WorldWideScience

Sample records for axial kinetic energy

  1. Hydrodynamic analysis of axial rotors for using of the river kinetic energy; Analise hidrodinamica de rotores axiais para aproveitamento da energia cinetica dos rios

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blanco, C.J.C.; Gouveia, M.S.A.V.; Mesquita, A.L. Amarante [Para Univ., Belem, PA (Brazil). Centro Tecnologico. Dept. de Engenharia Mecanica

    1996-07-01

    In order to make use of kinetic energy of Amazon rivers, a methodology is presented for horizontal-axis hydraulic turbine rotors design, based on the Glauert momentum vortex theory in conjunction with section data of two-dimensional air foil available in literature. Comparison with results obtained for wind turbine applications from others authors are performed in order to verify the validity of the procedure for the calculation of the power coefficient. For the hydraulic rotors an analysis is also presented to take account all the design parameters. (author)

  2. Casimir Energy in the Axial Gauge

    CERN Document Server

    Esposito, G; Kirsten, K; Esposito, Giampiero; Kamenshchik, Alexander Yu.; Kirsten, Klaus

    2000-01-01

    The zero-point energy of a conducting spherical shell is studied by imposing the axial gauge via path-integral methods, with boundary conditions on the electromagnetic potential and ghost fields. The coupled modes are then found to be the temporal and longitudinal modes for the Maxwell field. The resulting system can be decoupled by studying a fourth-order differential equation with boundary conditions on longitudinal modes and their second derivatives. The exact solution of such equation is found by using a Green-function method, and is obtained from Bessel functions and definite integrals involving Bessel functions. Complete agreement with a previous path-integral analysis in the Lorenz gauge, and with Boyer's value, is proved in detail.

  3. Energy Dissipation in Sandwich Structures During Axial Compression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Urban, Jesper

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to investigate the energy dissipation in sandwich structures during axial crushing. Axial crushing tests on six sandwich elements are described. The sandwich elements consist of a polyurethane core and E-glass/Polyester skin. The elements compare to full-scale structu......The purpose of this paper is to investigate the energy dissipation in sandwich structures during axial crushing. Axial crushing tests on six sandwich elements are described. The sandwich elements consist of a polyurethane core and E-glass/Polyester skin. The elements compare to full...

  4. Dimensional enhancement of kinetic energies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schleich, W.P.; Dahl, Jens Peder

    2002-01-01

    Simple thermodynamics considers kinetic energy to be an extensive variable which is proportional to the number N of particles. We present a quantum state of N noninteracting particles for which the kinetic energy increases quadratically with N. This enhancement effect is tied to the quantum centr...

  5. Superconductivity by kinetic energy saving?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Marel, D; Molegraaf, HJA; Presura, C; Santoso, [No Value; Hewson, AC; Zlatic,

    2003-01-01

    A brief introduction is given in the generic microscopic framework of superconductivity. The consequences for the temperature dependence of the kinetic energy, and the correlation energy are discussed for two cases: The BCS scenario and the non-Fermi liquid scenario. A quantitative comparison is mad

  6. Axial Permanent Magnet Generator for Wearable Energy Harvesting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Högberg, Stig; Sødahl, Jakob Wagner; Mijatovic, Nenad

    2016-01-01

    An increasing demand for battery-free electronics is evident by the rapid increase of wearable devices, and the design of wearable energy harvesters follows accordingly. An axial permanent magnet generator was designed to harvest energy from human body motion and supplying it to a wearable......W, respectively) with an iron yoke is subject to losses that exceed the realistic input power, and was therefore deemed infeasible. A generator without the iron yoke was concluded to perform well as a wearable energy harvester. An experimental investigation of a prototype revealed an output power of almost 1 m...

  7. Kinetic energy equations for the average-passage equation system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Richard W.; Adamczyk, John J.

    1989-01-01

    Important kinetic energy equations derived from the average-passage equation sets are documented, with a view to their interrelationships. These kinetic equations may be used for closing the average-passage equations. The turbulent kinetic energy transport equation used is formed by subtracting the mean kinetic energy equation from the averaged total instantaneous kinetic energy equation. The aperiodic kinetic energy equation, averaged steady kinetic energy equation, averaged unsteady kinetic energy equation, and periodic kinetic energy equation, are also treated.

  8. Invariant and energy analysis of an axially retracting beam

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Xiaodong; Liu Ming; Zhang Wei; Roderick V.N. Melnik

    2016-01-01

    The mechanism of a retracting cantilevered beam has been investigated by the invariant and energy-based analysis. The time-varying parameter partial differential equation governing the transverse vibrations of a beam with retracting motion is derived based on the momentum theorem. The assumed-mode method is used to truncate the governing partial differential equation into a set of ordinary differential equations (ODEs) with time-dependent coefficients. It is found that if the order of truncation is not less than the order of the initial conditions, the assumed-mode method can yield accurate results. The energy transfers among assumed modes are discussed during retrac-tion. The total energy varying with time has been investigated by numerical and analytical methods, and the results have good agreement with each other. For the transverse vibrations of the axially retracting beam, the adiabatic invariant is derived by both the averaging method and the Bessel function method.

  9. Axial focusing of energy from a hypervelocity impact on earth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boslough, M.B.; Chael, E.P.; Trucano, T.G.; Crawford, D.A.

    1994-12-01

    We have performed computational simulations to determine how energy from a large hypervelocity impact on the Earth`s surface would couple to its interior. Because of the first-order axial symmetry of both the impact energy source and the stress-wave velocity structure of the Earth, a disproportionate amount of energy is dissipated along the axis defined by the impact point and its antipode (point opposite the impact). For a symmetric and homogeneous Earth model, all the impact energy that is radiated as seismic waves into the Earth at a given takeoff angle (ray parameter), independent of azimuthal direction, is refocused (minus attenuation) on the axis of symmetry, regardless of the number of reflections and refractions it has experienced. Material on or near the axis of symmetry experiences more strain cycles with much greater amplitude than elsewhere, and therefore experiences more irreversible heating. The focusing is most intense in the upper mantle, within the asthenosphere, where seismic energy is most effectively converted to heat. For a sufficiently energetic impact, this mechanism might generate enough local heating to create an isostatic instability leading to uplift, possibly resulting in rifting, volcanism, or other rearrangement of the interior dynamics of the planet. These simulations demonstrate how hypervelocity impact energy can be transported to the Earth`s interior, supporting the possibility of a causal link between large impacts on Earth and major internally-driven geophysical processes.

  10. Kinetic modeling of a high power fast-axial-flow CO2 laser with computational fluid dynamics method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    A new computational fluid dynamics (CFD) method for the simulation of fast-axial-flow CO2 laser is developed.The model which is solved by CFD software uses a set of dynamic differential equations to describe the dynamic process in one discharge tube.The velocity,temperature,pressure and turbulence energy distributions in discharge passage are presented.There is a good agreement between the theoretical prediction and the experimental results.This result indicates that the parameters of the laser have significant effect on the flow distribution in the discharge passage.It is helpful to optimize the output of high power CO2 laser by mastering its kinetic characteristics.

  11. How ambiguous is the local kinetic energy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, James S M; Ayers, Paul W; Hernandez, Juan I Rodriguez

    2010-08-26

    The local kinetic energy and the closely related local electronic stress tensor are commonly used to elucidate chemical bonding patterns, especially for covalent bonds. We use three different approaches-transformation properties of the stress tensor, quasiprobability distributions, and the virial theorem from density-functional theory-to clarify the inherent ambiguity in these quantities, discussing the implications for analyses based on the local kinetic energy and stress tensor. An expansive-but not universal-family of local kinetic energy forms that includes the most common choices and is suitable for both chemical-bonding and atoms-in-molecule analysis is derived. A family of local electronic stress tensors is also derived. Several local kinetic energy functions that are mathematically justified, but unlikely to be conceptually useful, are derived. The implications of these forms for atoms-in-molecule analysis are discussed.

  12. Nanostructured energy devices equilibrium concepts and kinetics

    CERN Document Server

    Bisquert, Juan

    2014-01-01

    Due to the pressing needs of society, low cost materials for energy devices have experienced an outstanding development in recent times. In this highly multidisciplinary area, chemistry, material science, physics, and electrochemistry meet to develop new materials and devices that perform required energy conversion and storage processes with high efficiency, adequate capabilities for required applications, and low production cost. Nanostructured Energy Devices: Equilibrium Concepts and Kinetics introduces the main physicochemical principles that govern the operation of energy devices. It inclu

  13. Energy dissipation in the blade tip region of an axial fan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bizjan, B.; Milavec, M.; Širok, B.; Trenc, F.; Hočevar, M.

    2016-11-01

    A study of velocity and pressure fluctuations in the tip clearance flow of an axial fan is presented in this paper. Two different rotor blade tip designs were investigated: the standard one with straight blade tips and the modified one with swept-back tip winglets. Comparison of integral sound parameters indicates a significant noise level reduction for the modified blade tip design. To study the underlying mechanisms of the energy conversion and noise generation, a novel experimental method based on simultaneous measurements of local flow velocity and pressure has also been developed and is presented here. The method is based on the phase space analysis by the use of attractors, which enable more accurate identification and determination of the local flow structures and turbulent flow properties. Specific gap flow energy derived from the pressure and velocity time series was introduced as an additional attractor parameter to assess the flow energy distribution and dissipation within the phase space, and thus determines characteristic sources of the fan acoustic emission. The attractors reveal a more efficient conversion of the pressure to kinetic flow energy in the case of the modified (tip winglet) fan blade design, and also a reduction in emitted noise levels. The findings of the attractor analysis are in a good agreement with integral fan characteristics (efficiency and noise level), while offering a much more accurate and detailed representation of gap flow phenomena.

  14. Concepts of radial and angular kinetic energies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Jens Peder; Schleich, W.P.

    2002-01-01

    We consider a general central-field system in D dimensions and show that the division of the kinetic energy into radial and angular parts proceeds differently in the wave-function picture and the Weyl-Wigner phase-space picture, Thus, the radial and angular kinetic energies are different quantiti...... in the two pictures, containing different physical information, but the relation between them is well defined. We discuss this relation and illustrate its nature by examples referring to a free particle and to a ground-state hydrogen atom....

  15. Electric Vehicles Mileage Extender Kinetic Energy Storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jivkov, Venelin; Draganov, Vutko; Stoyanova, Yana

    2015-03-01

    The proposed paper considers small urban vehicles with electric hybrid propulsion systems. Energy demands are examined on the basis of European drive cycle (NEUDC) and on an energy recuperation coefficient and are formulated for description of cycle energy transfers. Numerical simulation results show real possibilities for increasing in achievable vehicle mileage at the same energy levels of a main energy source - the electric battery. Kinetic energy storage (KES), as proposed to be used as an energy buffer and different structural schemes of the hybrid propulsion system are commented. Minimum energy levels for primary (the electric battery) and secondary (KES) sources are evaluated. A strategy for reduced power flows control is examined, and its impact on achievable vehicle mileage is investigated. Results show an additional increase in simulated mileage at the same initial energy levels.

  16. Aircraft Measurements of Atmospheric Kinetic Energy Spectra

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundtang Petersen, Erik; Lilly, D. K.

    1983-01-01

    Wind velocity data obtained from a jet airliner are used to construct kinetic energy spectra over the range of wavelengths from 2.5 to 2500 km. The spectra exhibit an approximate -5/3 slope for wavelengths of less than about 150 km, steepening to about -2.2 at larger scales. These results support...

  17. Utilization of rotor kinetic energy storage for hybrid vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, John S.

    2011-05-03

    A power system for a motor vehicle having an internal combustion engine, the power system comprises an electric machine (12) further comprising a first excitation source (47), a permanent magnet rotor (28) and a magnetic coupling rotor (26) spaced from the permanent magnet rotor and at least one second excitation source (43), the magnetic coupling rotor (26) also including a flywheel having an inertial mass to store kinetic energy during an initial acceleration to an operating speed; and wherein the first excitation source is electrically connected to the second excitation source for power cycling such that the flywheel rotor (26) exerts torque on the permanent magnet rotor (28) to assist braking and acceleration of the permanent magnet rotor (28) and consequently, the vehicle. An axial gap machine and a radial gap machine are disclosed and methods of the invention are also disclosed.

  18. Vibration Suppression of an Axially Moving String with Transverse Wind Loadings by a Nonlinear Energy Sink

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye-Wei Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonlinear targeted energy transfer (TET is applied to suppress the excessive vibration of an axially moving string with transverse wind loads. The coupling dynamic equations used are modeled by a nonlinear energy sink (NES attached to the string to absorb vibrational energy. By a two-term Galerkin procedure, the equations are discretized, and the effects of vibration suppression by numerical methods are demonstrated. Results show that the NES can effectively suppress the vibration of the axially moving string with transverse wind loadings, thereby protecting the string from excessive movement.

  19. Estimation of turbulent kinetic energy dissipation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Huey-Long; Hondzo, Miki; Rao, A. Ramachandra

    2001-06-01

    The kinetic energy dissipation rate is one of the key intrinsic fluid flow parameters in environmental fluid dynamics. In an indirect method the kinetic energy dissipation rate is estimated from the Batchelor spectrum. Because the Batchelor spectrum has a significant difference between the highest and lowest spectral values, the spectral bias in the periodogram causes the lower spectral values at higher frequencies to increase. Consequently, the accuracy in fitting the Batchelor spectrum is affected. In this study, the multitaper spectral estimation method is compared to conventional methods in estimating the synthetic temperature gradient spectra. It is shown in the results that the multitaper spectra have less bias than the Hamming window smoothed spectra and the periodogram in estimating the synthetic temperature gradient spectra. The results of fitting the Batchelor spectrum based on four error functions are compared. When the theoretical noise spectrum is available and delineated at the intersection of the estimated spectrum, the fitting results of the kinetic energy dissipation rate corresponding to the four error functions do not have significant differences. However, when the noise spectrum is unknown and part of the Batchelor spectrum overlaps the region where the noise spectrum dominates, the weighted chi-square distributed error function has the best fitting results.

  20. Investigation of the Kinetic Energy Characterization of Advanced Ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-01

    ARL-TR-7263 ● APR 2015 US Army Research Laboratory Investigation of the Kinetic Energy Characterization of Advanced Ceramics ...Kinetic Energy Characterization of Advanced Ceramics by Tyrone L Jones Weapons and Materials Research Directorate, ARL...Kinetic Energy Characterization of Advanced Ceramics 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Tyrone L

  1. Equilibria and kinetics for pH-dependent axial ligation of bromomethyl(aquo)cobaloxime by aliphatic amine ligands

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M Bhoopal; N Ravi Kumar Reddy; S Satyanarayana

    2003-04-01

    Kinetics and equilibria of axial ligation of bromomethyl(aquo) cobaloxime by a series of straight chain primary amines (methylamine, ethylamine, propylamine, butylamine, pentylamine, hexylamine), cycloamines (cyclopentylamine, cyclohexylamine, cycloheptylamine) and secondary amines (N,N-dimethylamine, N,N-diethylamine) have been measured as functions of pH by spectrophotometric technique in aqueous solution, ionic strength 1 M (KCl) at 25°C. The rate of substitution of H2O varies with the Ka of incoming ligand, thus establishing nucleophilic participation of the ligand in the transition state. Binding and kinetic data are interpreted based on the basicity and steric influence of the entering ligand. To compare the rate constants of the entering ligands, pH independent second-order rate constants (on) are calculated.

  2. Kinetic energy recovery systems in motor vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Śliwiński, C.

    2016-09-01

    The article draws attention to the increasing environmental pollution caused by the development of vehicle transport and motorization. Different types of design solutions used in vehicles for the reduction of fuel consumption, and thereby emission of toxic gasses into the atmosphere, were specified. Historical design solutions concerning energy recovery devices in mechanical vehicles which used flywheels to accumulate kinetic energy were shown. Developmental tendencies in the area of vehicle manufacturing in the form of hybrid electric and electric devices were discussed. Furthermore, designs of energy recovery devices with electrical energy storage from the vehicle braking and shock absorbing systems were presented. A mechanical energy storing device using a flywheel operating under vacuum was presented, as were advantages and disadvantages of both systems, the limitations they impose on individual constructions and safety issues. The paper also discusses a design concept of an energy recovery device in mechanical vehicles which uses torsion springs as the main components of energy accumulation during braking. The desirability of a cooperation of both the mechanical- and electrical energy recovery devices was indicated.

  3. A note on the maintenance of the atmospheric kinetic energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, T.-C.; Lee, Y.-H.

    1982-01-01

    The winter simulations of the GLAS climate model and the NCAR community climate model are used to examine the maintenance of the atmospheric kinetic energy. It is found that the kinetic energy is generated in the lower latitudes south of the maximum westerlies, transported northward and then, destroyed in the midlatitudes north of the maximum westerlies. Therefore, the atmospheric kinetic energy is maintained by the counterbalance between the divergence (convergence) of kinetic energy flux and generation (destruction) of kinetic energy in lower (middle) latitudes.

  4. A double-superconducting axial bearing system for an energy storage flywheel model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng, Z; Lin, Q; Ma, G; Zheng, J; Zhang, Y; Wang, S; Wang, J [Applied Superconductivity Laboratory, Mail Stop 152, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu, 610031 (China)], E-mail: jsywang@home.swjtu.edu.cn

    2008-02-15

    The bulk high temperature superconductors (HTSCs) with unique flux-pinning property have been applied to fabricate two superconducting axial bearings for an energy storage flywheel model. The two superconducting axial bearings are respectively fixed at two ends of the vertical rotational shaft, whose stator is composed of seven melt-textured YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-x} (YBCO) bulks with diameter of 30 mm, height of 18 mm and rotor is made of three cylindrical axial-magnetized NdFeB permanent magnets (PM) by superposition with diameter of 63 mm, height of 27 mm. The experimental results show the total levitation and lateral force produced by the two superconducting bearings are enough to levitate and stabilize the 2.4 kg rotational shaft. When the two YBCO stators were both field cooled to the liquid nitrogen temperature at respective axial distances above or below the PM rotor, the shaft could be automatically levitated between the two stators without any contact. In the case of a driving motor, it can be stably rotated along the central axis besides the resonance frequency. This double-superconducting axial bearing system can be used to demonstrate the flux-pinning property of bulk HTSC for stable levitation and suspension and the principle of superconducting flywheel energy storage system to visitors.

  5. Partitioning kinetic energy during freewheeling wheelchair maneuvers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medola, Fausto O; Dao, Phuc V; Caspall, Jayme J; Sprigle, Stephen

    2014-03-01

    This paper describes a systematic method to partition the kinetic energy (KE) of a free-wheeling wheelchair. An ultralightweight rigid frame wheelchair was instrumented with two axle-mounted encoders and data acquisition equipment to accurately measure the velocity of the drive wheels. A mathematical model was created combining physical specifications and geometry of the wheelchair and its components. Two able-bodied subjects propelled the wheelchair over four courses that involved straight and turning maneuvers at differing speeds. The KE of the wheelchair was divided into three components: translational, rotational, and turning energy. This technique was sensitive to the changing contributions of the three energy components across maneuvers. Translational energy represented the major component of total KE in all maneuvers except a zero radius turn in which turning energy was dominant. Both translational and rotational energies are directly related to wheelchair speed. Partitioning KE offers a useful means of investigating the dynamics of a moving wheelchair. The described technique permits analysis of KE imparted to the wheelchair during maneuvers involving changes in speed and direction, which are most representative of mobility in everyday life. This technique can be used to study the effort required to maneuver different types and configurations of wheelchairs.

  6. On Kinetics Modeling of Vibrational Energy Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilmore, John O.; Sharma, Surendra P.; Cavolowsky, John A. (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    Two models of vibrational energy exchange are compared at equilibrium to the elementary vibrational exchange reaction for a binary mixture. The first model, non-linear in the species vibrational energies, was derived by Schwartz, Slawsky, and Herzfeld (SSH) by considering the detailed kinetics of vibrational energy levels. This model recovers the result demanded at equilibrium by the elementary reaction. The second model is more recent, and is gaining use in certain areas of computational fluid dynamics. This model, linear in the species vibrational energies, is shown not to recover the required equilibrium result. Further, this more recent model is inconsistent with its suggested rate constants in that those rate constants were inferred from measurements by using the SSH model to reduce the data. The non-linear versus linear nature of these two models can lead to significant differences in vibrational energy coupling. Use of the contemporary model may lead to significant misconceptions, especially when integrated in computer codes considering multiple energy coupling mechanisms.

  7. Kinetic energy decomposition scheme based on information theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imamura, Yutaka; Suzuki, Jun; Nakai, Hiromi

    2013-12-15

    We proposed a novel kinetic energy decomposition analysis based on information theory. Since the Hirshfeld partitioning for electron densities can be formulated in terms of Kullback-Leibler information deficiency in information theory, a similar partitioning for kinetic energy densities was newly proposed. The numerical assessments confirm that the current kinetic energy decomposition scheme provides reasonable chemical pictures for ionic and covalent molecules, and can also estimate atomic energies using a correction with viral ratios.

  8. Experimental Studies on Turbulence Kinetic Energy in Confined Vortex Flows

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    L.Yan; G.H.Vatistas; 等

    2000-01-01

    Turbulence kinetic energies in confined vortex flows have been studied.The studies were based on the experiments performed in a vortex chamber,In the experiments,a Laser Doppler Anemometry(LDA) was used to perform flow measurements inside the vortex chamber,which provided the data for the kinetic energy analysis.The studies concentrated on the influences of the contraction ratio and the inlet air flow rate on the kinetic energy,and analyzed the characteristics of the kinetic energy in the confined vortex flows,including the distributions of the tangential component,radial component and total turbulence kinetic energy,In the paper,both the experimental techniques and the experimental results were presented.Based on a similarity analyis and the experimental data,an empirical scaling formula was proposed so that the tangential component of the turbulence kinetic energy was dependent only on the parameter of the contraction ratio.

  9. Channeling energy loss and dechanneling of He along axial and planar directions of Si

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafiei, S.; Lamehi-Rachti, M.

    2016-01-01

    In the present work, the energy loss and the dechanneling of He ions in the energy of 1.5 MeV and 2 MeV along the and axial directions as well as the {1 0 0} and {1 1 0} planar directions of Si were studied by the simulation of the channeling Rutherford backscattering spectra. The simulation was done based on the considerations that a fraction of the aligned beam enters the sample as a random component due to the ions scattering from the surface, and the dechanneling starts at the greater penetration depths, xDech. It was presumed that the dechanneling process follows a simple exponential law with a parameter λ which is proportional to the half-thickness. The Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm was used to set the best parameters of energy loss ratio, xDech and λ. The experimental results are well reproduced by this simulation. Differences between various axial and planar channels in the Si crystal and their influence on the energy loss ratio and dechanneling of He ions are described. Moreover, the energy dependence of energy loss ratio and dechanneling of He ions were investigated. It is shown that the dechanneling behavior of ions depends on the energy and energy loss of the ions along a channel. The channeled to random energy loss increases by decreasing ions energy.

  10. Dynamic kinetic cross-coupling strategy for the asymmetric synthesis of axially chiral heterobiaryls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ros, Abel; Estepa, Beatriz; Ramírez-López, Pedro; Álvarez, Eleuterio; Fernández, Rosario; Lassaletta, José M

    2013-10-23

    A dynamic kinetic asymmetric transformation (DYKAT) technique has been designed for the synthesis of 2'-substituted 2-aryl pyridines/isoquinolines and related heterobiaryls. In this way, the Pd(0)-catalyzed coupling of racemic 2-triflates with aryl boroxines using a TADDOL-derived phosphoramidite as the ligand provides the corresponding coupling products with good to excellent enantioselectivities. Structural studies support that the formation of configurationally labile oxidative addition palladacycles is the key for the success of the methodology.

  11. High-resolution kinetic energy distributions via doppler shift measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Z.; Koplitz, B.; Buelow, S.; Baugh, D.; Wittig, C.

    1986-07-01

    In photolysis/probe experiments using pulsed sources, time delay produces both spatial and directional bias in the fragment distributions, thus enabling well-resolved kinetic energy distributions to be obtained from Doppler shift measurements. Data are presented for H-atoms detected using two-photon ionization, and high S/N and laser-limited kinetic energy resolution are demonstrated.

  12. Preliminary study on mechanics-based rainfall kinetic energy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Jiuqin Ms.

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available A raindrop impact power observation system was employed to observe the real-time raindrop impact power during a rainfall event and to analyze the corresponding rainfall characteristics. The experiments were conducted at different simulated rainfall intensities. As rainfall intensity increased, the observed impact power increased linearly indicating the power observation system would be satisfactory for characterizing rainfall erosivity. Momentum is the product of mass and velocity (Momentum=MV, which is related to the observed impact power value. Since there is no significant difference between momentum and impact power, observed impact power can represent momentum for different rainfall intensities. The relationship between momentum and the observed impact power provides a convenient way to calculate rainfall kinetic energy. The value of rainfall kinetic energy based on the observed impact power was higher than the classic rainfall kinetic energy. The rainfall impact power based kinetic energy and the classic rainfall kinetic energy showed linear correlation, which indicates that the raindrop impact power observation system can characterize rainfall kinetic energy. The article establishes a preliminary way to calculate rainfall kinetic energy by using the real-time observed momentum, providing a foundation for replacing the traditional methods for estimating kinetic energy of rainstorms.

  13. Energy absorption of aluminum alloy thin-walled tubes under axial impact

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Hongtu; Wang, Jian [Ludong University, Yantai (China); Shen, Guozhe; Hu, Ping [Dalian University of Technology, Dalian (China)

    2016-07-15

    Aluminum alloys are important technological materials for achieving the lightweight design of automotive structures. Many works have reported on the deformation and energy absorption of thin-walled tubes. Multicorner tubes with extra concave corners in the cross section were presented in this study to improve the energy absorption efficiency of aluminum alloy thin-walled tubes. The axial crushing of square and multicorner thin-walled tubes was simulated with the same cross-sectional perimeter. The method of folding element was applied to predict the crushing behavior of the thin-walled tubes under axial impact. The corners on the cross section were discussed to determine their effect on the energy absorption performance of thin-walled tubes. Results showed that the increasing performance of energy absorption of aluminum alloy thin-walled tubes was caused by the increasing number of corners on the cross section of multicorner tubes. Both the number and size of corners had an important effect on the crushing force efficiency of multicorner tubes. The maximum crushing force efficiency of multicorner tubes was 11.6% higher than that of square tubes with the same material consumption of thin-walled tubes. The multicorner tubes with 12 corners showed better energy absorption performance than the tubes with more than 12 corners; this high number of corners could lead to the small size of corners or unstable deformations. The high energy absorption performance of multicorner tubes prefers increasing the corner number and corner size of adjacent sides at the same time.

  14. Budget of Turbulent Kinetic Energy in a Shock Wave Boundary-Layer Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyas, Manan A.; Waindim, Mbu; Gaitonde, Datta V.

    2016-01-01

    Implicit large-eddy simulation (ILES) of a shock wave/boundary-layer interaction (SBLI) was performed. Quantities present in the exact equation of the turbulent kinetic energy transport were accumulated and used to calculate terms like production, dissipation, molecular diffusion, and turbulent transport. The present results for a turbulent boundary layer were validated by comparison with direct numerical simulation data. It was found that a longer development domain was necessary for the boundary layer to reach an equilibrium state and a finer mesh resolution would improve the predictions. In spite of these findings, trends of the present budget match closely with that of the direct numerical simulation. Budgets for the SBLI region are presented at key axial stations. These budgets showed interesting dynamics as the incoming boundary layer transforms and the terms of the turbulent kinetic energy budget change behavior within the interaction region.

  15. Reassessing the Plastic Hinge Model for Energy Dissipation of Axially Loaded Columns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. M. Korol

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the energy dissipation potential of axially loaded columns and evaluates the use of a plastic hinge model for analysis of hi-rise building column collapse under extreme loading conditions. The experimental program considered seven axially loaded H-shaped extruded aluminum structural section columns having slenderness ratios that would be typical of floor-to-ceiling heights in buildings. All seven test specimens initially experienced minor-axis overall buckling followed by formation of a plastic hinge at the mid-height region, leading to local buckling of the flanges on the compression side of the plastic hinge, and eventual folding of the compression flanges. The experimental energy absorption, based on load-displacement relations, was compared to the energy estimates based on section plastic moment resistance based on measured yield stress and based on measured hinge rotations. It was found that the theoretical plastic hinge model underestimates a column’s actual ability to absorb energy by a factor in the range of 3 to 4 below that obtained from tests. It was also noted that the realizable hinge rotation is less than 180°. The above observations are based, of course, on actual columns being able to sustain high tensile strains at hinge locations without fracturing.

  16. A multi-axial ferroelastic switching model using the homogenized energy approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oates, William S.; Peng, Xiao

    2009-03-01

    A new constitutive modeling framework is presented to predict polarization reorientation from mechanical loading in ferroelectric materials. The modeling framework employs a homogenized energy approach to predict the reorientation of local polarization variants in response to multi-axial mechanical loading. Single crystal energy relations are given and integrated into a polycrystal model using a reduced order modeling technique that employs a set of stochastic parameters which accommodate material inhomogeneities. The homogenized energy approach provides a methodology that simplifies computations required to predict nonlinear polarization reorientation from applied stresses. The new formulation circumvents the need for large scale minimization problems of multi-well energy potentials and facilitates constitutive model integration into finite element codes and nonlinear control designs. The theory is presented, numerically implemented, and compared with experiments on lead zirconate titanate given in the literature.

  17. Kinetics and equilibria for the axial ligation of bromomethyl (aqua)cobaloxime with pyridines - Isolation characterization and DNA binding

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Kotha Laxma Reddy; K Ashwini Kumar; N Ravi Kumar Reddy; Penumaka Nagababu; A Panasa Reddy; S Satyanarayana

    2009-11-01

    The kinetics and equilibria for the axial ligation of pyridine and substituted pyridines to bromomethyl(aqua)cobaloxime have been measured spectrophotometrically in aqueous solutions of ionic strength 1.0 M (KC1) at 25°C as a function of H. The binding constants and rate of formation increase in the order 4-NH2Py 4-EtPy > 4-MePy > Py > 2-NH2Py > 2-EtPy. The data have been interpreted based on the basicity of the ligand, -back bonding from Co(III) → L and hard and soft interactions. The rate of substitution of H2O varies with the pKa of the incoming ligand, thus establishing the existence of nucleophilic participation of the ligand in the transition state. We have investigated the DNA binding of bromomethyl(aqua)cobaloxime with DNA. Bromomethyl(ligand)cobaloximes were isolated and characterized by elemental analysis, IR and NMR (1H, 13C) spectra.

  18. Spectral kinetic energy transfer in turbulent premixed reacting flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Towery, C A Z; Poludnenko, A Y; Urzay, J; O'Brien, J; Ihme, M; Hamlington, P E

    2016-05-01

    Spectral kinetic energy transfer by advective processes in turbulent premixed reacting flows is examined using data from a direct numerical simulation of a statistically planar turbulent premixed flame. Two-dimensional turbulence kinetic-energy spectra conditioned on the planar-averaged reactant mass fraction are computed through the flame brush and variations in the spectra are connected to terms in the spectral kinetic energy transport equation. Conditional kinetic energy spectra show that turbulent small-scale motions are suppressed in the burnt combustion products, while the energy content of the mean flow increases. An analysis of spectral kinetic energy transfer further indicates that, contrary to the net down-scale transfer of energy found in the unburnt reactants, advective processes transfer energy from small to large scales in the flame brush close to the products. Triadic interactions calculated through the flame brush show that this net up-scale transfer of energy occurs primarily at spatial scales near the laminar flame thermal width. The present results thus indicate that advective processes in premixed reacting flows contribute to energy backscatter near the scale of the flame.

  19. Effect of Radial Density Configuration on Wave Field and Energy Flow in Axially Uniform Helicon Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Lei; Li, Qingchong; Zhang, Huijie; Li, Yinghong; Wu, Yun; Zhang, Bailing; Zhuang, Zhong

    2016-08-01

    The effect of the radial density configuration in terms of width, edge gradient and volume gradient on the wave field and energy flow in an axially uniform helicon plasma is studied in detail. A three-parameter function is employed to describe the density, covering uniform, parabolic, linear and Gaussian profiles. It finds that the fraction of power deposition near the plasma edge increases with density width and edge gradient, and decays in exponential and “bump-on-tail” profiles, respectively, away from the surface. The existence of a positive second-order derivative in the volume density configuration promotes the power deposition near the plasma core, which to our best knowledge has not been pointed out before. The transverse structures of wave field and current density remain almost the same during the variation of density width and gradient, confirming the robustness of the m=1 mode observed previously. However, the structure of the electric wave field changes significantly from a uniform density configuration, for which the coupling between the Trivelpiece-Gould (TG) mode and the helicon mode is very strong, to non-uniform ones. The energy flow in the cross section of helicon plasma is presented for the first time, and behaves sensitive to the density width and edge gradient but insensitive to the volume gradient. Interestingly, the radial distribution of power deposition resembles the radial profile of the axial component of current density, suggesting the control of the power deposition profile in the experiment by particularly designing the antenna geometry to excite a required axial current distribution. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 11405271)

  20. Thermodynamics of axial substitution and kinetics of reactions with amino acids for the paddlewheel complex tetrakis(acetato)chloridodiruthenium(II,III).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Rodrigo L S R; van Eldik, Rudi; de Oliveira Silva, Denise

    2012-06-18

    The known paddlewheel, tetrakis(acetato)chloridodiruthenium(II,III), offers a versatile synthetic route to a novel class of antitumor diruthenium(II,III) metallo drugs, where the equatorial ligands are nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory carboxylates. This complex was studied here as a soluble starting prototype model for antitumor analogues to elucidate the reactivity of the [Ru(2)(CH(3)COO)(4)](+) framework. Thermodynamic studies on equilibration reactions for axial substitution of water by chloride and kinetic studies on reactions of the diaqua complexes with the amino acids glycine, cysteine, histidine, and tryptophan were performed. The standard thermodynamic reaction parameters ΔH°, ΔS°, and ΔV° were determined and showed that both of the sequential axial substitution reactions are enthalpy driven. Kinetic rate laws and rate constants were determined for the axial substitution reactions of coordinated water by the amino acids that gave the corresponding aqua(amino acid)-Ru(2) substituted species. The results revealed that the [Ru(2)(CH(3)COO)(4)](+) paddlewheel framework remained stable during the axial ligand substitution reactions and was also mostly preserved in the presence of the amino acids.

  1. Approximate calculation of electronic energy levels of axially symmetric quantum dot and quantum ring by using energy dependent effective mass

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Yu-Min; Yu Zhong-Yuan

    2009-01-01

    Calculations of electronic structures about the semiconductor quantum dot and the semiconductor quantum ring are presented in this paper. To reduce the calculation costs, for the quantum dot and the quantum ring, their simplified axially symmetric shapes are utilized in our analysis. The energy dependent effective mass is taken into account in solving the Schrodinger equations in the single band effective mass approximation. The calculated results show that the energy dependent effective mass should be considered only for relatively small volume quantum dots or small quantum rings. For large size quantum materials, both the energy dependent effective mass and the parabolic effective mass can give the same results. The energy states and the effective masses of the quantum dot and the quantum ring as a function of geometric parameters are also discussed in detail.

  2. Energy loss distributions of relativistic protons axially channeled in a bent silicon crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stojanov, Nace; Petrović, Srdjan; Nešković, Nebojša

    2013-05-01

    A detailed study of the energy loss distributions of the relativistic protons axially channeled in the bent Si crystals is presented in this work. The bending angle was varied from 0 to 20 μrad, while the crystal thickness was equal to 1 mm. The proton energy was chosen to be 7 TeV in accordance with the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) project, at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), in Geneva, Switzerland. The energy loss distributions of the channeled protons were generated using the numerical solution of the proton equations of motion in the transverse plane and the computer simulation method. An accurate energy loss model was used, which takes into account the trajectory dependence of the energy loss of protons during their motion through the crystal channels. Further, the dispersion of the proton's scattering angle caused by its collisions with the electrons of the crystal and the divergence of the proton beam were taken into account. The calculated dependence of the number of dechanneled protons on the bending angle was excellently fitted by the Gompertz type dechanneling function.

  3. Energy loss distributions of relativistic protons axially channeled in a bent silicon crystal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stojanov, Nace, E-mail: nacestoj@pmf.ukim.mk [Institute of Physics, Faculty of Natural Sciences and Mathematics, Sts. Cyril and Methodius University, P.O. Box 162, 1000 Skopje (Macedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic of); Petrović, Srdjan; Nešković, Nebojša [Laboratory of Physics (010), Vinča Institute of Nuclear Sciences, University of Belgrade, P.O. Box 522, 11001 Belgrade (Serbia)

    2013-05-01

    A detailed study of the energy loss distributions of the relativistic protons axially channeled in the bent < 100 > Si crystals is presented in this work. The bending angle was varied from 0 to 20 μrad, while the crystal thickness was equal to 1 mm. The proton energy was chosen to be 7 TeV in accordance with the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) project, at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), in Geneva, Switzerland. The energy loss distributions of the channeled protons were generated using the numerical solution of the proton equations of motion in the transverse plane and the computer simulation method. An accurate energy loss model was used, which takes into account the trajectory dependence of the energy loss of protons during their motion through the crystal channels. Further, the dispersion of the proton’s scattering angle caused by its collisions with the electrons of the crystal and the divergence of the proton beam were taken into account. The calculated dependence of the number of dechanneled protons on the bending angle was excellently fitted by the Gompertz type dechanneling function.

  4. Renormalizing the kinetic energy operator in elementary quantum mechanics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coutinho, F A B [Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade de Sao Paulo e LIM 01-HCFMUSP, 05405-000 Sao Paulo (Brazil); Amaku, M [Faculdade de Medicina Veterinaria e Zootecnia, Universidade de Sao Paulo, 05508-970 Sao Paulo (Brazil)], E-mail: coutinho@dim.fm.usp.br

    2009-09-15

    In this paper, we consider solutions to the three-dimensional Schroedinger equation of the form {psi}(r) = u(r)/r, where u(0) {ne} 0. The expectation value of the kinetic energy operator for such wavefunctions diverges. We show that it is possible to introduce a potential energy with an expectation value that also diverges, exactly cancelling the kinetic energy divergence. This renormalization procedure produces a self-adjoint Hamiltonian. We solve some problems with this new Hamiltonian to illustrate its usefulness.

  5. Abnormal Kinetic Energy of Charged Dust Particles in Plasmas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Norman, G.; Stegailov, V.; Timofeev, A.

    2010-01-01

    A mechanism of the increase of the average kinetic energy of charged dust particles in gas discharge plasmas is suggested. Particle charge fluctuation is the reason for the appearance of forced resonance, which heals vertical oscillations. The energy transfer from vertical oscillations to the horizo

  6. Renormalizing the Kinetic Energy Operator in Elementary Quantum Mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coutinho, F. A. B.; Amaku, M.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we consider solutions to the three-dimensional Schrodinger equation of the form [psi](r) = u(r)/r, where u(0) [is not equal to] 0. The expectation value of the kinetic energy operator for such wavefunctions diverges. We show that it is possible to introduce a potential energy with an expectation value that also diverges, exactly…

  7. Macro and Micro Scale Electromagnetic Kinetic Energy Harvesting Generators

    CERN Document Server

    Beeby, S -P; Torah, R -N; Koukharenko, E; Roberts, S; O'Donnell, T; Roy, S

    2007-01-01

    This paper is concerned with generators that harvest electrical energy from the kinetic energy present in the sensor nodes environment. These generators have the potential to replace or augment battery power which has a limited lifetime and requires periodic replacement which limits the placement and application of the sensor node.

  8. System design and optimization study of axial flow turbine applied in an overtopping wave energy convertor

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Yuquan Zhang; Yuan Zheng; Chunxia Yang; Yantao Zhu; Xin Zhang

    2015-12-01

    The axial flow turbine applied in an overtopping wave energy convertor can continuously provide power with high efficiency and reliably. To study the rules between parameters of the turbine and flows, three different types of turbines with complete 3D flow-channel models were designed and optimized. It appears that diameter of the runner, flow rates, number of guide vanes and shape of outflow passage have a considerable impact on the performance of the whole convertor. The turbine with a diameter of 0.8 m, flow rate of 0.5 m3/s, double guide vanes and bent section in outflow passage shows the best comprehensive performance. Moreover, the results of the experiments indicate that the output power can be enhanced by increasing the wave overtopping rate.

  9. Energy efficiency of an innovative vertical axial rotary kiln for pottery production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Andrés Forero Núñez

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Colombia is a remarkablecoal producer and exporter worldwide; several sectors use this resource for electricity and thermal energy production. Among them, the ceramic industry consumed 118,590 tons in 2011. Most of the pottery production companies in this country arelocated in rural areas and use old coal fired kilns with low energy efficiencies, generating environmental effects to the population nearby. Despite of the importance of these industries to the small rural economies, the government agencies have closed them due to the lack of development on cleaner devices. This work aims to analyze the thermal behavior of an innovative vertical axial rotary kiln for pottery production, and the energy efficiency varying operation mode. The kiln operated during seven hours needed three hours for stabilizing sintering temperature at 800°C. The mean temperatures of the loading, drying, sintering and cooling stage were 204°C, 223°C, 809°C and 321°C respectively. The convection and radiation heat losses were 15 % whereas the flue gas heat losses 18 %.During continuous operation, the kiln energy efficiency was about 60 %. This design proven to reach the temperatures required in the firing stage of the pottery production; moreover, a gas fuel was fuelled making the process cleaner and more efficient than coal-fired systems.

  10. The quantum mechanics based on a general kinetic energy

    CERN Document Server

    Wei, Yuchuan

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we introduce the Schrodinger equation with a general kinetic energy operator. The conservation law is proved and the probability continuity equation is deducted in a general sense. Examples with a Hermitian kinetic energy operator include the standard Schrodinger equation, the relativistic Schrodinger equation, the fractional Schrodinger equation, the Dirac equation, and the deformed Schrodinger equation. We reveal that the Klein-Gordon equation has a hidden non-Hermitian kinetic energy operator. The probability continuity equation with sources indicates that there exists a different way of probability transportation, which is probability teleportation. An average formula is deducted from the relativistic Schrodinger equation, the Dirac equation, and the K-G equation.

  11. Kinetic energy recovery and power management for hybrid electric vehicles

    OpenAIRE

    P. Suntharalingam

    2011-01-01

    The major contribution of the work presented in this thesis is a thorough investigation of the constraints on regenerative braking and kinetic energy recovery enhancement for electric/hybrid electric vehicles during braking. Regenerative braking systems provide an opportunity to recycle the braking energy, which is otherwise dissipated as heat in the brake pads. However, braking energy harnessing is a relatively new concept in the automotive sector which still requires further research and de...

  12. Energy loss distributions of 7 TeV protons axially channeled in the bent Si crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stojanov, Nace; Petrović, Srdjan

    2016-04-01

    In this article, the energy loss distributions of relativistic protons axially channeled in the bent Si crystal are studied. The crystal thickness is equal to 1 mm, which corresponds to the reduced crystal thickness, Λ, equal to 1.22, whereas the bending angle, α, was varied from 0 to 30 μrad. The proton energy of 7 TeV was chosen in accordance with the concept of using the bent crystals as a tool for selective deflection of the beam halo particles from the LUA9 experiment at LHC. For the continuum interaction potential of the proton and the crystal the Molière's expression was used and the energy loss of a proton was calculated by applying the trajectory dependent stopping power model. Further, the uncertainness of the scattering angle of the proton caused by its collisions with the electrons of the crystal and the divergence of the proton beam were taken into account. The energy loss distribution of the channeled protons was obtained via the numerical solution of the proton equations of motion in the transverse plane and the computer simulation method. The analysis of the obtained theoretical data shows that the shape of the energy loss distribution strongly depends on the horizontal or vertical direction of the curvature of the crystal. The number of dechanneled protons as a function of the bending angle also strongly depends on the direction of the crystal's curvature. As a result, the dechanneling rates and ranges, obtained from the Gompertz type sigmoidal fitting functions, have different sets of values for different bending orientations. We have also studied the influence of the proton beam divergence on the energy loss distribution of channeled protons.

  13. Charged Axially Symmetric Solution and Energy in Teleparallel Theory Equivalent to General Relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Nashed, Gamal Gergess Lamee

    2007-01-01

    An exact charged solution with axial symmetry is obtained in the teleparallel equivalent of general relativity (TEGR). The associated metric has the structure function $G(\\xi)=1-{\\xi}^2-2mA{\\xi}^3-q^2A^2{\\xi}^4$. The fourth order nature of the structure function can make calculations cumbersome. Using a coordinate transformation we get a tetrad whose metric has the structure function in a factorisable form $(1-{\\xi}^2)(1+r_{+}A\\xi)(1+r_{-}A\\xi)$ with $r_{\\pm}$ as the horizons of Reissner-Nordstr$\\ddot{o}$m space-time. This new form has the advantage that its roots are now trivial to write down. Then, we study the singularities of this space-time. Using another coordinate transformation, we obtain a tetrad field. Its associated metric yields the Reissner-Nordstr$\\ddot{o}$m black hole. In Calculating the energy content of this tetrad field using the gravitational energy-momentum, we find that the resulting form depends on the radial coordinate! Using the regularized expression of the gravitational energy-moment...

  14. Evaluating rainfall kinetic energy - intensity relationships with observed disdrometric data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angulo-Martinez, Marta; Begueria, Santiago; Latorre, Borja

    2016-04-01

    Rainfall kinetic energy is required for determining erosivity, the ability of rainfall to detach soil particles and initiate erosion. Its determination relay on the use of disdrometers, i.e. devices capable of measuring the drop size distribution and velocity of falling raindrops. In the absence of such devices, rainfall kinetic energy is usually estimated with empirical expressions relating rainfall energy and intensity. We evaluated the performance of 14 rainfall energy equations in estimating one-minute rainfall energy and event total energy, in comparison with observed data from 821 rainfall episodes (more than 100 thousand one-minute observations) by means of an optical disdrometer. In addition, two sources of bias when using such relationships were evaluated: i) the influence of using theoretical terminal raindrop fall velocities instead of measured values; and ii) the influence of time aggregation (rainfall intensity data every 5-, 10-, 15-, 30-, and 60-minutes). Empirical relationships did a relatively good job when complete events were considered (R2 > 0.82), but offered poorer results for within-event (one-minute resolution) variation. Also, systematic biases where large for many equations. When raindrop size distribution was known, estimating the terminal fall velocities by empirical laws produced good results even at fine time resolution. The influence of time aggregation was very high in the estimated kinetic energy, although linear scaling may allow empirical correction. This results stress the importance of considering all these effects when rainfall energy needs to be estimated from more standard precipitation records. , and recommends the use of disdrometer data to locally determine rainfall kinetic energy.

  15. The eddy kinetic energy budget in the Red Sea

    KAUST Repository

    Zhan, Peng

    2016-06-09

    The budget of eddy kinetic energy (EKE) in the Red Sea, including the sources, redistributions and sink, is examined using a high-resolution eddy-resolving ocean circulation model. A pronounced seasonally varying EKE is identified, with its maximum intensity occurring in winter, and the strongest EKE is captured mainly in the central and northern basins within the upper 200 m. Eddies acquire kinetic energy from conversion of eddy available potential energy (EPE), from transfer of mean kinetic energy (MKE), and from direct generation due to time-varying (turbulent) wind stress, the first of which contributes predominantly to the majority of the EKE. The EPE-to-EKE conversion occurs almost in the entire basin, while the MKE-to-EKE transfer appears mainly along the shelf boundary of the basin (200 miso-bath) where high horizontal shear interacts with topography. The EKE generated by the turbulent wind stress is relatively small and limited to the southern basin. All these processes are intensified during winter, when the rate of energy conversion is about four to five times larger than that in summer. The EKE is redistributed by the vertical and horizontal divergence of energy flux and the advection of the mean flow. As a main sink of EKE, dissipation processes is ubiquitously found in the basin. The seasonal variability of these energy conversion terms can explain the significant seasonality of eddy activities in the Red Sea. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  16. The eddy kinetic energy budget in the Red Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Peng; Subramanian, Aneesh C.; Yao, Fengchao; Kartadikaria, Aditya R.; Guo, Daquan; Hoteit, Ibrahim

    2016-07-01

    The budget of eddy kinetic energy (EKE) in the Red Sea, including the sources, redistributions, and sink, is examined using a high'resolution eddy-resolving ocean circulation model. A pronounced seasonally varying EKE is identified, with its maximum intensity occurring in winter, and the strongest EKE is captured mainly in the central and northern basins within the upper 200 m. Eddies acquire kinetic energy from conversion of eddy available potential energy (EPE), from transfer of mean kinetic energy (MKE), and from direct generation due to time-varying (turbulent) wind stress, the first of which contributes predominantly to the majority of the EKE. The EPE-to-EKE conversion occurs almost in the entire basin, while the MKE-to-EKE transfer appears mainly along the shelf boundary of the basin (200 m isobath) where high horizontal shear interacts with topography. The EKE generated by the turbulent wind stress is relatively small and limited to the southern basin. All these processes are intensified during winter, when the rate of energy conversion is about 4-5 times larger than that in summer. The EKE is redistributed by the vertical and horizontal divergence of energy flux and the advection of the mean flow. As a main sink of EKE, dissipation processes is ubiquitously found in the basin. The seasonal variability of these energy conversion terms can explain the significant seasonality of eddy activities in the Red Sea.

  17. Kinetic-energy functionals studied by surface calculations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vitos, Levente; Skriver, Hans Lomholt; Kollár, J.

    1998-01-01

    The self-consistent jellium model of metal surfaces is used to study the accuracy of a number of semilocal kinetic-energy functionals for independent particles. It is shown that the poor accuracy exhibited by the gradient expansion approximation and most of the semiempirical functionals in the low...

  18. Local kinetic-energy density of the Airy gas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vitos, Levente; Johansson, B.; Kollár, J.;

    2000-01-01

    The Airy gas model is used to derive an expression for the local kinetic energy in the linear potential approximation. The expression contains an explicit Laplacian term 2/5((h) over bar(2)/2m)del(mu)(2)(r) that, according to jellium surface calculations, must be a universal feature of any accura...

  19. Axial turbine with underwater generator for energy recovery; Axialturbine mit Unterwassergenerator zur Energierueckgewinnung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Welzel, B. [Stuttgart Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Stroemungsmechanik und Hydraulische Stroemungsmaschinen

    1997-12-31

    Within the framework of a project sponsored by the Stiftung Energieforschung Baden-Wuerttemberg, an axial turbine was developed as a flash evaporator, which permits energy recovery in all sectors where liquids in piping undergoes pressure relaxation. A specific feature of this turbine is that it forms part, complete with generator, of a single pipeline and that it does not cause any pressure variations worth mentioning in case of mains failure. The report describes the turbine, its advantages, and a pilot operation carried out with a prototype. The turbine`s performance is compared with a return pump. Further, the optimization of the hydraulic design by computer and the results of a market analysis are dealt with. (orig.) [Deutsch] Im Rahmen einer von der Stiftung Energieforschung Baden-Wuerttemberg gefoerderten Neuentwicklung wurde eine Axialturbine als Entspannungsturbine entwickelt, mit der eine Energierueckgewinnung in allen Bereichen erfolgen kann, in denen Fluessigkeiten in Rohrleitungssystemen entspannt werden. Die Turbine zeichnet sich unter anderem dadurch aus, dass sie komplett, inklusive Generator, innerhalb einer Rohrleitung angeordnet ist und bei Netzausfall keine nennenswerte Druckschwankung erzeugt. Es werden die Turbine, deren Vorteile sowie der mit einem Prototypen durchgefuehrte Betriebsversuch beschrieben. Weiterhin werden ein Vergleich des Betriebsverhaltens mit einer rueckwaertslaufenden Pumpe, die rechnerische Optimierung der hydraulischen Formgebung sowie die Ergebnisse einer Marktanalyse behandelt. (orig.)

  20. Systems engineering analysis of kinetic energy weapon concepts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Senglaub, M.

    1996-06-01

    This study examines, from a systems engineering design perspective, the potential of kinetic energy weapons being used in the role of a conventional strategic weapon. Within the Department of Energy (DOE) complex, strategic weapon experience falls predominantly in the nuclear weapons arena. The techniques developed over the years may not be the most suitable methodologies for use in a new design/development arena. For this reason a more fundamental approach was pursued with the objective of developing an information base from which design decisions might be made concerning the conventional strategic weapon system concepts. The study examined (1) a number of generic missions, (2) the effects of a number of damage mechanisms from a physics perspective, (3) measures of effectiveness (MOE`s), and (4) a design envelope for kinetic energy weapon concepts. With the base of information a cut at developing a set of high-level system requirements was made, and a number of concepts were assessed against these requirements.

  1. Kinetics with deactivation of methylcyclohexane dehydrogenation for hydrogen energy storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maria, G.; Marin, A.; Wyss, C.; Mueller, S.; Newson, E. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1997-06-01

    The methylcyclohexane dehydrogenation step to recycle toluene and release hydrogen is being studied as part of a hydrogen energy storage project. The reaction is performed catalytically in a fixed bed reactor, and the efficiency of this step significantly determines overall system economics. The fresh catalyst kinetics and the deactivation of the catalyst by coke play an important role in the process analysis. The main reaction kinetics were determined from isothermal experiments using a parameter sensitivity analysis for model discrimination. An activation energy for the main reaction of 220{+-}11 kJ/mol was obtained from a two-parameter model. From non-isothermal deactivation in PC-controlled integral reactors, an activation energy for deactivation of 160 kJ/mol was estimated. A model for catalyst coke content of 3-17 weight% was compared with experimental data. (author) 3 figs., 6 refs.

  2. Determination of energy loss of 1200 keV deuterons along axial and planar channels of Si

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shafiei, S.; Lamehi-Rachti, M., E-mail: mlamehi@aeoi.org.ir

    2015-02-15

    In this paper, the energy loss of 1200 keV deuterons along the <1 0 0> and <1 1 0> axes as well as the {1 0 0} and {1 1 0} planes of Si were determined by the simulation of the channeling Rutherford backscattering spectra. The simulation was done by taking two considerations into account: (i) a minimum random component of the beam which enters the sample because of the scattering ions from the surface, (ii) the dechanneling starts at greater penetration depths, x{sub Dech}. Moreover, it was assumed that the dechanneling follows a Gompertz type sigmoidal function with two parameters k and x{sub c} which present the dechanneling rate and range, respectively. The best simulation parameters, penetration depth at which the dechanneling starts, energy loss and dechanneling rate and range, were chosen by using the Levenberg–Marquardt algorithm. The experimental results are well reproduced by this simulation. The ratio of channeling energy loss to the random is changed from 0.63 ± 0.02 along the <1 1 0> axial channel to the 0.91 ± 0.02 along the {1 0 0} planar direction. The differences in the energy loss and the dechanneling process along the axial and planar channels are attributed to the potential barrier and the fractional area of each channel blocked by atoms. The ratio of channeling to random energy loss of deuterons along the <1 0 0> axial direction is in agreement with another reference.

  3. Possible explanation of the atmospheric kinetic and potential energy spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallgren, Andreas; Deusebio, Enrico; Lindborg, Erik

    2011-12-23

    We hypothesize that the observed wave number spectra of kinetic and potential energy in the atmosphere can be explained by assuming that there are two related cascade processes emanating from the same large-scale energy source, a downscale cascade of potential enstrophy, giving rise to the k(-3) spectrum at synoptic scales and a downscale energy cascade giving rise to the k(-5/3) spectrum at mesoscales. The amount of energy which is going into the downscale energy cascade is determined by the rate of system rotation, with negligible energy going downscale in the limit of very fast rotation. We present a set of simulations of a system with strong rotation and stratification, supporting these hypotheses and showing good agreement with observations.

  4. Quantifying Turbulent Kinetic Energy in an Aortic Coarctation with Large Eddy Simulation and Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lantz, Jonas; Ebbers, Tino; Karlsson, Matts

    2012-11-01

    In this study, turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) in an aortic coarctation was studied using both a numerical technique (large eddy simulation, LES) and in vivo measurements using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). High levels of TKE are undesirable, as kinetic energy is extracted from the mean flow to feed the turbulent fluctuations. The patient underwent surgery to widen the coarctation, and the flow before and after surgery was computed and compared to MRI measurements. The resolution of the MRI was about 7 × 7 voxels in axial cross-section while 50x50 mesh cells with increased resolution near the walls was used in the LES simulation. In general, the numerical simulations and MRI measurements showed that the aortic arch had no or very low levels of TKE, while elevated values were found downstream the coarctation. It was also found that TKE levels after surgery were lowered, indicating that the diameter of the constriction was increased enough to decrease turbulence effects. In conclusion, both the numerical simulation and MRI measurements gave very similar results, thereby validating the simulations and suggesting that MRI measured TKE can be used as an initial estimation in clinical practice, while LES results can be used for detailed quantification and further research of aortic flows.

  5. Reaction Path Optimization with Holonomic Constraints and Kinetic Energy Potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brokaw, Jason B; Haas, Kevin R; Chu, Jhih-Wei

    2009-08-11

    Two methods are developed to enhance the stability, efficiency, and robustness of reaction path optimization using a chain of replicas. First, distances between replicas are kept equal during path optimization via holonomic constraints. Finding a reaction path is, thus, transformed into a constrained optimization problem. This approach avoids force projections for finding minimum energy paths (MEPs), and fast-converging schemes such as quasi-Newton methods can be readily applied. Second, we define a new objective function - the total Hamiltonian - for reaction path optimization, by combining the kinetic energy potential of each replica with its potential energy function. Minimizing the total Hamiltonian of a chain determines a minimum Hamiltonian path (MHP). If the distances between replicas are kept equal and a consistent force constant is used, then the kinetic energy potentials of all replicas have the same value. The MHP in this case is the most probable isokinetic path. Our results indicate that low-temperature kinetic energy potentials (optimization and can significantly reduce the required steps of minimization by 2-3 times without causing noticeable differences between a MHP and MEP. These methods are applied to three test cases, the C7eq-to-Cax isomerization of an alanine dipeptide, the (4)C1-to-(1)C4 transition of an α-d-glucopyranose, and the helix-to-sheet transition of a GNNQQNY heptapeptide. By applying the methods developed in this work, convergence of reaction path optimization can be achieved for these complex transitions, involving full atomic details and a large number of replicas (>100). For the case of helix-to-sheet transition, we identify pathways whose energy barriers are consistent with experimental measurements. Further, we develop a method based on the work energy theorem to quantify the accuracy of reaction paths and to determine whether the atoms used to define a path are enough to provide quantitative estimation of energy barriers.

  6. Rotational and divergent kinetic energy in the mesoscale model ALADIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Blažica

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Kinetic energy spectra from the mesoscale numerical weather prediction (NWP model ALADIN with horizontal resolution 4.4 km are split into divergent and rotational components which are then compared at horizontal scales below 300 km and various vertical levels. It is shown that about 50% of kinetic energy in the free troposphere in ALADIN is divergent energy. The percentage increases towards 70% near the surface and in the upper troposphere towards 100 hPa. The maximal percentage of divergent energy is found at stratospheric levels around 100 hPa and at scales below 100 km which are not represented by the global models. At all levels, the divergent energy spectra are characterised by shallower slopes than the rotational energy spectra, and the difference increases as horizontal scales become larger. A very similar vertical distribution of divergent energy is obtained by using the standard ALADIN approach for the computation of spectra based on the extension zone and by applying detrending approach commonly used in mesoscale NWP community.

  7. Design and characterization of axial flux permanent magnet energy harvester for vehicle magnetorheological damper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Xiaomin

    2016-01-01

    An axial flux permanent magnet energy harvester (AFPMEH) is proposed and analyzed for a vehicle magneto-rheological (MR) damper. The relationship between the output voltage and the input excitations are analytically developed. Under different constant rotation speeds and sinusoidal excitations, the harvesting energy is numerically computed for different loads of pure resistance and coil in the MR damper. To check the performance of the proposed AFPMEH for the MR damper, the AFPMEH and MR damper are fabricated individually. Experiments are performed to measure the harvesting energy of the AFPMEH and the damping characteristics of the MR damper under different excited conditions. The excited conditions include three constant rotation speeds and sinusoidal inputs. Load inputs of the pure resistance and the coil of the MR damper are considered. The results show that the time history of the generated voltage of the AFPMEH in experiment is agreed well with that of the AFPMEH in simulation. Under constant rotation speeds, the root mean square (rms) of loaded voltage will increase with the increment of load, whereas the rms of power will be affected by the amplitude of load. The MR damper powered by the AFPMEH can almost obtain the similar damping characteristics of that external power supply. Under sinusoidal inputs, the rms of loaded voltage will increase with the increment of external loads, whereas the rms of power will be almost kept as a constant. The damping range of the MR damper can also be enlarged over 30% comparing to off-state damping force. A quarter car model with an MR damper powered by the AFPMEH is developed to investigate the control performance. The on-off skyhook control is adopted to tune the input current of the MR damper. The vibration performance of the MR suspension is investigated under different roads and vehicle speeds. The numerical results show that the MR suspension with the AFPMEH under on-off skyhook control can achieve better ride comfort

  8. Casimir rack and pinion as a miniaturized kinetic energy harvester.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miri, MirFaez; Etesami, Zahra

    2016-08-01

    We study a nanoscale machine composed of a rack and a pinion with no contact, but intermeshed via the lateral Casimir force. We adopt a simple model for the random velocity of the rack subject to external random forces, namely, a dichotomous noise with zero mean value. We show that the pinion, even when it experiences random thermal torque, can do work against a load. The device thus converts the kinetic energy of the random motions of the rack into useful work.

  9. Energy dissipation in magnetic null points at kinetic scales

    OpenAIRE

    Olshevsky, Vyacheslav; Divin, Andrey; Eriksson, Elin; Markidis, Stefano; Lapenta, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    We use kinetic particle-in-cell and MHD simulations supported by an observational data set to investigate magnetic reconnection in clusters of null points in space plasma. The magnetic configuration under investigation is driven by fast adiabatic flux rope compression that dissipates almost half of the initial magnetic field energy. In this phase powerful currents are excited producing secondary instabilities, and the system is brought into a state of "intermittent turbulence" within a few io...

  10. Neutron Generation and Kinetic Energy of Expanding Laser Plasmas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Yong-Sheng; WANG Nai-Yan; DUAN Xiao-Jiao; LAN Xiao-Fei; TAN Zhi-Xin; TANG Xiu-Zhang; HE Ye-Xi

    2007-01-01

    We investigate the kinetic energy of expanding plasma of a solid target heated by a ultra-short and ultra-intense laser pulse and the efficiency of energy coupling between the ultra-intense laser pulse and the solid target, in order to increase the utilization ratio of laser energy and to raise the neutron generation farther. Some new ideas about improving the energy utilization by head-on collisions between the expanding plasmas are proposed. The significance is the raise of generation of shorter duration neutron, of the order of picoseconds, which allows for an increase of energy resolution in time-of-flight experiments and also for the investigation of the dynamics of nuclear processes with high temporal resolution.

  11. Plasma neutrino energy loss due to the axial-vector current at the late stages of stellar evolution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Jing-Jing

    2009-01-01

    Based on the Weinberg-Salam theory, the plasma neutrino energy loss rates of vector and axialvector contributions are studied.A ratable factor of the rates from the axial-vector current relative to those of the total neutrino energy loss rates is accurately calculated.The results show that the ratable factor will reach a maximum of 0.95 or even more at relatively higher temperature and lower density (such as P/μe< 10~7 g/cm~3).Thus the rates of the axial-vector contribution cannot be neglected.On the other hand, the rates of the axialvector contribution are on the order of~0.01% of the total vector contribution, which is in good agreement with Itoh's at relatively high density (such as p/μe>10~7 g/cm~3) and a temperature of T≤10~(11) K.

  12. Coenzyme B12 model studies: An HSAB approach to the equilibria and kinetics of axial ligation of alkyl(aquo)-cobaloximes by imidazole and cyanide

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Vaddeboina Sridhar; S Satyanarayana

    2000-12-01

    Kinetics and equilibria of the axial ligation of alkyl(aquo)cobaloximes by imidazole and cyanide have been measured spectrophotometrically in aqueous solutions of ionic strength 1.0 M at 25°C as a function of H. Comparison of IMD and CN- of CH3, C2H5 and BrCH2 cobaloximes indicates that their stability is in the order BrCH2 > CH3 > C2H5. As the electron-withdrawing capacity of the alkyl group trans to water increases, the electron density of the cobalt(III) decreases and thus it becomes a stronger Lewis acid and binds more strongly to imidazole and cyanide. The association and dissociation rate constants are better correlated to the relative softness of the ligand showing that cyanide binds 30 times faster than imidazole. These complexes are isolated and are characterized by IR and 1H NMR spectra.

  13. Momentum and Kinetic Energy Before the Tackle in Rugby Union

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharief Hendricks, David Karpul, Mike Lambert

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the physical demands of a tackle in match situations is important for safe and effective training, developing equipment and research. Physical components such as momentum and kinetic energy, and it relationship to tackle outcome is not known. The aim of this study was to compare momenta between ball-carrier and tackler, level of play (elite, university and junior and position (forwards vs. backs, and describe the relationship between ball-carrier and tackler mass, velocity and momentum and the tackle outcome. Also, report on the ball-carrier and tackler kinetic energy before contact and the estimated magnitude of impact (energy distributed between ball-carrier and tackler upon contact. Velocity over 0.5 seconds before contact was determined using a 2-dimensional scaled version of the field generated from a computer alogorithm. Body masses of players were obtained from their player profiles. Momentum and kinetic energy were subsequently calculated for 60 tackle events. Ball-carriers were heavier than the tacklers (ball-carrier 100 ± 14 kg vs. tackler 93 ± 11 kg, d = 0.52, p = 0.0041, n = 60. Ball-carriers as forwards had a significantly higher momentum than backs (forwards 563 ± 226 Kg.m.s-1 n = 31 vs. backs 438 ± 135 Kg.m.s-1, d = 0.63, p = 0.0012, n = 29. Tacklers dominated 57% of tackles and ball-carriers dominated 43% of tackles. Despite the ball-carrier having a mass advantage before contact more frequently than the tackler, momentum advantage and tackle dominance between the ball-carrier and tackler was proportionally similar. These findings may reflect a characteristic of the modern game of rugby where efficiently heavier players (particularly forwards are tactically predetermined to carry the ball in contact.

  14. Energy dissipation in magnetic null points at kinetic scales

    CERN Document Server

    Olshevsky, Vyacheslav; Eriksson, Elin; Markidis, Stefano; Lapenta, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    We use kinetic particle-in-cell and magnetohydrodynamic simulations supported by an observational dataset to investigate magnetic reconnection in clusters of null points in space plasma. The magnetic configuration under investigation is driven by fast adiabatic flux rope compression that dissipates almost half of the initial magnetic field energy. In this phase powerful currents are excited producing secondary instabilities, and the system is brought into a state of `intermittent turbulence' within a few ion gyro-periods. Reconnection events are distributed all over the simulation domain and energy dissipation is rather volume-filling. Numerous spiral null points interconnected via their spines form null lines embedded into magnetic flux ropes; null point pairs demonstrate the signatures of torsional spine reconnection. However, energy dissipation mainly happens in the shear layers formed by adjacent flux ropes with oppositely directed currents. In these regions radial null pairs are spontaneously emerging an...

  15. Flywheels for Low-Speed Kinetic Energy Storage Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Portnov, G.; Cruz, I.; Arias, F.; Fiffe, R. P.

    2003-07-01

    A brief overview of different steel disc-type flywheels is presented. It contents the analysis of relationship between stress-state and kinetic energy of rotating body, comparison of the main characteristics of flywheels and description of their optimization procedures. It is shown that profiles of the discs calculated on a basis of plane stress-state assumption may be considered only as a starting point for its further improvement using 3-D approach. The aim of the review is to provide a designer for a insight into problem of shaping of steel flywheels. (Author) 19 refs.

  16. Molecular partitioning based on the kinetic energy density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noorizadeh, Siamak

    2016-05-01

    Molecular partitioning based on the kinetic energy density is performed to a number of chemical species, which show non-nuclear attractors (NNA) in their gradient maps of the electron density. It is found that NNAs are removed using this molecular partitioning and although the virial theorem is not valid for all of the basins obtained in the being used AIM, all of the atoms obtained using the new approach obey this theorem. A comparison is also made between some atomic topological parameters which are obtained from the new partitioning approach and those calculated based on the electron density partitioning.

  17. The conservative cascade of kinetic energy in compressible turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Aluie, Hussein; Li, Hui

    2011-01-01

    The physical nature of compressible turbulence is of fundamental importance in a variety of astrophysical settings. We present the first direct evidence that mean kinetic energy cascades conservatively beyond a transitional "conversion" scale-range despite not being an invariant of the compressible flow dynamics. We use high-resolution three-dimensional simulations of compressible hydrodynamic turbulence on $512^3$ and $1024^3$ grids. We probe regimes of forced steady-state isothermal flows and of unforced decaying ideal gas flows. The key quantity we measure is pressure dilatation cospectrum, $E^{PD}(k)$, where we provide the first numerical evidence that it decays at a rate faster than $k^{-1}$ as a function of wavenumber. This is sufficient to imply that mean pressure dilatation acts primarily at large-scales and that kinetic and internal energy budgets statistically decouple beyond a transitional scale-range. Our results suggest that an extension of Kolmogorov's inertial-range theory to compressible turbu...

  18. ENERGY DISSIPATION IN MAGNETIC NULL POINTS AT KINETIC SCALES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olshevsky, Vyacheslav; Lapenta, Giovanni [Centre for Mathematical Plasma Astrophysics (CmPA), KU Leuven (Belgium); Divin, Andrey [Department of Physics, St. Petersburg State University (Russian Federation); Eriksson, Elin [Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division, Uppsala (Sweden); Markidis, Stefano, E-mail: sya@mao.kiev.ua [High Performance Computing and Visualization (HPCViz), KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2015-07-10

    We use kinetic particle-in-cell and MHD simulations supported by an observational data set to investigate magnetic reconnection in clusters of null points in space plasma. The magnetic configuration under investigation is driven by fast adiabatic flux rope compression that dissipates almost half of the initial magnetic field energy. In this phase powerful currents are excited producing secondary instabilities, and the system is brought into a state of “intermittent turbulence” within a few ion gyro-periods. Reconnection events are distributed all over the simulation domain and energy dissipation is rather volume-filling. Numerous spiral null points interconnected via their spines form null lines embedded into magnetic flux ropes; null point pairs demonstrate the signatures of torsional spine reconnection. However, energy dissipation mainly happens in the shear layers formed by adjacent flux ropes with oppositely directed currents. In these regions radial null pairs are spontaneously emerging and vanishing, associated with electron streams and small-scale current sheets. The number of spiral nulls in the simulation outweighs the number of radial nulls by a factor of 5–10, in accordance with Cluster observations in the Earth's magnetosheath. Twisted magnetic fields with embedded spiral null points might indicate the regions of major energy dissipation for future space missions such as the Magnetospheric Multiscale Mission.

  19. Energy Dissipation in Magnetic Null Points at Kinetic Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olshevsky, Vyacheslav; Divin, Andrey; Eriksson, Elin; Markidis, Stefano; Lapenta, Giovanni

    2015-07-01

    We use kinetic particle-in-cell and MHD simulations supported by an observational data set to investigate magnetic reconnection in clusters of null points in space plasma. The magnetic configuration under investigation is driven by fast adiabatic flux rope compression that dissipates almost half of the initial magnetic field energy. In this phase powerful currents are excited producing secondary instabilities, and the system is brought into a state of “intermittent turbulence” within a few ion gyro-periods. Reconnection events are distributed all over the simulation domain and energy dissipation is rather volume-filling. Numerous spiral null points interconnected via their spines form null lines embedded into magnetic flux ropes; null point pairs demonstrate the signatures of torsional spine reconnection. However, energy dissipation mainly happens in the shear layers formed by adjacent flux ropes with oppositely directed currents. In these regions radial null pairs are spontaneously emerging and vanishing, associated with electron streams and small-scale current sheets. The number of spiral nulls in the simulation outweighs the number of radial nulls by a factor of 5-10, in accordance with Cluster observations in the Earth's magnetosheath. Twisted magnetic fields with embedded spiral null points might indicate the regions of major energy dissipation for future space missions such as the Magnetospheric Multiscale Mission.

  20. A comparison of observed and numerically predicted eddy kinetic energy budgets for a developing extratropical cyclone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dare, P. M.; Smith, P. J.

    1983-01-01

    The eddy kinetic energy budget is calculated for a 48-hour forecast of an intense occluding winter cyclone associated with a strong well-developed jet stream. The model output consists of the initialized (1200 GMT January 9, 1975) and the 12, 24, 36, and 48 hour forecast fields from the Drexel/NCAR Limited Area Mesoscale Prediction System (LAMPS) model. The LAMPS forecast compares well with observations for the first 24 hours, but then overdevelops the low-level cyclone while inadequately developing the upper-air wave and jet. Eddy kinetic energy was found to be concentrated in the upper-troposphere with maxima flanking the primary trough. The increases in kinetic energy were found to be due to an excess of the primary source term of kinetic energy content, which is the horizontal flux of eddy kinetic energy over the primary sinks, and the generation and dissipation of eddy kinetic energy.

  1. Mass independent kinetic energy reducing inlet system for vacuum environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reilly, Peter T. A. [Knoxville, TN

    2010-12-14

    A particle inlet system comprises a first chamber having a limiting orifice for an incoming gas stream and a micrometer controlled expansion slit. Lateral components of the momentum of the particles are substantially cancelled due to symmetry of the configuration once the laminar flow converges at the expansion slit. The particles and flow into a second chamber, which is maintained at a lower pressure than the first chamber, and then moves into a third chamber including multipole guides for electromagnetically confining the particle. The vertical momentum of the particles descending through the center of the third chamber is minimized as an upward stream of gases reduces the downward momentum of the particles. The translational kinetic energy of the particles is near-zero irrespective of the mass of the particles at an exit opening of the third chamber, which may be advantageously employed to provide enhanced mass resolution in mass spectrometry.

  2. Functional derivative of the kinetic energy functional for spherically symmetric systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagy, Á

    2011-07-28

    Ensemble non-interacting kinetic energy functional is constructed for spherically symmetric systems. The differential virial theorem is derived for the ensemble. A first-order differential equation for the functional derivative of the ensemble non-interacting kinetic energy functional and the ensemble Pauli potential is presented. This equation can be solved and a special case of the solution provides the original non-interacting kinetic energy of the density functional theory.

  3. Experimental evidence of the decrease of kinetic energy of hadrons in passing through atomic nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strugalski, Z.

    1985-01-01

    Hadrons with kinetic energies higher than the pion production threshold lose their kinetic energies monotonically in traversing atomic nuclei, due to the strong interactions in nuclear matter. This phenomenon is a crude analogy to the energy loss of charged particles in their passage through materials. Experimental evidence is presented.

  4. Energy scavenging strain absorber: application to kinetic dielectric elastomer generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jean-Mistral, C.; Beaune, M.; Vu-Cong, T.; Sylvestre, A.

    2014-03-01

    Dielectric elastomer generators (DEGs) are light, compliant, silent energy scavengers. They can easily be incorporated into clothing where they could scavenge energy from the human kinetic movements for biomedical applications. Nevertheless, scavengers based on dielectric elastomers are soft electrostatic generators requiring a high voltage source to polarize them and high external strain, which constitutes the two major disadvantages of these transducers. We propose here a complete structure made up of a strain absorber, a DEG and a simple electronic power circuit. This new structure looks like a patch, can be attached on human's wear and located on the chest, knee, elbow… Our original strain absorber, inspired from a sailing boat winch, is able to heighten the external available strain with a minimal factor of 2. The DEG is made of silicone Danfoss Polypower and it has a total area of 6cm per 2.5cm sustaining a maximal strain of 50% at 1Hz. A complete electromechanical analytical model was developed for the DEG associated to this strain absorber. With a poling voltage of 800V, a scavenged energy of 0.57mJ per cycle is achieved with our complete structure. The performance of the DEG can further be improved by enhancing the imposed strain, by designing a stack structure, by using a dielectric elastomer with high dielectric permittivity.

  5. Metabolic and Biomechanical Measures of Gait Efficiency of Three Multi-Axial, Vertical Shock and Energy Storing Return Prosthetic Feet During Simple & Complex Mobility Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-01

    AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-11-1-0748 TITLE: Metabolic and Biomechanical Measures of Gait Efficiency of Three Multi-Axial...Metabolic and Biomechanical Measures of Gait Efficiency of Three Multi-Axial, Vertical Shock and Energy Storing Return Prosthetic Feet During Simple... athlete . Amputee performance will also be compared to a non-amputee control group. Body At this time we can report that 100% of experimental

  6. A rotational and axial motion system load frame insert for in situ high energy x-ray studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shade, Paul A., E-mail: paul.shade.1@us.af.mil; Schuren, Jay C.; Turner, Todd J. [Materials and Manufacturing Directorate, Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright-Patterson AFB, Ohio 45433 (United States); Blank, Basil [PulseRay, Beaver Dams, New York 14812 (United States); Kenesei, Peter; Goetze, Kurt; Lienert, Ulrich; Almer, Jonathan [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Suter, Robert M. [Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213 (United States); Bernier, Joel V.; Li, Shiu Fai [Engineering Directorate, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Lind, Jonathan [Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213 (United States); Engineering Directorate, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

    2015-09-15

    High energy x-ray characterization methods hold great potential for gaining insight into the behavior of materials and providing comparison datasets for the validation and development of mesoscale modeling tools. A suite of techniques have been developed by the x-ray community for characterizing the 3D structure and micromechanical state of polycrystalline materials; however, combining these techniques with in situ mechanical testing under well characterized and controlled boundary conditions has been challenging due to experimental design requirements, which demand new high-precision hardware as well as access to high-energy x-ray beamlines. We describe the design and performance of a load frame insert with a rotational and axial motion system that has been developed to meet these requirements. An example dataset from a deforming titanium alloy demonstrates the new capability.

  7. Cartilage surface characterization by frictional dissipated energy during axially loaded knee flexion--an in vitro sheep model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenz, Andrea; Rothstock, Stephan; Bobrowitsch, Evgenij; Beck, Alexander; Gruhler, Gerhard; Ipach, Ingmar; Leichtle, Ulf G; Wülker, Nikolaus; Walter, Christian

    2013-05-31

    Cartilage defects and osteoarthritis (OA) have an increasing incidence in the aging population. A wide range of treatment options are available. The introduction of each new treatment requires controlled, evidence based, histological and biomechanical studies to identify potential benefits. Especially for the biomechanical testing there is a lack of established methods which combine a physiologic testing environment of complete joints with the possibility of body-weight simulation. The current in-vitro study presents a new method for the measurement of friction properties of cartilage on cartilage in its individual joint environment including the synovial fluid. Seven sheep knee joints were cyclically flexed and extended under constant axial load with intact joint capsule using a 6° of freedom robotic system. During the cyclic motion, the flexion angle and the respective torque were recorded and the dissipated energy was calculated. Different mechanically induced cartilage defect sizes (16 mm², 50 mm², 200 mm²) were examined and compared to the intact situation at varying levels of the axial load. The introduced setup could significantly distinguish between most of the defect sizes for all load levels above 200 N. For these higher load levels, a high reproducibility was achieved (coefficient of variation between 4% and 17%). The proposed method simulates a natural environment for the analysis of cartilage on cartilage friction properties and is able to differentiate between different cartilage defect sizes. Therefore, it is considered as an innovative method for the testing of new treatment options for cartilage defects.

  8. A Comparison of Kinetic Energy and Momentum in Special Relativity and Classical Mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riggs, Peter J.

    2016-01-01

    Kinetic energy and momentum are indispensable dynamical quantities in both the special theory of relativity and in classical mechanics. Although momentum and kinetic energy are central to understanding dynamics, the differences between their relativistic and classical notions have not always received adequate treatment in undergraduate teaching.…

  9. Numeric kinetic energy operators for molecules in polyspherical coordinates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadri, Keyvan; Lauvergnat, David; Gatti, Fabien; Meyer, Hans-Dieter

    2012-06-21

    Generalized curvilinear coordinates, as, e.g., polyspherical coordinates, are in general better adapted to the resolution of the nuclear Schrödinger equation than rectilinear ones like the normal mode coordinates. However, analytical expressions of the kinetic energy operators (KEOs) for molecular systems in polyspherical coordinates may be prohibitively complicated for large systems. In this paper we propose a method to generate a KEO numerically and bring it to a form practicable for dynamical calculations. To examine the new method we calculated vibrational spectra and eigenenergies for nitrous acid (HONO) and compare it with results obtained with an exact analytical KEO derived previously [F. Richter, P. Rosmus, F. Gatti, and H.-D. Meyer, J. Chem. Phys. 120, 6072 (2004)]. In a second example we calculated π → π* photoabsorption spectrum and eigenenergies of ethene (C(2)H(4)) and compared it with previous work [M. R. Brill, F. Gatti, D. Lauvergnat, and H.-D. Meyer, Chem. Phys. 338, 186 (2007)]. In this ethene study the dimensionality was reduced from 12 to 6 by freezing six internal coordinates. Results for both molecules show that the proposed method for obtaining an approximate KEO is reliable for dynamical calculations. The error in eigenenergies was found to be below 1 cm(-1) for most states calculated.

  10. Turbulent Cells in Stars: I. Fluctuations in Kinetic Energy

    CERN Document Server

    Arnett, W David

    2010-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) hydrodynamic simulations of shell oxygen burning (Meakin and Arnett 2007) exhibit bursty, recurrent fluctuations in turbulent kinetic energy. These are shown to be due to a general instability of the convective cell, requiring only a localized source of heating or cooling. Such fluctuations are shown to be suppressed in simulations of stellar evolution which use mixing-length theory (MLT). Quantitatively similar behavior occurs in the model of a convective roll (cell) of (Lorenz 1963), which is known to have a strange attractor that gives rise to chaotic fluctuations in time. Study of simulations suggests that the Lorenz convective roll may approximate the behavior of a cell in the large scale convective flow. Other flow patterns are also of interest (Chandrasekhar 1961); here we examine some implications of this simplest case, which is not a unique solution, but may be representative. A direct derivation of the Lorenz equations from the general fluid-dynamic equations for stars is pres...

  11. Axial myopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Witting, Nanna; Andersen, Linda K; Vissing, John

    2016-01-01

    musculature involvement in the majority of myopathies in which paraspinal musculature was examined. Even in diseases named after a certain pattern of non-axial muscle affection, such as facioscapulohumeral and limb girdle muscular dystrophies, affection of the axial musculature was often severe and early...

  12. Neutron emission effects on final fragments mass and kinetic energy distribution from low energy fission of 34U

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montoya, M.; Rojas, J.; Lobato, I.

    2008-12-01

    The kinetic energy distribution as a function of mass of final fragments (m) from low energy fission of $^{234}U$, measured with the Lohengrin spectrometer by Belhafaf et al. presents a peak around m=108 and another around m = 122. The authors attribute the first peak to the evaporation of a large number of neutrons around the corresponding mass number; and the second peak to the distribution of the primary fragment kinetic energy. Nevertheless, the theoretical calculations related to primary distribution made by Faust et al. do not result in a peak around m = 122. In order to clarify this apparent controversy, we have made a numerical experiment in which the masses and the kinetic energy of final fragments are calculated, assuming an initial distribution of the kinetic energy without peaks on the standard deviation as function of fragment mass. As a result we obtain a pronounced peak on the standard deviation of the kinetic energy distribution around m = 109, a depletion from m = 121 to m = 129, and an small peak around m = 122, which is not as big as the measured by Belhafaf et al. Our simulation also reproduces the experimental results on the yield of the final mass, the average number of emitted neutrons as a function of the provisional mass (calculated from the values of the final kinetic energy of the complementary fragments) and the average value of fragment kinetic energy as a function of the final mass.

  13. From the Kinetic Energy Recovery System to the Thermo-Hydraulic Hybrid Motor Vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cristescu, Corneliu; Drumea, Petrin; Guta, Dragos; Dumitrescu, Catalin

    2011-12-01

    The paper presents some theoretical and experimental results obtained by the Hydraulics and Pneumatics Research Institute INOE 2000-IHP with its partners, regarding the creating of one hydraulic system able to recovering the kinetic energy of the motor vehicles, in the braking phases, and use this recovered energy in the starting and accelerating phases. Also, in the article is presented a testing stand, which was especially designed for testing the hydraulic system for recovery the kinetic energy. Through mounting of the kinetic energy recovering hydraulic system, on one motor vehicle, this vehicle became a thermo-hydraulic hybrid vehicle. Therefore, the dynamic behavior was analyzed for the whole hybrid motor vehicle, which includes the energy recovery system. The theoretical and experimental results demonstrate the possible performances of the hybrid vehicle and that the kinetic energy recovery hydraulic systems are good means to increase energy efficiency of the road motor vehicles and to decrease of the fuel consumption.

  14. Axial Crushing and Energy Absorption of Empty and Foam Filled Jute-glass/ Epoxy Bi-tubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalid Asad A.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Experimental work on the axial crushing of empty and polyurethane foam filled bi-tubular composite cone-tube has been carried out. Hand lay-up method was used to fabricate the bi-tubes using woven roving glass, jute and hybrid jute-glass/epoxy materials. The tubes were of 56 mm diameter, and the cones top diameters were 65 mm. Cone semi-apical angles of 5°, 10°, 15°, 20° and 25° were examined. Height of 120 mm was maintained for all the fabricated specimens. Effects of material used, cone semi apical angle and foam filler on the load-displacement relation, maximum load, crush force efficiency, and the specific energy absorption and failure mode were investigated. Results show that the foam filler improved the progressive crushing process, increased the maximum load and the absorbed energy of the bi-tubes. The maximum crushing load and the specific energy absorption increased with increasing the cone semi apical angle up to 20° for the empty bi-tubes and up to 25° for the foam filled bi-tubes. Progressive failure mode with fiber and matrix cracking was observed at the top narrow side of the fractured bi-tubes as well as at the bottom surface of 20° and 25° cone semi-apical angle bi-tubes.

  15. Axial anomaly and energy dependence of hyperon polarization in heavy-ion collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorin, Alexander; Teryaev, Oleg

    2017-01-01

    We address the issue of energy and charge dependence of global polarization of Λ hyperons in peripheral Au-Au collisions recently observed by the STAR Collaboration at Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). We compare different contributions to the anomalous mechanism relating polarization to vorticity and hydrodynamic helicity in QCD matter. We stress that the suppression of the gravitational anomaly contribution in strongly correlated matter observed in lattice simulations confirms our earlier prediction of rapid decrease of polarization with increasing collision energy. Our mechanism leads to polarization of Λ ¯ of the same sign and larger magnitude than the polarization of Λ. The energy and charge dependence of polarization is suggested as a sensitive probe of fine details of QCD matter structure.

  16. Axial anomaly and energy dependence of hyperon polarization in Heavy-Ion Collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Sorin, A

    2016-01-01

    We address the issue of energy and charge dependence of global polarization of $\\Lambda$ hyperons in peripheral $Au-Au$ collisions recently observed by STAR collaboration at RHIC. We compare the different contributions to the anomalous mechanism relating polarization to vorticity and hydrodynamic helicity in QCD matter. We stress that the suppression of gravitational anomaly related contribution in strongly correlated matter observed in lattice simulations confirms our earlier prediction of rapid decrease of polarization with collision energy. Our mechanism leads to the polarization of $\\bar \\Lambda$ of the same sign and larger magnitude than $\\Lambda$. The energy and charge dependence of polarization is suggested as a sensitive probe of fine details of QCD matter structure.

  17. Control of Active Axial Magnetic Bearings for Flywheel-based Energy Storage System

    OpenAIRE

    Morís Gómez, Juan

    2014-01-01

    This thesis deals with the design and implementation of the control system for a Flywheel-based Energy Storage System (FESS) with active magnetic bearings. The thesis focuses on the construction of realistic model of the system according to experimental tests. The simulation model will be used to control the thrust magnetic bearings in order to withstand the flywheel in levitation.

  18. Altering Kinetic Energy Entrainment in Large Eddy Simulations of Large Wind Farms Using Unconventional Wind Turbine Actuator Forcing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire VerHulst

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, horizontally periodic large eddy simulations (LES are utilized to study turbulent atmospheric boundary-layer flow over wind turbines in the far-downstream portion of a large wind farm where the wakes have merged and the flow is fully developed. In an attempt to increase power generation by enhancing the mean kinetic energy (MKE entrainment to the wind turbines, hypothetical synthetic forcing is applied to the flow at the turbine rotor locations. The synthetic forcing is not meant to represent any existing devices or control schemes, but rather acts as a proof of concept to inform future designs. The turbines are modeled using traditional actuator disks, and the unconventional synthetic forcing is applied in the vertical direction with the magnitude and direction dependent on the instantaneous velocity fluctuation at the rotor disk; in one set of LES meant to enhance the vertical entrainment of MKE, a downward force is prescribed in conjunction with a positive axial velocity fluctuation, whereas a negative axial velocity fluctuation results in an upward force. The magnitude of the forcing is proportional to the instantaneous thrust force with prefactors ranging from 0.1 to 1. The synthetic vertical forcing is found to have a significant effect on the power generated by the wind farm. Consistent with previous findings, the MKE flux to the level of the turbines is found to vary along with the total power produced by the wind turbine array. The reverse strategy of downward forcing of slow axial velocity flow is found to have almost no effect on the power output or entrainment. Several of the scenarios tested, e.g., where the vertical force is of similar magnitude to the horizontal thrust, would be very difficult to implement in practice, but the simulations serve the purpose of identifying trends and bounds on possible power increases from flow modifications through action at the turbine rotor.

  19. Kinetic energy management in road traffic injury prevention: a call for action

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davoud Khorasani-Zavareh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: By virtue of their variability, mass and speed have important roles in transferring energies during a crash incidence (kinetic energy. The sum of kinetic energy is important in determining an injury severity and that is equal to one half of the vehicle mass multiplied by the square of the vehicle speed. To meet the Vision Zero policy (a traffic safety policy prevention activities should be focused on vehicle speed management. Understanding the role of kinetic energy will help to develop measures to reduce the generation, distribution, and effects of this energy during a road traffic crash. Road traffic injury preventive activities necessitate Kinetic energy management to improve road user safety.

  20. Bidirectional Energy Cascades and the Origin of Kinetic Alfvenic and Whistler Turbulence in the Solar Wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Che, H.; Goldstein, M. L.; Vinas, A. F.

    2014-01-01

    The observed steep kinetic scale turbulence spectrum in the solar wind raises the question of how that turbulence originates. Observations of keV energetic electrons during solar quiet time suggest them as a possible source of free energy to drive kinetic turbulence. Using particle-in-cell simulations, we explore how the free energy released by an electron two-stream instability drives Weibel-like electromagnetic waves that excite wave-wave interactions. Consequently, both kinetic Alfvénic and whistler turbulence are excited that evolve through inverse and forward magnetic energy cascades.

  1. Kinetic energy release of diatomic and linear triatomic molecules in intense femtosecond laser fields

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Jian-Xin; Ma Ri; Ren Hai-Zhen; Li Xia; Wu Cheng-Yin; Yang Hong; Gong Qi-Huang

    2004-01-01

    @@ The kinetic energy release of fragment ions produced by the interaction of femtosecond laser pulse radiation with diatomic and linear triatomic molecules N2, CO, CO2 and CS2 is investigated. In the case of linear polarization, angles at which the kinetic energy release of ions has the maximum value are different from the alignment of molecules though the kinetic energy release of fragment atomic ions depends on the angle between the laser polarization vector and the detection axis of the time-of-flight.

  2. The mass angular scattering power method for determining the kinetic energies of clinical electron beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blais, N.; Podgorsak, E.B. (Montreal General Hospital, PQ (Canada). Dept. of Medical Physics)

    1992-10-01

    A method for determining the kinetic energy of clinical electron beams is described, based on the measurement in air of the spatial spread of a pencil electron beam which is produced from the broad clinical electron beam. As predicted by the Fermi-Eyges theory, the dose distribution measured in air on a plane, perpendicular to the incident direction of the initial pencil electron beam, is Gaussian. The square of its spatial spread is related to the mass angular scattering power which in turn is related to the kinetic energy of the electron beam. The measured spatial spread may thus be used to determine the mass angular scattering power, which is then used to determine the kinetic energy of the electron beam from the known relationship between mass angular scattering power and kinetic energy. Energies obtained with the mass angular scattering power method agree with those obtained with the electron range method. (author).

  3. The role of latent heat in kinetic energy conversions of South Pacific cyclones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kann, Deirdre M.; Vincent, Dayton G.

    1986-01-01

    The four-dimensional behavior of cyclone systems in the South Pacific Convergence Zone (SPCZ) is analyzed. Three cyclone systems, which occurred during the period from January 10-16, 1979, are examined using the data collected during the first special observing period of the FGGE. The effects of latent heating on the life cycles of the cyclones are investigated. Particular attention is given to the conversions of eddy available potential energy to eddy kinetic energy and of mean kinetic energy to eddy kinetic energy. The net radiation profile, sensible heat flux, total field of vertical motion, and latent heat component were computed. The life cycles of the cyclones are described. It is observed that the latent heating component accounts for nearly all the conversion in the three cyclones, and latent heating within the SPCZ is the major source of eddy kinetic energy for the cyclones.

  4. Energy Conservation Tests of a Coupled Kinetic-kinetic Plasma-neutral Transport Code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stotler, D. P.; Chang, C. S.; Ku, S. H.; Lang, J.; Park, G.

    2012-08-29

    A Monte Carlo neutral transport routine, based on DEGAS2, has been coupled to the guiding center ion-electron-neutral neoclassical PIC code XGC0 to provide a realistic treatment of neutral atoms and molecules in the tokamak edge plasma. The DEGAS2 routine allows detailed atomic physics and plasma-material interaction processes to be incorporated into these simulations. The spatial pro le of the neutral particle source used in the DEGAS2 routine is determined from the uxes of XGC0 ions to the material surfaces. The kinetic-kinetic plasma-neutral transport capability is demonstrated with example pedestal fueling simulations.

  5. Energy reduction: a technique for seed-injection locking of single-axial-mode Q-switched Nd:YAG laser

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sui Chen; Wenxiong Lin; Fei Shi; Jianhong Huang; Jinhui Li; Hui Zheng; Jipeng Lin; Canhua Xu

    2007-01-01

    A new technique for seed-injection locking of single-axial-mode (SAM) Q-switched Nd:YAG laser is reported. The technique called energy reduction (ER) is utilized when SAM operation is locked to design its feedback scheme. This method ensures long-term 100% seed-injection locking performance and the pulsed SAM output energy can reach as high as 200 mJ. Both temporal and spatial interferometric experiments have been executed to confirm the SAM oscillation.

  6. Determining the band gap and mean kinetic energy of atoms from reflection electron energy loss spectra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vos, M. [Atomic and Molecular Physics Laboratories, Research School of Physics and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra ACT (Australia); Marmitt, G. G. [Atomic and Molecular Physics Laboratories, Research School of Physics and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra ACT (Australia); Instituto de Fisica da Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Avenida Bento Goncalves 9500, 91501-970 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Finkelstein, Y. [Nuclear Research Center — Negev, Beer-Sheva 84190 (Israel); Moreh, R. [Physics Department, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva 84105 (Israel)

    2015-09-14

    Reflection electron energy loss spectra from some insulating materials (CaCO{sub 3}, Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3}, and SiO{sub 2}) taken at relatively high incoming electron energies (5–40 keV) are analyzed. Here, one is bulk sensitive and a well-defined onset of inelastic excitations is observed from which one can infer the value of the band gap. An estimate of the band gap was obtained by fitting the spectra with a procedure that includes the recoil shift and recoil broadening affecting these measurements. The width of the elastic peak is directly connected to the mean kinetic energy of the atom in the material (Doppler broadening). The experimentally obtained mean kinetic energies of the O, C, Li, Ca, and Si atoms are compared with the calculated ones, and good agreement is found, especially if the effect of multiple scattering is taken into account. It is demonstrated experimentally that the onset of the inelastic excitation is also affected by Doppler broadening. Aided by this understanding, we can obtain a good fit of the elastic peak and the onset of inelastic excitations. For SiO{sub 2}, good agreement is obtained with the well-established value of the band gap (8.9 eV) only if it is assumed that the intensity near the edge scales as (E − E{sub gap}){sup 1.5}. For CaCO{sub 3}, the band gap obtained here (7 eV) is about 1 eV larger than the previous experimental value, whereas the value for Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3} (7.5 eV) is the first experimental estimate.

  7. Turbulent kinetic energy balance measurements in the wake of a low-pressure turbine blade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sideridis, A. [Laboratory of Fluid Mechanics and Turbomachinery, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, 54124 Thessaloniki (Greece); Yakinthos, K., E-mail: kyros@eng.auth.g [Laboratory of Fluid Mechanics and Turbomachinery, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, 54124 Thessaloniki (Greece); Goulas, A. [Laboratory of Fluid Mechanics and Turbomachinery, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, 54124 Thessaloniki (Greece)

    2011-02-15

    The turbulent kinetic energy budget in the wake generated by a high lift, low-pressure two-dimensional blade cascade of the T106 profile was investigated experimentally using hot-wire anemometry. The purpose of this study is to examine the transport mechanism of the turbulent kinetic energy and provide validation data for turbulence modeling. Point measurements were conducted on a high spatial resolution, two-dimensional grid that allowed precise derivative calculations. Positioning of the probe was achieved using a high accuracy traversing mechanism. The turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) convection, production, viscous diffusion and turbulent diffusion were all obtained directly from experimental measurements. Dissipation and pressure diffusion were calculated indirectly using techniques presented and validated by previous investigators. Results for all terms of the turbulent kinetic energy budget are presented and discussed in detail in the present work.

  8. Anisotropy of the field-induced kinetic energy density in Bi2212

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peña, J.P., E-mail: jullypaola@if.ufrgs.br [Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Av. Bento Gonçalves 9500, C.P. 15051, 91501-970 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Silva, R.R. da [Instituto de Física Gleb Wataghin, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, Rua Sérgio Buarque de Holanda 777, C.P. 13083-970 Campinas, SP (Brazil); Pureur, P. [Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Av. Bento Gonçalves 9500, C.P. 15051, 91501-970 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil)

    2014-01-15

    We present an experimental study of the in-field kinetic energy density in two Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 8+δ} single crystals. The kinetic energy density is determined from magnetization measurements performed above the irreversibility line. Anisotropy effects are observed when an external magnetic field is applied in the direction perpendicular or parallel to the superconducting Cu–O{sub 2} planes. When the field is applied parallel to the c-axis, the most relevant contribution to the kinetic energy comes from the Abrikosov vortices. At low fields, an additional term related to granularity is also observed. A kink in the kinetic energy density associated to the decoupling of the superconducting layers is identified when the field is applied parallel to the ab planes.

  9. Development of an idealised downstream cyclone: Eulerian and Lagrangian perspective on the kinetic energy

    OpenAIRE

    Papritz, Lukas; Schemm, Sebastian

    2013-01-01

    In this idealised modelling study, the development of a downstream cyclone, which closely follows the life-cycle of a Shapiro-Keyser cyclone, is addressed from a quasi-geostrophic kinetic energy perspective. To this end a simulation of a dry, highly idealised, dispersive baroclinic wave, developing a primary and a downstream cyclone, is performed. Kinetic energy and processes contributing to its tendency – in particular baroclinic conversion and ageostrophic geopotential fluxes – are investig...

  10. High-energy interactions in Kinetic Inductance Detectors arrays

    CERN Document Server

    D'Addabbo, A; Goupy, J; Benoit, A; Bourrion, O; Catalano, A; Macias-Perez, J F; Monfardini, A

    2015-01-01

    The impacts of Cosmic Rays on the detectors are a key problem for space-based missions. We are studying the effects of such interactions on arrays of Kinetic Inductance Detectors (KID), in order to adapt this technology for use on board of satellites. Before proposing a new technology such as the Kinetic Inductance Detectors for a space-based mission, the problem of the Cosmic Rays that hit the detectors during in-flight operation has to be studied in detail. We present here several tests carried out with KID exposed to radioactive sources, which we use to reproduce the physical interactions induced by primary Cosmic Rays, and we report the results obtained adopting different solutions in terms of substrate materials and array geometries. We conclude by outlining the main guidelines to follow for fabricating KID for space-based applications.

  11. Kinetic and Available Potential Energy Transport during the Stratospheric Sudden Warming in January 2009

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZUO Qunjie; GAO Shouting; L(U) Daren

    2012-01-01

    The local features of transient kinetic energy and available potential energy were investigated using ECMWF (European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts) Interim Reanalysis data for the stratospheric sudden warming (SSW) event of January 2009.The Western Europe high plays important roles in the propagation of the energy from North America to Eurasian.When the Western Europe high appeared and shifted eastward,energy conversions increased and energy propagated from North America to Eurasian as a form of interaction energy flow.The baroclinic conversion between transient-eddy kinetic energy (Ke)and transient-eddy available potential energy (Ae) and the horizontal advection of geopotential height were approximately one order of magnitude less than Ke and Ae generation terms.So,these terms were less important to this SSW event.

  12. Effect of kinetic energy on the doping efficiency of cesium cations into superfluid helium droplets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Lei; Zhang, Jie; Freund, William M.; Kong, Wei, E-mail: wei.kong@oregonstate.edu [Department of Chemistry, Oregon State University, Corvallis, Oregon 97331 (United States)

    2015-07-28

    We present an experimental investigation of the effect of kinetic energy on the ion doping efficiency of superfluid helium droplets using cesium cations from a thermionic emission source. The kinetic energy of Cs{sup +} is controlled by the bias voltage of a collection grid collinearly arranged with the droplet beam. Efficient doping from ions with kinetic energies from 20 eV up to 480 V has been observed in different sized helium droplets. The relative ion doping efficiency is determined by both the kinetic energy of the ions and the average size of the droplet beam. At a fixed source temperature, the number of doped droplets increases with increasing grid voltage, while the relative ion doping efficiency decreases. This result implies that not all ions are captured upon encountering with a sufficiently large droplet, a deviation from the near unity doping efficiency for closed shell neutral molecules. We propose that this drop in ion doping efficiency with kinetic energy is related to the limited deceleration rate inside a helium droplet. When the source temperature changes from 14 K to 17 K, the relative ion doping efficiency decreases rapidly, perhaps due to the lack of viable sized droplets. The size distribution of the Cs{sup +}-doped droplet beam can be measured by deflection and by energy filtering. The observed doped droplet size is about 5 × 10{sup 6} helium atoms when the source temperature is between 14 K and 17 K.

  13. Modeling on the Effect of Coal Loads on Kinetic Energy of Balls for Ball Mills

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Bai

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a solution for the detection and control of coal loads that is more accurate and convenient than those currently used. To date, no research has addressed the use of a grinding medium as the controlled parameter. To improve the accuracy of the coal load detection based on the kinetic energy of balls in a tubular ball mill, a Discrete Element Method (DEM model for ball kinematics based on coal loads is proposed. The operating process for a ball mill and the ball motion, as influenced by the coal quality and the coal load, was analyzed carefully. The relationship between the operating efficiency of a coal pulverizing system, coal loads, and the balls’ kinetic energy was obtained. Origin and Matlab were utilized to draw the variation of parameters with increasing coal loads in the projectile and cascading motion states. The parameters include the balls’ real-time kinetic energy, the friction energy consumption, and the mill’s total work. Meanwhile, a method of balanced adjacent degree and a physical experiment were proposed to verify the considerable effect of the balls’ kinetic energy on coal loads. The model and experiment results indicate that a coal load control method based on the balls’ kinetic energy is therefore feasible for the optimized operation of a coal pulverizing system.

  14. Experimental free energy measurements of kinetic molecular states using fluctuation theorems

    CERN Document Server

    Alemany, Anna; Junier, Ivan; Ritort, Felix; 10.1038/nphys2375

    2013-01-01

    Recent advances in non-equilibrium statistical mechanics and single molecule technologies make it possible to extract free energy differences from irreversible work measurements in pulling experiments. To date, free energy recovery has been focused on native or equilibrium molecular states, whereas free energy measurements of kinetic states (i.e. finite lifetime states that are generated dynamically and are metastable) have remained unexplored. Kinetic states can play an important role in various domains of physics, such as nanotechnology or condensed matter physics. In biophysics, there are many examples where they determine the fate of molecular reactions: protein and peptide-nucleic acid binding, specific cation binding, antigen-antibody interactions, transient states in enzymatic reactions or the formation of transient intermediates and non-native structures in molecular folders. Here we demonstrate that it is possible to obtain free energies of kinetic states by applying extended fluctuation relations. T...

  15. A novel approach to kinetic energy release distribution and charge state distribution measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Kaidee [National Synchrotron Radiation Research Center, Hsinchu 30077, Taiwan (China)]. E-mail: lee@nsrrc.org.tw

    2005-06-15

    When a swarm of ions are accelerated by a pulsed electric field for a common duration before entering an electrostatically dispersive energy analyzer, they will be sorted according to their charge-to-mass ratio q/m. In other words, the apparent kinetic energy upon which an ion will be registered in an apparent 'energy' spectrum thus obtained is proportional to its q/m ratio. For ions of a fixed mass m, the apparent energy spectrum becomes a charge state distribution spectrum. For ions of a fixed charge q, the apparent energy spectrum becomes a mass spectrum. In essence, an energy analyzer becomes both a charge sorter and a mass spectrometer when operated in this mode. In addition, when applied to the detection of photofragment ions, this technique will be able to yield information on the kinetic energy release distribution of the underlying dissociation events.

  16. The propagation of kinetic energy across scales in turbulent flows

    CERN Document Server

    Cardesa, José I; Dong, Siwei; Jiménez, Javier

    2015-01-01

    A temporal study of energy transfer across length scales is performed in 3D numerical simulations of homogeneous shear flow and isotropic turbulence, at Reynolds numbers in the range $Re_{\\lambda}=107-384$. The average time taken by perturbations in the energy flux to travel between scales is measured and shown to be additive, as inferred from the agreement between the total travel time from a given scale to the smallest dissipative motions, and the time estimated from successive jumps through intermediate scales. Our data suggests that the propagation of disturbances in the energy flux is independent of the forcing and that it defines a `velocity' that determines the energy flux itself. These results support that the cascade is, on average, a scale-local process where energy is continuously transmitted from one scale to the next in order of decreasing size.

  17. Kinetics of energy transfer processes in C-phycocyanin complexes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵井泉; 李晔

    1999-01-01

    The antenna system of algae for photosynthesis is a functional entity composed of various phycobiliproteins and the linker polypeptides. Up to now, high-resolution crystal structure data have been available only for the isolated phycobiliproteins. To have an understanding of the functional connection between different phycobiliproteins, it is necessary to study the complexes composed of different phycobiliproteins. The energy transfer processes in C-phycocyanin complexes were studied through computer simulation because it is difficult to be studied by conventional experimental methods. The main pathways of energy flow and the dynamic property of the energy transfer were obtained. A fast transfer process between two neighboring disks was observed through analyzing the distribution curves of excitation energy over time. According to the definition of the time constants for energy transfer in time-resolved spectrum techniques, for a complex with three C-phycoeyanin hexamer disks, a fluorescence-rising comp

  18. Study of axial magnetic effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braguta, Victor [IHEP, Protvino, Moscow region, 142284 Russia ITEP, B. Cheremushkinskaya street 25, Moscow, 117218 (Russian Federation); School of Biomedicine, Far Eastern Federal University, Ajax 10 Building 25, Russian island, Vladivostok, 690922 (Russian Federation); Chernodub, M. N. [CNRS, Laboratoire de Mathématiques et Physique Théorique, Université François-Rabelais Tours, Fédération Denis Poisson, Parc de Grandmont, 37200 Tours, France Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Gent, Krijgslaan 281, S9, B-9000 Gent (Belgium); School of Biomedicine, Far Eastern Federal University, Ajax 10 Building 25, Russian island, Vladivostok, 690922 (Russian Federation); Goy, V. A. [School of Natural Sciences, Far Eastern Federal University, Sukhanova street 8, Vladivostok, 690950 (Russian Federation); Landsteiner, K. [Instituto de Física Teórica UAM/CSIC, C/ Nicolás Cabrera 13-15, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Molochkov, A. V. [School of Biomedicine, Far Eastern Federal University, Ajax 10 Building 25, Russian island, Vladivostok, 690922 (Russian Federation); Ulybyshev, M. [ITEP, B. Cheremushkinskaya street 25, Moscow, 117218 Russia Institute for Theoretical Problems of Microphysics, Moscow State University, Moscow, 119899 (Russian Federation)

    2016-01-22

    The Axial Magnetic Effect manifests itself as an equilibrium energy flow of massless fermions induced by the axial (chiral) magnetic field. Here we study the Axial Magnetic Effect in the quenched SU(2) lattice gauge theory with massless overlap fermions at finite temperature. We numerically observe that in the low-temperature hadron phase the effect is absent due to the quark confinement. In the high-temperature deconfinement phase the energy flow is an increasing function of the temperature which reaches the predicted asymptotic T{sup 2} behavior at high temperatures. We find, however, that energy flow is about one order of magnitude lower compared to a theoretical prediction.

  19. Factorial design for the evaluation of the interaction effect between particle size and heating rate in the kinetic energy of coal combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avila, Ivonete; Silva, Eugenio A.G.; Mortari, Daniela A.; Crnkovic, Paula M.; Milioli, Fernando E. [University of Sao Paulo (EESC/USP), Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil). Engineering School. Group of Thermal and Fluids Engineering], Emails: iavila@sc.usp.br, eugenio.silva@usp.br, paulam@sc.usp.br, milioli@sc.usp.br

    2010-07-01

    This paper evaluates the behavior of kinetic energy for different heating rates ({alpha}) and particle sizes of the material in the study of the coal combustion process. It aims to obtain a response surface in a large range of particle size, using heating rates between the minimum and maximum values allowed by the equipment. Therefore it searches for a model to evaluate the interaction effect between particle size and the heating rate and to predict the activation energy of the process studied. The activation energy of the process was determined using the isoconversional model Model Free Kinetics. In this model, the activation energy (E{sub {alpha}}) is obtained as a function of the reaction extent ({alpha}). The subscript in E{sub {alpha}} designates the values related to a given value of conversion ({alpha}). All experiments were conducted in thermogravimetric balance using samples of a Brazilian coal (EC4500) witch average particle size between 163 to 650 {mu}m and heating rates between 10 and 40 deg C min{sup -1} in dynamic atmosphere of air. A central rotatable composite design was applied for the 2{sup 2} factorial design including 4 tests under the axial conditions and 3 repetitions in the central point. As expected, the results show that both the particle size and the heating rate affected significantly the values of activation energy of the coal combustion process obtained by the model used. (author)

  20. Exact kinetic energy enables accurate evaluation of weak interactions by the FDE-vdW method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinha, Debalina; Pavanello, Michele, E-mail: m.pavanello@rutgers.edu [Department of Chemistry, Rutgers University, Newark, New Jersey 07102 (United States)

    2015-08-28

    The correlation energy of interaction is an elusive and sought-after interaction between molecular systems. By partitioning the response function of the system into subsystem contributions, the Frozen Density Embedding (FDE)-vdW method provides a computationally amenable nonlocal correlation functional based on the adiabatic connection fluctuation dissipation theorem applied to subsystem density functional theory. In reproducing potential energy surfaces of weakly interacting dimers, we show that FDE-vdW, either employing semilocal or exact nonadditive kinetic energy functionals, is in quantitative agreement with high-accuracy coupled cluster calculations (overall mean unsigned error of 0.5 kcal/mol). When employing the exact kinetic energy (which we term the Kohn-Sham (KS)-vdW method), the binding energies are generally closer to the benchmark, and the energy surfaces are also smoother.

  1. A high current pulsed power generator CQ-3-MMAF with co-axial cable transmitting energy for material dynamics experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guiji; Chen, Xuemiao; Cai, Jintao; Zhang, Xuping; Chong, Tao; Luo, Binqiang; Zhao, Jianheng; Sun, Chengwei; Tan, Fuli; Liu, Cangli; Wu, Gang

    2016-06-01

    A high current pulsed power generator CQ-3-MMAF (Multi-Modules Assembly Facility, MMAF) was developed for material dynamics experiments under ramp wave and shock loadings at the Institute of Fluid Physics (IFP), which can deliver 3 MA peak current to a strip-line load. The rise time of the current is 470 ns (10%-90%). Different from the previous CQ-4 at IFP, the CQ-3-MMAF energy is transmitted by hundreds of co-axial high voltage cables with a low impedance of 18.6 mΩ and low loss, and then hundreds of cables are reduced and converted to tens of cables into a vacuum chamber by a cable connector, and connected with a pair of parallel metallic plates insulated by Kapton films. It is composed of 32 capacitor and switch modules in parallel. The electrical parameters in short circuit are with a capacitance of 19.2 μF, an inductance of 11.7 nH, a resistance of 4.3 mΩ, and working charging voltage of 60 kV-90 kV. It can be run safely and stable when charged from 60 kV to 90 kV. The vacuum of loading chamber can be up to 10(-2) Pa, and the current waveforms can be shaped by discharging in time sequences of four groups of capacitor and switch modules. CQ-3-MMAF is an adaptive machine with lower maintenance because of its modularization design. The COMSOL Multi-physics® code is used to optimize the structure of some key components and calculate their structural inductance for designs, such as gas switches and cable connectors. Some ramp wave loading experiments were conducted to check and examine the performances of CQ-3-MMAF. Two copper flyer plates were accelerated to about 3.5 km/s in one shot when the working voltage was charged to 70 kV. The velocity histories agree very well. The dynamic experiments of some polymer bonded explosives and phase transition of tin under ramp wave loadings were also conducted. The experimental data show that CQ-3-MMAF can be used to do material dynamics experiments in high rate and low cost shots. Based on this design concept, the peak

  2. A high current pulsed power generator CQ-3-MMAF with co-axial cable transmitting energy for material dynamics experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guiji; Chen, Xuemiao; Cai, Jintao; Zhang, Xuping; Chong, Tao; Luo, Binqiang; Zhao, Jianheng; Sun, Chengwei; Tan, Fuli; Liu, Cangli; Wu, Gang

    2016-06-01

    A high current pulsed power generator CQ-3-MMAF (Multi-Modules Assembly Facility, MMAF) was developed for material dynamics experiments under ramp wave and shock loadings at the Institute of Fluid Physics (IFP), which can deliver 3 MA peak current to a strip-line load. The rise time of the current is 470 ns (10%-90%). Different from the previous CQ-4 at IFP, the CQ-3-MMAF energy is transmitted by hundreds of co-axial high voltage cables with a low impedance of 18.6 mΩ and low loss, and then hundreds of cables are reduced and converted to tens of cables into a vacuum chamber by a cable connector, and connected with a pair of parallel metallic plates insulated by Kapton films. It is composed of 32 capacitor and switch modules in parallel. The electrical parameters in short circuit are with a capacitance of 19.2 μF, an inductance of 11.7 nH, a resistance of 4.3 mΩ, and working charging voltage of 60 kV-90 kV. It can be run safely and stable when charged from 60 kV to 90 kV. The vacuum of loading chamber can be up to 10-2 Pa, and the current waveforms can be shaped by discharging in time sequences of four groups of capacitor and switch modules. CQ-3-MMAF is an adaptive machine with lower maintenance because of its modularization design. The COMSOL Multi-physics® code is used to optimize the structure of some key components and calculate their structural inductance for designs, such as gas switches and cable connectors. Some ramp wave loading experiments were conducted to check and examine the performances of CQ-3-MMAF. Two copper flyer plates were accelerated to about 3.5 km/s in one shot when the working voltage was charged to 70 kV. The velocity histories agree very well. The dynamic experiments of some polymer bonded explosives and phase transition of tin under ramp wave loadings were also conducted. The experimental data show that CQ-3-MMAF can be used to do material dynamics experiments in high rate and low cost shots. Based on this design concept, the peak

  3. Principal parametric resonance of axially accelerating rectangular thin plate in magnetic field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡宇达; 张金志

    2013-01-01

    Nonlinear parametric vibration and stability is investigated for an axially accelerating rectangular thin plate subjected to parametric excitations resulting from the axial time-varying tension and axial time-varying speed in the magnetic field. Consid-ering geometric nonlinearity, based on the expressions of total kinetic energy, potential energy, and electromagnetic force, the nonlinear magneto-elastic vibration equations of axially moving rectangular thin plate are derived by using the Hamilton principle. Based on displacement mode hypothesis, by using the Galerkin method, the nonlinear para-metric oscillation equation of the axially moving rectangular thin plate with four simply supported edges in the transverse magnetic field is obtained. The nonlinear principal parametric resonance amplitude-frequency equation is further derived by means of the multiple-scale method. The stability of the steady-state solution is also discussed, and the critical condition of stability is determined. As numerical examples for an axially moving rectangular thin plate, the influences of the detuning parameter, axial speed, axial tension, and magnetic induction intensity on the principal parametric resonance behavior are investigated.

  4. Numerical simulation and decomposition of kinetic energy in the Central Mediterranean: insight on mesoscale circulation and energy conversion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Sorgente

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The spatial and temporal variability of eddy and mean kinetic energy of the Central Mediterranean region has been investigated, from January 2008 to December 2010, by mean of a numerical simulation mainly to quantify the mesoscale dynamics and their relationships with physical forcing. In order to understand the energy redistribution processes, the baroclinic energy conversion has been analysed, suggesting hypotheses about the drivers of the mesoscale activity in this area. The ocean model used is based on the Princeton Ocean Model implemented at 1/32° horizontal resolution. Surface momentum and buoyancy fluxes are interactively computed by mean of standard bulk formulae using predicted model Sea Surface Temperature and atmospheric variables provided by the European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecast operational analyses. At its lateral boundaries the model is one-way nested within the Mediterranean Forecasting System operational products.

    The model domain has been subdivided in four sub-regions: Sardinia channel and southern Tyrrhenian Sea, Sicily channel, eastern Tunisian shelf and Libyan Sea. Temporal evolution of eddy and mean kinetic energy has been analysed, on each of the four sub-regions, showing different behaviours. On annual scales and within the first 5 m depth, the eddy kinetic energy represents approximately the 60 % of the total kinetic energy over the whole domain, confirming the strong mesoscale nature of the surface current flows in this area. The analyses show that the model well reproduces the path and the temporal behaviour of the main known sub-basin circulation features. New mesoscale structures have been also identified, from numerical results and direct observations, for the first time as the Pantelleria Vortex and the Medina Gyre.

    The classical kinetic energy decomposition (eddy and mean allowed to depict and to quantify the permanent and fluctuating parts of the circulation in the region, and

  5. The kinetic and available potential energy budget of a winter extratropical cyclone system

    OpenAIRE

    SMITH, PHILLIP J.; DARE, PATRICIA M.

    2011-01-01

    The energy budget of an extratropical cyclone system which traversed North America and intensified through the period 9–11 January 1975 is presented. The objectives of the study are (1) to document the complete energy budget of a significant winter cyclone event, and (2) to comment on the significance of latent heat release (LHR) in the cyclone's evolution. Results reveal an overall increase in both kinetic (K) and available potential energy (A). K increases are accounted for by boundary flux...

  6. Energy-Driven Kinetic Monte Carlo Method and Its Application in Fullerene Coalescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Feng; Yakobson, Boris I

    2014-09-04

    Mimicking the conventional barrier-based kinetic Monte Carlo simulation, an energy-driven kinetic Monte Carlo (EDKMC) method was developed to study the structural transformation of carbon nanomaterials. The new method is many orders magnitude faster than standard molecular dynamics or Monte Marlo (MC) simulations and thus allows us to explore rare events within a reasonable computational time. As an example, the temperature dependence of fullerene coalescence was studied. The simulation, for the first time, revealed that short capped single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) appear as low-energy metastable structures during the structural evolution.

  7. The Kinetic Energy of Hydrocarbons as a Function of Electron Density and Convolutional Neural Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Yao, Kun

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate a convolutional neural network trained to reproduce the Kohn-Sham kinetic energy of hydrocarbons from electron density. The output of the network is used as a non-local correction to the conventional local and semi-local kinetic functionals. We show that this approximation qualitatively reproduces Kohn-Sham potential energy surfaces when used with conventional exchange correlation functionals. Numerical noise inherited from the non-linearity of the neural network is identified as the major challenge for the model. Finally we examine the features in the density learned by the neural network to anticipate the prospects of generalizing these models.

  8. Theoretical study of atoms by the electronic kinetic energy density and stress tensor density

    CERN Document Server

    Nozaki, Hiroo; Tachibana, Akitomo

    2016-01-01

    We analyze the electronic structure of atoms in the first, second and third periods using the electronic kinetic energy density and stress tensor density, which are local quantities motivated by quantum field theoretic consideration, specifically the rigged quantum electrodynamics. We compute the zero surfaces of the electronic kinetic energy density, which we call the electronic interfaces, of the atoms. We find that their sizes exhibit clear periodicity and are comparable to the conventional atomic and ionic radii. We also compute the electronic stress tensor density and its divergence, tension density, of the atoms, and discuss how their electronic structures are characterized by them.

  9. Theoretical Study of Lithium Ionic Conductors by Electronic Stress Tensor Density and Electronic Kinetic Energy Density

    CERN Document Server

    Nozaki, Hiroo; Ichikawa, Kazuhide; Watanabe, Taku; Aihara, Yuichi; Tachibana, Akitomo

    2016-01-01

    We analyze the electronic structure of lithium ionic conductors, ${\\rm Li_3PO_4}$ and ${\\rm Li_3PS_4}$, using the electronic stress tensor density and kinetic energy density with special focus on the ionic bonds among them. We find that, as long as we examine the pattern of the eigenvalues of the electronic stress tensor density, we cannot distinguish between the ionic bonds and bonds among metalloid atoms. We then show that they can be distinguished by looking at the morphology of the electronic interface, the zero surface of the electronic kinetic energy density.

  10. On the possibility of kinetic energy density evaluation from the experimental electron-density distribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abramov, Yu.A. [National Inst. for Research in Inorganic Materials, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1997-05-01

    A simple new approach for the evaluation of the electronic kinetic energy density, G(r), from the experimental (multipole-fitted) electron density is proposed. It allows a quantitative and semi-quantitative description of the G(r) behavior at the bond critical points of compounds with closed-shell and shared interactions, respectively. This can provide information on the values of the kinetic electron energy densities at the bond critical points, which appears to be useful for quantum-topological studies of chemical interactions using experimental electron densities. (orig.).

  11. Neutron emission effects on final fragments mass and kinetic energy distribution from low energy fission of {sup 234}U

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montoya, M.; Rojas, J. [Instituto Peruano de Energia Nuclear, Av. Canada 1470, Lima 41 (Peru); Lobato, I. [Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Nacional de Ingenieria, Av. Tupac Amaru 210, Apartado Postal 31-139, Lima (Peru)]. e-mail: mmontoya@ipen.gob.pe

    2008-07-01

    The standard deviation of the final kinetic energy distribution ({sigma}{sub e}) as a function of mass of final fragments (m) from low energy fission of {sup 234}U, measured with the Lohengrin spectrometer by Belhafaf et al., presents a peak around m = 109 and another around m = 122. The authors attribute the first peak to the evaporation of a large number of neutrons around the corresponding mass number, i.e. there is no peak on the standard deviation of the primary kinetic energy distribution ({sigma}{sub E}) as a function of primary fragment mass (A). The second peak is attributed to a real peak on {sigma}{sub E}(A). However, theoretical calculations related to primary distributions made by H.R. Faust and Z. Bao do not suggest any peak on {sigma}{sub E}(A). In order to clarify this apparent controversy, we have made a numerical experiment in which the masses and the kinetic energy of final fragments are calculated, assuming an initial distribution of the kinetic energy without structures on the standard deviation as function of fragment mass. As a result we obtain a pronounced peak on {sigma}{sub e} (m) curve around m = 109, a depletion from m = 121 to m = 129, and an small peak around m = 122, which is not as great as that measured by Belhafaf et al. Our simulation also reproduces the experimental results on the yield of the final mass Y(m), the average number of emitted neutrons as a function of the provisional mass (calculated from the values of the final kinetic energy of the complementary fragments) and the average value of fragment kinetic energy as a function of the final mass. From our results we conclude that there are no peaks on the {sigma}{sub E} (A) curve, and the observed peaks on {sigma}{sub e} (m) are due to the emitted neutron multiplicity and the variation of the average fragment kinetic energy as a function of primary fragment mass. (Author)

  12. Bio-kinetic energy harvesting using electroactive polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slade, Jeremiah R.; Bowman, Jeremy; Kornbluh, Roy

    2012-06-01

    In hybrid vehicles, electric motors are used on each wheel to not only propel the car but also to decelerate the car by acting as generators. In the case of the human body, muscles spend about half of their time acting as a brake, absorbing energy, or doing what is known as negative work. Using dielectric elastomers it is possible to use the "braking" phases of walking to generate power without restricting or fatiguing the Warfighter. Infoscitex and SRI have developed and demonstrated methods for using electroactive polymers (EAPs) to tap into the negative work generated at the knee during the deceleration phase of the human gait cycle and convert it into electrical power that can be used to support wearable information systems, including display and communication technologies. The specific class of EAP that has been selected for these applications is termed dielectric elastomers. Because dielectric elastomers dissipate very little mechanical energy into heat, greater amounts of energy can be converted into electricity than by any other method. The long term vision of this concept is to have EAP energy harvesting cells located in components of the Warfighter ensemble, such as the boot uppers, knee pads and eventually even the clothing itself. By properly locating EAPs at these sites it will be possible to not only harvest power from the negative work phase but to actually reduce the amount of work done by the Warfighter's muscles during this phase, thereby reducing fatigue and minimizing the forces transmitted to the joints.

  13. Influence of the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability on the kinetic energy spectrum.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, Christopher R. (University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI)

    2010-09-01

    The fluctuating kinetic energy spectrum in the region near the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability (RMI) is experimentally investigated using particle image velocimetry (PIV). The velocity field is measured at a high spatial resolution in the light gas to observe the effects of turbulence production and dissipation. It is found that the RMI acts as a source of turbulence production near the unstable interface, where energy is transferred from the scales of the perturbation to smaller scales until dissipation. The interface also has an effect on the kinetic energy spectrum farther away by means of the distorted reflected shock wave. The energy spectrum far from the interface initially has a higher energy content than that of similar experiments with a flat interface. These differences are quick to disappear as dissipation dominates the flow far from the interface.

  14. Magnetic to magnetic and kinetic to magnetic energy transfers at the top of the Earth's core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huguet, Ludovic; Amit, Hagay; Alboussière, Thierry

    2016-11-01

    We develop the theory for the magnetic to magnetic and kinetic to magnetic energy transfer between different spherical harmonic degrees due to the interaction of fluid flow and radial magnetic field at the top of the Earth's core. We show that non-zero secular variation of the total magnetic energy could be significant and may provide evidence for the existence of stretching secular variation, which suggests the existence of radial motions at the top of the Earth's core-whole core convection or MAC waves. However, the uncertainties of the small scales of the geomagnetic field prevent a definite conclusion. Combining core field and flow models we calculate the detailed magnetic to magnetic and kinetic to magnetic energy transfer matrices. The magnetic to magnetic energy transfer shows a complex behaviour with local and non-local transfers. The spectra of magnetic to magnetic energy transfers show clear maxima and minima, suggesting an energy cascade. The kinetic to magnetic energy transfers, which are much weaker due to the weak poloidal flow, are either local or non-local between degree one and higher degrees. The patterns observed in the matrices resemble energy transfer patterns that are typically found in 3-D MHD numerical simulations.

  15. Energy dynamics and current sheet structure in fluid and kinetic simulations of decaying magnetohydrodynamic turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Makwana, K D; Li, H; Daughton, W; Cattaneo, F

    2014-01-01

    Simulations of decaying magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence are performed with a fluid and a kinetic code. The initial condition is an ensemble of long-wavelength, counter-propagating, shear-Alfv\\'{e}n waves, which interfere and rapidly generate strong MHD turbulence. The total energy is conserved and the rate of turbulent energy decay is very similar in both codes, although the fluid code has numerical dissipation whereas the kinetic code has kinetic dissipation. The inertial range power spectrum index is similar in both the codes. The fluid code shows a perpendicular wavenumber spectral slope of $k_{\\perp}^{-1.3}$. The kinetic code shows a spectral slope of $k_{\\perp}^{-1.5}$ for smaller simulation domain, and $k_{\\perp}^{-1.3}$ for larger domain. We estimate that collisionless damping mechanisms in the kinetic code can account for the dissipation of the observed nonlinear energy cascade. Current sheets are geometrically characterized. Their lengths and widths are in good agreement between the two codes. T...

  16. Energy transfer and dual cascade in kinetic magnetized plasma turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plunk, G G; Tatsuno, T

    2011-04-22

    The question of how nonlinear interactions redistribute the energy of fluctuations across available degrees of freedom is of fundamental importance in the study of turbulence and transport in magnetized weakly collisional plasmas, ranging from space settings to fusion devices. In this Letter, we present a theory for the dual cascade found in such plasmas, which predicts a range of new behavior that distinguishes this cascade from that of neutral fluid turbulence. These phenomena are explained in terms of the constrained nature of spectral transfer in nonlinear gyrokinetics. Accompanying this theory are the first observations of these phenomena, obtained via direct numerical simulations using the gyrokinetic code AstroGK. The basic mechanisms that are found provide a framework for understanding the turbulent energy transfer that couples scales both locally and nonlocally.

  17. An Estimation of Turbulent Kinetic Energy and Energy Dissipation Rate Based on Atmospheric Boundary Layer Similarity Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jongil; Arya, S. Pal; Shaohua, Shen; Lin, Yuh-Lang; Proctor, Fred H. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Algorithms are developed to extract atmospheric boundary layer profiles for turbulence kinetic energy (TKE) and energy dissipation rate (EDR), with data from a meteorological tower as input. The profiles are based on similarity theory and scalings for the atmospheric boundary layer. The calculated profiles of EDR and TKE are required to match the observed values at 5 and 40 m. The algorithms are coded for operational use and yield plausible profiles over the diurnal variation of the atmospheric boundary layer.

  18. Equilibria and kinetics for H-dependent axial ligation of alkyl(aquo) cobaloximes with aromatic and aliphatic N-donor ligands

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    V Sridhar; D Sudarshan Reddy; N Ravikumar Reddy; S Satyanarayana

    2002-02-01

    Equilibria and kinetics of the reaction of bromomethyl(aquo) cobaloxime with histamine, histidine, glycine and ethyl glycine ester and iodomethyl(aquo) cobaloxime with cyanide, imidazole and substituted imidazoles were studied as a function of H at 25°C, 1.0 M ionic strength (KCl) by spectrophotometry technique. The rate of substitution of H2O varies with the of the incoming ligand, thus establishing the existence of nucleophilic participation of the ligand in the transition state. Dissociation kinetic reactions were also studied as a function of H. Binding and kinetic data were interpreted based on the basicity, steric crowd of the entering ligand and HSAB principle. To compare the rate constants of the entering ligands H independent second-order rate constants were calculated.

  19. Kinetic reconstruction of the free-energy landscape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wedekind, Jan; Reguera, David

    2008-09-04

    We present a new general method to trace back a lot of valuable information from direct simulations and experiments of activated processes. In particular, it allows the reconstruction of the free-energy landscape for an arbitrary reaction coordinate directly from the out-of-equilibrium dynamics of the process. We demonstrate the power of this concept by its application to a molecular dynamics simulation of nucleation of a Lennard-Jones vapor. The same method can be also applied to Brownian dynamics and stochastic simulations.

  20. Kinetic-energy matrix elements for atomic Hylleraas-CI wave functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Frank E

    2016-05-28

    Hylleraas-CI is a superposition-of-configurations method in which each configuration is constructed from a Slater-type orbital (STO) product to which is appended (linearly) at most one interelectron distance rij. Computations of the kinetic energy for atoms by this method have been difficult due to the lack of formulas expressing these matrix elements for general angular momentum in terms of overlap and potential-energy integrals. It is shown here that a strategic application of angular-momentum theory, including the use of vector spherical harmonics, enables the reduction of all atomic kinetic-energy integrals to overlap and potential-energy matrix elements. The new formulas are validated by showing that they yield correct results for a large number of integrals published by other investigators.

  1. Abstract composition rule for relativistic kinetic energy in the thermodynamical limit

    CERN Document Server

    Biro, T S

    2008-01-01

    We demonstrate by simple mathematical considerations that a power-law tailed distribution in the kinetic energy of relativistic particles can be a limiting distribution seen in relativistic heavy ion experiments. We prove that the infinite repetition of an arbitrary composition rule on an infinitesimal amount leads to a rule with a formal logarithm. As a consequence the stationary distribution of energy in the thermodynamical limit follows the composed function of the Boltzmann-Gibbs exponential with this formal logarithm. In particular, interactions described as solely functions of the relative four-momentum squared lead to kinetic energy distributions of the Tsallis-Pareto (cut power-law) form in the high energy limit.

  2. A Kinetic Study of Marginal Soil Energy Plant Helianthus annuus Stalk Pyrolysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huaxiao Yan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The pyrolytic characteristics and kinetics of new marginal soil energy plant Helianthus annuus stalk were investigated using thermogravimetric (TG method from 50 to 800°C in an inert argon atmosphere at different heating rates of 5, 10, 20, and 30°C min−1. The kinetic parameters of activation energy and pre-exponential factor were deduced by Popescu, Flynn-Wall-Ozawa (FWO, and Kissinger-Akahira-Sunose (KAS methods, respectively. The results showed that three stages appeared in the thermal degradation process. The primary devolatilization stage of H. annuus stalk can be described by the Avrami-Erofeev function (n=4. The average activation energy of H. annuus stalk was only 142.9 kJ mol−1. There were minor kinetic compensation effects between the pre-exponential factor and the activation energy. The results suggest that H. annuus stalk is suitable for pyrolysis, and more importantly, the experimental results and kinetic parameters provided useful information for the design of pyrolytic processing system using H. annuus stalk as feedstock.

  3. Evaluation of the Kinetic Energy Approach for Modeling Turbulent Fluxes in Stratocumulus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lenderink, G.; Holtslag, A.A.M.

    2000-01-01

    The modeling of vertical mixing by a turbulence scheme on the basis of prognostic turbulent kinetic energy (E) and a diagnostic length scale (l ) is investigated with particular emphasis on the representation of entrainment. The behavior of this E–l scheme is evaluated for a stratocumulus case obser

  4. Dissociation of CO induced by He2+ ions : I. Fragmentation and kinetic energy release spectra

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bliek, FW; de Jong, MC; Hoekstra, R; Morgenstern, R

    1997-01-01

    The dissociation of COq+ ions (q less than or equal to 3) produced in collisions of keV amu(-1) He2+ ions with CO has been studied by time-of-flight measurements. Both singles and coincidence time-of-flight techniques have been used to determine the kinetic energy release of the dissociating CO mole

  5. Kinetic energies to analyze the experimental auger electron spectra by density functional theory calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endo, Kazunaka

    2016-02-01

    In the Auger electron spectra (AES) simulations, we define theoretical modified kinetic energies of AES in the density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The modified kinetic energies correspond to two final-state holes at the ground state and at the transition-state in DFT calculations, respectively. This method is applied to simulate Auger electron spectra (AES) of 2nd periodic atom (Li, Be, B, C, N, O, F)-involving substances (LiF, beryllium, boron, graphite, GaN, SiO2, PTFE) by deMon DFT calculations using the model molecules of the unit cell. Experimental KVV (valence band electrons can fill K-shell core holes or be emitted during KVV-type transitions) AES of the (Li, O) atoms in the substances agree considerably well with simulation of AES obtained with the maximum kinetic energies of the atoms, while, for AES of LiF, and PTFE substance, the experimental F KVV AES is almost in accordance with the spectra from the transitionstate kinetic energy calculations.

  6. Employing Magnetic Levitation to Monitor Reaction Kinetics and Measure Activation Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benz, Lauren; Cesafsky, Karen E.; Le, Tran; Park, Aileen; Malicky, David

    2012-01-01

    This article describes a simple and inexpensive undergraduate-level kinetics experiment that uses magnetic levitation to monitor the progress and determine the activation energy of a condensation reaction on a polymeric solid support. The method employs a cuvette filled with a paramagnetic solution positioned between two strong magnets. The…

  7. Constrained Parmeterization of Reduced Density Approximation of Kinetic Energy Functionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Debajit; Trickey, Samuel; Karasiev, Valentin

    2014-03-01

    Evaluation of forces in ab initio MD is greatly accelerated by orbital-free DFT, especially at finite temperature. The recent achievement of a fully non-empirical constraint-based generalized gradient (GGA) functional for the Kohn-Sham KE Ts [ n ] brings to light the inherent limitations of GGAs. This motivates inclusion of higher-order derivatives in the form of reduced derivative approximation (RDA) functionals. That, in turn, requires new functional forms and design criteria. RDA functionals are constrained further to produce a positive-definite, non-singular Pauli potential. We focus on designing a non-empirical constraint-based meta-GGA functional with certain combinations of higher-order derivatives which avoid nuclear-site singularities to a specified order of gradient expansion. Here we report progress on this agenda. Work supported by U.S. Dept. of Energy, grant DE-SC0002139.

  8. FLYWHEEL BASED KINETIC ENERGY RECOVERY SYSTEMS (KERS INTEGRATED IN VEHICLES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    THOMAS MATHEWS

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Today, many hybrid electric vehicles have been developed in order to reduce the consumption of fossil fuels; unfortunately these vehicles require electrochemical batteries to store energy, with high costs as well as poor conversion efficiencies. By integrating flywheel hybrid systems, these drawbacks can be overcome and can potentially replace battery powered hybrid vehicles cost effectively. The paper will explain the engineering, mechanics of the flywheel system and it’s working in detail. Each component of the flywheel-based kineticenergy recovery system will also be described. The advantages of this technology over the electric hybrids will be elucidated carefully. The latest advancements in the field, the potential future and scope of the flywheelhybrid will be assessed.

  9. Development of an idealised downstream cyclone: Eulerian and Lagrangian perspective on the kinetic energy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukas Papritz

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available In this idealised modelling study, the development of a downstream cyclone, which closely follows the life-cycle of a Shapiro-Keyser cyclone, is addressed from a quasi-geostrophic kinetic energy perspective. To this end a simulation of a dry, highly idealised, dispersive baroclinic wave, developing a primary and a downstream cyclone, is performed. Kinetic energy and processes contributing to its tendency – in particular baroclinic conversion and ageostrophic geopotential fluxes – are investigated in three dimensions both in an Eulerian and a Lagrangian framework from the genesis of the downstream cyclone as an upper-level kinetic energy centre, over frontal fracture to the fully developed cyclone showing the characteristic T-bone surface frontal structure, with a strong low-level jet along the bent-back front. Initially the downstream cyclone grows by the convergence of ageostrophic geopotential fluxes from the primary cyclone, but as vertical motions intensify this process is replaced by baroclinic conversion in the warm sector. We show that kinetic energy released in the warm sector is radiated away at all levels by ageostrophic geopotential fluxes: in the upper troposphere they are directed downstream, while in the lower troposphere they radiate kinetic energy to the rear of the cyclone. Thereby, vertical ageostrophic geopotential fluxes, their location and divergence, are identified to play a major role in the intensification of the cyclone in the lower troposphere and for the formation of the low-level jet. Low-level rearward ageostrophic geopotential fluxes converging along the bent-back front are shown to be a general characteristic of an eastward propagating baroclinic wave.

  10. Light Weakly Coupled Axial Forces: Models, Constraints, and Projections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kahn, Yonatan [Princeton U.; Krnjaic, Gordan [Fermilab; Mishra-Sharma, Siddharth [Princeton U.; Tait, Tim P. [UC, Irvine

    2016-09-28

    We investigate the landscape of constraints on MeV-GeV scale, hidden U(1) forces with nonzero axial-vector couplings to Standard Model fermions. While the purely vector-coupled dark photon, which may arise from kinetic mixing, is a well-motivated scenario, several MeV-scale anomalies motivate a theory with axial couplings which can be UV-completed consistent with Standard Model gauge invariance. Moreover, existing constraints on dark photons depend on products of various combinations of axial and vector couplings, making it difficult to isolate the effects of axial couplings for particular flavors of SM fermions. We present a representative renormalizable, UV-complete model of a dark photon with adjustable axial and vector couplings, discuss its general features, and show how some UV constraints may be relaxed in a model with nonrenormalizable Yukawa couplings at the expense of fine-tuning. We survey the existing parameter space and the projected reach of planned experiments, briefly commenting on the relevance of the allowed parameter space to low-energy anomalies in pi^0 and 8-Be* decay.

  11. A new exact quantum mechanical rovibrational kinetic energy operator for penta-atomic systems in internal coordinates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈光巨; 李玉学

    1999-01-01

    The concrete molecule-fixed (MF) kinetic energy operator for penta-atomic molecules is expressed in terms of the parameterδ, the matrix element G?, and angular momentum operator (?). The applications of the operator are also discussed. Finally, a general compact form of kinetic energy operator suitable for calculating the rovibrational spectra of polyatomie molecules is presented.

  12. Fission properties of einsteinium and fermium. [Half-life, kinetic energy release, mass division, prompt neutron emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffman, D.C.

    1978-01-01

    The systematics of the low energy fission of the fermium isotopes is studied considering half-lives, masss division, kinetic-energy release, and accompanying prompt neutron emission. It is shown that the low energy fission of the fermium isotopes is a microcosm of the fission process, exhibiting a wide range of half lives, mass and kinetic energy distributions and varying neutron emission. The trends in the fermium isotopes are considered. 23 references. (JFP)

  13. Kinetic Energy of Hydrocarbons as a Function of Electron Density and Convolutional Neural Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Kun; Parkhill, John

    2016-03-01

    We demonstrate a convolutional neural network trained to reproduce the Kohn-Sham kinetic energy of hydrocarbons from an input electron density. The output of the network is used as a nonlocal correction to conventional local and semilocal kinetic functionals. We show that this approximation qualitatively reproduces Kohn-Sham potential energy surfaces when used with conventional exchange correlation functionals. The density which minimizes the total energy given by the functional is examined in detail. We identify several avenues to improve on this exploratory work, by reducing numerical noise and changing the structure of our functional. Finally we examine the features in the density learned by the neural network to anticipate the prospects of generalizing these models.

  14. Accurate Reference Data for the Non-Additive Non-Interacting Kinetic Energy in Covalent Bonds

    CERN Document Server

    Nafziger, Jonathan; Wasserman, Adam

    2016-01-01

    The non-additive non-interacting kinetic energy is calculated exactly for fragments of H$_2$, Li$_2$, Be$_2$, C$_2$, N$_2$, F$_2$, and Na$_2$ within partition density-functional theory. The resulting fragments are uniquely determined and their sum reproduces the Kohn-Sham molecular density of the corresponding XC functional. We compare the use of fractional orbital occupation to the usual PDFT ensemble method for treating the fragment energies and densities. We also compare Thomas-Fermi and von Weiz{\\"a}cker approximate kinetic energy functionals to the numerically exact solution and find significant regions where the von Weiz{\\"a}cker solution is nearly exact.

  15. Energy deposition by heavy ions: additivity of kinetic and potential energy contributions in hillock formation on CaF2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y Y; Grygiel, C; Dufour, C; Sun, J R; Wang, Z G; Zhao, Y T; Xiao, G Q; Cheng, R; Zhou, X M; Ren, J R; Liu, S D; Lei, Y; Sun, Y B; Ritter, R; Gruber, E; Cassimi, A; Monnet, I; Bouffard, S; Aumayr, F; Toulemonde, M

    2014-07-18

    Modification of surface and bulk properties of solids by irradiation with ion beams is a widely used technique with many applications in material science. In this study, we show that nano-hillocks on CaF2 crystal surfaces can be formed by individual impact of medium energy (3 and 5 MeV) highly charged ions (Xe(22+) to Xe(30+)) as well as swift (kinetic energies between 12 and 58 MeV) heavy xenon ions. For very slow highly charged ions the appearance of hillocks is known to be linked to a threshold in potential energy (Ep) while for swift heavy ions a minimum electronic energy loss per unit length (Se) is necessary. With our results we bridge the gap between these two extreme cases and demonstrate, that with increasing energy deposition via Se the Ep-threshold for hillock production can be lowered substantially. Surprisingly, both mechanisms of energy deposition in the target surface seem to contribute in an additive way, which can be visualized in a phase diagram. We show that the inelastic thermal spike model, originally developed to describe such material modifications for swift heavy ions, can be extended to the case where both kinetic and potential energies are deposited into the surface.

  16. Rock Cutting Depth Model Based on Kinetic Energy of Abrasive Waterjet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Tae-Min; Cho, Gye-Chun

    2016-03-01

    Abrasive waterjets are widely used in the fields of civil and mechanical engineering for cutting a great variety of hard materials including rocks, metals, and other materials. Cutting depth is an important index to estimate operating time and cost, but it is very difficult to predict because there are a number of influential variables (e.g., energy, geometry, material, and nozzle system parameters). In this study, the cutting depth is correlated to the maximum kinetic energy expressed in terms of energy (i.e., water pressure, water flow rate, abrasive feed rate, and traverse speed), geometry (i.e., standoff distance), material (i.e., α and β), and nozzle system parameters (i.e., nozzle size, shape, and jet diffusion level). The maximum kinetic energy cutting depth model is verified with experimental test data that are obtained using one type of hard granite specimen for various parameters. The results show a unique curve for a specific rock type in a power function between cutting depth and maximum kinetic energy. The cutting depth model developed here can be very useful for estimating the process time when cutting rock using an abrasive waterjet.

  17. Kinetic energy of throughfall in a highly diverse forest ecosystem in the humid subtropics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geißler, Christian; Kühn, Peter; Scholten, Thomas

    2010-05-01

    After decades of research it is generally accepted that vegetation is a key factor in controlling soil erosion. Therefore, in ecosystems where erosion is a serious problem, afforestation is a common measure against erosion. Most of the studies in the last decades focused on agricultural systems and less attention was paid to natural systems. To understand the mechanisms preventing soil erosion in natural systems the processes have to be studied in detail and gradually. The first step and central research question is on how the canopies of the tree layer alter the properties of rainfall and generate throughfall. Kinetic energy is a widely used parameter to estimate the erosion potential of open field rainfall and throughfall. In the past, numerous studies have shown that vegetation of a certain height enhances the kinetic energy under the canopy (Chapman 1948, Mosley 1982, Vis 1986, Hall & Calder 1993, Nanko et al. 2006, Nanko et al. 2008) in relation to open field rainfall. This is mainly due to a shift in the drop size distribution to less but larger drops possessing a higher amount of kinetic energy. In vital forest ecosystems lower vegetation (shrubs, herbs) as well as a continuous litter layer protects the forest soil from the impact of large drops. The influence of biodiversity, specific forest stands or single species in this process system is still in discussion. In the present study calibrated splash cups (after Ellison 1947, Geißler et al. under review) have been used to detect differences in kinetic energy on the scale of specific species and on the scale of forest stands of contrasting age and biodiversity in a natural forest ecosystem. The splash cups have been calibrated experimentally using a laser disdrometer. The results show that the kinetic energy of throughfall produced by the tree layer increases with the age of the specific forest stand. The average throughfall kinetic energy (J m-2) is about 2.6 times higher in forests than under open field

  18. Statistical model of a flexible inextensible polymer chain: The effect of kinetic energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pergamenshchik, V. M.; Vozniak, A. B.

    2017-01-01

    Because of the holonomic constraints, the kinetic energy contribution in the partition function of an inextensible polymer chain is difficult to find, and it has been systematically ignored. We present the first thermodynamic calculation incorporating the kinetic energy of an inextensible polymer chain with the bending energy. To explore the effect of the translation-rotation degrees of freedom, we propose and solve a statistical model of a fully flexible chain of N +1 linked beads which, in the limit of smooth bending, is equivalent to the well-known wormlike chain model. The partition function with the kinetic and bending energies and correlations between orientations of any pair of links and velocities of any pair of beads are found. This solution is precise in the limits of small and large rigidity-to-temperature ratio b /T . The last exact solution is essential as even very "harmless" approximation results in loss of the important effects when the chain is very rigid. For very high b /T , the orientations of different links become fully correlated. Nevertheless, the chain does not go over into a hard rod even in the limit b /T →∞ : While the velocity correlation length diverges, the correlations themselves remain weak and tend to the value ∝T /(N +1 ). The N dependence of the partition function is essentially determined by the kinetic energy contribution. We demonstrate that to obtain the correct energy and entropy in a constrained system, the T derivative of the partition function has to be applied before integration over the constraint-setting variable.

  19. Proton Kinetic Effects and Turbulent Energy Cascade Rate in the Solar Wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osman, K.; Matthaeus, W. H.; Kiyani, K. H.; Hnat, B.; Chapman, S. C.

    2013-12-01

    The first observed connection between kinetic instabilities driven by proton temperature anisotropy and estimated energy cascade rates in the turbulent solar wind is reported using measurements from the Wind spacecraft at 1 AU. We find enhanced cascade rates are concentrated along the boundaries of the (β‖,T⊥/T‖)-plane, which includes regions theoretically unstable to the mirror and firehose instabilities. A strong correlation is observed between the estimated cascade rates and kinetic effects such as temperature anisotropy and plasma heating, resulting in protons 5-6 times hotter and 70-90% more anisotropic than under typical isotropic plasma conditions. These results offer new insights into kinetic processes in a turbulent regime.

  20. Proton Kinetic Effects and Turbulent Energy Cascade Rate in the Solar Wind

    CERN Document Server

    Osman, Kareem T; Kiyani, Khurom H; Hnat, Bogdan; Chapman, Sandra C

    2013-01-01

    The first observed connection between kinetic instabilities driven by proton temperature anisotropy and estimated energy cascade rates in the turbulent solar wind is reported using measurements from the Wind spacecraft at 1 AU. We find enhanced cascade rates are concentrated along the boundaries of the ($\\beta_{\\parallel}$, $T_{\\perp}/T_{\\parallel}$)-plane, which includes regions theoretically unstable to the mirror and firehose instabilities. A strong correlation is observed between the estimated cascade rate and kinetic effects such as temperature anisotropy and plasma heating, resulting in protons 5-6 times hotter and 70-90% more anisotropic than under typical isotropic plasma conditions. These results offer new insights into kinetic processes in a turbulent regime.

  1. Proton kinetic effects and turbulent energy cascade rate in the solar wind.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osman, K T; Matthaeus, W H; Kiyani, K H; Hnat, B; Chapman, S C

    2013-11-15

    The first observed connection between kinetic instabilities driven by proton temperature anisotropy and estimated energy cascade rates in the turbulent solar wind is reported using measurements from the Wind spacecraft at 1 AU. We find enhanced cascade rates are concentrated along the boundaries of the (β∥, T⊥/T∥) plane, which includes regions theoretically unstable to the mirror and firehose instabilities. A strong correlation is observed between the estimated cascade rate and kinetic effects such as temperature anisotropy and plasma heating, resulting in protons 5-6 times hotter and 70%-90% more anisotropic than under typical isotropic plasma conditions. These results offer new insights into kinetic processes in a turbulent regime.

  2. Anomalous kinetic energy of a system of dust particles in a gas discharge plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norman, G. E., E-mail: norman@ihed.ras.ru; Stegailov, V. V., E-mail: stegailov@gmail.com; Timofeev, A. V., E-mail: timofeevalvl@gmail.com [Russian Academy of Sciences, Joint Institute for High Temperatures (Russian Federation)

    2011-11-15

    The system of equations of motion of dust particles in a near-electrode layer of a gas discharge has been formulated taking into account fluctuations of the charge of a dust particle and the features of the nearelectrode layer of the discharge. The molecular dynamics simulation of the system of dust particles has been carried out. Performing a theoretical analysis of the simulation results, a mechanism of increasing the average kinetic energy of dust particles in the gas discharge plasma has been proposed. According to this mechanism, the heating of the vertical oscillations of dust particles is initiated by induced oscillations generated by fluctuations of the charge of dust particles, and the energy transfer from vertical to horizontal oscillations can be based on the parametric resonance phenomenon. The combination of the parametric and induced resonances makes it possible to explain an anomalously high kinetic energy of dust particles. The estimate of the frequency, amplitude, and kinetic energy of dust particles are close to the respective experimental values.

  3. Kinetic energy from supernova feedback in high-resolution galaxy simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Simpson, Christine M; Hummels, Cameron; Ostriker, Jeremiah P

    2014-01-01

    We describe a new method for adding a prescribed amount of kinetic energy to simulated gas modeled on a cartesian grid by directly altering grid cells' mass and velocity in a distributed fashion. The method is explored in the context of supernova feedback in high-resolution hydrodynamic simulations of galaxy formation. In idealized tests at varying background densities and resolutions, we show convergence in behavior between models with different initial kinetic energy fractions at low densities and/or at high resolutions. We find that in high density media ($\\gtrsim$ 50 cm$^{-3}$) with coarse resolution ($\\gtrsim 4$ pc per cell), results are sensitive to the initial fraction of kinetic energy due to the early rapid cooling of thermal energy. We describe and test a resolution dependent scheme for adjusting this fraction that approximately replicates our high-resolution tests. We apply the method to a prompt supernova feedback model, meant to mimic Type II supernovae, in a cosmological simulation of a $10^9$ M...

  4. On the ultrafast kinetics of the energy and electron transfer reactions in photosystem I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slavov, Chavdar Lyubomirov

    2009-07-09

    The subject of the current work is one of the main participants in the light-dependent phase of oxygenic photosynthesis, Photosystem I (PS I). This complex carries an immense number of cofactors: chlorophylls (Chl), carotenoids, quinones, etc, which together with the protein entity exhibit several exceptional properties. First, PS I has an ultrafast light energy trapping kinetics with a nearly 100% quantum efficiency. Secondly, both of the electron transfer branches in the reaction center are suggested to be active. Thirdly, there are some so called 'red' Chls in the antenna system of PS I, absorbing light with longer wavelengths than the reaction center. These 'red' Chls significantly modify the trapping kinetics of PS I. The purpose of this thesis is to obtain better understanding of the above-mentioned, specific features of PS I. This will not merely cast more light on the mechanisms of energy and electron transfer in the complex, but also will contribute to the future developments of optimized artificial light-harvesting systems. In the current work, a number of PS I complexes isolated from different organisms (Thermosynechococcus elongatus, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, Arabidopsis thaliana) and possessing distinctive features (different macroorganisation, monomers, trimers, monomers with a semibelt of peripheral antenna attached; presence of 'red' Chls) is investigated. The studies are primarily focused on the electron transfer kinetics in each of the cofactor branches in the PS I reaction center, as well as on the effect of the antenna size and the presence of 'red' Chls on the trapping kinetics of PS I. These aspects are explored with the help of several ultrafast optical spectroscopy methods: (i) time-resolved fluorescence ? single photon counting and synchroscan streak camera; and (ii) ultrafast transient absorption. Physically meaningful information about the molecular mechanisms of the energy trapping in PS I is

  5. Phase field model for strong anisotropy of kinetic and highly anisotropic interfacial energy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Guo-wei; HOU Hua; CHENG Jun

    2006-01-01

    A phase-field model was established for simulating pure materials, which was calculated effectively and taken into account the strong anisotropy of kinetic and highly anisotropic interfacial energy. The anisotropy (strong kinetic and highly interfacial energy) of various degrees was simulated with numerical calculation. During a variety of interfacial anisotropy coefficient, equilibrium crystal shape varies from smoothness to corner. There has a critical value during the course of the transformation. When the anisotropy coefficenct is lower than the critical value, the growth velocity v increases monotonically with the increase of it. Whereas the anisotropy coefficent is higher than the critical value, the growth velocity decreases with the increases of it. During a variety of degree of supercooling, the growth velocity is under control from thermal diffusion to kinetics. Under the control of thermal diffusion, the growth velocity increases with the increase of degree of supercooling and tip radius R decreases with the increase of temperature. Under the control of kinetics, with the increase of degree of supercooling both V and R, which can not fit the traditional microcosmic theory.

  6. Effect of heating rate and kinetic model selection on activation energy of nonisothermal crystallization of amorphous felodipine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chattoraj, Sayantan; Bhugra, Chandan; Li, Zheng Jane; Sun, Changquan Calvin

    2014-12-01

    The nonisothermal crystallization kinetics of amorphous materials is routinely analyzed by statistically fitting the crystallization data to kinetic models. In this work, we systematically evaluate how the model-dependent crystallization kinetics is impacted by variations in the heating rate and the selection of the kinetic model, two key factors that can lead to significant differences in the crystallization activation energy (Ea ) of an amorphous material. Using amorphous felodipine, we show that the Ea decreases with increase in the heating rate, irrespective of the kinetic model evaluated in this work. The model that best describes the crystallization phenomenon cannot be identified readily through the statistical fitting approach because several kinetic models yield comparable R(2) . Here, we propose an alternate paired model-fitting model-free (PMFMF) approach for identifying the most suitable kinetic model, where Ea obtained from model-dependent kinetics is compared with those obtained from model-free kinetics. The most suitable kinetic model is identified as the one that yields Ea values comparable with the model-free kinetics. Through this PMFMF approach, nucleation and growth is identified as the main mechanism that controls the crystallization kinetics of felodipine. Using this PMFMF approach, we further demonstrate that crystallization mechanism from amorphous phase varies with heating rate.

  7. Hierarchical expansion of the kinetic energy operator in curvilinear coordinates for the vibrational self-consistent field method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strobusch, D; Scheurer, Ch

    2011-09-28

    A new hierarchical expansion of the kinetic energy operator in curvilinear coordinates is presented and modified vibrational self-consistent field (VSCF) equations are derived including all kinematic effects within the mean field approximation. The new concept for the kinetic energy operator is based on many-body expansions for all G matrix elements and its determinant. As a test application VSCF computations were performed on the H(2)O(2) molecule using an analytic potential (PCPSDE) and different hierarchical approximations for the kinetic energy operator. The results indicate that coordinate-dependent reduced masses account for the largest part of the kinetic energy. Neither kinematic couplings nor derivatives of the G matrix nor its determinant had significant effects on the VSCF energies. Only the zero-point value of the pseudopotential yields an offset to absolute energies which, however, is irrelevant for spectroscopic problems.

  8. Turbulent Kinetic Energy Spectra of Solar Convection from NST Observations and Realistic MHD Simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Kitiashvili, I N; Goode, P R; Kosovichev, A G; Lele, S K; Mansour, N N; Wray, A A; Yurchyshyn, V B

    2012-01-01

    Turbulent properties of the quiet Sun represent the basic state of surface conditions, and a background for various processes of solar activity. Therefore understanding of properties and dynamics of this `basic' state is important for investigation of more complex phenomena, formation and development of observed phenomena in the photosphere and atmosphere. For characterization of the turbulent properties we compare kinetic energy spectra on granular and sub-granular scales obtained from infrared TiO observations with the New Solar Telescope (Big Bear Solar Observatory) and from 3D radiative MHD numerical simulations ('SolarBox' code). We find that the numerical simulations require a high spatial resolution with 10 - 25 km grid-step in order to reproduce the inertial (Kolmogorov) turbulence range. The observational data require an averaging procedure to remove noise and potential instrumental artifacts. The resulting kinetic energy spectra show a good agreement between the simulations and observations, opening...

  9. The onset of sediment transport in vegetated channels predicted by turbulent kinetic energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, J. Q.; Chung, H.; Nepf, H. M.

    2016-11-01

    This laboratory study advances our understanding of sediment transport in vegetated regions, by describing the impact of stem density on the critical velocity, Ucrit, at which sediment motion is initiated. Sparse emergent vegetation was modeled with rigid cylinders arranged in staggered arrays of different stem densities. The sediment transport rate, Qs, was measured over a range of current speeds using digital imaging, and the critical velocity was selected as the condition at which the magnitude of Qs crossed the noise threshold. For both grain sizes considered here (0.6-0.85 mm and 1.7-2 mm), Ucrit decreased with increasing stem density. This dependence can be explained by a threshold condition based on turbulent kinetic energy, kt, suggesting that near-bed turbulence intensity may be a more important control than bed shear stress on the initiation of sediment motion. The turbulent kinetic energy model unified the bare bed and vegetated channel measurements.

  10. Analysis of atmospheric flow over a surface protrusion using the turbulence kinetic energy equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, W.; Harper, W. L.; Fichtl, G. H.

    1975-01-01

    Atmospheric flow fields resulting from a semi-elliptical surface obstruction in an otherwise horizontally homogeneous statistically stationary flow are modelled with the boundary-layer/Boussinesq-approximation of the governing equation of fluid mechanics. The turbulence kinetic energy equation is used to determine the dissipative effects of turbulent shear on the mean flow. Mean-flow results are compared with those given in a previous paper where the same problem was attacked using a Prandtl mixing-length hypothesis. Iso-lines of turbulence kinetic energy and turbulence intensity are plotted in the plane of the flow. They highlight regions of high turbulence intensity in the stagnation zone and sharp gradients in intensity along the transition from adverse to favourable pressure gradient.

  11. How to measure kinetic energy of the heavy quark inside B mesons?

    CERN Document Server

    Bigi, Ikaros I; Shifman, M; Uraltsev, N; Vainshtein, A I

    1994-01-01

    We discuss how one can determine the average kinetic energy of the heavy quark inside heavy mesons from differential distributions in B decays. A new, so-called third, sum rule for the b\\rightarrow c transition is derived in the small velocity (SV) limit. Using this sum rule and the existing data on the momentum dependence in the B\\rightarrow D^* transition (the slope of the Isgur-Wise function) we obtain a new lower bound on the parameter \\mu_\\pi^2 = (2M_B)^{-1}\\langle B |\\bar b (i\\vec{D})^2 b |B\\rangle proportional to the average kinetic energy of b quark inside B meson. The existing data suggest \\mu_\\pi^2 > 0.4~GeV^2 and (from the ``optical'' sum rule) \\overline{\\Lambda} > 500 MeV, albeit with some numerical uncertainties.

  12. Some Properties of the Kinetic Energy Flux and Dissipation in Turbulent Stellar Convection Zones

    CERN Document Server

    Meakin, Casey

    2010-01-01

    We investigate simulated turbulent flow within thermally driven stellar convection zones. Different driving sources are studied, including cooling at the top of the convectively unstable region, as occurs in surface convection zones; and heating at the base by nuclear burning. The transport of enthalpy and kinetic energy, and the distribution of turbulent kinetic energy dissipation are studied. We emphasize the importance of global constraints on shaping the quasi-steady flow characteristics, and present an analysis of turbulent convection which is posed as a boundary value problem that can be easily incorporated into standard stellar evolution codes for deep, efficient convection. Direct comparison is made between the theoretical analysis and the simulated flow and very good agreement is found. Some common assumptions traditionally used to treat quasi-steady turbulent flow in stellar models are briefly discussed. The importance and proper treatment of convective boundaries are indicated.

  13. Revisiting the density scaling of the non-interacting kinetic energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgoo, Alex; Teale, Andrew M; Tozer, David J

    2014-07-28

    Scaling relations play an important role in the understanding and development of approximate functionals in density functional theory. Recently, a number of these relationships have been redefined in terms of the Kohn-Sham orbitals [Calderín, Phys. Rev. A: At., Mol., Opt. Phys., 2013, 86, 032510]. For density scaling the author proposed a procedure involving a multiplicative scaling of the Kohn-Sham orbitals whilst keeping their occupation numbers fixed. In the present work, the differences between this scaling with fixed occupation numbers and that of previous studies, where the particle number change implied by the scaling was accommodated through the use of the grand canonical ensemble, are examined. We introduce the terms orbital and ensemble density scaling for these approaches, respectively. The natural ambiguity of the density scaling of the non-interacting kinetic energy functional is examined and the ancillary definitions implicit in each approach are highlighted and compared. As a consequence of these differences, Calderín recovered a homogeneity of degree 1 for the non-interacting kinetic energy functional under orbital scaling, contrasting recent work by the present authors [J. Chem. Phys., 2012, 136, 034101] where the functional was found to be inhomogeneous under ensemble density scaling. Furthermore, we show that the orbital scaling result follows directly from the linearity and the single-particle nature of the kinetic energy operator. The inhomogeneity of the non-interacting kinetic energy functional under ensemble density scaling can be quantified by defining an effective homogeneity. This quantity is shown to recover the homogeneity values for important approximate forms that are exact for limiting cases such as the uniform electron gas and one-electron systems. We argue that the ensemble density scaling provides more insight into the development of new functional forms.

  14. Energy resolution and efficiency of phonon-mediated Kinetic Inductance Detectors for light detection

    OpenAIRE

    Cardani, L; Colantoni, I.; Cruciani, A.; Di Domizio, S.; Vignati, M.; Bellini, F.; Casali, N.; Castellano, M. G.; Coppolecchia, A.; Cosmelli, C.; Tomei, C.

    2015-01-01

    The development of sensitive cryogenic light detectors is of primary interest for bolometric experiments searching for rare events like dark matter interactions or neutrino-less double beta decay. Thanks to their good energy resolution and the natural multiplexed read-out, Kinetic Inductance Detectors (KIDs) are particularly suitable for this purpose. To efficiently couple KIDs-based light detectors to the large crystals used by the most advanced bolometric detectors, active surfaces of sever...

  15. Initiation and Modification of Reaction by Energy Addition: Kinetic and Transport Phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-10-01

    MODIFICATION OF REACTION BY ENERGY ADDITION: KINETIC AND TRANSPORT PHENOMENA by Francis E. Fendell and Mau-Song Chou Center for Propulsion Technology...TA - A2 L AUHOWAC - F49620-90-C-0070 Francis E. Fendell and Mau-Song Chou 7. PEMOS101IG ORGANIZATION NAME(S AND...a gaseous mixture is more pertinent for the supersonic-combustor applications of interest to the Air Force (compare Figs. 1 and 2) (Carrier, Fendell

  16. Bidirectional energy cascades and the origin of kinetic Alfvénic and whistler turbulence in the solar wind.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Che, H; Goldstein, M L; Viñas, A F

    2014-02-14

    The observed steep kinetic scale turbulence spectrum in the solar wind raises the question of how that turbulence originates. Observations of keV energetic electrons during solar quiet time suggest them as a possible source of free energy to drive kinetic turbulence. Using particle-in-cell simulations, we explore how the free energy released by an electron two-stream instability drives Weibel-like electromagnetic waves that excite wave-wave interactions. Consequently, both kinetic Alfvénic and whistler turbulence are excited that evolve through inverse and forward magnetic energy cascades.

  17. Monte-Carlo simulation for fragment mass and kinetic energy distributions from neutron induced fission of 235U

    CERN Document Server

    Montoya, M; Rojas, J

    2007-01-01

    The mass and kinetic energy distribution of nuclear fragments from thermal neutron induced fission of 235U have been studied using a Monte-Carlo simulation. Besides reproducing the pronounced broadening on the standard deviation of the final fragment kinetic energy distribution $\\sigma_{e}(m)$ around the mass number m = 109, our simulation also produces a second broadening around m = 125, that is in agreement with the experimental data obtained by Belhafaf et al. These results are consequence of the characteristics of the neutron emission, the variation in the primary fragment mean kinetic energy and the yield as a function of the mass.

  18. Role of kinetic energy of impinging molecules in the {alpha}-sexithiophene growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tonezzer, M., E-mail: matteo.tonezzer@cnr.i [IFN-CNR, Via alla Cascata 56/C, 38123 Povo di Trento (Italy) and Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Trento, Via Sommarive 14, I-38123 Povo Trento (Italy) and TASC IOM-CNR Laboratory, S.S. 14 km163.5, I-34012 Basovizza Trieste (Italy); Rigo, E. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Modena e Reggio Emilia, via Campi 213/A, 41100 Modena (Italy); Gottardi, S. [IFN-CNR, Via alla Cascata 56/C, 38123 Povo di Trento (Italy); Bettotti, P.; Pavesi, L. [Laboratorio di Nanoscienze, Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Trento, Via Sommarive 14, I-38123 Povo Trento (Italy); Iannotta, S. [IMEM-CNR, Parco Area delle Scienze, 37/a 43100 Parma (Italy); Toccoli, T., E-mail: toccoli@science.unitn.i [IFN-CNR, Via alla Cascata 56/C, 38123 Povo di Trento (Italy)

    2011-04-01

    We report on the {alpha}-sexithiophene sub-monolayer growth with supersonic molecular beam deposition by investigating how the kinetic energy of the impinging molecules influences the growth on substrates with different surface wettabilities and temperatures. The results show that the energy of the impinging molecules affects the morphology of the molecular film increasing the coverage and the island size, and reducing the fractality of the sub-monolayer islands. The possibility of directing growth of more ordered islands could improve the performances of electronic devices, which are greatly affected by the structure of the first monolayers.

  19. When and how does a prominence-like jet gain kinetic energy?

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Jiajia; Liu, Rui; Zhang, Quanhao; Liu, Kai; Shen, Chenglong; Wang, S

    2014-01-01

    Jet, a considerable amount of plasma being ejected from chromosphere or lower corona into higher corona, is a common phenomenon. Usually a jet is triggered by a brightening or a flare, which provides the first driving force to push plasma upward. In this process, magnetic reconnection is thought to be the mechanism to convert magnetic energy into thermal, non-thermal and kinetic energies. However, most jets could reach an unusual high altitude and end much later than the end of its associated flare. This fact implies that there is another way to continuously transfer magnetic energy into kinetic energy even after the reconnection. The whole picture described above is well known in the community, but how and how much magnetic energy is released through the way other than the reconnection is still unclear. Here, through studying a prominence-like jet observed by SDO/AIA and STEREO-A/EUVI, we find that the continuous relaxation of the post-reconnection magnetic field structure is an important process for a jet t...

  20. Coarse Molecular Dynamics of a Peptide Fragment Free Energy, Kinetics, and Long-Time Dynamics Computations

    CERN Document Server

    Hummer, G; Hummer, Gerhard; Kevrekidis, Ioannis G.

    2002-01-01

    We present a ``coarse molecular dynamics'' approach and apply it to studying the kinetics and thermodynamics of a peptide fragment dissolved in water. Short bursts of appropriately initialized simulations are used to infer the deterministic and stochastic components of the peptide motion parametrized by an appropriate set of coarse variables. Techniques from traditional numerical analysis (Newton-Raphson, coarse projective integration) are thus enabled; these techniques help analyze important features of the free-energy landscape (coarse transition states, eigenvalues and eigenvectors, transition rates, etc.). Reverse integration of (irreversible) expected coarse variables backward in time can assist escape from free energy minima and trace low-dimensional free energy surfaces. To illustrate the ``coarse molecular dynamics'' approach, we combine multiple short (0.5-ps) replica simulations to map the free energy surface of the ``alanine dipeptide'' in water, and to determine the ~ 1/(1000 ps) rate of interconv...

  1. Enzymatic Kinetic Isotope Effects from Path-Integral Free Energy Perturbation Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, J

    2016-01-01

    Path-integral free energy perturbation (PI-FEP) theory is presented to directly determine the ratio of quantum mechanical partition functions of different isotopologs in a single simulation. Furthermore, a double averaging strategy is used to carry out the practical simulation, separating the quantum mechanical path integral exactly into two separate calculations, one corresponding to a classical molecular dynamics simulation of the centroid coordinates, and another involving free-particle path-integral sampling over the classical, centroid positions. An integrated centroid path-integral free energy perturbation and umbrella sampling (PI-FEP/UM, or simply, PI-FEP) method along with bisection sampling was summarized, which provides an accurate and fast convergent method for computing kinetic isotope effects for chemical reactions in solution and in enzymes. The PI-FEP method is illustrated by a number of applications, to highlight the computational precision and accuracy, the rule of geometrical mean in kinetic isotope effects, enhanced nuclear quantum effects in enzyme catalysis, and protein dynamics on temperature dependence of kinetic isotope effects.

  2. Statistical rate theory and kinetic energy-resolved ion chemistry: theory and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armentrout, P B; Ervin, Kent M; Rodgers, M T

    2008-10-16

    Ion chemistry, first discovered 100 years ago, has profitably been coupled with statistical rate theories, developed about 80 years ago and refined since. In this overview, the application of statistical rate theory to the analysis of kinetic-energy-dependent collision-induced dissociation (CID) reactions is reviewed. This procedure accounts for and quantifies the kinetic shifts that are observed as systems increase in size. The statistical approach developed allows straightforward extension to systems undergoing competitive or sequential dissociations. Such methods can also be applied to the reverse of the CID process, association reactions, as well as to quantitative analysis of ligand exchange processes. Examples of each of these types of reactions are provided and the literature surveyed for successful applications of this statistical approach to provide quantitative thermochemical information. Such applications include metal-ligand complexes, metal clusters, proton-bound complexes, organic intermediates, biological systems, saturated organometallic complexes, and hydrated and solvated species.

  3. Distinct dissociation kinetics between ion pairs: Solvent-coordinate free-energy landscape analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yonetani, Yoshiteru

    2015-07-01

    Different ion pairs exhibit different dissociation kinetics; however, while the nature of this process is vital for understanding various molecular systems, the underlying mechanism remains unclear. In this study, to examine the origin of different kinetic rate constants for this process, molecular dynamics simulations were conducted for LiCl, NaCl, KCl, and CsCl in water. The results showed substantial differences in dissociation rate constant, following the trend kLiCl constants arose predominantly from the variation in solvent-state distribution between the ion pairs. The formation of a water-bridging configuration, in which the water molecule binds to an anion and a cation simultaneously, was identified as a key step in this process: water-bridge formation lowers the related dissociation free-energy barrier, thereby increasing the probability of ion-pair dissociation. Consequently, a higher probability of water-bridge formation leads to a higher ion-pair dissociation rate.

  4. Simple Method Obtaining Analytical Expressions of Particle and Kinetic-Energy Densities for One-Dimensional Confined Fermi Gases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG XiaoXue; WU Ying

    2002-01-01

    We develop a simple approach to obtain explicitly exact analytical expressions of particle and kinetic-energy densities for noninteracting Fermi gases in one-dimensional harmonic confinement, and in one-dimensional boxconfinement as well.

  5. Visualizing the large-$Z$ scaling of the kinetic energy density of atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Cancio, Antonio C

    2016-01-01

    The scaling of neutral atoms to large $Z$, combining periodicity with a gradual trend to homogeneity, is a fundamental probe of density functional theory, one that has driven recent advances in understanding both the kinetic and exchange-correlation energies. Although research focus is normally upon the scaling of energies, insights can also be gained from energy densities. We visualize the scaling of the positive-definite kinetic energy density (KED) in closed-shell atoms, in comparison to invariant quantities based upon the gradient and Laplacian of the density. We notice a striking fit of the KED within the core of any atom to a gradient expansion using both the gradient and the Laplacian, appearing as an asymptotic limit around which the KED oscillates. The gradient expansion is qualitatively different from that derived from first principles for a slowly-varying electron gas and is correlated with a nonzero Pauli contribution to the KED near the nucleus. We propose and explore orbital-free meta-GGA models...

  6. Kinetic study of solid waste pyrolysis using distributed activation energy model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhavanam, Anjireddy; Sastry, R C

    2015-02-01

    The pyrolysis characteristics of municipal solid waste, agricultural residues such as ground nut shell, cotton husk and their blends are investigated using non-isothermal thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) with in a temperature range of 30-900 °C at different heating rates of 10 °C, 30 °C and 50 °C/min in inert atmosphere. From the thermograms obtained from TGA, it is observed that the maximum rate of degradation occurred in the second stage of the pyrolysis process for all the solid wastes. The distributed activation energy model (DAEM) is used to study the pyrolysis kinetics of the solid wastes. The kinetic parameters E (activation energy), k0 (frequency factor) are calculated from this model. It is found that the range of activation energies for agricultural residues are lower than the municipal solid waste. The activation energies for the municipal solid waste pyrolysis process drastically decreased with addition of agricultural residues. The proposed DAEM is successfully validated with TGA experimental data.

  7. Modulation of Energy Transfer into Sequential Electron Transfer upon Axial Coordination of Tetrathiafulvalene in an Aluminum(III) Porphyrin-Free-Base Porphyrin Dyad.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poddutoori, Prashanth K; Bregles, Lucas P; Lim, Gary N; Boland, Patricia; Kerr, Russ G; D'Souza, Francis

    2015-09-08

    Axially assembled aluminum(III) porphyrin based dyads and triads have been constructed to investigate the factors that govern the energy and electron transfer processes in a perpendicular direction to the porphyrin plane. In the aluminum(III) porphyrin-free-base porphyrin (AlPor-Ph-H2Por) dyad, the AlPor occupies the basal plane, while the free-base porphyrin (H2Por) with electron withdrawing groups resides in the axial position through a benzoate spacer. The NMR, UV-visible absorption, and steady-state fluorescence studies confirm that the coordination of pyridine appended tetrathiafulvalene (TTF) derivative (TTF-py or TTF-Ph-py) to the dyad in noncoordinating solvents afford vertically arranged supramolecular self-assembled triads (TTF-py→AlPor-Ph-H2Por and TTF-Ph-py→AlPor-Ph-H2Por). Time-resolved studies revealed that the AlPor in dyad and triads undergoes photoinduced energy and/or electron transfer processes. Interestingly, the energy and electron donating/accepting nature of AlPor can be modulated by changing the solvent polarity or by stimulating a new competing process using a TTF molecule. In modest polar solvents (dichloromethane and o-dichlorobenzene), excitation of AlPor leads singlet-singlet energy transfer from the excited singlet state of AlPor ((1)AlPor*) to H2Por with a moderate rate constant (k(EnT)) of 1.78 × 10(8) s(-1). In contrast, excitation of AlPor in the triad results in ultrafast electron transfer from TTF to (1)AlPor* with a rate constant (k(ET)) of 8.33 × 10(9)-1.25 × 10(10) s(-1), which outcompetes the energy transfer from (1)AlPor* to H2Por and yields the primary radical pair TTF(+•)-AlPor(-•)-H2Por. A subsequent electron shift to H2Por generates a spatially well-separated TTF(+•)-AlPor-H2Por(-•) radical pair.

  8. Large Eddy Simulation of SGS Turbulent Kinetic Energy and SGS Turbulent Dissipation in a Backward-Facing Step Turbulent Flow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王兵; 张会强; 王希麟

    2004-01-01

    The instantaneous and time-averaged statistic characteristics of the sub-grid scale (SGS) turbulent kinetic energy and SGS dissipation in a backward-facing step turbulent flow have been studied bylarge eddy simulation. The SGS turbulent kinetic energy and SGS turbulent dissipation vary in different flow regions and decrease with the flow developing spatially. The fluid molecular dissipation shares about 14% to 28% of the whole dissipation.

  9. Potential to kinetic energy conversion in wave number domain for the Southern Hemisphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, H.-J.; Vincent, D. G.

    1984-01-01

    Preliminary results of a wave number study conducted for the South Pacific Convergence Zone (SPCZ) using FGGE data for the period January 10-27, 1979 are reported. In particular, three variables (geomagnetic height, z, vertical p-velocity, omega, and temperature, T) and one energy conversion quantity, omega-alpha (where alpha is the specific volume), are shown. It is demonstrated that wave number 4 plays an important role in the conversion from available potential energy to kinetic energy in the Southern Hemisphere tropics, particularly in the vicinity of the SPCZ. It is therefore suggested that the development and movement of wave number 4 waves be carefully monitored in making forecasts for the South Pacific region.

  10. Sensory Agreement Guides Kinetic Energy Optimization of Arm Movements during Object Manipulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farshchiansadegh, Ali; Melendez-Calderon, Alejandro; Ranganathan, Rajiv; Murphey, Todd D.; Mussa-Ivaldi, Ferdinando A.

    2016-01-01

    The laws of physics establish the energetic efficiency of our movements. In some cases, like locomotion, the mechanics of the body dominate in determining the energetically optimal course of action. In other tasks, such as manipulation, energetic costs depend critically upon the variable properties of objects in the environment. Can the brain identify and follow energy-optimal motions when these motions require moving along unfamiliar trajectories? What feedback information is required for such optimal behavior to occur? To answer these questions, we asked participants to move their dominant hand between different positions while holding a virtual mechanical system with complex dynamics (a planar double pendulum). In this task, trajectories of minimum kinetic energy were along curvilinear paths. Our findings demonstrate that participants were capable of finding the energy-optimal paths, but only when provided with veridical visual and haptic information pertaining to the object, lacking which the trajectories were executed along rectilinear paths. PMID:27035587

  11. Sensory Agreement Guides Kinetic Energy Optimization of Arm Movements during Object Manipulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Farshchiansadegh

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The laws of physics establish the energetic efficiency of our movements. In some cases, like locomotion, the mechanics of the body dominate in determining the energetically optimal course of action. In other tasks, such as manipulation, energetic costs depend critically upon the variable properties of objects in the environment. Can the brain identify and follow energy-optimal motions when these motions require moving along unfamiliar trajectories? What feedback information is required for such optimal behavior to occur? To answer these questions, we asked participants to move their dominant hand between different positions while holding a virtual mechanical system with complex dynamics (a planar double pendulum. In this task, trajectories of minimum kinetic energy were along curvilinear paths. Our findings demonstrate that participants were capable of finding the energy-optimal paths, but only when provided with veridical visual and haptic information pertaining to the object, lacking which the trajectories were executed along rectilinear paths.

  12. Five-dimensional teleparallel theory equivalent to general relativity, the axially symmetric solution,energy and spatial momentum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gamal G.L. Nashed

    2011-01-01

    A theory of (4+1)-dimensional gravity is developed on the basis of the teleparallel theory equivalent to general relativity.The fundamental gravitational field variables are the five-dimensional vector fields (pentad),defined globally on a manifold M,and gravity is attributed to the torsion.The Lagrangian density is quadratic in the torsion tensor.We then give the exact five-dimensional solution.The solution is a generalization of the familiar Schwarzschild and Kerr solutions of the four-dimensional teleparallel equivalent of general relativity.We also use the definition of the gravitational energy to calculate the energy and the spatial momentum.

  13. Numerical investigation of kinetic energy dynamics during autoignition of n-heptane/air mixture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucena Kreppel Paes, Paulo; Brasseur, James; Xuan, Yuan

    2015-11-01

    Many engineering applications involve complex turbulent reacting flows, where nonlinear, multi-scale turbulence-combustion couplings are important. Direct representation of turbulent reacting flow dynamics is associated with prohibitive computational costs, which makes it necessary to employ turbulent combustion models to account for the effects of unresolved scales on resolved scales. Classical turbulence models are extensively employed in reacting flow simulations. However, they rely on assumptions about the energy cascade, which are valid for incompressible, isothermal homogeneous isotropic turbulence. A better understanding of the turbulence-combustion interactions is required for the development of more accurate, physics-based sub-grid-scale models for turbulent reacting flows. In order to investigate the effects of reaction-induced density, viscosity, and pressure variations on the turbulent kinetic energy, Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) of autoignition of partially-premixed, lean n-heptane/air mixture in three-dimensional homogeneous isotropic turbulence has been performed. This configuration represents standard operating conditions of Homogeneous-Charge Compression-Ignition (HCCI) engines. The differences in the turbulent kinetic energy balance between the present turbulent reacting flow and incompressible, isothermal homogeneous isotropic turbulence are highlighted at different stages during the autoignition process.

  14. Axial focusing of impact energy in the earth`s interior: A possible link to flood basalts and hotspots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boslough, M.B.; Chael, E.P.; Trucano, T.G.; Crawford, D.A.; Campbell, D.L.

    1994-12-01

    We present the results of shock physics and seismological computational simulations that show how energy from a large impact can be coupled to the interior of the Earth. The radially-diverging shock wave generated by the impact decays to linearly elastic seismic waves. These waves reconverge (minus attenuation) along the axis of symmetry between the impact and its antipode. The locations that experience the most strain cycles with the largest amplitudes will dissipate the most energy and have the largest increases in temperature (for a given attenuation efficiency). We have shown that the locus of maximum energy deposition in the mantle lies along the impact axis. Moreover, the most intense focusing is within the asthenosphere at the antipode, within the range of depths where mechanical energy is most readily converted to heat. We propose that if large impacts on the Earth leave geological evidence anywhere other than the impact site itself, it will be at the antipode. We suggest that the most likely result of the focusing for a sufficiently large impact, consistent with features observed in the geological record, would be a flood basalt eruption at the antipode followed by hotspot volcanism. A direct prediction of this model would be the existence of undiscovered impact structures whose reconstructed locations would be antipodal to flood basalt provinces. One such structure would be in the Indian Ocean, associated with the Columbia River Basalts and Yellowstone; another would be a second K/T impact structure in the Pacific Ocean, associated with the Deccan Traps and Reunion.

  15. Light axial vector mesons

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Kan; Liu, Xiang; Matsuki, Takayuki

    2015-01-01

    Inspired by the abundant experimental observation of axial vector states, we study whether the observed axial vector states can be categorized into the conventional axial vector meson family. In this paper we carry out analysis based on the mass spectra and two-body Okubo-Zweig-Iizuka-allowed decays. Besides testing the possible axial vector meson assignments, we also predict abundant information for their decays and the properties of some missing axial vector mesons, which are valuable to further experimental exploration of the observed and predicted axial vector mesons.

  16. Observed and Simulated Power Spectra of Kinetic and Magnetic Energy retrieved with 2D inversions

    CERN Document Server

    Danilovic, S; van Noort, M; Cameron, R

    2016-01-01

    We try to retrieve the power spectra with certainty to the highest spatial frequencies allowed by current instrumentation. For this, we use 2D inversion code that were able to recover information up to the instrumental diffraction limit. The retrieved power spectra have shallow slopes extending further down to much smaller scales than found before. They seem not to show any power law. The observed slopes at subgranular scales agree with those obtained from recent local dynamo simulations. Small differences are found for vertical component of kinetic energy that suggest that observations suffer from an instrumental effect that is not taken into account.

  17. Calculated half-lives and kinetic energies for spontaneous emission of heavy ions from nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poenaru, D.N.; Greiner, W.; Depta, K.; Ivascu, M.; Mazilu, D.; Sandulescu, A.

    1986-05-01

    The most probable decays by spontaneous emission of heavy ions are listed for nuclides with Z = 47--106 and total half-lives>1 ..mu..sec. Partial half-lives, branching ratios relative to ..cap alpha.. decay, kinetic energies, and Q values are estimated by using the analytical superasymmetric fission model, a semiempirical formula for those ..cap alpha..-decay lifetimes which have not been measured, and the new Wapstra--Audi mass tables. Numerous ''stable'' nuclides with Z>40 are found to be metastable with respect to the new decay modes. The current experimental status is briefly reviewed.

  18. Numerical simulations of gun-launched kinetic energy projectiles subjected to asymmetric projectile base pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rabern, D.A.

    1991-01-01

    Three-dimensional numerical simulations were performed to determine the effect of an asymmetric base pressure on kinetic energy projectiles during launch. A matrix of simulations was performed in two separate launch environments. One launch environment represented a severe lateral load environment, while the other represented a nonsevere lateral load environment based on the gun tube straightness. The orientation of the asymmetric pressure field, its duration, the projectile's initial position, and the tube straightness were altered to determine the effects of each parameter. The pressure asymmetry translates down the launch tube to exit parameters and is washed out by tube profile. Results from the matrix of simulations are presented.

  19. Numerical simulations of gun-launched kinetic energy projectiles subjected to asymmetric projectile base pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rabern, D.A.

    1991-12-31

    Three-dimensional numerical simulations were performed to determine the effect of an asymmetric base pressure on kinetic energy projectiles during launch. A matrix of simulations was performed in two separate launch environments. One launch environment represented a severe lateral load environment, while the other represented a nonsevere lateral load environment based on the gun tube straightness. The orientation of the asymmetric pressure field, its duration, the projectile`s initial position, and the tube straightness were altered to determine the effects of each parameter. The pressure asymmetry translates down the launch tube to exit parameters and is washed out by tube profile. Results from the matrix of simulations are presented.

  20. Calculating kinetics parameters and reactivity changes with continuous-energy Monte Carlo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiedrowski, Brian C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Brown, Forrest B [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wilson, Paul [UNIV. WISCONSIN

    2009-01-01

    The iterated fission probability interpretation of the adjoint flux forms the basis for a method to perform adjoint weighting of tally scores in continuous-energy Monte Carlo k-eigenvalue calculations. Applying this approach, adjoint-weighted tallies are developed for two applications: calculating point reactor kinetics parameters and estimating changes in reactivity from perturbations. Calculations are performed in the widely-used production code, MCNP, and the results of both applications are compared with discrete ordinates calculations, experimental measurements, and other Monte Carlo calculations.

  1. Kinetic energy releases of small amino acids upon interaction with keV ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bari, S.; Alvarado, F.; Postma, J.; Sobocinski, P.; Hoekstra, R.; Schlatholter, T. [Groningen Univ., KVI Atomic Physics (Netherlands); Schlatholter, T. [Universites P. et M. Curie and D. Diderot, INSP, CNRS UMR 75-88, 75 - Paris (France)

    2009-01-15

    In chromatin, DNA is tightly packed into one complex together with histone and non-histone proteins. These proteins are known to protect the DNA against indirect and to some extent even direct radiation damage. Radiation action upon amino acids is thus one of the primary steps in biological radiation action. In this paper we investigate the ionization and fragmentation of the gas-phase amino acids glycine, alanine and valine upon interaction with keV {alpha}-particles. High resolution coincidence time-of-flight mass spectrometry is used to determine the dominant fragmentation channels as well as fragment kinetic energies. (authors)

  2. Kinetic energy releases of small amino acids upon interaction with keV ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bari, S.; Alvarado, F.; Postma, J.; Sobocinski, P.; Hoekstra, R.; Schlathölter, T.

    2009-01-01

    In chromatin, DNA is tightly packed into one complex together with histone and non-histone proteins. These proteins are known to protect the DNA against indirect and to some extent even direct radiation damage. Radiation action upon amino acids is thus one of the primary steps in biological radiation action. In this paper we investigate the ionization and fragmentation of the gas-phase amino acids glycine, alanine and valine upon interaction with keV α-particles. High resolution coincidence time-of-flight mass spectrometry is used to determine the dominant fragmentation channels as well as fragment kinetic energies.

  3. On energy balance and the structure of radiated waves in kinetics of crystalline defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Basant Lal

    2016-11-01

    Traveling waves, with well-known closed form expressions, in the context of the defects kinetics in crystals are excavated further with respect to their inherent structure of oscillatory components. These are associated with, so called, Frenkel-Kontorova model with a piecewise quadratic substrate potential, corresponding to the symmetric as well as asymmetric energy wells of the substrate, displacive phase transitions in bistable chains, and brittle fracture in triangular lattice strips under mode III conditions. The paper demonstrates that the power expended theorem holds so that the sum of rate of working and the rate of total energy flux into a control strip moving steadily with the defect equals the rate of energy sinking into the defect, in the sense of N.F. Mott. In the conservative case of the Frenkel-Kontorova model with asymmetric energy wells, this leads to an alternative expression for the mobility in terms of the energy flux through radiated lattice waves. An application of the same to the case of martensitic phase boundary and a crack, propagating uniformly in bistable chains and triangular lattice strips, respectively, is also provided and the energy release is expressed in terms of the radiated energy flux directly. The equivalence between the well-known expressions and their alternative is established via an elementary identity, which is stated and proved in the paper as the zero lemma. An intimate connection between the three distinct types of defects is, thus, revealed in the framework of energy balance, via a structural similarity between the corresponding variants of the 'zero' lemma containing the information about radiated energy flux. An extension to the dissipative models, in the presence of linear viscous damping, is detailed and analog of the zero lemma is proved. The analysis is relevant to the dynamics of dislocations, brittle cracks, and martensitic phase boundaries, besides possible applications to analogous physical contexts which are

  4. Mass yields and kinetic energy of fragments from fission of highly-excited nuclei with A≲220

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denisov, V. Yu.; Margitych, T. O.; Sedykh, I. Yu.

    2017-02-01

    It is shown that the potential energy surface of the two separated fragments has the saddle point, which takes place at small distance between the surfaces of well-deformed fragments. The height of this two-body saddle point is larger than the height of one-body fission barrier for nuclei with A ≲ 220. The mass yields of the fission fragments, which are appearing at the fission of nuclei with A ≲ 220, are related to the number of states of the two-fragment systems at the two-body saddle points. The characteristics of kinetic energy of fragments are described by using the trajectory motion equations with the dissipation terms. The Gaussian distribution of the final kinetic energy around the classical value of this energy induced by the stochastic fluctuations is taken into account at an evaluation of the total kinetic energy distributions of the fission fragments.

  5. Minimal Model of Quantum Kinetic Clusters for the Energy-Transfer Network of a Light-Harvesting Protein Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jianlan; Tang, Zhoufei; Gong, Zhihao; Cao, Jianshu; Mukamel, Shaul

    2015-04-02

    The energy absorbed in a light-harvesting protein complex is often transferred collectively through aggregated chromophore clusters. For population evolution of chromophores, the time-integrated effective rate matrix allows us to construct quantum kinetic clusters quantitatively and determine the reduced cluster-cluster transfer rates systematically, thus defining a minimal model of energy-transfer kinetics. For Fenna-Matthews-Olson (FMO) and light-havrvesting complex II (LCHII) monomers, quantum Markovian kinetics of clusters can accurately reproduce the overall energy-transfer process in the long-time scale. The dominant energy-transfer pathways are identified in the picture of aggregated clusters. The chromophores distributed extensively in various clusters can assist a fast and long-range energy transfer.

  6. Axial structure of the nucleon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veronique Bernard; Latifa Elouadrhiri; Ulf-G Meissner

    2002-01-01

    We review the current status of experimental and theoretical understanding of the axial nucleon structure at low and moderate energies. Topics considered include (quasi)elastic (anti)neutrino-nucleon scattering, charged pion electroproduction off nucleons and ordinary as well as radiative muon capture on the proton.

  7. Multi-dimensional potential energy surfaces and non-axial octupole correlations in actinide and transfermium nuclei from relativistic mean field models

    CERN Document Server

    Lu, Bing-Nan; Zhao, En-Guang; Zhou, Shan-Gui

    2013-01-01

    We have developed multi-dimensional constrained covariant density functional theories (MDC-CDFT) for finite nuclei in which the shape degrees of freedom \\beta_{\\lambda\\mu} with even \\mu, e.g., \\beta_{20}, \\beta_{22}, \\beta_{30}, \\beta_{32}, \\beta_{40}, etc., can be described simultaneously. The functional can be one of the following four forms: the meson exchange or point-coupling nucleon interactions combined with the non-linear or density-dependent couplings. For the pp channel, either the BCS approach or the Bogoliubov transformation is implemented. The MDC-CDFTs with the BCS approach for the pairing (in the following labelled as MDC-RMF models with RMF standing for "relativistic mean field") have been applied to investigate multi-dimensional potential energy surfaces and the non-axial octupole $Y_{32}$-correlations in N=150 isotones. In this contribution we present briefly the formalism of MDC-RMF models and some results from these models. The potential energy surfaces with and without triaxial deformatio...

  8. Gap modification improves blowers. Reducing the noise emission by reducing the energy consumption of axial flow machines. Spaltmodifikation verbessert Ventilatoren. Minderung der Schallemission bei Reduzierung des Energieverbrauchs axialer Stroemungsmaschinen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kameier, F. (TU Berlin (Germany). Hermann-Foettinger Inst.); Neise, W. (DLR, Berlin (Germany). Abt. Turbulenzforschung)

    1994-08-01

    The article describes a design feature that can reduce the sound emission of axial flow machines by up to 11 dB (A) (specific sound level), whilst improving the efficiency by seven percentage points. This improvement can be carried out on equipment that is already in use, as well as on new design. The gap between the rotating blades and the fixed housing, causes losses and an increased sound emission in axial flow machines. The aerodynamic and acoustic effects of a variation in the gap has been extensively examined on a model of a high-pressure axial blower. The widest gap (0.5% of the impeller diameter) has been retroactively improved in design so that a reduction in the negative effect of the gap occurs whilst retaining its nominal size. The diameter of the impeller as well as that of the housing remain unchanged. The gap modification, for which a patent has been applied for, has the equivalent effect of halving the gap width. (orig.)

  9. Electronic coherence and the kinetics of inter-complex energy transfer in light-harvesting systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huo, Pengfei; Miller, Thomas F

    2015-12-14

    We apply real-time path-integral dynamics simulations to characterize the role of electronic coherence in inter-complex excitation energy transfer (EET) processes. The analysis is performed using a system-bath model that exhibits the essential features of light-harvesting networks, including strong intra-complex electronic coupling and weak inter-complex coupling. Strong intra-complex coupling is known to generate both static and dynamic electron coherences, which delocalize the exciton over multiple chromophores and potentially influence the inter-complex EET dynamics. With numerical results from partial linearized density matrix (PLDM) real-time path-integral calculations, it is found that both static and dynamic coherence are correlated with the rate of inter-complex EET. To distinguish the impact of these two types of intra-complex coherence on the rate of inter-complex EET, we use Multi-Chromophore Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (MC-FRET) theory to map the original parameterization of the system-bath model to an alternative parameterization for which the effects of static coherence are preserved while the effects of dynamic coherence are largely eliminated. It is then shown that both parameterizations of the model (i.e., the original that supports dynamic coherence and the alternative that eliminates it), exhibit nearly identical EET kinetics and population dynamics over a wide range of parameters. These observations are found to hold for cases in which either the EET donor or acceptor is a dimeric complex and for cases in which the dimeric complex is either symmetric or asymmetric. The results from this study suggest that dynamic coherence plays only a minor role in the actual kinetics of inter-complex EET, whereas static coherence largely governs the kinetics of incoherent inter-complex EET in light-harvesting networks.

  10. Entanglement of helicity and energy in kinetic Alfven wave/whistler turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Galtier, S

    2014-01-01

    The role of magnetic helicity is investigated in kinetic Alfv\\'en wave and oblique whistler turbulence in presence of a relatively intense external magnetic field $b_0 {\\bf e_\\parallel}$. In this situation, turbulence is strongly anisotropic and the fluid equations describing both regimes are the reduced electron magnetohydrodynamics (REMHD) whose derivation, originally made from the gyrokinetic theory, is also obtained here from compressible Hall MHD. We use the asymptotic equations derived by Galtier \\& Bhattacharjee (2003) to study the REMHD dynamics in the weak turbulence regime. The analysis is focused on the magnetic helicity equation for which we obtain the exact solutions: they correspond to the entanglement relation, $n+\\tilde n = -6$, where $n$ and $\\tilde n$ are the power law indices of the perpendicular (to ${\\bf b_0}$) wave number magnetic energy and helicity spectra respectively. Therefore, the spectra derived in the past from the energy equation only, namely $n=-2.5$ and $\\tilde n = - 3.5$,...

  11. Enhancing Understanding of High Energy Density Plasmas Using Fluid Modeling with Kinetic Closures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, David; Held, Eric; Srinivasan, Bhuvana; Masti, Robert; King, Jake

    2016-10-01

    This work seeks to understand possible stabilization mechanisms of the early-time electrothermal instability in the evolution of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability in MagLIF (Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion) experiments. Such mechanisms may include electron thermal conduction, viscosity, and large magnetic fields. Experiments have shown that the high-energy density plasmas from wire-array implosions require physics modelling that goes well beyond simple models such as ideal MHD. The plan is to develop a multi-fluid extended-MHD model that includes kinetic closures for thermal conductivity, resistivity, and viscosity using codes that are easily available to the wider research community. Such an effort would provide the community with a well-benchmarked tool capable of advanced modeling of high-energy-density plasmas.

  12. Elimination of the Translational Kinetic Energy Contamination in pre-Born-Oppenheimer Calculations

    CERN Document Server

    Simmen, Benjamin; Reiher, Markus

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we present a simple strategy for the elimination of the translational kinetic energy contamination of the total energy in pre-Born--Oppenheimer calculations carried out in laboratory-fixed Cartesian coordinates (LFCCs). The simple expressions for the coordinates and the operators are thus preserved throughout the calculations, while the mathematical form and the parametrisation of the basis functions are chosen so that the translational and rotational invariances are respected. The basis functions are constructed using explicitly correlated Gaussian functions (ECGs) and the global vector representation. First, we observe that it is not possible to parametrise the ECGs so that the system is at rest in LFCCs and at the same time the basis functions are square-integrable with a non-vanishing norm. Then, we work out a practical strategy to circumvent this problem by making use of the properties of the linear transformation between the LFCCs and translationally invariant and center-of-mass Cartesian ...

  13. Fully-kinetic simulations of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability in high-energy-density plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, E. Paulo; Mori, Warren B.; Fiuza, Frederico

    2016-10-01

    The Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RTI) in high-energy-density (HED) plasmas is a central problem in a wide range of scenarios. It dictates, for instance, the dynamics of supernovae in astrophysical plasmas, and is also recognized as a critical challenge to achieving ignition in inertial confinement fusion. In some of these conditions the Larmor radius or Coulomb mean free path (m.f.p.) is finite, allowing kinetic effects to become important, and it is not fully clear how the development of the RTI deviates from standard hydrodynamic behavior. In order to obtain an accurate description of the RTI in these HED conditions it is essential to capture the self-consistent interplay between collisional and collisionless plasma processes, and the role of self-generated electric and magnetic fields. We have explored the dynamics of the RTI in HED plasma conditions using first-principles particle-in-cell simulations combined with Monte Carlo binary collisions. Our simulations capture the role of kinetic diffusion as well as the self-generated electric (e.g. space-charge) and magnetic (e.g. Biermann battery) fields on the growth rate and nonlinear evolution of the RTI for different plasma conditions. We will discuss how different collisional m.f.p. relative to the collisionless plasma skin depth affect the RTI development. This work was supported by the DOE Office of Science, Fusion Energy Science (FWP 100182).

  14. Microscopic distribution functions, structure, and kinetic energy of liquid and solid neon: quantum Monte Carlo simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Martin; Zoppi, Marco

    2002-03-01

    We have performed extensive path integral Monte Carlo simulations of liquid and solid neon, in order to derive the kinetic energy as well as the single-particle and pair distribution functions of neon atoms in the condensed phases. From the single-particle distribution function n(r) one can derive the momentum distribution and thus obtain an independent estimate of the kinetic energy. The simulations have been carried out using mostly the semiempirical HFD-C2 pair potential by Aziz et al. [R. A. Aziz, W. J. Meath, and A. R. Allnatt, Chem. Phys. 79, 295 (1983)], but, in a few cases, we have also used the Lennard-Jones potential. The differences between the potentials, as measured by the properties investigated, are not very large, especially when compared with the actual precision of the experimental data. The simulation results have been compared with all the experimental information that is available from neutron scattering. The overall agreement with the experiments is very good.

  15. On the evaluation of the non-interacting kinetic energy in density functional theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peach, Michael J G; Griffiths, David G J; Tozer, David J

    2012-04-14

    The utility of both an orbital-free and a single-orbital expression for computing the non-interacting kinetic energy in density functional theory is investigated for simple atomic systems. The accuracy of both expressions is governed by the extent to which the Kohn-Sham equation is solved for the given exchange-correlation functional and so special attention is paid to the influence of finite Gaussian basis sets. The orbital-free expression is a statement of the virial theorem and its accuracy is quantified. The accuracy of the single-orbital expression is sensitive to the choice of Kohn-Sham orbital. The use of particularly compact orbitals is problematic because the failure to solve the Kohn-Sham equation exactly in regions where the orbital has decayed to near-zero leads to unphysical behaviour in regions that contribute to the kinetic energy, rendering it inaccurate. This problem is particularly severe for core orbitals, which would otherwise appear attractive due to their formally nodeless nature. The most accurate results from the single-orbital expression are obtained using the relatively diffuse, highest occupied orbitals, although special care is required at orbital nodes.

  16. Kinetic analysis and energy efficiency of phenol degradation in a plasma-photocatalysis system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hui-juan; Chen, Xiao-yang

    2011-02-28

    Combination of two kinds of advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) is an effective approach to control wastewater pollution. In this research, a pulsed discharge plasma system with multi-point-to-plate electrode and an immobilized TiO(2) photocatalysis system is coupled to oxidize target pollutant in aqueous solution. Kinetic analysis (pseudo-first order kinetic constant, k) and energy efficiency (energy yield value at 50% phenol conversion, G(50)) of phenol oxidation in different reaction systems (plasma alone and plasma-photocatalysis) are reviewed to account for the synergistic mechanism of plasma and photocatalysis. The experimental results show that higher k and G(50) of phenol oxidation can be obtained in the plasma-photocatalysis system under the conditions of different gas bubbling varieties, initial solution pH and radical scavenger addition. Moreover, the investigation tested hydroxyl radical (OH) is the most important species for phenol removal in the synergistic system of plasma-photocatalysis as well as in the plasma alone system.

  17. Unified dark energy and dust dark matter dual to quadratic purely kinetic K-essence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guendelman, Eduardo; Nissimov, Emil; Pacheva, Svetlana

    2016-02-01

    We consider a modified gravity plus single scalar-field model, where the scalar Lagrangian couples symmetrically both to the standard Riemannian volume-form (spacetime integration measure density) given by the square root of the determinant of the Riemannian metric, as well as to another non-Riemannian volume-form in terms of an auxiliary maximal-rank antisymmetric tensor gauge field. As shown in a previous paper, the pertinent scalar-field dynamics provides an exact unified description of both dark energy via dynamical generation of a cosmological constant, and dark matter as a "dust" fluid with geodesic flow as a result of a hidden Noether symmetry. Here we extend the discussion by considering a non-trivial modification of the purely gravitational action in the form of f(R) = R - α R^2 generalized gravity. Upon deriving the corresponding "Einstein-frame" effective action of the latter modified gravity-scalar-field theory we find explicit duality (in the sense of weak versus strong coupling) between the original model of unified dynamical dark energy and dust fluid dark matter, on one hand, and a specific quadratic purely kinetic "k-essence" gravity-matter model with special dependence of its coupling constants on only two independent parameters, on the other hand. The canonical Hamiltonian treatment and Wheeler-DeWitt quantization of the dual purely kinetic "k-essence" gravity-matter model is also briefly discussed.

  18. Relativistic RPA in axial symmetry

    CERN Document Server

    Arteaga, D Pena; 10.1103/PhysRevC.77.034317

    2009-01-01

    Covariant density functional theory, in the framework of self-consistent Relativistic Mean Field (RMF) and Relativistic Random Phase approximation (RPA), is for the first time applied to axially deformed nuclei. The fully self-consistent RMF+RRPA equations are posed for the case of axial symmetry and non-linear energy functionals, and solved with the help of a new parallel code. Formal properties of RPA theory are studied and special care is taken in order to validate the proper decoupling of spurious modes and their influence on the physical response. Sample applications to the magnetic and electric dipole transitions in $^{20}$Ne are presented and analyzed.

  19. Effective atomic numbers, electron densities and kinetic energy released in matter of vitamins for photon interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shantappa, A.; Hanagodimath, S. M.

    2014-01-01

    Effective atomic numbers, electron densities of some vitamins (Retinol, Riboflavin, Niacin, Biotin, Folic acid, Cobalamin, Phylloquinone and Flavonoids) composed of C, H, O, N, Co, P and S have been calculated for total and partial photon interactions by the direct method for energy range 1 keV-100 GeV by using WinXCOM and kinetic energy released in matter (Kerma) relative to air is calculated in energy range of 1 keV-20 MeV. Change in effective atomic number and electron density with energy is calculated for all photon interactions. Variation of photon mass attenuation coefficients with energy are shown graphically only for total photon interaction. It is observed that change in mass attenuation coefficient with composition of different chemicals is very large below 100 keV and moderate between 100 keV and 10 MeV and negligible above 10 MeV. Behaviour of vitamins is almost indistinguishable except biotin and cobalamin because of large range of atomic numbers from 1(H) to 16 (S) and 1(H) to 27(Co) respectively. K a value shows a peak due to the photoelectric effect around K-absorption edge of high- Z constituent of compound for biotin and cobalamin.

  20. Effect of landing height on frontal plane kinematics, kinetics and energy dissipation at lower extremity joints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeow, C H; Lee, P V S; Goh, J C H

    2009-08-25

    Lack of the necessary magnitude of energy dissipation by lower extremity joint muscles may be implicated in elevated impact stresses present during landing from greater heights. These increased stresses are experienced by supporting tissues like cartilage, ligaments and bones, thus aggravating injury risk. This study sought to investigate frontal plane kinematics, kinetics and energetics of lower extremity joints during landing from different heights. Eighteen male recreational athletes were instructed to perform drop-landing tasks from 0.3- to 0.6-m heights. Force plates and motion-capture system were used to capture ground reaction force and kinematics data, respectively. Joint moment was calculated using inverse dynamics. Joint power was computed as a product of joint moment and angular velocity. Work was defined as joint power integrated over time. Hip and knee joints delivered significantly greater joint power and eccentric work (pheights. Substantial increase (pwork was noted at the hip joint in response to increasing landing height. Knee and hip joints acted as key contributors to total energy dissipation in the frontal plane with increase in peak ground reaction force (GRF). The hip joint was the top contributor to energy absorption, which indicated a hip-dominant strategy in the frontal plane in response to peak GRF during landing. Future studies should investigate joint motions that can maximize energy dissipation or reduce the need for energy dissipation in the frontal plane at the various joints, and to evaluate their effects on the attenuation of lower extremity injury risk during landing.

  1. Balancing the daylighting and energy performance of solar screens in residential desert buildings: Examination of screen axial rotation and opening aspect ratio

    KAUST Repository

    Sabry, Hanan

    2014-05-01

    Solar screens are typically used to control solar access into building spaces. They proved their usefulness in improving the daylighting and energy performance of buildings in the hot arid desert environments which are endowed with abundance of clear skies.The daylighting and energy performance of solar screens is affected by many parameters. These include screen perforation, depth, reflectivity and color, aspect ratio of openings, shape, tilt angle and rotation. Changing some of these parameters can improve the daylighting performance drastically. However, this can result in increased energy consumption. A balanced solution must be sought, where acceptable daylighting performance would be achieved at minimum energy consumption.This paper aims at defining solar screen designs that achieve visual comfort and at the same time minimum energy consumption in residential desert settings. The study focused on the effect of changing the solar screen axial rotation and the aspect ratio of its openings under the desert clear-sky. The individual and combined effects of changing these parameters were studied.Results of this study demonstrated that a non-rotated solar screen that has wide horizontal openings (aspect ratio of 18:1) proved to be successful in the north and south orientations. Its performance in the east/west orientations was also superior. In contrast, the screen that was rotated along its vertical axis while having small size openings (aspect ratio of 1:1) proved to be more successful in the east/west orientations. Its performance in the north orientation was also good. These solutions enhanced daylighting performance, while maintaining the energy consumption at a minimum.Moreover, it was observed that combining two screen parameters which proved useful in previous studies on daylighting or thermal performance does not add up to better solutions. The combined solutions that were tested in this study did not prove successful in satisfying daylighting and thermal

  2. 2D-3D Transition for Cationic and Anionic Gold Clusters: A Kinetic Energy Density Functional Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ferrighi, Lara; Hammer, Bjørk; Madsen, Georg

    2009-01-01

    gradient enhancement. Moreover, we show how MGGAs, in contrast to generalize gradient approximations with smaller gradient enhancements, avoid overestimating the bond energies by combining the information contained in the reduced gradient and the kinetic energy. This allows MGGAs to treat differently...

  3. Monte Carlo Simulation to relate primary and final fragments mass and kinetic energy distribution from low energy fission of $^{234}U$

    CERN Document Server

    Montoya, M; Lobato, I

    2008-01-01

    The kinetic energy distribution as a function of mass of final fragments (m) from low energy fission of $^{234}U$, measured with the Lohengrin spectrometer by Belhafaf et al. presents a peak around m=108 and another around m = 122. The authors attribute the first peak to the evaporation of a large number of neutrons around the corresponding mass number; and the second peak to the distribution of the primary fragment kinetic energy. Nevertheless, the theoretical calculations related to primary distribution made by Faust et al. do not result in a peak around m = 122. In order to clarify this apparent controversy, we have made a numerical experiment in which the masses and the kinetic energy of final fragments are calculated, assuming an initial distribution of the kinetic energy without peaks on the standard deviation as function of fragment mass. As a result we obtain a pronounced peak on the standard deviation of the kinetic energy distribution around m = 109, a depletion from m = 121 to m = 129, and an small...

  4. Estimation of daily energy expenditure in pregnant and non-pregnant women using a wrist-worn tri-axial accelerometer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent T van Hees

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Few studies have compared the validity of objective measures of physical activity energy expenditure (PAEE in pregnant and non-pregnant women. PAEE is commonly estimated with accelerometers attached to the hip or waist, but little is known about the validity and participant acceptability of wrist attachment. The objectives of the current study were to assess the validity of a simple summary measure derived from a wrist-worn accelerometer (GENEA, Unilever Discover, UK to estimate PAEE in pregnant and non-pregnant women, and to evaluate participant acceptability. METHODS: Non-pregnant (N = 73 and pregnant (N = 35 Swedish women (aged 20-35 yrs wore the accelerometer on their wrist for 10 days during which total energy expenditure (TEE was assessed using doubly-labelled water. PAEE was calculated as 0.9×TEE-REE. British participants (N = 99; aged 22-65 yrs wore accelerometers on their non-dominant wrist and hip for seven days and were asked to score the acceptability of monitor placement (scored 1 [least] through 10 [most] acceptable. RESULTS: There was no significant correlation between body weight and PAEE. In non-pregnant women, acceleration explained 24% of the variation in PAEE, which decreased to 19% in leave-one-out cross-validation. In pregnant women, acceleration explained 11% of the variation in PAEE, which was not significant in leave-one-out cross-validation. Median (IQR acceptability of wrist and hip placement was 9(8-10 and 9(7-10, respectively; there was a within-individual difference of 0.47 (p<.001. CONCLUSIONS: A simple summary measure derived from a wrist-worn tri-axial accelerometer adds significantly to the prediction of energy expenditure in non-pregnant women and is scored acceptable by participants.

  5. Theoretical analysis of ion kinetic energies and DLC film deposition by CH4+Ar (He) dielectric barrier discharge plasmas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Yan-Hong; Zhang Jia-Liang; Ma Teng-Cai; Li Jian; Liu Dong-Ping

    2007-01-01

    The kinetic energy of ions in dielectric barrier discharge plasmas are analysed theoretically using the model of binary collisions between ions and gas molecules. Langevin equation for ions in other gases, Blanc law for ions in mixed gases, and the two-temperature model for ions at higher reduced field are used to determine the ion mobility. The kinetic energies of ions in CH4 + Ar(He) dielectric barrier discharge plasma at a fixed total gas pressure and various Ar (He)concentrations are calculated. It is found that with increasing Ar (He) concentration in CH4 + Ar (He) from 20% to 83%,the CH4+ kinetic energy increases from 69.6 (43.9) to 92.1 (128.5)eV, while the Ar+ (He+) kinetic energy decreases from 97 (145.2) to 78.8 (75.5)eV. The increase of CH4+ kinetic energy is responsible for the increase of hardness of diamond-like carbon films deposited by CH4 + Ar (He) dielectric barrier discharge without bias voltage over substrates.

  6. LES and Proper Orthogonal Decomposition analysis of vertical entrainment of kinetic energy in large wind farms (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meneveau, C. V.; VerHulst, C.

    2013-12-01

    Vertical entrainment of kinetic energy has been shown to be an important limiting factor in the performance of very large wind turbine arrays. Given high Reynolds numbers and domain sizes on the order of kilometers, we rely on wall-modeled Large Eddy Simulation (LES) to predict flow within large wind farm. We use Proper Orthogonal Decomposition (POD) to identify energetically important large-scale structures in the flow. The primary large-scale structures are found to be streamwise counter-rotating vortices located above the height of the wind turbines. The contribution of each flow structure to the kinetic energy entrainment is quantified. Surprisingly, fewer flow structures (POD modes) contribute to the vertical kinetic energy flux than to the kinetic energy in the flow, for which the POD analysis is optimal. While the general characteristics of the flow structures are robust, the net kinetic energy entrainment to the turbines depends on the orientation of the wind turbines in the array. The various modes' contributions to variability and intermittency is also quantified. The POD analysis is performed for aligned and staggered wind turbine arrays as well as for atmospheric flow without wind turbines. This research is supported by a NSF Graduate Fellowship and by the WINDINSPIRE project, funded through NSF-OISE 1243482.

  7. Enhancing the prediction of turbulent kinetic energy in the marine atmospheric boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foreman, R. J.; Emeis, S.

    2010-09-01

    A recent study by Shaikh and Siddiqui (2010) has shown definitively that the turbulent structure of boundary layer flows over water is fundamentally different compared with that over a smooth surface and with that over a solid wavy surface whose wave amplitude is similar to that of dynamically wind-generated waves. In light of this new information, the constants of the Mellor-Yamada boundary layer model, which are based on laboratory data over solid walls, are re-evaluated to suit the turbulent dynamics of a dynamic, wavy surface. The constants are based on the principal that the enhanced turbulent production in the vicinity of waves is redistributed among the normal stress components by virtue of the enhanced pressure-velocity covariances also found in the vicinity of waves. There is then a feedback mechanism whereby enhanced normal stresses modify the dynamic surface. The net effect of this is that in the marine boundary layer, one can expect an enhancement of turbulent kinetic energy due to the enhancement of normal stresses at the expense of shear stresses. The constants in the Mellor-Yamada-Janjic planetary boundary layer scheme within the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model are changed to fit this principal. Simulations are then performed and compared with data (wind speed and turbulent kinetic energy) from the FINO1 platform in the North Sea. It is found that while predictions of the wind speed are barely changed, the magnitude of the tke error (RMS) is reduced by up to 50%. This is expected to be practically relevant for the estimation of blade fatigue of wind energy converters, where the tke is an important parameter in this assessment. It could also be relevant for pollution dispersion in marine boundary layers.

  8. Kinetic selection vs. free energy of DNA base pairing in control of polymerase fidelity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oertell, Keriann; Harcourt, Emily M; Mohsen, Michael G; Petruska, John; Kool, Eric T; Goodman, Myron F

    2016-04-19

    What is the free energy source enabling high-fidelity DNA polymerases (pols) to favor incorporation of correct over incorrect base pairs by 10(3)- to 10(4)-fold, corresponding to free energy differences of ΔΔGinc∼ 5.5-7 kcal/mol? Standard ΔΔG° values (∼0.3 kcal/mol) calculated from melting temperature measurements comparing matched vs. mismatched base pairs at duplex DNA termini are far too low to explain pol accuracy. Earlier analyses suggested that pol active-site steric constraints can amplify DNA free energy differences at the transition state (kinetic selection). A recent paper [Olson et al. (2013)J Am Chem Soc135:1205-1208] used Vent pol to catalyze incorporations in the presence of inorganic pyrophosphate intended to equilibrate forward (polymerization) and backward (pyrophosphorolysis) reactions. A steady-state leveling off of incorporation profiles at long reaction times was interpreted as reaching equilibrium between polymerization and pyrophosphorolysis, yielding apparent ΔG° = -RTlnKeq, indicating ΔΔG° of 3.5-7 kcal/mol, sufficient to account for pol accuracy without need of kinetic selection. Here we perform experiments to measure and account for pyrophosphorolysis explicitly. We show that forward and reverse reactions attain steady states far from equilibrium for wrong incorporations such as G opposite T. Therefore,[Formula: see text]values obtained from such steady-state evaluations ofKeqare not dependent on DNA properties alone, but depend largely on constraints imposed on right and wrong substrates in the polymerase active site.

  9. An efficient method for energy levels calculation using full symmetry and exact kinetic energy operator: Tetrahedral molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikitin, A. V., E-mail: avn@lts.iao.ru [Laboratory of Theoretical Spectroscopy, V.E. Zuev Institute of Atmospheric Optics, SB RAS, 1, Academician Zuev square, 634021 Tomsk (Russian Federation); Tomsk State University, 36 Lenin Avenue, 634050 Tomsk (Russian Federation); Rey, M.; Tyuterev, Vl. G. [Groupe de Spectrométrie Moléculaire et Atmosphérique, UMR CNRS 7331, Université de Reims, U.F.R. Sciences, B.P. 1039, 51687 Cedex 2 Reims (France)

    2015-03-07

    A simultaneous use of the full molecular symmetry and of an exact kinetic energy operator (KEO) is of key importance for accurate predictions of vibrational levels at a high energy range from a potential energy surface (PES). An efficient method that permits a fast convergence of variational calculations would allow iterative optimization of the PES parameters using experimental data. In this work, we propose such a method applied to tetrahedral AB{sub 4} molecules for which a use of high symmetry is crucial for vibrational calculations. A symmetry-adapted contracted angular basis set for six redundant angles is introduced. Simple formulas using this basis set for explicit calculation of the angular matrix elements of KEO and PES are reported. The symmetric form (six redundant angles) of vibrational KEO without the sin(q){sup −2} type singularity is derived. The efficient recursive algorithm based on the tensorial formalism is used for the calculation of vibrational matrix elements. A good basis set convergence for the calculations of vibrational levels of the CH{sub 4} molecule is demonstrated.

  10. Proton transfer pathways, energy landscape, and kinetics in creatine-water systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivchenko, Olga; Whittleston, Chris S; Carr, Joanne M; Imhof, Petra; Goerke, Steffen; Bachert, Peter; Wales, David J

    2014-02-27

    We study the exchange processes of the metabolite creatine, which is present in both tumorous and normal tissues and has NH2 and NH groups that can transfer protons to water. Creatine produces chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) contrast in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The proton transfer pathway from zwitterionic creatine to water is examined using a kinetic transition network constructed from the discrete path sampling approach and an approximate quantum-chemical energy function, employing the self-consistent-charge density-functional tight-binding (SCC-DFTB) method. The resulting potential energy surface is visualized by constructing disconnectivity graphs. The energy landscape consists of two distinct regions corresponding to the zwitterionic creatine structures and deprotonated creatine. The activation energy that characterizes the proton transfer from the creatine NH2 group to water was determined from an Arrhenius fit of rate constants as a function of temperature, obtained from harmonic transition state theory. The result is in reasonable agreement with values obtained in water exchange spectroscopy (WEX) experiments.

  11. Total kinetic energy release in the fast neutron-induced fission of $^{235}$U

    CERN Document Server

    Yanez, R; King, J; Barrett, J S; Fotiades, N; Lee, H Y

    2015-01-01

    We have measured the total kinetic energy (TKE) release for the $^{235}$U(n,f) reaction for $E_{n}$=2-100 MeV using the 2E method with an array of Si PIN diode detectors. The neutron energies were determined by time of flight measurements using the white spectrum neutron beam at the LANSCE facility. (To calibrate the apparatus, the TKE release for $^{235}$U(n$_{th}$,f) was also measured using a thermal neutron beam from the OSU TRIGA reactor). The TKE decreases non-linearly from 169.0 MeV to 161.4 MeV for $E_{n}$=2-90 MeV. The standard deviation of the TKE distribution is constant from $E_{n}$=20-90 MeV. Comparison of the data with the multi-modal fission model of Brosa indicates the TKE decrease is a consequence of the growth of symmetric fission and the corresponding decrease of asymmetric fission with increasing neutron energy. The average TKE associated with the Brosa superlong, standard I and standard II modes for a given mass is independent of neutron energy.

  12. Hybrid Kinetic-Fluid Electromagnetic Simulations of Imploding High Energy Density Plasmas for IFE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, Dale; Rose, Dave; Thoma, Carsten; Genoni, Thomas; Bruner, Nichelle; Clark, Robert; Stygar, William; Leeper, Ramon

    2011-10-01

    A new simulation technique is being developed to study high current and moderate density-radius product (ρR) z-pinch plasmas relevant to Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE). Fully kinetic, collisional, and electromagnetic simulations of the time evolution of up to 40-MA current (deuterium and DT) z-pinches, but with relatively low ρR, have yielded new insights into the mechanisms of neutron production. At fusion relevant conditions (ρR > 0.01 gm/cm2) , however, this technique requires a prohibitively large number of cells and particles. A new hybrid implicit technique has been developed that accurately describes high-density and magnetized imploding plasmas. The technique adapts a recently published algorithm, that enables accurate descriptions of highly magnetized particle orbits, to high density plasmas and also makes use of an improved kinetic particle remap technique. We will discuss the new technique, stable range of operation, and application to an IFE relevant z-pinch design at 60 MA. Work supported by Sandia National Laboratories.

  13. Characterization of the relation between energy landscape and the time evolution of complex materials using kinetic ART

    Science.gov (United States)

    N'tsouaglo, Kokou; Joly, Jean-Francois; Beland, Laurent; Brommer, Peter; Mousseau, Normand

    2013-03-01

    In the last two decades, there has been a considerable interest in the development of accelerated numerical methods for sampling the energy landscape of complex materials. Many of these methods are based on the kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) algorithm introduced 40 years ago. This is the case of kinetic ART, for example, which uses a very efficient transition-state searching method, ART nouveau, coupled with a topological tool, NAUTY, to offer an off-lattice KMC method with on-the-fly catalog building to study complex systems, such as ion-bombarded and amorphous materials, on timescales of a second or more. Looking at two systems, vacancy aggregation in Fe and energy relaxation in ion-bombarded c-Si, we characterize the changes in the energy landscape and the relation to its time evolution with kinetic ART and its correspondence with the well-known Bell-Evans-Polanyi principle used in chemistry.

  14. A new method for the derivation of exact vibration-rotational kinetic energy operator in internal coordinates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈光巨; 刘若庄

    1997-01-01

    An efficient angular momentum method is presented and used to derive analytic expressions for the vibration-rotational kinetic energy operator of polyatomic molecules.The vibration-rotational kinetic energy operator is expressed in terms of the total angular momentum operator J,the angular momentum operator J and the momentum operator p conjugate to Z in the molecule-fixed frame Not only the method of derivation is simpler than that in the previous work,but also the expressions ot the kinetic energy operators arc more compact.Particularly,the operator is easily applied to different vibrational or rovibrational problems of the polyatomic molecules by variations of matrix elements Gn of a mass-dependent constant symmetric matrix

  15. Direct measurements of quantum kinetic energy tensor in stable and metastable water near the triple point: an experimental benchmark

    CERN Document Server

    Andreani, Carla; Senesi, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    This study presents the first direct and quantitative measurements of the nuclear momentum distribution anisotropy and the quantum kinetic energy tensor in stable and metastable (supercooled) water near its triple point using Deep Inelastic Neutron Scattering (DINS). From the experimental spectra accurate lineshapes of the hydrogen momentum distributions are derived using an anisotropic Gaussian and a model independent framework. The experimental results, benchmarked with those obtained for the solid phase, provide the state of the art directional values of the hydrogen mean kinetic energy in metastable water. The determinations of the direction kinetic energies in the supercooled phase, benchmarked with ice at the same temperature, provide accurate and quantitative measurements of these dynamical observables in metastable and stable phases, {i.e.} key insight in the physical mechanisms of the hydrogen quantum state in both disordered and polycrystalline systems. The remarkable findings of this study establis...

  16. Note: Proton microbeam formation with continuously variable kinetic energy using a compact system for three-dimensional proton beam writing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohkubo, T., E-mail: ohkubo.takeru@jaea.go.jp; Ishii, Y. [Department of Advanced Radiation Technology, Takasaki Advanced Radiation Research Institute, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 1233 Watanuki-machi, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan)

    2015-03-15

    A compact focused gaseous ion beam system has been developed to form proton microbeams of a few hundreds of keV with a penetration depth of micrometer range in 3-dimensional proton beam writing. Proton microbeams with kinetic energies of 100-140 keV were experimentally formed on the same point at a constant ratio of the kinetic energy of the object side to that of the image side. The experimental results indicate that the beam diameters were measured to be almost constant at approximately 6 μm at the same point with the kinetic energy range. These characteristics of the system were experimentally and numerically demonstrated to be maintained as long as the ratio was constant.

  17. The effects of divergent and nondivergent winds on the kinetic energy budget of a mid-latitude cyclone - A case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, T.-C.; Alpert, J. C.; Schlatter, T. W.

    1978-01-01

    The magnitude of the divergent component of the wind is relatively small compared to that of the nondivergent component in large-scale atmospheric flows; nevertheless, it plays an important role in the case of explosive cyclogenesis examined here. The kinetic energy budget for the life cycle of an intense, developing cyclone over North America is calculated. The principal kinetic energy source is the net horizontal transport across the boundaries of the region enclosing the cyclone. By investigating the relative importance of the divergent and nondivergent wind components in the kinetic energy budget, it was found, as expected, that neglecting the divergent wind component in calculating the magnitude of the kinetic energy is of little consequence, but that the horizontal flux convergence and generation of kinetic energy depend crucially upon the divergent component. Modification of the divergent wind component can result in significant changes in the kinetic energy budget of the synoptic system.

  18. Energy resolution and efficiency of phonon-mediated kinetic inductance detectors for light detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardani, L.; Colantoni, I.; Cruciani, A.; Di Domizio, S.; Vignati, M.; Bellini, F.; Casali, N.; Castellano, M. G.; Coppolecchia, A.; Cosmelli, C.; Tomei, C.

    2015-08-01

    The development of sensitive cryogenic light detectors is of primary interest for bolometric experiments searching for rare events like dark matter interactions or neutrino-less double beta decay. Thanks to their good energy resolution and the natural multiplexed read-out, Kinetic Inductance Detectors (KIDs) are particularly suitable for this purpose. To efficiently couple KIDs-based light detectors to the large crystals used by the most advanced bolometric detectors, active surfaces of several cm2 are needed. For this reason, we are developing phonon-mediated detectors. In this paper, we present the results obtained with a prototype consisting of four 40 nm thick aluminum resonators patterned on a 2 × 2 cm2 silicon chip, and calibrated with optical pulses and X-rays. The detector features a noise resolution σE = 154 ± 7 eV and an (18 ± 2)% efficiency.

  19. Releasable Kinetic Energy-Based Inertial Control of a DFIG Wind Power Plant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lee, Jinsik; Muljadi, Eduard; Sørensen, Poul Ejnar;

    2016-01-01

    Wind turbine generators (WTGs) in a wind power plant (WPP) contain different levels of releasable kinetic energy (KE) because of the wake effects. This paper proposes a releasable KE-based inertial control scheme for a doubly fed induction generator (DFIG) WPP that differentiates the contributions...... of the WTGs depending on their stored KE. The proposed KE-based gain scheme aims to make use of the releasable KE in a WPP to raise the frequency nadir. To achieve this, two additional loops for the inertial control are implemented in each DFIG controller: the rate of change of frequency and droop loops....... The proposed scheme adjusts the two loop gains in a DFIG controller depending on its rotor speed so that a DFIG operating at a higher rotor speed releases more KE. The performance of the proposed scheme was investigated under various wind conditions. The results clearly indicate that the proposed scheme...

  20. Design of specially adapted reactive coordinates to economically compute potential and kinetic energy operators including geometry relaxation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thallmair, Sebastian; Roos, Matthias K; de Vivie-Riedle, Regina

    2016-06-21

    Quantum dynamics simulations require prior knowledge of the potential energy surface as well as the kinetic energy operator. Typically, they are evaluated in a low-dimensional subspace of the full configuration space of the molecule as its dimensionality increases proportional to the number of atoms. This entails the challenge to find the most suitable subspace. We present an approach to design specially adapted reactive coordinates spanning this subspace. In addition to the essential geometric changes, these coordinates take into account the relaxation of the non-reactive coordinates without the necessity of performing geometry optimizations at each grid point. The method is demonstrated for an ultrafast photoinduced bond cleavage in a commonly used organic precursor for the generation of electrophiles. The potential energy surfaces for the reaction as well as the Wilson G-matrix as part of the kinetic energy operator are shown for a complex chemical reaction, both including the relaxation of the non-reactive coordinates on equal footing. A microscopic interpretation of the shape of the G-matrix elements allows to analyze the impact of the non-reactive coordinates on the kinetic energy operator. Additionally, we compare quantum dynamics simulations with and without the relaxation of the non-reactive coordinates included in the kinetic energy operator to demonstrate its influence.

  1. Design of specially adapted reactive coordinates to economically compute potential and kinetic energy operators including geometry relaxation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thallmair, Sebastian; Roos, Matthias K.; de Vivie-Riedle, Regina

    2016-06-01

    Quantum dynamics simulations require prior knowledge of the potential energy surface as well as the kinetic energy operator. Typically, they are evaluated in a low-dimensional subspace of the full configuration space of the molecule as its dimensionality increases proportional to the number of atoms. This entails the challenge to find the most suitable subspace. We present an approach to design specially adapted reactive coordinates spanning this subspace. In addition to the essential geometric changes, these coordinates take into account the relaxation of the non-reactive coordinates without the necessity of performing geometry optimizations at each grid point. The method is demonstrated for an ultrafast photoinduced bond cleavage in a commonly used organic precursor for the generation of electrophiles. The potential energy surfaces for the reaction as well as the Wilson G-matrix as part of the kinetic energy operator are shown for a complex chemical reaction, both including the relaxation of the non-reactive coordinates on equal footing. A microscopic interpretation of the shape of the G-matrix elements allows to analyze the impact of the non-reactive coordinates on the kinetic energy operator. Additionally, we compare quantum dynamics simulations with and without the relaxation of the non-reactive coordinates included in the kinetic energy operator to demonstrate its influence.

  2. Unified dark energy and dust dark matter dual to quadratic purely kinetic K-essence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guendelman, Eduardo [Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Department of Physics, Beersheba (Israel); Nissimov, Emil; Pacheva, Svetlana [Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy, Sofia (Bulgaria)

    2016-02-15

    We consider a modified gravity plus single scalar-field model, where the scalar Lagrangian couples symmetrically both to the standard Riemannian volume-form (spacetime integration measure density) given by the square root of the determinant of the Riemannian metric, as well as to another non-Riemannian volume-form in terms of an auxiliary maximal-rank antisymmetric tensor gauge field. As shown in a previous paper, the pertinent scalar-field dynamics provides an exact unified description of both dark energy via dynamical generation of a cosmological constant, and dark matter as a ''dust'' fluid with geodesic flow as a result of a hidden Noether symmetry. Here we extend the discussion by considering a non-trivial modification of the purely gravitational action in the form of f(R) = R -αR{sup 2} generalized gravity. Upon deriving the corresponding ''Einstein-frame'' effective action of the latter modified gravity-scalar-field theory we find explicit duality (in the sense of weak versus strong coupling) between the original model of unified dynamical dark energy and dust fluid dark matter, on one hand, and a specific quadratic purely kinetic ''k-essence'' gravity-matter model with special dependence of its coupling constants on only two independent parameters, on the other hand. The canonical Hamiltonian treatment and Wheeler-DeWitt quantization of the dual purely kinetic ''k-essence'' gravity-matter model is also briefly discussed. (orig.)

  3. Scale-dependent distribution of kinetic energy from surface drifters in the Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balwada, Dhruv; LaCasce, Joseph H.; Speer, Kevin G.

    2016-10-01

    The scale-dependent distribution of kinetic energy is probed at the surface in the Gulf of Mexico using surface drifters from the Grand Lagrangian Deployment (GLAD) experiment. The second-order velocity structure function and its decomposition into rotational and divergent components are examined. The results reveal that the divergent component, compared to the rotational component, dominates at scales below 5 km, and the pattern is reversed at larger scales. The divergent component has a slope near 2/3 below 5 km, similar to an energy cascade range (k-5/3). The third-order velocity structure function at scales below 5 km is negative and implies a forward cascade of energy to smaller scales. The rotational component has a steeper slope, roughly 1.5, from scales of 5 km up to the deformation radius. This is similar to a 2-D enstrophy cascade, although the slope is shallower than the predicted 2. There is a brief 2/3 range from the deformation radius to 200 km, suggestive of a 2-D inverse cascade.

  4. Turbulent kinetic energy generation in the convective boundary layer derived from thermodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slameršak, Aljoša; Renner, Maik; Ganzeveld, Laurens; Hartogensis, Oscar; Kolle, Olaf; Kleidon, Axel

    2016-04-01

    Turbulent heat fluxes facilitate the bulk of heat transfer between the surface and lower atmosphere, which results in the diurnal growth of convective boundary layer (CBL) and turbulent kinetic energy generation (TKE). Here we postulate the hypothesis that TKE generation in the CBL occurs as a result of heat transfer in a "Carnot-like" heat engine with temporal changes in the internal energy of the boundary layer. We used the Tennekes energy-balance model of CBL and extended it with the analysis of the entropy balance to derive the estimates of TKE generation in the CBL. These TKE generation estimates were compared to the turbulent dissipation from a simple dissipation model from Moeng and Sullivan, to test the validity of our heat engine hypothesis. In addition, to evaluate the performance of the dissipation model, this was independently validated by a comparison of its estimates with the turbulent dissipation calculations based on spectral analysis of eddy covariance wind measurements at a German field station. Our analysis demonstrates how a consistent application of thermodynamics can be used to obtain an independent physical constraint on the diurnal boundary layer evolution. Furthermore, our analysis suggests that the CBL operates at the thermodynamic limit, thus imposing a thermodynamic constraint on surface-atmosphere exchange.

  5. The kinetic and available potential energy budget of a winter extratropical cyclone system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, P. J.; Dare, P. M.

    1986-01-01

    The energy budget of an extratropical cyclone system which traversed North America and intensified through the period January 9-11, 1975 is presented. The objectives of the study are: (1) to document the complete energy budget of a significant winter cyclone event, and (2) to comment on the significance of latent heat release (LHR) in the cyclone's evolution. Results reveal an overall increase in both kinetic (K) and available potential energy (A). K increases are accounted for by boundary flux convergence of K, while A increases are due to generation by LHR and K to A conversion. In addition, the general A increase is accompanied by a 24 h oscillation that is explained largely by the flux quantity in the A budget equation and is correlated with a similar fluctuation in the K to A conversion. LHR does not appear to be critical in the development of this cyclone system. Rather, LHR acts to increase the intensity of the event. It is hypothesized that the direct influence that LHR had on the deepening cyclone's reduced mass was augmented by an indirect influence, in which pre-existing dry dynamical forcing was enhanced by diabatic heating, thus leading to accelerated cyclone development at a later time.

  6. Total kinetic energy release in the fast neutron-induced fission of $^{235}$U

    CERN Document Server

    Yanez, R; King, J; Barrett, J S; Fotiades, N; Lee, H Y

    2016-01-01

    We have measured the total kinetic energy (TKE) release for the $^{235}$U(n,f) reaction for $E_{n}$=2-100 MeV using the 2E method with an array of Si PIN diode detectors. The neutron energies were determined by time of flight measurements using the white spectrum neutron beam at the LANSCE facility. To benchmark the TKE measurement, the TKE release for $^{235}$U(n$_{th}$,f) was also measured using a thermal neutron beam from the Oregon State University TRIGA reactor, giving pre-neutron emission $E^*_{TKE}=170.7\\pm0.4$ MeV in good agreement with known values. Our measurements are thus absolute measurements. The TKE in $^{235}$U(n,f) decreases non-linearly from 169.0 MeV to 161.4 MeV for $E_{n}$=2-90 MeV. Comparison of the data with the multi-modal fission model of Brosa indicates the TKE decrease is a consequence of the growth of symmetric fission and the corresponding decrease of asymmetric fission with increasing neutron energy. The average TKE associated with the Brosa superlong, standard I and standard II ...

  7. Kinetic theory of binary particles with unequal mean velocities and non-equipartition energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yanpei; Mei, Yifeng; Wang, Wei

    2017-03-01

    The hydrodynamic conservation equations and constitutive relations for a binary granular mixture composed of smooth, nearly elastic spheres with non-equipartition energies and different mean velocities are derived. This research is aimed to build three-dimensional kinetic theory to characterize the behaviors of two species of particles suffering different forces. The standard Enskog method is employed assuming a Maxwell velocity distribution for each species of particles. The collision components of the stress tensor and the other parameters are calculated from the zeroth- and first-order approximation. Our results demonstrate that three factors, namely the differences between two granular masses, temperatures and mean velocities all play important roles in the stress-strain relation of the binary mixture, indicating that the assumption of energy equipartition and the same mean velocity may not be acceptable. The collision frequency and the solid viscosity increase monotonously with each granular temperature. The zeroth-order approximation to the energy dissipation varies greatly with the mean velocities of both species of spheres, reaching its peak value at the maximum of their relative velocity.

  8. Blast Pressures Induced by the Impact of Kinetic Energy Penetrators on Steel Targets in an Enclosed Range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-02-01

    heat of detonation of pentolite is Sl k.J/g, so the kinetic energy of the tungsten penetrators is equal to the heat of detonation of...the heat of detonation of pentolite, 5.11 kJ/g. Then the scaled distance curves 3 can be used to predict blast pressure at the instrumented position for...kinetic and chemical energy is 11.8 MJ which equals the heat of detonation of 2.3 kg of pentolite. This would produce a reflected blast pressure of

  9. AGN JET KINETIC POWER AND THE ENERGY BUDGET OF RADIO GALAXY LOBES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Godfrey, L. E. H. [International Centre for Radio Astronomy Research, Curtin University, GPO Box U1987, Perth, WA 6102 (Australia); Shabala, S. S., E-mail: L.Godfrey@curtin.edu.au [School of Mathematics and Physics, Private Bag 37, University of Tasmania, Hobart, TAS 7001 (Australia)

    2013-04-10

    Recent results based on the analysis of radio galaxies and their hot X-ray emitting atmospheres suggest that non-radiating particles dominate the energy budget in the lobes of FR I radio galaxies, in some cases by a factor of more than 1000, while radiating particles dominate the energy budget in FR II radio galaxy lobes. This implies a significant difference in the radiative efficiency of the two morphological classes. To test this hypothesis, we have measured the kinetic energy flux for a sample of 3C FR II radio sources using a new method based on the observed parameters of the jet terminal hotspots, and compared the resulting Q{sub jet}-L{sub radio} relation to that obtained for FR I radio galaxies based on X-ray cavity measurements. Contrary to expectations, we find approximate agreement between the Q{sub jet}-L{sub radio} relations determined separately for FR I and FR II radio galaxies. This result is ostensibly difficult to reconcile with the emerging scenario in which the lobes of FR I and FR II radio galaxies have vastly different energy budgets. However, a combination of lower density environment, spectral aging and strong shocks driven by powerful FR II radio galaxies may reduce the radiative efficiency of these objects relative to FR Is and counteract, to some extent, the higher radiative efficiency expected to arise due to the lower fraction of energy in non-radiating particles. An unexpected corollary is that extrapolating the Q{sub jet}-L{sub radio} relation determined for low power FR I radio galaxies provides a reasonable approximation for high power sources, despite their apparently different lobe compositions.

  10. Oxygen uptake kinetics and energy system’s contribution around maximal lactate steady state swimming intensity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Leandro; Fernandes, Ricardo Jorge; Greco, Camila Coelho

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the oxygen uptake (V˙O2) kinetics and the energy systems’ contribution at 97.5, 100 and 102.5% of the maximal lactate steady state (MLSS) swimming intensity. Ten elite female swimmers performed three-to-five 30 min submaximal constant swimming bouts at imposed paces for the determination of the swimming velocity (v) at 100%MLSS based on a 7 x 200 m intermittent incremental protocol until voluntary exhaustion to find the v associated at the individual anaerobic threshold. V˙O2 kinetics (cardiodynamic, primary and slow component phases) and the aerobic and anaerobic energy contributions were assessed during the continuous exercises, which the former was studied for the beginning and second phase of exercise. Subjects showed similar time delay (TD) (mean = 11.5–14.3 s) and time constant (τp) (mean = 13.8–16.3 s) as a function of v, but reduced amplitude of the primary component for 97.5% (35.7 ± 7.3 mL.kg.min-1) compared to 100 and 102.5%MLSS (41.0 ± 7.0 and 41.3 ± 5.4 mL.kg.min-1, respectively), and τp decreased (mean = 9.6–10.8 s) during the second phase of exercise. Despite the slow component did not occur for all swimmers at all swim intensities, when observed it tended to increase as a function of v. Moreover, the total energy contribution was almost exclusively aerobic (98–99%) at 97.5, 100 and 102.5%MLSS. We suggest that well-trained endurance swimmers with a fast TD and τp values may be able to adjust faster the physiological requirements to minimize the amplitude of the slow component appearance, parameter associated with the fatigue delay and increase in exhaustion time during performance, however, these fast adjustments were not able to control the progressive fatigue occurred slightly above MLSS, and most of swimmers reached exhaustion before 30min swam. PMID:28245246

  11. Estimating free-energy barrier heights for an ultrafast folding protein from calorimetric and kinetic data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godoy-Ruiz, Raquel; Henry, Eric R; Kubelka, Jan; Hofrichter, James; Muñoz, Victor; Sanchez-Ruiz, Jose M; Eaton, William A

    2008-05-15

    Differential scanning calorimetry was used to measure the temperature dependence of the absolute heat capacity of the 35-residue subdomain of the villin headpiece, a protein that folds in 5 mus and is therefore assumed to have a small free-energy barrier separating folded and unfolded states. To obtain an estimate of the barrier height from the calorimetric data, two models, a variable-barrier model and an Ising-like model, were used to fit the heat capacity in excess of the folded state over the temperature range 15-125 degrees C. The variable-barrier model is based on an empirical mathematical form for the density of states, with four adjustable parameters and the enthalpy (H) as a reaction coordinate. The Ising-like model is based on the inter-residue contact map of the X-ray structure with exact enumeration of approximately 10(5) possible conformations, with two adjustable parameters in the partition function, and either the fraction of native contacts (Q) or the number of ordered residues (P) as reaction coordinates. The variable-barrier model provides an excellent fit to the data and yields a barrier height at the folding temperature ranging from 0.4 to 1.1 kcal mol(-1), while the Ising-like model provides a less good fit and yields barrier heights of 2.3 +/- 0.1 kcal mol(-1) and 2.1 +/- 0.1 kcal mol(-1) for the Q and P reaction coordinates, respectively. In both models, the barrier to folding increases with increasing temperature. Assuming a sufficiently large activation energy for diffusion on the free-energy surfaces, both models are consistent with the observation of a temperature-independent folding rate in previously published laser temperature-jump experiments. Analysis of this kinetic data, using an approximate form for the pre-exponential factor of Kramers theory and the 70 ns relaxation time for the fast phase that precedes the unfolding/refolding relaxation to determine the diffusion coefficient, results in a barrier height of 1.6 +/- 0.3 kcal mol

  12. Features of eddy kinetic energy and variations of upper circulation in the South China Sea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    贺志刚; 王东晓; 胡建宇

    2002-01-01

    The features of eddy kinetic energy (EKE) and the variations of upper circulation in the South China Sea (SCS) are discussed in this paper using geostrophic currents estimated from Maps of Sea Level Anomalies of the TOPEX/Poseidon altimetry data. A high EKE center is identified in the southeast, of Viemam coast with the highest energy level 1400 cm2@s-2 in both summer and autumn.This high EKE center is caused by the instability of the current axis leaving the coast of Vietnam in summer and the transition of seasonal circulation patterns in autumn. There exists another high EKE region in the northeastern SCS, southwest to Taiwan Island in winter. This high EKE region is generated from the eddy activities caused by the Kuroshio intrusion and accumulates more'than one third of the annual EKE, which confirms that the eddies are most active in winter. The transition of upper circulation patterns is also evidenced by the directions of the major axises of velocity variance ellipses between 10°and 14.5°N, which supports the model results reported before.

  13. Hubbard models with nearly flat bands: Ground-state ferromagnetism driven by kinetic energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Patrick; Richter, Johannes; Derzhko, Oleg

    2016-04-01

    We consider the standard repulsive Hubbard model with a flat lowest-energy band for two one-dimensional lattices (diamond chain and ladder) as well as for a two-dimensional lattice (bilayer) at half filling of the flat band. The considered models do not fall in the class of Mielke-Tasaki flat-band ferromagnets, since they do not obey the connectivity conditions. However, the ground-state ferromagnetism can emerge, if the flat band becomes dispersive. To study this kinetic-energy-driven ferromagnetism we use perturbation theory and exact diagonalization of finite lattices. We find as a typical scenario that small and moderate dispersion may lead to a ferromagnetic ground state for sufficiently large on-site Hubbard repulsion U >Uc , where Uc increases monotonically with the acquired bandwidth. However, we also observe for some specific parameter cases, that (i) ferromagnetism appears at already very small Uc, (ii) ferromagnetism does not show up at all, (iii) the critical on-site repulsion Uc is a nonmonotonic function of the bandwidth, or that (iv) a critical bandwidth is needed to open the window for ground-state ferromagnetism.

  14. Vector modeling and track simulation in axial turn-milling motion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Zeng-hui; JIA Chun-de

    2005-01-01

    Through vector analysis the kinetic vector model is built in a machining cylinder surface through axial turn-milling. When building a kinetic vector model in the machining field, machining through axial turn-milling and using equilateral triangles and square prism surfaces, the kinetic vector model is given any equilateral polygon prismic surface. Kinetic tracks are simulated through these kinetic models respectively, thus it can be seen that the axial turn-milling is a very effective method in manufacturing any equilateral, polygon, prismic surface.

  15. Neutron emission effects on fragment mass and kinetic energy distribution from fission of 239Pu induced by thermal neutrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montoya, M.; Rojas, J.; Lobato, I.

    2010-08-01

    The average of fragment kinetic energy (E*) and the multiplicity of prompt neutrons (ν) as a function of fragment mass (m*), as well as the fragment mass yield (Y(m*)) from thermal neutron-induced fission of 239Pu have been measured by Tsuchiya et al.. In that work the mass and kinetic energy are calculated from the measured kinetic energy of one fragment and the difference of time of flight of the two complementary fragments. However they do not present their results about the standard deviation σE*(m*). In this work we have made a numerical simulation of that experiment which reproduces its results, assuming an initial distribution of the primary fragment kinetic energy (E(A)) with a constant value of the standard deviation as function of fragment mass (σE(A)). As a result of the simulation we obtain the dependence σE*(m*) which presents an enhancement between m* = 92 and m* = 110, and a peak at m* = 121.

  16. The Reaction of Crotonic Anhydride with Scots and Corsican Pine: Investigation of Kinetic Profiles and Determination of Activation Energies

    OpenAIRE

    Özmen, Nilgül; ÇETİN, Nihat Sami

    2014-01-01

    The kinetics of the reaction of crotonic anhydride with Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris) and Corsican pine (Pinus nigra) using pyridine as catalyst/solvent was investigated and activation energies for the initial reaction determined. Activation energies were calculated from the Arrhenius equation using rate data obtained from time-course experiments repeated at several temperatures. In one method, reaction constants (k) were determined experimentally, while in the other method initial rates were...

  17. Conversion of Kinetic Energy from Synoptic Scale Disturbance to Low-Frequency Fluctuation over the Yangtze River Valley in the Summers of 1997 and 1999

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Yuefeng

    2007-01-01

    In order to investigate the conversion of kinetic energy from a synoptic scale disturbance (SSD; period≤seven days) to a low-frequency fluctuation (LFF; period>seven days), the budget equation of the LFF kinetic energy is derived. The energy conversion is then calculated and analyzed for the summers of 1997 and 1999.The results show that the energy conversion from the SSD to the LFF is obviously enhanced in the middle and lower troposphere during the heavy rainfall, suggesting this to be one of mechanisms inducing the heavy rainfall, although the local LFF kinetic energy may not be enhanced.

  18. An Unbroken Axial Vector Current Conservation Law

    CERN Document Server

    Sharafiddinov, Rasulkhozha S

    2015-01-01

    The mass, energy and momentum of the neutrino of a true flavor have an axial-vector nature. As a consequence, the left-handed truly neutral neutrino in an axial-vector field of emission can be converted into a right-handed one and vice versa. This predicts the unidenticality of masses, energies and momenta of neutrinos of the different components. Recognizing such a difference in masses, energies, momenta and accepting that the left-handed axial-vector neutrino and the right-handed antineutrino of true neutrality refer to long-lived C-odd leptons, and the right-handed truly neutral neutrino and the left-handed axial-vector antineutrino are of short-lived fermions of C-oddity, we would write a new CP-even Dirac equation taking into account the flavor symmetrical axial-vector mass, energy and momentum matrices. Their presence explains the spontaneous mirror symmetry violation, confirming that an axial-vector current conservation law has never violated. They reflect the availability of a mirror Minkowski space i...

  19. Energy resolution and efficiency of phonon-mediated kinetic inductance detectors for light detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cardani, L., E-mail: laura.cardani@roma1.infn.it [Dipartimento di Fisica, Sapienza Università di Roma, Piazzale Aldo Moro 2, 00185 Roma (Italy); Physics Department, Princeton University, Washington Road, 08544, Princeton, New Jersey (United States); Colantoni, I.; Coppolecchia, A. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Sapienza Università di Roma, Piazzale Aldo Moro 2, 00185 Roma (Italy); Cruciani, A.; Vignati, M.; Bellini, F.; Casali, N.; Cosmelli, C. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Sapienza Università di Roma, Piazzale Aldo Moro 2, 00185 Roma (Italy); INFN - Sezione di Roma, Piazzale Aldo Moro 2, 00185 Roma (Italy); Di Domizio, S. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università degli Studi di Genova, Via Dodecaneso 33, 16146 Genova (Italy); INFN - Sezione di Genova, Via Dodecaneso 33, 16146 Genova (Italy); Castellano, M. G. [Istituto di Fotonica e Nanotecnologie - CNR, Via Cineto Romano 42, 00156 Roma (Italy); Tomei, C. [INFN - Sezione di Roma, Piazzale Aldo Moro 2, 00185 Roma (Italy)

    2015-08-31

    The development of sensitive cryogenic light detectors is of primary interest for bolometric experiments searching for rare events like dark matter interactions or neutrino-less double beta decay. Thanks to their good energy resolution and the natural multiplexed read-out, Kinetic Inductance Detectors (KIDs) are particularly suitable for this purpose. To efficiently couple KIDs-based light detectors to the large crystals used by the most advanced bolometric detectors, active surfaces of several cm{sup 2} are needed. For this reason, we are developing phonon-mediated detectors. In this paper, we present the results obtained with a prototype consisting of four 40 nm thick aluminum resonators patterned on a 2 × 2 cm{sup 2} silicon chip, and calibrated with optical pulses and X-rays. The detector features a noise resolution σ{sub E} = 154 ± 7 eV and an (18 ± 2)% efficiency.

  20. A nonlinear MEMS electrostatic kinetic energy harvester for human-powered biomedical devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Y.; Cottone, F.; Marty, F.; Basset, P., E-mail: p.basset@esiee.fr [Université Paris-Est/ESYCOM/ESIEE Paris, Noisy-le-Grand 93162 (France); Boisseau, S. [CEA, Leti, Minatec Campus, Grenoble 38054 (France); Galayko, D. [UPMC-Sorbonne Université/LIP 6, CNRS, Paris 75005 (France)

    2015-12-21

    This article proposes a silicon-based electrostatic kinetic energy harvester with an ultra-wide operating frequency bandwidth from 1 Hz to 160 Hz. This large bandwidth is obtained, thanks to a miniature tungsten ball impacting with a movable proof mass of silicon. The motion of the silicon proof mass is confined by nonlinear elastic stoppers on the fixed part standing against two protrusions of the proof mass. The electrostatic transducer is made of interdigited-combs with a gap-closing variable capacitance that includes vertical electrets obtained by corona discharge. Below 10 Hz, the e-KEH offers 30.6 nJ per mechanical oscillation at 2 g{sub rms}, which makes it suitable for powering biomedical devices from human motion. Above 10 Hz and up to 162 Hz, the harvested power is more than 0.5 μW with a maximum of 4.5 μW at 160 Hz. The highest power of 6.6 μW is obtained without the ball at 432 Hz, in accordance with a power density of 142 μW/cm{sup 3}. We also demonstrate the charging of a 47-μF capacitor to 3.5 V used to power a battery-less wireless temperature sensor node.

  1. Characteristics of Zonal Propagation of Atmospheric Kinetic Energy at Equatorial Region in Asia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Hui; CHEN Longxun; HE Jinhai; TAO Shiyan; JIN Zuhui

    2006-01-01

    Based on the daily NCEP/NCAR reanalysis dataset from 1980 to 1997, the zonal propagations of 850 hPa kinetic energy (KE) and meridional wind (v) at equatorial region are examined respectively. Results show that the strongest center of KE in the tropical Asian monsoon region is located at 75°-90°E, with the secondary over the Somalia low-level jet channel, i.e., about 50°E. East to 90°E, disturbances of both KE and v observed are mainly coming from the western Pacific Ocean and propagating westward to the Bay of Bengal (BOB) passing through the South China Sea. But the propagation directions of both KE and v are rather disorderly between the BOB and the Somalia jet channel. Therefore, the East Asian summer monsoon and the Indian summer monsoon are different in the propagating features of the disturbances of KE and v. Above facts indicate that East Asian monsoon system exists undoubtedly even at the equatorial region, and quite distinct from the Indian monsoon system, it is mainly affected by the disturbances coming from the tropical western Pacific rather than from the Indian monsoon region. The boundary of the two monsoon systems is around 95°-100°E, which is more westward than the counterpart as proposed in earlier studies by 5-10 degrees in longitude.

  2. The terms of turbulent kinetic energy budget within random arrays of emergent cylinders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricardo, Ana M.; Koll, Katinka; Franca, Mário J.; Schleiss, Anton J.; Ferreira, Rui M. L.

    2014-05-01

    This article is aimed at quantifying and discussing the relative magnitude of key terms of the equation of conservation of turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) in the inter-stem space of a flow within arrays of vertical cylinders simulating plant stems of emergent and rigid vegetation. The spatial distribution of turbulent quantities and mean flow variables are influenced by two fundamental space scales, the diameter of the stems and the local stem areal number-density. Both may vary considerably since the areal distribution of plant stems in natural systems is generally not homogeneous; they are often arranged in alternating sparse and dense patches. The magnitude of the terms of the budget of TKE in the inter-stem space has seldom been quantified experimentally and is currently not well known. This work addresses this research need. New databases, consisting of three-component LDA velocity series and two-component PIV velocity maps, obtained in carefully controlled laboratory conditions, were used to calculate the terms of the TKE budget. The physical system comprises random arrays of rigid and emergent cylinders with longitudinally varying areal number-density. It is verified that the main source of TKE is vortex shedding from individual cylinders. The rates of production and dissipation are not in equilibrium. Regions with negative production, a previously unreported feature, are identified. Turbulent transport is particularly important along the von Kármán vortex street. Convective rate of change of TKE and pressure diffusion are most relevant in the vicinity of the cylinders.

  3. On the mean kinetic energy of the proton in strong hydrogen bonded systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finkelstein, Y. [Nuclear Research Center–Negev, Beer-Sheva 84190 (Israel); Moreh, R. [Physics Department, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva 84105 (Israel); Shang, S. L.; Wang, Y.; Liu, Z. K. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802 (United States); Shchur, Ya. [Institute for Condensed Matter Physics, 1 Svientsitskii str., L’viv 79011 (Ukraine)

    2016-02-07

    The mean atomic kinetic energies of the proton, Ke(H), and of the deuteron, Ke(D), were calculated in moderate and strongly hydrogen bonded (HB) systems, such as the ferro-electric crystals of the KDP type (XH{sub 2}PO{sub 4}, X = K, Cs, Rb, Tl), the DKDP (XD{sub 2}PO{sub 4}, X = K, Cs, Rb) type, and the X{sub 3}H(SO{sub 4}){sub 2} superprotonic conductors (X = K, Rb). All calculations utilized the simulated partial phonon density of states, deduced from density functional theory based first-principle calculations and from empirical lattice dynamics simulations in which the Coulomb, short range, covalent, and van der Waals interactions were accounted for. The presently calculated Ke(H) values for the two systems were found to be in excellent agreement with published values obtained by deep inelastic neutron scattering measurements carried out using the VESUVIO instrument of the Rutherford Laboratory, UK. The Ke(H) values of the M{sub 3}H(SO{sub 4}){sub 2} compounds, in which the hydrogen bonds are centro-symmetric, are much lower than those of the KDP type crystals, in direct consistency with the oxygen-oxygen distance R{sub OO}, being a measure of the HB strength.

  4. A nonlinear MEMS electrostatic kinetic energy harvester for human-powered biomedical devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Y.; Cottone, F.; Boisseau, S.; Marty, F.; Galayko, D.; Basset, P.

    2015-12-01

    This article proposes a silicon-based electrostatic kinetic energy harvester with an ultra-wide operating frequency bandwidth from 1 Hz to 160 Hz. This large bandwidth is obtained, thanks to a miniature tungsten ball impacting with a movable proof mass of silicon. The motion of the silicon proof mass is confined by nonlinear elastic stoppers on the fixed part standing against two protrusions of the proof mass. The electrostatic transducer is made of interdigited-combs with a gap-closing variable capacitance that includes vertical electrets obtained by corona discharge. Below 10 Hz, the e-KEH offers 30.6 nJ per mechanical oscillation at 2 grms, which makes it suitable for powering biomedical devices from human motion. Above 10 Hz and up to 162 Hz, the harvested power is more than 0.5 μW with a maximum of 4.5 μW at 160 Hz. The highest power of 6.6 μW is obtained without the ball at 432 Hz, in accordance with a power density of 142 μW/cm3. We also demonstrate the charging of a 47-μF capacitor to 3.5 V used to power a battery-less wireless temperature sensor node.

  5. Improved Soft Abrasive Flow Finishing Method Based on Turbulent Kinetic Energy Enhancing

    Science.gov (United States)

    LI, Jun; JI, Shiming; TAN, Dapeng

    2017-03-01

    Soft abrasive flow(SAF) finishing can process the irregular geometric surfaces, but with the matter of low processing efficiency. To address the issue, an improved SAF finishing method based on turbulent kinetic energy enhancing is proposed. A constrained flow passage with serration cross-section is constructed to increase the turbulence intensity. Taking the constrained flow passage as the objective, a two-phase fluid dynamic model is set up by using particle trajectory model and standard k-ɛ turbulence model, and the flow field characteristics of the flow passage are acquired. The numerical results show that the serration flow passage can enhance the turbulence intensity, uniform the particles distribution, and increase the particle concentration near the bottom wall. The observation results by particle image velocimetry(PIV) show that the internal vortex structures are formed in flow passage, and the abrasive flow takes on turbulence concentrating phenomenon in near-wall region. The finishing experiments prove that the proposed method can obtain better surface uniformity, and the processing efficiency can be improved more 35%. This research provides an abrasive flow modeling method to reveal the particle motion regulars, and can offer references to the technical optimization of fluid-based precision processing.

  6. Smoothing Control of Wind Farm Output by Using Kinetic Energy of Variable Speed Wind Power Generators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Daiki; Saitoh, Hiroumi

    This paper proposes a new control method for reducing fluctuation of power system frequency through smoothing active power output of wind farm. The proposal is based on the modulation of rotaional kinetic energy of variable speed wind power generators through power converters between permanent magnet synchronous generators (PMSG) and transmission lines. In this paper, the proposed control is called Fluctuation Absorption by Flywheel Characteristics control (FAFC). The FAFC can be easily implemented by adding wind farm output signal to Maximum Power Point Tracking control signal through a feedback control loop. In order to verify the effectiveness of the FAFC control, a simulation study was carried out. In the study, it was assumed that the wind farm consisting of PMSG type wind power generator and induction machine type wind power generaotors is connected with a power sysem. The results of the study show that the FAFC control is a useful method for reducing the impacts of wind farm output fluctuation on system frequency without additional devices such as secondary battery.

  7. Total kinetic energy in four global eddying ocean circulation models and over 5000 current meter records

    KAUST Repository

    Scott, Robert B.

    2010-01-01

    We compare the total kinetic energy (TKE) in four global eddying ocean circulation simulations with a global dataset of over 5000, quality controlled, moored current meter records. At individual mooring sites, there was considerable scatter between models and observations that was greater than estimated statistical uncertainty. Averaging over all current meter records in various depth ranges, all four models had mean TKE within a factor of two of observations above 3500. m, and within a factor of three below 3500. m. With the exception of observations between 20 and 100. m, the models tended to straddle the observations. However, individual models had clear biases. The free running (no data assimilation) model biases were largest below 2000. m. Idealized simulations revealed that the parameterized bottom boundary layer tidal currents were not likely the source of the problem, but that reducing quadratic bottom drag coefficient may improve the fit with deep observations. Data assimilation clearly improved the model-observation comparison, especially below 2000. m, despite assimilated data existing mostly above this depth and only south of 47°N. Different diagnostics revealed different aspects of the comparison, though in general the models appeared to be in an eddying-regime with TKE that compared reasonably well with observations. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Effect of high-energy heavy ion irradiation on the crystallization kinetics of Co-based metallic glasses

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Rohit Jain; Deepika Bhandari; N S Saxena; S K Sharma; A Tripathi

    2001-02-01

    Differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) is employed to study the crystallization kinetics of irradiated (at three different fluences with high-energy heavy ion; Ni11+ of 150 MeV) specimens of two Co-based metallic glasses. It is found that the crystallization process in both the glasses is completed in two phases. The DSC data have been analysed in terms of kinetic parameters viz. activation energy (), Avrami exponent (), dimensionality of growth (), using two different theoretical models. The results obtained have been compared with that of virgin samples. The lower activation energy in case of second crystallization occurring at higher temperature indicates the easier nucleation of second phase. The abnormally high value of Avrami exponent in Co–Ni glass indicates very high nucleation rate during first crystallization.

  9. Dissipative Axial Inflation

    CERN Document Server

    Notari, Alessio

    2016-01-01

    We analyze in detail the background cosmological evolution of a scalar field coupled to a massless abelian gauge field through an axial term $\\frac{\\phi}{f_\\gamma} F \\tilde{F}$, such as in the case of an axion. Gauge fields in this case are known to experience tachyonic growth and therefore can backreact on the background as an effective dissipation into radiation energy density $\\rho_R$, which which can lead to inflation without the need of a flat potential. We analyze the system, for momenta $k$ smaller than the cutoff $f_\\gamma$, including numerically the backreaction. We consider the evolution from a given static initial condition and explicitly show that, if $f_\\gamma$ is smaller than the field excursion $\\phi_0$ by about a factor of at least ${\\cal O} (20)$, there is a friction effect which turns on before that the field can fall down and which can then lead to a very long stage of inflation with a generic potential. In addition we find superimposed oscillations, which would get imprinted on any kind of...

  10. Nonperturbative Aspects of Axial Vector Vertex

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZONG Hong-Shi; CHEN Xiang-Song; WANG Fan; CHANG Chao-Hsi; ZHAO En-Guang

    2002-01-01

    It is shown how the axial vector current of current quarks is related to that of constituent quarks within the framework of the global color symmetry model.Gluon dressing of the axial vector vertex and the quark self-energy functions are described by the inhomogeneous Bethe-Salpeter equation in the ladder approximation and the Schwinger Dyson equation in the rainbow approximation,respectively.

  11. von K\\'arm\\'an energy decay and heating of protons and electrons in a kinetic plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, P; Matthaeus, W H; Shay, M A; Swisdak, M

    2013-01-01

    Decay in time of undriven weakly collisional kinetic plasma turbulence in systems large compared to the ion kinetic scales is investigated using fully electromagnetic particle-in-cell simulations initiated with transverse flow and magnetic disturbances, constant density, and a strong guide field. The observed energy decay is consistent with the von K\\'arm\\'an hypothesis of similarity decay, in a formulation adapted to magnetohydrodyamics (MHD). Kinetic dissipation occurs at small scales, but the overall rate is apparently controlled by large scale dynamics. At small turbulence amplitude the electrons are preferentially heated. At larger amplitudes proton heating is the dominant effect. In the solar wind and corona the protons are typically hotter, suggesting that these natural systems are in large amplitude turbulence regime.

  12. Von Kármán energy decay and heating of protons and electrons in a kinetic turbulent plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, P; Wan, M; Matthaeus, W H; Shay, M A; Swisdak, M

    2013-09-20

    Decay in time of undriven weakly collisional kinetic plasma turbulence in systems large compared to the ion kinetic scales is investigated using fully electromagnetic particle-in-cell simulations initiated with transverse flow and magnetic disturbances, constant density, and a strong guide field. The observed energy decay is consistent with the von Kármán hypothesis of similarity decay, in a formulation adapted to magnetohydrodyamics. Kinetic dissipation occurs at small scales, but the overall rate is apparently controlled by large scale dynamics. At small turbulence amplitudes the electrons are preferentially heated. At larger amplitudes proton heating is the dominant effect. In the solar wind and corona the protons are typically hotter, suggesting that these natural systems are in the large amplitude turbulence regime.

  13. Bi-Directional Energy Cascades and the Origin of Kinetic Alfv\\'enic and Whistler Turbulence in the Solar Wind

    CERN Document Server

    Che, H; Viñas, A F

    2013-01-01

    The observed sub-proton scale turbulence spectrum in the solar wind raises the question of how that turbulence originates. Observations of keV energetic electrons during solar quite-time suggest them as possible source of free energy to drive the turbulence. Using particle-in-cell simulations, we explore how free energy in energetic electrons, released by an electron two-stream instability drives Weibel-like electromagnetic waves that excite wave-wave interactions. Consequently, both kinetic Alfv\\'enic and whistler waves are excited that evolve through inverse and forward magnetic energy cascades.

  14. Pyrolysis Characteristics and Kinetics of Phoenix Tree Residues as a Potential Energy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Li

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available By using a thermogravimetric analyser under argon atmosphere, the pyrolysis process and the kinetic model of phoenix tree residues (the little stem, middle stem, and leaf at a 30 °C min−1 heating rate and the phoenix tree mix at three different heating rates (10 °C min−1, 30 °C min−1, and 50 °C min−1 were examined. The catalyst and the co-pyrolysis samples were at a 30 °C min−1 heating rate. The catalysts were Na2CO3, ZnCl2 and CaO in a mass fraction of 5 %. The experimental results revealed that the phoenix tree residues pyrolysis process consisted of three stages: dehydration stage, main pyrolysis stage, and the slow decomposition of residues. As the heating rate increased, the pyrolysis characteristic temperature of the phoenix tree grew, there was a backward-shift of the pyrolysis rate curve, and the mass loss rate gradually increased. The phoenix tree residues’ activation energy changed throughout the whole pyrolysis process, and the pyrolysis temperature ranges of the three main components (cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin existed in overlapping phenomenon. As compared to the little stem, middle stem, and leaf, the phoenix tree mix was more likely to be pyrolysed under the same heating rate. Different catalysts had a different impact on the pyrolysis: ZnCl2 moved the start point of the reaction to the lower temperatures, but did not speed up the reaction; Na2CO3 speeded up the reaction without changing the start point of the reaction; CaO speeded up the reaction, moved the start point of the reaction to higher temperatures.

  15. Buoyant Turbulent Kinetic Energy Production in Steep-Slope Katabatic Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oldroyd, Holly J.; Pardyjak, Eric R.; Higgins, Chad W.; Parlange, Marc B.

    2016-12-01

    We develop several critical concepts that should be considered when interpreting, modelling and designing future experiments for flows over sloping terrain. Vertical buoyancy fluxes in katabatic flows can be positive and a source of turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) despite the statically stable, thermal stratification that drives these flows. This phenomenon occurs when the ratio of along-slope to slope-normal kinematic heat fluxes is greater than the cotangent of the slope angle, suggesting a critical value of slope-angle steepness found in earlier studies. We provide field-data-based evidence that the along-slope heat flux may dominate the variables in this inequality, and therefore in generating buoyant TKE production or suppression over a steep slope. These data show the along-slope heat flux can be more variable and significantly larger in magnitude than the slope-normal component. The gradient Richardson number does not include the effects of the along-slope buoyancy; furthermore, none of the canonical stability parameters can properly reflect the TKE redistribution from turbulent transport divergence and the sink of TKE in cases of counter-gradient momentum fluxes, which we frequently observe near the peak of the katabatic jet. In such cases, canonical stability parameters inadequately represent the physical mechanisms associated with stability. These results have broad implications related to accurately modelling turbulence and surface exchanges over sloping terrain and illustrate the need to more thoroughly investigate the along-slope heat flux and its drivers, the meaning and definitions of stability, and the effects of non-local turbulent transport.

  16. Numerical study of the scaling of the maximum kinetic energy per unit length for imploding Z-pinch liner

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zeng Zheng-Zhong; Qiu Ai-Ci

    2004-01-01

    Numerical computation based on a zero-dimensional thin-plasma-shell model has been carried out to study the scaling of the maximum kinetic energy per unit length, the current amplitude and the compression ratio for the imploding Z-pinch liner driven by peaked current pulses. A dimensionless scaling constant of 0.9 with an error less than 10% is extracted at the optimal choice of the current and liner parameters. Deviation of the chosen experimental parameter from the optimal exerts a minor influence on the kinetic energy for wider-shaped and slower-decaying pulses, but the influence becomes significant for narrower-shaped and faster-decaying pulses. The computation is in reasonable agreement with experimental data from the Z, Saturn, Blackjack 5 and Qiangguang-I liners.

  17. Attenuation of 10 MeV electron beam energy to achieve low doses does not affect Salmonella spp. inactivation kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hieke, Anne-Sophie Charlotte; Pillai, Suresh D.

    2015-05-01

    The effect of attenuating the energy of a 10 MeV electron beam on Salmonella inactivation kinetics was investigated. No statistically significant differences were observed between the D10 values of either Salmonella 4,[5],12:i:- or a Salmonella cocktail (S. 4,[5],12:i:-, Salmonella Heidelberg, Salmonella Newport, Salmonella Typhimurium, Salmonella) when irradiated with either a non-attenuated 10 MeV eBeam or an attenuated 10 MeV eBeam (~2.9±0.22 MeV). The results show that attenuating the energy of a 10 MeV eBeam to achieve low doses does not affect the inactivation kinetics of Salmonella spp. when compared to direct 10 MeV eBeam irradiation.

  18. Analysis of atmospheric flow over a surface protrusion using the turbulence kinetic energy equation with reference to aeronautical operating systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, W.; Harper, W. L.

    1975-01-01

    Flow over surface obstructions can produce significantly large wind shears such that adverse flying conditions can occur for aeronautical systems (helicopters, STOL vehicles, etc.). Atmospheric flow fields resulting from a semi-elliptical surface obstruction in an otherwise horizontally homogeneous statistically stationary flow are modelled with the boundary-layer/Boussinesq-approximation of the governing equation of fluid mechanics. The turbulence kinetic energy equation is used to determine the dissipative effects of turbulent shear on the mean flow. Iso-lines of turbulence kinetic energy and turbulence intensity are plotted in the plane of the flow and highlight regions of high turbulence intensity in the stagnation zone and sharp gradients in intensity along the transition from adverse to favourable pressure gradient. Discussion of the effects of the disturbed wind field in CTOL and STOL aircraft flight path and obstruction clearance standards is given. The results indicate that closer inspection of these presently recommended standards as influenced by wind over irregular terrains is required.

  19. Mechanism of kinetic energy transfer in homogeneous bidisperse gas-solid flow and its implications for segregation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrabadi, Mohammad; Subramaniam, Shankar

    2017-02-01

    Most gas-solid flows encountered in nature and industrial applications are polydisperse, and the segregation or mixing of particle classes in polydisperse gas-solid flows is a phenomenon of great practical importance. A statistically homogeneous gas-solid flow with a bidisperse distribution (in size or density) of particles is a canonical representation of polydisperse flows. A key feature that distinguishes the bidisperse flow from its monodisperse counterpart is the exchange of momentum and kinetic energy between the particle classes due to collisions, which are important for applications outside the very dilute regime. The average exchange of linear momentum between particle classes due to collisions occurs through the particle-particle drag term. The conservation equations for average momentum corresponding to each particle class can be used to deduce the average slip velocity between the particle size and density classes, which is the signature of particle segregation. In this canonical problem, the steady value of particle mean slip velocity results from a balance between three terms, each in turn involving the body force or the mean fluid pressure gradient, the gas-particle drag, and the particle-particle drag. The particle-particle drag depends on the particle velocity fluctuations in each class [Louge, M. Y. et al., "The role of particle collisions in pneumatic transport," J. Fluid Mech. 231, 345-359 (1991)], thereby coupling the mean and second-moment equations. For monodisperse gas-solid flows the transfer of kinetic energy from the mean to second-moment equations was explained by Subramaniam and co-workers who proposed the conservation of interphase turbulent kinetic energy transfer principle [Xu, Y. and Subramaniam, S., "Consistent modeling of interphase turbulent kinetic energy transfer in particle-laden turbulent flows," Phys. Fluids 19(8), 085101 (2007)], and this was subsequently verified by particle-resolved direct numerical simulation [Mehrabadi

  20. Incipient manifestation of the shell structure of atoms within the WDA model for the exchange and kinetic energy density functionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glossman, M. D.; Balbás, L. C.; Alonso, J. A.

    1995-07-01

    The radial electron density obtained for all the atoms of the main groups of the Periodic Table through the solution of the Euler equation associated with the nonlocal weighted density approximation (WDA) for the exchange and kinetic energy density functionals shows an incipient shell structure which is absent in other calculations using kinetic energy functionals based on the electronic density. The WDA radial density reveals two local maxima and the position of the first maximum correlates with the position of the maximum for the 1s orbital in the Hartree-Fock approximation. The cusp condition at the nucleus is fulfilled accurately. Also we study the density-based electron localization function (DELF) as a complementary procedure for the visualization of shells.

  1. Effect of canopy thickness and canopy saturation on the amount and kinetic energy of throughfall: An experimental approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanko, Kazuki; Onda, Yuichi; Ito, Akane; Moriwaki, Hiromu

    2008-03-01

    To investigate how canopy thickness and canopy saturation affect the amount and kinetic energy of throughfall, we conducted indoor experiments using a 9.8-m-tall transplanted Japanese cypress (Chamaecyparis obtusa) and a large-scale rainfall simulator with spray nozzles at a height of 16 m. The amount of throughfall and raindrop sizes and velocities were measured at twenty-four points under four canopy structures generated by staged branch pruning. Decreasing the canopy thickness resulted in increases of the initial throughfall amount, volume proportion of large throughfall drops, the number of drops with high velocities, and throughfall kinetic energy. Compared to a saturated canopy, a canopy undergoing wetting had lower throughfall amounts and volume proportion of large drops, but higher mean drop velocity. Canopy thickness affected throughfall generation by affecting the processes of canopy saturation and drop generation within the canopy.

  2. General formulation of rovibrational kinetic energy operators and matrix elements in internal bond-angle coordinates using factorized Jacobians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopp, Wassja A.; Leonhard, Kai

    2016-12-01

    We show how inverse metric tensors and rovibrational kinetic energy operators in terms of internal bond-angle coordinates can be obtained analytically following a factorization of the Jacobian worked out by Frederick and Woywod. The structure of these Jacobians is exploited in two ways: On one hand, the elements of the metric tensor as well as its determinant all have the form ∑rmsin (αn) cos (βo) . This form can be preserved by working with the adjugate metric tensor that can be obtained without divisions. On the other hand, the adjugate can be obtained with less effort by exploiting the lower triangular structure of the Jacobians. Together with a suitable choice of the wavefunction, we avoid singularities and show how to obtain analytical expressions for the rovibrational kinetic energy matrix elements.

  3. The Temporal and Spatial Evolution of Momentum, Kinetic Energy and Force in Tsunami Waves during Breaking and Inundation

    CERN Document Server

    Marivela, Roberto; Synolakis, Costas

    2016-01-01

    A plethora of studies in the past decade describe tsunami hazards and study their evolution from the source to the target coastline, but mainly focus on coastal inundation and maximum runup. Nonetheless, anecdotal reports from eyewitnesses, photographs and videos suggest counterintuitive flow dynamics, for example rapid initial acceleration when the wave first strikes the initial shoreline. Further, the details of the flow field at or within tens of meters of the shoreline are exquisitely important in determining damage to structures and evacuation times. Based on a set of three-dimensional numerical simulations using solitary waves as a model, we show the spatial-temporal distribution of the flow momentum, kinetic energy and force during the breaking process. We infer that the flow reaches its highest destructive capacity not when flow momentum or kinetic energy reach their maxima, but when flow force reaches its. This occurs in the initial shoreline environment, which needs to be considered in nearshore str...

  4. Non-isothermal crystallization kinetics of polyethylene–clay nanocomposites prepared by high-energy ball milling

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Maryam Abareshi; Seyed Mojtaba Zebarjad; Elaheh K Goharshadi

    2014-08-01

    Non-isothermal crystallization kinetics of pure medium density polyethylene (MDPE) and MDPE–clay nanocomposites have been investigated by differential scanning calorimeter. The modified Avrami, Ozawa, Liu and Ziabicki equations have been applied to describe non-isothermal crystallization process. The results of Avrami analysis showed a very complicated crystallization mechanism. Although, Ozawa equation failed to provide an adequate description for non-isothermal crystallization process, Liu equation could describe it well. The data showed the crystallization rate of MDPE and nanocomposites raises with increasing cooling rate and the crystallization rate of nanocomposite is faster than that of MDPE at a given cooling rate. Ziabicki’s kinetic crystallizability index showed that clay can increase the ability of MDPE to crystallize, when it is cooled at unit cooling rate. The activation energy of samples has been evaluated by Kissinger method. The results showed that the activation energy of nanocomposite was lower than that of MDPE.

  5. Kinetic Energy Driven Superconductivity in the Electron Doped Cobaltate NaxCoO2 · yH2O

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Bin; LIANG Ying; FENG Shi-Ping; CHEN Wei-Yeu

    2005-01-01

    Within the charge-spin separation fermion-spin theory, we show that the mechanism of superconductivity in the electron doped cobaltate Nax CoO2. yH2 O is ascribed to its kinetic energy. The dressed fermions interact occurring directly through the kinetic energy by exchanging magnetic excitations. This interaction leads to a net attractive force between dressed fermions, then the electron Cooper pairs originating from the dressed fermion pairing state are due to the charge-spin recombination, and their condensation reveals the superconducting ground state. The superconducting transition temperature is identical to the dressed fermion pair transition temperature, and is suppressed to a lower temperature due to the strong magnetic frustration. The optimal superconducting transition temperature occurs in the electron doping concentration δ≈ 0.29, and then decreases for both underdoped and overdoped regimes, in qualitative agreement with the experimental results.

  6. Stereodynamical Origin of Anti-Arrhenius Kinetics: Negative Activation Energy and Roaming for a Four-Atom Reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coutinho, Nayara D; Silva, Valter H C; de Oliveira, Heibbe C B; Camargo, Ademir J; Mundim, Kleber C; Aquilanti, Vincenzo

    2015-05-07

    The OH + HBr → H2O + Br reaction, prototypical of halogen-atom liberating processes relevant to mechanisms for atmospheric ozone destruction, attracted frequent attention of experimental chemical kinetics: the nature of the unusual reactivity drop from low to high temperatures eluded a variety of theoretical efforts, ranking this one among the most studied four-atom reactions. Here, inspired by oriented molecular-beams experiments, we develop a first-principles stereodynamical approach. Thermalized sets of trajectories, evolving on a multidimensional potential energy surface quantum mechanically generated on-the-fly, provide a map of most visited regions at each temperature. Visualizations of rearrangements of bonds along trajectories and of the role of specific angles of reactants' mutual approach elucidate the mechanistic change from the low kinetic energy regime (where incident reactants reorient to find the propitious alignment leading to reaction) to high temperature (where speed hinders adjustment of directionality and roaming delays reactivity).

  7. Exact quantum mechanical vibration-rotation kinetic energy operator of four-particle system in various coordinates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈光巨; 刘若庄

    1996-01-01

    The vibration-rotational kinetic energy operators of four-particle system in various coordinates are derived using a new and simple angular momentum method. The operators are respectively suitable for studying the systems described by scattering coordinate, valence coordinate, Radau coordinate, Radau/Jacobi and Jacobi/valence hybrid coordinates and so on. Certain properties of these operators and their possible applications are discussed.

  8. On turbulent kinetic energy production and dissipation in dilute polymer solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liberzon, A.; Guala, M.; Kinzelbach, W.; Tsinober, A.

    2006-12-01

    Drag reduction by dilute polymer solutions is the most recognized phenomenon in wall-bounded turbulent flows, which is associated with large scales (e.g., velocity scales) in spite of a consensus that polymers act mainly on much smaller scales of velocity derivatives. We demonstrate that drag reduction is only one sort of polymers' effect on a turbulent flow and show how turbulent velocity and velocity derivatives are altered in the presence of dilute polymers, irrespective of drag reduction phenomena. This is an experimental study on the interaction of dilute polymers with a complex three-dimensional turbulent flow with small mean velocity gradients. Lagrangian data (e.g., velocities and velocity gradients) of flow tracers were obtained by using three-dimensional particle tracking velocimetry in an observational volume in the turbulent bulk region, far from the boundaries. The focus is on aspects related to the turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) production, -⟨uiuj⟩Sij (ui is the fluctuating velocity, ⟨uiuj⟩ is the Reynolds stress tensor, and Sij is the mean rate-of-strain tensor), such as an anisotropy of Reynolds stresses and the alignment of the velocity vector field with respect to the eigenframe of Sij, among others. We base our study on the comparison of turbulent quantities in flows of water and of dilute polymer solution, forced in two distinct ways: frictional forcing by smooth rotating disks and inertial forcing by disks with baffles. The comparison of the results from the water and from the dilute polymer solution flows allows a critical examination of the influence of polymers on the TKE production, viscous dissipation, and the related turbulent properties. We conclude with (i) quantification of the direct effect of polymers on the small scales of velocity derivatives, (ii) evidence of an additional dissipation mechanism by the polymers, which is the main reason for the strong inhibition of the viscous dissipation, 2νs2, in a turbulent bulk, (iii

  9. Analysis of Self Similar Scaling in Kinetic and Magnetic Energy Density as a Function of Distance From Sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, A.; Coplan, M. A.

    2009-12-01

    We analyze solar wind and interplanetary magnetic field data to study scaling properties of kinetic and magnetic energy density as a function of solar cycle and distance from the sun. In his original theory on turbulence, Kolmogorov predicted that in the inertial range the fluctuations in velocity differences should be self-similar. Analysis of solar wind data showed this not to be the case. On the other hand B. Hnat et.al.(Geophys. Res. Lett., 29 (10), 1446, 2002) and J.J Podesta (J. Geophys. Res., 111, A09105, 2006) showed that fluctuations in kinetic and magnetic energy density are approximately self-similar. We extend this analysis using data from the SWE and MFI experiments on the WIND spacecraft (at 1AU) during solar minimum (2006) and solar maximum (2001) and VHM/FGM experiment on the Ulysses spacecraft (1AU to 5AU). We calculate the cumulative distribution function (CDF) of the time delayed differences in kinetic and magnetic energy density and present a method through which the scaling exponent can be reliably calculated from the CDFs, instead of using structure functions which are very sensitive to large fluctuations. We compare the scaling exponents derived from the CDFs to the ones calculated from structure functions and study the rescaling properties of CDFs.

  10. On the relationship of the earth radiation budget to the variability of atmospheric available potential and kinetic energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randel, David L.; Vonder Haar, Thomas H.

    1990-01-01

    The zonal and eddy kinetics energies and available potential energies are examined for both the Northern and the Southern Hemispheres, using a data set produced by 8 years of continuous simultaneous observations of the circulation parameters and measurements of the earth radiation budget (ERB) from the Nimbus-7 ERB experiment. The relationships between the seasonal cycles in ERB and those of the energetics are obtained, showing that the solar annual cycle accounts for most of the seasonal variability. It was found that the ERB midlatitude gradients of the net balance and the outgoing radiation lead the annual cycle of the energetics by 2-3 weeks.

  11. Mean kinetic energy transport and event classification in a model wind turbine array versus an array of porous disks: Energy budget and octant analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camp, Elizabeth H.; Cal, Raúl Bayoán

    2016-08-01

    An array of model rotating wind turbines is compared experimentally to an array of static porous disks in order to quantify the similarities and differences in the mean kinetic energy transport within the wakes produced in these two cases. Stereo particle image velocimetry measurements are done in a wind tunnel bracketing the center turbine in the fourth row of a 4 ×3 array of model turbines. Equivalent sets of rotors and porous disks are created by matching their respective induction factors. The primary difference in the mean velocity components is found in the spanwise mean velocity component, which is as much as 190% different between the rotor and disk case. Horizontal averages of mean kinetic energy transport terms in the region where rotation is most important show percent differences in the range 3%-41%, which decrease to 1%-6% at streamwise coordinates where rotation is less important. Octant analysis is performed on the most significant term related to vertical mean kinetic energy flux u'v' ¯U . The average percent difference between corresponding octants is as much as 68% different in the near wake and as much as 17% different in the far wake. Furthermore, octant analysis elucidates the three-dimensional nature of sweeps and ejections in the near wake of the rotor case. Together, these results imply that a stationary porous disk adequately represents the mean kinetic energy transport of a rotor in the far wake where rotation is less important, while significant discrepancies exist at streamwise locations where rotation is a key phenomenon. This comparison has implications in the use of an actuator disk to model the wind turbine rotor in computational simulations specifically for studies where Reynolds stresses, turbulence intensity, or interactions with the atmosphere are of interest.

  12. Heat and turbulent kinetic energy budgets for surface layer cooling induced by the passage of Hurricane Frances (2004)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Peisheng; Sanford, Thomas B.; Imberger, JöRg

    2009-12-01

    Heat and turbulent kinetic energy budgets of the ocean surface layer during the passage of Hurricane Frances were examined using a three-dimensional hydrodynamic model. In situ data obtained with the Electromagnetic-Autonomous Profiling Explorer (EM-APEX) floats were used to set up the initial conditions of the model simulation and to compare to the simulation results. The spatial heat budgets reveal that during the hurricane passage, not only the entrainment in the bottom of surface mixed layer but also the horizontal water advection were important factors determining the spatial pattern of sea surface temperature. At the free surface, the hurricane-brought precipitation contributed a negligible amount to the air-sea heat exchange, but the precipitation produced a negative buoyancy flux in the surface layer that overwhelmed the instability induced by the heat loss to the atmosphere. Integrated over the domain within 400 km of the hurricane eye on day 245.71 of 2004, the rate of heat anomaly in the surface water was estimated to be about 0.45 PW (1 PW = 1015 W), with about 20% (0.09 PW in total) of this was due to the heat exchange at the air-sea interface, and almost all the remainder (0.36 PW) was downward transported by oceanic vertical mixing. Shear production was the major source of turbulent kinetic energy amounting 88.5% of the source of turbulent kinetic energy, while the rest (11.5%) was attributed to the wind stirring at sea surface. The increase of ocean potential energy due to vertical mixing represented 7.3% of the energy deposited by wind stress.

  13. Development of the cycloidal propeller StECon as a new small hydropower plant for kinetic energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, J.; Jensen, J.; Wieland, J.; Lohr, W.; Metzger, J.; Stiller, H.-L.

    2016-11-01

    The StECon (Stiller Energy Converter) is a promising new small hydropower plant for kinetic energy. It is an invention of Mr. Hans-Ludwig Stiller and has several advantages compared to the technologies for the use of hydropower known for millennia. It runs completely submerged forwards and backwards, with horizontal or vertical axis and has a compact design by using a single or a double-sided planetary gear with optimum alignment to the flow direction. The possible applications include mobile and stationary tide and current generators as well as hybrid solutions, either as a generator or as a propulsion system. The high expectations have to be confirmed in a research project StEwaKorad at the University of Siegen. Aim of this research project is to investigate the performance and characteristics of the StECon as an energy converter for producing renewable energy from hydropower with low fall heights including sea currents.

  14. Turbulence Kinetic Energy budget during the afternoon transition – Part 2: A simple TKE model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Nilsson

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available A simple model for turbulence kinetic energy (TKE and the TKE budget is presented for sheared convective atmospheric conditions based on observations from the Boundary Layer Late Afternoon and Sunset Turbulence (BLLAST field campaign. It is based on an idealized mixed-layer approximation and a simplified near-surface TKE budget. In this model, the TKE is dependent on four budget terms (turbulent dissipation rate, buoyancy production, shear production and vertical transport of TKE and only requires measurements of three input available (near-surface buoyancy flux, boundary layer depth and wind speed at one height in the surface layer. This simple model is shown to reproduce some of the observed variations between the different studied days in terms of near-surface TKE and its decay during the afternoon transition reasonably well. It is subsequently used to systematically study the effects of buoyancy and shear on TKE evolution using idealized constant and time-varying winds during the afternoon transition. From this, we conclude that many different TKE decay rates are possible under time-varying winds and that generalizing the decay with simple scaling laws for near-surface TKE of the form tα may be questionable. The model's errors result from the exclusion of processes such as elevated shear production and horizontal advection. The model also produces an overly rapid decay of shear production with height. However, the most influential budget terms governing near-surface TKE in the observed sheared convective boundary layers are included, while only second order factors are neglected. Comparison between modeled and averaged observed estimates of dissipation rate illustrate that the overall behavior of the model is often quite reasonable. Therefore, we use the model to discuss the low turbulence conditions that form first in the upper parts of the boundary layer during the afternoon transition and are only apparent later near the surface. This

  15. Mineral solubility and free energy controls on microbial reaction kinetics: Application to contaminant transport in the subsurface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taillefert, Martial [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States); Van Cappellen, Philippe [Univ. of Waterloo, ON (Canada)

    2016-11-14

    Recent developments in the theoretical treatment of geomicrobial reaction processes have resulted in the formulation of kinetic models that directly link the rates of microbial respiration and growth to the corresponding thermodynamic driving forces. The overall objective of this project was to verify and calibrate these kinetic models for the microbial reduction of uranium(VI) in geochemical conditions that mimic as much as possible field conditions. The approach combined modeling of bacterial processes using new bioenergetic rate laws, laboratory experiments to determine the bioavailability of uranium during uranium bioreduction, evaluation of microbial growth yield under energy-limited conditions using bioreactor experiments, competition experiments between metabolic processes in environmentally relevant conditions, and model applications at the field scale. The new kinetic descriptions of microbial U(VI) and Fe(III) reduction should replace those currently used in reactive transport models that couple catabolic energy generation and growth of microbial populations to the rates of biogeochemical redox processes. The above work was carried out in collaboration between the groups of Taillefert (batch reactor experiments and reaction modeling) at Georgia Tech and Van Cappellen (retentostat experiments and reactive transport modeling) at University of Waterloo (Canada).

  16. The sum rule for dipolar absorptions and rotational kinetic energy of wate and some dipolar molecules in condensed phases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikawa, Shun-ichi; Yamazaki, Shuichi; Kimura, Masao

    1981-06-01

    Another form of the sum rule for dipolar absorptions has been derived by means of quantum statistics. The difference between this and usually used form results from a quantum effect on the molecular rotational motion. By the joint use of the two forms, average rotational kinetic energies of water molec in the liquid and solid phases and some dipolar molecules in solutions have been estimated. It has been shown that the average rotational kinetic energ larger than the value expected from the classical equipartition rule, with an increase in the hindering potential for the rotational motion of the mole The dipole moments of water molecules in liquid and solid water have been estimated. These are considerably smaller than the gas-phase value.

  17. Energy

    CERN Document Server

    Foland, Andrew Dean

    2007-01-01

    Energy is the central concept of physics. Unable to be created or destroyed but transformable from one form to another, energy ultimately determines what is and isn''t possible in our universe. This book gives readers an appreciation for the limits of energy and the quantities of energy in the world around them. This fascinating book explores the major forms of energy: kinetic, potential, electrical, chemical, thermal, and nuclear.

  18. Kinetic Modeling of Next-Generation High-Energy, High-Intensity Laser-Ion Accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albright, Brian James [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Yin, Lin [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Stark, David James [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-02-06

    One of the long-standing problems in the community is the question of how we can model “next-generation” laser-ion acceleration in a computationally tractable way. A new particle tracking capability in the LANL VPIC kinetic plasma modeling code has enabled us to solve this long-standing problem

  19. Kinetic energy and charge state effects in the X-ray emission of Mo surface induced by Xeq+(q=25,29) ions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    L-shell X-ray spectra of Mo surface induced by Xe25+ and Xe29+ were measured. The X-ray intensity was obtained in the kinetic energy range of the incident ions from 350 to 600 keV. The relationship of X-ray intensity with kinetic energy of the projec-tile and its charge state were studied,and the simple explanation was given.

  20. Altered Axial Skeletal Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    The axial skeleton is routinely examined in standard developmental toxicity bioassays and has proven to be sensitive to a wide variety of chemical agents. Dysmorphogenesis in the skull, vertebral column and ribs has been described in both human populations and in laboratory anima...

  1. Dissipative axial inflation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Notari, Alessio; Tywoniuk, Konrad

    2016-12-01

    We analyze in detail the background cosmological evolution of a scalar field coupled to a massless abelian gauge field through an axial term phi/fγ F ~F, such as in the case of an axion. Gauge fields in this case are known to experience tachyonic growth and therefore can backreact on the background as an effective dissipation into radiation energy density ρR, which can lead to inflation without the need of a flat potential. We analyze the system, for momenta k smaller than the cutoff fγ, including the backreaction numerically. We consider the evolution from a given static initial condition and explicitly show that, if fγ is smaller than the field excursion phi0 by about a factor of at least Script O (20), there is a friction effect which turns on before the field can fall down and which can then lead to a very long stage of inflation with a generic potential. In addition we find superimposed oscillations, which would get imprinted on any kind of perturbations, scalars and tensors. Such oscillations have a period of 4-5 efolds and an amplitude which is typically less than a few percent and decreases linearly with fγ. We also stress that the curvature perturbation on uniform density slices should be sensitive to slow-roll parameters related to ρR rather than dot phi2/2 and we discuss the existence of friction terms acting on the perturbations, although we postpone a calculation of the power spectrum and of non-gaussianity to future work and we simply define and compute suitable slow roll parameters. Finally we stress that this scenario may be realized in the axion case, if the coupling 1/fγ to U(1) (photons) is much larger than the coupling 1/fG to non-abelian gauge fields (gluons), since the latter sets the range of the potential and therefore the maximal allowed phi0~ fG.

  2. High order magnetic optics for high dynamic range proton radiography at a kinetic energy of 800 MeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sjue, S. K. L., E-mail: sjue@lanl.gov; Mariam, F. G.; Merrill, F. E.; Morris, C. L.; Saunders, A. [Physics Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

    2016-01-15

    Flash radiography with 800 MeV kinetic energy protons at Los Alamos National Laboratory is an important experimental tool for investigations of dynamic material behavior driven by high explosives or pulsed power. The extraction of quantitative information about density fields in a dynamic experiment from proton generated images requires a high fidelity model of the proton imaging process. It is shown that accurate calculations of the transmission through the magnetic lens system require terms beyond second order for protons far from the tune energy. The approach used integrates the correlated multiple Coulomb scattering distribution simultaneously over the collimator and the image plane. Comparison with a series of static calibration images demonstrates the model’s accurate reproduction of both the transmission and blur over a wide range of tune energies in an inverse identity lens that consists of four quadrupole electromagnets.

  3. Equilibria and kinetics for pH-dependent axial ligation of ethylester and methylester(aquo)cobaloximes with aromatic and aliphatic N-donor ligands and a molecular mechanistic study of the Co-C bond

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    J V Madhuri; V Malathi; S Satyanarayana

    2004-03-01

    Equilibrium constants are determined for the reaction of ethylester and methyl ester (aquo) cobaloximes with histamine, histidine, glycine and ethyl glycine ester as a function of pH at 25°C, using spectrophotometric technique. The functional dependence of p on the substitution rate of H2O varies with the p of the incoming ligand, establishing the existence of nucleophilic participation of the ligand in the transition state. This data is interpreted with the help of kinetic data where dissociation kinetic reactions were also studied as a function of pH. Binding and kinetic data were correlated based on the basicity, steric hindrance of the entering ligand and HSAB principle. To compare the rate constants of the entering ligands pH-independent second-order rate constants were calculated. The effect of incoming ligand on Co-C bond is studied using molecular mechanics.

  4. Product kinetic and internal energy distributions via velocity-aligned Doppler spectroscopy: Technical report, May 1985-January 1987

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wittig, C.

    1987-01-01

    We developed a method of sub-Doppler resolution spectroscopy that is useful for determining kinetic energy distributions. With 'conventional' Doppler spectroscopy, it is almost impossible to obtain an accurate distribution from a line profile, even with the highest resolution, except when the distribution is quite simple (e.g., a delta function). This is due to the lineshape deriving from velocity components along the wave-vector of the probe radiation, k/sub probe/. However, by choosing only those species whose velocities are essentially parallel (or antiparallel) to k/sub probe/, this handicap is overcome. Here, one obtains the kinetic energy distribution along k/sub probe/, and the resolution is limited only by our ability to reject species with velocity components perpendicular to k/sub probe/. This rejection is done by spatial and temporal discrimination, using counterpropagating, overlapped, pulsed photolysis and probe sources. At long delays, molecules are detected which are aligned with k/sub probe/. We call the method velocity-aligned Doppler spectroscopy (VADS). We have perused several cases involving photodissociation of small molecules, in each case detecting H-atoms using sequential 2-photon ionization via Lyman-..cap alpha... We discern structure in the kinetic energy distribution which is attributed to internal excitation of the 'other' fragment, and resolution is limited by the dye laser bandwidth. In the case of HBr, we resolve the Br spin-orbit states, and with H/sub 2/S, we resolve the SH vibrational levels. 38 refs., 7 figs.

  5. Controlling drug delivery kinetics from mesoporous titania thin films by pore size and surface energy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karlsson J

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Johan Karlsson, Saba Atefyekta, Martin Andersson Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden Abstract: The osseointegration capacity of bone-anchoring implants can be improved by the use of drugs that are administrated by an inbuilt drug delivery system. However, to attain superior control of drug delivery and to have the ability to administer drugs of varying size, including proteins, further material development of drug carriers is needed. Mesoporous materials have shown great potential in drug delivery applications to provide and maintain a drug concentration within the therapeutic window for the desired period of time. Moreover, drug delivery from coatings consisting of mesoporous titania has shown to be promising to improve healing of bone-anchoring implants. Here we report on how the delivery of an osteoporosis drug, alendronate, can be controlled by altering pore size and surface energy of mesoporous titania thin films. The pore size was varied from 3.4 nm to 7.2 nm by the use of different structure-directing templates and addition of a swelling agent. The surface energy was also altered by grafting dimethylsilane to the pore walls. The drug uptake and release profiles were monitored in situ using quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D and it was shown that both pore size and surface energy had a profound effect on both the adsorption and release kinetics of alendronate. The QCM-D data provided evidence that the drug delivery from mesoporous titania films is controlled by a binding–diffusion mechanism. The yielded knowledge of release kinetics is crucial in order to improve the in vivo tissue response associated to therapeutic treatments. Keywords: mesoporous titania, controlled drug delivery, release kinetics, alendronate, QCM-D

  6. Kinetic energy dependence of carrier diffusion in a GaAs epilayer studied by wavelength selective PL imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, S.; Su, L. Q.; Kon, J.; Gfroerer, T.; Wanlass, M. W.; Zhang, Y.

    2017-05-01

    Photoluminescence (PL) imaging has been shown to be an efficient technique for investigating carrier diffusion in semiconductors. In the past, the measurement was typically carried out by measuring at one wavelength (e.g., at the band gap) or simply the whole emission band. At room temperature in a semiconductor like GaAs, the band-to-band PL emission may occur in a spectral range over 200 meV, vastly exceeding the average thermal energy of about 26 meV. To investigate the potential dependence of the carrier diffusion on the carrier kinetic energy, we performed wavelength selective PL imaging on a GaAs double hetero-structure in a spectral range from about 70 meV above to 50 meV below the bandgap, extracting the carrier diffusion lengths at different PL wavelengths by fitting the imaging data to a theoretical model. The results clearly show that the locally generated carriers of different kinetic energies mostly diffuse together, maintaining the same thermal distribution throughout the diffusion process. Potential effects related to carrier density, self-absorption, lateral wave-guiding, and local heating are also discussed.

  7. Ag diffusion in SiC high-energy grain boundaries: kinetic Monte Carlo study with first-principle calculations

    CERN Document Server

    Ko, Hyunseok; Szlufarska, Izabela; Morgan, Dane

    2016-01-01

    The diffusion of silver (Ag) impurities in high energy grain boundaries (HEGBs) of cubic (3C) silicon carbide (SiC) is studied using an ab initio based kinetic Monte Carlo (kMC) model. This study assesses the hypothesis that the HEGB diffusion is responsible for Ag release in Tristructural-Isotropic fuel particles, and provides a specific example to increase understanding of impurity diffusion in highly disordered grain boundaries. The HEGB environment was modeled by an amorphous SiC. The structure and stability of Ag defects were calculated using density functional theory code. The defect energetics suggested that the fastest diffusion takes place via an interstitial mechanism in a-SiC. The formation energy of Ag interstitials and the kinetic resolved activation energies between them were well approximated with Gaussian distributions that were then sampled in the kMC. The diffusion of Ag was simulated with the effective medium model using kMC. At 1200-1600C, Ag in a HEGB is predicted to exhibit an Arrhenius ...

  8. Albite feldspar dissolution kinetics as a function of the Gibbs free energy at high pCO_2

    CERN Document Server

    Hellmann, Roland; Tisserand, Delphine; Renard, François

    2008-01-01

    We are currently measuring the dissolution kinetics of albite feldspar at 100 deg C in the presence of high levels of dissolved CO_2 (pCO_2 = 9 MPa) as a function of the saturation state of the feldspar (Gibbs free energy of reaction, \\Delta G). The experiments are conducted using a flow through reactor, thereby allowing the dissolution reactions to occur at a fixed pH and at constant, but variable saturation states. Preliminary results indicate that at far-from-equilibrium conditions, the dissolution kinetics of albite are defined by a rate plateau, with R \\approx 5.0 x 10^{-10} mol m^{-2} s^{-1} at -70 -40 kJ mol^{-1}, the rates decrease sharply, revealing a strong inverse relation between the dissolution rate and free energy. Based on the experiments carried out to date, the dissolution rate-free energy data correspond to a highly non-linear and sigmoidal relation, in accord with recent studies.

  9. Thermogravimetric and Kinetic Analysis of Melon (Citrullus colocynthis L.) Seed Husk Using the Distributed Activation Energy Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyakuma, Bemgba Bevan

    2015-12-01

    This study seeks to characterize the thermochemical fuel properties of melon seed husk (MSH) as a potential biomass feedstock for clean energy and power generation. It examined the ultimate analysis, proximate analysis, FTIR spectroscopy and thermal decomposition of MSH. Thermogravimetric (TG) analysis was examined at 5, 10, 20 °C/min from 30-800 °C under nitrogen atmosphere. Subsequently, the Distributed Activation Energy Model (DAEM) was applied to determine the activation energy, E, and frequency factor, A. The results revealed that thermal decomposition of MSH occurs in three (3) stages; drying (30-150 °C), devolatization (150-400 °C) and char degradation (400-800 °C). Kinetic analysis revealed that the E values fluctuated from 145.44-300 kJ/mol (Average E = 193 kJ/mol) while A ranged from 2.64 × 1010 to 9.18 × 1020 min-1 (Average E = 9.18 × 1019 min-1) highlighting the complexity of MSH pyrolysis. The fuel characterization and kinetics of MSH showed it is an environmentally friendly solid biofuel for future thermal biomass conversion.

  10. Kinetic energy of Throughfall in subtropical forests of SE China - effects of tree canopy structure, functional traits, and biodiversity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Geißler

    Full Text Available Throughfall kinetic energy (TKE plays an important role in soil erosion in forests. We studied TKE as a function of biodiversity, functional diversity as well as structural stand variables in a secondary subtropical broad-leaved forest in the Gutianshan National Nature Reserve (GNNR in south-east China, a biodiversity hotspot in the northern hemisphere with more than 250 woody species present. Using a mixed model approach we could identify significant effects of all these variables on TKE: TKE increased with rarefied tree species richness and decreased with increasing proportion of needle-leaved species and increasing leaf area index (LAI. Furthermore, for average rainfall amounts TKE was decreasing with tree canopy height whereas for high rainfall amounts this was not the case. The spatial pattern of throughfall was stable across several rain events. The temporal variation of TKE decreased with rainfall intensity and increased with tree diversity. Our results show that more diverse forest stands over the season have to cope with higher cumulative raindrop energy than less diverse stands. However, the kinetic energy (KE of one single raindrop is less predictable in diverse stands since the variability in KE is higher. This paper is the first to contribute to the understanding of the ecosystem function of soil erosion prevention in diverse subtropical forests.

  11. Thermogravimetric and Kinetic Analysis of Melon (Citrullus colocynthis L. Seed Husk Using the Distributed Activation Energy Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nyakuma Bemgba Bevan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This study seeks to characterize the thermochemical fuel properties of melon seed husk (MSH as a potential biomass feedstock for clean energy and power generation. It examined the ultimate analysis, proximate analysis, FTIR spectroscopy and thermal decomposition of MSH. Thermogravimetric (TG analysis was examined at 5, 10, 20 °C/min from 30-800 °C under nitrogen atmosphere. Subsequently, the Distributed Activation Energy Model (DAEM was applied to determine the activation energy, E, and frequency factor, A. The results revealed that thermal decomposition of MSH occurs in three (3 stages; drying (30-150 °C, devolatization (150-400 °C and char degradation (400-800 °C. Kinetic analysis revealed that the E values fluctuated from 145.44-300 kJ/mol (Average E = 193 kJ/mol while A ranged from 2.64 × 1010 to 9.18 × 1020 min-1 (Average E = 9.18 × 1019 min-1 highlighting the complexity of MSH pyrolysis. The fuel characterization and kinetics of MSH showed it is an environmentally friendly solid biofuel for future thermal biomass conversion.

  12. The virial theorem and the kinetic energy of particles of a macroscopic system in the general field concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedosin, Sergey G.

    2017-03-01

    The virial theorem is considered for a system of randomly moving particles that are tightly bound to each other by the gravitational and electromagnetic fields, acceleration field and pressure field. The kinetic energy of the particles of this system is estimated by three methods, and the ratio of the kinetic energy to the absolute value of the energy of forces, binding the particles, is determined, which is approximately equal to 0.6. For simple systems in classical mechanics, this ratio equals 0.5. The difference between these ratios arises by the consideration of the pressure field and acceleration field inside the bodies, which make additional contribution to the acceleration of the particles. It is found that the total time derivative of the system's virial is not equal to zero, as is assumed in classical mechanics for systems with potential fields. This is due to the fact that although the partial time derivative of the virial for stationary systems tends to zero, but in real bodies the virial also depends on the coordinates and the convective derivative of the virial, as part of the total time derivative inside the body, is not equal to zero. It is shown that the convective derivative is also necessary for correct description of the equations of motion of particles.

  13. Current-voltage and kinetic energy flux relations for relativistic field-aligned acceleration of auroral electrons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. W. H. Cowley

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Recent spectroscopic observations of Jupiter's "main oval" auroras indicate that the primary auroral electron beam is routinely accelerated to energies of ~100 keV, and sometimes to several hundred keV, thus approaching the relativistic regime. This suggests the need to re-examine the classic non-relativistic theory of auroral electron acceleration by field-aligned electric fields first derived by Knight (1973, and to extend it to cover relativistic situations. In this paper we examine this problem for the case in which the source population is an isotropic Maxwellian, as also assumed by Knight, and derive exact analytic expressions for the field-aligned current density (number flux and kinetic energy flux of the accelerated population, for arbitrary initial electron temperature, acceleration potential, and field strength beneath the acceleration region. We examine the limiting behaviours of these expressions, their regimes of validity, and their implications for auroral acceleration in planetary magnetospheres (and like astrophysical systems. In particular, we show that for relativistic accelerating potentials, the current density increases as the square of the minimum potential, rather than linearly as in the non-relativistic regime, while the kinetic energy flux then increases as the cube of the potential, rather than as the square.

  14. Observational Constraints on Purely Kinetic/c-Essence Dark Energy Models

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Rong-Jia; GAO Xiang-Ting

    2009-01-01

    We consider constraints on purely kinetic k-essence models from the latest observational data (including 182 gold SNIa data,the shift parameter,and the acoustic scale).We find the best-fit values of the parameters are Ωm = 0.37 ±0.01 and κo = 0.064 ± 0.013 at 68.3% confidence level.The phase transition from deceleration to acceleration is found to occur at redshift zq=0~0.48-0.52 in 68.3% confidence level limits.By applying modelcomparison statistics (F-test,AICc,and BIC),we find that the purely kinetic k-essence scenario is favored over the A CDM model by the combined data.These results are also confirmed by combined data 307 SNIa + R + la.

  15. Bond energies in polyunsaturated acids and kinetics of co-oxidation of protiated and deuterated acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrianova, Z. S.; Breslavskaya, N. N.; Pliss, E. M.; Buchachenko, A. L.

    2016-10-01

    A computational program specially designed to analyze co-oxidation of substances in mixtures is suggested. The rigorous kinetic scheme of 32 reactions describing co-oxidation of isotope differing polyunsaturated fatty acids was computed to enlighten experimentally detected enormously large H/D isotope effects. The latter were shown to depend on the kinetic chain length and exhibit two extreme regimes of short and long chains which characterize isotope effects on the initiation and propagation chain reactions of hydrogen (deuterium) atom abstraction. No protective effect of deuterated polyunsaturated acids on the oxidation of protiated acids was detected. Protective effect of the deuterated compounds on the biologically important processes seems to be induced by the low yield of products formed in the chain termination reactions due to the low rate of initiation by deuterated compounds.

  16. The dp-elastic cross section measurement at the deuteron kinetic energy of 2.5 GeV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rustamov A.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available New results on the differential cross section in deuteron-proton elastic scattering are obtained at the deuteron kinetic energy of 2.5 GeV with the HADES spectrometer. The angular range of 69° – 125° in the center of mass system is covered. The obtained results are compared with the relativistic multiple scattering model calculation using the CD-Bonn deuteron wave function. The data at fixed scattering angles in the c.m. are in qualitative agreement with the constituent counting rules prediction.

  17. Improved energy kinetics following high protein diet in McArdle's syndrome. A 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, K E; Jakobsen, J; Thomsen, C;

    1990-01-01

    A patient with McArdle's syndrome was examined using bicycle ergometry and 31P NMR spectroscopy during exercise. The patients working capacity was approximately half the expected capacity of controls. Muscle energy kinetics improved significantly during intravenous glucose infusion and after 6...... weeks of high protein diet. During intravenous infusion of amino acids, no changes in working capacity could be detected. No decrease was seen in intracellular muscle pH during aerobic exercise. A significant decrease in muscle pH during aerobic exercise was detected in all controls....

  18. Frequency Activated Fast Power Reserve for Wind Power Plant Delivered from Stored Kinetic Energy in the Wind Turbine Inertia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knüppel, Thyge; Thuring, P.; Kumar, S

    2011-01-01

    With increased penetration of converter interfaced generation, synchronous generators may start to be displaced to keep the overall power balance. As a consequence the resulting inertia in the system may decrease and make the power system more exposed to frequency excursions. Here, a control...... is proposed that delivers a short-term power reserve from the kinetic energy in the wind turbine (WT) inertia, while considering the inherent characteristics of a wind power plant. The aim is to contribute with a fast power reserve to stabilize the frequency drop during large and sudden production deficits...

  19. One method of describing the transfer of energy of the kinetic degrees of freedom to the electronic states of molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, V. N.

    1996-09-01

    An analysis is made of the process of transferring the kinetic energy of highly excited vibrational terms of a molecule to an electronic state of one of its constituent atoms. This is done by utilizing a wave equation for the effective wave functions of the atom, corresponding to mixed states, in which the velocity of this atom relative to the neighboring atoms in the molecule enters as a parameter. An expression is found for the excitation probability in the case of a hydroge-like atom in the resonant approximation.

  20. Altered Right Ventricular Kinetic Energy Work Density and Viscous Energy Dissipation in Patients with Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension: A Pilot Study Using 4D Flow MRI.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Q Joyce Han

    Full Text Available Right ventricular (RV function has increasingly being recognized as an important predictor for morbidity and mortality in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH. The increased RV after-load increase RV work in PAH. We used time-resolved 3D phase contrast MRI (4D flow MRI to derive RV kinetic energy (KE work density and energy loss in the pulmonary artery (PA to better characterize RV work in PAH patients.4D flow and standard cardiac cine images were obtained in ten functional class I/II patients with PAH and nine healthy subjects. For each individual, we calculated the RV KE work density and the amount of viscous dissipation in the PA.PAH patients had alterations in flow patterns in both the RV and the PA compared to healthy subjects. PAH subjects had significantly higher RV KE work density than healthy subjects (94.7±33.7 mJ/mL vs. 61.7±14.8 mJ/mL, p = 0.007 as well as a much greater percent PA energy loss (21.1±6.4% vs. 2.2±1.3%, p = 0.0001 throughout the cardiac cycle. RV KE work density and percent PA energy loss had mild and moderate correlations with RV ejection fraction.This study has quantified two kinetic energy metrics to assess RV function using 4D flow. RV KE work density and PA viscous energy loss not only distinguished healthy subjects from patients, but also provided distinction amongst PAH patients. These metrics hold promise as imaging markers for RV function.

  1. An Unbroken Axial-Vector Current Conservation Law

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharafiddinov, Rasulkhozha S.

    2016-04-01

    The mass, energy and momentum of the neutrino of a true flavor have an axial-vector nature. As a consequence, the left-handed truly neutral neutrino in an axial-vector field of emission can be converted into a right-handed one and vice versa. This predicts the unidenticality of masses, energies and momenta of neutrinos of the different components. Recognizing such a difference in masses, energies, momenta and accepting that the left-handed axial-vector neutrino and the right-handed antineutrino of true neutrality refer to long-lived C-odd leptons, and the right-handed truly neutral neutrino and the left-handed axial-vector antineutrino are of short-lived fermions of C-oddity, we would write a new CP-even Dirac equation taking into account the flavor symmetrical axial-vector mass, energy and momentum matrices. Their presence explains the spontaneous mirror symmetry violation, confirming that an axial-vector current conservation law has never violated. They reflect the availability of a mirror Minkowski space in which a neutrino is characterized by left as well as by right space-time coordinates. Therefore, it is not surprising that whatever the main purposes experiments about a quasielastic axial-vector mass say in favor of an axial-vector mirror Minkowski space-time.

  2. The effect of vortex merging and non-merging on the transfer of modal turbulent kinetic energy content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ground, Cody; Vergine, Fabrizio; Maddalena, Luca

    2016-08-01

    A defining feature of the turbulent free shear layer is that its growth is hindered by compressibility effects, thus limiting its potential to sufficiently mix the injected fuel and surrounding airstream at the supersonic Mach numbers intrinsic to the combustor of air-breathing hypersonic vehicles. The introduction of streamwise vorticity is often proposed in an attempt to counteract these undesired effects. This fact makes the strategy of introducing multiple streamwise vortices and imposing upon them certain modes of mutual interaction in order to potentially enhance mixing an intriguing concept. However, many underlying fundamental characteristics of the flowfields in the presence such interactions are not yet well understood; therefore, the fundamental physics of these flowfields should be independently investigated before the explicit mixing performance is characterized. In this work, experimental measurements are taken with the stereoscopic particle image velocimetry technique on two specifically targeted modes of vortex interaction—the merging and non-merging of two corotating vortices. The fluctuating velocity fields are analyzed utilizing the proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) in order to identify the content, organization, and distribution of the modal turbulent kinetic energy content of the fluctuating velocity eigenmodes. The effects of the two modes of vortex interaction are revealed by the POD analysis which shows distinct differences in the modal features of the two cases. When comparing the low-order eigenmodes of the two cases, the size of the structures contained within the first ten modes is seen to increase as the flow progresses downstream for the merging case, whereas the opposite is true for the non-merging case. Additionally, the relative modal energy contribution of the first ten eigenmodes increases as the vortices evolve downstream for the merging case, whereas in the non-merging case the relative modal energy contribution decreases

  3. Field ionization of free helium atoms: Correlation between the kinetic energy of ionized atoms and probability of their field ionization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piskur, J.; Borg, L. [Institute of Experimental Physics, Graz University of Technology, Petersgasse 16, 8010 Graz (Austria); Stupnik, A.; Leisch, M. [Institute of Solid State Physics, Graz University of Technology, Petersgasse 16, 8010 Graz (Austria); Ernst, W.E. [Institute of Experimental Physics, Graz University of Technology, Petersgasse 16, 8010 Graz (Austria); Holst, B. [Institute of Experimental Physics, Graz University of Technology, Petersgasse 16, 8010 Graz (Austria)], E-mail: bodil@cantab.net

    2008-05-15

    In this paper the correlation between the kinetic energy of helium atoms and the probability of field ionization is investigated by exploiting the narrow velocity distribution of supersonic molecular beams. Field ionization measurements were carried out on supersonic helium beams at 298 K and 95 K corresponding to energies of about 65 meV and 20 meV, respectively, for the individual atoms. The field ionization was performed with a tungsten tip, radius of curvature 12 nm, kept at room temperature. The ionization probability was found to increase by about a factor 10 when the beam was cooled from 298 K to 95 K. The results presented in this paper are of importance for improving the understanding of field ionization and for the development of a new detector for helium and other molecular beams.

  4. Field ionization of free helium atoms: Correlation between the kinetic energy of ionized atoms and probability of their field ionization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piskur, J.; Borg, L.; Stupnik, A.; Leisch, M.; Ernst, W. E.; Holst, B.

    2008-05-01

    In this paper the correlation between the kinetic energy of helium atoms and the probability of field ionization is investigated by exploiting the narrow velocity distribution of supersonic molecular beams. Field ionization measurements were carried out on supersonic helium beams at 298 K and 95 K corresponding to energies of about 65 meV and 20 meV, respectively, for the individual atoms. The field ionization was performed with a tungsten tip, radius of curvature 12 nm, kept at room temperature. The ionization probability was found to increase by about a factor 10 when the beam was cooled from 298 K to 95 K. The results presented in this paper are of importance for improving the understanding of field ionization and for the development of a new detector for helium and other molecular beams.

  5. Interplay of waves and eddies in rotating stratified turbulence and the link with kinetic-potential energy partition

    CERN Document Server

    Marino, Raffaele; Herbert, Corentin; Pouquet, Annick

    2015-01-01

    The interplay between waves and eddies in stably stratified rotating flows is investigated by means of world-class direct numerical simulations using up to $3072^3$ grid points. Strikingly, we find that the shift from vortex to wave dominated dynamics occurs at a wavenumber $k_R$ which does not depend on Reynolds number, suggesting that partition of energy between wave and vortical modes is not sensitive to the development of turbulence at the smaller scales. We also show that $k_R$ is comparable to the wavenumber at which exchanges between kinetic and potential modes stabilize at close to equipartition, emphasizing the role of potential energy, as conjectured in the atmosphere and the oceans. Moreover, $k_R$ varies as the inverse of the Froude number as explained by the scaling prediction proposed, consistent with recent observations and modeling of the Mesosphere-Lower Thermosphere and of the ocean.

  6. Fundamentally excited flow past a surface-mounted rib. Part II: Kinetic energy budget details

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P K Panigrahi

    2001-10-01

    This paper presents the detailed turbulent kinetic energy budget and higher order statistics of flow behind a surface-mounted rib with and without superimposed acoustic excitation. Pattern recognition technique is used to determine the large-scale structure magnitude. It is observed that most of the turbulence contributions after the reattachment region are from the large-scale structures contrary to the belief that mostly random turbulent structures are present after reattachment. The dissipation is not a small-scale phenomena only. It may result due to the interaction between large-scale structures. From the results of higher order moments, the outer edge of the shear layer is observed to be non-Gaussian in nature with significant deviation from the Gaussian skewness and flatness value. The kinetic energy budget results show positive intermodal production in the outer edge of the shear layer indicating the presence of back scattering. The non-Gaussian velocity distribution, ejection motions and back-scattering present in the outer shear layer may be conjectured to be correlated with each other.

  7. Three-dimensional parameterizations of the synoptic scale kinetic energy and momentum flux in the Earth's atmosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Coumou

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available We present a new set of statistical-dynamical equations (SDEs which can accurately reproduce the three-dimensional atmospheric fields of synoptic scale kinetic energy and momentum flux. The set of equations is closed by finding proper parameterizations for the vertical macro-turbulent diffusion coefficient and ageostrophic terms. The equations have been implemented in a new SD atmosphere model, named Aeolus. We show that the synoptic scale kinetic energy and momentum fluxes generated by the model are in good agreement with empirical data, which were derived from bandpass-filtered ERA-40 data. In addition to present-day climate, the model is tested for substantially colder (last glacial maximum and warmer (2×CO2 climates, and shown to be in agreement with general circulation model (GCM results. With the derived equations, one can efficiently study the position and strength of storm tracks under different climate scenarios with calculation time a fraction of those of GCMs. This work prepares ground for the development of a new generation of fast Earth System Models of Intermediate Complexity which are able to perform multi-millennia simulations in a reasonable time frame while appropriately accounting for the climatic effect of storm tracks.

  8. Kinetics and heterogeneity of energy transfer from light harvesting complex II to photosystem I in the supercomplex isolated from Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santabarbara, Stefano; Tibiletti, Tania; Remelli, William; Caffarri, Stefano

    2017-03-29

    State transitions are a phenomenon that maintains the excitation balance between photosystem II (PSII) and photosystem I (PSI-LHCI) by controlling their relative absorption cross-sections. Under light conditions exciting PSII preferentially, a trimeric LHCII antenna moves from PSII to PSI-LHCI to form the PSI-LHCI-LHCII supercomplex. In this work, the excited state dynamics in the PSI-LHCI and PSI-LHCI-LHCII supercomplexes isolated from Arabidopsis have been investigated by picosecond time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy. The excited state decays were analysed using two approaches based on either (i) a sum of discrete exponentials or (ii) a continuous distribution of lifetimes. The results indicate that the energy transfer from LHCII to the bulk of the PSI antenna occurs with an average macroscopic transfer rate in the 35-65 ns(-1) interval. Yet, the most satisfactory description of the data is obtained when considering a heterogeneous population containing two PSI-LHCI-LHCII supercomplexes characterised by a transfer time of ∼15 and ∼60 ns(-1), likely due to the differences in the strength and orientation of LHCII harboured to PSI. Both these values are of the same order of magnitude of those estimated for the average energy transfer rates from the low energy spectral forms of LHCI to the bulk of the PSI antenna (15-40 ns(-1)), but they are slower than the transfer from the bulk antenna of PSI to the reaction centre (>150 ns(-1)), implying a relatively small kinetics bottleneck for the energy transfer from LHCII. Nevertheless, the kinetic limitation imposed by excited state diffusion has a negligible impact on the photochemical quantum efficiency of the supercomplex, which remains about 98% in the case of PSI-LHCI.

  9. Mediterranean sea eddy kinetic energy variability from 11 years of altimetric data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pujol, M.-I.; Larnicol, G.

    2005-12-01

    The eddy kinetic energy (EKE) variability of the Mediterranean Sea over eleven years (1993-2003) was studied using merged (T/P, Jason, ERS and Envisat) altimetric data. Special efforts were made to improve the data selection and the mapping procedure. The introduction of the Mean Dynamic Topography [Rio M.-H., Poulain P.-M., Pascual A., Mauri E., Larnico G., 2005, "A mean dynamic topography of the Mediterranean Sea computed from altimetric data and in situ measurements", submitted to J. Mar. Syst. (Liège Colloquium special issue).] made it possible to derive the absolute dynamic topography. Thus, an improved and more complete data set was obtained, which enabled previous studies based on altimetric data ([Iudicone D., Santoreli R., Marullo S., Gerosa P., 1998, "Sea level variability and surface eddy statistics in the Mediterranean Sea from TOPEX/POSEIDON data", J. Geoph. Res. 103 (C2), 2995-3011.]; [Ayoub N., Le Traon P.-Y., De Mey P., 1998, "A description of the Mediterranean surface circulation from combined ERS-1 and TOPEX/POSEIDON altimetric data", J. Mar. Syst. 18 (1-3), 3-40.]; [Larnicol G., Le Traon P.-Y., Ayoub N., De Mey P., 1995, "Mean sea level and surface circulation variability of the Mediterranean Sea from 2 years of TOPEX/POSEIDON altimetry ", J. Geoph. Res. 100 (C12), 25,163-25,177.]; [Larnicol G., Ayoub N., Le Traon P.-Y., 2002, "Major changes in Mediterranean Sea level variability from 7 years of TOPES/Poseidon and ERS-1/2 data", J. Mar. Syst. 33-34, 63-89.] to be enhanced. In particular, for the first time a relatively accurate description of the mean EKE distribution in the Mediterranean Sea could be provided. The mean EKE structure is the consequence of the superposition of different variability components. As previously described in other studies, mesoscale, seasonal and interannual components play a key role in this variability, but the contribution of long-term decadal signals, as well as sporadic events, are also important. In addition, a

  10. PFI-ZEKE (Pulsed Field Ionization-Zero Electron Kinetic Energy) para el estudio de iones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castaño, F.; Fernández, J. A.; Basterretxea, A. Longarte. F.; Sánchez Rayo, M. N.; Martínez, R.

    Entre las áreas hacia donde ha evolucionado la Química en los últimos años están los estudios de sistemas con especies reactivas de alta energía y los dominados por fuerzas intermoleculares débiles, con energías de unas pocas kcal/mol. En efecto, el estudio de las propiedades de los iones, comenzando por su relación con la molécula neutra de la que procede, la energía de ionización, los estados vibracionales y rotacionales, energías de enlace de Van der Waals entre el ión y una amplia variedad de otras moléculas, sus confórmeros o isómeros y sus reacciones o semi-reacciones químicas están en la raíz de la necesidad de la espectroscopía conocida como PFI-ZEKE, Pulsed Field Ionization-Zero Electron Kinetic Energy. Entre las aplicaciones que requieren estos conocimientos se encuentran la generación de plasmas para la fabricación de semiconductores, memorias magnéticas, etc, así como los sistemas astrofísicos, la ionosfera terrestre, etc. La espectroscopía ZEKE es una evolución de las de fluorescencia inducida por láser, LIF, ionización multifotónica acrecentada por resonancia, REMPI, con uno y dos colores y acoplada a un sistema de tiempo de vuelo, REMPI-TOF-MS, y las espectroscopías de doble resonancia IR-UV y UV-UV. Sus espectros y la ayuda de cálculos ab inicio permite determinar las energías de enlace de complejos de van der Waals en estados fundamental y excitados, identificar confórmeros e isómeros, obtener energías de ionización experimentales aproximadas (100 cm-1) y otras variables de interés. Al igual que con LIF, REMPI y dobles resonancias, es posible utilizar muestras gaseosas, pero los espectros están muy saturados de bandas y su interpretación es difícil o imposible. Se evitan estas dificultades estudiando las moléculas o complejos en expansiones supersónicas, donde la T de los grados de libertad solo alcanzan unos pocos K. Para realizar experimentos de ZEKE hay que utilizar una propiedad recientemente

  11. 质点动能定理的推导及应用%Derivation and application of the kinetic energy theorem of particle

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘雪梅; 张金锋

    2013-01-01

    The kinetic energy theorem of particle is derived by the equation of particle motion and Newton's second law.The two specific examples are solved by using the kinetic energy theorem of particle,Newton's second law and work-energy theorem,which reflects the application of the kinetic energy theorem of particle is more easy and more convenient.%利用牛顿第二定律及质点运动方程推导出质点动能定理形式,对两个具体实例分别运用质点动能定理、牛顿定律、功能原理进行求解,从而体现应用质点动能定律计算更加简单、方便。

  12. Cars and Kinetic Energy--Some Simple Physics with Real-World Relevance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parthasarathy, Raghuveer

    2012-01-01

    Understanding energy usage is crucial to understanding modern civilization, as well as many of the challenges it faces. Energy-related issues also offer real-world examples of important physical concepts, and as such have been the focus of several articles in "The Physics Teacher" in the past few decades (e.g., Refs. 1-5, noted further below).…

  13. Influence of the height of the vegetation cover in the variation of the kinetic energy of raindrops intercepted; Influencia de la altura de la cubierta vegetal en la variacion de la energia cinetica de las gotas de lluvia interceptadas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roldan Soriano, M.

    2009-07-01

    The erosive capacity of raindrops is function of mass (size) and terminal velocity. Drop mass and velocity govern the inherent erosivity of rainfall through kinetic energy. Kinetic energy is a very important property of the rainfall because it is one of the sources of energy in the process of water erosion. Vegetative canopy intercepts the raindrops and causes a variation on this rainfall kinetic energy due to modification of diameters and velocities distributions. If the height of canopy is enough, the bigger intercepted drops could achieve high velocities and their kinetic energies can increases. In this paper a quantitative evaluation of the increase of kinetic energy of intercepted drops is obtained and it is showed that this kinetic energy increases exponentially with vegetation height. (Author) 9 refs.

  14. Fission Fragment Mass Distributions and Total Kinetic Energy Release of 235-Uranium and 238-Uranium in Neutron-Induced Fission at Intermediate and Fast Neutron Energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duke, Dana Lynn [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-11-12

    This Ph.D. dissertation describes a measurement of the change in mass distributions and average total kinetic energy (TKE) release with increasing incident neutron energy for fission of 235U and 238U. Although fission was discovered over seventy-five years ago, open questions remain about the physics of the fission process. The energy of the incident neutron, En, changes the division of energy release in the resulting fission fragments, however, the details of energy partitioning remain ambiguous because the nucleus is a many-body quantum system. Creating a full theoretical model is difficult and experimental data to validate existing models are lacking. Additional fission measurements will lead to higher-quality models of the fission process, therefore improving applications such as the development of next-generation nuclear reactors and defense. This work also paves the way for precision experiments such as the Time Projection Chamber (TPC) for fission cross section measurements and the Spectrometer for Ion Determination in Fission (SPIDER) for precision mass yields.

  15. Kinetic mechanism of molecular energy transfer and chemical reactions in low-temperature air-fuel plasmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamovich, Igor V; Li, Ting; Lempert, Walter R

    2015-08-13

    This work describes the kinetic mechanism of coupled molecular energy transfer and chemical reactions in low-temperature air, H2-air and hydrocarbon-air plasmas sustained by nanosecond pulse discharges (single-pulse or repetitive pulse burst). The model incorporates electron impact processes, state-specific N(2) vibrational energy transfer, reactions of excited electronic species of N(2), O(2), N and O, and 'conventional' chemical reactions (Konnov mechanism). Effects of diffusion and conduction heat transfer, energy coupled to the cathode layer and gasdynamic compression/expansion are incorporated as quasi-zero-dimensional corrections. The model is exercised using a combination of freeware (Bolsig+) and commercial software (ChemKin-Pro). The model predictions are validated using time-resolved measurements of temperature and N(2) vibrational level populations in nanosecond pulse discharges in air in plane-to-plane and sphere-to-sphere geometry; temperature and OH number density after nanosecond pulse burst discharges in lean H(2)-air, CH(4)-air and C(2)H(4)-air mixtures; and temperature after the nanosecond pulse discharge burst during plasma-assisted ignition of lean H2-mixtures, showing good agreement with the data. The model predictions for OH number density in lean C(3)H(8)-air mixtures differ from the experimental results, over-predicting its absolute value and failing to predict transient OH rise and decay after the discharge burst. The agreement with the data for C(3)H(8)-air is improved considerably if a different conventional hydrocarbon chemistry reaction set (LLNL methane-n-butane flame mechanism) is used. The results of mechanism validation demonstrate its applicability for analysis of plasma chemical oxidation and ignition of low-temperature H(2)-air, CH(4)-air and C(2)H(4)-air mixtures using nanosecond pulse discharges. Kinetic modelling of low-temperature plasma excited propane-air mixtures demonstrates the need for development of a more accurate

  16. Critical Axial Load

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walt Wells

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Our objective in this paper is to solve a second order differential equation for a long, simply supported column member subjected to a lateral axial load using Heun's numerical method. We will use the solution to find the critical load at which the column member will fail due to buckling. We will calculate this load using Euler's derived analytical approach for an exact solution, as well as Euler's Numerical Method. We will then compare the three calculated values to see how much they deviate from one another. During the critical load calculation, it will be necessary to calculate the moment of inertia for the column member.

  17. A computational study of turbulent kinetic energy transport in barotropic turbulence on the f-plane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grooms, Ian, E-mail: ian.grooms@colorado.edu [Center for Atmosphere Ocean Science, Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, New York University, New York, New York 10012 (United States)

    2015-10-15

    Energy transport by eddies is diagnosed from a series of simulations of stochastically forced, inhomogeneous two-dimensional turbulence—barotropic dynamics on the f-plane. The divergence of the energy flux is compared to diffusive models, both fractional and harmonic, and the inferred diffusivity κ is compared to a mixing-length model κ ∝ Vℓ where V and ℓ are eddy velocity and length scales, respectively. The flux-divergence is found to be well approximated by Laplacian diffusion with a mixing-length approximation. This study provides some support for diffusive modeling of mesoscale eddy energy transport in ocean model parameterizations.

  18. Energy transfer kinetics of phycoerythrocyanins (PECs) from the cyanobacterium Anabaena variabilis(Ⅰ)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张景民; 张建平; 杨紫萱; 赵井泉; 蒋丽金; 陈建新; 叶彤; 张启元

    1997-01-01

    The excitation energy transfer processes in nionomeric phycoerythrocyanins ( PEC)have been studied in detail using steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence spectra techniques as well as the deconvolution fech nique of spectra.The results indicate that the energy transfer processes should take place between α84 PVB md β8 or β155-PCB chromophores,the time constants of energy transfer are 34.7 and 130 ps individually;the component with lifetime of 1.57 ns originates from the fluorescence lifetime of the terminal emitter of β84 and /or β155 PCB chre-mophores; and the component with lifetime of 515 ps might be assigned to the energy transfer between two PCB chro mophores of β subunit.

  19. Pressure and surface tension of an active simple liquid: a comparison between kinetic, mechanical and free-energy based approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marini Bettolo Marconi, Umberto; Maggi, Claudio; Melchionna, Simone

    2016-06-29

    We discuss different definitions of pressure for a system of active spherical particles driven by a non-thermal coloured noise. We show that mechanical, kinetic and free-energy based approaches lead to the same result up to first order in the non-equilibrium expansion parameter. The first prescription is based on a generalisation of the kinetic mesoscopic virial equation and expresses the pressure exerted on the walls in terms of the average of the virial of the inter-particle forces. In the second approach, the pressure and the surface tension are identified with the volume and area derivatives, respectively, of the partition function associated with the known stationary non-equilibrium distribution of the model. The third method is a mechanical approach and is related to the work necessary to deform the system. The pressure is obtained by comparing the expression of the work in terms of local stress and strain with the corresponding expression in terms of microscopic distribution. This is determined from the force balance encoded in the Born-Green-Yvon equation. Such a method has the advantage of giving a formula for the local pressure tensor and the surface tension even in inhomogeneous situations. By direct inspection, we show that the three procedures lead to the same values of the pressure, and give support to the idea that the partition function, obtained via the unified coloured noise approximation, is more than a formal property of the system, but determines the stationary non-equilibrium thermodynamics of the model.

  20. Experimental testing of axial induction based control strategies for wake control and wind farm optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartl, J.; Sætran, L.

    2016-09-01

    In state-of-the-art wind farms each turbine is controlled individually aiming for optimum turbine power not considering wake effects on downstream turbines. Wind farm control concepts aim for optimizing the overall power output of the farm taking wake interactions between the individual turbines into account. This experimental wind tunnel study investigates axial induction based control concepts. It is examined how the total array efficiency of two in-line model turbines is affected when the upstream turbine's tip speed ratio (λcontrol) or blade pitch angle (β-control) is modified. The focus is particularly directed on how the wake flow behind the upstream rotor is affected when its axial induction is reduced in order to leave more kinetic energy in the wake to be recovered by a downstream turbine. It is shown that the radial distribution of kinetic energy in the wake area can be controlled by modifying the upstream turbine's tip speed ratio. By pitching out the upstream turbine's blades, however, the available kinetic energy in the wake is increased at an equal rate over the entire blade span. Furthermore, the total array efficiency of the two turbine setup is mapped depending on the upstream turbines tip speed ratio and pitch angle. For a small turbine separation distance of x/D=3 the downstream turbine is able to recover the major part of the power lost on the upstream turbine. However, no significant increase in the two-turbine array efficiency is achieved by altering the upstream turbine's operation point away from its optimum.

  1. Kinetics and energy efficiency for the degradation of 1,4-dioxane by electro-peroxone process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Huijiao; Bakheet, Belal; Yuan, Shi; Li, Xiang; Yu, Gang [School of Environment, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Murayama, Seiichi [Power and Industrial Systems R& D Center, Toshiba Corporation, Fuchu-shi, Tokyo (Japan); Wang, Yujue, E-mail: wangyujue@tsinghua.edu.cn [School of Environment, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2015-08-30

    Highlights: • E-peroxone couples electrolysis with ozonation to driven peroxone reaction for pollutant degradation. • Significant amounts of ·OH can be efficiently produced in the E-peroxone process. • E-peroxone greatly enhances 1,4-dioxane degradation kinetics compared with ozonation and electrolysis. • E-peroxone consumes less energy for 1,4-dioxane mineralization than ozonation and electrolysis. • E-peroxone offers a cost-effective and energy-efficient alternative to degrade 1,4-dioxane. - Abstract: Degradation of 1,4-dioxane by ozonation, electrolysis, and their combined electro-peroxone (E-peroxone) process was investigated. The E-peroxone process used a carbon-polytetrafluorethylene cathode to electrocatalytically convert O{sub 2} in the sparged ozone generator effluent (O{sub 2} and O{sub 3} gas mixture) to H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. The electro-generated H{sub 2}O{sub 2} then react with sparged O{sub 3} to yield aqueous ·OH, which can in turn oxidize pollutants rapidly in the bulk solution. Using p-chlorobenzoic acid as ·OH probe, the pseudo-steady concentration of ·OH was determined to be ∼0.744 × 10{sup −9} mM in the E-peroxone process, which is approximately 10 and 186 times of that in ozonation and electrolysis using a Pt anode. Thanks to its higher ·OH concentration, the E-peroxone process eliminated 96.6% total organic carbon (TOC) from a 1,4-dioxane solution after 2 h treatment with a specific energy consumption (SEC) of 0.376 kWh g{sup −1} TOC{sub removed}. In comparison, ozonation and electrolysis using a boron-doped diamond anode removed only ∼6.1% and 26.9% TOC with SEC of 2.43 and 0.558 kWh g{sup −1} TOC{sub removed}, respectively. The results indicate that the E-peroxone process can significantly improve the kinetics and energy efficiency for 1,4-dioxane mineralization as compared to the two individual processes. The E-peroxone process may thus offer a highly effective and energy-efficient alternative to treat 1,4-dioxane

  2. Energy transfer kinetics of the np5(n + 1)p excited states of Ne and Kr.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabir, Md Humayun; Heaven, Michael C

    2011-09-01

    Energy transfer rate constants for Ne(2p(5)3p) and Kr(4p(5)5p) atoms colliding with ground state rare gas atoms (Rg) have been measured. In part, this study is motivated by the possibility of using excited rare gas atoms as the active species in optically pumped laser systems. Rg(np(5)(n + 1)s) metastable states may be produced using low-power electrical discharges. The potential then exits for optical pumping and laser action on the np(5)(n + 1)p ↔ np(5)(n + 1)s transitions. Knowledge of the rate constants for collisional energy transfer and deactivation of the np(5)(n + 1)p states is required to evaluate the laser potential for various Rg + buffer gas combinations. In the present study we have characterized energy transfer processes for Ne (2p(5)3p) + He for the six lowest energy states of the multiplet. Rate constants for state-to-state transfer have been determined. Deactivation of the lowest energy level of Kr (4p(5)5p) by He, Ne, and Kr has also been characterized. Initial results suggest that Kr (4p(5)5p) + Ne mixtures may be the best suited for optically pumped laser applications.

  3. Momentum and Turbulent Kinetic Energy Budgets Within the Park Avenue Street Canyon During the Joint Urban 2003 Field Campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Matthew A.; Pardyjak, Eric R.; Klein, Petra

    2011-07-01

    Very few attempts have so far been made to quantify the momentum and turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) budgets within real urban canopies. In this study, sonic anemometer data obtained during the Joint Urban 2003 field campaign in Oklahoma City, U.S.A. were used for calculating the momentum and TKE budgets within a real-world urban street canyon. Sonic anemometers were deployed on multiple towers in the lower half of the canyon. Gradients in all three principal directions were included in the analyses. The storage and buoyancy terms were found to have negligible contributions to both the momentum and TKE budgets. The momentum budgets were generally found to be more complex than a simple balance of two physical processes. The horizontal terms were found to have significant and sometimes dominant contributions to the momentum and TKE budgets.

  4. A paper-based electrostatic kinetic energy harvester with stacked multiple electret films made of electrospun polymer nanofibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Y.; Amroun, D.; Leprince-Wang, Y.; Basset, P.

    2016-11-01

    This paper reports the first flexible electrostatic kinetic energy harvester (e-KEH) with electret nanofibrous films obtained by electrospinning and paper-based electrodes. The nanofibrous electret outperforms plenary thin film Parylene in the storage stability of charge: the surface potential is stabilized within 1 day, without any obvious minishing during the following 9 days. The output power of the device is improved by implementing multiple electret layers, where the optimal number of electret layer is 3. With a finger tapping activation, this first prototype with the optimal configuration gives a maximum peak power of 45.6 μW with the optimal load of 16 MΩ. Working with a full-wave diode rectifier and a storage capacitor of 10nF, the voltage reaches 8.5 V with 450 strokes.

  5. Harvesting broadband kinetic impact energy from mechanical triggering/vibration and water waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Xiaonan; Yang, Weiqing; Jing, Qingshen; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2014-07-22

    We invented a triboelectric nanogenerator (TENG) that is based on a wavy-structured Cu-Kapton-Cu film sandwiched between two flat nanostructured PTFE films for harvesting energy due to mechanical vibration/impacting/compressing using the triboelectrification effect. This structure design allows the TENG to be self-restorable after impact without the use of extra springs and converts direct impact into lateral sliding, which is proved to be a much more efficient friction mode for energy harvesting. The working mechanism has been elaborated using the capacitor model and finite-element simulation. Vibrational energy from 5 to 500 Hz has been harvested, and the generator's resonance frequency was determined to be ∼100 Hz at a broad full width at half-maximum of over 100 Hz, producing an open-circuit voltage of up to 72 V, a short-circuit current of up to 32 μA, and a peak power density of 0.4 W/m(2). Most importantly, the wavy structure of the TENG can be easily packaged for harvesting the impact energy from water waves, clearly establishing the principle for ocean wave energy harvesting. Considering the advantages of TENGs, such as cost-effectiveness, light weight, and easy scalability, this approach might open the possibility for obtaining green and sustainable energy from the ocean using nanostructured materials. Lastly, different ways of agitating water were studied to trigger the packaged TENG. By analyzing the output signals and their corresponding fast Fourier transform spectra, three ways of agitation were evidently distinguished from each other, demonstrating the potential of the TENG for hydrological analysis.

  6. Kinetic and energy production analysis of pyrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass using a three-parallel Gaussian reaction model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Tianju; Zhang, Jinzhi; Wu, Jinhu

    2016-07-01

    The kinetic and energy productions of pyrolysis of a lignocellulosic biomass were investigated using a three-parallel Gaussian distribution method in this work. The pyrolysis experiment of the pine sawdust was performed using a thermogravimetric-mass spectroscopy (TG-MS) analyzer. A three-parallel Gaussian distributed activation energy model (DAEM)-reaction model was used to describe thermal decomposition behaviors of the three components, hemicellulose, cellulose and lignin. The first, second and third pseudocomponents represent the fractions of hemicellulose, cellulose and lignin, respectively. It was found that the model is capable of predicting the pyrolysis behavior of the pine sawdust. The activation energy distribution peaks for the three pseudo-components were centered at 186.8, 197.5 and 203.9kJmol(-1) for the pine sawdust, respectively. The evolution profiles of H2, CH4, CO, and CO2 were well predicted using the three-parallel Gaussian distribution model. In addition, the chemical composition of bio-oil was also obtained by pyrolysis-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry instrument (Py-GC/MS).

  7. ION KINETIC ENERGY CONSERVATION AND MAGNETIC FIELD STRENGTH CONSTANCY IN MULTI-FLUID SOLAR WIND ALFVÉNIC TURBULENCE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matteini, L.; Horbury, T. S.; Schwartz, S. J. [The Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London, SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Pantellini, F. [LESIA, Observatoire de Paris, CNRS, UPMC, Universit Paris-Diderot, 5 Place Jules Janssen, F-92195 Meudon (France); Velli, M. [Department of Earth, Planetary, and Space Sciences, UCLA, California (United States)

    2015-03-20

    We investigate the properties of plasma fluid motion in the large-amplitude, low-frequency fluctuations of highly Alfvénic fast solar wind. We show that protons locally conserve total kinetic energy when observed from an effective frame of reference comoving with the fluctuations. For typical properties of the fast wind, this frame can be reasonably identified by alpha particles which, due to their drift with respect to protons at about the Alfvén speed along the magnetic field, do not partake in the fluid low-frequency fluctuations. Using their velocity to transform the proton velocity into the frame of Alfvénic turbulence, we demonstrate that the resulting plasma motion is characterized by a constant absolute value of the velocity, zero electric fields, and aligned velocity and magnetic field vectors as expected for unidirectional Alfvénic fluctuations in equilibrium. We propose that this constraint, via the correlation between velocity and magnetic field in Alfvénic turbulence, is the origin of the observed constancy of the magnetic field; while the constant velocity corresponding to constant energy can only be observed in the frame of the fluctuations, the corresponding constant total magnetic field, invariant for Galilean transformations, remains the observational signature in the spacecraft frame of the constant total energy in the Alfvén turbulence frame.

  8. Across-phase biomass pyrolysis stoichiometry, energy balance, and product formation kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Predictive correlations between reactions occurring in the gas-, liquid- and solid-phases are necessary to economically utilize the thermochemical conversion of agricultural wastes impacting the food, water, and energy nexus. On the basis of an empirical mass balance (99.7%), this study established...

  9. A concept for energy harvesting from quasi-static structural deformations through axially loaded bilaterally constrained columns with multiple bifurcation points

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lajnef, N.; Burgueño, R.; Borchani, W.; Sun, Y.

    2014-05-01

    A major obstacle limiting the development of deployable sensing and actuation solutions is the scarcity of power. Converted energy from ambient loading using piezoelectric scavengers is a possible solution. Most of the previously developed research focused on vibration-based piezoelectric harvesters which are typically characterized by a response with a narrow natural frequency range. Several techniques were used to improve their effectiveness. These methods focus only on the transducer’s properties and configurations, but do little to improve the stimuli from the source. In contrast, this work proposes to focus on the input deformations generated within the structure, and the induction of an amplified amplitude and up-converted frequency toward the harvesters’ natural spectrum. This paper introduces the concept of using mechanically-equivalent energy converters and frequency modulators that can transform low-amplitude and low-rate service deformations into an amplified vibration input to the piezoelectric transducer. The introduced concept allows energy conversion within the unexplored quasi-static frequency range (≪1 Hz). The post-buckling behavior of bilaterally constrained columns is used as the mechanism for frequency up-conversion. A bimorph cantilever polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) piezoelectric beam is used for energy conversion. Experimental prototypes were built and tested to validate the introduced concept and the levels of extractable power were evaluated for different cases under varying input frequencies. Finally, finite element simulations are reported to provide insight into the scalability and performance of the developed concept.

  10. Effects of Geostrophic Kinetic Energy on the Distribution of Mesopelagic Fish Larvae in the Southern Gulf of California in Summer/Fall Stratified Seasons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contreras-Catala, Fernando; Sánchez-Velasco, Laura; Beier, Emilio; Godínez, Victor M; Barton, Eric D; Santamaría-Del-Angel, Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    Effects of geostrophic kinetic energy flux on the three-dimensional distribution of fish larvae of mesopelagic species (Vinciguerria lucetia, Diogenichthys laternatus, Benthosema panamense and Triphoturus mexicanus) in the southern Gulf of California during summer and fall seasons of stronger stratification were analyzed. The greatest larval abundance was found at sampling stations in geostrophic kinetic energy-poor areas (energy-rich areas (> 21 J/m3), where mesoscale eddies were present, the larvae of the dominant species had low abundance and were spread more evenly through the water column, in spite of the water column stratification. For example, in a cyclonic eddy, V. lucetia larvae (34 larvae/10m2) extended their distribution to, at least, the limit of sampling 200 m depth below the pycnocline, while D. laternatus larvae (29 larvae/10m2) were found right up to the surface, both probably as a consequence mixing and secondary circulation in the eddy. Results showed that the level of the geostrophic kinetic energy flux affects the abundance and the three-dimensional distribution of mesopelagic fish larvae during the seasons of stronger stratification, indicating that areas with low geostrophic kinetic energy may be advantageous for feeding and development of mesopelagic fish larvae because of greater water column stability.

  11. Pre-Study for a Battery Storage for a Kinetic Energy Storage System

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    This bachelor thesis investigates what kind of battery system that is suitable for an electric driveline equipped with a mechanical fly wheel, focusing on a battery with high specific energy capacity. Basic battery theory such as the principle of an electrochemical cell, limitations and C-rate is explained as well as the different major battery systems that are available. Primary and secondary cells are discussed, including the major secondary chemistries such as lead acid, nickel cadmium (Ni...

  12. The study of the (α, α'f) reaction at 120MeV on 232Th (III) : Total kinetic energies and mass distributions for excitation energies below 12 MeV

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    David, P.; Debrus, J.; Janszen, H.; Schulze, J.; Harakeh, M.N.; Plicht, J. van der; van der Woude, Adriaan

    1982-01-01

    The total kinetic energy release (TKE) of the fissioning nucleus 232Th is measured as a function of excitation energy and for various mass separations. A direct correlation of the TKE and of the prompt neutron yield excitation functions is observed. The mass yield is presented as function of the tot

  13. Energy

    CERN Document Server

    Robertson, William C

    2002-01-01

    Confounded by kinetic energy? Suspect that teaching about simple machines isn t really so simple? Exasperated by electricity? If you fear the study of energy is beyond you, this entertaining book will do more than introduce you to the topic. It will help you actually understand it. At the book s heart are easy-to-grasp explanations of energy basics work, kinetic energy, potential energy, and the transformation of energy and energy as it relates to simple machines, heat energy, temperature, and heat transfer. Irreverent author Bill Robertson suggests activities that bring the basic concepts of energy to life with common household objects. Each chapter ends with a summary and an applications section that uses practical examples such as roller coasters and home heating systems to explain energy transformations and convection cells. The final chapter brings together key concepts in an easy-to-grasp explanation of how electricity is generated. Energy is the second book in the Stop Faking It! series published by NS...

  14. Kinetics and

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mojtaba Ahmadi

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The aqueous degradation of Reactive Yellow 84 (RY84 by potassium peroxydisulfate (K2S2O8 has been studied in laboratory scale experiments. The effect of the initial concentrations of potassium peroxydisulfate and RY84, pH and temperature on RY84 degradation were also examined. Experimental data were analyzed using first and second-order kinetics. The degradation kinetics of RY84 of the potassium peroxydisulfate process followed the second-order reaction kinetics. These rate constants have an extreme values similar to of 9.493 mM−1min−1 at a peroxydisulfate dose of 4 mmol/L. Thermodynamic parameters such as activation (Ea and Gibbs free energy (ΔG° were also evaluated. The negative value of ΔGo and Ea shows the spontaneous reaction natural conditions and exothermic nature.

  15. Study of the charge kinetics of MgO (1 1 0) subjected to high energy electron irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boughariou, A., E-mail: aicha_boughariou@yahoo.fr [LaMaCoP, Université de Sfax pour le sud, Faculté des Sciences, 3038 Sfax Tunisie (Tunisia); Kallel, A. [LaMaCoP, Université de Sfax pour le sud, Faculté des Sciences, 3038 Sfax Tunisie (Tunisia); Blaise, G. [LPS, Université Paris-Sud XI, Batiment 510, Orsay 91405 (France)

    2014-09-15

    Highlights: • Variation of the logarithm of SEE yield with the injected dose in MgO (1 1 0) at high energy. • Critical energy E{sub C} of MgO (1 1 0). • Formation of an electrostatic mirror. • Breakdown phenomenon (current density effect). - Abstract: This article presents a study performed with a dedicated scanning electron microscope (SEM) on the electrical property evolution of magnesium oxide (1 1 0) single crystal during 15 and 30 keV irradiation. First, the charging behavior is studied during the charge injection process at low current density J{sub 0}, by measuring the logarithm of the secondary electron emission yield (lnσ). Next, we have investigated the dependence on the current density of the charge-trapping phenomena in MgO (1 1 0). The results shown that beyond the crossover energy E{sub 2}, the observed effects varies depending on whether the energy of the primary electrons is lower or higher than an energy called critical energy E{sub c} = 20 keV (in the case of MgO (1 1 0)). When irradiating the material at E{sub 0} < E{sub c} and at low J{sub 0}, self regulated regime is obtained, if J{sub 0} is sufficiently intense an aging regime is reached. This latter regime is characterized by a positive surface charge, when a negative charge was expected. At E{sub 0} > E{sub c}, and for low J{sub 0}, the detailed monitoring of the charge kinetic of MgO (1 1 0) at high primary energy E{sub 0} = 30 keV, permit to show that the combined effect of the increased negative surface potential during irradiation and extractor field below the surface of MgO fact that lnσ undergoes a strong slope failure at the beginning of the injection and stabilizes at a value much less than zero leading to the formation of an electrostatic mirror. At high J{sub 0}, the consequences of the charge accumulation are violent and a breakdown phenomenon is observed.

  16. Computational Plasma Physics at the Bleeding Edge: Simulating Kinetic Turbulence Dynamics in Fusion Energy Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, William

    2013-04-01

    Advanced computing is generally recognized to be an increasingly vital tool for accelerating progress in scientific research in the 21st Century. The imperative is to translate the combination of the rapid advances in super-computing power together with the emergence of effective new algorithms and computational methodologies to help enable corresponding increases in the physics fidelity and the performance of the scientific codes used to model complex physical systems. If properly validated against experimental measurements and verified with mathematical tests and computational benchmarks, these codes can provide more reliable predictive capability for the behavior of complex systems, including fusion energy relevant high temperature plasmas. The magnetic fusion energy research community has made excellent progress in developing advanced codes for which computer run-time and problem size scale very well with the number of processors on massively parallel supercomputers. A good example is the effective usage of the full power of modern leadership class computational platforms from the terascale to the petascale and beyond to produce nonlinear particle-in-cell simulations which have accelerated progress in understanding the nature of plasma turbulence in magnetically-confined high temperature plasmas. Illustrative results provide great encouragement for being able to include increasingly realistic dynamics in extreme-scale computing campaigns to enable predictive simulations with unprecedented physics fidelity. Some illustrative examples will be presented of the algorithmic progress from the magnetic fusion energy sciences area in dealing with low memory per core extreme scale computing challenges for the current top 3 supercomputers worldwide. These include advanced CPU systems (such as the IBM-Blue-Gene-Q system and the Fujitsu K Machine) as well as the GPU-CPU hybrid system (Titan).

  17. Investigation of Kinetics and Energy Consumption of Thin Layer Drying of Corn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Abbasi

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study thin layer drying of corn in a convective dryer was investigated at air temperatures of 50, 60 and 70ºC and air flow rates of 1, 1.4 and 1.8 kg min-1. Experiments were performed in Completely Randomized Design (CRD. The effect of air temperature and flow rate on drying time, drying rate, effective diffusivity coefficient and activation energy were studied. Results showed that the effects of temperature and flow rate on drying process were significant. Increasing the air temperature from 50 to 70 C˚, caused 31.7 percent decrease in drying time and change of air flow rate from 1 to 1.8 kg min-1 reduced drying time 27 percent in average. The effective diffusivity coefficient and activation energy varied from 3.47258 ×10-11 to 7.34352×10-11 m2 s-1. and 13.761 to 16.193 kJ mol-1, respectively depending on the drying treatments. The Logarithmic model was found to be in a better agreement with experimental data compared with other models. The minimum value of specific energy requirement (3.61 kWh kg-1 was obtained at a drying air temperature of 50 °C and air flow rate of 1 kg min-1, whereas the corresponding parameters for the maximum value (5.34 kWh kg-1 were determined as 70 °C and air flow rate 1.8 kg min-1.

  18. The force density and the kinetic energy-momentum tensor of electromagnetic fields in matter

    CERN Document Server

    Medina, Rodrigo

    2014-01-01

    We determine the invariant expression for the force density that the electromagnetic field exerts on dipolar matter. We construct the non-symmetric energy-momentum tensor of the electromagnetic field in matter which is consistent with that force and with Maxwell equations. We recover Minkowski's expression for the momentum density. We use our results to discuss momentum exchange of an electromagnetic wave-packet which falls into a dielectric block. In particular we show that the wave-packet pulls the block when it enters and drags it when it leaves.

  19. Kinetic study of energy transfer from He(n = 2, 3) to Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nayfeh, M.H.; Chen, C.H.; Payne, M.G.

    1976-11-01

    Time-resolved spectroscopic studies have been carried out on various emissions from He-Ar, He-Kr, He-Xe, and He-Ne mixtures to obtain kinetic information and quenching cross sections following charged-particle excitation. Our results are consistent with the pathways model of Payne, Klots, and Hurst in which Jesse effects are due primarily to energy transfer from He(2 /sup 1/S) to an atom or molecule which is consequentially ionized. Quenching cross sections for He(2 /sup 1/S) -Ar, -Kr, and -Xe at thermal (300 degreeK) collision energy were obtained as 22.5, 42, and 70 A/sup 2/, respectively, with an accuracy of 10%. These results are smaller than theoretical calculations which make use of the orbiting approximation, but agree well with experimental data obtained by crossed-molecular-beam methods. Using the same method, we obtained for the first time room-temperature quenching cross sections for He(2 /sup 1/P) -Ar and He(3 /sup 1/P) -Ne, -Ar, -Kr, -Xe (142 +- 42, 42 +- 4, 53 +- 5, 39 +- 4, and 73 +- 7 A/sup 2/, respectively). These results are larger than theoretical calculations based on the dipole-dipole mechanism by Katsuura and Watanabe. Quenching cross sections for He(3 /sup 3/P) -Ne, -Ar, -Kr, -Xe, and He(3 /sup 1/D) -Ne were obtained as 32 +- 5, 22 +- 3, 17 +- 3, 67 +- 10, and 30 +- 5 A/sup 2/, respectively. (AIP)

  20. Inclusive dielectron spectra in p+p collisions at 3.5 GeV kinetic beam energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agakishiev, G.; Belyaev, A.; Chernenko, S.; Fateev, O.; Ierusalimov, A.; Zanevsky, Y. [Joint Institute of Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation); Balanda, A.; Dybczak, A.; Michalska, B.; Otwinowski, J.; Przygoda, W.; Salabura, P.; Trebacz, R. [Jagiellonian University of Cracow, Smoluchowski Institute of Physics, Krakow (Poland); Belver, D.; Cabanelas, P.; Castro, E.; Garzon, J.A. [Univ. de Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Blanco, A.; Fonte, P.; Lopes, L.; Mangiarotti, A. [LIP-Laboratorio de Instrumentacao e Fisica Experimental de Particulas, Coimbra (Portugal); Boehmer, M.; Christ, T.; Friese, J.; Gernhaeuser, R.; Jurkovic, M.; Kruecken, R.; Maier, L.; Weber, M. [Technische Univ. Muenchen, Physik Dept. E12, Garching (Germany); Boyard, J.L.; Gumberidze, M.; Hennino, T.; Liu, T.; Moriniere, E.; Ramstein, B. [Univ. Paris Sud, Inst. de Physique Nucleaire, CNRS/IN2P3, Orsay (France); Chen, J.C.; Epple, E.; Fabbietti, L.; Lalik, R.; Lapidus, K.; Siebenson, J. [Excellence Cluster ' ' Origin and Structure of the Universe' ' , Garching (Germany); Destefanis, M.; Gilardi, C.; Kuehn, W.; Lange, J.S.; Metag, V.; Spruck, B. [Justus Liebig Univ. Giessen, II. Physikalisches Inst., Giessen (Germany); Dohrmann, F.; Kaempfer, B.; Kanaki, K.; Kotte, R.; Naumann, L.; Wendisch, C.; Wuestenfeld, J. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Inst. fuer Strahlenphysik, Dresden (Germany); Finocchiaro, P.; Gonzalez-Diaz, D.; Schmah, A.; Spataro, S. [Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Catania (Italy); Froehlich, I.; Galatyuk, T.; Lorenz, M.; Markert, J.; Michel, J.; Muentz, C.; Pachmayer, Y.C.; Palka, M.; Pechenova, O.; Pietraszko, J.; Rustamov, A.; Stroebele, H.; Tarantola, A.; Teilab, K. [Goethe-Univ., Inst. fuer Kernphysik, Frankfurt (Germany); Golubeva, M.; Guber, F.; Ivashkin, A.; Karavicheva, T.; Kurepin, A.; Reshetin, A.; Sadovsky, A. [Russian Academy of Science, Inst. for Nuclear Research, Moscow (Russian Federation)] [and others

    2012-05-15

    We present the inclusive invariant mass, transverse momentum and rapidity distributions of dielectrons (e{sup +}e{sup -} pairs) in p+p interactions at 3.5GeV beam kinetic energy. In the vector meson mass region, a distinct peak corresponding to direct {omega} decays is reconstructed with a 2% mass resolution. The data is compared to predictions from three model calculations. Due to the large acceptance of the HADES apparatus for e{sup +}e{sup -} invariant masses above 0.2 GeV/c{sup 2} and for transverse pair momenta p{sub t} < 1 GeV/c, acceptance corrections are, to a large extent, model independent. This allows us to extract from dielectron data for the first time at this energy the inclusive production cross-sections for light vector mesons. Inclusive production cross-sections for {pi}{sup 0} and {eta} mesons are also reported. The obtained results will serve as an important reference for the study of vector meson production in proton-nucleus and heavy-ion collisions. Furthermore, using this data, an improved value for the upper bound of the branching ratio for direct {eta} decays into the electron-positron channel is obtained. (orig.)

  1. High energy efficiency and high power density proton exchange membrane fuel cells: Electrode kinetics and mass transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, Supramaniam; Velev, Omourtag A.; Parthasathy, Arvind; Manko, David J.; Appleby, A. John

    1991-01-01

    The development of proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell power plants with high energy efficiencies and high power densities is gaining momentum because of the vital need of such high levels of performance for extraterrestrial (space, underwater) and terrestrial (power source for electric vehicles) applications. Since 1987, considerable progress has been made in achieving energy efficiencies of about 60 percent at a current density of 200 mA/sq cm and high power densities (greater than 1 W/sq cm) in PEM fuel cells with high (4 mg/sq cm) or low (0.4 mg/sq cm) platinum loadings in electrodes. The following areas are discussed: (1) methods to obtain these high levels of performance with low Pt loading electrodes - by proton conductor impregnation into electrodes, localization of Pt near front surface; (2) a novel microelectrode technique which yields electrode kinetic parameters for oxygen reduction and mass transport parameters; (3) demonstration of lack of water transport from anode to cathode; (4) modeling analysis of PEM fuel cell for comparison with experimental results and predicting further improvements in performance; and (5) recommendations of needed research and development for achieving the above goals.

  2. A System for Harvesting the Vehicle Idle Kinetic Energy%汽车闲散动能收集系统

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘隽; 刘俊标; 俞国勤; 邵宇鹰; 霍荣岭; 段中夏

    2012-01-01

    This paper has developed a new practical power generation system by combining the technology of hydraulic transmission and electromagnetic power generation for the purpose of harvesting the idle kinetic energy when vehicles are decelerating. The system design process and its component selection have been introduced, and the relevant ex- periments have been conducted. Finally experiment results show that the developed system can harvest about 4.5W electric power every time a car passes the system. The energy harvesting efficiency is about 3%.%介绍了利用液压传动和电磁发电等技术研制的一种新型实用的发电系统,目的在于收集产生车辆在减速等场合产生的闲散动能;讨论了该系统的设计思路及部件选型,并对研制的系统进行了相关实验。实验结果表明:一辆小汽车通过所研制系统时,一次可以获得4.5W左右的电能,能量收集效率约为3%。

  3. Kinetics of low energy electron attachment to some fluorinated alcohols in the gas phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wnorowski, K.; Wnorowska, J.; Kopyra, J.; Michalczuk, B.; Szamrej, I.; Barszczewska, W.

    2014-01-01

    Thermal electron attachment processes in the mixtures of CH3CH2OH, CF3CH2OH, CF3CF2CH2OH, (CF3)2CHOH and CH3CH(OH)CF3 with carbon dioxide have been investigated using an electron Pulsed Townsend technique. Measurements were carried out in the temperature range (298-413) K. The obtained rate coefficients depended on temperature in accordance to Arrhenius equation. From the fit to the experimental data points with function ln(k) = ln(A)-Ea/kBT the activation energies (Ea's) were determined. The rate coefficients at 298 K are equal to 3.2 × 10-13 cm3 s-1, 5.1 × 10-11 cm3 s-1, 1.1 × 10-10 cm3 s-1, 3.0 × 10-10 cm3 s-1 and 2.6 × 10-11 cm3 s-1 and activation energies are: 0.37 eV, 0.25 eV, 0.28 eV, 0.20 eV and 0.23 eV, respectively for CH3CH2OH, CF3CH2OH, CF3CF2CH2OH, (CF3)2CHOH and CH3CH(OH)CF3.

  4. Effects of Axial Non-uniform Tip Clearances on Aerodynamic Performance of a Transonic Axial Compressor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hongwei MA; Baihe LI

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents a numerical investigation of effects of axial non-uniform tip clearances on the aerodynamic performance of a transonic axial compressor rotor (NASA Rotor 37). The three-dimensional steady flow field within the rotor passage was simulated with the datum tip clearance of 0.356 mm at the design wheel speed of 17188.7 rpm. The simulation results are well consistent with the measurement results, which verified the numeri-cal method. Then the three-dimensional steady flow field within the rotor passage was simulated respectively with different axial non-uniform tip clearances. The calculation results showed that optimal axial non-uniform tip clearances could improve the compressor performance, while the efficiency and the pressure ratio of the com-pressor were increased. The flow mechanism is that the axial non-uniform tip clearance can weaken the tip leak-age vortex, blow down low-energy fluids in boundary layers and reduce both flow blockage and tip loss.

  5. Kinetic and internal energy distributions via velocity-aligned Doppler spectroscopy: The 193 nm photodissociation of H/sub 2/S and HBr

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Z.; Koplitz, B.; Wittig, C.

    1987-07-15

    We report center-of-mass kinetic energy distributions for the 193 nm photodissociation of H/sub 2/S and HBr using the method of velocity--aligned Doppler spectroscopy. Nascent H atoms are detected by sequential two-photon photoionization via Lyman-..cap alpha.. (121.6 nm + 364.7 nm), and internal SH(X /sup 2/Pi) and Br excitations are observed directly in the H-atom kinetic energy distributions. The kinetic energy resolution is much better than in ''conventional'' sub-Doppler resolution spectroscopy and results from detecting spatially selected species whose velocities are aligned with the wave vector of the probe radiation, k/sub probe/, thereby providing a kinetic energy distribution for a specific laboratory direction. This improved resolution is achieved in the present experiments by using pulsed, collimated, and overlapped photolysis and probe beams, but the vital aspect of the technique involves increasing the delay between the two lasers in order to discriminate against species having velocity components perpendicular to k/sub probe/.

  6. Monin-Obukhov Similarity Functions of the Structure Parameter of Temperature and Turbulent Kinetic Energy Dissipation Rate in the Stable Boundary Layer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartogensis, O.K.; Debruin, H.A.R.

    2005-01-01

    The Monin-Obukhov similarity theory (MOST) functions fepsi; and fT, of the dissipation rate of turbulent kinetic energy (TKE), ¿, and the structure parameter of temperature, CT2, were determined for the stable atmospheric surface layer using data gathered in the context of CASES-99. These data cover

  7. Effects of Geostrophic Kinetic Energy on the Distribution of Mesopelagic Fish Larvae in the Southern Gulf of California in Summer/Fall Stratified Seasons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contreras-Catala, Fernando; Beier, Emilio; Godínez, Victor M.; Barton, Eric D.; Santamaría-del-Angel, Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    Effects of geostrophic kinetic energy flux on the three-dimensional distribution of fish larvae of mesopelagic species (Vinciguerria lucetia, Diogenichthys laternatus, Benthosema panamense and Triphoturus mexicanus) in the southern Gulf of California during summer and fall seasons of stronger stratification were analyzed. The greatest larval abundance was found at sampling stations in geostrophic kinetic energy-poor areas ( 21 J/m3), where mesoscale eddies were present, the larvae of the dominant species had low abundance and were spread more evenly through the water column, in spite of the water column stratification. For example, in a cyclonic eddy, V. lucetia larvae (34 larvae/10m2) extended their distribution to, at least, the limit of sampling 200 m depth below the pycnocline, while D. laternatus larvae (29 larvae/10m2) were found right up to the surface, both probably as a consequence mixing and secondary circulation in the eddy. Results showed that the level of the geostrophic kinetic energy flux affects the abundance and the three-dimensional distribution of mesopelagic fish larvae during the seasons of stronger stratification, indicating that areas with low geostrophic kinetic energy may be advantageous for feeding and development of mesopelagic fish larvae because of greater water column stability. PMID:27760185

  8. Coherent control using kinetic energy and the geometric phase of a conical intersection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liekhus-Schmaltz, Chelsea; McCracken, Gregory A.; Kaldun, Andreas; Cryan, James P.; Bucksbaum, Philip H.

    2016-10-01

    Conical intersections (CIs) between molecular potential energy surfaces with non-vanishing non-adiabatic couplings generally occur in any molecule consisting of at least three atoms. They play a fundamental role in describing the molecular dynamics beyond the Born-Oppenheimer approximation and have been used to understand a large variety of effects, from photofragmentation and isomerization to more exotic applications such as exciton fission in semiconductors. However, few studies have used the features of a CI as a tool for coherent control. Here we demonstrate two modes of control around a conical intersection. The first uses a continuous light field to control the population on the two intersecting electronic states in the vicinity of a CI. The second uses a pulsed light field to control wavepackets that are subjected to the geometric phase shift in transit around a CI. This second technique is likely to be useful for studying the role of nuclear dynamics in electronic coherence phenomena.

  9. Coherent control using kinetic energy and the geometric phase of a conical intersection

    CERN Document Server

    Liekhus-Schmaltz, Chelsea; Kaldun, Andreas; Cryan, James P; Bucksbaum, Philip H

    2016-01-01

    Conical intersections (CI) between molecular potential energy surfaces with non-vanishing non-adiabatic couplings generally occur in any molecule consisting of at least three atoms. They play a fundamental role in describing the molecular dynamics beyond the Born-Oppenheimer approximation and have been used to understand a large variety of effects, from photofragmentation and isomerization to more exotic applications such as exciton fission in semiconductors. However, few studies have used the features of a CI as a tool for coherent control. Here we demonstrate two modes of control around a conical intersection. The first uses a continuous light field to control the population on the two intersecting electronic states in the vicinity of a CI. The second uses a pulsed light field to control wavepackets that are subjected to the geometric phase shift in transit around a CI. This second technique is likely to be useful for studying the role of nuclear dynamics in electronic coherence phenomena.

  10. Comparing Poynting flux dominated magnetic tower jets with kinetic-energy dominated jets

    CERN Document Server

    Huarte-Espinosa, Martín; Blackman, Eric G; Ciardi, Andrea; Hartigan, Patrick M; Lebedev, Sergey; Chittenden, Jeremy P

    2012-01-01

    Magnetic Towers represent one of two fundamental forms of MHD outflows. Driven by magnetic pressure gradients, these flows have been less well studied than magneto-centrifugally launched jets even though magnetic towers may well be as common. Here we present new results exploring the behavior and evolution of magnetic tower outflows and demonstrate their connection with pulsed power experimental studies and purely hydrodynamic jets which might represent the asymptotic propagation regimes of magneto-centrifugally launched jets. High-resolution AMR MHD simulations (using the AstroBEAR code) provide insights into the underlying physics of magnetic towers and help us constrain models of their propagation. Our simulations have been designed to explore the effects of thermal energy losses and rotation on both tower flows and their hydro counterparts. We find these parameters have significant effects on the stability of magnetic towers, but mild effects on the stability of hydro jets. Current-driven perturbations in...

  11. Build Axial Gradient Field by Using Axial Magnetized Permanent Rings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Axial magnetic field produced by an axial magnetized permanent ring was studied. For two permanent rings, if they are magnetized in the same directions, a nearly uniform axial field can be produced. If they are magnetized in opposite direction,an axial gradient magnetic field can be generated, with the field range changing from -B0 to B0. A permanent magnet with a high axial gradient field was fabricated, the measured results agree with the PANDIRA calculation very well. For wider usage,it is desirable for the field gradient to be changed. Some methods to produce the variable gradient field are presented. These kinds of axial gradient magnetic field can also be used as a beam focusing for linear accelerator if the periodic field can be produced along the beam trajectory. The axial magnetic field is something like a solenoid, large stray field will leak to the outside environment if no method is taken to control them. In this paper, one method is illustrated to shield off the outside leakage field.

  12. Unified Dark Energy and Dust Dark Matter Dual to Quadratic Purely Kinetic K-Essence

    CERN Document Server

    Guendelman, Eduardo; Pacheva, Svetlana

    2015-01-01

    We consider a modified gravity plus single-scalar-field model, where the scalar Lagrangian couples symmetrically both to the standard Riemannian volume-form (spacetime integration measure density) given by the square-root of the determinant of the Riemannian metric, as well as to another non-Riemannian volume-form in terms of an auxiliary maximal-rank antisymmetric tensor gauge field. As shown in a previous paper, the pertinent scalar field dynamics provides an exact unified description of both dark energy via dynamical generation of a cosmological constant, and dark matter as a "dust" fluid with geodesic flow as a result of a hidden Noether symmetry. Here we extend the discussion by considering a non-trivial modification of the purely gravitational action in the form of f(R) = R - \\alpha R^2 generalized gravity. Upon deriving the corresponding "Einstein-frame" effective action of the latter modified gravity-scalar-field theory we find explicit duality (in the sense of weak versus strong coupling) between the...

  13. Axially symmetric volume constrained anisotropic mean curvature flow

    CERN Document Server

    Palmer, Bennett

    2011-01-01

    We study the long time existence theory for a non local flow associated to a free boundary problem for a trapped non liquid drop. The drop has free boundary components on two horizontal plates and its free energy is anisotropic and axially symmetric. For axially symmetric initial surfaces with sufficiently large volume, we show that the flow exists for all time. Numerical simulations of the curvature flow are presented.

  14. Laplacian-level kinetic energy approximations based on the fourth-order gradient expansion: Global assessment and application to the subsystem formulation of density functional theory

    CERN Document Server

    Laricchia, S; Fabiano, E; Della Sala, F

    2014-01-01

    We test Laplacian-level meta-generalized gradient approximation (meta-GGA) non-interacting kinetic energy functionals based on the fourth-order gradient expansion (GE4). We consider several well known Laplacian-level meta-GGAs from literature (bare GE4, modified GE4, and the MGGA functional of Perdew and Constantin [Phys. Rev. B \\textbf{75},155109 (2007)]), as well as two newly designed Laplacian-level kinetic energy functionals (named L0.4 and L0.6). First, a general assessment of the different functionals is performed, testing them for model systems (one-electron densities, Hooke's atom and different jellium systems), atomic and molecular kinetic energies as well as for their behavior with respect to density-scaling transformations. Finally, we assess, for the first time, the performance of the different functionals for Subsystem Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations on non-covalently interacting systems. We find that the different Laplacian-level meta-GGA kinetic functionals may improve the descript...

  15. INVESTIGATION OF THE KINETICS OF DRYING SEEDS THISTLE IN VORTEX CHAMBER WITH MICROWAVE ENERGY SUPPLY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. A. Kazartsev

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In the study of the current state of the theory, techniques and technologies for processing of milk thistle showed up a number of problems. One of those moments - the need to promptly provide quality and efficient process for drying seeds, but Russia has not produced special equipment for postharvest processing of seeds of milk thistle, and used for drying grain domestic appliances, represented mainly by mining and drum dryers, it is not suitable for thistle. This is due to the fact that, firstly, in the dewatering process is necessary to provide a relatively low final moisture drying product (5-6 %, and, secondly, to keep their beneficial substance in full, which imposes additional restrictions on the conditions of drying. One way of creating a new drying technology development and implementation in the industry of high-intensive devices with active hydrodynamic regimes with microwave energy supply, providing in many cases, higher technical and economic indicators. Therefore, the use of devices with swirling flow of heat-carrier for the intensification of the process of drying of dispersed materials is both theoretical interest and practical value. Microwave drying is based on the fact that the dielectric properties of water and dry food substances are different: the wet material is heated much faster than dry. During the microwave drying temperature wetter internal layers higher than the exterior more dehydrated (which creates a "right" - from the inner to the outer layers of the product - the gradient of moisture mass transfer is not realizable in any of the other known methods of drying. Milk thistle seeds have a unique composition: 25-32 % fatty oil, 15-17 % protein, 26 % fat, in the-soluble (B group and fat-soluble (A, D, E, K, F vitamins, mono- and disaccharides, macro- and trace elements (copper, zinc, selenium, dietary fiber and enzymes, mucus, up to 5 % (glucose, etc., phenolic compounds including flaviolignans 2-3% (silibinin

  16. Zonal propagation of kinetic energy and convection in the South China Sea and Indian monsoon regions in boreal summer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Longxun; GAO Hui; HE Jinhai; TAO Shiyan; JIN Zuhui

    2004-01-01

    Zonal propagation of kinetic energy (KE) and convection in the South China Sea (SCS) and Indian summer monsoon areas are examined in present study. Results suggest that the SCS and Indian summer monsoon prevailed regions (5-15°N) are dominated by the southwesterly wind, however, the disturbances of KE at 850 hPa and convection are observed mainly coming from the western Pacific Ocean (140-150°E), after passing through the SCS, and westward propagated into the Bay of Bengal (90-100°E). In the Indian summer monsoon domain, where the disturbances of KE are found mainly coming from the Arabian Sea (AS) and eastward propagated into the Bay of Bengal. Therefore, the SCS and the Indian summer monsoon are quite different in zonal propagation of KE and convection. The SCS summer monsoon is mainly affected by the KE and convection coming from the tropical western Pacific. The Indian summer monsoon, however, can be partly influenced by the AS and the SCS summer monsoon. The analysis also suggests that the interaction region between the SCS and the Indian summer monsoon is around 90-95°E, rather than 105°E as proposed by earlier studies.

  17. Migration by soaring or flapping: numerical atmospheric simulations reveal that turbulence kinetic energy dictates bee-eater flight mode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapir, Nir; Horvitz, Nir; Wikelski, Martin; Avissar, Roni; Mahrer, Yitzhak; Nathan, Ran

    2011-11-22

    Aerial migrants commonly face atmospheric dynamics that may affect their movement and behaviour. Specifically, bird flight mode has been suggested to depend on convective updraught availability and tailwind assistance. However, this has not been tested thus far since both bird tracks and meteorological conditions are difficult to measure in detail throughout extended migratory flyways. Here, we applied, to our knowledge, the first comprehensive numerical atmospheric simulations by mean of the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS) to study how meteorological processes affect the flight behaviour of migrating birds. We followed European bee-eaters (Merops apiaster) over southern Israel using radio telemetry and contrasted bird flight mode (flapping, soaring-gliding or mixed flight) against explanatory meteorological variables estimated by RAMS simulations at a spatial grid resolution of 250 × 250 m(2). We found that temperature and especially turbulence kinetic energy (TKE) determine bee-eater flight mode, whereas, unexpectedly, no effect of tailwind assistance was found. TKE during soaring-gliding was significantly higher and distinct from TKE during flapping. We propose that applying detailed atmospheric simulations over extended migratory flyways can elucidate the highly dynamic behaviour of air-borne organisms, help predict the abundance and distribution of migrating birds, and aid in mitigating hazardous implications of bird migration.

  18. Migration by soaring or flapping: numerical atmospheric simulations reveal that turbulence kinetic energy dictates bee-eater flight mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapir, Nir; Horvitz, Nir; Wikelski, Martin; Avissar, Roni; Mahrer, Yitzhak; Nathan, Ran

    2011-01-01

    Aerial migrants commonly face atmospheric dynamics that may affect their movement and behaviour. Specifically, bird flight mode has been suggested to depend on convective updraught availability and tailwind assistance. However, this has not been tested thus far since both bird tracks and meteorological conditions are difficult to measure in detail throughout extended migratory flyways. Here, we applied, to our knowledge, the first comprehensive numerical atmospheric simulations by mean of the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS) to study how meteorological processes affect the flight behaviour of migrating birds. We followed European bee-eaters (Merops apiaster) over southern Israel using radio telemetry and contrasted bird flight mode (flapping, soaring–gliding or mixed flight) against explanatory meteorological variables estimated by RAMS simulations at a spatial grid resolution of 250 × 250 m2. We found that temperature and especially turbulence kinetic energy (TKE) determine bee-eater flight mode, whereas, unexpectedly, no effect of tailwind assistance was found. TKE during soaring–gliding was significantly higher and distinct from TKE during flapping. We propose that applying detailed atmospheric simulations over extended migratory flyways can elucidate the highly dynamic behaviour of air-borne organisms, help predict the abundance and distribution of migrating birds, and aid in mitigating hazardous implications of bird migration. PMID:21471116

  19. Temperature Dependence of the Kinetic Energy of the Correlated Electron Plasma by Restricted Path-Integral Molecular Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runge, Keith; Deymier, Pierre

    2013-03-01

    Recent progress in orbital-free Density Functional Theory (OF-DFT), particularly with regard to temperature dependent functionals, has promise for the simulation of warm dense matter (WDM) systems. WDM includes systems with densities of an order of magnitude beyond ambient or more and temperatures measured in kilokelvin. A challenge for the development of temperature dependent OF-DFT functionals is the lack of benchmark information with temperature and pressure dependence on simple models under WDM conditions. We present an approach to fill this critical gap using the restricted path-integral molecular dynamics (rPIMD) method. Electrons are described as harmonic necklaces within the discrete path integral representation while quantum exchange takes the form of cross linking between electron necklaces. A molecular dynamics algorithm is used to sample phase space and the fermion sign problem is addressed by restricting the density matrix to positive values. The temperature dependence of kinetic energies for the strongly coupled electron plasma is presented for a number of Wigner-Seitz radii in terms of a fourth order Sommerfeld expansion. Supported by US DoE Grant DE-SC0002139

  20. Ion kinetic energy conservation and magnetic field strength constancy in multi-fluid solar wind Alfv\\'enic turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Matteini, L; Pantellini, F; Velli, M; Schwartz, S J

    2015-01-01

    We investigate properties of the plasma fluid motion in the large amplitude low frequency fluctuations of highly Alfv\\'enic fast solar wind. We show that protons locally conserve total kinetic energy when observed from an effective frame of reference comoving with the fluctuations. For typical properties of the fast wind, this frame can be reasonably identified by alpha particles, which, owing to their drift with respect to protons at about the Alfv\\'en speed along the magnetic field, do not partake in the fluid low frequency fluctuations. Using their velocity to transform proton velocity into the frame of Alfv\\'enic turbulence, we demonstrate that the resulting plasma motion is characterized by a constant absolute value of the velocity, zero electric fields, and aligned velocity and magnetic field vectors as expected for unidirectional Alfv\\'enic fluctuations in equilibrium. We propose that this constraint, via the correlation between velocity and magnetic field in Alfv\\'enic turbulence, is at the origin of ...

  1. On a consistent high-order finite difference scheme with kinetic energy conservation for simulating turbulent reacting flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trisjono, Philipp; Kang, Seongwon; Pitsch, Heinz

    2016-12-01

    The main objective of this study is to present an accurate and consistent numerical framework for turbulent reacting flows based on a high-order finite difference (HOFD) scheme. It was shown previously by Desjardins et al. (2008) [4] that a centered finite difference scheme discretely conserving the kinetic energy and an upwind-biased scheme for the scalar transport can be combined into a useful scheme for turbulent reacting flows. With a high-order spatial accuracy, however, an inconsistency among discretization schemes for different conservation laws is identified, which can disturb a scalar field spuriously under non-uniform density distribution. Various theoretical and numerical analyses are performed on the sources of the unphysical error. From this, the derivative of the mass-conserving velocity and the local Péclet number are identified as the primary factors affecting the error. As a solution, an HOFD stencil for the mass conservation is reformulated into a flux-based form that can be used consistently with an upwind-biased scheme for the scalar transport. The effectiveness of the proposed formulation is verified using two-dimensional laminar flows such as a scalar transport problem and a laminar premixed flame, where unphysical oscillations in the scalar fields are removed. The applicability of the proposed scheme is demonstrated in an LES of a turbulent stratified premixed flame.

  2. A simple parameterization for the turbulent kinetic energy transport terms in the convective boundary layer derived from large eddy simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puhales, Franciano Scremin; Rizza, Umberto; Degrazia, Gervásio Annes; Acevedo, Otávio Costa

    2013-02-01

    In this work a parametrization for the transport terms of the turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) budget equation, valid for a convective boundary layer (CBL) is presented. This is a hard task to accomplish from experimental data, especially because of the difficulty associated to the measurements of pressure turbulent fluctuations, which are necessary to determine the pressure correlation TKE transport term. Thus, employing a large eddy simulation (LES) a full diurnal planetary boundary layer (PBL) cycle was simulated. In this simulation a forcing obtained from experimental data is used, so that the numerical experiment represents a more realistic case than a stationary PBL. For this study all terms of the TKE budget equation were determined for a CBL. From these data, polynomials that describe the TKE transport terms’ vertical profiles were adjusted. The polynomials found are a good description of the LES data, and from them it is shown that a simple formulation that directly relates the transport terms to the TKE magnitude has advantages on other parameterizations commonly used in CBL numerical models. Furthermore, the present study shows that the TKE turbulent transport term dominates over the TKE transport by pressure perturbations and that for most of the CBL these two terms have opposite signs.

  3. Low kinetic energy photoelectron diffractions for C 1s and O 1s electrons of free CO molecules in the EXAFS region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adachi, Jun-ichi; Yamazaki, Masakazu; Kimura, Yasuyuki; Yagishita, Akira [Photon Factory, IMSS, KEK, 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba 305-0801 (Japan); Kazama, Misato; Ohori, Yusuke; Fujikawa, Takashi [Graduate School of Advanced Integration Science, Chiba University, 1-33 Yayoi-cho, Inage 263-8522 (Japan); Teramoto, Takahiro, E-mail: jun-ichi.adachi@kek.j [Graduate School of Science, University of Tokyo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, 113-0033 (Japan)

    2009-11-15

    We have measured molecular-frame photoelectron angular distributions from carbon 1s and oxygen 1s levels of CO molecules up to a photoelectron kinetic energy (KE) of {approx}150 eV. The backward-scattering intensities exhibited a strong modulation as a function of the kinetic energy of the photoelectrons, whereas the intensities for the forward-scattering gradually increased and then became nearly constant over KE {approx}100 eV. Multiple scattering calculations with a muffin-tin potential qualitatively reproduced the experimental results. The present results may be considered as the observation of low-energy photoelectron diffraction patterns for gaseous free CO molecules, which are involved in modulations in extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectra.

  4. The interaction of C60 on Si(111 7x7 studied by Supersonic Molecular Beams: interplay between precursor kinetic energy and substrate temperature in surface activated processes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucrezia eAversa

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Buckminsterfullerene (C60 is a molecule fully formed of carbon that can be used, owing to its electronic and mechanical properties, as clean precursor for the growth of carbon-based materials, ranging from -conjugated systems (graphenes to synthesized species, e.g. carbides such as silicon carbide (SiC. To this goal, C60 cage rupture is the main physical process that triggers material growth. Cage breaking can be obtained either thermally by heating up the substrate to high temperatures (630°C, after C60 physisorption, or kinetically by using Supersonic Molecular Beam Epitaxy (SuMBE techniques. In this work, aiming at demonstrating the growth of SiC thin films by C60 supersonic beams, we present the experimental investigation of C60 impacts on Si(111 7x7 kept at 500°C for translational kinetic energies ranging from 18 to 30 eV. The attained kinetically activated synthesis of SiC submonolayer films is probed by in-situ surface electron spectroscopies (XPS and UPS. Furthermore, in these experimental conditions the C60-Si(111 7×7 collision has been studied by computer simulations based on a tight-binding approximation to Density Functional Theory, DFT. Our theoretical and experimental findings point towards a kinetically driven growth of SiC on Si, where C60 precursor kinetic energy plays a crucial role, while temperature is relevant only after cage rupture to enhance Si and carbon reactivity. In particular, we observe a counterintuitive effect in which for low kinetic energy (below 22 eV, C60 bounces back without breaking more effectively at high temperature due to energy transfer from excited phonons. At higher kinetic energy (22 < K < 30 eV, for which cage rupture occurs, temperature enhances reactivity without playing a major role in the cage break. These results are in good agreement with ab-initio molecular dynamics simulations. SuMBE is thus a technique able to drive materials growth at low temperature regime.

  5. A mononuclear iron(II) complex: cooperativity, kinetics and activation energy of the solvent-dependent spin transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bushuev, Mark B; Pishchur, Denis P; Logvinenko, Vladimir A; Gatilov, Yuri V; Korolkov, Ilya V; Shundrina, Inna K; Nikolaenkova, Elena B; Krivopalov, Viktor P

    2016-01-07

    The system [FeL2](BF4)2 (1)-EtOH-H2O (L is 4-(3,5-dimethyl-1H-pyrazol-1-yl)-2-(pyridin-2-yl)-6-methylpyrimidine) shows a complicated balance between the relative stabilities of solvatomorphs and polymorphs of the complex [FeL2](BF4)2. New solvatomorphs, 1(LS)·EtOH·H2O and β-1(LS)·xH2O, were isolated in this system. They were converted into four daughter phases, 1(A/LS), 1(D/LS), 1(E/LS)·yEtOH·zH2O and 1(F/LS). On thermal cycling in sealed ampoules, the phases 1(LS)·EtOH·H2O and β-1(LS)·xH2O transform into the anhydrous phase 1(A/LS). The hysteresis loop width for the (A/LS) ↔ (A/HS) spin transition depends on the water and ethanol contents in the ampoule and varies from ca. 30 K up to 145 K. The reproducible hysteresis loop of 145 K is the widest ever reported one for a spin crossover complex. The phase 1(A/LS) combines the outstanding spin crossover properties with thermal robustness allowing for multiple cycling in sealed ampoules without degradation. The kinetics of the 1(A/LS) → 1(A/HS) transition is sigmoidal which is indicative of strong cooperative interactions. The cooperativity of the 1(A/LS) → 1(A/HS) transition is related to the formation of a 2D supramolecular structure of the phase 1(A/LS). The activation energy for the spin transition is very high (hundreds of kJ mol(-1)). The kinetics of the 1(A/HS) → 1(A/LS) transition can either be sigmoidal or exponential depending on the water and ethanol contents in the ampoule. The phases 1(D/LS) and 1(F/LS) show gradual crossover, whereas the phase 1(E/LS)·yEtOH·yH2O shows a reversible hysteretic transition associated with the solvent molecule release and uptake.

  6. CFD Simulation and Optimization of Very Low Head Axial Flow Turbine Runner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yohannis Mitiku Tobo

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this work is Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD modelling, simulation and optimization of very low head axial flow turbine runner  to be used to drive  a centrifugal pump of turbine-driven pump. The ultimate goal of the optimization is to produce a power of 1kW at head less than 1m from flowing  river to drive centrifugal pump using mechanical coupling (speed multiplier gear directly. Flow rate, blade numbers, turbine rotational speed, inlet angle are parameters used in CFD modeling,  simulation and design optimization of the turbine runner. The computed results show that power developed by a turbine runner increases with increasing flow rate. Pressure inside the turbine runner increases with flow rate but, runner efficiency increases for some flow rate and almost constant thereafter. Efficiency and power developed by a runner drops quickly if turbine speed increases due to higher pressure losses and conversion of pressure energy to kinetic energy inside the runner. Increasing blade number increases power developed but, efficiency does not increase always. Efficiency increases for some blade number and drops down due to the fact that  change in direction of the relative flow vector at the runner exit, which decreases the net rotational momentum and increases the axial flow velocity.

  7. A critical study of the Miura-Maki integral method for the estimation of the kinetic parameters of the distributed activation energy model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Junmeng; Li, Tao; Liu, Ronghou

    2011-02-01

    Using some theoretically simulated data constructed from known sets of the activation energy distribution f(E) (assumed to follow the Gaussian distribution [Formula in text] where E is the activation energy, E(0) is the mean value of the activation energy distribution, and σ is the standard deviation of the activation energy distribution) and the frequency factor k(0), a critical study of the use of the Miura-Maki integral method for the estimation of the kinetic parameters of the distributed activation energy model has been performed from three cases. For all cases, the use of the Miura-Maki integral method leads to important errors in the estimation of k(0). There are some differences between the assumed and calculated activation energy distributions and the differences decrease with increasing the assumed k(0) values (for Case 1), with increasing the assumed σ values (for Case 2), and with decreasing the b values (for Case 3).

  8. Light Weakly Coupled Axial Forces: Models, Constraints, and Projections

    CERN Document Server

    Kahn, Yonatan; Mishra-Sharma, Siddharth; Tait, Tim M P

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the landscape of constraints on MeV-GeV scale, hidden U(1) forces with nonzero axial-vector couplings to Standard Model fermions. While the purely vector-coupled dark photon, which may arise from kinetic mixing, is a well-motivated scenario, several MeV-scale anomalies motivate a theory with axial couplings which can be UV-completed consistent with Standard Model gauge invariance. Moreover, existing constraints on dark photons depend on products of various combinations of axial and vector couplings, making it difficult to isolate the effects of axial couplings for particular flavors of SM fermions. We present a representative renormalizable, UV-complete model of a dark photon with adjustable axial and vector couplings, discuss its general features, and show how some UV constraints may be relaxed in a model with nonrenormalizable Yukawa couplings at the expense of fine-tuning. We survey the existing parameter space and the projected reach of planned experiments, briefly commenting on the relevan...

  9. Bi-axial Vibration Energy Harvesting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-01

    layer of beeswax [50] was employed at the interface between the ME transducer and the upper magnet to minimise shear movement. Measurements of the...Measurement of Physical and Mechanical Properties of Beeswax ,” Mat. Sci. and Tech., Vol. 18, p. 463, 2002. 51. Material Data Matrix, Ferroperm

  10. Comparing large eddy simulations and measurements of the turbulent kinetic energy budget in an urban canopy layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parlange, M. B.; Giometto, M. G.; Meneveau, C. V.; Fang, J.; Christen, A.

    2013-12-01

    Local turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) in the Urban Canopy Layer (UCL) is highly dependent on the actual configuration of obstacles relative to mean wind and stability. For many applications, building-resolving information is neither required nor feasible, and simply beyond the numerical capabilities of operational systems. Common urban canopy parameterizations (UCP) used in dispersion and mesoscale forecasting models hence rely on a horizontally averaged approach, where the UCL is represented as a 1D column, often for simplified geometries such as infinite street canyons. We use Large Eddy Simulations (LES) of the airflow over and within a realistic urban geometry in the city of Basel, Switzerland to determine all terms of the TKE budget in order to guide and validate current approaches used in UCPs. A series of high-resolution LES runs of the fully developed flow are performed in order to characterize the TKE budget terms in a horizontally averaged frame of view for various directions of the approaching flow under neutral conditions. Equations are solved on a regular domain with a horizontal resolution of 2 m. A Lagrangian scale-dependent LES model is adopted to parametrize the subgrid-scale stresses and buildings are taken into account adopting an immersed boundary approach with the geometry taken from a highly accurate digital building model. The modeled (periodic) domain is centered on the location of a 32 m tall tower, where measurements of turbulence were performed, during the BUBBLE program in 2001/02 (Rotach et al., Theor. Appl. Clim., 82, 231-261, 2005). Selected terms of the TKE budget were inferred from six levels of ultrasonic anemometer measurements operated over nearly a full year between ground level and two times the mean building height. This contribution answers the questions: (1) How well do TKE budget terms calculated by the LES at the exact tower location match the single point measurements on the tower under comparable conditions? (2) How

  11. Insights of ibuprofen electro-oxidation on metal-oxide-coated Ti anodes: Kinetics, energy consumption and reaction mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chong; Yu, Yanxin; Yin, Lifeng; Niu, Junfeng; Hou, Li-An

    2016-11-01

    Electrochemical degradation of ibuprofen (IBP) was performed on three types of Ti-based metal oxide electrodes. The degradation of IBP followed pseudo-first-order kinetics and the electrochemical degradation rate constant (k) over Ti/SnO2-Sb/Ce-PbO2 (9.4 × 10(-2) min(-1)) was 2.0 and 1.7 times of the values over Ti/Ce-PbO2 (4.7 × 10(-2) min(-1)) and Ti/SnO2-Sb (5.6 × 10(-2) min(-1)), respectively. The removal of total organic carbon and the energy consumption per order for IBP degradation were 93.2% and 13.1 Wh L(-1), respectively, under the optimal conditions using Ti/SnO2-Sb/Ce-PbO2 anode. Six aromatic intermediate products of IBP were identified by ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with a quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometer. The electrochemical mineralization mechanism of IBP was proposed. It was supposed that OH radicals produced on the surface of anode attacked IBP to form hydroxylated IBP derivatives that were then followed by a series of hydroxylation, loss of isopropanol and isopropyl, decarboxylation and benzene ring cleavage processes to form simple linear carboxylic acids. By successive hydroxylation, these carboxylic acids were then oxidized to CO2 and H2O, achieving the complete mineralization of IBP.

  12. Flow-Induced New Channels of Energy Exchange in Multi-Scale Plasma Dynamics – Revisiting Perturbative Hybrid Kinetic-MHD Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiraishi, Junya; Miyato, Naoaki; Matsunaga, Go

    2016-01-01

    It is found that new channels of energy exchange between macro- and microscopic dynamics exist in plasmas. They are induced by macroscopic plasma flow. This finding is based on the kinetic-magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) theory, which analyses interaction between macroscopic (MHD-scale) motion and microscopic (particle-scale) dynamics. The kinetic-MHD theory is extended to include effects of macroscopic plasma flow self-consistently. The extension is realised by generalising an energy exchange term due to wave-particle resonance, denoted by δ WK. The first extension is generalisation of the particle’s Lagrangian, and the second one stems from modification to the particle distribution function due to flow. These extensions lead to a generalised expression of δ WK, which affects the MHD stability of plasmas. PMID:27160346

  13. Dynamical influence of gravity waves generated by the Vestfjella Mountains in Antarctica: radar observations, fine-scale modelling and kinetic energy budget analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joel Arnault

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Gravity waves generated by the Vestfjella Mountains (in western Droning Maud Land, Antarctica, southwest of the Finnish/Swedish Aboa/Wasa station have been observed with the Moveable atmospheric radar for Antarctica (MARA during the SWEDish Antarctic Research Programme (SWEDARP in December 2007/January 2008. These radar observations are compared with a 2-month Weather Research Forecast (WRF model experiment operated at 2 km horizontal resolution. A control simulation without orography is also operated in order to separate unambiguously the contribution of the mountain waves on the simulated atmospheric flow. This contribution is then quantified with a kinetic energy budget analysis computed in the two simulations. The results of this study confirm that mountain waves reaching lower-stratospheric heights break through convective overturning and generate inertia gravity waves with a smaller vertical wavelength, in association with a brief depletion of kinetic energy through frictional dissipation and negative vertical advection. The kinetic energy budget also shows that gravity waves have a strong influence on the other terms of the budget, i.e. horizontal advection and horizontal work of pressure forces, so evaluating the influence of gravity waves on the mean-flow with the vertical advection term alone is not sufficient, at least in this case. We finally obtain that gravity waves generated by the Vestfjella Mountains reaching lower stratospheric heights generally deplete (create kinetic energy in the lower troposphere (upper troposphere–lower stratosphere, in contradiction with the usual decelerating effect attributed to gravity waves on the zonal circulation in the upper troposphere–lower stratosphere.

  14. The balance of kinetic and total energy simulated by the OSU two-level atmospheric general circulation model for January and July

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, J.-T.; Gates, W. L.; Kim, J.-W.

    1984-01-01

    A three-year simulation which prescribes seasonally varying solar radiation and sea surface temperature is the basis of the present study of the horizontal structure of the balances of kinetic and total energy simulated by Oregon State University's two-level atmospheric general circulation model. Mechanisms responsible for the local energy changes are identified, and the energy balance requirement's fulfilment is examined. In January, the vertical integral of the total energy shows large amounts of external heating over the North Pacific and Atlantic, together with cooling over most of the land area of the Northern Hemisphere. In July, an overall seasonal reversal is found. Both seasons are also characterized by strong energy flux divergence in the tropics, in association with the poleward transport of heat and momentum.

  15. Distribution of mean kinetic energy around an isolated wind turbine and a characteristic wind turbine of a very large wind farm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortina, Gerard; Calaf, Marc; Cal, Raúl Bayoán

    2016-11-01

    An isolated wind turbine and a very large wind farm are introduced into large-eddy simulations of an atmospheric boundary layer. The atmospheric flow is forced with a constant geostrophic wind and a time-varying surface temperature extracted from a selected period of the CASES-99 field experiment. A control volume approach is used to directly compare the transfer of mean kinetic energy around a characteristic wind turbine throughout a diurnal cycle considering both scenarios. For the very large wind farm case, results illustrate that the recovery of mean kinetic energy around a wind turbine is dominated by the vertical flux, regardless of atmospheric stratification. Contrarily, for an isolated wind turbine, the recovery is dependent on the background atmospheric stratification and it is produced by a combination of advection, vertical flux, and pressure redistribution. The analysis also illustrates that during the unstable stratification periods vertical entrainment of mean kinetic energy dominates, whereas during the stable regime horizontal entrainment is predominant. Finally, it is observed that in both scenarios, the single wind turbine and the large wind farm cases, turbulent mixing is driven by the background convective stratification during the unstable period and by the effect of the wind turbine during the stable regime.

  16. Influence of canopy thickness on throughfall amount and kinetic energy under different canopy saturation conditions: an indoor experiment with a Japanese cypress (Chamaecyparis obtusa) stand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanko, K.; Onda, Y.; Ito, A.; Moriwaki, H.

    2007-12-01

    To assess the influence of canopy thickness on throughfall amount and kinetic energy under different canopy saturation conditions, indoor laboratory experiments were conducted involving water sprinklers and a transplanted tree stand of Japanese cypress (Chamaecyparis obtusa) of 9.8 m high. Artificial rainfall was applied onto the tree for 15 min with an intensity of 39.8 mm h-1. Throughfall amount and raindrops measured at eight points for four canopy structures generated by staged branch pruning, each first branch height was 2, 3, 4, and 5 m, respectively. With the thinning of the canopy thickness, 1) initial throughfall amount increased depending on the decrease of canopy storage, 2) the abundance ratio of large drops generated as the drips increased owing to the decrease of splash droplets generated by the impact of the drips onto the foliage in the lower canopy layers, 3) the drips with higher velocities generated from the upper canopy layers increased, and consequently, 4) throughfall kinetic energy increased. The canopy thickness has an important effect on the variability of throughfall amount and kinetic energy due to the change of processes of canopy saturation and the drip generation in the canopies.

  17. Kinetic and internal energy distributions via velocity-aligned Doppler spectroscopy: The 193 nm photodissociation of H2S and HBr

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Z.; Koplitz, B.; Wittig, C.

    1987-07-01

    We report center-of-mass kinetic energy distributions for the 193 nm photodissociation of H2S and HBr using the method of velocity-aligned Doppler spectroscopy. Nascent H atoms are detected by sequential two-photon photoionization via Lyman-α (121.6 nm + 364.7 nm), and internal SH(X 2Π) and Br excitations are observed directly in the H-atom kinetic energy distributions. The kinetic energy resolution is much better than in ``conventional'' sub-Doppler resolution spectroscopy and results from detecting spatially selected species whose velocities are aligned with the wave vector of the probe radiation, kprobe, thereby providing a kinetic energy distribution for a specific laboratory direction. This improved resolution is achieved in the present experiments by using pulsed, collimated, and overlapped photolysis and probe beams, but the vital aspect of the technique involves increasing the delay between the two lasers in order to discriminate against species having velocity components perpendicular to kprobe. In the case of HBr, we identify the Br(2P3/2) and Br(2P1/2) contributions and find that the Br(2P1/2) channel accounts for approximately 14% of the fragmentation associated with perpendicular electronic transitions. Concerning H2S, SH(X 2Π) vibrational structure is clearly evident in the H-atom kinetic energy distribution, and the SH vibrational distribution shows oscillations, with [v″=0]>[v″=1], [v″=1][v″=3], [v″=3][v″=5]. Such oscillatory behavior was predicted theoretically by Kulander. A simulation of our data places 32% of the SH in v″>0 (˜2700 cm-1, which is approximately 14% of the available energy, hν-D0), while the general features of our H2S data are in accord with the TOF study of van Veen et al. Presently, our measurements appear to be limited by the dye laser resolution (˜0.06 cm-1 at 364.7 nm), but a significant improvement of the laser bandwidth is possible using commercially available sources. The velocity-aligned Doppler

  18. Aerodynamic Modelling and Optimization of Axial Fans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Dan Nørtoft

    A numerically efficient mathematical model for the aerodynamics oflow speed axial fans of the arbitrary vortex flow type has been developed.The model is based on a blade-element principle, whereby therotor is divided into a number of annular streamtubes.For each of these streamtubes relations...... for velocity, pressure andradial position are derived from the conservationlaws for mass, tangential momentum and energy.The resulting system of equations is non-linear and, dueto mass conservation and pressure equilibrium far downstream of the rotor,strongly coupled.The equations are solved using the Newton...

  19. Time-dependent coupling of electron energy distribution function, vibrational kinetics of the asymmetric mode of CO2 and dissociation, ionization and electronic excitation kinetics under discharge and post-discharge conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietanza, L. D.; Colonna, G.; D'Ammando, G.; Capitelli, M.

    2017-01-01

    A time-dependent self-consistent model based on the coupling of the Boltzmann equation for the electron energy distribution function (EEDF) with the non-equilibrium vibrational kinetics of the asymmetric mode, as well as a simplified global model, have been implemented for a pure CO2 plasma. The simplified time-dependent global model takes into account dissociation and ionization as well as the reverse of these processes. It also takes into account the excitation/de-excitation of an electronic excited state at 10.5 eV. The model has been applied to describe the discharge and post-discharge conditions typically met in an atmospheric-pressure dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) and in a moderate-pressure microwave discharge. The reported results show the strong coupling between the excited state and the electron energy distribution kinetics due to superelastic (vibrational and electronic) collisions. Moreover, the dissociation rate from a pure vibrational mechanism can become competitive with the corresponding rate from the direct electron impact mechanism at high values of vibrational temperature.

  20. Axial Current and Noether Charge

    CERN Document Server

    Mahato, Prasanta

    2012-01-01

    A decade ago, a Lagrangian density has been proposed by the author where only the local symmetries of the Lorentz subgroup of (A)ds group is retained. This formalism has been found to produce some results encompassing that of standard Einstein-Hilbert formalism. In the present article, the conserved axial vector matter currents, constructed in some earlier paper, have been found to be a result of Noether's theorem. PACS: 04.20.Fy, 04.20.Cv, 11.40.-q Keywords: Torsion, Axial Current, Noether's Theorem

  1. CO-AXIAL DISCHARGES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luce, J.S.; Smith, L.P.

    1960-11-22

    A method and apparatus are given for producing coaxial arc discharges in an evacuated enclosure and within a strong, confining magnetic field. The arcs are maintained at a high potential difference. Electrons will diffuse to the more positive arc from the negative arc, and positive ions will diffuse from the more positive arc to the negative arc. Coaxial arc discharges have the advantage that ions which return to strike the positive arc discharge will lose no energy since they do not strike a solid wall or electrode. Those discharges are useful in confining an ionized plasma between the discharges, and have the advantage of preventing impurities from the walls of the enclosure from entering ihe plasma area because of the arc barrier set up bv the cylindrical outer arc.

  2. High-kinetic-energy photoemission spectroscopy of Ni at 1s : 6-eV satellite at 4 eV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karis, O.; Svensson, S.; Rusz, J.; Oppeneer, P. M.; Gorgoi, M.; Schäfers, F.; Braun, W.; Eberhardt, W.; Mårtensson, N.

    2008-12-01

    Electron correlations are responsible for many profound phenomena in solid-state physics. A classical example is the 6-eV satellite in the photoelectron spectrum of Ni. Until now the satellite structure has only been investigated at the L shell and more shallow levels. Here we report a high-kinetic-energy photoemission spectroscopy (HIKE) investigation of Ni metal. We present 1s and 2p photoelectron spectra, obtained using excitation energies up to 12.6 keV. Our investigation demonstrates that the energy position of the satellite relative to the main line is different for the 1s and the 2p levels. In combination with electronic structure calculations, we show that this energy shift is attributed to unique differences in the core-valence coupling for the K and L2,3 shells in 3d transition metals, resulting in different screening of the core holes.

  3. Mechanism and kinetics of spontaneous nanotube growth driven by screw dislocations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morin, Stephen A; Bierman, Matthew J; Tong, Jonathan; Jin, Song

    2010-04-23

    Single-crystal nanotubes are commonly observed, but their formation is often not understood. We show that nanotube growth can be driven by axial screw dislocations: Self-perpetuating growth spirals enable anisotropic growth, and the dislocation strain energy overcomes the surface energy required for creating a new inner surface forming hollow tubes spontaneously. This was demonstrated through solution-grown zinc oxide nanotubes and nanowires by controlling supersaturation using a flow reactor and confirmed using microstructural characterization. The agreement between experimental growth kinetics and those predicted from fundamental crystal growth theories confirms that the growth of these nanotubes is driven by dislocations.

  4. Axial-vector dominance predictions in quasielastic neutrino-nucleus scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Amaro, J E

    2015-01-01

    We use the minimum meson-dominance ansatz compatible with low- and high energy constrains to model the nucleon axial form factor. The parameters of the resulting axial form factor are the masses and widths of the two axial mesons, incorporated as a product of monopoles. By applying the half width rule in a Monte Carlo simulation a distribution of theoretical predictions can be generated for the neutrino-nucleus quasielastic cross section. We test the model by applying it to the $(\

  5. Thermophoresis of Axially Symmetric Bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    Sweden Abstract. Thermophoresis of axially symmetric bodies is investigated to first order in the Knudsen-mimber, Kn. The study is made in the limit...derived. Asymptotic solutions are studied. INTRODUCTION Thermophoresis as a phenomenon has been known for a long time, and several authors have approached

  6. Development of a modified independent parallel reactions kinetic model and comparison with the distributed activation energy model for the pyrolysis of a wide variety of biomass fuels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sfakiotakis, Stelios; Vamvuka, Despina

    2015-12-01

    The pyrolysis of six waste biomass samples was studied and the fuels were kinetically evaluated. A modified independent parallel reactions scheme (IPR) and a distributed activation energy model (DAEM) were developed and their validity was assessed and compared by checking their accuracy of fitting the experimental results, as well as their prediction capability in different experimental conditions. The pyrolysis experiments were carried out in a thermogravimetric analyzer and a fitting procedure, based on least squares minimization, was performed simultaneously at different experimental conditions. A modification of the IPR model, considering dependence of the pre-exponential factor on heating rate, was proved to give better fit results for the same number of tuned kinetic parameters, comparing to the known IPR model and very good prediction results for stepwise experiments. Fit of calculated data to the experimental ones using the developed DAEM model was also proved to be very good.

  7. An Axial-Vector Photon in a Mirror World

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharafiddinov, Rasulkhozha S.

    2016-03-01

    The unity of symmetry laws emphasizes, in the case of a mirror CP-even Dirac Lagrangian, the ideas of the left- and right-handed axial-vector photons referring to long- and short-lived bosons of true neutrality, respectively. Such a difference in lifetimes expresses the unidenticality of masses, energies and momenta of axial-vector photons of the different components. They define the unified field theory equation of C-odd particles with an integral spin. Together with a new equation of a theory of truly neutral particles with the half-integral spin, the latter reflects the availability in their nature of the second type of the local axial-vector gauge transformation responsible for origination in the Lagrangian of C-oddity of an interaction Newton component giving an axial-vector mass to all the interacting particles and fields. The mirror axial-vector mass, energy and momentum operators constitute a CP-invariant equation of quantum mechanics, confirming that each of them can individually influence on matter field. Thereby, findings suggest at the level of the mass-charge structure of gauge invariance a new equation for the C-noninvariant Lagrangian.

  8. An Axial Vector Photon in a Mirror World

    CERN Document Server

    Sharafiddinov, Rasulkhozha S

    2015-01-01

    The unity of symmetry laws emphasizes, in the case of a mirror CP-even Dirac Lagrangian, the ideas of the left- and right-handed axial-vector photons referring to long- and short-lived bosons of true neutrality, respectively. Such a difference in lifetimes expresses the unidenticality of masses, energies and momenta of axial-vector photons of the different components. They define the unified field theory equation of C-odd particles with an integral spin. Together with a new equation of a theory of truly neutral particles with the half-integral spin, the latter reflects the availability in their nature of the second type of the local axial-vector gauge transformation responsible for origination in the Lagrangian of C-oddity of an interaction Newton component giving an axial-vector mass to all the interacting particles and fields. The mirror axial-vector mass, energy and momentum operators constitute a CP-invariant equation of quantum mechanics, confirming that each of them can individually influence on matter ...

  9. Optimization of axial blowers. Optimierung von Axial-Ventilatoren

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolte, W.

    1992-08-01

    For the optimum possible design of axial blowers, trials are evaluated in the article, which are based on the grid profile examined by N. Scholz. The computation for the pressure number and the primary degree of efficiency are shown as well as the evaluation of the effect of the Reynolds and mach number on the degree of efficiency and determination of the secondary losses. In a final example, the dimensions of a blower are computed from the data determined during the trials. (orig.).

  10. Oxidation of aqueous HF-treated Si(001) surface induced by translational kinetic energy of O sub 2 at room temperature

    CERN Document Server

    Yoshigoe, A

    2003-01-01

    The oxidation induced by the translational kinetic energy of O sub 2 on the Si(001) surface treated with HF solution were investigated by combining synchrotron radiation photoemission spectroscopy with the supersonic molecular beam techniques. The oxidation at room temperature did not progress up to 3600 L of O sub 2 exposure with incident energy of 0.04 eV, whereas the oxidation states of up to Si sup 4 sup + species were formed in the case of 3.0 eV. The oxide-layer thickness was estimated to be 0.26 nm at the final oxidation stages. We concluded that the Si atoms at the top layers were oxidized by the incident energy of 3.0 eV.

  11. View of the Axial Field Spectrometer

    CERN Multimedia

    1980-01-01

    The Axial Field Spectrometer, with the vertical uranium/scintillator calorimeter and the central drift chamber retracted for service. One coil of the Open Axial Field Magnet is just visible to the right.

  12. Systems approach to excitation-energy and electron transfer reaction networks in photosystem II complex: model studies for chlorophyll a fluorescence induction kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuoka, Takeshi; Tanaka, Shigenori; Ebina, Kuniyoshi

    2015-09-07

    Photosystem II (PS II) is a protein complex which evolves oxygen and drives charge separation for photosynthesis employing electron and excitation-energy transfer processes over a wide timescale range from picoseconds to milliseconds. While the fluorescence emitted by the antenna pigments of this complex is known as an important indicator of the activity of photosynthesis, its interpretation was difficult because of the complexity of PS II. In this study, an extensive kinetic model which describes the complex and multi-timescale characteristics of PS II is analyzed through the use of the hierarchical coarse-graining method proposed in the authors׳ earlier work. In this coarse-grained analysis, the reaction center (RC) is described by two states, open and closed RCs, both of which consist of oxidized and neutral special pairs being in quasi-equilibrium states. Besides, the PS II model at millisecond scale with three-state RC, which was studied previously, could be derived by suitably adjusting the kinetic parameters of electron transfer between tyrosine and RC. Our novel coarse-grained model of PS II can appropriately explain the light-intensity dependent change of the characteristic patterns of fluorescence induction kinetics from O-J-I-P, which shows two inflection points, J and I, between initial point O and peak point P, to O-J-D-I-P, which shows a dip D between J and I inflection points.

  13. Axial Spondyloarthritis: An Evolving Concept

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelly Ziadé

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Axial spondyloarthritis (AxSpA is the prototype of a family of inter-related yet heterogeneous diseases sharing common clinical and genetic manifestations: the spondyloarthritides (SpAs. The condition mainly affects the sacroiliac joints and axial skeleton, and has a clear classification scheme, wider epidemiological data, and distinct therapeutic guidelines when compared with other SpAs. However, the concept of AxSpA has not been immutable over time and has evolved tremendously on many levels over the past decades. This review identifies the evolution of the AxSpA concept at two levels. First, at the level of classification, the old classifications and rationales leading to the current Assessment of SpondyloArthritis international Society (ASAS classification are reviewed, and the advantages and drawbacks are discussed. Second, at the therapeutic level, current and future treatments are described and treatment strategies are discussed.

  14. [Axial spondyloarthritis and ankylosing spondylitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordström, Dan; Kauppi, Markku

    2010-01-01

    Current classification criteria for ankylosing spondylitis do not allow diagnosis before radiographic changes are visible in sacroiliacal joints. The the new axial spondyloarthropathy (SpA) criteria include axial SpA without radiographic changes as well as established ankylosing spondylitis, recognizing them as a continuum of the same disease. This is of major importance as the burden of early SpA is comparable to that of later stage disease. Diagnosis relies on inflammatory MRI findings which is the most significant change compared to earlier criteria. Emerging data on the efficacy of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) alpha blocking therapies already in early but also in established disease have given new promising alternatives for treatment of this often very cumbersome disease, that rarely responds to classic DMARDs.

  15. Vector and Axial Currents in Wilson Chiral Perturbation Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Aoki, Sinya; Sharpe, Stephen R

    2009-01-01

    We reconsider the construction of the vector and axial-vector currents in Wilson Chiral Perturbation Theory (WChPT), the low-energy effective theory for lattice QCD with Wilson fermions. We discuss in detail the finite renormalization of the currents that has to be taken into account in order to properly match the currents. We explicitly show that imposing the chiral Ward identities on the currents does, in general, affect the axial-vector current at O(a). As an application of our results we compute the pion decay constant to one loop in the two flavor theory. Our result differs from previously published ones.

  16. An effective theory for QCD with an axial chemical potential

    CERN Document Server

    Andrianov, Alexander A; Espriu, Domenec; Planells, Xumeu

    2013-01-01

    We consider the low energy realization of QCD in terms of meson fields when an axial chemical potential is present; a situation that may be relevant in heavy ion collisions. We shall demonstrate that the presence of an axial charge constitutes an explicit source of parity breaking. The eigenstates of strong interactions do not have a definite parity and interactions that would otherwise be forbidden compete with the familiar ones. In this work, we first focus on scalars and pseudoscalars that are described by a generalized linear sigma model; and next, we give some hints on how the Vector Meson Dominance model describes the vector sector.

  17. Instability of Meridional Axial System in f(R) Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Sharif, M

    2015-01-01

    We analyze dynamical instability of non-static reflection axial stellar structure by taking into account generalized Euler's equation in metric $f(R)$ gravity. Such an equation is obtained by contracting Bianchi identities of usual anisotropic and effective stress-energy tensors, which after using radial perturbation technique gives modified collapse equation. In the realm of $R+\\epsilon R^n$ gravity model, we investigate instability constraints at Newtonian and post-Newtonian approximations. We find that instability of meridional axial self-gravitating system depends upon static profile of structure coefficients while $f(R)$ extra curvature terms induce stability to the evolving celestial body.

  18. Holographic kinetic k-essence model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cruz, Norman [Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencia, Universidad de Santiago de Chile, Casilla 307, Santiago (Chile)], E-mail: ncruz@lauca.usach.cl; Gonzalez-Diaz, Pedro F.; Rozas-Fernandez, Alberto [Colina de los Chopos, Instituto de Fisica Fundamental, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Serrano 121, 28006 Madrid (Spain)], E-mail: a.rozas@cfmac.csic.es; Sanchez, Guillermo [Departamento de Matematica y Ciencia de la Computacion, Facultad de Ciencia, Universidad de Santiago de Chile, Casilla 307, Santiago (Chile)], E-mail: gsanchez@usach.cl

    2009-08-31

    We consider a connection between the holographic dark energy density and the kinetic k-essence energy density in a flat FRW universe. With the choice c{>=}1, the holographic dark energy can be described by a kinetic k-essence scalar field in a certain way. In this Letter we show this kinetic k-essential description of the holographic dark energy with c{>=}1 and reconstruct the kinetic k-essence function F(X)

  19. Dynamic Response of Axially Loaded Euler-Bernoulli Beams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bayat, M.; Barari, Amin; Shahidi, M.

    2011-01-01

    The current research deals with application of a new analytical technique called Energy Balance Method (EBM) for a nonlinear problem. Energy Balance Method is used to obtain the analytical solution for nonlinear vibration behavior of Euler-Bernoulli beams subjected to axial loads. Analytical expr...... to the conventional methods, only one iteration leads to high accuracy of the solutions which are valid for a wide range of vibration amplitudes....

  20. Golimumab for treatment of axial spondyloarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rios Rodriguez, Valeria; Poddubnyy, Denis

    2016-02-01

    Axial spondyloarthritis comprises two forms: nonradiographic (nonradiographic axial spondyloarthritis) and radiographic (better known as ankylosing spondylitis), which are often considered as two stages of one disease. Historically, all currently available TNF-α inhibitors were first investigated in ankylosing spondylitis and later on in nonradiographic axial spondyloarthritis. This year, EMA has granted golimumab approval for the treatment of active nonradiographic axial spondyloarthritis based on the recently published data from the GO-AHEAD study. This article summarizes recent data on efficacy and safety of golimumab in the treatment of ankylosing spondylitis and nonradiographic axial spondyloarthritis.

  1. Assessment of duration of the drive operation in the mode of kinetic energy recovery under power supply voltage sags in electrical grids of mechanical engineering enterprises

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shonin, O. B.; Novozhilov, N. G.

    2017-02-01

    Voltage sags in electric grids of mechanical engineering enterprises may lead to disconnection of important power consumers with variable frequency drives from the power grid and further interruption of the production process. The paper considers a sensorless V/f control system of еру induction motor drive under normal conditions and under voltage sags on the basis of a computer model of the drive and derivation of a formula for assessment of possible duration of the drive operation in the mode of controlled recovery of kinetic energy accumulated in rotating mass of the drive. Results of simulations have been used to validate results of calculations of the rotor velocity deceleration made in a closed form obtained from the equation reflecting the balance of torques. It is shown that results of calculations practically coincide with results of simulations in the range up to 5% of the velocity initial value. The proposed formula may be useful for estimation of the duration of the drive operation in the mode of recovery of kinetic energy depending on parameters of the motor and driven mechanisms.

  2. Kinetics of coffee industrial residue pyrolysis using distributed activation energy model and components separation of bio-oil by sequencing temperature-raising pyrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Nanwei; Ren, Jie; Ye, Ziwei; Xu, Qizhi; Liu, Jingyong; Sun, Shuiyu

    2016-12-01

    This study was carried out to investigate the kinetics of coffee industrial residue (CIR) pyrolysis, the effect of pyrolysis factors on yield of bio-oil component and components separation of bio-oil. The kinetics of CIR pyrolysis was analyzed using distributed activation energy model (DAEM), based on the experiments in thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA), and it indicated that the average of activation energy (E) is 187.86kJ·mol(-1). The bio-oils were prepared from CIR pyrolysis in vacuum tube furnace, and its components were determined by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Among pyrolysis factors, pyrolysis temperature is the most influential factor on components yield of bio-oil, directly concerned with the volatilization and yield of components (palmitic acid, linoleic acid, oleic acid, octadecanoic acid and caffeine). Furthermore, a new method (sequencing temperature-raising pyrolysis) was put forward and applied to the components separation of bio-oil. Based on experiments, a solution of components separation of bio-oil was come out.

  3. Kinetic Typography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Leeuwen, Theo; Djonov, Emilia

    2014-01-01

    After discussing broad cultural drivers behind the development of kinetic typography, the chapter outlines an approach to analysing kinetic typography which is based on Halliday's theory of transitivity, as applied by Kress and Van Leeuwen to visual images.......After discussing broad cultural drivers behind the development of kinetic typography, the chapter outlines an approach to analysing kinetic typography which is based on Halliday's theory of transitivity, as applied by Kress and Van Leeuwen to visual images....

  4. Study of the Standard k-ɛ Model for Tip Leakage Flow in an Axial Compressor Rotor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yanfei; Liu, Yangwei; Zhong, Luyang; Hou, Jiexuan; Lu, Lipeng

    2016-12-01

    The standard k-ɛ model (SKE) and the Reynolds stress model (RSM) are employed to predict the tip leakage flow (TLF) in a low-speed large-scale axial compressor rotor. Then, a new research method is adopted to "freeze" the turbulent kinetic energy and dissipation rate of the flow field derived from the RSM, and obtain the turbulent viscosity using the Boussinesq hypothesis. The Reynolds stresses and mean flow field computed on the basis of the frozen viscosity are compared with the results of the SKE and the RSM. The flow field in the tip region based on the frozen viscosity is more similar to the results of the RSM than those of the SKE, although certain differences can be observed. This finding indicates that the non-equilibrium turbulence transport nature plays an important role in predicting the TLF, as well as the turbulence anisotropy.

  5. 3-D Simulation of Vertical-Axial Tidal Current Turbine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiyang Zhang

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Vertical-axial tidal current turbine is the key for the energy converter, which has the advantages of simple structure, adaptability to flow and uncomplex convection device. It has become the hot point for research and application recently. At present, the study on the hydrodynamic performance of vertical-axial tidal current turbine is almost on 2-D numerical simulation, without the consideration of 3-D effect. CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics method and blade optimal control technique are used to improve accuracy in the prediction of tidal current turbine hydrodynamic performance. Numerical simulation of vertical-axial tidal current turbine is validated. Fixed and variable deflection angle turbine are comparatively studied to analysis the influence of 3-D effect and the character of fluid field and pressure field. The method, put the plate on the end of blade, of reduce the energy loss caused by 3-D effect is proposed. The 3-D CFD numerical model of vertical-axial tidal current turbine hydrodynamic performance in this study may provide theoretical, methodical and technical reference for the optimal design of turbine.

  6. Elongated Quantum Dots of Ge on Si Growth Kinetics Modeling with Respect to the Additional Energy of Edges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozovoy, K. A.; Pishchagin, A. A.; Kokhanenko, A. P.; Voitsekhovskii, A. V.

    2016-08-01

    In this paper refining of mathematical model for calculation of parameters of selforganised quantum dots (QDs) of Ge on Si grown by the method of molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) is done. Calculations of pyramidal and wedge-like clusters formation energy were conducted with respect to contributions of surface energy, additional edge energy, elastic strain relaxation, and decrease in the atoms attraction to substrate. With the help of well-known model based on the generalization of classical nucleation theory it was shown that elongated islands emerge later than pyramidal clusters. Calculations of QDs surface density and size distribution function for wedge-like clusters with different length to width ratio were performed. The absence of special geometry of islands for which surface density and average size of islands reach points of extremum that was predicted earlier by the model not taking into account energy of edges was revealed when considering the additional contribution of edge formation energy.

  7. Additivity of kinetic and potential energy contributions in modification of graphene supported on SiO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xitong; Zhao, Shijun; Wang, Yuyu; Xue, Jianming

    2017-04-01

    The damage production induced by MeV highly charged ions (HCI) irradiations in graphene supported on a SiO2 substrate is investigated using molecular dynamics method. We get results in agreement with our recent experiments. We find that the electronic energy loss and potential energy deposition have similar effects on the defects creation in SiO2 substrate-supported graphene and both mechanisms of energy deposition seem to contribute in an additive way. The influences of the energy deposition depth and radius are studied. Only the energy deposited below the surface within 2.5 nm will induce the damage in graphene. Hence, the HCI can be a powerful tool to induce defects in graphene without causing deep damage of the substrate. When charge of incident Xeq+ is above 30, a nanopore is formed and the size of nanopore in graphene can be controlled by changing the incident charge state.

  8. Kinetic parameters, collision rates, energy exchanges and transport coefficients of non-thermal electrons in premixed flames at sub-breakdown electric field strengths

    KAUST Repository

    Bisetti, Fabrizio

    2014-01-02

    The effects of an electric field on the collision rates, energy exchanges and transport properties of electrons in premixed flames are investigated via solutions to the Boltzmann kinetic equation. The case of high electric field strength, which results in high-energy, non-thermal electrons, is analysed in detail at sub-breakdown conditions. The rates of inelastic collisions and the energy exchange between electrons and neutrals in the reaction zone of the flame are characterised quantitatively. The analysis includes attachment, ionisation, impact dissociation, and vibrational and electronic excitation processes. Our results suggest that Townsend breakdown occurs for E/N = 140 Td. Vibrational excitation is the dominant process up to breakdown, despite important rates of electronic excitation of CO, CO2 and N2 as well as impact dissociation of O2 being apparent from 50 Td onwards. Ohmic heating in the reaction zone is found to be negligible (less than 2% of peak heat release rate) up to breakdown field strengths for realistic electron densities equal to 1010 cm-3. The observed trends are largely independent of equivalence ratio. In the non-thermal regime, electron transport coefficients are insensitive to mixture composition and approximately constant across the flame, but are highly dependent on the electric field strength. In the thermal limit, kinetic parameters and transport coefficients vary substantially across the flame due to the spatially inhomogeneous concentration of water vapour. A practical approach for identifying the plasma regime (thermal versus non-thermal) in studies of electric field effects on flames is proposed. © 2014 Taylor & Francis.

  9. Kinetic parameters, collision rates, energy exchanges and transport coefficients of non-thermal electrons in premixed flames at sub-breakdown electric field strengths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisetti, Fabrizio; El Morsli, Mbark

    2014-01-01

    The effects of an electric field on the collision rates, energy exchanges and transport properties of electrons in premixed flames are investigated via solutions to the Boltzmann kinetic equation. The case of high electric field strength, which results in high-energy, non-thermal electrons, is analysed in detail at sub-breakdown conditions. The rates of inelastic collisions and the energy exchange between electrons and neutrals in the reaction zone of the flame are characterised quantitatively. The analysis includes attachment, ionisation, impact dissociation, and vibrational and electronic excitation processes. Our results suggest that Townsend breakdown occurs for E/N = 140 Td. Vibrational excitation is the dominant process up to breakdown, despite important rates of electronic excitation of CO, CO2 and N2 as well as impact dissociation of O2 being apparent from 50 Td onwards. Ohmic heating in the reaction zone is found to be negligible (less than 2% of peak heat release rate) up to breakdown field strengths for realistic electron densities equal to 1010 cm-3. The observed trends are largely independent of equivalence ratio. In the non-thermal regime, electron transport coefficients are insensitive to mixture composition and approximately constant across the flame, but are highly dependent on the electric field strength. In the thermal limit, kinetic parameters and transport coefficients vary substantially across the flame due to the spatially inhomogeneous concentration of water vapour. A practical approach for identifying the plasma regime (thermal versus non-thermal) in studies of electric field effects on flames is proposed.

  10. Oxygen exchange at gas/oxide interfaces: how the apparent activation energy of the surface exchange coefficient depends on the kinetic regime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fielitz, Peter; Borchardt, Günter

    2016-08-10

    In the dedicated literature the oxygen surface exchange coefficient KO and the equilibrium oxygen exchange rate [Fraktur R] are considered to be directly proportional to each other regardless of the experimental circumstances. Recent experimental observations, however, contradict the consequences of this assumption. Most surprising is the finding that the apparent activation energy of KO depends dramatically on the kinetic regime in which it has been determined, i.e. surface exchange controlled vs. mixed or diffusion controlled. This work demonstrates how the diffusion boundary condition at the gas/solid interface inevitably entails a correlation between the oxygen surface exchange coefficient KO and the oxygen self-diffusion coefficient DO in the bulk ("on top" of the correlation between KO and [Fraktur R] for the pure surface exchange regime). The model can thus quantitatively explain the range of apparent activation energies measured in the different regimes: in the surface exchange regime the apparent activation energy only contains the contribution of the equilibrium exchange rate, whereas in the mixed or in the diffusion controlled regime the contribution of the oxygen self-diffusivity has also to be taken into account, which may yield significantly higher apparent activation energies and simultaneously quantifies the correlation KO ∝ DO(1/2) observed for a large number of oxides in the mixed or diffusion controlled regime, respectively.

  11. Using an internal coordinate Gaussian basis and a space-fixed Cartesian coordinate kinetic energy operator to compute a vibrational spectrum with rectangular collocation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzhos, Sergei; Carrington, Tucker

    2016-12-01

    We demonstrate that it is possible to use basis functions that depend on curvilinear internal coordinates to compute vibrational energy levels without deriving a kinetic energy operator (KEO) and without numerically computing coefficients of a KEO. This is done by using a space-fixed KEO and computing KEO matrix elements numerically. Whenever one has an excellent basis, more accurate solutions to the Schrödinger equation can be obtained by computing the KEO, potential, and overlap matrix elements numerically. Using a Gaussian basis and bond coordinates, we compute vibrational energy levels of formaldehyde. We show, for the first time, that it is possible with a Gaussian basis to solve a six-dimensional vibrational Schrödinger equation. For the zero-point energy (ZPE) and the lowest 50 vibrational transitions of H2CO, we obtain a mean absolute error of less than 1 cm-1; with 200 000 collocation points and 40 000 basis functions, most errors are less than 0.4 cm-1.

  12. Experimental studies on the axial crash behavior of aluminum foam-filled hat sections

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Qing-chun; FAN Zi-jie; GUI Liang-jin; WANG Zheng-hong; FU Zi-lai

    2006-01-01

    Drop hammer tests were carried out to study the axial crash behavior of aluminum foam-filled hat sections.First,the axial crash tests of the empty hat sections,aluminum foam and the aluminum foam-filled hat sections were carried out;then,based upon the test results,the axial crash behavior of the aluminum foam-filled hat sections were analyzed.It was found that aluminum foam filling can increase the energy absorption capacities of the hat sections.Compared with the non-filled structures,aluminum foamfilled structures were much more stable and needed less mass to absorb the specified energy.

  13. Kinetic performance and energy profile in a roller coaster electron transfer chain: a study of modified tetraheme-reaction center constructs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alric, Jean; Lavergne, Jérôme; Rappaport, Fabrice; Verméglio, André; Matsuura, Katsumi; Shimada, Keizo; Nagashima, Kenji V P

    2006-03-29

    In many electron-transfer proteins, the arrangement of cofactors implies a succession of uphill and downhill steps. The kinetic implications of such arrangements are examined in the present work, based on a study of chimeric photosynthetic reaction centers obtained by expressing the tetraheme subunit from Blastochloris viridis in another purple bacterium, Rubrivivax gelatinosus. Site-directed mutations of the environment of heme c559, which is the immediate electron donor to the primary donor P, induced modifications of this heme's midpoint potential over a range of 400 mV. This resulted in shifts of the apparent midpoint potentials of the neighboring carriers, yielding estimates of the interactions between redox centers. At both extremities of the explored range, the energy profile of the electron-transfer chain presented an additional uphill step, either downstream or upstream from c559. These modifications caused conspicuous changes of the electron-transfer rate across the tetraheme subunit, which became approximately 100-fold slower in the mutants where the midpoint potential of c559 was lowest. A theoretical analysis of the kinetics is presented, predicting a displacement of the rate-limiting step when lowering the potential of c559. A reasonable agreement with the data was obtained when combining this treatment with the rates predicted by electron transfer theory for the individual rate constants.

  14. Axial Vector $Z'$ and Anomaly Cancellation

    CERN Document Server

    Ismail, Ahmed; Tsao, Kuo-Hsing; Unwin, James

    2016-01-01

    Whilst the prospect of new $Z'$ gauge bosons with only axial couplings to the Standard Model (SM) fermions is widely discussed, examples of anomaly-free renormalisable models are lacking in the literature. We look to remedy this by constructing several motivated examples. Specifically, we consider axial vectors which couple universally to all SM fermions, as well as those which are generation-specific, leptophilic, and leptophobic. Anomaly cancellation typically requires the presence of new coloured and charged chiral fermions, and we argue that the masses of these new states must generally be comparable to that of the axial vector. Finally, an axial vector mediator could provide a portal between SM and hidden sector states, and we also consider the possibility that the axial vector couples to dark matter. If the dark matter relic density is set due to freeze-out via the axial vector, this strongly constrains the parameter space.

  15. The Renner-Teller effect in HCCCl{sup +}(X{sup ~2}Π) studied by zero-kinetic energy photoelectron spectroscopy and ab initio calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Wei; Dai, Zuyang; Wang, Jia; Mo, Yuxiang, E-mail: ymo@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn [Department of Physics and State Key Laboratory of Low-Dimensional Quantum Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2015-05-21

    The spin-vibronic energy levels of the chloroacetylene cation up to 4000 cm{sup −1} above the ground state have been measured using the one-photon zero-kinetic energy photoelectron spectroscopic method. The spin-vibronic energy levels have also been calculated using a diabatic model, in which the potential energy surfaces are expressed by expansions of internal coordinates, and the Hamiltonian matrix equation is solved using a variational method with harmonic basis functions. The calculated spin-vibronic energy levels are in good agreement with the experimental data. The Renner-Teller (RT) parameters describing the vibronic coupling for the H—C≡C bending mode (ε{sub 4}), Cl—C≡C bending mode (ε{sub 5}), the cross-mode vibronic coupling (ε{sub 45}) of the two bending vibrations, and their vibrational frequencies (ω{sub 4} and ω{sub 5}) have also been determined using an effective Hamiltonian matrix treatment. In comparison with the spin-orbit interaction, the RT effect in the H—C≡C bending (ε{sub 4}) mode is strong, while the RT effect in the Cl—C≡C bending mode is weak. There is a strong cross-mode vibronic coupling of the two bending vibrations, which may be due to a vibronic resonance between the two bending vibrations. The spin-orbit energy splitting of the ground state has been determined for the first time and is found to be 209 ± 2 cm{sup −1}.

  16. Energy transfer dynamics and kinetics of elementary processes (promoted) by gas-phase CO2 -N2 collisions: Selectivity control by the anisotropy of the interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardi, Andrea; Pirani, Fernando; Laganà, Antonio; Bartolomei, Massimiliano

    2016-06-15

    In this work, we exploit a new formulation of the potential energy and of the related computational procedures, which embodies the coupling between the intra and intermolecular components, to characterize possible propensities of the collision dynamics in energy transfer processes of interest for simulation and control of phenomena occurring in a variety of equilibrium and nonequilibrium environments. The investigation reported in the paper focuses on the prototype CO2 -N2 system, whose intramolecular component of the interaction is modeled in terms of a many body expansion while the intermolecular component is modeled in terms of a recently developed bonds-as-interacting-molecular-centers' approach. The main advantage of this formulation of the potential energy surface is that of being (a) truly full dimensional (i.e., all the variations of the coordinates associated with the molecular vibrations and rotations on the geometrical and electronic structure of the monomers, are explicitly taken into account without freezing any bonds or angles), (b) more flexible than other usual formulations of the interaction and (c) well suited for fitting procedures better adhering to accurate ab initio data and sensitive to experimental arrangement dependent information. Specific attention has been given to the fact that a variation of vibrational and rotational energy has a higher (both qualitative and quantitative) impact on the energy transfer when a more accurate formulation of the intermolecular interaction (with respect to that obtained when using rigid monomers) is adopted. This makes the potential energy surface better suited for the kinetic modeling of gaseous mixtures in plasma, combustion and atmospheric chemistry computational applications. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Aerodynamic modelling and optimization of axial fans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noertoft Soerensen, Dan

    1998-01-01

    A numerically efficient mathematical model for the aerodynamics of low speed axial fans of the arbitrary vortex flow type has been developed. The model is based on a blade-element principle, whereby the rotor is divided into a number of annular stream tubes. For each of these stream tubes relations for velocity, pressure and radial position are derived from the conservation laws for mass, tangential momentum and energy. The equations are solved using the Newton-Raphson methods, and solutions converged to machine accuracy are found at small computing costs. The model has been validated against published measurements on various fan configurations, comprising two rotor-only fan stages, a counter-rotating fan unit and a stator-rotor stator stage. Comparisons of local and integrated properties show that the computed results agree well with the measurements. Optimizations have been performed to maximize the mean value of fan efficiency in a design interval of flow rates, thus designing a fan which operates well over a range of different flow conditions. The optimization scheme was used to investigate the dependence of maximum efficiency on 1: the number of blades, 2: the width of the design interval and 3: the hub radius. The degree of freedom in the choice of design variable and constraints, combined with the design interval concept, provides a valuable design-tool for axial fans. To further investigate the use of design optimization, a model for the vortex shedding noise from the trailing edge of the blades has been incorporated into the optimization scheme. The noise emission from the blades was minimized in a flow rate design point. Optimizations were performed to investigate the dependence of the noise on 1: the number of blades, 2: a constraint imposed on efficiency and 3: the hub radius. The investigations showed, that a significant reduction of noise could be achieved, at the expense of a small reduction in fan efficiency. (EG) 66 refs.

  18. Diabetes mellitus and the eye: axial length

    OpenAIRE

    Huntjens, B.; O’Donnell, C.

    2006-01-01

    Background and aims: The refractive error of the eye is dependent on its axial length. Refractive error is known to fluctuate significantly in poorly controlled diabetic patients. Recently it has been reported that human eyes fluctuate in axial length during the day. However, this change is not detectable in all subjects, suggesting physiological influences such as diet. The purpose of this study was to investigate fluctuations in axial length and blood glucose levels (BGLs) in diabetic patie...

  19. Analysis of Flow Cytometry DNA Damage Response Protein Activation Kinetics Following X-rays and High Energy Iron Nuclei Exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Universities Space Research Association; Chappell, Lori J.; Whalen, Mary K.; Gurai, Sheena; Ponomarev, Artem; Cucinotta, Francis A.; Pluth, Janice M.

    2010-12-15

    We developed a mathematical method to analyze flow cytometry data to describe the kinetics of {gamma}H2AX and pATF2 phosphorylations ensuing various qualities of low dose radiation in normal human fibroblast cells. Previously reported flow cytometry kinetic results for these DSB repair phospho-proteins revealed that distributions of intensity were highly skewed, severely limiting the detection of differences in the very low dose range. Distributional analysis reveals significant differences between control and low dose samples when distributions are compared using the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test. Radiation quality differences are found in the distribution shapes and when a nonlinear model is used to relate dose and time to the decay of the mean ratio of phosphoprotein intensities of irradiated samples to controls. We analyzed cell cycle phase and radiation quality dependent characteristic repair times and residual phospho-protein levels with these methods. Characteristic repair times for {gamma}H2AX were higher following Fe nuclei as compared to X-rays in G1 cells (4.5 {+-} 0.46 h vs 3.26 {+-} 0.76 h, respectively), and in S/G2 cells (5.51 {+-} 2.94 h vs 2.87 {+-} 0.45 h, respectively). The RBE in G1 cells for Fe nuclei relative to X-rays for {gamma}H2AX was 2.05 {+-} 0.61 and 5.02 {+-} 3.47, at 2 h and 24-h postirradiation, respectively. For pATF2, a saturation effect is observed with reduced expression at high doses, especially for Fe nuclei, with much slower characteristic repair times (>7 h) compared to X-rays. RBEs for pATF2 were 0.66 {+-} 0.13 and 1.66 {+-} 0.46 at 2 h and 24 h, respectively. Significant differences in {gamma}H2AX and pATF2 levels comparing irradiated samples to control were noted even at the lowest dose analyzed (0.05 Gy) using these methods of analysis. These results reveal that mathematical models can be applied to flow cytometry data to uncover important and subtle differences following exposure to various qualities of low dose radiation.

  20. Relative contribution of combined kinetic and exchange energy terms vs the electronic component of molecular electrostatic potential in hardness potential derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharjee, Rituparna; Roy, Ram Kinkar

    2013-11-14

    The relative contribution of the sum of kinetic [(10/9)CFρ(r)2/3] and exchange energy [(4/9)CXρ(r)1/3] terms to that of the electronic part of the molecular electrostatic potential [Vel(r)] in the variants of hardness potential is investigated to assess the proposed definition of Δ+h(k) = −[VelN+1(k) – VelN(k)] and Δ–h(k) = −[VelN(k) – VelN–1(k)] (Saha; et al. J. Comput. Chem. 2013, 34, 662). Some substituted benzenes and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) (undergoing electrophilic aromatic substitution), carboxylic acids, and their derivatives are chosen to carry out the theoretical investigation as stated above. Intra- and intermolecular reactivity trends generated by Δ+h(k) and Δ–h(k) are found to be satisfactory and are correlated reasonably well with experimental results.

  1. Towards an exact orbital-free single-particle kinetic energy density for the inhomogeneous electron liquid in the Be atom

    CERN Document Server

    Krishtal, Alisa; Van Alsenoy, Christian

    2010-01-01

    Holas and March (Phys. Rev. A51, 2040 (1995)) wrote the gradient of the one-body potential V(r) in terms of low-order derivatives of the idempotent Dirac density matrix built from a single Slater determinant of Kohn-Sham orbitals. Here, this is first combined with the study of Dawson and March (J. Chem. Phys. 81, 5850 (1984)) to express the single-particle kinetic energy density of the Be atom ground-state in terms of both the electron density n(r) and potential V(r). While this is the more compact formulation, we then, by removing V(r), demonstrate that the ratio t(r)/n(r) depends, though non-locally, only on the single variable n'(r)/n(r), no high-order gradients entering for the spherical Be atom.

  2. Study of Pair and many-body interactions in rare-gas halide atom clusters using negative ion zero electron kinetic energy (ZEKE) and threshold photodetachment spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yourshaw, Ivan [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1998-07-09

    The diatomic halogen atom-rare gas diatomic complexes KrBr-, XeBr-, and KrCl- are studied in this work by zero electron kinetic energy (ZEKE) spectroscopy in order to characterize the weak intermolecular diatomic potentials of these species. Also, the ZEKE and threshold photodetachment spectra of the polyatomic clusters ArnBr- (n = 2-9) and ArnI- (n = 2-19) are studied to obtain information about the non-additive effects on the interactions among the atoms. This work is part of an ongoing effort to characterize the pair and many-body potentials of the complete series of rare gas halide clusters. In these studies we obtain information about both the anionic and neutral clusters.

  3. System Study for Axial Vane Engine Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badley, Patrick R.; Smith, Michael R.; Gould, Cedric O.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this engine feasibility study was to determine the benefits that can be achieved by incorporating positive displacement axial vane compression and expansion stages into high bypass turbofan engines. These positive-displacement stages would replace some or all of the conventional compressor and turbine stages in the turbine engine, but not the fan. The study considered combustion occurring internal to an axial vane component (i.e., Diesel engine replacing the standard turbine engine combustor, burner, and turbine); and external continuous flow combustion with an axial vane compressor and an axial vane turbine replacing conventional compressor and turbine systems.

  4. Electrochemically enhanced reduction of hexavalent chromium in contaminated clay: Kinetics, energy consumption, and application of pulse current

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sun, Tian Ran; Pamukcu, Sibel; Ottosen, Lisbeth M.;

    2015-01-01

    Electrochemically enhanced reduction of Cr(VI) in clay medium is a technique based on inputting extra energy into the clay to drive the favorable redox reaction. In this study, the reducing reagent Fe(II) was transported into Cr(VI) spiked kaolinite clay by direct current to investigate the depen......Electrochemically enhanced reduction of Cr(VI) in clay medium is a technique based on inputting extra energy into the clay to drive the favorable redox reaction. In this study, the reducing reagent Fe(II) was transported into Cr(VI) spiked kaolinite clay by direct current to investigate......,Fe)(OH)3] precipitates. XRD analysis suggested that the [(Cr,Fe)(OH)3] formed at the clay surface and grew into the pore fluid. SEM-EDX results indicated that the overall Fe(III):Cr(III) ratio of the precipitates was approximately 1.26:1. Application of pulse current decreased the non-productive energy...

  5. Bio-energy conversion performance, biodegradability, and kinetic analysis of different fruit residues during discontinuous anaerobic digestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Chen; Yan, Hu; Liu, Yan; Huang, Yan; Zhang, Ruihong; Chen, Chang; Liu, Guangqing

    2016-06-01

    Huge amounts of fruit residues are produced and abandoned annually. The high moisture and organic contents of these residues makes them a big problem to the environment. Conversely, they are a potential resource to the world. Anaerobic digestion is a good way to utilize these organic wastes. In this study, the biomethane conversion performances of a large number of fruit residues were determined and compared using batch anaerobic digestion, a reliable and easily accessible method. The results showed that some fruit residues containing high contents of lipids and carbohydrates, such as loquat peels and rambutan seeds, were well fit for anaerobic digestion. Contrarily, residues with high lignin content were strongly recommended not to be used as a single substrate for methane production. Multiple linear regression model was adopted to simulate the correlation between the organic component of these fruit residues and their experimental methane yield, through which the experimental methane yield could probably be predicted for any other fruit residues. Four kinetic models were used to predict the batch anaerobic digestion process of different fruit residues. It was shown that the modified Gompertz and Cone models were better fit for the fruit residues compared to the first-order and Fitzhugh models. The first findings of this study could provide useful reference and guidance for future studies regarding the applications and potential utilization of fruit residues.

  6. Development and analysis of prognostic equations for mesoscale kinetic energy and mesoscale (subgrid scale) fluxes for large-scale atmospheric models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avissar, Roni; Chen, Fei

    1993-01-01

    Generated by landscape discontinuities (e.g., sea breezes) mesoscale circulation processes are not represented in large-scale atmospheric models (e.g., general circulation models), which have an inappropiate grid-scale resolution. With the assumption that atmospheric variables can be separated into large scale, mesoscale, and turbulent scale, a set of prognostic equations applicable in large-scale atmospheric models for momentum, temperature, moisture, and any other gaseous or aerosol material, which includes both mesoscale and turbulent fluxes is developed. Prognostic equations are also developed for these mesoscale fluxes, which indicate a closure problem and, therefore, require a parameterization. For this purpose, the mean mesoscale kinetic energy (MKE) per unit of mass is used, defined as E-tilde = 0.5 (the mean value of u'(sub i exp 2), where u'(sub i) represents the three Cartesian components of a mesoscale circulation (the angle bracket symbol is the grid-scale, horizontal averaging operator in the large-scale model, and a tilde indicates a corresponding large-scale mean value). A prognostic equation is developed for E-tilde, and an analysis of the different terms of this equation indicates that the mesoscale vertical heat flux, the mesoscale pressure correlation, and the interaction between turbulence and mesoscale perturbations are the major terms that affect the time tendency of E-tilde. A-state-of-the-art mesoscale atmospheric model is used to investigate the relationship between MKE, landscape discontinuities (as characterized by the spatial distribution of heat fluxes at the earth's surface), and mesoscale sensible and latent heat fluxes in the atmosphere. MKE is compared with turbulence kinetic energy to illustrate the importance of mesoscale processes as compared to turbulent processes. This analysis emphasizes the potential use of MKE to bridge between landscape discontinuities and mesoscale fluxes and, therefore, to parameterize mesoscale fluxes

  7. Research on the kinetic energy ratio of return air entrainment in the form of low supply–middle return in the large space of brine experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Wang

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduced in this article is a 1:15 brine model experiment rig with an actual large space building as the research object, which provides different concentration brine for a simulation of the stratified air conditioning in the steady-state flow field featured with columnar air supply in the bottom, heat source on the ground, the central air return, and air exhaust from roof in a large space. According to the similarity theory, it is concluded that the similarity criterion numbers applied here are Reynolds number (Re and Archimedes number (Ar for designation of experiment rig size, choosing device type, and confirming experiment condition. In the designation of key components of experiment rig, the application of automation control makes brine recovery and recycling in the process; designation of electrical control system makes a centralized control of experiment start–stop and the adjustment of the pipeline flow, realizing automation in the whole experiment process. Particle image velocimetry testing technology is used to get velocity vector field of air return mouth area in the model under various working conditions, and also proper orthogonal decomposition method is applied to analyze flow field structure of air return mouth area and reconstruct it. Consequently, we can get a kinetic energy ratio of return air entrainment of lower air-conditioning section and upper non-air-conditioning section in large space. Experiments show that under the conditions of same air supply, indoor environment temperature difference, and height and direction of return air inlet, fastening the speed of return air suction, the entrainment of flow field around it strengthens accordingly. The entrainment of return air inlet has more kinetic energy in the lower air-conditioning section than the upper non-air-conditioning section.

  8. Source spectra of the gravity waves obtained from momentum flux and kinetic energy over Indian region: Comparison between observations and model results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pramitha, M.; Venkat Ratnam, M.; Krishna Murthy, B. V.; Vijaya Bhaskar Rao, S.

    2017-02-01

    Using 8 years (May 2006 to March 2014) of high resolution and high accuracy GPS radiosonde observations available from a tropical station Gadanki (13.5°N, 79.2°E), India, we have investigated the climatology of gravity wave energy and zonal momentum fluxes in the lower stratosphere. We also obtained best fit spectrum model for the gravity waves (GWs) for this tropical station. In general, strong annual variation in the energy and momentum flux with maximum during Indian summer monsoon is observed in the lower stratospheric region (18-25 km). By considering different source spectra, we have applied Gravitywave Regional or Global RAy Tracer (GROGRAT) model run on monthly basis using the source spectrum values at different altitudes on the ERA-Interim background fields to obtain the kinetic energy and zonal momentum fluxes for each of the spectra considered. These simulated fluxes are compared with the observed fluxes to arrive at the best fit spectrum model. It is found that the spectrum which represents the convection transient mountain mechanism that is purely anti-symmetric and anisotropic in nature is the best fit model for Gadanki location. This information would be useful in parameterization of the GWs in numerical models over Indian region.

  9. The Emergence of Axial Parts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Svenonius

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Many languages have specialized locative words or morphemes translating roughly into words like ‘front,’ ‘back,’ ‘top,’ ‘bottom,’ ‘side,’ and so on. Often, these words are used instead of more specialized adpositions to express spatial meanings corresponding to ‘behind,’ ‘above,’ and so on. I argue, on the basis of a cross-linguistic survey of such expressions, that in many cases they motivate a syntactic category which is distinct from both N and P, which I call AxPart for ‘Axial Part’; I show how the category relates to the words which instantiate it, and how the meaning of the construction is derived from the combination of P[lace] elements, AxParts, and the lexical material which expresses them.

  10. Unsteady Flows in Axial Turbomachines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marble, F. E.; Rannie, W. D.

    1957-01-01

    Of the various unsteady flows that occur in axial turbomachines certain asymmetric disturbances, of wave length large in comparison with blade spacing, have become understood to a certain extent. These disturbances divide themselves into two categories: self-induced oscillations and force disturbances. A special type of propagating stall appears as a self-induced disturbance; an asymmetric velocity profile introduced at the compressor inlet constitutes a forced disturbance. Both phenomena have been treated from a unified theoretical point of view in which the asymmetric disturbances are linearized and the blade characteristics are assumed quasi-steady. Experimental results are in essential agreement with this theory wherever the limitations of the theory are satisfied. For the self-induced disturbances and the more interesting examples of the forced disturbances, the dominant blade characteristic is the dependence of total pressure loss, rather than the turning angle, upon the local blade inlet angle.

  11. New determination of the $N$-$\\Delta(1232)$ axial form factors from weak pion production and coherent pion production off nuclei at T2K and MiniBooNE energies revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Hernández, E; Valverde, M; Vicente-Vacas, M J

    2010-01-01

    We re-evaluate our model predictions in Phys. Rev. D 79, 013002 (2009) for different observables in neutrino induced coherent pion production. This comes as a result of the new improved fit to old bubble chamber data of the dominant axial C_5^A nucleon-to-Delta form factor. We find an increase of 20%-30% in the values for the total cross sections. Uncertainties induced by the errors in the determination of C_5^A are computed. Our new results turn out to be compatible within about $1\\sigma$ with the former ones. We also stress the existing tension between the recent experimental determination of the \\sigma(CC coh \\pi^+)}/\\sigma(NC coh \\pi^0)} $ ratio by the SciBooNE Collaboration and the theoretical predictions.

  12. Energy and protein supplementation does not affect protein and amino acid kinetics or pregnancy outcomes in underweight Indian women

    Science.gov (United States)

    In India, the prevalence of low birth weight is high in women with a low body mass index (BMI), suggesting that underweight women are not capable of providing adequate energy and protein for fetal growth. Furthermore, as pregnancy progresses, there is increased need to provide methyl groups for meth...

  13. Health and imaging outcomes in axial spondyloarthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Machado, P.M.

    2016-01-01

    This thesis focuses on the assessment and monitoring of health and imaging outcomes in axial spondyloarthritis (SpA) and the relationship between these outcomes. Four major contributions to the understanding and management of axial SpA were made: 1) the improvement and facilitation of the assessment

  14. Computer simulation on kinetics of primary process in photosynthesis of algae (V) --Excitation energy transfer in phycoerythrocyanins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵井泉; 朱晋昌; 蒋丽金

    1996-01-01

    Excitation energy transfer in phycoerythrocyanins (PEC) was studied by use of computer simulation. The results observed from the simulation are as follows: (i) The α84 is a more efficient sensitizing chromophore than β155 and donates the excitation energy into β84 and β155 while it scarcely emits fluorescence itself, (ii) Only the 1α84 →2β84 is the sub-picosecond process in a PEC trimer, therefore it is readily to obtain the time constant from fs-level time-resolved spectral measurement. (iii) The β84 and β155 chromophores in PEC behave quite differently from those in C-PC because of the changes in α84. It is observed that 1β156→6β155 is the dominant pathway linking two trimers and both of the chromophores possess much higher fluorescence fractions, and about 80% of the total fluorescence is emitted from the β84 chromophore. (iv) A far less mean number of transfer times is observed through the fast-transfer pairs in PEC compared with that in C-PC because of slow transfer rate for the path

  15. High Kinetic Energy Penetrator Shielding and High Wear Resistance Materials Fabricated with Boron Nitride Nanotubes (BNNTS) and BNNT Polymer Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Jin Ho (Inventor); Park, Cheol (Inventor); Sauti, Godfrey (Inventor); Smith, Michael W. (Inventor); Jordan, Kevin C. (Inventor); Lowther, Sharon E. (Inventor); Bryant, Robert George (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    Boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs), boron nitride nanoparticles (BNNPs), carbon nanotubes (CNTs), graphites, or combinations, are incorporated into matrices of polymer, ceramic or metals. Fibers, yarns, and woven or nonwoven mats of BNNTs are used as toughening layers in penetration resistant materials to maximize energy absorption and/or high hardness layers to rebound or deform penetrators. They can be also used as reinforcing inclusions combining with other polymer matrices to create composite layers like typical reinforcing fibers such as Kevlar.RTM., Spectra.RTM., ceramics and metals. Enhanced wear resistance and usage time are achieved by adding boron nitride nanomaterials, increasing hardness and toughness. Such materials can be used in high temperature environments since the oxidation temperature of BNNTs exceeds 800.degree. C. in air. Boron nitride based composites are useful as strong structural materials for anti-micrometeorite layers for spacecraft and space suits, ultra strong tethers, protective gear, vehicles, helmets, shields and safety suits/helmets for industry.

  16. Exploring the Potential of Fulvalene Dimetals as Platforms for Molecular Solar Thermal Energy Storage: Computations, Syntheses, Structures, Kinetics, and Catalysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borjesson, K; Coso, D; Gray, V; Grossman, JC; Guan, JQ; Harris, CB; Hertkorn, N; Hou, ZR; Kanai, Y; Lee, D; Lomont, JP; Majumdar, A; Meier, SK; Moth-Poulsen, K; Myrabo, RL; Nguyen, SC; Segalman, RA; Srinivasan, V; Tolman, WB; Vinokurov, N; Vollhardt, KPC; Weidman, TW

    2014-10-03

    A study of the scope and limitations of varying the ligand framework around the dinuclear core of FvRu(2) in its function as a molecular solar thermal energy storage framework is presented. It includes DFT calculations probing the effect of substituents, other metals, and CO exchange for other ligands on Delta H-storage. Experimentally, the system is shown to be robust in as much as it tolerates a number of variations, except for the identity of the metal and certain substitution patterns. Failures include 1,1',3,3'-tetra-tert-butyl (4), 1,2,2',3'-tetraphenyl (9), diiron (28), diosmium (24), mixed iron-ruthenium (27), dimolybdenum (29), and di-tungsten (30) derivatives. An extensive screen of potential catalysts for the thermal reversal identified AgNO3-SiO2 as a good candidate, although catalyst decomposition remains a challenge.

  17. Angular distribution, kinetic energy distributions, and excitation functions of fast metastable oxygen fragments following electron impact of CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misakian, M.; Mumma, M. J.; Faris, J. F.

    1975-01-01

    Dissociative excitation of CO2 by electron impact was studied using the methods of translational spectroscopy and angular distribution analysis. Earlier time of flight studies revealed two overlapping spectra, the slower of which was attributed to metastable CO(a3 pi) fragments. The fast peak is the focus of this study. Threshold energy, angular distribution, and improve time of flight measurements indicate that the fast peak actually consists of five overlapping features. The slowest of the five features is found to consist of metastable 0(5S) produced by predissociation of a sigma u + state of CO2 into 0(5S) + CO(a3 pi). Oxygen Rydberg fragments originating directly from a different sigma u + state are believed to make up the next fastest feature. Mechanisms for producing the three remaining features are discussed.

  18. Point-by-Point model description of average prompt neutron data as a function of total kinetic energy of fission fragments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tudora, A.

    2013-03-01

    The experimental data of average prompt neutron multiplicity as a function of total kinetic energy of fragments (TKE) exhibit, especially in the case of 252Cf(SF), different slopes dTKE/dν and different behaviours at low TKE values. The Point-by-Point (PbP) model can describe these different behaviours. The higher slope dTKE/dν and the flattening of at low TKE exhibited by a part of experimental data sets is very well reproduced when the PbP multi-parametric matrix ν(A,TKE) is averaged over a double distribution Y(A,TKE). The lower slope and the almost linear behaviour over the entire TKE range exhibited by other data sets is well described when the same matrix ν(A,TKE) is averaged over a single distribution Y(A). In the case of average prompt neutron energy in SCM as a function of TKE, different dTKE/dɛ slopes are also obtained by averaging the same PbP matrix ɛ(A,TKE) over Y(A,TKE) and over Y(A). The results are exemplified for three fissioning systems benefiting of experimental data as a function of TKE: 252Cf(SF), 235U(nth,f) and 239Pu(nth,f). In the case of 234U(n,f) for the first time it was possible to calculate (TKE) and (TKE) at many incident energies by averaging the PbP multi-parametric matrices over the experimental Y(A,TKE) distributions recently measured at IRMM for 14 incident energies in the range 0.3-5 MeV. The results revealed that the slope dTKE/dν does not vary with the incident energy and the flattening of at low TKE values is more pronounced at low incident energies. The average model parameters dependences on TKE resulted from the PbP treatment allow the use of the most probable fragmentation approach, having the great advantage to provide results at many TKE values in a very short computing time compared to PbP and Monte Carlo treatments.

  19. Energy aAnalysis and Kinetics of Mint Leaves Dehydration Using Vibro-Fluidized Bed Heat Pump Dryer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. M Ataei Ardestani

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Fluidized bed dryers have not yet been used for drying products such as mint leaves. This could be due to high porosity and low mechanical resistance resulting in poor quality of fluidization. Applying vibration has been recommended to overcome problems such as channeling and defluidization, and hence improving the fluidization quality. In this research, a laboratory scale vibro-fluidized bed heat pump dryer was designed and constructed for drying mint leaves. The experiments were conducted at vibration frequency of 80 Hz and amplitude of 3 mm. The velocity and temperature of the inlet air was controlled by an automatic control system. Experiments were carried out at 40, 50 and 60 °C, and two methods: heat pump drying (HPD and non-heat pump drying (NHPD. The results revealed that drying process primarily occurred in the falling rate period. Effective moisture diffusivity of the samples increased with increase in drying air temperature and varied from 4.26656×10-11 to 2.95872×10-10 m2 s-1 for the HPD method, and 3.71918×10-11 to 1.29196×10-10 m2 s-1 for the NHPD method and was within the reported range of 10-9 to 10-11 m2 s-1 for drying of food materials. The activation energy was determined to be 84 kJ mol-1 for the HPD and 54.34 kJ mol-1 for the NHPD, both have very good agreement with the results of other investigators. The coefficient of performance and specific moisture evaporation rate showed the acceptable performance of the heat pump system. Moreover, the energy consumption of the dryer for the NHPD method was more than the HPD method.

  20. Surface response of tungsten to helium and hydrogen plasma flux as a function of temperature and incident kinetic energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukumar, Harikrishnan

    Tungsten is a leading candidate material for the diverter in future nuclear fusion reactors. Previous experiments have demonstrated that surface defects and bubbles form in tungsten when ex- posed to helium and hydrogen plasmas, even at modest ion energies. In some regimes, between 1000K and 2000K, and for He energies below 100eV, "fuzz" like features form. The mechanisms leading to these surfaces comprised of nanometer sized tungsten tendrils which include visible helium bubbles are not currently known. The role of helium bubble formation in tendril morphology could very likely be the starting point of these mechanisms. Using Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, the role of helium and hydrogen exposure in the initial formation mechanisms of tungsten "fuzz" are investigated. Molecular dynamics simulations are well suited to describe the time and length scales associated with initial formation of helium clusters that eventually grow to nano-meter sized helium bubbles. MD simulations also easily enable the modeling of a variety of surfaces such as single crystals, grain boundaries or "tendrils". While the sputtering yield of tungsten is generally low, previous observations of surface modification due to plasma exposure raise questions about the effects of surface morphology and sub-surface helium bubble populations on the sputtering behavior. Results of computational molecular dynamics are reported that investigate the influence of sub-surface helium bubble distributions on the sputtering yield of tungsten (100) and (110) surfaces induced by helium ion exposure in the range of 300 eV to 1 keV. The calculated sputtering yields are in reasonable agreement with a wide range of experimental data; but do not show any significant variation as a result of the pre-existing helium bubbles. Molecular dynamics simulations reveal a number of sub-surface mechanisms leading to nanometer- sized "fuzz" in tungsten exposed to low-energy helium plasmas. We find that during the bubble

  1. Axial force measurement for esophageal function testing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Flemming H Gravesen; Peter Funch-Jensen; Hans Gregersen; Asbjφrn Mohr Drewes

    2009-01-01

    The esophagus serves to transport food and fluid from the pharynx to the stomach. Manometry has been the "golden standard" for the diagnosis of esophageal motility diseases for many decades. Hence, esophageal function is normally evaluated by means of manometry even though it reflects the squeeze force (force in radial direction) whereas the bolus moves along the length of esophagus in a distal direction. Force measurements in the longitudinal (axial) direction provide a more direct measure of esophageal transport function. The technique used to record axial force has developed from external force transducers over in-vivo strain gauges of various sizes to electrical impedance based measurements. The amplitude and duration of the axial force has been shown to be as reliable as manometry. Normal, as well as abnormal, manometric recordings occur with normal bolus transit, which have been documented using imaging modalities such as radiography and scintigraphy. This inconsistency using manometry has also been documented by axial force recordings. This underlines the lack of information when diagnostics are based on manometry alone. Increasing the volume of a bag mounted on a probe with combined axial force and manometry recordings showed that axial force amplitude increased by 130% in contrast to an increase of 30% using manometry. Using axial force in combination with manometry provides a more complete picture of esophageal motility, and the current paper outlines the advantages of using this method.

  2. Axial force measurement for esophageal function testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gravesen, Flemming H; Funch-Jensen, Peter; Gregersen, Hans; Drewes, Asbjørn Mohr

    2009-01-14

    The esophagus serves to transport food and fluid from the pharynx to the stomach. Manometry has been the "golden standard" for the diagnosis of esophageal motility diseases for many decades. Hence, esophageal function is normally evaluated by means of manometry even though it reflects the squeeze force (force in radial direction) whereas the bolus moves along the length of esophagus in a distal direction. Force measurements in the longitudinal (axial) direction provide a more direct measure of esophageal transport function. The technique used to record axial force has developed from external force transducers over in-vivo strain gauges of various sizes to electrical impedance based measurements. The amplitude and duration of the axial force has been shown to be as reliable as manometry. Normal, as well as abnormal, manometric recordings occur with normal bolus transit, which have been documented using imaging modalities such as radiography and scintigraphy. This inconsistency using manometry has also been documented by axial force recordings. This underlines the lack of information when diagnostics are based on manometry alone. Increasing the volume of a bag mounted on a probe with combined axial force and manometry recordings showed that axial force amplitude increased by 130% in contrast to an increase of 30% using manometry. Using axial force in combination with manometry provides a more complete picture of esophageal motility, and the current paper outlines the advantages of using this method.

  3. Instability of meridional axial system in f(R) gravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharif, M.; Yousaf, Z. [University of the Punjab, Department of Mathematics, Lahore (Pakistan)

    2015-05-15

    We analyze the dynamical instability of a non-static reflection axial stellar structure by taking into account the generalized Euler equation in metric f(R) gravity. Such an equation is obtained by contracting the Bianchi identities of the usual anisotropic and effective stress-energy tensors, which after using a radial perturbation technique gives a modified collapse equation. In the realm of the R + εR{sup n} gravity model, we investigate instability constraints at Newtonian and post-Newtonian approximations. We find that the instability of a meridional axial self-gravitating system depends upon the static profile of the structure coefficients, while f(R) extra curvature terms induce the stability of the evolving celestial body. (orig.)

  4. New Anomaly of the Axial-Vector Current

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Han-Xin

    2001-01-01

    By computing the axial-vector current operator equation, we find the anomalous axial-vector curl equation besides the well-known anomalous axial-vector divergence equation (the Adler-Bell-Jackiw anomaly) and discuss its implication.``

  5. Kinetic Interface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2009-01-01

    A kinetic interface for orientation detection in a video training system is disclosed. The interface includes a balance platform instrumented with inertial motion sensors. The interface engages a participant's sense of balance in training exercises.......A kinetic interface for orientation detection in a video training system is disclosed. The interface includes a balance platform instrumented with inertial motion sensors. The interface engages a participant's sense of balance in training exercises....

  6. Axial characterization of particle beams emitted by conical wire array Z-pinches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munoz-Cordovez, Gonzalo; Veloso, Felipe; Valenzuela-Villaseca, Vicente; Vescovi, Milenko; Favre, Mario; Wyndham, Edmund

    2016-10-01

    The dynamics of the plasma and the emission of particle beams from tungsten conical wire arrays are experimentally studied in the Llampudken generator (400 kA in 300 ns). Particles are detected axially using biased Faraday cups and silicon substrates located at tens of centimeters above the array at different heights. Several ion pulses with kinetic energy 90 eV preceded by an electron beam are measured using time of flight (ToF), whereas the deposition of tungsten on silicon substrates is observed. In addition, ToF indicates that the emission of the beam occurs during the formation of the precursor (i.e., during the implosion of the array) observed by time-resolved laser probing and XUV imaging. The results might indicate that outflows from conical wire arrays propagate much further away than the observations made after laser and XUV images from conical arrays suggesting densities below the detection limits of these diagnostics. G. Munoz-Cordovez acknowledges financial support from CONICYT Grant for doctoral studies.

  7. Design of Off-statistics Axial-flow Fans by Means of Vortex Law Optimization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Andrea Lazari; Andrea Cattanei

    2014-01-01

    Off-statistics input data sets are common in axial-flow fans design and may easily result in some violation of the requirements of a good aerodynamic blade design.In order to circumvent this problem,in the present paper,a solution to the radial equilibrium equation is found which minimizes the outlet kinetic energy and fulfills the aerodynamic constraints,thus ensuring that the resulting blade has acceptable aerodynamic performance.The presented method is based on the optimization of a three-parameters vortex law and of the meridional channel size.The aerodynamic quantities to be employed as constraints are individuated and their suitable ranges of variation are proposed.The method is validated by means of a design with critical input data values and CFD analysis.Then,by means of systematic computations with different input data sets,some correlations and charts are obtained which are analogous to classic correlations based on statistical investigations on existing machines.Such new correlations help size a fan of given characteristics as well as study the feasibility of a given design.

  8. Design of off-statistics axial-flow fans by means of vortex law optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazari, Andrea; Cattanei, Andrea

    2014-12-01

    Off-statistics input data sets are common in axial-flow fans design and may easily result in some violation of the requirements of a good aerodynamic blade design. In order to circumvent this problem, in the present paper, a solution to the radial equilibrium equation is found which minimizes the outlet kinetic energy and fulfills the aerodynamic constraints, thus ensuring that the resulting blade has acceptable aerodynamic performance. The presented method is based on the optimization of a three-parameters vortex law and of the meridional channel size. The aerodynamic quantities to be employed as constraints are individuated and their suitable ranges of variation are proposed. The method is validated by means of a design with critical input data values and CFD analysis. Then, by means of systematic computations with different input data sets, some correlations and charts are obtained which are analogous to classic correlations based on statistical investigations on existing machines. Such new correlations help size a fan of given characteristics as well as study the feasibility of a given design.

  9. Influence of aeration and initial water thickness on axial velocity attenuation of jet flows

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang-ru WEI; Jun DENG; Bin LIU

    2013-01-01

    With the development of ski-jump energy dissipation for high and large discharge among the hydraulic projects,the effects of characteristics of water flow on energy dissipation are increasingly important.In the present study,the effects of aeration and the initial water thickness on axial velocity attenuation of jet flow were analyzed,using variance analysis and numerical calculated methods.From the analysis of test data,both of the air concentration and initial water thickness are sensitive factors for the axial velocity attenuation of jet flow along the axial way,and there is no significant interaction effect between the aeration and initial water thickness.Aeration has a more significant effect on the axial velocity attenuation of jet flow.Decreasing the initial water thickness of jet flow can reduce the length of jet core,and make the initial position of axial velocity attenuation closer to the nozzle exit.The numerical calculation results show that aeration can contribute to the enhancement of entrainment ability of jet flow,which may improve the interaction between jet flow and surroundings.For ski-jump energy dissipation among the hydraulic projects,combining aeration with decreasing initial water thickness of jet flow is an effective way to enhance the rate of axial velocity attenuation.

  10. Revealing atropisomer axial chirality in drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaPlante, Steven R; Edwards, Paul J; Fader, Lee D; Jakalian, Araz; Hucke, Oliver

    2011-03-07

    An often overlooked source of chirality is atropisomerism, which results from slow rotation along a bond axis due to steric hindrance and/or electronic factors. If undetected or not managed properly, this time-dependent chirality has the potential to lead to serious consequences, because atropisomers can be present as distinct enantiomers or diastereoisomers with their attendant different properties. Herein we introduce a strategy to reveal and classify compounds that have atropisomeric chirality. Energy barriers to axial rotation were calculated using quantum mechanics, from which predicted high barriers could be experimentally validated. A calculated rotational energy barrier of 20 kcal mol(-1) was established as a suitable threshold to distinguish between atropisomers and non-atropisomers with a prediction accuracy of 86%. This methodology was applied to subsets of drug databases in the course of which atropisomeric drugs were identified. In addition, some drugs were exposed that were not yet known to have this chiral attribute. The most valuable utility of this tool will be to predict atropisomerism along the drug discovery pathway. When used in concert with our compound classification scheme, decisions can be made during early discovery stages such as "hit-to-lead" and "lead optimization," to foresee and validate the presence of atropisomers and to exercise options of removing, further stabilizing, or rendering the chiral axis of interest more freely rotatable via SAR design, thereby decreasing this potential liability within a compound series. The strategy can also improve drug development plans, such as determining whether a drug or series should be developed as a racemic mixture or as an isolated single compound. Moreover, the work described herein can be extended to other chemical fields that require the assessment of potential chiral axes.

  11. Studies on fission with ALADIN. Precise and simultaneous measurement of fission yields, total kinetic energy and total prompt neutron multiplicity at GSI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, Julie-Fiona; Taieb, Julien; Chatillon, Audrey; Belier, Gilbert; Boutoux, Guillaume; Ebran, Adeline; Gorbinet, Thomas; Grente, Lucie; Laurent, Benoit; Pellereau, Eric [CEA DAM Bruyeres-le-Chatel, Arpajon (France); Alvarez-Pol, Hector; Ayyad, Yassid; Benlliure, Jose; Cortina Gil, Dolores; Caamano, Manuel; Fernandez Dominguez, Beatriz; Paradela, Carlos; Ramos, Diego; Rodriguez-Sanchez, Jose-Luis; Vargas, Jossitt [Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Audouin, Laurent; Tassan-Got, Laurent [CNRS/IN2P3, IPNO, Orsay (France); Aumann, Thomas [Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, Darmstadt (Germany); Casarejos, Enrique [Universidad de Vigo, Vigo (Spain); Farget, Fanny; Rodriguez-Tajes, Carme [CNRS/IN2P3, GANIL, Caen (France); Heinz, Andreas [Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg (Sweden); Jurado, Beatriz [CNRS/IN2P3, CENBG, Gradignan (France); Kelic-Heil, Aleksandra; Kurz, Nikolaus; Nociforo, Chiara; Pietri, Stephane; Rossi, Dominic; Schmidt, Karl-Heinz; Simon, Haik; Voss, Bernd; Weick, Helmut [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Darmstadt (Germany)

    2015-12-15

    A novel technique for fission studies, based on the inverse kinematics approach, is presented. Following pioneering work in the nineties, the SOFIA Collaboration has designed and built an experimental set-up dedicated to the simultaneous measurement of isotopic yields, total kinetic energies and total prompt neutron multiplicities, by fully identifying both fission fragments in coincidence, for the very first time. This experiment, performed at GSI, permits to study the fission of a wide variety of fissioning systems, ranging from mercury to neptunium, possibly far from the valley of stability. A first experiment, performed in 2012, has provided a large array of unprecedented data regarding the nuclear fission process. An excerpt of the results is presented. With this solid starter, further improvements of the experimental set-up are considered, which are consistent with the expected developments at the GSI facility, in order to measure more fission observables in coincidence. The completeness reached in the SOFIA data, permits to scrutinize the correlations between the interesting features of fission, offering a very detailed insight in this still unraveled mechanism. (orig.)

  12. Cu in In{sub 2}S{sub 3}: interdiffusion phenomena analysed by high kinetic energy X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pistor, P.; Allsop, N.; Caballero, R.; Camus, C.; Grimm, A.; Johnson, B.; Kropp, T.; Lauermann, I.; Lehmann, S.; Schorr, S.; Weber, A.; Klenk, R. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin fuer Materialien und Energie GmbH (HZB), Berlin (Germany); Braun, W.; Gorgoi, M. [Berliner Elektronenspeicherring-Gesellschaft fuer Synchrotronstrahlung m.b.H., Berlin (Germany); Fischer, Ch.-H. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin fuer Materialien und Energie GmbH (HZB), Berlin (Germany); Freie Universitaet Berlin (Germany). Fachbereich Physik; Moenig, H. [Freie Universitaet Berlin (Germany). Fachbereich Physik

    2009-05-15

    Chalcopyrite thin film solar cells with an In{sub 2}S{sub 3} buffer showed high efficiencies above 15%, but only after annealing at 200 C. One possible explanation is a Cu interdiffusion at the absorber/buffer interface. We were able to directly measure a Cu interdiffusion with a new tool at the BESSY synchrotron facility: HIKE (high kinetic energy X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy). Due to its increased information depth of up to 10-20 nm HIKE is able to provide chemical information even through thin closed overlayers. The HIKE endstation also allows in-situ heating. A layer stack of In{sub 2}S{sub 3}/ Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} was prepared and heated in-situ up to a temperature of 300 C while continuously measuring HIKE spectra. A strong increase of the Cu signal above temperatures around 200 C was found. With this setup we were able to directly monitor the Cu diffusion from the absorber into the buffer layer. (copyright 2009 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  13. Profile of the horizontal wind variance near the ground in near neutral flow - K-theory and the transport of the turbulent kinetic energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yahaya, S.; Frangi, J. P.

    2009-05-01

    This paper deals with the characteristics of the atmospheric turbulent flow in the vicinity of the ground, and particularly with the profile of the horizontal wind variance. The study is based on experimental measurements performed with fast cup anemometers located near the ground at 5 different levels (from 0.25 to 4 m) and sampled at 1 Hz. The experiment was carried over two agricultural plots with various tillage treatments in a fallow semiarid area (Central Aragon, Spain). The results of this study reveal that near the ground surface and under moderate wind, the horizontal wind variance logarithmically increases with height, in direct relationship with the friction velocity and the roughness length scale. A theoretical development has allowed us to link this behaviour to the modeling of the turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) transport through the eddy diffusivity. Thus, the study proposes a formulation of the similarity universal function of the horizontal wind variance. Besides, the formulation offers a new method for the determination of the friction velocity and the roughness length scale and can be used for the evaluation of the TKE transport rate.

  14. Axial Super-resolution Evanescent Wave Tomography

    CERN Document Server

    Pendharker, Sarang; Newman, Ward; Ogg, Stephen; Nazemifard, Neda; Jacob, Zubin

    2016-01-01

    Optical tomographic reconstruction of a 3D nanoscale specimen is hindered by the axial diffraction limit, which is 2-3 times worse than the focal plane resolution. We propose and experimentally demonstrate an axial super-resolution evanescent wave tomography (AxSET) method that enables the use of regular evanescent wave microscopes like Total Internal Reflection Fluorescence Microscope (TIRF) beyond surface imaging, and achieve tomographic reconstruction with axial super-resolution. Our proposed method based on Fourier reconstruction achieves axial super-resolution by extracting information from multiple sets of three-dimensional fluorescence images when the sample is illuminated by an evanescent wave. We propose a procedure to extract super-resolution features from the incremental penetration of an evanescent wave and support our theory by 1D (along the optical axis) and 3D simulations. We validate our claims by experimentally demonstrating tomographic reconstruction of microtubules in HeLa cells with an axi...

  15. Axial thermal rotation of slender rods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dichuan; Fakhri, Nikta; Pasquali, Matteo; Biswal, Sibani Lisa

    2011-05-06

    Axial rotational diffusion of rodlike polymers is important in processes such as microtubule filament sliding and flagella beating. By imaging the motion of small kinks along the backbone of chains of DNA-linked colloids, we produce a direct and systematic measurement of axial rotational diffusivity of rods both in bulk solution and near a wall. The measured diffusivities decrease linearly with the chain length, irrespective of the distance from a wall, in agreement with slender-body hydrodynamics theory. Moreover, the presence of small kinks does not affect the chain's axial diffusivity. Our system and measurements provide insights into fundamental axial diffusion processes of slender objects, which encompass a wide range of entities including biological filaments and linear polymer chains.

  16. How to diagnose axial spondyloarthritis early

    OpenAIRE

    Rudwaleit, M.; van der Heijde, D.; Khan, M.; Braun, J.; Sieper, J.

    2004-01-01

    Background: Chronic low back pain (LBP), the leading symptom of ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and undifferentiated axial spondyloarthritis (SpA), precedes the development of radiographic sacroiliitis, sometimes by many years.

  17. Axial force measurement for esophageal function testing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gravesen, Flemming Holbæk; Funch-Jensen, Peter; Gregersen, Hans

    2009-01-01

    force transducers over in-vivo strain gauges of various sizes to electrical impedance based measurements. The amplitude and duration of the axial force has been shown to be as reliable as manometry. Normal, as well as abnormal, manometric recordings occur with normal bolus transit, which have been...... force (force in radial direction) whereas the bolus moves along the length of esophagus in a distal direction. Force measurements in the longitudinal (axial) direction provide a more direct measure of esophageal transport function. The technique used to record axial force has developed from external...... documented using imaging modalities such as radiography and scintigraphy. This inconsistency using manometry has also been documented by axial force recordings. This underlines the lack of information when diagnostics are based on manometry alone. Increasing the volume of a bag mounted on a probe...

  18. Axial design of nuclear fuel using path relinking; Diseno axial de combustible nuclear utilizando path relinking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castillo, A.; Torres, M.; Ortiz, J. J.; Perusquia, R.; Hernandez, J. L.; Montes, J. L. [ININ, 52750 La Marquesa, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)]. e-mail: jacm@nuclear.inin.mx

    2008-07-01

    In the present work the preliminary results were obtained with the zoctli system whose purpose is the axial design of assembly of nuclear fuel under certain considerations. For the mentioned design well-know cells were already used and that they have been proven in diverse cycles of operation in the nuclear power plant of Laguna Verde. The design contemplates fuels assemblies of 10x10 and with 2 water channels. The assembly was distributed in 6 axial zones according to its structure. In order to take to end the optimization is was used the well-known technique like Path relinking and to find the group of previous solutions required by this technique uses the technical Taboo search. In order to work with Path relinking, 5 trajectories was taken in to account from a set of 5 previous solutions generated with theTaboo search, the update of the group of solutions is carried out in dynamic form. In the case of the Taboo search it was used a list of variable size, it was implement an aspiration approach, it was used the vector of frequencies and due to the cost of the evaluation of the objective function, only it was review 5% of the vicinity. For the objective function was considered the limit thermal, the axial profile of power, the effective multiplication factor and the margin of having turned off in cold. In order to prove the design system, it was used a balance cycle with a value of reference of 0.9928 for the effective multiplication factor that is equivalent to a produced energy of 10896 MWd/TU at the end of operation to full power. The designed assemblies were placed both in one of lots different from fresh assemblies on which it counts the referred cycle. At the end one a comparison with the results obtained with other techniques and under similar conditions is made. The results obtained until the moment show an appropriate performance of the system. It is possible to indicate that a small inconvenient is the amount of consumed resources of calculation during

  19. Extension of a Kinetic Approach to Chemical Reactions to Electronic Energy Levels and Reactions Involving Charged Species with Application to DSMC Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liechty, Derek S.

    2014-01-01

    The ability to compute rarefied, ionized hypersonic flows is becoming more important as missions such as Earth reentry, landing high mass payloads on Mars, and the exploration of the outer planets and their satellites are being considered. Recently introduced molecular-level chemistry models that predict equilibrium and nonequilibrium reaction rates using only kinetic theory and fundamental molecular properties are extended in the current work to include electronic energy level transitions and reactions involving charged particles. These extensions are shown to agree favorably with reported transition and reaction rates from the literature for near-equilibrium conditions. Also, the extensions are applied to the second flight of the Project FIRE flight experiment at 1634 seconds with a Knudsen number of 0.001 at an altitude of 76.4 km. In order to accomplish this, NASA's direct simulation Monte Carlo code DAC was rewritten to include the ability to simulate charge-neutral ionized flows, take advantage of the recently introduced chemistry model, and to include the extensions presented in this work. The 1634 second data point was chosen for comparisons to be made in order to include a CFD solution. The Knudsen number at this point in time is such that the DSMC simulations are still tractable and the CFD computations are at the edge of what is considered valid because, although near-transitional, the flow is still considered to be continuum. It is shown that the inclusion of electronic energy levels in the DSMC simulation is necessary for flows of this nature and is required for comparison to the CFD solution. The flow field solutions are also post-processed by the nonequilibrium radiation code HARA to compute the radiative portion.

  20. Woody biomass: Niche position as a source of sustainable renewable chemicals and energy and kinetics of hot-water extraction/hydrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shijie

    2010-01-01

    The conversion of biomass to chemicals and energy is imperative to sustaining our way of life as known to us today. Fossil chemical and energy sources are traditionally regarded as wastes from a distant past. Petroleum, natural gas, and coal are not being regenerated in a sustainable manner. However, biomass sources such as algae, grasses, bushes and forests are continuously being replenished. Woody biomass represents the most abundant and available biomass source. Woody biomass is a reliably sustainable source of chemicals and energy that could be replenished at a rate consistent with our needs. The biorefinery is a concept describing the collection of processes used to convert biomass to chemicals and energy. Woody biomass presents more challenges than cereal grains for conversion to platform chemicals due to its stereochemical structures. Woody biomass can be thought of as comprised of at least four components: extractives, hemicellulose, lignin and cellulose. Each of these four components has a different degree of resistance to chemical, thermal and biological degradation. The biorefinery concept proposed at ESF (State University of New York - College of Environmental Science and Forestry) aims at incremental sequential deconstruction, fractionation/conversion of woody biomass to achieve efficient separation of major components. The emphasis of this work is on the kinetics of hot-water extraction, filling the gap in the fundamental understanding, linking engineering developments, and completing the first step in the biorefinery processes. This first step removes extractives and hemicellulose fractions from woody biomass. While extractives and hemicellulose are largely removed in the extraction liquor, cellulose and lignin largely remain in the residual woody structure. Xylo-oligomers and acetic acid in the extract are the major components having the greatest potential value for development. Extraction/hydrolysis involves at least 16 general reactions that could

  1. Numerical simulation of axial flow compressors.

    OpenAIRE

    Jesuino Takachi Tomita

    2002-01-01

    This work deals with the numerical simulation of axial flow compressors, from design to performance prediction. The stage performance prediction uses the meanline flow properties. Stage-stacking is used to analyse a multi-stage compressor. A computer program, written in FORTRAN, was developed and is able to design an axial flow compressor given air mass flow, total pressure ratio, overall efficiency and design speed. All geometrical data relevant to the compressor performance prediction is ca...

  2. Wave propagation in axially moving periodic strings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorokin, Vladislav S.; Thomsen, Jon Juel

    2017-04-01

    The paper deals with analytically studying transverse waves propagation in an axially moving string with periodically modulated cross section. The structure effectively models various relevant technological systems, e.g. belts, thread lines, band saws, etc., and, in particular, roller chain drives for diesel engines by capturing both their spatial periodicity and axial motion. The Method of Varying Amplitudes is employed in the analysis. It is shown that the compound wave traveling in the axially moving periodic string comprises many components with different frequencies and wavenumbers. This is in contrast to non-moving periodic structures, for which all components of the corresponding compound wave feature the same frequency. Due to this "multi-frequency" character of the wave motion, the conventional notion of frequency band-gaps appears to be not applicable for the moving periodic strings. Thus, for such structures, by frequency band-gaps it is proposed to understand frequency ranges in which the primary component of the compound wave attenuates. Such frequency band-gaps can be present for a moving periodic string, but only if its axial velocity is lower than the transverse wave speed, and, the higher the axial velocity, the narrower the frequency band-gaps. The revealed effects could be of potential importance for applications, e.g. they indicate that due to spatial inhomogeneity, oscillations of axially moving periodic chains always involve a multitude of frequencies.

  3. Erbium hydride decomposition kinetics.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferrizz, Robert Matthew

    2006-11-01

    Thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) is used to study the decomposition kinetics of erbium hydride thin films. The TDS results presented in this report are analyzed quantitatively using Redhead's method to yield kinetic parameters (E{sub A} {approx} 54.2 kcal/mol), which are then utilized to predict hydrogen outgassing in vacuum for a variety of thermal treatments. Interestingly, it was found that the activation energy for desorption can vary by more than 7 kcal/mol (0.30 eV) for seemingly similar samples. In addition, small amounts of less-stable hydrogen were observed for all erbium dihydride films. A detailed explanation of several approaches for analyzing thermal desorption spectra to obtain kinetic information is included as an appendix.

  4. Axial Non-linear Dynamic Soil-Pile Interaction - Keynote

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holeyman A.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This keynote lecture describes recent analytical and numerical advances in the modeling of the axial nonlinear dynamic interaction between a single pile and its embedding soil. On one hand, analytical solutions are developed for assessing the nonlinear axial dynamic response of the shaft of a pile subjected to dynamic loads, and in particular to vibratory loads. Radial inhomogeneity arising from shear modulus degradation is evaluated over a range of parameters and compared with those obtained by other authors and by a numerical radial discrete model simulating the pile and soil movements from integration of the laws of motion. New approximate non linear solutions for axial pile shaft behaviour developed from general elastodynamic equations are presented and compared to existing linear solutions. The soil non linear behaviour and its ability to dissipate mechanical energy upon cyclic loading are shown to have a significant influence on the mechanical impedance provided by the surrounding soil against pile shaft movement. The limitations of over-simplified modelling of pile response are highlighted.

  5. Controllable rectification of the axial expansion in the thermally driven artificial muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Donghua; Zhang, Xingyi; Yong, Huadong; Zhou, Jun; Zhou, You-He

    2015-09-01

    At present, the concept of artificial muscle twisted by polymers or fibers has become a hot issue in the field of intelligent material research according to its distinguishing advantages, e.g., high energy density, large-stroke, non-hysteresis, and inexpensive. The axial thermal expansion coefficient is an important parameter which can affect its demanding applications. In this letter, a device with high accuracy capacitive sensor is constructed to measure the axial thermal expansion coefficient of the twisted carbon fibers and yarns of Kevlar, and a theoretical model based on the thermal elasticity and the geometrical features of the twisted structure are also presented to predict the axial expansion coefficient. It is found that the calculated results take good agreements with the experimental data. According to the present experiment and analyses, a method to control the axial thermal expansion coefficient of artificial muscle is proposed. Moreover, the mechanism of this kind of thermally driven artificial muscle is discussed.

  6. Electro-Kinetic Pumping with Slip Irreversibility in Heat Exchange of CSP-Powered Bio-Digester Assemblies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuel O.B. Ogedengbe

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Parametric studies of the effects of slip irreversibility in concentrating solar power (CSP-powered bio-digester assemblies are investigated. Complexities regarding the identification of the appropriate electro-kinetic phenomena for certain electrolyte phases are reviewed. The application of exergy analysis to the design of energy conversion devices, like solar thermal collectors, for the required heat of formation in a downdraft waste food bio-digester, is discussed. Thermal management in the silicon-based substrate of the energy system is analyzed. The rectangular-shaped micro-channels are simulated with a finite-volume, staggered coupling of the pressure-velocity fields. Entropy generation transport within the energy system is determined and coupled with the solution procedure. Consequently, the effects of channel size perturbation, Reynolds number, and pressure ratios on the thermal performance and exergy destruction are presented. A comparative analysis of the axial heat conduction for thermal management in energy conversion devices is proposed.

  7. Optimization of residual heat removal pump axial thrust and axial bearing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schubert, F.

    1996-12-01

    The residual heat removal (RHR) pumps of German 1300 megawatt pressurized-water reactor (PWR) power plants are of the single stage end suction type with volute casing or with diffuser and forged circular casing. Due to the service conditions the pumps have to cover the full capacity range as well as a big variation in suction static pressure. This results in a big difference in the axial thrust that has to be borne by the axial bearing. Because these pumps are designed to operate without auxiliary systems (things that do not exist can not fail), they are equipped with antifriction bearings and sump oil lubrication. To minimize the heat production within the bearing casing, a number of PWR plants have pumps with combined axial/radial bearings of the ball type. Due to the fact that the maximum axial thrust caused by static pressure and hydrodynamic forces on the impeller is too big to be borne by that type of axial bearing, the impellers were designed to produce a hydrodynamic axial force that counteracts the static axial force. Thus, the resulting axial thrust may change direction when the static pressure varies.

  8. Axial super-resolution evanescent wave tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pendharker, Sarang; Shende, Swapnali; Newman, Ward; Ogg, Stephen; Nazemifard, Neda; Jacob, Zubin

    2016-12-01

    Optical tomographic reconstruction of a 3D nanoscale specimen is hindered by the axial diffraction limit, which is 2-3 times worse than the focal plane resolution. We propose and experimentally demonstrate an axial super-resolution evanescent wave tomography (AxSET) method that enables the use of regular evanescent wave microscopes like Total Internal Reflection Fluorescence Microscope (TIRF) beyond surface imaging, and achieve tomographic reconstruction with axial super-resolution. Our proposed method based on Fourier reconstruction achieves axial super-resolution by extracting information from multiple sets of three-dimensional fluorescence images when the sample is illuminated by an evanescent wave. We propose a procedure to extract super-resolution features from the incremental penetration of an evanescent wave and support our theory by 1D (along the optical axis) and 3D simulations. We validate our claims by experimentally demonstrating tomographic reconstruction of microtubules in HeLa cells with an axial resolution of $\\sim$130 nm. Our method does not require any additional optical components or sample preparation. The proposed method can be combined with focal plane super-resolution techniques like STORM and can also be adapted for THz and microwave near-field tomography.

  9. Axial super-resolution evanescent wave tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pendharker, Sarang; Shende, Swapnali; Newman, Ward; Ogg, Stephen; Nazemifard, Neda; Jacob, Zubin

    2016-12-01

    Optical tomographic reconstruction of a three-dimensional (3D) nanoscale specimen is hindered by the axial diffraction limit, which is 2-3 times worse than the focal plane resolution. We propose and experimentally demonstrate an axial super-resolution evanescent wave tomography method that enables the use of regular evanescent wave microscopes like the total internal reflection fluorescence microscope beyond surface imaging and achieve a tomographic reconstruction with axial super-resolution. Our proposed method based on Fourier reconstruction achieves axial super-resolution by extracting information from multiple sets of 3D fluorescence images when the sample is illuminated by an evanescent wave. We propose a procedure to extract super-resolution features from the incremental penetration of an evanescent wave and support our theory by one-dimensional (along the optical axis) and 3D simulations. We validate our claims by experimentally demonstrating tomographic reconstruction of microtubules in HeLa cells with an axial resolution of ∼130  nm. Our method does not require any additional optical components or sample preparation. The proposed method can be combined with focal plane super-resolution techniques like stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy and can also be adapted for THz and microwave near-field tomography.

  10. Reducing axial mixing in flotation columns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al Taweel, A.M.; Ramadan, A.M. [Technical Univ. of Nova Scotia, Halifax (Canada). Chemical Engineering Dept.; Moharam, M.R.; Hassan, T.A. [Al Azhar Univ., Cairo (Egypt); El Mofty, S.M. [Cairo Univ., Giza (Egypt)

    1995-10-01

    The axial mixing characteristics of a pilot-scale flotation column were investigated with the objective of identifying means to mitigate the extent of axial mixing that adversely affects its grade/recovery performance. A wide range of design and operating conditions wa investigated and the experimental results, obtained using the dynamic response method, were analyzed using three axial mixing models. The dynamic response of the column can best be described using the axial dispersion model. The results obtained suggest that the value of the axial dispersion coefficient, E{sub L}, can be significantly reduced by judicial selection of hydrodynamic conditions and/or the use of column inserts that suppress the onset of hydrodynamic instabilities inherent to the operation of conventional flotation columns. Up to 40% reduction in the value of E{sub L} was thus obtained by using spargers that produce more uniform bubble sizes, while up to 30% reductions were obtained by controlling the residual frother concentration. 33 refs., 7 figs.

  11. Experimental study of the structure of flow regions with negative turbulent kinetic energy production in confined three-dimensional shear flows with and without buoyancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liberzon, A.; Lüthi, B.; Guala, M.; Kinzelbach, W.; Tsinober, A.

    2005-09-01

    Regions of negative turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) production are observed and studied in two different flows, namely in turbulent thermal Rayleigh-Bénard convection in a cubic cell, and in a mechanically agitated shear flow in absence of buoyancy, with a main focus on the small scale structure of the flow. The experimental investigation is performed using three-dimensional (3D) particle tracking velocimetry, which allows for measuring the three velocity components and the full tensor of velocity derivatives in a finite 3D volume. The capability to compute the TKE production term in its complete form P =-⟨uiuj⟩Sij is crucial due to the three dimensionality of the flows. A comparative analysis of four different flow situations is performed in regions with positive and negative TKE production with and without buoyancy effects. In both, convective shear flow and shear flow without buoyancy, negative TKE production is associated with the unusual, more pronounced alignment of the velocity vector u with the first eigenvector λ1S of the mean rate-of-strain tensor, related to the stretching eigenvalue, Λ1S, in contrast to the positive TKE production associated with the alignment with the third eigenvector (i.e., related to the negative, compressing eigenvalue). In the negative TKE production region of convective flow we find (i) increased values for mean strain, (ii) increased values of the first contribution PΛ1 in the eigenframe of the mean rate-of-strain tensor, and decreased values of the vertical contribution to the production term in a fixed frame of reference, (iii) stronger anisotropy of u, (iv) higher levels of fluctuating strain s2 and enstrophy ω2, as well as (v) higher rates of their production, -sijsjkski and ωiωjsij, compared to the respective values in positive TKE production region. In the shear flow without buoyancy, all the mentioned quantities are lower in the negative TKE production region than in the positive TKE production region. From this

  12. Improving the lattice axial vector current

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horsley, R. [Edinburgh Univ. (United Kingdom). School of Physics and Astronomy; Nakamura, Y. [RIKEN Advanced Institute for Computational Science, Kobe (Japan); Perlt, H.; Schiller, A. [Leipzig Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik; Rakow, P.E.L. [Liverpool Univ. (United Kingdom). Theoretical Physics Div.; Schierholz, G. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Zanotti, J.M. [Adelaide Univ. (Australia). CSSM, Dept. of Physics

    2015-11-15

    For Wilson and clover fermions traditional formulations of the axial vector current do not respect the continuum Ward identity which relates the divergence of that current to the pseudoscalar density. Here we propose to use a point-split or one-link axial vector current whose divergence exactly satisfies a lattice Ward identity, involving the pseudoscalar density and a number of irrelevant operators. We check in one-loop lattice perturbation theory with SLiNC fermion and gauge plaquette action that this is indeed the case including order O(a) effects. Including these operators the axial Ward identity remains renormalisation invariant. First preliminary results of a nonperturbative check of the Ward identity are also presented.

  13. Axial flow positive displacement worm gas generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murrow, Kurt David (Inventor); Giffin, Rollin George (Inventor); Fakunle, Oladapo (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    An axial flow positive displacement engine has an inlet axially spaced apart and upstream from an outlet. Inner and outer bodies have offset inner and outer axes extend from the inlet to the outlet through first, second, and third sections of a core assembly in serial downstream flow relationship. At least one of the bodies is rotatable about its axis. The inner and outer bodies have intermeshed inner and outer helical blades wound about the inner and outer axes respectively. The inner and outer helical blades extend radially outwardly and inwardly respectively. The helical blades have first, second, and third twist slopes in the first, second, and third sections respectively. The first twist slopes are less than the second twist slopes and the third twist slopes are less than the second twist slopes. A combustor section extends axially downstream through at least a portion of the second section.

  14. Axial symmetry and conformal Killing vectors

    CERN Document Server

    Mars, M; Mars, Marc; Senovilla, Jose M.M.

    1993-01-01

    Axisymmetric spacetimes with a conformal symmetry are studied and it is shown that, if there is no further conformal symmetry, the axial Killing vector and the conformal Killing vector must commute. As a direct consequence, in conformally stationary and axisymmetric spacetimes, no restriction is made by assuming that the axial symmetry and the conformal timelike symmetry commute. Furthermore, we prove that in axisymmetric spacetimes with another symmetry (such as stationary and axisymmetric or cylindrically symmetric spacetimes) and a conformal symmetry, the commutator of the axial Killing vector with the two others mush vanish or else the symmetry is larger than that originally considered. The results are completely general and do not depend on Einstein's equations or any particular matter content.

  15. Atlanto-axial infection after acupuncture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, A; Lind, C R P; Smith, R J; Kodali, V

    2015-12-11

    A 67-year-old man presented with neck cellulitis following acupuncture for cervical spondylosis. Blood cultures were positive for methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus. Increased neck pain and bacteraemia prompted MRI, which showed atlanto-axial septic arthritis without signs of infection of the tissues between the superficial cellulitic area and the atlanto-axial joint, thus making direct extension of infection unlikely. It is more likely that haematogenous spread of infection resulted in seeding in the atlanto-axial joint, with the proximity of the arthritis and acupuncture site being coincidental. Acupuncture is a treatment option for some indolent pain conditions. As such, acupuncture services are likely to be more frequently utilised. A history of acupuncture is rarely requested by the admitting doctor and seldom offered voluntarily by the patient, especially where the site of infection due to haematogenous spread is distant from the needling location. Awareness of infectious complications following acupuncture can reduce morbidity through early intervention.

  16. Improving the lattice axial vector current

    CERN Document Server

    Horsley, R; Perlt, H; Rakow, P E L; Schierholz, G; Schiller, A; Zanotti, J M

    2015-01-01

    For Wilson and clover fermions traditional formulations of the axial vector current do not respect the continuum Ward identity which relates the divergence of that current to the pseudoscalar density. Here we propose to use a point-split or one-link axial vector current whose divergence exactly satisfies a lattice Ward identity, involving the pseudoscalar density and a number of irrelevant operators. We check in one-loop lattice perturbation theory with SLiNC fermion and gauge plaquette action that this is indeed the case including order $O(a)$ effects. Including these operators the axial Ward identity remains renormalisation invariant. First preliminary results of a nonperturbative check of the Ward identity are also presented.

  17. Axial dechanneling and its application to defect analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaertner, K.; Goetz, G.; Hehl, K. (Friedrich-Schiller-Universitaet, Jena (German Democratic Republic). Sektion Physik)

    1984-03-01

    Within the basic description of Lindhard a theoretical model of axial dechanneling starting from the master equation for transverse energy distribution is developed. In contrast to the diffusion model, large changes in transverse energy are included which are of special importance for defects. Numerical results of the minimum backscattering yield for perfect crystals, crystals with point defects and crystals with dislocations show good agreement with experimental data for different temperatures and energies. This is the basis for the application to defect analysis. For point defects the measurement of temperature dependence of the minimum yield proved to be a very suitable method for the determination of preferred lattice positions if they are not too far from the string (< or approx. 0.07 nm in silicon).

  18. Axial design of fuel for BWRs using neural networks; Diseno axial de combustible para BWRs usando redes neuronales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortiz, J.J.; Castillo, A.; Montes, J.L.; Perusquia, R. [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 La Marquesa, Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)]. e-mail: jjortiz@nuclear.inin.mx

    2007-07-01

    In this work a new system of axial optimization of fuel is presented based on a recurrent multi state neural net called RENODC. They are described with detail the main characteristics of this type of neural net (architecture, energy function and actualization of neural states) and like was adapted to the assemble design of nuclear fuel. The fuel design is proven by means of a fuel recharge and pre determined control rod patterns. By this way a good axial fuel design one has, when the thermal limits are fulfilled along the cycle, the reactor stays critic and at least the wanted longitude of the cycle is reached; also the margin of in cold turned off is verified. The assemble of fuel created with RENODC it is substituted by a recharge assemble and it is sought to verify that the energy requirements and aspects of safety are completed. The used cycle corresponds to a balance cycle of 18 months that it can be applied to the Laguna Verde Nucleo electric Central. The tests demonstrate the effectiveness of the system to reach satisfactory results in times of CPU of around 4 hours. This way, it could be proven that the design proposed with a lightly superior enrichment to that of the substituted design, fulfills the energy requirements. In later stages of this project this system will be coupled to the other optimization modules that are already had. (Author)

  19. Axial loaded MRI of the lumbar spine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saifuddin, A. E-mail: asaifuddin@aol.com; Blease, S.; MacSweeney, E

    2003-09-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging is established as the technique of choice for assessment of degenerative disorders of the lumbar spine. However, it is routinely performed with the patient supine and the hips and knees flexed. The absence of axial loading and lumbar extension results in a maximization of spinal canal dimensions, which may in some cases, result in failure to demonstrate nerve root compression. Attempts have been made to image the lumbar spine in a more physiological state, either by imaging with flexion-extension, in the erect position or by using axial loading. This article reviews the literature relating to the above techniques.

  20. Axial Nucleon form factors from lattice QCD

    CERN Document Server

    Alexandrou, C; Carbonell, J; Constantinou, M; Harraud, P A; Guichon, P; Jansen, K; Korzec, T; Papinutto, M

    2010-01-01

    We present results on the nucleon axial form factors within lattice QCD using two flavors of degenerate twisted mass fermions. Volume effects are examined using simulations at two volumes of spatial length $L=2.1$ fm and $L=2.8$ fm. Cut-off effects are investigated using three different values of the lattice spacings, namely $a=0.089$ fm, $a=0.070$ fm and $a=0.056$ fm. The nucleon axial charge is obtained in the continuum limit and chirally extrapolated to the physical pion mass enabling comparison with experiment.