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Sample records for axial neck pain

  1. Neck Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... antidepressants for pain relief. Therapy Physical therapy. A physical therapist can teach you correct posture, alignment and neck- ... therapy, under supervision of a medical professional and physical therapist, may provide relief of some neck pain, especially ...

  2. Neck pain

    OpenAIRE

    2002-01-01

    Non-specific neck pain has a postural or mechanical basis, and affects about two thirds of people at some stage, especially in middle age. Acute neck pain resolves within days or weeks, but becomes chronic in about 10% of people.Whiplash injuries follow sudden acceleration–deceleration of the neck, such as in road traffic or sporting accidents. Up to 40% of people continue to report symptoms 15 years after the accident.

  3. Fluoroscopic cervical epidural injections in chronic axial or disc-related neck pain without disc herniation, facet joint pain, or radiculitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manchikanti L

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Laxmaiah Manchikanti, Kimberly A Cash, Vidyasagar Pampati, Yogesh MallaPain Management Center of Paducah, Paducah, KY, USABackground: While chronic neck pain is a common problem in the adult population, with a typical 12-month prevalence of 30%–50%, there is a lack of consensus regarding its causes and treatment. Despite limited evidence, cervical epidural injections are one of the commonly performed nonsurgical interventions in the management of chronic neck pain.Methods: A randomized, double-blind, active, controlled trial was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of cervical interlaminar epidural injections of local anesthetic with or without steroids for the management of chronic neck pain with or without upper extremity pain in patients without disc herniation, radiculitis, or facet joint pain.Results: One hundred and twenty patients without disc herniation or radiculitis and negative for facet joint pain by means of controlled diagnostic medial branch blocks were randomly assigned to one of two treatment groups, ie, injection of local anesthetic only (group 1 or local anesthetic mixed with nonparticulate betamethasone (group 2. The primary outcome of significant pain relief and improvement in functional status (≥50% was demonstrated in 72% of group 1 and 68% of group 2. The overall average number of procedures per year was 3.6 in both groups with an average total relief per year of 37–39 weeks in the successful group over a period of 52 weeks.Conclusion: Cervical interlaminar epidural injections of local anesthetic with or without steroids may be effective in patients with chronic function-limiting discogenic or axial pain.Keywords: chronic neck pain, cervical disc herniation, cervical discogenic pain, cervical epidural injections, epidural steroids, local anesthetics

  4. Neck Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Call for Letters of Interest Call for Topics Axial Spondyloarthritis Glucocorticoid-Induced Osteoporosis Gout Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis ... with systemic illnesses, such as polymyalgia rheumatica , ankylosing spondylitis , rheumatoid arthritis , tumors and infections. The common mechanical ...

  5. Axial Neck Pain after Cervical Laminectomy with Instrumented Fusion%颈椎椎板切除融合术后轴性疼痛

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩雨; 张永刚; 张雪松; 陆宁; 毛克亚; 崔庚; 王征

    2011-01-01

    目的:目前已证实颈椎椎板切除融合术是治疗多阶段的脊髓型颈椎病和后纵韧带骨化病的一种安全和有效的方法.然而,颈椎椎板切除融合术后经常发生颈部轴性疼痛.本研究的目的是观察C7棘突保留与否与颈椎椎板切除融合术后轴性疼痛的关系.方法:对2006年1月~2008年12月在我院行颈椎椎板切除融合术的67个病人进行回顾性分析.将这67个病人之中保留了C7棘突的29名病人称为A组,未保留C7棘突的38名病人称为B组,对两组病人的轴性症状、颈椎曲度和颈椎曲度指数(cervi cal curbatureindex,CCI)进行评估和比较.结果:在A组中有51.7%的病人发生了早期的轴性症状,10.3%的病人发生了晚期的轴性症状,B组分别为60.5%和42.1%.B组中42.1%的病人和A组中10.3%的病人在手术后晚期有轴性症状,A组的轴性疼痛发生率低于B组,有统计学意义(p=0.001).结论:保留C7棘突可以降低颈椎椎板切除融合术后轴性症状的发生率.%Objective: It has been demonstrated that cervical laminectomy with instrumented fusion is an effective and safe method of treating multi-level cervical spondylotic myelopathy and ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament.However, axial neck pain is frequently encountered after cervical laminectomy with instrumented fusion.The aim of the present study was to determine clinical significance of the C7 spinous process on axial neck pain after cervical laminectomy with instrumented fusion.Methods: A total of 67 consecutive patients that underwent cervical laminectomy with instrumented fusion between Janurary 2006 and December 2008 were reviewed.The authors evaluated and compared axial neck pain 、 lordotic angle and cervical curbature index (CCI) in patients that underwent C7 spinous process preserving surgery (groupA n = 29) and in patients in which the C7 spinons process was sacrificed (groupB, n = 38).Results: Early axial pain occurred in 51.7% of

  6. Neck pain: causes, diagnosis, treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksey Ivanovich Isaikin

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Neck pain is frequently encountered in clinical practice. In most cases, it is unassociated with a serious problem and ends with complete recovery. Nonspecific (mechanical, axial pain is most common; posttraumatic pain associated with whiplash injury is less frequently encountered; compression (radicular and myelopathic syndromes are much less frequent. Analysis of complaints and medical histories and neuroorthopedic and neurological examinations allow one to define the major source of pain. Additional studies are indicated in cases of suspected serious pathology, ineffective standard medical therapy, elective manual therapy or neurosurgery. Paracetamol, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents, and myelorelaxants are the drugs of choice in treating acute pain. If these are ineffective, blocks with local anesthetics and glucocorticoids, including diprospan, are used. Early activation and manual therapy are effective. Psychotherapy, therapeutic exercises, manual therapy, and the use of antidepressants and anticonvulsants are indicated for chronic pain. Surgical treatment has limited indications.

  7. Neck pain in different cephalalgias

    OpenAIRE

    E. A. Chechet; G. R. Tabeeva

    2014-01-01

    The paper reviews the literature related to the investigations of neck pain (cervicalgia) in patients with headache (cephalalgia). Neck pain is second to lower back pain as a reason for considerable socioeconomic damage to society. The prevalence of cervicalgia in the population ranges from 5.9 to 38%; the annual incidence is 10.4–21.3%; 14.2 to 71% of people report to have neck pain at some time in their lifetime. Neck pain is concurrent with cephalalgia in 70% of cases. In patients with cer...

  8. Neck pain causes respiratory dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapreli, Eleni; Vourazanis, Evangelos; Strimpakos, Nikolaos

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes a presumptive mechanism for the development of changes in respiratory function due to chronic neck pain. The patient with neck pain presents a number of factors that could constitute a predisposition of leading to a respiratory dysfunction: (a) the decreased strength of deep neck flexors and extensors, (b) the hyperactivity and increased fatigability of superficial neck flexors, (c) the limitation of range of motion, (d) the decrease in proprioception and disturbances in neuromuscular control, (e) the existence of pain and (f) the psychosocial influence of dysfunction. The possible connection of neck pain and respiratory function could have a great impact on various clinical aspects notably patient assessment, rehabilitation and pharmacological prescription.

  9. Neck pain in different cephalalgias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. A. Chechet

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper reviews the literature related to the investigations of neck pain (cervicalgia in patients with headache (cephalalgia. Neck pain is second to lower back pain as a reason for considerable socioeconomic damage to society. The prevalence of cervicalgia in the population ranges from 5.9 to 38%; the annual incidence is 10.4–21.3%; 14.2 to 71% of people report to have neck pain at some time in their lifetime. Neck pain is concurrent with cephalalgia in 70% of cases. In patients with cervicalgia, the prevalence of headache is 20–40% higher than in those with musculoskeletal pain at another site. Neck pain is as a major risk factor for migraine and tension headache (TH. Neck pain in TH progresses with the increased intensity, frequency, and strength of headache. There is a direct relationship of the quality of life worsening associated withcervicalgia to the frequency of migraine attacks and the risk of its chronization. Neck pain is noted in cervicogenic headache belonging to secondary headaches. The identification of mixed headache in a patient with cervicalgia allows the prescription of a treatment option that may be effective in relieving both headache and neck pain. The paper discusses the causes and pathogenesis of cervicalgia in patients with headache, examination methods, and main approaches to drug and nondrug therapies in relation to the leading pathophysiological mechanism, as well as new possibilities for the effective and safe relief of pain syndrome in this category of patients. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, myorelaxants,and their combination are observed to be effective in treating patients with cervicalgia and cephalalgia.

  10. Comparison of electromyographic activity and range of neck motion in violin students with and without neck pain during playing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Kyue-nam; Kwon, Oh-yun; Ha, Sung-min; Kim, Su-jung; Choi, Hyun-jung; Weon, Jong-hyuck

    2012-12-01

    Neck pain is common in violin students during a musical performance. The purpose of this study was to compare electromyographic (EMG) activity in superficial neck muscles with neck motion when playing the violin as well as neck range of motion (ROM) at rest, between violin students with and without neck pain. Nine violin students with neck pain and nine age- and gender-matched subjects without neck pain were recruited. Muscle activity of the bilateral upper trapezius, sternocleidomastoid, and superficial cervical extensor muscles was measured using surface EMG. Kinematic data on neck motion while playing and active neck ROM were also measured using a three-dimensional motion analysis system. Independent t-tests were used to compare EMG activity with kinematic data between groups. These analyses revealed that while playing, both the angle of left lateral bending and leftward rotation of the cervical spine were significantly greater in the neck pain group than among those without neck pain. Similarly, EMG activity of the left upper trapezius, both cervical extensors, and both sternocleidomastoid muscles were significantly greater in the neck pain group. The active ROM of left axial rotation was significantly lower in the neck pain group. These results suggest that an asymmetric playing posture and the associated increased muscle activity as well as decreased neck axial rotation may contribute to neck pain in violin students.

  11. Rheumatologists and neck pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smythe, H A

    2000-01-01

    Many authors have suggested that chronic pain syndromes are psychosocial in origin; maladaptive behaviours favoured by psychosocial and political factors. Sometimes this may be true, but neither the individual patients nor the accumulated scientific evidence deserve such a routine dismissal. In this editorial I will review issues of responsibility, the nature of referred pain and referred tenderness, evidence for the value of tender point examination as an objective measure, techniques of assessment of the cervical spine, techniques of assessment of pain behaviour, and the determinants of the specific symptom patterns associated with cervical injury.

  12. Altered Pain Sensitivity in Elderly Women with Chronic Neck Pain

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Background Age-related changes occur in both the peripheral and central nervous system, yet little is known about the influence of chronic pain on pain sensitivity in older persons. The aim of this study was to investigate pain sensitivity in elders with chronic neck pain compared to healthy elders. Methods Thirty elderly women with chronic neck pain and 30 controls were recruited. Measures of pain sensitivity included pressure pain thresholds, heat/cold pain thresholds and suprathreshold hea...

  13. [Update on current care guidelines. Neck pain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Neck pain is very common. Age, female gender, obesity, and several physical and psychological work related factors increase the risk while physical activity appears to decrease it. Non-specific neck pain is most common but serious or specific illness must be ruled out and neural compression identified. Patients are encouraged to remain active and improve their ergonomics. Acute neck pain often disappears without any special treatment. Paracetamol is the primary pain medication. Multidisciplinary treatment is recommended if disabling pain has lasted for two months, and intensive muscle exercises in chronic neck pain. Progressive muscle weakness and myelopathy indicate a surgical assessment.

  14. Association of neck pain, disability and neck pain during maximal effort with neck muscle strength and range of movement in women with chronic non-specific neck pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ylinen, Jari; Takala, Esa-Pekka; Kautiainen, Hannu; Nykänen, Matti; Häkkinen, Arja; Pohjolainen, Timo; Karppi, Sirkka-Liisa; Airaksinen, Olavi

    2004-10-01

    Several studies have reported lower neck muscle strength in patients with chronic neck pain compared to healthy controls. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the association between the severity of neck pain and disability with neck strength and range of movement in women suffering from chronic neck pain. One hundred and seventy-nine female office workers with chronic neck pain were selected to the study. The outcome was assessed by the self-rating questionnaires on neck pain (visual analogue scale, Vernon's disability index, Neck pain and disability index) and by measures of the passive range of movement (ROM) and maximal isometric neck muscle strength. No statistically significant correlation was found between perceived neck pain and the disability indices and the maximal isometric neck strength and ROM measures. However, the pain values reported during the strength tests were inversely correlated with the results of strength tests (r=-0.24 to -0.46), showing that pain was associated with decreased force production. About two-thirds of the patients felt pain during test efforts. Pain may prevent full effort during strength tests and hence the production of maximal force. Thus in patients with chronic neck pain the results do not always describe true maximal strength, but rather the patients' ability to bear strain, which may be considerably influenced by their painful condition. The results of the present study suggest that rehabilitation in cases of chronic neck pain should aim at raising tolerance to mechanical strain.

  15. Acute Neck Pain in General Practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.J. Vos (Kees)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractWe performed a prospective cohort study with one-year follow-up of patients with acute neck pain in general practice. Patients above 18 years of age consulting their GP for non-specific acute neck pain lasting no longer than six weeks were invited to participate. Self-administered quest

  16. Chronic Neck Pain and Cervicogenic Headaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Frank L.; Schofferman, Jerome

    2003-11-01

    Chronic axial neck pain and cervicogenic headache are common problems, and there have been significant advances in the understanding of the etiology and treatment of each. The severity and duration of pain drives the process. For patients who have had slight to moderate pain that has been present for less than 6 months and have no significant motor loss, strength training of anterior, posterior, and interscapular muscle groups coupled with body mechanics training is prescribed. After 8 weeks, if the patient is better, exercises are continued at home or in a gym. If the patient is not better, physical therapy is continued for up to 8 more weeks. In patients with motor loss or severe pain, radiographs and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) should be ordered at the initial visit. In patients with slight to moderate pain who are not better by 4 to 6 months, plain radiographs of the neck and MRI should be ordered. Based on the results, a spinal injection is usually prescribed. If MRI reveals spinal stenosis of the central or lateral canal, or a disc herniation, an epidural corticosteroid injection should be ordered. If the epidural provides good relief, the patient can be referred for more aggressive physical therapy and repeat the epidural as needed up to a maximum of three times. If there is no pathology within the canal, medial branch blocks and intra-articular steroid injections can be ordered based on the joints that are most tender or where disc space narrowing is greatest, or MRI or radiographs are recommended. If there is excellent relief from the medial branch block and joint injections, repeat when the steroids wear off. If there is good relief again, but pain recurs, medial branch radiofrequency neurotomy is recommended. For patients with one or two level disc degeneration that has not responded, a psychologic evaluation and discography is recommended. If there are no significant psychologic abnormalities, and one or two (rarely three) painful discs, surgical

  17. Non-specific neck pain in preadolescent to adolescent populations

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Neck pain is a common health problem globally. In addition to individual suffering, it causes a huge burden on societies. Some evidence suggests that neck pain in adolescence predicts frequent neck symptoms also in adulthood. A steady increase in prevalence of frequent and persistent neck pain among Finnish adolescents was observed in the 1990s, which might predict an increasing amount of adults with chronic neck pain in the near future. Thus, better understanding neck pain in children and ad...

  18. Chronic neck pain and masticatory dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catanzariti, Jean-François; Debuse, Thierry; Duquesnoy, Bernard

    2005-12-01

    Chronic nonspecific neck pain is a common problem in rheumatology and may resist conventional treatment. Pathophysiological links exist between the cervical spine and masticatory system. Occlusal disorders may cause neck pain and may respond to dental treatment. The estimated prevalence of occlusal disorders is about 45%, with half the cases being due to functional factors. Minor repeated masticatory dysfunction (MD) with craniocervical asymmetry is the most common clinical picture. The pain is usually located in the suboccipital region and refractory to conventional treatment. The time pattern may be suggestive, with nocturnal arousals or triggering by temporomandibular movements. MD should be strongly suspected in patients with at least two of the following: history of treated or untreated MD, unilateral temporomandibular joint pain and clicking, lateral deviation during mouth opening, and limitation of mouth opening (less than three fingerbreadths). Rheumatologists should consider MD among causes of neck pain, most notably in patients with abnormal craniocervical posture, signs linking the neck pain to mastication, and clinical manifestations of MD. Evidence suggesting that MD may cause neck pain has been published. However, studies are needed to determine whether treatment of MD can relieve neck pain.

  19. Management of patients with neck pain

    OpenAIRE

    E. A. Chechet; V. A. Parfenov

    2016-01-01

    Neck pain (cervicalgia) occupies one of the leading places among the reasons for outpatient visits, 75% of people have experienced neck pain at least once in their lives. In most cases, neck pain regresses; however, it recurs in almost one half of patients. The paper gives data on the risk factors, mechanisms, course, and prognosis of cervicalgia. It discusses the issues of differential diagnosis, examination, and approaches to treating this condition in these patients. Nonsteroidal anti-infl...

  20. Neck pain and disability due to neck pain: what is the relation?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fejer, René; Hartvigsen, Jan

    2008-01-01

    Pain and disability are interrelated, but the relationship between pain and disability is not straightforward. The objective of this study was to investigate the relationship between neck pain (NP) intensity, NP duration, and disability based on the population-based 'Funen Neck and Chest Pain......' study. Pain intensity was measured using 11-box numerical rating scales, pain duration was measured using the Standardized Nordic Questionnaire, and disability was measured by the Copenhagen Neck Functional Disability Scale. Spearman rank correlation coefficients and logistic regression analyses were...... used to measure correlations and strength of associations between pain intensity, pain duration, and disability given domain specific characteristics (socioeconomic, health and physical, comorbidity, and variables related to consequences of NP). Neck pain was very common, but mainly mild and did...

  1. Postural Correction in Persons with Neck Pain (II. Integrated Electromyography of the Upper Trapezius in Three Simulated Neck Positions).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enwemeka, C S; Bonet, I M; Ingle, J A; Prudhithumrong, S; Ogbahon, F E; Gbenedio, N A

    1986-01-01

    In the previous paper (Enwemeka, Bonet, Ingle, et al. 8:235-239, 1986) we showed that patients with neck pain and spasm of the upper trapezius often assume a forward head position, and that two neck positions, axial extension, and neutral neck position are frequently used by physical therapists to correct this faulty neck posture. Because there is no scientific basis for recommending either of the two corrective neck positions, we simulated the three neck positions in 10 normal adults and compared the integrated electromyography (IEMG) of the upper trapezius to determine if the muscle shows less activity in any of the two corrective positions. The results showed significantly less IEMG of the upper trapezius in each of the two corrective neck positions than in the faulty neck position (p 0.10). The implications and limitations of these findings are discussed along with suggestions for future studies. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 1986;8(5):240-242.

  2. Epidemiology, diagnosis, and treatment of neck pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Steven P

    2015-02-01

    Neck pain is the fourth leading cause of disability, with an annual prevalence rate exceeding 30%. Most episodes of acute neck pain will resolve with or without treatment, but nearly 50% of individuals will continue to experience some degree of pain or frequent occurrences. History and physical examination can provide important clues as to whether the pain is neuropathic or mechanical and can also be used to identify "red flags" that may signify serious pathology, such as myelopathy, atlantoaxial subluxation, and metastases. Magnetic resonance imaging is characterized by a high prevalence of abnormal findings in asymptomatic individuals but should be considered for cases involving focal neurologic symptoms, pain refractory to conventional treatment, and when referring a patient for interventional treatment. Few clinical trials have evaluated treatments for neck pain. Exercise treatment appears to be beneficial in patients with neck pain. There is some evidence to support muscle relaxants in acute neck pain associated with muscle spasm, conflicting evidence for epidural corticosteroid injections for radiculopathy, and weak positive evidence for cervical facet joint radiofrequency denervation. In patients with radiculopathy or myelopathy, surgery appears to be more effective than nonsurgical therapy in the short term but not in the long term for most people.

  3. Prevalence of neck pain in computer operators

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: Persisting neck pain is common in society, especially in office-workers. Although, neck pain is common source of disability, little is known about its prevalence and course. The bulk of literature available on this problem is in west with few studies done in an Indian setup. India is a middle-income developing country. The importance of this kind of studies becomes more obvious when it is considered that some reports indicate that...

  4. Acupuncture for patients with chronic neck pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witt, Claudia M; Jena, Susanne; Brinkhaus, Benno; Liecker, Bodo; Wegscheider, Karl; Willich, Stefan N

    2006-11-01

    Acupuncture is widely used by patients with neck pain, but there is a lack of information about its effectiveness in routine medical care. The aim was to investigate the effectiveness of acupuncture in addition to routine care in patients with chronic neck pain compared to treatment with routine care alone. We performed a randomized controlled multicentre trial plus non-randomized cohort in general practices in Germany. 14,161 patients with chronic neck pain (duration >6 months). Patients were randomly allocated to an acupuncture group or a control group receiving no acupuncture. Patients in the acupuncture group received up to 15 acupuncture sessions over three months. Patients who did not consent to randomization received acupuncture treatment. All subjects were allowed to receive usual medical care in addition to study treatment. Neck pain and disability (NPAD Scale by Wheeler) after three months. Of 14,161 patients (mean age 50.9+/-13.1 years, 68% female) 1880 were randomized to acupuncture and 1886 to control, and 10,395 included into the non-randomized acupuncture group. At three months, neck pain and disability improved by 16.2 (SE: 0.4) to 38.3 (SE: 0.4); and by 3.9 (SE: 0.4) to 50.5 (SE: 0.4), difference 12.3 (pacupuncture and control group, respectively. Treatment success was essentially maintained through six months. Non-randomized patients had more severe symptoms at baseline and showed higher neck pain and disability improvement compared to randomized patients. Treatment with acupuncture added to routine care in patients with chronic neck pain was associated with improvements in neck pain and disability compared to treatment with routine care alone.

  5. Sex differences in heritability of neck Pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fejer, René; Hartvigsen, Jan; Kyvik, Kirsten Ohm

    2006-01-01

    Experimental studies have suggested biological factors as a possible explanation for gender disparities in perception of pain. Recently, heritability of liability to neck pain (NP) has been found to be statistically significantly larger in women compared to men. However, no studies have been...

  6. Manipulation or Mobilisation for Neck Pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Gross; J. Miller; J. D'Sylva; S.J. Burnie; C.H. Goldsmith; N. Graham; T. Haines; G. Brønfort; J.L. Hoving

    2010-01-01

    Background Manipulation and mobilisation are often used, either alone or combined with other treatment approaches, to treat neck pain. Objectives To assess if manipulation or mobilisation improves pain, function/disability, patient satisfaction, quality of life, and global perceived effect in adults

  7. [Unilateral atypical neck pain in Eagle syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lonka, Matilde Mia; Schousboe, Lars Peter

    2012-04-30

    This article is an introduction to Eagle syndrome as a differential diagnosis in patients with lateral neck pain, a symptom, which is often difficult to diagnose and where the accepted treatment covers a variety of forms. This was the case for a 51 year-old man with lateral neck pain and a crunchy sensation/sound when he turned his head. After years of pain, the right examination and a computed tomography finally suggested Eagle syndrome. The patient had severe symptoms and was treated with an operation by which part of the ossificated stylohyoid ligament was removed. The operation relieved him of all his symptoms.

  8. Prevalence of neck pain in computer operators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S A Shah

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction: Persisting neck pain is common in society, especially in office-workers. Although, neck pain is common source of disability, little is known about its prevalence and course. The bulk of literature available on this problem is in west with few studies done in an Indian setup. India is a middle-income developing country. The importance of this kind of studies becomes more obvious when it is considered that some reports indicate that the greatest increase in the prevalence of musculo-skeletal disorders in the next decade will be in middle-/low-income countries. Aims & objectives: The Primary aim of this research was to study the prevalence of neck pain in computer operators. Methodology: Study design: Cross Sectional Study. Sampling technique: Simple Random Sampling. Study subject: They should be working on computer for at least 3 hours / day or 15 hours/week, in current job for at least past 6 months & should be willing to participate in the study. Technique: Study was approved from the Institutional Ethics Committee. Informed consent was taken prior to data collection. Data were collected from 700 subjects via structured mailed questionnaire which included individual variables & work related variables. Conclusions: Prevalence of neck pain was found to be 47%. The study shows that neck pain is affected by individual variables and work related variables.

  9. Are People With Whiplash-Associated Neck Pain Different from People With Nonspecific Neck Pain?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anstey, Ricci; Kongsted, Alice; Kamper, Steven

    2016-01-01

    Study Design Secondary analysis of a prospective cohort study with cross sectional and longitudinal analyses. Background The clinical importance of a history of whiplash associated disorder (WAD) in people with neck pain remains uncertain. Objective To compare people with WAD to people with non......-specific neck pain, in terms of their baseline characteristics, and pain and disability outcomes over 1 year. Methods Consecutive patients with neck pain presenting to a secondary care spine centre answered a comprehensive self-report questionnaire and underwent a physical examination. Patients were classified...... into either WAD or non-specific neck pain groups. We compared the outcomes of baseline characteristics of the 2 groups, as well as pain intensity and activity limitation at 6 and 12-month follow-up. Results 2578 participants were included in the study. Of these 488 (19%) were classified as having WAD...

  10. Neck muscle function in violinists/violists with and without neck pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinmetz, Anke; Claus, Andrew; Hodges, Paul W; Jull, Gwendolen A

    2016-04-01

    Neck pain is associated with changes in neuromuscular control of cervical muscles. Violin and viola playing requires good function of the flexor muscles to stabilize the instrument. This study investigated the flexor muscle behaviour in violin/viola players with and without neck pain using the craniocervical flexion test (CCFT). In total, 12 violin/viola players with neck pain, 21 violin/viola players without neck pain in the preceding 12 weeks and 21 pain-free non-musicians were included. Activity of the sternocleidomastoid muscles (SCM) was measured with surface electromyography (EMG) during the CCFT. Violin/viola players with neck pain displayed greater normalised SCM EMG amplitudes during CCFT than the pain-free musicians and non-musicians (P neck pain in violinists/violists is associated with altered behaviour of the superficial neck flexor muscles consistent with neck pain, despite the specific use of the deep and superficial neck flexors during violin playing.

  11. Bilateral experimental neck pain reorganize axioscapular muscle coordination and pain sensitivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Steffan Wittrup; Hirata, Rogerio Pessoto; Graven-Nielsen, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Neck pain is a large clinical problem where reorganized trunk and axioscapular muscle activities have been hypothesised contributing to pain persistence and pain hypersensitivity. This study investigated the effects of bilateral experimental neck pain on trunk and axioscapular muscle ...

  12. Management of patients with neck pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. A. Chechet

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Neck pain (cervicalgia occupies one of the leading places among the reasons for outpatient visits, 75% of people have experienced neck pain at least once in their lives. In most cases, neck pain regresses; however, it recurs in almost one half of patients. The paper gives data on the risk factors, mechanisms, course, and prognosis of cervicalgia. It discusses the issues of differential diagnosis, examination, and approaches to treating this condition in these patients. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are most effective in treating patients with acute cervicalgia. Therapeutic exercises and manual therapy are indicated in patients with chronic cervicalgia. There is evidence on the efficacy and safety of meloxicam for the management of acute and chronic cervicalgia.

  13. Acute Neck Pain in General Practice

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    textabstractWe performed a prospective cohort study with one-year follow-up of patients with acute neck pain in general practice. Patients above 18 years of age consulting their GP for non-specific acute neck pain lasting no longer than six weeks were invited to participate. Self-administered questionnaires were collected from patients at baseline and after 6, 12, 26 and 52 weeks. 187 patients were included and we have follow-up data of 138 patients (74%). After one-year 47% still reported ne...

  14. Respiratory weakness in patients with chronic neck pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitriadis, Zacharias; Kapreli, Eleni; Strimpakos, Nikolaos; Oldham, Jacqueline

    2013-06-01

    Respiratory muscle strength is one parameter that is currently proposed to be affected in patients with chronic neck pain. This study was aimed at examining whether patients with chronic neck pain have reduced respiratory strength and with which neck pain problems their respiratory strength is associated. In this controlled cross-sectional study, 45 patients with chronic neck pain and 45 healthy well-matched controls were recruited. Respiratory muscle strength was assessed through maximal mouth pressures. The subjects were additionally assessed for their pain intensity and disability, neck muscle strength, endurance of deep neck flexors, neck range of movement, forward head posture and psychological states. Paired t-tests showed that patients with chronic neck pain have reduced Maximal Inspiratory (MIP) (r = 0.35) and Maximal Expiratory Pressures (MEP) (r = 0.39) (P Neck muscle strength (r > 0.5), kinesiophobia (r neck pain and disability (r Neck muscle strength was the only predictor that remained as significant into the prediction models of MIP and MEP. It can be concluded that patients with chronic neck pain present weakness of their respiratory muscles. This weakness seems to be a result of the impaired global and local muscle system of neck pain patients, and psychological states also appear to have an additional contribution. Clinicians are advised to consider the respiratory system of patients with chronic neck pain during their usual assessment and appropriately address their treatment.

  15. The Funen Neck and Chest Pain study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fejer, René; Hartvigsen, Jan; Kyvik, Kirsten Ohm

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe the Funen Neck and Chest Pain (FNCP) study and carry out a comprehensive non-response analysis of the quality of the survey. METHODS: The FNCP questionnaire was sent out to 7000 randomly selected individuals aged 20-71 years living in Funen County, Denmark. A full description...

  16. Prevention of flight-related neck pain in military aircrew

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Oord, M.H.A.H.

    2012-01-01

    Military pilots and rear aircrew members are occupations with several occupational exposures that might cause neck pain. In addition to the negative impact of neck pain on health, safety is one of the main concerns for the military aviation, because neck pain may interfere with flying performance. I

  17. A 66-year-old man with neck pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaynstein, Dayna

    2017-03-01

    Neck pain is a fairly common complaint among patients in the ED. The differential diagnosis is broad, from musculoskeletal causes to potentially life-threatening causes. Providers need to have a good understanding of when the complaint of neck pain requires more diagnostic investigation, even in a patient with chronic neck pain.

  18. Short Term Effects of Mobilization Techniques on Neck Pain and Deep Neck Flexor Muscle Endurance in Patients with Mechanical Chronic Neck Pain

    OpenAIRE

    Kılınç, Hasan Erkan; Harput, Gülcan; Baltacı, Gül; İnce, Deniz İnal

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of the study was to investigate short term effects of cervical and scapular mobilization techniques on neck pain and deep cervical muscles endurance in chronical mechanical neck pain patients. Methods: 22 chronical mechanic neck pain patients four male 18 female (mean age: mean±sd 35.59± 15.85) were included. Before treatment, neck pain level (visual analog scale) and deep neck flexor muscles endurance (in supine position with digital chronometer) of all patients were eval...

  19. Prevalence of cervical facet joint pain in chronic neck pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manchikanti, Laxmaiah; Singh, Vijay; Rivera, Jose; Pampati, Vidyasagar

    2002-07-01

    Neck pain is considered to be one of the most common chronic pain conditions in modern society. Various structures identified as capable of transmitting pain in the cervical spine include facet joints, intervertebral discs, nerve root dura, ligaments, fascia, and muscles. The prevalence of cervical facet joint pain in patients with chronic pain after whiplash has been determined as 54% to 60%. However, the prevalence of chronic cervical facet joint pain has not yet been determined in a heterogenous population or in patients with cervical spine pain of idiopathic origin in a controlled environment. This study evaluated 160 patients seen in one interventional pain management practice in a non-university setting. Cervical facet joints were investigated with diagnostic blocks using lidocaine 1% preservative free initially, followed by bupivacaine 0.25%, usually 2 to 4 weeks apart. The study population consisted of 76 women and 30 men aged 43 +/- 13 years of age (mean +/- SD). Mode of onset of neck pain was determined as following a traumatic incident in 48% of the patients, whereas it was with gradual onset without an identifiable specific incident in the remaining 55 patients (52%). Eighty-one or 70% of the patients (70%) reported a definite response to lidocaine blocks. Confirmatory blocks with bupivacaine were performed in 81 patients with 64 patients with 60% of the total sample, or 79%, of the lidocaine-positive group reporting definite response with improvement in their pain. Thus, a prevalence rate of facet joint pain in chronic neck pain was determined to be 60% (95% CI, 50%-70%), with a false positive rate of controlled diagnostic blocks of 40% (95% CI, 34%-46%).

  20. Analysis of deep tissue hypersensitivity to pressure pain in professional pianists with insidious mechanical neck pain

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background The aim of this study was to investigate whether pressure pain hyperalgesia is a feature of professional pianists suffering from neck pain as their main playing-related musculoskeletal disorder. Methods Twenty-three active expert pianists, 6 males and 17 females (age: 36 ± 12 years) with insidious neck pain and 23 pianists, 9 males and 14 females (age: 38 ± 10 years) without neck pain the previous year were recruited. A numerical pain rate scale, Neck Disability Index, han...

  1. Quality of life and neck pain in nurses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucy Joslin

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To investigate the association between neck pain and psychological stress in nurses. Material and Methods: Nurses from the Avon Orthopaedic Centre completed 2 questionnaires: the Short Form-36 (SF-36 and 1 exploring neck pain and associated psychological stress. Results: Thirty four nurses entered the study (68% response. Twelve (35.3% had current neck pain, 13 (38.2% reported neck pain within the past year and 9 (26.5% had no neck pain. Subjects with current neck pain had significantly lower mental health (47.1 vs. 70.4; p = 0.002, physical health (60.8 vs. 76.8; p = 0.010 and overall SF-36 scores (56.8 vs. 74.9; p = 0.003. Five (41.7% subjects with current neck pain and 5 (38.5% subjects with neck pain in the previous year attributed it to psychological stress. Conclusions: Over 1/3 of nurses have symptomatic neck pain and significantly lower mental and physical health scores. Managing psychological stress may reduce neck pain, leading to improved quality of life for nurses, financial benefits for the NHS, and improved patient care.

  2. Detecting relevant changes and responsiveness of Neck Pain and Disability Scale and Neck Disability Index

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reneman, Michiel F.; Geertzen, Jan H. B.; Jorritsma, Wim; Knol-de Vries, Grietje; Dijkstra, Pieter U.

    2012-01-01

    To investigate relevant change on the Neck Pain and Disability Scale (NPAD) and Neck Disability Index (NDI) and which questionnaire is the most responsive in patients with non-specific chronic neck pain (CNP). Seventy-six patients with non-specific CNP in an outpatient tertiary rehabilitation settin

  3. Characteristics of a new episode of neck pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leaver, Andrew M; Maher, Christopher G; McAuley, James H; Jull, Gwendolen A; Refshauge, Kathryn M

    2013-06-01

    We report on the demographic and clinical characteristics of patients seeking manual therapy care for a new episode of non-specific neck pain and report on characteristics associated with higher levels of pain and disability in these patients. Demographic and clinical data were collected from patients who enrolled in a clinical trial of manipulation for neck pain. A profile of these patients was formulated using descriptive statistics. Multivariate linear regression models were used to describe the relationship between patient characteristics and severity of pain and disability. Patients with a new episode of non-specific neck pain reported pain intensity of 6.1 ± 2.0 (mean ± SD) on a 0-10 numerical scale and disability scores of 15.7 ± 7.4 (Neck Disability Index/50). Sixty-three percent had a prior history of neck pain. Concomitant symptoms were highly prevalent including upper limb pain (80%), headache (65%), upper back pain (64%), lower back pain (39%), dizziness (31%) and nausea (23%). There was a strong association between pain intensity and disability (p pain was also associated with not having concomitant back pain (p = 0.01) More severe disability was also associated with poor general health (p neck pain, and deemed suitable for treatment with neck manipulation reported moderately high intensity pain and disability with widespread and frequent concomitant symptoms.

  4. Physiotherapy for Chronic Neck Pain: Evaluation of a biopsychosocial approach

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Neck pain is a common complaint that causes substantial morbidity in western countries. Reported prevalence in the general population ranges from 9.5% to 22%, and the 12-month (point) prevalence estimates ranges from 30% to 50%. It is suggested that two thirds of individuals may at least once in their lifetime experience neck pain; it is more often reported by women than men. Patients with neck complaints generally also complain of neck stiffness and reduced mobil...

  5. Neck Pain in Primary Care: Prognosis and methodology

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    textabstractNeck pain is one of the most common musculoskeletal complaints in adults in the general population, with an estimated point prevalence of 20.6-22.2% and a 1-year prevalence of 31.4-35.6%. About half of those who experience neck pain consult their general practitioner (GP) for this complaint. In daily practice this means that a GP is consulted about five times a week for an episode of neck pain. The risk of developing neck pain is highest in women and in people of middle age (40-49...

  6. A rare differential diagnosis to occupational neck pain: bilateral stylohyoid syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Chronic neck pain is widely prevalent and a common source of disability in the working-age population. Etiology of chronic neck pain includes neck sprain, mechanical or muscular neck pain, myofascial pain syndrome, postural neck pain as well as pain due to degenerative changes. We report the case of a 42 year old secretary, complaining about a longer history of neck pain and limited movement of the cervical spine. Surprisingly, the adequate radiologic examination revealed a bilateral...

  7. Analysis of deep tissue hypersensitivity to pressure pain in professional pianists with insidious mechanical neck pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linari-Melfi Marcela

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of this study was to investigate whether pressure pain hyperalgesia is a feature of professional pianists suffering from neck pain as their main playing-related musculoskeletal disorder. Methods Twenty-three active expert pianists, 6 males and 17 females (age: 36 ± 12 years with insidious neck pain and 23 pianists, 9 males and 14 females (age: 38 ± 10 years without neck pain the previous year were recruited. A numerical pain rate scale, Neck Disability Index, hand size and pressure pain thresholds (PPT were assessed bilaterally over the C5-C6 zygapophyseal joint, deltoid muscle, the second metacarpal and the tibialis anterior muscle in a blinded design. Results The results showed that PPT levels were significantly decreased bilaterally over the second metacarpal and tibialis anterior muscles (P 0.10, in pianists with neck pain as compared to healthy pianists. Pianists with neck pain had a smaller (P Conclusions Our findings revealed pressure pain hypersensitivity over distant non-symptomatic distant points but not over the symptomatic areas in pianists suffering from neck pain. In addition, pianists with neck pain also had smaller hand size than those without neck pain. Future studies are needed to further determine the relevance of these findings in the clinical course of neck pain as playing-related musculoskeletal disorder in professional pianists.

  8. Mechanical pain sensitivity and the severity of chronic neck pain and disability are not modulated across the menstrual cycle

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Despite the high prevalence of neck pain among women, menstrual effects on regional pain outcomes have not been investigated in this clinical population. This study evaluated menstrual effects on mechanical pain sensitivity (Pressure Pain Threshold; PPT), neck pain intensity (Numeric Pain Rating Scale; NPRS) and neck-related disability (Neck Disability Index; NDI) in 22 normally menstruating (NM) and 17 hormonal contraceptive (HC) users with chronic neck pain. Sex hormones, PPT, and NDI were ...

  9. Basilar artery aneurysm case presented with neck pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uygar Utku

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Neck pain related with disorders of the brain and neck vascular structures is not rare but importance was attached to a condition that is often overlooked. Tension as a sudden onset, radiating to the nape, the neck pain becomes unbearable and within seconds the raging 51-year-old female patient with aneurysm at the distal end of basilar artery was found. Case, the only sign of neck pain with unruptured basilar artery aneurysm is presented in terms of raising awareness on the subject.

  10. Neck Pain in Primary Care: Prognosis and methodology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.M. Schellingerhout (Jasper Mattijs)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractNeck pain is one of the most common musculoskeletal complaints in adults in the general population, with an estimated point prevalence of 20.6-22.2% and a 1-year prevalence of 31.4-35.6%. About half of those who experience neck pain consult their general practitioner (GP) for this compla

  11. DOES ELECTROMYOGRAPHY BIOFEEDBACK TRAINING REDUCE WORK-RELATED NECK PAIN?

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to investigate the use of Electromyography (EMG) biofeedback training in dental professionals to reduce upper trapezius muscle tension and thereby to reduce the work related neck pain. By reducing muscle activity in the neck and shoulder postural stabilizing muscles, EMG biofeedback training would be an effective mode of treatment in dental professionals for the management of work related neck pain. Subjects and Methods: This RCT included a total of 50...

  12. Neck Pain and Disability Scale and Neck Disability Index : validity of Dutch language versions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jorritsma, Wim; Dijkstra, Pieter U.; Geertzen, Jan H. B.; Knol-de Vries, Grietje; Reneman, Michiel F.

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the validity of the Neck Pain and Disability Scale Dutch Language Version (NPAD-DLV) and the Neck Disability Index (NDI)-DLV. NPAD-DLV, NDI-DLV, Short-Form-36 Health Survey (SF-36)-DLV, visual analog scale (VAS)(pain) and VAS(disability) were administered to 112 patients with non-spec

  13. Neck pain and anxiety do not always go together

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Myburgh, Corrie; Roessler, Kirsten K; Larsen, Anders H

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT: Chronic pain and psychosocial distress are generally thought to be associated in chronic musculoskeletal disorders such as non-specific neck pain. However, it is unclear whether a raised level of anxiety is necessarily a feature of longstanding, intense pain amongst patient and general...... population sub-groups. In a cohort of 70 self-selected female, non-specific neck pain sufferers, we observed relatively high levels of self-reported pain of 4.46 (measured on the 11 point numerical pain rating scale (NRS-101)) and a longstanding duration of symptoms (156 days/year). However, the mean anxiety...

  14. Predictors of pain among patients with head and neck cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuman, Andrew G; Terrell, Jeffrey E; Light, Emily; Wolf, Gregory T; Bradford, Carol R; Chepeha, Douglas; Jiang, Yunyun; McLean, Scott; Ghanem, Tamer A; Duffy, Sonia A

    2012-12-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine predictors of pain 1 year after the diagnosis of head and neck cancer. DESIGN Prospective, multisite cohort study. SETTING Three academically affiliated medical centers. PATIENTS The study population comprised 374 previously untreated patients with carcinoma of the upper aerodigestive tract. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES Participants were surveyed before treatment and 1 year thereafter. Multivariate analyses were conducted to determine predictors of the 36-Item Short-Form Instrument (SF-36) bodily pain score 1 year after diagnosis. RESULTS The mean SF-36 bodily pain score at 1 year was 65, compared with 61 at the time of diagnosis (P = .004), and 75, the population norm (lower scores indicate worse pain). Variables independently associated with pain included pretreatment pain score (P neck dissection (P = .001), feeding tube (P = .05), xerostomia (P pain medication (P neck cancer pain and current smoking and problem drinking did not reach significance (P = .07 and P = .08, respectively). CONCLUSIONS Aggressive pain management may be indicated for patients with head and neck cancer who undergo neck dissections, complain of xerostomia, require feeding tubes, and have medical comorbidities. Treatment of modifiable risk factors such as depression, poor sleep quality, tobacco use, and alcohol abuse may also reduce pain and improve quality of life among patients with head and neck cancer.

  15. The burden of neck pain: its meaning for persons with neck pain and healthcare providers, explored by concept mapping

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To empirically define the concept of burden of neck pain. The lack of a clear understanding of this construct from the perspective of persons with neck pain and care providers hampers adequate measurement of this burden. An additional aim was to compare the conceptual model obtained with the frequently used Neck Disability Index (NDI). Methods Concept mapping, combining qualitative (nominal group technique and group consensus) and quantitative research methods (cluster analysis and mu...

  16. Back and neck pain : factors of importance for the prognosis

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Back pain and neck pain are very common and among the most frequent causes of sick-leave and disability pension, thereby greatly affecting the individual and the community. This stresses the need for prognostic research regarding these conditions. Aim: The main aim of the present work was to study prognostic factors, including manual therapy, for back and neck pain. The specific aims were, to investigate the influence of regular leisure physical activity and the body mass index (BMI) on...

  17. Relationships between sagittal postures of thoracic and cervical spine, presence of neck pain, neck pain severity and disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Kwok Tung; Cheung, Ka Yuen; Chan, Kwok Bun; Chan, Man Him; Lo, King Yuen; Chiu, Thomas Tai Wing

    2010-10-01

    This was a cross-sectional correlation study to explore the relationships between sagittal postures of thoracic and cervical spine, presence of neck pain, neck pain severity and disability. Moreover, the reliability of the photographic measurement of the sagittal posture of thoracic and cervical spine was investigated. Forty-five subjects without neck pain and forty-seven subjects with neck pain were recruited. Using a photographic method, the sagittal thoracic and cervical postures were measured by the upper thoracic and the craniovertebral (CV) angles respectively. The Numeric Pain Rating Scale (NPRS) and Chinese version Northwick Park Neck Pain Questionnaire (NPQ) were used to assess neck pain severity and disability. The upper thoracic angle was positively correlated (r(s) = 0.63, p angle was negatively correlated (r(s) = -0.56, p upper thoracic angle was negatively correlated with the CV angles (r(s) = -0.62, p angle, the upper thoracic angle was moderately correlated with the neck pain severity (r(s) = 0.43, p = 0.01) and disability (r(s) = 0.44, p = 0.02). The upper thoracic angle (OR = 1.37, p angle (OR = 0.86, p = 0.04).

  18. Characteristics of visual disturbances reported by subjects with neck pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treleaven, Julia; Takasaki, Hiroshi

    2014-06-01

    Visual symptoms are often reported by patients with neck pain. The aim of the study was to report on the prevalence and most troublesome visual disturbances in subjects with neck pain. Seventy subjects with neck pain and seventy healthy control subjects answered questions about the presence and magnitude (/12) - product of frequency (0-4) and intensity (0-3) of each of 16 visual symptoms noted to be associated with neck pain and other possible causes. A visual complaint index (VCI) (/168) was generated from the sum of the magnitude rating of 14 significant symptoms. The neck pain group had significantly (P > 0.05) greater prevalence and magnitude of 14/16 visual complaints and VCI (mean 27.4) compared to control subjects (mean 6.2). The most prevalent symptoms were 'need to concentrate to read' (70%) and 'sensitivity to light' (58.6%). The least prevalent were 'double vision' (28.6%) and 'dizzy reading' (38.6%). The most troublesome symptoms (greatest magnitude) were 'need to concentrate to read' (3.4/12), 'visual fatigue' (3/12), 'difficulty judging distances' (2.1/12) and 'sensitivity to light' (2.1/12) while the least troublesome complaints were 'double vision' (0.5/12), 'red eyes' (1/12) and 'spots and words moving' (1/12). The characteristics of the visual symptoms were mostly consistent for those previously associated with neck pain. Subjects with traumatic neck pain had a significantly higher VCI compared to those with idiopathic neck pain. The results could help with differential diagnosis. The visual symptoms might be related to eye movement control disturbances in neck pain, however further research is required.

  19. Short Term Effects of Mobilization Techniques on Neck Pain and Deep Neck Flexor Muscle Endurance in Patients with Mechanical Chronic Neck Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kılınç, Hasan Erkan; Harput, Gülcan; Baltacı, Gül; İnce, Deniz İnal

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of the study was to investigate short term effects of cervical and scapular mobilization techniques on neck pain and deep cervical muscles endurance in chronical mechanical neck pain patients. Methods: 22 chronical mechanic neck pain patients four male 18 female (mean age: mean±sd 35.59± 15.85) were included. Before treatment, neck pain level (visual analog scale) and deep neck flexor muscles endurance (in supine position with digital chronometer) of all patients were evaluated. Cyriax cervical mobilization for 10 minutes and scapular mobilization for 10 repetition 10 sets were performed to patients as treatment protocol. After treatment, 24 hours after and a week after evaluations of neck pain and deep cervical muscles endurance were repeated. Results: Before treatment Neck pain Visual Analog Scale scores was 5.78±1.43 point, 2.80±1.99 point after treatment, 24 hours later 3.36±2.12 point, one week later 3.91±2.24 point. This alteration was found significant statistically (p<0.01). Before treatment deep cervical flexor muscle endurance score was 27.25±17.74 sec, after treatment 39.46±25.20 sec, 24 hours later 38.67±28.43 and one week later 40.11±27.82 sec. This alteration was also found significant statistically (p=0.01). Conclusion: Initially neck pain scores in our subjects decreased quickly, after 24 hours these scores increased but last scores were below first neck pain level in a week follow-up. Deep neck cervical flexor muscles test scores also increased quickly, after 24 hours later this scores were stable along a week. Mobilization techniques are effective methods on neck pain and endurance in chronical mechanic neck pain patients.

  20. Associations among temporomandibular disorders, chronic neck pain and neck pain disability in computer office workers: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bragatto, M M; Bevilaqua-Grossi, D; Regalo, S C H; Sousa, J D; Chaves, T C

    2016-05-01

    Neck pain is the most common musculoskeletal complaint among computer office workers. There are several reports about the coexistence of neck pain and temporomandibular disorders (TMD). However, there are no studies investigating this association in the context of work involving computers. The purpose of this study was to verify the association between TMD and neck pain in computer office workers. Fifty-two female computer workers who were divided into two groups: (i) those with self-reported chronic neck pain and disability (WNP) (n = 26) and (ii) those without self-reported neck pain (WONP) (n = 26), and a control group (CG) consisting of 26 women who did not work with computers participated in this study. Clinical assessments were performed to establish a diagnosis of TMD, and craniocervical mechanical pain was assessed using manual palpation and pressure pain threshold (PPT). The results of this study showed that the WNP group had a higher percentage of participants with TMD than the WONP group (42·30% vs. 23·07%, χ(2) = 5·70, P = 0·02). PPTs in all cervical sites were significantly lower in the groups WNP and WONP compared to the CG. Regression analysis revealed TMD, neck pain and work-related factors to be good predictors of disability (R(2) = 0·93, P neck disability in computer workers is explained by the association among neck pain, TMD and unfavourable workplace conditions. Consequently, this study attempted to emphasise the importance of considering work activity for minimising neck pain-related disability.

  1. Cervical biomechanics and neck pain of "head-spinning" breakdancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauther, M D; Piotrowski, M; Hussmann, B; Lendemans, S; Wedemeyer, C; Jaeger, M

    2014-05-01

    The cervical spine of breakdancers is at great risk due to reversed body loading during headspin manoeuvers. This study focused on the cervical biomechanics of breakdancers and a correlation with neck pain. A standardized interview and biomechanical testing of the cervical spine of 25 participants with "headspin" ability ages 16-34 years and an age-matched cohort of 25 participants without any cervical spine problems was conducted. Neck pain history, Neck Disability Index (NDI), cervical range of motion (CROM) and cervical torque were recorded. The "headspin" group reported significantly better subjective fitness, more cervical complaints, higher pain intensity, a longer history of neck pain and a worse NDI compared to the "normal" collective. The "headspin" group showed a 2-2.5 times higher rate of neck pain than the normal population, with increased cervical flexion (pcervical torque in all planes (p<0.001). The CROM showed a negative moderate to strong correlation with NDI, pain intensity and history of neck pain. Sports medicine practitioners should be aware of headspin maneuver accidents that pose the risk of fractures, dislocations and spinal cord injuries of breakdancers.

  2. Psychological Care, Patient Education, Orthotics, Ergonomics and Prevention Strategies for Neck Pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gross, Anita R; Kaplan, Faith; Huang, Stacey

    2013-01-01

    To conduct an overview on psychological interventions, orthoses, patient education, ergonomics, and 1⁰/2⁰ neck pain prevention for adults with acute-chronic neck pain.......To conduct an overview on psychological interventions, orthoses, patient education, ergonomics, and 1⁰/2⁰ neck pain prevention for adults with acute-chronic neck pain....

  3. Identifying and treating the causes of neck pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Ginger

    2014-05-01

    Future studies are needed to further understand the pathophysiology of mechanical neck pain. Robust scientific evidence is sparse on which noninvasive treatments are the most beneficial and how to better select patients for particular noninvasive or invasive treatments.

  4. The diagnosis and treatment of nonspecific neck pain and whiplash.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binder, A

    2007-03-01

    Nonspecific (simple) neck pain is the commonest cause of neck symptoms and results from postural and mechanical causes. It includes pain following whiplash injury provided there is no bony injury or objective neurological deficit. The anatomy of the cervical spine is described, with the degenerative changes that are seen in patients with nonspecific neck pain, but also occur with ageing. The poor correlation between the degree of degeneration and presence and severity of symptoms is noted. A lack of specific pathology is also a feature of whiplash. The epidemiology, clinical presentation, investigation, and complications of nonspecific neck pain are described with a discussion of the controversial aspects of natural history, prognosis and therapy. Chronic whiplash is very common in some countries, but nonexistent in other countries and the factors which might explain this difference are considered. There is a great need for better quality studies to explore pathogenesis, natural history and factors including therapy that influence outcome.

  5. Head and neck pain review: traditional and new perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, M H; Nelson, A J

    1996-10-01

    A variety of conditions are frequently associated with the occurrence of head and neck pain. The purposes of this review are: to describe the characteristics of several musculoskeletal, neurological, and systemic conditions frequently cited as possible causes of head and neck pain and to suggest a new technique for treating head and neck pain. The characteristics of musculoskeletal conditions, such as muscle spasm, tendinitis, trigger points, and joint inflammation, and their relationship to head and neck pain are considered. The features and clinical implications of neurologic conditions, such as atypical facial pain, trigeminal and glossopharyngeal neuralgia, reflex sympathetic dystrophy, and neurogenic inflammation, are also described. The distinguishing characteristics of headaches, including cluster, tension, chronic daily, rebound, posttraumatic, and postlumbar puncture, are detailed. This review also addresses the contributions of systemic disorders, such as osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis and the variants, and rheumatoid-related conditions, like dermatomyositis, temporal arteritis, Lyme's disease, and fibromyalgia, to head and neck pain. The results of a recent pilot study of the effectiveness of intraoral circulating ice water for resolving symptoms related to head and neck pain secondary to neurogenic inflammation are presented in this work. Ice water circulating through hollow metal tubes was placed intraorally for 15 minutes in the posterior maxillary area on 12 individuals with cervical pain and muscle spasm. In nine of these individuals, reduced cervical pain perception, upper trapezius electromyography signal reduction, and increased cervical range of motion was produced. Six out of 12 individuals had accompanying headache, which was reduced or eliminated in four cases. These findings suggest a strong trigemino-cervical relationship to neck pain and headache.

  6. Prevalence and Risk Factor of Neck Pain in Elderly Korean Community Residents

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Neck pain is a common musculoskeletal condition, which causes substantial medical cost. In Korea, prevalence of neck pain in community based population, especially in elderly subjects, has scarcely been reported. We evaluated the prevalence, the severity and the risk factors of neck pain in elderly Korean community residents. Data for neck pain were collected for 1,655 subjects from a rural farming community. The point, 6-months and cumulative lifetime prevalence of neck pain was obtained in ...

  7. Neck Pain and Disability Scale and the Neck Disability Index : reproducibility of the Dutch Language Versions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jorritsma, W; Knol-de Vries, Grietje; Geertzen, J.H.B.; Dijkstra, P.U.; Reneman, M.F

    2010-01-01

    The first aim of this study was to translate the Neck Pain and Disability Scale (NPAD) from English into Dutch producing the NPAD-Dutch Language Version (DLV). The second aim was to analyze test-retest reliability and agreement of the NPAD-DLV and the Neck Disability Index (NDI)-DLV. The NPAD was tr

  8. Effects of neck pain on reaching overhead and reading: a case–control study of long and short neck flexion

    OpenAIRE

    Constand, Marissa K; MacDermid, Joy C

    2013-01-01

    Background Reaching overhead and reading are tasks that many individuals encounter daily. The level of difficulty of these tasks increases if an individual has neck pain. This study determined the neck movement patterns during these two tasks by comparing neck flexion of individuals with and without neck pain. Methods This case control study used the portable video technology, Dartfish ProSuite 5.5 Video Software, to analyse neck flexion movement patterns. Healthy individuals and individuals ...

  9. Manual therapy and exercise for neck pain: A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Miller; A. Gross; J. D'Sylva; S.J. Burnie; C.H. Goldsmith; N. Graham; T. Haines; G. Brønfort; J.L. Hoving

    2010-01-01

    Manual therapy is often used with exercise to treat neck pain. This cervical overview group systematic review update assesses if manual therapy, including manipulation or mobilisation, combined with exercise improves pain, function/disability, quality of life, global perceived effect, and patient sa

  10. Experimental neck muscle pain impairs standing balance in humans

    CERN Document Server

    Vuillerme, Nicolas; 10.1007/s00221-008-1639-7

    2009-01-01

    Impaired postural control has been reported in patients with chronic neck pain of both traumatic and non-traumatic etiologies, but whether painful stimulation of neck muscle per se can affect balance control during quiet standing in humans remains unclear. The purpose of the present experiment was thus to investigate the effect of experimental neck muscle pain on standing balance in young healthy adults. To achieve this goal, 16 male university students were asked to stand upright as still as possible on a force platform with their eyes closed in two conditions of No pain and Pain of the neck muscles elicited by experimental painful electrical stimulation. Postural control and postural performance were assessed by the displacements of the center of foot pressure (CoP) and of the center of mass (CoM), respectively. The results showed increased CoP and CoM displacements variance, range, mean velocity, and mean and median frequencies in the Pain relative to the No pain condition. The present findings emphasize t...

  11. Pain education combined with neck- and aerobic training is more effective at relieving chronic neck pain than pain education alone - A preliminary randomized controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brage, K; Ris Hansen, Inge; Falla, D

    2015-01-01

    -shoulder exercises, balance and aerobic training) (INV), or pain education alone (CTRL). Effect on neck pain, function and Global Perceived Effect (GPE) were measured. Surface electromyography (EMG) was recorded from neck flexor and extensor muscles during performance of the Cranio-Cervical Flexion Test (CCFT...

  12. [Neck pain due to tendonitis of the longus colli muscle].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coebergh, Jan Adriaan; Koppen, Hille; van Gils, Ad P; de Bruijn, Bas F

    2010-01-01

    Two patients presented to Accidents and Emergency with severe neck pain: a 70-year-old woman with acute, severe neck pain, which had developed a few days after outpatient resection of her left lingual tonsil. The patient was suspected to have spondylodiscitis. The other patient, a 54-year-old woman, was referred with severe neck pain and suspected meningitis. In both women, the pain was diagnosed as acute calcifying tendonitis of the longus colli muscle. This benign condition can present to many different specialities. Both patients responded well to treatment with NSAIDs. Acute calcifying tendonitis of the longus colli muscle can be diagnosed using various imaging techniques, such as X-ray, CT or MRI imaging. Calcification on cervical CT or a high signal on T2-weighted MRI images of the longus colli muscle are pathognomonic of tendonitis. A correct diagnosis can prevent further invasive diagnostics and/or unnecessary treatment.

  13. Axial low back pain: one painful area--many perceptions and mechanisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matti Förster

    Full Text Available Axial low back pain can be considered as a syndrome with both nociceptive and neuropathic pain components (mixed-pain. Especially neuropathic pain comprises a therapeutic challenge in practical experience and may explain why pharmacotherapy in back pain is often disappointing for both the patient and the therapist. This survey uses epidemiological and clinical data on the symptomatology of 1083 patients with axial low back pain from a cross sectional survey (painDETECT. Objectives were (1 to estimate whether neuropathic pain contributes to axial low back pain and if so to what extent. (2 To detect subgroups of patients with typical sensory symptom profiles and to analyse their demographic data and co-morbidities. (3 To compare patients with and without prior intervertebral disc surgery (IVD. Neuropathic pain components could be detected in 12% of the entire cohort. Cluster analyses of these patients revealed five distinct subgroups of patients showing a characteristic sensory profile, i.e. a typical constellation and combination of symptoms. All subgroups occurred in relevant numbers and some showed distinct neuropathic characteristics while others showed nociceptive features. Post-IVD-surgery patients showed a tendency to score more "neuropathic" than patients without surgery (not statistically significant. Axial low back pain has a high prevalence of co-morbidities with implication on therapeutic aspects. From these data it can be concluded that sensory profiles based on descriptor severity may serve as a better predictor for therapy assessment than pain intensity or sole diagnosis alone. Standardized phenotyping of pain symptoms with easy tools may help to develop an individualized therapy leading to a higher success rate in pharmacotherapy of axial low back pain.

  14. Changes in proprioception and pain in patients with neck pain after upper thoracic manipulation

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Jinmo; Lee, Byoungkwon; Kim, Changbeom

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to conduct cervical stability training and upper thoracic manipulation for patients with chronic neck pain and then investigate the changes of cervical proprioception and pain. [Subjects and Methods] Subjects were 30 workers with mechanical neck pain, who were randomly divided into an upper thoracic manipulation group and a cervical stability training group. Upper thoracic manipulation after cervical stability training was conducted for the upper thorac...

  15. Level of self-reported neck/shoulder pain and biomechanical workload in cleaners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madeleine, Pascal; Søgaard, Karen; Holtermann, Andreas; Samani, Afshin

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the relation between self-reported pain, muscular activity and postural load during cleaning tasks. Eighteen cleaners performed usual cleaning tasks in both a laboratory and a lecture room. The level of perceived pain in the neck-shoulder region during the last 7 days was recorded. Bipolar surface electromyography (SEMG) was recorded bilaterally from upper trapezius and erector spinae muscles during cleaning. Root mean square (RMS) and permutation entropy (PE) values representing amplitude and complexity of SEMG time-series were estimated. A tri-axial accelerometer package was mounted on the low back (L5-S1) to measure postural changes during cleaning tasks. The 10th, 50th and 90th percentiles of the angular distributions were computed to characterize postures and movements. Pain tended to play a significant role on RMS of left/right trapezius and left erector spinae muscles (P≤0.08). Cleaners with low pain level exhibited higher muscular activity during cleaning. Pain played or tended to play a significant role on PE of left and right erector spinae muscles (P≤0.08). Pain played a significant role on the 10th, 50th and 90th percentile (Pflexion angle (side bending). The present study emphasizes biomechanical adaptations occurring in presence of neck-shoulder pain during cleaning tasks.

  16. Misconceived Retropharyngeal Calcific Tendinitis during Management of Myofascial Neck Pain Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Ji Youn; Lim, Jin Hun; Kim, Yong Seok; Kwon, Young Eun; Yu, Jae Yong; Lee, Jun Hak

    2016-01-01

    Differential diagnosis of posterior neck pain is very challenging based on symptoms and physical examination only. Retropharyngeal calcific tendinitis is a rare and frequently misdiagnosed entity in various causes of neck pain. It results from calcium hydroxyapatite deposition in the longus colli muscle which is characterized by severe neck pain, painful restriction of neck movement, dysphagia, and odynophagia. We herein report a case of a patient with acute retropharyngeal calcific tendinitis, who complained of posterior neck pain, initially diagnosed and treated as a myofascial neck pain syndrome.

  17. A randomised controlled trial comparing graded exercise treatment and usual physiotherapy for patients with non-specific neck pain (the GET UP neck pain trial).

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Evidence supports exercise-based interventions for the management of neck pain, however there is little evidence of its superiority over usual physiotherapy. This study investigated the effectiveness of a group neck and upper limb exercise programme (GET) compared with usual physiotherapy (UP) for patients with non-specific neck pain. A total of 151 adult patients were randomised to either GET or UP. The primary measure was the Northwick Park Neck pain Questionnaire (NPQ) score at six weeks, ...

  18. Bogus visual feedback alters movement-evoked pain onset in people with neck pain

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Pain is a protective perceptual response shaped by contextual, psychological and sensory inputs, particularly those that suggest danger to the body. Sensory cues suggesting that a vulnerable body part is moving towards a painful position, may credibly signal danger and thereby modulate pain . In this double-blind repeated-measures experiment, we used virtual reality to investigate whether manipulating visual-proprioceptive cues can alter movement-evoked pain, in 24 people with neck pain. W...

  19. Comparison of pain, kinesiophobia and quality of life in patients with low back and neck pain

    OpenAIRE

    Uluğ, Naime; Yakut, Yavuz; Alemdaroğlu, İpek; Yılmaz, Öznur

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to compare patients with low back and neck pain with respect to kinesiophobia, pain, and quality of life. [Subjects and Methods] Three-hundred patients with low back (mean age 43.2±11 years) and 300 with neck pain (mean age 42.8±10.2 years) were included in this study. Pain severity was evaluated by using the Short-Form McGill Pain Questionnaire, which includes a Visual Analogue Scale, quality of life by the Nottingham Health Profile, and kinesiophobia ...

  20. Therapeutic modalities in the management of nonspecific neck pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swenson, Rand S

    2003-08-01

    This article has surveyed several therapeutic modalities, including physical modalities, thermal modalities, electrical modalities, exercise therapy, behavioral therapy, education, and laser therapy. Of these, exercise, mobilization, and manipulation have the greatest support in the literature, whereas thermal treatments (including therapeutic ultrasound), and electrical therapies (including TENS) have little evidence of effectiveness and no evidence for more than a transient benefit. There is a need for well-controlled studies of educational programs and behavioral interventions specifically for patients with chronic neck pain, particularly because these interventions are often employed as part of a multimodal treatment program. Low-power laser treatment and magnetic therapy require some well-controlled studies before they can be recommended to neck pain patients or discarded as worthless interventions. Cervical traction and soft collars seem to be generally ineffective for nonspecific neck pain.

  1. DOES ELECTROMYOGRAPHY BIOFEEDBACK TRAINING REDUCE WORK-RELATED NECK PAIN?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Faisal.C.K

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose of this study is to investigate the use of Electromyography (EMG biofeedback training in dental professionals to reduce upper trapezius muscle tension and thereby to reduce the work related neck pain. By reducing muscle activity in the neck and shoulder postural stabilizing muscles, EMG biofeedback training would be an effective mode of treatment in dental professionals for the management of work related neck pain. Subjects and Methods: This RCT included a total of 50 dental professionals (29 males and 21 females aged between 27-44 years (mean age of 36.4.They were randomly allocated equally into either experimental group who received EMG Biofeedback or the control group who received the conventional physiotherapy management. Patients in the control group were given Hot Packs, IFT and neck care advice. In addition to conventional Physiotherapy treatments, patients in the experimental group received an EMG Biofeedback training program for the bilateral trapezius. The treatments were given for 30-45 minutes/ day / 5 days in a week for 2 weeks. The outcome tools used were; Visual Analogue Scale (VAS and Neck Disability Scale (NDI and both were measured before starting the treatment and at end of 2 weeks. Results & Conclusion: Adding EMG biofeedback training for the trapezius muscles along with conventional physiotherapy management is found to be an effective method of treatment in the management of chronic non specific neck pain patients.

  2. A rare differential diagnosis to occupational neck pain: bilateral stylohyoid syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vogel Tobias

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Chronic neck pain is widely prevalent and a common source of disability in the working-age population. Etiology of chronic neck pain includes neck sprain, mechanical or muscular neck pain, myofascial pain syndrome, postural neck pain as well as pain due to degenerative changes. We report the case of a 42 year old secretary, complaining about a longer history of neck pain and limited movement of the cervical spine. Surprisingly, the adequate radiologic examination revealed a bilateral ossification of the stylohyoid ligament complex. Her symptoms remained intractable from conservative treatment consisting of anti-inflammatory medication as well as physical therapy. Hence the patient was admitted to surgical resection of the ossified stylohyoid ligament complex. Afterwards she was free of any complaints and went back to work. Therefore, ossification of the stylohyoid ligament complex causing severe neck pain and movement disorder should be regarded as a rare differential diagnosis of occupational related neck pain.

  3. A rare differential diagnosis to occupational neck pain: bilateral stylohyoid syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirchhoff, Gertrud; Kirchhoff, Chlodwig; Buhmann, Sonja; Kanz, Karl-Georg; Lenz, Miriam; Vogel, Tobias; Kichhoff, Rainer Maria

    2006-06-26

    Chronic neck pain is widely prevalent and a common source of disability in the working-age population. Etiology of chronic neck pain includes neck sprain, mechanical or muscular neck pain, myofascial pain syndrome, postural neck pain as well as pain due to degenerative changes. We report the case of a 42 year old secretary, complaining about a longer history of neck pain and limited movement of the cervical spine. Surprisingly, the adequate radiologic examination revealed a bilateral ossification of the stylohyoid ligament complex. Her symptoms remained intractable from conservative treatment consisting of anti-inflammatory medication as well as physical therapy. Hence the patient was admitted to surgical resection of the ossified stylohyoid ligament complex. Afterwards she was free of any complaints and went back to work. Therefore, ossification of the stylohyoid ligament complex causing severe neck pain and movement disorder should be regarded as a rare differential diagnosis of occupational related neck pain.

  4. Strategies for prevention and management of musculoskeletal conditions. Neck pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Irene; Harms-Ringdahl, Karin

    2007-02-01

    The aim of this article was to summarise the existing evidence concerning interventions for non-specific neck pain. Neck-and-shoulder pain is commonly experienced by both adolescents and adults. Although the prevalence appears to vary among different nations, the situation is essentially the same, at least in the industrialised nations. Explanations for the wide variation in incidence and prevalence include various methodological issues. Back and neck disorders represent one of the most common causes for both short- and long-term sick leave and disability pension. Evidenced risk factors for the onset and maintenance of non-specific neck and back pain include both individual and work-related psychosocial factors. Based on the existing evidence different forms of exercise can be strongly recommended for at-risk populations, as well as for the acute and chronic non-specific neck pain patient. Furthermore, for symptom relief this condition can be treated with transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation, low level laser therapy, pulse electromagnetic treatment or radiofrequency denervation.

  5. Chronic neck pain disability due to an acute whiplash injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nederhand, Marc J; Hermens, Hermie J; IJzerman, Maarten J; Turk, Dennis C; Zilvold, Gerrit

    2003-03-01

    Several theories about musculoskeletal pain syndromes such as whiplash-associated disorder (WAD) suggest that pain and muscle activity interact and may contribute to the chronicity of symptoms. Studies using surface electromyography (sEMG) have demonstrated abnormal muscle activation patterns of the upper trapezius muscles in the chronic stage of WAD (grade II). There are, however, no studies that confirm that these muscle reactions are initiated in the acute stage of WAD, nor that these muscle reactions persist in the transition from acute neck pain to chronic neck pain disability. We analyzed the muscle activation patterns of the upper trapezius muscles in a cohort of 92 subjects with acute neck pain due to a motor vehicle accident (MVA). This cohort was followed up in order to evaluate differences in muscular activation patterns between subjects who have recovered and those subjects who have not recovered following an acute WAD and developed chronic neck pain. sEMG parameters were obtained at 1, 4, 8, 12, and 24 weeks after an MVA. The level of muscle reactivity (the difference in pre- and post-exercise EMG levels) and the level of muscle activity during an isometric and a dynamic task were used as EMG parameters. The results revealed no elevated muscle reactivity either in the acute stage, or during the follow-up period. The results of both the isometric and dynamic task, showed statistically significant different EMG levels between four neck pain disability subgroups (analysis of variance reaching P-levels of 0.000), with an inverse relationship between the level of neck pain disability and EMG level. Furthermore, follow-up assessments of the EMG level during these two tasks, did not show a time related change. In conclusion, in subjects with future disability, the acute stage is characterized by a reorganization of the muscular activation of neck and shoulder muscles, possibly aimed at minimizing the use of painful muscles. This change of motor control, is in

  6. Prevalence and risk factor of neck pain in elderly Korean community residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Kyeong Min; Cho, Nam H; Lim, Seung Hun; Kim, Hyun Ah

    2013-05-01

    Neck pain is a common musculoskeletal condition, which causes substantial medical cost. In Korea, prevalence of neck pain in community based population, especially in elderly subjects, has scarcely been reported. We evaluated the prevalence, the severity and the risk factors of neck pain in elderly Korean community residents. Data for neck pain were collected for 1,655 subjects from a rural farming community. The point, 6-months and cumulative lifetime prevalence of neck pain was obtained in addition to the measurement of the severity of neck pain. The mean age of the study subjects was 61 yr and 57% were females. The lifetime prevalence of neck pain was 20.8% with women having a higher prevalence. The prevalence did not increase with age, and the majority of individuals had low-intensity/low-disability pain. Subjects with neck pain had a significantly worse SF-12 score in all domains except for mental health. The prevalence of neck pain was significantly associated with female gender, obesity and smoking. This is the first large-scale Korean study estimating the prevalence of neck pain in elderly population. Although the majority of individuals had low-intensity/low-disability pain, subjects with neck pain had a significantly worse SF-12 score indicating that neck pain has significant health impact.

  7. Effects of spinal manipulation in patients with mechanical neck pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Gregoletto

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To analyse changes in the range of motion (ROM and pain after spinal manipulation of the cervical spine and thoracic spine in subjects with mechanical neck pain. Methods : Spinal manipulations were performed in the cervical and thoracic spine with the Gonstead and Diversified DTV techniques. To assess cervical ROM an inclinometer was used. Cervical pain was assessed by Visual Analogue Scale (VAS. The participation of 73 patients was obtained. Ages ranged from 18 to 63 years, with an average of 42.27 years. The subjects of this study were characterized by having mechanical neck pain and restricted cervical ROM. Results: We observed a reduction in the intensity of pain perceived by patients and increased cervical ROM. There were significant differences between pre-treatment values (first visit and the fifth and tenth visits (p<0.01, and between the fifth and tenth visits (p<0.01 in all parameters except in the cervical extension of 70º. Conclusions: The results of this study suggest that spinal manipulation of the cervical and thoracic regions with the Gonstead and Diversified DTV techniques could subjectively reduce pain and produce considerable increase in cervical ROM in adults with mechanical neck pain.

  8. Chronic Neck Pain and Cervico-Craniofacial Pain Patients Express Similar Levels of Neck Pain-Related Disability, Pain Catastrophizing, and Cervical Range of Motion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Muñoz-García

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Neck pain (NP is strongly associated with cervico-craniofacial pain (CCFP. The primary aim of the present study was to compare the neck pain-related disability, pain catastrophizing, and cervical and mandibular ROM between patients with chronic mechanical NP and patients with CCFP, as well as asymptomatic subjects. Methods. A total of 64 participants formed three groups. All participants underwent a clinical examination evaluating the cervical range of motion and maximum mouth opening, neck disability index (NDI, and psychological factor of Pain Catastrophizing Scale (PCS. Results. There were no statistically significant differences between patients with NP and CCFP for NDI and PCS (P>0.05. One- way ANOVA revealed significant differences for all ROM measurements. The post hoc analysis showed no statistically significant differences in cervical extension and rotation between the two patient groups (P>0.05. The Pearson correlation analysis shows a moderate positive association between NDI and the PCS for the group of patients with NP and CCFP. Conclusion. The CCFP and NP patient groups have similar neck disability levels and limitation in cervical ROM in extension and rotation. Both groups had positively correlated the NDI with the PCS.

  9. Chronic Neck Pain and Cervico-Craniofacial Pain Patients Express Similar Levels of Neck Pain-Related Disability, Pain Catastrophizing, and Cervical Range of Motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-García, Daniel; Gil-Martínez, Alfonso; López-López, Almudena; Lopez-de-Uralde-Villanueva, Ibai; La Touche, Roy; Fernández-Carnero, Josué

    2016-01-01

    Background. Neck pain (NP) is strongly associated with cervico-craniofacial pain (CCFP). The primary aim of the present study was to compare the neck pain-related disability, pain catastrophizing, and cervical and mandibular ROM between patients with chronic mechanical NP and patients with CCFP, as well as asymptomatic subjects. Methods. A total of 64 participants formed three groups. All participants underwent a clinical examination evaluating the cervical range of motion and maximum mouth opening, neck disability index (NDI), and psychological factor of Pain Catastrophizing Scale (PCS). Results. There were no statistically significant differences between patients with NP and CCFP for NDI and PCS (P > 0.05). One- way ANOVA revealed significant differences for all ROM measurements. The post hoc analysis showed no statistically significant differences in cervical extension and rotation between the two patient groups (P > 0.05). The Pearson correlation analysis shows a moderate positive association between NDI and the PCS for the group of patients with NP and CCFP. Conclusion. The CCFP and NP patient groups have similar neck disability levels and limitation in cervical ROM in extension and rotation. Both groups had positively correlated the NDI with the PCS.

  10. Chronic Neck Pain and Cervico-Craniofacial Pain Patients Express Similar Levels of Neck Pain-Related Disability, Pain Catastrophizing, and Cervical Range of Motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-García, Daniel; Gil-Martínez, Alfonso; López-López, Almudena; Lopez-de-Uralde-Villanueva, Ibai; La Touche, Roy; Fernández-Carnero, Josué

    2016-01-01

    Background. Neck pain (NP) is strongly associated with cervico-craniofacial pain (CCFP). The primary aim of the present study was to compare the neck pain-related disability, pain catastrophizing, and cervical and mandibular ROM between patients with chronic mechanical NP and patients with CCFP, as well as asymptomatic subjects. Methods. A total of 64 participants formed three groups. All participants underwent a clinical examination evaluating the cervical range of motion and maximum mouth opening, neck disability index (NDI), and psychological factor of Pain Catastrophizing Scale (PCS). Results. There were no statistically significant differences between patients with NP and CCFP for NDI and PCS (P > 0.05). One- way ANOVA revealed significant differences for all ROM measurements. The post hoc analysis showed no statistically significant differences in cervical extension and rotation between the two patient groups (P > 0.05). The Pearson correlation analysis shows a moderate positive association between NDI and the PCS for the group of patients with NP and CCFP. Conclusion. The CCFP and NP patient groups have similar neck disability levels and limitation in cervical ROM in extension and rotation. Both groups had positively correlated the NDI with the PCS. PMID:27119020

  11. The effect of fear of movement on muscle activation in posttraumatic neck pain disability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nederhand, Marc J.; Hermens, Hermie J.; IJzerman, Maarten J.; Groothuis, Karin G.M.; Turk, Dennis C.

    2006-01-01

    Studies using surface electromyography have demonstrated a reorganization of muscle activation patterns of the neck and shoulder muscles in patients with posttraumatic neck pain disability. The neurophysiologically oriented "pain adaptation" model explains this reorganization as a useful adaptation

  12. Craniosacral Therapy for the Treatment of Chronic Neck Pain

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: With growing evidence for the effectiveness of craniosacral therapy (CST) for pain management, the efficacy of CST remains unclear. This study therefore aimed at investigating CST in comparison with sham treatment in chronic nonspecific neck pain patients. Materials and Methods: A total of 54 blinded patients were randomized into either 8 weekly units of CST or light-touch sham treatment. Outcomes were assessed before and after treatment (week 8) and again 3 months later (week 20)...

  13. Misconceived Retropharyngeal Calcific Tendinitis during Management of Myofascial Neck Pain Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Differential diagnosis of posterior neck pain is very challenging based on symptoms and physical examination only. Retropharyngeal calcific tendinitis is a rare and frequently misdiagnosed entity in various causes of neck pain. It results from calcium hydroxyapatite deposition in the longus colli muscle which is characterized by severe neck pain, painful restriction of neck movement, dysphagia, and odynophagia. We herein report a case of a patient with acute retropharyngeal calcific tendiniti...

  14. Altered motor control patterns in whiplash and chronic neck pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasseljen Ottar

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Persistent whiplash associated disorders (WAD have been associated with alterations in kinesthetic sense and motor control. The evidence is however inconclusive, particularly for differences between WAD patients and patients with chronic non-traumatic neck pain. The aim of this study was to investigate motor control deficits in WAD compared to chronic non-traumatic neck pain and healthy controls in relation to cervical range of motion (ROM, conjunct motion, joint position error and ROM-variability. Methods Participants (n = 173 were recruited to three groups: 59 patients with persistent WAD, 57 patients with chronic non-traumatic neck pain and 57 asymptomatic volunteers. A 3D motion tracking system (Fastrak was used to record maximal range of motion in the three cardinal planes of the cervical spine (sagittal, frontal and horizontal, and concurrent motion in the two associated cardinal planes relative to each primary plane were used to express conjunct motion. Joint position error was registered as the difference in head positions before and after cervical rotations. Results Reduced conjunct motion was found for WAD and chronic neck pain patients compared to asymptomatic subjects. This was most evident during cervical rotation. Reduced conjunct motion was not explained by current pain or by range of motion in the primary plane. Total conjunct motion during primary rotation was 13.9° (95% CI; 12.2–15.6 for the WAD group, 17.9° (95% CI; 16.1–19.6 for the chronic neck pain group and 25.9° (95% CI; 23.7–28.1 for the asymptomatic group. As expected, maximal cervical range of motion was significantly reduced among the WAD patients compared to both control groups. No group differences were found in maximal ROM-variability or joint position error. Conclusion Altered movement patterns in the cervical spine were found for both pain groups, indicating changes in motor control strategies. The changes were not related to a

  15. Physiotherapy for Chronic Neck Pain: Evaluation of a biopsychosocial approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F. Vonk (Frieke)

    2010-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Neck pain is a common complaint that causes substantial morbidity in western countries. Reported prevalence in the general population ranges from 9.5% to 22%, and the 12-month (point) prevalence estimates ranges from 30% to 50%. It is suggested that two thirds of indivi

  16. On the relationship between pain intensity and postural sway in patients with non-specific neck pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruhe, Alexander; Fejer, René; Walker, Bruce

    2013-01-01

    Increased center of pressure excursions are well documented in patients with non-specific neck pain. While a linear relationship between pain intensity and postural sway has been described in low back pain patients, no such investigation has been conducted in adults with non-specific neck pain....

  17. Work-related risk factors for neck pain : results of a prospective cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ariëns, G.A.M.

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this thesis is to determine which work related physical and psychosocial risk factors exist which cause neck pain and absenteeism because of neck pain. There is some evidence for a positive relationship between he duration of sedentary posture at work and neck pain, and between twisting o

  18. Neck pain or spasms - self care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ice bag in place. Have a partner gently massage the sore or painful areas. Try sleeping on ... As part of physical therapy, you may receive massage and stretching exercises along with exercises to strengthen ...

  19. Neuromodulation of the cervical spinal cord in the treatment of chronic intractable neck and upper extremity pain: a case series and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallejo, Ricardo; Kramer, Jeffery; Benyamin, Ramsin

    2007-03-01

    Electrical spinal neuromodulation in the form of spinal cord stimulation is currently used for treating chronic painful conditions such as complex regional pain syndrome, diabetic neuropathy, postherpetic neuralgia, peripheral ischemia, low back pain, and other conditions refractory to more conservative treatments. To date, there are very few published reports documenting the use of spinal cord stimulation in the treatment of head/neck and upper limb pain. This paper reports a case series of 5 consecutive patients outlining the use of spinal cord stimulation to treat upper extremity pain. All subjects had previously undergone cervical fusion surgery to treat chronic neck and upper limb pain. Patients were referred following failure of the surgery to manage their painful conditions. Spinal cord stimulators were placed in the cervical epidural space through a thoracic needle placement. Stimulation parameters were adjusted to capture as much of the painful area(s) as possible. In total, 4 out of 5 patients moved to implantation. In all cases, patients reported significant (70-90%) reductions in pain, including axial neck pain and upper extremity pain. Interestingly, 2 patients with associated headache and lower extremity pain obtained relief after paresthesia-steering reportedly covered those areas. Moreover, 2 patients reported that cervical spinal cord stimulation significantly improved axial low back pain. Patients continue to report excellent pain relief up to 9 months following implantation. This case series documents the successful treatment of neck and upper extremity pain following unsuccessful cervical spine fusion surgery. Given this initial success, prospective, controlled studies are warranted to more adequately assess the long term utility and cost effectiveness of electrical neuromodulation treatment of chronic neck and upper extremity pain.

  20. Craniosacral Therapy for the Treatment of Chronic Neck Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauche, Romy; Cramer, Holger; Rampp, Thomas; Saha, Felix J.; Ostermann, Thomas; Dobos, Gustav

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: With growing evidence for the effectiveness of craniosacral therapy (CST) for pain management, the efficacy of CST remains unclear. This study therefore aimed at investigating CST in comparison with sham treatment in chronic nonspecific neck pain patients. Materials and Methods: A total of 54 blinded patients were randomized into either 8 weekly units of CST or light-touch sham treatment. Outcomes were assessed before and after treatment (week 8) and again 3 months later (week 20). The primary outcome was the pain intensity on a visual analog scale at week 8; secondary outcomes included pain on movement, pressure pain sensitivity, functional disability, health-related quality of life, well-being, anxiety, depression, stress perception, pain acceptance, body awareness, patients’ global impression of improvement, and safety. Results: In comparison with sham, CST patients reported significant and clinically relevant effects on pain intensity at week 8 (−21 mm group difference; 95% confidence interval, −32.6 to −9.4; P=0.001; d=1.02) and at week 20 (−16.8 mm group difference; 95% confidence interval, −27.5 to −6.1; P=0.003; d=0.88). Minimal clinically important differences in pain intensity at week 20 were reported by 78% within the CST group, whereas 48% even had substantial clinical benefit. Significant between-group differences at week 20 were also found for pain on movement, functional disability, physical quality of life, anxiety and patients’ global improvement. Pressure pain sensitivity and body awareness were significantly improved only at week 8. No serious adverse events were reported. Discussion: CST was both specifically effective and safe in reducing neck pain intensity and may improve functional disability and the quality of life up to 3 months after intervention. PMID:26340656

  1. The role of myofascial trigger points in musculoskeletal pain syndromes of the head and neck.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-de-Las-Peñas, César; Simons, David; Cuadrado, Maria Luz; Pareja, Juan

    2007-10-01

    Neck and head pain syndromes are common problems seen in clinical practice. Pain features of commonly designated idiopathic neck pain and some primary headaches (ie, tension-type headache or migraine) fit the descriptions of referred pain originating in muscle trigger points (TrPs). This article discusses the scientific evidence supporting the role of muscle TrPs in chronic musculo-skeletal disorders of the neck and head. The relevance of referred pain elicited by muscle TrPs in patients with neck pain has been investigated in few studies. Some authors found that both muscle TrPs in neck-shoulder muscles and cervical joint dysfunctions contribute at the same time to neck pain perception. Furthermore, it seems that referred pain originated in muscle TrPs could also contribute to neck symptoms perceived by subjects after a rear-end crash. In addition, several recent studies reported that both TTH and migraine are associated with referred pain from TrPs in the suboccipital, upper trapezius, sternocleidomastoid, temporalis, or superior oblique muscles. Referred pain elicited by active TrPs mimics the pain areas observed during head pain attacks in these primary headaches. Based on available data, it seems that the pain profile of neck and head syndromes may be provoked referred pain from TrPs in the posterior cervical, head, and shoulder muscles. Additional studies are needed to delineate more information on the relation between muscle TrPs and musculoskeletal pain syndromes of the head and neck.

  2. Neck pain and anxiety do not always go together

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larsen Anders H

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Chronic pain and psychosocial distress are generally thought to be associated in chronic musculoskeletal disorders such as non-specific neck pain. However, it is unclear whether a raised level of anxiety is necessarily a feature of longstanding, intense pain amongst patient and general population sub-groups. In a cohort of 70 self-selected female, non-specific neck pain sufferers, we observed relatively high levels of self-reported pain of 4.46 (measured on the 11 point numerical pain rating scale (NRS-101 and a longstanding duration of symptoms (156 days/year. However, the mean anxiety scores observed (5.49, fell well below the clinically relevant threshold of 21 required by the Beck Anxiety Inventory. The cohort was stratified to further distinguish individuals with higher pain intensity (NRS>6 and longer symptom duration (>90 days. Although a highly statistically significant difference (p = 0.000 was subsequently observed with respect to pain intensity, in the resulting sub-groups, none such a difference was noted with respect to anxiety levels. Our results indicate that chronic, intense pain and anxiety do not always appear to be related. Explanations for these findings may include that anxiety is not triggered in socially functional individuals, that individual coping strategies have come into play or in some instances that a psychological disorder like alexithymia could be a confounder. More studies are needed to clarify the specific role of anxiety in chronic non-specific musculoskeletal pain before general evidence-driven clinical extrapolations can be made.

  3. Clinical effects of deep cervical flexor muscle activation in patients with chronic neck pain

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate clinical effects of deep cervical flexor (DCF) muscles exercise on pain, Neck Disability Index (NDI), and neck and shoulder postures in patients with chronic neck pain. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-eight patients with chronic neck pain were randomly assigned into either the general strengthening exercise (GSE) group or the DCF activation group as control and experimental groups, respectively. All exercises were performed three times per ...

  4. Time-wise change in neck pain in response to rehabilitation with specific resistance training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zebis, Mette Kreutzfeldt; Andersen, Christoffer H; Sundstrup, Emil

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To determine the time-wise effect of specific resistance training on neck pain among industrial technicians with frequent neck pain symptoms. Methods Secondary analysis of a parallel-group cluster randomized controlled trial of 20 weeks performed at two large industrial production units...... in Copenhagen, Denmark. Women with neck pain >30 mm VAS (N = 131) were included in the present analysis. The training group (N = 77) performed specific resistance training for the neck/shoulder muscles three times a week, and the control group (N = 54) received advice to stay active. Participants of both groups...... registered neck pain intensity (0–100 mm VAS) once a week. Results Neck pain intensity was 55 mm (SD 23) at baseline. There was a significant group by time interaction for neck pain (F-value 2.61, Pneck pain reached significance after 4 weeks (11 mm, 95% CI 2...

  5. Do whiplash patients differ from other patients with non-specific neck pain regarding pain, function or prognosis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhagen, Arianne P; Lewis, Martyn; Schellingerhout, Jasper M; Heymans, Martijn W; Dziedzic, Krysia; de Vet, Henrica C W; Koes, Bart W

    2011-10-01

    We evaluated whether patients with self-reported whiplash differed in perceived pain, functional limitation and prognosis from patients with other painful neck complaints. Data from three Dutch trials and an English trial were used all evaluating conservative treatment in neck pain patients in primary care. All patients had non-specific neck pain. Information on any trauma or injury came from self-report at baseline. We compared frequencies of baseline variables and outcome at short-term and long term for whiplash and non-trauma neck pain patients separately. The total study population consisted of 804 neck pain patients. Of these patients 133 reported (16.5%) that an injury was the cause of their neck pain. In all trials there were 17-18% more male patients in the whiplash group. At follow-up pain decreased between 12 and 28%, function 10%, and 25-50% of patients recovered in all trials. Post-treatment improvements in pain, function and recovery were comparable between whiplash and non-trauma patients. We also found no different prognostic factors between whiplash and non-trauma patients. Overall we found in a population with mild to moderate pain no clinically relevant differences between patients with self-reported whiplash and patients with other painful neck complaints. The findings suggest that whiplash patients with mild to moderate pain should not be considered a specific subgroup of patients with non-specific neck pain.

  6. Dose-response of strengthening exercise for treatment of severe neck pain in women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Christoffer H; Andersen, Lars Louis; Pedersen, Mogens T

    2013-01-01

    Specific strength training is shown relieves neck pain in office workers. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of specific strength training in women with severe neck pain and to analyze the dose-response relationship between training adherence and pain reduction. 118...... untrained women with severe neck pain (>30 mm VAS pain) were included from a larger study, in which the subjects were randomized to 20-weeks specific strength training for the neck/shoulders or to a control group. In the intention-to-treat analysis, the training group experienced greater pain relief than...

  7. Computer mouse use predicts acute pain but not prolonged or chronic pain in the neck and shoulder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, JH; Harhoff, M.; Grimstrup, S.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Computer use may have an adverse effect on musculoskeletal outcomes. This study assessed the risk of neck and shoulder pain associated with objectively recorded professional computer use. METHODS: A computer programme was used to collect data on mouse and keyboard usage and weekly...... quartile increase in weekly mouse usage time. Mouse and keyboard usage time did not predict the onset of prolonged or chronic pain in the neck or shoulder. Women had higher risks for neck and shoulder pain. Number of keystrokes and mouse clicks, length of the average activity period, and micro-pauses did...... not influence reports of acute or prolonged pain. A few psychosocial factors predicted the risk of prolonged pain. CONCLUSIONS: Most computer workers have no or minor neck and shoulder pain, few experience prolonged pain, and even fewer, chronic neck and shoulder pain. Moreover, there seems...

  8. Kinematics of fast cervical rotations in persons with chronic neck pain: a cross-sectional and reliability study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Häger-Ross Charlotte

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Assessment of sensorimotor function is useful for classification and treatment evaluation of neck pain disorders. Several studies have investigated various aspects of cervical motor functions. Most of these have involved slow or self-paced movements, while few have investigated fast cervical movements. Moreover, the reliability of assessment of fast cervical axial rotation has, to our knowledge, not been evaluated before. Methods Cervical kinematics was assessed during fast axial head rotations in 118 women with chronic nonspecific neck pain (NS and compared to 49 healthy controls (CON. The relationship between cervical kinematics and symptoms, self-rated functioning and fear of movement was evaluated in the NS group. A sub-sample of 16 NS and 16 CON was re-tested after one week to assess the reliability of kinematic variables. Six cervical kinematic variables were calculated: peak speed, range of movement, conjunct movements and three variables related to the shape of the speed profile. Results Together, peak speed and conjunct movements had a sensitivity of 76% and a specificity of 78% in discriminating between NS and CON, of which the major part could be attributed to peak speed (NS: 226 ± 88 °/s and CON: 348 ± 92 °/s, p Conclusions Peak speed of fast cervical axial rotations is reduced in people with chronic neck pain, and even further reduced in subjects with concomitant low back pain. Fast cervical rotation test seems to be a reliable and valid tool for assessment of neck pain disorders on group level, while a rather large between subject variation and overlap between groups calls for caution in the interpretation of individual assessments.

  9. Psychometric properties of the Neck OutcOme Score (NOOS), Neck Disability Index (NDI) and Short form-36 (SF-36) were evaluated in patients with neck pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Tina Juul; Søgaard, Karen; Davis, Aileen M;

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess reliability, construct validity, responsiveness and interpretability for Neck OutcOme Score (NOOS), Neck Disability Index (NDI) and Short-form-36 (SF-36) in neck pain patients. STUDY DESIGN AND SETTING: Internal consistency was assessed by Cronbach's alpha. Test-retest reliab......OBJECTIVE: To assess reliability, construct validity, responsiveness and interpretability for Neck OutcOme Score (NOOS), Neck Disability Index (NDI) and Short-form-36 (SF-36) in neck pain patients. STUDY DESIGN AND SETTING: Internal consistency was assessed by Cronbach's alpha. Test......, valid and responsive measure of self-reported disability in neck pain patients, performing at least as well or better than the commonly used SF-36 and NDI....

  10. The study of correlation between forward head posture and neck pain in Iranian office workers

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Factors such as prolonged sitting at work or improper posture of head during work may have a great role in neck pain occurrence among office employees, particularly among those who work with computers. Although some studies claim a significant difference in head posture between patients and pain-free participants, in literature the forward head posture (FHP) has not always been associated with neck pain. Since head, cervical and thoracic postures and their relation with neck pain...

  11. Prevalence and anatomical location of muscle tenderness in adults with nonspecific neck/shoulder pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lars L; Hansen, Klaus; Mortensen, Ole S;

    2011-01-01

    Many adults experience bothersome neck/shoulder pain. While research and treatment strategies often focus on the upper trapezius, other neck/shoulder muscles may be affected as well. The aim of the present study is to evaluate the prevalence and anatomical location of muscle tenderness in adults...... with nonspecific neck/shoulder pain....

  12. Effect of Targeted Strength, Endurance, and Coordination Exercise on Neck and Shoulder Pain Among Fighter Pilots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lange, Britt; Toft, Palle; Myburgh, Corrie

    2013-01-01

    : To explore in Danish F-16 pilots: (1) the effect on neck and shoulder pain of a 24-week training intervention including targeted training of the deep neck muscles; (2) selected clinical signs and symptoms at baseline; (3) the prevalence and intensity of neck and shoulder pain....

  13. Changes in proprioception and pain in patients with neck pain after upper thoracic manipulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jinmo; Lee, Byoungkwon; Kim, Changbeom

    2015-03-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to conduct cervical stability training and upper thoracic manipulation for patients with chronic neck pain and then investigate the changes of cervical proprioception and pain. [Subjects and Methods] Subjects were 30 workers with mechanical neck pain, who were randomly divided into an upper thoracic manipulation group and a cervical stability training group. Upper thoracic manipulation after cervical stability training was conducted for the upper thoracic manipulation group, and only stability training was conducted for the cervical stability training group. The intervention period was six weeks, and consisted of three sessions a week, each of which lasted for 30 minutes. For proprioception measurement, an electro-goniometer was used to measure reposition sense before and after the intervention. The visual analogue scale was used to assess pain. [Results] After the intervention, the error angle was significantly smaller in flexion and right left side-bending, and pain was significantly reduced in the upper thoracic manipulation group. According to the post intervention comparison of the two groups, there were significant differences in the proprioception and pain values. [Conclusion] Conducting both cervical stability training and upper thoracic manipulation for patients with chronic neck pain was more helpful for the improvement of proprioception and pain than cervical stability training alone.

  14. An investigation to determine the association between neck pain and upper limb disability for patients with non-specific neck pain: a secondary analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLean, Sionnadh Mairi; Moffett, Jennifer Klaber; Sharp, Donald Macfie; Gardiner, Eric

    2011-10-01

    This study investigated the relationship between neck pain and upper limb disability in patients with non-specific neck pain (n = 151) recruited from physiotherapy departments in the United Kingdom. Baseline neck pain/disability was measured using the Northwick Park Neck Pain Questionnaire (NPQ). Baseline upper limb disability was measured using the Disabilities of Arm, Shoulder, Hand questionnaire (DASH). A range of baseline psychosocial variables were measured as potential confounding variables. Pairwise analysis revealed a positive correlation between NPQ score and DASH score (Pearsons' r = 0.799, p pain self efficacy (PSE) scores (B = -0.489) {R(2) = 0.713; n = 100, p neck pain/disability also report severe upper limb disability. The relationship between neck pain/disability and upper limb disability was mediated by PSE. Clinically, the presence of severe neck pain or low PSE should direct clinicians towards an assessment of upper limb function. In these cases upper limb disability may need to be addressed as part of the neck management process.

  15. Chronic Neck Pain and Whiplash: A Case-Control Study of the Relationship between Acute Whiplash Injuries and Chronic Neck Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael D Freeman

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The authors undertook a case-control study of chronic neck pain and whiplash injuries in nine states in the United States to determine whether whiplash injuries contributed significantly to the population of individuals with chronic neck and other spine pain.

  16. Prevalence and anatomical location of muscle tenderness in adults with nonspecific neck/shoulder pain

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Many adults experience bothersome neck/shoulder pain. While research and treatment strategies often focus on the upper trapezius, other neck/shoulder muscles may be affected as well. The aim of the present study is to evaluate the prevalence and anatomical location of muscle tenderness in adults with nonspecific neck/shoulder pain. Methods Clinical neck/shoulder examination at two large office workplaces in Copenhagen, Denmark. 174 women and 24 men (aged 25-65 years) with ...

  17. Impact of motor vehicle accidents on neck pain and disability in general practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.J. Vos (Kees); A.P. Verhagen (Arianne); J. Passchier (Jan); B.W. Koes (Bart)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractBackground: High levels of continuous neck pain after a motor vehicle accident (MVA) are reported in cross-sectional studies. Knowledge of this association in general practice is limited. Aim: To compare the differences in perceived pain and disability in patients with acute neck pain du

  18. Effect of yoga on the Myofascial Pain Syndrome of neck.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharan, D; Manjula, M; Urmi, D; Ajeesh, Ps

    2014-01-01

    Myofascial Pain Syndrome (MPS) refers to pain attributed to muscle and its surrounding fascia, which is associated with "myofascial trigger points" (MTrPs). MTrPs in the trapezius has been proposed as the main cause of temporal and cervicogenic headache and neck pain. Literature shows that the prevalence of various musculoskeletal disorders (MSD) among physiotherapists is high. Yoga has traditionally been used to treat MSDs in various populations. But there is scarcity of literature which explains the effects of yoga on reducing MPS of the neck in terms of various physical parameters and subjective responses. Therefore, a pilot study was done among eight physiotherapists with minimum six months of experience. A structured yoga protocol was designed and implemented for five days in a week for four weeks. The outcome variables were Disability of Arm, Shoulder and Hands (DASH) score, Neck Disability Index (NDI), Visual Analogue Scale (VAS), Pressure Pain Threshold (PPT) for Trigger Points, Cervical Range of Motion (CROM) - active & passive, grip and pinch strengths. The variables were compared before and after the intervention. Finally, the result revealed that all the variables (DASH: P<0.00, NDI: P<0.00, VAS: P<0.00, PPT: Left: P<0.00, PPT: Right: P<0.00, Grip strength: left: P<0.00, Grip strength: right: P<0.01, Key pinch: left: P<0.01, Key pinch: right: P<0.01, Palmar pinch: left: P<0.01, Palmar pinch: right: P<0.00, Tip pinch: left: P<0.01, Tip pinch: Right: P<0.01) improved significantly after intervention.

  19. Effect of yoga on the Myofascial Pain Syndrome of neck

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D Sharan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Myofascial Pain Syndrome (MPS refers to pain attributed to muscle and its surrounding fascia, which is associated with ′′myofascial trigger points′′ (MTrPs. MTrPs in the trapezius has been proposed as the main cause of temporal and cervicogenic headache and neck pain. Literature shows that the prevalence of various musculoskeletal disorders (MSD among physiotherapists is high. Yoga has traditionally been used to treat MSDs in various populations. But there is scarcity of literature which explains the effects of yoga on reducing MPS of the neck in terms of various physical parameters and subjective responses. Therefore, a pilot study was done among eight physiotherapists with minimum six months of experience. A structured yoga protocol was designed and implemented for five days in a week for four weeks. The outcome variables were Disability of Arm, Shoulder and Hands (DASH score, Neck Disability Index (NDI, Visual Analogue Scale (VAS, Pressure Pain Threshold (PPT for Trigger Points, Cervical Range of Motion (CROM - active & passive, grip and pinch strengths. The variables were compared before and after the intervention. Finally, the result revealed that all the variables (DASH: P<0.00, NDI: P<0.00, VAS: P<0.00, PPT: Left: P<0.00, PPT: Right: P<0.00, Grip strength: left: P<0.00, Grip strength: right: P<0.01, Key pinch: left: P<0.01, Key pinch: right: P<0.01, Palmar pinch: left: P<0.01, Palmar pinch: right: P<0.00, Tip pinch: left: P<0.01, Tip pinch: Right: P<0.01 improved significantly after intervention.

  20. The study of correlation between forward head posture and neck pain in Iranian office workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parisa Nejati

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Factors such as prolonged sitting at work or improper posture of head during work may have a great role in neck pain occurrence among office employees, particularly among those who work with computers. Although some studies claim a significant difference in head posture between patients and pain-free participants, in literature the forward head posture (FHP has not always been associated with neck pain. Since head, cervical and thoracic postures and their relation with neck pain has not been studied in Iranian office employees, the purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between some work-related and individual factors, such as poor posture, with neck pain in the office employees. Material and methods It was a cross-sectional correlation study carried out to explore the relationship between neck pain and sagittal postures of cervical and thoracic spine among office employees in forward looking position and also in a working position. Forty-six subjects without neck pain and 55 with neck pain were examined using a photographic method. Thoracic and cervical postures were measured using the high thoracic (HT and craniovertebral (CV angles, respectively. Results High thoracic and CV angles were positively correlated with the presence of neck pain only in working position (p 0.05. Conclusions Our findings have revealed that office employees had a defective posture while working and that the improper posture was more severe in the office employees who suffered from the neck pain.

  1. Neck pain and postural balance among workers with high postural demands - a cross-sectional study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Marie B.; Skotte, Jørgen H.; Holtermann, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    Neck pain is related to impaired postural balance among patients and is highly prevalent among workers with high postural demands, for example, cleaners. We therefore hypothesised, that cleaners with neck pain suffer from postural dysfunction. This cross-sectional study tested if cleaners with neck...... pain have an impaired postural balance compared with cleaners without neck pain. Postural balance of 194 cleaners with (n = 85) and without (N = 109) neck pain was studied using three different tests. Success or failure to maintain the standing position for 30 s in unilateral stance was recorded...... in the Romberg position with eyes closed, but not with eyes open. Postural balance is impaired among cleaners with neck pain and the current study suggests a particular role of the slow component of postural sway. Furthermore, the unilateral stance test is a simple test to illustrate functional impairment among...

  2. Prevalence of neck pain in migraine and tension-type headache

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ashina, Sait; Bendtsen, Lars; Lyngberg, Ann C

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We assessed the prevalence of neck pain in the population in relation to headache. METHODS: In a cross-sectional study, a total of 797 individuals completed a headache interview and provided self-reported data on neck pain. We identified migraine, TTH or both migraine and TTH (M...... OR 3.0, 95% CI 2.0-4.4, pmigraine (76.2%) (p... by pure TTH and migraine. Myofascial tenderness is significantly increased in individuals with neck pain....

  3. A literature review of neck pain associated with computer use: public health implications

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    Prolonged use of computers during daily work activities and recreation is often cited as a cause of neck pain. This review of the literature identifies public health aspects of neck pain as associated with computer use. While some retrospective studies support the hypothesis that frequent computer operation is associated with neck pain, few prospective studies reveal causal relationships. Many risk factors are identified in the literature. Primary prevention strategies have largely been confi...

  4. Chronic neck pain : An epidemiological, psychological and SPECT study with emphasis on whiplash-associated disorders

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    Chronic neck pain, a common cause of disability, seems to be the result of several interacting mechanisms. In addition to degenerative and inflammatory changes and trauma, psychological and psychosocial factors are also involved. One common type of trauma associated with chronic neck pain is whiplash injury; this sometimes results in whiplash-associated disorder (WAD), a controversial condition with largely unknown pathogenetic mechanisms. We studied the prevalence of chronic neck pain of tra...

  5. A value proposition for early physical therapist management of neck pain: a retrospective cohort analysis

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Background Neck pain is one of the most common reasons for entry into the healthcare system. Recent increases in healthcare utilization and medical costs have not correlated with improvements in health. Therefore there is a need to identify management strategies for neck pain that are effective for the patient, cost efficient for the payer and provided at the optimal time during an episode of neck pain. Methods One thousand five hundred thirty-one patients who underwent physical therapist man...

  6. Conservative Management of Uncomplicated Mechanical Neck Pain in a Military Aviator

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    on-station osteopath, chiropractor , or physical therapist who is trained in these procedures. While the management of mechanical neck pain in the...Reference and Waiver Guide states that neck and back pain from biomechan- ical derangements of the spine and resulting muscle aches and spasms, known...use of fl ight surgeon pre- scribed NSAIDs for a short-term course of care to manage back or neck pain .6,7 These medications are considered

  7. Neck pain in military helicopter aircrew and the role of exercise therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmon, Danielle M; Harrison, Michael F; Neary, J Patrick

    2011-10-01

    Neck pain is a growing aeromedical concern for military forces on an international scale. Neck pain prevalence in the global military helicopter community has been reported in the range of 56.6-84.5%. Despite this high prevalence, historically, research examining helicopter aircrews has focused predominantly on low back pain. A number of recent studies have emerged examining flight-related factors that are hypothesized to contribute to the development of flight-related neck pain. Loading factors such as the posture adopted during flight, use of night vision goggles, and vibration have all been found to contribute to neck pain and muscular fatigue. Prolonged or repeated exposureto these loading factors has been hypothesized to perpetuate or contribute to the development of neck pain. Despite the high number of helicopter aircrew personnel that suffer from neck pain, very few individuals seek treatment for the disorder. The focus of medical personnel should, therefore, be directed toward a solution that addresses not only the issue of muscular fatigue, but the hesitancy to seek treatment. Previous research in military and civilian populations have used exercise therapy as a treatment modality for neck pain and have found improved endurance capacity in the neck musculature and reduced self-reported neck pain.

  8. Risk factors for neck pain in office workers: a prospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Refshauge Kathryn M

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Persisting neck pain is common in society. It has been reported that the prevalence of neck pain in office workers is much higher than in the general population. The costs to the worker, employer and society associated with work-related neck pain are known to be considerable and are escalating. The factors that place office workers at greater risk of developing neck pain are not understood. The aim of this study is to investigate the incidence and risk factors of work-related neck pain in Australian office workers. Methods/design We will conduct a prospective cohort study. A cohort of office workers without neck pain will be followed over a 12 month period, after baseline measurement of potential risk factors. The categories of risk factors being evaluated are physical (cervical spine posture, range of movement, muscle endurance and exercise frequency, demographic (age, sex, work environment (sitting duration, frequency of breaks and psychosocial (psychological distress and psychosocial work factors. Cox regression analysis will be used to identify risk factors associated with work-related neck pain, and will be expressed as hazard ratios with 95% confidence intervals. The data will also enable the incidence of neck pain in this population to be estimated. Discussion In addition to clarifying the magnitude of this occupational health problem these data could inform policy in workplaces and provide the basis for primary prevention of neck pain in office workers, targeting the identified risk factors.

  9. A pain in the neck--a review of deep space neck infections in the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harney, T; Mullarkey, C; O'Donnell, J

    2012-01-01

    We report a case of prevertebral abscess in a 37-year-old male, presenting with a 2-day history of neck pain radiating to the right shoulder. We also review the current literature relating to the presentation and the emergency management of deep neck space infections.

  10. The relation between pain extent and quality-of-life, psychological factors and neck funktion in patients with chronic neck pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ris Hansen, Inge; Barbero, Marco; Falla, Deborah

    of Kinesiophobia (TSK), Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-ll), Neck Disability Index (NDI) and clinical tests: Craniocervical Flexion Test (CCFT), Cervical Extension Test (CE), and Cervical Range of Motion (CROM). Results: Significant positive correlations were observed between pain extent and NDI (r = 0.33; p... factors and/or decreased function of the involved body parts. Purpose: To study the relation between pain extent with 1) quality of life, 2) kinesiophobia, depression, 3) cervical muscle function and mobility and additionally the relation of pain extent with the origin of pain being traumatic or non...... to the origin being traumatic or non-traumatic. Conclusion: Pain extent extracted from pain drawings are moderately correlated with patient-reported neck function, and weakly correlated with depression, kinesiophobia and cervical clinical tests. In clinical decision-making, pain extent may indicate reduced neck...

  11. Exercise training as treatment of neck pain among fighter pilots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Murray, Mike; Lange, Britt; Andersen, Christoffer Højnicke

    ) seldom, trained but stopped, 6) no participation at all. Maximal Voluntary Isometric Contraction (MVC) and Rate of Force Development (RFD) for cervical flexion and extension were measured by strain-gauge transducers. Results Prevalence of neck pain was significantly reduced in ET from baseline (mean ± SD...... 58% participated more that once a week (scale 1+2). Compliance according to the questionnaire correlated with registrations in the training diary (r = -0.745, P = MVC measures for cervical flexion and extension at baseline in ET were 183.6 N ± 47.1 and 286.5 N ± 48.0, and in REF 160.7 N...

  12. Acupuncture for chronic neck pain--a cohort study in an NHS pain clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blossfeldt, Patrick

    2004-09-01

    The study investigates the outcome of acupuncture for chronic neck pain in a cohort of patients referred to an NHS chronic pain clinic. One hundred and seventy two patients were selected for acupuncture over a period of 6.5 years. Treatment was given by a single acupuncturist and consisted of a course of needle acupuncture for an average of seven sessions per patient. Treatment outcome was measured by an oral rating scale of improvement at the end of treatment and at follow up six months and one year after treatment. Nineteen patients were withdrawn from treatment for various reasons, two for adverse events. One hundred and fifty three patients were evaluated, of whom 68% had a successful outcome from acupuncture, reporting an improvement in pain of at least 50%. The success rate was higher in patients with a short duration of pain: 85% in patients with pain for up to three months and 78% with pain for up to six months. Long-term follow up showed that 49% of the patients who completed treatment had maintained the benefit after six months, and 40% at one year. The results indicate that acupuncture can be an effective treatment for selected patients with chronic neck pain.

  13. The immediate effects of cervical spine manipulative therapy and mobilization on local skin temperature, in mechanical neck pain

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    M.Tech. Purpose: Mechanical neck pain is the most common type of cervical spine pain encountered. It is also referred to as simple or non-specific neck pain, and is common in all groups of people. Often the exact cause of the pain is unknown. Neck pain, although felt in the neck, can be caused by numerous spinal problems. Neck pain may arise due to muscular tightness in both the neck and upper back, or due to entrapment of nerves of the cervical vertebrae. Joint dysfunction in the cervical...

  14. Economic burden of back and neck pain: effect of a neuropathic component.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinman, Nathan; Patel, Aarti A; Benson, Carmela; Macario, Alex; Kim, Myoung; Biondi, David M

    2014-08-01

    This was a retrospective database analysis (2001-2009) of employees' medical, prescription drug, and absence costs and days from sick leave, short- and long-term disability, and workers' compensation. Employees with an ICD-9 diagnostic code for back or neck pain and an ICD-9 for a back- or neck-related neuropathic condition (eg, myelopathy, compression of the spinal cord, neuritis, radiculitis) or radiculopathy were considered to have nociceptive back or neck pain with a neuropathic component. Employees with an ICD-9 for back pain or neck pain and no ICD-9 for a back- or neck-related neuropathic condition or radiculopathy were defined to have nociceptive back or neck pain. Patients with nociceptive back or neck pain with a neuropathic component were classified as having or not having prior nociceptive pain. Annual costs (medical and prescription drug costs and absence costs) and days from sick leave, short- and long-term disability, and workers' compensation were evaluated. Mean annual total costs were highest ($8512) for nociceptive pain with a neuropathic component with prior nociceptive pain (n=9162 employees), $7126 for nociceptive pain with a neuropathic component with no prior nociceptive pain (n=5172), $5574 for nociceptive pain only (n=35,347), and $3017 for control employees with no back or neck pain diagnosis (n=226,683). Medical, short-term disability, and prescription drugs yielded the highest incremental costs compared to controls. Mean total absence days/year were 8.26, 7.86, 5.70, and 3.44, respectively. The economic burden of back pain or neck pain is increased when associated with a neuropathic component.

  15. The Influence of Ergonomic Training on Low Back and Neck Pains in Female Hospital Personnel

    OpenAIRE

    Saeidi

    2014-01-01

    Background Prevalence of low back pain (LBP) and neck pain (NP) in workers, especially in nurses is high, but their knowledge of ergonomics is not enough. Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of ergonomic training on low back pain and neck pain, posture, and function in female hospital personnel of Najaf-Abad, Iran. Patients and Methods In this queasy experim...

  16. Effect of brief daily resistance training on rapid force development in painful neck and shoulder muscles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jay, Kenneth; Schraefel, Mc; Andersen, Christoffer H

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the effect of small daily amounts of progressive resistance training on rapid force development of painful neck/shoulder muscles. METHODS: 198 generally healthy adults with frequent neck/shoulder muscle pain (mean: age 43.1 years, computer use 93% of work time, 88% women...... relationship existed between changes in rapid force development and pain (r = 0.27, Pneck/shoulder pain increases rapid force development and...

  17. Connectionist Expert System to Diagnose Neck and Arm Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Thamarai Selvi

    1999-07-01

    Full Text Available A connectionist expert system (CES called BIONET aimed at assisting physicians in the diagnosis of diseases, such as neck and arm pain has been proposed. BIONET is an artificial network or connectionist network model capable of classifying diseases. Need for the development of CES for defence personnel has been discussed: BIONET is a feedforward three layer neural network with one hidden layer. The input, layer has been designated as stimulus layer, the hidden layer as receptor layer and output layer ag cortical layer. The sequential connections with spatial orientation have been maintained between stimulus layer and receptor layer for each specific factor. Parallel connections are established only at the cortical layer. Direct firing and facilitatory and inhibitory mechanisms are adhered to the neurophysiology of human nervous system. An algorithm for training on BIONET is also given. BIONET is simulated on a digital computer with training samples of patients collected from various hospitals in Tamil Nadu to diagnose neck and arm pain,diseases for testing purpose.

  18. The effectiveness of thoracic manipulation on patients with chronic mechanical neck pain - a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Herman Mun Cheung; Wing Chiu, Thomas Tai; Lam, Tai-Hing

    2011-04-01

    The aim of our study was to assess the effectiveness of thoracic manipulation (TM) on patients with chronic neck pain. 120 patients aged between 18 and 55 were randomly allocated into two groups: an experimental group which received TM and a control group without the manipulative procedure. Both groups received infrared radiation therapy (IRR) and a standard set of educational material. TM and IRR were given twice weekly for 8 sessions. Outcome measures included craniovertebral angle (CV angle), neck pain (Numeric Pain Rating Scale; NPRS), neck disability (Northwick Park Neck Disability Questionnaire; NPQ), health-related quality of life status (SF36 Questionnaire) and neck mobility. These outcome measures were assessed immediately after 8 sessions of treatment, 3-months and at a 6-month follow-up. Patients that received TM showed significantly greater improvement in pain intensity (p = 0.043), CV angle (p = 0.049), NPQ (p = 0.018), neck flexion (p = 0.005), and the Physical Component Score (PCS) of the SF36 Questionnaire (p = 0.002) than the control group immediately post-intervention. All these improvements were maintained at the 6-month follow-ups. This study shows that TM was effective in reducing neck pain, improving dysfunction and neck posture and neck range of motion (ROM) for patients with chronic mechanical neck pain up to a half-year post-treatment.

  19. Clinical effects of deep cervical flexor muscle activation in patients with chronic neck pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jin Young; Kwag, Kwang Il

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate clinical effects of deep cervical flexor (DCF) muscles exercise on pain, Neck Disability Index (NDI), and neck and shoulder postures in patients with chronic neck pain. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-eight patients with chronic neck pain were randomly assigned into either the general strengthening exercise (GSE) group or the DCF activation group as control and experimental groups, respectively. All exercises were performed three times per week over 4 weeks. NDI and numeric rating scale (NRS) score for pain were determined and radiological assessment of neck-shoulder postures (head tilt angle [HTA], neck flexion angle [NFA], and forward shoulder angle [FSA]) was performed before (baseline), 4 weeks after, and 8 weeks after exercise in order to directly compare the exercise effects between the groups. [Results] In the DCF group, the NDI, NRS score, and neck-shoulder postures (analyzed by uisng HTA, NFA, and FSA) were significantly improved. [Conclusion] DCF activation exercise was effective to alleviate pain, recover functions, and correct forward head posture in the patients with neck pain. Hence, it might be recommended in the rehabilitation of patients with chronic neck pain.

  20. Fluoroscopic lumbar interlaminar epidural injections in managing chronic lumbar axial or discogenic pain

    OpenAIRE

    Manchikanti L; Cash KA; McManus CD; Pampati V; Benyamin R

    2012-01-01

    Laxmaiah Manchikanti,1,2 Kimberly A Cash,1 Carla D McManus,1 Vidyasagar Pampati,1 Ramsin Benyamin3,41Pain Management Center of Paducah, Paducah, KY; 2University of Louisville, Louisville, KY; 3Millennium Pain Center, Bloomington, IL; 4University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL, USAAbstract: Among the multiple causes of chronic low back pain, axial and discogenic pain are common. Various modalities of treatments are utilized in managing discogenic and axial low back pain including e...

  1. Chronic neck pain. An epidemiological, psychological and SPECT study with emphasis on whiplash-associated disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guez, Michel

    2006-02-01

    Chronic neck pain, a common cause of disability, seems to be the result of several interacting mechanisms. In addition to degenerative and inflammatory changes and trauma, psychological and psychosocial factors are also involved. One common type of trauma associated with chronic neck pain is whiplash injury; this sometimes results in whiplash-associated disorder (WAD), a controversial condition with largely unknown pathogenetic mechanisms. We studied the prevalence of chronic neck pain of traumatic and non-traumatic origin and compared the prevalence of, sociodemographic data, self-perceived health, workload and chronic low-back pain in these groups. In a ready-made questionnaire (MONICA study), we added questions about cervical spine and low-back complaints. 6,000 (72%) completed a self-administered questionnaire. 43% reported neck pain: 48% of women and 38% of men. Women of working age had more neck pain than retired women, a phenomenon not seen in men. 19% of the studied population suffered from chronic neck pain and it was more frequent in women. A history of neck trauma was common in those with chronic neck pain. Those with a history of neck trauma perceived their health worse and were more often on sick-leave. About 50% of those with traumatic and non-traumatic chronic neck pain also had chronic low-back pain. We assessed the subjective and objective neuropsychological functioning in 42 patients with chronic neck pain, 21 with a whiplash trauma, and 21 without previous neck trauma. Despite cognitive complaints, the WAD patients had normal neuropsychological functioning, but the WAD group especially had deviant MMPI results-indicating impaired coping ability and somatization. WAD patients had no alterations in cerebral blood-flow pattern, as measured by rCBF-SPECT and SPM analysis, compared to healthy controls. This contrasts with the non-traumatic group with chronic neck pain, which showed marked blood-flow changes. The blood-flow changes in the non

  2. Influence of frequency and duration of strength training for effective management of neck and shoulder pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Christoffer H; Andersen, Lars Louis; Gram, Bibi

    2012-01-01

    training (REF). Primary outcome was self-reported neck and shoulder pain (scale 0-9) and secondary outcome work disability (Disability in Arms, Shoulders and Hands (DASH)). RESULTS: The intention-to-treat analysis showed reduced neck and right shoulder pain in the training groups after 20 weeks compared......BACKGROUND: Specific strength training can reduce neck and shoulder pain in office workers, but the optimal combination of exercise frequency and duration remains unknown. This study investigates how one weekly hour of strength training for the neck and shoulder muscles is most effectively...

  3. Spinal Manipulative Therapy and Exercise for Seniors with Chronic Neck Pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maiers, Michele; Bronfort, Gert; Evans, Roni

    2014-01-01

    Neck pain, common among the elderly population, has considerable implications on health and quality of life. Evidence supports the use of spinal manipulative therapy and exercise to treat neck pain; however, no studies to date have evaluated the effectiveness of these therapies specifically...

  4. The association between self-reported cardiovascular disorders and troublesome neck pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nolet, Paul S; Côté, Pierre; Cassidy, John David

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this population-based cohort study was to investigate the association between self-reported cardiovascular disorders and troublesome neck pain.......The purpose of this population-based cohort study was to investigate the association between self-reported cardiovascular disorders and troublesome neck pain....

  5. Effectiveness of dry needling for chronic nonspecific neck pain: a randomized, single-blinded, clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerezo-Téllez, Ester; Torres-Lacomba, María; Fuentes-Gallardo, Isabel; Perez-Muñoz, Milagros; Mayoral-Del-Moral, Orlando; Lluch-Girbés, Enrique; Prieto-Valiente, Luis; Falla, Deborah

    2016-09-01

    Chronic neck pain attributed to a myofascial pain syndrome is characterized by the presence of muscle contractures referred to as myofascial trigger points. In this randomized, parallel-group, blinded, controlled clinical trial, we examined the effectiveness of deep dry needling (DDN) of myofascial trigger points in people with chronic nonspecific neck pain. The study was conducted at a public Primary Health Care Centre in Madrid, Spain, from January 2010 to December 2014. A total of 130 participants with nonspecific neck pain presenting with active myofascial trigger points in their cervical muscles were included. These participants were randomly allocated to receive: DDN plus stretching (n = 65) or stretching only (control group [n = 65]). Four sessions of treatment were applied over 2 weeks with a 6-month follow-up after treatment. Pain intensity, mechanical hyperalgesia, neck active range of motion, neck muscle strength, and perceived neck disability were measured at baseline, after 2 sessions of intervention, after the intervention period, and 15, 30, 90, and 180 days after the intervention. Significant and clinically relevant differences were found in favour of dry needling in all the outcomes (all P neck pain. The results support the use of DDN in the management of myofascial pain syndrome in people with chronic nonspecific neck pain.

  6. High intensity physical exercise and pain in the neck and upper limb among slaughterhouse workers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sundstrup, Emil; Jakobsen, Markus D.; Andersen, Kenneth Jay

    2014-01-01

    and pain among 595 slaughterhouse workers in Denmark, Europe. Using logistic regression analyses, odds ratios for pain and work disability as a function of physical exercise, gender, age, BMI, smoking, and job position were estimated. The prevalence of pain in the neck, shoulder, elbow, and hand....../wrist was 48%, 60%, 40%, and 52%, respectively. The odds for experiencing neck pain were significantly lower among slaughterhouse workers performing physical exercise (OR = 0.70, CI: 0.49-0.997), whereas the odds for pain in the shoulders, elbow, or hand/wrist were not associated with exercise. The present...... study can be used as general reference of pain in the neck and upper extremity among slaughterhouse workers. Future studies should investigate the effect of high intensity physical exercise on neck and upper limb pain in slaughterhouse workers....

  7. Clinimetric evaluation of methods to measure muscle functioning in patients with non-specific neck pain: a systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Neck pain is a significant health problem in modern society. There is evidence to suggest that neck muscle strength is reduced in patients with neck pain. This article provides a critical analysis of the research literature on the clinimetric properties of tests to measure neck muscle strength or endurance in patients with non-specific neck pain, which can be used in daily practice. Methods A computerised literature search was performed in the Medline, CINAHL and Embase da...

  8. Influence of neck pain on cervical movement in the sagittal plane during smartphone use

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] Smartphone use reportedly changes posture. However, how neck posture is altered in smartphone users with neck pain is unknown. This study examined changes in the posture of young adults with and without mild neck pain (MNP) when using a smartphone. [Subjects] Thirteen control subjects and 14 subjects with MNP who used smartphones were recruited. [Methods] The upper cervical (UC) and lower cervical (LC) angles in the sagittal plane were measured using an ultrasound-based motion analy...

  9. An ICON Overview on Physical Modalities for Neck Pain and Associated Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Neck pain is common, can be disabling and is costly to society. Physical modalities are often included in neck rehabilitation programs. Interventions may include thermal, electrotherapy, ultrasound, mechanical traction, laser and acupuncture. Definitive knowledge regarding optimal modalities and dosage for neck pain management is limited. Purpose: To systematically review existing literature to establish the evidence-base for recommendations on physical modalities for acute to c...

  10. Heritability of neck pain: a population-based study of 33,794 Danish twins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fejer, R; Hartvigsen, J; Kyvik, K O

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To determine the heritability of neck pain in a large population-based study of twins. METHODS: Data on lifetime prevalence of neck pain from a population-based cross-sectional survey of Danish twins were used. To assess twin similarity, the probandwise concordance rates, zygosity......-specific odds ratios and tetrachoric correlations were calculated and compared for monozygotic and dizygotic twins. Using biometric modelling (structural equation modelling), the genetic and environmental contributions of the liability to neck pain were estimated. RESULTS: A total of 33,794 twins (response rate...... 73%) answered the questions regarding neck pain. Probandwise concordance rates, zygosity-specific odds ratios and tetrachoric correlations showed a significant genetic effect on neck pain. An overall additive genetic component of 44% was found. The genetic effect decreased with age, accounting...

  11. Prevalence of Neck and Back Pain amongst Aircrew at the Extremes of Anthropometric Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-06

    length, thigh clearance, thumb tip reach, head circumference , and neck circumference ) and issued a neck pain survey to 88 aviators (56 pilots and 31...survey. The majority of volunteers were in the 50th percentile or higher for weight and neck circumference , likely representing a change in body shape...between the ages of 19 to 24 years all had less than 500 flying hours. Overall discomfort in the aircraft increased as weight and neck circumference

  12. Neck pain among fighter pilots after the introduction of the JHMCS helmet and NVG in their environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lange, Britt; Torp-Svendsen, J; Toft, Palle

    2011-01-01

    Neck pain is a common complaint among fighter pilots. With implementation of the joint helmet mounted cuing system (JHMCS), the strain on the pilot's neck has increased.......Neck pain is a common complaint among fighter pilots. With implementation of the joint helmet mounted cuing system (JHMCS), the strain on the pilot's neck has increased....

  13. Clinimetric evaluation of methods to measure muscle functioning in patients with non-specific neck pain: a systematic review.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koning, C.H. de; Heuvel, SP van den; Staal, J.B.; Smits-Engelsman, B.C.M.; Hendriks, E.J.M.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Neck pain is a significant health problem in modern society. There is evidence to suggest that neck muscle strength is reduced in patients with neck pain. This article provides a critical analysis of the research literature on the clinimetric properties of tests to measure neck muscle st

  14. A randomised controlled trial comparing graded exercise treatment and usual physiotherapy for patients with non-specific neck pain (the GET UP neck pain trial).

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLean, Sionnadh M; Klaber Moffett, Jennifer A; Sharp, Donald M; Gardiner, Eric

    2013-06-01

    Evidence supports exercise-based interventions for the management of neck pain, however there is little evidence of its superiority over usual physiotherapy. This study investigated the effectiveness of a group neck and upper limb exercise programme (GET) compared with usual physiotherapy (UP) for patients with non-specific neck pain. A total of 151 adult patients were randomised to either GET or UP. The primary measure was the Northwick Park Neck pain Questionnaire (NPQ) score at six weeks, six months and 12 months. Mixed modelling identified no difference in neck pain and function between patients receiving GET and those receiving UP at any follow-up time point. Both interventions resulted in modest significant and clinically important improvements on the NPQ score with a change score of around 9% between baseline and 12 months. Both GET and UP are appropriate clinical interventions for patients with non-specific neck pain, however preferences for treatment and targeted strategies to address barriers to adherence may need to be considered in order to maximise the effectiveness of these approaches.

  15. Conservative management of uncomplicated mechanical neck pain in a military aviator

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Non-radicular neck pain arising from local musculoskeletal structures, known as mechanical neck pain or somatic dysfunction, is highly prevalent in the fighter jet aviator population. The management of this problem includes both therapeutic and aeromedical decisions. In addition to non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medications, waiver guides recommend therapeutic exercise and manipulative therapy as treatments for somatic spine pain in aviators, and such treatments are employed in many military...

  16. Effectiveness of small daily amounts of progressive resistance training for frequent neck/shoulder pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lars; Saervoll, Charlotte A; Mortensen, Ole S;

    2011-01-01

    Regular physical exercise is a cornerstone in rehabilitation programs, but adherence to comprehensive exercise remains low. This study determined the effectiveness of small daily amounts of progressive resistance training for relieving neck/shoulder pain in healthy adults with frequent symptoms......; 174 women and 24 men working at least 30 h per week and with frequent neck/shoulder pain were randomly assigned to resistance training with elastic tubing for 2 or 12 minutes per day 5 times per week, or weekly information on general health (control group). Primary outcomes were changes in intensity...... of neck/shoulder pain (scale 0 to 10), examiner-verified tenderness of the neck/shoulder muscles (total tenderness score of 0 to 32), and isometric muscle strength at 10 weeks. Compared with the control group, neck/shoulder pain and tenderness, respectively, decreased 1.4 points (95% confidence interval...

  17. Time-wise change in neck pain in response to rehabilitation with specific resistance training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zebis, Mette Kreutzfeldt; Andersen, Christoffer H; Sundstrup, Emil;

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To determine the time-wise effect of specific resistance training on neck pain among industrial technicians with frequent neck pain symptoms. Methods Secondary analysis of a parallel-group cluster randomized controlled trial of 20 weeks performed at two large industrial production units...... in Copenhagen, Denmark. Women with neck pain >30 mm VAS (N = 131) were included in the present analysis. The training group (N = 77) performed specific resistance training for the neck/shoulder muscles three times a week, and the control group (N = 54) received advice to stay active. Participants of both groups...... a two-phase pattern, i.e. weekly participation rate was between 70–86% during the initial 7 weeks, dropping towards 55–63% during the latter half of the training period. Conclusion Four weeks of specific resistance training reduced neck pain significantly, but 15 weeks is required to achieve maximal...

  18. Neck and Back Pain Prevalence in Workers of Iranian Steel industries at 2015

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Hassan Nassir- Kashani

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Work related musculoskeletal disorders (WMSDs are considered as the main cause of occupational complications and disability in developing countries. In Iranian steel companies, workers commonly are directly involved in the production process and physical activities such as manual material handling and awkward postures. Present study was performed for assessment of neck and back pain prevalence among workers of four Iranian steel industries. Study participants in our cross sectional study, were randomly selected from workers of four Iranian steel industries. Data of neck and back pain were gathered by Nordic questionnaire. Logistic regression was used for controlling confounding variables and determining independent predictors of neck and back pain among study workers. Among study workers, prevalence of neck and back pain in a recent year were 18.40% and 13.90% respectively. Age (p≤0.02 and job experience (p≤0.00 had significant association with neck pain. Age, sex, BMI, and job duration were not known as an independent predictor of neck or back pain. Neck and back pain prevalence in steel industries were happened whit higher rate compared to most of other countries. Next studies will suggest for determining work related risk factors of WMSDs in workers and designing preventive strategies.

  19. Personality traits and sick leave in workers diagnosed with nonorganic neck pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llor Esteban, Bartolomé; Sánchez Ortuño, Ma Montserrat; García Izquierdo, Mariano; Ruiz Hernández, José Antonio; Luna Maldonado, Aurelio

    2012-11-01

    Previous research has suggested that personality can influence the perception and reporting of physical symptoms, such as pain. To assess the relationship between the course of nonorganic neck pain and the individual's personality, we studied the association between two indicators of neck pain prognosis, such as the duration of sick leave associated with neck pain and sick leave recurrence, and 15 personality traits in a sample of 64 workers suffering from disabling neck pain without any signs of physical abnormalities in the neck area. The TEA Personality Test (TPT), a self-report instrument designed to evaluate personality traits related to organizational behaviors, was used. Compared to the normative data, the study sample obtained high scores in the Depression, Anxiety and Emotional Instability scales, thus suggesting a personality profile primarily characterized by high neuroticism-related scores. Controlling for age, gender, and any rehabilitation undergone, we found a positive relationship between Depression and the duration of sick leave (in weeks). Moreover, lower scores on the TPT personality trait Dynamism and activeness were associated with higher likelihood of sick leave recurrence. These findings highlight the need for further research into the role played by personality at the onset and in the maintenance of nonorganic neck pain. Furthermore, they suggest that a complementary psychological approach may be useful to nonorganic neck pain management.

  20. Age Moderates the Relationships between Family Functioning and Neck Pain/Disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzy, Grażyna; Polczyk, Romuald; Szpitalak, Malwina; Vernon, Howard

    2016-01-01

    This cross-sectional clinical study was designed to explore the relationships between family functioning, coping styles, and neck pain and neck disability. It was hypothesized that better family functioning and more effective coping styles would be associated with less pain and pain-related disability. It also was hypothesized that these relationships would be stronger in older people because they have fewer resources, more limited coping styles, and may depend more on their family for support. In this study, 88 women with chronic non-traumatic neck pain completed the Family Assessment Measure (FAM), Coping Inventory for Stressful Situations (CISS), Neck Disability Index (NDI), and a Visual-Analogue Scale (VAS) measuring the subjective intensity of neck pain. Zero-order and partial correlations and hierarchical stepwise regression were performed. CISS was not correlated with the NDI orVAS. Good family functioning was correlated with lower NDI and VAS scores. Age was found to moderate the relationship between the FAM and both NDI and VAS. This relationship was significant and positive in older patients, but non-significant in younger patients. It was concluded that better family functioning is associated with lower neck disability and pain intensity, especially in the case of older women suffering from non-traumatic neck pain.

  1. Pain severity and catastrophising modify treatment success in neck pain patients in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhagen, A P; Karels, C H; Schellingerhout, J M; Willemsen, S P; Koes, B W; Bierma-Zeinstra, S M A

    2010-06-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate whether clinical factors at baseline in patients with non-specific neck pain are related to recovery after treatment with manual therapy versus physiotherapy. Participating physiotherapists recruited new consulters with complaints of the neck and/or upper extremity. For this study we selected patients from this cohort with non-specific neck complaints. Participants filled in questionnaires at baseline, 3 and 6 months. The main outcome measure was recovery at 6 months follow-up. Possible predictors like complaint-specific factors, physical factors, social and psychological factors were evaluated for interaction with treatment. Of the 396 participants in this study, 97 (24.5%) received manual therapy, all others received physiotherapy, consisting of exercises, massage or physical applications. In the multivariable model four variables were significantly related to recovery: duration of complaint, catastrophising, distress and somatisation. Severity of main complaint and catastrophising appeared to show interaction with treatment. It appeared that every point increase in severity or catastrophising resulted in a lower chance to recover from physiotherapy compared to manual therapy. In conclusion, severity of main complaint and catastrophising seem to modify treatment success. Increased pain severity or catastrophising at baseline increased the chance of treatment success after manual therapy compared to physiotherapy.

  2. Pre- and post-operative gait analysis for evaluation of neck pain in chronic whiplash

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ginsburg Glen M

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Chronic neck pain after whiplash is notoriously refractory to conservative treatment, and positive radiological findings to explain the symptoms are scarce. The apparent disproportionality between subjective complaints and objective findings is significant for the planning of treatment, impairment ratings, and judicial questions on causation. However, failure to identify a symptom's focal origin with routine imaging studies does not invalidate the symptom per se. It is therefore of a general interest both to develop effective therapeutic strategies in chronic whiplash, and to establish techniques for objectively evaluation of treatment outcomes. Methods Twelve patients with chronic neck pain after whiplash underwent pre- and postoperative computerized 3D gait analysis. Results Significant improvement was found in all gait parameters, cervical range-of-motion, and self reported pain (VAS. Conclusion Chronic neck pain is associated with abnormal cervical spine motion and gait patterns. 3D gait analysis is a useful instrument to assess the outcome of treatment for neck pain.

  3. Specific exercise training for reducing neck and shoulder pain among military helicopter pilots and crew members

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Murray, Mike; Lange, Britt; Nørnberg, Bo Riebeling

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Flight-related neck/shoulder pain is frequent among military helicopter pilots and crew members. With a lifetime prevalence of 81 % for pilots and 84 % for crew members, the prevalence of neck pain is considered high compared to the general population. The aim of this study...... was to investigate whether a specifically tailored exercise intervention would reduce the prevalence and incidence rate of neck/shoulder pain among helicopter pilots and crew members. METHOD: This study used a prospective, parallel group, single blinded, randomized controlled design. Participants were military...... status at enrollment, and 3) operational flying within the previous 6 months. Primary outcome was change in neck and shoulder pain assessed by 1) a modified version of the "Standardized Nordic questionnaire for the analysis of musculoskeletal symptoms" and by 2) pressure pain threshold measurements...

  4. Effect of two contrasting types of physical exercise on chronic neck muscle pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, L.L.; Kjær, Michael; Søgaard, Kirsten;

    2008-01-01

    Objective. The prevalence of neck muscle pain has steadily increased and especially pain from the descending part of the trapezius muscle has been associated with monotonous work tasks such as computer work. Physical exercise is generally recommended as treatment, but it is unclear which type...... of training is most effective. Our objective was to determine the effectiveness of specific strength training of the painful muscle versus general fitness training without direct involvement of the painful muscle (leg bicycling) on work-related neck muscle pain. Methods. We conducted a randomized controlled...

  5. Chronic neck pain: making the connection between capsular ligament laxity and cervical instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steilen, Danielle; Hauser, Ross; Woldin, Barbara; Sawyer, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    The use of conventional modalities for chronic neck pain remains debatable, primarily because most treatments have had limited success. We conducted a review of the literature published up to December 2013 on the diagnostic and treatment modalities of disorders related to chronic neck pain and concluded that, despite providing temporary relief of symptoms, these treatments do not address the specific problems of healing and are not likely to offer long-term cures. The objectives of this narrative review are to provide an overview of chronic neck pain as it relates to cervical instability, to describe the anatomical features of the cervical spine and the impact of capsular ligament laxity, to discuss the disorders causing chronic neck pain and their current treatments, and lastly, to present prolotherapy as a viable treatment option that heals injured ligaments, restores stability to the spine, and resolves chronic neck pain. The capsular ligaments are the main stabilizing structures of the facet joints in the cervical spine and have been implicated as a major source of chronic neck pain. Chronic neck pain often reflects a state of instability in the cervical spine and is a symptom common to a number of conditions described herein, including disc herniation, cervical spondylosis, whiplash injury and whiplash associated disorder, postconcussion syndrome, vertebrobasilar insufficiency, and Barré-Liéou syndrome. When the capsular ligaments are injured, they become elongated and exhibit laxity, which causes excessive movement of the cervical vertebrae. In the upper cervical spine (C0-C2), this can cause a number of other symptoms including, but not limited to, nerve irritation and vertebrobasilar insufficiency with associated vertigo, tinnitus, dizziness, facial pain, arm pain, and migraine headaches. In the lower cervical spine (C3-C7), this can cause muscle spasms, crepitation, and/or paresthesia in addition to chronic neck pain. In either case, the presence of

  6. Fluoroscopic lumbar interlaminar epidural injections in managing chronic lumbar axial or discogenic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manchikanti, Laxmaiah; Cash, Kimberly A; McManus, Carla D; Pampati, Vidyasagar; Benyamin, Ramsin

    2012-01-01

    Among the multiple causes of chronic low back pain, axial and discogenic pain are common. Various modalities of treatments are utilized in managing discogenic and axial low back pain including epidural injections. However, there is a paucity of evidence regarding the effectiveness, indications, and medical necessity of any treatment modality utilized for managing axial or discogenic pain, including epidural injections. In an interventional pain management practice in the US, a randomized, double-blind, active control trial was conducted. The objective was to assess the effectiveness of lumbar interlaminar epidural injections of local anesthetic with or without steroids for managing chronic low back pain of discogenic origin. However, disc herniation, radiculitis, facet joint pain, or sacroiliac joint pain were excluded. Two groups of patients were studied, with 60 patients in each group receiving either local anesthetic only or local anesthetic mixed with non-particulate betamethasone. Primary outcome measures included the pain relief-assessed by numeric rating scale of pain and functional status assessed by the, Oswestry Disability Index, Secondary outcome measurements included employment status, and opioid intake. Significant improvement or success was defined as at least a 50% decrease in pain and disability. Significant improvement was seen in 77% of the patients in Group I and 67% of the patients in Group II. In the successful groups (those with at least 3 weeks of relief with the first two procedures), the improvement was 84% in Group I and 71% in Group II. For those with chronic function-limiting low back pain refractory to conservative management, it is concluded that lumbar interlaminar epidural injections of local anesthetic with or without steroids may be an effective modality for managing chronic axial or discogenic pain. This treatment appears to be effective for those who have had facet joints as well as sacroiliac joints eliminated as the pain source.

  7. Aberrant cervical vasculature anastomosis as cause of neck pain and successful treatment with embolization technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Lucy; Ladner, Travis R; Cobb, Mark; Mocco, J

    2016-01-27

    We report a patient with non-dermatomal radiating neck pain without focal neurologic deficit. Traditional workup could not identify an anatomic or biomechanical cause. Imaging showed a deep cervical vessel centered in the region of pain. Angiography later identified an aberrant anastomosis of this vessel with the occipital artery. Subsequent endovascular embolization of this arterial trunk resulted in complete pain relief.

  8. Function and structure of the deep cervical extensor muscles in patients with neck pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schomacher, Jochen; Falla, Deborah

    2013-10-01

    The deep cervical extensors are anatomically able to control segmental movements of the cervical spine in concert with the deep cervical flexors. Several investigations have confirmed changes in cervical flexor muscle control in patients with neck pain and as a result, effective evidence-based therapeutic exercises have been developed to address such dysfunctions. However, knowledge on how the deep extensor muscles behave in patients with neck pain disorders is scare. Structural changes such as higher concentration of fat within the muscle, variable cross-sectional area and higher proportions of type II fibres have been observed in the deep cervical extensors of patients with neck pain compared to healthy controls. These findings suggest that the behaviour of the deep extensors may be altered in patients with neck pain. Consistent with this hypothesis, a recent series of studies confirm that patients display reduced activation of the deep cervical extensors as well as less defined activation patterns. This article provides an overview of the various different structural and functional changes in the deep neck extensor muscles documented in patients with neck pain. Relevant recommendations for the management of muscle dysfunction in patients with neck pain are presented.

  9. Efficacy of Massage Therapy on Pain and Dysfunction in Patients with Neck Pain: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Hong Cheng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To systematically evaluate the evidence of whether massage therapy (MT is effective for neck pain. Methods. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs were identified through searches of 5 English and Chinese databases (to December 2012. The search terms included neck pain, neck disorders, cervical vertebrae, massage, manual therapy, Tuina, and random. In addition, we performed hand searches at the library of Nanjing University of Traditional Chinese Medicine. Two reviewers independently abstracted data and assessed the methodological quality of RCTs by PEDro scale. And the meta-analyses of improvements on pain and neck-related function were conducted. Results. Fifteen RCTs met inclusion criteria. The meta-analysis showed that MT experienced better immediate effects on pain relief compared with inactive therapies (n=153; standardised mean difference (SMD, 1.30; 95% confidence interval (CI, 0.09 to 2.50; P=0.03 and traditional Chinese medicine (n=125; SMD, 0.73; 95% CI 0.13 to 1.33; P=0.02. There was no valid evidence of MT on improving dysfunction. With regard to follow-up effects, there was not enough evidence of MT for neck pain. Conclusions. This systematic review found moderate evidence of MT on improving pain in patients with neck pain compared with inactive therapies and limited evidence compared with traditional Chinese medicine. There were no valid lines of evidence of MT on improving dysfunction. High quality RCTs are urgently needed to confirm these results and continue to compare MT with other active therapies for neck pain.

  10. Range of motion in the upper and lower cervical spine in people with chronic neck pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudolfsson, Thomas; Björklund, Martin; Djupsjöbacka, Mats

    2012-02-01

    Reduced cervical range of motion (ROM) is a common finding in people with neck pain. With few exceptions, only the angle between head and thorax has been measured. Our aim was to use an extended model to compare active cervical flexion and extension, separate for upper and lower cervical levels, between people with chronic non-traumatic neck pain and controls. We also investigated associations between ROM measures, symptoms and self-rated functioning. In this cross-sectional study, 102 subjects with neck pain and 33 healthy controls participated. An electromagnetic tracker system was used to measure the kinematics to construct a three-segment model including the thorax, cervical spine and head. Neutral flexion/extension were defined at subjects' self-selected seated posture. We found that in the neck pain group, extension in the upper cervical levels and predominately flexion for the lower levels were reduced. The ratio between ROM for the upper and lower levels was altered in the neck pain group so that the lower levels contributed to a lesser extent to the total sagittal ROM compared to controls. These findings could not be explained by a greater forward head posture but must have other origins. For the neck pain group, ROM measures were weakly associated to pain and self-rated functioning. Altogether, this implies that using a three-segment model for assessment of ROM can be a valuable improvement for characterisation of patients and treatment evaluation.

  11. The effect of intra-operative transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation on posterior neck pain following thyroidectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, C; Choi, J B; Lee, Y-S; Chang, H-S; Shin, C S; Kim, S; Han, D W

    2015-04-01

    Posterior neck pain following thyroidectomy is common because full neck extension is required during the procedure. We evaluated the effect of intra-operative transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation on postoperative neck pain in patients undergoing total thyroidectomy under general anaesthesia. One hundred patients were randomly assigned to one of two groups; 50 patients received transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation applied to the trapezius muscle and 50 patients acted as controls. Postoperative posterior neck pain and anterior wound pain were evaluated using an 11-point numerical rating scale at 30 min, 6 h, 24 h and 48 h following surgery. The numerical rating scale for posterior neck pain was significantly lower in the transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation group compared with the control group at all time points (p pain at any time point. No adverse effects related to transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation were observed. We conclude that intra-operative transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation applied to the trapezius muscle reduced posterior neck pain following thyroidectomy.

  12. Analysis of scapular muscle EMG activity in patients with idiopathic neck pain: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castelein, Birgit; Cools, Ann; Bostyn, Emma; Delemarre, Jolien; Lemahieu, Trees; Cagnie, Barbara

    2015-04-01

    It is proposed that altered scapular muscle function can contribute to abnormal loading of the cervical spine. However, it is not clear if patients with idiopathic neck pain show altered activity of the scapular muscles. The aim of this paper was to systematically review the literature regarding the differences or similarities in scapular muscle activity, measured by electromyography ( = EMG), between patients with chronic idiopathic neck pain compared to pain-free controls. Case-control (neck pain/healthy) studies investigating scapular muscle EMG activity (amplitude, timing and fatigue parameters) were searched in Pubmed and Web of Science. 25 articles were included in the systematic review. During rest and activities below shoulder height, no clear differences in mean Upper Trapezius ( = UT) EMG activity exist between patients with idiopathic neck pain and a healthy control group. During overhead activities, no conclusion for scapular EMG amplitude can be drawn as a large variation of results were reported. Adaptation strategies during overhead tasks are not the same between studies. Only one study investigated timing of the scapular muscles and found a delayed onset and shorter duration of the SA during elevation in patients with idiopathic neck pain. For scapular muscle fatigue, no definite conclusions can be made as a wide variation and conflicting results are reported. Further high quality EMG research on scapular muscles (broader than the UT) is necessary to understand/draw conclusions on how scapular muscles react in the presence of idiopathic neck pain.

  13. Prevalence and anatomical location of muscle tenderness in adults with nonspecific neck/shoulder pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mortensen Ole S

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many adults experience bothersome neck/shoulder pain. While research and treatment strategies often focus on the upper trapezius, other neck/shoulder muscles may be affected as well. The aim of the present study is to evaluate the prevalence and anatomical location of muscle tenderness in adults with nonspecific neck/shoulder pain. Methods Clinical neck/shoulder examination at two large office workplaces in Copenhagen, Denmark. 174 women and 24 men (aged 25-65 years with nonspecific neck/shoulder pain for a duration of at least 30 days during the previous year and a pain intensity of at least 2 on a modified VAS-scale of 0-10 participated. Exclusion criteria were traumatic injuries or other serious chronic disease. Using a standardized finger pressure of 2 kg, palpable tenderness were performed of eight anatomical neck/shoulder locations in the left and right side on a scale of 'no tenderness', 'some tenderness' and 'severe tenderness'. Results In women, the levator scapulae, neck extensors and infraspinatus showed the highest prevalence of severe tenderness (18-30%. In comparison, the prevalence of severe tenderness in the upper trapezius, occipital border and supraspinatus was 13-19%. Severe tenderness of the medial deltoid was least prevalent (0-1%. In men, the prevalence of severe tenderness in the levator scapulae was 13-21%, and ranged between 0-8% in the remainder of the examined anatomical locations. Conclusions A high prevalence of tenderness exists in several anatomical locations of the neck/shoulder complex among adults with nonspecific neck/shoulder pain. Future research should focus on several neck/shoulder muscles, including the levator scapulae, neck extensors and infraspinatus, and not only the upper trapezius. Trial Registration ISRCTN60264809

  14. When should a cervical collar be used to treat neck pain?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muzin, Stefan; Isaac, Zacharia; Walker, Joseph; Abd, Omar El; Baima, Jennifer

    2008-06-01

    Neck pain is one of the most prevalent and costly health problems in the United States. It remains a complex, subjective experience with a variety of musculoskeletal causes. Although, cervical collars are a seemingly benign intervention, they can have adverse effects, especially when used for longer periods of time. It is feared that a long period of immobilization, can result in atrophy-related secondary damage. Many physicians cite anecdotal evidence of their clinical utility and soft cervical collars are often prescribed by convention for patients complaining of neck pain. The use of cervical collars to treat neck pain is an area of controversy. This review article examines the current evidence and studies related to recommending cervical collars for neck pain of a variety of etiologies.

  15. The Clinical Effects of Carthami-Flos Pharmacopuncture on Posterior Neck pain of Menopausal Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae-Yeon Park

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The purpose of this research was to examine the effect of Carthami-Flos Pharmacopuncture on posterior neck pain of menopausal women. Methods: We treated 20 female patients with neck pain patient(45-60 yr into two groups and treated Group A with Carthami-Flos Pharmacopuncture and common acupuncture and Group B with common acupuncture. The efficacy of treatment was measured by VAS, NDI and MENQOL scores of before and after 30 days to start treatment. Results: Both group A and B represented effective improvement in VAS and NDI of neck pain and MENQOL scores. And group A was more effective than B group statistically. Conclusions: It was suggested that Carthami-Flos Pharmacopuncture treatment might have effect on posterior neck pain treatment of menopausal women.

  16. Fluoroscopic lumbar interlaminar epidural injections in managing chronic lumbar axial or discogenic pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manchikanti L

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Laxmaiah Manchikanti,1,2 Kimberly A Cash,1 Carla D McManus,1 Vidyasagar Pampati,1 Ramsin Benyamin3,41Pain Management Center of Paducah, Paducah, KY; 2University of Louisville, Louisville, KY; 3Millennium Pain Center, Bloomington, IL; 4University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL, USAAbstract: Among the multiple causes of chronic low back pain, axial and discogenic pain are common. Various modalities of treatments are utilized in managing discogenic and axial low back pain including epidural injections. However, there is a paucity of evidence regarding the effectiveness, indications, and medical necessity of any treatment modality utilized for managing axial or discogenic pain, including epidural injections. In an interventional pain management practice in the US, a randomized, double-blind, active control trial was conducted. The objective was to assess the effectiveness of lumbar interlaminar epidural injections of local anesthetic with or without steroids for managing chronic low back pain of discogenic origin. However, disc herniation, radiculitis, facet joint pain, or sacroiliac joint pain were excluded. Two groups of patients were studied, with 60 patients in each group receiving either local anesthetic only or local anesthetic mixed with non-particulate betamethasone. Primary outcome measures included the pain relief-assessed by numeric rating scale of pain and functional status assessed by the, Oswestry Disability Index, Secondary outcome measurements included employment status, and opioid intake. Significant improvement or success was defined as at least a 50% decrease in pain and disability. Significant improvement was seen in 77% of the patients in Group I and 67% of the patients in Group II. In the successful groups (those with at least 3 weeks of relief with the first two procedures, the improvement was 84% in Group I and 71% in Group II. For those with chronic function-limiting low back pain refractory to conservative management

  17. Process evaluation of a participatory ergonomics programme to prevent low back pain and neck pain among workers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Driessen, M.T.; Proper, K.I.; Anema, J.R.; Bongers, P.M.; Beek, A.J. van der

    2010-01-01

    Background: Both low back pain (LBP) and neck pain (NP) are major occupational health problems. In the workplace, participatory ergonomics (PE) is frequently used on musculoskeletal disorders. However, evidence on the effectiveness of PE to prevent LBP and NP obtained from randomised controlled tria

  18. EFFECT OF THE CERVICAL ENDURANCE TRAINING PROGRAMME IN MECHANICAL NECK PAIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pranjal Gogoi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Mechanical neck pain commonly arises insidiously and is generally multifactorial in origin. Regardless of the primary source of pain, the prognosis for individual experiencing chronic neck pain is poor. Exercise interventions are important for effective management of patients with neck pain.the objective of the study is to compare the efficacy of cervical endurance training programme with cervical isometric exercise in alleviating symptoms of mechanical neck pain. Methods: 40 subjects were assessed and identified with Mechanical Neck Pain and recruited for the study and were randomly divided into two groups. In one group endurance training for cervical muscles and in another group resisted isometric had been given for 3 weeks. The post treatment scores regarding endurance, pain intensity, disability, Range of motion and muscle power were compared with the pre treatment scores. Results: Paired‘t’ test was done to compare the pretreatment scores with the post treatment scores .Unpaired ‘t’ test was done to compare the post treatment scores of both the groups. The pain intensity, disability were found to be significantly decreased in experimental group than the control group (p<0.001. While the endurance was found to be significantly increased in experimental group than the control group (p < 0.001. The muscle power was found to be slightly increased in the control group than the experimental group .The post treatment cervical range of motion does not have significant difference in between the groups (Flexion- p=0.35 and Extension-p=0.40. Conclusion: This study showed that the progressive endurance exercise is beneficial in alleviating mechanical neck pain and should be incorporated along with the conventional physiotherapy treatment for mechanical neck pain.

  19. Shoulder pain and disability in daily life, following supraomohyoid neck dissection : a pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Wilgen, CP; Dijkstra, PU; Nauta, JM; Vermey, A; Roodenburg, JLN

    2003-01-01

    Introduction: The purpose of this pilot study was to assess shoulder morbidity; i.e. pain and disability in daily activities, at least I year after unilateral or bilateral supraomohyoid neck dissection. Patients and methods: 52 patients having been subjected to a supraomohyoid neck dissection comple

  20. Effect of scapular function training on chronic pain in the neck/shoulder region

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Christoffer H; Andersen, Lars L; Zebis, Mette K;

    2014-01-01

    supervision or to a control group. At baseline and at follow-up the participants were tested for maximum isometric shoulder strength by a blinded tester. Further, once a week participants reported pain intensity of the neck/shoulder during the previous week. RESULTS: In intention-to-treat analysis neck...

  1. Torque-EMG-velocity relationship in female workers with chronic neck muscle pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lars L; Nielsen, Pernille K; Søgaard, Karen

    2008-01-01

    The present study investigated the effect of chronic neck muscle pain (defined as trapezius myalgia) on neck/shoulder muscle function during concentric, eccentric and static contraction. Forty-two female office workers with trapezius myalgia (MYA) and 20 healthy matched controls (CON) participated...

  2. Physical capacity in relation to low back, neck, or shoulder pain in a working population

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hamberg - Reenen, H.H. van; Ariëns, G.A.M.; Blatter, B.M.; Twisk, J.W.R.; Mechelen, W. van; Bongers, P.M.

    2006-01-01

    Aims: To investigate the longitudinal relation between physical capacity (isokinetic lifting strength, static endurance of the back, neck, and shoulder muscles, and mobility of the spine) and low back, neck, and shoulder pain. Methods: In this prospective cohort study, 1789 Dutch workers participate

  3. Physical exercises and functional rehabilitation for the management of chronic neck pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ylinen, J

    2007-03-01

    Despite chronic neck pain being so common in the population, few randomized studies have evaluated exercise methods in treating the neck disorders. The aim of this review was to reassess the effectiveness of different exercise methods in relieving pain and improving disability in patients with chronic nonspecific neck pain. Ten randomized controlled or comparative high-quality trials were included in a more detailed analysis using patient-oriented primary outcome measures (e.g., patient's rated pain and disability) as well as pressure pain threshold and functional outcomes (neck strength and range of motion). Findings revealed moderate evidence supporting the effectiveness of both long-term dynamic as well as isometric resistance exercises of the neck and shoulder musculature for chronic or frequent neck disorders. Findings revealed no evidence supporting the long-term effectiveness of postural and proprioceptive exercises or other very low intensity exercises. Clinicians are encouraged to consider these findings and incorporate them into their practice when planning the treatment of patients with chronic neck disorders.

  4. Chronic Neck Pain: Making the Connection Between Capsular Ligament Laxity and Cervical Instability

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    The use of conventional modalities for chronic neck pain remains debatable, primarily because most treatments have had limited success. We conducted a review of the literature published up to December 2013 on the diagnostic and treatment modalities of disorders related to chronic neck pain and concluded that, despite providing temporary relief of symptoms, these treatments do not address the specific problems of healing and are not likely to offer long-term cures. The objectives of this narra...

  5. Isolated pulmonic valve endocarditis presenting as neck pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aditya Goud

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available We discuss a unique case of a 52-year-old man with no history of intravenous drug use or dental procedures who presented with neck pain, 2 weeks of fevers, chills, night sweats, cough, and dyspnea found to have isolated pulmonic valve (PV endocarditis. The patient did not have an associated murmur, which is commonly seen in right-sided infectious endocarditis. A transthoracic echocardiogram showed a thickened PV leaflet, with subsequent transesophageal echocardiogram showing a PV mass. Speciation of blood cultures revealed Streptococcus oralis. In right-sided infective endocarditis, usually the tricuspid valve is involved; however, in our case the tricuspid valve was free of any mass or vegetation. The patient did meet Duke criteria and was thus started on long-term intravenous antibiotics for infectious endocarditis. The patient's symptoms quickly improved with antibiotics. A careful history and evaluating the patient's risk factors are key in earlier detection of infective endocarditis (IE. Because of early detection and a high index of suspicion, the patient had no further complications and did not require any surgery. In conclusion, clinical suspicion of right-sided IE should be high in patients who present with persistent fevers and pulmonary symptoms in order to reduce the risk of complications, and to improve outcomes.

  6. Increased neck muscle activity and impaired balance among females with whiplash-related chronic neck pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul-Kristensen, Birgit; Clausen, Brian; Ris Hansen, Inge

    2013-01-01

    To investigate neck muscle activity and postural control in patients with whiplash-associated disorder compared with healthy controls.......To investigate neck muscle activity and postural control in patients with whiplash-associated disorder compared with healthy controls....

  7. Simple neck pain questions used in surveys, evaluated in relation to health outcomes: a cohort study

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background The high prevalence of pain reported in many epidemiological studies, and the degree to which this prevalence reflects severe pain is under discussion in the literature. The aim of the present study was to evaluate use of the simple neck pain questions commonly included in large epidemiological survey studies with respect to aspects of health. We investigated if and how an increase in number of days with pain is associated with reduction in health outcomes. Methods A cohor...

  8. The influence of neck pain on sensorimotor function in the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uthaikhup, Sureeporn; Jull, Gwendolen; Sungkarat, Somporn; Treleaven, Julia

    2012-01-01

    Greater disturbances in sensorimotor control have been demonstrated in younger to middle aged groups. However, it is unknown whether or not the impairments documented in these populations can be extrapolated to elders with neck pain. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of neck pain on sensorimotor function in elders. Twenty elders with neck pain (12 women and 8 men) and 20 healthy elder controls (14 women and 6 men) aged 65 years and over were recruited from the general community. Tests for sensorimotor function included; cervical joint position sense (JPS); computerised rod-and-frame test (RFT); smooth pursuit neck torsion test (SPNT); standing balance (under conditions of eyes open, eyes closed on firm and soft surfaces in comfortable stance); step test and ten-meter walk test with and without head movement. Elders with neck pain had greater deficits in the majority of sensorimotor function tests after controlling for effects of age and comorbidities. Significant differences were found in the SPNT (pneck pain have greater sensorimotor disturbances than elders without neck pain, supporting a contribution of altered afferent information originating from the cervical spine to such disturbances. The findings may inform falls prevention and management programs.

  9. The Association Between Neck Pain and Pulmonary Function: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahlaee, Amir Hossein; Ghamkhar, Leila; Arab, Amir Massoud

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study was to systematically review the evidence on respiratory function changes in patients with chronic neck pain. MEDLINE, Elsevier, ProQuest, PubMed, Scopus, Springer, and Google scholar electronic databases were explored thorough December 2015. English-language studies investigating cervical musculoskeletal and respiratory parameters in patients with chronic neck pain were included. Characteristics of the patients, sampling method and size, musculoskeletal and respiratory parameters studied, and appropriateness of the statistical tests were considered. Studies were rated based on study design and performance. Of the 68 studies reviewed, 9 observational studies met our inclusion criteria. Significant difference in maximum inspiratory and expiratory pressures were reported in patients with chronic neck pain compared to asymptomatic subjects. Some of the respiratory volumes were found to be lower in patients with chronic neck pain. Muscle strength and endurance, cervical range of motion, and psychological states were found to be significantly correlated with respiratory parameters. Lower Pco2 in patients and significant relationship between chest expansion and neck pain were also shown. Respiratory retraining was found to be effective in improving some cervical musculoskeletal and respiratory impairment. Functional pulmonary impairments accompany chronic neck pain. Based on the observed association, investigation of the effectiveness of management of CNP on respiratory function is strongly suggested.

  10. Protocol for Shoulder function training reducing musculoskeletal pain in shoulder and neck: a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mortensen Ole S

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neck and shoulder complaints are common among employees in sedentary occupations characterized by intensive computer use. Such musculoskeletal pain - which is often associated with restricted range of motion and loss of muscle strength - is one of the most common conditions treated by physical therapists. The exact mechanism of neck pain is rarely revealed by clinical examination and the treatment has varied from passive rest to active treatments. Active treatments have often been divided into either training of the painful area or the surrounding musculature avoiding direct training of the painful area. Our study investigates the effect of the latter approach. Methods/Design A randomized controlled trial of 10 weeks duration is currently being conducted. Employed office workers with severe neck-shoulder pain are randomized to 3 × 20 min shoulder function training with training supervision or to a reference group receiving advice to stay physically active. Shoulder function training primarily focuses on the serratus anterior and lower trapezius muscle with only minimal activation the upper trapezius. An announcement was sent to the administrative section of the university including jobs characterized by intensive computer work. The first 100 positive replies entered the study. Among these inclusion criteria were pain intensity in the neck/shoulder of at least 3 on a 0-9 scale. Exclusion criteria were cardiovascular disease, trauma, hypertension, or serious chronic disease. Before and after the intervention period the participants replied to a questionnaire about musculoskeletal disorders and work disability, and underwent a standardized clinical examination of the neck and shoulder girdle. Further, on a weekly basis the participants log pain intensity of the neck and shoulder during the previous week. The primary outcome measure is pain in the neck and shoulders at week 10 based on the weekly pain registration and results

  11. The role of physiotherapy in the management of non-specific back pain and neck pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moffett, J; McLean, S

    2006-04-01

    This paper provides an overview of best practice for the role of physiotherapy in managing back pain and neck pain, based mainly on evidence-based guidelines and systematic reviews. More up-to-date relevant primary research is also highlighted. A stepped approach is recommended in which the physiotherapist initially takes a history and carries out a physical examination to exclude any potentially serious pathology and identify any particular functional deficits. Initially, advice providing simple messages of explanation and reassurance will form the basis of a patient education package. Self-management is emphasized throughout. A return to normal activities is encouraged. For the patient who is not recovering after a few weeks, a short course of physiotherapy may be offered. This should be based on an active management approach, such as exercise therapy. Manual therapy should also be considered. Any passive treatment should only be used if required to relieve pain and assist in helping patients get moving. Barriers to recovery need to be explored. Those few patients who have persistent pain and disability that interferes with their daily lives and work need more intensive treatment or a different approach. A multidisciplinary approach may then be optimal, although it is not widely available. Liaison with the workplace and/or social services may be important. Getting all players on side is crucial, especially at this stage.

  12. A randomized controlled intervention trial to relieve and prevent neck/shoulder pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lars L; Jørgensen, Marie B; Blangsted, Anne Katrine;

    2008-01-01

    PURPOSE: The objective of this study is to investigate the effect of three different workplace interventions on long-term compliance, muscle strength gains, and neck/shoulder pain in office workers. METHODS: A 1-yr randomized controlled intervention trial was done with three groups: specific...... in maximal muscle strength, and changes in intensity of neck/shoulder pain (scale 0-9) in those with and without pain at baseline. RESULTS: Regular participation was achieved by 54%, 31%, and 16% of those of the participants who answered the questionnaire in SRT (78%), APE (81%), and REF (80%), respectively......, during the first half of the intervention period, and decreased to 35%, 28% and 9%, respectively, during the second half. Shoulder elevation strength increased 9-11% in SRT and APE (P pain at baseline decreased the intensity of neck pain through SRT, from 5.0 +/- 0...

  13. Can widespread hypersensitivity in carpal tunnel syndrome be substantiated if neck and arm pain are absent?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, A B; Soon, B T C; Wasner, G; Coppieters, M W

    2012-02-01

    Recent studies demonstrated that patients with carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) have signs of thermal and mechanical hyperalgesia in extra-median territories suggesting an involvement of central pain mechanisms. As previous studies included patients with shoulder/arm symptoms or neck pain, a potential influence of these coexisting disorders cannot be excluded. This study therefore evaluated whether widespread sensory changes (hypoesthesia or hyperalgesia) are present in patients with unilateral CTS in the absence of coexisting disorders. Twenty-six patients with unilateral CTS with symptoms localised to their hand and 26 healthy controls participated in the study. A comprehensive quantitative sensory testing (QST) protocol including thermal and mechanical detection and pain thresholds was performed over the hands (median, ulnar and radial innervation area), lateral elbows, neck and tibialis anterior muscle. Patients with CTS demonstrated thermal and mechanical hypoesthesia in the hand but not at distant sites. Thermal or mechanical hyperalgesia was not identified at any location with traditional QST threshold testing. However, patients with CTS rated the pain during thermal pain testing significantly higher than healthy participants. This was especially apparent for heat pain ratings which were elevated not only in the affected hand but also in the neck and tibialis anterior muscle. In conclusion, CTS alone in the absence of coexisting neck and arm pain does not account for sensory changes outside the affected hand as determined by traditional QST threshold testing. Elevated pain ratings may however be an early indication of central pain mechanisms.

  14. Fluoroscopic caudal epidural injections in managing chronic axial low back pain without disc herniation, radiculitis, or facet joint pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manchikanti L

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Laxmaiah Manchikanti,1,2 Kimberly A Cash,1 Carla D McManus,1 Vidyasagar Pampati11Pain Management Center of Paducah, Paducah, 2Department of Anesthesiology and Perioperative Medicine, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY, USABackground: Chronic low back pain without disc herniation is common. Various modalities of treatments are utilized in managing this condition, including epidural injections. However, there is continued debate on the effectiveness, indications, and medical necessity of any treatment modality utilized for managing axial or discogenic pain, including epidural injections.Methods: A randomized, double-blind, actively controlled trial was conducted. The objective was to evaluate the ability to assess the effectiveness of caudal epidural injections of local anesthetic with or without steroids for managing chronic low back pain not caused by disc herniation, radiculitis, facet joints, or sacroiliac joints. A total of 120 patients were randomized to two groups; one group did not receive steroids (group 1 and the other group did (group 2. There were 60 patients in each group. The primary outcome measure was at least 50% improvement in Numeric Rating Scale and Oswestry Disability Index. Secondary outcome measures were employment status and opioid intake. These measures were assessed at 3, 6, 12, 18, and 24 months after treatment.Results: Significant pain relief and functional status improvement (primary outcome defined as a 50% or more reduction in scores from baseline, were observed in 54% of patients in group 1 and 60% of patients in group 2 at 24 months. In contrast, 84% of patients in group 1 and 73% in group 2 saw significant pain relief and functional status improvement in the successful groups at 24 months.Conclusion: Caudal epidural injections of local anesthetic with or without steroids are effective in patients with chronic axial low back pain of discogenic origin without facet joint pain, disc herniation, and

  15. Massage Therapy for Neck and Shoulder Pain: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling Jun Kong

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To evaluate the effectiveness of massage therapy (MT for neck and shoulder pain. Methods. Seven English and Chinese databases were searched until December 2011 for randomized controlled trials (RCTs of MT for neck and shoulder pain. The methodological quality of RCTs was assessed based on PEDro scale. The meta-analyses of MT for neck and shoulder pain were performed. Results. Twelve high-quality studies were included. In immediate effects, the meta-analyses showed significant effects of MT for neck pain (standardised mean difference, SMD, 1.79; 95% confidence intervals, CI, 1.01 to 2.57; P<0.00001 and shoulder pain (SMD, 1.50; 95% CI, 0.55 to 2.45; P=0.002 versus inactive therapies. And MT showed short-term effects for shoulder pain (SMD, 1.51; 95% CI, 0.53 to 2.49; P=0.003. But MT did not show better effects for neck pain (SMD, 0.13; 95% CI, −0.38 to 0.63; P=0.63 or shoulder pain (SMD, 0.88; 95% CI, −0.74 to 2.51; P=0.29 than active therapies. In addition, functional status of the shoulder was not significantly affected by MT. Conclusion. MT may provide immediate effects for neck and shoulder pain. However, MT does not show better effects on pain than other active therapies. No evidence suggests that MT is effective in functional status.

  16. Acupuncture at Houxi (SI 3) acupoint for acute neck pain caused by stiff neck: study protocol for a pilot randomised controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The use of acupuncture has been suggested for the treatment of acute neck pain caused by stiff neck in China. However, current evidence is insufficient to draw any conclusions about its efficacy. Therefore this pilot study was designed to evaluate the feasibility and efficacy of acupuncture at the Houxi (SI3) acupoint for treatment of acute neck pain. Methods/analysis This pilot study will be a two-parallel-group, assessor-blinded, randomised controlled trial. Thirty-six stiff ne...

  17. ASSESSMENT AND COMPARISION OF CERVICAL JOINT POSITION SENSE IN SUBJECTS WITH CHRONIC NECK PAIN vs NORMALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oberoi Mugdha

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: The abundance of mechanoreceptors in the cervical spine and their central and reflex afferent connections to the vestibular, visual and postural control system suggests that the cervical proprioceptive information provides important somatosensory information influencing postural stability, head orientation and eye movement control. Disturbances to the afferent input from the cervical region is thought to underlie symptoms of dizziness, unsteadiness, visual disturbances and signs of altered postural stability, cervical proprioception and head and eye movement control in people with chronic neck pain. This study aimed to assess and compare cervical joint position sense in subjects with chronic neck pain vs normals. Methods: Total 60 subjects, divided into two groups chronic neck pain group (n=30 (12 males and 18 females with mean age of 40.7 years and control group (n=30 with age and gender matched normal individuals were assessed for baseline data and demographic variables. Head repositioning accuracy test was used to assess cervical joint position sense in degrees. Results: The difference in the head repositioning error values were found to be extremely significant (p<0.0001 for all the neck movements for subjects with chronic neck pain as compared to normals. Conclusion: Cervical joint position sense in subjects with chronic neck pain is found to be altered as compared to age and gender matched normals.

  18. Individual and work related risk factors for neck pain among office workers: a cross sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cagnie, B; Danneels, L; Van Tiggelen, D; De Loose, V; Cambier, D

    2007-05-01

    Work related neck disorders are common problems in office workers, especially among those who are intensive computer users. It is generally agreed that the etiology of work related neck disorders is multidimensional which is associated with, and influenced by, a complex array of individual, physical and psychosocial factors. The aim of the current study was to estimate the one-year prevalence of neck pain among office workers and to determine which physical, psychological and individual factors are associated with these prevalences. Five hundred and twelve office workers were studied. Information was collected by an online questionnaire. Self-reported neck pain during the preceding 12 months was regarded as a dependent variable, whereas different individual, work-related physical and psychosocial factors were studied as independent variables. The 12 month prevalences of neck pain in office workers was 45.5%. Multivariate analysis revealed that women had an almost two-fold risk compared with men (OR = 1.95, 95% CI 1.22-3.13). The odds ratio for age indicates that persons older than 30 years have 2.61 times more chance of having neck pain than younger individuals (OR = 2.61, 95% CI 1.32-3.47). Being physically active decreases the likelihood of having neck pain (OR = 1.85, 95% CI 1.14-2.99). Significant associations were found between neck pain and often holding the neck in a forward bent posture for a prolonged time (OR = 2.01, 95% CI 1.20-3.38), often sitting for a prolonged time (OR = 2.06, 95% CI 1.17-3.62) and often making the same movements per minute (OR = 1.63, 95% CI 1.02-2.60). Mental tiredness at the end of the workday (OR = 2.05, 95% CI 1.29-3.26) and shortage of personnel (OR = 1.71, 95% CI 1.06-2.76) are significantly associated with neck pain. The results of this study indicate that physical and psychosocial work factors, as well as individual variables, are associated with the frequency of neck pain. These association patterns suggest also

  19. Implementation of neck/shoulder exercises for pain relief among industrial workers: A randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannerz Harald

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although leisure-time physical activity is important for health, adherence to regular exercise is challenging for many adults. The workplace may provide an optimal setting to reach a large proportion of the adult population needing regular physical exercise. This study evaluates the effect of implementing strength training at the workplace on non-specific neck and shoulder pain among industrial workers. Methods Cluster-randomized controlled trial involving 537 adults from occupations with high prevalence of neck and shoulder pain (industrial production units. Participants were randomized to 20 weeks of high-intensity strength training for the neck and shoulders three times a week (n = 282 or a control group receiving advice to stay physically active (n = 255. The strength training program followed principles of progressive overload and periodization. The primary outcome was changes in self-reported neck and shoulder pain intensity (scale 0-9. Results 85% of the participants followed the strength training program on a weekly basis. In the training group compared with the control group, neck pain intensity decreased significantly (-0.6, 95% CI -1.0 to -0.1 and shoulder pain intensity tended to decrease (-0.2, 95% CI -0.5 to 0.1, P = 0.07. For pain-cases at baseline (pain intensity > = 3 the odds ratio - in the training group compared with the control group - for being a non-case at follow-up (pain intensity Conclusion High-intensity strength training relying on principles of progressive overload can be successfully implemented at industrial workplaces, and results in significant reductions of neck and shoulder pain. Trial registration NCT01071980.

  20. Incidence of shoulder pain after neck dissection : A clinical explorative study for risk factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, PU; van Wilgen, PC; Brendeke, W; de Goede, CJT; Kerst, A; Koolstra, M; Marinus, J; Schoppink, EM; Stuiver, MM; van de Velde, CF; Roodenburg, JLN

    2001-01-01

    Background. It is the purpose of this study to determine the incidence of shoulder pain and restricted range of motion of the shoulder after neck dissection, and to identify risk factors for the development of shoulder pain and restricted range of motion. Methods. Clinical patients who underwent a n

  1. Manual therapy with or without physical medicine modalities for neck pain: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. D'Sylva; J. Miller; A. Gross; S.J. Burnie; C.H. Goldsmith; N. Graham; T. Haines; G. Brønfort; J.L. Hoving

    2010-01-01

    Manual therapy interventions are often used with or without physical medicine modalities to treat neck pain. This review assessed the effect of 1) manipulation and mobilisation, 2) manipulation, mobilisation and soft tissue work, and 3) manual therapy with physical medicine modalities on pain, funct

  2. Effect of two contrasting types of physical exercise on chronic neck muscle pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lars L; Kjaer, Michael; Søgaard, Karen

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The prevalence of neck muscle pain has steadily increased and especially pain from the descending part of the trapezius muscle has been associated with monotonous work tasks such as computer work. Physical exercise is generally recommended as treatment, but it is unclear which type of ...

  3. Level of self-reported neck/shoulder pain and biomechanical workload in cleaners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madeleine, Pascal; Søgaard, Karen; Holtermann, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the relation between self-reported pain, muscular activity and postural load during cleaning tasks. Eighteen cleaners performed usual cleaning tasks in both a laboratory and a lecture room. The level of perceived pain in the neck-shoulder region...

  4. National survey of back & neck pain amongst consultant ophthalmologists in the United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyer, Jonathan N; Lee, Richard M; Chowdhury, Haziq R; Smith, Henry B; Dhital, Anish; Khandwala, Mona

    2015-12-01

    Repetitive tasks, awkward or prolonged working postures, and high cognitive load are risk factors for occupational musculoskeletal disorders. Ophthalmologists may be vulnerable given that they are exposed to a combination of these factors. This national study assesses the prevalence, severity and associations of back and neck pain amongst UK consultant ophthalmologists. A postal survey was conducted using addresses supplied by the Royal College of Ophthalmologists. Statistical analysis was performed using Pearson correlation coefficient, two-tailed probability testing, analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Dunn's multiple comparison test. 518 responses were received (50.3 % response rate). Back and neck pain were reported by 50.6 % (262/518) and 31.8 % (165/518) of respondents, respectively, with 62.4 % (323/518) reporting one or both. 33.6 % (174/518) reported pain whilst operating, of whom 78.7 % (137/174) found operating exacerbated their pain. 31.7 % (164/518) reported pain when using the slit lamp, of whom 71.3 % (117/164) found it exacerbated their pain. Individual subspecialties showed a significant relative risk of back or neck pain in some circumstances, when compared to ophthalmologists as a whole. Occupational back and neck pain remains a problem amongst ophthalmologists. Recommendations are made for modifications to the working environment, and consideration should be given to improving education for trainees.

  5. Lasting effects of workplace strength training for neck/shoulder/arm pain among laboratory technicians

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Peter; Larsen, Anders I; Zebis, Mette K;

    2014-01-01

    , (2) training culture, that is, relatively more employees trained at the workplace and with colleagues, (3) self-reported health changes, and (4) prevention of neck and wrist pain development among initially pain-free employees. CONCLUSIONS: This natural experiment shows that strength training can...

  6. Neck pain, concerns of falling and physical performance in community-dwelling Danish citizens over 75 years of age

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kendall, Julie C; Boyle, Eleanor; Hartvigsen, Jan

    2017-01-01

    AIMS: The aim of this study was to determine the associations between neck pain, concerns of falling and physical performance in older people. METHODS: Cross-sectional study of 423 community-dwelling Danes aged 75 years and older. Measures consisted of self-reported neck pain, physical performance...... between neck pain and fear of falling were determined using multivariable logistic regression modelling. RESULTS: Bothersome neck pain that limits daily activities is significantly associated with concerns of falling (unadjusted odds ratio (OR) 3.29, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.54-7.03) and impaired...... physical performance (unadjusted OR 2.26, 95% CI 1.09-4.69). However, these relationships became nonsignificant after adjusting for potential confounders. Bothersome neck pain and concerns of falling is attenuated by depression, and the relationship between bothersome neck pain and decreased physical...

  7. Efficacy and safety of acupuncture for chronic uncomplicated neck pain: a randomised controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vas, Jorge; Perea-Milla, Emilio; Méndez, Camila; Sánchez Navarro, Cayetana; León Rubio, José María; Brioso, Mauricio; García Obrero, Inmaculada

    2006-12-15

    Chronic neck pain is highly prevalent. To determine the efficacy and safety of acupuncture, in comparison with transcutaneous nerve stimulation-placebo (TENS-placebo) in the treatment of chronic uncomplicated neck pain, a single blind prospective study was designed, to be carried out at a Primary Healthcare Centre, with random assignment to two parallel groups and with evaluation and analysis by independent evaluators. A random assignment was made from 123 patients of the 149 initially recruited. These patients had been diagnosed with uncomplicated neck pain and experienced neck motion-related pain intensity equal to or exceeding 30 on a visual analogue scale (VAS) from 0 to 100 mm. The treatment with acupuncture was compared with TENS-placebo, applied over 5 sessions in three weeks. The primary endpoint was the change in maximum pain intensity related to motion of the neck, one week after the final treatment. Sensitivity was analysed per protocol (PP) and variant analyses were by intention to treat (ITT). Adjustment was made for confounders by multiple linear regression, including baseline values and rescue therapy. By ITT analysis, the change in the pain-VAS variable was greater among the experimental group (28.1 (95% CI 21.4-34.7)). The improvements in quality of life (physical aspect), active neck mobility and reduced rescue medication were clinically and statistically significant. In the treatment of the intensity of chronic neck pain, acupuncture is more effective than the placebo treatment and presents a safety profile making it suitable for routine use in clinical practice.

  8. Is pressure pain sensitivity over the cervical musculature associated with neck disability in individuals with migraine?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Maria Claudia; Chaves, Thaís Cristina; Florencio, Lidiane Lima; Carvalho, Gabriela Ferreira; Dach, Fabíola; Fernández-De-Las-Penãs, Cesar; Bevilaqua-Grossi, Débora

    2015-01-01

    The objective was to determine if disability due to neck pain is correlated with pressure pain sensitivity in the cervical muscles in patients with migraine. Thirty-two volunteers with migraine completed the Neck Disability Index (NDI). Pressure pain thresholds (PPT) over the sternocleidomastoid, upper trapezius and suboccipital muscles were also assessed. Data were analyzed using the Spearman correlation coefficient (rs) and linear regression models (α cervical muscles correlated moderately and was inversely proportional in patients with migraine, but the association was not linear, so both outcomes should be considered in the assessment of this population.

  9. Osteopathic manipulative treatment to resolve head and neck pain after tooth extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Patricia M; Gustowski, Sharon M

    2012-07-01

    Pain is a common occurrence after tooth extraction and is usually localized to the extraction site. However, clinical experience shows that patients may also have pain in the head or neck in the weeks after this procedure. The authors present a case representative of these findings. In the case, cranial and cervical somatic dysfunction in a patient who had undergone tooth extraction was resolved through the use of osteopathic manipulative treatment. This case emphasizes the need to include a dental history when evaluating head and neck pain as part of comprehensive osteopathic medical care. The case can also serve as a foundation for a detailed discussion regarding how to effectively incorporate osteopathic manipulative treatment into primary care practice for patients who present with head or neck pain after tooth extraction.

  10. Chronic neck pain patients with traumatic or non-traumatic onset

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ris Hansen, Inge; Juul-Kristensen, Birgit; Boyle, Eleanor

    2017-01-01

    tests of cervical range of motion, gaze stability, eye movement, cranio-cervical flexion, cervical extensors, and pressure pain threshold. The participants completed the following questionnaires: physical and mental component summary of the Short Form Health Survey, EuroQol-5D, Neck Disability Index....... The purpose of this study was to investigate the clinical presentation of chronic neck pain patients with and without traumatic onset by examining cervical mobility, sensorimotor function, cervical muscle performance and pressure pain threshold in addition to the following self-reported characteristics...... in the traumatic group showed worse results on all measures compared with those in the non-traumatic group, significantly on neck muscle function (cervical extension mobility p = 0.005, cranio-cervical flexion test p = 0.007, cervical extensor test p = 0.006) and cervical pressure pain threshold bilateral (p = 0...

  11. The effect of balance training on cervical sensorimotor function and neck pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beinert, Konstantin; Taube, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    The authors' aim was to evaluate the effect of balance training on cervical joint position sense in people with subclinical neck pain. Thirty-four participants were randomly assigned to balance training or to stay active. Sensorimotor function was determined before and after 5 weeks of training by assessing the ability to reproduce the neutral head position and a predefined rotated head position. After balance training, the intervention group showed improved joint repositioning accuracy and decreased pain whereas no effects were observed in the control group. A weak correlation was identified between reduced neck pain intensity and improved joint repositioning. The present data demonstrate that balance training can effectively improve cervical sensorimotor function and decrease neck pain intensity.

  12. Activator instrument versus dry needling of active upper trapezius myofascial trigger points in those with neck pain

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    M.Tech. (Chiropractic) Neck pain is a common and costly complaint in society and many are made to believe that their neck pain is caused by pinched nerve, compressed disk, arthritis or displaced cervical vertebrae, when in reality the pain may be solely due to referral from myofascial trigger points in overworked or traumatized muscles of their upper back and shoulders. Travel and Simons (1999) demonstrated trapezius muscle of the neck, back and shoulder as the main cause of mechanical nec...

  13. Office workers' risk factors for the development of non-specific neck pain: a systematic review of prospective cohort studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paksaichol, Arpalak; Janwantanakul, Prawit; Purepong, Nithima; Pensri, Praneet; van der Beek, Allard J

    2012-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to systematically review prospective cohort studies to gain insights into risk factors for the development of non-specific neck pain in office workers as well as to assess the strength of evidence. Publications were systematically searched from 1980 - March 2011 in several databases. The following key words were used: neck pain paired with risk or prognostic factors and office or computer or visual display unit or visual display terminal. Relevant studies were retrieved and assessed for methodological quality by two independent reviewers. The strength of the evidence was based on methodological quality and consistency of the results. Five high-quality and two low-quality prospective cohort studies investigating the predictive value of 47 individual, work-related physical and work-related psychosocial factors for the onset of non-specific neck pain in office workers were included in this review. Strong evidence was found for female gender and previous history of neck complaints to be predictors of the onset of neck pain. Interestingly, for a large number of factors that have been mentioned in the literature as risk factors for neck pain, such as high physical leisure activity, low social support, and high psychosocial stress, we found no predictive value for future neck pain in office workers. Literature with respect to the development of non-specific neck pain in office workers is scant. Only female gender and previous history of neck complaints have been identified as risk factors that predict the onset of neck pain.

  14. Effectiveness of Iyengar yoga in treating spinal (back and neck) pain: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crow, Edith Meszaros; Jeannot, Emilien; Trewhela, Alison

    2015-01-01

    Considerable amount of money spent in health care is used for treatments of lifestyle related, chronic health conditions, which come from behaviors that contribute to morbidity and mortality of the population. Back and neck pain are two of the most common musculoskeletal problems in modern society that have significant cost in health care. Yoga, as a branch of complementary alternative medicine, has emerged and is showing to be an effective treatment against nonspecific spinal pain. Recent studies have shown positive outcome of yoga in general on reducing pain and functional disability of the spine. The objective of this study is to conduct a systematic review of the existing research within Iyengar yoga method and its effectiveness on relieving back and neck pain (defined as spinal pain). Database research form the following sources (Cochrane library, NCBI PubMed, the Clinical Trial Registry of the Indian Council of Medical Research, Google Scholar, EMBASE, CINAHL, and PsychINFO) demonstrated inclusion and exclusion criteria that selected only Iyengar yoga interventions, which in turn, identified six randomized control trials dedicated to compare the effectiveness of yoga for back and neck pain versus other care. The difference between the groups on the postintervention pain or functional disability intensity assessment was, in all six studies, favoring the yoga group, which projected a decrease in back and neck pain. Overall six studies with 570 patients showed, that Iyengar yoga is an effective means for both back and neck pain in comparison to control groups. This systematic review found strong evidence for short-term effectiveness, but little evidence for long-term effectiveness of yoga for chronic spine pain in the patient-centered outcomes.

  15. Effectiveness of Iyengar yoga in treating spinal (back and neck pain: A systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edith Meszaros Crow

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Considerable amount of money spent in health care is used for treatments of lifestyle related, chronic health conditions, which come from behaviors that contribute to morbidity and mortality of the population. Back and neck pain are two of the most common musculoskeletal problems in modern society that have significant cost in health care. Yoga, as a branch of complementary alternative medicine, has emerged and is showing to be an effective treatment against nonspecific spinal pain. Recent studies have shown positive outcome of yoga in general on reducing pain and functional disability of the spine. The objective of this study is to conduct a systematic review of the existing research within Iyengar yoga method and its effectiveness on relieving back and neck pain (defined as spinal pain. Database research form the following sources (Cochrane library, NCBI PubMed, the Clinical Trial Registry of the Indian Council of Medical Research, Google Scholar, EMBASE, CINAHL, and PsychINFO demonstrated inclusion and exclusion criteria that selected only Iyengar yoga interventions, which in turn, identified six randomized control trials dedicated to compare the effectiveness of yoga for back and neck pain versus other care. The difference between the groups on the postintervention pain or functional disability intensity assessment was, in all six studies, favoring the yoga group, which projected a decrease in back and neck pain. Overall six studies with 570 patients showed, that Iyengar yoga is an effective means for both back and neck pain in comparison to control groups. This systematic review found strong evidence for short-term effectiveness, but little evidence for long-term effectiveness of yoga for chronic spine pain in the patient-centered outcomes.

  16. Effects of chronic neck-shoulder pain on normalized mutual information analysis of surface electromyography during functional tasks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madeleine, Pascal; Xie, Yanfei; Szeto, Grace P. Y.;

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effects neck-shoulder pain on the connectivity of surface electromyography (SEMG) signals during functional tasks. METHODS: Twenty adults suffering from chronic neck-shoulder pain and 20 healthy controls were recruited. The SEMG signals from the left and right proximal....... Moreover, NMI values in homonymous proximal muscles were higher during texting compared with computer typing with both hands. CONCLUSIONS: Our results show for the first time that chronic neck-shoulder pain affects the functional connectivity of muscle pairs. SIGNIFICANCE: The study furnishes novel...... information about the effects of chronic neck-shoulder pain on the interplay of muscle pairs during functional tasks....

  17. Back and neck pain are related to mental health problems in adolescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O'Sullivan Peter B

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is a high prevalence of mental health problems amongst adolescents. In addition there is a high prevalence of spinal pain in this population. Evidence suggests that these conditions are related. This study sought to extend earlier findings by examining the relationship between mental health problems as measured by the Child Behaviour Check List (CBCL and the experience of back and neck pain in adolescents. Methods One thousand five hundred and eighty participants (mean age 14.1 years from the Western Australian Pregnancy (Raine Study provided cross-sectional spinal pain and CBCL data. Results As predicted, there was a high prevalence of back and neck pain in this cohort. On the whole, females reported more mental health difficulties than males. There were strong relationships between the majority of symptom scales of the CBCL and back and neck pain. Scores on the CBCL were associated with higher odds of comorbid back and neck pain. Conclusions These findings strongly support the need to consider both psychological and pain symptoms when providing assessments and treatment for adolescents. Further research is required to inform causal models.

  18. The effectiveness of Long's manipulation on patients with chronic mechanical neck pain: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jian Hua; Shen, Tong; Chung, Raymond Chi Keung; Chiu, Thomas Tai Wing

    2013-08-01

    Long's manipulation (LM) is a representative Chinese manipulation approach incorporating both spinal manipulation and traditional Chinese massage (TCM) techniques. This randomized controlled trial (RCT) aimed to compare the immediate and short-term relative effectiveness of LM to TCM on patients with chronic neck pain. Patients were randomly assigned to either LM group or TCM group. LM group was treated with Long's manipulation, while the TCM group received TCM therapy. Patients attended 8 sessions of treatment (one session every three days). Outcome measures included neck disability (Northwick Park Neck Pain Questionnaire; NPQ), pain intensity (Numeric Pain Rating Scale; NPRS), patient perceived satisfaction of care (PPS) (11-point scale), craniovertebral angle (CV angle) and cervical range of motion (ROM). A blinded assessor performed assessment at baseline, immediate after treatment and 3 months post treatment. LM group achieved significantly greater improvement than TCM group in pain intensity (p angle and most of cervical ROM between groups (p = 0.169 ∼ 0.888) with an exception of flexion at 3-month follow-up (p = 0.005). This study shows that LM could produce better effects than TCM in relieving pain and improving disability in the management of patients with chronic mechanical neck pain.

  19. EFFICACY OF POST ISOMETRIC RELAXATION VERSUS STATIC STRECHING IN SUBJECTS WITH CHRONIC NON SPECIFIC NECK PAIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.Haritha

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Neck pain is a common problem within our society. Upper trapezius sternocleidomastoid and the levator scapulae are the most common postural muscles that tends to get shorten leading to restricted neck mobility. There is lack of evidence to allow conclusions to be drawn about the effectiveness of post isometric relaxation when compared with static stretching exercises. The aim is to find out the effectiveness of Post isometric relaxation Versus Static stretching in the subjects with chronic nonspecific neck pain. To evaluate the effectiveness of post isometric relaxation technique on pain by using Visual analoge scale, range of motion by using Universal Goniometry, and functional disability by using Neck Disability Index in chronic nonspecific neck pain. Methods: A convenient sample of thirty seven subjects was diagnosed with nonspecific neck pain was randomly allocated to one of the two treatment groups on the basis of the inclusion criteria. The experimental group (n=15 received three sessions of post isometric relaxation technique for trapezius, sternocleidomastoid and the levator scapulae and control group (n=15 received the three sessions of static stretching for trapezius, sternocliedomastiod and levator scapulae for four weeks. Results: Non parametric tests demonstrated a statistically significant difference with experimental group showing greater improvement in ROM, VAS, and NDI than the control group and significant difference within the group also. Conclusion: This study concluded and the results reflected that post isometric relaxation technique group had better improvement in reduction of pain, improvement in the range of motion, and increased neck functional activities than the static stretching group.

  20. An overview of psychosocial and behavioral factors in neck-and-shoulder pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linton, S J

    1995-01-01

    Psychological factors are suspected to be pertinent in the etiology, maintenance, treatment and prevention of neck and shoulder pain problems. I present a broad overview of current knowledge and trends concerning cognitive-behavioral factors for these pain problems. Although there is a dire lack of research concerning cognitive-behavioral approaches and no psychological theory specific to neck and shoulder problems is currently available, a good deal is nevertheless known about musculoskeletal pain in general. Consequently, there is reason to believe that these factors may be involved in the etiology of neck-and-shoulder disorders. In particular, psychological factors appear to be important in the development and maintenance of subacute and chronic problems. Treatment techniques, adherence, and prevention are examined from a psychological perspective. The application of cognitive-behavioral factors to the treatment and prevention of neck and shoulder pain should provide new avenues which enhance results. It is concluded that while a lack of research precludes definite conclusions, there is ample reason to believe that research into psychological factors may well result in a better understanding of neck and shoulder pain and enhanced treatment and prevention outcomes.

  1. Case studies in cervicothoracic spine function evaluation and treatment of two dancers with mechanical neck pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandow, Emily

    2011-03-01

    It has been reported that manual therapy directed at the thoracic spine followed by exercise may improve outcomes in patients with mechanical neck pain. At this point, there is little available data on dancers with neck pain, and it is unclear whether this type of treatment is appropriate for restoring the rigorous level of activity required of the dancer. The purpose of this study was to review the evaluation, clinical decision-making process, and treatment of two dancers-one with acute and the other with chronic neck pain-who fell into the classification of patients who might benefit from an intervention to the thoracic spine. The two participants were a musical theater dancer with an acute onset of neck pain and a retired dancer who was an active dance company director with an 11-year history of chronic neck pain. Both participants went through a standard examination and were treated with mobilizations to the upper thoracic spine followed by therapeutic exercises. In both cases, successful outcomes were achieved immediately after treatment and up to six months after discharge from physical therapy.

  2. Predictors of outcome in neck pain patients undergoing chiropractic care: comparison of acute and chronic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peterson Cynthia

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neck pain is a common complaint in patients presenting for chiropractic treatment. The few studies on predictors for improvement in patients while undergoing treatment identify duration of symptoms, neck stiffness and number of previous episodes as the strong predictor variables. The purpose of this study is to continue the research for predictors of a positive outcome in neck pain patients undergoing chiropractic treatment. Methods Acute ( 3 months (n = 255 neck pain patients with no chiropractic or manual therapy in the prior 3 months were included. Patients completed the numerical pain rating scale (NRS and Bournemouth questionnaire (BQ at baseline prior to treatment. At 1 week, 1 month and 3 months after start of treatment the NRS and BQ were completed along with the Patient Global Impression of Change (PGIC scale. Demographic information was provided by the clinician. Improvement at each of the follow up points was categorized using the PGIC. Multivariate regression analyses were done to determine significant independent predictors of improvement. Results Baseline mean neck pain and total disability scores were significantly (p  Conclusions The most consistent predictor of clinically relevant improvement at both 1 and 3 months after the start of chiropractic treatment for both acute and chronic patients is if they report improvement early in the course of treatment. The co-existence of either radiculopathy or dizziness however do not imply poorer prognosis in these patients.

  3. Extension and flexion in the upper cervical spine in neck pain patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst, Markus J; Crawford, Rebecca J; Schelldorfer, Sarah; Rausch-Osthoff, Anne-Kathrin; Barbero, Marco; Kool, Jan; Bauer, Christoph M

    2015-08-01

    Neck pain is a common problem in the general population with high risk of ongoing complaints or relapses. Range of motion (ROM) assessment is scientifically established in the clinical process of diagnosis, prognosis and outcome evaluation in neck pain. Anatomically, the cervical spine (CS) has been considered in two regions, the upper and lower CS. Disorders like cervicogenic headache have been clinically associated with dysfunctions of the upper CS (UCS), yet ROM tests and measurements are typically conducted on the whole CS. A cross-sectional study assessing 19 subjects with non-specific neck pain was undertaken to examine UCS extension-flexion ROM in relation to self-reported disability and pain (via the Neck Disability Index (NDI)). Two measurement devices (goniometer and electromagnetic tracking) were employed and compared. Correlations between ROM and the NDI were stronger for the UCS compared to the CS, with the strongest correlation between UCS flexion and the NDI-headache (r = -0.62). Correlations between UCS and CS ROM were fair to moderate, with the strongest correlation between UCS flexion and CS extension ROM (r = -0.49). UCS flexion restriction is related to headache frequency and intensity. Consistency and agreement between both measurement systems and for all tests was high. The results demonstrate that separate UCS ROM assessments for extension and flexion are useful in patients with neck pain.

  4. Efficacy of manipulation for non-specific neck pain of recent onset: design of a randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herbert Rob D

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Manipulation is a common treatment for non-specific neck pain. Neck manipulation, unlike gentler forms of manual therapy such as mobilisation, is associated with a small risk of serious neurovascular injury and can result in stroke or death. It is thought however, that neck manipulation provides better results than mobilisation where clinically indicated. There is long standing and vigorous debate both within and between the professions that use neck manipulation as well as the wider scientific community as to whether neck manipulation potentially does more harm than good. The primary aim of this study is to determine whether neck manipulation provides more rapid resolution of an episode of neck pain than mobilisation. Methods/Design 182 participants with acute and sub-acute neck pain will be recruited from physiotherapy, chiropractic and osteopathy practices in Sydney, Australia. Participants will be randomly allocated to treatment with either manipulation or mobilisation. Randomisation will occur after the treating practitioner decides that manipulation is an appropriate treatment for the individual participant. Both groups will receive at least 4 treatments over 2 weeks. The primary outcome is number of days taken to recover from the episode of neck pain. Cox regression will be used to compare survival curves for time to recovery for the manipulation and mobilisation treatment groups. Discussion This paper presents the rationale and design of a randomised controlled trial to compare the effectiveness of neck manipulation and neck mobilisation for acute and subacute neck pain.

  5. An Overview of Systematic Reviews on Prognostic Factors in Neck Pain: Results from the International Collaboration on Neck Pain (ICON) Project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walton, David M; Carroll, Linda J; Kasch, Helge;

    2013-01-01

    of transition to chronic or persistent problems. As a field of research, prognosis in neck pain has stimulated several empirical primary research papers, and a number of systematic reviews. As part of the International Consensus on Neck (ICON) project, we sought to establish the general state of knowledge...... in the area through a structured, systematic review of systematic reviews (overview). An exhaustive search strategy was created and employed to identify the 13 systematic reviews (SRs) that served as the primary data sources for this overview. A decision algorithm for data synthesis, which incorporated...

  6. Predictors of incident and persistent neck/shoulder pain in Iranian workers: a cohort study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farideh Sadeghian

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Pain in the neck and shoulder has been linked with various psychosocial risk factors, as well as with occupational physical activities. However, most studies to date have been cross-sectional, making it difficult to exclude reverse causation. Moreover, they have been carried out largely in northern Europe, and the relationship to psychosocial factors might be different in other cultural environments. METHODS: To explore causes of neck/shoulder pain, we carried out a longitudinal study in Iranian nurses and office workers. Participants (n =383 completed a baseline questionnaire about neck/shoulder pain in the past month and possible risk factors, and were again asked about pain 12 months later. Associations with pain at follow-up were explored by Poisson regression and summarised by prevalence rate ratios (PRRs. RESULTS: After adjustment for other risk factors, new pain at follow-up was more frequent in office workers than nurses (PRR 1.9, 95%CI 1.3-2.8, among those with worst mental health (PRR 1.8, 95%CI 1.0-3.0, in those who reported incentives from piecework or bonuses (PRR1.4, 95%CI 1.0-2.0, and in those reporting job dissatisfaction (PRR 1.5, 95%CI 1.0-2.1. The strongest predictor of pain persistence was somatising tendency. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings are consistent with a hazard of neck/shoulder pain from prolonged use of computer keyboards, although it is possible that the association is modified by health beliefs and expectations. They also indicate that the association of low mood with neck/shoulder pain extends to non-European populations, and is not entirely attributable to reverse causation. Psychosocial aspects of work appeared to have relatively weak impact.

  7. Simple neck pain questions used in surveys, evaluated in relation to health outcomes: a cohort study

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    Grimby-Ekman Anna

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The high prevalence of pain reported in many epidemiological studies, and the degree to which this prevalence reflects severe pain is under discussion in the literature. The aim of the present study was to evaluate use of the simple neck pain questions commonly included in large epidemiological survey studies with respect to aspects of health. We investigated if and how an increase in number of days with pain is associated with reduction in health outcomes. Methods A cohort of university students (baseline age 19–25 years were recruited in 2002 and followed annually for 4 years. The baseline response rate was 69% which resulted in 1200 respondents (627 women, 573 men. Participants were asked about present and past pain and perceptions of their general health, sleep disturbance, stress and energy levels, and general performance. The data were analyzed using a mixed model for repeated measurements and a random intercept logistic model. Results When reporting present pain, participants also reported lower prevalence of very good health, higher stress and sleep disturbance scores and lower energy score. Among those with current neck pain, additional questions characterizing the pain such as duration (categorized, additional pain sites and decreased general performance were associated with lower probability of very good health and higher amounts of sleep disturbance. Knowing about the presence or not of pain explains more of the variation in health between individuals, than within individuals. Conclusion This study of young university students has demonstrated that simple neck pain survey questions capture features of pain that affect aspects of health such as perceived general health, sleep disturbance, mood in terms of stress and energy. Simple pain questions are more useful for group descriptions than for describing or following pain in an individual.

  8. EFFECTIVENESS OF MC KENZIE EXERCISES IN REDUCING NECK AND BACK PAIN AMONG MADRASSA STUDENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saima Aziz

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: In this advanced era, neck and back pain has become a common musculoskeletal problem. These symptoms have a high prevalence in the community and now they are affecting even our adolescents leaving a major impact on youth’s functional and educational activities. Nevertheless, the burden of these musculoskeletal pains, which relates not only to its prevalence but also to increase in physiological and psychological stress among them, distressing their creativity. Madrassa students have a daily exposure to neck and back pain due to poor posture. The McKenzie method is a popular treatment for back and neck pain among physical therapists. So, the intention of this study is to test the effectiveness of McKenzie exercises in neck and back pain, because hardly any data is available on McKenzie technique and its outcome in Pakistan. The objective of the study is to determine the effectiveness of McKenzie exercises in reducing neck and back pain among madrassa students. Methods: The students were recruited from Madrassa Darul Akram (Baldia town and Jamia Ashraf-ul-madrassa (Gulshan-e-Iqbal Karachi. One sixty three students aged between 12–18 years of both genders who were fulfilling the inclusion criteria were selected from Madrassa Darul Akram (Baldia town and Jamia Ashraf-ul-madrassa (Gulshane-Iqbal. The participants received McKenzie exercises programs intervention for three consecutive weeks. Outcome Measure: Neck Disability Index (NDI, Modified Oswestry Low Back Pain Disability Index (ODI and Numeric Pain Rating Scale (NPRS Results: The present study showed significant results in all three scales in both genders (p<0.001.Among sections, the Hafiz students revealed greater score in all 3 scales before treatment as compared to ‘Alim/Alima’ and ‘Nazra’ students and after treatment showed significant results in all 3 domains (p<0.001. Conclusion: Findings of this study revealed that madrassa students were more prone to develop neck

  9. Changes in and predictors of pain characteristics in patients with head and neck cancer undergoing radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astrup, Guro Lindviksmoen; Rustøen, Tone; Miaskowski, Christine; Paul, Steven M; Bjordal, Kristin

    2015-05-01

    Pain is a common symptom in patients with head and neck cancer (HNC) that is associated with significant decrements in physical and psychological functioning. Only 4 studies have evaluated for changes in and predictors of different pain characteristics in these patients. In this longitudinal study of patients with HNC, changes in pain intensity (i.e., average pain, worst pain), pain interference with function, and pain relief were evaluated from the initiation of radiotherapy and through the following 6 months. Hierarchical linear modeling was used to evaluate for changes over time in these 4 pain characteristics, as well as to identify predictors of interindividual variability in each characteristic. Overall, pain intensity and interference with function scores were in the mild-to-moderate range, while pain relief scores were in the moderate range. The occurrence of pain, as well as scores for each pain characteristic, increased from the initiation to the completion of radiotherapy, followed by a gradual decrease to near pretreatment levels at 6 months. However, interindividual variability existed in patients' ratings of each pain characteristic. Predictors of more severe pain characteristic scores were more comorbidities, worse physical functioning, not having surgery before radiotherapy, difficulty swallowing, mouth sores, sleep disturbance, fatigue, more energy, and less social support. Patients with more depressive symptoms had better pain relief. Although some of the predictors cannot be modified (e.g., rrence of surgery), other predictors (e.g., symptoms) can be treated. Therefore, information about these predictors may result in decreased pain in patients with HNC.

  10. Randomized controlled pilot study: pain intensity and pressure pain thresholds in patients with neck and low back pain before and after traditional East Asian "gua sha" therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauche, Romy; Wübbeling, Klaus; Lüdtke, Rainer; Cramer, Holger; Choi, Kyung-Eun; Rampp, Thomas; Michalsen, Andreas; Langhorst, Jost; Dobos, Gustav J

    2012-01-01

    Gua Sha is a traditional East Asian healing technique where the body surface is "press-stroked" with a smooth-edged instrument to raise therapeutic petechiae that last 2-5 days. The technique is traditionally used in the treatment of both acute and chronic neck and back pain. This study aimed to measure the effects of Gua Sha therapy on the pain ratings and pressure pain thresholds of patients with chronic neck pain (CNP) and chronic low back pain (CLBP). A total of 40 patients with either CNP or CLBP (mean age 49.23 ± 10.96 years) were randomized to either a treatment group (TG) or a waiting list control group (WLC). At baseline assessment (T1), all patients rated their pain on a 10 cm visual analog scale (VAS). Patients' pressure pain thresholds (PPT) at a site of maximal pain (pain-maximum) and an adjacent (pain-adjacent) site were also established. The treatment group then received a single Gua Sha treatment. Post-intervention measurements were taken for both groups at T2, seven days after baseline assessment (T1), using the same VAS and PPT measurements in precisely the same locations as at T1. Final analysis were conducted with 21 patients with CNP and 18 patients with CLBP. The study groups were equally distributed with regard to randomization. Patients in both the CNP and the CLBP treatment groups reported pain reduction (p treatment, as compared to the waiting list group. Pain sensitivity improved in the TG in CNP, but not in CLBP patients, possibly due to higher pressure sensitivity in the neck area. No adverse events were reported. These results suggest that Gua Sha may be an effective treatment for patients with chronic neck and low back pain. Further study of Gua Sha is warranted.

  11. Influence of neck pain on cervical movement in the sagittal plane during smartphone use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Man-Sig

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] Smartphone use reportedly changes posture. However, how neck posture is altered in smartphone users with neck pain is unknown. This study examined changes in the posture of young adults with and without mild neck pain (MNP) when using a smartphone. [Subjects] Thirteen control subjects and 14 subjects with MNP who used smartphones were recruited. [Methods] The upper cervical (UC) and lower cervical (LC) angles in the sagittal plane were measured using an ultrasound-based motion analysis system while the seated subjects used a smartphone for 5 min. [Results] During smartphone use, the MNP group exhibited greater UC and LC flexion angles than the control group. [Conclusion] These findings suggest that young adults with MNP are more careful and more frequently utilize a neutral neck posture than young adults without MNP when using a smartphone while sitting.

  12. Translation of the Neck Disability Index and validation of the Greek version in a sample of neck pain patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonopoulou Maria D

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neck pain is a highly prevalent condition resulting in major disability. Standard scales for measuring disability in patients with neck pain have a pivotal role in research and clinical settings. The Neck Disability Index (NDI is a valid and reliable tool, designed to measure disability in activities of daily living due to neck pain. The purpose of our study was the translation and validation of the NDI in a Greek primary care population with neck complaints. Methods The original version of the questionnaire was used. Based on international standards, the translation strategy comprised forward translations, reconciliation, backward translation and pre-testing steps. The validation procedure concerned the exploration of internal consistency (Cronbach alpha, test-retest reliability (Intraclass Correlation Coefficient, Bland and Altman method, construct validity (exploratory factor analysis and responsiveness (Spearman correlation coefficient, Standard Error of Measurement and Minimal Detectable Change of the questionnaire. Data quality was also assessed through completeness of data and floor/ceiling effects. Results The translation procedure resulted in the Greek modified version of the NDI. The latter was culturally adapted through the pre-testing phase. The validation procedure raised a large amount of missing data due to low applicability, which were assessed with two methods. Floor or ceiling effects were not observed. Cronbach alpha was calculated as 0.85, which was interpreted as good internal consistency. Intraclass correlation coefficient was found to be 0.93 (95% CI 0.84–0.97, which was considered as very good test-retest reliability. Factor analysis yielded one factor with Eigenvalue 4.48 explaining 44.77% of variance. The Spearman correlation coefficient (0.3; P = 0.02 revealed some relation between the change score in the NDI and Global Rating of Change (GROC. The SEM and MDC were calculated as 0.64 and 1

  13. Does Deep Cervical Flexor Muscle Training Affect Pain Pressure Thresholds of Myofascial Trigger Points in Patients with Chronic Neck Pain? A Prospective Randomized Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavlos Bobos

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. We need to understand more about how DNF performs in different contexts and whether it affects the pain threshold over myofascial trigger points (MTrPs. Purpose. The objectives were to investigate the effect of neck muscles training on disability and pain and on pain threshold over MTrPs in people with chronic neck pain. Methods. Patients with chronic neck pain were eligible for participation with a Neck Disability Index (NDI score of over 5/50 and having at least one MTrP on either levator scapulae, upper trapezoid, or splenius capitis muscle. Patients were randomly assigned into either DNF training, superficial neck muscle exercise, or advice group. Generalized linear model (GLM was used to detect differences in treatment groups over time. Results. Out of 67 participants, 60 (47 females, mean age: 39.45 ± 12.67 completed the study. Neck disability and neck pain were improved over time between and within groups (p<0.05. However, no differences were found within and between the therapeutic groups (p<0.05 in the tested muscles’ PPTs and in cervicothoracic angle over a 7-week period. Conclusion. All three groups improved over time. This infers that the pain pathways involved in the neck pain relief are not those involved in pain threshold.

  14. The effect of traditional cupping on pain and mechanical thresholds in patients with chronic nonspecific neck pain : a randomised controlled pilot study

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Introduction. Cupping has been used since antiquity in the treatment of pain conditions. In this pilot study, we investigated the effect of traditional cupping therapy on chronic nonspecific neck pain (CNP) and mechanical sensory thresholds. Methods. Fifty CNP patients were randomly assigned to treatment (TG, n = 25) or waiting list control group (WL, n = 25). TG received a single cupping treatment. Pain at rest (PR), pain related to movement (PM), quality of life (SF-36), Neck Disability Ind...

  15. Pain management in head and neck cancer patients undergoing chemo-radiotherapy: Clinical practical recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirabile, A; Airoldi, M; Ripamonti, C; Bolner, A; Murphy, B; Russi, E; Numico, G; Licitra, L; Bossi, P

    2016-03-01

    Pain in head and neck cancer represents a major issue, before, during and after the oncological treatments. The most frequent cause of pain is chemo/radiation related oral mucositis, which involves 80% of the patients and worsens their quality of life inhibiting speaking, eating, drinking or swallowing and sometimes reducing the treatment compliance, the maximum dose intensity and thus the potential efficacy of treatment. Nevertheless pain is still often under estimated and undertreated. An Italian multidisciplinary group of head and neck cancer specialists met with the aim of reaching a consensus on pain management in this setting. The Delphi Appropriateness method was used for the consensus. External expert reviewers evaluated the final statements. The paper contains 30 consensus-reached statements about pain management in HNC patients and offers a review of recent literature in these topics.

  16. The clinical examination of neck pain patients: the validity of a group of tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Hertogh, Willem J; Vaes, Peter H; Vijverman, Veerle; De Cordt, Ann; Duquet, William

    2007-02-01

    We evaluated whether a blinded observer could identify the neck pain patients in a sample of 42 subjects consisting of neck pain patients and asymptomatic controls.The allocation of subjects to either the control or patient group was based on the scoring of a VAS scale for pain intensity, a Bournemouth Questionnaire (BQ), a manual examination of the rotation of C0-2-7 (rated for Range Of Motion, end feel, onset of pain), an adapted Spurling test and Cervical Range Of Motion (CROM) measurements.The VAS and BQ resulted in a high % of correct allocations (>/= 77.5%) and a high specificity (90.9%). The Manual Examination Procedures (MEPs) have similar results especially when clustered. The combination of the VAS score, BQ and MEPs resulted in a sensitivity and specificity of 100% and 86.4%, respectively. Except for the flexion movement all CROM allocation percentages are around 50%, indicating a lesser diagnostic value.Our findings reinforce the validity of MEPs. Clustering pain measurements, BQ and MEPs provides the highest diagnostic value to identify neck pain patients or necks in need of treatment.

  17. SHORT TERM EFFICACY OF KINESIOTAPING AND EXERCISES ON CHRONIC MECHANICAL NECK PAIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kulkarni Prachi Sanjay 1 , 2 , 3 ,

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and introduction:The purpose of study is to determine the short term effectiveness of Kinesiotapingcombined with Exercises in reducing pain and improving Cervical range of motion and functional ability forsubjects with Chronic Mechanical Neck pain.Method::Pre to post test experimental study design randomised thirty Chronic Mechanical Neck pain patientseach 15 into KT and control group. KT group received kinesiotaping with exercises and Control groupreceivedonly exercises for 3 times a week for 4 weeks.Pain, active cervical range of motion and functional ability weremeasured before and after 4 weeks of intervention.Results:Comparative analysis using Independent‘t’ test and Mann Whitney U test found that there is a statisticallysignificant difference (p<0.05 in means of NPRS, active Flexion, Extension, Rotation to right, Rotation to LeftROM, Neck Disability Index (NDI in percentage when compared post intervention means between the groups.Pre to post test within the group analysis in both the groups using Paired‘t’ test and Wilcoxon signed rank testfound that there is a statistically significant change in means of NPRS, Flexion, Extension, Rotation to right,Rotation to Left ROM, NDI.Conclusion:Kinesiotaping combined with exercises for 4 weeks found short term effect in improving pain,active cervical ROM and functional ability than exercises alone in treatment of chronic Mechanical neck pain

  18. A novel method for neck coordination exercise – a pilot study on persons with chronic non-specific neck pain

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    Björklund Martin

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic neck pain is a common problem and is often associated with changes in sensorimotor functions, such as reduced proprioceptive acuity of the neck, altered coordination of the cervical muscles, and increased postural sway. In line with these findings there are studies supporting the efficacy of exercises targeting different aspects of sensorimotor function, for example training aimed at improving proprioception and muscle coordination. To further develop this type of exercises we have designed a novel device and method for neck coordination training. The aim of the study was to investigate the clinical applicability of the method and to obtain indications of preliminary effects on sensorimotor functions, symptoms and self-rated characteristics in non-specific chronic neck pain Methods The study was designed as an uncontrolled clinical trial including fourteen subjects with chronic non-specific neck pain. A new device was designed to allow for an open skills task with adjustable difficulty. With visual feedback, subjects had to control the movement of a metal ball on a flat surface with a rim strapped on the subjects' head. Eight training sessions were performed over a four week period. Skill acquisition was measured throughout the intervention period. After intervention subjects were interviewed about their experience of the exercise and pain and sensorimotor functions, including the fast and slow components of postural sway and jerkiness-, range-, position sense-, movement time- and velocity of cervical rotation, were measured. At six-month follow up, self-rated pain, health and functioning was collected. Results The subjects improved their skill to perform the exercise and were overall positive to the method. No residual negative side-effects due to the exercise were reported. After intervention the fast component of postural sway (p = 0.019 and jerkiness of cervical rotation (p = 0.032 were reduced. The follow up

  19. Flexion-relaxation ratio in computer workers with and without chronic neck pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinheiro, Carina Ferreira; dos Santos, Marina Foresti; Chaves, Thais Cristina

    2016-02-01

    This study evaluated the flexion-relaxation phenomenon (FRP) and flexion-relaxation ratios (FR-ratios) using surface electromyography (sEMG) of the cervical extensor muscles of computer workers with and without chronic neck pain, as well as of healthy subjects who were not computer users. This study comprised 60 subjects 20-45years of age, of which 20 were computer workers with chronic neck pain (CPG), 20 were computer workers without neck pain (NPG), and 20 were control individuals who do not use computers for work and use them less than 4h/day for other purposes (CG). FRP and FR-ratios were analyzed using sEMG of the cervical extensors. Analysis of FR-ratios showed smaller values in the semispinalis capitis muscles of the two groups of workers compared to the control group. The reference FR-ratio (flexion relaxation ratio [FRR], defined as the maximum activity in 1s of the re-extension/full flexion sEMG activity) was significantly higher in the computer workers with neck pain compared to the CG (CPG: 3.10, 95% confidence interval [CI95%] 2.50-3.70; NPG: 2.33, CI95% 1.93-2.74; CG: 1.99, CI95% 1.81-2.17; p<0.001). The FR-ratios and FRR of sEMG in this study suggested that computer use could increase recruitment of the semispinalis capitis during neck extension (concentric and eccentric phases), which could explain our results. These results also suggest that the FR-ratios of the semispinalis may be a potential functional predictive neuromuscular marker of asymptomatic neck musculoskeletal disorders since even asymptomatic computer workers showed altered values. On the other hand, the FRR values of the semispinalis capitis demonstrated a good discriminative ability to detect neck pain, and such results suggested that each FR-ratio could have a different application.

  20. Intensive dynamic training for females with chronic neck/shoulder pain. A randomized controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Randløv, A; Østergaard, Mikkel; Manniche, C;

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To compare the clinical effectiveness of an intensive three-month training programme with a less intensive programme on females suffering from chronic neck/shoulder pain. STUDY DESIGN: A prospective observer-blinded clinical trial including 12-month pretreatment follow-up. SETTING......: Patients were referred to the Departments of Rheumatology and Physical Medicine at Hvidovre Hospital by their general practitioners. Training was undertaken at a satellite clinic for physiotherapy of Hvidovre Hospital. SUBJECTS: Female patients aged 18-65 years suffering from chronic neck/shoulder pain...... for a minimum of six months. INTERVENTION: Patients were examined by a physician in order to exclude serious diseases. They were then randomized to either an intensive neck/shoulder training programme or a programme of lesser intensity but of similar duration. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Scales measuring pain...

  1. Unusual case of acute neck pain: acute calcific longus colli tendinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Gunjan S; Fomin, Daren A; Joshi, Gargi S; Serano, Richard D

    2016-06-02

    Acute calcific longus colli tendinitis (ACLCT), a very rare cause of severe neck pain, dysphagia and odynophagia, is often mistaken for other common causes of neck pain. However, prompt recognition of this uncommon presentation is important to prevent unnecessary medical and surgical intervention. A 46-year-old Caucasian man presented with a 1-day history of severe neck pain, headache and odynophagia. The patient was afebrile with stable vital signs, however, the laboratory data showed mildly elevated C reactive protein and erythrocyte sedimentation rate. The physical examination was remarkable for markedly reduced cervical range of motion. MRI revealed the pathognomonic findings of paravertebral oedema and calcification. The definitive diagnosis of ACLCT was made and the patient was successfully managed with a short course of oral steroid, benzodiazepine and aural acupuncture, with complete resolution of the condition within a week.

  2. Reliability, construct and discriminative validity of clinical testing in subjects with and without chronic neck pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, René; Ris Hansen, Inge; Falla, Deborah

    2014-01-01

    Flexion Test (CCFT), Range of Movement (ROM), Joint Position Error (JPE), Gaze Stability (GS), Smooth Pursuit Neck Torsion Test (SPNTT), and neuromuscular control of the Deep Cervical Extensors (DCE). Test-retest reliability was assessed for Postural Control (SWAY) and Pressure Pain Threshold (PPT) over......BACKGROUND: The reliability of clinical tests for the cervical spine has not been adequately evaluated. Six cervical clinical tests, which are low cost and easy to perform in clinical settings, were tested for intra- and inter-examiner reliability, and two performance tests were assessed for test......-retest reliability in people with and without chronic neck pain. Moreover, construct and between-group discriminative validity of the tests were examined. METHODS: Twenty-one participants with chronic neck pain and 21 asymptomatic participants were included. Intra- and inter-reliability were evaluated for the Cranio-Cervical...

  3. Less known non-infectious and neuromusculoskeletal system-originated anterolateral neck and craniofacial pain disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydil, Utku; Kizil, Yusuf; Köybaşioğlu, Ahmet

    2012-01-01

    Pain syndromes of neuromusculoskeletal origin are not well-known by most of the clinicians working on head and neck area. As a result, most of the patients with these syndromes are either overlooked without having any treatment or they inappropriately have antibiotic treatments or surgical interventions such as dental extractions and tonsillectomies. Better recognition of the pain syndromes of the neck and face region or entities related to neuromusculoskeletal system may result in more appropriate and effective management of such conditions while avoiding unnecessary medical and surgical treatments. In this review, causes, clinical characteristics, diagnostic and treatment modalities of relatively less known craniofacial and neck pain entities including Eagle syndrome, carotidynia, glossopharyngeal neuralgia, superior laryngeal neuralgia, hyoid bone syndrome, acute calcific retropharyngeal tendinitis, temporal tendinitis, thyroid and cricoid cartilage syndromes, and mastoid process syndrome are summarized.

  4. Effectiveness of a behaviour graded activity program versus conventional exercise for chronic neck pain patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vonk, Frieke; Verhagen, Arianne P; Twisk, Jos W; Köke, Albère J A; Luiten, Marlies W C T; Koes, Bart W

    2009-05-01

    Chronic neck pain is a common complaint in the Netherlands with a point prevalence of 14.3%. Patients with chronic neck pain are often referred to physiotherapy and, nowadays, are mostly treated with exercise therapy. It is, however, unclear which type of exercise therapy is to be preferred. Therefore, this study evaluates the effectiveness of behaviour graded activity (BGA) compared with conventional exercise (CE) for patients with chronic neck pain. Eligible patients with non-specific chronic neck were randomly allocated to either BGA or CE. Primary treatment outcome is the patient's global perceived effect concerning recovery from complaint and daily functioning. Outcome assessment was performed at baseline, and at 4, 9, 26, and 52 weeks after randomization. Effectiveness was examined with general estimating equations analyses. Baseline demographics and patient characteristics were well balanced between the two groups. Mean age was 45.7 (SD 12.4) years and the median duration of complaints was 60 months. The mean number of treatments was 6.6 (SD 3.0) in BGA and 11.2 (SD 4.1) in CE. No significant differences between treatments were found in their effectiveness of managing patients with chronic neck pain. In both BGA and CE some patients reported recovery from complaints and daily function but the proportion of recovered patients did not exceed 50% during the 12-month follow-up period. Both groups showed clinically relevant improvements in physical secondary outcomes. International Standard Randomised Controlled Trial Number: ISRCTN88733332.

  5. Acuity of goal-directed arm movements to visible targets in chronic neck pain

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate end-point acuity in goal-directed arm movements in subjects with chronic neck pain, while taking the trade-off between speed and accuracy into account, and to evaluate associations between reduced acuity and self-rated characteristics. Design: Single-blinded, controlled, comparative group study. Subjects: Forty-five subjects with chronic non-traumatic, non-specific neck pain (n = 24) and whiplash-associated disorders (n = 21). Healthy subjects served as controls (n = 22...

  6. Effect of neck strength training on health-related quality of life in females with chronic neck pain: a randomized controlled 1-year follow-up study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kautiainen Hannu

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic neck pain is a common condition associated not only with a decrease in neck muscle strength, but also with decrease in health-related quality of life (HRQoL. While neck strength training has been shown to be effective in improving neck muscle strength and reducing neck pain, HRQoL among patients with neck pain has been reported as an outcome in only two short-term exercise intervention studies. Thus, reports on the influence of a long-term neck strength training intervention on HRQoL among patients with chronic neck pain have been lacking. This study reports the effect of one-year neck strength training on HRQoL in females with chronic neck pain. Methods One hundred eighty female office workers, 25 to 53 years of age, with chronic neck pain were randomized to a strength training group (STG, n = 60, endurance training group (ETG, n = 60 or control group (CG, n = 60. The STG performed high-intensity isometric neck strengthening exercises with an elastic band while the ETG performed lighter dynamic neck muscle training. The CG received a single session of guidance on stretching exercises. HRQoL was assessed using the generic 15D questionnaire at baseline and after 12 months. Statistical comparisons among the groups were performed using bootstrap-type analysis of covariance (ANCOVA with baseline values as covariates. Effect sizes were calculated using the Cohen method for paired samples. Results Training led to statistically significant improvement in the 15D total scores for both training groups, whereas no changes occurred for the control group (P = 0.012, between groups. The STG improved significantly in five of 15 dimensions, while the ETG improved significantly in two dimensions. Effect size (and 95% confidence intervals for the 15D total score was 0.39 (0.13 to 0.72 for the STG, 0.37 (0.08 to 0.67 for the ETG, and -0.06 (-0.25 to 0.15 for the CG. Conclusions One year of either strength or endurance training seemed

  7. Experimental Muscle Pain Impairs the Synergistic Modular Control of Neck Muscles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Gizzi

    Full Text Available A motor task can be performed via different patterns of muscle activation that show regularities that can be factorized in combinations of a reduced number of muscle groupings (also referred to as motor modules, or muscle synergies. In this study we evaluate whether an acute noxious stimulus induces a change in the way motor modules are combined to generate movement by neck muscles. The neck region was selected as it is a region with potentially high muscular redundancy. We used the motor modules framework to assess the redistribution of muscular activity of 12 muscles (6 per side in the neck region of 8 healthy individuals engaged in a head and neck aiming task, in non-painful conditions (baseline, isotonic saline injection, post pain and after the injection of hypertonic saline into the right splenius capitis muscle. The kinematics of the task was similar in the painful and control conditions. A general decrease of activity was noted for the injected muscle during the painful condition together with an increase or decrease of the activity of the other muscles. Subjects did not adopt shared control strategies (motor modules inter subject similarity at baseline 0.73±0.14; the motor modules recorded during the painful condition could not be used to reconstruct the activation patterns of the control conditions, and the painful stimulus triggered a subject-specific redistribution of muscular activation (i.e., in some subjects the activity of a given muscle increased, whereas in other subjects it decreased with pain. Alterations of afferent input (i.e., painful stimulus influenced motor control at a multi muscular level, but not kinematic output. These findings provide new insights into the motor adaptation to pain.

  8. Experimental Muscle Pain Impairs the Synergistic Modular Control of Neck Muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gizzi, Leonardo; Muceli, Silvia; Petzke, Frank; Falla, Deborah

    2015-01-01

    A motor task can be performed via different patterns of muscle activation that show regularities that can be factorized in combinations of a reduced number of muscle groupings (also referred to as motor modules, or muscle synergies). In this study we evaluate whether an acute noxious stimulus induces a change in the way motor modules are combined to generate movement by neck muscles. The neck region was selected as it is a region with potentially high muscular redundancy. We used the motor modules framework to assess the redistribution of muscular activity of 12 muscles (6 per side) in the neck region of 8 healthy individuals engaged in a head and neck aiming task, in non-painful conditions (baseline, isotonic saline injection, post pain) and after the injection of hypertonic saline into the right splenius capitis muscle. The kinematics of the task was similar in the painful and control conditions. A general decrease of activity was noted for the injected muscle during the painful condition together with an increase or decrease of the activity of the other muscles. Subjects did not adopt shared control strategies (motor modules inter subject similarity at baseline 0.73±0.14); the motor modules recorded during the painful condition could not be used to reconstruct the activation patterns of the control conditions, and the painful stimulus triggered a subject-specific redistribution of muscular activation (i.e., in some subjects the activity of a given muscle increased, whereas in other subjects it decreased with pain). Alterations of afferent input (i.e., painful stimulus) influenced motor control at a multi muscular level, but not kinematic output. These findings provide new insights into the motor adaptation to pain.

  9. Topical morphine gel for pain management in head and neck cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazaki, Takuya; Satou, Shinichi; Ohno, Tsunehisa; Yoshida, Atsuhiro; Nishimura, Kazunari

    2014-10-01

    Pain is common in head and neck cancer patients. Regardless of the cause, pain management is essential in supportive care. Recent research has suggested that opioid receptors on peripheral nerve terminals may play an important role in pain modulation. A number of publications have reported the use of topical morphine for painful ulcers that occur because of a variety of medical conditions. To the best of our knowledge, there are no reports in the literature regarding the use of morphine gel in head and neck cancer patients. We present two cases treated with morphine gel therapy for cutaneous pain resulting from radiation-induced dermatitis and tumor infiltration. We obtained good pain control in both cases without side effects. In one case, the use of the gel allowed a decrease in systemic opioid medication, and adverse effects of systemic opioid administration were resolved. Our experience suggests that this treatment presents great potential for selected head and neck cancer patients, especially those with prominent pain limited to the body surface.

  10. EFFECTIVENESS OF ISCHEMIC COMPRESSION ON TRAPEZIUS MYOFASCIAL TRIGGER POINTS IN NECK PAIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pragnya Ravichandran

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Neck pain is a common disorder prevailing among individuals of different populations. The myofascial pain syndrome is a disorder related to myofascial trigger points. It is defined as a hyperirritable locus in skeletal muscle and that is associated with a hypersensitive palpable nodule in a taut band of muscle. Manual therapy has got a profound role in treating and ischemic compression technique has been researched widely. Thus the study intends to analyse the effectiveness of Manual Therapy (Ischemic Compression on functional outcome in neck pain. Methods: A single blinded randomized control study was conducted for subjects of sample size 30 who met the inclusion criteria and random allocation was made. The baseline parameters as like pain severity using VAS, pain pressure threshold using pressure Algometer, active cervical lateral flexion using 360 degree goniometer and disability using NDI were recorded. Study group received ischemic compression followed by myofascial stretches while the control group received ultrasonic therapy of 1.4watts/cm2. Both received Cryotherapy post session. After 2 weeks the baseline parameters were again recorded for t-test analysis. Result: There was no statistical significance between groups (p≥0.05. But active cervical lateral flexion showed improved mobility in study group and a high statistical significance within groups (p≤0.01 in relation to all parameters. Conclusion: Both ultrasonic therapy and Ischemic compression technique was found to show better improvement in pain pressure threshold and functional outcome in neck pain.

  11. Assessment of neck pain and cervical mobility among female computer workers at Hail University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammad, Walaa S; Hamza, Hayat H; ElSais, Walaa M

    2015-01-01

    The aims of this study were to investigate the prevalence of neck pain among computer workers at Hail University, Saudi Arabia and to compare the cervical range of motion (ROM) of female computer workers suffering from neck pain to the cervical ROM of healthy female computer workers. One hundred and seventy-six female volunteers between 20 and 46 years of age were investigated. Fifty-six of these volunteers were staff members, 22 were administrators and 98 were students. The Cervical Range of Motion (CROM) instrument was used to measure the ROM of the cervical spine. A questionnaire was used to assess participants for the presence of neck pain. The data were analyzed using the Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) software, and the level of significant was set at p cervical lateral flexion, rotation to the right side and protraction range between the pain and pain-free groups. Our results demonstrated that cervical ROM measurements, particularly cervical lateral flexion, rotation and protraction, could be useful for predicting changes in head and neck posture after long-term computer work.

  12. Cervical disc herniation presenting with neck pain and contralateral symptoms: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeung Jacky T

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Cervical disc herniation often results in neck and arm pain in patients as a result of direct impingement of nerve roots and associated inflammatory processes. The clinical presentation usually corresponds with the side of herniation and ipsilateral symptoms predominate the clinical picture. Case presentation A 35-year-old Caucasian man presented to our facility with neck pain and left-sided upper and lower extremity pain. A magnetic resonance imaging scan revealed a right paramedian herniated disc at the C5 to C6 level. All other cervical levels were normal without central canal stenosis or neural foraminal stenosis. Results from magnetic reasonance imaging scans of the brain and lumbar spine were negative. An anterior cervical discectomy was performed at the C5 to C6 level, and an inter-body graft and plate were placed. Our patient had complete resolution of his neck and left arm pain. Conclusions Anterior discectomy and fusion of the cervical spine resulted in complete resolution of our patient’s neck and left arm symptoms and improvement of his contralateral left leg pain. Cervical disc herniation may present with contralateral symptoms that are different from the current perception of this disease.

  13. The construct validity of the Short Form-36 Health Survey for patients with nonspecific chronic neck pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knol -de Vries, Grietje E.; Jorritsma, Wim; Dijkstra, Pieter U.; Geertzen, Jan H. B.; Reneman, Michiel F.

    2015-01-01

    Self-reported disability related to neck pain can be measured using general health questionnaires. The validity of the Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36) in patients with nonspecific chronic neck pain (CNP) in a tertiary outpatient rehabilitation setting is unknown. This

  14. Neck exercises, physical and cognitive behavioural-graded activity as a treatment for adult whiplash patients with chronic neck pain: Design of a randomised controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ris Hansen, Inge; Christensen, Robin Daniel Kjersgaard; Thomsen, Bente

    2011-01-01

    is to present the design of a randomised controlled trial (RCT) aimed at evaluating the effectiveness of a combined individual physical and cognitive behavioural-graded activity program on self-reported general physical function, in addition to neck function, pain, disability and quality of life in patients......ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Many patients suffer from chronic neck pain following a whiplash injury. A combination of cognitive, behavioural therapy with physiotherapy interventions has been indicated to be effective in the management of patients with chronic whiplash-associated disorders. The objective...... with chronic neck pain following whiplash injury compared with a matched control group measured at baseline and 4 and 12 months after baseline. METHODS: The design is a two-centre, RCT-study with a parallel group design. Included are whiplash patients with chronic neck pain for more than 6 months, recruited...

  15. Effectiveness of acupuncture intervention for neck pain caused by cervical spondylosis: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Background Neck pain caused by cervical spondylosis has become a common health problem worldwide among >40-year-old adults. Acupuncture intervention is one of the most popular treatment measures for this disorder. However, evidence for its efficacy in relieving neck pain and recovering neck physiological function has not been established in randomized, placebo-controlled trials. The primary aim of this trial is to assess the efficacy and safety of active acupuncture compared with sham acupunc...

  16. Efficacy of manipulation for non-specific neck pain of recent onset: design of a randomised controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background Manipulation is a common treatment for non-specific neck pain. Neck manipulation, unlike gentler forms of manual therapy such as mobilisation, is associated with a small risk of serious neurovascular injury and can result in stroke or death. It is thought however, that neck manipulation provides better results than mobilisation where clinically indicated. There is long standing and vigorous debate both within and between the professions that use neck manipulation as well a...

  17. Chronic neck pain disability due to an acute whiplash injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nederhand, Marc J.; Hermens, Hermie J.; IJzerman, Maarten J.; Turk, Dennis C.; Zilvold, Gerrit

    2003-01-01

    Several theories about musculoskeletal pain syndromes such as whiplash-associated disorder (WAD) suggest that pain and muscle activity interact and may contribute to the chronicity of symptoms. Studies using surface electromyography (sEMG) have demonstrated abnormal muscle activation patterns of the

  18. Back and neck pain are related to mental health problems in adolescence

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background There is a high prevalence of mental health problems amongst adolescents. In addition there is a high prevalence of spinal pain in this population. Evidence suggests that these conditions are related. This study sought to extend earlier findings by examining the relationship between mental health problems as measured by the Child Behaviour Check List (CBCL) and the experience of back and neck pain in adolescents. Methods One thousand five hundred and eighty participants (m...

  19. Prevalence of Referred Pain with Pulpal Origin in the Head, Face and Neck Region

    OpenAIRE

    Mardani, Siamak; Eghbal, Mohammad Jafar; Baharvand, Maryam

    2008-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: This study was designed to evaluate the prevalence of referred pain with pulpal source in the head, face and neck region among patients referred to Dental School of Shahid Beheshti University MC, Tehran, Iran in 2004. MATERIALS AND METHODS: In this cross-sectional study, 100 patients (55 males and 45 females) referred to oral medicine department of Shahid Beheshti Dental School evaluated via clinical and radiographic examination to seek their pain sources and sites. Inclusion cr...

  20. The effectiveness of chiropractic manipulative therapy and Spidertech therapy in the treatment of chronic neck pain

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    M.Tech. Purpose: This study aims to compare the effects of Chiropractic manipulative therapy of the cervical spine in conjunction with SpiderTech therapy in the treatment of chronic neck pain with regards to pain, disability and cervical spine range of motion. Method: This study consisted of two groups of 15 participants between the ages of eighteen and forty, ensuring equal male to female and age ratios. The potential participants were examined and accepted according to the inclusion and ...

  1. Effectiveness of Iyengar yoga in treating spinal (back and neck) pain: A systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Edith Meszaros Crow; Emilien Jeannot; Alison Trewhela

    2015-01-01

    Considerable amount of money spent in health care is used for treatments of lifestyle related, chronic health conditions, which come from behaviors that contribute to morbidity and mortality of the population. Back and neck pain are two of the most common musculoskeletal problems in modern society that have significant cost in health care. Yoga, as a branch of complementary alternative medicine, has emerged and is showing to be an effective treatment against nonspecific spinal pain. Recent st...

  2. Preliminary study of neck muscle size and strength measurements in females with chronic non-specific neck pain and healthy control subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezasoltani, Asghar; Ali-Reza, Ahmadipor; Khosro, Khademi-Kalantari; Abbass, Rahimi

    2010-08-01

    Neck muscle weakness and atrophy are two common causes of pain and disability among office workers. The aim of this study was to compare the strength of the neck extensor and flexor muscles and the size of the semispinalis capitis muscle (SECM) in patients with chronic non-specific neck pain (CNNP) and healthy subjects. Twenty female office workers (10 patients with CNNP and 10 healthy subjects) participated in this study. The strength of the neck extensor and flexor muscles was measured by an isometric device and the SECM size was measured by ultrasonography. Neck muscle strength, size of the SECM and the ratios of neck strength to body weight, neck extensor strength to SECM size, SECM size to body weight and neck flexor to extensor strength were all significantly lower in patients compared to controls (P neck strength, the size of the SECM and the ratio of neck muscle strength to SECM size appear to be useful parameters in appraising patients with CNNP.

  3. The Effect of a Program Using Some Therapeutic Methods to Rehabilitate Patients Suffering from Neck Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayad O MAR

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Neck pain is one of the common physical problems of the adults which needs to be taken seriously in order to prevent further health problems. As the daily life of the modern people leads physical in activity, and the use of electronic devices causes imprope r effect on certain parts of the body, specials programs have to be developed as preventive treatment. Therapeutic methods can also be listed through such preventive methods. The purpose of this study was to i dentify the impact of the proposed program usin g some natural methods of treatment for the rehabilitation of people with neck pain , to i dentify the improved range of motion in all directions to the neck area , and also t o identify the extent of improvement in muscle strength for the neck and back. Twelv e patients in Ain Zara Physiotherapy Center and Tripoli Clinic (in Tripoli city were chosen as voluntarily whose age ranged from 30 to 50 years, and the subjects were divided into two groups , as experimental and control groups. This study proved that pro posed therapeutic methods help the treatment of neck pain.

  4. The effectiveness of isometric exercises as compared to general exercises in the management of chronic non-specific neck pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Muhammad; Soomro, Rabail Rani; Ali, Syed Shahzad

    2014-09-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of isometric exercises as compared to general exercises in chronic non-specific neck pain. For this randomised controlled trial total 68 patients (34 each group) with chronic non-specific neck pain were recruited from Alain Poly Clinic and Institute of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation Dow University of Health Sciences, Karachi between May, 2012 and August, 2012. Simple randomisation method was used to assign participants into isometric exercise group and general exercise groups. The isometric exercise group performed exercises for neck muscle groups with a rubber band and general exercises group performed active range of movement exercises for all neck movements. Patients in both groups received 3 supervised treatment sessions per week for 12 weeks. Visual Analogue Scale (VAS), North wick Park Neck Pain Questionnaire and goniometer were used to assess pain, disability and neck range of movements at baseline and after 12 weeks. Both interventions showed statistically significant improvements in pain, function and range of movement p = 0.001f or isometric exercise group, p = 0.04 for general exercises group and p = 0.001 for range of movement. However, mean improvements in post intervention VAS score and North wick Park Neck Pain Questionnaire score was better in isometric exercises group as compared to general exercise group. In conclusion, both interventions are effective in the treatment of chronic non-specific neck pain however; isometric exercises are clinically more effective than general exercises.

  5. A best-evidence review of diagnostic procedures for neck and low-back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubinstein, Sidney M; van Tulder, Maurits

    2008-06-01

    This chapter aims to present an overview of the best available evidence on diagnostic procedures for neck and low-back pain. Relatively little is known about the accuracy of such procedures. Although most spinal conditions are benign and self-limiting, the real challenge to the clinician is to distinguish serious spinal pathology or nerve-root pain from non-specific neck and low-back pain. The use of valid procedures can assist the clinician in this aim. A search was conducted in PubMed to identify relevant systematic reviews and primary studies on diagnostic procedures for the neck and low back. A systematic review was included if at least two independent reviewers were used; a systematic procedure was followed for identifying the literature; and a methodological assessment was conducted. In the absence of systematic reviews, primary studies are reported. Systematic reviews were identified which evaluated evidence for diagnostic procedures in the following categories: history, physical examination, and special studies, including diagnostic imaging, diagnostic blocks, and facet and sacroiliac joint injections. In general, there is much more evidence on diagnostic procedures for the low back than there is for the neck. With regard to the history, a number of factors can be identified which can assist the clinician in identifying sciatica due to disc herniation or serious pathology. With regard to the physical examination, the straight-leg raise is the only sign consistently reported to be sensitive for sciatica due to disc herniation, but is limited by its low specificity. The diagnostic accuracy of other neurological signs and tests is unclear. Orthopaedic tests of the neck, such as Spurling's or the upper-limb tension test, are useful to rule a radiculopathy in or rule out, respectively. In patients 50 years of age or older, plain spinal radiography together with standard laboratory tests are highly accurate in identifying underlying systemic disease; however

  6. A painful stiff neck following an ear, nose, and throat surgical procedure: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlidis, Elena; Copioli, Cristiana; Spagnoli, Carlotta; Mazzotta, Silvia; Ormitti, Francesca; Crisi, Girolamo; Pisani, Francesco

    2015-02-01

    Grisel syndrome is a rare, nontraumatic atlantoaxial subluxation, typical of developmental ages and characterized by head flexion/rotation and painful fixation. Neurological symptoms may occur. It is secondary to head/neck infections and ear, nose, and throat surgery (adenoidectomy, tonsillectomy, and mastoidectomy). Here, we report the case of a child who presented a painful stiff neck following an adenotonsillectomy, with imaging evidencing an atlantoaxial subluxation. The child showed improvement in his condition following a conservative treatment with antibiotics, anti-inflammatory, and analgesic therapy and cervical collar. We believe it is of great significance for clinicians taking into account this peculiar condition in the differential diagnosis of a stiff neck in pediatric patients, thus avoiding misdiagnosis and delays. Indeed, its diagnosis is mainly based on a focused anamnesis associated with the detection of the typical neuroradiological findings.

  7. Night vision goggle-induced neck pain in military helicopter aircrew: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Michael F; Coffey, Brendan; Albert, Wayne J; Fischer, Steven L

    2015-01-01

    Neck pain occurs at a significant rate in the military helicopter community. It is often attributed to the use of night vision goggles (NVG) and to a number of additional factors such as anthropometrics, posture, vibration, mission length, physical fitness, and helmet fit or load. A number of research studies have addressed many aspects of this epidemic, but an up-to-date and comprehensive review of the literature is not currently available. This paper reviews the spinal anatomy in general and then summarizes what is known about the incidence and prevalence of neck injuries, how the operational environments and equipment may contribute to these injuries, and what can be done to address them from a prevention and/or rehabilitation perspective. Harrison MF, Coffey B, Albert WJ, Fischer SL. Night vision goggle-induced neck pain in military helicopter aircrew: a literature review.

  8. High physical and psychological load at work and sickness absence due to neck pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ariëns, G.A.M.; Bongers, P.M.; Hoogendoorn, W.E.; Wal, G. van der; Mechelen, W. van

    2002-01-01

    Objectives This study investigates the relationship between physical and psychosocial load at work and sickness absence due to neck pain. Methods A prospective cohort study with a follow-up period of 3 years (1994-1998) was performed among a working population. At the beginning of the study, physica

  9. The effect of work-focused rehabilitation among patients with neck and back pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Myhre, Kjersti; Marchand, Gunn Hege; Leivseth, Gunnar;

    2014-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN: Multicenter randomized trial with patients listed as sick for 1 to 12 months due to neck or back pain and referred to secondary care. OBJECTIVE: To compare the return-to-work (RTW) rate among patients offered work-focused rehabilitation or multidisciplinary rehabilitation. SUMMARY O...

  10. Reproducibility of cervical range of motion in patients with neck pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoving, J.L.; Pool, J.J.M.; Mameren, van H.; Deville, W.L.J.M.; Assendelft, W.J.J.; Vet, de H.C.W.; Winter, de A.F.; Koes, B.W.; Bouter, L.M.

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the intra-rater and inter-rater reproducibility of the measurement of active Range of Motion (ROM) in patients with neck pain using the Cybex Electronic Digital Inclinometer-320 (EDI-320). DESIGN: In an outpatient clinic in a primary care setting 32 patients with at least 2 week

  11. Reproducibility of cervical range of motion in patients with neck pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pool, JJM; van Mameren, H; Deville, WJLM; Assendelft, WJJ; de Vet, HCW; de Winter, AF; Koes, BW; Bouter, LM; Hoving, J.L.

    2005-01-01

    Background: Reproducibility measurements of the range of motion are an important prerequisite for the interpretation of study results. The aim of the study is to assess the intra-rater and interrater reproducibility of the measurement of active Range of Motion ( ROM) in patients with neck pain using

  12. Reproducibility of cervical range of motion in patients with neck pain.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoving, J.L.; Pool, J.J.M.; Mameren, H.H. van; Devillé, W.L.J.M.; Assendelft, W.J.J.; Vet, H.C.W. de; Winter, A.F. de; Koes, B.W.; Bouter, L.M.

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the intra-rater and inter-rater reproducibility of the measurement of active Range of Motion (ROM) in patients with neck pain using the Cybex Electronic Digital Inclinometer-320 (EDI-320). DESIGN: In an outpatient clinic in a primary care setting 32 patients with at least 2 week

  13. Management of neck pain in Royal Australian Air Force fast jet aircrew.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Netto, Kevin; Hampson, Gregory; Oppermann, Brett; Carstairs, Greg; Aisbett, Brad

    2011-01-01

    To examine the type and effectiveness of various strategies used by Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF) fast jet (FJ) aircrew in self-referral and management of flight-related neck pain, a 6-section, 18-question survey tool was distributed to 86 eligible RAAF aircrew. Selective results from the sections evaluating aircrew demographics, incidence of flight-related neck pain, and the self-referral strategies of aircrew to manage these injuries are presented here. Eighty-two RAAF FJ aircrew responded to the survey. Ninety-five percent of the respondents experienced flight-related neck pain. The most commonly sought treatment modalities were on-base medical and physiotherapy services. Many respondents reported that currently provided on-base treatment and ancillary services such as chiropractic therapy are the most effective in alleviating symptoms. Further investigation into the effectiveness and safety of these ancillary therapies needs to be performed to allow appropriate consideration of their place in the management of neck pain in FJ aircrew.

  14. Efficacy of acupunture in patients with chronic neck pain--a randomised, sham controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahin, Nilay; Ozcan, Emel; Sezen, Kasim; Karatas, Omer; Issever, Halim

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of electroacupuncture and sham acupuncture in the treatment of patients with chronic neck pain. 31 patients with chronic neck pain were included in a randomised, controlled trial. Electric stimulation was given for 30 minutes at low frequency (1-4Hz), pulse width of 200 micros, interrupted wave form. Of the 29 patients who completed the therapy, 13 were assigned to conventional acupuncture and 16 to sham acupuncture groups, receiving 3 sessions a week for a total of 10 sessions, each lasting for 30 minutes. Patients were evaluated before and after therapy and 3 months later by Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) and the bodily pain subscale of the Short Form Health Survey-36 scale. The treating physician was different from the evaluating physician who, like the patient, was blinded. VAS scores in both groups significantly reduced after therapy and at 3 months post-therapy, but the difference between groups was not significant. In respect of bodily pain, there was a significant improvement in the acupuncture group after therapy (P<0.01). Stimulation of conventional acupuncture points was not generally superior to needling ofnonspecific points on the neck, and both treatments were associated with improvement of symptoms. Needles inserted into the neck are likely to be an inappropriate sham control for acupuncture.

  15. The prevalence of neck pain in the world population: a systematic critical review of the literature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fejer, René; Kyvik, Kirsten Ohm; Hartvigsen, Jan

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of neck pain (NP) in the world population and to identify areas of methodological variation between studies. A systematic search was conducted in five databases (MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, OSH-ROM, and PsycINFO), followed by a screening...

  16. Fear avoidance and illness beliefs in post-traumatic neck pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buitenhuis, Jan; de Jong, Peter J.

    2011-01-01

    Study Design. A descriptive overview of the relevant literature and the introduction of a new psychological model. Objective. The fear-avoidance (FA) model and the potential importance of illness beliefs in post-traumatic neck pain are discussed. The causal beliefs-anxiety model is introduced as an

  17. A Comparison of the Deep Cervical Flexor Muscle Thicknesses in Subjects with and without Neck Pain during Craniocervical Flexion Exercises.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun, Ilsub; Kim, Kyoung

    2013-11-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of the present study was to examine the amount of change in the thicknesses of the deep cervical flexor (DCF) and sternocleidomastoid (SCM) muscles in subjects with neck pain and subjects without neck pain during craniocervical flexion exercise (CCFE). [Subjects] The total number of subjects was 40, comprising 20 in the no-pain group (males 11, females 9) and 20 in the pain group (males 8, females 12). [Methods] Muscle images were obtained using ultrasound, and the thicknesses of the individual muscles were measured using the NIH ImageJ software. [Results] During CCFE, as pressure increased, the no-pain group recruited the DCF more than the pain group, while the pain group recruited the SCM more. [Conclusion] Selective DCF contraction exercises are considered very useful in the treatment of patients with neck pain.

  18. Acute neck pain: cervical spine range of motion and position sense prior to and after joint mobilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNair, Peter J; Portero, Pierre; Chiquet, Christophe; Mawston, Grant; Lavaste, Francois

    2007-11-01

    Despite the relatively high prevalence of cervical spine pain, the efficacy of treatment procedures is limited. In the current study, range of motion and proprioception was assessed prior to and after specific cervical spine mobilisation techniques. A 44-year-old male office worker presented with a history of cervical pain of 1 day duration. He had woken with pain, stiffness and a loss of range of motion. Examination findings indicated pain to be at C5-6 on the left side. Measurement of maximal three-dimensional cervical motion was undertaken using a Zebris system. A position matching task tested the individual's ability to actively reposition their head and neck. The treatment undertaken involved grade III down-slope mobilisations on the left side at C5-6 and C6-7 in supine lying. This technique was then progressed by placing the subject in an upright sitting position, and sustained natural apophyseal glides were performed at C6. Immediately following the treatment, the patient reported a considerable decrease in pain, less difficulty in movement and reduced stiffness. Motion analyses showed the most marked percentage improvements in range of motion after treatment were in flexion (55%), extension (35%), left rotation (56%), and left lateral flexion (22%). Ipsilateral lateral flexion with axial rotation was also notably improved following treatment. No change in proprioceptive ability was found following the treatment. The findings showed that the application of standardised specific mobilisation techniques led to substantial improvements in the range of motion and the restitution of normal coupled motion.

  19. Position of document holder and work related risk factors for neck pain among computer users: a narrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambusam, S; Baharudin, O; Roslizawati, N; Leonard, J

    2015-01-01

    Document holder is used as a remedy to address occupational neck pain among computer users. An understanding on the effects of the document holder along with other work related risk factors while working in computer workstation requires attention. A comprehensive knowledge on the optimal location of the document holder in computer use and associated work related factors that may contribute to neck pain reviewed in this article. A literature search has been conducted over the past 14 years based on the published articles from January 1990 to January 2014 in both Science Direct and PubMed databases. Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) keywords for search were neck muscle OR head posture OR muscle tension' OR muscle activity OR work related disorders OR neck pain AND/OR document location OR document holder OR source document OR copy screen holder.Document holder placed lateral to the screen was most preferred to reduce neck discomfort among occupational typists. Document without a holder was placed flat on the surface is least preferred. The head posture and muscle activity increases when the document is placed flat on the surface compared to when placed on the document holder. Work related factors such as static posture, repetitive movement, prolong sitting and awkward positions were the risk factors for chronic neck pain. This review highlights the optimal location for document holder for computer users to reduce neck pain. Together, the importance of work related risk factors for to neck pain on occupational typist is emphasized for the clinical management.

  20. Protocol for Shoulder function training reducing musculoskeletal pain in shoulder and neck: a randomized controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Christoffer H; Andersen, Lars L; Mortensen, Ole S

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Neck and shoulder complaints are common among employees in sedentary occupations characterized by intensive computer use. Such musculoskeletal pain - which is often associated with restricted range of motion and loss of muscle strength - is one of the most common conditions...... training of the painful area. Our study investigates the effect of the latter approach. METHODS/DESIGN: A randomized controlled trial of 10 weeks duration is currently being conducted. Employed office workers with severe neck-shoulder pain are randomized to 3 × 20 min shoulder function training...... with training supervision or to a reference group receiving advice to stay physically active. Shoulder function training primarily focuses on the serratus anterior and lower trapezius muscle with only minimal activation the upper trapezius.An announcement was sent to the administrative section of the university...

  1. Exercise training as treatment of neck pain among military helicopter pilots and crew members

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Murray, Mike; Lange, Britt; Nørnberg, Bo Riebeling

    ) and Pressure-Pain-Threshold (PPT) in the trapezius m. and upper neck extensors. Secondary outcome: Maximal-Voluntary-Contraction (MVC) for cervical flexion/extension and shoulder-elevation. Results: Neck-pain for ETG was (mean±SD) 1.9±1.7 at baseline and 1.8±2.1 at follow-up, and correspondingly for REF 2.......4±2.0 and 1.7±1.7. Preliminary intention-to-treat analysis, revealed no significant effect on change in pain or PPT between groups. Further analysis, controlling for training frequency, intensity and volume are pending. Baseline MVC for ETG cervical flexion/extension was 184.4±59.8N and 247.2±63.8N...

  2. Lasting effects of workplace strength training for neck/shoulder/arm pain among laboratory technicians

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Peter; Larsen, Anders I; Zebis, Mette Kreutzfeldt;

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. This study investigated long-term effects and implementation processes of workplace strength training for musculoskeletal disorders. Methods. 333 and 140 laboratory technicians from private and public sector companies, respectively, replied to a 3-year follow-up questionnaire subsequent...... to a 1-year randomized controlled trial (RCT) with high-intensity strength training for prevention and treatment of neck, shoulder, and arm pain. Being a natural experiment, the two participating companies implemented and modified the initial training program in different ways during the subsequent 2......, (2) training culture, that is, relatively more employees trained at the workplace and with colleagues, (3) self-reported health changes, and (4) prevention of neck and wrist pain development among initially pain-free employees. Conclusions. This natural experiment shows that strength training can...

  3. Risk factors in the onset of neck/shoulder pain in a prospective study of workers in industrial and service companies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, JH; Kaergaard, A.; Mikkelsen, S.;

    2003-01-01

    AIMS: To quantify the relative contribution of work related physical factors, psychosocial workplace factors, and individual factors and aspects of somatisation to the onset of neck/shoulder pain. METHODS: Four year prospective cohort study of workers from industrial and service companies...... pain (symptom cases); and neck/shoulder pain with pressure tenderness in the muscles of the neck/shoulder region (clinical cases). RESULTS: During follow up, 636 (14.1%) participants reported neck/shoulder pain of new onset; among these, 82 (1.7%) also had clinical signs of substantial muscle...... subsequent neck/shoulder pain, and neck/shoulder pain with pressure tenderness. CONCLUSIONS: High levels of distress, and physical and psychosocial workplace factors are predictors of onset of pain in the neck and/or shoulders, particularly pain with pressure tenderness in the muscles...

  4. An increased response to experimental muscle pain is related to psychological status in women with chronic non-traumatic neck-shoulder pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Persson Ann L

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neck-shoulder pain conditions, e.g., chronic trapezius myalgia, have been associated with sensory disturbances such as increased sensitivity to experimentally induced pain. This study investigated pain sensitivity in terms of bilateral pressure pain thresholds over the trapezius and tibialis anterior muscles and pain responses after a unilateral hypertonic saline infusion into the right legs tibialis anterior muscle and related those parameters to intensity and area size of the clinical pain and to psychological factors (sleeping problems, depression, anxiety, catastrophizing and fear-avoidance. Methods Nineteen women with chronic non-traumatic neck-shoulder pain but without simultaneous anatomically widespread clinical pain (NSP and 30 age-matched pain-free female control subjects (CON participated in the study. Results NSP had lower pressure pain thresholds over the trapezius and over the tibialis anterior muscles and experienced hypertonic saline-evoked pain in the tibialis anterior muscle to be significantly more intense and locally more widespread than CON. More intense symptoms of anxiety and depression together with a higher disability level were associated with increased pain responses to experimental pain induction and a larger area size of the clinical neck-shoulder pain at its worst. Conclusion These results indicate that central mechanisms e.g., central sensitization and altered descending control, are involved in chronic neck-shoulder pain since sensory hypersensitivity was found in areas distant to the site of clinical pain. Psychological status was found to interact with the perception, intensity, duration and distribution of induced pain (hypertonic saline together with the spreading of clinical pain. The duration and intensity of pain correlated negatively with pressure pain thresholds.

  5. Unilateral neck pain: a case of Eagle syndrome with associated nontraumatic styloid fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlik, Kseniya; Griffin, Gregory D; Zoumberakis, Erick

    2014-01-01

    We present a case of Eagle syndrome in a 77-year-old woman with associated aneurysm and nontraumatic styloid process fracture, without history of tonsillectomy, who presented to the emergency department. The first set of symptoms associated with the elongation of the temporal styloid process and/or the calcification of the stylomandibular or stylohyoid ligaments was described by Eagle in 1937. Classically, unilateral pain in the oropharynx radiating to the neck and face that is exacerbated by head turning and neck rotation is characteristic of Eagle syndrome. However, styloid process elongation and stylohyoid calcification found in Eagle syndrome may also present with vascular symptomsthrough impingement and injury of the carotid arteries. Eagle syndrome is a rare but important differential that the emergency physician must consider in a patient with unilateral neck pain and positional neurological symptoms with head turning and in posttonsillectomy patients. Patients with medical history of Eagle syndrome presenting with neck pain and especially neurological symptomsmust be thoroughly evaluated for carotid and jugular venous injury. Specifically, the decision to obtain computed tomography and computed tomographic angiography to evaluate for carotid artery injury is important for patient management and disposition.

  6. Individual, physical and psychological risk factors for neck pain in Australian office workers: a 1-year longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hush, Julia M; Michaleff, Zoe; Maher, Christopher G; Refshauge, Kathryn

    2009-10-01

    Neck pain is more prevalent in office workers than in the general community. To date, findings from prospective studies that investigated causal relationships between putative risk factors and the onset of neck pain in this population have been limited by high loss to follow-up. The aim of this research was to prospectively evaluate a range of risk factors for neck pain in office workers, using validated and reliable objective measures as well as attain an estimate of 1-year incidence. We assembled a cohort of 53 office workers without neck pain and measured individual, physical, workplace and psychological factors at baseline. We followed participants for 1 year to measure the incidence of neck pain. We achieved 100% participant follow-up. Cox regression analysis was applied to examine the relationship between the putative risk factors and the cumulative incidence of neck pain. The 1-year incidence proportion of neck pain in Australian office workers was estimated in this study to be 0.49 (95% CI 0.36-0.62). Predictors of neck pain with moderate to large effect sizes were female gender (HR: 3.07; 95% CI: 1.18-7.99) and high psychological stress (HR: 1.64; 95% CI: 0.66-4.07). Protective factors included increased mobility of the cervical spine (HR: 0.44; 95% CI: 0.19-1.05) and frequent exercise (HR: 0.64; 95% CI: 0.27-1.51). These results reveal that neck pain is common in Australian office workers and that there are risk factors that are potentially modifiable.

  7. Prognostic factors for long-term sickness absence among employees with neck-shoulder and low-back pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holtermann, Andreas; Hansen, Jørgen V; Burr, Hermann;

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to identify prognostic factors for long-term sickness absence among employees with neck-shoulder or low-back pain. METHODS: In 2000, a representative sample of Danish employees (N=5036) rated their average pain intensity in the neck-shoulder and low-back during...... the last three months on a 10-point scale; using a questionnaire, they also reported on physical and psychosocial work factors, health behavior, work ability and self-efficacy. Employees reporting pain intensity of >or=4 were considered to have musculoskeletal pain. As a result, we defined two populations...... to be included in our analyses: people with pain in the neck-shoulder (N=848) and low-back (N=676) regions. Data on long-term sickness absence of >or=3 weeks for the period 2001-2002 were attained from the Danish national register of social transfer payments. RESULTS: One fifth of employees with neck...

  8. Changes in the incidence of occupational disability as a result of back and neck pain in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steenstra, I.A.; Verbeek, J.H.; Prinsze, F.J.; Knol, D.L.

    2006-01-01

    Background: Back pain ( including neck pain) is one of the most prevalent health problems for which physicians are consulted. Back pain can decrease the quality of life considerably during a great part of the lives of those who suffer from it. At the same time it has an enormous economic impact, mai

  9. Cervical interlaminar epidural steroid injection for neck pain and cervical radiculopathy: effect and prognostic factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Jong Won; Lee, Joon Woo; Kim, Sung Hyun; Kwack, Kyu-Sung [Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Department of Radiology, Gyeonggi-do (Korea); Choi, Ja-Young; Moon, Sung Gyu; Jun, Woo Sun [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea); Yeom, Jin-Sup [Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Gyeongi-Do (Korea); Kim, Hyun-Jib [Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Department of Neurosurgery, Gyeongi-Do (Korea); Kang, Heung Sik [Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Department of Radiology, Gyeonggi-do (Korea); Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea)

    2007-05-15

    To verify the usefulness of a fluoroscopy guided cervical interlaminar epidural steroid injection (CIESI) in patients with neck pain and cervical radiculopathy and to evaluate outcome predictors. We retrospectively analyzed 91 patients from July 2004 to June 2005 in whom CIESI was initially performed for neck pain and cervical radiculopathy. Therapeutic effects were evaluated 2 weeks after the administration of CIESI, and CIESI effectiveness was graded using a five-point scale, namely, whether the pain had disappeared, was much improved, slightly improved, the same, or aggravated. We also used a visual analog scale (VAS) for the clinical evaluation. According to documentation and follow-up charts, we categorized treatments as effective or ineffective. Possible outcome predictors, namely, diagnosis (spinal stenosis vs herniated disc), primary symptoms (neck pain vs radiculopathy vs both), age, gender, and duration of pain (more or less than 6 months) were also analyzed. Fisher's exact test, the chi-square test, and multiple logistic regression analysis were used for the statistical analysis. After their medical records had been reviewed, 76 patients were included in this study. Inclusion criteria were: the availability of a cross-sectional image, such as a CT scan or an MR image, and a follow-up record after injection. The medical records of 76 patients (male:female = 41: 35) of mean age 53.1 years (range 32 years to 82 years) were reviewed. Two weeks after injection, 55 patients (72.4%) had experienced effective pain relief. Patients with herniated discs had significantly better results than patients with spinal stenosis (86.1% vs 60.0%) (P < 0.05). Other non-significant predictors of an improved outcome included: a symptom duration of <6 months, a young age, and the presence of cervical radiculopathy. Multiple regression analysis showed that the only factor that was significantly associated with outcome was the cause of the pain, i.e., herniated disc or

  10. The experience and management of neck pain in general practice: the patients' perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherer, Martin; Schaefer, Helene; Blozik, Eva; Chenot, Jean-François; Himmel, Wolfgang

    2010-06-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the perspective and expectation of patients presenting with neck pain in general practice. The study design is a qualitative analysis of patient interviews and was conducted in a primary care setting in Germany. Twenty patients aged 20-78, according to theoretical sampling were included in the study. Patients tried to cope autonomously with the situation and consulted GPs only if their self-help had failed. When patients asked for external help, they usually focused on somatic treatment options such as massage, physiotherapy or injections. Most patients reported to have experiences with somatic therapies; however, they felt that some or all of these treatments were inefficient or led only to short-time improvements. Patients often avoided psychosocial themes when talking to doctors for fear of being branded as 'neurotic'. Although neck pain is difficult to manage and a burden for patients, they have obviously found a way of both living with their pain and a pragmatic approach of talking about their symptoms with their doctor. According to the patients' statements, the interaction between doctor and patient seems to be rather distant, ensuring that both sides avoid any issues that might touch upon psychological aspects of neck pain.

  11. Relationship between atlanto-odontoid osteoarthritis and idiopathic suboccipital neck pain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zapletal, J. [Dept. of Radiology, Leyenburg Hospital, The Hague (Netherlands); Hekster, R.E.M. [Dept. of Radiology, Leyenburg Hospital, The Hague (Netherlands); Straver, J.S. [Dept. of Neurology, Leyenburg Hospital, The Hague (Netherlands); Wilmink, J.T. [Dept. of Neuroradiology, University Hospital, Maastricht (Netherlands); Hermans, J. [Dept. of Medical Statistics, Leiden Univ. (Netherlands)

    1996-01-01

    We discuss the relationship of atlanto-odontoid (AO) (anterior C1-C2 joint) osteoarthritis to suboccipital pain. A questionnaire regarding suboccipital neck pain was presented to 210 consecutive patients undergoing computed tomography (CT) of the brain or sinuses for a variety of indications. In all patients the AO joint and the lateral scout image of the cervical spine were studied. In 104 (49%) degenerative changes were seen at the AO joint. There were 89 patients (42%) who reported pain in the suboccipital region, although this was not the reason for CT in any patient. Statistical analysis of the prevalence of suboccipital neck pain in all patients showed the presence of AO osteoarthritis seen on CT to be associated with occurrence of these symptoms. This association remained significant in the same study population after excluding patients with a history of rheumatoid arthritis, migraine, stress and neck trauma and patients with signs of degenerative changes of C2-C7 on the computed lateral scout image. (orig.)

  12. The efficacy of intermittent cervical traction in patents with chronic neck pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borman, Pinar; Keskin, Dilek; Ekici, Betul; Bodur, Hatice

    2008-10-01

    Previous studies about the usefulness of traction therapy have concluded with conflicting results. The aim of this study was to examine its efficacy in chronic neck pain. Forty-two patients with at least 6 weeks of nonspecific neck pain were selected for the study. Data about demographic characteristics including age, sex, body mass index, duration of cervical pain, working status, smoking status, and regular exercise were recorded. Each patient was randomly assigned to Group 1-receiving only standard physical therapy including hot pack, ultrasound therapy and exercise program and Group 2-treated with traction therapy in addition to standard physical therapy. The patients were reevaluated at the end of the therapy. The main outcome measures of the treatment were pain intensity by visual analog scale (VAS), disability by neck disability index (NDI), and quality of life assessed by Nottingham Health Profile (NHP). Twenty-four female and 18 male patients with mean age of 48.2+/-11.5 years and a mean disease duration of 4.3+/-2.9 years were included to the study. There were no differences between the groups in terms of age, sex, pain intensity, and scores of NHP and NDI at entry. There were 21 patients in both groups. Both groups improved significantly in pain intensity and the scores of NDI and physical subscles of NHP at the end of the therapies (ppain scores in both groups (pneck pain. We suggest the clinicians to consider this condition and to focus on exercise therapy in the management of patients suffering from this condition.

  13. Acupuncture for chronic neck pain: a pilot for a randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bland Martin J

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acupuncture is increasingly being used for many conditions including chronic neck pain. However the evidence remains inconclusive, indicating the need for further well-designed research. The aim of this study was to conduct a pilot randomised controlled parallel arm trial, to establish key features required for the design and implementation of a large-scale trial on acupuncture for chronic neck pain. Methods Patients whose GPs had diagnosed neck pain were recruited from one general practice, and randomised to receive usual GP care only, or acupuncture (up to 10 treatments over 3 months as an adjunctive treatment to usual GP care. The primary outcome measure was the Northwick Park Neck Pain Questionnaire (NPQ at 3 months. The primary analysis was to determine the sample size for the full scale study. Results Of the 227 patients with neck pain identified from the GP database, 28 (12.3% consenting patients were eligible to participate in the pilot and 24 (10.5% were recruited to the trial. Ten patients were randomised to acupuncture, receiving an average of eight treatments from one of four acupuncturists, and 14 were randomised to usual GP care alone. The sample size for the full scale trial was calculated from a clinically meaningful difference of 5% on the NPQ and, from this pilot, an adjusted standard deviation of 15.3%. Assuming 90% power at the 5% significance level, a sample size of 229 would be required in each arm in a large-scale trial when allowing for a loss to follow-up rate of 14%. In order to achieve this sample, one would need to identify patients from databases of GP practices with a total population of 230,000 patients, or approximately 15 GP practices roughly equal in size to the one involved in this study (i.e. 15,694 patients. Conclusion This pilot study has allowed a number of recommendations to be made to facilitate the design of a large-scale trial, which in turn will help to clarify the existing evidence

  14. Translation and validation of the German version of the Bournemouth Questionnaire for Neck Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soklic Marina

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Clinical outcome measures are important tools to monitor patient improvement during treatment as well as to document changes for research purposes. The short-form Bournemouth questionnaire for neck pain patients (BQN was developed from the biopsychosocial model and measures pain, disability, cognitive and affective domains. It has been shown to be a valid and reliable outcome measure in English, French and Dutch and more sensitive to change compared to other questionnaires. The purpose of this study was to translate and validate a German version of the Bournemouth questionnaire for neck pain patients. Methods German translation and back translation into English of the BQN was done independently by four persons and overseen by an expert committee. Face validity of the German BQN was tested on 30 neck pain patients in a single chiropractic practice. Test-retest reliability was evaluated on 31 medical students and chiropractors before and after a lecture. The German BQN was then assessed on 102 first time neck pain patients at two chiropractic practices for internal consistency, external construct validity, external longitudinal construct validity and sensitivity to change compared to the German versions of the Neck Disability Index (NDI and the Neck Pain and Disability Scale (NPAD. Results Face validity testing lead to minor changes to the German BQN. The Intraclass Correlation Coefficient for the test-retest reliability was 0.99. The internal consistency was strong for all 7 items of the BQN with Cronbach α's of .79 and .80 for the pre and post-treatment total scores. External construct validity and external longitudinal construct validity using Pearson's correlation coefficient showed statistically significant correlations for all 7 scales of the BQN with the other questionnaires. The German BQN showed greater responsiveness compared to the other questionnaires for all scales. Conclusions The German BQN is a valid and

  15. The Influence of Ergonomic Training on Low Back and Neck Pains in Female Hospital Personnel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeidi

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Background Prevalence of low back pain (LBP and neck pain (NP in workers, especially in nurses is high, but their knowledge of ergonomics is not enough. Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of ergonomic training on low back pain and neck pain, posture, and function in female hospital personnel of Najaf-Abad, Iran. Patients and Methods In this queasy experimental study, 47 female staffs with LBP or NP were selected through a simple consecutive sampling method. The subjects completed a questionnaire on LBP and NP and were evaluated for posture, back tests, and cost of related treatments. Afterward, they participated in an ergonomic training program, including face to face and group education sessions on ergonomic risk factors for LBP and NP, in the work place. After six months of follow up, all the tests and data collection were repeated and data was analyzed using paired t-test and regression analysis. Results Prevalence of LBP and NP were 87% and 45.7%, respectively. Repetitive motions were the most frequent cause of pain (67%. Pain intensity, posture, risk of musculoskeletal disorders, weight, waist circumference, sick leaves, and the costs of treatments reduced significantly after intervention (P < 0.05. Conclusions With regards to the influence of ergonomic training on improving LBP and NP and decreasing the treatment costs, this intervention beside others can be useful for controlling musculoskeletal disorders in hospital personnel.

  16. Does a combination of physical training, specific exercises and pain education improve health-related quality of life in patients with chronic neck pain?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ris Hansen, Inge; Søgaard, Karen; Gram, Bibi

    2016-01-01

    anterior and cervical spine, Cranio-cervical Flexion, Cervical Extension muscle function, and oculomotion) were recorded at baseline and after 4 months. RESULTS: The exercise group showed statistically significant improvement in physical HR-QoL, mental HR-QoL, depression, cervical pressure pain threshold...... controlled trial of 200 neck pain patients receiving pain education. The exercise group received additional exercises for neck/shoulder, balance and oculomotor function, plus graded physical activity training. Patient-reported outcome measures (Short Form-36 Physical and Mental component summary scores, Euro......AIM: To investigate the effect of combining pain education, specific exercises and graded physical activity training (exercise) compared with pain education alone (control) on physical health-related quality of life (HR-QoL) in chronic neck pain patients. METHODS: A multicentre randomised...

  17. Measuring practitioner/therapist effects in randomised trials of low back pain and neck pain interventions in primary care settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Martyn; Morley, Stephen; van der Windt, Danielle A W M; Hay, Elaine; Jellema, Petra; Dziedzic, Krysia; Main, Chris J

    2010-11-01

    In psychological health treatment studies it has been shown that differences between therapists account for some of the non-specific effect of treatment but this phenomenon has not so far systematically been investigated in musculoskeletal disorders. In this study we evaluated and compared the size and potential influence of the 'practitioner effect' (or 'therapist effect') in three randomised treatment trials of low back pain and neck pain patients in primary care. We calculated the proportion of variance in outcomes attributable to differences across practitioners, i.e. the practitioner-variance partition coefficient (p-vpc). As measures of outcome, we focused on self-reported disability as the primary outcome, but we also investigated assessed psychological outcomes. The p-vpc for the disability measures ranged from 2.6% to 7.1% across trials and time points (post treatment and follow up). Estimates differed between treatment subgroups within trials; being highest in treatment subgroups assigned to psychosocial-based interventions. A 'practitioner effect' does exist and is more pronounced in treatments involving greater psychosocial emphasis. This has implications for both practice and research in this clinical area. It highlights the importance of patient-practitioner interactions, and the need to address practitioner effects in designing and analysing outcome studies in low back pain and neck pain in primary care.

  18. Cervicocephalic kinesthetic sensibility and postural balance in patients with nontraumatic chronic neck pain – a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eriksson Magnus

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although cervical pain is widespread, most victims are only mildly and occasionally affected. A minority, however, suffer chronic pain and/or functional impairments. Although there is abundant literature regarding nontraumatic neck pain, little focuses on diagnostic criteria. During the last decade, research on neck pain has been designed to evaluate underlying pathophysiological mechanisms, without noteworthy success. Independent researchers have investigated postural balance and cervicocephalic kinesthetic sensibility among patients with chronic neck pain, and have (in most cases concluded the source of the problem is a reduced ability in the neck's proprioceptive system. Here, we investigated cervicocephalic kinesthetic sensibility and postural balance among patients with nontraumatic chronic neck pain. Methods Ours was a two-group, observational pilot study of patients with complaints of continuous neck pain during the 3 months prior to recruitment. Thirteen patients with chronic neck pain of nontraumatic origin were recruited from an institutional outpatient clinic. Sixteen healthy persons were recruited as a control group. Cervicocephalic kinesthetic sensibility was assessed by exploring head repositioning accuracy and postural balance was measured with computerized static posturography. Results Parameters of cervicocephalic kinesthetic sensibility were not reduced. However, in one of six test movements (flexion, global repositioning errors were significantly larger in the experimental group than in the control group (p Conclusion In patients with nontraumatic chronic neck pain, we found statistically significant global repositioning errors in only one of six test movements. In this cohort, we found no evidence of impaired postural balance. Head repositioning accuracy and computerized static posturography are imperfect measures of functional proprioceptive impairments. Validity of (and procedures for using these

  19. Comparative Effects of Acupressure at Local and Distal Acupuncture Points on Pain Conditions and Autonomic Function in Females with Chronic Neck Pain

    OpenAIRE

    Matsubara, Takako; Arai, Young-Chang P.; Shiro, Yukiko; Shimo, Kazuhiro; Nishihara, Makoto; Sato, Jun; Ushida, Takahiro

    2010-01-01

    Acupressure on local and distal acupuncture points might result in sedation and relaxation, thereby reducing chronic neck pain. The aim was to investigate the effect of acupressure at local (LP) and distal acupuncture points (DP) in females with chronic neck pain. Thirty-three females were assigned to three groups: the control group did not receive any stimuli, the LP group received acupressure at local acupuncture points, GB 21, SI 14 and SI 15, and the DP group received acupressure at dista...

  20. Comparative Effects of Acupressure at Local and Distal Acupuncture Points on Pain Conditions and Autonomic Function in Females with Chronic Neck Pain

    OpenAIRE

    Matsubara, Takako; Arai, Young-Chang P.; Shiro, Yukiko; Shimo, Kazuhiro; Nishihara, Makoto; Sato, Jun; Ushida, Takahiro

    2011-01-01

    Acupressure on local and distal acupuncture points might result in sedation and relaxation, thereby reducing chronic neck pain. The aim was to investigate the effect of acupressure at local (LP) and distal acupuncture points (DP) in females with chronic neck pain. Thirty-three females were assigned to three groups: the control group did not receive any stimuli, the LP group received acupressure at local acupuncture points, GB 21, SI 14 and SI 15, and the DP group received acupressure at dista...

  1. Vertebral artery dissection with compelling evidence on duplex ultrasound presenting only with neck pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siepmann, Timo; Borchert, Monique; Barlinn, Kristian

    2016-01-01

    Vertebral artery dissection (VAD) is among the most common identifiable etiologies of stroke in young adults and poses a diagnostic challenge due to nonspecific symptoms and substantial variability of imaging results. Here, we present a case of unspecific neck pain as isolated symptom of VAD with unusually compelling evidence on duplex ultrasound. This observation has clinical relevance as the absence of any neurological symptoms in our patient highlights the necessity of considering cervical artery dissection in patients presenting with unspecific symptoms such as neck pain, even if isolated. Furthermore, our image of intramural hematoma on duplex ultrasound has been captured in an unusual, clear and distinct fashion and might therefore be a useful reference image in the clinical assessment of patients with a suspicion of cervical artery dissection. PMID:27843318

  2. Vertebral artery dissection with compelling evidence on duplex ultrasound presenting only with neck pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siepmann T

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Timo Siepmann, Monique Borchert, Kristian Barlinn Department of Neurology, Carl Gustav Carus University Hospital, Technische Universität Dresden, Dresden, Germany Abstract: Vertebral artery dissection (VAD is among the most common identifiable etiologies of stroke in young adults and poses a diagnostic challenge due to nonspecific symptoms and substantial variability of imaging results. Here, we present a case of unspecific neck pain as isolated symptom of VAD with unusually compelling evidence on duplex ultrasound. This observation has clinical relevance as the absence of any neurological symptoms in our patient highlights the necessity of considering cervical artery dissection in patients presenting with unspecific symptoms such as neck pain, even if isolated. Furthermore, our image of intramural hematoma on duplex ultrasound has been captured in an unusual, clear and distinct fashion and might therefore be a useful reference image in the clinical assessment of patients with a suspicion of cervical artery dissection. Keywords: vertebrobasilar, cervical, duplex sonography, magnetic resonance imaging

  3. An electromyographic evaluation of elastic band exercises targeting neck and shoulder pain among helm bearing military helicopter crew

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Lars Askær; Grøndberg, Thomas Stig; Murray, Mike

    INTRODUCTION Flight related neck and shoulder pain is a frequent problem in helicopter pilots and crew [1]. Pain causes personnel suffering, reduces operational capabilities and incurs high financial cost due to the loss of manpower. Evidence suggests that the occupational loading such as posture...... is generally considered necessary for gaining strength, but with elastic bands it is hard to control exercise intensity [3]. The purpose of the present study was to conduct an electromyographic evaluation of the neuromuscular activity in trapezius descendens, sternocleidomastoideus and the upper neck extensors...... during an elastic band exercise program targeting neck and shoulder pain among military helicopter pilots and crew. METHODS The study was conducted in a laboratory setting at University of Southern Denmark, Odense. A group of 11 healthy males (25,9±1,4 years) with no pain in neck or shoulders (VAS=0...

  4. Manual therapy, physical therapy, or continued care by a general practitioner for patients with neck pain: a randomized, controlled trial.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoving, J.L.; Koes, B.W.; Vet, H.C.W. de; Windt, D.A.W.M. van der; Assendelft, W.J.J.; Mameren, H. van; Devillé, W.L.J.M.; Pool, J.J.M.; Scholten, R.J.P.M.; Bouter, L.M.

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Neck pain is a common problem, but the effectiveness of frequently applied conservative therapies has never been directly compared. OBJECTIVE: To determine the effectiveness of manual therapy, physical therapy, and continued care by a general practitioner. DESIGN: Randomized, controlled

  5. Pre- and post-operative gait analysis for evaluation of neck pain in chronic whiplash

    OpenAIRE

    Ginsburg Glen M; Nystrom Ake; Stuberg Wayne; Dejong Stacey

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Introduction Chronic neck pain after whiplash is notoriously refractory to conservative treatment, and positive radiological findings to explain the symptoms are scarce. The apparent disproportionality between subjective complaints and objective findings is significant for the planning of treatment, impairment ratings, and judicial questions on causation. However, failure to identify a symptom's focal origin with routine imaging studies does not invalidate the symptom per se. It is t...

  6. Work and neck pain: a prospective study of psychological, social, and mechanical risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Jan Olav; Knardahl, Stein

    2010-10-01

    To determine the impact of occupational psychological/social and mechanical factors on neck pain, a prospective cohort study with a follow-up period of 2 years was conducted with a sample of Norwegian employees. The following designs were tested: (i) cross-sectional analyses at baseline (n=4569) and follow-up (n=4122), (ii) prospective analyses with baseline predictors, (iii) prospective analyses with average exposure over time [(T1+T2)/2] as predictor, and (iv) prospective analyses with measures of change in exposure from T1 to T2 as predictors. A total of 2419 employees responded to both the baseline and follow-up questionnaire. Data were analyzed using ordinal logistic regression. After adjustment for age, sex, neck pain at T1, and other exposure factors that had been estimated to be confounders, the most consistent risk factors were role conflict (highest OR 2.97, 99% CI: 1.29-6.74) and working with arms raised to or above shoulder level (highest OR 1.37, 99% CI: 1.05-1.78). The most consistent protective factors were empowering leadership (lowest OR 0.53, 99% CI: 0.35-0.81) and decision control (lowest OR 0.60, 99% CI: 0.36-1.00). Hence, psychological and social factors are important precursors of neck pain, along with mechanical factors. Although traditional factors such as quantitative demands and decision control play a part in the etiology of neck pain at work, in this study several new factors emerged as more important.

  7. Should we abandon cervical spine manipulation for mechanical neck pain? : yes

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Cervical spine manipulation (a high velocity, low amplitude, end range thrust manoeuvre) is a common\\ud treatment option for mechanical neck pain yet may carry the potential for serious neurovascular\\ud complications, specifically vertebral artery dissection and subsequent vertebrobasilar stroke. The nonsuperiority\\ud of manipulation to alternative treatments, coupled with concerns regarding safety, renders\\ud cervical spine manipulation unnecessary and inadvisable.

  8. When Should a Cervical Collar be Used to Treat Neck Pain?

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    Neck pain is one of the most prevalent and costly health problems in the United States. It remains a complex, subjective experience with a variety of musculoskeletal causes. Although, cervical collars are a seemingly benign intervention, they can have adverse effects, especially when used for longer periods of time. It is feared that a long period of immobilization, can result in atrophy-related secondary damage. Many physicians cite anecdotal evidence of their clinical utility and soft cervi...

  9. Exploring integrative medicine for back and neck pain - a pragmatic randomised clinical pilot trial

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background A model for integrative medicine (IM) adapted to Swedish primary care was previously developed. The aim of this study was to explore the feasibility of a pragmatic randomised clinical trial to investigate the effectiveness of the IM model versus conventional primary care in the management of patients with non-specific back/neck pain. Specific objectives included the exploration of recruitment and retention rates, patient and care characteristics, clinical differences and e...

  10. Implementation of neck/shoulder exercises for pain relief among industrial workers: A randomized controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Although leisure-time physical activity is important for health, adherence to regular exercise is challenging for many adults. The workplace may provide an optimal setting to reach a large proportion of the adult population needing regular physical exercise. This study evaluates the effect of implementing strength training at the workplace on non-specific neck and shoulder pain among industrial workers. Methods Cluster-randomized controlled trial involving 537 adults from ...

  11. Ultrasound-Guided Miniscalpel-Needle Release versus Dry Needling for Chronic Neck Pain: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongjun Zheng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To compare ultrasound-guided miniscalpel-needle (UG-MSN release versus ultrasound-guided dry needling (UG-DN for chronic neck pain. Methods. A total of 169 patients with chronic neck pain were randomized to receive either UG-MSN release or UG-DN. Before treatment and at 3 and 6 months posttreatment, pain was measured using a 10-point visual analogue scale (VAS. Neck function was examined using the neck disability index. Health-related quality of life was examined using the physical component score (PCS and mental component score (MCS of the SF-36 health status scale. Results. Patients in the UG-MSN release had greater improvement on the VAS (by 2 points at 3 months and 0.9 points at 6 months versus in the UG-DN arm; (both P<0.0001. Patients receiving UG-MSN release also showed significantly lower scores on the adjusted neck disability index, as well as significantly lower PCS. No severe complications were observed. Conclusion. UG-MSN release was superior to UG-DN in reducing pain intensity and neck disability in patients with chronic neck pain and was not associated with severe complications. The procedural aspects in the two arms were identical; however, we did not verify the blinding success. As such, the results need to be interpreted with caution.

  12. Changes in the incidence of occupational disability as a result of back and neck pain in the Netherlands

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Background Back pain (including neck pain) is one of the most prevalent health problems for which physicians are consulted. Back pain can decrease the quality of life considerably during a great part of the lives of those who suffer from it. At the same time it has an enormous economic impact, mainly through sickness absence and long-term disability. The objective of this paper is to compare the incidence of occupational disability as a result of back and neck pain in 1980–1985 to 19...

  13. Comparative effectiveness of manipulation, mobilisation and the Activator instrument in treatment of non-specific neck pain: a systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Miller Peter; Gemmell Hugh

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Background Neck pain is a common problem and different forms of manual therapy are used in its treatment. The purpose of this systematic review was to critically appraise the literature that directly compared manipulation, mobilisation and the Activator instrument for non-specific neck pain. Methods Electronic databases (MEDLINE, MANTIS and CINAHL) were searched from their inception to October 2005 for all English language randomised clinical trials that directly compared manipulatio...

  14. Comparative effectiveness of manipulation, mobilisation and the Activator instrument in treatment of non-specific neck pain: a systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Gemmell, Hugh; Miller, Peter

    2006-01-01

    Background Neck pain is a common problem and different forms of manual therapy are used in its treatment. The purpose of this systematic review was to critically appraise the literature that directly compared manipulation, mobilisation and the Activator instrument for non-specific neck pain. Methods Electronic databases (MEDLINE, MANTIS and CINAHL) were searched from their inception to October 2005 for all English language randomised clinical trials that directly compared manipulation, mobili...

  15. The effect of cetylated fatty esters and physical therapy on myofascial pain syndrome of the neck.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharan, Deepak; Jacob, Biju Nirmal; Ajeesh, P S; Bookout, Jack B; Barathur, Raj R

    2011-07-01

    Participants with Myofascial Pain Syndrome (MPS) of the neck were randomly assigned into 2 groups of the double-blinded study: topical cetylated fatty ester complex (CFEC) cream application plus physical therapy (CF-PT; n=37), and placebo cream application plus physical therapy (PL-PT; n=35). There were 3 visits during 4 weeks of treatment. Physical Therapy (PT), given twice/week, included Ischaemic Compression, Deep Pressure Trigger Point Massage and Myofascial Releases. Topical cream [CFEC cream (5.6%) and 1.5% menthol] or placebo cream [1.5% menthol, in a cream base] was applied twice/day. CF-PT provided the fastest and most effective study treatment modality. The addition of CFEC cream to PT resulted in statistically significant improvements, compared to PL-PT, for reduction of pain, neck disability and life quality indicators. Our results indicate that cetylated derivatives of fatty acids can effectively reduce pain and symptoms associated with neck MPS, when combined with physical therapy.

  16. Cervical Spondylotic Myelopathy presenting as mechanical neck pain: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Benjamin E; Diver, Claire J; Taylor, Alan J

    2014-08-01

    Cervical Spondylotic Myelopathy (CSM) is the most common type of myelopathy in adults over 55 years of age. In the early stages symptoms may include local neck pain and stiffness that might mimic the presentation of non-specific mechanical neck pain (NSMNP). The patient was a 79 year old male, who complained of eight weeks of neck pain. He had been referred for physiotherapy by his family physician with a diagnosis of NSMNP. Initial presentation was consistent with the referral, but further assessment by the physiotherapist revealed findings suggestive of CSM. He was referred for an urgent cervical MRI scan, which revealed myelomalacic changes at C3/4 due to spondylotic changes. The patient was unsuitable for manual therapy intervention and was referred to a spinal orthopaedic surgeon who performed a posterior decompression and stabilisation at C3-C5, 2 months after the initial presentation. This case report highlights the importance of considering CSM in adults over 55 years of age presenting with NSMNP, particularly as the prevalence of both increases with age. It demonstrates the need for health professionals to carry out detailed examination where CSM may be a potential differential diagnosis. Outcomes are less favourable for patients over the age of 70, therefore an urgent surgical opinion was required for this patient. Deterioration of symptoms whilst he awaited surgery demonstrates how missed diagnosis may lead to possible long term spinal cord damage, with potential medico-legal concerns for the therapist.

  17. The effect of massage therapy and/or exercise therapy on subacute or long-lasting neck pain - the Stockholm neck trial (STONE): study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Background Neck pain is a major health problem in populations worldwide and an economic burden in modern societies due to its high prevalence and costs in terms of health care expenditures and lost productivity. Massage and exercise therapy are widely used management options for neck pain. However, there is a lack of scientific evidence regarding their effectiveness for subacute and long-lasting neck pain. This study protocol describes a randomized controlled trial aiming to determine the eff...

  18. Clinimetric evaluation of methods to measure muscle functioning in patients with non-specific neck pain: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smits-Engelsman Bouwien CM

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neck pain is a significant health problem in modern society. There is evidence to suggest that neck muscle strength is reduced in patients with neck pain. This article provides a critical analysis of the research literature on the clinimetric properties of tests to measure neck muscle strength or endurance in patients with non-specific neck pain, which can be used in daily practice. Methods A computerised literature search was performed in the Medline, CINAHL and Embase databases from 1980 to January 2007. Two reviewers independently assessed the clinimetric properties of identified measurement methods, using a checklist of generally accepted criteria for reproducibility (inter- and intra-observer reliability and agreement, construct validity, responsiveness and feasibility. Results The search identified a total of 16 studies. The instruments or tests included were: muscle endurance tests for short neck flexors, craniocervical flexion test with an inflatable pressure biofeedback unit, manual muscle testing of neck musculature, dynamometry and functional lifting tests (the cervical progressive iso-inertial lifting evaluation (PILE test and the timed weighted overhead test. All the articles included report information on the reproducibility of the tests. Acceptable intra- and inter-observer reliability was demonstrated for t enduranctest for short neck flexors and the cervical PILE test. Construct validity and responsiveness have hardly been documented for tests on muscle functioning. Conclusion The endurance test of the short neck flexors and the cervical PILE test can be regarded as appropriate instruments for measuring different aspects of neck muscle function in patients with non-specific neck pain. Common methodological flaws in the studies were their small sample size and an inappropriate description of the study design.

  19. The clinical course and prognostic factors of non-specific neck pain: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borghouts, J A; Koes, B W; Bouter, L M

    1998-07-01

    Neck pain occurs frequently in western societies. In the majority of cases, no specific cause can be identified. In order to gain insight into the clinical course and prognostic factors of non-specific neck pain, a systematic review was conducted. A computerized literature search was carried out to identify observational studies on non-specific neck pain and randomized clinical trials (RCTs) on conservative treatment of non-specific neck pain. Two reviewers scored independently, the methodological quality of all identified publications, using a standardized set of 13 criteria which were divided into five categories according to: study population, study design, follow-up, outcome measures and analysis/data presentation. To determine prognosis per study, an overall percentage of recovery for the most important outcome measures (pain, general improvement, functional status, health care utilization and lost days of work) was calculated. In total 23 eligible publications were identified (six observational studies and 17 RCTs). Only seven of 23 studies scored 50% or more of the 13 items, indicating a generally poor quality of methods. The most prevalent methodological shortcomings appeared to be selection of the study population, the sample size and analysis techniques. Most information regarding the clinical course is available for the group of patients with complaints for more than 6 months, who are treated in a secondary care or an occupational setting. In this group of patients, 46% (median) had less pain, with a range of 22-79% and a general improvement that ranged between 37 and 95% (47% median). The reduction in the use of analgesics ranged between 32 and 80% (37% median). Six studies reported on prognostic factors. Bearing in mind the limited number of studies and the low methodological quality, there are some indications that the localization (radiation to the arms/neurologic signs) and radiologic findings (degenerative changes in the discs and joints) are not

  20. Complimentary effect of yogic sound resonance relaxation technique in patients with common neck pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yogitha Bali

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Studies have shown that conventional treatment methods with drugs, physiotherapy and exercises for common neck pain (CNP may be inadequate. Yoga techniques have been found to be effective complimentary therapies in chronic low back pain and also for stress reduction in other diseases. Objective: The aim of the study was to examine the complimentary role of a yogic relaxation called mind sound resonance technique (MSRT in non-surgical management of CNP. Materials and Methods: In this randomized controlled study, 60 patients with CNP were assigned to two groups (yoga, n=30 and (control, n=30. The yoga group received yogic MSRT for 20 minutes in supine position after the conventional physiotherapy program for 30 minutes using pre-recorded audio CD and the control group had non-guided supine rest for 20 minutes (after physiotherapy, for 10 days. MSRT provides deep relaxation for both mind and body by introspective experience of the sound resonance in the whole body while repeating the syllables A, U, M and Om and a long chant (Mahamrityunjaya mantra several times in a meaningful sequence. Both the groups had pre and post assessments using visual pain analog scale, tenderness scoring key, neck disability score (NDS questionnaire, goniometric measurement of cervical spinal flexibility, and state and trait anxiety inventory-Y1 (STAI-Y1. Results: Mann-Whitney U test showed significant difference between groups in pain (P<0.01, tenderness (P<0.01, neck movements (P<0.01. NDS (P<0.01 and state anxiety (STAI-Y1 showed higher reduction in yoga (P<0.01 than that in the control group. Wilcoxon′s test showed a significant improvement in both groups on all variables (P<0.01. Conclusions : Yoga relaxation through MSRT adds significant complimentary benefits to conventional physiotherapy for CNP by reducing pain, tenderness, disability and state anxiety and providing improved flexibility.

  1. Effect of Training Supervision on Effectiveness of Strength Training for Reducing Neck/Shoulder Pain and Headache in Office Workers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gram, Bibi; Andersen, Christoffer Højnicke; Zebis, Mette Kreutzfeldt;

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To investigate the effect of workplace neck/shoulder strength training with and without regular supervision on neck/shoulder pain and headache among office workers. Method. A 20-week cluster randomized controlled trial among 351 office workers was randomized into three groups: two...... training groups with the same total amount of planned exercises three times per week (1) with supervision (3WS) throughout the intervention period, (2) with minimal supervision (3MS) only initially, and (3) a reference group (REF). Main outcome is self-reported pain intensity in neck and shoulder (scale 0...

  2. Effect of training supervision on effectiveness of strength training for reducing neck/shoulder pain and headache in office workers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gram, Bibi; Andersen, Christoffer; Zebis, Mette Kreutzfeldt

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To investigate the effect of workplace neck/shoulder strength training with and without regular supervision on neck/shoulder pain and headache among office workers. Method. A 20-week cluster randomized controlled trial among 351 office workers was randomized into three groups: two...... training groups with the same total amount of planned exercises three times per week (1) with supervision (3WS) throughout the intervention period, (2) with minimal supervision (3MS) only initially, and (3) a reference group (REF). Main outcome is self-reported pain intensity in neck and shoulder (scale 0...

  3. Evaluation of the immediate effect of acupuncture on pain, cervical range of motion and electromyographic activity of the upper trapezius muscle in patients with nonspecific neck pain: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Background Nonspecific neck pain can cause considerable suffering, possible disability and reductions in quality of life and productivity. The aim of the proposed study is to evaluate the immediate effect of acupuncture on pain, cervical range of motion and electromyographic activity of the upper trapezius muscle in patients with nonspecific neck pain. Methods/Design A total of 12 patients with nonspecific neck pain and 12 healthy subjects will be enrolled in a randomized, single-blind crosso...

  4. Pain in the neck and shoulder joint in a rheumatologist's practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuri Aleksandrovich Olyunin

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Diseases accompanied by pain in the neck and shoulder joint are rather numerous, frequently result in permanent functional failure, and are encountered in a considerable number of patients followed up by rheumatologists, neurologists, orthopedics, and therapists. The frequency of these impairments may vary from 7 to 47% according to the characteristics of the study population and used definition. The list of nosological entities to be excluded in the differential diagnosis includes diseases caused by lesions in the cervical spinal area, its muscles, ligaments, and tendons, neurological changes, systemic inflammatory diseases, myofascial pain syndrome, as well as diseases that can induce referred pain in the neck and shoulder joint (pneumonia, coronary heart disease, gastroduodenal ulcer disease. To follow a sparing regimen plays a large role in the treatment of soft tissue diseases in the shoulder joint. The use of analgesics, primarily nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs, such as nimesulide (nayz, is an important component of therapy. The drug has been successfully used for back pain, osteoarthrosis, and extraarticular soft tissue diseases. The local administration of glucocorticoids is worth consideration if a reduced load on the affected area and the use of NSAIDs produce no desirable effect.

  5. Pain in the neck and shoulder joint in a rheumatologist's practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuri Aleksandrovich Olyunin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Diseases accompanied by pain in the neck and shoulder joint are rather numerous, frequently result in permanent functional failure, and are encountered in a considerable number of patients followed up by rheumatologists, neurologists, orthopedics, and therapists. The frequency of these impairments may vary from 7 to 47% according to the characteristics of the study population and used definition. The list of nosological entities to be excluded in the differential diagnosis includes diseases caused by lesions in the cervical spinal area, its muscles, ligaments, and tendons, neurological changes, systemic inflammatory diseases, myofascial pain syndrome, as well as diseases that can induce referred pain in the neck and shoulder joint (pneumonia, coronary heart disease, gastroduodenal ulcer disease. To follow a sparing regimen plays a large role in the treatment of soft tissue diseases in the shoulder joint. The use of analgesics, primarily nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs, such as nimesulide (nayz, is an important component of therapy. The drug has been successfully used for back pain, osteoarthrosis, and extraarticular soft tissue diseases. The local administration of glucocorticoids is worth consideration if a reduced load on the affected area and the use of NSAIDs produce no desirable effect.

  6. Persistent Neck and Shoulder Pains among Computer Office Workers: A Longitudinal Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farideh Sadeghian

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Please cite this article as: Sadeghian F, Raei M, Amiri M. Persistent Neck and Shoulder Pains among Computer Office Workers: A Longitudinal Study. Arch Hyg Sci 2012;1(2:33-40. Background & Aims of the Study: In developing countries, with increasing use of computer systems, millions of computer workers are at high risk of neck and shoulder pains. The aim of this study was to assess the relationships between work-related physical and psychosocial factors and persistent neck and shoulder pains among computer office workers. Materials & Methods : This longitudinal study with 1-year follow-up was conducted among all eligible computer office workers (n=182 of Shahroud universities (northeastern Iran in 2009-2010. “Cultural and Psychosocial Influences on Disability (CUPID” questionnaire was used to collect data on demographic characteristics, physical, organizational and psychosocial factors at work, and neck and shoulder symptoms. Chi square and logistic regression analysis was used to analyze the data through SPSS version 16. Results: Computer office workers with the mean±SD age of 32.1±6.7 years and the mean±SD weekly work hours of 47.4±8.2 participated in this study. At the baseline 39.6% of workers reported neck and shoulder pains. At one year follow-up, 59.7% of them reported neck pain and 51.3% reported shoulder pain. Significant relationships were found between persistence of neck and shoulder pains and age, gender, and decision latitude at work. Conclusions: Although neck and shoulder pains were equally prevalent among the study group, after one year follow up, persistent neck pain was more than shoulder pain. Age, gender, and decision latitude at work were identified as risk factors for both pains. References: 1. Buckle PW, Devereux JJ. The nature of work-related neck and upper limb musculoskeletal disorders. Appl Ergon 2002;33(3:207–17. 2. Tinubu BMS, Mbada CE, Oyeyemi AL, Fabunmi AA. Work-Related Musculoskeletal Disorders among

  7. The effect of thoracic spine manipulation on pain and disability in patients with non-specific neck pain: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huisman, P.A.; Speksnijder, C.M.; Wijer, A. de

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Purpose: The aim of this systematic review was to determine the efficacy of thoracic spine manipulation (TSM) in reducing pain and disability in patients diagnosed with non-specific neck pain. Methods: An extensive literature search of PubMed, The Cochrane Library, CINAHL and EMBASE was con

  8. Do subjects with whiplash-associated disorders respond differently in the short-term to manual therapy and exercise than those with mechanical neck pain?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Castaldo, Matteo; Catena, Antonella; Chiarotto, Alessandro

    2017-01-01

    with whiplash-associated disorders participated. Clinical and physical outcomes including neck pain intensity, neck-related disability, and pain area, as well as cervical range of motion and pressure pain thresholds over the upper trapezius and tibialis anterior muscles, were obtained at baseline and after...... outcomes and cervical range of motion with both groups experiencing similar improvements (all P  0.222). CONCLUSIONS : The current clinical trial found that subjects with mechanical neck pain and whiplash......OBJECTIVE : To compare the short-term effects of manual therapy and exercise on pain, related disability, range of motion, and pressure pain thresholds between subjects with mechanical neck pain and whiplash-associated disorders. METHODS : Twenty-two subjects with mechanical neck pain and 28...

  9. Cost-effectiveness of acupuncture treatment in patients with chronic neck pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willich, Stefan N; Reinhold, Thomas; Selim, Dagmar; Jena, Susanne; Brinkhaus, Benno; Witt, Claudia M

    2006-11-01

    Acupuncture is increasingly used in patients with chronic pain, but there is a lack of evidence on the cost-benefit relationship of this treatment strategy. The objective of this study was to assess costs and cost-effectiveness of additional acupuncture treatment in patients with chronic neck pain compared to patients receiving routine care alone. A randomized controlled trial including patients (18 years of age) with chronic neck pain (>6 months) was carried out. We assessed the resource use and health related quality of life (SF-36) at baseline and after 3 months using complete social health insurance funds and standardized questionnaires, respectively. The main outcome parameters were direct and indirect cost differences during the 3 months study period and the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) of acupuncture treatment. A total of 3,451 patients (1,753 acupuncture-group, 1,698 control-group) were randomized (31% men, age 53.5+/-12.9 years; 69% women, 49.2+/-12.7 years). Acupuncture treatment was associated with significantly higher costs over the 3 months study duration compared to routine care (925.53+/-1,551.06 euros vs. 648.06+/-1,459.13 euros; mean difference: 277.47 euros [95% CI: 175.71 euros-379.23 euros]). This cost increase was mainly due to costs of acupuncture (361.76+/-90.16 euros). The ICER was 12,469 euros per QALY gained and proved robust in additional sensitivity analyses. Since health insurance databases were used, private medical expenses such as over the counter medication were not included. Beyond the 3 months study duration, acupuncture might be associated with further health economic effects. According to international cost-effectiveness threshold values, acupuncture is a cost-effective treatment strategy in patients with chronic neck pain.

  10. Effect of brief daily resistance training on occupational neck/shoulder muscle activity in office workers with chronic pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lidegaard, Mark; Jensen, Rene B; Andersen, Christoffer H

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE: This study investigates the acute and longitudinal effects of resistance training on occupational muscle activity in office workers with chronic pain. METHODS: 30 female office workers with chronic neck and shoulder pain participated for 10 weeks in high-intensity elastic resistance trai...

  11. High Intensity Physical Exercise and Pain in the Neck and Upper Limb among Slaughterhouse Workers: Cross-Sectional Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emil Sundstrup

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Slaughterhouse work involves a high degree of repetitive and forceful upper limb movements and thus implies an elevated risk of work-related musculoskeletal disorders. High intensity strength training effectively rehabilitates musculoskeletal disorders among sedentary employees, but less is known about the effect among workers with repetitive and forceful work demands. Before performing randomized controlled trials it may be beneficial to assess the cross-sectional connection between exercise and musculoskeletal pain. We investigated the association between high intensity physical exercise and pain among 595 slaughterhouse workers in Denmark, Europe. Using logistic regression analyses, odds ratios for pain and work disability as a function of physical exercise, gender, age, BMI, smoking, and job position were estimated. The prevalence of pain in the neck, shoulder, elbow, and hand/wrist was 48%, 60%, 40%, and 52%, respectively. The odds for experiencing neck pain were significantly lower among slaughterhouse workers performing physical exercise (OR = 0.70, CI: 0.49–0.997, whereas the odds for pain in the shoulders, elbow, or hand/wrist were not associated with exercise. The present study can be used as general reference of pain in the neck and upper extremity among slaughterhouse workers. Future studies should investigate the effect of high intensity physical exercise on neck and upper limb pain in slaughterhouse workers.

  12. Effect of Chinese tuina massage therapy on resting state brain functional network of patients with chronic neck pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: Chronic neck pain caused by cervical radiculopathy may influence the DMN, which plays an important role in emotion, cognition, and memory, by stimulating the sensory afferent network. Tuina not only significantly relieves pain and discomfort, but also reverses the causality between aDMN and SMN.

  13. Applying Joint Mobilization at Different Cervical Vertebral Levels does not Influence Immediate Pain Reduction in Patients with Chronic Neck Pain: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aquino, Rafaela L; Caires, Priscila M; Furtado, Fernanda C; Loureiro, Aline V; Ferreira, Paulo H; Ferreira, Manuela L

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare the effects of applying joint mobilization at symptomatic and asymptomatic cervical levels in patients with chronic nonspecific neck pain. Forty-eight patients aged between 18 and 65 years and presenting nonspecific neck pain with a minimum duration of 3 months were recruited for the study. Included patients were randomized to one of two treatment groups: (i) control group: the most symptomatic vertebral level was mobilized; (ii) experimental group: a randomly selected vertebral level was chosen and mobilized. All patients received one treatment session. Pain intensity in resting position during the most painful active cervical movement as well as during vertebral palpation was quantified using an 11-point pain scale. Follow-up measures were taken immediately after intervention by a blinded assessor. The results showed no significant difference in pain intensity immediately after treatment between groups (symptomatic level treated vs. randomly chosen cervical vertebral level treated) during resting position, painful active movement, or vertebral palpation. Within-group comparisons showed significant pain relief after treatment during the most painful active movement as well as during vertebral palpation for both groups, but not during resting position. Significant change in immediate pain intensity during painful active movement and vertebral palpation was achieved after vertebral mobilization. however, both groups presented similar pain reductions suggesting that pain reduction due to joint mobilization is not specific to the vertebral level being mobilized.

  14. Neck exercises, physical and cognitive behavioural-graded activity as a treatment for adult whiplash patients with chronic neck pain: Design of a randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hansen Inge

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many patients suffer from chronic neck pain following a whiplash injury. A combination of cognitive, behavioural therapy with physiotherapy interventions has been indicated to be effective in the management of patients with chronic whiplash-associated disorders. The objective is to present the design of a randomised controlled trial (RCT aimed at evaluating the effectiveness of a combined individual physical and cognitive behavioural-graded activity program on self-reported general physical function, in addition to neck function, pain, disability and quality of life in patients with chronic neck pain following whiplash injury compared with a matched control group measured at baseline and 4 and 12 months after baseline. Methods/Design The design is a two-centre, RCT-study with a parallel group design. Included are whiplash patients with chronic neck pain for more than 6 months, recruited from physiotherapy clinics and an out-patient hospital department in Denmark. Patients will be randomised to either a pain management (control group or a combined pain management and training (interventiongroup. The control group will receive four educational sessions on pain management, whereas the intervention group will receive the same educational sessions on pain management plus 8 individual training sessions for 4 months, including guidance in specific neck exercises and an aerobic training programme. Patients and physiotherapists are aware of the allocation and the treatment, while outcome assessors and data analysts are blinded. The primary outcome measures will be Medical Outcomes Study Short Form 36 (SF36, Physical Component Summary (PCS. Secondary outcomes will be Global Perceived Effect (-5 to +5, Neck Disability Index (0-50, Patient Specific Functioning Scale (0-10, numeric rating scale for pain bothersomeness (0-10, SF-36 Mental Component Summary (MCS, TAMPA scale of Kinesiophobia (17-68, Impact of Event Scale (0-45, EuroQol (0

  15. Is neck pain associated with worse health-related quality of life 6 months later? A population-based cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nolet, P. S.; Cote, P.; Kristman, V. L.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND CONTEXT: Current evidence suggests that neck pain is negatively associated with health-related quality of life (HRQoL). However, these studies are cross-sectional and do not inform the association between neck pain and future HRQoL. PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to investigate...... the association between increasing grades of neck pain severity and HRQoL 6 months later. In addition, this longitudinal study examines the crude association between the course of neck pain and HRQoL. STUDY DESIGN: This is a population-based cohort study. PATIENT SAMPLE: Eleven hundred randomly sampled...... Questionnaire to measure neck pain and its related disability. The SF-36 questionnaire was used to measure physical and mental HRQoL 6 months later. Multivariable linear regression was used to measure the association between graded neck pain and HRQoL while controlling for confounding. Analysis of variance...

  16. Fatty infiltrate in the cervical extensor muscles is not a feature of chronic, insidious-onset neck pain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elliott, J. [Division of Physiotherapy, School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, University of Queensland, Brisbane (Australia); Department of Physical Therapy, Rueckert-Hartman School for Health Professions, Regis University, Denver, Colorado (United States); Centre for Magnetic Resonance, University of Queensland, Brisbane (Australia)], E-mail: jelltt@regis.edu; Sterling, M. [Division of Physiotherapy, School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, University of Queensland, Brisbane (Australia); Noteboom, J.T. [Department of Physical Therapy, Rueckert-Hartman School for Health Professions, Regis University, Denver, Colorado (United States); Darnell, R. [Division of Physiotherapy, School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, University of Queensland, Brisbane (Australia); Galloway, G. [Centre for Magnetic Resonance, University of Queensland, Brisbane (Australia); Jull, G. [Division of Physiotherapy, School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, University of Queensland, Brisbane (Australia)

    2008-06-15

    Aim: To investigate the presence of fatty infiltrate in the cervical extensor musculature in patients with insidious-onset neck pain to better understand the possible pathophysiology underlying such changes in chronic whiplash-associated disorders (WAD). Materials and methods: A sample of convenience of 23 women with persistent insidious-onset neck pain (mean age 29.2 {+-} 6.9 years) was recruited for the study. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was used to quantify fatty infiltration in the cervical extensor musculature. Quantitative Sensory Testing (QST; pressure and thermal pain thresholds) was performed as sensory features are present in chronic whiplash. Self-reported pain and disability, as well as psychological distress, were measured using the Neck Disability Index (NDI) and the General Health Questionnaire-28 (GHQ-28), respectively. Results: Measures were compared with those of a previous dataset of chronic whiplash patients (n = 79, mean age 29.7 {+-} 7.8 years). Using a classification tree, insidious-onset neck pain was clearly identified from whiplash (p < 0.001), based on the presence of MRI fatty infiltrate in the cervical extensor musculature (0/102 individuals) and altered temperature thresholds (cold; 3/102 individuals). Conclusion: Fatty infiltrates in the cervical extensor musculature and widespread hyperalgesia were not features of the insidious-onset neck pain group in this study; whereas these features have been identified in patients with chronic WAD. This novel finding may enable a better understanding of the underlying pathophysiological processes in patients with chronic whiplash.

  17. Post-operative pain management in head and neck cancer patients: predictive factors and efficacy of therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchini, C; Malagò, M; Crema, L; Aimoni, C; Matarazzo, T; Bortolazzi, S; Ciorba, A; Pelucchi, S; Pastore, A

    2016-04-01

    There is increasing interest about all aspects of pain sensation for patients undergoing head and neck surgery, and efforts have been made to better assess, monitor and reduce the occurrence of pain. The aetiology of pain is considered to be "multifactorial", as it is defined by several features such as personal experience, quality perception, location, intensity and emotional impact. The aim of this paper is: (i) to evaluate the efficacy of analgesic treatment in patients with head and neck cancer treated by surgery, and (ii) to study the variables and predictive factors that can influence the occurrence of pain. A total of 164 patients, affected by head and neck cancer and surgically treated, between December 2009 and December 2013, were included in this study. Data collected include age, gender, assessment of anaesthetic risk, tumour localisation, pathological cancer stage, TNM stage, type of surgery performed, complexity and duration of surgery, post-operative complications, postoperative days of hospital stay and pain evaluation on days 0, 1, 3 and 5 post-surgery. We studied the appropriateness of analgesic therapy in terms of incidence and prevalence of post-operative pain; we also related pain to patient characteristics, disease and surgical treatment to determine possible predictive factors. The population studied received adequate pain control through analgesic therapy immediately post-surgery and in the following days. No associations between gender, age and post-operative pain were found, whereas pathological cancer stage, complexity of surgery and tumour site were significantly associated with the risk of post-operative pain. Adequate pain control is essential in oncological patients, and particularly in head and neck cancer patients as the prevalence of pain in this localisation is reported to be higher than in other anatomical sites. Improved comprehension of the biological and psychological factors that characterise pain perception will help to

  18. The Effectiveness of Cupping Therapy on Relieving Chronic Neck and Shoulder Pain: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee-Mei Chi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The research aimed to investigate the effectiveness of cupping therapy (CT in changes on skin surface temperature (SST for relieving chronic neck and shoulder pain (NSP among community residents. A single-blind experimental design constituted of sixty subjects with self-perceived NSP. The subjects were randomly allocated to two groups. The cupping group received CT at SI 15, GB 21, and LI 15 acupuncture points, and the control group received no intervention. Pain was assessed using the SST, visual analog scale (VAS, and blood pressure (BP. The main results were SST of GB 21 acupuncture point raised from 30.6°C to 32.7°C and from 30.7°C to 30.6°C in the control group. Neck pain intensity (NPI severity scores were reduced from 9.7 to 3.6 in the cupping group and from 9.7 to 9.5 in the control group. The SST and NPI differences between the groups were statistically significant (P < 0.001. One treatment of CT is shown to increase SST. In conjunction with the physiological effect the subjective experience of NSP is reduced in intensity. Further studies are required to improve the understanding and potential long-term effects of CT.

  19. The Effectiveness of Cupping Therapy on Relieving Chronic Neck and Shoulder Pain: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Lee-Mei; Lin, Li-Mei; Chen, Chien-Lin; Wang, Shu-Fang; Lai, Hui-Ling; Peng, Tai-Chu

    2016-01-01

    The research aimed to investigate the effectiveness of cupping therapy (CT) in changes on skin surface temperature (SST) for relieving chronic neck and shoulder pain (NSP) among community residents. A single-blind experimental design constituted of sixty subjects with self-perceived NSP. The subjects were randomly allocated to two groups. The cupping group received CT at SI 15, GB 21, and LI 15 acupuncture points, and the control group received no intervention. Pain was assessed using the SST, visual analog scale (VAS), and blood pressure (BP). The main results were SST of GB 21 acupuncture point raised from 30.6°C to 32.7°C and from 30.7°C to 30.6°C in the control group. Neck pain intensity (NPI) severity scores were reduced from 9.7 to 3.6 in the cupping group and from 9.7 to 9.5 in the control group. The SST and NPI differences between the groups were statistically significant (P < 0.001). One treatment of CT is shown to increase SST. In conjunction with the physiological effect the subjective experience of NSP is reduced in intensity. Further studies are required to improve the understanding and potential long-term effects of CT.

  20. Sensory and sympathetic disorders in chronic non-specific neck pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaproudina, Nina; Ming, Zhiyong; Närhi, Matti

    2015-01-01

    The signs of sympathetic and sensory nerve-related disorders are not widely investigated in chronic nonspecific neck pain (NNP) patients. Thus, we performed skin temperature (Tsk), evaporation and touch threshold (TT) measurements to reveal possible dysfunctions at the fingertips of NNP patients (n=60) compared with healthy controls (n=11). Neck pain intensity was the main modifier of Tsk, and age the main modifier of TT in a multivariate model. On comparisons of the subgroups of NNP patients with unilateral (n=26) and bilateral (n=34) symptoms and controls, TT differed and Tsk tended to differ, the unilateral pain patients being found to demonstrate higher TT values on both sides. Interrelations between the measured parameters were found in the controls, but not in the patients. The NNP patients exhibited signs of functional impairment of innervation reflected in changes in tactile sensitivity and vasoactive sympathetic function. These changes may be based on both central and peripheral mechanisms, which possibly differ in patients with unilateral and bilateral symptoms.

  1. A workplace exercise versus health promotion intervention to prevent and reduce the economic and personal burden of non-specific neck pain in office personnel: protocol of a cluster-randomised controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Non-specific neck pain is a major burden to industry, yet the impact of introducing a workplace ergonomics and exercise intervention on work productivity and severity of neck pain in a population of office personnel is unknown. Research question: Does a combined workplace-based best practice ergonomic and neck exercise program reduce productivity losses and risk of developing neck pain in asymptomatic workers, or decrease severity of neck pain in symptomatic workers, compared...

  2. Influence of geometry and materials on the axial and torsional strength of the head-neck taper junction in modular hip replacements: A finite element study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallahnezhad, Khosro; Farhoudi, Hamidreza; Oskouei, Reza H; Taylor, Mark

    2016-07-01

    The assembly force is important in establishing the mechanical environment at the head-neck taper junction of modular hip replacements. Previous experimental results of the assembled taper junctions with different material combinations (Co-28Cr-6Mo and Ti-6Al-4V) reported similar axial strengths (pull-off loads), but lower torsional strengths (twist-off moments) for the CoCr/CoCr junction. However, mechanics of the junction and the strength behaviour have not been understood yet. A three dimensional finite element model of an isolated femoral head-neck junction was developed to explore the assembly and disassembly procedures, particularly the axial and torsional strengths for different material combinations and geometries. Under the same assembly load, the contacting length between the CoCr head and titanium neck was greater than that of in CoCr/CoCr. The contact length in the titanium neck was more sensitive to the assembly force when compared to the CoCr neck. For instance, with increasing the assembly force from 1890 to 3700N, the contact length increased by 88% for CoCr/Ti and 59% for CoCr/CoCr junctions. The torsional strength of the junction was related to the lateral deformation of the neck material due to the applied moment. The angular mismatch existing between the head and neck components was found to play the main role in the torsional strength of the junction. The smaller mismatch angle the higher torsional strength. It is suggested to consider reducing the mismatch angle, particularly in CoCr/CoCr junctions, and ensure a sufficiently high assembly force is applied by impaction for this combination.

  3. Neck Injuries and Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or upper arms. Muscle strain or tension often causes neck pain. The problem is usually overuse, such as from ... or accidents, including car accidents, are another common cause of neck pain. Whiplash, a soft tissue injury to the neck, ...

  4. Centrifuge-induced neck and back pain in F-16 pilots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lange, Britt; Nielsen, René Tyranski; Skejø, Pernille Bro

    2013-01-01

    Early in their careers, as an important part of their training to become fighter pilots, pilots undergo centrifuge training in order to learn effective anti-G straining maneuvers (AGSM) and to test their G tolerance. The exposure of pilots, especially early in their careers, to training that could...... lead to injuries should be avoided. This is a report of four cases of neck pain experienced during G-tolerance training, some of which may have caused ongoing problems for the pilot. Cases: Four cases, describing four different injuries experienced during G-tolerance training, are presented, including...

  5. Cervical spine osteoblastoma presenting as mechanical neck pain: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    1994-01-01

    Osteoblastoma is a benign bone-forming tumor that represents approximately 1% of all primary bone tumors. It occurs 40% of the time in the spine, most commonly in the posterior elements. The clinical presentation in this case is of chronic neck pain and stiffness. Although most lesions are well visualized on plain films, a bone scan or CT scan may be of better diagnostic value. Treatment is via surgical excision. In this report we present a case of cervical osteoblastoma mistaken for mechanic...

  6. Are there gender differences in coping with neck pain following acute whiplash trauma?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carstensen, T B W; Frostholm, Lisbeth; Oernboel, E

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Little is known about gender differences in coping after whiplash, and to date possible interaction of gender and coping on recovery has not been investigated. AIMS: To examine if gender differences in coping are associated with long-lasting neck pain after acute whiplash. METHODS......: Seven hundred and forty participants referred from emergency departments or general practitioners after car accidents in Denmark. Within a median of five days, post-collision participants completed questionnaires on collision characteristics, psychological distress, and socio-demographics. After 3months...

  7. Neck pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... posture while watching TV or reading Having your computer monitor positioned too high or too low Sleeping ... M. is also a founding member of Hi-Ethics and subscribes to the principles of the Health ...

  8. Acute effects of single and multiple level thoracic manipulations on chronic mechanical neck pain: a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puntumetakul R

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Rungthip Puntumetakul,1,2 Thavatchai Suvarnnato,1,3 Phurichaya Werasirirat,1 Sureeporn Uthaikhup,2 Junichiro Yamauchi,4,5 Rose Boucaut6 1School of Physical Therapy, Faculty of Associated Medical Sciences, 2Research Center in Back, Neck, Other Joint Pain and Human Performance, 3Physical Therapy Unit, Srinagarind Hospital, Faculty of Medicine, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen, Thailand; 4Graduate School of Human Health Sciences, Tokyo Metropolitan University, 5Future Institute for Sport Sciences, Tokyo, Japan; 6School of Health Sciences (Physiotherapy, University of South Australia, Adelaide, SA, Australia Background: Thoracic spine manipulation has become a popular alternative to local cervical manipulative therapy for mechanical neck pain. This study investigated the acute effects of single-level and multiple-level thoracic manipulations on chronic mechanical neck pain (CMNP.Methods: Forty-eight patients with CMNP were randomly allocated to single-level thoracic manipulation (STM at T6–T7 or multiple-level thoracic manipulation (MTM, or to a control group (prone lying. Cervical range of motion (CROM, visual analog scale (VAS, and the Thai version of the Neck Disability Index (NDI-TH scores were measured at baseline, and at 24-hour and at 1-week follow-up.Results: At 24-hour and 1-week follow-up, neck disability and pain levels were significantly (P<0.05 improved in the STM and MTM groups compared with the control group. CROM in flexion and left lateral flexion were increased significantly (P<0.05 in the STM group when compared with the control group at 1-week follow-up. The CROM in right rotation was increased significantly after MTM compared to the control group (P<0.05 at 24-hour follow-up. There were no statistically significant differences in neck disability, pain level at rest, and CROM between the STM and MTM groups.Conclusion: These results suggest that both single-level and multiple-level thoracic manipulation improve neck disability

  9. Mechanical Diagnosis and Therapy has similar effects on pain and disability as ‘wait and see’ and other approaches in people with neck pain: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Takasaki

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Questions: In people with neck pain, does Mechanical Diagnosis and Therapy (MDT reduce pain and disability more than ‘wait and see’? Does MDT reduce pain and disability more than other interventions? Are any differences in effect clinically important? Design: Systematic review of randomised trials with meta-analysis. Participants: People with neck pain. Intervention: MDT. Outcome measures: Pain intensity and disability due to neck pain in the short (< 3 months, intermediate (< 1 year and long term (≥ 1 year. Results: Five trials were included. Most comparisons demonstrated mean differences in effect that favoured MDT over wait-and-see controls or other interventions, although most were statistically non-significant. For pain, all comparisons had a 95% confidence interval (CI with lower limits that were less than 20 on a scale of 0 to 100, which suggests that the difference may not be clinically important. For disability, even the upper limits of the 95% CI were below this threshold, confirming that the differences are not clinically important. In all of the trials, some or all of the treating therapists did not have the highest level of MDT training. Conclusion: The additional benefit of MDT compared with the wait-and-see approach or other therapeutic approaches may not be clinically important in terms of pain intensity and is not clinically important in terms of disability. However, these estimates of the effect of MDT may reflect suboptimal training of the treating therapists. Further research could improve the precision of the estimates and assess whether the extent of training in MDT influences its effect. [Takasaki H, May S (2014 Mechanical Diagnosis and Therapy has similar effects on pain and disability as ‘wait and see’ and other approaches in people with neck pain: a systematic review. Journal of Physiotherapy 60: 78–84].

  10. Interactive cervical motion kinematics: sensitivity, specificity and clinically significant values for identifying kinematic impairments in patients with chronic neck pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarig Bahat, Hilla; Chen, Xiaoqi; Reznik, David; Kodesh, Einat; Treleaven, Julia

    2015-04-01

    Chronic neck pain has been consistently shown to be associated with impaired kinematic control including reduced range, velocity and smoothness of cervical motion, that seem relevant to daily function as in quick neck motion in response to surrounding stimuli. The objectives of this study were: to compare interactive cervical kinematics in patients with neck pain and controls; to explore the new measures of cervical motion accuracy; and to find the sensitivity, specificity, and optimal cutoff values for defining impaired kinematics in those with neck pain. In this cross-section study, 33 patients with chronic neck pain and 22 asymptomatic controls were assessed for their cervical kinematic control using interactive virtual reality hardware and customized software utilizing a head mounted display with built-in head tracking. Outcome measures included peak and mean velocity, smoothness (represented by number of velocity peaks (NVP)), symmetry (represented by time to peak velocity percentage (TTPP)), and accuracy of cervical motion. Results demonstrated significant and strong effect-size differences in peak and mean velocities, NVP and TTPP in all directions excluding TTPP in left rotation, and good effect-size group differences in 5/8 accuracy measures. Regression results emphasized the high clinical value of neck motion velocity, with very high sensitivity and specificity (85%-100%), followed by motion smoothness, symmetry and accuracy. These finding suggest cervical kinematics should be evaluated clinically, and screened by the provided cut off values for identification of relevant impairments in those with neck pain. Such identification of presence or absence of kinematic impairments may direct treatment strategies and additional evaluation when needed.

  11. Comparative effectiveness of manipulation, mobilisation and the Activator instrument in treatment of non-specific neck pain: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miller Peter

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neck pain is a common problem and different forms of manual therapy are used in its treatment. The purpose of this systematic review was to critically appraise the literature that directly compared manipulation, mobilisation and the Activator instrument for non-specific neck pain. Methods Electronic databases (MEDLINE, MANTIS and CINAHL were searched from their inception to October 2005 for all English language randomised clinical trials that directly compared manipulation, mobilisation and the Activator instrument. Inclusion and exclusion criteria were applied to select the studies and these studies were then evaluated using validated criteria. Results Five such studies were identified. The methodological quality was mostly poor. Findings from the studies were mixed and no one therapy was shown to be more effective than the others. Conclusion Further high quality research has to be done before a recommendation can be made as to the most effective manual method for non-specific neck pain.

  12. Effect of cycling on oxygenation of relaxed neck/shoulder muscles in women with and without chronic pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lars L; Blangsted, Anne Katrine; Nielsen, Pernille Kofoed;

    2010-01-01

    Work-related neck/shoulder muscle pain has been associated with increased anaerobic muscle metabolism. Thus, interventions to enhance oxygenation of painful muscles seem relevant. While cycling with relaxed shoulders has been shown to result in acute neck/shoulder muscle pain reduction, the effect......-maximal cycling in an upright position with relaxed shoulders. Near-infrared spectroscopy was used to measure trapezius muscle oxygenation during and 2 min after the cycling period. For both MYA and CON, oxygenation of the passive trapezius increased in a linear fashion over time, to values approximately 5 micro...... increases oxygenation of resting neck/shoulder muscles in women with and without trapezius myalgia, indicating acute positive effects of either neural or humoral factors on vascular beds of distant relaxed muscles. Although this beneficial response was observed in both groups, the post-exercise response...

  13. A rare case of neck pain: acute longus colli calcific tendinitis in a possibly immunocompromised individual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estimable, Kerlie; Rizk, Cynthia; Pujalte, George G A

    2015-01-01

    We present a rare case of severe neck pain in a 45-year-old man with severe hidradenitis suppurativa who was participating in a study involving adalimumab. The neck pain was associated with acute longus colli calcific tendinitis, which is a noninfectious inflammatory response in the longus colli tendons secondary to deposition of calcium hydroxyapatite crystal. The diagnosis was made by computed tomography, which showed calcifications and deposits, and magnetic resonance imaging, which showed a retropharyngeal effusion. Ears, Nose, and Throat Services performed a fiberoptic scope examination, which revealed a patent airway and no drainable abscess. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs resulted in a dramatic improvement in the patient's clinical symptoms. In acute longus colli tendinitis, differentiating retropharyngeal aseptic effusion from infection is important. Of note, the confounding factor in this case was that the patient was blinded to whether he was receiving the placebo or adalimumab, so whether the patient was immunosuppressed and at risk for infection was unknown. Clinician familiarity and education concerning acute calcific longus colli tendinitis may lead to decreased costs stemming from incorrect diagnosis and unnecessary treatment.

  14. Correlation of non-traumatic neck pain with cervical angle and shoulder retractor power in adult clerical population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isha Avadhut Godbole

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: A forward head posture (or chin poking is perhaps the most common abnormality associated with NP and is commonly defined as the protrusion of the head in the sagittal plane so that the head is placed anterior to the trunk. Forward head posture can occur because of an anterior translation of the head, lower cervical flexion, or both, and it is claimed to be associated with an increase in upper-cervical extension. It is suggested that forward head posture leads to an increase in the compressive forces on the cervical apophyseal joints and posterior part of the vertebra and to changes in connective tissue length and strength (because of stretching of the anterior structures of the neck and shortening of the posterior muscles resulting in pain. The objective of the study was to correlate neck pain with cervical angle and shoulder retractor power in non-traumatic neck pain patients. Methods: 50 clerical workers having non traumatic neck pain were included. Neck pain was measured on VAS, cervical angle was measured using photometric method and shoulder retractor power was measured. Results: VAS showed moderate positive correlation with cervical angles (0.63 and 0.72 and moderate negative correlation with shoulder retractor power (-0.59 and -0.71. A moderate positive correlation of craniocervical angle to VAS seen (0.66 whereas there was negative correlation with shoulder retractors I and II (-0.59 and -0.61 A positive correlation was seen between VAS and craniocervical angle but is moderately negative with shoulder retractors I (Rhomboids and II (Middle trapezius (0.78, 0.04, -0.69 and -0.64. Conclusion: A moderate increase in cranio vertebral and craniocervical angle showed plausible weakness in lower Trapezius and rhomboids among clerks` having Non-traumatic neck pain. [Int J Res Med Sci 2015; 3(4.000: 859-862

  15. Correlations of Neck/Shoulder Perfusion Characteristics and Pain Symptoms of the Female Office Workers with Sedentary Lifestyle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Shan-Hua; Li, Yung-Hui; Kuo, Fun-Chie

    2017-01-01

    Aim Modern office workers are often impacted by chronic neck/shoulder pain. Most of the previous studies which investigated the relationship of the occupational factors and musculoskeletal symptoms had adopted questionnaire survey. In this study the microcirculatory characteristics and perceived symptoms in neck/shoulder region were compared among office workers with sedentary lifestyle. Methods Thirty-seven female office workers were recruited in this study. Microcirculatory flow in neck/shoulder region characterized by the mean blood flow (MMBF value), pulsatile blood flow (PMBF value), and the PMBF/MMBF ratio (perfusion pulsatility, PP) were investigated using Laser Doppler Flowmetry (LDF). A Chinese version of the Standardized Nordic Musculoskeletal Questionnaire (NMQ) were also administered to collect the information of perceived neck/shoulder symptoms. Correlations between the perfusion characteristics and the individual/occupational factors were analyzed using the Spearman test. The difference of the MMBF values between the low-pain group (pain level≤2) and the high-pain group (pain level>2) were compared using the Mann-Whitney U test. Results There were 81% participants reported neck or shoulder pain symptoms. The duration of shoulder pain was significantly correlated with the workers’ age and the duration of employment (p<0.01) (n = 37). While both the MMBF and PMBF values in shoulder region were significantly reduced with the workers’ age and the duration of employment (p<0.05) (n = 27). And there was a 54% reduction in the MMBF value of the workers from age of 23 to 47. And the MMBF value of the high-pain group (n = 15) was significantly lower than the value of the low-pain group (n = 15) (p<0.05). The duration of shoulder pain showed a moderately negative correlation with PMBF values (n = 19). Besides, the PP value was moderately correlated with shoulder pain level attributed by the rapid reduction of MMBF values (p = 0.07). Conclusion In this

  16. Back and neck pain among school teachers in Poland and its correlations with physical activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerzy Rottermund

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Back pain represents one of the most common diseases across various populations of workers worldwide. This study analyzes the prevalence and severity of back pain, based on selected demographic variables, and the relationship with physical activity among school teachers. Material and Methods: The study included 998 professionally active teachers (840 females and 158 males from the southern part of Poland. Validated psychometric tools, namely: 1 for evaluation of disability due to back pain – a Polish version of the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI and Neck Disability Index (NDI, 2 for physical activity assessment – the Subjective Experience of Work Load (SEWL as well as the authors’ supplementary questionnaire, addressing demographic and anthropometric variables were used. Results: There was no correlation between age and the NDI scores in females (r = 0.027, in contrast to males (r = 0.202; p ≤ 0.05. Statistically significant correlations (p ≤ 0.05 were reported between: age and the ODI, in both females (r = 0.219 and males (r = 0.180. No associations between the body mass index (BMI-ODI, and BMI-NDI were found. In the case of women, disability related to low back pain (LBP had a negative impact on the indicators of their activity during work, sports, and leisure time. In the case of men, the NDI and ODI scores did not differ, based on activity indicators. Conclusions: Our findings confirm that back pain represents a serious concern among teachers. Age appears to be a prognostic factor, while no association between the BMI and LBP has been revealed. The limitation of physical activity leads to more frequent back pain. Med Pr 2015;66(6:771–778

  17. Musculoskeletal neck and back pain in undergraduate dental students at a UK dental school - a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijay, S; Ide, M

    2016-09-09

    Objective Limited data exist on musculoskeletal problems within dental students: we aimed to determine the prevalence of these disorders.Design Single centre cross-sectional study.Setting A UK Dental School 2015.Methods Students completed a modified Nordic pain questionnaire.Main outcome measures Self-reported frequency and severity of pain, fitness and coping strategies.Results 63% of 390 respondents were female and 75% aged under 23. Seventy-nine percent experienced pain with 42% experiencing pain for 30 or more days in the past year. Lower back pain was most common (54%) and was most frequently the worst area of pain (48%). Thirty-six percent reported pain lasting at least four hours. The mean 'average pain intensity' VAS score was 3.81/10 (sd = 1.75) and mean 'worst pain intensity' was 5.56 (sd = 2.10). More females reported neck pain (58% versus 37%, P pain intensity' (mean 4.02, sd 1.82 versus 3.43 sd 1.55, P = 0.012. Daily stretching was used by 55.7% of respondents, and this positively correlated with 'average' and 'worst pain intensity' (P = 0.096 and P = 0.001) scores. Eighteen percent sought professional help to manage pain.Conclusion Musculoskeletal pain is a problem for dental students. Education in self-care may be helpful; however, assessments of possible interventions are needed.

  18. Exploring integrative medicine for back and neck pain - a pragmatic randomised clinical pilot trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rydén Anna

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A model for integrative medicine (IM adapted to Swedish primary care was previously developed. The aim of this study was to explore the feasibility of a pragmatic randomised clinical trial to investigate the effectiveness of the IM model versus conventional primary care in the management of patients with non-specific back/neck pain. Specific objectives included the exploration of recruitment and retention rates, patient and care characteristics, clinical differences and effect sizes between groups, selected outcome measures and power calculations to inform the basis of a full-scale trial. Methods Eighty patients with back/neck pain of at least two weeks duration were randomised to the two types of care. Outcome measures were standardised health related quality of life (the eight domains of SF-36 complemented by a set of exploratory "IM tailored" outcomes targeting self-rated disability, stress and well-being (0-10 scales; days in pain (0-14; and the use of analgesics and health care over the last two weeks (yes/no. Data on clinical management were derived from medical records. Outcome changes from baseline to follow-up after 16 weeks were used to explore the differences between the groups. Results Seventy-five percent (80/107 of screened patients in general practice were eligible and feasible to enrol into the trial. Eighty-two percent (36/44 of the integrative and 75% (27/36 of the conventional care group completed follow-up after 16 weeks. Most patients had back/neck pain of at least three months duration. Conventional care typically comprised advice and prescription of analgesics, occasionally complemented with sick leave or a written referral to physiotherapy. IM care generally integrated seven treatment sessions from two different types of complementary therapies with conventional care over ten weeks. The study was underpowered to detect any statistically significant differences between the groups. One SF-36 domain

  19. A randomized clinical trial comparing general exercise, McKenzie treatment and a control group in patients with neck pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjellman, Görel; Oberg, Birgitta

    2002-07-01

    Seventy-seven patients with neck pain in the primary health care were included in a prospective, randomized clinical trial and randomly assigned to general exercise, McKenzie treatment, or a control group. Seventy patients completed the treatment; response rate 93% at 12-month follow-up. All three groups showed significant improvement regarding the main outcomes, pain intensity and Neck Disability Index, even at 12-month follow-up, but there was no significant difference between the groups. In all, 79% reported that they were better or completely restored after treatment, although 51% reported constant/daily pain. In the McKenzie group compared with the control group, a tendency toward greater improvement was noted for pain intensity at 3 weeks and at 6-month follow-up, and for post-treatment Neck Disability Index. Significant improvement in Distress and Risk Assessment Method scores was shown in the McKenzie group only. The three groups had similar recurrence rates, although after 12 months the McKenzie group showed a tendency toward fewer visits for additional health care. The study did not provide a definite evidence of treatment efficacy in patients with neck pain, however, there was a tendency toward a better outcome with the two active alternatives compared with the control group.

  20. The therapeutic effects of acupuncture on patients with chronic neck myofascial pain syndrome: a single-blind randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Mei-Yuan; Hsieh, Ching-Liang; Cheng, Yung-Yen; Hung, Hung-Chang; Li, Tsai-Chung; Yen, Sch-May; Huang, I-Shin

    2010-01-01

    Chronic neck myofascial pain syndrome (MPS) is a common disorder seen in clinics. There is no gold standard method to treat myofascial pain. We investigated the effects of acupuncture on patients with chronic neck MPS by a single-blind randomized controlled trial. A total of 35 patients were randomly allocated to an acupuncture group (AG) or a sham acupuncture group (SG). Each subject received acupuncture treatment twice per week for three consecutive weeks. The primary outcome measure was quality of life as assessed with Short Form-36, and secondary outcome measures were neck range of motion (ROM), motion-related pain, and Short-Form McGill Pain Questionnaire (SF-MPQ), as determined by a blinded investigator. The clinical assessments were made before treatment (BT) and after six acupuncture treatments (AT), as well as four weeks (F1) and 12 weeks (F2) after the end of the treatment. A total of 34 patients completed the trial. The results indicated that there is no significant difference in the ROM, motion-related pain, and SF-MPQ scores between AG and SG at AT, F1 and F2 (all p > 0.05). However, AG has greater improvement in physical functioning and role emotional of Short Form-36 quality of life at F2. The results indicate that acupuncture may be used to improve the quality of life in patients with chronic neck MPS.

  1. Effectiveness of behavioural graded activity compared with physiotherapy treatment in chronic neck pain: design of a randomised clinical trial [ISRCTN88733332].

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F. Vonk (Frieke); A.P. Verhagen (Arianne); M. Geilen (Mario); C.J. Vos (Kees); B.W. Koes (Bart)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractBACKGROUND: Chronic neck pain is a common complaint in the Netherlands with a point prevalence of 14.3%. Patients with chronic neck pain are often referred to a physiotherapist and, although many treatments are available, it remains unclear which type of treatment is to

  2. Preliminary results, methodological considerations and recruitment difficulties of a randomised clinical trial comparing two treatment regimens for patients with headache and neck pain.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hertogh, W. de; Vaes, P.; Devroey, D.; Louis, P.; Carpay, H.; Truijen, S.; Duquet, W.; Oostendorp, R.A.B.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Headache is a highly prevalent disorder. Irrespective of the headache diagnosis it is often accompanied with neck pain and -stiffness. Due to this common combination of headache and neck pain, physical treatments of the cervical spine are often considered. The additional value of these t

  3. Atlanto-axial infection after acupuncture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, A; Lind, C R P; Smith, R J; Kodali, V

    2015-12-11

    A 67-year-old man presented with neck cellulitis following acupuncture for cervical spondylosis. Blood cultures were positive for methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus. Increased neck pain and bacteraemia prompted MRI, which showed atlanto-axial septic arthritis without signs of infection of the tissues between the superficial cellulitic area and the atlanto-axial joint, thus making direct extension of infection unlikely. It is more likely that haematogenous spread of infection resulted in seeding in the atlanto-axial joint, with the proximity of the arthritis and acupuncture site being coincidental. Acupuncture is a treatment option for some indolent pain conditions. As such, acupuncture services are likely to be more frequently utilised. A history of acupuncture is rarely requested by the admitting doctor and seldom offered voluntarily by the patient, especially where the site of infection due to haematogenous spread is distant from the needling location. Awareness of infectious complications following acupuncture can reduce morbidity through early intervention.

  4. The efficacy of utilizing Kinesio® taping in isolation or in combination with spinal manipulation in the treatment of chronic neck pain

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    M.Tech. (Chiropractic) Introduction: Neck pain is a common condition which affects up to 70 percent of people at some point in their lives, and at any given time about 10 to 20 percent of the population reports neck problems. Although spinal manipulation on its own is effective in the treatment of chronic neck pain, chiropractors continue to search adjunctive modalities to improve the positive outcomes of their treatment. Therefore, it is important to look for the best possible treatment p...

  5. A unilateral open door laminoplasty technique: prospective analysis of the relationship between midline extensor muscle preservation and postoperative neck pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jin Hoon; Jeong, Eui-Kyun; Lee, Moon Kyu; Chul Rhim, Seung; Roh, Sung Woo; Kim, Jeoung Hee; Jeon, Sang Ryong

    2015-02-01

    Since laminoplasty was first introduced, several techniques have been developed to reduce postoperative neck pain and progressive kyphosis following this procedure. We describe the importance of deep muscle preservation to prevent postoperative neck pain following cervical posterior surgery, using the inter-muscular plane. We performed cervical laminoplasty on 10 patients from March to July 2012. The mean follow-up duration was 14.6 (range 12-18) months, and the mean age was 58.8 (48-68) years. There were eight men and two women in the study cohort, which consisted of eight cases of cervical spondylotic myelopathy and two cases of ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament. The Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) score and neck disability index (NDI) score were assessed before and at 6 and 12 months after surgery. The numeric rating scale (NRS) for neck pain was evaluated at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months after surgery. CT scan was performed immediately after the operation, and a radiograph was performed preoperatively and during the follow-up evaluation at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months after surgery. The preoperative JOA and NDI scores improved in all patients. Although there were two patients who complained of moderate postoperative neck pain (NRS 4 and 5), their condition gradually improved. Seven patients had mild or no neck pain (below NRS 3) at the 12 month follow-up. In addition, the cervical alignment was well maintained in all but one patient. Although larger prospective cohorts, longer follow-up periods, and comparative analyses are still needed, the clinical and radiological outcomes observed in the short 12 month period in this small cohort are promising.

  6. Comparison of Dry Needling versus Orthopedic Manual Therapy in Patients with Myofascial Chronic Neck Pain: A Single-Blind, Randomized Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene Campa-Moran

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of three interventions for the treatment of myofascial chronic neck pain. Methods. Thirty-six patients were randomly assigned to one of three intervention groups: orthopedic manual therapy (OMT, dry needling and stretching (DN-S, and soft tissue techniques (STT. All groups received two treatment sessions with a 48 h time interval. Outcome measures included neck pain intensity measured using a visual analogue scale, cervical range of motion (ROM, pressure pain threshold for measuring mechanical hyperalgesia, and two self-reported questionnaires (neck disability index and pain catastrophizing scale. Results. The ANOVA revealed significant differences for the group × time interaction for neck disability, neck pain intensity, and pain catastrophizing. The DN-S and OMT groups reduced neck disability. Only the OMT group showed decreases in mechanical hyperalgesia and pain catastrophizing. The cervical ROM increased in OMT (i.e., flexion, side-bending, and rotation and DN-S (i.e., side-bending and rotation groups. Conclusions. The three interventions are all effective in reducing pain intensity. Reduction in mechanical hyperalgesia and pain catastrophizing was only observed in the OMT group. Cervical ROM improved in the DN-S and OMT groups and also neck disability being only clinically relevant for OMT group.

  7. Comparison of Dry Needling versus Orthopedic Manual Therapy in Patients with Myofascial Chronic Neck Pain: A Single-Blind, Randomized Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campa-Moran, Irene; Rey-Gudin, Etelvina; Fernández-Carnero, Josué; Paris-Alemany, Alba; Gil-Martinez, Alfonso; Lerma Lara, Sergio; Prieto-Baquero, Almudena; Alonso-Perez, José Luis; La Touche, Roy

    2015-01-01

    Objective. The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of three interventions for the treatment of myofascial chronic neck pain. Methods. Thirty-six patients were randomly assigned to one of three intervention groups: orthopedic manual therapy (OMT), dry needling and stretching (DN-S), and soft tissue techniques (STT). All groups received two treatment sessions with a 48 h time interval. Outcome measures included neck pain intensity measured using a visual analogue scale, cervical range of motion (ROM), pressure pain threshold for measuring mechanical hyperalgesia, and two self-reported questionnaires (neck disability index and pain catastrophizing scale). Results. The ANOVA revealed significant differences for the group × time interaction for neck disability, neck pain intensity, and pain catastrophizing. The DN-S and OMT groups reduced neck disability. Only the OMT group showed decreases in mechanical hyperalgesia and pain catastrophizing. The cervical ROM increased in OMT (i.e., flexion, side-bending, and rotation) and DN-S (i.e., side-bending and rotation) groups. Conclusions. The three interventions are all effective in reducing pain intensity. Reduction in mechanical hyperalgesia and pain catastrophizing was only observed in the OMT group. Cervical ROM improved in the DN-S and OMT groups and also neck disability being only clinically relevant for OMT group.

  8. Effect of Scapular Function Training on Chronic Pain in the Neck/Shoulder Region: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Neck and shoulder complaints are common among employees in occupations characterized by intensive computer use. Treatment has varied from passive rest to active treatments and active treatments have often been divided into either training of the painful area or the surrounding musculature avoiding direct training of the painful area. Our study investigates the effect of the latter approach. The purpose of this study was in a randomised controlled trial to investigate if intensive scap...

  9. How relatives of patients with head and neck cancer experience pain, disease progression and treatment: A qualitative interview study

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: This study of relatives to patients with head and neck cancer (HNC) treated with radiotherapy describes how the relatives experienced the patients situation, especially with respect to pain, and how the relatives themselves experienced the situation. Methods: Semi-structured interviews of 21 relatives to HNC patients who suffered from pain were conducted, and a qualitative content analysis was performed. Results: The relatives experienced that the patients suffered from physical, psy...

  10. The optimized acupuncture treatment for neck pain caused by cervical spondylosis: a study protocol of a multicentre randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Zhao-Hui

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neck pain is one of the chief symptoms of cervical spondylosis (CS. Acupuncture is a well-accepted and widely used complementary therapy for the management of neck pain caused by CS. In this paper, we present a randomized controlled trial protocol evaluating the use of acupuncture for CS neck pain, comparing the effects of the optimized acupuncture therapy in real practice compared with sham and shallow acupuncture. Methods/Design This trial uses a multicentre, parallel-group, randomized, sham acupuncture and shallow acupuncture, controlled single-blind design. Nine hospitals are involved as trial centres. 945 patients who meet inclusion criteria are randomly assigned to receive optimized acupuncture therapy, sham acupuncture or shallow acupuncture by a computerized central randomization system. The interventions past for 4 weeks with eight to ten treatments in total. The group allocations and interventions are concealed to patients and statisticians. The Northwick Park Neck Pain Questionnaire (NPQ is used as the primary outcome measure, and the McGill Pain Questionnaire (MPQ and The Short Form (36 Health Survey (SF-36 are applied as secondary outcome measures. The evaluation is performed at baseline, at the end of the intervention, and at the end of the first month and the third month during follow-up. The statistical analyses will include baseline data comparison and repeated measures of analysis of variance (ANOVA for primary and secondary outcomes of group and time differences. Adverse events (AEs will be reported if they occur. Discussion This trial is a multicentre randomized control trial (RCT on the efficacy of acupuncture for CS neck pain and has a large sample size and central randomization in China. It will strictly follow the CONSORT statement and STRICTA extension guideline to report high-quality study results. By setting the control groups as sham and shallow acupuncture, this study attempts to reveal the

  11. Traditional Chinese medicine for neck pain and low back pain: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qi-ling Yuan

    Full Text Available Neck pain (NP and low back pain (LBP are common symptoms bothering people in daily life. Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM has been used to treat various symptoms and diseases in China and has been demonstrated to be effective. The objective of the present study was to review and analyze the existing data about pain and disability in TCM treatments for NP and LBP.Studies were identified by a comprehensive search of databases, such as MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Cochrane Library, up to September 1, 2013. A meta-analysis was performed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of TCM in managing NP and LBP.Seventy five randomized controlled trials (n = 11077 were included. Almost all of the studies investigated individuals experiencing chronic NP (CNP or chronic LBP (CLBP. We found moderate evidence that acupuncture was more effective than sham-acupuncture in reducing pain immediately post-treatment for CNP (visual analogue scale (VAS 10 cm, mean difference (MD = -0.58 (-0.94, -0.22, 95% confidence interval, p = 0.01, CLBP (standardized mean difference = -0.47 (-0.77, -0.17, p = 0.003, and acute LBP (VAS 10 cm, MD = -0.99 (-1.24, -0.73, p< 0.001. Cupping could be more effective than waitlist in VAS (100 mm (MD = -19.10 (-27.61, -10.58, p < 0. 001 for CNP or medications (e.g. NSAID for CLBP (MD = -5.4 (-8.9, -0.19, p = 0.003. No serious or life-threatening adverse effects were found.Acupuncture, acupressure, and cupping could be efficacious in treating the pain and disability associated with CNP or CLBP in the immediate term. Gua sha, tai chi, qigong, and Chinese manipulation showed fair effects, but we were unable to draw any definite conclusions, and further research is still needed. The efficacy of tuina and moxibustion is unknown because no direct evidence was obtained. These TCM modalities are relatively safe.

  12. The effect of traditional cupping on pain and mechanical thresholds in patients with chronic nonspecific neck pain: a randomised controlled pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauche, Romy; Cramer, Holger; Hohmann, Claudia; Choi, Kyung-Eun; Rampp, Thomas; Saha, Felix Joyonto; Musial, Frauke; Langhorst, Jost; Dobos, Gustav

    2012-01-01

    Introduction. Cupping has been used since antiquity in the treatment of pain conditions. In this pilot study, we investigated the effect of traditional cupping therapy on chronic nonspecific neck pain (CNP) and mechanical sensory thresholds. Methods. Fifty CNP patients were randomly assigned to treatment (TG, n = 25) or waiting list control group (WL, n = 25). TG received a single cupping treatment. Pain at rest (PR), pain related to movement (PM), quality of life (SF-36), Neck Disability Index (NDI), mechanical detection (MDT), vibration detection (MDT), and pressure pain thresholds (PPT) were measured before and three days after a single cupping treatment. Patients also kept a pain and medication diary (PaDi, MeDi) during the study. Results. Baseline characteristics were similar in the two groups. After cupping TG reported significantly less pain (PR: -17.9 mm VAS, 95%CI -29.2 to -6.6; PM: -19.7, 95%CI -32.2 to -7.2; PaDi: -1.5 points on NRS, 95%CI -2.5 to -0.4; all P cupping might be an effective treatment for improving pain, quality of life, and hyperalgesia in CNP.

  13. Experiences of pain: a longitudinal, qualitative study of patients with head and neck cancer recently treated with radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaller, Anne; Larsson, Britt; Lindblad, Mona; Liedberg, Gunilla M

    2015-06-01

    It is not unusual for patients with head and neck cancer (HNC) to suffer from both tumor- and treatment-related pain that is difficult to alleviate despite individualized pain management. The aim of this qualitative study was to describe how HNC patients experience pain and how pain influences those who are treated with radiotherapy (RT). Qualitative semistructured interviews were performed 1 and 6 months after patients completed RT. The interviews addressed symptoms, moods, and suffering. The study included 26 patients with HNC who had recently completed RT. The interviews were analyzed using manifest content analysis. The main category was: HNC patients did not report that their severe physical pain influenced their psychological suffering, but it did influence their social lives. Furthermore, four categories were revealed: pain in the head and neck region, overwhelming fatigue, altered mood and preoccupied mind, and decreased participation and changed relationships. Physical pain, psychological distress, and social withdrawal were prominent at both interviews and consequently their situation can be considered as chronic. Remarkably, patients did not express a clear relationship between pain and psychological load. This may imply a biomedical view of pain or may reflect the difficult situation patients were in (i.e., facing a possibly life-threatening cancer). Thus, their situation might require a prioritization and might negatively affect the possibility of identifying the interaction between the different pain dimensions. The biopsychosocial model of chronic pain aims to understand the interaction between pain and psychosocial factors. Interventions aiming to teach patients with HNC how to internalize the biopsychosocial model framework to manage pain could be useful and should be evaluated in future research.

  14. Psychometric characteristics of the Spanish version of instruments to measure neck pain disability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    González Luis

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The NDI, COM and NPQ are evaluation instruments for disability due to NP. There was no Spanish version of NDI or COM for which psychometric characteristics were known. The objectives of this study were to translate and culturally adapt the Spanish version of the Neck Disability Index Questionnaire (NDI, and the Core Outcome Measure (COM, to validate its use in Spanish speaking patients with non-specific neck pain (NP, and to compare their psychometric characteristics with those of the Spanish version of the Northwick Pain Questionnaire (NPQ. Methods Translation/re-translation of the English versions of the NDI and the COM was done blindly and independently by a multidisciplinary team. The study was done in 9 primary care Centers and 12 specialty services from 9 regions in Spain, with 221 acute, subacute and chronic patients who visited their physician for NP: 54 in the pilot phase and 167 in the validation phase. Neck pain (VAS, referred pain (VAS, disability (NDI, COM and NPQ, catastrophizing (CSQ and quality of life (SF-12 were measured on their first visit and 14 days later. Patients' self-assessment was used as the external criterion for pain and disability. In the pilot phase, patients' understanding of each item in the NDI and COM was assessed, and on day 1 test-retest reliability was estimated by giving a second NDI and COM in which the name of the questionnaires and the order of the items had been changed. Results Comprehensibility of NDI and COM were good. Minutes needed to fill out the questionnaires [median, (P25, P75]: NDI. 4 (2.2, 10.0, COM: 2.1 (1.0, 4.9. Reliability: [ICC, (95%CI]: NDI: 0.88 (0.80, 0.93. COM: 0.85 (0.75,0.91. Sensitivity to change: Effect size for patients having worsened, not changed and improved between days 1 and 15, according to the external criterion for disability: NDI: -0.24, 0.15, 0.66; NPQ: -0.14, 0.06, 0.67; COM: 0.05, 0.19, 0.92. Validity: Results of NDI, NPQ and COM were consistent

  15. A comparison of physical characteristics between patients seeking treatment for neck pain and age-matched healthy people

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jordan, A; Mehlsen, J; Ostergaard, K

    1997-01-01

    To compare physical characteristics of the cervical musculature, including maximal isometric strength of the flexors and extensors, relative isometric endurance of the extensors and the active range of motion (ROM) in extension in a group of patients seeking treatment for chronic neck pain...

  16. The effectiveness of participatory ergonomics to prevent low-back and neck pain - results of a cluster randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Driessen, M.T.; Proper, K.I.; Anema, J.R.; Knol, D.L.; Bongers, P.M.; Beek, A.J. van der

    2011-01-01

    Objective The aim of this randomized controlled trial (RCT) was to investigate the effectiveness of the Stay@ Work participatory ergonomics (PE) program to prevent low-back and neck pain. Methods A total of 37 departments were randomly allocated to either the intervention (PE) or control group (no P

  17. Cervical kinematic training with and without interactive VR training for chronic neck pain - a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarig Bahat, Hilla; Takasaki, Hiroshi; Chen, Xiaoqi; Bet-Or, Yaheli; Treleaven, Julia

    2015-02-01

    Impairments in cervical kinematics are common in patients with neck pain. A virtual reality (VR) device has potential to be effective in the management of these impairments. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of kinematic training (KT) with and without the use of an interactive VR device. In this assessor-blinded, allocation-concealed pilot clinical trial, 32 participants with chronic neck pain were randomised into the KT or kinematic plus VR training (KTVR) group. Both groups completed four to six training sessions comprising of similar KT activities such as active and quick head movements and fine head movement control and stability over five weeks. Only the KTVR group used the VR device. The primary outcome measures were neck disability index (NDI), cervical range of motion (ROM), head movement velocity and accuracy. Kinematic measures were collected using the VR system that was also used for training. Secondary measures included pain intensity, TAMPA scale of kinesiophobia, static and dynamic balance, global perceived effect and participant satisfaction. The results demonstrated significant (p neck pain in a larger cohort.

  18. Teenager with chest pain and swollen neck: a leave-it-alone condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Pen-Yuan; Wang, Hung-Jung

    2015-07-01

    A 19-year-old boy with shortness of breath and chest pain after strenuous exercise presented to emergency department . On physical examination, the neck and shoulders appeared to be swollen. There was crepitus on skin palpation. Chest X-ray disclosed diffuse subcutaneous emphysema and pneumomediastinum. CT showed additional finding of air in epidural space. The patient was discharged after 2 days of hospitalisation with conservative treatment uneventfully. Pneumorrhachis is usually caused by abrupt increase in intrathoracic pressure in instance of forceful vomiting, cough or asthma attack in an otherwise healthy young adult. It is usually accompanied with pneumomediastinum. The management of epidural pneumatosis should be tailored according to its primary cause. For most patients with pneumorrhachis associated to a spontaneous pneumomediastinum without neurological symptoms, this condition is generally self-limited. For epidural free air of large volume that causes neurological deficits, surgical laminectomy may be indicated.

  19. Giant Prolactinoma Presenting with Neck Pain and Structural Compromise of the Occipital Condyles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yecies, Derek; Ajlan, Abdulrazag; Ratliff, John; Ziskin, Jennifer; Hwang, Peter; Vogel, Hannes; Katznelson, Laurence; Harsh, Griffith

    2015-11-01

    Prolactinomas are the most common form of endocrinologically active pituitary adenoma; they account for ∼ 45% of pituitary adenomas encountered in clinical practice. Giant adenomas are those > 4 cm in diameter. Less than 0.5% of pituitary adenomas encountered in neurosurgical practice are giant prolactinomas. Patients with giant prolactinomas typically present with highly elevated prolactin levels, endocrinologic disturbances, and neurologic symptoms from mass-induced pressure. Described here is an unusual case of a giant prolactinoma presenting with neck pain and structural compromise of the occipital condyles. Transnasal biopsy of the nasopharyngeal portion of the mass obtained tissue consistent with an atypical prolactinoma with p53 reactivity and a high Ki-67 index of 5%. Despite the size and invasiveness of the tumor, the patient had resolution of his clinical symptoms, dramatic reduction of his hyperprolactinemia, and near-complete disappearance of his tumor following medical treatment.

  20. Bilateral Simultaneous Femoral Neck Fracture Mimicking Abdominal Pain in a Cerebral Palsy Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Mariani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Simultaneous bilateral femoral neck fractures are unusual lesions, generally associated with an underlying condition which causes impaired bone mineralization, triggered by an increased bone stress. We present a 24-year-old cerebral palsy patient, who was previously evaluated in another institution due to inability to walk, interpreted as abdominal pain. No alteration in blood analysis or abdominal X-rays was found. As no response to treatment was observed, a new abdominal X-ray was taken, which incidentally depicted bilateral medial femoral neck fracture. He was referred to our practice after a resection arthroplasty was offered in another institution. After admission, bilateral one-stage THA was performed. Several reports emphasize bone disease as a major precipitating factor, and there is an increased incidence of hip fractures in chronic epilepsy, renal osteodystrophy, and chronic steroid use. Femoral head resection has been proven to be effective in immobilized patients, whereas this was not a reasonable option in this patient who presented walking ability. Despite the treatment election, primary care physicians should be aware of and alert to the possibility of fractures in patients with neurological disorders and calcium metabolism alterations. Late diagnosis of orthopedic injuries in this type of patients may lead to permanent disability.

  1. Throat Infection, Neck and Chest Pain and Cardiac Response: A Persistent Infection-Related Clinical Syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Changqing ZHOU; Xiangning FU; Jiangtao YAN; Qiao FAN; Zhuoya LI; Katherine Cianflone; Daowen WANG

    2009-01-01

    Dizziness,chest discomfort,chest depression and dyspnea are a group of symptoms that are common complaints in clinical practice. Patients with these symptoms are usually informed that while neurosis consequent to coronary heart disease is excluded nonetheless they remain unhealthy with no rational explanation or treatment. 165 cases of these symptoms and 85 control subjects were reviewed and underwent further medical history inquiry,routine EKG test and cardiac ultrasound examination. Thirty-five patients received coronary artery angiography to exclude coronary heart disease. Serum myocardial autoantibodies against beta1-adrenoceptor,alpha-myosin heavy chain,M2-muscarinie receptor and adenine-nucleotide translocator were tested,and inflammatory cytokines and high sensitivity C-reaction protein were measured and lymphocyte subclass was assayed by flow cytometry. All patients had a complex of four symptoms or tetralogy: (1) persistent throat or upper respiratory tract infection,(2) neck pain,(3) chest pain and (4) chest depression or dyspnea,some of them with anxiety. Anti-myocardial autoantibodies (AMCAs) were present in all patients vs. 8% in and CD4-CD8+ lymphocytes were significantly higher and CD56+ lymphocytes lower in patients than those in controls (P<0.01). The ratio of serum pathogen antibodies positive against Coxsackie virus-B,cytomegalovirus,Mycoplasma pneumoniae and Chlamydia pneumoniae were all markedly higher in patients. These data led to identification of a persistent respiratory infection-related clinical syndrome,including persistent throat infection,neck spinal lesion,fib cartilage inflammation,symptoms of car-diac depression and dyspnea with or without anxiety.

  2. Reproducibility of cervical range of motion in patients with neck pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Vet Henrica CW

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Reproducibility measurements of the range of motion are an important prerequisite for the interpretation of study results. The aim of the study is to assess the intra-rater and inter-rater reproducibility of the measurement of active Range of Motion (ROM in patients with neck pain using the Cybex Electronic Digital Inclinometer-320 (EDI-320. Methods In an outpatient clinic in a primary care setting 32 patients with at least 2 weeks of pain and/or stiffness in the neck were randomly assessed, in a test- retest design with blinded raters using a standardized measurement protocol. Cervical flexion-extension, lateral flexion and rotation were assessed. Results Reliability expressed by the Intraclass Correlation Coefficient (ICC was 0.93 (lateral flexion or higher for intra-rater reliability and 0.89 (lateral flexion or higher for inter-rater reliability. The 95% limits of agreement for intra-rater agreement, expressing the range of the differences between two ratings were -2.5 ± 11.1° for flexion-extension, -0.1 ± 10.4° for lateral flexion and -5.9 ± 13.5° for rotation. For inter-rater agreement the limits of agreement were 3.3 ± 17.0° for flexion-extension, 0.5 ± 17.0° for lateral flexion and -1.3 ± 24.6° for rotation. Conclusion In general, the intra-rater reproducibility and the inter-rater reproducibility were good. We recommend to compare the reproducibility and clinical applicability of the EDI-320 inclinometer with other cervical ROM measures in symptomatic patients.

  3. Chronic Mechanical Neck Pain in Adults Treated by Manual Therapy: A Systematic Review of Change Scores in Randomized Controlled Trials of a Single Session

    OpenAIRE

    Vernon, Howard; Humphreys, Barry Kim

    2008-01-01

    We report a systematic analysis of group change scores of subjects with chronic neck pain not due to whiplash and without headache or arm pain, in randomized clinical trials of a single session of manual therapy. A comprehensive literature search of clinical trials of chronic neck pain treated with manual therapies up to December 2006 was conducted. Trials that scored above 60% on the PEDro Scale were included. Change scores were analyzed for absolute, percentage change and effect size (ES) w...

  4. The outcome of control groups in clinical trials of conservative treatments for chronic mechanical neck pain: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hagino Carol

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic neck pain is highly prevalent in Western societies, with about 15% of females and 10% of males suffering with it at any time. The course of untreated chronic neck pain patients in clinical trials has not been well-defined and the placebo effect has not been clarified. Methods A systematic review of RCT's of conservative treatments for chronic mechanical neck pain was conducted. Studies were excluded if they did not include a control group, if they involved subjects with whiplash injuries, a predominance of headache or arm pain associated with chronic neck pain and if only one treatment was reported. Only studies scoring 3–5 out of 5 on the Jadad Scale for quality were included in the final analysis. Data on change in pain scores of subjects in both placebo (PL as well as no-treatment (NT control groups were analyzed. Mean changes in pain scores as well as effect sizes were calculated, summarized and compared between these groups. Results Twenty (20 studies, 5 in the NT group and 15 in the PL group, with outcome intervals ranging from 1–52 weeks were included in the final analysis. The mean [95% CI] effect size of change in pain ratings in the no-treatment control studies at outcome points up to 10 weeks was 0.18 [-0.05, 0.41] and for outcomes from 12–52 weeks it was 0.4 [0.12, 0.68]. In the placebo control groups it was 0.50 [0.10, 0.90] at up to 10 weeks and 0.33. [-1.97, 2.66] at 12–24 weeks. None of the comparisons between the no-treatment and placebo groups were statistically significant. Conclusion It appears that the changes in pain scores in subjects with chronic neck pain not due to whiplash who are enrolled in no-treatment and placebo control groups were similarly small and not significantly different. As well, they do not appear to increase over longer-term follow-up.

  5. Referred pain from myofascial trigger points in head and neck-shoulder muscles reproduces head pain features in children with chronic tension type headache.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-de-las-Peñas, César; Fernández-Mayoralas, Daniel M; Ortega-Santiago, Ricardo; Ambite-Quesada, Silvia; Palacios-Ceña, Domingo; Pareja, Juan A

    2011-02-01

    Our aim was to describe the referred pain pattern and areas from trigger points (TrPs) in head, neck, and shoulder muscles in children with chronic tension type headache (CTTH). Fifty children (14 boys, 36 girls, mean age: 8 ± 2) with CTTH and 50 age- and sex- matched children participated. Bilateral temporalis, masseter, superior oblique, upper trapezius, sternocleidomastoid, suboccipital, and levator scapula muscles were examined for TrPs by an assessor blinded to the children's condition. TrPs were identified with palpation and considered active when local and referred pains reproduce headache pain attacks. The referred pain areas were drawn on anatomical maps, digitalized, and also measured. The total number of TrPs was significantly greater in children with CTTH as compared to healthy children (P < 0.001). Active TrPs were only present in children with CTTH (P < 0.001). Within children with CTTH, a significant positive association between the number of active TrPs and headache duration (r (s) = 0.315; P = 0.026) was observed: the greater the number of active TrPs, the longer the duration of headache attack. Significant differences in referred pain areas between groups (P < 0.001) and muscles (P < 0.001) were found: the referred pain areas were larger in CTTH children (P < 0.001), and the referred pain area elicited by suboccipital TrPs was larger than the referred pain from the remaining TrPs (P < 0.001). Significant positive correlations between some headache clinical parameters and the size of the referred pain area were found. Our results showed that the local and referred pains elicited from active TrPs in head, neck and shoulder shared similar pain pattern as spontaneous CTTH in children, supporting a relevant role of active TrPs in CTTH in children.

  6. Changes in the incidence of occupational disability as a result of back and neck pain in the Netherlands

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    Verbeek Jos H

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Back pain (including neck pain is one of the most prevalent health problems for which physicians are consulted. Back pain can decrease the quality of life considerably during a great part of the lives of those who suffer from it. At the same time it has an enormous economic impact, mainly through sickness absence and long-term disability. The objective of this paper is to compare the incidence of occupational disability as a result of back and neck pain in 1980–1985 to 1999–2000 and to explain the findings. Methods A descriptive study was performed at population level of changes in incidence of occupational disability as a result of back and neck pain. Statistics from the National Institute of Social Insurance in the Netherlands are used to calculate age and gender specific incidence rates for back pain diagnoses based on the ICD-classification. Incidence rate ratios stratified according to gender and adjusted for age were calculated to indicate changes over time. Results The incidence of occupational disability as a result of back pain decreased significantly by 37% (95% CI 37%–38% in men and with 21% (95% CI 20%–24% in women, after adjustment for age. For overall occupational disability as a result of all diagnoses this was 18% (95% CI 18%–19% and 34% (95% CI 33%–35% respectively. Changes were not homogeneous over diagnostic subcategories and age groups. Spondylosis decreased most in men by 59% (95% CI 57%–61%. The incidence of non-specific back pain and neck pain increased most by 196% (95% CI 164%–215%. Post-laminectomy syndrome increased over all age categories both for men (85%, 95% CI 61%–113% and women (113%, 95% CI 65%–179%. Conclusion The decrease in occupational disability as a result of back pain was larger than the decrease in occupational disability over all diagnoses. However, time trends were not homogeneous over age-, nor over sex- nor back pain categories. Most of this decrease was due to

  7. A workplace exercise versus health promotion intervention to prevent and reduce the economic and personal burden of non-specific neck pain in office personnel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnston, V; O'Leary, S; Comans, T

    2014-01-01

    to examine the effect of the intervention on reducing the productivity loss in dollar units (AUD), and severity of neck pain and disability. DISCUSSION: The findings of this study will have a direct impact on policies that underpin the prevention and management of neck pain in office personnel.......INTRODUCTION: Non-specific neck pain is a major burden to industry, yet the impact of introducing a workplace ergonomics and exercise intervention on work productivity and severity of neck pain in a population of office personnel is unknown. RESEARCH QUESTION: Does a combined workplace-based best...... controlled trial. PARTICIPANTS AND SETTING: Office personnel aged over 18 years, and who work>30 hours/week. INTERVENTION: Individualised best practice ergonomics intervention plus 3×20 minute weekly, progressive neck/shoulder girdle exercise group sessions for 12 weeks. CONTROL: Individualised best practice...

  8. How Do Patients with Chronic Neck Pain Experience the Effects of Qigong and Exercise Therapy? A Qualitative Interview Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Holmberg

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The high prevalence of chronic neck pain in high income countries impacts quality of life and the social and work-related activities of those afflicted. We aimed to understand how mind-body therapies and exercise therapy may influence the experience of pain among patients with chronic neck pain. Methods. This qualitative interview study investigated how patients with chronic neck pain experienced the effects of exercise or qigong therapy at two time points: during an intervention at three months and after the intervention at six months. Interviews were analysed thematically across interviews and within person-cases. Based on other qualitative studies, a sample size of 20 participants was deemed appropriate. Results. The sample (n=20 consisted of 16 women and four men (age range: 29 to 59. Patients’ experiences differed according to the therapies’ philosophies. Exercise therapy group interviewees described a focus on correct posture and muscle tension release. Qigong group interviewees discussed calming and relaxing effects. Maintaining regular exercise was easier to achieve with exercise therapy. Conclusions. The findings of this study may help health care providers when counselling chronic pain patients on self-help interventions by informing them of different bodily and emotional experiences of mind-body interventions compared to exercise therapy.

  9. How Do Patients with Chronic Neck Pain Experience the Effects of Qigong and Exercise Therapy? A Qualitative Interview Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmberg, Christine; Farahani, Zubin; Witt, Claudia M.

    2016-01-01

    Background. The high prevalence of chronic neck pain in high income countries impacts quality of life and the social and work-related activities of those afflicted. We aimed to understand how mind-body therapies and exercise therapy may influence the experience of pain among patients with chronic neck pain. Methods. This qualitative interview study investigated how patients with chronic neck pain experienced the effects of exercise or qigong therapy at two time points: during an intervention at three months and after the intervention at six months. Interviews were analysed thematically across interviews and within person-cases. Based on other qualitative studies, a sample size of 20 participants was deemed appropriate. Results. The sample (n = 20) consisted of 16 women and four men (age range: 29 to 59). Patients' experiences differed according to the therapies' philosophies. Exercise therapy group interviewees described a focus on correct posture and muscle tension release. Qigong group interviewees discussed calming and relaxing effects. Maintaining regular exercise was easier to achieve with exercise therapy. Conclusions. The findings of this study may help health care providers when counselling chronic pain patients on self-help interventions by informing them of different bodily and emotional experiences of mind-body interventions compared to exercise therapy. PMID:27418938

  10. Relationship of inflammatory markers and pain in patients with head and neck cancer prior to anticancer therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, K.G. [Departamento de Ciências Fisiológicas, Centro de Ciências da Saúde, Universidade Federal do Espírito Santo, Vitória, ES (Brazil); Zeidler, S.V. von [Departamento de Patologia, Centro de Ciências da Saúde, Universidade Federal do Espírito Santo, Vitória, ES (Brazil); Lamas, A.Z. [Departamento de Ciências Fisiológicas, Centro de Ciências da Saúde, Universidade Federal do Espírito Santo, Vitória, ES (Brazil); Podestá, J.R.V. de; Sena, A.; Souza, E.D.; Lenzi, J. [Divisão de Cabeça e Pescoço, Hospital Santa Rita de Cássia, Vitória, ES (Brazil); Lemos, E.M. [Centro de Doenças Infecciosas, Universidade Federal do Espírito Santo, Vitória, ES (Brazil); Gouvea, S.A.; Bissoli, N.S. [Departamento de Ciências Fisiológicas, Centro de Ciências da Saúde, Universidade Federal do Espírito Santo, Vitória, ES (Brazil)

    2014-05-30

    Pain is a common symptom in patients with cancer, including those with head and neck cancer (HNC). While studies suggest an association between chronic inflammation and pain, levels of inflammatory cytokines, such as C-reactive protein (CRP) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), have not been correlated with pain in HNC patients who are not currently undergoing anticancer treatment. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between these inflammatory markers and perceived pain in HNC patients prior to anticancer therapy. The study group consisted of 127 HNC patients and 9 healthy controls. Pain was assessed using the Brief Pain Inventory (BPI), and serum levels of CRP and TNF-α were determined using the particle-enhanced turbidimetric immunoassay (PETIA) and ELISA techniques, respectively. Patients experiencing pain had significantly higher levels of CRP (P<0.01) and TNF-α (P<0.05) compared with controls and with patients reporting no pain. There were significantly positive associations between pain, CRP level, and tumor stage. This is the first study to report a positive association between perceived pain and CRP in HNC patients at the time of diagnosis. The current findings suggest important associations between pain and inflammatory processes in HNC patients, with potential implications for future treatment strategies.

  11. Reliability and responsiveness of the Dutch version of the Neck Disability Index in patients with acute neck pain in general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vos, Cees J; Verhagen, Arianne P; Koes, Bart W

    2006-11-01

    A prospective cohort study with a 1 week follow-up. To examine the reliability and responsiveness of the Dutch version of the Neck Disability Index (NDI) in patients with acute neck pain in general practice. An increasing number of studies on treatment options is published in which the NDI is used. Reports of the ability of the NDI to detect change over time, often called responsiveness, however have not yet been published. At baseline 187 patients (119 women, 68 men) were included. They completed a questionnaire on demographic variables, self-reported cause of their complaints and the NDI. After 1 week, 86 patients were sent the NDI again together with the perceived recovery scale which was used as our external criterion. The scale ranged from 1 (complete recovery) to 7 (complaints are worse than ever). Response rate was 93%. Test-retest scores on reliability were good (ICC = 0.90). A Bland and Altman plot and a graph of total sum score differences showed no visible tendency towards unequal spreading of the data. For patients that reported on the perceived recovery scale that they were "stable" we found a responsiveness ratio of 1.82. The standard error of measurement (SEM) was 0.60 what resulted in a minimal detectable change (MDC) of 1.66. The NDI has shown to be a reliable and responsive instrument in patients with acute neck pain in general practice.

  12. The economic evaluation of a participatory ergonomics programme to prevent low back and neck pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driessen, Maurice; Bosmans, Judith; Proper, Karin; Anema, Johannes; Bongers, Paulien; van der Beek, Allard

    2012-01-01

    This study was an economic evaluation conducted alongside a cluster randomised controlled trial with a follow-up of 12 months. The aim was to evaluate the cost-effectiveness and cost-benefit of the Stay@Work Participatory Ergonomics programme (PE) compared to a control group (no PE). In total, 37 departments (n=3047 workers) were randomised into either the intervention (PE) or control group (no PE). During a meeting, working groups followed the steps of PE, and composed and prioritized ergonomic measures aimed to prevent low back pain (LBP) and neck pain (NP). Working groups had to implement the ergonomic measures within three months in their department. Cost data included those directly related to LBP and NP. Cost-effectiveness analyses (CEA) and cost-benefit analyses (CBA) were performed. After 12 months, health care costs and costs of productivity losses were higher in the intervention group than in the control group (the mean total cost difference was $/euro$127; 95% CI $/euro$-164 - $/euro$418). From a societal perspective, the CEA showed that PE was not cost-effective compared to control for LBP and NP prevalence, work performance, and sick leave. The CBA from a company perspective showed a monetary loss of $/euro$78 per worker. The PE programme was neither cost-effective nor cost-beneficial on any of the effect measures.

  13. A similarity based learning framework for interim analysis of outcome prediction of acupuncture for neck pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Gang; Liang, Zhaohui; Yin, Jian; Fu, Wenbin; Li, Guo-Zheng

    2013-01-01

    Chronic neck pain is a common morbid disorder in modern society. Acupuncture has been administered for treating chronic pain as an alternative therapy for a long time, with its effectiveness supported by the latest clinical evidence. However, the potential effective difference in different syndrome types is questioned due to the limits of sample size and statistical methods. We applied machine learning methods in an attempt to solve this problem. Through a multi-objective sorting of subjective measurements, outstanding samples are selected to form the base of our kernel-oriented model. With calculation of similarities between the concerned sample and base samples, we are able to make full use of information contained in the known samples, which is especially effective in the case of a small sample set. To tackle the parameters selection problem in similarity learning, we propose an ensemble version of slightly different parameter setting to obtain stronger learning. The experimental result on a real data set shows that compared to some previous well-known methods, the proposed algorithm is capable of discovering the underlying difference among different syndrome types and is feasible for predicting the effective tendency in clinical trials of large samples.

  14. Neuro Emotional Technique for the treatment of trigger point sensitivity in chronic neck pain sufferers: A controlled clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pollard Henry

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Trigger points have been shown to be active in many myofascial pain syndromes. Treatment of trigger point pain and dysfunction may be explained through the mechanisms of central and peripheral paradigms. This study aimed to investigate whether the mind/body treatment of Neuro Emotional Technique (NET could significantly relieve pain sensitivity of trigger points presenting in a cohort of chronic neck pain sufferers. Methods Sixty participants presenting to a private chiropractic clinic with chronic cervical pain as their primary complaint were sequentially allocated into treatment and control groups. Participants in the treatment group received a short course of Neuro Emotional Technique that consists of muscle testing, general semantics and Traditional Chinese Medicine. The control group received a sham NET protocol. Outcome measurements included pain assessment utilizing a visual analog scale and a pressure gauge algometer. Pain sensitivity was measured at four trigger point locations: suboccipital region (S; levator scapulae region (LS; sternocleidomastoid region (SCM and temporomandibular region (TMJ. For each outcome measurement and each trigger point, we calculated the change in measurement between pre- and post- treatment. We then examined the relationships between these measurement changes and six independent variables (i.e. treatment group and the above five additional participant variables using forward stepwise General Linear Model. Results The visual analog scale (0 to 10 had an improvement of 7.6 at S, 7.2 at LS, 7.5 at SCM and 7.1 at the TMJ in the treatment group compared with no improvement of at S, and an improvement of 0.04 at LS, 0.1 at SCM and 0.1 at the TMJ point in the control group, (P Conclusion After a short course of NET treatment, measurements of visual analog scale and pressure algometer recordings of four trigger point locations in a cohort of chronic neck pain sufferers were significantly

  15. Small effect of genetic factors on neck pain in old age: a study of 2,108 Danish twins 70 years of age and older

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartvigsen, Jan; Petersen, Hans Christian; Frederiksen, Henrik;

    2005-01-01

    environmental risk factors (rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis, disc prolapse, and coronary heart disease) showed no significant additive genetic, dominant genetic, or common environmental effects. CONCLUSION: Genetic factors do not play an important role in the liability to neck pain in persons 70 years......STUDY DESIGN: Classic twin study. OBJECTIVES: To determine the heritability of neck pain in persons 70 years of age and older. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: Previous studies have shown a moderate effect of genetic factors on back pain in the elderly. Genetic influence on neck pain in old age...... is unknown. METHODS: Data on the 1-month prevalence of neck pain from twin pairs participating in the population based Longitudinal Study of Aging Danish Twins formed the basis of this analysis. To assess twin similarity, probandwise concordance rates, odds ratios, and tetrachoric correlations were...

  16. WE-E-BRE-09: Investigation of the Association Between Radiation-Induced Pain and Radiation Dose in Head and Neck Cancer Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gay, H; Dyk, P; Mullen, D; Eschen, L; Fergus, S; Chin, R; Thorstad, W [Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Oh, J; Apte, A; Deasy, J [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Patients with head and neck cancer who undergo radiotherapy often experience several undesirable side-effects, including xerostomia, trismus, and pain in the head and neck area, but little is know about the dose-volume predictors of such pain. We investigated the association between radiation dose and both throat and esophagus pain during radiotherapy. Methods: We analyzed 124 head and neck patients who received radiotherapy at the Washington University School of Medicine in Saint Louis. For these patients, weekly PROs were recorded, including 16 pain and anatomical location questions. In addition, 17 observational symptoms were recorded. Patients were asked to describe their pain at each site according to a four-level scale: none (0), mild (1), moderate (2), and severe (3). We explored the association between throat pain and the mean dose received in oral cavity and between esophageal pain and the mean dose received in the esophagus. The severity of pain was determined by the difference between the baseline (week 1) pain score and the maximum pain score during treatment. The baseline pain score was defined as the first available pain score before receiving 10 Gy because radiotherapy pain originates later during treatment. Dose-volume metrics were extracted from treatment plans using CERR. To evaluate the correlation between pain and radiation dose, Spearman's correlation coefficient (Rs) was used. Results: The associations between throat pain and the mean dose to the oral cavity, and between esophagus pain and the mean dose to the esophagus, were both statistically significant, with Rs=0.320 (p=0.003) and Rs=0.424 (p<0.0001), respectively. Mean dose, for each structure, was a better predictor of pain than total integral dose. Conclusion: We demonstrated that pain during radiotherapy in head and neck patients highly correlates with the dose delivered. We will further investigate the association between other pain locations and relevant normal tissue

  17. Effectiveness of botulinum toxin type A treatment of neck pain related to nocturnal bruxism: a case report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santamato, Andrea; Panza, Francesco; Di Venere, Daniela; Solfrizzi, Vincenzo; Frisardi, Vincenza; Ranieri, Maurizio; Fiore, Pietro

    2010-01-01

    Objective This case report describes a patient with nocturnal bruxism and related neck pain treated with botulinum toxin type A (BTX-A). Clinical Features The patient was a 27-year-old man with nocturnal bruxism and difficulty in active mouth opening and chewing and neck pain at rest. His numeric pain score was 7 of 10. Surface electromyography of the temporalis and masseter muscles showed typical signs of hyperactivity, characterized by compound muscle action potential amplitude alterations. Intervention and Outcome After clinical evaluation, he was treated with BTX-A to reduce masseter and temporalis muscle hyperactivity. After 3 days of treatment with BTX-A, with each masseter muscle injected with a dose of about 40 mouse units with a dilution of 1 mL and with temporal muscle bilaterally injected with 25 mouse units with the same dilution, a decrease in bruxism symptoms was reported. Neck pain also decreased after the first treatment (visual analog scale of 2/10) and then resolved completely. After 4 weeks, electromyography showed the reduction of muscle hyperactivity with a decrease in the amplitude of the motor action potential. The same reduction in signs and symptoms was still present at assessment 3 months posttreatment. Conclusion These findings suggest that BTX-A may be a therapeutic option for the treatment of bruxism and related disorders. PMID:22027036

  18. Effects of Miniscalpel-Needle Release on Chronic Neck Pain: A Retrospective Analysis with 12-Month Follow-Up.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuming Li

    Full Text Available Chronic neck pain is a highly prevalent condition, and is often treated with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Limited clinical studies with short-term follow-up have shown promising efficacy of acupuncture as well as miniscalpel-needle (MSN release. In this retrospective study, we examined whether MSN release could produce long-lasting relief in patients with chronic neck pain.We retrieved the medical records of all patients receiving weekly MSN release treatment for chronic neck pain at this institution during a period from May 2012 to December 2013. Only cases with the following information at prior to, and 1, 6, and 12 months after the treatment, were included in the analysis: neck disability index (NDI, numerical pain rating scale (NPRS, and active cervical range of motion (CROM. The primary analysis of interest is comparison of the 12-month measures with the baseline. Patients who took analgesic drugs or massage within 2 weeks prior to assessment were excluded from the analysis. For MSN release, tender points were identified manually by an experienced physician, and did not necessarily follow the traditional acupuncture system. MSN was inserted vertically (parallel to the spine until breaking through resistance and patient reporting of distention, soreness or heaviness. The depth of the needling ranged from 10 to 50 mm. The release was carried out by moving the MSN up and down 3-5 times without rotation.A total of 559 cases (patients receiving weekly MSN release treatment for chronic neck pain were screened. The number of cases with complete information (NDI, NPRS, and CROM at baseline, 1, 6 and 12 months after last treatment was 180. After excluding the cases with analgesic treatment or massage within 2 weeks of assessment (n = 53, a total of 127 cases were included in data analysis. The number of MSN release session was 7 (range: 4-11. At 12 months after the treatment, both NPRS and NDI were significantly lower [3 (0, 9 vs. 7 (5, 10

  19. Process evaluation of a participatory ergonomics programme to prevent low back pain and neck pain among workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Driessen Maurice T

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Both low back pain (LBP and neck pain (NP are major occupational health problems. In the workplace, participatory ergonomics (PE is frequently used on musculoskeletal disorders. However, evidence on the effectiveness of PE to prevent LBP and NP obtained from randomised controlled trials (RCTs is scarce. This study evaluates the process of the Stay@Work participatory ergonomics programme, including the perceived implementation of the prioritised ergonomic measures. Methods This cluster-RCT was conducted at the departments of four Dutch companies (a railway transportation company, an airline company, a steel company, and a university including its university medical hospital. Directly after the randomisation outcome, intervention departments formed a working group that followed the steps of PE during a six-hour working group meeting. Guided by an ergonomist, working groups identified and prioritised risk factors for LBP and NP, and composed and prioritised ergonomic measures. Within three months after the meeting, working groups had to implement the prioritised ergonomic measures at their department. Data on various process components (recruitment, reach, fidelity, satisfaction, and implementation components, i.e., dose delivered and dose received were collected and analysed on two levels: department (i.e., working group members from intervention departments and participant (i.e., workers from intervention departments. Results A total of 19 intervention departments (n = 10 with mental workloads, n = 1 with a light physical workload, n = 4 departments with physical and mental workloads, and n = 4 with heavy physical workloads were recruited for participation, and the reach among working group members who participated was high (87%. Fidelity and satisfaction towards the PE programme rated by the working group members was good (7.3 or higher. The same was found for the Stay@Work ergocoach training (7.5 or higher. In total, 66

  20. How does pain lead to disability? A systematic review and meta-analysis of mediation studies in people with back and neck pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hopin; Hübscher, Markus; Moseley, G Lorimer; Kamper, Steven J; Traeger, Adrian C; Mansell, Gemma; McAuley, James H

    2015-06-01

    Disability is an important outcome from a clinical and public health perspective. However, it is unclear how disability develops in people with low back pain or neck pain. More specifically, the mechanisms by which pain leads to disability are not well understood. Mediation analysis is a way of investigating these mechanisms by examining the extent to which an intermediate variable explains the effect of an exposure on an outcome. This systematic review and meta-analysis aimed to identify and examine the extent to which putative mediators explain the effect of pain on disability in people with low back pain or neck pain. Five electronic databases were searched. We found 12 studies (N = 2961) that examined how pain leads to disability with mediation analysis. Standardized regression coefficients (β) of the indirect and total paths were pooled. We found evidence to show that self-efficacy (β = 0.23, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.10 to 0.34), psychological distress (β = 0.10, 95% CI = 0.01 to 0.18), and fear (β = 0.08, 95% CI = 0.01 to 0.14) mediated the relationship between pain and disability, but catastrophizing did not (β = 0.07, 95% CI = -0.06 to 0.19). The methodological quality of these studies was low, and we highlight potential areas for development. Nonetheless, the results suggest that there are significant mediating effects of self-efficacy, psychological distress, and fear, which underpins the direct targeting of these constructs in treatment.

  1. Comparative Effects of Acupressure at Local and Distal Acupuncture Points on Pain Conditions and Autonomic Function in Females with Chronic Neck Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takako Matsubara

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Acupressure on local and distal acupuncture points might result in sedation and relaxation, thereby reducing chronic neck pain. The aim was to investigate the effect of acupressure at local (LP and distal acupuncture points (DP in females with chronic neck pain. Thirty-three females were assigned to three groups: the control group did not receive any stimuli, the LP group received acupressure at local acupuncture points, GB 21, SI 14 and SI 15, and the DP group received acupressure at distal acupuncture points, LI 4, LI 10 and LI 11. Verbal rating scale (VRS, Neck Disability Index (NDI, State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI, muscle hardness (MH, salivary alpha-amylase (sAA activity, heart rate (HR, heart rate variability (HRV values and satisfaction due to acupressure were assessed. VRS, NDI, STAI and MH values decreased after acupressure in the LP and the DP group. HR decreased and the power of high frequency (HF component of HRV increased after acupressure in only the LP group. Although acupressure on not only the LP but also the DP significantly improved pain conditions, acupressure on only the LP affected the autonomic nervous system while acupuncture points per se have different physical effects according to location.

  2. Self-administered physical exercise training as treatment of neck pain among military helicopter pilots and crew

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Murray, Mike; Lange, Britt; Nørnberg, Bo Riebeling

    ) and upper neck extensors (UNE). Secondary outcome: Maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) for cervical extension/flexion and shoulder elevation. Training compliance was self-reported and categorized as regular if performed ≥ 1 times a week. Results: Neck pain at baseline was 1.9±1.7 (mean±SD) in ETG and 2......), was 2.2±0.6 at baseline and 1.3±1.3 at follow-up, but not significantly different from REF. MVC for cervical extension/flexion was in ETG 248±64/184±60 N at baseline and 261±56/194±63 N at follow-up, and correspondingly for REF 241±60/174±52 N and 226±58/175±43 N. MVC for cervical extension...... was significantly improved in ETG compared to REF (p=0.016). Discussion: Specific neck training significantly increased MVC in UNE in ETG. Also, PPT decreased significantly in left TRA in ETG and in REF in both TRA and UNE. No significant difference was observed between groups for self-reported neck pain. This may...

  3. Physical, psychosocial, and individual risk factors for neck/shoulder pain with pressure tenderness in the muscles among workers performing monotonous, repetitive work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, JH; Kaergaard, A.; Frost, P.

    2002-01-01

    with reduced health-related quality of life. CONCLUSIONS: Work-related physical and psychosocial factors, as well as several individual risk factors, are important in the understanding of neck/shoulder pain. The findings suggest that neck/shoulder pain has a multifactorial nature. Reduced health...... force (2.3, 1.4-4.0). The strongest work-related psychosocial risk was high job demands (1.8, 1.2-2.7). Increased risk was also associated with neck/shoulder injury (2.6, 1.6-4.1), female gender (1.8, 1.2-2.8), and low pressure pain threshold (1.6, 1.1-2.3). Neck/shoulder pain was strongly associated...

  4. Conservative care with or without manipulative therapy in the management of back and neck pain in Danish children aged 9-15

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dissing, Kristina Boe; Hartvigsen, Jan; Wedderkopp, Niels

    Background Complaints in the musculoskeletal system often start early in life and back and neck pain in children are well-established predictors for similar problems in adulthood. Despite lack of evidence of effectiveness, manipulative therapy is one of the most commonly used treatment modalities...... for back and neck pain in children. The primary objective of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of manipulative therapy when added to an approach consisting of manual soft tissue treatment, exercises and advice as needed, in children aged 9-15 complaining of back and neck pain. Method The project...... is nested in the CHAMPS Study, which includes around 1200 children aged 9-15, who were all invited to participate in this randomized controlled trial in case they experienced back and/or neck pain during the two year inclusion period. Parents received text messages (SMS) on a weekly basis inquiring about...

  5. Conservative care with or without manipulative therapy in the management of back and neck pain in Danish children aged 9-15

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dissing, Kristina Boe; Hartvigsen, Jan; Wedderkopp, Niels

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Complaints in the musculoskeletal system often start early in life and back and neck pain in children are well-established predictors for similar problems in adulthood. Despite lack of evidence of effectiveness, manipulative therapy is one of the most commonly used treatment modalities...... for back and neck pain in children. The primary objective of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of manipulative therapy when added to an approach consisting of manual soft tissue treatment, exercises and advice as needed, in children aged 9-15 complaining of back and neck pain. METHOD: The project...... is nested in the Childhood Health, Activity and Motor Performance School Study, which includes around 1200 children aged 9-15, who were all invited to participate in this randomized controlled trial in case they experienced back and/or neck pain during the two year inclusion period. Parents received text...

  6. Quantitative sensory testing somatosensory profiles in patients with cervical radiculopathy are distinct from those in patients with nonspecific neck-arm pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tampin, Brigitte; Slater, Helen; Hall, Toby; Lee, Gabriel; Briffa, Noelle Kathryn

    2012-12-01

    The aim of this study was to establish the somatosensory profiles of patients with cervical radiculopathy and patients with nonspecific neck-arm pain associated with heightened nerve mechanosensitivity (NSNAP). Sensory profiles were compared to healthy control (HC) subjects and a positive control group comprising patients with fibromyalgia (FM). Quantitative sensory testing (QST) of thermal and mechanical detection and pain thresholds, pain sensitivity and responsiveness to repetitive noxious mechanical stimulation was performed in the maximal pain area, the corresponding dermatome and foot of 23 patients with painful C6 or C7 cervical radiculopathy, 8 patients with NSNAP in a C6/7 dermatomal pain distribution, 31 HC and 22 patients with FM. For both neck-arm pain groups, all QST parameters were within the 95% confidence interval of HC data. Patients with cervical radiculopathy were characterised by localised loss of function (thermal, mechanical, vibration detection Ppain area and dermatome (thermal detection, vibration detection, pressure pain sensitivity Pneck-arm pain groups demonstrated increased cold sensitivity in their maximal pain area (Pneck-arm pain groups differed from patients with FM, the latter characterised by a widespread gain of function in most nociceptive parameters (thermal, pressure, mechanical pain sensitivity Ppain characteristics between the 2 neck-arm pain groups, distinct sensory profiles were demonstrated for each group.

  7. Assessing the Level of Disability, Deep Cervical Flexor Endurance and Fear Avoidance Beliefs in Bankers with Neck Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deptee Warikoo

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess the level of disability, the deep cervical flexor endurance and fear avoidance beliefs (FAB in bankers with neck pain and to find a correlation between disability and deep cervical muscle endurance, FAB and disability, FAB and deep flexor muscle endurance. Methods: It ws an observational study. The Subjects who had neck pain and minimum 5 years’ experience as a Banker participated in the study. Total 100 subjects were selected. All the subjects were assessed for their disability by the neck pain and disability score (NPDI, their deep cervical flexor endurance using Pressure Biofeedback using Cranio-Cervical flexion test (CCFT and Fear Avoidance Belief by using questionnaire( FABQ. Results: It was found that bankers have a moderate level of disability. The results showed an elevated fear avoidance belief with a mean value of FABQ-PA 21.61±4.42 and FABQ-W 37.81± 5.69. The results indicated that a negative correlation was found between NPDI and CCFT (r=0.855. A positive correlation was found between NPDI and FABQ-PA(r=0.337, FABQ-W(r=0.500. In the present study a negative correlation was found between CCFT and FABQ-W(r=0.553, FABQ-PA (0.348 and positive correlation (r=0.540 was found between FABQ-PA and FABQ-W. Conclusion: The present study concluded that there was a significant level of disability and significantly decreased endurance level and increased fear avoidance beliefs (both work and physical activity related among bankers with neck pain. In addition to that there was a significant correlation found between NPDI and CCFT, NPDI and FABQ, CCFT and FABQ, FABQ-W and FABQ-PA.

  8. Lumbar intervertebral disc degeneration associated with axial and radiating low back pain in ageing SPARC-null mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millecamps, Magali; Tajerian, Maral; Naso, Lina; Sage, E Helene; Stone, Laura S

    2012-06-01

    Chronic low back pain (LBP) is a complex, multifactorial disorder with unclear underlying mechanisms. In humans and rodents, decreased expression of secreted protein acidic rich in cysteine (SPARC) is associated with intervertebral disc (IVD) degeneration and signs of LBP. The current study investigates the hypothesis that IVD degeneration is a risk factor for chronic LBP. SPARC-null and age-matched control mice ranging from 6 to 78 weeks of age were evaluated in this study. X-ray and histologic analysis revealed reduced IVD height, increased wedging, and signs of degeneration (bulging and herniation). Cutaneous sensitivity to cold, heat, and mechanical stimuli were used as measures of referred (low back and tail) and radiating pain (hind paw). Region specificity was assessed by measuring icilin- and capsaicin-evoked behaviour after subcutaneous injection into the hind paw or upper lip. Axial discomfort was measured by the tail suspension and grip force assays. Motor impairment was determined by the accelerating rotarod. Physical function was evaluated by voluntary activity after axial strain or during ambulation with forced lateral flexion. SPARC-null mice developed (1) region-specific, age-dependent hypersensitivity to cold, icilin, and capsaicin (hind paw only), (2) axial discomfort, (3) motor impairment, and (4) reduced physical function. Morphine (6 mg/kg, i.p.) reduced cutaneous sensitivity and alleviated axial discomfort in SPARC-null mice. Ageing SPARC-null mice mirror many aspects of the complex and challenging nature of LBP in humans and incorporate both anatomic and functional components of the disease. The current study supports the hypothesis that IVD degeneration is a risk factor for chronic LBP.

  9. Effects of heart rate variability biofeedback in subjects with stress-related chronic neck pain: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallman, David M; Olsson, Erik M G; von Schéele, Bo; Melin, Lennart; Lyskov, Eugene

    2011-06-01

    Recent studies focusing on autonomic nervous system (ANS) dysfunctions, together with theoretical pathophysiological models of musculoskeletal disorders, indicate the involvement of ANS regulation in development and maintenance of chronic muscle pain. Research has demonstrated the effectiveness of heart rate variability (HRV) biofeedback (BF) in increasing HRV and reducing the symptoms of different disorders characterized by ANS aberration. The study investigated the effects of resonance frequency HRV BF on autonomic regulation and perceived health, pain, stress and disability in 24 subjects with stress-related chronic neck-shoulder pain. Twelve subjects participated in 10 weekly sessions of resonant HRV BF and were compared to a control group. Subjective reports and HRV measures during relaxation and in response to a standardized stress protocol were assessed for both groups pre- and post-intervention. Group × time interactions revealed a significantly stronger increase over time in perceived health (SF-36) for the treatment group, including vitality, bodily pain and social functioning. Interactions were also seen for HRV during relaxation and reactivity to stress. The present pilot study indicates improvement in perceived health over a 10 week intervention with HRV-biofeedback in subjects with chronic neck-pain. Increased resting HRV as well as enhanced reactivity to hand grip and cold pressor tests might reflect beneficial effects on ANS regulation, and suggest that this intervention protocol is suitable for a larger controlled trial.

  10. Importance of psychological factors for the recovery from a first episode of acute non-specific neck pain - a longitudinal observational study

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Background The influence of psychological factors on acute neck pain is sparsely studied. In a secondary analysis of prospectively collected data, this study investigated how several psychological factors develop in the first three months of acute neck pain and how these factors influence self-perceived recovery. Methods Patients were recruited in various chiropractic practices throughout Switzerland between 2010 and 2014. The follow-up telephone interviews were conducted for all patients by ...

  11. Effectiveness of behavioural graded activity compared with physiotherapy treatment in chronic neck pain: design of a randomised clinical trial [ISRCTN88733332

    OpenAIRE

    2004-01-01

    Abstract Background Chronic neck pain is a common complaint in the Netherlands with a point prevalence of 14.3%. Patients with chronic neck pain are often referred to a physiotherapist and, although many treatments are available, it remains unclear which type of treatment is to be preferred. The objective of this article is to present the design of a randomised clinical trial, Ephysion, which examines the clinical and cost effectiveness of behavioural graded activity compared with a physiothe...

  12. The effectiveness of cervical adjustment therapy, dry needling of the levator scapulae muscle and the combination of the two in the treatment of chronic mechanical neck pain

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    M.Tech. The aim of this study was to compare the effectiveness of cervical adjustment therapy, dry needling of the levator scapulae muscle and a combination of the two in the treatment of chronic mechanical neck pain. Forty-five patients were recruited via posters and advertisements from in and around the University of Johannesburg. The participants had to present with bilateral neck pain, decreased range of motion and an active levator scapulae muscles trigger point, which was diagnosed u...

  13. Reliability and group differences in quantitative cervicothoracic measures among individuals with and without chronic neck pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahidi Bahar

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Clinicians frequently rely on subjective categorization of impairments in mobility, strength, and endurance for clinical decision-making; however, these assessments are often unreliable and lack sensitivity to change. The objective of this study was to determine the inter-rater reliability, minimum detectable change (MDC, and group differences in quantitative cervicothoracic measures for individuals with and without chronic neck pain (NP. Methods Nineteen individuals with NP and 20 healthy controls participated in this case control study. Two physical therapists performed a 30-minute examination on separate days. A handheld dynamometer, gravity inclinometer, ruler, and stopwatch were used to quantify cervical range of motion (ROM, cervical muscle strength and endurance, and scapulothoracic muscle length and strength, respectively. Results Intraclass correlation coefficients for inter-rater reliability were significantly greater than zero for most impairment measures, with point estimates ranging from 0.45 to 0.93. The NP group exhibited reduced cervical ROM (P ≤ 0.012 and muscle strength (P ≤ 0.038 in most movement directions, reduced cervical extensor endurance (P = 0.029, and reduced rhomboid and middle trapezius muscle strength (P ≤ 0.049. Conclusions Results demonstrate the feasibility of obtaining objective cervicothoracic impairment measures with acceptable inter-rater agreement across time. The clinical utility of these measures is supported by evidence of impaired mobility, strength, and endurance among patients with NP, with corresponding MDC values that can help establish benchmarks for clinically significant change.

  14. The Variations of Torg Ratio with Gender in Patients with Neck Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Özlen Karabulut

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The Torg Ratio which may help to identify patients at risk for cervical spine cord injuries is an indicator of cervical canal stenosis determined by dividing the sagittal spinal canal diameter by the corresponding sagittal vertebral-body diameter. It was reported that male and female subjects showed differences in previous studies. The aim of this study was to investigate these differences. Our study that included the subjects 45 women and 45 men with neck pain was carried out at Diyarbakır State Hospital. The mean ages of male and female participants were 30 and 33. We measured both diaemeters on the lateral radiographs of the cervical spine in mm by using a Vernier Calipper. Women had smaller sagittal spinal canal and vertebral body diameters at all levels. The narrowest sagittal spinal canal diameters measured were at C4 level in men and at C2 level in women. The mean Torg Ratio was 0.73 at C4 in men and 0.80 at C2 in women. We found larger Torg Ratios in females at all cervical vertebral levels except C2 level.

  15. Intravenous paracetamol infusion: Superior pain management and earlier discharge from hospital in patients undergoing palliative head-neck cancer surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saikat Majumdar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Paracetamol; a cyclooxygenase inhibitor; acts through the central nervous system as well as serotoninergic system as a nonopioid analgesic. A prospective, double-blinded, and randomized-controlled study was carried out to compare the efficacy of preoperative 1g intravenous (iv paracetamol with placebo in providing postoperative analgesia in head-neck cancer surgery. Materials and Methods: From 2008 February to 2009 December, 80 patients for palliative head-neck cancer surgery were randomly divided into (F and (P Group receiving ivplacebo and iv paracetamol, respectively, 5 min before induction. Everybody received fentanyl before induction and IM diclofenac for pain relief at8 hourly for 24 h after surgery. Visual analogue scale (VAS and amount of fentanyl were measured for postoperative pain assessment (24 h. Results and Statistical analysis: The mean VAS score in 1 st , 2 nd postoperative hour, and fentanyl requirement was less and the need for rescue analgesic was delayed in ivparacetamol group which were all statistically significant. Paracetamol group had a shorter surgical intensive care unit (SICU and hospital stay which was also statistically significant. Conclusion: The study demonstrates the effectiveness of ivparacetamol as preemptive analgesic in the postoperative pain control after head-neck cancer surgery and earlier discharge from hospital.

  16. The Brief Illness Perceptions Questionnaire identifies 3 classes of people seeking rehabilitation for mechanical neck pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, David M; Lefebvre, Andy; Reynolds, Darcy

    2015-06-01

    Illness representations pertain to the ways in which an individual constructs and understands the experience of a health condition. The Brief Illness Perceptions Questionnaire (BIPQ) comprises 9 items intended to capture the key components of the Illness Representations Model. The purpose of this paper was to explore the utility of the BIPQ for evaluating and classifying uncomplicated mechanical neck pain in the rehabilitation setting. A convenience sample of 198 subjects presenting to physiotherapy for neck pain problems were used in this study. In the first step, 183 subjects completed the BIPQ and a series of related cognitive measures. Latent class analysis (LCA) was used to explore the number of identifiable classes amongst the sample based on BIPQ response patterns. A regression equation was created to facilitate classification. In the second step, an independent sample of 15 subjects were classified using the equation established in step 1, and they were followed over a 3 month period. The LCA revealed 3 classes of subjects with optimal fit statistics: mildly affected, moderately affected, and severely affected. Inter-group comparisons of the secondary cognitive measures supported these labels. Classification accuracy of a regression equation was high (94.5%). Applying the equation to the independent longitudinal sample revealed that it functioned equally well and that the classes may have prognostic value. The BIPQ may be a useful clinical tool for classification of neck pain.

  17. The Effect of Traditional Cupping on Pain and Mechanical Thresholds in Patients with Chronic Nonspecific Neck Pain: A Randomised Controlled Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romy Lauche

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Cupping has been used since antiquity in the treatment of pain conditions. In this pilot study, we investigated the effect of traditional cupping therapy on chronic nonspecific neck pain (CNP and mechanical sensory thresholds. Methods. Fifty CNP patients were randomly assigned to treatment (TG, n=25 or waiting list control group (WL, n=25. TG received a single cupping treatment. Pain at rest (PR, pain related to movement (PM, quality of life (SF-36, Neck Disability Index (NDI, mechanical detection (MDT, vibration detection (MDT, and pressure pain thresholds (PPT were measured before and three days after a single cupping treatment. Patients also kept a pain and medication diary (PaDi, MeDi during the study. Results. Baseline characteristics were similar in the two groups. After cupping TG reported significantly less pain (PR: −17.9 mm VAS, 95%CI −29.2 to −6.6; PM: −19.7, 95%CI −32.2 to −7.2; PaDi: −1.5 points on NRS, 95%CI −2.5 to −0.4; all P<0.05 and higher quality of life than WL (SF-36, Physical Functioning: 7.5, 95%CI 1.4 to 13.5; Bodily Pain: 14.9, 95%CI 4.4 to 25.4; Physical Component Score: 5.0, 95%CI 1.4 to 8.5; all P<0.05. No significant effect was found for NDI, MDT, or VDT, but TG showed significantly higher PPT at pain-areas than WL (in lg(kPa; pain-maximum: 0.088, 95%CI 0.029 to 0.148, pain-adjacent: 0.118, 95%CI 0.038 to 0.199; both P<0.01. Conclusion. A single application of traditional cupping might be an effective treatment for improving pain, quality of life, and hyperalgesia in CNP.

  18. Validity of the neck disability index, Northwick Park neck pain questionnaire, and problem elicitation technique for measuring disability associated with whiplash-associated disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoving, Jan Lucas; O'Leary, Elizabeth F; Niere, Ken R; Green, Sally; Buchbinder, Rachelle

    2003-04-01

    The Neck Disability Index (NDI) and Northwick Park Neck Pain Questionnaire (NPQ) were developed to measure self-perceived disability from neck pain, including that which may arise from whiplash injury. However, there is little data specifically concerning their validity for whiplash-associated disorders (WAD). The aim of this study was to assess the validity of the NDI and NPQ as measures of outcome in WAD by comparing them to a patient preference questionnaire, the problem elicitation technique (PET), which identifies problems that are of most importance to the individual patient. A cross-sectional study of 71 patients with varying severity and duration of WAD were recruited from a private physiotherapy practice. All patients completed a standardized self-administered questionnaire that included demographic and clinical details as well as self-perceived pain and severity of symptoms, NDI and NPQ. A trained interviewer administered the PET. Construct validity of the disability measures was examined by determining their correlation with each other and with pain and severity of symptoms by calculating Pearson's correlation coefficients. Content validity of the NDI and NPQ was assessed by comparing the items of both questionnaires to the problems identified by the PET. Participants' mean age was 40.1 years (SD=14.3) and 59 were women (83.1%). Most patients were in WAD category I (n=23, 32.1%), or II (n=42, 59.2%). Mean NDI, NPQ, and PET scores were 40.7 (SD=17.0), 38.7 (SD=15.8), and 160.2 (SD=92.0, range 6.0-509.5), respectively. Correlations between the NDI and PET, NPQ and PET, and NDI and NPQ were r=0.57, 0.56 and 0.88, respectively. The PET identified an average of 7.7 problems per patient (SD=4.2, range 1-17 problems). Problems most commonly identified were work for wages (52.1%), fatigued during the day (50.7%), participation in sports (47.9%), depression (43.7%), drive a car (43.7%), socialize with friends (33.8%), sleep through the night (31.0%), frustration

  19. Fluoroscopic caudal epidural injections in managing chronic axial low back pain without disc herniation, radiculitis, or facet joint pain

    OpenAIRE

    Manchikanti L; Cash KA; McManus CD; Pampati V

    2012-01-01

    Laxmaiah Manchikanti,1,2 Kimberly A Cash,1 Carla D McManus,1 Vidyasagar Pampati11Pain Management Center of Paducah, Paducah, 2Department of Anesthesiology and Perioperative Medicine, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY, USABackground: Chronic low back pain without disc herniation is common. Various modalities of treatments are utilized in managing this condition, including epidural injections. However, there is continued debate on the effectiveness, indications, and medical necessity of ...

  20. Immediate and short-term effects of the combination of dry needling and percutaneous TENS on post-needling soreness in patients with chronic myofascial neck pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose V. León-Hernández

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Background Dry needling (DN and percutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (PENS are widely used techniques in the treatment of myofascial pain. Objective To investigate the immediate and short-term effects of the combination of DN and PENS compared to DN alone on the upper trapezius muscle. Method This is a 72-hour follow-up single-blinded randomized controlled trial. Sixty-two volunteer patients with chronic myofascial neck pain with active Myofascial Trigger Points (MTrPs in the upper trapezius muscle were recruited. Randomization was performed, and 31 patients received DN treatment (DN group and 31 received DN and PENS (DN+PENS group. The primary outcomes were neck disability index (NDI and visual analog scale for pain for both post-needling soreness (PNS and neck pain intensity (NPI. Pressure pain threshold (PPT and cervical range of motion (CROM were the secondary outcomes. Results We detected between-group differences in NPI and PNS in favor of the DN+PENS group immediately after treatment. No between-group differences in NDI were observed. Conclusion PENS application after dry needling treatment is more effective than dry needling alone for decreasing soreness in the short term and improving neck pain intensity immediately in patients with myofascial chronic neck pain.

  1. In a secondary care setting, differences between neck pain subgroups classified using the Quebec task force classification system were typically small

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Hanne; Kent, Peter; Kjaer, Per

    2015-01-01

    and patients with NP + NRI had experienced the largest improvements in pain intensity. Similar results were obtained for activity limitation. CONCLUSIONS: This study found baseline and outcome differences between neck pain subgroups classified using the Quebec Task Force Classification System. However......BACKGROUND: The component of the Quebec Task Force Classification System that subgroups patients based on the extent of their radiating pain and neurological signs has been demonstrated to have prognostic implications for patients with low back pain but has not been tested on patients with neck...... collected, routine clinical data. Patients were classified into Local NP only, NP + arm pain above the elbow, NP + arm pain below the elbow, and NP with signs of nerve root involvement (NP + NRI). Outcome was pain intensity and activity limitation. Associations were tested in longitudinal linear mixed...

  2. Usefulness of K-Point Injection for the Nonspecific Neck Pain in So-Called K-Point Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Jeong Jae; Ahn, Hyo Sae; Lee, Sung Jun; Lee, Dong Yeol

    2016-01-01

    Background Shoichi Kokubun introduced his successful experience with local anesthetic injection at the occipital insertion of the sternocleidomastoid muscle in K-point syndrome. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the short-term and long-term effectiveness of K-point injection and investigate factors affecting treatment results. Methods K-point injection was performed in 58 patients with K-point syndrome at Yeungnam University Medical Center. The syndrome was associated with cervical whiplash injury in 10 patients and was of nonspecific origin in the rest. One milliliter of 2% lidocaine mixed with 1 milliliter of dexamethasone was injected in 50 patients and 2 milliliters of 1% lidocaine alone in the rest. Initially, the severity of local tenderness at the K-point and other tender points was examined and the degree of immediate pain relief effect was assessed within 1 hour after injection. Early effect within 1 month after the injection and current effect were evaluated in 27 patients using a modified Kim's questionnaire with regard to the duration of improvement, degree of improvement in pain and daily living activities, and satisfaction. Results Of the total 58 patients, 44 (75.8%) apparently had immediate pain relief after K-point injection. The only factor associated with successful immediate pain relief was the whiplash injury associated with traffic accident (TA). The early pain control effect was associated with the immediate effect. The current effect was associated with the early effect alone. Satisfaction with the K-point injection was related to early successful pain relief. Conclusions K-point injection would be useful for early pain relief in nonspecific neck pain syndrome so called K-point syndrome, but not for current pain relief. Especially, it was very effective for early pain control in the whiplash injury associated with TA. PMID:27904721

  3. Inter-therapist agreement in classifying patients with cervical radiculopathy and patients with non-specific neck-arm pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tampin, Brigitte; Briffa, Noelle Kathryn; Hall, Toby; Lee, Gabriel; Slater, Helen

    2012-10-01

    Identification of differences in clinical presentation and underlying pain mechanisms may assist the classification of patients with neck-arm pain which is important for the provision of targeted best evidence based management. The aim of this study was to: (i) assess the inter-examiner agreement in using specific systems to classify patients with cervical radiculopathy and patients with non-specific neck-arm pain associated with heightened nerve mechanosensitivity (NSNAP); (ii) assess the agreement between two clinical examiners and two clinical experts in classifying these patients, and (iii) assess the diagnostic accuracy of the two clinical examiners. Forty patients with unilateral neck-arm pain were examined by two clinicians and classified into (i) cervical radiculopathy, (ii) NSNAP, (iii) other. The classifications were compared to those made independently by two experts, based on a review of patients' clinical assessment notes. The experts' opinion was used as the reference criterion to assess the diagnostic accuracy of the clinical examiners in classifying each patient group. There was an 80% agreement between clinical examiners, and between experts and 70%-80% between clinical examiners and experts in classifying patients with cervical radiculopathy (kappa between 0.41 and 0.61). Agreement was 72.5%-80% in classifying patients with NSNAP (kappa between 0.43 and 0.52). Clinical examiners' diagnostic accuracy was high (radiculopathy: sensitivity 79%-84%; specificity 76%-81%; NSNAP: sensitivity 78%-100%; specificity 71%-81%). Compared to expert opinion, clinicians were able to identify patients with cervical radiculopathy and patients with NSNAP in 80% of cases, our data supporting the reliability of these classification systems.

  4. Stay@Work : Participatory Ergonomics to prevent low back and neck pain among workers : Design of a randomised controlled trial to evaluate the (cost-)effectiveness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Driessen, M.T.; Anema, J.R.; Proper, K.I.; Bongers, P.M.; Beek, A.J.van der

    2008-01-01

    Background. Low back pain (LBP) and neck pain (NP) are a major public health problem with considerable costs for individuals, companies and society. Therefore, prevention is imperative. The Stay@Work study investigates the (cost-)effectiveness of Participatory Ergonomics (PE) to prevent LBP and NP a

  5. The influence of age, gender, lifestyle factors and sub-clinical neck pain on the cervical flexion-rotation test and cervical range of motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Kenric; Hall, Toby; Robinson, Kim

    2008-12-01

    The flexion-rotation test (FRT) is commonly used when assessing cervicogenic headache. Additionally, active range of motion (AROM) is frequently used to evaluate impairment in neck pain. No studies have investigated the interaction of the FRT and AROM with age, gender, pain and lifestyle factors. The purpose of this study was to determine the influence of these factors on the FRT and cervical AROM. A group of 66 participants (aged 20-78) were studied, 28 experienced sub-clinical neck pain (recurrent neck pain or discomfort which has not received treatment from a healthcare professional) while 38 did not. Age, gender, lifestyle factors and sub-clinical neck pain were assessed using a questionnaire. Measurement of AROM was performed by two examiners blind to the results of the questionnaire. Multiple linear regression analysis found that 59% of the variance in the FRT was explained by the presence of sub-clinical pain and cervical lateral flexion measures. Secondly, 58-72% of the variance in active cervical ROM measures was influenced by factors including the FRT, gender and movements of the neck in other planes. This study found that lifestyle factors do not influence the cervical FRT and AROM.

  6. Efficacy and safety of Myofascial-meridian Release Acupuncture (MMRA) for chronic neck pain: a study protocol for randomized, patient- and assessor-blinded, sham controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Seunghoon; Nam, Dongwoo; Leem, Jungtae; Han, Gajin; Lee, Seungmin; Lee,Junhee

    2016-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study is to evaluate the efficacy and safety of myofascial-meridian release acupuncture (MMRA) in the treatment of chronic neck pain compared with sham acupuncture. Methods/design A protocol for a randomized, patient- and assessor-blinded, sham controlled parallel trial is presented. Seventy-four participants with a ≥3 month history of neck pain and a score of ≥4 on the 11-point pain intensity numerical rating scale (PI-NRS) will be randomly assigned to the MMRA...

  7. A cross-sectional study of self-reported back and neck pain among English schoolchildren and associated physical and psychological risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Sam; Buckle, Peter; Stubbs, David

    2007-11-01

    This study set out to identify the associations between ergonomics and other factors with back and neck pain among schoolchildren. Self-reported questionnaires were used to record health outcomes and potential risk factors in state schools. Six hundred and seventy-nine schoolchildren from Surrey in the United Kingdom aged 11-14 years took part. Twenty-seven percent of children reported having neck pain, 18% reported having upper back pain, and 22% reported having low back pain. A forward stepwise logistic regression was performed with pain categories the dependent variables. Neck pain was significantly associated with school furniture features, emotional and conduct problems, family history of low back pain and previous treatment for musculoskeletal disorders. Upper back pain was associated with school bag weight (3.4-4.45 kg), school furniture features, emotional problems and previous treatment for musculoskeletal disorders. Low back pain was associated with school furniture features, emotional problems, family history and previous injury or accident. It is important to recognise the influence of physical, psychological and family factors in children's pain.

  8. CO-OCCURRENCE OF CHRONIC HEAD, FACE AND NECK PAIN, AND DEPRESSION IN WAR VETERANS WITH POST-TRAUMATIC STRESS DISORDER.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhvić-Urek, Miranda; Vukšić, Željka; Simonić-Kocijan, Sunčana; Braut, Vedrana; Braut, Alen; Uhač, Ivone

    2015-09-01

    This study investigated the relationship between chronic head, face and neck pain, and the level of depression in Croatian war veterans with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The presence of self-reported pain, pain on digital palpation, and pain severity in masticatory and neck muscles, temporomandibular joints and sinuses, as well as the level of depression were assessed in a group of war veterans with PTSD (n=52). Control groups consisted of war veterans without PTSD (n=50) and healthy men that were not engaged in war actions and were free from PTSD (n=50). The number of self-reported pain and number of painful sites were correlated with the level of depression. More self-reported pain and painful sites were recorded in the group of war veterans with PTSD as compared with either war veterans without PTSD or healthy men. Furthermore, PTSD patients mostly suffered from severe depression. There was a statistically significant positive correlation between all investigated pain parameters and level of depression. As the most important finding, the present study demonstrated chronic head, face and neck pain to be related to depression in PTSD patients.

  9. Classification of neck/shoulder pain in epidemiological research: a comparison of personal and occupational characteristics, disability, and prognosis among 12,195 workers from 18 countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarquis, Leila M M; Coggon, David; Ntani, Georgia; Walker-Bone, Karen; Palmer, Keith T; Felli, Vanda E; Harari, Raul; Barrero, Lope H; Felknor, Sarah A; Gimeno, David; Cattrell, Anna; Vargas-Prada, Sergio; Bonzini, Matteo; Solidaki, Eleni; Merisalu, Eda; Habib, Rima R; Sadeghian, Farideh; Kadir, M Masood; Warnakulasuriya, Sudath S P; Matsudaira, Ko; Nyantumbu, Busisiwe; Sim, Malcolm R; Harcombe, Helen; Cox, Ken; Marziale, Maria H; Harari, Florencia; Freire, Rocio; Harari, Natalia; Monroy, Magda V; Quintana, Leonardo A; Rojas, Marianela; Harris, E Clare; Serra, Consol; Martinez, J Miguel; Delclos, George; Benavides, Fernando G; Carugno, Michele; Ferrario, Marco M; Pesatori, Angela C; Chatzi, Leda; Bitsios, Panos; Kogevinas, Manolis; Oha, Kristel; Freimann, Tiina; Sadeghian, Ali; Peiris-John, Roshini J; Sathiakumar, Nalini; Wickremasinghe, A Rajitha; Yoshimura, Noriko; Kelsall, Helen L; Hoe, Victor C W; Urquhart, Donna M; Derrett, Sarah; McBride, David; Herbison, Peter; Gray, Andrew; Salazar Vega, Eduardo J

    2016-05-01

    To inform case definition for neck/shoulder pain in epidemiological research, we compared levels of disability, patterns of association, and prognosis for pain that was limited to the neck or shoulders (LNSP) and more generalised musculoskeletal pain that involved the neck or shoulder(s) (GPNS). Baseline data on musculoskeletal pain, disability, and potential correlates were collected by questionnaire from 12,195 workers in 47 occupational groups (mostly office workers, nurses, and manual workers) in 18 countries (response rate = 70%). Continuing pain after a mean interval of 14 months was ascertained through a follow-up questionnaire in 9150 workers from 45 occupational groups. Associations with personal and occupational factors were assessed by Poisson regression and summarised by prevalence rate ratios (PRRs). The 1-month prevalence of GPNS at baseline was much greater than that of LNSP (35.1% vs 5.6%), and it tended to be more troublesome and disabling. Unlike LNSP, the prevalence of GPNS increased with age. Moreover, it showed significantly stronger associations with somatising tendency (PRR 1.6 vs 1.3) and poor mental health (PRR 1.3 vs 1.1); greater variation between the occupational groups studied (prevalence ranging from 0% to 67.6%) that correlated poorly with the variation in LNSP; and was more persistent at follow-up (72.1% vs 61.7%). Our findings highlight important epidemiological distinctions between subcategories of neck/shoulder pain. In future epidemiological research that bases case definitions on symptoms, it would be useful to distinguish pain that is localised to the neck or shoulder from more generalised pain that happens to involve the neck/shoulder region.

  10. CLASSIFICATION OF NECK/SHOULDER PAIN IN EPIDEMIOLOGICAL RESEARCH: A COMPARISON OF PERSONAL AND OCCUPATIONAL CHARACTERISTICS, DISABILITY AND PROGNOSIS AMONG 12,195 WORKERS FROM 18 COUNTRIES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarquis, Leila M M; Coggon, David; Ntani, Georgia; Walker-Bone, Karen; Palmer, Keith T; Felli, Vanda E; Harari, Raul; Barrero, Lope H; Felknor, Sarah A.; Gimeno, David; Cattrell, Anna; Vargas-Prada, Sergio; Bonzini, Matteo; Solidaki, Eleni; Merisalu, Eda; Habib, Rima R.; Sadeghian, Farideh; Kadir, M Masood; Warnakulasuriya, Sudath SP; Matsudaira, Ko; Nyantumbu, Busisiwe; Sim, Malcolm R; Harcombe, Helen; Cox, Ken; Marziale, Maria H; Harari, Florencia; Freire, Rocio; Harari, Natalia; Monroy, Magda V; Quintana, Leonardo A; Rojas, Marianela; Harris, E Clare; Serra, Consol; Martinez, J Miguel; Delclos, George; Benavides, Fernando G; Carugno, Michele; Ferrario, Marco M; Pesatori, Angela C; Chatzi, Leda; Bitsios, Panos; Kogevinas, Manolis; Oha, Kristel; Freimann, Tiina; Sadeghian, Ali; Peiris-John, Roshini J; Sathiakumar, Nalini; Wickremasinghe, A Rajitha; Yoshimura, Noriko; Kelsall, Helen L; Hoe, Victor C W; Urquhart, Donna M; Derrett, Sarah; McBride, David; Herbison, Peter; Gray, Andrew; Vega, Eduardo J. Salazar

    2016-01-01

    To inform case-definition for neck/shoulder pain in epidemiological research, we compared levels of disability, patterns of association and prognosis for pain that was limited to the neck or shoulders (LNSP) and more generalised musculoskeletal pain that involved the neck or shoulder(s) (GPNS). Baseline data on musculoskeletal pain, disability and potential correlates were collected by questionnaire from 12,195 workers in 47 occupational groups (mostly office workers, nurses, and manual workers) in 18 countries (response rate = 70%). Continuing pain after a mean interval of 14 months was ascertained through a follow-up questionnaire in 9,150 workers from 45 occupational groups. Associations with personal and occupational factors were assessed by Poisson regression and summarised by prevalence rate ratios (PRRs). The one-month prevalence of GPNS at baseline was much greater than that of LNSP (35.1% vs. 5.6%), and it tended to be more troublesome and disabling. Unlike LNSP, the prevalence of GPNS increased with age. Moreover, it showed significantly stronger associations with somatising tendency (PRR 1.6 vs. 1.3) and poor mental health (PRR 1.3 vs. 1.1); greater variation between the occupational groups studied (prevalence ranging from 0% to 67.6%) that correlated poorly with the variation in LNSP; and was more persistent at follow-up (72.1% vs. 61.7%). Our findings highlight important epidemiological distinctions between sub-categories of neck/shoulder pain. In future epidemiological research that bases case definitions on symptoms, it would be useful to distinguish pain which is localised to the neck or shoulder from more generalised pain that happens to involve the neck/shoulder region. PMID:26761390

  11. Effectiveness of the Gaze Direction Recognition Task for Chronic Neck Pain and Cervical Range of Motion: A Randomized Controlled Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Nobusako

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We developed a mental task with gaze direction recognition (GDR by which subjects observed neck rotation of another individual from behind and attempted to recognize the direction of gaze. A randomized controlled trial was performed in test (=9 and control (=8 groups of subjects with chronic neck pain undergoing physical therapy either with or without the GDR task carried out over 12 sessions during a three-week period. Primary outcome measures were defined as the active range of motion and pain on rotation of the neck. Secondary outcome measures were reaction time (RT and response accuracy in the GDR task group. ANOVA indicated a main effect for task session and group, and interaction of session. Post hoc testing showed that the GDR task group exhibited a significant simple main effect upon session, and significant sequential improvement of neck motion and relief of neck pain. Rapid effectiveness was significant in both groups. The GDR task group had a significant session-to-session reduction of RTs in correct responses. In conclusion, the GDR task we developed provides a promising rehabilitation measure for chronic neck pain.

  12. Stress-related psychological symptoms contribute to axial pain persistence after motor vehicle collision: path analysis results from a prospective longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feinberg, Rose K; Hu, JunMei; Weaver, Mark A; Fillingim, Roger B; Swor, Robert A; Peak, David A; Jones, Jeffrey S; Rathlev, Niels K; Lee, David C; Domeier, Robert M; Hendry, Phyllis L; Liberzon, Israel; McLean, Samuel A

    2017-04-01

    Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms and pain after traumatic events such as motor vehicle collision (MVC) have been proposed to be mutually promoting. We performed a prospective multicenter study that enrolled 948 individuals who presented to the emergency department within 24 hours of MVC and were discharged home after evaluation. Follow-up evaluations were completed 6 weeks, 6 months, and 1 year after MVC. Path analysis results supported the hypothesis that axial pain after MVC consistently promotes the maintenance of hyperarousal and intrusive symptoms, from the early weeks after injury through 1 year. In addition, path analysis results supported the hypothesis that one or more PTSD symptom clusters had an influence on axial pain outcomes throughout the year after MVC, with hyperarousal symptoms most influencing axial pain persistence in the initial months after MVC. The influence of hyperarousal symptoms on pain persistence was only present among individuals with genetic vulnerability to stress-induced pain, suggesting specific mechanisms by which hyperarousal symptoms may lead to hyperalgesia and allodynia. Further studies are needed to better understand the specific mechanisms by which pain and PTSD symptoms enhance one another after trauma, and how such mechanisms vary among specific patient subgroups, to better inform the development of secondary preventive interventions.

  13. Bariatric bypasses contribute to loss of bone mineral density but reduce axial back pain in morbidly obese patients considering spine surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, Nancy E.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Many spine surgeons recommend stringent weight loss, including bariatric bypass procedures, prior to “elective” spine surgery (should not be for axial back pain alone) in morbidly obese patients (defined by a body mass index (BMI) of >40 mg/kg2 or >35 mg/kg2 with two or more major comorbidities) to reduce their greater risk for major perioperative complications. Although bypasses typically lead to marked weight reduction and even reduced axial back pain, they also promote unrecognized and often insufficiently treated vitamin D deficiency and loss of bone mineral density. Methods: Morbidly obese patients who are under consideration for “elective” spine operations (other than for back pain alone) are often told to lose weight. Some choose to undergo bariatric bypass procedures, but are unaware of the potential risks/complications of these procedures. Results: Within the first 2 years following most bariatric bypass procedures, patients experience not only marked loss of weight and muscle mass, but also significant vitamin D deficiency and loss of bone mineral density, increasing their susceptibility to fractures. Nevertheless, some patients also experience a sufficient reduction of axial back pain to avoid spinal surgery. Conclusions: Morbidly obese patients under consideration for “elective” spine surgery may undergo bariatric bypass procedures that lead to a significant reduction of vitamin D levels and loss of bone mineral density. However, potential benefits may include a sufficient reduction of axial back pain to avoid surgery in a select subset of patients altogether. PMID:28217392

  14. Dosing study of massage for chronic neck pain: protocol for the dose response evaluation and analysis of massage [DREAM] trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sherman Karen J

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite the growing popularity of massage, its effectiveness for treating neck pain remains unclear, largely because of the poor quality of research. A major deficiency of previous studies has been their use of low “doses” of massage that massage therapists consider inadequate. Unfortunately, the number of minutes per massage session, sessions per week, or weeks of treatment necessary for massage to have beneficial or optimal effects are not known. This study is designed to address these gaps in our knowledge by determining, for persons with chronic neck pain: 1 the optimal combination of number of treatments per week and length of individual treatment session, and 2 the optimal number of weeks of treatment. Methods/design In this study, 228 persons with chronic non-specific neck pain will be recruited from primary health care clinics in a large health care system in the Seattle area. Participants will be randomized to a wait list control group or 4 weeks of treatment with one of 5 different dosing combinations (2 or 3 30-min treatments per week or 1, 2, or 3 60-min treatments per week. At the end of this 4-week primary treatment period, participants initially receiving each of the 5 dosing combinations will be randomized to a secondary treatment period of either no additional treatment or 6 weekly 60-min massages. The primary outcomes, neck-related dysfunction and pain, will be assessed by blinded telephone interviewers 5, 12, and 26 weeks post-randomization. To better characterize the trajectory of treatment effects, these interview data will be supplemented with outcomes data collected by internet questionnaire at 10, 16, 20 and 39 weeks. Comparisons of outcomes for the 6 groups during the primary treatment period will identify the optimal weekly dose, while comparisons of outcomes during the secondary treatment period will determine if 10 weeks of treatment is superior to 4 weeks. Discussion A broad dosing schedule

  15. Altered spinal kinematics and muscle recruitment pattern of the cervical and thoracic spine in people with chronic neck pain during functional task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsang, Sharon M H; Szeto, Grace P Y; Lee, Raymond Y W

    2014-02-01

    Knowledge on the spinal kinematics and muscle activation of the cervical and thoracic spine during functional task would add to our understanding of the performance and interplay of these spinal regions during dynamic condition. The purpose of this study was to examine the influence of chronic neck pain on the three-dimensional kinematics and muscle recruitment pattern of the cervical and thoracic spine during an overhead reaching task involving a light weight transfer by the upper limb. Synchronized measurements of the three-dimensional spinal kinematics and electromyographic activities of cervical and thoracic spine were acquired in thirty individuals with chronic neck pain and thirty age- and gender-matched asymptomatic controls. Neck pain group showed a significantly decreased cervical velocity and acceleration while performing the task. They also displayed with a predominantly prolonged coactivation of cervical and thoracic muscles throughout the task cycle. The current findings highlighted the importance to examine differential kinematic variables of the spine which are associated with changes in the muscle recruitment in people with chronic neck pain. The results also provide an insight to the appropriate clinical intervention to promote the recovery of the functional disability commonly reported in patients with neck pain disorders.

  16. The cancer pain related factors affected by celecoxib together with cetuximab in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yaqiong; Yan, Jia; Huang, Yan; Xu, Hui; Zhang, Ying; Hu, Rong; Jiang, Jue; Chen, Zhifeng; Jiang, Hong

    2015-03-01

    Pain is the most disruptive influence on the quality of prognosis among head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) patients. The development of pain is closely associated with tumor growth and inflammation in the cancer patients. Notably, cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) is an important mediator during inflammation. Celecoxib, a selective inhibitor of COX-2, was hailed as a promising chemopreventive agent for HNSCC. Dose-dependent cardiac toxicity limits long-term use of celecoxib. However, the toxicity can be diminished by lowering the dosage. In this study, we hypothesized that a combinatory strategy to reduce cancer pain via two distinct pathways, tumor grown inhibition and inflammation blockade, which would enhance analgesia effect induced by HNSCC. We found that treatment of cetuximab (C225), a monoclonal anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) antibody, with low-dose celecoxib results in a more pronounced anticancer effect in HNSCC than either agent alone. More noticeably, the combination could downregulate the phosphorylation of constitutively active extracellular signal regulated kinase (ERK) in CAL-27 and Fadu cells. Furthermore, combination therapy enhancing S phase arrest and downregulating cyclin D1 was observed in Fadu cells. The COX-2 expression was significantly blocked by celecoxib combined with C225, and other cancer pain related factors, such as ET-1 and NGF, was also downregulated by combination treatment. Taken together, these results strongly suggest that combination of celecoxib with C225 holds potential as a new therapy strategy in developing cancer pain treatment in HNSCC.

  17. Altered postural sway in patients suffering from non-specific neck pain and whiplash associated disorder - A systematic review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruhe Alexander

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Study design Systematic literature review. Objectives To assess differences in center of pressure (COP measures in patients suffering from non-specific neck pain (NSNP or whiplash-associated disorder (WAD compared to healthy controls and any relationship between changes in postural sway and the presence of pain, its intensity, previous pain duration and the perceived level of disability. Summary of Background data Over the past 20 years, the center of pressure (COP has been commonly used as an index of postural stability in standing. While several studies investigated COP excursions in neck pain and WAD patients and compared these to healthy individuals, no comprehensive analysis of the reported differences in postural sway pattern exists. Search methods Six online databases were systematically searched followed by a manual search of the retrieved papers. Selection Criteria Papers comparing COP measures derived from bipedal static task conditions on a force plate of people with NSNP and WAD to those of healthy controls. Data collection and analysis Two reviewers independently screened titles and abstracts for relevance. Screening for final inclusion, data extraction and quality assessment were carried out with a third reviewer to reconcile differences. Results Ten papers met the inclusion criteria. Heterogeneity in study designs prevented pooling of the data and no direct comparison of data across the studies was possible. Instead, a qualitative data analysis was conducted. There was broad consensus that patients with either type of neck pain have increased COP excursions compared to healthy individuals, a difference that was more pronounced in people with WAD. An increased sway in antero-posterior direction was observed in both groups. Conclusions Patients with neck pain (due to either NSNP or WAD exhibit greater postural instability than healthy controls, signified by greater COP excursions irrespective of the COP parameter chosen

  18. THE EFFECT OF PREEMPTIVE GABAPENTIN ON POSTOPERATIVE PAIN AND OPIOID REQUIREMENT FOLLOWING SURGERIES IN THE ANTERIOR PART OF THE NECK

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    Nikhil

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Acute postoperative pain has resulted in physiological and psychological disturbances. In spite of the spectacular advances in pain relief during surgery, relief of pain in the postoperative period still remains a problem. Here, we decided to study the effect of pre-emptive oral gabapentin on postoperative pain and opioid requirement. AIMS To evaluate the effect of pre-emptive gabapentin on postoperative pain and opioid requirement following surgeries in the neck area. To observe for the change in heart rate and blood pressure following surgery for 24 hrs. post-operatively. To observe for the incidence of nausea and vomiting. MATERIALS AND METHODS The patients selected for elective surgical procedures were randomly allocated into two groups, a control Group C and a gabapentin Group G of 30 members each. Patients in Group C received B-complex capsule orally as placebo 2 hours prior to surgery and those in Group B received gabapentin 300 mg orally 2 hours before surgery. After surgery, pain scores were assessed by a blinded person using visual analogue scale hourly for first 24 hours. Pethidine 1 mg/kg slow IV was given if pain score was 4 or more. Also adverse effects in the form of nausea and vomiting were documented. Statistical analysis of all the quantitative data was done by using the ‘Student’s unpaired t-test’ (e.g.: Mean Age, Vas Scores, Heart Rate, Systolic Blood Pressure, Diastolic Blood Pressure. Statistical analysis of all the qualitative data was done by using Chi ( 2 square test (e.g.: Gender, Nausea, Vomiting. Inter-group comparison of pethidine requirement was done using Mann-Whitney ‘u’ test (Z. RESULTS Patients in the gabapentin group had significantly lower VAS scores at all-time intervals of 0-6, 7-12, 13-18, 19-24 hours than those in the control group and it was statistically significant. Total pethidine requirement after surgery in the first 24 hours in the gabapentin group was (47±23.51 when

  19. Prevalence of persistent neck and upper limb pain in a historical cohort of sewing machine operators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, J H; Gaardboe, O

    1993-12-01

    Four hundred and twenty-four sewing machine operators from a historical cohort of garment industry workers answered questionnaires concerning musculoskeletal symptoms and job exposure. They were compared with 781 women from the general population of the region and an internal control group of 89 women from the garment industry. The risk for persistent neck and shoulder complaints increased with years of being a sewing machine operator: (up to seven years, eight to fifteen years, and more than fifteen years: prevalence proportion ratio 1.8, 3.5 and 4.4 [neck] and 1.5, 4 and 6.8 [shoulder] compared with the controls [n = 781]). The exposure-response relationships remained when adjusted for potential confounders, of which age, current shoulder-neck exposure, and child bearing were the most contributing. The study revealed that work for more than eight years as a sewing machine operator probably has a cumulative deleterious effect on the neck and shoulders.

  20. Effectiveness of home-based cupping massage compared to progressive muscle relaxation in patients with chronic neck pain--a randomized controlled trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romy Lauche

    Full Text Available UNLABELLED: Chronic neck pain is a major public health problem with very few evidence-based complementary treatment options. This study aimed to test the efficacy of 12 weeks of a partner-delivered home-based cupping massage, compared to the same period of progressive muscle relaxation in patients with chronic non-specific neck pain. Patients were randomly assigned to self-directed cupping massage or progressive muscle relaxation. They were trained and asked to undertake the assigned treatment twice weekly for 12 weeks. Primary outcome measure was the current neck pain intensity (0-100 mm visual analog scale; VAS after 12 weeks. Secondary outcome measures included pain on motion, affective pain perception, functional disability, psychological distress, wellbeing, health-related quality of life, pressure pain thresholds and adverse events. Sixty one patients (54.1±12.7 years; 73.8%female were randomized to cupping massage (n = 30 or progressive muscle relaxation (n = 31. After treatment, both groups showed significantly less pain compared to baseline however without significant group differences. Significant effects in favor of cupping massage were only found for wellbeing and pressure pain thresholds. In conclusion, cupping massage is no more effective than progressive muscle relaxation in reducing chronic non-specific neck pain. Both therapies can be easily used at home and can reduce pain to a minimal clinically relevant extent. Cupping massage may however be better than PMR in improving well-being and decreasing pressure pain sensitivity but more studies with larger samples and longer follow-up periods are needed to confirm these results. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01500330.

  1. Comparative short-term effects of two thoracic spinal manipulation techniques in subjects with chronic mechanical neck pain: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casanova-Méndez, Amaloha; Oliva-Pascual-Vaca, Angel; Rodriguez-Blanco, Cleofás; Heredia-Rizo, Alberto Marcos; Gogorza-Arroitaonandia, Kristobal; Almazán-Campos, Ginés

    2014-08-01

    Spinal Manipulation (SM) has been purported to decrease pain and improve function in subjects with non-specific neck pain. Previous research has investigated which individuals with non-specific neck pain will be more likely to benefit from SM. It has not yet been proven whether or not the effectiveness of thoracic SM depends on the specific technique being used. This double-blind randomized trial has compared the short-term effects of two thoracic SM maneuvers in subjects with chronic non-specific neck pain. Sixty participants were distributed randomly into two groups. One group received the Dog technique (n = 30), with the subject in supine position, and the other group underwent the Toggle-Recoil technique (n = 30), with the participant lying prone, T4 being the targeted area in both cases. Evaluations were made of self-reported neck pain (Visual Analogue Scale); neck mobility (Cervical Range of Motion); and pressure pain threshold at the cervical and thoracic levels (C4 and T4 spinous process) and over the site described for location of tense bands of the upper trapezius muscle. Measurements were taken before intervention, immediately afterward, and 20 min later. Both maneuvers improved neck mobility and mechanosensitivity and reduced pain in the short term. No major or clinical differences were found between the groups. In the between-groups comparison slightly better results were observed in the Toggle-Recoil group only for cervical extension (p = 0.009), right lateral flexion (p = 0.004) and left rotation (p < 0.05).

  2. A 9-year follow-up of a self-management group intervention for persistent neck pain in primary health care: a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavsson C

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Catharina Gustavsson,1,2 Lena von Koch1,3,4 1Center for Clinical Research Dalarna, Department of Public Health and Caring Science, Uppsala University, Uppsala, 2School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Dalarna University, Falun, 3Department of Neurobiology, Care Science and Society, Karolinska Institutet, 4Department of Neurology, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden Background and objective: In previous short-term and 2-year follow-ups, a pain and stress self-management group intervention (PASS had better effect on pain-related disability, self-efficacy, catastrophizing, and perceived pain control than individually administered physiotherapy (IAPT for patients with persistent tension-type neck pain. Studies that have evaluated long-term effects of self-management approaches toward persistent neck pain are sparse. The objective of this study was to compare pain-related disability, self-efficacy for activities of daily living (ADL, catastrophizing, pain, pain control, use of analgesics, and health care utilization in people with persistent tension-type neck pain 9 years after they received the PASS or IAPT. Materials and methods: Of 156 people (PASS, n = 77; IAPT, n = 79 originally included in a randomized controlled trial, 129 people (PASS, n = 63; IAPT, n = 66 were eligible and were approached for the 9-year follow-up. They were sent a self-assessment questionnaire, comprising the Neck Disability Index, the Self-Efficacy Scale, the Coping Strategies Questionnaire, and questions regarding pain, analgesics, and health care utilization. Mixed linear models for repeated measures analysis or generalized estimating equations were used to evaluate the differences between groups and within groups over time (baseline, previous follow-ups, and 9-year follow-up and the interaction effect of “time by group”. Results: Ninety-four participants (73% responded (PASS, n = 48; IAPT, n = 46. At 9 years, PASS participants reported less

  3. Syringomyelia and Arnold-Chiari malformation associated with neck pain and left arm radiculopathy treated with spinal manipulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tieppo Francio, Vinicius

    2014-11-09

    An 18-year-old female patient presented with left dominant neck pain after a motor vehicle collision. Her cervical spine MRI revealed syringomyelia with associated Type I Arnold-Chiari malformation. Some researchers have reported that these might be considered contraindications to spinal manipulation. Nevertheless, her benign and functional clinical examination suggested otherwise and she underwent four manipulative treatments in 2 weeks. By the end of the treatment plan and after 1-month follow-up, she was asymptomatic, no adverse effects were noted and her outcome assessment score decreased from 56% to 0%. This case illustrates that spinal manipulation may be a useful adjunctive treatment procedure for spinal pain, even in the presence of syringomyelia and Chiari malformation, which may not necessarily be a contraindication to spinal manipulation, when performed by a skilled and well-trained physician.

  4. Exploring the Causes of Neck Pain and Disability as Perceived by Those Who Experience the Condition: A Mixed-Methods Study

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Designing effective treatment protocols for neck-related disability has proven difficult. Disability has been examined from structural, emotional, and cognitive perspectives, with evidence supporting a multidimensional nature. The patient’s perspective of their condition has found increasing value for patient-centred, evidence-informed care. This cross-sectional study utilized descriptive thematic analysis to examine perceptions of causation in 118 people with neck pain. The Brief Illness Per...

  5. Development of a clinical prediction rule to identify patients with neck pain who are likely to benefit from home-based mechanical cervical traction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Congcong; Ming, Guan; Ng, Lih Yen

    2011-06-01

    The objective of the study was to identify the population of patients with neck pain who improved with home-based mechanical cervical traction (HMCT). A prospective cohort study was conducted in a physical therapy clinic at a local hospital. Patients with neck pain referred to the clinic for physical therapy were included in the study. A HMCT program was given to participants for 2 weeks. The patient's demographic data, Numerical Pain Scale (NPS) score, Neck Disability Index (NDI) and Fear-Avoidance Beliefs Questionnaire score were collected, and standard physical examination of the cervical spine was conducted before intervention. The NPS score, NDI and a global rating of perceived improvement were collected after the intervention was completed. A total of 103 patients participated in the study and 47 had a positive response to HMCT. A clinical prediction rule with four variables (Fear-Avoidance Beliefs Work Subscale score pain intensity ≥ 7/10, positive cervical distraction test and pain below shoulder) was identified. With satisfaction of at least three out of four variables (positive likelihood ratio = 4.77), the intervention's success rate increased from 45.6% to over 80%. It appears that patients with neck pain who are likely to respond to HMCT may be identified.

  6. Effectiveness of behavioural graded activity compared with physiotherapy treatment in chronic neck pain: design of a randomised clinical trial [ISRCTN88733332

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    Vos Cees J

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic neck pain is a common complaint in the Netherlands with a point prevalence of 14.3%. Patients with chronic neck pain are often referred to a physiotherapist and, although many treatments are available, it remains unclear which type of treatment is to be preferred. The objective of this article is to present the design of a randomised clinical trial, Ephysion, which examines the clinical and cost effectiveness of behavioural graded activity compared with a physiotherapy treatment for patients with chronic non-specific neck pain. Methods Eligible patients with non-specific neck pain persisting longer than 3 months will be randomly allocated to either the behavioural graded activity programme or to the physiotherapy treatment. The graded activity programme is based on an operant approach, which uses a time-contingent method to increase the patient's activity level. This treatment is compared with physiotherapy treatment using a pain-contingent method. Primary treatment outcome is the patient's global perceived effect concerning recovery from the complaint. Global perceived effect on daily functioning is also explored as primary outcome to establish the impact of treatment on daily activity. Direct and indirect costs will also be assessed. Secondary outcomes include the patient's main complaints, pain intensity, medical consumption, functional status, quality of life, and psychological variables. Recruitment of patients will take place up to the end of the year 2004 and follow-up measurement will continue until end 2005.

  7. A Rare Case of Parkinson's Disease with Severe Neck Pain Owing to Crowned Dens Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Background: Pain is regarded as one of the most common nonmotor symptoms in Parkinson's disease (PD). In particular, musculoskeletal pain has been reported as the most common type of PD-associated pain. Crowned dens syndrome (CDS), related to microcrystalline deposition in the periodontoid process, is the main cause of acute or chronic cervical pain. Case Presentation: This report describes the case of an 87-year-old woman who had severe bradykinesia, muscle rigidity, gait disturbance and nec...

  8. Inclusion of thoracic spine thrust manipulation into an electro-therapy/thermal program for the management of patients with acute mechanical neck pain: a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Iglesias, Javier; Fernández-de-las-Peñas, Cesar; Cleland, Joshua A; Alburquerque-Sendín, Francisco; Palomeque-del-Cerro, Luis; Méndez-Sánchez, Roberto

    2009-06-01

    Our aim was to examine the effects of a seated thoracic spine distraction thrust manipulation included in an electrotherapy/thermal program on pain, disability, and cervical range of motion in patients with acute neck pain. This randomized controlled trial included 45 patients (20 males, 25 females) between 23 and 44 years of age presenting with acute neck pain. Patients were randomly divided into 2 groups: an experimental group which received a thoracic manipulation, and a control group which did not receive the manipulative procedure. Both groups received an electrotherapy program consisting of 6 sessions of TENS (frequency 100Hz; 20min), superficial thermo-therapy (15min) and soft tissue massage. The experimental group also received a thoracic manipulation once a week for 3 consecutive weeks. Outcome measures included neck pain (numerical pain rate scale; NPRS), level of disability (Northwick Park Neck Pain Questionnaire; NPQ) and neck mobility. These outcomes were assessed at baseline and 1 week after discharge. A 2-way repeated-measures ANOVA with group as between-subject variable and time as within-subject variable was used. Patients receiving thoracic manipulation experienced greater reductions in both neck pain, with between-group difference of 2.3 (95% CI 2-2.7) points on a 11-NPRS, and perceived disability with between-group differences 8.5 (95% CI 7.2-9.8) points. Further, patients receiving thoracic manipulation experienced greater increases in all cervical motions with between-group differences of 10.6 degrees (95% CI 8.8-12.5 degrees) for flexion; 9.9 degrees (95% CI 8.1-11.7 degrees) for extension; 9.5 degrees (95% CI 7.6-11.4 degrees) for right lateral-flexion; 8 degrees (95% CI 6.2-9.8 degrees) for left lateral-flexion; 9.6 degrees (95% CI 7.7-11.6 degrees) for right rotation; and 8.4 degrees (95% CI 6.5-10.3 degrees) for left rotation. We found that the inclusion of a thoracic manipulation into an electrotherapy/thermal program was effective in

  9. [Myofascial pain syndrome--fascial muscle pain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partanen, Juhani; Ojala, Tuula; Arokoski, Jari P A

    2010-01-01

    Symptoms of myofascial pain syndrome, i.e. fascial muscle pain may occur in several areas of the body, particularly in the neck-shoulder region. The muscle pain symptom in the neck-shoulder region is commonly termed tension neck pain or nonspecific neck pain, but myofascial pain syndrome can also be distinguished into its own diagnosis. This review deals with the clinical picture of myofascial pain syndrome along with pathophysiological hypotheses and treatment options.

  10. Intelligent physical exercise at work: effect of supervision on motivation and reduction in neck-shoulder pain. Result from VIMS-study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gram, Bibi; Zebis, Mette Kreutzfeldt; Pedersen, Mogens Theisen;

    INTELLIGENT PHYSICAL EXERCISE AT WORK: EFFECT OF SUPERVISION ON MOTIVATION AND REDUCTION IN NECK-SHOULDER PAIN? RESULT FROM VIMS-STUDY. Gram B1,Zebis MK1, Pedersen MT2, Andersen LL3, Sjøgaard G1 1: Inst. of Sports Science and Clinical Biomechanics, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark 2....... Inst. of Exercise and Sport Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Denmark 3: National Research Centre for the Working Environment, Denmark Introduction It is well known that sedentary occupation with computer work is associated with development of pain in neck and shoulder. Studies have shown...... and neck/shoulder pain during a worksite physical exercise intervention. Method The study was conducted as a cluster randomized controlled trial in Denmark; study design is previously published (3). The participants were office workers and recruited from 12 different work units in Denmark. Three hundred...

  11. Neck/shoulder pain is more strongly related to depressed mood in adolescent girls than in boys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollock, C M; Harries, R L; Smith, A J; Straker, L M; Kendall, G E; O'Sullivan, P B

    2011-06-01

    A cross-sectional study of 1258, 14 year old girls and boys used self-report and physical examination measures to assess neck/shoulder pain in the last month, depressed mood, physical fitness, body composition, self-efficacy, global self-worth, family functioning and social advantage. The data was used to compare the relationship between depressed mood and neck/shoulder pain (NSP) in adolescent girls and boys. The prevalence of NSP in girls (34%, 211/621) was significantly greater than in boys (21%, 134/637; p < .001). After controlling for covariates, girls with medium (OR = 4.28; CI = 2.31-7.92; p < .001) and high depressed mood (OR = 8.63; CI = 4.39-16.98; p < .001) were significantly more likely to report NSP than girls with low depressed mood. Depressed mood was also a significant correlate of NSP in boys after controlling for covariates, although the association was substantially weaker (OR = 2.44; CI = 1.29-4.61; p < .001). After controlling for relevant biological, psychological and social covariates, depressed mood was a significant correlate of NSP in both sexes; but the association between depressed mood and NSP was significantly stronger for girls than for boys.

  12. Is one better than another?: A randomized clinical trial of manual therapy for patients with chronic neck pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izquierdo Pérez, Honorio; Alonso Perez, Jose Luis; Gil Martinez, Alfonso; La Touche, Roy; Lerma-Lara, Sergio; Commeaux Gonzalez, Noelia; Arribas Perez, Hector; Bishop, Mark D; Fernández-Carnero, Josue

    2014-06-01

    Our purpose was to compare the effectiveness of three manual therapy techniques: high velocity, low amplitude (HVLA), mobilization (Mob) and sustained natural apophyseal glide (SNAG) in patients with chronic neck pain (CNP). The randomized controlled trial included patients with mechanically reproducible CNP, who were randomized to the treatment group. Outcome measures were the Visual Analogue scale (VAS), Neck Disability Index (NDI), Global Rating of Change (GROC) and Cervical Range of Motion (CROM). Two-way repeated measures analysis of variance compared outcomes at baseline, at the end of treatment and 1, 2 and 3 months after treatment. A total of 51 subjects completed the trial. No significant differences were found between HVLA, Mob and SNAG at the end of treatment and during the follow-up in any of the analysed outcomes. There were no differences in satisfaction for all techniques. The results lead to the conclusion that there is no long-term difference between the application of HVLA, Mob and SNAG in pain, disability and cervical range of motion for patients with CNP.

  13. Cross-cultural adaptation of the Neck Disability Index and Copenhagen Neck Functional Disability Scale for patients with neck pain due to degenerative and discopathic disorders. Psychometric properties of the Polish versions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glowacki Maciej

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Even though there are several region-specific functional outcome questionnaires measuring neck disorders that have been developed in English-speaking countries, no Polish version has ever been validated. The purpose of our study was to translate, culturally adapt and validate the Neck Disability Index (NDI and Copenhagen Neck Functional Disability Scale (CDS for Polish-speaking patients with neck pain. Methods The translation was carried out according to the International Quality of Life Association (IQOLA Project. Sixty patients were treated due to degenerative and discopathic disorders in the cervical spine filled out the NDI-PL and the CDS-PL. The pain level was evaluated using the Visual Analog Scale. The mean age of the assessed group was 47.1 years (SD 8.9. We used Cronbach's alpha to assess internal consistency. We assessed the test-retest reliability using the Intraclass Correlation Coefficients (ICCs. The Spearman's rank correlation coefficient (rS was used to determine dependency between quantitative characteristics. The Mann-Whitney test was applied to determine dependency between quantitative and qualitative characteristics. Results The Cronbach's alpha values were excellent for the NDI-PL in the test and in the retest (0.84, 0.85, respectively, and for the CDS-PL (0.90 in the test and in the retest. Intraclass Correlation Coefficients were excellent for the CDS-PL and NDI-PL and equalled 0.93 (95% CI from 0.89 to 0.95 and 0.87 (95% CI from 0.80 to 0.92, respectively The concurrent validity was good in the test and in the retest (rs = 0.42 p Conclusions The present versions of the NDI-PL and CDS-PL, the first to be published in Polish, have proven to be reliable and valid for patients with degenerative changes in the cervical spine. The NDI-PL and CDS-PL have excellent internal consistency and test-retest reliability, and good concurrent validity. The adapted questionnaires showed a strong inter-correlation both

  14. Work-related neck pain among desk job workers of tertiary care hospital in New Delhi, India: Burden and determinants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surendra Babu Darivemula

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Work-related Neck Pain (WRNP is a leading cause of disability and absenteeism. There is dearth of information about burden and determinants of WRNP in health facility setting in India. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study was carried out at tertiary care hospital in New Delhi. All Group C desk job workers involved in the administrative work were included in the study. Participants were screened for WRNP by using pretested semi-structured questionnaire. Detailed information on probable risk factors was collected among patients with WRNP. Neck examination by trained investigator was done. Work place assessment was done by using observation check-list using the recommendations of the ISO Standard (Ergonomic requirements for office work with visual display terminals. Crude and adjusted odds ratio was calculated with 95% confidence interval to understand the determinants of WRNP. Results: In total, 441 participants were included in the study. Of them, 58% were males. Majority of participants aged between31-50 years. One-year prevalence of neck pain and WRNP was reported as 43.3%, (95% CI 38.7%-47.9% and 28.3%, (95% CI 24.3%-32.7% respectively. On multivariate analysis, female gender (OR-2.0 95% CI and poor perception of breaks during working hours (OR-2.4 95% CI, along with work place related factors such as posture (OR-5.4 95% CI and height of the screen (<10 cms (OR-2.6 were identified as independent determinants of WRNP. Conclusion: High one-year prevalence of WRNP was reported among desk job workers. Burden of WRNP was reported more among females as compared to males. Most common factor identified was Computer use for more than 4-6 hours was most important predictor of WRNP followed by work related factors such as height of screen and posture are associated with WRNP.

  15. Effect of Acupuncture Therapy on neck Pain Rehabilitation%中医针灸疗法对颈部疼痛康复的作用探析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    童兵

    2014-01-01

    目的:探究中医针灸疗法对颈部疼痛康复的治疗效果。方法选取2011~2012年来我院就治的49例由颈椎病而引发颈部疼痛的患者。对患者采用中医针灸疗法进行治疗,观察患者的治疗效果,并进行记录。结果经中医针灸治疗后,颈部疼痛感明显减轻。49例患者中,23例椎动脉型颈椎病患者中,18例患者颈部疼痛消失;12例交感神经型颈椎病患者中,10例颈部疼痛消失;14例脊髓型颈椎病患者中,11例颈部疼痛消失。结论在由颈椎病而引发颈部疼痛的患者临床治疗期间,采用中医针灸疗法进行治疗,可使患者的颈部疼痛感得到有效缓解,值得临床推广应用。%Objective To explore acupuncture therapy on neck pain rehabilitation treatment. Methods 2011~2012 came to our hospital for treatment of 49 cases of cervical disease caused by the neck pain patients. Acupuncture therapy for patients with treatment,patient outcomes observed and recorded. Results The patients after acupuncture treatment,neck pain was significantly reduced. Among them,23 cases of cervical vertebral artery disease in 18 patients with neck pain eased 12 cases of sympathetic cervical spondylosis in 10 patients with neck pain eased. 14 cases of patients with cervical myelopathy in 11 patients with neck pain eased. Conclusion Cervical spondylosis caused by neck pain during the clinical treatment of patients,the use of acupuncture therapy for patients with treatment of patients with neck pain can be effectively al eviated,worthy of clinical application.

  16. Psychopathology predicts the outcome of medial branch blocks with corticosteroid for chronic axial low back or cervical pain: a prospective cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tipirneni Naveen

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Comorbid psychopathology is an important predictor of poor outcome for many types of treatments for back or neck pain. But it is unknown if this applies to the results of medial branch blocks (MBBs for chronic low back or neck pain, which involves injecting the medial branch of the dorsal ramus nerves that innervate the facet joints. The objective of this study was to determine whether high levels of psychopathology are predictive of pain relief after MBB injections in the lumbar or cervical spine. Methods This was a prospective cohort study. Consecutive patients in a pain medicine practice undergoing MBBs of the lumbar or cervical facets with corticosteroids were recruited to participate. Subjects were selected for a MBB based on operationalized selection criteria and the procedure was performed in a standardized manner. Subjects completed the Brief Pain Inventory (BPI and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS just prior to the procedure and at one-month follow up. Scores on the HADS classified the subjects into three groups based on psychiatric symptoms, which formed the primary predictor variable: Low, Moderate, or High levels of psychopathology. The primary outcome measure was the percent improvement in average daily pain rating one-month following an injection. Analysis of variance and chi-square were used to analyze the analgesia and functional rating differences between groups, and to perform a responder analysis. Results Eighty six (86 subjects completed the study. The Low psychopathology group (n = 37 reported a mean of 23% improvement in pain at one-month while the High psychopathology group (n = 29 reported a mean worsening of -5.8% in pain (p Low group had at least 30% improvement in pain versus 10% in the High group (p Conclusion Psychiatric comorbidity is associated with diminished pain relief after a MBB injection performed with steroid at one-month follow-up. These findings illustrate the importance

  17. Exercise for the treatment of neck pain among military helicopter pilots and crew members

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Murray, Mike; Lange, Britt; Riebling Nørnberg, Bo

    +NVG). Electromyography (EMG) was conducted for: trapezius m. (TRA), upper neck extensors (UNE) and sternocleido-mastoid m. (SCM). EMG was normalized to Maximal Voluntary Contractions (MVC). Results: EMG in UNE (%MVC) was in general significantly higher than TRA and SCM, and significantly higher during SAR+NVG (pilots: 2...... targeting deep/superficial neck muscles (2). TheraBand® elastics as well as video instructions and training diaries were used. Discussion: Muscle activity was ~10% MVC in UNE and such sustained activity implies a high risk for developing disorders (3). An ongoing randomized controlled trial will evaluate...

  18. Which subgroups of patients with non-specific neck pain are more likely to benefit from spinal manipulation therapy, physiotherapy, or usual care?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schellingerhout, Jasper Mattijs; Verhagen, Arianne Petra; Heymans, Martinus Wilhelmus; Pool, Jan Jacobus Maria; Vonk, Frieke; Koes, Bart Willem; Wilhelmina de Vet, Henrica Cornelia

    2008-10-31

    The objective of this study is to identify subgroups of patients with non-specific neck pain who are more likely to benefit from either physiotherapy, spinal manipulation therapy, or usual care, on the short- and long-term. Data of three recently finished randomised controlled trials, with similar design and setting, were combined. The combined study population consisted of 329 patients with non-specific neck pain in an adult (18-70years) primary care population in the Netherlands. The primary outcome measure was global perceived recovery and was measured at the end of the treatment period and after 52 weeks of follow-up. Fourteen candidate variables were selected for the analysis. Predictors were identified by multivariable logistic regression analysis and were tested for interaction with treatment. Based on the multivariable models with interaction terms a decision model for treatment choice was developed. The analysis revealed three predictors for recovery of which the effect is modified by treatment: pain intensity (0-10 scale) in the short-term model, age and (no) accompanying low back pain in the long-term model. With these predictors a clinically relevant improvement in recovery rate (up to 25% improvement) can be established in patients receiving a tailored instead of a non-advised treatment. In conclusion we identified three characteristics that facilitate a deliberate treatment choice, to optimise benefit of treatment in patients with non-specific neck pain: age, pain intensity, and (no) accompanying low back pain.

  19. The relationship between superficial muscle activity during the cranio-cervical flexion test and clinical features in patients with chronic neck pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Leary, Shaun; Falla, Deborah; Jull, Gwendolen

    2011-10-01

    Changes in motor behavior are a known feature of chronic mechanical neck pain disorders. This study examined the strength of the association between reported levels of pain and disability from 84 individuals (63 women, 21 men) with chronic mechanical neck pain and levels of electromyographic activity recorded from superficial cervical flexor (sternocleidomastoid; SCM and anterior scalene; AS) muscles during progressive stages of the cranio-cervical flexion muscle test. A significant positive association was observed between superficial muscle activity and pain intensity (P 0.5) or perceived disability (P > 0.21). The strongest relationship between pain intensity and superficial muscle activity occurred at the final increment of the cranio-cervical flexion test (inner-range test position) for both the SCM and AS muscles (R(2) = 0.16). Although a positive and significant relationship between pain intensity and superficial muscle activity was shown, the relationship was only modest (16% explained variance), indicating that multiple factors contribute to the altered motor function observed in individuals with chronic mechanical neck pain.

  20. Lasting Effects of Workplace Strength Training for Neck/Shoulder/Arm Pain among Laboratory Technicians: Natural Experiment with 3-Year Follow-Up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Mortensen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. This study investigated long-term effects and implementation processes of workplace strength training for musculoskeletal disorders. Methods. 333 and 140 laboratory technicians from private and public sector companies, respectively, replied to a 3-year follow-up questionnaire subsequent to a 1-year randomized controlled trial (RCT with high-intensity strength training for prevention and treatment of neck, shoulder, and arm pain. Being a natural experiment, the two participating companies implemented and modified the initial training program in different ways during the subsequent 2 years after the RCT. Results. At 3-year follow-up the pain reduction in neck, shoulder, elbow, and wrist achieved during the first year was largely maintained at both companies. However, the private sector company was rated significantly better than the public sector company in (1 training adherence, (2 training culture, that is, relatively more employees trained at the workplace and with colleagues, (3 self-reported health changes, and (4 prevention of neck and wrist pain development among initially pain-free employees. Conclusions. This natural experiment shows that strength training can be implemented successfully at different companies during working hours on a long-term basis with lasting effects on pain in neck, shoulder, and arm.

  1. The construct validity of the Short Form-36 Health Survey for patients with nonspecific chronic neck pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vries, Grietje E; Jorritsma, Wim; Dijkstra, Pieter U; Geertzen, Jan H B; Reneman, Michiel F

    2015-06-01

    Self-reported disability related to neck pain can be measured using general health questionnaires. The validity of the Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36) in patients with nonspecific chronic neck pain (CNP) in a tertiary outpatient rehabilitation setting is unknown. This study investigates construct validity of the SF-36 in these patients using 16 a-priori formulated hypotheses. Ninety-one patients admitted for rehabilitation completed the SF-36 before the rehabilitation program. SF-36 domain scores of patients with CNP were compared with general population reference values and standardized differences were calculated. For both the SF-36 physical and the mental component summary (PCS and MCS), differences between primary and tertiary care setting, men and women, age groups, litigants and nonlitigants, patients with and without compensation, and with ≥3 versus≤2 concomitant complaints were analyzed using independent t-tests. Differences between PCS and MCS scores were analyzed using a paired t-test. Twelve hypotheses were not rejected and four were rejected. All SF-36 domain scores were significantly lower than the general population references values. The domain scores 'role physical', 'bodily pain', 'vitality', 'social functioning,' and 'role emotional' were relevantly (≥1 SD) lower. SF-36-PCS and SF-36-MCS scores were significantly lower in tertiary care. The SF-36-PCS score was significantly lower for patients with workers compensation and patients with at least three concomitant complaints. The SF-36-MCS score was significantly lower for the age group of at least 39 years. The SF-36 has good construct validity and can be used to measure self-reported general health in patients with nonspecific CNP in outpatient tertiary rehabilitation.

  2. Reproducibility of cervical range of motion in patients with neck pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Hoving (J.); J.J.M. Pool (Jan); H. van Mameren (Henk); W. Devillé (Walter); W.J.J. Assendelft (Willem); H.C. de Vet (Henrica C); A.F. de Winter (Andrea); B.W. Koes (Bart); L.M. Bouter (Lex)

    2005-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Reproducibility measurements of the range of motion are an important prerequisite for the interpretation of study results. The aim of the study is to assess the intra-rater and interrater reproducibility of the measurement of active Range of Motion (ROM) in patients with neck

  3. Measurement properties of disease-specific questionnaires in patients with neck pain: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.M. Schellingerhout (Jasper Mattijs); A.P. Verhagen (Arianne); M.W. Heymans (Martijn); B.W. Koes (Bart); H.C.W. de Vet (Henrica); C.B. Terwee (Caroline)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractPurpose: To critically appraise and compare the measurement properties of the original versions of neck-specific questionnaires. Methods: Bibliographic databases were searched for articles concerning the development or evaluation of the measurement properties of an original version of a

  4. Musculoskeletal neck-shoulder pain : a new ambulant myofeedback intervention approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voerman, Gerritje Evelien

    2007-01-01

    Persisting musculoskeletal complaints in the neck-shoulder region are highly prevalent and associated with high health care and community costs in industrialized countries. The mechanisms underlying the development and perpetuation of these complaints have not fully been identified yet, but explanat

  5. Atlanto-axial subluxation after pyogenic spondylitis of the atlanto-occipital joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsunoda, Kazuhiko; Iizuka, Haku; Sorimachi, Yasunori; Ara, Tsuyoshi; Nishinome, Masahiro; Takechi, Yasuhiko; Takagishi, Kenji

    2011-07-01

    This report presents a case of atlanto-axial subluxation after treatment of pyogenic spondylitis of the atlanto-occipital joint. A 60-year-old male had 1-month history of neck pain with fever. Magnetic resonance imaging showed inflammation around the odontoid process. Intravenous antibiotic therapy was administrated immediately. After 6 weeks, CRP had returned almost to normal. After 4 months, laboratory data was still normal, but the patient experienced increasing neck pain. Lateral cervical radiography in the neutral position showed instability between C1 and C2. Computed tomography showed a bony union of the atlanto-occipital joint and severe destruction of the atlanto-axial joint on the left side. Transarticular screw fixation for the atlanto-axial joint was performed. A lateral cervical radiograph in the neutral position after surgery showed a solid bony union. Neck pain improved following surgery. We speculate that spondylitis of the atlanto-occipital joint induced a loosening of the transverse ligament and articulation of the atlanto-axial joint. A bony fusion of the atlanto-occipital joint after antibiotic treatment resolved the pyogenic inflammation concentrated stress to the damaged atlanto-axial joint, resulting in further damage. The atlanto-axial instability was finally managed by the insertion of a transarticular screw.

  6. The influence of a series of five dry cupping treatments on pain and mechanical thresholds in patients with chronic non-specific neck pain - a randomised controlled pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dobos Gustav J

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In this preliminary trial we investigated the effects of dry cupping, an ancient method for treating pain syndromes, on patients with chronic non-specific neck pain. Sensory mechanical thresholds and the participants' self-reported outcome measures of pain and quality of life were evaluated. Methods Fifty patients (50.5 ± 11.9 years were randomised to a treatment group (TG or a waiting-list control group (WL. Patients in the TG received a series of 5 cupping treatments over a period of 2 weeks; the control group did not. Self-reported outcome measures before and after the cupping series included the following: Pain at rest (PR and maximal pain related to movement (PM on a 100-mm visual analogue scale (VAS, pain diary (PD data on a 0-10 numeric rating scale (NRS, Neck Disability Index (NDI, and health-related quality of life (SF-36. In addition, the mechanical-detection thresholds (MDT, vibration-detection thresholds (VDT, and pressure-pain thresholds (PPT were determined at pain-related and control areas. Results Patients of the TG had significantly less pain after cupping therapy than patients of the WL group (PR: Δ-22.5 mm, p = 0.00002; PM: Δ-17.8 mm, p = 0.01. Pain diaries (PD revealed that neck pain decreased gradually in the TG patients and that pain reported by the two groups differed significantly after the fifth cupping session (Δ-1.1, p = 0.001. There were also significant differences in the SF-36 subscales for bodily pain (Δ13.8, p = 0.006 and vitality (Δ10.2, p = 0.006. Group differences in PPT were significant at pain-related and control areas (all p Conclusions A series of five dry cupping treatments appeared to be effective in relieving chronic non-specific neck pain. Not only subjective measures improved, but also mechanical pain sensitivity differed significantly between the two groups, suggesting that cupping has an influence on functional pain processing. Trial registration The trial was registered at

  7. Multi-channel array EMG in chronic neck-shoulder pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kallenberg, Laura Anna Cornelia

    2007-01-01

    Chronic muscular pain has become an important problem, affecting a considerable part of the working population in the industrialised countries. Chronic muscular pain is a multifactorial problem and comprises a range of conditions that are not all clinically welldefined. Subjective symptoms include c

  8. External Validation of a Referral Rule for Axial Spondyloarthritis in Primary Care Patients with Chronic Low Back Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Hoeven, Lonneke; Vergouwe, Yvonne; de Buck, P. D. M.; Luime, Jolanda J.; Hazes, Johanna M. W.; Weel, Angelique E. A. M.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To validate and optimize a referral rule to identify primary care patients with chronic low back pain (CLBP) suspected for axial spondyloarthritis (axSpA). Design Cross-sectional study with data from 19 Dutch primary care practices for development and 38 for validation. Participants Primary care patients aged 18-45 years with CLBP existing more than three months and onset of back pain started before the age of 45 years. Main Outcome The number of axSpA patients according to the ASAS criteria. Methods The referral rule (CaFaSpA referral rule) was developed using 364 CLBP patients from 19 primary care practices and contains four easy to use variables; inflammatory back pain, good response to nonsteriodal anti-inflammatory drugs, family history of spondyloarthritis and a back pain duration longer than five years. This referral rule is positive when at least two variables are present. Validation of the CaFaSpA rule was accomplished in 579 primary care CLBP patients from 38 practices from other areas. Performance of the referral rule was assessed by c-statistic and calibration plot. To fit the final referral rule the development and validation datasets were pooled leading to a total study population of 943 primary care participants. Results The referral rule was validated in 579 patients (41% male, mean age 36 (sd7.0). The percentage of identified axSpA patients was 16% (n=95). External validation resulted in satisfactory calibration and reasonable discriminative ability (c-statistics 0.70 [95% CI, 0.64-0.75]). In the pooled dataset sensitivity and specificity of the referral rule were 75% and 58%. Conclusions The CaFaSpA referral rule for axSpA consists of four easy to use predictors for primary care physicians and has a good predictive value in this validation study. The referral rule has the potential to be a screening tool for primary care by identifying CLBP patients suspected for axSpA. PMID:26200904

  9. External Validation of a Referral Rule for Axial Spondyloarthritis in Primary Care Patients with Chronic Low Back Pain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lonneke van Hoeven

    Full Text Available To validate and optimize a referral rule to identify primary care patients with chronic low back pain (CLBP suspected for axial spondyloarthritis (axSpA.Cross-sectional study with data from 19 Dutch primary care practices for development and 38 for validation.Primary care patients aged 18-45 years with CLBP existing more than three months and onset of back pain started before the age of 45 years.The number of axSpA patients according to the ASAS criteria.The referral rule (CaFaSpA referral rule was developed using 364 CLBP patients from 19 primary care practices and contains four easy to use variables; inflammatory back pain, good response to nonsteriodal anti-inflammatory drugs, family history of spondyloarthritis and a back pain duration longer than five years. This referral rule is positive when at least two variables are present. Validation of the CaFaSpA rule was accomplished in 579 primary care CLBP patients from 38 practices from other areas. Performance of the referral rule was assessed by c-statistic and calibration plot. To fit the final referral rule the development and validation datasets were pooled leading to a total study population of 943 primary care participants.The referral rule was validated in 579 patients (41% male, mean age 36 (sd7.0. The percentage of identified axSpA patients was 16% (n=95. External validation resulted in satisfactory calibration and reasonable discriminative ability (c-statistics 0.70 [95% CI, 0.64-0.75]. In the pooled dataset sensitivity and specificity of the referral rule were 75% and 58%.The CaFaSpA referral rule for axSpA consists of four easy to use predictors for primary care physicians and has a good predictive value in this validation study. The referral rule has the potential to be a screening tool for primary care by identifying CLBP patients suspected for axSpA.

  10. Effects of a home-exercise therapy programme on cervical and lumbar range of motion among nurses with neck and lower back pain: a quasi-experimental study

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Background Cervical and lumbar range of motion limitations are usually associated with musculoskeletal pain in the neck and lower back, and are a major health problem among nurses. Physical exercise has been evaluated as an effective intervention method for improving cervical and lumbar range of motion, and for preventing and reducing musculoskeletal pain. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of a home-exercise therapy programme on cervical and lumbar range of motion among...

  11. Clinical feasibility of cervical exercise to improve neck pain, body function, and psychosocial factors in patients with post-traumatic stress disorder: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Seong Doo; Kim, Suhn Yeop

    2015-05-01

    [Purpose] To investigate the effect of cervical exercise on neck pain, disability, and psychosocial factors in patients with post-traumatic stress disorder. [Subjects] Thirty patients with post-traumatic stress disorder, who also complained of neck pain. [Methods] The cervical exercise group (n = 15) participated in cervical exercises for 30 min, 3 times/week for 6 weeks, and the control group (n = 16) underwent conventional physical therapy alone, without exercise. The exercises were performed in the following order: cervical relaxation, local muscle stabilization, and global muscle stabilization using a sling system. [Results] Compared to the control group, the cervical exercise group demonstrated significant decreases as follows: Visual analogue scale score, 4.2 vs. 1.0; Neck disability index, 3.9 vs. 1.9; and depression on the Symptom checklist-90-revised, 9.4 vs. 4.3 and on the Hopkins symptom checklist-25, 6.3 vs. 2.8. However, anxiety on the Symptom checklist-90-revised (3.1 vs. 1.3) was not significantly different. Effect sizes were as follows: Visual analogue scale score, 1.8; Neck disability index, 0.9; depression, 1.0; and anxiety on Symptom checklist-90-revised and Hopkins symptom checklist-25, 0.6 and 0.8, respectively. [Conclusion] Cervical exercise is effective in improving neck pain, disability, and efficacy of psychological treatment for depression in patients with post-traumatic stress disorder.

  12. The clinical effectiveness of a myofeedback-based teletreatment service in patients with non-specific neck and shoulder pain: A randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kosterink, Stephanie M.; Huis in 't Veld, Rianne M.H.A.; Cagnie, Barbara; Hasenbring, Monika; Vollenbroek-Hutten, Miriam M.R.

    2010-01-01

    We investigated the effectiveness and efficiency of a four-week myofeedback-based teletreatment service in subjects with non-specific neck and shoulder pain. Subjects were recruited in Belgium, Germany and the Netherlands and randomly allocated to the intervention or conventional care. Subjects in t

  13. Is an imbalance between physical capacity and exposure to work-related physical factors associated with low-back, neck or shoulder pain?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hamberg-Reenen, H.H. van; Ariëns, G.A.M.; Blatter, B.M.; Beek, A.J. van der; Twisk, J.W.R.; Mechelen, W. van; Bongers, P.M.

    2006-01-01

    Objectives: This study investigates whether an imbalance between physical capacity and exposure to work-related physical factors is associated with low-back, neck, or shoulder pain. Methods: Data of the longitudinal study on musculoskeletal disorders, absenteeism, stress, and health (SMASH), with a

  14. Indicating spinal joint mobilisations or manipulations in patients with neck or low-back pain: Protocol of an inter-examiner reliability study among manual therapists

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. van Trijffel (Emiel); R. Lindeboom (Robert); P.M.M. Bossuyt (Patrick); M.A. Schmitt (Maarten); C. Lucas (Cees); B.W. Koes (Bart); R.A. Oostendorp (Robert)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Manual spinal joint mobilisations and manipulations are widely used treatments in patients with neck and low-back pain. Inter-examiner reliability of passive intervertebral motion assessment of the cervical and lumbar spine, perceived as important for indicating these interve

  15. Altered alignment of the shoulder girdle and cervical spine in patients with insidious onset neck pain and whiplash-associated disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helgadottir, Harpa; Kristjansson, Eythor; Mottram, Sarah; Karduna, Andrew; Jonsson, Halldor

    2011-08-01

    Clinical theory suggests that altered alignment of the shoulder girdle has the potential to create or sustain symptomatic mechanical dysfunction in the cervical and thoracic spine. The alignment of the shoulder girdle is described by two clavicle rotations, i.e, elevation and retraction, and by three scapular rotations, i.e., upward rotation, internal rotation, and anterior tilt. Elevation and retraction have until now been assessed only in patients with neck pain. The aim of the study was to determine whether there is a pattern of altered alignment of the shoulder girdle and the cervical and thoracic spine in patients with neck pain. A three-dimensional device measured clavicle and scapular orientation, and cervical and thoracic alignment in patients with insidious onset neck pain (IONP) and whiplash-associated disorder (WAD). An asymptomatic control group was selected for baseline measurements. The symptomatic groups revealed a significantly reduced clavicle retraction and scapular upward rotation as well as decreased cranial angle. A difference was found between the symptomatic groups on the left side, whereas the WAD group revealed an increased scapular anterior tilt and the IONP group a decreased clavicle elevation. These changes may be an important mechanism for maintenance and recurrence or exacerbation of symptoms in patients with neck pain.

  16. The feasibility of a web-based counselling program for occupational physicians and employees on sick leave due to back or neck pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, T.; Heinrich, J.; Blatter, B.M.; Anema, J.R.; van der Beek, A.J.

    2009-01-01

    Background: The objective of this feasibility study was to gain insight into occupational physicians' (OPs) and employees' use of, and attitudes towards, 'Snelbeter' (Get Well Fast), a new web-based counselling program for employees on sick leave due to non-specific back or neck pain and their OPs.

  17. Effect of Training Supervision on Effectiveness of Strength Training for Reducing Neck/Shoulder Pain and Headache in Office Workers: Cluster Randomized Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bibi Gram

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To investigate the effect of workplace neck/shoulder strength training with and without regular supervision on neck/shoulder pain and headache among office workers. Method. A 20-week cluster randomized controlled trial among 351 office workers was randomized into three groups: two training groups with the same total amount of planned exercises three times per week (1 with supervision (3WS throughout the intervention period, (2 with minimal supervision (3MS only initially, and (3 a reference group (REF. Main outcome is self-reported pain intensity in neck and shoulder (scale 0–9 and headache (scale 0–10. Results. Intention-to-treat analyses showed a significant decrease in neck pain intensity the last 7 days in 3MS compared with REF: −0.5 ± 0.2 (P<0.02 and a tendency for 3WS versus REF: −0.4 ± 0.2 (P<0.07. Intensity of headache the last month decreased in both training groups: 3WS versus REF: −1.1 ± 0.2 (P<0.001 and 3MS versus REF: −1.1 ± 0.2 (P<0.001. Additionally, days of headache decreased 1.0 ± 0.5 in 3WS and 1.3 ± 0.5 in 3MS versus REF. There were no differences between the two training groups for any of the variables. Conclusion. Neck/shoulder training at the workplace reduced neck pain and headache among office workers independently of the extent of supervision. This finding has important practical implications for future workplace interventions.

  18. Psychological Care, Patient Education, Orthotics, Ergonomics and Prevention Strategies for Neck Pain: An Systematic Overview Update as Part of the ICON§ Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Anita R.; Kaplan, Faith; Huang, Stacey; Khan, Mahweesh; Santaguida, P. Lina; Carlesso, Lisa C.; MacDermid, Joy C.; Walton, David M.; Kenardy, Justin; Söderlund, Anne; Verhagen, Arianne; Hartvigsen, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To conduct an overview on psychological interventions, orthoses, patient education, ergonomics, and 1⁰/2⁰ neck pain prevention for adults with acute-chronic neck pain. Search Strategy: Computerized databases and grey literature were searched (2006-2012). Selection Criteria: Systematic reviews of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) on pain, function/disability, global perceived effect, quality-of-life and patient satisfaction were retrieved. Data Collection & Analysis: Two independent authors selected articles, assessed risk of bias using AMSTAR tool and extracted data. The GRADE tool was used to evaluate the body of evidence and an external panel to provide critical review. Main Results: We retrieved 30 reviews (5-9 AMSTAR score) reporting on 75 RCTs with the following moderate GRADE evidence. For acute whiplash associated disorder (WAD), an education video in emergency rooms (1RCT, 405participants] favoured pain reduction at long-term follow-up thus helping 1 in 23 people [Standard Mean Difference: -0.44(95%CI: -0.66 to -0.23)). Use of a soft collar (2RCTs, 1278participants) was not beneficial in the long-term. For chronic neck pain, a mind-body intervention (2RCTs, 1 meta-analysis, 191participants) improved short-term pain/function in 1 of 4 or 6 participants. In workers, 2-minutes of daily scapula-thoracic endurance training (1RCT, 127participants) over 10 weeks was beneficial in 1 of 4 participants. A number of psychosocial interventions, workplace interventions, collar use and self-management educational strategies were not beneficial. Reviewers' Conclusions: Moderate evidence exists for quantifying beneficial and non-beneficial effects of a limited number of interventions for acute WAD and chronic neck pain. Larger trials with more rigorous controls need to target promising interventions PMID:24133554

  19. Neck and Back Pain in Undergraduate Dental Students at a UK Dental School

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Objective Limited data exist on musculoskeletal problems within dental students: we aimed to determine the prevalence of these disorders. Design Single centre cross-sectional study Setting A UK Dental School 2015. Subjects (materials) and methods Students completed a modified Nordic pain questionnaire. Main outcome measures Self-reported frequency and severity of pain, fitness and coping strategies. Results 63% of 390 respondents were female and 75% aged under 23. Seventy-nine percent experie...

  20. Does a combination of physical training, specific exercises and pain education improve health-related quality of life in patients with chronic neck pain? A randomised control trial with a 4-month follow up

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ris Hansen, Inge; Søgaard, Karen; Gram, Bibi;

    2016-01-01

    anterior and cervical spine, Cranio-cervical Flexion, Cervical Extension muscle function, and oculomotion) were recorded at baseline and after 4 months. Results The exercise group showed statistically significant improvement in physical HR-QoL, mental HR-QoL, depression, cervical pressure pain threshold......Qol-5D, Beck Depression Inventory-II, Neck Disability Index, Pain Bothersomeness, Patient-Specific Functioning Scale, Tampa Scale of Kinesiophobia, Global Perceived Effect) and clinical tests (Aastrand Physical Fitness, cervical Range of Motion, Pressure Pain Threshold at infraspinatus, tibialis......, cervical extension movement, muscle function, and oculomotion. Per protocol analyses confirmed these results with additional significant improvements in the exercise group compared with controls. Conclusions This multimodal intervention may be an effective intervention for chronic neck pain patients...

  1. An educational and physical program to reduce headache, neck/shoulder pain in a working community: a cluster-randomized controlled trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franco Mongini

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Noninvasive physical management is often prescribed for headache and neck pain. Systematic reviews, however, indicate that the evidence of its efficacy is limited. Our aim was to evaluate the effectiveness of a workplace educational and physical program in reducing headache and neck/shoulder pain. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Cluster-randomized controlled trial. All municipal workers of the City of Turin, Italy, were invited to participate. Those who agreed were randomly assigned, according to their departments, to the intervention group (IG or to the control group and were given diaries for the daily recording of pain episodes for 1 month (baseline. Subsequently, only the IG (119 departments, 923 workers began the physical and educational program, whereas the control group (117 departments, 990 workers did not receive any intervention. All participants were again given diaries for the daily recording of pain episodes after 6 months of intervention. The primary outcome was the change in the frequency of headache (expressed as the proportion of subjects with a ≥50% reduction of frequency; responder rate; among the secondary outcomes there were the absolute reduction of the number of days per month with headache and neck/shoulder pain. Differences between the two groups were evaluated using mixed-effect regression models. The IG showed a higher responder rate [risk ratio, 95% confidence interval (CI] for headache (1.58; 1.28 to 1.92 and for neck/shoulder pain (1.53; 1.27 to 1.82, and a larger reduction of the days per month (95% CI with headache (-1.72; -2.40 to -1.04 and with neck/shoulder pain (-2.51; -3.56 to -1.47. CONCLUSIONS: The program effectively reduced headache and neck/shoulder pain in a large working community and appears to be easily transferable to primary-care settings. Further trials are needed to investigate the program effectiveness in a clinical setting, for highly selected patients suffering from specific

  2. Pressure pain sensitivity maps of the neck-shoulder and the low back regions in men and women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madeleine Pascal

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Musculoskeletal pain in the low back and neck-shoulder regions is a major problem among the working population all over the world. The prevalence of musculoskeletal pain is found to be higher among women. Women also have lower pressure pain thresholds (PPTs than men. Pressure pain topography aims at mapping the spatial distribution of PPT within a muscle in an attempt to track changes in mechanical sensitivity. In order to assess gender differences in the pain topography, it is necessary to map the distribution in both healthy men and women. The aim of this study was to assess PPT maps from the cervico-thoracic and lumbar regions in men and women. Methods Eleven men and eleven women without any known musculoskeletal disorders participated in the study. PPT was measured twice at 36 points over the trapezius muscle of the dominant arm, at 36 points over the trapezius muscle on the contralateral side and at 12 points over the spine between the left and right trapezius. Further, 11 points were measured over the erector spinae muscle on the left side of the spine between the first and the fifth lumbar vertebrae, 11 on the right side and 5 points on the spine itself. The measurements on each trapezius muscle were divided according to anatomical subdivisions. Three-way and two-way ANOVAs were used to analyse the differences in PPTs with the following factors: gender, locations and sub-divisions (only for cervico-thoracic region. Results There were no differences between left and right side in neither the cervico-thoracic nor the lumbar region, but there were (large effect differences between the subdivisions in the trapezius with the lowest values in the upper part (P 2 = 0.19. Women had (small effect lower PPT in both cervico-thoracic and lumbar regions (P ≤ 0.001; partial η2 = 0.02 for both regions, but gender had no effect on neither location nor subdivisions. Conclusions The pain topography was not found to be different

  3. Effect of neck muscle isometric contraction training on axial symptom postoperative of laminoplasty%颈部肌肉等长收缩训练对颈椎管扩大成形术后颈部轴性症状的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭永传; 张益宏; 马守战; 贾思明

    2016-01-01

    目的:探讨颈部肌肉等长收缩训练对颈椎管扩大成型术后轴性症状的影响作用。方法2011年7月至2013年7月收治符合纳入标准条件的患者100例,随机分组A、B组,均采用椎管扩大成型术式,术后3 d B组开始实施颈部肌肉等长收缩训练3个月,分两个阶段进行。术后随访1.5年,记录术后3个月、6个月、1年、1.5年4个时间点患者轴性症状的罹患率及疼痛程度VAS评分,并进行统计分析。结果术后随访3个月、6个月、1年、1.5年4个时间点,A、B两组患者轴性症状疼痛VAS评分及轴性症状发生率比较差异有统计学意义( P<0.05)。结论早期肌肉等长收缩训练能够促进颈椎椎管扩大成型术后轴性症状的恢复,是预防治疗颈椎管扩大成型术后轴性症状的一种有效方法,值得在临床上推广应用。%Objective To investigate the effect of neck muscle isometric contraction training on axial symptom postoperative of laminoplasty. Methods One hundred patients from July 2011 to July 2013 were selected, they were ran-domly divided into group A and group B, both adopted laminoplasty. Three days after surgery, patients in group B began to implement neck muscle isometric contraction training for three months in two stages. Patients were all followed up for 1. 5 years. The axial pain VAS and the attack rate after 3 months, 6 months, 1 years and 1. 5 years of the two groups were re-corded and analyzed. Results After followed up for 3 months, 6 months, 1 year, 1. 5 years, the difference of axial pain VAS and the attack rate between the two groups had significant difference(P<0. 05). Conclusions Neck mus-cle isometric contraction training in early stage can promote the recovery of axial symptoms postoperative of laminopla-ty, is an effective method to prevent and treat axial pain after cervical laminoplasty, it should be widely applied in clinical practice.

  4. The Benefit of a Mechanical Needle Stimulation Pad in Patients with Chronic Neck and Lower Back Pain: Two Randomized Controlled Pilot Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Hohmann

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. The objective was to investigate whether a treatment with a needle stimulation pad (NSP changes perceived pain and/or sensory thresholds in patients with chronic neck (NP and lower back pain (BP. Methods. 40 patients with chronic NP and 42 patients with chronic BP were equally randomized to either treatment or waiting list control group. The treatment group self-administered a NSP over a period of 14 days. Pain ratings were recorded on numerical rating scales (NRSs. Mechanical detection thresholds (MDTs and pressure pain thresholds (PPTs were determined at the site of maximal pain and in the adjacent region, vibration detection thresholds (VDT were measured at close spinal processes. The Northwick Park Neck Pain Questionnaire (NPQ and the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI were utilized for the NP and BP study, respectively. Results. NRS ratings were significantly reduced for the treatment groups compared to the control groups (NP: P=.021 and BP: P<.001, accompanied by a significant increase of PPT at pain maximum (NP: P=.032 and BP: P=.013. There was no effect on VDT and MDT. The NPQ showed also a significant improvement, but not the ODI. Conclusions. The mechanical NSP seems to be an effective treatment method for chronic NP and BP.

  5. Correlational analysis of neck/shoulder pain and low back pain with the use of digital products, physical activity and psychological status among adolescents in Shanghai.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi Shan

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: This study investigates the neck/shoulder pain (NSP and low back pain (LBP among current high school students in Shanghai and explores the relationship between these pains and their possible influences, including digital products, physical activity, and psychological status. METHODS: An anonymous self-assessment was administered to 3,600 students across 30 high schools in Shanghai. This questionnaire examined the prevalence of NSP and LBP and the level of physical activity as well as the use of mobile phones, personal computers (PC and tablet computers (Tablet. The CES-D (Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression scale was also included in the survey. The survey data were analyzed using the chi-square test, univariate logistic analyses and a multivariate logistic regression model. RESULTS: Three thousand sixteen valid questionnaires were received including 1,460 (48.41% from male respondents and 1,556 (51.59% from female respondents. The high school students in this study showed NSP and LBP rates of 40.8% and 33.1%, respectively, and the prevalence of both influenced by the student's grade, use of digital products, and mental status; these factors affected the rates of NSP and LBP to varying degrees. The multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that Gender, grade, soreness after exercise, PC using habits, tablet use, sitting time after school and academic stress entered the final model of NSP, while the final model of LBP consisted of gender, grade, soreness after exercise, PC using habits, mobile phone use, sitting time after school, academic stress and CES-D score. CONCLUSIONS: High school students in Shanghai showed high prevalence of NSP and LBP that were closely related to multiple factors. Appropriate interventions should be implemented to reduce the occurrences of NSP and LBP.

  6. Botulinum toxin for the treatment of myofascial pain syndromes involving the neck and back: a review from a clinical perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Climent, José M; Kuan, Ta-Shen; Fenollosa, Pedro; Martin-Del-Rosario, Francisco

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. Botulinum toxin inhibits acetylcholine (ACh) release and probably blocks some nociceptive neurotransmitters. It has been suggested that the development of myofascial trigger points (MTrP) is related to an excess release of ACh to increase the number of sensitized nociceptors. Although the use of botulinum toxin to treat myofascial pain syndrome (MPS) has been investigated in many clinical trials, the results are contradictory. The objective of this paper is to identify sources of variability that could explain these differences in the results. Material and Methods. We performed a content analysis of the clinical trials and systematic reviews of MPS. Results and Discussion. Sources of differences in studies were found in the diagnostic and selection criteria, the muscles injected, the injection technique, the number of trigger points injected, the dosage of botulinum toxin used, treatments for control group, outcome measures, and duration of followup. The contradictory results regarding the efficacy of botulinum toxin A in MPS associated with neck and back pain do not allow this treatment to be recommended or rejected. There is evidence that botulinum toxin could be useful in specific myofascial regions such as piriformis syndrome. It could also be useful in patients with refractory MPS that has not responded to other myofascial injection therapies.

  7. Shoulder Pain, Functional Status, and Health-Related Quality of Life after Head and Neck Cancer Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsiao-Lan Wang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Head and neck cancer (HNC patients experience treatment-related complications that may interfere with health-related quality of life (HRQOL. The purpose of this study was to describe the symptom experience (shoulder pain and functional status factors that are related to global and domain-specific HRQOL at one month after HNC surgery. In this exploratory study, we examined 29 patients. The outcome variables included global HRQOL as well as physical, functional, emotional, and social well-being. Symptom experience and functional status factors were the independent variables. In the symptom experience variables, shoulder pain distress was negatively associated with physical well-being (R2=0.24. Among the functional status variables, eating impairment was negatively related to global HRQOL (R2=0.18 and physical well-being (R2=0.21. Speaking impairment and impaired body image explained a large amount of the variance in functional well-being (R2=0.45. This study provided initial results regarding symptom experience and functional status factors related to poor HRQOL in the early postoperative period for HNC patients.

  8. Should neck pain in a patient with Hashimoto′s thyroiditis be underestimated? A case and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umut Mousa

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Hashimoto′s Thyroiditis (HT is an autoimmune disease and the most frequent cause of hypothyroidism. Subacute thyroiditis (SAT overlapping HT is a rare entity. A 69-year-old female patient with HT and multinodular goiter has been followed on levothyroxine replacement therapy for 7 years. She presented with neck pain radiating to the right ear persisting for 2 months. She was prescribed analgesics and antibiotics by other physicians during that period, which did not work. Her vital signs were stable with no tachycardia or fever. The right lobe of the thyroid gland was tender on palpation. Her TSH level was 3.94 mIU/ml, ESR 23 mm/h, CRP 3.2 mg/l, WBC 4900/μl at presentation. Thyroid ultrasonography revealed a hypoechoic area over the tender lobe. Power Doppler imaging revealed almost no blood flow in that area. She was started on methylprednisolone 32 mg/day. At day 10 of therapy, her symptoms had completely resolved. Ultrasonography repeated showed that the hypoechoic area had disappeared. Glucocorticoid dosage was tapered and stopped. Emergence of subacute thyroiditis in a case with preexisting Hashimoto′s thyroiditis is a quite rare condition, but should be kept in mind along with a painful attack of HT in the differential diagnosis.

  9. Botulinum Toxin for the Treatment of Myofascial Pain Syndromes Involving the Neck and Back: A Review from a Clinical Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José M. Climent

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Botulinum toxin inhibits acetylcholine (ACh release and probably blocks some nociceptive neurotransmitters. It has been suggested that the development of myofascial trigger points (MTrP is related to an excess release of ACh to increase the number of sensitized nociceptors. Although the use of botulinum toxin to treat myofascial pain syndrome (MPS has been investigated in many clinical trials, the results are contradictory. The objective of this paper is to identify sources of variability that could explain these differences in the results. Material and Methods. We performed a content analysis of the clinical trials and systematic reviews of MPS. Results and Discussion. Sources of differences in studies were found in the diagnostic and selection criteria, the muscles injected, the injection technique, the number of trigger points injected, the dosage of botulinum toxin used, treatments for control group, outcome measures, and duration of followup. The contradictory results regarding the efficacy of botulinum toxin A in MPS associated with neck and back pain do not allow this treatment to be recommended or rejected. There is evidence that botulinum toxin could be useful in specific myofascial regions such as piriformis syndrome. It could also be useful in patients with refractory MPS that has not responded to other myofascial injection therapies.

  10. Is low-level laser therapy in relieving neck pain effective? Systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadhim-Saleh, Amjed; Maganti, Harinad; Ghert, Michelle; Singh, Sheila; Farrokhyar, Forough

    2013-10-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the efficacy of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) in reducing acute and chronic neck pain as measured by the visual analog scale (VAS). A systematic search of nine electronic databases was conducted to identify original articles. For study selection, two reviewers independently assessed titles, abstracts, and full text for eligibility. Methodological quality was assessed using the Detsky scale. Data were analyzed using random-effects model in the presence of heterogeneity and fixed-effect model in its absence. Heterogeneity was assessed using Cochran's Q statistic and quantifying I (2). Risk ratios (RR) with 95 % confidence intervals (CI) were reported. Eight randomized controlled trials involving 443 patients met the strict inclusion criteria. Inter-rater reliability for study selection was 92.8 % (95 % CIs 80.9-100 %) and for methodological quality assessment was 83.9 % (95 % CIs 19.4-96.8 %). Five trials included patients with cervical myofascial