR techniques. The study goal was to draw a comparison between sagittal-oblique MR technique of ACL imaging versus flexion MR technique of ACL imaging and, versus ACL imaging obtained with standard MR protocol of the knee. In this prospective study we included 149 patients who were referred to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examination due to knee soft tissues trauma during 12 months period. MRI signs of ACL trauma, especially detection of partial tears, number of slices per technique showing the whole ACL, duration of applied additional protocols, and reproducibility of examination were analysed. Accuracy of standard MRI protocol of the knee comparing to both additional techniques is identical in detection of a complete ACL rupture. Presentations of the partial ruptures of ACL using flexion technique and sagittal-oblique technique were more sensitive (p<0.001) than presentation using standard MR protocol. There was no statistically significant difference between MRI detection of the ruptured ACL between additional techniques (p> 0.65). Sagittal-oblique technique provides a higher number of MRI slices showing the whole course of the ACL and requires a shorter scan time compared to flexion technique (p<0.001). Both additional techniques (flexion and sagittal-oblique) are just as precise as the standard MR protocol for the evaluation of a complete rupture of the ACL, so they should be used in cases of suspicion of partial rupture of the ACL. Our study showed sagittal-oblique technique was superior, because it did not depend on patient’s ability to exactly repeat the same external rotation if standard MR protocol was used or to repeat exactly the same flexion in flexion MR technique in

  7. An Unbroken Axial Vector Current Conservation Law

    CERN Document Server

    Sharafiddinov, Rasulkhozha S

    2015-01-01

    The mass, energy and momentum of the neutrino of a true flavor have an axial-vector nature. As a consequence, the left-handed truly neutral neutrino in an axial-vector field of emission can be converted into a right-handed one and vice versa. This predicts the unidenticality of masses, energies and momenta of neutrinos of the different components. Recognizing such a difference in masses, energies, momenta and accepting that the left-handed axial-vector neutrino and the right-handed antineutrino of true neutrality refer to long-lived C-odd leptons, and the right-handed truly neutral neutrino and the left-handed axial-vector antineutrino are of short-lived fermions of C-oddity, we would write a new CP-even Dirac equation taking into account the flavor symmetrical axial-vector mass, energy and momentum matrices. Their presence explains the spontaneous mirror symmetry violation, confirming that an axial-vector current conservation law has never violated. They reflect the availability of a mirror Minkowski space i...

  8. Coronal Heating and the Magnetic Flux Content of the Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falconer, D. A.; Moore, R. L.; Porter, J. G.; Hathaway, D. H.; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Previously, from analysis of SOHO/EIT coronal images in combination with Kitt Peak magnetograms (Falconer et al 1998, ApJ, 501, 386-396), we found that the quiet corona is the sum of two components: the e-scale corona and the coronal network. The large-scale corona consists of all coronal-temperature (T approx. 10(exp 6) K) structures larger than supergranules (>approx.30,000 km). The coronal network (1) consists of all coronal-temperature structures smaller than supergranules, (2) is rooted in and loosely traces the photospheric magnetic network, (3) has its brightest features seated on polarity dividing fines (neutral lines) in the network magnetic flux, and (4) produces only about 5% of the total coronal emission in quiet regions. The heating of the coronal network is apparently magnetic in origin. Here, from analysis of EIT coronal images of quiet regions in combination with magnetograms of the same quiet regions from SOHO/MDI and from Kitt Peak, we examine the other 95% of the quiet corona and its relation to the underlying magnetic network. We find: (1) Dividing the large-scale corona into its bright and dim halves divides the area into bright "continents" and dark "oceans" having spans of 2-4 supergranules. (2) These patterns are also present in the photospheric magnetograms: the network is stronger under the bright half and weaker under the dim half. (3) The radiation from the large-scale corona increases roughly as the cube root of the magnetic flux content of the underlying magnetic network. In contrast, Fisher et A (1998, ApJ, 508, 985-998) found that the coronal radiation from an active region increases roughly linearly with the magnetic flux content of the active region. We assume, as is widely held, that nearly all of the large-scale corona is magnetically rooted in the network. Our results, together with the result of Fisher et al (1999), suggest that either the coronal heating in quiet regions has a large non-magnetic component, or, if the heating

  9. NONLINEAR FORCE-FREE MODELING OF A LONG-LASTING CORONAL SIGMOID

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study of the magnetic configuration and evolution of a long-lasting quiescent coronal sigmoid is presented. The sigmoid was observed by Hinode/XRT and Transition Region and Coronal Explorer (TRACE) between 2007 February 6 and 12 when it finally erupted. We construct nonlinear force-free field models for several observations during this period, using the flux-rope insertion method. The high spatial and temporal resolution of the X-Ray Telescope (XRT) allows us to finely select best-fit models that match the observations. The modeling shows that a highly sheared field, consisting of a weakly twisted flux rope embedded in a potential field, very well describes the structure of the X-ray sigmoid. The flux rope reaches a stable equilibrium, but its axial flux is close to the stability limit of about 5 x 1020 Mx. The relative magnetic helicity increases with time from February 8 until just prior to the eruption on February 12. We study the spatial distribution of the torsion parameter α in the vicinity of the flux rope, and find that it has a hollow-core distribution, i.e., electric currents are concentrated in a current layer at the boundary between the flux rope and its surroundings. The current layer is located near the bald patch separatrix surface (BPSS) of the magnetic configuration, and the X-ray emission appears to come from this current layer/BPSS, consistent with the Titov and Demoulin model. We find that the twist angle Φ of the magnetic field increases with time to about 2π just prior to the eruption, but never reaches the value necessary for the kink instability.

  10. SOLAR MAGNETIC ACTIVITY CYCLES, CORONAL POTENTIAL FIELD MODELS AND ERUPTION RATES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrie, G. J. D. [National Solar Observatory, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States)

    2013-05-10

    We study the evolution of the observed photospheric magnetic field and the modeled global coronal magnetic field during the past 3 1/2 solar activity cycles observed since the mid-1970s. We use synoptic magnetograms and extrapolated potential-field models based on longitudinal full-disk photospheric magnetograms from the National Solar Observatory's three magnetographs at Kitt Peak, the Synoptic Optical Long-term Investigations of the Sun vector spectro-magnetograph, the spectro-magnetograph and the 512-channel magnetograph instruments, and from Stanford University's Wilcox Solar Observatory. The associated multipole field components are used to study the dominant length scales and symmetries of the coronal field. Polar field changes are found to be well correlated with active fields over most of the period studied, except between 2003 and 2006 when the active fields did not produce significant polar field changes. Of the axisymmetric multipoles, only the dipole and octupole follow the poles whereas the higher orders follow the activity cycle. All non-axisymmetric multipole strengths are well correlated with the activity cycle. The tilt of the solar dipole is therefore almost entirely due to active-region fields. The axial dipole and octupole are the largest contributors to the global field except while the polar fields are reversing. This influence of the polar fields extends to modulating eruption rates. According to the Computer Aided CME Tracking, Solar Eruptive Event Detection System, and Nobeyama radioheliograph prominence eruption catalogs, the rate of solar eruptions is found to be systematically higher for active years between 2003 and 2012 than for those between 1997 and 2002. This behavior appears to be connected with the weakness of the late-cycle 23 polar fields as suggested by Luhmann. We see evidence that the process of cycle 24 field reversal is well advanced at both poles.

  11. Solar magnetic activity cycles, coronal potential field models and eruption rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrie, Gordon

    2013-07-01

    We study the evolution of the observed photospheric magnetic field and the modeled global coronal magnetic field during the past 3 1/2 solar activity cycles observed since the mid-1970s. We use synoptic magnetograms and extrapolated potential-field models based on longitudinal full-disk photospheric magnetograms from the NSO's three magnetographs at Kitt Peak, the Synoptic Optical Long-term Investigations of the Sun (SOLIS) vector spectro-magnetograph (VSM), the spectro-magnetograph and the 512-channel magnetograph instruments, and from the U. Stanford's Wilcox Solar Observatory. The associated multipole field components are used to study the dominant length scales and symmetries of the coronal field. Of the axisymmetric multipoles, only the dipole and octupole follow the poles whereas the higher orders follow the activity cycle. All non-axisymmetric multipole strengths are well correlated with the activity cycle. The axial dipole and octupole are the largest contributors to the global field except while the polar fields are reversing. This influence of the polar fields extends to modulating eruption rates. According to the Computer Aided CME Tracking (CACTus), Solar Eruptive Event Detection System (SEEDS), and Nobeyama radioheliograph prominence eruption catalogs, the rate of solar eruptions is found to be systematically higher for active years between 2003-2012 than for those between 1997-2002. This behavior appears to be connected with the weakness of the late-cycle 23 polar fields as suggested by Luhmann. We see evidence that the process of cycle 24 field reversal is well advanced at both poles.

  12. Complications of Bilateral Sagittal Split Osteotomy in Patients with Mandibular Prognathism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majid Eshghpour

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Bilateral sagittal split osteotomy (BSSO of mandible is vastly used in treatment of mandibular deficiencies and discrepancies. Since this method could affect esthetic as well as function, evaluating these effects from various aspects is crucial. This study assessed the effects of this technique on the function of masseter muscle, jaw movements, and sensory changes along with failures in screws used for fixation. Methods: 48 patients with mandibular prognathism participated. Electromyography (EMG of the masseter muscle; limits of jaw movements including maximum opening (MIO, protrusive (PM, lateral movements (LLE and LRE; presences of sensory changes and two point discrimination test; and number of removed screws were recorded at the baseline, 3 months, and 6 months after surgery. Results: EMG activity of masseter decreased significantly 3 months after the surgery. However, after 6 months the masseter activity revealed no statistically significant difference with baseline activity. There was a significant decrease in MIO and PM after 3 months. The 6 month measurement of MIO and PM was also lower than baseline. However, no difference was observed between LRE and LLE in both follow up sessions. Among 46 patients, 27 patients developed lip paresthesia 3 months after surgery. After 6 month, lip paresthesia remained in 11 patients. Among 276 screws used for fixation 3 screws removed due to exposure to oral cavity and 2 due to patient discomfort. Conclusion: As BSSO in patients with mandibular prognathism revealed temporary functional and sensory changes, it is a safe and appropriate method in orthognathic surgery.

  13. Hybrid fixation in the bilateral sagittal split osteotomy for lower jaw advancement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe Ladeira Pereira

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Miniplate and screw fixation has been widely used in bilateral sagittal split osteotomy, but some issues remain unclear concerning its lack of rigidity when compared to Spiessl's bicortical technique. This paper demonstrates the hybrid fixation technique in a case report. A 34-year-old female patient underwent a double jaw surgery with counter-clockwise rotation of the mandible fixed using the hybrid fixation technique. The patient evolved well in the postoperative period and is still under follow up after 14 months, reporting satisfaction with the results and no significant deviation from the treatment plan up to now. No damage to tooth roots was done, maxillomandibular range of motion was within normality and regression of the inferior alveolar nerve paresthesia was observed bilaterally. The hybrid mandibular fixation is clearly visible in the panoramic and cephalometric control radiographs. It seems that the hybrid fixation can sum the advantages of both monocortical and bicortical techniques in lower jaw advancement, increasing fixation stability without significant damage to the mandibular articulation and the inferior alveolar nerve. A statistical investigation seems necessary to prove its efficacy.

  14. Clinical and radiographic evaluation of a computer-generated guiding device in bilateral sagittal split osteotomies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Moniem Barakat, Ahmed; Abou-ElFetouh, Adel; Hakam, Maha Mohammed; El-Hawary, Hesham; Abdel-Ghany, Khaled Mahmoud

    2014-07-01

    The bilateral sagittal split osteotomy (BSSO) is one of the main orthognathic surgery procedures used for managing skeletal mandibular excess, deficiency or asymmetry. It is known to be a technique-sensitive procedure with high reported incidences of inferior alveolar nerve injury, bad splits and post-surgical relapse. With the increasing use of computer-assisted techniques in orthognathic surgery, the accurate transfer of the virtual plan to the operating room is currently a subject of research. This study evaluated the efficacy of computer-generated device at maintaining the planned condylar position and minimizing inferior alveolar nerve injury during BSSO. The device was used in 6 patients who required isolated mandibular surgery for correction of their skeletal deformities. Clinical evaluation showed good recovery of the maximal incisal opening and a reproducible occlusion in 5 of the 6 patients. Radiographic evaluation showed better control of the condyle position in both the vertical and anteroposterior directions than in the mediolateral direction. The degree of accuracy between the planned and achieved screw positions were judged as good to excellent in all cases. Within the limitations of this study and the small sample size, the proposed device design allowed for good transfer of the virtual surgical plan to the operating room.

  15. Accuracy of experimental mandibular osteotomy using the image-guided sagittal saw.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietruski, P; Majak, M; Swiatek-Najwer, E; Popek, M; Szram, D; Zuk, M; Jaworowski, J

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to perform an objective assessment of the accuracy of mandibular osteotomy simulations performed using an image-guided sagittal saw. A total of 16 image-guided mandibular osteotomies were performed on four prefabricated anatomical models according to the virtual plan. Postoperative computed tomography (CT) image data were fused with the preoperative CT scan allowing an objective comparison of the results of the osteotomy executed with the virtual plan. For each operation, the following parameters were analyzed and compared independently twice by two observers: resected bone volume, osteotomy trajectory angle, and marginal point positions. The mean target registration error was 0.95±0.19mm. For all osteotomies performed, the mean difference between the planned and actual bone resection volumes was 8.55±5.51%, the mean angular deviation between planned and actual osteotomy trajectory was 8.08±5.50°, and the mean difference between the preoperative and the postoperative marginal point positions was 2.63±1.27mm. In conclusion, despite the initial stages of the research, encouraging results were obtained. The current limitations of the navigated saw are discussed, as well as the improvements in technology that should increase its predictability and efficiency, making it a reliable method for improving the surgical outcomes of maxillofacial operations. PMID:26780924

  16. Rapid Hip Osteoarthritis Development in a Patient with Anterior Acetabular Cyst with Sagittal Alignment Change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuhiro Homma

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Rapidly destructive coxarthrosis (RDC is rare and develops unusual clinical course. Recent studies suggest multiple possible mechanisms of the development of RDC. However the exact mechanism of RDC is still not clear. The difficulty of the study on RDC is attributed to its rareness and the fact that the data before the onset of RDC is normally unavailable. In this report, we presented the patient having the radiographic data before the onset who had rapid osteoarthritis (OA development after contralateral THA, which meets the current criteria of RDC. We thought that the increased posterior tilt of the pelvis after THA reinforced the stress concentration at pre-existed anterior acetabular cyst, thereby the destruction of the cyst was occurred. As a result the rapid OA was developed. We think that there is the case of rapid osteoarthritis developing due to alternating load concentration by posterior pelvic tilt on preexisting anterior acetabular cyst such as our patient among the cases diagnosed as RDC without any identifiable etiology. The recognition of sagittal alignment changes and anterior acetabular cyst may play important role in prediction and prevention of the rapid hip osteoarthritis development similar to RDC.

  17. Comparison of the Multidetector-row Computed Tomographic Angiography Axial and Coronal Planes' Usefulness for Detecting Thoracodorsal Artery Perforators

    OpenAIRE

    Jong Gyu Kim; Soo Hyang Lee

    2012-01-01

    Background During the planning of a thoracodorsal artery perforator (TDAP) free flap, preoperative multidetector-row computed tomographic (MDCT) angiography is valuable for predicting the locations of perforators. However, CT-based perforator mapping of the thoracodorsal artery is not easy because of its small diameter. Thus, we evaluated 1-mm-thick MDCT images in multiple planes to search for reliable perforators accurately. Methods Between July 2010 and October 2011, 19 consecutive patients...

  18. ON THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN THE CORONAL MAGNETIC DECAY INDEX AND CORONAL MASS EJECTION SPEED

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu Yan; Liu Chang; Jing Ju; Wang Haimin, E-mail: yx2@njit.edu [Space Weather Research Lab, Center for Solar-Terrestrial Research, New Jersey Institute of Technology, 323 Martin Luther King Boulevard, Newark, NJ 07102-1982 (United States)

    2012-12-10

    Numerical simulations suggest that kink and torus instabilities are two potential contributors to the initiation and prorogation of eruptive events. A magnetic parameter called the decay index (i.e., the coronal magnetic gradient of the overlying fields above the eruptive flux ropes) could play an important role in controlling the kinematics of eruptions. Previous studies have identified a threshold range of the decay index that distinguishes between eruptive and confined configurations. Here we advance the study by investigating if there is a clear correlation between the decay index and coronal mass ejection (CME) speed. Thirty-eight CMEs associated with filament eruptions and/or two-ribbon flares are selected using the H{alpha} data from the Global H{alpha} Network. The filaments and flare ribbons observed in H{alpha} associated with the CMEs help to locate the magnetic polarity inversion line, along which the decay index is calculated based on the potential field extrapolation using Michelson Doppler Imager magnetograms as boundary conditions. The speeds of CMEs are obtained from the LASCO C2 CME catalog available online. We find that the mean decay index increases with CME speed for those CMEs with a speed below 1000 km s{sup -1} and stays flat around 2.2 for the CMEs with higher speeds. In addition, we present a case study of a partial filament eruption, in which the decay indices show different values above the erupted/non-erupted part.

  19. BMD measurements of the spine derived from sagittal reformations of contrast-enhanced MDCT without dedicated software

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baum, Thomas, E-mail: thbaum@gmx.de [Institut fuer Roentgendiagnostik, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Ismaninger Str. 22, 81675 Muenchen (Germany); Mueller, Dirk, E-mail: dirk.mueller@roe.med.tum.de [Institut fuer Roentgendiagnostik, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Ismaninger Str. 22, 81675 Muenchen (Germany); Dobritz, Martin, E-mail: dobritz@roe.med.tum.de [Institut fuer Roentgendiagnostik, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Ismaninger Str. 22, 81675 Muenchen (Germany); Rummeny, Ernst J., E-mail: institut@roe.med.tum.de [Institut fuer Roentgendiagnostik, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Ismaninger Str. 22, 81675 Muenchen (Germany); Link, Thomas M., E-mail: thomas.link@radiology.ucsf.edu [Musculoskeletal and Quantitative Imaging Research, Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, University of California San Francisco, 185 Berry Street, Suite 350, San Francisco, CA 94107 (United States); Bauer, Jan S., E-mail: jsb@roe.med.tum.de [Institut fuer Roentgendiagnostik, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Ismaninger Str. 22, 81675 Muenchen (Germany)

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To assess QCT equivalent BMD of the lumbar spine in sagittal reformations of routine abdominal contrast-enhanced MDCT with simple PACS measurement tools and to apply this method to MDCT datasets for differentiating patients with and without osteoporotic vertebral fractures. Materials and methods: Eight postmenopausal women (65 {+-} 5years) underwent standard QCT to assess BMD of L1-L3. Afterwards routine abdominal contrast-enhanced MDCT images of these women were obtained and apparent BMD of L1-L3 was measured using the sagittal reformations. The MDCT-to-QCT conversion equation for BMD was calculated with linear regression analysis. The conversion equation was applied to vertebral BMD datasets (L1-L3) of 75 postmenopausal women (66 {+-} 4years). Seventeen of the 75 patients had osteoporotic vertebral fractures. Results: BMD values of contrast-enhanced MDCT were on average 56 mg/ml higher than those of standard QCT. A correlation coefficient of r = 0.94 (p < 0.05) was calculated for the BMD values of MDCT and standard QCT with the conversion equation BMD{sub QCT} = 0.69 x BMD{sub MDCT} - 11 mg/ml. Accordingly converted BMD values of patients with vertebral fractures were significantly lower than those of patients without vertebral fractures (69 mg/ml vs. 85 mg/ml; p < 0.05). Using ROC analysis to differentiate patients with and without vertebral fractures, AUC = 0.72 was obtained for converted BMD values (p < 0.05). Short- and long-term reproducibility errors for BMD measurements in the sagittal reformations amounted 2.09% and 7.70%, respectively. Conclusion: BMD measurements of the spine could be computed in sagittal reformations of routine abdominal contrast-enhanced MDCT with minimal technical and time effort. Using the conversion equation, the acquired BMD data could differentiate patients with and without osteoporotic vertebral fractures.

  20. Sagittal otolith size and shape variability to identify geographical intraspecific differences in three species of the genus Merluccius

    OpenAIRE

    Torres, G. J.; Lombarte, Antoni; Morales-nin, Beatriz

    2000-01-01

    A study was carried out on the morphology (size and shape) of the saccular otolith (sagitta) by means of image analysis on three species of the genus Merluccius (M. gayi, M. hubbsi and M. merluccius). By digitization of the sagittae, morphometry and outline (Fourier harmonic) as form descriptor measurements were obtained, that were subsequently analysed by means of multivariant methods, allowing the intraspecific variability to be quantified. The differences in the intraspecific sagittal otol...

  1. Exploration of the validity of the two-dimensional sagittal plane assumption in modeling the standing long jump.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickox, Lauren J; Ashby, Blake M; Alderink, Gordon J

    2016-05-01

    Most previous standing long jump studies have been based on the assumption of two-dimensional sagittal plane motion with bilateral symmetry. The purpose of this study was to investigate the validity of this assumption. Standing long jump trials were collected using six adult male participants. Each participant stood with a foot on each of two force plates and performed eight standing long jumps for maximal distance. Inverse dynamics analyses were performed for two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) models, and joint moments, powers, and work values were compared. The differences between these models with respect to the validity of the common planar jumping assumption were analyzed. Good agreement was observed between 2D and 3D methods for the lower body, with minimal differences in sagittal plane moments, power, and work for the ankle, knee, and lower back. There were significant, but relatively small differences in the sagittal plane kinematics and kinetics at the hip. For the upper body, the results contradicted the sagittal plane assumption in that significant moments and power were generated about the abduction/adduction axis of the shoulder and a similar amount of work was performed about both abduction/adduction and flexion/extension axes of the shoulder. The elbow also showed significant differences in power and work. These results indicate that an assumption of planar motion should be sufficient for many studies of the standing long jump that only examine lower body movement. However, for studies that include upper body motion, diagnosing injury risk, or investigating gender differences, a 3D model may be more appropriate.

  2. Effect of Long Term Oral Warfarin Sodium Treatment on Bone Mineral Density Scores and Spinal Sagittal Alignment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamil Eyvazov

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of long term oral warfarin sodium treatment on bone mineral density (BMD and spinal sagittal alignment. Materials and Methods: Sixty four participants were enrolled for this retrospective study. Participants were divided into two groups-participants who had taken warfarin sodium for at least two years (n=33 and participants who had never taken warfarin sodium (n=31. All of the individuals were evaluated at the same center. Dual X-ray absorptiometry (DXA was used for measuring BMD. Whole spine x-rays were obtained for sagittal assessment and the following parameters were measured: Cervical lordosis, thoracic kyphosis, lumbar lordosis, pelvic incidence, pelvic tilt, sacral slope and sagittal vertical axis (SVA. Results: The mean BMD value was significantly higher in participants who had not taken warfarin sodium compared to participants who had taken warfarin sodium. The differences between the average values were 0.1552 g/cm2 in BMD; 2.1 in T scores; 1.4 in Z scores. On the radiological evaluation of the spine, cervical lordosis was 7.1 degrees lower, lumbar lordosis was 4.7 degrees lower and thoracic kyphosis was 5.3 degrees higher in the patients using drug. C7 plumb line was interchanged forward in the patients using drug. Conclusions: This study shows that warfarin sodium use worsens bone quality in the lumbar region and does not affect bone quality in the femoral region. Furthermore, warfarin sodium use also reduces physiological lordosis and enhances thoracic kyphosis. Consequences of these changes are the likely cause of sagittal spinal anterior imbalance. Long-term oral warfarin sodium use affect bone mineral density and spinal alignment. Our conclusion about giving clear message and show exactly mechanism we need prospective randomized multicentre studies in future. We strongly believe this study will be pioneer for future researches.

  3. Clinical Follow-up on Sagittal Fracture at the Temporal Root of the Zygomatic Arch: Does It Need Open Reduction?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Seon Cheon

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background The zygoma is a major portion of the midfacial contour. When deformity occursin this area, a reduction should be conducted to correct it. If a sagittal fracture at the temporalroot of the zygomatic arch occurs, this also requires reduction, but it is difficult to approachdue to its anatomical location, and the possibility of fixation is also limited. Thus, the authorsattempted the reduction of sagittal fracture by two- or three-point fixation and the Gilliesapproach without direct manipulation. The preoperative and postoperative results of thepatients were evaluated. Follow-up was performed to establish a treatment guideline.Methods A retrospective study was done with 40 patients who had sagittal fractures at thetemporal root of the zygomatic arch from March 2009 to June 2012. Only two- or three-pointfixation was performed for the accompanying zygomatic-orbital-maxillary fracture. The Gilliesapproach was used for complex fractures of the zygomatic arch, while the temporal root ofthe zygomatic arch was only observed without reduction. Preoperative and postoperativecomputed tomography and X-ray scans were performed to examine the results.Results The result of the paired t-test on preoperative and postoperative bone gap differences,the depression level, and the degree of temporal protrusion showed a marked decrease in themean difference at a 95% confidence interval. The results were acceptable.Conclusions In the treatment of sagittal fractures at the temporal root of the zygomatic arch,it is acceptable to use indirect reduction and non-fixation methods. This leads to a satisfactoryaesthetic and functional outcome.

  4. Early Outcomes of Minimally Invasive Anterior Longitudinal Ligament Release for Correction of Sagittal Imbalance in Patients with Adult Spinal Deformity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armen R. Deukmedjian

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The object of this study was to evaluate a novel surgical technique in the treatment of adult degenerative scoliosis and present our early experience with the minimally invasive lateral approach for anterior longitudinal ligament release to provide lumbar lordosis and examine its impact on sagittal balance. Methods. All patients with adult spinal deformity (ASD treated with the minimally invasive lateral retroperitoneal transpsoas interbody fusion (MIS LIF for release of the anterior longitudinal ligament were examined. Patient demographics, clinical data, spinopelvic parameters, and outcome measures were recorded. Results. Seven patients underwent release of the anterior longitudinal ligament (ALR to improve sagittal imbalance. All cases were split into anterior and posterior stages, with mean estimated blood loss of 125 cc and 530 cc, respectively. Average hospital stay was 8.3 days, and mean follow-up time was 9.1 months. Comparing pre- and postoperative 36′′ standing X-rays, the authors discovered a mean increase in global lumbar lordosis of 24 degrees, increase in segmental lumbar lordosis of 17 degrees per level of ALL released, decrease in pelvic tilt of 7 degrees, and decrease in sagittal vertical axis of 4.9 cm. At the last followup, there was a mean improvement in VAS and ODI scores of 26.2% and 18.3%. Conclusions. In the authors’ early experience, release of the anterior longitudinal ligament using the minimally invasive lateral retroperitoneal transpsoas approach may be a feasible alternative in correcting sagittal deformity.

  5. Probing Coronal Mass Ejections with Faraday Rotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spangler, Steven R.; Fischer, P. D.; Kooi, J. E.; Buffo, J. J.

    2013-07-01

    Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) are one of the most important solar phenomena in affecting conditions on Earth. There is not a consensus as to the physical mechanisms responsible for ejecting CME material from the solar atmosphere. Measurements that specify basic physical properties close to the Sun, when the CME is still evolving, should be useful in determining the correct theoretical model. One of the best observational techniques is that of Faraday rotation, a rotation in the plane of polarization of radio waves when propagating through a magnetized medium like the corona. The importance of Faraday rotation in determining the structure and evolutionary history of CMEs was discussed in Liu et al (ApJ 665, 1439, 2007). In this paper, we report Faraday rotation observations of ``constellations'' of background extragalactic radio sources near the Sun on three days in August, 2012, with the intention of observing a source occulted by a CME. Observations were made with the Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory. We made polarization measurements at 6 frequencies between 1.31 and 1.94 GHz. On August 2, 2012, a CME clearly visible on the LASCO C3 coronagraph occulted a radio source from our sample, 0843+1547. Preliminary data analysis shows a Faraday rotation transient for 0843+1547 which appears to be associated with the CME. The Faraday rotation measure changes from nearly 0 before CME passage, to a value of about -12 radians/square-meter before declining after CME passage. We will discuss the interpretation of these data in terms of models for CME structure, as well as the status of our observations of other sources on August 2, and on other days. This work was supported at the University of Iowa by grant ATM09-56901.

  6. MAGNETIC FLUX SUPPLEMENT TO CORONAL BRIGHT POINTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mou, Chaozhou; Huang, Zhenghua; Xia, Lidong; Li, Bo; Fu, Hui; Jiao, Fangran; Hou, Zhenyong [Shandong Provincial Key Laboratory of Optical Astronomy and Solar-Terrestrial Environment, Institute of Space Sciences, Shandong University, Weihai, 264209 Shandong (China); Madjarska, Maria S., E-mail: z.huang@sdu.edu.cn [Armagh Observatory, College Hill, Armagh BT61 9DG (United Kingdom)

    2016-02-10

    Coronal bright points (BPs) are associated with magnetic bipolar features (MBFs) and magnetic cancellation. Here we investigate how BP-associated MBFs form and how the consequent magnetic cancellation occurs. We analyze longitudinal magnetograms from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager to investigate the photospheric magnetic flux evolution of 70 BPs. From images taken in the 193 Å passband of the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) we dermine that the BPs’ lifetimes vary from 2.7 to 58.8 hr. The formation of the BP MBFs is found to involve three processes, namely, emergence, convergence, and local coalescence of the magnetic fluxes. The formation of an MBF can involve more than one of these processes. Out of the 70 cases, flux emergence is the main process of an MBF buildup of 52 BPs, mainly convergence is seen in 28, and 14 cases are associated with local coalescence. For MBFs formed by bipolar emergence, the time difference between the flux emergence and the BP appearance in the AIA 193 Å passband varies from 0.1 to 3.2 hr with an average of 1.3 hr. While magnetic cancellation is found in all 70 BPs, it can occur in three different ways: (I) between an MBF and small weak magnetic features (in 33 BPs); (II) within an MBF with the two polarities moving toward each other from a large distance (34 BPs); (III) within an MBF whose two main polarities emerge in the same place simultaneously (3 BPs). While an MBF builds up the skeleton of a BP, we find that the magnetic activities responsible for the BP heating may involve small weak fields.

  7. Are halo coronal mass ejections special events?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lara, Alejandro; Gopalswamy, Nat; Xie, Hong; Mendoza-Torres, Eduardo; PéRez-EríQuez, RomáN.; Michalek, Gregory

    2006-06-01

    We revisited the properties of wide coronal mass ejections (CMEs) called halo CMEs. Using the large LASCO/SOHO CMEs data set, from 1996 to 2004, we examined the statistical properties of (partial and full) halo CMEs and compare with the same properties of "normal" width (lower than 120°) CMEs. We found that halo CMEs have different properties than "normal" CMEs, which cannot be explained merely by the current geometric interpretation that they are seen as halos because they are traveling in the Sun Earth direction. We found that the CME width distribution is formed by, at least, three different populations: Two gaussians: a narrow and a medium distribution centered at ˜17° and ˜38°, respectively; the narrow population most likely corresponds to the "true" observed widths, whereas the medium width population is the product of projection effects. The third distribution corresponds to wider CMEs (80° FOD), i.e., the highest point within the coronograph field of view where a CME can be distinguished from the background. In other words, the highest CME altitude measured. The FOD for nonhalo CMEs decreases exponentially from ˜5 to ˜30 R⊙ in the LASCO field of view. On the other hand, the FOD of halo CMEs increase with distance. This means that it is more likely to see halo CMEs at large distances (from the Sun) than nonhalo CMEs. These halo CME properties may be explained if the white light wide enhancements (or halo) seen by coronographs correspond to a combination of an expanding (shock) wave which disturbs and/or compresses the ambient material and the CME material itself.

  8. Projection effects in coronal mass ejections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vršnak, B.; Sudar, D.; Ruždjak, D.; Žic, T.

    2007-07-01

    Context: Basic observational parameters of a coronal mass ejection (CME) are its speed and angular width. Measurements of the CME speed and angular width are severely influenced by projection effects. Aims: The goal of this paper is to investigate a statistical relationship between the plane-of-sky speeds of CMEs and the direction of their propagation, hopefully providing an estimate of the true speeds of CMEs. Methods: We analyze the correlation between the plane-of-sky velocity and the position of the CME source region, employing several non-halo CME samples. The samples are formed applying various restrictions to avoid crosstalk of relevant parameters. For example, we select only CMEs observed to radial distances larger than 10 solar radii; we omit CMEs showing a considerable acceleration in the considered distance range and treat CMEs of different angular widths separately. Finally, we combine these restriction criteria, up to the limits beyond which the statistical significance of the results becomes ambiguous. Results: A distinct anti-correlation is found between the angular width of CMEs and their source-region position, clearly showing an increasing trend towards the disc center. Similarly, all of the considered subsamples show a correlation between the CME projected speed and the distance of the source region from the disc center. On average, velocities of non-halo limb-CMEs are 1.5-2 times higher than in the case of non-halo CMEs launched from regions located close to the disc center. Conclusions: Unfortunately, the established empirical relationships provide only a rough estimate of the velocity correction as a function of the source-region location. To a certain degree, the results can be explained in terms of CME cone models, but only after taking crosstalk of various parameters and observational artifacts into account.

  9. Magnetic Reconnection in Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fermo, R. L.; Opher, M.; Drake, J. F.

    2014-12-01

    Magnetic reconnection is a ubiquitous phenomenon in many varied space and astrophysical plasmas, and as such plays an important role in the dynamics of interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs). It is widely regarded that reconnection is instrumental in the formation and ejection of the initial CME flux rope, but reconnection also continues to affect the dynamics as it propagates through the interplanetary medium. For example, reconnection on the leading edge of the ICME, by which it interacts with the interplanetary medium, leads to flux erosion. However, recent in situ observations by Gosling et al. found signatures of reconnection exhausts in the interior. In light of this data, we consider the stability properties of systems with this flux rope geometry with regard to their minimum energy Taylor state. Variations from this state will result in the magnetic field relaxing back towards the minimum energy state, subject to the constraints that the toroidal flux and magnetic helicity remain invariant. In reversed field pinches, this relaxation is mediated by reconnection in the interior of the system, as has been shown theoretically and experimentally. By treating the ICME flux rope in a similar fashion, we show analytically that the the elongation of the flux tube cross section in the latitudinal direction will result in a departure from the Taylor state. The resulting relaxation of the magnetic field causes reconnection to commence in the interior of the ICME, in agreement with the observations of Gosling et al. We present MHD simulations in which reconnection initiates at a number of rational surfaces, and ultimately produces a stochastic magnetic field. If the time scales for this process are shorter than the propagation time to 1 AU, this result explains why many ICME flux ropes no longer exhibit the smooth, helical flux structure characteristic of a magnetic cloud.

  10. Normal values of the sagittal diameter of the lumbar spine (vertebral body and dural sac) in children measured by MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knirsch, Walter [University Children' s Hospital Freiburg, Department of Pediatric Cardiology, Freiburg (Germany); University Children' s Hospital Zurich, Division of Paediatric Cardiology, Zurich (Switzerland); Kurtz, Claudia; Langer, Mathias [University Hospital Freiburg, Department of Radiology, Freiburg (Germany); Haeffner, Nicole; Kececioglu, Deniz [University Children' s Hospital Freiburg, Department of Pediatric Cardiology, Freiburg (Germany)

    2005-04-01

    The definition of normal values is a prerequisite for the reliable evaluation of abnormality in the lumbar spine, such as spinal canal stenosis or dural ectasia in patients with Marfan syndrome. Values for vertebral body diameter (VBD) and dural sac diameter (DSD) for the lumbar spine have been published in adults. In children, normal values have been established using conventional radiography or myelography, but not by MRI. To define normal values for the sagittal diameter of the vertebral body and dural sac, and to calculate a dural sac ratio (DSR) in the lumbosacral spine (L1-S1) in healthy children using MRI. A total of 75 healthy children between 6 years and 17 years of age were examined using a sagittal T2-weighted sequence. Sagittal VBD and DSD were measured and a DSR was calculated. This was a retrospective and cross-sectional study. With increasing age there is a significant increase of VBD, a slight increase of DSD, and a slight decrease of DSR. There is no significant sex difference. DSR in healthy children is higher than in healthy adults. MRI is a reliable method demonstrating the natural shape of the lumbosacral spine and its absolute values. These normal values compare well with those established by conventional radiological techniques. Our data may serve as a reference for defining dural ectasia in children with Marfan syndrome. (orig.)

  11. Normal values of the sagittal diameter of the lumbar spine (vertebral body and dural sac) in children measured by MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The definition of normal values is a prerequisite for the reliable evaluation of abnormality in the lumbar spine, such as spinal canal stenosis or dural ectasia in patients with Marfan syndrome. Values for vertebral body diameter (VBD) and dural sac diameter (DSD) for the lumbar spine have been published in adults. In children, normal values have been established using conventional radiography or myelography, but not by MRI. To define normal values for the sagittal diameter of the vertebral body and dural sac, and to calculate a dural sac ratio (DSR) in the lumbosacral spine (L1-S1) in healthy children using MRI. A total of 75 healthy children between 6 years and 17 years of age were examined using a sagittal T2-weighted sequence. Sagittal VBD and DSD were measured and a DSR was calculated. This was a retrospective and cross-sectional study. With increasing age there is a significant increase of VBD, a slight increase of DSD, and a slight decrease of DSR. There is no significant sex difference. DSR in healthy children is higher than in healthy adults. MRI is a reliable method demonstrating the natural shape of the lumbosacral spine and its absolute values. These normal values compare well with those established by conventional radiological techniques. Our data may serve as a reference for defining dural ectasia in children with Marfan syndrome. (orig.)

  12. Coronal Seismology: Inferring Magnetic Fields and Exploring Damping Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAteer, R. T. James; Ireland, Jack

    2015-08-01

    Recent observations in extreme ultra-violet wavelengths have shown that the solar corona oscillates at many different spatial sizes and temporal size scales. However, much remains unknown about many of these oscillations; they are intermittent for unknown reasons, appear on some coronal features and not on other, similar, neighboring features, and may (or may not) be magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) wave modes. Definitive causes of the structure and origins of these oscillations are still largely lacking. Here, we use automated oscillation detection routines to study a large sample of oscillations, inferring physical mechanisms as to how and why the corona varies.First, we measure the oscillation content of different physical regions on the Sun in SDO AIA data, using two different automated oscillation detection algorithms. This shows a power-law distribution in oscillatory frequency, disagreeing with strong historical assumptions about the nature of coronal heating and coronal seismology. We show how such disagreements can be reconciled by using a power-law background for oscillatory signals.Second we use coronal seismology to provide a means to infer coronal plasma parameters and to differentiate between potential damping mechanisms. Recent sets of kink-mode observations (usually 5-8 loops) have come insights into how the coronal is structured and how it evolves. We present a complex set of flare-induced, off-limb, coronal kink-mode oscillations of almost 100 loops. These display a spread of periods, amplitudes, and damping times, allowing us to probe the spatial distribution of these parameters for the first time. Both Fourier and Wavelet routines are used to automatically extract and characterize these oscillations. An initial period of P~500s, results in an inferred coronal magnetic field of B~20G. The decrease in the oscillation period of the loop position corresponds to a drop in number density inside the coronal loop, as predicted by MHD. As the the period drops

  13. Standing Slow MHD Waves in Radiatively Cooling Coronal Loops

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K. S. Al-Ghafri

    2015-06-01

    The standing slow magneto-acoustic oscillations in cooling coronal loops are investigated. There are two damping mechanisms which are considered to generate the standing acoustic modes in coronal magnetic loops, namely, thermal conduction and radiation. The background temperature is assumed to change temporally due to optically thin radiation. In particular, the background plasma is assumed to be radiatively cooling. The effects of cooling on longitudinal slow MHD modes is analytically evaluated by choosing a simple form of radiative function, that ensures the temperature evolution of the background plasma due to radiation, coincides with the observed cooling profile of coronal loops. The assumption of low-beta plasma leads to neglecting the magnetic field perturbation and, eventually, reduces the MHD equations to a 1D system modelling longitudinal MHD oscillations in a cooling coronal loop. The cooling is assumed to occur on a characteristic time scale, much larger than the oscillation period that subsequently enables using the WKB theory to study the properties of standing wave. The governing equation describing the time-dependent amplitude of waves is obtained and solved analytically. The analytically derived solutions are numerically evaluated to give further insight into the evolution of the standing acoustic waves. We find that the plasma cooling gives rise to a decrease in the amplitude of oscillations. In spite of the reduction in damping rate caused by rising the cooling, the damping scenario of slow standing MHD waves strongly increases in hot coronal loops.

  14. Magnetic Evolution and Temperature Variation in a Coronal Hole

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Jun; Wang, Jingxiu; Wang, Haimin

    2007-01-01

    We have explored the magnetic flux evolution and temperature variation in a coronal-hole region, using Big Bear Solar Observatory (BBSO) deep magnetograms and {\\it SOHO}/EIT images observed from 2005 October 10 to 14. For comparison, we also investigated a neighboring quiet region of the Sun. The coronal hole evolved from its mature stage to its disappearance during the observing period. We have obtained the following results: (1) When the coronal hole was well developed on October 10, about 60 % of the magnetic flux was positive. The EUV brightness was 420 counts pixel$^{-1}$, and the coronal temperature, estimated from the line ratio of the EIT 195 {\\AA} and 171 {\\AA} images, was 1.07 MK. (2) On October 14, when the coronal hole had almost disappeared, 51 % of the magnetic flux was positive, the EUV radiance was 530 counts pixel$^{-1}$, and the temperature was 1.10 MK. (3) In the neighboring quiet region, the fraction of positive flux varied between 0.49 and 0.47. The EUV brightness displayed an irregular v...

  15. Axial and tangential views of the acromioclavicular joint: the introduction of new projections

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Wei; ZHAGN Qi; SU Yan-ling; ZHANG Ze-kun; HOU Zhi-yong; PAN Jin-she; ZHANG Xiao-lin; ZHANG Ying-ze

    2012-01-01

    Background Routine anteroposterior radiographs of the acromioclavicular (AC) joint with or without weight bearing have limitations in demonstrating the AC joint.Transarticular fixation with Kirschner wire is a treatment choice for AC dislocations.However,percutaneous fixation of the AC joint is technically demanding.The C-arm fluoroscopy can be used as routine intraoperative guidance to facilitate this procedure.The current study aims to introduce new projections,the axial and tangential views of AC joint,to help evaluate the severity of the injury and facilitate the percutaneous procedure.Methods Three shoulder specimens were used to find the projection directions of the axial and tangential views of the AC joint by using the digital radiography (DR) unit.The axial and tangential views were taken of 20 adult volunteers by referencing the projection directions determined in the shoulder specimens.The angles showed on the DR system and the angles between the coronal plane of the body and the vertical plane of the flat panel detector (FPD) during taking these radiographs were recorded.The C-arm fluoroscopy unit was used to take the axial and tangential views referencing the angles measured on the DR system.Routine anteroposterior radiographs of the AC joint were taken on the volunteers.The minimal distances from the distal clavicle to the acromion were measured on both tangential and anteroposterior radiographs.The data was statistically analyzed.Results The clear axial and tangential radiographs of AC joints of the volunteers were obtained using both DR and C-arm fluoroscopy units.The angles demonstrated on the DR window are (20.8±2.4)° for male and (18.3±2.3)° for female.During taking the axial views,the angles between the coronal plane of the body and vertical plane of FPD are (23.3±3.2)° for male and (20.1±2.4)° for female.During taking tangential views,the corresponding angles are (117.5±3.7)° for male and (113.1±3.3)° for female.On the tangential

  16. Optimization of residual heat removal pump axial thrust and axial bearing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schubert, F.

    1996-12-01

    The residual heat removal (RHR) pumps of German 1300 megawatt pressurized-water reactor (PWR) power plants are of the single stage end suction type with volute casing or with diffuser and forged circular casing. Due to the service conditions the pumps have to cover the full capacity range as well as a big variation in suction static pressure. This results in a big difference in the axial thrust that has to be borne by the axial bearing. Because these pumps are designed to operate without auxiliary systems (things that do not exist can not fail), they are equipped with antifriction bearings and sump oil lubrication. To minimize the heat production within the bearing casing, a number of PWR plants have pumps with combined axial/radial bearings of the ball type. Due to the fact that the maximum axial thrust caused by static pressure and hydrodynamic forces on the impeller is too big to be borne by that type of axial bearing, the impellers were designed to produce a hydrodynamic axial force that counteracts the static axial force. Thus, the resulting axial thrust may change direction when the static pressure varies.

  17. Polarization converters based on axially symmetric twisted nematic liquid crystal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Shih-Wei; Ting, Chi-Lun; Fuh, Andy Y-G; Lin, Tsung-Hsien

    2010-02-15

    An axially symmetric twisted nematic liquid crystal (ASTNLC) device, based on axially symmetric photoalignment, was demonstrated. Such an ASTNLC device can convert axial (azimuthal) to azimuthal (axial) polarization. The optical properties of the ASTNLC device are analyzed and found to agree with simulation results. The ASTNLC device with a specific device can be adopted as an arbitrary axial symmetric polarization converter or waveplate for axially, azimuthally or vertically polarized light. A design for converting linear polarized light to axially symmetric circular polarized light is also demonstrated. PMID:20389369

  18. Spinal curves and health: a systematic critical review of the epidemiological literature dealing with associations between sagittal spinal curves and health

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Sanne Toftgaard; Hartvigsen, Jan

    2008-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to (1) determine whether sagittal spinal curves are associated with health in epidemiological studies, (2) estimate the strength of such associations, and (3) consider whether these relations are likely to be causal....

  19. Muscle contributions to whole-body sagittal plane angular momentum during walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neptune, R R; McGowan, C P

    2011-01-01

    Walking is a complex dynamic task that requires the regulation of whole-body angular momentum to maintain dynamic balance while performing walking subtasks such as propelling the body forward and accelerating the leg into swing. In human walking, the primary mechanism to regulate angular momentum is muscle force generation. Muscles accelerate body segments and generate ground reaction forces that alter angular momentum about the body's center-of-mass to restore and maintain dynamic stability. In addition, gravity contributes to whole-body angular momentum through its contribution to the ground reaction forces. The purpose of this study was to generate a muscle-actuated forward dynamics simulation of normal walking to quantify how individual muscles and gravity contribute to whole-body angular momentum in the sagittal plane. In early stance, the uniarticular hip and knee extensors (GMAX and VAS), biarticular hamstrings (HAM) and ankle dorsiflexors (TA) generated backward angular momentum while the ankle plantar flexors (SOL and GAS) generated forward momentum. In late stance, SOL and GAS were the primary contributors and generated angular momentum in opposite directions. SOL generated primarily forward angular momentum while GAS generated backward angular momentum. The difference between muscles was due to their relative contributions to the horizontal and vertical ground reaction forces. Gravity contributed to the body's angular momentum in early stance and to a lesser extent in late stance, which was counteracted primarily by the plantar flexors. These results may provide insight into balance and movement disorders and provide a basis for developing locomotor therapies that target specific muscle groups.

  20. Sagittal changes in lower incisors by the use of lingual arch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen Carolina Becker Letti

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to evaluate a sagittal variation on the lower incisors with the use of the lingual arch on the transition from mixed to permanent dentition. METHODS: The sample was constituted of 44 Caucasian patients (26 girls and 18 boys, divided in two groups: CG, control group, monitoring the lower arch space with no orthodontic/orthopedic treatment during the rated period (n = 14; EG, experimental group, presenting anterior inferior mild crowding and installation of the lingual arch for space maintenance (n = 30. The position of the lower incisors was analyzed on computerized cephalometric tracings performed at the beginning of the monitoring (T1 and at the end, on the permanent dentition (T2. In order to evaluate the position of the incisors it was used Tweed and Steiner measurements: IMPA, 1.NB and 1-NB. The alterations were analyzed through the "t" test for paired samples, while the differences between the groups were analyzed through the "t" test for independent samples, as for sexual dimorphism. RESULTS: The values in T2 were greater in relation to T1 for all measurements on EG (IMPA, p = 0.038; 1.NB, p = 0.007 and 1-NB, p < 0.0001. On comparing the differences (T2-T1 between CG and EG, it can be gauged differences significantly superior for measure 1.NB (p = 0.002 and 1-NB (p < 0.0001 on EG. There was no statisticaly significant difference between genres. CONCLUSION: It was concluded that the lower incisors were projected after using the lingual arch to control the space on the transition from mixed to permanent dentition, however, within acceptable standards, not having difference between genres.

  1. The impact of sagittal balance on clinical results after posterior interbody fusion for patients with degenerative spondylolisthesis: A Pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chung Sung-Soo

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Comparatively little is known about the relation between the sagittal vertical axis and clinical outcome in cases of degenerative lumbar spondylolisthesis. The objective of this study was to determine whether lumbar sagittal balance affects clinical outcomes after posterior interbody fusion. This series suggests that consideration of sagittal balance during posterior interbody fusion for degenerative spondylolisthesis can yield high levels of patient satisfaction and restore spinal balance Methods A retrospective study of clinical outcomes and a radiological review was performed on 18 patients with one or two level degenerative spondylolisthesis. Patients were divided into two groups: the patients without improvement in pelvic tilt, postoperatively (Group A; n = 10 and the patients with improvement in pelvic tilt postoperatively (Group B; n = 8. Pre- and postoperative clinical outcome surveys were administered to determine Visual Analogue Pain Scores (VAS and Oswestry disability index (ODI. In addition, we evaluated full spine radiographic films for pelvic tilt (PT, sacral slope (SS, pelvic incidence (PI, thoracic kyphosis (TK, lumbar lordosis (LL, sacrofemoral distance (SFD, and sacro C7 plumb line distance (SC7D Results All 18 patients underwent surgery principally for the relief of radicular leg pain and back pain. In groups A and B, mean preoperative VAS were 6.85 and 6.81, respectively, and these improved to 3.20 and 1.63 at last follow-up. Mean preoperative ODI were 43.2 and 50.4, respectively, and these improved to 23.6 and 18.9 at last follow-up. In spinopelvic parameters, no significant difference was found between preoperative and follow up variables except PT in Group A. However, significant difference was found between the preoperative and follows up values of PT, SS, TK, LL, and SFD/SC7D in Group B. Between parameters of group A and B, there is borderline significance on preoperative PT, preoperative LL and last

  2. Axial instability of rotating relativistic stars

    CERN Document Server

    Friedman, J L; Friedman, John L.; Morsink, Sharon M.

    1998-01-01

    Perturbations of rotating relativistic stars can be classified by their behavior under parity. For axial perturbations (r-modes), initial data with negative canonical energy is found with angular dependence $e^{im\\phi}$ for all values of $m\\geq 2$ and for arbitrarily slow rotation. This implies instability (or marginal stability) of such perturbations for rotating perfect fluids. This low $m$-instability is strikingly different from the instability to polar perturbations, which sets in first for large values of $m$. The timescale for the axial instability appears, for small angular velocity $\\Omega$, to be proportional to a high power of $\\Omega$. As in the case of polar modes, viscosity will again presumably enforce stability except for hot, rapidly rotating neutron stars. This work complements Andersson's numerical investigation of axial modes in slowly rotating stars.

  3. Axial flow positive displacement worm gas generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murrow, Kurt David (Inventor); Giffin, Rollin George (Inventor); Fakunle, Oladapo (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    An axial flow positive displacement engine has an inlet axially spaced apart and upstream from an outlet. Inner and outer bodies have offset inner and outer axes extend from the inlet to the outlet through first, second, and third sections of a core assembly in serial downstream flow relationship. At least one of the bodies is rotatable about its axis. The inner and outer bodies have intermeshed inner and outer helical blades wound about the inner and outer axes respectively. The inner and outer helical blades extend radially outwardly and inwardly respectively. The helical blades have first, second, and third twist slopes in the first, second, and third sections respectively. The first twist slopes are less than the second twist slopes and the third twist slopes are less than the second twist slopes. A combustor section extends axially downstream through at least a portion of the second section.

  4. Improving the lattice axial vector current

    CERN Document Server

    Horsley, R; Perlt, H; Rakow, P E L; Schierholz, G; Schiller, A; Zanotti, J M

    2015-01-01

    For Wilson and clover fermions traditional formulations of the axial vector current do not respect the continuum Ward identity which relates the divergence of that current to the pseudoscalar density. Here we propose to use a point-split or one-link axial vector current whose divergence exactly satisfies a lattice Ward identity, involving the pseudoscalar density and a number of irrelevant operators. We check in one-loop lattice perturbation theory with SLiNC fermion and gauge plaquette action that this is indeed the case including order $O(a)$ effects. Including these operators the axial Ward identity remains renormalisation invariant. First preliminary results of a nonperturbative check of the Ward identity are also presented.

  5. Coronal Seismology and the Propagation of Acoustic Waves Along Coronal Loops

    CERN Document Server

    Klimchuk, J A; De Moortel, I

    2004-01-01

    We use a combination of analytical theory, numerical simulation, and data analysis to study the propagation of acoustic waves along coronal loops. We show that the intensity perturbation of a wave depends on a number of factors, including dissipation of the wave energy, pressure and temperature gradients in the loop atmosphere, work action between the wave and a flow, and the sensitivity properties of the observing instrument. In particular, the scale length of the intensity perturbation varies directly with the dissipation scale length (i.e., damping length) and the scale lengths of pressure, temperature, and velocity. We simulate wave propagation in three different equilibrium loop models and find that dissipation and pressure and temperature stratification are the most important effects in the low corona where the waves are most easily detected. Velocity effects are small, and cross-sectional area variations play no direct role for lines-of-sight that are normal to the loop axis. The intensity perturbation...

  6. Flux Rope Formation Preceding Coronal Mass Ejection Onset

    CERN Document Server

    Green, L M

    2009-01-01

    We analyse the evolution of a sigmoidal (S shaped) active region toward eruption, which includes a coronal mass ejection (CME) but leaves part of the filament in place. The X-ray sigmoid is found to trace out three different magnetic topologies in succession: a highly sheared arcade of coronal loops in its long-lived phase, a bald-patch separatrix surface (BPSS) in the hours before the CME, and the first flare loops in its major transient intensity enhancement. The coronal evolution is driven by photospheric changes which involve the convergence and cancellation of flux elements under the sigmoid and filament. The data yield unambiguous evidence for the existence of a BPSS, and hence a flux rope, in the corona prior to the onset of the CME.

  7. Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Observations of Coronal Streamers in the SOHO Era

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Leonard Strachan

    2008-03-01

    Measurements made with the Ultraviolet Coronagraph Spectrometer (UVCS) on the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory can be used to determine physical parameters in the solar corona such as hydrogen and ion kinetic temperatures, electron densities, and absolute elemental abundances. Hydrogen and ion outflow velocities can be determined by combining the UV spectroscopic measurements with white light polarized brightness measurements. These combined measurements can be used to reveal physical characteristics of coronal streamers. To date we have studied plasma properties, such as the variation of plasma outflows in quiescent streamers, primarily in classic helmet streamers at solar minimum. Outflows have not been observed in the centers of coronal streamers suggesting that these are closed magnetic field regions.We propose to study all of the coronal streamers in the UVCS synoptic dataset in order to investigate different types of streamers and their long-term evolution.

  8. The Nature of CME-Flare Associated Coronal Dimming

    CERN Document Server

    Cheng, J X

    2016-01-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are often accompanied by coronal dimming evident in extreme ultraviolet (EUV) and soft X-ray observations. The locations of dimming are sometimes considered to map footpoints of the erupting flux rope. As the emitting material expands in the corona, the decreased plasma density leads to reduced emission observed in spectral and irradiance measurements. Therefore, signatures of dimming may reflect properties of CMEs in the early phase of its eruption. In this study, we analyze the event of flare, CME, and coronal dimming on December 26, 2011. We use the data from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on Solar Dynamics Observatories (SDO) for disk observations of the dimming, and analyze images taken by EUVI, COR1, and COR2 onboard the Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatories to obtain the height and velocity of the associated CMEs observed at the limb. We also measure magnetic reconnection rate from flare observations. Dimming occurs in a few locations next to the flare ribbons,...

  9. Magnetic reconnection between a solar filament and nearby coronal loops

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Leping; Peter, Hardi; Priest, Eric; Chen, Huadong; Guo, Lijia; Chen, Feng; Mackay, Duncan

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic reconnection, the rearrangement of magnetic field topology, is a fundamental physical process in magnetized plasma systems all over the universe1,2. Its process is difficult to be directly observed. Coronal structures, such as coronal loops and filament spines, often sketch the magnetic field geometry and its changes in the solar corona3. Here we show a highly suggestive observation of magnetic reconnection between an erupting solar filament and its nearby coronal loops, resulting in changes in connection of the filament. X-type structures form when the erupting filament encounters the loops. The filament becomes straight, and bright current sheets form at the interfaces with the loops. Many plasmoids appear in these current sheets and propagate bi-directionally. The filament disconnects from the current sheets, which gradually disperse and disappear, reconnects to the loops, and becomes redirected to the loop footpoints. This evolution of the filament and the loops suggests successive magnetic recon...

  10. A data driven kinetic approach to coronal heating

    CERN Document Server

    Toutountzi, A; Isliker, H; Moraitis, K; Georgoulis, M; Chintzoglou, G

    2016-01-01

    Coronal heating through the explosive release of magnetic energy remains an open problem in solar physics. Several one-dimensional hydrodynamical models have been developed over the last decade, using simple approaches for the way energy is deposited and transported in the coronal plasma, namely by inserting 'nanoflares' in the form of 'hot spots' at random sites and times. Our aim in this work is to investigate the problem from a different perspective. With the help of a nonlinear force-free extrapolation method we reconstruct the coronal magnetic field of a well-studied solar active region using an observed photospheric vector magnetogram of the region as the required boundary condition. We then determine the locations, energy contents, and volumes of unstable areas within the active-region corona. These areas include strong gradients in the magnetic field and are naturally connected to three-dimensional current sheets. The statistical distributions of these volumes, their fractal structure and correspondin...

  11. Study of impurity behaviour in non-coronal equilibrium state

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cheng Fa-Yin; Shi Bing-Ren

    2007-01-01

    A physical model of analysing the behaviour of impurities out of coronal equilibrium in tokamak plasmas has been proposed. Through solving the time-dependent rate equations including the effects of atomic processes and the particle transport losses, the ionization state distribution is obtained for a range of low Z impurities such as helium, carbon,oxygen and argon. By using the ionization state distribution of these impurities, the radiation rate coefficients and the mean charge state changing with plasma temperature are calculated. The results show that the mean charge stateis sensitively dependent on the parameter neτ, and this is the reason why the radiation power of impurities under non-coronal equilibrium conditions is several orders of magnitude higher than that under coronal equilibrium condition.

  12. Shock Formation of Slow Magnetosonic Waves in Coronal Plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuntz, Manfred; Suess, Steven T.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We investigate the height of shock formation in coroner plumes for slow magnetosonic waves. The models take into account plume geometric spreading, heat conduction and radiative damping. The wave parameters as well as the spreading functions of the plumes and the base magnetic field strengths are given by empirical constraints mostly from Solar and Heliospheric Observatory/Ultraviolet Coronagraph Spectrometer (SOHO/UVCS). Our models show that shock formation occurs at low coronal heights, i.e., within 1.3 solar radius, depending on the model parameters. The shock formation is calculated using the well-established wave breaking condition given by the intersection of C+ characteristics in the space-time plane. Our models show that shock heating by slow magnetosonic waves is expected to be relevant at most heights in solar coronal plumes, although slow magnetosonic waves are most likely not a solely operating energy supply mechanism.

  13. Coronal Loop Evolution Observed with AIA and Hi-C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulu-Moore, Fana; Winebarger, A.; Cirtain, J.; Kobayashi, K.; Korreck, K.; Golub, L.; Kuzin. S.; Walsh, R.; DeForest, C.; DePontieu, B.; Weber, M.

    2012-01-01

    Despite much progress toward understanding the dynamics of the solar corona, the physical properties of coronal loops are not yet fully understood. Recent investigations and observations from different instruments have yielded contradictory results about the true physical properties of coronal loops. In the past, the evolution of loops has been used to infer the loop substructure. With the recent launch of High Resolution Coronal Imager (Hi-C), this inference can be validated. In this poster we discuss the first results of loop analysis comparing AIA and Hi-C data. We find signatures of cooling in a pixel selected along a loop structure in the AIA multi-filter observations. However, unlike previous studies, we find that the cooling time is much longer than the draining time. This is inconsistent with previous cooling models.

  14. CoMP observations of Coronal Mass Ejections

    CERN Document Server

    Tian, H; McIntosh, S W; Bethge, C; de Toma, G; Gibson, S

    2013-01-01

    CoMP measures not only the polarization of coronal emission, but also the full radiance profiles of coronal emission lines. For the first time, CoMP observations provide high-cadence image sequences of the coronal line intensity, Doppler shift and line width simultaneously in a large field of view. By studying the Doppler shift and line width we may explore more of the physical processes of CME initiation and propagation. Here we identify a list of CMEs observed by CoMP and present the first results of these observations. Our preliminary analysis shows that CMEs are usually associated with greatly increased Doppler shift and enhanced line width. These new observations provide not only valuable information to constrain CME models and probe various processes during the initial propagation of CMEs in the low corona, but also offer a possible cheap and low-risk means of space weather monitoring.

  15. Damping of Slow Magnetoacoustic Waves in an Inhomogeneous Coronal Plasma

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Nagendra Kumar; Pradeep Kumar; Shiv Singh; Anil Kumar

    2008-03-01

    We study the propagation and dissipation of slow magnetoacoustic waves in an inhomogeneous viscous coronal loop plasma permeated by uniform magnetic field. Only viscosity and thermal conductivity are taken into account as dissipative processes in the coronal loop. The damping length of slow-mode waves exhibit varying behaviour depending upon the physical parameters of the loop in an active region AR8270 observed by TRACE. The wave energy flux associated with slow magnetoacoustic waves turns out to be of the order of 106 erg cm-2 s-1 which is high enough to replace the energy lost through optically thin coronal emission and the thermal conduction belowto the transition region. It is also found that only those slow-mode waves which have periods more than 240 s provide the required heating rate to balance the energy losses in the solar corona. Our calculated wave periods for slow-mode waves nearly match with the oscillation periods of loop observed by TRACE.

  16. Treatment of chronic low back pain in patients with spinal deformities using a sagittal re-alignment brace

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiss Hans-Rudolf

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background For adult scoliosis patients with chronic low back pain bracing is initially indicated before spinal surgery is considered. Until recently there has been a lack of research into the effect upon pain reductions in the mid and long-term. Promising results have been documented in short-term studies for the application of a sagittal re-alignment brace in patients with spinal deformities and along with pain; however mid-term and long-term results are not yet available. The purpose of this study is to investigate the mid-term effects of this brace with respect to pain control. Materials and methods 67 patients (58 females and 9 males with chronic low back pain (> 24 months and the diagnosis of scoliosis or hyperkyphosis were treated with a sagittal re-alignment brace (physio-logic brace™ between January 2006 and July 2007. The indication for this kind of brace treatment was derived from a positive sagittal re-alignment test (SRT and the exclusion of successful conservative treatment during the last 24 months. The aim of this type of conservative intervention was to avoid surgery for chronic low back pain. Results The average pain intensity was measured on the Roland and Morris VRS (5 steps before treatment. This was 3.3 (t1, at the time of brace adjustment it was 2.7 (t2 and after at an average observation time of 18 months it was 2.0 (t3. The differences were highly significant in the Wilcoxon test. Discussion Short-term measurements showed that a significant pain reduction is possible in chronic postural low back pain using a sagittal re-alignment brace inducing lumbar re-lordosation. In a preliminary report at adjustment (t2, highly significant improvements of pain intensity have also been demonstrated. At 6 months of treatment however, no improvement was measured. The improvement of the mid-term effects (18 months found in this study compared to the preliminary report may be due to the changed approach to compliance: whilst

  17. Kinematics and amplitude evolution of global coronal extreme ultraviolet waves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ting Li; Jun Zhang; Shu-Hong Yang; Wei Liu

    2012-01-01

    With the observations of the Solar-Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO) and the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO),we analyze in detail the kinematics of global coronal waves together with their intensity amplitudes (so-called "perturbation profiles").We use a semi-automatic method to investigate the perturbation profiles of coronal waves.The location and amplitude of the coronal waves are calculated over a 30° sector on the sphere,where the wave signal is strongest.The position with the strongest perturbation at each time is considered as the location of the wave front.In all four events,the wave velocities vary with time for most of their lifetime,up to 15 min,while in the event observed by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly there is an additional early phase with a much higher velocity.The velocity varies greatly between different waves from 216 to 440 km s-1.The velocity of the two waves initially increases,subsequently decreases,and then increases again.Two other waves show a deceleration followed by an acceleration.Three categories of amplitude evolution of global coronal waves are found for the four events.The first is that the amplitude only shows a decrease.The second is that the amplitude initially increases and then decreases,and the third is that the amplitude shows an orderly increase,a decrease,an increase again and then a decrease.All the extreme ultraviolet waves show a decrease in amplitude while propagating farther away,probably because the driver of the global coronal wave (coronal mass ejection) is moving farther away from the solar surface.

  18. Eruptions that Drive Coronal Jets in a Solar Active Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterling, Alphonse C.; Moore, Ronald L.; Falconer, David A.; Panesar, Navdeep K.; Akiyama, Sachiko; Yashiro, Seiji; Gopalswamy, Nat

    2016-01-01

    Solar coronal jets are common in both coronal holes and in active regions (e.g., Shibata et al. 1992, Shimojo et al. 1996, Cirtain et al. 2007. Savcheva et al. 2007). Recently, Sterling et al. (2015), using data from Hinode/XRT and SDO/AIA, found that coronal jets originating in polar coronal holes result from the eruption of small-scale filaments (minifilaments). The jet bright point (JBP) seen in X-rays and hotter EUV channels off to one side of the base of the jet's spire develops at the location where the minifilament erupts, consistent with the JBPs being miniature versions of typical solar flares that occur in the wake of large-scale filament eruptions. Here we consider whether active region coronal jets also result from the same minifilament-eruption mechanism, or whether they instead result from a different mechanism (e.g. Yokoyama & Shibata 1995). We present observations of an on-disk active region (NOAA AR 11513) that produced numerous jets on 2012 June 30, using data from SDO/AIA and HMI, and from GOES/SXI. We find that several of these active region jets also originate with eruptions of miniature filaments (size scale 20'') emanating from small-scale magnetic neutral lines of the region. This demonstrates that active region coronal jets are indeed frequently driven by minifilament eruptions. Other jets from the active region were also consistent with their drivers being minifilament eruptions, but we could not confirm this because the onsets of those jets were hidden from our view. This work was supported by funding from NASA/LWS, NASA/HGI, and Hinode. A full report of this study appears in Sterling et al. (2016).

  19. SIMULATIONS OF SOLAR JETS CONFINED BY CORONAL LOOPS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wyper, P. F. [Oak Ridge Associated Universities, Heliophysics Science Division, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, 8800 Greenbelt Rd, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); DeVore, C. R., E-mail: peter.f.wyper@nasa.gov, E-mail: c.richard.devore@nasa.gov [Heliophysics Science Division, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, 8800 Greenbelt Rd, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2016-03-20

    Coronal jets are collimated, dynamic events that occur over a broad range of spatial scales in the solar corona. In the open magnetic field of coronal holes, jets form quasi-radial spires that can extend far out into the heliosphere, while in closed-field regions the jet outflows are confined to the corona. We explore the application of the embedded-bipole model to jets occurring in closed coronal loops. In this model, magnetic free energy is injected slowly by footpoint motions that introduce twist within the closed dome of the jet source region, and is released rapidly by the onset of an ideal kink-like instability. Two length scales characterize the system: the width (N) of the jet source region and the footpoint separation (L) of the coronal loop that envelops the jet source. We find that both the conditions for initiation and the subsequent dynamics are highly sensitive to the ratio L/N. The longest-lasting and most energetic jets occur along long coronal loops with large L/N ratios, and share many of the features of open-field jets, while smaller L/N ratios produce shorter-duration, less energetic jets that are affected by reflections from the far-loop footpoint. We quantify the transition between these behaviors and show that our model replicates key qualitative and quantitative aspects of both quiet Sun and active-region loop jets. We also find that the reconnection between the closed dome and surrounding coronal loop is very extensive: the cumulative reconnected flux at least matches the total flux beneath the dome for small L/N, and is more than double that value for large L/N.

  20. Photospheric and coronal magnetic fields in six magnetographs. I. Consistent evolution of the bashful ballerina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virtanen, Ilpo; Mursula, Kalevi

    2016-06-01

    Aims: We study the long-term evolution of photospheric and coronal magnetic fields and the heliospheric current sheet (HCS), especially its north-south asymmetry. Special attention is paid to the reliability of the six data sets used in this study and to the consistency of the results based on these data sets. Methods: We use synoptic maps constructed from Wilcox Solar Observatory (WSO), Mount Wilson Observatory (MWO), Kitt Peak (KP), SOLIS, SOHO/MDI, and SDO/HMI measurements of the photospheric field and the potential field source surface (PFSS) model. Results: The six data sets depict a fairly similar long-term evolution of magnetic fields and the heliospheric current sheet, including polarity reversals and hemispheric asymmetry. However, there are time intervals of several years long, when first KP measurements in the 1970s and 1980s, and later WSO measurements in the 1990s and early 2000s, significantly deviate from the other simultaneous data sets, reflecting likely errors at these times. All of the six magnetographs agree on the southward shift of the heliospheric current sheet (the so-called bashful ballerina phenomenon) in the declining to minimum phase of the solar cycle during a few years of the five included cycles. We show that during solar cycles 20-22, the southward shift of the HCS is mainly due to the axial quadrupole term, reflecting the stronger magnetic field intensity at the southern pole during these times. During cycle 23 the asymmetry is less persistent and mainly due to higher harmonics than the quadrupole term. Currently, in the early declining phase of cycle 24, the HCS is also shifted southward and is mainly due to the axial quadrupole as for most earlier cycles. This further emphasizes the special character of the global solar field during cycle 23.

  1. Axial Stiffness of Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes

    OpenAIRE

    Zavalniuk, Vladimir

    2011-01-01

    The axial stiffness of MWCNTs is demonstrated to be determined only by several external shells (usually 3-5 and up to 15 for the extremely large nanotubes and high elongations) what is in a good agreement with experimentally observed inverse relation between the radius and Young modulus (i.e., stiffness) of MWCNTs. This result is a consequence of the van der Waals intershell interaction. The interpolating formula is obtained for the actual axial stiffness of MWCNT as a function of the tube ex...

  2. Axial Vircator for Electronic Warfare Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Drazan

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with a high power microwave generator with virtual cathode – vircator in axial release for electronic warfare applications. The classification of directed energy weapons microwave (DEWM is introduced together with basic block diagrams of a particular class of DEWM. In the paper, methods for designing vircator pulsed power supply, axial vircator structure, measurement methods and experimental results are presented. The vircator in electromagnetic ammunition is powered by magneto-cumulative generator and in weapons for defense of objects (WDO, it is powered by Marx generator. The possible applications of a vircator in the DEWM area are discussed.

  3. Axial loaded MRI of the lumbar spine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saifuddin, A. E-mail: asaifuddin@aol.com; Blease, S.; MacSweeney, E

    2003-09-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging is established as the technique of choice for assessment of degenerative disorders of the lumbar spine. However, it is routinely performed with the patient supine and the hips and knees flexed. The absence of axial loading and lumbar extension results in a maximization of spinal canal dimensions, which may in some cases, result in failure to demonstrate nerve root compression. Attempts have been made to image the lumbar spine in a more physiological state, either by imaging with flexion-extension, in the erect position or by using axial loading. This article reviews the literature relating to the above techniques.

  4. Coronal seismology waves and oscillations in stellar coronae

    CERN Document Server

    Stepanov, Alexander; Nakariakov, Valery M

    2012-01-01

    This concise and systematic account of the current state of this new branch of astrophysics presents the theoretical foundations of plasma astrophysics, magneto-hydrodynamics and coronal magnetic structures, taking into account the full range of available observation techniques -- from radio to gamma. The book discusses stellar loops during flare energy releases, MHD waves and oscillations, plasma instabilities and heating and charged particle acceleration. Current trends and developments in MHD seismology of solar and stellar coronal plasma systems are also covered, while recent p

  5. Progresses in the treatment of coronal shear fractures of the capitellum%肱骨小头冠状面骨折治疗进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姜刚强; 李海峰; 阮狄克

    2013-01-01

    Coronal shear fractures of the capitellum are uncommon elbow fractures, and the major injury mechanism is that axial extrusion forces from the radius were transmitted to the capitellum. Computerized tomography ( CT ) examination plays an important role in preoperative assessment of fractures and surgical plan-making. Dubberley classiifcation is usually used to direct the surgical treatment of fractures and judge the healing. Most of such fractures belong to intra-articular fractures, so the effects of conservative treatment are not good, and the incidence of postoperative complications such as avascular necrosis and joint stiffness is higher. Open reduction and internal ifxation ( ORIF ) is considered to be an ideal plan in the treatment of coronal shear fractures of the capitellum. Posterior and lateral approaches are commonly used in the treatment of such fractures. But currently, the choice of internal ifxation screws remains controversial. The effects of resection of fracture fragments are satisfactory in the treatment of coronal shear fractures with trochlea of humerus not involved. Minimally invasive arthroscopic surgery provides a new train of thought for the treatment of fractures. Elbow arthroplasty and ORIF combined with external ifxator can be used in the treatment of special type fractures. Functional exercise in the early stage after the operation plays an important role for the elbow joint function recovery.

  6. Experimental Characterization of the Anatomical Structures of the Lumbar Spine Under Dynamic Sagittal Bending.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradfield, C A; Demetropoulos, C K; Luongo, M E; Pyles, C O; Armiger, R S; Merkle, A C

    2015-01-01

    Underbody blast (UBB) events transmit high-rate vertical loads through the seated occupant’s lumbar spine and have a high probability of inducing severe injury. While previous studies have characterized the lumbar spine under quasi-static loading, additional work should focus on the complex kinetic and kinematic response under high loading rates. To discern the biomechanical influence of the lumbar spine’s anatomical structures during dynamic loading, the axial force, flexion-extension moments and range of motion for lumbar motion segments (n=18) were measured during different states of progressive dissection. Pre-compression was applied using a static mass while dynamic bending was applied using an offset drop mass. Dynamic loading resulted in peak axial loads of 4,224±133 N, while maximum peak extension and flexion moments were 19.6±12.5 and -44.8±8.6 Nm in the pre-dissected state, respectively. Upon dissection, transection of the interspinous ligament, ligamentum flavum and facet capsules resulted in significantly larger flexion angles, while the removal of the posterior elements increased the total peak angular displacement in extension from 3.3±1.5 to 5.0±1.7 degrees (p=0.002). This study provides insight on the contribution of individual anatomical components on overall lumbar response under high-rate loading, as well as validation data for numerical models. PMID:25996712

  7. A new way to convert Alfven waves into heat in solar coronal holes - Intermittent magnetic levitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, R. L.; Hammer, R.; Musielak, Z. E.; Suess, S. T.; An, C.-H.

    1992-01-01

    In our recent analysis of Alfven wave reflection in solar coronal holes, we found evidence that coronal holes are heated by reflected Alfven waves. This result suggests that the reflection is inherent to the process that dissipates these Alfven waves into heat. We propose a novel dissipation process that is driven by the reflection, and that plausibly dominates the heating in coronal holes.

  8. Knowledge Based Design of Axial Flow Compressor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinesh kumar.R

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In the aerospace industry with highly competitive market the time to design and delivery is shortening every day. Pressure on delivering robust product with cost economy is in demand in each development. Even though technology is older, it is new for each customer requirement and highly non-liner to fit one in another place. Gas turbine is considered one of a complex design in the aircraft system. It involves experts to be grouped with designers of various segments to arrive the best output. The time is crucial to achieve a best design and it needs knowledge automation incorporated with CAD/CAE tools. In the present work an innovative idea in the form of Knowledge Based Engineering for axial compressor is proposed, this includes the fundamental design of axial compressor integrated with artificial intelligence in the form of knowledge capturing and programmed with high level language (Visual Basis.Net and embedded into CATIA v5. This KBE frame work eases out the design and modeling of axial compressor design and produces 3D modeling for further flow simulation with fluid dynamic in Ansys-Fluent. Most of the aerospace components are developed through simulation driven product development and in this case it is established for axial compressor.

  9. The Axial Current in Electromagnetic Interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Cheoun, M K; Cheon, I T; Cheoun, Myung Ki; Cheon, Il-Tong

    1998-01-01

    We discussed the possibility that the charged axial currents of matter fields could be non-conserved in electromagnetic interaction at $O(e) $ order. It means that chiral symmetry is broken explicitly by electromagnetic interaction. This explicit symmetry breaking of chiral symmetry is shown to lead the mass differences between the charged and neutral particles of matter fields.

  10. Primitive axial algebras of Jordan type

    OpenAIRE

    Hall, J I; Rehren, F; Shpectorov, S.

    2014-01-01

    An axial algebra over the field $\\mathbb F$ is a commutative algebra generated by idempotents whose adjoint action has multiplicity-free minimal polynomial. For semisimple associative algebras this leads to sums of copies of $\\mathbb F$. Here we consider the first nonassociative case, where adjoint minimal polynomials divide $(x-1)x(x-\\eta)$ for fixed $0\

  11. Axially symmetric SU(3) gravitating skyrmions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ioannidou, Theodora [Maths Division, School of Technology, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki 54124 (Greece)]. E-mail: ti3@auth.gr; Kleihaus, Burkhard [Institut fuer Physik, Universitaet Oldenburg, Postfach 2503, D-26111 Oldenburg (Germany)]. E-mail: kleihaus@theorie.physik.uni-oldenburg.de; Zakrzewski, Wojtek [Department of Mathematical Sciences, University of Durham, Durham DH1 3LE (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: w.j.zakrzewski@durham.ac.uk

    2004-10-21

    Axially symmetric gravitating multi-skyrmion configurations are obtained using the harmonic map ansatz introduced in [J. Math. Phys. 40 (1999) 6353]. In particular, the effect of gravity on the energy and baryon densities of the SU(3) non-gravitating multi-skyrmion configurations is studied in detail.

  12. Axially symmetric SU(3) Gravitating Skyrmions

    CERN Document Server

    Ioannidou, T A; Zakrzewski, W J; Ioannidou, Theodora; Kleihaus, Burkhard; Zakrzewski, Wojtek

    2004-01-01

    Axially symmetric gravitating multi-skyrmion configurations are obtained using the harmonic map ansatz introduced in [1]. In particular, the effect of gravity on the energy and baryon densities of the SU(3) non-gravitating multi-skyrmion configurations is studied in detail.

  13. Axially symmetric SU(3) gravitating skyrmions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Axially symmetric gravitating multi-skyrmion configurations are obtained using the harmonic map ansatz introduced in [J. Math. Phys. 40 (1999) 6353]. In particular, the effect of gravity on the energy and baryon densities of the SU(3) non-gravitating multi-skyrmion configurations is studied in detail

  14. Numerical simulations of the solar corona and Coronal Mass Ejections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poedts, S.; Jacobs, C.; van der Holst, B.; Chane, E.; Keppens, R.

    2009-01-01

    Numerical simulations Of Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) call provide a deeper Insight ill the Structure and propagation of these impressive solar events. lit this work, we present our latest results Of numerical simulations of the initial evolution Of a fast CME. For this purpose, the equations Of id

  15. Closed Field Coronal Heating Models Inspired by Wave Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downs, C.; Lionello, R.; Mikic, Z.; Linker, J.; Velli, M. M.

    2013-12-01

    To simulate the energy balance of coronal plasmas on macroscopic scales, we often require the specification of the coronal heating mechanism in some functional form. To go beyond empirical formulations and to build a more physically motivated heating function, we investigate the wave-turbulence dissipation (WTD) phenomenology for the heating of closed coronal loops. To do so, we employ an implementation of non-WKB equations designed to capture the large-scale propagation, reflection, and dissipation of wave turbulence along a loop. The parameter space of this model is explored by solving the coupled WTD and hydrodynamic equations in 1D for an idealized loop, and the relevance to a range of solar conditions is established by computing solutions for several hundred loops extracted from a realistic 3D coronal field. Due to the implicit dependence of the WTD heating model on loop geometry and plasma properties along the loop and at the footpoints, we find that this model can significantly reduce the number of free parameters when compared to traditional empirical heating models, and still robustly describe a broad range of quiet-sun and active region conditions. The importance of the self-reflection term in producing realistic heating scale heights and thermal non-equilibrium cycles is discussed, and preliminary 3D thermodynamic MHD simulations using this formulation are presented. Research supported by NASA and NSF.

  16. Competition between shock and turbulent heating in coronal loop system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Takuma

    2016-11-01

    2.5-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations are performed with high spatial resolution in order to distinguish between competing models of the coronal heating problem. A single coronal loop powered by Alfvén waves excited in the photosphere is the target of this study. The coronal structure is reproduced in our simulations as a natural consequence of the transportation and dissipation of Alfvén waves. Further, the coronal structure is maintained as the spatial resolution is changed from 25 to 3 km, although the temperature at the loop top increases with the spatial resolution. The heating mechanisms change gradually across the magnetic canopy at a height of 4 Mm. Below the magnetic canopy, both the shock and the MHD turbulence are dominant heating processes. Above the magnetic canopy, the shock heating rate reduces to less than 10 per cent of the total heating rate while the MHD turbulence provides significant energy to balance the radiative cooling and thermal conduction loss or gain. The importance of compressibility shown in this study would significantly impact on the prospects of successful MHD turbulence theory in the solar chromosphere.

  17. Competition between shock and turbulent heating in coronal loop system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Takuma

    2016-08-01

    2.5-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations are performed with high spatial resolution in order to distinguish between competing models of the coronal heating problem. A single coronal loop powered by Alfvén waves excited in the photosphere is the target of the present study. The coronal structure is reproduced in our simulations as a natural consequence of the transportation and dissipation of Alfvén waves. Further, the coronal structure is maintained as the spatial resolution is changed from 25 to 3 km, although the temperature at the loop top increases with the spatial resolution. The heating mechanisms change gradually across the magnetic canopy at a height of 4 Mm. Below the magnetic canopy, both the shock and the MHD turbulence are dominant heating processes. Above the magnetic canopy, the shock heating rate reduces to less than 10 % of the total heating rate while the MHD turbulence provides significant energy to balance the radiative cooling and thermal conduction loss or gain. The importance of compressibility shown in the present study would significantly impact on the prospects of successful MHD turbulence theory in the solar chromosphere.

  18. Closed-Field Coronal Heating Driven by Wave Turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Downs, Cooper; Mikić, Zoran; Linker, Jon A; Velli, Marco

    2016-01-01

    To simulate the energy balance of coronal plasmas on macroscopic scales, we often require the specification of the coronal heating mechanism in some functional form. To go beyond empirical formulations and to build a more physically motivated heating function, we investigate the wave-turbulence-driven (WTD) phenomenology for the heating of closed coronal loops. Our implementation is designed to capture the large-scale propagation, reflection, and dissipation of wave turbulence along a loop. The parameter space of this model is explored by solving the coupled WTD and hydrodynamic evolution in 1D for an idealized loop. The relevance to a range of solar conditions is also established by computing solutions for over one hundred loops extracted from a realistic 3D coronal field. Due to the implicit dependence of the WTD heating model on loop geometry and plasma properties along the loop and at the footpoints, we find that this model can significantly reduce the number of free parameters when compared to traditiona...

  19. Competition between shock and turbulent heating in coronal loop system

    CERN Document Server

    Matsumoto, Takuma

    2016-01-01

    2.5-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations are performed with high spatial resolution in order to distinguish between competing models of the coronal heating problem. A single coronal loop powered by Alfv\\'{e}n waves excited in the photosphere is the target of the present study. The coronal structure is reproduced in our simulations as a natural consequence of the transportation and dissipation of Alfv\\'{e}n waves. Further, the coronal structure is maintained as the spatial resolution is changed from 25 to 3 km, although the temperature at the loop top increases with the spatial resolution. The heating mechanisms change gradually across the magnetic canopy at a height of 4 Mm. Below the magnetic canopy, both the shock and the MHD turbulence are dominant heating processes. Above the magnetic canopy, the shock heating rate reduces to less than 10 % of the total heating rate while the MHD turbulence provides significant energy to balance the radiative cooling and thermal conduction loss or gain. The i...

  20. Skeletal Stability after Large Mandibular Advancement (> 10 mm with Bilateral Sagittal Split Osteotomy and Skeletal Elastic Intermaxillary Fixation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristoffer Schwartz

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of the present study was to assess the skeletal stability after large mandibular advancement (> 10 mm with bilateral sagittal split osteotomy and skeletal elastic intermaxillary fixation and to correlate the skeletal stability with the vertical facial type. Material and Methods: A total of 33 consecutive patients underwent bimaxillary surgery to correct skeletal Class II malocclusion with a mandibular advancement (> 10 mm measured at B-point and postoperative skeletal elastic intermaxillary fixation for 16 weeks. Skeletal stability was evaluated using lateral cephalometric radiographs obtained preoperative (T1, 8 weeks postoperatively (T2, and 18 month postoperatively (T3. B-point and pogonion (Pog was used to measure the skeletal relapse and the mandibular plane angle (MP-angle was used to determine the vertical facial type. Results: The mean advancement from T1 to T2 were 11.6 mm and 13.5 mm at B-point and Pog, respectively. The mean skeletal relapse from T2 to T3 was -1.3 mm at B-point and -1.6 mm at Pog. The nineteen patients characterized as long facial types, showed the highest amount of skeletal relapse (-1.5 mm at B-point and -1.9 mm at Pog. Conclusions: The present study showed a limited amount of skeletal relapse in large mandibular advancement (> 10 mm with bilateral sagittal split osteotomy and skeletal elastic intermaxillary fixation. Bilateral sagittal split osteotomy in combination with skeletal intermaxillary fixation can therefore be an alternative to distraction osteogenesis in large mandibular advancements.

  1. Skeletal Stability after Large Mandibular Advancement (> 10 mm) with Bilateral Sagittal Split Osteotomy and Skeletal Elastic Intermaxillary Fixation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigo-Domingo, Maria; Jensen, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives The aim of the present study was to assess the skeletal stability after large mandibular advancement (> 10 mm) with bilateral sagittal split osteotomy and skeletal elastic intermaxillary fixation and to correlate the skeletal stability with the vertical facial type. Material and Methods A total of 33 consecutive patients underwent bimaxillary surgery to correct skeletal Class II malocclusion with a mandibular advancement (> 10 mm) measured at B-point and postoperative skeletal elastic intermaxillary fixation for 16 weeks. Skeletal stability was evaluated using lateral cephalometric radiographs obtained preoperative (T1), 8 weeks postoperatively (T2), and 18 month postoperatively (T3). B-point and pogonion (Pog) was used to measure the skeletal relapse and the mandibular plane angle (MP-angle) was used to determine the vertical facial type. Results The mean advancement from T1 to T2 were 11.6 mm and 13.5 mm at B-point and Pog, respectively. The mean skeletal relapse from T2 to T3 was -1.3 mm at B-point and -1.6 mm at Pog. The nineteen patients characterized as long facial types, showed the highest amount of skeletal relapse (-1.5 mm at B-point and -1.9 mm at Pog). Conclusions The present study showed a limited amount of skeletal relapse in large mandibular advancement (> 10 mm) with bilateral sagittal split osteotomy and skeletal elastic intermaxillary fixation. Bilateral sagittal split osteotomy in combination with skeletal intermaxillary fixation can therefore be an alternative to distraction osteogenesis in large mandibular advancements. PMID:27489609

  2. Latitudinal Dependence of Coronal Hole-Associated Fast Solar Wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, L.; Landi, E.

    2014-05-01

    The fast solar wind can have at least two different coronal sources: high-latitude, polar coronal holes (PCH) and low-latitude, equatorial coronal holes (ECH). The in-situ differences in the PCH and ECH winds have not been well studied, nor have the differences in their evolution over the solar cycles. Ulysses' 19 years of observations from 1990 to 2009, combined with ACE observations from 1998 to the present, provide us with measurements of solar wind properties that span two entire solar cycles, which allow us to study the in-situ properties and evolution of the coronal hole-associated solar wind at different latitudes. In this work, we focus on the PCH and ECH solar winds during the minima between solar cycles 22-23 and 23-24. We use data from SWICS, SWOOPS, and VHM/FGM on board Ulysses, and SWICS, SWEPAM, and MAG on board ACE to analyze the proton dynamics, heavy ion composition, elemental abundance, and magnetic field properties of the PCH wind and ECH wind, with a special focus on their differences during the recent two solar minima. We also include the slow and hot, streamer-associated (ST) wind as a reference in the comparison. The comparison of PCH and ECH wind shows that: 1) the in-situ properties of ECH and PCH winds are significantly different during the two solar minima, and 2) the two types of coronal hole-associated solar wind respond differently to changes in solar activity strength from cycle 23 to cycle 24.

  3. Magnetic Field in the Gravitationally Stratified Coronal Loops

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    B. N. Dwivedi; A. K. Srivastava

    2015-03-01

    We study the effect of gravitational stratification on the estimation of magnetic fields in the coronal loops. By using the method of MHD seismology of kink waves for the estimation of magnetic field of coronal loops, we derive a new formula for the magnetic field considering the effect of gravitational stratification. The fast-kink wave is a potential diagnostic tool for the estimation of magnetic field in fluxtubes. We consider the eleven kink oscillation cases observed by TRACE between July 1998 and June 2001. We calculate magnetic field in the stratified loops (str) and compare them with the previously calculated absolute magnetic field (abs). The gravitational stratification efficiently affects the magnetic field estimation in the coronal loops as it affects also the properties of kink waves. We find ≈22% increment in the magnetic field for the smallest ( = 72 Mm) while ≈42% increment in the absolute magnetic field for the longest ( = 406 Mm) coronal loops. The magnetic fields str and abs also increase with the number density, if the loop length does not vary much. The increment in the magnetic field due to gravitational stratification is small at the lower number densities, however, it is large at the higher number densities. We find that damping time of kink waves due to phase-mixing is less in the case of gravitationally stratified loops compared to nonstratified ones. This indicates the more rapid damping of kink waves in the stratified loops. In conclusion, we find that the gravitational stratification efficiently affects the estimation of magnetic field and damping time estimation especially in the longer coronal loops.

  4. On the nature of transverse coronal waves revealed by wavefront dislocations

    CERN Document Server

    Ariste, A López; Arregui, I; Khomenko, E; Collados, M

    2015-01-01

    Coronal waves are an important aspect of the dynamics of the plasma in the corona. Wavefront dislocations are topological features of most waves in nature and also of magnetohydrodynamic waves. Are there dislocations in coronal waves? The finding and explanation of dislocations may shed light on the nature and characteristics of the propagating waves, their interaction in the corona and in general on the plasma dynamics. We positively identify dislocations in coronal waves observed by the Coronal Multi-channel Polarimeter (CoMP) as singularities in the Doppler shifts of emission coronal lines. We study the possible singularities that can be expected in coronal waves and try to reproduce the observed dislocations in terms of localization and frequency of appearance. The observed dislocations can only be explained by the interference of a kink and a sausage wave modes propagating with different frequencies along the coronal magnetic field. In the plane transverse to the propagation, the cross-section of the osc...

  5. Review of Axial Burnup Distribution Considerations for Burnup Credit Calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagner, J.C.; DeHart, M.D.

    2000-03-01

    This report attempts to summarize and consolidate the existing knowledge on axial burnup distribution issues that are important to burnup credit criticality safety calculations. Recently released Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff guidance permits limited burnup credit, and thus, has prompted resolution of the axial burnup distribution issue. The reactivity difference between the neutron multiplication factor (keff) calculated with explicit representation of the axial burnup distribution and keff calculated assuming a uniform axial burnup is referred to as the ``end effect.'' This end effect is shown to be dependent on many factors, including the axial-burnup profile, total accumulated burnup, cooling time, initial enrichment, assembly design, and the isotopics considered (i.e., actinide-only or actinides plus fission products). Axial modeling studies, efforts related to the development of axial-profile databases, and the determination of bounding axial profiles are also discussed. Finally, areas that could benefit from further efforts are identified.

  6. Review of Axial Burnup Distribution Considerations for Burnup Credit Calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report attempts to summarize and consolidate the existing knowledge on axial burnup distribution issues that are important to burnup credit criticality safety calculations. Recently released Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff guidance permits limited burnup credit, and thus, has prompted resolution of the axial burnup distribution issue. The reactivity difference between the neutron multiplication factor (keff) calculated with explicit representation of the axial burnup distribution and keff calculated assuming a uniform axial burnup is referred to as the ''end effect.'' This end effect is shown to be dependent on many factors, including the axial-burnup profile, total accumulated burnup, cooling time, initial enrichment, assembly design, and the isotopics considered (i.e., actinide-only or actinides plus fission products). Axial modeling studies, efforts related to the development of axial-profile databases, and the determination of bounding axial profiles are also discussed. Finally, areas that could benefit from further efforts are identified

  7. On the problem of axial anomaly in supersymmetric gauge theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The explicit relation is found between the axial current obeying the Adler-Bardeen theorem and the supersymmetric one belonging to a supermultiplet. It is shown that the axial and superconformal anomalies are consistent in all orders of perturbation theory

  8. Aerodynamic Modelling and Optimization of Axial Fans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Dan Nørtoft

    of fan efficiency in a design interval of flow rates,thus designinga fan which operates well over a range of different flow conditions.The optimization scheme was used to investigate the dependence ofmaximum efficiency on1: the number of blades,2: the width of the design interval and3: the hub radius.......The degree of freedom in the choice of design variables andconstraints, combined with the design interval concept, providesa valuable design-tool for axial fans.To further investigate the use of design optimization, a modelfor the vortex shedding noise from the trailing edge of the bladeshas been......A numerically efficient mathematical model for the aerodynamics oflow speed axial fans of the arbitrary vortex flow type has been developed.The model is based on a blade-element principle, whereby therotor is divided into a number of annular streamtubes.For each of these streamtubes relations...

  9. Proto-I axial-focusing experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The time-integrated axial (z) focus of the 4.5-cm-radius Proto I (1.5 MV, 500 kA) radial proton diode is presently limited to approx. 3 mm FWHM. This result is obtained with current neutralized beam transport in a gas cell with 6 Torr argon. If the vertical local divergence were the same (10 or less) as the horizontal divergence, the local divergence alone would produce a 1.5 mm FWHM focus. The axial focal size is evidently limited by time-dependent effects. These are studied by observing the beam incident upon various targets with two time-resolved pinhole cameras. The first camera observes Rutherford-scattered protons from gold targets with an array of 11 siicon PIN detectors. The second camera observes K/sub α/-fluorescence from aluminum targets with 4 independently-gated microchannel plates imaging tubes

  10. Microwave axial dielectric properties of carbon fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Wen; Xiao, Peng; Luo, Heng; Li, Zhuan

    2015-10-01

    Randomly distributed carbon fibers (CFs) reinforced epoxy resin composites are prepared by the pouring method, the dielectric properties of CF composites with different fiber content and length have been performed in the frequency range from 8.2 to 12.4 GHz. The complex permittivity of the composite increases with the fiber length, which is attributed to the decrease of depolarization field, and increases with the volume fraction, which is attributed to the increase of polarization. A formula, based on the theory of Reynolds-Hugh, is proposed to calculate the effective permittivity of CF composites, and validated by the experiments. The proposed formula is further applied to derive the axial permittivity of CF and analyze the effect of fiber length on the axial permittivity.

  11. Axial flow positive displacement worm compressor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murrow, Kurt David (Inventor); Giffin, Rollin George (Inventor); Fakunle, Oladapo (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    An axial flow positive displacement compressor has an inlet axially spaced apart and upstream from an outlet. Inner and outer bodies have offset inner and outer axes extend from the inlet to the outlet through first and second sections of a compressor assembly in serial downstream flow relationship. At least one of the bodies is rotatable about its axis. The inner and outer bodies have intermeshed inner and outer helical blades wound about the inner and outer axes respectively. The inner and outer helical blades extend radially outwardly and inwardly respectively. The helical blades have first and second twist slopes in the first and second sections respectively. The first twist slopes are less than the second twist slopes. An engine including the compressor has in downstream serial flow relationship from the compressor a combustor and a high pressure turbine drivingly connected to the compressor by a high pressure shaft.

  12. Simultaneous display of MRA and MPR in detecting vascular compression for trigeminal neuralgia or hemifacial spasm: comparison with oblique sagittal views of MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arbab, A.S.; Aoki, S.; Yoshikawa, T.; Kumagai, H.; Araki, T. [Department of Radiology, Yamanashi Medical University, Yamanashi 409-3898 (Japan); Nishiyama, Y.; Nagaseki, Y.; Nukui, H. [Department of Neurosurgery, Yamanashi Medical University, Yamanashi 409-3898 (Japan)

    2000-07-01

    A new technique, simultaneous display of magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) and multiplanar reconstruction (MPR), was performed by a workstation to identify the involved vessels in patients with trigeminal neuralgia (TN) or hemifacial spasm (HFS), and the results were compared with those of oblique sagittal MRI technique. Twelve patients with either HFS or TN were prospectively assessed by simultaneous display of MRA and MPR, and oblique sagittal techniques, to point out the neurovascular compression and to identify the involved vessels. Three-dimensional (3D) time-of-flight (TOF) spoiled gradient-echo (SPGR) images were acquired to create MRA and MPR. Oblique sagittal views were also created and displayed on films. A total of 15 vessels in 12 patients were identified as compressing vessels during surgery. Simultaneous display of MRA and MPR technique pointed out the presence of vessels at and/or around root entry/exit zone (REZ) in all 12 patients, but proper identification by the name of the individual vessel was correct in 13 of 15 cases. However, oblique sagittal technique indicated the presence of vessels at and/or around REZ in 11 patients, but only 8 of 14 vessels were correctly identified. Our new method, simultaneous display of MRA-MPR, facilitated correct identification of the involved vessels compared with the oblique sagittal view method. (orig.)

  13. Simultaneous display of MRA and MPR in detecting vascular compression for trigeminal neuralgia or hemifacial spasm: comparison with oblique sagittal views of MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new technique, simultaneous display of magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) and multiplanar reconstruction (MPR), was performed by a workstation to identify the involved vessels in patients with trigeminal neuralgia (TN) or hemifacial spasm (HFS), and the results were compared with those of oblique sagittal MRI technique. Twelve patients with either HFS or TN were prospectively assessed by simultaneous display of MRA and MPR, and oblique sagittal techniques, to point out the neurovascular compression and to identify the involved vessels. Three-dimensional (3D) time-of-flight (TOF) spoiled gradient-echo (SPGR) images were acquired to create MRA and MPR. Oblique sagittal views were also created and displayed on films. A total of 15 vessels in 12 patients were identified as compressing vessels during surgery. Simultaneous display of MRA and MPR technique pointed out the presence of vessels at and/or around root entry/exit zone (REZ) in all 12 patients, but proper identification by the name of the individual vessel was correct in 13 of 15 cases. However, oblique sagittal technique indicated the presence of vessels at and/or around REZ in 11 patients, but only 8 of 14 vessels were correctly identified. Our new method, simultaneous display of MRA-MPR, facilitated correct identification of the involved vessels compared with the oblique sagittal view method. (orig.)

  14. Extra-Axial Medulloblastoma in the Cerebellar Hemisphere

    OpenAIRE

    Chung, Eui Jin; Jeun, Sin Soo

    2014-01-01

    Extra-axial medulloblastoma is a rare phenomenon. We report a case in a 5-year-old boy who presented with nausea, vomiting, and gait disturbance. He was treated with total removal of the tumor. This is the first case of an extra-axially located medulloblastoma occurring in the cerebellar hemisphere posteriolateral to the cerebellopontine angle in Korea. Although the extra-axial occurrence of medulloblastoma is rare, it should be considered in the differential diagnosis of extra-axial lesions ...

  15. Axial flux permanent magnet brushless machines

    CERN Document Server

    Gieras, Jacek F; Kamper, Maarten J

    2008-01-01

    Axial Flux Permanent Magnet (AFPM) brushless machines are modern electrical machines with a lot of advantages over their conventional counterparts. They are being increasingly used in consumer electronics, public life, instrumentation and automation system, clinical engineering, industrial electromechanical drives, automobile manufacturing industry, electric and hybrid electric vehicles, marine vessels and toys. They are also used in more electric aircrafts and many other applications on larger scale. New applications have also emerged in distributed generation systems (wind turbine generators

  16. Axial force measurement for esophageal function testing

    OpenAIRE

    Gravesen, Flemming H; Funch-Jensen, Peter; Gregersen, Hans; Drewes, Asbjørn Mohr

    2009-01-01

    The esophagus serves to transport food and fluid from the pharynx to the stomach. Manometry has been the “golden standard” for the diagnosis of esophageal motility diseases for many decades. Hence, esophageal function is normally evaluated by means of manometry even though it reflects the squeeze force (force in radial direction) whereas the bolus moves along the length of esophagus in a distal direction. Force measurements in the longitudinal (axial) direction provide a more direct measure o...

  17. Multimode interaction in axially excited cylindrical shells

    OpenAIRE

    Silva F. M. A.; Rodrigues L.; Gonçalves P. B.; Del Prado Z. J. G. N

    2014-01-01

    Cylindrical shells exhibit a dense frequency spectrum, especially near the lowest frequency range. In addition, due to the circumferential symmetry, frequencies occur in pairs. So, in the vicinity of the lowest natural frequencies, several equal or nearly equal frequencies may occur, leading to a complex dynamic behavior. So, the aim of the present work is to investigate the dynamic behavior and stability of cylindrical shells under axial forcing with multiple equal or nearly equal natural fr...

  18. Numerical simulation of an axial blood pump.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chua, Leok Poh; Su, Boyang; Lim, Tau Meng; Zhou, Tongming

    2007-07-01

    The axial blood pump with a magnetically suspended impeller is superior to other artificial blood pumps because of its small size. In this article, the distributions of velocity, path line, pressure, and shear stress in the straightener, the rotor, and the diffuser of the axial blood pump, as well as the gap zone were obtained using the commercial software, Fluent (version 6.2). The main focus was on the flow field of the blood pump. The numerical results showed that the axial blood pump could produce 5.14 L/min of blood at 100 mm Hg through the outlet when rotating at 11,000 rpm. However, there was a leakage flow of 1.06 L/min in the gap between the rotor cylinder and the pump housing, and thus the overall flow rate the impeller could generate was 6.2 L/min. The numerical results showed that 75% of the scalar shear stresses (SSs) were less than 250 Pa, and 10% were higher than 500 Pa within the whole pump. The high SS region appeared around the blade tip where a large variation of velocity direction and magnitude was found, which might be due to the steep angle variation at the blade tip. Because the exposure time of the blood cell at the high SS region within the pump was relatively short, it might not cause serious damage to the blood cells, but the improvement of blade profile should be considered in the future design of the axial pump. PMID:17584481

  19. Axially evoked postural reflexes: influence of task

    OpenAIRE

    Govender, Sendhil; Dennis, Danielle L.; Colebatch, James G.

    2014-01-01

    Postural reflexes were recorded in healthy subjects (n = 17) using brief axial accelerations and tap stimuli applied at the vertebra prominens (C7) and manubrium sterni. Short latency (SL) responses were recorded from the soleus, hamstrings and tibialis anterior muscles and expressed as a percentage of the background EMG prior to stimulus onset. In the majority of postural conditions tested, subjects were recorded standing erect and leaning forward with their feet together. The SL response wa...

  20. Consistent formulation of the spacelike axial gauge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burnel, A.; Van der Rest-Jaspers, M.

    1983-12-15

    The usual formulation of the spacelike axial gauge is afflicted with the difficulty that the metric is indefinite while no ghost is involved. We solve this difficulty by introducing a ghost whose elimination is such that the metric becomes positive for physical states. The technique consists in the replacement of the gauge condition nxA = 0 by the weaker one partial/sub 0/nxAroughly-equal0.

  1. Golimumab for the treatment of axial spondyloarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelfer, Gita; Perry, Lisa; Deodhar, Atul

    2016-01-01

    Axial spondyloarthritis (axSpA) is a chronic, immune-mediated inflammatory disease of the axial skeleton that includes ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and non-radiographic axial spondyloarthritis (nr-axSpA). Patients with AS experience chronic pain due to sacroiliac joint and spinal inflammation, and may develop spinal ankylosing with syndesmophyte formation. Tumor necrosis factor α inhibitors (TNFi) have shown promise in the management of AS and axSpA by targeting the underlying inflammatory process, and providing symptomatic relief. Whether they alter the progression of the disease is uncertain. Golimumab is a fully human IgG1 monoclonal antibody that targets and downregulates the pro-inflammatory cytokine TNF-α. The use of golimumab has been shown to reduce the signs and symptoms of axSpA as well as improve patient function and quality reported outcomes. This review focuses on the biological rationale and the results of clinical trials with golimumab for the treatment of axSpA.

  2. Turbulence Effects of Axial Flow Hydrokinetic Turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, C.; Chamorro, L. P.; Neary, V. S.; Morton, S.; Sotiropoulos, F.

    2011-12-01

    Axial flow hydrokinetic turbines provide a method for extracting the kinetic energy available in unidirectional (river), bidirectional (tidal) and marine currents; however, a deep understanding of the wake dynamics, momentum recovery, geomorphologic effects, and ecological interaction with these hydrokinetic turbines is required to guarantee their economical and environmental viability. The St. Anthony Falls Laboratory (SAFL) at the University of Minnesota (UMN) has performed physical modeling experiments using a 1:10 scale axial flow tidal turbine in the SAFL Main Channel, a 2.75m x 1.8m x 80m open channel test facility. A sophisticated control system allows synchronous measurements of turbine torque and rotational speed along with high resolution 3-D velocity measurements within the channel. Using acoustic Doppler velocimeters (ADVs), high resolution 3-D velocity profile data were collected up to 15 turbine diameters downstream of the turbine location. These data provide valuable information on the wake characteristics (turbulence, Reynolds stresses, etc.) resulting from a rotating axial flow hydrokinetic machine. Regions of high turbulence and shear zones that persist in the near wake regions are delineated along with the velocity deficit and momentum recovery within the wake downstream of the device. Synchronous ADV data shed light on the rotational and meandering characteristics of the wake and its potential impacts on the local geomorphology and hydrodynamic environment. This dataset on single hydrokinetic turbine flow characteristics is the basis for further work on the optimal arrangement and performance environment for arrays of similar hydrokinetic devices.

  3. DYNAMIC RESPONSES OF VISCOELASTIC AXIALLY MOVING BELT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李映辉; 高庆; 蹇开林; 殷学纲

    2003-01-01

    Based on the Kelvin viscoelastic differential constitutive law and the motion equation of the axially moving belt, the nonlinear dynamic model of the viscoelastic axial moving belt was established. And then it was reduced to be a linear differential system which the analytical solutions with a constant transport velocity and with a harmonically varying transport velocity were obtained by applying Lie group transformations. According to the nonlinear dynamic model, the effects of material parameters and the steady-state velocity and the perturbed axial velocity of the belt on the dynamic responses of the belts were investigated by the research of digital simulation. The result shows: 1 ) The nonlinear vibration frequency of the belt will become small when the relocity of the belt increases. 2 ) Increasing the value of viscosity or decreasing the value of elasticity leads to a deceasing in vibration frequencies. 3 ) The most effects of the transverse amplitudes come from the frequency of the perturbed velocity when the belt moves with harmonic velocity.

  4. Risk factors for common complications associated with bilateral sagittal split osteotomy: A literature review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verweij, Jop P; Houppermans, Pascal N W J; Gooris, Peter; Mensink, Gertjan; van Merkesteyn, J P Richard

    2016-09-01

    The most common complications that are associated with bilateral sagittal split osteotomy are: bad splits, postoperative infection, removal of osteosynthesis material, and neurosensory disturbances of the lower lip. Particularly in elective orthognathic surgery, it is important that surgeons inform their patients about the risk of these complications and attempt to minimize these risks. The purpose of this literature review and meta-analysis is to provide an overview of these common complications and their risk factors. After a systematic electronic database search, 59 studies were identified and included in this review. For each complication, a pooled mean incidence was computed. Both the pooled study group and the pooled 'complication group' were analysed. The mean incidences for bad split (2.3% per SSO), postoperative infection (9.6% per patient), removal of the osteosynthesis material (11.2% per patient), and neurosensory disturbances of the lower lip (33.9% per patient) are reported. Regularly reported risk factors for complications were the patient's age, smoking habits, presence of third molars, the surgical technique and type of osteosynthesis material. This information may help the surgeon to minimize the risk of these complications and inform the patient about the risks of complications associated with bilateral sagittal split osteotomy. PMID:27527679

  5. CHARACTERISTICS OF BODY POSTURE IN THE SAGITTAL PLANE AND FITNESS OF FIRST-FORM PUPILS FROM RURAL AREAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Żukowska Hanna

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to find correlations between characteristics of body posture in the sagittal plane and fitness and endurance of first-form children from rural areas. Material: an analysis of more than 30 sources of scientific and educational literature. Results: the study involved 209 children, including 102 girls and 107 boys. They were children who lived in the country since they were born. To assess particular characteristics of body posture, the children were studied by means of the measuring equipment using the projection Moiré system. Motor skills were estimated using selected EUROFIT physical fitness tests (sitting forward bend, standing broad jump, handgrip, sit-and-reach, bent arm hang and 10 x 5 m shuttle run. The level of physical endurance was evaluated with the Harvard Step Test modified by Montoye. Conclusions: the conducted research reveals statistically significant correlations between the characteristics of body posture in the sagittal plane and selected EUROFIT physical fitness tests and physical endurance of the children involved in the study.

  6. The role of the lateral pterygoid muscle in the sagittal fracture of mandibular condyle (SFMC) healing process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chng-Kui; Liu, Ping; Meng, Fan-Wen; Deng, Bang-Lian; Xue, Yang; Mao, Tian-Qiu; Hu, Kai-Jin

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the role of the lateral peterygoid muscle in the reconstruction of the shape of the condyle during healing of a sagittal fracture of the mandibular condyle. Twenty adult sheep were divided into 2 groups: all had a unilateral operation on the right side when the anterior and posterior attachments of the discs were cut, and an oblique vertical osteotomy was made from the lateral pole of the condyle to the medial side of the condylar neck. Ten sheep had the lateral pterygoid muscle cut, and the other 10 sheep did not. Sheep were killed at 4 weeks (n=2 from each group), 12 weeks (n=4), and 24 weeks (n=4) postoperatively. Computed tomograms (CT) were taken before and after operations. We dissected the joints, and recorded with the naked eye the shape, degree of erosion, and amount of calcification of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). In the group in which the lateral peterygoid muscle had not been cut the joints showed overgrowth of new bone and more advanced ankylosis. Our results show that the lateral pterygoid muscle plays an important part in reconstructing the shape of the condyle during the healing of a sagittal fracture of the mandibular condyle, and combined with the dislocated and damaged disc is an important factor in the aetiology of traumatic ankylosis of the TMJ.

  7. Standing sausage modes in coronal loops with plasma flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bo; Chen, Shao-Xia; Xia, Li-Dong; Yu, Hui

    2014-08-01

    Context. Magnetohydrodynamic waves are important for diagnosing the physical parameters of coronal plasmas. Field-aligned flows appear frequently in coronal loops. Aims: We examine the effects of transverse density and plasma flow structuring on standing sausage modes trapped in coronal loops, and examine their observational implications in the context of coronal seismology. Methods: We model coronal loops as straight cold cylinders with plasma flow embedded in a static corona. An eigen-value problem governing propagating sausage waves is formulated and its solutions are employed to construct standing modes. Two transverse profiles are distinguished, and are called profiles E and N. A parameter study is performed on the dependence of the maximum period Pmax and cutoff length-to-radius ratio (L/a)cutoff in the trapped regime on the density parameters (ρ0/ρ∞ and profile steepness p) and the flow parameters (its magnitude U0 and profile steepness u). Results: For either profile, introducing a flow reduces Pmax obtainable in the trapped regime relative to the static case. The value of Pmax is sensitive to p for profile N, but is insensitive to p for profile E. By far the most important effect a flow introduces is to reduce the capability for loops to trap standing sausage modes: (L/a)cutoff may be substantially reduced in the case with flow relative to the static one. In addition, (L/a)cutoff is smaller for a stronger flow, and for a steeper flow profile when the flow magnitude is fixed. Conclusions: If the density distribution can be described by profile N, then measuring the sausage mode period can help deduce the density profile steepness. However, this practice is not feasible if profile E more accurately describes the density distribution. Furthermore, even field-aligned flows with magnitudes substantially smaller than the ambient Alfvén speed can make coronal loops considerably less likely to support trapped standing sausage modes. Appendix A is available in

  8. Coronal Abundance Anomalies in Solar-Like Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laming, John

    We propose to model the trend of coronal abundance anomalies observed in a sample of solar-like stars by Wood & Linsky (2010). Dwarf stars of similar spectral type to the Sun show what has become known as a FIP (First Ionization Potential) Effect, where elements with first ionization potential below about 10 eV are enhanced in abundance in the corona by a factor of about 3 - 4. Stars of later spectral type show a diminished FIP effect, with the anomaly disappearing at about K5 spectral type. Beyond this, M dwarf stars show an inverse FIP effect, with the low FIP ions becoming depleted in the stellar corona, by factors of order 2.5 - 3. The solar case of positive FIP effect has been successfully interpreted as being due to the action of the ponderomotive force associated with chromospheric Alfven waves. In conditions in which upgoing Alfven waves are transmitted into coronal loops, or in which coronally generated waves reflect at loop footpoints, the ponderomotive force is directed upwards, and accelerates chromospheric ions (the low FIP elements) into the corona. Neutral atoms are not affected. The inverse FIP effect can arise when upward propagating chromospheric Alfven waves are reflected back down again at coronal loop footpoints, due to a mismatch between the wave frequency and the loop resonance. We propose to study stars for which parameters like asteroseismic oscillation frequencies, coronal abundance anomalies, and chromospheric structure are known. As well as constraining coronal magnetic fields and loop resonances in these stars, we expect important insights into the nature of stellar dynamos since the M dwarfs in the sample (with inverse FIP effect) are at or near the fully convective limit. Finally, we will be able to assess potential fractionation in the O/Ne abundance ratio. Drake & Testa (2005) argued that Ne is depleted in the solar corona relative to O, but not in the coronae of more active stars. Our FIP models provide some support for this in the

  9. A new strategy of axial power distribution control based on three axial offsets concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have proposed a very simple control procedure for axial xenon oscillation control based on a characteristic trajectory. The trajectory is drawn by three offsets of power distributions, namely, AOp, AOi and AOx. They are defined as the offset of axial power distribution, the offset of the power distribution under which the current iodine distribution is obtained as the equilibrium and that for xenon distribution, respectively. When these offsets are plotted on X-Y plane for (AOp-AOx, AOi-AOx) the trajectory draws a quite characteristic ellipse (or an elliptic spiral). On the other hands, Constant Axial Offset Control (CAOC) procedure is adopted as axial power distribution control strategy during both base load and load following operations in domestic PWRs. In the previous paper, we have presented an innovative procedure of axial power distribution control during load following in PWRs based on this trajectory such that the AOp-AOx is to be controlled to zero when the value deviates the pre-determined limiting values. In this paper we propose a modified control strategy to get more stability of axial power distributions. In this strategy, we control the trajectory to be close to the major axis of the ellipse when the power distribution reaches the limiting values. In other words, the plot is not controlled only to reduce AOp-AOx but also AOi-AOx is taken into account at the same time. It is known that when the plot is controlled to the major axis, it means that the point gives the peak position of axial xenon oscillation. Therefore xenon oscillation will not increase its amplitude any more. Thus more stable axial power distribution control is attained. This kind of design concept is quite important especially for the future PWRs with elongated fuel length and longer core life. Because in a longer effective core and also the longer core life, it has been known that the stability of axial xenon oscillation becomes more unstable. In this paper, some simulation

  10. Might axial myofascial properties and biomechanical mechanisms be relevant to ankylosing spondylitis and axial spondyloarthritis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masi, Alfonse T

    2014-01-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis and axial spondyloarthropathy have characteristic age- and sex-specific onset patterns, typical entheseal lesions, and marked heritability, but the integrative mechanisms causing the pathophysiological and structural alterations remain largely undefined. Myofascial tissues are integrated in the body into webs and networks which permit transmission of passive and active tensional forces that provide stabilizing support and help to control movements. Axial myofascial hypertonicity was hypothesized as a potential excessive polymorphic trait which could contribute to chronic biomechanical overloading and exaggerated stresses at entheseal sites. Such a mechanism may help to integrate many of the characteristic host, pathological, and structural features of ankylosing spondylitis and axial spondyloarthritis. Biomechanical stress and strain were recently documented to correlate with peripheral entheseal inflammation and new bone formation in a murine model of spondyloarthritis. Ankylosing spondylitis has traditionally been classified by the modified New York criteria, which require the presence of definite radiographic sacroiliac joint lesions. New classification criteria for axial spondyloarthritis now include patients who do not fulfill the modified New York criteria. The male-to-female sex ratios clearly differed between the two patient categories - 2:1 or 3:1 in ankylosing spondylitis and 1:1 in non-radiographic axial spondyloarthritis - and this suggests a spectral concept of disease and, among females, milder structural alterations. Magnetic resonance imaging of active and chronic lesions in ankylosing spondylitis and axial spondyloarthritis reveals complex patterns, usually interpreted as inflammatory reactions, but shows similarities to acute degenerative disc disease, which attributed to edema formation following mechanical stresses and micro-damage. A basic question is whether mechanically induced microinjury and immunologically mediated

  11. Validation Of The Coronal Thick Target Source Model

    CERN Document Server

    Fleishman, Gregory D; Nita, Gelu N; Gary, Dale E

    2015-01-01

    We present detailed 3D modeling of a dense, coronal thick target X-ray flare using the GX Simulator tool, photospheric magnetic measurements, and microwave imaging and spectroscopy data. The developed model offers a remarkable agreement between the synthesized and observed spectra and images in both X-ray and microwave domains, which validates the entire model. The flaring loop parameters are chosen to reproduce the emission measure, temperature, and the nonthermal electron distribution at low energies derived from the X-ray spectral fit, while the remaining parameters, unconstrained by the X-ray data, are selected such as to match the microwave images and total power spectra. The modeling suggests that the accelerated electrons are trapped in the coronal part of the flaring loop, but away from where the magnetic field is minimal, and, thus, demonstrates that the data are clearly inconsistent with electron magnetic trapping in the weak diffusion regime mediated by the Coulomb collisions. Thus, the modeling su...

  12. Magnetic reconnection between a solar filament and nearby coronal loops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Leping; Zhang, Jun; Peter, Hardi; Priest, Eric; Chen, Huadong; Guo, Lijia; Chen, Feng; Mackay, Duncan

    2016-09-01

    Magnetic reconnection is difficult to observe directly but coronal structures on the Sun often betray the magnetic field geometry and its evolution. Here we report the observation of magnetic reconnection between an erupting filament and its nearby coronal loops, resulting in changes in the filament connection. X-type structures form when the erupting filament encounters the loops. The filament becomes straight, and bright current sheets form at the interfaces. Plasmoids appear in these current sheets and propagate bi-directionally. The filament disconnects from the current sheets, which gradually disperse and disappear, then reconnects to the loops. This evolution suggests successive magnetic reconnection events predicted by theory but rarely detected with such clarity in observations. Our results confirm the three-dimensional magnetic reconnection theory and have implications for the evolution of dissipation regions and the release of magnetic energy for reconnection in many magnetized plasma systems.

  13. Estimate of Coronal Magnetic Field Strength Using Plasmoid Acceleration Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choe, G.; Lee, K.; Jang, M.

    2010-12-01

    A method of estimating the lower bound of coronal magnetic field strength in the neighborhood of an ejecting plasmoid is presented. Based on the assumption that the plasma ejecta is within a magnetic island, an analytical expression for the force acting on the ejecta is derived. A rather simple calculation shows that the vertical force acting on a cylinder-like volume, whose lateral surface is a flux surface and whose magnetic axis is parallel to the horizontal, is just the difference in total pressure (magnetic pressure plus plasma pressure) below and above the volume. The method is applied to a limb coronal mass ejection event, and a lower bound of the magnetic field strength just below the CME core is estimated. The method is expected to provide useful information on the strength of reconnecting magnetic field if applied to X-ray plasma ejecta.

  14. Role of Coronal Mass Ejections in the Heliospheric Hale Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, M. J.; Schwardron, N. A.; Crooker, N. U.; Hughes, W. J.; Spence, H. E.

    2007-01-01

    The 11-year solar cycle variation in the heliospheric magnetic field strength can be explained by the temporary buildup of closed flux released by coronal mass ejections (CMEs). If this explanation is correct, and the total open magnetic flux is conserved, then the interplanetary-CME closed flux must eventually open via reconnection with open flux close to the Sun. In this case each CME will move the reconnected open flux by at least the CME footpoint separation distance. Since the polarity of CME footpoints tends to follow a pattern similar to the Hale cycle of sunspot polarity, repeated CME eruption and subsequent reconnection will naturally result in latitudinal transport of open solar flux. We demonstrate how this process can reverse the coronal and heliospheric fields, and we calculate that the amount of flux involved is sufficient to accomplish the reversal within the 11 years of the solar cycle.

  15. Coronal Loops: Observations and Modeling of Confined Plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Reale, Fabio

    2010-01-01

    Coronal loops are the building blocks of the X-ray bright solar corona. They owe their brightness to the dense confined plasma, and this review focuses on loops mostly as structures confining plasma. After a brief historical overview, the review is divided into two separate but not independent sections: the first illustrates the observational framework, the second reviews the theoretical knowledge. Quiescent loops and their confined plasma are considered, and therefore topics such as loop oscillations and flaring loops (except for non-solar ones which provide information on stellar loops) are not specifically addressed here. The observational section discusses loop classification and populations, and then describes the morphology of coronal loops, its relationship with the magnetic field, and the concept of loops as multi-stranded structures. The following part of this section is devoted to the characteristics of the loop plasma, and of its thermal structure in particular, according to the classification into...

  16. A Model for Radio Emission from Solar Coronal Shocks

    CERN Document Server

    Zhao, G Q; Wu, D J

    2014-01-01

    Solar coronal shocks are very common phenomena in the solar atmosphere and are believed to be the drivers of solar type II radio bursts. However, the microphysical nature of these emissions is still an open problem. This paper proposes that electron cyclotron maser (ECM) emission is responsible for the generation of radiations from the coronal shocks. In the present model, an energetic ion beam accelerated by the shock excites first Alfv\\'en wave (AW) and then the excited AW leads to the formation of a density-depleted duct along the foreshock boundary of the shock. In this density-depleted duct, the energetic electron beam produced via the shock acceleration can effectively excite radio emission by the ECM instability. Our results show that this model may have potential application to solar type II radio bursts.

  17. Nonlinear Dynamics of the Parker Scenario for Coronal Heating

    CERN Document Server

    Rappazzo, A F; Einaudi, G; Dahlburg, R B

    2007-01-01

    The Parker or field line tangling model of coronal heating is studied comprehensively via long-time high-resolution simulations of the dynamics of a coronal loop in cartesian geometry within the framework of reduced magnetohydrodynamics (RMHD). Slow photospheric motions induce a Poynting flux which saturates by driving an anisotropic turbulent cascade dominated by magnetic energy. In physical space this corresponds to a magnetic topology where magnetic field lines are barely entangled, nevertheless current sheets (corresponding to the original tangential discontinuities hypothesized by Parker) are continuously formed and dissipated. Current sheets are the result of the nonlinear cascade that transfers energy from the scale of convective motions ($\\sim 1,000 km$) down to the dissipative scales, where it is finally converted to heat and/or particle acceleration. Current sheets constitute the dissipative structure of the system, and the associated magnetic reconnection gives rise to impulsive ``bursty'' heating ...

  18. Coronal Rotation at Solar Minimum from UV Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancuso, S.

    2008-01-01

    UVCS/SOHO observations have been analyzed to reconstruct intensity time series of the O VI 1032 A and H 11216 A spectral lines at different coronal heliolatitudes from 1.5 to 3.0 solar radii from Sun center. Evidence was found for coronal differential rotation that differs significantly from that of the photospheric plasma. The study of the latitudinal variation shows that the UV corona decelerates toward the photospheric rates from the equator up to the poleward boundary 2 of the midlatitude streamers, reaching a peak of 28.16+/-0.20 days around +30 from the equator at 1.5 solar radii, while a less evident peak is observed in the northern hemisphere. This result suggests a real north-south rotational asymmetry as a consequence of different activity and weak coupling between the magnetic fields of the two hemispheres. The study of the radial rotation profiles shows that the corona is rotating almost rigidly with height.

  19. On The Fourier And Wavelet Analysis Of Coronal Time Series

    CERN Document Server

    Auchère, F; Bocchialini, K; Buchlin, E; Solomon, J

    2016-01-01

    Using Fourier and wavelet analysis, we critically re-assess the significance of our detection of periodic pulsations in coronal loops. We show that the proper identification of the frequency dependence and statistical properties of the different components of the power spectra provies a strong argument against the common practice of data detrending, which tends to produce spurious detections around the cut-off frequency of the filter. In addition, the white and red noise models built into the widely used wavelet code of Torrence & Compo cannot, in most cases, adequately represent the power spectra of coronal time series, thus also possibly causing false positives. Both effects suggest that several reports of periodic phenomena should be re-examined. The Torrence & Compo code nonetheless effectively computes rigorous confidence levels if provided with pertinent models of mean power spectra, and we describe the appropriate manner in which to call its core routines. We recall the meaning of the default c...

  20. Spatial damping of propagating sausage waves in coronal cylinders

    CERN Document Server

    Guo, Ming-Zhe; Li, Bo; Xia, Li-Dong; Yu, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Sausage modes are important in coronal seismology. Spatially damped propagating sausage waves were recently observed in the solar atmosphere. We examine how wave leakage influences the spatial damping of sausage waves propagating along coronal structures modeled by a cylindrical density enhancement embedded in a uniform magnetic field. Working in the framework of cold magnetohydrodynamics, we solve the dispersion relation (DR) governing sausage waves for complex-valued longitudinal wavenumber $k$ at given real angular frequencies $\\omega$. For validation purposes, we also provide analytical approximations to the DR in the low-frequency limit and in the vicinity of $\\omega_{\\rm c}$, the critical angular frequency separating trapped from leaky waves. In contrast to the standing case, propagating sausage waves are allowed for $\\omega$ much lower than $\\omega_{\\rm c}$. However, while able to direct their energy upwards, these low-frequency waves are subject to substantial spatial attenuation. The spatial damping ...

  1. Stellar activity and coronal heating: an overview of recent results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Testa, Paola; Saar, Steven H.; Drake, Jeremy J.

    2015-01-01

    Observations of the coronae of the Sun and of solar-like stars provide complementary information to advance our understanding of stellar magnetic activity, and of the processes leading to the heating of their outer atmospheres. While solar observations allow us to study the corona at high spatial and temporal resolution, the study of stellar coronae allows us to probe stellar activity over a wide range of ages and stellar parameters. Stellar studies therefore provide us with additional tools for understanding coronal heating processes, as well as the long-term evolution of solar X-ray activity. We discuss how recent studies of stellar magnetic fields and coronae contribute to our understanding of the phenomenon of activity and coronal heating in late-type stars. PMID:25897087

  2. Stellar Activity and Coronal Heating: an overview of recent results

    CERN Document Server

    Testa, Paola; Drake, Jeremy

    2015-01-01

    Observations of the coronae of the Sun and of solar-like stars provide complementary information to advance our understanding of stellar magnetic activity, and of the processes leading to the heating of their outer atmospheres. While solar observations allow us to study the corona at high spatial and temporal resolution, the study of stellar coronae allows us to probe stellar activity over a wide range of ages and stellar parameters. Stellar studies therefore provide us with additional tools for understanding coronal heating processes, as well as the long-term evolution of solar X-ray activity. We discuss how recent studies of stellar magnetic fields and coronae contribute to our understanding of the phenomenon of activity and coronal heating in late-type stars.

  3. Coronal Structures as Tracers of Sub-Surface Processes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Alexei A. PevtSOV; Richard C. Canfield

    2000-09-01

    The solar corona - one of the most spectacular celestial shows and yet one of the most challenging puzzles - exhibits a spectrum of structures related to both the quiet Sun and active regions. In spite of dramatic differences in appearance and physical processes, all these structures share a common origin: they are all related to the solar magnetic field. The origin of the field is beneath the turbulent convection zone, where the magnetic field is not a master but a slave, and one can wonder how much the coronal magnetic field ``remembers" its dynamo origin. Surprisingly, it does. We will describe several observational phenomena that indicate a close relationship between coronal and sub-photospheric processes.

  4. Automatic measurement of orbital volume in unilateral coronal synostosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Vedrana Andersen; Einarsson, Gudmundur; Darvann, Tron Andre;

    2016-01-01

    . These measures are typically computed by guided procedures that require expert time. We propose a method with higher degree of automation based on finding an optimal smooth closed surface. CT scans of 17 infants with UCS are included in our experimental validation, where we compare our method to expert guided...... segmentations. We obtain similar measures, as well as high Dice scores, compared to the experts. The run time for the proposed approach with a prototype implementation is around 3 minutes on a standard laptop, making the method suitable for rapid evaluation of orbital volume in UCS.......Premature fusion of the coronal suture on one side of the calvaria (unilateral coronal synostosis, UCS) results in asymmetric craniofacial development and the deformation of the orbits. Often this necessitates surgery, where CT scanning is employed to obtain measures of the bony orbit...

  5. Inferring the Coronal Density Irregularity from EUV Spectra

    CERN Document Server

    Hahn, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the density structure of the solar corona is important for modeling both coronal heating and the solar wind. Direct measurements are difficult because of line-of-sight integration and possible unresolved structures. We present a new method for quantifying such structure using density-sensitive EUV line intensities to derive a density irregularity parameter, a relative measure of the amount of structure along the line of sight. We also present a simple model to relate the inferred irregularities to physical quantities, such as the filling factor and density contrast. For quiet Sun regions and interplume regions of coronal holes, we find a density contrast of at least a factor of three to ten and corresponding filling factors of about 10-20%. Our results are in rough agreement with other estimates of the density structures in these regions. The irregularity diagnostic provides a useful relative measure of unresolved structure in various regions of the corona.

  6. Energetic characterisation and statistics of solar coronal brightenings

    CERN Document Server

    Joulin, Vincent; Solomon, Jacques; Guennou, Chloé

    2016-01-01

    To explain the high temperature of the corona, much attention has been paid to the distribution of energy in dissipation events. Indeed, if the event energy distribution is steep enough, the smallest, unobservable events could be the largest contributors to the total energy dissipation in the corona. Previous observations have shown a wide distribution of energies but remain inconclusive about the precise slope. Furthermore, these results rely on a very crude estimate of the energy. On the other hand, more detailed spectroscopic studies of structures such as coronal bright points do not provide enough statistical information to derive their total contribution to heating. We aim at getting a better estimate of the distributions of the energy dissipated in coronal heating events using high-resolution, multi-channel Extreme Ultra-Violet (EUV) data. To estimate the energies corresponding to heating events and deduce their distribution, we detect brightenings in five EUV channels of the Atmospheric Imaging Assembl...

  7. The Interaction between Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) and Coronal Holes (CHs) during the Solar Cycle 23 and its Geomagnetic Consequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Amaal; Gopalswamy, Nat

    2016-07-01

    The interactions between the two large scale phenomena, coronal holes (CHs) and coronal mass ejections (CMEs) maybe considered as one of the most important relations that having a direct impact not only on space weather but also on the relevant plasma physics. Many observations have shown that throughout their propagation from the Sun to interplanetary space, CMEs interact with the heliospheric structures (e.g., other CMEs, Corotating interaction regions (CIRs), helmet streamers, and CHs). Such interactions could enhance the southward magnetic field component, which has important implications for geomagnetic storm generation. These interactions imply also a significant energy and momentum transfer between the interacting systems where magnetic reconnection is taking place. When CHs deflect CMEs away from or towards the Sun-Earth line, the geomagnetic response of the CME is highly affected. Gopalswamy et al. [2009] have addressed the deflection of CMEs due to the existence of CHs that are in close proximity to the eruption regions. They have shown that CHs can act as magnetic barriers that constrain CMEs propagation and can significantly affect their trajectories. Here, we study the interaction between coronal holes (CHs) and coronal mass ejections (CMEs) using a resultant force exerted by all coronal holes present on the disk and is defined as the coronal hole influence parameter (CHIP). The CHIP magnitude for each CH depends on the CH area, the distance between the CH centroid and the eruption region, and the average magnetic field within the CH at the photospheric level. The CHIP direction for each CH points from the CH centroid to the eruption region. We focus on Solar Cycle 23 CMEs originating from the disk center of the Sun (central meridian distance data sets of observations of CMEs and their interplanetary counterparts; known as interplanetary CMEs (ICMEs). There are 2 subsets of ICMEs: magnetic cloud (MC) and non-magnetic cloud (non-MC) ICMEs. MCs are

  8. Numerical simulations of transverse oscillations in radiatively cooling coronal loops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magyar, Norbert; Van Doorsselaere, Tom; Marcu, Alexandru

    2016-05-01

    We aim to study the influence of radiative cooling on the standing kink oscillations of coronal loops. To solve the 3D MHD ideal problem, we use the FLASH code. Our model consists of a straight, density enhanced and gravitationally stratified magnetic flux tube. We perturbed the system initially, leading to a transverse oscillation of the structure, and followed its evolution for a number of periods. A realistic radiative cooling is implemented. Results are compared to available analytical theory. We find that in the linear regime (i.e. low amplitude perturbation and slow cooling) the obtained period and damping time are in good agreement with theory. The cooling leads to an amplification of the oscillation amplitude. However, the difference between the cooling and non-cooling cases is small (around 6% after 6 oscillations). In high amplitude runs with realistic cooling, instabilities deform the loop, leading to increased damping. In this case, the difference between cooling and non-cooling is still negligible at around 12%. A set of simulations with higher density loops are also performed, to explore what happens when the cooling takes place in a very short time (t cool ≈ 100 s). In this case, the difference in amplitude after nearly 3 oscillation periods for the low amplitude case is 21% between cooling and non-cooling cases. We strengthen the results of previous analytical studies that state that the amplification due to cooling is ineffective, and its influence on the oscillation characteristics is small, at least for the cases shown here. Furthermore, the presence of a relatively strong damping in the high amplitude runs even in the fast cooling case indicates that it is unlikely that cooling could alone account for the observed, flare-related undamped oscillations of coronal loops. These results may be significant in the field of coronal seismology, allowing its application to coronal loop oscillations with observed fading-out or cooling behaviour.

  9. Projection Effects in Coronal Dimmings and Associated EUV Wave Event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dissauer, K.; Temmer, M.; Veronig, A. M.; Vanninathan, K.; Magdalenić, J.

    2016-10-01

    We investigate the high-speed (v > 1000 km s‑1) extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) wave associated with an X1.2 flare and coronal mass ejection (CME) from NOAA active region 11283 on 2011 September 6 (SOL2011-09-06T22:12). This EUV wave features peculiar on-disk signatures in particular, we observe an intermittent “disappearance” of the front for 120 s in Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO)/AIA 171, 193, 211 Å data, whereas the 335 Å filter, sensitive to hotter plasmas (T ∼ 2.5 MK), shows a continuous evolution of the wave front. The eruption was also accompanied by localized coronal dimming regions. We exploit the multi-point quadrature position of SDO and STEREO-A, to make a thorough analysis of the EUV wave evolution, with respect to its kinematics and amplitude evolution and reconstruct the SDO line-of-sight (LOS) direction of the identified coronal dimming regions in STEREO-A. We show that the observed intensities of the dimming regions in SDO/AIA depend on the structures that are lying along their LOS and are the combination of their individual intensities, e.g., the expanding CME body, the enhanced EUV wave, and the CME front. In this context, we conclude that the intermittent disappearance of the EUV wave in the AIA 171, 193, and 211 Å filters, which are channels sensitive to plasma with temperatures below ∼2 MK is also caused by such LOS integration effects. These observations clearly demonstrate that single-view image data provide us with limited insight to correctly interpret coronal features.

  10. Energetic characterisation and statistics of solar coronal brightenings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joulin, V.; Buchlin, E.; Solomon, J.; Guennou, C.

    2016-07-01

    Context. To explain the high temperature of the corona, much attention has been paid to the distribution of energy in dissipation events. Indeed, if the event energy distribution is steep enough, the smallest, unobservable events could be the largest contributors to the total energy dissipation in the corona. Previous observations have shown a wide distribution of energies but remain inconclusive about the precise slope. Furthermore, these results rely on a very crude estimate of the energy. On the other hand, more detailed spectroscopic studies of structures such as coronal bright points do not provide enough statistical information to derive their total contribution to heating. Aims: We aim at getting a better estimate of the distributions of the energy dissipated in coronal heating events using high-resolution, multi-channel extreme ultraviolet (EUV) data. Methods: To estimate the energies corresponding to heating events and deduce their distribution, we detected brightenings in five EUV channels of the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). We combined the results of these detections and used maps of temperature and emission measure derived from the same observations to compute the energies. Results: We obtain distributions of areas, durations, intensities, and energies (thermal, radiative, and conductive) of events. These distributions are power laws and we also find power-law correlations between event parameters. Conclusions: The energy distributions indicate that the energy from a population of events like the ones we detect represents a small contribution to the total coronal heating, even when extrapolating to smaller scales. The main explanations for this are how heating events can be extracted from observational data, and the incomplete knowledge of the thermal structure and processes in the coronal plasma attainable from available observations. Two movies attached to Fig. 3 are available in electronic form at

  11. On the "Extended" Solar Cycle in Coronal Emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbrecht, E.; Wang, Y.-M.; Sheeley, N. R., Jr.; Rich, N. B.

    2010-06-01

    Butterfly diagrams (latitude-time plots) of coronal emission show a zone of enhanced brightness that appears near the poles just after solar maximum and migrates toward lower latitudes; a bifurcation seems to occur at sunspot minimum, with one branch continuing to migrate equatorward with the sunspots of the new cycle and the other branch heading back to the poles. The resulting patterns have been likened to those seen in torsional oscillations and have been taken as evidence for an extended solar cycle lasting over ~17 yr. In order to clarify the nature of the overlapping bands of coronal emission, we construct butterfly diagrams from green-line simulations covering the period 1967-2009 and from 19.5 nm and 30.4 nm observations taken with the Extreme-Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope during 1996-2009. As anticipated from earlier studies, we find that the high-latitude enhancements mark the footpoint areas of closed loops with one end rooted outside the evolving boundaries of the polar coronal holes. The strong underlying fields were built up over the declining phase of the cycle through the poleward transport of active-region flux by the surface meridional flow. Rather than being a precursor of the new-cycle sunspot activity zone, the high-latitude emission forms a physically distinct, U-shaped band that curves upward again as active-region fields emerge at midlatitudes and reconnect with the receding polar-hole boundaries. We conclude that the so-called extended cycle in coronal emission is a manifestation not of early new-cycle activity, but of the poleward concentration of old-cycle trailing-polarity flux by meridional flow.

  12. Combining Models of Coronal Mass Ejections and Solar Dynamos

    OpenAIRE

    Warnecke, Jörn

    2013-01-01

    Observations show that Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) are associated with twisted magnetic flux configurations. Conventionally, CMEs are modeled by shearing and twisting the footpoints of a certain distribution of magnetic flux at the solar surface and letting it evolve at the surface. Of course, the surface velocities and magnetic field patterns should ultimately be obtained from realistic simulations of the solar convection zone where the field is generated by dynamo action. Therefore, a uni...

  13. Longitudinal magnetohydrodynamics oscillations in dissipative, cooling coronal loops

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper investigates the effect of cooling on standing slow magnetosonic waves in coronal magnetic loops. The damping mechanism taken into account is thermal conduction that is a viable candidate for dissipation of slow magnetosonic waves in coronal loops. In contrast to earlier studies, here we assume that the characteristic damping time due to thermal conduction is not small, but arbitrary, and can be of the order of the oscillation period, i.e., a temporally varying plasma is considered. The approximation of low-beta plasma enables us to neglect the magnetic field perturbation when studying longitudinal waves and consider, instead, a one-dimensional motion that allows a reliable first insight into the problem. The background plasma temperature is assumed to be decaying exponentially with time, with the characteristic cooling timescale much larger than the oscillation period. This assumption enables us to use the WKB method to study the evolution of the oscillation amplitude analytically. Using this method we obtain the equation governing the oscillation amplitude. The analytical expressions determining the wave properties are evaluated numerically to investigate the evolution of the oscillation frequency and amplitude with time. The results show that the oscillation period increases with time due to the effect of plasma cooling. The plasma cooling also amplifies the amplitude of oscillations in relatively cool coronal loops, whereas, for very hot coronal loop oscillations the damping rate is enhanced by the cooling. We find that the critical point for which the amplification becomes dominant over the damping is in the region of 4 MK. These theoretical results may serve as impetus for developing the tools of solar magneto-seismology in dynamic plasmas.

  14. EUV and Coronagraphic Observations of Coronal Mass Ejections

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Durgesh Tripathi

    2006-06-01

    The Large Angle Spectrometric Coronagraph (LASCO) and Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (EIT) onboard Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) provide us with unprecedented multi-wavelength observations helping us to understand different dynamic phenomena on the Sun and in the corona. In this paper we discuss the association between post-eruptive arcades (PEAs) detected by EIT and white-light coronal mass ejections (CMEs) detected by LASCO/C2 telescope.

  15. Stellar coronal magnetic fields and star-planet interaction

    OpenAIRE

    Lanza, A. F.

    2009-01-01

    Evidence of magnetic interaction between late-type stars and close-in giant planets is provided by the observations of stellar hot spots rotating synchronously with the planets and showing an enhancement of chromospheric and X-ray fluxes. We investigate star-planet interaction in the framework of a magnetic field model of a stellar corona, considering the interaction between the coronal field and that of a planetary magnetosphere moving through the corona. The energy budget of the star-planet...

  16. Extended HXR Sources - Albedo Patches or Coronal Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennis, Brian R.

    2011-01-01

    Extended HXR sources in the presence of compact footpoints have been reported based on visibility amplitudes from different detectors. Attempts have been made to determine the location and extent of these sources through direct imaging. Results of this work will be described for simulated sources and for specific flares at different solar longitudes, with a discussion of the possible nature of the extended sources as either albedo patches or coronal sources or a combination of the two.

  17. Axial flow heat exchanger devices and methods for heat transfer using axial flow devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koplow, Jeffrey P.

    2016-02-16

    Systems and methods described herein are directed to rotary heat exchangers configured to transfer heat to a heat transfer medium flowing in substantially axial direction within the heat exchangers. Exemplary heat exchangers include a heat conducting structure which is configured to be in thermal contact with a thermal load or a thermal sink, and a heat transfer structure rotatably coupled to the heat conducting structure to form a gap region between the heat conducting structure and the heat transfer structure, the heat transfer structure being configured to rotate during operation of the device. In example devices heat may be transferred across the gap region from a heated axial flow of the heat transfer medium to a cool stationary heat conducting structure, or from a heated stationary conducting structure to a cool axial flow of the heat transfer medium.

  18. CFD Simulation of Casing Treatment of Axial Flow Compressors

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeWitt, Kenneth

    2005-01-01

    A computational study is carried out to understand the physical mechanism responsible for the improvement in stall margin of an axial flow rotor due to the circumferential casing grooves. It is shown that the computational tool used predicts an increase in operating range of the rotor when casing grooves are present. A budget of the axial momentum equation is carried out at the rotor casing in the tip gap in order to uncover the physical process behind this stall margin improvement. It is shown that for the smooth casing the net axial pressure force . However in the presence of casing grooves the net axial shear stress force acting at the casing is augmented by the axial force due to the radial transport of axial momentum, which occurs across the grooves and power stream interface. This additional force adds to the net axial viscous sheer force and thus leads to an increase in the stall margin of the rotor.

  19. Solar coronal plumes and the fast solar wind

    CERN Document Server

    Dwivedi, B N

    2015-01-01

    The spectral profiles of the coronal Ne viii line at 77 nm have different shapes in quiet-Sun regions and coronal holes (CHs). A single Gaussian fit of the line profile provides an adequate approximation in quiet-Sun areas, whereas a strong shoulder on the long-wavelength side is a systematic feature in CHs. Although this has been noticed since 1999, no physical reason for the peculiar shape could be given. In an attempt to identify the cause of this peculiarity, we address three problems that could not be conclusively resolved in a review article by a study team of the International Space Science Institute (ISSI; Wilhelm et al. 2011) : (1) The physical processes operating at the base and inside of plumes as well as their interaction with the solar wind (SW). (2) The possible contribution of plume plasma to the fast SW streams. (3) The signature of the first-ionization potential (FIP) effect between plumes and inter-plume regions (IPRs). Before the spectroscopic peculiarities in IPRs and plumes in polar coron...

  20. The Temperature-Dependent Nature of Coronal Dimmings

    CERN Document Server

    Robbrecht, Eva

    2010-01-01

    The opening-up of the magnetic field during solar eruptive events is often accompanied by a dimming of the local coronal emission. From observations of filament eruptions recorded with the Extreme-Ultraviolet Imager on STEREO during 2008-2009, it is evident that these dimmings are much more pronounced in 19.5 nm than in the lower-temperature line 17.1 nm, as viewed either on the disk or above the limb. We conclude that most of the cooler coronal plasma is not ejected but remains gravitationally bound when the loops open up. This result is consistent with Doppler measurements by Imada and coworkers, who found that the upflow speeds in a transient coronal hole increased dramatically above a temperature of 1 MK; it is also consistent with the quasistatic behavior of polar plumes, as compared with the hotter interplume regions that are the main source of the fast solar wind. When the open flux reconnects and closes down again, the trapped plasma is initially heated to such high temperatures that it is no longer v...

  1. Validation of the Coronal Thick Target Source Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleishman, Gregory D.; Xu, Yan; Nita, Gelu N.; Gary, Dale E.

    2016-01-01

    We present detailed 3D modeling of a dense, coronal thick-target X-ray flare using the GX Simulator tool, photospheric magnetic measurements, and microwave imaging and spectroscopy data. The developed model offers a remarkable agreement between the synthesized and observed spectra and images in both X-ray and microwave domains, which validates the entire model. The flaring loop parameters are chosen to reproduce the emission measure, temperature, and the nonthermal electron distribution at low energies derived from the X-ray spectral fit, while the remaining parameters, unconstrained by the X-ray data, are selected such as to match the microwave images and total power spectra. The modeling suggests that the accelerated electrons are trapped in the coronal part of the flaring loop, but away from where the magnetic field is minimal, and, thus, demonstrates that the data are clearly inconsistent with electron magnetic trapping in the weak diffusion regime mediated by the Coulomb collisions. Thus, the modeling supports the interpretation of the coronal thick-target sources as sites of electron acceleration in flares and supplies us with a realistic 3D model with physical parameters of the acceleration region and flaring loop.

  2. Projection effects in coronal dimmings and associated EUV wave event

    CERN Document Server

    Dissauer, Karin; Veronig, Astrid M; Vanninathan, Kamalam; Magdalenić, Jasmina

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the high-speed ($v >$ 1000 km s$^{-1}$) extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) wave associated with an X1.2 flare and coronal mass ejection (CME) from NOAA active region 11283 on 2011 September 6 (SOL2011-09-06T22:12). This EUV wave features peculiar on-disk signatures, in particular we observe an intermittent "disappearance" of the front for 120 s in SDO/AIA 171, 193, 211 {\\AA} data, whereas the 335 {\\AA} filter, sensitive to hotter plasmas (T$\\sim$2.5 MK), shows a continuous evolution of the wave front. The eruption was also accompanied by localized coronal dimming regions. We exploit the multi-point quadrature position of SDO and STEREO-A, to make a thorough analysis of the EUV wave evolution, with respect to its kinematics and amplitude evolution and reconstruct the SDO line-of-sight (LOS) direction of the identified coronal dimming regions in STEREO-A. We show that the observed intensities of the dimming regions in SDO/AIA depend on the structures that are lying along their LOS and are the combination ...

  3. The Nature of CME-flare-Associated Coronal Dimming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, J. X.; Qiu, J.

    2016-07-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are often accompanied by coronal dimming that is evident in extreme ultraviolet (EUV) and soft X-ray observations. The locations of dimming are sometimes considered to map footpoints of the erupting flux rope. As the emitting material expands in the corona, the decreased plasma density leads to reduced emission observed in spectral and irradiance measurements. Therefore, signatures of dimming may reflect the properties of CMEs in the early phase of their eruption. In this study, we analyze the event of flare, CME, and coronal dimming on 2011 December 26. We use the data from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on the Solar Dynamics Observatory for disk observations of the dimming, and analyze images taken by EUVI, COR1, and COR2 on board the Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory to obtain the height and velocity of the associated CMEs observed at the limb. We also measure the magnetic reconnection rate from flare observations. Dimming occurs in a few locations next to the flare ribbons, and it is observed in multiple EUV passbands. Rapid dimming starts after the onset of fast reconnection and CME acceleration, and its evolution tracks the CME height and flare reconnection. The spatial distribution of dimming exhibits cores of deep dimming with a rapid growth, and their light curves are approximately linearly scaled with the CME height profile. From the dimming analysis we infer the process of the CME expansion, and estimate properties of the CME.

  4. An Impulsive Heating Model for the Evolution of Coronal Loops

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Feng; Wei-Qun Gan

    2006-01-01

    It was suggested by Parker that the solar corona is heated by many small energy release events generally called microflares or nanoflares. More and more observations showed flows and intensity variations in nonflaring loops. Both theories and observations have indicated that the heating of coronal loops should actually be unsteady. Using SOLFTM (Solar Flux Tube Model), we investigate the hydrodynamics of coronal loops undergoing different manners of impulsive heating with the same total energy deposition. The half length of the loops is 110 Mm, a typical length of active region loops. We divide the loops into two categories: loops that experience catastrophic cooling and loops that do not. It is found that when the nanoflare heating sources are in the coronal part, the loops are in non-catastrophic-cooling state and their evolutions are similar. When the heating is localized below the transition region, the loops evolve in quite different ways. It is shown that with increasing number of heating pulses and inter-pulse time, the catastrophic cooling is weakened, delayed, or even disappears altogether.

  5. Intermediate Inclinations of Type 2 Coronal-Line Forest AGN

    CERN Document Server

    Rose, Marvin; Crenshaw, Michael; Glidden, Ana

    2015-01-01

    Coronal-Line Forest Active Galactic Nuclei (CLiF AGN) are remarkable in the sense that they have a rich spectrum of dozens of coronal emission lines (e.g. [FeVII], [FeX] and [NeV]) in their spectra. Rose, Elvis & Tadhunter (2015) suggest that the inner obscuring torus wall is the most likely location of the coronal line region in CLiF AGN, and the unusual strength of the forbidden high ionization lines is due to a specific AGN-torus inclination angle. Here we test this suggestion using mid-IR colours (4.6$\\mu$m-22$\\mu$m) from the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) for the CLiF AGN. We use the Fischer et al. (2014) result that showed that as the AGN-torus inclination becomes more face on, the Spitzer 5.5$\\mu$m to 30$\\mu$m colours become bluer. We show that the [W2-W4] colours for the CLiF AGN ($\\langle$[W2-W4]$\\rangle$ = 5.92$\\pm$0.12) are intermediate between SDSS type 1 ($\\langle$[W2-W4]$\\rangle$ = 5.22$\\pm$0.01) and type 2 AGN ($\\langle$[W2-W4]$\\rangle$ = 6.35$\\pm$0.03). This implies that the AG...

  6. Solar Coronal Plumes and the Fast Solar Wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwivedi, Bhola N.; Wilhelm, Klaus

    2015-03-01

    The spectral profiles of the coronal Ne viii line at 77 nm have different shapes in quiet-Sun regions and Coronal Holes (CHs). A single Gaussian fit of the line profile provides an adequate approximation in quiet-Sun areas, whereas, a strong shoulder on the long-wavelength side is a systematic feature in CHs. Although this has been noticed since 1999, no physical reason for the peculiar shape could be given. In an attempt to identify the cause of this peculiarity, we address three problems that could not be conclusively resolved, in a review article by a study team of the International Space Science Institute (ISSI) (Wilhelm et al. 2011): (1) The physical processes operating at the base and inside of plumes, as well as their interaction with the Solar Wind (SW). (2) The possible contribution of plume plasma to the fast SW streams. (3) The signature of the First-Ionization Potential (FIP) effect between plumes and inter-plume regions (IPRs). Before the spectroscopic peculiarities in IPRs and plumes in Polar Coronal Holes (PCHs) can be further investigated with the instrument Solar Ultraviolet Measurements of Emitted Radiation (SUMER) aboard the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO), it is mandatory to summarize the results of the review to place the spectroscopic observations into context. Finally, a plume model is proposed that satisfactorily explains the plasma flows up and down the plume field lines and leads to the shape of the neon line in PCHs.

  7. Determination of the Coronal Magnetic Field by Hot Loop Oscillations

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, T; Qiu, J; Wang, Tongjiang; Innes, Davina E.; Qiu, Jiong

    2006-01-01

    We apply a new method to determine the magnetic field in coronal loops using observations of coronal loop oscillations. We analyze seven Doppler shift oscillation events detected by SUMER in the hot flare line Fe XIX to obtain oscillation periods of these events. The geometry, temperature, and electron density of the oscillating loops are measured from coordinated multi-channel soft X-ray imaging observations from SXT. All the oscillations are consistent with standing slow waves in their fundamental mode. The parameters are used to calculate the magnetic field of coronal loops based on MHD wave theory. For the seven events, the plasma $\\beta$ is in the range 0.15-0.91 with a mean of 0.33$\\pm$0.26, and the estimated magnetic field varies between 21-61 G with a mean of 34$\\pm$14 G. With background emission subtracted, the estimated magnetic field is reduced by 9%-35%. The maximum backgroud subtraction gives a mean of 22$\\pm$13 G in the range 12-51 G. We discuss measurement uncertainties and the prospect of dete...

  8. Signature of mass supply to quiet coronal loops

    CERN Document Server

    Tian, H; Marsch, E; He, J -S; Zhou, G -Q; 10.1051/0004-6361:20078813

    2009-01-01

    Aims. The physical implication of large blue shift of Ne viii in the quiet Sun region is investigated in this paper. Methods. We compare the significant Ne viii blue shifts, which are visible as large blue patches on the Doppler-shift map of a middlelatitude quiet-Sun region observed by SUMER, with the coronal magnetic-field structures as reconstructed from a simultaneous photospheric magnetogram by means of a force-free-field extrapolation. Results. We show for the first time that coronal funnels also exist in the quiet Sun. The region studied contains several small funnels that originate from network lanes, expand with height and finally merge into a single wide open-field region. However, the large blue shifts of the Ne viii line are not generally associated with funnels. A comparison between the projections of coronal loops onto the solar x−y-plane and the Ne viii dopplergram indicates that there are some loops that reveal large Ne viii blue shifts in both legs, and some loops with upflow in one...

  9. Projection effects in coronal dimmings and associated EUV wave event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dissauer, Karin; Temmer, Manuela; Veronig, Astrid; Vanninathan, Kamalam; Magdalenic, Jasmina

    2016-04-01

    We investigate the high-speed (v > 1000 km s‑1) extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) wave associated with an X1.2 flare and coronal mass ejection (CME) from NOAA active region 11283. This EUV wave features peculiar on-disk signatures, in particular we observe an intermittent "disappearance" of the front for 120 s in SDO/AIA 171, 193, 211 Å data, whereas the 335 Å filter, sensitive to hotter plasmas (T˜ 2.5 MK), shows a continuous evolution of the wave front. We exploit the multi-point quadrature position of SDO and STEREO-A, to make a thorough analysis of the EUV wave evolution, with respect to its kinematics and amplitude evolution. We identify on-disk coronal dimming regions in SDO/AIA, reminiscent of core dimmings, that have no corresponding on-disk dimming signatures in STEREO-A/EUVI. Reconstructing the SDO line-of-sight (LOS) direction in STEREO-A clearly shows that the observed SDO on-disk dimming areas are not the footprints of the erupting fluxrope but result from decreased emission from the expanding CME body integrated along the LOS. In this context, we conclude that the intermittent disappearance of the EUV wave in the AIA 171, 193, 211 Å filters, which are channels sensitive to plasma with temperatures below ˜ 2 MK is also caused by such LOS integration effects. These observations clearly demonstrate that single-view image data provide us with limited insight to correctly interpret coronal features.

  10. Spatial damping of propagating sausage waves in coronal cylinders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Ming-Zhe; Chen, Shao-Xia; Li, Bo; Xia, Li-Dong; Yu, Hui

    2015-09-01

    Context. Sausage modes are important in coronal seismology. Spatially damped propagating sausage waves were recently observed in the solar atmosphere. Aims: We examine how wave leakage influences the spatial damping of sausage waves propagating along coronal structures modeled by a cylindrical density enhancement embedded in a uniform magnetic field. Methods: Working in the framework of cold magnetohydrodynamics, we solve the dispersion relation (DR) governing sausage waves for complex-valued, longitudinal wavenumber k at given real angular frequencies ω. For validation purposes, we also provide analytical approximations to the DR in the low-frequency limit and in the vicinity of ωc, the critical angular frequency separating trapped from leaky waves. Results: In contrast to the standing case, propagating sausage waves are allowed for ω much lower than ωc. However, while able to direct their energy upward, these low-frequency waves are subject to substantial spatial attenuation. The spatial damping length shows little dependence on the density contrast between the cylinder and its surroundings, and depends only weakly on frequency. This spatial damping length is of the order of the cylinder radius for ω ≲ 1.5vAi/a, where a and vAi are the cylinder radius and the Alfvén speed in the cylinder, respectively. Conclusions: If a coronal cylinder is perturbed by symmetric boundary drivers (e.g., granular motions) with a broadband spectrum, wave leakage efficiently filters out the low-frequency components.

  11. Fast-sausage oscillations in coronal loops with smooth boundary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopin, I.; Nagorny, I.

    2014-12-01

    Aims: The effect of the transition layer (shell) in nonuniform coronal loops with a continuous radial density profile on the properties of fast-sausage modes are studied analytically and numerically. Methods: We modeled the coronal waveguide as a structured tube consisting of a cord and a transition region (shell) embedded within a magnetic uniform environment. The derived general dispersion relation was investigated analytically and numerically in the context of frequency, cut-off wave number, and the damping rate of fast-sausage oscillations for various values of loop parameters. Results: The frequency of the global fast-sausage mode in the loops with a diffuse (or smooth) boundary is determined mainly by the external Alfvén speed and longitudinal wave number. The damping rate of such a mode can be relatively low. The model of coronal loop with diffuse boundary can support a comparatively low-frequency, global fast-sausage mode of detectable quality without involving extremely low values of the density contrast. The effect of thin transition layer (corresponds to the loops with steep boundary) is negligible and produces small reductions of oscillation frequency and relative damping rate in comparison with the case of step-function density profile. Seismological application of obtained results gives the estimated Alfvén speed outside the flaring loop about 3.25 Mm/s.

  12. Interpretation of the coronal magnetic field configuration of the Sun

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Bo; Yu, Hui

    2012-01-01

    The origin of the heliospheric magnetic flux on the Sun, and hence the origin of the solar wind, is a topic of hot debate.While the prevailing view is that the solar wind originates from outside coronal streamer helmets, there also exists the suggestion that the open magnetic field spans a far wider region.Without the definitive measurement of the coronal magnetic field, it is difficult to resolve the conflict between the two scenarios without doubt.We present two 2-dimensional, Alfv\\'enic-turbulence-based models of the solar corona and solar wind, one with and the other without a closed magnetic field region in the inner corona.The purpose of the latter model is to test whether it is possible to realize a picture suggested by polarimetric measurements of the corona using the FeXIII 10747\\AA\\ line, where open magnetic field lines seem to penetrate the streamer base.The boundary conditions at the coronal base are able to account for important observational constraints, especially those on the magnetic flux dis...

  13. The Density of Coronal Plasma in Active Stellar Coronae

    CERN Document Server

    Testa, P; Peres, G; Testa, Paola; Drake, Jeremy J.; Peres, Giovanni

    2004-01-01

    We have analyzed high-resolution X-ray spectra of a sample of 22 active stars observed with the High Energy Transmission Grating Spectrometer on {\\em Chandra} in order to investigate their coronal plasma density. Densities where investigated using the lines of the He-like ions O VII, Mg XI, and Si XIII. While Si XIII lines in all stars of the sample are compatible with the low-density limit, Mg XI lines betray the presence of high plasma densities ($> 10^{12}$ cm$^{-3}$) for most of the sources with higher X-ray luminosity ($> 10^{30}$ erg/s); stars with higher $L_X$ and $L_X/L_{bol}$ tend to have higher densities at high temperatures. Ratios of O VII lines yield much lower densities of a few $10^{10}$ cm$^{-3}$, indicating that the ``hot'' and ``cool'' plasma resides in physically different structures. Our findings imply remarkably compact coronal structures, especially for the hotter plasma emitting the Mg XI lines characterized by coronal surface filling factor, $f_{MgXI}$, ranging from $10^{-4}$ to $10^{-...

  14. Comprehensive Analysis of Mandibular Residual Asymmetry after Bilateral Sagittal Split Ramus Osteotomy Correction of Menton Point Deviation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Qiuping; Huang, Xiaoqiong; Xu, Yue; Yang, Xiaoping

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Facial asymmetry often persists even after mandibular deviation corrected by the bilateral sagittal split ramus osteotomy (BSSRO) operation, since the reference facial sagittal plane for the asymmetry analysis is usually set up before the mandibular menton (Me) point correction. Our aim is to develop a predictive and quantitative method to assess the true asymmetry of the mandible after a midline correction performed by a virtual BSSRO, and to verify its availability by evaluation of the post-surgical improvement. Patients and Methods A retrospective cohort study was conducted at the Hospital of Stomatology, Sun Yat-sen University (China) of patients with pure hemi-mandibular elongation (HE) from September 2010 through May 2014. Mandibular models were reconstructed from CBCT images of patients with pre-surgical orthodontic treatment. After mandibular de-rotation and midline alignment with virtual BSSRO, the elongation hemi-mandible was virtually mirrored along the facial sagittal plane. The residual asymmetry, defined as the superimposition and boolean operation of the mirrored elongation side on the normal side, was calculated, including the volumetric differences and the length of transversal and vertical asymmetry discrepancy. For more specific evaluation, both sides of the hemi-mandible were divided into the symphysis and parasymphysis (SP), mandibular body (MB), and mandibular angle (MA) regions. Other clinical variables include deviation of Me point, dental midline and molar relationship. The measurement of volumetric discrepancy between the two sides of post-surgical hemi-mandible were also calculated to verify the availability of virtual surgery. Paired t-tests were computed and the P value was set at .05. Results This study included 45 patients. The volume differences were 407.8±64.8 mm3, 2139.1±72.5 mm3, and 422.5±36.9 mm3; residual average transversal discrepancy, 1.9 mm, 1.0 mm, and 2.2 mm; average vertical discrepancy, 1.1 mm, 2.2 mm, and 2

  15. Posterior epidural fat on sagittal MR images: can it heIp in distinguishing between isthmic and degenerative lumbar spondylolisthesis?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Youn, Byung Jae; Choi, Jung Ah; Kim, Jung Eun; Choi, Ja Young; Hong, Sung Hwan; Kang, Heung Sik [College of Medicine, Seoul National Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-11-01

    We tried to assess the value of posterior epidural fat for distinguishing isthmic spondylolisthesis from degenerative lumbar spondylolisthesis on midline sagittal MR images. The midline sagittal MR images of the lumbar spines were retrospectively studied for 50 patients without spondylolisthesis, for 78 patients with isthmic spondylolisthesis and for 43 patients with degenerative spondylolisthesis. The anteroposterior diameter of the posterior epidural fat (ADEF) was measured at each intervertebral disc level by two radiologists and these values were then compared between each group. To normalize for difference of body size, the posterior epidural fat ratio (PEFR) at each level of spondylolisthesis and at L1-2 were also determined for each level of spondylolisthesis, and the PERF was compared between each group. Statistical analysis was performed by the chi-square method. For the patients with isthmic spondylolisthesis, the ADEFs at the spinal levels with spondylolisthesis were significantly greater than those ADEFs in the control group that were measured at the corresponding disc levels (p<0.05). For the patients with degenerative spondylolisthesis, the ADEFs at the spinal level with spondylolisthesis were significantly less than the ADEFs in the control group that were measured at the corresponding disc levels (p<0.05). The PEFRs obtained at L4-5 were 1.37{+-}0.12 for the control group, 2.61{+-}1.31 for the patients with isthmic spondylolisthesis, and 0.60{+-}0.05 for the patients with degenerative spondylolisthesis. The PEFRs obtained at L5-S1 were 2.25{+-}1.32 for the control group, 3.47{+-}1.69 for the patients with isthmic spondylolisthesis and 1.65{+-}0.18 for the patients with degenerative spondylolisthesis. At both levels, the PEFRs were greatest for the isthmic spondylolisthesis group and smallest for the degenerative spondylolisthesis group, and all the differences were statistically significant. The posterior epidural fat, which is easily seen structure

  16. Frontobiparietal remodeling with or without a widening bridge for sagittal synostosis: comparison of 2 cohorts for aesthetic and functional outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Veelen, Marie-Lise C; Mihajlović, Dalibor; Dammers, Ruben; Lingsma, Hester; van Adrichem, Leon N A; Mathijssen, Irene M J

    2015-07-01

    OBJECT Various techniques to correct sagittal synostosis have been described. The authors of this study assess the results of 2 techniques for late complete cranial remodeling and test the hypothesis that adding a widening bridge would improve outcome. METHODS In this retrospective study, the authors evaluated patients with nonsyndromic sagittal synostosis-those who underwent frontobiparietal remodeling (FBR) and those who underwent modified FBR (MFBR) involving the introduction of a bony bridge to increase the width of the skull. Outcomes for both groups are described in terms of the aesthetic results assessed on photographs and any changes in the cranial index (CI) and head circumference over time, the presence of papilledema, and complaints of headache. The effect of the surgical technique on CI and head circumference over time was assessed using linear regression analysis, with adjustment for preoperative CI and head circumference. RESULTS Sixty-nine patients with isolated sagittal synostosis were included in this study: 35 underwent MFBR and 34 underwent the original technique of FBR. The mean follow-up period was 7 years. In the 1st year after surgery, mean CI improved by 9% in the FBR group and by 12% in the MFBR group. One year after surgery, CI in the MFBR group was on average 4.7% higher than that in the FBR group (p MFBR group than in the FBR group. The impact of surgical technique on CI was less important than the impact of preoperative CI (R(2)= 0.26 vs 0.54), and this applied at all time points during follow-up. Head circumference declined during follow-up in both groups. It was influenced by preoperative head circumference, but not by surgical technique. Aesthetic outcome, prevalence of headache (42%), and papilledema (7%) were comparable in both groups. CONCLUSIONS Adding a widening bridge to late complete remodeling significantly improved CI and helped to prevent CI from decreasing in the long term. This addition did not affect the head

  17. Effect of Acute Alterations in Foot Strike Patterns during Running on Sagittal Plane Lower Limb Kinematics and Kinetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin A. Valenzuela, Scott K. Lynn, Lisa R. Mikelson, Guillermo J. Noffal, Daniel A. Judelson

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available subjects were identified through slow motion video playback (n = 21, age = 22.8±2.2 years, mass = 73.1±14.5 kg, height 1.75 ± 0.10 m. On day two, subjects performed five overground run trials in both their natural and unnatural strike patterns while motion and force data were collected. Data were collected over two days so that foot strike videos could be analyzed for group placement purposes. Several 2 (Foot Strike Pattern –forefoot strike [FFS], rearfoot strike [RFS] x 2 (Group – PFFG, PRFG mixed model ANOVAs (p < 0.05 were run on speed, active peak vertical ground reaction force (VGRF, peak early stance and mid stance sagittal ankle moments, sagittal plane hip and knee moments, ankle dorsiflexion ROM, and sagittal plane hip and knee ROM. There were no significant interactions or between group differences for any of the measured variables. Within subject effects demonstrated that the RFS condition had significantly lower (VGRF (RFS = 2.58 ± .21 BW, FFS = 2.71 ± 0.23 BW, dorsiflexion moment (RFS = -2.6 1± 0.61 Nm·kg-1, FFS = -3.09 ± 0.32 Nm·kg-1, and dorsiflexion range of motion (RFS = 17.63 ± 3.76°, FFS = 22.10 ± 5.08°. There was also a significantly higher peak plantarflexion moment (RFS = 0.23 ± 0.11 Nm·kg-1, FFS = 0.01 ± 0.01 Nm·kg-1, peak knee moment (RFS = 2.61 ± 0.54 Nm·kg-1, FFS = 2.39 ± 0.61 Nm·kg-1, knee ROM (RFS = 31.72 ± 2.79°, FFS = 29.58 ± 2.97°, and hip ROM (RFS = 42.72 ± 4.03°, FFS = 41.38 ± 3.32° as compared with the FFS condition. This research suggests that acute changes in foot strike patterns during shod running can create alterations in certain lower limb kinematic and kinetic measures that are not dependent on the preferred foot strike pattern of the individual. This research also challenges the contention that the impact transient spike in the vertical ground reaction force curve is only present during a rear foot strike type of running gait.

  18. A solar type II radio burst from coronal mass ejection-coronal ray interaction: Simultaneous radio and extreme ultraviolet imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simultaneous radio and extreme ultraviolet (EUV)/white-light imaging data are examined for a solar type II radio burst occurring on 2010 March 18 to deduce its source location. Using a bow-shock model, we reconstruct the three-dimensional EUV wave front (presumably the type-II-emitting shock) based on the imaging data of the two Solar TErrestrial RElations Observatory spacecraft. It is then combined with the Nançay radio imaging data to infer the three-dimensional position of the type II source. It is found that the type II source coincides with the interface between the coronal mass ejection (CME) EUV wave front and a nearby coronal ray structure, providing evidence that the type II emission is physically related to the CME-ray interaction. This result, consistent with those of previous studies, is based on simultaneous radio and EUV imaging data for the first time.

  19. Single Band Helical Antenna in Axial Mode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parminder Singh

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Helical antennas have been widely used in a various useful applications, due to their low weight and low profile conformability, easy and cheap realization.Radiation properties of this antenna are examined both theoretically and experimentally. In this paper, an attempt has been made to investigate new helical antenna structure for Applications. CST MWS Software is used for the simulation and design calculations of the helical antennas. The axial ratio, return loss, VSWR, Directivity, gain, radiation pattern is evaluated. Using CST MWS simulation software proposed antenna is designed/simulated and optimized. The antenna exhibits a single band from 0 GHz to 3 GHz for GPS and several satellite applications

  20. Shaped charge with an axial channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malygin, A. V.; Proskuryakov, E. V.; Sorokin, M. V.; Fomin, V. M.

    2011-05-01

    A shaped charge with an axial channel is considered. The charge is initiated by an impact of an annular plate. As a result, the shaped charge is initiated at all points of the domain shaped as a ring. The impact plate material and parameters (velocity, thickness, width, and distance covered by the plate) that ensure stable penetration of the shaped charge are determined. The results obtained can be used to develop a composite (e.g., "tandem") shaped charge of the "base-head" type (the charge located farther from the target is first initiated, followed by initiation of the charge located closer to the target).