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Sample records for awake rats achieving

  1. Optimised motion tracking for positron emission tomography studies of brain function in awake rats.

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    Andre Z Kyme

    Full Text Available Positron emission tomography (PET is a non-invasive molecular imaging technique using positron-emitting radioisotopes to study functional processes within the body. High resolution PET scanners designed for imaging rodents and non-human primates are now commonplace in preclinical research. Brain imaging in this context, with motion compensation, can potentially enhance the usefulness of PET by avoiding confounds due to anaesthetic drugs and enabling freely moving animals to be imaged during normal and evoked behaviours. Due to the frequent and rapid motion exhibited by alert, awake animals, optimal motion correction requires frequently sampled pose information and precise synchronisation of these data with events in the PET coincidence data stream. Motion measurements should also be as accurate as possible to avoid degrading the excellent spatial resolution provided by state-of-the-art scanners. Here we describe and validate methods for optimised motion tracking suited to the correction of motion in awake rats. A hardware based synchronisation approach is used to achieve temporal alignment of tracker and scanner data to within 10 ms. We explored the impact of motion tracker synchronisation error, pose sampling rate, rate of motion, and marker size on motion correction accuracy. With accurate synchronisation (20 Hz, and a small head marker suitable for awake animal studies, excellent motion correction results were obtained in phantom studies with a variety of continuous motion patterns, including realistic rat motion (<5% bias in mean concentration. Feasibility of the approach was also demonstrated in an awake rat study. We conclude that motion tracking parameters needed for effective motion correction in preclinical brain imaging of awake rats are achievable in the laboratory setting. This could broaden the scope of animal experiments currently possible with PET.

  2. Sampling phasic dopamine signaling with fast-scan cyclic voltammetry in awake, behaving rats.

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    Fortin, S M; Cone, J J; Ng-Evans, S; McCutcheon, J E; Roitman, M F

    2015-01-05

    Fast-scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV) is an electrochemical technique that permits the in vivo measurement of extracellular fluctuations in multiple chemical species. The technique is frequently utilized to sample sub-second (phasic) concentration changes of the neurotransmitter dopamine in awake and behaving rats. Phasic dopamine signaling is implicated in reinforcement, goal-directed behavior, and locomotion, and FSCV has been used to investigate how rapid changes in striatal dopamine concentration contribute to these and other behaviors. This unit describes the instrumentation and construction, implantation, and use of components required to sample and analyze dopamine concentration changes in awake rats with FSCV.

  3. Evaluation of Gastrointestinal Motility in Awake Rats: A Learning Exercise for Undergraduate Biomedical Students

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    Souza, M. A. N.; Souza, M. H. L. P.; Palheta, R. C., Jr.; Cruz, P. R. M.; Medeiros, B. A.; Rola, F. H.; Magalhaes, P. J. C.; Troncon, L. E. A.; Santos, A. A.

    2009-01-01

    Current medical curricula devote scarce time for practical activities on digestive physiology, despite frequent misconceptions about dyspepsia and dysmotility phenomena. Thus, we designed a hands-on activity followed by a small-group discussion on gut motility. Male awake rats were randomly submitted to insulin, control, or hypertonic protocols.…

  4. RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN ANALGESIA AND EXTRACELLULAR MORPHINE IN BRAIN AND SPINAL-CORD IN AWAKE RATS

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    MATES, FF; ROLLEMA, H; TAIWO, YO; LEVINE, JD; BASBAUM, AI

    1995-01-01

    Extracellular concentrations of morphine from the dorsal spinal cord, the periaqueductal gray (FAG) including the dorsal raphe, and the lateral hypothalamus were measured by microdialysis in awake rats after intraperitoneal (i.p.) administration of 2.5, 5.0 and 10 mg/kg morphine. Morphine concentrat

  5. Characterization of flexible ECoG electrode arrays for chronic recording in awake rats.

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    Yeager, John D; Phillips, Derrick J; Rector, David M; Bahr, David F

    2008-08-30

    We developed a 64-channel flexible polyimide ECoG electrode array and characterized its performance for long-term implantation, chronic cortical recording and high resolution mapping of surface-evoked potentials in awake rats. To achieve the longest possible recording periods, the flexibility of the electrode array, adhesion between the metals and carrier substrate, and biocompatibility were critical for maintaining the signal integrity. Experimental testing of thin film adhesion was applied to a gold-polyimide system in order to characterize relative interfacial fracture energies for several different adhesion layers, yielding an increase in overall device reliability. We tested several different adhesion techniques including the following: gold alone without an adhesion layer, titanium-tungsten, tantalum and chromium. We found titanium-tungsten to be a suitable adhesion layer considering the biocompatibility requirements as well as stability and delamination resistance. While chromium and tantalum produced stronger gold adhesion, concerns over biocompatibility of these materials require further testing. We implanted the polyimide ECoG electrode arrays through a slit made in the skull of rats and recorded cortical surface evoked responses. The arrays performed reliably over a period of at least 100 days and signals compared well with traditional screw electrodes, with better high frequency response characteristics. Since the ultimate goal of chronically implanted electrode arrays is for neural prosthetic devices that need to last many decades, other adhesion layers that would prove safe for implantation may be tested in the same way in order to improve the device reliability.

  6. Layer-specific high-frequency spiking in the prefrontal cortex of awake rats

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    Zimbo Saroeni Raymond Maria Boudewijns

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Cortical pyramidal neurons show irregular in vivo action potential (AP spiking with high frequency bursts occurring on sparse background activity. Somatic APs can backpropagate from soma into basal and apical dendrites and locally generate dendritic calcium spikes. The critical AP frequency for generation of such dendritic calcium spikes can be very different depending on cell-type or brain area involved. Previously, it was shown in vitro that calcium electrogenesis can also be induced in L(ayer 5 pyramidal neurons of prefrontal cortex (PFC. It remains an open question whether somatic burst spiking and resulting dendritic calcium electrogenesis also occur in morphologically more compact L2/3 pyramidal neurons. Furthermore, it is not known whether critical frequencies that trigger dendritic calcium electrogenesis occur in PFC under awake conditions in vivo. Here, we addressed these issues and found that pyramidal neurons in both PFC L2/3 and L5 in awake rats spike APs in short bursts, but with different probabilities. The critical frequency for calcium electrogenesis in vitro was layer-specific and lower in L5 neurons compared to L2/3. Taking the in vitro critical frequency as predictive measure for dendritic electrogenesis during in vivo spontaneous activity, supracritical bursts in vivo were observed in a larger fraction of L5 neurons compared to L2/3 neurons but with similar incidence within these subpopulations. Together, these results show that in PFC of awake rats, AP spiking occurs at frequencies that are relevant for dendritic calcium electrogenesis and suggest that in awake rat PFC, dendritic calcium electrogenesis may be involved in neuronal computation.

  7. Mismatch responses in the awake rat: evidence from epidural recordings of auditory cortical fields.

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    Fabienne Jung

    Full Text Available Detecting sudden environmental changes is crucial for the survival of humans and animals. In the human auditory system the mismatch negativity (MMN, a component of auditory evoked potentials (AEPs, reflects the violation of predictable stimulus regularities, established by the previous auditory sequence. Given the considerable potentiality of the MMN for clinical applications, establishing valid animal models that allow for detailed investigation of its neurophysiological mechanisms is important. Rodent studies, so far almost exclusively under anesthesia, have not provided decisive evidence whether an MMN analogue exists in rats. This may be due to several factors, including the effect of anesthesia. We therefore used epidural recordings in awake black hooded rats, from two auditory cortical areas in both hemispheres, and with bandpass filtered noise stimuli that were optimized in frequency and duration for eliciting MMN in rats. Using a classical oddball paradigm with frequency deviants, we detected mismatch responses at all four electrodes in primary and secondary auditory cortex, with morphological and functional properties similar to those known in humans, i.e., large amplitude biphasic differences that increased in amplitude with decreasing deviant probability. These mismatch responses significantly diminished in a control condition that removed the predictive context while controlling for presentation rate of the deviants. While our present study does not allow for disambiguating precisely the relative contribution of adaptation and prediction error processing to the observed mismatch responses, it demonstrates that MMN-like potentials can be obtained in awake and unrestrained rats.

  8. Spiking in primary somatosensory cortex during natural whisking in awake head-restrained rats is cell-type specific

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    C.P.J. de Kock (Christiaan); B. Sakmann (Bert)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractSensation involves active movement of sensory organs, but it remains unknown how position or movement of sensory organs is encoded in cortex. In the rat whisker system, each whisker is represented by an individual cortical (barrel) column. Here, we quantified in awake, head-fixed rats th

  9. Algorithmic complexity as an index of cortical function in awake and pentobarbital-anesthetized rats.

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    Shaw, F Z; Chen, R F; Tsao, H W; Yen, C T

    1999-11-15

    This study introduces algorithmic complexity to measure characteristics of brain functions. The EEG of the rat was recorded with implanted electrodes. The normalized complexity value was relatively independent of data length, and it showed a simpler and easier calculation characteristic than other non-linear indexes. The complexity index revealed significant differences among awake, asleep, and anesthetized states. It may be useful in tracking short-term and long-term changes in brain functions, such as anesthetized depth, drug effects, or sleep-wakefulness.

  10. Ex vivo evaluation of the serotonin 1A receptor partial agonist [³H]CUMI-101 in awake rats

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    Palner, Mikael; Underwood, Mark D; Kumar, Dileep J S;

    2011-01-01

    [³H]CUMI-101 is a 5-HT(1A) partial agonist, which has been evaluated for use as a positron emission tracer in baboon and humans. We sought to evaluate the properties of [³H]CUMI-101 ex vivo in awake rats and determine if [³H]CUMI-101 can measure changes in synaptic levels of serotonin after...

  11. SIMULTANEOUS MEASUREMENT OF EXTRACELLULAR MORPHINE AND SEROTONIN IN BRAIN-TISSUE AND CSF BY MICRODIALYSIS IN AWAKE RATS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MATOS, FF; ROLLEMA, H; BASBAUM, AI

    1992-01-01

    In this report, we describe an HPLC with electrochemical detection assay for the simultaneous measurement of levels of morphine, serotonin, 5-hydroxyindole-3-acetic acid, and homovanillic acid in dialysates of various brain areas and CSF in the awake rat. Morphine could be detected in the dialysates

  12. Neural correlates of sensorimotor gating: A metabolic positron emission tomography study in awake rats

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    Cathrin eRohleder

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Impaired sensorimotor gating occurs in neuropsychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia and can be measured using the prepulse inhibition (PPI paradigm of the acoustic startle response. This assay is frequently used to validate animal models of neuropsychiatric disorders and to explore the therapeutic potential of new drugs. The underlying neural network of PPI has been extensively studied with invasive methods and genetic modifications. However, its relevance for healthy untreated animals and the functional interplay between startle- and PPI-related areas during a PPI session is so far unknown. Therefore, we studied awake rats in a PPI paradigm, startle control and background noise control, combined with behavioral [18F]fluoro-2-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET. Subtractive analyses between conditions were used to identify brain regions involved in startle and PPI processing in well-hearing Black hooded rats. For correlative analysis with regard to the amount of PPI we also included hearing-impaired Lister hooded rats that startled more often, because their hearing threshold was just below the lowest prepulses. Metabolic imaging showed that the brain areas proposed for startle and PPI mediation are active during PPI paradigms in healthy untreated rats. More importantly, we show for the first time that the whole PPI modulation network is active during passive PPI sessions, where no selective attention to prepulse or startle stimulus is required. We conclude that this reflects ongoing monitoring of stimulus significance and constant adjustment of sensorimotor gating.

  13. Endocytic structures and synaptic vesicle recycling at a central synapse in awake rats.

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    Körber, Christoph; Horstmann, Heinz; Sätzler, Kurt; Kuner, Thomas

    2012-12-01

    The synaptic vesicle (SV) cycle has been studied extensively in cultured cells and slice preparations, but not much is known about the roles and relative contributions of endocytic pathways and mechanisms of SV recycling in vivo, under physiological patterns of activity. We employed horseradish peroxidase (HRP) as an in vivo marker of endocytosis at the calyx of Held synapse in the awake rat. Ex vivo serial section scanning electron microscopy and 3D reconstructions revealed two categories of labelled structures: HRP-filled SVs and large cisternal endosomes. Inhibition of adaptor protein complexes 1 and 3 (AP-1, AP-3) by in vivo application of Brefeldin A (BFA) disrupted endosomal SV budding while SV recycling via clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME) remained unaffected. In conclusion, our study establishes cisternal endosomes as an intermediate of the SV cycle and reveals CME and endosomal budding as the predominant mechanisms of SV recycling in a tonically active central synapse in vivo.

  14. Mapping the functional network of medial prefrontal cortex by combining optogenetics and fMRI in awake rats.

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    Liang, Zhifeng; Watson, Glenn D R; Alloway, Kevin D; Lee, Gangchea; Neuberger, Thomas; Zhang, Nanyin

    2015-08-15

    The medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) plays a critical role in multiple cognitive and limbic functions. Given its vital importance, investigating the function of individual mPFC circuits in animal models has provided critical insight into the neural basis underlying different behaviors and psychiatric conditions. However, our knowledge regarding the mPFC whole-brain network stays largely at the anatomical level, while the functional network of mPFC, which can be dynamic in different conditions or following manipulations, remains elusive especially in awake rodents. Here we combined optogenetic stimulation and functional magnetic resonance imaging (opto-fMRI) to reveal the network of brain regions functionally activated by mPFC outputs in awake rodents. Our data showed significant increases in blood-oxygenation-level dependent (BOLD) signals in prefrontal, striatal and limbic regions when mPFC was optically stimulated. This activation pattern was robust, reproducible, and did not depend on the stimulation period in awake rats. BOLD signals, however, were substantially reduced when animals were anesthetized. In addition, regional brain activation showing increased BOLD signals during mPFC stimulation was corroborated by electrophysiological recordings. These results expand the applicability of the opto-fMRI approach from sensorimotor processing to cognition-related networks in awake rodents. Importantly, it may help elucidate the circuit mechanisms underlying numerous mPFC-related functions and behaviors that need to be assessed in the awake state.

  15. Markerless rat head motion tracking using structured light for brain PET imaging of unrestrained awake small animals

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    Miranda, Alan; Staelens, Steven; Stroobants, Sigrid; Verhaeghe, Jeroen

    2017-03-01

    Preclinical positron emission tomography (PET) imaging in small animals is generally performed under anesthesia to immobilize the animal during scanning. More recently, for rat brain PET studies, methods to perform scans of unrestrained awake rats are being developed in order to avoid the unwanted effects of anesthesia on the brain response. Here, we investigate the use of a projected structure stereo camera to track the motion of the rat head during the PET scan. The motion information is then used to correct the PET data. The stereo camera calculates a 3D point cloud representation of the scene and the tracking is performed by point cloud matching using the iterative closest point algorithm. The main advantage of the proposed motion tracking is that no intervention, e.g. for marker attachment, is needed. A manually moved microDerenzo phantom experiment and 3 awake rat [18F]FDG experiments were performed to evaluate the proposed tracking method. The tracking accuracy was 0.33 mm rms. After motion correction image reconstruction, the microDerenzo phantom was recovered albeit with some loss of resolution. The reconstructed FWHM of the 2.5 and 3 mm rods increased with 0.94 and 0.51 mm respectively in comparison with the motion-free case. In the rat experiments, the average tracking success rate was 64.7%. The correlation of relative brain regional [18F]FDG uptake between the anesthesia and awake scan reconstructions was increased from on average 0.291 (not significant) before correction to 0.909 (p  <  0.0001) after motion correction. Markerless motion tracking using structured light can be successfully used for tracking of the rat head for motion correction in awake rat PET scans.

  16. Salicylate induced tinnitus: behavioral measures and neural activity in auditory cortex of awake rats.

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    Yang, Guang; Lobarinas, Edward; Zhang, Liyan; Turner, Jeremy; Stolzberg, Daniel; Salvi, Richard; Sun, Wei

    2007-04-01

    Neurophysiological studies of salicylate-induced tinnitus have generally been carried out under anesthesia, a condition that abolishes the perception of tinnitus and depresses neural activity. To overcome these limitations, measurement of salicylate induced tinnitus were obtained from rats using schedule induced polydipsia avoidance conditioning (SIPAC) and gap pre-pulse inhibition of acoustic startle (GPIAS). Both behavioral measures indicated that tinnitus was present after treatment with 150 and 250 mg/kg of salicylate; measurements with GPIAS indicated that the pitch of the tinnitus was near 16 kHz. Chronically implanted microwire electrode arrays were used to monitor the local field potentials and spontaneous discharge rate from multiunit clusters in the auditory cortex of awake rats before and after treatment with 150 mg/kg of salicylate. The amplitude of the local field potential elicited with 60 dB SPL tone bursts increased significantly 2h after salicylate treatment particularly at 16-20 kHz; frequencies associated with the tinnitus pitch. Field potential amplitudes had largely recovered 1-2 days post-salicylate when behavioral results showed that tinnitus was absent. The mean spontaneous spike recorded from the same multiunit cluster pre- and post-salicylate decreased from 22 spikes/s before treatment to 14 spikes/s 2h post-salicylate and recovered 1 day post-treatment. These preliminary physiology data suggest that salicylate induced tinnitus is associated with sound evoked hyperactivity in auditory cortex and spontaneous hypoactivity.

  17. Nitric oxide modulates the cardiovascular effects elicited by acetylcholine in the NTS of awake rats.

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    da Silva, Liana Gouveia; Dias, Ana Carolina Rodrigues; Furlan, Elaina; Colombari, Eduardo

    2008-12-01

    Microinjection of acetylcholine chloride (ACh) in the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) of awake rats caused a transient and dose-dependent hypotension and bradycardia. Because it is known that cardiovascular reflexes are affected by nitric oxide (NO) produced in the NTS, we investigated whether these ACh-induced responses depend on NO in the NTS. Responses to ACh (500 pmol in 100 nl) were strongly reduced by ipsilateral microinjection of the NOS inhibitor NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME; 10 nmol in 100 nl) in the NTS: mean arterial pressure (MAP) fell by 50 +/- 5 mmHg before L-NAME to 9 +/- 4 mmHg, 10 min after L-NAME, and HR fell by 100 +/- 26 bpm before L-NAME to 20 +/- 10 bpm, 10 min after L-NAME (both P NTS also reduced responses to ACh: MAP fell from 42 +/- 3 mmHg before TRIM to 27 +/- 6 mmHg, 10 min after TRIM (P NTS of conscious rats induces hypotension and bradycardia, and these effects may be mediated at least partly by NO produced in NTS neurons.

  18. Noradrenergic inhibitory modulation in the caudal commissural NTS of the pressor response to chemoreflex activation in awake rats.

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    Silva de Oliveira, Luciana C; Bonagamba, Leni G H; Machado, Benedito H

    2007-10-30

    In the present study we evaluated the possible modulatory role of noradrenaline on the neurotransmission of the peripheral chemoreflex afferents in the caudal commissural NTS of awake rats. To reach this goal we performed a dose-response curve to microinjection of increasing dose of noradrenaline into the caudal commissural NTS of awake rats and then the threshold dose, which produces minor changes in the baseline mean arterial pressure, was selected to be used in the chemoreflex experiment. The peripheral chemoreflex was activated with KCN before and after bilateral microinjections of noradrenaline (5 nMol/50 nL, threshold dose) into the NTS. The data show that microinjection of noradrenaline into the caudal NTS produced a significant reduction in the pressor response to the chemoreflex 30 s after the injection when compared to the control response (30+/-6 vs. 49+/-3 mm Hg) but no significant changes in the bradycardic response. The data indicate that noradrenaline in the caudal commissural NTS of awake rats may play an important inhibitory neuromodulatory role on the processing of the pressor/sympathoexcitatory component of the chemoreflex.

  19. Examination of Rapid Dopamine Dynamics with Fast Scan Cyclic Voltammetry During Intra-oral Tastant Administration in Awake Rats.

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    Wickham, Robert J; Park, Jinwoo; Nunes, Eric J; Addy, Nii A

    2015-08-12

    Rapid, phasic dopamine (DA) release in the mammalian brain plays a critical role in reward processing, reinforcement learning, and motivational control. Fast scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV) is an electrochemical technique with high spatial and temporal (sub-second) resolution that has been utilized to examine phasic DA release in several types of preparations. In vitro experiments in single-cells and brain slices and in vivo experiments in anesthetized rodents have been used to identify mechanisms that mediate dopamine release and uptake under normal conditions and in disease models. Over the last 20 years, in vivo FSCV experiments in awake, freely moving rodents have also provided insight of dopaminergic mechanisms in reward processing and reward learning. One major advantage of the awake, freely moving preparation is the ability to examine rapid DA fluctuations that are time-locked to specific behavioral events or to reward or cue presentation. However, one limitation of combined behavior and voltammetry experiments is the difficulty of dissociating DA effects that are specific to primary rewarding or aversive stimuli from co-occurring DA fluctuations that mediate reward-directed or other motor behaviors. Here, we describe a combined method using in vivo FSCV and intra-oral infusion in an awake rat to directly investigate DA responses to oral tastants. In these experiments, oral tastants are infused directly to the palate of the rat--bypassing reward-directed behavior and voluntary drinking behavior--allowing for direct examination of DA responses to tastant stimuli.

  20. Acute blood volume expansion delays the gastrointestinal transit of a charcoal meal in awake rats

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    de-Oliveira G.R.

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study evaluates the effect of blood volume expansion on the gastrointestinal transit of a charchoal meal (2.5 ml of an aqueous suspension consisting of 5% charcoal and 5% gum arabic in awake male Wistar rats (200-270 g. On the day before the experiments, the rats were anesthetized with ether, submitted to left jugular vein cannulation and fasted with water ad libitum until 2 h before the gastrointestinal transit measurement. Blood volume expansion by iv infusion of 1 ml/min Ringer bicarbonate in volumes of 3, 4 or 5% body weight delayed gastrointestinal transit at 10 min after test meal administration by 21.3-26.7% (P<0.05, but no effect was observed after 1 or 2% body weight expansion. The effect of blood volume expansion (up to 5% body weight on gastrointestinal transit lasted for at least 60 min (P<0.05. Mean arterial pressure increased transiently and central venous pressure increased and hematocrit decreased (P<0.05. Subdiaphragmatic vagotomy and yohimbine (3 mg/kg prevented the delay caused by expansion on gastrointestinal transit, while atropine (0.5 mg/kg, L-NAME (2 mg/kg, hexamethonium (10 mg/kg, prazosin (1 mg/kg or propranolol (2 mg/kg were ineffective. These data show that blood volume expansion delays the gastrointestinal transit of a charcoal meal and that vagal and yohimbine-sensitive pathways appear to be involved in this phenomenon. The delay in gastrointestinal transit observed here, taken together with the modifications of gastrointestinal permeability to salt and water reported by others, may be part of the mechanisms involved in liquid excess management.

  1. Distinct BOLD activation profiles following central and peripheral oxytocin administration in awake rats

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    Craig F Ferris

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available A growing body of literature has suggested that intranasal oxytocin (OT or other systemic routes of administration can alter prosocial behavior, presumably by directly activating OT sensitive neural circuits in the brain. Yet there is no clear evidence that OT given peripherally can cross the blood-brain-barrier at levels sufficient to engage the OT receptor. To address this issue we examined changes in blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD signal intensity in response to peripheral OT injections (0.1, 0.5 or 2.5 mg/kg during functional magnetic resonance (fMRI in awake rats imaged at 7.0 tesla. These data were compared to OT (1ug/5 µl given directly to the brain via the lateral cerebroventricle. Using a 3D annotated MRI atlas of the rat brain segmented into 171 brain areas and computational analysis we reconstructed the distributed integrated neural circuits identified with BOLD fMRI following central and peripheral OT. Both routes of administration caused significant changes in BOLD signal within the first 10 min of administration. As expected, central OT activated a majority of brain areas known to express a high density of OT receptors e.g., lateral septum, subiculum, shell of the accumbens, bed nucleus of the stria terminalis. This profile of activation was not matched by peripheral OT. The change in BOLD signal to peripheral OT did not show any discernible dose-response. Interestingly, peripheral OT affected all subdivisions of the olfactory bulb, in addition to the cerebellum and several brainstem areas relevant to the autonomic nervous system, including the solitary tract nucleus. The results from this imaging study do not support a direct central action of peripheral OT on the brain. Instead, the patterns of brain activity suggest that peripheral OT may interact at the level of the olfactory bulb and through sensory afferents from the autonomic nervous system to influence brain activity.

  2. Vincristine delays gastric emptying and gastrointestinal transit of liquid in awake rats

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    A.A. Peixoto Júnior

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available We evaluated the effects of vincristine on the gastrointestinal (GI motility of awake rats and correlated them with the course of vincristine-induced peripheral neuropathy. Vincristine or saline was injected into the tail vein of male Wistar rats (180-250 g on alternate days: 50 µg/kg (5 doses, N = 10, 100 µg/kg (2, 3, 4 and 5 doses, N = 49 or 150 µg/kg (1, 2, or 5 doses, N = 37. Weight and stool output were measured daily for each animal. One day after completing the vincristine treatment, the animals were fasted for 24 h, gavage-fed with a test meal and sacrificed 10 min later to measure gastric emptying (GE, GI transit and colon weight. Sensory peripheral neuropathy was evaluated by hot plate testing. Chronic vincristine treatments with total cumulative doses of at least 250 µg/kg significantly decreased GE by 31-59% and GI transit by 55-93%. The effect of 5 doses of vincristine (150 µg/kg on GE did not persist for more than 1 week. Colon weight increased after 2 and 5 doses of vincristine (150 µg/kg. Fecal output decreased up to 48 h after the fifth dose of vincristine (150 µg/kg. Vincristine decreased the heat pain threshold 1 day after 5 doses of 50-100 µg/kg or after 3-5 doses of 150 µg/kg. This effect lasted for at least 2 weeks after the fifth dose. Chronic intravenous vincristine treatment delayed GE and GI transit of liquid. This effect correlated with the peak increase in colon weight but not with the pain threshold changes.

  3. Neuropeptides in the posterodorsal medial amygdala modulate central cardiovascular reflex responses in awake male rats

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    Quagliotto, E. [Departamento de Ciências Básicas da Saúde/Fisiologia, Universidade Federal de Ciências da Saúde de Porto Alegre, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Programa de Pós-Graduação em Neurociências, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Casali, K.R. [Instituto de Ciência e Tecnologia, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, São José dos Campos, SP (Brazil); Dal Lago, P. [Departamento de Fisioterapia, Universidade Federal de Ciências da Saúde de Porto Alegre, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Rasia-Filho, A.A. [Departamento de Ciências Básicas da Saúde/Fisiologia, Universidade Federal de Ciências da Saúde de Porto Alegre, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Programa de Pós-Graduação em Neurociências, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil)

    2014-11-21

    The rat posterodorsal medial amygdala (MePD) links emotionally charged sensory stimuli to social behavior, and is part of the supramedullary control of the cardiovascular system. We studied the effects of microinjections of neuroactive peptides markedly found in the MePD, namely oxytocin (OT, 10 ng and 25 pg; n=6/group), somatostatin (SST, 1 and 0.05 μM; n=8 and 5, respectively), and angiotensin II (Ang II, 50 pmol and 50 fmol; n=7/group), on basal cardiovascular activity and on baroreflex- and chemoreflex-mediated responses in awake adult male rats. Power spectral and symbolic analyses were applied to pulse interval and systolic arterial pressure series to identify centrally mediated sympathetic/parasympathetic components in the heart rate variability (HRV) and arterial pressure variability (APV). No microinjected substance affected basal parameters. On the other hand, compared with the control data (saline, 0.3 µL; n=7), OT (10 ng) decreased mean AP (MAP{sub 50}) after baroreflex stimulation and increased both the mean AP response after chemoreflex activation and the high-frequency component of the HRV. OT (25 pg) increased overall HRV but did not affect any parameter of the symbolic analysis. SST (1 μM) decreased MAP{sub 50}, and SST (0.05 μM) enhanced the sympathovagal cardiac index. Both doses of SST increased HRV and its low-frequency component. Ang II (50 pmol) increased HRV and reduced the two unlike variations pattern of the symbolic analysis (P<0.05 in all cases). These results demonstrate neuropeptidergic actions in the MePD for both the increase in the range of the cardiovascular reflex responses and the involvement of the central sympathetic and parasympathetic systems on HRV and APV.

  4. Brain processing of biologically relevant odors in the awake rat, as revealed by manganese-enhanced MRI.

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    Benoist Lehallier

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: So far, an overall view of olfactory structures activated by natural biologically relevant odors in the awake rat is not available. Manganese-enhanced MRI (MEMRI is appropriate for this purpose. While MEMRI has been used for anatomical labeling of olfactory pathways, functional imaging analyses have not yet been performed beyond the olfactory bulb. Here, we have used MEMRI for functional imaging of rat central olfactory structures and for comparing activation maps obtained with odors conveying different biological messages. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Odors of male fox feces and of chocolate flavored cereals were used to stimulate conscious rats previously treated by intranasal instillation of manganese (Mn. MEMRI activation maps showed Mn enhancement all along the primary olfactory cortex. Mn enhancement elicited by male fox feces odor and to a lesser extent that elicited by chocolate odor, differed from that elicited by deodorized air. This result was partly confirmed by c-Fos immunohistochemistry in the piriform cortex. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: By providing an overall image of brain structures activated in awake rats by odorous stimulation, and by showing that Mn enhancement is differently sensitive to different stimulating odors, the present results demonstrate the interest of MEMRI for functional studies of olfaction in the primary olfactory cortex of laboratory small animals, under conditions close to natural perception. Finally, the factors that may cause the variability of the MEMRI signal in response to different odor are discussed.

  5. GLUCOSE AND LACTATE METABOLISM IN THE AWAKE AND STIMULATED RAT: A 13C-NMR STUDY.

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    Denys eSampol

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Glucose is the major energetic substrate for the brain but evidence has accumulated during the last 20 years that lactate produced by astrocytes could be an additional substrate for neurons. However, little information exists about this lactate shuttle in vivo in activated and awake animals. We designed an experiment in which the cortical barrel field (S1BF was unilaterally activated during infusion of both glucose and lactate (alternatively labeled with 13C in rats. At the end of stimulation (1h, both S1BF areas were removed and analyzed by HR-MAS NMR spectroscopy to compare glucose and lactate metabolism in the activated area versus the non-activated one. In combination with microwave irradiation, HR-MAS spectroscopy is a powerful technical approach to study brain lactate metabolism in vivo.Using in vivo 14C-2-deoxyglucose and autoradiography, we confirmed that whisker stimulation was effective since we observed a 40% increase in glucose uptake in the activated S1BF area compared to the ipsilateral one.We first determined that lactate observed on spectra of biopsies did not arise from post-mortem metabolism. 1H-NMR data indicated that during brain activation, there was an average 2.4-fold increase in lactate content in the activated area. When [1-13C]glucose+lactate were infused, 13C-NMR data showed an increase in 13C-labeled lactate during brain activation, as well as an increase in lactate C3-specific enrichment. This result demonstrates that the increase in lactate observed on 1H-NMR spectra originates from newly synthesized lactate from the labeled precursor ([1-13C]glucose. It also shows that this additional lactate does not arise from an increase in blood lactate uptake since it would otherwise be unlabeled. These results are in favor of intracerebral lactate production during brain activation in vivo, which could be a supplementary fuel for neurons.

  6. The role of the hypothalamic nitric oxide in the pressor responses elicited by acute environmental stress in awake rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawa, T; Takeda, K; Harada, S; Hatta, T; Moriguchi, J; Miki, S; Morimoto, S; Itoh, H; Nakata, T; Sasaki, S; Nakagawa, M

    2002-08-09

    We quantitatively investigated the change in nitric oxide (NO) in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN) and its effect on cardiovascular regulation during shaker stress (SS) using brain microdialysis in awake rats. Male Wistar rats were fed either N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME, 0.7 g/L) or tap water for 2 weeks. Two days after implantation of an arterial catheter and guide shaft, a microdialysis probe was placed to perfuse the PVN with degassed Ringer solution at 2 microl/min in awake normotensive Wistar (CONTROL) and chronic L-NAME-treated hypertensive rats. After the rat was placed in a plastic cage set on a shaker, the blood pressure and heart rate was monitored and 10-min SS was loaded at a frequency of 200 cycles/min. Dialysate samples were analyzed by NO analyzer (based on the Griess reaction) every 10 min, and NOx (NO(2)(-) + NO(3)(-)) was measured. Plasma NOx was also measured before and after SS. Pressor responses elicited by SS were significantly greater in L-NAME-treated rats than in the CONTROL. Although NOx in the PVN dialysate were increased by SS in the CONTROL, these responses were attenuated in chronic L-NAME-treated rats. Resting plasma NOx were higher in the CONTROL than in L-NAME-treated rats. SS elicited no difference between two groups in plasma NOx. These results indicated that NO within the PVN, but not in systemic circulation, may play a role on the attenuation of the pressor responses elicited by SS. The dysfunction of NO release within the PVN may, in part, play a role in the exaggerated pressor responses in acute environmental stress.

  7. An Experimental Model of Vasovagal Syncope Induces Cerebral Hypoperfusion and Fainting-Like Behavior in Awake Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBride, Devin W.; Reis, Cesar; Frank, Ethan; Klebe, Damon W.; Zhang, John H.; Applegate, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Vasovagal syncope, a contributing factor to elderly falls, is the transient loss of consciousness caused by decreased cerebral perfusion. Vasovagal syncope is characterized by hypotension, bradycardia, and reduced cerebral blood flow, resulting in fatigue, altered coordination, and fainting. The purpose of this study is to develop an animal model which is similar to human vasovagal syncope and establish an awake animal model of vasovagal syncope. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to sinusoidal galvanic vestibular stimulation (sGVS). Blood pressure, heart rate, and cerebral blood flow were monitored before, during, and post-stimulation. sGVS resulted in hypotension, bradycardia, and decreased cerebral blood flow. One cohort of animals was subjected to sGVS while freely moving. sGVS in awake animals produced vasovagal syncope-like symptoms, including fatigue and uncoordinated movements; two animals experienced spontaneous falling. Another cohort of animals was preconditioned with isoflurane for several days before being subjected to sGVS. Isoflurane preconditioning before sGVS did not prevent sGVS-induced hypotension or bradycardia, yet isoflurane preconditioning attenuated sGVS-induced cerebral blood flow reduction. The sGVS rat model mimics elements of human vasovagal syncope pathophysiology (hypotension, bradycardia, and decreased cerebral perfusion), including behavioral symptoms such as fatigue and altered balance. This study indicates that the sGVS rat model is similar to human vasovagal syncope and that therapies directed at preventing cerebral hypoperfusion may decrease syncopal episodes and reduce injuries from syncopal falls. PMID:27658057

  8. Oxytocin and vasopressin modulation of the neural correlates of motivation and emotion: results from functional MRI studies in awake rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Febo, Marcelo; Ferris, Craig F

    2014-09-11

    Oxytocin and vasopressin modulate a range of species typical behavioral functions that include social recognition, maternal-infant attachment, and modulation of memory, offensive aggression, defensive fear reactions, and reward seeking. We have employed novel functional magnetic resonance mapping techniques in awake rats to explore the roles of these neuropeptides in the maternal and non-maternal brain. Results from the functional neuroimaging studies that are summarized here have directly and indirectly confirmed and supported previous findings. Oxytocin is released within the lactating rat brain during suckling stimulation and activates specific subcortical networks in the maternal brain. Both vasopressin and oxytocin modulate brain regions involved unconditioned fear, processing of social stimuli and the expression of agonistic behaviors. Across studies there are relatively consistent brain networks associated with internal motivational drives and emotional states that are modulated by oxytocin and vasopressin. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Oxytocin and Social Behav.

  9. Water versus salty taste and Iontophoretic ANGII responses of septopreoptic neurons in dehydrated and euhydrated awake rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mousseau, M C; Thornton, S N; Liénard, F; Martial, F P; Nicolaïdis, S

    1996-01-01

    Little is known of the influence of gustatory, particularly salt, input on neurons of the forebrain and if the same neurons are sensitive to hydromineral balance humoral stimuli. In awake, nonpremedicated rats we recorded the activity of spontaneously active neurons in the preoptic/anterior hypothalamic area of dehydrated and euhydrated rats while allowing them to ingest water or a hypertonic salt solution (1.6% NaCl) administered to the tongue. The hormones angiotensin and aldosterone, both implicated in hydromineral balance, were applied by iontophoresis to the same neurons. In the dehydrated rats, 27% (15/55) of the spontaneously active neurons responded to a liquid (either water or the NaCl) applied to the tongue; in the euhydrated rats 23% (18/78) responded to the same stimuli. In the dehydrated rats, however, 33% (5/15) of the responding neurons were inhibited when the NaCl solution was applied to the tongue compared with only 5% (1/18) in the euhydrated rats. Iontophoretic application of angiotensin increased the spontaneous activity in 21% of those neurons tested that responded to taste. These results suggest that the state of hydration of an animal is able to change the neuronal response to substances applied to the tongue. Furthermore, it appears that these gustatory-sensitive neurons may also be related to hydromineral balance regulation since they are able to respond to angiotensin.

  10. EXTRACELLULAR GAMMA-AMINOBUTYRIC-ACID IN THE SUBSTANTIA-NIGRA RETICULATA MEASURED BY MICRODIALYSIS IN AWAKE RATS - EFFECTS OF VARIOUS STIMULANTS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    TIMMERMAN, W; WESTERINK, BHC

    1995-01-01

    The gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-ergic system in the substantia nigra reticulata (SNR) was challenged by local infusion of various receptor-specific agents to obtain additional information on the physiological significance of extracellular GABA levels as measured by microdialysis in awake rats. No

  11. Electrical stimulation of the substantia nigra reticulata : Detection of neuronal extracellular GABA in the ventromedial thalamus and its regulatory mechanism using microdialysis in awake rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmerman, W; Westerink, BHC

    1997-01-01

    A combination of electrical stimulation and microdialysis was used to study the nigrothalamic gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA)ergic system and its regulatory mechanisms in awake rats. Extracellular GABA levels in the ventromedial nucleus of the thalamus were detected in S-min fractions collected befor

  12. Effect of hepatic glucose production on acute insulin resistance induced by lipid-infusion in awake rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ling Li; Gang-Yi Yang

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To explore the influence of hepatic glucose production on acute insulin resistance induced by a lipid infusion in awake rats.METHODS: A hyperinsulinaemic-euglycaemic clamp was established in awake chronically catheterized rats. Two groups of rats were studied either with a 4-h intraarterial infusion of lipid/heparin or saline. Insulin-mediated peripheral and hepatic glucose metabolism was assessed by hyperinsulinaemiceuglycaemic clamp combined with [3-3H]-glucose infusion.RESULTS: During hyperinsulinaemic-euglycaemic clamp,there was a significant increase in plasma free fatty acid (FFA, from 741.9±50.6 to 2346.4±238.5 μmol/L, P<0.01) in lipid-infused group. The glucose infusion rates (GIR) in the lipid infusion rats, compared to control rats, were significantly reduced (200-240 min average: lipid infusion; 12.6±1.5 vs control; 34.0±1.6 mg/kg.min, P<0.01), declining to - 35%of the corresponding control values during the last time of the clamp (240 min: lipid infusion; 12.0±1.9 vs control;34.7±1.7 mg/kg.min, P<0.0001). At the end of clamp study,the hepatic glucose production (HGP) in control rats was significantly suppressed (88%) from 19.0±4.5 (basal) to 2.3±0.9 mg/kg.min (P<0.01). The suppressive effect of insulin on HGP was significantly blunted in the lipid-infused (P<0.05). The rate of glucose disappearance (GRd) was a slight decrease in the lipid-infused rats compared with controls during the clamp.CONCLUSION: These data suggest that lipid infusion could induces suppression of hepatic glucose production, impairs the abilities of insulin to suppress lipolysis and mediate glucose utilization in peripheral tissue. Therefore, we conclude that lipid-infusion induces an acute insulin resistance in vivo.

  13. Spontaneous Changes in Taste Sensitivity of Single Units Recorded over Consecutive Days in the Brainstem of the Awake Rat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sammons, Joshua D.; Weiss, Michael S.; Escanilla, Olga D.; Fooden, Andrew F.; Victor, Jonathan D.

    2016-01-01

    A neuron’s sensitivity profile is fundamental to functional classification of cell types, and underlies theories of sensory coding. Here we show that gustatory neurons in the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) and parabrachial nucleus of the pons (PbN) of awake rats spontaneously change their tuning properties across days. Rats were surgically implanted with a chronic microwire assembly into the NTS or PbN. Following recovery, water-deprived rats had free access to a lick spout that delivered taste stimuli while cellular activity was recorded. In 12 rats for the NTS and 8 rats for the PbN, single units could be isolated at the same electrode on consecutive days (NTS, 14 units for 2–5 consecutive days, median = 2 days; PbN, 23 units for 2–7 days, median = 2.5 days). Waveforms were highly similar (waveform template correlation > 0.99) across days in 13 units in NTS and 13 units in PbN. This degree of similarity was rare (0.3% of pairs in NTS, 1.5% of pairs in PbN) when the waveforms were from presumed-different neurons (units recorded on nonconsecutive days with at least one intervening day in which there were no spikes, or from different wires or rats). Analyses of multi-day recordings that met this criterion for “same unit” showed that responses to taste stimuli appeared, disappeared, or shifted in magnitude across days, resulting in changes in tuning. These data imply, generally, that frameworks for cell classification and, specifically, that theories of taste coding, need to consider plasticity of response profiles. PMID:27479490

  14. In Vivo Microdialysis in Awake, Freely Moving Rats Demonstrates HIV-1 Tat-Induced Alterations in Dopamine Transmission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferris, Mark J.; Frederick-Duus, Danielle; Fadel, Jim; Mactutus, Charles F.; Booze, Rosemarie M.

    2013-01-01

    Individuals infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) may develop neuropsychological impairment, and a modest percentage may progress to HIV-associated dementia (HAD). Research using human and nonhuman, in vitro and in vivo models, demonstrates that subcortical dopamine (DA) systems may be particularly vulnerable to HIV-induced neurodegeneration. The goal of the current investigation is to provide an understanding of the extent to which the HIV-1 protein Tat induces alterations in striatal DA transmission using in vivo brain microdialysis in awake, freely moving rats. The current study was designed to investigate Tat-induced neuronal dysfunction between 24-h and 48-h post-Tat administration, and demonstrates a reduction in evoked DA for the Tat-treated group relative to vehicle-treated group at 24 and 48 h. The Tat-induced reduction of DA overflow by 24 h suggests dysfunction of nerve terminals, and a compromised DA system in Tat-treated animals. Furthermore, the current study provides direct support for HIV-associated decline of DA function at a systemic level, helping to characterize the functional outcome of the relatively large amount of research on the molecular and behavioral levels of HIV-induced neurotoxicity. This initial study may provide additional characteristics of Tat-induced neuronal dysfunction to inform research on therapeutic intervention, and it provides a springboard for future in vivo research currently needed in the field. PMID:19086089

  15. The effect of combined glutamate receptor blockade in the NTS on the hypoxic ventilatory response in awake rats differs from the effect of individual glutamate receptor blockade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pamenter, Matthew E; Nguyen, Jetson; Carr, John A; Powell, Frank L

    2014-08-01

    Ventilatory acclimatization to hypoxia (VAH) increases the hypoxic ventilatory response (HVR) and causes persistent hyperventilation when normoxia is restored, which is consistent with the occurrence of synaptic plasticity in acclimatized animals. Recently, we demonstrated that antagonism of individual glutamate receptor types (GluRs) within the nucleus tractus solitarii (NTS) modifies this plasticity and VAH (J. Physiol. 592(8):1839-1856); however, the effects of combined GluR antagonism remain unknown in awake rats. To evaluate this, we exposed rats to room air or chronic sustained hypobaric hypoxia (CSH, PiO2 = 70 Torr) for 7-9 days. On the experimental day, we microinjected artificial cerebrospinal fluid (ACSF: sham) and then a "cocktail" of the GluR antagonists MK-801 and DNQX into the NTS. The location of injection sites in the NTS was confirmed by glutamate injections on a day before the experiment and with histology following the experiment. Ventilation was measured in awake, unrestrained rats breathing normoxia or acute hypoxia (10% O2) in 15-min intervals using barometric pressure plethysmography. In control (CON) rats, acute hypoxia increased ventilation; NTS microinjections of GluR antagonists, but not ACSF, significantly decreased ventilation and breathing frequency in acute hypoxia but not normoxia (P NTS significantly decreased ventilation in normoxia and breathing frequency in hypoxia. A persistent HVR after combined GluR blockade in the NTS contrasts with the effect of individual GluR blockade and also with results in anesthetized rats. Our findings support the hypotheses that GluRs in the NTS contribute to, but cannot completely explain, VAH in awake rats.

  16. The Functional Networks of Prepulse Inhibition: Neuronal Connectivity Analysis Based on FDG-PET in Awake and Unrestrained Rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cathrin Rohleder

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Prepulse inhibition (PPI is a neuropsychological process during which a weak sensory stimulus (prepulse attenuates the motor response (startle reaction to a subsequent strong startling stimulus. It is measured as a surrogate marker of sensorimotor gating in patients suffering from neuropsychological diseases such as schizophrenia, as well as in corresponding animal models. A variety of studies has shown that PPI of the acoustical startle reaction comprises three brain circuitries for: i startle mediation, ii PPI mediation and iii modulation of PPI mediation. While anatomical connections and information flow in the startle and PPI mediation pathways are well known, spatial and temporal interactions of the numerous regions involved in PPI modulation are incompletely understood.We therefore combined [18F]fluoro-2-deoxyglucose positron-emission-tomography (FDG-PET with PPI and resting state control paradigms in awake rats. A battery of subtractive, correlative as well as seed-based functional connectivity analyses revealed a default mode-like network (DMN active during resting state only. Furthermore, two functional networks were observed during PPI: Metabolic activity in the lateral circuitry was positively correlated with PPI effectiveness and involved the auditory system and emotional regions. The medial network was negatively correlated with PPI effectiveness, i.e. associated with startle, and recruited a spatial/cognitive network. Our study provides evidence for two distinct neuronal networks, whose continuous interplay determines PPI effectiveness in rats, probably by either protecting the prepulse or facilitating startle processing.Discovering similar networks affected in neuropsychological disorders may help to better understand mechanisms of sensorimotor gating deficits and provide new perspectives for therapeutic strategies.

  17. Performance Enhancement of the RatCAP Awake Rate Brain PET System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaska, P.; Vaska, P.; Woody, C.; Schlyer, D.; Radeka, V.; O' Connor, P.; Park, S.-J.; Pratte, J.-F.; Junnarkar, M.; Purschke, S.; Southekal, S.; Stoll, S.; Schiffer, W.; Neill, J.; Wharton, D.; Myers, N.; Wiley, S.; Kandasamy, A.; Fried, J.; Krishnamoorthy, S. Kriplani, A.; Maramraju, S.; Lecomte, R.; Fontaine, R.

    2011-03-01

    The first full prototype of the RatCAP PET system, designed to image the brain of a rat while conscious, has been completed. Initial results demonstrated excellent spatial resolution, 1.8 mm FWHM with filtered backprojection and <1.5 mm FWHM with a Monte Carlo based MLEM method. However, noise equivalent countrate studies indicated the need for better timing to mitigate the effect of randoms. Thus, the front-end ASIC has been redesigned to minimize time walk, an accurate coincidence time alignment method has been implemented, and a variance reduction technique for the randoms is being developed. To maximize the quantitative capabilities required for neuroscience, corrections are being implemented and validated for positron range and photon noncollinearity, scatter (including outside the field of view), attenuation, randoms, and detector efficiency (deadtime is negligible). In addition, a more robust and compact PCI-based optical data acquisition system has been built to replace the original VME-based system while retaining the linux-based data processing and image reconstruction codes. Finally, a number of new animal imaging experiments have been carried out to demonstrate the performance of the RatCAP in real imaging situations, including an F-18 fluoride bone scan, a C-11 raclopride scan, and a dynamic C-11 methamphetamine scan.

  18. Time courses of behavioral and regional cerebral metabolic responses to different doses of meta-chlorophenylpiperazine in awake rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freo, U; Soncrant, T T; Ricchieri, G L; Wozniak, K M; Larson, D M; Rapoport, S I

    1990-03-19

    The time course and relation to dose of regional cerebral metabolic rates for glucose (rCMRglc) and of motor behavior were measured in awake male adult Fischer-344 rats after administration of meta-chlorophenylpiperazine (MCPP), a serotonin-1B receptor agonist. rCMRglc was determined, using the quantitative autoradiographic [14C]deoxyglucose technique, in 71 brain regions at 5, 15, 30 and 60 min after administration of MCPP 2.5 mg/kg i.p., and at 15 min after MCPP 25 and 40 mg/kg. The time course of performance on a rotating rod was measured periodically for 60 min after MCPP 2.5 mg/kg, a dose which impaired locomotion and reduced rCMRglc maximally at 15-30 min after its administration. At 15 min, rCMRglc declined significantly in 28 (40%) of the areas studied (mean decline 16%). Most regions affected were telencephalic or diencephalic, corresponding to the projection areas of serotonergic fibers arising from the raphe nuclei. After higher doses of MCPP, a behavioral serotonin syndrome was observed with both rCMRglc increases and decreases (25 mg/kg) or only rCMRglc increases (40 mg/kg). Whereas behavioral and metabolic activation induced by high doses of MCPP may result from stimulation at postsynaptic serotonin receptors, rCMRglc reductions and hypomotility produced by MCPP 2.5 mg/kg resemble the effects of serotonin receptor antagonists and suggest that, at this low dose, MCPP acts at modulatory serotonin autoreceptors to reduce endogenous serotonin release.

  19. Saturation thresholds of evoked neural and hemodynamic responses in awake and asleep rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schei, Jennifer L.; Van Nortwick, Amy S.; Meighan, Peter C.; Rector, David M.

    2011-03-01

    Neural activation generates a hemodynamic response to the localized region replenishing nutrients to the area. Changes in vigilance state have been shown to alter the vascular response where the vascular response is muted during wake compared to quiet sleep. We tested the saturation thresholds of the neurovascular response in the auditory cortex during wake and sleep by chronically implanting rats with an EEG electrode, a light emitting diode (LED, 600 nm), and photodiode to simultaneously measure evoked response potentials (ERPs) and evoked hemodynamic responses. We stimulated the cortex with a single speaker click delivered at random intervals 2-13 s at varied stimulus intensities ranging from 45-80 dB. To further test the potential for activity related saturation, we sleep deprived animals for 2, 4, or 6 hours and recorded evoked responses during the first hour recovery period. With increasing stimulus intensity, integrated ERPs and evoked hemodynamic responses increased; however the hemodynamic response approached saturation limits at a lower stimulus intensity than the ERP. With longer periods of sleep deprivation, the integrated ERPs did not change but evoked hemodynamic responses decreased. There may be physical limits in cortical blood delivery and vascular compliance, and with extended periods of neural activity during wake, vessels may approach these limits.

  20. Identifying the Integrated Neural Networks Involved in Capsaicin-Induced Pain Using fMRI in Awake TRPV1 Knockout and Wild-Type Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason Richard Yee

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, we used functional MRI in awake rats to investigate the pain response that accompanies intradermal injection of capsaicin into the hindpaw. To this end, we used BOLD imaging together with a 3D segmented, annotated rat atlas and computational analysis to identify the integrated neural circuits involved in capsaicin-induced pain. The specificity of the pain response to capsaicin was tested in a transgenic model that contains a biallelic deletion of the gene encoding for the transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily V member 1 (TRPV1. Capsaicin is an exogenous ligand for the TRPV1 receptor, and in wild-type rats, activated the putative pain neural circuit. In addition, capsaicin-treated wild-type rats exhibited activation in brain regions comprising the Papez circuit and habenular system, systems that play important roles in the integration of emotional information, and learning and memory of aversive information, respectively. As expected, capsaicin administration to TRPV1-KO rats failed to elicit the robust BOLD activation pattern observed in wild-type controls. However, the intradermal injection of formalin elicited a significant activation of the putative pain pathway as represented by such areas as the anterior cingulate, somatosensory cortex, parabrachial nucleus, and periaqueductal gray. Notably, comparison of neural responses to capsaicin in wild-type versus knock-out rats uncovered evidence that capsaicin may function in an antinociceptive capacity independent of TRPV1 signaling. Our data suggest that neuroimaging of pain in awake, conscious animals has the potential to inform the neurobiological basis of full and integrated perceptions of pain.

  1. The bradycardic and hypotensive responses to serotonin are reduced by activation of GABA A receptors in the nucleus tractus solitarius of awake rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.C. Callera

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the effects of bilateral injections of the GABA receptor agonists muscimol (GABA A and baclofen (GABA B into the nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS on the bradycardia and hypotension induced by iv serotonin injections (5-HT, 2 µg/rat in awake male Holtzman rats. 5-HT was injected in rats with stainless steel cannulas implanted bilaterally in the NTS, before and 5, 15, and 60 min after bilateral injections of muscimol or baclofen into the NTS. The responses to 5-HT were tested before and after the injection of atropine methyl bromide. Muscimol (50 pmol/50 nl, N = 8 into the NTS increased basal mean arterial pressure (MAP from 115 ± 4 to 144 ± 6 mmHg, did not change basal heart rate (HR and reduced the bradycardia (-40 ± 14 and -73 ± 26 bpm at 5 and 15 min, respectively, vs -180 ± 20 bpm for the control and hypotension (-11 ± 4 and -14 ± 4 mmHg, vs -40 ± 9 mmHg for the control elicited by 5-HT. Baclofen (12.5 pmol/50 nl, N = 7 into the NTS also increased basal MAP, but did not change basal HR, bradycardia or hypotension in response to 5-HT injections. Atropine methyl bromide (1 mg/kg body weight injected iv reduced the bradycardic and hypotensive responses to 5-HT injections. The stimulation of GABA A receptors in the NTS of awake rats elicits a significant increase in basal MAP and decreases the cardiac Bezold-Jarisch reflex responses to iv 5-HT injections.

  2. SEMICIRCADIAN RHYTHM OF DOPAMINE RELEASE IN THE MEDIOBASAL HYPOTHALAMUS IN AWAKE RATS DURING PSEUDOPREGNANCY - EVIDENCE THAT A THYROTROPIN-RELEASING-HORMONE ANALOG STIMULATES DOPAMINE RELEASE AND THEREBY INHIBITS PROLACTIN SECRETION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    TIMMERMAN, W; POELMAN, RT; WESTERINK, BHC; SCHUILING, GA

    1995-01-01

    The release of dopamine (DA) from tuberoinfundibular (TIDA) neurons during prolactin (PRL) surge and nonsurge periods and the effects of the thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) analogue CG 3703 on DA and PRL secretion were studied in awake pseudopregnant (PSP) rats by simultaneous measurement of ext

  3. CHARACTERIZATION OF THE DA-ERGIC SYSTEM IN THE MEDIOBASAL HYPOTHALAMUS - A NEW APPROACH TO SIMULTANEOUSLY MONITOR THE RELEASE OF DA FROM THE TIDA NEURONS AND THE PRL SECRETION FROM THE ADENOHYPOPHYSIS IN AWAKE RATS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    TIMMERMAN, W; DEINUM, ME; POELMAN, RT; WESTERINK, BHC; SCHUILING, GA

    1994-01-01

    The TIDA neurons, which constitute part of the arcuate nucleus-ME complex, play an important inhibitory role in the regulation of the PRL secretion from the adenohypophysis. To simultaneously study the release of DA from the TIDA neurons and the PRL secretion from the adenohypophysis in awake rats,

  4. Intracerebroventricular Administration of Amyloid β-protein Oligomers Selectively Increases Dorsal Hippocampal Dialysate Glutamate Levels in the Awake Rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean D. O’Shea

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Extensive evidence supports an important role for soluble oligomers of the amyloid β-protein (Aβ in Alzheimer’s Disease pathogenesis. In the present study we combined intracerebroventricular (icv injections with brain microdialysis technology in the fully conscious rat to assess the effects of icv administered SDS-stable low-n Aβ oligomers (principally dimers and trimers on excitatory and inhibitory amino acid transmission in the ipsilateral dorsal hippocampus. Microdialysis was employed to assess the effect of icv administration of Aβ monomers and Aβ oligomers on dialysate glutamate, aspartate and GABA levels in the dorsal hippocampus. Administration of Aβ oligomers was associated with a +183% increase (p<0.0001 vs. Aβ monomer-injected control in dorsal hippocampal glutamate levels which was still increasing at the end of the experiment (260 min, whereas aspartate and GABA levels were unaffected throughout. These findings demonstrate that icv administration and microdialysis technology can be successfully combined in the awake rat and suggests that altered dorsal hippocampal glutamate transmission may be a useful target for pharmacological intervention in Alzheimer’s Disease.

  5. Antagonism of glutamate receptors in the intermediate and caudal NTS of awake rats produced no changes in the hypertensive response to chemoreflex activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Benedito H; Bonagamba, Leni G H

    2005-01-15

    The role of excitatory amino acid (EAA) receptors in the neurotransmission of the sympathoexcitatory component of the chemoreflex (pressor response) in the intermediate and caudal aspects of the commissural nucleus tractus solitarii (NTS) of awake rats was evaluated. Microinjection of kynurenic acid, a non-selective antagonist of EAA receptors, into the intermediate and caudal commissural NTS produced a large increase in the baseline mean arterial pressure (MAP), which may reduce the magnitude of the pressor response to chemoreflex activation. To avoid this problem sodium nitroprusside (SNP) was infused (i.v.) after microinjections of kynurenic acid (2 nmol/50 nl) into the NTS, in order to normalize the MAP and then the chemoreflex was activated and the magnitude of the pressor response evaluated. Microinjection of kynurenic acid into the intermediate (bilaterally) and caudal (midline) commissural NTS (n=6) produced a significant increase in baseline MAP (103+/-5 vs. 137+/-6 mm Hg) normalized by SNP infusion (107+/-4 mm Hg) and under this experimental condition the pressor response to chemoreflex activation was not statistically different in relation to the control (37+/-7 vs. 44+/-6 mm Hg). Bilateral microinjections of kynurenic acid into the caudal NTS (n=8) also produced a significant increase in baseline MAP (109+/-4 vs. 145+/-6 mm Hg) normalized by SNP infusion (109+/-6 mm Hg). After normalization of MAP, the pressor response to chemoreflex activation at 3 (34+/-6 mm Hg) and 10 min (37+/-6 mm Hg) was also not different in relation to the control (46+/-5 mm Hg). These data indicate that the antagonism of EAA receptors simultaneously in the intermediate (bilateral) and caudal (midline) commissural NTS or only in the caudal commissural NTS (bilateral) of awake rats had no effect on the hypertensive response to chemoreflex activation. We suggest that neurotransmitter other than l-glutamate may take part in the neurotransmission of the sympathoexcitatory component

  6. Integrated wireless fast-scan cyclic voltammetry recording and electrical stimulation for reward-predictive learning in awake, freely moving rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yu-Ting; Wickens, Jeffery R.; Huang, Yi-Ling; Pan, Wynn H. T.; Chen, Fu-Yu Beverly; Chen, Jia-Jin Jason

    2013-08-01

    Objective. Fast-scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV) is commonly used to monitor phasic dopamine release, which is usually performed using tethered recording and for limited types of animal behavior. It is necessary to design a wireless dopamine sensing system for animal behavior experiments. Approach. This study integrates a wireless FSCV system for monitoring the dopamine signal in the ventral striatum with an electrical stimulator that induces biphasic current to excite dopaminergic neurons in awake freely moving rats. The measured dopamine signals are unidirectionally transmitted from the wireless FSCV module to the host unit. To reduce electrical artifacts, an optocoupler and a separate power are applied to isolate the FSCV system and electrical stimulator, which can be activated by an infrared controller. Main results. In the validation test, the wireless backpack system has similar performance in comparison with a conventional wired system and it does not significantly affect the locomotor activity of the rat. In the cocaine administration test, the maximum electrically elicited dopamine signals increased to around 230% of the initial value 20 min after the injection of 10 mg kg-1 cocaine. In a classical conditioning test, the dopamine signal in response to a cue increased to around 60 nM over 50 successive trials while the electrically evoked dopamine concentration decreased from about 90 to 50 nM in the maintenance phase. In contrast, the cue-evoked dopamine concentration progressively decreased and the electrically evoked dopamine was eliminated during the extinction phase. In the histological evaluation, there was little damage to brain tissue after five months chronic implantation of the stimulating electrode. Significance. We have developed an integrated wireless voltammetry system for measuring dopamine concentration and providing electrical stimulation. The developed wireless FSCV system is proven to be a useful experimental tool for the continuous

  7. Inhibitory modulation of chemoreflex bradycardia by stimulation of the nucleus raphe obscurus is mediated by 5-HT3 receptors in the NTS of awake rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weissheimer, Karin Viana; Machado, Benedito H

    2007-03-30

    Several studies demonstrated the involvement of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) and its different receptor subtypes in the modulation of neurotransmission of cardiovascular reflexes in the nucleus tractus solitarii (NTS). Moreover, anatomic evidence suggests that nucleus raphe obscurus (ROb) is a source of 5-HT-containing terminals within the NTS. In the present study we investigated the possible changes in the cardiovascular responses to peripheral chemoreceptor activation by potassium cyanide (KCN, i.v.) following ROb stimulation with L-glutamate (10 nmol/50 nL) and also whether 5-HT3 receptors in the caudal commissural NTS are involved in this neuromodulation. The results showed that stimulation of the ROb with L-glutamate in awake rats (n=15) produced a significant reduction in the bradycardic response 30 s after the microinjection (-182+/-19 vs -236+/-10 bpm; Wilcoxon test) but no changes in the pressor response to peripheral chemoreceptor activation (43+/-4 vs 51+/-3 mmHg; two-way ANOVA) in relation to the control. Microinjection of 5--HT3 receptors antagonist granisetron (500 pmol/50 nL), but not the vehicle, into the caudal commissural NTS bilaterally prevented the reduction of chemoreflex bradycardia in response to microinjection of L-glutamate into ROb. These data indicate that 5-HT-containing projections from ROb to the NTS play an inhibitory neuromodulatory role in the chemoreflex evoked bradycardia by releasing 5-HT and activating 5-HT3 receptors in the caudal NTS.

  8. Ex vivo evaluation of the serotonin 1A receptor partial agonist [³H]CUMI-101 in awake rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palner, Mikael; Underwood, Mark D; Kumar, Dileep J S;

    2011-01-01

    -DL-phenylalanine, a serotonin synthesis inhibitor, did not show any effect on the standardized uptake values (SUVs) in any region. Citalopram did alter SBR, but this was due to changes in cerebellar SUVs. Our results indicate that [³H]CUMI-101 is a good radioligand for imaging 5-HT(1A) high-density regions in rats; however...

  9. Mechanical characteristics of rat vibrissae: resonant frequencies and damping in isolated whiskers and in the awake behaving animal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, Mitra J.; Johnson, Nicholas J.; Towal, R. Blythe; Assad, Christopher

    2003-01-01

    We investigated the natural resonance properties and damping characteristics of rat macrovibrissae (whiskers). Isolated whiskers rigidly fixed at the base showed first-mode resonance peaks between 27 and 260 Hz, principally depending on whisker length. These experimentally measured resonant frequencies were matched using a theoretical model of the whisker as a conical cantilever beam, with Young's modulus as the only free parameter. The best estimate for Young's modulus was approximately 3-4 GPa. Results of both vibration and impulse experiments showed that the whiskers are strongly damped, with damping ratios between 0.11 and 0.17. In the behaving animal, whiskers that deflected past an object were observed to resonate but were damped significantly more than isolated whiskers. The time course of damping varied depending on the individual whisker and the phase of the whisking cycle, which suggests that the rat may modulate biomechanical parameters that affect damping. No resonances were observed for whiskers that did not contact the object or during free whisking in air. Finally, whiskers on the same side of the face were sometimes observed to move in opposite directions over the full duration of a whisk. We discuss the potential roles of resonance during natural exploratory behavior and specifically suggest that resonant oscillations may be important in the rat's tactile detection of object boundaries.

  10. Effect of intraperitoneally administered hydrolyzed whey protein on blood pressure and renal sodium handling in awake spontaneously hypertensive rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Costa E.L.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study evaluated the acute effect of the intraperitoneal (ip administration of a whey protein hydrolysate (WPH on systolic arterial blood pressure (SBP and renal sodium handling by conscious spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR. The ip administration of WPH in a volume of 1 ml dose-dependently lowered the SBP in SHR 2 h after administration at doses of 0.5 g/kg (0.15 M NaCl: 188.5 ± 9.3 mmHg vs WPH: 176.6 ± 4.9 mmHg, N = 8, P = 0.001 and 1.0 g/kg (0.15 M NaCl: 188.5 ± 9.3 mmHg vs WPH: 163.8 ± 5.9 mmHg, N = 8, P = 0.0018. Creatinine clearance decreased significantly (P = 0.0084 in the WPH-treated group (326 ± 67 µL min-1 100 g body weight-1 compared to 0.15 M NaCl-treated (890 ± 26 µL min-1 100 g body weight-1 and captopril-treated (903 ± 72 µL min-1 100 g body weight-1 rats. The ip administration of 1.0 g WPH/kg also decreased fractional sodium excretion to 0.021 ± 0.019% compared to 0.126 ± 0.041 and 0.66 ± 0.015% in 0.15 M NaCl and captopril-treated rats, respectively (P = 0.033. Similarly, the fractional potassium excretion in WPH-treated rats (0.25 ± 0.05% was significantly lower (P = 0.0063 than in control (0.91 ± 0.15% and captopril-treated rats (1.24 ± 0.30%, respectively. The present study shows a decreased SBP in SHR after the administration of WPH associated with a rise in tubule sodium reabsorption despite an angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE-inhibiting in vitro activity (IC50 = 0.68 mg/mL. The present findings suggest a pathway involving ACE inhibition but measurements of plasma ACE activity and angiotensin II levels are needed to support this suggestion.

  11. Effect of intraperitoneally administered hydrolyzed whey protein on blood pressure and renal sodium handling in awake spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, E L; Almeida, A R; Netto, F M; Gontijo, J A R

    2005-12-01

    The present study evaluated the acute effect of the intraperitoneal (ip) administration of a whey protein hydrolysate (WPH) on systolic arterial blood pressure (SBP) and renal sodium handling by conscious spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). The ip administration of WPH in a volume of 1 ml dose-dependently lowered the SBP in SHR 2 h after administration at doses of 0.5 g/kg (0.15 M NaCl: 188.5 +/- 9.3 mmHg vs WPH: 176.6 +/- 4.9 mmHg, N = 8, P = 0.001) and 1.0 g/kg (0.15 M NaCl: 188.5 +/- 9.3 mmHg vs WPH: 163.8 +/- 5.9 mmHg, N = 8, P = 0.0018). Creatinine clearance decreased significantly (P = 0.0084) in the WPH-treated group (326 +/- 67 microL min-1 100 g body weight-1) compared to 0.15 M NaCl-treated (890 +/- 26 microL min-1 100 g body weight-1) and captopril-treated (903 +/- 72 microL min-1 100 g body weight-1) rats. The ip administration of 1.0 g WPH/kg also decreased fractional sodium excretion to 0.021 +/- 0.019% compared to 0.126 +/- 0.041 and 0.66 +/- 0.015% in 0.15 M NaCl and captopril-treated rats, respectively (P = 0.033). Similarly, the fractional potassium excretion in WPH-treated rats (0.25 +/- 0.05%) was significantly lower (P = 0.0063) than in control (0.91 +/- 0.15%) and captopril-treated rats (1.24 +/- 0.30%), respectively. The present study shows a decreased SBP in SHR after the administration of WPH associated with a rise in tubule sodium reabsorption despite an angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE)-inhibiting in vitro activity (IC50 = 0.68 mg/mL). The present findings suggest a pathway involving ACE inhibition but measurements of plasma ACE activity and angiotensin II levels are needed to support this suggestion.

  12. Taste coding of complex naturalistic taste stimuli and traditional taste stimuli in the parabrachial pons of the awake, freely licking rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sammons, Joshua D; Weiss, Michael S; Victor, Jonathan D; Di Lorenzo, Patricia M

    2016-07-01

    Several studies have shown that taste-responsive cells in the brainstem taste nuclei of rodents respond to sensory qualities other than gustation. Such data suggest that cells in the classical gustatory brainstem may be better tuned to respond to stimuli that engage multiple sensory modalities than to stimuli that are purely gustatory. Here, we test this idea by recording the electrophysiological responses to complex, naturalistic stimuli in single neurons in the parabrachial pons (PbN, the second neural relay in the central gustatory pathway) in awake, freely licking rats. Following electrode implantation and recovery, we presented both prototypical and naturalistic taste stimuli and recorded the responses in the PbN. Prototypical taste stimuli (NaCl, sucrose, citric acid, and caffeine) and naturalistic stimuli (clam juice, grape juice, lemon juice, and coffee) were matched for taste quality and intensity (concentration). Umami (monosodium glutamate + inosine monophosphate) and fat (diluted heavy cream) were also tested. PbN neurons responded to naturalistic stimuli as much or more than to prototypical taste stimuli. Furthermore, they convey more information about naturalistic stimuli than about prototypical ones. Moreover, multidimensional scaling analyses showed that across unit responses to naturalistic stimuli were more widely separated than responses to prototypical taste stimuli. Interestingly, cream evoked a robust and widespread response in PbN cells. Collectively, these data suggest that natural foods are more potent stimulators of PbN cells than purely gustatory stimuli. Probing PbN cells with pure taste stimuli may underestimate the response repertoire of these cells.

  13. Hemodynamic and respiratory responses to microinjection of ATP into the intermediate and caudal NTS of awake rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antunes, Vagner R; Bonagamba, Leni G H; Machado, Benedito H

    2005-01-25

    The nucleus tractus solitarii (NTS) is the site of integration of the peripheral chemoreceptor afferents in the brainstem. Previous studies from our laboratory have shown that microinjection of ATP into the intermediate NTS produced increases in arterial pressure and bradycardia. In the present study, we evaluated the hemodynamic and respiratory responses to microinjection of ATP into the intermediate and caudal commissural NTS. In the same group of rats the responses were compared with cardiorespiratory responses to chemoreflex activation (KCN, i.v.). The data show that microinjection of ATP into the intermediate NTS produced pressor and bradycardic responses similar to those observed in response to chemoreflex activation but apnoea instead of tachypnoea. Microinjection of ATP into caudal commissural NTS produced increase in arterial pressure and tachypnoea similar to the chemoreflex but a minor bradycardia. The data show that microinjection of ATP into different sub-regions of the NTS produces a diverse pattern of hemodynamic and respiratory responses and suggest the involvement of this purine in the neurotransmission of the cardiovascular reflex in the NTS.

  14. Awake craniotomy for tumor resection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammadali Attari

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Surgical treatment of brain tumors, especially those located in the eloquent areas such as anterior temporal, frontal lobes, language, memory areas, and near the motor cortex causes high risk of eloquent impairment. Awake craniotomy displays major rule for maximum resection of the tumor with minimum functional impairment of the Central Nervous System. These case reports discuss the use of awake craniotomy during the brain surgery in Alzahra Hospital, Isfahan, Iran. A 56-year-old woman with left-sided body hypoesthesia since last 3 months and a 25-year-old with severe headache of 1 month duration were operated under craniotomy for brain tumors resection. An awake craniotomy was planned to allow maximum tumor intraoperative testing for resection and neurologic morbidity avoidance. The method of anesthesia should offer sufficient analgesia, hemodynamic stability, sedation, respiratory function, and also awake and cooperative patient for different neurological test. Airway management is the most important part of anesthesia during awake craniotomy. Tumor surgery with awake craniotomy is a safe technique that allows maximal resection of lesions in close relationship to eloquent cortex and has a low risk of neurological deficit.

  15. Preparation of the patient and the airway for awake intubation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkateswaran Ramkumar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Awake intubation is usually performed electively in the presence of a difficult airway. A detailed airway examination is time-consuming and often not feasible in an emergency. A simple 1-2-3 rule for airway examination allows one to identify potential airway difficulty within a minute. A more detailed airway examination can give a better idea about the exact nature of difficulty and the course of action to be taken to overcome it. When faced with an anticipated difficult airway, the anaesthesiologist needs to consider securing the airway in an awake state without the use of anaesthetic agents or muscle relaxants. As this can be highly discomforting to the patient, time and effort must be spent to prepare such patients both psychologically and pharmacologically for awake intubation. Psychological preparation is best initiated by an anaesthesiologist who explains the procedure in simple language. Sedative medications can be titrated to achieve patient comfort without compromising airway patency. Additional pharmacological preparation includes anaesthetising the airway through topical application of local anaesthetics and appropriate nerve blocks. When faced with a difficult airway, one should call for the difficult airway cart as well as for help from colleagues who have interest and expertise in airway management. Preoxygenation and monitoring during awake intubation is important. Anxious patients with a difficult airway may need to be intubated under general anaesthesia without muscle relaxants. Proper psychological and pharmacological preparation of the patient by an empathetic anaesthesiologist can go a long way in making awake intubation acceptable for all concerned.

  16. Breathing patterns of awake rats exposed to acrolein and perfluorisobutylene determined with an integrated system of nose-only exposure and online analyzed multiple monitoring of breathing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergers, W.W.A.; Beyersbergen Van Henegouwen, A.G.; Hammer, A.H.; Bruijnzeel, P.L.B.

    1996-01-01

    Studies on changes in breathing patterns of rats due to exposure to acrolein and the Leflon pyrolysis product perfluorisobutylene (PFIB) were performed to evaluate a new developed integrated system of nose- only exposure and multiple monitoring of breathing of up to eight rats. Measurements of breat

  17. Effects of NMDA and non-NMDA ionotropic glutamate receptors in the medial preoptic area on body temperature in awake rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengupta, Trina; Jaryal, Ashok Kumar; Mallick, Hruda Nanda

    2016-10-01

    Glutamate when microinjected at the medial preoptic area (mPOA) influences brain temperature (Tbr) and body temperature (Tb) in rats. Glutamate and its various receptors are present at the mPOA. The aim of this study was to identify the contribution of each of the ionotropic glutamatergic receptors at the mPOA on changes in Tbr and Tb in freely moving rats. Adult male Wistar rats (n=40) were implanted with bilateral guide cannula with indwelling styli above the mPOA. A telemetric transmitter was implanted at the peritoneum to record Tb and locomotor activity (LMA). A precalibrated thermocouple wire implanted near the hypothalamus was used to assess Tbr. Specific agonist for each ionotropic glutamate receptor was microinjected into the mPOA and its effects on temperature and LMA were measured in the rats. The rats were also microinjected with the respective ionotropic receptor antagonists, 15min prior to the microinjection of each agonist. Amongst amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA), N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) and kainic acid, AMPA increased Tb and LMA when injected at the mPOA. Specific antagonists for AMPA receptors was able to attenuate this increase (ptemperature.

  18. Awake operative videothoracoscopic pulmonary resections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pompeo, Eugenio; Mineo, Tommaso C

    2008-08-01

    The authors' initial experience with awake videothoracoscopic lung resection suggests that these procedures can be easily and safely performed under sole thoracic epidural anesthesia with no mortality and negligible morbidity. One major concern was that operating on a ventilating lung would render surgical maneuvers more difficult because of the lung movements and lack of a sufficient operating space. Instead, the open pneumothorax created after trocar insertion produces a satisfactory lung collapse that does not hamper surgical maneuvers. These results contradict the accepted assumption that the main prerequisite for allowing successful thoracoscopic lung surgery is general anesthesia with one-lung ventilation. No particular training is necessary to accomplish an awake pulmonary resection for teams experienced in thoracoscopic surgery, and conversions to general anesthesia are mainly caused by the presence of extensive fibrous pleural adhesions or the development of intractable panic attacks. Overall, awake pulmonary resection is easily accepted and well tolerated by patients, as confirmed by the high anesthesia satisfaction score, which was better than in nonawake control patients. Nonetheless, thoracic epidural anesthesia has potential complications, including epidural hematoma, spinal cord injury, and phrenic nerve palsy caused by inadvertently high anesthetic level, but these never occurred in the authors' experience. Further concerns relate to patient participation in operating room conversations or risk for development of perioperative panic attacks. However, the authors have found that reassuring the patient during the procedure, explaining step-by-step what is being performed, and even showing the ongoing procedure on the operating video can greatly improve the perioperative wellness and expectations of patients, particularly if the procedure is performed for oncologic diseases. Panic attacks occurred in few patients and could be usually managed through

  19. Awake fiberoptic or awake video laryngoscopic tracheal intubation in patients with anticipated difficult airway management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenstock, Charlotte Vallentin; Thøgersen, Bente; Afshari, Arash;

    2012-01-01

    Awake flexible fiberoptic intubation (FFI) is the gold standard for management of anticipated difficult tracheal intubation. The purpose of this study was to compare awake FFI to awake McGrath® video laryngoscope, (MVL), (Aircraft Medical, Edinburgh, Scotland, United Kingdom) intubation in patien...

  20. Identification of cortical lamination in awake monkeys by high resolution magnetic resonance imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Gang; Wang, Feng; Gore, John C.; Roe, Anna W.

    2011-01-01

    Brodman divided the neocortex into 47 different cortical areas based on histological differences in laminar myeloarchitectonic and cytoarchitectonic defined structure. The ability to do so in vivo with anatomical magnetic resonance (MR) methods in awake subjects would be extremely advantageous for many functional studies. However, due to the limitations of spatial resolution and contrast, this has been difficult to achieve in awake subjects. Here, we report that by using a combination of MR m...

  1. Serotonin mediates rapid changes of striatal glucose and lactate metabolism after systemic 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, "Ecstasy") administration in awake rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gramsbergen, Jan Bert; Cumming, Paul

    2007-01-01

    metabolism in freely moving rats using rapid sampling microdialysis (every minute) coupled to flow-injection analysis (FIA) with biosensors for glucose and lactate. Blood samples for analysis of glucose and lactate were taken at 30-45 min intervals before and after drug dosing and body temperature...... The pathway for selective serotonergic toxicity of 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, "Ecstasy") is poorly understood, but has been linked to hyperthermia and disturbed energy metabolism. We investigated the dose-dependency and time-course of MDMA-induced perturbations of cerebral glucose...... depletions of striatal serotonin. Blood glucose and lactate levels were also transiently elevated (163 and 135%) at the highest MDMA doses. The blood glucose rises were significantly related to brain glucose and brain lactate changes. The metabolic perturbations in striatum and the hyperthermic response (+1...

  2. Inhibition of histamine release by local and intracerebroventricular infusion of galanin in hypothalamus, hippocampus and prefrontal cortex of awake rat: A microdialysis study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshitake, Shimako; Ijiri, Soichiro; Kehr, Jan; Yoshitake, Takashi

    2013-02-08

    The neuropeptide galanin is co-localized with histamine in subpopulations of neurons in the tuberomammillary nucleus suggesting its involvement in modulating histaminergic neurotransmission. The purpose of the present study was to investigate, by use of microdialysis, the effects of local intraparenchymal (combined infusion and microdialysis probe), and intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) infusions of galanin on extracellular levels of histamine in its major projecting areas, ventromedial hypothalamic nucleus ventrolateral part (VMHVL), CA3 area of ventral hippocampus (vHipp) and medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) in separate groups (n=5 rats/each) of freely moving rats. Galanin (0.5nmol and 1.5nmol) dose-dependently decreased the basal histamine levels in the VMHVL to 77.1% (i.c.v.) at 40min and to 82.1% (intra-VMHVL infusion) already at 20min, of the control group (32.6±3.5fmol/10μl), whereas only 1.5nmol i.c.v. galanin and not the local infusions deceased the histamine levels in the vHipp (8.4±0.6fmol/10μl) to 82.8% and in mPFC (9.8±0.9fmol/10μl) to 87.5%. It is concluded that central administration of galanin decreased the basal extracellular histamine levels in major histamine projecting areas, however, these effects were less prominent than those observed for 5-HT (Kehr et al., 2002 [12]) and ACh (Yoshitake et al., 2011 [38]) in the ventral hippocampus following i.c.v. and/or local galanin infusions.

  3. High temporal resolution for in vivo monitoring of neurotransmitters in awake epileptic rats using brain microdialysis and capillary electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrot, Sandrine; Sauvinet, Valérie; Riban, Véronique; Depaulis, Antoine; Renaud, Bernard; Denoroy, Luc

    2004-12-30

    A method for high temporal resolution monitoring of five neurotransmitters, dopamine (DA), noradrenaline (NA), gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), glutamate (Glu), l-aspartate (L-Asp), in freely-moving rats using microdialysis and capillary electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence detection (CE-LIFD) was developed. An on-line device, including microdialysis and derivatization with naphthalene-2,3-dicarboxaldehyde, mixes the dialysate with derivatization reagents directly in the collection tube, i.e. with no reactor. Thereafter, collected derivatized samples are analyzed off-line with an automated CE system coupled to a LIFD using a 442 nm excitation. The sampling time was limited by the minimal volume required for the analysis by the automated CE system used: neurotransmitters could be determined in 667 nl dialysates (940 nl after derivatization), i.e. in samples collected every 20 s with a flow rate of 2 microl/min. The detection limits at the dialysis probe were 3 x 10(-9), 1 x 10(-9), 1.9 x 10(-8), 4.2 x 10(-7), 2.1 x 10(-7) mol/l for DA, NA, GABA, Glu and L-Asp, respectively. The protocol was validated using in vitro/in vivo tests and the performances--repeatability, linearity, characteristics of the probes--were determined. Finally, the high temporal resolution allowed the simultaneous monitoring of these neurotransmitters in rats with genetic absence epilepsy and revealed, for the first time, increases in GABA concentrations concomitantly with the seizures, detected when our new microdialysis method was combined to electroencephalographic recordings.

  4. 31P nuclear magnetic resonance in vivo spectroscopy of the metabolic changes induced in the awake rat brain during KCN intoxication and its reversal by hydroxocobalamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benabid, A L; Decorps, M; Remy, C; Le Bas, J F; Confort, S; Leviel, J L

    1987-03-01

    Radiofrequency surface coils were chronically implanted in rats, which were subsequently subjected to 31P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) investigations at 4.7 T. The implanted coil allowed study of the animals without need for anesthesia, which is a prerequisite for studies of normal brain metabolism. The animals may be kept in the NMR probe for several hours. During subsequent experiments, they may be placed in the same position, therefore allowing follow-up studies for periods as long as 2 months. This method has been used in the study of sublethal KCN intoxication. KCN, a cytochrome c oxidase inhibitor, induces a blockade of cell respiratory processes, which is reflected, in a dose-dependent manner, by a decrease in phosphocreatine content and pH and an increase in inorganic phosphate content, whereas ATP levels remain constant until high doses of KCN (6 mg/kg i.p.) are reached. 31P NMR allows the time course of these metabolic changes to be followed. For high KCN doses, a new peak, termed X, is observed, which is interpreted as being due to a pool of inorganic phosphate at very low pH (5.65), corresponding to a subset of cells that did not survive KCN injury. Hydroxocobalamine, a specific antidote of KCN, suppresses the metabolic changes due to 6 mg/kg of KCN.

  5. Markerless motion tracking of awake animals in positron emission tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyme, Andre; Se, Stephen; Meikle, Steven; Angelis, Georgios; Ryder, Will; Popovic, Kata; Yatigammana, Dylan; Fulton, Roger

    2014-11-01

    Noninvasive functional imaging of awake, unrestrained small animals using motion-compensation removes the need for anesthetics and enables an animal's behavioral response to stimuli or administered drugs to be studied concurrently with imaging. While the feasibility of motion-compensated radiotracer imaging of awake rodents using marker-based optical motion tracking has been shown, markerless motion tracking would avoid the risk of marker detachment, streamline the experimental workflow, and potentially provide more accurate pose estimates over a greater range of motion. We have developed a stereoscopic tracking system which relies on native features on the head to estimate motion. Features are detected and matched across multiple camera views to accumulate a database of head landmarks and pose is estimated based on 3D-2D registration of the landmarks to features in each image. Pose estimates of a taxidermal rat head phantom undergoing realistic rat head motion via robot control had a root mean square error of 0.15 and 1.8 mm using markerless and marker-based motion tracking, respectively. Markerless motion tracking also led to an appreciable reduction in motion artifacts in motion-compensated positron emission tomography imaging of a live, unanesthetized rat. The results suggest that further improvements in live subjects are likely if nonrigid features are discriminated robustly and excluded from the pose estimation process.

  6. Cardiovascular profile after intravenous injection of Africanized bee venom in awake rats Perfil cardiovascular após a inoculação intravenosa de veneno de abelha africanizada em ratos acordados

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janaína Valadares Guimarães

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available The manifestations caused by Africanized bee stings depend on the sensitivity of the victim and the toxicity of the venom. Previous studies in our laboratory have demonstrated cardiac changes and acute tubular necrosis (ATN in the kidney of rats inoculated with Africanized bee venom (ABV. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the changes in mean arterial pressure (MAP and heart rate (HR over a period of 24 h after intravenous injection of ABV in awake rats. A significant reduction in basal HR as well as in basal MAP occurred immediately after ABV injection in the experimental animals. HR was back to basal level 2 min after ABV injection and remained normal during the time course of the experiment, while MAP returned to basal level 10 min later and remained at this level for the next 5 h. However, MAP presented again a significant reduction by the 7th and 8th h and returned to the basal level by the 24th h. The fall in MAP may contribute to the pathogenesis of ATN observed. The fall in MAP probably is due to several factors, in addition to the cardiac changes already demonstrated, it is possible that the components of the venom themselves or even substances released in the organism play some role in vascular beds.As manifestações causadas por picadas de abelhas africanizadas dependem da sensibilidade da vítima e da toxicidade do veneno. Estudos anteriores em nosso laboratório mostraram alterações cardíacas e necrose tubular aguda (NTA nos rins de ratos inoculados com veneno de abelhas africanizadas (VAA. O objetivo do presente estudo foi avaliar as alterações na pressão arterial média (PAM e na freqüência cardíaca (FC num período de 24 horas após a inoculação de VAA em ratos mantidos acordados. Uma redução significante na FC basal e na PAM ocorreu imediatamente após a inoculação de VAA nos animais experimentais. A FC voltou aos níveis basais 2 min após a inoculação do VAA e permaneceu nestes valores durante o

  7. AWAKE starts the equipment installation phase

    CERN Multimedia

    Antonella Del Rosso

    2015-01-01

    AWAKE is the proof-of-principle experiment whose aim is to use protons to generate powerful wakefields to accelerate an electron beam. With accelerator gradients hundreds of times higher than those used in current systems, this technique could revolutionise the field of particle acceleration. Installed in the tunnel previously used by the CNGS facility, AWAKE is completing the service installation phase and will receive the plasma cell in the coming months.   The AWAKE proton line with all the magnets installed. (Image: AWAKE collaboration.) AWAKE is the world’s first proton-driven plasma wakefield acceleration experiment. In AWAKE, a beam of protons from the SPS will be travelling through a plasma cell and this will generate a wakefield that, in turn, will accelerate an electron beam. A laser will ionise the gas in the plasma cell and seed the self-modulation instability that will trigger the wakefield in the plasma. The project aims to prove that the plasma wakefield can be driv...

  8. High fat diet promotes achievement of peak bone mass in young rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malvi, Parmanand; Piprode, Vikrant; Chaube, Balkrishna; Pote, Satish T. [National Centre for Cell Science, Savitribai Phule Pune University Campus, Ganeshkhind, Pune 411 007 (India); Mittal, Monika; Chattopadhyay, Naibedya [Division of Endocrinology and Center for Research in Anabolic Skeletal Targets in Health and Illness (ASTHI), CSIR-Central Drug Research Institute, Jankipuram Extension, Sitapur Road, Lucknow 226 031 (India); Wani, Mohan R. [National Centre for Cell Science, Savitribai Phule Pune University Campus, Ganeshkhind, Pune 411 007 (India); Bhat, Manoj Kumar, E-mail: manojkbhat@nccs.res.in [National Centre for Cell Science, Savitribai Phule Pune University Campus, Ganeshkhind, Pune 411 007 (India)

    2014-12-05

    Highlights: • High fat diet helps in achieving peak bone mass at younger age. • Shifting from high fat to normal diet normalizes obese parameters. • Bone parameters are sustained even after withdrawal of high fat diet. - Abstract: The relationship between obesity and bone is complex. Epidemiological studies demonstrate positive as well as negative correlation between obesity and bone health. In the present study, we investigated the impact of high fat diet-induced obesity on peak bone mass. After 9 months of feeding young rats with high fat diet, we observed obesity phenotype in rats with increased body weight, fat mass, serum triglycerides and cholesterol. There were significant increases in serum total alkaline phosphatase, bone mineral density and bone mineral content. By micro-computed tomography (μ-CT), we observed a trend of better trabecular bones with respect to their microarchitecture and geometry. This indicated that high fat diet helps in achieving peak bone mass and microstructure at younger age. We subsequently shifted rats from high fat diet to normal diet for 6 months and evaluated bone/obesity parameters. It was observed that after shifting rats from high fat diet to normal diet, fat mass, serum triglycerides and cholesterol were significantly decreased. Interestingly, the gain in bone mineral density, bone mineral content and trabecular bone parameters by HFD was retained even after body weight and obesity were normalized. These results suggest that fat rich diet during growth could accelerate achievement of peak bone mass that is sustainable even after withdrawal of high fat diet.

  9. Critical Neural Networks in Awake Surgery for Gliomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    KINOSHITA, Masashi; MIYASHITA, Katsuyoshi; TSUTSUI, Taishi; FURUTA, Takuya; NAKADA, Mitsutoshi

    2016-01-01

    From the embarrassing character commonly infiltrating eloquent brain regions, the surgical resection of glioma remains challenging. Owing to the recent development of in vivo visualization techniques for the human brain, white matter regions can be delineated using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) as a routine clinical practice in neurosurgery. In confirmation of the results of DTI tractography, a direct electrical stimulation (DES) substantially influences the investigation of cortico-subcortical networks, which can be identified via specific symptoms elicited in the concerned white matter tracts (eg., the arcuate fascicle, superior longitudinal fascicles, inferior fronto-occipital fascicle, inferior longitudinal fascicle, frontal aslant tract, sensori-motor tracts, optic radiation, and so forth). During awake surgery for glioma using DES, it is important to identify the anatomo-functional structure of white matter tracts to identify the surgical boundaries of brain regions not only to achieve maximal resection of the glioma but also to maximally preserve quality of life. However, the risk exists that neurosurgeons may be misled by the inability of DTI to visualize the actual anatomy of the white matter fibers, resulting in inappropriate decisions regarding surgical boundaries. This review article provides information of the critical neuronal network that is necessary to identify and understand in awake surgery for glioma, with special references to white matter tracts and the author’s experiences. PMID:27250817

  10. AWAKE: Advanced Proton Driven Plasma Wakefield Acceleration Experiment at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Gschwendtner, E

    2014-01-01

    Plasma wakefield acceleration is a promising alternative reaching accelerating fields a magnitude of up to 3 higher (GV/m) when compared to conventional RF acceleration. AWAKE, world’s first proton-driven plasma wakefield experiment, was launched at CERN to verify this concept. In this experiment proton bunches at 400 GeV/c will be extracted from the CERN SPS and sent to the plasma cell, where the proton beam drives the plasma wakefields and creates a large accelerating field. This large gradient of ~GV/m can be achieved by relying on the self-modulation instability (SMI) of the proton beam; when seeded by ionization through a short laser pulse, a train of micro-bunches with a period on the order of the plasma wavelength (~mm) develops, which can drive such a large amplitude wake from a long proton bunch (~12 cm). An electron beam will be injected into the plasma to probe the accelerating wakefield. The AWAKE experiment is being installed at CERN in the former CNGS facility, which must be modified to mat...

  11. Awake, Offline Processing during Associative Learning.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James K Bursley

    Full Text Available Offline processing has been shown to strengthen memory traces and enhance learning in the absence of conscious rehearsal or awareness. Here we evaluate whether a brief, two-minute offline processing period can boost associative learning and test a memory reactivation account for these offline processing effects. After encoding paired associates, subjects either completed a distractor task for two minutes or were immediately tested for memory of the pairs in a counterbalanced, within-subjects functional magnetic resonance imaging study. Results showed that brief, awake, offline processing improves memory for associate pairs. Moreover, multi-voxel pattern analysis of the neuroimaging data suggested reactivation of encoded memory representations in dorsolateral prefrontal cortex during offline processing. These results signify the first demonstration of awake, active, offline enhancement of associative memory and suggest that such enhancement is accompanied by the offline reactivation of encoded memory representations.

  12. Path to AWAKE: Evolution of the concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldwell, A.; Adli, E.; Amorim, L.; Apsimon, R.; Argyropoulos, T.; Assmann, R.; Bachmann, A.-M.; Batsch, F.; Bauche, J.; Berglyd Olsen, V. K.; Bernardini, M.; Bingham, R.; Biskup, B.; Bohl, T.; Bracco, C.; Burrows, P. N.; Burt, G.; Buttenschön, B.; Butterworth, A.; Cascella, M.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chevallay, E.; Cipiccia, S.; Damerau, H.; Deacon, L.; Dirksen, P.; Doebert, S.; Dorda, U.; Elsen, E.; Farmer, J.; Fartoukh, S.; Fedosseev, V.; Feldbaumer, E.; Fiorito, R.; Fonseca, R.; Friebel, F.; Geschonke, G.; Goddard, B.; Gorn, A. A.; Grulke, O.; Gschwendtner, E.; Hansen, J.; Hessler, C.; Hillenbrand, S.; Hofle, W.; Holloway, J.; Huang, C.; Hüther, M.; Jaroszynski, D.; Jensen, L.; Jolly, S.; Joulaei, A.; Kasim, M.; Keeble, F.; Kersevan, R.; Kumar, N.; Li, Y.; Liu, S.; Lopes, N.; Lotov, K. V.; Lu, W.; Machacek, J.; Mandry, S.; Martin, I.; Martorelli, R.; Martyanov, M.; Mazzoni, S.; Meddahi, M.; Merminga, L.; Mete, O.; Minakov, V. A.; Mitchell, J.; Moody, J.; Müller, A.-S.; Najmudin, Z.; Noakes, T. C. Q.; Norreys, P.; Osterhoff, J.; Öz, E.; Pardons, A.; Pepitone, K.; Petrenko, A.; Plyushchev, G.; Pozimski, J.; Pukhov, A.; Reimann, O.; Rieger, K.; Roesler, S.; Ruhl, H.; Rusnak, T.; Salveter, F.; Savard, N.; Schmidt, J.; von der Schmitt, H.; Seryi, A.; Shaposhnikova, E.; Sheng, Z. M.; Sherwood, P.; Silva, L.; Simon, F.; Soby, L.; Sosedkin, A. P.; Spitsyn, R. I.; Tajima, T.; Tarkeshian, R.; Timko, H.; Trines, R.; Tückmantel, T.; Tuev, P. V.; Turner, M.; Velotti, F.; Verzilov, V.; Vieira, J.; Vincke, H.; Wei, Y.; Welsch, C. P.; Wing, M.; Xia, G.; Yakimenko, V.; Zhang, H.; Zimmermann, F.

    2016-09-01

    This paper describes the conceptual steps in reaching the design of the AWAKE experiment currently under construction at CERN. We start with an introduction to plasma wakefield acceleration and the motivation for using proton drivers. We then describe the self-modulation instability - a key to an early realization of the concept. This is then followed by the historical development of the experimental design, where the critical issues that arose and their solutions are described. We conclude with the design of the experiment as it is being realized at CERN and some words on the future outlook. A summary of the AWAKE design and construction status as presented in this conference is given in Gschwendtner et al. [1].

  13. Path to AWAKE: Evolution of the concept

    CERN Document Server

    Caldwell, A; Amorim, L.; Apsimon, R.; Argyropoulos, T.; Assmann, R.; Bachmann, A.-M.; Batsch, F.; Bauche, J.; Berglyd Olsen, V.K.; Bernardini, M.; Bingham, R.; Biskup, B.; Bohl, T.; Bracco, C.; Burrows, P.N.; Burt, G.; Buttenschön, B.; Butterworth, A.; Cascella, M.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chevallay, E.; Cipiccia, S.; Damerau, H.; Deacon, L.; Dirksen, P.; Doebert, S.; Dorda, U.; Elsen, E.; Farmer, J.; Fartoukh, S.; Fedosseev, V.; Feldbaumer, E.; Fiorito, R.; Fonseca, R.; Friebel, F.; Geschonke, G.; Goddard, B.; Gorn, A.A.; Grulke, O.; Gschwendtner, E.; Hansen, J.; Hessler, C.; Hillenbrand, S.; Hofle, W.; Holloway, J.; Huang, C.; Hüther, M.; Jaroszynski, D.; Jensen, L.; Jolly, S.; Joulaei, A.; Kasim, M.; Keeble, F.; Kersevan, R.; Kumar, N.; Li, Y.; Liu, S.; Lopes, N.; Lotov, K.V.; Lu, W.; Machacek, J.; Mandry, S.; Martin, I.; Martorelli, R.; Martyanov, M.; Mazzoni, S.; Meddahi, M.; Merminga, L.; Mete, O.; Minakov, V.A.; Mitchell, J.; Moody, J.; Müller, A.-S.; Najmudin, Z.; Noakes, T.C.Q.; Norreys, P.; Osterhoff, J.; Öz, E.; Pardons, A.; Pepitone, K.; Petrenko, A.; Plyushchev, G.; Pozimski, J.; Pukhov, A.; Reimann, O.; Rieger, K.; Roesler, S.; Ruhl, H.; Rusnak, T.; Salveter, F.; Savard, N.; Schmidt, J.; von der Schmitt, H.; Seryi, A.; Shaposhnikova, E.; Sheng, Z.M.; Sherwood, P.; Silva, L.; Simon, F.; Soby, L.; Sosedkin, A.P.; Spitsyn, R.I.; Tajima, T.; Tarkeshian, R.; Timko, H.; Trines, R.; Tückmantel, T.; Tuev, P.V.; Turner, M.; Velotti, F.; Verzilov, V.; Vieira, J.; Vincke, H.; Wei, Y.; Welsch, C.P.; Wing, M.; Xia, G.; Yakimenko, V.; Zhang, H.; Zimmermann, F.

    2016-01-01

    This report describes the conceptual steps in reaching the design of the AWAKE experiment currently under construction at CERN. We start with an introduction to plasma wakefield acceleration and the motivation for using proton drivers. We then describe the self-modulation instability --- a key to an early realization of the concept. This is then followed by the historical development of the experimental design, where the critical issues that arose and their solutions are described. We conclude with the design of the experiment as it is being realized at CERN and some words on the future outlook. A summary of the AWAKE design and construction status as presented in this conference is given in [1].

  14. Path to AWAKE: Evolution of the concept

    OpenAIRE

    Caldwell, Allen; Adli, E.; Bernardini, M.; Soby, L.; Sosedkin, A. P.; Spitsyn, R. I.; Tajima, T.; Tarkeshian, R.; Timko, H.; Trines, R; Tückmantel, T.; Tuev, P. V.; Turner, M.; Bingham, R.; Velotti, F.

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the conceptual steps in reaching the design of the AWAKE experiment currently under construction at CERN. We start with an introduction to plasma wakefield acceleration and the motivation for using proton drivers. We then describe the self-modulation instability – a key to an early realization of the concept. This is then followed by the historical development of the experimental design, where the critical issues that arose and their solutions are described. We conclude w...

  15. Path to AWAKE: Evolution of the concept

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caldwell, A. [Max Planck Institute for Physics, Föhringer Ring 6, 80805 München (Germany); Adli, E. [University of Oslo, 0316 Oslo (Norway); Amorim, L. [GoLP/Instituto de Plasmas e Fusão Nuclear, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, Lisbon (Portugal); Apsimon, R. [Cockcroft Institute, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Lancaster University, Lancaster LA1 4YR (United Kingdom); Argyropoulos, T. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Assmann, R. [DESY, Notkestrasse 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Bachmann, A.-M.; Batsch, F. [Max Planck Institute for Physics, Föhringer Ring 6, 80805 München (Germany); Bauche, J. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Berglyd Olsen, V.K. [University of Oslo, 0316 Oslo (Norway); Bernardini, M. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Bingham, R. [STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Didcot OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Biskup, B. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Czech Technical University, Zikova 1903/4, 166 36 Praha 6 (Czech Republic); Bohl, T.; Bracco, C. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Burrows, P.N. [John Adams Institute for Accelerator Science, Oxford (United Kingdom); University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 2JD (United Kingdom); Burt, G. [Cockcroft Institute, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Lancaster University, Lancaster LA1 4YR (United Kingdom); Buttenschön, B. [Max Planck Institute for Plasma Physics, Wendelsteinstr. 1, 17491 Greifswald (Germany); Butterworth, A. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Cascella, M. [UCL, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); and others

    2016-09-01

    This paper describes the conceptual steps in reaching the design of the AWAKE experiment currently under construction at CERN. We start with an introduction to plasma wakefield acceleration and the motivation for using proton drivers. We then describe the self-modulation instability – a key to an early realization of the concept. This is then followed by the historical development of the experimental design, where the critical issues that arose and their solutions are described. We conclude with the design of the experiment as it is being realized at CERN and some words on the future outlook. A summary of the AWAKE design and construction status as presented in this conference is given in Gschwendtner et al. [1]. - Highlights: • Proton-driven plasma wakefield acceleration is proposed to bring electron bunches to high energies. • The self-modulation instability allows the use of existing proton bunches. • Schemes for overcoming the varying wake phase velocity were developed. • AWAKE will demonstrate proton-driven plasma wakefield acceleration for the first time.

  16. Nociceptive responses to thermal and mechanical stimulations in awake pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    di Giminiani, Pierpaolo; Petersen, Lars Jelstrup; Herskin, Mette S

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Porcine skin exhibits a high degree of homology to human skin, and the pig has recently been used as a cutaneous pain model. However, before the full potential of this novel in vivo cutaneous pain model can be achieved, several methodological aspects related to the management of awake...... animal studies in a large species require further examination. This manuscript describes the initial development of a porcine model of cutaneous nociception and focuses on interactions between the sensory modality, body size and the anatomical location of the stimulation site. METHODS: Pigs of different...... body sizes (30 and 60 kg) were exposed to thermal (CO(2) laser) and mechanical (pressure application measurement device) stimulations to the flank and the hind legs in a balanced order. The median response latency and the type of behavioural response were recorded. RESULTS: Small pigs exhibited...

  17. CERN AWAKE Facility Readiness for First Beam

    CERN Document Server

    Bracco, Chiara; Butterworth, Andrew; Damerau, Heiko; Döbert, Steffen; Fedosseev, Valentin; Feldbaumer, Eduard; Gschwendtner, Edda; Höfle, Wolfgang; Pardons, Ans; Shaposhnikova, Elena; Vincke, Helmut

    2016-01-01

    The AWAKE project at CERN was approved in August 2013 and since then a big effort was made to be able to probe the acceleration of electrons before the "2019-2020 Long Shutdown". The next steps in this challenging schedule will be a dry run of all the beam line systems, at the end of the HW commissioning in June 2016, and the first proton beam sent to the plasma cell one month later. The current status of the project is presented together with an outlook over the foreseen works for operation with electrons in 2018.

  18. Preparing to perform an awake fiberoptic intubation.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Walsh, M E

    2012-02-03

    Fiberoptically guided tracheal intubation represents one of the most important advances in airway management to occur in the past thirty years. Perhaps its most important role is in management of the anticipated difficult airway. This is a situation in which the dangers of encountering the life-threatening "can\\'t intubate, can\\'t ventilate" situation can be avoided by placement of an endotracheal tube while the patient is awake. Although skill at the procedure of endoscopy is obviously necessary in this setting, these authors hold that success or failure of the technique frequently depends on the adequacy of preparation. These measures include 1) pre-operative assessment of the patient; 2) careful explanation of what lies in store; 3) "setting the stage"; 4) preparing the equipment to be used; and 5) preparing the patient (antisialogue, sedation, application of topical anesthesia to the upper airway). If these preparatory measures are carried out meticulously, the likelihood of performing a successful and comfortable awake fiberoptic tracheal intubation is greatly increased.

  19. Lung function measurement in awake young children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisgaard, H; Klug, B

    1995-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate methods applicable in a clinical setting for monitoring of changes in lung function in awake young children. Impedance measurements by the impulse oscillation technique (ZIOS), respiratory resistance measurements by the interrupter technique (Rint) and transcu......The aim of the study was to evaluate methods applicable in a clinical setting for monitoring of changes in lung function in awake young children. Impedance measurements by the impulse oscillation technique (ZIOS), respiratory resistance measurements by the interrupter technique (Rint......, with suspected asthma. Measurements with each technique were repeated after each challenge step. A special face-mask was developed with an integrated mouthpiece which ensured mouth breathing during the measurements. The order of sensitivity of the techniques to assess methacholine-induced changes in lung...... to methacholine in young children aged 4-6 yrs. This implies that ZIOS, Rint and Ptc,O2 provide convenient indices of changes in lung function. Their combined use will be useful for monitoring airway diseases of young children....

  20. A VLSI Neural Monitoring System With Ultra-Wideband Telemetry for Awake Behaving Subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenwald, E; Mollazadeh, M; Hu, C; Wei Tang; Culurciello, E; Thakor, V

    2011-04-01

    Long-term monitoring of neuronal activity in awake behaving subjects can provide fundamental information about brain dynamics for neuroscience and neuroengineering applications. Here, we present a miniature, lightweight, and low-power recording system for monitoring neural activity in awake behaving animals. The system integrates two custom designed very-large-scale integrated chips, a neural interface module fabricated in 0.5 μm complementary metal-oxide semiconductor technology and an ultra-wideband transmitter module fabricated in a 0.5 μm silicon-on-sapphire (SOS) technology. The system amplifies, filters, digitizes, and transmits 16 channels of neural data at a rate of 1 Mb/s. The entire system, which includes the VLSI circuits, a digital interface board, a battery, and a custom housing, is small and lightweight (24 g) and, thus, can be chronically mounted on small animals. The system consumes 4.8 mA and records continuously for up to 40 h powered by a 3.7-V, 200-mAh rechargeable lithium-ion battery. Experimental benchtop characterizations as well as in vivo multichannel neural recordings from awake behaving rats are presented here.

  1. Clinical assessment of awake endotracheal intubation using the lightwand technique alone in patients with difficult airways

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XUE Fu-shan; HE Nong; LIAO Xu; XU Xiu-Zheng; XU Yachao; YANG Quan-yong; LUO Mao-ping; ZHANG Yan-ming

    2009-01-01

    Background There is few study to determine whether the use of the lightwand technique alone could achieve effective, safe and successful awake endotracheal intubation (ETI), therefore we designed a prospective clinical study to systematically evaluate the feasibility, safety and efficacy of awake ETI using the lightwand alone in patients with difficult airways.Methods Seventy adult patients with difficult airways were enrolled in this study. After the desired sedation with fentanyl and midazolam, airway topical anesthesia was performed with 9 ml of 2% lidocaine, which were in order sprayed in three aliquots at 5 minutes intervals into the supraglottic (two doses) and laryngotracheal areas (one dose) using a combined unit of the lightwand and MADgic atomizer. After airway topical anesthesia, awake ETI was performed using a Lightwand. Subjective assessments by patients and operators using the visual analogue scores (VAS), and objective assessments by an independent investigator using patients' tolerance and reaction scores, coughing severity, intubating conditions and cardiovascular variables were taken as the observed parameters.Results Of 210 airway sprays, 197 (93.8%) were successfully completed on the first attempt. The total time for airway spray was (14.6±1.5) minutes. During airway topical anesthesia, the average patients' tolerance scores were 1.7-2.3. After airway topical anesthesia, the mean VAS for discomfort levels that the patients reported was 6.5. Also airway topical anesthesia procedure was rated as acceptable and no discomfort by 94.3% of patients. The lightwand-guided awake ETI was successfully completed on first attempt within 29 seconds in all patients. During awake ETI, patients' reaction and coughing scores were 1.9 and 1.6, respectively. All patients exhibited excellent or acceptable intubating conditions. Cardiovascular monitoring revealed that changes of systolic blood pressure and heart rate at each stage of airway manipulations were less

  2. INFLAMMATORY SOUP INDUCES RECURRENT HEADACHE IN AWAKE BEHAVING RATS AND CONTRIBUTES TO THE EXPRESSION OF C-FOS IN PAG AREA%致炎剂诱发清醒大鼠反复发作头痛及对PAG区c-Fos表达的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    薛刘军; 周志奎; 叶青; 武文卉; 刘欣; 刘沙; 万琪

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: To establish a recurrent headache model in awake behaving rats using inflammatory soup to activate dural nociceptors regularly. Methods: Dural inflammation by infusing inflammatory soup (IS) or saline through PE-10 tubing on the dura in male rats were indused. Infusion was repeated once a day for six days. Periorbital von Frey thresholds were tested to monitor the change of trigeminal sensitivity. We observed the ratio of dural mast cells degranulation from SSS stained with toluidine blue were ob-serued. C-Fos immunoreactive positive neurons of once IS infusion group, six times IS and NS infusions group were observed and counted in periagueductal grey matter (PAG) area in coronal brain sections by using standard avidinbiotin immunohistochemistry. Results: Six infusions of IS induced a decrease in periorbital pressure thresholds.The ratio of dural mast cells degranulation from SSS has great difference between IS6 and NS6 infusions group (P 0.05). Conclusions: Using inflammatory soup, recurrent headache in rats were indused successfully and provide a better experimental model to elucidate the mechanisms for the transition of episodic to chronic headache.%目的:采用复方致炎剂(IS)定期刺激大鼠硬脑膜,建立一种清醒状态下大鼠反复发作性头痛模型.方法:在雄性SD大鼠硬脑膜上埋置PE-10管,连续6天给予IS或等量生理盐水.采用VonFrey毛测试大鼠眶周的压力疼痛阈值,将左侧硬脑膜行甲苯胺蓝染色观察肥大细胞脱颗粒比率,通过免疫组化染色技术对六次NS及IS和一次IS给药组大鼠的中脑导水管灰质(PAG)区域c-Fos阳性细胞进行计数观察.结果:随着IS刺激次数的增多大鼠的眶周压力疼痛阈值下降;肥大细胞脱颗粒比率较NS组明显增加(P0.05).结论:反复给予复方致炎剂可以成功诱导大鼠反复发作性头痛,为慢性头痛转变机制研究提供了一种较好的实验模型.

  3. Anesthesia management of awake craniotomy performed under asleep-awake-asleep technique using laryngeal mask airway: Report of two cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vitthal Shrinivas

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Asleep-awake-asleep technique of anesthesia is used during awake craniotomy with or without securing airway. We assessed this technique using laryngeal mask airway (LMA in two patients. Patients underwent awake craniotomy for epilepsy surgery and the removal of a frontotemporal glioma. After anesthesia induction, airway was secured using LMA. Anesthesia was maintained using oxygen, nitrous oxide and sevoflurane, supplemented with an infusion of propofol and remifentanil. Twenty minutes before corticography, anesthesia was discontinued and LMA removed. Both patients were awake and cooperative during the neurological assessment and surgery on eloquent areas. The LMA was reinserted before the closure of the dura and remained in place until the end of surgery. Both patients had no recall of events under anesthesia, although experienced mild pain and discomfort during awake phase of surgery. Both expressed complete satisfaction over the anesthetic management. Asleep-awake-asleep technique using LMA offers airway protection. The painful aspect of surgery can be performed under anesthesia, hence minimizing the duration of stress and pain. Patients remained awake and cooperative throughout the time of neurological testing.

  4. Effects of the 5-HT1B receptor antagonist NAS-181 on extracellular levels of acetylcholine, glutamate and GABA in the frontal cortex and ventral hippocampus of awake rats: a microdialysis study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xiao Jing; Wang, Fu-Hua; Stenfors, Carina; Ogren, Sven Ove; Kehr, Jan

    2007-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of the 5-HT(1B) receptor antagonist NAS-181 ((R)-(+)-2-(3-morpholinomethyl-2H-chromen-8-yl) oxymethyl-morpholine methanesulfonate) on cholinergic, glutamatergic and GABA-ergic neurotransmission in the rat brain in vivo. Extracellular levels of acetylcholine, glutamate and GABA were monitored by microdialysis in the frontal cortex (FC) and ventral hippocampus (VHipp) in separate groups of freely moving rats. NAS-181 (1, 5 or 10 mg/kg, s.c.) caused a dose-dependent increase in ACh levels, reaching the maximal values of 500% (FC) and 230% (VHipp) of controls at 80 min post-injection. On the contrary, NAS-181 injected at doses of 10 or 20 mg/kg s.c. had no effect on basal extracellular levels of Glu and GABA in these areas. The present data suggest that ACh neurotransmission in the FC and VHipp, the brain structures strongly implicated in cognitive function, is under tonic inhibitory control of 5-HT(1B) heteroreceptors localized at the cholinergic terminals in these areas.

  5. Functional recordings from awake, behaving rodents through a microchannel based regenerative neural interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gore, Russell K.; Choi, Yoonsu; Bellamkonda, Ravi; English, Arthur

    2015-02-01

    Objective. Neural interface technologies could provide controlling connections between the nervous system and external technologies, such as limb prosthetics. The recording of efferent, motor potentials is a critical requirement for a peripheral neural interface, as these signals represent the user-generated neural output intended to drive external devices. Our objective was to evaluate structural and functional neural regeneration through a microchannel neural interface and to characterize potentials recorded from electrodes placed within the microchannels in awake and behaving animals. Approach. Female rats were implanted with muscle EMG electrodes and, following unilateral sciatic nerve transection, the cut nerve was repaired either across a microchannel neural interface or with end-to-end surgical repair. During a 13 week recovery period, direct muscle responses to nerve stimulation proximal to the transection were monitored weekly. In two rats repaired with the neural interface, four wire electrodes were embedded in the microchannels and recordings were obtained within microchannels during proximal stimulation experiments and treadmill locomotion. Main results. In these proof-of-principle experiments, we found that axons from cut nerves were capable of functional reinnervation of distal muscle targets, whether regenerating through a microchannel device or after direct end-to-end repair. Discrete stimulation-evoked and volitional potentials were recorded within interface microchannels in a small group of awake and behaving animals and their firing patterns correlated directly with intramuscular recordings during locomotion. Of 38 potentials extracted, 19 were identified as motor axons reinnervating tibialis anterior or soleus muscles using spike triggered averaging. Significance. These results are evidence for motor axon regeneration through microchannels and are the first report of in vivo recordings from regenerated motor axons within microchannels in a small

  6. Functional Connectivity Hubs and Networks in the Awake Marmoset Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annabelle Marie Belcher

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In combination with advances in analytical methods, resting-state fMRI is allowing unprecedented access to achieve a better understanding of the network organization of the brain. Increasing evidence suggests that this architecture may incorporate highly functionally connected nodes, or hubs, and we have recently proposed local functional connectivity density (lFCD mapping to identify highly-connected nodes in the human brain. Here we imaged awake nonhuman primates to test whether, like the human brain, the marmoset brain contains functional connectivity hubs. Ten adult common marmosets (Callithrix jacchus were acclimated to mild, comfortable restraint using individualized helmets. Following restraint training, resting BOLD data were acquired during eight consecutive 10 min scans for each subject. lFCD revealed prominent cortical and subcortical hubs of connectivity across the marmoset brain; specifically, in primary and secondary visual cortices (V1/V2, higher-order visual association areas (A19M/V6[DM], posterior parietal and posterior cingulate areas (PGM and A23b/A31, thalamus, dorsal and ventral striatal areas (caudate, putamen, lateral septal nucleus, and anterior cingulate cortex (A24a. lFCD hubs were highly connected to widespread areas of the brain, and further revealed significant network-network interactions. These data provide a baseline platform for future investigations in a nonhuman primate model of the brain’s network topology.

  7. Dexmedetomidine versus Remifentanil for Sedation during Awake Fiberoptic Intubation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davide Cattano

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This study compared remifentanil and dexmedetomidine as awake fiberoptic intubation (AFOI anesthetics. Thirty-four adult ASA I-III patients were enrolled in a double-blinded randomized pilot study to receive remifentanil (REM or dexmedetomidine (DEX for sedation during AFOI (nasal and oral. Thirty patients completed the study and received 2 mg midazolam IV and topical anesthesia. The REM group received a loading dose of 0.75 mcg/kg followed by an infusion of 0.075 mcg/kg/min. The DEX group received a loading dose of 0.4 mcg/kg followed by an infusion of 0.7 mcg/kg/hr. Time to sedation, number of intubation attempts, Ramsay sedation scale (RSS score, bispectral index (BIS, and memory recall were recorded. All thirty patients were successfully intubated by AFOI (22 oral intubations/8 nasal. First attempt success rate with AFOI was higher in the REM group than the DEX group, 72% and 38% (P=0.02, respectively. The DEX group took longer to attain RSS of ≥3 and to achieve BIS <80, as compared to the REM group. Postloading dose verbal recall was poorer in the DEX group. Dexmedetomidine seems a useful adjunct for patients undergoing AFOI but is dependent on dosage and time. Further studies in the use of dexmedetomidine for AFOI are warranted.

  8. Investigation of cross-species translatability of pharmacological MRI in awake nonhuman primate - a buprenorphine challenge study.

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    Stephanie Seah

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Pharmacological MRI (phMRI is a neuroimaging technique where drug-induced hemodynamic responses can represent a pharmacodynamic biomarker to delineate underlying biological consequences of drug actions. In most preclinical studies, animals are anesthetized during image acquisition to minimize movement. However, it has been demonstrated anesthesia could attenuate basal neuronal activity, which can confound interpretation of drug-induced brain activation patterns. Significant efforts have been made to establish awake imaging in rodents and nonhuman primates (NHP. Whilst various platforms have been developed for imaging awake NHP, comparison and validation of phMRI data as translational biomarkers across species remain to be explored. METHODOLOGY: We have established an awake NHP imaging model that encompasses comprehensive acclimation procedures with a dedicated animal restrainer. Using a cerebral blood volume (CBV-based phMRI approach, we have determined differential responses of brain activation elicited by the systemic administration of buprenorphine (0.03 mg/kg i.v., a partial µ-opioid receptor agonist, in the same animal under awake and anesthetized conditions. Additionally, region-of-interest analyses were performed to determine regional drug-induced CBV time-course data and corresponding area-under-curve (AUC values from brain areas with high density of µ-opioid receptors. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In awake NHPs, group-level analyses revealed buprenorphine significantly activated brain regions including, thalamus, striatum, frontal and cingulate cortices (paired t-test, versus saline vehicle, p<0.05, n = 4. This observation is strikingly consistent with µ-opioid receptor distribution depicted by [6-O-[(11C]methyl]buprenorphine ([(11C]BPN positron emission tomography imaging study in baboons. Furthermore, our findings are consistent with previous buprenorphine phMRI studies in humans and conscious rats which collectively

  9. Patient experiences during awake mechanical ventilation

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    Danille Prime

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Sedation practices in an ICU have shifted significantly in the past 20 years toward the use of minimizing sedation in mechanically ventilated patients. While minimizing sedation is clearly in the best interest of patients, data are lacking about how this approach affects patients’ experiences. Methods: We interviewed mechanically ventilated patients receiving minimal sedation, over a 6-month period in an ICU, in order to explore their emotional, comfort, and communication experiences. Their responses were compared with the responses of their available family members regarding their attitudes and perceptions of the patients’ experiences. Results: Seventy-five percent of the patients agreed or strongly agreed that they experienced pain, and 50% agreed or strongly agreed that they were comfortable. Half of the patients agreed or strongly agreed that they preferred to be kept awake. Five patients (31% indicated that they were frustrated while 17 relatives (89% agreed or strongly agreed that the patients were frustrated. When controlling for age and gender of respondents, family members perceived higher levels of patient pain (least square [LS] mean [95% CI]: 4.2 [3.7, 4.7] vs. 3.1 [2.5, 3.8]; p=0.022, frustration (LS mean [95% CI]: 4.2 [3.7, 4.6] vs. 3.2 [2.6, 3.9]; p=0.031, and adequate communication with nurses and doctors (LS mean [95% CI]: 3.9 [3.5, 4.4] vs. 3.1 [2.4, 3.7]; p=0.046 than the patients themselves. Conclusion: Patients tolerated minimal sedation without significant frustration while mechanically ventilated despite experiencing discomfort. Patient and family member perceptions of the patient experience may differ, especially in regards to pain and frustration. The use of a communication tool can facilitate understanding of patient experiences and preferences.

  10. Coding odor identity and odor value in awake rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunez-Parra, Alexia; Li, Anan; Restrepo, Diego

    2014-01-01

    In the last decade, drastic changes in the understanding of the role of the olfactory bulb and piriform cortex in odor detection have taken place through awake behaving recording in rodents. It is clear that odor responses in mitral and granule cells are strikingly different in the olfactory bulb of anesthetized versus awake animals. In addition, sniff recording has evidenced that mitral cell responses to odors during the sniff can convey information on the odor identity and sniff phase. Moreover, we review studies that show that the mitral cell conveys information on not only odor identity but also whether the odor is rewarded or not (odor value). Finally, we discuss how the substantial increase in awake behaving recording raises questions for future studies.

  11. A 4-channel 3 Tesla phased array receive coil for awake rhesus monkey fMRI and diffusion MRI experiments

    OpenAIRE

    Khachaturian, Mark Haig

    2010-01-01

    Awake monkey fMRI and diffusion MRI combined with conventional neuroscience techniques has the potential to study the structural and functional neural network. The majority of monkey fMRI and diffusion MRI experiments are performed with single coils which suffer from severe EPI distortions which limit resolution. By constructing phased array coils for monkey MRI studies, gains in SNR and anatomical accuracy (i.e., reduction of EPI distortions) can be achieved using parallel imaging. The major...

  12. Awake transapical aortic valve implantation using thoracic epidural anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Chirojit; Walther, Thomas; Borger, Michael Andrew; Kempfert, Joerg; Schuler, Gerhard; Mohr, Friedrich Wilhelm; Ender, Joerg

    2009-09-01

    Transapical aortic valve implantation is a minimally invasive, beating-heart procedure that normally requires a general anesthetic. We herein report an 85-year-old patient with impaired pulmonary function who underwent successful transapical aortic valve implantation while awake, using a thoracic epidural anesthetic.

  13. Indirect self-modulation instability measurement concept for the AWAKE proton beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, M.; Petrenko, A.; Biskup, B.; Burger, S.; Gschwendtner, E.; Lotov, K. V.; Mazzoni, S.; Vincke, H.

    2016-09-01

    AWAKE, the Advanced Proton-Driven Plasma Wakefield Acceleration Experiment, is a proof-of-principle R&D experiment at CERN using a 400 GeV / c proton beam from the CERN SPS (longitudinal beam size σz = 12 cm) which will be sent into a 10 m long plasma section with a nominal density of ≈ 7 ×1014 atoms /cm3 (plasma wavelength λp = 1.2 mm). In this paper we show that by measuring the time integrated transverse profile of the proton bunch at two locations downstream of the AWAKE plasma, information about the occurrence of the self-modulation instability (SMI) can be inferred. In particular we show that measuring defocused protons with an angle of 1 mrad corresponds to having electric fields in the order of GV/m and fully developed self-modulation of the proton bunch. Additionally, by measuring the defocused beam edge of the self-modulated bunch, information about the growth rate of the instability can be extracted. If hosing instability occurs, it could be detected by measuring a non-uniform defocused beam shape with changing radius. Using a 1 mm thick Chromox scintillation screen for imaging of the self-modulated proton bunch, an edge resolution of 0.6 mm and hence an SMI saturation point resolution of 1.2 m can be achieved.

  14. Unassisted blood collection from unanesthetized rats and gerbils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alworth, Leanne C; Kelly, Lisa M; Cooper, Tanya L; Salyards, Greg W

    2012-05-21

    Blood collection is a common procedure in animal research. This column describes humane methods of collecting blood from the rat and the gerbil that can be carried out by a single person on an awake animal.

  15. Enclosure for small animals during awake animal imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goddard, Jr., James S

    2013-11-26

    An enclosure or burrow restrains an awake animal during an imaging procedure. A tubular body, made from a radiolucent material that does not attenuate x-rays or gamma rays, accepts an awake animal. A proximal end of the body includes an attachment surface that corresponds to an attachment surface of an optically transparent and optically uniform window. An anti-reflective coating may be applied to an inner surface, an outer surface, or both surfaces of the window. Since the window is a separate element of the enclosure and it is not integrally formed as part of the body, it can be made with optically uniform thickness properties for improved motion tracking of markers on the animal with a camera during the imaging procedure. The motion tracking information is then used to compensate for animal movement in the image.

  16. The influence of awake craniotomy on postoperative neuropsychology

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    YANG Ming-yuan

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective To assess the neuropsychological function and quality of life of the patients after awake craniotomy (AC. Methods A case-control study was conducted among 81 patients who underwent awake craniotomy, and a 1-to-1 control group (matched by age, gender, degree of education, tumor location and characteristic undergoing general anesthesia (GA in glioma resections was assembled. The incidence of postoperative neurological deficits, psychological disorders and recurrence were investigated during telephone follow-ups, and Medical Outcomes Study Short Form 36 (SF-36 was adopted to evaluate the life quality of patients. Results Almost 73 pairs of patients fulfilled the survey of AC and GA group respectively. There were 21 patients and 28 patients with postoperative neurological deficits, and 12 patients and 8 patients with psychological disorders in AC and GA group respectively. Thirty patients of AC group had the recollection of being awake during the surgery. There were 9 patients in CA group having long-term ( > 6 months neurological deficits, which was less than the number of GA group (18 patients, P = 0.038. According to the assessment in short-term, medium-term and long-term postoperative neurological deficits, there was no significant difference in the quality-of-life scores between the two groups (P > 0.05, for all. Conclusion Awake craniotomy can be the main method for removing the lesions located in or close to functional areas with lower incidence of long?term postoperative neurological deficits, and it has no significant impact on the psychological status and the quality of life postoperatively.

  17. Modeling of an Electron Injector for the AWAKE Project

    CERN Document Server

    Mete, O; Apsimon, R; Burt, G; Doebert, S; Fiorito, R; Welsch, C

    2015-01-01

    Particle-in-cell simulations were performed by using PARMELA to characterise an electron injector with a booster linac for the AWAKE project in order to provide the baseline specifications required by the plasma wakefield experiments. Tolerances and errors were investigated. A 3 GHz travelling wave structure designed by using CST code. Particles were tracked by using the field maps acquired from these electromagnetic simulations. These results are pre- sented in comparison with the generic accelerating structure model within PARMELA.

  18. Hour-long adaptation in the awake early visual system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoelzel, Carl R; Huff, Joseph M; Bereshpolova, Yulia; Zhuang, Jun; Hei, Xiaojuan; Alonso, Jose-Manuel; Swadlow, Harvey A

    2015-08-01

    Sensory adaptation serves to adjust awake brains to changing environments on different time scales. However, adaptation has been studied traditionally under anesthesia and for short time periods. Here, we demonstrate in awake rabbits a novel type of sensory adaptation that persists for >1 h and acts on visual thalamocortical neurons and their synapses in the input layers of the visual cortex. Following prolonged visual stimulation (10-30 min), cells in the dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN) show a severe and prolonged reduction in spontaneous firing rate. This effect is bidirectional, and prolonged visually induced response suppression is followed by a prolonged increase in spontaneous activity. The reduction in thalamic spontaneous activity following prolonged visual activation is accompanied by increases in 1) response reliability, 2) signal detectability, and 3) the ratio of visual signal/spontaneous activity. In addition, following such prolonged activation of an LGN neuron, the monosynaptic currents generated by thalamic impulses in layer 4 of the primary visual cortex are enhanced. These results demonstrate that in awake brains, prolonged sensory stimulation can have a profound, long-lasting effect on the information conveyed by thalamocortical inputs to the visual cortex.

  19. Coated minispheres of salmon calcitonin target rat intestinal regions to achieve systemic bioavailability: Comparison between intestinal instillation and oral gavage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguirre, Tanira A S; Aversa, Vincenzo; Rosa, Mónica; Guterres, Sílvia S; Pohlmann, Adriana R; Coulter, Ivan; Brayden, David J

    2016-09-28

    Achieving oral peptide delivery is an elusive challenge. Emulsion-based minispheres of salmon calcitonin (sCT) were synthesized using single multiple pill (SmPill®) technology incorporating the permeation enhancers (PEs): sodium taurodeoxycholate (NaTDC), sodium caprate (C10), or coco-glucoside (CG), or the pH acidifier, citric acid (CA). Minispheres were coated with an outer layer of Eudragit® L30 D-55 (designed for jejunal release) or Surelease®/Pectin (designed for colonic release). The process was mild and in vitro biological activity of sCT was retained upon release from minispheres stored up to 4months. In vitro release profiles suggested that sCT was released from minispheres by diffusion through coatings due to swelling of gelatin and the polymeric matrix upon contact with PBS at pH6.8. X-ray analysis confirmed that coated minispheres dissolved at the intended intestinal region of rats following oral gavage. Uncoated minispheres at a dose of ~2000I.U.sCT/kg were administered to rats by intra-jejunal (i.j.) or intra-colonic (i.c.) instillation and caused hypocalcaemia. Notable sCT absolute bioavailability (F) values were: 5.5% from minispheres containing NaTDC (i.j), 17.3% with CG (i.c.) and 18.2% with C10 (i.c.). Coated minispheres administered by oral gavage at threefold higher doses also induced hypocalcaemia. A highly competitive F value of 2.7% was obtained for orally-administered sCT-minispheres containing CG (45μmol/kg) and coated with Eudragit®. In conclusion, the SmPill® technology is a potential dosage form for several peptides when formulated with PEs and coated for regional delivery. PK data from instillations over-estimates oral bioavailability and poorly predicts rank ordering of formulations.

  20. The pharmacokinetics of intravenous fenoldopam in healthy, awake cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, K E; Labato, M A; Court, M H

    2016-04-01

    Fenoldopam is a selective dopamine-1 receptor agonist that improves diuresis by increasing renal blood flow and perfusion and causing peripheral vasodilation. Fenoldopam has been shown to induce diuresis and be well-tolerated in healthy cats. It is used clinically in cats with oliguric kidney injury at doses extrapolated from human medicine and canine studies. The pharmacokinetics in healthy beagle dogs has been reported; however, pharmacokinetic data in cats are lacking. The goal of this study was to determine pharmacokinetic data for healthy, awake cats receiving an infusion of fenoldopam. Six healthy, awake, client-owned cats aged 2-6 years old received a 120-min constant rate infusion of fenoldopam at 0.8 μg/kg/min followed by a 20-min washout period. Ascorbate stabilized plasma samples were collected during and after the infusion for the measurement of fenoldopam concentration by HPLC with mass spectrometry detection. This study showed that the geometric mean of the volume of distribution, clearance, and half-life (198 mL/kg, 46 mL/kg/min, and 3.0 mins) is similar to pharmacokinetic parameters for humans. No adverse events were noted. Fenoldopam at a constant rate infusion of 0.8 μg/kg per min was well tolerated in healthy cats. Based on the results, further evaluation of fenoldopam in cats with kidney disease is recommended.

  1. Realignment strategies for awake-monkey fMRI data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoewer, Steffen; Goense, Jozien; Keliris, Georgios A; Bartels, Andreas; Logothetis, Nikos K; Duncan, John; Sigala, Natasha

    2011-12-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) experiments with awake nonhuman primates (NHPs) have recently seen a surge of applications. However, the standard fMRI analysis tools designed for human experiments are not optimal for NHP data collected at high fields. One major difference is the experimental setup. Although real head movement is impossible for NHPs, MRI image series often contain visible motion artifacts. Animal body movement results in image position changes and geometric distortions. Since conventional realignment methods are not appropriate to address such differences, algorithms tailored specifically for animal scanning become essential. We have implemented a series of high-field NHP specific methods in a software toolbox, fMRI Sandbox (http://kyb.tuebingen.mpg.de/~stoewer/), which allows us to use different realignment strategies. Here we demonstrate the effect of different realignment strategies on the analysis of awake-monkey fMRI data acquired at high field (7 T). We show that the advantage of using a nonstandard realignment algorithm depends on the amount of distortion in the dataset. While the benefits for less distorted datasets are minor, the improvement of statistical maps for heavily distorted datasets is significant.

  2. Endotracheal Administration of Sufentanil and Tetracaine During Awake Fiberoptic Intubation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Meng; Tao, Jun; Cheng, Min; Wang, Qingli

    2016-01-01

    Combined use of local anesthetics and low-dose opioids enhances the effects of local anesthetics. This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of combined administration of sufentanil and tetracaine through the cricothyroid membrane during awake nasal intubation using fiberoptic bronchoscopy in patients with difficult airways. Forty patients were divided into 2 groups: group A received endotracheal administration of 25 μg of sufentanil and 2 mL of 1% tetracaine mixture; group B received endotracheal administration of 2 mL 1% tetracaine and routine local anesthetic sprays followed by slow intravenous injection of 25 μg of sufentanil. The results showed that endotracheal intubation was safely completed in all patients and vital signs including blood pressure, heart rate, and pulse oxygen saturation were not significantly different between groups A and B. However, time required for local anesthesia to take effect, time required to complete intubation, cough reflex, patient tolerance during intubation, and hemodynamic indices were significantly better in group A than in group B. In conclusion, our results suggest that endotracheal administration of sufentanil combined with tetracaine is safe, effective, and feasible in the context of awake nasal intubation using fiberoptic bronchoscopy.

  3. Ventilation and respiratory pattern and timing in resting awake cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennings, D B; Szlyk, P C

    1985-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to characterize the variability and patterns of spontaneous respiratory behaviour in awake cats. Respiration was measured in six cats over 80 or 90 min by the plethysmographic technique. In three cats, arterial blood gases were measured. Breath frequency (f) and tidal volume (VT) varied considerably breath-to-breath, although on average, these measurements as well as average ventilation remained relatively constant. The incidence of breath ventilation (VT X 60/TTOT) and VT were distributed unimodally but the incidence of breath f had a bimodal distribution. In the low f range, average f was 22.5 breaths/min, and in the high f range, average f was 41.6 breaths/min. The latter range appeared to be associated with purring. Inspiratory duration (TI) was less than expiratory duration (TE) at low f but exceeded TE at high f. For a given breath ventilation there was a predictable f and VT. At shorter TI (higher f) mean inspiratory flow, an index of central respiratory drive, increased but VT decreased. This study indicates that "normal" control respiratory behaviour in awake cats is better described by the range and pattern of breathing than by average values.

  4. Median effective dose of remifentanil for awake laryngoscopy and intudation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Ya-chao; XUE Fu-shan; LUO Mad-ping; YANG Quan-yong; LIAO Xu; LU Yi; ZHANG Yan-ming

    2009-01-01

    Background Awake intubation requires an anesthetic management that provides sufficient patient safety and comfort, adequate intubating conditions, and stable hemodynamics. In this prospective clinical study, our aim was to determine the median effective dose (ED50) of remifentanil in combination with midazolam and airway topical anesthesia for awake laryngoscopy and intubation.Methods Thirty-six female adult patients, scheduled for elective plastic surgery under general anesthesia requiring orotracheal intubation were included in this study. Ten minutes after intravenous administration of midazolam 0.1 mg/kg, patients were assigned to receive remifentanil in bolus, followed by a continuous infusion. The bolus dose and infusion rate of remifentanil were adjusted by a modified Dixon's up-and-down method. Patient's reaction score at laryngoscopy and an Observer's Assessment of Alertness/Sedation Scale (OAA/S) were used to determine whether the remifentanil dosage regimen was accepted. During laryngoscopy, 2% lidocaine was sprayed into the airway to provide the topical anesthesia. EDso of remifentanil was calculated by the modified Dixon up-and-clown method, and the probit analysis was then used to confirm the results obtained from the modified Dixon's up-and-down method. In the patients who were scored as "accept", patient's OAA/S and reaction scores at different observed points, intubating condition score and patient's tolerance to the endotracheal tube after intubation were evaluated and recorded. Blood pressure and heart rate at different measuring points were also noted.Results ED50 of remifentanil for awake laryngoscopy and intubation obtained by the modified Dixon's up-and-down method was (0.62±0.02) pg/kg. Using probit analysis, ED50 and ED95 of remifentanil were 0.63 μg/kg (95% Cl, 0.54-0.70) and 0.83 μg/kg (95% Cl, 0.73-2.59), respectively. Nineteen patients who were scored as =accept" had an OAA/S of 15 and tolerated well laryngoscopy without significant

  5. Spike timing and synaptic dynamics at the awake thalamocortical synapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swadlow, Harvey A; Bezdudnaya, Tatiana; Gusev, Alexander G

    2005-01-01

    Thalamocortical (TC) neurons form only a small percentage of the synapses onto neurons of cortical layer 4, but the response properties of these cortical neurons are arguably dominated by thalamic input. This discrepancy is explained, in part, by studies showing that TC synapses are of high efficacy. However, TC synapses display activity-dependent depression. Because of this, in vitro measures of synaptic efficacy will not reflect the situation in vivo, where different neuronal populations have widely varying levels of "spontaneous" activity. Indeed, TC neurons of awake subjects generate high rates of spontaneous activity that would be expected, in a depressing synapse, to result in a chronic state of synaptic depression. Here, we review recent work in the somatosensory thalamocortical system of awake rabbits in which the relationship between TC spike timing and TC synaptic efficacy was examined during both thalamic "relay mode" (alert state) and "burst mode" (drowsy state). Two largely independent methodological approaches were used. First, we employed cross-correlation methods to examine the synaptic impact of single TC "barreloid" neurons on a single neuronal subtype in the topographically aligned layer 4 "barrel" - putative fast-spike inhibitory interneurons. We found that the initial spike of a TC burst, as well as isolated TC spikes with long preceding interspike intervals (ISIs) elicited postsynaptic action potentials far more effectively than did TC impulses with short ISIs. Our second approach took a broader view of the postsynaptic impact of TC impulses. In these experiments we examined spike-triggered extracellular field potentials and synaptic currents (using current source-density analysis) generated through the depths of a cortical barrel column by the impulses of single topographically aligned TC neurons. We found that (a) closely neighboring TC neurons may elicit very different patterns of monosynaptic activation within layers 4 and 6 of the aligned

  6. A regenerative microchannel device for recording multiple single-unit action potentials in awake, ambulatory animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, Akhil; Tipton, John; Tahilramani, Mayank; Kharbouch, Adel; Gaupp, Eric; Song, Chao; Venkataraman, Poornima; Falcone, Jessica; Lacour, Stéphanie P; Stanley, Garrett B; English, Arthur W; Bellamkonda, Ravi V

    2016-02-01

    Despite significant advances in robotics, commercially advanced prosthetics provide only a small fraction of the functionality of the amputated limb that they are meant to replace. Peripheral nerve interfacing could provide a rich controlling link between the body and these advanced prosthetics in order to increase their overall utility. Here, we report on the development of a fully integrated regenerative microchannel interface with 30 microelectrodes and signal extraction capabilities enabling evaluation in an awake and ambulatory rat animal model. In vitro functional testing validated the capability of the microelectrodes to record neural signals similar in size and nature to those that occur in vivo. In vitro dorsal root ganglia cultures revealed striking cytocompatibility of the microchannel interface. Finally, in vivo, the microchannel interface was successfully used to record a multitude of single-unit action potentials through 63% of the integrated microelectrodes at the early time point of 3 weeks. This marks a significant advance in microchannel interfacing, demonstrating the capability of microchannels to be used for peripheral nerve interfacing.

  7. AWAKE CRANIOTOMY USING DEXMEDETOMIDINE INFUSION AND SCALP BLOCK: OUR EXPERIENCE IN SERIES OF CASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annapurna Sarma

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Awake craniotomy is an important technique used for brain tumour excision from eloquent cortex. Awake craniotomy allows maximum resection of the tumor with minimum functional impairment . The critical aspect is to maintain adequate analgesia and sedation, hemodynamic stability, airway safety, while keeping the patient awake and cooperative for neurological testing. AIM OF THE STUDY: We are reporting cases series of awake craniotomy under monito red anesthesia care using dexmedetomidine infusion as an adjuvant to scalp block, titrating the sedation level by BIS monitoring. MATERIALS AND METHODS: After careful patient selection and psychological preparation Monitored Anesthesia Care was provided by continuous infusion of dexmedetomidine at a rate of 0.2 - 0.5ug/kg/min titrating sedation score to BIS value of 70 - 90. Bilateral scalp block was administered using 0.5% bupivacaine. For dura mater incision, a pad with 2% lidocaine was applied for 3 minutes . The tumor removal was complete with no neurological deficiency. All the patients were discharged on 5 th postoperative day without complications and with full patient satisfaction. CONCLUSION: We conclude that monitored anesthesia care with dexmedetomidine infusion and scalp block for awake craniotomy is safe and efficacious. Absence of complications and high patient satisfaction score makes this technique close to an ideal technique for awake craniotomy. KEYWORDS: Awake craniotomy; Dexmedetomidine; Scalp b lock; BIS index

  8. The electron accelerator for the AWAKE experiment at CERN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pepitone, K., E-mail: kevin.pepitone@cern.ch [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Doebert, S., E-mail: steffen.doebert@cern.ch [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Burt, G. [The University of Lancaster, Lancaster (United Kingdom); Chevallay, E.; Chritin, N.; Delory, C.; Fedosseev, V.; Hessler, Ch.; McMonagle, G. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Mete, O. [The University of Manchester, Manchester (United Kingdom); Verzilov, V. [Triumf, Vancouver (Canada); Apsimon, R. [The University of Lancaster, Lancaster (United Kingdom)

    2016-09-01

    The AWAKE collaboration prepares a proton driven plasma wakefield acceleration experiment using the SPS beam at CERN. A long proton bunch extracted from the SPS interacts with a high power laser and a 10 m long rubidium vapour plasma cell to create strong wakefields allowing sustained electron acceleration. The electron bunch to probe these wakefields is supplied by a 20 MeV electron accelerator. The electron accelerator consists of an RF-gun and a short booster structure. This electron source should provide beams with intensities between 0.1 and 1 nC, bunch lengths between 0.3 and 3 ps and an emittance of the order of 2 mm mrad. The wide range of parameters should cope with the uncertainties and future prospects of the planned experiments. The layout of the electron accelerator, its instrumentation and beam dynamics simulations are presented.

  9. Replicability and heterogeneity of awake unrestrained canine FMRI responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory S Berns

    Full Text Available Previously, we demonstrated the possibility of fMRI in two awake and unrestrained dogs. Here, we determined the replicability and heterogeneity of these results in an additional 11 dogs for a total of 13 subjects. Based on an anatomically placed region-of-interest, we compared the caudate response to a hand signal indicating the imminent availability of a food reward to a hand signal indicating no reward. 8 of 13 dogs had a positive differential caudate response to the signal indicating reward. The mean differential caudate response was 0.09%, which was similar to a comparable human study. These results show that canine fMRI is reliable and can be done with minimal stress to the dogs.

  10. Replicability and heterogeneity of awake unrestrained canine FMRI responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berns, Gregory S; Brooks, Andrew; Spivak, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Previously, we demonstrated the possibility of fMRI in two awake and unrestrained dogs. Here, we determined the replicability and heterogeneity of these results in an additional 11 dogs for a total of 13 subjects. Based on an anatomically placed region-of-interest, we compared the caudate response to a hand signal indicating the imminent availability of a food reward to a hand signal indicating no reward. 8 of 13 dogs had a positive differential caudate response to the signal indicating reward. The mean differential caudate response was 0.09%, which was similar to a comparable human study. These results show that canine fMRI is reliable and can be done with minimal stress to the dogs.

  11. A 4-channel 3 Tesla phased array receive coil for awake rhesus monkey fMRI and diffusion MRI experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khachaturian, Mark Haig

    2010-01-01

    Awake monkey fMRI and diffusion MRI combined with conventional neuroscience techniques has the potential to study the structural and functional neural network. The majority of monkey fMRI and diffusion MRI experiments are performed with single coils which suffer from severe EPI distortions which limit resolution. By constructing phased array coils for monkey MRI studies, gains in SNR and anatomical accuracy (i.e., reduction of EPI distortions) can be achieved using parallel imaging. The major challenges associated with constructing phased array coils for monkeys are the variation in head size and space constraints. Here, we apply phased array technology to a 4-channel phased array coil capable of improving the resolution and image quality of full brain awake monkey fMRI and diffusion MRI experiments. The phased array coil is that can adapt to different rhesus monkey head sizes (ages 4-8) and fits in the limited space provided by monkey stereotactic equipment and provides SNR gains in primary visual cortex and anatomical accuracy in conjunction with parallel imaging and improves resolution in fMRI experiments by a factor of 2 (1.25 mm to 1.0 mm isotropic) and diffusion MRI experiments by a factor of 4 (1.5 mm to 0.9 mm isotropic).

  12. Pediatric awake craniotomy for seizure focus resection with dexmedetomidine sedation-a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheshadri, Veena; Chandramouli, B A

    2016-08-01

    Resection of lesions near the eloquent cortex of brain necessitates awake craniotomy to reduce the risk of permanent neurologic deficits during surgery. There are limited reports of anesthetic management of awake craniotomy in pediatric patients. This report is on use of dexmedetomidine sedation for awake craniotomy in a 11-year-old child, without any airway adjuncts throughout the procedure. Dexmedetomidine infusion administered at a dosage of 0.2 to 0.7μg kg(-1) h(-1) provided adequate sedation for the entire procedure. There were no untoward incidents or any interference with electrocorticography, intraoperative stimulation, and functional mapping. Adequate preoperative visits and counseling of patient and parents regarding course and nature of events along with well-planned intraoperative management are of utmost importance in a pediatric age group for successful intraoperative awake craniotomy.

  13. Urgent awake thoracoscopic treatment of retained haemothorax associated with respiratory failure

    OpenAIRE

    Pompeo, Eugenio; Cristino, Benedetto; Rogliani, Paola; Dauri, Mario

    2015-01-01

    A number of video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS) procedures are being increasingly performed by awake anesthesia in an attempt of minimizing the surgical- and anesthesia-related traumas. However, so far the usefulness of awake VATS for urgent management of retained haemothorax has been scarcely investigated. Herein we present two patients with retained haemothorax following previous thoracentesis and blunt chest trauma, respectively, who developed acute respiratory failure and underwen...

  14. Awake tracheal intubation using Pentax airway scope in 30 patients: A Case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Payal Kajekar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Pentax airway scope (AWS has been successfully used for managing difficult intubations. In this case series, we aimed to evaluate the success rate and time taken to complete intubation, when AWS was used for awake tracheal intubation. Methods: We prospectively evaluated the use of AWS for awake tracheal intubation in 30 patients. Indication for awake intubation, intubation time, total time to complete tracheal intubation, laryngoscopic view (Cormack and Lehane grade, total dose of local anaesthetic used, anaesthetists rating and patient′s tolerance of the procedure were recorded. Results: The procedure was successful in 25 out of the 30 patients (83%. The mean (standard deviation intubation time and total time to complete the tracheal intubation was 5.4 (2.4 and 13.9 (3.7 min, respectively in successful cases. The laryngeal view was grade 1 in 24 and grade 2 in one of 25 successful intubations. In three out of the five patients where the AWS failed, awake tracheal intubation was successfully completed with the assistance of flexible fibre optic scope (FOS. Conclusion: Awake tracheal intubation using AWS was successful in 83% of patients. Success rate can be further improved using a combination of AWS and FOS. Anaesthesiologists who do not routinely use FOS may find AWS easier to use for awake tracheal intubation using an oral route.

  15. Age-related alterations in behavioral and cerebral metabolic responses to the serotonin agonist meta-chlorophenylpiperazine in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freo, U; Rapoport, S I; Soncrant, T T

    1991-01-01

    To determine the functional relevance of the age-related neurochemical changes that occur in brain serotonin systems during aging, we measured the effects of the serotonin receptor agonist meta-chlorophenylpiperazine (MCPP) on behavior and on regional cerebral metabolic rates for glucose (rCMRglc) in awake rats. rCMRglc was determined in 74 regions of Fischer-344 rats aged 3, 12 and 24 months, at 15 and 90 min after MCPP 2.5 mg/kg IP, using the quantitative, autoradiographic [14C]2-deoxy-D-glucose technique. The time-course of motor performance following MCPP was assessed with a rotating rod. MCPP impaired motor performance in all ages maximally at 15-30 min. Three-month-old rats recovered completely within 60 min, whereas 12-month-old animals exhibited partial recovery and 24-month-old rats did not recover by 120 min. At 15 min after MCPP, rCMRglc was reduced in 51 of the 74 studied regions (overall decrease, 20%) of 3-month-old rats, in 21 regions (13% decrease) of 12-month-old rats and in 14 regions (2% decrease) of 24-month-old animals. Similar MCPP brain concentrations were achieved at 15 min in rats of all ages. The results suggest that the functional integrity of serotonergic transmission is reduced in aged rats and that the dysregulation is presynaptic.

  16. Stability of thalamocortical synaptic transmission across awake brain states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoelzel, Carl R; Bereshpolova, Yulia; Swadlow, Harvey A

    2009-05-27

    Sensory cortical neurons are highly sensitive to brain state, with many neurons showing changes in spatial and/or temporal response properties and some neurons becoming virtually unresponsive when subjects are not alert. Although some of these changes are undoubtedly attributable to state-related filtering at the thalamic level, another likely source of such effects is the thalamocortical (TC) synapse, where activation of nicotinic receptors on TC terminals have been shown to enhance synaptic transmission in vitro. However, monosynaptic TC synaptic transmission has not been directly examined during different states of alertness. Here, in awake rabbits that shifted between alert and non-alert EEG states, we examined the monosynaptic TC responses and short-term synaptic dynamics generated by spontaneous impulses of single visual and somatosensory TC neurons. We did this using spike-triggered current source-density analysis, an approach that enables assessment of monosynaptic extracellular currents generated in different cortical layers by impulses of single TC afferents. Spontaneous firing rates of TC neurons were higher, and burst rates were much lower in the alert state. However, we found no state-related changes in the amplitude of monosynaptic TC responses when TC spikes with similar preceding interspike interval were compared. Moreover, the relationship between the preceding interspike interval of the TC spike and postsynaptic response amplitude was not influenced by state. These data indicate that TC synaptic transmission and dynamics are highly conserved across different states of alertness and that observed state-related changes in receptive field properties that occur at the cortical level result from other mechanisms.

  17. AWAKE CRANIOTOMY USING DEXMEDETOMIDINE INFUSION AND SCALP BLOCK: OUR EXPERIENCE IN SERIES OF CASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MSSV Prasad

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Awake craniotomy for removal of intracranial tumors is most challenging procedure. The critical aspect of awake craniotomy is to maintain adequate analgesia and sedation, hemodynamic stability, airway safety, while keeping the patient immobile for duration of surgery, cooperative for neurological testing. AIM OF THE STUDY: Dexmedetomidine is good analgesic, sedative and has anaesthetic-sparing properties without causing significant respiratory depression. [1] We are reporting cases series of awake craniotomy under monitored anesthesia care using dexmedetomidine infusion as an adjuvant to scalp block, titrating the sedation level by BIS monitoring. MATERIALS AND METHODS: after careful patient selection and psychological preparation Monitored Anesthesia care(MAC was provided by continuous infusion of Dexmedetomidine at a rate of 0.2-0.5 mcg/kg/min titrating sedation level to a BIS value of 70-90%. Bilateral scalp block was administered using 0.5% bupivacaine. For dura mater incision, a pad with 2% lidocaine was applied for 3 minutes. The tumor removal was complete with no neurological deficiency. All the patients were discharged on 5th postoperative day without complications and with full patient satisfaction. CONCLUSION: We conclude that monitored anesthesia care with dexmedetomidine infusion and scalp block for awake craniotomy is a safe and efficacious. Absence of complications and high patient satisfaction score makes this technique close to an ideal technique for awake craniotomy.

  18. Associations of Sleep Quality and Awake Physical Activity with Fluctuations in Nocturnal Blood Pressure in Patients with Cardiovascular Risk Factors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manabu Kadoya

    Full Text Available Sleep quality and awake physical activity are important behavioral factors involved in the occurrence of cardiovascular diseases, potentially through nocturnal blood pressure (BP changes. However, the impacts of quantitatively measured sleep quality and awake physical activity on BP fluctuation, and their relationships with several candidate causal factors for nocturnal hypertension are not well elucidated.This cross-sectional study included 303 patients registered in the HSCAA study. Measurements included quantitatively determined sleep quality parameters and awake physical activity obtained by actigraph, nocturnal systolic BP (SBP fall [100 × (1- sleep SBP/awake SBP ratio], apnea hypopnea index, urinary sodium and cortisol secretion, plasma aldosterone concentration and renin activity, insulin resistance index, parameters of heart rate variability (HRV, and plasma brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF.Simple regression analysis showed that time awake after sleep onset (r = -0.150, a parameter of sleep quality, and awake physical activity (r = 0.164 were significantly correlated with nocturnal SBP fall. Among those, time awake after sleep onset (β = -0.179 and awake physical activity (β = 0.190 were significantly and independently associated with nocturnal SBP fall in multiple regression analysis. In a subgroup of patients without taking anti-hypertensive medications, both time awake after sleep onset (β = -0.336 and awake physical activity (β = 0.489 were more strongly and independently associated with nocturnal SBP falls.Sleep quality and awake physical activity were found to be significantly associated with nocturnal SBP fall, and that relationship was not necessarily confounded by candidate causal factors for nocturnal hypertension.

  19. AWAKE, The Advanced Proton Driven Plasma Wakefield Acceleration Experiment at CERN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gschwendtner, E.; Adli, E.; Amorim, L.; Apsimon, R.; Assmann, R.; Bachmann, A.-M.; Batsch, F.; Bauche, J.; Berglyd Olsen, V. K.; Bernardini, M.; Bingham, R.; Biskup, B.; Bohl, T.; Bracco, C.; Burrows, P. N.; Burt, G.; Buttenschön, B.; Butterworth, A.; Caldwell, A.; Cascella, M.; Chevallay, E.; Cipiccia, S.; Damerau, H.; Deacon, L.; Dirksen, P.; Doebert, S.; Dorda, U.; Farmer, J.; Fedosseev, V.; Feldbaumer, E.; Fiorito, R.; Fonseca, R.; Friebel, F.; Gorn, A. A.; Grulke, O.; Hansen, J.; Hessler, C.; Hofle, W.; Holloway, J.; Hüther, M.; Jaroszynski, D.; Jensen, L.; Jolly, S.; Joulaei, A.; Kasim, M.; Keeble, F.; Li, Y.; Liu, S.; Lopes, N.; Lotov, K. V.; Mandry, S.; Martorelli, R.; Martyanov, M.; Mazzoni, S.; Mete, O.; Minakov, V. A.; Mitchell, J.; Moody, J.; Muggli, P.; Najmudin, Z.; Norreys, P.; Öz, E.; Pardons, A.; Pepitone, K.; Petrenko, A.; Plyushchev, G.; Pukhov, A.; Rieger, K.; Ruhl, H.; Salveter, F.; Savard, N.; Schmidt, J.; Seryi, A.; Shaposhnikova, E.; Sheng, Z. M.; Sherwood, P.; Silva, L.; Soby, L.; Sosedkin, A. P.; Spitsyn, R. I.; Trines, R.; Tuev, P. V.; Turner, M.; Verzilov, V.; Vieira, J.; Vincke, H.; Wei, Y.; Welsch, C. P.; Wing, M.; Xia, G.; Zhang, H.

    2016-09-01

    The Advanced Proton Driven Plasma Wakefield Acceleration Experiment (AWAKE) aims at studying plasma wakefield generation and electron acceleration driven by proton bunches. It is a proof-of-principle R&D experiment at CERN and the world's first proton driven plasma wakefield acceleration experiment. The AWAKE experiment will be installed in the former CNGS facility and uses the 400 GeV/c proton beam bunches from the SPS. The first experiments will focus on the self-modulation instability of the long (rms ~12 cm) proton bunch in the plasma. These experiments are planned for the end of 2016. Later, in 2017/2018, low energy (~15 MeV) electrons will be externally injected into the sample wakefields and be accelerated beyond 1 GeV. The main goals of the experiment will be summarized. A summary of the AWAKE design and construction status will be presented.

  20. AWAKE, The Advanced Proton Driven Plasma Wakefield Acceleration Experiment at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Gschwendtner, E.; Amorim, L.; Apsimon, R.; Assmann, R.; Bachmann, A.M.; Batsch, F.; Bauche, J.; Berglyd Olsen, V.K.; Bernardini, M.; Bingham, R.; Biskup, B.; Bohl, T.; Bracco, C.; Burrows, P.N.; Burt, G.; Buttenschon, B.; Butterworth, A.; Caldwell, A.; Cascella, M.; Chevallay, E.; Cipiccia, S.; Damerau, H.; Deacon, L.; Dirksen, P.; Doebert, S.; Dorda, U.; Farmer, J.; Fedosseev, V.; Feldbaumer, E.; Fiorito, R.; Fonseca, R.; Friebel, F.; Gorn, A.A.; Grulke, O.; Hansen, J.; Hessler, C.; Hofle, W.; Holloway, J.; Huther, M.; Jaroszynski, D.; Jensen, L.; Jolly, S.; Joulaei, A.; Kasim, M.; Keeble, F.; Li, Y.; Liu, S.; Lopes, N.; Lotov, K.V.; Mandry, S.; Martorelli, R.; Martyanov, M.; Mazzoni, S.; Mete, O.; Minakov, V.A.; Mitchell, J.; Moody, J.; Muggli, P.; Najmudin, Z.; Norreys, P.; Oz, E.; Pardons, A.; Pepitone, K.; Petrenko, A.; Plyushchev, G.; Pukhov, A.; Rieger, K.; Ruhl, H.; Salveter, F.; Savard, N.; Schmidt, J.; Seryi, A.; Shaposhnikova, E.; Sheng, Z.M.; Sherwood, P.; Silva, L.; Soby, L.; Sosedkin, A.P.; Spitsyn, R.I.; Trines, R.; Tuev, P.V.; Turner, M.; Verzilov, V.; Vieira, J.; Vincke, H.; Wei, Y.; Welsch, C.P.; Wing, M.; Xia, G.; Zhang, H.

    2016-01-01

    The Advanced Proton Driven Plasma Wakefield Acceleration Experiment (AWAKE) aims at studying plasma wakefield generation and electron acceleration driven by proton bunches. It is a proof-of-principle R&D experiment at CERN and the world's first proton driven plasma wakefield acceleration experiment. The AWAKE experiment will be installed in the former CNGS facility and uses the 400 GeV/c proton beam bunches from the SPS. The first experiments will focus on the self-modulation instability of the long (rms ~12 cm) proton bunch in the plasma. These experiments are planned for the end of 2016. Later, in 2017/2018, low energy (~15 MeV) electrons will be externally injected to sample the wakefields and be accelerated beyond 1 GeV. The main goals of the experiment will be summarized. A summary of the AWAKE design and construction status will be presented.

  1. AWAKE, The Advanced Proton Driven Plasma Wakefield Acceleration Experiment at CERN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gschwendtner, E. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Adli, E. [University of Oslo, Oslo 0316 (Norway); Amorim, L. [GoLP/Instituto de Plasmas e Fusão Nuclear, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, Lisbon (Portugal); Apsimon, R. [Cockcroft Institute, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Lancaster University, Lancaster LA1 4YR (United Kingdom); Assmann, R. [DESY, Notkestrasse 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Bachmann, A.-M.; Batsch, F. [Max Planck Institute for Physics, Föhringer Ring 6, München 80805 (Germany); Bauche, J. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Berglyd Olsen, V.K. [University of Oslo, Oslo 0316 (Norway); Bernardini, M. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Bingham, R. [STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Didcot OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Biskup, B. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Czech Technical University, Zikova 1903/4, 166 36 Praha 6 (Czech Republic); Bohl, T.; Bracco, C. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Burrows, P.N. [John Adams Institute for Accelerator Science, Oxford (United Kingdom); University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 2JD (United Kingdom); Burt, G. [Cockcroft Institute, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Buttenschön, B. [Max Planck Institute for Plasma Physics, Wendelsteinstr. 1, Greifswald 17491 (Germany); Butterworth, A. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Caldwell, A. [Max Planck Institute for Physics, Föhringer Ring 6, München 80805 (Germany); Cascella, M. [UCL, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); and others

    2016-09-01

    The Advanced Proton Driven Plasma Wakefield Acceleration Experiment (AWAKE) aims at studying plasma wakefield generation and electron acceleration driven by proton bunches. It is a proof-of-principle R&D experiment at CERN and the world's first proton driven plasma wakefield acceleration experiment. The AWAKE experiment will be installed in the former CNGS facility and uses the 400 GeV/c proton beam bunches from the SPS. The first experiments will focus on the self-modulation instability of the long (rms ~12 cm) proton bunch in the plasma. These experiments are planned for the end of 2016. Later, in 2017/2018, low energy (~15 MeV) electrons will be externally injected into the sample wakefields and be accelerated beyond 1 GeV. The main goals of the experiment will be summarized. A summary of the AWAKE design and construction status will be presented.

  2. [Non-verbal communication of patients submitted to heart surgery: from awaking after anesthesia to extubation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werlang, Sueli da Cruz; Azzolin, Karina; Moraes, Maria Antonieta; de Souza, Emiliane Nogueira

    2008-12-01

    Preoperative orientation is an essential tool for patient's communication after surgery. This study had the objective of evaluating non-verbal communication of patients submitted to cardiac surgery from the time of awaking from anesthesia until extubation, after having received preoperative orientation by nurses. A quantitative cross-sectional study was developed in a reference hospital of the state of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil, from March to July 2006. Data were collected in the pre and post operative periods. A questionnaire to evaluate non-verbal communication on awaking from sedation was applied to a sample of 100 patients. Statistical analysis included Student, Wilcoxon, and Mann Whittney tests. Most of the patients responded satisfactorily to non-verbal communication strategies as instructed on the preoperative orientation. Thus, non-verbal communication based on preoperative orientation was helpful during the awaking period.

  3. [Awake Nasotracheal Intubation for a 4-Year-old Boy with an Oral Penetrating Toothbrush Injury].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Naoya; Ando, Kokichi; Saito, Kazutomo; Toyama, Hiroaki; Fudeta, Hiroto; Yamauchi, Masanori

    2015-09-01

    We report a case of an oral penetrating injury caused by a toothbrush in a 4-year-old 17-kg boy. The toothbrush was lodged in the right cervical region through the oral cavity, and emergency surgery for removal was planned under general anesthesia. Although mask ventilation was not possible because of the protruding toothbrush handle, awake nasotracheal intubation was successfully performed with a fiber-scope and intravenous fentanyl 25 μg. We conclude that appropriate analgesics could facilitate awake intubation in pediatric patients.

  4. Indirect Self-Modulation Instability Measurement Concept for the AWAKE Proton Beam

    OpenAIRE

    Turner, M.; Petrenko, A.; Biskup, B.; Burger, S; Gschwendtner, E; Lotov, K. V.; S. Mazzoni; Vincke, H.

    2015-01-01

    AWAKE, the Advanced Proton-Driven Plasma Wakefield Acceleration Experiment, is a proof-of-principle R&D experiment at CERN using a 400 GeV/c proton beam from the CERN SPS (longitudinal beam size sigma_z = 12 cm) which will be sent into a 10 m long plasma section with a nominal density of approx. 7x10^14 atoms/cm3 (plasma wavelength lambda_p = 1.2mm). In this paper we show that by measuring the time integrated transverse profile of the proton bunch at two locations downstream of the AWAKE plas...

  5. AWAKE, The Advanced Proton Driven Plasma Wakefield Acceleration Experiment at CERN

    OpenAIRE

    Gschwendtner, E; Adli, E.; Bingham, R.; Biskup, B.; Bohl, T.; Bracco, C.; Burrows, P.N.; Burt, G.; Buttenschon, B.; Butterworth, A.(CERN, Geneva, Switzerland); Caldwell, A.; Cascella, M.; AMORIM, L.; Chevallay, E.; Cipiccia, S.

    2016-01-01

    The Advanced Proton Driven Plasma Wakefield Acceleration Experiment (AWAKE) aims at studying plasma wakefield generation and electron acceleration driven by proton bunches. It is a proof-of-principle R&D; experiment at CERN and the world׳s first proton driven plasma wakefield acceleration experiment. The AWAKE experiment will be installed in the former CNGS facility and uses the 400 GeV/c proton beam bunches from the SPS. The first experiments will focus on the self-modulation instability of ...

  6. Inflammatory Profile of Awake Function-Controlled Craniotomy and Craniotomy under General Anesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus Klimek

    2009-01-01

    Results. Plasma IL-6 level significantly increased with time similarly in both groups. No significant plasma IL-8 and IL-10 change was observed in both experimental groups. The VAS pain score was significantly lower in the awake group compared to the anesthesia group at 12 hours postoperative. Postoperative anxiety and stress declined similarly in both groups. Conclusion. This study suggests that awake function-controlled craniotomy does not cause a significantly different inflammatory response than craniotomy performed under general anesthesia. It is also likely that function-controlled craniotomy does not cause a greater emotional challenge than tumor resection under general anesthesia.

  7. Awake surgery between art and science. Part I: clinical and operative settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talacchi, Andrea; Santini, Barbara; Casagrande, Francesca; Alessandrini, Franco; Zoccatelli, Giada; Squintani, Giovanna M

    2013-01-01

    Awake surgery requires coordinated teamwork and communication between the surgeon and the anesthesiologist, as he monitors the patient, the neuroradiologist as he interprets the images for intraoperative confirmation, and the neuropsychologist and neurophysiologist as they evaluate in real-time the patient's responses to commands and questions. To improve comparison across published studies on clinical assessment and operative settings in awake surgery, we reviewed the literature, focusing on methodological differences and aims. In complex, interdisciplinary medical care, such differences can affect the outcome and the cost-benefit ratio of the treatment. Standardization of intraoperative mapping and related controversies will be discussed in Part II.

  8. Comprehensive Evaluation of Neuroprotection Achieved by Extended Selective Brain Cooling Therapy in a Rat Model of Penetrating Ballistic-Like Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xi-Chun May; Shear, Deborah A; Deng-Bryant, Ying; Leung, Lai Yee; Wei, Guo; Chen, Zhiyong; Tortella, Frank C

    2016-03-01

    Brain hypothermia has been considered as a promising alternative to whole-body hypothermia in treating acute neurological disease, for example, traumatic brain injury. Previously, we demonstrated that 2-hours selective brain cooling (SBC) effectively mitigated acute (≤24 hours postinjury) neurophysiological dysfunction induced by a penetrating ballistic-like brain injury (PBBI) in rats. This study evaluated neuroprotective effects of extended SBC (4 or 8 hours in duration) on sub-acute secondary injuries between 3 and 21 days postinjury (DPI). SBC (34°C) was achieved via extraluminal cooling of rats' bilateral common carotid arteries (CCA). Depending on the experimental design, SBC was introduced either immediately or with a 2- or 4-hour delay after PBBI and maintained for 4 or 8 hours. Neuroprotective effects of SBC were evaluated by measuring brain lesion volume, axonal injury, neuroinflammation, motor and cognitive functions, and post-traumatic seizures. Compared to untreated PBBI animals, 4 or 8 hours SBC treatment initiated immediately following PBBI produced comparable neuroprotective benefits against PBBI-induced early histopathology at 3 DPI as evidenced by significant reductions in brain lesion volume, axonal pathology (beta-amyloid precursor protein staining), neuroinflammation (glial fibrillary acetic protein stained-activated astrocytes and rat major histocompatibility complex class I stained activated microglial cell), and post-traumatic nonconvulsive seizures. In the later phase of the injury (7-21 DPI), significant improvement on motor function (rotarod test) was observed under most SBC protocols, including the 2-hour delay in SBC initiation. However, SBC treatment failed to improve cognitive performance (Morris water maze test) measured 13-17 DPI. The protective effects of SBC on delayed axonal injury (silver staining) were evident out to 14 DPI. In conclusion, the CCA cooling method of SBC produced neuroprotection measured across multiple

  9. The Sleep Elaboration-Awake Pruning (SEAP) theory of memory: long term memories grow in complexity during sleep and undergo selection while awake. Clinical, psychopharmacological and creative implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charlton, Bruce G; Andras, Peter

    2009-07-01

    Long term memory (LTM) systems need to be adaptive such that they enhance an organism's reproductive fitness and self-reproducing in order to maintain their complexity of communications over time in the face of entropic loss of information. Traditional 'representation-consolidation' accounts conceptualize memory adaptiveness as due to memories being 'representations' of the environment, and the longevity of memories as due to 'consolidation' processes. The assumption is that memory representations are formed while an animal is awake and interacting with the environment, and these memories are consolidated mainly while the animal is asleep. So the traditional view of memory is 'instructionist' and assumes that information is transferred from the environment into the brain. By contrast, we see memories as arising endogenously within the brain's LTM system mainly during sleep, to create complex but probably maladaptive memories which are then simplified ('pruned') and selected during the awake period. When awake the LTM system is brought into a more intense interaction with past and present experience. Ours is therefore a 'selectionist' account of memory, and could be termed the Sleep Elaboration-Awake Pruning (or SEAP) theory. The SEAP theory explains the longevity of memories in the face of entropy by the tendency for memories to grow in complexity during sleep; and explains the adaptiveness of memory by selection for consistency with perceptions and previous memories during the awake state. Sleep is therefore that behavioural state during which most of the internal processing of the system of LTM occurs; and the reason sleep remains poorly understood is that its primary activity is the expansion of long term memories. By re-conceptualizing the relationship between memory, sleep and the environment; SEAP provides a radically new framework for memory research, with implications for the measurement of memory and the design of empirical investigations in clinical

  10. A case of secondary somatosensory epilepsy with a left deep parietal opercular lesion: successful tumor resection using a transsubcentral gyral approach during awake surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maesawa, Satoshi; Fujii, Masazumi; Futamura, Miyako; Hayashi, Yuichiro; Iijima, Kentaro; Wakabayashi, Toshihiko

    2016-03-01

    . Thus, this report demonstrated the safe and effective use of the transsubcentral gyral approach during awake surgery to resect deep parietal opercular lesions, clarified electrophysiological characteristics in the SII area, and achieved successful tumor resection with good control of epilepsy.

  11. Nociception-related somatosensory evoked potentials in awake dogs recorded after intra epidermal electrical stimulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Oostrom, H.; Stienen, P.J.; Doornenbal, A.; Hellebrekers, L.J.

    2009-01-01

    Eur J Pain. 2009 Feb;13(2):154-60. Epub 2008 May 16. Nociception-related somatosensory evoked potentials in awake dogs recorded after intra epidermal electrical stimulation. van Oostrom H, Stienen PJ, Doornenbal A, Hellebrekers LJ. Department of Clinical Sciences of Companion Animals, Division Anest

  12. Stay Awake Behind the Wheel (A Minute of Health with CDC)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2016-11-10

    Being a safe driver requires complete focus on the road and the cars around you. This podcast discusses the importance of staying awake while driving.  Created: 11/10/2016 by MMWR.   Date Released: 11/10/2016.

  13. Awake insertion of the laryngeal mask airway using topical lidocaine and intravenous remifentanil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lee, MC; Absalom, AR; Menon, DK; Smith, HL

    2006-01-01

    We assessed the use of intravenous remifentanil for the insertion of the laryngeal mask airway in 10 healthy awake volunteers, a technique primarily developed to facilitate functional magnetic resonance imaging studies of anaesthesia. Each volunteer received 200 mu g glycopyrronium intravenously. To

  14. Comparison of jaw muscle EMG activity in awake and sleep bruxers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Castrillon, Eduardo; Dreyer Nielsen, Patricia; Haugland, Morten;

    2015-01-01

    TITLE: Comparison of Jaw Muscle EMG Activity in Awake and Sleep Bruxers AUTHORS: E. E. Castrillon, P. Dreyer, M. Haugland, W. Yachida, T. Arima, P. Svensson AUTHORS/INSTITUTIONS: E.E. Castrillon, P. Dreyer, P. Svensson, Aarhus School of Dentistry, Aarhus C, DENMARK; E.E. Castrillon, P. Svensson, ...

  15. Awake craniotomy in a patient with ejection fraction of 10%: considerations of cerebrovascular and cardiovascular physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Lingzhong; Weston, Stephen D; Chang, Edward F; Gelb, Adrian W

    2015-05-01

    A 37-year-old man with nonischemic 4-chamber dilated cardiomyopathy and low-output cardiac failure (estimated ejection fraction of 10%) underwent awake craniotomy for a low-grade oligodendroglioma resection under monitored anesthesia care. The cerebrovascular and cardiovascular physiologic challenges and our management of this patient are discussed.

  16. Membrane Potential Dynamics of Spontaneous and Visually Evoked Gamma Activity in V1 of Awake Mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Perrenoud, Q.; Pennartz, C.M.A.; Gentet, L.J.

    2016-01-01

    Cortical gamma activity (30-80 Hz) is believed to play important functions in neural computation and arises from the interplay of parvalbumin-expressing interneurons (PV) and pyramidal cells (PYRs). However, the subthreshold dynamics underlying its emergence in the cortex of awake animals remain unc

  17. a-Band Oscillations in Intracellular Membrane Potentials of Dentate Gyrus Neurons in Awake Rodents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Ross W.; Strowbridge, Ben W.

    2014-01-01

    The hippocampus and dentate gyrus play critical roles in processing declarative memories and spatial information. Dentate granule cells, the first relay in the trisynaptic circuit through the hippocampus, exhibit low spontaneous firing rates even during locomotion. Using intracellular recordings from dentate neurons in awake mice operating a…

  18. Impaired formalin-evoked changes of spinal amino acid levels in diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malmberg, Annika B; O'Connor, William T; Glennon, Jeffery C; Ceseña, Rose; Calcutt, Nigel A

    2006-10-18

    To investigate mechanisms by which diabetes alters sensory processing, we measured levels of amino acid neurotransmitters in spinal dialysates from awake, unrestrained control and diabetic rats under resting conditions and following hind paw formalin injection. Under resting conditions, glutamate concentrations in spinal dialysates were significantly (Phyperalgesia in diabetic rats does not appear to be secondary to enhanced glutamatergic input to the spinal cord.

  19. Sleeping Beauty Awakes: Children's Literature and Sex Role Myths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Karel

    Both males and females are mythologized in children's literature. The internalization of these myths has been found to have far-reaching implications for intellectual achievement and individual functioning in a democracy. Numerous studies have indicated that these sexual myths are destructive to females' self-image. Eleanor Maccoby, in her study…

  20. Use of movable high-field-strength intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging with awake craniotomies for resection of gliomas: preliminary experience.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Leuthardt, Eric C

    2011-07-01

    Awake craniotomy with electrocortical mapping and intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging (iMRI) are established techniques for maximizing tumor resection and preserving function, but there has been little experience combining these methodologies.

  1. A method for unit recording in the lumbar spinal cord during locomotion of the conscious adult rat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Rune W; Chen, Ming-Teh; Huang, Hsueh-Chen;

    2009-01-01

    Extracellular recordings from single units in the brain, for example the neocortex, have proven feasible in moving, awake rats, but have not yet been possible in the spinal cord. Single-unit activity during locomotor-like activity in reduced preparations from adult cats and rats have provided...

  2. Beam Transfer Line Design for a Plasma Wakefield Acceleration Experiment (AWAKE) at the CERN SPS

    CERN Document Server

    Bracco, C; Brethoux, D; Clerc, V; Goddard, B; Gschwendtner, E; Jensen, L K; Kosmicki, A; Le Godec, G; Meddahi, M; Muggli, P; Mutin, C; Osborne, O; Papastergiou, K; Pardons, A; Velotti, F M; Vincke, H

    2013-01-01

    The world’s first proton driven plasma wakefield acceleration experiment (AWAKE) is presently being studied at CERN. The experimentwill use a high energy proton beam extracted from the SPS as driver. Two possible locations for installing the AWAKE facility were considered: the West Area and the CNGS beam line. The previous transfer line from the SPS to the West Area was completely dismantled in 2005 and would need to be fully re-designed and re-built. For this option, geometric constraints for radiation protection reasons would limit the maximum proton beam energy to 300 GeV. The existing CNGS line could be used by applying only minor changes to the lattice for the final focusing and the interface between the proton beam and the laser, required for plasma ionisation and bunch-modulation seeding. The beam line design studies performed for the two options are presented.

  3. Evolving Models of Pavlovian Conditioning: Cerebellar Cortical Dynamics in Awake Behaving Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michiel M. ten Brinke

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Three decades of electrophysiological research on cerebellar cortical activity underlying Pavlovian conditioning have expanded our understanding of motor learning in the brain. Purkinje cell simple spike suppression is considered to be crucial in the expression of conditional blink responses (CRs. However, trial-by-trial quantification of this link in awake behaving animals is lacking, and current hypotheses regarding the underlying plasticity mechanisms have diverged from the classical parallel fiber one to the Purkinje cell synapse LTD hypothesis. Here, we establish that acquired simple spike suppression, acquired conditioned stimulus (CS-related complex spike responses, and molecular layer interneuron (MLI activity predict the expression of CRs on a trial-by-trial basis using awake behaving mice. Additionally, we show that two independent transgenic mouse mutants with impaired MLI function exhibit motor learning deficits. Our findings suggest multiple cerebellar cortical plasticity mechanisms underlying simple spike suppression, and they implicate the broader involvement of the olivocerebellar module within the interstimulus interval.

  4. Laryngeal Radiation Fibrosis: A Case of Failed Awake Flexible Fibreoptic Intubation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes M. Huitink

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Awake fibreoptic intubation is accepted as the gold standard for intubation of patients with an anticipated difficult airway. Radiation fibrosis may cause difficulties during the intubation procedure. We present an unusual severe case of radiation induced changes to the larynx, with limited clinical symptoms, that caused failure of the fibreoptic intubation technique. A review of the known literature on radiation fibrosis and airway management is presented.

  5. Millisecond Coupling of Local Field Potentials to Synaptic Currents in the Awake Visual Cortex

    OpenAIRE

    Haider, Bilal; Schulz, David P.A.; Häusser, Michael; Carandini, Matteo

    2016-01-01

    Summary The cortical local field potential (LFP) is a common measure of population activity, but its relationship to synaptic activity in individual neurons is not fully established. This relationship has been typically studied during anesthesia and is obscured by shared slow fluctuations. Here, we used patch-clamp recordings in visual cortex of anesthetized and awake mice to measure intracellular activity; we then applied a simple method to reveal its coupling to the simultaneously recorded ...

  6. Millisecond Coupling of Local Field Potentials to Synaptic Currents in the Awake Visual Cortex

    OpenAIRE

    Haider, B; Schulz, D. P.; Häusser, M.; Carandini, M.

    2016-01-01

    The cortical local field potential (LFP) is a common measure of population activity, but its relationship to synaptic activity in individual neurons is not fully established. This relationship has been typically studied during anesthesia and is obscured by shared slow fluctuations. Here, we used patch-clamp recordings in visual cortex of anesthetized and awake mice to measure intracellular activity; we then applied a simple method to reveal its coupling to the simultaneously recorded LFP. LFP...

  7. Development of a simultaneous optical/PET imaging system for awake mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takuwa, Hiroyuki; Ikoma, Yoko; Yoshida, Eiji; Tashima, Hideaki; Wakizaka, Hidekatsu; Shinaji, Tetsuya; Yamaya, Taiga

    2016-09-01

    Simultaneous measurements of multiple physiological parameters are essential for the study of brain disease mechanisms and the development of suitable therapies to treat them. In this study, we developed a measurement system for simultaneous optical imaging and PET for awake mice. The key elements of this system are the OpenPET, optical imaging and fixation apparatus for an awake mouse. The OpenPET is our original open-type PET geometry, which can be used in combination with another device because of the easily accessible open space of the former. A small prototype of the axial shift single-ring OpenPET was used. The objective lens for optical imaging with a mounted charge-coupled device camera was placed inside the open space of the AS-SROP. Our original fixation apparatus to hold an awake mouse was also applied. As a first application of this system, simultaneous measurements of cerebral blood flow (CBF) by laser speckle imaging (LSI) and [11C]raclopride-PET were performed under control and 5% CO2 inhalation (hypercapnia) conditions. Our system successfully obtained the CBF and [11C]raclopride radioactivity concentration simultaneously. Accumulation of [11C]raclopride was observed in the striatum where the density of dopamine D2 receptors is high. LSI measurements could be stably performed for more than 60 minutes. Increased CBF induced by hypercapnia was observed while CBF under the control condition was stable. We concluded that our imaging system should be useful for investigating the mechanisms of brain diseases in awake animal models.

  8. On the "Awake Lion "Culture%“醒狮”文化

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姜喜平; 黎宇

    2012-01-01

    2006年“狮舞”作为民间舞蹈列入国务院确定的第一批国家级非物质文化遗产名录,狮舞包括徐水舞狮、天塔狮舞、黄沙狮子、广东醒狮。广东醒狮指佛山市、遂溪县、广州市的舞狮活动。文章通过田野调查法对广东省的广州市、佛山市、东莞市的醒狮历史文化进行阐述,并走访多名民间艺人和“醒狮”专家,发现“醒狮”存在发展不均衡,其主要原因为:风俗各异、经济状况、部门重视程度不同。%In 2006 "lion-dancing " as a folk dance was by the State Department identified the first batch of national intangible cultural heritage list, which includes the Xushui lion -dancing, Tianta lion-dancing, Huangsha lion -dancing and awake lion of Guangdong Province. Awake lion of Guangdong Province is lion-dancing in Foshan City, Suixi County, Guangzhou County. The article based on the field investigation of Guangdong Province in Guangzhou, Foshan, Dongguan about the awake lion history culture, and many folk artists and" Lion" experts were visited, the study found that " awake lion " development is not balanced. The main reasons are: different customs, economic status, departments emphasis.

  9. Characterization of scale-free properties of human electrocorticography in awake and slow wave sleep states

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John M Zempel

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Like many complex dynamic systems, the brain exhibits scale-free dynamics that follow power law scaling. Broadband power spectral density (PSD of brain electrical activity exhibits state-dependent power law scaling with a log frequency exponent that varies across frequency ranges. Widely divergent naturally occurring neural states, awake and slow wave sleep (SWS periods, were used evaluate the nature of changes in scale-free indices. We demonstrate two analytic approaches to characterizing electrocorticographic (ECoG data obtained during Awake and SWS states. A data driven approach was used, characterizing all available frequency ranges. Using an Equal Error State Discriminator (EESD, a single frequency range did not best characterize state across data from all six subjects, though the ability to distinguish awake and SWS states in individual subjects was excellent. Multisegment piecewise linear fits were used to characterize scale-free slopes across the entire frequency range (0.2-200 Hz. These scale-free slopes differed between Awake and SWS states across subjects, particularly at frequencies below 10 Hz and showed little difference at frequencies above 70 Hz. A Multivariate Maximum Likelihood Analysis (MMLA method using the multisegment slope indices successfully categorized ECoG data in most subjects, though individual variation was seen. The ECoG spectrum is not well characterized by a single linear fit across a defined set of frequencies, but is best described by a set of discrete linear fits across the full range of available frequencies. With increasing computational tractability, the use of scale-free slope values to characterize EEG data will have practical value in clinical and research EEG studies.

  10. GHz modulation detection using a streak camera: Suitability of streak cameras in the AWAKE experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieger, K.; Caldwell, A.; Reimann, O.; Muggli, P.

    2017-02-01

    Using frequency mixing, a modulated light pulse of ns duration is created. We show that, with a ps-resolution streak camera that is usually used for single short pulse measurements, we can detect via an FFT detection approach up to 450 GHz modulation in a pulse in a single measurement. This work is performed in the context of the AWAKE plasma wakefield experiment where modulation frequencies in the range of 80-280 GHz are expected.

  11. "Awake Veno-arterial Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation" in Pediatric Cardiogenic Shock: A Single-Center Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, F; Jack, T; Sasse, M; Kaussen, T; Bertram, H; Horke, A; Seidemann, K; Beerbaum, P; Koeditz, H

    2015-12-01

    In pediatric patients with acute refractory cardiogenic shock (CS), extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) remains an established procedure to maintain adequate organ perfusion. In this context, ECMO can be used as a bridging procedure to recovery, VAD or transplantation. While being supported by ECMO, most centers tend to keep their patients well sedated and supported by invasive ventilation. This may be associated with an increased risk of therapy-related morbidity and mortality. In order to optimize clinical management in pediatric patients with ECMO therapy, we report our strategy of veno-arterial ECMO (VA-ECMO) in extubated awake and conscious patients. We therefore present data of six of our patients with CS, who were treated by ECMO being awake without continuous analgosedation and invasive ventilation. Of these six patients, four were 14 years of age. Median time on ECMO was 17.4 days (range 6.9-94.2 days). Median time extubated, while receiving ECMO support was 9.5 days. Mean time extubated was 78 % of the total time on ECMO. Three patients reached full recovery of cardiac function on "Awake-VA-ECMO," whereas the other three were successfully bridged to destination therapy (VAD, heart transplantation, withdrawal). Four out of our six patients are still alive. Complications related to ECMO therapy (i.e., severe bleeding, site infection or dislocation of cannulas) were not observed. We conclude that "Awake-VA-ECMO" in extubated, spontaneously breathing conscious pediatric patients is feasible and safe for the treatment of acute CS and can be used as a "bridging therapy" to recovery, VAD implantation or transplantation.

  12. Dexmedetomidine-midazolam versus Sufentanil-midazolam for Awake Fiberoptic Nasotracheal Intubation: A Randomized Double-blind Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Cheng-Wen; Li, Yan-Dong; Tian, Hai-Tao; Kong, Xian-Gang; Chen, Kui

    2015-01-01

    Background: Awake fiberoptic intubation (AFOI) is usually performed in the management of the predicted difficult airway. The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of dexmedetomidine with midazolam (DM) and sufentanil with midazolam (SM) for sedation for awake fiberoptic nasotracheal intubation. Methods: Fifty patients with limited mouth opening scheduled for AFOI were randomly assigned to two groups (n = 25 per group) by a computer-generated randomization schedule. All subjects received midazolam 0.02 mg/kg as premedication and airway topical anesthesia with a modified “spray-as-you-go” technique. Group DM received dexmedetomidine at a loading dose of 0.5 μg/kg over 10 min followed by a continuous infusion of 0.25 μg·kg−1·h−1, whereas Group SM received sufentanil at a loading dose of 0.2 μg/kg over 10 min followed by a continuous infusion of 0.1 μg·kg−1·h−1. As necessary, since the end of the administration of the loading dose of the study drug, an additional dose of midazolam 0.5 mg at 2-min intervals was given to achieve a modified Observers’ Assessment of Alertness/Sedation of 2–3. The quality of intubation conditions and adverse events were observed. Results: The scores of ease of the AFOI procedure, patient's reaction during AFOI, coughing severity, tolerance after intubation, recall of the procedure and discomfort during the procedure were comparable in both groups (z = 0.572, 0.664, 1.297, 0.467, 0.895, and 0.188, respectively, P > 0.05). Hypoxic episodes similarly occurred in the two groups, but the first partial pressure of end-tidal CO2 after intubation was higher in Group SM than that in Group DM (45.2 ± 4.2 mmHg vs. 42.2 ± 4.3 mmHg, t = 2.495, P midazolam sedation, but respiratory depression is still a potential risk in the sufentanil regimen. PMID:26612286

  13. Dexmedetomidine-midazolam versus Sufentanil-midazolam for Awake Fiberoptic Nasotracheal Intubation: A Randomized Double-blind Study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cheng-Wen Li; Yan-Dong Li; Hai-Tao Tian; Xian-Gang Kong; Kui Chen

    2015-01-01

    Background: Awake fiberoptic intubation (AFOI) is usually performed in the management of the predicted difficult airway.The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of dexmedetomidine with midazolam (DM) and sufentanil with midazolam (SM) for sedation for awake fiberoptic nasotracheal intubation.Methods: Fifty patients with limited mouth opening scheduled for AFOI were randomly assigned to two groups (n =25 per group) by a computer-generated randomization schedule.All subjects received midazolam 0.02 mg/kg as premedication and airway topical anesthesia with a modified "spray-as-you-go" technique.Group DM received dexmedetomidine at a loading dose of 0.5 μg/kg over 10 min followed by a continuous infusion of 0.25 μg·kg-1 ·h-1, whereas Group SM received sufentanil at a loading dose of 0.2 μg/kg over 10 min followed by a continuous infusion of 0.1 μtg·kg-1·h-L As necessary, since the end of the administration of the loading dose of the study drug, an additional dose of midazolam 0.5 mg at 2-min intervals was given to achieve a modified Observers'Assessment of Alertness/Sedation of 2-3.The quality of intubation conditions and adverse events were observed.Results: The scores of ease of the AFOI procedure, patient's reaction during AFOI, coughing severity, tolerance after intubation, recall of the procedure and discomfort during the procedure were comparable in both groups (z =0.572, 0.664, 1.297, 0.467, 0.895, and 0.188, respectively, P > 0.05).Hypoxic episodes similarly occurred in the two groups, but the first partial pressure of end-tidal CO2 after intubation cwas higher in Group SM than that in Group DM (45.2 ± 4.2 mmHg vs.42.2 ± 4.3 mmHg, t =2.495, P < 0.05).Conclusions: Both dexmedetomidine and sufentanil are effective as an adjuvant forAFOI under airway topical anesthesia combined with midazolam sedation, but respiratory depression is still a potential risk in the sufentanil regimen.

  14. A naturalistic glyceryl trinitrate infusion migraine model in the rat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramachandran, Roshni; Bhatt, Deepak Kumar; Ploug, Kenneth Beri

    2012-01-01

    Glyceryl trinitrate (GTN) infusion is a reliable method to provoke migraine-like headaches in humans. Previous studies have simulated this human model in anaesthetized or in awake rodents using GTN doses 10,000 times higher than used in humans. The relevance of such toxicological doses to migraine...... is not certain. Anaesthesia and low blood pressure caused by high GTN doses both can affect the expression of nociceptive marker c-fos. Therefore, our aim was to simulate the human GTN migraine model in awake rats using a clinically relevant dose....

  15. Imaging circulating tumor cells in freely moving awake small animals using a miniaturized intravital microscope.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Sarah Sasportas

    Full Text Available Metastasis, the cause for 90% of cancer mortality, is a complex and poorly understood process involving the invasion of circulating tumor cells (CTCs into blood vessels. These cells have potential prognostic value as biomarkers for early metastatic risk. But their rarity and the lack of specificity and sensitivity in measuring them render their interrogation by current techniques very challenging. How and when these cells are circulating in the blood, on their way to potentially give rise to metastasis, is a question that remains largely unanswered. In order to provide an insight into this "black box" using non-invasive imaging, we developed a novel miniature intravital microscopy (mIVM strategy capable of real-time long-term monitoring of CTCs in awake small animals. We established an experimental 4T1-GL mouse model of metastatic breast cancer, in which tumor cells express both fluorescent and bioluminescent reporter genes to enable both single cell and whole body tumor imaging. Using mIVM, we monitored blood vessels of different diameters in awake mice in an experimental model of metastasis. Using an in-house software algorithm we developed, we demonstrated in vivo CTC enumeration and computation of CTC trajectory and speed. These data represent the first reported use we know of for a miniature mountable intravital microscopy setup for in vivo imaging of CTCs in awake animals.

  16. [Difficult Ventilation Requiring Emergency Endotracheal Intubation during Awake Craniotomy Managed by Laryngeal Mask Airway].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, Asako; Mizota, Toshiyuki; Tanaka, Tomoharu; Segawa, Hajime; Fukuda, Kazuhiko

    2016-04-01

    We report a case of difficult ventilation requiring emergency endotracheal intubation during awake craniotomy managed by laryngeal mask airway (LMA). A 45-year-old woman was scheduled to receive awake craniotomy for brain tumor in the frontal lobe. After anesthetic induction, airway was secured using ProSeal LMA and patient was mechanically ventilated in pressure-control mode. Patient's head was fixed with head-pins at anteflex position, and the operation started. About one hour after the start of the operation, tidal volume suddenly decreased. We immediately started manual ventilation, but the airway resistance was extremely high and we could not adequately ventilate the patient. We administered muscle relaxant for suspected laryngospasm, but ventilatory status did not improve; so we decided to conduct emergency endotracheal intubation. We tried to intubate using Airwayscope or LMA-Fastrach, but they were not effective in our case. Finally trachea was intubated using transnasal fiberoptic bronchoscopy. We discuss airway management during awake craniotomy, focusing on emergency endotracheal intubation during surgery.

  17. Auditory ERPs to stimulus deviance in an awake chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes: towards hominid cognitive neurosciences.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ari Ueno

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: For decades, the chimpanzee, phylogenetically closest to humans, has been analyzed intensively in comparative cognitive studies. Other than the accumulation of behavioral data, the neural basis for cognitive processing in the chimpanzee remains to be clarified. To increase our knowledge on the evolutionary and neural basis of human cognition, comparative neurophysiological studies exploring endogenous neural activities in the awake state are needed. However, to date, such studies have rarely been reported in non-human hominid species, due to the practical difficulties in conducting non-invasive measurements on awake individuals. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We measured auditory event-related potentials (ERPs of a fully awake chimpanzee, with reference to a well-documented component of human studies, namely mismatch negativity (MMN. In response to infrequent, deviant tones that were delivered in a uniform sound stream, a comparable ERP component could be detected as negative deflections in early latencies. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The present study reports the MMN-like component in a chimpanzee for the first time. In human studies, various ERP components, including MMN, are well-documented indicators of cognitive and neural processing. The results of the present study validate the use of non-invasive ERP measurements for studies on cognitive and neural processing in chimpanzees, and open the way for future studies comparing endogenous neural activities between humans and chimpanzees. This signifies an essential step in hominid cognitive neurosciences.

  18. Prospective pilot trial of dexmedetomidine sedation for awake diagnostic flexible bronchoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Keat; Orme, Ruari; Williams, Daryl; Segal, Reny

    2010-10-01

    Dexmedetomidine has the favorable properties of sedation, sympatholysis, analgesia, and a low risk of apnea. These properties suggest that dexmedetomidine may be useful in procedural sedation. In view of this, we conducted a pilot trial to determine the feasibility of using dexmedetomidine as a sole agent for providing sedation during awake diagnostic flexible bronchoscopy. Patients presenting for awake diagnostic flexible bronchoscopy consented to participate in a trial of dexmedetomidine sedation for the procedure. In addition to local anesthetic topicalization of the airways, dexmedetomidine was infused at 0.5 μg/kg over 10 minutes followed by an infusion of 0.2 to 0.7 μg/kg/h titrating to a Ramsay Sedation Scale score of 3. Hemodynamic parameters (heart rate, blood pressure), oxygenation status (pulse oximetry), adverse events, use of rescue sedation, and patient and proceduralist satisfaction were recorded during the trial. Five of 9 recruited patients required rescue sedation to allow the procedure to proceed. Dexmedetomidine as a sole agent at an infusion of 0.5 μg/kg over 10 minutes followed by an infusion of 0.2 to 0.7 μg/kg/h is unable to provide adequate sedation for awake diagnostic flexible bronchoscopy without the need for rescue sedation in a large proportion of patients.

  19. Laser pulse propagation in a meter scale rubidium vapor/plasma cell in AWAKE experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joulaei, A. [Max-Planck Institute for Physics, Munich (Germany); University of Mazandaran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Moody, J. [Max-Planck Institute for Physics, Munich (Germany); Berti, N.; Kasparian, J. [University of Geneva (Switzerland); Mirzanejhad, S. [University of Mazandaran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Muggli, P. [Max-Planck Institute for Physics, Munich (Germany)

    2016-09-01

    We present the results of numerical studies of laser pulse propagating in a 3.5 cm Rb vapor cell in the linear dispersion regime by using a 1D model and a 2D code that has been modified for our special case. The 2D simulation finally aimed at finding laser beam parameters suitable to make the Rb vapor fully ionized to obtain a uniform, 10 m-long, at least 1 mm in radius plasma in the next step for the AWAKE experiment. - Highlights: • Discussion the AWAKE plasma source based on photoionization of rubidium vapor with a TW/cm^2 Intensity laser with a spectrum across valence ground state transition resonances. • Examines the propagation of the AWAKE ionization laser through rubidium vapor at design density on a small scale and reduced intensity with a linear numerical model compared to experimental results. • Discusses physics of pulse propagation through the vapor at high intensity regime where strong ionization occurs within the laser pulse.

  20. Social ultrasonic vocalization in awake head-restrained mouse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Weiner

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Numerous animal species emit vocalizations in response to various social stimuli. The neural basis of vocal communication has been investigated in monkeys, songbirds, rats, bats and invertebrates resulting in deep insights into motor control, neural coding and learning. Mice, which recently became very popular as a model system for mammalian neuroscience, also utilize ultrasonic vocalizations (USVs during mating behavior. However, our knowledge is lacking of both the behavior and its underlying neural mechanism. We developed a novel method for head-restrained male mice (HRMM to interact with non-restrained female mice (NRFM and show that mice can emit USVs in this context. We first recorded USVs in free arena with non-restrained male mice (NRMM and NRFM. Of the NRMM, which vocalized in the free arena, the majority could be habituated to also vocalize while head-restrained but only when a female mouse was present in proximity. The USVs emitted by HRMM are similar to the USVs of NRMM in the presence of a female mouse in their spectral structure, inter syllable interval distribution and USV sequence length, and therefore are interpreted as social USVs. By analyzing vocalizations of NRMM, we established criteria to predict which individuals are likely to vocalize while head fixed based on the USV rate and average syllable duration. To characterize the USVs emitted by HRMM, we analyzed the syllable composition of HRMM and NRMM and found that USVs emitted by HRMM have higher proportions of USVs with complex spectral representation, supporting previous studies showing that mice social USVs are context dependent. Our results suggest a way to study the neural mechanisms of production and control of social vocalization in mice using advanced methods requiring head fixation.

  1. Screening for Cerebroprotective Agents Using an In Vivo Model of Cerebral Reversible Depolarization in Awake Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    her The thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) has been assistance with the manuscript; Miguel Perez- Pinzon postulated to be involved in the regulation...G, ed. London: Plenum, 1988: 9-21. 73. Sarkadi A, Szabo S, Laszy J, Ambrus A, Szporny L. Ef- 53. Sick TJ, Perez- Pinzon MA, Lutz P, Rosenthal M

  2. Global cerebral blood flow and metabolism during acute hyperketonemia in the awake and anesthetized rat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linde, Rasmus; Hasselbalch, Steen G.; Topp, Simon;

    2006-01-01

    In the human setting, it has been shown that acute increase in the concentration of ketone bodies by infusion of beta-hydroxybutyrate increased the cerebral blood flow (CBF) without affecting the overall cerebral metabolic activity. The mechanism by which this effect of ketone bodies was mediated...

  3. Fos expression in the NTS in response to peripheral chemoreflex activation in awake rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Josiane de Campos; Bonagamba, Leni G H; Stern, Javier E; Machado, Benedito H

    2010-01-15

    Chemoreflex afferent fibers terminate in the nucleus tractus solitarii (NTS), but the specific location of the NTS neurons excited by peripheral chemoreflex activation remains to be characterized. Here, the topographic distribution of chemoreflex sensitive cells at the commissural NTS was evaluated. To reach this goal, Fos-immunoreactive neurons (Fos-ir) were accounted in rostro-caudal levels of the intermediate and caudal commissural NTS, after intermittent chemoreflex activation with intravenous injection of potassium cyanide [KCN (80microg/kg) or saline (0.9%, vehicle), one injection every 3min during 30min]. In response to intermittent intravenous injections of KCN, a significant increase in the number of Fos-ir neurons was observed specifically in the lateral intermediate commissural NTS [(LI)NTS (82+/-9 vs. 174+/-16, cell number mean per section)] and lateral caudal commissural NTS [(LC)NTS (71+/-9 vs. 199+/-18, cell number mean per section)]. To evaluate the influence of baroreceptor-mediated inputs following the increase in blood pressure during intermittent chemoreflex activation, we performed an intermittent activation of the arterial baroreflex by intravenous injection of phenylephrine [1.5microg/kg iv (one injection every 3min during 30min)]. This procedure induced no change in Fos-ir in (LI)NTS (64+/-6 vs. 62+/-12, cell number mean per section) or (LC)NTS (56+/-15 vs. 77+/-12, cell number mean per section). These data support the involvement of the commissural NTS in the processing of peripheral chemoreflex, and provide a detailed characterization of the topographical distribution of activated neurons within this brain region.

  4. Spared nerve injury rats exhibit thermal hyperalgesia on an automated operant dynamic thermal escape Task

    OpenAIRE

    Chialvo Dante R; Calvo Oscar; Baliki Marwan; Apkarian A Vania

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Well-established methods are available to measure thermal and mechanical sensitivity in awake behaving rats. However, they require experimenter manipulations and tend to emphasize reflexive behaviors. Here we introduce a new behavioral test, with which we examine thermal sensitivity of rats with neuropathic injury. We contrast thermal hyperalgesia between spared nerve injury and chronic constriction injury rats. This device is a fully automated thermal sensitivity assessment tool des...

  5. MATLAB-based automated patch-clamp system for awake behaving mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Niraj S; Siegel, Jennifer J; Taylor, William; Chitwood, Raymond A; Johnston, Daniel

    2015-08-01

    Automation has been an important part of biomedical research for decades, and the use of automated and robotic systems is now standard for such tasks as DNA sequencing, microfluidics, and high-throughput screening. Recently, Kodandaramaiah and colleagues (Nat Methods 9: 585-587, 2012) demonstrated, using anesthetized animals, the feasibility of automating blind patch-clamp recordings in vivo. Blind patch is a good target for automation because it is a complex yet highly stereotyped process that revolves around analysis of a single signal (electrode impedance) and movement along a single axis. Here, we introduce an automated system for blind patch-clamp recordings from awake, head-fixed mice running on a wheel. In its design, we were guided by 3 requirements: easy-to-use and easy-to-modify software; seamless integration of behavioral equipment; and efficient use of time. The resulting system employs equipment that is standard for patch recording rigs, moderately priced, or simple to make. It is written entirely in MATLAB, a programming environment that has an enormous user base in the neuroscience community and many available resources for analysis and instrument control. Using this system, we obtained 19 whole cell patch recordings from neurons in the prefrontal cortex of awake mice, aged 8-9 wk. Successful recordings had series resistances that averaged 52 ± 4 MΩ and required 5.7 ± 0.6 attempts to obtain. These numbers are comparable with those of experienced electrophysiologists working manually, and this system, written in a simple and familiar language, will be useful to many cellular electrophysiologists who wish to study awake behaving mice.

  6. Methemoglobinemia induced by exposure to topical benzocaine for an awake nasal intubation--a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shih-Kai; Wu, Ji-Leih; Lee, Yung-Lung; Tsao, Shao-Lun

    2007-06-01

    Topical benzocaine and lidocaine are widely used in general anesthesia to minimize the stimulation by awake intubation and in very rare occasion they may induce methemoglobinemia. Although this complication is uncommon, it may be potentially lethal. Here we report a 29-year-old female who was scheduled to receive correction of malocclusion and developed acute methemoglobinemia soon after induction of general anesthesia. Three weeks ago, she had received open reduction for fracture of mandible with intermaxillary fixation under general anesthesia, for which awake fiberoptic intubation was smoothly performed after premedication with 2% topical lidocaine and intravenous fentanyl. This time, trachomucosal block with 4 mL of 4% topical lidocaine and spray of 20% topical benzocaine over the oral cavity and nostrils were carried out before intubation. Awake blind intubation was performed because she could not open her mouth for more than 1 cm. A 6.5 mm-sized nasal endotracheal tube was smoothly placed in first attempt. About 10 min later, an unexplained cyanosis occurred and SpO2 fell to about 70%. Based on a high oxygen tension by arterial blood gas analysis (PaO2) with a contradictory fall of oxygen saturation by pulse oximetry (SpO2), acute methemoglobinemia was highly suspected. The diagnosis was confirmed by multiple-wavelength CO-oximetry. The methemoglobinemia was resolved gradually after methylene blue was given. In conclusion, we must always take the possibility of methemoglobinemia into consideration for differential diagnosis in case of unexplained cyanosis, particularly when patients have prior exposure to methemoglobin-inducing agents.

  7. Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexey Kondrashov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We aimed to perform a chemical analysis of both Alibernet red wine and an alcohol-free Alibernet red wine extract (AWE and to investigate the effects of AWE on nitric oxide and reactive oxygen species production as well as blood pressure development in normotensive Wistar Kyoto (WKY and spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs. Total antioxidant capacity together with total phenolic and selected mineral content was measured in wine and AWE. Young 6-week-old male WKY and SHR were treated with AWE (24,2 mg/kg/day for 3 weeks. Total NOS and SOD activities, eNOS and SOD1 protein expressions, and superoxide production were determined in the tissues. Both antioxidant capacity and phenolic content were significantly higher in AWE compared to wine. The AWE increased NOS activity in the left ventricle, aorta, and kidney of SHR, while it did not change NOS activity in WKY rats. Similarly, increased SOD activity in the plasma and left ventricle was observed in SHR only. There were no changes in eNOS and SOD1 expressions. In conclusion, phenolics and minerals included in AWE may contribute directly to increased NOS and SOD activities of SHR. Nevertheless, 3 weeks of AWE treatment failed to affect blood pressure of SHR.

  8. Laser pulse propagation in a meter scale rubidium vapor/plasma cell in AWAKE experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joulaei, A.; Moody, J.; Berti, N.; Kasparian, J.; Mirzanejhad, S.; Muggli, P.

    2016-09-01

    We present the results of numerical studies of laser pulse propagating in a 3.5 cm Rb vapor cell in the linear dispersion regime by using a 1D model and a 2D code that has been modified for our special case. The 2D simulation finally aimed at finding laser beam parameters suitable to make the Rb vapor fully ionized to obtain a uniform, 10 m-long, at least 1 mm in radius plasma in the next step for the AWAKE experiment.

  9. Laser pulse propagation in a meter scale rubidium vapor/plasma cell in AWAKE experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Joulaei, Atefeh; Berti, Nicolas; Kasparian, Jerome; Mirzanejhad, Saeed; Muggli, Patric

    2016-01-01

    We present the results of numerical studies of laser pulse propagating in a 3.5 cm Rb vapor cell in the linear dispersion regime by using a 1D model and a 2D code that has been modified for our special case. The 2D simulation finally aimed at finding laser beam parameters suitable to make the Rb vapor fully ionized to obtain a uniform, 10 m-long, at least 1 mm in radius plasma in the next step for the AWAKE experiment.

  10. Methemoglobinemia with the use of benzocaine spray for awake fiberoptic intubation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Aziz, Samer; Hashmi, Nazish; Khan, Sabina; Ismaeil, Mohamed

    2013-10-01

    We report a case in which the use of benzocaine spray to facilitate awake fiber optic intubation (FOI) in a patient with a difficult airway caused methemoglobinemia intraoperatively. Local benzocaine was sprayed to numb the patient's airway for a total time of one second, fifteen minutes later SpO2 decreased to 85% on the pulse oximeter. Arterial blood gas (ABG) showed a MetHb of 24.6% of total Hemoglobin. The patient was successfully treated with methylene blue intravenously and recovered uneventfully. Small amounts of local benzocaine sprayed to numb the airway can cause significant methemoglobinemia that requires immediate recognition and appropriate management.

  11. Acute functional reactivation of the language network during awake intraoperative brain mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spena, Giannantonio; Costi, Emanuele; Panciani, Pier Paolo; Roca, Elena; Migliorati, Karol; Fontanella, Marco Maria

    2015-01-01

    Acute brain plasticity during resection of central lesions has been recently described. In the cases reported, perilesional latent networks, useful to preserve the neurological functions, were detected in asymptomatic patients. In this paper, we presented a case of acute functional reactivation (AFR) of the language network in a symptomatic patient. Tumor resection allowed to acutely restore the neurological deficit. Intraoperative direct cortical stimulation (DCS) and functional neuroimaging showed new epicentres of activation of the language network after tumor excision. DCS in awake surgery is mandatory to reveal AFR needful to improve the extent of resection preserving the quality of life.

  12. Cost analysis of awake versus asleep deep brain stimulation: a single academic health center experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, R Lorie; Geddes, Jonah; McCartney, Shirley; Burchiel, Kim J

    2016-05-01

    OBJECT The objective of this study was to compare the cost of deep brain stimulation (DBS) performed awake versus asleep at a single US academic health center and to compare costs across the University HealthSystem Consortium (UHC) Clinical Database. METHODS Inpatient and outpatient demographic and hospital financial data for patients receiving a neurostimulator lead implant (from the first quarter of 2009 to the second quarter of 2014) were collected and analyzed. Inpatient charges included those associated with International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision (ICD-9) procedure code 0293 (implantation or replacement of intracranial neurostimulator lead). Outpatient charges included all preoperative charges ≤ 30 days prior to implant and all postoperative charges ≤ 30 days after implant. The cost of care based on reported charges and a cost-to-charge ratio was estimated. The UHC database was queried (January 2011 to March 2014) with the same ICD-9 code. Procedure cost data across like hospitals (27 UHC hospitals) conducting similar DBS procedures were compared. RESULTS Two hundred eleven DBS procedures (53 awake and 158 asleep) were performed at a single US academic health center during the study period. The average patient age ( ± SD) was 65 ± 9 years old and 39% of patients were female. The most common primary diagnosis was Parkinson's disease (61.1%) followed by essential and other forms of tremor (36%). Overall average DBS procedure cost was $39,152 ± $5340. Asleep DBS cost $38,850 ± $4830, which was not significantly different than the awake DBS cost of $40,052 ± $6604. The standard deviation for asleep DBS was significantly lower (p ≤ 0.05). In 2013, the median cost for a neurostimulator implant lead was $34,052 at UHC-affiliated hospitals that performed at least 5 procedures a year. At Oregon Health & Science University, the median cost was $17,150 and the observed single academic health center cost for a neurostimulator lead implant was

  13. Case Report: Emergency awake craniotomy for cerebral abscess in a patient with unrepaired cyanotic congenital heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fassl, Jens; Tobler, Daniel; Zumofen, Daniel; Steiner, Luzius A.; Goettel, Nicolai

    2017-01-01

    We report the case of a 39-year-old male with complex cyanotic congenital heart disease undergoing emergency craniotomy for a cerebral abscess. Maintenance of intraoperative hemodynamic stability and adequate tissue oxygenation during anesthesia may be challenging in patients with cyanotic congenital heart disease. In this case, we decided to perform the surgery as an awake craniotomy after interdisciplinary consensus. We discuss general aspects of anesthetic management during awake craniotomy and specific concerns in the perioperative care of patients with congenital heart disease. PMID:27928498

  14. Awake and unable to move: what can perioperative practitioners do to avoid accidental awareness under general anaesthesia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, D

    2015-12-01

    I thought the last thing I would remember about my surgery was counting up to 10 ... but that didn't happen... I could hear people talking, instruments banging, the sound of my heart beat coming from the anaesthetic machine and all of a sudden, that horrible pain digging inside my body. Oh my God! I thought. I'm awake! I tried to tell someone but no sound came out of my mouth. I tried to kick my legs, shake my arms, blink, breathe... Nothing!! I couldn't move a muscle. I was paralysed and awake during my operation... I thought I was going to die!!!

  15. Association of Awake Bruxism with Khat, Coffee, Tobacco, and Stress among Jazan University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quadri, Mir Faeq Ali; Mahnashi, Ali; Al Almutahhir, Ayman; Tubayqi, Hamzah; Hakami, Abdullah; Arishi, Mohamed; Alamir, Abdulwahab

    2015-01-01

    Objective. The objective is to assess the prevalence of bruxism among the university students and to check its association with their khat chewing habit. Materials and Methods. A cross-sectional descriptive study is designed using cluster random sampling. Pretested questionnaire was administered by a trained interviewer to assess awake bruxism and the use of variables like khat, coffee, tobacco, and stress. Chi-square test at 5% significance was used for assessing the association. Logistic regression was also performed after adjusting for covariates. Results. A high response rate (95%) was obtained as the distribution and collection of questionnaire was within an hour interval. 85% (63%, males; 22%, females) experienced an episode of bruxism at least one time in the past six months. Regression analysis revealed an association of stress (P = 0.00; OR = 5.902, 95% CI 2.614–13.325) and khat use (P = 0.05; OR = 1.629, 95% CI 0.360–7.368) with bruxism. Interestingly, it is observed that the one who chew khat experienced 3.56 times (95% CI; 2.62–11.22) less pain when compared to the nonusers. Conclusion. This study is the first of its kind to assess the association of bruxism with khat chewing. High amount of stress and khat use can be considered as important risk indicators for awake bruxism. PMID:26491448

  16. Association of Awake Bruxism with Khat, Coffee, Tobacco, and Stress among Jazan University Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mir Faeq Ali Quadri

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The objective is to assess the prevalence of bruxism among the university students and to check its association with their khat chewing habit. Materials and Methods. A cross-sectional descriptive study is designed using cluster random sampling. Pretested questionnaire was administered by a trained interviewer to assess awake bruxism and the use of variables like khat, coffee, tobacco, and stress. Chi-square test at 5% significance was used for assessing the association. Logistic regression was also performed after adjusting for covariates. Results. A high response rate (95% was obtained as the distribution and collection of questionnaire was within an hour interval. 85% (63%, males; 22%, females experienced an episode of bruxism at least one time in the past six months. Regression analysis revealed an association of stress (P=0.00; OR = 5.902, 95% CI 2.614–13.325 and khat use (P=0.05; OR = 1.629, 95% CI 0.360–7.368 with bruxism. Interestingly, it is observed that the one who chew khat experienced 3.56 times (95% CI; 2.62–11.22 less pain when compared to the nonusers. Conclusion. This study is the first of its kind to assess the association of bruxism with khat chewing. High amount of stress and khat use can be considered as important risk indicators for awake bruxism.

  17. Disrupting neural activity related to awake-state sharp wave-ripple complexes prevents hippocampal learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miriam Shirin Nokia

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Oscillations in hippocampal local-field potentials reflect the crucial involvement of the hippocampus in memory trace formation: theta (4-8 Hz oscillations and ripples (~200 Hz occurring during sharp waves are thought to mediate encoding and consolidation, respectively. During sharp wave-ripple complexes (SPW-Rs, hippocampal cell firing closely follows the pattern that took place during the initial experience, most likely reflecting replay of that event. Disrupting hippocampal ripples using electrical stimulation either during training in awake animals or during sleep after training retards spatial learning. Here, adult rabbits were trained in trace eyeblink conditioning, a hippocampus-dependent associative learning task. A bright light was presented to the animals during the inter-trial interval, when awake, either during SPW-Rs or irrespective of their neural state. Learning was particularly poor when the light was presented following SPW-Rs. While the light did not disrupt the ripple itself, it elicited a theta-band oscillation, a state that does not usually coincide with SPW-Rs. Thus, it seems that consolidation depends on neuronal activity within and beyond the hippocampus taking place immediately after, but by no means limited to, hippocampal SPW-Rs.

  18. Awake fi beroptic intubation of a patient with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elif Bakı

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis is a rapidly progressive disease from the fi fth to sixth decades of life causing degeneration and death of the upper and lower motor neurons and no effective treatment. The diagnosis isdependent on the clinical presentation and consistent electrodiagnostic studies. Progressive denervation affects the muscles, causing muscular weakness and atrophy, when the ventilation muscles are affected deathdue to respiratory failure occurs within a few years. We present the case of a 54 years old, 180 cm height and 94 kg weight male patient with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis who underwent surgical treatment of thyroidcancer. Fiberoptic intubation was orally performed providing spontaneus breathing. Propofol was applied after passing vocal cords. Anesthesia was maintained with sevofl orane (%2 and a mixture of oxygen and airunder volume controlled ventilation. Rocuronium was used 20 mg at the beginning of the surgery. At the end of surgery, he wasn’t extubated and transferred to anesthesia intensive care unit. He was extubated after tenhours and he was awaked perfectly. The patient was discharged from intensive care unit after 24 hours and from hospital after ten days. We reported that amyotrophic lateral sclerosis patient with limited mouth opening who underwent thyroid surgery, using awake intubation.

  19. Indirect Self-Modulation Instability Measurement Concept for the AWAKE Proton Beam

    CERN Document Server

    Turner, M; Biskup, B; Burger, S; Gschwendtner, E; Lotov, K V; Mazzoni, S; Vincke, H

    2016-01-01

    AWAKE, the Advanced Proton-Driven Plasma Wakefield Acceleration Experiment, is a proof-of-principle R&D experiment at CERN using a 400 GeV/c proton beam from the CERN SPS (longitudinal beam size sigma_z = 12 mm) which will be sent into a 10 m long plasma section with a nominal density of approx. 7x10^14 atoms/cm3 (plasma wavelength lambda_p = 1.2mm). In this paper we show that by measuring the time integrated transverse profile of the proton bunch at two locations downstream of the AWAKE plasma, information about the occurrence of the self-modulation instability (SMI) can be inferred. In particular we show that measuring defocused protons with an angle of 1 mrad corresponds to having electric fields in the order of GV/m and fully developed self-modulation of the proton bunch. Additionally, by measuring the defocused beam edge of the self-modulated bunch, information about the growth rate of the instability can be extracted. If hosing instability occurs, it could be detected by measuring a non-uniform defo...

  20. Response Patterns of GABAergic Neurons in the Anterior Piriform Cortex of Awake Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Rongfeng; Zhang, Juen; Luo, Minmin; Hu, Ji

    2016-06-01

    Local inhibition by γ-amino butyric acid (GABA)-containing neurons is of vital importance for the operation of sensory cortices. However, the physiological response patterns of cortical GABAergic neurons are poorly understood, especially in the awake condition. Here, we utilized the recently developed optical tagging technique to specifically record GABAergic neurons in the anterior piriform cortex (aPC) in awake mice. The identified aPC GABAergic neurons were stimulated with robotic delivery of 32 distinct odorants, which covered a broad range of functional groups. We found that aPC GABAergic neurons could be divided into 4 types based on their response patterns. Type I, type II, and type III neurons displayed broad excitatory responses to test odorants with different dynamics. Type I neurons were constantly activated during odorant stimulation, whereas type II neurons were only transiently activated at the onset of odorant delivery. In addition, type III neurons displayed transient excitatory responses both at the onset and termination of odorant presentation. Interestingly, type IV neurons were broadly inhibited by most of the odorants. Taken together, aPC GABAergic neurons adopt different strategies to affect the cortical circuitry. Our results will allow for better understanding of the role of cortical GABAergic interneurons in sensory information processing.

  1. Status of the proton and electron transfer lines for the AWAKE Experiment at CERN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, J.S., E-mail: janet.schmidt@cern.ch [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Bauche, J. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Biskup, B. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Czech Technical University, Prague (Czech Republic); Bracco, C.; Doebert, S.; Goddard, B.; Gschwendtner, E.; Jensen, L.K.; Jones, O.R.; Mazzoni, S.; Meddahi, M.; Pepitone, K.; Petrenko, A.; Velotti, F.M.; Vorozhtsov, A. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland)

    2016-09-01

    The AWAKE project at CERN is planned to study proton driven plasma wakefield acceleration with an externally injected electron beam. Therefore two transfer lines are being designed in order to provide the proton beam from the SPS and the electron beam from an RF gun to the plasma cell. The commissioning of the proton line will take place in 2016 for the first phase of the experiment, which is focused on the self-modulation of a 12 cm long proton bunch in the plasma. The electron line will be added for the second phase of AWAKE in 2017, when the wakefield will be probed with an electron beam of 10–20 MeV/c. The challenge for these transfer lines lies in the parallel operation of the proton, electron and laser beam used to ionize the plasma and seed the self-modulation. These beams, of different characteristics, need to be synchronized and positioned for optimized injection conditions into the wakefield. This task requires great flexibility in the transfer line optics. The status of these designs will be presented in this paper.

  2. Status of the proton and electron transfer lines for the AWAKE Experiment at CERN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, J. S.; Bauche, J.; Biskup, B.; Bracco, C.; Doebert, S.; Goddard, B.; Gschwendtner, E.; Jensen, L. K.; Jones, O. R.; Mazzoni, S.; Meddahi, M.; Pepitone, K.; Petrenko, A.; Velotti, F. M.; Vorozhtsov, A.

    2016-09-01

    The AWAKE project at CERN is planned to study proton driven plasma wakefield acceleration with an externally injected electron beam. Therefore two transfer lines are being designed in order to provide the proton beam from the SPS and the electron beam from an RF gun to the plasma cell. The commissioning of the proton line will take place in 2016 for the first phase of the experiment, which is focused on the self-modulation of a 12 cm long proton bunch in the plasma. The electron line will be added for the second phase of AWAKE in 2017, when the wakefield will be probed with an electron beam of 10-20 MeV/c. The challenge for these transfer lines lies in the parallel operation of the proton, electron and laser beam used to ionize the plasma and seed the self-modulation. These beams, of different characteristics, need to be synchronized and positioned for optimized injection conditions into the wakefield. This task requires great flexibility in the transfer line optics. The status of these designs will be presented in this paper.

  3. The stimulus-evoked population response in visual cortex of awake monkey is a propagating wave.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, Lyle; Reynaud, Alexandre; Chavane, Frédéric; Destexhe, Alain

    2014-04-28

    Propagating waves occur in many excitable media and were recently found in neural systems from retina to neocortex. While propagating waves are clearly present under anaesthesia, whether they also appear during awake and conscious states remains unclear. One possibility is that these waves are systematically missed in trial-averaged data, due to variability. Here we present a method for detecting propagating waves in noisy multichannel recordings. Applying this method to single-trial voltage-sensitive dye imaging data, we show that the stimulus-evoked population response in primary visual cortex of the awake monkey propagates as a travelling wave, with consistent dynamics across trials. A network model suggests that this reliability is the hallmark of the horizontal fibre network of superficial cortical layers. Propagating waves with similar properties occur independently in secondary visual cortex, but maintain precise phase relations with the waves in primary visual cortex. These results show that, in response to a visual stimulus, propagating waves are systematically evoked in several visual areas, generating a consistent spatiotemporal frame for further neuronal interactions.

  4. A novel tablet computer platform for advanced language mapping during awake craniotomy procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Melanie A; Tam, Fred; Garavaglia, Marco M; Golestanirad, Laleh; Hare, Gregory M T; Cusimano, Michael D; Schweizer, Tom A; Das, Sunit; Graham, Simon J

    2016-04-01

    A computerized platform has been developed to enhance behavioral testing during intraoperative language mapping in awake craniotomy procedures. The system is uniquely compatible with the environmental demands of both the operating room and preoperative functional MRI (fMRI), thus providing standardized testing toward improving spatial agreement between the 2 brain mapping techniques. Details of the platform architecture, its advantages over traditional testing methods, and its use for language mapping are described. Four illustrative cases demonstrate the efficacy of using the testing platform to administer sophisticated language paradigms, and the spatial agreement between intraoperative mapping and preoperative fMRI results. The testing platform substantially improved the ability of the surgeon to detect and characterize language deficits. Use of a written word generation task to assess language production helped confirm areas of speech apraxia and speech arrest that were inadequately characterized or missed with the use of traditional paradigms, respectively. Preoperative fMRI of the analogous writing task was also assistive, displaying excellent spatial agreement with intraoperative mapping in all 4 cases. Sole use of traditional testing paradigms can be limiting during awake craniotomy procedures. Comprehensive assessment of language function will require additional use of more sophisticated and ecologically valid testing paradigms. The platform presented here provides a means to do so.

  5. Membrane Potential Dynamics of Spontaneous and Visually Evoked Gamma Activity in V1 of Awake Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quentin Perrenoud

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Cortical gamma activity (30-80 Hz is believed to play important functions in neural computation and arises from the interplay of parvalbumin-expressing interneurons (PV and pyramidal cells (PYRs. However, the subthreshold dynamics underlying its emergence in the cortex of awake animals remain unclear. Here, we characterized the intracellular dynamics of PVs and PYRs during spontaneous and visually evoked gamma activity in layers 2/3 of V1 of awake mice using targeted patch-clamp recordings and synchronous local field potentials (LFPs. Strong gamma activity patterned in short bouts (one to three cycles, occurred when PVs and PYRs were depolarizing and entrained their membrane potential dynamics regardless of the presence of visual stimulation. PV firing phase locked unconditionally to gamma activity. However, PYRs only phase locked to visually evoked gamma bouts. Taken together, our results indicate that gamma activity corresponds to short pulses of correlated background synaptic activity synchronizing the output of cortical neurons depending on external sensory drive.

  6. Intact skull chronic windows for mesoscopic wide-field imaging in awake mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silasi, Gergely; Xiao, Dongsheng; Vanni, Matthieu P.; Chen, Andrew C. N.; Murphy, Timothy H.

    2016-01-01

    Background Craniotomy-based window implants are commonly used for microscopic imaging, in head-fixed rodents, however their field of view is typically small and incompatible with mesoscopic functional mapping of cortex. New Method We describe a reproducible and simple procedure for chronic through-bone wide-field imaging in awake head-fixed mice providing stable optical access for chronic imaging over large areas of the cortex for months. Results The preparation is produced by applying clear-drying dental cement to the intact mouse skull, followed by a glass coverslip to create a partially transparent imaging surface. Surgery time takes about 30 minutes. A single set-screw provides a stable means of attachment for mesoscale assessment without obscuring the cortical field of view. Comparison with Existing Methods We demonstrate the utility of this method by showing seed-pixel functional connectivity maps generated from spontaneous cortical activity of GCAMP6 signals in both awake and anesthetized mice. Conclusions We propose that the intact skull preparation described here may be used for most longitudinal studies that do not require micron scale resolution and where cortical neural or vascular signals are recorded with intrinsic sensors. PMID:27102043

  7. Does Global Astrocytic Calcium Signaling Participate in Awake Brain State Transitions and Neuronal Circuit Function?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjaerby, Celia; Rasmussen, Rune; Andersen, Mie; Nedergaard, Maiken

    2017-02-16

    We continuously need to adapt to changing conditions within our surrounding environment, and our brain needs to quickly shift between resting and working activity states in order to allow appropriate behaviors. These global state shifts are intimately linked to the brain-wide release of the neuromodulators, noradrenaline and acetylcholine. Astrocytes have emerged as a new player participating in the regulation of brain activity, and have recently been implicated in brain state shifts. Astrocytes display global Ca(2+) signaling in response to activation of the noradrenergic system, but whether astrocytic Ca(2+) signaling is causative or correlative for shifts in brain state and neural activity patterns is not known. Here we review the current available literature on astrocytic Ca(2+) signaling in awake animals in order to explore the role of astrocytic signaling in brain state shifts. Furthermore, we look at the development and availability of innovative new methodological tools that are opening up for new ways of visualizing and perturbing astrocyte activity in awake behaving animals. With these new tools at hand, the field of astrocyte research will likely be able to elucidate the causal and mechanistic roles of astrocytes in complex behaviors within a very near future.

  8. [Perioperative management of an obese patient complicated with sleep apnea syndrome (SAS) undergoing awake craniotomy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komayama, Noriaki; Kamata, Kotoe; Maruyama, Takashi; Nitta, Masayuki; Muragaki, Yoshihiro; Ozaki, Makoto

    2014-10-01

    Both obesity (BMI over 30) and SAS are risks for Supper airway maintenance. We report an obese patient (BMI 33.5) with SAS who underwent awake craniotomy. Weight reduction was instructed 1 month before the operation, and the patient lost enough weight to use intraoperative MRI. Under general anesthesia, surgical pads containing 2% lidocaine with adrenaline were inserted into the nasal cavities. The patient's airway S was secured by i-gel® until dura was opened. A nasal airway was then inserted to confirm the upper airway patency and anesthetics were terminated The patient regained consciousness and started respiration. The i-gel® was removed. The nasal airway was changed to an RAE tracheal tube ; the tube was fixed above the vocal cords under bronchofiberscopic observation. Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) via RAE tube was started. Neither coughing nor epistaxis was observed.The RAE tube prevented glossoptosis and did not disturb speech mapping. Emergent endotracheal intubation was easily managed because the tube was close to the glottis. The RAE tube was removed and nasal CP AP was applied overnight Carefully prepared CP AP support via nasal RAE tube was practical in keeping upper airway patency for an obese patient complicated with SAS undergoing awake craniotomy.

  9. Achieving Standardization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henningsson, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    competitive, national customs and regional economic organizations are seeking to establish a standardized solution for digital reporting of customs data. However, standardization has proven hard to achieve in the socio-technical e-Customs solution. In this chapter, the authors identify and describe what has...

  10. Achieving Standardization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henningsson, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    competitive, national customs and regional economic organizations are seeking to establish a standardized solution for digital reporting of customs data. However, standardization has proven hard to achieve in the socio-technical e-Customs solution. In this chapter, the authors identify and describe what has...

  11. Liquid chromatography coupled with multi-channel electrochemical detection for the determination of daidzin in rat blood sampled by an automated blood sampling system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Feifei; Zhu, Yongxin; Long, Hong; Cregor, Meloney; Xie, Fuming; Kissinger, Candice B; Kissinger, Peter T

    2002-05-25

    Daidzin, a soy-derived biologically active natural product, has been reported to inhibit mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase and suppress ethanol intake. This paper describes a method for the determination of daidzin in rat blood. After administration of daidzin, blood samples were periodically collected from awake, freely moving animals by a Culex automated blood sampler. Daidzin was extracted from 50 microl of diluted blood (blood and saline at a ratio of 1:1) with ethyl acetate. Chromatographic separation was achieved within 12 min using a microbore C(18) (100 x 1.0 mm) 3 microm column with a mobile phase containing 20 mM sodium acetate, 0.25 mM EDTA, pH 4.3, 4% methanol and 11% acetonitrile at a flow-rate of 90 microl/min. Detection was attained using a four-channel electrochemical detector with glassy carbon electrodes using oxidation potentials of +1100, 950, 850, 750 mV vs. Ag/AgCl. The limit of detection for daidzin in rat plasma was 5 ng/ml at a signal-to-noise ratio of 3:1. The extraction recovery of daidzin from rat plasma was over 74%. Linearity was obtained for the range of 25-1000 ng/ml. The intra- and inter-assay precisions were in the ranges of 2.7-6.6 and 1.9-3.7%, respectively. This method is suitable to routine in vivo monitoring of daidzin in rat plasma.

  12. A VEP study in sleeping and awake one-month-old infants and its relation with social behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Sara; Crego, Alberto; Ribeiro, Eugénia; Gonçalves, Óscar; Sampaio, Adriana

    2015-04-01

    With the present study we aimed to analyze the relationship between infants' behavior and their visual evoked-potential (VEPs) response. Specifically, we want to verify differences regarding the VEP response in sleeping and awake infants and if an association between VEP components, in both groups, with neurobehavioral outcome could be identified. To do so, thirty-two full-term and healthy infants, approximately 1-month of age, were assessed through a VEP unpatterned flashlight stimuli paradigm, offered in two different intensities, and were assessed using a neurobehavioral scale. However, only 18 infants have both assessments, and therefore, these is the total included in both analysis. Infants displayed a mature neurobehavioral outcome, expected for their age. We observed that P2 and N3 components were present in both sleeping and awake infants. Differences between intensities were found regarding the P2 amplitude, but only in awake infants. Regression analysis showed that N3 amplitude predicted an adequate social interactive and internal regulatory behavior in infants who were awake during the stimuli presentation. Taking into account that social orientation and regulatory behaviors are fundamental keys for social-like behavior in 1-month-old infants, this study provides an important approach for assessing physiological biomarkers (VEPs) and its relation with social behavior, very early in postnatal development. Moreover, we evidence the importance of the infant's state when studying differences regarding visual threshold processing and its association with behavioral outcome.

  13. NCOG-06. Usability and validity of a phone battery to assess language functions in brain tumor patients undergoing awake surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Witte, E. de; Piai, V.; Dronkers, N.F.; Berger, M.S.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: A wake surgery in eloquent brain regions is performed to preserve language functions. Although in general no major permanent language deficits are found after awake brain surgery, clinically relevant impairments are detected (Satoer et al., 2014). Unfortunately, follow-up of tum

  14. Laser speckle imaging identification of increases in cortical microcirculatory blood flow induced by motor activity during awake craniotomy ; Clinical article

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. Klijn (Elko); M.E.J.L. Hulscher (Marlies); R.K. Balvers (Rutger); W.P.J. Holland (Wim); J. Bakker (Jan); A.J.P.E. Vincent (Arnoud); C.M.F. Dirven (Clemens); C. Ince (Can)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractObject. The goal of awake neurosurgery is to maximize resection of brain lesions with minimal injury to functional brain areas. Laser speckle imaging (LSI) is a noninvasive macroscopic technique with high spatial and temporal resolution used to monitor changes in capillary perfusion. In

  15. REAL-TIME MEASUREMENT OF AIRWAY RESPONSES TO SULOFUR DIOXIDE (SO2) IN AN INTACT, AWAKE GUINEA PIG MODEL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Real-time measurment of airway responses to Sulfur Dioxide (SO2) in an intact, awake guinea pig model. J Stanek1,2, Q Krantz2, J Nolan2, D Winsett2, W Watkinson2, and D Costa2. 1College of Veterinary Medicine, NCSU, Raleigh, NC, USA; 2Pulmonary Toxicology Branch, ETD, NHEERL, US...

  16. Measurement of lung function in awake 2-4-year-old asthmatic children during methacholine challenge and acute asthma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klug, B; Bisgaard, H

    1996-01-01

    This study evaluated three techniques for testing of lung function in young awake children. We compared measurements by the forced or impulse oscillation technique (IOS), the interrupter technique (IT), and transcutaneous measurements of oxygen (tcPo2) with concomitant measurements of specific...

  17. A Comparison of Visual Response Properties in the Lateral Geniculate Nucleus and Primary Visual Cortex of Awake and Anesthetized Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durand, Séverine; Iyer, Ramakrishnan; Mizuseki, Kenji; de Vries, Saskia; Mihalas, Stefan; Reid, R Clay

    2016-11-30

    The cerebral cortex of the mouse has become one of the most important systems for studying information processing and the neural correlates of behavior. Multiple studies have examined the first stages of visual cortical processing: primary visual cortex (V1) and its thalamic inputs from the dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus (dLGN), but more rarely in the lateral posterior nucleus (LP) in mice. Multiple single-unit surveys of dLGN and V1, both with electrophysiology and two-photon calcium imaging, have described receptive fields in anesthetized animals. Increasingly, awake animals are being used in physiological studies, so it is important to compare neuronal responses between awake and anesthetized state. We have performed a comprehensive survey of spatial and temporal response properties in V1, dLGN, and lateral posterior nucleus of both anesthetized and awake animals, using a common set of stimuli: drifting sine-wave gratings spanning a broad range of spatial and temporal parameters, and sparse noise stimuli consisting of flashed light and dark squares. Most qualitative receptive field parameters were found to be unchanged between the two states, such as most aspects of spatial processing, but there were significant differences in several parameters, most notably in temporal processing. Compared with anesthetized animals, the temporal frequency that evoked the peak response was shifted toward higher values in the dLGN of awake mice and responses were more sustained. Further, the peak response to a flashed stimulus was earlier in all three areas. Overall, however, receptive field properties in the anesthetized animal remain a good model for those in the awake animal.

  18. Classifying Multiple Types of Hand Motions Using Electrocorticography During Intraoperative Awake Craniotomy & Seizure Monitoring Processes - Case Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao eXie

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In this work, some case studies were conducted toclassify several kinds of hand motions from electrocorticography(ECoG signals during intraoperative awake craniotomy &extraoperative seizure monitoring processes. Four subjects (P1,P2 with intractable epilepsy during seizure monitoring and P3,P4 with brain tumor during awake craniotomy participatedin the experiments. Subjects performed three types of handmotions (Grasp, Thumb-finger motion and Index-finger motioncontralateral to the motor cortex covered with ECoG electrodes.Two methods were used for signal processing. Method I:autoregressive (AR model with burg method was applied toextract features, and additional waveform length (WL featurehas been considered, finally the linear discriminative analysis(LDA was used as the classifier. Method II: stationary subspaceanalysis (SSA was applied for data preprocessing, and thecommon spatial pattern (CSP was used for feature extractionbefore LDA decoding process. Applying method I, the threeclassaccuracy of P1□P4 were 90.17%, 96.00%, 91.77% and92.95% respectively. For method II, the three-class accuracy ofP1□P4 were 72.00%, 93.17%, 95.22% and 90.36% respectively.This study verified the possibility of decoding multiple handmotion types during an awake craniotomy, which is the firststep towards dexterous neuroprosthetic control during surgicalimplantation, in order to verify the optimal placement of electrodes.The accuracy during awake craniotomy was comparableto results during seizure monitoring. This study also indicatedthat ECoG was a promising approach for precise identificationof eloquent cortex during awake craniotomy, and might forma promising BCI system that could benefit both patients andneurosurgeons.

  19. Neurons Differentiated from Transplanted Stem Cells Respond Functionally to Acoustic Stimuli in the Awake Monkey Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Jing-Kuan; Wang, Wen-Chao; Zhai, Rong-Wei; Zhang, Yu-Hua; Yang, Shang-Chuan; Rizak, Joshua; Li, Ling; Xu, Li-Qi; Liu, Li; Pan, Ming-Ke; Hu, Ying-Zhou; Ghanemi, Abdelaziz; Wu, Jing; Yang, Li-Chuan; Li, Hao; Lv, Long-Bao; Li, Jia-Li; Yao, Yong-Gang; Xu, Lin; Feng, Xiao-Li; Yin, Yong; Qin, Dong-Dong; Hu, Xin-Tian; Wang, Zheng-Bo

    2016-07-26

    Here, we examine whether neurons differentiated from transplanted stem cells can integrate into the host neural network and function in awake animals, a goal of transplanted stem cell therapy in the brain. We have developed a technique in which a small "hole" is created in the inferior colliculus (IC) of rhesus monkeys, then stem cells are transplanted in situ to allow for investigation of their integration into the auditory neural network. We found that some transplanted cells differentiated into mature neurons and formed synaptic input/output connections with the host neurons. In addition, c-Fos expression increased significantly in the cells after acoustic stimulation, and multichannel recordings indicated IC specific tuning activities in response to auditory stimulation. These results suggest that the transplanted cells have the potential to functionally integrate into the host neural network.

  20. The Dutch Linguistic Intraoperative Protocol: a valid linguistic approach to awake brain surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Witte, E; Satoer, D; Robert, E; Colle, H; Verheyen, S; Visch-Brink, E; Mariën, P

    2015-01-01

    Intraoperative direct electrical stimulation (DES) is increasingly used in patients operated on for tumours in eloquent areas. Although a positive impact of DES on postoperative linguistic outcome is generally advocated, information about the neurolinguistic methods applied in awake surgery is scarce. We developed for the first time a standardised Dutch linguistic test battery (measuring phonology, semantics, syntax) to reliably identify the critical language zones in detail. A normative study was carried out in a control group of 250 native Dutch-speaking healthy adults. In addition, the clinical application of the Dutch Linguistic Intraoperative Protocol (DuLIP) was demonstrated by means of anatomo-functional models and five case studies. A set of DuLIP tests was selected for each patient depending on the tumour location and degree of linguistic impairment. DuLIP is a valid test battery for pre-, intraoperative and postoperative language testing and facilitates intraoperative mapping of eloquent language regions that are variably located.

  1. Does Global Astrocytic Calcium Signaling Participate in Awake Brain State Transitions and Neuronal Circuit Function?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaerby, Celia; Rasmussen, Rune; Andersen, Mie

    2017-01-01

    We continuously need to adapt to changing conditions within our surrounding environment, and our brain needs to quickly shift between resting and working activity states in order to allow appropriate behaviors. These global state shifts are intimately linked to the brain-wide release...... of the neuromodulators, noradrenaline and acetylcholine. Astrocytes have emerged as a new player participating in the regulation of brain activity, and have recently been implicated in brain state shifts. Astrocytes display global Ca2+ signaling in response to activation of the noradrenergic system, but whether...... astrocytic Ca2+ signaling is causative or correlative for shifts in brain state and neural activity patterns is not known. Here we review the current available literature on astrocytic Ca2+ signaling in awake animals in order to explore the role of astrocytic signaling in brain state shifts. Furthermore, we...

  2. Long-term optical imaging of intrinsic signals in anesthetized and awake monkeys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roe, Anna W.

    2007-04-01

    Some exciting new efforts to use intrinsic signal optical imaging methods for long-term studies in anesthetized and awake monkeys are reviewed. The development of such methodologies opens the door for studying behavioral states such as attention, motivation, memory, emotion, and other higher-order cognitive functions. Long-term imaging is also ideal for studying changes in the brain that accompany development, plasticity, and learning. Although intrinsic imaging lacks the temporal resolution offered by dyes, it is a high spatial resolution imaging method that does not require application of any external agents to the brain. The bulk of procedures described here have been developed in the monkey but can be applied to the study of surface structures in any in vivo preparation.

  3. Sensory-Driven Enhancement of Calcium Signals in Individual Purkinje Cell Dendrites of Awake Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farzaneh Najafi

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Climbing fibers (CFs are thought to contribute to cerebellar plasticity and learning by triggering a large influx of dendritic calcium in the postsynaptic Purkinje cell (PC to signal the occurrence of an unexpected sensory event. However, CFs fire about once per second whether or not an event occurs, raising the question of how sensory-driven signals might be distinguished from a background of ongoing spontaneous activity. Here, we report that in PC dendrites of awake mice, CF-triggered calcium signals are enhanced when the trigger is a sensory event. In addition, we show that a large fraction of the total enhancement in each PC dendrite can be accounted for by an additional boost of calcium provided by sensory activation of a non-CF input. We suggest that sensory stimulation may modulate dendritic voltage and calcium concentration in PCs to increase the strength of plasticity signals during cerebellar learning.

  4. Characterization of nociceptive behavioural responses in the awake pig following UV-B-induced inflammation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    di Giminiani, Pierpaolo; Petersen, L J; Herskin, Mette S.

    2014-01-01

    Background Among the current translational inflammatory pain models, the ultraviolet (UV) irradiation is of rapidly growing interest. The development of primary thermal and mechanical hyperalgesia has been observed in humans and rodents. The pig as a translational animal model might be advantageous...... of irradiation compared with the control skin at both 24 and 48 h (P thermal hyperalgesia following UV-B inflammation in porcine skin, but they were not capable of providing a clear indication...... due to its great homology with humans. Methods The skin in the flank of awake pigs was irradiated by a UV-B light source (1 J/cm2) and changes in thermal and mechanical sensitivity 24 and 48 h following irradiation were measured via assessment of nociceptive behaviours. Results Thermal sensitivity...

  5. Awake caudal anesthesia for inguinal hernia operations: successful use in low birth weight neonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geze, S; Imamoğlu, M; Cekic, B

    2011-09-01

    Neonates with inguinal hernia face a relatively high risk of incarcerated hernia and bowel obstruction and this therefore requires surgical treatment. Complications following general anesthesia even for minor surgery are more common in low birth weight neonates than in term neonates. Caudal epidural anesthesia without adjunct general anesthesia has been recommended for neonates to reduce the risk of postoperative complications. The successful application of awake caudal anesthesia with levobupivacaine for inguinal hernia repair in 15 low birth weight neonates is reported. Single dose caudal epidural anesthesia was administered for inguinal hernia surgery to avoid complications associated with general anesthesia. Caudal block was performed with 2.5 mg/kg body weight (BW) levobupivacaine. Caudal anesthesia can be recommended as an effective technique for avoiding postoperative anesthetic complications in low birth weight neonates.

  6. Motion compensation using origin ensembles in awake small animal positron emission tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillam, John E.; Angelis, Georgios I.; Kyme, Andre Z.; Meikle, Steven R.

    2017-02-01

    In emission tomographic imaging, the stochastic origin ensembles algorithm provides unique information regarding the detected counts given the measured data. Precision in both voxel and region-wise parameters may be determined for a single data set based on the posterior distribution of the count density allowing uncertainty estimates to be allocated to quantitative measures. Uncertainty estimates are of particular importance in awake animal neurological and behavioral studies for which head motion, unique for each acquired data set, perturbs the measured data. Motion compensation can be conducted when rigid head pose is measured during the scan. However, errors in pose measurements used for compensation can degrade the data and hence quantitative outcomes. In this investigation motion compensation and detector resolution models were incorporated into the basic origin ensembles algorithm and an efficient approach to computation was developed. The approach was validated against maximum liklihood—expectation maximisation and tested using simulated data. The resultant algorithm was then used to analyse quantitative uncertainty in regional activity estimates arising from changes in pose measurement precision. Finally, the posterior covariance acquired from a single data set was used to describe correlations between regions of interest providing information about pose measurement precision that may be useful in system analysis and design. The investigation demonstrates the use of origin ensembles as a powerful framework for evaluating statistical uncertainty of voxel and regional estimates. While in this investigation rigid motion was considered in the context of awake animal PET, the extension to arbitrary motion may provide clinical utility where respiratory or cardiac motion perturb the measured data.

  7. A Phase IIIb, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multicenter study evaluating the safety and efficacy of dexmedetomidine for sedation during awake fiberoptic intubation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergese, Sergio D; Candiotti, Keith A; Bokesch, Paula M; Zura, Andrew; Wisemandle, Wayne; Bekker, Alex Y

    2010-01-01

    GABA-mediated sedatives have respiratory depressant properties that may be detrimental in patients with difficult airways. In this randomized, double-blind, multicenter, Phase IIIb Food and Drug Administration study, safety and efficacy of dexmedetomidine compared with placebo were evaluated as the primary sedative for awake fiberoptic intubation (AFOI). Patients were randomized to receive dexmedetomidine or saline. Patients were sedated with dexmedetomidine or rescue midazolam to achieve targeted sedation (Ramsay Sedation Scale ≥ 2) before topicalization and throughout AFOI. Primary efficacy endpoint was percentage of patients requiring rescue midazolam; secondary efficacy endpoints were total dose of rescue midazolam, percentage requiring additional rescue nonmidazolam medications, anesthesiologist's assessment of ease of subject care, and patient recall and satisfaction 24 hours postoperatively. Less rescue midazolam was required to maintain Ramsay Sedation Scale ≥2 (47.3% vs. 86.0%, P sedated with midazolam. Patients and anesthesiologists showed favorable satisfaction responses in both groups. Adverse events and patient recall were similar in both groups. Dexmedetomidine is effective as the primary sedative in patients undergoing AFOI. Some patients may require small supplemental doses of midazolam, in addition to dexmedetomidine, to achieve sufficient sedation for AFOI. Dexmedetomidine provides another AFOI option for sedation of patients with difficult airways.

  8. Predictors of Failure of Awake Regional Anesthesia for Neonatal Hernia Repair : Data from the General Anesthesia Compared to Spinal Anesthesia Study-Comparing Apnea and Neurodevelopmental Outcomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frawley, Geoff; Bell, Graham; Disma, Nicola; Withington, Davinia E; de Graaff, Jurgen C; Morton, Neil S; McCann, Mary Ellen; Arnup, Sarah J; Bagshaw, Oliver; Wolfler, Andrea; Bellinger, David; Davidson, Andrew J; Absalom, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Awake regional anesthesia (RA) is a viable alternative to general anesthesia (GA) for infants undergoing lower abdominal surgery. Benefits include lower incidence of postoperative apnea and avoidance of anesthetic agents that may increase neuroapoptosis and worsen neurocognitive outcomes

  9. Predictors of Failure of Awake Regional Anesthesia for Neonatal Hernia Repair : Data from the General Anesthesia Compared to Spinal Anesthesia Study--Comparing Apnea and Neurodevelopmental Outcomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frawley, Geoff; Bell, Graham; Disma, Nicola; Withington, Davinia E; de Graaff, Jurgen C; Morton, Neil S; McCann, Mary Ellen; Arnup, Sarah J; Bagshaw, Oliver; Wolfler, Andrea; Bellinger, David; Davidson, Andrew J

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Awake regional anesthesia (RA) is a viable alternative to general anesthesia (GA) for infants undergoing lower abdominal surgery. Benefits include lower incidence of postoperative apnea and avoidance of anesthetic agents that may increase neuroapoptosis and worsen neurocognitive outcomes

  10. Early Fesoterodine Fumarate Administration Prevents Neurogenic Detrusor Overactivity in a Spinal Cord Transected Rat Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biardeau, Xavier; Przydacz, Mikolaj; Aharony, Shachar; Loutochin, George; Campeau, Lysanne; Kyheng, Maeva; Corcos, Jacques

    2017-01-01

    Background In spinal cord injury, onset of detrusor overactivity (DO) is detrimental for quality of life (incontinence) and renal risk. Prevention has only been achieved with complex sophisticated electrical neuromodulation techniques. Purpose To assess the efficacy of early fesoterodine fumarate (FF) administration in preventing bladder overactivity in a spinal cord transected (SCT) rat model. Methods 33 Sprague-Dawley rats were allocated to 6 groups–Group 1: 3 normal controls; Group 2: 6 SCT controls; Group 3: 6 SCT rats + FF 0.18 mg/kg/d; Group 4: 6 SCT rats + FF 0.12 mg/kg/d; Group 5: 6 SCT rats + FF 0.18 mg/kg/d + 72-h wash-out period; Group 6: 6 SCT rats + FF 0.12 mg/kg/d + 72-h wash-out period. SCT was performed at T10. FF was continuously administered. Cystometry was undertaken 6 weeks after SCT in awake rats recording intermicturition pressure (IMP), baseline pressure, threshold pressure (Pthres) and maximum pressure (Pmax). Normal controls and SCT controls were initially compared using the Mann-Whitney U tests in order to confirm the SCT effect on cystometric parameters. The comparisons in cystometric and metabolic cage parameters between SCT controls and treated rats were done using post-hoc Dunn’s tests for Kruskal-Wallis analysis. Statistical testing was conducted at the two-tailed α-level of 0.05. Results Pressure parameters were significantly higher in SCT control group compared to normal controls. Six weeks after SCT, IMP was significantly lower in low dose treated group than in SCT controls. Pmax was significantly lower in 3 treated groups compared to SCT controls. Pthres was significantly lower in full time treated groups than in SCT controls. Conclusion Early administration of FF modulates bladder overactivity in a SCT rat model. Whereas short-term prevention has been demonstrated, the long-term should be further analyzed. Clinical application of these results should confirm this finding through randomized research protocols. PMID:28060912

  11. Biofeedback for treatment of awake and sleep bruxism in adults: systematic review protocol

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Bruxism is a disorder of jaw-muscle activity characterised by repetitive clenching or grinding of the teeth which results in discomfort and damage to dentition. The two clinical manifestations of the condition (sleep and awake bruxism) are thought to have unrelated aetiologies but are palliated using similar techniques. The lack of a definitive treatment has prompted renewed interest in biofeedback, a behaviour change method that uses electronic detection to provide a stimulus whenever bruxism occurs. This systematic review aims to provide a comprehensive overview of the state of research into biofeedback for bruxism; to assess the efficacy and acceptability of biofeedback therapy in management of awake bruxism and, separately, sleep bruxism in adults; and to compare findings between the two variants. Methods A systematic review of published literature examining biofeedback as an intervention directed at controlling primary bruxism in adults. We will search electronic databases and the grey literature using a predefined search strategy to identify randomised and non-randomised studies, technical reports and patents. Searches will not be restricted by language or date and will be expanded through contact with authors and experts, and by following up reference lists and citations. Two authors, working independently, will conduct screening of search results, study selection, data extraction and quality assessment and a third will resolve any disagreements. The primary outcomes of acceptability and effectiveness will be assessed using only randomised studies, segregated by bruxism subtype. A meta-analysis of these data will be conducted only if pre-defined conditions for quality and heterogeneity are met, otherwise the data will be summarized in narrative form. Data from non-randomised studies will be used to augment a narrative synthesis of the state of technical developments and any safety-related issues. PROSPERO registration number: CRD42013006880

  12. Only a whisper away. A philosophical view of the awake patient's situation during regional anaesthetics and surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsson, Ann-Christin; Ekebergh, Margaretha; Larsson Mauléon, Annika; Almerud Österberg, Sofia

    2012-10-01

    In this study the awake patient's intraoperative situation and experiences during regional anaesthetics and surgery are reflected upon by using the work of the French philosopher Maurice Merleau-Ponty. Merleau-Ponty's phenomenological idea of the body as being at the centre of the world highlights the patient's embodied position and bestows significance onto the body as a whole, as a lived body. A case, based on the findings from a previous interview study, is presented as a contextual starting point where a patient goes from having a familiar body recognized as her own to having a partially anaesthetized body experienced as an unknown object. The intraoperative caring space is described in this context as the mutual ground where the awake patient and the nurse anaesthetist (NA) can interact to create meaning. The NA can act as the patient's bodily extension to bridge the gap between the patient's experiences and the situation. This calls for the NA's proximity and genuine presence in order to meet and understand the patient's awake experiences. Learning from the patient's situatedness gives information that is valuable for NAs to share with patients who are less experienced with this contextual situation. The challenge for the NA is not to perform routine-based care, but to acknowledge every patient's lifeworld and uniqueness thus enabling the patient to move easily along the mind-body-world continuum. The core of intraoperative care is to provide support and promote well-being of awake patients in the intraoperative environment. The use of a philosophical perspective is relevant for nurses who work in an intraoperative setting where patients undergo regional anaesthetics. This study shows how nursing research using phenomenological philosophy can help uncover new meanings known only to the patients living the experience.

  13. The Use of the Target Cancellation Task to Identify Eloquent Visuospatial Regions in Awake Craniotomies: Technical Note.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conner, Andrew K; Glenn, Chad; Burks, Joshua D; McCoy, Tressie; Bonney, Phillip A; Chema, Ahmed A; Case, Justin L; Brunner, Scott; Baker, Cordell; Sughrue, Michael

    2016-11-17

    The success of awake craniotomies relies on the patient's performance of function-specific tasks that are simple, quick, and reproducible. Intraoperative identification of visuospatial function through cortical and subcortical mapping has utilized a variety of intraoperative tests, each with its own benefits and drawbacks. In light of this, we developed a simple software program that aids in preventing neglect by simulating a target-cancellation task on a portable electronic device. In this report, we describe the interactive target cancellation task and have reviewed seven consecutive patients who underwent awake craniotomy for parietal and/or posterior temporal infiltrating brain tumors of the non-dominant hemisphere. Each of these patients performed target cancellation and line bisection tasks intraoperatively. The outcomes of each patient and testing scenario are described. Positive intraoperative cortical and subcortical sites involved with visuospatial processing were identified in three of the seven patients using the target cancellation and confirmed utilizing the line-bisection task. No identification of visuospatial function was accomplished utilizing the line-bisection task alone. Complete visuospatial function mapping was completed in less than 10 minutes in all patients. No patients had preoperative or postoperative hemineglect. Our findings highlight the feasibility of the target cancellation technique for use during awake craniotomy to aid in avoiding postoperative hemineglect. Target cancellation may offer an alternative method of cortical and subcortical visuospatial mapping in patients unable to perform other commonly used modalities.

  14. Interhemispheric transfalcine approach and awake cortical mapping for resection of peri-atrial gliomas associated with the central lobule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malekpour, Mahdi; Cohen-Gadol, Aaron A

    2015-02-01

    Medial posterior frontal and parietal gliomas extending to the peri-atrial region are difficult to reach surgically because of the working angle required to expose the lateral aspect of the tumor and the proximity of the tumor to the sensorimotor lobule; retraction of the sensorimotor cortex may lead to morbidity. The interhemispheric transfalcine approach is favorable and safe for resection of medial hemispheric tumors adjacent to the falx cerebri, but the literature on this approach is scarce. Awake cortical mapping using this operative route for tumors associated with the sensorimotor cortex has not been previously reported to our knowledge. We present the first case of a right medial posterior frontoparietal oligoastrocytoma that was resected through the interhemispheric transfalcine approach using awake cortical and subcortical mapping. Through a contralateral frontoparietal craniotomy, we excised a section of the falx and exposed the contralateral medial hemisphere. Cortical stimulation allowed localization of the supplementary motor cortex, and suprathreshold stimulation mapping excluded the primary motor cortex corresponding to the leg area. Gross total tumor resection was accomplished without any intraoperative or postoperative deficits. Awake cortical mapping using the contralateral transfalcine approach allows a "cross-court" operative route to map functional cortices and resect peri-atrial low-grade gliomas. This technique can minimize the otherwise necessary retraction on the ipsilateral hemisphere through an ipsilateral craniotomy.

  15. EFFECT OF PRECURSOR LOADING ON THE SYNTHESIS RATE AND RELEASE OF DOPAMINE AND SEROTONIN IN THE STRIATUM - A MICRODIALYSIS STUDY IN CONSCIOUS RATS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    WESTERINK, BHC; DEVRIES, JB

    1991-01-01

    The effects of systemic administration of tyrosine and phenylalanine on the extracellular levels of tyrosine and dopamine were determined by microdialysis in the striatum of awake rats. In addition, the effects of these precursors on in vivo 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA) formation were determine

  16. Validation of a Modified Algometer to Measure Mechanical Nociceptive Thresholds in Awake Dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ubedullah Kaka

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to validate the use of a modified algometer device to measure mechanical nociceptive thresholds in six dogs. Dogs were administered morphine intravenously (IV at 1 mg/kg or saline at equivolume in a crossover design with one-week washout period. Mechanical nociceptive thresholds were determined before, after the administration of treatments at 5 minutes, and hourly for 8 hours. Thresholds were recorded at the carpal pad, metacarpal foot pad, tibia, femur, and abdomen. Heart rates, body temperature, and respiration were recorded at similar time points. Thresholds increased significantly (P<0.05 from baseline values for up to 3 hours at tibia and abdomen, 4 hours at metacarpal pad, and 5 hours at the carpal pad and femur. Hypothermia, bradycardia, and change in respiration were observed in all dogs after morphine injection. Saline did not alter any threshold levels during the eight-hour study period, indicating no evidence of tolerance, learned avoidance, or local hyperaesthesia. The device and methods of testing were well tolerated by all the dogs. Results suggest that the modified algometer and method of application are useful to measure nociceptive mechanical thresholds in awake dogs.

  17. Hypoxia-induced vasodilation and effects of regional phentolamine in awake patients with sleep apnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradkhan, Raman; Spitnale, Brett; McQuillan, Patrick; Hogeman, Cynthia; Gray, Kristen S; Leuenberger, Urs A

    2010-05-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is associated with increased sympathetic nerve activity, endothelial dysfunction, and premature cardiovascular disease. To determine whether hypoxia is associated with impaired skeletal muscle vasodilation, we compared femoral artery blood flow (ultrasound) and muscle sympathetic nerve activity (peroneal microneurography) during exposure to acute systemic hypoxia (fraction of inspired oxygen 0.1) in awake patients with OSA (n=10) and controls (n=8). To assess the role of elevated sympathetic nerve activity, in a separate group of patients with OSA (n=10) and controls (n=10) we measured brachial artery blood flow during hypoxia before and after regional alpha-adrenergic block with phentolamine. Despite elevated sympathetic activity, in OSA the vascular responses to hypoxia in the leg did not differ significantly from those in controls [P=not significant (NS)]. Following regional phentolamine, in both groups the hypoxia-induced increase in brachial blood flow was markedly enhanced (OSA pre vs. post, 84+/-13 vs. 201+/-34 ml/min, Pphentolamine, the increase of brachial blood flow above baseline was similar (OSA vs. controls +61+/-16 vs. +48+/-6%; P=NS). We conclude that despite high sympathetic vasoconstrictor tone and prominent sympathetic responses to acute hypoxia, hypoxia-induced limb vasodilation is preserved in OSA.

  18. Characterizing Alzheimer's disease severity via resting-awake EEG amplitude modulation analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco J Fraga

    Full Text Available Changes in electroencephalography (EEG amplitude modulations have recently been linked with early-stage Alzheimer's disease (AD. Existing tools available to perform such analysis (e.g., detrended fluctuation analysis, however, provide limited gains in discriminability power over traditional spectral based EEG analysis. In this paper, we explore the use of an innovative EEG amplitude modulation analysis technique based on spectro-temporal signal processing. More specifically, full-band EEG signals are first decomposed into the five well-known frequency bands and the envelopes are then extracted via a Hilbert transform. Each of the five envelopes are further decomposed into four so-called modulation bands, which were chosen to coincide with the delta, theta, alpha and beta frequency bands. Experiments on a resting-awake EEG dataset collected from 76 participants (27 healthy controls, 27 diagnosed with mild-AD, and 22 with moderate-AD showed significant differences in amplitude modulations between the three groups. Most notably, i delta modulation of the beta frequency band disappeared with an increase in disease severity (from mild to moderate AD, ii delta modulation of the theta band appeared with an increase in severity, and iii delta modulation of the beta frequency band showed to be a reliable discriminant feature between healthy controls and mild-AD patients. Taken together, it is hoped that the developed tool can be used to assist clinicians not only with early detection of Alzheimer's disease, but also to monitor its progression.

  19. Inhibition shapes selectivity to vocalizations in the inferior colliculus of awake mice

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    Zachary eMayko

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The inferior colliculus (IC is a major center for integration of auditory information as itreceives ascending projections from a variety of brainstem nuclei as well as descending projectionsfrom the thalamus and auditory cortex. The ascending projections are both excitatory andinhibitory and their convergence at the IC results in a microcircuitry that is important forshaping responses to simple, binaural, and modulated sounds in the IC. Here, we examined therole inhibition plays in shaping selectivity to vocalizations in the IC of awake, normal-hearingadult mice (CBA/CaJ strain. Neurons in the IC of mice show selectivity in their responses tovocalizations, and we hypothesized that this selectivity is created by inhibitory microcircuitryin the IC. We compared single unit responses in the IC to pure tones and a variety of ultrasonicmouse vocalizations before and after iontophoretic application of GABAA receptor (GABAARand glycine receptor (GlyR antagonists. The most pronounced effects of blocking GABAAR andGlyR on IC neurons were to increase spike rates and broaden excitatory frequency tuning curvesin response to pure tone stimuli, and to decrease selectivity to vocalizations. Thus, inhibitionplays an important role in creating selectivity to vocalizations in the inferior colliculus.

  20. Baroreceptor control of heart rate in the awake toad: peripheral autonomic effectors and arterial baroreceptor areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchi-da-Silva, L M; Menescal-de-Oliveira, L; Hoffmann, A

    2000-04-12

    Systemic injection of sodium nitroprusside (30 microg/kg, i.v.) in the awake Bufo paracnemis toad induced a fall in arterial blood pressure and tachycardia. This tachycardia, but not the hypotension, was significantly reduced in toads with bilateral electrolytic lesion of the caudal and commissural regions of the solitary tract nucleus and in animals with transection of the spinal cord, 2 mm below the obex. This indicates that the tachycardia is reflex, depends on the integrity of the solitary tract nucleus and is due to descending spinal autonomic activation. Pretreatment with propranolol (4 mg/kg, i.v.) significantly reduced the tachycardia but did not block it completely, showing the importance of beta-adrenoceptors in its genesis. The reflex increase in heart rate induced by nitroprusside was not statistically significant in animals with bilateral section of the laryngeal nerve, whose baroreceptor fibers originate from the pulmocutaneous artery or in animals in which the bilateral section of the laryngeal nerve was performed together with section of the glossopharyngeal nerves, which incorporate fibers originating from the carotid labyrinth. The reduction of the reflex tachycardia was significant in toads with aortic arch denervation alone or combined with section of the laryngeal nerves or in animals with complete denervation of the three baroreceptors areas. These results suggest that the region of the aortic arch, when submitted to unloading, is the most important baroreceptor zone for cardiac compensation in toads.

  1. Auditory response properties of neurons in the putamen and globus pallidus of awake cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Renjia; Qin, Ling; Sato, Yu

    2014-05-01

    Several decades of research have provided evidence that the basal ganglia are closely involved in motor processes. Recent clinical, electrophysiological, behavioral data have revealed that the basal ganglia also receive afferent input from the auditory system, but the detailed auditory response characteristics have not yet reported. The present study aimed to reveal the acoustic response properties of neurons in parts of the basal ganglia. We recorded single-unit activities from the putamen (PU) and globus pallidus (GP) of awake cats passively listening to pure tones, click trains, and natural sounds. Our major findings were: 1) responses in both PU and GP neurons were elicited by pure-tone stimuli, whereas PU neurons had lower intensity thresholds, shorter response latencies, shorter excitatory duration, and larger response magnitudes than GP neurons. 2) Some GP neurons showed a suppressive response lasting throughout the stimulus period. 3) Both PU and GP did not follow periodically repeated click stimuli well, and most neurons only showed a phasic response at the stimulus onset and offset. 4) In response to natural sounds, PU also showed a stronger magnitude and shorter duration of excitatory response than GP. The selectivity for natural sounds was low in both nuclei. 5) Nonbiological environmental sounds more efficiently evoked responses in PU and GP than the vocalizations of conspecifics and other species. Our results provide insights into how acoustic signals are processed in the basal ganglia and revealed the distinction of PU and GP in sensory representation.

  2. High-throughput mapping of brain-wide activity in awake and drug-responsive vertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Xudong; Wang, Shiqi; Yu, Xudong; Liu, Zhuguo; Wang, Fei; Li, Wai Tsun; Cheng, Shuk Han; Dai, Qiuyun; Shi, Peng

    2015-02-01

    The reconstruction of neural activity across complete neural circuits, or brain activity mapping, has great potential in both fundamental and translational neuroscience research. Larval zebrafish, a vertebrate model, has recently been demonstrated to be amenable to whole brain activity mapping in behaving animals. Here we demonstrate a microfluidic array system ("Fish-Trap") that enables high-throughput mapping of brain-wide activity in awake larval zebrafish. Unlike the commonly practiced larva-processing methods using a rigid gel or a capillary tube, which are laborious and time-consuming, the hydrodynamic design of our microfluidic chip allows automatic, gel-free, and anesthetic-free processing of tens of larvae for microscopic imaging with single-cell resolution. Notably, this system provides the capability to directly couple pharmaceutical stimuli with real-time recording of neural activity in a large number of animals, and the local and global effects of pharmacoactive drugs on the nervous system can be directly visualized and evaluated by analyzing drug-induced functional perturbation within or across different brain regions. Using this technology, we tested a set of neurotoxin peptides and obtained new insights into how to exploit neurotoxin derivatives as therapeutic agents. The novel and versatile "Fish-Trap" technology can be readily unitized to study other stimulus (optical, acoustic, or physical) associated functional brain circuits using similar experimental strategies.

  3. The Challenge of Interfacing the Primary Beam Lines for the AWAKE Project at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Bracco, C; Gschwendtner, E; Meddahi, M; Petrenko, A; Velotti, FM

    2014-01-01

    The Proton Driven Plasma Wakefield Acceleration Experiment (AWAKE) at CERN foresees the simultaneous operation of a proton, a laser and an electron beam. The first stage of the experiment will consist in proving the self-modulation, in the plasma, of a long proton bunch into micro-bunches. The success of this experiment requires an almost perfect concentricity of the proton and laser beam, over the full length of the plasma cell. The complexity of integrating the laser into the proton beam line and fulfilling the strict requirements in terms of pointing precision of the proton beam at the plasma cell are described. The second stage of the experiment foresees also the injection of electron bunches to probe the accelerating wakefields driven by the proton beam. Studies were performed to evaluate the possibility of injecting the electron beam parallel and with an offset to the beam axis. This option would imply that protons and electrons will have to share the last few meters of a common beam line. Issues and po...

  4. Effects of hypercapnia on variability of normal respiratory behavior in awake cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szlyk, P C; Jennings, D B

    1987-03-01

    Resting quiet awake cats breathing air in a steady state have a range of respiratory behavior, and this encompasses nonpurring and purring (D. B. Jennings and P. C. Szlyk, Can. J. Physiol. Pharmacol. 63: 148-154, 1985). On a given study day, individual cats usually breathed in a limited part of their potential respiratory range. Respiratory pattern, such as average breath frequency (f) and average tidal volume (VT) utilized for a given level of ventilation (V), could be predicted when cats breathed air; as well, inspiratory (TI) and expiratory (TE) times were specific for a given breath f. Inhalation of 2% and 4% CO2 in air caused an average increase in ventilation of 16 and 100%, respectively but breath-to-breath variability of V, f, and VT persisted at each fractional concentration of inspired CO2 (FICO2). The range of different V utilized breath to breath when breathing 2% CO2 overlapped with V during air control studies. Substantial overlap with control V also occurred in three of six cats when breathing 4% CO2. The most consistent effect of progressive hypercapnia was to increase VT and decrease f at a given level of V; increase in V during hypercapnia was accounted for by an increase in mean inspiratory flow (VT/TI). Hypercapnia also caused the fraction of breathing cycle devoted to inspiration (TI/TT) to increase at low f but not at high f.

  5. Efficacy of "Awake ECMO" for critical respiratory failure after pediatric open-heart surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higashida, Akihiko; Hoashi, Takaya; Kagisaki, Koji; Shimada, Masatoshi; Takahashi, Yuzo; Hayashi, Teruyuki; Ichikawa, Hajime

    2016-06-01

    A 4-year-old boy with atrioventricular discordance, double-outlet right ventricle, pulmonary stenosis, and mitral regurgitation, was undergoing anatomical repair consisting of Senning, Rastelli, Damus-Kaye-Stansel procedures, and a mitral valve repair, complained of post-operative excessive airway tract secretion, which ultimately developed into acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) 28 days after the operation. The cause of the ARDS was thought to be frequent manual positive pressure recruitment and prolonged inhalation of pure oxygen. At 45 days after the operation, hypercapnia and respiratory acidosis turned out to be irreversible, and therefore, veno-arterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) was established utilizing the Endumo(®)4000 system. Pulmonic interstitial inflammation gradually improved while resting the lung under ECMO support; however, effective ventilation volume decreased critically because a massive pulmonary hemorrhage occurred at 2 and 9 days after the initiation of ECMO. To maximize the effectiveness of respiratory physical therapy, "Awake ECMO" was started and tidal volume dramatically increased with a regained cough reflex. Five days later, he was successfully weaned off from ECMO, and discharged 7 months after the operation without any neurological and physiological sequelae.

  6. Coherent 25- to 35-Hz Oscillations in the Sensorimotor Cortex of Awake Behaving Monkeys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murthy, Venkatesh N.; Fetz, Eberhard E.

    1992-06-01

    Synchronous 25- to 35-Hz oscillations were observed in local field potentials and unit activity in sensorimotor cortex of awake rhesus monkeys. The oscillatory episodes occurred often when the monkeys retrieved raisins from a Kluver board or from unseen locations using somatosensory feedback; they occurred less often during performance of repetitive wrist flexion and extension movements. The amplitude, duration, and frequency of oscillations were not directly related to movement parameters in behaviors studied so far. The occurrence of the oscillations was not consistently related to bursts of activity in forearm muscles, but cycle-triggered averages of electromyograms revealed synchronous modulation in flexor and extensor muscles. The phase of the oscillations changed continuously from the surface to the deeper layers of the cortex, reversing their polarity completely at depths exceeding 800 μm. The oscillations could become synchronized over a distance of 14 mm mediolaterally in precentral cortex. Coherent oscillations could also occur at pre- and postcentral sites separated by an estimated tangential intracortical distance of 20 mm. Activity of single units was commonly seen to burst in synchrony with field potential oscillations. These findings suggest that such oscillations may facilitate interactions between cells during exploratory and manipulative movements, requiring attention to sensorimotor integration.

  7. Prevalence and potential factors associated with probable sleep or awake bruxism and dentin hypersensitivity in undergraduate students

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    Neusa Barros DANTAS-NETA

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To measure the prevalence of probable sleep or awake bruxism and cervical dentin hypersensitivity of undergraduate students and to determine the symptoms associated with these conditions.METHODOLOGY: This was a cross-sectional study. A diagnosis of probable bruxism was reached when students reported clenching or grinding of the teeth during sleep and/or wakefulness, and when they also presented some of the signs and symptoms of bruxism and masseter muscle pain on palpation. Cervical dentinal hypersensitivity was diagnosed by testing for sensitivity to pain in the cervical region of the teeth. Pain was triggered either by touch (using a #5 probe or by an air jet spray. The sample consisted of 306 university students aged between 19 and 35 years old. The data were stored and analysed using SPSS software, version 15.0 for Windows.RESULT: The prevalence of probable bruxism was 34.3%, with no predominance regarding sex. Probable awake bruxism was more prevalent (61.9%, mostly occurring when the individual reported being in a state of mental concentration (63.1%. There was no association between probable sleep or awake bruxism and dentin hypersensitivity (p = 0.195. Individuals with probable sleep bruxism had increased odds of having muscular pain in the face upon waking (OR = 14.14, 95% CI 5.06-39.55, and those with probable awake bruxism had a increased odds of having facial muscle fatigue when chewing or talking for a long time (OR = 2.88, 95% CI 1.53-5.43 and muscular pain in the face upon waking (OR = 5.31, 95% CI 1.93-14.62.CONCLUSION: The prevalence of probable bruxism was 34.3% and that of HDC was 57.8%, with 22.2% of these subjects also showing probable bruxism. Individuals with probable bruxism tended to have a higher odds of facial pain when they awakened and when chewing or talking for long periods. There were no associations between probable sleep and awake bruxism and cervical dentin hypersensitivity.

  8. Nicotine effects on regional cerebral blood flow in awake, resting tobacco smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domino, E F; Minoshima, S; Guthrie, S; Ohl, L; Ni, L; Koeppe, R A; Zubieta, J K

    2000-12-01

    The hypothesis for this research was that regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) would increase following nasal nicotine administration to overnight abstinent tobacco smokers in relationship to the known brain distribution of nicotinic cholinergic receptors (nAChRs). Nine male and nine female healthy adult smokers were studied. They abstained overnight from tobacco products for 10 or more hours prior to study the next morning. Nicotine nasal spray was given in doses of 1-2.5 mg total with half in each nostril while the subject was awake and resting in a supine position. Oleoresin of pepper solution in a similar volume was used as an active placebo to control for the irritating effects of nicotine. Both substances were given single blind to the subjects. Positron emission tomography (PET) with H(2)(15)O was used to measure rCBF. The data from each subject volunteer were normalized to global activity to better assess regional brain changes. Both nasal nicotine and pepper spray produced similar increases in CBF in somesthetic area II, consistent with the irritant effects of both substances. The mean rCBF effects of nasal pepper were subtracted from those of nasal nicotine to determine the actions of nicotine alone. The latter produced increases in rCBF in the thalamus, pons, Brodman area 17 of the visual cortex, and cerebellum. Some brain areas that contain a large number of nAChRs, such as the thalamus, showed an increase in CBF. Other areas that have few nAChRs, such as the cerebellum, also showed an increase in relative CBF. The hippocampal/parahippocampal areas showed greater regional decreases (left) and lesser increases (right) in CBF that correlated with the increase in plasma arterial nicotine concentrations. The results obtained indicate complex primary and secondary effects of nicotine in which only some regional brain CBF changes correlate with the known distribution of nAChR. No gender differences were noted.

  9. The conjugacy of the vestibulo-ocular reflex evoked by single labyrinth stimulation in awake monkeys.

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    Tang, Xuehui; Xu, Youguo; Simpson, Ivra; Jeffcoat, Ben; Mustain, William; Zhou, Wu

    2010-10-01

    It is well known that the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) is conjugate when measured in the dark with minimal vergence. But the neural basis of the VOR conjugacy remains to be identified. In the present study, we measured the VOR conjugacy during single labyrinth stimulation to examine whether the VOR conjugacy depends on reciprocal stimulation of the two labyrinths. There are conflicting views on this issue. First, since the vestibular signals carried by the ascending tract of Deiters' are distributed exclusively to the motoneurons of the ipsilateral eye, the neural innervations after single labyrinth stimulation are not symmetrical for the two eyes. Thus, single labyrinth stimulation may generate disjunctive VOR responses. Second, the only published study on this issue was an electrooculography (EOG) study that reported disjunctive VOR responses during unilateral caloric irrigation (Wolfe in Ann Otol 88:79-85, 1979). Third, the VOR during unilateral caloric stimulation performed in clinical vestibular tests is routinely perceived to be conjugate. To resolve these conflicting views, the present study examined the VOR conjugacy during single labyrinth stimulation by recording binocular eye position signals in awake monkeys with a search coil technique. In contradiction to the previous EOG study and the prediction based on the asymmetry of the unilateral brainstem VOR circuits, we found that the VOR during unilateral caloric irrigation was conjugate over a wide range of conditions. We conclude that the net neural innervations received by the two eyes are symmetrical after single labyrinth stimulation, despite the apparent asymmetry in the unilateral VOR pathways. A novel role for the ascending tract of Deiters' in the VOR conjugacy is proposed.

  10. Awake reactivation of emotional memory traces through hippocampal-neocortical interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Voogd, Lycia D; Fernández, Guillén; Hermans, Erno J

    2016-07-01

    Emotionally arousing experiences are typically well remembered not only due to immediate effects at encoding, but also through further strengthening of subsequent consolidation processes. A large body of research shows how neuromodulatory systems promote synaptic consolidation. However, how emotionally arousing experiences alter systems-level interactions, presumably a consequence of modifications at a synaptic level, remains unclear. Animal models predict that memory traces are maintained by spontaneous reactivations across hippocampal-neocortical circuits during "offline" periods such as post-learning rest, and suggest this might be stronger for emotional memories. The present study was designed to test this hypothesis in humans using functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Participants underwent a two-category localizer paradigm followed by a categorical differential delay fear conditioning paradigm interleaved with blocks of awake rest. Counterbalanced across participants, exemplars of one category (CS+), but not the other (CS-), were paired with mild electrical shocks. Fear recall (differential conditioned pupil dilation) was tested 24h later. Analyses of the localizer paradigm replicate earlier work showing category-specific response patterns in neocortical higher-order visual regions. Critically, we show that during post-learning rest, spontaneous reactivation of these neocortical patterns was stronger for the CS+ than the CS- category. Furthermore, hippocampal connectivity with the regions exhibiting these reactivations predicted strength of fear recall 24h later. We conclude that emotional arousal during learning promotes spontaneous post-learning reactivation of neocortical representations of recent experiences, which leads to better memory when coinciding with hippocampal connectivity. Our findings reveal a systems-level mechanism that may explain the persistence of long-term memory for emotional experiences.

  11. Measurement of Electroretinograms and Visually Evoked Potentials in Awake Moving Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusuke Tomiyama

    Full Text Available The development of new treatments for intractable retinal diseases requires reliable functional assessment tools for animal models. In vivo measurements of neural activity within visual pathways, including electroretinogram (ERG and visually evoked potential (VEP recordings, are commonly used for such purposes. In mice, the ERG and VEPs are usually recorded under general anesthesia, a state that may alter sensory transduction and neurotransmission, but seldom in awake freely moving mice. Therefore, it remains unknown whether the electrophysiological assessment of anesthetized mice accurately reflects the physiological function of the visual pathway. Herein, we describe a novel method to record the ERG and VEPs simultaneously in freely moving mice by immobilizing the head using a custom-built restraining device and placing a rotatable cylinder underneath to allow free running or walking during recording. Injection of the commonly used anesthetic mixture xylazine plus ketamine increased and delayed ERG oscillatory potentials by an average of 67.5% and 36.3%, respectively, compared to unanesthetized mice, while having minimal effects on the a-wave and b-wave. Similarly, components of the VEP were enhanced and delayed by up to 300.2% and 39.3%, respectively, in anesthetized mice. Our method for electrophysiological recording in conscious mice is a sensitive and robust means to assess visual function. It uses a conventional electrophysiological recording system and a simple platform that can be built in any laboratory at low cost. Measurements using this method provide objective indices of mouse visual function with high precision and stability, unaffected by anesthetics.

  12. Fast transmission from the dopaminergic ventral midbrain to the sensory cortex of awake primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mylius, Judith; Happel, Max F K; Gorkin, Alexander G; Huang, Ying; Scheich, Henning; Brosch, Michael

    2015-11-01

    Motivated by the increasing evidence that auditory cortex is under control of dopaminergic cell structures of the ventral midbrain, we studied how the ventral tegmental area and substantia nigra affect neuronal activity in auditory cortex. We electrically stimulated 567 deep brain sites in total within and in the vicinity of the two dopaminergic ventral midbrain structures and at the same time, recorded local field potentials and neuronal discharges in cortex. In experiments conducted on three awake macaque monkeys, we found that electrical stimulation of the dopaminergic ventral midbrain resulted in short-latency (~35 ms) phasic activations in all cortical layers of auditory cortex. We were also able to demonstrate similar activations in secondary somatosensory cortex and superior temporal polysensory cortex. The electrically evoked responses in these parts of sensory cortex were similar to those previously described for prefrontal cortex. Moreover, these phasic responses could be reversibly altered by the dopamine D1-receptor antagonist SCH23390 for several tens of minutes. Thus, we speculate that the dopaminergic ventral midbrain exerts a temporally precise, phasic influence on sensory cortex using fast-acting non-dopaminergic transmitters and that their effects are modulated by dopamine on a longer timescale. Our findings suggest that some of the information carried by the neuronal discharges in the dopaminergic ventral midbrain, such as the motivational value or the motivational salience, is transmitted to auditory cortex and other parts of sensory cortex. The mesocortical pathway may thus contribute to the representation of non-auditory events in the auditory cortex and to its associative functions.

  13. Stimulation of the cardiopulmonary baroreflex enhances ventricular contractility in awake dogs: a mathematical analysis study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sala-Mercado, Javier A; Moslehpour, Mohsen; Hammond, Robert L; Ichinose, Masashi; Chen, Xiaoxiao; Evan, Sell; O'Leary, Donal S; Mukkamala, Ramakrishna

    2014-08-15

    The cardiopulmonary baroreflex responds to an increase in central venous pressure (CVP) by decreasing total peripheral resistance and increasing heart rate (HR) in dogs. However, the direction of ventricular contractility change is not well understood. The aim was to elucidate the cardiopulmonary baroreflex control of ventricular contractility during normal physiological conditions via a mathematical analysis. Spontaneous beat-to-beat fluctuations in maximal ventricular elastance (Emax), which is perhaps the best available index of ventricular contractility, CVP, arterial blood pressure (ABP), and HR were measured from awake dogs at rest before and after β-adrenergic receptor blockade. An autoregressive exogenous input model was employed to jointly identify the three causal transfer functions relating beat-to-beat fluctuations in CVP to Emax (CVP → Emax), which characterizes the cardiopulmonary baroreflex control of ventricular contractility, ABP to Emax, which characterizes the arterial baroreflex control of ventricular contractility, and HR to Emax, which characterizes the force-frequency relation. The CVP → Emax transfer function showed a static gain of 0.037 ± 0.010 ml(-1) (different from zero; P < 0.05) and an overall time constant of 3.2 ± 1.2 s. Hence, Emax would increase and reach steady state in ∼16 s in response to a step increase in CVP, without any change to ABP or HR, due to the cardiopulmonary baroreflex. Following β-adrenergic receptor blockade, the CVP → Emax transfer function showed a static gain of 0.0007 ± 0.0113 ml(-1) (different from control; P < 0.10). Hence, Emax would change little in steady state in response to a step increase in CVP. Stimulation of the cardiopulmonary baroreflex increases ventricular contractility through β-adrenergic receptor system mediation.

  14. Techniques for collecting saliva from awake, unrestrained, adult monkeys for cortisol assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutz, C K; Tiefenbacher, S; Jorgensen, M J; Meyer, J S; Novak, M A

    2000-10-01

    Cortisol levels serve as an index of pituitary-adrenal activity in nonhuman primates. In adult monkeys, cortisol is normally measured in blood (typically requiring restraint or sedation) or urine (reflecting a state rather than point estimate). In contrast, saliva collection is less invasive than drawing blood and allows for repeated sampling within a short period of time. Although protocols exist for collecting saliva from young monkeys, these procedures are inadequate for awake, unrestrained adult animals. Our laboratory has developed two methods for collecting saliva from adult rhesus monkeys: a "screen" method, which involves licking screen-covered gauze, and a "pole" method, which involves sucking and chewing on an attached rope. Twenty-three adult male rhesus monkeys were used to evaluate these two methods. After a period of adaptation, saliva samples were collected from 21 of 23 subjects. Saliva collection was faster with the pole than with the screen method (P method was not suitable for some animals because of their tendency to bite off the attached rope. An analysis of 19 saliva samples revealed a mean cortisol concentration of 0.84 microg/dl (range 0.27-1.77 microg/dl). There was no statistically significant difference in cortisol value between methods used (P > 0.22). The influence of the flavoring on the cortisol assay was tested, and was found to have no significant effect (P > 0.28). Our results indicate that either technique can be used to safely collect saliva from unrestrained adult monkeys. Choice of technique will depend on the proclivities of individual monkeys.

  15. Neural mechanisms of interstimulus interval-dependent responses in the primary auditory cortex of awake cats

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    Qin Ling

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Primary auditory cortex (AI neurons show qualitatively distinct response features to successive acoustic signals depending on the inter-stimulus intervals (ISI. Such ISI-dependent AI responses are believed to underlie, at least partially, categorical perception of click trains (elemental vs. fused quality and stop consonant-vowel syllables (eg.,/da/-/ta/continuum. Methods Single unit recordings were conducted on 116 AI neurons in awake cats. Rectangular clicks were presented either alone (single click paradigm or in a train fashion with variable ISI (2–480 ms (click-train paradigm. Response features of AI neurons were quantified as a function of ISI: one measure was related to the degree of stimulus locking (temporal modulation transfer function [tMTF] and another measure was based on firing rate (rate modulation transfer function [rMTF]. An additional modeling study was performed to gain insight into neurophysiological bases of the observed responses. Results In the click-train paradigm, the majority of the AI neurons ("synchronization type"; n = 72 showed stimulus-locking responses at long ISIs. The shorter cutoff ISI for stimulus-locking responses was on average ~30 ms and was level tolerant in accordance with the perceptual boundary of click trains and of consonant-vowel syllables. The shape of tMTF of those neurons was either band-pass or low-pass. The single click paradigm revealed, at maximum, four response periods in the following order: 1st excitation, 1st suppression, 2nd excitation then 2nd suppression. The 1st excitation and 1st suppression was found exclusively in the synchronization type, implying that the temporal interplay between excitation and suppression underlies stimulus-locking responses. Among these neurons, those showing the 2nd suppression had band-pass tMTF whereas those with low-pass tMTF never showed the 2nd suppression, implying that tMTF shape is mediated through the 2nd suppression. The

  16. Case Report: Emergency awake craniotomy for cerebral abscess in a patient with unrepaired cyanotic congenital heart disease [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corinne D’Antico

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available We report the case of a 39-year-old male with complex cyanotic congenital heart disease undergoing emergency craniotomy for a cerebral abscess. Maintenance of intraoperative hemodynamic stability and adequate tissue oxygenation during anesthesia may be challenging in patients with cyanotic congenital heart disease. In this case, we decided to perform the surgery as an awake craniotomy after interdisciplinary consensus. We discuss general aspects of anesthetic management during awake craniotomy and specific concerns in the perioperative care of patients with congenital heart disease.

  17. Whisking-Related Changes in Neuronal Firing and Membrane Potential Dynamics in the Somatosensory Thalamus of Awake Mice

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    Nadia Urbain

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The thalamus transmits sensory information to the neocortex and receives neocortical, subcortical, and neuromodulatory inputs. Despite its obvious importance, surprisingly little is known about thalamic function in awake animals. Here, using intracellular and extracellular recordings in awake head-restrained mice, we investigate membrane potential dynamics and action potential firing in the two major thalamic nuclei related to whisker sensation, the ventral posterior medial nucleus (VPM and the posterior medial group (Pom, which receive distinct inputs from brainstem and neocortex. We find heterogeneous state-dependent dynamics in both nuclei, with an overall increase in action potential firing during active states. Whisking increased putative lemniscal and corticothalamic excitatory inputs onto VPM and Pom neurons, respectively. A subpopulation of VPM cells fired spikes phase-locked to the whisking cycle during free whisking, and these cells may therefore signal whisker position. Our results suggest differential processing of whisking comparing thalamic nuclei at both sub- and supra-threshold levels.

  18. A method for closed-loop presentation of sensory stimuli conditional on the internal brain-state of awake animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutishauser, Ueli; Kotowicz, Andreas; Laurent, Gilles

    2013-04-30

    Brain activity often consists of interactions between internal-or on-going-and external-or sensory-activity streams, resulting in complex, distributed patterns of neural activity. Investigation of such interactions could benefit from closed-loop experimental protocols in which one stream can be controlled depending on the state of the other. We describe here methods to present rapid and precisely timed visual stimuli to awake animals, conditional on features of the animal's on-going brain state; those features are the presence, power and phase of oscillations in local field potentials (LFP). The system can process up to 64 channels in real time. We quantified its performance using simulations, synthetic data and animal experiments (chronic recordings in the dorsal cortex of awake turtles). The delay from detection of an oscillation to the onset of a visual stimulus on an LCD screen was 47.5ms and visual-stimulus onset could be locked to the phase of ongoing oscillations at any frequency ≤40Hz. Our software's architecture is flexible, allowing on-the-fly modifications by experimenters and the addition of new closed-loop control and analysis components through plugins. The source code of our system "StimOMatic" is available freely as open-source.

  19. Five-Minute Awake Snoring Test for Determining CPAP Pressures (Five-Minute CPAP Test): A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camacho, Macario; Ruoff, Chad M.; Kawai, Makoto; Modi, Rahul; Arbee, Jabri; Hekmat, Anahid; Robertson, Matthew; Certal, Victor; Capasso, Robson; Kushida, Clete A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To develop a quick, simple, bedside test for determining continuous positive airway pressures (CPAP) for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) patients. Study Design. Prospective case series at a tertiary medical center. Methods. The Five-Minute Awake Snoring Test for Determining CPAP (Five-Minute CPAP Test) was developed and tested. Patients wear a soft-gel nasal triangle mask while holding a tongue depressor with the wide section (1.75 cm) between the teeth. Fixed pressure nasal CPAP is applied while the patient simulates snoring at 4 centimeters of water pressure. The pressure is incrementally titrated up and then down to determine the lowest pressure at which the patient cannot snore (Quiet Pressure). Results. Overall, thirty-eight patients participated. All could simulate snoring. Correlation coefficients were statistically significant between Quiet Pressures and body mass index (rs = 0.60 [strong positive relationship], p = 0.0088), apnea-hypopnea index (rs = 0.49 [moderate positive relationship], p = 0.039), lowest oxygen saturation (rs = −0.47 [moderate negative relationship], p = 0.048), and oxygen desaturation index (rs = 0.62 [strong positive relationship], p = 0.0057). Conclusion. This pilot study introduces a new concept, which is the final product of over one year of exploration, development, and testing. Five-Minute CPAP Test is a quick, inexpensive, and safe bedside test based on supine awake simulated snoring with nasal CPAP. PMID:26881088

  20. Five-Minute Awake Snoring Test for Determining CPAP Pressures (Five-Minute CPAP Test: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Macario Camacho

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To develop a quick, simple, bedside test for determining continuous positive airway pressures (CPAP for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA patients. Study Design. Prospective case series at a tertiary medical center. Methods. The Five-Minute Awake Snoring Test for Determining CPAP (Five-Minute CPAP Test was developed and tested. Patients wear a soft-gel nasal triangle mask while holding a tongue depressor with the wide section (1.75 cm between the teeth. Fixed pressure nasal CPAP is applied while the patient simulates snoring at 4 centimeters of water pressure. The pressure is incrementally titrated up and then down to determine the lowest pressure at which the patient cannot snore (Quiet Pressure. Results. Overall, thirty-eight patients participated. All could simulate snoring. Correlation coefficients were statistically significant between Quiet Pressures and body mass index (rs=0.60 [strong positive relationship], p=0.0088, apnea-hypopnea index (rs=0.49 [moderate positive relationship], p=0.039, lowest oxygen saturation (rs=-0.47 [moderate negative relationship], p=0.048, and oxygen desaturation index (rs=0.62 [strong positive relationship], p=0.0057. Conclusion. This pilot study introduces a new concept, which is the final product of over one year of exploration, development, and testing. Five-Minute CPAP Test is a quick, inexpensive, and safe bedside test based on supine awake simulated snoring with nasal CPAP.

  1. Five-Minute Awake Snoring Test for Determining CPAP Pressures (Five-Minute CPAP Test): A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camacho, Macario; Ruoff, Chad M; Kawai, Makoto; Modi, Rahul; Arbee, Jabri; Hekmat, Anahid; Robertson, Matthew; Zaghi, Soroush; Certal, Victor; Capasso, Robson; Kushida, Clete A

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To develop a quick, simple, bedside test for determining continuous positive airway pressures (CPAP) for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) patients. Study Design. Prospective case series at a tertiary medical center. Methods. The Five-Minute Awake Snoring Test for Determining CPAP (Five-Minute CPAP Test) was developed and tested. Patients wear a soft-gel nasal triangle mask while holding a tongue depressor with the wide section (1.75 cm) between the teeth. Fixed pressure nasal CPAP is applied while the patient simulates snoring at 4 centimeters of water pressure. The pressure is incrementally titrated up and then down to determine the lowest pressure at which the patient cannot snore (Quiet Pressure). Results. Overall, thirty-eight patients participated. All could simulate snoring. Correlation coefficients were statistically significant between Quiet Pressures and body mass index (r s = 0.60 [strong positive relationship], p = 0.0088), apnea-hypopnea index (r s = 0.49 [moderate positive relationship], p = 0.039), lowest oxygen saturation (r s = -0.47 [moderate negative relationship], p = 0.048), and oxygen desaturation index (r s = 0.62 [strong positive relationship], p = 0.0057). Conclusion. This pilot study introduces a new concept, which is the final product of over one year of exploration, development, and testing. Five-Minute CPAP Test is a quick, inexpensive, and safe bedside test based on supine awake simulated snoring with nasal CPAP.

  2. Apnea after Awake Regional and General Anesthesia in Infants : The General Anesthesia Compared to Spinal Anesthesia Study-Comparing Apnea and Neurodevelopmental Outcomes, a Randomized Controlled Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Davidson, Andrew J.; Morton, Neil S.; Arnup, Sarah J.; De Graaff, Jurgen C.; Disma, Nicola; Withington, Davinia E.; Frawley, Geoff; Hunt, Rodney W.; Hardy, Pollyanna; Khotcholava, Magda; Von Ungern Sternberg, Britta S.; Wilton, Niall; Tuo, Pietro; Salvo, Ida; Ormond, Gillian; Stargatt, Robyn; Locatelli, Bruno Guido; McCann, Mary Ellen; Lee, Katherine; Sheppard, Suzette; Hartmann, Penelope; Ragg, Philip; Backstrom, Marie; Costi, David; Von Ungern-Sternberg, Britta S.; Knottenbelt, Graham; Montobbio, Giovanni; Mameli, Leila; Giribaldi, Gaia; Prato, Alessio Pini; Mattioli, Girolamo; Wolfler, Andrea; Izzo, Francesca; Sonzogni, Valter; Van Gool, Jose T D G; Numan, Sandra C.; Kalkman, Cor J.; Hagenaars, J. H M; Absalom, Anthony R.; Hoekstra, Frouckje M.; Volkers, Martin J.; Furue, Koto; Gaudreault, Josee; Berde, Charles; Soriano, Sulpicio; Young, Vanessa; Sethna, Navil; Kovatsis, Pete; Cravero, Joseph P.; Bellinger, David; Marmor, Jacki; Lynn, Anne; Ivanova, Iskra; Hunyady, Agnes; Verma, Shilpa; Polaner, David; Thomas, Joss; Meuller, Martin; Haret, Denisa; Szmuk, Peter; Steiner, Jeffery; Kravitz, Brian; Suresh, Santhanam; Hays, Stephen R.; Taenzer, Andreas H.; Maxwell, Lynne G.; Williams, Robert K.; Bell, Graham T.; Dorris, Liam; Adey, Claire; Bagshaw, Oliver; Chisakuta, Anthony; Eissa, Ayman; Stoddart, Peter; Davis, Annette; Myles, Paul; Wolf, Andy; McIntosh, Neil; Carlin, John; Leslie, Kate; De Lima, Jonathan; Hammer, Greg; Field, David; Gebski, Val; Tibboel, Dick

    2015-01-01

    Background: Postoperative apnea is a complication in young infants. Awake regional anesthesia (RA) may reduce the risk; however, the evidence is weak. The General Anesthesia compared to Spinal anesthesia study is a randomized, controlled trial designed to assess the influence of general anesthesia (

  3. Apnea after Awake Regional and General Anesthesia in Infants : The General Anesthesia Compared to Spinal Anesthesia Study-Comparing Apnea and Neurodevelopmental Outcomes, a Randomized Controlled Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Davidson, Andrew J; Morton, Neil S; Arnup, Sarah J; de Graaff, Jurgen C; Disma, Nicola; Withington, Davinia E; Frawley, Geoff; Hunt, Rodney W; Hardy, Pollyanna; Khotcholava, Magda; von Ungern Sternberg, Britta S; Wilton, Niall; Tuo, Pietro; Salvo, Ida; Ormond, Gillian; Stargatt, Robyn; Locatelli, Bruno Guido; McCann, Mary Ellen; Absalom, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Postoperative apnea is a complication in young infants. Awake regional anesthesia (RA) may reduce the risk; however, the evidence is weak. The General Anesthesia compared to Spinal anesthesia study is a randomized, controlled trial designed to assess the influence of general anesthesia (

  4. Decapitation in rats: latency to unconsciousness and the 'wave of death'.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clementina M van Rijn

    Full Text Available The question whether decapitation is a humane method of euthanasia in awake animals is being debated. To gather arguments in this debate, obsolete rats were decapitated while recording the EEG, both of awake rats and of anesthetized rats. Following decapitation a fast and global loss of power of the EEG was observed; the power in the 13-100 Hz frequency band, expressing cognitive activity, decreased according to an exponential decay function to half the initial value within 4 seconds. Whereas the pre-decapitation EEG of the anesthetized animals showed a burst suppression pattern quite different from the awake animals, the power in the postdecapitation EEG did not differ between the two groups. This might indicate that either the power of the EEG does not correlate well with consciousness or that consciousness is briefly regained in the anesthetized group after decapitation. Remarkably, after 50 seconds (awake group or 80 seconds (anesthetized group following decapitation, a high amplitude slow wave was observed. The EEG before this wave had more power than the signal after the wave. This wave might be due to a simultaneous massive loss of membrane potentials of the neurons. Still functioning ion channels, which keep the membrane potential intact before the wave, might explain the observed power difference. Two conclusions were drawn from this experiment. It is likely that consciousness vanishes within seconds after decapitation, implying that decapitation is a quick and not an inhumane method of euthanasia. It seems that the massive wave which can be recorded approximately one minute after decapitation reflects the ultimate border between life and death. This observation might have implications in the discussions on the appropriate time for organ donation.

  5. The neuropharmacology of upper airway motor control in the awake and asleep states: implications for obstructive sleep apnoea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Horner Richard L

    2001-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Obstructive sleep apnoea is a common and serious breathing problem that is caused by effects of sleep on pharyngeal muscle tone in individuals with narrow upper airways. There has been increasing focus on delineating the brain mechanisms that modulate pharyngeal muscle activity in the awake and asleep states in order to understand the pathogenesis of obstructive apnoeas and to develop novel neurochemical treatments. Although initial clinical studies have met with only limited success, it is proposed that more rational and realistic approaches may be devised for neurochemical modulation of pharyngeal muscle tone as the relevant neurotransmitters and receptors that are involved in sleep-dependent modulation are identified following basic experiments.

  6. [Venoarterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation in an awake patient : Use of the mobile ECMO team for fulminant pulmonary embolism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, D; Lotz, C; Kippnich, M; Adami, P; Kranke, P; Roewer, N; Kredel, M; Schimmer, C; Leyh, R; Muellenbach, R M

    2015-05-01

    The current report highlights the use of venoarterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (va-ECMO) in a case of pulmonary embolism complicated by right ventricular failure. A 38-year-old woman was admitted to a secondary care hospital with dyspnea and systemic hypotension. Diagnostic testing revealed a massive pulmonary embolism. Thrombolytic therapy was unsuccessful necessitating thromboendarterectomy in the presence of cardiogenic shock. To allow the necessary transport of the highly unstable patient to a tertiary care center a mobile ECMO team was called in. The team immediately initiated awake va-ECMO as a bridge to therapy. Extracorporeal support subsequently allowed a safe transportation and successful completion of the surgical procedure with complete recovery.

  7. [Somatic pain sensitivity under indometacin induced gastric and small intestinal injury in rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iarushkina, N I; Bagaeva, T R; Filaretova, L P

    2014-01-01

    The aim was to study the effect of indometacin (IM) induced gastrointestinal injury on somatic pain sensitivity in awake rats. IM was administered at the ulcerogenic dose (35 mg/kg, s. c.) to fasted (24 h) and fed rats. Somatic pain sensitivity was evaluated using a tail flick test. Latency time was measured under conditions of the formation of gastric erosion (1 - 4 h after IM injection) as well as small intestinal injury (24, 48 and 72 h after IM injection). IM administration caused the gastric erosion formation only in fasted rats (4 h after the administration) and the small intestinal injury in both fasted and fed rats (24, 48, 72 h after the administration). Indomethacin-caused gastric and small intestinal injury resulted in an increase in tail flick latency. We did not observe any changes in tail flick latency in IM-treated rats without significant gastrointestinal injury. The gastrointestinal injury was accompanied by signs of chronic stress: long-lasting increase in corticosterone blood level, adrenal hypertrophy, thymus involution, and loss of body weight. Thus, the IM-induced gastrointestinal injury formation resulted in somatic pain inhibition in awake rats.

  8. Success rates and complications of awake caudal versus spinal block in preterm infants undergoing inguinal hernia repair: A prospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahin Seyedhejazi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Inguinal hernia is a common disease in preterm infants necessitating surgical repair. Despite the increased risk of postoperative apnea in preterm infants, the procedure was conventionally performed under general anesthesia. Recently, regional anesthesia approaches, including spinal and caudal blocks have been proposed as safe and efficient alternative anesthesia methods in this group of patients. The current study evaluates awake caudal and spinal blocks in preterm infants undergoing inguinal hernia repair. Materials and Methods: In a randomized clinical trial, 66 neonates and infants (weight <5 kg undergoing inguinal hernia repair were recruited in Tabriz Teaching Children Hospital during a 12-month period. They were randomly divided into two equal groups; receiving either caudal block by 1 ml/kg of 0.25% bupivacaine plus 20 μg adrenaline (group C or spinal block by 1 mg/kg of 0.5% bupivacaine plus 20 μg adrenaline (group S. Vital signs and pain scores were documented during operation and thereafter up to 24 h after operation. Results: Decrease in heart rate and systolic blood pressure was significantly higher in group C throughout the study period (P < 0.05. The mean recovery time was significantly higher in group S (27.3 ± 5.5 min vs. 21.8 ± 9.3 min; P = 0.03. Postoperative need for analgesia was significantly more frequent in group S (75.8% vs. 36.4%; P = 0.001. Failure in anesthesia was significantly higher in group S (24.4% vs. 6.1%; P = 0.04. Conclusion: More appropriate success rate, duration of recovery and postoperative need of analgesics could contribute to caudal block being a superior anesthesia technique compared to spinal anesthesia in awaked preterm infants undergoing inguinal hernia repair.

  9. Advantages and disadvantages of intraoperative language tasks in awake surgery: a three-task approach for prefrontal tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rofes, A; Spena, G; Miozzo, A; Fontanella, M M; Miceli, G

    2015-12-01

    Multidisciplinary efforts are being made to provide surgical teams with sensitive and specific tasks for language mapping in awake surgery. Researchers and clinicians have elaborated different tasks over time. A fair amount of work has been directed to study the neurofunctional correlates of some of these tasks, and there is recent interest in their standardization. However, little discussion exists on the advantages and disadvantages that each task poses from the perspective of the cognitive neuroscience of language. Such an approach may be a relevant step to assess task validity, to avoid using tasks that tap onto similar processes, and to provide patients with a surgical treatment that ensures maximal tumor resection while avoiding postoperative language deficits. An understanding of the language components that each task entails may also be relevant to improve the current assessments and the ways in which tasks are administered, and to disentangle neurofunctional questions. We reviewed 17 language mapping tasks that have been used in awake surgery. Overt production tasks have been a preferred choice over comprehension tasks. Tasks tapping lexico-semantic processes, particularly object-naming, maintain their role as gold standards. Automated speech tasks are used to detect speech errors and to set the amplitude of the stimulator. Comprehension tasks, reading and writing tasks, and tasks that assess grammatical aspects of language may be regularly administered in the near future. We provide examples of a three-task approach we are administering to patients with prefrontal lesions. We believe that future advances in this area are contingent upon reviewing gold standards and introducing new assessment tools.

  10. Topical airway anesthesia for awake fiberoptic intubation: Comparison between airway nerve blocks and nebulized lignocaine by ultrasonic nebulizer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babita Gupta

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Overview: Awake fiberoptic bronchoscope (FOB guided intubation is the gold standard of airway management in patients with cervical spine injury. It is essential to sufficiently anesthetize the upper airway before the performance of awake FOB guided intubation in order to ensure patient comfort and cooperation. This randomized controlled study was performed to compare two methods of airway anesthesia, namely ultrasonic nebulization of local anesthetic and performance of airway blocks. Materials and Methods: A total of 50 adult patients with cervical spine injury were randomly allocated into two groups. Group L received airway anesthesia through ultrasonic nebulization of 10 ml of 4% lignocaine and Group NB received airway blocks (bilateral superior laryngeal and transtracheal recurrent laryngeal each with 2 ml of 2% lignocaine and viscous lignocaine gargles. FOB guided orotracheal intubation was then performed. Hemodynamic variables at baseline and during the procedure, patient recall, vocal cord visibility, ease of intubation, coughing/gagging episodes, and signs of lignocaine toxicity were noted. Results: The observations did not reveal any significant differences in demographics or hemodynamic parameters at any time during the study. However, the time taken for intubation was significantly lower in Group NB as compared with the Group L. Group L had an increased number of coughing/gagging episodes as compared with Group NB. Vocal cord visibility and ease of intubation were better in patients who received airway blocks and hence the amount of supplemental lignocaine used was less in this group. Overall patient comfort was better in Group NB with fewer incidences of unpleasant recalls as compared with Group L. Conclusion: Upper airway blocks provide better quality of anesthesia than lignocaine nebulization as assessed by patient recall of procedure, coughing/gagging episodes, ease of intubation, vocal cord visibility, and time taken to intubate.

  11. An analysis approach for high-field fMRI data from awake non-human primates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steffen Stoewer

    Full Text Available fMRI experiments with awake non-human primates (NHP have seen a surge of applications in recent years. However, the standard fMRI analysis tools designed for human experiments are not optimal for analysis of NHP fMRI data collected at high fields. There are several reasons for this, including the trial-based nature of NHP experiments, with inter-trial periods being of no interest, and segmentation artefacts and distortions that may result from field changes due to movement. We demonstrate an approach that allows us to address some of these issues consisting of the following steps: 1 Trial-based experimental design. 2 Careful control of subject movement. 3 Computer-assisted selection of trials devoid of artefacts and animal motion. 4 Nonrigid between-trial and rigid within-trial realignment of concatenated data from temporally separated trials and sessions. 5 Linear interpolation of inter-trial intervals and high-pass filtering of temporally continuous data 6 Removal of interpolated data and reconcatenation of datasets before statistical analysis with SPM. We have implemented a software toolbox, fMRI Sandbox (http://code.google.com/p/fmri-sandbox/, for semi-automated application of these processing steps that interfaces with SPM software. Here, we demonstrate that our methodology provides significant improvements for the analysis of awake monkey fMRI data acquired at high-field. The method may also be useful for clinical applications with subjects that are unwilling or unable to remain motionless for the whole duration of a functional scan.

  12. Leader as achiever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dienemann, Jacqueline

    2002-01-01

    This article examines one outcome of leadership: productive achievement. Without achievement one is judged to not truly be a leader. Thus, the ideal leader must be a visionary, a critical thinker, an expert, a communicator, a mentor, and an achiever of organizational goals. This article explores the organizational context that supports achievement, measures of quality nursing care, fiscal accountability, leadership development, rewards and punishments, and the educational content and teaching strategies to prepare graduates to be achievers.

  13. Activation-induced resetting of cerebral oxygen and glucose uptake in the rat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, P L; Linde, R; Hasselbalch, S G;

    1998-01-01

    In the clinical setting it has been shown that activation will increase cerebral glucose uptake in excess of cerebral oxygen uptake. To study this phenomenon further, this study presents an experimental setup that enables precise determination of the ratio between cerebral uptake of glucose...... and oxygen in the awake rat. Global CBF was measured by the Kety-Schmidt technique, and the ratio between cerebral uptake rates for oxygen, glucose, and lactate was calculated from cerebral arterial-venous differences. During baseline conditions, rats were kept in a closed box designed to minimize...

  14. Wide-Awake Primary Flexor Tendon Repair, Tenolysis, and Tendon Transfer

    OpenAIRE

    Tang, Jin Bo

    2015-01-01

    Tendon surgery is unique because it should ensure tendon gliding after surgery. Tendon surgery now can be performed under local anesthesia without tourniquet, by injecting epinephrine mixed with lidocaine, to achieve vasoconstriction in the area of surgery. This method allows the tendon to move actively during surgery to test tendon function intraoperatively and to ensure the tendon is properly repaired before leaving the operating table. I applied this method to primary flexor tendon repair ...

  15. The Effects of Changing Attention and Context in an Awake Offline Processing Period on Visual Long-Term Memory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy Michael Ellmore

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available There is accumulating evidence that sleep as well as awake offline processing is important for the transformation of new experiences into long-term memory. Yet much remains to be understood about how various cognitive factors influence the efficiency of awake offline processing. In the present study we investigated how changes in attention and context in the immediate period after exposure to new visual information influences long-term memory consolidation. After presentation of multiple naturalistic scenes within a working memory paradigm, recognition was assessed 30 minutes and 24 hours later in three groups of subjects. One group of subjects engaged in a focused attention task (the Revised Attentional Network Task (R-ANT in the 30 minutes after exposure to the scenes. Another group of subjects remained in the testing room during the 30 minutes after scene exposure and engaged in no goal- or task-directed activities. A third group of subjects left the testing room and returned 30 minutes later. A signal detection analysis revealed no significant differences among the three groups in hits, false alarms, or sensitivity on the 30-minute recognition task. At the 24-hour recognition test, the group that performed the R-ANT made significantly fewer hits compared to the group that left the testing room and didn’t perform the attention ask. The group that performed the R-ANT and the group that remained in the testing room during the 30-minute post-exposure interval made significantly fewer false alarms on the 24-hour recognition test compared to the group that left the testing room. The group that stayed in the testing room and engaged in no goal- or task-directed activities exhibited significantly higher sensitivity (d’ compared to the group that left the testing room and the group that performed the R-ANT task. Staying in the same context after exposure to new information and resting quietly with minimal engagement of attention results in the

  16. Analisa Data Dan Titik Berat Sayap Pada Pesawat Tanpa Awak Dan Pengujian Impak Dengan Material Aluminium – Magnesium (96%-4%)

    OpenAIRE

    Marbun, Ivan Basker

    2014-01-01

    Aluminium banyak digunakan didalam aplikasi bidang automotive yang memiliki sifat mekanis yang memadai seperti ketangguhan (impak). di dalam pengecoran aluminium memiliki titik kelemahan tersendiri. maka perlu dilakukan penelitian dengan perpaduan dua material antara Aluminium-Magnesium yang dipakai untuk pembuatan pesawat tanpa awak. Pada penelitian ini dilakukan untuk membandingkan berat dari hasil perhitungan teori dan hasil pengecoran pesawat dan titik berat (pusat massa ) sayap pesawat u...

  17. Effect of Equal Daily Doses Achieved by Different Power Densities of Low-Level Laser Therapy at 635 nm on Open Skin Wound Healing in Normal and Diabetic Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Róbert Kilík

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective. Despite the fact that the molecular mechanism of low-level laser therapy (LLLT is not yet known, the exploitation of phototherapy in clinical medicine and surgery is of great interest. The present study investigates the effects of LLLT on open skin wound healing in normal and diabetic rats. Materials and Methods. Four round full-thickness skin wounds on dorsum were performed in male adult nondiabetic (n=24 and diabetic (n=24 Sprague–Dawley rats. AlGaInP (635 nm, wavelength; 5 J/cm2, daily dose was used to deliver power densities of 1, 5, and 15 mW/cm2 three times daily until euthanasia. Results. PMNL infiltration was lower in the irradiated groups (15 mW/cm2. The synthesis and organisation of collagen fibres were consecutively enhanced in the 5 mW/cm2 and 15 mW/cm2 groups compared to the others in nondiabetic rats. In the diabetic group the only significant difference was recorded in the ratio PMNL/Ma at 15 mW/cm2. A significant difference in the number of newly formed capillaries in the irradiated group (5, 15 mW/cm2 was recorded on day six after injury compared to the control group. Conclusion. LLLT confers a protective effect against excessive inflammatory tissue response; it stimulates neovascularization and the early formation of collagen fibres.

  18. Rise in DPA Following SDA-Rich Dietary Echium Oil Less Effective in Affording Anti-Arrhythmic Actions Compared to High DHA Levels Achieved with Fish Oil in Sprague-Dawley Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahinda Y. Abeywardena

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Stearidonic acid (SDA; C18:4n-3 has been suggested as an alternative to fish oil (FO for delivering health benefits of C ≥ 20 long-chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC n-3 PUFA. Echium oil (EO represents a non-genetically-modified source of SDA available commercially. This study compared EO and FO in relation to alterations in plasma and tissue fatty acids, and for their ability to afford protection against ischemia-induced cardiac arrhythmia and ventricular fibrillation (VF. Rats were fed (12 weeks diets supplemented with either EO or FO at three dose levels (1, 3 and 5% w/w; n = 18 per group. EO failed to influence C22:6n-3 (DHA but increased C22:5n-3 (DPA in tissues dose-dependently, especially in heart tissue. Conversely, DHA in hearts of FO rats showed dose-related elevation; 14.8%–24.1% of total fatty acids. Kidney showed resistance for incorporation of LC n-3 PUFA. Overall, FO provided greater cardioprotection than EO. At the highest dose level, FO rats displayed lower (p < 0.05 episodes of VF% (29% vs. 73% and duration (22.7 ± 12.0 vs. 75.8 ± 17.1 s than the EO group but at 3% EO was comparable to FO. We conclude that there is no endogenous conversion of SDA to DHA, and that DPA may be associated with limited cardiac benefit.

  19. Rise in DPA Following SDA-Rich Dietary Echium Oil Less Effective in Affording Anti-Arrhythmic Actions Compared to High DHA Levels Achieved with Fish Oil in Sprague-Dawley Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abeywardena, Mahinda Y; Adams, Michael; Dallimore, Julie; Kitessa, Soressa M

    2016-01-04

    Stearidonic acid (SDA; C18:4n-3) has been suggested as an alternative to fish oil (FO) for delivering health benefits of C ≥ 20 long-chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC n-3 PUFA). Echium oil (EO) represents a non-genetically-modified source of SDA available commercially. This study compared EO and FO in relation to alterations in plasma and tissue fatty acids, and for their ability to afford protection against ischemia-induced cardiac arrhythmia and ventricular fibrillation (VF). Rats were fed (12 weeks) diets supplemented with either EO or FO at three dose levels (1, 3 and 5% w/w; n = 18 per group). EO failed to influence C22:6n-3 (DHA) but increased C22:5n-3 (DPA) in tissues dose-dependently, especially in heart tissue. Conversely, DHA in hearts of FO rats showed dose-related elevation; 14.8%-24.1% of total fatty acids. Kidney showed resistance for incorporation of LC n-3 PUFA. Overall, FO provided greater cardioprotection than EO. At the highest dose level, FO rats displayed lower (p DHA, and that DPA may be associated with limited cardiac benefit.

  20. Neural correlates of face and object perception in an awake chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes examined by scalp-surface event-related potentials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirokata Fukushima

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The neural system of our closest living relative, the chimpanzee, is a topic of increasing research interest. However, electrophysiological examinations of neural activity during visual processing in awake chimpanzees are currently lacking. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In the present report, skin-surface event-related brain potentials (ERPs were measured while a fully awake chimpanzee observed photographs of faces and objects in two experiments. In Experiment 1, human faces and stimuli composed of scrambled face images were displayed. In Experiment 2, three types of pictures (faces, flowers, and cars were presented. The waveforms evoked by face stimuli were distinguished from other stimulus types, as reflected by an enhanced early positivity appearing before 200 ms post stimulus, and an enhanced late negativity after 200 ms, around posterior and occipito-temporal sites. Face-sensitive activity was clearly observed in both experiments. However, in contrast to the robustly observed face-evoked N170 component in humans, we found that faces did not elicit a peak in the latency range of 150-200 ms in either experiment. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Although this pilot study examined a single subject and requires further examination, the observed scalp voltage patterns suggest that selective processing of faces in the chimpanzee brain can be detected by recording surface ERPs. In addition, this non-invasive method for examining an awake chimpanzee can be used to extend our knowledge of the characteristics of visual cognition in other primate species.

  1. Visual Responsiveness of Neurons in the Secondary Somatosensory Area and its Surrounding Parietal Operculum Regions in Awake Macaque Monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hihara, Sayaka; Taoka, Miki; Tanaka, Michio; Iriki, Atsushi

    2015-11-01

    Previous neurophysiological studies performed in macaque monkeys have shown that the secondary somatosensory cortex (SII) is essentially engaged in the processing of somatosensory information and no other sensory input has been reported. In contrast, recent human brain-imaging studies have revealed the effects of visual and auditory stimuli on SII activity, which suggest multisensory integration in the human SII. To determine whether multisensory responses of the SII also exist in nonhuman primates, we recorded single-unit activity in response to visual and auditory stimuli from the SII and surrounding regions in 8 hemispheres from 6 awake monkeys. Among 1157 recorded neurons, 306 neurons responded to visual stimuli. These visual neurons usually responded to rather complex stimuli, such as stimulation of the peripersonal space (40.5%), observation of human action (29.1%), and moving-object stimulation outside the monkey's reach (23.9%). We occasionally applied auditory stimuli to visual neurons and found 10 auditory-responsive neurons that exhibited somatosensory responses. The visual neurons were distributed continuously along the lateral sulcus covering the entire SII, along with other somatosensory neurons. These results highlight the need to investigate novel functional roles-other than somesthetic sensory processing-of the SII.

  2. Evaluation of the kappa-opioid receptor-selective tracer [{sup 11}C]GR103545 in awake rhesus macaques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schoultz, Bent W. [University of Oslo, Department of Chemistry, Oslo (Norway); Hjornevik, Trine; Willoch, Frode [University of Oslo, Centre for Molecular Biology and Neuroscience and Institute of Basic Medical Sciences, Oslo (Norway); Akershus University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Loerenskog (Norway); Marton, Janos [ABX Advanced Biochemical Compounds GmbH, Radeberg (Germany); Noda, Akihiro; Murakami, Yoshihiro; Miyoshi, Sosuke; Nishimura, Shintaro [Medical and Pharmacological Research Center Foundation, Basic Research Department, Hakui City, Ishikawa (Japan); Aarstad, Erik [University College of London, Institute of Nuclear Medicine, London (United Kingdom); Drzezga, Alexander [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Munich (Germany); Matsunari, Ichiro [Medical and Pharmacological Research Center Foundation, Clinical Research Department, Hakui City, Ishikawa (Japan); Henriksen, Gjermund [University of Oslo, Department of Chemistry, Oslo (Norway); Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Munich (Germany)

    2010-06-15

    The recent development in radiosynthesis of the {sup 11}C-carbamate function increases the potential of [{sup 11}C]GR103545, which for the last decade has been regarded as promising for imaging the kappa-opioid receptor ({kappa}-OR) with PET. In the present study, [{sup 11}C]GR103545 was evaluated in awake rhesus macaques. Separate investigations were performed to clarify the OR subtype selectivity of this compound. Regional brain uptake kinetics of [{sup 11}C]GR103545 was studied 0-120 min after injection. The binding affinity and opioid subtype selectivity of [{sup 11}C]GR103545 was determined in cells transfected with cloned human opioid receptors. In vitro binding assays demonstrated a high affinity of GR103545 for {kappa}-OR (K{sub i} = 0.02 {+-}0.01 nM) with excellent selectivity over {mu}-OR (6 x 10{sup 2}-fold) and {delta}-OR (2 x 10{sup 4}-fold). PET imaging revealed a volume of distribution (V{sub T}) pattern consistent with the known distribution of {kappa}-OR, with striatum = temporal cortex > cingulate cortex > frontal cortex > parietal cortex > thalamus > cerebellum. [{sup 11}C]GR103545 is selective for {kappa}-OR and holds promise for use to selectively depict and quantify this receptor in humans by means of PET. (orig.)

  3. Dexmedetomidine for awake intubation and an opioid-free general anesthesia in a superobese patient with suspected difficult intubation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaszynski T

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Tomasz Gaszynski,1 Ewelina Gaszynska,2 Tomasz Szewczyk31Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Therapy, 2Department of Hygiene and Health Promotion, 3Department of Gastroenterology, Oncology, and General Surgery, Barlicki University Hospital, Medical University of Lodz, PolandAbstract: Super-obese patients (body mass index [BMI] >50 kg/m2 are at a particularly high risk of anesthesia-related complications during postoperative period, eg, critical respiratory events including respiratory arrest, and over-sedation leading to problems with maintaining airway open, hypoxia and hypercapnia. In this paper authors present a case of a 39-year-old super-obese (BMI 62.3 kg/m2 female patient who was admitted for surgical treatment of obesity. Preanesthesia evaluation revealed hypertension and type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM as comorbidities as well as potential for a difficult intubation– neck circumference of 46 cm, reduced neck mobility and DM type 2. Patient was intubated using "awake intubation" method using topical anesthesia and dexmedetomidine infusion. General anesthesia was maintained with sevoflurane and dexmedetomidine infusion instead of opioid administration in "opioid-free anesthesia method".Keywords: morbid obesity, non-opioid anesthesia, dexmedetomidine

  4. 'No delays achiever'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-05-01

    The latest version of the NHS Institute for Innovation and Improvement's 'no delays achiever', a web based tool created to help NHS organisations achieve the 18-week target for GP referrals to first treatment, is available at www.nodelaysachiever.nhs.uk.

  5. Wide Awake Parenting: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial of a parenting program for the management of post-partum fatigue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dunning Melissa

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Exhaustion and fatigue are commonly experienced by parents during the post-partum period, and can have implications for daily functioning, mental health and parenting practices. There is a need for the development of effective interventions to assist parents with the management of fatigue. This paper outlines the procedure for a randomised controlled study which aims to test the efficacy of Wide Awake Parenting, a program for the management of fatigue in the postnatal period. Methods/design Parents with an infant less than 6 months of age, and from seven Local Government Areas in Melbourne, Australia were invited to participate in this study. Parents were randomised to receive the Wide Awake Parenting program (intervention groups or usual care (control group offered by health services. The Wide Awake Parenting program provides parents with psycho-education and information about fatigue, and strategies to reduce its effects either via a self-directed method, or professionally led with a home visit and telephone support. Baseline data will be collected prior to randomisation, and further data will be collected at 2- and 6-weeks post intervention. Discussion To our knowledge this is the first randomised controlled trial of a program which compares the efficacy of a self-management approach and health professional assistance for the management of fatigue in the early post-partum period. If effective, it could offer an important, universal public health management approach to this common health concern. Trial registration number Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry, ACTRN12611000133932.

  6. Awake extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) as bridge to recovery after left main coronary artery occlusion: a promising concept of haemodynamic support in cardiogenic shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alozie, Anthony; Kische, Stephan; Birken, Thomas; Kaminski, Alexander; Westphal, Bernd; Nöldge-Schomburg, Gabriele; Ince, Hüseyin; Steinhoff, Gustav

    2014-10-01

    Cardiogenic shock following acute myocardial infarction is associated with high mortality rate. Different management concepts including fluid management, inotropic support, intra aortic balloon counterpulsation (IABP) and extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) mainly in mechanically ventilated patients have been used as cornerstones of management. However, success rates have been disappointing. Few reports suggested that ECMO when performed under circumvention of mechanical ventilation, may offer some survival benefits. We herein present our experience with the use of veno-arterial ECMO as bridge to recovery in an awake and spontaneously breathing patient after left main coronary artery occlusion complicated by cardiogenic shock.

  7. NCLB: Achievement Robin Hood?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bracey, Gerald W.

    2008-01-01

    In his "Wall Street Journal" op-ed on the 25th of anniversary of "A Nation At Risk", former assistant secretary of education Chester E. Finn Jr. applauded the report for turning U.S. education away from equality and toward achievement. It was not surprising, then, that in mid-2008, Finn arranged a conference to examine the…

  8. Cognitive Processes and Achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Dennis; Randhawa, Bikkar S.

    For a group of 165 fourth- and fifth-grade students, four achievement test scores were correlated with success on nine tests designed to measure three cognitive functions: sustained attention, successive processing, and simultaneous processing. This experiment was designed in accordance with Luria's model of the three functional units of the…

  9. Environmental enrichment increases paired-pulse depression in rat auditory cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Percaccio, Cherie R; Engineer, Navzer D; Pruette, Autumn L; Pandya, Pritesh K; Moucha, Raluca; Rathbun, Daniel L; Kilgard, Michael P

    2005-11-01

    Temporal features are important for the identification of natural sounds. Earlier studies have shown that cortical processing of temporal information can be altered by long-term experience with modulated sounds. In a previous study, we observed that environmental enrichment dramatically increased the response of cortical neurons to single tone and noise burst stimuli in both awake and anesthetized rats. Here, we evaluate how enrichment influences temporal information processing in the auditory cortex. We recorded responses to repeated tones and noise bursts in awake rats using epidural evoked potentials and in anesthetized rats using microelectrodes. Enrichment increased the response of cortical neurons to stimuli presented at slow rates and decreased the response to stimuli presented at fast rates relative to controls. Our observation that enrichment substantially increased response strength and forward masking is consistent with earlier reports that long-term potentiation of cortical synapses is associated with increased paired-pulse depression. Enrichment also increased response synchronization at slow rates and decreased synchronization at fast rates. Paired-pulse depression increased within days of environmental enrichment and was restored to normal levels after return to standard housing conditions. These results are relevant to several clinical disorders characterized by abnormal gating of sensory information, including autism, schizophrenia, and dyslexia.

  10. Effects of continuous positive airway pressure on upper airway inspiratory dynamics in awake patients with sleep-disordered breathing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vérin, E; Similowski, T; Sériès, F

    2003-01-01

    Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is the main treatment of the obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS). We assessed its effects on the upper airway (UA) dynamics in response to bilateral anterior magnetic phrenic nerve stimulation (BAMPS) in 17 awake untreated OSAS patients (15 males; 52 +/- 7 years) whose effective CPAP (P(eff)) had been determined beforehand by a conventional titration sleep study. All twitch-related inspirations were flow-limited, flow first rising to a maximum (V(Imax)), then decreasing to a minimum (V(Imin)), and then increasing again (M-shaped pattern). Up to V(Imin), the relationship between driving pressure (P(d)) and flow (V) could adequately be fitted to a polynomial regression model (V = k(1)P(d) + k(2)P(d)(2); r(2) = 0.71-0.98, P < 0.0001). At atmospheric pressure V(Imax) was 700 +/- 377 ml s(-1), V(Imin) was 458 +/- 306 ml s(-1), k(1) was 154.5 +/- 63.9 ml s(-1) (cmH(2)O)(-1), and k(2) was 10.7 +/- 7.3 ml s(-1) (cmH(2)O)(-1). CPAP significantly increased V(Imax) and V(Imin) (peak values 1007 +/- 332 ml and 837 +/- 264 ml s(-1), respectively) as well as k(1) and k(2) (peak values 300.9 +/- 178.2 ml s(-1) (cmH(2)O)(-1) and 55.2 +/- 65.3 ml s(-1) (cmH(2)O)(-1), respectively). With increasing CPAP, k(1)/k(2) increased up to a peak value before decreasing. We defined as P(eff,stim) the CPAP value corresponding to the highest k(1)/k(2) value. P(eff,stim) was correlated with P(eff) (P(eff) = 7.0 +/- 2.0; P(eff,stim) = 6.4 +/- 2.6 cmH(2)O; r = 0.886; 95 % CI 0.696-0.960, P < 0.001). We conclude that CPAP improves UA dynamics in OSAS and that the therapeutic CPAP to apply can be predicted during wakefulness using BAMPS.

  11. Functional MR imaging in the awake monkey: effects of motion on dynamic off-resonance and processing strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeuffer, Josef; Shmuel, Amir; Keliris, Georgios A; Steudel, Thomas; Merkle, Hellmut; Logothetis, Nikos K

    2007-07-01

    Functional MR imaging of the alert, behaving monkey is being used more and more often to detect activation patterns and guide electrophysiological research investigating the neural basis of behavior. Several labs have reported fMRI data from the awake monkey, but none of them has studied and systematically corrected the effects of monkeys' motion on fMRI time series. In this study, a significant refinement of acquisition and correction strategies is reported that can be used to minimize magnetic susceptibility artifacts induced by respiration and by jaw and body movement. Real-time acquisition of sensor signals (e.g., signals induced by jaw and body movement) and MR navigator data were combined to optimize fMRI signal-correction strategies. Within trials, the artifact-induced off-resonance changes were small and mainly reflected the effects of respiration; between trials, movements caused major changes of global frequency and shim (>20 Hz/cm). Several methods were used to assess the stability of the fMRI series: k-space analysis ('dynamic intensity and off-resonance changes in k-space', dubbed DICK and DORK) and image analysis using a Laplace operator and a center-of-mass metric. The variability between trials made it essential to correct for inter-trial variations. On the other hand, images were sufficiently stable with our approach to perform fMRI evaluations on single trials before averaging of trials. Different motion correction strategies were compared: DORK, McFLIRT (rigid body model with three translations and three rotations) and 2D image alignment based on a center-of-mass detection (in-plane translation). The latter yielded the best results and proved to be fast and robust for intra- and inter-trial alignment. Finally, fMRI in the behaving monkey was tested for spatial and temporal reproducibility on a trial-to-trial basis. Highly activated voxels also displayed good reproducibility between trials. On average, the BOLD amplitude response to a short 3-s

  12. Achieveing Organizational Excellence Through

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Abzari

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available AbstractToday, In order to create motivation and desirable behavior in employees, to obtain organizational goals,to increase human resources productivity and finally to achieve organizational excellence, top managers oforganizations apply new and effective strategies. One of these strategies to achieve organizational excellenceis creating desirable corporate culture. This research has been conducted to identify the path to reachorganizational excellence by creating corporate culture according to the standards and criteria oforganizational excellence. The result of the so-called research is this paper in which researchers foundtwenty models and components of corporate culture and based on the Industry, organizational goals andEFQM model developed a model called "The Eskimo model of Culture-Excellence". The method of theresearch is survey and field study and the questionnaires were distributed among 116 managers andemployees. To assess the reliability of questionnaires, Cronbach alpha was measured to be 95% in the idealsituation and 0/97 in the current situation. Systematic sampling was done and in the pre-test stage 45questionnaires were distributed. A comparison between the current and the ideal corporate culture based onthe views of managers and employees was done and finally it has been concluded that corporate culture isthe main factor to facilitate corporate excellence and success in order to achieve organizational effectiveness.The contribution of this paper is that it proposes a localized –applicable model of corporate excellencethrough reinforcing corporate culture.

  13. Decoupling kinematics and mechanics reveals coding properties of trigeminal ganglion neurons in the rat vibrissal system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bush, Nicholas E; Schroeder, Christopher L; Hobbs, Jennifer A; Yang, Anne Et; Huet, Lucie A; Solla, Sara A; Hartmann, Mitra Jz

    2016-06-27

    Tactile information available to the rat vibrissal system begins as external forces that cause whisker deformations, which in turn excite mechanoreceptors in the follicle. Despite the fundamental mechanical origin of tactile information, primary sensory neurons in the trigeminal ganglion (Vg) have often been described as encoding the kinematics (geometry) of object contact. Here we aimed to determine the extent to which Vg neurons encode the kinematics vs. mechanics of contact. We used models of whisker bending to quantify mechanical signals (forces and moments) at the whisker base while simultaneously monitoring whisker kinematics and recording single Vg units in both anesthetized rats and awake, body restrained rats. We employed a novel manual stimulation technique to deflect whiskers in a way that decouples kinematics from mechanics, and used Generalized Linear Models (GLMs) to show that Vg neurons more directly encode mechanical signals when the whisker is deflected in this decoupled stimulus space.

  14. The Sleeping Beauty awakes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wassink, J.

    2008-01-01

    A century ago it was decided that Delft was in need of a garden with ´technical plants´. This summer the Botanical Garden that resulted celebrated its centenary with a world conference. After being neglected for decades, the garden now looks forward to a flourishing period.

  15. Achieving form in autobiography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas (Nick Meihuizen

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This article argues that, unlike biographies which tend to follow patterns based on conventional expectations, salient autobiographies achieve forms unique to themselves. The article draws on ideas from contemporary formalists such as Peter McDonald and Angela Leighton but also considers ideas on significant form stemming from earlier writers and critics such as P.N. Furbank and Willa Cather. In extracting from these writers the elements of what they consider comprise achieved form, the article does not seek to provide a rigid means of objectively testing the formal attributes of a piece of writing. It rather offers qualitative reminders of the need to be alert to the importance of form, even if the precise nature of this importance is not possible to define. Form is involved in meaning, and this continuously opens up possibilities regarding the reader’s relationship with the work in question. French genetic critic Debray Genette distinguishes between ‘semantic effect’ (the direct telling involved in writing and ‘semiological effect’ (the indirect signification involved. It is the latter, the article argues in summation, which gives a work its singular nature, producing a form that is not predictable but suggestive, imaginative.

  16. Establishment and Evaluation of a New Aproach for Chronic Enhanced External Counterpulsation in Awaking Dogs%清醒犬慢性体外反搏实验方法的建立和评价

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    伍贵富; 刘磊; 郑振声; 马虹; 钱月桃; 方典秋

    2001-01-01

    【Objective】 To develop a new divice and approach for enhancedexternal counterpulsation (EECP) in awaking dogs. 【Methods】 The device was designed specially for dogs which consisted of main console, support frame, external and inner balloon cuffs. The hemodynamic effects of the new EECP device were examined in six beagle dogs by direct measurement of aortic pressure. The total EECP time was 28 to 30 hours (1~2 hours daily for each dog). 【Results】 The aortic diastolic pressure(pD) was highly enhanced when augmentation pressure increased to (174.0±18.4) mmHg (P<0.01) while aortic systolic pressure (pS) decreased by (19.22±8.70) mmHg with pD/pS ratio of 1.24±0.05 during EECP. These dogs didn′t develop any changes in appeptite and mental state during the long-term EECP experiment.【Conclusion】 The new device of EECP can achieve good hemodynamic effects and the EECP protocol conducted in this study is reliable and feasible for further study of EECP in awaking dogs.%【目的】探索一种新的体外反搏实验装置和实验方法。【方法】自行设计制作一套适合比格犬清醒状态下长期接受反搏治疗的装置,该装置由反搏主机、反搏架、反搏内外囊套等组成。采用导管端式压力传感器检测主动脉根部压力,评价该系统的即时血流动力学效果。6条比格犬接受了即时血流动力学测定和长期体外反搏治疗,治疗总时间约28~30h不等(每日1次,每次1~2h),历时6~8周。【结果】反搏中实验犬的主动脉舒张期增压波可达(174.0±18.4)mmHg,显著高于反搏前的舒张压(P<0.01)。舒张压与收缩压比值(pD/pS)上升至1.24±0.05。此外,反搏过程中,主动脉收缩压平均下降达(19.22±8.70)mmHg。全部动物能顺利完成慢性体外反搏治疗观察,且动物的食欲、精神状态等无异常改变。【结论】该装置应用于体外反搏的慢性动物实验研究是可行的、有效的。

  17. Achieving diagnosis by consensus

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kane, Bridget

    2009-08-01

    This paper provides an analysis of the collaborative work conducted at a multidisciplinary medical team meeting, where a patient’s definitive diagnosis is agreed, by consensus. The features that distinguish this process of diagnostic work by consensus are examined in depth. The current use of technology to support this collaborative activity is described, and experienced deficiencies are identified. Emphasis is placed on the visual and perceptual difficulty for individual specialities in making interpretations, and on how, through collaboration in discussion, definitive diagnosis is actually achieved. The challenge for providing adequate support for the multidisciplinary team at their meeting is outlined, given the multifaceted nature of the setting, i.e. patient management, educational, organizational and social functions, that need to be satisfied.

  18. Recognizing outstanding achievements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speiss, Fred

    One function of any professional society is to provide an objective, informed means for recognizing outstanding achievements in its field. In AGU's Ocean Sciences section we have a variety of means for carrying out this duty. They include recognition of outstanding student presentations at our meetings, dedication of special sessions, nomination of individuals to be fellows of the Union, invitations to present Sverdrup lectures, and recommendations for Macelwane Medals, the Ocean Sciences Award, and the Ewing Medal.Since the decision to bestow these awards requires initiative and judgement by members of our section in addition to a deserving individual, it seems appropriate to review the selection process for each and to urge you to identify those deserving of recognition.

  19. Achieving English Spoken Fluency

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王鲜杰

    2000-01-01

    Language is first and foremost oral,spoken language,speaking skill is the most important one of the four skills(L,S,R,W)and also it is the most difficult one of the four skills. To have an all-round command of a language one must be able to speak and to understand the spoken language, it is not enough for a language learner only to have a good reading and writing skills. As Englisn language teachers, we need to focus on improving learners' English speaking skill to meet the need of our society and our country and provide learner some useful techniques to achieving their English spoken fluency. This paper focuses on the spoken how to improving learners speaking skill.

  20. Achieving closure at Fernald

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradburne, John; Patton, Tisha C.

    2001-02-25

    When Fluor Fernald took over the management of the Fernald Environmental Management Project in 1992, the estimated closure date of the site was more than 25 years into the future. Fluor Fernald, in conjunction with DOE-Fernald, introduced the Accelerated Cleanup Plan, which was designed to substantially shorten that schedule and save taxpayers more than $3 billion. The management of Fluor Fernald believes there are three fundamental concerns that must be addressed by any contractor hoping to achieve closure of a site within the DOE complex. They are relationship management, resource management and contract management. Relationship management refers to the interaction between the site and local residents, regulators, union leadership, the workforce at large, the media, and any other interested stakeholder groups. Resource management is of course related to the effective administration of the site knowledge base and the skills of the workforce, the attraction and retention of qualified a nd competent technical personnel, and the best recognition and use of appropriate new technologies. Perhaps most importantly, resource management must also include a plan for survival in a flat-funding environment. Lastly, creative and disciplined contract management will be essential to effecting the closure of any DOE site. Fluor Fernald, together with DOE-Fernald, is breaking new ground in the closure arena, and ''business as usual'' has become a thing of the past. How Fluor Fernald has managed its work at the site over the last eight years, and how it will manage the new site closure contract in the future, will be an integral part of achieving successful closure at Fernald.

  1. Achievement Goals and Achievement Emotions: A Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chiungjung

    2011-01-01

    This meta-analysis synthesized 93 independent samples (N = 30,003) in 77 studies that reported in 78 articles examining correlations between achievement goals and achievement emotions. Achievement goals were meaningfully associated with different achievement emotions. The correlations of mastery and mastery approach goals with positive achievement…

  2. Vietnam: achievements and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran Tien Duc

    1999-01-01

    The Vietnamese Government's successful development of the National Population and Family Planning Program has contributed in raising people's awareness on population issues and changing their attitudes and behavior regarding fostering small families. It has also been found to be very effective in substantially decreasing fertility level. In addition, economic levels of many households have been greatly improved since the adoption of a renovation policy. The advancement of welfare accompanied by the provision of better basic social services, including health services, has boost people's health. Several factors behind the achievements of the National Population and Family Planning Program include: 1) Strengthening of the political commitment of national and local leaders; 2) Nationwide mobilization of mass organizations and NGOs; 3) A strong advocacy and information, education and communication program; 4) Provision of various kinds of contraceptives; 5) Effective management of the program by priority; and 6) Support of the international community. Despite such successes, Vietnam is facing a number of new issues such as enlargement of the work force, shifting migration patterns and accelerating urbanization, aging of population, and change of household structure. Nevertheless, the Government of Vietnam is preparing a New Population Strategy aimed to address these issues.

  3. A novel thermoelectric cooling device using Peltier modules for inducing local hypothermia of the spinal cord: the effect of local electrically controlled cooling for the treatment of spinal cord injuries in conscious rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morizane, Kei; Ogata, Tadanori; Morino, Tadao; Horiuchi, Hideki; Yamaoka, Gotaro; Hino, Masayuki; Miura, Hiromasa

    2012-03-01

    We developed a novel thermoelectric cooling device using Peltier modules for the treatment of spinal cord injury in rats. The extracorporeal electrically cooling component was attached to the aluminum arched plate which was placed on the surface of the spinal cord after the contusion injury in the 11th thoracic spinal cord. During the hypothermic treatment, rats were awake and could move in the cage. Hind limb motor function, evaluated using a BBB scale, in the hypothermic animals (33°C for 48 h) was significantly higher than that in the normothermic animals from 2 weeks to 8 weeks after the injury.

  4. High-resolution manometric evaluation of the effects of cisapride on the esophagus during administration of solid and liquid boluses in awake healthy dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullal, Tarini V; Kass, Philip H; Conklin, Jeffrey L; Belafsky, Peter C; Marks, Stanley L

    2016-08-01

    OBJECTIVE To validate the use of high-resolution manometry (HRM) in awake, healthy dogs and compare the effects of bolus type (liquid vs solid) and drug treatment (saline [0.9% NaCl] solution [SS] vs cisapride) on esophageal pressure profiles. ANIMALS 8 healthy dogs. PROCEDURES In a crossover study, each dog received SS (10 mL) IV, and HRM was performed during oral administration of 10 boluses (5 mL each) of water or 10 boluses (5 g each) of canned food. Cisapride (1 mg/kg in 60 mL of SS) was subsequently administered IV to 7 dogs; HRM and bolus administration procedures were repeated. Two to 4 weeks later, HRM was repeated following administration of SS and water and food boluses in 4 dogs. Pressure profile data were obtained for all swallows, and 11 outcome variables were statistically analyzed. RESULTS After SS administration, predicted means for the esophageal contractile integral were 850.4 cm/mm Hg/s for food boluses and 660.3 cm/mm Hg/s for water boluses. Predicted means for esophageal contraction front velocity were 6.2 cm/s for water boluses and 5.6 cm/s for food boluses after SS administration. Predicted means for residual LES pressure were significantly higher following cisapride administration. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results indicated that HRM was feasible and repeatable in awake healthy dogs of various breeds and sizes. Stronger esophageal contractions and faster esophageal contraction velocity occurred during solid bolus and liquid bolus swallows, respectively. Lower esophageal sphincter pressure increased significantly following cisapride administration. Esophageal contractions and bolus transit latency should be further evaluated by HRM in clinically dysphagic dogs.

  5. Comparative randomised study of GlideScope® video laryngoscope versus flexible fibre-optic bronchoscope for awake nasal intubation of oropharyngeal cancer patients with anticipated difficult intubation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Essam Abd El-Halim Mahran

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Awake flexible fibre-optic bronchoscope (FFS is the standard method of intubation in difficult airway in oral cancer patients. We decided to evaluate GlideScope® video laryngoscope (GL for intubation as compared to the standard FFS for nasal intubation in such patients. Methods: After the ethical committee approval, we included 54 oropharyngeal cancer patients divided randomly into two equal groups: Group G and Group F. After pre-medication and pre-oxygenation, awake nasal intubation was performed using GL in Group G and FFS in Group F. In both groups, we compared intubation time in seconds (mean ± standard deviation (primary outcome, success rate of the first intubation attempt, percentage of Cormack and Lehane glottic score and incidence of complications. We assumed that GL could be a suitable alternative for the standard FFS in nasal intubation of patients with oropharyngeal cancer. Success rate of the first attempt and Cormack and Lehane glottic score were compared using Chi-square test. Results: Intubation time in seconds was significantly shorter in Group G (70.85 ± 8.88 S than in Group F (90.26 ± 9.41 S with (P < 0.001. The success rate of the first attempt intubation was slightly higher in Group G (81.5% than Group F (78.8%. Cormack and Lehane glottic Score I and II showed insignificant difference between both Group G (92.6% and Group F (96.3%. We detected three cases of sore throat in each group. Conclusion: GlideScope® could be a suitable alternative to FFS in nasal intubation of oropharyngeal cancer patients.

  6. THE ROLE OF GABA RECEPTORS IN THE CONTROL OF NIGROSTRIATAL DOPAMINERGIC-NEURONS - DUAL-PROBE MICRODIALYSIS STUDY IN AWAKE RATS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    SANTIAGO, M; WESTERINK, BHC

    1992-01-01

    A microdialysis probe implanted into the substantia nigra was used to infuse gamma-aminobutyric acid-ergic (GABAergic) compounds onto cell bodies/dendrites of dopaminergic neurons, while a second microdialysis probe was used to record the extracellular concentrations of dopamine and 3,4-dihydroxy-ph

  7. The gain of the baroreflex bradycardia is reduced by microinjection of NMDA receptor antagonists into the nucleus tractus solitarii of awake rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frigero, M; Bonagamba, L G; Machado, B H

    2000-02-14

    The baroreflex activation with phenylephrine infusion produces a bradycardic response. In the present study, the role of NMDA receptors in the nucleus tractus solitarii (NTS) in the processing of the parasympathetic component of the baroreflex was evaluated using acid phosphonivaleric (AP-5), a selective NMDA receptor antagonist. Baroreflex activation was performed before and after bilateral microinjection of AP-5 into the intermediate commissural NTS (0.5 mm lateral to the midline). Microinjection of the vehicle (saline, 0.9%) or a dose of 2 nmol/50 nl of AP-5 into the NTS produced no effect on the gain of the baroreflex while a dose of 10 nmol/50 nl of AP-5 produced a significant reduction in the gain of the baroreflex 2 min after microinjection [-1.43+/-0.22 vs. -0. 43+/-0.03 bpm/mmHg, (n=6)], with a return to control levels 10 min after the microinjections. The dose of 10 nmol/50 nl was selective for NMDA receptors considering that the cardiovascular responses to microinjection of AMPA (0.05 pmol/50 nl), a non-NMDA receptor agonist, were not affected by this dose of AP-5 and the responses to microinjection of NMDA (2 nmol/50 nl) were blocked. The data show that the bradycardic response to baroreflex activation was blocked by AP-5 microinjected into the NTS, indicating that the neurotransmission of the parasympathetic component of the baroreflex is mediated by NMDA receptors in the NTS.

  8. Analysis of clinical outcomes of linear vs. deep stop decompression from 3.5 to 6 atmospheres absolute (350 - 600 kpa) in awake rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cronjé, Frans J; Meintjes, W A Jack; Bennett, Peter B

    2011-01-01

    Recreational divers are introducing "deep stops" at half the depth (HD-DS) to reduce the risk of spinal DCS with only Doppler evidence to support it. Therefore this research was designed to show the effect of an HD-DS on spinal DCS manifestations by evaluating whether: (1) air diving-induced spin...

  9. Activity/inactivity circadian rhythm shows high similarities between young obesity-induced rats and old rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravo Santos, R; Delgado, J; Cubero, J; Franco, L; Ruiz-Moyano, S; Mesa, M; Rodríguez, A B; Uguz, C; Barriga, C

    2016-03-01

    The objective of the present study was to compare differences between elderly rats and young obesity-induced rats in their activity/inactivity circadian rhythm. The investigation was motivated by the differences reported previously for the circadian rhythms of both obese and elderly humans (and other animals), and those of healthy, young or mature individuals. Three groups of rats were formed: a young control group which was fed a standard chow for rodents; a young obesity-induced group which was fed a high-fat diet for four months; and an elderly control group with rats aged 2.5 years that was fed a standard chow for rodents. Activity/inactivity data were registered through actimetry using infrared actimeter systems in each cage to detect activity. Data were logged on a computer and chronobiological analysis were performed. The results showed diurnal activity (sleep time), nocturnal activity (awake time), amplitude, acrophase, and interdaily stability to be similar between the young obesity-induced group and the elderly control group, but different in the young control group. We have concluded that obesity leads to a chronodisruption status in the body similar to the circadian rhythm degradation observed in the elderly.

  10. Attitude Towards Physics and Additional Mathematics Achievement Towards Physics Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veloo, Arsaythamby; Nor, Rahimah; Khalid, Rozalina

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to identify the difference in students' attitude towards Physics and Additional Mathematics achievement based on gender and relationship between attitudinal variables towards Physics and Additional Mathematics achievement with achievement in Physics. This research focused on six variables, which is attitude towards…

  11. Disruption of ripple-associated hippocampal activity during rest impairs spatial learning in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ego-Stengel, Valérie; Wilson, Matthew A

    2010-01-01

    The hippocampus plays a key role in the acquisition of new memories for places and events. Evidence suggests that the consolidation of these memories is enhanced during sleep. At the neuronal level, reactivation of awake experience in the hippocampus during sharp-wave ripple events, characteristic of slow-wave sleep, has been proposed as a neural mechanism for sleep-dependent memory consolidation. However, a causal relation between sleep reactivation and memory consolidation has not been established. Here we show that disrupting neuronal activity during ripple events impairs spatial learning. We trained rats daily in two identical spatial navigation tasks followed each by a 1-hour rest period. After one of the tasks, stimulation of hippocampal afferents selectively disrupted neuronal activity associated with ripple events without changing the sleep-wake structure. Rats learned the control task significantly faster than the task followed by rest stimulation, indicating that interfering with hippocampal processing during sleep led to decreased learning.

  12. Brain pyruvate recycling and peripheral metabolism: an NMR analysis ex vivo of acetate and glucose metabolism in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serres, Sébastien; Bezancon, Eric; Franconi, Jean-Michel; Merle, Michel

    2007-06-01

    The occurrence of pyruvate recycling in the rat brain was studied in either pentobarbital anesthetized animals or awake animals receiving a light analgesic dose of morphine, which were infused with either [1-13C]glucose + acetate or glucose + [2-13C]acetate for various periods of time. Metabolite enrichments in the brain, blood and the liver were determined from NMR analyses of tissue extracts. They indicated that: (i) Pyruvate recycling was revealed in the brain of both the anesthetized and awake animals, as well as from lactate and alanine enrichments as from glutamate isotopomer composition, but only after infusion of glucose + [2-13C]acetate. (ii) Brain glucose was labelled from [2-13C]acetate at the same level in anaesthetized and awake rats (approximately 4%). Comparing its enrichment with that of blood and liver glucose indicated that brain glucose labelling resulted from hepatic gluconeogenesis. (iii) Analysing glucose 13C-13C coupling in the brain, blood and the liver confirmed that brain glucose could be labelled in the liver through the activities of both pyruvate recycling and gluconeogenesis. (iv) The rate of appearance and the amount of brain glutamate C4-C5 coupling, a marker of pyruvate recycling when starting from [2-13C]acetate, were lower than those of brain glucose labelling from hepatic metabolism. (v) The evaluation of the contributions of glucose and acetate to glutamate metabolism revealed that more than 60% of brain glutamate was synthesized from glucose whereas only 7% was from acetate and that glutamate C4-C5 coupling was mainly due to the metabolism of glucose labelled through hepatic gluconeogenesis. All these results indicate that, under the present conditions, the pyruvate recycling observed through the labelling of brain metabolites mainly originates from peripheral metabolism.

  13. Probing Intrinsic Resting-State Networks in the Infant Rat Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajic, Dusica; Craig, Michael M.; Borsook, David; Becerra, Lino

    2016-01-01

    Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI) measures spontaneous fluctuations in blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) signal in the absence of external stimuli. It has become a powerful tool for mapping large-scale brain networks in humans and animal models. Several rs-fMRI studies have been conducted in anesthetized and awake adult rats, reporting consistent patterns of brain activity at the systems level. However, the evolution to adult patterns of resting-state activity has not yet been evaluated and quantified in the developing rat brain. In this study, we hypothesized that large-scale intrinsic networks would be easily detectable but not fully established as specific patterns of activity in lightly anesthetized 2-week-old rats (N = 11). Independent component analysis (ICA) identified 8 networks in 2-week-old-rats. These included Default mode, Sensory (Exteroceptive), Salience (Interoceptive), Basal Ganglia-Thalamic-Hippocampal, Basal Ganglia, Autonomic, Cerebellar, as well as Thalamic-Brainstem networks. Many of these networks consisted of more than one component, possibly indicative of immature, underdeveloped networks at this early time point. Except for the Autonomic network, infant rat networks showed reduced connectivity with subcortical structures in comparison to previously published adult networks. Reported slow fluctuations in the BOLD signal that correspond to functionally relevant resting-state networks in 2-week-old rats can serve as an important tool for future studies of brain development in the settings of different pharmacological applications or disease. PMID:27803653

  14. BOLD Imaging in Awake Wild-Type and Mu-Opioid Receptor Knock-Out Mice Reveals On-Target Activation Maps in Response to Oxycodone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelsey Moore

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD imaging in awake mice was used to identify differences in brain activity between wild-type, and Mu (µ opioid receptor knock-outs (MuKO in response to oxycodone (OXY. Using a segmented, annotated MRI mouse atlas and computational analysis, patterns of integrated positive and negative BOLD activity were identified across 122 brain areas. The pattern of positive BOLD showed enhanced activation across the brain in WT mice within 15 min of intraperitoneal administration of 2.5 mg of OXY. BOLD activation was detected in 72 regions out of 122, and was most prominent in areas of high µ opioid receptor density (thalamus, ventral tegmental area, substantia nigra, caudate putamen, basal amygdala and hypothalamus, and focus on pain circuits indicated strong activation in major pain processing centers (central amygdala, solitary tract, parabrachial area, insular cortex, gigantocellularis area, ventral thalamus primary sensory cortex and prelimbic cortex. Importantly, the OXY-induced positive BOLD was eliminated in MuKO mice in most regions, with few exceptions (some cerebellar nuclei, CA3 of the hippocampus, medial amygdala and preoptic areas. This result indicates that most effects of OXY on positive BOLD are mediated by the µ opioid receptor (on-target effects. OXY also caused an increase in negative BOLD in WT mice in few regions (16 out of 122 and, unlike the positive BOLD response the negative BOLD was only partially eliminated in the MuKO mice (cerebellum, and in some case intensified (hippocampus. Negative BOLD analysis therefore shows activation and deactivation events in the absence of the µ receptor for some areas where receptor expression is normally extremely low or absent (off-target effects. Together, our approach permits establishing opioid-induced BOLD activation maps in awake mice. In addition, comparison of WT and MuKO mutant mice reveals both on-target and off-target activation events, and set an OXY

  15. BOLD Imaging in Awake Wild-Type and Mu-Opioid Receptor Knock-Out Mice Reveals On-Target Activation Maps in Response to Oxycodone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Kelsey; Madularu, Dan; Iriah, Sade; Yee, Jason R.; Kulkarni, Praveen; Darcq, Emmanuel; Kieffer, Brigitte L.; Ferris, Craig F.

    2016-01-01

    Blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) imaging in awake mice was used to identify differences in brain activity between wild-type, and Mu (μ) opioid receptor knock-outs (MuKO) in response to oxycodone (OXY). Using a segmented, annotated MRI mouse atlas and computational analysis, patterns of integrated positive and negative BOLD activity were identified across 122 brain areas. The pattern of positive BOLD showed enhanced activation across the brain in WT mice within 15 min of intraperitoneal administration of 2.5 mg of OXY. BOLD activation was detected in 72 regions out of 122, and was most prominent in areas of high μ opioid receptor density (thalamus, ventral tegmental area, substantia nigra, caudate putamen, basal amygdala, and hypothalamus), and focus on pain circuits indicated strong activation in major pain processing centers (central amygdala, solitary tract, parabrachial area, insular cortex, gigantocellularis area, ventral thalamus primary sensory cortex, and prelimbic cortex). Importantly, the OXY-induced positive BOLD was eliminated in MuKO mice in most regions, with few exceptions (some cerebellar nuclei, CA3 of the hippocampus, medial amygdala, and preoptic areas). This result indicates that most effects of OXY on positive BOLD are mediated by the μ opioid receptor (on-target effects). OXY also caused an increase in negative BOLD in WT mice in few regions (16 out of 122) and, unlike the positive BOLD response the negative BOLD was only partially eliminated in the MuKO mice (cerebellum), and in some case intensified (hippocampus). Negative BOLD analysis therefore shows activation and deactivation events in the absence of the μ receptor for some areas where receptor expression is normally extremely low or absent (off-target effects). Together, our approach permits establishing opioid-induced BOLD activation maps in awake mice. In addition, comparison of WT and MuKO mutant mice reveals both on-target and off-target activation events, and set an OXY brain

  16. Mathematics Achievement in High- and Low-Achieving Secondary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadpour, Ebrahim; Shekarchizadeh, Ahmadreza

    2015-01-01

    This paper identifies the amount of variance in mathematics achievement in high- and low-achieving schools that can be explained by school-level factors, while controlling for student-level factors. The data were obtained from 2679 Iranian eighth graders who participated in the 2007 Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study. Of the…

  17. Awaking anaesthesia and intraoperative cortico-subcortical electrostimulation in surgery for secondary epilepsy induced by lesions in cerebral eloquent regions%全麻唤醒和术中电刺激在脑功能区病灶性癫痫手术中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姚一; 高鹏; 张小斌; 谭启富; 方赟; 王逢鹏; 江建东; 黄德志; 刘小伟; 沈七襄

    2010-01-01

    Objective To discuss the application of awaking anesthesia and intraoperative cortico-subcortical electrostimulation in the surgery for patients with secondary epilepsy induced by lesions in eloquent areas. Methods A total of 11 patients initiated with epileptic seizure were collected in our study. All patients were right-handed and 5 had neurological dysfunction, and the mean Karnofsky performance status (KPS) scores were 87. Skull MRI and long-term video-EEG monitoring were performed for all patients, and 6 of them got functional MRI. The surgeries were performed under intravenous anesthesia: 4 got trachea intubation and the other 7 were performed pharyngeal esophageal intubation under awaking anesthesia. Electrocorticographic recordings were adopted to confirm the epileptogenic zone, and then cortical electrical stimulus was performed to locate the cortical functional area. Under subcortical electrostimulation monitoring, we resected the lesions by the methods of focal cortical resection or multiple subpial transaction (MST) according to the relation between epileptogenic zone and functional cortex; during the resection, subcortical electrostimulation was adopted to protect the tracts lay in the sub-cortex. Results Total resection was achieved in 10 patients, and subtotal excision in 1. The epileptogenic zone was performed cortical resection or pia mater-fiber transverse amputation.Two cases got transient hemiparalysis after operation. Followed up for 6-20 months, none of the patients had neurologic deficit, and the average KPS scores were 100. Epilepsies were well-controlled using only one antiepileptic drug. Conclusion Pharyngeal esophageal intubation under awaking anesthesia is safe and convenient. With the monitoring of intraoperative cortico-subcortical electrostimulation, we can resect the lesions up to the hilt and protect the eloquent areas effectively, and improve the life quality of patients.%目的 探讨全麻唤醒和术中电刺激在脑功能区

  18. Peer relationships and academic achievement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krnjajić Stevan B.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available After their childhood, when children begin to establish more intensive social contacts outside family, first of all, in school setting, their behavior i.e. their social, intellectual, moral and emotional development is more strongly affected by their peers. Consequently, the quality of peer relationships considerably affects the process of adaptation and academic achievement and their motivational and emotional attitude towards school respectively. Empirical findings showed that there is bi-directional influence between peer relationships and academic achievement. In other words, the quality of peer relationships affects academic achievement, and conversely, academic achievement affects the quality of peer relationships. For example, socially accepted children exhibiting prosocial, cooperative and responsible forms of behavior in school most frequently have high academic achievement. On the other hand, children rejected by their peers often have lower academic achievement and are a risk group tending to delinquency, absenteeism and drop out of school. Those behavioral and interpersonal forms of competence are frequently more reliable predictors of academic achievement than intellectual abilities are. Considering the fact that various patterns of peer interaction differently exert influence on students' academic behavior, the paper analyzed effects of (a social competence, (b social acceptance/rejection, (c child's friendships and (d prosocial behavior on academic achievement.

  19. Healthy Eating and Academic Achievement

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2014-12-09

    This podcast highlights the evidence that supports the link between healthy eating and improved academic achievement. It also identifies a few actions to support a healthy school nutrition environment to improve academic achievement.  Created: 12/9/2014 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 12/9/2014.

  20. Physical Activity and Academic Achievement

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2014-12-09

    This podcast highlights the evidence that supports the link between physical activity and improved academic achievement. It also identifies a few actions to support a comprehensive school physical activity program to improve academic achievement.  Created: 12/9/2014 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 12/9/2014.

  1. Sociocultural Origins of Achievement Motivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maehr, Martin L.

    1977-01-01

    Presents a theoretical review of work on sociocultural influences on achievement, focusing on a critical evaluation of the work of David McClellan. Offers an alternative conception of achievement motivation which stresses the role of contextual and situational factors in addition to personality factors. Available from: Transaction Periodicals…

  2. Parental Involvement and Academic Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, Sarah Christine

    2015-01-01

    This research study examined the correlation between student achievement and parent's perceptions of their involvement in their child's schooling. Parent participants completed the Parent Involvement Project Parent Questionnaire. Results slightly indicated parents of students with higher level of achievement perceived less demand or invitations…

  3. Induction of ischemic stroke in awake freely moving mice reveals that isoflurane anesthesia can mask the benefits of a neuroprotection therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela eSeto

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Anesthetics such as isoflurane are commonly used to sedate experimental animals during the induction of stroke. Since these agents are known to modulate synaptic excitability, inflammation and blood flow, they could hinder the development and discovery of new neuroprotection therapies. To address this issue, we developed a protocol for inducing photothrombotic occlusion of cerebral vessels in fully conscious mice and tested two potential neuroprotectant drugs (a GluN2B or α4β2 nicotinic receptor antagonist. Our data show in vehicle treated mice that just 20 minutes of exposure to isoflurane during stroke induction can significantly reduce ischemic cortical damage relative to mice that were awake during stroke. When comparing potential stroke therapies, none provided any level of neuroprotection if the stroke was induced with anesthesia. However, if mice were fully conscious during stroke, the α4β2 nicotinic receptor antagonist reduced ischemic damage by 23% relative to vehicle treated controls, whereas the GluN2B antagonist had no significant effect. These results suggest that isoflurane anesthesia can occlude the benefits of certain stroke treatments and warrant caution when using anesthetics for pre-clinical testing of neuroprotective agents.

  4. PK/PD Modelling of the QT Interval: a Step Towards Defining the Translational Relationship Between In Vitro, Awake Beagle Dogs, and Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marostica, Eleonora; Van Ammel, Karel; Teisman, Ard; Gallacher, David; Van Bocxlaer, Jan; De Ridder, Filip; Boussery, Koen; Vermeulen, An

    2016-07-01

    Inhibiting the human ether-a-go-go-related gene (hERG)-encoded potassium ion channel is positively correlated with QT-interval prolongation in vivo, which is considered a risk factor for the occurrence of Torsades de Pointes (TdP). A pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic model was developed for four compounds that reached the clinic, to relate drug-induced QT-interval change in awake dogs and humans and to derive a translational scaling factor a 1. Overall, dogs were more sensitive than humans to QT-interval change, an a 1 of 1.5 was found, and a 10% current inhibition in vitro produced a higher percent QT-interval change in dogs as compared to humans. The QT-interval changes in dogs were predictive for humans. In vitro and in vivo information could reliably describe the effects in humans. Robust translational knowledge is likely to reduce the need for expensive thorough QT studies; therefore, expanding this work to more compounds is recommended.

  5. A new model of bilateral hemispheric ischemia in the unanesthetized rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulsinelli, W A; Brierley, J B

    1979-01-01

    A new model of transient, bilateral hemispheric ischemia in the unanesthetized rat is described. During ether anesthesia the rat's vertebral arteries were electrocauterized through the alar foramina of the first cervical vertebra and reversible clasps placed loosely around the common carotid arteries. Twenty-four hr later, the awake rats were restrained and the carotid clasps tightened to produce 4-vessel occlusion. The carotid clasps were removed after 10, 20 or 30 min of 4-vessel occlusion and the animals killed by perfusion fixation 72 hr later. Rats which convulsed during the ischemic or post-ischemic period were excluded from further study. All rats subjected to 20 or 30 min of 4-vessel occlusion demonstrated ischemic neuronal damage. The H1 and paramedian hippocampus, striatum and layers 3, 5 and 6 of the posterior neocortex were the regions most frequently damaged. The advantages of this model are the ease of preparation of large numbers of animals, a high rate of predictable ischemic neuronal damage, a low incidence of seizures and the absence of anesthesia.

  6. Design and clinical application of daily awaking verification scale in patients with mechanical ventilation and sedation%机械通气镇静患者每日唤醒核查表的设计及临床应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘敏; 冯其梅

    2016-01-01

    目的:通过设计机械通气镇静患者“每日唤醒核查表”,以提高护士对唤醒措施的依从性。方法:于2013年10月至2014年3月,将“每日唤醒核查表”应用于ICU机械通气镇静需要唤醒的患者,观察护士执行唤醒措施的依从性,患者机械通气时间、镇静时间、镇静药物总量。结果:使用“每日唤醒核查表”后,护士对唤醒措施的依从性及患者镇静药物总量、总镇静时间、机械通气时间、住ICU时间与实施前比较,差异有统计学意义(P<0.05)。结论:应用“每日唤醒核查表”,提高了医护人员对唤醒措施的依从性,降低了患者镇静药物的用量,缩短了患者总镇静时间、机械通气时间、住ICU时间,保证了患者安全。此方法简单、可操作性强,医护人员接受程度高。%Objective: To improve the implementation rate of daily awaking by designing daily awaking veriifcation scale. Methods: From October, 2013 to March, 2014, the Daily Awaking (DA) Veriifcation Scale was used in ICU patients with mechanically ventilation and sedation who needed to be waked up. We observed the nurses' executive compliance of management measures, duration of mechanical ventilation, duration of sedation, and the total amount of sedative drugs. Results: After the Daily Awaking (DA) Veriifcation Scale was used, the observation indexes, such as the implementation rate of awaking measures, the total amount of sedative drugs, duration of sedation, duration of mechanical ventilation, and ICU stay, were improved signiifcantly (P<0.05). Conclusions: By using the Daily Awaking (DA) Veriifcation Scale, we could improve the implementation rate of awaking therapy, reduce the total amount of sedative drugs, shorten the duration of sedation, duration of mechanical ventilation and ICU stay, and ensure the patients' medical safety. This method is simple and easy to operate, could be highly accepted by medical staff

  7. Efficacy of intravenous dexmedetomidine on patient's satisfaction, comfort and sedation during awake fibre-optic intubation in patients with cervical spondylotic myelopathy posted for elective cervical fixation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saikat Niyogi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Various anaesthetic drugs, in addition to airway block, are used for producing favourable intubation conditions during awake fibre-optic intubation (AFOI, but most of them cause respiratory depression and hypoxaemia. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of intravenous (IV dexmedetomidine (DEX on sedation, patient comfort and cardiovascular responses during AFOI in patients with cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM. Methods: This randomised, placebo-controlled, double-blinded, prospective study was conducted on 56 adult patients with cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM undergoing elective cervical fixation, who were randomly allocated into two groups - Group D and Group C. Group D patients received DEX infusion at a rate of 1 μg/kg for the first 10 min followed by 0.5 μg/kg/h and Group C received 0.9% normal saline infusion in the same manner. Airway blocks with lignocaine were given to all patients before undergoing AFOI. Patient's alertness, sedation and cardiorespiratory changes during the procedure were assessed by the Observer Assessment Awareness and Sedation (OAA/S scale. On the 1st post-operative day, patient's' comfort during AFOI was assessed by visual analogue scale (VAS. Results: Patients of Group D had an acceptable level of sedation (OAA/S score: 20 to 17 with greater comfort and satisfaction (VAS: 40–60, compared to control group (VAS: 50–90, P < 0.001.. Moreover, haemodynamic parameters were less significantly altered in the DEX group during AFOI. Conclusions: IV DEX infusion during AFOI improves patient's tolerances with an acceptable level of sedation without significant haemodynamic instability and respiratory depression.

  8. Disciplinary climate and student achievement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sortkær, Bent; Reimer, David

    Disciplinary climate has emerged as one of the single most important factors related to student achievement. Using data from the OECD Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) 2003 for Canada, Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Latvia and Norway we find a significant and nontrivial association...... between the perceived disciplinary climate in the classroom and students’ mathematics performance in Canada, Denmark and Norway. Furthermore we exploit country specific class-size rules in order to single out a subsample with classroom-level data (PISA is sampled by age and not by classes) and find...... that the estimates based on school-level data might underestimate the relationship between disciplinary climate and student achievement. Finally we find evidence for gender differences in the association between disciplinary climate and student achievement that can partly be explained by gender-specific perceptions...

  9. Mathematics Achievement by Immigrant Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gary G. Huang

    2000-05-01

    Full Text Available In this study, I examined academic achievement of immigrant children in the United States, Canada, England, Australia, and New Zealand. Analyzing data from the Third International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS, I gauged the performance gaps relating to the generation of immigration and the home language background. I found immigrant children's math and science achievement to be lower than the others only in England, the U.S., and Canada. Non-English language background was found in each country to relate to poor math and science learning and this disadvantage was stronger among native-born children—presumably children of indigenous groups—than among immigrant children. I also examined the school variation in math performance gaps, using hierarchical linear modeling (HLM to each country's data. The patterns in which language- and generation-related math achievement gaps varied between schools are different in the five countries.

  10. Caffeine in the neonatal period induces long-lasting changes in sleep and breathing in adult rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montandon, Gaspard; Horner, Richard L; Kinkead, Richard; Bairam, Aida

    2009-11-15

    Caffeine is commonly used clinically to treat apnoeas and unstable breathing associated with premature birth. Caffeine antagonizes adenosine receptors and acts as an efficient respiratory stimulant in neonates. Owing to its persistent effects on adenosine receptor expression in the brain, neonatal caffeine administration also has significant effects on maturation of the respiratory control system. However, since adenosine receptors are critically involved in sleep regulation, and sleep also modulates breathing, we tested the hypothesis that neonatal caffeine treatment disrupts regulation of sleep and breathing in the adult rat. Neonatal caffeine treatment (15 mg kg(-1) day(-1)) was administered from postnatal days 3-12. At adulthood (8-10 weeks old), sleep and breathing were measured with a telemetry system and whole-body plethysmography respectively. In adult rats treated with caffeine during the neonatal period, sleep time was reduced, sleep onset latency was increased, and non-rapid eye movement (non-REM) sleep was fragmented compared to controls. Ventilation at rest was higher in caffeine-treated adult rats compared to controls across sleep/wake states. Hypercapnic ventilatory responses were significantly reduced in caffeine-treated rats compared to control rats across sleep/wake states. Additional experiments in adult anaesthetized rats showed that at similar levels of arterial blood gases, phrenic nerve activity was enhanced in caffeine-treated rats. This study demonstrates that administration of caffeine in the neonatal period alters respiratory control system activity in awake and sleeping rats, as well as in the anaesthetized rats, and also has persistent disrupting effects on sleep that are apparent in adult rats.

  11. Clinical signs and symptoms of acute reflex sympathetic dystrophy in one hindlimb of the rat, induced by infusion of a free-radical donor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Laan, L; Kapitein, P; Verhofstad, A; Hendriks, T; Goris, R J

    1998-06-01

    The acute phase of reflex sympathetic dystrophy (RSD) is characterized by the classical signs and symptoms of inflammation (rubor, calor, dolor, tumor and impaired function). As free radicals are involved in acute inflammation, we studied the effects of free radicals in an animal model, especially as to signs and symptoms found in acute RSD. Awake rats were given continuous intra-arterial infusion (1 ml/h) in the left hindlimb, with saline (n = 6) or the free-radical donor tert-butylhydroperoxide (tert-BuOOH, 25 mM, n = 6). During a 24-h infusion period the skin temperature, volume, skin color, function and pain reactions of the paws were observed. After 24 h the rats were killed and both gastrocnemius muscles were histologically analyzed. Infusion with tert-BuOOH induced in the left paw an increased skin temperature, increased volume, redness of the plantar skin, impaired function and increased pain sensation, while these acute RSD signs and symptoms were absent in the saline infused animals. The alterations in pain sensation (spontaneous, mechanical and thermal pain) were similar to findings in the neuropathic animal model. The gastrocnemius muscles of the saline infused rats and the contralateral gastrocnemius muscle of the tert-BuOOH infused rats showed no histological tissue damage. In the left gastrocnemius muscle free-radical-related damage was visible. Induction of free-radical formation in one hindlimb of awake rats mimics the acute signs and symptoms of acute RSD, with alterations in pain sensation as found in the classical neuropathic animal model of RSD, as well as in acute RSD patients.

  12. Epistemological Beliefs and Academic Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arslantas, Halis Adnan

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to identify the relationship between teacher candidates' epistemological beliefs and academic achievement. The participants of the study were 353 teacher candidates studying their fourth year at the Education Faculty. The Epistemological Belief Scale was used which adapted to Turkish through reliability and validity work by…

  13. Adolescents' Academic Expectations and Achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Christopher E.; Field, Tiffany M.; Diego, Miguel A.

    2001-01-01

    Hypothesis that mother relationships are more influential than father relationships on adolescents' academic expectations and achievement was tested with 80 high school seniors. The mother child relationship was found to be predictive of academic expectations. It suggests that the amount of time they spend together may be the contributing factor.…

  14. The opening of achievement report

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    The unified plan for Sharqu River has been worked out by experts from Yangtze Water Conservancy Commission, Yangtze Hydraulic Engineering Investigation Academy, and the Academy from T.A.R. A meeting of reporting their achievements has been hold in Lhasa.

  15. Chinese Achievements Attract Worldwide Attention

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1995-01-01

    THE People’s Republic of China was founded 45 years ago. Since the policies of economic and social reform and opening were carried out in the beginning of the 1980s, China has been gradually entering into prosperity and has made inspiring achievements. 1. The living standards of the people and their

  16. Achieving universal access to broadband

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Falch, Morten; Henten, Anders

    2009-01-01

    The paper discusses appropriate policy measures for achieving universal access to broadband services in Europe. Access can be delivered by means of many different technology solutions described in the paper. This means a greater degree of competition and affects the kind of policy measures...

  17. Achieving a sustainable service advantage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coyne, K P

    1993-01-01

    Many managers believe that superior service should play little or no role in competitive strategy; they maintain that service innovations are inherently copiable. However, the author states that this view is too narrow. For a company to achieve a lasting service advantage, it must base a new service on a capability gap that competitors cannot or will not copy.

  18. Achieving world class maintenance status

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomlingson, P.D. [Paul D. Tomingson Associates (United States)

    2007-08-15

    The article written by a management consultant, discusses the art of successful planning and operation of maintenance in mines considering factors such as benchmaking, key performance indices (KPIs) and frequency of procedures which can help achieve 'world class maintenance'. 1 fig.

  19. Faculty Development: Assessing Learner Achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, Barbara A.; Overfield, Karen

    This study addressed the challenges of developing a faculty professional development workshop on assessment, measurement, and evaluation of achievement in adult learners. The setting for the workshop was a system of postsecondary career colleges throughout the United States. The curriculum development model of D. Kirkpatrick (1994) was used as a…

  20. Evidence for increased cellular uptake of glutamate and aspartate in the rat hippocampus during kainic acid seizures. A microdialysis study using the "indicator diffusion' method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruhn, T; Christensen, Thomas; Diemer, Nils Henrik

    1997-01-01

    Using a newly developed technique, based on microdialysis, which allows cellular uptake of glutamate and aspartate to be studied in awake animals, we investigated uptake of glutamate and aspartate in the hippocampal formation of rats during limbic seizures induced by systemical administration of ....... The results indicate that during KA-induced seizures, uptake of glutamate and aspartate is increased, possibly aimed at maintaining the extracellular homeostasis of these two excitatory amino acids.......Using a newly developed technique, based on microdialysis, which allows cellular uptake of glutamate and aspartate to be studied in awake animals, we investigated uptake of glutamate and aspartate in the hippocampal formation of rats during limbic seizures induced by systemical administration...... of kainic acid (KA). With [14C]mannitol as an extracellular reference substance, the cellular extraction of the test substance [3H]D-aspartate was measured at different stages of seizure-activity. The results were compared to those obtained in a sham operated control group. During severe generalized clonic...

  1. Dexmedetomidine for an awake fiber-optic intubation of a parturient with Klippel-Feil syndrome, Type I Arnold Chiari malformation and status post released tethered spinal cord presenting for repeat cesarean section

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanmay H. Shah

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Patients with Klippel-Feil Syndrome (KFS have congenital fusion of their cervical vertebrae due to a failure in the normal segmentation of the cervical vertebrae during the early weeks of gestation and also have myriad of other associated anomalies. Because of limited neck mobility, airway management in these patients can be a challenge for the anesthesiologist. We describe a unique case in which a dexmedetomidine infusion was used as sedation for an awake fiber-optic intubation in a parturient with Klippel-Feil Syndrome, who presented for elective cesarean delivery. A 36-yearold female, G2P1A0 with KFS (fusion of cervical vertebrae who had prior cesarean section for breech presentation with difficult airway management was scheduled for repeat cesarean delivery. After obtaining an informed consent, patient was taken in the operating room and non-invasive monitors were applied. Dexmedetomidine infusion was started and after adequate sedation, an awake fiberoptic intubation was performed. General anesthetic was administered after intubation and dexmedetomidine infusion was continued on maintenance dose until extubation. Klippel-Feil Syndrome (KFS is a rare congenital disorder for which the true incidence is unknown, which makes it even rare to see a parturient with this disease. Patients with KFS usually have other congenital abnormalities as well, sometimes including the whole thoraco-lumbar spine (Type III precluding the use of neuraxial anesthesia for these patients. Obstetric patients with KFS can present unique challenges in administering anesthesia and analgesia, primarily as it relates to the airway and dexmedetomidine infusion has shown promising result to manage the airway through awake fiberoptic intubation without any adverse effects on mother and fetus.

  2. Hypothalamic L-Histidine Decarboxylase Is Up-Regulated During Chronic REM Sleep Deprivation of Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Gloria E.; Koban, Michael

    2016-01-01

    A competition of neurobehavioral drives of sleep and wakefulness occurs during sleep deprivation. When enforced chronically, subjects must remain awake. This study examines histaminergic neurons of the tuberomammillary nucleus of the posterior hypothalamus in response to enforced wakefulness in rats. We tested the hypothesis that the rate-limiting enzyme for histamine biosynthesis, L-histidine decarboxylase (HDC), would be up-regulated during chronic rapid eye movement sleep deprivation (REM-SD) because histamine plays a major role in maintaining wakefulness. Archived brain tissues of male Sprague Dawley rats from a previous study were used. Rats had been subjected to REM-SD by the flowerpot paradigm for 5, 10, or 15 days. For immunocytochemistry, rats were transcardially perfused with acrolein-paraformaldehyde for immunodetection of L-HDC; separate controls used carbodiimide-paraformaldehyde for immunodetection of histamine. Immunolocalization of histamine within the tuberomammillary nucleus was validated using carbodiimide. Because HDC antiserum has cross-reactivity with other decarboxylases at high antibody concentrations, titrations localized L-HDC to only tuberomammillary nucleus at a dilution of ≥ 1:300,000. REM-SD increased immunoreactive HDC by day 5 and it remained elevated in both dorsal and ventral aspects of the tuberomammillary complex. Our results suggest that up-regulation of L-HDC within the tuberomammillary complex during chronic REM-SD may be responsible for maintaining wakefulness. PMID:27997552

  3. Quantitative autoradiographic assessment of sup 55 Fe-RBC distribution in rat brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, S.Z.; Nakata, H.; Tajima, A.; Gruber, K.; Acuff, V.; Patlak, C.; Fenstermacher, J. (State Univ. of New York, Stony Brook (USA))

    1990-11-01

    A simple in vivo technique of labeling erythrocytes (RBCs) with {sup 55}Fe was developed for quantitative autoradiography (QAR). This procedure involved injecting 5-6 ml of ({sup 55}Fe)ferrous citrate solution (1 mCi/ml) intraperitoneally into donor rats. The number of labeled RBCs reached a maximum at around 7 days and declined very slowly thereafter. Labeled RBCs were harvested from donor rats and used for RBC volume measurement in awake rats. Brain radioactivity was assayed by QAR, which yielded spatial resolution of greater than 50 microns. Tight nearly irreversible binding of {sup 55}Fe to RBCs was found in vivo and in vitro. More than 99.5% of the {sup 55}Fe in the blood of donor rats was bound to RBCs. Because of this, labeled blood can be taken from donors and injected into recipients without further preparation. The tissue absorption of {sup 55}Fe emissions was the same in gray and white matter. Microvascular RBC volumes measured with {sup 55}Fe-labeled RBCs agreed with those assayed with {sup 51}Cr-labeled RBCs for many, but not all, brain areas. In conclusion, {sup 55}Fe-RBCs can be readily prepared by this technique and accurately quantitated in brain tissue by QAR.

  4. Cortical stimulation and tooth pulp evoked potentials in rats: a model of direct anti-nociception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusina, Robert; Barek, Stephane; Vaculin, Simon; Azérad, Jean; Rokyta, Richard

    2010-01-01

    While the effect of cortex stimulation on pain control is widely accepted, its physiological basis remains poorly understood. We chose an animal model of pain to study the influence of sensorimotor cortex stimulation on tooth pulp stimulation evoked potentials (TPEPs). Fifteen awake rats implanted with tooth pulp, cerebral cortex, and digastric muscle electrodes were divided into three groups, receiving 60 Hz, 40 Hz and no cortical stimulation, respectively. TPEPs were recorded before, one, three and five hours after continuous stimulation. We observed an inverse relationship between TPEP amplitude and latency with increasing tooth pulp stimulation. The amplitudes of the early components of TPEPs increased and their latency decreased with increasing tooth pulp stimulation intensity. Cortical stimulation decreased the amplitude of TPEPs; however, neither the latencies of TPEPs nor the jaw-opening reflex were changed after cortical stimulation. The decrease in amplitude of TPEPs after cortical stimulation may reflect its anti-nociceptive effect.

  5. Metacognition, achievement goals, study strategies and academic achievement: pathways to achievement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vrugt, A.; Oort, F.J.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to develop and test a model of effective selfregulated learning. Based on effort expenditure we discerned effective self-regulators and less effective self-regulators. The model comprised achievement goals (mastery, performance-approach and -avoidance goals), metacog

  6. Metacognition, Achievement Goals, Study Strategies and Academic Achievement: Pathways to Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrugt, Anneke; Oort, Frans J.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to develop and test a model of effective self-regulated learning. Based on effort expenditure we discerned effective self-regulators and less effective self-regulators. The model comprised achievement goals (mastery, performance-approach and -avoidance goals), metacognition (metacognitive knowledge, regulation and…

  7. The incongruous achiever in adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kline, S A; Golombek, H

    1974-06-01

    The authors wished to study some of the internal psychological dynamics of achievement in a nonpatient identified high school population. Questionnaires were administered to the Grade 13 students and their parents in a large high school. A number of students whose achievement and educational plans were not congruous with their general background were selected for interview. The findings suggest that a wide variety of ages and developmental stages can be discerned as critical points in the development of a student's attitude toward higher education. These students have many values in common, and their values appear related to a positive or negative identification with parental values. The students themselves show a wide range of personality integration. They relate in a special way to a wide variety of teachers' personalities.

  8. Database Research: Achievements and Challenges

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shan Wang; Xiao-Yong Du; Xiao-Feng Meng; Hong Chen

    2006-01-01

    Database system is the infrastructure of the modern information system. The R&D in the database system moves along by giant steps. This report presents the achievements Renmin University of China (RUC) has made in the past 25 years and at the same time addresses some of the research projects we, RUC, are currently working on. The National Natural Science Foundation of China supports and initiates most of our research projects and these successfully conducted projects have produced fruitful results.

  9. Predicting educational achievement from DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selzam, S; Krapohl, E; von Stumm, S; O'Reilly, P F; Rimfeld, K; Kovas, Y; Dale, P S; Lee, J J; Plomin, R

    2017-01-01

    A genome-wide polygenic score (GPS), derived from a 2013 genome-wide association study (N=127,000), explained 2% of the variance in total years of education (EduYears). In a follow-up study (N=329,000), a new EduYears GPS explains up to 4%. Here, we tested the association between this latest EduYears GPS and educational achievement scores at ages 7, 12 and 16 in an independent sample of 5825 UK individuals. We found that EduYears GPS explained greater amounts of variance in educational achievement over time, up to 9% at age 16, accounting for 15% of the heritable variance. This is the strongest GPS prediction to date for quantitative behavioral traits. Individuals in the highest and lowest GPS septiles differed by a whole school grade at age 16. Furthermore, EduYears GPS was associated with general cognitive ability (~3.5%) and family socioeconomic status (~7%). There was no evidence of an interaction between EduYears GPS and family socioeconomic status on educational achievement or on general cognitive ability. These results are a harbinger of future widespread use of GPS to predict genetic risk and resilience in the social and behavioral sciences. PMID:27431296

  10. Taste quality and intensity of 100 stimuli as reported by rats: the taste-location association task

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shree Hari eGautam

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The interpretation of neural activity related to sensory stimulation requires an understanding of the subject's perception of the stimulation. Previous methods used to evaluate the perception of chemosensory stimuli by rodents have distinct limitations. We developed a novel behavioral paradigm, the taste-location association task, to complement these methods. First we tested if rats are able to learn associations between five basic taste stimuli and their spatial locations. This spatial task was based on 4 prototypical tastants and water. All four rats trained to perform the task reached levels of performance well above chance. Control trials demonstrated that the rats used only taste cues. Further, the learned stimulus set was resistant to interference, allowing for generalization experiments performed subsequently. We tested the rats' gustatory generalizations of 100 tastants to the five trained stimuli, both regarding their taste qualities as well as intensity ratings. The taste profiles generated by these experiments contribute to the understanding of how perception of the specific taste stimuli relate to the perception of the five basic taste qualities in intact behaving rats. In this large taste space we found that intensity plays a major role. Furthermore, umami stimuli were not reported as being similar to other basic tastants. Our new paradigm enables neurophysiological studies of taste-based learning and memory in awake, freely moving animals.

  11. Chronic monitoring of cortical hemodynamics in behaving, freely-moving rats using a miniaturized head-mounted optical microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigal, Iliya; Gad, Raanan; Koletar, Margaret; Ringuette, Dene; Stefanovic, Bojana; Levi, Ofer

    2016-03-01

    Growing interest within the neurophysiology community in assessing healthy and pathological brain activity in animals that are awake and freely-behaving has triggered the need for optical systems that are suitable for such longitudinal studies. In this work we report label-free multi-modal imaging of cortical hemodynamics in the somatosensory cortex of awake, freely-behaving rats, using a novel head-mounted miniature optical microscope. The microscope employs vertical cavity surface emitting lasers (VCSELs) at three distinct wavelengths (680 nm, 795 nm, and 850 nm) to provide measurements of four hemodynamic markers: blood flow speeds, HbO, HbR, and total Hb concentration, across a > 2 mm field of view. Blood flow speeds are extracted using Laser Speckle Contrast Imaging (LSCI), while oxygenation measurements are performed using Intrinsic Optical Signal Imaging (IOSI). Longitudinal measurements on the same animal are made possible over the course of > 6 weeks using a chronic window that is surgically implanted into the skull. We use the device to examine changes in blood flow and blood oxygenation in superficial cortical blood vessels and tissue in response to drug-induced absence-like seizures, correlating motor behavior with changes in blood flow and blood oxygenation in the brain.

  12. Achieving Universal Access to Broadband

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morten FALCH

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper discusses appropriate policy measures for achieving universal access to broadband services in Europe. Access can be delivered by means of many different technology solutions described in the paper. This means a greater degree of competition and affects the kind of policy measures to be applied. The paper concludes that other policy measure than the classical universal service obligation are in play, and discusses various policy measures taking the Lisbon process as a point of departure. Available policy measures listed in the paper include, universal service obligation, harmonization, demand stimulation, public support for extending the infrastructure, public private partnerships (PPP, and others.

  13. Teacher Quality and Student Achievement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda Darling-Hammond

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Using data from a 50-state survey of policies, state case study analyses, the 1993-94 Schools and Staffing Surveys (SASS, and the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP, this study examines the ways in which teacher qualifications and other school inputs are related to student achievement across states. The findings of both the qualitative and quantitative analyses suggest that policy investments in the quality of teachers may be related to improvements in student performance. Quantitative analyses indicate that measures of teacher preparation and certification are by far the strongest correlates of student achievement in reading and mathematics, both before and after controlling for student poverty and language status. State policy surveys and case study data are used to evaluate policies that influence the overall level of teacher qualifications within and across states. This analysis suggests that policies adopted by states regarding teacher education, licensing, hiring, and professional development may make an important difference in the qualifications and capacities that teachers bring to their work. The implications for state efforts to enhance quality and equity in public education are discussed.

  14. Updates and achievements in virology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buonaguro, Franco M; Campadelli-Fiume, Gabriella; De Giuli Morghen, Carlo; Palù, Giorgio

    2010-07-01

    The 4th European Congress of Virology, hosted by the Italian Society for Virology, attracted approximately 1300 scientists from 46 countries worldwide. It also represented the first conference of the European Society for Virology, which was established in Campidoglio, Rome, Italy in 2009. The main goal of the meeting was to share research activities and results achieved in European virology units/institutes and to strengthen collaboration with colleagues from both western and developing countries. The worldwide representation of participants is a testament to the strength and attraction of European virology. The 5-day conference brought together the best of current virology; topics covered all three living domains (bacteria, archaea and eucarya), with special sessions on plant and veterinary virology as well as human virology, including two oral presentations on mimiviruses. The conference included five plenary sessions, 31 workshops, one hepatitis C virus roundtable, ten special workshops and three poster sessions, as well as 45 keynote lectures, 191 oral presentations and 845 abstracts. Furthermore, the Gesellschaft fur Virologie Loeffler-Frosch medal award was given to Peter Vogt for his long-standing career and achievements; the Gardner Lecture of the European Society for Clinical Virology was presented by Yoshihiro Kawaoka, and the Pioneer in Virology Lecture of the Italian Society for Virology was presented by Ulrich Koszinowski.

  15. 年龄对妇科手术七氟醚麻醉清醒肺泡浓度的影响%Influence of age on the MAC-awake of sevoflurane in women undergoing gynecological surgeries

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张燕; 雷波; 徐志新

    2011-01-01

    Objective To observe the influence of age on the MAC-awake of sevoflurane in women undergoing gynecological surgeries. Methods Sixty patients with ASA Ⅰ or Ⅱ undergoing gynecological surgeries under sevofluence were divided into three groups with 20 each: group I , 20-29 years old; group Ⅱ , 30-39 years old; and group Ⅲ , 40-50 years old. Anesthesia was induced with sevoflurane 8% in oxygen, the end-tidal sevoflurane concentration was maintained at 3% for 10 min after loss the eyelash reflex and then the LMA was inserted, and the intraoperative maintenance concentration of sevoflurane was 3%. At the end of the surgeries, the concentration of sevoflurane was determined with the up-down sequence method at a 0. 1% interval, and then the LMA was extubated. The MAC-awake of sevoflurane and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (95% CD were calculated. Results The MAC-awake and corresponding 95% CI of the three groups were as follows: group I, 0.64% (0. 57%-0. 70%); group Ⅱ , 0.55% (0. 50%-0. 60%); and group I, 0.44% (0.37%-0.50%). Conclusion The MAC-awake of sevoflurane in women undergoing gynecological surgeries decrease with the increase of age.%目的 观察年龄对妇科手术七氟醚麻醉清醒肺泡浓度(MAC-awake)的影响.方法 择期行妇科短小手术患者60例,ASA Ⅰ或Ⅱ级,依据年龄均分为三组:Ⅰ组,20~29岁;Ⅱ组,30~39岁;Ⅲ组,40~50岁.8%七氟醚诱导,眼睑反射消失后维持呼气末七氟醚浓度3%10 min后插入喉罩,术中七氟醚浓度维持在3%.手术结束后以0.1%浓度梯度按Dixon序贯法调整七氟醚浓度并拔出喉罩.计算意识恢复时呼气末七氟醚的MAC-awake即EC50及相应的95%可信区间(CI).结果 Ⅰ、Ⅱ、Ⅲ组意识恢复时呼气末七氟醚EC50及相应的95%CI分别为0.64%(0.57%~0.70%)、0.55%(0.50%~0.60%)及0.44%(0.37%~0.50%).结论 妇科手术七氟醚麻醉随着年龄增长其七氟醚的MAC-awake逐渐下降.

  16. Experimental coccidioidomycosis in the immunosuppressed rat

    OpenAIRE

    Mirta C. Remesar; Jorgelina L. Blejer; Negroni,Ricardo; Nejamkis,Marta R.

    1992-01-01

    C. immitis inoculated rats are known to develop infection restricted to lung whereas cyclophosphamide (CY) treatment leads to widespread dissemination with considerable mortality. In this study, an attempt was made to elucidate the mechanisms involved in such behaviour. With this aim, spleen cells were transferred from infected CY-treated to infected untreated rats, achieving significant specific inhibition in footpad swelling to coccidioidin in recipients, attributable to a suppressor T cell...

  17. Progress, Wealth, and Mathematics Achievement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valero, Paola

    2013-01-01

    international mathematics education journal (Laisant & Fehr, 1899). In the times of the Cold War, a similar argument emerged, however the justification was related to keeping the supremacy of the Capitalist West in front of the growing menace of the expansion of the Communist Soviet Union. Nowadays...... as a result, among others, of the growing series of comparative information on educational achievement and development. Such reports can be seen as performances of the comparative logic of Modernity that operates differential positioning, not only among individuals but also among nations, with respect to what...... is considered to be the desired and normal level of development and growth. “Mathematics for all” can be seen as an effect of power that operates on subjects and nations alike to determine who are the individuals/nations who excel, while creating a narrative of inclusion for all those who, by the very same...

  18. Capacity-achieving CPM schemes

    CERN Document Server

    Perotti, Alberto; Benedetto, Sergio; Montorsi, Guido

    2008-01-01

    The pragmatic approach to coded continuous-phase modulation (CPM) is proposed as a capacity-achieving low-complexity alternative to the serially-concatenated CPM (SC-CPM) coding scheme. In this paper, we first perform a selection of the best spectrally-efficient CPM modulations to be embedded into SC-CPM schemes. Then, we consider the pragmatic capacity (a.k.a. BICM capacity) of CPM modulations and optimize it through a careful design of the mapping between input bits and CPM waveforms. The so obtained schemes are cascaded with an outer serially-concatenated convolutional code to form a pragmatic coded-modulation system. The resulting schemes exhibit performance very close to the CPM capacity without requiring iterations between the outer decoder and the CPM demodulator. As a result, the receiver exhibits reduced complexity and increased flexibility due to the separation of the demodulation and decoding functions.

  19. Opioid microinjection into raphe magnus modulates cardiorespiratory function in mice and rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellman, Kevin M; Mendelson, Scott J; Mendez-Duarte, Marco A; Russell, James L; Mason, Peggy

    2009-11-01

    The raphe magnus (RM) participates in opioid analgesia and contains pain-modulatory neurons with respiration-related discharge. Here, we asked whether RM contributes to respiratory depression, the most prevalent lethal effect of opioids. To investigate whether opioidergic transmission in RM produces respiratory depression, we microinjected a mu-opioid receptor agonist, DAMGO, or morphine into the RM of awake rodents. In mice, opioid microinjection produced sustained decreases in respiratory rate (170 to 120 breaths/min), as well as heart rate (520 to 400 beats/min). Respiratory sinus arrhythmia, indicative of enhanced parasympathetic activity, was prevalent in mice receiving DAMGO microinjection. We performed similar experiments in rats but observed no changes in breathing rate or heart rate. Both rats and mice experienced significantly more episodes of bradypnea, indicative of impaired respiratory drive, after opioid microinjection. During spontaneous arousals, rats showed less tachycardia after opioid microinjection than before microinjection, suggestive of an attenuated sympathetic tone. Thus, activation of opioidergic signaling within RM produces effects beyond analgesia, including the unwanted destabilization of cardiorespiratory function. These adverse effects on homeostasis consequent to opioid microinjection imply a role for RM in regulating the balance of sympathetic and parasympathetic tone.

  20. Brown Norway rats, a putative schizophrenia model, show increased electroencephalographic activity at rest and decreased event-related potential amplitude, power, and coherence in the auditory sensory gating paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomimatsu, Yoshiro; Hibino, Ryosuke; Ohta, Hiroyuki

    2015-08-01

    In recent schizophrenia clinical research, electroencephalographic (EEG) oscillatory activities induced by a sensory stimulus or behavioral tasks have gained considerable interest as functional and pathophysiological biomarkers. The Brown Norway (BN) rat is a putative schizophrenia model that shows naturally low sensorimotor gating and deficits in cognitive performance, although other phenotypes have not been studied. The present study aimed to investigate the neurophysiological features of BN rats, particularly EEG/event-related potential (ERP). EEG activity was recorded at rest and during the auditory sensory gating paradigm under an awake, freely moving condition. Frequency and ERP analysis were performed along with time-frequency analysis of evoked power and intertrial coherence. Compared with Wistar-Kyoto rats, a well-documented control line, BN rats showed increased EEG power at rest, particularly in the theta and gamma ranges. In ERP analysis, BN rats showed reduced N40-P20 amplitude but normal sensory gating. The rats also showed reduced evoked power and intertrial coherence against auditory stimuli. These results suggest that BN rats show features of EEG/ERP measures clinically relevant to schizophrenia and may provide additional opportunities for translational research.

  1. CEREBRAL PALSY AND MUSIC ACHIEVEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miodrag L. STOSHLJEVIKJ

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Pupils with cerebral palsy attend elementary education accordind to a regular and special teaching plan and program. Regular school curriculum was reformed in 1992, while special plan and program has not been changed and adapted according to pupil’s needs and capacities. Music is one of the best means of expressing oneself and plays a very important role in the development of every child, the child with cerebral palsy in particular.In order to test the possibility of pupils with cerebral palsy, with and without mental retardation, to apprehend the actual program content, we have conducted research on musical achievement of children with cerebral palsy. During 2007 a research was carried out, on the sample of 27 pupils with cerebral palsy and mild mental retardation who attended classes in the school “Miodrag Matikj”, and a sample of16 students with cerebral palsy without mental retardation who attended the school “Dr. Dragan Hercog” in Belgrade.Results of the research, as well as analysis of music curriculum content, indicated that the capacities of students with cerebral palsy to carry out the curriculum tasks require special approach and methodology. Therefore, we introduced some proposals to overcome the difficulties in fulfilling music curriculum demands of those pupils. We made special emphasis on the use of computer based Assistive technology which facilitates the whole process to a large extent.

  2. Academic Achievement Among Juvenile Detainees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigorenko, Elena L; Macomber, Donna; Hart, Lesley; Naples, Adam; Chapman, John; Geib, Catherine F; Chart, Hilary; Tan, Mei; Wolhendler, Baruch; Wagner, Richard

    2015-01-01

    The literature has long pointed to heightened frequencies of learning disabilities (LD) within the population of law offenders; however, a systematic appraisal of these observations, careful estimation of these frequencies, and investigation of their correlates and causes have been lacking. Here we present data collected from all youth (1,337 unique admissions, mean age 14.81, 20.3% females) placed in detention in Connecticut (January 1, 2010-July 1, 2011). All youth completed a computerized educational screener designed to test a range of performance in reading (word and text levels) and mathematics. A subsample (n = 410) received the Wide Range Achievement Test, in addition to the educational screener. Quantitative (scale-based) and qualitative (grade-equivalence-based) indicators were then analyzed for both assessments. Results established the range of LD in this sample from 13% to 40%, averaging 24.9%. This work provides a systematic exploration of the type and severity of word and text reading and mathematics skill deficiencies among juvenile detainees and builds the foundation for subsequent efforts that may link these deficiencies to both more formal, structured, and variable definitions and classifications of LD, and to other types of disabilities (e.g., intellectual disability) and developmental disorders (e.g., ADHD) that need to be conducted in future research.

  3. Achieving monospermy or preventing polyspermy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dale B

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Brian Dale Centre for Assisted Fertilization, Naples, Italy Abstract: Images of sea urchin oocytes with hundreds of spermatozoa attached to their surface have fascinated scientists for over a century and led to the idea that oocytes have evolved mechanisms to allow the penetration of one spermatozoon while repelling supernumerary spermatozoa. Popular texts have extrapolated this concept, to the mammals and amphibians, and in many cases to include all the Phyla. Here, it is argued that laboratory experiments, using sea urchin oocytes deprived of their extracellular coats and inseminated at high densities, are artifactual and that the experiments leading to the idea of a fast block to polyspermy are flawed. Under natural conditions, the number of spermatozoa at the site of fertilization is extremely low, compared with the numbers generated. The sperm:oocyte ratio is regulated first by dilution in externally fertilizing species and the female reproductive tract in those with internal fertilization, followed by a bottleneck created by the oocytes extracellular coats. In order to progress to the oocyte plasma membrane, the fertilizing spermatozoon must encounter and respond to a correct sequence of signals from the oocytes extracellular coats. Those that do not, are halted in their progression by defective signaling and fall to the wayside. Final success and entry is finely tuned by the spermatozoon anchoring to an actin-rich predetermined site on the plasma membrane. In this review, the variation in the form, function, and number of gametes produced across the animal kingdom and the many ways in which sperm–oocyte interactions are regulated to reduce numbers are discussed. Since in nature, final sperm:oocyte ratios approach unity it would appear that selective pressures have favored the achievement of monospermy, rather than the evolution of polyspermy preventing mechanisms. Keywords: monospermy, natural conditions, polyspermy, laboratory

  4. The Effects of Urethane on Rat Outer Hair Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingyu Fu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The cochlea converts sound vibration into electrical impulses and amplifies the low-level sound signal. Urethane, a widely used anesthetic in animal research, has been shown to reduce the neural responses to auditory stimuli. However, the effects of urethane on cochlea, especially on the function of outer hair cells, remain largely unknown. In the present study, we compared the cochlear microphonic responses between awake and urethane-anesthetized rats. The results revealed that the amplitude of the cochlear microphonic was decreased by urethane, resulting in an increase in the threshold at all of the sound frequencies examined. To deduce the possible mechanism underlying the urethane-induced decrease in cochlear sensitivity, we examined the electrical response properties of isolated outer hair cells using whole-cell patch-clamp recording. We found that urethane hyperpolarizes the outer hair cell membrane potential in a dose-dependent manner and elicits larger outward current. This urethane-induced outward current was blocked by strychnine, an antagonist of the α9 subunit of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor. Meanwhile, the function of the outer hair cell motor protein, prestin, was not affected. These results suggest that urethane anesthesia is expected to decrease the responses of outer hair cells, whereas the frequency selectivity of cochlea remains unchanged.

  5. The Effects of Urethane on Rat Outer Hair Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Mingyu; Chen, Mengzi; Yang, Xueying

    2016-01-01

    The cochlea converts sound vibration into electrical impulses and amplifies the low-level sound signal. Urethane, a widely used anesthetic in animal research, has been shown to reduce the neural responses to auditory stimuli. However, the effects of urethane on cochlea, especially on the function of outer hair cells, remain largely unknown. In the present study, we compared the cochlear microphonic responses between awake and urethane-anesthetized rats. The results revealed that the amplitude of the cochlear microphonic was decreased by urethane, resulting in an increase in the threshold at all of the sound frequencies examined. To deduce the possible mechanism underlying the urethane-induced decrease in cochlear sensitivity, we examined the electrical response properties of isolated outer hair cells using whole-cell patch-clamp recording. We found that urethane hyperpolarizes the outer hair cell membrane potential in a dose-dependent manner and elicits larger outward current. This urethane-induced outward current was blocked by strychnine, an antagonist of the α9 subunit of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor. Meanwhile, the function of the outer hair cell motor protein, prestin, was not affected. These results suggest that urethane anesthesia is expected to decrease the responses of outer hair cells, whereas the frequency selectivity of cochlea remains unchanged. PMID:28050287

  6. Development of a behavioral assessment of craniofacial muscle pain in lightly anesthetized rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ro, Jin Y; Capra, Norman; Masri, Radi

    2003-07-01

    In this study, a new behavioral assessment of craniofacial muscle pain in the lightly anesthetized rat is described. Intramuscular injections with algesic agents in lightly anesthetized rats evoked a characteristic ipsilateral hindpaw shaking behavior for several minutes similar to previously described orofacial pain-induced grooming behavior in awake rats (Neurosci Lett 103 (1989) 349, Pain 62 (1995) 295). Eighty-two male Sprague-Dawley rats were used in a series of experiments to study whether this behavior could serve as a valid measure of craniofacial muscle pain. First, we demonstrated that different algesic chemicals, mustard oil (20%), formalin (3%) or hypertonic saline (5%) injected in the mid-region of the masseter muscle effectively elicited the hindpaw shaking behavior. The behavior was only minimally evoked with vehicle injection. Repeated administrations of hypertonic saline, a short duration non-sensitizing algogen, demonstrated reproducibility of the assay. Second, we showed that the peak and overall magnitude of the shaking behavior evoked by injections with different concentrations of mustard oil (1 and 5%) changed in a concentration dependent manner. Finally, we showed that systemic administration of morphine sulfate (3 and 0.3 mg/kg, i.p.) dose dependently attenuated mustard oil induced hindpaw-shaking behavior. Lidocaine injected locally 5 min prior to mustard oil injection also significantly decreased the hindpaw shaking behavior. Based on these results we concluded that ipsilateral hindpaw shaking in lightly anesthetized rats is a stereotypical behavior evoked by noxious muscle stimulation and can be used as a reliable behavioral measure to assess craniofacial muscle pain.

  7. An Analysis of High School Mathematics Achievement and English Language Arts Achievement as Predictors of Science Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Anthony C.

    2012-01-01

    Science assessments require students to read and comprehend questions and to solve mathematical problems. The purpose of this study is to determine whether the following variables can be used to predict science achievement: English language arts achievement, mathematics achievement, socioeconomic status (SES), limited English proficiency (LEP)…

  8. Enriching the Hierarchical Model of Achievement Motivation: Autonomous and Controlling Reasons Underlying Achievement Goals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michou, Aikaterini; Vansteenkiste, Maarten; Mouratidis, Athanasios; Lens, Willy

    2014-01-01

    Background: The hierarchical model of achievement motivation presumes that achievement goals channel the achievement motives of need for achievement and fear of failure towards motivational outcomes. Yet, less is known whether autonomous and controlling reasons underlying the pursuit of achievement goals can serve as additional pathways between…

  9. Cardiovascular and respiratory changes during slow-wave sleep in rats are associated with electrocorticogram desynchronization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.R. Dias-dos-Santos

    1997-11-01

    Full Text Available In awake rats a single recurrent larger tidal volume (deep breaths occurs at regular intervals, followed by oscillations in arterial pressure and heart rate. In the present study we recorded the changes in blood pressure, heart rate and ventilation during the wakefulness-sleep cycle identified by electrocorticographic records in order to determine whether the deep breaths and cardiovascular oscillations were associated with changes in the electrocorticogram. During several episodes of slow-wave sleep (SWS in 7 rats the deep breaths and oscillations in arterial pressure and heart rate were preceded by SWS desynchronization. The interval between deep breaths during SWS was 71 ± 4 s, the period between initial desynchronization and the generation of deep breaths was 3.98 ± 0.45 s and the duration of SWS desynchronization was 11 ± 0.65 s. Hypotension (-16 ± 1 mmHg and tachycardia (+15 ± 5 bpm were observed during deep breaths in the SWS state. These data indicate that the oscillations in arterial pressure and heart rate during SWS are associated with deep breaths, which in turn are preceded by desynchronization of the electrocorticogram in this state of sleep

  10. Texture coding in the rat whisker system: slip-stick versus differential resonance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason Wolfe

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Rats discriminate surface textures using their whiskers (vibrissae, but how whiskers extract texture information, and how this information is encoded by the brain, are not known. In the resonance model, whisker motion across different textures excites mechanical resonance in distinct subsets of whiskers, due to variation across whiskers in resonance frequency, which varies with whisker length. Texture information is therefore encoded by the spatial pattern of activated whiskers. In the competing kinetic signature model, different textures excite resonance equally across whiskers, and instead, texture is encoded by characteristic, nonuniform temporal patterns of whisker motion. We tested these models by measuring whisker motion in awake, behaving rats whisking in air and onto sandpaper surfaces. Resonant motion was prominent during whisking in air, with fundamental frequencies ranging from approximately 35 Hz for the long Delta whisker to approximately 110 Hz for the shorter D3 whisker. Resonant vibrations also occurred while whisking against textures, but the amplitude of resonance within single whiskers was independent of texture, contradicting the resonance model. Rather, whiskers resonated transiently during discrete, high-velocity, and high-acceleration slip-stick events, which occurred prominently during whisking on surfaces. The rate and magnitude of slip-stick events varied systematically with texture. These results suggest that texture is encoded not by differential resonant motion across whiskers, but by the magnitude and temporal pattern of slip-stick motion. These findings predict a temporal code for texture in neural spike trains.

  11. Antihyperalgesic effect of systemic dexmedetomidine and gabapentin in a rat model of monoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei-Shi; Xu, Hua; Xu, Bo; Sun, Shan; Deng, Xiao-Ming; Zhang, Yu-Qiu

    2009-04-06

    The present study investigated the effects of systemic administration of dexmedetomidine, a selective alpha2 adrenergic receptor (alpha2AR) agonist, and gabapentin either alone or in combination on thermal hyperalgesia evoked by ankle joint inflammation. Monoarthritis of rat ankle joint was induced by an intra-articular injection of Complete Freund's Adjuvant (CFA). The paw withdrawal latency (PWL) from a thermal stimulus was measured in awake rats. Intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of dexmedetomidine (2.5, 5, 10 and 20 microg/kg) or gabapentin (25, 50, 100 and 200 mg/kg) significantly and dose-dependently increased the PWL of the hindpaw ipsilateral to CFA-injected joint. The PWLs of the non-injected and normal saline (NS)-injected hindpaws were not significantly affected by the two agents at the most doses tested except the highest dose of dexmedetomidine (20 microg/kg). Although low dose of dexmedetomidine (2.5 microg/kg) or gabapentin (25 mg/kg) alone did not affect or lightly increased PWLs of the hindpaw ipsilateral to CFA-injected joint, a combination of dexmedetomidine and gabapentin (2.5 microg/kg+25 mg/kg, or 5 microg/kg+50 mg/kg) significantly reversed CFA-induced thermal hyperalgesia for 60 min without sedation/motor impairment. These results provide the first identification that co-application of dexmedetomidine and gabapentin may synergistically antagonize inflammatory pain, and this might prove to be beneficial in the treatment of arthritic pain.

  12. Suppressant effects of selective 5-HT2 antagonists on rapid eye movement sleep in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tortella, F C; Echevarria, E; Pastel, R H; Cox, B; Blackburn, T P

    1989-04-24

    The effects of the novel, highly selective serotonin-2 (5-HT2) antagonists, ICI 169,369 and ICI 170,809, on 24 h EEG sleep-wake activity were studied in the rat. Both compounds caused a dose-related increase in the latency to rapid eye movement sleep (REMS) and significantly suppressed cumulative REMS time up to 12 h postinjection. In contrast, neither drug disrupted slow-wave sleep continuity in as much as the latency to non-REMS (NREMS) and cumulative NREMS time were unchanged. However, at the highest dose tested (20 mg/kg) ICI 170,809 did produce a significant increase in total NREMS time during the second half of the sleep-awake cycle. These results demonstrate effects of selective 5-HT2 antagonists on sleep in rats which appear to be specific for REMS behavior, suggesting that the priming influence of serotonin on REMS may involve 5-HT2 receptor subtypes. The relationship between the REMS suppressant actions of these compounds and their consideration as therapeutic agents in depression is discussed.

  13. Cardiovascular alterations after injection of 2% lidocaine with norepinephrine 1:50,000 (xylestesin) in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faraco, Fatima Neves; Armonia, Paschoal Laercio; Malamed, Stanley F

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of the present study is to determine the cardiovascular effects produced by intravascular injection of 2% lidocaine with 20 microg/mL of norepinephrine on systolic, diastolic, and mean arterial pressures and heart rate of rats at the following times: control period, during the injection (first 15 seconds), during the first minute, and at the end of 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, and 30 minutes after drug administration. The study was performed on 13 male Wistar rats with weights between 200 grams and 220 grams that were awake during the recording of these parameters. The dose administered was proportional to 1 cartridge of local anesthetic (1.8 mL) in an average-size human, which is equivalent to 0.51 mg/kg of lidocaine hydrochloride and 0.51 microg/kg of norepinephrine hydrochloride. The average time of injection was 15.7 seconds. The results of this study showed significant increases in systolic, diastolic, and mean arterial pressure and a noticeable decrease in heart rate. The greatest variation occurred in the systolic blood pressure. The greatest alterations occurred during injection and within the first minute following administration of the anesthetic solution. We would anticipate these changes in the parameters analyzed to be clinically significant. Thus, dentists using 2% lidocaine with norepinephrine 20 mug/mL should be very careful to avoid intravascular injection.

  14. Three brief assessments of math achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, Eric T; Ashcraft, Mark H

    2012-12-01

    Because of wide disparities in college students' math knowledge-that is, their math achievement-studies of cognitive processing in math tasks also need to assess their individual level of math achievement. For many research settings, however, using existing math achievement tests is either too costly or too time consuming. To solve this dilemma, we present three brief tests of math achievement here, two drawn from the Wide Range Achievement Test and one composed of noncopyrighted items. All three correlated substantially with the full achievement test and with math anxiety, our original focus, and all show acceptable to excellent reliability. When lengthy testing is not feasible, one of these brief tests can be substituted.

  15. Predicting Academic Achievement from Classroom Behaviors

    OpenAIRE

    Flynt, Cynthia J.

    2008-01-01

    PREDICTING ACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENT FROM CLASSROOM BEHAVIORS by Cynthia J. Flynt Nancy Bodenhorn & Kusum Singh, Co-Chairs Counselor Education (ABSTRACT) This study examined the influence of behaviors exhibited in the classroom on reading and math achievement in the first, third and eighth grades; and the influence of teacher perceptions on reading and math achievement of African-Americans versus White students and male versus female students. Lastly, the study examined te...

  16. Cognitive abilities, sociocultural background and academic achievement

    OpenAIRE

    Diniz, António; Pocinho, Margarida Maria Ferreira Diogo Dias; Almeida,Leandro Silva

    2011-01-01

    The infl uence of students’ sociocultural background on academic achievement is a well established fact. Research also points out that sociocultural background is related to students’ cognitive abilities and these have an effect on their academic achievement. However, the mediator role of cognitive abilities on the relationship between sociocultural background and academic achievement is less well known. A structural equation model that represents these relationships was tested in a sample...

  17. Establishment of model of visceral pain due to colorectal distension and its behavioral assessment in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian-Ping Yang; Ming Yao; Xing-Hong Jiang; Li-Na Wang

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To establish a visceral pain model via colorectal distension (CRD) and to evaluate the efficiency of behavioral responses of CRD by measuring the score of abdominal withdrawal reflex (AWR) in rats.METHODS: Thirty-eight male SD rats weighing 180-240g were used to establish the visceral pain model. The rat was inserted intra-anally with a 7 cm long flexible latex balloon under ether anesthesia, and colorectal distensions by inflating the balloon with air were made 30 min after recovering from the anesthesia.Five AWR scores (AWR0 to AWR4) were used to assess the intensity of noxious visceral stimuli. It was regarded as the threshold of the minimal pressure (kPa). For abdominal flatting was induced by colorectal distension.RESULTS: A vigorous AWR to distension of the descending colon and rectum was found in 100% of the awake rats tested. The higher the pressure of distension; the higher the score of AWR. The distension pressures of 0, 2.00, 3.33, 5.33 and 8.00 kPa produced different AWR scores (P<0.05). The pain threshold of AWR was constant for up to 80 min after the initial windup (first 1-3 distensions), the mean threshold was 3.69±0.35 kPa. Systemic administration of morphine sulfate elevated the threshold of visceral pain in a dosedependent and naloxone reversible manner.CONCLUSION: Scoring the AWR during colorectal distensions can assess the intensity of noxious visceral stimulus. Flatting of abdomen (AWR 3) to CRD as the visceral pain threshold is clear, constant and reliable.This pain model and its behavioral assessment are good for research on visceral pain and analgesics.

  18. 右美托咪啶用于饱腹创伤患者清醒插管的效果%Clinical Observation of Dexmedetomidine Used in Awake Intubation in Satiety Patients with Food Intaken

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄毅然; 李文红; 吴会红; 陈睿

    2013-01-01

    Objective To observe the clinical effects of dexmedetomidine.(Dex) used in awake intubation in satiety patients with food intaken.Methods 30 patients were randomly and equally divided into two groups.Patients in group A received midazolam 30 μg/kg and FentanyL 1 μg/kg,and those in group B received Dex at loading of does 0.6 μg/kg for 15 minutes with the rate of 30 μg/(kg · h),when the patients experession of alertness/Sedation(OAA/S) reached to 3 in the two groups were received 1% tetracaine enough topical anesthetics to the airway,then awake intubation was administered.OAA/S,HR,MAP,SPO2,and RR were recorded before drug adminisration (T0),when QAA/S reached to 3 (T1),and success of intubation (T2).Results HR in group B showed down obviously and it was less than in group A after using the drug (P < 0.05) ; BP in the two groups raised after intubation(P < 0.05),SpO2 in the two group lowered after using the drugs and was higher in group B than in group A (P < 0.05).Conclusion Dex had desirable sedation and analgesia effects and may be used in awake intubation in satiety patients with food intaken alone.%目的 探讨右美托咪啶用于饱腹创伤患者清醒插管的效果.方法 将急诊行气管插管全麻饱腹创伤患者30例随机分为咪达唑仑复合芬太尼组(A组)和右美托咪啶组(B组),每组15例.A组静脉注射芬太尼1μg/kg及咪达唑仑30 μg/kg,B组于15 min内静脉输注右美托咪啶0.6 μg/kg,15 min后改为30μg/(kg·h)维持患者Ramsay镇静评分3~4分,咽喉腔表面麻醉后清醒气管插管.结果 两组一般资料各指标、插管时间比较差异无统计学意义,与A组比较,B组清醒气管插管时MAP降低,HR减慢,呼吸抑制的发生率降低(P<0.05),心动过速、高血压、恶心、呛咳、躁动的发生率降低(P<0.05).结论 右美托咪啶作为一种新型的镇静、镇痛药,应用于饱腹患者清醒气管插管,可减轻插管所致的心脑血管应激反应,对自主呼吸无抑制.

  19. Achievement Goals and Discrete Achievement Emotions: A Theoretical Model and Prospective Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pekrun, Reinhard; Elliot, Andrew J.; Maier, Markus A.

    2006-01-01

    A theoretical model linking achievement goals to discrete achievement emotions is proposed. The model posits relations between the goals of the trichotomous achievement goal framework and 8 commonly experienced achievement emotions organized in a 2 (activity/outcome focus) x 2 (positive/negative valence) taxonomy. Two prospective studies tested…

  20. Comparativo da classificação de Fujita no paciente acordado e sob sonoendoscopia A comparison of the Fujita classification of awake and drug-induced sleep endoscopy patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Augusto Winckler Rabelo

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available São poucos os estudos que comparam resultados endoscópicos no paciente acordado com o mesmo paciente sob sono induzido por drogas. OBJETIVOS: O objetivo do presente estudo é comparar os acha dos endoscópicos num mesmo paciente, em dois momentos diferentes: ambulatorial e sob sedação com propofol, por meio da classificação de Fujita. Desenho do estudo: estudo de coorte transversal. MÉTODO: Trinta e quatro pacientes foram submetido ao exame otorrinolaringológico ambulatorial, incluindo nasoendoscopia com manobra de Müller com o paciente acordado e à sonoendoscopia com propofol. A classificação de Fujita foi adotada para comparar os dois exames endoscópicos. Correlacionamos a concordância entre os exames com dados clínicos dos pacientes, como Índice de Massa Corporal, idade e gravidade da síndrome da apneia obstrutiva do sono. RESULTADOS: Não houve concordância nenhuma entre os dois exames endoscópicos, seja para o grupo no geral, seja para cada um dos subgrupos analisados. CONCLUSÃO: Não existe concordância entre os achados endoscópicos com o paciente acordado e os mesmos com o paciente com sono induzido.Only a few studies have compared the outcomes of patients kept awake during endoscopic examination and subjects submitted to drug-induced sleep endoscopy. OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to compare the endoscopic findings of patients submitted to outpatient endoscopy and endoscopic examination with sedation by propofol based on the Fujita Classification. METHOD: This cross-sectional cohort study enrolled 34 patients. The subjects underwent ENT examination, nasal endoscopy with Müller's maneuver, and drug-induced sleep endoscopy with propofol. The Fujita Classification was used to compare the two modes of endoscopic examination. The examinations were correlated to patient clinical data such as BMI, age, and OSAS severity. RESULTS: There was no agreement between the two modes of endoscopic examination, whether for the group in

  1. Multimedia Technology and Students' Achievement in Geography

    Science.gov (United States)

    DaSilva, Edmar Bernardes; Kvasnak, Robb Neil

    2012-01-01

    In this study done at a community college in South Florida, the achievements of students who spoke English as their second language who had attended their K-12 education outside the United States in their home countries, in a U.S. college course on world geography are compared with the achievements of students in the same classes who spoke English…

  2. Achievement and Its Correlates: Symposium III A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Maznah; And Others

    This symposium contains a report of a study which (1) examined the relationship between Malaysian children's perception of control and their academic achievement, by Maznah Ismail and Choo Piang Foong, and two abstracts of studies which (2) investigated achievement motivation and attribution of success in rural and urban Malaysian ethnic groups,…

  3. Professional Learning Communities Impact on Student Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Jan L.

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the impact of the Professional Learning Community model on student achievement in the state of California. Specifically, the study compared student achievement between two school types: Professional Learning Community schools and Non Professional Learning schools. The research utilized existing API scores for California schools…

  4. Physical Environment and Middle Grade Achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Tak Cheung

    This study measured the influence of air conditioning, carpeting, fluorescent lighting, and interior pastel coloring on the academic achievement of eighth grade Georgia pupils in 1975-76 when the variance due to socioeconomic status was statistically controlled. Analysis of covariance was used to compare the achievement scores of students on the…

  5. Health and Nutrition: Preconditions for Educational Achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negussie, Birgit

    This paper discusses the importance of maternal and infant health for children's educational achievement. Education, health, and nutrition are so closely related that changes in one causes changes in the others. Improvement of maternal and preschooler health and nutrition is a precondition for improved educational achievement. Although parental…

  6. Achieving scale strategies for sustained competitive performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grube, Mark E; Gish, Ryan S; Tkach, Sasha N

    2008-05-01

    Growth to achieve scale requires the following strategic initiatives: Having a clear understanding of what the organization is and what it wants to become. Ensuring a structured and rigorous growth process. Leveraging size to achieve benefits of scale. Recognizing the importance of physicians, ambulatory care, and primary care. Establishing and maintaining accountability as growth occurs.

  7. Psychological Adjustment and Academic Achievement among Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmood, Khalid; Iqbal, Muhammad Maqsood

    2015-01-01

    This study was studied that emotional and behavioural problems of young students who are directly related to their academic achievement and thus play a vital role in the development of young learners carrier. This study helped to fill a gap by conducting an exploration of psychological adjustment and academic achievement among adolescents. It also…

  8. Achieve inventory reduction and improve customer service?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moody, M C

    2000-05-01

    Is it really possible to achieve significant reductions in your manufacturing inventories while improving customer service? If you really want to achieve significant inventory reductions, focus on the root causes, and develop countermeasures and a work plan, to execute your countermeasures. Include measurements for recording your progress, and deploy your countermeasures until they are no longer required, or until new ones are needed.

  9. A Multivariate Model of Achievement in Geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, MarLynn; Taasoobshirazi, Gita; Carr, Martha

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that several key variables influence student achievement in geometry, but no research has been conducted to determine how these variables interact. A model of achievement in geometry was tested on a sample of 102 high school students. Structural equation modeling was used to test hypothesized relationships among…

  10. Therapeutic effect of Captopril on rheumatoid arthritis in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong-Mei Liu; Kai-Jie Wang

    2014-01-01

    cells infiltration and cartilago articularis damage degree etc. were observed inGroupsB,C,D andE. Conclusions:Intervention treatment withCaptopril can effectively reduce theTNF-αcontent in serum of rheumatoid arthritis rats and inhibit the generation of inflammatory factors, so as to achieve the therapeutic effect.

  11. Student academic achievement in college chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabibzadeh, Kiana S.

    General Chemistry is required for variety of baccalaureate degrees, including all medical related fields, engineering, and science majors. Depending on the institution, the prerequisite requirement for college level General Chemistry varies. The success rate for this course is low. The purpose of this study is to examine the factors influencing student academic achievement and retention in General Chemistry at the college level. In this study student achievement is defined by those students who earned grades of "C" or better. The dissertation contains in-depth studies on influence of Intermediate Algebra as a prerequisite compared to Fundamental Chemistry for student academic achievement and student retention in college General Chemistry. In addition the study examined the extent and manner in which student self-efficacy influences student academic achievement in college level General Chemistry. The sample for this part of the study is 144 students enrolled in first semester college level General Chemistry. Student surveys determined student self-efficacy level. The statistical analyses of study demonstrated that Fundamental Chemistry is a better prerequisite for student academic achievement and student retention. The study also found that student self-efficacy has no influence on student academic achievement. The significance of this study will be to provide data for the purpose of establishing a uniform and most suitable prerequisite for college level General Chemistry. Finally the variables identified to influence student academic achievement and enhance student retention will support educators' mission to maximize the students' ability to complete their educational goal at institutions of higher education.

  12. Personality and academic achievement in nniversity students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel Niño de Guzmán

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available The correlations among personality, academic performance and other variables in 170 university students were studied, using two instruments validated into the population: the NEOPJ-R, and the EPPS. Other variables as age, study level, self perception of academic achievement and self perception of motivation, and sources of support were included. Jt was confirmed the reliability and validity of both tests and the correlations between them. The results showed associations among academic performance and conscientiousness, endurance,change, and aggression. The academic performance was better explained by achievements triving, deliberation, change, self perception of academic achievement and age.

  13. Limited feedback achieves the empirical capacity

    CERN Document Server

    Eswaran, Krishnan; Sahai, Anant; Gastpar, Michael

    2007-01-01

    The utility of limited feedback for coding over an individual sequence of DMCs is investigated. This study complements recent results showing how limited or noisy feedback can boost the reliability of communication. A strategy with fixed input distribution $P$ is given that asymptotically achieves rates arbitrarily close to the mutual information induced by $P$ and the state-averaged channel. When the capacity achieving input distribution is the same over all channel states, this achieves rates at least as large as the capacity of the state averaged channel, sometimes called the empirical capacity.

  14. Rat Genome Database (RGD)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Rat Genome Database (RGD) is a collaborative effort between leading research institutions involved in rat genetic and genomic research to collect, consolidate,...

  15. Recent CAS Achievements in Life Sciences

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    @@ Recent years have witnessed remarkable progress scored by CAS researchers along with the smooth development of the knowledge innovation program piloted at CAS. The follow-ings are just recent examples of CAS research achievements in life sciences.

  16. The integrated curriculum: experiences, achievements and problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gale, J

    1984-01-01

    In this article the aims, experiences and achievements of vertical and horizontal integration in undergraduate medical education are considered and reviewed, and some problems are identified. It is concluded that a clearer definition of integration would now be helpful.

  17. Cognitive abilities, sociocultural background and academic achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diniz, António; Dias Pocinho, Margarida; Silva Almeida, Leandro

    2011-11-01

    The influence of students' sociocultural background on academic achievement is a well established fact. Research also points out that sociocultural background is related to students' cognitive abilities and these have an effect on their academic achievement. However, the mediator role of cognitive abilities on the relationship between sociocultural background and academic achievement is less well known. A structural equation model that represents these relationships was tested in a sample (N= 728) of Portuguese junior high school students. Multigroup analysis of the model showed the importance of the cognitive ability mediation effect between sociocultural background and academic achievement in the 7th and 9th grades, but not in the 8th grade. This difference may be the result of the academic transition experienced in the 7th and 9th grades in the Portuguese educational system, which requires parents' higher involvement in school.

  18. 2008: year of the rat for stem cell research

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Duanqing Pei

    2009-01-01

    @@ 2008 breakthrough of the year went to reprogramming as announced by magazine Science recently [1], highlighting a stem cell revolution in the scientific world underway commencing at 2006. For the field of stem cell and developmental biology, 2008 ended with a truly exciting achievement for the Rat, i.e., the generation of germline competent embryonic stem cells from rat blastocysts (Figure 1) [2, 3].

  19. Factors Affecting Students’ Achievement in Mathematics ∗

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    In this study, the factors that affect students’ mathematics achievement in secondary school mathematics grades of 6th, 7th and 8th were explored. For this purpose, the factors that affect mathematics education and mathematics achievement such as type of school, family income, studying time and students’ attitude towards mathematics and attendance to private courses have been investigated. The sample of the study consisted of 275 students from one private (n=58) and two state schools (n= 217)...

  20. Achievement Goals, Learning Strategies and Language Achievement among Peruvian High School Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lennia Matos

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available We used an achievement goal framework to study the role of motivation in the academic context of a Peruvian sample of 8th to 10th grade high school students (N = 1505. The purpose of this cross-sectional study was to examine the relationship between students' achievement goals, their use of learning strategies and their academic achievement. Multiple Hierarchical Regressions Analyses identified, as predicted, positive effects of mastery goals, including more use of learning strategies and higher academic achievement, and negative effects of performance avoidance goals, including lower academic achievement. Mixed results were found for pursuing performance approach goals, which predicted a greater use of learning strategies, but were unrelated to academic achievement. The present findings support the external validity of achievement goal theory in a sample of students from a culture that is understudied in the achievement goal literature in particular and the motivational literature in general.

  1. Code Compliant School Buildings Boost Student Achievement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronald B. Lumpkin

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Much of the focus in the literature in raising student achievement has included parental involvement, principal leadership, quality of instruction, students’ socioeconomic status, curriculum, and use of technology. Limited empirical research relates the condition of the school building as a variable that affects student achievement. Furthermore, there is no research that has examined the impact of building codes on achievement outcomes in the state of Florida. This research determined whether academic achievement of 4th-, 8th-, 9th-, and 10th-grade students as measured by the mathematics and reading subtests of the Florida Comprehensive Achievement Test (FCAT increased in new school buildings compliant to the 2000 Florida State Requirements for Educational Facilities. A causal-comparative design determined whether the independent variables, old and new school building influenced student achievement as measured by students’ FCAT mathematics and reading subtest scores. The control group was two cohorts of 4th-, 8th-, 9th-, and 10th-grade students who attended school in old buildings. The experimental group was two cohorts of 4th-, 8th-, 9th-, and 10th-grade students who attended school in new buildings. Transition from an old school into a new school was the treatment. Two hypotheses were formulated for testing and the research question for the inquiry was whether the percentage of students passing the FCAT mathematics and reading subtests increases after transitioning from an old school building into a new 2000 UBC (Uniform Building Code compliant facility.

  2. ASSOCIATION BETWEEN EMOTIONAL VARIABLES AND SCHOOL ACHIEVEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Randler

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Recent psychological studies highlight emotional aspects, and they show an important role within individual learning processes. Hereby, positive emotions were supposed to positively influence learning and achievement processes and negative ones do the contrary. In this study, an educational unit “ecosystem lake” was used during which achievement (three tests and emotional variables (interest, well-being, anxiety and boredom; measured at the end of three pre-selected lessons were monitored. The research question was to explore correlations between emotional variables and the learning outcome of the teaching unit. Prior knowledge was regressed against the subsequent tests to account for its confounding effect. Regressions showed a highly significant influence of prior knowledge on the subsequent measurements of achievement. However, after accounting for prior knowledge, a positive correlation between interest/well-being and achievement and a negative correlation between anxiety/boredom and achievement was found. Further research and interventions should try to enhance positive emotions in biology lessons to positively influence achievement.

  3. A Mediation Analysis of Achievement Motives, Goals, Learning Strategies, and Academic Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diseth, Age; Kobbeltvedt, Therese

    2010-01-01

    Background: Previous research is inconclusive regarding antecedents and consequences of achievement goals, and there is a need for more research in order to examine the joint effects of different types of motives and learning strategies as predictors of academic achievement. Aims: To investigate the relationship between achievement motives,…

  4. Causal Ordering of Academic Self-Concept and Achievement: Effects of Type of Achievement Measure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinxten, Maarten; De Fraine, Bieke; Van Damme, Jan; D'Haenens, Ellen

    2010-01-01

    Background: The relation between academic self-concept and achievement has been examined in a large number of studies. The majority of these studies have found evidence for a reciprocal effects model. However, there is an ongoing debate on how students' achievement should be measured and whether the type of achievement indicator (grades, tests,…

  5. Decontamination properties of bentonite in rats irradiated contaminated with radiocesium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kossakowski, S.; Dziura, A. [National Veterinary Research Institute, Pulawy (Poland)

    1994-12-31

    Decontamination properties of bentonite were examined in rats irradiated with 154.5 mC/kg and contaminated with 13.83 kBq of Cs-137. The rats were fed a granulated LSM diet supplemented with 10% bentonite for 1, 3 and 5 days and were examined radiometrically for Cs-137 concentration in the small intestine, liver, kidneys, lung, spleen, heart, muscles, tongue, blood, brain, testicles and prostate. The findings revealed that the highest decontamination efficacy in the rats contaminated 1 and 5 days postirradiation was achieved after three-day administration of bentonite. (author). 16 refs, 2 tabs.

  6. [Orthotopic liver transplant in rats. Surgical technique, complications and treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lausada, Natalia R; Gondolesi, G E; Ortiz, E; Dreizzen, E; Raimondi, J C

    2002-01-01

    The orthotopic rat liver transplant model is a widely used technique in transplantation research. It has many advantages over other animal transplant models because of its availability and low cost. However, it must be emphasized that success with the rat model requires thorough training. The aim of this paper is to describe the microsurgical technique involved in 60 rat liver transplants and to discuss the complications and their treatments. Forty-nine liver transplants were performed at the Experimental Laboratory of the University Hospital, Ontario, Canada (ELUH) and 11 were performed at the Laboratorio de Trasplante de Organos de la Facultad de Ciencias Médicas de La Plata, Buenos Aires. Argentina (LTO). Among the transplants performed at the ELUH, the observed complications were haemorrhage (n = 4), pneumothorax (n = 1), anastomotic failure (n = 15), bile leak (n = 3), and bile duct necrosis (n = 9). The remaining 17 rats at the ELUH were healthy at day 7 after surgery. Animal survival immediately postop, at 24 hours postop and at 7 days postop was achieved with the 9th, 20th and 21st transplants respectively. At the LTO, 3 rats died as a result of anaesthetic complications. Seven-day animal survival was achieved with the 11th transplant. We beleive that the description of the orthotopic rat liver transplantation technique, as well as the discussion regarding complications and their management, can be useful for researchers interested in performing liver transplantation in rats.

  7. Student self-esteem and academic achievement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milošević Nikoleta M.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available There is a growing belief that academic achievement is the product of a complex network of teacher-student relations, where the identity of successful and unsuccessful student is developing with high, moderate or low self-esteem level. Self-esteem is most often defined as a conscious cognitive-affective expression of self-evaluation which is one of the most immediate indicators of self-concept integration degree. A number of authors view high self-esteem level as an important prerequisite for high academic achievement. In contrast, academic achievement and other experiences related to teaching and learning are considered to exert significant influence on self-esteem and a student should be successful at school first so as to develop a positive self-image and his academic abilities. The debate on what comes first - self-esteem or academic achievement - is in its character more academic than practical. This claim is supported by an increasing number of studies indicating the dynamism and reciprocity of correlation between academic achievement and self-esteem. The paper gives recommendations for educational practice to promote self-esteem and development of personal and social responsibility, which contributes to better student academic achievement. It is pointed out that teacher education in the field is necessary and that self-esteem and responsibility must become essential segments of curricula. Teacher is expected to become sensitive to the needs of students who are at risk to be unsuccessful and to largely apply cooperative learning methods. Findings demonstrate that cooperative learning either sustain or increase student self-esteem, whereas traditional teaching methods, in general, lead to its decline. Cooperative relations improve student self-image in respect of academic abilities and social interactions. Positive feedback, peer support, more frequent experience of learning achievement leads mainly to general increase in self-esteem and

  8. Forebrain medial septum region facilitates nociception in a rat formalin model of inflammatory pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Andy Thiam-Huat; Ariffin, Mohammed Zacky; Zhou, Mingyi; Ye, Jenn Zhou; Moochhala, Shabbir M; Khanna, Sanjay

    2011-11-01

    The medial septum is anatomically and functionally linked to the hippocampus, a region implicated in nociception. However, the role of medial septum in nociception remains unclear. To investigate the role of the region in nociception in rats, muscimol, a GABA agonist, or zolpidem, a positive allosteric modulator of GABA(A) receptors, was microinjected into medial septum to attenuate the activity of neurons in the region. Electrophysiological studies in anesthetized rats indicated that muscimol evoked a stronger and longer-lasting suppression of medial septal-mediated activation of hippocampal theta field activity than zolpidem. Similarly, microinjection of muscimol (1 or 2 μg/0.5 μl) into the medial septum of awake rats suppressed both licking and flinching behaviors in the formalin test of inflammatory pain, whereas only the latter behavior was affected by zolpidem (8 or 12 μg/0.5 μl) administered into the medial septum. Interestingly, both drugs selectively attenuated nociceptive behaviors in the second phase of the formalin test that are partly driven by central plasticity. Indeed, muscimol reduced the second phase behaviors by 30% to 60%, which was comparable to the reduction seen with systemic administration of a moderate dose of the analgesic morphine. The reduction was accompanied by a decrease in formalin-induced expression of spinal c-Fos protein that serves as an index of spinal nociceptive processing. The drug effects on nociceptive behaviors were without overt sedation and were distinct from the effects observed after septal lateral microinjections. Taken together, these findings suggest that the activation of medial septum is pro-nociceptive and facilitates aspects of central neural processing underlying nociception.

  9. Effects of Gender, Mathematics Anxiety and Achievement Motivation on College Students’ Achievement in Mathematics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajogbeje Oke James

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The urge to excel or perform maximally in mathematics varies from individual to individual because achievement motivation is often developed or learnt during socialization and learning experiences. The study examined the relationship between College of Education students’ achievement motivation and mathematics achievement, correlation coefficient between mathematics anxiety and college students’ achievement motivation as well as mathematics anxiety and mathematics achievement. The sample, 268 College of Education students offering mathematics as one of their subject combination, was selected using purposive sampling techniques. Three research instruments namely: Mathematics Anxiety Scale (MAS, Achievement Motivation Scale (AMS and Mathematics Achievement Test (MAT were used to collect data for the study. Data collected for the study were analyzed using correlational analysis and ANOVA. The results showed that a significantly low negative correlation coefficient existed between mathematics anxiety and mathematics achievement. There is a negative and significant correlation coefficient between mathematics anxiety and achievement motivation. Similarly, a positive and significant correlation coefficient also exists between achievement motivation and mathematics achievement. Based on the findings of the study, it was recommended that mathematics teachers should adopt activity based strategies and conducive learning environment in order to reduce college students’ anxieties in mathematics learning.

  10. Leadership, self-efficacy, and student achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grayson, Kristin

    This study examined the relationships between teacher leadership, science teacher self-efficacy, and fifth-grade science student achievement in diverse schools in a San Antonio, Texas, metropolitan school district. Teachers completed a modified version of the Leadership Behavior Description Question (LBDQ) Form XII by Stogdill (1969), the Science Efficacy and Belief Expectations for Science Teaching (SEBEST) by Ritter, Boone, and Rubba (2001, January). Students' scores on the Texas Assessment of Knowledge and Skills (TAKS) measured fifth-grade science achievement. At the teacher level of analysis multiple regressions showed the following relationships between teachers' science self-efficacy and teacher classroom leadership behaviors and the various teacher and school demographic variables. Predictors of teacher self efficacy beliefs included teacher's level of education, gender, and leadership initiating structure. The only significant predictor of teacher self-efficacy outcome expectancy was gender. Higher teacher self-efficacy beliefs predicted higher leadership initiating structure. At the school level of analysis, higher school levels of percentage of students from low socio-economic backgrounds and higher percentage of limited English proficient students predicted lower school student mean science achievement. These findings suggest a need for continued research to clarify relationships between teacher classroom leadership, science teacher self-efficacy, and student achievement especially at the teacher level of analysis. Findings also indicate the importance of developing instructional methods to address student demographics and their needs so that all students, despite their backgrounds, will achieve in science.

  11. Rapid and Cost-Effective Gene Targeting in Rat Embryonic Stem Cells by TALENs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chang Tong; Guanyi Huang; Charles Ashton; Hongping Wu; Hexin Yan; Qi-Long Ying

    2012-01-01

    The rat is the preferred animal model in many areas of biomedical research and drug development.Genetic manipulation in rats has lagged behind that in mice due to the lack of efficient gene targeting tools.Previously,we generated a knockout rat via conventional homologous recombination in rat embryonic stem (ES) cells.Here,we show that efficient gene targeting in rat ES cells can be achieved quickly through transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN)-mediated DNA double-strand breaks.Using the Golden Gate cloning technique,we constructed a pair of TALEN targeting vectors for the gene of interest in 5 days.After gene transfection,the targeted rat ES cell colonies were isolated,screened,and confirmed by PCR without the need of drug selection.Our results suggest that TALEN-mediated gene targeting is a superior means of establishing genetically modified rat ES cell lines with high efficiency and short turnaround time.

  12. Achieving high luminosity in the Fermilab Tevatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holmes, S.D.

    1991-05-01

    Fermilab has embarked upon a program, christened Fermilab III, to raise the luminosity in the Tevatron proton-antiproton collider over the next five years by at least a factor of thirty beyond the currently achieved level of 1.6{times}10{sup 30}cm{sup {minus}2}sec{sup {minus}1}. Components of the program include implementation of electrostatic separators, Antiproton Source improvements, installation of cold compressors, doubling the existing linac output energy, and the construction of a new accelerator--the Fermilab Main Injector. Basic limitations in the achievement of higher luminosity in the Tevatron, the strategy developed to achieve the Fermilab III goals, and the evolution of luminosity throughout the period will be discussed. 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  13. Achievable Precision for Optical Ranging Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moision, Bruce; Erkmen, Baris I.

    2012-01-01

    Achievable RMS errors in estimating the phase, frequency, and intensity of a direct-detected intensity-modulated optical pulse train are presented. For each parameter, the Cramer-Rao-Bound (CRB) is derived and the performance of the Maximum Likelihood estimator is illustrated. Approximations to the CRBs are provided, enabling an intuitive understanding of estimator behavior as a function of the signaling parameters. The results are compared to achievable RMS errors in estimating the same parameters from a sinusoidal waveform in additive white Gaussian noise. This establishes a framework for a performance comparison of radio frequency (RF) and optical science. Comparisons are made using parameters for state-of-the-art deep-space RF and optical links. Degradations to the achievable errors due to clock phase noise and detector jitter are illustrated.

  14. Home media and children's achievement and behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofferth, Sandra L

    2010-01-01

    This study provides a national picture of the time American 6- to 12-year-olds spent playing video games, using the computer, and watching TV at home in 1997 and 2003, and the association of early use with their achievement and behavior as adolescents. Girls benefited from computer use more than boys, and Black children benefited more than White children. Greater computer use in middle childhood was associated with increased achievement for White and Black girls, and for Black but not White boys. Increased video game play was associated with an improved ability to solve applied problems for Black girls but lower verbal achievement for all girls. For boys, increased video game play was linked to increased aggressive behavior problems.

  15. Factors Affecting Students’ Achievement in Mathematics ∗

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekrem SAVAŞ

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the factors that affect students’ mathematics achievement in secondary school mathematics grades of 6th, 7th and 8th were explored. For this purpose, the factors that affect mathematics education and mathematics achievement such as type of school, family income, studying time and students’ attitude towards mathematics and attendance to private courses have been investigated. The sample of the study consisted of 275 students from one private (n=58 and two state schools (n= 217 in Van. Data analysis involved descriptive statistics and Chi-Square analysis. The result of study showed that type of school, family income, studying time, students’ attitude towards mathematics and attendance to private courses had statistically significant effects on students’ mathematics achievement.

  16. Achieving single channel, full duplex wireless communication

    KAUST Repository

    Choi, Jung Il

    2010-01-01

    This paper discusses the design of a single channel full-duplex wireless transceiver. The design uses a combination of RF and baseband techniques to achieve full-duplexing with minimal effect on link reliability. Experiments on real nodes show the full-duplex prototype achieves median performance that is within 8% of an ideal full-duplexing system. This paper presents Antenna Cancellation, a novel technique for self-interference cancellation. In conjunction with existing RF interference cancellation and digital baseband interference cancellation, antenna cancellation achieves the amount of self-interference cancellation required for full-duplex operation. The paper also discusses potential MAC and network gains with full-duplexing. It suggests ways in which a full-duplex system can solve some important problems with existing wireless systems including hidden terminals, loss of throughput due to congestion, and large end-to-end delays. Copyright 2010 ACM.

  17. Achievement Motivation and EEG Spectral Power

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena V. Vorobyeva

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Achievement motivation is a psychological category which implies a desire to achieve significant (powerful results in certain sphere. According to the results of psychophysiological research people who are motivated for success are very active before they are instructed by the researcher which proves that they aimed at the perception of the referent situation and the intense level of expectations. One of the vital issues today is a problem how genes influence human behaviour. Thus on the basis of contemporary researches we can conclude that such influence is regulated by brain processes.

  18. Achieving competitiveness through supply chain integration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wong, Chee Yew; Arlbjørn, Jan S.; Seerup, Søren

    2007-01-01

    Supply chain development can take place in several steps, from functional optimisation, then internal integration, dyadic integration and last, integration in chains and networks. Before external integration gives true value, order in own house must be achieved. This paper presents a case study...... of a Danish manufacturer that has gone through a major transformation process, and the paper intends to discuss how such a Business Process Reengineering (BPR) project aimed to achieve internal integration. The paper demonstrates how improved competitiveness can be obtained through a synchronous...

  19. Impact of Metacognition on Guitar Performance Achievement

    OpenAIRE

    Yokuş, Tuba

    2013-01-01

    This study has been carried out to determine the impact of the development of metacognition on guitar performance achievement in the individual instrument guitar lesson, which is included in the Bachelor’s program of Music Teacher Education in Marmara University Atatürk Faculty of Education, Department of Fine Arts Education, in Turkey. “Experimental Design with Pretest–Posttest Control Group” has been used, in order to achieve the objective of the study. The study sample (N=10) consists of g...

  20. Achieving patient satisfaction: resolving patient complaints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oxler, K F

    1997-07-01

    Patients demand to be active participants on and partners with the health care team to design their care regimen. Patients bring unique perceptions and expectations and use these to evaluate service quality and satisfaction. If customer satisfaction is not achieved and a patient complaint results, staff must have the skills to respond and launch a service recovery program. Service recovery, when done with style and panache, can retain loyal customers. Achieving patient satisfaction and resolving patient complaints require commitment from top leadership and commitment from providers to dedicate the time to understand their patients' needs.

  1. Armodafinil, the R-enantiomer of modafinil: wake-promoting effects and pharmacokinetic profile in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisor, Jonathan P; Dement, William C; Aimone, Lisa; Williams, Michael; Bozyczko-Coyne, Donna

    2006-11-01

    Modafinil reduces the excessive sleepiness associated with narcolepsy, obstructive sleep apnea/hypopnea syndrome, and shift work sleep disorder. In rats, modafinil promotes dose-dependent increases in wake duration. The wake-promoting activity of the R-enantiomer of modafinil (armodafinil) was evaluated in WKY rats and compared to the classical stimulant, D-methamphetamine. Electroencephalographic and electromyographic signals were assessed via a tethered cranial implant. Body temperature and locomotor activity were assessed by telemetry via intraperitoneal implant. Rats (n=60, 12 per group) were subjected to one of five parallel treatments: armodafinil at 30, 100 and 300 mg/kg i.p.; D-methamphetamine, 1 mg/kg i.p. and vehicle. Armodafinil and D-methamphetamine increased time spent awake relative to vehicle. Armodafinil-evoked increases in wake duration were dose-dependent and proportional to plasma compound exposure. Induction of wakefulness by D-methamphetamine was associated with an approximately two-fold increase in locomotor activity during the 2-h period immediately following administration relative to vehicle. D-methamphetamine also increased body temperature over the same time interval. The dose of armodafinil (100 mg/kg, i.p.) that was closest to D-methamphetamine in its wake-promoting efficacy did not produce changes in either body temperature or the intensity of locomotor activity relative to vehicle. Acute rebound hypersomnolence, characterized by increases in non-rapid eye movement sleep (NREMS) as a percentage of time and NREMS bout duration and by a decreased frequency of brief awakenings following sleep deprivation, occurred following D-methamphetamine-but not armodafinil-induced wake in this rat model which has been shown to be predictive of human drug responses.

  2. Developing a Motivational Model of College Achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuckman, Bruce W.; Abry, Dennis

    This study involves developing a motivational model of college achievement. The predictor variables, which were procrastination tendency, self-efficacy, self-regulation, intrinsic value, outcome value, cognitive strategy, test anxiety, students grade goals, parent grade goals, and grade point average, as well as the criterion variable exam…

  3. Perceptions of Parent Involvement in Academic Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    DePlanty, Jennifer; Coulter-Kern, Russell; Duchane, Kim A.

    2007-01-01

    The authors sought to understand the types of parent involvement that teachers, parents, and students believe affect the academic achievement of adolescent learners at the junior high school level. Research that included focus groups, interviews, and surveys indicated that teachers and students believed that parent involvement at school was…

  4. Student Perceptions of High-Achieving Classmates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Händel, Marion; Vialle, Wilma; Ziegler, Albert

    2013-01-01

    The reported study investigated students' perceptions of their high-performing classmates in terms of intelligence, social skills, and conscientiousness in different school subjects. The school subjects for study were examined with regard to cognitive, physical, and gender-specific issues. The results show that high academic achievements in…

  5. Critical Consciousness: A Key to Student Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Amin, Aaliyah; Seider, Scott; Graves, Daren; Tamerat, Jalene; Clark, Shelby; Soutter, Madora; Johannsen, Jamie; Malhotra, Saira

    2017-01-01

    Research has suggested that critical consciousness--the ability to recognize and analyze systems of inequality and the commitment to take action against these systems--can be a gateway to academic motivation and achievement for marginalized students. To explore this approach, the authors studied five urban schools that include critical…

  6. Attitudes and Achievement: A Complex Relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Mary L.

    This paper investigates the popular belief that children's attitudes toward school and particular subjects have a positive relationship with their school and subject achievement. Definitions of attitude by L. L. Thurstone, L. W. Doob, and M. Fishbein are presented as a basis for the investigation. The difficulties involved in assessing attitudes…

  7. Impact of School Technology on Student Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Larry Douglas, Jr.

    2012-01-01

    This study provides an overview of the impact of school technology on elementary students in grades three through five attending public schools in Indiana. The investigation focused on the impact of various technologies on student achievement as measured on Indiana Statewide Testing for Educational Progress-Plus (ISTEP+). Various comparisons were…

  8. Factors Contributing to Institutions Achieving Environmental Sustainability

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Matthew; Card, Karen

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to determine what factors contributed to three universities achieving environmental sustainability. Design/methodology/approach: A case study methodology was used to determine how each factor contributed to the institutions' sustainability. Site visits, fieldwork, document reviews, and interviews with…

  9. How Teacher Turnover Harms Student Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronfeldt, Matthew; Loeb, Susanna; Wyckoff, James

    2013-01-01

    Researchers and policymakers often assume that teacher turnover harms student achievement, though recent studies suggest this may not be the case. Using a unique identification strategy that employs school-by-grade level turnover and two classes of fixed-effects models, this study estimates the effects of teacher turnover on over 850,000 New York…

  10. Culturalizing Achievement Goal Theory and Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zusho, Akane; Clayton, Karen

    2011-01-01

    This article is primarily designed to provide a cultural analysis of the literature on achievement goals. First, an overview of the four dominant approaches to the study of culture--namely, cross-cultural psychology, cultural psychology, indigenous psychology, and psychological anthropology--is offered. Second, we analyze the extant body of…

  11. 28 CFR 545.28 - Achievement awards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Judicial Administration BUREAU OF PRISONS, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE INSTITUTIONAL MANAGEMENT WORK AND COMPENSATION Inmate Work and Performance Pay Program § 545.28 Achievement awards. (a) With prior approval of... related trades classroom work that is part of a certified apprenticeship program may be granted...

  12. Professional Learning Communities and Student Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Thach Kam Yin

    2010-01-01

    An exploratory quantitative study of professional learning communities and student achievement in the largest school system in the State of North Carolina provides evidence to support systemic implementation of professional learning community practices and activities. A one-way ANOVA was conducted to explore the impact of teachers' perceptions of…

  13. Five Companies Receive IDEA10 Achievement Awards

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Prestigious industry awards presented at IDEA10 in Miami Beach this week;special Entrepreneurial Award also presented at IDEA 10 CARY,NC April 28,2010-The IDEA10 Achievement Awards, which recognize the best new nonwoven and engineered fabric products introduced in the past three years,were presented in six different categories

  14. Physics Achievements from the Belle Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Brodzicka, Jolanta; Chang, Paoti; Eidelman, Simon; Golob, Bostjan; Hayasaka, Kiyoshi; Hayashii, Hisaki; Iijima, Toru; Inami, Kenji; Kinoshita, Kay; Kwon, Youngjoon; Miyabayashi, Kenkichi; Mohanty, Gagan; Nakao, Mikihiko; Nakazawa, Hideyuki; Olsen, Stephen; Sakai, Yoshihide; Schwanda, Christoph; Schwartz, Alan; Trabelsi, Karim; Uehara, Sadaharu; Uno, Shoji; Watanabe, Yasushi; Zupanc, Anze

    2012-01-01

    The Belle experiment, running at the KEKB e+e- asymmetric energy collider during the first decade of the century, achieved its original objective of measuring precisely differences between particles and anti-particles in the B system. After collecting 1000 fb-1 of data at various Upsilon resonances, Belle also obtained the many other physics results described in this article.

  15. Achieving Excellence: Mastery Learning in Legal Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feinman, J. M.; Feldman, Marc

    1985-01-01

    Law schools should require excellence of all students, and mastery learning is a technique useful for structuring entire curricula or course segments to achieve high standards. A Rutgers course in contracts, torts, and legal research and writing developed to apply mastery learning strategies has proven successful. (MSE)

  16. Ego Development and Adolescent Academic Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bursik, Krisanne; Martin, Timothy A.

    2006-01-01

    This study investigated ego developmental differences in adolescent academic orientations and academic achievement. A sample of 142 male and female high school students completed the Washington University Sentence Completion Test and self-report measures assessing academic locus of control, learning orientation (LO), and grade orientation (GO).…

  17. What Characterises High Achieving Students’ Mathematical Reasoning?

    OpenAIRE

    Haavold, Per Øystein

    2011-01-01

    This study investigates high achieving students’ mathematical reasoning when given an unfamiliar trigonometric equation. The findings indicate that the students’ way of thinking is strongly linked with imitative reasoning and only when they received some form of guidance, were they able to display flexible and creative mathematical reasoning.

  18. Friend Influence on Achievement during Middle Childhood

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLay, Dawn

    2013-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate friend influence on academic achievement and task avoidance during middle childhood in a sample of 794 participants in 397 stable same-sex friendship dyads (205 girl dyads and 192 boy dyads) from four municipalities in Finland: two in Central Finland, one in Western Finland, and one in Eastern Finland.…

  19. Competition and achievement goals in work teams

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heidemeier, H.; Bittner, Jenny V.

    2012-01-01

    This study examined how competition within teams influences which type of achievement goals employees adopt. We studied how dispositional learning-goal and performance-goal orientation interact with team-level competition and predict whether team members adopt state learning or performance achieveme

  20. Achieving Organisational Change through Values Alignment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branson, Christopher M.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to, first, establish the interdependency between the successful achievement of organisational change and the attainment of values alignment within an organisation's culture and then, second, to describe an effective means for attaining such values alignment. Design/methodology/approach: Literature from the…

  1. Achievements in Building The Legal System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    In the past three decades,people have gained an increasingly deeper under-standing of the law,and theories on democracy and justice have been en-riched.A socialist legal framework has been developing and the rule of law has becomea basic governing principle.China has made unprecedented achievements in promoting law-based governance.

  2. New Achievements in Well Logging Technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tan Tingdong

    1996-01-01

    @@ In the first five years of 1990s, new achievements made in China's onshore well logging technology have enhanced the benefits of exploration and development for complex oil and gas reservoirs and have thus showed the trend of the development of China's well logging technology towards the end of this century.

  3. Parenting Styles and Adolescents' Achievement Strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aunola, Kaisa; Stattin, Hakan; Nurmi, Jari-Erik

    2000-01-01

    Investigates the extents to which adolescents' achievement strategies are associated with the parenting styles they experience in their families. Respondents (N=354) identified four types of families: those with Authoritative; Authoritarian; Permissive; and Neglectful parenting styles. Results further reveal that adolescents from authoritative…

  4. Improving Achievement through Problem-Based Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sungur, Semra; Tekkaya, Ceren; Geban, Omer

    2006-01-01

    In this study, the effect of problem-based learning on students' academic achievement and performance skills in a unit on the human excretory system was investigated. Sixty-one 10th grade students, from two full classes instructed by the same biology teacher, were involved in the study. Classes were randomly assigned as either the experimental or…

  5. Effects of Individualized Assignments on Biology Achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kremer, Philip L.

    1983-01-01

    Compared detailed (favoring field dependence and induction) and nondetailed (favoring field dependence and deduction) assignments on biology achievement of grade 10 male students (N=95) over a seven-month period. Detailed assignments, employing pictorial and verbal block diagrams and high structure, significantly enhanced learning among some…

  6. Achieving Sex Equity via Vocational Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goetsch, David L.; Gulledge, Earl N.

    1981-01-01

    Reviews the women's rights movement and discusses the evolution of society's attitudes toward women. Discusses the goals and methods of Okaloosa-Walton Junior College Sex Equity Plan, a vocational education program for achieving sex equity. Highlights five major components: education, student recruitment, self-paced, self-directed instruction, job…

  7. Symbolic Notations and Students' Achievements in Algebra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter, Ebiendele E.; Olaoye, Adetunji A.

    2013-01-01

    This study focuses on symbolic notations and its impact on students' achievement in Algebra. The main reason for this study rests on the observation from personal and professional experiences on students' increasing hatred for Algebra. One hundred and fifty (150) Senior Secondary School Students (SSS) from Ojo Local Education District, Ojo, Lagos,…

  8. Enhancing Communication and Achieving Mutual-benefits

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Gendang; Xu Jianmei

    2006-01-01

    @@ The Third China International Small & Medium Enterprises Fair and Sino-Italy Small &Medium Enterprises Fair was completed successfully The pageant for international small and medium enterprises, the third China International Small & Medium Enterprises Fair and Sino-Italy Small & Medium Enterprises Fair, was completed successfully recently in Guangzhou.During those several days, the fair has achieved great success.

  9. Only Children, Achievement, and Interpersonal Orientation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falbo, Toni

    Many psychological theories point to the importance of siblings in individual personality development. The impact of sibling status on interpersonal and achievement orientation was examined with undergraduates (N=1782) who completed a series of objective personality measures and a background questionnaire. Sibling status was defined in terms of…

  10. Psychological Barriers to Achievement in Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Lois S.

    1982-01-01

    This study explored the relationships among birth order, number of course credits achieved, and personality integration for 56 women graduate students. No evidence of significant stress was found as these women approached career choice points, nor was there a significant effect from birth order. (Author/RD)

  11. Achieving Fluency: Special Education and Mathematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fennell, Francis

    2011-01-01

    "Achieving Fluency" presents the understandings that all teachers need to play a role in the education of students who struggle: those with disabilities and those who simply lack essential foundational knowledge. This book serves teachers and supervisors by sharing increasingly intensive instructional interventions for struggling students on…

  12. Active Learning Strategies and Vocabulary Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, John R.

    2015-01-01

    Using a quantitative method of data collection, this research explored the question: Do active learning strategies used in grades 5 and 6 affect student vocabulary achievement in a positive or negative direction? In their research, Wolfe (2001), Headley, et al., (1995), Freiberg, et al., (1992), and Brunner (2009) emphasize the importance of…

  13. Cognitive Style, Operativity, and Mathematics Achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberge, James J.; Flexer, Barbara K.

    1983-01-01

    This study examined the effects of field dependence/independence and the level of operational development on the mathematics achievement of 450 students in grades 6-8. Field-independent students scored significantly higher on total mathematics, concepts, and problem-solving tests. High-operational students scored significantly higher on all tests.…

  14. Principals' Leadership Styles and Student Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harnish, David Alan

    2012-01-01

    Many schools struggle to meet No Child Left Behind's stringent adequate yearly progress standards, although the benchmark has stimulated national creativity and reform. The purpose of this study was to explore teacher perceptions of principals' leadership styles, curriculum reform, and student achievement to ascertain possible factors to improve…

  15. Addressing Achievement Gaps with Psychological Interventions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeager, David; Walton, Gregory; Cohen, Geoffrey L.

    2013-01-01

    Student psychology--how the classroom looks and feels from the perspective of the student--can powerfully affect motivation and learning, and experiments are increasingly showing that even brief interventions to change psychology can boost achievement over months or years. When paired with other structural reforms, social-psychological…

  16. Goal Orientations and Adolescent Mathematics Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keys, Tran Dang

    2013-01-01

    Motivation is a fundamental educational challenge for adolescents in the United States, and particularly for immigrant youth. The motivation to achieve, especially in mathematics, declines during adolescence. Most of what is known about motivation is based on studies of predominately middle-class White students; yet the influx of immigrants over…

  17. Relationship of Study Habits with Mathematics Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odiri, Onoshakpokaiye E.

    2015-01-01

    The study examined the relationship of study habits of students and their achievement in mathematics. The method used for the study was correlation design. A sample of 500 students were randomly selected from 25 public secondary schools in Delta Central Senatorial District, Delta State, Nigeria. Questionnaires were drawn to gather data on…

  18. Covariation of Cognitive Styles, Intelligence and Achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satterly, D. J.

    1979-01-01

    A hierarchical factor analysis of 430 pupils' scores was performed on a matrix of correlations between three measures of cognitive style (analytic-synthetic; field independence; leveling-sharpening) and achievement in mathematics, geography, and English. Findings provide some support for the independence of cognitive style from general…

  19. Attitude, Gender and Achievement in Computer Programming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baser, Mustafa

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this research was to explore the relationship among students' attitudes toward programming, gender and academic achievement in programming. The scale used for measuring students' attitudes toward programming was developed by the researcher and consisted of 35 five-point Likert type items in four subscales. The scale was administered to…

  20. Low and high achievers in math

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overgaard, Steffen; Tonnesen, Pia Beck; Weng, Peter

    2015-01-01

    In this session we will present the results of the preliminary analysis of the qualitative and quantitative data, which can be used to enhance the teaching of low and high mathematics achievers so as to increase their mathematical knowledge and confidence....

  1. The Highest & Lowest Reliability Achievable with Redundancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Becker, Peter W.

    1977-01-01

    -dependent, it is difficult to assess the reliability of the system. The paper describes the ¿-transformation by which the highest and lowest reliability achievable can be determined for a configuration using components with specified reliabilities. As a by-product we become able to pinpoint the statistical relationships...

  2. Factors Implicated in High Mathematics Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forgasz, Helen J.; Hill, Janelle C.

    2013-01-01

    The most recent Program for International Student Assessment (PISA) (2009) mathematical literacy results provide evidence that in Western English-speaking countries, including Australia, the gender gap in achievement appears to be widening in favour of males. In the study reported in this article, the aim was to explore the effects of gender,…

  3. Age and Outstanding Occupational Achievement: Lehman Revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mumford, Michael D.

    1984-01-01

    Reviews the findings of Lehman's study of age and outstanding occupational achievement along with the explanations of why major contributions most likely occur in young adulthood. Proposes an alternative explanation based on the central developmental tasks facing individuals in young adulthood and middle age. (JAC)

  4. Personality Traits, Learning and Academic Achievements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Mikael

    2015-01-01

    There has been an increased interest in personality traits (especially the five-factor model) in relation to education and learning over the last decade. Previous studies have shown a relation between personality traits and learning, and between personality traits and academic achievement. The latter is typically described in terms of Grade Point…

  5. Effects of Ability Grouping on Student Achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulik, James A.; Kulik, Chen-Lin C.

    1987-01-01

    Examines the effect of within-class and between-class ability groupings on the academic achievement of gifted elementary and secondary level students. Results showed that gifted students gained more academically than they would have if they had been taught in heterogeneous classes. (PS)

  6. Accelerating Mathematics Achievement Using Heterogeneous Grouping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burris, Carol Corbett; Heubert, Jay P.; Levin, Henry M.

    2006-01-01

    This longitudinal study examined the effects of providing an accelerated mathematics curriculum in heterogeneously grouped middle school classes in a diverse suburban school district. A quasi-experimental cohort design was used to evaluate subsequent completion of advanced high school math courses as well as academic achievement. Results showed…

  7. Toward Achieving the Dietitian's Goal: Client Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wulf, Kathleen M.; Biltz, Peggy

    The role of the dietitian as a teacher of clients who must adhere to a special diet for health reasons is discussed. The objective of this education process is to achieve a complete understanding on the part of the client not only of what is allowed in the diet but also why it is desirable. The dietitian in the professional role as an educator…

  8. Closing the Achievement Gap on ACT & SAT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, David

    2010-01-01

    Research has focused on four groups of factors and the achievement gap: (1) student characteristics (high school GPA, attendance patterns, courses taken in high school, participation in extra-curricular activities, etc.); (2) family characteristics (family structure, in home, parents' level of education, mobility, etc.); (3) school-based…

  9. Achieving Product Qualities Through Software Architecture Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-14

    2004 by Carnegie Mellon University page 1 Achieving Product Qualities Through Software Architecture Practices Linda Northrop Director, Product ...of this collection of information, including suggestions for reducing this burden, to Washington Headquarters Services , Directorate for Information... Product Qualities Through Software Architecture Practices 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT

  10. Five Companies Receive IDEA10 Achievement Awards

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    @@ CARY, NC April 28, 2010 - The IDEA10 Achievement Awards, which recognize the best new nonwoven and engineered fabric products introduced in the past three years, were presented in six different categories during a special ceremony on the second day of IDEA10 International Engineered Fabrics Conference and Exposition, April 28, 2010, in Miami Beach, Florida.

  11. Mathematics Achievement of Vietnamese Grade 5 Pupils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Patrick

    2007-01-01

    This article reports the results of a national survey of mathematics achievement at the end of primary school in Vietnam. A sample of more than 72000 students were assessed from 61 provinces. The items were matched to the Vietnam Mathematics curriculum for Year 5 students. Using a skills audit of the items, a variable of Vietnamese mathematics…

  12. Poverty and Educational Achievement: An Analysis Plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zill, Nicholas

    This paper describes a series of proposed analyses that would make use of existing information from national surveys of the school-aged population and other large-scale databases in order to illuminate trends in the makeup, life circumstances, schooling, and educational achievement of the population of United States children that is eligible for…

  13. Achievement Goals, Learning Strategies and Language Achievement among Peruvian High School Students

    OpenAIRE

    Lennia Matos; Willy Lens; Maarten Vansteenkiste

    2007-01-01

    We used an achievement goal framework to study the role of motivation in the academic context of a Peruvian sample of 8th to 10th grade high school students (N = 1505). The purpose of this cross-sectional study was to examine the relationship between students' achievement goals, their use of learning strategies and their academic achievement. Multiple Hierarchical Regressions Analyses identified, as predicted, positive effects of mastery goals, including more use of learning strategies and hi...

  14. Effect of blended learning to academic achievement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veysel Karani Ceylan

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the effects of blended learning on the middle school students’ academic achievement level and product evaluation scores were investigated. Blended learning provides more effective learning outcome gains through enriching todays’ developing Web Technologies with learning environments. This study was carried out with a total of 53 students enrolled in the experimental group and control group in the 6th grade classrooms during the 2014/2015 school year in a middle school in southwest part of Turkey. The intervention lasted 7 weeks. During the seven weeks, the unit of “problem solving, computer programming and development of Software product”, covered in Educational technologies and Software course, is taught through blended learning environment. The experimental group was taught using blended learning environment which supported with enriched web technologies (such as video-conference, Learning Management System, Discussion blogs , etc.. Whereas the experimental group was given access to all these enriched contents that are presented to the control group only during the classroom environment through present teaching methods. The design of the study includes quantitative method. We collected quantitative data such as academic achievement test and product evaluation scale. Academic achievement test and product evaluation scale were used as quantitative data collection sources. Quantitative data was collected through the evaluation of students’ projects that they developed during the process of the study and the academic achievement tests. During the data analysis phase, independent t-test, frequency and ANOVA tests were used. As a result of this study, it is concluded that blended learning environment had generated a significant difference in students’ academic achievement on behalf of experimental group. Implications of the study for the educational environments were discussed.

  15. Rectal dexmedetomidine in rats: evaluation of sedative and mucosal effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Volkan Hanci

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: In this study, we investigated the anesthetic and mucosal effects of the rectal application of dexmedetomidine to rats. METHODS: Male Wistar albino rats weighing 250-300 g were divided into four groups: Group S (n = 8 was a sham group that served as a baseline for the normal basal values; Group C (n = 8 consisted of rats that received the rectal application of saline alone; Group IPDex (n = 8 included rats that received the intraperitoneal application of dexmedetomidine (100 µg kg-1; and Group RecDex (n = 8 included rats that received the rectal application of dexmedetomidine (100 µg kg-1. For the rectal drug administration, we used 22 G intravenous cannulas with the stylets removed. We administered the drugs by advancing the cannula 1 cm into the rectum, and the rectal administration volume was 1 mL for all the rats. The latency and anesthesia time (min were measured. Two hours after rectal administration, 75 mg kg-1 ketamine was administered for intraperitoneal anesthesia in all the groups, followed by the removal of the rats' rectums to a distal distance of 3 cm via an abdominoperineal surgical procedure. We histopathologically examined and scored the rectums. RESULTS: Anesthesia was achieved in all the rats in the Group RecDex following the administration of dexmedetomidine. The onset of anesthesia in the Group RecDex was significantly later and of a shorter duration than in the Group IPDEx (p < 0.05. In the Group RecDex, the administration of dexmedetomidine induced mild-moderate losses of mucosal architecture in the colon and rectum, 2 h after rectal inoculation. CONCLUSION: Although 100 µg kg-1 dexmedetomidine administered rectally to rats achieved a significantly longer duration of anesthesia compared with the rectal administration of saline, our histopathological evaluations showed that the rectal administration of 100 µg kg-1 dexmedetomidine led to mild-moderate damage to the mucosal structure of the

  16. A user-configurable headstage for multimodality neuromonitoring in freely moving rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanokwan Limnuson

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Multimodal monitoring of brain activity, physiology, and neurochemistry is an important approach to gain insight into brain function, modulation, and pathology. With recent progress in micro- and nanotechnology, micro-nano-implants have become important catalysts in advancing brain research. However, to date, only a limited number of brain parameters have been measured simultaneously in awake animals in spite of significant recent progress in sensor technology. Here we have provided a cost and time effective approach to designing a headstage to conduct a multimodality brain monitoring in freely moving animals. To demonstrate this method, we have designed a user-configurable headstage for our micromachined multimodal neural probe. The headstage can reliably record direct-current electrocorticography (DC-ECoG, brain oxygen tension (PbrO2, cortical temperature and regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF simultaneously without significant signal crosstalk or movement artifacts for 72 hours. Even in a noisy environment, it can record low-level neural signals with high quality. Moreover, it can easily interface with signal conditioning circuits that have high power consumption and are difficult to miniaturize. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time where multiple physiological, biochemical and electrophysiological cerebral variables have been simultaneously recorded from freely moving rats. We anticipate that the developed system will aid in gaining further insight into not only normal cerebral functioning but also pathophysiology of conditions such as epilepsy, stroke and traumatic brain injury.

  17. Early predictors of high school mathematics achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegler, Robert S; Duncan, Greg J; Davis-Kean, Pamela E; Duckworth, Kathryn; Claessens, Amy; Engel, Mimi; Susperreguy, Maria Ines; Chen, Meichu

    2012-07-01

    Identifying the types of mathematics content knowledge that are most predictive of students' long-term learning is essential for improving both theories of mathematical development and mathematics education. To identify these types of knowledge, we examined long-term predictors of high school students' knowledge of algebra and overall mathematics achievement. Analyses of large, nationally representative, longitudinal data sets from the United States and the United Kingdom revealed that elementary school students' knowledge of fractions and of division uniquely predicts those students' knowledge of algebra and overall mathematics achievement in high school, 5 or 6 years later, even after statistically controlling for other types of mathematical knowledge, general intellectual ability, working memory, and family income and education. Implications of these findings for understanding and improving mathematics learning are discussed.

  18. Academic achievement of children of divorced parents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherian, V I

    1989-04-01

    This study investigated the academic achievement of 242 pupils whose parents were divorced and 713 pupils whose parents were neither divorced nor separated. The subjects were in the age range of 13 to 17 yr., with a mean age of 15.6 yr. and they were chosen at random from the total Standard 7 population of Transkei, South Africa. A questionnaire was administered to 1,021 pupils to identify the children of parents divorced or separated and neither divorced nor separated. Analysis of variance indicated that the academic achievement of children whose parents were divorced or separated was significantly lower than that of the children whose parents were neither divorced nor separated.

  19. 2 x 2 Achievement Goals and Achievement Emotions: A Cluster Analysis of Students' Motivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Leong Yeok; Liu, Woon Chia

    2012-01-01

    This study sought to better understand the adoption of multiple achievement goals at an intra-individual level, and its links to emotional well-being, learning, and academic achievement. Participants were 480 Secondary Two students (aged between 13 and 14 years) from two coeducational government schools. Hierarchical cluster analysis revealed the…

  20. Predicting Mathematics Achievement by Motivation and Self-Efficacy across Gender and Achievement Levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sartawi, AbdelAziz; Alsawaie, Othman N.; Dodeen, Hamzeh; Tibi, Sana; Alghazo, Iman M.

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the extent to which self-efficacy and motivation served as a predictor for mathematics achievement of fifth grade students in United Arab Emirates (UAE) across gender and achievement levels. Self-efficacy was measured by two scales, which differed in levels of specificity--Category Specific and Task Specific. Motivation was…

  1. The Link between Musical Achievement and Academic Achievement of Young Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costley, Kevin C.

    2011-01-01

    During the twentieth century it has been theorized that there is a link between musical achievement and academic achievement of young children. In support of this controversial view, many educators and music specialists promote the relationship between, parent, teacher, and child. The theory is: with cooperative learning experiences in the study…

  2. Subclinical Obsessive-Compulsive Symptoms, Cognitive Processes, School Achievement, and Intelligence-Achievement Relationship in Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malakar, Partha; Basu, Jayanti

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine whether the general intelligence, cognitive processes, school achievement, and intelligence-achievement relationship of adolescents with subclinical levels of obsessive-compulsive symptoms differed from those of their normal counterparts. From an initial large pool of 14-year-old Bengali students in eighth…

  3. Quantum gravity phenomenology. Achievements and challenges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liberati, S. [International School for Advanced Study (SISSA), Trieste (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Trieste (Italy); Maccione, L. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany)

    2011-05-15

    Motivated by scenarios of quantum gravity, Planck-suppressed deviations from Lorentz invariance are expected at observable energies. Ultra-High-Energy Cosmic Rays, the most energetic particles ever observed in nature, yielded in the last two years strong constraints on deviations suppressed by O(E{sup 2}/M{sup 2}{sub Pl}) and also, for the first time, on space-time foam, stringy inspired models of quantum gravity. We review the most important achievements and discuss future outlooks. (orig.)

  4. Does cultural capital really affect academic achievement?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jæger, Mads Meier

    2011-01-01

    This paper provides new estimates of the causal effect of cultural capital on academic achievement. The author analyzes data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth – Children and Young Adults and uses a fixed effect design to address the problem of omitted variable bias which has resulted...... cultural mobility theory (cultural capital more important in low-SES environments) for indicators capturing “concerted cultivation.”...

  5. Achieving 15% Tandem Polymer Solar Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-23

    MONITOR’S REPORT NUMBER(S) 12. DISTRIBUTION/AVAILABILITY STATEMENT Distribution A - Approved for Public Release 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT...DISTRIBUTION/AVAILABILITY STATEMENT . Use agency-mandated availability statements to indicate the public availability or distribution limitations of...Photonics, Nature Communications etc. The achievements in Year 2 and 3 are describes below. 1 I. New polymer development, morphology and novel

  6. Effective Factors in Achieving Sustainable Agriculture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tahereh Sharghi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: The indiscriminate use of chemical inputs led to severe degradation of resources in Iran. Therefore, considering the increasing population and growing demand of agricultural products, it seems necessary to achieve a sustainable agriculture. In this study, sustainable agriculture refers to a kind of agriculture which is ecologically appropriate, economically justifiable, and socially desirable. Approach: There were two objectives for this study .The first objective of this study was to identify the effective factors in achieving sustainable agriculture. The second objective was to categorize the effective factors in achieving sustainable agriculture. In this study the Delphi technique has been used. Sustainable agriculture expert researchers of statistical and related issues were 56 scholars selected from the experts in the research centers of Tehran and Yazd provinces. The instruments used in data collection were three series of questionnaires sent to the researchers via email, fax and mail. Results: Findings have shown that the researchers have identified effective factors in achieving sustainable agriculture in Iran as the sections of Infrastructure, policy-making, economy, society, participation, research, extension and education. From the 35 factors exposed to the researchers, the factors of attainment of researches related to sustainable agriculture by agricultural research institutions in Iran, Interaction and participation of researchers, extension educators, farmers and policy-makers of sustainable agriculture, attempt to give priority to those who are the most appropriate from the standpoint of practically creating interactive, logical as well as flexible planning system between different sections dealing with sustainable agriculture have gained the agreement of 100% researchers. Conclusion: The important conclusion is that the communication between extension, farmers and policymaker should be strengthened. So

  7. Student prosocial behavior and academic achievement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spasenović Vera Z.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers correlation between student prosocial behavior and academic achievement. Attention first focuses on the issue of prosocial behavior defining, making it operational and measuring it. Next consideration is given to the ways that prosocial behavior contributes to academic achievement. It is thought that prosocial behavior can produce indirect effects on student prosocial behavior because it is bound to certain academically relevant forms of behavior leading to successful learning and work. Also, correlation is interpreted by means of teacher’s preferences of prosocial students, which is reflected in teacher expectations and behavior towards students but in evaluating their work too. In addition, prosocial behavior may produce direct effects, for it is through peer prosocial interactions that positive intellectual exchange is performed, which contributes to more successful mastering of teaching content. The paper provides a survey of investigations whose results indicate that there exists correlation between student prosocial behavior and academic achievement. Also, consideration is given to possible methods and treatments for encouraging prosocial behavior in school context, especially the role of teacher in the process and the importance of the program for promoting student prosocial skills.

  8. Achieving High Performance Perovskite Solar Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yang

    2015-03-01

    Recently, metal halide perovskite based solar cell with the characteristics of rather low raw materials cost, great potential for simple process and scalable production, and extreme high power conversion efficiency (PCE), have been highlighted as one of the most competitive technologies for next generation thin film photovoltaic (PV). In UCLA, we have realized an efficient pathway to achieve high performance pervoskite solar cells, where the findings are beneficial to this unique materials/devices system. Our recent progress lies in perovskite film formation, defect passivation, transport materials design, interface engineering with respect to high performance solar cell, as well as the exploration of its applications beyond photovoltaics. These achievements include: 1) development of vapor assisted solution process (VASP) and moisture assisted solution process, which produces perovskite film with improved conformity, high crystallinity, reduced recombination rate, and the resulting high performance; 2) examination of the defects property of perovskite materials, and demonstration of a self-induced passivation approach to reduce carrier recombination; 3) interface engineering based on design of the carrier transport materials and the electrodes, in combination with high quality perovskite film, which delivers 15 ~ 20% PCEs; 4) a novel integration of bulk heterojunction to perovskite solar cell to achieve better light harvest; 5) fabrication of inverted solar cell device with high efficiency and flexibility and 6) exploration the application of perovskite materials to photodetector. Further development in film, device architecture, and interfaces will lead to continuous improved perovskite solar cells and other organic-inorganic hybrid optoelectronics.

  9. Are Reductions in Population Sodium Intake Achievable?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica L. Levings

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The vast majority of Americans consume too much sodium, primarily from packaged and restaurant foods. The evidence linking sodium intake with direct health outcomes indicates a positive relationship between higher levels of sodium intake and cardiovascular disease risk, consistent with the relationship between sodium intake and blood pressure. Despite communication and educational efforts focused on lowering sodium intake over the last three decades data suggest average US sodium intake has remained remarkably elevated, leading some to argue that current sodium guidelines are unattainable. The IOM in 2010 recommended gradual reductions in the sodium content of packaged and restaurant foods as a primary strategy to reduce US sodium intake, and research since that time suggests gradual, downward shifts in mean population sodium intake are achievable and can move the population toward current sodium intake guidelines. The current paper reviews recent evidence indicating: (1 significant reductions in mean population sodium intake can be achieved with gradual sodium reduction in the food supply, (2 gradual sodium reduction in certain cases can be achieved without a noticeable change in taste or consumption of specific products, and (3 lowering mean population sodium intake can move us toward meeting the current individual guidelines for sodium intake.

  10. DPAL: historical perspective and summary of achievements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhdanov, B. V.; Knize, R. J.

    2013-10-01

    Alkali vapor lasers are under extensive research and development during the past decade because of their potential for scaling to high powers while maintaining a good beam quality. Also, a possibility of using efficient diode lasers for pumping alkali vapor promises high total wall plug efficiency for a Diode Pumped Alkali Laser (DPAL). Since the first DPAL demonstration with output power of 130 mW in 20051, a significant progress in this field was achieved. The output power of about 1 kW in continuous wave (CW) operation with optical efficiency close to 50% was recently demonstrated for a Cs DPAL2. Also, the DPALs based on other alkali metals (Rubidium and Potassium) were demonstrated3,4 . In spite of these significant achievements, there are still several problems in DPAL power scaling exist that must be addressed. Among them are the thermal5 and photoionization6 issues that become important even at power level about several tens of watts. In this paper we present a historical review of the alkali laser research and development, discuss the most important achievements and future perspectives in this field of research.

  11. Social-Emotional Learning and Academic Achievement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meghan P. McCormick

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Social-emotional learning (SEL programs have demonstrated positive effects on children’s social-emotional, behavioral, and academic outcomes, as well as classroom climate. Some programs also theorize that program impacts on children’s outcomes will be partially explained by improvements in classroom social processes, namely classroom emotional support and organization. Yet there is little empirical evidence for this hypothesis. Using data from the evaluation of the SEL program INSIGHTS, this article tests whether assignment to INSIGHTS improved low-income kindergarten and first grade students’ math and reading achievement by first enhancing classroom emotional support and organization. Multilevel regression analyses, instrumental variables estimation, and inverse probability of treatment weighting (IPTW were used to conduct quantitative analyses. Across methods, the impact of INSIGHTS on math and reading achievement in first grade was partially explained by gains in both classroom emotional support and organization. The IPTW method revealed that the program impact on reading achievement in first grade was partially explained through an improvement in classroom organization. Implications for research and practice are discussed.

  12. 脑磁图描记联合术中唤醒用于显微镜下切除功能区胚胎发育不良性神经上皮瘤%Magnetoencephalography and awaking anesthesia in microsurgical resection of dysembryoplastic neuroepithelial tumor in function areas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭韬; 李文玲; 武江; 赵文清; 康进生; 杜亚丽; 董长征; 岳向勇

    2011-01-01

    Objective To summarize our experience on application of magnetoeneephalography (MEG) and awaking anesthesia in microsurgical treatment of dysembryoplastic neuroepithelial tumors in the functional areas. Methods The range of the functional area was largely defined by MEG; intraoperative cortical electrical stimulation was used under awaking anesthesia to identify the border of function area and dysembryoplastic neuroepithelial tumors. Dysembryoplastic neuroepithelial tumors were resected under microscope in four patients and the outcomes of the patients were observed. Results Satisfactory outcomes were obtained in the 4 patients and there were no injuries in the function area. No epileptic seizures or recurrence of dysembryoplastic neuroepithelial tumors were found during long term follow-up. Conclusion Combined treatment using MEG and awaking anesthesia contributes to safe and effective surgical treatment of dysembroplastic neuroepithelial tumors in the function areas.%目的 总结脑磁图(magnetoencephalography, MEG)描记与术中唤醒联合应用切除功能区胚胎发育不良性神经上皮瘤(dysembroplastic neuroepithelial tumor,DNT)的经验.方法根据MEG结果大体确定功能区范围,在唤醒麻醉下应用术中皮质电刺激刺激相应区域皮质,明确功能区和DNT边界.在显微镜下切除DNT 4例,观察治疗效果.结果 4例患者手术效果良好,无功能区损害.长期随访未出现癫发作及DNT复发.结论 联合应用MEG与术中唤醒技术显微镜下切除肿瘤是治疗功能区DNT安全、有效的方法.

  13. [Affiliative achievement motivation and non-affiliative achievement motivation of female students].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doi, K

    1988-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the two dimensional theory of achievement motivation (Doi, 1982) in female students. Doi's motivation scale were administered to 81 female university students, 58 female students of school of nursing and 77 female students of school of English Language, and the Yatabe-Guilford personality inventory was also administered to the first and the second groups. Affiliative achievement motivation and non-affiliative achievement motivation were extracted by principal component analyses and canonical correlation analyses. Non-affiliative achievement motivation was found to be related to personality type: emotional instability and introversion. These findings differ from achievement motivation concepts (Murray, 1938; McClelland, Atkinson, Clark, & Lowell, 1953), that include emotional stability and extraversion.

  14. Potentiation by choline of basal and electrically evoked acetylcholine release, as studied using a novel device which both stimulates and perfuses rat corpus striatum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farber, S. A.; Kischka, U.; Marshall, D. L.; Wurtman, R. J.

    1993-01-01

    We examined the release of acetylcholine (ACh) and dopamine (DA) using a novel probe through which striatal neurons could be both superfused and stimulated electrically in both anesthetized and freely moving awake animals. Optimal stimulation parameters for eliciting ACh release from cholinergic neurons differed from those required for eliciting DA release from dopaminergic terminals: at 0.6 ms pulse duration, 20 Hz and 200 microA, ACh release increased to 357 +/- 30% (P < 0.01) of baseline and was blocked by the addition of tetrodotoxin (TTX). Pulse durations of 2.0 ms or greater were required to increase DA release. Unlike ACh release, DA release showed no frequency dependence above 5 Hz. The maximal evoked releases of ACh and DA were 556 +/- 94% (P < 0.01) and 254 +/- 38% (P < 0.05) of baseline, respectively. Peripheral administration of choline (Ch) chloride (30-120 mg/kg) to anesthetized animals caused dose-related (r = 0.994, P < 0.01) increases in ACh release; basal release rose from 117 +/- 7% to 141 +/- 5% of initial baseline levels (P < 0.05) and electrically evoked ACh release rose from 386 +/- 38% to 600 +/- 34% (P < 0.01) in rats given 120 mg/kg. However, Ch failed to affect basal or evoked DA release although neostigmine (10 microM) significantly elevated basal DA release (from 36.7 fmol/10 min to 71.5 fmol/10 min; P < 0.05). In awake animals, Ch (120 mg/kg) also elevated both basal (from 106 +/- 7% to 154 +/- 17%; P < 0.05) and electrically evoked (from 146 +/- 13 to 262 +/- 16%; P < 0.01) ACh release.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS).

  15. Longitudinal effects of educational expectations and achievement attributions on adolescents' academic achievements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Kun-Shia; Cheng, Ying-Yao; Chen, Yi-Ling; Wu, Yuh-Yih

    2009-01-01

    This study used nationwide data from the Taiwan Education Panel Survey (TEPS) to examine the longitudinal effects of educational expectations and achievement attributions on the academic achievements of adolescents. The sample included 2,000 Taiwanese secondary school students, each of whom completed three waves of questionnaires and cognitive tests: the first in grade 7 (in 2001), the second in grade 9 (in 2003), and the third in grade 11 (in 2005). Through multilevel longitudinal analysis, the results showed: (1) educational expectations accounted for a moderate amount of the variance in academic achievements; (2) students with high educational expectations and effort attribution exhibited higher growth rates in their academic achievements; and (3) studentswith lower educational expectations and those attributing success to others showed significantly fewer academic achievements and significantly lower growth rates in such achievements. The results demonstrated that adolescents' educational expectations and achievement attributions play crucial roles in the long-term course of academic accomplishments. Implications for educational practice and further studies are also discussed.

  16. Improving Student Achievement in Math and Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Nancy G.; Hamsa, Irene Schulz; Heath, Panagiota; Perry, Robert; White, Stacy J.

    1998-01-01

    As the new millennium approaches, a long anticipated reckoning for the education system of the United States is forthcoming, Years of school reform initiatives have not yielded the anticipated results. A particularly perplexing problem involves the lack of significant improvement of student achievement in math and science. Three "Partnership" projects represent collaborative efforts between Xavier University (XU) of Louisiana, Southern University of New Orleans (SUNO), Mississippi Valley State University (MVSU), and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Stennis Space Center (SSC), to enhance student achievement in math and science. These "Partnerships" are focused on students and teachers in federally designated rural and urban empowerment zones and enterprise communities. The major goals of the "Partnerships" include: (1) The identification and dissemination of key indices of success that account for high performance in math and science; (2) The education of pre-service and in-service secondary teachers in knowledge, skills, and competencies that enhance the instruction of high school math and science; (3) The development of faculty to enhance the quality of math and science courses in institutions of higher education; and (4) The incorporation of technology-based instruction in institutions of higher education. These goals will be achieved by the accomplishment of the following objectives: (1) Delineate significant ?best practices? that are responsible for enhancing student outcomes in math and science; (2) Recruit and retain pre-service teachers with undergraduate degrees in Biology, Math, Chemistry, or Physics in a graduate program, culminating with a Master of Arts in Curriculum and Instruction; (3) Provide faculty workshops and opportunities for travel to professional meetings for dissemination of NASA resources information; (4) Implement methodologies and assessment procedures utilizing performance-based applications of higher order

  17. Media and attention, cognition, and school achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Marie Evans; Vandewater, Elizabeth A

    2008-01-01

    Marie Evans Schmidt and Elizabeth Vandewater review research on links between various types of electronic media and the cognitive skills of school-aged children and adolescents. One central finding of studies to date, they say, is that the content delivered by electronic media is far more influential than the media themselves. Most studies, they point out, find a small negative link between the total hours a child spends viewing TV and that child's academic achievement. But when researchers take into account characteristics of the child, such as IQ or socioeconomic status, this link typically disappears. Content appears to be crucial. Viewing educational TV is linked positively with academic achievement; viewing entertainment TV is linked negatively with achievement. When it comes to particular cognitive skills, say the authors, researchers have found that electronic media, particularly video games, can enhance visual spatial skills, such as visual tracking, mental rotation, and target localization. Gaming may also improve problem-solving skills. Researchers have yet to understand fully the issue of transfer of learning from electronic media. Studies suggest that, under some circumstances, young people are able to transfer what they learn from electronic media to other applications, but analysts are uncertain how such transfer occurs. In response to growing public concern about possible links between electronic media use and attention problems in children and adolescents, say the authors, researchers have found evidence for small positive links between heavy electronic media use and mild attention problems among young people but have found only inconsistent evidence so far for a link between attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and media use. The authors point out that although video games, interactive websites, and multimedia software programs appear to offer a variety of possible benefits for learning, there is as yet little empirical evidence to suggest that

  18. Editorial: Well Documented Articles Achieve More Impact

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sönke Albers

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available This issue offers for the first time supplementary material to articles. It consists of Excel files providing data the research is based on, calculation sheets, and optimization tools. Moreover, text files with pseudo code of algorithms and data of instances used for testing these algorithms as well as a video file with a demonstration of the use of a system in experiments are supplied for download. This material facilitates the understanding of the published articles and the replication of their findings to the benefit of scientific progress. And last but not least, such well documented articles will achieve much more impact.

  19. ACHIEVING BETTER UNDERSTANDING BY LISTENING WITH PREDICTION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The skill of Listening with comprehension is anessential part of communication and basic to ESL/EFL learning.Prediction is also a key process in un-derstanding spoken language.This article intends tooffer a definition for prediction in ESL/EFL listening,examines its foundations,draws some insights into itsnature,and illustrates how to develop and employprediction in pre-listening and while-listening stages,also how to‘repair’prediction in the post-listeningstage,in an attempt to help listeners achieve the goalof better understanding.

  20. Early Retirement Incentives and Student Achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzpatrick, Maria D; Lovenheim, Michael F

    2014-08-01

    Early retirement incentives (ERIs) are increasingly prevalent in education as districts seek to close budget gaps by replacing expensive experienced teachers with lower-cost newer teachers. Combined with the aging of the teacher workforce, these ERIs are likely to change the composition of teachers dramatically in the coming years. We use exogenous variation from an ERI program in Illinois in the mid-1990s to provide the first evidence in the literature of the effects of large-scale teacher retirements on student achievement. We find the program did not reduce test scores; likely, it increased them, with positive effects most pronounced in lower-SES schools.

  1. Fruitful Achievements of Auto China 2006

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    @@ Nine days'Auto China 2006 was closed on November 27,2006.This exhibition set many records:over 1500 domestic and overseas exhibitors attended the meeting;about 300 foreign exhibitors; catered over 600,000 audiences,among which,32,000 are foreign audiences; 6376 domestic and foreign journalists reported this exhibition.Under the prominent results,there are some more figures.Yao Rui,Vice President of China International Exhibition Center Group Corporation shows that the exhibition improved the achievements in ten industries.

  2. Various Means of Achieving Humor in English

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    温晓棠

    2014-01-01

    Humor can be found everywhere in our daily life. It shows one's wisdom and confidence, which reflects a person's character, mind and cultivation. While it makes people laugh, it enlightens and instruct people. As we all know, English humor is a manifestation of the western literature. However, people in non-English speaking countries cannot completely understand English humor because of the differences of different cultures. The present paper starts from the analysis of English humor, trying to find out some ways of achieving humor so as to better our understanding and appreciation of English humor.

  3. Achievements and Prospects of China's Hydropower Generation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhou Dabing

    2010-01-01

    @@ Outstanding achievements The scale of hydropower development con-tinuously expanding to a new level As a type of clean and renewable energy resource,water power takes an extremely important position in the energy layout of the world.The theoretic reservation of China's hydro energy is ranked the first in the world.But from the foundation of P.R.C.to the year of 1978(the year when the reform and opening-up took place),the hydro energy exploitation in the whole country was less than 10% of the reservation.

  4. A minimum achievable PV electrical generating cost

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabisky, E.S. [11 Carnation Place, Lawrenceville, NJ 08648 (United States)

    1996-03-22

    The role and share of photovoltaic (PV) generated electricity in our nation`s future energy arsenal is primarily dependent on its future production cost. This paper provides a framework for obtaining a minimum achievable electrical generating cost (a lower bound) for fixed, flat-plate photovoltaic systems. A cost of 2.8 $cent/kWh (1990$) was derived for a plant located in Southwestern USA sunshine using a cost of money of 8%. In addition, a value of 22 $cent/Wp (1990$) was estimated as a minimum module manufacturing cost/price

  5. Maximal entanglement achievable by controlled dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Serafini, Alessio

    2009-01-01

    We consider the feedback control of quantum systems comprised of any number of bosonic degrees of freedom. We derive a general upper bound for the logarithmic negativity achievable, at steady state, with continuous Gaussian measurements on the environment and linear driving on the system. Our results apply to rotating wave system-bath couplings and to any quadratic system's Hamiltonian. Furthermore, we apply this upper bound to parametric processes, show it to be tight, and compare it to feedback strategies limited to local measurements.

  6. Rat Bite Fever

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Español Text Size Email Print Share Rat Bite Fever Page Content Article Body Rat-bite fever is a disease that occurs in humans who ... ingestion of contaminated food or milk products (Haverhill fever). Most cases in the United States are caused ...

  7. SWEEP Project RAT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibsen, Lars Bo; Madsen, Søren; Petersen, L. B.

    This report presents the results from the design analyses made for the clustered suction caisson used as foundation for a Riser Access Tower (RAT). The RAT is intended built next to the K15-FA-1 Platform in the Dutch Sector of the North Sea....

  8. Dexmedetomidina para teste neurocognitivo em craniotomia com o paciente acordado: relato de caso Dexmedetomidina para prueba neurocognitiva en craniotomía con el paciente despierto: relato de caso Dexmedetomidine for neurocognitive testing in awake craniotomy: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Cursino Pinto dos Santos

    2006-08-01

    done using cognitive tests to determine their exact location. Patients must be awake, comfortable, and cooperative for the precise identification of the areas to be preserved. The objective of this report is to present a surgical procedure done with the patient awake, without endotracheal intubation, using sevofluorane initially, followed by dexmedetomidine. This technique allowed the realization of motor and speech evaluation tests. CASE REPORT: Twenty-seven years old male patient, physical status ASA I, with a brain tumor. In the operating room, without pre-anesthetic medication, midazolam (1 mg was administered, and general anesthesia was induced with propofol (80 mg. Maintenance was done with O2, N2O, and sevofluorane, with a mask, for catheterization of the right radial artery, introduction of a vesical catheter, and infiltration of the surgical site. This phase lasted around 20 minutes, and the infusion of dexmedetomidine was initiated in the last 10 minutes to maintain a level of sedation Ramsay score 2. Cortical mapping followed (75 minutes. Afterwards, tumor resection was done while the patient remained sedated with higher doses of dexmedetomidine. Hemodynamic and respiratory parameters remained stable, and the procedure was performed without complications, lasting a total of five hours. After the surgical procedure the patient was transferred to the ICU. He did not develop any neurological changes, being discharged to a regular ward the following day. CONCLUSIONS: Awake craniotomy with the proper mapping of speech and motor cortical areas was successfully done with the continuous infusion of dexmedetomidine. Both the patient and the surgical team were pleased with the technique.

  9. Digital replantation teaching model in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ad-El, D D; Harper, A; Hoffman, L A

    2000-01-01

    Replant surgery is a complex procedure that requires advanced microsurgical skills and is usually performed as an emergency operation, lasting many hours. For these reasons, teaching replantation is difficult. Although teaching models exist, they are often too general or complicated for routine use and do not simulate the stages and the pitfalls of human replant surgery. We have designed a model that is simple and imitates human replant surgery. After reviewing the rat anatomy, students dissect and replant a rat hind limb that has been sharply amputated by the instructor. They follow the same principles of "real" surgery like debridement, minimizing ischemia time, and stable fixation before anatomosis of vessels. After marking the structures, bony fixation followed by vessel and nerve anastomosis are performed. Muscle is reattached to the skin and limb vascularity evaluated. After we designed this model, plastic surgery residents performed the technique on 10 rats. An 80% limb viability rate was achieved. This model is simple to perform, simulates all the relevant structures and pitfalls of human surgery, and the rats are relatively cheap and can be used for other parallel projects.

  10. Dogs' Body Language Relevant to Learning Achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Masashi; Ohtani, Nobuyo; Ohta, Mitsuaki

    2014-01-01

    The facial expressions and body postures of dogs can give helpful information about their moods and emotional states. People can more effectively obedience train their dogs if we can identify the mannerisms associated with learning in dogs. The aim of this study was to clarify the dog's body language during operant conditioning to predict achievement in the test that followed by measuring the duration of behaviors. Forty-six untrained dogs (17 males and 26 females) of various breeds were used. Each session consisted of 5 minutes of training with a treat reward followed by 3 minutes of rest and finally an operant conditioning test that consisted of 20 "hand motion" cues. The operant tests were conducted a total of nine times over three consecutive days, and the success numbers were counted. The duration of the dog's behavior, focusing on the dog's eyes, mouth, ears, tail and tail-wagging, was recorded during the operant conditioning sessions before the test. Particular behaviors, including wide-eyes, closed mouth, erect ears, and forward and high tail carriage, without wagging or with short and quick wagging, related to high achievement results. It is concluded that dogs' body language during operant conditioning was related to their success rate.

  11. Achieving the Renewable Energy Target for Jamaica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullahi Olabode ABDULKADRI

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available ieving the Renewable Energy Target for Jamaica Abstract: The high cost of energy in Jamaica, one of the highest in the Caribbean region, is usually cited as a hindrance to industrial development and efficiency, especially in the manufacturing sector. High energy cost is also considered to be a national energy security issue and the government is taking steps to ensure adequate supply of energy at affordable prices. In the current National Development Plan, the government has set a target for renewable energy sources to supply 20% of the country's energy need by the year 2030. Using a linear programing model of energy planning, we examine how realistically this target could be achieved. Our findings indicate that the 20% renewable energy target is technically achievable with the optimal plan showing a mixture of wind power, hydropower and bagasse power but no solar power. However, when the timeline for investment in new generating capacities that will ensure the attainment of the target is considered, it becomes highly improbable that the target will be met. This study fills the gap that exists in evidence-based analysis of energy policy in Jamaica.

  12. Understanding how animal groups achieve coordinated movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbert-Read, J E

    2016-10-01

    Moving animal groups display remarkable feats of coordination. This coordination is largely achieved when individuals adjust their movement in response to their neighbours' movements and positions. Recent advancements in automated tracking technologies, including computer vision and GPS, now allow researchers to gather large amounts of data on the movements and positions of individuals in groups. Furthermore, analytical techniques from fields such as statistical physics now allow us to identify the precise interaction rules used by animals on the move. These interaction rules differ not only between species, but also between individuals in the same group. These differences have wide-ranging implications, affecting how groups make collective decisions and driving the evolution of collective motion. Here, I describe how trajectory data can be used to infer how animals interact in moving groups. I give examples of the similarities and differences in the spatial and directional organisations of animal groups between species, and discuss the rules that animals use to achieve this organisation. I then explore how groups of the same species can exhibit different structures, and ask whether this results from individuals adapting their interaction rules. I then examine how the interaction rules between individuals in the same groups can also differ, and discuss how this can affect ecological and evolutionary processes. Finally, I suggest areas of future research.

  13. Achieving Supply Chain Integration within Construction Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter McDermotti

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The main driver behind the adoption of supply chain management (SCM philosophy into the construction industry was the successes within other industry sectors. SCM can be defined as network of different organisations, linked upstream and downstream in a chain, aiming to produce quality and value in the services and products for the end consumers through integrated processes and activities. In order to achieve the optimised level of integration of the whole supply chain, the industry has responded in various forms. This paper will discuss different initiatives by the researchers,construction industry,and the UK government in order to achieve optimal level of supply chain integration. This paper will discuss the concept of aggregation,and also look at other supply chain integration related concepts including client-led supply chain, knowledge about the whole supply chain, effects of procurement on integration of supply chain, etc. The paper will give a brief overview and initial findings of a project undertaken by the authors, and also include examples from the UK construction industry on bundling of the supply and demand.

  14. Housing Affordability And Children's Cognitive Achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Sandra; Holupka, C Scott

    2016-11-01

    Housing cost burden-the fraction of income spent on housing-is the most prevalent housing problem affecting the healthy development of millions of low- and moderate-income children. By affecting disposable income, a high burden affects parents' expenditures on both necessities for and enrichment of their children, as well as investments in their children. Reducing those expenditures and investments, in turn, can affect children's development, including their cognitive skills and physical, social, and emotional health. This article summarizes the first empirical evidence of the effects of housing affordability on children's cognitive achievement and on one factor that appears to contribute to these effects: the larger expenditures on child enrichment by families in affordable housing. We found that housing cost burden has the same relationship to both children's cognitive achievement and enrichment spending on children, exhibiting an inverted U shape in both cases. The maximum benefit occurs when housing cost burden is near 30 percent of income-the long-standing rule-of-thumb definition of affordable housing. The effect of the burden is stronger on children's math ability than on their reading comprehension and is more pronounced with burdens above the 30 percent standard. For enrichment spending, the curve is "shallower" (meaning the effect of optimal affordability is less pronounced) but still significant.

  15. VULNERABILITIES IN ACHIEVING AGRICULTURAL POTENTIAL OF ROMANIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristian TEODOR

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The land fund of Romania represents a huge potential for agriculture. The potential has proved difficult to achieve, and among the main vulnerabilities researched lately, we have identified the decline in consumption of vegetable crops, fruit and meat, determined by the declining purchasing power in Romania and the European Union's common market. Therefore the degree of achievement of the agricultural potential is directly influenced by economic developments in Romania and EU Member States. The technical endowment of Romanian farmers is an old and still unresolved problem. Even though Romania has benefited from EU pre-accession funds and still benefits from it, they proved to be a poor solution for Romanian farmers with farm machinery equipment. Indicator analysis of the evolution of the number of tractors in Romania in the post-accession period, reveals that the actual number of tractors in the period under review increased overall, but even if the total number of tractors in Romania increased from 2007 until 2012, UAA (ha per a tractor is almost constant.

  16. Psychophysical correspondence between vibrotactile intensity and intracortical microstimulation for tactile neuroprostheses in rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devecioğlu, İsmail; Güçlü, Burak

    2017-02-01

    Objective. Recent studies showed that intracortical microstimulation (ICMS) generates artificial sensations which can be utilized as somatosensory feedback in cortical neuroprostheses. To mimic the natural psychophysical response, ICMS parameters are modulated according to psychometric equivalence functions (PEFs). PEFs match the intensity levels of ICMS and mechanical stimuli, which elicit equal detection probabilities, but they typically do not include the frequency as a control variable. We aimed to establish frequency-dependent PEFs for vibrotactile stimulation of the glabrous skin and ICMS in the primary somatosensory cortex of awake freely behaving rats. Approach. We collected psychometric data for vibrotactile and ICMS detection at three stimulation frequencies (40, 60 and 80 Hz). The psychometric data were fitted with a model equation of two independent variables (stimulus intensity and frequency) and four subject-dependent parameters. For each rat, we constructed a separate PEF which was used to estimate the ICMS current amplitude for a given displacement amplitude and frequency. The ICMS frequency was set equal to the vibrotactile frequency. We validated the PEFs in a modified task which included randomly selected probe trials presented either with a vibrotactile or an ICMS stimulus, and also at frequencies and intensity levels not tested before. Main results. The PEFs were generally successful in estimating the ICMS current intensities (no significant differences between vibrotactile and ICMS trials in Kolmogorov-Smirnov tests). Specifically, hit rates from both trial conditions were significantly correlated in 86% of the cases, and 52% of all data had perfect match in linear regression. Significance. The psychometric correspondence model presented in this study was constructed based on surface functions which define psychophysical detection probability as a function of stimulus intensity and frequency. Therefore, it may be used for the real

  17. Ketamine-induced oscillations in the motor circuit of the rat basal ganglia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Jesús Nicolás

    Full Text Available Oscillatory activity can be widely recorded in the cortex and basal ganglia. This activity may play a role not only in the physiology of movement, perception and cognition, but also in the pathophysiology of psychiatric and neurological diseases like schizophrenia or Parkinson's disease. Ketamine administration has been shown to cause an increase in gamma activity in cortical and subcortical structures, and an increase in 150 Hz oscillations in the nucleus accumbens in healthy rats, together with hyperlocomotion.We recorded local field potentials from motor cortex, caudate-putamen (CPU, substantia nigra pars reticulata (SNr and subthalamic nucleus (STN in 20 awake rats before and after the administration of ketamine at three different subanesthetic doses (10, 25 and 50 mg/Kg, and saline as control condition. Motor behavior was semiautomatically quantified by custom-made software specifically developed for this setting.Ketamine induced coherent oscillations in low gamma (~ 50 Hz, high gamma (~ 80 Hz and high frequency (HFO, ~ 150 Hz bands, with different behavior in the four structures studied. While oscillatory activity at these three peaks was widespread across all structures, interactions showed a different pattern for each frequency band. Imaginary coherence at 150 Hz was maximum between motor cortex and the different basal ganglia nuclei, while low gamma coherence connected motor cortex with CPU and high gamma coherence was more constrained to the basal ganglia nuclei. Power at three bands correlated with the motor activity of the animal, but only coherence values in the HFO and high gamma range correlated with movement. Interactions in the low gamma band did not show a direct relationship to movement.These results suggest that the motor effects of ketamine administration may be primarily mediated by the induction of coherent widespread high-frequency activity in the motor circuit of the basal ganglia, together with a frequency

  18. Time course of changes in heart rate and blood pressure variability in rats with myocardial infarction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Aires

    Full Text Available Our aim was to determine the time course of changes in autonomic balance in the acute (1 and 3 days, sub-acute (7 days and chronic (28 days phases of myocardial infarction (MI in rats. Autonomic balance was assessed by temporal and spectral analyses of blood pressure variability (BPV and heart rate variability (HRV. Pulsatile blood pressure (BP recordings (30 min were obtained in awake and unrestrained male Wistar rats (N = 77; 8-10 weeks old with MI (coronary ligature or sham operation (SO. Data are reported as means±SE. The high frequency (HF component (n.u. of HRV was significantly lower in MI-1- (P0.05. This reduction was mainly due to attenuation of the low frequency (LF band of BPV in absolute and normalized units (SO-1=39.3±7%; SO-3=55±4.5%; SO-7=46.8±4.5%; SO-28=45.7±5%; MI-1=13±3.5%; MI-3=35±4.7%; MI-7=25±2.8%; MI-28=21.4±2.8%. The results suggest that the reduction in HRV was associated with decrease of the HF component of HRV suggesting recovery of the vagal control of heartbeats along the post-infarction healing period. The depression of BPV was more dependent on the attenuation of the LF component, which is linked to the baroreflex modulation of the autonomic balance.

  19. Time course of changes in heart rate and blood pressure variability in rats with myocardial infarction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aires, R.; Pimentel, E.B.; Forechi, L.; Dantas, E.M.; Mill, J.G.

    2017-01-01

    Our aim was to determine the time course of changes in autonomic balance in the acute (1 and 3 days), sub-acute (7 days) and chronic (28 days) phases of myocardial infarction (MI) in rats. Autonomic balance was assessed by temporal and spectral analyses of blood pressure variability (BPV) and heart rate variability (HRV). Pulsatile blood pressure (BP) recordings (30 min) were obtained in awake and unrestrained male Wistar rats (N = 77; 8-10 weeks old) with MI (coronary ligature) or sham operation (SO). Data are reported as means±SE. The high frequency (HF) component (n.u.) of HRV was significantly lower in MI-1- (P0.05). This reduction was mainly due to attenuation of the low frequency (LF) band of BPV in absolute and normalized units (SO-1=39.3±7%; SO-3=55±4.5%; SO-7=46.8±4.5%; SO-28=45.7±5%; MI-1=13±3.5%; MI-3=35±4.7%; MI-7=25±2.8%; MI-28=21.4±2.8%). The results suggest that the reduction in HRV was associated with decrease of the HF component of HRV suggesting recovery of the vagal control of heartbeats along the post-infarction healing period. The depression of BPV was more dependent on the attenuation of the LF component, which is linked to the baroreflex modulation of the autonomic balance. PMID:28076450

  20. Social and environmental contexts modulate sleep deprivation-induced c-Fos activation in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deurveilher, Samuel; Ryan, Nathan; Burns, Joan; Semba, Kazue

    2013-11-01

    People often sleep deprive themselves voluntarily for social and lifestyle reasons. Animals also appear to stay awake longer as a result of their natural curiosity to explore novel environments and interact socially with conspecifics. Although multiple arousal systems in the brain are known to act jointly to promote and maintain wakefulness, it remains unclear whether these systems are similarly engaged during voluntary vs. forced wakefulness. Using c-Fos immunohistochemistry, we compared neuronal responses in rats deprived of sleep for 2 h by gentle sensory stimulation, exploration under social isolation, or exploration with social interaction, and rats under undisturbed control conditions. In many arousal, limbic, and autonomic nuclei examined (e.g., anterior cingulate cortex and locus coeruleus), the two sleep deprivation procedures involving exploration were similarly effective, and both were more effective than sleep deprivation with sensory stimulation, in increasing the number of c-Fos immunoreactive neurons. However, some nuclei (e.g., paraventricular hypothalamic nucleus and select amygdala nuclei) were more responsive to exploration with social interaction, while others (e.g., histaminergic tuberomammillary nucleus) responded more strongly to exploration in social isolation. In the rostral basal forebrain, cholinergic and GABAergic neurons responded preferentially to exploration with social interaction, whereas resident neurons in general responded most strongly to exploration without social interaction. These results indicate that voluntary exploration with/without social interaction is more effective than forced sleep deprivation with gentle sensory stimulation for inducing c-Fos in arousal and limbic/autonomic brain regions, and suggest that these nuclei participate in different aspects of arousal during sustained voluntary wakefulness.