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Sample records for aware self-organizing density

  1. Energy Aware Self-Organizing Density Management in Wireless Sensor Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Merrer, Erwan Le; Kermarrec, Anne-Marie; Viana, Aline; Bertier, Marin

    2008-01-01

    Energy consumption is the most important factor that determines sensor node lifetime. The optimization of wireless sensor network lifetime targets not only the reduction of energy consumption of a single sensor node but also the extension of the entire network lifetime. We propose a simple and adaptive energy-conserving topology management scheme, called SAND (Self-Organizing Active Node Density). SAND is fully decentralized and relies on a distributed probing approach and on the redundancy resolution of sensors for energy optimizations, while preserving the data forwarding and sensing capabilities of the network. We present the SAND's algorithm, its analysis of convergence, and simulation results. Simulation results show that, though slightly increasing path lengths from sensor to sink nodes, the proposed scheme improves significantly the network lifetime for different neighborhood densities degrees, while preserving both sensing and routing fidelity.

  2. A Self-organizing Location and Mobility-Aware Route Optimization Protocol for Bluetooth Wireless

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheikh Tahir Bakhsh

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Bluetooth allows multi-hop ad-hoc networks that contain multiple interconnected piconets in a common area to form a scatternet. Routing is one of the technical issues in a scatternet because nodes can arrive and leave at arbitrary times; hence node mobility has a serious impact on network performance. Bluetooth network is built in an ad-hoc fashion, therefore, a fully connected network does not guarantee. Moreover, a partially connected network may not find the shortest route between source and destination. In this paper, a new Self-organizing Location and Mobility-aware Route Optimization (LMRO protocol is proposed for Bluetooth scatternet, which is based on node mobility and location. The proposed protocol considered the shortest route ahead of the source and destination nodes through nodes location information. In addition, proposed protocol guarantees network connectivity through executing Self-organizing procedure for the damaged route by considering signal strength. The proposed LMRO protocol predicts node mobility through the signal strength and activates an alternate link before the main link breaks. Simulation results show that the LMRO protocol has reduced the average hop count by 20%-50% and increased network throughput by 30%-40% compared to existing protocols.

  3. Image Clustering Method Based on Density Maps Derived from Self-Organizing Mapping: SOM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kohei Arai

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available A new method for image clustering with density maps derived from Self-Organizing Maps (SOM is proposed together with a clarification of learning processes during a construction of clusters. It is found that the proposed SOM based image clustering method shows much better clustered result for both simulation and real satellite imagery data. It is also found that the separability among clusters of the proposed method is 16% longer than the existing k-mean clustering. It is also found that the separability among clusters of the proposed method is 16% longer than the existing k-mean clustering. In accordance with the experimental results with Landsat-5 TM image, it takes more than 20000 of iteration for convergence of the SOM learning processes.

  4. Self-Organizing Robots

    CERN Document Server

    Murata, Satoshi

    2012-01-01

    It is man’s ongoing hope that a machine could somehow adapt to its environment by reorganizing itself. This is what the notion of self-organizing robots is based on. The theme of this book is to examine the feasibility of creating such robots within the limitations of current mechanical engineering. The topics comprise the following aspects of such a pursuit: the philosophy of design of self-organizing mechanical systems; self-organization in biological systems; the history of self-organizing mechanical systems; a case study of a self-assembling/self-repairing system as an autonomous distributed system; a self-organizing robot that can create its own shape and robotic motion; implementation and instrumentation of self-organizing robots; and the future of self-organizing robots. All topics are illustrated with many up-to-date examples, including those from the authors’ own work. The book does not require advanced knowledge of mathematics to be understood, and will be of great benefit to students in the rob...

  5. Self-organization of dislocation-free, high-density, vertically aligned GaN nanocolumns involving InGaN quantum wells on graphene/SiO2 covered with a thin AlN buffer layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Hiroaki; Konno, Yuta; Kishino, Katsumi

    2016-02-05

    We demonstrated the self-organization of high-density GaN nanocolumns on multilayer graphene (MLG)/SiO2 covered with a thin AlN buffer layer by RF-plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. MLG/SiO2 substrates were prepared by the transfer of CVD graphene onto thermally oxidized SiO2/Si [100] substrates. Employing the MLG with an AlN buffer layer enabled the self-organization of high-density and vertically aligned nanocolumns. Transmission electron microscopy observation revealed that no threading dislocations, stacking faults, or twinning defects were included in the self-organized nanocolumns. The photoluminescence (PL) peak intensities of the self-organized GaN nanocolumns were 2.0-2.6 times higher than those of a GaN substrate grown by hydride vapor phase epitaxy. Moreover, no yellow luminescence or ZB-phase GaN emission was observed from the nanocolumns. An InGaN/GaN MQW and p-type GaN were integrated into GaN nanocolumns grown on MLG, displaying a single-peak PL emission at a wavelength of 533 nm. Thus, high-density nitride p-i-n nanocolumns were fabricated on SiO2/Si using the transferred MLG interlayer, indicating the possibility of developing visible nanocolumn LEDs on graphene/SiO2.

  6. Self-Organized Bistability

    CERN Document Server

    di Santo, Serena; Vezzani, Alessandro; Muñoz, Miguel A

    2016-01-01

    Self-organized criticality elucidates the conditions under which physical and biological systems tune themselves to the edge of a second-order phase transition, with scale invariance. Motivated by the empirical observation of bimodal distributions of activity in neuroscience and other fields, we propose and analyze a theory for the self-organization to the point of phase-coexistence in systems exhibiting a first-order phase transition. It explains the emergence of regular avalanches with attributes of scale-invariance which coexist with huge anomalous ones, with realizations in many fields.

  7. Self-organizing networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marchetti, Nicola; Prasad, Neeli R.; Johansson, Johan;

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, a general overview of Self-Organizing Networks (SON), and the rationale and state-of-the-art of wireless SON are first presented. The technical and business requirements are then briefly treated, and the research challenges within the field of SON are highlighted. Thereafter, the r...

  8. Self Organization in Compensated Semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berezin, Alexander A.

    2004-03-01

    In partially compensated semiconductor (PCS) Fermi level is pinned to donor sub-band. Due to positional randomness and almost isoenergetic hoppings, donor-spanned electronic subsystem in PCS forms fluid-like highly mobile collective state. This makes PCS playground for pattern formation, self-organization, complexity emergence, electronic neural networks, and perhaps even for origins of life, bioevolution and consciousness. Through effects of impact and/or Auger ionization of donor sites, whole PCS may collapse (spinodal decomposition) into microblocks potentially capable of replication and protobiological activity (DNA analogue). Electronic screening effects may act in RNA fashion by introducing additional length scale(s) to system. Spontaneous quantum computing on charged/neutral sites becomes potential generator of informationally loaded microstructures akin to "Carl Sagan Effect" (hidden messages in Pi in his "Contact") or informational self-organization of "Library of Babel" of J.L. Borges. Even general relativity effects at Planck scale (R.Penrose) may affect the dynamics through (e.g.) isotopic variations of atomic mass and local density (A.A.Berezin, 1992). Thus, PCS can serve as toy model (experimental and computational) at interface of physics and life sciences.

  9. Analysis of the activity pattern of volcanoes through self-organized crack networks: The effect of density barriers—An application to Vesuvius activity in the period 1631-1944

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piegari, E.; Di Maio, R.; Scandone, R.

    2013-06-01

    We simulated the pattern of activity of a strato-volcano by using a cellular automaton model where magma is allowed to ascend to the surface through self-organized crack networks. Magma rises toward the surface by filling connected paths of fractures until the magma's density is less than that of surrounding rocks. If magma enters a region with negative or neutral buoyancy, it cools and solidifies; as a result, the local density profile is modified, and magmatic dikes are formed. We simulated the temporal evolution of high-density pathways of dikes that magma may eventually utilize to reach the surface. We showed that if a shallow neutral-negative buoyancy zone is restored after eruptions, due to, for example, piecemeal or chaotic collapses, a characteristic timescale appears in the inter-event repose time distribution. Such characteristic repose time represents the average time that magma takes to form a high-density pathway through the less dense rock layer, and it may give a hint to predict possible eruptive scenarios. Even if the model includes many simplifying assumptions in the definition of magma-rock interaction, the results obtained from simulations are consistent with the eruptive behavior of the Mt. Somma-Vesuvius volcano for the 1631-1944 period.

  10. Emergence or self-organization?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Emergence is not well defined, but all emergent systems have the following characteristics: the whole is more than the sum of the parts, they show bottom-up rather top-down organization and, if biological, they involve chemical signaling. Self-organization can be understood in terms of the second and third stages of thermodynamics enabling these stages used as analogs of ecosystem functioning. The second stage system was suggested earlier to provide a useful analog of the behavior of natural and agricultural ecosystems subjected to perturbations, but for this it needs the capacity for self-organization. Considering the hierarchy of the ecosystem suggests that this self-organization is provided by the third stage, whose entropy maximization acts as an analog of that of the soil population when it releases small molecules from much larger molecules in dead plant matter. This it does as vigorously as conditions allow. Through this activity, the soil population confers self-organization at both the ecosystem and the global level. The soil population has been seen as both emergent and self-organizing, supporting the suggestion that the two concepts are are so closely linked as to be virtually interchangeable. If this idea is correct one of the characteristics of a biological emergent system seems to be the ability to confer self-organization on an ecosystem or other entity which may be larger than itself. The beehive and the termite colony are emergent systems which share this ability. PMID:21966574

  11. Self-Organization in Embedded Real-Time Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Brinkschulte, Uwe; Rettberg, Achim

    2013-01-01

    This book describes the emerging field of self-organizing, multicore, distributed and real-time embedded systems.  Self-organization of both hardware and software can be a key technique to handle the growing complexity of modern computing systems. Distributed systems running hundreds of tasks on dozens of processors, each equipped with multiple cores, requires self-organization principles to ensure efficient and reliable operation. This book addresses various, so-called Self-X features such as self-configuration, self-optimization, self-adaptation, self-healing and self-protection. Presents open components for embedded real-time adaptive and self-organizing applications; Describes innovative techniques in: scheduling, memory management, quality of service, communications supporting organic real-time applications; Covers multi-/many-core embedded systems supporting real-time adaptive systems and power-aware, adaptive hardware and software systems; Includes case studies of open embedded real-time self-organizi...

  12. Self-organized Learning Environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalsgaard, Christian; Mathiasen, Helle

    2007-01-01

    system actively. The two groups used the system in their own way to support their specific activities and ways of working. The paper concludes that self-organized learning environments can strengthen the development of students’ academic as well as social qualifications. Further, the paper identifies...... systems, has a potential to support students’ development of self-organized learning environments and facilitate self-governed activities in higher education. The paper is based on an empirical study of two project groups’ use of a conference system. The study showed that the students used the conference......The purpose of the paper is to discuss the potentials of using a conference system in support of a project based university course. We use the concept of a self-organized learning environment to describe the shape of the course. In the paper we argue that educational technology, such as conference...

  13. Self-Organized Criticality Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aschwanden, M. J.

    2013-07-01

    Contents: (1) Introduction - Norma B. Crosby --- (2) Theoretical Models of SOC Systems - Markus J. Aschwanden --- (3) SOC and Fractal Geometry - R. T. James McAteer --- (4) Percolation Models of Self-Organized Critical Phenomena - Alexander V. Milovanov --- (5) Criticality and Self-Organization in Branching Processes: Application to Natural Hazards - Álvaro Corral, Francesc Font-Clos --- (6) Power Laws of Recurrence Networks - Yong Zou, Jobst Heitzig, Jürgen Kurths --- (7) SOC computer simolations - Gunnar Pruessner --- (8) SOC Laboratory Experiments - Gunnar Pruessner --- (9) Self-Organizing Complex Earthquakes: Scaling in Data, Models, and Forecasting - Michael K. Sachs et al. --- (10) Wildfires and the Forest-Fire Model - Stefan Hergarten --- (11) SOC in Landslides - Stefan Hergarten --- (12) SOC and Solar Flares - Paul Charbonneau --- (13) SOC Systems in Astrophysics - Markus J. Aschwanden ---

  14. Effects of Onset Density in Preschool Children: Implications for Development of Phonological Awareness and Phonological Representation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foy, Judith G.; Mann, Virginia A.

    2009-01-01

    Neighborhood density influences adult performance on several word processing tasks. Some studies show age-related effects of density on children's performance, reflecting a developmental restructuring of the mental lexicon from holistic into segmental representations that may play a role in phonological awareness. To further investigate density…

  15. PARALLEL SELF-ORGANIZING MAP

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    A new self-organizing map, parallel self-organizing map (PSOM), was proposed for information parallel processing purpose. In this model, there are two separate layers of neurons connected together,the number of neurons in both layer and connections between them is equal to the number of total elements of input signals, the weight updating is managed through a sequence of operations among some unitary transformation and operation matrixes, so the conventional repeated learning procedure was modified to learn just once and an algorithm was developed to realize this new learning method. With a typical classification example, the performance of PSOM demonstrated convergence results similar to Kohonen's model. Theoretic analysis and proofs also showed some interesting properties of PSOM. As it was pointed out, the contribution of such a network may not be so significant, but its parallel mode may be interesting for quantum computation.

  16. Self-Organizing Tunnel Peers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Tunneling is an important approach in IPv6 transition techniques. The tunnel broker model provides a way to build virtual IPv6 networks without manual configuration.However, neither it adapts performance variation on the IPv4 infrastructure,nor it is a scalable solution for a wide-area IPv6 networking environment. In this paper, a self-organizing tunnel peer (SOTP)model is presented. Tunnel peers are clustered in the SOTP system so that optimization is scalable. Four primitive operations related to cluster construction - arrest,release,division and death - endow the system with the nature of self-organization.Occurrence and behavior of the operations are decided by criteria on the IPv4 end-to-end performance; hence measurement is an indispensable component of the system. The metabolism of cluster relaxes the requirement to accuracy of measurement and optimization.

  17. Understanding and Self-Organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newton, Natika W

    2017-01-01

    How do we manage to understand a completely novel state of affairs, such as the sudden effects of an unexpected earthquake, or the arrival of a total stranger instead of the sister we were waiting for? In each case, for a moment we might be stunned, but we are able quite quickly to fit these events into our overall framework for understanding the world. However, terrified and despairing we feel, we know what earthquakes are and this event fits that schema; in the case of the stranger we know that this kind of thing happens, and that we must ask the stranger "Who are you, and where is my sister?" This paper asks about the mechanisms by which we rapidly achieve an understanding of our world, both the unexpected changes we may experience, and the ongoing comfortable familiarity we normally have with our surroundings. We attempt a solution by means of examining fundamental questions: What is it to understand something?What sorts of things do we try to understand?Is there a conscious EXPERIENCE of understanding?Does understanding involve conscious mental images?What is self-organization? I will argue that these questions revolve around the need of a living organism to take action, and that understanding anything involves knowing how we might act relative to that thing in our environment. The experience of understanding is a feeling that the action affordances of a situation are clear and available. Action (as opposed to reaction) includes imagery, particularly motor imagery, which can be used in the guidance of action. Understanding requires a conscious process involving motor imagery of action affordances, and action can be understood only in self-organizational terms. I explain how self-organization can ground the kinds of action affordance experience needed for conscious understanding. The paper concludes that our day-to-day understanding of our environment is the result of a self-organizing process.

  18. Self-Organized Network Flows

    CERN Document Server

    Helbing, D; Lämmer, S; Helbing, Dirk; Siegmeier, Jan; L\\"{a}mmer, Stefan

    2007-01-01

    A model for traffic flow in street networks or material flows in supply networks is presented, that takes into account the conservation of cars or materials and other significant features of traffic flows such as jam formation, spillovers, and load-dependent transportation times. Furthermore, conflicts or coordination problems of intersecting or merging flows are considered as well. Making assumptions regarding the permeability of the intersection as a function of the conflicting flows and the queue lengths, we find self-organized oscillations in the flows similar to the operation of traffic lights.

  19. Self-organizing biochemical cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orgel, L. E.; Bada, J. L. (Principal Investigator)

    2000-01-01

    I examine the plausibility of theories that postulate the development of complex chemical organization without requiring the replication of genetic polymers such as RNA. One conclusion is that theories that involve the organization of complex, small-molecule metabolic cycles such as the reductive citric acid cycle on mineral surfaces make unreasonable assumptions about the catalytic properties of minerals and the ability of minerals to organize sequences of disparate reactions. Another conclusion is that data in the Beilstein Handbook of Organic Chemistry that have been claimed to support the hypothesis that the reductive citric acid cycle originated as a self-organized cycle can more plausibly be interpreted in a different way.

  20. A self-organized system of smart preys and predators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rozenfeld, Alejandro F. [Instituto de Investigaciones Fisicoquimicas Teoricas y Aplicadas (INIFTA), Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, UNLP, CONICET, Suc. 4, C.C. 16 (1900) La Plata (Argentina); Albano, Ezequiel V. [Instituto de Investigaciones Fisicoquimicas Teoricas y Aplicadas (INIFTA), Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, UNLP, CONICET, Suc. 4, C.C. 16 (1900) La Plata (Argentina)]. E-mail: ealbano@inifta.unlp.edu.ar

    2004-11-22

    Based on the fact that, a standard prey-predator model (SPPM), exhibits irreversible phase transitions, belonging to the universality class of directed percolation (DP), between prey-predator coexistence and predator extinction [Phys. Lett. A 280 (2001) 45], a self-organized prey-predator model (SOPPM) is formulated and studied by means of extensive Monte Carlo simulations. The SOPPM is achieved defining the parameters of the SPPM as functions of the density of species. It is shown that the SOPPM self-organizes into an active state close the absorbing phase of the SPPM, and consequently their avalanche exponents also belong to the universality class of DP.

  1. Hierarchical organization versus self-organization

    OpenAIRE

    Busseniers, Evo

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we try to define the difference between hierarchical organization and self-organization. Organization is defined as a structure with a function. So we can define the difference between hierarchical organization and self-organization both on the structure as on the function. In the next two chapters these two definitions are given. For the structure we will use some existing definitions in graph theory, for the function we will use existing theory on (self-)organization. In the t...

  2. Self-organization and social science

    OpenAIRE

    Barbrook-Johnson, P.; Anzola, D; Cano, J.I.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Complexity science and its methodological applications have increased in popularity in social science during the last two decades. One key concept within complexity science is that of self-organization. Self-organization is used to refer to the emergence of stable patterns through autonomous and self-reinforcing dynamics at the micro-level. In spite of its potential relevance for the study of social dynamics, the articulation and use of the concept of self-organization has been kept ...

  3. Self-organization through decoupling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romar Correa

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available In one line of research, the transition from Fordism to flexible specialisation is explained by the infeasibility of a mode of regulation that relied on central controls. According to another explanation, which we favour, the disintegration of vertically integrated production is unpredictable. The concept of self-organization is often recommended to model the transition from hierarchical organizational forms to flatter structures. Formally, a conditionally stable nonlinear system of differential equations is examined. In the first thesis, the characteristic roots with positive real parts play the role of ‘order’ parameters which can become unstable modes. The rest of the variables refer to stable modes. The strategy is to show that the stable modes can be expressed in terms of the unstable modes so that the former can be eliminated from the system. On the other hand, we provide a theorem showing that a coupled set of differential equations can become uncoupled and vice versa as an argument in favour of the second thesis. The path of evolution can turn both ways.

  4. An Energy-Efficient Routing and Self-Organization Algorithm in Wireless Sensor Networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Li-feng; ZOU Shi-hong; ZHANG Lei; CHENG Shi-duan

    2005-01-01

    Energy efficiency is the most important goal in wireless sensor network routing and self-organization algorithms. To achieve this goal, our paper first presents a distributed energy-aware routing algorithm Nearest to Theoretical Point(NTP). Then it applies NTP to self-organization of sensor networks to form an energy-efficient self-organization algorithm Shortest Path Tree-NTP(SPT-NTP). Theoretic analysis and simulation show that NTP and SPT-NTP can ensure less network energy consumption than other related algorithms.

  5. Self-Steered Self-Organization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keijzer, Fred; Tschacher, W.; Dauwalder, J.P.

    2003-01-01

    Self-organization has become a well-established phenomenon in physics. It is now also propagated as an important phenomenon in psychology. What is the difference between these two forms of self-organization? One important way in which these two forms are distinguished is by the additional presence o

  6. Physical Foundations of Self-organizing Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Atanu; Georgiev, Georgi

    2014-03-01

    The appearance of coherent global pattern due to local interactions is known as self-organization. Self-organization is a spontaneous process in highly non-equilibrium dissipative systems that form structures which tend to maximize energy dissipation by leveling off energy gradients. This follows as a direct consequence of the Second Law of Thermodynamics. Also, a local interaction embodies in the above definition a mechanistic dimension to self-organization. The link between mechanics and the Second Law of Thermodynamics lie in the Principle of Least Action, a strong law of nature that is obeyed in every spontaneous process. Thus, self-organization rests on two basic foundational principles of nature namely, the Second Law of Thermodynamics and the Principle of Least Action. We attempt to develop a formal definition of self-organization based on those principles.

  7. Awareness of Breast Density and Its Impact on Breast Cancer Detection and Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Deborah J.; Radecki Breitkopf, Carmen; Ziegenfuss, Jeanette Y.; Jenkins, Sarah M.; Vachon, Celine M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Legislation mandating disclosure of breast density (BD) information has passed in 21 states; however, actual awareness of BD and knowledge of its impact on breast cancer detection and risk are unknown. Methods We conducted a national cross-sectional survey administered in English and Spanish using a probability-based sample of screening-age women, with oversampling of Connecticut, the only state with BD legislation in effect for > 1 year before the survey. Results Of 2,311 women surveyed, 65% responded. Overall, 58% of women had heard of BD, 49% knew that BD affects breast cancer detection, and 53% knew that BD affects cancer risk. After multivariable adjustment, increased BD awareness was associated with white non-Hispanic race/ethnicity (Hispanic v white non-Hispanic: odds ratio [OR], 0.23; P < .001), household income (OR, 1.07 per category increase; P < .001), education (OR, 1.19 per category increase; P < .001), diagnostic evaluation after a mammogram (OR, 2.64; P < .001), and postmenopausal hormone therapy (OR, 1.69; P = .002). Knowledge of the masking effect of BD was associated with higher household income (OR, 1.10; P < .001), education (OR, 1.22; P = .01), prior breast biopsy (OR, 2.16; P < .001), and residing in Connecticut (Connecticut v other states: OR, 3.82; P = .003). Connecticut residents were also more likely to have discussed their BD with a health care provider (67% v 43% for residents of other US states; P = .001). Conclusion Disparities in BD awareness and knowledge exist by race/ethnicity, education, and income. BD legislation seems to be effective in increasing knowledge of BD impact on breast cancer detection. These findings support continued and targeted efforts to improve BD awareness and knowledge among women eligible for screening mammography. PMID:25732156

  8. Digitally Printed Dewetting Patterns for Self-Organized Microelectronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckstein, Ralph; Alt, Milan; Rödlmeier, Tobias; Scharfer, Philip; Lemmer, Uli; Hernandez-Sosa, Gerardo

    2016-09-01

    Self-organization of functional materials induced by low surface-energetic direct printed structures is presented. This study investigates fundamental fluid and substrate interactions and fabricates all-printed small area organic photodetectors with On-Off ratios of ≈10(5) and dark current densities of ≈10(-4) mA cm(-2) , as well as ring oscillators based on n-type organic field-effect transistors showing working frequencies up to 400 Hz.

  9. Complex Systems and Self-organization Modelling

    CERN Document Server

    Bertelle, Cyrille; Kadri-Dahmani, Hakima

    2009-01-01

    The concern of this book is the use of emergent computing and self-organization modelling within various applications of complex systems. The authors focus their attention both on the innovative concepts and implementations in order to model self-organizations, but also on the relevant applicative domains in which they can be used efficiently. This book is the outcome of a workshop meeting within ESM 2006 (Eurosis), held in Toulouse, France in October 2006.

  10. Modeling self-organizing traffic lights with elementary cellular automata

    CERN Document Server

    Gershenson, Carlos

    2009-01-01

    There have been several highway traffic models proposed based on cellular automata. The simplest one is elementary cellular automaton rule 184. We extend this model to city traffic with cellular automata coupled at intersections using only rules 184, 252, and 136. The simplicity of the model offers a clear understanding of the main properties of city traffic and its phase transitions. We use the proposed model to compare two methods for coordinating traffic lights: a green-wave method that tries to optimize phases according to expected flows and a self-organizing method that adapts to the current traffic conditions. The self-organizing method delivers considerable improvements over the green-wave method. For low densities, the self-organizing method promotes the formation and coordination of platoons that flow freely in four directions, i.e. with a maximum velocity and no stops. For medium densities, the method allows a constant usage of the intersections, exploiting their maximum flux capacity. For high dens...

  11. Quantifying self-organization in fusion plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajković, M.; Milovanović, M.; Škorić, M. M.

    2017-05-01

    A multifaceted framework for understanding self-organization in fusion plasma dynamics is presented which concurrently manages several important issues related to the nonlinear and multiscale phenomena involved, namely,(1) it chooses the optimal template wavelet for the analysis of temporal or spatio-temporal plasma dynamics, (2) it detects parameter values at which bifurcations occur, (3) it quantifies complexity and self-organization, (4) it enables short-term prediction of nonlinear dynamics, and (5) it extracts coherent structures in turbulence by separating them from the incoherent component. The first two aspects including the detection of changes in the dynamics of a nonlinear system are illustrated by analyzing Stimulated Raman Scattering in a bounded, weakly dissipative plasma. Self-organization in the fusion plasma is quantitatively analyzed based on the numerical simulations of the Gyrokinetic-Vlasov (GKV) model of plasma dynamics. The parameters for the standard and inward shifted magnetic configurations, relevant for the Large Helical Device, were used in order to quantitatively compare self-organization and complexity in the two configurations. Finally, self-organization is analyzed for three different confinement regimes of the MAST device.

  12. Self-organization in social tagging systems

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Chuang; Zhang, Zi-Ke

    2011-01-01

    Individuals often imitate each other to fall into the typical group, leading to a self-organized state of typical behaviors in a community. In this paper, we model self-organization in social tagging systems and illustrate the underlying interaction and dynamics. Specifically, we introduce a model in which individuals adjust their own tagging tendency to imitate the average tagging tendency. We found that when users are of low confidence, they tend to imitate others and lead to a self-organized state with active tagging. On the other hand, when users are of high confidence and are stubborn for changes, tagging becomes inactive. We observe a phase transition at a critical level of user confidence when the system changes from one regime to the other. The distributions of post length obtained from the model are compared to real data which show good agreements.

  13. Self-organization of functional materials in confinement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentili, Denis; Valle, Francesco; Albonetti, Cristiano; Liscio, Fabiola; Cavallini, Massimiliano

    2014-08-19

    This Account aims to describe our experience in the use of patterning techniques for addressing the self-organization processes of materials into spatially confined regions on technologically relevant surfaces. Functional properties of materials depend on their chemical structure, their assembly, and spatial distribution at the solid state; the combination of these factors determines their properties and their technological applications. In fact, by controlling the assembly processes and the spatial distribution of the resulting structures, functional materials can be guided to technological and specific applications. We considered the principal self-organizing processes, such as crystallization, dewetting and phase segregation. Usually, these phenomena produce defective molecular films, compromising their use in many technological applications. This issue can be overcome by using patterning techniques, which induce molecules to self-organize into well-defined patterned structures, by means of spatial confinement. In particular, we focus our attention on the confinement effect achieved by stamp-assisted deposition for controlling size, density, and positions of material assemblies, giving them new chemical/physical functionalities. We review the methods and principles of the stamp-assisted spatial confinement and we discuss how they can be advantageously exploited to control crystalline order/orientation, dewetting phenomena, and spontaneous phase segregation. Moreover, we highlight how physical/chemical properties of soluble functional materials can be driven in constructive ways, by integrating them into operating technological devices.

  14. Regeneration, morphogenesis and self-organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, Daniel

    2014-07-01

    The RIKEN Center for Developmental Biology in Kobe, Japan, hosted a meeting entitled 'Regeneration of Organs: Programming and Self-Organization' in March, 2014. Scientists from across the globe met to discuss current research on regeneration, organ morphogenesis and self-organization - and the links between these fields. A diverse range of experimental models and organ systems was presented, and the speakers aptly illustrated the unique power of each. This Meeting Review describes the major advances reported and themes emerging from this exciting meeting. © 2014. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  15. Self-organizing sensing and actuation for automatic control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, George Shu-Xing

    2017-07-04

    A Self-Organizing Process Control Architecture is introduced with a Sensing Layer, Control Layer, Actuation Layer, Process Layer, as well as Self-Organizing Sensors (SOS) and Self-Organizing Actuators (SOA). A Self-Organizing Sensor for a process variable with one or multiple input variables is disclosed. An artificial neural network (ANN) based dynamic modeling mechanism as part of the Self-Organizing Sensor is described. As a case example, a Self-Organizing Soft-Sensor for CFB Boiler Bed Height is presented. Also provided is a method to develop a Self-Organizing Sensor.

  16. Mobility and Density Aware AODV Protocol Extension for Mobile Adhoc Networks-MADA-AODV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. M.K Nawaz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: In this study, we proposed a method to improve the performance of AODV by reducing overhead by adopting a route message propagation mechanism. According to the new scheme, a node will be selected to forward a routing request message if and only if a condition based on its mobility (speed and number of neighbors is satisfied. If the routing request is allowed to propagate through a node then there will be at least a possible path which includes that node in its path list. So, at the end of the route resolving process, the destination will have a possible path through that node. If the routing request is disallowed to propagate through a node then there will not be a possible path which includes that node in its path list. So, at the end of the route resolving process, the destination will not have a possible path through that node. We implemented the idea on network simulator (ns2 and measured the improvement in performance. Mobility and node density are the two major factors which has much influence on the performance of any routing protocol of mobile adhoc network. Several previous works highlighted this fact. In this study, we will improve the performance of AODV by adding mobility and density aware behaviors in route resolving process. Approach: In this study we describe an idea for improving the performance of AODV and reduce some of the overheads in a large and dense network with mobile nodes with different speeds. The proposed design will be implemented on AODV as an extension and will give a new protocol namely ‘Mobility and Density Based Extended AODV’ (MADA-AODV. Results: The performance of MADA-AODV has been compared with the other routing protocols AODV,DSDV and DSR with metrics throughput, MAC load, Routing Load, Control message overhead will be used to measure the performance of the protocol in terms of different network overhead. We have arrived more significant and comparable results. Conclusion: We have

  17. Designing Self-Organized Contextualized Feedback Loops

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kalz, Marco

    2013-01-01

    Kalz, M. (2013). Designing Self-Organized Contextualized Feedback Loops. In D. Whitelock, W. Warburton, G. Wills, & L. Gilbert (Eds.), International Conference on Computer Assisted Assessment (CAA 2013). July, 9-10, 2013, University of Southampton, Southampton, UK. http://caaconference.com.

  18. Functional self-organization in complex systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fontana, W. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA) Santa Fe Inst., NM (USA))

    1990-01-01

    A novel approach to functional self-organization is presented. It consists of a universe generated by a formal language that defines objects (=programs), their meaning (=functions), and their interactions (=composition). Results obtained so far are briefly discussed. 17 refs., 5 figs.

  19. Self-organized criticality in fragmenting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oddershede, L.; Dimon, P.; Bohr, J.

    1993-01-01

    The measured mass distributions of fragments from 26 fractured objects of gypsum, soap, stearic paraffin, and potato show evidence of obeying scaling laws; this suggests the possibility of self-organized criticality in fragmenting. The probability of finding a fragment scales inversely to a power...

  20. Self-organized critical pinball machine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flyvbjerg, H.

    2004-01-01

    The nature of self-organized criticality (SOC) is pin-pointed with a simple mechanical model: a pinball machine. Its phase space is fully parameterized by two integer variables, one describing the state of an on-going game, the other describing the state of the machine. This is the simplest...

  1. Self-organization in circular shear layers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergeron, K.; Coutsias, E.A.; Lynov, Jens-Peter

    1996-01-01

    Experiments on forced circular shear layers performed in both magnetized plasmas and in rotating fluids reveal qualitatively similar self-organization processes leading to the formation of patterns of coherent vortical structures with varying complexity. In this paper results are presented from...

  2. How self-organization can guide evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glancy, Jonathan; Stone, James V; Wilson, Stuart P

    2016-11-01

    Self-organization and natural selection are fundamental forces that shape the natural world. Substantial progress in understanding how these forces interact has been made through the study of abstract models. Further progress may be made by identifying a model system in which the interaction between self-organization and selection can be investigated empirically. To this end, we investigate how the self-organizing thermoregulatory huddling behaviours displayed by many species of mammals might influence natural selection of the genetic components of metabolism. By applying a simple evolutionary algorithm to a well-established model of the interactions between environmental, morphological, physiological and behavioural components of thermoregulation, we arrive at a clear, but counterintuitive, prediction: rodents that are able to huddle together in cold environments should evolve a lower thermal conductance at a faster rate than animals reared in isolation. The model therefore explains how evolution can be accelerated as a consequence of relaxed selection, and it predicts how the effect may be exaggerated by an increase in the litter size, i.e. by an increase in the capacity to use huddling behaviours for thermoregulation. Confirmation of these predictions in future experiments with rodents would constitute strong evidence of a mechanism by which self-organization can guide natural selection.

  3. Self-Organizing Tree Using Cluster Validity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Yasue; Suzuki, Yukinori; Miyamoto, Takayuki; Maeda, Junji

    Self-organizing tree (S-TREE) models solve clustering problems by imposing tree-structured constraints on the solution. It has a self-organizing capacity and has better performance than previous tree-structured algorithms. S-TREE carries out pruning to reduce the effect of bad leaf nodes when the tree reaches a predetermined maximum size (U), However, it is difficult to determine U beforehand because it is problem-dependent. U gives the limit of tree growth and can also prevent self-organization of the tree. It may produce an unnatural clustering. In this paper, we propose an algorithm for pruning algorithm that does not require U. This algorithm prunes extra nodes based on a significant level of cluster validity and allows the S-TREE to grow by a self-organization. The performance of the new algorithm was examined by experiments on vector quantization. The results of experiments show that natural leaf nodes are formed by this algorithm without setting the limit for the growth of the S-TREE.

  4. Neurodynamics with spatial self-organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zak, M

    1991-01-01

    A neural network architecture with self-organization in phase and actual space is proposed and discussed. Special type of differential local interconnections simulating diffusion, dispersion, and convection were investigated. It is shown that these interconnections are responsible for biological pattern formation in a homogeneous neural structure. The model suggests a phenomenological explanation of the mechanisms of edge detection in vision process.

  5. Increasing Public Awareness of Direct-to-Consumer Genetic Tests: Health Care Access, Internet Use, and Population Density Correlates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lila J. Finney Rutten

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Uncertainty around the value of and appropriate regulatory models for direct-to-consumer (DTC genetic testing underscores the importance of tracking public awareness of these services. We analyzed nationally representative, cross-sectional data from the Health Information National Trends Survey in 2008 (n=7,674 and 2011 (n=3,959 to assess population-level changes in awareness of DTC genetic testing in the U.S. and to explore sociodemographic, health care, Internet use, and population density correlates. Overall, awareness increased significantly from 29% in 2008 to 37% in 2011. The observed increase in awareness from 2008 to 2011 remained significant (OR=1.39 even when adjusted for sociodemographic variables, health care access, Internet use, and population density. Independent of survey year, the odds of awareness of DTC genetic tests were significantly higher for those aged 50–64 (OR=1.64, and 65–74 (OR=1.60; college graduates (OR=2.02; those with a regular source of health care (OR=1.27; those with a prior cancer diagnosis (OR=1.24; those who use the Internet (OR=1.27; and those living in urban areas (OR=1.25. Surveillance of awareness—along with empirical data on use of and response to genetic risk information—can inform public health and policy efforts to maximize benefits and minimize risks of DTC genetic testing.

  6. Self-organization in bacterial swarming: lessons from myxobacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yilin; Jiang, Yi; Kaiser, A. Dale; Alber, Mark

    2011-10-01

    When colonizing surfaces, many bacteria are able to self-organize into an actively expanding biofilm, in which millions of cells move smoothly and orderly at high densities. This phenomenon is known as bacterial swarming. Despite the apparent resemblance to patterns seen in liquid crystals, the dynamics of bacterial swarming cannot be explained by theories derived from equilibrium statistical mechanics. To understand how bacteria swarm, a central question is how order emerges in dense and initially disorganized populations of bacterial cells. Here we briefly review recent efforts, with integrated computational and experimental approaches, in addressing this question.

  7. Self-organization in the movement activity of social insects (Hymenoptera: Formicidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neves, Felipe Marcel; Pie, Marcio Roberto; Viana, Ricardo Luiz

    2012-09-01

    Social insects present behavioral, morphologic and social variation, which bring ideal situations to study emergent temporal-spatial patterns. In this study, we observe the self-organization in the movement activity of social insects in different species and densities. In our preliminary results, all the species observed present a pattern more complex in higher densities and with structural differences between them.

  8. SELF-ORGANIZED CRITICALITY AND CELLULAR AUTOMATA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    CREUTZ,M.

    2007-01-01

    Cellular automata provide a fascinating class of dynamical systems based on very simple rules of evolution yet capable of displaying highly complex behavior. These include simplified models for many phenomena seen in nature. Among other things, they provide insight into self-organized criticality, wherein dissipative systems naturally drive themselves to a critical state with important phenomena occurring over a wide range of length and the scales. This article begins with an overview of self-organized criticality. This is followed by a discussion of a few examples of simple cellular automaton systems, some of which may exhibit critical behavior. Finally, some of the fascinating exact mathematical properties of the Bak-Tang-Wiesenfeld sand-pile model [1] are discussed.

  9. Hierarchical Self-organization of Complex Systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHAI Li-he; WEN Dong-sheng

    2004-01-01

    Researches on organization and structure in complex systems are academic and industrial fronts in modern sciences. Though many theories are tentatively proposed to analyze complex systems, we still lack a rigorous theory on them. Complex systems possess various degrees of freedom, which means that they should exhibit all kinds of structures. However, complex systems often show similar patterns and structures. Then the question arises why such similar structures appear in all kinds of complex systems. The paper outlines a theory on freedom degree compression and the existence of hierarchical self-organization for all complex systems is found. It is freedom degree compression and hierarchical self-organization that are responsible for the existence of these similar patterns or structures observed in the complex systems.

  10. Information Driven Ecohydrologic Self-Organization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin L. Ruddell

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Variability plays an important role in the self-organized interaction between vegetation and its environment, yet the principles that characterize the role of the variability in these interactions remain elusive. To address this problem, we study the dependence between a number of variables measured at flux towers by quantifying the information flow between the different variables along with the associated time lag. By examining this network of feedback loops for seven ecosystems in different climate regions, we find that: (1 the feedback tends to maximize information production in the entire system, and the latter increases with increasing variability within the whole system; and (2 variables that participate in feedback exhibit moderated variability. Self-organization arises as a tradeoff where the ability of the total system to maximize information production through feedback is limited by moderate variability of the participating variables. This relationship between variability and information production leads to the emergence of ordered organization.

  11. Cytoskeletal self-organization in neuromorphogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehmelt, Leif

    2014-01-01

    Self-organization of dynamic microtubules via interactions with associated motors plays a critical role in spindle formation. The microtubule-based mechanisms underlying other aspects of cellular morphogenesis, such as the formation and development of protrusions from neuronal cells is less well understood. In a recent study, we investigated the molecular mechanism that underlies the massive reorganization of microtubules induced in non-neuronal cells by expression of the neuronal microtubule stabilizer MAP2c. In that study we directly observed cortical dynein complexes and how they affect the dynamic behavior of motile microtubules in living cells. We found that stationary dynein complexes transiently associate with motile microtubules near the cell cortex and that their rapid turnover facilitates efficient microtubule transport. Here, we discuss our findings in the larger context of cellular morphogenesis with specific focus on self-organizing principles from which cellular shape patterns such as the thin protrusions of neurons can emerge.

  12. Self-organized podosomes are dynamic mechanosensors

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    Podosomes are self-organized dynamic actin-containing structures that adhere to the extracellular matrix via integrins [1–5]. Yet it is not clear what regulates podosome dynamics and whether podosomes can function as direct mechanosensors like focal adhesions [6–9]. We show here that myosin IIs form circular structures outside and at the podosome actin ring to regulate podosome dynamics. Inhibiting myosin II-dependent tension dissipated podosome actin rings before dissipating the myosin ring ...

  13. Self-organization and clustering algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezdek, James C.

    1991-01-01

    Kohonen's feature maps approach to clustering is often likened to the k or c-means clustering algorithms. Here, the author identifies some similarities and differences between the hard and fuzzy c-Means (HCM/FCM) or ISODATA algorithms and Kohonen's self-organizing approach. The author concludes that some differences are significant, but at the same time there may be some important unknown relationships between the two methodologies. Several avenues of research are proposed.

  14. Big Data Empowered Self Organized Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Baldo, Nicola; Giupponi, Lorenza; Mangues-Bafalluy, Josep

    2014-01-01

    Mobile networks are generating a huge amount of data in the form of network measurements as well as network control and management interactions, and 5G is expected to make it even bigger. In this paper, we discuss the different approaches according to which this information could be leveraged using a Big Data approach. In particular, we focus on Big Data Empowered Self Organized Networks, discussing its most peculiar traits, its potential, and the relevant related work, as well as analysing s...

  15. Self organizing software research : LDRD final report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osbourn, Gordon Cecil

    2004-01-01

    We have made progress in developing a new statistical mechanics approach to designing self organizing systems that is unique to SNL. The primary application target for this ongoing research has been the development of new kinds of nanoscale components and hardware systems. However, this research also enables an out of the box connection to the field of software development. With appropriate modification, the collective behavior physics ideas for enabling simple hardware components to self organize may also provide design methods for a new class of software modules. Our current physics simulations suggest that populations of these special software components would be able to self assemble into a variety of much larger and more complex software systems. If successful, this would provide a radical (disruptive technology) path to developing complex, high reliability software unlike any known today. This high risk, high payoff opportunity does not fit well into existing SNL funding categories, as it is well outside of the mainstreams of both conventional software development practices and the nanoscience research area that spawned it. This LDRD effort was aimed at developing and extending the capabilities of self organizing/assembling software systems, and to demonstrate the unique capabilities and advantages of this radical new approach for software development.

  16. The physical principles underpinning self-organization in plants

    CERN Document Server

    Turner, Philip

    2016-01-01

    We present evidence based theory for the emergence of plant structure in which CO2 is not only the source of carbon for plant growth, but also plays a critical role as a source of charge (ionization), with charge density dictating plant structures at a wide range of scales. As levels of charge density increase beyond a critical point, dis- sipative systems lead to the emergence of macroscopic quantum processes analogous with high temperature super conductivity and coherent random lasing. The assembly of molecules into larger, ordered structures operates within charge-induced coherent bosonic fields acting as a structuring force in competition with exterior potentials. Within these processes many of the phenomena associated with standard quantum theory are recovered, including quantization, non-dissipation, self-organization, confinement, structuration conditioned by the environment, environmental fluctuations leading to macroscopic quantum decoherence and evolutionary time described by a time dependent Schrod...

  17. Self-Organization Activities of College Students: Challenges and Opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shmurygina, Natalia; Bazhenova, Natalia; Bazhenov, Ruslan; Nikolaeva, Natalia; Tcytcarev, Andrey

    2016-01-01

    The article provides the analysis of self-organization activities of college students related to their participation in youth associations activities. The purpose of research is to disclose a degree of students' activities demonstration based on self-organization processes, assessment of existing self-organization practices of the youth,…

  18. Self-organized motion in anisotropic swarms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tianguang CHU; Long WANG; Tongwen CHEN

    2003-01-01

    This paper considers an anisotropic swarm model with a class of attraction and repulsion functions. It is shown that the members of the swarm will aggregate and eventually form a cohesive cluster of finite size around the swarm center. Moreover,It is also proved that under certain conditions, the swarm system can be completely stable, i. e., every solution converges to the equilibrium points of the system. The model and results of this paper extend a recent work on isotropic swarms to more general cases and provide further insight into the effect of the interaction pattern on self-organized motion in a swarm system.

  19. Self-organized criticality on quasiperiodic graphs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, D.

    1999-09-01

    Self-organized critical models are used to describe the 1/f-spectra of rather different physical situations like snow avalanches, noise of electric currents, luminosities of stars or topologies of landscapes. The prototype of the SOC-models is the sandpile model of Bak, Tang and Wiesenfeld (Phys. Rev. Lett. 59, (1987) 351). We implement this model on non-periodic graphs where it can become either isotropic or anisotropic and compare its properties with the periodic counterpart on the square lattice.

  20. Biologically inspired self-organizing networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Naoki WAKAMIYA; Kenji LEIBNITZ; Masayuki MURATA

    2009-01-01

    Information networks are becoming more and more complex to accommodate a continuously increasing amount of traffic and networked devices, as well as having to cope with a growing diversity of operating environments and applications. Therefore, it is foreseeable that future information networks will frequently face unexpected problems, some of which could lead to the complete collapse of a network. To tackle this problem, recent attempts have been made to design novel network architectures which achieve a high level of scalability, adaptability, and robustness by taking inspiration from self-organizing biological systems. The objective of this paper is to discuss biologically inspired networking technologies.

  1. Self-organized model of cascade spreading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gualdi, S.; Medo, M.; Zhang, Y.-C.

    2011-01-01

    We study simultaneous price drops of real stocks and show that for high drop thresholds they follow a power-law distribution. To reproduce these collective downturns, we propose a minimal self-organized model of cascade spreading based on a probabilistic response of the system elements to stress conditions. This model is solvable using the theory of branching processes and the mean-field approximation. For a wide range of parameters, the system is in a critical state and displays a power-law cascade-size distribution similar to the empirically observed one. We further generalize the model to reproduce volatility clustering and other observed properties of real stocks.

  2. Self-organized model of cascade spreading

    CERN Document Server

    Gualdi, Stanislao; Zhang, Yi-Cheng

    2010-01-01

    We study simultaneous price drops of real stocks and show that for high drop thresholds they follow a power-law distribution. To reproduce these collective downturns, we propose a self-organized model of cascade spreading based on a probabilistic response of the system's elements to stress conditions. This model is solvable using the theory of branching processes and the mean-field approximation and displays a power-law cascade-size distribution-similar to the empirically observed one-over a wide range of parameters.

  3. Self-organized chaos through polyhomeostatic optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markovic, D; Gros, Claudius

    2010-08-06

    The goal of polyhomeostatic control is to achieve a certain target distribution of behaviors, in contrast to homeostatic regulation, which aims at stabilizing a steady-state dynamical state. We consider polyhomeostasis for individual and networks of firing-rate neurons, adapting to achieve target distributions of firing rates maximizing information entropy. We show that any finite polyhomeostatic adaption rate destroys all attractors in Hopfield-like network setups, leading to intermittently bursting behavior and self-organized chaos. The importance of polyhomeostasis to adapting behavior in general is discussed.

  4. Robin Hood as self-organized criticality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaitsev, S. I.

    1992-11-01

    It is shown that a wide class of physical processes named low-temperature creep (or Robin Hood systems) has to demonstrate self-organized criticality. At least “real” and “toy” models (1D and 2D) demonstrate long range (restricted by the model size only) spatial correlation in Monte Carlo simulation. The models can be used for investigation of such phenomena as dislocation glide, movement of flux in superconductors, movement of domain walls in magnetics, grain boundaries in polycrystals, plastic deformation and so on.

  5. Granular self-organization by autotuning of friction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Deepak; Nitsure, Nitin; Bhattacharya, S; Ghosh, Shankar

    2015-09-15

    A monolayer of granular spheres in a cylindrical vial, driven continuously by an orbital shaker and subjected to a symmetric confining centrifugal potential, self-organizes to form a distinctively asymmetric structure which occupies only the rear half-space. It is marked by a sharp leading edge at the potential minimum and a curved rear. The area of the structure obeys a power-law scaling with the number of spheres. Imaging shows that the regulation of motion of individual spheres occurs via toggling between two types of motion, namely, rolling and sliding. A low density of weakly frictional rollers congregates near the sharp leading edge whereas a denser rear comprises highly frictional sliders. Experiments further suggest that because the rolling and sliding friction coefficients differ substantially, the spheres acquire a local time-averaged coefficient of friction within a large range of intermediate values in the system. The various sets of spatial and temporal configurations of the rollers and sliders constitute the internal states of the system. Experiments demonstrate and simulations confirm that the global features of the structure are maintained robustly by autotuning of friction through these internal states, providing a previously unidentified route to self-organization of a many-body system.

  6. Self-Organization of Bioinspired Fibrous Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Sung Hoon

    Nature uses fibrous surfaces for a wide range of functions such as sensing, adhesion, structural color, and self-cleaning. However, little is known about how fiber properties enable them to self-organize into diverse and complex functional forms. Using polymeric micro/nanofiber arrays with tunable properties as model systems, we demonstrate how the combination of mechanical and surface properties can be harnessed to transform an array of anchored nanofibers into a variety of complex, hierarchically organized dynamic functional surfaces. We show that the delicate balance between fiber elasticity and surface adhesion plays a critical role in determining the shape, chirality, and hierarchy of the assembled structures. We further report a strategy for controlling the long-range order of fiber assemblies by manipulating the shape and movement of the liquid-vapor interface. Our study provides fundamental understanding of the pattern formation by self-organization of bioinspired fibrous surfaces. Moreover, our new strategies offer a foundation for designing a vast assortment of functional surfaces with adhesive, optical, water-repellent, capture and release, and many more capabilities with the structural and dynamic sophistication of their biological counterparts.

  7. A Modified Earthquake Model of Self-Organized Criticality on Small World Networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIN Min; ZHAO Xiao-Wei; CHEN Tian-Lun

    2004-01-01

    A modified Olami Feder-Christensen model of self-organized criticality on a square lattice with the properties of small world networks has been studied.We find that our model displays power-law behavior and the exponent τ of the model depends on φ,the density of long-range connections in our network.

  8. Self-organizing human cardiac microchambers mediated by geometric confinement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Zhen; Wang, Jason; Loskill, Peter; Huebsch, Nathaniel; Koo, Sangmo; Svedlund, Felicia L.; Marks, Natalie C.; Hua, Ethan W.; Grigoropoulos, Costas P.; Conklin, Bruce R.; Healy, Kevin E.

    2015-07-01

    Tissue morphogenesis and organ formation are the consequences of biochemical and biophysical cues that lead to cellular spatial patterning in development. To model such events in vitro, we use PEG-patterned substrates to geometrically confine human pluripotent stem cell colonies and spatially present mechanical stress. Modulation of the WNT/β-catenin pathway promotes spatial patterning via geometric confinement of the cell condensation process during epithelial-mesenchymal transition, forcing cells at the perimeter to express an OCT4+ annulus, which is coincident with a region of higher cell density and E-cadherin expression. The biochemical and biophysical cues synergistically induce self-organizing lineage specification and creation of a beating human cardiac microchamber confined by the pattern geometry. These highly defined human cardiac microchambers can be used to study aspects of embryonic spatial patterning, early cardiac development and drug-induced developmental toxicity.

  9. Self-organized shape and frontal density of fish schools

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hemelrijk, C.K.; Hildenbrandt, H.

    2008-01-01

    Models of swarming (based on avoidance, alignment and attraction) produce patterns of behaviour also seen in schools of fish. However, the significance of such similarities has been questioned, because some model assumptions are unrealistic [e.g. speed in most models is constant with random error, t

  10. A Signature of Self-Organized Criticality in the HT-6M Edge Plasma Turbulence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Wen-Hao; YU Chang-Xuan; WEN Yi-Zhi; XU Yu-Hong; LING Bi-Li; GONG Xian-Zu; LIU Bao-Hua; WAN Bao-Nian

    2001-01-01

    ower spectra of electron density and floating potential fluctuations in the velocity shear layer of the HT-6M edge region have been measured and analysed. All the spectra have three distinct frequency regions with the spectral decay indices typical of self-organized criticality systems (0, -1 and -4) when Doppler shift effects induced by the plasma E × B flow velocity have been taken into account. These results are consistent with the predictions of the self-organized criticality models, which may be an indication of edge plasma turbulence in the HT-6M tokamak evolving into a critical state independent of local plasma parameters.

  11. Self-organizing nets for optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milano, Michele; Koumoutsakos, Petros; Schmidhuber, Jürgen

    2004-05-01

    Given some optimization problem and a series of typically expensive trials of solution candidates sampled from a search space, how can we efficiently select the next candidate? We address this fundamental problem by embedding simple optimization strategies in learning algorithms inspired by Kohonen's self-organizing maps and neural gas networks. Our adaptive nets or grids are used to identify and exploit search space regions that maximize the probability of generating points closer to the optima. Net nodes are attracted by candidates that lead to improved evaluations, thus, quickly biasing the active data selection process toward promising regions, without loss of ability to escape from local optima. On standard benchmark functions, our techniques perform more reliably than the widely used covariance matrix adaptation evolution strategy. The proposed algorithm is also applied to the problem of drag reduction in a flow past an actively controlled circular cylinder, leading to unprecedented drag reduction.

  12. Hybrid Self Organizing Map for Overlapping Clusters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.N.M. Sap

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The Kohonen self organizing map is an excellent tool in exploratoryphase of data mining and pattern recognition. The SOM is a popular tool that maps high dimensional space into a small number of dimensions by placing similar elements close together, forming clusters. Recently researchers found that to capture the uncertainty involved in cluster analysis, it is not necessary to have crisp boundaries in some clustering operations. In this paper to overcomethe uncertainty, a two-level clustering algorithm based on SOM which employs the rough set theory is proposed. The two-level stage Rough SOM (first using SOM to produce the prototypes that are then clustered in the second stage is found to perform well and more accurate compared with the proposed crisp clustering method (Incremental SOM and reduces the errors.

  13. Self-organization of antiperiodic oscillations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freire, J. G.; Cabeza, C.; Marti, A. C.; Pöschel, T.; Gallas, J. A. C.

    2014-12-01

    Antiperiodic oscillations forming infinite cascades of spirals were recently found experimentally and numerically in the control parameter space of an autonomous electronic circuit. They were discovered while recording one specific voltage of the circuit. Here, we show that such regular self-organization may be measured in any of the four variables of the circuit. Although the relative size of individual phases, their boundaries and the number of peaks of each characteristic oscillation depends on the physical quantity used to record them, the global structural organization of the complex phase diagrams is an invariant of the circuit. Tunable families of antiperiodic oscillations cast fresh light on new intricate behavior of nonlinear systems and open the possibility of studying hitherto unobserved phenomena.

  14. Self-organized atomic switch networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stieg, Adam Z.; Avizienis, Audrius V.; Sillin, Henry O.; Martin-Olmos, Cristina; Lam, Miu-Ling; Aono, Masakazu; Gimzewski, James K.

    2014-01-01

    The spontaneous emergence of complex behavior in dynamical systems occurs through the collective interaction of nonlinear elements toward a highly correlated, non-equilibrium critical state. Criticality has been proposed as a model for understanding complexity in systems whose behavior can be approximated as a state lying somewhere between order and chaos. Here we present unique, purpose-built devices, known as atomic switch networks (ASN), specifically designed to generate the class of emergent properties which underlie critical dynamics in complex systems. The network is an open, dissipative system comprised of highly interconnected (˜109/cm2) atomic switch interfaces wired through the spontaneous electroless deposition of metallic silver fractal architectures. The functional topology of ASN architectures self-organizes to produce persistent critical dynamics without fine-tuning, indicating a capacity for memory and learning via persistent critical states toward potential utility in real-time, neuromorphic computation.

  15. The self-organizing worm algorithm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    A new multi-modal optimization algorithm called the self-organizing worm algorithm (SOWA) is presented for optimization of multi-modal functions.The main idea of this algorithm can be described as follows:disperse some worms equably in the domain;the worms exchange the information each other and creep toward the nearest high point;at last they will stop on the nearest high point.All peaks of multi-modal function can be found rapidly through studying and chasing among the worms.In contrast with the classical multi-modal optimization algorithms,SOWA is provided with a simple calculation,strong convergence,high precision,and does not need any prior knowledge.Several simulation experiments for SOWA are performed,and the complexity of SOWA is analyzed amply.The results show that SOWA is very effective in optimization of multi-modal functions.

  16. Pearls are self-organized natural ratchets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartwright, Julyan H E; Checa, Antonio G; Rousseau, Marthe

    2013-07-02

    Pearls, the most flawless and highly prized of them, are perhaps the most perfectly spherical macroscopic bodies in the biological world. How are they so round? Why are other pearls solids of revolution (off-round, drop, ringed pearl), and yet others have no symmetry (baroque pearls)? We observe that with a spherical pearl the growth fronts of nacre are spirals and target patterns distributed across its surface, and that this is true for a baroque pearl, too, but that in pearls with rotational symmetry spirals and target patterns are found only in the vicinity of the poles; elsewhere the growth fronts are arrayed in ratchet fashion around the equator. We argue that pearl rotation is a self-organized phenomenon caused and sustained by physical forces from the growth fronts, and that rotating pearls are an example--perhaps unique--of a natural ratchet.

  17. Control of self-organizing nonlinear systems

    CERN Document Server

    Klapp, Sabine; Hövel, Philipp

    2016-01-01

    The book summarizes the state-of-the-art of research on control of self-organizing nonlinear systems with contributions from leading international experts in the field. The first focus concerns recent methodological developments including control of networks and of noisy and time-delayed systems. As a second focus, the book features emerging concepts of application including control of quantum systems, soft condensed matter, and biological systems. Special topics reflecting the active research in the field are the analysis and control of chimera states in classical networks and in quantum systems, the mathematical treatment of multiscale systems, the control of colloidal and quantum transport, the control of epidemics and of neural network dynamics.

  18. Impact of plasma parameter on self-organization of electron temperature gradient driven turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawai, C.; Idomura, Y.; Maeyama, S.; Ogawa, Y.

    2017-04-01

    Self-organization in the slab electron temperature gradient driven (ETG) turbulence is investigated based on gyrokinetic simulations and the Hasegawa-Mima (HM) equation. The scale and the anisotropy of self-organized turbulent structures vary depending on the Rhines scale and the characteristic scale given by the adiabatic response term in the HM equation. The former is determined by competition between the linear wave dispersion and the nonlinear turbulent cascade, while the latter is given as the scale, at which the turbulent cascade is impeded. These scales are controlled by plasma parameters such as the density and temperature gradient, and the temperature ratio of ion to electron. It is found that depending on the plasma parameters, the ETG turbulence shows either isotropic turbulence or zonal flows, which give significantly different transport levels. Although the modulational instability excites zonal modes regardless of the plasma parameters, the final turbulent structure is determined by the self-organization process.

  19. On the self-organizing process of large scale shear flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newton, Andrew P. L. [Department of Applied Maths, University of Sheffield, Sheffield, Yorkshire S3 7RH (United Kingdom); Kim, Eun-jin [School of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Sheffield, Sheffield, Yorkshire S3 7RH (United Kingdom); Liu, Han-Li [High Altitude Observatory, National Centre for Atmospheric Research, P. O. BOX 3000, Boulder, Colorado 80303-3000 (United States)

    2013-09-15

    Self organization is invoked as a paradigm to explore the processes governing the evolution of shear flows. By examining the probability density function (PDF) of the local flow gradient (shear), we show that shear flows reach a quasi-equilibrium state as its growth of shear is balanced by shear relaxation. Specifically, the PDFs of the local shear are calculated numerically and analytically in reduced 1D and 0D models, where the PDFs are shown to converge to a bimodal distribution in the case of finite correlated temporal forcing. This bimodal PDF is then shown to be reproduced in nonlinear simulation of 2D hydrodynamic turbulence. Furthermore, the bimodal PDF is demonstrated to result from a self-organizing shear flow with linear profile. Similar bimodal structure and linear profile of the shear flow are observed in gulf stream, suggesting self-organization.

  20. Electronic self-organization in layered transition metal dichalcogenides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ritschel, Tobias

    2015-10-30

    The interplay between different self-organized electronically ordered states and their relation to unconventional electronic properties like superconductivity constitutes one of the most exciting challenges of modern condensed matter physics. In the present thesis this issue is thoroughly investigated for the prototypical layered material 1T-TaS{sub 2} both experimentally and theoretically. At first the static charge density wave order in 1T-TaS{sub 2} is investigated as a function of pressure and temperature by means of X-ray diffraction. These data indeed reveal that the superconductivity in this material coexists with an inhomogeneous charge density wave on a macroscopic scale in real space. This result is fundamentally different from a previously proposed separation of superconducting and insulating regions in real space. Furthermore, the X-ray diffraction data uncover the important role of interlayer correlations in 1T-TaS{sub 2}. Based on the detailed insights into the charge density wave structure obtained by the X-ray diffraction experiments, density functional theory models are deduced in order to describe the electronic structure of 1T-TaS{sub 2} in the second part of this thesis. As opposed to most previous studies, these calculations take the three-dimensional character of the charge density wave into account. Indeed the electronic structure calculations uncover complex orbital textures, which are interwoven with the charge density wave order and cause dramatic differences in the electronic structure depending on the alignment of the orbitals between neighboring layers. Furthermore, it is demonstrated that these orbital-mediated effects provide a route to drive semiconductor-to-metal transitions with technologically pertinent gaps and on ultrafast timescales. These results are particularly relevant for the ongoing development of novel, miniaturized and ultrafast devices based on layered transition metal dichalcogenides. The discovery of orbital textures

  1. A self-organized neural comparator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludueña, Guillermo A; Gros, Claudius

    2013-04-01

    Learning algorithms need generally the ability to compare several streams of information. Neural learning architectures hence need a unit, a comparator, able to compare several inputs encoding either internal or external information, for instance, predictions and sensory readings. Without the possibility of comparing the values of predictions to actual sensory inputs, reward evaluation and supervised learning would not be possible. Comparators are usually not implemented explicitly. Necessary comparisons are commonly performed by directly comparing the respective activities one-to-one. This implies that the characteristics of the two input streams (like size and encoding) must be provided at the time of designing the system. It is, however, plausible that biological comparators emerge from self-organizing, genetically encoded principles, which allow the system to adapt to the changes in the input and the organism. We propose an unsupervised neural circuitry, where the function of input comparison emerges via self-organization only from the interaction of the system with the respective inputs, without external influence or supervision. The proposed neural comparator adapts in an unsupervised form according to the correlations present in the input streams. The system consists of a multilayer feedforward neural network, which follows a local output minimization (anti-Hebbian) rule for adaptation of the synaptic weights. The local output minimization allows the circuit to autonomously acquire the capability of comparing the neural activities received from different neural populations, which may differ in population size and the neural encoding used. The comparator is able to compare objects never encountered before in the sensory input streams and evaluate a measure of their similarity even when differently encoded.

  2. Self-organization in complex systems as decision making

    CERN Document Server

    Yukalov, V I

    2014-01-01

    The idea is advanced that self-organization in complex systems can be treated as decision making (as it is performed by humans) and, vice versa, decision making is nothing but a kind of self-organization in the decision maker nervous systems. A mathematical formulation is suggested based on the definition of probabilities of system states, whose particular cases characterize the probabilities of structures, patterns, scenarios, or prospects. In this general framework, it is shown that the mathematical structures of self-organization and of decision making are identical. This makes it clear how self-organization can be seen as an endogenous decision making process and, reciprocally, decision making occurs via an endogenous self-organization. The approach is illustrated by phase transitions in large statistical systems, crossovers in small statistical systems, evolutions and revolutions in social and biological systems, structural self-organization in dynamical systems, and by the probabilistic formulation of c...

  3. Self-Organization during Friction of Slide Bearing Antifriction Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iosif S. Gershman

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses the peculiarities of self-organization behavior and formation of dissipative structures during friction of antifriction alloys for slide bearings against a steel counterbody. It shows that during self-organization, the moment of friction in a tribosystem may be decreasing with the load growth and in the bifurcations of the coefficient of friction with respect to load. Self-organization and the formation of dissipative structures lead to an increase in the seizure load.

  4. Functional Nanostructures and Dynamic Materials through Self-Organization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jean-Marie; LEHN

    2007-01-01

    1 Results Supramolecular chemistry is actively exploring systems undergoing self-organization.The design of molecular information controlled,"programmed"and functional self-organizing systems provides an original approach to nanoscience and nanotechnology.The spontaneous but controlled generation of well-defined,functional molecular and supramolecular architectures of nanometric size through self-organization represents a means of performing programmed engineering and processing of functional nanostruct...

  5. Real-Time Imaging of Self-Organization and Mechanical Competition in Carbon Nanotube Forest Growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balakrishnan, Viswanath; Bedewy, Mostafa; Meshot, Eric R; Pattinson, Sebastian W; Polsen, Erik S; Laye, Fabrice; Zakharov, Dmitri N; Stach, Eric A; Hart, A John

    2016-12-27

    The properties of carbon nanotube (CNT) networks and analogous materials comprising filamentary nanostructures are governed by the intrinsic filament properties and their hierarchical organization and interconnection. As a result, direct knowledge of the collective dynamics of CNT synthesis and self-organization is essential to engineering improved CNT materials for applications such as membranes and thermal interfaces. Here, we use real-time environmental transmission electron microscopy (E-TEM) to observe nucleation and self-organization of CNTs into vertically aligned forests. Upon introduction of the carbon source, we observe a large scatter in the onset of nucleation of individual CNTs and the ensuing growth rates. Experiments performed at different temperatures and catalyst particle densities show the critical role of CNT density on the dynamics of self-organization; low-density CNT nucleation results in the CNTs becoming pinned to the substrate and forming random networks, whereas higher density CNT nucleation results in self-organization of the CNTs into bundles that are oriented perpendicular to the substrate. We also find that mechanical coupling between growing CNTs alters their growth trajectory and shape, causing significant deformations, buckling, and defects in the CNT walls. Therefore, it appears that CNT-CNT coupling not only is critical for self-organization but also directly influences CNT quality and likely the resulting properties of the forest. Our findings show that control of the time-distributed kinetics of CNT nucleation and bundle formation are critical to manufacturing well-organized CNT assemblies and that E-TEM can be a powerful tool to investigate the mesoscale dynamics of CNT networks.

  6. Interface design and processes of self-organization in nanosystems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    The role of structural design of nanosystems, i.e. systems with high density of surfaces, boundaries and interfaces greatly increases as material science rapidly develops in the direction of molecular and atomic assembly technology of materials and constructions. The processes occurring in interface layers determine the unique properties of nanosystems. The evolution of a substance in a boundary layer tends to a stationary state corresponding to external conditions. For micro(nano)-systems interfaces corresponding to a symmetry dictated energy extremum can be selected as states -attractors. To optimize structural design, forecasting and achievement of desirable characteristics, the processes of internal structural self-organization of a system should be in resonance with processes of controlling external influences (synergy resonance principle). This approach, together with earlier developed crystallochemical methods of searching for symmetry preferred interfaces of heteroepitaxy, allows one to carry out modeling generation and experimental selection of nanosystems with desirable properties and purposeful nanodesigning to create new materials, structures and devices. In view these tasks the discussion concentrates on: (1) Processes of special boundary texture formation in order to obtain high stable magnetic properties of permanent magnets on the basis of Sm-Co powders; (2) Processes of structural self-organization and boundary design upon Bi, Bi-Sb nanofilm formation with a big length of electron mean free path; (3) Creation of coherent solid-state heterojunctions of superionic conductor- an electronic conductor in order to conserve fast ionic transport and low activation energy of ion-movement in the crystal layer interface. Formation of such hererojunctions is of the key role in the creation of new types of devices with high frequency capacitance characteristics and a necessary element for the future information technologies, namely, wireless networks of

  7. Recursive self-organizing network models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, Barbara; Micheli, Alessio; Sperduti, Alessandro; Strickert, Marc

    2004-01-01

    Self-organizing models constitute valuable tools for data visualization, clustering, and data mining. Here, we focus on extensions of basic vector-based models by recursive computation in such a way that sequential and tree-structured data can be processed directly. The aim of this article is to give a unified review of important models recently proposed in literature, to investigate fundamental mathematical properties of these models, and to compare the approaches by experiments. We first review several models proposed in literature from a unifying perspective, thereby making use of an underlying general framework which also includes supervised recurrent and recursive models as special cases. We shortly discuss how the models can be related to different neuron lattices. Then, we investigate theoretical properties of the models in detail: we explicitly formalize how structures are internally stored in different context models and which similarity measures are induced by the recursive mapping onto the structures. We assess the representational capabilities of the models, and we shortly discuss the issues of topology preservation and noise tolerance. The models are compared in an experiment with time series data. Finally, we add an experiment for one context model for tree-structured data to demonstrate the capability to process complex structures.

  8. Self-organizing strategies for a column-store database

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ivanova, M.G.; Kersten, M.L.; Nes, N.J.

    2008-01-01

    Column-store database systems open new vistas for improved maintenance through self-organization. Individual columns are the focal point, which simplify balancing conflicting requirements. This work presents two workload-driven self-organizing techniques in a column-store, i.e. adaptive segmentation

  9. Self Organized Multi Agent Swarms (SOMAS) for Network Security Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-03-01

    overarching control of the system. For instance, ants and termites display this kind of behavior to an amazing degree. Even though many human organizations...determine whether specified hypotheses based on research objectives have been falsified or validated (since experimentation cannot verify hypotheses...self organized criticality. However, the metric used to measure self organization should be developed further. While the experimentation with self

  10. Enabling Self-Organization in Embedded Systems with Reconfigurable Hardware

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christophe Bobda

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a methodology based on self-organization to manage resources in networked embedded systems based on reconfigurable hardware. Two points are detailed in this paper, the monitoring system used to analyse the system and the Local Marketplaces Global Symbiosis (LMGS concept defined for self-organization of dynamically reconfigurable nodes.

  11. The concept of self-organization in cellular architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misteli, Tom

    2001-01-01

    In vivo microscopy has recently revealed the dynamic nature of many cellular organelles. The dynamic properties of several cellular structures are consistent with a role for self-organization in their formation, maintenance, and function; therefore, self-organization might be a general principle in cellular organization. PMID:11604416

  12. Self-organization in chronic pain: a concept analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monsivais, Diane

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to examine the concept of self-organization in chronic pain using Rodgers' (2000) evolutionary approach. This article describes the antecedents, attributes, and consequences of self-organization in chronic pain. Self-organization in chronic pain may be achieved through the attributes of being believed, accessing credible resources, and taking action and responsibility. Self-organization occurs when the patient with pain develops a transformed identity, new insights, and is an active, in-control participant in care. Chronic pain is a common and costly problem, and recognition of the key attributes of self-organization in this condition is an important step in promoting positive health outcomes. Rehabilitation nurses play a key role in providing credible resources and working with the patient to take action and responsibility.

  13. Self-organization criticality of debris flow rheology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Yuyi; JAN Chyandeng; CHEN Xiaoqing; HAN Wenliang

    2003-01-01

    Based on the viewpoint of stress and strain self-organization criticality of debris flow mass, this paper probes into inter-nonlinear action between different factors in the thixotropic liquefaction system of loose clastic soil onslope to make clastic soil in slope develop naturally towards critical stress status, and slope debris flow finally occurs under trigging by rainstorm. Also according to observation and analysis of self-organization criticality of sedimentrunoff system of viscous debris flow surges in ravines and power relation between magnitude and frequency of debris flows, this paper expounds similarity of the self-organized structure of debris flow mass. The self-organized critical system is a weak chaotic system. Debris flow occurrences can be predicted accordingly by means of observation at certain time scale and analysis of self-organization criticality of magnitude, frequency and time interval of debris flows.

  14. From self-organized to extended criticality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa eLovecchio

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available We address the issue of criticality that is attracting the attention of an increasing number of neurophysiologists. Our main purpose is to establish the specific nature of some dynamical processes that although physically different, are usually termed as "critical", and we focus on those characterized by the cooperative interaction of many units. We notice that the term "criticality" has been adopted to denote both noise-induced phase transitions and Self-Organized Criticality (SOC with no clear connection with the traditional phase transitions, namely the transformation of a thermodynamic system from one state of matter to another. We notice the recent attractive proposal of extended criticality advocated by Bailly and Longo, which is realized through a wide set of critical points rather than emerging as a singularity from a unique value of the control parameter. We study a set of cooperatively firing neurons and we show that for an extended set of interaction couplings the system exhibits a form of temporal complexity similar to that emerging at criticality from ordinary phase transitions. This extended criticality regime is characterized by three main properties: i In the ideal limiting case of infinitely large time period, temporal complexity corresponds to Mittag-Leffler complexity; ii For large values of the interaction coupling the periodic nature of the process becomes predominant while maintaining to some extent, in the intermediate time asymptotic region, the signature of complexity; iii Focusing our attention on firing neuron avalanches, we find two of the popular SOC properties, namely the power indexes 2 and 1.5 respectively for time length and for the intensity of the avalanches. We derive the conclusion that SOC emerges from extended criticality, thereby explaining the experimental observation of Plenz and Beggs: avalanches occur in time with surprisingly regularity, in apparent conflict with he temporal complexity of physical

  15. Self-Organization in Coordination-Driven Self-Assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Northrop, Brian H.; Zheng, Yao-Rong; Chi, Ki-Whan; Stang, Peter J.

    2009-01-01

    Conspectus Self-assembly allows for the preparation of highly complex molecular and supramolecular systems from relatively simple starting materials. Typically, self-assembled supramolecules are constructed by combining complementary pairs of two highly symmetric molecular components, thus limiting the chances of forming unwanted side products. Combining asymmetric molecular components or multiple complementary sets of molecules in one complex mixture can produce myriad different ordered and disordered supramolecular assemblies. Alternatively, spontaneous self-organization phenomena can promote the formation of specific product(s) out of a collection of multiple possibilities. Self-organization processes are common throughout much of nature and are especially common in biological systems. Recently, researchers have studied self-organized self-assembly in purely synthetic systems. This Account describes our investigations of self-organization in the coordination-driven self-assembly of platinum(II)-based metallosupramolecules. The modularity of the coordination-driven approach to self-assembly has allowed us to systematically study a wide variety of different factors that can control the extent of supramolecular self-organization. In particular, we have evaluated the effects of the symmetry and polarity of ambidentate donor subunits, differences in geometrical parameters (e.g. the size, angularity, and dimensionality) of Pt(II)-based acceptors and organic donors, the influence of temperature and solvent, and the effects of intermolecular steric interactions and hydrophobic interactions on self-organization. Our studies have shown that the extent of self-organization in the coordination-driven self-assembly of both 2D polygons and 3D polyhedra ranges from no organization (a statistical mixture of multiple products), to amplified organization (wherein a particular product or products are favored over others), and all the way to the absolute self-organization of

  16. Self-organization in coordination-driven self-assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Northrop, Brian H; Zheng, Yao-Rong; Chi, Ki-Whan; Stang, Peter J

    2009-10-20

    Self-assembly allows for the preparation of highly complex molecular and supramolecular systems from relatively simple starting materials. Typically, self-assembled supramolecules are constructed by combining complementary pairs of two highly symmetric molecular components, thus limiting the chances of forming unwanted side products. Combining asymmetric molecular components or multiple complementary sets of molecules in one complex mixture can produce myriad different ordered and disordered supramolecular assemblies. Alternatively, spontaneous self-organization phenomena can promote the formation of specific product(s) out of a collection of multiple possibilities. Self-organization processes are common throughout much of nature and are especially common in biological systems. Recently, researchers have studied self-organized self-assembly in purely synthetic systems. This Account describes our investigations of self-organization in the coordination-driven self-assembly of platinum(II)-based metallosupramolecules. The modularity of the coordination-driven approach to self-assembly has allowed us to systematically study a wide variety of different factors that can control the extent of supramolecular self-organization. In particular, we have evaluated the effects of the symmetry and polarity of ambidentate donor subunits, differences in geometrical parameters (e.g., the size, angularity, and dimensionality) of Pt(II)-based acceptors and organic donors, the influence of temperature and solvent, and the effects of intermolecular steric interactions and hydrophobic interactions on self-organization. Our studies have shown that the extent of self-organization in the coordination-driven self-assembly of both 2D polygons and 3D polyhedra ranges from no organization (a statistical mixture of multiple products) to amplified organization (wherein a particular product or products are favored over others) and all the way to the absolute self-organization of discrete

  17. The concept of self-organizing systems. Why bother?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elverfeldt, Kirsten v.; Embleton-Hamann, Christine; Slaymaker, Olav

    2016-04-01

    Complexity theory and the concept of self-organizing systems provide a rather challenging conceptual framework for explaining earth systems change. Self-organization - understood as the aggregate processes internal to an environmental system that lead to a distinctive spatial or temporal organization - reduces the possibility of implicating a specific process as being causal, and it poses some restrictions on the idea that external drivers cause a system to change. The concept of self-organizing systems suggests that many phenomena result from an orchestration of different mechanisms, so that no causal role can be assigned to an individual factor or process. The idea that system change can be due to system-internal processes of self-organization thus proves a huge challenge to earth system research, especially in the context of global environmental change. In order to understand the concept's implications for the Earth Sciences, we need to know the characteristics of self-organizing systems and how to discern self-organizing systems. Within the talk, we aim firstly at characterizing self-organizing systems, and secondly at highlighting the advantages and difficulties of the concept within earth system sciences. The presentation concludes that: - The concept of self-organizing systems proves especially fruitful for small-scale earth surface systems. Beach cusps and patterned ground are only two of several other prime examples of self-organizing earth surface systems. They display characteristics of self-organization like (i) system-wide order from local interactions, (ii) symmetry breaking, (iii) distributed control, (iv) robustness and resilience, (v) nonlinearity and feedbacks, (vi) organizational closure, (vii) adaptation, and (viii) variation and selection. - It is comparatively easy to discern self-organization in small-scale systems, but to adapt the concept to larger scale systems relevant to global environmental change research is more difficult: Self-organizing

  18. Two possible mechanisms for vortex self-organization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The vortex self-organization is investigated in this paper by four groups of numerical experiments within the framework of quasi-geostrophic model, and based on the experimental results two types of possible mechanisms for vortex self-organization are suggested. The meso-scale topography may enable separated vortices to merge into a larger scale vortex; and the interaction of meso-γand meso-β scale systems may make separated vortices to self organize a typhoon-like vortex circulation.

  19. Fe and Co nanostructures embedded into the Cu(100) surface: Self-Organization and magnetic properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolesnikov, S. V., E-mail: kolesnikov@physics.msu.ru; Klavsyuk, A. L.; Saletsky, A. M. [Moscow State University, Faculty of Physics (Russian Federation)

    2015-10-15

    The self-organization and magnetic properties of small iron and cobalt nanostructures embedded into the first layer of a Cu(100) surface are investigated using the self-learning kinetic Monte Carlo method and density functional theory. The similarities and differences between the Fe/Cu(100) and the Co/Cu(100) are underlined. The time evolution of magnetic properties of a copper monolayer with embedded magnetic atoms at 380 K is discussed.

  20. Self-Organized Filaments in Dielectric Barrier Discharge in Air at Atmospheric Pressure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DONG Li-Fang; LI Xue-Chen; YINZeng-Qian; QIAN Sheng-Fa; OUYANG Ji-Ting; WANG Long

    2001-01-01

    The self-organized filament pattern created by dielectric barrier discharges in air at atmospheric pressure is investigated experimentally. The density and dimension of filament are analysed quantitatively. The experimental results show that the distance between neighbouring filaments decreases with the increased applied voltage or with the decreased width of the gas gap. Also, the diameter of the filament decreases with the increased applied voltages or with the decreased width of the gas gap.

  1. Self-organization in magnetic flux ropes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukin, Vyacheslav S.

    2014-06-01

    This cross-disciplinary special issue on 'Self-organization in magnetic flux ropes' follows in the footsteps of another collection of manuscripts dedicated to the subject of magnetic flux ropes, a volume on 'Physics of magnetic flux ropes' published in the American Geophysical Union's Geophysical Monograph Series in 1990 [1]. Twenty-four years later, this special issue, composed of invited original contributions highlighting ongoing research on the physics of magnetic flux ropes in astrophysical, space and laboratory plasmas, can be considered an update on our state of understanding of this fundamental constituent of any magnetized plasma. Furthermore, by inviting contributions from research groups focused on the study of the origins and properties of magnetic flux ropes in a variety of different environments, we have attempted to underline both the diversity of and the commonalities among magnetic flux ropes throughout the solar system and, indeed, the universe. So, what is a magnetic flux rope? The answer will undoubtedly depend on whom you ask. A flux rope can be as narrow as a few Larmor radii and as wide as the Sun (see, e.g., the contributions by Heli Hietala et al and by Angelous Vourlidas). As described below by Ward Manchester IV et al , they can stretch from the Sun to the Earth in the form of interplanetary coronal mass ejections. Or, as in the Swarthmore Spheromak Experiment described by David Schaffner et al , they can fit into a meter-long laboratory device tended by college students. They can be helical and line-tied (see, e.g., Walter Gekelman et al or J Sears et al ), or toroidal and periodic (see, e.g., John O'Bryan et al or Philippa Browning et al ). They can form in the low plasma beta environment of the solar corona (Tibor Török et al ), the order unity beta plasmas of the solar wind (Stefan Eriksson et al ) and the plasma pressure dominated stellar convection zones (Nicholas Nelson and Mark Miesch). In this special issue, Setthivoine You

  2. Complexity in plasma: From self-organization to geodynamo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, T. [Theory and Computer Simulation Center, National Institute for Fusion Science, Nagoya 464-01 (Japan); the Complexity Simulation Group

    1996-05-01

    A central theme of {open_quote}{open_quote}Complexity{close_quote}{close_quote} is the question of the creation of ordered structure in nature (self-organization). The assertion is made that self-organization is governed by three key processes, i.e., energy pumping, entropy expulsion and nonlinearity. Extensive efforts have been done to confirm this assertion through computer simulations of plasmas. A system exhibits markedly different features in self-organization, depending on whether the energy pumping is instantaneous or continuous, or whether the produced entropy is expulsed or reserved. The nonlinearity acts to bring a nonequilibrium state into a bifurcation, thus resulting in a new structure along with an anomalous entropy production. As a practical application of our grand view of self-organization a preferential generation of a dipole magnetic field is successfully demonstrated. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  3. Acoustic seafloor sediment classification using self-organizing feature maps

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Chakraborty, B.; Kaustubha, R.; Hegde, A.; Pereira, A.

    A self-organizing feature map (SOFM), a kind of artificial neural network (ANN) architecture, is used in this work for continental shelf seafloor sediment classification. Echo data are acquired using an echosounding system from three types...

  4. Comparative investigation of two different self-organizing map ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    selection approaches based on self-organizing map (SOM) technique in partial least-squares (PLS) ... synthetic mixtures and a real combination product of sulfamethoxazole (SMX) and ... common multivariate method seen in in-process.

  5. Self-Organized Criticality in a Random Network Model

    OpenAIRE

    Nirei, Makoto

    1998-01-01

    A new model of self-organized criticality is defined by incorporating a random network model in order to explain endogenous complex fluctuations of economic aggregates. The model can feature many globally interactive systems such as economies or societies.

  6. Breast Density Awareness and Knowledge, and Intentions for Breast Cancer Screening in a Diverse Sample of Women Age Eligible for Mammography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santiago-Rivas, Marimer; Benjamin, Shayna; Andrews, Janna Z; Jandorf, Lina

    2017-08-14

    The objectives of this study were to assess breast density knowledge and breast density awareness, and to identify information associated with intention to complete routine and supplemental screening for breast cancer in a diverse sample of women age eligible for mammography. We quantitatively (self-report) assessed breast density awareness and knowledge (N = 264) in black (47.7%), Latina (35.2%), and white (17%) women recruited online and in the community. Most participants reported having heard about breast density (69.2%); less than one third knew their own breast density status (30.4%). Knowing their own breast density, believing that women should be notified of their breast density in their mammogram report, and feeling informed if being provided this information are associated with likelihood of completing mammogram. Intending mammogram completion and knowledge regarding the impact of breast density on mammogram accuracy are associated with likelihood of completing supplemental ultrasound tests of the breast. These findings help inform practitioners and policy makers about information and communication factors that influence breast cancer screening concerns and decisions. Knowing this information should prepare practitioners to better identify women who may have not been exposed to breast density messages.

  7. Distinguishing volcanic lithology using Self-Organizing Map

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Self-Organizing Map is an unsupervised learning algorithm. It has the ability of self-organization,self-learning and side associative thinking. Based on the principle it can identified the complex volcanic lithology. According to the logging data of the volcanic rock samples, the SOM will be trained, The SOM training results were analyzed in order to choose optimally parameters of the network. Through identifying the logging data of volcanic formations, the result shows that the map can achieve good application effects.

  8. Self-organization in cold atomic gases: a synchronization perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tesio, E; Robb, G R M; Oppo, G-L; Gomes, P M; Ackemann, T; Labeyrie, G; Kaiser, R; Firth, W J

    2014-10-28

    We study non-equilibrium spatial self-organization in cold atomic gases, where long-range spatial order spontaneously emerges from fluctuations in the plane transverse to the propagation axis of a single optical beam. The self-organization process can be interpreted as a synchronization transition in a fully connected network of fictitious oscillators, and described in terms of the Kuramoto model. © 2014 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  9. Extending Particle Swarm Optimisers with Self-Organized Criticality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løvbjerg, Morten; Krink, Thiemo

    2002-01-01

    Particle swarm optimisers (PSOs) show potential in function optimisation, but still have room for improvement. Self-organized criticality (SOC) can help control the PSO and add diversity. Extending the PSO with SOC seems promising reaching faster convergence and better solutions.......Particle swarm optimisers (PSOs) show potential in function optimisation, but still have room for improvement. Self-organized criticality (SOC) can help control the PSO and add diversity. Extending the PSO with SOC seems promising reaching faster convergence and better solutions....

  10. Measuring the Complexity of Self-Organizing Traffic Lights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darío Zubillaga

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available We apply measures of complexity, emergence, and self-organization to an urban traffic model for comparing a traditional traffic-light coordination method with a self-organizing method in two scenarios: cyclic boundaries and non-orientable boundaries. We show that the measures are useful to identify and characterize different dynamical phases. It becomes clear that different operation regimes are required for different traffic demands. Thus, not only is traffic a non-stationary problem, requiring controllers to adapt constantly; controllers must also change drastically the complexity of their behavior depending on the demand. Based on our measures and extending Ashby’s law of requisite variety, we can say that the self-organizing method achieves an adaptability level comparable to that of a living system.

  11. 9th Workshop on Self-Organizing Maps

    CERN Document Server

    Príncipe, José; Zegers, Pablo

    2013-01-01

    Self-organizing maps (SOMs) were developed by Teuvo Kohonen in the early eighties. Since then more than 10,000 works have been based on SOMs. SOMs are unsupervised neural networks useful for clustering and visualization purposes. Many SOM applications have been developed in engineering and science, and other fields. This book contains refereed papers presented at the 9th Workshop on Self-Organizing Maps (WSOM 2012) held at the Universidad de Chile, Santiago, Chile, on December 12-14, 2012. The workshop brought together researchers and practitioners in the field of self-organizing systems. Among the book chapters there are excellent examples of the use of SOMs in agriculture, computer science, data visualization, health systems, economics, engineering, social sciences, text and image analysis, and time series analysis. Other chapters present the latest theoretical work on SOMs as well as Learning Vector Quantization (LVQ) methods.

  12. Self-organization of atoms coupled to a chiral reservoir

    CERN Document Server

    Eldredge, Zachary; Chang, Darrick; Gorshkov, Alexey V

    2016-01-01

    Tightly confined modes of light, as in optical nanofibers or photonic crystal waveguides, can lead to large optical coupling in atomic systems, which mediates long-range interactions between atoms. These one-dimensional systems can naturally possess couplings that are asymmetric between modes propagating in different directions. Strong long-range interaction among atoms via these modes can drive them to a self-organized periodic distribution. In this paper, we examine the self-organizing behavior of atoms in one dimension coupled to a chiral reservoir. We determine the solution to the equations of motion in different parameter regimes, relative to both the detuning of the pump laser that initializes the atomic dipole-dipole interactions and the degree of reservoir chirality. In addition, we calculate possible experimental signatures such as reflectivity from self-organized atoms and motional sidebands.

  13. Clustering with an Improved Self-Organizing Tree

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Yukinori; Sasaki, Yasue

    A self-organizing tree (S-TREE) has a self-organizing capability and better performance than previously reported tree-structured clustering. In the S-TREE algorithm, since a tree grows in greedy fashion, a pruning mechanism is necessary to reduce the effect of bad leaf nodes. Extra nodes are pruned when the tree reaches a predetermined maximum size (U). U is problem-dependent and is therefore difficult to specify beforehand. Furthermore, since U gives the limit of tree growth and also prevents self-organizing of the tree, it may produce unnatural clustering. We are presenting a new pruning algorithm without U. In this paper, we present results showing the performance of the new pruning algorithm using samples generated from normal distributions. The results of computational experiments showed that the new pruning algorithm works well for clustering of those samples.

  14. Emergence of cooperation with self-organized criticality

    CERN Document Server

    Jeong, Hyeong-Chai

    2010-01-01

    Cooperation and self-organized criticality are two main keywords in current studies of evolution. We propose a generalized Bak-Sneppen model and provide a natural mechanism which accounts for both phenomena simultaneously. We use the prisoner's dilemma games to mimic the interactions among the species. Each species is identified by its cooperation probability and its fitness is given by the payoffs from the neighbors. The species with the least payoff is replaced by a new species with a random cooperation probability. When the neighbors of the least fit one are also replaced with a non-zero probability, a strong cooperation emerges. Bak-Sneppen process builds a self-organized structure so that the cooperation can emerge even in the parameter region where a uniform or random population decreases the number of cooperators. The emergence of cooperation is due to the same dynamical correlation which leads to self-organized criticality in replacement activities.

  15. Self-organized structures in soft confined thin films

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ashutosh Sharma

    2005-10-01

    We present a mini-review of our recent work on spontaneous, self-organized creation of mesostructures in soft materials like thin films of polymeric liquids and elastic solids. These very small scale, highly confined systems are inherently unstable and thus self-organize into ordered structures which can be exploited for MEMS, sensors, opto-electronic devices and a host of other nanotechnology applications. In particular, mesomechanics requires incorporation of intermolecular interactions and surface tension forces, which are usually inconsequential in classical macroscale mechanics. We point to some experiments and quasi-continuum simulations of self-organized structures in thin soft films which are germane not only to nanotechnology, but also to a spectrum of classical issues such as adhesion/debonding, wetting, coatings, tribology and membranes.

  16. Self-organization of divided hierarchy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odagaki, Takashi; Kitada, Keigo; Omizo, Kenta; Fujie, Ryo

    2015-03-01

    There are two types of extreme form of hierarchy, one is the plutonomy where small fraction of winners and losers and many people in the middle class appear and the other a divided hierarchy where half of population become winners and the remaining half become losers. We study the emergence of the divided hierarchy in a model society which consists of bellicose individuals who always try to fight and fight with the strongest neighbor and pacific individuals who always try not to fight and when necessary fight with the weakest neighbor. In our model society, (1) individuals make random walk on a square lattice, (2) when two individuals encounter they fight each other and (3) the winner deprives wealth from the loser. By a Monte Carlo simulation, we show that there are two transitions when the population density is increased; one is a transition from the egalitarian society to a hierarchical society I where winners, losers and middle classes coexist and the other is a transition from the hierarchical society I to a hierarchical society II where winners and losers exist but no middle classes exist, that is the divided hierarchy. We also show that clusters consisting mostly of bellicose individuals appear in the hierarchical society I.

  17. Self-Organization of Microscale Condensate for Delayed Flooding of Nanostructured Superhydrophobic Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ölçeroğlu, Emre; McCarthy, Matthew

    2016-03-02

    Superhydrophobic surfaces enhance condensation by inhibiting the formation of an insulating liquid layer. While this produces efficient heat transfer at low supersaturations, superhydrophobicity has been shown to break down at increased supersaturations. As heat transfer increases, the random distribution and high density of nucleation sites produces pinned droplets, which lead to uncontrollable flooding. In this work, engineered variations in wettability are used to promote the self-organization of microscale droplets, which is shown to effectively delay flooding. Virus-templated superhydrophobic surfaces are patterned with an array of superhydrophilic islands designed to minimize surface adhesion while promoting spatial order. By use of optical and electron microscopy, the surfaces are optimized and characterized during condensation. Mixed wettability imparts spatial order not only through preferential nucleation but more importantly through the self-organization of coalescing droplets at high supersaturations. The self-organization of microscale droplets (diameters of 1 mm) on the surface. As heat transfer increases, the surfaces transition from jumping-mode to shedding-mode removal with no flooding. This demonstrates the ability to engineer surfaces to resist flooding and can act as the basis for developing robust superhydrophobic surfaces for condensation applications.

  18. 5G heterogeneous networks self-organizing and optimization

    CERN Document Server

    Rong, Bo; Kadoch, Michel; Sun, Songlin; Li, Wenjing

    2016-01-01

    This SpringerBrief provides state-of-the-art technical reviews on self-organizing and optimization in 5G systems. It covers the latest research results from physical-layer channel modeling to software defined network (SDN) architecture. This book focuses on the cutting-edge wireless technologies such as heterogeneous networks (HetNets), self-organizing network (SON), smart low power node (LPN), 3D-MIMO, and more. It will help researchers from both the academic and industrial worlds to better understand the technical momentum of 5G key technologies.

  19. Unsupervised learning via self-organization a dynamic approach

    CERN Document Server

    Kyan, Matthew; Jarrah, Kambiz; Guan, Ling

    2014-01-01

    To aid in intelligent data mining, this book introduces a new family of unsupervised algorithms that have a basis in self-organization, yet are free from many of the constraints typical of other well known self-organizing architectures. It then moves through a series of pertinent real world applications with regards to the processing of multimedia data from its role in generic image processing techniques such as the automated modeling and removal of impulse noise in digital images, to problems in digital asset management, and its various roles in feature extraction, visual enhancement, segmentation, and analysis of microbiological image data.

  20. Rapid self-organized criticality: Fractal evolution in extreme environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halley, Julianne D.; Warden, Andrew C.; Sadedin, Suzanne; Li, Wentian

    2004-09-01

    We introduce the phenomenon of rapid self-organized criticality (RSOC) and show that, like some models of self-organized criticality (SOC), RSOC generates scale-invariant event distributions and 1/f noise. Unlike SOC, however, RSOC persists despite more than an order of magnitude variation in driving rate and displays extremely thick and dynamic branching geometry. Starting with an initial set of parameter values, we perform two numerical experiments in which nonequilibrium RSOC systems are tuned towards their critical points. The approach to the critical state is tracked using average branching rates, which must equal 1 if systems are genuinely critical.

  1. Self-Organizing Map Models of Language Acquisition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping eLi

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Connectionist models have had a profound impact on theories of language. While most early models were inspired by the classic PDP architecture, recent models of language have explored various other types of models, including self-organizing models for language acquisition. In this paper we aim at providing a review of the latter type of models, and highlight a number of simulation experiments that we have conducted based on these models. We show that self-organizing connectionist models can provide significant insights into long-standing debates in both monolingual and bilingual language development.

  2. Variants of guided self-organization for robot control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martius, Georg; Herrmann, J Michael

    2012-09-01

    Autonomous robots can generate exploratory behavior by self-organization of the sensorimotor loop. We show that the behavioral manifold that is covered in this way can be modified in a goal-dependent way without reducing the self-induced activity of the robot. We present three strategies for guided self-organization, namely by using external rewards, a problem-specific error function, or assumptions about the symmetries of the desired behavior. The strategies are analyzed for two different robots in a physically realistic simulation.

  3. Macroscopic and microscopic self-organization by nonlocal anisotropic interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Cristiani, Emiliano; Tosin, Andrea

    2009-01-01

    This paper is concerned with mathematical modeling of intelligent systems, such as human crowds and animal groups. In particular, the focus is on the emergence of different self-organized patterns from non-locality and anisotropy of the interactions among individuals. A mathematical technique by time-evolving measures is introduced to deal with both macroscopic and microscopic scales within a unified modeling framework. Then self-organization issues are investigated and numerically reproduced at the proper scale, according to the kind of agents under consideration.

  4. Resource Letter SOP-1: Self-Organizing Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Donald T.

    2015-08-01

    This Resource Letter introduces the reader to an area of physics where systems can self-organize to a particular shape or behavior that, while dynamically changing, is surprisingly robust. The self-organization is due to the complex interactions that typically preclude explanation from just the forces among adjacent molecules or objects. How one recognizes such systems and explains their behavior is the topic of this Resource Letter. Some systems exhibit universal behavior that is well documented and understood, but other systems are just now being investigated.

  5. Self-Organized Fission Control for Flocking System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingyong Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper studies the self-organized fission control problem for flocking system. Motivated by the fission behavior of biological flocks, information coupling degree (ICD is firstly designed to represent the interaction intensity between individuals. Then, from the information transfer perspective, a “maximum-ICD” based pairwise interaction rule is proposed to realize the directional information propagation within the flock. Together with the “separation/alignment/cohesion” rules, a self-organized fission control algorithm is established that achieves the spontaneous splitting of flocking system under conflict external stimuli. Finally, numerical simulations are provided to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm.

  6. Structure and dynamics in self-organized C60 fullerenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patnaik, Archita

    2007-01-01

    This manuscript on 'structure and dynamics in self-organized C60 fullerenes' has three sections dealing with: (A) pristine C60 aggregate structure and geometry in solvents of varying dielectric constant. Here, using positronium (Ps) as a fundamental probe which maps changes in the local electron density of the microenvironment, the onset concentration for stable C60 aggregate formation and its phase behavior is deduced from the specific interactions of the Ps atom with the surrounding. (B) A novel methanofullerene dyad, based on a hydrophobic (acceptor C60 moiety)-hydrophilic (bridge with benzene and ester functionalities)-hydrophobic (donor didodecyloxybenzene) network is chosen for investigation of characteristic self-assembly it undergoes leading to supramolecular aggregates. The pi-electronic amphiphile, necessitating a critical dielectric constant epsilon > or = 30 in binary THF-water mixtures, dictated the formation of bilayer vesicles as precursors for spherical fractal aggregates upon complete dyad extraction into a more polar water phase. (C) While the molecular orientation is dependent on the packing density, the ordering of the molecular arrangement, indispensable for self-assembly depends on the balance between the structures demanded by inter-molecular and molecule-substrate interactions. The molecular orientation in a monolayer affects the orientation in a multilayer, formed on the monolayer, suggesting the possibility of the latter to act as a template for controlling the structure of the three dimensionally grown self-assembled molecular aggregation. A systematic study on the electronic structure and orientation associated with C60 functionalized aminothiol self-assembled monolayers on Au(111) surface is presented using surface sensitive Ultra-Violet Photoelectron Spectroscopy (UPS) and C-K edge Near-Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy. The results revealed drastic modifications to d-band structure of Au(111) and the

  7. Stigmergy, self-organization, and sorting in collective robotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, O; Melhuish, C

    1999-01-01

    Many structures built by social insects are the outcome of a process of self-organization, in which the repeated actions of the insects interact over time with the changing physical environment to produce a characteristic end state. A major mediating factor is stigmergy, the elicitation of specific environment-changing behaviors by the sensory effects of local environmental changes produced by previous behavior. A typical task involving stigmergic self-organization is brood sorting: Many ant species sort their brood so that items at similar stages of development are grouped together and separated from items at different stages of development. This article examines the operation of stigmergy and self-organization in a homogeneous group of physical robots, in the context of the task of clustering and sorting Frisbees of two different types. Using a behavioral rule set simpler than any yet proposed for ant sorting, and having no capacity for spatial orientation or memory, the robots are able to achieve effective clustering and sorting showing all the signs of self-organization. It is argued that the success of this demonstration is crucially dependent on the exploitation of real-world physics, and that the use of simulation alone to investigate stigmergy may fail to reveal its power as an evolutionary option for collective life forms.

  8. Gaining insight in domestic violence with emergent self organizing maps

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Poelmans; P. Elzinga; S. Viaene; M.M. van Hulle; G. Dedene

    2009-01-01

    Topographic maps are an appealing exploratory instrument for discovering new knowledge from databases. During the past years, new types of Self Organizing Maps (SOM) were introduced in the literature, including the recent Emergent SOM. The ESOM tool is used here to analyze a large set of police repo

  9. Self-Organization and Annealed Disorder in a Fracturing Process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Caldarelli, Guido; Di Tolla, Francesco; Petri, Alberto

    1996-01-01

    We show that a vectorial model for inhomogeneous elastic media self-organizes under external stress. An onset of crack avalanches of every duration and length scale compatible with the lattice size is observed. The behavior is driven by the introduction of annealed disorder, i.e., by lowering the...

  10. Simple model of self-organized biological evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Boer, Jan; Derrida, Bernard; Flyvbjerg, Henrik; Jackson, Andrew D.; Wettig, Tilo

    1994-08-01

    We give an exact solution of a recently proposed self-organized critical model of biological evolution. We show that the model has a power law distribution of durations of coevolutionary ``avalanches'' with a mean field exponent 3/2. We also calculate analytically the finite size effects which cut off this power law at times of the order of the system size.

  11. Self-Organized Construction with Continuous Building Material

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heinrich, Mary Katherine; Wahby, Mostafa; Divband Soorati, Mohammad;

    2016-01-01

    Self-organized construction with continuous, structured building material, as opposed to modular units, offers new challenges to the robot-based construction process and lends the opportunity for increased flexibility in constructed artifact properties, such as shape and deformation. As an exampl...

  12. Precipitate coarsening and self organization in erbium-doped silica

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sckerl, Mads W.; Guldberg-Kjær, Søren Andreas; Poulsen, Mogens Rysholt

    1999-01-01

    , and formation of erbium-rich. precipitates is seen to occur if the erbium concentration exceeds similar to 0.01 at. %. These precipitates are observed to coarsen and subsequently dissolve with increasing annealing time. Moreover, self organization of precipitates has been observed in the form of layering...

  13. Self-organized criticality in a network of interacting neurons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cowan, J.D.; Neuman, J.; Kiewiet, B.; Drongelen, van W.

    2013-01-01

    This paper contains an analysis of a simple neural network that exhibits self-organized criticality. Such criticality follows from the combination of a simple neural network with an excitatory feedback loop that generates bistability, in combination with an anti-Hebbian synapse in its input pathway.

  14. Self-organization and coherent structures in plasmas and fluids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, A.H.; Juul Rasmussen, J.; Schmidt, M.R.

    1996-01-01

    momentum the development into propagating dipolar structures is observed. This development is discussed by employing self-organization principles. The detailed structures of the evolving dipoles depends on the initial condition. It seems that there are no unique dipolar solutions, but a large class...

  15. Adaptive self-organization of Bali's ancient rice terraces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lansing, J Stephen; Thurner, Stefan; Chung, Ning Ning; Coudurier-Curveur, Aurélie; Karakaş, Çağil; Fesenmyer, Kurt A; Chew, Lock Yue

    2017-06-20

    Spatial patterning often occurs in ecosystems as a result of a self-organizing process caused by feedback between organisms and the physical environment. Here, we show that the spatial patterns observable in centuries-old Balinese rice terraces are also created by feedback between farmers' decisions and the ecology of the paddies, which triggers a transition from local to global-scale control of water shortages and rice pests. We propose an evolutionary game, based on local farmers' decisions that predicts specific power laws in spatial patterning that are also seen in a multispectral image analysis of Balinese rice terraces. The model shows how feedbacks between human decisions and ecosystem processes can evolve toward an optimal state in which total harvests are maximized and the system approaches Pareto optimality. It helps explain how multiscale cooperation from the community to the watershed scale could persist for centuries, and why the disruption of this self-organizing system by the Green Revolution caused chaos in irrigation and devastating losses from pests. The model shows that adaptation in a coupled human-natural system can trigger self-organized criticality (SOC). In previous exogenously driven SOC models, adaptation plays no role, and no optimization occurs. In contrast, adaptive SOC is a self-organizing process where local adaptations drive the system toward local and global optima.

  16. Eco-evolutionary feedbacks in self-organized ecosystems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jager, M.; de Jager, M.

    2015-01-01

    Spatial patterns in natural systems may appear amazingly complex. Yet, they can often be explained by a few simple rules. In self-organized ecosystems, complex spatial patterns at the ecosystem scale arise as the consequence of actions of and interactions between organisms at a local scale. Aggregat

  17. Self-Organizing Individual Differences in Brain Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Marc D.

    2005-01-01

    Brain development is self-organizing in that the unique structure of each brain evolves in unpredictable ways through recursive modifications of synaptic networks. In this article, I review mechanisms of neural change in real time and over development, and I argue that change at each of these time scales embodies principles of self-organizing…

  18. 10th Workshop on Self-Organizing Maps

    CERN Document Server

    Schleif, Frank-Michael; Kaden, Marika; Lange, Mandy

    2014-01-01

    The book collects the scientific contributions presented at the 10th Workshop on Self-Organizing Maps (WSOM 2014) held at the University of Applied Sciences Mittweida, Mittweida (Germany, Saxony), on July 2–4, 2014. Starting with the first WSOM-workshop 1997 in Helsinki this workshop focuses on newest results in the field of supervised and unsupervised vector quantization like self-organizing maps for data mining and data classification.   This 10th WSOM brought together more than 50 researchers, experts and practitioners in the beautiful small town Mittweida in Saxony (Germany) nearby the mountains Erzgebirge to discuss new developments in the field of unsupervised self-organizing vector quantization systems and learning vector quantization approaches for classification. The book contains the accepted papers of the workshop after a careful review process as well as summaries of the invited talks.   Among these book chapters there are excellent examples of the use of self-organizing maps in agriculture, ...

  19. Clustering analysis of malware behavior using Self Organizing Map

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pirscoveanu, Radu-Stefan; Stevanovic, Matija; Pedersen, Jens Myrup

    2016-01-01

    For the time being, malware behavioral classification is performed by means of Anti-Virus (AV) generated labels. The paper investigates the inconsistencies associated with current practices by evaluating the identified differences between current vendors. In this paper we rely on Self Organizing ...

  20. THEORETICAL BASES OF PEDAGOGICAL MAINTENANCE OF SCHOOL STUDENTS’ SELF- ORGANIZATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Komova O. V.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The theoretical elements of pedagogical maintenance of school students’ self-organization are considered in the article, as new forms of organization of educational process. We research the problem of pedagogical maintenance in psychological and pedagogical literature. There is a definition of this concept. The author thinks that the process of quality’s improvement of school students’ independent activity and their selforganization is not good developed. It is necessary to investigate this process. The problem of school students’ self-organization is described in pedagogic. There is a structure of a motivational and self - organizational basis of educational activity. This structure consists of certain stages. The first, it is a concentration of attention on an educational situation. The second, it is a pupils’ orientation in activity. The third, it has to define the purpose. The fourth, these are the ways to achievement of the purpose (performance of educational actions. Then it is a control and correction of educational actions. The last, it is an assessment (self-assessment of the received result. The pedagogical maintenance of self - organization and elements of the chosen structure makes the main contents of research in system of additional education. The author allocates levels of management of selforganization of school students. There is a definition of pedagogical maintenance of self-organization of school students. There is a conclusion that mastering skills of self-organization and self-control it not only pledge of a successful organization of educational activity, but also successful existence and selfrealization in modern society

  1. Self-organized topology of recurrence-based complex networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hui; Liu, Gang

    2013-12-01

    With the rapid technological advancement, network is almost everywhere in our daily life. Network theory leads to a new way to investigate the dynamics of complex systems. As a result, many methods are proposed to construct a network from nonlinear time series, including the partition of state space, visibility graph, nearest neighbors, and recurrence approaches. However, most previous works focus on deriving the adjacency matrix to represent the complex network and extract new network-theoretic measures. Although the adjacency matrix provides connectivity information of nodes and edges, the network geometry can take variable forms. The research objective of this article is to develop a self-organizing approach to derive the steady geometric structure of a network from the adjacency matrix. We simulate the recurrence network as a physical system by treating the edges as springs and the nodes as electrically charged particles. Then, force-directed algorithms are developed to automatically organize the network geometry by minimizing the system energy. Further, a set of experiments were designed to investigate important factors (i.e., dynamical systems, network construction methods, force-model parameter, nonhomogeneous distribution) affecting this self-organizing process. Interestingly, experimental results show that the self-organized geometry recovers the attractor of a dynamical system that produced the adjacency matrix. This research addresses a question, i.e., "what is the self-organizing geometry of a recurrence network?" and provides a new way to reproduce the attractor or time series from the recurrence plot. As a result, novel network-theoretic measures (e.g., average path length and proximity ratio) can be achieved based on actual node-to-node distances in the self-organized network topology. The paper brings the physical models into the recurrence analysis and discloses the spatial geometry of recurrence networks.

  2. Self-organized topology of recurrence-based complex networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Hui, E-mail: huiyang@usf.edu; Liu, Gang [Complex Systems Monitoring, Modeling and Analysis Laboratory, University of South Florida, Tampa, Florida 33620 (United States)

    2013-12-15

    With the rapid technological advancement, network is almost everywhere in our daily life. Network theory leads to a new way to investigate the dynamics of complex systems. As a result, many methods are proposed to construct a network from nonlinear time series, including the partition of state space, visibility graph, nearest neighbors, and recurrence approaches. However, most previous works focus on deriving the adjacency matrix to represent the complex network and extract new network-theoretic measures. Although the adjacency matrix provides connectivity information of nodes and edges, the network geometry can take variable forms. The research objective of this article is to develop a self-organizing approach to derive the steady geometric structure of a network from the adjacency matrix. We simulate the recurrence network as a physical system by treating the edges as springs and the nodes as electrically charged particles. Then, force-directed algorithms are developed to automatically organize the network geometry by minimizing the system energy. Further, a set of experiments were designed to investigate important factors (i.e., dynamical systems, network construction methods, force-model parameter, nonhomogeneous distribution) affecting this self-organizing process. Interestingly, experimental results show that the self-organized geometry recovers the attractor of a dynamical system that produced the adjacency matrix. This research addresses a question, i.e., “what is the self-organizing geometry of a recurrence network?” and provides a new way to reproduce the attractor or time series from the recurrence plot. As a result, novel network-theoretic measures (e.g., average path length and proximity ratio) can be achieved based on actual node-to-node distances in the self-organized network topology. The paper brings the physical models into the recurrence analysis and discloses the spatial geometry of recurrence networks.

  3. Self-Organization of Blood Pressure Regulation: Experimental Evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortrat, Jacques-Olivier; Levrard, Thibaud; Courcinous, Sandrine; Victor, Jacques

    2016-01-01

    Blood pressure regulation is a prime example of homeostatic regulation. However, some characteristics of the cardiovascular system better match a non-linear self-organized system than a homeostatic one. To determine whether blood pressure regulation is self-organized, we repeated the seminal demonstration of self-organized control of movement, but applied it to the cardiovascular system. We looked for two distinctive features peculiar to self-organization: non-equilibrium phase transitions and hysteresis in their occurrence when the system is challenged. We challenged the cardiovascular system by means of slow, 20-min Tilt-Up and Tilt-Down tilt table tests in random order. We continuously determined the phase between oscillations at the breathing frequency of Total Peripheral Resistances and Heart Rate Variability by means of cross-spectral analysis. We looked for a significant phase drift during these procedures, which signed a non-equilibrium phase transition. We determined at which head-up tilt angle it occurred. We checked that this angle was significantly different between Tilt-Up and Tilt-Down to demonstrate hysteresis. We observed a significant non-equilibrium phase transition in nine healthy volunteers out of 11 with significant hysteresis (48.1 ± 7.5° and 21.8 ± 3.9° during Tilt-Up and Tilt-Down, respectively, p < 0.05). Our study shows experimental evidence of self-organized short-term blood pressure regulation. It provides new insights into blood pressure regulation and its related disorders. PMID:27065880

  4. Dynamic self-organization of microwell-aggregated cellular mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Wei; Tung, Chih-Kuan; Lu, Yen-Chun; Pardo, Yehudah; Wu, Mingming; Das, Moumita; Kao, Der-I; Chen, Shuibing; Ma, Minglin

    2016-06-29

    Cells with different cohesive properties self-assemble in a spatiotemporal and context-dependent manner. Previous studies on cell self-organization mainly focused on the spontaneous structural development within a short period of time during which the cell numbers remained constant. However the effect of cell proliferation over time on the self-organization of cells is largely unexplored. Here, we studied the spatiotemporal dynamics of self-organization of a co-culture of MDA-MB-231 and MCF10A cells seeded in a well defined space (i.e. non-adherent microfabricated wells). When cell-growth was chemically inhibited, high cohesive MCF10A cells formed a core surrounded by low cohesive MDA-MB-231 cells on the periphery, consistent with the differential adhesion hypothesis (DAH). Interestingly, this aggregate morphology was completely inverted when the cells were free to grow. At an initial seeding ratio of 1 : 1 (MDA-MB-231 : MCF10A), the fast growing MCF10A cells segregated in the periphery while the slow growing MDA-MB-231 cells stayed in the core. Another morphology developed at an inequal seeding ratio (4 : 1), that is, the cell mixtures developed a side-by-side aggregate morphology. We conclude that the cell self-organization depends not only on the cell cohesive properties but also on the cell seeding ratio and proliferation. Furthermore, by taking advantage of the cell self-organization, we purified human embryonic stem cells-derived pancreatic progenitors (hESCs-PPs) from co-cultured feeder cells without using any additional tools or labels.

  5. Self-organization of hot plasmas the canonical profile transport model

    CERN Document Server

    Dnestrovskij, Yu N

    2015-01-01

    In this monograph the author presents the Canonical Profile Transport Model or CPTM as a rather general mathematical framework to simulate plasma discharges.The description of hot plasmas in a magnetic fusion device is a very challenging task and many plasma properties still lack a physical explanation. One important property is plasma self-organization.It is very well known from experiments that the radial profile of the plasma pressure and temperature remains rather unaffected by changes of the deposited power or plasma density. The attractiveness of the CPTM is that it includes the effect o

  6. Self-Organized Criticality with Complex Scaling Exponents in the Train Model

    CERN Document Server

    Elmer, F J

    1997-01-01

    The train model which is a variant of the Burridge-Knopoff earthquake model is investigated for a velocity-strengthening friction law. It shows self-organized criticality with complex scaling exponents. That is, the probability density function of the avalanche strength is a power law times a log-periodic function. Exact results (scaling exponent: $3/2+2\\pi i/\\ln 4$) are found for a nonlocal cellular automaton which approximates the overdamped train model. Further the influence of random static friction is discussed.

  7. Self-Organized Traveling Chemo-Hydrodynamic Fingers Triggered by a Chemical Oscillator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escala, D M; Budroni, M A; Carballido-Landeira, J; De Wit, A; Muñuzuri, A P

    2014-02-01

    Pulsatile chemo-hydrodynamic patterns due to a coupling between an oscillating chemical reaction and buoyancy-driven hydrodynamic flows can develop when two solutions of separate reactants of the Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction are put in contact in the gravity field and conditions for chemical oscillations are met in the contact zone. In regular oscillatory conditions, localized periodic changes in the concentration of intermediate species induce pulsatile density gradients, which, in turn, generate traveling convective fingers breaking the transverse symmetry. These patterns are the self-organized result of a genuine coupling between chemical and hydrodynamic modes.

  8. Preparation and third-order nonlinear optical properties of self-organized complex oxide Ce: BaTiO3 quantum dots

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    师文生; 陈正豪; 刘宁宁; 吕惠宾; 周岳亮; 崔大复; 杨国桢

    2000-01-01

    Pulsed laser ablation epitaxial Strancky-Krastanow growth of self-organized complex oxide Ce:BaTiO3 quantum dots on MgO(100) substrates is demonstrated. Atomic force microscopy and X-ray diffraction are used to observe the structure and the growth process of the self-organized complex oxide quantum dots. The average dimension, height, and the density of self-organized complex oxide Ce:BaTiO3 quantum dots are given. The nonlinear refractive indexes of the wetting layer and the self-organized ordered quantum dots are determined by the single beam Z-scan method. The mechanisms of the nonlinear effect enhancement for these low-dimensional structure are discussed.

  9. Preparation and third-order nonlinear optical properties of self-organized complex oxide Ce:BaTiO3 quantum dots

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Pulsed laser ablation epitaxial Strancky-Krastanow growth of self-organized complex oxide Ce:BaTiO3 quantum dots on MgO(100) substrates is demonstrated.Atomic force microscopy and X-ray diffraction are used to observe the structure and the growth process of the self-organized complex oxide quantum dots.The average dimension,height,and the density of self-organized complex oxide Ce:BaTiO3 quantum dots are given.The nonlinear refractive indexes of the wetting layer and the self-organized ordered quantum dots are determined by the single beam Z-scan method.The mechanisms of the nonlinear effect enhancement for these low-dimensional structure are discussed.

  10. Self-Organization of Motor-Propelled Cytoskeletal Filaments at Topographically Defined Borders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alf Månsson

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Self-organization phenomena are of critical importance in living organisms and of great interest to exploit in nanotechnology. Here we describe in vitro self-organization of molecular motor-propelled actin filaments, manifested as a tendency of the filaments to accumulate in high density close to topographically defined edges on nano- and microstructured surfaces. We hypothesized that this “edge-tracing” effect either (1 results from increased motor density along the guiding edges or (2 is a direct consequence of the asymmetric constraints on stochastic changes in filament sliding direction imposed by the edges. The latter hypothesis is well captured by a model explicitly defining the constraints of motility on structured surfaces in combination with Monte-Carlo simulations [cf. Nitta et al. (2006] of filament sliding. In support of hypothesis 2 we found that the model reproduced the edge tracing effect without the need to assume increased motor density at the edges. We then used model simulations to elucidate mechanistic details. The results are discussed in relation to nanotechnological applications and future experiments to test model predictions.

  11. Substrate dependent self-organization of mesoporous cobalt oxide nanowires with remarkable pseudocapacitance

    KAUST Repository

    Baby, Rakhi Raghavan

    2012-05-09

    A scheme of current collector dependent self-organization of mesoporous cobalt oxide nanowires has been used to create unique supercapacitor electrodes, with each nanowire making direct contact with the current collector. The fabricated electrodes offer the desired properties of macroporosity to allow facile electrolyte flow, thereby reducing device resistance and nanoporosity with large surface area to allow faster reaction kinetics. Co 3O 4 nanowires grown on carbon fiber paper collectors self-organize into a brush-like morphology with the nanowires completely surrounding the carbon microfiber cores. In comparison, Co 3O 4 nanowires grown on planar graphitized carbon paper collectors self-organize into a flower-like morphology. In three electrode configuration, brush-like and flower-like morphologies exhibited specific capacitance values of 1525 and 1199 F/g, respectively, at a constant current density of 1 A/g. In two electrode configuration, the brush-like nanowire morphology resulted in a superior supercapacitor performance with high specific capacitances of 911 F/g at 0.25 A/g and 784 F/g at 40 A/g. In comparison, the flower-like morphology exhibited lower specific capacitance values of 620 F/g at 0.25 A/g and 423 F/g at 40 A/g. The Co 3O 4 nanowires with brush-like morphology exhibited high values of specific power (71 kW/kg) and specific energy (81 Wh/kg). Maximum energy and power densities calculated for Co 3O 4 nanowires with flower-like morphology were 55 Wh/kg and 37 kW/kg respectively. Both electrode designs exhibited excellent cycling stability by retaining ∼91-94% of their maximum capacitance after 5000 cycles of continuous charge-discharge. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  12. Self-Organized Vortices of Circling Self-Propelled Particles and Curved Active Flagella

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Yingzi; Gompper, Gerhard

    2014-01-01

    Self-propelled point-like particles move along circular trajectories when their translocation velocity is constant and the angular velocity related to their orientation vector is also constant. We investigate the collective behavior of ensembles of such circle swimmers by Brownian dynamics simulations. If the particles interact via a ``velocity-trajectory coordination" rule within neighboring particles, a self-organized vortex pattern emerges. This vortex pattern is characterized by its particle-density correlation function $G_\\rho$, the density correlation function $G_c$ of trajectory centers, and an order parameter $S$ representing the degree of the aggregation of the particles. Here, we systematically vary the system parameters, such as the particle density and the interaction range, in order to reveal the transition of the system from a light-vortex-dominated to heavy-vortex-dominated state, where vortices contain mainly a single and many self-propelled particles, respectively. We also study a semi-dilute...

  13. Self-organization of gold nanoparticles on silanated surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Htet H. Kyaw

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The self-organization of monolayer gold nanoparticles (AuNPs on 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES-functionalized glass substrate is reported. The orientation of APTES molecules on glass substrates plays an important role in the interaction between AuNPs and APTES molecules on the glass substrates. Different orientations of APTES affect the self-organization of AuNps on APTES-functionalized glass substrates. The as grown monolayers and films annealed in ultrahigh vacuum and air (600 °C were studied by water contact angle measurements, atomic force microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, UV–visible spectroscopy and ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy. Results of this study are fundamentally important and also can be applied for designing and modelling of surface plasmon resonance based sensor applications.

  14. Self-Organizing OFDMA System for Broadband Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Aloke (Inventor); Anandappan, Thanga (Inventor); Malve, Sharath Babu (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Systems and methods for a self-organizing OFDMA system for broadband communication are provided. In certain embodiments a communication node for a self organizing network comprises a communication interface configured to transmit data to and receive data from a plurality of nodes; and a processing unit configured to execute computer readable instructions. Further, computer readable instructions direct the processing unit to identify a sub-region within a cell, wherein the communication node is located in the sub-region; and transmit at least one data frame, wherein the data from the communication node is transmitted at a particular time and frequency as defined within the at least one data frame, where the time and frequency are associated with the sub-region.

  15. 11th Workshop on Self-Organizing Maps

    CERN Document Server

    Mendenhall, Michael; O'Driscoll, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    This book contains the articles from the international conference 11th Workshop on Self-Organizing Maps 2016 (WSOM 2016), held at Rice University in Houston, Texas, 6-8 January 2016. WSOM is a biennial international conference series starting with WSOM'97 in Helsinki, Finland, under the guidance and direction of Professor Tuevo Kohonen (Emeritus Professor, Academy of Finland). WSOM brings together the state-of-the-art theory and applications in Competitive Learning Neural Networks: SOMs, LVQs and related paradigms of unsupervised and supervised vector quantization. The current proceedings present the expert body of knowledge of 93 authors from 15 countries in 31 peer reviewed contributions. It includes papers and abstracts from the WSOM 2016 invited speakers representing leading researchers in the theory and real-world applications of Self-Organizing Maps and Learning Vector Quantization: Professor Marie Cottrell (Universite Paris 1 Pantheon Sorbonne, France), Professor Pablo Estevez (University of Chile and ...

  16. Self-organizing map models of language acquisition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ping; Zhao, Xiaowei

    2013-01-01

    Connectionist models have had a profound impact on theories of language. While most early models were inspired by the classic parallel distributed processing architecture, recent models of language have explored various other types of models, including self-organizing models for language acquisition. In this paper, we aim at providing a review of the latter type of models, and highlight a number of simulation experiments that we have conducted based on these models. We show that self-organizing connectionist models can provide significant insights into long-standing debates in both monolingual and bilingual language development. We suggest future directions in which these models can be extended, to better connect with behavioral and neural data, and to make clear predictions in testing relevant psycholinguistic theories. PMID:24312061

  17. Self-organizing map models of language acquisition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ping; Zhao, Xiaowei

    2013-11-19

    Connectionist models have had a profound impact on theories of language. While most early models were inspired by the classic parallel distributed processing architecture, recent models of language have explored various other types of models, including self-organizing models for language acquisition. In this paper, we aim at providing a review of the latter type of models, and highlight a number of simulation experiments that we have conducted based on these models. We show that self-organizing connectionist models can provide significant insights into long-standing debates in both monolingual and bilingual language development. We suggest future directions in which these models can be extended, to better connect with behavioral and neural data, and to make clear predictions in testing relevant psycholinguistic theories.

  18. How nature works the science of self-organized criticality

    CERN Document Server

    Bak, Per

    1996-01-01

    This is an acclaimed book intended for the general reader who is interested in science. The author is a physicist who is well-known for his development of the property called "self-organized criticality", a property or phenomenon that lies at the heart of large dynamical systems. It can be used to analyse systems that are complicated, and which are part of the new science of complexity. It is a unifying concept that can be used to study phenomena in fields as diverse as economics, astronomy, the earth sciences, and physics. The author discusses his discovery of self-organized criticality; its relation to the world of classical physics; computer simulations and experiments which aid scientists' understanding of the property; and the relation of the subject to popular areas such as fractal geometry and power laws; cellular automata, and a wide range of practical applications.

  19. Self-organized Criticality Behavior in Bulk Metallic Glasses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jun-wei QIAO; Zhong WANG

    2016-01-01

    Serrated flows are known as repeated yielding of bulk metallic glasses (BMGs)during plastic deformation under different loading conditions,which are associated with the operation of shear banding.According to the statis-tics of some parameters,the shear avalanches can display a self-organized critical state,suggesting a large ductility of BMGs.The emergence of the self-organized criticality (SOC)behavior in different BMGs is due to the tempera-ture,strain rate,and chemical compositions.The SOC behavior is accompanied with the following phenomena:the interactions occur in the shear bands;the incubation time is longer than the relaxation time;the time interval is lac-king of typical time scale;and the spatial or temporal parameters should display a power-law distribution.

  20. Self-Organized Criticality of Rainfall in Central China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiliang Wang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Rainfall is a complexity dynamics process. In this paper, our objective is to find the evidence of self-organized criticality (SOC for rain datasets in China by employing the theory and method of SOC. For this reason, we analyzed the long-term rain records of five meteorological stations in Henan, a central province of China. Three concepts, that is, rain duration, drought duration, accumulated rain amount, are proposed to characterize these rain events processes. We investigate their dynamics property by using scale invariant and found that the long-term rain processes in central China indeed exhibit the feature of self-organized criticality. The proposed theory and method may be suitable to analyze other datasets from different climate zones in China.

  1. SOUNET: Self-Organized Underwater Wireless Sensor Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hee-won Kim

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we propose an underwater wireless sensor network (UWSN named SOUNET where sensor nodes form and maintain a tree-topological network for data gathering in a self-organized manner. After network topology discovery via packet flooding, the sensor nodes consistently update their parent node to ensure the best connectivity by referring to the timevarying neighbor tables. Such a persistent and self-adaptive method leads to high network connectivity without any centralized control, even when sensor nodes are added or unexpectedly lost. Furthermore, malfunctions that frequently happen in self-organized networks such as node isolation and closed loop are resolved in a simple way. Simulation results show that SOUNET outperforms other conventional schemes in terms of network connectivity, packet delivery ratio (PDR, and energy consumption throughout the network. In addition, we performed an experiment at the Gyeongcheon Lake in Korea using commercial underwater modems to verify that SOUNET works well in a real environment.

  2. SOUNET: Self-Organized Underwater Wireless Sensor Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hee-Won; Cho, Ho-Shin

    2017-02-02

    In this paper, we propose an underwater wireless sensor network (UWSN) named SOUNET where sensor nodes form and maintain a tree-topological network for data gathering in a self-organized manner. After network topology discovery via packet flooding, the sensor nodes consistently update their parent node to ensure the best connectivity by referring to the timevarying neighbor tables. Such a persistent and self-adaptive method leads to high network connectivity without any centralized control, even when sensor nodes are added or unexpectedly lost. Furthermore, malfunctions that frequently happen in self-organized networks such as node isolation and closed loop are resolved in a simple way. Simulation results show that SOUNET outperforms other conventional schemes in terms of network connectivity, packet delivery ratio (PDR), and energy consumption throughout the network. In addition, we performed an experiment at the Gyeongcheon Lake in Korea using commercial underwater modems to verify that SOUNET works well in a real environment.

  3. Analytical investigation of self-organized criticality in neural networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Droste, Felix; Do, Anne-Ly; Gross, Thilo

    2013-01-06

    Dynamical criticality has been shown to enhance information processing in dynamical systems, and there is evidence for self-organized criticality in neural networks. A plausible mechanism for such self-organization is activity-dependent synaptic plasticity. Here, we model neurons as discrete-state nodes on an adaptive network following stochastic dynamics. At a threshold connectivity, this system undergoes a dynamical phase transition at which persistent activity sets in. In a low-dimensional representation of the macroscopic dynamics, this corresponds to a transcritical bifurcation. We show analytically that adding activity-dependent rewiring rules, inspired by homeostatic plasticity, leads to the emergence of an attractive steady state at criticality and present numerical evidence for the system's evolution to such a state.

  4. Can dynamical synapses produce true self-organized criticality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Ariadne de Andrade; Copelli, Mauro; Kinouchi, Osame

    2015-06-01

    Neuronal networks can present activity described by power-law distributed avalanches presumed to be a signature of a critical state. Here we study a random-neighbor network of excitable cellular automata coupled by dynamical synapses. The model exhibits a very similar to conservative self-organized criticality (SOC) models behavior even with dissipative bulk dynamics. This occurs because in the stationary regime the model is conservative on average, and, in the thermodynamic limit, the probability distribution for the global branching ratio converges to a delta-function centered at its critical value. So, this non-conservative model pertain to the same universality class of conservative SOC models and contrasts with other dynamical synapses models that present only self-organized quasi-criticality (SOqC). Analytical results show very good agreement with simulations of the model and enable us to study the emergence of SOC as a function of the parametric derivatives of the stationary branching ratio.

  5. Developing neuronal networks: self-organized criticality predicts the future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pu, Jiangbo; Gong, Hui; Li, Xiangning; Luo, Qingming

    2013-01-01

    Self-organized criticality emerged in neural activity is one of the key concepts to describe the formation and the function of developing neuronal networks. The relationship between critical dynamics and neural development is both theoretically and experimentally appealing. However, whereas it is well-known that cortical networks exhibit a rich repertoire of activity patterns at different stages during in vitro maturation, dynamical activity patterns through the entire neural development still remains unclear. Here we show that a series of metastable network states emerged in the developing and "aging" process of hippocampal networks cultured from dissociated rat neurons. The unidirectional sequence of state transitions could be only observed in networks showing power-law scaling of distributed neuronal avalanches. Our data suggest that self-organized criticality may guide spontaneous activity into a sequential succession of homeostatically-regulated transient patterns during development, which may help to predict the tendency of neural development at early ages in the future.

  6. Energy sources, self-organization, and the origin of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boiteau, Laurent; Pascal, Robert

    2011-02-01

    The emergence and early developments of life are considered from the point of view that contingent events that inevitably marked evolution were accompanied by deterministic driving forces governing the selection between different alternatives. Accordingly, potential energy sources are considered for their propensity to induce self-organization within the scope of the chemical approach to the origin of life. Requirements in terms of quality of energy locate thermal or photochemical activation in the atmosphere as highly likely processes for the formation of activated low-molecular weight organic compounds prone to induce biomolecular self-organization through their ability to deliver quanta of energy matching the needs of early biochemical pathways or the reproduction of self-replicating entities. These lines of reasoning suggest the existence of a direct connection between the free energy content of intermediates of early pathways and the quanta of energy delivered by available sources of energy.

  7. Self-organization of gold nanoparticles on silanated surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyaw, Htet H; Al-Harthi, Salim H; Sellai, Azzouz; Dutta, Joydeep

    2015-01-01

    The self-organization of monolayer gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) on 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES)-functionalized glass substrate is reported. The orientation of APTES molecules on glass substrates plays an important role in the interaction between AuNPs and APTES molecules on the glass substrates. Different orientations of APTES affect the self-organization of AuNps on APTES-functionalized glass substrates. The as grown monolayers and films annealed in ultrahigh vacuum and air (600 °C) were studied by water contact angle measurements, atomic force microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, UV-visible spectroscopy and ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy. Results of this study are fundamentally important and also can be applied for designing and modelling of surface plasmon resonance based sensor applications.

  8. Exploiting Self-organization in Bioengineered Systems: A Computational Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Delin; Doloman, Anna; Podgorski, Gregory J; Vargis, Elizabeth; Flann, Nicholas S

    2017-01-01

    The productivity of bioengineered cell factories is limited by inefficiencies in nutrient delivery and waste and product removal. Current solution approaches explore changes in the physical configurations of the bioreactors. This work investigates the possibilities of exploiting self-organizing vascular networks to support producer cells within the factory. A computational model simulates de novo vascular development of endothelial-like cells and the resultant network functioning to deliver nutrients and extract product and waste from the cell culture. Microbial factories with vascular networks are evaluated for their scalability, robustness, and productivity compared to the cell factories without a vascular network. Initial studies demonstrate that at least an order of magnitude increase in production is possible, the system can be scaled up, and the self-organization of an efficient vascular network is robust. The work suggests that bioengineered multicellularity may offer efficiency improvements difficult to achieve with physical engineering approaches.

  9. Self-Organization and Forces in the Mitotic Spindle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavin, Nenad; Tolić, Iva M

    2016-07-05

    At the onset of division, the cell forms a spindle, a precise self-constructed micromachine composed of microtubules and the associated proteins, which divides the chromosomes between the two nascent daughter cells. The spindle arises from self-organization of microtubules and chromosomes, whose different types of motion help them explore the space and eventually approach and interact with each other. Once the interactions between the chromosomes and the microtubules have been established, the chromosomes are moved to the equatorial plane of the spindle and ultimately toward the opposite spindle poles. These transport processes rely on directed forces that are precisely regulated in space and time. In this review, we discuss how microtubule dynamics and their rotational movement drive spindle self-organization, as well as how the forces acting in the spindle are generated, balanced, and regulated.

  10. Universal Quantification for Self-Organized Criticality in Atmospheric Flows

    CERN Document Server

    Selvam, A M

    1997-01-01

    Atmospheric flows exhibit selfsimilar fluctuations on all scales(space-time) ranging from climate(kilometers/years) to turbulence(millimeters/seconds) manifested as fractal geometry to the global cloud cover pattern concomitant with inverse power law form for power spectra of temporal fluctuations. Selfsimilar fluctuations implying long-range correlations are ubiquitous to dynamical systems in nature and are identified as signatures of self-organized criticality in atmospheric flows. Also, mathematical models for simulation and prediction of atmospheric flows are nonlinear and computer realizations give unrealistic solutions because of deterministic chaos, a direct consequence of finite precision round-off error doubling for each iteration of iterative computations incorporated in long-term numerical integration schemes used for model solutions An alternative non-deterministic cell dynamical system model predicts, (a): the observed self organized criticality as a consequence of quantumlike mechanics governing...

  11. Self-organizing model of motor cortical activities during drawing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Siming H.; Si, Jennie; Schwartz, Andrew B.

    1996-05-01

    The population vector algorithm has been developed to combine the simultaneous direction- related activities of a population of motor cortical neurons to predict the trajectory of the arm movement. In our study, we consider a self-organizing model of a neural representation of the arm trajectory based on neuronal discharge rates. Self-organizing feature mapping (SOFM) is used to select the optimal set of weights in the model to determine the contribution of individual neuron to the overall movement. The correspondence between the movement directions and the discharge patterns of the motor cortical neurons is established in the output map. The topology preserving property of the SOFM is used to analyze real recorded data of a behavior monkey. The data used in this analysis were taken while the monkey was drawing spirals and doing the center out movement. Using such a statistical model, the monkey's arm moving directions could be well predicted based on the motor cortex neuronal firing information.

  12. Secure steganographic communication algorithm based on self-organizing patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunoriene, Loreta; Ragulskis, Minvydas

    2011-11-01

    A secure steganographic communication algorithm based on patterns evolving in a Beddington-de Angelis-type predator-prey model with self- and cross-diffusion is proposed in this paper. Small perturbations of initial states of the system around the state of equilibrium result in the evolution of self-organizing patterns. Small differences between initial perturbations result in slight differences also in the evolving patterns. It is shown that the generation of interpretable target patterns cannot be considered as a secure mean of communication because contours of the secret image can be retrieved from the cover image using statistical techniques if only it represents small perturbations of the initial states of the system. An alternative approach when the cover image represents the self-organizing pattern that has evolved from initial states perturbed using the dot-skeleton representation of the secret image can be considered as a safe visual communication technique protecting both the secret image and communicating parties.

  13. Self-organized service negotiation for collaborative decision making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bo; Huang, Zhenhua; Zheng, Ziming

    2014-01-01

    This paper proposes a self-organized service negotiation method for CDM in intelligent and automatic manners. It mainly includes three phases: semantic-based capacity evaluation for the CDM sponsor, trust computation of the CDM organization, and negotiation selection of the decision-making service provider (DMSP). In the first phase, the CDM sponsor produces the formal semantic description of the complex decision task for DMSP and computes the capacity evaluation values according to participator instructions from different DMSPs. In the second phase, a novel trust computation approach is presented to compute the subjective belief value, the objective reputation value, and the recommended trust value. And in the third phase, based on the capacity evaluation and trust computation, a negotiation mechanism is given to efficiently implement the service selection. The simulation experiment results show that our self-organized service negotiation method is feasible and effective for CDM.

  14. Self-Organization in 2D Traffic Flow Model with Jam-Avoiding Drive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagatani, Takashi

    1995-04-01

    A stochastic cellular automaton (CA) model is presented to investigate the traffic jam by self-organization in the two-dimensional (2D) traffic flow. The CA model is the extended version of the 2D asymmetric exclusion model to take into account jam-avoiding drive. Each site contains either a car moving to the up, a car moving to the right, or is empty. A up car can shift right with probability p ja if it is blocked ahead by other cars. It is shown that the three phases (the low-density phase, the intermediate-density phase and the high-density phase) appear in the traffic flow. The intermediate-density phase is characterized by the right moving of up cars. The jamming transition to the high-density jamming phase occurs with higher density of cars than that without jam-avoiding drive. The jamming transition point p 2c increases with the shifting probability p ja. In the deterministic limit of p ja=1, it is found that a new jamming transition occurs from the low-density synchronized-shifting phase to the high-density moving phase with increasing density of cars. In the synchronized-shifting phase, all up cars do not move to the up but shift to the right by synchronizing with the move of right cars. We show that the jam-avoiding drive has an important effect on the dynamical jamming transition.

  15. THEORETICAL BASES OF PEDAGOGICAL MAINTENANCE OF SCHOOL STUDENTS’ SELF- ORGANIZATION

    OpenAIRE

    Komova O. V.

    2015-01-01

    The theoretical elements of pedagogical maintenance of school students’ self-organization are considered in the article, as new forms of organization of educational process. We research the problem of pedagogical maintenance in psychological and pedagogical literature. There is a definition of this concept. The author thinks that the process of quality’s improvement of school students’ independent activity and their selforganization is not good developed. It is necessary to investigate this p...

  16. Characterizing self-organization and coevolution by ergodic invariants

    CERN Document Server

    Mendes, R V

    1999-01-01

    In addition to the emergent complexity of patterns that appears when many agents come in interaction, it is also useful to characterize the dynamical processes that lead to their self-organization. A set of ergodic invariants is identified for this purpose, which is computed in several examples, namely a Bernoulli network with either global or nearest-neighbor coupling, a generalized Bak-Sneppen model and a continuous minority model.

  17. Simple model of self-organized biological evolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de Boer, J.; Derrida, B.; Flyvbjerg, H.; Jackson, A.D.; Wettig, T. (Department of Physics, State University of New York at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, New York 11794-3800 (United States) The Isaac Newton Institute for Mathematical Sciences, 20 Clarkson Road, Cambridge, CB4 0EH (United Kingdom) Laboratoire de Physique Statistique, Ecole Normale Superieure, 24 rue Lhomond, F-75005 Paris (France) Service de Physique Theorique, Centre de Etudes Nucleaires de Saclay, F-91191, Gif-Sur-Yvette (France) CONNECT, The Niels Bohr Institute, Blegdamsvej 17, DK-2100 Copenhagen (Denmark))

    1994-08-08

    We give an exact solution of a recently proposed self-organized critical model of biological evolution. We show that the model has a power law distribution of durations of coevolutionary avalanches'' with a mean field exponent 3/2. We also calculate analytically the finite size effects which cut off this power law at times of the order of the system size.

  18. Thermosolutal self-organization of supramolecular polymers into nanocraters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marangoni, Tomas; Mezzasalma, Stefano A; Llanes-Pallas, Anna; Yoosaf, K; Armaroli, Nicola; Bonifazi, Davide

    2011-02-15

    The ability of two complementary molecular modules bearing H-bonding uracilic and 2,6-(diacetylamino)pyridyl moieties to self-assemble and self-organize into submicrometer morphologies has been investigated by means of spectroscopic, thermogravimetric, and microscopic methods. Using uracilic (3)N-BOC-protected modules, it has been possible to thermally trigger the self-assembly/self-organization process of the two molecular modules, inducing the formation of objects on a mica surface that exhibit crater-like morphology and a very homogeneous size distribution. Confirmation of the presence of the hydrogen-bonding-driven self-assembly/self-organization process in solution was obtained by variable-temperature (VT) steady-state UV-vis absorption and emission measurements. The variation of the geometric and spatial features of the morphologies was monitored at different T by means of atomic force microscopy (AFM) and was interpreted by a nonequilibrium diffusion model for two chemical species in solution. The formation of nanostructures turned out to be affected by the solid substrate (molecular interactions at a solid-liquid interface), by the matter-momentum transport in solution (solute diffusivity D(0) and solvent kinematic viscosity ν), and the thermally dependent cleavage reaction of the BOC functions (T-dependent differential weight loss, θ = θ(Τ)) in a T interval extrapolated to ∼60 K. A scaling function, f = f (νD(0), ν/D(0), θ), relying on the onset condition of a concentration-driven thermosolutal instability has been established to simulate the T-dependent behavior of the structural dimension (i.e., height and radius) of the self-organized nanostructures as ⟨h⟩ ≈ f (T) and ⟨r⟩ ≈ 1/f (T).

  19. Self-organization via active exploration in robotic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogmen, H.; Prakash, R. V.

    1992-01-01

    We describe a neural network based robotic system. Unlike traditional robotic systems, our approach focussed on non-stationary problems. We indicate that self-organization capability is necessary for any system to operate successfully in a non-stationary environment. We suggest that self-organization should be based on an active exploration process. We investigated neural architectures having novelty sensitivity, selective attention, reinforcement learning, habit formation, flexible criteria categorization properties and analyzed the resulting behavior (consisting of an intelligent initiation of exploration) by computer simulations. While various computer vision researchers acknowledged recently the importance of active processes (Swain and Stricker, 1991), the proposed approaches within the new framework still suffer from a lack of self-organization (Aloimonos and Bandyopadhyay, 1987; Bajcsy, 1988). A self-organizing, neural network based robot (MAVIN) has been recently proposed (Baloch and Waxman, 1991). This robot has the capability of position, size rotation invariant pattern categorization, recognition and pavlovian conditioning. Our robot does not have initially invariant processing properties. The reason for this is the emphasis we put on active exploration. We maintain the point of view that such invariant properties emerge from an internalization of exploratory sensory-motor activity. Rather than coding the equilibria of such mental capabilities, we are seeking to capture its dynamics to understand on the one hand how the emergence of such invariances is possible and on the other hand the dynamics that lead to these invariances. The second point is crucial for an adaptive robot to acquire new invariances in non-stationary environments, as demonstrated by the inverting glass experiments of Helmholtz. We will introduce Pavlovian conditioning circuits in our future work for the precise objective of achieving the generation, coordination, and internalization

  20. Quantitative analysis of cellular metabolic dissipative, self-organized structures

    OpenAIRE

    Ildefonso Martínez de la Fuente

    2010-01-01

    One of the most important goals of the postgenomic era is understanding the metabolic dynamic processes and the functional structures generated by them. Extensive studies during the last three decades have shown that the dissipative self-organization of the functional enzymatic associations, the catalytic reactions produced during the metabolite channeling, the microcompartmentalization of these metabolic processes and the emergence of dissipative networks are the fundamental elements of the ...

  1. Self-organization analysis for a nonlocal convective Fisher equation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cunha, J.A.R. da [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade de Brasilia, 70919-970 Brasilia DF (Brazil); International Center for Condensed Matter Physics, CP 04513, 70919-970 Brasilia DF (Brazil); Penna, A.L.A. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade de Brasilia, 70919-970 Brasilia DF (Brazil); International Center for Condensed Matter Physics, CP 04513, 70919-970 Brasilia DF (Brazil)], E-mail: penna.andre@gmail.com; Vainstein, M.H. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade de Brasilia, 70919-970 Brasilia DF (Brazil); International Center for Condensed Matter Physics, CP 04513, 70919-970 Brasilia DF (Brazil); Morgado, R. [International Center for Condensed Matter Physics, CP 04513, 70919-970 Brasilia DF (Brazil); Departamento de Matematica, Universidade de Brasilia, 70910-900 Brasilia DF (Brazil); Oliveira, F.A. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade de Brasilia, 70919-970 Brasilia DF (Brazil); International Center for Condensed Matter Physics, CP 04513, 70919-970 Brasilia DF (Brazil)

    2009-02-02

    Using both an analytical method and a numerical approach we have investigated pattern formation for a nonlocal convective Fisher equation with constant and spatial velocity fields. We analyze the limits of the influence function due to nonlocal interaction and we obtain the phase diagram of critical velocities v{sub c} as function of the width {mu} of the influence function, which characterize the self-organization of a finite system.

  2. Self-Organized Collective Displacements of Self-Driven Individuals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albano, Ezequiel V.

    1996-09-01

    An archetype model for the collective displacements of self-driven individuals, aimed to describe the dynamic of flocking behavior among living things, is presented and studied. Processes such as growth, death, survival, self-propagation, and competition are considered. It is shown that systems ruled by the model self-organize into a critical state exhibiting power-law behavior in both the distribution of population avalanches and the spatial correlation between individuals.

  3. Subharmonic instability of a self-organized granular jet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kollmer, J E; Pöschel, T

    2016-03-22

    Downhill flows of granular matter colliding in the lowest point of a valley, may induce a self-organized jet. By means of a quasi two-dimensional experiment where fine grained sand flows in a vertically sinusoidally agitated cylinder, we show that the emergent jet, that is, a sheet of ejecta, does not follow the frequency of agitation but reveals subharmonic response. The order of the subharmonics is a complex function of the parameters of driving.

  4. Sonification of a Network's Self-Organized Criticality

    OpenAIRE

    Vickers, Paul; Laing, Chris; Fairfax, Tom

    2014-01-01

    Communication networks involve the transmission and reception of large volumes of data. Research indicates that network traffic volumes will continue to increase. These traffic volumes will be unprecedented and the behaviour of global information infrastructures when dealing with these data volumes is unknown. It has been shown that complex systems (including computer networks) exhibit self-organized criticality under certain conditions. Given the possibility in such systems of a sudden and s...

  5. Architectural Patterns for Self-Organizing Systems-of-Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-01

    of needs ( Maslow 1943). At the base of the hierarchy are the physiological needs ; these are the most primitive needs for all organisms based on self...motivation hierarchy is self-actualization. Maslow describes this motivation as a person achieving potential ( Maslow 1943). Satisfaction of needs at any...show that they are necessary for self-organization to occur. Common Purpose Abraham Maslow proposed a theory on human motivation based on a hierarchy

  6. Scaling and self-organized criticality in proteins II

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    The complexity of proteins is substantially simplified by regarding them as archetypical examples of self-organized criticality (SOC). To test this idea and to elaborate it, this article applies the Moret–Zebende (MZ) SOC hydrophobicity scale to transport repeat proteins of the HEAT superfamily, importin β, and transportin, as well as the export protein Cse1p, and their ubiquitous cargo manager Ran. The difference between the MZ scale and conventional hydrophobicity scales reflects long-range...

  7. Self-organizing Complex Networks: individual versus global rules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoodi, Korosh; West, Bruce J.; Grigolini, Paolo

    2017-01-01

    We introduce a form of Self-Organized Criticality (SOC) inspired by the new generation of evolutionary game theory, which ranges from physiology to sociology. The single individuals are the nodes of a composite network, equivalent to two interacting subnetworks, one leading to strategy choices made by the individuals under the influence of the choices of their nearest neighbors and the other measuring the Prisoner's Dilemma Game payoffs of these choices. The interaction between the two networks is established by making the imitation strength K increase or decrease according to whether the last two payoffs increase or decrease upon increasing or decreasing K. Although each of these imitation strengths is selected selfishly, and independently of the others as well, the social system spontaneously evolves toward the state of cooperation. Criticality is signaled by temporal complexity, namely the occurrence of non-Poisson renewal events, the time intervals between two consecutive crucial events being given by an inverse power law index μ = 1.3 rather than by avalanches with an inverse power law distribution as in the original form of SOC. This new phenomenon is herein labeled self-organized temporal criticality (SOTC). We compare this bottom-up self-organization process to the adoption of a global choice rule based on assigning to all the units the same value K, with the time evolution of common K being determined by consciousness of the social benefit, a top-down process implying the action of a leader. In this case self-organization is impeded by large intensity fluctuations and the global social benefit turns out to be much weaker. We conclude that the SOTC model fits the requests of a manifesto recently proposed by a number of European social scientists. PMID:28736534

  8. Self-organized vortex multiplets in swirling flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Okulov, Valery; Naumov, Igor; Sørensen, Jens Nørkær

    2008-01-01

    The possibility of double vortex multiplet formation at the center of an intensively swirling cocurrent flow generated in a cylindrical container by its rotating lid is reported for the first time. The boundary of the transition to unsteady flow regimes, which arise as a result of the equilibrium...... rotation of self-organized vortex multiplets (triplet, double triplet, double doublet, and quadruplet), has been experimentally determined for cylinders with the aspect (height to radius) ratios in a wider interval than that studied previously....

  9. Mechanical models for the self-organization of tubular patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Chin-Lin

    2013-01-01

    Organogenesis, such as long tubule self-organization, requires long-range coordination of cell mechanics to arrange cell positions and to remodel the extracellular matrix. While the current mainstream in the field of tissue morphogenesis focuses primarily on genetics and chemical signaling, the influence of cell mechanics on the programming of patterning cues in tissue morphogenesis has not been adequately addressed. Here, we review experimental evidence and propose quantitative mechanical models by which cells can create tubular patterns.

  10. Dynamic Self-Organization and Early Lexical Development in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ping; Zhao, Xiaowei; Whinney, Brian Mac

    2007-01-01

    In this study we present a self-organizing connectionist model of early lexical development. We call this model DevLex-II, based on the earlier DevLex model. DevLex-II can simulate a variety of empirical patterns in children's acquisition of words. These include a clear vocabulary spurt, effects of word frequency and length on age of acquisition,…

  11. Clustering Similarity Digest Bloom Filters in Self-Organizing Maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-01

    Science Foundation. xv THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK xvi CHAPTER 1: Introduction In the late 1980s, IBM’s 3390 Model 1 direct access storage device...information autonomously. From there, we look at a specific type of artificial neural network, the self-organizing map, as a appropriate model to build...training was not thorough enough for significant similarity scor - ing with the untrained document collection. In Section 4.1 we saw that each SOM had a

  12. On the Gompertzian dynamics of growth and self-organization

    OpenAIRE

    Molski, Marcin; Konarski, Jerzy

    2007-01-01

    Comment on the Waliszewski's article "A principle of fractal-sto-chastic dualism and Gompertzian dynamics of growth and self-organization" (BioSystems 82 (2005)61-73) is presented. It has been proved that the main idea of this work that Gompertzian dynamics is governed by the Schr\\"{o}dinger-like equation including anharmonic Morse potential has been already introduced by Molski and Konarski in 2003. Some inconsistencies and mathematical errors in the Waliszewski's model are also pointed out.

  13. Innovative Mechanism of Rural Organization Based on Self-Organization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    The paper analyzes the basic situation of the formation of innovative rural organizations with the form of self-organization;reveals the features of self-organization,including the four aspects of openness of rural organization,innovation of rural organization far away from equilibrium,the non-linear response mechanism of rural organization innovation and the random rise and fall of rural organization innovation.The evolution mechanism of rural organization innovation is revealed according to the growth stage,the ideal stage,the decline and the fall stage.The paper probes into the basic restriction mechanism of the self-organization evaluation of rural organization from three aspects,including target recognition,path dependence and knowledge sharing.The basic measures on cultivating the innovative mechanism of rural organization are put forward.Firstly,constructing the dissipative structure of rural organization innovation;secondly,cultivating the dynamic study capability of rural organization innovation system;thirdly,selecting the step-by-step evolution strategy of rural organization innovation system.

  14. Cellular self-organization by autocatalytic alignment feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junkin, Michael; Leung, Siu Ling; Whitman, Samantha; Gregorio, Carol C.; Wong, Pak Kin

    2011-01-01

    Myoblasts aggregate, differentiate and fuse to form skeletal muscle during both embryogenesis and tissue regeneration. For proper muscle function, long-range self-organization of myoblasts is required to create organized muscle architecture globally aligned to neighboring tissue. However, how the cells process geometric information over distances considerably longer than individual cells to self-organize into well-ordered, aligned and multinucleated myofibers remains a central question in developmental biology and regenerative medicine. Using plasma lithography micropatterning to create spatial cues for cell guidance, we show a physical mechanism by which orientation information can propagate for a long distance from a geometric boundary to guide development of muscle tissue. This long-range alignment occurs only in differentiating myoblasts, but not in non-fusing myoblasts perturbed by microfluidic disturbances or other non-fusing cell types. Computational cellular automata analysis of the spatiotemporal evolution of the self-organization process reveals that myogenic fusion in conjunction with rotational inertia functions in a self-reinforcing manner to enhance long-range propagation of alignment information. With this autocatalytic alignment feedback, well-ordered alignment of muscle could reinforce existing orientations and help promote proper arrangement with neighboring tissue and overall organization. Such physical self-enhancement might represent a fundamental mechanism for long-range pattern formation during tissue morphogenesis. PMID:22193956

  15. Self-organization at the frictional interface for green tribology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nosonovsky, Michael

    2010-10-28

    Despite the fact that self-organization during friction has received relatively little attention from tribologists so far, it has the potential for the creation of self-healing and self-lubricating materials, which are important for green or environment-friendly tribology. The principles of the thermodynamics of irreversible processes and of the nonlinear theory of dynamical systems are used to investigate the formation of spatial and temporal structures during friction. The transition to the self-organized state with low friction and wear occurs through destabilization of steady-state (stationary) sliding. The criterion for destabilization is formulated and several examples are discussed: the formation of a protective film, microtopography evolution and slip waves. The pattern formation may involve self-organized criticality and reaction-diffusion systems. A special self-healing mechanism may be embedded into the material by coupling the corresponding required forces. The analysis provides the structure-property relationship, which can be applied for the design optimization of composite self-lubricating and self-healing materials for various ecologically friendly applications and green tribology.

  16. Self Organizing Maps for use in Deep Inelastic Scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Askanazi, Evan

    2015-04-01

    Self Organizing Maps are a type of artificial neural network that has been proven to be particularly useful in solving complex problems in neural biology, engineering, robotics and physics. We are attempting to use the Self Organizing Map to solve problems and probe phenomenological patterns in subatomic physics, specifically in Deep Inelastic Scattering (DIS). In DIS there is a cross section in electron hadron scattering that is dependent on the momentum fraction x of the partons in the hadron and the momentum transfer of the virtual photon exchanged. There is a soft cross part of this cross section that currently can only be found through experimentation; this soft part is comprised of Structure Functions which in turn are comprised of the Parton Distribution Functions (PDFs). We aim to use the Self Organizing Process, or SOP, to take theoretical models of these PDFs and fit it to the previous, known data. The SOP will also be used to probe the behavior of the PDFs in particular at large x values, in order to observe how they congregate. The ability of the SOPto take multidimensional data and convert it into two dimensional output is anticipated to be particularly useful in achieving this aim.

  17. Periodic surface structures on titanium self-organized upon double femtosecond pulse exposures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gemini, Laura; Hashida, Masaki; Miyasaka, Yasuhiro; Inoue, Shunsuke; Limpouch, Jiri; Mocek, Tomas; Sakabe, Shuji

    2015-05-01

    Laser induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) self-organized on Ti surface after irradiations by femtosecond laser beam composed by double pulses with a fixed time delay of 160 fs. The fluence of the first pulse (FPP), responsible for surface plasma formation, was varied in the range 10-50 mJ cm-2 and always kept below the LIPSS formation threshold fluence (FLIPSS) on Ti for 50-single-shots exposure. The fluence of the delayed pulse (FLP), responsible for LIPSS self-organization, was varied in the range 60-150 mJ cm-2 and always kept above FLIPSS. Regardless the specific fluence FLP of the delayed pulse, the interspace of the grating structures increases with the increase of FPP, that is an increase of the surface plasma density. This tendency suggests that a variation of the surface plasma density, due to a variation of FPP, actually leads to a modification of the grating features. Moreover, we observed that the LIPSS periodicities after double pulse exposures are in quite good agreement with data on LIPSS periodicities after single 160 fs pulse irradiations on Ti surface and with the curve predicted by the parametric decay model. This experimental result suggests that the preformed plasma might be produced in the rising edge of the temporal profile of the laser pulse.

  18. Light-mediated self-organization of sunflower stands increases oil yield in the field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López Pereira, Mónica; Sadras, Victor O; Batista, William; Casal, Jorge J; Hall, Antonio J

    2017-07-25

    Here, we show a unique crop response to intraspecific interference, whereby neighboring sunflower plants in a row avoid each other by growing toward a more favorable light environment and collectively increase production per unit land area. In high-density stands, a given plant inclined toward one side of the interrow space, and the immediate neighbors inclined in the opposite direction. This process started early as an incipient inclination of pioneer plants, and the arrangement propagated gradually as a "wave" of alternate inclination that persisted until maturity. Measurements and experimental manipulation of light spectral composition indicate that these responses are mediated by changes in the red/far-red ratio of the light, which is perceived by phytochrome. Cellular automata simulations reproduced the patterns of stem inclination in field experiments, supporting the proposition of self-organization of stand structure. Under high crop population densities (10 and 14 plants per m(2)), as yet unachievable in commercial farms with current hybrids due to lodging and diseases, self-organized crops yielded between 19 and 47% more oil than crops forced to remain erect.

  19. Self-organizing adaptive map: autonomous learning of curves and surfaces from point samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piastra, Marco

    2013-05-01

    Competitive Hebbian Learning (CHL) (Martinetz, 1993) is a simple and elegant method for estimating the topology of a manifold from point samples. The method has been adopted in a number of self-organizing networks described in the literature and has given rise to related studies in the fields of geometry and computational topology. Recent results from these fields have shown that a faithful reconstruction can be obtained using the CHL method only for curves and surfaces. Within these limitations, these findings constitute a basis for defining a CHL-based, growing self-organizing network that produces a faithful reconstruction of an input manifold. The SOAM (Self-Organizing Adaptive Map) algorithm adapts its local structure autonomously in such a way that it can match the features of the manifold being learned. The adaptation process is driven by the defects arising when the network structure is inadequate, which cause a growth in the density of units. Regions of the network undergo a phase transition and change their behavior whenever a simple, local condition of topological regularity is met. The phase transition is eventually completed across the entire structure and the adaptation process terminates. In specific conditions, the structure thus obtained is homeomorphic to the input manifold. During the adaptation process, the network also has the capability to focus on the acquisition of input point samples in critical regions, with a substantial increase in efficiency. The behavior of the network has been assessed experimentally with typical data sets for surface reconstruction, including suboptimal conditions, e.g. with undersampling and noise.

  20. A Design Approach for Controlled Self-Organization-Based Sensor Networks Focused on Control Timescale

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Many researches on network control with a design principle of self-organization have been studied for large-scale networks. Since self-organized control is based on local interactions between system elements, it has high scalability, adaptability, and robustness; however, the management of the whole system is very difficult. In order to solve this problem, a controlled self-organization scheme has been proposed, which aims for desired system behavior by controlling a part of self-organized no...

  1. IMPLEMENTING SELF-ORGANIZED LEARNING FOR THE CADETS OF GRADUATE MILITARY SCHOOLS (The subject Foreign Language Learning taken for instance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. PENNO

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper considered the issues of putting into practice a self-organized learning for the cadets in learning foreign languages at the graduate military school. The requirement to get knowledge with ease that the contemporary society sets and social awareness of the channels to get knowledge by specialists has urged consideration of the above issue, in particular, for the domain of aviation, with emphasis put on learning selves along with career‟ development. The paper specified the teacher‟s task for this case that is creating the favorable environment for the efficient self-organized learning, in particular, with application of multimedia training facilities (CAL = computerassisted learning ones into the training and upgrading procedures. The survey gave consideration to the Tmaker set of tests describing the ways the cadets at the Air Force Academy shall apply the test‟ assignments for the purpose of improving self-scheduled learning skills and testing selves. In addition, the paper specified several characteristics of arranging the self-scheduled learning at the Graduate Military School. To complete the author submitted the data to confirm shaping of an affirmative attitude in the cadets to self-organized learning while a recurrent use of the mentioned set of tests.

  2. Translator awareness Translator awareness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolfram Wilss

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available If we want to encompass adequately the wide-ranging field of human translation, it is necessary to include in translation studies (TS the concept of translator awareness (or translator consciousness, for that matter. However, this is more easily said than done, because this concept does not easily lend itself to definition, let alone to measurement, e. g., by investigating translator behaviour. To put it bluntly: Translator awareness is a fuzzy concept. Like many obviously difficult-to-define concepts, with which dialogue in TS is burdened, translator awareness lacks an articulated theory within which different forms of translator behaviour can be convincingly related to, or distinguished from, one another. Hence, TS has so far not tackled, at least not systematically, the issue of translator awareness. If we want to encompass adequately the wide-ranging field of human translation, it is necessary to include in translation studies (TS the concept of translator awareness (or translator consciousness, for that matter. However, this is more easily said than done, because this concept does not easily lend itself to definition, let alone to measurement, e. g., by investigating translator behaviour. To put it bluntly: Translator awareness is a fuzzy concept. Like many obviously difficult-to-define concepts, with which dialogue in TS is burdened, translator awareness lacks an articulated theory within which different forms of translator behaviour can be convincingly related to, or distinguished from, one another. Hence, TS has so far not tackled, at least not systematically, the issue of translator awareness.

  3. Self-Organized Link State Aware Routing for Multiple Mobile Agents in Wireless Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oda, Akihiro; Nishi, Hiroaki

    Recently, the importance of data sharing structures in autonomous distributed networks has been increasing. A wireless sensor network is used for managing distributed data. This type of distributed network requires effective information exchanging methods for data sharing. To reduce the traffic of broadcasted messages, reduction of the amount of redundant information is indispensable. In order to reduce packet loss in mobile ad-hoc networks, QoS-sensitive routing algorithm have been frequently discussed. The topology of a wireless network is likely to change frequently according to the movement of mobile nodes, radio disturbance, or fading due to the continuous changes in the environment. Therefore, a packet routing algorithm should guarantee QoS by using some quality indicators of the wireless network. In this paper, a novel information exchanging algorithm developed using a hash function and a Boolean operation is proposed. This algorithm achieves efficient information exchanges by reducing the overhead of broadcasting messages, and it can guarantee QoS in a wireless network environment. It can be applied to a routing algorithm in a mobile ad-hoc network. In the proposed routing algorithm, a routing table is constructed by using the received signal strength indicator (RSSI), and the neighborhood information is periodically broadcasted depending on this table. The proposed hash-based routing entry management by using an extended MAC address can eliminate the overhead of message flooding. An analysis of the collision of hash values contributes to the determination of the length of the hash values, which is minimally required. Based on the verification of a mathematical theory, an optimum hash function for determining the length of hash values can be given. Simulations are carried out to evaluate the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm and to validate the theory in a general wireless network routing algorithm.

  4. Growth and self-organization of SiGe nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aqua, J.-N., E-mail: aqua@insp.jussieu.fr [Institut des Nanosciences de Paris, Université Pierre et Marie Curie Paris 6 and CNRS UMR 7588, 4 place Jussieu, 75252 Paris (France); Berbezier, I., E-mail: isabelle.berbezier@im2np.fr [Institut Matériaux Microélectronique Nanoscience de Provence, Aix-Marseille Université, UMR CNRS 6242, 13997 Marseille (France); Favre, L. [Institut Matériaux Microélectronique Nanoscience de Provence, Aix-Marseille Université, UMR CNRS 6242, 13997 Marseille (France); Frisch, T. [Institut Non Linéaire de Nice, Université de Nice Sophia Antipolis, UMR CNRS 6618, 1361 routes des Lucioles, 06560 Valbonne (France); Ronda, A. [Institut Matériaux Microélectronique Nanoscience de Provence, Aix-Marseille Université, UMR CNRS 6242, 13997 Marseille (France)

    2013-01-01

    Many recent advances in microelectronics would not have been possible without the development of strain induced nanodevices and bandgap engineering, in particular concerning the common SiGe system. In this context, a huge amount of literature has been devoted to the growth and self-organization of strained nanostructures. However, even if an overall picture has been drawn out, the confrontation between theories and experiments is still, under various aspects, not fully satisfactory. The objective of this review is to present a state-of-the-art of theoretical concepts and experimental results on the spontaneous formation and self-organization of SiGe quantum dots on silicon substrates. The goal is to give a comprehensive overview of the main experimental results on the growth and long time evolution of these dots together with their morphological, structural and compositional properties. We also aim at describing the basis of the commonly used thermodynamic and kinetic models and their recent refinements. The review covers the thermodynamic theory for different levels of elastic strain, but focuses also on the growth dynamics of SiGe quantum dots in several experimental circumstances. The strain driven kinetically promoted instability, which is the main form of instability encountered in the epitaxy of SiGe nanostructures at low strain, is described. Recent developments on its continuum description based on a non-linear analysis particularly useful for studying self-organization and coarsening are described together with other theoretical frameworks. The kinetic evolution of the elastic relaxation, island morphology and film composition are also extensively addressed. Theoretical issues concerning the formation of ordered island arrays on a pre-patterned substrate, which is governed both by equilibrium ordering and kinetically-controlled ordering, are also reported in connection with the experimental results for the fabrication technology of ordered arrays of Si

  5. Self-Organization in Integrated Conservation and Development Initiatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiana Simão Seixas

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper uses a cooking metaphor to explore key elements (i.e., ingredients for a great meal that contribute to self-organization processes in the context of successful community-based conservation (CBC or integrated conservation and development projects (ICDP. We pose two major questions: (1 What are the key factors that drive peoples' and/or organizations' willingness to take responsibilities and to act? (2 What contributes to community self-organization? In other words, how conservation-development projects originate, evolve, survive or disappear? In order to address these questions we examine trigger events and catalytic elements in several cases among the Equator Prize finalists and short-listed nominees, from both the 2002 and 2004 awards. The Prize recognizes efforts in integrating biodiversity conservation and poverty reduction. We use secondary data in our analysis, including data from several technical reports and scientific papers written about the Equator Prize finalists and short-listed nominees. We observed common ingredients in most projects including: (1 involvement and commitment of key players (including communities, (2 funding, (3 strong leadership, (4 capacity building, (5 partnership with supportive organizations and government, and (6 economic incentives (including alternative livelihood options. We also observed that CBC and ICDP initiatives opportunistically evolve in a multi-level world, in which local communities establish linkages with people and organizations at different political levels, across different geographical scales and for different purposes. We conclude that there is no right 'recipe' to promote community self-organization but often a mix of some of these six ingredients need to come together for 'success' and that one or two ingredients are not sufficient to ensure success. Also the existence of these six ingredients does not guarantee a great meal - the 'chef's' creativity also is critical. That is

  6. Self-Organized Topological State with Majorana Fermions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vazifeh, M. M.; Franz, M.

    2013-11-01

    Most physical systems known to date tend to resist entering the topological phase and must be fine-tuned to reach that phase. Here, we introduce a system in which a key dynamical parameter adjusts itself in response to the changing external conditions so that the ground state naturally favors the topological phase. The system consists of a quantum wire formed of individual magnetic atoms placed on the surface of an ordinary s-wave superconductor. It realizes the Kitaev paradigm of topological superconductivity when the wave vector characterizing the emergent spin helix dynamically self-tunes to support the topological phase. We call this phenomenon a self-organized topological state.

  7. Scaling and Regeneration of Self-Organized Patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, Steffen; Stückemann, Tom; Beirán Amigo, Manuel; Rink, Jochen C.; Jülicher, Frank; Friedrich, Benjamin M.

    2015-04-01

    Biological patterns generated during development and regeneration often scale with organism size. Some organisms, e.g., flatworms, can regenerate a rescaled body plan from tissue fragments of varying sizes. Inspired by these examples, we introduce a generalization of Turing patterns that is self-organized and self-scaling. A feedback loop involving diffusing expander molecules regulates the reaction rates of a Turing system, thereby adjusting pattern length scales proportional to system size. Our model captures essential features of body plan regeneration in flatworms as observed in experiments.

  8. Self-organization in collective behaviour of active nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.Sh. Baranova

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The self-organization of the set of active nanoparticles was self-consistently described on the basis of Lorentz's three-parametrical system in frameworks of the phenomenological scheme. The continuous and discontinuous types of transition from a rotary movement mode to the forward were considered. The fluctuation’s influence on transition is investigated and diagrammed of possible modes of active nanoparticles group behavior are constructed. The kinetics of transition between rotary and forward movement types for different correlations between characteristic times of system’s key parameters was analyzed on the basis of phase portraits.

  9. Self-Organization in Coupled Map Scale-Free Networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIANG Xiao-Ming; L(U) Hua-ping; LIU Zong-Hua

    2008-01-01

    We study the self-organization of phase synchronization in coupled map scale-free networks with chaotic logistic map at each node and find that a variety of ordered spatiotemporal patterns emerge spontaneously in a regime of coupling strength.These ordered behaviours will change with the increase of the average links and are robust to both the system size and parameter mismatch.A heuristic theory is given to explain the mechanism of serf-organization and to figure out the regime of coupling for the ordered spatiotemporal patterns.

  10. Self-organized Criticality Model for Ocean Internal Waves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Gang; LIN Min; QIAO Fang-Li; HOU Yi-Jun

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we present a simple spring-block model for ocean internal waves based on the self-organized criticality (SOC). The oscillations of the water blocks in the model display power-law behavior with an exponent of-2 in the frequency domain, which is similar to the current and sea water temperature spectra in the actual ocean and the universal Garrett and Munk deep ocean internal wave model [Geophysical Fluid Dynamics 2 (1972) 225; J. Geophys. Res. 80 (1975) 291]. The influence of the ratio of the driving force to the spring coefficient to SOC behaviors in the model is also discussed.

  11. Self-organization, embodiment, and biologically inspired robotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeifer, Rolf; Lungarella, Max; Iida, Fumiya

    2007-11-16

    Robotics researchers increasingly agree that ideas from biology and self-organization can strongly benefit the design of autonomous robots. Biological organisms have evolved to perform and survive in a world characterized by rapid changes, high uncertainty, indefinite richness, and limited availability of information. Industrial robots, in contrast, operate in highly controlled environments with no or very little uncertainty. Although many challenges remain, concepts from biologically inspired (bio-inspired) robotics will eventually enable researchers to engineer machines for the real world that possess at least some of the desirable properties of biological organisms, such as adaptivity, robustness, versatility, and agility.

  12. Self organizing maps in urban heat stress projections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyoung

    2016-04-01

    A self organizing map (SOM) is an unsupervised machine learning algorithm well suited for identifying patterns in large datasets. It has been used successfully to classify atmospheric states in climate data and as part of statistical downscaling procedures. This study aims to use SOMs to produce downscaled CMIP5-based projections of wet-bulb temperature in urban areas, taking into account the regional atmospheric state and learned local dynamics. These downscaled projections will be compared to the CMIP5 models as well as to observations and then used to project local extreme heat stress events in the future.

  13. Self-organized synchronization in decentralized power grids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohden, Martin; Sorge, Andreas; Timme, Marc; Witthaut, Dirk

    2012-08-10

    Robust synchronization (phase locking) of power plants and consumers centrally underlies the stable operation of electric power grids. Despite current attempts to control large-scale networks, even their uncontrolled collective dynamics is not fully understood. Here we analyze conditions enabling self-organized synchronization in oscillator networks that serve as coarse-scale models for power grids, focusing on decentralizing power sources. Intriguingly, we find that whereas more decentralized grids become more sensitive to dynamical perturbations, they simultaneously become more robust to topological failures. Decentralizing power sources may thus facilitate the onset of synchronization in modern power grids.

  14. Adaptation to optimal cell growth through self-organized criticality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furusawa, Chikara; Kaneko, Kunihiko

    2012-05-18

    A simple cell model consisting of a catalytic reaction network is studied to show that cellular states are self-organized in a critical state for achieving optimal growth; we consider the catalytic network dynamics over a wide range of environmental conditions, through the spontaneous regulation of nutrient transport into the cell. Furthermore, we find that the adaptability of cellular growth to reach a critical state depends only on the extent of environmental changes, while all chemical species in the cell exhibit correlated partial adaptation. These results are in remarkable agreement with the recent experimental observations of the present cells.

  15. Clogging and self-organized criticality in complex networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianconi, Ginestra; Marsili, Matteo

    2004-09-01

    We propose a simple model that aims at describing, in a stylized manner, how local breakdowns due to imbalances or congestion propagate in real dynamical networks. The model converges to a self-organized critical stationary state in which the network shapes itself as a consequence of avalanches of rewiring processes. Depending on the model's specification, we obtain either single-scale or scale-free networks. We characterize in detail the relation between the statistical properties of the network and the nature of the critical state, by computing the critical exponents. The model also displays a nontrivial, sudden collapse to a complete network.

  16. Self-organization of charged particles in circular geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazmitdinov, R. G.; Puente, A.; Cerkaski, M.; Pons, M.

    2017-04-01

    The basic principles of self-organization of one-component charged particles, confined in disk and circular parabolic potentials, are proposed. A system of equations is derived, which allows us to determine equilibrium configurations for an arbitrary, but finite, number of charged particles that are distributed over several rings. Our approach reduces significantly the computational effort in minimizing the energy of equilibrium configurations and demonstrates a remarkable agreement with the values provided by molecular dynamics calculations. With the increase of particle number n >180 we find a steady formation of a centered hexagonal lattice that smoothly transforms to valence circular rings in the ground-state configurations for both potentials.

  17. Financial market model based on self-organized percolation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Chunxia; WANG Jie; ZHOU Tao; LIU Jun; XU Min; ZHOU Peiling; WANG Binghong

    2005-01-01

    Starting with the self-organized evolution of the trader group's structure, a parsimonious percolation model for stock market is established, which can be considered as a kind of betterment of the Cont-Bouchaud model. The return distribution of the present model obeys Lévy form in the center and displays fat-tail property, in accord with the stylized facts observed in real-life financial time series. Furthermore, this model reveals the power-law relationship between the peak value of the probability distribution and the time scales, in agreement with the empirical studies on the Hang Seng Index.

  18. Self-organizing migrating algorithm methodology and implementation

    CERN Document Server

    Zelinka, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    This book brings together the current state of-the-art research in Self Organizing Migrating Algorithm (SOMA) as a novel population-based evolutionary algorithm, modeled on the predator-prey relationship, by its leading practitioners. As the first ever book on SOMA, this book is geared towards graduate students, academics and researchers, who are looking for a good optimization algorithm for their applications. This book presents the methodology of SOMA, covering both the real and discrete domains, and its various implementations in different research areas. The easy-to-follow and implement methodology used in the book will make it easier for a reader to implement, modify and utilize SOMA. .

  19. Java Parallel Implementations of Kohonen Self-Organizing Feature Maps

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Shang-ming; HU Jie

    2004-01-01

    The Kohonen self-organizing map (SOM) is an important tool to find a mapping from high-dimensional space to low dimensional space. The time a SOM requires increases with the number of neurons. A parallel implementation of the algorithm can make it faster. This paper investigates the most recent parallel algorithms on SOMs. Using Java network programming utilities, improved parallel and distributed system are set up to simulate these algorithms. From the simulations, we conclude that those algorithms form good feature maps.

  20. Self-Organized Criticality and Mass Extinction in Evolutionary Algorithms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krink, Thiemo; Thomsen, Rene

    2001-01-01

    The gaps in the fossil record gave rise to the hypothesis that evolution proceeded in long periods of stasis, which alternated with occasional, rapid changes that yielded evolutionary progress. One mechanism that could cause these punctuated bursts is the re-colonbation of changing and deserted...... at a critical state between chaos and order, known as self-organized criticality (SOC). Based on this background, we used SOC to control the size of spatial extinction zones in a diffusion model. The SOC selection process was easy to implement and implied only negligible computational costs. Our results show...

  1. Self-organizing phenomena at membrane level and low-level laser therapy of rhinitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ailioaie, Laura; Ailioaie, C.; Topoliceanu, Fl.

    2000-06-01

    Allergic rhinitis is the most common allergic disease affecting many people worldwide. Low level laser therapy (LLLT) was applied as monotherapy to 32 children, under placebo controlled conditions. There have been used two GaAlAs diode lasers. The density of energy and the frequency 2 sessions daily - were applied under a special experimental protocol of treatment, including endonasal regions treated with an optical fiber and the extrameridian acupuncture points for rhinitis, 10 days monthly, three months consecutively. The initial investigations with fiberoptic rhinoscope revealed a swollen, pale and edematous mucosa, with increased nasal sections, which may be watery to mucoid. At the end of LLLT, the symptoms of rhinitis like sneezing, nasal congestion, stuffy nose, mouth breathing, snoring - have disappeared and the aspect of nasal mucosa was normal. The results could be explained in the new scenario of self-organizing phenomena at membrane level. The physiological beneficial effects may be correlated and possibly explained by self-organizing paradigms. Our result warrant that LLL is a very good therapy modality for children suffering from allergic rhinitis.

  2. A principle of fractal-stochastic dualism and Gompertzian dynamics of growth and self-organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waliszewski, Przemyslaw

    2005-10-01

    The emergence of Gompertzian dynamics at the macroscopic, tissue level during growth and self-organization is determined by the existence of fractal-stochastic dualism at the microscopic level of supramolecular, cellular system. On one hand, Gompertzian dynamics results from the complex coupling of at least two antagonistic, stochastic processes at the molecular cellular level. It is shown that the Gompertz function is a probability function, its derivative is a probability density function, and the Gompertzian distribution of probability is of non-Gaussian type. On the other hand, the Gompertz function is a contraction mapping and defines fractal dynamics in time-space; a prerequisite condition for the coupling of processes. Furthermore, the Gompertz function is a solution of the operator differential equation with the Morse-like anharmonic potential. This relationship indicates that distribution of intrasystemic forces is both non-linear and asymmetric. The anharmonic potential is a measure of the intrasystemic interactions. It attains a point of the minimum (U(0), t(0)) along with a change of both complexity and connectivity during growth and self-organization. It can also be modified by certain factors, such as retinoids.

  3. Periodic surface structures on titanium self-organized upon double femtosecond pulse exposures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gemini, Laura, E-mail: gemini@fzu.cz [Advanced Research Center for Beam Science, Institute for Chemical Research, Kyoto University Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Department of Physics, Graduate School of Science, Kyoto University, 606-8502 Kyoto (Japan); FNSPE, Czech Technical University in Prague, Brehova 7, 11519 Prague (Czech Republic); HiLASE Centre, Institute of Physics, ASCR, Za Radnicí 828, 25241 Dolní Břežany (Czech Republic); Hashida, Masaki; Miyasaka, Yasuhiro; Inoue, Shunsuke [Advanced Research Center for Beam Science, Institute for Chemical Research, Kyoto University Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Department of Physics, Graduate School of Science, Kyoto University, 606-8502 Kyoto (Japan); Limpouch, Jiri [FNSPE, Czech Technical University in Prague, Brehova 7, 11519 Prague (Czech Republic); Mocek, Tomas [HiLASE Centre, Institute of Physics, ASCR, Za Radnicí 828, 25241 Dolní Břežany (Czech Republic); Sakabe, Shuji [Advanced Research Center for Beam Science, Institute for Chemical Research, Kyoto University Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Department of Physics, Graduate School of Science, Kyoto University, 606-8502 Kyoto (Japan)

    2015-05-01

    Highlights: • LIPSS self-formed on Ti surface upon irradiations by 25 double pulses. • A surface plasma density variation leads to a variation of LIPSS features. • Data from double pulse irradiations well agree with the parametric decay model. • Results confirm the formation of surface plasma during the ultra-short interaction. • Results support once again the validity of the parametric decay model. - Abstract: Laser induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) self-organized on Ti surface after irradiations by femtosecond laser beam composed by double pulses with a fixed time delay of 160 fs. The fluence of the first pulse (F{sub PP}), responsible for surface plasma formation, was varied in the range 10–50 mJ cm{sup −2} and always kept below the LIPSS formation threshold fluence (F{sub LIPSS}) on Ti for 50-single-shots exposure. The fluence of the delayed pulse (F{sub LP}), responsible for LIPSS self-organization, was varied in the range 60–150 mJ cm{sup −2} and always kept above F{sub LIPSS}. Regardless the specific fluence F{sub LP} of the delayed pulse, the interspace of the grating structures increases with the increase of F{sub PP}, that is an increase of the surface plasma density. This tendency suggests that a variation of the surface plasma density, due to a variation of F{sub PP}, actually leads to a modification of the grating features. Moreover, we observed that the LIPSS periodicities after double pulse exposures are in quite good agreement with data on LIPSS periodicities after single 160 fs pulse irradiations on Ti surface and with the curve predicted by the parametric decay model. This experimental result suggests that the preformed plasma might be produced in the rising edge of the temporal profile of the laser pulse.

  4. The Self-Organized Archive: SPASE, PDS and Archive Cooperatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, T. A.; Hughes, J. S.; Roberts, D. A.; Walker, R. J.; Joy, S. P.

    2005-05-01

    Information systems with high quality metadata enable uses and services which often go beyond the original purpose. There are two types of metadata: annotations which are items that comment on or describe the content of a resource and identification attributes which describe the external properties of the resource itself. For example, annotations may indicate which columns are present in a table of data, whereas an identification attribute would indicate source of the table, such as the observatory, instrument, organization, and data type. When the identification attributes are collected and used as the basis of a search engine, a user can constrain on an attribute, the archive can then self-organize around the constraint, presenting the user with a particular view of the archive. In an archive cooperative where each participating data system or archive may have its own metadata standards, providing a multi-system search engine requires that individual archive metadata be mapped to a broad based standard. To explore how cooperative archives can form a larger self-organized archive we will show how the Space Physics Archive Search and Extract (SPASE) data model will allow different systems to create a cooperative and will use Planetary Data System (PDS) plus existing space physics activities as a demonstration.

  5. Correlated earthquakes in a self-organized model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Baiesi

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Motivated by the fact that empirical time series of earthquakes exhibit long-range correlations in space and time and the Gutenberg-Richter distribution of magnitudes, we propose a simple fault model that can account for these types of scale-invariance. It is an avalanching process that displays power-laws in the event sizes, in the epicenter distances as well as in the waiting-time distributions, and also aftershock rates obeying a generalized Omori law. We thus confirm that there is a relation between temporal and spatial clustering of the activity in this kind of models. The fluctuating boundaries of possible slipping areas show that the size of the largest possible earthquake is not always maximal, and the average correlation length is a fraction of the system size. This suggests that there is a concrete alternative to the extreme interpretation of self-organized criticality as a process in which every small event can cascade to an arbitrary large one: the new picture includes fluctuating domains of coherent stress field as part of the global self-organization. Moreover, this picture can be more easily compared with other scenarios discussing fluctuating correlations lengths in seismicity.

  6. The self-organization of capillary wave sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Protiere, Suzie [Laboratoire Matiere et Systemes Complexes, UMR 7057 CNRS, Universite Paris 7, ENS, 24 rue Lhomond, 75005 Paris (France); Couder, Yves [Laboratoire Matiere et Systemes Complexes, UMR 7057 CNRS, Universite Paris 7, ENS, 24 rue Lhomond, 75005 Paris (France); Fort, Emmanuel [Laboratoire Materiaux et Phenomenes Quantiques, UMR 7162 CNRS, Universite Paris 7, 2 place Jussieu, 75252 Paris Cedex 05 (France); Boudaoud, Arezki [Laboratoire de Physique Statistique, 24 rue Lhomond, 75231 Paris Cedex 05 (France)

    2005-11-16

    A liquid drop can be kept bouncing at the surface of a bath of the same liquid for any length of time if the bath is kept oscillating vertically. Several regimes can be observed. For a liquid of moderate viscosity, the bouncing of the drop generates damped capillary waves with a wavelength corresponding to the forcing frequency. Therefore when several identical drops are placed on the oscillating surface, the interaction of their waves leads to the self-organization of the drops with a 2D triangular lattice. Another remarkable regime is observed when the forcing amplitude is increased close to the Faraday instability threshold: the drop starts moving in the horizontal plane at a constant velocity. We have studied the movement of one 'walking drop' as well as the possible interactions of several of these particular drops placed on the surface of the liquid, leading to their complex self-organization. These drops can collide via their waves and in certain situations attract each other and start orbiting.

  7. Self-organizing map classifier for stressed speech recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partila, Pavol; Tovarek, Jaromir; Voznak, Miroslav

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents a method for detecting speech under stress using Self-Organizing Maps. Most people who are exposed to stressful situations can not adequately respond to stimuli. Army, police, and fire department occupy the largest part of the environment that are typical of an increased number of stressful situations. The role of men in action is controlled by the control center. Control commands should be adapted to the psychological state of a man in action. It is known that the psychological changes of the human body are also reflected physiologically, which consequently means the stress effected speech. Therefore, it is clear that the speech stress recognizing system is required in the security forces. One of the possible classifiers, which are popular for its flexibility, is a self-organizing map. It is one type of the artificial neural networks. Flexibility means independence classifier on the character of the input data. This feature is suitable for speech processing. Human Stress can be seen as a kind of emotional state. Mel-frequency cepstral coefficients, LPC coefficients, and prosody features were selected for input data. These coefficients were selected for their sensitivity to emotional changes. The calculation of the parameters was performed on speech recordings, which can be divided into two classes, namely the stress state recordings and normal state recordings. The benefit of the experiment is a method using SOM classifier for stress speech detection. Results showed the advantage of this method, which is input data flexibility.

  8. Attitudes and the Self as Self-Organizing Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eiser, J. Richard

    This paper considers how conventional theories of attitudes and the self may be reconceptualized from the perspective of chaos theory and work on self-organization. Within attitude theory, there has been a long tradition of research that has treated attitudes as single points on a bipolar evaluative continuum. More recent approaches to attitudes treat attitudes as structures of evaluative associations stored in memory (Fazio, 1990). This work can be linked to chaos theory by regarding attitudes as attractors (Eiser, 1994) within a phase space whose dimensions correspond broadly to features of the attitude object and its context and which is contoured by previous and concurrent associative learning Specifically, it is proposed that attractors are laid down through processes of association. such as may be simulated through connectionist, or parallel distributed processing, systems. Associative learning and memory processes also are implicated in our concept of self, linking with the philosophy of Hume and contemporary research on interactive models of personality (Mischel & Shoda, 1995). Speculatively, it is suggested that consciousness involves representation of the self within a patterned (i.e. self-organized) environment.

  9. SELF-ORGANIZATION OF LEAD SULFIDE QUANTUM DOTS INTO SUPERSTRUCTURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena V. Ushakova

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The method of X-ray structural analysis (X-ray scattering at small angles is used to show that the structures obtained by self-organization on a substrate of lead sulfide (PbS quantum dots are ordered arrays. Self-organization of quantum dots occurs at slow evaporation of solvent from a cuvette. The cuvette is a thin layer of mica with teflon ring on it. The positions of peaks in SAXS pattern are used to calculate crystal lattice of obtained ordered structures. Such structures have a primitive orthorhombic crystal lattice. Calculated lattice parameters are: a = 21,1 (nm; b = 36,2 (nm; c = 62,5 (nm. Dimensions of structures are tens of micrometers. The spectral properties of PbS QDs superstructures and kinetic parameters of their luminescence are investigated. Absorption band of superstructures is broadened as compared to the absorption band of the quantum dots in solution; the luminescence band is slightly shifted to the red region of the spectrum, while its bandwidth is not changed much. Luminescence lifetime of obtained structures has been significantly decreased in comparison with the isolated quantum dots in solution, but remained the same for the lead sulfide quantum dots close-packed ensembles. Such superstructures can be used to produce solar cells with improved characteristics.

  10. SELF-ORGANIZED SEMANTIC FEATURE EVOLUTION FOR AXIOMATIC DESIGN

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAO He; FENG Yixiong; TAN Jianrong; XUE Yang

    2008-01-01

    Aiming at the problem existing in the computer aided design process that how to express the design intents with high-level engineering terminologies, a mechanical product self-organized semantic feature evolution technology for axiomatic design is proposed, so that the constraint relations between mechanical parts could be expressed in a semantic form which is more suitable for designers. By describing the evolution rules for semantic constraint information, the abstract expression of design semantics in mechanical product evolution process is realized and the constraint relations between parts are mapped to the geometric level from the semantic level; With semantic feature relation graph, the abstract semantic description, the semantic relative structure and the semantic constraint information are linked together; And the methods of semantic feature self-organized evolution are classified. Finally, combining a design example of domestic high-speed elevator, how to apply the theory to practical product development is illustrated and this method and its validity is described and verified. According to the study results, the designers are able to represent the design intents at an advanced semantic level in a more intuitional and natural way and the automation, recursion and visualization for mechanical product axiomatic design are also realized.

  11. Cellular self-organization on micro-structured surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Röttgermann, Peter J F; Alberola, Alicia Piera; Rädler, Joachim O

    2014-04-14

    Micro-patterned surfaces are frequently used in high-throughput single-cell studies, as they allow one to image isolated cells in defined geometries. Commonly, cells are seeded in excess onto the entire chip, and non-adherent cells are removed from the unpatterned sectors by rinsing. Here, we report on the phenomenon of cellular self-organization, which allows for autonomous positioning of cells on micro-patterned surfaces over time. We prepared substrates with a regular lattice of protein-coated adhesion sites surrounded by PLL-g-PEG passivated areas, and studied the time course of cell ordering. After seeding, cells randomly migrate over the passivated surface until they find and permanently attach to adhesion sites. Efficient cellular self-organization was observed for three commonly used cell lines (HuH7, A549, and MDA-MB-436), with occupancy levels typically reaching 40-60% after 3-5 h. The time required for sorting was found to increase with increasing distance between adhesion sites, and is well described by the time-to-capture in a random-search model. Our approach thus paves the way for automated filling of cell arrays, enabling high-throughput single-cell analysis of cell samples without losses.

  12. Self-organization of network dynamics into local quantized states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolaides, Christos; Juanes, Ruben; Cueto-Felgueroso, Luis

    2016-02-17

    Self-organization and pattern formation in network-organized systems emerges from the collective activation and interaction of many interconnected units. A striking feature of these non-equilibrium structures is that they are often localized and robust: only a small subset of the nodes, or cell assembly, is activated. Understanding the role of cell assemblies as basic functional units in neural networks and socio-technical systems emerges as a fundamental challenge in network theory. A key open question is how these elementary building blocks emerge, and how they operate, linking structure and function in complex networks. Here we show that a network analogue of the Swift-Hohenberg continuum model-a minimal-ingredients model of nodal activation and interaction within a complex network-is able to produce a complex suite of localized patterns. Hence, the spontaneous formation of robust operational cell assemblies in complex networks can be explained as the result of self-organization, even in the absence of synaptic reinforcements.

  13. Stochastic models for plant microtubule self-organization and structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eren, Ezgi C; Dixit, Ram; Gautam, Natarajan

    2015-12-01

    One of the key enablers of shape and growth in plant cells is the cortical microtubule (CMT) system, which is a polymer array that forms an appropriately-structured scaffolding in each cell. Plant biologists have shown that stochastic dynamics and simple rules of interactions between CMTs can lead to a coaligned CMT array structure. However, the mechanisms and conditions that cause CMT arrays to become organized are not well understood. It is prohibitively time-consuming to use actual plants to study the effect of various genetic mutations and environmental conditions on CMT self-organization. In fact, even computer simulations with multiple replications are not fast enough due to the spatio-temporal complexity of the system. To redress this shortcoming, we develop analytical models and methods for expeditiously computing CMT system metrics that are related to self-organization and array structure. In particular, we formulate a mean-field model to derive sufficient conditions for the organization to occur. We show that growth-prone dynamics itself is sufficient to lead to organization in presence of interactions in the system. In addition, for such systems, we develop predictive methods for estimation of system metrics such as expected average length and number of CMTs over time, using a stochastic fluid-flow model, transient analysis, and approximation algorithms tailored to our problem. We illustrate the effectiveness of our approach through numerical test instances and discuss biological insights.

  14. Taming Self-Organization Dynamics to Dramatically Control Porous Architectures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, Ronan; Sader, John E; Boland, John J

    2016-03-22

    We demonstrate templating of functional materials with unexpected and intricate micro- and nanostructures by controlling the condensation, packing, and evaporation of water droplets on a polymer solution. Spontaneous evaporation of a polymer solution induces cooling of the liquid surface and water microdroplet condensation from the ambient vapor. These droplets pack together and act as a template to imprint an entangled polymer film. This breath figure (BF) phenomenon is an example of self-organization that involves the long-range ordering of droplets. Equilibrium-based analysis provides many insights into contact angles and drop stability of individual drops, but the BF phenomenon remains poorly understood thus far, preventing translation to real applications. Here we investigate the dynamics of this phenomenon to separate out the competing influences and then introduce a modulation scheme to ultimately manipulate the water vapor-liquid equilibrium independently from the solvent evaporation. This approach to BF control provides insights into the mechanism, a rationale for microstructure design, and evidence for the benefits of dynamical control of self-organization systems. We finally present dramatically different porous architectures from this approach reminiscent of microscale Petri dishes, conical flasks, and test tubes.

  15. Triggering signaling pathways using F-actin self-organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colin, A; Bonnemay, L; Gayrard, C; Gautier, J; Gueroui, Z

    2016-10-04

    The spatiotemporal organization of proteins within cells is essential for cell fate behavior. Although it is known that the cytoskeleton is vital for numerous cellular functions, it remains unclear how cytoskeletal activity can shape and control signaling pathways in space and time throughout the cell cytoplasm. Here we show that F-actin self-organization can trigger signaling pathways by engineering two novel properties of the microfilament self-organization: (1) the confinement of signaling proteins and (2) their scaffolding along actin polymers. Using in vitro reconstitutions of cellular functions, we found that both the confinement of nanoparticle-based signaling platforms powered by F-actin contractility and the scaffolding of engineered signaling proteins along actin microfilaments can drive a signaling switch. Using Ran-dependent microtubule nucleation, we found that F-actin dynamics promotes the robust assembly of microtubules. Our in vitro assay is a first step towards the development of novel bottom-up strategies to decipher the interplay between cytoskeleton spatial organization and signaling pathway activity.

  16. Self-organization of network dynamics into local quantized states

    CERN Document Server

    Nicolaides, Christos; Cueto-Felgueroso, Luis

    2015-01-01

    Self-organization and pattern formation in network-organized systems emerges from the collective activation and interaction of many interconnected units. A striking feature of these non-equilibrium structures is that they are often localized and robust: only a small subset of the nodes, or cell assembly, is activated. Understanding the role of cell assemblies as basic functional units in neural networks and socio-technical systems emerges as a fundamental challenge in network theory. A key open question is how these elementary building blocks emerge, and how they operate, linking structure and function in complex networks. Here we show that a network analogue of the Swift-Hohenberg continuum model---a minimal-ingredients model of nodal activation and interaction within a complex network---is able to produce a complex suite of localized patterns. Hence, the spontaneous formation of robust operational cell assemblies in complex networks can be explained as the result of self-organization, even in the absence of...

  17. Self-organization of network dynamics into local quantized states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolaides, Christos; Juanes, Ruben; Cueto-Felgueroso, Luis

    2016-02-01

    Self-organization and pattern formation in network-organized systems emerges from the collective activation and interaction of many interconnected units. A striking feature of these non-equilibrium structures is that they are often localized and robust: only a small subset of the nodes, or cell assembly, is activated. Understanding the role of cell assemblies as basic functional units in neural networks and socio-technical systems emerges as a fundamental challenge in network theory. A key open question is how these elementary building blocks emerge, and how they operate, linking structure and function in complex networks. Here we show that a network analogue of the Swift-Hohenberg continuum model—a minimal-ingredients model of nodal activation and interaction within a complex network—is able to produce a complex suite of localized patterns. Hence, the spontaneous formation of robust operational cell assemblies in complex networks can be explained as the result of self-organization, even in the absence of synaptic reinforcements.

  18. Simulation study of one-dimensional self-organized pattern in an atmospheric-pressure dielectric barrier discharge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Jiao; Wang, Yanhui, E-mail: wangyh@dlut.edu.cn; Wang, Dezhen, E-mail: wangdez@dlut.edu.cn [School of Physics and Optoelectronic Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China)

    2015-04-15

    A two-dimensional fluid model is developed to simulate the one-dimensional self-organized patterns in an atmospheric-pressure dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) driven by sinusoidal voltage in argon. Under certain conditions, by changing applied voltage amplitude, the transversely uniform discharge can evolve into the patterned discharge and the varied self-organized patterned discharges with different numbers and arrangements of discharge channels can be observed. Similar to the uniform atmospheric-pressure DBD, the patterned discharge mode is found to undergo a transition from Townsend regime, sub-glow regime to glow regime with increasing applied voltage amplitude. In the different regimes, charged particles and electric field display different dynamical behaviors. If the voltage amplitude is increased over a certain value, the discharge enters an asymmetric patterned discharge mode, and then transforms into the spatially chaotic state with out-of-order discharge channels. The reason for forming the one-dimensional self-organized pattern is mainly due to the so-called activation-inhibition effect resulting from the local high electron density region appearing in discharge space. Electrode arrangement is the reason that induces local high electron density.

  19. Advancing interconnect density for spiking neural network hardware implementations using traffic-aware adaptive network-on-chip routers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrillo, Snaider; Harkin, Jim; McDaid, Liam; Pande, Sandeep; Cawley, Seamus; McGinley, Brian; Morgan, Fearghal

    2012-09-01

    The brain is highly efficient in how it processes information and tolerates faults. Arguably, the basic processing units are neurons and synapses that are interconnected in a complex pattern. Computer scientists and engineers aim to harness this efficiency and build artificial neural systems that can emulate the key information processing principles of the brain. However, existing approaches cannot provide the dense interconnect for the billions of neurons and synapses that are required. Recently a reconfigurable and biologically inspired paradigm based on network-on-chip (NoC) and spiking neural networks (SNNs) has been proposed as a new method of realising an efficient, robust computing platform. However, the use of the NoC as an interconnection fabric for large-scale SNNs demands a good trade-off between scalability, throughput, neuron/synapse ratio and power consumption. This paper presents a novel traffic-aware, adaptive NoC router, which forms part of a proposed embedded mixed-signal SNN architecture called EMBRACE (EMulating Biologically-inspiRed ArChitectures in hardwarE). The proposed adaptive NoC router provides the inter-neuron connectivity for EMBRACE, maintaining router communication and avoiding dropped router packets by adapting to router traffic congestion. Results are presented on throughput, power and area performance analysis of the adaptive router using a 90 nm CMOS technology which outperforms existing NoCs in this domain. The adaptive behaviour of the router is also verified on a Stratix II FPGA implementation of a 4 × 2 router array with real-time traffic congestion. The presented results demonstrate the feasibility of using the proposed adaptive NoC router within the EMBRACE architecture to realise large-scale SNNs on embedded hardware.

  20. Generalized radial basis function networks for classification and novelty detection: self-organization of optimal Bayesian decision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albrecht, S; Busch, J; Kloppenburg, M; Metze, F; Tavan, P

    2000-12-01

    By adding reverse connections from the output layer to the central layer it is shown how a generalized radial basis functions (GRBF) network can self-organize to form a Bayesian classifier, which is also capable of novelty detection. For this purpose, three stochastic sequential learning rules are introduced from biological considerations which pertain to the centers, the shapes, and the widths of the receptive fields of the neurons and allow ajoint optimization of all network parameters. The rules are shown to generate maximum-likelihood estimates of the class-conditional probability density functions of labeled data in terms of multivariate normal mixtures. Upon combination with a hierarchy of deterministic annealing procedures, which implement a multiple-scale approach, the learning process can avoid the convergence problems hampering conventional expectation-maximization algorithms. Using an example from the field of speech recognition, the stages of the learning process and the capabilities of the self-organizing GRBF classifier are illustrated.

  1. COMPLEX SYSTEM SELF-ORGANIZATION AND BOUNDARY OF ITS PERCEPTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DUBROV Ju. I.

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Stipulations. The term “complex system” (CS is rather frequently utilized, therefore, we will take an effort to give a detailed explanation of what is understood by this term. In order to do that, we will not cite a variety of interpretations existing for this term, instead, we are intended to give a notion to this term that would provide for a more visual interpretation. Basic problem statement. Using the abovementioned Stipulation and Hypotheses it is necessary to determine a quality criterion of a self-organizing system functioning as well as to give its formal description. Certain SC subclasses. In order to detect qualitative peculiarities of the considered model the following numerical investigations were conducted. In a new equilibrium state we obtain an absolutely new evolvable system that again, with the change of a load parameter, initiates the process of its development similar. Facts confirming presence of information perception boundary (IPB with self-organizing systems. Given analysis shows that any system, capable of perceiving information, possesses its own IPB. This fact comes well enough to an agreement with data that prove the possibilities of self-organization on the basis of the existing principles of physics and biology. According to the abovementioned it can be concluded that the task of a qualitative survey of evolvable system may lie in determination of its IPB, depending on determining parameters, such as quantity and quality of information coming into the system as well as speed rate of its organization. Such survey is aimed at the description of all possible bifurcations, plotting of a range of bifurcation set at a range with various type of phase portraits and to indicate a phase portrait corresponding to every range with IPB domain. Using the words of great I.P. Pavlov “all types of life, from the simplest to the most complex organisms, including human, is a long line of ever complicating to the highest degree

  2. Is there a self-organization principle of river deltas?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tejedor, Alejandro; Longjas, Anthony; Foufoula-Georgiou, Efi

    2017-04-01

    River deltas are known to possess a complex topological and flux-partitioning structure which has recently been quantified using spectral graph theory [Tejedor et al., 2015a,b]. By analysis of real and simulated deltas it has also been shown that there is promise in formalizing relationships between this topo-dynamic delta structure and the underlying delta forming processes [e.g., Tejedor et al., 2016]. The question we pose here is whether there exists a first order organizational principle behind the self-organization of river deltas and whether this principle can be unraveled from the co-evolving topo-dynamic structure encoded in the delta planform. To answer this question, we introduce a new metric, the nonlocal Entropy Rate (nER) that captures the information content of a delta network in terms of the degree of uncertainty in delivering fluxes from any point of the network to the shoreline. We hypothesize that if the "guiding principle" of undisturbed deltas is to efficiently and robustly build land by increasing the diversity of their flux pathways over the delta plane, then they would exhibit maximum nonlocal Entropy Rate at states at which geometry and flux dynamics are at equilibrium. At the same time, their nER would be non-optimal at transient states, such as before and after major avulsions during which topology and dynamics adjust to each other to reach a new equilibrium state. We will present our results for field and simulated deltas, which confirm this hypothesis and open up new ways of thinking about self-organization, complexity and robustness in river deltas. One particular connection of interest might have important implications since entropy rate and resilience are related by the fluctuation theorem [Demetrius and Manke, 2005], and therefore our results suggest that deltas might in fact self-organize to maximize their resilience to structural and dynamic perturbations. References: Tejedor, A., A. Longjas, I. Zaliapin, and E. Foufoula

  3. SOMz: photometric redshift PDFs with self organizing maps and random atlas

    CERN Document Server

    Kind, M Carrasco

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we explore the applicability of the unsupervised machine learning technique of Self Organizing Maps (SOM) to estimate galaxy photometric redshift probability density functions (PDFs). This technique takes a spectroscopic training set, and maps the photometric attributes, but not the redshifts, to a two dimensional surface by using a process of competitive learning where neurons compete to more closely resemble the training data multidimensional space. The key feature of a SOM is that it retains the topology of the input set, revealing correlations between the attributes that are not easily identified. We test three different 2D topological mapping: rectangular, hexagonal, and spherical, by using data from the DEEP2 survey. We also explore different implementations and boundary conditions on the map and also introduce the idea of a random atlas where a large number of different maps are created and their individual predictions are aggregated to produce a more robust photometric redshift PDF. We a...

  4. Self-organized phenomena of pedestrian counter flow in a channel under periodic boundary conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Xiang; Duan Xiao-Yin; Dong Li-Yun

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we investigate self-organized phenomena such as lane formation generated by pedestrian counter flow in a channel.The lattice gas model is extended to take the effect of walkers in the opposite direction into account simultaneously when they are in the view field of a walker,i.e.,walkers tend to follow the leaders in the same direction and avoid conflicts with those walking towards them.The improved model is then used to mimic pedestrian counter flow in a channel under periodic boundary conditions.Numerical simulations show that lane formation is well reproduced,and this process is rather rapid which coincides with real pedestrian traffic.The average velocity and critical density are found to increase to some degree with the consideration of view field.

  5. Self-organized dots of GaN:Mn grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuroda, S.; Marcet, S. [CEA-CNRS Group ' ' Nanophysique et Semiconducteurs' ' , Laboratoire de Spectrometrie Physique, Universite Joseph Fourier, Grenoble I and CEA/DRFMC/SP2M, 17 avenue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble, Cedex 9 (France); Institute of Materials Science, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8573 (Japan); Halley, D.; Ferrand, D.; Mariette, H. [CEA-CNRS Group ' ' Nanophysique et Semiconducteurs' ' , Laboratoire de Spectrometrie Physique, Universite Joseph Fourier, Grenoble I and CEA/DRFMC/SP2M, 17 avenue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble, Cedex 9 (France); Cibert, J. [Laboratoire Louis Neel, CNRS, BP 166, 38042 Grenoble (France); Yamamoto, S.; Sakai, T.; Ohshima, T.; Itoh, H. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 1233 Watanuki, Takasaki, Gumma 370-1292 (Japan)

    2006-07-01

    Self-organized dots of Mn-doped GaN were grown on AlN by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. The growth was performed in the nitrogen-rich growth regime with the addition of small amount of Mn flux. The in-situ surface observation using reflection high energy electron diffraction (RHEED) and the ex-situ examination using atomic force microscope (AFM) revealed that the dot formation was observed only in the case where the amount of Mn flux was small. The estimate of Mn composition using particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE) experiment showed that the Mn composition in the dots layer was much higher than in thick (Ga,Mn)N layers grown with the same amount of Mn flux. The maximum Mn composition for the high-density dot formation was about x=0.01. (copyright 2006 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  6. Fabrication of self-organized dots of GaN:Mn using plasma-assisted MBE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroda, S.; Marcet, S.; Bellet-Amalric, E.; Halley, D.; Ferrand, D.; Cibert, J.; Mariette, H.

    2005-02-01

    The growth of self-organized dots of Mn-doped GaN on AlN by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy was studied. The observations of reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED) revealed that the transition of the growth mode from 2D to 3D was delayed by adding a small amount of Mn flux and it disappeared with the further increase in Mn flux. By atomic force microscope (AFM) measurement on a surface with uncapped dots, it was found that the 2D-3D transition occurs with the formation of high dots density only when a tiny amount of Mn flux was added. A possible mechanism for the suppression of the dot formation by additional Mn atoms is discussed.

  7. Self-Organizing Maps-based ocean currents forecasting system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilibić, Ivica; Šepić, Jadranka; Mihanović, Hrvoje; Kalinić, Hrvoje; Cosoli, Simone; Janeković, Ivica; Žagar, Nedjeljka; Jesenko, Blaž; Tudor, Martina; Dadić, Vlado; Ivanković, Damir

    2016-03-01

    An ocean surface currents forecasting system, based on a Self-Organizing Maps (SOM) neural network algorithm, high-frequency (HF) ocean radar measurements and numerical weather prediction (NWP) products, has been developed for a coastal area of the northern Adriatic and compared with operational ROMS-derived surface currents. The two systems differ significantly in architecture and algorithms, being based on either unsupervised learning techniques or ocean physics. To compare performance of the two methods, their forecasting skills were tested on independent datasets. The SOM-based forecasting system has a slightly better forecasting skill, especially during strong wind conditions, with potential for further improvement when data sets of higher quality and longer duration are used for training.

  8. Pathways to self-organization: crystallization via nucleation and growth

    CERN Document Server

    Jungblut, Swetlana

    2016-01-01

    Crystallization, a prototypical self-organization process during which a disordered state spontaneously transforms into a crystal characterized by a regular arrangement of its building blocks, usually proceeds by nucleation and growth. In the initial stages of the transformation, a localized nucleus of the new phase forms in the old one due to a random fluctuation. Most of these nuclei disappear after a short time, but rarely a crystalline embryo may reach a critical size after which further growth becomes thermodynamically favorable and the entire system is converted into the new phase. In these lecture notes, we will discuss several theoretical concepts and computational methods to study crystallization. More specifically, we will address the rare event problem arising in the simulation of nucleation processes and explain how to calculate nucleation rates accurately. Particular attention is directed towards discussing statistical tools to analyze crystallization trajectories and identify the transition mech...

  9. Self-organized instability in graded-index multimode fibre

    CERN Document Server

    Wright, Logan G; Nolan, Daniel A; Li, Ming-Jun; Christodoulides, Demetrios N; Wise, Frank W

    2016-01-01

    Multimode fibres (MMFs) are attracting interest for complex spatiotemporal dynamics, and for ultrafast fibre sources, imaging and telecommunications. This new interest is based on three key properties: their high spatiotemporal complexity (information capacity), the important role of disorder, and complex intermodal interactions. To date, phenomena in MMFs have been studied only in limiting cases where one or more of these properties can be neglected. Here we study MMFs in a regime in which all these elements are integral. We observe a spatial beam-cleaning process preceding spatiotemporal modulation instability. We show that the origin of these processes is a universal unstable attractor in graded-index MMFs. Both the self-organization of the attractor, as well as its instability, are caused by intermodal interactions characterized by cooperating disorder, nonlinearity and dissipation. The demonstration of a disorder-enhanced nonlinear process in MMF has important implications for telecommunications, and the...

  10. Characterization of Suicidal Behaviour with Self-Organizing Maps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José M. Leiva-Murillo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The study of the variables involved in suicidal behavior is important from a social, medical, and economical point of view. Given the high number of potential variables of interest, a large population of subjects must be analysed in order to get conclusive results. In this paper, we describe a method based on self-organizing maps (SOMs for finding the most relevant variables even when their relation to suicidal behavior is strongly nonlinear. We have applied the method to a cohort with more than 8,000 subjects and 600 variables and discovered four groups of variables involved in suicidal behavior. According to the results, there are four main groups of risk factors that characterize the population of suicide attempters: mental disorders, alcoholism, impulsivity, and childhood abuse. The identification of specific subpopulations of suicide attempters is consistent with current medical knowledge and may provide a new avenue of research to improve the management of suicidal cases.

  11. Modeling financial markets by self-organized criticality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biondo, Alessio Emanuele; Pluchino, Alessandro; Rapisarda, Andrea

    2015-10-01

    We present a financial market model, characterized by self-organized criticality, that is able to generate endogenously a realistic price dynamics and to reproduce well-known stylized facts. We consider a community of heterogeneous traders, composed by chartists and fundamentalists, and focus on the role of informative pressure on market participants, showing how the spreading of information, based on a realistic imitative behavior, drives contagion and causes market fragility. In this model imitation is not intended as a change in the agent's group of origin, but is referred only to the price formation process. We introduce in the community also a variable number of random traders in order to study their possible beneficial role in stabilizing the market, as found in other studies. Finally, we also suggest some counterintuitive policy strategies able to dampen fluctuations by means of a partial reduction of information.

  12. Self-Organized Criticality in Solar Physics and Astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Aschwanden, Markus J

    2010-01-01

    The concept of "self-organized criticality" (SOC) has been introduced by Bak, Tang, and Wiesenfeld (1987) to describe the statistics of avalanches on the surface of a sandpile with a critical slope, which produces a scale-free powerlaw size distribution of avalanches. In the meantime, SOC behavior has been identified in many nonlinear dissipative systems that are driven to a critical state. On a most general level, SOC is the statistics of coherent nonlinear processes, in contrast to the Poisson statistics of incoherent random processes. The SOC concept has been applied to laboratory experiments (of rice or sand piles), to human activities (population growth, language, economy, traffic jams, wars), to biophysics, geophysics (earthquakes, landslides, forest fires), magnetospheric physics, solar physics (flares), stellar physics (flares, cataclysmic variables, accretion disks, black holes, pulsar glitches, gamma ray bursts), and to galactic physics and cosmology.

  13. A self-organized critical model for evolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flyvbjerg, H.; Bak, P.; Jensen, M.H.; Sneppen, K.

    1996-01-01

    A simple mathematical model of biological macroevolution is presented. It describes an ecology of adapting, interacting species. Species evolve to maximize their individual fitness in their environment. The environment of any given species is affected by other evolving species; hence it is not constant in time. The ecology evolves to a ``self-organized critical`` state where periods of stasis alternate with avalanches of causally connected evolutionary changes. This characteristic intermittent behaviour of natural history, known as ``punctuated equilibrium,`` thus finds a theoretical explanation as a selforganized critical phenomenon. In particular, large bursts of apparently simultaneous evolutionary activity require no external cause. They occur as the less frequent result of the very same dynamics that governs the more frequent small-scale evolutionary activity. Our results are compared with data from the fossil record collected by J. Sepkoski, Jr., and others.

  14. Self-Organized Criticality and Mass Extinction in Evolutionary Algorithms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krink, Thiemo; Thomsen, Rene

    2001-01-01

    niches after mass extinction events. Furthermore, paleontological studies have shown that there is a power law relationship between the frequency of species extinction events and the sue of the extinction impact. Power law relationships of this kind are typical for complex systems, which operate...... at a critical state between chaos and order, known as self-organized criticality (SOC). Based on this background, we used SOC to control the size of spatial extinction zones in a diffusion model. The SOC selection process was easy to implement and implied only negligible computational costs. Our results show...... that the SOC spatial extinction model clearly outperforms simple evolutionary algorithms (EAs) and the difffision model (CGA). Further, our results support the biological hypothesis that mass extinctions might play an important role in evolution. However, the success of simple EAs indicates that evolution...

  15. Self-organized criticality, evolution and the fossil extinction record

    CERN Document Server

    Newman, M E J

    1996-01-01

    Statistical analysis indicates that the fossil extinction record is compatible with a distribution of extinction events whose frequency is related to their size by a power law with an exponent close to two. This result is in agreement with predictions based on self-organized critical models of extinction, and might well be taken as evidence of critical behaviour in terrestrial evolution. We argue however that there is a much simpler explanation for the appearance of a power law in terms of extinctions caused by stresses (either biotic or abiotic) to which species are subjected by their environment. We give an explicit model of this process and discuss its properties and implications for the interpretation of the fossil record.

  16. Weighted Evolving Networks with Self-organized Communities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE Zhou; LI Xiang; WANG Xiao-Fan

    2008-01-01

    In order to describe the self-organization of communities in the evolution of weighted networks,we propose a new evolving model for weighted community-structured networks with the preferential mechanisms functioned in different levels according to community sizes and node strengths,respectively.Theoretical analyses and numerical simulations show that our model captures power-law distributions of community sizes,node strengths,and link weights,with tunable exponents of v≥ 1,γ> 2,and a > 2,respectively,sharing large clustering coefficients and scaling clustering spectra,and covering the range from disassortative networks to assortative networks.Finally,we apply our new model to the scientific co-authorship networks with both their weighted and unweighted data.sets to verify its effectiveness.

  17. Self-organized criticality and 1/f noise in traffic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paczuski, M. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Nagel, K. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Phantom traffic jams may emerge ``out of nowhere`` from small fluctuations rather than being triggered by large, exceptional events. We show how phantom jams arise in a model of single lane highway traffic, which mimics human driving behavior. Surprisingly, the optimal state of highest efficiency, with the largest throughput, is a critical state with traffic jams of all sizes. We demonstrate that open systems self-organize to the most efficient state. In the model we study, this critical state is a percolation transition for the phantom traffic jams. At criticality, the individual jams have a complicated fractal structure where cars follow an intermittent stop and go pattern. We analytically derive the form of the corresponding power spectrum to be 1/f{sup {alpha}} with {alpha} = 1 exactly. This theoretical prediction agrees with our numerical simulations and with observations of 1/f noise in real traffic.

  18. Self-organized architectures from assorted DNA-framed nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wenyan; Halverson, Jonathan; Tian, Ye; Tkachenko, Alexei V.; Gang, Oleg

    2016-09-01

    The science of self-assembly has undergone a radical shift from asking questions about why individual components self-organize into ordered structures, to manipulating the resultant order. However, the quest for far-reaching nanomanufacturing requires addressing an even more challenging question: how to form nanoparticle (NP) structures with designed architectures without explicitly prescribing particle positions. Here we report an assembly concept in which building instructions are embedded into NPs via DNA frames. The integration of NPs and DNA origami frames enables the fabrication of NPs with designed anisotropic and selective interactions. Using a pre-defined set of different DNA-framed NPs, we show it is possible to design diverse planar architectures, which include periodic structures and shaped meso-objects that spontaneously emerge on mixing of the different topological types of NP. Even objects of non-trivial shapes, such as a nanoscale model of Leonardo da Vinci's Vitruvian Man, can be self-assembled successfully.

  19. Self-organizing magnetic beads for biomedical applications

    CERN Document Server

    Gusenbauer, Markus; Reichel, Franz; Exl, Lukas; Bance, Simon; Ozelt, Harald; Schrefl, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    In the field of biomedicine magnetic beads are used for drug delivery and to treat hyperthermia. Here we propose to use self-organized bead structures to isolate circulating tumor cells using lab-on-chip technologies. Typically blood flows past microposts functionalized with antibodies for circulating tumor cells. Creating these microposts with interacting magnetic beads makes it possible to tune the geometry in size, position and shape. We developed a simulation tool that combines micromagnetics and discrete particle dynamics, in order to design micropost arrays made of interacting beads. The simulation takes into account the viscous drag of the blood flow, magnetostatic interactions between the magnetic beads and gradient forces from external aligned magnets. We developed a particle-particle particle-mesh method for effective computation of the magnetic force and torque acting on the particles.

  20. Design Methodology for Self-organized Mobile Networks Based

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Petearson Anzola

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The methodology proposed in this article enables a systematic design of routing algorithms based on schemes of biclustering, which allows you to respond with timely techniques, clustering heuristics proposed by a researcher, and a focused approach to routing in the choice of clusterhead nodes. This process uses heuristics aimed at improving the different costs in communication surface groups called biclusters. This methodology globally enables a variety of techniques and heuristics of clustering that have been addressed in routing algorithms, but we have not explored all possible alternatives and their different assessments. Therefore, the methodology oriented design research of routing algorithms based on biclustering schemes will allow new concepts of evolutionary routing along with the ability to adapt the topological changes that occur in self-organized data networks.

  1. 25 Years of Self-Organized Criticality: Solar and Astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Aschwanden, Markus J; Dimitropoulou, Michaila; Georgoulis, Manolis; Hergarten, Stefan; MdAteer, James; Milovanov, Alexander V; Mineshige, Shin; Morales, Laura; Nishizuka, Naoto; Pruessner, Gunnar; Sanchez, Raul; Sharma, Surja; Strugarek, Antoine; Uritsky, Vadim

    2014-01-01

    Shortly after the seminal paper {\\sl "Self-Organized Criticality: An explanation of 1/f noise"} by Bak, Tang, and Wiesenfeld (1987), the idea has been applied to solar physics, in {\\sl "Avalanches and the Distribution of Solar Flares"} by Lu and Hamilton (1991). In the following years, an inspiring cross-fertilization from complexity theory to solar and astrophysics took place, where the SOC concept was initially applied to solar flares, stellar flares, and magnetospheric substorms, and later extended to the radiation belt, the heliosphere, lunar craters, the asteroid belt, the Saturn ring, pulsar glitches, soft X-ray repeaters, blazars, black-hole objects, cosmic rays, and boson clouds. The application of SOC concepts has been performed by numerical cellular automaton simulations, by analytical calculations of statistical (powerlaw-like) distributions based on physical scaling laws, and by observational tests of theoretically predicted size distributions and waiting time distributions. Attempts have been und...

  2. Self-organized Collaboration Network Model Based on Module Emerging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hongyong; Lu, Lan; Liu, Qiming

    Recently, the studies of the complex network have gone deep into many scientific fields, such as computer science, physics, mathematics, sociology, etc. These researches enrich the realization for complex network, and increase understands for the new characteristic of complex network. Based on the evolvement characteristic of the author collaboration in the scientific thesis, a self-organized network model of the scientific cooperation network is presented by module emerging. By applying the theoretical analysis, it is shown that this network model is a scale-free network, and the strength degree distribution and the module degree distribution of the network nodes have the same power law. In order to make sure the validity of the theoretical analysis for the network model, we create the computer simulation and demonstration collaboration network. By analyzing the data of the network, the results of the demonstration network and the computer simulation are consistent with that of the theoretical analysis of the model.

  3. Self-organization of dynein motors generates meiotic nuclear oscillations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sven K Vogel

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Meiotic nuclear oscillations in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe are crucial for proper chromosome pairing and recombination. We report a mechanism of these oscillations on the basis of collective behavior of dynein motors linking the cell cortex and dynamic microtubules that extend from the spindle pole body in opposite directions. By combining quantitative live cell imaging and laser ablation with a theoretical description, we show that dynein dynamically redistributes in the cell in response to load forces, resulting in more dynein attached to the leading than to the trailing microtubules. The redistribution of motors introduces an asymmetry of motor forces pulling in opposite directions, leading to the generation of oscillations. Our work provides the first direct in vivo observation of self-organized dynamic dynein distributions, which, owing to the intrinsic motor properties, generate regular large-scale movements in the cell.

  4. Controlling self-organized criticality in sandpile models

    CERN Document Server

    Cajueiro, Daniel O

    2013-01-01

    We introduce an external control to reduce the size of avalanches in some sandpile models exhibiting self organized criticality. This rather intuitive approach seems to be missing in the vast literature on such systems. The control action, which amounts to triggering avalanches in sites that are near to be come critical, reduces the probability of very large events, so that energy dissipation occurs most locally. The control is applied to a directed Abelian sandpile model driven by both uncorrelated and correlated deposition. The latter is essential to design an efficient and simple control heuristic, but has only small influence in the uncontrolled avalanche probability distribution. The proposed control seeks a tradeoff between control cost and large event risk. Preliminary results hint that the proposed control works also for an undirected sandpile model.

  5. Simulating Self-organization and Interference between Certain Hierarchical Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raczynski, Stanislaw

    2014-10-01

    A model of the dynamics and interactions between organizations with self-organizing hierarchical structures is presented for discrete events. The active objects of the model are individuals (people, organization members). The parameters of an individual are ability, corruption level, resources, and lust for power, among others. Three organizations are generated and interact with each other, attempting to gain more members and power. The individuals appear and disappear, due to a simple 'birth-and-death' process. If an individual disappears from the model, a corresponding reconfiguration in the hierarchical structure occurs. The organization's growth and macro-patterns are the result of the activities of the individuals. The aim of the simulation is to visualize the evolution of the organizations and the stability of the whole system. A 'steady state' for the model is rare; instead, in most parameter configurations, the model enters into oscillations.

  6. Self-organized criticality of liquefaction in saturated granules

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴爱祥; 孙业志; 李青松

    2003-01-01

    Utilizing the dissipative structure theory, the evolutionary process of vibrating liquefaction in saturatedgranules was analyzed. When the irreversible force increases to some degree, the system will be in a state far fromequilibrium, and the new structure probably occurs. According to synergetics, the equation of liquefaction evolutionwas deduced, and the evolutionary process was analyzed by dynamics. The evolutionary process of vibrating lique-faction is a process in which the period doubling accesses to chaos, and the fluctuation is the original driving force ofsystem evolution. The liquefaction process was also analyzed by fractal geometry. The steady process of vibratingliquefaction obeys the scaling form, and shows self-organized criticality in the course of vibration. With the incre-ment of the recurrence number, the stress of saturated granules will decrease rapidly or lose completely, and thestrain will increase rapidly, so that the granules can not sustain load and the "avalanche" phenomenon takes place.

  7. Empowered by Wireless Communication: Self-Organizing Traffic Collectives

    CERN Document Server

    Fekete, Sándor P; Wegener, Axel; Hellbrück, Horst; Fischer, Stefan

    2010-01-01

    In recent years, tremendous progress has been made in understanding the dynamics of vehicle traffic flow and traffic congestion by interpreting traffic as a multi-particle system. This helps to explain the onset and persistence of many undesired phenomena, e.g., traffic jams. It also reflects the apparent helplessness of drivers in traffic, who feel like passive particles that are pushed around by exterior forces; one of the crucial aspects is the inability to communicate and coordinate with other traffic participants. We present distributed methods for solving these fundamental problems, employing modern wireless, ad-hoc, multi-hop networks. The underlying idea is to use these capabilities as the basis for self-organizing methods for coordinating data collection and processing, recognizing traffic phenomena, and changing their structure by coordinated behavior. The overall objective is a multi-level approach that reaches from protocols for local wireless communication, data dissemination, pattern recognition...

  8. Self-organizing social hierarchies in a timid society

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odagaki, Takashi; Tsujiguchi, Masaru

    2006-07-01

    Emergence of hierarchies is investigated by Monte Carlo simulation in a timid society where all individuals are pacifist. The self-organization of hierarchies is shown to occur in two steps as the population is increased, i.e. there are three states, one egalitarian and two hierarchical states; the transition from the egalitarian to the first hierarchical state is continuous and the transition from the first hierarchical state to the second one is discontinuous. In the first hierarchical society, all individuals belong to either middle class or losers and no winners appear. In the second hierarchical society, many winners emerge and the population of the middle class is reduced. The hierarchy in the second hierarchical society is stronger than the hierarchy in a no-preference society studied by Bonabeau et al. [Physica A 217 (1995) 373].

  9. Self-Organized Control of Irregular or Perturbed Network Traffic

    CERN Document Server

    Helbing, D; Lebacque, J P; Helbing, Dirk; L\\"ammer, Stefan; Lebacque, Jean-Patrick

    2005-01-01

    We present a fluid-dynamic model for the simulation of urban traffic networks with road sections of different lengths and capacities. The model allows one to efficiently simulate the transitions between free and congested traffic, taking into account congestion-responsive traffic assignment and adaptive traffic control. We observe dynamic traffic patterns which significantly depend on the respective network topology. Synchronization is only one interesting example and implies the emergence of green waves. In this connection, we will discuss adaptive strategies of traffic light control which can considerably improve throughputs and travel times, using self-organization principles based on local interactions between vehicles and traffic lights. Similar adaptive control principles can be applied to other queueing networks such as production systems. In fact, we suggest to turn push operation of traffic systems into pull operation: By removing vehicles as fast as possible from the network, queuing effects can be ...

  10. Self-Organization of Mobile Populations in Cyclic Competition

    CERN Document Server

    Reichenbach, Tobias; Frey, Erwin

    2008-01-01

    The formation of out-of-equilibrium patterns is a characteristic feature of spatially-extended, biodiverse, ecological systems. Intriguing examples are provided by cyclic competition of species, as metaphorically described by the `rock-paper-scissors' game. Both experimentally and theoretically, such non-transitive interactions have been found to induce self-organization of static individuals into noisy, irregular clusters. However, a profound understanding and characterization of such patterns is still lacking. Here, we theoretically investigate the influence of individuals' mobility on the spatial structures emerging in rock-paper-scissors games. We devise a quantitative approach to analyze the spatial patterns self-forming in the course of the stochastic time evolution. For a paradigmatic model originally introduced by May and Leonard, within an interacting particle approach, we demonstrate that the system's behavior - in the proper continuum limit - is aptly captured by a set of stochastic partial differe...

  11. Coastal Water Quality Assessment by Self-Organizing Map

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    NIU Zhiguang; ZHANG Hongwei; ZHANG Ying

    2005-01-01

    A new approach to coastal water quality assessment was put forward through study on self-organizing map (SOM). Firstly, the water quality data of Bohai Bay from 1999 to 2002 were prepared. Then, a set of software for coastal water quality assessment was developed based on the batch version algorithm of SOM and SOM toolbox in MATLAB environment. Furthermore, the training results of SOM could be analyzed with single water quality indexes, the value of N: P( atomic ratio) and the eutrophication index E so that the data were clustered into five different pollution types using k-means clustering method. Finally, it was realized that the monitoring data serial trajectory could be tracked and the new data be classified and assessed automatically. Through application it is found that this study helps to analyze and assess the coastal water quality by several kinds of graphics, which offers an easy decision support for recognizing pollution status and taking corresponding measures.

  12. Self-organized plasmonic metasurfaces for all-optical modulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Della Valle, G.; Polli, D.; Biagioni, P.; Martella, C.; Giordano, M. C.; Finazzi, M.; Longhi, S.; Duò, L.; Cerullo, G.; Buatier de Mongeot, F.

    2015-06-01

    We experimentally demonstrate a self-organized metasurface with a polarization dependent transmittance that can be dynamically controlled by optical means. The configuration consists of tightly packed plasmonic nanowires with a large dispersion of width and height produced by the defocused ion-beam sputtering of a thin gold film supported on a silica glass. Our results are quantitatively interpreted according to a theoretical model based on the thermomodulational nonlinearity of gold and a finite-element numerical analysis of the absorption and scattering cross-sections of the nanowires. We found that the polarization sensitivity of the metasurface can be strongly enhanced by pumping with ultrashort laser pulses, leading to potential applications in ultrafast all-optical modulation and switching of light.

  13. Self-organized criticality of forest fires in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Self-organized criticality (SOC) of forest fires in China from 1950 to 1989 is studied. The stability, scale- invariant character of SOC and external effects on SOC of forest fires in China are analyzed in detail. Forest-fire cellular automata model is a typical model for the research of SOC. Based on the traditional forest-fire model, an improved model, in which effects of tree species, meteorological conditions and human efforts on forest fires are considered, is introduced. Actual forest fire data in China are compared with simulation results of the two models. It is shown that forest fire data in China have SOC behavior and simulation results of the improved model accord better with actual forest fire data than those of the traditional model.

  14. An Improved Self-Organizing CPN-Based Fuzzy System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Zhiming; WANG Yue; TAO Ran; ZHOU Siyong

    2001-01-01

    An improved self-organizing CPN-based fuzzy system is proposed in this paper.Asso-ciated with the neuro-fuzzy system,there is a two-phase hybrid learning algorithm,which utilizes aCPN-based nearest-neighborhood clustering schemefor both structure learning and initial parameters set-ting,and a gradient descent method with variablelearning rate for parameters fine-tuning.By combin-ing the above two methods,the learning speed is muchfaster than that of the original back-propagation al-gorithms.The comparative results on the examplessuggested that the method has the merits of simplestructure,fast learning speed and good modeling ac-curacy.

  15. Fingerprint Image Segmentation Using Haar Wavelet and Self Organizing Map

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sri Suwarno

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Fingerprint image segmentation is one of the important preprocessing steps in Automatic Fingerprint Identification Systems (AFIS. Segmentation separates image background from image foreground, removing unnecessary information from the image. This paper proposes a new fingerprint segmentation method using Haar wavelet and Kohonen’s Self Organizing Map (SOM. Fingerprint image was decomposed using 2D Haar wavelet in two levels. To generate features vectors, the decomposed image was divided into nonoverlapping blocks of 2x2 pixels and converted into four elements vectors. These vectors were then fed into SOM network that grouped them into foreground and background clusters. Finally, blocks in the background area were removed based on indexes of blocks in the background cluster. From the research that has been carried out, we conclude that the proposed method is effective to segment background from fingerprint images.

  16. A Self-organized MIMO-OFDM-based Cellular Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grünheid, Rainer; Fellenberg, Christian

    2012-05-01

    This paper presents a system proposal for a self-organized cellular network, which is based on the MIMO-OFDM transmission technique. Multicarrier transmission, combined with appropriate beamforming concepts, yields high bandwidth-efficiency and shows a robust behavior in multipath radio channels. Moreover, it provides a fine and tuneable granularity of space-time-frequency resources. Using a TDD approach and interference measurements in each cell, the Base Stations (BSs) decide autonomously which of the space-time-frequency resource blocks are allocated to the Mobile Terminals (MTs) in the cell, in order to fulfil certain Quality of Service (QoS) parameters. Since a synchronized Single Frequency Network (SFN), i.e., a re-use factor of one is applied, the resource blocks can be shared adaptively and flexibly among the cells, which is very advantageous in the case of a non-uniform MT distribution.

  17. Self-organized correlations lead to explosive synchronization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yang; Cao, Zhoujian; Wang, Shihong; Hu, Gang

    2015-02-01

    Very recently, a first-order phase transition, named explosive synchronization (ES), has attracted great attention due to its remarkable novelty in theory and significant impact in applications. However, so far, all observations of ES have been associated with various correlation constraints on system parameters, which restrict its generality and applications. Here we consider heterogeneous networks around Hopf bifurcation point described by chemical reaction-diffusion systems and also by their reduced order parameter versions, the complex Ginzburg-Landau equations, and demonstrate that explosive synchronization can appear as an emergent feature of oscillatory networks, and the restrictions on specific parameter correlations used so far for ES can be lifted entirely. Theoretical analyses and numerical simulations show with a perfect agreement that explosive synchronization can appear in networks with nodes having identical natural frequencies, and necessary correlation conditions for ES can be realized in a self-organized manner by network evolution.

  18. Self-organized criticality in a computer network model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan; Ren; Shan

    2000-02-01

    We study the collective behavior of computer network nodes by using a cellular automaton model. The results show that when the load of network is constant, the throughputs and buffer contents of nodes are power-law distributed in both space and time. Also the feature of 1/f noise appears in the power spectrum of the change of the number of nodes that bear a fixed part of the system load. It can be seen as yet another example of self-organized criticality. Power-law decay in the distribution of buffer contents implies that heavy network congestion occurs with small probability. The temporal power-law distribution for throughput might be a reasonable explanation for the observed self-similarity in computer network traffic.

  19. Self-organized criticality model for brain plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Arcangelis, Lucilla; Perrone-Capano, Carla; Herrmann, Hans J

    2006-01-20

    Networks of living neurons exhibit an avalanche mode of activity, experimentally found in organotypic cultures. Here we present a model that is based on self-organized criticality and takes into account brain plasticity, which is able to reproduce the spectrum of electroencephalograms (EEG). The model consists of an electrical network with threshold firing and activity-dependent synapse strengths. The system exhibits an avalanche activity in a power-law distribution. The analysis of the power spectra of the electrical signal reproduces very robustly the power-law behavior with the exponent 0.8, experimentally measured in EEG spectra. The same value of the exponent is found on small-world lattices and for leaky neurons, indicating that universality holds for a wide class of brain models.

  20. Self-organization of punishment in structured populations

    CERN Document Server

    Perc, Matjaz

    2012-01-01

    Cooperation is crucial for the remarkable evolutionary success of the human species. Not surprisingly, some individuals are willing to bare additional costs in order to punish defectors. Current models assume that, once set, the fine and cost of punishment do not change over time. Here we show that relaxing this assumption by allowing players to adapt their sanctioning efforts in dependence on the success of cooperation can explain both, the spontaneous emergence of punishment, as well as its ability to deter defectors and those unwilling to punish them with globally negligible investments. By means of phase diagrams and the analysis of emerging spatial patterns, we demonstrate that adaptive punishment promotes public cooperation either through the invigoration of spatial reciprocity, the prevention of the emergence of cyclic dominance, or through the provision of competitive advantages to those that sanction antisocial behavior. Presented results indicate that the process of self-organization significantly e...

  1. Hierarchical self-organization of cytoskeletal active networks

    CERN Document Server

    Gordon, Daniel; Keasar, Chen; Farago, Oded

    2012-01-01

    The structural reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton is facilitated through the action of motor proteins that crosslink the actin filaments and transport them relative to each other. Here, we present a combined experimental-computational study that probes the dynamic evolution of mixtures of actin filaments and clusters of myosin motors. While on small spatial and temporal scales the system behaves in a very noisy manner, on larger scales it evolves into several well distinct patterns such as bundles, asters, and networks. These patterns are characterized by junctions with high connectivity, whose formation is possible due to the organization of the motors in "oligoclusters" (intermediate-size aggregates). The simulations reveal that the self-organization process proceeds through a series of hierarchical steps, starting from local microscopic moves and ranging up to the macroscopic large scales where the steady-state structures are formed. Our results shed light into the mechanisms involved in processes li...

  2. Self-organization of cosmic radiation pressure instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogan, Craig J.

    1991-01-01

    Under some circumstances the absorption of radiation momentum by an absorbing medium opens the possibility of a dynamical instability, sometimes called 'mock gravity'. Here, a simplified abstract model is studied in which the radiation source is assumed to remain spatially uniform, there is no reabsorption or reradiated light, and no forces other than radiative pressure act on the absorbing medium. It is shown that this model displays the unique feature of being not only unstable, but also self-organizing. The structure approaches a statistical dynamical steady state which is almost independent of initial conditions. In this saturated state the absorbers are concentrated in thin walls around empty bubbles; as the instability develops the big bubbles get bigger and the small ones get crushed and disappear. A linear analysis shows that to first order the thin walls are indeed stable structures. It is speculated that this instability may play a role in forming cosmic large-scale structure.

  3. Self-organization of mesoscopic silver wires by electrochemical deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Sheng; Koch, Thomas; Walheim, Stefan; Rösner, Harald; Nold, Eberhard; Kobler, Aaron; Scherer, Torsten; Wang, Di; Kübel, Christian; Wang, Mu; Hahn, Horst; Schimmel, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Long, straight mesoscale silver wires have been fabricated from AgNO3 electrolyte via electrodeposition without the help of templates, additives, and surfactants. Although the wire growth speed is very fast due to growth under non-equilibrium conditions, the wire morphology is regular and uniform in diameter. Structural studies reveal that the wires are single-crystalline, with the [112] direction as the growth direction. A possible growth mechanism is suggested. Auger depth profile measurements show that the wires are stable against oxidation under ambient conditions. This unique system provides a convenient way for the study of self-organization in electrochemical environments as well as for the fabrication of highly-ordered, single-crystalline metal nanowires.

  4. Self-organization of the protocell was a forward process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, S. W.; Matsuno, K.

    1983-01-01

    Yockey's (1981) interpretation of information theory relative to concepts of self-organization in the origin of life is criticized on the ground that it assumes that each amino acid residue type in a given sequence is an unaided information carrier throughout evolution. It is argued that more than one amino acid residue can act as a unit information carrier, and that this was the case in prebiotic protein evolution. Forward-extrapolation should be used to study prebiotic evolution, not backward-extrapolation. Transposing the near-random internal order of modern proteins to primitive proteins, as Yockey has done, is an unsupported assumption and disagrees with the results of experimental models of the primordial type. Studies indicate that early primary information carriers in evolution were mixtures of free alpha amino acids which necessarily had the capability of sequencing themselves.

  5. Vector representation of user's view using self-organizing map

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ae, Tadashi; Yamaguchi, Tomohisa; Monden, Eri; Kawabata, Shunji; Kamitani, Motoki

    2004-05-01

    There exist various objects, such as pictures, music, texts, etc., around our environment. We have a view for these objects by looking, reading or listening. Our view is concerned with our behaviors deeply, and is very important to understand our behaviors. Therefore, we propose a method which acquires a view as a vector, and apply the vector to sequence generation. We focus on sequences of the data of which a user selects from a multimedia database containing pictures, music, movie, etc.. These data cannot be stereotyped because user's view for them changes by each user. Therefore, we represent the structure of the multimedia database as the vector representing user's view and the stereotyped vector, and acquire sequences containing the structure as elements. We demonstrate a city-sequence generation system which reflects user's intension as an application of sequence generation containing user's view. We apply the self-organizing map to this system to represent user's view.

  6. Color Image Segmentation using Kohonen Self-Organizing Map (SOM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I Komang Ariana

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Color image segmentation using Kohonen Self-Organizing Map (SOM, is proposed in this study. RGB color space is used as input in the process of clustering by SOM. Measurement of the distance between weight vector and input vector in learning and recognition stages in SOM method, uses Normalized Euclidean Distance. Then, the validity of clustering result is tested by Davies-Bouldin Index (DBI and Validity Measure (VM to determine the most optimal number of cluster. The clustering result, according to the most optimal number of cluster, then is processed with spatial operations. Spatial operations are used to eliminate noise and small regions which are formed from the clustering result. This system allows segmentation process become automatic and unsupervised. The segmentation results are close to human perception.

  7. Self Organized Criticality as a new paradigm of sleep regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, Plamen Ch.; Bartsch, Ronny P.

    2012-02-01

    Humans and animals often exhibit brief awakenings from sleep (arousals), which are traditionally viewed as random disruptions of sleep caused by external stimuli or pathologic perturbations. However, our recent findings show that arousals exhibit complex temporal organization and scale-invariant behavior, characterized by a power-law probability distribution for their durations, while sleep stage durations exhibit exponential behavior. The co-existence of both scale-invariant and exponential processes generated by a single regulatory mechanism has not been observed in physiological systems until now. Such co-existence resembles the dynamical features of non-equilibrium systems exhibiting self-organized criticality (SOC). Our empirical analysis and modeling approaches based on modern concepts from statistical physics indicate that arousals are an integral part of sleep regulation and may be necessary to maintain and regulate healthy sleep by releasing accumulated excitations in the regulatory neuronal networks, following a SOC-type temporal organization.

  8. Traffic Instabilities in Self-Organized Pedestrian Crowds

    CERN Document Server

    Moussaid, Mehdi; Moreau, Mathieu; Fehrenbach, Jerome; Chabiron, Olivier; Lemercier, Samuel; Pettre, Julien; Appert-Rolland, Cecile; Degond, Pierre; Theraulaz, Guy; 10.1371/journal.pcbi.1002442

    2012-01-01

    In human crowds as well as in many animal societies, local interactions among individuals often give rise to self-organized collective organizations that offer functional benefits to the group. For instance, flows of pedestrians moving in opposite directions spontaneously segregate into lanes of uniform walking directions. This phenomenon is often referred to as a smart collective pattern, as it increases the traffic efficiency with no need of external control. However, the functional benefits of this emergent organization have never been experimentally measured, and the underlying behavioral mechanisms are poorly understood. In this work, we have studied this phenomenon under controlled laboratory conditions. We found that the traffic segregation exhibits structural instabilities characterized by the alternation of organized and disorganized states, where the lifetime of well-organized clusters of pedestrians follow a stretched exponential relaxation process. Further analysis show that the inter-pedestrian v...

  9. Self-organization of progress across the century of physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perc, Matjaž

    2013-04-01

    We make use of information provided in the titles and abstracts of over half a million publications that were published by the American Physical Society during the past 119 years. By identifying all unique words and phrases and determining their monthly usage patterns, we obtain quantifiable insights into the trends of physics discovery from the end of the 19th century to today. We show that the magnitudes of upward and downward trends yield heavy-tailed distributions, and that their emergence is due to the Matthew effect. This indicates that both the rise and fall of scientific paradigms is driven by robust principles of self-organization. Data also confirm that periods of war decelerate scientific progress, and that the later is very much subject to globalisation.

  10. Modeling financial markets by self-organized criticality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biondo, Alessio Emanuele; Pluchino, Alessandro; Rapisarda, Andrea

    2015-10-01

    We present a financial market model, characterized by self-organized criticality, that is able to generate endogenously a realistic price dynamics and to reproduce well-known stylized facts. We consider a community of heterogeneous traders, composed by chartists and fundamentalists, and focus on the role of informative pressure on market participants, showing how the spreading of information, based on a realistic imitative behavior, drives contagion and causes market fragility. In this model imitation is not intended as a change in the agent's group of origin, but is referred only to the price formation process. We introduce in the community also a variable number of random traders in order to study their possible beneficial role in stabilizing the market, as found in other studies. Finally, we also suggest some counterintuitive policy strategies able to dampen fluctuations by means of a partial reduction of information.

  11. Self-organization of mesoscopic silver wires by electrochemical deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheng Zhong

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Long, straight mesoscale silver wires have been fabricated from AgNO3 electrolyte via electrodeposition without the help of templates, additives, and surfactants. Although the wire growth speed is very fast due to growth under non-equilibrium conditions, the wire morphology is regular and uniform in diameter. Structural studies reveal that the wires are single-crystalline, with the [112] direction as the growth direction. A possible growth mechanism is suggested. Auger depth profile measurements show that the wires are stable against oxidation under ambient conditions. This unique system provides a convenient way for the study of self-organization in electrochemical environments as well as for the fabrication of highly-ordered, single-crystalline metal nanowires.

  12. Self-organizing traffic lights at multiple-street intersections

    CERN Document Server

    Gershenson, Carlos

    2011-01-01

    Summary: Traffic light coordination is a complex problem. In this paper, we extend previous work on an abstract model of city traffic to allow for multiple street intersections. We test a self-organizing method in our model, showing that it is close to theoretical optima and superior to a traditional method of traffic light coordination. Abstract: The elementary cellular automaton following rule 184 can mimic particles flowing in one direction at a constant speed. This automaton can therefore model highway traffic. In a recent paper, we have incorporated intersections regulated by traffic lights to this model using exclusively elementary cellular automata. In such a paper, however, we only explored a rectangular grid. We now extend our model to more complex scenarios employing an hexagonal grid. This extension shows first that our model can readily incorporate multiple-way intersections and hence simulate complex scenarios. In addition, the current extension allows us to study and evaluate the behavior of two...

  13. Theory of self-organized critical transport in tokamak plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kishimoto, Y.; Tajima, T.; Horton, W.; LeBrun, M.J.; Kim, J.Y. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Naka, Ibaraki (Japan). Naka Fusion Research Establishment]|[Texas Univ., Austin, TX (United States). Inst. for Fusion Studies

    1995-07-01

    A theoretical and computational study of the ion temperature gradient and {eta}{sub i} instabilities in tokamak plasmas has been carried out. In toroidal geometry the modes have a radially extended structure and their eigenfrequencies are constant over many rational surfaces that are coupled through toroidicity. These nonlocal properties of the ITG modes impose strong constraint on the drift mode fluctuations and the amciated transport, showing a self-organized characteristic. As any significant deviation away from marginal stability causes rapid temperature relaxation and intermittent bursts, the modes hover near marginality and exhibit strong kinetic characteristics. As a result, the temperature relaxation is self-semilar and nonlocal, leading to a radially increasing heat diffusivity. The nonlocal transport leads to the Bohm-like diffusion scaling. The heat input regulates the deviation of the temperature gradient away from marginality. The obtained transport scalings and properties are globally consistent with experimental observations of L-mode charges.

  14. Experimental econophysics: Complexity, self-organization, and emergent properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, J. P.

    2015-03-01

    Experimental econophysics is concerned with statistical physics of humans in the laboratory, and it is based on controlled human experiments developed by physicists to study some problems related to economics or finance. It relies on controlled human experiments in the laboratory together with agent-based modeling (for computer simulations and/or analytical theory), with an attempt to reveal the general cause-effect relationship between specific conditions and emergent properties of real economic/financial markets (a kind of complex adaptive systems). Here I review the latest progress in the field, namely, stylized facts, herd behavior, contrarian behavior, spontaneous cooperation, partial information, and risk management. Also, I highlight the connections between such progress and other topics of traditional statistical physics. The main theme of the review is to show diverse emergent properties of the laboratory markets, originating from self-organization due to the nonlinear interactions among heterogeneous humans or agents (complexity).

  15. Modelling Financial Markets by Self-Organized Criticality

    CERN Document Server

    Biondo, A E; Rapisarda, A

    2015-01-01

    We present a financial market model, characterized by self-organized criticality, that is able to generate endogenously a realistic price dynamics and to reproduce well-known stylized facts. We consider a community of heterogeneous traders, composed by chartists and fundamentalists, and focus on the role of informative pressure on market participants, showing how the spreading of information, based on a realistic imitative behavior, drives contagion and causes market fragility. In this model imitation is not intended as a change in the agent's group of origin, but is referred only to the price formation process. We introduce in the community also a variable number of random traders in order to study their possible beneficial role in stabilizing the market, as found in other studies. Finally we also suggest some counterintuitive policy strategies able to dampen fluctuations by means of a partial reduction of information.

  16. Performance and energy efficiency in wireless self-organized networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, C.

    2009-07-01

    Self-organized packet radio networks (ad-hoc networks) and wireless sensor networks have got massive attention recently. One of critical problems in such networks is the energy efficiency, because wireless nodes are usually powered by battery. Energy efficiency design can dramatically increase the survivability and stability of wireless ad-hoc/sensor networks. In this thesis the energy efficiency has been considered at different protocol layers for wireless ad-hoc/sensor networks. The energy consumption of wireless nodes is inspected at the physical layer and MAC layer. At the network layer, some current routing protocols are compared and special attention has been paid to reactive routing protocols. A minimum hop analysis is given and according to the analysis result, a modification of AODV routing is proposed. A variation of transmit power can be also applied to clustering algorithm, which is believed to be able to control the scalability of network. Clustering a network can also improve the energy efficiency. We offer a clustering scheme based on the link state measurement and variation of transmit power of intra-cluster and inter-cluster transmission. Simulation shows that it can achieve both targets. In association with the clustering algorithm, a global synchronization scheme is proposed to increase the efficiency of clustering algorithm. The research attention has been also paid to self-organization for multi-hop cellular networks. A 2-hop 2-slot uplink proposal to infrastructure-based cellular networks. The proposed solution can significantly increase the throughput of uplink communication and reduce the energy consumption of wireless terminals. (orig.)

  17. Mechanism of self-organization in point vortex system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yatsuyanagi, Yuichi [Faculty of Education, Shizuoka University, Suruga-ku, Shizuoka 422-8529 (Japan); Hatori, Tadatsugu, E-mail: yatsuyanagi.yuichi@shizuoka.ac.jp [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan)

    2015-12-15

    A mechanism of the self-organization in an unbounded two-dimensional (2D) point vortex system is discussed. A kinetic equation for the system with positive and negative vortices is derived using the Klimontovich formalism. Similar to the Fokker–Planck collision term, the obtained collision term consists of a diffusion term and a drift term. It is revealed that the mechanism for the self-organization in the 2D point vortex system at negative absolute temperature is mainly provided by the drift term. Positive and negative vortices are driven toward opposite directions respectively by the drift term. As a result, well-known, two isolated clumps with positive and negative vortices, respectively, are formed as an equilibrium distribution. Regardless of the number of species of the vortices, either single- or double-sign, it is found that the collision term has following physically good properties: (i) when the system reaches a quasi-stationary state near the thermal equilibrium state with negative absolute temperature, the sign of dω/dψ is expected to be positive, where ω is the vorticity and ψ is the stream function. In this case, the diffusion term decreases the mean field energy, while the drift term increases it. As a whole, the total mean field energy is conserved. (ii) Similarly, the diffusion term increases the Boltzmann entropy, while the drift term decreases it. As a whole, the total entropy production rate is positive or zero (H theorem), which ensures that the system relaxes to the global thermal equilibrium state characterized by the zero entropy production. (regular papers)

  18. Traffic instabilities in self-organized pedestrian crowds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Moussaïd

    Full Text Available In human crowds as well as in many animal societies, local interactions among individuals often give rise to self-organized collective organizations that offer functional benefits to the group. For instance, flows of pedestrians moving in opposite directions spontaneously segregate into lanes of uniform walking directions. This phenomenon is often referred to as a smart collective pattern, as it increases the traffic efficiency with no need of external control. However, the functional benefits of this emergent organization have never been experimentally measured, and the underlying behavioral mechanisms are poorly understood. In this work, we have studied this phenomenon under controlled laboratory conditions. We found that the traffic segregation exhibits structural instabilities characterized by the alternation of organized and disorganized states, where the lifetime of well-organized clusters of pedestrians follow a stretched exponential relaxation process. Further analysis show that the inter-pedestrian variability of comfortable walking speeds is a key variable at the origin of the observed traffic perturbations. We show that the collective benefit of the emerging pattern is maximized when all pedestrians walk at the average speed of the group. In practice, however, local interactions between slow- and fast-walking pedestrians trigger global breakdowns of organization, which reduce the collective and the individual payoff provided by the traffic segregation. This work is a step ahead toward the understanding of traffic self-organization in crowds, which turns out to be modulated by complex behavioral mechanisms that do not always maximize the group's benefits. The quantitative understanding of crowd behaviors opens the way for designing bottom-up management strategies bound to promote the emergence of efficient collective behaviors in crowds.

  19. Nanospace-Mediated Self-Organization of Nanoparticles in Flexible Porous Polymer Templates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroda, Yoshiyuki; Muto, Itaru; Shimojima, Atsushi; Wada, Hiroaki; Kuroda, Kazuyuki

    2017-08-31

    Self-organization is a fundamental process for the construction of complex hierarchically ordered nanostructures, which are widespread in biological systems. However, precise control of size, shape, and surface properties is required for self-organization of nanoparticles. Here, we demonstrate a novel self-organization phenomenon mediated by flexible nanospaces in templates. Inorganic nanoparticles (e.g., silica, zirconia, and titania) are deposited in porous polymer thin films with randomly distributed pores on the surface, leaving a partially filled nanospace in each pore. Heating at temperatures beyond the glass transition temperature of the template leads to self-organization of the inorganic nanoparticles into one-dimensional chainlike networks. The self-organization is mediated by the deformation and fusion of the residual nanospaces, and it can be rationally controlled by sequential heat treatments. These results show that a nanospace, defined by the nonexistence of matter, interacts indirectly with matter and can be used as a component of self-organization systems.

  20. Quasiperiodic Strain Bursts and Self-Organization in Crystal Microplasticity (PREPRINT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-01

    AFRL-RX-WP-TP-2012-0249 QUASIPERIODIC STRAIN BURSTS AND SELF- ORGANIZATION IN CRYSTAL MICROPLASTICITY (PREPRINT) D.M. Dimiduk Metals...2012 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE QUASIPERIODIC STRAIN BURSTS AND SELF-ORGANIZATION IN CRYSTAL MICROPLASTICITY (PREPRINT) 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER In-house...18 Quasiperiodic strain bursts and self-organization in crystal microplasticity S. Papanikolaou,1,2∗ D. M. Dimiduk,3 W. Choi4, J. P. Sethna4, M. D

  1. Self-organization of chaos in mythology from a scientific point of view

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melker, Alexander I.

    2007-04-01

    In this contribution ancient Greek myths describing world's creation are analyzed as if they were a scientific paper. The 'paper' divided into the following parts: initial and boundary conditions, self-organization of chaos, world lines of self-organization, conclusion. It is shown that the self-organization of chaos consists of several stages during which two motive forces (attractive and repulsive) are generated, and totally disordered chaos transforms into partially ordered. It is found that there are five world lines of self-organization: water, light, cosmos-weather, water-fire, and State evolution.

  2. Fractal Self-Organization of Bacteria-Inspired Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yufeng; Krumanocker, Ian; Coppens, Marc-Olivier

    2012-06-01

    We develop an agent-based model as a preliminary theoretical basis to guide the synthesis of a new class of materials with dynamic properties similar to bacterial colonies. Each agent in the model is representative of an individual bacterium capable of: the uptake of chemicals (nutrients), which are metabolized; active movement (part viscous, part diffusive), consuming metabolic energy; and cellular division, when agents have doubled in size. The agents grow in number and self-organize into fractal structures, depending on the rules that define the actions of the agents and the parameter values. The environment of the agents includes chemicals responsible for their growth and is described by a diffusion-reaction equation with Michaelis-Menten kinetics. These rules are modeled mathematically by a set of equations with five dimensionless groups that are functions of physical parameters. Simulations are performed for different parameter values. The resulting structures are characterized by their fractal scaling regime, box-counting and mass-radius dimensions, and lacunarity. Each parameter influences the overall structure in a unique way, generating a wide spectrum of structures. For certain combinations of parameter values, the model converges to a steady state, with a finite population of agents that no longer divide.

  3. Dynamic self-organization of confined autophoretic particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medrano, Anthony; Michelin, Sébastien; Kanso, Eva

    2016-11-01

    We study the behavior of chemically-active Janus particles in microfluidic Hele-Shaw-type confinement. These micron-scale chemical motors, when immersed in a fuel-laden fluid, produce an ionic chemical field which leads to motility and consequently a local fluid flow. In unconfined settings, experimental and computational studies have shown these particles to spontaneously self-organize into crystal structures, and form into asters of two or more particles. Here, we show that geometric confinement alters both the chemical and hydrodynamic signature of the particles in such a way that their far-field effects can be modeled as source dipoles. Each particle moves according to its own self-propelled motion and in response to the chemical and hydrodynamic field created by other particles. Two interaction modes are observed: self-assembly into quasi-static crystals and into dynamically-evolving chains. We discuss the conditions that lead to these modes of interactions and the phase transitions between them for various Janus particle concentrations. The National GEM Consortium.

  4. Fast CEUS image segmentation based on self organizing maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paire, Julie; Sauvage, Vincent; Albouy-Kissi, Adelaïde; Ladam Marcus, Viviane; Marcus, Claude; Hoeffel, Christine

    2014-03-01

    Contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) has recently become an important technology for lesion detection and characterization. CEUS is used to investigate the perfusion kinetics in tissue over time, which relates to tissue vascularization. In this paper, we present an interactive segmentation method based on the neural networks, which enables to segment malignant tissue over CEUS sequences. We use Self-Organizing-Maps (SOM), an unsupervised neural network, to project high dimensional data to low dimensional space, named a map of neurons. The algorithm gathers the observations in clusters, respecting the topology of the observations space. This means that a notion of neighborhood between classes is defined. Adjacent observations in variables space belong to the same class or related classes after classification. Thanks to this neighborhood conservation property and associated with suitable feature extraction, this map provides user friendly segmentation tool. It will assist the expert in tumor segmentation with fast and easy intervention. We implement SOM on a Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) to accelerate treatment. This allows a greater number of iterations and the learning process to converge more precisely. We get a better quality of learning so a better classification. Our approach allows us to identify and delineate lesions accurately. Our results show that this method improves markedly the recognition of liver lesions and opens the way for future precise quantification of contrast enhancement.

  5. A conciliation mechanism for self-organizing dynamic small groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Minglun; Hu, Zhongfeng; Jain, Hemant

    2016-01-01

    A group of individuals, organizations or things in internet of things (IoT) often dynamically self-organizes in small groups to accomplish certain tasks. This is common in virtual organization, social networks and the evolving field of IoT. These small groups have different behavioral characteristics than large groups. Members individually have some requirements and contribute some resources to the group. The organization and operation of such a group requires dynamic identification of group requirements that can be fulfilled by available resources and is approved by the group. We apply design science methods to develop an artifact that helps in conciliation of collective requirements and resources of small groups while maintaining each member's satisfaction. The mechanism also supports dynamic conciliation as members leave and new members join the group. Each member's requirement is specified as an explicit/implicit objective that is feasible/not feasible based on resources available to the group and whether the requirement is in alignment with other members' objectives. We validate the artifact by using it for a manufacturing service group and simulating the change in collective group requirements and resources as group membership changes dynamically.

  6. Business Client Segmentation in Banking Using Self-Organizing Maps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bach Mirjana Pejić

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Segmentation in banking for the business client market is traditionally based on size measured in terms of income and the number of employees, and on statistical clustering methods (e.g. hierarchical clustering, k-means. The goal of the paper is to demonstrate that self-organizing maps (SOM effectively extend the pool of possible criteria for segmentation of the business client market with more relevant criteria, including behavioral, demographic, personal, operational, situational, and cross-selling products. In order to attain the goal of the paper, the dataset on business clients of several banks in Croatia, which, besides size, incorporates a number of different criteria, is analyzed using the SOM-Ward clustering algorithm of Viscovery SOMine software. The SOM-Ward algorithm extracted three segments that differ with respect to the attributes of foreign trade operations (import/export, annual income, origin of capital, important bank selection criteria, views on the loan selection and the industry. The analyzed segments can be used by banks for deciding on the direction of further marketing activities.

  7. Entropy and the Self-Organization of Information and Value

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rainer Feistel

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Adam Smith, Charles Darwin, Rudolf Clausius, and Léon Brillouin considered certain “values” as key quantities in their descriptions of market competition, natural selection, thermodynamic processes, and information exchange, respectively. None of those values can be computed from elementary properties of the particular object they are attributed to, but rather values represent emergent, irreducible properties. In this paper, such values are jointly understood as information values in certain contexts. For this aim, structural information is distinguished from symbolic information. While the first can be associated with arbitrary physical processes or structures, the latter requires conventions which govern encoding and decoding of the symbols which form a message. As a value of energy, Clausius’ entropy is a universal measure of the structural information contained in a thermodynamic system. The structural information of a message, in contrast to its meaning, can be evaluated by Shannon’s entropy of communication. Symbolic information is found only in the realm of life, such as in animal behavior, human sociology, science, or technology, and is often cooperatively valuated by competition. Ritualization is described here as a universal scenario for the self-organization of symbols by which symbolic information emerges from structural information in the course of evolution processes. Emergent symbolic information exhibits the novel fundamental code symmetry which prevents the meaning of a message from being reducible to the physical structure of its carrier. While symbols turn arbitrary during the ritualization transition, their structures preserve information about their evolution history.

  8. Can Self-Organizing Maps accurately predict photometric redshifts?

    CERN Document Server

    Way, M J

    2012-01-01

    We present an unsupervised machine learning approach that can be employed for estimating photometric redshifts. The proposed method is based on a vector quantization approach called Self--Organizing Mapping (SOM). A variety of photometrically derived input values were utilized from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey's Main Galaxy Sample, Luminous Red Galaxy, and Quasar samples along with the PHAT0 data set from the PHoto-z Accuracy Testing project. Regression results obtained with this new approach were evaluated in terms of root mean square error (RMSE) to estimate the accuracy of the photometric redshift estimates. The results demonstrate competitive RMSE and outlier percentages when compared with several other popular approaches such as Artificial Neural Networks and Gaussian Process Regression. SOM RMSE--results (using $\\Delta$z=z$_{phot}$--z$_{spec}$) for the Main Galaxy Sample are 0.023, for the Luminous Red Galaxy sample 0.027, Quasars are 0.418, and PHAT0 synthetic data are 0.022. The results demonstrate th...

  9. Application of Self-Organizing Map to Stellar Spectral Classifications

    CERN Document Server

    Mahdi, Bazarghan

    2011-01-01

    We present an automatic, fast, accurate and robust method of classifying astronomical objects. The Self Organizing Map (SOM) as an unsupervised Artificial Neural Network (ANN) algorithm is used for classification of stellar spectra of stars. The SOM is used to make clusters of different spectral classes of Jacoby, Hunter and Christian (JHC) library. This ANN technique needs no training examples and the stellar spectral data sets are directly fed to the network for the classification. The JHC library contains 161 spectra out of which, 158 spectra are selected for the classification. These 158 spectra are input vectors to the network and mapped into a two dimensional output grid. The input vectors close to each other are mapped into the same or neighboring neurons in the output space. So, the similar objects are making clusters in the output map and making it easy to analyze high dimensional data. After running the SOM algorithm on 158 stellar spectra, with 2799 data points each, the output map is analyzed and ...

  10. Russian Character Recognition using Self-Organizing Map

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunawan, D.; Arisandi, D.; Ginting, F. M.; Rahmat, R. F.; Amalia, A.

    2017-01-01

    The World Tourism Organization (UNWTO) in 2014 released that there are 28 million visitors who visit Russia. Most of the visitors might have problem in typing Russian word when using digital dictionary. This is caused by the letters, called Cyrillic that used by the Russian and the countries around it, have different shape than Latin letters. The visitors might not familiar with Cyrillic. This research proposes an alternative way to input the Cyrillic words. Instead of typing the Cyrillic words directly, camera can be used to capture image of the words as input. The captured image is cropped, then several pre-processing steps are applied such as noise filtering, binary image processing, segmentation and thinning. Next, the feature extraction process is applied to the image. Cyrillic letters recognition in the image is done by utilizing Self-Organizing Map (SOM) algorithm. SOM successfully recognizes 89.09% Cyrillic letters from the computer-generated images. On the other hand, SOM successfully recognizes 88.89% Cyrillic letters from the image captured by the smartphone’s camera. For the word recognition, SOM successfully recognized 292 words and partially recognized 58 words from the image captured by the smartphone’s camera. Therefore, the accuracy of the word recognition using SOM is 83.42%

  11. Computer simulations of self-organized megaripples in the nearshore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, E. L.

    2011-03-01

    Megaripples are bed forms with heights of 20-50 cm and lengths of 1-10 m that are common in the surf zone of natural beaches. They affect sediment transport, flow energy dissipation, and larger-scale hydro- and morphodynamics. They are thought to be dynamically similar to bed forms in deserts, rivers, and deeper marine environments. Here a self-organization model (similar to models for subaerial bed forms) is used to simulate the formation and development of megaripples in the surf zone. Sediment flux is determined from combined wave and current flows using stream power and bed shear stress formulations as well as a third formulation for transport based on simple rules, which represent sheet flow. Random bed irregularities, either imposed or resulting from small variations in transport representing turbulence, are necessary seeds for bed form development. Feedback between the bed and the flow, in the form of a shadow zone downstream of a bed form and increasing flow acceleration with elevation over the crests of bed forms, alter the transport such that organized bed forms emerge. Modeled bed form morphology (including cross-sectional shape and plan view) and dynamics (including growth and migration) are similar to natural megaripples. The model can be used to extend the field observations of Clarke and Werner (2004), which suggest that, if conditions remain the same, megaripples will continue to grow. Contrary to many bed form models, this model supports the idea that bed form spacing grows continually.

  12. Self-organized instability in graded-index multimode fibres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Logan G.; Liu, Zhanwei; Nolan, Daniel A.; Li, Ming-Jun; Christodoulides, Demetrios N.; Wise, Frank W.

    2016-12-01

    Multimode fibres (MMFs) are attracting interest in the study of spatiotemporal dynamics as well as in the context of ultrafast fibre sources, imaging and telecommunications. This interest stems from three differences compared with single-mode fibre structures: their spatiotemporal complexity (information capacity), the role of disorder, and their complex intermodal interactions. To date, MMFs have been studied in limiting cases in which one or more of these properties can be neglected. Here, we study a regime in which all these elements are integral. We observe a spatial beam-cleaning phenomenon that precedes spatiotemporal modulation instability. We provide evidence that the origin of these processes is a universal unstable attractor in graded-index MMFs. The self-organization and instability of the attractor are both caused by intermodal interactions characterized by cooperating disorder, nonlinearity and dissipation. Disorder-enhanced nonlinear processes in MMFs have important implications for future telecommunications, and the multifaceted nature of the considered dynamics showcases MMFs as potential laboratories for a variety of topics in complexity science.

  13. Self-organization in a driven dissipative plasma system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaikh, Dastgeer; Dasgupta, B.; Hu, Q.; Zank, G. P.

    2010-02-01

    We perform a fully self-consistent three-dimensional numerical simulation for a compressible, dissipative magnetoplasma driven by large-scale perturbations, that contain a fairly broad spectrum of characteristic modes, ranging from largest scales to intermediate scales and down to the smallest scales, where the energy of the system is dissipated by collisional (ohmic) and viscous dissipations. Additionally, our simulation includes nonlinear interactions amongst a wide range of fluctuations that are initialized with random spectral amplitudes, leading to the cascade of spectral energy in the inertial range spectrum, and takes into account large-scale as well as small-scale perturbations that may have been induced by the background plasma fluctuations, as well as the non-adiabatic exchange of energy leading to the migration of energy from the energy-containing modes or randomly injected energy driven by perturbations and further dissipated by the smaller scales. Besides demonstrating the comparative decays of the total energy and the dissipation rate of the energy, our results show the existence of a perpendicular component of the current, thus clearly confirming that the self-organized state is non-force free.

  14. Intrusion Detection System using Self Organizing Map: A Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kruti Choksi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Due to usage of computer every field, Network Security is the major concerned in today’s scenario. Every year the number of users and speed of network is increasing, along with it online fraud or security threats are also increasing. Every day a new attack is generated to harm the system or network. It is necessary to protect the system or networks from various threats by using Intrusion Detection System which can detect “known” as well as “unknown” attack and generate alerts if any unusual behavior in the traffic. There are various approaches for IDS, but in this paper, survey is focused on IDS using Self Organizing Map. SOM is unsupervised, fast conversion and automatic clustering algorithm which is able to handle novelty detection. The main objective of the survey is to find and address the current challenges of SOM. Our survey shows that the existing IDS based on SOM have poor detection rate for U2R and R2L attacks. To improve it, proper normalization technique should be used. During the survey we also found that HSOM and GHSOM are advance model of SOM which have their own unique feature for better performance of IDS. GHSOM is efficient due to its low computation time. This survey is beneficial to design and develop efficient SOM based IDS having less computation time and better detection rate.

  15. Powerlaws and Self-Organized Criticality in Theory and Nature

    CERN Document Server

    Markovic, Dimitrije

    2013-01-01

    Powerlaws and distributions with heavy tails are common features of many experimentally studied complex systems, like the distribution of the sizes of earthquakes and solar flares, or the duration of neuronal avalanches in the brain. It had been tempting to surmise that a single general concept may act as a unifying underlying generative mechanism, with the theory of self organized criticality being a weighty contender. On the theory side there has been, lively activity in developing new and extended models. Three classes of models have emerged. The first line of models is based on a separation between the time scales of drive and dissipation, and includes the original sandpile model and its extensions, like the dissipative earthquake model. Within this approach the steady state is close to criticality in terms of an absorbing phase transition. The second line of approach is based on external drives and internal dynamics competing on similar time scales and includes the coherent noise model, which has a non-c...

  16. Self-organized criticality in developing neuronal networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Tetzlaff

    Full Text Available Recently evidence has accumulated that many neural networks exhibit self-organized criticality. In this state, activity is similar across temporal scales and this is beneficial with respect to information flow. If subcritical, activity can die out, if supercritical epileptiform patterns may occur. Little is known about how developing networks will reach and stabilize criticality. Here we monitor the development between 13 and 95 days in vitro (DIV of cortical cell cultures (n = 20 and find four different phases, related to their morphological maturation: An initial low-activity state (≈19 DIV is followed by a supercritical (≈20 DIV and then a subcritical one (≈36 DIV until the network finally reaches stable criticality (≈58 DIV. Using network modeling and mathematical analysis we describe the dynamics of the emergent connectivity in such developing systems. Based on physiological observations, the synaptic development in the model is determined by the drive of the neurons to adjust their connectivity for reaching on average firing rate homeostasis. We predict a specific time course for the maturation of inhibition, with strong onset and delayed pruning, and that total synaptic connectivity should be strongly linked to the relative levels of excitation and inhibition. These results demonstrate that the interplay between activity and connectivity guides developing networks into criticality suggesting that this may be a generic and stable state of many networks in vivo and in vitro.

  17. Growth, collapse, and self-organized criticality in complex networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yafeng; Fan, Huawei; Lin, Weijie; Lai, Ying-Cheng; Wang, Xingang

    2016-04-01

    Network growth is ubiquitous in nature (e.g., biological networks) and technological systems (e.g., modern infrastructures). To understand how certain dynamical behaviors can or cannot persist as the underlying network grows is a problem of increasing importance in complex dynamical systems as well as sustainability science and engineering. We address the question of whether a complex network of nonlinear oscillators can maintain its synchronization stability as it expands. We find that a large scale avalanche over the entire network can be triggered in the sense that the individual nodal dynamics diverges from the synchronous state in a cascading manner within a relatively short time period. In particular, after an initial stage of linear growth, the network typically evolves into a critical state where the addition of a single new node can cause a group of nodes to lose synchronization, leading to synchronization collapse for the entire network. A statistical analysis reveals that the collapse size is approximately algebraically distributed, indicating the emergence of self-organized criticality. We demonstrate the generality of the phenomenon of synchronization collapse using a variety of complex network models, and uncover the underlying dynamical mechanism through an eigenvector analysis.

  18. Self-organized criticality in developing neuronal networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tetzlaff, Christian; Okujeni, Samora; Egert, Ulrich; Wörgötter, Florentin; Butz, Markus

    2010-12-02

    Recently evidence has accumulated that many neural networks exhibit self-organized criticality. In this state, activity is similar across temporal scales and this is beneficial with respect to information flow. If subcritical, activity can die out, if supercritical epileptiform patterns may occur. Little is known about how developing networks will reach and stabilize criticality. Here we monitor the development between 13 and 95 days in vitro (DIV) of cortical cell cultures (n = 20) and find four different phases, related to their morphological maturation: An initial low-activity state (≈19 DIV) is followed by a supercritical (≈20 DIV) and then a subcritical one (≈36 DIV) until the network finally reaches stable criticality (≈58 DIV). Using network modeling and mathematical analysis we describe the dynamics of the emergent connectivity in such developing systems. Based on physiological observations, the synaptic development in the model is determined by the drive of the neurons to adjust their connectivity for reaching on average firing rate homeostasis. We predict a specific time course for the maturation of inhibition, with strong onset and delayed pruning, and that total synaptic connectivity should be strongly linked to the relative levels of excitation and inhibition. These results demonstrate that the interplay between activity and connectivity guides developing networks into criticality suggesting that this may be a generic and stable state of many networks in vivo and in vitro.

  19. 25 Years of Self-Organized Criticality: Solar and Astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aschwanden, Markus J.; Crosby, Norma B.; Dimitropoulou, Michaila; Georgoulis, Manolis K.; Hergarten, Stefan; McAteer, James; Milovanov, Alexander V.; Mineshige, Shin; Morales, Laura; Nishizuka, Naoto; Pruessner, Gunnar; Sanchez, Raul; Sharma, A. Surja; Strugarek, Antoine; Uritsky, Vadim

    2016-01-01

    Shortly after the seminal paper "Self-Organized Criticality: An explanation of 1/ f noise" by Bak et al. (1987), the idea has been applied to solar physics, in "Avalanches and the Distribution of Solar Flares" by Lu and Hamilton (1991). In the following years, an inspiring cross-fertilization from complexity theory to solar and astrophysics took place, where the SOC concept was initially applied to solar flares, stellar flares, and magnetospheric substorms, and later extended to the radiation belt, the heliosphere, lunar craters, the asteroid belt, the Saturn ring, pulsar glitches, soft X-ray repeaters, blazars, black-hole objects, cosmic rays, and boson clouds. The application of SOC concepts has been performed by numerical cellular automaton simulations, by analytical calculations of statistical (powerlaw-like) distributions based on physical scaling laws, and by observational tests of theoretically predicted size distributions and waiting time distributions. Attempts have been undertaken to import physical models into the numerical SOC toy models, such as the discretization of magneto-hydrodynamics (MHD) processes. The novel applications stimulated also vigorous debates about the discrimination between SOC models, SOC-like, and non-SOC processes, such as phase transitions, turbulence, random-walk diffusion, percolation, branching processes, network theory, chaos theory, fractality, multi-scale, and other complexity phenomena. We review SOC studies from the last 25 years and highlight new trends, open questions, and future challenges, as discussed during two recent ISSI workshops on this theme.

  20. Self-organization of punishment in structured populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perc, Matjaž; Szolnoki, Attila

    2012-04-01

    Cooperation is crucial for the remarkable evolutionary success of the human species. Not surprisingly, some individuals are willing to bear additional costs in order to punish defectors. Current models assume that, once set, the fine and cost of punishment do not change over time. Here we show that relaxing this assumption by allowing players to adapt their sanctioning efforts in dependence on the success of cooperation can explain both the spontaneous emergence of punishment and its ability to deter defectors and those unwilling to punish them with globally negligible investments. By means of phase diagrams and the analysis of emerging spatial patterns, we demonstrate that adaptive punishment promotes public cooperation through the invigoration of spatial reciprocity, the prevention of the emergence of cyclic dominance, or the provision of competitive advantages to those that sanction antisocial behavior. The results presented indicate that the process of self-organization significantly elevates the effectiveness of punishment, and they reveal new mechanisms by means of which this fascinating and widespread social behavior could have evolved.

  1. Self-Organization of Aging in a Modified Penna Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Gi Ok; Shim, Sugie

    The Penna model for biological aging is modified so that the fertility of each individual is determined by means of the number of activated mutations at that time. A new concept of "good" mutation, which makes an individual to mature enough to reproduce, is introduced. It is assumed that each individual can reproduce only during adulthood, which is determined by the number of activated mutations. The results of Monte Carlo calculations using the modified model show that the ranges of the reproductive age are broadened as time goes by, thus showing self-organization in the biological aging to the direction of the maximum self-conservation. In addition, the population, the survival rate, and the average life span were calculated and analyzed by changing the number of new mutations at birth. It is observed that the higher is the considered number of new mutations at birth, the shorter is the obtained average life span. The mortality functions are also calculated and they showed the exponential increase in adulthood, satisfying the Gompertz law.

  2. Identifying individual sperm whales acoustically using self-organizing maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ioup, Juliette W.; Ioup, George E.

    2005-09-01

    The Littoral Acoustic Demonstration Center (LADC) is a consortium at Stennis Space Center comprising the University of New Orleans, the University of Southern Mississippi, the Naval Research Laboratory, and the University of Louisiana at Lafayette. LADC deployed three Environmental Acoustic Recording System (EARS) buoys in the northern Gulf of Mexico during the summer of 2001 to study ambient noise and marine mammals. Each LADC EARS was an autonomous, self-recording buoy capable of 36 days of continuous recording of a single channel at an 11.7-kHz sampling rate (bandwidth to 5859 Hz). The hydrophone selected for this analysis was approximately 50 m from the bottom in a water depth of 800 m on the continental slope off the Mississippi River delta. This paper contains recent analysis results for sperm whale codas recorded during a 3-min period. Results are presented for the identification of individual sperm whales from their codas, using the acoustic properties of the clicks within each coda. The recorded time series, the Fourier transform magnitude, and the wavelet transform coefficients are each used separately with a self-organizing map procedure for 43 codas. All show the codas as coming from four or five individual whales. [Research supported by ONR.

  3. 25 Years of Self-organized Criticality: Numerical Detection Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAteer, R. T. James; Aschwanden, Markus J.; Dimitropoulou, Michaila; Georgoulis, Manolis K.; Pruessner, Gunnar; Morales, Laura; Ireland, Jack; Abramenko, Valentyna

    2016-01-01

    The detection and characterization of self-organized criticality (SOC), in both real and simulated data, has undergone many significant revisions over the past 25 years. The explosive advances in the many numerical methods available for detecting, discriminating, and ultimately testing, SOC have played a critical role in developing our understanding of how systems experience and exhibit SOC. In this article, methods of detecting SOC are reviewed; from correlations to complexity to critical quantities. A description of the basic autocorrelation method leads into a detailed analysis of application-oriented methods developed in the last 25 years. In the second half of this manuscript space-based, time-based and spatial-temporal methods are reviewed and the prevalence of power laws in nature is described, with an emphasis on event detection and characterization. The search for numerical methods to clearly and unambiguously detect SOC in data often leads us outside the comfort zone of our own disciplines—the answers to these questions are often obtained by studying the advances made in other fields of study. In addition, numerical detection methods often provide the optimum link between simulations and experiments in scientific research. We seek to explore this boundary where the rubber meets the road, to review this expanding field of research of numerical detection of SOC systems over the past 25 years, and to iterate forwards so as to provide some foresight and guidance into developing breakthroughs in this subject over the next quarter of a century.

  4. Spatial self-organization favors heterotypic cooperation over cheating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momeni, Babak; Waite, Adam James; Shou, Wenying

    2013-11-12

    Heterotypic cooperation-two populations exchanging distinct benefits that are costly to produce-is widespread. Cheaters, exploiting benefits while evading contribution, can undermine cooperation. Two mechanisms can stabilize heterotypic cooperation. In 'partner choice', cooperators recognize and choose cooperating over cheating partners; in 'partner fidelity feedback', fitness-feedback from repeated interactions ensures that aiding your partner helps yourself. How might a spatial environment, which facilitates repeated interactions, promote fitness-feedback? We examined this process through mathematical models and engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains incapable of recognition. Here, cooperators and their heterotypic cooperative partners (partners) exchanged distinct essential metabolites. Cheaters exploited partner-produced metabolites without reciprocating, and were competitively superior to cooperators. Despite initially random spatial distributions, cooperators gained more partner neighbors than cheaters did. The less a cheater contributed, the more it was excluded and disfavored. This self-organization, driven by asymmetric fitness effects of cooperators and cheaters on partners during cell growth into open space, achieves assortment. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.00960.001.

  5. Metabolic evolution and the self-organization of ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braakman, Rogier; Follows, Michael J; Chisholm, Sallie W

    2017-04-11

    Metabolism mediates the flow of matter and energy through the biosphere. We examined how metabolic evolution shapes ecosystems by reconstructing it in the globally abundant oceanic phytoplankter Prochlorococcus To understand what drove observed evolutionary patterns, we interpreted them in the context of its population dynamics, growth rate, and light adaptation, and the size and macromolecular and elemental composition of cells. This multilevel view suggests that, over the course of evolution, there was a steady increase in Prochlorococcus' metabolic rate and excretion of organic carbon. We derived a mathematical framework that suggests these adaptations lower the minimal subsistence nutrient concentration of cells, which results in a drawdown of nutrients in oceanic surface waters. This, in turn, increases total ecosystem biomass and promotes the coevolution of all cells in the ecosystem. Additional reconstructions suggest that Prochlorococcus and the dominant cooccurring heterotrophic bacterium SAR11 form a coevolved mutualism that maximizes their collective metabolic rate by recycling organic carbon through complementary excretion and uptake pathways. Moreover, the metabolic codependencies of Prochlorococcus and SAR11 are highly similar to those of chloroplasts and mitochondria within plant cells. These observations lead us to propose a general theory relating metabolic evolution to the self-amplification and self-organization of the biosphere. We discuss the implications of this framework for the evolution of Earth's biogeochemical cycles and the rise of atmospheric oxygen.

  6. Self-organization in precipitation reactions far from the equilibrium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakouzi, Elias; Steinbock, Oliver

    2016-08-01

    Far from the thermodynamic equilibrium, many precipitation reactions create complex product structures with fascinating features caused by their unusual origins. Unlike the dissipative patterns in other self-organizing reactions, these features can be permanent, suggesting potential applications in materials science and engineering. We review four distinct classes of precipitation reactions, describe similarities and differences, and discuss related challenges for theoretical studies. These classes are hollow micro- and macrotubes in chemical gardens, polycrystalline silica carbonate aggregates (biomorphs), Liesegang bands, and propagating precipitation-dissolution fronts. In many cases, these systems show intricate structural hierarchies that span from the nanometer scale into the macroscopic world. We summarize recent experimental progress that often involves growth under tightly regulated conditions by means of wet stamping, holographic heating, and controlled electric, magnetic, or pH perturbations. In this research field, progress requires mechanistic insights that cannot be derived from experiments alone. We discuss how mesoscopic aspects of the product structures can be modeled by reaction-transport equations and suggest important targets for future studies that should also include materials features at the nanoscale.

  7. Growth, collapse, and self-organized criticality in complex networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yafeng; Fan, Huawei; Lin, Weijie; Lai, Ying-Cheng; Wang, Xingang

    2016-01-01

    Network growth is ubiquitous in nature (e.g., biological networks) and technological systems (e.g., modern infrastructures). To understand how certain dynamical behaviors can or cannot persist as the underlying network grows is a problem of increasing importance in complex dynamical systems as well as sustainability science and engineering. We address the question of whether a complex network of nonlinear oscillators can maintain its synchronization stability as it expands. We find that a large scale avalanche over the entire network can be triggered in the sense that the individual nodal dynamics diverges from the synchronous state in a cascading manner within a relatively short time period. In particular, after an initial stage of linear growth, the network typically evolves into a critical state where the addition of a single new node can cause a group of nodes to lose synchronization, leading to synchronization collapse for the entire network. A statistical analysis reveals that the collapse size is approximately algebraically distributed, indicating the emergence of self-organized criticality. We demonstrate the generality of the phenomenon of synchronization collapse using a variety of complex network models, and uncover the underlying dynamical mechanism through an eigenvector analysis. PMID:27079515

  8. Self-organization of hydrogen gas bubbles rising above laser-etched metallic aluminum in a weakly basic aqueous solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barmina, E V; Kuzmin, P G; Shafeev, G A

    2011-10-01

    Self-organization of hydrogen bubbles is reported under etching of metallic Aluminum in a weakly basic solution. The ascending gas bubbles drift to the areas with higher density of bubbles. As a result, ascending bubbles form various stationary structures whose symmetry is determined by the symmetry of the etched area. Bubbles are aligned along the bisectors of the contour of the etched area. The special laser-assisted profiling of the etched area in shape of a vortex induces a torque in the fluid above the etched area. The process is interpreted on the basis of Bernoulli equation.

  9. Giant Peltier Effect in Self-Organized Quasi-One-Dimensional Nano-Structure in Cu-Ni Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang Vu, Nguyen; Sato, Kazunori; Katayama-Yoshida, Hiroshi

    2011-01-01

    Based upon ab initio electronic structure calculations by the Korringa-Kohn-Rostoker coherent potential approximation and Monte Carlo simulation of the two-dimensional spinodal nano-decomposition, we simulate the formation of a self-organized quasi-one-dimensional nano-structure (Konbu-Phase) under a layer-by-layer crystal growth condition of Cu-Ni alloy. We propose a new mechanism of the giant Peltier coefficient dramatically enhanced by the one-dimensional singular density of states in the Konbu-Phase in addition to the conventional Peltier cooling and the spin-entropy expansion cooling.

  10. Giant Peltier Effect in Self-Organized Quasi-One-Dimensional Nano-Structure in Cu--Ni Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vu, Nguyen Dang; Sato, Kazunori; Katayama-Yoshida, Hiroshi

    2011-01-01

    Based upon ab initio electronic structure calculations by the Korringa--Kohn--Rostoker coherent potential approximation and Monte Carlo simulation of the two-dimensional spinodal nano-decomposition, we simulate the formation of a self-organized quasi-one-dimensional nano-structure (Konbu-Phase) under a layer-by-layer crystal growth condition of Cu--Ni alloy. We propose a new mechanism of the giant Peltier coefficient dramatically enhanced by the one-dimensional singular density of states in the Konbu-Phase in addition to the conventional Peltier cooling and the spin-entropy expansion cooling.

  11. Self-organizing groups : conditions and constraints in a sociotechnical perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Zwaan, A.H.; Molleman, E.

    1998-01-01

    An increased level of self-organization, particularly in autonomous work teams, is widely believed to be a necessary part of a successful firm and a factor in many modern restructuring initiatives. This article investigates the limitations of self-organized groups and surveys these limitations from

  12. Self-organizing groups : conditions and constraints in a sociotechnical perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Zwaan, A.H.; Molleman, E.

    1998-01-01

    An increased level of self-organization, particularly in autonomous work teams, is widely believed to be a necessary part of a successful firm and a factor in many modern restructuring initiatives. This article investigates the limitations of self-organized groups and surveys these limitations from

  13. Self-Organized Robust Principal Component Analysis by Back-Propagation Learning

    OpenAIRE

    樋口, 勇夫

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study is the suggestion of a self-organized back-propagation algorithm for robust principal component analysis. The self-organizing algorithm that discriminates the influence of data automatically is applied to learning of a sandglass type neural network.

  14. Self-organization and Spatial Planning : Foundations, Challenges, Constraints and consequences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Roo, Gert; de Roo, Gert; Boelens, Luuk

    2016-01-01

    Does self-organization matter to planning? Spatial Planning and self-organization: the combination of these two themes is perhaps somewhat unexpected, one being the collective manifestation of ‘intentional’ action, the other representing ‘spontaneous’ phenomena. Spatial Planning labels itself a scie

  15. Motivating Company Personnel by Applying the Semi-self-organized Teams Principle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumlander, Deniss

    The only way nowadays to improve stability of software development process in the global rapidly evolving world is to be innovative and involve professionals into projects motivating them using both material and non material factors. In this paper self-organized teams are discussed. Unfortunately not all kind of organizations can benefit directly from agile method including applying self-organized teams. The paper proposes semi-self-organized teams presenting it as a new and promising motivating factor allowing deriving many positive sides of been self-organized and partly agile and been compliant to less strict conditions for following this innovating process. The semi-self organized teams are reliable at least in the short-term perspective and are simple to organize and support.

  16. Self-Organization of Spatial Patterning in Human Embryonic Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deglincerti, Alessia; Etoc, Fred; Ozair, M Zeeshan; Brivanlou, Ali H

    2016-01-01

    The developing embryo is a remarkable example of self-organization, where functional units are created in a complex spatiotemporal choreography. Recently, human embryonic stem cells (ESCs) have been used to recapitulate in vitro the self-organization programs that are executed in the embryo in vivo. This represents an unique opportunity to address self-organization in humans that is otherwise not addressable with current technologies. In this chapter, we review the recent literature on self-organization of human ESCs, with a particular focus on two examples: formation of embryonic germ layers and neural rosettes. Intriguingly, both activation and elimination of TGFβ signaling can initiate self-organization, albeit with different molecular underpinnings. We discuss the mechanisms underlying the formation of these structures in vitro and explore future challenges in the field.

  17. On the Nature and Shape of Tubulin Trails: Implications on Microtubule Self-Organization

    CERN Document Server

    Glade, Nicolas

    2012-01-01

    Microtubules, major elements of the cell skeleton are, most of the time, well organized in vivo, but they can also show self-organizing behaviors in time and/or space in purified solutions in vitro. Theoretical studies and models based on the concepts of collective dynamics in complex systems, reaction-diffusion processes and emergent phenomena were proposed to explain some of these behaviors. In the particular case of microtubule spatial self-organization, it has been advanced that microtubules could behave like ants, self-organizing by 'talking to each other' by way of hypothetic (because never observed) concentrated chemical trails of tubulin that are expected to be released by their disassembling ends. Deterministic models based on this idea yielded indeed like-looking spatio-temporal self-organizing behaviors. Nevertheless the question remains of whether microscopic tubulin trails produced by individual or bundles of several microtubules are intense enough to allow microtubule self-organization at a macr...

  18. Observation of self-organized criticality (SOC) behavior during edge biasing experiment on TEXTOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Y.H.; Jachmich, S.; Weynants, R.R. [Ecole Royale Militaire/Koninklijke Militaire School, Laboratory for Plasma Physics, Euratom-Belgian State Association, Brussels, Belgium, Partner in the Trilateral Euregio Cluster (Belgium)

    2004-07-01

    The self-organized criticality (SOC) behavior of the edge plasma transport has been investigated using the fluctuation data measured in the plasma edge and the scrape-off layer of TEXTOR tokamak before and during the edge electrode biasing experiments. In the 'non-shear' discharge phase before biasing, both the potential and density fluctuations clearly exhibit some of the characteristics associated with SOC: (1) existence of f{sup -1} power-law dependence in the frequency spectrum, (2) slowly decaying long tails in the autocorrelation function, (3) values of Hurst parameters larger than 0.5 at all the detected radial locations, (4) non-Gaussian probability density function of fluctuations and (5) radial propagation of avalanche-like events in the edge plasma area. During the biasing phase, with the generation of an edge radial electric field E{sub r} and hence a sheared E{sub r} x B flow, the local turbulence is found to be well de-correlated by the E{sub r} x B velocity shear, consistent with theoretical predictions. Nevertheless, it is concomitantly found that the Hurst parameters are substantially enhanced in the negative flow shear region and in the scrape-off layer as well, which is contrary to theoretical expectation. Implication of these observations to our understanding of plasma transport mechanisms is discussed. (authors)

  19. Behavioral self-organization underlies the resilience of a coastal ecosystem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Paoli, Hélène; van der Heide, Tjisse; van den Berg, Aniek; Silliman, Brian R; Herman, Peter M J; van de Koppel, Johan

    2017-07-25

    Self-organized spatial patterns occur in many terrestrial, aquatic, and marine ecosystems. Theoretical models and observational studies suggest self-organization, the formation of patterns due to ecological interactions, is critical for enhanced ecosystem resilience. However, experimental tests of this cross-ecosystem theory are lacking. In this study, we experimentally test the hypothesis that self-organized pattern formation improves the persistence of mussel beds (Mytilus edulis) on intertidal flats. In natural beds, mussels generate self-organized patterns at two different spatial scales: regularly spaced clusters of mussels at centimeter scale driven by behavioral aggregation and large-scale, regularly spaced bands at meter scale driven by ecological feedback mechanisms. To test for the relative importance of these two spatial scales of self-organization on mussel bed persistence, we conducted field manipulations in which we factorially constructed small-scale and/or large-scale patterns. Our results revealed that both forms of self-organization enhanced the persistence of the constructed mussel beds in comparison to nonorganized beds. Small-scale, behaviorally driven cluster patterns were found to be crucial for persistence, and thus resistance to wave disturbance, whereas large-scale, self-organized patterns facilitated reformation of small-scale patterns if mussels were dislodged. This study provides experimental evidence that self-organization can be paramount to enhancing ecosystem persistence. We conclude that ecosystems with self-organized spatial patterns are likely to benefit greatly from conservation and restoration actions that use the emergent effects of self-organization to increase ecosystem resistance to disturbance.

  20. Identification of lithofacies using Kohonen self-organizing maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, H.-C.; Kopaska-Merkel, D. C.; Chen, H.-C.

    2002-01-01

    Lithofacies identification is a primary task in reservoir characterization. Traditional techniques of lithofacies identification from core data are costly, and it is difficult to extrapolate to non-cored wells. We present a low-cost automated technique using Kohonen self-organizing maps (SOMs) to identify systematically and objectively lithofacies from well log data. SOMs are unsupervised artificial neural networks that map the input space into clusters in a topological form whose organization is related to trends in the input data. A case study used five wells located in Appleton Field, Escambia County, Alabama (Smackover Formation, limestone and dolomite, Oxfordian, Jurassic). A five-input, one-dimensional output approach is employed, assuming the lithofacies are in ascending/descending order with respect to paleoenvironmental energy levels. To consider the possible appearance of new logfacies not seen in training mode, which may potentially appear in test wells, the maximum number of outputs is set to 20 instead of four, the designated number of lithosfacies in the study area. This study found eleven major clusters. The clusters were compared to depositional lithofacies identified by manual core examination. The clusters were ordered by the SOM in a pattern consistent with environmental gradients inferred from core examination: bind/boundstone, grainstone, packstone, and wackestone. This new approach predicted lithofacies identity from well log data with 78.8% accuracy which is more accurate than using a backpropagation neural network (57.3%). The clusters produced by the SOM are ordered with respect to paleoenvironmental energy levels. This energy-related clustering provides geologists and petroleum engineers with valuable geologic information about the logfacies and their interrelationships. This advantage is not obtained in backpropagation neural networks and adaptive resonance theory neural networks. ?? 2002 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Hierarchical self-organization of non-cooperating individuals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamás Nepusz

    Full Text Available Hierarchy is one of the most conspicuous features of numerous natural, technological and social systems. The underlying structures are typically complex and their most relevant organizational principle is the ordering of the ties among the units they are made of according to a network displaying hierarchical features. In spite of the abundant presence of hierarchy no quantitative theoretical interpretation of the origins of a multi-level, knowledge-based social network exists. Here we introduce an approach which is capable of reproducing the emergence of a multi-levelled network structure based on the plausible assumption that the individuals (representing the nodes of the network can make the right estimate about the state of their changing environment to a varying degree. Our model accounts for a fundamental feature of knowledge-based organizations: the less capable individuals tend to follow those who are better at solving the problems they all face. We find that relatively simple rules lead to hierarchical self-organization and the specific structures we obtain possess the two, perhaps most important features of complex systems: a simultaneous presence of adaptability and stability. In addition, the performance (success score of the emerging networks is significantly higher than the average expected score of the individuals without letting them copy the decisions of the others. The results of our calculations are in agreement with a related experiment and can be useful from the point of designing the optimal conditions for constructing a given complex social structure as well as understanding the hierarchical organization of such biological structures of major importance as the regulatory pathways or the dynamics of neural networks.

  2. Spatial self-organization in hybrid models of multicellular adhesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonforti, Adriano; Duran-Nebreda, Salva; Montañez, Raúl; Solé, Ricard

    2016-10-01

    Spatial self-organization emerges in distributed systems exhibiting local interactions when nonlinearities and the appropriate propagation of signals are at work. These kinds of phenomena can be modeled with different frameworks, typically cellular automata or reaction-diffusion systems. A different class of dynamical processes involves the correlated movement of agents over space, which can be mediated through chemotactic movement or minimization of cell-cell interaction energy. A classic example of the latter is given by the formation of spatially segregated assemblies when cells display differential adhesion. Here, we consider a new class of dynamical models, involving cell adhesion among two stochastically exchangeable cell states as a minimal model capable of exhibiting well-defined, ordered spatial patterns. Our results suggest that a whole space of pattern-forming rules is hosted by the combination of physical differential adhesion and the value of probabilities modulating cell phenotypic switching, showing that Turing-like patterns can be obtained without resorting to reaction-diffusion processes. If the model is expanded allowing cells to proliferate and die in an environment where diffusible nutrient and toxic waste are at play, different phases are observed, characterized by regularly spaced patterns. The analysis of the parameter space reveals that certain phases reach higher population levels than other modes of organization. A detailed exploration of the mean-field theory is also presented. Finally, we let populations of cells with different adhesion matrices compete for reproduction, showing that, in our model, structural organization can improve the fitness of a given cell population. The implications of these results for ecological and evolutionary models of pattern formation and the emergence of multicellularity are outlined.

  3. Biomechanical factors contributing to self-organization in seagrass landscapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca, M.S.; Koehl, M.A.R.; Kopp, B.S.

    2007-01-01

    individual shoot self-organization driven by reduced force and drag on the shoots and somewhat improved light capture.

  4. Multistability and self-organization in disordered SQUID metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarides, N.; Tsironis, G. P.

    2013-08-01

    Planar arrays of magnetoinductively coupled rf SQUIDs (Superconducting QUantum Interference Devices) belong to the emergent class of superconducting metamaterials that encompass the Josephson effect. These SQUID-based metamaterials acquire their electromagnetic properties from the resonant characteristics of their constitutive elements, i.e., the individual rf SQUIDs. In its simplest version, an rf SQUID consists of a superconducting ring interrupted by a Josephson junction. We investigate numerically the response of a two-dimensional rf SQUID metamaterial with respect to the driving frequency of an externally applied alternating magnetic field in the presence of disorder arising from critical current fluctuations of the Josephson elements; in effect, the resonance frequencies of individual SQUIDs are distributed randomly around a mean value. Bistability is observed in the current amplitude-frequency curves both in ordered and disordered SQUID metamaterials; moreover, bistability is favored by disorder through the improvement of synchronization between SQUID oscillators. Relatively weak disorder widens significantly the bistability region by helping the system to self-organize and leads to nearly homogeneous states that change smoothly with varying driving frequency. Also, the total current of the metamaterial is enhanced, compared with that of uncoupled SQUIDs, through the synergetic action of coupling and synchronization. The existence of simultaneously stable states that provide either high or low total current, allows the metamaterial to exhibit different magnetic responses that correspond to different values of the effective magnetic permeability. At low power of the incident field, high current amplitude states exhibit extreme diamagnetic properties corresponding to negative magnetic permeability in a narrow frequency interval.

  5. Self-organization and the dynamical nature of ventricular fibrillation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalife, José; Gray, Richard A.; Morley, Gregory E.; Davidenko, Jorge M.

    1998-03-01

    This article reviews recent data supporting the conjecture that, in the structurally and electrophysiologically normal heart, cardiac fibrillation is not a totally random phenomenon. Experimental and numerical studies based on the theory of excitable media suggest that fibrillation in the mammalian ventricles is the result of self-organized three-dimensional (3-D) electrical rotors giving rise to scroll waves that move continuously (i.e., drift) throughout the heart at varying speeds. A brief review of studies on the dynamics of rotors in two-dimensional (2-D) and 3-D excitable media is presented with emphasis on the experimental demonstration of such dynamics in cardiac muscle of various species. The discussion is centered on rotor dynamics in the presence and the absence of structural heterogeneities, and in the phenomena of drifting and anchoring, which in the electrocardiogram (ECG) may manifest as life-threatening cardiac rhythm disturbances. For instance, in the rabbit heart, a single electrical rotor that drifts rapidly throughout the ventricles gives rise to complex patterns of excitation. In the ECG such patterns are indistinguishable from ventricular fibrillation. On the other hand, a rotor that anchors to a discontinuity or defect in the muscle (e.g., a scar, a large artery or a bundle of connective tissue) may result in stationary rotating activity, which in the ECG is manifested as a form of so-called "monomorphic" ventricular tachycardia. More recent data show that ventricular fibrillation occurs in mammals irrespective of size or species. While in small hearts, such as those of mice and rabbits, a single drifting or meandering rotor can result in fibrillation, in larger hearts, such as the sheep and possibly the human, fibrillation occurs in the form of a relatively small number of coexisting but short-lived rotors. Overall, the work discussed here has paved the way for a better understanding of the mechanisms of fibrillation in the normal, as well

  6. Evolution of Self-Organized Task Specialization in Robot Swarms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliseo Ferrante

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Division of labor is ubiquitous in biological systems, as evidenced by various forms of complex task specialization observed in both animal societies and multicellular organisms. Although clearly adaptive, the way in which division of labor first evolved remains enigmatic, as it requires the simultaneous co-occurrence of several complex traits to achieve the required degree of coordination. Recently, evolutionary swarm robotics has emerged as an excellent test bed to study the evolution of coordinated group-level behavior. Here we use this framework for the first time to study the evolutionary origin of behavioral task specialization among groups of identical robots. The scenario we study involves an advanced form of division of labor, common in insect societies and known as "task partitioning", whereby two sets of tasks have to be carried out in sequence by different individuals. Our results show that task partitioning is favored whenever the environment has features that, when exploited, reduce switching costs and increase the net efficiency of the group, and that an optimal mix of task specialists is achieved most readily when the behavioral repertoires aimed at carrying out the different subtasks are available as pre-adapted building blocks. Nevertheless, we also show for the first time that self-organized task specialization could be evolved entirely from scratch, starting only from basic, low-level behavioral primitives, using a nature-inspired evolutionary method known as Grammatical Evolution. Remarkably, division of labor was achieved merely by selecting on overall group performance, and without providing any prior information on how the global object retrieval task was best divided into smaller subtasks. We discuss the potential of our method for engineering adaptively behaving robot swarms and interpret our results in relation to the likely path that nature took to evolve complex sociality and task specialization.

  7. 25 Years of Self-organized Criticality: Concepts and Controversies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, Nicholas W.; Pruessner, Gunnar; Chapman, Sandra C.; Crosby, Norma B.; Jensen, Henrik J.

    2016-01-01

    Introduced by the late Per Bak and his colleagues, self-organized criticality (SOC) has been one of the most stimulating concepts to come out of statistical mechanics and condensed matter theory in the last few decades, and has played a significant role in the development of complexity science. SOC, and more generally fractals and power laws, have attracted much comment, ranging from the very positive to the polemical. The other papers (Aschwanden et al. in Space Sci. Rev., 2014, this issue; McAteer et al. in Space Sci. Rev., 2015, this issue; Sharma et al. in Space Sci. Rev. 2015, in preparation) in this special issue showcase the considerable body of observations in solar, magnetospheric and fusion plasma inspired by the SOC idea, and expose the fertile role the new paradigm has played in approaches to modeling and understanding multiscale plasma instabilities. This very broad impact, and the necessary process of adapting a scientific hypothesis to the conditions of a given physical system, has meant that SOC as studied in these fields has sometimes differed significantly from the definition originally given by its creators. In Bak's own field of theoretical physics there are significant observational and theoretical open questions, even 25 years on (Pruessner 2012). One aim of the present review is to address the dichotomy between the great reception SOC has received in some areas, and its shortcomings, as they became manifest in the controversies it triggered. Our article tries to clear up what we think are misunderstandings of SOC in fields more remote from its origins in statistical mechanics, condensed matter and dynamical systems by revisiting Bak, Tang and Wiesenfeld's original papers.

  8. On the Dynamic of Population Spreading of Self-Organized Colonies of Individuals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albano, Ezequiel V.

    A simple model for the self-organized displacements of self-driving individuals, aimed to describe the dynamic of flocking behavior among living things, is presented and studied. Processes such as growth, death, survival, self-propagation, competition and communication are considered. The model has two simple rules: The first one governs the displacements and states that all individuals have some tendency to assume the average age direction of motion of the neighboring individuals with some random perturbation (noise) added. The ability of the individuals to damp the external noise is introduced by means of the parameter α, such as for α→0 individuals cannot suppress the noise while for larger α-values e.g. α≥4 the noise is effectively suppressed. The second rule allow the individuals to self-regulate the population. The dynamic of the spreading of small colonies on an otherwise empty sample is firstly studied. The survivability of the colonies depends on the starting configuration. In finite samples and after some transient period, surviving colonies succeed to establish a stationary state. It is found that the spreading behavior of the colonies is independent on the parameter α. Spreading studies performed in finite space shows that after some transient period the systems reaches a stationary state with a constant (average) density of individuals. Such state can also be achieved starting from a randomly distributed population. In the stationary state the population density is conserved, however the local density of individuals becomes enhaced, in comparison to the global density. This behavior reflects a clustering tendency, i.e. "flocking behavior". Different patterns of displacement, ranging from random migration (resembling clouds of mosquitoes) to well ordered formations following a defined direction of migration (resembling herds of quadrupeds) are obtained varing the parameter α.

  9. Recurrence and interoccurrence behavior of self-organized complex phenomena

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. G. Abaimov

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available The sandpile, forest-fire and slider-block models are said to exhibit self-organized criticality. Associated natural phenomena include landslides, wildfires, and earthquakes. In all cases the frequency-size distributions are well approximated by power laws (fractals. Another important aspect of both the models and natural phenomena is the statistics of interval times. These statistics are particularly important for earthquakes. For earthquakes it is important to make a distinction between interoccurrence and recurrence times. Interoccurrence times are the interval times between earthquakes on all faults in a region whereas recurrence times are interval times between earthquakes on a single fault or fault segment. In many, but not all cases, interoccurrence time statistics are exponential (Poissonian and the events occur randomly. However, the distribution of recurrence times are often Weibull to a good approximation. In this paper we study the interval statistics of slip events using a slider-block model. The behavior of this model is sensitive to the stiffness α of the system, α=kC/kL where kC is the spring constant of the connector springs and kL is the spring constant of the loader plate springs. For a soft system (small α there are no system-wide events and interoccurrence time statistics of the larger events are Poissonian. For a stiff system (large α, system-wide events dominate the energy dissipation and the statistics of the recurrence times between these system-wide events satisfy the Weibull distribution to a good approximation. We argue that this applicability of the Weibull distribution is due to the power-law (scale invariant behavior of the hazard function, i.e. the probability that the next event will occur at a time t0 after the last event has a power-law dependence on t0. The Weibull distribution is the only distribution that

  10. Expression cartography of human tissues using self organizing maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Parallel high-throughput microarray and sequencing experiments produce vast quantities of multidimensional data which must be arranged and analyzed in a concerted way. One approach to addressing this challenge is the machine learning technique known as self organizing maps (SOMs). SOMs enable a parallel sample- and gene-centered view of genomic data combined with strong visualization and second-level analysis capabilities. The paper aims at bridging the gap between the potency of SOM-machine learning to reduce dimension of high-dimensional data on one hand and practical applications with special emphasis on gene expression analysis on the other hand. Results The method was applied to generate a SOM characterizing the whole genome expression profiles of 67 healthy human tissues selected from ten tissue categories (adipose, endocrine, homeostasis, digestion, exocrine, epithelium, sexual reproduction, muscle, immune system and nervous tissues). SOM mapping reduces the dimension of expression data from ten of thousands of genes to a few thousand metagenes, each representing a minicluster of co-regulated single genes. Tissue-specific and common properties shared between groups of tissues emerge as a handful of localized spots in the tissue maps collecting groups of co-regulated and co-expressed metagenes. The functional context of the spots was discovered using overrepresentation analysis with respect to pre-defined gene sets of known functional impact. We found that tissue related spots typically contain enriched populations of genes related to specific molecular processes in the respective tissue. Analysis techniques normally used at the gene-level such as two-way hierarchical clustering are better represented and provide better signal-to-noise ratios if applied to the metagenes. Metagene-based clustering analyses aggregate the tissues broadly into three clusters containing nervous, immune system and the remaining tissues. Conclusions The SOM technique

  11. Expression cartography of human tissues using self organizing maps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Löffler Markus

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Parallel high-throughput microarray and sequencing experiments produce vast quantities of multidimensional data which must be arranged and analyzed in a concerted way. One approach to addressing this challenge is the machine learning technique known as self organizing maps (SOMs. SOMs enable a parallel sample- and gene-centered view of genomic data combined with strong visualization and second-level analysis capabilities. The paper aims at bridging the gap between the potency of SOM-machine learning to reduce dimension of high-dimensional data on one hand and practical applications with special emphasis on gene expression analysis on the other hand. Results The method was applied to generate a SOM characterizing the whole genome expression profiles of 67 healthy human tissues selected from ten tissue categories (adipose, endocrine, homeostasis, digestion, exocrine, epithelium, sexual reproduction, muscle, immune system and nervous tissues. SOM mapping reduces the dimension of expression data from ten of thousands of genes to a few thousand metagenes, each representing a minicluster of co-regulated single genes. Tissue-specific and common properties shared between groups of tissues emerge as a handful of localized spots in the tissue maps collecting groups of co-regulated and co-expressed metagenes. The functional context of the spots was discovered using overrepresentation analysis with respect to pre-defined gene sets of known functional impact. We found that tissue related spots typically contain enriched populations of genes related to specific molecular processes in the respective tissue. Analysis techniques normally used at the gene-level such as two-way hierarchical clustering are better represented and provide better signal-to-noise ratios if applied to the metagenes. Metagene-based clustering analyses aggregate the tissues broadly into three clusters containing nervous, immune system and the remaining tissues

  12. Dissecting Ubiquitin Folding Using the Self-Organized Polymer Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Govardhan; Thirumalai, D

    2015-08-27

    Folding of Ubiquitin (Ub), a functionally important protein found in eukaryotic organisms, is investigated at low and neutral pH at different temperatures using simulations of the coarse-grained self-organized-polymer model with side chains (SOP-SC). The melting temperatures (Tm's), identified with the peaks in the heat capacity curves, decrease as pH decreases, in qualitative agreement with experiments. The calculated radius of gyration, showing dramatic variations with pH, is in excellent agreement with scattering experiments. At Tm, Ub folds in a two-state manner at low and neutral pH. Clustering analysis of the conformations sampled in equilibrium folding trajectories at Tm, with multiple transitions between the folded and unfolded states, shows a network of metastable states connecting the native and unfolded states. At low and neutral pH, Ub folds with high probability through a preferred set of conformations resulting in a pH-dependent dominant folding pathway. Folding kinetics reveal that Ub assembly at low pH occurs by multiple pathways involving a combination of nucleation-collapse and diffusion collision mechanism. The mechanism by which Ub folds is dictated by the stability of the key secondary structural elements responsible for establishing long-range contacts and collapse of Ub. Nucleation collapse mechanism holds if the stability of these elements are marginal, as would be the case at elevated temperatures. If the lifetimes associated with these structured microdomains are on the order of hundreds of microseconds, then Ub folding follows the diffusion-collision mechanism with intermediates, many of which coincide with those found in equilibrium. Folding at neutral pH is a sequential process with a populated intermediate resembling that sampled at equilibrium. The transition state structures, obtained using a Pfold analysis, are homogeneous and globular with most of the secondary and tertiary structures being native-like. Many of our findings for

  13. Evolutionary Cell Computing: From Protocells to Self-Organized Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombano, Silvano; New, Michael H.; Pohorille, Andrew; Scargle, Jeffrey; Stassinopoulos, Dimitris; Pearson, Mark; Warren, James

    2000-01-01

    On the path from inanimate to animate matter, a key step was the self-organization of molecules into protocells - the earliest ancestors of contemporary cells. Studies of the properties of protocells and the mechanisms by which they maintained themselves and reproduced are an important part of astrobiology. These studies also have the potential to greatly impact research in nanotechnology and computer science. Previous studies of protocells have focussed on self-replication. In these systems, Darwinian evolution occurs through a series of small alterations to functional molecules whose identities are stored. Protocells, however, may have been incapable of such storage. We hypothesize that under such conditions, the replication of functions and their interrelationships, rather than the precise identities of the functional molecules, is sufficient for survival and evolution. This process is called non-genomic evolution. Recent breakthroughs in experimental protein chemistry have opened the gates for experimental tests of non-genomic evolution. On the basis of these achievements, we have developed a stochastic model for examining the evolutionary potential of non-genomic systems. In this model, the formation and destruction (hydrolysis) of bonds joining amino acids in proteins occur through catalyzed, albeit possibly inefficient, pathways. Each protein can act as a substrate for polymerization or hydrolysis, or as a catalyst of these chemical reactions. When a protein is hydrolyzed to form two new proteins, or two proteins are joined into a single protein, the catalytic abilities of the product proteins are related to the catalytic abilities of the reactants. We will demonstrate that the catalytic capabilities of such a system can increase. Its evolutionary potential is dependent upon the competition between the formation of bond-forming and bond-cutting catalysts. The degree to which hydrolysis preferentially affects bonds in less efficient, and therefore less well

  14. Expression cartography of human tissues using self organizing maps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirth, Henry; Löffler, Markus; von Bergen, Martin; Binder, Hans

    2011-07-27

    Parallel high-throughput microarray and sequencing experiments produce vast quantities of multidimensional data which must be arranged and analyzed in a concerted way. One approach to addressing this challenge is the machine learning technique known as self organizing maps (SOMs). SOMs enable a parallel sample- and gene-centered view of genomic data combined with strong visualization and second-level analysis capabilities. The paper aims at bridging the gap between the potency of SOM-machine learning to reduce dimension of high-dimensional data on one hand and practical applications with special emphasis on gene expression analysis on the other hand. The method was applied to generate a SOM characterizing the whole genome expression profiles of 67 healthy human tissues selected from ten tissue categories (adipose, endocrine, homeostasis, digestion, exocrine, epithelium, sexual reproduction, muscle, immune system and nervous tissues). SOM mapping reduces the dimension of expression data from ten of thousands of genes to a few thousand metagenes, each representing a minicluster of co-regulated single genes. Tissue-specific and common properties shared between groups of tissues emerge as a handful of localized spots in the tissue maps collecting groups of co-regulated and co-expressed metagenes. The functional context of the spots was discovered using overrepresentation analysis with respect to pre-defined gene sets of known functional impact. We found that tissue related spots typically contain enriched populations of genes related to specific molecular processes in the respective tissue. Analysis techniques normally used at the gene-level such as two-way hierarchical clustering are better represented and provide better signal-to-noise ratios if applied to the metagenes. Metagene-based clustering analyses aggregate the tissues broadly into three clusters containing nervous, immune system and the remaining tissues. The SOM technique provides a more intuitive and

  15. Fertility Awareness

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... I Help Someone Who's Being Bullied? Volunteering Fertility Awareness KidsHealth > For Teens > Fertility Awareness Print A A A What's in this article? ... español Monitoreo de fertilidad What Is It? Fertility awareness is a way to prevent pregnancy by not ...

  16. Control of Separation and Diameter of Ag Nanorods through Self-organized Seeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Paul R.; Stagon, Stephen P.; Huang, Hanchen

    2015-11-01

    This paper proposes a mechanism of controlling the diameter and separation of metallic nanorods from physical vapor deposition through self-organized seeds and experimentally demonstrates the feasibility using Ag as the prototype metal, In as the seed, and Si the substrate. Being non-wetting on Si substrates, deposited In atoms self-organize into islands. Subsequently deposited Ag atoms attach to In islands, rather than to Si substrates, due to preferential bonding and geometrical shadowing. The experimental results show that self-organized In seeds of 5 nm nominal thickness give rise to the best separation and the smallest diameter of Ag nanorods.

  17. Heredity and self-organization: partners in the generation and evolution of phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malagon, Nicolas; Larsen, Ellen

    2015-01-01

    In this review we examine the role of self-organization in the context of the evolution of morphogenesis. We provide examples to show that self-organized behavior is ubiquitous, and suggest it is a mechanism that can permit high levels of biodiversity without the invention of ever-increasing numbers of genes. We also examine the implications of self-organization for understanding the "internal descriptions" of organisms and the concept of a genotype-phenotype map. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Perovskite light-emitting diodes based on solution-processed self-organized multiple quantum wells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Nana; Cheng, Lu; Ge, Rui; Zhang, Shuting; Miao, Yanfeng; Zou, Wei; Yi, Chang; Sun, Yan; Cao, Yu; Yang, Rong; Wei, Yingqiang; Guo, Qiang; Ke, You; Yu, Maotao; Jin, Yizheng; Liu, Yang; Ding, Qingqing; di, Dawei; Yang, Le; Xing, Guichuan; Tian, He; Jin, Chuanhong; Gao, Feng; Friend, Richard H.; Wang, Jianpu; Huang, Wei

    2016-11-01

    Organometal halide perovskites can be processed from solutions at low temperatures to form crystalline direct-bandgap semiconductors with promising optoelectronic properties. However, the efficiency of their electroluminescence is limited by non-radiative recombination, which is associated with defects and leakage current due to incomplete surface coverage. Here we demonstrate a solution-processed perovskite light-emitting diode (LED) based on self-organized multiple quantum wells (MQWs) with excellent film morphologies. The MQW-based LED exhibits a very high external quantum efficiency of up to 11.7%, good stability and exceptional high-power performance with an energy conversion efficiency of 5.5% at a current density of 100 mA cm-2. This outstanding performance arises because the lower bandgap regions that generate electroluminescence are effectively confined by perovskite MQWs with higher energy gaps, resulting in very efficient radiative decay. Surprisingly, there is no evidence that the large interfacial areas between different bandgap regions cause luminescence quenching.

  19. Manifestation of intrinsic defects in optical properties of self-organized opal photonic crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlasov; Astratov; Baryshev; Kaplyanskii; Karimov; Limonov

    2000-05-01

    Self-organized synthetic opals possessing a face centered cubic (fcc) lattice are promising for fabrication of a three-dimensional photonic crystal with a full photonic band gap in the visible. The fundamental limiting factor of this method is the large concentration of lattice defects and, especially, planar stacking faults, which are intrinsic to self-assembling growth of colloidal crystal. We have studied the influence of various types of defects on photonic band structure of synthetic opals by means of optical transmission, reflection and diffraction along different crystallographic directions. We found that in carefully chosen samples the stacking probability alpha can be as high as 0.8-0.9 revealing the strong preference of fcc packing sequence over the hexagonal close-packed (hcp). It is shown that scattering on plane stacking faults located perpendicular to the direction of growth results in a strong anisotropy of diffraction pattern as well as in appearance of a pronounced doublet structure in transmission and reflection spectra taken from the directions other than the direction of growth. This doublet is a direct manifestation of the coexistence of two crystallographic phases--pure fcc and strongly faulted. As a result the inhomogeneously broadened stop-bands overlap over a considerable amount of phase space. The latter, however, does not mean the depletion of the photonic density of states since large disordering results in filling of the partial gaps with both localized and extended states.

  20. A Self-Organizing Incremental Neural Network based on local distribution learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Youlu; Shi, Xiaofeng; Shen, Furao; Zhou, Ke; Zhao, Jinxi

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, we propose an unsupervised incremental learning neural network based on local distribution learning, which is called Local Distribution Self-Organizing Incremental Neural Network (LD-SOINN). The LD-SOINN combines the advantages of incremental learning and matrix learning. It can automatically discover suitable nodes to fit the learning data in an incremental way without a priori knowledge such as the structure of the network. The nodes of the network store rich local information regarding the learning data. The adaptive vigilance parameter guarantees that LD-SOINN is able to add new nodes for new knowledge automatically and the number of nodes will not grow unlimitedly. While the learning process continues, nodes that are close to each other and have similar principal components are merged to obtain a concise local representation, which we call a relaxation data representation. A denoising process based on density is designed to reduce the influence of noise. Experiments show that the LD-SOINN performs well on both artificial and real-word data. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Self-Organized Growth, Structure, and Magnetism of Monatomic Transition-Metal Oxide Chains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferstl, Pascal; Hammer, Lutz; Sobel, Christopher; Gubo, Matthias; Heinz, Klaus; Schneider, M. Alexander; Mittendorfer, Florian; Redinger, Josef

    2016-07-01

    We report on the self-organized growth of monatomic transition-metal oxide chains of (3 ×1 ) periodicity and unusual M O2 stoichiometry (M =Ni , Co, Fe, Mn) on Ir(100). We analyze their structural and magnetic properties by means of quantitative LEED, STM, and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. LEED analyses reveal a fascinating common atomic structure in which the transition-metal atoms sit above a missing-row structure of the surface and are coupled to the substrate only via oxygen atoms. This structure is confirmed by DFT calculations with structural parameters deviating by less than 1.7 pm. The DFT calculations predict that the NiO2 chains are nonmagnetic, CoO2 chains are ferromagnetic, while FeO2 and MnO2 are antiferromagnetic. All structures show only weak magnetic interchain coupling. Further, we demonstrate the growth of oxide chains of binary alloys of Co and Ni or Fe on Ir(100), which allows us to produce well-controlled ensembles of ferromagnetic chains of different lengths separated by nonmagnetic or antiferromagnetic segments.

  2. SIRS Model of Passengers’ Panic Propagation under Self-Organization Circumstance in the Subway Emergency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haifeng Zhao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Subway emergency may lead to passengers’ panic, especially under self-organizing circumstance, which will spread rapidly and have an adverse impact on the society. This paper builds an improved SIRS model of passengers’ panic spread in subway emergency with consideration of passengers’ density, the characteristic of subway car with the confined space, and passengers’ psychological factors. The spread of passengers’ panic is simulated by use of Matlab, which draws the rules of how group panic spreads dynamically. The trend of stable point of the infection ratio is analyzed by changing different parameters, which help to draw a conclusion that immunization rate, spontaneous immune loss rate, and passenger number have a great influence on the final infected ratio. Finally, we propose an integrated control strategy and find the peak of passengers’ panic and the final infected ratio is greatly improved through the numerical simulation. The research plays a vital role in helping the government and subway administration to master the panic spread mechanism and reduce the panic spread by improving measures and also provides certain reference significance for rail system construction, emergency contingency plans, and the construction and implementation of emergency response system.

  3. Self-organized magnetic particles to tune the mechanical behavior of a granular system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Meredith; Wang, Dong; Barés, Jonathan; Behringer, Robert P.

    2016-09-01

    Above a certain density a granular material jams. This property can be controlled by either tuning a global property, such as the packing fraction or by applying shear strain, or at the micro-scale by tuning grain shape, inter-particle friction or externally controlled organization. Here, we introduce a novel way to change a local granular property by adding a weak anisotropic magnetic interaction between particles. We measure the evolution of the pressure, P, and coordination number, Z, for a packing of 2D photo-elastic disks, subject to uniaxial compression. A fraction R m of the particles have embedded cuboidal magnets. The strength of the magnetic interactions between particles is too weak to have a strong direct effect on P or Z when the system is jammed. However, the magnetic interactions play an important role in the evolution of latent force networks when systems containing a large enough fraction of the particles with magnets are driven through unjammed to jammed states. In this case, a statistically stable network of magnetic chains self-organizes before jamming and overlaps with force chains once jamming occurs, strengthening the granular medium. This property opens a novel way to control mechanical properties of granular materials.

  4. Aging and efficiency in living systems: Complexity, adaptation and self-organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Atanu; Georgiev, Georgi; Iannacchione, Germano

    2017-04-01

    Living systems are open, out-of-equilibrium thermodynamic entities, that maintain order by locally reducing their entropy. Aging is a process by which these systems gradually lose their ability to maintain their out-of-equilibrium state, as measured by their free-energy rate density, and hence, their order. Thus, the process of aging reduces the efficiency of those systems, making them fragile and less adaptive to the environmental fluctuations, gradually driving them towards the state of thermodynamic equilibrium. In this paper, we discuss the various metrics that can be used to understand the process of aging from a complexity science perspective. Among all the metrics that we propose, action efficiency, is observed to be of key interest as it can be used to quantify order and self-organization in any physical system. Based upon our arguments, we present the dependency of other metrics on the action efficiency of a system, and also argue as to how each of the metrics, influences all the other system variables. In order to support our claims, we draw parallels between technological progress and biological growth. Such parallels are used to support the universal applicability of the metrics and the methodology presented in this paper. Therefore, the results and the arguments presented in this paper throw light on the finer nuances of the science of aging. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Self-organization of bimetallic PdAu nanoparticles on SiO{sub 2} surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruffino, F., E-mail: francesco.ruffino@ct.infn.it; Grimaldi, M. G. [Universita di Catania, Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia (Italy)

    2011-06-15

    Bimetallic PdAu nanoparticles on SiO{sub 2} substrate were produced by a sequential room-temperature sputtering deposition method. By the atomic force microscopy technique we studied the nanoparticles self-organization mechanisms in various conditions. First, Pd nucleation and growth proceeds at the substrate defects and the Pd nanoparticles density increase rapidly. During the second sputtering deposition, Au atoms adsorb on the SiO{sub 2} and diffuse toward Pd nanoparticles without forming new nuclei. The Au atoms are trapped by the preformed Pd nanoparticles, forming PdAu bimetallic nanoparticles which size increases. Furthermore, fixing the amount of deposited Pd and increasing the amount of deposited Au, we analyzed the evolution of the PdAu film surface morphology: we observe that the PdAu grows initially as three-dimensional islands; then the PdAu film morphology evolves from compact three-dimensional islands to partially coalesced worm-like structures, followed by a percolation morphology and finally to a continuous and rough film. The application of the interrupted coalescence model allowed us to evaluate the critical mean island diameter R{sub c} Almost-Equal-To 2.8 nm for the partial coalescence process. The application of the dynamic scaling theory of growing interfaces allowed us to evaluate the dynamic growth exponent {beta} = 0.21 {+-} 0.01 from the evolution of the film surface roughness. Finally, fixing the amount of deposited Pd and Au we studied the self-organization mechanism of the PdAu nanoparticles induced by thermal processes performed in the 973-1173 K temperature range. The observed kinetic growth mechanism is consistent with a surface diffusion-limited ripening of the nanoparticles with a temperature-dependent growth exponent. The dependence of the growth exponent on the temperature is supposed to be linked to the variation with the temperature of the characteristics of the PdAu alloy. The activation energy for the surface diffusion

  6. Self-organization in foliated phase space: a construction of scale hierarchy by adiabatic invariants of magnetized particles

    CERN Document Server

    Yoshida, Z

    2014-01-01

    Adiabatic invariants foliate phase space, and impart a macro-scale hierarchy by separating microscopic variables. On a macroscopic leaf, long-scale ordered structures are created while maximizing entropy. A plasma confined in a magnetosphere is invoked for unveiling the organizing principle ---in the vicinity of a magnetic dipole, the plasma self-organizes to a state with a steep density gradient. The resulting nontrivial structure has maximum entropy in an appropriate, constrained phase space. One could view such a phase space as a leaf foliated in terms of Casimir invariants ---adiabatic invariants measuring the number of quasi-particles (macroscopic representation of periodic motions) are identified as the relevant Casimir invariants. The density clump is created in response to the inhomogeneity of the energy level (frequency) of quasi-particles.

  7. Effects of Interactive Function Forms and Refractoryperiod in a Self-Organized Critical Model Based on Neural Networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOULi-Ming; CHENTian-Lun

    2004-01-01

    Based on the standard self-organizing map neural network model and an integrate-and-fire mechanism, we investigate the effect of the nonlinear interactive function on the self-organized criticality in our model. Based on the sewe also investigate the effect of the refractoryperiod on the self-organized criticality of the system.

  8. Effects of Interactive Function Forms and Refractoryperiod in a Self-Organized Critical Model Based on Neural Networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Li-Ming; CHEN Tian-Lun

    2004-01-01

    Based on the standard self-organizing map neural network model and an integrate-and-tire mechanism, we investigate the effect of the nonlinear interactive function on the self-organized criticality in our model. Based on these we also investigate the effect of the refractoryperiod on the self-organized criticality of the system.

  9. Effects of Some Neurobiological Factors in a Self-organized Critical Model Based on Neural Networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Li-Ming; ZHANG Ying-Yue; CHEN Tian-Lun

    2005-01-01

    Based on an integrate-and-fire mechanism, we investigate the effect of changing the efficacy of the synapse,the transmitting time-delayed, and the relative refractoryperiod on the self-organized criticality in our neural network model.

  10. Active self-organization of microtubules in an inert chamber system

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Arif Md Rashedul Kabir; Daisuke Inoue; Akira Kakugo; Kazuki Sada; Jian Ping Gong

    2012-01-01

    Microtubule-kinesin system is considered as a building block for the construction of artificial biomachines, and active self-organization of microtubules has been used to integrate their structural...

  11. Pseudo-self-organized topological phases in glassy selenides for IR photonics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shpotyuk, O. [Lviv Institute of Materials of Scientific Research Company ' ' Carat' ' 202, Stryjska str., 79031 Lviv (Ukraine); Institute of Physics of Jan Dlugosz University 13/15, al. Armii Krajowej, 42201 Czestochowa (Poland); Golovchak, R. [Lviv Institute of Materials of Scientific Research Company ' ' Carat' ' 202, Stryjska str., 79031 Lviv (Ukraine)

    2011-09-15

    Network-forming cluster approach is applied to As-Se and Ge-Se glasses to justify their tendency to self-organization. It is shown that reversibility windows determined by temperature-modulated differential scanning calorimetry using short-term aged or as-prepared samples do not necessary coincide with self-organized phase in these materials. The obtained results testify also pseudo-self-organization phenomenon in Ge-Se glasses: over-constrained outrigger raft structural units built of two edge- and four corner-shared tetrahedra are interconnected via optimally-constrained {identical_to}Ge-Se-Se-Ge{identical_to} bridges within the range of compositions identified previously as self-organized phase by temperature modulated differential scanning calorimetry technique. (copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  12. Number theoretic example of scale-free topology inducing self-organized criticality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luque, Bartolo; Miramontes, Octavio; Lacasa, Lucas

    2008-10-10

    In this Letter we present a general mechanism by which simple dynamics running on networks become self-organized critical for scale-free topologies. We illustrate this mechanism with a simple arithmetic model of division between integers, the division model. This is the simplest self-organized critical model advanced so far, and in this sense it may help to elucidate the mechanism of self-organization to criticality. Its simplicity allows analytical tractability, characterizing several scaling relations. Furthermore, its mathematical nature brings about interesting connections between statistical physics and number theoretical concepts. We show how this model can be understood as a self-organized stochastic process embedded on a network, where the onset of criticality is induced by the topology.

  13. Self-organization and oscillation of negatively charged dust particles in a 2-dimensional dusty plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Y.L. [College of Science, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100083 (China); Huang, F., E-mail: huangfeng@cau.edu.cn [College of Science, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100083 (China); Chen, Z.Y., E-mail: chenzy@mail.buct.edu.cn [Department of Physics, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China); State Key Laboratory of Laser Propulsion & Application, Beijing 101416 (China); Liu, Y.H. [School of Physics and Optoelectronic Engineering, Ludong University, Yantai 264025 (China); Yu, M.Y. [Institute for Fusion Theory and Simulation, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Institute for Theoretical Physics I, Ruhr University, D-44801 Bochum (Germany)

    2016-02-22

    Negatively charged dust particles immersed in 2-dimensional dusty plasma system are investigated by molecular dynamics simulations. The effects of the confinement potential and attraction interaction potential on dust particle self-organization are studied in detail and two typical dust particle distributions are obtained when the system reaches equilibrium. The average radial velocity (ARV), average radial force (ARF) and radial mean square displacement are employed to analyze the dust particles' dynamics. Both ARVs and ARFs exhibit oscillation behaviors when the simulation system reaches equilibrium state. The relationships between the oscillation and confinement potential and attraction potential are studied in this paper. The simulation results are qualitatively similar to experimental results. - Highlights: • Self-organization and oscillation of a 2-dimensional dusty plasma is investigated. • Effect of the confinement potential on dust self-organization and oscillation is given. • Effect of the attraction potential on dust self-organization and oscillation is studied.

  14. Topology assisted self-organization of colloidal nanoparticles: application to 2D large-scale nanomastering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadiri, Hind; Kostcheev, Serguei; Turover, Daniel; Salas-Montiel, Rafael; Nomenyo, Komla; Gokarna, Anisha; Lerondel, Gilles

    2014-01-01

    Our aim was to elaborate a novel method for fully controllable large-scale nanopatterning. We investigated the influence of the surface topology, i.e., a pre-pattern of hydrogen silsesquioxane (HSQ) posts, on the self-organization of polystyrene beads (PS) dispersed over a large surface. Depending on the post size and spacing, long-range ordering of self-organized polystyrene beads is observed wherein guide posts were used leading to single crystal structure. Topology assisted self-organization has proved to be one of the solutions to obtain large-scale ordering. Besides post size and spacing, the colloidal concentration and the nature of solvent were found to have a significant effect on the self-organization of the PS beads. Scanning electron microscope and associated Fourier transform analysis were used to characterize the morphology of the ordered surfaces. Finally, the production of silicon molds is demonstrated by using the beads as a template for dry etching.

  15. Self-organization in the Earth climate system versus Milankovitch-Berger astronomical cycles

    CERN Document Server

    Maslov, Lev A

    2014-01-01

    The Late Pleistocene Antarctic temperature variation curve is decomposed into two parts: cyclic and stochastic. These two parts represent different but tightly interconnected processes and also represent two different types of self-organization of the Earth climate system. The self-organization in the cyclic component is the non-linear auto-oscillation reaction of the Earth climate system, as a whole, to the input of solar radiation. The self-organization in the stochastic component is a nonlinear critical process, taking energy from, and fluctuating around the cyclic component of the temperature variations. The system of ODEs is written to model the cyclic part of the temperature variation, and the multifractal spectrum of the stochastic part of the temperature variation is calculated. The Earth climate can be characterized as an open, complex, self-organized dynamical system with nonlinear reaction to the input of solar radiation.

  16. Number theoretic example of scale-free topology inducing self-organized criticality

    CERN Document Server

    Luque, Bartolo; Lacasa, Lucas

    2008-01-01

    In this work we present a general mechanism by which simple dynamics running on networks become self-organized critical for scale free topologies. We illustrate this mechanism with a simple arithmetic model of division between integers, the division model. This is the simplest self-organized critical model advanced so far, and in this sense it may help to elucidate the mechanism of self-organization to criticality. Its simplicity allows analytical tractability, characterizing several scaling relations. Furthermore, its mathematical nature brings about interesting connections between statistical physics and number theoretical concepts. We show how this model can be understood as a self-organized stochastic process embedded on a network, where the onset of criticality is induced by the topology.

  17. Nanoscience with liquid crystals from self-organized nanostructures to applications

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Quan

    2014-01-01

    This book focuses on the exciting topic of nanoscience with liquid crystals: from self-organized nanostructures to applications. The elegant self-organized liquid crystalline nanostructures, the synergetic characteristics of liquid crystals and nanoparticles, liquid crystalline nanomaterials, synthesis of nanomaterials using liquid crystals as templates, nanoconfinement and nanoparticles of liquid crystals are covered and discussed, and the prospect of fabricating functional materials is highlighted. Contributions, collecting the scattered literature of the field from leading and active player

  18. Self organization of wireless sensor networks using ultra-wideband radios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowla, Farid U.; Nekoogar, Franak; Spiridon, Alex

    2009-06-16

    A novel UWB communications method and system that provides self-organization for wireless sensor networks is introduced. The self-organization is in terms of scalability, power conservation, channel estimation, and node synchronization in wireless sensor networks. The UWB receiver in the present invention adds two new tasks to conventional TR receivers. The two additional units are SNR enhancing unit and timing acquisition and tracking unit.

  19. Self-organization of domain growth in the Ising model with impurities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jørgen Vitting; Mouritsen, Ole G.

    1992-01-01

    in a cascade of spin flips at the domain boundaries. We have analyzed the lifetime and size distribution functions for the avalanches and related the results to the general phenomena of self-organized criticality and to recent experiments on cellular magnetic domain patterns in magnetic garnet films. Our...... results suggest that the self-organized state in this system appears to be subcritical, in agreement with a recent theory....

  20. Dendritic Liquid Crystals:Self-organization and Nuclear Magnetic Relaxation Investigation of Their Molecular Dynamics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    A.Van-quynh; P.J.Sebasti■o; D.Apreutesei; G.H.Mehl

    2007-01-01

    1 Results Liquid crystalline dendrimers and structurally related multipodes are supermolecules consisting of an amorphous hyper-branched core at the periphery of which are attached mesogenic groups capable of self-organization.Two opposite tendencies compete in these systems: the internal dendrimer tends to adopt a pseudo-spherical architecture that has a disordering influence on the packing of the mesogenic parts whose tend to self-organize into partially ordered structures.These kinds of systems show ...

  1. Extended Virtual Spring Mesh (EVSM): The Distributed Self-Organizing Mobile Ad Hoc Network for Area Exploration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurt Derr

    2011-12-01

    Mobile Ad hoc NETworks (MANETs) are distributed self-organizing networks that can change locations and configure themselves on the fly. This paper focuses on an algorithmic approach for the deployment of a MANET within an enclosed area, such as a building in a disaster scenario, which can provide a robust communication infrastructure for search and rescue operations. While a virtual spring mesh (VSM) algorithm provides scalable, self-organizing, and fault-tolerant capabilities required by aMANET, the VSM lacks the MANET's capabilities of deployment mechanisms for blanket coverage of an area and does not provide an obstacle avoidance mechanism. This paper presents a new technique, an extended VSM (EVSM) algorithm that provides the following novelties: (1) new control laws for exploration and expansion to provide blanket coverage, (2) virtual adaptive springs enabling the mesh to expand as necessary, (3) adapts to communications disturbances by varying the density and movement of mobile nodes, and (4) new metrics to assess the performance of the EVSM algorithm. Simulation results show that EVSM provides up to 16% more coverage and is 3.5 times faster than VSM in environments with eight obstacles.

  2. Coulomb gap and variable-range hopping in self-organized carbon networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govor, L. V.; Bashmakov, I. A.; Boehme, K.; Pientka, M.; Parisi, J.

    2001-08-01

    Carbon networks fabricated by means of a self-organized process, which is in the focus of our interest, represent disordered porous systems. The degree of disorder and, accordingly, the values of their electric conductivity extending from insulator to metal behavior change via heat treatment under vacuum conditions at process temperatures in the range from 600 to 1000 °C. Upon varying the ambient temperature from 4.2 to 295 K, four transport mechanisms can be observed. For carbon nets whose conductivity is far beyond the metal-insulator transition (MIT), the specific resistivity ρ depends on the temperature T as ρ(T)∝T-b exp([T0/T]1/p). In the low-temperature range, a Coulomb gap in the density of states located near the Fermi energy level occurs, which means that the characteristic value of the exponent is p=2. At high temperatures, the pre-exponential part ρ(T)∝T-b dominates. In the intermediate temperature range, we disclose Mott's hopping law with p=3. However, the specific resistivity of the carbon networks subject close to the MIT follows the power law ρ(T)∝T-b with 0≲b≲3 at low temperatures. In the high-temperature range, the specific resistivity is characterized by ρ(T)∝exp(-[T/T1]c-1), where the values for c vary from 1.3 to 1.5. The above four charge transport mechanisms can be explained by the tails in the density of localized states pulled out of the conduction and valence band, as a consequence of disorder and, particularly, by some overlap between these tails.

  3. Middleware Solutions for Self-organizing Multi-hop Multi-path Internet Connectivity Based on Bluetooth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellavista, Paolo; Giannelli, Carlo

    The availability of heterogeneous wireless interfaces and of growing computing resources on widespread portable devices pushes for enabling innovative deployment scenarios where mobile nodes dynamically self-organize to offer Internet connectivity to their peers via dynamically established multi-hop multi-path opportunities. We claim the suitability of novel, mobility-aware, and application-layer middleware based on lightweight evaluation indicators to support the complexity of that scenario, involving heterogeneous wireless technologies over differentiated and statically unpredictable execution environments. To validate these claims, we have implemented an innovative middleware that manages the durability/throughput-aware formation and selection of different multi-hop paths simultaneously. This paper specifically focuses on how our middleware effectively exploits Bluetooth for multi-hop multi-path networking, by pointing out the crucial role of i) compliance with standard solutions to favor rapid deployment over off-the-shelf equipment and ii) the reduction of the usual overhead associated with some expensive Bluetooth operations, e.g., device inquiry. In particular, the paper shows how it is possible, on the one hand, to extend JSR-82 to portably access monitoring indicators for lightweight mobility/throughput estimations and, on the other hand, to reduce the time needed to update the set of available Bluetooth-based connectivity opportunities via approximated and lightweight forms of discovery.

  4. Language Awareness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    White, Lana; Maylath, J. Bruce; Adams, Anthony; Couzijn, Michel

    2000-01-01

    Language Awareness: A History and Implementations offers teachers of mother tongue and foreign languages a view of the beginnings and the ramifications of the language-teaching movement called Language Awareness. The philosophy held in common among the teachers in this international movement is twof

  5. Language Awareness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    White, Lana; Maylath, J. Bruce; Adams, Anthony; Couzijn, Michel

    2000-01-01

    Language Awareness: A History and Implementations offers teachers of mother tongue and foreign languages a view of the beginnings and the ramifications of the language-teaching movement called Language Awareness. The philosophy held in common among the teachers in this international movement is

  6. The Self-Organization of a Spoken Word

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John G. eHolden

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Pronunciation time probability density and hazard functions from large speeded wordnaming data sets were assessed for empirical patterns consistent with multiplicative andreciprocal feedback dynamics—interaction dominant dynamics. Lognormal and inversepower-law distributions are associated with multiplicative and interdependent dynamicsin many natural systems. Mixtures of lognormal and inverse power-law distributionsoffered better descriptions of the participant’s distributions than the ex-Gaussian or ex-Wald—alternatives corresponding to additive, superposed, component processes. Theevidence for interaction dominant dynamics suggests fundamental links between theobserved coordinative synergies that support speech production and the shapes ofpronunciation time distributions.

  7. The self-organization of a spoken word.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holden, John G; Rajaraman, Srinivasan

    2012-01-01

    Pronunciation time probability density and hazard functions from large speeded word naming data sets were assessed for empirical patterns consistent with multiplicative and reciprocal feedback dynamics - interaction dominant dynamics. Lognormal and inverse power law distributions are associated with multiplicative and interdependent dynamics in many natural systems. Mixtures of lognormal and inverse power law distributions offered better descriptions of the participant's distributions than the ex-Gaussian or ex-Wald - alternatives corresponding to additive, superposed, component processes. The evidence for interaction dominant dynamics suggests fundamental links between the observed coordinative synergies that support speech production and the shapes of pronunciation time distributions.

  8. Consumption, supply and transport: self-organization without direct communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessler, J. O.

    1996-01-01

    Swimming bacteria of the species Bacillus subtilis require and consume oxygen. In static liquid cultures the cells' swimming behaviour leads them to accumulate up oxygen concentration gradients generated by consumption and supply. Since the density of bacterial cells exceeds that of the fluid in which they live, fluid regions where cells have accumulated are denser than depleted regions. These density variations cause convection. The fluid motion is dynamically maintained by the swimming of the cells toward regions of attraction: the air-fluid interface and the fluctuating advecting attractors, gradients of oxygen concentration that are embedded in the convecting fluid. Because of the fluid dynamical conservation laws, these complex physical and biological factors generate patterns ordered over distances > 10000 bacterial cell diameters. The convection enhances long-range transport and mixing of oxygen, cells and extracellular products by orders of magnitude. Thus, through the interplay of physical and biological factors, a population of undifferentiated selfish cells creates functional dynamic patterns. Populations of bacteria that have organised themselves into regularly patterned regions of vigorous convection and varying cell concentration interact with their environment as if they were one purposeful, coherent multicellular individual. The mathematical and experimental ingredients of these remarkable phenomena are presented here.

  9. Self-organizing strategy design and validation for integrated air-ground detection swarm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Meiyan An; Zhaokui Wang; Yulin Zhang

    2016-01-01

    A self-organized integrated air-ground detection swarm is tentatively applied to achieve reentry vehicle landing detection, such as searching and rescuing a manned spaceship. The detec-tion swarm consists of multiple unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) and unmanned ground vehicles (UGVs). The UAVs can access a detected object quickly for high mobility, while the UGVs can comprehensively investigate the object due to the variety of car-ried equipment. In addition, the integrated air-ground detection swarm is capable of detecting from the ground and the air si-multaneously. To accomplish the coordination of the UGVs and UAVs, they are al regarded as individuals of the artificial swarm. Those individuals make control decisions independently of others based on the self-organizing strategy. The overal requirements for the detection swarm are analyzed, and the theoretical model of the self-organizing strategy based on a combined individual and environmental virtual function is established. The numerical in-vestigation proves that the self-organizing strategy is suitable and scalable to control the detection swarm. To further inspect the en-gineering reliability, an experiment set is established in laboratory, and the experimental demonstration shows that the self-organizing strategy drives the detection swarm forming a close range and mul-tiangular surveil ance configuration of a landing spot.

  10. Brain basis of self: self-organization and lessons from dreaming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahn, David

    2013-01-01

    Through dreaming, a different facet of the self is created as a result of a self-organizing process in the brain. Self-organization in biological systems often happens as an answer to an environmental change for which the existing system cannot cope; self-organization creates a system that can cope in the newly changed environment. In dreaming, self-organization serves the function of organizing disparate memories into a dream since the dreamer herself is not able to control how individual memories become weaved into a dream. The self-organized dream provides, thereby, a wide repertoire of experiences; this expanded repertoire of experience results in an expansion of the self beyond that obtainable when awake. Since expression of the self is associated with activity in specific areas of the brain, the article also discusses the brain basis of the self by reviewing studies of brain injured patients, discussing brain imaging studies in normal brain functioning when focused, when daydreaming and when asleep and dreaming.

  11. Self-organization of the earth's biosphere-geochemical or geophysiological?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartzman, David W.; Shore, Steven N.; Volk, Tyler; Mcmenamin, Mark

    1994-01-01

    We explore the implications of indicating the biosphere's self-organization by the trend over time of the net entropic flow from the Earth's surface, the actual physical boundary of virtually all biotic mass. This flow, derived from the radiative surface entropy budget, is approximately inversely related to the surface temperature when the solar incident flux remains constant. In the geophysiological ('gaian') interpretation, biospheric self-organization has increased with the progressive colonization of the continents and evolutionary developments in the land biota, as a result of surface cooling arising from biotic enhancement of weathering. The key site for this self-organization is at the interface between land and atmosphere, the soil, where carbon is sequestered by its reaction (as carbonic and organic acids) with calcium magnesium silicates. Along with disequilibrium (steady-state) levels of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere, the occurrence of differentiated soil is the critical material evidence for biospheric self-organization, whether it be geophysiological or geochemical (ie., purely result of inorganic reactions). The computed equilibrium levels of carbon dioxide and corresponding equilibrium temperatures in the past are dramatically different from the steady-state levels. With future solar luminosity increase, the biospheric capacity for climatic regulation will decrease, leading to the ending of self-organization some two billion years from now. The Earth's surface will then approach chemical equilibrium with respect to the carbonate-silicate cycle.

  12. [Intraoperative awareness].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, G

    2003-02-01

    The first cases of general anesthesia were already cases with awareness. Until today, case reports of patients with awareness are published. These published cases are likely to be the top of the iceberg, as most patients with postoperative recall do not inform their anesthesiologist. Incidence of awareness with recall is between 0.1 and 0.2 %. In a large multicenter-study, incidence of recall was 0.1 % without, and 0.18 % with the use of muscle relaxants. The risk is increased with decreased doses of anesthetics, e.g. in patients with hemodynamic instability (trauma cases), patients undergoing cesarean section or cardiac surgery. Intraoperative awareness does not necessarily cause explicit (conscious) memory. Even in the absence of explicit memory, implicit (unconscious) memory can still have consequences for the patient. In the worst case, it can cause post-traumatic stress disorder. There is doubt whether patients may profit from positive suggestions given during intraoperative awareness. Recommendations to administer benzodiazepines to prevent explicit memory must be reconsidered. Complete neuromuscular block should be avoided whenever possible. If a patient is thought to be aware, he should be contacted, his situation should be explained and affirming comments should be given until consciousness is lost again. Postoperative visit should include questions about awareness and recall. The anesthetist should not disbelieve reported recall. Explanation of what had happened and referral to an experienced psychologist must be offered. Thus, the incidence of severe sequelae should decrease.

  13. Self-organized formation of metal-carbon nanostructures by hyperthermal ion deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hannstein, I.K.

    2006-04-26

    The quasi-simultaneous deposition of mass-selected hyperthermal carbon and metal ions results in a variety of interesting film morphologies, depending on the metal used and the deposition conditions. The observed features are of the order of a few nanometres and are therefore interesting for future potential applications in the various fields of nanotechnology. The present study focuses on the structural analysis of amorphous carbon films containing either copper, silver, gold, or iron using amongst others Rutherford Backscattering Spectroscopy, High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy, and Energy Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy. The film morphologies found are as follows: copper-containing films consist of copper nanoclusters with sizes ranging from about 3 to 9 nm uniformly distributed throughout the amorphous carbon matrix. The cluster size hereby rises with the copper content of the films. The silver containing films decompose into a pure amorphous carbon film with silver agglomerates at the surface. Both, the gold- and the iron-containing films show a multilayer structure of metal-rich layers with higher cluster density separated by metal-depleted amorphous carbon layers. The layer distances are of the order of up to 15 nm in the case of gold-carbon films and 7 nm in the case of iron-carbon films. The formation of theses different structures cannot be treated in the context of conventional self-organization mechanisms basing upon thermal diffusion and equilibrium thermodynamics. Instead, an ion-induced atomic transport, sputtering effects, and the stability of small metal clusters were taken into account in order to model the structure formation processes. A similar multilayer morphology was recently also reported in the literature for metal-carbon films grown by magnetron sputtering techniques. In order to investigate, whether the mechanisms are the same as in the case of the ion beam deposited films described above, first experiments were conducted

  14. Are Namibian “Fairy Circles” the Consequence of Self-Organizing Spatial Vegetation Patterning?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cramer, Michael D.; Barger, Nichole N.

    2013-01-01

    Causes of over-dispersed barren “fairy circles” that are often surrounded by ca. 0.5 m tall peripheral grasses in a matrix of shorter (ca. 0.2 m tall) grasses in Namibian grasslands remain mysterious. It was hypothesized that the fairy circles are the consequence of self-organizing spatial vegetation patterning arising from resource competition and facilitation. We examined the edaphic properties of fairy circles and variation in fairy circle size, density and landscape occupancy (% land surface) with edaphic properties and water availability at a local scale (<50 km) and with climate and vegetation characteristics at a regional scale. Soil moisture in the barren fairy circles declines from the center towards the periphery and is inversely correlated with soil organic carbon, possibly indicating that the peripheral grass roots access soil moisture that persists into the dry season within fairy circles. Fairy circle landscape occupancy is negatively correlated with precipitation and soil [N], consistent with fairy circles being the product of resource-competition. Regional fairy circle presence/absence is highly predictable using an empirical model that includes narrow ranges of vegetation biomass, precipitation and temperature seasonality as predictor variables, indicating that fairy circles are likely a climate-dependent emergent phenomenon. This dependence of fairy circle occurrence on climate explains why fairy circles in some locations may appear and disappear over time. Fairy circles are only over-dispersed at high landscape occupancies, indicating that inter-circle competition may determine their spacing. We conclude that fairy circles are likely to be an emergent arid-grassland phenomenon that forms as a consequence of peripheral grass resource-competition and that the consequent barren circle may provide a resource-reservoir essential for the survival of the larger peripheral grasses and provides a habitat for fossicking fauna. PMID:23976962

  15. Are Namibian "fairy circles" the consequence of self-organizing spatial vegetation patterning?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cramer, Michael D; Barger, Nichole N

    2013-01-01

    Causes of over-dispersed barren "fairy circles" that are often surrounded by ca. 0.5 m tall peripheral grasses in a matrix of shorter (ca. 0.2 m tall) grasses in Namibian grasslands remain mysterious. It was hypothesized that the fairy circles are the consequence of self-organizing spatial vegetation patterning arising from resource competition and facilitation. We examined the edaphic properties of fairy circles and variation in fairy circle size, density and landscape occupancy (% land surface) with edaphic properties and water availability at a local scale (<50 km) and with climate and vegetation characteristics at a regional scale. Soil moisture in the barren fairy circles declines from the center towards the periphery and is inversely correlated with soil organic carbon, possibly indicating that the peripheral grass roots access soil moisture that persists into the dry season within fairy circles. Fairy circle landscape occupancy is negatively correlated with precipitation and soil [N], consistent with fairy circles being the product of resource-competition. Regional fairy circle presence/absence is highly predictable using an empirical model that includes narrow ranges of vegetation biomass, precipitation and temperature seasonality as predictor variables, indicating that fairy circles are likely a climate-dependent emergent phenomenon. This dependence of fairy circle occurrence on climate explains why fairy circles in some locations may appear and disappear over time. Fairy circles are only over-dispersed at high landscape occupancies, indicating that inter-circle competition may determine their spacing. We conclude that fairy circles are likely to be an emergent arid-grassland phenomenon that forms as a consequence of peripheral grass resource-competition and that the consequent barren circle may provide a resource-reservoir essential for the survival of the larger peripheral grasses and provides a habitat for fossicking fauna.

  16. Are Namibian "fairy circles" the consequence of self-organizing spatial vegetation patterning?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael D Cramer

    Full Text Available Causes of over-dispersed barren "fairy circles" that are often surrounded by ca. 0.5 m tall peripheral grasses in a matrix of shorter (ca. 0.2 m tall grasses in Namibian grasslands remain mysterious. It was hypothesized that the fairy circles are the consequence of self-organizing spatial vegetation patterning arising from resource competition and facilitation. We examined the edaphic properties of fairy circles and variation in fairy circle size, density and landscape occupancy (% land surface with edaphic properties and water availability at a local scale (<50 km and with climate and vegetation characteristics at a regional scale. Soil moisture in the barren fairy circles declines from the center towards the periphery and is inversely correlated with soil organic carbon, possibly indicating that the peripheral grass roots access soil moisture that persists into the dry season within fairy circles. Fairy circle landscape occupancy is negatively correlated with precipitation and soil [N], consistent with fairy circles being the product of resource-competition. Regional fairy circle presence/absence is highly predictable using an empirical model that includes narrow ranges of vegetation biomass, precipitation and temperature seasonality as predictor variables, indicating that fairy circles are likely a climate-dependent emergent phenomenon. This dependence of fairy circle occurrence on climate explains why fairy circles in some locations may appear and disappear over time. Fairy circles are only over-dispersed at high landscape occupancies, indicating that inter-circle competition may determine their spacing. We conclude that fairy circles are likely to be an emergent arid-grassland phenomenon that forms as a consequence of peripheral grass resource-competition and that the consequent barren circle may provide a resource-reservoir essential for the survival of the larger peripheral grasses and provides a habitat for fossicking fauna.

  17. Analytical SIR for Self-Organizing Wireless Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung KiWon

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The signal to interference ratio (SIR in the presence of multipath fading, shadowing and path loss is a valuable parameter for studying the capacity of a wireless system. This paper presents a new generalized path loss equation that takes into account the large-scale path loss as well as the small-scale multipath fading. The probability density function (pdf of the SIR for self-organising wireless networks with Nakagami- channel model is analytically derived using the new path loss equation. We chose the Nakagami- channel fading model because it encompasses a large class of fading channels. The results presented show good agreement between the analytical and Monte Carlo- based methods. Furthermore, the pdf of the signal to interference plus noise ratio (SINR is provided as an extension to the SIR derivation. The analytical derivation of the pdf for a single interferer in this paper lays a solid foundation to calculate the statistics for multiple interferers.

  18. Global consensus theorem and self-organized criticality: unifying principles for understanding self-organization, swarm intelligence and mechanisms of carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenfeld, Simon

    2013-01-01

    Complex biological systems manifest a large variety of emergent phenomena among which prominent roles belong to self-organization and swarm intelligence. Generally, each level in a biological hierarchy possesses its own systemic properties and requires its own way of observation, conceptualization, and modeling. In this work, an attempt is made to outline general guiding principles in exploration of a wide range of seemingly dissimilar phenomena observed in large communities of individuals devoid of any personal intelligence and interacting with each other through simple stimulus-response rules. Mathematically, these guiding principles are well captured by the Global Consensus Theorem (GCT) equally applicable to neural networks and to Lotka-Volterra population dynamics. Universality of the mechanistic principles outlined by GCT allows for a unified approach to such diverse systems as biological networks, communities of social insects, robotic communities, microbial communities, communities of somatic cells, social networks and many other systems. Another cluster of universal laws governing the self-organization in large communities of locally interacting individuals is built around the principle of self-organized criticality (SOC). The GCT and SOC, separately or in combination, provide a conceptual basis for understanding the phenomena of self-organization occurring in large communities without involvement of a supervisory authority, without system-wide informational infrastructure, and without mapping of general plan of action onto cognitive/behavioral faculties of its individual members. Cancer onset and proliferation serves as an important example of application of these conceptual approaches. In this paper, the point of view is put forward that apparently irreconcilable contradictions between two opposing theories of carcinogenesis, that is, the Somatic Mutation Theory and the Tissue Organization Field Theory, may be resolved using the systemic approaches

  19. Global Consensus Theorem and Self-Organized Criticality: Unifying Principles for Understanding Self-Organization, Swarm Intelligence and Mechanisms of Carcinogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenfeld, Simon

    2013-01-01

    Complex biological systems manifest a large variety of emergent phenomena among which prominent roles belong to self-organization and swarm intelligence. Generally, each level in a biological hierarchy possesses its own systemic properties and requires its own way of observation, conceptualization, and modeling. In this work, an attempt is made to outline general guiding principles in exploration of a wide range of seemingly dissimilar phenomena observed in large communities of individuals devoid of any personal intelligence and interacting with each other through simple stimulus-response rules. Mathematically, these guiding principles are well captured by the Global Consensus Theorem (GCT) equally applicable to neural networks and to Lotka-Volterra population dynamics. Universality of the mechanistic principles outlined by GCT allows for a unified approach to such diverse systems as biological networks, communities of social insects, robotic communities, microbial communities, communities of somatic cells, social networks and many other systems. Another cluster of universal laws governing the self-organization in large communities of locally interacting individuals is built around the principle of self-organized criticality (SOC). The GCT and SOC, separately or in combination, provide a conceptual basis for understanding the phenomena of self-organization occurring in large communities without involvement of a supervisory authority, without system-wide informational infrastructure, and without mapping of general plan of action onto cognitive/behavioral faculties of its individual members. Cancer onset and proliferation serves as an important example of application of these conceptual approaches. In this paper, the point of view is put forward that apparently irreconcilable contradictions between two opposing theories of carcinogenesis, that is, the Somatic Mutation Theory and the Tissue Organization Field Theory, may be resolved using the systemic approaches

  20. Anesthesia Awareness

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... biopsy or a dental procedure Local or regional anesthesia, such as an epidural or spinal block, or a nerve block To reduce your risk of experiencing awareness during procedures with general anesthesia, it is important to tell your physician anesthesiologist ...

  1. Spatial fluctuations of pedestrian velocities in bidirectional streams: Exploring the effects of self-organization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saberi, Meead; Aghabayk, Kayvan; Sobhani, Amir

    2015-09-01

    Individual pedestrian velocities vary over time and space depending on the crowd size, location of individuals' within the crowd, and formation of self-organized lanes. We use empirical data to explore the spatial fluctuations of pedestrian velocities in bidirectional streams. We find that, unlike ordinary fluids, the velocity profile in bidirectional pedestrian streams does not necessarily follow a hyperbolic form. Rather, the shape of the velocity profile is highly dependent on the formation of self-organized lanes. We also show that the spatial fluctuations of pedestrian velocities along and transverse to the flow direction are widely distributed and can be modeled by a sum of Gaussian distributions. Results suggest that the effect of self-organization phenomenon is strong enough that for the same crowd size, the velocity distribution does not significantly change when pedestrians are highly mixed compared to when separate lanes are formed.

  2. Subwavelength Microstructures Fabrication by Self-Organization Processes in Photopolymerizable Nanocomposite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Yu. Denisyuk

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes our research results on nanometers sizes subwavelength nanostructure fabrication by UV curing of special nanocomposite material with self-organization and light self-focusing effects. For this purpose, special UV curable nanocomposite material with a set of effects was developing: light self-focusing in the photopolymer with positive refractive index change, self-organization based on photo-induced nanoparticles transportation, and oxygen-based polymerization threshold. Both holographic and projection lithography writing methods application for microstructure making shows geometrical optical laws perturbation as result of nanocomposite self-organization effects with formation of nanometers-sized high-aspect-ratio structures. Obtained results will be useful for diffraction limit overcoming in projection lithography as well as for deep lithography technique.

  3. Self-organization of In2S3 quantum dots into fractal nanostructures by electrophoretic deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigneashwari, B; Tyagi, A K; Dash, S; Shankar, P; Manna, I; Suthanthiraraj, S Austin

    2009-09-01

    This paper describes the assembly of In2S3 quantum dots by electrophoretic deposition (EPD) and their subsequent self-organization into fractal nanostructures over ITO substrates. The surface morphology and the organization of these dots into nanostructures were analyzed using SEM, HRSEM and AFM techniques. These analyses reveal the existence, under appropriate conditions, of very unique nanoscale structural motifs and scale invariance associated with the assembly. Formation of such a well correlated assembly, although seems to be electric field driven, appears to be dominated by self-organizing mechanism. Such self-organized nano-scale structures consisting of cavities are likely to have fascinating condensed phase transport properties. The paper reports microscopic study of such fractal assemblies using SEM, HTSEM and AFM.

  4. Self-organizing approximation-based control for higher order systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yuanyuan; Farrell, Jay A

    2007-07-01

    Adaptive approximation-based control typically uses approximators with a predefined set of basis functions. Recently, spatially dependent methods have defined self-organizing approximators where new locally supported basis elements were incorporated when existing basis elements were insufficiently excited. In this paper, performance-dependent self-organizing approximators will be defined. The designer specifies a positive tracking error criteria. The self-organizing approximation-based controller then monitors the tracking performance and adds basis elements only as needed to achieve the tracking specification. The method of this paper is applicable to general nth-order input-state feedback linearizable systems. This paper includes a complete stability analysis and a detailed simulation example.

  5. Self-organizing control strategy for asteroid intelligent detection swarm based on attraction and repulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Meiyan; Wang, Zhaokui; Zhang, Yulin

    2017-01-01

    The self-organizing control strategy for asteroid intelligent detection swarm, which is considered as a space application instance of intelligent swarm, is developed. The leader-follower model for the asteroid intelligent detection swarm is established, and the further analysis is conducted for massive asteroid and small asteroid. For a massive asteroid, the leader spacecraft flies under the gravity field of the asteroid. For a small asteroid, the asteroid gravity is negligible, and a trajectory planning method is proposed based on elliptic cavity virtual potential field. The self-organizing control strategy for the follower spacecraft is developed based on a mechanism of velocity planning and velocity tracking. The simulation results show that the self-organizing control strategy is valid for both massive asteroid and small asteroid, and the exploration swarm forms a stable configuration.

  6. Self-organizing fuzzy clustering neural network and application to electronic countermeasures effectiveness evaluation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    A self-organizing fuzzy clustering neural network by combining the self-organizing Kohonen clustering network with the fuzzy theory is proposed.This network model is designed for the effectiveness evaluation of electronic countermeasures,which not only exerts the advantages of the fuzzy theory,but also has a good ability in machine learning and data analysis.The subjective value of sample versus class is computed by the fuzzy computing theory,and the classified results obtained by self-organizing learning of Kohonen neural network are represented on output layer.Meanwhile,the fuzzy competition learning algorithm keeps the similar information between samples and overcomes the disadvantages of neural network which has fewer samples.The simulation result indicates that the proposed algorithm is feasible and effective.

  7. Self-organization in Complex Systems The Past, Present, and Future of Synergetics : International Symposium

    CERN Document Server

    Pelster, Axel

    2016-01-01

    This proceedings volume contains talks and poster presentations from the International Symposium "Self-Organization in Complex Systems: The Past, Present, and Future of Synergetics", which took place at Hanse-Wissenschaftskolleg, an Institute of Advanced Studies, in Delmenhorst, Germany, during the period November 13 - 16, 2012. The Symposium was organized in honour of Hermann Haken, who celebrated his 85th birthday in 2012. With his fundamental theory of Synergetics he had laid the mathematical-physical basis for describing and analyzing self-organization processes in a diversity of fields of research. The quest for common and universal principles of self-organization in complex systems was clearly covered by the wide range of interdisciplinary topics reported during the Symposium. These extended from complexity in classical systems and quantum systems over self-organisation in neuroscience even to the physics of finance. Moreover, by combining a historical view with a present status report the Symposium con...

  8. Tilt aftereffects in a self-organizing model of the primary visual cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bednar, J A; Miikkulainen, R

    2000-07-01

    RF-LISSOM, a self-organizing model of laterally connected orientation maps in the primary visual cortex, was used to study the psychological phenomenon known as the tilt aftereffect. The same self-organizing processes that are responsible for the long-term development of the map are shown to result in tilt aftereffects over short timescales in the adult. The model permits simultaneous observation of large numbers of neurons and connections, making it possible to relate high-level phenomena to low-level events, which is difficult to do experimentally. The results give detailed computational support for the long-standing conjecture that the direct tilt aftereffect arises from adaptive lateral interactions between feature detectors. They also make a new prediction that the indirect effect results from the normalization of synaptic efficacies during this process. The model thus provides a unified computational explanation of self-organization and both the direct and indirect tilt aftereffect in the primary visual cortex.

  9. Secure eHealth-Care Service on Self-Organizing Software Platform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Im Y. Jung

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available There are several applications connected to IT health devices on the self-organizing software platform (SoSp that allow patients or elderly users to be cared for remotely by their family doctors under normal circumstances or during emergencies. An evaluation of the SoSp applied through PAAR watch/self-organizing software platform router was conducted targeting a simple user interface for aging users, without the existence of extrasettings based on patient movement. On the other hand, like normal medical records, the access to, and transmission of, health information via PAAR watch/self-organizing software platform requires privacy protection. This paper proposes a security framework for health information management of the SoSp. The proposed framework was designed to ensure easy detection of identification information for typical users. In addition, it provides powerful protection of the user’s health information.

  10. Mobility Model for Self-Organizing and Cooperative MSN and MANET Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrzej Sikora

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Self-organization mechanisms are used for building scalable systems consisting of a huge number of subsystems. In computer networks, self-organizing is especially important in ad hoc networking. A self-organizing ad hoc network is a collection of wireless devices that collaborate with each other to form a network system that adapts to achieve a goal or goals. Such network is often built from mobile devices that may spontaneously create a network and dynamically adapted to changes in an unknown environment. Mobility pattern is a critical element that influences the performance characteristics of mobile sensor networks (MSN and mobile ad hoc networks (MANET. In this paper, we survey main directions to mobility modeling. We describe a novel algorithm for calculating mobility patterns for mobile devices that is based on a cluster formation and an artificial potential function. Finally, we present the simulation results of its application to a rescue mission planning.

  11. Temporal, spatial and social patterens of self-organization within street sport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sand, Anne-Lene

    of being self-organized. This is showcased through different types of street sport as parkour, skateboarding, soccer and street handball. This multi-practices perspective allows me to analyse the way in which street sport is organized as a board phenomenon. Danish research show that associated sport......Due to an increased urbanization and digitalization self-organized practices are becoming a central way of doing sports among contemporary young people and adults in urban contexts. The aim of this presentation is to contribute with knowledge about what it means to be self-organized within street...... sport. Scandinavian youth research tend to discuss the practices of young people in relation to institutionalized places which tend to organize the practices in pre-established activities that are organized for them in terms of where it takes place, when, how and with whom (Zeiher 2001). In contrast...

  12. Adolescent self-organization predicts midlife memory in a prospective birth cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Man K; Jones, Peter B; Barnett, Jennifer H; Gaysina, Darya; Kuh, Diana; Croudace, Tim J; Richards, Marcus

    2013-12-01

    Childhood and adolescent mental health have a lasting impact on adult life chances, with strong implications for subsequent health, including cognitive aging. Using the British 1946 birth cohort, the authors tested associations between adolescent conduct problems, emotional problems and aspects of self-organization, and verbal memory at 43 years and rate of decline in verbal memory from 43 to 60-64 years. After controlling for childhood intelligence, adolescent self-organization was positively associated with verbal memory at 43 years, mainly through educational attainment, although not with rate of memory decline. Associations between adolescent conduct and emotional problems and future memory were of negligible magnitude. It has been suggested that interventions to improve self-organization may save a wide range of societal costs; this study also suggests that this might also benefit cognitive function in later life. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved.

  13. A framework for proving the self-organization of dynamic systems

    CERN Document Server

    Anceaume, Emmanuelle; Potop-Butucaru, Maria; Roy, Matthieu

    2010-01-01

    This paper aims at providing a rigorous definition of self- organization, one of the most desired properties for dynamic systems (e.g., peer-to-peer systems, sensor networks, cooperative robotics, or ad-hoc networks). We characterize different classes of self-organization through liveness and safety properties that both capture information re- garding the system entropy. We illustrate these classes through study cases. The first ones are two representative P2P overlays (CAN and Pas- try) and the others are specific implementations of \\Omega (the leader oracle) and one-shot query abstractions for dynamic settings. Our study aims at understanding the limits and respective power of existing self-organized protocols and lays the basis of designing robust algorithm for dynamic systems.

  14. Giddens' "structuration," Luhmann's "self-organization," and the operationalization of the dynamics of meaning

    CERN Document Server

    Leydesdorff, Loet

    2009-01-01

    Luhmann's social systems theory and Giddens' structuration theory of action share an emphasis on reflexivity, but focus on meaning along a divide between inter-human communication and intentful action as two different systems of reference. Recombining these two theories, simulations of interaction, organization, and self-organization of intentional communication can be distinguished by using algorithms from the computation of anticipatory systems. The self-organizing and organizing layers remain rooted in the double contingency of the human encounter which provides the variation. Organization and self-organization of communication are reflexive upon and therefore reconstructive of each other. Using mutual information in three dimensions, the imprint of meaning processing in the modeling system on the historical organization of uncertainty in the modeled system can be measured. This is shown empirically in the case of intellectual organization as "structurating" structure in the textual domain of scientific ar...

  15. Analytical SIR for Self-Organizing Wireless Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdurazak Mudesir

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The signal to interference ratio (SIR in the presence of multipath fading, shadowing and path loss is a valuable parameter for studying the capacity of a wireless system. This paper presents a new generalized path loss equation that takes into account the large-scale path loss as well as the small-scale multipath fading. The probability density function (pdf of the SIR for self-organising wireless networks with Nakagami-m channel model is analytically derived using the new path loss equation. We chose the Nakagami-m channel fading model because it encompasses a large class of fading channels. The results presented show good agreement between the analytical and Monte Carlo- based methods. Furthermore, the pdf of the signal to interference plus noise ratio (SINR is provided as an extension to the SIR derivation. The analytical derivation of the pdf for a single interferer in this paper lays a solid foundation to calculate the statistics for multiple interferers.

  16. A strategy for tissue self-organization that is robust to cellular heterogeneity and plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerchiari, Alec E; Garbe, James C; Jee, Noel Y; Todhunter, Michael E; Broaders, Kyle E; Peehl, Donna M; Desai, Tejal A; LaBarge, Mark A; Thomson, Matthew; Gartner, Zev J

    2015-02-17

    Developing tissues contain motile populations of cells that can self-organize into spatially ordered tissues based on differences in their interfacial surface energies. However, it is unclear how self-organization by this mechanism remains robust when interfacial energies become heterogeneous in either time or space. The ducts and acini of the human mammary gland are prototypical heterogeneous and dynamic tissues comprising two concentrically arranged cell types. To investigate the consequences of cellular heterogeneity and plasticity on cell positioning in the mammary gland, we reconstituted its self-organization from aggregates of primary cells in vitro. We find that self-organization is dominated by the interfacial energy of the tissue-ECM boundary, rather than by differential homo- and heterotypic energies of cell-cell interaction. Surprisingly, interactions with the tissue-ECM boundary are binary, in that only one cell type interacts appreciably with the boundary. Using mathematical modeling and cell-type-specific knockdown of key regulators of cell-cell cohesion, we show that this strategy of self-organization is robust to severe perturbations affecting cell-cell contact formation. We also find that this mechanism of self-organization is conserved in the human prostate. Therefore, a binary interfacial interaction with the tissue boundary provides a flexible and generalizable strategy for forming and maintaining the structure of two-component tissues that exhibit abundant heterogeneity and plasticity. Our model also predicts that mutations affecting binary cell-ECM interactions are catastrophic and could contribute to loss of tissue architecture in diseases such as breast cancer.

  17. Three-dimensional Monte Carlo simulation of nanorod self-organization in REBa2Cu3O y thin films grown by vapor phase epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichino, Yusuke; Yoshida, Yutaka; Miura, Shun

    2017-01-01

    Some metal-complex oxides (MCOs) self-organize within REBa2Cu3O y (REBCO: RE = rare earth) superconducting thin films grown by vapor phase epitaxy. To clarify the self-organization mechanism, we developed a three-dimensional Monte Carlo (3D-MC) simulation code using a simple model and simulated nanorod growth under various growth conditions. As a result, the self-organization of nanorods was reproduced by 3D-MC simulations and we clarified the nanorod growth mechanism as follows. The growth mode of MCO particles was 3D island growth due to the instability of the interface of the MCO and the substrate. On the other hand, that of REBCO particles was 2D island growth. There were diverse nanostructures, which were strongly affected by substrate temperature (T s) and deposition rate (v dep). We constructed a contour plot of the nanorod number density and a phase diagram of the nanostructures depending on T s and v dep.

  18. Self-organization and solution of shortest-path optimization problems with memristive networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pershin, Yuriy V.; Di Ventra, Massimiliano

    2013-07-01

    We show that memristive networks, namely networks of resistors with memory, can efficiently solve shortest-path optimization problems. Indeed, the presence of memory (time nonlocality) promotes self organization of the network into the shortest possible path(s). We introduce a network entropy function to characterize the self-organized evolution, show the solution of the shortest-path problem and demonstrate the healing property of the solution path. Finally, we provide an algorithm to solve the traveling salesman problem. Similar considerations apply to networks of memcapacitors and meminductors, and networks with memory in various dimensions.

  19. A self-organizing power system stabilizer using Fuzzy Auto-Regressive Moving Average (FARMA) model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Y.M.; Moon, U.C. [Seoul National Univ. (Korea, Republic of). Electrical Engineering Dept.; Lee, K.Y. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States). Electrical Engineering Dept.

    1996-06-01

    This paper presents a self-organizing power system stabilizer (SOPSS) which use the Fuzzy Auto-Regressive Moving Average (FARMA) model. The control rules and the membership functions of the proposed logic controller are generated automatically without using any plant model. The generated rules are stored in the fuzzy rule space and updated on-line by a self-organizing procedure. To show the effectiveness of the proposed controller, comparison with a conventional controller for one-machine infinite-bus system is presented.

  20. Nanostructural self-organization and dynamic adaptation of metal-polymer tribosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mashkov, Yu. K.

    2017-02-01

    The results of investigating the effect of nanosize modifiers of a polymer matrix on the nanostructural self-organization of polymer composites and dynamic adaptation of metal-polymer tribosystems, which considerably affect the wear resistance of polymer composite materials, have been analyzed. It has been shown that the physicochemical nanostructural self-organization processes are developed in metal-polymer tribosystems with the formation of thermotropic liquid-crystal structures of the polymer matrix, followed by the transition of the system to the stationary state with a negative feedback that ensures dynamic adaptation of the tribosystem to given operating conditions.

  1. When Self-Organization intersects with Urban Planning: Two Cases from Helsinki

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horelli, Liisa; Saad-Sulonen, Joanna; Wallin, Sirkku

    2015-01-01

    Participation as self-organization has emerged as a new form of citizen activism, often supported by digital technology. A comparative qualitative analysis of two case studies in Helsinki indicates that the self-organization of citizens expands the practice of urban planning. Together, they enable...... the mobilization of different groups around issues related to urban space. The consequences have become visible in temporary uses of places, event making and community development through bottom-up cultures. However, the lacking links to decision-making constrains new solutions and creative actions....

  2. Self-organized Criticality in a Model Based on Neural Network

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Xiao-Wei; CHEN Tian-Lun

    2001-01-01

    Based on the LISSOM neural network model, we introduce a model to investigate self-organized criticality in the activity of neural populations. The influence of connection (synapse) between neurons has been adequately considered in this model. It is found to exhibit self-organized criticality (SOC) behavior under appropriate conditions.``We also find that the learning process has promotive influence on emergence of SOC behavior. In addition, we analyze the influence of various factors of the model on the SOC behavior, which is characterized by the power-law behavior of the avalanche size distribution.``

  3. Self-organized control in cooperative robots using a pattern formation principle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Starke, Jens; Ellsaesser, Carmen; Fukuda, Toshio

    2011-01-01

    Self-organized modular approaches proved in nature to be robust and optimal and are a promising strategy to control future concepts of flexible and modular manufacturing processes. We show how this can be applied to a model of flexible manufacturing based on time-dependent robot-target assignment...... problems where robot teams have to serve manufacturing targets such that an objective function is optimized. Feasibility of the self-organized solutions can be guaranteed even for unpredictable situations like sudden changes in the demands or breakdowns of robots. As example an uncrewed space mission...

  4. Complexity and Information: Measuring Emergence, Self-organization, and Homeostasis at Multiple Scales

    CERN Document Server

    Gershenson, Carlos

    2012-01-01

    Concepts used in the scientific study of complex systems have become so widespread that their use and abuse has led to ambiguity and confusion in their meaning. In this paper we use information theory to provide abstract and concise measures of complexity, emergence, self-organization, and homeostasis. The purpose is to clarify the meaning of these concepts with the aid of the proposed formal measures. In a simplified version of the measures (focussing on the information produced by a system), emergence becomes the opposite of self-organization, while complexity represents their balance. We use computational experiments on random Boolean networks and elementary cellular automata to illustrate our measures at multiple scales.

  5. Morphological self-organizing feature map neural network with applications to automatic target recognition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shijun Zhang; Zhongliang Jing; Jianxun Li

    2005-01-01

    @@ The rotation invariant feature of the target is obtained using the multi-direction feature extraction property of the steerable filter. Combining the morphological operation top-hat transform with the self-organizing feature map neural network, the adaptive topological region is selected. Using the erosion operation, the topological region shrinkage is achieved. The steerable filter based morphological self-organizing feature map neural network is applied to automatic target recognition of binary standard patterns and realworld infrared sequence images. Compared with Hamming network and morphological shared-weight networks respectively, the higher recognition correct rate, robust adaptability, quick training, and better generalization of the proposed method are achieved.

  6. Self-organized arrays of Cd nanocluster on Si (111)-7×7 surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Shao-Jie; Xiao, Hua-Fang; Ye, Juan; Sun, Kai; Tao, Min-Long; Tu, Yu-Bing; Wang, Ya-Li; Xie, Zheng-Bo; Wang, Jun-Zhong

    2017-02-01

    We studied the self-organization of Cd clusters on Si(111)-7×7 surface with an ultrahigh vacuum scanning tunneling microcopy (STM). Highly-ordered arrays of Cd nanoclusters have been fabricated by elevating the substrate temperature. The Cd clusters occupy equally the faulted and unfaulted half-unit cells of Si(111)-7×7 without obvious preference to either of them, forming Cd cluster pairs or hexamers. Furthermore, high-resolution STM images demonstrate that the charge transfer between Cd and Si atoms is responsible for cluster-cluster attractions, which in turn drive the self-organization of Cd nanoclusters into highly ordered arrays.

  7. Self-Organized Bistability Associated with First-Order Phase Transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    di Santo, Serena; Burioni, Raffaella; Vezzani, Alessandro; Muñoz, Miguel A.

    2016-06-01

    Self-organized criticality elucidates the conditions under which physical and biological systems tune themselves to the edge of a second-order phase transition, with scale invariance. Motivated by the empirical observation of bimodal distributions of activity in neuroscience and other fields, we propose and analyze a theory for the self-organization to the point of phase coexistence in systems exhibiting a first-order phase transition. It explains the emergence of regular avalanches with attributes of scale invariance that coexist with huge anomalous ones, with realizations in many fields.

  8. Self-organization in Kerr-cavity-soliton formation in parametric frequency combs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Y. Henry; Lamont, Michael R. E.; Strogatz, Steven H.; Gaeta, Alexander L.

    2016-12-01

    We show that self-organization and synchronization underlie Kerr-cavity-soliton formation in parametric frequency combs. By reducing the Lugiato-Lefever equation to a set of phase equations, we find that self-organization arises from a two-stage process via pump-degenerate and pump-nondegenerate four-wave mixing. The reduced phase equations are akin to the Kuramoto model of coupled oscillators and intuitively explain the origin of the pump phase offset, predict antisymmetrization of the intracavity field before phase synchronization, and clarify the role of chaos in Kerr-cavity-soliton formation in parametric combs.

  9. KohonAnts: A Self-Organizing Ant Algorithm for Clustering and Pattern Classification

    CERN Document Server

    Fernandes, C; Merelo, J J; Ramos, V; Laredo, J L J

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we introduce a new ant-based method that takes advantage of the cooperative self-organization of Ant Colony Systems to create a naturally inspired clustering and pattern recognition method. The approach considers each data item as an ant, which moves inside a grid changing the cells it goes through, in a fashion similar to Kohonen's Self-Organizing Maps. The resulting algorithm is conceptually more simple, takes less free parameters than other ant-based clustering algorithms, and, after some parameter tuning, yields very good results on some benchmark problems.

  10. Empirical Evidence for Self-Organized Patterns in California Wildfire Sizes: Implications for Landscape Resilience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Povak, N. A.; Hessburg, P. F.

    2009-05-01

    Wildfires are an important disturbance in many western US ecosystems and are integral in shaping spatial and temporal vegetation patterns. Ecological resilience has been described as the amount of disturbance that an ecosystem could withstand without changing self-organized processes and structures. Inherent in resilient systems are observable self-organized patterns in vegetation and processes on the landscape. It is theorized that self-organized systems are capable of withstanding a large range of disturbance sizes and intensities without significantly changing the resultant distribution of vegetation patch sizes over time. Past research has used power-law statistics to describe self-organization in wildfire behavior, and we extend this research using several different methods to identify evidence for landscape resilience over a large geographic area. We used a catalogue of California wildfires (>1ha; 1950-2007) grouped at multiple levels within Bailey's hierarchy of ecoregions to (1) identify self-organized patterns in wildfire size distributions across the state, (2) identify lower and upper limits on self-organized behavior, and (3) find links between these patterns and top-down and bottom-up processes. Within most ecoregions we found reliable evidence for self-organized behavior in wildfire size distributions. Evidence included good fits of: (1) 2-3 parameter statistical distributions within the Pareto and Generalized Beta II (P/GB2) family of distributions over the entire range of fire event sizes; these distributions all have in common a power-law tail, (2) the Pareto I (power-law) distribution to the right-tail of the fire-size distributions, and (3) broken-stick regression models to the inverse cumulative distribution functions for fire sizes. For most ecoregions, self-organized properties were generally limited to fires within 100 to 10000 ha, indicating that meso-scale processes controlling fire sizes likely are acting at this scale. Scaling parameters

  11. From self-organization to emergence: Aesthetic implications of shifting ideas of organization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayles, N. Katherine

    1996-06-01

    From 1945-95, a shift took place within cybernetics from a paradigm emphasizing self-organization to one emphasizing emergence. Central in bringing about this shift was the spread of the microcomputer. With its greatly enhanced processing speed and memory capabilities, the microcomputer made simulations possible that could not have been done before. The microcomputer has also been instrumental in effecting a similar change within literary texts. To exemplify the aesthetic implications of the shift from self-organization to emergence, the chapter discusses Vladmir Nabokov's Pale Fire and Milorad Pavić's Dictionary of the Khazars: A Lexicon Novel in 100,000 Words.

  12. Self-organizing method for collaboration in multi-robot system on basis of balance principle

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yangbin DONA; Jinping JIANG; Yan HE

    2008-01-01

    By analyzing the operation characteristics of two subtasks that have resource dependency on each other, this paper demonstrates the impact of progress relation between the two subtasks on the whole task's progress, and then puts forward a self-organizing prin-ciple called balance principle that keeps the individual profit between robots equal. Furthermore, an algorithm is designed for adjusting subtask selection on the basis of this principle. Simulation shows the validity of the algorithm on self-organizing task allocation in a multi-robot system.

  13. Self-Organizing Global Gene Expression Regulated through Criticality: Mechanism of the Cell-Fate Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuchiya, Masa; Giuliani, Alessandro; Hashimoto, Midori; Erenpreisa, Jekaterina; Yoshikawa, Kenichi

    2016-01-01

    Background A fundamental issue in bioscience is to understand the mechanism that underlies the dynamic control of genome-wide expression through the complex temporal-spatial self-organization of the genome to regulate the change in cell fate. We address this issue by elucidating a physically motivated mechanism of self-organization. Principal Findings Building upon transcriptome experimental data for seven distinct cell fates, including early embryonic development, we demonstrate that self-organized criticality (SOC) plays an essential role in the dynamic control of global gene expression regulation at both the population and single-cell levels. The novel findings are as follows: i) Mechanism of cell-fate changes: A sandpile-type critical transition self-organizes overall expression into a few transcription response domains (critical states). A cell-fate change occurs by means of a dissipative pulse-like global perturbation in self-organization through the erasure of initial-state critical behaviors (criticality). Most notably, the reprogramming of early embryo cells destroys the zygote SOC control to initiate self-organization in the new embryonal genome, which passes through a stochastic overall expression pattern. ii) Mechanism of perturbation of SOC controls: Global perturbations in self-organization involve the temporal regulation of critical states. Quantitative evaluation of this perturbation in terminal cell fates reveals that dynamic interactions between critical states determine the critical-state coherent regulation. The occurrence of a temporal change in criticality perturbs this between-states interaction, which directly affects the entire genomic system. Surprisingly, a sub-critical state, corresponding to an ensemble of genes that shows only marginal changes in expression and consequently are considered to be devoid of any interest, plays an essential role in generating a global perturbation in self-organization directed toward the cell-fate change

  14. Stone Polygons: Self-Organization Assisted by Noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, M.; Hager, B. H.

    2002-12-01

    Polygonal patterns formed by sorted gravel are commonly found on flat surfaces where water drainage is poor because of underlying permafrost. The similarity in pattern of these stone polygons with Rayleigh-Benard thermal convection cells is intriguing. There is even a suggestion that stone polygons are formed by Rayleigh-Benard convection of water through the underlying porous soil (Kranz et al, 1983). Recent developments in understanding the microphysical mechanisms of frost heaving (e.g. Wettlaufer, 1999; Zhu et al 2000) reinforce the conventional view that the freeze-thawing cycle of ice is the primary natural agent for this pattern formation. Mathematically, a large body of solutions to problems in pattern formation can be attributed to the reaction-diffusion system. There is a subtle difference, however, between systems like Rayleigh-Benard convection cells and stone polygons: The latter are formed in a noisy natural environment, the former in a highly controlled laboratory environment. In other words, the effects of large sources of noise must be accounted for explicitly in understanding the pattern formation of stone polygons. A distribution of stone polygons formed cooperatively results from sorting among water, soil, and stones controlled by weather changes. We propose a nonlinear reaction-diffusion type of model for this coupled process. We consider the incremental population density of stones (positive or negative relative to the initial uniform distribution). The positive feedback between freeze-thaw cycles and the local stone accumulation (positive or negative) is modeled by a linear production term, while the gravitational reconfiguration gives rise to a cubic nonlinear saturation term. Noise due to fluctuations of the environment is represented by the diffusion term. Similar systems have emerged in wide ranges of physical and chemical problems, yet most of the investigations in the other fields are on stability fields associated with varying control

  15. Nonlinear dynamics analysis of a self-organizing recurrent neural network: chaos waning.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jürgen Eser

    Full Text Available Self-organization is thought to play an important role in structuring nervous systems. It frequently arises as a consequence of plasticity mechanisms in neural networks: connectivity determines network dynamics which in turn feed back on network structure through various forms of plasticity. Recently, self-organizing recurrent neural network models (SORNs have been shown to learn non-trivial structure in their inputs and to reproduce the experimentally observed statistics and fluctuations of synaptic connection strengths in cortex and hippocampus. However, the dynamics in these networks and how they change with network evolution are still poorly understood. Here we investigate the degree of chaos in SORNs by studying how the networks' self-organization changes their response to small perturbations. We study the effect of perturbations to the excitatory-to-excitatory weight matrix on connection strengths and on unit activities. We find that the network dynamics, characterized by an estimate of the maximum Lyapunov exponent, becomes less chaotic during its self-organization, developing into a regime where only few perturbations become amplified. We also find that due to the mixing of discrete and (quasi-continuous variables in SORNs, small perturbations to the synaptic weights may become amplified only after a substantial delay, a phenomenon we propose to call deferred chaos.

  16. Topology assisted self-organization of colloidal nanoparticles: application to 2D large-scale nanomastering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hind Kadiri

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Our aim was to elaborate a novel method for fully controllable large-scale nanopatterning. We investigated the influence of the surface topology, i.e., a pre-pattern of hydrogen silsesquioxane (HSQ posts, on the self-organization of polystyrene beads (PS dispersed over a large surface. Depending on the post size and spacing, long-range ordering of self-organized polystyrene beads is observed wherein guide posts were used leading to single crystal structure. Topology assisted self-organization has proved to be one of the solutions to obtain large-scale ordering. Besides post size and spacing, the colloidal concentration and the nature of solvent were found to have a significant effect on the self-organization of the PS beads. Scanning electron microscope and associated Fourier transform analysis were used to characterize the morphology of the ordered surfaces. Finally, the production of silicon molds is demonstrated by using the beads as a template for dry etching.

  17. Self-Organization and the Self-Assembling Process in Tissue Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eswaramoorthy, Rajalakshmanan; Hadidi, Pasha; Hu, Jerry C.

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, the tissue engineering paradigm has shifted to include a new and growing subfield of scaffoldless techniques which generate self-organizing and self-assembling tissues. This review aims to provide a cogent description of this relatively new research area, with special emphasis on applications toward clinical use and research models. Particular emphasis is placed on providing clear definitions of self-organization and the self-assembling process, as delineated from other scaffoldless techniques in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Significantly, during formation, self-organizing and self-assembling tissues display biological processes similar to those that occur in vivo. These help lead to the recapitulation of native tissue morphological structure and organization. Notably, functional properties of these tissues also approach native tissue values; some of these engineered tissues are already in clinical trials. This review aims to provide a cohesive summary of work in this field, and to highlight the potential of self-organization and the self-assembling process to provide cogent solutions to current intractable problems in tissue engineering. PMID:23701238

  18. Actomyosin-based Self-organization of cell internalization during C. elegans gastrulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pohl Christian

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gastrulation is a key transition in embryogenesis; it requires self-organized cellular coordination, which has to be both robust to allow efficient development and plastic to provide adaptability. Despite the conservation of gastrulation as a key event in Metazoan embryogenesis, the morphogenetic mechanisms of self-organization (how global order or coordination can arise from local interactions are poorly understood. Results We report a modular structure of cell internalization in Caenorhabditis elegans gastrulation that reveals mechanisms of self-organization. Cells that internalize during gastrulation show apical contractile flows, which are correlated with centripetal extensions from surrounding cells. These extensions converge to seal over the internalizing cells in the form of rosettes. This process represents a distinct mode of monolayer remodeling, with gradual extrusion of the internalizing cells and simultaneous tissue closure without an actin purse-string. We further report that this self-organizing module can adapt to severe topological alterations, providing evidence of scalability and plasticity of actomyosin-based patterning. Finally, we show that globally, the surface cell layer undergoes coplanar division to thin out and spread over the internalizing mass, which resembles epiboly. Conclusions The combination of coplanar division-based spreading and recurrent local modules for piecemeal internalization constitutes a system-level solution of gradual volume rearrangement under spatial constraint. Our results suggest that the mode of C. elegans gastrulation can be unified with the general notions of monolayer remodeling and with distinct cellular mechanisms of actomyosin-based morphogenesis.

  19. Self-organization processes in field-invasion team sports : implications for leadership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passos, Pedro; Araújo, Duarte; Davids, Keith

    2013-01-01

    In nature, the interactions between agents in a complex system (fish schools; colonies of ants) are governed by information that is locally created. Each agent self-organizes (adjusts) its behaviour, not through a central command centre, but based on variables that emerge from the interactions with other system agents in the neighbourhood. Self-organization has been proposed as a mechanism to explain the tendencies for individual performers to interact with each other in field-invasion sports teams, displaying functional co-adaptive behaviours, without the need for central control. The relevance of self-organization as a mechanism that explains pattern-forming dynamics within attacker-defender interactions in field-invasion sports has been sustained in the literature. Nonetheless, other levels of interpersonal coordination, such as intra-team interactions, still raise important questions, particularly with reference to the role of leadership or match strategies that have been prescribed in advance by a coach. The existence of key properties of complex systems, such as system degeneracy, nonlinearity or contextual dependency, suggests that self-organization is a functional mechanism to explain the emergence of interpersonal coordination tendencies within intra-team interactions. In this opinion article we propose how leadership may act as a key constraint on the emergent, self-organizational tendencies of performers in field-invasion sports.

  20. Neighborhoods in Development: Human Development Index and Self-Organizing Maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rende, Sevinc; Donduran, Murat

    2013-01-01

    The Human Development Index (HDI) has been instrumental in broadening the discussion of economic development beyond money-metric progress, in particular, by ranking a country against other countries in terms of the well being of their citizens. We propose self-organizing maps to explore similarities among countries using the components of the HDI…

  1. Research on Self-Organization in Resilient Recovery of Cluster Supply Chains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Geng

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available An effective way to deal with high-risk and low-probability disruptions is to create a resilient cluster supply chain, in which the study of resilience lies in its recovery mechanism when failures occur. First, the paper describes the representation method of cluster supply chain resilience. Second, a cluster supply chain network structure generation model is proposed. And based on cascading effect model, it makes analysis of dynamic evolution process when cluster supply chain failure happens. Then it focuses on the self-organization characteristic, which contributes to cluster supply chain emergence overall resilient recovery through local self-organization reconstruction behavior. We also make theoretical analysis of cluster supply chain network characteristics and its effect on the resilience, which helps to illustrate that the root of vulnerability lies in cascading failure while self-organization is the key to resilient recovery. Besides, with the study of self-organization characteristic, it provides theoretical guidance for local control and further achievement of overall resilient optimization.

  2. Self-organizing networks in 3GPP: Standardization and future trends

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jorguseski, L.; Pais, A.V.; Gunnarsson, F.; Centonza, A.; Willcock, C.

    2014-01-01

    Self-Organizing Networks (SON) is a common term for mobile network automation, critical to the cost-efficient deployment, operation and maintenance of mobile networks. This article provides an overview of SON standardization in 3GPP, including both existing and planned functionalities. It also provi

  3. Processible conducting nanoscale cylinders due to self-organized polyaniline supra molecules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kosonen, H; Valkama, S; Ruokolainen, J; Knaapila, M; Torkkeli, M; Serimaa, R; Monkman, AP; ten Brinke, G; Ikkala, O

    2003-01-01

    Polyaniline sulphonates contain hydrogen bonding acceptor sites, which allow construction of supramolecules and self-organized structures. Here we have characterized the phase behavior of complexes of polyaniline, camphorsulphomc acid (CSA) and 4-hexylresorcinol (tires), PANI(CSA)(x)(Hres)(y), using

  4. Research progress of self-organized Ge quantum dots on Si substrate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Changjun; YU Jinzhong; WANG Qiming

    2004-01-01

    A review is presented on recent research development of self-organized Ge/Si quantum dots (QDs).Emphasis is put on the morphological evolution of the Ge quantum dots grown on Si (001) substrate,the structure analysis of multilayer Ge QDs,the optical and electronic properties of these nanostructures,and the approaches to fabricating ordered Ge quantum dots.

  5. Self-organizing change? On drivers, causes and global environmental change

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Elverfeldt, Kirsten; Embleton-Hamann, Christine; Slaymaker, Olav

    2016-01-01

    Within global environmental change research, certain external drivers generally are assumed to cause the environmental system to change. The most commonly considered drivers are relief, sea level, hydroclimate, and/or people. However, complexity theory and self-organizing systems provide a very different framework and means of explanation. Self-organization - understood as the aggregate processes internal to an environmental system that lead to a distinctive spatial, temporal, or other organization - reduces the possibility of implicating a specific process as being causal. The principle of equifinality, whereby two or more different drivers can generate the same form, has long been recognized within a process-response framework, as well as the concept of divergence, which states that similar causes or processes result in different effects. Both ideas differ from self-organization in that they (i) deal with drivers external to the system and (ii) imply concrete cause-and-effect relations that might be difficult to discern. The assumption is, however, that careful study will eventually lead to the true causes and processes. Studies of self-organization deal with the ways in which internal processes interact and may drive a system toward an instability threshold, the so-called bifurcation point. At this point, the system develops by chance and no single external or internal cause for the change can be defined. For research into environmental change this is a crucial theory for two reasons:

  6. Entropy in the Bak-Sneppen Model for Self-Organized Criticality

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨纯斌

    2003-01-01

    The distributions of fitness on the sites of one- and two-dimensional lattices are studied for the nearest-neighbour Bak-Sneppen model on self-organized criticality. The distributions show complicated behaviour showing that the system is far from equilibrium. By introducing the "energy" of a site, the entropy flow from the system to its environment is investigated.

  7. Self-organized flexible leadership promotes collective intelligence in human groups

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kurvers, R.H.J.M.; Wolf, Max; Naguib, Marc; Krause, Jens

    2015-01-01

    Collective intelligence refers to the ability of groups to outperform individual decision-makers. At present, relatively little is known about the mechanisms promoting collective intelligence in natural systems. We here test a novel mechanism generating collective intelligence: self-organization

  8. Advanced nanopattern formation by a subtractive self-organization process with focused ion beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lugstein, A. [Technical University Vienna, Floragasse 7, 1040 Vienna (Austria)]. E-mail: alois.lugstein@tuwien.ac.at; Basner, B. [Technical University Vienna, Floragasse 7, 1040 Vienna (Austria); Brezna, W. [Technical University Vienna, Floragasse 7, 1040 Vienna (Austria); Weil, M. [Technical University Vienna, Floragasse 7, 1040 Vienna (Austria); Golka, S. [Technical University Vienna, Floragasse 7, 1040 Vienna (Austria); Bertagnolli, E. [Technical University Vienna, Floragasse 7, 1040 Vienna (Austria)

    2006-01-15

    We have studied the evolution of the GaAs, InAs and GaSb surfaces due to FIB exposure. In contrast to conventional bottom up or top down processes the observed nanopattern formation is discussed, based on a subtractive self-organization process relying on material decomposition induced by FIB exposure.

  9. Neighborhoods in Development: Human Development Index and Self-Organizing Maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rende, Sevinc; Donduran, Murat

    2013-01-01

    The Human Development Index (HDI) has been instrumental in broadening the discussion of economic development beyond money-metric progress, in particular, by ranking a country against other countries in terms of the well being of their citizens. We propose self-organizing maps to explore similarities among countries using the components of the HDI…

  10. Autonomous distributed self-organizing and self-healing hardware architecture - The eDNA concept

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boesen, Michael Reibel; Madsen, Jan; Keymeulen, Didier

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the current state of the autonomous distributed self-organizing and self-healing electronic DNA (eDNA) hardware architecture (patent pending). In its current prototype state, the eDNA architecture is capable of responding to multiple injected faults by autonomously reconfiguri...

  11. Distributed Storage Management Using Dynamic Pricing in a Self-Organized Energy Community

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Negeri, E.; Baken, N.

    2012-01-01

    We consider a future self-organized energy community that is composed of “prosumer” households that can autonomously generate, store, import and export power, and also selfishly strive to minimize their cost by adjusting their load profiles using the flexibly of their distributed storage. In such

  12. Implications of behavioral architecture for the evolution of self-organized division of labor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duarte, A.; Scholtens, E.; Weissing, F. J.

    2012-01-01

    Division of labor has been studied separately from a proximate self-organization and an ultimate evolutionary perspective. We aim to bring together these two perspectives. So far this has been done by choosing a behavioral mechanism a priori and considering the evolution of the properties of this me

  13. Market potential for collective self-organized housing interventions in Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwer, J.; Gerohazi, E.; Szemzo, H.; Luig, K.T.

    2016-01-01

    Collective Self-Organized (CSO) Housing (referring to both renovation of existing stock and construction of new dwellings, with the definitive influence of the residents) has become the center of attention of public authorities and private businesses alike, the main reason being that it is often

  14. Effects of the ISIS Recommender System for Navigation Support in Self-Organized Learning Networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drachsler, Hendrik; Hummel, Hans; Van den Berg, Bert; Eshuis, Jannes; Waterink, Wim; Nadolski, Rob; Berlanga, Adriana; Boers, Nanda; Koper, Rob

    2008-01-01

    Drachsler, H., Hummel, H. G. K., Van den Berg, B., Eshuis, J., Waterink, W., Nadolski, R., Berlanga, A., Boers, N., & Koper, R. (2008). Effects of the ISIS Recommender System for Navigation Support in Self-Organized Learning Networks. In M. Kalz, R. Koper, V. Hornung-Prähauser & M. Luckmann (Eds.).

  15. Advantages of a TDMA based, energy-efficient, self-organizing MAC protocol for WSNs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoesel, van L.F.W.; Nieberg, T.; Kip, H.J.; Havinga, P.J.M.

    2004-01-01

    The paper presents EMACs, a medium access protocol especially designed for wireless sensor networks. The medium access protocol consists of a fully distributed and self-organizing TDMA scheme, in which each active node periodically listens to the channel and broadcasts a short control message. This

  16. Towards a Knowledge Building Community: From Guided to Self-Organized Inquiry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Cacciamani

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Over four academic years a design experiment was conducted involving four online university courses with the goal of shifting from Guided to Self-Organized Inquiry to foster Knowledge Building communities in the classroom. Quantitative analyses focused on notes contributed to collective knowledge spaces, as well as reading and building-on notes of others. All team members, including teachers, contributed at high levels. Students tended to produce more notes in the guided-inquiry approach but read more and demonstrated more even distribution of work as part of self-organized inquiry. Qualitative data focused on strategies students reported as new to their school experience. Strategies fell into three categories common to both guided and self-organizing inquiry: elaborating course content for depth of understanding, collaboration in an online environment, and metacognition, with greater reflection on idea development. Distinctive aspects of self-organized inquiry, according to student reports, included going beyond given information, linking new understandings and personal experiences, attention to the collective works of the community, and learning from instructor’s strategies.

  17. Hierarchic Theory of Complex Systems (biosystems, colloids): self-organization & osmos

    OpenAIRE

    Kaivarainen, Alex

    2000-01-01

    1. Protein domain mesoscopic organization 2. Quantum background of lipid domain organization in biomembranes 3. Hierarchic approach to theory of solutions and colloid systems 4. Distant solvent-mediated interaction between macromolecules 5. Spatial self-organization in the water-macromolecular systems 6. Properties of [bisolvent - polymer system] 7. Osmosis and solvent activity. Traditional and mesoscopic approach

  18. Self-organization of a hybrid nanostructure consisting of a nanoneedle and nanodot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hai; Wu, Junsheng; Wang, Ying; Chow, Chee Lap; Liu, Qing; Gan, Chee Lip; Tang, Xiaohong; Rawat, Rajdeep Singh; Tan, Ooi Kiang; Ma, Jan; Huang, Yizhong

    2012-09-24

    A special materials system that allows the self-organization of a unique hybrid nanonipple structure is developed. The system consists of a nanoneedle with a small nanodot sitting on top. Such hybrid nanonipples provide building blocks to assemble functional devices with significantly improved performance. The application of the system to high-sensitivity gas sensors is also demonstrated.

  19. Patterning exergy of benthic macroinvertebrate communities using self-organizing maps

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Park, Y.S.; Lek, S.; Scardi, M.; Verdonschot, P.F.M.; Jørgensen, S.E.

    2006-01-01

    Exergy is a measure of the free energy of a system with contributions from all components including the energy of organisms, and it is used as an ecological indicator. In this study, we implemented a self-organizing map (SOM) for patterning exergy of benthic macroinvertebrate communities. The datase

  20. Self-organized spectrum chunk selection algorithm for Local Area LTE-Advanced

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kumar, Sanjay; Wang, Yuanye; Marchetti, Nicola

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a self organized spectrum chunk selection algorithm in order to minimize the mutual intercell interference among Home Node Bs (HeNBs), aiming to improve the system throughput performance compared to the existing frequency reuse one scheme. The proposed algorithm is useful...

  1. Monitoring Scientific Developments from a Dynamic Perspective: Self-Organized Structuring To Map Neural Network Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noyons, E. C. M.; van Raan, A. F. J.

    1998-01-01

    Using bibliometric mapping techniques, authors developed a methodology of self-organized structuring of scientific fields which was applied to neural network research. Explores the evolution of a data generated field structure by monitoring the interrelationships between subfields, the internal structure of subfields, and the dynamic features of…

  2. Self-organized criticality in the intermediate phase of rigidity percolation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brière, M-A; Chubynsky, M V; Mousseau, Normand

    2007-05-01

    Experimental results for covalent glasses have highlighted the existence of a self-organized phase due to the tendency of glass networks to minimize internal stress. Recently, we have shown that an equilibrated self-organized two-dimensional lattice-based model also possesses an intermediate phase in which a percolating rigid cluster exists with a probability between zero and one, depending on the average coordination of the network. In this paper, we study the properties of this intermediate phase in more detail. We find that microscopic perturbations, such as the addition or removal of a single bond, can affect the rigidity of macroscopic regions of the network, in particular, creating or destroying percolation. This, together with a power-law distribution of rigid cluster sizes, suggests that the system is maintained in a critical state on the rigid-floppy boundary throughout the intermediate phase, a behavior similar to self-organized criticality, but, remarkably, in a thermodynamically equilibrated state. The distinction between percolating and nonpercolating networks appears physically meaningless, even though the percolating cluster, when it exists, takes up a finite fraction of the network. We point out both similarities and differences between the intermediate phase and the critical point of ordinary percolation models without self-organization. Our results are consistent with an interpretation of recent experiments on the pressure dependence of Raman frequencies in chalcogenide glasses in terms of network homogeneity.

  3. Leadership of Self-Organized Networks Lessons from the War on Terror

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheatley, Margaret J.

    2007-01-01

    In the past few decades, scientists have developed a rich understanding of how living systems organize and function. They describe life's capacity to self-organize as networks of interdependent relationships, to learn and adapt, and to grow more capable and orderly over time. These dynamics and descriptions stand in stark contrast to how we humans…

  4. A nanobiosensor for dynamic single cell analysis during microvascular self-organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, S; Sun, J; Zhang, D D; Wong, P K

    2016-10-14

    The formation of microvascular networks plays essential roles in regenerative medicine and tissue engineering. Nevertheless, the self-organization mechanisms underlying the dynamic morphogenic process are poorly understood due to a paucity of effective tools for mapping the spatiotemporal dynamics of single cell behaviors. By establishing a single cell nanobiosensor along with live cell imaging, we perform dynamic single cell analysis of the morphology, displacement, and gene expression during microvascular self-organization. Dynamic single cell analysis reveals that endothelial cells self-organize into subpopulations with specialized phenotypes to form microvascular networks and identifies the involvement of Notch1-Dll4 signaling in regulating the cell subpopulations. The cell phenotype correlates with the initial Dll4 mRNA expression level and each subpopulation displays a unique dynamic Dll4 mRNA expression profile. Pharmacological perturbations and RNA interference of Notch1-Dll4 signaling modulate the cell subpopulations and modify the morphology of the microvascular network. Taken together, a nanobiosensor enables a dynamic single cell analysis approach underscoring the importance of Notch1-Dll4 signaling in microvascular self-organization.

  5. Self-organization of head-centered visual responses under ecological training conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mender, Bedeho M W; Stringer, Simon M

    2014-01-01

    We have studied the development of head-centered visual responses in an unsupervised self-organizing neural network model which was trained under ecological training conditions. Four independent spatio-temporal characteristics of the training stimuli were explored to investigate the feasibility of the self-organization under more ecological conditions. First, the number of head-centered visual training locations was varied over a broad range. Model performance improved as the number of training locations approached the continuous sampling of head-centered space. Second, the model depended on periods of time where visual targets remained stationary in head-centered space while it performed saccades around the scene, and the severity of this constraint was explored by introducing increasing levels of random eye movement and stimulus dynamics. Model performance was robust over a range of randomization. Third, the model was trained on visual scenes where multiple simultaneous targets where always visible. Model self-organization was successful, despite never being exposed to a visual target in isolation. Fourth, the duration of fixations during training were made stochastic. With suitable changes to the learning rule, it self-organized successfully. These findings suggest that the fundamental learning mechanism upon which the model rests is robust to the many forms of stimulus variability under ecological training conditions.

  6. Three-Dimensional Self-Organization in Nanocomposite Layered Systems by Ultrafast Laser Pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zeming; Siegel, Jan; Garcia-Lechuga, Mario; Epicier, Thierry; Lefkir, Yaya; Reynaud, Stéphanie; Bugnet, Matthieu; Vocanson, Francis; Solis, Javier; Vitrant, Guy; Destouches, Nathalie

    2017-05-23

    Controlling plasmonic systems with nanometer resolution in transparent films and their colors over large nonplanar areas is a key issue for spreading their use in various industrial fields. Using light to direct self-organization mechanisms provides high-speed and flexible processes to meet this challenge. Here, we describe a route for the laser-induced self-organization of metallic nanostructures in 3D. Going beyond the production of planar nanopatterns, we demonstrate that ultrafast laser-induced excitation combined with nonlinear feedback mechanisms in a nanocomposite thin film can lead to 3D self-organized nanostructured films. The process, which can be extended to complex layered composite systems, produces highly uniform large-area nanopatterns. We show that 3D self-organization originates from the simultaneous excitation of independent optical modes at different depths in the film and is activated by the plasmon-induced charge separation and thermally induced NP growth mechanisms. This laser color marking technique enables multiplexed optical image encoding and the generated nanostructured Ag NPs:TiO2 films offer great promise for applications in solar energy harvesting, photocatalysis, or photochromic devices.

  7. Speculation about Behavior, Brain Damage, and Self-Organization: The Other Way to Herd a Cat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colangelo, Annette; Holden, John G.; Buchanan, Lori; Van Orden, Guy C.

    2004-01-01

    This article contrasts aphasic patients' performance of word naming and lexical decision with that of intact college-aged readers. We discuss this contrast within a framework of self-organization; word recognition by aphasic patients is destabilized relative to intact performance. Less stable performance shows itself as an increase in the…

  8. Proceedings of the 1st Workshop on Technology Support for Self-Organized Learners

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kalz, Marco; Koper, Rob; Hornung-Prähauser, Veronika; Luckmann, Michaela

    2008-01-01

    Kalz, M., Koper, R., Hornung-Prähauser, V., & Luckmann, M. (Eds.) (2008). Proceedings of the 1st Workshop on Technology Support for Self-Organized Learners. June, 2-3, 2008, Salzburg, Austria: CEUR Workshop Proceedings, ISSN 1613-0073. Available at http://ceur-ws.org/Vol-349.

  9. Effects of the ISIS Recommender System for Navigation Support in Self-Organized Learning Networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drachsler, Hendrik; Hummel, Hans; Van den Berg, Bert; Eshuis, Jannes; Waterink, Wim; Nadolski, Rob; Berlanga, Adriana; Boers, Nanda; Koper, Rob

    2008-01-01

    Drachsler, H., Hummel, H. G. K., Van den Berg, B., Eshuis, J., Waterink, W., Nadolski, R., Berlanga, A., Boers, N., & Koper, R. (2008). Effects of the ISIS Recommender System for Navigation Support in Self-Organized Learning Networks. In M. Kalz, R. Koper, V. Hornung-Prähauser & M. Luckmann (Eds.).

  10. Nonlinear dynamics analysis of a self-organizing recurrent neural network: chaos waning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eser, Jürgen; Zheng, Pengsheng; Triesch, Jochen

    2014-01-01

    Self-organization is thought to play an important role in structuring nervous systems. It frequently arises as a consequence of plasticity mechanisms in neural networks: connectivity determines network dynamics which in turn feed back on network structure through various forms of plasticity. Recently, self-organizing recurrent neural network models (SORNs) have been shown to learn non-trivial structure in their inputs and to reproduce the experimentally observed statistics and fluctuations of synaptic connection strengths in cortex and hippocampus. However, the dynamics in these networks and how they change with network evolution are still poorly understood. Here we investigate the degree of chaos in SORNs by studying how the networks' self-organization changes their response to small perturbations. We study the effect of perturbations to the excitatory-to-excitatory weight matrix on connection strengths and on unit activities. We find that the network dynamics, characterized by an estimate of the maximum Lyapunov exponent, becomes less chaotic during its self-organization, developing into a regime where only few perturbations become amplified. We also find that due to the mixing of discrete and (quasi-)continuous variables in SORNs, small perturbations to the synaptic weights may become amplified only after a substantial delay, a phenomenon we propose to call deferred chaos.

  11. Triadic motifs and dyadic self-organization in the World Trade Network

    CERN Document Server

    Squartini, Tiziano

    2012-01-01

    In self-organizing networks, topology and dynamics coevolve in a continuous feedback, without exogenous driving. The World Trade Network (WTN) is one of the few empirically well documented examples of self-organizing networks: its topology strongly depends on the GDP of world countries, which in turn depends on the structure of trade. Therefore, understanding which are the key topological properties of the WTN that deviate from randomness provides direct empirical information about the structural effects of self-organization. Here, using an analytical pattern-detection method that we have recently proposed, we study the occurrence of triadic "motifs" (subgraphs of three vertices) in the WTN between 1950 and 2000. We find that, unlike other properties, motifs are not explained by only the in- and out-degree sequences. By contrast, they are completely explained if also the numbers of reciprocal edges are taken into account. This implies that the self-organization process underlying the evolution of the WTN is a...

  12. Of Slumdogs and Schoolmasters: Jacotot, Ranciere and Mitra on Self-Organized Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamp, Richard

    2013-01-01

    This article argues that the concept and practice of "self-organized learning", as pioneered by Sugata Mitra (and his team) in the "Hole-in-the-Wall" experiments (1999-2005) that inspired the novel "Q & A" (2006) and the resulting movie, "Slumdog millionaire" (2008) bear direct, but not uncritical…

  13. Anion-directed self-organization of thermotropic liquid crystalline materials containing a guanidinium moiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dongwoo; Jon, Sangyong; Lee, Hyung-Kun; Baek, Kangkyun; Oh, Nam-Keun; Zin, Wang-Cheol; Kim, Kimoon

    2005-11-28

    New wedge-shaped thermotropic liquid crystalline materials containing a guanidinium moiety at the apex organize into various supramolecular structures such as hexagonal columnar, rectangular columnar and Pm3n cubic mesophases depending on anions illustrating guest-directed self-organization in mesophases.

  14. Processible conducting nanoscale cylinders due to self-organized polyaniline supra molecules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kosonen, H; Valkama, S; Ruokolainen, J; Knaapila, M; Torkkeli, M; Serimaa, R; Monkman, AP; ten Brinke, G; Ikkala, O

    2003-01-01

    Polyaniline sulphonates contain hydrogen bonding acceptor sites, which allow construction of supramolecules and self-organized structures. Here we have characterized the phase behavior of complexes of polyaniline, camphorsulphomc acid (CSA) and 4-hexylresorcinol (tires), PANI(CSA)(x)(Hres)(y), using

  15. Context Awareness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brønsted, Jeppe

    forståelse. Traditionelt har denne form for information ikke været tilstede i informationssystemer, men med bølgen af Pervasive Computing og Communication begynder ting så småt at ændre sig. Et af målene for context aware computing er, at udnytte denne ekstra ressource af informationer der ellers er...... forbeholdt mennesker, til at forbedre interaktionen med og udnyttelsen af IT-systemer. Information om kontekst fra forskellige kilder kombineres og systemet foreslår relevante handlinger eller udfører dem automatisk. I dette dokument beskrives begreberne context og context awareness og hvorfor de er vigtige...

  16. Context Awareness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brønsted, Jeppe

    forståelse. Traditionelt har denne form for information ikke været tilstede i informationssystemer, men med bølgen af Pervasive Computing og Communication begynder ting så småt at ændre sig. Et af målene for context aware computing er, at udnytte denne ekstra ressource af informationer der ellers er...... forbeholdt mennesker, til at forbedre interaktionen med og udnyttelsen af IT-systemer. Information om kontekst fra forskellige kilder kombineres og systemet foreslår relevante handlinger eller udfører dem automatisk. I dette dokument beskrives begreberne context og context awareness og hvorfor de er vigtige...

  17. Symbiotic intelligence: Self-organizing knowledge on distributed networks, driven by human interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, N.; Joslyn, C.; Rocha, L.; Smith, S.; Kantor, M. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Rasmussen, S. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)]|[Santa Fe Inst., NM (United States)

    1998-07-01

    This work addresses how human societies, and other diverse and distributed systems, solve collective challenges that are not approachable from the level of the individual, and how the Internet will change the way societies and organizations view problem solving. The authors apply the ideas developed in self-organizing systems to understand self-organization in informational systems. The simplest explanation as to why animals (for example, ants, wolves, and humans) are organized into societies is that these societies enhance the survival of the individuals which make up the populations. Individuals contribute to, as well as adapt to, these societies because they make life easier in one way or another, even though they may not always understand the process, either individually or collectively. Despite the lack of understanding of the how of the process, society during its existence as a species has changed significantly, from separate, small hunting tribes to a highly technological, globally integrated society. The authors combine this understanding of societal dynamics with self-organization on the Internet (the Net). The unique capability of the Net is that it combines, in a common medium, the entire human-technological system in both breadth and depth: breadth in the integration of heterogeneous systems of machines, information and people; and depth in the detailed capturing of the entire complexity of human use and creation of information. When the full diversity of societal dynamics is combined with the accuracy of communication on the Net, a phase transition is argued to occur in problem solving capability. Through conceptual examples, an experiment of collective decision making on the Net and a simulation showing the effect of noise and loss on collective decision making, the authors argue that the resulting symbiotic structure of humans and the Net will evolve as an alternative problem solving approach for groups, organizations and society. Self-organizing

  18. Sustained activity in hierarchical modular neural networks: self-organized criticality and oscillations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheng-Jun Wang

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral cortical brain networks possess a number of conspicuous features of structure and dynamics. First, these networks have an intricate, non-random organization. They are structured in a hierarchical modular fashion, from large-scale regions of the whole brain, via cortical areas and area subcompartments organized as structural and functional maps to cortical columns, and finally circuits made up of individual neurons. Second, the networks display self-organized sustained activity, which is persistent in the absence of external stimuli. At the systems level, such activity is characterized by complex rhythmical oscillations over a broadband background, while at the cellular level, neuronal discharges have been observed to display avalanches, indicating that cortical networks are at the state of self-organized criticality. We explored the relationship between hierarchical neural network organization and sustained dynamics using large-scale network modeling. It was shown that sparse random networks with balanced excitation and inhibition can sustain neural activity without external stimulation. We find that a hierarchical modular architecture can generate sustained activity better than random networks. Moreover, the system can simultaneously support rhythmical oscillations and self-organized criticality, which are not present in the respective random networks. The underlying mechanism is that each dense module cannot sustain activity on its own, but displays self-organized criticality in the presence of weak perturbations. The hierarchical modular networks provide the coupling among subsystems with self-organized criticality. These results imply that the hierarchical modular architecture of cortical networks plays an important role in shaping the ongoing spontaneous activity of the brain, potentially allowing the system to take advantage of both the sensitivityof critical state and predictability and timing of oscillations for efficient

  19. Symbiotic intelligence: Self-organizing knowledge on distributed networks, driven by human interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, N.; Joslyn, C.; Rocha, L.; Smith, S.; Kantor, M. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Rasmussen, S. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)]|[Santa Fe Inst., NM (United States)

    1998-07-01

    This work addresses how human societies, and other diverse and distributed systems, solve collective challenges that are not approachable from the level of the individual, and how the Internet will change the way societies and organizations view problem solving. The authors apply the ideas developed in self-organizing systems to understand self-organization in informational systems. The simplest explanation as to why animals (for example, ants, wolves, and humans) are organized into societies is that these societies enhance the survival of the individuals which make up the populations. Individuals contribute to, as well as adapt to, these societies because they make life easier in one way or another, even though they may not always understand the process, either individually or collectively. Despite the lack of understanding of the how of the process, society during its existence as a species has changed significantly, from separate, small hunting tribes to a highly technological, globally integrated society. The authors combine this understanding of societal dynamics with self-organization on the Internet (the Net). The unique capability of the Net is that it combines, in a common medium, the entire human-technological system in both breadth and depth: breadth in the integration of heterogeneous systems of machines, information and people; and depth in the detailed capturing of the entire complexity of human use and creation of information. When the full diversity of societal dynamics is combined with the accuracy of communication on the Net, a phase transition is argued to occur in problem solving capability. Through conceptual examples, an experiment of collective decision making on the Net and a simulation showing the effect of noise and loss on collective decision making, the authors argue that the resulting symbiotic structure of humans and the Net will evolve as an alternative problem solving approach for groups, organizations and society. Self-organizing

  20. Self-organized growth and magnetic properties of epitaxial silicide nanoislands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, J. K.; Levy, R.; Camus, Y.; Dascalu, M.; Cesura, F.; Chalasani, R.; Kohn, A.; Markovich, G.; Goldfarb, I.

    2017-01-01

    Self-organized transition-metal (Ni and Fe) and rare-earth (Er) silicide nanostructures were grown on Si(1 1 1) and Si(0 0 1) surfaces under low coverage conditions, in a "solid phase" and "reactive deposition" epitaxial regimes. Island evolution was continuously monitored in-situ, using real-time scanning tunneling microscopy and surface electron diffraction. After anneal of a Ni/Si(1 1 1) surface at 700 °C, we observed small hemispherical Ni-silicide nanoislands ∼10 nm in diameter decorating surface steps in a self-ordered fashion and pinning them. Fe-silicide nanoislands formed after a 550 °C anneal of a Fe-covered surface, were also self-ordered along the surface step-bunches, however were significantly larger (∼70 × 10 nm) and exhibited well-developed three-dimensional polyhedral shapes. Ni-silicide islands were sparsely distributed, separated by about ∼100 nm from one another, on average, whereas Fe-silicide islands were more densely packed, with only ∼50 nm mean separation distance. In spite of the above differences between both types of island in size, shape, and number density, the self-ordering in both cases was close to ideal, with practically no islands nucleated on terraces. Superconducting quantum interference device magnetometry showed considerable superparamagnetism, in particular in Fe-silicide islands with ∼1.9 μB/Fe atom, indicating stronger ferromagnetic coupling of individual magnetic moments, contrary to Ni-silicide islands with the calculated moments of only ∼ 0.5μB /Ni atom. To elucidate the effects of the island size, shape, and lateral ordering on the measured magnetic response, we have controllably changed the island morphology by varying deposition methods and conditions and even using differently oriented Si substrates. We have also begun experimenting with rare-earth silicide islands. In the forthcoming experiments we intend to compare the magnetic response of these variously built and composed islands and correlate

  1. Catalyst free self-organized grown high-quality GaN nanorods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aschenbrenner, T.; Kunert, G.; Freund, W.; Kruse, C.; Figge, S.; Hommel, D. [Institute of Solid State Physics, Semiconductor Epitaxy, University of Bremen (Germany); Schowalter, M.; Vogt, C.; Rosenauer, A. [Institute of Solid State Physics, Electron Microscopy, University of Bremen (Germany); Kalden, J.; Sebald, K.; Gutowski, J. [Institute of Solid State Physics, Semiconductor Optics, University of Bremen (Germany)

    2011-08-15

    Highly ordered GaN nanorods were grown self-organized and without catalyst on r-plane sapphire by molecular beam epitaxy while the AlN nucleation sites for the nanorods were provided by a nitridation process using a metal-organic vapor-phase epitaxy system. The growth window for the nanorod formation was analysed in detail and turned out to be very sensitive with respect to the growth temperature. The nanorods are symmetrically tilted with an inclination angle of 62 between the substrate and the nanorods. The mirror axis is the c-direction of the compact GaN layer surrounding the roots of the nanocolumns. Methods for the control of the nanorod density and the suppression of one nanorod growth direction are presented. The results indicate a diffusion based growth mechanism. Transmission electron microscopy studies and high resolution X-ray diffraction (HRXRD) polar plots reveal the epitaxial relationship between substrate, compact GaN layer and nanorods. The nanorods grow in c-direction and the side facets are m-planes. Transmission electron microscopic and optical analysis of the nanorods reveal the good structural and optical properties, respectively. A full width at half maximum (FWHM) of 1.2 meV of the donor-bound exciton emission was measured for both the ensemble and single free-standing nanorods. Successful n- and Mg-doping of nanorods was verified by a strong increase of the micro-photoluminescence intensity of the respective donor-bound and acceptor-bound exciton emission peak in comparison to an undoped sample. The background shows a secondary electron microscope image (angle of 10 between sample surface and electron beam) of the nanorods. Superimposed to the SEM image, a typical micro-photoluminescence spectrum of the excitonic emission of an ensemble at 25 K is presented. The donor-bound, acceptor-bound and free exciton lines are labelled with D{sup 0}X, A{sup 0}X and FX, respectively. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGa

  2. Wave model and self-organization theory of C-space: application in the ergonomics and design

    OpenAIRE

    Kovalev, Y. N.; National Aviation University, Ukraine

    2012-01-01

    Axiomatic wave model and self-organization theory of s– spaceand their application for modeling and optimization of human–machine systems and person–dwelling–environment systems are considered. Axiomatic wave model and self-organization theory of s– spaceand their application for modeling and optimization of human–machine systems and person–dwelling–environment systems are considered.

  3. Evolutionary Awareness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory Gorelik

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we advance the concept of “evolutionary awareness,” a metacognitive framework that examines human thought and emotion from a naturalistic, evolutionary perspective. We begin by discussing the evolution and current functioning of the moral foundations on which our framework rests. Next, we discuss the possible applications of such an evolutionarily-informed ethical framework to several domains of human behavior, namely: sexual maturation, mate attraction, intrasexual competition, culture, and the separation between various academic disciplines. Finally, we discuss ways in which an evolutionary awareness can inform our cross-generational activities—which we refer to as “intergenerational extended phenotypes”—by helping us to construct a better future for ourselves, for other sentient beings, and for our environment.

  4. Evolutionary awareness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorelik, Gregory; Shackelford, Todd K

    2014-08-27

    In this article, we advance the concept of "evolutionary awareness," a metacognitive framework that examines human thought and emotion from a naturalistic, evolutionary perspective. We begin by discussing the evolution and current functioning of the moral foundations on which our framework rests. Next, we discuss the possible applications of such an evolutionarily-informed ethical framework to several domains of human behavior, namely: sexual maturation, mate attraction, intrasexual competition, culture, and the separation between various academic disciplines. Finally, we discuss ways in which an evolutionary awareness can inform our cross-generational activities-which we refer to as "intergenerational extended phenotypes"-by helping us to construct a better future for ourselves, for other sentient beings, and for our environment.

  5. A Development of Self-Organization Algorithm for Fuzzy Logic Controller

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Y.M.; Moon, U.C. [Seoul National Univ. (Korea, Republic of). Coll. of Engineering; Lee, K.Y. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States). Dept. of Electrical Engineering

    1994-09-01

    This paper proposes a complete design method for an on-line self-organizing fuzzy logic controller without using any plant model. By mimicking the human learning process, the control algorithm finds control rules of a system for which little knowledge has been known. To realize this, a concept of Fuzzy Auto-Regressive Moving Average(FARMA) rule is introduced. In a conventional fuzzy logic control, knowledge on the system supplied by an expert is required in developing control rules. However, the proposed new fuzzy logic controller needs no expert in making control rules. Instead, rules are generated using the history of input-output pairs, and new inference and defuzzification methods are developed. The generated rules are strode in the fuzzy rule space and updated on-line by a self-organizing procedure. The validity of the proposed fuzzy logic control method has been demonstrated numerically in controlling an inverted pendulum. (author). 28 refs., 16 figs.

  6. Information and Self-Organization A Macroscopic Approach to Complex Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Haken, Hermann

    2006-01-01

    This book presents the concepts needed to deal with self-organizing complex systems from a unifying point of view that uses macroscopic data. The various meanings of the concept "information" are discussed and a general formulation of the maximum information (entropy) principle is used. With the aid of results from synergetics, adequate objective constraints for a large class of self-organizing systems are formulated and examples are given from physics, life and computer science. The relationship to chaos theory is examined and it is further shown that, based on possibly scarce and noisy data, unbiased guesses about processes of complex systems can be made and the underlying deterministic and random forces determined. This allows for probabilistic predictions of processes, with applications to numerous fields in science, technology, medicine and economics. The extensions of the third edition are essentially devoted to an introduction to the meaning of information in the quantum context. Indeed, quantum inform...

  7. Two-dimensional charge transport in self-organized, high-mobility conjugated polymers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sirringhaus, H.; Brown, P.J.; Friend, R.H.

    1999-01-01

    Self-organization in many solution-processed, semiconducting conjugated polymers results in complex microstructures, in which ordered microcrystalline domains are embedded in an amorphous matrix(I). This has important consequences for electrical properties of these materials: charge transport...... is usually limited by the most difficult hopping processes and is therefore dominated by the disordered matrix, resulting in low charge-carrier mobilities(2) (less than or equal to 10(-5) cm(2)V(-1)s(-1)). Here we use thin-film, field-effect transistor structures to probe the transport properties...... of the ordered microcrystalline domains in the conjugated polymer poly(3-hexylthiophene), P3HT, Self-organization in P3HT results in a lamella structure with two-dimensional conjugated sheets formed by interchain stacking. We find that, depending on processing conditions, the lamellae can adopt two different...

  8. Clustering of the Self-Organizing Map based Approach in Induction Machine Rotor Faults Diagnostics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed TOUMI

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Self-Organizing Maps (SOM is an excellent method of analyzingmultidimensional data. The SOM based classification is attractive, due to itsunsupervised learning and topology preserving properties. In this paper, theperformance of the self-organizing methods is investigated in induction motorrotor fault detection and severity evaluation. The SOM is based on motor currentsignature analysis (MCSA. The agglomerative hierarchical algorithms using theWard’s method is applied to automatically dividing the map into interestinginterpretable groups of map units that correspond to clusters in the input data. Theresults obtained with this approach make it possible to detect a rotor bar fault justdirectly from the visualization results. The system is also able to estimate theextent of rotor faults.

  9. On Origin of Power-Law Distributions in Self-Organized Criticality from Random Walk Treatment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHANG Zhe; CAO Xiao-Feng; GUAN Cheng-Bo; DENG Zong-Wei; HUANG Chao-Guang; YANG Chun-Bin; LI Xin

    2008-01-01

    The origin of power-law distributions in self-organized criticality is investigated by treating the variation of the number of active sites in the system as a stochastic process. An avalanche is then regarded as a first-return random walk process in a one-dimensional lattice. We assume that the variation of the number of active sites has three possibilities in each update: to increase by 1 with probability fl, to decrease by 1 with probability f2, or remain unchanged with probability 1-f1-f2. This mimics the dynamics in the system. Power-law distributions of the lifetime are found when the random walk is unbiased with equal probability to move in opposite directions. This shows that power-law distributions in self-organized criticality may be caused by the balance of competitive interactions.

  10. Self-organization effect in poly(3-hexylthiophene): methanofullerenes solar cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Huang-Zhong; Peng Jun-Biao

    2008-01-01

    This paper studies the self-organization of the polymer in solar cells based on poly(3-hexylthiophene): [6, 6]-phenyl C61-butyric acid methyl ester by controlling the growth rate of active layer. These blend films are characterized by UV-vis absorption spectroscopy, charge-transport dark J - V curve, x-ray diffraction pattern curve, and atomic force microscopy. The results indicate that slowing down the drying process of the wet films leads to an enhanced self-organization, which causes an increased hole transport. Increased incident light absorption, higher carrier mobility, and balanced carrier transport in the active layer explain the enhancement in the device performance, the power conversion efficiency of 3.43% and fill factor up to 64.6% are achieved under Air Mass 1.5, 100 mW/cm2.

  11. Intergroup Joint Scheduling for Mitigating Asymmetric Uplink Interference in Self-Organizing Virtual Cell Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ohyun Jo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We introduce the concept of self-organizing VCN (virtual cell network. Here self-organizing VCN topology for efficient operation will be configured, and the functions of the each element will be defined. Also, the operation scenarios of VCN will be described. Then, we propose an efficient scheduling algorithm that considers the asymmetry of interference between downlink and uplink to mitigate intercell interference with little computing overhead. The basic concept is to construct scheduling groups that consist of several users. Each user in a scheduling group is affiliated with a different cell. Then, the intercell groups are managed efficiently in the proposed VCNs. There is no need for the exchange of a lot of information among base stations to schedule the users over the entire network.

  12. Formation of Self-Organized Anode Patterns in Arc Discharge Simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Trelles, Juan Pablo

    2013-01-01

    Pattern formation and self-organization are phenomena commonly observed experimentally in diverse types of plasma systems, including atmospheric-pressure electric arc discharges. However, numerical simulations reproducing anode pattern formation in arc discharges have proven exceedingly elusive. Time-dependent three-dimensional thermodynamic nonequilibrium simulations reveal the spontaneous formation of self-organized patterns of anode attachment spots in the free-burning arc, a canonical thermal plasma flow established by a constant DC current between an axi-symmetric electrodes configuration in the absence of external forcing. The number of spots, their size, and distribution within the pattern depend on the applied total current and on the resolution of the spatial discretization, whereas the main properties of the plasma flow, such as maximum temperatures, velocity, and voltage drop, depend only on the former. The sensibility of the solution to the spatial discretization stresses the computational require...

  13. Self-organization of high intensity laser pulses propagating in gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koga, James [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Kizu, Kyoto (Japan). Kansai Research Establishment

    2001-10-01

    In recent years the development of high intensity short pulse lasers has opened up wide fields of science which had previously been difficult to study. Recent experiments of short pulse lasers propagating in air have shown that these laser pulses can propagate over very long distances (up to 12 km) with little or no distortion of the pulse. Here we present a model of this propagation using a modified version of the self-organized criticality model developed for sandpiles by Bak, Tang, and Weisenfeld. The additions to the sandpile model include the formation of plasma which acts as a threshold diffusion term and self-focusing by the nonlinear index of refraction which acts as a continuous inverse diffusion. Results of this simple model indicate that a strongly self-focusing laser pulse shows self-organized critical behavior. (author)

  14. Laser Control of Self-Organization Process in Microscopic Region and Fabrication of Fine Microporous Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yukimasa Matsumura

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a controlling technique of microporous structure by laser irradiation during self-organization process. Self-organization process is fabrication method of microstructure. Polymer solution was dropped on the substrate at high humid condition. Water in air appears dropping air temperature below the dew point. The honeycomb structure with regularly aligned pores on the film was fabricated by attaching water droplets onto the solution surface. We demonstrate that it was possible to prevent forming pores at the region of laser irradiation and flat surface was fabricated. We also demonstrated that a combination structure with two pore sizes and flat surface was produced by a single laser-pulse irradiation. Our method is a unique microfabrication processing technique that combines the advantages of bottom-up and top-down techniques. This method is a promising technique that can be applied to produce for photonic crystals, biological cell culturing, surface science and electronics fields, and so forth.

  15. A Compact Self-organizing Cellular Automata-based Genetic Algorithm

    CERN Document Server

    Barmpoutis, Vasileios

    2007-01-01

    A Genetic Algorithm (GA) is proposed in which each member of the population can change schemata only with its neighbors according to a rule. The rule methodology and the neighborhood structure employ elements from the Cellular Automata (CA) strategies. Each member of the GA population is assigned to a cell and crossover takes place only between adjacent cells, according to the predefined rule. Although combinations of CA and GA approaches have appeared previously, here we rely on the inherent self-organizing features of CA, rather than on parallelism. This conceptual shift directs us toward the evolution of compact populations containing only a handful of members. We find that the resulting algorithm can search the design space more efficiently than traditional GA strategies due to its ability to exploit mutations within this compact self-organizing population. Consequently, premature convergence is avoided and the final results often are more accurate. In order to reinforce the superior mutation capability, ...

  16. Self-Organized Complexity and Coherent Infomax from the Viewpoint of Jaynes’s Probability Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William A. Phillips

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses concepts of self-organized complexity and the theory of Coherent Infomax in the light of Jaynes’s probability theory. Coherent Infomax, shows, in principle, how adaptively self-organized complexity can be preserved and improved by using probabilistic inference that is context-sensitive. It argues that neural systems do this by combining local reliability with flexible, holistic, context-sensitivity. Jaynes argued that the logic of probabilistic inference shows it to be based upon Bayesian and Maximum Entropy methods or special cases of them. He presented his probability theory as the logic of science; here it is considered as the logic of life. It is concluded that the theory of Coherent Infomax specifies a general objective for probabilistic inference, and that contextual interactions in neural systems perform functions required of the scientist within Jaynes’s theory.

  17. Self-Organized Criticality in Daily Incidence of Acute Myocardial Infarction

    CERN Document Server

    Selvam, A M; Mody, S M S

    1998-01-01

    Continuous periodogram power spectral analysis of daily incidence of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) reported at a leading hospital for cardiology in Pune, India for the two-year period June 1992 to May 1994 show that the power spectra follow the universal and unique inverse power law form of the statistical normal distribution. Inverse power law form for power spectra of space-time fluctuations are ubiquitous to dynamical systems in nature and have been identified as signatures of self-organized criticality. The unique quantification for self-organized criticality presented in this paper is shown to be intrinsic to quantumlike mechanics governing fractal space-time fluctuation patterns in dynamical systems. The results are consistent with El Naschie's concept of cantorian fractal spacetime characteristics for quantum systems.

  18. A Growing Self-Organizing Network for Reconstructing Curves and Surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Piastra, Marco

    2008-01-01

    Self-organizing networks such as Neural Gas, Growing Neural Gas and many others have been adopted in actual applications for both dimensionality reduction and manifold learning. Typically, in these applications, the structure of the adapted network yields a good estimate of the topology of the unknown subspace from where the input data points are sampled. The approach presented here takes a different perspective, namely by assuming that the input space is a manifold of known dimension. In return, the new type of growing self-organizing network presented gains the ability to adapt itself in way that may guarantee the effective and stable recovery of the exact topological structure of the input manifold.

  19. Scalable peer-to-peer resource discovering scheme for wireless self-organized networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xi; JI Hong

    2009-01-01

    Peer-to-peer technologies have attracted increasing research attention with fruitful protocols and applications proposed for wired networks. As to mobile environments, there are currently no mature deployments. A novel resource managing and discovering protocol, Cheer, is proposed to realize scalable and effective peer-to-peer lookup in wireless self-organized networks. Cheer resolves the topologies mismatch problem between peer-to-peer overlay networks and actual nodes distribution, allowing for frequent nodes membership changes. With specially designed resource storage table, Cheer also supports multikey and fuzzy lookup. Its hybrid architecture and improved routing scheme based on small-world theory may realize effective lookup routing. Theoretical analysis and simulation results both prove that Cheer makes using peer-to-peer applications in large-scale self-organized mobile networks feasible and promising.

  20. Self-organization of cadmium sulfide nanoparticles on the macroscopic scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rempel, Andrej A.; Kozhevnikova, Natalia S.; van den Berghe, Sven; van Renterghem, Wouter; Leenaers, Ann J. G.

    2005-06-01

    A self-organization of chemical bath deposited cadmium sulfide colloidal particles into well shaped hexagonal prisms of nearly the same size in a micrometer range is found. The self-organization phenomenon itself and the size of resulting prisms depend on the chemical affinity of the deposition reaction. In spite of the nearly perfect shape, the inner structure of the CdS colloidal crystals is highly disordered and has at least two hierarchy levels. On the scale of scanning electron microscopy, the loose and disordered microstructure of the colloidal crystals consists of nonuniformly shaped coagulates, with sizes between 150 and 250 nm. Transmission electron microscopy shows that the coagulates are polycrystals with large angle boundaries between nonuniformly shaped grains with an average size of 7 +/- 2 nm.