WorldWideScience

Sample records for axial kinetic energy

  1. Energy harvesting efficiency of piezoelectric flags in axial flows

    CERN Document Server

    Michelin, Sebastien

    2012-01-01

    Self-sustained oscillations resulting from fluid-solid instabilities, such as the flutter of a flexible flag in axial flow, can be used to harvest energy if one is able to convert the solid energy into electricity. Here, this is achieved using piezoelectric patches attached to the surface of the flag that convert the solid deformation into an electric current powering purely resistive output circuits. Nonlinear numerical simulations in the slender-body limit, based on an explicit description of the coupling between the fluid-solid and electric systems, are used to determine the harvesting efficiency of the system, namely the fraction of the flow kinetic energy flux effectively used to power the output circuit, and its evolution with the system's parameters. The role of the tuning between the characteristic frequencies of the fluid-solid and electric systems is emphasized, as well as the critical impact of the piezoelectric coupling intensity. High fluid loading, classically associated with destabilization by ...

  2. Dimensional enhancement of kinetic energies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schleich, W.P.; Dahl, Jens Peder

    2002-01-01

    Simple thermodynamics considers kinetic energy to be an extensive variable which is proportional to the number N of particles. We present a quantum state of N noninteracting particles for which the kinetic energy increases quadratically with N. This enhancement effect is tied to the quantum centr...... centrifugal potential whose strength is quadratic in the number of dimensions of configuration space....

  3. Dimensional enhancement of kinetic energies

    OpenAIRE

    Schleich, W. P.; Dahl, Jens Peder

    2002-01-01

    Simple thermodynamics considers kinetic energy to be an extensive variable which is proportional to the number, N, of particles. We present a quantum state of N non-interacting particles for which the kinetic energy increases quadratically with N. This enhancement effect is tied to the quantum centrifugal potential whose strength is quadratic in the number of dimensions of configuration space.

  4. Energy Dissipation in Sandwich Structures During Axial Compression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Urban, Jesper

    2002-01-01

    -scale structural elements in fast sandwich vessels. Two of the crushing tests are simulated with the explicit finite element software LS-DYNA3D. The key results are load-end shortening relationship and the energy dissipation. Good agreement between the numerical predictions and the experiments are obtained......The purpose of this paper is to investigate the energy dissipation in sandwich structures during axial crushing. Axial crushing tests on six sandwich elements are described. The sandwich elements consist of a polyurethane core and E-glass/Polyester skin. The elements compare to full...

  5. Superconductivity by kinetic energy saving?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Marel, D; Molegraaf, HJA; Presura, C; Santoso, [No Value; Hewson, AC; Zlatic,

    2003-01-01

    A brief introduction is given in the generic microscopic framework of superconductivity. The consequences for the temperature dependence of the kinetic energy, and the correlation energy are discussed for two cases: The BCS scenario and the non-Fermi liquid scenario. A quantitative comparison is mad

  6. Kinetic energy equations for the average-passage equation system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Richard W.; Adamczyk, John J.

    1989-01-01

    Important kinetic energy equations derived from the average-passage equation sets are documented, with a view to their interrelationships. These kinetic equations may be used for closing the average-passage equations. The turbulent kinetic energy transport equation used is formed by subtracting the mean kinetic energy equation from the averaged total instantaneous kinetic energy equation. The aperiodic kinetic energy equation, averaged steady kinetic energy equation, averaged unsteady kinetic energy equation, and periodic kinetic energy equation, are also treated.

  7. Numerical nodal simulation of the axial power distribution within nuclear reactors using a kinetics diffusion model. I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Presented here is a new numerical nodal method for the simulation of the axial power distribution within nuclear reactors using the one-dimensional one speed kinetics diffusion model with one group of delayed neutron precursors. Our method is based on a spectral analysis of the nodal kinetics equations. These equations are obtained by integrating the original kinetics equations separately over a time step and over a spatial node, and then considering flat approximations for the forward difference terms. These flat approximations are the only approximations that are considered in the method. As a result, the spectral nodal method for space - time reactor kinetics generates numerical solutions for space independent problems or for time independent problems that are completely free from truncation errors. We show numerical results to illustrate the method's accuracy for coarse mesh calculations. (author)

  8. Kinetic energy budget analysis of spiraling columnar critical convection in a rapidly rotating spherical shell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takehiro, Shin-ichi, E-mail: takepiro@gfd-dennou.or [Research Institute for Mathematical Sciences, Kyoto University, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan)

    2010-10-15

    The kinetic energy budget analysis of spiraling columnar critical convection emerging in a rapidly rotating spherical shell is performed. In the cylindrical-radially elongated spiraling convection mode appearing as a critical mode at small Prandtl numbers, the kinetic energy generated in the inner region of the spherical shell is transported in a cylindrically radial manner and is dissipated near the outer boundary around the equator. However, when the Prandtl number is increased, the dynamical energy flux turns in the axial direction rather than in the cylindrically radial direction. The kinetic energy generated inside the shell is transported in the direction of the rotating axis and is dissipated near the outer boundary at the same cylindrically radial location. The existence of the axial component of the dynamical energy flux is attributed to the ageostrophic flows in the columnar vortices induced by viscous damping and buoyancy force. In spite of the existence of the axial component of dynamical energy flux, the obtained geometry of the axially integrated kinetic energy budget is consistent with the results using a two-dimensional rotating annulus model. Therefore, the interpretation of spiraling structure with the radial propagation properties of topographic Rossby waves is applicable to the three-dimensional spiraling columnar convection emerging in a rotating spherical shell. Flow patterns calculated from the dispersion relation of two-dimensional topographic Rossby waves in a rotating spherical shell well explain the structure of the three-dimensional spiraling columnar convection.

  9. Concepts of radial and angular kinetic energies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Jens Peder; Schleich, W.P.

    2002-01-01

    We consider a general central-field system in D dimensions and show that the division of the kinetic energy into radial and angular parts proceeds differently in the wave-function picture and the Weyl-Wigner phase-space picture, Thus, the radial and angular kinetic energies are different quantities...

  10. Molecular Energy Relations From Chemical Kinetics

    OpenAIRE

    Finkel, Robert W.

    2007-01-01

    Since molecular energy transformations are responsible for chemical reaction rates at the most fundamental level, chemical kinetics should provide some information about molecular energies. This is the premise and objective of this note. We describe a Hamiltonian formulation for kinetic rate equations where the concentrations are the generalized coordinates and the conjugate momenta are simply related to individual average molecular energies. Simple examples are presented and the resulting en...

  11. Equilibria and kinetics for pH-dependent axial ligation of bromomethyl(aquo)cobaloxime by aliphatic amine ligands

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M Bhoopal; N Ravi Kumar Reddy; S Satyanarayana

    2003-04-01

    Kinetics and equilibria of axial ligation of bromomethyl(aquo) cobaloxime by a series of straight chain primary amines (methylamine, ethylamine, propylamine, butylamine, pentylamine, hexylamine), cycloamines (cyclopentylamine, cyclohexylamine, cycloheptylamine) and secondary amines (N,N-dimethylamine, N,N-diethylamine) have been measured as functions of pH by spectrophotometric technique in aqueous solution, ionic strength 1 M (KCl) at 25°C. The rate of substitution of H2O varies with the Ka of incoming ligand, thus establishing nucleophilic participation of the ligand in the transition state. Binding and kinetic data are interpreted based on the basicity and steric influence of the entering ligand. To compare the rate constants of the entering ligands, pH independent second-order rate constants (on) are calculated.

  12. How ambiguous is the local kinetic energy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, James S M; Ayers, Paul W; Hernandez, Juan I Rodriguez

    2010-08-26

    The local kinetic energy and the closely related local electronic stress tensor are commonly used to elucidate chemical bonding patterns, especially for covalent bonds. We use three different approaches-transformation properties of the stress tensor, quasiprobability distributions, and the virial theorem from density-functional theory-to clarify the inherent ambiguity in these quantities, discussing the implications for analyses based on the local kinetic energy and stress tensor. An expansive-but not universal-family of local kinetic energy forms that includes the most common choices and is suitable for both chemical-bonding and atoms-in-molecule analysis is derived. A family of local electronic stress tensors is also derived. Several local kinetic energy functions that are mathematically justified, but unlikely to be conceptually useful, are derived. The implications of these forms for atoms-in-molecule analysis are discussed. PMID:20586467

  13. How ambiguous is the local kinetic energy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, James S M; Ayers, Paul W; Hernandez, Juan I Rodriguez

    2010-08-26

    The local kinetic energy and the closely related local electronic stress tensor are commonly used to elucidate chemical bonding patterns, especially for covalent bonds. We use three different approaches-transformation properties of the stress tensor, quasiprobability distributions, and the virial theorem from density-functional theory-to clarify the inherent ambiguity in these quantities, discussing the implications for analyses based on the local kinetic energy and stress tensor. An expansive-but not universal-family of local kinetic energy forms that includes the most common choices and is suitable for both chemical-bonding and atoms-in-molecule analysis is derived. A family of local electronic stress tensors is also derived. Several local kinetic energy functions that are mathematically justified, but unlikely to be conceptually useful, are derived. The implications of these forms for atoms-in-molecule analysis are discussed.

  14. Molecular Energy Relations From Chemical Kinetics

    CERN Document Server

    Finkel, Robert W

    2007-01-01

    Since molecular energy transformations are responsible for chemical reaction rates at the most fundamental level, chemical kinetics should provide some information about molecular energies. This is the premise and objective of this note. We describe a Hamiltonian formulation for kinetic rate equations where the concentrations are the generalized coordinates and the conjugate momenta are simply related to individual average molecular energies. Simple examples are presented and the resulting energy relations naturally include non-equilibrium reactions. An analysis predicts the reasonable outcome that thermal agitation of a composite molecule increases its rate of dissociation.

  15. Nanostructured energy devices equilibrium concepts and kinetics

    CERN Document Server

    Bisquert, Juan

    2014-01-01

    Due to the pressing needs of society, low cost materials for energy devices have experienced an outstanding development in recent times. In this highly multidisciplinary area, chemistry, material science, physics, and electrochemistry meet to develop new materials and devices that perform required energy conversion and storage processes with high efficiency, adequate capabilities for required applications, and low production cost. Nanostructured Energy Devices: Equilibrium Concepts and Kinetics introduces the main physicochemical principles that govern the operation of energy devices. It inclu

  16. Stochastic Chemical Kinetics with Energy Parameters

    CERN Document Server

    Fayolle, Guy; Pirogov, Serguei

    2011-01-01

    Abstact: We introduce new models of energy redistribution in stochastic chemical kinetics with several molecule types and energy parameters. The main results concern the situations when there are product form measures. Using a probabilistic interpretation of the related Boltzmann equation, we find some invariant measures explicitly and prove convergence to them.

  17. Kinetic-energy-momentum tensor in electrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheppard, Cheyenne J.; Kemp, Brandon A.

    2016-01-01

    We show that the Einstein-Laub formulation of electrodynamics is invalid since it yields a stress-energy-momentum (SEM) tensor that is not frame invariant. Two leading hypotheses for the kinetic formulation of electrodynamics (Chu and Einstein-Laub) are studied by use of the relativistic principle of virtual power, mathematical modeling, Lagrangian methods, and SEM transformations. The relativistic principle of virtual power is used to demonstrate the field dynamics associated with energy relations within a relativistic framework. Lorentz transformations of the respective SEM tensors demonstrate the relativistic frameworks for each studied formulation. Mathematical modeling of stationary and moving media is used to illustrate the differences and discrepancies of specific proposed kinetic formulations, where energy relations and conservation theorems are employed. Lagrangian methods are utilized to derive the field kinetic Maxwell's equations, which are studied with respect to SEM tensor transforms. Within each analysis, the Einstein-Laub formulation violates special relativity, which invalidates the Einstein-Laub SEM tensor.

  18. Utilization of rotor kinetic energy storage for hybrid vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, John S.

    2011-05-03

    A power system for a motor vehicle having an internal combustion engine, the power system comprises an electric machine (12) further comprising a first excitation source (47), a permanent magnet rotor (28) and a magnetic coupling rotor (26) spaced from the permanent magnet rotor and at least one second excitation source (43), the magnetic coupling rotor (26) also including a flywheel having an inertial mass to store kinetic energy during an initial acceleration to an operating speed; and wherein the first excitation source is electrically connected to the second excitation source for power cycling such that the flywheel rotor (26) exerts torque on the permanent magnet rotor (28) to assist braking and acceleration of the permanent magnet rotor (28) and consequently, the vehicle. An axial gap machine and a radial gap machine are disclosed and methods of the invention are also disclosed.

  19. Nonlocal kinetic-energy-density functionals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper we present nonlocal kinetic-energy functionals T[n] within the average density approximation (ADA) framework, which do not require any extra input when applied to any electron system and recover the exact kinetic energy and the linear response function of a homogeneous system. In contrast with previous ADA functionals, these present good behavior of the long-range tail of the exact weight function. The averaging procedure for the kinetic functional (averaging the Fermi momentum of the electron gas, instead of averaging the electron density) leads to a functional without numerical difficulties in the calculation of extended systems, and it gives excellent results when applied to atoms and jellium surfaces. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  20. Vibration Suppression of an Axially Moving String with Transverse Wind Loadings by a Nonlinear Energy Sink

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye-Wei Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonlinear targeted energy transfer (TET is applied to suppress the excessive vibration of an axially moving string with transverse wind loads. The coupling dynamic equations used are modeled by a nonlinear energy sink (NES attached to the string to absorb vibrational energy. By a two-term Galerkin procedure, the equations are discretized, and the effects of vibration suppression by numerical methods are demonstrated. Results show that the NES can effectively suppress the vibration of the axially moving string with transverse wind loadings, thereby protecting the string from excessive movement.

  1. On kinetic energy stabilized superconductivity in cuprates

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, D. J.

    2006-01-01

    The possibility of kinetic energy driven superconductivity in cuprates as was recently found in the $tJ$ model is discussed. We argue that the violation of the virial theorem implied by this result is serious and means that the description of superconductivity within the $tJ$ model is pathological.

  2. Aircraft Measurements of Atmospheric Kinetic Energy Spectra

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundtang Petersen, Erik; Lilly, D. K.

    1983-01-01

    Wind velocity data obtained from a jet airliner are used to construct kinetic energy spectra over the range of wavelengths from 2.5 to 2500 km. The spectra exhibit an approximate -5/3 slope for wavelengths of less than about 150 km, steepening to about -2.2 at larger scales. These results support...

  3. Electric Vehicles Mileage Extender Kinetic Energy Storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jivkov Venelin

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The proposed paper considers small urban vehicles with electric hybrid propulsion systems. Energy demands are examined on the basis of European drive cycle (NEUDC and on an energy recuperation coefficient and are formulated for description of cycle energy transfers. Numerical simulation results show real possibilities for increasing in achievable vehicle mileage at the same energy levels of a main energy source - the electric battery. Kinetic energy storage (KES, as proposed to be used as an energy buffer and different structural schemes of the hybrid propulsion system are commented. Minimum energy levels for primary (the electric battery and secondary (KES sources are evaluated. A strategy for reduced power flows control is examined, and its impact on achievable vehicle mileage is investigated. Results show an additional increase in simulated mileage at the same initial energy levels.

  4. Stochastic Chemical Kinetics with Energy Parameters

    OpenAIRE

    Fayolle, Guy; Malyshev, Vadim A.; Pirogov, Serguei

    2004-01-01

    International audience Abstact: We introduce new models of energy redistribution in stochastic chemical kinetics with several molecule types and energy parameters. The main results concern the situations when there are product form measures. Using a probabilistic interpretation of the related Boltzmann equation, we find some invariant measures explicitly and prove convergence to them. Résumé : Nous introduisons de nouveaux modèles de réseaus de cinétique chimique, avec plusieurs types d...

  5. Computation of liquid drop deformation energy for axial symmetric nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Computation methods for deformation dependent terms of the nuclear potential energy in the Myers-Swiatecki's and Krappe-Nix's variants of the liquid-drop model are presented. Also, an extension of the Krappe-Nix integral, surface and Coulomb energies formulas in case of reflection asymmetric deformations leading to fragments with different charge-to-mass ratio is introduced. (author)

  6. A double-superconducting axial bearing system for an energy storage flywheel model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng, Z; Lin, Q; Ma, G; Zheng, J; Zhang, Y; Wang, S; Wang, J [Applied Superconductivity Laboratory, Mail Stop 152, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu, 610031 (China)], E-mail: jsywang@home.swjtu.edu.cn

    2008-02-15

    The bulk high temperature superconductors (HTSCs) with unique flux-pinning property have been applied to fabricate two superconducting axial bearings for an energy storage flywheel model. The two superconducting axial bearings are respectively fixed at two ends of the vertical rotational shaft, whose stator is composed of seven melt-textured YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-x} (YBCO) bulks with diameter of 30 mm, height of 18 mm and rotor is made of three cylindrical axial-magnetized NdFeB permanent magnets (PM) by superposition with diameter of 63 mm, height of 27 mm. The experimental results show the total levitation and lateral force produced by the two superconducting bearings are enough to levitate and stabilize the 2.4 kg rotational shaft. When the two YBCO stators were both field cooled to the liquid nitrogen temperature at respective axial distances above or below the PM rotor, the shaft could be automatically levitated between the two stators without any contact. In the case of a driving motor, it can be stably rotated along the central axis besides the resonance frequency. This double-superconducting axial bearing system can be used to demonstrate the flux-pinning property of bulk HTSC for stable levitation and suspension and the principle of superconducting flywheel energy storage system to visitors.

  7. Kinetics and equilibria for the axial ligation of bromomethyl (aqua)cobaloxime with pyridines - Isolation characterization and DNA binding

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Kotha Laxma Reddy; K Ashwini Kumar; N Ravi Kumar Reddy; Penumaka Nagababu; A Panasa Reddy; S Satyanarayana

    2009-11-01

    The kinetics and equilibria for the axial ligation of pyridine and substituted pyridines to bromomethyl(aqua)cobaloxime have been measured spectrophotometrically in aqueous solutions of ionic strength 1.0 M (KC1) at 25°C as a function of H. The binding constants and rate of formation increase in the order 4-NH2Py 4-EtPy > 4-MePy > Py > 2-NH2Py > 2-EtPy. The data have been interpreted based on the basicity of the ligand, -back bonding from Co(III) → L and hard and soft interactions. The rate of substitution of H2O varies with the pKa of the incoming ligand, thus establishing the existence of nucleophilic participation of the ligand in the transition state. We have investigated the DNA binding of bromomethyl(aqua)cobaloxime with DNA. Bromomethyl(ligand)cobaloximes were isolated and characterized by elemental analysis, IR and NMR (1H, 13C) spectra.

  8. Optimization of an axial-flux permanent-magnet generator for a small wind energy application

    OpenAIRE

    Vansompel, Hendrik; Sergeant, Peter; Dupré, Luc

    2011-01-01

    Axial-flux permanent-magnet synchronous machines have a high torque output at low speeds and are therefore very suitable for direct drive wind energy applications. This research focuses on: measures to improve the efficiency of the energy conversion; simplification of the construction and easy maintenance by introduction of a modular stator construction; adaptations required to obtain an efficient power conversion in direct drive wind energy applications.

  9. The effect of non-uniform damping on flutter in axial flow and energy harvesting strategies

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, Kiran; Michelin, Sebastien; de Langre, Emmanuel

    2012-01-01

    The problem of energy harvesting from flutter instabilities in flexible slender structures in axial flows is considered. In a recent study, we used a reduced order theoretical model of such a system to demonstrate the feasibility for harvesting energy from these structures. Following this preliminary study, we now consider a continuous fluid-structure system. Energy harvesting is modelled as strain-based damping and the slender structure under investigation lies in a moderate fluid loading ra...

  10. Kinetic energy recovery systems in motor vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Śliwiński, C.

    2016-09-01

    The article draws attention to the increasing environmental pollution caused by the development of vehicle transport and motorization. Different types of design solutions used in vehicles for the reduction of fuel consumption, and thereby emission of toxic gasses into the atmosphere, were specified. Historical design solutions concerning energy recovery devices in mechanical vehicles which used flywheels to accumulate kinetic energy were shown. Developmental tendencies in the area of vehicle manufacturing in the form of hybrid electric and electric devices were discussed. Furthermore, designs of energy recovery devices with electrical energy storage from the vehicle braking and shock absorbing systems were presented. A mechanical energy storing device using a flywheel operating under vacuum was presented, as were advantages and disadvantages of both systems, the limitations they impose on individual constructions and safety issues. The paper also discusses a design concept of an energy recovery device in mechanical vehicles which uses torsion springs as the main components of energy accumulation during braking. The desirability of a cooperation of both the mechanical- and electrical energy recovery devices was indicated.

  11. Channeling energy loss and dechanneling of He along axial and planar directions of Si

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafiei, S.; Lamehi-Rachti, M.

    2016-01-01

    In the present work, the energy loss and the dechanneling of He ions in the energy of 1.5 MeV and 2 MeV along the and axial directions as well as the {1 0 0} and {1 1 0} planar directions of Si were studied by the simulation of the channeling Rutherford backscattering spectra. The simulation was done based on the considerations that a fraction of the aligned beam enters the sample as a random component due to the ions scattering from the surface, and the dechanneling starts at the greater penetration depths, xDech. It was presumed that the dechanneling process follows a simple exponential law with a parameter λ which is proportional to the half-thickness. The Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm was used to set the best parameters of energy loss ratio, xDech and λ. The experimental results are well reproduced by this simulation. Differences between various axial and planar channels in the Si crystal and their influence on the energy loss ratio and dechanneling of He ions are described. Moreover, the energy dependence of energy loss ratio and dechanneling of He ions were investigated. It is shown that the dechanneling behavior of ions depends on the energy and energy loss of the ions along a channel. The channeled to random energy loss increases by decreasing ions energy.

  12. Kinetic energy decomposition scheme based on information theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imamura, Yutaka; Suzuki, Jun; Nakai, Hiromi

    2013-12-15

    We proposed a novel kinetic energy decomposition analysis based on information theory. Since the Hirshfeld partitioning for electron densities can be formulated in terms of Kullback-Leibler information deficiency in information theory, a similar partitioning for kinetic energy densities was newly proposed. The numerical assessments confirm that the current kinetic energy decomposition scheme provides reasonable chemical pictures for ionic and covalent molecules, and can also estimate atomic energies using a correction with viral ratios.

  13. Partitioning kinetic energy during freewheeling wheelchair maneuvers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medola, Fausto O; Dao, Phuc V; Caspall, Jayme J; Sprigle, Stephen

    2014-03-01

    This paper describes a systematic method to partition the kinetic energy (KE) of a free-wheeling wheelchair. An ultralightweight rigid frame wheelchair was instrumented with two axle-mounted encoders and data acquisition equipment to accurately measure the velocity of the drive wheels. A mathematical model was created combining physical specifications and geometry of the wheelchair and its components. Two able-bodied subjects propelled the wheelchair over four courses that involved straight and turning maneuvers at differing speeds. The KE of the wheelchair was divided into three components: translational, rotational, and turning energy. This technique was sensitive to the changing contributions of the three energy components across maneuvers. Translational energy represented the major component of total KE in all maneuvers except a zero radius turn in which turning energy was dominant. Both translational and rotational energies are directly related to wheelchair speed. Partitioning KE offers a useful means of investigating the dynamics of a moving wheelchair. The described technique permits analysis of KE imparted to the wheelchair during maneuvers involving changes in speed and direction, which are most representative of mobility in everyday life. This technique can be used to study the effort required to maneuver different types and configurations of wheelchairs.

  14. Kinetic Energy Transport in Rayleigh--B\\'enard Convection

    OpenAIRE

    Petschel, Klaus; Stellmach, Stephan; Wilczek, Michael; Lülff, Johannes; Hansen, Ulli

    2014-01-01

    The kinetic energy balance in Rayleigh--B\\'{e}nard convection is investigated for the Prandtl number range $0.01\\le Pr \\le 150$ and for fixed Rayleigh number $Ra=5\\cdot10^{6}$. The kinetic energy balance is divided into a dissipation, a production and a flux term. We discuss profiles of all terms and find that the different contributions to the energy balance can be spatially separated into regions where kinetic energy is produced and where kinetic energy is dissipated. Analysing the Prandtl ...

  15. Experimental Studies on Turbulence Kinetic Energy in Confined Vortex Flows

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    L.Yan; G.H.Vatistas; 等

    2000-01-01

    Turbulence kinetic energies in confined vortex flows have been studied.The studies were based on the experiments performed in a vortex chamber,In the experiments,a Laser Doppler Anemometry(LDA) was used to perform flow measurements inside the vortex chamber,which provided the data for the kinetic energy analysis.The studies concentrated on the influences of the contraction ratio and the inlet air flow rate on the kinetic energy,and analyzed the characteristics of the kinetic energy in the confined vortex flows,including the distributions of the tangential component,radial component and total turbulence kinetic energy,In the paper,both the experimental techniques and the experimental results were presented.Based on a similarity analyis and the experimental data,an empirical scaling formula was proposed so that the tangential component of the turbulence kinetic energy was dependent only on the parameter of the contraction ratio.

  16. Effects of the symmetry energy slope on the axial oscillations of neutron stars

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wen De-Hua; Zhou Ying

    2013-01-01

    The impact of symmetry energy slope L on the axial w-mode oscillations is explored,where the range of the constrained slope L of symmetry energy at saturation density is adopted from 25 MeV to 115 MeV while keeping the equation of state (EOS) of symmetric nuclear matter fixed.Based on the range of the symmetry energy slope,a constraint on the frequency and damping time of the wI-mode of the neutron star is given.It is found that there is a perfect linear relation between the frequency and the stellar mass for a fixed slope L,and the softer symmetry energy corresponds to a higher frequency.Moreover,it is confirmed that both the frequencies and damping times have a perfect universal scaling behavior for the EOSs with different symmetry energy slopes at saturation density.

  17. Reassessing the Plastic Hinge Model for Energy Dissipation of Axially Loaded Columns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. M. Korol

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the energy dissipation potential of axially loaded columns and evaluates the use of a plastic hinge model for analysis of hi-rise building column collapse under extreme loading conditions. The experimental program considered seven axially loaded H-shaped extruded aluminum structural section columns having slenderness ratios that would be typical of floor-to-ceiling heights in buildings. All seven test specimens initially experienced minor-axis overall buckling followed by formation of a plastic hinge at the mid-height region, leading to local buckling of the flanges on the compression side of the plastic hinge, and eventual folding of the compression flanges. The experimental energy absorption, based on load-displacement relations, was compared to the energy estimates based on section plastic moment resistance based on measured yield stress and based on measured hinge rotations. It was found that the theoretical plastic hinge model underestimates a column’s actual ability to absorb energy by a factor in the range of 3 to 4 below that obtained from tests. It was also noted that the realizable hinge rotation is less than 180°. The above observations are based, of course, on actual columns being able to sustain high tensile strains at hinge locations without fracturing.

  18. Kinetic energy functional for Fermi vapors in spherical harmonic confinement

    OpenAIRE

    Minguzzi, A.; March, N. H.; Tosi, M. P.

    2001-01-01

    Two equations are constructed which reflect, for fermions moving independently in a spherical harmonic potential, a differential virial theorem and a relation between the turning points of kinetic energy and particle densities. These equations are used to derive a differential equation for the particle density and a non-local kinetic energy functional.

  19. Hydro-Kinetic Energy Conversion : Resource and Technology

    OpenAIRE

    Grabbe, Mårten

    2013-01-01

    The kinetic energy present in tidal currents and other water courses has long been appreciated as a vast resource of renewable energy. The work presented in this doctoral thesis is devoted to both the characteristics of the hydro-kinetic resource and the technology for energy conversion. An assessment of the tidal energy resource in Norwegian waters has been carried out based on available data in pilot books. More than 100 sites have been identified as interesting with a total estimated theor...

  20. Turbulence generation through intense kinetic energy sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maqui, Agustin F.; Donzis, Diego A.

    2016-06-01

    Direct numerical simulations (DNS) are used to systematically study the development and establishment of turbulence when the flow is initialized with concentrated regions of intense kinetic energy. This resembles both active and passive grids which have been extensively used to generate and study turbulence in laboratories at different Reynolds numbers and with different characteristics, such as the degree of isotropy and homogeneity. A large DNS database was generated covering a wide range of initial conditions with a focus on perturbations with some directional preference, a condition found in active jet grids and passive grids passed through a contraction as well as a new type of active grid inspired by the experimental use of lasers to photo-excite the molecules that comprise the fluid. The DNS database is used to assert under what conditions the flow becomes turbulent and if so, the time required for this to occur. We identify a natural time scale of the problem which indicates the onset of turbulence and a single Reynolds number based exclusively on initial conditions which controls the evolution of the flow. It is found that a minimum Reynolds number is needed for the flow to evolve towards fully developed turbulence. An extensive analysis of single and two point statistics, velocity as well as spectral dynamics and anisotropy measures is presented to characterize the evolution of the flow towards realistic turbulence.

  1. Zero kinetic energy photoelectron spectroscopy of triphenylene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harthcock, Colin; Zhang, Jie; Kong, Wei, E-mail: wei.kong@oregonstate.edu [Department of Chemistry, Oregon State University, Corvallis, Oregon 97331 (United States)

    2014-06-28

    We report vibrational information of both the first electronically excited state and the ground cationic state of jet-cooled triphenylene via the techniques of resonantly enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) and zero kinetic energy (ZEKE) photoelectron spectroscopy. The first excited electronic state S{sub 1} of the neutral molecule is of A{sub 1}′ symmetry and is therefore electric dipole forbidden in the D{sub 3h} group. Consequently, there are no observable Franck-Condon allowed totally symmetric a{sub 1}′ vibrational bands in the REMPI spectrum. All observed vibrational transitions are due to Herzberg-Teller vibronic coupling to the E′ third electronically excited state S{sub 3}. The assignment of all vibrational bands as e′ symmetry is based on comparisons with calculations using the time dependent density functional theory and spectroscopic simulations. When an electron is eliminated, the molecular frame undergoes Jahn-Teller distortion, lowering the point group to C{sub 2v} and resulting in two nearly degenerate electronic states of A{sub 2} and B{sub 1} symmetry. Here we follow a crude treatment by assuming that all e′ vibrational modes resolve into b{sub 2} and a{sub 1} modes in the C{sub 2v} molecular frame. Some observed ZEKE transitions are tentatively assigned, and the adiabatic ionization threshold is determined to be 63 365 ± 7 cm{sup −1}. The observed ZEKE spectra contain a consistent pattern, with a cluster of transitions centered near the same vibrational level of the cation as that of the intermediate state, roughly consistent with the propensity rule. However, complete assignment of the detailed vibrational structure due to Jahn-Teller coupling requires much more extensive calculations, which will be performed in the future.

  2. Influence of axial energy spread on the negative-mass instability in a relativistic nonneutral E layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The influence of an axial energy spread on the negative-mass instability in a relativistic nonneutral E layer aligned parallel to a uniform axial magnetic field B0e/sub z/ is investigated. The stability analysis is carried out within the framework of the linearized Vlasov--Maxwell equations. It is assumed that the E layer is thin with radial thickness (2a) much smaller than the mean radius (R0), and that ν/γ0very-much-less-than1, where ν is Budker's parameter and γ0mc2 is the mean electron energy. Stability properties are investigated for the choice of electron distribution function in which all electrons have the same value of canonical angular momentum (P/sub theta P0/=const) and a step-function distribution in axial momentum p/sub z/. The negative-mass growth rate is calculated including the important stabilizing influence of axial energy spread (ΔE), and it is shown that a modest energy spread (ΔE/γ0mc2approx. = a few percent) is sufficient to stabilize perturbations with axial wavenumber satisfying k2R20> or approx. =1

  3. Energy loss distributions of relativistic protons axially channeled in a bent silicon crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stojanov, Nace; Petrović, Srdjan; Nešković, Nebojša

    2013-05-01

    A detailed study of the energy loss distributions of the relativistic protons axially channeled in the bent Si crystals is presented in this work. The bending angle was varied from 0 to 20 μrad, while the crystal thickness was equal to 1 mm. The proton energy was chosen to be 7 TeV in accordance with the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) project, at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), in Geneva, Switzerland. The energy loss distributions of the channeled protons were generated using the numerical solution of the proton equations of motion in the transverse plane and the computer simulation method. An accurate energy loss model was used, which takes into account the trajectory dependence of the energy loss of protons during their motion through the crystal channels. Further, the dispersion of the proton's scattering angle caused by its collisions with the electrons of the crystal and the divergence of the proton beam were taken into account. The calculated dependence of the number of dechanneled protons on the bending angle was excellently fitted by the Gompertz type dechanneling function.

  4. Energy loss distributions of relativistic protons axially channeled in a bent silicon crystal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stojanov, Nace, E-mail: nacestoj@pmf.ukim.mk [Institute of Physics, Faculty of Natural Sciences and Mathematics, Sts. Cyril and Methodius University, P.O. Box 162, 1000 Skopje (Macedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic of); Petrović, Srdjan; Nešković, Nebojša [Laboratory of Physics (010), Vinča Institute of Nuclear Sciences, University of Belgrade, P.O. Box 522, 11001 Belgrade (Serbia)

    2013-05-01

    A detailed study of the energy loss distributions of the relativistic protons axially channeled in the bent < 100 > Si crystals is presented in this work. The bending angle was varied from 0 to 20 μrad, while the crystal thickness was equal to 1 mm. The proton energy was chosen to be 7 TeV in accordance with the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) project, at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), in Geneva, Switzerland. The energy loss distributions of the channeled protons were generated using the numerical solution of the proton equations of motion in the transverse plane and the computer simulation method. An accurate energy loss model was used, which takes into account the trajectory dependence of the energy loss of protons during their motion through the crystal channels. Further, the dispersion of the proton’s scattering angle caused by its collisions with the electrons of the crystal and the divergence of the proton beam were taken into account. The calculated dependence of the number of dechanneled protons on the bending angle was excellently fitted by the Gompertz type dechanneling function.

  5. Coenzyme B12 model studies: An HSAB approach to the equilibria and kinetics of axial ligation of alkyl(aquo)-cobaloximes by imidazole and cyanide

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Vaddeboina Sridhar; S Satyanarayana

    2000-12-01

    Kinetics and equilibria of the axial ligation of alkyl(aquo)cobaloximes by imidazole and cyanide have been measured spectrophotometrically in aqueous solutions of ionic strength 1.0 M at 25°C as a function of H. Comparison of IMD and CN- of CH3, C2H5 and BrCH2 cobaloximes indicates that their stability is in the order BrCH2 > CH3 > C2H5. As the electron-withdrawing capacity of the alkyl group trans to water increases, the electron density of the cobalt(III) decreases and thus it becomes a stronger Lewis acid and binds more strongly to imidazole and cyanide. The association and dissociation rate constants are better correlated to the relative softness of the ligand showing that cyanide binds 30 times faster than imidazole. These complexes are isolated and are characterized by IR and 1H NMR spectra.

  6. System design and optimization study of axial flow turbine applied in an overtopping wave energy convertor

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Yuquan Zhang; Yuan Zheng; Chunxia Yang; Yantao Zhu; Xin Zhang

    2015-12-01

    The axial flow turbine applied in an overtopping wave energy convertor can continuously provide power with high efficiency and reliably. To study the rules between parameters of the turbine and flows, three different types of turbines with complete 3D flow-channel models were designed and optimized. It appears that diameter of the runner, flow rates, number of guide vanes and shape of outflow passage have a considerable impact on the performance of the whole convertor. The turbine with a diameter of 0.8 m, flow rate of 0.5 m3/s, double guide vanes and bent section in outflow passage shows the best comprehensive performance. Moreover, the results of the experiments indicate that the output power can be enhanced by increasing the wave overtopping rate.

  7. Approximate calculation of electronic energy levels of axially symmetric quantum dot and quantum ring by using energy dependent effective mass

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Yu-Min; Yu Zhong-Yuan

    2009-01-01

    Calculations of electronic structures about the semiconductor quantum dot and the semiconductor quantum ring are presented in this paper. To reduce the calculation costs, for the quantum dot and the quantum ring, their simplified axially symmetric shapes are utilized in our analysis. The energy dependent effective mass is taken into account in solving the Schrodinger equations in the single band effective mass approximation. The calculated results show that the energy dependent effective mass should be considered only for relatively small volume quantum dots or small quantum rings. For large size quantum materials, both the energy dependent effective mass and the parabolic effective mass can give the same results. The energy states and the effective masses of the quantum dot and the quantum ring as a function of geometric parameters are also discussed in detail.

  8. Energy efficiency of an innovative vertical axial rotary kiln for pottery production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Andrés Forero Núñez

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Colombia is a remarkablecoal producer and exporter worldwide; several sectors use this resource for electricity and thermal energy production. Among them, the ceramic industry consumed 118,590 tons in 2011. Most of the pottery production companies in this country arelocated in rural areas and use old coal fired kilns with low energy efficiencies, generating environmental effects to the population nearby. Despite of the importance of these industries to the small rural economies, the government agencies have closed them due to the lack of development on cleaner devices. This work aims to analyze the thermal behavior of an innovative vertical axial rotary kiln for pottery production, and the energy efficiency varying operation mode. The kiln operated during seven hours needed three hours for stabilizing sintering temperature at 800°C. The mean temperatures of the loading, drying, sintering and cooling stage were 204°C, 223°C, 809°C and 321°C respectively. The convection and radiation heat losses were 15 % whereas the flue gas heat losses 18 %.During continuous operation, the kiln energy efficiency was about 60 %. This design proven to reach the temperatures required in the firing stage of the pottery production; moreover, a gas fuel was fuelled making the process cleaner and more efficient than coal-fired systems.

  9. Energy loss distributions of 7 TeV protons axially channeled in the bent Si crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stojanov, Nace; Petrović, Srdjan

    2016-04-01

    In this article, the energy loss distributions of relativistic protons axially channeled in the bent Si crystal are studied. The crystal thickness is equal to 1 mm, which corresponds to the reduced crystal thickness, Λ, equal to 1.22, whereas the bending angle, α, was varied from 0 to 30 μrad. The proton energy of 7 TeV was chosen in accordance with the concept of using the bent crystals as a tool for selective deflection of the beam halo particles from the LUA9 experiment at LHC. For the continuum interaction potential of the proton and the crystal the Molière's expression was used and the energy loss of a proton was calculated by applying the trajectory dependent stopping power model. Further, the uncertainness of the scattering angle of the proton caused by its collisions with the electrons of the crystal and the divergence of the proton beam were taken into account. The energy loss distribution of the channeled protons was obtained via the numerical solution of the proton equations of motion in the transverse plane and the computer simulation method. The analysis of the obtained theoretical data shows that the shape of the energy loss distribution strongly depends on the horizontal or vertical direction of the curvature of the crystal. The number of dechanneled protons as a function of the bending angle also strongly depends on the direction of the crystal's curvature. As a result, the dechanneling rates and ranges, obtained from the Gompertz type sigmoidal fitting functions, have different sets of values for different bending orientations. We have also studied the influence of the proton beam divergence on the energy loss distribution of channeled protons.

  10. A Kinetic Model for the Energy Transfer in Phycobilisomes

    OpenAIRE

    Suter, Georg W.; Holzwarth, Alfred R.

    1987-01-01

    A kinetic model for the energy transfer in phycobilisome (PBS) rods of Synechococcus 6301 is presented, based on a set of experimental parameters from picosecond studies. It is shown that the enormous complexity of the kinetic system formed by 400-500 chromophores can be greatly simplified by using symmetry arguments. According to the model the transfer along the phycocyanin rods has to be taken into account in both directions, i.e., back and forth along the rods. The corresponding forward ra...

  11. Renormalizing the kinetic energy operator in elementary quantum mechanics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coutinho, F A B [Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade de Sao Paulo e LIM 01-HCFMUSP, 05405-000 Sao Paulo (Brazil); Amaku, M [Faculdade de Medicina Veterinaria e Zootecnia, Universidade de Sao Paulo, 05508-970 Sao Paulo (Brazil)], E-mail: coutinho@dim.fm.usp.br

    2009-09-15

    In this paper, we consider solutions to the three-dimensional Schroedinger equation of the form {psi}(r) = u(r)/r, where u(0) {ne} 0. The expectation value of the kinetic energy operator for such wavefunctions diverges. We show that it is possible to introduce a potential energy with an expectation value that also diverges, exactly cancelling the kinetic energy divergence. This renormalization procedure produces a self-adjoint Hamiltonian. We solve some problems with this new Hamiltonian to illustrate its usefulness.

  12. Logarithmic entropy corrected holographic dark energy with nonminimal kinetic coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amani, Ali R.; Sadeghi, J.; Farajollahi, H.; Pourali, M.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we have considered a cosmological model with the non--minimal kinetic coupling terms and investigated its cosmological implications with respect to the logarithmic entropy-- corrected holographic dark energy (LECHDE). The correspondence between LECHDE in flat FRW cosmology and the phantom dark energy model with the aim to interpret the current universe acceleration is also examined.

  13. Macro and Micro Scale Electromagnetic Kinetic Energy Harvesting Generators

    CERN Document Server

    Beeby, S -P; Torah, R -N; Koukharenko, E; Roberts, S; O'Donnell, T; Roy, S

    2007-01-01

    This paper is concerned with generators that harvest electrical energy from the kinetic energy present in the sensor nodes environment. These generators have the potential to replace or augment battery power which has a limited lifetime and requires periodic replacement which limits the placement and application of the sensor node.

  14. The quantum mechanics based on a general kinetic energy

    CERN Document Server

    Wei, Yuchuan

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we introduce the Schrodinger equation with a general kinetic energy operator. The conservation law is proved and the probability continuity equation is deducted in a general sense. Examples with a Hermitian kinetic energy operator include the standard Schrodinger equation, the relativistic Schrodinger equation, the fractional Schrodinger equation, the Dirac equation, and the deformed Schrodinger equation. We reveal that the Klein-Gordon equation has a hidden non-Hermitian kinetic energy operator. The probability continuity equation with sources indicates that there exists a different way of probability transportation, which is probability teleportation. An average formula is deducted from the relativistic Schrodinger equation, the Dirac equation, and the K-G equation.

  15. Axial turbine with underwater generator for energy recovery; Axialturbine mit Unterwassergenerator zur Energierueckgewinnung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Welzel, B. [Stuttgart Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Stroemungsmechanik und Hydraulische Stroemungsmaschinen

    1997-12-31

    Within the framework of a project sponsored by the Stiftung Energieforschung Baden-Wuerttemberg, an axial turbine was developed as a flash evaporator, which permits energy recovery in all sectors where liquids in piping undergoes pressure relaxation. A specific feature of this turbine is that it forms part, complete with generator, of a single pipeline and that it does not cause any pressure variations worth mentioning in case of mains failure. The report describes the turbine, its advantages, and a pilot operation carried out with a prototype. The turbine`s performance is compared with a return pump. Further, the optimization of the hydraulic design by computer and the results of a market analysis are dealt with. (orig.) [Deutsch] Im Rahmen einer von der Stiftung Energieforschung Baden-Wuerttemberg gefoerderten Neuentwicklung wurde eine Axialturbine als Entspannungsturbine entwickelt, mit der eine Energierueckgewinnung in allen Bereichen erfolgen kann, in denen Fluessigkeiten in Rohrleitungssystemen entspannt werden. Die Turbine zeichnet sich unter anderem dadurch aus, dass sie komplett, inklusive Generator, innerhalb einer Rohrleitung angeordnet ist und bei Netzausfall keine nennenswerte Druckschwankung erzeugt. Es werden die Turbine, deren Vorteile sowie der mit einem Prototypen durchgefuehrte Betriebsversuch beschrieben. Weiterhin werden ein Vergleich des Betriebsverhaltens mit einer rueckwaertslaufenden Pumpe, die rechnerische Optimierung der hydraulischen Formgebung sowie die Ergebnisse einer Marktanalyse behandelt. (orig.)

  16. Determination of energy loss of 1200 keV deuterons along axial and planar channels of Si

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shafiei, S.; Lamehi-Rachti, M., E-mail: mlamehi@aeoi.org.ir

    2015-02-15

    In this paper, the energy loss of 1200 keV deuterons along the <1 0 0> and <1 1 0> axes as well as the {1 0 0} and {1 1 0} planes of Si were determined by the simulation of the channeling Rutherford backscattering spectra. The simulation was done by taking two considerations into account: (i) a minimum random component of the beam which enters the sample because of the scattering ions from the surface, (ii) the dechanneling starts at greater penetration depths, x{sub Dech}. Moreover, it was assumed that the dechanneling follows a Gompertz type sigmoidal function with two parameters k and x{sub c} which present the dechanneling rate and range, respectively. The best simulation parameters, penetration depth at which the dechanneling starts, energy loss and dechanneling rate and range, were chosen by using the Levenberg–Marquardt algorithm. The experimental results are well reproduced by this simulation. The ratio of channeling energy loss to the random is changed from 0.63 ± 0.02 along the <1 1 0> axial channel to the 0.91 ± 0.02 along the {1 0 0} planar direction. The differences in the energy loss and the dechanneling process along the axial and planar channels are attributed to the potential barrier and the fractional area of each channel blocked by atoms. The ratio of channeling to random energy loss of deuterons along the <1 0 0> axial direction is in agreement with another reference.

  17. Kinetic and Exchange Energy Densities near the Nucleus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucian A. Constantin

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the behavior of the kinetic and the exchange energy densities near the nuclear cusp of atomic systems. Considering hydrogenic orbitals, we derive analytical expressions near the nucleus, for single shells, as well as in the semiclassical limit of large non-relativistic neutral atoms. We show that a model based on the helium iso-electronic series is very accurate, as also confirmed by numerical calculations on real atoms up to two thousands electrons. Based on this model, we propose non-local density-dependent ingredients that are suitable for the description of the kinetic and exchange energy densities in the region close to the nucleus. These non-local ingredients are invariant under the uniform scaling of the density, and they can be used in the construction of non-local exchange-correlation and kinetic functionals.

  18. Evaluating rainfall kinetic energy - intensity relationships with observed disdrometric data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angulo-Martinez, Marta; Begueria, Santiago; Latorre, Borja

    2016-04-01

    Rainfall kinetic energy is required for determining erosivity, the ability of rainfall to detach soil particles and initiate erosion. Its determination relay on the use of disdrometers, i.e. devices capable of measuring the drop size distribution and velocity of falling raindrops. In the absence of such devices, rainfall kinetic energy is usually estimated with empirical expressions relating rainfall energy and intensity. We evaluated the performance of 14 rainfall energy equations in estimating one-minute rainfall energy and event total energy, in comparison with observed data from 821 rainfall episodes (more than 100 thousand one-minute observations) by means of an optical disdrometer. In addition, two sources of bias when using such relationships were evaluated: i) the influence of using theoretical terminal raindrop fall velocities instead of measured values; and ii) the influence of time aggregation (rainfall intensity data every 5-, 10-, 15-, 30-, and 60-minutes). Empirical relationships did a relatively good job when complete events were considered (R2 > 0.82), but offered poorer results for within-event (one-minute resolution) variation. Also, systematic biases where large for many equations. When raindrop size distribution was known, estimating the terminal fall velocities by empirical laws produced good results even at fine time resolution. The influence of time aggregation was very high in the estimated kinetic energy, although linear scaling may allow empirical correction. This results stress the importance of considering all these effects when rainfall energy needs to be estimated from more standard precipitation records. , and recommends the use of disdrometer data to locally determine rainfall kinetic energy.

  19. Kinetic-energy functionals studied by surface calculations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vitos, Levente; Skriver, Hans Lomholt; Kollár, J.

    1998-01-01

    The self-consistent jellium model of metal surfaces is used to study the accuracy of a number of semilocal kinetic-energy functionals for independent particles. It is shown that the poor accuracy exhibited by the gradient expansion approximation and most of the semiempirical functionals in the lo...

  20. Turbulence kinetic energy budget during the afternoon transition - Part 2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nilsson, Erik; Lothon, Marie; Lohou, Fabienne; Pardyjak, Eric; Hartogensis, Oscar; Darbieu, Clara

    2016-01-01

    A simple model for turbulence kinetic energy (TKE) and the TKE budget is presented for sheared convective atmospheric conditions based on observations from the Boundary Layer Late Afternoon and Sunset Turbulence (BLLAST) field campaign. It is based on an idealized mixedlayer approximation and a s

  1. Local kinetic-energy density of the Airy gas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vitos, Levente; Johansson, B.; Kollár, J.;

    2000-01-01

    The Airy gas model is used to derive an expression for the local kinetic energy in the linear potential approximation. The expression contains an explicit Laplacian term 2/5((h) over bar(2)/2m)del(mu)(2)(r) that, according to jellium surface calculations, must be a universal feature of any accura...

  2. Mass, Momentum and Kinetic Energy of a Relativistic Particle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanchini, Enzo

    2010-01-01

    A rigorous definition of mass in special relativity, proposed in a recent paper, is recalled and employed to obtain simple and rigorous deductions of the expressions of momentum and kinetic energy for a relativistic particle. The whole logical framework appears as the natural extension of the classical one. Only the first, second and third laws of…

  3. The eddy kinetic energy budget in the Red Sea

    KAUST Repository

    Zhan, Peng

    2016-06-09

    The budget of eddy kinetic energy (EKE) in the Red Sea, including the sources, redistributions and sink, is examined using a high-resolution eddy-resolving ocean circulation model. A pronounced seasonally varying EKE is identified, with its maximum intensity occurring in winter, and the strongest EKE is captured mainly in the central and northern basins within the upper 200 m. Eddies acquire kinetic energy from conversion of eddy available potential energy (EPE), from transfer of mean kinetic energy (MKE), and from direct generation due to time-varying (turbulent) wind stress, the first of which contributes predominantly to the majority of the EKE. The EPE-to-EKE conversion occurs almost in the entire basin, while the MKE-to-EKE transfer appears mainly along the shelf boundary of the basin (200 miso-bath) where high horizontal shear interacts with topography. The EKE generated by the turbulent wind stress is relatively small and limited to the southern basin. All these processes are intensified during winter, when the rate of energy conversion is about four to five times larger than that in summer. The EKE is redistributed by the vertical and horizontal divergence of energy flux and the advection of the mean flow. As a main sink of EKE, dissipation processes is ubiquitously found in the basin. The seasonal variability of these energy conversion terms can explain the significant seasonality of eddy activities in the Red Sea. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  4. Plasma neutrino energy loss due to the axial-vector current at the late stages of stellar evolution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Jing-Jing

    2009-01-01

    Based on the Weinberg-Salam theory, the plasma neutrino energy loss rates of vector and axialvector contributions are studied.A ratable factor of the rates from the axial-vector current relative to those of the total neutrino energy loss rates is accurately calculated.The results show that the ratable factor will reach a maximum of 0.95 or even more at relatively higher temperature and lower density (such as P/μe< 10~7 g/cm~3).Thus the rates of the axial-vector contribution cannot be neglected.On the other hand, the rates of the axialvector contribution are on the order of~0.01% of the total vector contribution, which is in good agreement with Itoh's at relatively high density (such as p/μe>10~7 g/cm~3) and a temperature of T≤10~(11) K.

  5. A proposed method to measure relativistic kinetic energy of electrons in Penning Trap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Penning ion trap is a versatile tool which serves as a storage device for sub-atomic particles using a combination of quadrupolar electric potential for axial confinement and a strong magnetic field for radial confinement. Trapped particles have three oscillatory motions: 1) axial motion, along the direction of the magnetic field with frequency ωz, 2) the trap modified cyclotron motion at a higher frequency ω+, 3) slow magnetron motion with frequency ω+ , where ω- z + . The cryogenic Penning trap has so far been used for various precision measurements like the measurement of (g-2) parameter of electron and positron and several other similar studies. In this work, a new method of measuring the shape of a beta spectrum by high precision measurement of the relativistic kinetic energy of the electrons using a cryogenic Penning trap is proposed. Using this method, it might be possible to measure the shape of the end-point of a beta spectrum with a high precision enabling the mass measurement of electron-neutrino

  6. Design and characterization of axial flux permanent magnet energy harvester for vehicle magnetorheological damper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Xiaomin

    2016-01-01

    An axial flux permanent magnet energy harvester (AFPMEH) is proposed and analyzed for a vehicle magneto-rheological (MR) damper. The relationship between the output voltage and the input excitations are analytically developed. Under different constant rotation speeds and sinusoidal excitations, the harvesting energy is numerically computed for different loads of pure resistance and coil in the MR damper. To check the performance of the proposed AFPMEH for the MR damper, the AFPMEH and MR damper are fabricated individually. Experiments are performed to measure the harvesting energy of the AFPMEH and the damping characteristics of the MR damper under different excited conditions. The excited conditions include three constant rotation speeds and sinusoidal inputs. Load inputs of the pure resistance and the coil of the MR damper are considered. The results show that the time history of the generated voltage of the AFPMEH in experiment is agreed well with that of the AFPMEH in simulation. Under constant rotation speeds, the root mean square (rms) of loaded voltage will increase with the increment of load, whereas the rms of power will be affected by the amplitude of load. The MR damper powered by the AFPMEH can almost obtain the similar damping characteristics of that external power supply. Under sinusoidal inputs, the rms of loaded voltage will increase with the increment of external loads, whereas the rms of power will be almost kept as a constant. The damping range of the MR damper can also be enlarged over 30% comparing to off-state damping force. A quarter car model with an MR damper powered by the AFPMEH is developed to investigate the control performance. The on-off skyhook control is adopted to tune the input current of the MR damper. The vibration performance of the MR suspension is investigated under different roads and vehicle speeds. The numerical results show that the MR suspension with the AFPMEH under on-off skyhook control can achieve better ride comfort

  7. Effects of the nuclear symmetry energy on gravitational waves from the axial W-modes of isolated neutron stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The frequencies and damping times of the axial w-mode oscillations of neutron stars are investigated using a nuclear equation of state (EOS) partially constrained by the available terrestrial laboratory data. It is found that the nuclear symmetry energy Esym(ρ), especially its high density behavior, plays an important role in determining both the eigen-frequencies and the damping times of these oscillations. (author)

  8. Permanent Magnet Spiral Motor for Magnetic Gradient Energy Utilization: Axial Magnetic Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valone, Thomas F.

    2010-01-01

    power for magnetic field switching device can be achieved in order to deflect the rotor magnet in transit. The Wiegand effect itself (bistable FeCoV wire called "Vicalloy") invented by John Wiegand (Switchable Magnetic Device, US Patent ♯4,247,601), utilizing Barkhausen jumps of magnetic domains, is also applied for a similar achievement (Dilatush, 1977). Conventional approaches for spiral magnetic gradient force production have not been adequate for magnetostatic motors to perform useful work. It is proposed that integrating a magnetic force control device with a spiral stator inhomogeneous axial magnetic field motor is a viable approach to add a sufficient nonlinear boundary shift to apply the angular momentum and potential energy gained in 315 degrees of the motor cycle.

  9. Systems engineering analysis of kinetic energy weapon concepts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Senglaub, M.

    1996-06-01

    This study examines, from a systems engineering design perspective, the potential of kinetic energy weapons being used in the role of a conventional strategic weapon. Within the Department of Energy (DOE) complex, strategic weapon experience falls predominantly in the nuclear weapons arena. The techniques developed over the years may not be the most suitable methodologies for use in a new design/development arena. For this reason a more fundamental approach was pursued with the objective of developing an information base from which design decisions might be made concerning the conventional strategic weapon system concepts. The study examined (1) a number of generic missions, (2) the effects of a number of damage mechanisms from a physics perspective, (3) measures of effectiveness (MOE`s), and (4) a design envelope for kinetic energy weapon concepts. With the base of information a cut at developing a set of high-level system requirements was made, and a number of concepts were assessed against these requirements.

  10. Kinetics with deactivation of methylcyclohexane dehydrogenation for hydrogen energy storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maria, G.; Marin, A.; Wyss, C.; Mueller, S.; Newson, E. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1997-06-01

    The methylcyclohexane dehydrogenation step to recycle toluene and release hydrogen is being studied as part of a hydrogen energy storage project. The reaction is performed catalytically in a fixed bed reactor, and the efficiency of this step significantly determines overall system economics. The fresh catalyst kinetics and the deactivation of the catalyst by coke play an important role in the process analysis. The main reaction kinetics were determined from isothermal experiments using a parameter sensitivity analysis for model discrimination. An activation energy for the main reaction of 220{+-}11 kJ/mol was obtained from a two-parameter model. From non-isothermal deactivation in PC-controlled integral reactors, an activation energy for deactivation of 160 kJ/mol was estimated. A model for catalyst coke content of 3-17 weight% was compared with experimental data. (author) 3 figs., 6 refs.

  11. Crystal dissolution kinetics and Gibbs free energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luettge, Andreas [Department of Earth Science and the Department of Chemistry, Center for Biological and Environmental Nanotechnology, Rice University, 6100 Main Street, Houston, TX 77005 (United States)]. E-mail: aluttge@rice.edu

    2006-02-15

    The dependence of dissolution rates on the difference of Gibbs free energy is of critical importance for our understanding of crystal dissolution, reactive flow models and their applications to a variety of environmentally related problems. Here, we review experimental data generated with mineral powders and single crystals to develop a better understanding of apparent inconsistencies between otherwise internally consistent data sets. Additional information from direct surface observations and measurements with vertical scanning interferometry (VSI) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) of albite dissolution at 25, 150 and 185 deg. C may shed new light on this old but unsolved question. Our discussion is based on the importance of etch pit development, its {delta}G dependence, and the pits' role as a source for steps and step movement in the dissolution process. Results indicate that reaction history may be of critical importance in determining the overall reaction mechanism and its rate. Different rates are observed for systems having otherwise identical {delta}G {sub r} acquired from increasing versus decreasing disequilibrium positions. In this context, we finally discuss the validity of the common application of transition state theory (TST) to elementary and overall reactions governing the dissolution process. In this discussion of crystal dissolution, we contrast TST applications with a stochastic, many-body treatment that has led to the development of a stepwave model. This discussion also focuses on the controversy caused by the rivalry between surface adsorption models and a probabilistic model that seeks to incorporate the full three-dimensional crystal structure.

  12. Mesoscale and macroscale kinetic energy fluxes from granular fabric evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, David M.; Tordesillas, Antoinette; Froyland, Gary

    2014-03-01

    Recent advances in high-resolution measurements means it is now possible to identify and track the local "fabric" or contact topology of individual grains in a deforming sand throughout loading history. These provide compelling impetus to the development of methods for inferring changes in the contact forces and energies at multiple spatiotemporal scales, using information on grain contacts alone. Here we develop a surrogate measure of the fluctuating kinetic energy based on changes in the local contact topology of individual grains. We demonstrate the method for dense granular materials under quasistatic biaxial shear. In these systems, the initially stable and solidlike response eventually gives way to liquidlike behavior and global failure. This crossover in mechanical behavior, akin to a phase transition, is marked by bursts of kinetic energy and frictional dissipation. Mechanisms underlying this release of energy include the buckling of major load-bearing structures known as force chains. These columns of grains represent major repositories for stored strain energy. Stored energy initially accumulates at all of the contacts along the force chain, but is released collectively when the chain overloads and buckles. The exact quantification of the buildup and release of energy in force chains, and the manner in which force chain buckling propagates in the sample (i.e., diffuse and systemwide versus localized into shear bands), requires detailed knowledge of contact forces. To date, however, the forces at grain contacts continue to elude measurement in natural granular materials like sand. Here, using data from computer simulations, we show that a proxy for the fluctuating kinetic energy in dense granular materials can be suitably constructed solely from the evolving properties of the grain's local contact topology. Our approach directly relates the evolution of fabric to energy flux and makes possible research into the propagation of failure from measurements of

  13. Effects of directed and kinetic energy weapons on spacecraft

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fraas, A P

    1986-12-01

    The characteristics of the various directed energy beams are reviewed, and their damaging effects on typical materials are examined for a wide range of energy pulse intensities and durations. Representative cases are surveyed, and charts are presented to indicate regions in which damage to spacecraft structures, particularly radiators for power plants, would be likely. The effects of kinetic energy weapons, such as bird-shot, are similarly examined. The charts are then applied to evaluate the effectiveness of various measures designed to reduce the vulnerability of spacecraft components, particularly nuclear electric power plants.

  14. High energy micro electron beam generation using chirped laser pulse in the presence of an axial magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akou, H., E-mail: h.akou@nit.ac.ir; Hamedi, M. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Basic Science, Babol University of Technology, Babol 47148-71167 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    In this paper, the generation of high-quality and high-energy micro electron beam in vacuum by a chirped Gaussian laser pulse in the presence of an axial magnetic field is numerically investigated. The features of energy and angular spectra, emittances, and position distribution of electron beam are compared in two cases, i.e., in the presence and absence of an external magnetic field. The electron beam is accelerated with higher energy and qualified in spatial distribution in the presence of the magnetic field. The presence of an axial magnetic field improves electron beam spatial quality as well as its gained energy through keeping the electron motion parallel to the direction of propagation for longer distances. It has been found that a 64 μm electron bunch with about MeV initial energy becomes a 20 μm electron beam with high energy of the order of GeV, after interacting with a laser pulse in the presence of an external magnetic field.

  15. Universal Power Law for Relationship between Rainfall Kinetic Energy and Rainfall Intensity

    OpenAIRE

    Seung Sook Shin; Sang Deog Park; Byoung Koo Choi

    2016-01-01

    Rainfall kinetic energy has been linked to linear, exponential, logarithmic, and power-law functions using rainfall intensity as an independent variable. The power law is the most suitable mathematical expression used to relate rainfall kinetic energy and rainfall intensity. In evaluating the rainfall kinetic energy, the empirical power laws have shown a larger deviation than other functions. In this study, universal power law between rainfall kinetic energy and rainfall intensity was propose...

  16. Rotational and divergent kinetic energy in the mesoscale model ALADIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Blažica

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Kinetic energy spectra from the mesoscale numerical weather prediction (NWP model ALADIN with horizontal resolution 4.4 km are split into divergent and rotational components which are then compared at horizontal scales below 300 km and various vertical levels. It is shown that about 50% of kinetic energy in the free troposphere in ALADIN is divergent energy. The percentage increases towards 70% near the surface and in the upper troposphere towards 100 hPa. The maximal percentage of divergent energy is found at stratospheric levels around 100 hPa and at scales below 100 km which are not represented by the global models. At all levels, the divergent energy spectra are characterised by shallower slopes than the rotational energy spectra, and the difference increases as horizontal scales become larger. A very similar vertical distribution of divergent energy is obtained by using the standard ALADIN approach for the computation of spectra based on the extension zone and by applying detrending approach commonly used in mesoscale NWP community.

  17. Casimir rack and pinion as a miniaturized kinetic energy harvester.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miri, MirFaez; Etesami, Zahra

    2016-08-01

    We study a nanoscale machine composed of a rack and a pinion with no contact, but intermeshed via the lateral Casimir force. We adopt a simple model for the random velocity of the rack subject to external random forces, namely, a dichotomous noise with zero mean value. We show that the pinion, even when it experiences random thermal torque, can do work against a load. The device thus converts the kinetic energy of the random motions of the rack into useful work.

  18. Fragment kinetic energy distributions in ion induced CO2 fragmentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The dissociation of CO3+2 formed in heavy ion induced ionization of CO2 has been studied using the technique of time of flight mass spectroscopy with position sensitive ion detector, with 5 MeV/u Si12+ ions as projectiles. The kinetic energy released in the CO3+2→ C+ + O+ + O+ is measured and compared to theoretical ab initio calculations as well as photoionization results.

  19. Casimir rack and pinion as a miniaturized kinetic energy harvester

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miri, MirFaez; Etesami, Zahra

    2016-08-01

    We study a nanoscale machine composed of a rack and a pinion with no contact, but intermeshed via the lateral Casimir force. We adopt a simple model for the random velocity of the rack subject to external random forces, namely, a dichotomous noise with zero mean value. We show that the pinion, even when it experiences random thermal torque, can do work against a load. The device thus converts the kinetic energy of the random motions of the rack into useful work.

  20. Kinetic Energy of Tornadoes in the United States

    OpenAIRE

    Tyler Fricker; James B. Elsner

    2015-01-01

    Tornadoes can cause catastrophic destruction. Here total kinetic energy (TKE) as a metric of destruction is computed from the fraction of the tornado path experiencing various damage levels and a characteristic wind speed for each level. The fraction of the path is obtained from a model developed for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission that combines theory with empirical data. TKE is validated as a useful metric by comparing it to other indexes and loss indicators. Half of all tornadoes have TK...

  1. Electron injection for direct acceleration to multi-GeV energy by a Gaussian laser field under the influence of axial magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghotra, Harjit Singh; Kant, Niti

    2016-05-01

    Electron injected in the path of a circularly polarized Gaussian laser beam under the influence of an external axial magnetic field is shown to be accelerated with a several GeV of energy in vacuum. A small angle of injection δ with 0 ∘ propagation of laser pulse is suggested for better trapping of electron in laser field and stronger betatron resonance under the influence of axial magnetic field. Such an optimized electron injection with axial magnetic field maximizes the acceleration gradient and electron energy gain with low electron scattering.

  2. Michaelis-Menten Kinetics and the Activation Energy Relate Soil Peroxidase Kinetics to the Lignin Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triebwasser-Freese, D.; Tharayil, N.; Preston, C. M.; Gerard, P.

    2013-12-01

    Recently, it has been suggested that lignin exhibit a turnover rate of less than 6 years, suggesting that the enzymatic mechanisms mediating the decay of lignin are less understood. One factor that could be affecting the mean residence time of lignin in the soil is the catalytic efficiency of soil oxidoreductase enzymes. We characterized the spatial and seasonal transitions in the Michaelis-Menten kinetics and activation energy of the soil oxidoreductase enzyme, peroxidase, across three ecosystems of differing litter chemistries- pine, deciduous forest, and a cultivated field- and associate it to the soil lignin chemistries. To interpret the combined effect of Vmax and Km, the two parameters were integrated into one term which we defined as the catalytic efficiency. Generally, the peroxidases in pine soils exhibited the highest Vmax and Km, resulting in the lowest catalytic efficiency, followed by that in the deciduous soils. Meanwhile, the agricultural soils which exhibited the lowest Vmax and Km contained the highest catalytic efficiency of peroxidase. Through linear regression analysis of the kinetic parameters to the soil lignin chemistry, we discerned that the catalytic efficiency term best associated to the lignin monomer ratios (C/V, P/V, and SCV/V). The Activation Energy of peroxidase varied by depth, and seasons across the ecosystems. However, the Activation Energy of peroxidase did not relate to the lignin chemistry or quantity. Collectively, our results show that although the peroxidase Vmax and Km in the phenolic-poor soils are low, the degradation efficiency of peroxidases in this soils can be equivalent or exceed that of phenolic-rich soils. This study, through the characterization of Michaelis-Menten kinetics, provides a new insight into the mechanisms that could moderate the decomposition of lignin in soils.

  3. Effect of axial heat transfer and atmospheric conditions on the energy performance of GSHP systems: A simulation-based analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A range of analytical and numerical models is available to investigate the thermal behaviour of vertical ground heat exchangers, both in the short- and long-term. However, most of them ignore the thermal effects of weather at ground level that affect the upper part of boreholes. Furthermore, few models look at the integrated simulation of a ground source heat pump system for both the borehole field and heat pump. Consequently, a limited number of applications to real cases are available for designers. This paper shows a study to assess the effects of both axial heat transfer in boreholes and the weather at ground level on the fluid temperature in the boreholes, as well as on the energy efficiency of the heat pump. To this purpose, long-term analysis of two ground source heat pump systems was conducted over ten years by means of a detailed numerical simulation tool. The systems were for two office buildings with unbalanced load profiles in Canada and Italy. These case studies were analyzed as they were being designed, then the influence of the borehole arrangement and borehole length was also investigated. The simulation results show that axial heat transfer affects fluid temperature in the boreholes and the seasonal energy efficiency of the whole system more than the weather. Moreover, when the load profile is unbalanced, neglecting the effect of weather does not always ensure a conservative design of the borehole field. - Highlights: • Multi-year integrated simulations of two real GSHP systems are carried out. • The work focuses on the long-term energy efficiency of GSHP systems. • The simulation tool considers both the borehole field and the heat pump. • The axial heat transfer in the ground affects the energy efficiency of the system. • The weather at the ground level affects the fluid temperature in the boreholes

  4. Neutron Generation and Kinetic Energy of Expanding Laser Plasmas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Yong-Sheng; WANG Nai-Yan; DUAN Xiao-Jiao; LAN Xiao-Fei; TAN Zhi-Xin; TANG Xiu-Zhang; HE Ye-Xi

    2007-01-01

    We investigate the kinetic energy of expanding plasma of a solid target heated by a ultra-short and ultra-intense laser pulse and the efficiency of energy coupling between the ultra-intense laser pulse and the solid target, in order to increase the utilization ratio of laser energy and to raise the neutron generation farther. Some new ideas about improving the energy utilization by head-on collisions between the expanding plasmas are proposed. The significance is the raise of generation of shorter duration neutron, of the order of picoseconds, which allows for an increase of energy resolution in time-of-flight experiments and also for the investigation of the dynamics of nuclear processes with high temporal resolution.

  5. Enhanced propagation of rainfall kinetic energy in the UK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diodato, Nazzareno; Bellocchi, Gianni

    2016-07-01

    A gridded 0.25° reconstruction of rainfall kinetic energy (RKE) over the UK, on the basis of pluviometric observations and reanalysis back to 1765, shows that autumn RKE doubled in 1991-2013 (˜2 MJ m-2) compared to 1948-1990 (˜1 MJ m-2). A shift eastward is underway, which includes southern and northern portions of the country. Analyzing the long-running England and Wales precipitation series, we conclude that it is likely that increased precipitation amounts associated with more frequent convective storms created conditions for higher energy events.

  6. Decay and Spatial Diffusion of Turbulent Kinetic Energy In The Presence of a Linear Kinetic Energy Gradient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meneveau, Charles

    2015-11-01

    A topic that elicited the interest of John Lumley is pressure transport in turbulence. In 1978 (JL, in Advances in Applied Mechanics, pages 123-176) he showed that pressure transport likely acts in the opposite direction to the spatial flux of kinetic energy due to triple velocity correlations. Here we examine a flow in which the interplay of turbulent decay and spatial transport is particularly relevant. Specifically, using a specially designed active grid and screens placed in the Corrsin wind tunnel, such a flow is realized. Data are acquired using X-wire thermal anemometry at different spanwise and downstream locations. In order to resolve the dissipation rate accurately, measurements are also acquired using the NSTAP probe developed and manufactured by Princeton researchers and kindly provided to us (M. Hultmark, Y. Fan, L. Smits). The results show power-law decay with downstream distance, with a decay exponent that becomes larger in the high kinetic energy side of the flow. Measurements of the dissipation enable us to obtain the spanwise gradient of the spatial flux. One possible explanation for the observations is upgrading transport of kinetic energy due to pressure-velocity correlations, although its magnitude required to close the budget appears very large. Absence of simultaneous pressure velocity measurement preclude us to fully elucidate the observed trends. In collaboration with Adrien Thormann, Johns Hopkins University. Financial support: National Science Foundation.

  7. Dissipation of jet bulk kinetic energy in powerful blazars

    CERN Document Server

    Katarzynski, K

    2006-01-01

    We investigate the dissipation of the bulk kinetic energy of a relativistic jet at different distances from the central power--house and analyse in detail how the dissipated energy is radiated away. We assume that the location of the dissipation region is a function of the bulk Lorentz factor Gamma of the jet, being closer to the center for smaller Gamma. This assumption is naturally fulfilled in the internal shock scenario. The dissipated energy is partially used to accelerate electrons and to amplify the magnetic field. This process creates a source inside the jet (blob). Such blobs may efficiently produce synchrotron and inverse Compton emission. We find that even if the blobs or shells responsible for the blazar activity carry the same energy (in bulk kinetic form), the fact that they move at different Gamma can produce dramatic variations in different bands, even if the bolometric luminosity is instead very similar. This is due to the relative importance of the synchrotron, self-Compton and external Comp...

  8. Oil shale pyrolysis kinetics and variable activation energy principle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Ayed, Omar S. [Faculty of Engineering Technology, Department of Chemical Engineering, P.O. Box 15008, Marka 11134 (Jordan); Matouq, M.; Anbar, Z.; Khaleel, Adnan M. [Faculty of Engineering Technology, Department of Chemical Engineering, P.O. Box 15008, Marka 11134 (Jordan); Department of Basic Sciences, Prince Abdullah Bin-Ghazi of Science and Information, Al-Balqa Applied University (Jordan); Abu-Nameh, Eyad [Department of Basic Sciences, Prince Abdullah Bin-Ghazi of Science and Information, Al-Balqa Applied University (Jordan)

    2010-04-15

    A modified first order kinetic equation with variable activation energy is employed to model the total weight loss of Ellajjun oil shale samples. Fixed bed retort with 400 g of oil shale sample size is used in this study in 350-550 C temperature range. Variable heating rate, h, in the range 2.6-5 C min{sup -1} are tested. Activation energy was allowed to vary as a function of oil shale conversion. The value of the activation energy increased from 98 to 120 kJ mol{sup -1} while the corresponding frequency factor changed from 9.51 x 10{sup 5} to 1.16 x 10{sup 6}. Fischer Assay analysis of the studied samples indicated 12.2 wt.% oil content. The oil shale decomposition ranged from 3.2% to 28.0%. The obtained kinetic data are modeled using variable heating rate, pyrolysis temperature and variable activation energy principle in a nitrogen sweeping medium. Good fit to the obtained experimental data is achieved. (author)

  9. Momentum and Kinetic Energy Before the Tackle in Rugby Union

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharief Hendricks, David Karpul, Mike Lambert

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the physical demands of a tackle in match situations is important for safe and effective training, developing equipment and research. Physical components such as momentum and kinetic energy, and it relationship to tackle outcome is not known. The aim of this study was to compare momenta between ball-carrier and tackler, level of play (elite, university and junior and position (forwards vs. backs, and describe the relationship between ball-carrier and tackler mass, velocity and momentum and the tackle outcome. Also, report on the ball-carrier and tackler kinetic energy before contact and the estimated magnitude of impact (energy distributed between ball-carrier and tackler upon contact. Velocity over 0.5 seconds before contact was determined using a 2-dimensional scaled version of the field generated from a computer alogorithm. Body masses of players were obtained from their player profiles. Momentum and kinetic energy were subsequently calculated for 60 tackle events. Ball-carriers were heavier than the tacklers (ball-carrier 100 ± 14 kg vs. tackler 93 ± 11 kg, d = 0.52, p = 0.0041, n = 60. Ball-carriers as forwards had a significantly higher momentum than backs (forwards 563 ± 226 Kg.m.s-1 n = 31 vs. backs 438 ± 135 Kg.m.s-1, d = 0.63, p = 0.0012, n = 29. Tacklers dominated 57% of tackles and ball-carriers dominated 43% of tackles. Despite the ball-carrier having a mass advantage before contact more frequently than the tackler, momentum advantage and tackle dominance between the ball-carrier and tackler was proportionally similar. These findings may reflect a characteristic of the modern game of rugby where efficiently heavier players (particularly forwards are tactically predetermined to carry the ball in contact.

  10. Energy dissipation in magnetic null points at kinetic scales

    CERN Document Server

    Olshevsky, Vyacheslav; Eriksson, Elin; Markidis, Stefano; Lapenta, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    We use kinetic particle-in-cell and magnetohydrodynamic simulations supported by an observational dataset to investigate magnetic reconnection in clusters of null points in space plasma. The magnetic configuration under investigation is driven by fast adiabatic flux rope compression that dissipates almost half of the initial magnetic field energy. In this phase powerful currents are excited producing secondary instabilities, and the system is brought into a state of `intermittent turbulence' within a few ion gyro-periods. Reconnection events are distributed all over the simulation domain and energy dissipation is rather volume-filling. Numerous spiral null points interconnected via their spines form null lines embedded into magnetic flux ropes; null point pairs demonstrate the signatures of torsional spine reconnection. However, energy dissipation mainly happens in the shear layers formed by adjacent flux ropes with oppositely directed currents. In these regions radial null pairs are spontaneously emerging an...

  11. Entropy perturbations in assisted dark energy with mixed kinetic terms

    CERN Document Server

    Karwan, Khamphee

    2010-01-01

    We study the effects of entropy perturbations in the two fields assisted dark energy model on the density perturbations in the universe. Based on usual scenario of assisted dark energy, in which one scalar field is subdominant compared with the other in the early epoch, we show that the entropy perturbations in this two scalar field system can be constant in the early epoch and hence survive until the present epoch for a generic evolution of both fields during the radiation and matter eras. This behaviour of the entropy perturbations is preserved even when the fields are coupled via kinetic interaction. The entropy perturbations can enhance the integrated Sachs-Wolfe (ISW) effect if the signs of the contributions from entropy perturbations and curvature perturbations are opposite during dark energy domination, otherwise the ISW contribution is suppressed or changes sign. For canonical scalar field the effect of entropy perturbations on ISW effect is small because the initial value of the entropy perturbations...

  12. Army hypersonic compact kinetic-energy missile laser window design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Gerald W.; Cayson, Stephen C.; Jones, Michael M.; Carriger, Wendy; Mitchell, Robert R.; Strobel, Forrest A.; Rembert, Michael; Gibson, David A.

    2003-09-01

    The U.S. Army Aviation and Missile Command, Aviation and Missile Research, Engineering, and Development Center (AMRDEC) is currently developing the Compact Kinetic Energy Missile (CKEM) which achieves hypersonic velocities at sea level. The system incorporates guidance to the target and requires active guidance technology. CKEM's kinetic energy warhead requires an accurate guidance sub-system in order to achieve high probability of kills at long range. Due to the severity of the aerothermal environments, minimized reaction time for small time to target conditions, and the communication degrading effects of the missile's energetic boost motor, a state of the art guidance technique is being developed by the AMRDEC Missile Guidance Directorate called Side-Scatter Laser Beam Rider. This technology incorporates a 1.06 micron laser to receive an off-axis laser guidance link to communicate guidance information from the launch site to the missile. This concept requires the use of optical windows on board the missile for the missile-borne laser energy signal receivers. The current concept utilizes four rectangular windows at 90° increments around the missile. The peak velocity during flight can reach approximately 6300 ft/sec inducing severe aerothermal heating and highly transient thermal gradients. The Propulsion and Structures Directorate was tasked to design and experimentally validate the laser window. Additionally, flight tests were conducted to demonstrate the laser guidance technology. This paper will present the laser window design development process as well as aerothermal testing to induce flight like environments and assess worst case thermostructural conditions.

  13. Casimir rack and pinion as a miniaturized kinetic energy harvester.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miri, MirFaez; Etesami, Zahra

    2016-08-01

    We study a nanoscale machine composed of a rack and a pinion with no contact, but intermeshed via the lateral Casimir force. We adopt a simple model for the random velocity of the rack subject to external random forces, namely, a dichotomous noise with zero mean value. We show that the pinion, even when it experiences random thermal torque, can do work against a load. The device thus converts the kinetic energy of the random motions of the rack into useful work. PMID:27627286

  14. Molecular partitioning based on the kinetic energy density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noorizadeh, Siamak

    2016-05-01

    Molecular partitioning based on the kinetic energy density is performed to a number of chemical species, which show non-nuclear attractors (NNA) in their gradient maps of the electron density. It is found that NNAs are removed using this molecular partitioning and although the virial theorem is not valid for all of the basins obtained in the being used AIM, all of the atoms obtained using the new approach obey this theorem. A comparison is also made between some atomic topological parameters which are obtained from the new partitioning approach and those calculated based on the electron density partitioning.

  15. Quieting the Flows in Valves Using Kinetic Energy Degraders

    OpenAIRE

    Pluviose, Michel

    2013-01-01

    It’s common knowledge that nature is a subtle mixture of order and disorder. On a windless day, everything seems calm, and yet billions and billions of molecules are constantly moving and colliding in the microscopic world. We are oblivious to all this activity and believe we are safe. Then the wind picks up. It possesses kinetic energy that we can partially capture in wind turbines. Sometimes, violent gusts and gale force winds begin to blow, destroying houses and damaging nature in their pa...

  16. Spectral Energy Transfer and Dissipation of Magnetic Energy from Fluid to Kinetic Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowers, K.; Li, H.

    2007-01-01

    We investigate the magnetic energy transfer from the fluid to kinetic scales and dissipation processes using three-dimensional fully kinetic particle-in-cell plasma simulations. The nonlinear evolution of a sheet pinch is studied where we show that it exhibits both fluid scale global relaxation and kinetic scale collisionless reconnection at multiple resonant surfaces. The interactions among collisionless tearing modes destroy the original flux surfaces and produce stochastic fields, along with generating sheets and filaments of intensified currents. In addition, the magnetic energy is transferred from the original shear length scale both to the large scales due to the global relaxation and to the smaller, kinetic scales for dissipation. The dissipation is dominated by the thermal or pressure effect in the generalized Ohm’s law, and electrons are preferentially accelerated.

  17. A rotational and axial motion system load frame insert for in situ high energy x-ray studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shade, Paul A., E-mail: paul.shade.1@us.af.mil; Schuren, Jay C.; Turner, Todd J. [Materials and Manufacturing Directorate, Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright-Patterson AFB, Ohio 45433 (United States); Blank, Basil [PulseRay, Beaver Dams, New York 14812 (United States); Kenesei, Peter; Goetze, Kurt; Lienert, Ulrich; Almer, Jonathan [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Suter, Robert M. [Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213 (United States); Bernier, Joel V.; Li, Shiu Fai [Engineering Directorate, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Lind, Jonathan [Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213 (United States); Engineering Directorate, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

    2015-09-15

    High energy x-ray characterization methods hold great potential for gaining insight into the behavior of materials and providing comparison datasets for the validation and development of mesoscale modeling tools. A suite of techniques have been developed by the x-ray community for characterizing the 3D structure and micromechanical state of polycrystalline materials; however, combining these techniques with in situ mechanical testing under well characterized and controlled boundary conditions has been challenging due to experimental design requirements, which demand new high-precision hardware as well as access to high-energy x-ray beamlines. We describe the design and performance of a load frame insert with a rotational and axial motion system that has been developed to meet these requirements. An example dataset from a deforming titanium alloy demonstrates the new capability.

  18. Kinetic energy for the nuclear Yang-Mills collective model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosensteel, George; Sparks, Nick

    2015-10-01

    The Bohr-Mottelson-Frankfurt model of nuclear rotations and quadrupole vibrations is a foundational model in nuclear structure physics. The model, also called the geometrical collective model or simply GCM, has two hidden mathematical structures, one Lie group theoretic and the other differential geometric. Although the group structure has been understood for some time, the geometric structure is a new unexplored feature that shares the same mathematical origin as Yang-Mills, viz., a vector bundle with a non-abelian structure group and a connection. Using the de Rham Laplacian ▵ = * d * d from differential geometry for the kinetic energy extends significantly the physical scope of the GCM model. This Laplacian contains a ``magnetic'' term due to the coupling between base manifold rotational and fiber vorticity degrees of freedom. When the connection specializes to irrotational flow, the Laplacian reduces to the Bohr-Mottelson kinetic energy operator. More generally, the connection yields a moment of inertia that is intermediate between the extremes of irrotational flow and rigid body motion.

  19. Cartilage surface characterization by frictional dissipated energy during axially loaded knee flexion--an in vitro sheep model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenz, Andrea; Rothstock, Stephan; Bobrowitsch, Evgenij; Beck, Alexander; Gruhler, Gerhard; Ipach, Ingmar; Leichtle, Ulf G; Wülker, Nikolaus; Walter, Christian

    2013-05-31

    Cartilage defects and osteoarthritis (OA) have an increasing incidence in the aging population. A wide range of treatment options are available. The introduction of each new treatment requires controlled, evidence based, histological and biomechanical studies to identify potential benefits. Especially for the biomechanical testing there is a lack of established methods which combine a physiologic testing environment of complete joints with the possibility of body-weight simulation. The current in-vitro study presents a new method for the measurement of friction properties of cartilage on cartilage in its individual joint environment including the synovial fluid. Seven sheep knee joints were cyclically flexed and extended under constant axial load with intact joint capsule using a 6° of freedom robotic system. During the cyclic motion, the flexion angle and the respective torque were recorded and the dissipated energy was calculated. Different mechanically induced cartilage defect sizes (16 mm², 50 mm², 200 mm²) were examined and compared to the intact situation at varying levels of the axial load. The introduced setup could significantly distinguish between most of the defect sizes for all load levels above 200 N. For these higher load levels, a high reproducibility was achieved (coefficient of variation between 4% and 17%). The proposed method simulates a natural environment for the analysis of cartilage on cartilage friction properties and is able to differentiate between different cartilage defect sizes. Therefore, it is considered as an innovative method for the testing of new treatment options for cartilage defects.

  20. Kinetic Energy of Tornadoes in the United States.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tyler Fricker

    Full Text Available Tornadoes can cause catastrophic destruction. Here total kinetic energy (TKE as a metric of destruction is computed from the fraction of the tornado path experiencing various damage levels and a characteristic wind speed for each level. The fraction of the path is obtained from a model developed for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission that combines theory with empirical data. TKE is validated as a useful metric by comparing it to other indexes and loss indicators. Half of all tornadoes have TKE exceeding 62.1 GJ and a quarter have TKE exceeding 383.2 GJ. One percent of the tornadoes have TKE exceeding 31.9 TJ. April has more energy than May with fewer tornadoes; March has more energy than June with half as many tornadoes. September has the least energy but November and December have the fewest tornadoes. Alabama ranks number one in terms of tornado energy with 2.48 PJ over the period 2007-2013. TKE can be used to help better understand the changing nature of tornado activity.

  1. Kinetic Energy of Tornadoes in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fricker, Tyler; Elsner, James B

    2015-01-01

    Tornadoes can cause catastrophic destruction. Here total kinetic energy (TKE) as a metric of destruction is computed from the fraction of the tornado path experiencing various damage levels and a characteristic wind speed for each level. The fraction of the path is obtained from a model developed for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission that combines theory with empirical data. TKE is validated as a useful metric by comparing it to other indexes and loss indicators. Half of all tornadoes have TKE exceeding 62.1 GJ and a quarter have TKE exceeding 383.2 GJ. One percent of the tornadoes have TKE exceeding 31.9 TJ. April has more energy than May with fewer tornadoes; March has more energy than June with half as many tornadoes. September has the least energy but November and December have the fewest tornadoes. Alabama ranks number one in terms of tornado energy with 2.48 PJ over the period 2007-2013. TKE can be used to help better understand the changing nature of tornado activity. PMID:26132830

  2. Isospin-invariant Skyrme energy-density-functional approach with axial symmetry

    CERN Document Server

    Sheikh, J A; Dobaczewski, J; Nakatsukasa, T; Nazarewicz, W; Sato, K

    2014-01-01

    We develop the isospin-invariant Skyrme-EDF method by considering local densities in all possible isospin channels and proton-neutron (p-n) mixing terms as mandated by the isospin symmetry. The EDF employed has the most general form that depends quadratically on the isoscalar and isovector densities. We test and benchmark the resulting p-n EDF approach, and study the general properties of the new scheme by means of the cranking in the isospin space. We extend the existing axial DFT solver HFBTHO to the case of isospin-invariant EDF approach with all possible p-n mixing terms. Explicit expressions have been derived for all the densities and potentials that appear in the isospin representation. In practical tests, we consider the Skyrme EDF SkM* and, as a first application, concentrate on Hartree-Fock aspects of the problem, i.e., pairing has been disregarded. Calculations have been performed for the (A=78, T~11), (A=40, T~8), and (A=48, T~4) isobaric analog chains. Isospin structure of self-consistent p-n mixe...

  3. Functional derivative of the kinetic energy functional for spherically symmetric systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagy, Á

    2011-07-28

    Ensemble non-interacting kinetic energy functional is constructed for spherically symmetric systems. The differential virial theorem is derived for the ensemble. A first-order differential equation for the functional derivative of the ensemble non-interacting kinetic energy functional and the ensemble Pauli potential is presented. This equation can be solved and a special case of the solution provides the original non-interacting kinetic energy of the density functional theory. PMID:21806089

  4. Functional derivative of the kinetic energy functional for spherically symmetric systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagy, Á

    2011-07-28

    Ensemble non-interacting kinetic energy functional is constructed for spherically symmetric systems. The differential virial theorem is derived for the ensemble. A first-order differential equation for the functional derivative of the ensemble non-interacting kinetic energy functional and the ensemble Pauli potential is presented. This equation can be solved and a special case of the solution provides the original non-interacting kinetic energy of the density functional theory.

  5. Imprints of the nuclear symmetry energy on gravitational waves from the axial w-modes of neutron stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The eigenfrequencies of the axial w-modes of oscillating neutron stars are studied using the continued fraction method with an equation of state (EOS) partially constrained by the recent terrestrial nuclear laboratory data. It is shown that the density dependence of the nuclear symmetry energy Esym(ρ) affects significantly both the frequencies and the damping times of these modes. Besides confirming the previously found universal behavior of the mass-scaled eigenfrequencies as functions of the compactness of neutron stars, we explored several alternative universal scaling functions. Moreover, the wII-mode is found to exist only for neutron stars having a compactness of M/R≥0.1078 independent of the EOS used.

  6. Mass independent kinetic energy reducing inlet system for vacuum environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reilly, Peter T. A. [Knoxville, TN

    2010-12-14

    A particle inlet system comprises a first chamber having a limiting orifice for an incoming gas stream and a micrometer controlled expansion slit. Lateral components of the momentum of the particles are substantially cancelled due to symmetry of the configuration once the laminar flow converges at the expansion slit. The particles and flow into a second chamber, which is maintained at a lower pressure than the first chamber, and then moves into a third chamber including multipole guides for electromagnetically confining the particle. The vertical momentum of the particles descending through the center of the third chamber is minimized as an upward stream of gases reduces the downward momentum of the particles. The translational kinetic energy of the particles is near-zero irrespective of the mass of the particles at an exit opening of the third chamber, which may be advantageously employed to provide enhanced mass resolution in mass spectrometry.

  7. An integral turbulent kinetic energy analysis of free shear flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, C. E.; Phares, W. J.

    1973-01-01

    Mixing of coaxial streams is analyzed by application of integral techniques. An integrated turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) equation is solved simultaneously with the integral equations for the mean flow. Normalized TKE profile shapes are obtained from incompressible jet and shear layer experiments and are assumed to be applicable to all free turbulent flows. The shear stress at the midpoint of the mixing zone is assumed to be directly proportional to the local TKE, and dissipation is treated with a generalization of the model developed for isotropic turbulence. Although the analysis was developed for ducted flows, constant-pressure flows were approximated with the duct much larger than the jet. The axisymmetric flows under consideration were predicted with reasonable accuracy. Fairly good results were also obtained for the fully developed two-dimensional shear layers, which were computed as thin layers at the boundary of a large circular jet.

  8. Study of axial magnetic effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braguta, Victor [IHEP, Protvino, Moscow region, 142284 Russia ITEP, B. Cheremushkinskaya street 25, Moscow, 117218 (Russian Federation); School of Biomedicine, Far Eastern Federal University, Ajax 10 Building 25, Russian island, Vladivostok, 690922 (Russian Federation); Chernodub, M. N. [CNRS, Laboratoire de Mathématiques et Physique Théorique, Université François-Rabelais Tours, Fédération Denis Poisson, Parc de Grandmont, 37200 Tours, France Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Gent, Krijgslaan 281, S9, B-9000 Gent (Belgium); School of Biomedicine, Far Eastern Federal University, Ajax 10 Building 25, Russian island, Vladivostok, 690922 (Russian Federation); Goy, V. A. [School of Natural Sciences, Far Eastern Federal University, Sukhanova street 8, Vladivostok, 690950 (Russian Federation); Landsteiner, K. [Instituto de Física Teórica UAM/CSIC, C/ Nicolás Cabrera 13-15, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Molochkov, A. V. [School of Biomedicine, Far Eastern Federal University, Ajax 10 Building 25, Russian island, Vladivostok, 690922 (Russian Federation); Ulybyshev, M. [ITEP, B. Cheremushkinskaya street 25, Moscow, 117218 Russia Institute for Theoretical Problems of Microphysics, Moscow State University, Moscow, 119899 (Russian Federation)

    2016-01-22

    The Axial Magnetic Effect manifests itself as an equilibrium energy flow of massless fermions induced by the axial (chiral) magnetic field. Here we study the Axial Magnetic Effect in the quenched SU(2) lattice gauge theory with massless overlap fermions at finite temperature. We numerically observe that in the low-temperature hadron phase the effect is absent due to the quark confinement. In the high-temperature deconfinement phase the energy flow is an increasing function of the temperature which reaches the predicted asymptotic T{sup 2} behavior at high temperatures. We find, however, that energy flow is about one order of magnitude lower compared to a theoretical prediction.

  9. Axial anomaly and energy dependence of hyperon polarization in Heavy-Ion Collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Sorin, A

    2016-01-01

    We address the issue of energy and charge dependence of global polarization of $\\Lambda$ hyperons in peripheral $Au-Au$ collisions recently observed by STAR collaboration at RHIC. We compare the different contributions to the anomalous mechanism relating polarization to vorticity and hydrodynamic helicity in QCD matter. We stress that the suppression of gravitational anomaly related contribution in strongly correlated matter observed in lattice simulations confirms our earlier prediction of rapid decrease of polarization with collision energy. Our mechanism leads to the polarization of $\\bar \\Lambda$ of the same sign and larger magnitude than $\\Lambda$. The energy and charge dependence of polarization is suggested as a sensitive probe of fine details of QCD matter structure.

  10. A calculation of internal kinetic energy and polarizability of compressed argon from the statistical atom model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seldam, C.A. ten; Groot, S.R. de

    1952-01-01

    From Jensen's and Gombás' modification of the statistical Thomas-Fermi atom model, a theory for compressed atoms is developed by changing the boundary conditions. Internal kinetic energy and polarizability of argon are calculated as functions of pressure. At 1000 atm. an internal kinetic energy of a

  11. A Virial Theorem for the Kinetic Energy of a Heavy Quark inside Hadrons

    OpenAIRE

    Neubert, Matthias(PRISMA Cluster of Excellence & Mainz Institut for Theoretical Physics, Johannes Gutenberg University, D-55099, Mainz, Germany)

    1993-01-01

    The formalism of the heavy quark effective theory is used to derive the field-theory analog of the virial theorem, which relates the matrix element of the kinetic energy of a heavy quark inside a hadron to a matrix element of the gluon field strength tensor. The existing QCD sum rule calculations of the kinetic energy are not consistent with this theorem.

  12. A Comparison of Kinetic Energy and Momentum in Special Relativity and Classical Mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riggs, Peter J.

    2016-01-01

    Kinetic energy and momentum are indispensable dynamical quantities in both the special theory of relativity and in classical mechanics. Although momentum and kinetic energy are central to understanding dynamics, the differences between their relativistic and classical notions have not always received adequate treatment in undergraduate teaching.…

  13. Control of Active Axial Magnetic Bearings for Flywheel-based Energy Storage System

    OpenAIRE

    Morís Gómez, Juan

    2014-01-01

    This thesis deals with the design and implementation of the control system for a Flywheel-based Energy Storage System (FESS) with active magnetic bearings. The thesis focuses on the construction of realistic model of the system according to experimental tests. The simulation model will be used to control the thrust magnetic bearings in order to withstand the flywheel in levitation.

  14. The Rainfall and Rainfall Kinetic Energy Intensity-Duration of Landslides and Debris flow in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Jui-Ming; Chen, Hongey

    2016-04-01

    This research used Joss-Waldvogel Disdrometers (JWD) which set in Shiment catchment, Northern Taiwan and Chishan catchment, Southern Taiwan to record rainfall kinetic energy data, to find the relationship between rainfall kinetic energy and rainfall intensity in these two areas. The distance between the two areas is less than 150 km. These data help the researchers and showed that the equations of relationship were ekN =28.7* (1-0.7027*exp(-0.0395*I)) and ekS=27.4*(1-0.5954*exp(-0.0345*I)). Generally, rainfall kinetic energy in Northern Taiwan is higher than in Southern Taiwan during rainfall period. Also, the occurring time and rainfall records of 143 landslide events from 2006 to 2012 were analyzed. The rainfall-intensity (I-D) relationship could be used to build rainfall threshold which were IN=15.13 D‑0.28 and IS=47.58 D‑0.35. In brief, the rainfall feature in landslide of Northern Taiwan had low rainfall intensity, long rainfall duration and low average accumulative rainfall. By combining rainfall kinetic energy and rainfall threshold, rainfall kinetic energy threshold could be established, which were ¯E N=13.83 D‑0.04 and ¯E S =15.59 D‑0.02. The results showed that not only for rainfall but also for rainfall kinetic energy threshold, the values of thresholds in North were lower than those in South. Due to impaction energy of rainfall to ground surface, rainfall kinetic energy would not forever increase. Therefore, rainfall kinetic energy threshold is also a useful tool for landslide warning. Key words: Rainfall kinetic energy, Rainfall threshold, Rainfall kinetic energy threshold, Landslide

  15. Altering Kinetic Energy Entrainment in Large Eddy Simulations of Large Wind Farms Using Unconventional Wind Turbine Actuator Forcing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire VerHulst

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, horizontally periodic large eddy simulations (LES are utilized to study turbulent atmospheric boundary-layer flow over wind turbines in the far-downstream portion of a large wind farm where the wakes have merged and the flow is fully developed. In an attempt to increase power generation by enhancing the mean kinetic energy (MKE entrainment to the wind turbines, hypothetical synthetic forcing is applied to the flow at the turbine rotor locations. The synthetic forcing is not meant to represent any existing devices or control schemes, but rather acts as a proof of concept to inform future designs. The turbines are modeled using traditional actuator disks, and the unconventional synthetic forcing is applied in the vertical direction with the magnitude and direction dependent on the instantaneous velocity fluctuation at the rotor disk; in one set of LES meant to enhance the vertical entrainment of MKE, a downward force is prescribed in conjunction with a positive axial velocity fluctuation, whereas a negative axial velocity fluctuation results in an upward force. The magnitude of the forcing is proportional to the instantaneous thrust force with prefactors ranging from 0.1 to 1. The synthetic vertical forcing is found to have a significant effect on the power generated by the wind farm. Consistent with previous findings, the MKE flux to the level of the turbines is found to vary along with the total power produced by the wind turbine array. The reverse strategy of downward forcing of slow axial velocity flow is found to have almost no effect on the power output or entrainment. Several of the scenarios tested, e.g., where the vertical force is of similar magnitude to the horizontal thrust, would be very difficult to implement in practice, but the simulations serve the purpose of identifying trends and bounds on possible power increases from flow modifications through action at the turbine rotor.

  16. Equilibria and kinetics for H-dependent axial ligation of alkyl(aquo) cobaloximes with aromatic and aliphatic N-donor ligands

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    V Sridhar; D Sudarshan Reddy; N Ravikumar Reddy; S Satyanarayana

    2002-02-01

    Equilibria and kinetics of the reaction of bromomethyl(aquo) cobaloxime with histamine, histidine, glycine and ethyl glycine ester and iodomethyl(aquo) cobaloxime with cyanide, imidazole and substituted imidazoles were studied as a function of H at 25°C, 1.0 M ionic strength (KCl) by spectrophotometry technique. The rate of substitution of H2O varies with the of the incoming ligand, thus establishing the existence of nucleophilic participation of the ligand in the transition state. Dissociation kinetic reactions were also studied as a function of H. Binding and kinetic data were interpreted based on the basicity, steric crowd of the entering ligand and HSAB principle. To compare the rate constants of the entering ligands H independent second-order rate constants were calculated.

  17. Principal parametric resonance of axially accelerating rectangular thin plate in magnetic field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡宇达; 张金志

    2013-01-01

    Nonlinear parametric vibration and stability is investigated for an axially accelerating rectangular thin plate subjected to parametric excitations resulting from the axial time-varying tension and axial time-varying speed in the magnetic field. Consid-ering geometric nonlinearity, based on the expressions of total kinetic energy, potential energy, and electromagnetic force, the nonlinear magneto-elastic vibration equations of axially moving rectangular thin plate are derived by using the Hamilton principle. Based on displacement mode hypothesis, by using the Galerkin method, the nonlinear para-metric oscillation equation of the axially moving rectangular thin plate with four simply supported edges in the transverse magnetic field is obtained. The nonlinear principal parametric resonance amplitude-frequency equation is further derived by means of the multiple-scale method. The stability of the steady-state solution is also discussed, and the critical condition of stability is determined. As numerical examples for an axially moving rectangular thin plate, the influences of the detuning parameter, axial speed, axial tension, and magnetic induction intensity on the principal parametric resonance behavior are investigated.

  18. Surface analysis of zeolites: An XPS, variable kinetic energy XPS, and low energy ion scattering study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bare, Simon R.; Knop-Gericke, Axel; Teschner, Detre; Hävacker, Michael; Blume, Raoul; Rocha, Tulio; Schlögl, Robert; Chan, Ally S. Y.; Blackwell, N.; Charochak, M. E.; ter Veen, Rik; Brongersma, Hidde H.

    2016-06-01

    The surface Si/Al ratio in a series of zeolite Y samples has been obtained using laboratory XPS, synchrotron (variable kinetic energy) XPS, and low energy ion scattering (LEIS) spectroscopy. The non-destructive depth profile obtained using variable kinetic energy XPS is compared to that from the destructive argon ion bombardment depth profile from the lab XPS instrument. All of the data indicate that the near surface region of both the ammonium form and steamed Y zeolites is strongly enriched in aluminum. It is shown that when the inelastic mean free path of the photoelectrons is taken into account the laboratory XPS of aluminosilicates zeolites does not provide a true measurement of the surface stoichiometry, while variable kinetic energy XPS results in a more surface sensitive measurement. A comprehensive Si/Al concentration profile as a function of depth is developed by combining the data from the three surface characterization techniques. The LEIS spectroscopy reveals that the topmost atomic layer is further enriched in Al compared to subsequent layers.

  19. Numeric kinetic energy operators for molecules in polyspherical coordinates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadri, Keyvan; Lauvergnat, David; Gatti, Fabien; Meyer, Hans-Dieter

    2012-06-21

    Generalized curvilinear coordinates, as, e.g., polyspherical coordinates, are in general better adapted to the resolution of the nuclear Schrödinger equation than rectilinear ones like the normal mode coordinates. However, analytical expressions of the kinetic energy operators (KEOs) for molecular systems in polyspherical coordinates may be prohibitively complicated for large systems. In this paper we propose a method to generate a KEO numerically and bring it to a form practicable for dynamical calculations. To examine the new method we calculated vibrational spectra and eigenenergies for nitrous acid (HONO) and compare it with results obtained with an exact analytical KEO derived previously [F. Richter, P. Rosmus, F. Gatti, and H.-D. Meyer, J. Chem. Phys. 120, 6072 (2004)]. In a second example we calculated π → π* photoabsorption spectrum and eigenenergies of ethene (C(2)H(4)) and compared it with previous work [M. R. Brill, F. Gatti, D. Lauvergnat, and H.-D. Meyer, Chem. Phys. 338, 186 (2007)]. In this ethene study the dimensionality was reduced from 12 to 6 by freezing six internal coordinates. Results for both molecules show that the proposed method for obtaining an approximate KEO is reliable for dynamical calculations. The error in eigenenergies was found to be below 1 cm(-1) for most states calculated.

  20. Zero Kinetic Energy Photoelectron Spectroscopy of Benzo[h]quinoline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harthcock, Colin; Zhang, Jie; Kong, Wei

    2015-12-17

    We report zero kinetic energy (ZEKE) photoelectron spectroscopy of benzo[h]quinoline (BhQ) via resonantly enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) through the first electronically excited state S1. From the simulated REMPI spectra with and without Herzberg-Teller coupling, we conclude that vibronic coupling plays a minor but observable role in the electronic excitation to the S1 state. We further compare the S1 state of BhQ with the first two electronically excited states of phenanthrene, noticing a similarity of the S1 state of BhQ with the second electronically excited state S2 of phenanthrene. In the ZEKE spectra of BhQ, the vibrational frequencies of the cationic state D0 are consistently higher than those of the intermediate neutral state, indicating enhanced bonding upon ionization. The sparse ZEKE spectra, compared with the spectrum of phenanthrene containing rich vibronic activities, further imply that the nitrogen atom has attenuated the structural change between S1 and D0 states. We speculate that the nitrogen atom can withdraw an electron in the S1 state and donate an electron in the D0 state, thereby minimizing the structural change during ionization. The origin of the first electronically excited state is determined to be 29,410 ± 5 cm(-1), and the adiabatic ionization potential is determined to be 65,064 ± 7 cm(-1). PMID:26039927

  1. Turbulence Effects of Axial Flow Hydrokinetic Turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, C.; Chamorro, L. P.; Neary, V. S.; Morton, S.; Sotiropoulos, F.

    2011-12-01

    Axial flow hydrokinetic turbines provide a method for extracting the kinetic energy available in unidirectional (river), bidirectional (tidal) and marine currents; however, a deep understanding of the wake dynamics, momentum recovery, geomorphologic effects, and ecological interaction with these hydrokinetic turbines is required to guarantee their economical and environmental viability. The St. Anthony Falls Laboratory (SAFL) at the University of Minnesota (UMN) has performed physical modeling experiments using a 1:10 scale axial flow tidal turbine in the SAFL Main Channel, a 2.75m x 1.8m x 80m open channel test facility. A sophisticated control system allows synchronous measurements of turbine torque and rotational speed along with high resolution 3-D velocity measurements within the channel. Using acoustic Doppler velocimeters (ADVs), high resolution 3-D velocity profile data were collected up to 15 turbine diameters downstream of the turbine location. These data provide valuable information on the wake characteristics (turbulence, Reynolds stresses, etc.) resulting from a rotating axial flow hydrokinetic machine. Regions of high turbulence and shear zones that persist in the near wake regions are delineated along with the velocity deficit and momentum recovery within the wake downstream of the device. Synchronous ADV data shed light on the rotational and meandering characteristics of the wake and its potential impacts on the local geomorphology and hydrodynamic environment. This dataset on single hydrokinetic turbine flow characteristics is the basis for further work on the optimal arrangement and performance environment for arrays of similar hydrokinetic devices.

  2. Energy Conservation Tests of a Coupled Kinetic-kinetic Plasma-neutral Transport Code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stotler, D. P.; Chang, C. S.; Ku, S. H.; Lang, J.; Park, G.

    2012-08-29

    A Monte Carlo neutral transport routine, based on DEGAS2, has been coupled to the guiding center ion-electron-neutral neoclassical PIC code XGC0 to provide a realistic treatment of neutral atoms and molecules in the tokamak edge plasma. The DEGAS2 routine allows detailed atomic physics and plasma-material interaction processes to be incorporated into these simulations. The spatial pro le of the neutral particle source used in the DEGAS2 routine is determined from the uxes of XGC0 ions to the material surfaces. The kinetic-kinetic plasma-neutral transport capability is demonstrated with example pedestal fueling simulations.

  3. Kinetic energy management in road traffic injury prevention: a call for action

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davoud Khorasani-Zavareh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: By virtue of their variability, mass and speed have important roles in transferring energies during a crash incidence (kinetic energy. The sum of kinetic energy is important in determining an injury severity and that is equal to one half of the vehicle mass multiplied by the square of the vehicle speed. To meet the Vision Zero policy (a traffic safety policy prevention activities should be focused on vehicle speed management. Understanding the role of kinetic energy will help to develop measures to reduce the generation, distribution, and effects of this energy during a road traffic crash. Road traffic injury preventive activities necessitate Kinetic energy management to improve road user safety.

  4. Universal Power Law for Relationship between Rainfall Kinetic Energy and Rainfall Intensity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung Sook Shin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Rainfall kinetic energy has been linked to linear, exponential, logarithmic, and power-law functions using rainfall intensity as an independent variable. The power law is the most suitable mathematical expression used to relate rainfall kinetic energy and rainfall intensity. In evaluating the rainfall kinetic energy, the empirical power laws have shown a larger deviation than other functions. In this study, universal power law between rainfall kinetic energy and rainfall intensity was proposed based on the rainfall power theory under an ideal assumption that drop-size is uniformly distributed in constant rainfall intensity. An exponent of the proposed power law was 11/9 and coefficient was estimated at 10.3 from the empirical equations of the existing power-law relation. The rainfall kinetic energy calculated by universal power law showed >95% concordance rate in comparison to the average values calculated from exponential and logarithmic functions used in soil erosion model such as USLE, RUSLE, EUROSEM, and SEMMA and <5% relative difference as compared to the average rainfall kinetic energies calculated by other empirical functions. Therefore, it is expected that power law of ideal assumption may be utilized as a universal power law in evaluating rainfall kinetic energy.

  5. Dissociation of CO induced by He2+ ions. Pt. 1: Fragmentation and kinetic energy release spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The dissociation of COq+ ions (q ≤ 3) produced in collisions of keV amu-1 He2+ ions with CO has been studied by time-of-flight measurements. Both singles and coincidence time-of-flight techniques have been used to determine the kinetic energy release of the dissociating CO molecules. We describe the method to transform the singles and coincidence time-of-flight spectra into total kinetic energy distributions and discuss these distributions. They represent kinetic energy release distributions which clearly exhibit various contributions associated with different dissociation channels. In comparison with other ionization methods similarities but also clear differences are noted. (author)

  6. Kinetic energy distributions of fragment ions in collisions of energetic heavy ions with C60

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mass distributions of fragment ions of C60 produced in collisions with energetic heavy ions have been measured by means of time-of-flight (TOF) method. From the peak profile analysis, initial kinetic energy distributions (KED) of fragment ions were obtained. KED were investigated for three different projectiles. For all fragment ions except for C1+, KED peaked at a few eV kinetic energies. KED of C1+ was found to have a double-peak structure, indicating that the C1+ ions were produced through two different mechanisms. Also, it was found that the mean kinetic energies had strong correlation with electronic stopping cross-section. (author)

  7. Bidirectional Energy Cascades and the Origin of Kinetic Alfvenic and Whistler Turbulence in the Solar Wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Che, H.; Goldstein, M. L.; Vinas, A. F.

    2014-01-01

    The observed steep kinetic scale turbulence spectrum in the solar wind raises the question of how that turbulence originates. Observations of keV energetic electrons during solar quiet time suggest them as a possible source of free energy to drive kinetic turbulence. Using particle-in-cell simulations, we explore how the free energy released by an electron two-stream instability drives Weibel-like electromagnetic waves that excite wave-wave interactions. Consequently, both kinetic Alfvénic and whistler turbulence are excited that evolve through inverse and forward magnetic energy cascades.

  8. Prediction of free turbulent mixing using a turbulent kinetic energy method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harsha, P. T.

    1973-01-01

    Free turbulent mixing of two-dimensional and axisymmetric one- and two-stream flows is analyzed by a relatively simple turbulent kinetic energy method. This method incorporates a linear relationship between the turbulent shear and the turbulent kinetic energy and an algebraic relationship for the length scale appearing in the turbulent kinetic energy equation. Good results are obtained for a wide variety of flows. The technique is shown to be especially applicable to flows with heat and mass transfer, for which nonunity Prandtl and Schmidt numbers may be assumed.

  9. Kinetic energy release of diatomic and linear triatomic molecules in intense femtosecond laser fields

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Jian-Xin; Ma Ri; Ren Hai-Zhen; Li Xia; Wu Cheng-Yin; Yang Hong; Gong Qi-Huang

    2004-01-01

    @@ The kinetic energy release of fragment ions produced by the interaction of femtosecond laser pulse radiation with diatomic and linear triatomic molecules N2, CO, CO2 and CS2 is investigated. In the case of linear polarization, angles at which the kinetic energy release of ions has the maximum value are different from the alignment of molecules though the kinetic energy release of fragment atomic ions depends on the angle between the laser polarization vector and the detection axis of the time-of-flight.

  10. Generation of radially polarized high energy mid-infrared optical vortex by use of a passive axially symmetric ZnSe waveplate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We demonstrated the generation of the intense radially polarized mid-infrared optical vortex at a wavelength of 10.6 μm by use of a passive axially symmetric zinc selenide (ZnSe) waveplate with high energy pulse throughput. The phase of the radially polarized optical vortex with the degree of polarization of 0.95 was spirally distributed in regard to the angle. The converted laser beam energy of about 2.6 mJ per pulse was obtained at the input pulse energy of 4.9 mJ, corresponding to the energy conversion efficiency of 56%

  11. Generation of radially polarized high energy mid-infrared optical vortex by use of a passive axially symmetric ZnSe waveplate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wakayama, Toshitaka, E-mail: wakayama@saitama-med.ac.jp; Yonemura, Motoki [School of Biomedical Engineering, Saitama Medical University, Yamane 1397-1, Hidaka, Saitama 350-1241 (Japan); Oikawa, Hiroki; Sasanuma, Atsushi; Arai, Goki; Fujii, Yusuke [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Utsunomiya University, Yoto 7-1-2, Utsunomiya, Tochigi 321-8585 (Japan); Dinh, Thanh-Hung; Otani, Yukitoshi [Center for Optical Research & Education (CORE), Utsunomiya University, Yoto 7-1-2, Utsunomiya, Tochigi 321-8585 (Japan); Higashiguchi, Takeshi, E-mail: higashi@cc.utsunomiya-u.ac.jp [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Utsunomiya University, Yoto 7-1-2, Utsunomiya, Tochigi 321-8585 (Japan); Center for Optical Research & Education (CORE), Utsunomiya University, Yoto 7-1-2, Utsunomiya, Tochigi 321-8585 (Japan); Sakaue, Kazuyuki, E-mail: kazuyuki.sakaue@aoni.waseda.jp [Waseda Institute for Advanced Study, Waseda University, 3-4-1, Okubo, Shinjuku, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan); Washio, Masakazu [Research Institute for Science and Engineering, Waseda University, 3-4-1, Okubo, Shinjuku, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan); Miura, Taisuke, E-mail: miura@fzu.cz [HiLASE Centre, Institute of Physics CAS, Za radnicí 828, 252 41, Dolní Břežany (Czech Republic); Takahashi, Akihiko [Department of Health Sciences, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, 3-1-1 Maidashi, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan); Nakamura, Daisuke; Okada, Tatsuo [Graduate School of Information Sciences and Electrical Engineering, Kyushu University, 744 Motooka, Nishi, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan)

    2015-08-24

    We demonstrated the generation of the intense radially polarized mid-infrared optical vortex at a wavelength of 10.6 μm by use of a passive axially symmetric zinc selenide (ZnSe) waveplate with high energy pulse throughput. The phase of the radially polarized optical vortex with the degree of polarization of 0.95 was spirally distributed in regard to the angle. The converted laser beam energy of about 2.6 mJ per pulse was obtained at the input pulse energy of 4.9 mJ, corresponding to the energy conversion efficiency of 56%.

  12. New Momentum and Energy Balance Equations Considering Kinetic Energy Effect for Mathematical Modelling of a Fixed Bed Adsorption Column

    OpenAIRE

    Luberti, Mauro; Kim, Yo Han; Lee, Chang-Ha; Ferrari, Maria-Chiara; Ahn, Hyungwoong

    2015-01-01

    It was aimed to derive rigorous momentum and energy balance equations where the change of kinetic energy in both spatial and temporal domains of a fixed-bed adsorption column was newly taken into account. While the effect of kinetic energy on adsorption column dynamics is negligible in most cases, it can become more and more influential with an adsorption column experiencing a huge pressure drop or with the gas velocity changing abruptly with time and along the column. The rigorous momentum a...

  13. Near-surface circulation and kinetic energy in the tropical Indian Ocean derived from lagrangian drifters

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Shenoi, S.S.C.; Saji, P.K.; Almeida, A.M.

    Equatorial Current, the Equatorial Counter Current, and the southwestward current along the Indonesian Islands; they differ in the Bay of Bengal during the southwest monsoon, but are similar during the northeast monsoon. Maps of mean and eddy kinetic energy...

  14. Turbulent kinetic energy balance measurements in the wake of a low-pressure turbine blade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sideridis, A. [Laboratory of Fluid Mechanics and Turbomachinery, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, 54124 Thessaloniki (Greece); Yakinthos, K., E-mail: kyros@eng.auth.g [Laboratory of Fluid Mechanics and Turbomachinery, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, 54124 Thessaloniki (Greece); Goulas, A. [Laboratory of Fluid Mechanics and Turbomachinery, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, 54124 Thessaloniki (Greece)

    2011-02-15

    The turbulent kinetic energy budget in the wake generated by a high lift, low-pressure two-dimensional blade cascade of the T106 profile was investigated experimentally using hot-wire anemometry. The purpose of this study is to examine the transport mechanism of the turbulent kinetic energy and provide validation data for turbulence modeling. Point measurements were conducted on a high spatial resolution, two-dimensional grid that allowed precise derivative calculations. Positioning of the probe was achieved using a high accuracy traversing mechanism. The turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) convection, production, viscous diffusion and turbulent diffusion were all obtained directly from experimental measurements. Dissipation and pressure diffusion were calculated indirectly using techniques presented and validated by previous investigators. Results for all terms of the turbulent kinetic energy budget are presented and discussed in detail in the present work.

  15. Analysis of energy transfer in quantum networks using kinetic network approximations

    CERN Document Server

    Moser, David K

    2012-01-01

    Coherent energy transfer in pigment-protein complexes has been studied by mapping the quantum network to a kinetic network. This gives an analytic way to find parameter values for optimal transfer efficiency. In the case of the Fenna-Matthews-Olson (FMO) complex, the comparison of quantum and kinetic network evolution shows that dephasing-assisted energy transfer is driven by the two-site coherent interaction, and not system-wide coherence. Using the Schur complement, we find a new kinetic network that gives a closer approximation to the quantum network by including all multi-site coherence contributions. Our new network approximation can be expanded as a series with contributions representing different numbers of coherently interacting sites. For both kinetic networks we study the system relaxation time, the time it takes for the excitation to spread throughout the complex. We make mathematically rigorous estimates of the relaxation time when comparing kinetic and quantum network. Numerical simulations compa...

  16. Density dependence of the single particle kinetic energy in {sup 3}He-{sup 4}He

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azuah, R.T. [Keele Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Physics]|[Rutherford Appleton Lab., Chilton, Didcot (United Kingdom); Stirling, W.G. [Keele Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Physics; Gibbs, M.R. [Keele Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Physics; Sokol, P.E. [Dept. of Physics, Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Mayers, J. [Rutherford Appleton Lab., Chilton, Didcot (United Kingdom)

    1995-08-01

    We present inelastic neutron scattering measurements of liquid {sup 3}He-{sup 4}He mixtures at 1.5 K and at {sup 3}He concentrations of 0,15,40,70 and 100%. There is little apparent concentration dependence of the {sup 3}He kinetic energy, in disagreement with recent variational calculations for mixtures. The kinetic energy of the {sup 4}He component for the lower concentration mixtures is consistent with theoretical predictions. (orig.).

  17. Movers and Shakers: Kinetic Energy Harvesting for the Internet of Things

    OpenAIRE

    Gorlatova, Maria; Sarik, John; Grebla, Guy; Cong, Mina; Kymissis, Ioannis; Zussman, Gil

    2013-01-01

    Numerous energy harvesting wireless devices that will serve as building blocks for the Internet of Things (IoT) are currently under development. However, there is still only limited understanding of the properties of various energy sources and their impact on energy harvesting adaptive algorithms. Hence, we focus on characterizing the kinetic (motion) energy that can be harvested by a wireless node with an IoT form factor and on developing energy allocation algorithms for such nodes. In this ...

  18. A high current pulsed power generator CQ-3-MMAF with co-axial cable transmitting energy for material dynamics experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guiji; Chen, Xuemiao; Cai, Jintao; Zhang, Xuping; Chong, Tao; Luo, Binqiang; Zhao, Jianheng; Sun, Chengwei; Tan, Fuli; Liu, Cangli; Wu, Gang

    2016-06-01

    A high current pulsed power generator CQ-3-MMAF (Multi-Modules Assembly Facility, MMAF) was developed for material dynamics experiments under ramp wave and shock loadings at the Institute of Fluid Physics (IFP), which can deliver 3 MA peak current to a strip-line load. The rise time of the current is 470 ns (10%-90%). Different from the previous CQ-4 at IFP, the CQ-3-MMAF energy is transmitted by hundreds of co-axial high voltage cables with a low impedance of 18.6 mΩ and low loss, and then hundreds of cables are reduced and converted to tens of cables into a vacuum chamber by a cable connector, and connected with a pair of parallel metallic plates insulated by Kapton films. It is composed of 32 capacitor and switch modules in parallel. The electrical parameters in short circuit are with a capacitance of 19.2 μF, an inductance of 11.7 nH, a resistance of 4.3 mΩ, and working charging voltage of 60 kV-90 kV. It can be run safely and stable when charged from 60 kV to 90 kV. The vacuum of loading chamber can be up to 10-2 Pa, and the current waveforms can be shaped by discharging in time sequences of four groups of capacitor and switch modules. CQ-3-MMAF is an adaptive machine with lower maintenance because of its modularization design. The COMSOL Multi-physics® code is used to optimize the structure of some key components and calculate their structural inductance for designs, such as gas switches and cable connectors. Some ramp wave loading experiments were conducted to check and examine the performances of CQ-3-MMAF. Two copper flyer plates were accelerated to about 3.5 km/s in one shot when the working voltage was charged to 70 kV. The velocity histories agree very well. The dynamic experiments of some polymer bonded explosives and phase transition of tin under ramp wave loadings were also conducted. The experimental data show that CQ-3-MMAF can be used to do material dynamics experiments in high rate and low cost shots. Based on this design concept, the peak

  19. High-energy interactions in Kinetic Inductance Detectors arrays

    CERN Document Server

    D'Addabbo, A; Goupy, J; Benoit, A; Bourrion, O; Catalano, A; Macias-Perez, J F; Monfardini, A

    2015-01-01

    The impacts of Cosmic Rays on the detectors are a key problem for space-based missions. We are studying the effects of such interactions on arrays of Kinetic Inductance Detectors (KID), in order to adapt this technology for use on board of satellites. Before proposing a new technology such as the Kinetic Inductance Detectors for a space-based mission, the problem of the Cosmic Rays that hit the detectors during in-flight operation has to be studied in detail. We present here several tests carried out with KID exposed to radioactive sources, which we use to reproduce the physical interactions induced by primary Cosmic Rays, and we report the results obtained adopting different solutions in terms of substrate materials and array geometries. We conclude by outlining the main guidelines to follow for fabricating KID for space-based applications.

  20. Incident energy dependence of the mean kinetic energy, flow and temperature azimuthal distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The squeeze-out phenomena initially predicted by hydrodynamical calculations has been extensively studied experimentally. A unified representation of the observed trends can be done in terms of the azimuthal distribution of the total mass or kinetic energy. Previously reported comprehensive description of the squeeze-out phenomena in the range 0.25 - 1.15 A · GeV was based on the parametrization of the total mass spectra with an expression characteristic for radially symmetric shell expansion. As far as such a situation can hardly be encountered in heavy ion collisions and is not specific at all for mid-central geometries, we prefer to present also the experimental information free of any model which can be used to extract it. Due to this reasons we report also the results on azimuthal distribution of the mean kinetic energy (kincm>) besides the ones corresponding to β and T values. The azimuthal distributions of kincm>, β and T can be fit with the following expression: (kincm>, β,T) = (kincm>, β,T)0 - (Δ kincm>, Δβ, ΔT) ·cos2Φ. The excitation functions of (kincm>, β,T)max and (kincm>, β,T)min from 90 A · MeV to 400 A · MeV are given. The ellipsoidal character of the flow with the major axis perpendicular to the reaction plane constantly enhances from 90 to 400 A· MeV. At 90 A · MeV the two values are very similar. The lower slope in (E,β,T)min is due to the fact that the violence of the expansion increases faster as a function of incident energy than the decrease of the passage time. At higher incident energy the relativistic contraction and the gradient of the thermal pressure in the reaction plane due to the confinement created by the spectator matter are increasing. The two slopes reverse and a crossing point is expected. It would correspond to an elliptic flow with the major axis aligned in the reaction plane. A larger modulation in the mean kinetic energy or flow relative to temperature can be explained by the larger variation of the

  1. Factorial design for the evaluation of the interaction effect between particle size and heating rate in the kinetic energy of coal combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avila, Ivonete; Silva, Eugenio A.G.; Mortari, Daniela A.; Crnkovic, Paula M.; Milioli, Fernando E. [University of Sao Paulo (EESC/USP), Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil). Engineering School. Group of Thermal and Fluids Engineering], Emails: iavila@sc.usp.br, eugenio.silva@usp.br, paulam@sc.usp.br, milioli@sc.usp.br

    2010-07-01

    This paper evaluates the behavior of kinetic energy for different heating rates ({alpha}) and particle sizes of the material in the study of the coal combustion process. It aims to obtain a response surface in a large range of particle size, using heating rates between the minimum and maximum values allowed by the equipment. Therefore it searches for a model to evaluate the interaction effect between particle size and the heating rate and to predict the activation energy of the process studied. The activation energy of the process was determined using the isoconversional model Model Free Kinetics. In this model, the activation energy (E{sub {alpha}}) is obtained as a function of the reaction extent ({alpha}). The subscript in E{sub {alpha}} designates the values related to a given value of conversion ({alpha}). All experiments were conducted in thermogravimetric balance using samples of a Brazilian coal (EC4500) witch average particle size between 163 to 650 {mu}m and heating rates between 10 and 40 deg C min{sup -1} in dynamic atmosphere of air. A central rotatable composite design was applied for the 2{sup 2} factorial design including 4 tests under the axial conditions and 3 repetitions in the central point. As expected, the results show that both the particle size and the heating rate affected significantly the values of activation energy of the coal combustion process obtained by the model used. (author)

  2. Determining the band gap and mean kinetic energy of atoms from reflection electron energy loss spectra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vos, M. [Atomic and Molecular Physics Laboratories, Research School of Physics and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra ACT (Australia); Marmitt, G. G. [Atomic and Molecular Physics Laboratories, Research School of Physics and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra ACT (Australia); Instituto de Fisica da Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Avenida Bento Goncalves 9500, 91501-970 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Finkelstein, Y. [Nuclear Research Center — Negev, Beer-Sheva 84190 (Israel); Moreh, R. [Physics Department, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva 84105 (Israel)

    2015-09-14

    Reflection electron energy loss spectra from some insulating materials (CaCO{sub 3}, Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3}, and SiO{sub 2}) taken at relatively high incoming electron energies (5–40 keV) are analyzed. Here, one is bulk sensitive and a well-defined onset of inelastic excitations is observed from which one can infer the value of the band gap. An estimate of the band gap was obtained by fitting the spectra with a procedure that includes the recoil shift and recoil broadening affecting these measurements. The width of the elastic peak is directly connected to the mean kinetic energy of the atom in the material (Doppler broadening). The experimentally obtained mean kinetic energies of the O, C, Li, Ca, and Si atoms are compared with the calculated ones, and good agreement is found, especially if the effect of multiple scattering is taken into account. It is demonstrated experimentally that the onset of the inelastic excitation is also affected by Doppler broadening. Aided by this understanding, we can obtain a good fit of the elastic peak and the onset of inelastic excitations. For SiO{sub 2}, good agreement is obtained with the well-established value of the band gap (8.9 eV) only if it is assumed that the intensity near the edge scales as (E − E{sub gap}){sup 1.5}. For CaCO{sub 3}, the band gap obtained here (7 eV) is about 1 eV larger than the previous experimental value, whereas the value for Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3} (7.5 eV) is the first experimental estimate.

  3. Effect of kinetic energy on the doping efficiency of cesium cations into superfluid helium droplets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present an experimental investigation of the effect of kinetic energy on the ion doping efficiency of superfluid helium droplets using cesium cations from a thermionic emission source. The kinetic energy of Cs+ is controlled by the bias voltage of a collection grid collinearly arranged with the droplet beam. Efficient doping from ions with kinetic energies from 20 eV up to 480 V has been observed in different sized helium droplets. The relative ion doping efficiency is determined by both the kinetic energy of the ions and the average size of the droplet beam. At a fixed source temperature, the number of doped droplets increases with increasing grid voltage, while the relative ion doping efficiency decreases. This result implies that not all ions are captured upon encountering with a sufficiently large droplet, a deviation from the near unity doping efficiency for closed shell neutral molecules. We propose that this drop in ion doping efficiency with kinetic energy is related to the limited deceleration rate inside a helium droplet. When the source temperature changes from 14 K to 17 K, the relative ion doping efficiency decreases rapidly, perhaps due to the lack of viable sized droplets. The size distribution of the Cs+-doped droplet beam can be measured by deflection and by energy filtering. The observed doped droplet size is about 5 × 106 helium atoms when the source temperature is between 14 K and 17 K

  4. Effect of kinetic energy on the doping efficiency of cesium cations into superfluid helium droplets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Lei; Zhang, Jie; Freund, William M.; Kong, Wei, E-mail: wei.kong@oregonstate.edu [Department of Chemistry, Oregon State University, Corvallis, Oregon 97331 (United States)

    2015-07-28

    We present an experimental investigation of the effect of kinetic energy on the ion doping efficiency of superfluid helium droplets using cesium cations from a thermionic emission source. The kinetic energy of Cs{sup +} is controlled by the bias voltage of a collection grid collinearly arranged with the droplet beam. Efficient doping from ions with kinetic energies from 20 eV up to 480 V has been observed in different sized helium droplets. The relative ion doping efficiency is determined by both the kinetic energy of the ions and the average size of the droplet beam. At a fixed source temperature, the number of doped droplets increases with increasing grid voltage, while the relative ion doping efficiency decreases. This result implies that not all ions are captured upon encountering with a sufficiently large droplet, a deviation from the near unity doping efficiency for closed shell neutral molecules. We propose that this drop in ion doping efficiency with kinetic energy is related to the limited deceleration rate inside a helium droplet. When the source temperature changes from 14 K to 17 K, the relative ion doping efficiency decreases rapidly, perhaps due to the lack of viable sized droplets. The size distribution of the Cs{sup +}-doped droplet beam can be measured by deflection and by energy filtering. The observed doped droplet size is about 5 × 10{sup 6} helium atoms when the source temperature is between 14 K and 17 K.

  5. Kinetic and Available Potential Energy Transport during the Stratospheric Sudden Warming in January 2009

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZUO Qunjie; GAO Shouting; L(U) Daren

    2012-01-01

    The local features of transient kinetic energy and available potential energy were investigated using ECMWF (European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts) Interim Reanalysis data for the stratospheric sudden warming (SSW) event of January 2009.The Western Europe high plays important roles in the propagation of the energy from North America to Eurasian.When the Western Europe high appeared and shifted eastward,energy conversions increased and energy propagated from North America to Eurasian as a form of interaction energy flow.The baroclinic conversion between transient-eddy kinetic energy (Ke)and transient-eddy available potential energy (Ae) and the horizontal advection of geopotential height were approximately one order of magnitude less than Ke and Ae generation terms.So,these terms were less important to this SSW event.

  6. Experimental free energy measurements of kinetic molecular states using fluctuation theorems

    CERN Document Server

    Alemany, Anna; Junier, Ivan; Ritort, Felix; 10.1038/nphys2375

    2013-01-01

    Recent advances in non-equilibrium statistical mechanics and single molecule technologies make it possible to extract free energy differences from irreversible work measurements in pulling experiments. To date, free energy recovery has been focused on native or equilibrium molecular states, whereas free energy measurements of kinetic states (i.e. finite lifetime states that are generated dynamically and are metastable) have remained unexplored. Kinetic states can play an important role in various domains of physics, such as nanotechnology or condensed matter physics. In biophysics, there are many examples where they determine the fate of molecular reactions: protein and peptide-nucleic acid binding, specific cation binding, antigen-antibody interactions, transient states in enzymatic reactions or the formation of transient intermediates and non-native structures in molecular folders. Here we demonstrate that it is possible to obtain free energies of kinetic states by applying extended fluctuation relations. T...

  7. Logarithmic entropy--corrected holographic dark energy with non--minimal kinetic coupling

    CERN Document Server

    Amani, Ali R; Farajollahi, H; Pourali, M

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we have considered a cosmological model with the non--minimal kinetic coupling terms and investigated its cosmological implications with respect to the logarithmic entropy-- corrected holographic dark energy (LECHDE). The correspondence between LECHDE in flat FRW cosmology and the phantom dark energy model with the aim to interpret the current universe acceleration is also examined.

  8. Relativistic Momentum and Kinetic Energy, and E = mc[superscript 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Ben Yu-Kuang

    2009-01-01

    Based on relativistic velocity addition and the conservation of momentum and energy, I present simple derivations of the expressions for the relativistic momentum and kinetic energy of a particle, and for the formula E = mc[superscript 2]. (Contains 5 footnotes and 2 figures.)

  9. Vibrational energy-transfer kinetics in molecular disequilibrium. Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A continuous wave CO laser was used to excite the vibrational mode of CO in gas mixtures. 13C isotope enrichment was studied. High steady-state excitation of the CO vibrational mode (0.3 eV/molecule) was achieved, while a translational-rotational temperature near 3000K was maintained by the steady flow of cold gas into the cell. Kinetics of the observed C2 formation were studied. Diagnostic experiments were begun to detect reaction intermediates in the enrichment process

  10. Pressure-strain energy redistribution in compressible turbulence: return-to-isotropy versus kinetic-potential energy equipartition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kurnchul; Venugopal, Vishnu; Girimaji, Sharath S.

    2016-08-01

    Return-to-isotropy and kinetic-potential energy equipartition are two fundamental pressure-moderated energy redistributive processes in anisotropic compressible turbulence. Pressure-strain correlation tensor redistributes energy among various Reynolds stress components and pressure-dilatation is responsible for energy reallocation between dilatational kinetic and potential energies. The competition and interplay between these pressure-based processes are investigated in this study. Direct numerical simulations (DNS) of low turbulent Mach number dilatational turbulence are performed employing the hybrid thermal Lattice Boltzman method (HTLBM). It is found that a tendency towards equipartition precedes proclivity for isotropization. An evolution towards equipartition has a collateral but critical effect on return-to-isotropy. The preferential transfer of energy from strong (rather than weak) Reynolds stress components to potential energy accelerates the isotropization of dilatational fluctuations. Understanding of these pressure-based redistributive processes is critical for developing insight into the character of compressible turbulence.

  11. Mesoscale Equipartition of kinetic energy in Quantum Turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Salort, Julien; Lévêque, Emmanuel; 10.1209/0295-5075/94/24001

    2012-01-01

    The turbulence of superfluid helium is investigated numerically at finite temperature. Direct numerical simulations are performed with a "truncated HVBK" model, which combines the continuous description of the Hall-Vinen-Bekeravich-Khalatnikov equations with the additional constraint that this continuous description cannot extend beyond a quantum length scale associated with the mean spacing between individual superfluid vortices. A good agreement is found with experimental measurements of the vortex density. Besides, by varying the turbulence intensity only, it is observed that the inter-vortex spacing varies with the Reynolds number as $Re^{-3/4}$, like the viscous length scale in classical turbulence. In the high temperature limit, Kolmogorov's inertial cascade is recovered, as expected from previous numerical and experimental studies. As the temperature decreases, the inertial cascade remains present at large scales while, at small scales, the system evolves towards a statistical equipartition of kinetic ...

  12. Exact kinetic energy enables accurate evaluation of weak interactions by the FDE-vdW method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinha, Debalina; Pavanello, Michele, E-mail: m.pavanello@rutgers.edu [Department of Chemistry, Rutgers University, Newark, New Jersey 07102 (United States)

    2015-08-28

    The correlation energy of interaction is an elusive and sought-after interaction between molecular systems. By partitioning the response function of the system into subsystem contributions, the Frozen Density Embedding (FDE)-vdW method provides a computationally amenable nonlocal correlation functional based on the adiabatic connection fluctuation dissipation theorem applied to subsystem density functional theory. In reproducing potential energy surfaces of weakly interacting dimers, we show that FDE-vdW, either employing semilocal or exact nonadditive kinetic energy functionals, is in quantitative agreement with high-accuracy coupled cluster calculations (overall mean unsigned error of 0.5 kcal/mol). When employing the exact kinetic energy (which we term the Kohn-Sham (KS)-vdW method), the binding energies are generally closer to the benchmark, and the energy surfaces are also smoother.

  13. Nuclear kinetic energy spectra of D_2^+ in intense laser field: Beyond Born Oppenheimer approximation

    CERN Document Server

    Vafaee, Mohsen

    2007-01-01

    The electronic full dimensional of the time dependent Schr\\"odinger equation of the aligned deuterium molecular ion numerically is solved for the simulation of the complicated dissociative ionization process and compared with the related experimental results. In this work, the R-dependent ionization rate and the enhanced ionization phenomenon beyond the Born-Oppenheimer approximation are introduced and calculated and enhanced ionization is directly related to kinetic energy release (KER) of nuclear energy. The signification of the Coulomb explosion energy and dissociation-ionization energy in the ionization channel are comparatively revealed in the total kinetic energy release. It shows that the dissociation-ionization energy spectra in the ionization channel have significant role in the structure of the KER spectrum.

  14. Drop size distributions and kinetic energy rates in variable intensity rainfall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assouline, Shmuel

    2016-04-01

    Temporal variability in rainfall intensity reflects on the drop size distribution (DSD), and affects the rainfall kinetic energy during the event. Smith et al. (2009) reported on 1-min interval rainfall intensity and corresponding DSD variability during a storm on the 22/7/06 at Princeton, NJ. They reported also on DSDs characteristics of heavy convective rainfall events during the whole summer. Applying the DSD model of Assouline and Mualem (1997), it is shown that: (a) a similar relationship between the mean drop size and the rainfall intensity characterized the local rainfall at both the seasonal and the single storm scale; (b) using the mean drop size as a scaling factor of the DSD removes the rainfall intensity dependence at the intrastorm scale, providing a powerful tool to deal with temporal variability of rainfall rates during rainfall events. For a storm characterized by a given temporal variability of intensities, three different ways of evaluating kinetic energy per unit mass or time were applied. By comparison to estimates accounting for rainfall temporal variability and related full DSDs, representing the storm by mean intensity and drop diameter tends to overestimate kinetic energy for low intensities and underestimate it for the higher ones. The relative error for the kinetic energy per unit of mass is ±45% and shifts from negative to positive sign for I>25 mm/h. For the kinetic energy per unit of time, the relative error ranges from -100% to +210% and changes sign for I>45 mm/h. When temporal variation of intensity is accounted for but drops are characterized by their mean values instead of the full DSD, kinetic energy is underestimated by 20% on average. Consequently, accounting for temporal variability in rainfall intensity during a storm has a notable impact on the erosive power of the rainfall.

  15. The distribution of eddy kinetic and potential energies in the global ocean

    OpenAIRE

    Ferrari, Raffaele; Wunsch, Carl

    2009-01-01

    Understanding of the major sources, sinks, and reservoirs of energy in the ocean is briefly updated in a diagram. The nature of the dominant kinetic energy reservoir, that of the balanced variablity, is then found to be indistinguishable in the observations from a sum of barotropic and first baroclinic ordinary quasi-geostrophic modes. Little supporting evidence is available to partition the spectra among forced motions and turbulent cascades, along with significant energy more consistent wit...

  16. The Kinetic Energy of Hydrocarbons as a Function of Electron Density and Convolutional Neural Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Yao, Kun

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate a convolutional neural network trained to reproduce the Kohn-Sham kinetic energy of hydrocarbons from electron density. The output of the network is used as a non-local correction to the conventional local and semi-local kinetic functionals. We show that this approximation qualitatively reproduces Kohn-Sham potential energy surfaces when used with conventional exchange correlation functionals. Numerical noise inherited from the non-linearity of the neural network is identified as the major challenge for the model. Finally we examine the features in the density learned by the neural network to anticipate the prospects of generalizing these models.

  17. Theoretical study of atoms by the electronic kinetic energy density and stress tensor density

    CERN Document Server

    Nozaki, Hiroo; Tachibana, Akitomo

    2016-01-01

    We analyze the electronic structure of atoms in the first, second and third periods using the electronic kinetic energy density and stress tensor density, which are local quantities motivated by quantum field theoretic consideration, specifically the rigged quantum electrodynamics. We compute the zero surfaces of the electronic kinetic energy density, which we call the electronic interfaces, of the atoms. We find that their sizes exhibit clear periodicity and are comparable to the conventional atomic and ionic radii. We also compute the electronic stress tensor density and its divergence, tension density, of the atoms, and discuss how their electronic structures are characterized by them.

  18. A Kinetic Study of Marginal Soil Energy Plant Helianthus annuus Stalk Pyrolysis

    OpenAIRE

    Huaxiao Yan; Hui Zhao; Yan Zhang; Yuanyu Tian; Kechang Xie

    2013-01-01

    The pyrolytic characteristics and kinetics of new marginal soil energy plant Helianthus annuus stalk were investigated using thermogravimetric (TG) method from 50 to 800°C in an inert argon atmosphere at different heating rates of 5, 10, 20, and 30°C min−1. The kinetic parameters of activation energy and pre-exponential factor were deduced by Popescu, Flynn-Wall-Ozawa (FWO), and Kissinger-Akahira-Sunose (KAS) methods, respectively. The results showed that three stages appeared in the thermal ...

  19. Theoretical Study of Lithium Ionic Conductors by Electronic Stress Tensor Density and Electronic Kinetic Energy Density

    CERN Document Server

    Nozaki, Hiroo; Ichikawa, Kazuhide; Watanabe, Taku; Aihara, Yuichi; Tachibana, Akitomo

    2016-01-01

    We analyze the electronic structure of lithium ionic conductors, ${\\rm Li_3PO_4}$ and ${\\rm Li_3PS_4}$, using the electronic stress tensor density and kinetic energy density with special focus on the ionic bonds among them. We find that, as long as we examine the pattern of the eigenvalues of the electronic stress tensor density, we cannot distinguish between the ionic bonds and bonds among metalloid atoms. We then show that they can be distinguished by looking at the morphology of the electronic interface, the zero surface of the electronic kinetic energy density.

  20. Kinetics of energy transfer processes in C-phycocyanin complexes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵井泉; 李晔

    1999-01-01

    The antenna system of algae for photosynthesis is a functional entity composed of various phycobiliproteins and the linker polypeptides. Up to now, high-resolution crystal structure data have been available only for the isolated phycobiliproteins. To have an understanding of the functional connection between different phycobiliproteins, it is necessary to study the complexes composed of different phycobiliproteins. The energy transfer processes in C-phycocyanin complexes were studied through computer simulation because it is difficult to be studied by conventional experimental methods. The main pathways of energy flow and the dynamic property of the energy transfer were obtained. A fast transfer process between two neighboring disks was observed through analyzing the distribution curves of excitation energy over time. According to the definition of the time constants for energy transfer in time-resolved spectrum techniques, for a complex with three C-phycoeyanin hexamer disks, a fluorescence-rising comp

  1. The propagation of kinetic energy across scales in turbulent flows

    CERN Document Server

    Cardesa, José I; Dong, Siwei; Jiménez, Javier

    2015-01-01

    A temporal study of energy transfer across length scales is performed in 3D numerical simulations of homogeneous shear flow and isotropic turbulence, at Reynolds numbers in the range $Re_{\\lambda}=107-384$. The average time taken by perturbations in the energy flux to travel between scales is measured and shown to be additive, as inferred from the agreement between the total travel time from a given scale to the smallest dissipative motions, and the time estimated from successive jumps through intermediate scales. Our data suggests that the propagation of disturbances in the energy flux is independent of the forcing and that it defines a `velocity' that determines the energy flux itself. These results support that the cascade is, on average, a scale-local process where energy is continuously transmitted from one scale to the next in order of decreasing size.

  2. Influence of the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability on the kinetic energy spectrum.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, Christopher R. (University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI)

    2010-09-01

    The fluctuating kinetic energy spectrum in the region near the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability (RMI) is experimentally investigated using particle image velocimetry (PIV). The velocity field is measured at a high spatial resolution in the light gas to observe the effects of turbulence production and dissipation. It is found that the RMI acts as a source of turbulence production near the unstable interface, where energy is transferred from the scales of the perturbation to smaller scales until dissipation. The interface also has an effect on the kinetic energy spectrum farther away by means of the distorted reflected shock wave. The energy spectrum far from the interface initially has a higher energy content than that of similar experiments with a flat interface. These differences are quick to disappear as dissipation dominates the flow far from the interface.

  3. Numerical simulation and decomposition of kinetic energy in the Central Mediterranean: insight on mesoscale circulation and energy conversion

    OpenAIRE

    Sorgente, R.; A. Olita; P. Oddo; L. Fazioli; A. Ribotti

    2011-01-01

    The spatial and temporal variability of eddy and mean kinetic energy of the Central Mediterranean region has been investigated, from January 2008 to December 2010, by mean of a numerical simulation mainly to quantify the mesoscale dynamics and their relationships with physical forcing. In order to understand the energy redistribution processes, the baroclinic energy conversion has been analysed, suggesting hypotheses about the drivers of the mesoscale activity in this area. The ocean model us...

  4. Kinetic and thermal energy harvesters for implantable medical devices and biomedical autonomous sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Implantable medical devices usually require a battery to operate and this can represent a severe restriction. In most cases, the implantable medical devices must be surgically replaced because of the dead batteries; therefore, the longevity of the whole implantable medical device is determined by the battery lifespan. For this reason, researchers have been studying energy harvesting techniques from the human body in order to obtain batteryless implantable medical devices. The human body is a rich source of energy and this energy can be harvested from body heat, breathing, arm motion, leg motion or the motion of other body parts produced during walking or any other activity. In particular, the main human-body energy sources are kinetic energy and thermal energy. This paper reviews the state-of-art in kinetic and thermoelectric energy harvesters for powering implantable medical devices. Kinetic energy harvesters are based on electromagnetic, electrostatic and piezoelectric conversion. The different energy harvesters are analyzed highlighting their sizes, energy or power they produce and their relative applications. As they must be implanted, energy harvesting devices must be limited in size, typically about 1 cm3. The available energy depends on human-body positions; therefore, some positions are more advantageous than others. For example, favorable positions for piezoelectric harvesters are hip, knee and ankle where forces are significant. The energy harvesters here reported produce a power between 6 nW and 7.2 mW; these values are comparable with the supply requirements of the most common implantable medical devices; this demonstrates that energy harvesting techniques is a valid solution to design batteryless implantable medical devices. (topical review)

  5. Bio-kinetic energy harvesting using electroactive polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slade, Jeremiah R.; Bowman, Jeremy; Kornbluh, Roy

    2012-06-01

    In hybrid vehicles, electric motors are used on each wheel to not only propel the car but also to decelerate the car by acting as generators. In the case of the human body, muscles spend about half of their time acting as a brake, absorbing energy, or doing what is known as negative work. Using dielectric elastomers it is possible to use the "braking" phases of walking to generate power without restricting or fatiguing the Warfighter. Infoscitex and SRI have developed and demonstrated methods for using electroactive polymers (EAPs) to tap into the negative work generated at the knee during the deceleration phase of the human gait cycle and convert it into electrical power that can be used to support wearable information systems, including display and communication technologies. The specific class of EAP that has been selected for these applications is termed dielectric elastomers. Because dielectric elastomers dissipate very little mechanical energy into heat, greater amounts of energy can be converted into electricity than by any other method. The long term vision of this concept is to have EAP energy harvesting cells located in components of the Warfighter ensemble, such as the boot uppers, knee pads and eventually even the clothing itself. By properly locating EAPs at these sites it will be possible to not only harvest power from the negative work phase but to actually reduce the amount of work done by the Warfighter's muscles during this phase, thereby reducing fatigue and minimizing the forces transmitted to the joints.

  6. Numerical simulation and decomposition of kinetic energy in the Central Mediterranean: insight on mesoscale circulation and energy conversion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Sorgente

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The spatial and temporal variability of eddy and mean kinetic energy of the Central Mediterranean region has been investigated, from January 2008 to December 2010, by mean of a numerical simulation mainly to quantify the mesoscale dynamics and their relationships with physical forcing. In order to understand the energy redistribution processes, the baroclinic energy conversion has been analysed, suggesting hypotheses about the drivers of the mesoscale activity in this area. The ocean model used is based on the Princeton Ocean Model implemented at 1/32° horizontal resolution. Surface momentum and buoyancy fluxes are interactively computed by mean of standard bulk formulae using predicted model Sea Surface Temperature and atmospheric variables provided by the European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecast operational analyses. At its lateral boundaries the model is one-way nested within the Mediterranean Forecasting System operational products.

    The model domain has been subdivided in four sub-regions: Sardinia channel and southern Tyrrhenian Sea, Sicily channel, eastern Tunisian shelf and Libyan Sea. Temporal evolution of eddy and mean kinetic energy has been analysed, on each of the four sub-regions, showing different behaviours. On annual scales and within the first 5 m depth, the eddy kinetic energy represents approximately the 60 % of the total kinetic energy over the whole domain, confirming the strong mesoscale nature of the surface current flows in this area. The analyses show that the model well reproduces the path and the temporal behaviour of the main known sub-basin circulation features. New mesoscale structures have been also identified, from numerical results and direct observations, for the first time as the Pantelleria Vortex and the Medina Gyre.

    The classical kinetic energy decomposition (eddy and mean allowed to depict and to quantify the permanent and fluctuating parts of the circulation in the region, and

  7. Kinetic, potential and surface tension energies of solitary waves in deep water

    OpenAIRE

    Hur, Vera Mikyoung

    2015-01-01

    We present an exact relation among the kinetic, potential and surface tension energies of a solitary wave in deep water in all dimensions. We deduce its non-existence in the absence of the effects of surface tension, provided that gravity acts in a direction opposite to what is physically realistic.

  8. Kinetic, potential and surface tension energies of solitary waves in deep water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present an exact relation among the kinetic, potential and surface tension energies of a solitary wave in deep water in all dimensions. We deduce its non-existence in the absence of the effects of surface tension, provided that gravity acts in a direction opposite to what is physically realistic. (fast track communication)

  9. Dissociation of CO induced by He2+ ions : I. Fragmentation and kinetic energy release spectra

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bliek, FW; de Jong, MC; Hoekstra, R; Morgenstern, R

    1997-01-01

    The dissociation of COq+ ions (q less than or equal to 3) produced in collisions of keV amu(-1) He2+ ions with CO has been studied by time-of-flight measurements. Both singles and coincidence time-of-flight techniques have been used to determine the kinetic energy release of the dissociating CO mole

  10. A Kinetic Study of Marginal Soil Energy Plant Helianthus annuus Stalk Pyrolysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huaxiao Yan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The pyrolytic characteristics and kinetics of new marginal soil energy plant Helianthus annuus stalk were investigated using thermogravimetric (TG method from 50 to 800°C in an inert argon atmosphere at different heating rates of 5, 10, 20, and 30°C min−1. The kinetic parameters of activation energy and pre-exponential factor were deduced by Popescu, Flynn-Wall-Ozawa (FWO, and Kissinger-Akahira-Sunose (KAS methods, respectively. The results showed that three stages appeared in the thermal degradation process. The primary devolatilization stage of H. annuus stalk can be described by the Avrami-Erofeev function (n=4. The average activation energy of H. annuus stalk was only 142.9 kJ mol−1. There were minor kinetic compensation effects between the pre-exponential factor and the activation energy. The results suggest that H. annuus stalk is suitable for pyrolysis, and more importantly, the experimental results and kinetic parameters provided useful information for the design of pyrolytic processing system using H. annuus stalk as feedstock.

  11. Employing Magnetic Levitation to Monitor Reaction Kinetics and Measure Activation Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benz, Lauren; Cesafsky, Karen E.; Le, Tran; Park, Aileen; Malicky, David

    2012-01-01

    This article describes a simple and inexpensive undergraduate-level kinetics experiment that uses magnetic levitation to monitor the progress and determine the activation energy of a condensation reaction on a polymeric solid support. The method employs a cuvette filled with a paramagnetic solution positioned between two strong magnets. The…

  12. A generalized virial theorem and the balance of kinetic and potential energies in the semiclassical limit

    OpenAIRE

    Yafaev, D. R.

    2010-01-01

    We obtain two-sided bounds on kinetic and potential energies of a bound state of a quantum particle in the semiclassical limit, as the Planck constant $\\hbar\\ri 0$. Proofs of these results rely on the generalized virial theorem obtained in the paper as well as on a decay of eigenfunctions in the classically forbidden region.

  13. Kinetic energy and added mass of hydrodynamically interacting gas bubbles in liquid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kok, J.B.W.

    1988-01-01

    By averaging the basic equations on microscale, expressions are derived for the effective added mass density and the kinetic energy density of a mixture of liquid and gas bubbles. Due to hydrodynamic interaction between the bubbles there appears to be a difference between the effective added mass de

  14. Kinetic energies to analyze the experimental auger electron spectra by density functional theory calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endo, Kazunaka

    2016-02-01

    In the Auger electron spectra (AES) simulations, we define theoretical modified kinetic energies of AES in the density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The modified kinetic energies correspond to two final-state holes at the ground state and at the transition-state in DFT calculations, respectively. This method is applied to simulate Auger electron spectra (AES) of 2nd periodic atom (Li, Be, B, C, N, O, F)-involving substances (LiF, beryllium, boron, graphite, GaN, SiO2, PTFE) by deMon DFT calculations using the model molecules of the unit cell. Experimental KVV (valence band electrons can fill K-shell core holes or be emitted during KVV-type transitions) AES of the (Li, O) atoms in the substances agree considerably well with simulation of AES obtained with the maximum kinetic energies of the atoms, while, for AES of LiF, and PTFE substance, the experimental F KVV AES is almost in accordance with the spectra from the transitionstate kinetic energy calculations.

  15. Influence of electrode material on measured ion kinetic-energy distributions in radio-frequency discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The measurement of ion kinetic energies is important for understanding processes that occur in discharges, e.g., the influence of ions on the etching of semiconductor materials in plasma reactors. Direct measurements of ion kinetic energies striking surfaces exposed to the discharge requires sampling through an orifice in a surface. Difficulties with ion sampling through a small aperture, manifested by errors or distortions in measured ion kinetic-energy distributions (IEDs) have been encountered in previous investigations of both dc and radio-frequency (rf) discharges. The errors are usually most significant at relatively low ion energies. Previous measurements in our laboratory of IEDs for ions sampled through a 0.1-mm hole in a grounded, aluminum electrode for rf discharges in argon showed evidence of reduced detection efficiency (discrimination) for low energy ions (<10 eV), and apparent shifts in the measured ion energies for plasmas generated in other gases. It has been suggested that surface charging at or near the sampling orifice can cause both discrimination and energy shifts. The existence of an insulating, or partially insulating, layer of aluminum oxide on the surface of an electrode allows the possibility of surface-charge accumulation. In the present work, IEDs were measured at both aluminum and 304 stainless-steel grounded electrodes with 0.1 mm sampling orifices in rf plasmas generated in argon and oxygen

  16. A new exact quantum mechanical rovibrational kinetic energy operator for penta-atomic systems in internal coordinates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈光巨; 李玉学

    1999-01-01

    The concrete molecule-fixed (MF) kinetic energy operator for penta-atomic molecules is expressed in terms of the parameterδ, the matrix element G?, and angular momentum operator (?). The applications of the operator are also discussed. Finally, a general compact form of kinetic energy operator suitable for calculating the rovibrational spectra of polyatomie molecules is presented.

  17. Energy conserving continuum algorithms for kinetic & gyrokinetic simulations of plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakim, A.; Hammett, G. W.; Shi, E.; Stoltzfus-Dueck, T.

    2015-11-01

    We present high-order, energy conserving, continuum algorithms for the solution of gyrokinetic equations for use in edge turbulence simulations. The distribution function is evolved with a discontinuous Galerkin scheme, while the fields are evolved with a continuous finite-element method. These algorithms work for a general, possibly non-canonical, Poisson bracket operator and conserve energy exactly. Benchmark simulations with ETG turbulence in 3X/2V are shown, as well as initial applications of the algorithms to turbulence in a simplified SOL geometry. Sheath boundary conditions with recycling and secondary electron emission are implemented, and a Lenard-Bernstein collision operator is included. Extension of these algorithms to full Vlasov-Maxwell equations are presented. It is shown that with a particular choice of numerical fluxes the total (particle+field) energy is conserved. Algorithms are implemented in a flexible and open-source framework, Gkeyll, which also includes fluid models, allowing potential hybrid simulations of various plasma problems. Supported by the Max-Planck/Princeton Center for Plasma Physics, and DOE Contract DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  18. A multi-layer model for turbulent kinetic energy in pipe flows

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Xi; Hussain, Fazle; She, Zhen-Su

    2011-01-01

    A multi-layer model of an energy length function is developed by employing recent results of the authors. The theory predicts the complete, mean streamwise turbulent kinetic-energy profile (MKP), in good agreement with empirical data for a wide range of Reynolds numbers (Re). In particular, a critical $Re_\\tau$ is predicted, beyond which a scaling anomaly appears and MKP develops a second peak.

  19. Energy storage in the photosynthetic electron-transport chain. An analogy with Michaelis-Menten kinetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DEJAN MARKOVIC

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Simultaneous measurements of fluorescence and thermal emission have been performed by applying combined fluorescence and photoacoustic techniques on isolated thylakoids pretreated by prolonged illumination with saturating light. The traces were used to create Lineweaver-Burk type plots, proving clearly at least a formal analogy between the kinetics of the mechanisms governing fluorescence and thermal emission from isolated thylakoids and Michaelis-Menten kinetics of enzymatic reactions. Two characteristic parameters were calculated from them (energy storage and half-saturation light intensity in order to obtain a basic, initial response of the photosynthetic apparatus functioning under photoinhibition stress.

  20. Measurements and kinetic modeling of energy coupling in volume and surface nanosecond pulse discharges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takashima, Keisuke; Yin, Zhiyao; Adamovich, Igor V.

    2013-02-01

    Nanosecond pulse discharge plasma imaging, coupled pulse energy measurements, and kinetic modeling are used to analyze the mechanism of energy coupling in high repetition rate, spatially uniform, nanosecond pulse discharges in air in plane-to-plane geometry. Under these conditions, coupled pulse energy scales nearly linearly with pressure (number density), with energy coupled per molecule being nearly constant, in good agreement with the kinetic model predictions. In spite of high-peak reduced electric field reached before breakdown, E/N ˜ 500-700 Td, the reduced electric field in the plasma after breakdown is much lower, E/N ˜ 50-100 Td, predicting that a significant fraction of energy coupled to the air plasma, up to 30-40%, is loaded into nitrogen vibrational mode. A self-similar, local ionization kinetic model predicting energy coupling to the plasma in a surface ionization wave discharge produced by a nanosecond voltage pulse has been developed. The model predicts key discharge parameters such as ionization wave speed and propagation distance, electric field, electron density, plasma layer thickness, and pulse energy coupled to the plasma, demonstrating good qualitative agreement with experimental data and two-dimensional kinetic modeling calculations. The model allows an analytic solution and lends itself to incorporation into existing compressible flow codes, at very little computational cost, for in-depth analysis of the nanosecond discharge plasma flow control mechanism. The use of the model would place the main emphasis on coupling of localized thermal perturbations produced by the discharge with the flow via compression waves and would provide quantitative insight into the flow control mechanism on a long time scale.

  1. FLYWHEEL BASED KINETIC ENERGY RECOVERY SYSTEMS (KERS INTEGRATED IN VEHICLES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    THOMAS MATHEWS

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Today, many hybrid electric vehicles have been developed in order to reduce the consumption of fossil fuels; unfortunately these vehicles require electrochemical batteries to store energy, with high costs as well as poor conversion efficiencies. By integrating flywheel hybrid systems, these drawbacks can be overcome and can potentially replace battery powered hybrid vehicles cost effectively. The paper will explain the engineering, mechanics of the flywheel system and it’s working in detail. Each component of the flywheel-based kineticenergy recovery system will also be described. The advantages of this technology over the electric hybrids will be elucidated carefully. The latest advancements in the field, the potential future and scope of the flywheelhybrid will be assessed.

  2. Constrained Parmeterization of Reduced Density Approximation of Kinetic Energy Functionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Debajit; Trickey, Samuel; Karasiev, Valentin

    2014-03-01

    Evaluation of forces in ab initio MD is greatly accelerated by orbital-free DFT, especially at finite temperature. The recent achievement of a fully non-empirical constraint-based generalized gradient (GGA) functional for the Kohn-Sham KE Ts [ n ] brings to light the inherent limitations of GGAs. This motivates inclusion of higher-order derivatives in the form of reduced derivative approximation (RDA) functionals. That, in turn, requires new functional forms and design criteria. RDA functionals are constrained further to produce a positive-definite, non-singular Pauli potential. We focus on designing a non-empirical constraint-based meta-GGA functional with certain combinations of higher-order derivatives which avoid nuclear-site singularities to a specified order of gradient expansion. Here we report progress on this agenda. Work supported by U.S. Dept. of Energy, grant DE-SC0002139.

  3. Kinetic Energy of Hydrocarbons as a Function of Electron Density and Convolutional Neural Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Kun; Parkhill, John

    2016-03-01

    We demonstrate a convolutional neural network trained to reproduce the Kohn-Sham kinetic energy of hydrocarbons from an input electron density. The output of the network is used as a nonlocal correction to conventional local and semilocal kinetic functionals. We show that this approximation qualitatively reproduces Kohn-Sham potential energy surfaces when used with conventional exchange correlation functionals. The density which minimizes the total energy given by the functional is examined in detail. We identify several avenues to improve on this exploratory work, by reducing numerical noise and changing the structure of our functional. Finally we examine the features in the density learned by the neural network to anticipate the prospects of generalizing these models.

  4. Accurate Reference Data for the Non-Additive Non-Interacting Kinetic Energy in Covalent Bonds

    CERN Document Server

    Nafziger, Jonathan; Wasserman, Adam

    2016-01-01

    The non-additive non-interacting kinetic energy is calculated exactly for fragments of H$_2$, Li$_2$, Be$_2$, C$_2$, N$_2$, F$_2$, and Na$_2$ within partition density-functional theory. The resulting fragments are uniquely determined and their sum reproduces the Kohn-Sham molecular density of the corresponding XC functional. We compare the use of fractional orbital occupation to the usual PDFT ensemble method for treating the fragment energies and densities. We also compare Thomas-Fermi and von Weiz{\\"a}cker approximate kinetic energy functionals to the numerically exact solution and find significant regions where the von Weiz{\\"a}cker solution is nearly exact.

  5. Rock Cutting Depth Model Based on Kinetic Energy of Abrasive Waterjet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Tae-Min; Cho, Gye-Chun

    2016-03-01

    Abrasive waterjets are widely used in the fields of civil and mechanical engineering for cutting a great variety of hard materials including rocks, metals, and other materials. Cutting depth is an important index to estimate operating time and cost, but it is very difficult to predict because there are a number of influential variables (e.g., energy, geometry, material, and nozzle system parameters). In this study, the cutting depth is correlated to the maximum kinetic energy expressed in terms of energy (i.e., water pressure, water flow rate, abrasive feed rate, and traverse speed), geometry (i.e., standoff distance), material (i.e., α and β), and nozzle system parameters (i.e., nozzle size, shape, and jet diffusion level). The maximum kinetic energy cutting depth model is verified with experimental test data that are obtained using one type of hard granite specimen for various parameters. The results show a unique curve for a specific rock type in a power function between cutting depth and maximum kinetic energy. The cutting depth model developed here can be very useful for estimating the process time when cutting rock using an abrasive waterjet.

  6. Phase field model for strong anisotropy of kinetic and highly anisotropic interfacial energy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Guo-wei; HOU Hua; CHENG Jun

    2006-01-01

    A phase-field model was established for simulating pure materials, which was calculated effectively and taken into account the strong anisotropy of kinetic and highly anisotropic interfacial energy. The anisotropy (strong kinetic and highly interfacial energy) of various degrees was simulated with numerical calculation. During a variety of interfacial anisotropy coefficient, equilibrium crystal shape varies from smoothness to corner. There has a critical value during the course of the transformation. When the anisotropy coefficenct is lower than the critical value, the growth velocity v increases monotonically with the increase of it. Whereas the anisotropy coefficent is higher than the critical value, the growth velocity decreases with the increases of it. During a variety of degree of supercooling, the growth velocity is under control from thermal diffusion to kinetics. Under the control of thermal diffusion, the growth velocity increases with the increase of degree of supercooling and tip radius R decreases with the increase of temperature. Under the control of kinetics, with the increase of degree of supercooling both V and R, which can not fit the traditional microcosmic theory.

  7. On the ultrafast kinetics of the energy and electron transfer reactions in photosystem I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slavov, Chavdar Lyubomirov

    2009-07-09

    The subject of the current work is one of the main participants in the light-dependent phase of oxygenic photosynthesis, Photosystem I (PS I). This complex carries an immense number of cofactors: chlorophylls (Chl), carotenoids, quinones, etc, which together with the protein entity exhibit several exceptional properties. First, PS I has an ultrafast light energy trapping kinetics with a nearly 100% quantum efficiency. Secondly, both of the electron transfer branches in the reaction center are suggested to be active. Thirdly, there are some so called 'red' Chls in the antenna system of PS I, absorbing light with longer wavelengths than the reaction center. These 'red' Chls significantly modify the trapping kinetics of PS I. The purpose of this thesis is to obtain better understanding of the above-mentioned, specific features of PS I. This will not merely cast more light on the mechanisms of energy and electron transfer in the complex, but also will contribute to the future developments of optimized artificial light-harvesting systems. In the current work, a number of PS I complexes isolated from different organisms (Thermosynechococcus elongatus, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, Arabidopsis thaliana) and possessing distinctive features (different macroorganisation, monomers, trimers, monomers with a semibelt of peripheral antenna attached; presence of 'red' Chls) is investigated. The studies are primarily focused on the electron transfer kinetics in each of the cofactor branches in the PS I reaction center, as well as on the effect of the antenna size and the presence of 'red' Chls on the trapping kinetics of PS I. These aspects are explored with the help of several ultrafast optical spectroscopy methods: (i) time-resolved fluorescence ? single photon counting and synchroscan streak camera; and (ii) ultrafast transient absorption. Physically meaningful information about the molecular mechanisms of the energy trapping in PS I is

  8. Design, analysis and testing of a piezoelectric flex transducer for harvesting bio-kinetic energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, A.; Zhu, M.; Tiwari, A.

    2013-12-01

    The increasing prevalence of low power consuming electronics brings greater potential to mobile energy harvesting devices as a possible power source. A new piezoelectric energy harvesting device, called the piezoelectric flex transducer (PFT), is presented and developed. A Finite Element Model (FEM) was developed to design and analyse the PFT. The PFT consists of a piezoelectric element sandwiched between substrate layers and metal endcaps that are able to amplify the axial force on the piezoelectric element. Based on the concept of the Cymbal transducer, the PFT can withstand higher forces, was retrofitted into a shoe and used to power a wireless sensor module whilst the subject with a body weight of 760N was wearing the shoe and ran at 3.1mph (1.4HZ on shoe), the PFT produced an average maximum power of 2.5mW (over 2MΩ load).

  9. Total kinetic energy distribution of fission fragments in 6,7Li + 238U reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The shape and width of fission-fragment (FF) mass and kinetic energy distribution provides a lot of information on the fission reaction mechanism and the structure of the compound nucleus (CN), the fragments as well as the interacting nuclei. The shape of the mass distribution of the fission fragments for the actinides induced by the proton or neutron is known to change with the incident energy. At low energies, it shows a double humped distribution which changes slowly to a single humped distribution as energy increases. However, for a reaction involving a weakly bound projectile (i.e., 6Li + 232Th), a sharp change in the shape of the mass distribution with energy was observed. The sharp increase in the peak to valley ratio (P:V) in the fission-fragment mass distribution in 6Li + 232Th reaction by Itkis et al. and in 6,7Li + 238U reactions by Santra et al. was concluded to be due to the reduced energy transfer to the composite system caused by incomplete fusion (ICF) of alpha or deuteron/triton followed by fissions. Total Kinetic Energy (TKE) distribution of fission fragments is another important observable on which the effect of projectile breakup is not explored yet. In this contribution, the study of breakup/transfer effect on average TKE distribution for 6,7Li + 238U reactions is presented

  10. Vector modeling and track simulation in axial turn-milling motion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Zeng-hui; JIA Chun-de

    2005-01-01

    Through vector analysis the kinetic vector model is built in a machining cylinder surface through axial turn-milling. When building a kinetic vector model in the machining field, machining through axial turn-milling and using equilateral triangles and square prism surfaces, the kinetic vector model is given any equilateral polygon prismic surface. Kinetic tracks are simulated through these kinetic models respectively, thus it can be seen that the axial turn-milling is a very effective method in manufacturing any equilateral, polygon, prismic surface.

  11. Some Properties of the Kinetic Energy Flux and Dissipation in Turbulent Stellar Convection Zones

    CERN Document Server

    Meakin, Casey

    2010-01-01

    We investigate simulated turbulent flow within thermally driven stellar convection zones. Different driving sources are studied, including cooling at the top of the convectively unstable region, as occurs in surface convection zones; and heating at the base by nuclear burning. The transport of enthalpy and kinetic energy, and the distribution of turbulent kinetic energy dissipation are studied. We emphasize the importance of global constraints on shaping the quasi-steady flow characteristics, and present an analysis of turbulent convection which is posed as a boundary value problem that can be easily incorporated into standard stellar evolution codes for deep, efficient convection. Direct comparison is made between the theoretical analysis and the simulated flow and very good agreement is found. Some common assumptions traditionally used to treat quasi-steady turbulent flow in stellar models are briefly discussed. The importance and proper treatment of convective boundaries are indicated.

  12. How to measure kinetic energy of the heavy quark inside B mesons?

    CERN Document Server

    Bigi, Ikaros I; Shifman, M; Uraltsev, N; Vainshtein, A I

    1994-01-01

    We discuss how one can determine the average kinetic energy of the heavy quark inside heavy mesons from differential distributions in B decays. A new, so-called third, sum rule for the b\\rightarrow c transition is derived in the small velocity (SV) limit. Using this sum rule and the existing data on the momentum dependence in the B\\rightarrow D^* transition (the slope of the Isgur-Wise function) we obtain a new lower bound on the parameter \\mu_\\pi^2 = (2M_B)^{-1}\\langle B |\\bar b (i\\vec{D})^2 b |B\\rangle proportional to the average kinetic energy of b quark inside B meson. The existing data suggest \\mu_\\pi^2 > 0.4~GeV^2 and (from the ``optical'' sum rule) \\overline{\\Lambda} > 500 MeV, albeit with some numerical uncertainties.

  13. Confidence limits of SN, Kinetic Energy and chemical yields in evolutionary synthesis models

    CERN Document Server

    Luridiana, V

    2001-01-01

    When evolutionary synthesis models take into account the stochastic nature of the IMF together with the discrete number of stars in real stellar clusters, typical output turns to dispersion band (where real data can be placed) instead of narrow lines. We present here a qualitative analysis of such dispersion in the SN rate, the kinetic energy and the 14N/12C ratio for different amounts of mass transformed into stars.

  14. Energy level formula for the Morse oscillator with an additional kinetic coupling potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Hong-yi; Chen, Bo-zhan; Fan, Yue

    1996-02-01

    Based on the <η| representation which is the common eigenstate of the relative position x1 - x2 and the total momentum P1 + P2 of two particles we derive the energy level formula for a Morse oscillator with an additional kinetic coupling potential. The <η| representation seems to provide a direct and convenient approach for solving certain dynamical problems for two-body systems.

  15. ENERGY TRANSFER IN TRIMERIC C-PHYCOCYANIN STUDIED BY PICOSECOND FLUORESCENCE KINETICS

    OpenAIRE

    WENDLER, J.; John, Wolfhart; Scheer, Hugo; Holzwarth, A. R.

    1986-01-01

    The excited state kinetics of trimeric C-phycocyanin from Mastigocladus laminosus has been measured as a function of the emission and excitation wavelength by the single-photon timing technique with picosecond resolution and simultaneous data analysis. A fast decay component of 22 ps (C-phycocyanin with linker peptides) and 36 ps (C-phycocyanin lacking linker peptides) is attributed to efficient energy transfer from sensitizing to fluorescing chromophores. At long detection wavelengths the fa...

  16. Kinetic theory of binary particles with unequal mean velocities and non-equipartition energies

    OpenAIRE

    Mei, Yifeng; Chen, Yanpei; Wang, Wei

    2015-01-01

    The hydrodynamic conservation equations and constitutive relations for a binary granular mixture composed of smooth, nearly elastic, hard spheres with non-equipartition energies and different mean velocities are derived. This research is aimed to build three-dimensional kinetic theory to characterize the behaviors of two species of particles suffering different forces. The standard Enskog method is employed assuming a Maxwell velocity distribution for each species of particles. The collision ...

  17. From Forcing to Dissipation : Kinetic and Available Potential Energy Pathways in Idealized Models of Ocean Circulation

    OpenAIRE

    Barkan, Roy

    2015-01-01

    The general circulation of the ocean is forced by surface fluxes of momentum, heat, and freshwater at basin scales. The kinetic (E_k) and available potential (E_a) energy sources associated with these external forces drive a circulation which exhibits flow features that vary on a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. Understanding how the different forcing mechanisms lead to the observed large-scale ocean circulation patterns and to what degree do the various smaller scale processes modi...

  18. Membrane Bending Energy and Fusion Pore Kinetics in Ca2+-Triggered Exocytosis

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Zhen; Jackson, Meyer B.

    2010-01-01

    A fusion pore composed of lipid is an obligatory kinetic intermediate of membrane fusion, and its formation requires energy to bend membranes into highly curved shapes. The energetics of such deformations in viral fusion is well established, but the role of membrane bending in Ca2+-triggered exocytosis remains largely untested. Amperometry recording showed that during exocytosis in chromaffin and PC12 cells, fusion pores formed by smaller vesicles dilated more rapidly than fusion pores formed...

  19. Axially symmetric rotating traversable wormholes

    CERN Document Server

    Kuhfittig, P K F

    2003-01-01

    This paper generalizes the static and spherically symmetric traversable wormhole geometry to a rotating axially symmetric one with a time-dependent angular velocity by means of an exact solution. It was found that the violation of the weak energy condition, although unavoidable, is considerably less severe than in the static spherically symmetric case. The radial tidal constraint is more easily met due to the rotation. Similar improvements are seen in one of the lateral tidal constraints. The magnitude of the angular velocity may have little effect on the weak energy condition violation for an axially symmetric wormhole. For a spherically symmetric one, however, the violation becomes less severe with increasing angular velocity. The time rate of change of the angular velocity, on the other hand, was found to have no effect at all. Finally, the angular velocity must depend only on the radial coordinate, confirming an earlier result.

  20. Monte-Carlo simulation for fragment mass and kinetic energy distributions from neutron induced fission of 235U

    CERN Document Server

    Montoya, M; Rojas, J

    2007-01-01

    The mass and kinetic energy distribution of nuclear fragments from thermal neutron induced fission of 235U have been studied using a Monte-Carlo simulation. Besides reproducing the pronounced broadening on the standard deviation of the final fragment kinetic energy distribution $\\sigma_{e}(m)$ around the mass number m = 109, our simulation also produces a second broadening around m = 125, that is in agreement with the experimental data obtained by Belhafaf et al. These results are consequence of the characteristics of the neutron emission, the variation in the primary fragment mean kinetic energy and the yield as a function of the mass.

  1. Bidirectional energy cascades and the origin of kinetic Alfvénic and whistler turbulence in the solar wind.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Che, H; Goldstein, M L; Viñas, A F

    2014-02-14

    The observed steep kinetic scale turbulence spectrum in the solar wind raises the question of how that turbulence originates. Observations of keV energetic electrons during solar quiet time suggest them as a possible source of free energy to drive kinetic turbulence. Using particle-in-cell simulations, we explore how the free energy released by an electron two-stream instability drives Weibel-like electromagnetic waves that excite wave-wave interactions. Consequently, both kinetic Alfvénic and whistler turbulence are excited that evolve through inverse and forward magnetic energy cascades.

  2. Measuring kinetic energy changes in the mesoscale with low acquisition rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report on the measurement of the average kinetic energy changes in isothermal and non-isothermal quasistatic processes in the mesoscale, realized with a Brownian particle trapped with optical tweezers. Our estimation of the kinetic energy change allows to access to the full energetic description of the Brownian particle. Kinetic energy estimates are obtained from measurements of the mean square velocity of the trapped bead sampled at frequencies several orders of magnitude smaller than the momentum relaxation frequency. The velocity is tuned applying a noisy electric field that modulates the amplitude of the fluctuations of the position and velocity of the Brownian particle, whose motion is equivalent to that of a particle in a higher temperature reservoir. Additionally, we show that the dependence of the variance of the time-averaged velocity on the sampling frequency can be used to quantify properties of the electrophoretic mobility of a charged colloid. Our method could be applied to detect temperature gradients in inhomogeneous media and to characterize the complete thermodynamics of biological motors and of artificial micro and nanoscopic heat engines.

  3. Energy deposition by heavy ions: additivity of kinetic and potential energy contributions in hillock formation on CaF2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y Y; Grygiel, C; Dufour, C; Sun, J R; Wang, Z G; Zhao, Y T; Xiao, G Q; Cheng, R; Zhou, X M; Ren, J R; Liu, S D; Lei, Y; Sun, Y B; Ritter, R; Gruber, E; Cassimi, A; Monnet, I; Bouffard, S; Aumayr, F; Toulemonde, M

    2014-07-18

    Modification of surface and bulk properties of solids by irradiation with ion beams is a widely used technique with many applications in material science. In this study, we show that nano-hillocks on CaF2 crystal surfaces can be formed by individual impact of medium energy (3 and 5 MeV) highly charged ions (Xe(22+) to Xe(30+)) as well as swift (kinetic energies between 12 and 58 MeV) heavy xenon ions. For very slow highly charged ions the appearance of hillocks is known to be linked to a threshold in potential energy (Ep) while for swift heavy ions a minimum electronic energy loss per unit length (Se) is necessary. With our results we bridge the gap between these two extreme cases and demonstrate, that with increasing energy deposition via Se the Ep-threshold for hillock production can be lowered substantially. Surprisingly, both mechanisms of energy deposition in the target surface seem to contribute in an additive way, which can be visualized in a phase diagram. We show that the inelastic thermal spike model, originally developed to describe such material modifications for swift heavy ions, can be extended to the case where both kinetic and potential energies are deposited into the surface.

  4. Energy deposition by heavy ions: additivity of kinetic and potential energy contributions in hillock formation on CaF2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y Y; Grygiel, C; Dufour, C; Sun, J R; Wang, Z G; Zhao, Y T; Xiao, G Q; Cheng, R; Zhou, X M; Ren, J R; Liu, S D; Lei, Y; Sun, Y B; Ritter, R; Gruber, E; Cassimi, A; Monnet, I; Bouffard, S; Aumayr, F; Toulemonde, M

    2014-01-01

    Modification of surface and bulk properties of solids by irradiation with ion beams is a widely used technique with many applications in material science. In this study, we show that nano-hillocks on CaF2 crystal surfaces can be formed by individual impact of medium energy (3 and 5 MeV) highly charged ions (Xe(22+) to Xe(30+)) as well as swift (kinetic energies between 12 and 58 MeV) heavy xenon ions. For very slow highly charged ions the appearance of hillocks is known to be linked to a threshold in potential energy (Ep) while for swift heavy ions a minimum electronic energy loss per unit length (Se) is necessary. With our results we bridge the gap between these two extreme cases and demonstrate, that with increasing energy deposition via Se the Ep-threshold for hillock production can be lowered substantially. Surprisingly, both mechanisms of energy deposition in the target surface seem to contribute in an additive way, which can be visualized in a phase diagram. We show that the inelastic thermal spike model, originally developed to describe such material modifications for swift heavy ions, can be extended to the case where both kinetic and potential energies are deposited into the surface. PMID:25034006

  5. Role of kinetic energy of impinging molecules in the {alpha}-sexithiophene growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tonezzer, M., E-mail: matteo.tonezzer@cnr.i [IFN-CNR, Via alla Cascata 56/C, 38123 Povo di Trento (Italy) and Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Trento, Via Sommarive 14, I-38123 Povo Trento (Italy) and TASC IOM-CNR Laboratory, S.S. 14 km163.5, I-34012 Basovizza Trieste (Italy); Rigo, E. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Modena e Reggio Emilia, via Campi 213/A, 41100 Modena (Italy); Gottardi, S. [IFN-CNR, Via alla Cascata 56/C, 38123 Povo di Trento (Italy); Bettotti, P.; Pavesi, L. [Laboratorio di Nanoscienze, Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Trento, Via Sommarive 14, I-38123 Povo Trento (Italy); Iannotta, S. [IMEM-CNR, Parco Area delle Scienze, 37/a 43100 Parma (Italy); Toccoli, T., E-mail: toccoli@science.unitn.i [IFN-CNR, Via alla Cascata 56/C, 38123 Povo di Trento (Italy)

    2011-04-01

    We report on the {alpha}-sexithiophene sub-monolayer growth with supersonic molecular beam deposition by investigating how the kinetic energy of the impinging molecules influences the growth on substrates with different surface wettabilities and temperatures. The results show that the energy of the impinging molecules affects the morphology of the molecular film increasing the coverage and the island size, and reducing the fractality of the sub-monolayer islands. The possibility of directing growth of more ordered islands could improve the performances of electronic devices, which are greatly affected by the structure of the first monolayers.

  6. Total kinetic energy release in the fast neutron-induced fission of $^{235}$U

    OpenAIRE

    Yanez, R; Loveland, W.; King, J.; Barrett, J. S.; Fotiades, N.; Lee, H. Y.

    2015-01-01

    We have measured the total kinetic energy (TKE) release for the $^{235}$U(n,f) reaction for $E_{n}$=2-100 MeV using the 2E method with an array of Si PIN diode detectors. The neutron energies were determined by time of flight measurements using the white spectrum neutron beam at the LANSCE facility. (To calibrate the apparatus, the TKE release for $^{235}$U(n$_{th}$,f) was also measured using a thermal neutron beam from the OSU TRIGA reactor). The TKE decreases non-linearly from 169.0 MeV to ...

  7. Total kinetic energy release in the fast neutron-induced fission of $^{235}$U

    OpenAIRE

    Yanez, R; Loveland, W.; King, J.; Barrett, J. S.; Fotiades, N.; Lee, H. Y.

    2016-01-01

    We have measured the total kinetic energy (TKE) release for the $^{235}$U(n,f) reaction for $E_{n}$=2-100 MeV using the 2E method with an array of Si PIN diode detectors. The neutron energies were determined by time of flight measurements using the white spectrum neutron beam at the LANSCE facility. To benchmark the TKE measurement, the TKE release for $^{235}$U(n$_{th}$,f) was also measured using a thermal neutron beam from the Oregon State University TRIGA reactor, giving pre-neutron emissi...

  8. Five-dimensional teleparallel theory equivalent to general relativity, the axially symmetric solution,energy and spatial momentum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gamal G.L. Nashed

    2011-01-01

    A theory of (4+1)-dimensional gravity is developed on the basis of the teleparallel theory equivalent to general relativity.The fundamental gravitational field variables are the five-dimensional vector fields (pentad),defined globally on a manifold M,and gravity is attributed to the torsion.The Lagrangian density is quadratic in the torsion tensor.We then give the exact five-dimensional solution.The solution is a generalization of the familiar Schwarzschild and Kerr solutions of the four-dimensional teleparallel equivalent of general relativity.We also use the definition of the gravitational energy to calculate the energy and the spatial momentum.

  9. Enzymatic Kinetic Isotope Effects from Path-Integral Free Energy Perturbation Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, J

    2016-01-01

    Path-integral free energy perturbation (PI-FEP) theory is presented to directly determine the ratio of quantum mechanical partition functions of different isotopologs in a single simulation. Furthermore, a double averaging strategy is used to carry out the practical simulation, separating the quantum mechanical path integral exactly into two separate calculations, one corresponding to a classical molecular dynamics simulation of the centroid coordinates, and another involving free-particle path-integral sampling over the classical, centroid positions. An integrated centroid path-integral free energy perturbation and umbrella sampling (PI-FEP/UM, or simply, PI-FEP) method along with bisection sampling was summarized, which provides an accurate and fast convergent method for computing kinetic isotope effects for chemical reactions in solution and in enzymes. The PI-FEP method is illustrated by a number of applications, to highlight the computational precision and accuracy, the rule of geometrical mean in kinetic isotope effects, enhanced nuclear quantum effects in enzyme catalysis, and protein dynamics on temperature dependence of kinetic isotope effects. PMID:27498645

  10. Enzymatic Kinetic Isotope Effects from Path-Integral Free Energy Perturbation Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, J

    2016-01-01

    Path-integral free energy perturbation (PI-FEP) theory is presented to directly determine the ratio of quantum mechanical partition functions of different isotopologs in a single simulation. Furthermore, a double averaging strategy is used to carry out the practical simulation, separating the quantum mechanical path integral exactly into two separate calculations, one corresponding to a classical molecular dynamics simulation of the centroid coordinates, and another involving free-particle path-integral sampling over the classical, centroid positions. An integrated centroid path-integral free energy perturbation and umbrella sampling (PI-FEP/UM, or simply, PI-FEP) method along with bisection sampling was summarized, which provides an accurate and fast convergent method for computing kinetic isotope effects for chemical reactions in solution and in enzymes. The PI-FEP method is illustrated by a number of applications, to highlight the computational precision and accuracy, the rule of geometrical mean in kinetic isotope effects, enhanced nuclear quantum effects in enzyme catalysis, and protein dynamics on temperature dependence of kinetic isotope effects.

  11. Dissipative Axial Inflation

    CERN Document Server

    Notari, Alessio

    2016-01-01

    We analyze in detail the background cosmological evolution of a scalar field coupled to a massless abelian gauge field through an axial term $\\frac{\\phi}{f_\\gamma} F \\tilde{F}$, such as in the case of an axion. Gauge fields in this case are known to experience tachyonic growth and therefore can backreact on the background as an effective dissipation into radiation energy density $\\rho_R$, which which can lead to inflation without the need of a flat potential. We analyze the system, for momenta $k$ smaller than the cutoff $f_\\gamma$, including numerically the backreaction. We consider the evolution from a given static initial condition and explicitly show that, if $f_\\gamma$ is smaller than the field excursion $\\phi_0$ by about a factor of at least ${\\cal O} (20)$, there is a friction effect which turns on before that the field can fall down and which can then lead to a very long stage of inflation with a generic potential. In addition we find superimposed oscillations, which would get imprinted on any kind of...

  12. Energy deposition by heavy ions: Additivity of kinetic and potential energy contributions in hillock formation on CaF2

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Y.Y.; Grygiel, C.; Dufour, C; J. R. Sun; Wang, Z.G.; Zhao, Y. T.; G. Q. Xiao; Cheng, R.; Zhou, X. M.; Ren, J. R.; Liu, S. D.; Lei, Y.; Sun, Y. B.; Ritter, R.; E. Gruber

    2014-01-01

    Modification of surface and bulk properties of solids by irradiation with ion beams is a widely used technique with many applications in material science. In this study, we show that nano-hillocks on CaF2 crystal surfaces can be formed by individual impact of medium energy (3 and 5 MeV) highly charged ions (Xe22+ to Xe30+) as well as swift (kinetic energies between 12 and 58 MeV) heavy xenon ions. For very slow highly charged ions the appearance of hillocks is known to be linked to a threshol...

  13. An Unbroken Axial Vector Current Conservation Law

    CERN Document Server

    Sharafiddinov, Rasulkhozha S

    2015-01-01

    The mass, energy and momentum of the neutrino of a true flavor have an axial-vector nature. As a consequence, the left-handed truly neutral neutrino in an axial-vector field of emission can be converted into a right-handed one and vice versa. This predicts the unidenticality of masses, energies and momenta of neutrinos of the different components. Recognizing such a difference in masses, energies, momenta and accepting that the left-handed axial-vector neutrino and the right-handed antineutrino of true neutrality refer to long-lived C-odd leptons, and the right-handed truly neutral neutrino and the left-handed axial-vector antineutrino are of short-lived fermions of C-oddity, we would write a new CP-even Dirac equation taking into account the flavor symmetrical axial-vector mass, energy and momentum matrices. Their presence explains the spontaneous mirror symmetry violation, confirming that an axial-vector current conservation law has never violated. They reflect the availability of a mirror Minkowski space i...

  14. Structure and Propagation Characteristics of Climatological Mean Kinetic Energy of Disturbance of Intraseasonal Oscillation in Asian Summer Monsoon Zone

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    [Objective] The research aimed to study the structure and propagation characteristics of climatological mean kinetic energy of disturbance of intraseasonal oscillation in Asian summer monsoon zone. [Method] When South China Sea monsoon started to break out, the kinetic energy of intraseasonal oscillation disturbance in the monsoon zone was analyzed, especially the researches about the variation of South China Sea monsoon, the development of Indian monsoon and the advancement of East Asian monsoon. [Result] ...

  15. Distinct dissociation kinetics between ion pairs: Solvent-coordinate free-energy landscape analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yonetani, Yoshiteru

    2015-07-01

    Different ion pairs exhibit different dissociation kinetics; however, while the nature of this process is vital for understanding various molecular systems, the underlying mechanism remains unclear. In this study, to examine the origin of different kinetic rate constants for this process, molecular dynamics simulations were conducted for LiCl, NaCl, KCl, and CsCl in water. The results showed substantial differences in dissociation rate constant, following the trend kLiCl constants arose predominantly from the variation in solvent-state distribution between the ion pairs. The formation of a water-bridging configuration, in which the water molecule binds to an anion and a cation simultaneously, was identified as a key step in this process: water-bridge formation lowers the related dissociation free-energy barrier, thereby increasing the probability of ion-pair dissociation. Consequently, a higher probability of water-bridge formation leads to a higher ion-pair dissociation rate.

  16. Coarse Molecular Dynamics of a Peptide Fragment Free Energy, Kinetics, and Long-Time Dynamics Computations

    CERN Document Server

    Hummer, G; Hummer, Gerhard; Kevrekidis, Ioannis G.

    2002-01-01

    We present a ``coarse molecular dynamics'' approach and apply it to studying the kinetics and thermodynamics of a peptide fragment dissolved in water. Short bursts of appropriately initialized simulations are used to infer the deterministic and stochastic components of the peptide motion parametrized by an appropriate set of coarse variables. Techniques from traditional numerical analysis (Newton-Raphson, coarse projective integration) are thus enabled; these techniques help analyze important features of the free-energy landscape (coarse transition states, eigenvalues and eigenvectors, transition rates, etc.). Reverse integration of (irreversible) expected coarse variables backward in time can assist escape from free energy minima and trace low-dimensional free energy surfaces. To illustrate the ``coarse molecular dynamics'' approach, we combine multiple short (0.5-ps) replica simulations to map the free energy surface of the ``alanine dipeptide'' in water, and to determine the ~ 1/(1000 ps) rate of interconv...

  17. Ion kinetic energies in inductively coupled plasma/mass spectrometry (ICP-MS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ion kinetic energies in an inductively coupled plasma/mass spectrometer (ICP-MS) system have been measured with the use of a retarding potential on the analyzing quadrupole. The energies differ markedly from those previously reported in the literature. This is attributed to the elimination of any arcing of the ICP to the sampling orifice or skimmer of the ICP-MS system. In the absence of secondary discharge effects, the ion energies increase with the mass of the ion and are consistent with those expected from molecular beam sampling from a plasma with a temperature of --5000 K and a potential of --2 V. Ion energies are found to be virtually independent of aerosol gas flow, plasma power, and sample matrix composition, allowing independent optimization of plasma parameters and ion optics

  18. Kinetic study of solid waste pyrolysis using distributed activation energy model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhavanam, Anjireddy; Sastry, R C

    2015-02-01

    The pyrolysis characteristics of municipal solid waste, agricultural residues such as ground nut shell, cotton husk and their blends are investigated using non-isothermal thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) with in a temperature range of 30-900 °C at different heating rates of 10 °C, 30 °C and 50 °C/min in inert atmosphere. From the thermograms obtained from TGA, it is observed that the maximum rate of degradation occurred in the second stage of the pyrolysis process for all the solid wastes. The distributed activation energy model (DAEM) is used to study the pyrolysis kinetics of the solid wastes. The kinetic parameters E (activation energy), k0 (frequency factor) are calculated from this model. It is found that the range of activation energies for agricultural residues are lower than the municipal solid waste. The activation energies for the municipal solid waste pyrolysis process drastically decreased with addition of agricultural residues. The proposed DAEM is successfully validated with TGA experimental data.

  19. A simplified model for average kinetic energy flux within large wind turbine arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markfort, Corey; Zhang, Wei; Porte-Agel, Fernando

    2015-11-01

    We investigate the kinetic energy distribution within an array of wind turbines using a 1-D model for the interactions between large-scale wind farms and the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL). Obstructed shear flow scaling is used to predict the development length of the wind farm flow as well as vertical momentum flux. Within the region of flow development, momentum and energy is advected into the wind farm and wake turbulence draws excess momentum in from between turbines. This is characterized by large dispersive fluxes. Once the flow within the farm is developed, the area - averaged velocity profile exhibits an inflection point, characteristic of obstructed shear flows. The inflected velocity profile is responsible for a characteristic turbulence eddy scale, which may be responsible for a significant amount of the vertical momentum and energy flux. Prediction of this scale is useful for determining the amount of available power for harvesting. The model result for kinetic energy flux is compared to wind tunnel measurements. The model is useful for optimizing wind turbine spacing and layout, and for assessing the impacts of wind farms on nearby wind resources and the environment.

  20. Visualizing the large-$Z$ scaling of the kinetic energy density of atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Cancio, Antonio C

    2016-01-01

    The scaling of neutral atoms to large $Z$, combining periodicity with a gradual trend to homogeneity, is a fundamental probe of density functional theory, one that has driven recent advances in understanding both the kinetic and exchange-correlation energies. Although research focus is normally upon the scaling of energies, insights can also be gained from energy densities. We visualize the scaling of the positive-definite kinetic energy density (KED) in closed-shell atoms, in comparison to invariant quantities based upon the gradient and Laplacian of the density. We notice a striking fit of the KED within the core of any atom to a gradient expansion using both the gradient and the Laplacian, appearing as an asymptotic limit around which the KED oscillates. The gradient expansion is qualitatively different from that derived from first principles for a slowly-varying electron gas and is correlated with a nonzero Pauli contribution to the KED near the nucleus. We propose and explore orbital-free meta-GGA models...

  1. Enhanced von Weizsäcker Wang-Govind-Carter kinetic energy density functional for semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Ilgyou; Carter, Emily A.

    2014-05-01

    We propose a new form of orbital-free (OF) kinetic energy density functional (KEDF) for semiconductors that is based on the Wang-Govind-Carter (WGC99) nonlocal KEDF. We enhance within the latter the semi-local von Weizsäcker KEDF term, which is exact for a single orbital. The enhancement factor we introduce is related to the extent to which the electron density is localized. The accuracy of the new KEDF is benchmarked against Kohn-Sham density functional theory (KSDFT) by comparing predicted energy differences between phases, equilibrium volumes, and bulk moduli for various semiconductors, along with metal-insulator phase transition pressures. We also compare point defect and (100) surface energies in silicon for a broad test of its applicability. This new KEDF accurately reproduces the exact non-interacting kinetic energy of KSDFT with only one additional adjustable parameter beyond the three parameters in the WGC99 KEDF; it exhibits good transferability between semiconducting to metallic silicon phases and between various III-V semiconductors without parameter adjustment. Overall, this KEDF is more accurate than previously proposed OF KEDFs (e.g., the Huang-Carter (HC) KEDF) for semiconductors, while the computational efficiency remains at the level of the WGC99 KEDF (several hundred times faster than the HC KEDF). This accurate, fast, and transferable new KEDF holds considerable promise for large-scale OFDFT simulations of metallic through semiconducting materials.

  2. Axial Halbach Magnetic Bearings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichenberg, Dennis J.; Gallo, Christopher A.; Thompson, William K.

    2008-01-01

    Axial Halbach magnetic bearings have been investigated as part of an effort to develop increasingly reliable noncontact bearings for future high-speed rotary machines that may be used in such applications as aircraft, industrial, and land-vehicle power systems and in some medical and scientific instrumentation systems. Axial Halbach magnetic bearings are passive in the sense that unlike most other magnetic bearings that have been developed in recent years, they effect stable magnetic levitation without need for complex active control.

  3. Axial static mixer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandrock, H.E.

    1982-05-06

    Static axial mixing apparatus includes a plurality of channels, forming flow paths of different dimensions. The axial mixer includes a flow adjusting device for adjustable selective control of flow resistance of various flow paths in order to provide substantially identical flows through the various channels, thereby reducing nonuniform coating of interior surfaces of the channels. The flow adjusting device may include diaphragm valves, and may further include a pressure regulating system therefor.

  4. Surface nanoscale axial photonics

    OpenAIRE

    Sumetsky, M.; Fini, J. M.

    2011-01-01

    Dense photonic integration promises to revolutionize optical computing and communications. However, efforts towards this goal face unacceptable attenuation of light caused by surface roughness in microscopic devices. Here we address this problem by introducing Surface Nanoscale Axial Photonics (SNAP). The SNAP platform is based on whispering gallery modes circulating around the optical fiber surface and undergoing slow axial propagation readily described by the one-dimensional Schr\\"odinger e...

  5. Nonperturbative Aspects of Axial Vector Vertex

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZONG Hong-Shi; CHEN Xiang-Song; WANG Fan; CHANG Chao-Hsi; ZHAO En-Guang

    2002-01-01

    It is shown how the axial vector current of current quarks is related to that of constituent quarks within the framework of the global color symmetry model.Gluon dressing of the axial vector vertex and the quark self-energy functions are described by the inhomogeneous Bethe-Salpeter equation in the ladder approximation and the Schwinger Dyson equation in the rainbow approximation,respectively.

  6. Axial Vircator for Electronic Warfare Applications

    OpenAIRE

    L. Drazan; R. Vrana

    2009-01-01

    This paper deals with a high power microwave generator with virtual cathode – vircator in axial release for electronic warfare applications. The classification of directed energy weapons microwave (DEWM) is introduced together with basic block diagrams of a particular class of DEWM. In the paper, methods for designing vircator pulsed power supply, axial vircator structure, measurement methods and experimental results are presented. The vircator in electromagnetic ammunition is powered b...

  7. Ultra-low kinetic energy photoelectron angular distribution measurements in He and Ne using a Velocity Map Imaging spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juarez, A. M.; Redt, E.; Hoenert, M.; Hoyos-Campo, L. M.; Rolles, D.; Berrah, N.; Aguilar, A.

    2009-11-01

    We present photoelectron angular distributions (PADs) in Helium and Neon for electrons with excess energies between 5 and 100 meV. These ultra-low kinetic energy PAD measurements were obtained with a modified Velocity Map Imaging spectrometer (VMI) and VUV light from the Advanced Light Source (ALS) synchrotron radiation source. The efficiency and reliability of the spectrometer at this ultra-low kinetic energy range has been tested by determining the variation with energy of the asymmetry, β, parameter of photoelectrons from the s-shell direct ionization in Helium. For Neon, we determined the energy dependent asymmetry parameters across the "s" and "d" autoionizing resonances between the P3/2 and P1/2 ionic states. Furthermore, we measured the asymmetry parameter for photoelectrons produced from the n = 2 to n = 6 satellite states of He. These measurements were performed at values of excess kinetic energy previously unexplored.

  8. Ultra-low kinetic energy photoelectron angular distribution measurements in He and Ne using a Velocity Map Imaging spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Juarez, A M; Hoyos-Campo, L M [Institute de Ciencias Fisicas, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Cuernavaca, Mor. 62210 (Mexico); Redt, E; Hoenert, M; Aguilar, A [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley CA-94720 (United States); Rolles, D [Max Planck Advanced Study Group, CFEL, D-22761 Hamburg (Germany); Berrah, N, E-mail: aaguilar@lbl.go [Department of Physics, Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo MI-49008 (United States)

    2009-11-01

    We present photoelectron angular distributions (PADs) in Helium and Neon for electrons with excess energies between 5 and 100 meV. These ultra-low kinetic energy PAD measurements were obtained with a modified Velocity Map Imaging spectrometer (VMI) and VUV light from the Advanced Light Source (ALS) synchrotron radiation source. The efficiency and reliability of the spectrometer at this ultra-low kinetic energy range has been tested by determining the variation with energy of the asymmetry, {beta}, parameter of photoelectrons from the s-shell direct ionization in Helium. For Neon, we determined the energy dependent asymmetry parameters across the 's' and 'd' autoionizing resonances between the P{sub 3/2} and P{sub 1/2} ionic states. Furthermore, we measured the asymmetry parameter for photoelectrons produced from the n = 2 to n = 6 satellite states of He. These measurements were performed at values of excess kinetic energy previously unexplored.

  9. Balancing the daylighting and energy performance of solar screens in residential desert buildings: Examination of screen axial rotation and opening aspect ratio

    KAUST Repository

    Sabry, Hanan

    2014-05-01

    Solar screens are typically used to control solar access into building spaces. They proved their usefulness in improving the daylighting and energy performance of buildings in the hot arid desert environments which are endowed with abundance of clear skies.The daylighting and energy performance of solar screens is affected by many parameters. These include screen perforation, depth, reflectivity and color, aspect ratio of openings, shape, tilt angle and rotation. Changing some of these parameters can improve the daylighting performance drastically. However, this can result in increased energy consumption. A balanced solution must be sought, where acceptable daylighting performance would be achieved at minimum energy consumption.This paper aims at defining solar screen designs that achieve visual comfort and at the same time minimum energy consumption in residential desert settings. The study focused on the effect of changing the solar screen axial rotation and the aspect ratio of its openings under the desert clear-sky. The individual and combined effects of changing these parameters were studied.Results of this study demonstrated that a non-rotated solar screen that has wide horizontal openings (aspect ratio of 18:1) proved to be successful in the north and south orientations. Its performance in the east/west orientations was also superior. In contrast, the screen that was rotated along its vertical axis while having small size openings (aspect ratio of 1:1) proved to be more successful in the east/west orientations. Its performance in the north orientation was also good. These solutions enhanced daylighting performance, while maintaining the energy consumption at a minimum.Moreover, it was observed that combining two screen parameters which proved useful in previous studies on daylighting or thermal performance does not add up to better solutions. The combined solutions that were tested in this study did not prove successful in satisfying daylighting and thermal

  10. Estimation of daily energy expenditure in pregnant and non-pregnant women using a wrist-worn tri-axial accelerometer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent T van Hees

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Few studies have compared the validity of objective measures of physical activity energy expenditure (PAEE in pregnant and non-pregnant women. PAEE is commonly estimated with accelerometers attached to the hip or waist, but little is known about the validity and participant acceptability of wrist attachment. The objectives of the current study were to assess the validity of a simple summary measure derived from a wrist-worn accelerometer (GENEA, Unilever Discover, UK to estimate PAEE in pregnant and non-pregnant women, and to evaluate participant acceptability. METHODS: Non-pregnant (N = 73 and pregnant (N = 35 Swedish women (aged 20-35 yrs wore the accelerometer on their wrist for 10 days during which total energy expenditure (TEE was assessed using doubly-labelled water. PAEE was calculated as 0.9×TEE-REE. British participants (N = 99; aged 22-65 yrs wore accelerometers on their non-dominant wrist and hip for seven days and were asked to score the acceptability of monitor placement (scored 1 [least] through 10 [most] acceptable. RESULTS: There was no significant correlation between body weight and PAEE. In non-pregnant women, acceleration explained 24% of the variation in PAEE, which decreased to 19% in leave-one-out cross-validation. In pregnant women, acceleration explained 11% of the variation in PAEE, which was not significant in leave-one-out cross-validation. Median (IQR acceptability of wrist and hip placement was 9(8-10 and 9(7-10, respectively; there was a within-individual difference of 0.47 (p<.001. CONCLUSIONS: A simple summary measure derived from a wrist-worn tri-axial accelerometer adds significantly to the prediction of energy expenditure in non-pregnant women and is scored acceptable by participants.

  11. Graph-based analysis of kinetics on multidimensional potential-energy surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okushima, T.; Niiyama, T.; Ikeda, K. S.; Shimizu, Y.

    2009-09-01

    The aim of this paper is twofold: one is to give a detailed description of an alternative graph-based analysis method, which we call saddle connectivity graph, for analyzing the global topography and the dynamical properties of many-dimensional potential-energy landscapes and the other is to give examples of applications of this method in the analysis of the kinetics of realistic systems. A Dijkstra-type shortest path algorithm is proposed to extract dynamically dominant transition pathways by kinetically defining transition costs. The applicability of this approach is first confirmed by an illustrative example of a low-dimensional random potential. We then show that a coarse-graining procedure tailored for saddle connectivity graphs can be used to obtain the kinetic properties of 13- and 38-atom Lennard-Jones clusters. The coarse-graining method not only reduces the complexity of the graphs, but also, with iterative use, reveals a self-similar hierarchical structure in these clusters. We also propose that the self-similarity is common to many-atom Lennard-Jones clusters.

  12. Sensory Agreement Guides Kinetic Energy Optimization of Arm Movements during Object Manipulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farshchiansadegh, Ali; Melendez-Calderon, Alejandro; Ranganathan, Rajiv; Murphey, Todd D; Mussa-Ivaldi, Ferdinando A

    2016-04-01

    The laws of physics establish the energetic efficiency of our movements. In some cases, like locomotion, the mechanics of the body dominate in determining the energetically optimal course of action. In other tasks, such as manipulation, energetic costs depend critically upon the variable properties of objects in the environment. Can the brain identify and follow energy-optimal motions when these motions require moving along unfamiliar trajectories? What feedback information is required for such optimal behavior to occur? To answer these questions, we asked participants to move their dominant hand between different positions while holding a virtual mechanical system with complex dynamics (a planar double pendulum). In this task, trajectories of minimum kinetic energy were along curvilinear paths. Our findings demonstrate that participants were capable of finding the energy-optimal paths, but only when provided with veridical visual and haptic information pertaining to the object, lacking which the trajectories were executed along rectilinear paths. PMID:27035587

  13. Sensory Agreement Guides Kinetic Energy Optimization of Arm Movements during Object Manipulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Farshchiansadegh

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The laws of physics establish the energetic efficiency of our movements. In some cases, like locomotion, the mechanics of the body dominate in determining the energetically optimal course of action. In other tasks, such as manipulation, energetic costs depend critically upon the variable properties of objects in the environment. Can the brain identify and follow energy-optimal motions when these motions require moving along unfamiliar trajectories? What feedback information is required for such optimal behavior to occur? To answer these questions, we asked participants to move their dominant hand between different positions while holding a virtual mechanical system with complex dynamics (a planar double pendulum. In this task, trajectories of minimum kinetic energy were along curvilinear paths. Our findings demonstrate that participants were capable of finding the energy-optimal paths, but only when provided with veridical visual and haptic information pertaining to the object, lacking which the trajectories were executed along rectilinear paths.

  14. Momentum or kinetic energy - How do substrate properties influence the calculation of rainfall erosivity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goebes, Philipp; Seitz, Steffen; Geißler, Christian; Lassu, Tamás; Peters, Piet; Seeger, Manuel; Nadrowski, Karin; Scholten, Thomas

    2014-09-01

    Rainfall erosivity is a key component in soil erosion by water. While kinetic energy and momentum are used to describe the erosivity of rainfall, and both are derived from mass and velocity of raindrops, it is not clear how different substrates transform this energy. In our study we conducted rainfall simulation experiments to determine splash detachment amounts of five substrates (coarse sand, medium sand, fine sand, PE balls, silt) for seven different rainfall intensities (52-116 mm h-1). We used linear mixed-effect modeling (LME) to calculate erosivity predictors for each substrate. Additionally, we separated drop-size-velocity relationship into lower left and upper right quarter to investigate the effect of small and slow just as big and fast raindrops on splash detachment amounts. We suggest using momentum divided by drop diameter as a substrate-independent erosivity predictor. To consider different substrates specific erosivity parameters are needed. Heavier substrates like sand are best described by kinetic energy multiplied by diameter whereas lighter substrates like silt point to momentum divided by diameter to the power of 1.5. Furthermore, our results show that substrates are differently affected by the size and velocity of drops. While splash detachment of light substances can be reliably predicted by drop size and velocity for small and slow drops, drop size and velocity loses its predictive power in heavier substrates like sand.

  15. Einstein-Maxwell Dirichlet walls, negative kinetic energies, and the adiabatic approximation for extreme black holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, Tomás; Kelly, William R.; Marolf, Donald

    2015-10-01

    The gravitational Dirichlet problem—in which the induced metric is fixed on boundaries at finite distance from the bulk—is related to simple notions of UV cutoffs in gauge/gravity duality and appears in discussions relating the low-energy behavior of gravity to fluid dynamics. We study the Einstein-Maxwell version of this problem, in which the induced Maxwell potential on the wall is also fixed. For flat walls in otherwise asymptotically flat spacetimes, we identify a moduli space of Majumdar-Papapetrou-like static solutions parametrized by the location of an extreme black hole relative to the wall. Such solutions may be described as balancing gravitational repulsion from a negative-mass image source against electrostatic attraction to an oppositely signed image charge. Standard techniques for handling divergences yield a moduli space metric with an eigenvalue that becomes negative near the wall, indicating a region of negative kinetic energy and suggesting that the Hamiltonian may be unbounded below. One may also surround the black hole with an additional (roughly spherical) Dirichlet wall to impose a regulator whose physics is more clear. Negative kinetic energies remain, though new terms do appear in the moduli space metric. The regulator dependence indicates that the adiabatic approximation may be ill-defined for classical extreme black holes with Dirichlet walls.

  16. Numerical investigation of kinetic energy dynamics during autoignition of n-heptane/air mixture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucena Kreppel Paes, Paulo; Brasseur, James; Xuan, Yuan

    2015-11-01

    Many engineering applications involve complex turbulent reacting flows, where nonlinear, multi-scale turbulence-combustion couplings are important. Direct representation of turbulent reacting flow dynamics is associated with prohibitive computational costs, which makes it necessary to employ turbulent combustion models to account for the effects of unresolved scales on resolved scales. Classical turbulence models are extensively employed in reacting flow simulations. However, they rely on assumptions about the energy cascade, which are valid for incompressible, isothermal homogeneous isotropic turbulence. A better understanding of the turbulence-combustion interactions is required for the development of more accurate, physics-based sub-grid-scale models for turbulent reacting flows. In order to investigate the effects of reaction-induced density, viscosity, and pressure variations on the turbulent kinetic energy, Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) of autoignition of partially-premixed, lean n-heptane/air mixture in three-dimensional homogeneous isotropic turbulence has been performed. This configuration represents standard operating conditions of Homogeneous-Charge Compression-Ignition (HCCI) engines. The differences in the turbulent kinetic energy balance between the present turbulent reacting flow and incompressible, isothermal homogeneous isotropic turbulence are highlighted at different stages during the autoignition process.

  17. Releasable Kinetic Energy-Based Inertial Control of a DFIG Wind Power Plant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lee, Jinsik; Muljadi, Eduard; Sørensen, Poul Ejnar;

    2016-01-01

    Wind turbine generators (WTGs) in a wind power plant (WPP) contain different levels of releasable kinetic energy (KE) because of the wake effects. This paper proposes a releasable KE-based inertial control scheme for a doubly fed induction generator (DFIG) WPP that differentiates the contributions...... of the WTGs depending on their stored KE. The proposed KE-based gain scheme aims to make use of the releasable KE in a WPP to raise the frequency nadir. To achieve this, two additional loops for the inertial control are implemented in each DFIG controller: the rate of change of frequency and droop loops...

  18. Kinetic energy releases of small amino acids upon interaction with keV ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In chromatin, DNA is tightly packed into one complex together with histone and non-histone proteins. These proteins are known to protect the DNA against indirect and to some extent even direct radiation damage. Radiation action upon amino acids is thus one of the primary steps in biological radiation action. In this paper we investigate the ionization and fragmentation of the gas-phase amino acids glycine, alanine and valine upon interaction with keV α-particles. High resolution coincidence time-of-flight mass spectrometry is used to determine the dominant fragmentation channels as well as fragment kinetic energies. (authors)

  19. Half-lives and kinetic energies for the spontaneously emitted heavy clusters from nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The partial half-lives, branching ratios relative to the alpha decay, kinetic energies and Q-values for the most probable spontaneously emitted heavy ions from 766 nuclides with z=47-106 and total half-lives longer than 1 μs, are estimated by using the analytical supersymmetric fission model, a semiempirical formula for α-decay life-times which are not measured, and the Wapstra-Audi new mass tables. Even the so-called 'stable' nuclides with Z>40 are meta-stable relative to the new decay modes. The experimental evidences are briefly reviewed. (orig.)

  20. Observed and Simulated Power Spectra of Kinetic and Magnetic Energy retrieved with 2D inversions

    CERN Document Server

    Danilovic, S; van Noort, M; Cameron, R

    2016-01-01

    We try to retrieve the power spectra with certainty to the highest spatial frequencies allowed by current instrumentation. For this, we use 2D inversion code that were able to recover information up to the instrumental diffraction limit. The retrieved power spectra have shallow slopes extending further down to much smaller scales than found before. They seem not to show any power law. The observed slopes at subgranular scales agree with those obtained from recent local dynamo simulations. Small differences are found for vertical component of kinetic energy that suggest that observations suffer from an instrumental effect that is not taken into account.

  1. Kinetic energy releases of small amino acids upon interaction with keV ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bari, S.; Alvarado, F.; Postma, J.; Sobocinski, P.; Hoekstra, R.; Schlatholter, T. [Groningen Univ., KVI Atomic Physics (Netherlands); Schlatholter, T. [Universites P. et M. Curie and D. Diderot, INSP, CNRS UMR 75-88, 75 - Paris (France)

    2009-01-15

    In chromatin, DNA is tightly packed into one complex together with histone and non-histone proteins. These proteins are known to protect the DNA against indirect and to some extent even direct radiation damage. Radiation action upon amino acids is thus one of the primary steps in biological radiation action. In this paper we investigate the ionization and fragmentation of the gas-phase amino acids glycine, alanine and valine upon interaction with keV {alpha}-particles. High resolution coincidence time-of-flight mass spectrometry is used to determine the dominant fragmentation channels as well as fragment kinetic energies. (authors)

  2. Evidence from the Special Relativity and Blackbody Radiation Theories for the Existence of Photons Possessing Zero Kinetic Energy

    CERN Document Server

    Buenker, R J

    1992-01-01

    The traditional interpretation of radiative emission and absorption asserts that photons are created and annihilated in such processes. A Gedanken experiment is considered in which kinetic energy from observed photons is systematically removed until a limit of zero is reached. With the help of the relativistic Doppler effect it is shown that even for infinitesimally small kinetic energies the photons continue to exist, since in other inertial systems they will be observed to have a much higher energy/frequency falling in an easily detectable range. It is possible to formulate an alternative explanation for absorption and emission processes on this basis in terms of real photons with exactly zero kinetic energy being present before or after radiative interactions. Bolstering this hypothesis is the fact that the statistical mechanical treatment of photons interacting with oscillators in blackbody radiation theory predicts an infinite density of photons of this energy, both in the original Planck formulation emp...

  3. Notepad-like triboelectric generator for efficiently harvesting low-velocity motion energy by interconversion between kinetic energy and elastic potential energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Guanlin; Leng, Qiang; Lian, Jiawei; Guo, Hengyu; Yi, Xi; Hu, Chenguo

    2015-01-21

    Great attention has been paid to nanogenerators that harvest energy from ambient environments lately. In order to give considerable output current, most nanogenerators require high-velocity motion that in most cases can hardly be provided in our daily life. Here we report a notepad-like triboelectric generator (NTEG), which uses simple notepad-like structure to generate elastic deformation so as to turn a low-velocity kinetic energy into high-velocity kinetic energy through the conversion of elastic potential energy. Therefore, the NTEG can achieve high current output under low-velocity motion, which completely distinguishes it from tribogenerators previously reported. The factors that may affect the output performance are explored, including the number of slices, active length of slice, press speed, and vertical displacement. In addition, the working mechanism is systematically studied, indicating that the efficiency of the generator can be greatly enhanced by interconversion between kinetic energy and elastic potential energy. The short-circuit current, the open-circuit voltage, and power density are 205 μA and 470 V and 9.86 W/m(2), respectively, which is powerful enough to light up hundreds of light-emitting diodes (LEDs) and charge a commercial capacitor. Besides, NTEGs have been successfully applied to a self-powered door monitor. PMID:25564956

  4. Electronic coherence and the kinetics of inter-complex energy transfer in light-harvesting systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huo, Pengfei; Miller, Thomas F

    2015-12-14

    We apply real-time path-integral dynamics simulations to characterize the role of electronic coherence in inter-complex excitation energy transfer (EET) processes. The analysis is performed using a system-bath model that exhibits the essential features of light-harvesting networks, including strong intra-complex electronic coupling and weak inter-complex coupling. Strong intra-complex coupling is known to generate both static and dynamic electron coherences, which delocalize the exciton over multiple chromophores and potentially influence the inter-complex EET dynamics. With numerical results from partial linearized density matrix (PLDM) real-time path-integral calculations, it is found that both static and dynamic coherence are correlated with the rate of inter-complex EET. To distinguish the impact of these two types of intra-complex coherence on the rate of inter-complex EET, we use Multi-Chromophore Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (MC-FRET) theory to map the original parameterization of the system-bath model to an alternative parameterization for which the effects of static coherence are preserved while the effects of dynamic coherence are largely eliminated. It is then shown that both parameterizations of the model (i.e., the original that supports dynamic coherence and the alternative that eliminates it), exhibit nearly identical EET kinetics and population dynamics over a wide range of parameters. These observations are found to hold for cases in which either the EET donor or acceptor is a dimeric complex and for cases in which the dimeric complex is either symmetric or asymmetric. The results from this study suggest that dynamic coherence plays only a minor role in the actual kinetics of inter-complex EET, whereas static coherence largely governs the kinetics of incoherent inter-complex EET in light-harvesting networks. PMID:26073739

  5. On energy balance and the structure of radiated waves in kinetics of crystalline defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Basant Lal

    2016-11-01

    Traveling waves, with well-known closed form expressions, in the context of the defects kinetics in crystals are excavated further with respect to their inherent structure of oscillatory components. These are associated with, so called, Frenkel-Kontorova model with a piecewise quadratic substrate potential, corresponding to the symmetric as well as asymmetric energy wells of the substrate, displacive phase transitions in bistable chains, and brittle fracture in triangular lattice strips under mode III conditions. The paper demonstrates that the power expended theorem holds so that the sum of rate of working and the rate of total energy flux into a control strip moving steadily with the defect equals the rate of energy sinking into the defect, in the sense of N.F. Mott. In the conservative case of the Frenkel-Kontorova model with asymmetric energy wells, this leads to an alternative expression for the mobility in terms of the energy flux through radiated lattice waves. An application of the same to the case of martensitic phase boundary and a crack, propagating uniformly in bistable chains and triangular lattice strips, respectively, is also provided and the energy release is expressed in terms of the radiated energy flux directly. The equivalence between the well-known expressions and their alternative is established via an elementary identity, which is stated and proved in the paper as the zero lemma. An intimate connection between the three distinct types of defects is, thus, revealed in the framework of energy balance, via a structural similarity between the corresponding variants of the 'zero' lemma containing the information about radiated energy flux. An extension to the dissipative models, in the presence of linear viscous damping, is detailed and analog of the zero lemma is proved. The analysis is relevant to the dynamics of dislocations, brittle cracks, and martensitic phase boundaries, besides possible applications to analogous physical contexts which are

  6. An ocean kinetic energy converter for low-power applications using piezoelectric disk elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viñolo, C.; Toma, D.; Mànuel, A.; del Rio, J.

    2013-09-01

    The main problem facing long-term electronic system deployments in the sea, is to find a feasible way to supply them with the power they require. Harvesting mechanical energy from the ocean wave oscillations and converting it into electrical energy, provides an alternative method for creating self-contained power sources. However, the very low and varying frequency of ocean waves, which generally varies from 0.1 Hz to 2 Hz, presents a hurdle which has to be overcome if this mechanical energy is to be harvested. In this paper, a new sea wave kinetic energy converter is described using low-cost disk piezoelectric elements, which has no dependence on their excitement frequency, to feed low-consumption maritime-deployed electronic devices. The operating principles of the piezoelectric device technique are presented, including analytical formulations describing the transfer of energy. Finally, a prototypical design, which generates electrical energy from the motion of a buoy, is introduced. The paper concludes with the the behavior study of the piezoelectric prototype device as a power generator.

  7. Microscopic distribution functions, structure, and kinetic energy of liquid and solid neon: quantum Monte Carlo simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Martin; Zoppi, Marco

    2002-03-01

    We have performed extensive path integral Monte Carlo simulations of liquid and solid neon, in order to derive the kinetic energy as well as the single-particle and pair distribution functions of neon atoms in the condensed phases. From the single-particle distribution function n(r) one can derive the momentum distribution and thus obtain an independent estimate of the kinetic energy. The simulations have been carried out using mostly the semiempirical HFD-C2 pair potential by Aziz et al. [R. A. Aziz, W. J. Meath, and A. R. Allnatt, Chem. Phys. 79, 295 (1983)], but, in a few cases, we have also used the Lennard-Jones potential. The differences between the potentials, as measured by the properties investigated, are not very large, especially when compared with the actual precision of the experimental data. The simulation results have been compared with all the experimental information that is available from neutron scattering. The overall agreement with the experiments is very good.

  8. Kinetic energy and momentum correction coefficients in straight compound channels with vegetated floodplain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamidifar, H.; Omid, M. H.; Keshavarzi, A.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, the effect of flow relative depth (ratio of the floodplain to the main channel flow depths) and vegetation density on the kinetic energy and momentum correction coefficients (termed as α and β, respectively) was described based on an experimental study. A series of experiments was run using rigid dowels with seven flow relative depths and four vegetation densities in an asymmetric compound channel. The local flow velocities were measured using an acoustic Doppler velocimeter (ADV). Using regression analysis, velocity data were considered and equations were developed for calculating the kinetic energy and momentum correction coefficients as a function of the flow relative depth and vegetation density. The results show that the values of α and β decrease as the relative depth increases. Also, as the vegetation density increases, the effects of the vegetation on α and β increase too. Finally, by comparing with the findings of the previous researchers, it was found that the average values of the α for asymmetric compound channels with vegetation are 26.5% and 43.3% greater than those for asymmetric and symmetric compound channels without vegetation respectively while these values for β are 12.7% and 18.1%, respectively. Furthermore, the floodplain vegetation can increase the average values of coefficients α and β by 52.8% and 21.6%, respectively, in comparison with single channels.

  9. On the evaluation of the non-interacting kinetic energy in density functional theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peach, Michael J G; Griffiths, David G J; Tozer, David J

    2012-04-14

    The utility of both an orbital-free and a single-orbital expression for computing the non-interacting kinetic energy in density functional theory is investigated for simple atomic systems. The accuracy of both expressions is governed by the extent to which the Kohn-Sham equation is solved for the given exchange-correlation functional and so special attention is paid to the influence of finite Gaussian basis sets. The orbital-free expression is a statement of the virial theorem and its accuracy is quantified. The accuracy of the single-orbital expression is sensitive to the choice of Kohn-Sham orbital. The use of particularly compact orbitals is problematic because the failure to solve the Kohn-Sham equation exactly in regions where the orbital has decayed to near-zero leads to unphysical behaviour in regions that contribute to the kinetic energy, rendering it inaccurate. This problem is particularly severe for core orbitals, which would otherwise appear attractive due to their formally nodeless nature. The most accurate results from the single-orbital expression are obtained using the relatively diffuse, highest occupied orbitals, although special care is required at orbital nodes. PMID:22502495

  10. On the evaluation of the non-interacting kinetic energy in density functional theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peach, Michael J G; Griffiths, David G J; Tozer, David J

    2012-04-14

    The utility of both an orbital-free and a single-orbital expression for computing the non-interacting kinetic energy in density functional theory is investigated for simple atomic systems. The accuracy of both expressions is governed by the extent to which the Kohn-Sham equation is solved for the given exchange-correlation functional and so special attention is paid to the influence of finite Gaussian basis sets. The orbital-free expression is a statement of the virial theorem and its accuracy is quantified. The accuracy of the single-orbital expression is sensitive to the choice of Kohn-Sham orbital. The use of particularly compact orbitals is problematic because the failure to solve the Kohn-Sham equation exactly in regions where the orbital has decayed to near-zero leads to unphysical behaviour in regions that contribute to the kinetic energy, rendering it inaccurate. This problem is particularly severe for core orbitals, which would otherwise appear attractive due to their formally nodeless nature. The most accurate results from the single-orbital expression are obtained using the relatively diffuse, highest occupied orbitals, although special care is required at orbital nodes.

  11. Kinetic analysis and energy efficiency of phenol degradation in a plasma-photocatalysis system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hui-juan; Chen, Xiao-yang

    2011-02-28

    Combination of two kinds of advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) is an effective approach to control wastewater pollution. In this research, a pulsed discharge plasma system with multi-point-to-plate electrode and an immobilized TiO(2) photocatalysis system is coupled to oxidize target pollutant in aqueous solution. Kinetic analysis (pseudo-first order kinetic constant, k) and energy efficiency (energy yield value at 50% phenol conversion, G(50)) of phenol oxidation in different reaction systems (plasma alone and plasma-photocatalysis) are reviewed to account for the synergistic mechanism of plasma and photocatalysis. The experimental results show that higher k and G(50) of phenol oxidation can be obtained in the plasma-photocatalysis system under the conditions of different gas bubbling varieties, initial solution pH and radical scavenger addition. Moreover, the investigation tested hydroxyl radical (OH) is the most important species for phenol removal in the synergistic system of plasma-photocatalysis as well as in the plasma alone system.

  12. Hypovalency--a kinetic-energy density description of a 4c-2e bond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobsen, Heiko

    2009-06-01

    A bond descriptor based on the kinetic energy density, the localized-orbital locator (LOL), is used to characterize the nature of the chemical bond in electron deficient multi-center bonds. The boranes B(2)H(6), B(4)H(4), B(4)H(10), [B(6)H(6)](2-), and [B(6)H(7)](-) serve as prototypical examples of hypovalent 3c-2e and 4c-2e bonding. The kinetic energy density is derived from a set of Kohn-Sham orbitals obtained from pure density functional calculations (PBE/TZVP), and the topology of LOL is analyzed in terms of (3,-3) attractors (Gamma). The B-B-B and B-H-B 3c-2e, and the B-B-H-B 4c-2e bonding situations are defined by their own characteristic LOL profiles. The presence of one attractor in relation to the three or four atoms that are engaged in electron deficient bonding provides sufficient indication of the type of 3c-2e or 4c-2e bond present. For the 4c-2e bond in [B(6)H(7)](-) the LOL analysis is compared to results from an experimental QTAIM study. PMID:19452076

  13. Unified dark energy and dust dark matter dual to quadratic purely kinetic K-essence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guendelman, Eduardo; Nissimov, Emil; Pacheva, Svetlana

    2016-02-01

    We consider a modified gravity plus single scalar-field model, where the scalar Lagrangian couples symmetrically both to the standard Riemannian volume-form (spacetime integration measure density) given by the square root of the determinant of the Riemannian metric, as well as to another non-Riemannian volume-form in terms of an auxiliary maximal-rank antisymmetric tensor gauge field. As shown in a previous paper, the pertinent scalar-field dynamics provides an exact unified description of both dark energy via dynamical generation of a cosmological constant, and dark matter as a "dust" fluid with geodesic flow as a result of a hidden Noether symmetry. Here we extend the discussion by considering a non-trivial modification of the purely gravitational action in the form of f(R) = R - α R^2 generalized gravity. Upon deriving the corresponding "Einstein-frame" effective action of the latter modified gravity-scalar-field theory we find explicit duality (in the sense of weak versus strong coupling) between the original model of unified dynamical dark energy and dust fluid dark matter, on one hand, and a specific quadratic purely kinetic "k-essence" gravity-matter model with special dependence of its coupling constants on only two independent parameters, on the other hand. The canonical Hamiltonian treatment and Wheeler-DeWitt quantization of the dual purely kinetic "k-essence" gravity-matter model is also briefly discussed.

  14. Elimination of the Translational Kinetic Energy Contamination in pre-Born-Oppenheimer Calculations

    CERN Document Server

    Simmen, Benjamin; Reiher, Markus

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we present a simple strategy for the elimination of the translational kinetic energy contamination of the total energy in pre-Born--Oppenheimer calculations carried out in laboratory-fixed Cartesian coordinates (LFCCs). The simple expressions for the coordinates and the operators are thus preserved throughout the calculations, while the mathematical form and the parametrisation of the basis functions are chosen so that the translational and rotational invariances are respected. The basis functions are constructed using explicitly correlated Gaussian functions (ECGs) and the global vector representation. First, we observe that it is not possible to parametrise the ECGs so that the system is at rest in LFCCs and at the same time the basis functions are square-integrable with a non-vanishing norm. Then, we work out a practical strategy to circumvent this problem by making use of the properties of the linear transformation between the LFCCs and translationally invariant and center-of-mass Cartesian ...

  15. Entanglement of helicity and energy in kinetic Alfven wave/whistler turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Galtier, S

    2014-01-01

    The role of magnetic helicity is investigated in kinetic Alfv\\'en wave and oblique whistler turbulence in presence of a relatively intense external magnetic field $b_0 {\\bf e_\\parallel}$. In this situation, turbulence is strongly anisotropic and the fluid equations describing both regimes are the reduced electron magnetohydrodynamics (REMHD) whose derivation, originally made from the gyrokinetic theory, is also obtained here from compressible Hall MHD. We use the asymptotic equations derived by Galtier \\& Bhattacharjee (2003) to study the REMHD dynamics in the weak turbulence regime. The analysis is focused on the magnetic helicity equation for which we obtain the exact solutions: they correspond to the entanglement relation, $n+\\tilde n = -6$, where $n$ and $\\tilde n$ are the power law indices of the perpendicular (to ${\\bf b_0}$) wave number magnetic energy and helicity spectra respectively. Therefore, the spectra derived in the past from the energy equation only, namely $n=-2.5$ and $\\tilde n = - 3.5$,...

  16. Theoretical analysis of ion kinetic energies and DLC film deposition by CH4+Ar (He) dielectric barrier discharge plasmas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Yan-Hong; Zhang Jia-Liang; Ma Teng-Cai; Li Jian; Liu Dong-Ping

    2007-01-01

    The kinetic energy of ions in dielectric barrier discharge plasmas are analysed theoretically using the model of binary collisions between ions and gas molecules. Langevin equation for ions in other gases, Blanc law for ions in mixed gases, and the two-temperature model for ions at higher reduced field are used to determine the ion mobility. The kinetic energies of ions in CH4 + Ar(He) dielectric barrier discharge plasma at a fixed total gas pressure and various Ar (He)concentrations are calculated. It is found that with increasing Ar (He) concentration in CH4 + Ar (He) from 20% to 83%,the CH4+ kinetic energy increases from 69.6 (43.9) to 92.1 (128.5)eV, while the Ar+ (He+) kinetic energy decreases from 97 (145.2) to 78.8 (75.5)eV. The increase of CH4+ kinetic energy is responsible for the increase of hardness of diamond-like carbon films deposited by CH4 + Ar (He) dielectric barrier discharge without bias voltage over substrates.

  17. LES and Proper Orthogonal Decomposition analysis of vertical entrainment of kinetic energy in large wind farms (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meneveau, C. V.; VerHulst, C.

    2013-12-01

    Vertical entrainment of kinetic energy has been shown to be an important limiting factor in the performance of very large wind turbine arrays. Given high Reynolds numbers and domain sizes on the order of kilometers, we rely on wall-modeled Large Eddy Simulation (LES) to predict flow within large wind farm. We use Proper Orthogonal Decomposition (POD) to identify energetically important large-scale structures in the flow. The primary large-scale structures are found to be streamwise counter-rotating vortices located above the height of the wind turbines. The contribution of each flow structure to the kinetic energy entrainment is quantified. Surprisingly, fewer flow structures (POD modes) contribute to the vertical kinetic energy flux than to the kinetic energy in the flow, for which the POD analysis is optimal. While the general characteristics of the flow structures are robust, the net kinetic energy entrainment to the turbines depends on the orientation of the wind turbines in the array. The various modes' contributions to variability and intermittency is also quantified. The POD analysis is performed for aligned and staggered wind turbine arrays as well as for atmospheric flow without wind turbines. This research is supported by a NSF Graduate Fellowship and by the WINDINSPIRE project, funded through NSF-OISE 1243482.

  18. Kinetic selection vs. free energy of DNA base pairing in control of polymerase fidelity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oertell, Keriann; Harcourt, Emily M; Mohsen, Michael G; Petruska, John; Kool, Eric T; Goodman, Myron F

    2016-04-19

    What is the free energy source enabling high-fidelity DNA polymerases (pols) to favor incorporation of correct over incorrect base pairs by 10(3)- to 10(4)-fold, corresponding to free energy differences of ΔΔGinc∼ 5.5-7 kcal/mol? Standard ΔΔG° values (∼0.3 kcal/mol) calculated from melting temperature measurements comparing matched vs. mismatched base pairs at duplex DNA termini are far too low to explain pol accuracy. Earlier analyses suggested that pol active-site steric constraints can amplify DNA free energy differences at the transition state (kinetic selection). A recent paper [Olson et al. (2013)J Am Chem Soc135:1205-1208] used Vent pol to catalyze incorporations in the presence of inorganic pyrophosphate intended to equilibrate forward (polymerization) and backward (pyrophosphorolysis) reactions. A steady-state leveling off of incorporation profiles at long reaction times was interpreted as reaching equilibrium between polymerization and pyrophosphorolysis, yielding apparent ΔG° = -RTlnKeq, indicating ΔΔG° of 3.5-7 kcal/mol, sufficient to account for pol accuracy without need of kinetic selection. Here we perform experiments to measure and account for pyrophosphorolysis explicitly. We show that forward and reverse reactions attain steady states far from equilibrium for wrong incorporations such as G opposite T. Therefore,[Formula: see text]values obtained from such steady-state evaluations ofKeqare not dependent on DNA properties alone, but depend largely on constraints imposed on right and wrong substrates in the polymerase active site. PMID:27044101

  19. Kinetic selection vs. free energy of DNA base pairing in control of polymerase fidelity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oertell, Keriann; Harcourt, Emily M; Mohsen, Michael G; Petruska, John; Kool, Eric T; Goodman, Myron F

    2016-04-19

    What is the free energy source enabling high-fidelity DNA polymerases (pols) to favor incorporation of correct over incorrect base pairs by 10(3)- to 10(4)-fold, corresponding to free energy differences of ΔΔGinc∼ 5.5-7 kcal/mol? Standard ΔΔG° values (∼0.3 kcal/mol) calculated from melting temperature measurements comparing matched vs. mismatched base pairs at duplex DNA termini are far too low to explain pol accuracy. Earlier analyses suggested that pol active-site steric constraints can amplify DNA free energy differences at the transition state (kinetic selection). A recent paper [Olson et al. (2013)J Am Chem Soc135:1205-1208] used Vent pol to catalyze incorporations in the presence of inorganic pyrophosphate intended to equilibrate forward (polymerization) and backward (pyrophosphorolysis) reactions. A steady-state leveling off of incorporation profiles at long reaction times was interpreted as reaching equilibrium between polymerization and pyrophosphorolysis, yielding apparent ΔG° = -RTlnKeq, indicating ΔΔG° of 3.5-7 kcal/mol, sufficient to account for pol accuracy without need of kinetic selection. Here we perform experiments to measure and account for pyrophosphorolysis explicitly. We show that forward and reverse reactions attain steady states far from equilibrium for wrong incorporations such as G opposite T. Therefore,[Formula: see text]values obtained from such steady-state evaluations ofKeqare not dependent on DNA properties alone, but depend largely on constraints imposed on right and wrong substrates in the polymerase active site.

  20. Direct measurements of quantum kinetic energy tensor in stable and metastable water near the triple point: an experimental benchmark

    CERN Document Server

    Andreani, Carla; Senesi, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    This study presents the first direct and quantitative measurements of the nuclear momentum distribution anisotropy and the quantum kinetic energy tensor in stable and metastable (supercooled) water near its triple point using Deep Inelastic Neutron Scattering (DINS). From the experimental spectra accurate lineshapes of the hydrogen momentum distributions are derived using an anisotropic Gaussian and a model independent framework. The experimental results, benchmarked with those obtained for the solid phase, provide the state of the art directional values of the hydrogen mean kinetic energy in metastable water. The determinations of the direction kinetic energies in the supercooled phase, benchmarked with ice at the same temperature, provide accurate and quantitative measurements of these dynamical observables in metastable and stable phases, {i.e.} key insight in the physical mechanisms of the hydrogen quantum state in both disordered and polycrystalline systems. The remarkable findings of this study establis...

  1. Report of the panel on the use of depleted uranium alloys for large caliber long rod kinetic energy penetrators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In early 1977 the National Materials Advisory Board, an operating unit in the Commission on Sociotechnical Systems of the National Research Council, NAS/NAE, formed a study committee on High Density Materials for Kinetic Energy Penetrators. The Specific objectives of the Committee were defined as follows. Assess the potential of two materials for use in kinetic energy penetrators, including such factors as: (a) properties (as applied to this application: strength, toughness, and dynamic behavior); (b) uniformity, reliability and reproducibility; (c) deterioration in storage; (d) production capability; (e) ecological impact; (f) quality assurance; (g) availability, and (h) cost. The Committee was divided into two Panels; one panel devoted to the study of tungsten alloys and the other devoted to the study of depleted uranium alloys for use in Kinetic energy penetrators. This report represents the findings and recommendation of the Panel on Uranium

  2. A new method for the derivation of exact vibration-rotational kinetic energy operator in internal coordinates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈光巨; 刘若庄

    1997-01-01

    An efficient angular momentum method is presented and used to derive analytic expressions for the vibration-rotational kinetic energy operator of polyatomic molecules.The vibration-rotational kinetic energy operator is expressed in terms of the total angular momentum operator J,the angular momentum operator J and the momentum operator p conjugate to Z in the molecule-fixed frame Not only the method of derivation is simpler than that in the previous work,but also the expressions ot the kinetic energy operators arc more compact.Particularly,the operator is easily applied to different vibrational or rovibrational problems of the polyatomic molecules by variations of matrix elements Gn of a mass-dependent constant symmetric matrix

  3. Equilibria and kinetics for pH-dependent axial ligation of ethylester and methylester(aquo)cobaloximes with aromatic and aliphatic N-donor ligands and a molecular mechanistic study of the Co-C bond

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    J V Madhuri; V Malathi; S Satyanarayana

    2004-03-01

    Equilibrium constants are determined for the reaction of ethylester and methyl ester (aquo) cobaloximes with histamine, histidine, glycine and ethyl glycine ester as a function of pH at 25°C, using spectrophotometric technique. The functional dependence of p on the substitution rate of H2O varies with the p of the incoming ligand, establishing the existence of nucleophilic participation of the ligand in the transition state. This data is interpreted with the help of kinetic data where dissociation kinetic reactions were also studied as a function of pH. Binding and kinetic data were correlated based on the basicity, steric hindrance of the entering ligand and HSAB principle. To compare the rate constants of the entering ligands pH-independent second-order rate constants were calculated. The effect of incoming ligand on Co-C bond is studied using molecular mechanics.

  4. Total kinetic energy release in the fast neutron-induced fission of $^{235}$U

    CERN Document Server

    Yanez, R; King, J; Barrett, J S; Fotiades, N; Lee, H Y

    2015-01-01

    We have measured the total kinetic energy (TKE) release for the $^{235}$U(n,f) reaction for $E_{n}$=2-100 MeV using the 2E method with an array of Si PIN diode detectors. The neutron energies were determined by time of flight measurements using the white spectrum neutron beam at the LANSCE facility. (To calibrate the apparatus, the TKE release for $^{235}$U(n$_{th}$,f) was also measured using a thermal neutron beam from the OSU TRIGA reactor). The TKE decreases non-linearly from 169.0 MeV to 161.4 MeV for $E_{n}$=2-90 MeV. The standard deviation of the TKE distribution is constant from $E_{n}$=20-90 MeV. Comparison of the data with the multi-modal fission model of Brosa indicates the TKE decrease is a consequence of the growth of symmetric fission and the corresponding decrease of asymmetric fission with increasing neutron energy. The average TKE associated with the Brosa superlong, standard I and standard II modes for a given mass is independent of neutron energy.

  5. Kinetic model for the vibrational energy exchange in flowing molecular gas mixtures. Ph.D. Thesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Offenhaeuser, F.

    1987-01-01

    The present study is concerned with the development of a computational model for the description of the vibrational energy exchange in flowing gas mixtures, taking into account a given number of energy levels for each vibrational degree of freedom. It is possible to select an arbitrary number of energy levels. The presented model uses values in the range from 10 to approximately 40. The distribution of energy with respect to these levels can differ from the equilibrium distribution. The kinetic model developed can be employed for arbitrary gaseous mixtures with an arbitrary number of vibrational degrees of freedom for each type of gas. The application of the model to CO2-H2ON2-O2-He mixtures is discussed. The obtained relations can be utilized in a study of the suitability of radiation-related transitional processes, involving the CO2 molecule, for laser applications. It is found that the computational results provided by the model agree very well with experimental data obtained for a CO2 laser. Possibilities for the activation of a 16-micron and 14-micron laser are considered.

  6. Kinetic-Energy Distributions of Positive and Negative Ions in DC Townsend Discharges of Carbon Dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, M. V. V. S.; van Brunt, R. J.; Olthoff, J. K.

    1997-10-01

    Ion kinetic-energy distributions (IEDs), mean energies, and relative abundances are measured for CO_2^+, CO^+, O_2^+, O^+, C^+, and O^- ions produced in dc Townsend discharges in pure carbon dioxide. The discharges are generated at electric field-to-gas density ratios (E/N) ranging from 3.5 x 10-18 Vm^2 to 20 x 10-18 Vm^2 (3.5 to 20 kTd). Ions sampled from the discharge through a small orifice in the center of the grounded electrode were energy and mass analyzed by an electrostatic energy analyzer attached to a quadrupole mass spectrometer.(M. V. V. S. Rao, R. J. Van Brunt, and J. K. Olthoff, Phys. Rev. E 54), 5641 (1996) In the present experiments, CO_2^+ was determined to be the dominant positive ion (greater than 85%) at all E/N. The IEDs of CO_2^+, O_2^+, and O^+ are Maxwellian at all E/N, with CO^+ exhibiting non-Maxwellian behavior above 10 kTd, and C^+ exhibiting non-Maxwellian behavior at all E/N. Negative ion fluxes were substantially lower than positive ion fluxes, with O^- being the only detectable negative ion. The IEDs for O^- are Maxwellian at 6 kTd and below. The fact that O^- is the only negative ion indicates that no asymmetric charge transfer exists for O^- in CO_2.

  7. Design of specially adapted reactive coordinates to economically compute potential and kinetic energy operators including geometry relaxation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thallmair, Sebastian; Roos, Matthias K; de Vivie-Riedle, Regina

    2016-06-21

    Quantum dynamics simulations require prior knowledge of the potential energy surface as well as the kinetic energy operator. Typically, they are evaluated in a low-dimensional subspace of the full configuration space of the molecule as its dimensionality increases proportional to the number of atoms. This entails the challenge to find the most suitable subspace. We present an approach to design specially adapted reactive coordinates spanning this subspace. In addition to the essential geometric changes, these coordinates take into account the relaxation of the non-reactive coordinates without the necessity of performing geometry optimizations at each grid point. The method is demonstrated for an ultrafast photoinduced bond cleavage in a commonly used organic precursor for the generation of electrophiles. The potential energy surfaces for the reaction as well as the Wilson G-matrix as part of the kinetic energy operator are shown for a complex chemical reaction, both including the relaxation of the non-reactive coordinates on equal footing. A microscopic interpretation of the shape of the G-matrix elements allows to analyze the impact of the non-reactive coordinates on the kinetic energy operator. Additionally, we compare quantum dynamics simulations with and without the relaxation of the non-reactive coordinates included in the kinetic energy operator to demonstrate its influence.

  8. Design of specially adapted reactive coordinates to economically compute potential and kinetic energy operators including geometry relaxation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thallmair, Sebastian; Roos, Matthias K; de Vivie-Riedle, Regina

    2016-06-21

    Quantum dynamics simulations require prior knowledge of the potential energy surface as well as the kinetic energy operator. Typically, they are evaluated in a low-dimensional subspace of the full configuration space of the molecule as its dimensionality increases proportional to the number of atoms. This entails the challenge to find the most suitable subspace. We present an approach to design specially adapted reactive coordinates spanning this subspace. In addition to the essential geometric changes, these coordinates take into account the relaxation of the non-reactive coordinates without the necessity of performing geometry optimizations at each grid point. The method is demonstrated for an ultrafast photoinduced bond cleavage in a commonly used organic precursor for the generation of electrophiles. The potential energy surfaces for the reaction as well as the Wilson G-matrix as part of the kinetic energy operator are shown for a complex chemical reaction, both including the relaxation of the non-reactive coordinates on equal footing. A microscopic interpretation of the shape of the G-matrix elements allows to analyze the impact of the non-reactive coordinates on the kinetic energy operator. Additionally, we compare quantum dynamics simulations with and without the relaxation of the non-reactive coordinates included in the kinetic energy operator to demonstrate its influence. PMID:27334151

  9. Design of specially adapted reactive coordinates to economically compute potential and kinetic energy operators including geometry relaxation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thallmair, Sebastian; Roos, Matthias K.; de Vivie-Riedle, Regina

    2016-06-01

    Quantum dynamics simulations require prior knowledge of the potential energy surface as well as the kinetic energy operator. Typically, they are evaluated in a low-dimensional subspace of the full configuration space of the molecule as its dimensionality increases proportional to the number of atoms. This entails the challenge to find the most suitable subspace. We present an approach to design specially adapted reactive coordinates spanning this subspace. In addition to the essential geometric changes, these coordinates take into account the relaxation of the non-reactive coordinates without the necessity of performing geometry optimizations at each grid point. The method is demonstrated for an ultrafast photoinduced bond cleavage in a commonly used organic precursor for the generation of electrophiles. The potential energy surfaces for the reaction as well as the Wilson G-matrix as part of the kinetic energy operator are shown for a complex chemical reaction, both including the relaxation of the non-reactive coordinates on equal footing. A microscopic interpretation of the shape of the G-matrix elements allows to analyze the impact of the non-reactive coordinates on the kinetic energy operator. Additionally, we compare quantum dynamics simulations with and without the relaxation of the non-reactive coordinates included in the kinetic energy operator to demonstrate its influence.

  10. Kinetic mean field theories: Results of energy constraint in maximizing entropy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stell, G.; Karkheck, J.; Beijeren, H. van

    1983-01-01

    Structure of liquids and solids; crystallography Classical, semiclassical, and quantum theories of liquid structure Statistical theories of liquid structure - Kinetic and transport theory of fluids; physical properties of gases Kinetic and transport theory

  11. Anomalous dissipation and kinetic-energy distribution in pipes at very high Reynolds numbers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xi; Wei, Bo-Bo; Hussain, Fazle; She, Zhen-Su

    2016-01-01

    A symmetry-based theory is developed for the description of (streamwise) kinetic energy K in turbulent pipes at extremely high Reynolds numbers (Re's). The theory assumes a mesolayer with continual deformation of wall-attached eddies which introduce an anomalous dissipation, breaking the exact balance between production and dissipation. An outer peak of K is predicted above a critical Re of 10^{4}, in good agreement with experimental data. The theory offers an alternative explanation for the recently discovered logarithmic distribution of K. The concept of anomalous dissipation is further supported by a significant modification of the k-ω equation, yielding an accurate prediction of the entire K profile. PMID:26871016

  12. Stationary points of the rigid body kinetic energy and the principal axes of inertia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labinac, Velimir; Jusup, Marko; Legović, Tarzan

    2013-10-01

    We demonstrate how searching for the extrema of the rotational kinetic energy can be exploited to introduce the idea of the principal axes of inertia in a general and intuitive way. To that end, we propose a motivational starting point for a discussion with students, followed by a physical problem that, in its simplest form, can be handled using only basic calculus. Principal axes and moments of inertia arise seamlessly as solutions to the proposed problem. A numerical example is provided to emphasize key ideas. To encourage alternative ways of thinking, we also show how similar conclusions can be derived from the square of the angular momentum. A generalized procedure, appropriate for a classical mechanics course, is outlined in the Appendix.

  13. Hailfall: the relationship between radar-derived hail kinetic energy and hail damage to buildings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohl, Roman; Schiesser, Hans-Heinrich; Aller, Dörte

    Relationships between radar-derived hail kinetic energy and hail damage to residential and agricultural buildings are presented for nine hail cells that occurred over the Swiss Mittelland (1992-1999). Hail kinetic energy ( EKINPIX) was calculated from C-band Doppler radar Constant Altitude Plan Position Indicators (CAPPIs) at a height of 1.5 km and daily hail damage claim data were available per Swiss community through several cantonal building insurance companies. In order to derive point-to-point relationships, hailfall and damage variables were triangulated on a 2×2-km grid and cross-correlation coefficients were then calculated for entire hail cells. The results show that high season hail storms (15 June-15 August) produced higher mean damage than low season storms (before and after) and weighted logistic damage functions produced correlation coefficients of 0.83 (0.86) for high (low) season storms over residential buildings and 0.79 (0.88) over agricultural buildings. The relationship between EKINPIX and total loss ratios (damage in relation to total sums insured) reveals no seasonal difference in hailstorm intensities and nonweighted logistic functions yield correlation coefficients of 0.85 (0.84) for residential (agricultural) buildings. The comparison between actual and predicted losses showed that nonweighted functions overestimated actual damage and that altered damage functions (flatter slope gradients) predicted damages that are in the range of the actual losses. Damage functions are calibrated using EKINPIX, total loss ratios and actual losses from two independent hail cells. One hail cell showed that damage induced through rainfall that followed hailfall multiplied the final loss considerably. The valuable agreement between radar-measured hailfall intensity and total loss ratios suggests that the established damage functions could be used by insurance companies to derive possible maximal hail losses to a building portfolio of interest.

  14. Unified dark energy and dust dark matter dual to quadratic purely kinetic K-essence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guendelman, Eduardo [Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Department of Physics, Beersheba (Israel); Nissimov, Emil; Pacheva, Svetlana [Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy, Sofia (Bulgaria)

    2016-02-15

    We consider a modified gravity plus single scalar-field model, where the scalar Lagrangian couples symmetrically both to the standard Riemannian volume-form (spacetime integration measure density) given by the square root of the determinant of the Riemannian metric, as well as to another non-Riemannian volume-form in terms of an auxiliary maximal-rank antisymmetric tensor gauge field. As shown in a previous paper, the pertinent scalar-field dynamics provides an exact unified description of both dark energy via dynamical generation of a cosmological constant, and dark matter as a ''dust'' fluid with geodesic flow as a result of a hidden Noether symmetry. Here we extend the discussion by considering a non-trivial modification of the purely gravitational action in the form of f(R) = R -αR{sup 2} generalized gravity. Upon deriving the corresponding ''Einstein-frame'' effective action of the latter modified gravity-scalar-field theory we find explicit duality (in the sense of weak versus strong coupling) between the original model of unified dynamical dark energy and dust fluid dark matter, on one hand, and a specific quadratic purely kinetic ''k-essence'' gravity-matter model with special dependence of its coupling constants on only two independent parameters, on the other hand. The canonical Hamiltonian treatment and Wheeler-DeWitt quantization of the dual purely kinetic ''k-essence'' gravity-matter model is also briefly discussed. (orig.)

  15. Unified dark energy and dust dark matter dual to quadratic purely kinetic K-essence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We consider a modified gravity plus single scalar-field model, where the scalar Lagrangian couples symmetrically both to the standard Riemannian volume-form (spacetime integration measure density) given by the square root of the determinant of the Riemannian metric, as well as to another non-Riemannian volume-form in terms of an auxiliary maximal-rank antisymmetric tensor gauge field. As shown in a previous paper, the pertinent scalar-field dynamics provides an exact unified description of both dark energy via dynamical generation of a cosmological constant, and dark matter as a ''dust'' fluid with geodesic flow as a result of a hidden Noether symmetry. Here we extend the discussion by considering a non-trivial modification of the purely gravitational action in the form of f(R) = R -αR2 generalized gravity. Upon deriving the corresponding ''Einstein-frame'' effective action of the latter modified gravity-scalar-field theory we find explicit duality (in the sense of weak versus strong coupling) between the original model of unified dynamical dark energy and dust fluid dark matter, on one hand, and a specific quadratic purely kinetic ''k-essence'' gravity-matter model with special dependence of its coupling constants on only two independent parameters, on the other hand. The canonical Hamiltonian treatment and Wheeler-DeWitt quantization of the dual purely kinetic ''k-essence'' gravity-matter model is also briefly discussed. (orig.)

  16. On renormalization of axial anomaly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is shown that multiplicative renormalization of the axial singlet current results in renormalization of the axial anomaly in all orders of perturbation theory. It is a necessary condition for the Adler - Bardeen theorem being valid. 10 refs.; 2 figs

  17. Total kinetic energy release in the fast neutron-induced fission of $^{235}$U

    CERN Document Server

    Yanez, R; King, J; Barrett, J S; Fotiades, N; Lee, H Y

    2016-01-01

    We have measured the total kinetic energy (TKE) release for the $^{235}$U(n,f) reaction for $E_{n}$=2-100 MeV using the 2E method with an array of Si PIN diode detectors. The neutron energies were determined by time of flight measurements using the white spectrum neutron beam at the LANSCE facility. To benchmark the TKE measurement, the TKE release for $^{235}$U(n$_{th}$,f) was also measured using a thermal neutron beam from the Oregon State University TRIGA reactor, giving pre-neutron emission $E^*_{TKE}=170.7\\pm0.4$ MeV in good agreement with known values. Our measurements are thus absolute measurements. The TKE in $^{235}$U(n,f) decreases non-linearly from 169.0 MeV to 161.4 MeV for $E_{n}$=2-90 MeV. Comparison of the data with the multi-modal fission model of Brosa indicates the TKE decrease is a consequence of the growth of symmetric fission and the corresponding decrease of asymmetric fission with increasing neutron energy. The average TKE associated with the Brosa superlong, standard I and standard II ...

  18. Turbulent kinetic energy generation in the convective boundary layer derived from thermodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slameršak, Aljoša; Renner, Maik; Ganzeveld, Laurens; Hartogensis, Oscar; Kolle, Olaf; Kleidon, Axel

    2016-04-01

    Turbulent heat fluxes facilitate the bulk of heat transfer between the surface and lower atmosphere, which results in the diurnal growth of convective boundary layer (CBL) and turbulent kinetic energy generation (TKE). Here we postulate the hypothesis that TKE generation in the CBL occurs as a result of heat transfer in a "Carnot-like" heat engine with temporal changes in the internal energy of the boundary layer. We used the Tennekes energy-balance model of CBL and extended it with the analysis of the entropy balance to derive the estimates of TKE generation in the CBL. These TKE generation estimates were compared to the turbulent dissipation from a simple dissipation model from Moeng and Sullivan, to test the validity of our heat engine hypothesis. In addition, to evaluate the performance of the dissipation model, this was independently validated by a comparison of its estimates with the turbulent dissipation calculations based on spectral analysis of eddy covariance wind measurements at a German field station. Our analysis demonstrates how a consistent application of thermodynamics can be used to obtain an independent physical constraint on the diurnal boundary layer evolution. Furthermore, our analysis suggests that the CBL operates at the thermodynamic limit, thus imposing a thermodynamic constraint on surface-atmosphere exchange.

  19. Axially symmetric SU(3) gravitating skyrmions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ioannidou, Theodora [Maths Division, School of Technology, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki 54124 (Greece)]. E-mail: ti3@auth.gr; Kleihaus, Burkhard [Institut fuer Physik, Universitaet Oldenburg, Postfach 2503, D-26111 Oldenburg (Germany)]. E-mail: kleihaus@theorie.physik.uni-oldenburg.de; Zakrzewski, Wojtek [Department of Mathematical Sciences, University of Durham, Durham DH1 3LE (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: w.j.zakrzewski@durham.ac.uk

    2004-10-21

    Axially symmetric gravitating multi-skyrmion configurations are obtained using the harmonic map ansatz introduced in [J. Math. Phys. 40 (1999) 6353]. In particular, the effect of gravity on the energy and baryon densities of the SU(3) non-gravitating multi-skyrmion configurations is studied in detail.

  20. Axially symmetric SU(3) Gravitating Skyrmions

    CERN Document Server

    Ioannidou, T A; Zakrzewski, W J; Ioannidou, Theodora; Kleihaus, Burkhard; Zakrzewski, Wojtek

    2004-01-01

    Axially symmetric gravitating multi-skyrmion configurations are obtained using the harmonic map ansatz introduced in [1]. In particular, the effect of gravity on the energy and baryon densities of the SU(3) non-gravitating multi-skyrmion configurations is studied in detail.

  1. Axially symmetric SU(3) gravitating skyrmions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Axially symmetric gravitating multi-skyrmion configurations are obtained using the harmonic map ansatz introduced in [J. Math. Phys. 40 (1999) 6353]. In particular, the effect of gravity on the energy and baryon densities of the SU(3) non-gravitating multi-skyrmion configurations is studied in detail

  2. Segment-interaction in sprint start: Analysis of 3D angular velocity and kinetic energy in elite sprinters

    OpenAIRE

    Slawinski, Jean; BONNEFOY, Alice; ONTANON, Guy; LEVEQUE, Jean-Michel; Miller, Christian; RIQUET, Annie; CHEZE, Laurence; Dumas, Raphaël

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to measure during a sprint start the joint angularv elocity and the kinetic energy of the different segments in elite sprinters.This was performed using a 3D kinematic analysis of the wholebody.

  3. Axial Vircator for Electronic Warfare Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Drazan

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with a high power microwave generator with virtual cathode – vircator in axial release for electronic warfare applications. The classification of directed energy weapons microwave (DEWM is introduced together with basic block diagrams of a particular class of DEWM. In the paper, methods for designing vircator pulsed power supply, axial vircator structure, measurement methods and experimental results are presented. The vircator in electromagnetic ammunition is powered by magneto-cumulative generator and in weapons for defense of objects (WDO, it is powered by Marx generator. The possible applications of a vircator in the DEWM area are discussed.

  4. Estimating free-energy barrier heights for an ultrafast folding protein from calorimetric and kinetic data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godoy-Ruiz, Raquel; Henry, Eric R; Kubelka, Jan; Hofrichter, James; Muñoz, Victor; Sanchez-Ruiz, Jose M; Eaton, William A

    2008-05-15

    Differential scanning calorimetry was used to measure the temperature dependence of the absolute heat capacity of the 35-residue subdomain of the villin headpiece, a protein that folds in 5 mus and is therefore assumed to have a small free-energy barrier separating folded and unfolded states. To obtain an estimate of the barrier height from the calorimetric data, two models, a variable-barrier model and an Ising-like model, were used to fit the heat capacity in excess of the folded state over the temperature range 15-125 degrees C. The variable-barrier model is based on an empirical mathematical form for the density of states, with four adjustable parameters and the enthalpy (H) as a reaction coordinate. The Ising-like model is based on the inter-residue contact map of the X-ray structure with exact enumeration of approximately 10(5) possible conformations, with two adjustable parameters in the partition function, and either the fraction of native contacts (Q) or the number of ordered residues (P) as reaction coordinates. The variable-barrier model provides an excellent fit to the data and yields a barrier height at the folding temperature ranging from 0.4 to 1.1 kcal mol(-1), while the Ising-like model provides a less good fit and yields barrier heights of 2.3 +/- 0.1 kcal mol(-1) and 2.1 +/- 0.1 kcal mol(-1) for the Q and P reaction coordinates, respectively. In both models, the barrier to folding increases with increasing temperature. Assuming a sufficiently large activation energy for diffusion on the free-energy surfaces, both models are consistent with the observation of a temperature-independent folding rate in previously published laser temperature-jump experiments. Analysis of this kinetic data, using an approximate form for the pre-exponential factor of Kramers theory and the 70 ns relaxation time for the fast phase that precedes the unfolding/refolding relaxation to determine the diffusion coefficient, results in a barrier height of 1.6 +/- 0.3 kcal mol

  5. Einstein-Maxwell Dirichlet walls, negative kinetic energies, and the adiabatic approximation for extreme black holes

    CERN Document Server

    Andrade, Tomas; Marolf, Donald

    2015-01-01

    The gravitational Dirichlet problem -- in which the induced metric is fixed on boundaries at finite distance from the bulk -- is related to simple notions of UV cutoffs in gauge/gravity duality and appears in discussions relating the low-energy behavior of gravity to fluid dynamics. We study the Einstein-Maxwell version of this problem, in which the induced Maxwell potential on the wall is also fixed. For flat walls in otherwise-asymptotically-flat spacetimes, we identify a moduli space of Majumdar-Papapetrou-like static solutions parametrized by the location of an extreme black hole relative to the wall. Such solutions may be described as balancing gravitational repulsion from a negative-mass image-source against electrostatic attraction to an oppositely-signed image charge. Standard techniques for handling divergences yield a moduli space metric with an eigenvalue that becomes negative near the wall, indicating a region of negative kinetic energy and suggesting that the Hamiltonian may be unbounded below. O...

  6. Maximizing kinetic energy transfer in one-dimensional many-body collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main problem discussed in this paper involves a simple one-dimensional two-body collision, in which the problem can be extended into a chain of one-dimensional many-body collisions. The result is quite interesting, as it provides us with a thorough mathematical understanding that will help in designing a chain system for maximum energy transfer for a range of collision types. In this paper, we will show that there is a way to improve the kinetic energy transfer between two masses, and the idea can be applied recursively. However, this method only works for a certain range of collision types, which is indicated by a range of coefficients of restitution. Although the concept of momentum, elastic and inelastic collision, as well as Newton’s laws, are taught in junior college physics, especially in Singapore schools, students in this level are not expected to be able to do this problem quantitatively, as it requires rigorous mathematics, including calculus. Nevertheless, this paper provides nice analytical steps that address some common misconceptions in students’ way of thinking about one-dimensional collisions. (paper)

  7. Axial instability of rotating relativistic stars

    CERN Document Server

    Friedman, J L; Friedman, John L.; Morsink, Sharon M.

    1998-01-01

    Perturbations of rotating relativistic stars can be classified by their behavior under parity. For axial perturbations (r-modes), initial data with negative canonical energy is found with angular dependence $e^{im\\phi}$ for all values of $m\\geq 2$ and for arbitrarily slow rotation. This implies instability (or marginal stability) of such perturbations for rotating perfect fluids. This low $m$-instability is strikingly different from the instability to polar perturbations, which sets in first for large values of $m$. The timescale for the axial instability appears, for small angular velocity $\\Omega$, to be proportional to a high power of $\\Omega$. As in the case of polar modes, viscosity will again presumably enforce stability except for hot, rapidly rotating neutron stars. This work complements Andersson's numerical investigation of axial modes in slowly rotating stars.

  8. Conversion of Kinetic Energy from Synoptic Scale Disturbance to Low-Frequency Fluctuation over the Yangtze River Valley in the Summers of 1997 and 1999

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Yuefeng

    2007-01-01

    In order to investigate the conversion of kinetic energy from a synoptic scale disturbance (SSD; period≤seven days) to a low-frequency fluctuation (LFF; period>seven days), the budget equation of the LFF kinetic energy is derived. The energy conversion is then calculated and analyzed for the summers of 1997 and 1999.The results show that the energy conversion from the SSD to the LFF is obviously enhanced in the middle and lower troposphere during the heavy rainfall, suggesting this to be one of mechanisms inducing the heavy rainfall, although the local LFF kinetic energy may not be enhanced.

  9. Critical Axial Load

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walt Wells

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Our objective in this paper is to solve a second order differential equation for a long, simply supported column member subjected to a lateral axial load using Heun's numerical method. We will use the solution to find the critical load at which the column member will fail due to buckling. We will calculate this load using Euler's derived analytical approach for an exact solution, as well as Euler's Numerical Method. We will then compare the three calculated values to see how much they deviate from one another. During the critical load calculation, it will be necessary to calculate the moment of inertia for the column member.

  10. Trapped Particle Stability for the Kinetic Stabilizer

    CERN Document Server

    Berk, H L

    2011-01-01

    A kinetically stabilized axially symmetric tandem mirror (KSTM) uses the momentum flux of low-energy, unconfined particles that sample only the outer end-regions of the mirror plugs, where large favorable field-line curvature exists. The window of operation is determined for achieving MHD stability with tolerable energy drain from the kinetic stabilizer. Then MHD stable systems are analyzed for stability of the trapped particle mode. This mode is characterized by the detachment of the central-cell plasma from the kinetic stabilizer region without inducing field-line bending. Stability of the trapped particle mode is sensitive to the electron connection between the stabilizer and the end plug. It is found that the stability condition for the trapped particle mode is more constraining than the stability condition for the MHD mode, and it is challenging to satisfy the required power constraint. Furthermore a severe power drain may arise from the necessary connection of low-energy electrons in the kinetic stabili...

  11. Trapped particle stability for the kinetic stabilizer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berk, H. L.; Pratt, J.

    2011-08-01

    A kinetically stabilized axially symmetric tandem mirror (KSTM) uses the momentum flux of low-energy, unconfined particles that sample only the outer end-regions of the mirror plugs, where large favourable field-line curvature exists. The window of operation is determined for achieving magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) stability with tolerable energy drain from the kinetic stabilizer. Then MHD stable systems are analysed for stability of the trapped particle mode. This mode is characterized by the detachment of the central-cell plasma from the kinetic-stabilizer region without inducing field-line bending. Stability of the trapped particle mode is sensitive to the electron connection between the stabilizer and the end plug. It is found that the stability condition for the trapped particle mode is more constraining than the stability condition for the MHD mode, and it is challenging to satisfy the required power constraint. Furthermore, a severe power drain may arise from the necessary connection of low-energy electrons in the kinetic stabilizer to the central region.

  12. Effect of high-energy heavy ion irradiation on the crystallization kinetics of Co-based metallic glasses

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Rohit Jain; Deepika Bhandari; N S Saxena; S K Sharma; A Tripathi

    2001-02-01

    Differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) is employed to study the crystallization kinetics of irradiated (at three different fluences with high-energy heavy ion; Ni11+ of 150 MeV) specimens of two Co-based metallic glasses. It is found that the crystallization process in both the glasses is completed in two phases. The DSC data have been analysed in terms of kinetic parameters viz. activation energy (), Avrami exponent (), dimensionality of growth (), using two different theoretical models. The results obtained have been compared with that of virgin samples. The lower activation energy in case of second crystallization occurring at higher temperature indicates the easier nucleation of second phase. The abnormally high value of Avrami exponent in Co–Ni glass indicates very high nucleation rate during first crystallization.

  13. On the mean kinetic energy of the proton in strong hydrogen bonded systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finkelstein, Y. [Nuclear Research Center–Negev, Beer-Sheva 84190 (Israel); Moreh, R. [Physics Department, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva 84105 (Israel); Shang, S. L.; Wang, Y.; Liu, Z. K. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802 (United States); Shchur, Ya. [Institute for Condensed Matter Physics, 1 Svientsitskii str., L’viv 79011 (Ukraine)

    2016-02-07

    The mean atomic kinetic energies of the proton, Ke(H), and of the deuteron, Ke(D), were calculated in moderate and strongly hydrogen bonded (HB) systems, such as the ferro-electric crystals of the KDP type (XH{sub 2}PO{sub 4}, X = K, Cs, Rb, Tl), the DKDP (XD{sub 2}PO{sub 4}, X = K, Cs, Rb) type, and the X{sub 3}H(SO{sub 4}){sub 2} superprotonic conductors (X = K, Rb). All calculations utilized the simulated partial phonon density of states, deduced from density functional theory based first-principle calculations and from empirical lattice dynamics simulations in which the Coulomb, short range, covalent, and van der Waals interactions were accounted for. The presently calculated Ke(H) values for the two systems were found to be in excellent agreement with published values obtained by deep inelastic neutron scattering measurements carried out using the VESUVIO instrument of the Rutherford Laboratory, UK. The Ke(H) values of the M{sub 3}H(SO{sub 4}){sub 2} compounds, in which the hydrogen bonds are centro-symmetric, are much lower than those of the KDP type crystals, in direct consistency with the oxygen-oxygen distance R{sub OO}, being a measure of the HB strength.

  14. Study of Some Simple Approximations to the Non-Interacting Kinetic Energy Functional

    CERN Document Server

    Salazar, Edison X; Ludeña, Eduardo V; Cornejo, Mauricio; Karasiev, Valentin V

    2016-01-01

    Within the framework of density functional theory, we present a study of approximations to the enhancement factor of the non-interacting kinetic energy functional $T_s[\\rho]$. For this purpose, we employ the model of Liu and Parr [S. Liu and R.G. Parr, Phys. Rev. A {\\bf 55}, 1792 (1997)] based on a series expansion of $T_s[\\rho]$ involving powers of the density. Applications to 34 atoms, at the Hartree-Fock level showed that the enhancement factors present peaks that are in excellent agreement with those of the exact ones and give an accurate description of the shell structure of these atoms. The application of Z-dependent expansions to represent some of the terms of these approximation for neutral atoms and for positive and negative ions, which allows $T_s[\\rho]$ to be cast in a very simple form, is also explored. Indications are given as to how these functionals may be applied to molecules and clusters

  15. Energy resolution and efficiency of phonon-mediated kinetic inductance detectors for light detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cardani, L., E-mail: laura.cardani@roma1.infn.it [Dipartimento di Fisica, Sapienza Università di Roma, Piazzale Aldo Moro 2, 00185 Roma (Italy); Physics Department, Princeton University, Washington Road, 08544, Princeton, New Jersey (United States); Colantoni, I.; Coppolecchia, A. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Sapienza Università di Roma, Piazzale Aldo Moro 2, 00185 Roma (Italy); Cruciani, A.; Vignati, M.; Bellini, F.; Casali, N.; Cosmelli, C. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Sapienza Università di Roma, Piazzale Aldo Moro 2, 00185 Roma (Italy); INFN - Sezione di Roma, Piazzale Aldo Moro 2, 00185 Roma (Italy); Di Domizio, S. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università degli Studi di Genova, Via Dodecaneso 33, 16146 Genova (Italy); INFN - Sezione di Genova, Via Dodecaneso 33, 16146 Genova (Italy); Castellano, M. G. [Istituto di Fotonica e Nanotecnologie - CNR, Via Cineto Romano 42, 00156 Roma (Italy); Tomei, C. [INFN - Sezione di Roma, Piazzale Aldo Moro 2, 00185 Roma (Italy)

    2015-08-31

    The development of sensitive cryogenic light detectors is of primary interest for bolometric experiments searching for rare events like dark matter interactions or neutrino-less double beta decay. Thanks to their good energy resolution and the natural multiplexed read-out, Kinetic Inductance Detectors (KIDs) are particularly suitable for this purpose. To efficiently couple KIDs-based light detectors to the large crystals used by the most advanced bolometric detectors, active surfaces of several cm{sup 2} are needed. For this reason, we are developing phonon-mediated detectors. In this paper, we present the results obtained with a prototype consisting of four 40 nm thick aluminum resonators patterned on a 2 × 2 cm{sup 2} silicon chip, and calibrated with optical pulses and X-rays. The detector features a noise resolution σ{sub E} = 154 ± 7 eV and an (18 ± 2)% efficiency.

  16. Smoothing Control of Wind Farm Output by Using Kinetic Energy of Variable Speed Wind Power Generators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Daiki; Saitoh, Hiroumi

    This paper proposes a new control method for reducing fluctuation of power system frequency through smoothing active power output of wind farm. The proposal is based on the modulation of rotaional kinetic energy of variable speed wind power generators through power converters between permanent magnet synchronous generators (PMSG) and transmission lines. In this paper, the proposed control is called Fluctuation Absorption by Flywheel Characteristics control (FAFC). The FAFC can be easily implemented by adding wind farm output signal to Maximum Power Point Tracking control signal through a feedback control loop. In order to verify the effectiveness of the FAFC control, a simulation study was carried out. In the study, it was assumed that the wind farm consisting of PMSG type wind power generator and induction machine type wind power generaotors is connected with a power sysem. The results of the study show that the FAFC control is a useful method for reducing the impacts of wind farm output fluctuation on system frequency without additional devices such as secondary battery.

  17. Production and destruction of eddy kinetic energy in forced submesoscale eddy-resolving simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Sonaljit; Ramachandran, Sanjiv; Tandon, Amit; Mahadevan, Amala

    2016-09-01

    We study the production and dissipation of the eddy kinetic energy (EKE) in a submesoscale eddy field forced with downfront winds using the Process Study Ocean Model (PSOM) with a horizontal grid resolution of 0.5 km. We simulate an idealized 100 m deep mixed-layer front initially in geostrophic balance with a jet in a domain that permits eddies within a range of O(1 km-100 km). The vertical eddy viscosities and the dissipation are parameterized using four different subgrid vertical mixing parameterizations: the k - ɛ , the KPP, and two different constant eddy viscosity and diffusivity profiles with a magnitude of O(10-2m2s-1) in the mixed layer. Our study shows that strong vertical eddy viscosities near the surface reduce the parameterized dissipation, whereas strong vertical eddy diffusivities reduce the lateral buoyancy gradients and consequently the rate of restratification by mixed-layer instabilities (MLI). Our simulations show that near the surface, the spatial variability of the dissipation along the periphery of the eddies depends on the relative alignment of the ageostrophic and geostrophic shear. Analysis of the resolved EKE budgets in the frontal region from the simulations show important similarities between the vertical structure of the EKE budget produced by the k - ɛ and KPP parameterizations, and earlier LES studies. Such an agreement is absent in the simulations using constant eddy-viscosity parameterizations.

  18. Turbulence intensity and turbulent kinetic energy parameters over a heterogeneous terrain of Loess Plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Ping; Zhang, Qiang; Wang, Runyuan; Li, Yaohui; Wang, Sheng

    2015-09-01

    A deep understanding of turbulence structure is important for investigating the characteristics of the atmospheric boundary layer, especially over heterogeneous terrain. In the present study, turbulence intensity and turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) parameters are analyzed for different conditions with respect to stability, wind direction and wind speed over a valley region of the Loess Plateau of China during December 2003 and January 2004. The purpose of the study is to examine whether the observed turbulence intensity and TKE parameters satisfy Monin-Obukhov similarity theory (MOST), and analyze the wind shear effect on, and thermal buoyancy function of, the TKE, despite the terrain heterogeneity. The results demonstrate that the normalized intensity of turbulence follows MOST for all stability in the horizontal and vertical directions, as well as the normalized TKE in the horizontal direction. The shear effect of the wind speed in the Loess Plateau region is strong in winter and could enhance turbulence for all stability conditions. During daytime, the buoyancy and shear effect together constitute the generation of TKE under unstable conditions. At night, the contribution of buoyancy to TKE is relatively small, and mechanical shearing is the main production form of turbulence.

  19. Connectivity of Marine Protected Areas and Its Relation with Total Kinetic Energy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andressa D'Agostini

    Full Text Available The East Continental Shelf (ECS of Brazil is a hotspot of endemism and biodiversity of reef biota in the South Atlantic, hosting a number of Marine Protected Areas (MPAs. Connectivity of MPAs through larval dispersal influences recruitment, population dynamics, genetic structure and biogeography in coral reef ecosystems. Connectivity of protected reef ecosystem in the ECS was investigated with a hydrodynamic model (ROMS forcing an Individual Based Model (IBM-Ichthyop, and used groupers (genus Mycteroperca as functional group. The hydrodynamic output from ROMS was compared with satellite data and showed good agreement with observed surface fields. Eggs were released, in IBM experiments, from April to September along six years (2002-2007 in five MPAs along the ECS. Intrannual variability in recruitment and self-recruitment of grouper larvae was observed, as well as a negative correlation of these population parameters with total Kinetic Energy (KE used as a metric of the physical environment. Higher KE leads to increased offshore advection of larvae, reduced total recruitment and connectivity of MPAs. Our results indicate high and uni-directional connectivity between MPAs from north to south influenced by the Brazil Current flowing in the same direction. Results also showed that some MPAs act predominantly as "sink" while others are mainly "source" areas.

  20. Connectivity of Marine Protected Areas and Its Relation with Total Kinetic Energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Agostini, Andressa; Gherardi, Douglas Francisco Marcolino; Pezzi, Luciano Ponzi

    2015-01-01

    The East Continental Shelf (ECS) of Brazil is a hotspot of endemism and biodiversity of reef biota in the South Atlantic, hosting a number of Marine Protected Areas (MPAs). Connectivity of MPAs through larval dispersal influences recruitment, population dynamics, genetic structure and biogeography in coral reef ecosystems. Connectivity of protected reef ecosystem in the ECS was investigated with a hydrodynamic model (ROMS) forcing an Individual Based Model (IBM-Ichthyop), and used groupers (genus Mycteroperca) as functional group. The hydrodynamic output from ROMS was compared with satellite data and showed good agreement with observed surface fields. Eggs were released, in IBM experiments, from April to September along six years (2002-2007) in five MPAs along the ECS. Intrannual variability in recruitment and self-recruitment of grouper larvae was observed, as well as a negative correlation of these population parameters with total Kinetic Energy (KE) used as a metric of the physical environment. Higher KE leads to increased offshore advection of larvae, reduced total recruitment and connectivity of MPAs. Our results indicate high and uni-directional connectivity between MPAs from north to south influenced by the Brazil Current flowing in the same direction. Results also showed that some MPAs act predominantly as "sink" while others are mainly "source" areas. PMID:26448650

  1. Characteristics of Zonal Propagation of Atmospheric Kinetic Energy at Equatorial Region in Asia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Hui; CHEN Longxun; HE Jinhai; TAO Shiyan; JIN Zuhui

    2006-01-01

    Based on the daily NCEP/NCAR reanalysis dataset from 1980 to 1997, the zonal propagations of 850 hPa kinetic energy (KE) and meridional wind (v) at equatorial region are examined respectively. Results show that the strongest center of KE in the tropical Asian monsoon region is located at 75°-90°E, with the secondary over the Somalia low-level jet channel, i.e., about 50°E. East to 90°E, disturbances of both KE and v observed are mainly coming from the western Pacific Ocean and propagating westward to the Bay of Bengal (BOB) passing through the South China Sea. But the propagation directions of both KE and v are rather disorderly between the BOB and the Somalia jet channel. Therefore, the East Asian summer monsoon and the Indian summer monsoon are different in the propagating features of the disturbances of KE and v. Above facts indicate that East Asian monsoon system exists undoubtedly even at the equatorial region, and quite distinct from the Indian monsoon system, it is mainly affected by the disturbances coming from the tropical western Pacific rather than from the Indian monsoon region. The boundary of the two monsoon systems is around 95°-100°E, which is more westward than the counterpart as proposed in earlier studies by 5-10 degrees in longitude.

  2. Turbulence kinetic energy budget in bubbly flows in a vertical duct

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hosokawa, Shigeo; Suzuki, Takashi; Tomiyama, Akio [Graduate School of Engineering, Kobe University, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Kobe, Hyogo (Japan)

    2012-03-15

    Understanding turbulence kinetic energy (TKE) budget in gas-liquid two-phase bubbly flows is indispensable to develop and improve turbulence models for the bubbly flows. In this study, a molecular tagging velocimetry based on photobleaching reaction was applied to turbulent bubbly flows with sub-millimeter bubbles in a vertical square duct to examine the applicability of the k-{epsilon} models to the bubbly flows. Effects of bubbles on TKE budget are discussed and a priori tests of the standard and low Reynolds number k-{epsilon} models are carried out to examine the applicability of these models to the bubbly flows. The conclusions obtained are as follows: (1) The photobleaching molecular tagging velocimetry is of use for validating turbulence models. (2) The bubbles increase the liquid velocity gradient in the near wall region, and therefore, enhance the production and dissipation rates of TKE. (3) The k-{epsilon} models can reasonably evaluate the production rate of TKE in the bubbly flows. (4) The modulations of diffusion due to the bubbles have different characteristics from the diffusion enhancement due to shear-induced turbulence. Hence, the k-{epsilon} models fail in evaluating the diffusion rate in the near wall region in the bubbly flows. (5) The k-{epsilon} models represent the trends of the production, dissipation, and diffusion rates of {epsilon} in the bubbly flow, although more accurate experimental data are required for quantitative validation of the {epsilon} equation. (orig.)

  3. The terms of turbulent kinetic energy budget within random arrays of emergent cylinders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricardo, Ana M.; Koll, Katinka; Franca, Mário J.; Schleiss, Anton J.; Ferreira, Rui M. L.

    2014-05-01

    This article is aimed at quantifying and discussing the relative magnitude of key terms of the equation of conservation of turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) in the inter-stem space of a flow within arrays of vertical cylinders simulating plant stems of emergent and rigid vegetation. The spatial distribution of turbulent quantities and mean flow variables are influenced by two fundamental space scales, the diameter of the stems and the local stem areal number-density. Both may vary considerably since the areal distribution of plant stems in natural systems is generally not homogeneous; they are often arranged in alternating sparse and dense patches. The magnitude of the terms of the budget of TKE in the inter-stem space has seldom been quantified experimentally and is currently not well known. This work addresses this research need. New databases, consisting of three-component LDA velocity series and two-component PIV velocity maps, obtained in carefully controlled laboratory conditions, were used to calculate the terms of the TKE budget. The physical system comprises random arrays of rigid and emergent cylinders with longitudinally varying areal number-density. It is verified that the main source of TKE is vortex shedding from individual cylinders. The rates of production and dissipation are not in equilibrium. Regions with negative production, a previously unreported feature, are identified. Turbulent transport is particularly important along the von Kármán vortex street. Convective rate of change of TKE and pressure diffusion are most relevant in the vicinity of the cylinders.

  4. Characteristics of turbulent kinetic energy dissipation rate and turbidity near the coast of East China Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yanwei; Xu, Huiping; Qin, Rufu; Xu, Changwei; Fan, Daidu

    2016-09-01

    The East China Sea (ECS) has a high suspended-sediment concentration because of the influence of the Changjiang River, indicated by high turbidity in the water. Considering the islands offthe coast and the complex topography, and the strong influence of tides and wind, the coast offthe ECS is a typical region with strong oceanic mixing processes. The changes in the dynamic processes near the bottom play an important role in the control of water turbidity. The turbulent kinetic energy dissipation rate ( ɛ ) is a parameter that shows the strength of ocean mixing. This is estimated based on a structure method using current velocity that is measured by a high-frequency Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP) from a seafloor observatory in the ECS. The results indicate strong ocean mixing processes with a mean ɛ value of 5.7×10-5 W/kg and distinct tidal variations in the dissipation rate. Conversely, the variation of the water turbidity leads to changes in the water dynamical structure near the bottom. Comparing the dissipation rate with the turbidity near the bottom boundary layer, we find that the high turbidity mimics strong ocean mixing.

  5. A nonlinear MEMS electrostatic kinetic energy harvester for human-powered biomedical devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Y.; Cottone, F.; Marty, F.; Basset, P., E-mail: p.basset@esiee.fr [Université Paris-Est/ESYCOM/ESIEE Paris, Noisy-le-Grand 93162 (France); Boisseau, S. [CEA, Leti, Minatec Campus, Grenoble 38054 (France); Galayko, D. [UPMC-Sorbonne Université/LIP 6, CNRS, Paris 75005 (France)

    2015-12-21

    This article proposes a silicon-based electrostatic kinetic energy harvester with an ultra-wide operating frequency bandwidth from 1 Hz to 160 Hz. This large bandwidth is obtained, thanks to a miniature tungsten ball impacting with a movable proof mass of silicon. The motion of the silicon proof mass is confined by nonlinear elastic stoppers on the fixed part standing against two protrusions of the proof mass. The electrostatic transducer is made of interdigited-combs with a gap-closing variable capacitance that includes vertical electrets obtained by corona discharge. Below 10 Hz, the e-KEH offers 30.6 nJ per mechanical oscillation at 2 g{sub rms}, which makes it suitable for powering biomedical devices from human motion. Above 10 Hz and up to 162 Hz, the harvested power is more than 0.5 μW with a maximum of 4.5 μW at 160 Hz. The highest power of 6.6 μW is obtained without the ball at 432 Hz, in accordance with a power density of 142 μW/cm{sup 3}. We also demonstrate the charging of a 47-μF capacitor to 3.5 V used to power a battery-less wireless temperature sensor node.

  6. A nonlinear MEMS electrostatic kinetic energy harvester for human-powered biomedical devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article proposes a silicon-based electrostatic kinetic energy harvester with an ultra-wide operating frequency bandwidth from 1 Hz to 160 Hz. This large bandwidth is obtained, thanks to a miniature tungsten ball impacting with a movable proof mass of silicon. The motion of the silicon proof mass is confined by nonlinear elastic stoppers on the fixed part standing against two protrusions of the proof mass. The electrostatic transducer is made of interdigited-combs with a gap-closing variable capacitance that includes vertical electrets obtained by corona discharge. Below 10 Hz, the e-KEH offers 30.6 nJ per mechanical oscillation at 2 grms, which makes it suitable for powering biomedical devices from human motion. Above 10 Hz and up to 162 Hz, the harvested power is more than 0.5 μW with a maximum of 4.5 μW at 160 Hz. The highest power of 6.6 μW is obtained without the ball at 432 Hz, in accordance with a power density of 142 μW/cm3. We also demonstrate the charging of a 47-μF capacitor to 3.5 V used to power a battery-less wireless temperature sensor node

  7. A nonlinear MEMS electrostatic kinetic energy harvester for human-powered biomedical devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Y.; Cottone, F.; Boisseau, S.; Marty, F.; Galayko, D.; Basset, P.

    2015-12-01

    This article proposes a silicon-based electrostatic kinetic energy harvester with an ultra-wide operating frequency bandwidth from 1 Hz to 160 Hz. This large bandwidth is obtained, thanks to a miniature tungsten ball impacting with a movable proof mass of silicon. The motion of the silicon proof mass is confined by nonlinear elastic stoppers on the fixed part standing against two protrusions of the proof mass. The electrostatic transducer is made of interdigited-combs with a gap-closing variable capacitance that includes vertical electrets obtained by corona discharge. Below 10 Hz, the e-KEH offers 30.6 nJ per mechanical oscillation at 2 grms, which makes it suitable for powering biomedical devices from human motion. Above 10 Hz and up to 162 Hz, the harvested power is more than 0.5 μW with a maximum of 4.5 μW at 160 Hz. The highest power of 6.6 μW is obtained without the ball at 432 Hz, in accordance with a power density of 142 μW/cm3. We also demonstrate the charging of a 47-μF capacitor to 3.5 V used to power a battery-less wireless temperature sensor node.

  8. Total kinetic energy in four global eddying ocean circulation models and over 5000 current meter records

    KAUST Repository

    Scott, Robert B.

    2010-01-01

    We compare the total kinetic energy (TKE) in four global eddying ocean circulation simulations with a global dataset of over 5000, quality controlled, moored current meter records. At individual mooring sites, there was considerable scatter between models and observations that was greater than estimated statistical uncertainty. Averaging over all current meter records in various depth ranges, all four models had mean TKE within a factor of two of observations above 3500. m, and within a factor of three below 3500. m. With the exception of observations between 20 and 100. m, the models tended to straddle the observations. However, individual models had clear biases. The free running (no data assimilation) model biases were largest below 2000. m. Idealized simulations revealed that the parameterized bottom boundary layer tidal currents were not likely the source of the problem, but that reducing quadratic bottom drag coefficient may improve the fit with deep observations. Data assimilation clearly improved the model-observation comparison, especially below 2000. m, despite assimilated data existing mostly above this depth and only south of 47°N. Different diagnostics revealed different aspects of the comparison, though in general the models appeared to be in an eddying-regime with TKE that compared reasonably well with observations. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd.

  9. Impact of Nocturnal Low-Level Jets on Near-Surface Turbulence Kinetic Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte, Henrique F.; Leclerc, Monique Y.; Zhang, Gengsheng; Durden, David; Kurzeja, Robert; Parker, Matthew; Werth, David

    2015-09-01

    We report on the role of low-level jets (LLJs) on the modulation of near-surface turbulence in the stable boundary layer, focusing on the behaviour of the transport terms of the turbulence kinetic energy (TKE) budget. We also examine the applicability of Monin-Obukhov similarity theory (MOST) in light of these terms. Using coincident near-surface turbulence and LLJ data collected over a three-month period in South Carolina, USA, we found that turbulence during LLJ periods was typically stronger and more well-developed in comparison with periods without a LLJ. We found a local imbalance in the near-surface TKE budget, in which the imbalance (residual) term was typically positive (i.e., energy gain) and nearly in equilibrium with buoyant consumption. Based on a comparison with previous studies, we assume that this residual term represents mostly pressure transport. We found the behaviour of the residual term to be better delineated in the presence of LLJs. We found shear production to adhere to MOST remarkably well during LLJs, except under very stable conditions. Gain of non-local TKE via pressure transport, likely consisting of large-scale fluctuations, could be the cause of the observed deviation from the MOST -less prediction. The fact that this deviation was observed for periods with well-developed turbulence with an inertial subrange slope close to indicates that such Kolmogorov turbulence is not a sufficient condition to guarantee the applicability of the MOST -less concept, as recently suggested in the literature. The implications of these results are discussed.

  10. Bi-Directional Energy Cascades and the Origin of Kinetic Alfv\\'enic and Whistler Turbulence in the Solar Wind

    CERN Document Server

    Che, H; Viñas, A F

    2013-01-01

    The observed sub-proton scale turbulence spectrum in the solar wind raises the question of how that turbulence originates. Observations of keV energetic electrons during solar quite-time suggest them as possible source of free energy to drive the turbulence. Using particle-in-cell simulations, we explore how free energy in energetic electrons, released by an electron two-stream instability drives Weibel-like electromagnetic waves that excite wave-wave interactions. Consequently, both kinetic Alfv\\'enic and whistler waves are excited that evolve through inverse and forward magnetic energy cascades.

  11. Axial skeletal CT densitometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since the discovery of the Roentgen ray a precise and accurate assessment of bone mineral content has been a challenge to many investigators. A number of methods have been developed but no one satisfied. Considering its technical possibilities computed tomography is very promising in determination of bone mineral content (BMC). The new modality enables BMC estimations in the axial skeletal trabecular bone. CT densitometry can be performed on a normal commercially available third generation whole body CT scanner. No dedicated device in a special clinical set-up is necessary. In this study 106 patients, most of them clinically suspected of osteoporosis, were examined. The new method CT densitometry has been evaluated. The results have been correlated to alternative BMC determination methods. (Auth.)

  12. Correlated Signals at the Energy and Intensity Frontiers from Nonabelian Kinetic Mixing

    CERN Document Server

    Barello, G; Newby, Christopher A

    2015-01-01

    We show that when a dark abelian gauge sector and SU$(2)_{L}$ kinetically mix it necessarily generates a relation between the kinetic mixing strength and the mass of the mediating particle. Remarkably, this correspondence maps the weak scale directly to the kinetic mixing strengths being probed by modern fixed-target experiments and next generation flavor factories. This illuminates the exciting possibility of correlated discoveries of a new particle at the LHC and a dark photon at intensity frontier experiments. To motivate the scenario, we construct a simple model and explore its phenomenology and constraints.

  13. Kinetic Energy Driven Superconductivity in the Electron Doped Cobaltate NaxCoO2 · yH2O

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Bin; LIANG Ying; FENG Shi-Ping; CHEN Wei-Yeu

    2005-01-01

    Within the charge-spin separation fermion-spin theory, we show that the mechanism of superconductivity in the electron doped cobaltate Nax CoO2. yH2 O is ascribed to its kinetic energy. The dressed fermions interact occurring directly through the kinetic energy by exchanging magnetic excitations. This interaction leads to a net attractive force between dressed fermions, then the electron Cooper pairs originating from the dressed fermion pairing state are due to the charge-spin recombination, and their condensation reveals the superconducting ground state. The superconducting transition temperature is identical to the dressed fermion pair transition temperature, and is suppressed to a lower temperature due to the strong magnetic frustration. The optimal superconducting transition temperature occurs in the electron doping concentration δ≈ 0.29, and then decreases for both underdoped and overdoped regimes, in qualitative agreement with the experimental results.

  14. Numerical study of the scaling of the maximum kinetic energy per unit length for imploding Z-pinch liner

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zeng Zheng-Zhong; Qiu Ai-Ci

    2004-01-01

    Numerical computation based on a zero-dimensional thin-plasma-shell model has been carried out to study the scaling of the maximum kinetic energy per unit length, the current amplitude and the compression ratio for the imploding Z-pinch liner driven by peaked current pulses. A dimensionless scaling constant of 0.9 with an error less than 10% is extracted at the optimal choice of the current and liner parameters. Deviation of the chosen experimental parameter from the optimal exerts a minor influence on the kinetic energy for wider-shaped and slower-decaying pulses, but the influence becomes significant for narrower-shaped and faster-decaying pulses. The computation is in reasonable agreement with experimental data from the Z, Saturn, Blackjack 5 and Qiangguang-I liners.

  15. Attenuation of 10 MeV electron beam energy to achieve low doses does not affect Salmonella spp. inactivation kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hieke, Anne-Sophie Charlotte; Pillai, Suresh D.

    2015-05-01

    The effect of attenuating the energy of a 10 MeV electron beam on Salmonella inactivation kinetics was investigated. No statistically significant differences were observed between the D10 values of either Salmonella 4,[5],12:i:- or a Salmonella cocktail (S. 4,[5],12:i:-, Salmonella Heidelberg, Salmonella Newport, Salmonella Typhimurium, Salmonella) when irradiated with either a non-attenuated 10 MeV eBeam or an attenuated 10 MeV eBeam (~2.9±0.22 MeV). The results show that attenuating the energy of a 10 MeV eBeam to achieve low doses does not affect the inactivation kinetics of Salmonella spp. when compared to direct 10 MeV eBeam irradiation.

  16. Stereodynamical Origin of Anti-Arrhenius Kinetics: Negative Activation Energy and Roaming for a Four-Atom Reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coutinho, Nayara D; Silva, Valter H C; de Oliveira, Heibbe C B; Camargo, Ademir J; Mundim, Kleber C; Aquilanti, Vincenzo

    2015-05-01

    The OH + HBr → H2O + Br reaction, prototypical of halogen-atom liberating processes relevant to mechanisms for atmospheric ozone destruction, attracted frequent attention of experimental chemical kinetics: the nature of the unusual reactivity drop from low to high temperatures eluded a variety of theoretical efforts, ranking this one among the most studied four-atom reactions. Here, inspired by oriented molecular-beams experiments, we develop a first-principles stereodynamical approach. Thermalized sets of trajectories, evolving on a multidimensional potential energy surface quantum mechanically generated on-the-fly, provide a map of most visited regions at each temperature. Visualizations of rearrangements of bonds along trajectories and of the role of specific angles of reactants' mutual approach elucidate the mechanistic change from the low kinetic energy regime (where incident reactants reorient to find the propitious alignment leading to reaction) to high temperature (where speed hinders adjustment of directionality and roaming delays reactivity). PMID:26263312

  17. Non-isothermal crystallization kinetics of polyethylene–clay nanocomposites prepared by high-energy ball milling

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Maryam Abareshi; Seyed Mojtaba Zebarjad; Elaheh K Goharshadi

    2014-08-01

    Non-isothermal crystallization kinetics of pure medium density polyethylene (MDPE) and MDPE–clay nanocomposites have been investigated by differential scanning calorimeter. The modified Avrami, Ozawa, Liu and Ziabicki equations have been applied to describe non-isothermal crystallization process. The results of Avrami analysis showed a very complicated crystallization mechanism. Although, Ozawa equation failed to provide an adequate description for non-isothermal crystallization process, Liu equation could describe it well. The data showed the crystallization rate of MDPE and nanocomposites raises with increasing cooling rate and the crystallization rate of nanocomposite is faster than that of MDPE at a given cooling rate. Ziabicki’s kinetic crystallizability index showed that clay can increase the ability of MDPE to crystallize, when it is cooled at unit cooling rate. The activation energy of samples has been evaluated by Kissinger method. The results showed that the activation energy of nanocomposite was lower than that of MDPE.

  18. Exact quantum mechanical vibration-rotation kinetic energy operator of four-particle system in various coordinates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈光巨; 刘若庄

    1996-01-01

    The vibration-rotational kinetic energy operators of four-particle system in various coordinates are derived using a new and simple angular momentum method. The operators are respectively suitable for studying the systems described by scattering coordinate, valence coordinate, Radau coordinate, Radau/Jacobi and Jacobi/valence hybrid coordinates and so on. Certain properties of these operators and their possible applications are discussed.

  19. Analysis of Self Similar Scaling in Kinetic and Magnetic Energy Density as a Function of Distance From Sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, A.; Coplan, M. A.

    2009-12-01

    We analyze solar wind and interplanetary magnetic field data to study scaling properties of kinetic and magnetic energy density as a function of solar cycle and distance from the sun. In his original theory on turbulence, Kolmogorov predicted that in the inertial range the fluctuations in velocity differences should be self-similar. Analysis of solar wind data showed this not to be the case. On the other hand B. Hnat et.al.(Geophys. Res. Lett., 29 (10), 1446, 2002) and J.J Podesta (J. Geophys. Res., 111, A09105, 2006) showed that fluctuations in kinetic and magnetic energy density are approximately self-similar. We extend this analysis using data from the SWE and MFI experiments on the WIND spacecraft (at 1AU) during solar minimum (2006) and solar maximum (2001) and VHM/FGM experiment on the Ulysses spacecraft (1AU to 5AU). We calculate the cumulative distribution function (CDF) of the time delayed differences in kinetic and magnetic energy density and present a method through which the scaling exponent can be reliably calculated from the CDFs, instead of using structure functions which are very sensitive to large fluctuations. We compare the scaling exponents derived from the CDFs to the ones calculated from structure functions and study the rescaling properties of CDFs.

  20. Enhancing kinetic energy entrainment in LES of large wind farms by unconventional forcing at the turbine rotors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhulst, Claire; Meneveau, Charles

    2015-11-01

    Vertical entrainment of mean kinetic energy is believed to be a limiting factor for power generation in very large wind farms, which operate in the turbulent atmospheric boundary layer and experience detrimental wake effects. A new approach, meant to increase vertical entrainment and aid wake recovery, is proposed and evaluated with a preliminary ``proof of concept'' test using Large Eddy Simulation (LES) with periodic boundary conditions to obtain realistic fully developed flow. In addition to the traditional actuator thrust force, a synthetic vertical force is applied at the turbine rotors to force high-speed flow downward and low-speed flow upward. The ratio of the vertical force and the thrust force, held constant within each case, ranges from 0 to 1 across six cases and is applied independently at each turbine. The proposed approach is found to increase the power extraction and mean kinetic energy entrainment significantly, by up to 95% when the vertical force is similar in magnitude to the thrust force. The effect of the forcing scheme on the mean velocity field is considered in detail. In addition, a quadrant analysis is performed to determine how the synthetic forcing changes the statistical characteristics of the mean kinetic energy entrainment within the wind farm. This work was supported by NSF grant 1243482 (the WINDINSPIRE project).

  1. Buoyant Turbulent Kinetic Energy Production in Steep-Slope Katabatic Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oldroyd, Holly J.; Pardyjak, Eric R.; Higgins, Chad W.; Parlange, Marc B.

    2016-07-01

    We develop several critical concepts that should be considered when interpreting, modelling and designing future experiments for flows over sloping terrain. Vertical buoyancy fluxes in katabatic flows can be positive and a source of turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) despite the statically stable, thermal stratification that drives these flows. This phenomenon occurs when the ratio of along-slope to slope-normal kinematic heat fluxes is greater than the cotangent of the slope angle, suggesting a critical value of slope-angle steepness found in earlier studies. We provide field-data-based evidence that the along-slope heat flux may dominate the variables in this inequality, and therefore in generating buoyant TKE production or suppression over a steep slope. These data show the along-slope heat flux can be more variable and significantly larger in magnitude than the slope-normal component. The gradient Richardson number does not include the effects of the along-slope buoyancy; furthermore, none of the canonical stability parameters can properly reflect the TKE redistribution from turbulent transport divergence and the sink of TKE in cases of counter-gradient momentum fluxes, which we frequently observe near the peak of the katabatic jet. In such cases, canonical stability parameters inadequately represent the physical mechanisms associated with stability. These results have broad implications related to accurately modelling turbulence and surface exchanges over sloping terrain and illustrate the need to more thoroughly investigate the along-slope heat flux and its drivers, the meaning and definitions of stability, and the effects of non-local turbulent transport.

  2. Pyrolysis Characteristics and Kinetics of Phoenix Tree Residues as a Potential Energy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Li

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available By using a thermogravimetric analyser under argon atmosphere, the pyrolysis process and the kinetic model of phoenix tree residues (the little stem, middle stem, and leaf at a 30 °C min−1 heating rate and the phoenix tree mix at three different heating rates (10 °C min−1, 30 °C min−1, and 50 °C min−1 were examined. The catalyst and the co-pyrolysis samples were at a 30 °C min−1 heating rate. The catalysts were Na2CO3, ZnCl2 and CaO in a mass fraction of 5 %. The experimental results revealed that the phoenix tree residues pyrolysis process consisted of three stages: dehydration stage, main pyrolysis stage, and the slow decomposition of residues. As the heating rate increased, the pyrolysis characteristic temperature of the phoenix tree grew, there was a backward-shift of the pyrolysis rate curve, and the mass loss rate gradually increased. The phoenix tree residues’ activation energy changed throughout the whole pyrolysis process, and the pyrolysis temperature ranges of the three main components (cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin existed in overlapping phenomenon. As compared to the little stem, middle stem, and leaf, the phoenix tree mix was more likely to be pyrolysed under the same heating rate. Different catalysts had a different impact on the pyrolysis: ZnCl2 moved the start point of the reaction to the lower temperatures, but did not speed up the reaction; Na2CO3 speeded up the reaction without changing the start point of the reaction; CaO speeded up the reaction, moved the start point of the reaction to higher temperatures.

  3. Extra-axial brain tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapalino, Otto; Smirniotopoulos, James G

    2016-01-01

    Extra-axial brain tumors are the most common adult intracranial neoplasms and encompass a broad spectrum of pathologic subtypes. Meningiomas are the most common extra-axial brain tumor (approximately one-third of all intracranial neoplasms) and typically present as slowly growing dural-based masses. Benign meningiomas are very common, and may occasionally be difficult to differentiate from more aggressive subtypes (i.e., atypical or malignant varieties) or other dural-based masses with more aggressive biologic behavior (e.g., hemangiopericytoma or dural-based metastases). Many neoplasms that typically affect the brain parenchyma (intra-axial), such as gliomas, may also present with primary or secondary extra-axial involvement. This chapter provides a general and concise overview of the common types of extra-axial tumors and their typical imaging features. PMID:27432671

  4. Build Axial Gradient Field by Using Axial Magnetized Permanent Rings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Axial magnetic field produced by an axial magnetized permanent ring was studied. For two permanent rings, if they are magnetized in the same directions, a nearly uniform axial field can be produced. If they are magnetized in opposite direction,an axial gradient magnetic field can be generated, with the field range changing from -B0 to B0. A permanent magnet with a high axial gradient field was fabricated, the measured results agree with the PANDIRA calculation very well. For wider usage,it is desirable for the field gradient to be changed. Some methods to produce the variable gradient field are presented. These kinds of axial gradient magnetic field can also be used as a beam focusing for linear accelerator if the periodic field can be produced along the beam trajectory. The axial magnetic field is something like a solenoid, large stray field will leak to the outside environment if no method is taken to control them. In this paper, one method is illustrated to shield off the outside leakage field.

  5. A two Turbulence Kinetic Energy model as a scale-adaptive approach to modeling the planetary boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Ritthik; Stevens, Bjorn

    2016-03-01

    A two Turbulence Kinetic Energy (2TKE) model is developed to address the boundary layer "grey zone" problem. The model combines ideas from local and nonlocal models into a single energetically consistent framework. By applying the Reynolds averaging to the large eddy simulation (LES) equations that employ Deardorff's subgrid TKE, we arrive at a system of equations for the boundary layer quantities and two turbulence kinetic energies: one which encapsulates the TKE of large boundary-layer-scale eddies and another which represents the energy of eddies subgrid to the vertical grid size of a typical large-scale model. These two energies are linked via the turbulent cascade of energy from larger to smaller scales and are used to model the mixing in the boundary layer. The model is evaluated for three dry test cases and found to compare favorably to large eddy simulations. The usage of two TKEs for mixing helps reduce the dependency of the model on the vertical grid scale as well as on the free tropospheric stability and facilitates a smoother transition from convective to stable regimes. The usage of two TKEs representing two ranges of scales satisfies the prerequisite for modeling the boundary layer in the "grey zone": an idea that is explored further in a companion paper.

  6. Kinetic energy and charge state effects in the X-ray emission of Mo surface induced by Xeq+(q=25,29) ions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    L-shell X-ray spectra of Mo surface induced by Xe25+ and Xe29+ were measured. The X-ray intensity was obtained in the kinetic energy range of the incident ions from 350 to 600 keV. The relationship of X-ray intensity with kinetic energy of the projec-tile and its charge state were studied,and the simple explanation was given.

  7. The sum rule for dipolar absorptions and rotational kinetic energy of wate and some dipolar molecules in condensed phases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikawa, Shun-ichi; Yamazaki, Shuichi; Kimura, Masao

    1981-06-01

    Another form of the sum rule for dipolar absorptions has been derived by means of quantum statistics. The difference between this and usually used form results from a quantum effect on the molecular rotational motion. By the joint use of the two forms, average rotational kinetic energies of water molec in the liquid and solid phases and some dipolar molecules in solutions have been estimated. It has been shown that the average rotational kinetic energ larger than the value expected from the classical equipartition rule, with an increase in the hindering potential for the rotational motion of the mole The dipole moments of water molecules in liquid and solid water have been estimated. These are considerably smaller than the gas-phase value.

  8. Characterization of Multiflux Axial Compressors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the present work the results of analytical models of performance are compared with experimental data acquired in the multi flux axial compressor test facility, built in The Pilcaniyeu Technological Complex for the SIGMA project.We describe the experimental circuit and the data of the dispersion inside the axial compressor obtained using a tracer gas through one of the annular inlets.The attained results can be used to validate the design code for the multi flux axial compressors and SIGMA industrial plant

  9. Axial gap rotating electrical machine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2016-02-23

    Direct drive rotating electrical machines with axial air gaps are disclosed. In these machines, a rotor ring and stator ring define an axial air gap between them. Sets of gap-maintaining rolling supports bear between the rotor ring and the stator ring at their peripheries to maintain the axial air gap. Also disclosed are wind turbines using these generators, and structures and methods for mounting direct drive rotating electrical generators to the hubs of wind turbines. In particular, the rotor ring of the generator may be carried directly by the hub of a wind turbine to rotate relative to a shaft without being mounted directly to the shaft.

  10. Turbulence kinetic energy budget during the afternoon transition - Part 2: A simple TKE model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Erik; Lothon, Marie; Lohou, Fabienne; Pardyjak, Eric; Hartogensis, Oscar; Darbieu, Clara

    2016-07-01

    A simple model for turbulence kinetic energy (TKE) and the TKE budget is presented for sheared convective atmospheric conditions based on observations from the Boundary Layer Late Afternoon and Sunset Turbulence (BLLAST) field campaign. It is based on an idealized mixed-layer approximation and a simplified near-surface TKE budget. In this model, the TKE is dependent on four budget terms (turbulent dissipation rate, buoyancy production, shear production and vertical transport of TKE) and only requires measurements of three available inputs (near-surface buoyancy flux, boundary layer depth and wind speed at one height in the surface layer) to predict vertical profiles of TKE and TKE budget terms.This simple model is shown to reproduce some of the observed variations between the different studied days in terms of near-surface TKE and its decay during the afternoon transition reasonably well. It is subsequently used to systematically study the effects of buoyancy and shear on TKE evolution using idealized constant and time-varying winds during the afternoon transition. From this, we conclude that many different TKE decay rates are possible under time-varying winds and that generalizing the decay with simple scaling laws for near-surface TKE of the form tα may be questionable.The model's errors result from the exclusion of processes such as elevated shear production and horizontal advection. The model also produces an overly rapid decay of shear production with height. However, the most influential budget terms governing near-surface TKE in the observed sheared convective boundary layers are included, while only second-order factors are neglected. Comparison between modeled and averaged observed estimates of dissipation rate illustrates that the overall behavior of the model is often quite reasonable. Therefore, we use the model to discuss the low-turbulence conditions that form first in the upper parts of the boundary layer during the afternoon transition and are only

  11. Turbulence Kinetic Energy budget during the afternoon transition – Part 2: A simple TKE model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Nilsson

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available A simple model for turbulence kinetic energy (TKE and the TKE budget is presented for sheared convective atmospheric conditions based on observations from the Boundary Layer Late Afternoon and Sunset Turbulence (BLLAST field campaign. It is based on an idealized mixed-layer approximation and a simplified near-surface TKE budget. In this model, the TKE is dependent on four budget terms (turbulent dissipation rate, buoyancy production, shear production and vertical transport of TKE and only requires measurements of three input available (near-surface buoyancy flux, boundary layer depth and wind speed at one height in the surface layer. This simple model is shown to reproduce some of the observed variations between the different studied days in terms of near-surface TKE and its decay during the afternoon transition reasonably well. It is subsequently used to systematically study the effects of buoyancy and shear on TKE evolution using idealized constant and time-varying winds during the afternoon transition. From this, we conclude that many different TKE decay rates are possible under time-varying winds and that generalizing the decay with simple scaling laws for near-surface TKE of the form tα may be questionable. The model's errors result from the exclusion of processes such as elevated shear production and horizontal advection. The model also produces an overly rapid decay of shear production with height. However, the most influential budget terms governing near-surface TKE in the observed sheared convective boundary layers are included, while only second order factors are neglected. Comparison between modeled and averaged observed estimates of dissipation rate illustrate that the overall behavior of the model is often quite reasonable. Therefore, we use the model to discuss the low turbulence conditions that form first in the upper parts of the boundary layer during the afternoon transition and are only apparent later near the surface. This

  12. Solar Sailing Kinetic Energy Interceptor (KEI) Mission for Impacting/Deflecting Near-Earth Asteroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wie, Bong

    2005-01-01

    A solar sailing mission architecture, which requires a t least ten 160-m, 300-kg solar sail spacecraft with a characteristic acceleration of 0.5 mm/sqs, is proposed as a realistic near- term option for mitigating the threat posed by near-Earth asteroids (NEAs). Its mission feasibility is demonstrated for a fictional asteroid mitigation problem created by AIAA. This problem assumes that a 200-m asteroid, designated 2004WR, was detected on July 4, 2004, and that the expected impact will occur on January 14, 2015. The solar sailing phase of the proposed mission for the AIAA asteroid mitigation problem is comprised of the initial cruise phase from 1 AU t o 0.25 AU (1.5 years), the cranking orbit phase (3.5 years), and the retrograde orbit phase (1 year) prior to impacting the target asteroid at its perihelion (0.75 AU from the sun) on January 1, 2012. The proposed mission will require at least ten kinetic energy interceptor (KEI) solar sail spacecraft. Each KEI sailcraft consists of a 160- m, 150-kg solar sail and a 150-kg microsatellite impactor. The impactor is to be separated from a large solar sail prior to impacting the 200-m target asteroid at its perihelion. Each 150-kg microsatellite impactor, with a relative impact velocity of at least 70 km/s, will cause a conservatively estimated AV of 0.3 cm/s in the trajectory of the 200-m target asteroid, due largely to the impulsive effect of material ejected from the newly-formed crater. The deflection caused by a single impactor will increase the Earth-miss-distance by 0.45Re (where Re denotes the Earth radius of 6,378 km). Therefore, at least ten KEI sailcraft will be required for consecutive impacts, but probably without causing fragmentation, to increase the total Earth-miss-distance by 4.5Re. This miss-distance increase of 29,000 km is outside of a typical uncertainty/error of about 10,000 km in predicting the Earth-miss- distance. A conventional Delta I1 2925 launch vehicle is capable of injecting at least two KEI

  13. Separation-induced boundary layer transition: Modeling with a non-linear eddy-viscosity model coupled with the laminar kinetic energy equation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vlahostergios, Z. [Laboratory of Fluid Mechanics and Turbomachinery, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Karamanli str., Thessaloniki 54124 (Greece); Yakinthos, K. [Laboratory of Fluid Mechanics and Turbomachinery, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Karamanli str., Thessaloniki 54124 (Greece)], E-mail: kyros@eng.auth.gr; Goulas, A. [Laboratory of Fluid Mechanics and Turbomachinery, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Karamanli str., Thessaloniki 54124 (Greece)

    2009-08-15

    We present an effort to model the separation-induced transition on a flat plate with a semi-circular leading edge, using a cubic non-linear eddy-viscosity model combined with the laminar kinetic energy. A non-linear model, compared to a linear one, has the advantage to resolve the anisotropic behavior of the Reynolds-stresses in the near-wall region and it provides a more accurate expression for the generation of turbulence in the transport equation of the turbulence kinetic energy. Although in its original formulation the model is not able to accurately predict the separation-induced transition, the inclusion of the laminar kinetic energy increases its accuracy. The adoption of the laminar kinetic energy by the non-linear model is presented in detail, together with some additional modifications required for the adaption of the laminar kinetic energy into the basic concepts of the non-linear eddy-viscosity model. The computational results using the proposed combined model are shown together with the ones obtained using an isotropic linear eddy-viscosity model, which adopts also the laminar kinetic energy concept and in comparison with the existing experimental data.

  14. Core-Shell Al-Polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) Configurations to Enhance Reaction Kinetics and Energy Performance for Nanoenergetic Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jun; Qiao, Zhiqiang; Yang, Yuntao; Shen, Jinpeng; Long, Zhang; Li, Zhaoqian; Cui, Xudong; Yang, Guangcheng

    2016-01-01

    The energy performance of solid energetic materials (Al, Mg, etc.) is typically restricted by a natural passivation layer and the diffusion-limited kinetics between the oxidizer and the metal. In this work, we use polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) as the fluorine carrier and the shielding layer to construct a new type of nano-Al based fuels. The PTFE shell not only prevents nano-Al layers from oxidation, but also assists in enhancing the reaction kinetics, greatly improving the stability and reactivity of fuels. An in situ chemical vapor deposition combined with the electrical explosion of wires (EEW) method is used to fabricate core-shell nanostructures. Studies show that by controlling the stoichiometric ratio of the precursors, the morphology of the PTFE shell and the energy performance can be easily tuned. The resultant composites exhibit superior energy output characters than that of their physically mixed Al/PTFE counterparts. This synthetic strategy might provide a general approach to prepare other high-energy fuels (Mg, Si). PMID:26612396

  15. Mean kinetic energy transport and event classification in a model wind turbine array versus an array of porous disks: Energy budget and octant analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camp, Elizabeth H.; Cal, Raúl Bayoán

    2016-08-01

    An array of model rotating wind turbines is compared experimentally to an array of static porous disks in order to quantify the similarities and differences in the mean kinetic energy transport within the wakes produced in these two cases. Stereo particle image velocimetry measurements are done in a wind tunnel bracketing the center turbine in the fourth row of a 4 ×3 array of model turbines. Equivalent sets of rotors and porous disks are created by matching their respective induction factors. The primary difference in the mean velocity components is found in the spanwise mean velocity component, which is as much as 190% different between the rotor and disk case. Horizontal averages of mean kinetic energy transport terms in the region where rotation is most important show percent differences in the range 3%-41%, which decrease to 1%-6% at streamwise coordinates where rotation is less important. Octant analysis is performed on the most significant term related to vertical mean kinetic energy flux u'v' ¯U . The average percent difference between corresponding octants is as much as 68% different in the near wake and as much as 17% different in the far wake. Furthermore, octant analysis elucidates the three-dimensional nature of sweeps and ejections in the near wake of the rotor case. Together, these results imply that a stationary porous disk adequately represents the mean kinetic energy transport of a rotor in the far wake where rotation is less important, while significant discrepancies exist at streamwise locations where rotation is a key phenomenon. This comparison has implications in the use of an actuator disk to model the wind turbine rotor in computational simulations specifically for studies where Reynolds stresses, turbulence intensity, or interactions with the atmosphere are of interest.

  16. Nuclear Axial Currents in Chiral Effective Field Theory

    OpenAIRE

    Baroni, A.; Girlanda, L.; Pastore, S.; Schiavilla, R.; Viviani, M

    2015-01-01

    Two-nucleon axial charge and current operators are derived in chiral effective field theory up to one loop. The derivation is based on time-ordered perturbation theory, and accounts for cancellations between the contributions of irreducible diagrams and the contributions due to non-static corrections from energy denominators of reducible diagrams. Ultraviolet divergencies associated with the loop corrections are isolated in dimensional regularization. The resulting axial current is finite and...

  17. High order magnetic optics for high dynamic range proton radiography at a kinetic energy of 800 MeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjue, S. K. L.; Mariam, F. G.; Merrill, F. E.; Morris, C. L.; Saunders, A.

    2016-01-01

    Flash radiography with 800 MeV kinetic energy protons at Los Alamos National Laboratory is an important experimental tool for investigations of dynamic material behavior driven by high explosives or pulsed power. The extraction of quantitative information about density fields in a dynamic experiment from proton generated images requires a high fidelity model of the proton imaging process. It is shown that accurate calculations of the transmission through the magnetic lens system require terms beyond second order for protons far from the tune energy. The approach used integrates the correlated multiple Coulomb scattering distribution simultaneously over the collimator and the image plane. Comparison with a series of static calibration images demonstrates the model's accurate reproduction of both the transmission and blur over a wide range of tune energies in an inverse identity lens that consists of four quadrupole electromagnets.

  18. High order magnetic optics for high dynamic range proton radiography at a kinetic energy of 800 MeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sjue, S. K. L., E-mail: sjue@lanl.gov; Mariam, F. G.; Merrill, F. E.; Morris, C. L.; Saunders, A. [Physics Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

    2016-01-15

    Flash radiography with 800 MeV kinetic energy protons at Los Alamos National Laboratory is an important experimental tool for investigations of dynamic material behavior driven by high explosives or pulsed power. The extraction of quantitative information about density fields in a dynamic experiment from proton generated images requires a high fidelity model of the proton imaging process. It is shown that accurate calculations of the transmission through the magnetic lens system require terms beyond second order for protons far from the tune energy. The approach used integrates the correlated multiple Coulomb scattering distribution simultaneously over the collimator and the image plane. Comparison with a series of static calibration images demonstrates the model’s accurate reproduction of both the transmission and blur over a wide range of tune energies in an inverse identity lens that consists of four quadrupole electromagnets.

  19. Controlling drug delivery kinetics from mesoporous titania thin films by pore size and surface energy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karlsson J

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Johan Karlsson, Saba Atefyekta, Martin Andersson Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden Abstract: The osseointegration capacity of bone-anchoring implants can be improved by the use of drugs that are administrated by an inbuilt drug delivery system. However, to attain superior control of drug delivery and to have the ability to administer drugs of varying size, including proteins, further material development of drug carriers is needed. Mesoporous materials have shown great potential in drug delivery applications to provide and maintain a drug concentration within the therapeutic window for the desired period of time. Moreover, drug delivery from coatings consisting of mesoporous titania has shown to be promising to improve healing of bone-anchoring implants. Here we report on how the delivery of an osteoporosis drug, alendronate, can be controlled by altering pore size and surface energy of mesoporous titania thin films. The pore size was varied from 3.4 nm to 7.2 nm by the use of different structure-directing templates and addition of a swelling agent. The surface energy was also altered by grafting dimethylsilane to the pore walls. The drug uptake and release profiles were monitored in situ using quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D and it was shown that both pore size and surface energy had a profound effect on both the adsorption and release kinetics of alendronate. The QCM-D data provided evidence that the drug delivery from mesoporous titania films is controlled by a binding–diffusion mechanism. The yielded knowledge of release kinetics is crucial in order to improve the in vivo tissue response associated to therapeutic treatments. Keywords: mesoporous titania, controlled drug delivery, release kinetics, alendronate, QCM-D

  20. Segment-interaction in sprint start: Analysis of 3D angular velocity and kinetic energy in elite sprinters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slawinski, J; Bonnefoy, A; Ontanon, G; Leveque, J M; Miller, C; Riquet, A; Chèze, L; Dumas, R

    2010-05-28

    The aim of the present study was to measure during a sprint start the joint angular velocity and the kinetic energy of the different segments in elite sprinters. This was performed using a 3D kinematic analysis of the whole body. Eight elite sprinters (10.30+/-0.14s 100 m time), equipped with 63 passive reflective markers, realised four maximal 10 m sprints start on an indoor track. An opto-electronic Motion Analysis system consisting of 12 digital cameras (250 Hz) was used to collect the 3D marker trajectories. During the pushing phase on the blocks, the 3D angular velocity vector and its norm were calculated for each joint. The kinetic energy of 16 segments of the lower and upper limbs and of the total body was calculated. The 3D kinematic analysis of the whole body demonstrated that joints such as shoulders, thoracic or hips did not reach their maximal angular velocity with a movement of flexion-extension, but with a combination of flexion-extension, abduction-adduction and internal-external rotation. The maximal kinetic energy of the total body was reached before clearing block (respectively, 537+/-59.3 J vs. 514.9+/-66.0 J; p< or =0.01). These results suggested that a better synchronization between the upper and lower limbs could increase the efficiency of pushing phase on the blocks. Besides, to understand low interindividual variances in the sprint start performance in elite athletes, a 3D complete body kinematic analysis shall be used. PMID:20226465

  1. Thermogravimetric and Kinetic Analysis of Melon (Citrullus colocynthis L. Seed Husk Using the Distributed Activation Energy Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nyakuma Bemgba Bevan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This study seeks to characterize the thermochemical fuel properties of melon seed husk (MSH as a potential biomass feedstock for clean energy and power generation. It examined the ultimate analysis, proximate analysis, FTIR spectroscopy and thermal decomposition of MSH. Thermogravimetric (TG analysis was examined at 5, 10, 20 °C/min from 30-800 °C under nitrogen atmosphere. Subsequently, the Distributed Activation Energy Model (DAEM was applied to determine the activation energy, E, and frequency factor, A. The results revealed that thermal decomposition of MSH occurs in three (3 stages; drying (30-150 °C, devolatization (150-400 °C and char degradation (400-800 °C. Kinetic analysis revealed that the E values fluctuated from 145.44-300 kJ/mol (Average E = 193 kJ/mol while A ranged from 2.64 × 1010 to 9.18 × 1020 min-1 (Average E = 9.18 × 1019 min-1 highlighting the complexity of MSH pyrolysis. The fuel characterization and kinetics of MSH showed it is an environmentally friendly solid biofuel for future thermal biomass conversion.

  2. Thermogravimetric and Kinetic Analysis of Melon (Citrullus colocynthis L.) Seed Husk Using the Distributed Activation Energy Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyakuma, Bemgba Bevan

    2015-12-01

    This study seeks to characterize the thermochemical fuel properties of melon seed husk (MSH) as a potential biomass feedstock for clean energy and power generation. It examined the ultimate analysis, proximate analysis, FTIR spectroscopy and thermal decomposition of MSH. Thermogravimetric (TG) analysis was examined at 5, 10, 20 °C/min from 30-800 °C under nitrogen atmosphere. Subsequently, the Distributed Activation Energy Model (DAEM) was applied to determine the activation energy, E, and frequency factor, A. The results revealed that thermal decomposition of MSH occurs in three (3) stages; drying (30-150 °C), devolatization (150-400 °C) and char degradation (400-800 °C). Kinetic analysis revealed that the E values fluctuated from 145.44-300 kJ/mol (Average E = 193 kJ/mol) while A ranged from 2.64 × 1010 to 9.18 × 1020 min-1 (Average E = 9.18 × 1019 min-1) highlighting the complexity of MSH pyrolysis. The fuel characterization and kinetics of MSH showed it is an environmentally friendly solid biofuel for future thermal biomass conversion.

  3. Current-voltage and kinetic energy flux relations for relativistic field-aligned acceleration of auroral electrons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. W. H. Cowley

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Recent spectroscopic observations of Jupiter's "main oval" auroras indicate that the primary auroral electron beam is routinely accelerated to energies of ~100 keV, and sometimes to several hundred keV, thus approaching the relativistic regime. This suggests the need to re-examine the classic non-relativistic theory of auroral electron acceleration by field-aligned electric fields first derived by Knight (1973, and to extend it to cover relativistic situations. In this paper we examine this problem for the case in which the source population is an isotropic Maxwellian, as also assumed by Knight, and derive exact analytic expressions for the field-aligned current density (number flux and kinetic energy flux of the accelerated population, for arbitrary initial electron temperature, acceleration potential, and field strength beneath the acceleration region. We examine the limiting behaviours of these expressions, their regimes of validity, and their implications for auroral acceleration in planetary magnetospheres (and like astrophysical systems. In particular, we show that for relativistic accelerating potentials, the current density increases as the square of the minimum potential, rather than linearly as in the non-relativistic regime, while the kinetic energy flux then increases as the cube of the potential, rather than as the square.

  4. Kinetic energy of Throughfall in subtropical forests of SE China - effects of tree canopy structure, functional traits, and biodiversity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Geißler

    Full Text Available Throughfall kinetic energy (TKE plays an important role in soil erosion in forests. We studied TKE as a function of biodiversity, functional diversity as well as structural stand variables in a secondary subtropical broad-leaved forest in the Gutianshan National Nature Reserve (GNNR in south-east China, a biodiversity hotspot in the northern hemisphere with more than 250 woody species present. Using a mixed model approach we could identify significant effects of all these variables on TKE: TKE increased with rarefied tree species richness and decreased with increasing proportion of needle-leaved species and increasing leaf area index (LAI. Furthermore, for average rainfall amounts TKE was decreasing with tree canopy height whereas for high rainfall amounts this was not the case. The spatial pattern of throughfall was stable across several rain events. The temporal variation of TKE decreased with rainfall intensity and increased with tree diversity. Our results show that more diverse forest stands over the season have to cope with higher cumulative raindrop energy than less diverse stands. However, the kinetic energy (KE of one single raindrop is less predictable in diverse stands since the variability in KE is higher. This paper is the first to contribute to the understanding of the ecosystem function of soil erosion prevention in diverse subtropical forests.

  5. Ag diffusion in SiC high-energy grain boundaries: kinetic Monte Carlo study with first-principle calculations

    CERN Document Server

    Ko, Hyunseok; Szlufarska, Izabela; Morgan, Dane

    2016-01-01

    The diffusion of silver (Ag) impurities in high energy grain boundaries (HEGBs) of cubic (3C) silicon carbide (SiC) is studied using an ab initio based kinetic Monte Carlo (kMC) model. This study assesses the hypothesis that the HEGB diffusion is responsible for Ag release in Tristructural-Isotropic fuel particles, and provides a specific example to increase understanding of impurity diffusion in highly disordered grain boundaries. The HEGB environment was modeled by an amorphous SiC. The structure and stability of Ag defects were calculated using density functional theory code. The defect energetics suggested that the fastest diffusion takes place via an interstitial mechanism in a-SiC. The formation energy of Ag interstitials and the kinetic resolved activation energies between them were well approximated with Gaussian distributions that were then sampled in the kMC. The diffusion of Ag was simulated with the effective medium model using kMC. At 1200-1600C, Ag in a HEGB is predicted to exhibit an Arrhenius ...

  6. Frequency Activated Fast Power Reserve for Wind Power Plant Delivered from Stored Kinetic Energy in the Wind Turbine Inertia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knüppel, Thyge; Thuring, P.; Kumar, S;

    2011-01-01

    is proposed that delivers a short-term power reserve from the kinetic energy in the wind turbine (WT) inertia, while considering the inherent characteristics of a wind power plant. The aim is to contribute with a fast power reserve to stabilize the frequency drop during large and sudden production deficits...... until primary and secondary frequency reserves respond to restore the nominal frequency. A programmable reserve contribution in terms of amount and duration is proposed to be able to coordinate with other sources of frequency reserve. Simulation results are shown for different WT operating points...

  7. Evidence of two-length-scale kinetics of R-phase transformation by high-energy X-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The cubic-to-rhombohedral (C-R) phase transition in an AuCd shape memory alloy was investigated by in situ high-energy X-ray diffraction. We present the first direct experimental evidence of two-length-scale phase transition kinetics in this alloy system. It was further found that aging in the R-phase leads to two-way memory 'loss', characterized by the reselection of new variants. We attributed this two-way memory 'loss' to the internal stresses caused by the defects formed in the off-equilibrium state of the studied AuCd system.

  8. Improved energy kinetics following high protein diet in McArdle's syndrome. A 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, K E; Jakobsen, J; Thomsen, C;

    1990-01-01

    A patient with McArdle's syndrome was examined using bicycle ergometry and 31P NMR spectroscopy during exercise. The patients working capacity was approximately half the expected capacity of controls. Muscle energy kinetics improved significantly during intravenous glucose infusion and after 6...... weeks of high protein diet. During intravenous infusion of amino acids, no changes in working capacity could be detected. No decrease was seen in intracellular muscle pH during aerobic exercise. A significant decrease in muscle pH during aerobic exercise was detected in all controls....

  9. Light Weakly Coupled Axial Forces: Models, Constraints, and Projections

    CERN Document Server

    Kahn, Yonatan; Mishra-Sharma, Siddharth; Tait, Tim M P

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the landscape of constraints on MeV-GeV scale, hidden U(1) forces with nonzero axial-vector couplings to Standard Model fermions. While the purely vector-coupled dark photon, which may arise from kinetic mixing, is a well-motivated scenario, several MeV-scale anomalies motivate a theory with axial couplings which can be UV-completed consistent with Standard Model gauge invariance. Moreover, existing constraints on dark photons depend on products of various combinations of axial and vector couplings, making it difficult to isolate the effects of axial couplings for particular flavors of SM fermions. We present a representative renormalizable, UV-complete model of a dark photon with adjustable axial and vector couplings, discuss its general features, and show how some UV constraints may be relaxed in a model with nonrenormalizable Yukawa couplings at the expense of fine-tuning. We survey the existing parameter space and the projected reach of planned experiments, briefly commenting on the relevan...

  10. Observational Constraints on Purely Kinetic/c-Essence Dark Energy Models

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Rong-Jia; GAO Xiang-Ting

    2009-01-01

    We consider constraints on purely kinetic k-essence models from the latest observational data (including 182 gold SNIa data,the shift parameter,and the acoustic scale).We find the best-fit values of the parameters are Ωm = 0.37 ±0.01 and κo = 0.064 ± 0.013 at 68.3% confidence level.The phase transition from deceleration to acceleration is found to occur at redshift zq=0~0.48-0.52 in 68.3% confidence level limits.By applying modelcomparison statistics (F-test,AICc,and BIC),we find that the purely kinetic k-essence scenario is favored over the A CDM model by the combined data.These results are also confirmed by combined data 307 SNIa + R + la.

  11. Bond energies in polyunsaturated acids and kinetics of co-oxidation of protiated and deuterated acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrianova, Z. S.; Breslavskaya, N. N.; Pliss, E. M.; Buchachenko, A. L.

    2016-10-01

    A computational program specially designed to analyze co-oxidation of substances in mixtures is suggested. The rigorous kinetic scheme of 32 reactions describing co-oxidation of isotope differing polyunsaturated fatty acids was computed to enlighten experimentally detected enormously large H/D isotope effects. The latter were shown to depend on the kinetic chain length and exhibit two extreme regimes of short and long chains which characterize isotope effects on the initiation and propagation chain reactions of hydrogen (deuterium) atom abstraction. No protective effect of deuterated polyunsaturated acids on the oxidation of protiated acids was detected. Protective effect of the deuterated compounds on the biologically important processes seems to be induced by the low yield of products formed in the chain termination reactions due to the low rate of initiation by deuterated compounds.

  12. Definition of the local fields of velocity, temperature and turbulent characteristics for axial stabilized fluid in arbitrary formed rod bundle assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the temperature fields in rod clads of experimental assemblies a good agreement have been got with use of prior calculations by subchannel code COBRA-IV-I, from results of which an additional information about δt/δX3 distribution was taken. The method of definition the local fields of velocity, turbulent kinetic energy, temperature and eddy diffusivities for one-phase axial stabilized fluids in arbitrary formed rod bundle assemblies with invariable upward geometry was developed. According to this model the AGURA code was worked out to calculate local thermal hydraulic problems in combination with temperature fields in fuel rods and constructive elements of fuel assemblies. The method does not use any prior geometric scales and is based only on invariant local flow parameters: turbulent kinetic energy, velocity field deformation tensor and specific work of inner friction. Verification of this method by available experimental data showed a good agreement of calculation data and findings of velocity and t.k.e. fields, when the secondary flows have not a substantial influence to a balance of axial momentum and turbulent kinetic energy. (author)

  13. CFD Simulation and Optimization of Very Low Head Axial Flow Turbine Runner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yohannis Mitiku Tobo

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this work is Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD modelling, simulation and optimization of very low head axial flow turbine runner  to be used to drive  a centrifugal pump of turbine-driven pump. The ultimate goal of the optimization is to produce a power of 1kW at head less than 1m from flowing  river to drive centrifugal pump using mechanical coupling (speed multiplier gear directly. Flow rate, blade numbers, turbine rotational speed, inlet angle are parameters used in CFD modeling,  simulation and design optimization of the turbine runner. The computed results show that power developed by a turbine runner increases with increasing flow rate. Pressure inside the turbine runner increases with flow rate but, runner efficiency increases for some flow rate and almost constant thereafter. Efficiency and power developed by a runner drops quickly if turbine speed increases due to higher pressure losses and conversion of pressure energy to kinetic energy inside the runner. Increasing blade number increases power developed but, efficiency does not increase always. Efficiency increases for some blade number and drops down due to the fact that  change in direction of the relative flow vector at the runner exit, which decreases the net rotational momentum and increases the axial flow velocity.

  14. A study on the kinetics of high-energy phosphates in myocardium by phosphorous nuclear magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Effect of artificial blood, FC 43 (Perfluorochemicals) on the kinetics of high-energy phosphate in the myocardium was evaluated by 31P-NMR which permits a continuous and non-invasive assessment of in vivo phosphorus compounds. Cardiac perfusion was carried out on a excised rat heart with a Krebs-Henseleit modified solution and FC 43 alternately. Under the normal condition, ischemic condition, and at second perfusion amounts of intramyocardial creatine phosphoric acid, ATP, and inorganic phosphorus were determined by 31P-NMR. Coronary flow was simultaneously estimated. The ischemic state due to interruption of perfusion resulted in a decrease in creatine phosphoric acid, which was associated with an increase in inorganic phosphorus and intracellular acidosis. No change of ATP amount was observed under ischemic state. With resumption of perfusion, the levels of creatine phosphoric acid and inorganic phosphorus rapidly returned to the normal. In the group of FC 43, coronary flow was 2.68 ml/min/g of the heart weight, about 1/2 of that of the Krebs-Henseleit group (5.68 ml/min/g of the heart weight). In controls, there was no difference between the two groups concerning creatine phosphoric acid level and recovery of creatine phospohric acid level after ischemia. These results showed that FC 43 supplies sufficient oxygen, and has no effect on the kinetics of energy in the myocardium. (Ueda, J.)

  15. Fundamentally excited flow past a surface-mounted rib. Part II: Kinetic energy budget details

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P K Panigrahi

    2001-10-01

    This paper presents the detailed turbulent kinetic energy budget and higher order statistics of flow behind a surface-mounted rib with and without superimposed acoustic excitation. Pattern recognition technique is used to determine the large-scale structure magnitude. It is observed that most of the turbulence contributions after the reattachment region are from the large-scale structures contrary to the belief that mostly random turbulent structures are present after reattachment. The dissipation is not a small-scale phenomena only. It may result due to the interaction between large-scale structures. From the results of higher order moments, the outer edge of the shear layer is observed to be non-Gaussian in nature with significant deviation from the Gaussian skewness and flatness value. The kinetic energy budget results show positive intermodal production in the outer edge of the shear layer indicating the presence of back scattering. The non-Gaussian velocity distribution, ejection motions and back-scattering present in the outer shear layer may be conjectured to be correlated with each other.

  16. Three-dimensional parameterizations of the synoptic scale kinetic energy and momentum flux in the Earth's atmosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Coumou

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available We present a new set of statistical-dynamical equations (SDEs which can accurately reproduce the three-dimensional atmospheric fields of synoptic scale kinetic energy and momentum flux. The set of equations is closed by finding proper parameterizations for the vertical macro-turbulent diffusion coefficient and ageostrophic terms. The equations have been implemented in a new SD atmosphere model, named Aeolus. We show that the synoptic scale kinetic energy and momentum fluxes generated by the model are in good agreement with empirical data, which were derived from bandpass-filtered ERA-40 data. In addition to present-day climate, the model is tested for substantially colder (last glacial maximum and warmer (2×CO2 climates, and shown to be in agreement with general circulation model (GCM results. With the derived equations, one can efficiently study the position and strength of storm tracks under different climate scenarios with calculation time a fraction of those of GCMs. This work prepares ground for the development of a new generation of fast Earth System Models of Intermediate Complexity which are able to perform multi-millennia simulations in a reasonable time frame while appropriately accounting for the climatic effect of storm tracks.

  17. The effect of vortex merging and non-merging on the transfer of modal turbulent kinetic energy content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ground, Cody; Vergine, Fabrizio; Maddalena, Luca

    2016-08-01

    A defining feature of the turbulent free shear layer is that its growth is hindered by compressibility effects, thus limiting its potential to sufficiently mix the injected fuel and surrounding airstream at the supersonic Mach numbers intrinsic to the combustor of air-breathing hypersonic vehicles. The introduction of streamwise vorticity is often proposed in an attempt to counteract these undesired effects. This fact makes the strategy of introducing multiple streamwise vortices and imposing upon them certain modes of mutual interaction in order to potentially enhance mixing an intriguing concept. However, many underlying fundamental characteristics of the flowfields in the presence such interactions are not yet well understood; therefore, the fundamental physics of these flowfields should be independently investigated before the explicit mixing performance is characterized. In this work, experimental measurements are taken with the stereoscopic particle image velocimetry technique on two specifically targeted modes of vortex interaction—the merging and non-merging of two corotating vortices. The fluctuating velocity fields are analyzed utilizing the proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) in order to identify the content, organization, and distribution of the modal turbulent kinetic energy content of the fluctuating velocity eigenmodes. The effects of the two modes of vortex interaction are revealed by the POD analysis which shows distinct differences in the modal features of the two cases. When comparing the low-order eigenmodes of the two cases, the size of the structures contained within the first ten modes is seen to increase as the flow progresses downstream for the merging case, whereas the opposite is true for the non-merging case. Additionally, the relative modal energy contribution of the first ten eigenmodes increases as the vortices evolve downstream for the merging case, whereas in the non-merging case the relative modal energy contribution decreases

  18. 质点动能定理的推导及应用%Derivation and application of the kinetic energy theorem of particle

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘雪梅; 张金锋

    2013-01-01

    The kinetic energy theorem of particle is derived by the equation of particle motion and Newton's second law.The two specific examples are solved by using the kinetic energy theorem of particle,Newton's second law and work-energy theorem,which reflects the application of the kinetic energy theorem of particle is more easy and more convenient.%利用牛顿第二定律及质点运动方程推导出质点动能定理形式,对两个具体实例分别运用质点动能定理、牛顿定律、功能原理进行求解,从而体现应用质点动能定律计算更加简单、方便。

  19. Interplay of waves and eddies in rotating stratified turbulence and the link with kinetic-potential energy partition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marino, Raffaele; Rosenberg, Duane; Herbert, Corentin; Pouquet, Annick

    2015-11-01

    The interplay between waves and eddies in stably stratified rotating flows is investigated by means of world-class direct numerical simulations using up to 30723 grid points. Strikingly, we find that the shift from vortex- to wave-dominated dynamics occurs at a wave number k R which does not depend on the Reynolds number, suggesting that the partition of energy between wave and vortical modes is not sensitive to the development of turbulence at the smaller scales. We also show that k R is comparable to the wave number at which exchanges between kinetic and potential modes stabilize at close to equipartition, emphasizing the role of potential energy, as conjectured in the atmosphere and the oceans. Moreover, k R varies as the inverse of the Froude number as explained by the scaling prediction proposed, consistently with recent observations and modeling of the Mesosphere-Lower Thermosphere and of the ocean.

  20. Interplay of waves and eddies in rotating stratified turbulence and the link with kinetic-potential energy partition

    CERN Document Server

    Marino, Raffaele; Herbert, Corentin; Pouquet, Annick

    2015-01-01

    The interplay between waves and eddies in stably stratified rotating flows is investigated by means of world-class direct numerical simulations using up to $3072^3$ grid points. Strikingly, we find that the shift from vortex to wave dominated dynamics occurs at a wavenumber $k_R$ which does not depend on Reynolds number, suggesting that partition of energy between wave and vortical modes is not sensitive to the development of turbulence at the smaller scales. We also show that $k_R$ is comparable to the wavenumber at which exchanges between kinetic and potential modes stabilize at close to equipartition, emphasizing the role of potential energy, as conjectured in the atmosphere and the oceans. Moreover, $k_R$ varies as the inverse of the Froude number as explained by the scaling prediction proposed, consistent with recent observations and modeling of the Mesosphere-Lower Thermosphere and of the ocean.

  1. Dynamic dual-energy chest radiography: a potential tool for lung tissue motion monitoring and kinetic study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Tong; Ducote, Justin L.; Wong, Jerry T.; Molloi, Sabee

    2011-02-01

    Dual-energy chest radiography has the potential to provide better diagnosis of lung disease by removing the bone signal from the image. Dynamic dual-energy radiography is now possible with the introduction of digital flat-panel detectors. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the feasibility of using dynamic dual-energy chest radiography for functional lung imaging and tumor motion assessment. The dual-energy system used in this study can acquire up to 15 frames of dual-energy images per second. A swine animal model was mechanically ventilated and imaged using the dual-energy system. Sequences of soft-tissue images were obtained using dual-energy subtraction. Time subtracted soft-tissue images were shown to be able to provide information on regional ventilation. Motion tracking of a lung anatomic feature (a branch of pulmonary artery) was performed based on an image cross-correlation algorithm. The tracking precision was found to be better than 1 mm. An adaptive correlation model was established between the above tracked motion and an external surrogate signal (temperature within the tracheal tube). This model is used to predict lung feature motion using the continuous surrogate signal and low frame rate dual-energy images (0.1-3.0 frames per second). The average RMS error of the prediction was (1.1 ± 0.3) mm. The dynamic dual energy was shown to be potentially useful for lung functional imaging such as regional ventilation and kinetic studies. It can also be used for lung tumor motion assessment and prediction during radiation therapy.

  2. Dynamic dual-energy chest radiography: a potential tool for lung tissue motion monitoring and kinetic study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dual-energy chest radiography has the potential to provide better diagnosis of lung disease by removing the bone signal from the image. Dynamic dual-energy radiography is now possible with the introduction of digital flat-panel detectors. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the feasibility of using dynamic dual-energy chest radiography for functional lung imaging and tumor motion assessment. The dual-energy system used in this study can acquire up to 15 frames of dual-energy images per second. A swine animal model was mechanically ventilated and imaged using the dual-energy system. Sequences of soft-tissue images were obtained using dual-energy subtraction. Time subtracted soft-tissue images were shown to be able to provide information on regional ventilation. Motion tracking of a lung anatomic feature (a branch of pulmonary artery) was performed based on an image cross-correlation algorithm. The tracking precision was found to be better than 1 mm. An adaptive correlation model was established between the above tracked motion and an external surrogate signal (temperature within the tracheal tube). This model is used to predict lung feature motion using the continuous surrogate signal and low frame rate dual-energy images (0.1-3.0 frames per second). The average RMS error of the prediction was (1.1 ± 0.3) mm. The dynamic dual energy was shown to be potentially useful for lung functional imaging such as regional ventilation and kinetic studies. It can also be used for lung tumor motion assessment and prediction during radiation therapy.

  3. Dynamic dual-energy chest radiography: a potential tool for lung tissue motion monitoring and kinetic study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu Tong [Department of Physics, Carleton University, 1125 Colonel By Drive, Ottawa, ON, K1S5B6 (Canada); Ducote, Justin L; Wong, Jerry T; Molloi, Sabee, E-mail: txu@physics.carleton.ca [Department of Radiological Sciences, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States)

    2011-02-21

    Dual-energy chest radiography has the potential to provide better diagnosis of lung disease by removing the bone signal from the image. Dynamic dual-energy radiography is now possible with the introduction of digital flat-panel detectors. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the feasibility of using dynamic dual-energy chest radiography for functional lung imaging and tumor motion assessment. The dual-energy system used in this study can acquire up to 15 frames of dual-energy images per second. A swine animal model was mechanically ventilated and imaged using the dual-energy system. Sequences of soft-tissue images were obtained using dual-energy subtraction. Time subtracted soft-tissue images were shown to be able to provide information on regional ventilation. Motion tracking of a lung anatomic feature (a branch of pulmonary artery) was performed based on an image cross-correlation algorithm. The tracking precision was found to be better than 1 mm. An adaptive correlation model was established between the above tracked motion and an external surrogate signal (temperature within the tracheal tube). This model is used to predict lung feature motion using the continuous surrogate signal and low frame rate dual-energy images (0.1-3.0 frames per second). The average RMS error of the prediction was (1.1 {+-} 0.3) mm. The dynamic dual energy was shown to be potentially useful for lung functional imaging such as regional ventilation and kinetic studies. It can also be used for lung tumor motion assessment and prediction during radiation therapy.

  4. Pyrolysis Characteristics and Kinetics of Phoenix Tree Residues as a Potential Energy

    OpenAIRE

    Li, H.; X.-H. Li; L. Liu; K.-Q. Li; X.-H. Wang

    2015-01-01

    By using a thermogravimetric analyser under argon atmosphere, the pyrolysis process and the kinetic model of phoenix tree residues (the little stem, middle stem, and leaf) at a 30 °C min−1 heating rate and the phoenix tree mix at three different heating rates (10 °C min−1, 30 °C min−1, and 50 °C min−1) were examined. The catalyst and the co-pyrolysis samples were at a 30 °C min−1 heating rate. The catalysts were Na2CO3, ZnCl2 and CaO in a mass fraction of 5 %. The experimental results reveale...

  5. Simulation of an Axial Vircator

    CERN Document Server

    Tikhomirov, V V

    2013-01-01

    An algorithm of particle-in-cell simulations is described and tested to aid further the actual design of simple vircators working on axially symmetric modes. The methods of correction of the numerical solution, have been chosen and jointly tested, allow the stable simulation of the fast nonlinear multiflow dynamics of virtual cathode formation and evolution, as well as the fields generated by the virtual cathode. The selected combination of the correction methods can be straightforwardly generalized to the case of axially nonsymmetric modes, while the parameters of these correction methods can be widely used to improve an agreement between the simulation predictions and the experimental data.

  6. Dynamic Response of Axially Loaded Euler-Bernoulli Beams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bayat, M.; Barari, Amin; Shahidi, M.

    2011-01-01

    The current research deals with application of a new analytical technique called Energy Balance Method (EBM) for a nonlinear problem. Energy Balance Method is used to obtain the analytical solution for nonlinear vibration behavior of Euler-Bernoulli beams subjected to axial loads. Analytical...

  7. Use of latent heat storage to conserve energy during drying and its effect on drying kinetics of a food product

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devahastin, Sakamon; Pitaksuriyarat, Saovakhon [Department of Food Engineering, King Mongkut' s University of Technology Thonburi, 91 Pracha u-tid Road, Bangkok 10140 (Thailand)

    2006-10-15

    The present study aimed at investigating the feasibility of using a latent heat storage (LHS) with paraffin wax as a phase change material (PCM) to store excess solar energy and release it when the energy availability is inadequate or not available. First, attention was given on the heat transfer characteristics of the PCM during the charge and discharge periods of the LHS. The effects of inlet hot air temperature in the range of 70-90{sup o}C and inlet air velocities of 1 and 2ms{sup -1} on the charge time were determined, while during the discharge period only the effect of inlet ambient air velocity was considered. The effect of the use of LHS on the drying kinetics of sweet potato and the ability of the LHS to conserve energy during drying of sweet potato were also determined. It was found that the drying rate of sweet potato increased with a decrease of the inlet ambient air velocity. The amount of the energy extractable from the LHS was 1920 and 1386kJminkg{sup -1} and the energy savings was 40% and 34% when using an inlet ambient air velocity of 1 and 2ms{sup -1}, respectively. (author)

  8. Axial electron-channelling analysis of perovskite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The orientation dependence of characteristic X-ray emission (the Borrmann effect) under near-zone-axis diffraction conditions has been used to identify the site preferences of strontium, zirconium and uranium impurities within a CaTiO3 (perovskite) host structure. As characteristic emission lines from these impurities occur at both higher and lower energies than the calcium or titanium K-shell excitations, effects of delocalization are clearly measureable, and are used as a tool in axial electron channeling or ALCHEMI analysis. It is found that strontium and uranium strongly partition into calcium sites, whereas zirconium occupies titanium sites. (author)

  9. PFI-ZEKE (Pulsed Field Ionization-Zero Electron Kinetic Energy) para el estudio de iones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castaño, F.; Fernández, J. A.; Basterretxea, A. Longarte. F.; Sánchez Rayo, M. N.; Martínez, R.

    Entre las áreas hacia donde ha evolucionado la Química en los últimos años están los estudios de sistemas con especies reactivas de alta energía y los dominados por fuerzas intermoleculares débiles, con energías de unas pocas kcal/mol. En efecto, el estudio de las propiedades de los iones, comenzando por su relación con la molécula neutra de la que procede, la energía de ionización, los estados vibracionales y rotacionales, energías de enlace de Van der Waals entre el ión y una amplia variedad de otras moléculas, sus confórmeros o isómeros y sus reacciones o semi-reacciones químicas están en la raíz de la necesidad de la espectroscopía conocida como PFI-ZEKE, Pulsed Field Ionization-Zero Electron Kinetic Energy. Entre las aplicaciones que requieren estos conocimientos se encuentran la generación de plasmas para la fabricación de semiconductores, memorias magnéticas, etc, así como los sistemas astrofísicos, la ionosfera terrestre, etc. La espectroscopía ZEKE es una evolución de las de fluorescencia inducida por láser, LIF, ionización multifotónica acrecentada por resonancia, REMPI, con uno y dos colores y acoplada a un sistema de tiempo de vuelo, REMPI-TOF-MS, y las espectroscopías de doble resonancia IR-UV y UV-UV. Sus espectros y la ayuda de cálculos ab inicio permite determinar las energías de enlace de complejos de van der Waals en estados fundamental y excitados, identificar confórmeros e isómeros, obtener energías de ionización experimentales aproximadas (100 cm-1) y otras variables de interés. Al igual que con LIF, REMPI y dobles resonancias, es posible utilizar muestras gaseosas, pero los espectros están muy saturados de bandas y su interpretación es difícil o imposible. Se evitan estas dificultades estudiando las moléculas o complejos en expansiones supersónicas, donde la T de los grados de libertad solo alcanzan unos pocos K. Para realizar experimentos de ZEKE hay que utilizar una propiedad recientemente

  10. Altered Right Ventricular Kinetic Energy Work Density and Viscous Energy Dissipation in Patients with Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension: A Pilot Study Using 4D Flow MRI.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Q Joyce Han

    Full Text Available Right ventricular (RV function has increasingly being recognized as an important predictor for morbidity and mortality in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH. The increased RV after-load increase RV work in PAH. We used time-resolved 3D phase contrast MRI (4D flow MRI to derive RV kinetic energy (KE work density and energy loss in the pulmonary artery (PA to better characterize RV work in PAH patients.4D flow and standard cardiac cine images were obtained in ten functional class I/II patients with PAH and nine healthy subjects. For each individual, we calculated the RV KE work density and the amount of viscous dissipation in the PA.PAH patients had alterations in flow patterns in both the RV and the PA compared to healthy subjects. PAH subjects had significantly higher RV KE work density than healthy subjects (94.7±33.7 mJ/mL vs. 61.7±14.8 mJ/mL, p = 0.007 as well as a much greater percent PA energy loss (21.1±6.4% vs. 2.2±1.3%, p = 0.0001 throughout the cardiac cycle. RV KE work density and percent PA energy loss had mild and moderate correlations with RV ejection fraction.This study has quantified two kinetic energy metrics to assess RV function using 4D flow. RV KE work density and PA viscous energy loss not only distinguished healthy subjects from patients, but also provided distinction amongst PAH patients. These metrics hold promise as imaging markers for RV function.

  11. Computer axial tomography in geosciences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Computer Axial Tomography (CAT) is one of the most adequate non-invasive techniques for the investigation of the internal structure of a large category of objects. Initially designed for medical investigations, this technique, based on the attenuation of X- or gamma-ray (and in some cases neutrons), generates digital images which map the numerical values of the linear attenuation coefficient of a section or of the entire volume of the investigated sample. Shortly after its application in medicine, CAT has been successfully used in archaeology, life sciences, and geosciences as well as for the industrial materials non-destructive testing. Depending on the energy of the utilized radiation as well as on the effective atomic number of the sample, CAT can provide with a spatial resolution of 0.01 - 0.5 mm, quantitative as well as qualitative information concerning local density, porosity or chemical composition of the sample. At present two types of axial Computer Tomographs (CT) are in use. One category, consisting of medical as well as industrial CT is equipped with X-ray tubes while the other uses isotopic gamma-ray sources. CT provided with intense X-ray sources (equivalent to 12-15 kCi or 450-550 TBq) has the advantage of an extremely short running time (a few seconds and even less) but presents some disadvantages known as beam hardening and absorption edge effects. These effects, intrinsically related to the polychromatic nature of the X-rays generated by classical tubes, need special mathematical or physical corrections. A polychromatic X-ray beam can be made almost monochromatic by means of crystal diffraction or by using adequate multicomponent filters, but these devices are costly and considerably diminish the output of X-ray generators. In the case of CT of the second type, monochromatic gamma-rays generated by radioisotopic sources, such as 169 Yb (50.4 keV), 241 Am (59 keV), 192 Ir (310.5 and 469.1 keV ) or 137 Cs (662.7 keV), are used in combination with

  12. A concept for energy harvesting from quasi-static structural deformations through axially loaded bilaterally constrained columns with multiple bifurcation points

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lajnef, N.; Burgueño, R.; Borchani, W.; Sun, Y.

    2014-05-01

    A major obstacle limiting the development of deployable sensing and actuation solutions is the scarcity of power. Converted energy from ambient loading using piezoelectric scavengers is a possible solution. Most of the previously developed research focused on vibration-based piezoelectric harvesters which are typically characterized by a response with a narrow natural frequency range. Several techniques were used to improve their effectiveness. These methods focus only on the transducer’s properties and configurations, but do little to improve the stimuli from the source. In contrast, this work proposes to focus on the input deformations generated within the structure, and the induction of an amplified amplitude and up-converted frequency toward the harvesters’ natural spectrum. This paper introduces the concept of using mechanically-equivalent energy converters and frequency modulators that can transform low-amplitude and low-rate service deformations into an amplified vibration input to the piezoelectric transducer. The introduced concept allows energy conversion within the unexplored quasi-static frequency range (≪1 Hz). The post-buckling behavior of bilaterally constrained columns is used as the mechanism for frequency up-conversion. A bimorph cantilever polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) piezoelectric beam is used for energy conversion. Experimental prototypes were built and tested to validate the introduced concept and the levels of extractable power were evaluated for different cases under varying input frequencies. Finally, finite element simulations are reported to provide insight into the scalability and performance of the developed concept.

  13. Enhanced betatron X-rays from axially modulated plasma wakefields

    CERN Document Server

    Palastro, J P; Gordon, D

    2015-01-01

    In the cavitation regime of plasma-based accelerators, a population of high-energy electrons tailing the driver can undergo betatron motion. The motion results in X-ray emission, but the brilliance and photon energy are limited by the electrons' initial transverse coordinate. To overcome this, we exploit parametrically unstable betatron motion in a cavitated, axially modulated plasma. Theory and simulations are presented showing that the unstable oscillations increase both the total X-ray energy and average photon energy.

  14. Statistical properties of kinetic and total energy densities in reverberant spaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Finn; Molares, Alfonso Rodriguez

    2010-01-01

    Many acoustical measurements, e.g., measurement of sound power and transmission loss, rely on determining the total sound energy in a reverberation room. The total energy is usually approximated by measuring the mean-square pressure (i.e., the potential energy density) at a number of discrete...... modal overlap, and this analysis has never been published. Moreover, until fairly recently, measurement of the total sound energy density required an elaborate experimental arrangement based on finite-difference approximations using at least four amplitude and phase matched pressure microphones...

  15. Pressure and surface tension of an active simple liquid: a comparison between kinetic, mechanical and free-energy based approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marini Bettolo Marconi, Umberto; Maggi, Claudio; Melchionna, Simone

    2016-06-29

    We discuss different definitions of pressure for a system of active spherical particles driven by a non-thermal coloured noise. We show that mechanical, kinetic and free-energy based approaches lead to the same result up to first order in the non-equilibrium expansion parameter. The first prescription is based on a generalisation of the kinetic mesoscopic virial equation and expresses the pressure exerted on the walls in terms of the average of the virial of the inter-particle forces. In the second approach, the pressure and the surface tension are identified with the volume and area derivatives, respectively, of the partition function associated with the known stationary non-equilibrium distribution of the model. The third method is a mechanical approach and is related to the work necessary to deform the system. The pressure is obtained by comparing the expression of the work in terms of local stress and strain with the corresponding expression in terms of microscopic distribution. This is determined from the force balance encoded in the Born-Green-Yvon equation. Such a method has the advantage of giving a formula for the local pressure tensor and the surface tension even in inhomogeneous situations. By direct inspection, we show that the three procedures lead to the same values of the pressure, and give support to the idea that the partition function, obtained via the unified coloured noise approximation, is more than a formal property of the system, but determines the stationary non-equilibrium thermodynamics of the model.

  16. A comparison of power output from linear and nonlinear kinetic energy harvesters using real vibration data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beeby, Stephen P.; Wang, Leran; Zhu, Dibin; Weddell, Alex S.; Merrett, Geoff V.; Stark, Bernard; Szarka, Gyorgy; Al-Hashimi, Bashir M.

    2013-07-01

    The design of vibration energy harvesters (VEHs) is highly dependent upon the characteristics of the environmental vibrations present in the intended application. VEHs can be linear resonant systems tuned to particular frequencies or nonlinear systems with either bistable operation or a Duffing-type response. This paper provides detailed vibration data from a range of applications, which has been made freely available for download through the Energy Harvesting Network’s online data repository. In particular, this research shows that simulation is essential in designing and selecting the most suitable vibration energy harvester for particular applications. This is illustrated through C-based simulations of different types of VEHs, using real vibration data from a diesel ferry engine, a combined heat and power pump, a petrol car engine and a helicopter. The analysis shows that a bistable energy harvester only has a higher output power than a linear or Duffing-type nonlinear energy harvester with the same Q-factor when it is subjected to white noise vibration. The analysis also indicates that piezoelectric transduction mechanisms are more suitable for bistable energy harvesters than electromagnetic transduction. Furthermore, the linear energy harvester has a higher output power compared to the Duffing-type nonlinear energy harvester with the same Q factor in most cases. The Duffing-type nonlinear energy harvester can generate more power than the linear energy harvester only when it is excited at vibrations with multiple peaks and the frequencies of these peaks are within its bandwidth. Through these new observations, this paper illustrates the importance of simulation in the design of energy harvesting systems, with particular emphasis on the need to incorporate real vibration data.

  17. Cars and Kinetic Energy--Some Simple Physics with Real-World Relevance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parthasarathy, Raghuveer

    2012-01-01

    Understanding energy usage is crucial to understanding modern civilization, as well as many of the challenges it faces. Energy-related issues also offer real-world examples of important physical concepts, and as such have been the focus of several articles in "The Physics Teacher" in the past few decades (e.g., Refs. 1-5, noted further below).…

  18. Kinetic energy release in CO fragmentation by electron loss and capture collisions of fast B''2''+ ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ionization and fragmentation of CO molecules have been investigated in charge-changing collisions of B''2''+ ions at v = 1.69 a.u.. Fragment ions from CO were measured by using a momentum 3D imaging technique in coincidence with outgoing projectile charge states. We deduced the kinetic energy release (KER) associated with charge-changing collisions of B''2''+ to B''3''+, B''1''+ and B''0''+. The KER spectra in the fragmentation to C''+ and O''+ ions are found to be different to some extent for these loss and capture collisions. It is concluded that the electron loss collision populates the intact CO molecule to highly excited states of (CO)''2''+''1 more effectively than electron capture collisions, resulting from different effective impact parameters associated with loss and capture collisions.

  19. Energy and momentum preserving Coulomb collision model for kinetic Monte Carlo simulations of plasma steady states in toroidal fusion devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runov, A. M.; Kasilov, S. V.; Helander, P.

    2015-11-01

    A kinetic Monte Carlo model suited for self-consistent transport studies is proposed and tested. The Monte Carlo collision operator is based on a widely used model of Coulomb scattering by a drifting Maxwellian and a new algorithm enforcing the momentum and energy conservation laws. The difference to other approaches consists in a specific procedure of calculating the background Maxwellian parameters, which does not require ensemble averaging and, therefore, allows for the use of single-particle algorithms. This possibility is useful in transport balance (steady state) problems with a phenomenological diffusive ansatz for the turbulent transport, because it allows a direct use of variance reduction methods well suited for single particle algorithms. In addition, a method for the self-consistent calculation of the electric field is discussed. Results of testing of the new collision operator using a set of 1D examples, and preliminary results of 2D modelling in realistic tokamak geometry, are presented.

  20. Real-time assessment of power system transient stability using rate of change of kinetic energy method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Taee, M.A. [Amman University (Jordan). Electrical Engineering Dept.; Al-Azzawi, F.J.; Al-Taee, A.A.; Al-Jumaily, T.Z. [Baghdad Univ. (Iraq). Electrical Engineering Dept.

    2001-11-01

    The effectiveness of the rate of change of kinetic energy (RACKE) in defining power system stability was studied previously using off-line computer simulation. Theoretical analyses indicated the effectiveness of this method in deciding transient stability of power systems, and its effectiveness in increasing the stability margin when a dynamic brake element is used. The practical implementation of the RACKE method with a resistive dynamic brake is presented. The brake insertion and removal instants are decided on-line by a microcomputer controller. The hardware and software design considerations of the proposed controller are described. The observed behaviour of the power system prototype during fault conditions is found to be in agreement with that obtained from simulation tests. (author)

  1. Investigation of a passenger car's dynamic response due to a flywheel-based kinetic energy recovery system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bischof, Günter; Reisinger, Karl; Singraber, Thomas; Summer, Andreas

    2014-02-01

    With the advent of flywheel-based kinetic energy recovery systems in automotive applications new safety issues arise as a consequence of the flywheel's high rotational speed. While the special structural safety requirements of the components are well discussed in the literature, there is still little research on the influence of gyroscopic effects on vehicle dynamics. The aim of this paper is to investigate the influence of a typical high-speed flywheel on the driving dynamics of an average passenger car. To this end the equations of motion of a gyroscope are derived, which relate the vehicle's roll, pitch and yaw rate with the transverse torque acting on the flywheel. These equations are implemented in a commercial vehicle dynamics simulation program in order to determine the reaction torques acting on the vehicle within a representative range of driving situations. Numerical simulations indicate that the gyroscopic effect can be considered insignificant in standard driving situations.

  2. Momentum and Turbulent Kinetic Energy Budgets Within the Park Avenue Street Canyon During the Joint Urban 2003 Field Campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Matthew A.; Pardyjak, Eric R.; Klein, Petra

    2011-07-01

    Very few attempts have so far been made to quantify the momentum and turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) budgets within real urban canopies. In this study, sonic anemometer data obtained during the Joint Urban 2003 field campaign in Oklahoma City, U.S.A. were used for calculating the momentum and TKE budgets within a real-world urban street canyon. Sonic anemometers were deployed on multiple towers in the lower half of the canyon. Gradients in all three principal directions were included in the analyses. The storage and buoyancy terms were found to have negligible contributions to both the momentum and TKE budgets. The momentum budgets were generally found to be more complex than a simple balance of two physical processes. The horizontal terms were found to have significant and sometimes dominant contributions to the momentum and TKE budgets.

  3. Characterising the nanoscale kinetic friction using force-equilibrium and energy-conservation models with optical manipulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Hongtao; Wang, Shiliang; Huang, Han

    2016-02-12

    SiC nanowires were manipulated under an optic microscope to investigate the nanoscale friction between nanowires and a flat substrate. The deflection of the nanowires was modeled as that of an Euler-Bernoulli beam subjected to a uniformly distributed load. A simple formula was developed to calculate the kinetic friction from the normalized deflections at the two ends of a nanowire. The frictional force per unit area determined ranges from 0.18-0.51 MPa. Both experimental and simulated results demonstrated that the proposed approach was reliable. The results were also compared with those estimated using an energy-conservation model, which produced a frictional force ranging from 0.21-0.62 MPa. The results obtained from the two different methods are in excellent agreement. PMID:26762859

  4. Nonlinearity of the Bifunctional of the Nonadditive Kinetic Energy: Numerical Consequences in Orbital-Free Embedding Calculations

    OpenAIRE

    Dulak, Marcin; Wesolowski, Tomasz Adam

    2006-01-01

    The bifunctional of the nonadditive kinetic energy in the reference system of noninteracting electrons ( [ρA, ρB] = Ts[ρA + ρB] − Ts[ρA] − Ts[ρB]) is the key quantity in orbital-free embedding calculations because they hinge on approximations to [ρA,ρB]. Since [ρA,ρB] is not linear in ρA, the associated potential (functional derivative) [ρ,ρB]/δρ|ρ=ρA(r) changes if ρA varies. In this work, for two approximations to [ρA,ρB], which are nonlinear in ρA (gradient-free and gradient-dependent), the...

  5. Ab initio free energy of vacancy formation and mass-action kinetics in vis-active TiO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent reports have identified bulk defects such as oxygen vacancies as key players in visible-light photoactive TiO2. This would imply greater visible light absorption rates may be possible provided effective defect engineering can be achieved. To further this we have developed methods to simulate vacancy formation in bulk TiO2 using ab initio techniques. Initial results of these methods show an entropic reduction in the free energy of vacancy formation of 2.3 eV over a range of 266 K. The use of this result is illustrated by a 'toy' mass-action kinetics model which offers insight into vacancy concentration, rate constants, and enthalpy of reaction. (fast track communication)

  6. Kinetics and energy efficiency for the degradation of 1,4-dioxane by electro-peroxone process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Huijiao; Bakheet, Belal; Yuan, Shi; Li, Xiang; Yu, Gang [School of Environment, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Murayama, Seiichi [Power and Industrial Systems R& D Center, Toshiba Corporation, Fuchu-shi, Tokyo (Japan); Wang, Yujue, E-mail: wangyujue@tsinghua.edu.cn [School of Environment, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2015-08-30

    Highlights: • E-peroxone couples electrolysis with ozonation to driven peroxone reaction for pollutant degradation. • Significant amounts of ·OH can be efficiently produced in the E-peroxone process. • E-peroxone greatly enhances 1,4-dioxane degradation kinetics compared with ozonation and electrolysis. • E-peroxone consumes less energy for 1,4-dioxane mineralization than ozonation and electrolysis. • E-peroxone offers a cost-effective and energy-efficient alternative to degrade 1,4-dioxane. - Abstract: Degradation of 1,4-dioxane by ozonation, electrolysis, and their combined electro-peroxone (E-peroxone) process was investigated. The E-peroxone process used a carbon-polytetrafluorethylene cathode to electrocatalytically convert O{sub 2} in the sparged ozone generator effluent (O{sub 2} and O{sub 3} gas mixture) to H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. The electro-generated H{sub 2}O{sub 2} then react with sparged O{sub 3} to yield aqueous ·OH, which can in turn oxidize pollutants rapidly in the bulk solution. Using p-chlorobenzoic acid as ·OH probe, the pseudo-steady concentration of ·OH was determined to be ∼0.744 × 10{sup −9} mM in the E-peroxone process, which is approximately 10 and 186 times of that in ozonation and electrolysis using a Pt anode. Thanks to its higher ·OH concentration, the E-peroxone process eliminated 96.6% total organic carbon (TOC) from a 1,4-dioxane solution after 2 h treatment with a specific energy consumption (SEC) of 0.376 kWh g{sup −1} TOC{sub removed}. In comparison, ozonation and electrolysis using a boron-doped diamond anode removed only ∼6.1% and 26.9% TOC with SEC of 2.43 and 0.558 kWh g{sup −1} TOC{sub removed}, respectively. The results indicate that the E-peroxone process can significantly improve the kinetics and energy efficiency for 1,4-dioxane mineralization as compared to the two individual processes. The E-peroxone process may thus offer a highly effective and energy-efficient alternative to treat 1,4-dioxane

  7. Forced axial segregation in axially inhomogeneous rotating systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, S.; Windows-Yule, C. R. K.; Luding, S.; Parker, D. J.; Thornton, A. R.

    2015-08-01

    Controlling segregation is both a practical and a theoretical challenge. Using a novel drum design comprising concave and convex geometry, we explore, through the application of both discrete particle simulations and positron emission particle tracking, a means by which radial size segregation may be used to drive axial segregation, resulting in an order of magnitude increase in the rate of separation. The inhomogeneous drum geometry explored also allows the direction of axial segregation within a binary granular bed to be controlled, with a stable, two-band segregation pattern being reliably and reproducibly imposed on the bed for a variety of differing system parameters. This strong banding is observed to persist even in systems that are highly constrained in the axial direction, where such segregation would not normally occur. These findings, and the explanations provided of their underlying mechanisms, could lead to radical new designs for a broad range of particle processing applications but also may potentially prove useful for medical and microflow applications.

  8. Energy transfer kinetics of phycoerythrocyanins (PECs) from the cyanobacterium Anabaena variabilis(Ⅰ)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张景民; 张建平; 杨紫萱; 赵井泉; 蒋丽金; 陈建新; 叶彤; 张启元

    1997-01-01

    The excitation energy transfer processes in nionomeric phycoerythrocyanins ( PEC)have been studied in detail using steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence spectra techniques as well as the deconvolution fech nique of spectra.The results indicate that the energy transfer processes should take place between α84 PVB md β8 or β155-PCB chromophores,the time constants of energy transfer are 34.7 and 130 ps individually;the component with lifetime of 1.57 ns originates from the fluorescence lifetime of the terminal emitter of β84 and /or β155 PCB chre-mophores; and the component with lifetime of 515 ps might be assigned to the energy transfer between two PCB chro mophores of β subunit.

  9. Predicting the energy consumption of continuous well-mixed fluidized bed dryers from drying kinetic data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, C.G.J.

    1999-09-01

    Precious work has shown that it is possible to predict the size of a continuous well-mixed fluidized bed dryer from batch drying curve measurements. This approach has been extended in the present study to include energy consumption calculations. A computer code was written to simulate the performance of the dryer and to determine its specific energy consumption E{sub s}. Starting in this case with an isothermal bed batch drying curve, the program first calculates the mean solids residence time required under specified operating conditions. Mass and energy balances are then used to calculate the heat duty and E{sub s}. The bed temperature was found to have a significant effect on specific energy consumption in all cases. However, the influences of air flowrate and humidity, and of solids loading, were shown to depend on the solids drying characteristics.

  10. Kinetic and energy production analysis of pyrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass using a three-parallel Gaussian reaction model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Tianju; Zhang, Jinzhi; Wu, Jinhu

    2016-07-01

    The kinetic and energy productions of pyrolysis of a lignocellulosic biomass were investigated using a three-parallel Gaussian distribution method in this work. The pyrolysis experiment of the pine sawdust was performed using a thermogravimetric-mass spectroscopy (TG-MS) analyzer. A three-parallel Gaussian distributed activation energy model (DAEM)-reaction model was used to describe thermal decomposition behaviors of the three components, hemicellulose, cellulose and lignin. The first, second and third pseudocomponents represent the fractions of hemicellulose, cellulose and lignin, respectively. It was found that the model is capable of predicting the pyrolysis behavior of the pine sawdust. The activation energy distribution peaks for the three pseudo-components were centered at 186.8, 197.5 and 203.9kJmol(-1) for the pine sawdust, respectively. The evolution profiles of H2, CH4, CO, and CO2 were well predicted using the three-parallel Gaussian distribution model. In addition, the chemical composition of bio-oil was also obtained by pyrolysis-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry instrument (Py-GC/MS). PMID:27035484

  11. Kinetics of ultrasound-assisted extraction of antioxidant polyphenols from food by-products: Extraction and energy consumption optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradal, Delphine; Vauchel, Peggy; Decossin, Stéphane; Dhulster, Pascal; Dimitrov, Krasimir

    2016-09-01

    Ultrasound-assisted extraction (UAE) of antioxidant polyphenols from chicory grounds was studied in order to propose a suitable valorization of this food industry by-product. The main parameters influencing the extraction process were identified. A new mathematical model for multi-criteria optimization of UAE was proposed. This kinetic model permitted the following and the prediction of the yield of extracted polyphenols, the antioxidant activity of the obtained extracts and the energy consumption during the extraction process in wide ranges of temperature (20-60°C), ethanol content in the solvent (0-60% (vol.) in ethanol-water mixtures) and ultrasound power (0-100W). After experimental validation of the model, several simulations at different technological restrictions were performed to illustrate the potentiality of the model to find the optimal conditions for obtaining a given yield within minimal process duration or with minimal energy consumption. The advantage of ultrasound assistance was clearly demonstrated both for the reduction of extraction duration and for the reduction of energy consumption. PMID:27150754

  12. A Kinetic Study on the Axial Coordination Fast Reaction between Amino-acid Compounds and Macrocyclic Cobalt Complex%大环钴配合物与氨基酸类物质轴向配位 快速反应动力学研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    延玺; 王国清; 朱文祥; 刘向荣; 朱守荣; 林华宽; 朱志昂; 陈荣悌

    2001-01-01

    模拟维生素B12合成了水溶性的高氯酸双氯(5,7,7,12,14,14-六甲基-1,4,8,11-四氮杂环十四烷)钴(Ⅲ)配合物,用停流分光光度计对甘氨酸等5种氨基酸与该配合物的轴向快速反应动力学性质进行了研究,探讨了它们的反应机制,对实验数据进行了拟合处理,得到预平衡步的平衡常数K和速控步的速率常数k,并算出了预平衡步的△r,△r以及速控步的△≠rHm,△≠rSm。在实验的基础上,提出了维生素B12治疗肝脏疾病的可能原因。%Thedichloro(5,7,7,12,14,14-hexamethyl-1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradecane) Cobalt(Ш) perchlorate 〔Co(C16H36N4)Cl2〕ClO4 was synthesized for the imitation of vitamin B12.The kinetic study on axial coordination fast reaction between 〔Co(C16H36N4)Cl2〕ClO4 and five amino-acid compounds at different temperatures by means of the union Giken RA-401 stopped-flow was reported.The mechanism of the reaction was postulated.The equilibrium constants K of the pre-equilibrium step and the rate constants k of rate-determining step were evaluated.The △r,△r of the prequilibrium step and △≠rHm,△≠rSm of the rate-determining step were also calculated.

  13. View of the Axial Field Spectrometer

    CERN Multimedia

    1980-01-01

    The Axial Field Spectrometer, with the vertical uranium/scintillator calorimeter and the central drift chamber retracted for service. One coil of the Open Axial Field Magnet is just visible to the right.

  14. An Axial Vector Photon in a Mirror World

    CERN Document Server

    Sharafiddinov, Rasulkhozha S

    2015-01-01

    The unity of symmetry laws emphasizes, in the case of a mirror CP-even Dirac Lagrangian, the ideas of the left- and right-handed axial-vector photons referring to long- and short-lived bosons of true neutrality, respectively. Such a difference in lifetimes expresses the unidenticality of masses, energies and momenta of axial-vector photons of the different components. They define the unified field theory equation of C-odd particles with an integral spin. Together with a new equation of a theory of truly neutral particles with the half-integral spin, the latter reflects the availability in their nature of the second type of the local axial-vector gauge transformation responsible for origination in the Lagrangian of C-oddity of an interaction Newton component giving an axial-vector mass to all the interacting particles and fields. The mirror axial-vector mass, energy and momentum operators constitute a CP-invariant equation of quantum mechanics, confirming that each of them can individually influence on matter ...

  15. An Axial-Vector Photon in a Mirror World

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharafiddinov, Rasulkhozha S.

    2016-03-01

    The unity of symmetry laws emphasizes, in the case of a mirror CP-even Dirac Lagrangian, the ideas of the left- and right-handed axial-vector photons referring to long- and short-lived bosons of true neutrality, respectively. Such a difference in lifetimes expresses the unidenticality of masses, energies and momenta of axial-vector photons of the different components. They define the unified field theory equation of C-odd particles with an integral spin. Together with a new equation of a theory of truly neutral particles with the half-integral spin, the latter reflects the availability in their nature of the second type of the local axial-vector gauge transformation responsible for origination in the Lagrangian of C-oddity of an interaction Newton component giving an axial-vector mass to all the interacting particles and fields. The mirror axial-vector mass, energy and momentum operators constitute a CP-invariant equation of quantum mechanics, confirming that each of them can individually influence on matter field. Thereby, findings suggest at the level of the mass-charge structure of gauge invariance a new equation for the C-noninvariant Lagrangian.

  16. Fission Fragment Mass Distributions and Total Kinetic Energy Release of 235-Uranium and 238-Uranium in Neutron-Induced Fission at Intermediate and Fast Neutron Energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duke, Dana Lynn [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-11-12

    This Ph.D. dissertation describes a measurement of the change in mass distributions and average total kinetic energy (TKE) release with increasing incident neutron energy for fission of 235U and 238U. Although fission was discovered over seventy-five years ago, open questions remain about the physics of the fission process. The energy of the incident neutron, En, changes the division of energy release in the resulting fission fragments, however, the details of energy partitioning remain ambiguous because the nucleus is a many-body quantum system. Creating a full theoretical model is difficult and experimental data to validate existing models are lacking. Additional fission measurements will lead to higher-quality models of the fission process, therefore improving applications such as the development of next-generation nuclear reactors and defense. This work also paves the way for precision experiments such as the Time Projection Chamber (TPC) for fission cross section measurements and the Spectrometer for Ion Determination in Fission (SPIDER) for precision mass yields.

  17. Energy transfer kinetics of the np5(n + 1)p excited states of Ne and Kr.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabir, Md Humayun; Heaven, Michael C

    2011-09-01

    Energy transfer rate constants for Ne(2p(5)3p) and Kr(4p(5)5p) atoms colliding with ground state rare gas atoms (Rg) have been measured. In part, this study is motivated by the possibility of using excited rare gas atoms as the active species in optically pumped laser systems. Rg(np(5)(n + 1)s) metastable states may be produced using low-power electrical discharges. The potential then exits for optical pumping and laser action on the np(5)(n + 1)p ↔ np(5)(n + 1)s transitions. Knowledge of the rate constants for collisional energy transfer and deactivation of the np(5)(n + 1)p states is required to evaluate the laser potential for various Rg + buffer gas combinations. In the present study we have characterized energy transfer processes for Ne (2p(5)3p) + He for the six lowest energy states of the multiplet. Rate constants for state-to-state transfer have been determined. Deactivation of the lowest energy level of Kr (4p(5)5p) by He, Ne, and Kr has also been characterized. Initial results suggest that Kr (4p(5)5p) + Ne mixtures may be the best suited for optically pumped laser applications.

  18. Axially symmetric static sources of gravitational field

    CERN Document Server

    Hernandez-Pastora, J L; Martin, J

    2016-01-01

    A general procedure to find static and axially symmetric, interior solutions to the Einstein equations is presented. All the so obtained solutions, verify the energy conditions for a wide range of values of the parameters, and match smoothly to some exterior solution of the Weyl family, thereby representing globally regular models describing non spherical sources of gravitational field. In the spherically symmetric limit, all our models converge to the well known incompressible perfect fluid solution.The key stone of our approach is based on an ansatz allowing to define the interior metric in terms of the exterior metric functions evaluated at the boundary source. Some particular sources are obtained, and the physical variables of the energy-momentum tensor are calculated explicitly, as well as the geometry of the source in terms of the relativistic multipole moments. The total mass of different configurations is also calculated, it is shown to be equal to the monopole of the exterior solution.

  19. Simulation of an Axial Vircator

    OpenAIRE

    Tikhomirov, V. V.; Siahlo, S. E.

    2013-01-01

    An algorithm of particle-in-cell simulations is described and tested to aid further the actual design of simple vircators working on axially symmetric modes. The methods of correction of the numerical solution, have been chosen and jointly tested, allow the stable simulation of the fast nonlinear multiflow dynamics of virtual cathode formation and evolution, as well as the fields generated by the virtual cathode. The selected combination of the correction methods can be straightforwardly gene...

  20. Effects of microwave - fluidized bed drying on quality, energy consumption and drying kinetics of soybean kernels

    OpenAIRE

    Khoshtaghaza, Mohammad Hadi; Darvishi, Hosain; Minaei, Saeid

    2014-01-01

    Moisture content of soybean kernel at harvest time is too high for storage, and needs to be reduced. In this research, drying characteristics, quality and energy requirement for microwave-fluidized bed drying of soybean kernels were studied. The results showed that air temperature (80–140 °C), velocity (1.8–4.5 m/s) and microwave power (200–500 W) significantly influenced drying time, moisture diffusivity, rehydration capacity, cracking, and specific energy consumption (P ≤ 0.05). Among the a...

  1. Across-phase biomass pyrolysis stoichiometry, energy balance, and product formation kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Predictive correlations between reactions occurring in the gas-, liquid- and solid-phases are necessary to economically utilize the thermochemical conversion of agricultural wastes impacting the food, water, and energy nexus. On the basis of an empirical mass balance (99.7%), this study established...

  2. Mean Kinetic Energy Budget of Wakes Within Model Wind Farms: Comparison of an Array of Model Wind Turbines and Porous Discs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camp, E.; Cal, R. B.

    2015-12-01

    To optimize the power production of large wind farms, it is important to understand the flow within the wind turbine array as well as its interaction with the surrounding atmosphere. Computational simulations are often employed to study both the velocity field within and immediately above wind farms. In many computational studies, wind turbines are modeled as stationary, porous actuator discs. A wind tunnel study is done in order to compare the wakes within an array of porous discs and an equivalent array of model wind turbines. To characterize the wakes within a 4×3 model wind farm, stereoscopic particle image velocimetry (SPIV) is employed. SPIV measurements focus on the region along the centerline of the array upstream and downstream of the center turbine in the fourth row. The computed mean flow fields and turbulent stresses provide a basis to compare the near and far wakes of the turbines with those of the porous discs. The detailed analysis of the wakes for each case focus on the mean kinetic energy budget within the wakes. Examining the mean kinetic energy budget is done via computing the mean kinetic energy, flux of kinetic energy, and production of turbulence which are analogous to a measure of extracted power.

  3. Monin-Obukhov Similarity Functions of the Structure Parameter of Temperature and Turbulent Kinetic Energy Dissipation Rate in the Stable Boundary Layer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartogensis, O.K.; Debruin, H.A.R.

    2005-01-01

    The Monin-Obukhov similarity theory (MOST) functions fepsi; and fT, of the dissipation rate of turbulent kinetic energy (TKE), ¿, and the structure parameter of temperature, CT2, were determined for the stable atmospheric surface layer using data gathered in the context of CASES-99. These data cover

  4. Effects of Geostrophic Kinetic Energy on the Distribution of Mesopelagic Fish Larvae in the Southern Gulf of California in Summer/Fall Stratified Seasons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contreras-Catala, Fernando; Beier, Emilio; Godínez, Victor M.; Barton, Eric D.; Santamaría-del-Angel, Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    Effects of geostrophic kinetic energy flux on the three-dimensional distribution of fish larvae of mesopelagic species (Vinciguerria lucetia, Diogenichthys laternatus, Benthosema panamense and Triphoturus mexicanus) in the southern Gulf of California during summer and fall seasons of stronger stratification were analyzed. The greatest larval abundance was found at sampling stations in geostrophic kinetic energy-poor areas ( 21 J/m3), where mesoscale eddies were present, the larvae of the dominant species had low abundance and were spread more evenly through the water column, in spite of the water column stratification. For example, in a cyclonic eddy, V. lucetia larvae (34 larvae/10m2) extended their distribution to, at least, the limit of sampling 200 m depth below the pycnocline, while D. laternatus larvae (29 larvae/10m2) were found right up to the surface, both probably as a consequence mixing and secondary circulation in the eddy. Results showed that the level of the geostrophic kinetic energy flux affects the abundance and the three-dimensional distribution of mesopelagic fish larvae during the seasons of stronger stratification, indicating that areas with low geostrophic kinetic energy may be advantageous for feeding and development of mesopelagic fish larvae because of greater water column stability. PMID:27760185

  5. Effects of microwave - fluidized bed drying on quality, energy consumption and drying kinetics of soybean kernels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoshtaghaza, Mohammad Hadi; Darvishi, Hosain; Minaei, Saeid

    2015-08-01

    Moisture content of soybean kernel at harvest time is too high for storage, and needs to be reduced. In this research, drying characteristics, quality and energy requirement for microwave-fluidized bed drying of soybean kernels were studied. The results showed that air temperature (80-140 °C), velocity (1.8-4.5 m/s) and microwave power (200-500 W) significantly influenced drying time, moisture diffusivity, rehydration capacity, cracking, and specific energy consumption (P ≤ 0.05). Among the applied models, Page's model has the best performance to estimate the microwave-fluidized bed drying behavior of the soybean kernels. Moisture diffusivity values increased (6.25 × 10(-10) to 42.14 × 10(-10) m(2)/s) as the air velocity decreased and air temperature and microwave power increased. Activation energy was foundto be between 3.33 and 17.70 kJ/mol. Minimum cracking percentage of soybean kernels (12.96 %) was obtained at 80 °C, 1.8 m/s and 200 W treatments. The increase in microwave power and decrease in air velocity level decreased the rehydration capacity. Specific energy consumption varied from 50.94 to 338.76 MJ/kg water and the lowest specific energy consumption were obtained at 80 °C, 4.5 m/s and 500 W. PMID:26243896

  6. Pressure and surface tension of an active simple liquid: a comparison between kinetic, mechanical and free-energy based approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marini Bettolo Marconi, Umberto; Maggi, Claudio; Melchionna, Simone

    2016-06-29

    We discuss different definitions of pressure for a system of active spherical particles driven by a non-thermal coloured noise. We show that mechanical, kinetic and free-energy based approaches lead to the same result up to first order in the non-equilibrium expansion parameter. The first prescription is based on a generalisation of the kinetic mesoscopic virial equation and expresses the pressure exerted on the walls in terms of the average of the virial of the inter-particle forces. In the second approach, the pressure and the surface tension are identified with the volume and area derivatives, respectively, of the partition function associated with the known stationary non-equilibrium distribution of the model. The third method is a mechanical approach and is related to the work necessary to deform the system. The pressure is obtained by comparing the expression of the work in terms of local stress and strain with the corresponding expression in terms of microscopic distribution. This is determined from the force balance encoded in the Born-Green-Yvon equation. Such a method has the advantage of giving a formula for the local pressure tensor and the surface tension even in inhomogeneous situations. By direct inspection, we show that the three procedures lead to the same values of the pressure, and give support to the idea that the partition function, obtained via the unified coloured noise approximation, is more than a formal property of the system, but determines the stationary non-equilibrium thermodynamics of the model. PMID:27301440

  7. High energy efficiency and high power density proton exchange membrane fuel cells: Electrode kinetics and mass transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, Supramaniam; Velev, Omourtag A.; Parthasathy, Arvind; Manko, David J.; Appleby, A. John

    1991-01-01

    The development of proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell power plants with high energy efficiencies and high power densities is gaining momentum because of the vital need of such high levels of performance for extraterrestrial (space, underwater) and terrestrial (power source for electric vehicles) applications. Since 1987, considerable progress has been made in achieving energy efficiencies of about 60 percent at a current density of 200 mA/sq cm and high power densities (greater than 1 W/sq cm) in PEM fuel cells with high (4 mg/sq cm) or low (0.4 mg/sq cm) platinum loadings in electrodes. The following areas are discussed: (1) methods to obtain these high levels of performance with low Pt loading electrodes - by proton conductor impregnation into electrodes, localization of Pt near front surface; (2) a novel microelectrode technique which yields electrode kinetic parameters for oxygen reduction and mass transport parameters; (3) demonstration of lack of water transport from anode to cathode; (4) modeling analysis of PEM fuel cell for comparison with experimental results and predicting further improvements in performance; and (5) recommendations of needed research and development for achieving the above goals.

  8. A System for Harvesting the Vehicle Idle Kinetic Energy%汽车闲散动能收集系统

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘隽; 刘俊标; 俞国勤; 邵宇鹰; 霍荣岭; 段中夏

    2012-01-01

    This paper has developed a new practical power generation system by combining the technology of hydraulic transmission and electromagnetic power generation for the purpose of harvesting the idle kinetic energy when vehicles are decelerating. The system design process and its component selection have been introduced, and the relevant ex- periments have been conducted. Finally experiment results show that the developed system can harvest about 4.5W electric power every time a car passes the system. The energy harvesting efficiency is about 3%.%介绍了利用液压传动和电磁发电等技术研制的一种新型实用的发电系统,目的在于收集产生车辆在减速等场合产生的闲散动能;讨论了该系统的设计思路及部件选型,并对研制的系统进行了相关实验。实验结果表明:一辆小汽车通过所研制系统时,一次可以获得4.5W左右的电能,能量收集效率约为3%。

  9. Axial Force at the Vessel Bottom Induced by Axial Impellers

    OpenAIRE

    I. Fořt; P. Hasal; A. Paglianti; F. Magelli

    2008-01-01

    This paper deals with the axial force affecting the flat bottom of a cylindrical stirred vessel. The vessel is equipped with four radial baffles and is stirred with a four 45° pitched blade impeller pumping downwards. The set of pressure transducers is located along the whole radius of the flat bottom between two radial baffles. The radial distribution of the dynamic pressures indicated by the transducers is measured in dependence on the impeller off-bottom clearance and impeller speed.It fol...

  10. Golimumab for treatment of axial spondyloarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rios Rodriguez, Valeria; Poddubnyy, Denis

    2016-02-01

    Axial spondyloarthritis comprises two forms: nonradiographic (nonradiographic axial spondyloarthritis) and radiographic (better known as ankylosing spondylitis), which are often considered as two stages of one disease. Historically, all currently available TNF-α inhibitors were first investigated in ankylosing spondylitis and later on in nonradiographic axial spondyloarthritis. This year, EMA has granted golimumab approval for the treatment of active nonradiographic axial spondyloarthritis based on the recently published data from the GO-AHEAD study. This article summarizes recent data on efficacy and safety of golimumab in the treatment of ankylosing spondylitis and nonradiographic axial spondyloarthritis.

  11. A simple approach to the ABJ axial anomaly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A very simple semi-quantitative derivation of the Adler-Bell-Jackiw (ABJ) axial anomaly is given, based on an investigation of the absorptive part of the VVA triangle graph and dispersion relations. Essential ingredients of our discussion are: normal Ward identities for the absorptive part of the relevant diagram, dimensional analysis, unitarity, and energy-momentum conservation. An explanation of the physical origin of axial anomaly, proposed in some earlier treatments within such a dispersive framework, is critically examined. In particular, the interpretation of the ABJ anomaly as an analogy of the Lee-Nauenberg effect occurring in the massless limit of spinor electrodynamics is shown to be fallacious

  12. Vector and Axial Currents in Wilson Chiral Perturbation Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Aoki, Sinya; Sharpe, Stephen R

    2009-01-01

    We reconsider the construction of the vector and axial-vector currents in Wilson Chiral Perturbation Theory (WChPT), the low-energy effective theory for lattice QCD with Wilson fermions. We discuss in detail the finite renormalization of the currents that has to be taken into account in order to properly match the currents. We explicitly show that imposing the chiral Ward identities on the currents does, in general, affect the axial-vector current at O(a). As an application of our results we compute the pion decay constant to one loop in the two flavor theory. Our result differs from previously published ones.

  13. Instability of Meridional Axial System in f(R) Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Sharif, M

    2015-01-01

    We analyze dynamical instability of non-static reflection axial stellar structure by taking into account generalized Euler's equation in metric $f(R)$ gravity. Such an equation is obtained by contracting Bianchi identities of usual anisotropic and effective stress-energy tensors, which after using radial perturbation technique gives modified collapse equation. In the realm of $R+\\epsilon R^n$ gravity model, we investigate instability constraints at Newtonian and post-Newtonian approximations. We find that instability of meridional axial self-gravitating system depends upon static profile of structure coefficients while $f(R)$ extra curvature terms induce stability to the evolving celestial body.

  14. Vector and axial currents in Wilson chiral perturbation theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We reconsider the construction of the vector and axial-vector currents in Wilson Chiral Perturbation Theory, the low-energy effective theory for lattice QCD with Wilson fermions. We discuss in detail the finite renormalization of the currents that has to be taken into account in order to properly match the currents. We explicitly show that imposing the chiral Ward identities on the currents does, in general, affect the axial-vector current at O(a). As an application of our results we compute the pion decay constant to one loop in the two-flavor theory. Our result differs from previously published ones.

  15. Investigation of Kinetics and Energy Consumption of Thin Layer Drying of Corn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Abbasi

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study thin layer drying of corn in a convective dryer was investigated at air temperatures of 50, 60 and 70ºC and air flow rates of 1, 1.4 and 1.8 kg min-1. Experiments were performed in Completely Randomized Design (CRD. The effect of air temperature and flow rate on drying time, drying rate, effective diffusivity coefficient and activation energy were studied. Results showed that the effects of temperature and flow rate on drying process were significant. Increasing the air temperature from 50 to 70 C˚, caused 31.7 percent decrease in drying time and change of air flow rate from 1 to 1.8 kg min-1 reduced drying time 27 percent in average. The effective diffusivity coefficient and activation energy varied from 3.47258 ×10-11 to 7.34352×10-11 m2 s-1. and 13.761 to 16.193 kJ mol-1, respectively depending on the drying treatments. The Logarithmic model was found to be in a better agreement with experimental data compared with other models. The minimum value of specific energy requirement (3.61 kWh kg-1 was obtained at a drying air temperature of 50 °C and air flow rate of 1 kg min-1, whereas the corresponding parameters for the maximum value (5.34 kWh kg-1 were determined as 70 °C and air flow rate 1.8 kg min-1.

  16. Combinatorial modeling of protein folding kinetics: free energy profiles and rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henry, Eric R. [Laboratory of Chemical Physics, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Building 5, Room 104, Bethesda, MD 20892-0520 (United States); Eaton, William A. [Laboratory of Chemical Physics, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Building 5, Room 104, Bethesda, MD 20892-0520 (United States)]. E-mail: eaton@helix.nih.gov

    2004-12-27

    A combinatorial approach has been used to determine the optimal assumptions and robustness of simple statistical mechanical models for protein folding. By combining alternative plausible assumptions and different enumeration schemes for constructing partition functions, 76 closely related Ising-like models were generated. These include various contiguous sequence approximations, the possibility of forming a disordered loop between ordered segments, the use of an atomistic or coarse-grained representation of the protein structure, and the choice of ordered residues or native contacts as a reaction coordinate. We also consider all 2{sup N} conformations of an N-residue protein (e.g., 10{sup 30} conformations for a 100-residue protein). Although the number of configurations is much too large to list, a free energy profile can be calculated using a build-up procedure by accumulation and recombination of partial partition functions. The predictions of the 76 models were tested against two kinds of experimental data - folding rates and the determination of two-state behavior for 25 proteins. Two-state behavior was judged by the relative magnitude of the dominant relaxation calculated from the rate matrix for motion on the free energy profile. The relative performance of each assumption was evaluated using rank sum statistics which show, with the exception of the single sequence approximation, that this class of models is not sensitive to alternative assumptions. Two-state free energy profiles are calculated for almost all but the {alpha}-helical proteins, and surprisingly accurate rates are predicted in both the absence and presence of denaturant. The combinatorics also show that an {alpha}-carbon representation of the protein structure does nearly as well as atomistic descriptions, possibly reflecting partial interatomic interactions between native residues in structures of the transition state ensemble. With its coarse-grained description of both the energy and entropy

  17. Laplacian-level kinetic energy approximations based on the fourth-order gradient expansion: Global assessment and application to the subsystem formulation of density functional theory

    CERN Document Server

    Laricchia, S; Fabiano, E; Della Sala, F

    2014-01-01

    We test Laplacian-level meta-generalized gradient approximation (meta-GGA) non-interacting kinetic energy functionals based on the fourth-order gradient expansion (GE4). We consider several well known Laplacian-level meta-GGAs from literature (bare GE4, modified GE4, and the MGGA functional of Perdew and Constantin [Phys. Rev. B \\textbf{75},155109 (2007)]), as well as two newly designed Laplacian-level kinetic energy functionals (named L0.4 and L0.6). First, a general assessment of the different functionals is performed, testing them for model systems (one-electron densities, Hooke's atom and different jellium systems), atomic and molecular kinetic energies as well as for their behavior with respect to density-scaling transformations. Finally, we assess, for the first time, the performance of the different functionals for Subsystem Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations on non-covalently interacting systems. We find that the different Laplacian-level meta-GGA kinetic functionals may improve the descript...

  18. Kinetics of low energy electron attachment to some fluorinated alcohols in the gas phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wnorowski, K.; Wnorowska, J.; Kopyra, J.; Michalczuk, B.; Szamrej, I.; Barszczewska, W.

    2014-01-01

    Thermal electron attachment processes in the mixtures of CH3CH2OH, CF3CH2OH, CF3CF2CH2OH, (CF3)2CHOH and CH3CH(OH)CF3 with carbon dioxide have been investigated using an electron Pulsed Townsend technique. Measurements were carried out in the temperature range (298-413) K. The obtained rate coefficients depended on temperature in accordance to Arrhenius equation. From the fit to the experimental data points with function ln(k) = ln(A)-Ea/kBT the activation energies (Ea's) were determined. The rate coefficients at 298 K are equal to 3.2 × 10-13 cm3 s-1, 5.1 × 10-11 cm3 s-1, 1.1 × 10-10 cm3 s-1, 3.0 × 10-10 cm3 s-1 and 2.6 × 10-11 cm3 s-1 and activation energies are: 0.37 eV, 0.25 eV, 0.28 eV, 0.20 eV and 0.23 eV, respectively for CH3CH2OH, CF3CH2OH, CF3CF2CH2OH, (CF3)2CHOH and CH3CH(OH)CF3.

  19. The interaction of C60 on Si(111 7x7 studied by Supersonic Molecular Beams: interplay between precursor kinetic energy and substrate temperature in surface activated processes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucrezia eAversa

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Buckminsterfullerene (C60 is a molecule fully formed of carbon that can be used, owing to its electronic and mechanical properties, as clean precursor for the growth of carbon-based materials, ranging from -conjugated systems (graphenes to synthesized species, e.g. carbides such as silicon carbide (SiC. To this goal, C60 cage rupture is the main physical process that triggers material growth. Cage breaking can be obtained either thermally by heating up the substrate to high temperatures (630°C, after C60 physisorption, or kinetically by using Supersonic Molecular Beam Epitaxy (SuMBE techniques. In this work, aiming at demonstrating the growth of SiC thin films by C60 supersonic beams, we present the experimental investigation of C60 impacts on Si(111 7x7 kept at 500°C for translational kinetic energies ranging from 18 to 30 eV. The attained kinetically activated synthesis of SiC submonolayer films is probed by in-situ surface electron spectroscopies (XPS and UPS. Furthermore, in these experimental conditions the C60-Si(111 7×7 collision has been studied by computer simulations based on a tight-binding approximation to Density Functional Theory, DFT. Our theoretical and experimental findings point towards a kinetically driven growth of SiC on Si, where C60 precursor kinetic energy plays a crucial role, while temperature is relevant only after cage rupture to enhance Si and carbon reactivity. In particular, we observe a counterintuitive effect in which for low kinetic energy (below 22 eV, C60 bounces back without breaking more effectively at high temperature due to energy transfer from excited phonons. At higher kinetic energy (22 < K < 30 eV, for which cage rupture occurs, temperature enhances reactivity without playing a major role in the cage break. These results are in good agreement with ab-initio molecular dynamics simulations. SuMBE is thus a technique able to drive materials growth at low temperature regime.

  20. A trajectory approach to two-state kinetics of single particles on sculpted energy landscapes

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, David; Inamdar, Mandar; Lee, Heun Jin; Fraser, Scott; Dill, Ken; Phillips, Rob

    2008-01-01

    We study the trajectories of a single colloidal particle as it hops between two energy wells A and B, which are sculpted using adjacent optical traps by controlling their respective power levels and separation. Whereas the dynamical behaviors of such systems are often treated by master-equation methods that focus on particles as actors, we analyze them here instead using a trajectory-based variational method called Maximum Caliber, which utilizes a dynamical partition function. We show that the Caliber strategy accurately predicts the full dynamics that we observe in the experiments: from the observed averages, it predicts second and third moments and covariances, with no free parameters. The covariances are the dynamical equivalents of Maxwell-like equilibrium reciprocal relations and Onsager-like dynamical relations. In short, this work describes an experimental model system for exploring full trajectory distributions in one-particle two-state systems, and it validates the Caliber approach as a useful way t...

  1. Kinetic-theory approach to low-energy collective modes in nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two different solutions of the linearized Vlasov equation for finite systems, characterized by fixed- and moving-surface boundary conditions, are discussed in a unified perspective. A condition determining the eigenfrequencies of collective nuclear oscillations, that can be obtained from the moving-surface solution, is studied for isoscalar vibrations of lowest multipolarity. Analytic expressions for the friction and mass parameters related to the low-energy surface excitations are derived and their value is compared to values given by other models. Both similarities and differences are found with respect to the other approaches, however the close agreement obtained in many cases with one of the other models suggests that, in spite of some important differences, the two approaches are substantially equivalent. The formalism based on the Vlasov equation is more transparent since it leads to analytical expressions that can be a basis for further improvement of the model

  2. Coherent control using kinetic energy and the geometric phase of a conical intersection

    CERN Document Server

    Liekhus-Schmaltz, Chelsea; Kaldun, Andreas; Cryan, James P; Bucksbaum, Philip H

    2016-01-01

    Conical intersections (CI) between molecular potential energy surfaces with non-vanishing non-adiabatic couplings generally occur in any molecule consisting of at least three atoms. They play a fundamental role in describing the molecular dynamics beyond the Born-Oppenheimer approximation and have been used to understand a large variety of effects, from photofragmentation and isomerization to more exotic applications such as exciton fission in semiconductors. However, few studies have used the features of a CI as a tool for coherent control. Here we demonstrate two modes of control around a conical intersection. The first uses a continuous light field to control the population on the two intersecting electronic states in the vicinity of a CI. The second uses a pulsed light field to control wavepackets that are subjected to the geometric phase shift in transit around a CI. This second technique is likely to be useful for studying the role of nuclear dynamics in electronic coherence phenomena.

  3. Low kinetic energy photoelectron diffractions for C 1s and O 1s electrons of free CO molecules in the EXAFS region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adachi, Jun-ichi; Yamazaki, Masakazu; Kimura, Yasuyuki; Yagishita, Akira [Photon Factory, IMSS, KEK, 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba 305-0801 (Japan); Kazama, Misato; Ohori, Yusuke; Fujikawa, Takashi [Graduate School of Advanced Integration Science, Chiba University, 1-33 Yayoi-cho, Inage 263-8522 (Japan); Teramoto, Takahiro, E-mail: jun-ichi.adachi@kek.j [Graduate School of Science, University of Tokyo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, 113-0033 (Japan)

    2009-11-15

    We have measured molecular-frame photoelectron angular distributions from carbon 1s and oxygen 1s levels of CO molecules up to a photoelectron kinetic energy (KE) of {approx}150 eV. The backward-scattering intensities exhibited a strong modulation as a function of the kinetic energy of the photoelectrons, whereas the intensities for the forward-scattering gradually increased and then became nearly constant over KE {approx}100 eV. Multiple scattering calculations with a muffin-tin potential qualitatively reproduced the experimental results. The present results may be considered as the observation of low-energy photoelectron diffraction patterns for gaseous free CO molecules, which are involved in modulations in extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectra.

  4. Axially symmetric Lorentzian wormholes in general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The field equations of Einstein's theory of general relativity, being local, do not fix the global structure of space-time. They admit topologically non-trivial solutions, including spatially closed universes and the amazing possibility of shortcuts for travel between distant regions in space and time - so-called Lorentzian wormholes. The aim of this thesis is to (mathematically) construct space-times which contain traversal wormholes connecting arbitrary distant regions of an asymptotically flat or asymptotically de Sitter universe. Since the wormhole mouths appear as two separate masses in the exterior space, space-time can at best be axially symmetric. We eliminate the non-staticity caused by the gravitational attraction of the mouths by anchoring them by strings held at infinity or, alternatively, by electric repulsion. The space-times are obtained by surgically grafting together well-known solutions of Einstein's equations along timelike hypersurfaces. This surgery naturally concentrates a non-zero stress-energy tensor on the boundary between the two space-times which can be investigated by using the standard thin shell formalism. It turns out that, when using charged black holes, the provided constructions are possible without violation of any of the energy conditions. In general, observers living in the axially symmetric, asymptotically flat (respectively asymptotically de Sitter) region axe able to send causal signals through the topologically non-trivial region. However, the wormhole space-times contain closed timelike curves. Because of this explicit violation of global hyperbolicity these models do not serve as counterexamples to known topological censorship theorems. (author)

  5. Exploration of hemolytic model of axial blood pump

    OpenAIRE

    Miao Song; Yu Chang; Yanjiao Xuan

    2012-01-01

    Axial flow blood pumps provides additional energy to blood for heart failure patient, but its implanting destroy environment of blood cells, the direct consequence is hemolysis. According to energy conservation theorem, the severity of pump hemolysis depends on the energy utilization ratio of it. This is a new train of thought in this field. In the light of it, it¡¯s necessary to clear up how much energy used to pump blood, so part of the rest is the energy leading to hemolysis. At present, a...

  6. Kinetic energy dissipation of a tuning fork immersed in superfluid helium at different frequencies of oscillations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An experimental study is made of the drag coefficient, which is the characteristics of energy dissipation during oscillations of the tuning forks, immersed in liquid helium. The experiments were performed in the temperature range from 0.1 to 3.5 K covering both the range of a hydrodynamic flow, and the ballistic regime of transfer of thermal excitations of superfluid helium below 0.6 K. It is found that there is the frequency dependence of the drag coefficient in the hydrodynamic limit, when the main dissipation mechanism is the viscous friction of the fluid against the walls of the oscillating body at temperatures above 0.7 K. In this case, the drag coefficient is proportional to the square root of the frequency of oscillation, and its temperature dependence in He II is determined by the respective dependence of the normal component density of the normal component and the viscosity of the fluid. At lower temperatures, the dependence of drag coefficient on the frequency is not available, and the magnitude of the dissipative losses is determined only by the temperature dependence of the density of the normal component. At the same time in the entire range of temperatures value of dissipative losses depends on the geometry of the oscillating body.

  7. Unified Dark Energy and Dust Dark Matter Dual to Quadratic Purely Kinetic K-Essence

    CERN Document Server

    Guendelman, Eduardo; Pacheva, Svetlana

    2015-01-01

    We consider a modified gravity plus single-scalar-field model, where the scalar Lagrangian couples symmetrically both to the standard Riemannian volume-form (spacetime integration measure density) given by the square-root of the determinant of the Riemannian metric, as well as to another non-Riemannian volume-form in terms of an auxiliary maximal-rank antisymmetric tensor gauge field. As shown in a previous paper, the pertinent scalar field dynamics provides an exact unified description of both dark energy via dynamical generation of a cosmological constant, and dark matter as a "dust" fluid with geodesic flow as a result of a hidden Noether symmetry. Here we extend the discussion by considering a non-trivial modification of the purely gravitational action in the form of f(R) = R - \\alpha R^2 generalized gravity. Upon deriving the corresponding "Einstein-frame" effective action of the latter modified gravity-scalar-field theory we find explicit duality (in the sense of weak versus strong coupling) between the...

  8. A master equation approach to the dynamics of zero electron kinetic energy (ZEKE) states and ZEKE spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have theoretically studied important dynamic processes involved in zero electron kinetic energy (ZEKE) spectroscopy using the density matrix method with the inverse Born-Oppenheimer approximation basis sets. In ZEKE spectroscopy, the ZEKE Rydberg states are populated by laser excitation (either a one- or two-photon process), which is followed by autoionizations and l-mixing due to a stray field. The discrimination field is then applied to ionize loosely bound electrons in the ZEKE states. This is followed by using the extraction field to extract electrons from the ZEKE levels which have a strength comparable to that of the extraction field. These extracted electrons are measured for the relative intensities of the ion states under investigation. The spectral positions are determined by the applied laser wavelength and modified by the extraction electric field. In this paper, all of these processes are conducted within the context of the density matrix method. The density matrix method can provide not only the dynamics of system's population and coherence (or phase) but also the rate constants of the processes involved in the ZEKE spectroscopy. Numerical examples are given to demonstrate the theoretical treatments.

  9. Improved tests on the relationship between the kinetic energy of galaxies and the mass of their central black holes

    CERN Document Server

    Feoli, A

    2007-01-01

    We support, with new fitting instruments and the analysis of more recent experimental data, the proposal of a relationship between the mass of a Supermassive Black Hole (SMBH) and the kinetic energy of random motions in the host elliptical galaxy. The first results obtained in a previous paper with 13 elliptical galaxies are now confirmed by the new data and an enlarged sample. We find $M_{BH} \\propto (M_{G} \\sigma^{2}/c^2)^\\beta$ with $0.8 \\leq \\beta \\leq 1$ depending on the different fitting methods and samples used. The meaningful case $\\beta = 1$ is carefully analyzed. Furthermore, we test the robustness of our relationship including in the sample also lenticular and spiral galaxies and we show that the result does not change. Finally we find a stronger correlation between the mass of the galaxy and the corresponding velocity dispersion that allows to connect our relationship to the $M_{BH} \\propto \\sigma^\\alpha$ law. With respect to this law, our relationship has the advantage to have a smaller scatter.

  10. A simple parameterization for the turbulent kinetic energy transport terms in the convective boundary layer derived from large eddy simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puhales, Franciano Scremin; Rizza, Umberto; Degrazia, Gervásio Annes; Acevedo, Otávio Costa

    2013-02-01

    In this work a parametrization for the transport terms of the turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) budget equation, valid for a convective boundary layer (CBL) is presented. This is a hard task to accomplish from experimental data, especially because of the difficulty associated to the measurements of pressure turbulent fluctuations, which are necessary to determine the pressure correlation TKE transport term. Thus, employing a large eddy simulation (LES) a full diurnal planetary boundary layer (PBL) cycle was simulated. In this simulation a forcing obtained from experimental data is used, so that the numerical experiment represents a more realistic case than a stationary PBL. For this study all terms of the TKE budget equation were determined for a CBL. From these data, polynomials that describe the TKE transport terms’ vertical profiles were adjusted. The polynomials found are a good description of the LES data, and from them it is shown that a simple formulation that directly relates the transport terms to the TKE magnitude has advantages on other parameterizations commonly used in CBL numerical models. Furthermore, the present study shows that the TKE turbulent transport term dominates over the TKE transport by pressure perturbations and that for most of the CBL these two terms have opposite signs.

  11. Zonal propagation of kinetic energy and convection in the South China Sea and Indian monsoon regions in boreal summer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Longxun; GAO Hui; HE Jinhai; TAO Shiyan; JIN Zuhui

    2004-01-01

    Zonal propagation of kinetic energy (KE) and convection in the South China Sea (SCS) and Indian summer monsoon areas are examined in present study. Results suggest that the SCS and Indian summer monsoon prevailed regions (5-15°N) are dominated by the southwesterly wind, however, the disturbances of KE at 850 hPa and convection are observed mainly coming from the western Pacific Ocean (140-150°E), after passing through the SCS, and westward propagated into the Bay of Bengal (90-100°E). In the Indian summer monsoon domain, where the disturbances of KE are found mainly coming from the Arabian Sea (AS) and eastward propagated into the Bay of Bengal. Therefore, the SCS and the Indian summer monsoon are quite different in zonal propagation of KE and convection. The SCS summer monsoon is mainly affected by the KE and convection coming from the tropical western Pacific. The Indian summer monsoon, however, can be partly influenced by the AS and the SCS summer monsoon. The analysis also suggests that the interaction region between the SCS and the Indian summer monsoon is around 90-95°E, rather than 105°E as proposed by earlier studies.

  12. Estimation of Turbulent Kinetic Energy Dissipation Rate in the Bottom Boundary Layer of the Pearl River Estuary

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Huan; WU Chao-yu; REN Jie

    2011-01-01

    A structure function approach is applied to estimate the turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) dissipation rate in the bottom boundary layer of the Pearl River Estuary (PRE).Simultaneous measurements with an acoustic Doppler velocimeter (ADV) supplied independent data for the verification of the structure function method.The results show that,1) the structure function approach is reliable and successfully applied method to estimate the TKE dissipation rate.The observed dissipation rates range between 8.3× 10-4 W/kg and 4.9×l0 6 W/kg in YM01 and between 3.4×10 4 W/kg and 4.8× 10-7 W/kg in YM03,respectively,while exhibiting a strong quarter-diurnal variation.2) The balance between the shear production and viscous dissipation is better achieved in the straight river.This first-order balance is significantly broken in the estuary by non-shear production/dissipation due to wave-induced fluctuations.

  13. Digesta kinetics, energy intake, grazing behavior, and body temperature of grazing beef cattle differing in adaptation to heat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprinkle, J E; Holloway, J W; Warrington, B G; Ellist, W C; Stuth, J W; Forbes, T D; Greene, L W

    2000-06-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether digesta kinetics, energy intake (EI, kcal ME intake x kg(-.75) x d(-1)), grazing behavior, or body temperature differed by breed, lactational state, or season of the year among cattle presumed to vary in adaptability to the subtropics. Two-year-old lactating and nonlactating Brahman x Angus (BA; n = 5, n = 5), Tuli x Angus (TA; n = 5, n = 4), and Angus (A; n = 4, n = 4) cows were used. During both early (ES) and late summer (LS), lactating cattle vs nonlactating cattle had greater gastrointestinal tract load (CM2) and EI (P .48). During LS, lactating cattle had decreased early morning rectal temperatures (P .26) late afternoon rectal temperatures compared with BA and TA. With data pooled over both grazing trials, BA cattle had the smallest CM2 (P .28) early morning rectal temperatures compared with BA during ES and LS. During LS, TA spent more time in the sun and less time in the shade than did either A or BA (P .50). During LS, EI for lactating A was greater than for BA and TA (P x Angus cattle appear to be comparable to BA with respect to heat adaptation. It appears that EI demands are greater in a hot environment. PMID:10875645

  14. Holographic kinetic k-essence model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cruz, Norman [Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencia, Universidad de Santiago de Chile, Casilla 307, Santiago (Chile)], E-mail: ncruz@lauca.usach.cl; Gonzalez-Diaz, Pedro F.; Rozas-Fernandez, Alberto [Colina de los Chopos, Instituto de Fisica Fundamental, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Serrano 121, 28006 Madrid (Spain)], E-mail: a.rozas@cfmac.csic.es; Sanchez, Guillermo [Departamento de Matematica y Ciencia de la Computacion, Facultad de Ciencia, Universidad de Santiago de Chile, Casilla 307, Santiago (Chile)], E-mail: gsanchez@usach.cl

    2009-08-31

    We consider a connection between the holographic dark energy density and the kinetic k-essence energy density in a flat FRW universe. With the choice c{>=}1, the holographic dark energy can be described by a kinetic k-essence scalar field in a certain way. In this Letter we show this kinetic k-essential description of the holographic dark energy with c{>=}1 and reconstruct the kinetic k-essence function F(X)

  15. Axial Vector $Z'$ and Anomaly Cancellation

    CERN Document Server

    Ismail, Ahmed; Tsao, Kuo-Hsing; Unwin, James

    2016-01-01

    Whilst the prospect of new $Z'$ gauge bosons with only axial couplings to the Standard Model (SM) fermions is widely discussed, examples of anomaly-free renormalisable models are lacking in the literature. We look to remedy this by constructing several motivated examples. Specifically, we consider axial vectors which couple universally to all SM fermions, as well as those which are generation-specific, leptophilic, and leptophobic. Anomaly cancellation typically requires the presence of new coloured and charged chiral fermions, and we argue that the masses of these new states must generally be comparable to that of the axial vector. Finally, an axial vector mediator could provide a portal between SM and hidden sector states, and we also consider the possibility that the axial vector couples to dark matter. If the dark matter relic density is set due to freeze-out via the axial vector, this strongly constrains the parameter space.

  16. Mass Effect on Axial Charge Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Guo, Er-dong

    2016-01-01

    We studied effect of finite quark mass on the dynamics of axial charge using the D3/D7 model in holography. The mass term in axial anomaly equation affects both the fluctuation (generation) and dissipation of axial charge. We studied the dependence of the effect on quark mass and external magnetic field. For axial charge generation, we calculated the mass diffusion rate, which characterizes the helicity flipping rate. The rate is a non-monotonous function of mass and can be significantly enhanced by the magnetic field. The diffusive behavior is also related to a divergent susceptibility of axial charge. For axial charge dissipation, we found that in the long time limit, the mass term dissipates all the charge effectively generated by parallel electric and magnetic fields. The result is consistent with a relaxation time approximation. The rate of dissipation through mass term is a monotonous increasing function of both quark mass and magnetic field.

  17. Origin of axial current in scyllac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The origin of the axial current observed in Scyllac (a high beta stellarator experiment) is discussed. A shaped coil and/or helical winding produce rotational transform which links magnetic lines of force to the plasma column and the axial current is induced electromagnetically. This phenomenon is inherent in a pulsed high-beta stellarator. The rotational transform produced by the induced axial current is much smaller than that associated with the l = 1, 0 equilibrium fields. The effect of the axial current on the equilibrium and stability of the plasma column is thus small. It is also shown that the magnetic field shear near a plasma surface is very strong

  18. Flow-Induced New Channels of Energy Exchange in Multi-Scale Plasma Dynamics – Revisiting Perturbative Hybrid Kinetic-MHD Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiraishi, Junya; Miyato, Naoaki; Matsunaga, Go

    2016-01-01

    It is found that new channels of energy exchange between macro- and microscopic dynamics exist in plasmas. They are induced by macroscopic plasma flow. This finding is based on the kinetic-magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) theory, which analyses interaction between macroscopic (MHD-scale) motion and microscopic (particle-scale) dynamics. The kinetic-MHD theory is extended to include effects of macroscopic plasma flow self-consistently. The extension is realised by generalising an energy exchange term due to wave-particle resonance, denoted by δ WK. The first extension is generalisation of the particle’s Lagrangian, and the second one stems from modification to the particle distribution function due to flow. These extensions lead to a generalised expression of δ WK, which affects the MHD stability of plasmas. PMID:27160346

  19. Flow-Induced New Channels of Energy Exchange in Multi-Scale Plasma Dynamics - Revisiting Perturbative Hybrid Kinetic-MHD Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiraishi, Junya; Miyato, Naoaki; Matsunaga, Go

    2016-01-01

    It is found that new channels of energy exchange between macro- and microscopic dynamics exist in plasmas. They are induced by macroscopic plasma flow. This finding is based on the kinetic-magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) theory, which analyses interaction between macroscopic (MHD-scale) motion and microscopic (particle-scale) dynamics. The kinetic-MHD theory is extended to include effects of macroscopic plasma flow self-consistently. The extension is realised by generalising an energy exchange term due to wave-particle resonance, denoted by δ WK. The first extension is generalisation of the particle's Lagrangian, and the second one stems from modification to the particle distribution function due to flow. These extensions lead to a generalised expression of δ WK, which affects the MHD stability of plasmas. PMID:27160346

  20. Flow-Induced New Channels of Energy Exchange in Multi-Scale Plasma Dynamics – Revisiting Perturbative Hybrid Kinetic-MHD Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiraishi, Junya; Miyato, Naoaki; Matsunaga, Go

    2016-05-01

    It is found that new channels of energy exchange between macro- and microscopic dynamics exist in plasmas. They are induced by macroscopic plasma flow. This finding is based on the kinetic-magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) theory, which analyses interaction between macroscopic (MHD-scale) motion and microscopic (particle-scale) dynamics. The kinetic-MHD theory is extended to include effects of macroscopic plasma flow self-consistently. The extension is realised by generalising an energy exchange term due to wave-particle resonance, denoted by δ WK. The first extension is generalisation of the particle’s Lagrangian, and the second one stems from modification to the particle distribution function due to flow. These extensions lead to a generalised expression of δ WK, which affects the MHD stability of plasmas.

  1. Enhanced betatron X-rays from axially modulated plasma wakefields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palastro, J. P.; Kaganovich, D.; Gordon, D. [Naval Research Laboratory, Washington DC 20375-5346 (United States)

    2015-06-15

    In the cavitation regime of plasma-based accelerators, a population of high-energy electrons trailing the driver can undergo betatron motion. The motion results in X-ray emission, but the brilliance and photon energy are limited by the electrons' initial transverse coordinate. To overcome this, we exploit parametrically unstable betatron motion in a cavitated, axially modulated plasma. Theory and simulations are presented showing that the unstable oscillations increase both the total X-ray energy and average photon energy.

  2. Dynamical influence of gravity waves generated by the Vestfjella Mountains in Antarctica: radar observations, fine-scale modelling and kinetic energy budget analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joel Arnault

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Gravity waves generated by the Vestfjella Mountains (in western Droning Maud Land, Antarctica, southwest of the Finnish/Swedish Aboa/Wasa station have been observed with the Moveable atmospheric radar for Antarctica (MARA during the SWEDish Antarctic Research Programme (SWEDARP in December 2007/January 2008. These radar observations are compared with a 2-month Weather Research Forecast (WRF model experiment operated at 2 km horizontal resolution. A control simulation without orography is also operated in order to separate unambiguously the contribution of the mountain waves on the simulated atmospheric flow. This contribution is then quantified with a kinetic energy budget analysis computed in the two simulations. The results of this study confirm that mountain waves reaching lower-stratospheric heights break through convective overturning and generate inertia gravity waves with a smaller vertical wavelength, in association with a brief depletion of kinetic energy through frictional dissipation and negative vertical advection. The kinetic energy budget also shows that gravity waves have a strong influence on the other terms of the budget, i.e. horizontal advection and horizontal work of pressure forces, so evaluating the influence of gravity waves on the mean-flow with the vertical advection term alone is not sufficient, at least in this case. We finally obtain that gravity waves generated by the Vestfjella Mountains reaching lower stratospheric heights generally deplete (create kinetic energy in the lower troposphere (upper troposphere–lower stratosphere, in contradiction with the usual decelerating effect attributed to gravity waves on the zonal circulation in the upper troposphere–lower stratosphere.

  3. Turbulence Kinetic Energy budget during the afternoon transition – Part 1: Observed surface TKE budget and boundary layer description for 10 intensive observation period days

    OpenAIRE

    Nilsson, E.; Lohou, F.; M. Lothon; Pardyjak, E.; Mahrt, L.; C. Darbieu

    2015-01-01

    The decay of turbulence kinetic energy (TKE) and its budget in the afternoon period from mid-day until zero buoyancy flux at the surface is studied in a two-part paper by means of measurements from the Boundary Layer Late Afternoon and Sunset Turbulence (BLLAST) field campaign for 10 Intensive Observation Period days. Here, in Part 1, near-surface measurements from a small tower are used to estimate a TKE budget. The overall boundary layer characteristics a...

  4. Assessing the sources of uncertainty associated with the calculation of rainfall kinetic energy and the erosivity R factor. Application to the Upper Llobregat Basin, NE Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Latron

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The sources of uncertainty associated with the calculation of rainfall kinetic energy and rainfall erosivity were investigated when the USLE R factor was operationally calculated for a mountainous river basin (504 km2 in the Southeastern Pyrenees. Rainfall kinetic energy was first obtained at the scale of the rainfall event by means of sub-hourly precipitation tipping-bucket rain gauge records and updates of the Kinnell (1981 equation. Annual erosivity values for the nearby pluviometric stations were then derived from the linear regressions between daily rainfall erosivity and daily precipitation, obtained for two different seasons. Finally, maps for rainfall erosivity estimates were obtained from the station values with Thiessen polygons. The sources of uncertainty analysed were i the tipping-bucket instrumental errors, ii the efficiency of the Kinnell (1981 equation, iii the efficiency of the regressions between daily precipitation and kinetic energy, iv the temporal variability of annual rainfall erosivity values, and the spatial variability of v annual rainfall erosivity values and vi long-term R factor values. The results showed that the uncertainty associated with the calculation of rainfall kinetic energy from rainfall intensity at the event and station scales is highly relevant and must be taken into account for experimental or modelling purposes; for longer temporal scales, the relevance of this source of uncertainty remains high if there is a low variability of the types of rain. Temporal variability of precipitation at wider spatial scales is the main source of uncertainty when rainfall erosivity is to be calculated on an annual basis, whereas the uncertainty associated with the long-term R factor is rather low and less important than the uncertainty associated with the other RUSLE factors when operationally used for long-term soil erosion modelling.

  5. Assessing the sources of uncertainty associated with the calculation of rainfall kinetic energy and erosivity – application to the Upper Llobregat Basin, NE Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Catari

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The diverse sources of uncertainty associated with the calculation of rainfall kinetic energy and rainfall erosivity, calculated from precipitation data, were investigated at a range of temporal and spatial scales in a mountainous river basin (504 km2 in the south-eastern Pyrenees. The sources of uncertainty analysed included both methodological and local sources of uncertainty and were (i tipping-bucket rainfall gauge instrumental errors, (ii the efficiency of the customary equation used to derive rainfall kinetic energy from intensity, (iii the efficiency of the regressions obtained between daily precipitation and rainfall erosivity, (iv the temporal variability of annual rainfall erosivity values, and the spatial variability of (v annual rainfall erosivity values and (vi long-term erosivity values. The differentiation between systematic (accuracy and random (precision errors was taken into account in diverse steps of the analysis. The results showed that the uncertainty associated with the calculation of rainfall kinetic energy from rainfall intensity at the event and station scales was as high as 30%, because of insufficient information on rainfall drop size distribution. This methodological limitation must be taken into account for experimental or modelling purposes when rainfall kinetic energy is derived solely from rainfall intensity data. For longer temporal scales, the relevance of this source of uncertainty remained high if low variability in the types of rain was supposed. Temporal variability of precipitation at wider spatial scales was the main source of uncertainty when rainfall erosivity was calculated on an annual basis, whereas the uncertainty associated with long-term erosivity was rather low and less important than the uncertainty associated with other model factors such as those in the RUSLE, when operationally used for long-term soil erosion modelling.

  6. Assessing the sources of uncertainty associated with the calculation of rainfall kinetic energy and erosivity – application to the Upper Llobregat Basin, NE Spain

    OpenAIRE

    Catari, G.; Latron, J.; Gallart, F.

    2011-01-01

    The diverse sources of uncertainty associated with the calculation of rainfall kinetic energy and rainfall erosivity, calculated from precipitation data, were investigated at a range of temporal and spatial scales in a mountainous river basin (504 km2) in the south-eastern Pyrenees. The sources of uncertainty analysed included both methodological and local sources of uncertainty and were (i) tipping-bucket rainfall gauge instrumental errors, (ii) the efficiency of the c...

  7. Comparing large eddy simulations and measurements of the turbulent kinetic energy budget in an urban canopy layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parlange, M. B.; Giometto, M. G.; Meneveau, C. V.; Fang, J.; Christen, A.

    2013-12-01

    Local turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) in the Urban Canopy Layer (UCL) is highly dependent on the actual configuration of obstacles relative to mean wind and stability. For many applications, building-resolving information is neither required nor feasible, and simply beyond the numerical capabilities of operational systems. Common urban canopy parameterizations (UCP) used in dispersion and mesoscale forecasting models hence rely on a horizontally averaged approach, where the UCL is represented as a 1D column, often for simplified geometries such as infinite street canyons. We use Large Eddy Simulations (LES) of the airflow over and within a realistic urban geometry in the city of Basel, Switzerland to determine all terms of the TKE budget in order to guide and validate current approaches used in UCPs. A series of high-resolution LES runs of the fully developed flow are performed in order to characterize the TKE budget terms in a horizontally averaged frame of view for various directions of the approaching flow under neutral conditions. Equations are solved on a regular domain with a horizontal resolution of 2 m. A Lagrangian scale-dependent LES model is adopted to parametrize the subgrid-scale stresses and buildings are taken into account adopting an immersed boundary approach with the geometry taken from a highly accurate digital building model. The modeled (periodic) domain is centered on the location of a 32 m tall tower, where measurements of turbulence were performed, during the BUBBLE program in 2001/02 (Rotach et al., Theor. Appl. Clim., 82, 231-261, 2005). Selected terms of the TKE budget were inferred from six levels of ultrasonic anemometer measurements operated over nearly a full year between ground level and two times the mean building height. This contribution answers the questions: (1) How well do TKE budget terms calculated by the LES at the exact tower location match the single point measurements on the tower under comparable conditions? (2) How

  8. Species-Specific Effects on Throughfall Kinetic Energy in Subtropical Forest Plantations Are Related to Leaf Traits and Tree Architecture.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philipp Goebes

    Full Text Available Soil erosion is a key threat to many ecosystems, especially in subtropical China where high erosion rates occur. While the mechanisms that induce soil erosion on agricultural land are well understood, soil erosion processes in forests have rarely been studied. Throughfall kinetic energy (TKE is influenced in manifold ways and often determined by the tree's leaf and architectural traits. We investigated the role of species identity in mono-specific stands on TKE by asking to what extent TKE is species-specific and which leaf and architectural traits account for variation in TKE. We measured TKE of 11 different tree species planted in monocultures in a biodiversity-ecosystem-functioning experiment in subtropical China, using sand-filled splash cups during five natural rainfall events in summer 2013. In addition, 14 leaf and tree architectural traits were measured and linked to TKE. Our results showed that TKE was highly species-specific. Highest TKE was found below Choerospondias axillaris and Sapindus saponaria, while Schima superba showed lowest TKE. These species-specific effects were mediated by leaf habit, leaf area (LA, leaf pinnation, leaf margin, stem diameter at ground level (GD, crown base height (CBH, tree height, number of branches and leaf area index (LAI as biotic factors and throughfall as abiotic factor. Among these, leaf habit, tree height and LA showed the highest effect sizes on TKE and can be considered as major drivers of TKE. TKE was positively influenced by LA, GD, CBH, tree height, LAI, and throughfall amount while it was negatively influenced by the number of branches. TKE was lower in evergreen, simple leaved and dentate leaved than in deciduous, pinnated or entire leaved species. Our results clearly showed that soil erosion in forest plantations can be mitigated by the appropriate choice of tree species.

  9. Turbulence kinetic energy budget and spatial heterogeneity of surface fluxes above and beneath an open pine canopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vickers, D.; Thomas, C. K.

    2013-12-01

    We examine the average contributions from shear generation, buoyancy production and vertical turbulent transport to the turbulence kinetic energy (TKE) tendency for two vertical layers of a tall open pine forest: a lower layer in the subcanopy space in contact with the understory and the surface, and an upper layer extending from the top half of the open subcanopy trunk space upwards to about twice the canopy height. The subcanopy TKE is strongly related to the TKE above the canopy, with approximately one-tenth the magnitude. In the upper layer, shear generation of turbulence dominates, while in the lower layer the vertical turbulent transfer of TKE is the largest of the three terms. The vertical turbulent transport in the lower layer is of similar magnitude but opposite sign to that in the upper layer. The observations suggest that a significant fraction of the subcanopy turbulence is driven by shear generation of turbulence above the canopy that is subsequently transported downward by turbulence into the subcanopy. In addition, we evaluate the spatial heterogeneity of the TKE, the three TKE tendency terms, the CO2 flux, moisture flux, heat flux and the friction velocity in the subcanopy. In terms of fluxes, the heterogeneity is by far the largest for the CO2 flux. Based on the observed weak heterogeneity of the turbulence and the strong heterogeneity of the CO2 flux, we conclude that significant variations in the CO2 source terms occur on scales smaller than our network, where the distance between measurement sites is 87 m. We also observe large systematic differences in the long-term average subcanopy moisture and especially CO2 flux depending on location within the network of measurement sites despite the lack of any clear differences in soils, exposure, vegetation, elevation or terrain slope.

  10. Experimental studies on the axial crash behavior of aluminum foam-filled hat sections

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Qing-chun; FAN Zi-jie; GUI Liang-jin; WANG Zheng-hong; FU Zi-lai

    2006-01-01

    Drop hammer tests were carried out to study the axial crash behavior of aluminum foam-filled hat sections.First,the axial crash tests of the empty hat sections,aluminum foam and the aluminum foam-filled hat sections were carried out;then,based upon the test results,the axial crash behavior of the aluminum foam-filled hat sections were analyzed.It was found that aluminum foam filling can increase the energy absorption capacities of the hat sections.Compared with the non-filled structures,aluminum foamfilled structures were much more stable and needed less mass to absorb the specified energy.

  11. Axial magnetic field and toroidally streaming fast ions in the dense plasma focus are natural consequences of conservation laws in the curved axisymmetric geometry of the current sheath

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Direct measurement of axial magnetic field in the PF-1000 dense plasma focus (DPF), and its reported correlation with neutron emission, call for a fresh look at previous reports of existence of axial magnetic field component in the DPF from other laboratories, and associated data suggesting toroidal directionality of fast ions participating in fusion reactions, with a view to understand the underlying physics. In this context, recent work dealing with application of the hyperbolic conservation law formalism to the DPF is extended in this paper to a curvilinear coordinate system, which reflects the shape of the DPF current sheath. Locally unidirectional shock propagation in this coordinate system enables construction of a system of 7 one-dimensional hyperbolic conservation law equations with geometric source terms, taking into account all the components of magnetic field and flow velocity. Rankine-Hugoniot jump conditions for this system lead to expressions for the axial magnetic field and three components of fluid velocity having high ion kinetic energy

  12. Health and imaging outcomes in axial spondyloarthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Machado, P.M.

    2016-01-01

    This thesis focuses on the assessment and monitoring of health and imaging outcomes in axial spondyloarthritis (SpA) and the relationship between these outcomes. Four major contributions to the understanding and management of axial SpA were made: 1) the improvement and facilitation of the assessment

  13. Energy

    CERN Document Server

    Foland, Andrew Dean

    2007-01-01

    Energy is the central concept of physics. Unable to be created or destroyed but transformable from one form to another, energy ultimately determines what is and isn''t possible in our universe. This book gives readers an appreciation for the limits of energy and the quantities of energy in the world around them. This fascinating book explores the major forms of energy: kinetic, potential, electrical, chemical, thermal, and nuclear.

  14. Heparin kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The author has studied the kinetics of heparin and heparin fractions after intravenous administration in humans and in this thesis the results of this study are reported. Basic knowledge about the physico-chemical properties of heparin and its interactions with proteins resulting in anticoagulant and lipolytic effects are discussed in a review (chapter II), which also comprises some clinical aspects of heparin therapy. In chapter III the kinetics of the anticoagulant effect are described after intravenous administration of five commercial heparin preparations. A mathematical model is presented that fits best to these kinetics. The kinetics of the anticoagulant and lipolytic effects after intravenous injection of various 35S-radiolabelled heparin fractions and their relationship with the disappearance of the radiolabel are described in chapter IV. Chapter V gives a description of the kinetics of two radiolabels after injection of in vitro formed complexes consisting of purified, 125I-radiolabelled antithrombin III and various 35S-radiolabelled heparin fractions. (Auth.)

  15. A non-resonant, gravity-induced micro triboelectric harvester to collect kinetic energy from low-frequency jiggling movements of human limbs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents a non-resonant, gravity-induced micro triboelectric harvester with high internal resistance. The device collects kinetic energy from low-frequency jiggling movements for the power supply of portable electric devices such as wristwatches. It includes a friction module to produce triboelectric charge and an electrostatic induction module to export energy. The friction that transfers charge is induced by jiggling movements, with gravity and inertia of an internal slider, instead of with external direct force. The non-resonant structure allows the device to respond to low frequencies of 1.5–5.5 Hz, covering the frequencies of human motion. Load resistance sweeping shows that the optimal load resistance is about 1.1 GΩ, with the peak output voltage of about 260 V, and the output power of 60 µW. The proposed harvester responds to low-frequency kinetic energy in jiggling movements matching that of a human limb's running motion; so it has potential to convert the mechanical energy of arm swings or strides into electric energy. (paper)

  16. Can the nucleon axial charge be O(Nc^0)?

    CERN Document Server

    Kojo, Toru

    2012-01-01

    The nucleon self-energy and its relation to the nucleon axial charge gA are discussed at large Nc. The energy is compared for the hedgehog, conventional, and recently proposed dichotomous nucleon wavefunctions which give different values for gA. We consider their energies at both perturbative and non-perturbative levels. In perturbative estimates, we take into account the pion exchanges among quarks up to the third orders of axial charge vertices, including the many-body forces such as the Wess-Zumino terms. It turns out that the perturbative pion exchanges among valence quarks give the same leading Nc contributions for three wavefunctions, while their mass differences are O(Lamba_qcd). The signs of splittings flip for different orders of the axial charge vertices, so it is hard to conclude which one is the most energetically favored. For non-perturbative estimates involving the modification of quark bases, we use the chiral quark soliton model as an illustration. With the hedgehog quark wavefunctions with gA...

  17. Assessing the sources of uncertainty associated with the calculation of rainfall kinetic energy and the erosivity R factor. Application to the Upper Llobregat Basin, NE Spain

    OpenAIRE

    Latron, J.; Gallart, F.; Catari, G.

    2010-01-01

    The sources of uncertainty associated with the calculation of rainfall kinetic energy and rainfall erosivity were investigated when the USLE R factor was operationally calculated for a mountainous river basin (504 km2) in the Southeastern Pyrenees. Rainfall kinetic energy was first obtained at the scale of the rainfall event by means of sub-hourly precipitation tipping-bucket rain gauge records and updates of the Kinnell (1981) equation. Annual erosivity values for the nearby pluviome...

  18. High-kinetic-energy photoemission spectroscopy of Ni at 1s : 6-eV satellite at 4 eV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karis, O.; Svensson, S.; Rusz, J.; Oppeneer, P. M.; Gorgoi, M.; Schäfers, F.; Braun, W.; Eberhardt, W.; Mårtensson, N.

    2008-12-01

    Electron correlations are responsible for many profound phenomena in solid-state physics. A classical example is the 6-eV satellite in the photoelectron spectrum of Ni. Until now the satellite structure has only been investigated at the L shell and more shallow levels. Here we report a high-kinetic-energy photoemission spectroscopy (HIKE) investigation of Ni metal. We present 1s and 2p photoelectron spectra, obtained using excitation energies up to 12.6 keV. Our investigation demonstrates that the energy position of the satellite relative to the main line is different for the 1s and the 2p levels. In combination with electronic structure calculations, we show that this energy shift is attributed to unique differences in the core-valence coupling for the K and L2,3 shells in 3d transition metals, resulting in different screening of the core holes.

  19. Axial force measurement for esophageal function testing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Flemming H Gravesen; Peter Funch-Jensen; Hans Gregersen; Asbjφrn Mohr Drewes

    2009-01-01

    The esophagus serves to transport food and fluid from the pharynx to the stomach. Manometry has been the "golden standard" for the diagnosis of esophageal motility diseases for many decades. Hence, esophageal function is normally evaluated by means of manometry even though it reflects the squeeze force (force in radial direction) whereas the bolus moves along the length of esophagus in a distal direction. Force measurements in the longitudinal (axial) direction provide a more direct measure of esophageal transport function. The technique used to record axial force has developed from external force transducers over in-vivo strain gauges of various sizes to electrical impedance based measurements. The amplitude and duration of the axial force has been shown to be as reliable as manometry. Normal, as well as abnormal, manometric recordings occur with normal bolus transit, which have been documented using imaging modalities such as radiography and scintigraphy. This inconsistency using manometry has also been documented by axial force recordings. This underlines the lack of information when diagnostics are based on manometry alone. Increasing the volume of a bag mounted on a probe with combined axial force and manometry recordings showed that axial force amplitude increased by 130% in contrast to an increase of 30% using manometry. Using axial force in combination with manometry provides a more complete picture of esophageal motility, and the current paper outlines the advantages of using this method.

  20. Axial force measurement for esophageal function testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gravesen, Flemming H; Funch-Jensen, Peter; Gregersen, Hans; Drewes, Asbjørn Mohr

    2009-01-14

    The esophagus serves to transport food and fluid from the pharynx to the stomach. Manometry has been the "golden standard" for the diagnosis of esophageal motility diseases for many decades. Hence, esophageal function is normally evaluated by means of manometry even though it reflects the squeeze force (force in radial direction) whereas the bolus moves along the length of esophagus in a distal direction. Force measurements in the longitudinal (axial) direction provide a more direct measure of esophageal transport function. The technique used to record axial force has developed from external force transducers over in-vivo strain gauges of various sizes to electrical impedance based measurements. The amplitude and duration of the axial force has been shown to be as reliable as manometry. Normal, as well as abnormal, manometric recordings occur with normal bolus transit, which have been documented using imaging modalities such as radiography and scintigraphy. This inconsistency using manometry has also been documented by axial force recordings. This underlines the lack of information when diagnostics are based on manometry alone. Increasing the volume of a bag mounted on a probe with combined axial force and manometry recordings showed that axial force amplitude increased by 130% in contrast to an increase of 30% using manometry. Using axial force in combination with manometry provides a more complete picture of esophageal motility, and the current paper outlines the advantages of using this method. PMID:19132762

  1. New Anomaly of the Axial-Vector Current

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Han-Xin

    2001-01-01

    By computing the axial-vector current operator equation, we find the anomalous axial-vector curl equation besides the well-known anomalous axial-vector divergence equation (the Adler-Bell-Jackiw anomaly) and discuss its implication.``

  2. Kinetic simulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    C.S. Chang

    2007-01-01

    @@ The ITER relevant edge plasmas in the present day experiments are in the kinetic regime,with the pedestalions in the long-mean-free-path banans collisionality regime and the pedestal electrons in the banana-plateau regime.

  3. Kinetic Interface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2009-01-01

    A kinetic interface for orientation detection in a video training system is disclosed. The interface includes a balance platform instrumented with inertial motion sensors. The interface engages a participant's sense of balance in training exercises.......A kinetic interface for orientation detection in a video training system is disclosed. The interface includes a balance platform instrumented with inertial motion sensors. The interface engages a participant's sense of balance in training exercises....

  4. Rotationally resolved vibrational spectra of AsH3 + (" separators=" X ˜ 2 A2 ″) : Tunneling splittings studied by zero-kinetic-energy photoelectron spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wei; Dai, Zuyang; Wang, Jia; Mo, Yuxiang

    2016-06-01

    The rotationally resolved vibrational spectra of AsH3 + (" separators=" X ˜ 2 A2 ″) have been measured for the first time with vibrational energies up to 6000 cm-1 above the ground state using the zero-kinetic-energy photoelectron method. The symmetric inversion vibrational energy levels ( v2 +) and the corresponding rotational constants for v2 + = 0 -15 have been determined. The tunneling splittings of the inversion vibration energy levels have been observed and are 0.8 and 37.7 (±0.5) cm-1 for the ground and the first excited vibrational states, respectively. The first adiabatic ionization energy for AsH3 was determined as 79 243.3 ± 1 cm-1. The geometric parameters of AsH3 + (" separators=" X ˜ 2 A2 ″) as a function of inversion vibrational numbers have been determined, indicating that the geometric structure of the cation changes from near-planar to pyramidal with increasing inversion vibrational excitation. In addition to the experimental measurements, a two-dimensional theoretical calculation considering the two symmetric vibrational modes was performed to determine the energy levels of the symmetric inversion, which are in good agreement with the experimental results. The inversion vibrational energy levels of SbH3 + (" separators=" X ˜ 2 A2 ″) have also been calculated and are found to have much smaller energy splittings than those of AsH3 + (" separators=" X ˜ 2 A2 ″) .

  5. Instability of meridional axial system in f(R) gravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharif, M.; Yousaf, Z. [University of the Punjab, Department of Mathematics, Lahore (Pakistan)

    2015-05-15

    We analyze the dynamical instability of a non-static reflection axial stellar structure by taking into account the generalized Euler equation in metric f(R) gravity. Such an equation is obtained by contracting the Bianchi identities of the usual anisotropic and effective stress-energy tensors, which after using a radial perturbation technique gives a modified collapse equation. In the realm of the R + εR{sup n} gravity model, we investigate instability constraints at Newtonian and post-Newtonian approximations. We find that the instability of a meridional axial self-gravitating system depends upon the static profile of the structure coefficients, while f(R) extra curvature terms induce the stability of the evolving celestial body. (orig.)

  6. Axial Ge/Si nanowire heterostructure tunnel FETs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Picraux, Sanuel T [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Daych, Shadi A [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    The vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) growth of semiconductor nanowires allows doping and composition modulation along their axis and the realization of axial 1 D heterostructures. This provides additional flexibility in energy band-edge engineering along the transport direction which is difficult to attain by planar materials growth and processing techniques. We report here on the design, growth, fabrication, and characterization of asymmetric heterostructure tunnel field-effect transistors (HTFETs) based on 100% compositionally modulated Si/Ge axial NWs for high on-current operation and low ambipolar transport behavior. We discuss the optimization of band-offsets and Schottky barrier heights for high performance HTFETs and issues surrounding their experimental realization. Our HTFET devices with 10 nm PECVD SiN{sub x} gate dielectric resulted in a measured current drive exceeding 100 {mu}A/{mu}m (I/{pi}D) and 10{sup 5} I{sub on}/I{sub off} ratios.

  7. Axial Thermal Rotation of Slender Rods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dichuan; Fakhri, Nikta; Pasquali, Matteo; Biswal, Sibani Lisa

    2011-05-01

    Axial rotational diffusion of rodlike polymers is important in processes such as microtubule filament sliding and flagella beating. By imaging the motion of small kinks along the backbone of chains of DNA-linked colloids, we produce a direct and systematic measurement of axial rotational diffusivity of rods both in bulk solution and near a wall. The measured diffusivities decrease linearly with the chain length, irrespective of the distance from a wall, in agreement with slender-body hydrodynamics theory. Moreover, the presence of small kinks does not affect the chain’s axial diffusivity. Our system and measurements provide insights into fundamental axial diffusion processes of slender objects, which encompass a wide range of entities including biological filaments and linear polymer chains.

  8. Axial force measurement for esophageal function testing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gravesen, Flemming Holbæk; Funch-Jensen, Peter; Gregersen, Hans;

    2009-01-01

    force (force in radial direction) whereas the bolus moves along the length of esophagus in a distal direction. Force measurements in the longitudinal (axial) direction provide a more direct measure of esophageal transport function. The technique used to record axial force has developed from external...... force transducers over in-vivo strain gauges of various sizes to electrical impedance based measurements. The amplitude and duration of the axial force has been shown to be as reliable as manometry. Normal, as well as abnormal, manometric recordings occur with normal bolus transit, which have been...... documented using imaging modalities such as radiography and scintigraphy. This inconsistency using manometry has also been documented by axial force recordings. This underlines the lack of information when diagnostics are based on manometry alone. Increasing the volume of a bag mounted on a probe...

  9. Oxidation of aqueous HF-treated Si(001) surface induced by translational kinetic energy of O sub 2 at room temperature

    CERN Document Server

    Yoshigoe, A

    2003-01-01

    The oxidation induced by the translational kinetic energy of O sub 2 on the Si(001) surface treated with HF solution were investigated by combining synchrotron radiation photoemission spectroscopy with the supersonic molecular beam techniques. The oxidation at room temperature did not progress up to 3600 L of O sub 2 exposure with incident energy of 0.04 eV, whereas the oxidation states of up to Si sup 4 sup + species were formed in the case of 3.0 eV. The oxide-layer thickness was estimated to be 0.26 nm at the final oxidation stages. We concluded that the Si atoms at the top layers were oxidized by the incident energy of 3.0 eV.

  10. Nonperturbative features of the axial current

    CERN Document Server

    Kopeliovich, B Z; Siddikov, M

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we study the nonperturbative structure of the axial current and evaluate the two-point distribution amplitudes $\\int d\\xi\\, e^{-iq...\\xi}$ in the framework of the instanton vacuum model in the leading order in $\\mathcal{O}(N_{c})$. We perform a direct numerical test of the relations between the axial current and the pion distribution amplitudes, imposed by PCAC, and found excellent agreement.

  11. PAMELA results on the cosmic-ray antiproton flux from 60 MeV to 180 GeV in kinetic energy

    CERN Document Server

    Adriani, O; Bazilevskaya, G A; Bellotti, R; Boezio, M; Bogomolov, E A; Bonechi, L; Bongi, M; Bonvicini, V; Borisov, S; Bottai, S; Bruno, A; Cafagna, F; Campana, D; Carbone, R; Carlson, P; Casolino, M; Castellini, G; Consiglio, L; De Pascale, M P; De Santis, C; De Simone, N; Di Felice, V; Galper, A M; Gillard, W; Grishantseva, L; Hofverberg, P; Jerse, G; Karelin, A V; Koldashov, S V; Krutkov, S Y; Kvashnin, A N; Leonov, A; Malvezzi, V; Marcelli, L; Mayorov, A G; Menn, W; Mikhailov, V V; Mocchiutti, E; Monaco, A; Mori, N; Nikonov, N; Osteria, G; Papini, P; Pearce, M; Picozza, P; Pizzolotto, C; Ricci, M; Ricciarini, S B; Rossetto, L; Simon, M; Sparvoli, R; Spillantini, P; Stozhkov, Y I; Vacchi, A; Vannuccini, E; Vasilyev, G; Voronov, S A; Wu, J; Yurkin, Y T; Zampa, G; Zampa, N; Zverev, V G

    2010-01-01

    The satellite-borne experiment PAMELA has been used to make a new measurement of the cosmic-ray antiproton flux and the antiproton-to-proton flux ratio which extends previously published measurements down to 60 MeV and up to 180 GeV in kinetic energy. During 850 days of data acquisition approximately 1500 antiprotons were observed. The measurements are consistent with purely secondary production of antiprotons in the galaxy. More precise secondary production models are required for a complete interpretation of the results.

  12. Activation energy and R. Chen frequency factor in the Randall and Wilkins original equation for second order kinetics. Emission curve simulated in Microsoft Excel algebra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work the incorporation of activation energy and frequency factor parameters proposed by R. Chen are presented in the original formulation of Randall and wilkins second order kinetics. The results concordance are compared between the calculus following the R. Chen methodology with those ones obtained by direct incorporation of the previously indicated in the Randall-Wilkins-Levy expression for a simulated thermoluminescent emission curve of two peaks with maximum peak temperature (tm): t m1=120 and t m2=190. (Author)

  13. Design of Off-statistics Axial-flow Fans by Means of Vortex Law Optimization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Andrea Lazari; Andrea Cattanei

    2014-01-01

    Off-statistics input data sets are common in axial-flow fans design and may easily result in some violation of the requirements of a good aerodynamic blade design.In order to circumvent this problem,in the present paper,a solution to the radial equilibrium equation is found which minimizes the outlet kinetic energy and fulfills the aerodynamic constraints,thus ensuring that the resulting blade has acceptable aerodynamic performance.The presented method is based on the optimization of a three-parameters vortex law and of the meridional channel size.The aerodynamic quantities to be employed as constraints are individuated and their suitable ranges of variation are proposed.The method is validated by means of a design with critical input data values and CFD analysis.Then,by means of systematic computations with different input data sets,some correlations and charts are obtained which are analogous to classic correlations based on statistical investigations on existing machines.Such new correlations help size a fan of given characteristics as well as study the feasibility of a given design.

  14. Algebraic stress model for axial flow in a bare rod-bundle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The problem of predicting transport properties for momentum and heat across the boundaries of interconnected channels has been the subject of many investigations. In the particular case of axial flow through rod-bundles, transport coefficients for channel faces aligned with rod centers are known to be considerably higher than those calculated by simple isotropic theories. And yet, it was been found that secondary flows play only a minor role in this overall transport, being turbulence highly enhanced across that hypothetical surface. In order to numerically predict the correct amount of the quantity being transported, the approach taken by many investigators was then to artificially increase the diffusion coefficient obtained via a simple isopropic theory (usually the standard k-ε model) and numerically match the correct experimentally observed mixing rates. The present paper reports an attempt to describe the turbulent stresses by means of an Algebraic Stress Model for turbulence. Relative turbulent kinetic energy distribution in all three directions are presented and compared with experiments in a square lattice. The strong directional dependence of transport terms are then obtained via a model for the Reynolds stresses. The results identify a need for a better representation of the mean-flow field part of the pressure-strain correlation term

  15. Axial design of nuclear fuel using path relinking; Diseno axial de combustible nuclear utilizando path relinking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castillo, A.; Torres, M.; Ortiz, J. J.; Perusquia, R.; Hernandez, J. L.; Montes, J. L. [ININ, 52750 La Marquesa, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)]. e-mail: jacm@nuclear.inin.mx

    2008-07-01

    In the present work the preliminary results were obtained with the zoctli system whose purpose is the axial design of assembly of nuclear fuel under certain considerations. For the mentioned design well-know cells were already used and that they have been proven in diverse cycles of operation in the nuclear power plant of Laguna Verde. The design contemplates fuels assemblies of 10x10 and with 2 water channels. The assembly was distributed in 6 axial zones according to its structure. In order to take to end the optimization is was used the well-known technique like Path relinking and to find the group of previous solutions required by this technique uses the technical Taboo search. In order to work with Path relinking, 5 trajectories was taken in to account from a set of 5 previous solutions generated with theTaboo search, the update of the group of solutions is carried out in dynamic form. In the case of the Taboo search it was used a list of variable size, it was implement an aspiration approach, it was used the vector of frequencies and due to the cost of the evaluation of the objective function, only it was review 5% of the vicinity. For the objective function was considered the limit thermal, the axial profile of power, the effective multiplication factor and the margin of having turned off in cold. In order to prove the design system, it was used a balance cycle with a value of reference of 0.9928 for the effective multiplication factor that is equivalent to a produced energy of 10896 MWd/TU at the end of operation to full power. The designed assemblies were placed both in one of lots different from fresh assemblies on which it counts the referred cycle. At the end one a comparison with the results obtained with other techniques and under similar conditions is made. The results obtained until the moment show an appropriate performance of the system. It is possible to indicate that a small inconvenient is the amount of consumed resources of calculation during

  16. Influence of aeration and initial water thickness on axial velocity attenuation of jet flows

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang-ru WEI; Jun DENG; Bin LIU

    2013-01-01

    With the development of ski-jump energy dissipation for high and large discharge among the hydraulic projects,the effects of characteristics of water flow on energy dissipation are increasingly important.In the present study,the effects of aeration and the initial water thickness on axial velocity attenuation of jet flow were analyzed,using variance analysis and numerical calculated methods.From the analysis of test data,both of the air concentration and initial water thickness are sensitive factors for the axial velocity attenuation of jet flow along the axial way,and there is no significant interaction effect between the aeration and initial water thickness.Aeration has a more significant effect on the axial velocity attenuation of jet flow.Decreasing the initial water thickness of jet flow can reduce the length of jet core,and make the initial position of axial velocity attenuation closer to the nozzle exit.The numerical calculation results show that aeration can contribute to the enhancement of entrainment ability of jet flow,which may improve the interaction between jet flow and surroundings.For ski-jump energy dissipation among the hydraulic projects,combining aeration with decreasing initial water thickness of jet flow is an effective way to enhance the rate of axial velocity attenuation.

  17. Large eddy simulation study of turbulent kinetic energy and scalar variance budgets and turbulent/non-turbulent interface in planar jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Tomoaki; Sakai, Yasuhiko; Nagata, Koji; Ito, Yasumasa

    2016-04-01

    Spatially developing planar jets with passive scalar transports are simulated for various Reynolds (Re = 2200, 7000, and 22 000) and Schmidt numbers (Sc = 1, 4, 16, 64, and 128) by the implicit large eddy simulation (ILES) using low-pass filtering as an implicit subgrid-scale model. The budgets of resolved turbulent kinetic energy k and scalar variance are explicitly evaluated from the ILES data except for the dissipation terms, which are obtained from the balance in the transport equations. The budgets of k and in the ILES agree well with the DNS and experiments for both high and low Re cases. The streamwise decay of the mean turbulent kinetic energy dissipation rate obeys the power low obtained by the scaling argument. The mechanical-to-scalar timescale ratio C ϕ is evaluated in the self-similar region. For the high Re case, C ϕ is close to the isotropic value (C ϕ = 2) near the jet centerline. However, when Re is not large, C ϕ is smaller than 2 and depends on the Schmidt number. The T/NT interface is also investigated by using the scalar isosurface. The velocity and scalar fields near the interface depend on the interface orientation for all Re. The velocity toward the interface is observed near the interface facing in the streamwise, cross-streamwise, and spanwise directions in the planar jet in the resolved velocity field.

  18. Axial Non-linear Dynamic Soil-Pile Interaction - Keynote

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holeyman A.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This keynote lecture describes recent analytical and numerical advances in the modeling of the axial nonlinear dynamic interaction between a single pile and its embedding soil. On one hand, analytical solutions are developed for assessing the nonlinear axial dynamic response of the shaft of a pile subjected to dynamic loads, and in particular to vibratory loads. Radial inhomogeneity arising from shear modulus degradation is evaluated over a range of parameters and compared with those obtained by other authors and by a numerical radial discrete model simulating the pile and soil movements from integration of the laws of motion. New approximate non linear solutions for axial pile shaft behaviour developed from general elastodynamic equations are presented and compared to existing linear solutions. The soil non linear behaviour and its ability to dissipate mechanical energy upon cyclic loading are shown to have a significant influence on the mechanical impedance provided by the surrounding soil against pile shaft movement. The limitations of over-simplified modelling of pile response are highlighted.

  19. Erbium hydride decomposition kinetics.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferrizz, Robert Matthew

    2006-11-01

    Thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) is used to study the decomposition kinetics of erbium hydride thin films. The TDS results presented in this report are analyzed quantitatively using Redhead's method to yield kinetic parameters (E{sub A} {approx} 54.2 kcal/mol), which are then utilized to predict hydrogen outgassing in vacuum for a variety of thermal treatments. Interestingly, it was found that the activation energy for desorption can vary by more than 7 kcal/mol (0.30 eV) for seemingly similar samples. In addition, small amounts of less-stable hydrogen were observed for all erbium dihydride films. A detailed explanation of several approaches for analyzing thermal desorption spectra to obtain kinetic information is included as an appendix.

  20. Optimization of residual heat removal pump axial thrust and axial bearing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schubert, F.

    1996-12-01

    The residual heat removal (RHR) pumps of German 1300 megawatt pressurized-water reactor (PWR) power plants are of the single stage end suction type with volute casing or with diffuser and forged circular casing. Due to the service conditions the pumps have to cover the full capacity range as well as a big variation in suction static pressure. This results in a big difference in the axial thrust that has to be borne by the axial bearing. Because these pumps are designed to operate without auxiliary systems (things that do not exist can not fail), they are equipped with antifriction bearings and sump oil lubrication. To minimize the heat production within the bearing casing, a number of PWR plants have pumps with combined axial/radial bearings of the ball type. Due to the fact that the maximum axial thrust caused by static pressure and hydrodynamic forces on the impeller is too big to be borne by that type of axial bearing, the impellers were designed to produce a hydrodynamic axial force that counteracts the static axial force. Thus, the resulting axial thrust may change direction when the static pressure varies.

  1. Polarization converters based on axially symmetric twisted nematic liquid crystal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Shih-Wei; Ting, Chi-Lun; Fuh, Andy Y-G; Lin, Tsung-Hsien

    2010-02-15

    An axially symmetric twisted nematic liquid crystal (ASTNLC) device, based on axially symmetric photoalignment, was demonstrated. Such an ASTNLC device can convert axial (azimuthal) to azimuthal (axial) polarization. The optical properties of the ASTNLC device are analyzed and found to agree with simulation results. The ASTNLC device with a specific device can be adopted as an arbitrary axial symmetric polarization converter or waveplate for axially, azimuthally or vertically polarized light. A design for converting linear polarized light to axially symmetric circular polarized light is also demonstrated. PMID:20389369

  2. Controllable rectification of the axial expansion in the thermally driven artificial muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Donghua; Zhang, Xingyi; Yong, Huadong; Zhou, Jun; Zhou, You-He

    2015-09-01

    At present, the concept of artificial muscle twisted by polymers or fibers has become a hot issue in the field of intelligent material research according to its distinguishing advantages, e.g., high energy density, large-stroke, non-hysteresis, and inexpensive. The axial thermal expansion coefficient is an important parameter which can affect its demanding applications. In this letter, a device with high accuracy capacitive sensor is constructed to measure the axial thermal expansion coefficient of the twisted carbon fibers and yarns of Kevlar, and a theoretical model based on the thermal elasticity and the geometrical features of the twisted structure are also presented to predict the axial expansion coefficient. It is found that the calculated results take good agreements with the experimental data. According to the present experiment and analyses, a method to control the axial thermal expansion coefficient of artificial muscle is proposed. Moreover, the mechanism of this kind of thermally driven artificial muscle is discussed.

  3. New determination of the $N$-$\\Delta(1232)$ axial form factors from weak pion production and coherent pion production off nuclei at T2K and MiniBooNE energies revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Hernández, E; Valverde, M; Vicente-Vacas, M J

    2010-01-01

    We re-evaluate our model predictions in Phys. Rev. D 79, 013002 (2009) for different observables in neutrino induced coherent pion production. This comes as a result of the new improved fit to old bubble chamber data of the dominant axial C_5^A nucleon-to-Delta form factor. We find an increase of 20%-30% in the values for the total cross sections. Uncertainties induced by the errors in the determination of C_5^A are computed. Our new results turn out to be compatible within about $1\\sigma$ with the former ones. We also stress the existing tension between the recent experimental determination of the \\sigma(CC coh \\pi^+)}/\\sigma(NC coh \\pi^0)} $ ratio by the SciBooNE Collaboration and the theoretical predictions.

  4. Supplementing energy and protein source at different rate of degradability to mixture of corn waste and coffee pod as basal diet on rumen fermentation kinetic of beef cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dicky Pamungkas

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The use of corn waste and coffee pod as basal diet needs energy and protein supplementation in order to optimize rumen microbial growth. A research was done to study the appropriate supplement which is suitable based on the result of rumen fermentation kinetics. Four ruminally canulated cows, (205-224 kg of live weight were placed in individual cages. The basal diet (BD offered were corn waste and coffee pod mixture (80:20. Source of high degradable energy (HDE was cassava pomace; while the low degradable energy (LDE was arenga piñata waste. The high degradable protein (HDP was mixed-concentrate while the low degradable protein (LDP was leucaena leave meal. The supplementation of energy and protein to basal diet was in ratio of 50:50 based on dry matter. Feed offered were basal diet and the supplement at ratio of 60: 40 (3 % of LW. Observation was carried out for 4 periods (10 days/period. In each period, animal was fed one of the following diets: A = BD, B = BD+ HDE+LDP, C = BD+LDE+LDP, and D = BD+HDE+HDP. Rumen kinetics observed were: pH, and VFA, NH3 and rumen microbial protein concentrations. Rumen fluid was taken at the end of each period gradually along the course of 24 hours fermentation. The results showed that the diets gave significant effect (P < 0.05 on rumen pH. The lowest rumen pH (5.76 was observed on diet D at 2:00, 12 hours after feeding. Meanwhile, the highest pH (7.22 was found in animal fed diet A at 16:00. The total VFA on diet D of periode:1, 3 and 4 showed the highest level: 68.1 mmol/l; 75.37 mmol/l and 85.14 mmol/l respectively. The highest NH3 concentration was found in diet D followed by diet C, B and A. At 12:00 observation or at 4 h after morning feeding the highest NH3 was observed from diet D (41.94 mg/100 ml. It is concluded that diet D resulted in the best rumen fermentation kinetic, therefore it could be used in feed formulation in cattle diets.

  5. Holographic kinetic k-essence model

    OpenAIRE

    Cruz, N.; González Díaz, Pedro F.; Rozas Fernández, Alberto; Sánchez, G.

    2008-01-01

    We consider a connection between the holographic dark energy density and the kinetic k-essence energy density in a flat FRW universe. With the choice c ≥ 1, the holographic dark energy can be described by a kinetic k-essence scalar field in a certain way. In this Letter we show this kinetic k-essential description of the holographic dark energy with c ≥ 1 and reconstruct the kinetic k-essence function F (X). © 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Axial flow positive displacement worm gas generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murrow, Kurt David (Inventor); Giffin, Rollin George (Inventor); Fakunle, Oladapo (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    An axial flow positive displacement engine has an inlet axially spaced apart and upstream from an outlet. Inner and outer bodies have offset inner and outer axes extend from the inlet to the outlet through first, second, and third sections of a core assembly in serial downstream flow relationship. At least one of the bodies is rotatable about its axis. The inner and outer bodies have intermeshed inner and outer helical blades wound about the inner and outer axes respectively. The inner and outer helical blades extend radially outwardly and inwardly respectively. The helical blades have first, second, and third twist slopes in the first, second, and third sections respectively. The first twist slopes are less than the second twist slopes and the third twist slopes are less than the second twist slopes. A combustor section extends axially downstream through at least a portion of the second section.

  7. Improving the lattice axial vector current

    CERN Document Server

    Horsley, R; Perlt, H; Rakow, P E L; Schierholz, G; Schiller, A; Zanotti, J M

    2015-01-01

    For Wilson and clover fermions traditional formulations of the axial vector current do not respect the continuum Ward identity which relates the divergence of that current to the pseudoscalar density. Here we propose to use a point-split or one-link axial vector current whose divergence exactly satisfies a lattice Ward identity, involving the pseudoscalar density and a number of irrelevant operators. We check in one-loop lattice perturbation theory with SLiNC fermion and gauge plaquette action that this is indeed the case including order $O(a)$ effects. Including these operators the axial Ward identity remains renormalisation invariant. First preliminary results of a nonperturbative check of the Ward identity are also presented.

  8. Axial Stiffness of Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes

    OpenAIRE

    Zavalniuk, Vladimir

    2011-01-01

    The axial stiffness of MWCNTs is demonstrated to be determined only by several external shells (usually 3-5 and up to 15 for the extremely large nanotubes and high elongations) what is in a good agreement with experimentally observed inverse relation between the radius and Young modulus (i.e., stiffness) of MWCNTs. This result is a consequence of the van der Waals intershell interaction. The interpolating formula is obtained for the actual axial stiffness of MWCNT as a function of the tube ex...

  9. Axial loaded MRI of the lumbar spine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saifuddin, A. E-mail: asaifuddin@aol.com; Blease, S.; MacSweeney, E

    2003-09-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging is established as the technique of choice for assessment of degenerative disorders of the lumbar spine. However, it is routinely performed with the patient supine and the hips and knees flexed. The absence of axial loading and lumbar extension results in a maximization of spinal canal dimensions, which may in some cases, result in failure to demonstrate nerve root compression. Attempts have been made to image the lumbar spine in a more physiological state, either by imaging with flexion-extension, in the erect position or by using axial loading. This article reviews the literature relating to the above techniques.

  10. Kinetic parameters, collision rates, energy exchanges and transport coefficients of non-thermal electrons in premixed flames at sub-breakdown electric field strengths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisetti, Fabrizio; El Morsli, Mbark

    2014-01-01

    The effects of an electric field on the collision rates, energy exchanges and transport properties of electrons in premixed flames are investigated via solutions to the Boltzmann kinetic equation. The case of high electric field strength, which results in high-energy, non-thermal electrons, is analysed in detail at sub-breakdown conditions. The rates of inelastic collisions and the energy exchange between electrons and neutrals in the reaction zone of the flame are characterised quantitatively. The analysis includes attachment, ionisation, impact dissociation, and vibrational and electronic excitation processes. Our results suggest that Townsend breakdown occurs for E/N = 140 Td. Vibrational excitation is the dominant process up to breakdown, despite important rates of electronic excitation of CO, CO2 and N2 as well as impact dissociation of O2 being apparent from 50 Td onwards. Ohmic heating in the reaction zone is found to be negligible (less than 2% of peak heat release rate) up to breakdown field strengths for realistic electron densities equal to 1010 cm-3. The observed trends are largely independent of equivalence ratio. In the non-thermal regime, electron transport coefficients are insensitive to mixture composition and approximately constant across the flame, but are highly dependent on the electric field strength. In the thermal limit, kinetic parameters and transport coefficients vary substantially across the flame due to the spatially inhomogeneous concentration of water vapour. A practical approach for identifying the plasma regime (thermal versus non-thermal) in studies of electric field effects on flames is proposed.

  11. Kinetic parameters, collision rates, energy exchanges and transport coefficients of non-thermal electrons in premixed flames at sub-breakdown electric field strengths

    KAUST Repository

    Bisetti, Fabrizio

    2014-01-02

    The effects of an electric field on the collision rates, energy exchanges and transport properties of electrons in premixed flames are investigated via solutions to the Boltzmann kinetic equation. The case of high electric field strength, which results in high-energy, non-thermal electrons, is analysed in detail at sub-breakdown conditions. The rates of inelastic collisions and the energy exchange between electrons and neutrals in the reaction zone of the flame are characterised quantitatively. The analysis includes attachment, ionisation, impact dissociation, and vibrational and electronic excitation processes. Our results suggest that Townsend breakdown occurs for E/N = 140 Td. Vibrational excitation is the dominant process up to breakdown, despite important rates of electronic excitation of CO, CO2 and N2 as well as impact dissociation of O2 being apparent from 50 Td onwards. Ohmic heating in the reaction zone is found to be negligible (less than 2% of peak heat release rate) up to breakdown field strengths for realistic electron densities equal to 1010 cm-3. The observed trends are largely independent of equivalence ratio. In the non-thermal regime, electron transport coefficients are insensitive to mixture composition and approximately constant across the flame, but are highly dependent on the electric field strength. In the thermal limit, kinetic parameters and transport coefficients vary substantially across the flame due to the spatially inhomogeneous concentration of water vapour. A practical approach for identifying the plasma regime (thermal versus non-thermal) in studies of electric field effects on flames is proposed. © 2014 Taylor & Francis.

  12. Stability analysis of restricted non-static axial symmetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharif, M.; Bhatti, M. Zaeem Ul Haq, E-mail: msharif.math@pu.edu.pk, E-mail: mzaeem.math@gmail.com [Department of Mathematics, University of the Punjab, Quaid-e-Azam Campus, Lahore-54590 (Pakistan)

    2013-11-01

    This paper aims to investigate the instability of very restricted class of non-static axially symmetric spacetime with anisotropic matter configuration. The perturbation scheme is established for the Einstein field equations and conservation laws. The instability range in the Newtonian and post-Newtonian regions are explored by constructing the collapse equation in this scenario. It is found that the adiabatic index plays an important role in the stability analysis which depends upon the physical parameters i.e., energy density and anisotropic pressure of the fluid distribution.

  13. Stability analysis of restricted non-static axial symmetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper aims to investigate the instability of very restricted class of non-static axially symmetric spacetime with anisotropic matter configuration. The perturbation scheme is established for the Einstein field equations and conservation laws. The instability range in the Newtonian and post-Newtonian regions are explored by constructing the collapse equation in this scenario. It is found that the adiabatic index plays an important role in the stability analysis which depends upon the physical parameters i.e., energy density and anisotropic pressure of the fluid distribution

  14. Kinetic-Energy Distributions of Positive and Negative Ions in DC Townsend Discharges of CHF3 at High E/N

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, M. V. V. S.; van Brunt, R. J.; Olthoff, J. K.

    1997-10-01

    In this paper we present ion kinetic-energy distributions (IEDs), mean energies, and relative abundances of CF_3^+, CF_2^+, CF^+, CHF_2^+, CHF^+, CH^+, C^+, H^+, and F- ions produced in dc Townsend discharges in pure CHF_3. The discharges are generated at electric field-to-gas density ratios (E/N) ranging from 5 x 10-18 Vm^2 to 25 x 10-18 Vm^2 (5 to 25 kTd). Ions sampled from the discharge through a small orifice in the center of the grounded electrode were energy and mass analyzed by an electrostatic energy analyzer attached to a quadrupole mass spectrometer.(M. V. V. S. Rao, R. J. Van Brunt, and J. K. Olthoff, Phys. Rev. E 54), 5641 (1996) In the present experiments, CHF_2^+ was determined to be the dominant positive ion at all E/N, followed by CF^+. The negative ion fluxes were substantially lower than the positive ion fluxes, with F^- being the only negative ion with significant intensity. At 5 kTd, the IEDs of all positive ions exhibit Maxwellian behavior. However, at higher E/N the role of collisional dissociation processes increases and the IEDs of the positive ions deviate from those predicted by simple collisional charge-transfer models. The IEDs for F^- are non-maxwellian at all E/N.

  15. A kinetic model incorporating both localized and delocalized recombination: Application to the dependence of the TL dose response on photon energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A conduction band/valence band kinetic model for thermoluminescence (TL) dose response is described which incorporates both localized and delocalized recombination mechanisms. The model is capable of simulating the linear/supralinear behaviour of TL dose response and, as well, the experimentally observed decrease of the supralinearity with decreasing photon energy. These characteristics are observed in the dose response of the various peaks in the glow curve of LiF:Mg,Ti and in other TL materials. In the irradiation stage, the model uses nanodosimetric considerations to describe the electron–hole concentration, ne–h and e-only concentration, ne, filling rates with dose of a spatially correlated trapping center/luminescent center (TC/LC) complex. The linear dose response arises from the dominant role of the geminate/localized recombination at low dose. The supralinearity arises due to the increased relative intensity of delocalized recombination at high dose coupled with a decrease in the efficiency of the competitive processes with increasing dose. The dependence of the supralinearity on photon energy is obtained by adopting different dose-filling-rates of ne–h and ne as a function of photon energy. Specifically, for low dose-levels below ∼1–10 Gy, ne–h/ne is assumed to increase slowly/linearly with dose and to increase slightly with decreasing photon energy below ∼100 keV due to the increasing average ionization density of the electron tracks. For levels of dose above ∼10 Gy, the ratio increases more rapidly in an exponential manner with later entry to maximum values with decreasing photon energy. The demarcation dose of ∼1–10 Gy separating the linear from the exponentially increasing behaviour of ne–h/ne corresponds to the approximate onset of supralinearity observed for composite peak 5 in LiF:Mg,Ti. This assumed behaviour for ne–h/ne is consistent with the structure/size of electron tracks and the onset and relative importance of intra

  16. Physisorption kinetics

    CERN Document Server

    Kreuzer, Hans Jürgen

    1986-01-01

    This monograph deals with the kinetics of adsorption and desorption of molecules physisorbed on solid surfaces. Although frequent and detailed reference is made to experiment, it is mainly concerned with the theory of the subject. In this, we have attempted to present a unified picture based on the master equation approach. Physisorption kinetics is by no means a closed and mature subject; rather, in writing this monograph we intended to survey a field very much in flux, to assess its achievements so far, and to give a reasonable basis from which further developments can take off. For this reason we have included many papers in the bibliography that are not referred to in the text but are of relevance to physisorption. To keep this monograph to a reasonable size, and also to allow for some unity in the presentation of the material, we had to omit a number of topics related to physisorption kinetics. We have not covered to any extent the equilibrium properties of physisorbed layers such as structures, phase tr...

  17. Knowledge Based Design of Axial Flow Compressor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinesh kumar.R

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In the aerospace industry with highly competitive market the time to design and delivery is shortening every day. Pressure on delivering robust product with cost economy is in demand in each development. Even though technology is older, it is new for each customer requirement and highly non-liner to fit one in another place. Gas turbine is considered one of a complex design in the aircraft system. It involves experts to be grouped with designers of various segments to arrive the best output. The time is crucial to achieve a best design and it needs knowledge automation incorporated with CAD/CAE tools. In the present work an innovative idea in the form of Knowledge Based Engineering for axial compressor is proposed, this includes the fundamental design of axial compressor integrated with artificial intelligence in the form of knowledge capturing and programmed with high level language (Visual Basis.Net and embedded into CATIA v5. This KBE frame work eases out the design and modeling of axial compressor design and produces 3D modeling for further flow simulation with fluid dynamic in Ansys-Fluent. Most of the aerospace components are developed through simulation driven product development and in this case it is established for axial compressor.

  18. The Axial Current in Electromagnetic Interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Cheoun, M K; Cheon, I T; Cheoun, Myung Ki; Cheon, Il-Tong

    1998-01-01

    We discussed the possibility that the charged axial currents of matter fields could be non-conserved in electromagnetic interaction at $O(e) $ order. It means that chiral symmetry is broken explicitly by electromagnetic interaction. This explicit symmetry breaking of chiral symmetry is shown to lead the mass differences between the charged and neutral particles of matter fields.

  19. Primitive axial algebras of Jordan type

    OpenAIRE

    Hall, J I; Rehren, F; Shpectorov, S.

    2014-01-01

    An axial algebra over the field $\\mathbb F$ is a commutative algebra generated by idempotents whose adjoint action has multiplicity-free minimal polynomial. For semisimple associative algebras this leads to sums of copies of $\\mathbb F$. Here we consider the first nonassociative case, where adjoint minimal polynomials divide $(x-1)x(x-\\eta)$ for fixed $0\

  20. Axial design of fuel for BWRs using neural networks; Diseno axial de combustible para BWRs usando redes neuronales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortiz, J.J.; Castillo, A.; Montes, J.L.; Perusquia, R. [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 La Marquesa, Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)]. e-mail: jjortiz@nuclear.inin.mx

    2007-07-01

    In this work a new system of axial optimization of fuel is presented based on a recurrent multi state neural net called RENODC. They are described with detail the main characteristics of this type of neural net (architecture, energy function and actualization of neural states) and like was adapted to the assemble design of nuclear fuel. The fuel design is proven by means of a fuel recharge and pre determined control rod patterns. By this way a good axial fuel design one has, when the thermal limits are fulfilled along the cycle, the reactor stays critic and at least the wanted longitude of the cycle is reached; also the margin of in cold turned off is verified. The assemble of fuel created with RENODC it is substituted by a recharge assemble and it is sought to verify that the energy requirements and aspects of safety are completed. The used cycle corresponds to a balance cycle of 18 months that it can be applied to the Laguna Verde Nucleo electric Central. The tests demonstrate the effectiveness of the system to reach satisfactory results in times of CPU of around 4 hours. This way, it could be proven that the design proposed with a lightly superior enrichment to that of the substituted design, fulfills the energy requirements. In later stages of this project this system will be coupled to the other optimization modules that are already had. (Author)