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Sample records for awake rats achieving

  1. Optimised motion tracking for positron emission tomography studies of brain function in awake rats.

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    Andre Z Kyme

    Full Text Available Positron emission tomography (PET is a non-invasive molecular imaging technique using positron-emitting radioisotopes to study functional processes within the body. High resolution PET scanners designed for imaging rodents and non-human primates are now commonplace in preclinical research. Brain imaging in this context, with motion compensation, can potentially enhance the usefulness of PET by avoiding confounds due to anaesthetic drugs and enabling freely moving animals to be imaged during normal and evoked behaviours. Due to the frequent and rapid motion exhibited by alert, awake animals, optimal motion correction requires frequently sampled pose information and precise synchronisation of these data with events in the PET coincidence data stream. Motion measurements should also be as accurate as possible to avoid degrading the excellent spatial resolution provided by state-of-the-art scanners. Here we describe and validate methods for optimised motion tracking suited to the correction of motion in awake rats. A hardware based synchronisation approach is used to achieve temporal alignment of tracker and scanner data to within 10 ms. We explored the impact of motion tracker synchronisation error, pose sampling rate, rate of motion, and marker size on motion correction accuracy. With accurate synchronisation (20 Hz, and a small head marker suitable for awake animal studies, excellent motion correction results were obtained in phantom studies with a variety of continuous motion patterns, including realistic rat motion (<5% bias in mean concentration. Feasibility of the approach was also demonstrated in an awake rat study. We conclude that motion tracking parameters needed for effective motion correction in preclinical brain imaging of awake rats are achievable in the laboratory setting. This could broaden the scope of animal experiments currently possible with PET.

  2. Critical evaluation of colon submucosal microdialysis in awake, mobile rats.

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    Norbert Cibicek

    Full Text Available Sensors able to record large bowel physiology and biochemistry in situ in awake rodents are lacking. Microdialysis is a mini-invasive technique that may be utilized to continuously deliver or recover low-molecular substances from various tissues. In this experiment we evaluated the feasibility of in vivo microdialysis to monitor extracellular fluid chemistry in the descending colon submucosa of conscious, freely moving rodents. Following surgical implantation of a microdialysis probe, male Wistar rats were housed in metabolic cages where they were analgized and clinically followed for four days with free access to standard diet and water. To assess local microcirculation and probe function, glucose, lactate, glucose-to-lactate ratio and urea clearance were determined in the dialysates from the three postoperative days with focus on the final 24-h period. In an attempt to mitigate the expected tissue inflammatory response, one group of animals had the catheters perfused with 5-aminosalicylic acid-enriched medium with final concentration 1 μmol/L. For verification of probe position and the assessment of the surrounding foreign body reaction, standard histological and immunohistochemical methods were employed. Microdialysis of rat gut is associated with considerable technical challenges that may lead to the loss of probe function and high drop-out rate. In this setting, limited data did not allow to draw any firm conclusion regarding local anti-inflammatory effectiveness of 5-aminosalicylic acid perfusion. Although intestinal microdialysis may be suitable for larger anesthetized animals, low reproducibility of the presented method compromises its routine experimental use in awake and freely moving small-sized rodents.

  3. Propofol anesthesia compared to awake reduces infarct size in rats.

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    Gelb, Adrian W; Bayona, Nestor A; Wilson, John X; Cechetto, David F

    2002-05-01

    Propofol has not been studied directly in animals subject to cerebral ischemia in the conscious state. Strokes are usually induced in animals while they are anesthetized, making it difficult to eliminate anesthetic interactions as a complicating factor. Therefore, to compare the neuroprotective effects of propofol to the unanesthetized state, experiments were performed using a model that induces a stroke in the conscious rat. Cerebral ischemia was induced in awake Wistar rats by a local intracerebral injection of the potent vasoconstrictor endothelin. Four days before the strokes were induced, a guide cannula was implanted for the injection of endothelin. On the day of the experiment, endothelin (6.0 pmol in 3 microl) was injected into the striatum. Propofol (25 or 15 mg. kg-1. h-1) or intralipid (vehicle) were infused for 4 h starting immediately after the endothelin injection. In another series, the propofol infusion was begun 1 h after the endothelin injection and continued for 4 h. Three days later, the animals were killed, and the brains were sectioned and stained. The propofol group (25 mg. kg-1. h-1) had a significantly reduced infarct size (0.7 +/- 0.21 mm3, first 4 h; 0.27 +/- 0.07 mm3, started 1 h after initiation of infarct) compared with the intralipid controls (3.40 +/- 0.53 mm3). To exclude a direct interaction between propofol and endothelin, in thiobutabarbital anesthetized rats, endothelin-induced cerebral vasoconstriction was examined using videomicroscopy, with or without propofol. Propofol had no effect on the magnitude or time course of the endothelin-induced vasoconstriction. The results show that concurrent or delayed administration of propofol is neuroprotective.

  4. The First Awake Clipping of a Brain Aneurysm in Malaysia and in ASEAN: Achieving International Standards.

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    Idris, Zamzuri; Kandasamy, Regunath; Neoh, Yee Yik; Abdullah, Jafri Malin; Wan Hassan, Wan Mohd Nazaruddin; Mat Hassan, Mohd Erham

    2018-02-01

    World-renowned neurosurgeon, Professor Saleem Abdulrauf, has been featured in several medical journals for his successful "Awake Brain Aneurysm Surgery". Regarded as a "world first", this surgery, involves clipping un-ruptured brain aneurysms while patients are awake. Only one or two neurosurgery centres worldwide are capable of this. Performing the surgery while the patient is awake lowers risks of brain ischemia with neurological deficits and ventilator associated morbidities. The technique has been viewed as the start of a new era in brain surgery. Physicians from the Universiti Sains Malaysia (USM) School of Medical Sciences, at the Health Campus in Kelantan, headed by Professor Dr Zamzuri Idris (neurosurgeon) and Dr Wan Mohd Nazaruddin Wan Hassan (neuroanaesthetist), recently performed a similar procedure, the first such surgery in Malaysia and Southeast Asia. The USM team can therefore be considered to be among the first few to have done this brain surgery and achieved successful patient outcomes.

  5. Layer-specific high-frequency spiking in the prefrontal cortex of awake rats

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    Zimbo Saroeni Raymond Maria Boudewijns

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Cortical pyramidal neurons show irregular in vivo action potential (AP spiking with high frequency bursts occurring on sparse background activity. Somatic APs can backpropagate from soma into basal and apical dendrites and locally generate dendritic calcium spikes. The critical AP frequency for generation of such dendritic calcium spikes can be very different depending on cell-type or brain area involved. Previously, it was shown in vitro that calcium electrogenesis can also be induced in L(ayer 5 pyramidal neurons of prefrontal cortex (PFC. It remains an open question whether somatic burst spiking and resulting dendritic calcium electrogenesis also occur in morphologically more compact L2/3 pyramidal neurons. Furthermore, it is not known whether critical frequencies that trigger dendritic calcium electrogenesis occur in PFC under awake conditions in vivo. Here, we addressed these issues and found that pyramidal neurons in both PFC L2/3 and L5 in awake rats spike APs in short bursts, but with different probabilities. The critical frequency for calcium electrogenesis in vitro was layer-specific and lower in L5 neurons compared to L2/3. Taking the in vitro critical frequency as predictive measure for dendritic electrogenesis during in vivo spontaneous activity, supracritical bursts in vivo were observed in a larger fraction of L5 neurons compared to L2/3 neurons but with similar incidence within these subpopulations. Together, these results show that in PFC of awake rats, AP spiking occurs at frequencies that are relevant for dendritic calcium electrogenesis and suggest that in awake rat PFC, dendritic calcium electrogenesis may be involved in neuronal computation.

  6. Ozone uptake in awake Sprague-Dawley rats

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    Wiester, M.J.; Williams, T.B.; King, M.E.; Menache, M.G.; Miller, F.J.

    1987-07-01

    Knowledge of ozone (O/sub 3/) uptake in rats in integral to efforts to quantitatively extrapolate animal data to man. We have measured percentage O/sub 3/ uptake in 30 adult Sprague-Dawley rats exposed, nose only, for 1 hr to 0.3, 0.6, or 1.0 ppm O/sub 3/. Tidal volume and breathing rate measurements, obtained by plethysmography, were time-matched with changes in airstream concentrations of O/sub 3/, oxygen, and carbon dioxide, due to animal breathing, for computation of O/sub 3/ uptake and respiratory gas exchange values. Ozone uptake was calculated by a fractional deposition technique, i.e. O/sub 3/ in vs O/sub 3/ out. Total respiratory system O/sub 3/ uptake was found to be approximately 40% of that inspired and did not vary with O/sub 3/ concentration nor during the 1-hr exposure. The quantity of O/sub 3/ inhaled and retained by the rat increased proportionally with O/sub 3/ concentration.

  7. Ozone uptake in awake Sprague-Dawley rats

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    Wiester, M.J.; Williams, T.B.; King, M.E.; Menache, M.G.; Miller, F.J.

    1987-01-01

    Knowledge of ozone (O/sub 3/) uptake in rats is integral to efforts to quantitatively extrapolate animal data to man. The authors measured percent uptake of 30 adult Sprague-Dawley rats exposed, nose only, for 1 hr to 0.3, 0.6 or 1.0 ppm O/sub 3/. Resting breathing measurements were obtained by plethysmography while changes in ozone, oxygen, and carbon dioxide, due to animal breathing, were computed. Ozone uptake was calculated by a fractional deposition technique, i.e. O/sub 3/ in vs. O/sub 3/ out. Pulmonary O/sub 3/ uptake was found to be approximately 40% of that inspired. The value did not vary over time nor was it affected by O/sub 3/ concentration. Although ozone uptake did not appear to be influenced by ventilatory changes within normal breathing limits, it was positively correlated with respiratory gas exchange. The quantitative retention of O/sub 3/ by the respiratory epithelium increased proportionally with O/sub 3/ concentration and minute volume.

  8. Spiking in primary somatosensory cortex during natural whisking in awake head-restrained rats is cell-type specific

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    C.P.J. de Kock (Christiaan); B. Sakmann (Bert)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractSensation involves active movement of sensory organs, but it remains unknown how position or movement of sensory organs is encoded in cortex. In the rat whisker system, each whisker is represented by an individual cortical (barrel) column. Here, we quantified in awake, head-fixed rats

  9. Spiking in primary somatosensory cortex during natural whisking in awake head-restrained rats is cell-type specific

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Kock, C.P.J.; Sakmann, B.

    2009-01-01

    Sensation involves active movement of sensory organs, but it remains unknown how position or movement of sensory organs is encoded in cortex. In the rat whisker system, each whisker is represented by an individual cortical (barrel) column. Here, we quantified in awake, head-fixed rats the impact of

  10. Awake craniotomy

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    Bajunaid, Khalid M.; Ajlan, Abdulrazag M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To report the personal experiences of patients undergoing awake craniotomy for brain tumor resection. Methods: We carried out a qualitative descriptive survey of patients’ experiences with awake craniotomies for brain tumor resection. The survey was conducted through a standard questionnaire form after the patient was discharged from the hospital. Results: Of the 9 patients who met the inclusion criteria and underwent awake craniotomy, 3 of those patients reported no recollection of the operation. Five patients had auditory recollections from the operation. Two-thirds (6/9) reported that they did not perceive pain. Five patients remembered the head clamp fixation, and 2 of those patients classified the pain from the clamp as moderate. None of the patients reported that the surgery was more difficult than anticipated. Conclusion: Awake craniotomy for surgical resection of brain tumors was well tolerated by patients. Most patients reported that they do not recall feeling pain during the operation. However, we feel that further work and exploration are needed in order to achieve better control of pain and discomfort during these types of operations. PMID:26166593

  11. SIMULTANEOUS MEASUREMENT OF EXTRACELLULAR MORPHINE AND SEROTONIN IN BRAIN-TISSUE AND CSF BY MICRODIALYSIS IN AWAKE RATS

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    MATOS, FF; ROLLEMA, H; BASBAUM, AI

    In this report, we describe an HPLC with electrochemical detection assay for the simultaneous measurement of levels of morphine, serotonin, 5-hydroxyindole-3-acetic acid, and homovanillic acid in dialysates of various brain areas and CSF in the awake rat. Morphine could be detected in the dialysates

  12. Ex vivo evaluation of the serotonin 1A receptor partial agonist [³H]CUMI-101 in awake rats

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    Palner, Mikael; Underwood, Mark D; Kumar, Dileep J S

    2011-01-01

    [³H]CUMI-101 is a 5-HT(1A) partial agonist, which has been evaluated for use as a positron emission tracer in baboon and humans. We sought to evaluate the properties of [³H]CUMI-101 ex vivo in awake rats and determine if [³H]CUMI-101 can measure changes in synaptic levels of serotonin after diffe...

  13. Sex differences in neural activation following different routes of oxytocin administration in awake adult rats.

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    Dumais, Kelly M; Kulkarni, Praveen P; Ferris, Craig F; Veenema, Alexa H

    2017-07-01

    The neuropeptide oxytocin (OT) regulates social behavior in sex-specific ways across species. OT has promising effects on alleviating social deficits in sex-biased neuropsychiatric disorders. However little is known about potential sexually dimorphic effects of OT on brain function. Using the rat as a model organism, we determined whether OT administered centrally or peripherally induces sex differences in brain activation. Functional magnetic resonance imaging was used to examine blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) signal intensity changes in the brains of awake rats during the 20min following intracerebroventricular (ICV; 1μg/5μl) or intraperitoneal (IP; 0.1mg/kg) OT administration as compared to baseline. ICV OT induced sex differences in BOLD activation in 26 out of 172 brain regions analyzed, with 20 regions showing a greater volume of activation in males (most notably the nucleus accumbens and insular cortex), and 6 regions showing a greater volume of activation in females (including the lateral and central amygdala). IP OT also elicited sex differences in BOLD activation with a greater volume of activation in males, but this activation was found in different and fewer (10) brain regions compared to ICV OT. In conclusion, exogenous OT modulates neural activation differently in male versus female rats with the pattern and magnitude, but not the direction, of sex differences depending on the route of administration. These findings highlight the need to include both sexes in basic and clinical studies to fully understand the role of OT on brain function. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Distinct BOLD activation profiles following central and peripheral oxytocin administration in awake rats

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    Craig F Ferris

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available A growing body of literature has suggested that intranasal oxytocin (OT or other systemic routes of administration can alter prosocial behavior, presumably by directly activating OT sensitive neural circuits in the brain. Yet there is no clear evidence that OT given peripherally can cross the blood-brain-barrier at levels sufficient to engage the OT receptor. To address this issue we examined changes in blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD signal intensity in response to peripheral OT injections (0.1, 0.5 or 2.5 mg/kg during functional magnetic resonance (fMRI in awake rats imaged at 7.0 tesla. These data were compared to OT (1ug/5 µl given directly to the brain via the lateral cerebroventricle. Using a 3D annotated MRI atlas of the rat brain segmented into 171 brain areas and computational analysis we reconstructed the distributed integrated neural circuits identified with BOLD fMRI following central and peripheral OT. Both routes of administration caused significant changes in BOLD signal within the first 10 min of administration. As expected, central OT activated a majority of brain areas known to express a high density of OT receptors e.g., lateral septum, subiculum, shell of the accumbens, bed nucleus of the stria terminalis. This profile of activation was not matched by peripheral OT. The change in BOLD signal to peripheral OT did not show any discernible dose-response. Interestingly, peripheral OT affected all subdivisions of the olfactory bulb, in addition to the cerebellum and several brainstem areas relevant to the autonomic nervous system, including the solitary tract nucleus. The results from this imaging study do not support a direct central action of peripheral OT on the brain. Instead, the patterns of brain activity suggest that peripheral OT may interact at the level of the olfactory bulb and through sensory afferents from the autonomic nervous system to influence brain activity.

  15. Vincristine delays gastric emptying and gastrointestinal transit of liquid in awake rats

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    A.A. Peixoto Júnior

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available We evaluated the effects of vincristine on the gastrointestinal (GI motility of awake rats and correlated them with the course of vincristine-induced peripheral neuropathy. Vincristine or saline was injected into the tail vein of male Wistar rats (180-250 g on alternate days: 50 µg/kg (5 doses, N = 10, 100 µg/kg (2, 3, 4 and 5 doses, N = 49 or 150 µg/kg (1, 2, or 5 doses, N = 37. Weight and stool output were measured daily for each animal. One day after completing the vincristine treatment, the animals were fasted for 24 h, gavage-fed with a test meal and sacrificed 10 min later to measure gastric emptying (GE, GI transit and colon weight. Sensory peripheral neuropathy was evaluated by hot plate testing. Chronic vincristine treatments with total cumulative doses of at least 250 µg/kg significantly decreased GE by 31-59% and GI transit by 55-93%. The effect of 5 doses of vincristine (150 µg/kg on GE did not persist for more than 1 week. Colon weight increased after 2 and 5 doses of vincristine (150 µg/kg. Fecal output decreased up to 48 h after the fifth dose of vincristine (150 µg/kg. Vincristine decreased the heat pain threshold 1 day after 5 doses of 50-100 µg/kg or after 3-5 doses of 150 µg/kg. This effect lasted for at least 2 weeks after the fifth dose. Chronic intravenous vincristine treatment delayed GE and GI transit of liquid. This effect correlated with the peak increase in colon weight but not with the pain threshold changes.

  16. Neuropeptides in the posterodorsal medial amygdala modulate central cardiovascular reflex responses in awake male rats

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    Quagliotto, E. [Departamento de Ciências Básicas da Saúde/Fisiologia, Universidade Federal de Ciências da Saúde de Porto Alegre, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Programa de Pós-Graduação em Neurociências, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Casali, K.R. [Instituto de Ciência e Tecnologia, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, São José dos Campos, SP (Brazil); Dal Lago, P. [Departamento de Fisioterapia, Universidade Federal de Ciências da Saúde de Porto Alegre, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Rasia-Filho, A.A. [Departamento de Ciências Básicas da Saúde/Fisiologia, Universidade Federal de Ciências da Saúde de Porto Alegre, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Programa de Pós-Graduação em Neurociências, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil)

    2014-11-21

    The rat posterodorsal medial amygdala (MePD) links emotionally charged sensory stimuli to social behavior, and is part of the supramedullary control of the cardiovascular system. We studied the effects of microinjections of neuroactive peptides markedly found in the MePD, namely oxytocin (OT, 10 ng and 25 pg; n=6/group), somatostatin (SST, 1 and 0.05 μM; n=8 and 5, respectively), and angiotensin II (Ang II, 50 pmol and 50 fmol; n=7/group), on basal cardiovascular activity and on baroreflex- and chemoreflex-mediated responses in awake adult male rats. Power spectral and symbolic analyses were applied to pulse interval and systolic arterial pressure series to identify centrally mediated sympathetic/parasympathetic components in the heart rate variability (HRV) and arterial pressure variability (APV). No microinjected substance affected basal parameters. On the other hand, compared with the control data (saline, 0.3 µL; n=7), OT (10 ng) decreased mean AP (MAP{sub 50}) after baroreflex stimulation and increased both the mean AP response after chemoreflex activation and the high-frequency component of the HRV. OT (25 pg) increased overall HRV but did not affect any parameter of the symbolic analysis. SST (1 μM) decreased MAP{sub 50}, and SST (0.05 μM) enhanced the sympathovagal cardiac index. Both doses of SST increased HRV and its low-frequency component. Ang II (50 pmol) increased HRV and reduced the two unlike variations pattern of the symbolic analysis (P<0.05 in all cases). These results demonstrate neuropeptidergic actions in the MePD for both the increase in the range of the cardiovascular reflex responses and the involvement of the central sympathetic and parasympathetic systems on HRV and APV.

  17. Acute blood volume expansion delays the gastrointestinal transit of a charcoal meal in awake rats

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    de-Oliveira G.R.

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study evaluates the effect of blood volume expansion on the gastrointestinal transit of a charchoal meal (2.5 ml of an aqueous suspension consisting of 5% charcoal and 5% gum arabic in awake male Wistar rats (200-270 g. On the day before the experiments, the rats were anesthetized with ether, submitted to left jugular vein cannulation and fasted with water ad libitum until 2 h before the gastrointestinal transit measurement. Blood volume expansion by iv infusion of 1 ml/min Ringer bicarbonate in volumes of 3, 4 or 5% body weight delayed gastrointestinal transit at 10 min after test meal administration by 21.3-26.7% (P<0.05, but no effect was observed after 1 or 2% body weight expansion. The effect of blood volume expansion (up to 5% body weight on gastrointestinal transit lasted for at least 60 min (P<0.05. Mean arterial pressure increased transiently and central venous pressure increased and hematocrit decreased (P<0.05. Subdiaphragmatic vagotomy and yohimbine (3 mg/kg prevented the delay caused by expansion on gastrointestinal transit, while atropine (0.5 mg/kg, L-NAME (2 mg/kg, hexamethonium (10 mg/kg, prazosin (1 mg/kg or propranolol (2 mg/kg were ineffective. These data show that blood volume expansion delays the gastrointestinal transit of a charcoal meal and that vagal and yohimbine-sensitive pathways appear to be involved in this phenomenon. The delay in gastrointestinal transit observed here, taken together with the modifications of gastrointestinal permeability to salt and water reported by others, may be part of the mechanisms involved in liquid excess management.

  18. Neuropeptides in the posterodorsal medial amygdala modulate central cardiovascular reflex responses in awake male rats

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    Quagliotto, E.; Casali, K.R.; Dal Lago, P.; Rasia-Filho, A.A.

    2014-01-01

    The rat posterodorsal medial amygdala (MePD) links emotionally charged sensory stimuli to social behavior, and is part of the supramedullary control of the cardiovascular system. We studied the effects of microinjections of neuroactive peptides markedly found in the MePD, namely oxytocin (OT, 10 ng and 25 pg; n=6/group), somatostatin (SST, 1 and 0.05 μM; n=8 and 5, respectively), and angiotensin II (Ang II, 50 pmol and 50 fmol; n=7/group), on basal cardiovascular activity and on baroreflex- and chemoreflex-mediated responses in awake adult male rats. Power spectral and symbolic analyses were applied to pulse interval and systolic arterial pressure series to identify centrally mediated sympathetic/parasympathetic components in the heart rate variability (HRV) and arterial pressure variability (APV). No microinjected substance affected basal parameters. On the other hand, compared with the control data (saline, 0.3 µL; n=7), OT (10 ng) decreased mean AP (MAP 50 ) after baroreflex stimulation and increased both the mean AP response after chemoreflex activation and the high-frequency component of the HRV. OT (25 pg) increased overall HRV but did not affect any parameter of the symbolic analysis. SST (1 μM) decreased MAP 50 , and SST (0.05 μM) enhanced the sympathovagal cardiac index. Both doses of SST increased HRV and its low-frequency component. Ang II (50 pmol) increased HRV and reduced the two unlike variations pattern of the symbolic analysis (P<0.05 in all cases). These results demonstrate neuropeptidergic actions in the MePD for both the increase in the range of the cardiovascular reflex responses and the involvement of the central sympathetic and parasympathetic systems on HRV and APV

  19. Brain processing of biologically relevant odors in the awake rat, as revealed by manganese-enhanced MRI.

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    Benoist Lehallier

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: So far, an overall view of olfactory structures activated by natural biologically relevant odors in the awake rat is not available. Manganese-enhanced MRI (MEMRI is appropriate for this purpose. While MEMRI has been used for anatomical labeling of olfactory pathways, functional imaging analyses have not yet been performed beyond the olfactory bulb. Here, we have used MEMRI for functional imaging of rat central olfactory structures and for comparing activation maps obtained with odors conveying different biological messages. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Odors of male fox feces and of chocolate flavored cereals were used to stimulate conscious rats previously treated by intranasal instillation of manganese (Mn. MEMRI activation maps showed Mn enhancement all along the primary olfactory cortex. Mn enhancement elicited by male fox feces odor and to a lesser extent that elicited by chocolate odor, differed from that elicited by deodorized air. This result was partly confirmed by c-Fos immunohistochemistry in the piriform cortex. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: By providing an overall image of brain structures activated in awake rats by odorous stimulation, and by showing that Mn enhancement is differently sensitive to different stimulating odors, the present results demonstrate the interest of MEMRI for functional studies of olfaction in the primary olfactory cortex of laboratory small animals, under conditions close to natural perception. Finally, the factors that may cause the variability of the MEMRI signal in response to different odor are discussed.

  20. Brain processing of biologically relevant odors in the awake rat, as revealed by manganese-enhanced MRI.

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    Lehallier, Benoist; Rampin, Olivier; Saint-Albin, Audrey; Jérôme, Nathalie; Ouali, Christian; Maurin, Yves; Bonny, Jean-Marie

    2012-01-01

    So far, an overall view of olfactory structures activated by natural biologically relevant odors in the awake rat is not available. Manganese-enhanced MRI (MEMRI) is appropriate for this purpose. While MEMRI has been used for anatomical labeling of olfactory pathways, functional imaging analyses have not yet been performed beyond the olfactory bulb. Here, we have used MEMRI for functional imaging of rat central olfactory structures and for comparing activation maps obtained with odors conveying different biological messages. Odors of male fox feces and of chocolate flavored cereals were used to stimulate conscious rats previously treated by intranasal instillation of manganese (Mn). MEMRI activation maps showed Mn enhancement all along the primary olfactory cortex. Mn enhancement elicited by male fox feces odor and to a lesser extent that elicited by chocolate odor, differed from that elicited by deodorized air. This result was partly confirmed by c-Fos immunohistochemistry in the piriform cortex. By providing an overall image of brain structures activated in awake rats by odorous stimulation, and by showing that Mn enhancement is differently sensitive to different stimulating odors, the present results demonstrate the interest of MEMRI for functional studies of olfaction in the primary olfactory cortex of laboratory small animals, under conditions close to natural perception. Finally, the factors that may cause the variability of the MEMRI signal in response to different odor are discussed.

  1. Decreased gastric emptying and gastrointestinal and intestinal transits of liquid after complete spinal cord transection in awake rats

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    Gondim F. de-A.A.

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available We studied the effect of complete spinal cord transection (SCT on gastric emptying (GE and on gastrointestinal (GI and intestinal transits of liquid in awake rats using the phenol red method. Male Wistar rats (N = 65 weighing 180-200 g were fasted for 24 h and complete SCT was performed between C7 and T1 vertebrae after a careful midline dorsal incision. GE and GI and intestinal transits were measured 15 min, 6 h or 24 h after recovery from anesthesia. A test meal (0.5 mg/ml phenol red in 5% glucose solution was administered intragastrically (1.5 ml and the animals were sacrificed by an iv thiopental overdose 10 min later to evaluate GE and GI transit. For intestinal transit measurements, 1 ml of the test meal was administered into the proximal duodenum through a cannula inserted into a gastric fistula. GE was inhibited (P<0.05 by 34.3, 23.4 and 22.7%, respectively, at 15 min, 6 h and 24 h after SCT. GI transit was inhibited (P<0.05 by 42.5, 19.8 and 18.4%, respectively, at 15 min, 6 h and 24 h after SCT. Intestinal transit was also inhibited (P<0.05 by 48.8, 47.2 and 40.1%, respectively, at 15 min, 6 h and 24 h after SCT. Mean arterial pressure was significantly decreased (P<0.05 by 48.5, 46.8 and 41.5%, respectively, at 15 min, 6 h and 24 h after SCT. In summary, our report describes a decreased GE and GI and intestinal transits in awake rats within the first 24 h after high SCT.

  2. System-specific activity in response to Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol: a functional magnetic resonance imaging study in awake male rats.

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    Madularu, Dan; Yee, Jason R; Kulkarni, Praveen; Ferris, Craig F

    2017-12-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effects of two doses of Δ 9 -tetrahydrocannabinol (THC, cannabis' main psychoactive agent) and vehicle on blood-oxygen-level dependent (BOLD) activity in drug-naïve, awake rats, in an effort to obtain a THC-specific map of activation in clinically-relevant regions and systems. Intraperitoneal injections of low dose of THC resulted in increased positive and negative BOLD signals compared to vehicle and high dose in areas rich in cannabinoid receptor 1, as well as throughout the pain and hippocampal neural systems. These results offer unique maps of activity, or 'fingerprints', associated with systemic THC administration, allowing for further comparisons with either additional doses or compounds, or between THC administration modalities (i.e. systemic vs. ingested vs. inhaled), which ultimately adds to the translatability assessment of THC-induced BOLD between animal and human studies. © 2017 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Odor-taste convergence in the nucleus of the solitary tract of the awake freely licking rat.

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    Escanilla, Olga D; Victor, Jonathan D; Di Lorenzo, Patricia M

    2015-04-22

    Flavor is produced by the integration of taste, olfaction, texture, and temperature, currently thought to occur in the cortex. However, previous work has shown that brainstem taste-related nuclei also respond to multisensory inputs. Here, we test the hypothesis that taste and olfaction interact in the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS; the first neural relay in the central gustatory pathway) in awake, freely licking rats. Electrophysiological recordings of taste and taste + odor responses were conducted in an experimental chamber following surgical electrode implantation and recovery. Tastants (0.1 m NaCl, 0.1 m sucrose, 0.01 m citric acid, and 0.0001 m quinine) were delivered for five consecutive licks interspersed with five licks of artificial saliva rinse delivered on a VR5 schedule. Odorants were n-amyl acetate (banana), acetic acid (vinegar), octanoic acid (rancid), and phenylethyl alcohol (floral). For each cell, metric space analyses were used to quantify the information conveyed by spike count, by the rate envelope, and by individual spike timing. Results revealed diverse effects of odorants on taste-response magnitude and latency across cells. Importantly, NTS cells were more competent at discriminating taste + odor stimuli versus tastants presented alone for all taste qualities using both rate and temporal coding. The strong interaction of odorants and tastants at the NTS underscores its role as the initial node in the neural circuit that controls food identification and ingestion. Copyright © 2015 the authors 0270-6474/15/356284-14$15.00/0.

  4. Performance Enhancement of the RatCAP Awake Rate Brain PET System

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    Vaska, P.; Vaska, P.; Woody, C.; Schlyer, D.; Radeka, V.; O' Connor, P.; Park, S.-J.; Pratte, J.-F.; Junnarkar, M.; Purschke, S.; Southekal, S.; Stoll, S.; Schiffer, W.; Neill, J.; Wharton, D.; Myers, N.; Wiley, S.; Kandasamy, A.; Fried, J.; Krishnamoorthy, S. Kriplani, A.; Maramraju, S.; Lecomte, R.; Fontaine, R.

    2011-03-01

    The first full prototype of the RatCAP PET system, designed to image the brain of a rat while conscious, has been completed. Initial results demonstrated excellent spatial resolution, 1.8 mm FWHM with filtered backprojection and <1.5 mm FWHM with a Monte Carlo based MLEM method. However, noise equivalent countrate studies indicated the need for better timing to mitigate the effect of randoms. Thus, the front-end ASIC has been redesigned to minimize time walk, an accurate coincidence time alignment method has been implemented, and a variance reduction technique for the randoms is being developed. To maximize the quantitative capabilities required for neuroscience, corrections are being implemented and validated for positron range and photon noncollinearity, scatter (including outside the field of view), attenuation, randoms, and detector efficiency (deadtime is negligible). In addition, a more robust and compact PCI-based optical data acquisition system has been built to replace the original VME-based system while retaining the linux-based data processing and image reconstruction codes. Finally, a number of new animal imaging experiments have been carried out to demonstrate the performance of the RatCAP in real imaging situations, including an F-18 fluoride bone scan, a C-11 raclopride scan, and a dynamic C-11 methamphetamine scan.

  5. Processing of Intraoral Olfactory and Gustatory Signals in the Gustatory Cortex of Awake Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuelsen, Chad L; Fontanini, Alfredo

    2017-01-11

    The integration of gustatory and olfactory information is essential to the perception of flavor. Human neuroimaging experiments have pointed to the gustatory cortex (GC) as one of the areas involved in mediating flavor perception. Although GC's involvement in encoding the chemical identity and hedonic value of taste stimuli is well studied, it is unknown how single GC neurons process olfactory stimuli emanating from the mouth. In this study, we relied on multielectrode recordings to investigate how single GC neurons respond to intraorally delivered tastants and tasteless odorants dissolved in water and whether/how these two modalities converge in the same neurons. We found that GC neurons could either be unimodal, responding exclusively to taste (taste-only) or odor (odor-only), or bimodal, responding to both gustatory and olfactory stimuli. Odor responses were confirmed to result from retronasal olfaction: monitoring respiration revealed that exhalation preceded odor-evoked activity and reversible inactivation of olfactory receptors in the nasal epithelium significantly reduced responses to intraoral odorants but not to tastants. Analysis of bimodal neurons revealed that they encode palatability significantly better than the unimodal taste-only group. Bimodal neurons exhibited similar responses to palatable tastants and odorants dissolved in water. This result suggested that odorized water could be palatable. This interpretation was further supported with a brief access task, where rats avoided consuming aversive taste stimuli and consumed the palatable tastants and dissolved odorants. These results demonstrate the convergence of the chemosensory components of flavor onto single GC neurons and provide evidence for the integration of flavor with palatability coding. Food perception and choice depend upon the concurrent processing of olfactory and gustatory signals from the mouth. The primary gustatory cortex has been proposed to integrate chemosensory stimuli

  6. A novel, simple and inexpensive procedure for the simultaneous determination of iopamidol and p-aminohippuric acid for renal function assessment from plasma samples in awake rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Romero, Violeta; González-Villalva, Karla I; Reyes, José L; Franco-Bourland, Rebecca E; Guízar-Sahagún, Gabriel; Castañeda-Hernández, Gilberto; Cruz-Antonio, Leticia

    2015-03-25

    The purpose of the current study was to design, validate and implement a novel analytical method for the simultaneous plasma measurement of iopamidol and p-aminohippuric acid (PAH) to estimate renal function in awake rats. A reverse-phase high performance liquid chromatographic (RP-HPLC) method for the simultaneous measurement of iopamidol (for glomerular filtration rate estimation, GFR) and PAH (for tubular secretion determination, TS) was designed and validated using a C-18 column, 0.1M acetic acid-10% acetonitrile (90:10, v/v) as mobile phase, at a flow rate of 0.3 ml/min, and UV detection at 270 nm. Iopamidol (244.8 mg/kg) was administered intravenously followed immediately by sodium PAH (100 mg/kg) to healthy female Sprague-Dawley rats. Plasma samples obtained at 2.5, 5, 10, 15, 20, 30, 45, 60, 90, and 120 min after drug administration were deproteinized with 2.5% trichloroacetic acid containing p-aminobenzoic acid as internal standard, and separated by the validated RP-HPLC method described above. The iopamidol and PAH chromatographic data were analyzed using a non-compartmental model. The results demonstrated that the RP-HPLC method was linear in ranges between 15-120 μg/ml and 2.5-120 μg/ml for iopamidol and PAH, respectively. Precision and accuracy were within 15% for both drugs. Recovery of iopamidol and PAH was 92% and 100%, respectively. Plasma iopamidol and PAH clearances in awake rats, estimates for GFR and TS, respectively, were 1.49±0.20 ml/min and 3.73±0.38 ml/min. In conclusion, the method here described is a simple and reliable procedure, for the simultaneous and time-saving determination of GFR and TS from plasma samples in the conscious rat. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. No evidence of a role for neuronal nitric oxide synthase in the nucleus tractus solitarius in ventilatory responses to acute or chronic hypoxia in awake rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pamenter, Matthew E.; Go, Ariel; Fu, Zhenxing

    2015-01-01

    When exposed to a hypoxic environment, the body's first response is a reflex increase in ventilation, termed the hypoxic ventilatory response (HVR). With chronic sustained hypoxia (CSH), such as during acclimatization to high altitude, an additional time-dependent increase in ventilation occurs, which increases the HVR and is termed ventilatory acclimatization to hypoxia (VAH). This secondary increase persists after exposure to CSH and involves plasticity within the circuits in the central nervous system that control breathing. The mechanisms of HVR plasticity are currently poorly understood. We hypothesized that changes in neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) activity or expression in the nucleus tractus solitarius contribute to this plasticity and underlie VAH in rats. To test this, we treated rats held in normoxia or 10% O2 (CSH, PiO2 = 70 Torr) for 7–9 days and measured ventilation in conscious, unrestrained animals before and after microinjecting the general NOS antagonist L-NG-Nitroarginine methyl ester into the nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS) or systemically injecting the nNOS-specific antagonist S-methyl-l-thiocitrulline. Localization of injection sites in the NTS was confirmed by histology following the experiment. We found that 1) neither NTS-specific nor systemic nNOS antagonism had any effect on hypoxia-mediated changes in breathing or metabolism (P > 0.05), but 2) nNOS protein expression was increased in the middle and caudal NTS by CSH. A persistent HVR after nNOS blockade in the NTS contrasts with results in awake mice, and our findings do not support the hypotheses that nNOS in the NTS contribute to the HVR or VAH in awake rats. PMID:25571988

  8. Comparative potency of sensory-induced brainstem activation to trigger spreading depression and seizures in the cortex of awake rats: Implications for the pathophysiology of migraine aura.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinogradova, Lyudmila V

    2015-10-01

    Migraine and epilepsy are highly co-morbid neurological disorders associated with episodic dysfunction of both cortical and subcortical networks. The study examined the interrelation between cortical spreading depression, the electrophysiological correlate of migraine aura and seizures triggered at cortical and brainstem levels by repeated sound stimulation in rats with acoustic hypersensitivity (reflex audiogenic epilepsy). In awake, freely moving rats with innate audiogenic epilepsy, 25 episodes of running seizure (brainstem seizures) were induced by repeated sound stimulation. Spreading depression and seizures were recorded using implanted cortical electrodes. The first sound-induced brainstem seizures evoked neither spreading depression nor seizures in the cortex. With repetition, brainstem seizures began to be followed by a single cortical spreading depression wave and an epileptiform discharge. Spreading depression was more frequent an early cortical event than seizures: spreading depression appeared after 8.4 ± 1.0 repeated stimulations in 100% rats (n = 24) while cortical seizures were recorded after 12.9 ± 1.2 tests in 46% rats. Brainstem seizure triggered unilateral long-latency spreading depression. Bilateral short-latency cortical spreading depression was recorded only after intense cortical seizures. These data show that episodic brainstem activation is a potent trigger of unilateral cortical spreading depression. Development of intense seizures in the cortex leads to initiation of spreading depression in multiple cortical sites of both hemispheres. © International Headache Society 2014.

  9. Analysis of clinical outcomes of linear vs. deep stop decompression from 3.5 to 6 atmospheres absolute (350 - 600 kpa) in awake rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cronjé, Frans J; Meintjes, W A Jack; Bennett, Peter B

    2011-01-01

    Recreational divers are introducing "deep stops" at half the depth (HD-DS) to reduce the risk of spinal DCS with only Doppler evidence to support it. Therefore this research was designed to show the effect of an HD-DS on spinal DCS manifestations by evaluating whether: (1) air diving-induced spinal...... DCS could be produced in awake, freely moving rats at 3.5-6.0 atm abs (350-600 kPa); and (2) whether the introduction of an HD-DS reduced spinal DCS in such a model. Fifty-one female, Wistar rats (221 to 450 g) underwent one-hour compression at 350 to 600 kPa with seven minutes of decompression with....../without a five-minute DS (HD-DS / No-DS). Animals were observed for three hours. Outcomes were classified as: (1) asymptomatic; (2) breathing difficulties; (3) paralysis/weakness; (4) immobility; or (5) death. Eight animals, exposed to 385 kPa air breathing for 60 minutes followed by a three-staged decompression...

  10. Intracerebroventricular Administration of Amyloid β-protein Oligomers Selectively Increases Dorsal Hippocampal Dialysate Glutamate Levels in the Awake Rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean D. O’Shea

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Extensive evidence supports an important role for soluble oligomers of the amyloid β-protein (Aβ in Alzheimer’s Disease pathogenesis. In the present study we combined intracerebroventricular (icv injections with brain microdialysis technology in the fully conscious rat to assess the effects of icv administered SDS-stable low-n Aβ oligomers (principally dimers and trimers on excitatory and inhibitory amino acid transmission in the ipsilateral dorsal hippocampus. Microdialysis was employed to assess the effect of icv administration of Aβ monomers and Aβ oligomers on dialysate glutamate, aspartate and GABA levels in the dorsal hippocampus. Administration of Aβ oligomers was associated with a +183% increase (p<0.0001 vs. Aβ monomer-injected control in dorsal hippocampal glutamate levels which was still increasing at the end of the experiment (260 min, whereas aspartate and GABA levels were unaffected throughout. These findings demonstrate that icv administration and microdialysis technology can be successfully combined in the awake rat and suggests that altered dorsal hippocampal glutamate transmission may be a useful target for pharmacological intervention in Alzheimer’s Disease.

  11. Integrated wireless fast-scan cyclic voltammetry recording and electrical stimulation for reward-predictive learning in awake, freely moving rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yu-Ting; Wickens, Jeffery R.; Huang, Yi-Ling; Pan, Wynn H. T.; Chen, Fu-Yu Beverly; Chen, Jia-Jin Jason

    2013-08-01

    Objective. Fast-scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV) is commonly used to monitor phasic dopamine release, which is usually performed using tethered recording and for limited types of animal behavior. It is necessary to design a wireless dopamine sensing system for animal behavior experiments. Approach. This study integrates a wireless FSCV system for monitoring the dopamine signal in the ventral striatum with an electrical stimulator that induces biphasic current to excite dopaminergic neurons in awake freely moving rats. The measured dopamine signals are unidirectionally transmitted from the wireless FSCV module to the host unit. To reduce electrical artifacts, an optocoupler and a separate power are applied to isolate the FSCV system and electrical stimulator, which can be activated by an infrared controller. Main results. In the validation test, the wireless backpack system has similar performance in comparison with a conventional wired system and it does not significantly affect the locomotor activity of the rat. In the cocaine administration test, the maximum electrically elicited dopamine signals increased to around 230% of the initial value 20 min after the injection of 10 mg kg-1 cocaine. In a classical conditioning test, the dopamine signal in response to a cue increased to around 60 nM over 50 successive trials while the electrically evoked dopamine concentration decreased from about 90 to 50 nM in the maintenance phase. In contrast, the cue-evoked dopamine concentration progressively decreased and the electrically evoked dopamine was eliminated during the extinction phase. In the histological evaluation, there was little damage to brain tissue after five months chronic implantation of the stimulating electrode. Significance. We have developed an integrated wireless voltammetry system for measuring dopamine concentration and providing electrical stimulation. The developed wireless FSCV system is proven to be a useful experimental tool for the continuous

  12. A novel vibrotactile system for stimulating the glabrous skin of awake freely behaving rats during operant conditioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devecioğlu, İsmail; Güçlü, Burak

    2015-03-15

    Rat skin is innervated by mechanoreceptive fibers similar to those in other mammals. Tactile experiments with behaving rats mostly focus on the vibrissal system which does not exist in humans. The aim of this study was to design and implement a novel vibrotactile system to stimulate the glabrous skin of behaving rats during operant conditioning. A computer-controlled vibrotactile system was developed for various tasks in which the volar surface of unrestrained rats' fore- and hindpaws was stimulated in an operant chamber. The operant chamber was built from off-the-shelf components. A highly accurate electrodynamic shaker with a novel multi-probe design was used for generating mechanical displacements. Twenty-five rats were trained for four sequential tasks: (A) middle-lever (trial start signal) press, (B) side-lever press with an associated visual cue, (C) similar to (B) with the addition of an auditory/tactile stimulus, (D) auditory/tactile detection (yes/no) task. Out of 9 rats which could complete the tactile version of this training schedule, 5 had over 70% accuracy in the tactile version of the detection task. Unlike actuators for stimulating whiskers, this system does not require a particular head/body alignment and can be used with freely behaving animals. The vibrotactile system was found to be effective for conditioning freely behaving rats based on stimuli applied on the glabrous skin. However, detection accuracies were lower compared to those in tasks involving whisker stimulation reported previously, probably due to differences in cortical processing. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Supradural inflammatory soup in awake and freely moving rats induces facial allodynia that is blocked by putative immune modulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieseler, Julie; Ellis, Amanda; McFadden, Andrew; Stone, Kendra; Brown, Kimberley; Cady, Sara; Bastos, Leandro F; Sprunger, David; Rezvani, Niloofar; Johnson, Kirk; Rice, Kenner C; Maier, Steven F; Watkins, Linda R

    2017-06-01

    Facial allodynia is a migraine symptom that is generally considered to represent a pivotal point in migraine progression. Treatment before development of facial allodynia tends to be more successful than treatment afterwards. As such, understanding the underlying mechanisms of facial allodynia may lead to a better understanding of the mechanisms underlying migraine. Migraine facial allodynia is modeled by applying inflammatory soup (histamine, bradykinin, serotonin, prostaglandin E2) over the dura. Whether glial and/or immune activation contributes to such pain is unknown. Here we tested if trigeminal nucleus caudalis (Sp5C) glial and/or immune cells are activated following supradural inflammatory soup, and if putative glial/immune inhibitors suppress the consequent facial allodynia. Inflammatory soup was administered via bilateral indwelling supradural catheters in freely moving rats, inducing robust and reliable facial allodynia. Gene expression for microglial/macrophage activation markers, interleukin-1β, and tumor necrosis factor-α increased following inflammatory soup along with robust expression of facial allodynia. This provided the basis for pursuing studies of the behavioral effects of 3 diverse immunomodulatory drugs on facial allodynia. Pretreatment with either of two compounds broadly used as putative glial/immune inhibitors (minocycline, ibudilast) prevented the development of facial allodynia, as did treatment after supradural inflammatory soup but prior to the expression of facial allodynia. Lastly, the toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) antagonist (+)-naltrexone likewise blocked development of facial allodynia after supradural inflammatory soup. Taken together, these exploratory data support that activated glia and/or immune cells may drive the development of facial allodynia in response to supradural inflammatory soup in unanesthetized male rats. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. The effect of an acute nicotine infusion on the local cerebral glucose utilization of the awake rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grünwald, F; Schröck, H; Kuschinsky, W

    1988-01-01

    The effect of acute infusion of nicotine on local cerebral glucose utilization (LCGU) was studied in discrete regions of the central nervous system of the rat by means of the quantitative autoradiographic (14C)2-deoxy-D-glucose method described by Sokoloff et al. Nicotine was administered in three dosages: 0.5 microgram/kg/min, 1.58 micrograms/kg/min, and 5 micrograms/kg/min. The resulting plasma concentrations of nicotine were 10/39/114 ng/ml plasma. During the experiment blood pressure, heart rate, body temperature, hematocrit, acid-base status, and plasma glucose concentration showed no or minor changes. Nicotine significantly increased LCGU in a dose-dependent manner in the following 9 of 45 examined structures: substantia nigra (compact part), superior colliculus (superficial grey layer), interpeduncular nucleus and cingulate cortex (P less than 0.01); lateral geniculate body, optic chiasm, anteroventral and anteromedial nucleus of thalamus and mamillary body (P less than 0.05). For most of these structures with increased LCGU, other investigators have reported a high regional receptor binding of nicotine (exception: mamillary body and optic chiasm). It is concluded that nicotine has distinct effects on the functional activity of localized brain areas.

  15. Awake Craniotomy and Coaching

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruis, Carla; Huenges Wajer, Irene; Robe, Pierre; van Zandvoort, Martine

    2014-01-01

    Background: The importance of monitoring cognition during awake craniotomy has been well described in previous studies. The relevance of being coached during such a procedure has received less attention and questions still remain unanswered about what factors are the most important herein.

  16. An array of highly flexible electrodes with a tailored configuration locked by gelatin during implantation – initial evaluation in cortex cerebri of awake rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johan eAgorelius

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available A major challenge in the field of neural interfaces is to overcome the problem of poor stability of neuronal recordings, which impedes long-term studies of individual neurons in the brain. Conceivably, unstable recordings reflect relative movements between electrode and tissue. To address this challenge, we have developed a new ultra-flexible electrode array and evaluated its performance in awake non-restrained animals.MethodsAn array of eight separated gold leads (4 x10 μm, individually flexible in 3D, were cut from a gold sheet using laser milling and insulated with Parylene C. To provide structural support during implantation into rat cortex, the electrode array was embedded in a hard gelatin based material, which dissolves after implantation. Recordings were made during 3 weeks. At termination, the animals were perfused with fixative and frozen to prevent dislocation of the implanted electrodes. A thick slice of brain tissue, with the electrode array still in situ, was made transparent using methyl salicylate to evaluate the conformation of the implanted electrode array.ResultsMedian noise levels and signal/noise remained relatively stable during the 3 week observation period; 4.3 μV to 5.9 μV and 2.8 to 4.2, respectively. The spike amplitudes were often quite stable within recording sessions and for 15% of recordings where single-units were identified, the highest-SNR unit had an amplitude higher than 150 V. In addition, high correlations (>0.96 between unit waveforms recorded at different time points were obtained for 58% of the electrode sites. The structure of the electrode array was well preserved 3 weeks after implantation.Conclusions A new implantable multichannel neural interface, comprising electrodes individually flexible in 3D that retain its architecture and functionality after implantation has been developed. Since the new neural interface design is adaptable, it offers a versatile tool to explore the function of various

  17. Awake craniotomy for tumor resection

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammadali Attari; Sohrab Salimi

    2013-01-01

    Surgical treatment of brain tumors, especially those located in the eloquent areas such as anterior temporal, frontal lobes, language, memory areas, and near the motor cortex causes high risk of eloquent impairment. Awake craniotomy displays major rule for maximum resection of the tumor with minimum functional impairment of the Central Nervous System. These case reports discuss the use of awake craniotomy during the brain surgery in Alzahra Hospital, Isfahan, Iran. A 56-year-old woman with le...

  18. Awake craniotomy for tumor resection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammadali Attari

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Surgical treatment of brain tumors, especially those located in the eloquent areas such as anterior temporal, frontal lobes, language, memory areas, and near the motor cortex causes high risk of eloquent impairment. Awake craniotomy displays major rule for maximum resection of the tumor with minimum functional impairment of the Central Nervous System. These case reports discuss the use of awake craniotomy during the brain surgery in Alzahra Hospital, Isfahan, Iran. A 56-year-old woman with left-sided body hypoesthesia since last 3 months and a 25-year-old with severe headache of 1 month duration were operated under craniotomy for brain tumors resection. An awake craniotomy was planned to allow maximum tumor intraoperative testing for resection and neurologic morbidity avoidance. The method of anesthesia should offer sufficient analgesia, hemodynamic stability, sedation, respiratory function, and also awake and cooperative patient for different neurological test. Airway management is the most important part of anesthesia during awake craniotomy. Tumor surgery with awake craniotomy is a safe technique that allows maximal resection of lesions in close relationship to eloquent cortex and has a low risk of neurological deficit.

  19. Breathing patterns of awake rats exposed to acrolein and perfluorisobutylene determined with an integrated system of nose-only exposure and online analyzed multiple monitoring of breathing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergers, W.W.A.; Beyersbergen Van Henegouwen, A.G.; Hammer, A.H.; Bruijnzeel, P.L.B.

    1996-01-01

    Studies on changes in breathing patterns of rats due to exposure to acrolein and the Leflon pyrolysis product perfluorisobutylene (PFIB) were performed to evaluate a new developed integrated system of nose- only exposure and multiple monitoring of breathing of up to eight rats. Measurements of

  20. Hippocampal-Prefrontal Reactivation during Learning Is Stronger in Awake Compared with Sleep States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Wenbo; Shin, Justin D; Frank, Loren M; Jadhav, Shantanu P

    2017-12-06

    Hippocampal sharp-wave ripple (SWR) events occur during both behavior (awake SWRs) and slow-wave sleep (sleep SWRs). Awake and sleep SWRs both contribute to spatial learning and memory, thought to be mediated by the coordinated reactivation of behavioral experiences in hippocampal-cortical circuits seen during SWRs. Current hypotheses suggest that reactivation contributes to memory consolidation processes, but whether awake and sleep reactivation are suited to play similar or different roles remains unclear. Here we addressed that issue by examining the structure of hippocampal (area CA1) and prefrontal (PFC) activity recorded across behavior and sleep stages in male rats learning a spatial alternation task. We found a striking state difference: prefrontal modulation during awake and sleep SWRs was surprisingly distinct, with differing patterns of excitation and inhibition. CA1-PFC synchronization was stronger during awake SWRs, and spatial reactivation, measured using both pairwise and ensemble measures, was more structured for awake SWRs compared with post-task sleep SWRs. Stronger awake reactivation was observed despite the absence of coordination between network oscillations, namely hippocampal SWRs and cortical delta and spindle oscillations, which is prevalent during sleep. Finally, awake CA1-PFC reactivation was enhanced most prominently during initial learning in a novel environment, suggesting a key role in early learning. Our results demonstrate significant differences in awake and sleep reactivation in the hippocampal-prefrontal network. These findings suggest that awake SWRs support accurate memory storage and memory-guided behavior, whereas sleep SWR reactivation is better suited to support integration of memories across experiences during consolidation. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Hippocampal sharp-wave ripples (SWRs) occur both in the awake state during behavior and in the sleep state after behavior. Awake and sleep SWRs are associated with memory

  1. Serotonin mediates rapid changes of striatal glucose and lactate metabolism after systemic 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, "Ecstasy") administration in awake rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gramsbergen, Jan Bert; Cumming, Paul

    2007-01-01

    metabolism in freely moving rats using rapid sampling microdialysis (every minute) coupled to flow-injection analysis (FIA) with biosensors for glucose and lactate. Blood samples for analysis of glucose and lactate were taken at 30-45 min intervals before and after drug dosing and body temperature...

  2. Spatiotemporal Changes of Neuronal Responses in the Primary Somatosensory Cortex to Noxious Tail Stimulation in Awake and Pentobarbital-Anesthetized Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Chung-Chih; Lee, Jye-Chang; Chiou, Ruei-Jen; Tsai, Meng-Li; Yen, Chen-Tung

    2015-10-31

    Primary somatosensory cortex (SI) is a key area in the processing of nociceptor inputs to our consciousness. To clarify the columnar and laminar organization of SI for pain processing, we compared spatiotemporal changes in neuronal activities of the primary sensorimotor cortex (SmI) of the rat in response to noxious laser heat stimulation applied to the mid-tail. Longitudinal and vertical array microelectrodes were chronically implanted in the cerebral cortex. Evoked neuronal activities, including intracortical local field potentials (LFP) and ensemble single-unit activity (SU) around SmI were simultaneously recorded. The effect of pentobarbital on the neuronal responses was evaluated in comparison with the neuronal responses in conscious animals to explore the potential substrate of nociceptive processing in the conscious state. The results from the experiment with longitudinal microelectrode arrays indicated that noxious stimulation induced a neuronal response which was spread widely around the SmI of the conscious rat, and the range of neuronal responses was limited to the tail region of the SmI under anesthesia. The results from the experiment with vertical microelectrode arrays showed the universal neuronal responses through all cortical layers of the SmI in conscious rats, and sodium pentobarbital suppressed these neuronal responses in the supragranular layers significantly relative to the deeper layers and basal activity. These results imply that a wider range of cortical activation, both in the horizontal or vertical dimension, might be important for nociceptive processing in the conscious state.

  3. Surgeon-patient communication during awake procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Claire S; Guyton, Kristina; Pariser, Joseph J; Siegler, Mark; Schindler, Nancy; Langerman, Alexander

    2017-06-01

    Surgeons are increasingly performing procedures on awake patients. Communication during such procedures is complex and underexplored in the literature. Surgeons were recruited from the faculty of 2 hospitals to participate in an interview regarding their approaches to communication during awake procedures. Three researchers used the constant comparative method to transcribe, code, and review interviews until saturation was reached. Twenty-three surgeons described the advantages and disadvantages of awake procedures, their communication with the awake patient, their interactions with staff and with trainees, the environment of awake procedures, and how communication in this context is taught and learned. Surgeons recognized communication during awake procedures as important and reported varied strategies for ensuring patient comfort in this context. However, they also acknowledged challenges with multiparty communication during awake procedures, especially in balancing commitments to teaching with their duty to comfort the patient. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. How I do it: Awake craniotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Ciaran Scott; Severgnini, Flavio; McKintosh, Edward

    2017-01-01

    Awake craniotomy allows continuous assessment of a patient's clinical and neurological status during open brain surgery. This facilitates early detection of interference with eloquent cortex, and hence can allow a surgeon to maximize resection margins without compromising neurological function. Awake craniotomy requires an effective scalp blockade, intraoperative assessment, and a carefully co-ordinated theatre team. A variety of clinical and electrophysiological techniques can be used to assess cortical function. Effective scalp blockade and awake craniotomy provides the opportunity to intraoperatively assess cortical function in the awake patient, thus providing an important neurosurgical option for lesions near eloquent cortex.

  5. Awake fiberoptic or awake video laryngoscopic tracheal intubation in patients with anticipated difficult airway management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenstock, Charlotte Vallentin; Thøgersen, Bente; Afshari, Arash

    2012-01-01

    Awake flexible fiberoptic intubation (FFI) is the gold standard for management of anticipated difficult tracheal intubation. The purpose of this study was to compare awake FFI to awake McGrath® video laryngoscope, (MVL), (Aircraft Medical, Edinburgh, Scotland, United Kingdom) intubation in patients...

  6. The asleep-awake technique using propofol-remifentanil anaesthesia for awake craniotomy for cerebral tumours

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Karsten Skovgaard

    2008-01-01

    Background and objective: We retrospectively reviewed the first 25 planned cases of awake craniotomies using the 'asleep-awake' technique, an alternative to the often-used 'asleep-awake-asleep' technique. Methods: The patients were anaesthetized using propofol/remifentanil anaesthesia, a laryngeal...

  7. Awake craniotomy: improving the patient's experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potters, Jan-Willem; Klimek, Markus

    2015-10-01

    Awake craniotomy patients are exposed to various stressful stimuli while their attention and vigilance is important for the success of the surgery. We describe several recent findings on the perception of awake craniotomy patients and address nonpharmacological perioperative factors that enhance the experience of awake craniotomy patients. These factors could also be applicable to other surgical patients. Proper preoperative counseling gives higher patient satisfaction and should be individually tailored to the patient. Furthermore, there is a substantial proportion of patients who have significant pain or fear during an awake craniotomy procedure. There is a possibility that this could induce post-traumatic stress disorder or related symptoms. Preoperative preparation is of utmost importance in awake craniotomy patients, and a solid doctor-patient relationship is an important condition. Nonpharmacological intraoperative management should focus on reduction of fear and pain by adaptation of the environment and careful and well considered communication.

  8. Anaesthetic management for awake craniotomy in brain glioma ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The awake brain surgery is an innovative approach in the treatment of tumors in the functional areas of the brain. There are various anesthetic techniques for awake craniotomy (AC), including asleep-awake-asleep technique, monitored anesthesia care, and the recent introduced awakeawake- awake method. We describe ...

  9. The clinical management of awake bruxism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Ronald E; Auclair Clark, Wendy

    2017-06-01

    Awake bruxism is a common clinical condition that often goes undetected, often leading to pain or damaged teeth and restorations. The authors searched electronic databases regarding the treatment and effects of awake bruxism compared with those of sleep bruxism. The authors used the search terms diurnal bruxism and oral parafunction. The authors combined information from relevant literature with clinical experience to establish a recommended protocol for diagnosis and treatment. The authors found articles regarding the diagnosis and treatment of bruxism. The authors combined information from the articles with a review of clinical cases to establish a treatment protocol for awake bruxism. Literature and clinical experience indicate a lack of patient awareness and, thus, underreporting of awake bruxism. As a result, myriad dental consequences can occur from bruxism. The authors propose a need for increased awareness, for both patients and professionals, particularly of the number of conditions related to awake bruxism. Clinicians should look for clinical signs and symptoms of awake bruxism and use minimally invasive treatment modalities. Copyright © 2017 American Dental Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. AWAKE starts the equipment installation phase

    CERN Multimedia

    Antonella Del Rosso

    2015-01-01

    AWAKE is the proof-of-principle experiment whose aim is to use protons to generate powerful wakefields to accelerate an electron beam. With accelerator gradients hundreds of times higher than those used in current systems, this technique could revolutionise the field of particle acceleration. Installed in the tunnel previously used by the CNGS facility, AWAKE is completing the service installation phase and will receive the plasma cell in the coming months.   The AWAKE proton line with all the magnets installed. (Image: AWAKE collaboration.) AWAKE is the world’s first proton-driven plasma wakefield acceleration experiment. In AWAKE, a beam of protons from the SPS will be travelling through a plasma cell and this will generate a wakefield that, in turn, will accelerate an electron beam. A laser will ionise the gas in the plasma cell and seed the self-modulation instability that will trigger the wakefield in the plasma. The project aims to prove that the plasma wakefield can be driv...

  11. High fat diet promotes achievement of peak bone mass in young rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malvi, Parmanand; Piprode, Vikrant; Chaube, Balkrishna; Pote, Satish T.; Mittal, Monika; Chattopadhyay, Naibedya; Wani, Mohan R.; Bhat, Manoj Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • High fat diet helps in achieving peak bone mass at younger age. • Shifting from high fat to normal diet normalizes obese parameters. • Bone parameters are sustained even after withdrawal of high fat diet. - Abstract: The relationship between obesity and bone is complex. Epidemiological studies demonstrate positive as well as negative correlation between obesity and bone health. In the present study, we investigated the impact of high fat diet-induced obesity on peak bone mass. After 9 months of feeding young rats with high fat diet, we observed obesity phenotype in rats with increased body weight, fat mass, serum triglycerides and cholesterol. There were significant increases in serum total alkaline phosphatase, bone mineral density and bone mineral content. By micro-computed tomography (μ-CT), we observed a trend of better trabecular bones with respect to their microarchitecture and geometry. This indicated that high fat diet helps in achieving peak bone mass and microstructure at younger age. We subsequently shifted rats from high fat diet to normal diet for 6 months and evaluated bone/obesity parameters. It was observed that after shifting rats from high fat diet to normal diet, fat mass, serum triglycerides and cholesterol were significantly decreased. Interestingly, the gain in bone mineral density, bone mineral content and trabecular bone parameters by HFD was retained even after body weight and obesity were normalized. These results suggest that fat rich diet during growth could accelerate achievement of peak bone mass that is sustainable even after withdrawal of high fat diet

  12. High fat diet promotes achievement of peak bone mass in young rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malvi, Parmanand; Piprode, Vikrant; Chaube, Balkrishna; Pote, Satish T. [National Centre for Cell Science, Savitribai Phule Pune University Campus, Ganeshkhind, Pune 411 007 (India); Mittal, Monika; Chattopadhyay, Naibedya [Division of Endocrinology and Center for Research in Anabolic Skeletal Targets in Health and Illness (ASTHI), CSIR-Central Drug Research Institute, Jankipuram Extension, Sitapur Road, Lucknow 226 031 (India); Wani, Mohan R. [National Centre for Cell Science, Savitribai Phule Pune University Campus, Ganeshkhind, Pune 411 007 (India); Bhat, Manoj Kumar, E-mail: manojkbhat@nccs.res.in [National Centre for Cell Science, Savitribai Phule Pune University Campus, Ganeshkhind, Pune 411 007 (India)

    2014-12-05

    Highlights: • High fat diet helps in achieving peak bone mass at younger age. • Shifting from high fat to normal diet normalizes obese parameters. • Bone parameters are sustained even after withdrawal of high fat diet. - Abstract: The relationship between obesity and bone is complex. Epidemiological studies demonstrate positive as well as negative correlation between obesity and bone health. In the present study, we investigated the impact of high fat diet-induced obesity on peak bone mass. After 9 months of feeding young rats with high fat diet, we observed obesity phenotype in rats with increased body weight, fat mass, serum triglycerides and cholesterol. There were significant increases in serum total alkaline phosphatase, bone mineral density and bone mineral content. By micro-computed tomography (μ-CT), we observed a trend of better trabecular bones with respect to their microarchitecture and geometry. This indicated that high fat diet helps in achieving peak bone mass and microstructure at younger age. We subsequently shifted rats from high fat diet to normal diet for 6 months and evaluated bone/obesity parameters. It was observed that after shifting rats from high fat diet to normal diet, fat mass, serum triglycerides and cholesterol were significantly decreased. Interestingly, the gain in bone mineral density, bone mineral content and trabecular bone parameters by HFD was retained even after body weight and obesity were normalized. These results suggest that fat rich diet during growth could accelerate achievement of peak bone mass that is sustainable even after withdrawal of high fat diet.

  13. Predicting sleepiness during an awake craniotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoi, Chihiro; Hiromitsu, Kentaro; Saito, Shoko; Yamada, Ryoji; Shinoura, Nobusada; Midorikawa, Akira

    2015-12-01

    An awake craniotomy is a safe neurological surgical technique that minimizes the risk of brain damage. During the course of this surgery, the patient is asked to perform motor or cognitive tasks, but some patients exhibit severe sleepiness. Thus, the present study investigated the predictive value of a patient's preoperative neuropsychological background in terms of sleepiness during an awake craniotomy. Thirty-seven patients with brain tumor who underwent awake craniotomy were included in this study. Prior to craniotomy, the patient evaluated cognitive status, and during the surgery, each patient's performance and attitude toward cognitive tasks were recorded by neuropsychologists. The present findings showed that the construction and calculation abilities of the patients were moderately correlated with their sleepiness. These results indicate that the preoperative cognitive functioning of patients was related to their sleepiness during the awake craniotomy procedure and that the patients who exhibited sleepiness during an awake craniotomy had previously experienced reduced functioning in the parietal lobe. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Evaluation of Language Function under Awake Craniotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanno, Aya; Mikuni, Nobuhiro

    2015-01-01

    Awake craniotomy is the only established way to assess patients' language functions intraoperatively and to contribute to their preservation, if necessary. Recent guidelines have enabled the approach to be used widely, effectively, and safely. Non-invasive brain functional imaging techniques, including functional magnetic resonance imaging and diffusion tensor imaging, have been used preoperatively to identify brain functional regions corresponding to language, and their accuracy has increased year by year. In addition, the use of neuronavigation that incorporates this preoperative information has made it possible to identify the positional relationships between the lesion and functional regions involved in language, conduct functional brain mapping in the awake state with electrical stimulation, and intraoperatively assess nerve function in real time when resecting the lesion. This article outlines the history of awake craniotomy, the current state of pre- and intraoperative evaluation of language function, and the clinical usefulness of such functional evaluation. When evaluating patients' language functions during awake craniotomy, given the various intraoperative stresses involved, it is necessary to carefully select the tasks to be undertaken, quickly perform all examinations, and promptly evaluate the results. As language functions involve both input and output, they are strongly affected by patients' preoperative cognitive function, degree of intraoperative wakefulness and fatigue, the ability to produce verbal articulations and utterances, as well as perform synergic movement. Therefore, it is essential to appropriately assess the reproducibility of language function evaluation using awake craniotomy techniques.

  15. Anaesthesia for awake craniotomy is safe and well-tolerated

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jakob Hessel; Olsen, Karsten Skovgaard

    2010-01-01

    Awake craniotomy for tumour resection has been performed at Glostrup Hospital since 2004. We describe and discuss the various anaesthetic approaches for such surgery and retrospectively analyse the 44 planned awake craniotomies performed at Glostrup Hospital. The surgery falls into four phases......: craniotomy, mapping, tumour resection and closing. Three methods are being used: monitored anaesthetic care, asleep-awake-asleep and asleep-awake (AA)....

  16. Mice and rats achieve similar levels of performance in an adaptive decision-making task

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santiago eJaramillo

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Two opposing constraints exist when choosing a model organism for studying the neural basis of adaptive decision-making: (1 experimental access and (2 behavioral complexity. Available molecular and genetic approaches for studying neural circuits in the mouse fulfill the first requirement. In contrast, it is still under debate if mice can perform cognitive tasks of sufficient complexity. Here we compare learning and performance of mice and rats, the preferred behavioral rodent model, during an acoustic flexible categorization two-alternative choice task. The task required animals to switch between two categorization definitions several times within a behavioral session. We found that both species achieved similarly high performance levels. On average, rats learned the task faster than mice, although some mice were as fast as the average rat. No major differences in subjective categorization boundaries or the speed of adaptation between the two species were found. Our results demonstrate that mice are an appropriate model for the study of the neural mechanisms underlying adaptive decision-making, and suggest they might be suitable for other cognitive tasks as well.

  17. The neurolinguistic approach to awake surgery reviewed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Witte, Elke; Mariën, Peter

    2013-02-01

    Intraoperative direct electrical stimulation (DES) is increasingly used in patients operated on for tumours in critical language areas. Although a positive impact of DES on postoperative linguistic outcome is generally advocated, the literature is only scantily documented with information about the linguistic methods applied in awake surgery. This article critically reviews the neurolinguistic procedures currently used in awake studies. Based on an extensive review of the literature, an overview is given of the language mapping techniques applied in brain tumour surgery. Studies investigating linguistic testing and outcome in awake surgery were analysed. Information about the timing of the assessment(s), the linguistic tasks, the linguistic stimuli and the indication for awake surgery was also discussed. Intraoperative DES remains the 'gold standard' for language mapping, but pre- and postoperative non-invasive mapping methods are important adjuncts. In the pre- and postoperative phase, standardised linguistic test batteries are generally used to assess language function. In the intraoperative phase, only naming and number counting are commonly applied. Most often no detailed information about the linguistic stimuli is provided and no standardised protocols measuring different linguistic levels have been described. Awake surgery with DES is a useful tool for preserving linguistic functions in patients undergoing surgery in critical brain regions. However, no studies exist that apply a well-balanced and standardised linguistic protocol to reliably identify the critical language zones. The availability of a standardised linguistic protocol might substantially increase intraoperative comfort and might improve outcome and quality of life. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. AWAKE: Advanced Proton Driven Plasma Wakefield Acceleration Experiment at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Gschwendtner, E

    2014-01-01

    Plasma wakefield acceleration is a promising alternative reaching accelerating fields a magnitude of up to 3 higher (GV/m) when compared to conventional RF acceleration. AWAKE, world’s first proton-driven plasma wakefield experiment, was launched at CERN to verify this concept. In this experiment proton bunches at 400 GeV/c will be extracted from the CERN SPS and sent to the plasma cell, where the proton beam drives the plasma wakefields and creates a large accelerating field. This large gradient of ~GV/m can be achieved by relying on the self-modulation instability (SMI) of the proton beam; when seeded by ionization through a short laser pulse, a train of micro-bunches with a period on the order of the plasma wavelength (~mm) develops, which can drive such a large amplitude wake from a long proton bunch (~12 cm). An electron beam will be injected into the plasma to probe the accelerating wakefield. The AWAKE experiment is being installed at CERN in the former CNGS facility, which must be modified to mat...

  19. Path to AWAKE: Evolution of the concept

    CERN Document Server

    Caldwell, A.; Amorim, L.; Apsimon, R.; Argyropoulos, T.; Assmann, R.; Bachmann, A.-M.; Batsch, F.; Bauche, J.; Berglyd Olsen, V.K.; Bernardini, M.; Bingham, R.; Biskup, B.; Bohl, T.; Bracco, C.; Burrows, P.N.; Burt, G.; Buttenschön, B.; Butterworth, A.; Cascella, M.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chevallay, E.; Cipiccia, S.; Damerau, H.; Deacon, L.; Dirksen, P.; Doebert, S.; Dorda, U.; Elsen, E.; Farmer, J.; Fartoukh, S.; Fedosseev, V.; Feldbaumer, E.; Fiorito, R.; Fonseca, R.; Friebel, F.; Geschonke, G.; Goddard, B.; Gorn, A.A.; Grulke, O.; Gschwendtner, E.; Hansen, J.; Hessler, C.; Hillenbrand, S.; Hofle, W.; Holloway, J.; Huang, C.; Hüther, M.; Jaroszynski, D.; Jensen, L.; Jolly, S.; Joulaei, A.; Kasim, M.; Keeble, F.; Kersevan, R.; Kumar, N.; Li, Y.; Liu, S.; Lopes, N.; Lotov, K.V.; Lu, W.; Machacek, J.; Mandry, S.; Martin, I.; Martorelli, R.; Martyanov, M.; Mazzoni, S.; Meddahi, M.; Merminga, L.; Mete, O.; Minakov, V.A.; Mitchell, J.; Moody, J.; Müller, A.-S.; Najmudin, Z.; Noakes, T.C.Q.; Norreys, P.; Osterhoff, J.; Öz, E.; Pardons, A.; Pepitone, K.; Petrenko, A.; Plyushchev, G.; Pozimski, J.; Pukhov, A.; Reimann, O.; Rieger, K.; Roesler, S.; Ruhl, H.; Rusnak, T.; Salveter, F.; Savard, N.; Schmidt, J.; von der Schmitt, H.; Seryi, A.; Shaposhnikova, E.; Sheng, Z.M.; Sherwood, P.; Silva, L.; Simon, F.; Soby, L.; Sosedkin, A.P.; Spitsyn, R.I.; Tajima, T.; Tarkeshian, R.; Timko, H.; Trines, R.; Tückmantel, T.; Tuev, P.V.; Turner, M.; Velotti, F.; Verzilov, V.; Vieira, J.; Vincke, H.; Wei, Y.; Welsch, C.P.; Wing, M.; Xia, G.; Yakimenko, V.; Zhang, H.; Zimmermann, F.

    2016-09-01

    This report describes the conceptual steps in reaching the design of the AWAKE experiment currently under construction at CERN. We start with an introduction to plasma wakefield acceleration and the motivation for using proton drivers. We then describe the self-modulation instability --- a key to an early realization of the concept. This is then followed by the historical development of the experimental design, where the critical issues that arose and their solutions are described. We conclude with the design of the experiment as it is being realized at CERN and some words on the future outlook. A summary of the AWAKE design and construction status as presented in this conference is given in [1].

  20. Awake, Offline Processing during Associative Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bursley, James K; Nestor, Adrian; Tarr, Michael J; Creswell, J David

    2016-01-01

    Offline processing has been shown to strengthen memory traces and enhance learning in the absence of conscious rehearsal or awareness. Here we evaluate whether a brief, two-minute offline processing period can boost associative learning and test a memory reactivation account for these offline processing effects. After encoding paired associates, subjects either completed a distractor task for two minutes or were immediately tested for memory of the pairs in a counterbalanced, within-subjects functional magnetic resonance imaging study. Results showed that brief, awake, offline processing improves memory for associate pairs. Moreover, multi-voxel pattern analysis of the neuroimaging data suggested reactivation of encoded memory representations in dorsolateral prefrontal cortex during offline processing. These results signify the first demonstration of awake, active, offline enhancement of associative memory and suggest that such enhancement is accompanied by the offline reactivation of encoded memory representations.

  1. Awake, Offline Processing during Associative Learning.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James K Bursley

    Full Text Available Offline processing has been shown to strengthen memory traces and enhance learning in the absence of conscious rehearsal or awareness. Here we evaluate whether a brief, two-minute offline processing period can boost associative learning and test a memory reactivation account for these offline processing effects. After encoding paired associates, subjects either completed a distractor task for two minutes or were immediately tested for memory of the pairs in a counterbalanced, within-subjects functional magnetic resonance imaging study. Results showed that brief, awake, offline processing improves memory for associate pairs. Moreover, multi-voxel pattern analysis of the neuroimaging data suggested reactivation of encoded memory representations in dorsolateral prefrontal cortex during offline processing. These results signify the first demonstration of awake, active, offline enhancement of associative memory and suggest that such enhancement is accompanied by the offline reactivation of encoded memory representations.

  2. Evaluation of Language Function under Awake Craniotomy

    OpenAIRE

    KANNO, Aya; MIKUNI, Nobuhiro

    2015-01-01

    Awake craniotomy is the only established way to assess patients’ language functions intraoperatively and to contribute to their preservation, if necessary. Recent guidelines have enabled the approach to be used widely, effectively, and safely. Non-invasive brain functional imaging techniques, including functional magnetic resonance imaging and diffusion tensor imaging, have been used preoperatively to identify brain functional regions corresponding to language, and their accuracy has increase...

  3. Beam studies and experimental facility for the AWAKE experiment at CERN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bracco, Chiara; Gschwendtner, Edda; Petrenko, Alexey; Timko, Helga; Argyropoulos, Theodoros; Bartosik, Hannes; Bohl, Thomas; Esteban Müller, Juan; Goddard, Brennan; Meddahi, Malika; Pardons, Ans; Shaposhnikova, Elena; Velotti, Francesco M.; Vincke, Helmut

    2014-01-01

    A Proton Driven Plasma Wakefield Acceleration Experiment has been proposed as an approach to eventually accelerate an electron beam to the TeV energy range in a single plasma section. To verify this novel technique, a proof of principle R and D experiment, AWAKE, is planned at CERN using 400 GeV proton bunches from the SPS. An electron beam will be injected into the plasma cell to probe the accelerating wakefield. The AWAKE experiment will be installed in the CNGS facility profiting from existing infrastructure where only minor modifications need to be foreseen. The design of the experimental area and the proton and electron beam lines are shown. The achievable SPS proton bunch properties and their reproducibility have been measured and are presented. - Highlights: • A proton driven plasma wakefield experiment using the first time protons as drive beam is proposed. • The integration of AWAKE experiment, the proton, laser and electron beam line in an existing CERN facility is demonstrated. • The necessary modifications in the experimental facility are presented. • Proton beam optics and a new electron beam line are adapted to match with the required beam parameters. • Short high-intensity bunches were studied in the SPS to guide the design parameters of the AWAKE project

  4. Decapitation in Rats: Latency to Unconsciousness and the ‘Wave of Death’

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijn, C.M. van; Krijnen, J.C.M.; Menting-Hermeling, S.; Coenen, A.M.L.

    2011-01-01

    The question whether decapitation is a humane method of euthanasia in awake animals is being debated. To gather arguments in this debate, obsolete rats were decapitated while recording the EEG, both of awake rats and of anesthetized rats. Following decapitation a fast and global loss of power of the

  5. Awake craniotomy and multilingualism: language testing during anaesthesia for awake craniotomy in a bilingual patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costello, T G

    2014-08-01

    An awake craniotomy for epilepsy surgery is presented where a bilingual patient post-operatively reported temporary aphasia of his first language (Spanish). This case report discusses the potential causes for this clinical presentation and methods to prevent the occurrence of this in future patients undergoing this form of surgery. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Awake Craniotomy Anesthesia: A Comparison of the Monitored Anesthesia Care and Asleep-Awake-Asleep Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eseonu, Chikezie I; ReFaey, Karim; Garcia, Oscar; John, Amballur; Quiñones-Hinojosa, Alfredo; Tripathi, Punita

    2017-08-01

    Commonly used sedation techniques for an awake craniotomy include monitored anesthesia care (MAC), using an unprotected airway, and the asleep-awake-asleep (AAA) technique, using a partially or totally protected airway. We present a comparative analysis of the MAC and AAA techniques, evaluating anesthetic management, perioperative outcomes, and complications in a consecutive series of patients undergoing the removal of an eloquent brain lesion. Eighty-one patients underwent awake craniotomy for an intracranial lesion over a 9-year period performed by a single-surgeon and a team of anesthesiologists. Fifty patients were treated using the MAC technique, and 31 were treated using the AAA technique. A retrospective analysis evaluated anesthetic management, intraoperative complications, postoperative outcomes, pain management, and complications. The MAC and AAA groups had similar preoperative patient and tumor characteristics. Mean operative time was shorter in the MAC group (283.5 minutes vs. 313.3 minutes; P = 0.038). Hypertension was the most common intraoperative complication seen (8% in the MAC group vs. 9.7% in the AAA group; P = 0.794). Intraoperative seizure occurred at a rate of 4% in the MAC group and 3.2% in the AAA group (P = 0.858). Awake cases were converted to general anesthesia in no patients in the MAC group and in 1 patient (3.2%) in the AAA group (P = 0.201). No cases were aborted in either group. The mean hospital length of stay was 3.98 days in the MAC group and 3.84 days in the AAA group (P = 0.833). Both the MAC and AAA sedation techniques provide an efficacious and safe method for managing awake craniotomy cases and produce similar perioperative outcomes, with the MAC technique associated with shorter operative time. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Preparing to perform an awake fiberoptic intubation.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Walsh, M E

    2012-02-03

    Fiberoptically guided tracheal intubation represents one of the most important advances in airway management to occur in the past thirty years. Perhaps its most important role is in management of the anticipated difficult airway. This is a situation in which the dangers of encountering the life-threatening "can\\'t intubate, can\\'t ventilate" situation can be avoided by placement of an endotracheal tube while the patient is awake. Although skill at the procedure of endoscopy is obviously necessary in this setting, these authors hold that success or failure of the technique frequently depends on the adequacy of preparation. These measures include 1) pre-operative assessment of the patient; 2) careful explanation of what lies in store; 3) "setting the stage"; 4) preparing the equipment to be used; and 5) preparing the patient (antisialogue, sedation, application of topical anesthesia to the upper airway). If these preparatory measures are carried out meticulously, the likelihood of performing a successful and comfortable awake fiberoptic tracheal intubation is greatly increased.

  8. Imaging learned fear circuitry in awake mice using fMRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Anjanette P; Lennen, Ross J; Marshall, Ian; Jansen, Maurits A; Pernet, Cyril R; Brydges, Nichola M; Duguid, Ian C; Holmes, Megan C

    2015-09-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) of learned behaviour in 'awake rodents' provides the opportunity for translational preclinical studies into the influence of pharmacological and genetic manipulations on brain function. fMRI has recently been employed to investigate learned behaviour in awake rats. Here, this methodology is translated to mice, so that future fMRI studies may exploit the vast number of genetically modified mouse lines that are available. One group of mice was conditioned to associate a flashing light (conditioned stimulus, CS) with foot shock (PG; paired group), and another group of mice received foot shock and flashing light explicitly unpaired (UG; unpaired group). The blood oxygen level-dependent signal (proxy for neuronal activation) in response to the CS was measured 24 h later in awake mice from the PG and UG using fMRI. The amygdala, implicated in fear processing, was activated to a greater degree in the PG than in the UG in response to the CS. Additionally, the nucleus accumbens was activated in the UG in response to the CS. Because the CS signalled an absence of foot shock in the UG, it is possible that this region is involved in processing the safety aspect of the CS. To conclude, the first use of fMRI to visualise brain activation in awake mice that are completing a learned emotional task is reported. This work paves the way for future preclinical fMRI studies to investigate genetic and environmental influences on brain function in transgenic mouse models of disease and aging. © 2015 The Authors. European Journal of Neuroscience published by Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Awake perimetry testing for occipital epilepsy surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joswig, Holger; Girvin, John P; Blume, Warren T; Burneo, Jorge G; Steven, David A

    2017-12-08

    In the literature, there are few reports that provide a detailed account on the technique of visual electrocortical stimulation in the setting of resective surgery for occipital epilepsy. In this technical note, the authors describe how a 26-year-old male with long-standing occipital epilepsy underwent resective surgery under awake conditions, using electrocortical stimulation of the occipital lobe, with the aid of a laser pointer and a perimetry chart on a stand within his visual field. The eloquent primary visual cortex was found to overlap with the seizure onset zone that was previously determined with subdural electrodes. A maximum functionally safe resection was performed, rendering the patient seizure free as of his last follow-up at 20 months, with no visual field impairment.

  10. Comparison of Conscious Sedation and Asleep-Awake-Asleep Techniques for Awake Craniotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilmen, Ozlem Korkmaz; Akcil, Eren Fatma; Oguz, Abdulvahap; Vehid, Hayriye; Tunali, Yusuf

    2017-01-01

    Since awake craniotomy (AC) has become a standard of care for supratentorial tumour resection, especially in the motor and language cortex, determining the most appropriate anaesthetic protocol is very important. The aim of this retrospective study is to compare the effectiveness of conscious sedation (CS) to "awake-asleep-awake" (AAA) techniques for supratentorial tumour resection. Forty-two patients undergoing CS and 22 patients undergoing AAA were included in the study. The primary endpoint was to compare the CS and AAA techniques with respect to intraoperative pain and agitation in patients undergoing supratentorial tumour resection. The secondary endpoint was comparison of the other intraoperative complications. This study results show that the incidence of intraoperative agitation and seizure were lower in the AAA group than in the CS group. Intraoperative blood pressures were significantly higher in the CS group than in the AAA group during the pinning and incision, but the level of blood pressures did not need antihypertensive treatment. Otherwise, blood pressures were significantly higher in the AAA group than in the CS group during the neurological examination and the severity of hypertension needed statistically significant more antihypertensive treatment in the AAA group. As a result of hypertension, the amount of intraoperative bleeding was higher in the AAA group than in the CS group. In conclusion, the AAA technique may provide better results with respect to agitation and seizure, but intraoperative hypertension needed a vigilant follow-up especially in the wake-up period. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Ammonia encephalopathy and awake craniotomy for brain language mapping: cause of failed awake craniotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villalba Martínez, G; Fernández-Candil, J L; Vivanco-Hidalgo, R M; Pacreu Terradas, S; León Jorba, A; Arroyo Pérez, R

    2015-05-01

    We report the case of an aborted awake craniotomy for a left frontotemporoinsular glioma due to ammonia encephalopathy on a patient taking Levetiracetam, valproic acid and clobazam. This awake mapping surgery was scheduled as a second-stage procedure following partial resection eight days earlier under general anesthesia. We planned to perform the surgery with local anesthesia and sedation with remifentanil and propofol. After removal of the bone flap all sedation was stopped and we noticed slow mentation and excessive drowsiness prompting us to stop and control the airway and proceed with general anesthesia. There were no post-operative complications but the patient continued to exhibit bradypsychia and hand tremor. His ammonia level was found to be elevated and was treated with an infusion of l-carnitine after discontinuation of the valproic acid with vast improvement. Ammonia encephalopathy should be considered in patients treated with valproic acid and mental status changes who require an awake craniotomy with patient collaboration. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  12. Awake language mapping and 3-Tesla intraoperative MRI-guided volumetric resection for gliomas in language areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Junfeng; Wu, Jinsong; Yao, Chengjun; Zhuang, Dongxiao; Qiu, Tianming; Hu, Xiaobing; Zhang, Jie; Gong, Xiu; Liang, Weimin; Mao, Ying; Zhou, Liangfu

    2013-09-01

    The use of both awake surgery and intraoperative MRI (iMRI) has been reported to optimize the maximal safe resection of gliomas. However, there has been little research into combining these two demanding procedures. We report our unique experience with, and methodology of, awake surgery in a movable iMRI system, and we quantitatively evaluate the contribution of the combination on the extent of resection (EOR) and functional outcome of patients with gliomas involving language areas. From March 2011 to November 2011, 30 consecutive patients who underwent awake surgery with iMRI guidance were prospectively investigated. The EOR was assessed by volumetric analysis. Language assessment was conducted before surgery and 1 week, 1 month, 3 months and 6 months after surgery using the Aphasia Battery of Chinese. Awake language mapping integrated with 3.0 Tesla iMRI was safely performed for all patients. An additional resection was conducted in 11 of 30 patients (36.7%) after iMRI. The median EOR significantly increased from 92.5% (range, 75.1-97.0%) to 100% (range, 92.6-100%) as a result of iMRI (p<0.01). Gross total resection was achieved in 18 patients (60.0%), and in seven of those patients (23.3%), the gross total resection could be attributed to iMRI. A total of 12 patients (40.0%) suffered from transient language deficits; however, only one (3.3%) patient developed a permanent deficit. This study demonstrates the potential utility of combining awake craniotomy with iMRI; it is safe and reliable to perform awake surgery using a movable iMRI. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Physiotherapy for Patients on Awake Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polastri, Massimiliano; Loforte, Antonino; Dell'Amore, Andrea; Nava, Stefano

    2016-12-01

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) is used as temporary life support in subjects with potentially reversible respiratory/cardiac failure. The principal purpose of this review was to assess the characteristics and potential advantages of physiotherapeutic interventions in subjects on awake ECMO support. Seven databases were interrogated: we searched titles, abstracts and keywords using the Medical Subject Headings terms 'extracorporeal membrane oxygenation' and 'rehabilitation' linked with the Boolean operator 'AND'. In total, 216 citations were retrieved. Nine citations satisfied our inclusion criteria and were subjected to full-text analysis. The numbers of patients enrolled in the included studies (most of which were case series) were low (n = 52). We found no prospective studies or randomized controlled trials. Overall, subjects on awake ECMO usually received a combination of passive and active physiotherapy, and most achieved an acceptable degree of autonomy after treatment. Emerging research in the field affords preliminary evidence supporting the safety of early mobilization and ambulation in patients on awake veno-venous ECMO support. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. The influence of awake craniotomy on postoperative neuropsychology

    OpenAIRE

    YANG Ming-yuan; GENG Ying; WANG Gang; HAN Ru-quan

    2012-01-01

    Objective To assess the neuropsychological function and quality of life of the patients after awake craniotomy (AC). Methods A case-control study was conducted among 81 patients who underwent awake craniotomy, and a 1-to-1 control group (matched by age, gender, degree of education, tumor location and characteristic) undergoing general anesthesia (GA) in glioma resections was assembled. The incidence of postoperative neurological deficits, psychological disorders and recurrence were investigat...

  15. Awake craniotomy: A qualitative review and future challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghazanwy, Mahmood; Chakrabarti, Rajkalyan; Tewari, Anurag; Sinha, Ashish

    2014-01-01

    Neurosurgery in awake patients incorporates newer technologies that require the anesthesiologists to update their skills and evolve their methodologies. They need effective communication skills and knowledge of selecting the right anesthetic drugs to ensure adequate analgesia, akinesia, along with patient satisfaction with the anesthetic conduct throughout the procedure. The challenge of providing adequate anesthetic care to an awake patient for intracranial surgery requires more than routine vigilance about anesthetic management. PMID:25422613

  16. Patient response to awake craniotomy - a summary overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milian, Monika; Tatagiba, Marcos; Feigl, Guenther C

    2014-06-01

    Awake craniotomy is a valuable procedure since it allows brain mapping and live monitoring of eloquent brain functions. The advantage of minimizing resource utilization is also emphasized by some physicians in North America. Data on how well an awake craniotomy is tolerated by patients and how much stress it creates is available from different studies, but this topic has not consequently been summarized in a review of the available literature. Therefore, it is the purpose of this review to shed more light on the still controversially discussed aspect of an awake craniotomy. We reviewed the available English literature published until December 2013 searching for studies that investigated patients' responses to awake craniotomies. Twelve studies, published between 1998 and 2013, including 396 patients with awake surgery were identified. Eleven of these 12 studies set the focus on the perioperative time, one study focused on the later postoperative time. The vast majority of patients felt well prepared and overall satisfaction with the procedure was high. In the majority of studies up to 30 % of the patients recalled considerable pain and 10-14 % experienced strong anxiety during the procedure. The majority of patients reported that they would undergo an awake craniotomy again. A post traumatic stress disorder was present neither shortly nor years after surgery. However, a normal human response to such an exceptional situation can for instance be the delayed appearance of unintentional distressing recollections of the event despite the patients' satisfaction concerning the procedure. For selected patients, an awake craniotomy presents the best possible way to reduce the risk of surgery related neurological deficits. However, benefits and burdens of this type of procedure should be carefully considered when planning an awake craniotomy and the decision should serve the interests of the patient.

  17. Anaesthesia for awake craniotomy: A retrospective study of 54 cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Navdeep Sokhal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: The anaesthetic challenge of awake craniotomy is to maintain adequate sedation, analgesia, respiratory and haemodynamic stability in an awake patient who should be able to co-operate during intraoperative neurological assessment. The current literature, sharing the experience on awake craniotomy, in Indian context, is minimal. Hence, we carried out a retrospective study with the aim to review and analyse the anaesthetic management and perioperative complications in patients undergoing awake craniotomy, at our centre. Methods: Medical records of 54 patients who underwent awake craniotomy for intracranial lesions over a period of 10 years were reviewed, retrospectively. Data regarding anaesthetic management, intraoperative complications and post-operative course were recorded. Results: Propofol (81.5% and dexmedetomidine (18.5% were the main agents used for providing conscious sedation to facilitate awake craniotomy. Hypertension (16.7% was the most commonly encountered complication during intraoperative period, followed by seizures (9.3%, desaturation (7.4%, tight brain (7.4%, and shivering (5.6%. The procedure had to be converted to general anaesthesia in one of patients owing to refractory brain bulge. The incidence of respiratory and haemodynamic complications were comparable in the both groups (P > 0.05. There was less incidence of intraoperative seizures in patients who received propofol (P = 0.03. In post-operative period, 20% of patients developed new motor deficit. Mean intensive care unit stay was 2.8 ± 1.9 day (1-14 days and mean hospital stay was 7.0 ± 5.0 day (3-30 days. Conclusions: ′Conscious sedation′ was the technique of choice for awake craniotomy, at our institute. Fentanyl, propofol, and dexmedetomidine were the main agents used for this purpose. Patients receiving propofol had less incidence of intraoperative seizure. Appropriate selection of patients, understanding the procedure of surgery, and

  18. Awake Craniotomy: First-Year Experiences and Patient Perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joswig, Holger; Bratelj, Denis; Brunner, Thomas; Jacomet, Alfred; Hildebrandt, Gerhard; Surbeck, Werner

    2016-06-01

    Awake craniotomy for brain lesions in or near eloquent brain regions enables neurosurgeons to assess neurologic functions of patients intraoperatively, reducing the risk of permanent neurologic deficits and increasing the extent of resection. A retrospective review was performed of a consecutive series of patients with awake craniotomies in the first year of their introduction to our tertiary non-university-affiliated neurosurgery department. Operation time, complications, and neurologic outcome were assessed, and patient perception of awake craniotomy was surveyed using a mailed questionnaire. There were 24 awake craniotomies performed in 22 patients for low-grade/high-grade gliomas, cavernomas, and metastases (average 2 cases per month). Mean operation time was 205 minutes. Failure of awake craniotomy because of intraoperative seizures with subsequent postictal impaired testing or limited cooperation occurred in 2 patients. Transient neurologic deficits occurred in 29% of patients; 1 patient sustained a permanent neurologic deficit. Of the 18 patients (82%) who returned the questionnaire, only 2 patients recalled significant fear during surgery. Introducing awake craniotomy to a tertiary non-university-affiliated neurosurgery department is feasible and resulted in reasonable operation times and complication rates and high patient satisfaction. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Dexmedetomidine versus Remifentanil for Sedation during Awake Fiberoptic Intubation

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    Davide Cattano

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This study compared remifentanil and dexmedetomidine as awake fiberoptic intubation (AFOI anesthetics. Thirty-four adult ASA I-III patients were enrolled in a double-blinded randomized pilot study to receive remifentanil (REM or dexmedetomidine (DEX for sedation during AFOI (nasal and oral. Thirty patients completed the study and received 2 mg midazolam IV and topical anesthesia. The REM group received a loading dose of 0.75 mcg/kg followed by an infusion of 0.075 mcg/kg/min. The DEX group received a loading dose of 0.4 mcg/kg followed by an infusion of 0.7 mcg/kg/hr. Time to sedation, number of intubation attempts, Ramsay sedation scale (RSS score, bispectral index (BIS, and memory recall were recorded. All thirty patients were successfully intubated by AFOI (22 oral intubations/8 nasal. First attempt success rate with AFOI was higher in the REM group than the DEX group, 72% and 38% (P=0.02, respectively. The DEX group took longer to attain RSS of ≥3 and to achieve BIS <80, as compared to the REM group. Postloading dose verbal recall was poorer in the DEX group. Dexmedetomidine seems a useful adjunct for patients undergoing AFOI but is dependent on dosage and time. Further studies in the use of dexmedetomidine for AFOI are warranted.

  20. Use of GlideScope for double lumen endotracheal tube insertion in an awake patient with difficult airway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onrubia, X; Lluch-Oltra, A; Armero, R; Baldó, J

    2014-01-01

    There is scientific evidence that an anticipated difficult airway must be managed with the patient being awake. The GlideScope has been proven to be a useful device to intubate the trachea in some instances when difficult airway is present, and particularly in the awake patient. It has also been used for double lumen tube (DLT) in the anaesthetized patient, but its use with DLT in both circumstances, awake patients with difficult airway has not been described. GlideScope enabled us to achieve accurate local anesthetic spraying and a successful endotracheal intubation with a double lumen tube (DLT) in an awake patient with predicted difficult airway and bronchoaspiration risk. Different ways to resolve cases like this can be found in the anesthetic literature, but we think this could be another option to bear in mind. We also describe a new variation in the maneuver of introducing a DLT into the trachea under GlideScope view as DLT presents with some difficulties when introduced under normal circumstances. This option could add some risk for the patients when used in inexperienced hands and there is not sufficient scientific evidence in the literature to recommend it for all cases. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  1. Bunch rotation tests at SPS flat top for the AWAKE experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Argyropoulos, T; Bohl, T; Esteban Müller, J F; Petrenko, A; Shaposhnikova, E; Timko, H

    2013-01-01

    This note summarises the results of two MDs on bunch rotation at SPS flat top. The first MD was carried out on 11th July 2012 with the Q26 optics, while the second MD on the 30th October 2012 used the Q20 optics. To obtain a short bunch length, which is important for the plasma wake-field acceleration project AWAKE, the bunches have been rotated in longitudinal phase space on the SPS flat top. The aim of the MDs was to obtain first estimates of what bunch length, intensity, and transverse emittances - which are crucial for the project - can be achieved for high-intensity single bunches.

  2. Awake percutaneous tracheostomy as an alternative to open ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: This case report details the management of a patient with a threatened airway booked for an emergency awake tracheostomy but successfully managed with a percutaneous tracheostomy technique. The case illustrates the challenges of managing a severely compromised airway and presents an alternative ...

  3. Awake craniotomy using electromagnetic navigation technology without rigid pin fixation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morsy, Ahmed A; Ng, Wai Hoe

    2015-11-01

    We report our institutional experience using an electromagnetic navigation system, without rigid head fixation, for awake craniotomy patients. The StealthStation® S7 AxiEM™ navigation system (Medtronic, Inc.) was used for this technique. Detailed preoperative clinical and neuropsychological evaluations, patient education and contrast-enhanced MRI (thickness 1.5mm) were performed for each patient. The AxiEM Mobile Emitter was typically placed in a holder, which was mounted to the operating room table, and a non-invasive patient tracker was used as the patient reference device. A monitored conscious sedation technique was used in all awake craniotomy patients, and the AxiEM Navigation Pointer was used for navigation during the procedure. This offers the same accuracy as optical navigation, but without head pin fixation or interference with intraoperative neurophysiological techniques and surgical instruments. The application of the electromagnetic neuronavigation technology without rigid head fixation during an awake craniotomy is accurate, and offers superior patient comfort. It is recommended as an effective adjunctive technique for the conduct of awake surgery. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Anxiety in the preoperative phase of awake brain tumor surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruis, Carla; Huenges Wajer, I.M.C.; Robe, Pierre; van Zandvoort, Martine

    OBJECTIVE: Awake surgery emerges as a standard of care for brain tumors located in or near eloquent areas. Levels of preoperative anxiety in patients are important, because anxiety can influence cognitive performance and participation, hence altering the outcome of the procedure. In this study we

  5. Anxiety in the preoperative phase of awake brain tumor surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruis, C.; Huenges Wajer, I.M.C.; Robe, Pierre; van Zandvoort, M.J.E.

    Objective Awake surgery emerges as a standard of care for brain tumors located in or near eloquent areas. Levels of preoperative anxiety in patients are important, because anxiety can influence cognitive performance and participation, hence altering the outcome of the procedure. In this study we

  6. Initial Experience with Awake Craniotomy In Sudan | Mohamed ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    especially if the tumour is located in the anterior temporal or frontal lobes, near motor, language, or memory areas of the brain. Awake craniotomy has been proposed aiming for maximum resection with minimum impairment of neurological function. The technique should provide adequate sedation, analgesia, respiratory ...

  7. Descriptive Study: Anesthesia for Awake Craniotomy in Siriraj Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saipin Muangman

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: The purpose of awake craniotomy is to test neurological functions to ensure accurate lesion surgery and lessen postoperative neurological complications. There are several methods to provide anesthesia during awake craniotomy including local anesthesia infiltration, local anesthesia plus conscious sedation, general anesthesia and wake-up during surgery and sleep again (asleep-awake-asleep or AAA. Each method has its pro and con with different complications. In Siriraj Hospital, there was no prior study of anesthetic techniques and complications of awake craniotomy. Methods: The retrospective descriptive study of awake craniotomy was carried out with 60 patients in Siriraj Hospital 2007-2011. Results: There were 35 males (58.3% with average age 40.7±12.6 years and weight 64.2±12 kilograms undergoing awake craniotomy. Twenty patients (33.3% presented with seizure before surgery. Most diagnosis was oligodendroglioma in 25 patients (41.7%, mostly at the frontal lobe (44 patients or 73.3%. The most common position was supine(46patientsor76.7%. ICU lengthof stay was1.4±0.9(0,6days. Hospital stay was11.1±9 (4,55days. Total intravenous anesthesia (TIVA was mostlyused(52patientsor90% while18patients (30% received scalp block. Most patients (85% did not require nasal airways while 8 patients (13.3% did, and only 1 patient (1.7% required laryngeal mask airway (LMA to help open up air passage. The drugs used during asleep1 and asleep2 were propofol together with dexmedetomidine and fentanyl in 34 patients (56.7% and 23 patients (38.3%, respectively. Whilebeingawake (15patientsor20%,dexmedetomidine and/or fentanyl were administered. Complications during anesthesia were hypertension (33.3%, hypotension (26.7%, upper airway obstruction(23.3%, bradycardia (15%, tachycardia (10%, seizure (1.7% andnausea (1.7%. Conclusion: The most common anesthesia method inSiriraj Hospital for awake craniotomy was TIVA (90%, using propofol together with

  8. Bonfils fiberscope vs GlideScope for awake intubation in morbidly obese patients with expected difficult airways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nassar, Mahmoud; Zanaty, Ola M; Ibrahim, Mohamed

    2016-08-01

    To assess the efficacy of both Bonfils and GlideScope in obese patient with difficult airways for bariatric surgery using awake intubation. Comparative study. Operating room. The study was carried out on 60 patients, for laparoscopic bariatric surgery, after approval of the Medical Ethics Committee and having an informed written consent from each patient. Patients were randomly categorized into 2 equal groups 30 patients in each group. Awake intubation with either Retromolar Bonfils or GlideScope. Time to visualize the laryngeal inlet, time of intubation, time of scope manipulation, success rate at each attempt, the lowest oxygen saturation, hemodynamic parameters, and any complication. Regarding intubation criteria, GlideScope achieves shorter times compared with Retromolar for visualization of the vocal cords and intubation, in addition to less intubation attempts, but both without a statistically significant difference. Retromolar shows better patient satisfaction than does GlideScope, with statistically significant difference. Both Bonfils fiberscope and the GlideScope can be successfully used for awake intubation in morbidly obese patients with expected difficult airways. Bonfils intubating fiberscope was more tolerated by patients with statistical difference; on the other hand, GlideScope provided shorter intubation time and less intubation attempts but not statistically significant. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Enclosure for small animals during awake animal imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goddard, Jr., James S

    2013-11-26

    An enclosure or burrow restrains an awake animal during an imaging procedure. A tubular body, made from a radiolucent material that does not attenuate x-rays or gamma rays, accepts an awake animal. A proximal end of the body includes an attachment surface that corresponds to an attachment surface of an optically transparent and optically uniform window. An anti-reflective coating may be applied to an inner surface, an outer surface, or both surfaces of the window. Since the window is a separate element of the enclosure and it is not integrally formed as part of the body, it can be made with optically uniform thickness properties for improved motion tracking of markers on the animal with a camera during the imaging procedure. The motion tracking information is then used to compensate for animal movement in the image.

  10. Pediatric awake craniotomy and intra-operative stimulation mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balogun, James A; Khan, Osaama H; Taylor, Michael; Dirks, Peter; Der, Tara; Carter Snead Iii, O; Weiss, Shelly; Ochi, Ayako; Drake, James; Rutka, James T

    2014-11-01

    The indications for operating on lesions in or near areas of cortical eloquence balance the benefit of resection with the risk of permanent neurological deficit. In adults, awake craniotomy has become a versatile tool in tumor, epilepsy and functional neurosurgery, permitting intra-operative stimulation mapping particularly for language, sensory and motor cortical pathways. This allows for maximal tumor resection with considerable reduction in the risk of post-operative speech and motor deficits. We report our experience of awake craniotomy and cortical stimulation for epilepsy and supratentorial tumors located in and around eloquent areas in a pediatric population (n=10, five females). The presenting symptom was mainly seizures and all children had normal neurological examinations. Neuroimaging showed lesions in the left opercular (n=4) and precentral or peri-sylvian regions (n=6). Three right-sided and seven left-sided awake craniotomies were performed. Two patients had a history of prior craniotomy. All patients had intra-operative mapping for either speech or motor or both using cortical stimulation. The surgical goal for tumor patients was gross total resection, while for all epilepsy procedures, focal cortical resections were completed without any difficulty. None of the patients had permanent post-operative neurologic deficits. The patient with an epileptic focus over the speech area in the left frontal lobe had a mild word finding difficulty post-operatively but this improved progressively. Follow-up ranged from 6 to 27 months. Pediatric awake craniotomy with intra-operative mapping is a precise, safe and reliable method allowing for resection of lesions in eloquent areas. Further validations on larger number of patients will be needed to verify the utility of this technique in the pediatric population. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Music is Beneficial for Awake Craniotomy Patients: A Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jadavji-Mithani, Radhika; Venkatraghavan, Lashmi; Bernstein, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Patients undergoing awake craniotomy may experience high levels of stress. Minimizing anxiety benefits patients and surgeons. Music has many therapeutic effects in altering human mood and emotion. Tonality of music as conveyed by composition in major or minor keys can have an impact on patients' emotions and thoughts. Assessing the effects of listening to major and minor key musical pieces on patients undergoing awake craniotiomy could help in the design of interventions to alleviate anxiety, stress and tension. Twenty-nine patients who were undergoing awake craniotomy were recruited and randomly assigned into two groups: Group 1 subjects listened to major key music and Group 2 listened to minor key compositions. Subjects completed a demographics questionnaire, a pre- and post-operative Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI) and a semi-structured open-ended interview. RESULTS were analyzed using modified thematic analysis through open and axial coding. Overall, patients enjoyed the music regardless of the key distinctions and stated they benefitted from listening to the music. No adverse reactions to the music were found. Subjects remarked that the music made them feel more at ease and less anxious before, during and after their procedure. Patients preferred either major key or minor key music but not a combination of both. Those who preferred major key pieces said it was on the basis of tonality while the individuals who selected minor key pieces stated that tempo of the music was the primary factor. Overall, listening to music selections was beneficial for the patients. Future work should further investigate the effects of audio interventions in awake surgery through narrative means.

  12. The influence of awake craniotomy on postoperative neuropsychology

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    YANG Ming-yuan

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective To assess the neuropsychological function and quality of life of the patients after awake craniotomy (AC. Methods A case-control study was conducted among 81 patients who underwent awake craniotomy, and a 1-to-1 control group (matched by age, gender, degree of education, tumor location and characteristic undergoing general anesthesia (GA in glioma resections was assembled. The incidence of postoperative neurological deficits, psychological disorders and recurrence were investigated during telephone follow-ups, and Medical Outcomes Study Short Form 36 (SF-36 was adopted to evaluate the life quality of patients. Results Almost 73 pairs of patients fulfilled the survey of AC and GA group respectively. There were 21 patients and 28 patients with postoperative neurological deficits, and 12 patients and 8 patients with psychological disorders in AC and GA group respectively. Thirty patients of AC group had the recollection of being awake during the surgery. There were 9 patients in CA group having long-term ( > 6 months neurological deficits, which was less than the number of GA group (18 patients, P = 0.038. According to the assessment in short-term, medium-term and long-term postoperative neurological deficits, there was no significant difference in the quality-of-life scores between the two groups (P > 0.05, for all. Conclusion Awake craniotomy can be the main method for removing the lesions located in or close to functional areas with lower incidence of long?term postoperative neurological deficits, and it has no significant impact on the psychological status and the quality of life postoperatively.

  13. Awake craniotomy anesthetic management using dexmedetomidine, propofol, and remifentanil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prontera, Andrea; Baroni, Stefano; Marudi, Andrea; Valzania, Franco; Feletti, Alberto; Benuzzi, Francesca; Bertellini, Elisabetta; Pavesi, Giacomo

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Awake craniotomy allows continuous monitoring of patients’ neurological functions during open surgery. Anesthesiologists have to sedate patients in a way so that they are compliant throughout the whole surgical procedure, nevertheless maintaining adequate analgesia and anxiolysis. Currently, the use of α2-receptor agonist dexmedetomidine as the primary hypnotic–sedative medication is increasing. Methods Nine patients undergoing awake craniotomy were treated with refined monitored anesthesia care (MAC) protocol consisting of a combination of local anesthesia without scalp block, low-dose infusion of dexmedetomidine, propofol, and remifentanil, without the need of airways management. Results The anesthetic protocol applied in our study has the advantage of decreasing the dose of each drug and thus reducing the occurrence of side effects. All patients had smooth and rapid awakenings. The brain remained relaxed during the entire procedure. Conclusion In our experience, this protocol is safe and effective during awake brain surgery. Nevertheless, prospective randomized trials are necessary to confirm the optimal anesthetic technique to be used. PMID:28424537

  14. Diet control to achieve euglycemia induces significant loss of heart and liver weight via increased autophagy compared with ad libitum diet in diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jun-Ho; Lee, Ju-Han; Jin, Mingli; Han, Sang-Don; Chon, Gyu-Rak; Kim, Ick-Hee; Kim, Seonguk; Kim, Sung-Young; Choi, Soo-Bong; Noh, Yun-Hee

    2014-08-29

    Intensive glucose control increases the all-cause mortality in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM); however, the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. We hypothesized that strict diet control to achieve euglycemia in diabetes damages major organs, increasing the mortality risk. To evaluate effects on major organs when euglycemia is obtained by diet control, we generated a model of end-stage T2DM in 13-week-old Sprague-Dawley rats by subtotal pancreatectomy, followed by ad libitum feeding for 5 weeks. We divided these rats into two groups and for the subsequent 6 weeks provided ad libitum feeding to half (AL, n=12) and a calorie-controlled diet to the other half (R, n=12). To avoid hypoglycemia, the degree of calorie restriction in the R group was isocaloric (g per kg body weight per day) compared with a sham-operated control group (C, n=12). During the 6-week diet control period, AL rats ate three times more than rats in the C or R groups, developing hyperglycemia with renal hyperplasia. R group achieved euglycemia but lost overall body weight significantly compared with the C or AL group (49 or 22%, respectively), heart weight (39 or 23%, respectively) and liver weight (50 or 46%, respectively). Autophagy levels in the heart and liver were the highest in the R group (Pdiabetes but may be deleterious even at isocaloric rate when insulin is deficient because of significant loss of heart and liver mass via increased autophagy.

  15. Awake Surgery for a Violin Player: Monitoring Motor and Music Performance, A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piai, Vitória; Vos, Sandra H; Idelberger, Reinhard; Gans, Pauline; Doorduin, Jonne; Ter Laan, Mark

    2018-02-27

    We report the case of a professional violin player who underwent an awake craniotomy to resect a tumor in the left supplementary motor area, an area involved in motor planning. A careful pre- and intraoperative monitoring plan for music performance and complex motor function was established that could be used in combination with cortical stimulation. The patient suffered an epileptic seizure during cortical stimulation. The monitoring of complex motor and musical functions was implemented with the patient playing the violin while the resection was performed. Almost complete resection was achieved with no notable postoperative deficits contributing to functional impairment. The multidisciplinary approach, involving neurosurgery, neuropsychology, anesthesiology, and clinical neurophysiology, allowed us to successfully cope with the theoretical and practical challenges associated with tailored care for a professional musician. The music and motor monitoring plan is reported in detail to enable other sites to reproduce and adapt it accordingly.

  16. A Retrospective Study of Success, Failure, and Time Needed to Perform Awake Intubation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Thomas T; Gal, Jonathan S; DeMaria, Samuel; Lin, Hung-Mo; Levine, Adam I; Hyman, Jaime B

    2016-07-01

    Awake intubation is the standard of care for management of the anticipated difficult airway. The performance of awake intubation may be perceived as complex and time-consuming, potentially leading clinicians to avoid this technique of airway management. This retrospective review of awake intubations at a large academic medical center was performed to determine the average time taken to perform awake intubation, its effects on hemodynamics, and the incidence and characteristics of complications and failure. Anesthetic records from 2007 to 2014 were queried for the performance of an awake intubation. Of the 1,085 awake intubations included for analysis, 1,055 involved the use of a flexible bronchoscope. Each awake intubation case was propensity matched with two controls (1:2 ratio), with similar comorbidities and intubations performed after the induction of anesthesia (n = 2,170). The time from entry into the operating room until intubation was compared between groups. The anesthetic records of all patients undergoing awake intubation were also reviewed for failure and complications. The median time to intubation for patients intubated post induction was 16.0 min (interquartile range: 13 to 22) from entrance into the operating room. The median time to intubation for awake patients was 24.0 min (interquartile range: 19 to 31). The complication rate was 1.6% (17 of 1,085 cases). The most frequent complications observed were mucous plug, endotracheal tube cuff leak, and inadvertent extubation. The failure rate for attempted awake intubation was 1% (n = 10). Awake intubations have a high rate of success and low rate of serious complications and failure. Awake intubations can be performed safely and rapidly.

  17. Resection of Gliomas with and without Neuropsychological Support during Awake Craniotomy-Effects on Surgery and Clinical Outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelm, Anna; Sollmann, Nico; Ille, Sebastian; Meyer, Bernhard; Ringel, Florian; Krieg, Sandro M

    2017-01-01

    During awake craniotomy for tumor resection, a neuropsychologist (NP) is regarded as a highly valuable partner for neurosurgeons. However, some centers do not routinely involve an NP, and data to support the high influence of the NP on the perioperative course of patients are mostly lacking. The aim of this study was to investigate whether there is a difference in clinical outcomes between patients who underwent awake craniotomy with and without the attendance of an NP. Our analysis included 61 patients, all operated on for resection of a presumably language-eloquent glioma during an awake procedure. Of these 61 cases, 47 surgeries were done with neuropsychological support (NP group), whereas 14 surgeries were performed without an NP (non-NP group) due to a language barrier between the NP and the patient. For these patients, neuropsychological assessment was provided by a bilingual resident. Both groups were highly comparable regarding age, gender, preoperative language function, and tumor grades (glioma WHO grades 1-4). Gross total resection (GTR) was achieved more frequently in the NP group (NP vs. non-NP: 61.7 vs. 28.6%, P  = 0.04), which also had shorter durations of surgery (NP vs. non-NP: 240.7 ± 45.7 vs. 286.6 ± 54.8 min, P  vs. postoperative imaging) was lower in the NP group (NP vs. non-NP: 19.1 vs. 42.9%, P  = 0.09), but no difference was observed in terms of permanent surgery-related language deterioration (NP vs. non-NP: 6.4 vs. 14.3%, P  = 0.48). We need professional neuropsychological evaluation during awake craniotomies for removal of presumably language-eloquent gliomas. Although these procedures are routinely carried out with an NP, this is one of the first studies to provide data supporting the NP's crucial role. Despite the small group size, our study shows statistically significant results, with higher rates of GTR and shorter durations of surgery among patients of the NP group. Moreover, our data emphasize the common

  18. Resection of Gliomas with and without Neuropsychological Support during Awake Craniotomy—Effects on Surgery and Clinical Outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Kelm

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundDuring awake craniotomy for tumor resection, a neuropsychologist (NP is regarded as a highly valuable partner for neurosurgeons. However, some centers do not routinely involve an NP, and data to support the high influence of the NP on the perioperative course of patients are mostly lacking.ObjectiveThe aim of this study was to investigate whether there is a difference in clinical outcomes between patients who underwent awake craniotomy with and without the attendance of an NP.MethodsOur analysis included 61 patients, all operated on for resection of a presumably language-eloquent glioma during an awake procedure. Of these 61 cases, 47 surgeries were done with neuropsychological support (NP group, whereas 14 surgeries were performed without an NP (non-NP group due to a language barrier between the NP and the patient. For these patients, neuropsychological assessment was provided by a bilingual resident.ResultsBoth groups were highly comparable regarding age, gender, preoperative language function, and tumor grades (glioma WHO grades 1–4. Gross total resection (GTR was achieved more frequently in the NP group (NP vs. non-NP: 61.7 vs. 28.6%, P = 0.04, which also had shorter durations of surgery (NP vs. non-NP: 240.7 ± 45.7 vs. 286.6 ± 54.8 min, P < 0.01. Furthermore, the rate of unexpected tumor residuals (estimation of the intraoperative extent of resection vs. postoperative imaging was lower in the NP group (NP vs. non-NP: 19.1 vs. 42.9%, P = 0.09, but no difference was observed in terms of permanent surgery-related language deterioration (NP vs. non-NP: 6.4 vs. 14.3%, P = 0.48.ConclusionWe need professional neuropsychological evaluation during awake craniotomies for removal of presumably language-eloquent gliomas. Although these procedures are routinely carried out with an NP, this is one of the first studies to provide data supporting the NP’s crucial role. Despite the small group size, our study shows

  19. Removal of Laryngeal Mask Airway: Awake or Deep Anesthesia?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SM Heidari

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of this study was to study the influence of depth of anesthesia (awake or deep anesthesia and choice of anesthetic drug (halothane or propofol on the incidence and severity of airway hyperreactivity associated with Laryngeal Mask Airway (LMA removal. Methods: A prospective, randomized, double blind study was done in 156 ASA physical status I and II patients, aged 18-65 years, who had under gone short time elective surgery (<1 hour. Patients were randomly assigned in one of the four subgroups: Hal-Aw (anesthesia maintenance with halothane and LMA removal in awaked state, Hal-Deep (anesthesia maintenance with halothane and LMA removal in deep anesthesia, Pro-Aw (anesthesia maintenance with propofol and LMA removal in awaked state, and Pro-Deep (anesthesia maintenance with propofol and LMA removal in deep anesthesia. The incidence of cough and straining, bronchospasm, laryngospasm, breathholding, vomiting, oxygen desaturation, and severity of airway hyperreactivity (mild, moderate, severe with LMA removal were evaluated. Results: There were no significant differences in bronchospasm, larynchospasm, oxygen desaturation among four subgroups. Significant differences were in cough and straining, breath holding, vomiting, and finally severity of airway hyperreactivity among four subgroups. Depth of anesthesia didn’t have any effect on incidence and severity of airway hyperreactivity but in those with propofol, they were lower than those with halothane. Conclusion: In short time surgery and with use of LMA, anesthesia with propofol is associated with lower incidence and severity of airway hyperreactivity than halothane. Keywords: propofol, halothane, airway hyperreactivity, Laryngeal Mask Airway (LMA.

  20. Anxiety in the preoperative phase of awake brain tumor surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruis, Carla; Wajer, Irene Huenges; Robe, Pierre; van Zandvoort, Martine

    2017-06-01

    Awake surgery emerges as a standard of care for brain tumors located in or near eloquent areas. Levels of preoperative anxiety in patients are important, because anxiety can influence cognitive performance and participation, hence altering the outcome of the procedure. In this study we analyzed the prevalence and potential clinical predictors of anxiety in the pre-operative phase of an awake brain tumor surgery. Seventy consecutive candidates for an awake brain tumor surgery were included. All patients received a neuropsychological pre-operative work-up. The Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) was administrated to investigate symptoms of anxiety. Demographic and medical data were extracted from patients' charts. Linear regression analyses, multiple regression analyses, t-tests for parametric and Mann-Whitney U tests for non-parametric data were used to analyze the relation between demographic and medical variables and pre-operative anxiety. Mean score on the anxiety scale of the HADS was 6.1 (SD=4.2, range 1-19) and 25% of the patients scored on or above the cut-off for anxiety symptoms (score >7). Women reported higher levels of anxiety than men (p<0.01). Furthermore, younger patient were more anxious than older patients (p<0.05). No other variables were significantly related to pre-operative anxiety. Merely, one in every four patients reported significant anxiety symptoms in the pre-operative phase. Besides gender and age, none of the other demographic or medical factors were significantly associated with the level of anxiety. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. [Dexmedetomidine for neurocognitive testing in awake craniotomy: case report.].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Marcelo Cursino Pinto Dos; Vinagre, Ronaldo Contreras Oliveira

    2006-08-01

    Tumor resections in the speech areas of the brain are more safely done using cognitive tests to determine their exact location. Patients must be awake, comfortable, and cooperative for the precise identification of the areas to be preserved. The objective of this report is to present a surgical procedure done with the patient awake, without endotracheal intubation, using sevofluorane initially, followed by dexmedetomidine. This technique allowed the realization of motor and speech evaluation tests. Twenty-seven years old male patient, physical status ASA I, with a brain tumor. In the operating room, without pre-anesthetic medication, midazolam (1 mg) was administered, and general anesthesia was induced with propofol (80 mg). Maintenance was done with O2, N2O, and sevofluorane, with a mask, for catheterization of the right radial artery, introduction of a vesical catheter, and infiltration of the surgical site. This phase lasted around 20 minutes, and the infusion of dexmedetomidine was initiated in the last 10 minutes to maintain a level of sedation Ramsay score 2. Cortical mapping followed (75 minutes). Afterwards, tumor resection was done while the patient remained sedated with higher doses of dexmedetomidine. Hemodynamic and respiratory parameters remained stable, and the procedure was performed without complications, lasting a total of five hours. After the surgical procedure the patient was transferred to the ICU. He did not develop any neurological changes, being discharged to a regular ward the following day. Awake craniotomy with the proper mapping of speech and motor cortical areas was successfully done with the continuous infusion of dexmedetomidine. Both the patient and the surgical team were pleased with the technique.

  2. Characterizing Awake and Anesthetized States Using a Dimensionality Reduction Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirsadeghi, M; Behnam, H; Shalbaf, R; Jelveh Moghadam, H

    2016-01-01

    Distinguishing between awake and anesthetized states is one of the important problems in surgery. Vital signals contain valuable information that can be used in prediction of different levels of anesthesia. Some monitors based on electroencephalogram (EEG) such as the Bispectral (BIS) index have been proposed in recent years. This study proposes a new method for characterizing between awake and anesthetized states. We validated our method by obtaining data from 25 patients during the cardiac surgery that requires cardiopulmonary bypass. At first, some linear and non-linear features are extracted from EEG signals. Then a method called "LLE"(Locally Linear Embedding) is used to map high-dimensional features in a three-dimensional output space. Finally, low dimensional data are used as an input to a quadratic discriminant analyzer (QDA). The experimental results indicate that an overall accuracy of 88.4 % can be obtained using this method for classifying the EEG signal into conscious and unconscious states for all patients. Considering the reliability of this method, we can develop a new EEG monitoring system that could assist the anesthesiologists to estimate the depth of anesthesia accurately.

  3. Mapping oxygen concentration in the awake mouse brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, Declan G; Parpaleix, Alexandre; Roche, Morgane; Charpak, Serge

    2016-01-01

    Although critical for brain function, the physiological values of cerebral oxygen concentration have remained elusive because high-resolution measurements have only been performed during anesthesia, which affects two major parameters modulating tissue oxygenation: neuronal activity and blood flow. Using measurements of capillary erythrocyte-associated transients, fluctuations of oxygen partial pressure (Po2) associated with individual erythrocytes, to infer Po2 in the nearby neuropil, we report the first non-invasive micron-scale mapping of cerebral Po2 in awake, resting mice. Interstitial Po2 has similar values in the olfactory bulb glomerular layer and the somatosensory cortex, whereas there are large capillary hematocrit and erythrocyte flux differences. Awake tissue Po2 is about half that under isoflurane anesthesia, and within the cortex, vascular and interstitial Po2 values display layer-specific differences which dramatically contrast with those recorded under anesthesia. Our findings emphasize the importance of measuring energy parameters non-invasively in physiological conditions to precisely quantify and model brain metabolism. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12024.001 PMID:26836304

  4. The pharmacokinetics of intravenous fenoldopam in healthy, awake cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, K E; Labato, M A; Court, M H

    2016-04-01

    Fenoldopam is a selective dopamine-1 receptor agonist that improves diuresis by increasing renal blood flow and perfusion and causing peripheral vasodilation. Fenoldopam has been shown to induce diuresis and be well-tolerated in healthy cats. It is used clinically in cats with oliguric kidney injury at doses extrapolated from human medicine and canine studies. The pharmacokinetics in healthy beagle dogs has been reported; however, pharmacokinetic data in cats are lacking. The goal of this study was to determine pharmacokinetic data for healthy, awake cats receiving an infusion of fenoldopam. Six healthy, awake, client-owned cats aged 2-6 years old received a 120-min constant rate infusion of fenoldopam at 0.8 μg/kg/min followed by a 20-min washout period. Ascorbate stabilized plasma samples were collected during and after the infusion for the measurement of fenoldopam concentration by HPLC with mass spectrometry detection. This study showed that the geometric mean of the volume of distribution, clearance, and half-life (198 mL/kg, 46 mL/kg/min, and 3.0 mins) is similar to pharmacokinetic parameters for humans. No adverse events were noted. Fenoldopam at a constant rate infusion of 0.8 μg/kg per min was well tolerated in healthy cats. Based on the results, further evaluation of fenoldopam in cats with kidney disease is recommended. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Being with and Being There: Our Enactment of Wide-Awakeness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Rebecca

    2017-01-01

    Maxine Greene championed that teachers and students can discover openings providing space for the development of wide-awakeness through art and aesthetic education. Wide-awakeness is a heightened sense of consciousness encouraging critical awareness and deep engagement with one's world. As individuals come alive in this way, their open-minded…

  6. Anaesthesia for awake craniotomy: A report of two cases in national ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Anaesthesia for neurosurgery while the patient remains awake requires a highly motivated patient and provision of high safety standard. Resection of brain tumours may cause neurological sequelae especially in the eloquent cortex depending on the site and size of tumour. Awake craniotomy which allows monitoring and ...

  7. Resection of highly language-eloquent brain lesions based purely on rTMS language mapping without awake surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ille, Sebastian; Sollmann, Nico; Butenschoen, Vicki M; Meyer, Bernhard; Ringel, Florian; Krieg, Sandro M

    2016-12-01

    The resection of left-sided perisylvian brain lesions harbours the risk of postoperative language impairment. Therefore the individual patient's language distribution is investigated by intraoperative direct cortical stimulation (DCS) during awake surgery. Yet, not all patients qualify for awake surgery. Non-invasive language mapping by repetitive navigated transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) has frequently shown a high correlation in comparison with the results of DCS language mapping in terms of language-negative brain regions. The present study analyses the extent of resection (EOR) and functional outcome of patients who underwent left-sided perisylvian resection of brain lesions based purely on rTMS language mapping. Four patients with left-sided perisylvian brain lesions (two gliomas WHO III, one glioblastoma, one cavernous angioma) underwent rTMS language mapping prior to surgery. Data from rTMS language mapping and rTMS-based diffusion tensor imaging fibre tracking (DTI-FT) were transferred to the intraoperative neuronavigation system. Preoperatively, 5 days after surgery (POD5), and 3 months after surgery (POM3) clinical follow-up examinations were performed. No patient suffered from a new surgery-related aphasia at POM3. Three patients underwent complete resection immediately, while one patient required a second rTMS-based resection some days later to achieve the final, complete resection. The present study shows for the first time the feasibility of successfully resecting language-eloquent brain lesions based purely on the results of negative language maps provided by rTMS language mapping and rTMS-based DTI-FT. In very select cases, this technique can provide a rescue strategy with an optimal functional outcome and EOR when awake surgery is not feasible.

  8. Dexmedetomidine sedation for awake fiberoptic intubation of patients with difficult airways due to severe odontogenic cervicofacial infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Barry C; Sutter, Steven J

    2011-06-01

    Odontogenic infections present challenging airway scenarios to surgeons and anesthesiologists. Among specialists, there is controversy over airway management for those patients with airways made difficult by trismus and swelling with anatomic impingement and derangement. Awake fiberoptic intubation has achieved favor in the oral and maxillofacial surgery and anesthesiology communities for management of such difficult airways, but patient comfort and anxiety management with traditional agents may prove hazardous because of potential suppression of protective mechanisms and respiratory depression. Three cases are presented showing the utility and safety of the use of dexmedetomidine sedation for presurgical airway instrumentation and insertion in patients with challenging airways because of severe cervicofacial odontogenic infections. Dexmedetomidine administration provided safe and effective sedation and anxiolysis for awake fiberoptic airway instrumentation and airway insertion in patients presenting with severe cervicofacial infections with difficult airways because of anatomic obstruction. Dexmedetomidine sedation is advocated for use in awake fiberoptic intubation of patients with cervicofacial infections and difficult airways because of its ability to provide sedation, analgesia, reversible anterograde amnesia, and anxiolysis without impairment of protective reflexes, respiratory depression, or hemodynamic compromise. One of the most significant challenges facing oral and maxillofacial surgeons is the difficult airway. Anatomically compromised airways present unique clinically daunting situations to both surgeon and anesthesiologist, who are both charged with the provision of safe, effective preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative airway management. Among these conditions, odontogenic infections and patients with head and neck trauma, temporomandibular disorders, orofacial tumors, and severe craniofacial anomalies present for surgical treatment by the

  9. Optical methods and integrated systems for brain imaging in awake, untethered animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murari, Kartikeya

    Imaging is a powerful tool for biomedical research offering non-contact and minimally or non-invasive means of investigating at multiple scales---from single molecules to large populations of cells. Imaging in awake, behaving animals is an emerging field that offers the additional advantage of being able to study physiological processes and structures in a more natural state than what is possible in tissue slices or even in anesthetized animals. To date, most imaging in awake animals has used optical fiber bundles or electrical cables to transfer signals to traditional imaging-system components. However, the fibers or cables tether the animal and greatly limit the kind and duration of animal behavior that can be studied using imaging methods. This work involves three distinct yet related approaches to fulfill the goal of imaging in unanesthetized, unrestrained animals---optical techniques for functional and structural imaging, development of novel photodetectors and the design of miniaturized imaging systems. I hypothesized that the flow within vessels might act as a contrast-enhancing agent and improve the visualization of vascular architecture using laser speckle imaging. When imaging rodent cerebral vasculature I saw a two to four fold increase in the contrast-to-noise ratios and was able to visualize 10--30% more vascular features over reflectance techniques. I designed a complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) photodetector array that was comparable in sensitivity and noise performance to cooled CCD sensors, able to image fluorescence from a single cell, while running at faster frame rates. Next, I designed an imaging system weighing under 6 grams and occupying less than 4 cm3. The system incorporated multispectral illumination, adjustable focusing optics and the high-sensitivity CMOS imager. I was able to implement a variety of optical modalities with the system and performed reflectance, fluorescence, spectroscopic and laser speckle imaging with my

  10. Default-mode-like network activation in awake rodents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaymin Upadhyay

    Full Text Available During wakefulness and in absence of performing tasks or sensory processing, the default-mode network (DMN, an intrinsic central nervous system (CNS network, is in an active state. Non-human primate and human CNS imaging studies have identified the DMN in these two species. Clinical imaging studies have shown that the pattern of activity within the DMN is often modulated in various disease states (e.g., Alzheimer's, schizophrenia or chronic pain. However, whether the DMN exists in awake rodents has not been characterized. The current data provides evidence that awake rodents also possess 'DMN-like' functional connectivity, but only subsequent to habituation to what is initially a novel magnetic resonance imaging (MRI environment as well as physical restraint. Specifically, the habituation process spanned across four separate scanning sessions (Day 2, 4, 6 and 8. At Day 8, significant (p<0.05 functional connectivity was observed amongst structures such as the anterior cingulate (seed region, retrosplenial, parietal, and hippocampal cortices. Prior to habituation (Day 2, functional connectivity was only detected (p<0.05 amongst CNS structures known to mediate anxiety (i.e., anterior cingulate (seed region, posterior hypothalamic area, amygdala and parabracial nucleus. In relating functional connectivity between cingulate-default-mode and cingulate-anxiety structures across Days 2-8, a significant inverse relationship (r = -0.65, p = 0.0004 was observed between these two functional interactions such that increased cingulate-DMN connectivity corresponded to decreased cingulate anxiety network connectivity. This investigation demonstrates that the cingulate is an important component of both the rodent DMN-like and anxiety networks.

  11. Teaching and sustainably implementing awake craniotomy in resource-poor settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howe, Kathryn L; Zhou, Guosheng; July, Julius; Totimeh, Teddy; Dakurah, Thomas; Malomo, Adefolarin O; Mahmud, Muhammad R; Ismail, Nasiru J; Bernstein, Mark A

    2013-12-01

    Awake craniotomy for brain tumor resection has the benefit of avoiding a general anesthetic and decreasing associated costs (e.g., intensive care unit beds and intravenous line insertion). In low- and middle-income countries, significant resource limitations for the system and individual make awake craniotomy an ideal tool, yet it is infrequently used. We sought to determine if awake craniotomy could be effectively taught and implemented safely and sustainably in low- and middle-income countries. A neurosurgeon experienced in the procedure taught awake craniotomy to colleagues in China, Indonesia, Ghana, and Nigeria during the period 2007-2012. Patients were selected on the basis of suspected intraaxial tumor, absence of major dysphasia or confusion, and ability to tolerate the positioning. Data were recorded by the local surgeons and included preoperative imaging, length of hospital admission, final pathology, postoperative morbidity, and mortality. Awake craniotomy was performed for 38 cases of suspected brain tumor; most procedures were completed independently. All patients underwent preoperative computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging. In 64% of cases, patients remained in the hospital craniotomy was successfully taught and implemented in 6 neurosurgical centers in China, Indonesia, Ghana, and Nigeria. Awake craniotomy is safe, resource-sparing, and sustainable. The data suggest awake craniotomy has the potential to significantly improve access to neurosurgical care in resource-challenged settings. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Anaesthetic Management of Supratentorial Tumor Craniotomy Using Awake-Throughout Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafiq, Faraz; Salim, Fahad; Enam, Ather; Parkash, Jai; Faheem, Mohammad

    2017-12-01

    The authors are reporting an anaesthetic management of patient presenting with left parietal lobe space occupying lesion and scheduled for Awake-craniotomy. Awake-throughout approach using scalp block was planned. Among techniques reported for keeping patient awake during the surgery, this one is really underutilized. The successful conduct requires thorough preoperative assessment and psychological preparation. We used powerpoint presentation as a preoperative teaching tool. The anatomical landmark technique was used to institute scalp block, where individual nerves were targeted bilaterally. Patient remained stable throughout and participated actively in intraoperative neurological monitoring. Postoperative period showed remarkable recovery, better pain control, and shorter length of stay in hospital.

  13. Awake insertion of a Laryngeal Mask Airway-Proseal™ as alternative to awake fiberoptic intubation in management of anticipated difficult airway in ambulatory surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matilde Zaballos

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and objectives The decision whether to manage an ambulatory patient with a previously documented difficult airway with a supraglottic device remain controversial. We report an awake insertion of a Laryngeal Mask Airway Proseal™ in a patient with known difficult airway scheduled for ambulatory surgery. Case report A 46-yr-old woman was programmed as a day case surgery for breast nodule resection. Her anesthetic record included an impossible intubation with cancelation of surgery and subsequent awake fibroscopic intubation. She reported emotional distress with the previous experience and declined this approach. In view of the previous experience, an awake airway control with a Laryngeal Mask Airway Proseal™ was planned after explaining and reassuring the patient. After adequate topicalisation, a size 4 Laryngeal Mask Airway Proseal™ was successfully inserted after two attempts, and their patency was confirmed by capnography. Anesthesia was induced intravenously and the surgery was uneventful. Conclusion We describe a feasible alternative strategy to awake intubation in a patient with known difficult airway undergoing ambulatory surgery. In this specific clinical situation, if tracheal intubation is deemed unnecessary, awake supraglottic airway might allow adequate ventilation and their use should be considered.

  14. Pediatric awake craniotomy for seizure focus resection with dexmedetomidine sedation-a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheshadri, Veena; Chandramouli, B A

    2016-08-01

    Resection of lesions near the eloquent cortex of brain necessitates awake craniotomy to reduce the risk of permanent neurologic deficits during surgery. There are limited reports of anesthetic management of awake craniotomy in pediatric patients. This report is on use of dexmedetomidine sedation for awake craniotomy in a 11-year-old child, without any airway adjuncts throughout the procedure. Dexmedetomidine infusion administered at a dosage of 0.2 to 0.7μg kg(-1) h(-1) provided adequate sedation for the entire procedure. There were no untoward incidents or any interference with electrocorticography, intraoperative stimulation, and functional mapping. Adequate preoperative visits and counseling of patient and parents regarding course and nature of events along with well-planned intraoperative management are of utmost importance in a pediatric age group for successful intraoperative awake craniotomy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Technical Aspects of Awake Craniotomy With Mapping for Brain Tumors in a Limited Resource Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leal, Rafael Teixeira Magalhaes; Barcellos, Bruno Mendonça; Landeiro, Jose Alberto

    2018-02-13

    Brain tumor surgery near or within eloquent regions is increasingly common and is associated with a high risk of neurological injury. Awake craniotomy with mapping has been shown to be a valid method to preserve neurological function while increasing the extent of resection. However, the technique used varies greatly among centers. Most count on professionals such as neuropsychologists, speech therapists, neurophysiologists or neurologists to help in intraoperative patient evaluation. We describe our technique with the sole participation of neurosurgeons and anesthesiologists. A retrospective review of 19 patients who underwent awake craniotomies for brain tumors between January 2013 and February 2017 at a tertiary university hospital was performed. We sought to identify and describe the most critical stages involved in this surgery as well as show the complications associated to our technique. Preoperative preparation, positioning, anesthesia, brain mapping, resection and management of seizures and pain were stages deemed relevant to the accomplishment of an awake craniotomy. Sixteen percent of the patients developed new post-operative deficit. Seizures occurred in 24%. None of them led to awake craniotomy failure. We provide a thorough description of the technique used in the awake craniotomies with mapping employed in our institution, where the intraoperative patient evaluation is carried out solely by neurosurgeons and anesthesiologists. The absence of other specialized personnel and equipment does not necessarily preclude successful mapping during awake craniotomy. Hopefully, we are providing helpful information for those who wish to offer function-guided tumor resection in their own centers. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. Awake tracheal intubation using Pentax airway scope in 30 patients: A Case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Payal Kajekar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Pentax airway scope (AWS has been successfully used for managing difficult intubations. In this case series, we aimed to evaluate the success rate and time taken to complete intubation, when AWS was used for awake tracheal intubation. Methods: We prospectively evaluated the use of AWS for awake tracheal intubation in 30 patients. Indication for awake intubation, intubation time, total time to complete tracheal intubation, laryngoscopic view (Cormack and Lehane grade, total dose of local anaesthetic used, anaesthetists rating and patient′s tolerance of the procedure were recorded. Results: The procedure was successful in 25 out of the 30 patients (83%. The mean (standard deviation intubation time and total time to complete the tracheal intubation was 5.4 (2.4 and 13.9 (3.7 min, respectively in successful cases. The laryngeal view was grade 1 in 24 and grade 2 in one of 25 successful intubations. In three out of the five patients where the AWS failed, awake tracheal intubation was successfully completed with the assistance of flexible fibre optic scope (FOS. Conclusion: Awake tracheal intubation using AWS was successful in 83% of patients. Success rate can be further improved using a combination of AWS and FOS. Anaesthesiologists who do not routinely use FOS may find AWS easier to use for awake tracheal intubation using an oral route.

  17. Patients' perspective on awake craniotomy for brain tumors-single center experience in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leal, Rafael Teixeira Magalhaes; da Fonseca, Clovis Orlando; Landeiro, Jose Alberto

    2017-04-01

    Awake craniotomy with brain mapping is the gold standard for eloquent tissue localization. Patients' tolerability and satisfaction have been shown to be high; however, it is a matter of debate whether these findings could be generalized, since patients across the globe have their own cultural backgrounds and may perceive and accept this procedure differently. We conducted a prospective qualitative study about the perception and tolerability of awake craniotomy in a population of consecutive brain tumor patients in Brazil between January 2013 and April 2015. Seventeen patients were interviewed using a semi-structured model with open-ended questions. Patients' thoughts were grouped into five categories: (1) overall perception: no patient considered awake craniotomy a bad experience, and most understood the rationale behind it. They were positively surprised with the surgery; (2) memory: varied from nothing to the entire surgery; (3) negative sensations: in general, it was painless and comfortable. Remarks concerning discomfort on the operating table were made; (4) postoperative recovery: perception of the postoperative period was positive; (5) previous surgical experiences versus awake craniotomy: patients often preferred awake surgery over other surgery under general anesthesia, including craniotomies. Awake craniotomy for brain tumors was well tolerated and yielded high levels of satisfaction in a population of patients in Brazil. This technique should not be avoided under the pretext of compromising patients' well-being.

  18. Effect of nitroglycerin on myocardial collateral conductance in awake dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brazzamano, S.; Rembert, J.C.; Greenfield, J.C. Jr.

    1988-01-01

    Conductance of the coronary collateral circulation during the course of two abrupt circumflex coronary occlusions was measured in awake dogs ∼ 2 wk after collateral vessels were stimulated to develop. The pressure gradient from the central aorta to the distal circumflex coronary artery was measured, and myocardial blood flow was determined by 9-μm radioactive microspheres at 30 s and 4 min after coronary occlusions. Collateral conductance was calculated as mean collateral blood flow divided by the mean aorta-coronary pressure gradient. Before nitroglycerin, collateral conductance increased in all eight dogs from 30 s to 4 min. After nitroglycerin administration, the conductance at 30 s increased from the prenitroglycerin control value to 0.014 ± 0.012 ml·min -1 ·g -1 ·mmHg -1 . The mean change in conductance from 30 s to 4 min postnitroglycerin was significantly less than during prenitroglycerin. These data indicate that an increase in conductance during coronary occlusion occurs even in the immature collateral circulation. This effect presumably takes place in the arterial smooth muscle at the origin of the collateral vasculature

  19. Neural representation of face familiarity in an awake chimpanzee

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirokata Fukushima

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Evaluating the familiarity of faces is critical for social animals as it is the basis of individual recognition. In the present study, we examined how face familiarity is reflected in neural activities in our closest living relative, the chimpanzee. Skin-surface event-related brain potentials (ERPs were measured while a fully awake chimpanzee observed photographs of familiar and unfamiliar chimpanzee faces (Experiment 1 and human faces (Experiment 2. The ERPs evoked by chimpanzee faces differentiated unfamiliar individuals from familiar ones around midline areas centered on vertex sites at approximately 200 ms after the stimulus onset. In addition, the ERP response to the image of the subject’s own face did not significantly diverge from those evoked by familiar chimpanzees, suggesting that the subject’s brain at a minimum remembered the image of her own face. The ERPs evoked by human faces were not influenced by the familiarity of target individuals. These results indicate that chimpanzee neural representations are more sensitive to the familiarity of conspecific than allospecific faces.

  20. Functional Connectivity Hubs and Networks in the Awake Marmoset Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belcher, Annabelle M; Yen, Cecil Chern-Chyi; Notardonato, Lucia; Ross, Thomas J; Volkow, Nora D; Yang, Yihong; Stein, Elliot A; Silva, Afonso C; Tomasi, Dardo

    2016-01-01

    In combination with advances in analytical methods, resting-state fMRI is allowing unprecedented access to a better understanding of the network organization of the brain. Increasing evidence suggests that this architecture may incorporate highly functionally connected nodes, or "hubs", and we have recently proposed local functional connectivity density (lFCD) mapping to identify highly-connected nodes in the human brain. Here, we imaged awake nonhuman primates to test whether, like the human brain, the marmoset brain contains FC hubs. Ten adult common marmosets (Callithrix jacchus) were acclimated to mild, comfortable restraint using individualized helmets. Following restraint training, resting BOLD data were acquired during eight consecutive 10 min scans for each subject. lFCD revealed prominent cortical and subcortical hubs of connectivity across the marmoset brain; specifically, in primary and secondary visual cortices (V1/V2), higher-order visual association areas (A19M/V6[DM]), posterior parietal and posterior cingulate areas (PGM and A23b/A31), thalamus, dorsal and ventral striatal areas (caudate, putamen, lateral septal nucleus, and anterior cingulate cortex (A24a). lFCD hubs were highly connected to widespread areas of the brain, and further revealed significant network-network interactions. These data provide a baseline platform for future investigations in a nonhuman primate model of the brain's network topology.

  1. Electroacupuncture-Assisted Craniotomy on an Awake Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amritpal Sidhu

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Although acupuncture has existed for over 2000 years, its application as an anesthetic aid began in the 1950s in China. The first surgical procedure performed under acupuncture anesthesia was a tonsillectomy. Soon thereafter, major and minor surgical procedures took place with electroacupuncture alone providing the anesthesia. The procedures performed were diverse, ranging from cardiothoracic surgery to dental extractions. Usage of acupuncture anesthesia, specifically in neurosurgery, has been well documented in hospitals across China, especially in Beijing, dating back to the 1970s. We present a case of a 65-year-old man who presented with right-sided body weakness. He had a past medical history of uncontrolled diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and obstructive sleep apnea requiring use of a nasal continuous positive airway pressure device during sleep. We performed a computed tomography brain scan, which revealed a left-sided acute on chronic subdural hemorrhage. Due to his multiple comorbidities, we decided to perform the surgical procedure under electroacupuncture anesthesia. The aim of this case report is to describe a craniotomy performed under electroacupuncture on an elderly patient with multiple comorbidities who was awake during the procedure and in whom this procedure, if it had been performed under general anesthesia, would have carried high risk.

  2. Electroacupuncture-Assisted Craniotomy on an Awake Patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidhu, Amritpal; Murgahayah, Trushna; Narayanan, Vairavan; Chandran, Hari; Waran, Vicknes

    2017-01-01

    Although acupuncture has existed for over 2000 years, its application as an anesthetic aid began in the 1950s in China. The first surgical procedure performed under acupuncture anesthesia was a tonsillectomy. Soon thereafter, major and minor surgical procedures took place with electroacupuncture alone providing the anesthesia. The procedures performed were diverse, ranging from cardiothoracic surgery to dental extractions. Usage of acupuncture anesthesia, specifically in neurosurgery, has been well documented in hospitals across China, especially in Beijing, dating back to the 1970s. We present a case of a 65-year-old man who presented with right-sided body weakness. He had a past medical history of uncontrolled diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and obstructive sleep apnea requiring use of a nasal continuous positive airway pressure device during sleep. We performed a computed tomography brain scan, which revealed a left-sided acute on chronic subdural hemorrhage. Due to his multiple comorbidities, we decided to perform the surgical procedure under electroacupuncture anesthesia. The aim of this case report is to describe a craniotomy performed under electroacupuncture on an elderly patient with multiple comorbidities who was awake during the procedure and in whom this procedure, if it had been performed under general anesthesia, would have carried high risk. Copyright © 2016 Medical Association of Pharmacopuncture Institute. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Anaesthetic management for awake craniotomy in brain glioma resection: initial experience in Military Hospital Mohamed V of Rabat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meziane, Mohammed; Elkoundi, Abdelghafour; Ahtil, Redouane; Guazaz, Miloudi; Mustapha, Bensghir; Haimeur, Charki

    2017-01-01

    The awake brain surgery is an innovative approach in the treatment of tumors in the functional areas of the brain. There are various anesthetic techniques for awake craniotomy (AC), including asleep-awake-asleep technique, monitored anesthesia care, and the recent introduced awake-awake-awake method. We describe our first experience with anesthetic management for awake craniotomy, which was a combination of these techniques with scalp nerve block, and propofol/rémifentanil target controlled infusion. A 28-year-oldmale underwent an awake craniotomy for brain glioma resection. The scalp nerve block was performed and a low sedative state was maintained until removal of bone flap. During brain glioma resection, the patient awake state was maintained without any complications. Once, the tumorectomy was completed, the level of anesthesia was deepened and a laryngeal mask airway was inserted. A well psychological preparation, a reasonable choice of anesthetic techniques and agents, and continuous team communication were some of the key challenges for successful outcome in our patient.

  4. Modulation-Frequency-Specific Adaptation in Awake Auditory Cortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beitel, Ralph E.; Vollmer, Maike; Heiser, Marc A.; Schreiner, Christoph E.

    2015-01-01

    Amplitude modulations are fundamental features of natural signals, including human speech and nonhuman primate vocalizations. Because natural signals frequently occur in the context of other competing signals, we used a forward-masking paradigm to investigate how the modulation context of a prior signal affects cortical responses to subsequent modulated sounds. Psychophysical “modulation masking,” in which the presentation of a modulated “masker” signal elevates the threshold for detecting the modulation of a subsequent stimulus, has been interpreted as evidence of a central modulation filterbank and modeled accordingly. Whether cortical modulation tuning is compatible with such models remains unknown. By recording responses to pairs of sinusoidally amplitude modulated (SAM) tones in the auditory cortex of awake squirrel monkeys, we show that the prior presentation of the SAM masker elicited persistent and tuned suppression of the firing rate to subsequent SAM signals. Population averages of these effects are compatible with adaptation in broadly tuned modulation channels. In contrast, modulation context had little effect on the synchrony of the cortical representation of the second SAM stimuli and the tuning of such effects did not match that observed for firing rate. Our results suggest that, although the temporal representation of modulated signals is more robust to changes in stimulus context than representations based on average firing rate, this representation is not fully exploited and psychophysical modulation masking more closely mirrors physiological rate suppression and that rate tuning for a given stimulus feature in a given neuron's signal pathway appears sufficient to engender context-sensitive cortical adaptation. PMID:25878263

  5. Fast optical signal not detected in awake behaving monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radhakrishnan, Harsha; Vanduffel, Wim; Deng, Hong Ping; Ekstrom, Leeland; Boas, David A; Franceschini, Maria Angela

    2009-04-01

    While the ability of near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) to measure cerebral hemodynamic evoked responses (slow optical signal) is well established, its ability to measure non-invasively the 'fast optical signal' is still controversial. Here, we aim to determine the feasibility of performing NIRS measurements of the 'fast optical signal' or Event-Related Optical Signals (EROS) under optimal experimental conditions in awake behaving macaque monkeys. These monkeys were implanted with a 'recording well' to expose the dura above the primary visual cortex (V1). A custom-made optical probe was inserted and fixed into the well. The close proximity of the probe to the brain maximized the sensitivity to changes in optical properties in the cortex. Motion artifacts were minimized by physical restraint of the head. Full-field contrast-reversing checkerboard stimuli were presented to monkeys trained to perform a visual fixation task. In separate sessions, two NIRS systems (CW4 and ISS FD oximeter), which previously showed the ability to measure the fast signal in human, were used. In some sessions EEG was acquired simultaneously with the optical signal. The increased sensitivity to cortical optical changes with our experimental setup was quantified with 3D Monte Carlo simulations on a segmented MRI monkey head. Averages of thousands of stimuli in the same animal, or grand averages across the two animals and across repeated sessions, did not lead to detection of the fast optical signal using either amplitude or phase of the optical signal. Hemodynamic responses and visual evoked potentials were instead always detected with single trials or averages of a few stimuli. Based on these negative results, despite the optimal experimental conditions, we doubt the usefulness of non-invasive fast optical signal measurements with NIRS.

  6. Associations of Sleep Quality and Awake Physical Activity with Fluctuations in Nocturnal Blood Pressure in Patients with Cardiovascular Risk Factors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manabu Kadoya

    Full Text Available Sleep quality and awake physical activity are important behavioral factors involved in the occurrence of cardiovascular diseases, potentially through nocturnal blood pressure (BP changes. However, the impacts of quantitatively measured sleep quality and awake physical activity on BP fluctuation, and their relationships with several candidate causal factors for nocturnal hypertension are not well elucidated.This cross-sectional study included 303 patients registered in the HSCAA study. Measurements included quantitatively determined sleep quality parameters and awake physical activity obtained by actigraph, nocturnal systolic BP (SBP fall [100 × (1- sleep SBP/awake SBP ratio], apnea hypopnea index, urinary sodium and cortisol secretion, plasma aldosterone concentration and renin activity, insulin resistance index, parameters of heart rate variability (HRV, and plasma brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF.Simple regression analysis showed that time awake after sleep onset (r = -0.150, a parameter of sleep quality, and awake physical activity (r = 0.164 were significantly correlated with nocturnal SBP fall. Among those, time awake after sleep onset (β = -0.179 and awake physical activity (β = 0.190 were significantly and independently associated with nocturnal SBP fall in multiple regression analysis. In a subgroup of patients without taking anti-hypertensive medications, both time awake after sleep onset (β = -0.336 and awake physical activity (β = 0.489 were more strongly and independently associated with nocturnal SBP falls.Sleep quality and awake physical activity were found to be significantly associated with nocturnal SBP fall, and that relationship was not necessarily confounded by candidate causal factors for nocturnal hypertension.

  7. [Non-verbal communication of patients submitted to heart surgery: from awaking after anesthesia to extubation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werlang, Sueli da Cruz; Azzolin, Karina; Moraes, Maria Antonieta; de Souza, Emiliane Nogueira

    2008-12-01

    Preoperative orientation is an essential tool for patient's communication after surgery. This study had the objective of evaluating non-verbal communication of patients submitted to cardiac surgery from the time of awaking from anesthesia until extubation, after having received preoperative orientation by nurses. A quantitative cross-sectional study was developed in a reference hospital of the state of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil, from March to July 2006. Data were collected in the pre and post operative periods. A questionnaire to evaluate non-verbal communication on awaking from sedation was applied to a sample of 100 patients. Statistical analysis included Student, Wilcoxon, and Mann Whittney tests. Most of the patients responded satisfactorily to non-verbal communication strategies as instructed on the preoperative orientation. Thus, non-verbal communication based on preoperative orientation was helpful during the awaking period.

  8. Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexey Kondrashov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We aimed to perform a chemical analysis of both Alibernet red wine and an alcohol-free Alibernet red wine extract (AWE and to investigate the effects of AWE on nitric oxide and reactive oxygen species production as well as blood pressure development in normotensive Wistar Kyoto (WKY and spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs. Total antioxidant capacity together with total phenolic and selected mineral content was measured in wine and AWE. Young 6-week-old male WKY and SHR were treated with AWE (24,2 mg/kg/day for 3 weeks. Total NOS and SOD activities, eNOS and SOD1 protein expressions, and superoxide production were determined in the tissues. Both antioxidant capacity and phenolic content were significantly higher in AWE compared to wine. The AWE increased NOS activity in the left ventricle, aorta, and kidney of SHR, while it did not change NOS activity in WKY rats. Similarly, increased SOD activity in the plasma and left ventricle was observed in SHR only. There were no changes in eNOS and SOD1 expressions. In conclusion, phenolics and minerals included in AWE may contribute directly to increased NOS and SOD activities of SHR. Nevertheless, 3 weeks of AWE treatment failed to affect blood pressure of SHR.

  9. Supine awake oximetry as a screening tool for daytime hypercapnia in super-obese patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Yewon; Garden, Frances L; Jee, Adelle S; Srikantha, Subash; Gupta, Saurabh; Buchanan, Peter R; Collett, Peter W; Marks, Guy B; Vedam, Hima

    2017-10-01

    Evidence-based screening tools are required for detection of daytime hypercapnia in high-risk patient populations. To determine the validity of supine awake oximetry as a test for daytime hypercapnia and severe sleep disordered breathing (SDB) in super-obese patients. This was a cross-sectional diagnostic test evaluation of super-obese adults (body mass index >50 kg/m 2 ) presenting to Liverpool Hospital, Australia, between 2009 and 2015 for diagnostic polysomnography (PSG) and arterial blood gas measurement. Supine awake oxygen saturation (SpO 2 ) was determined using oximetry measurements from the first three awake epochs of raw PSG data. Sensitivity and specificity of SpO 2 for detecting patients with daytime hypercapnia (PaCO 2 >45 mmHg) and severe SDB (respiratory disturbance index (RDI) >30 events/h) were assessed at various cut-off points and displayed using a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve. Area under the ROC curve and positive and negative predictive values (PPV and NPV) in the present patient population were derived. Of 52 patients, 23 (44%) had daytime hypercapnia. SpO 2 measured awake in the supine position was associated with the presence of daytime hypercapnia but not with the presence of severe SDB. Overall, awake supine SpO 2 <91.2% had 34.8% sensitivity, 96.6% specificity and 88.8% PPV, and SpO 2 <96.7% had 87.0% sensitivity, 20.7% specificity and 66.7% NPV for the presence of daytime hypercapnia. Awake supine oximetry is an easily performed test that may have novel use in identifying patients at high risk of respiratory failure. Future studies are required to evaluate prospectively its role in screening patients at risk of daytime hypercapnia. © 2017 Royal Australasian College of Physicians.

  10. Awake seizures after pure sleep-related epilepsy: a systematic review and implications for driving law.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, R H; King, W H; Johnston, J A; Smith, P E M

    2010-02-01

    Who with sleep seizures is safe to drive? Driving law is controversial; ineligibility varies between individual US states and EU countries. Current UK driving law is strongly influenced by a single-centre study from 1974 where most participants were not taking antiepileptic drugs (AEDs). However, pure sleep-related epilepsy is often fully controlled on medication, and its withdrawal can provoke awake seizures. This systematic review asked, 'What is the risk of awake seizures in pure sleep-related epilepsy?' 9885 titles were identified; 2312 were excluded (not human or adult); 40 full texts were reviewed; six papers met our inclusion criteria; each of these six studies had a different pure sleep-related epilepsy definition. Using the largest prospective study, we were able to calculate next year's awake seizure chance (treated with antiepileptic medication). This was maximal in the second year: 5.7% (95% CI 3.0 to 10.4%). European licensing bodies including the UK's Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency broadly accept a risk of less than 20% for Group 1 licensing. However, this study excluded patients with frontal-lobe epilepsies. Furthermore, follow-up (n=160) varied from 2 to 6 years, yet new awake seizures may occur even after 10-20 years of pure sleep-related epilepsy A paucity of evidence underpins present licensing law; current rulings would be difficult to defend if legally challenged. The law may be penalising people with pure sleep-related epilepsy without increased risk of awake seizures, while failing to identify subgroups at unacceptable risk of an awake seizure at the wheel.

  11. Accurate motor mapping in awake common marmosets using micro-electrocorticographical stimulation and stochastic threshold estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosugi, Akito; Takemi, Mitsuaki; Tia, Banty; Castagnola, Elisa; Ansaldo, Alberto; Sato, Kenta; Awiszus, Friedemann; Seki, Kazuhiko; Ricci, Davide; Fadiga, Luciano; Iriki, Atsushi; Ushiba, Junichi

    2018-03-01

    Motor map has been widely used as an indicator of motor skills and learning, cortical injury, plasticity, and functional recovery. Cortical stimulation mapping using epidural electrodes is recently adopted for animal studies. However, several technical limitations still remain. Test-retest reliability of epidural cortical stimulation (ECS) mapping has not been examined in detail. Many previous studies defined evoked movements and motor thresholds by visual inspection, and thus, lacked quantitative measurements. A reliable and quantitative motor map is important to elucidate the mechanisms of motor cortical reorganization. The objective of the current study was to perform reliable ECS mapping of motor representations based on the motor thresholds, which were stochastically estimated by motor evoked potentials and chronically implanted micro-electrocorticographical (μECoG) electrode arrays, in common marmosets. Approach. ECS was applied using the implanted μECoG electrode arrays in three adult common marmosets under awake conditions. Motor evoked potentials were recorded through electromyographical electrodes implanted in upper limb muscles. The motor threshold was calculated through a modified maximum likelihood threshold-hunting algorithm fitted with the recorded data from marmosets. Further, a computer simulation confirmed reliability of the algorithm. Main results. Computer simulation suggested that the modified maximum likelihood threshold-hunting algorithm enabled to estimate motor threshold with acceptable precision. In vivo ECS mapping showed high test-retest reliability with respect to the excitability and location of the cortical forelimb motor representations. Significance. Using implanted μECoG electrode arrays and a modified motor threshold-hunting algorithm, we were able to achieve reliable motor mapping in common marmosets with the ECS system. © 2018 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  12. [Awake Nasotracheal Intubation for a 4-Year-old Boy with an Oral Penetrating Toothbrush Injury].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Naoya; Ando, Kokichi; Saito, Kazutomo; Toyama, Hiroaki; Fudeta, Hiroto; Yamauchi, Masanori

    2015-09-01

    We report a case of an oral penetrating injury caused by a toothbrush in a 4-year-old 17-kg boy. The toothbrush was lodged in the right cervical region through the oral cavity, and emergency surgery for removal was planned under general anesthesia. Although mask ventilation was not possible because of the protruding toothbrush handle, awake nasotracheal intubation was successfully performed with a fiber-scope and intravenous fentanyl 25 μg. We conclude that appropriate analgesics could facilitate awake intubation in pediatric patients.

  13. Per-oral flexible laryngoscopy in awake neonates and infants: the 'pacifier' technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loizou, P; Haloob, N; Evgeniou, E

    2014-02-01

    It is common for ENT specialists to be called to neonatal intensive care units to assess neonates with suspected laryngomalacia. At Addenbrooke's Hospital, Cambridge, UK, it is standard practice to initially try to assess the larynx whilst the patient is awake. This can cause the patient to cry and become irritable, and can induce worry in the parents. A literature search revealed that numerous procedures have been successfully performed on neonates and infants whilst they were being pacified. This paper describes various procedures where pacification has been used effectively. Furthermore, it reports a pacification technique developed for per-oral flexible laryngoscopy in awake neonates and infants.

  14. Inflammatory Profile of Awake Function-Controlled Craniotomy and Craniotomy under General Anesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus Klimek

    2009-01-01

    Results. Plasma IL-6 level significantly increased with time similarly in both groups. No significant plasma IL-8 and IL-10 change was observed in both experimental groups. The VAS pain score was significantly lower in the awake group compared to the anesthesia group at 12 hours postoperative. Postoperative anxiety and stress declined similarly in both groups. Conclusion. This study suggests that awake function-controlled craniotomy does not cause a significantly different inflammatory response than craniotomy performed under general anesthesia. It is also likely that function-controlled craniotomy does not cause a greater emotional challenge than tumor resection under general anesthesia.

  15. Awake surgery between art and science. Part I: clinical and operative settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talacchi, Andrea; Santini, Barbara; Casagrande, Francesca; Alessandrini, Franco; Zoccatelli, Giada; Squintani, Giovanna M

    2013-01-01

    Awake surgery requires coordinated teamwork and communication between the surgeon and the anesthesiologist, as he monitors the patient, the neuroradiologist as he interprets the images for intraoperative confirmation, and the neuropsychologist and neurophysiologist as they evaluate in real-time the patient's responses to commands and questions. To improve comparison across published studies on clinical assessment and operative settings in awake surgery, we reviewed the literature, focusing on methodological differences and aims. In complex, interdisciplinary medical care, such differences can affect the outcome and the cost-benefit ratio of the treatment. Standardization of intraoperative mapping and related controversies will be discussed in Part II.

  16. The Sleep Elaboration-Awake Pruning (SEAP) theory of memory: long term memories grow in complexity during sleep and undergo selection while awake. Clinical, psychopharmacological and creative implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charlton, Bruce G; Andras, Peter

    2009-07-01

    Long term memory (LTM) systems need to be adaptive such that they enhance an organism's reproductive fitness and self-reproducing in order to maintain their complexity of communications over time in the face of entropic loss of information. Traditional 'representation-consolidation' accounts conceptualize memory adaptiveness as due to memories being 'representations' of the environment, and the longevity of memories as due to 'consolidation' processes. The assumption is that memory representations are formed while an animal is awake and interacting with the environment, and these memories are consolidated mainly while the animal is asleep. So the traditional view of memory is 'instructionist' and assumes that information is transferred from the environment into the brain. By contrast, we see memories as arising endogenously within the brain's LTM system mainly during sleep, to create complex but probably maladaptive memories which are then simplified ('pruned') and selected during the awake period. When awake the LTM system is brought into a more intense interaction with past and present experience. Ours is therefore a 'selectionist' account of memory, and could be termed the Sleep Elaboration-Awake Pruning (or SEAP) theory. The SEAP theory explains the longevity of memories in the face of entropy by the tendency for memories to grow in complexity during sleep; and explains the adaptiveness of memory by selection for consistency with perceptions and previous memories during the awake state. Sleep is therefore that behavioural state during which most of the internal processing of the system of LTM occurs; and the reason sleep remains poorly understood is that its primary activity is the expansion of long term memories. By re-conceptualizing the relationship between memory, sleep and the environment; SEAP provides a radically new framework for memory research, with implications for the measurement of memory and the design of empirical investigations in clinical

  17. Technical Note: On The Usage and Development of the AWAKE Web Server and Web Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Berger, Dillon Tanner

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this technical note is to give a brief explanation of the AWAKE Web Server, the current web applications it serves, and how to edit, maintain, and update the source code. The majority of this paper is dedicated to the development of the server and its web applications.

  18. Stay Awake Behind the Wheel (A Minute of Health with CDC)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2016-11-10

    Being a safe driver requires complete focus on the road and the cars around you. This podcast discusses the importance of staying awake while driving.  Created: 11/10/2016 by MMWR.   Date Released: 11/10/2016.

  19. a-Band Oscillations in Intracellular Membrane Potentials of Dentate Gyrus Neurons in Awake Rodents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Ross W.; Strowbridge, Ben W.

    2014-01-01

    The hippocampus and dentate gyrus play critical roles in processing declarative memories and spatial information. Dentate granule cells, the first relay in the trisynaptic circuit through the hippocampus, exhibit low spontaneous firing rates even during locomotion. Using intracellular recordings from dentate neurons in awake mice operating a…

  20. Evaluating the procedure for performing awake cystometry in a mouse model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mann-Gow, Travis K.; Larson, Troy R.; Teigland Wøien, Chrissie

    2017-01-01

    technique for recording urinary bladder pressure in an awake, freely moving mouse. In addition, experimental data is presented to show how surgery, as well as tubing type and size, affect lower urinary tract function and recording sensitivity. The effect of tube diameter on pressure recording was assessed...

  1. Awake measures of nasal resistance and upper airway resistance on CPAP during sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masdeu, Maria J; Seelall, Vijay; Patel, Amit V; Ayappa, Indu; Rapoport, David M

    2011-02-15

    Since on CPAP, the nose is the primary determinant of upper airway resistance, we assess utility of noninvasive measures of nasal resistance during wakefulness as a predictor of directly assessed upper airway resistance on CPAP during sleep in patients with obstructive sleep apnea/hypopnea syndrome. Patients with complaints of snoring and excessive daytime sleepiness were recruited. 14 subjects underwent daytime evaluations including clinical assessment, subjective questionnaires to assess nasal symptoms and evaluation of nasal resistance with acoustic rhinometry (AR) and active anterior rhinomanometry (RM) in the sitting and supine positions. Patients underwent nocturnal polysomnography on optimal CPAP with measurements of supraglottic pressure to evaluate upper airway resistance. Comparisons were made between nasal resistance using AR and RM during wakefulness, and between AR and RM awake and upper airway resistance during sleep. Our study shows that measures of awake nasal resistance using AR and RM had little or no correlation to each other in the sitting position, whereas there was significant but weak correlation in the supine position. Upper airway resistance measured while on CPAP during sleep did not show significant relationships to any of the awake measures of nasal resistance (AR or RM). Awake measurements of nasal resistance do not seem to be predictive of upper airway resistance during sleep on CPAP.

  2. Awake nasotracheal fiber-optic intubation in a patient with severe ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Facial trauma significantly increases the difficulty in airway management in the emergency department or during the provision of anesthesia for surgery. We present airway management in a patient with severe facial trauma that necessitated awake nasotracheal fiber-optic intubation for safe induction of anesthesia.

  3. Awake nasotracheal fiber-optic intubation in a patient with severe ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    using a flexible fiber-optic choledochoscope (1) The technique is indicated in patients with difficult airways in whom losing the airway following induction of anes- thesia is deemed dangerous or fatal. Successful awake fiber-optic intubation requires con-. Introduction. Trauma to the face presents considerable challenges to.

  4. Inflammatory profile of awake function-controlled craniotomy and craniotomy under general anesthesia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Klimek (Markus); J.W. Hol (Jaap Willem); S.C.A. Wens (Stephan); C. Heijmans-Antonissen (Claudia); S.P. Niehof (Sjoerd); A.J. Vincent (Arnaud); J. Klein (Jan); F.J. Zijlstra (Freek)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractBackground. Surgical stress triggers an inflammatory response and releases mediators into human plasma such as interleukins (ILs). Awake craniotomy and craniotomy performed under general anesthesia may be associated with different levels of stress. Our aim was to investigate whether

  5. The effect of single low-dose dexamethasone on vomiting during awake craniotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamata, Kotoe; Morioka, Nobutada; Maruyama, Takashi; Komayama, Noriaki; Nitta, Masayuki; Muragaki, Yoshihiro; Kawamata, Takakazu; Ozaki, Makoto

    2016-12-01

    Intraoperative vomiting leads to serious respiratory complications that could influence the surgical decision-making process for awake craniotomy. However, the use of antiemetics is still limited in Japan. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of prophylactically administered single low-dose dexamethasone on the incidence of vomiting during awake craniotomy. The frequency of hyperglycemia was also examined. We conducted a retrospective case review of awake craniotomy for glioma resection between 2012 and 2015. Of the 124 patients, 91 were included in the analysis. Dexamethasone was not used in 43 patients and the 48 remaining patients received an intravenous bolus of 4.95 mg dexamethasone at anesthetic induction. Because of stable operating conditions, no one required conscious sedation throughout functional mapping and tumor resection. Although dexamethasone pretreatment reduced the incidence of intraoperative vomiting (P = 0.027), the number of patients who complained of nausea was comparable (P = 0.969). No adverse events related to vomiting occurred intraoperatively. Baseline blood glucose concentration did not differ between each group (P = 0.143), but the samples withdrawn before emergence (P = 0.018), during the awake period (P craniotomy cases. However, as even a small dose of dexamethasone increases the risk for hyperglycemia, antiemetic prophylaxis with dexamethasone should be administered after careful consideration. Monitoring of perioperative blood glucose concentration is also necessary.

  6. Awake craniotomy in a developmentally delayed blind man with cognitive deficits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burbridge, Mark; Raazi, Mateen

    2013-04-01

    To describe the complex perioperative considerations and anesthetic management of a cognitively delayed blind adult male who underwent awake craniotomy to remove a left anterior temporal lobe epileptic focus. A 28-yr-old left-handed blind cognitively delayed man was scheduled for awake craniotomy to resect a left anterior temporal lobe epileptic focus due to intractable epilepsy despite multiple medications. His medical history was also significant for retinopathy of prematurity that rendered him legally blind in both eyes and an intracerebral hemorrhage shortly after birth that resulted in a chronic brain injury and developmental delay. His cognitive capacity was comparable with that of an eight year old. Since patient cooperation was the primary concern during the awake electrocorticography phase of surgery, careful assessment of the patient's ability to tolerate the procedure was undertaken. There was extensive planning between surgeons and anesthesiologists, and a patient-specific pharmacological strategy was devised to facilitate surgery. The operation proceeded without complication, the patient has remained seizure-free since the procedure, and his quality of life has improved dramatically. This case shows that careful patient assessment, effective interdisciplinary communication, and a carefully tailored anesthetic strategy can facilitate an awake craniotomy in a potentially uncooperative adult patient with diminished mental capacity and sensory deficits.

  7. Awake craniotomy for trapping a giant fusiform aneurysm of the middle cerebral artery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passacantilli, Emiliano; Anichini, Giulio; Cannizzaro, Delia; Fusco, Francesca; Pedace, Francesca; Lenzi, Jacopo; Santoro, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Giant fusiform aneurysms of the distal middle cerebral artery (MCA) are rare lesions that, because of the absence of an aneurysm neck and the presence of calcified walls and partial thrombosis, can be difficult to clip without sacrificing the parent vessel. Moreover, when the aneurysm is located in the dominant hemisphere, it is not possible to test language and cognitive functions during surgical intervention, making the closure of the parent vessel extremely dangerous. A 46-year-old woman presented with a one-year history of frontal headache without neurological deficit. A magnetic resonance imaging and an angiography showed a giant fusiform aneurysm of the left M2 tract. Because of the location and the absence of a neck, the aneurysm was considered difficult to coil and not amenable to preoperative balloon occlusion; thus, the patient was a candidate for surgical treatment. After a preoperative psychological evaluation, patient underwent awake craniotomy with the asleep-awake-asleep technique. A standard left pterional approach was performed to expose the internal carotid artery, the MCA and the aneurysm originating from the frontal branch of the MCA. Neurological examination responses remained unchanged during temporary parent artery occlusion, and trapping was successfully performed. Awake craniotomy is a useful option in intracranial aneurysm surgery because it permits neurological testing before vessels are permanently clipped or sacrificed. With the asleep-awake-asleep technique, it is possible to perform a standard pterional craniotomy, which allows good exposure of the vascular structures without cerebral retraction.

  8. Optimizing oxygenation and intubation conditions during awake fibre-optic intubation using a high-flow nasal oxygen-delivery system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badiger, S; John, M; Fearnley, R A; Ahmad, I

    2015-10-01

    Awake fibre-optic intubation is a widely practised technique for anticipated difficult airway management. Despite the administration of supplemental oxygen during the procedure, patients are still at risk of hypoxia because of the effects of sedation, local anaesthesia, procedural complications, and the presence of co-morbidities. Traditionally used oxygen-delivery devices are low flow, and most do not have a sufficient reservoir or allow adequate fresh gas flow to meet the patient's peak inspiratory flow rate, nor provide an adequate fractional inspired oxygen concentration to prevent desaturation should complications arise. A prospective observational study was conducted using a high-flow humidified transnasal oxygen-delivery system during awake fibre-optic intubation in 50 patients with anticipated difficult airways. There were no episodes of desaturation or hypercapnia using the high-flow system, and in all patients the oxygen saturation improved above baseline values, despite one instance of apnoea resulting from over-sedation. All patients reported a comfortable experience using the device. The high-flow nasal oxygen-delivery system improves oxygenation saturation, decreases the risk of desaturation during the procedure, and potentially, optimizes conditions for awake fibre-optic intubation. The soft nasal cannulae uniquely allow continuous oxygenation and simultaneous passage of the fibrescope and tracheal tube. The safety of the procedure may be increased, because any obstruction, hypoventilation, or periods of apnoea that may arise may be tolerated for longer, allowing more time to achieve ventilation in an optimally oxygenated patient. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Journal of Anaesthesia. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Emergent Awake tracheostomy--The five-year experience at an urban tertiary care center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Christina H; Friedman, Remy; White, Priscilla E; Mady, Leila J; Kalyoussef, Evelyne

    2015-11-01

    There are few studies that discuss the issues surrounding emergent awake tracheostomy. We aim to review the indications, anesthesia used, complications, and outcomes of patients undergoing urgent awake tracheostomy. Chart review. Medical charts of patients who underwent an emergent awake tracheostomy at our institution-affiliated tertiary care center over a 5-year period from 2009 to 2014 were reviewed. Data were collected from inpatient, outpatient, and operative records. Sixty-eight patients underwent emergent awake tracheostomy. Over half presented with hoarseness (n=37, 54.4%) and/or stridor (n=37, 54.4%). Acute upper airway obstruction secondary to malignancy was the most common indication and accounted for 58 cases (85.3%). Thirty-nine (70.1%) of the 55 patients with squamous cell carcinoma presented with advanced disease (stage III or IV). Other indications included glottic or subglottic stenosis (4.4%), failure to intubate (2.9%), and other (7.4%). Local anesthesia was used alone in 35.3% of cases and in combination with conscious sedation in 64.7% of cases. Mild bleeding occurred postoperatively in five patients (7.4%). There were no other postoperative complications. Nineteen patients were lost to follow-up. The mean follow-up of 49 patients was 7.2 weeks, ranging from 2 to 261 weeks. Long-term complications occurred in three patients and included tracheitis 7.4% and suprastomal granuloma 2.9%. Eleven patients (22%) were decannulated at a mean of 11.8 months following tracheostomy. Emergent awake tracheostomy should be considered in patients with impeding airway obstruction and is a safe and effective method to secure an airway in these patients. 4. © 2015 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  10. Organic and Non-Organic Language Disorders after Awake Brain Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elke De Witte

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Awake surgery with Direct Electrical Stimulation (DES is considered the ‘gold standard’ to resect brain tumours in the language dominant hemisphere (De Witte & Mariën, 2013. Although transient language impairments are common in the immediate postoperative phase, permanent postoperative language deficits seem to be rare (Duffau, 2007. Milian et al. (2014 stated that most patients tolerate the awake procedure well and would undergo a similar procedure again. However, postoperative psychological symptoms including recurrent distressing dreams and persistent avoidance of stimuli have been recorded following awake surgery (Goebel, Nabavi, Schubert, & Mehdorn, 2010; Milian et al., 2014. To the best of our knowledge, psychogenic language disturbances have never been described after awake surgery. In general, only a handful of non-organic, psychogenic language disorders have been reported in the literature (De Letter et al., 2012. We report three patients with left brain tumours (see table 1 who presented linguistic symptoms after awake surgery that were incompatible with the lesion location, suggesting a psychogenic origin. METHODS: Neurocognitive (language, memory, executive functions investigations were carried out before, during and after awake surgery (6 weeks, 6 months postsurgery on the basis of standardised tests. Pre- and postoperative (fMRI images, DTI results and intraoperative DES findings were analysed. A selection of tasks was used to map language intraoperatively (De Witte et al., 2013. In the postoperative phase spontaneous speech and behavioural phenomena to errors were video-recorded. RESULTS: Preoperative language tests did not reveal any speech or language problems. Intraoperatively, eloquent sites were mapped and preserved enabling good language skills at the end of the awake procedure. However, assessments in the first weeks postsurgery disclosed language and behavioural symptoms that support the hypothesis of a

  11. A moderate elevation of blood glucose level increases the effectiveness of thermoradiotherapy in a rat tumor model II. improved tumor control at clinically achievable temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berg, Ad P. van den; Berg-Blok, Anneke E. van den; Kal, Henk B.; Reinhold, Huib S.

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the therapeutic gain (at the TCD 50 level) that can be obtained by boosting thermoradiotherapy with intravenous glucose infusion at different temperatures. This completes our series of studies to determine the optimal conditions and the effectiveness of glucose administration at clinically achievable glucose levels and treatment temperatures. Methods and Materials: Subcutaneous rat rhabdomyosarcoma BA1112 was irradiated with graded single doses of 300-kV X-rays (dose range 0-60 Gy). Fifteen minutes after irradiation, a 100-min intravenous infusion was started, consisting of either glucose (20% solution, 2.4-3 g/kg/h) or saline as a control. Then heat was applied to the tumors at 42 deg. C or 43 deg. C (water bath) during a subsequent 100-min period of infusion. Tumor control was scored as the absence of palpable growth at 100 days after treatment. Results: Glucose infusion enhanced tumor control independent of temperature in the range 42-43 deg. C. At 42 deg. C, the TCD 50 for X-irradiation decreased by 5.9 Gy (SEM 1.8 Gy), from 41.6 (1.6) to 35.7 (1.5) Gy, and at 43 deg. C from 33.3 (1.6) to 27.3 (1.5) Gy, representing a glucose enhancement ratio of approximately 1.2. At doses corresponding to the TCD 50 at either 42 or 43 deg. C, the addition of glucose increased tumor control from 50% to 70%. An enhancement ratio of 2.1 was found for the combination of irradiation, glucose infusion, and heating at 43 deg. C, with respect to irradiation alone (TCD 50 56.3 Gy, reanalyzed earlier data). The contribution of combined heat and glucose to tumor control represented an additive effect, probably on the hypoxic cell population. Conclusion: Moderate glucose administration (blood concentration 300 mg/100 mL) sizably improves experimental tumor control after combined X-irradiation and hyperthermia under clinically feasible conditions. Clinical treatment should benefit from this additional modality, in particular if unsatisfactory local control rates are due

  12. Sleeping Beauty Awakes: Children's Literature and Sex Role Myths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Karel

    Both males and females are mythologized in children's literature. The internalization of these myths has been found to have far-reaching implications for intellectual achievement and individual functioning in a democracy. Numerous studies have indicated that these sexual myths are destructive to females' self-image. Eleanor Maccoby, in her study…

  13. Clinical outcomes of asleep vs awake deep brain stimulation for Parkinson disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodsky, Matthew A; Anderson, Shannon; Murchison, Charles; Seier, Mara; Wilhelm, Jennifer; Vederman, Aaron; Burchiel, Kim J

    2017-11-07

    To compare motor and nonmotor outcomes at 6 months of asleep deep brain stimulation (DBS) for Parkinson disease (PD) using intraoperative imaging guidance to confirm electrode placement vs awake DBS using microelectrode recording to confirm electrode placement. DBS candidates with PD referred to Oregon Health & Science University underwent asleep DBS with imaging guidance. Six-month outcomes were compared to those of patients who previously underwent awake DBS by the same surgeon and center. Assessments included an "off"-levodopa Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) II and III, the 39-item Parkinson's Disease Questionnaire, motor diaries, and speech fluency. Thirty participants underwent asleep DBS and 39 underwent awake DBS. No difference was observed in improvement of UPDRS III (+14.8 ± 8.9 vs +17.6 ± 12.3 points, p = 0.19) or UPDRS II (+9.3 ± 2.7 vs +7.4 ± 5.8 points, p = 0.16). Improvement in "on" time without dyskinesia was superior in asleep DBS (+6.4 ± 3.0 h/d vs +1.7 ± 1.2 h/d, p = 0.002). Quality of life scores improved in both groups (+18.8 ± 9.4 in awake, +8.9 ± 11.5 in asleep). Improvement in summary index ( p = 0.004) and subscores for cognition ( p = 0.011) and communication ( p < 0.001) were superior in asleep DBS. Speech outcomes were superior in asleep DBS, both in category (+2.77 ± 4.3 points vs -6.31 ± 9.7 points ( p = 0.0012) and phonemic fluency (+1.0 ± 8.2 points vs -5.5 ± 9.6 points, p = 0.038). Asleep DBS for PD improved motor outcomes over 6 months on par with or better than awake DBS, was superior with regard to speech fluency and quality of life, and should be an option considered for all patients who are candidates for this treatment. NCT01703598. This study provides Class III evidence that for patients with PD undergoing DBS, asleep intraoperative CT imaging-guided implantation is not significantly different from awake microelectrode recording-guided implantation in improving motor outcomes at 6 months. © 2017

  14. Use of movable high-field-strength intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging with awake craniotomies for resection of gliomas: preliminary experience.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Leuthardt, Eric C

    2011-07-01

    Awake craniotomy with electrocortical mapping and intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging (iMRI) are established techniques for maximizing tumor resection and preserving function, but there has been little experience combining these methodologies.

  15. Evolving Models of Pavlovian Conditioning: Cerebellar Cortical Dynamics in Awake Behaving Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michiel M. ten Brinke

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Three decades of electrophysiological research on cerebellar cortical activity underlying Pavlovian conditioning have expanded our understanding of motor learning in the brain. Purkinje cell simple spike suppression is considered to be crucial in the expression of conditional blink responses (CRs. However, trial-by-trial quantification of this link in awake behaving animals is lacking, and current hypotheses regarding the underlying plasticity mechanisms have diverged from the classical parallel fiber one to the Purkinje cell synapse LTD hypothesis. Here, we establish that acquired simple spike suppression, acquired conditioned stimulus (CS-related complex spike responses, and molecular layer interneuron (MLI activity predict the expression of CRs on a trial-by-trial basis using awake behaving mice. Additionally, we show that two independent transgenic mouse mutants with impaired MLI function exhibit motor learning deficits. Our findings suggest multiple cerebellar cortical plasticity mechanisms underlying simple spike suppression, and they implicate the broader involvement of the olivocerebellar module within the interstimulus interval.

  16. Beam Transfer Line Design for a Plasma Wakefield Acceleration Experiment (AWAKE) at the CERN SPS

    CERN Document Server

    Bracco, C; Brethoux, D; Clerc, V; Goddard, B; Gschwendtner, E; Jensen, L K; Kosmicki, A; Le Godec, G; Meddahi, M; Muggli, P; Mutin, C; Osborne, O; Papastergiou, K; Pardons, A; Velotti, F M; Vincke, H

    2013-01-01

    The world’s first proton driven plasma wakefield acceleration experiment (AWAKE) is presently being studied at CERN. The experimentwill use a high energy proton beam extracted from the SPS as driver. Two possible locations for installing the AWAKE facility were considered: the West Area and the CNGS beam line. The previous transfer line from the SPS to the West Area was completely dismantled in 2005 and would need to be fully re-designed and re-built. For this option, geometric constraints for radiation protection reasons would limit the maximum proton beam energy to 300 GeV. The existing CNGS line could be used by applying only minor changes to the lattice for the final focusing and the interface between the proton beam and the laser, required for plasma ionisation and bunch-modulation seeding. The beam line design studies performed for the two options are presented.

  17. Intraoperative electrical stimulation in awake craniotomy: methodological aspects of current practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szelényi, Andrea; Bello, Lorenzo; Duffau, Hugues; Fava, Enrica; Feigl, Guenther C; Galanda, Miroslav; Neuloh, Georg; Signorelli, Francesco; Sala, Francesco

    2010-02-01

    There is increasing evidence that the extent of tumor removal in low-grade glioma surgery is related to patient survival time. Thus, the goal of resecting the largest amount of tumor possible without leading to permanent neurological sequelae is a challenge for the neurosurgeon. Electrical stimulation of the brain to detect cortical and axonal areas involved in motor, language, and cognitive function and located within the tumor or along its boundaries has become an essential tool in combination with awake craniotomy. Based on a literature review, discussions within the European Low-Grade Glioma Group, and illustrative clinical experience, the authors of this paper provide an overview for neurosurgeons, neurophysiologists, linguists, and anesthesiologists as well as those new to the field about the stimulation techniques currently being used for mapping sensorimotor, language, and cognitive function in awake surgery for low-grade glioma. The paper is intended to help the understanding of these techniques and facilitate a comparison of results between users.

  18. Comparison of jaw muscle EMG activity in awake and sleep bruxers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Castrillon, Eduardo; Dreyer Nielsen, Patricia; Haugland, Morten

    2015-01-01

    TITLE: Comparison of Jaw Muscle EMG Activity in Awake and Sleep Bruxers AUTHORS: E. E. Castrillon, P. Dreyer, M. Haugland, W. Yachida, T. Arima, P. Svensson AUTHORS/INSTITUTIONS: E.E. Castrillon, P. Dreyer, P. Svensson, Aarhus School of Dentistry, Aarhus C, DENMARK; E.E. Castrillon, P. Svensson, ...... of the jaw muscle activity in different populations of self-reported bruxers and non-bruxers. Financial Interest Disclosure: Morten Haughland works for DELTA A/S that has commercial agreement with SUNSTAR that produces Grindcare (portable EMG device)...... been proposed to have different underlying pathophysiology. Objectives: To compare the characteristics of multiple days EMG assessment of the anterior temporalis muscles between patients with self-reported awake bruxism, sleep bruxism and healthy individuals. Methods: Methods: Participants...

  19. arXiv Simulation Study of an LWFA-based Electron Injector for AWAKE Run 2

    CERN Document Server

    Williamson, B.; Doebert, S.; Karsch, S.; Muggli, P.

    The AWAKE experiment aims to demonstrate preservation of injected electron beam quality during acceleration in proton-driven plasma waves. The short bunch duration required to correctly load the wakefield is challenging to meet with the current electron injector system, given the space available to the beamline. An LWFA readily provides short-duration electron beams with sufficient charge from a compact design, and provides a scalable option for future electron acceleration experiments at AWAKE. Simulations of a shock-front injected LWFA demonstrate a 43 TW laser system would be sufficient to produce the required charge over a range of energies beyond 100 MeV. LWFA beams typically have high peak current and large divergence on exiting their native plasmas, and optimisation of bunch parameters before injection into the proton-driven wakefields is required. Compact beam transport solutions are discussed.

  20. Resection of Gliomas with and without Neuropsychological Support during Awake Craniotomy—Effects on Surgery and Clinical Outcome

    OpenAIRE

    Anna Kelm; Nico Sollmann; Nico Sollmann; Sebastian Ille; Sebastian Ille; Bernhard Meyer; Florian Ringel; Florian Ringel; Sandro M. Krieg; Sandro M. Krieg

    2017-01-01

    BackgroundDuring awake craniotomy for tumor resection, a neuropsychologist (NP) is regarded as a highly valuable partner for neurosurgeons. However, some centers do not routinely involve an NP, and data to support the high influence of the NP on the perioperative course of patients are mostly lacking.ObjectiveThe aim of this study was to investigate whether there is a difference in clinical outcomes between patients who underwent awake craniotomy with and without the attendance of an NP.Metho...

  1. Biofeedback for treatment of awake and sleep bruxism in adults: systematic review protocol

    OpenAIRE

    Ilovar, Sasa; Zolger, Danaja; Castrillon, Eduardo; Car, Josip; Huckvale, Kit

    2014-01-01

    Background Bruxism is a disorder of jaw-muscle activity characterised by repetitive clenching or grinding of the teeth which results in discomfort and damage to dentition. The two clinical manifestations of the condition (sleep and awake bruxism) are thought to have unrelated aetiologies but are palliated using similar techniques. The lack of a definitive treatment has prompted renewed interest in biofeedback, a behaviour change method that uses electronic detection to provide a stimulus when...

  2. AIP GHz modulation detection using a streak camera: Suitability of streak cameras in the AWAKE experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Rieger, K; Reimann, O; Muggli, P

    2017-01-01

    Using frequency mixing, a modulated light pulse of ns duration is created. We show that, with a ps-resolution streak camera that is usually used for single short pulse measurements, we can detect via an FFT detection approach up to 450 GHz modulation in a pulse in a single measurement. This work is performed in the context of the AWAKE plasma wakefield experiment where modulation frequencies in the range of 80–280 GHz are expected.

  3. Establishing valid neuropsychological assessments in patients with gliomas undergoing awake surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Becker, Juliane

    2017-01-01

    The present work highlights various requirements for neuropsychological assessment in the context of glioma patients undergoing awake craniotomy. The first study assessed the validity of the Brief Cognitive Status Exam (BCSE) compared to already established cognitive screening instruments such as Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE) and Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA) in patients with intracranial tumors. For screening purposes, the MoCA turned out to be the best available tool, in clini...

  4. Social ultrasonic vocalization in awake head-restrained mouse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Weiner

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Numerous animal species emit vocalizations in response to various social stimuli. The neural basis of vocal communication has been investigated in monkeys, songbirds, rats, bats and invertebrates resulting in deep insights into motor control, neural coding and learning. Mice, which recently became very popular as a model system for mammalian neuroscience, also utilize ultrasonic vocalizations (USVs during mating behavior. However, our knowledge is lacking of both the behavior and its underlying neural mechanism. We developed a novel method for head-restrained male mice (HRMM to interact with non-restrained female mice (NRFM and show that mice can emit USVs in this context. We first recorded USVs in free arena with non-restrained male mice (NRMM and NRFM. Of the NRMM, which vocalized in the free arena, the majority could be habituated to also vocalize while head-restrained but only when a female mouse was present in proximity. The USVs emitted by HRMM are similar to the USVs of NRMM in the presence of a female mouse in their spectral structure, inter syllable interval distribution and USV sequence length, and therefore are interpreted as social USVs. By analyzing vocalizations of NRMM, we established criteria to predict which individuals are likely to vocalize while head fixed based on the USV rate and average syllable duration. To characterize the USVs emitted by HRMM, we analyzed the syllable composition of HRMM and NRMM and found that USVs emitted by HRMM have higher proportions of USVs with complex spectral representation, supporting previous studies showing that mice social USVs are context dependent. Our results suggest a way to study the neural mechanisms of production and control of social vocalization in mice using advanced methods requiring head fixation.

  5. PERANCANGAN SISTEM TELE-NAVIGATION PADA PESAWAT TANPA AWAK (MICRO UAV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agus Basukesti

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Sistem navigasi pada pengoperasian pesawat tanpa awak (Micro UAV saat ini terdapat 2 cara yaitu dengan cara pandangan manual (line of sight dan sistem autopilot. Sistem navigasi line of sight memiliki kelemahan jangkauan pesawat tanpa awak hanya pada radius 200 meter karena keterbatasan penglihatan dari pengendali. Metode autopilot adalah metode kendali pesawat dengan algoritma lock position and homing. Sistem autopilot bekerja dengan cara mencari koordinat posisi yang dituju kemudian kembali ke lokasi awal. Keunggulan teknologi ini adalah pesawat dapat menjangkau jarak yang cukup jauh. Akan tetapi metode ini memiliki kelemahan yaitu pesawat harus terbang tinggi dan pesawat belum bisa menghindari halangan seperti gedung pencakar langit maupun pepohonan tinggi. Dalam penelitian ini dirancang sebuah sistem tele-navigasi yang merupakan modifikasi sistem navigasi line of sight dan autopilot sehingga dapat menutupi kelemahan dari masing masing metode navigasi yang ada saat ini. metode penelitian yang digunakan dalam penelitian ini adalah metode eksperimen yaitu dengan membuat pilot plan sistem Tele-navigasi yang selanjutnya akan diuji dengan pesawat tanpa awak (micro UAV jenis flying wing. Metode dokumentasi dan metode studi pustaka juga digunakan untuk melengkapi data teknis alat yang digunakan sehingga dapat dilakukan analisis mendalam terhadap performa alat yang dirancang. Kata kunci: line of sight, lock position and homing, autopilot, micro UAV.

  6. Imaging circulating tumor cells in freely moving awake small animals using a miniaturized intravital microscope.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Sarah Sasportas

    Full Text Available Metastasis, the cause for 90% of cancer mortality, is a complex and poorly understood process involving the invasion of circulating tumor cells (CTCs into blood vessels. These cells have potential prognostic value as biomarkers for early metastatic risk. But their rarity and the lack of specificity and sensitivity in measuring them render their interrogation by current techniques very challenging. How and when these cells are circulating in the blood, on their way to potentially give rise to metastasis, is a question that remains largely unanswered. In order to provide an insight into this "black box" using non-invasive imaging, we developed a novel miniature intravital microscopy (mIVM strategy capable of real-time long-term monitoring of CTCs in awake small animals. We established an experimental 4T1-GL mouse model of metastatic breast cancer, in which tumor cells express both fluorescent and bioluminescent reporter genes to enable both single cell and whole body tumor imaging. Using mIVM, we monitored blood vessels of different diameters in awake mice in an experimental model of metastasis. Using an in-house software algorithm we developed, we demonstrated in vivo CTC enumeration and computation of CTC trajectory and speed. These data represent the first reported use we know of for a miniature mountable intravital microscopy setup for in vivo imaging of CTCs in awake animals.

  7. Awake Craniotomy for Tumor Resection: Further Optimizing Therapy of Brain Tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehdorn, H Maximilian; Schwartz, Felix; Becker, Juliane

    2017-01-01

    In recent years more and more data have emerged linking the most radical resection to prolonged survival in patients harboring brain tumors. Since total tumor resection could increase postoperative morbidity, many methods have been suggested to reduce the risk of postoperative neurological deficits: awake craniotomy with the possibility of continuous patient-surgeon communication is one of the possibilities of finding out how radical a tumor resection can possibly be without causing permanent harm to the patient.In 1994 we started to perform awake craniotomy for glioma resection. In 2005 the use of intraoperative high-field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was included in the standard tumor therapy protocol. Here we review our experience in performing awake surgery for gliomas, gained in 219 patients.Patient selection by the operating surgeon and a neuropsychologist is of primary importance: the patient should feel as if they are part of the surgical team fighting against the tumor. The patient will undergo extensive neuropsychological testing, functional MRI, and fiber tractography in order to define the relationship between the tumor and the functionally relevant brain areas. Attention needs to be given at which particular time during surgery the intraoperative MRI is performed. Results from part of our series (without and with ioMRI scan) are presented.

  8. Surgery-Independent Language Function Decline in Patients Undergoing Awake Craniotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonen, Tal; Sela, Gal; Yanakee, Ranin; Ram, Zvi; Grossman, Rachel

    2017-03-01

    Despite selection process before awake-craniotomy, some patients experience an unexpected decline in language functions in the operating room (OR), compared with their baseline evaluation, which may impair their functional monitoring. To investigate this phenomenon we prospectively compared language function the day before surgery and on entrance to the OR. Data were collected prospectively from consecutive patients undergoing awake-craniotomy with intraoperative cortical mapping for resection of gliomas affecting language areas. Language functions of 79 patients were evaluated and compared 1-2 days before surgery and after entering the OR. Changes in functional linguistic performance were analyzed with respect to demographic, clinical, and pathologic characteristics. There was a significant decline in language function, beyond sedation effect, after entering the OR, (from median/interquartile range: 0.94/0.72-0.98 to median/interquartile range: 0.86/0.51-0.94; Z = -7.19, P craniotomy may experience a substantial decline in language functioning after entering the OR. Tumor grade and the presence of preoperative language deficits were significant risk factors for this phenomenon, suggesting a possible relation between cognitive reserve, psychobehavioral coping abilities and histologic features of a tumor involving language areas. Capturing and identifying this unique population of patients who are prone to experience such language decline may improve our ability in the future to select patients eligible for awake-craniotomy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Successful Insular Glioma Removal in a Deaf Signer Patient During an Awake Craniotomy Procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metellus, Philippe; Boussen, Salah; Guye, Maxime; Trebuchon, Agnes

    2017-02-01

    Resection of tumors located within the insula of the dominant hemisphere represents a technical challenge because of the complex anatomy, including the surrounding vasculature, and the relationship to functional (motor and language) structures. We report here the case of a successful resection of a left insular glioma in a native deaf signer during an awake craniotomy. The patient, a congenitally deaf right-handed patient who is a native user of sign language, presented with a seizure 1 week before he was referred to our department. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a left heterogeneous insular tumor enhanced after intravenous gadolinium infusion. Because of its deep and dominant hemisphere location, an awake craniotomy was decided. The patient was evaluated intraoperatively using object naming, text reading, and sign repetition tasks. An isolated inferior frontal gyrus site evoked repeated object naming errors. A transopercular parietal approach was performed and allowed the successful removal of the tumor under direct electric stimulation and electrocorticography. To our knowledge, this is the first report of successful removal of a left insular tumor without any functional sequelae in a native deaf signer using intraoperative direct cerebral stimulation during an awake craniotomy. The methodology used also provides the first evidence of the actual anatomo-functional organization of language in deaf signers. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Is a wake-up call in order? Review of the evidence for awake craniotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paldor, Iddo; Drummond, Katharine J; Awad, Mohammed; Sufaro, Yuval Z; Kaye, Andrew H

    2016-01-01

    Awake craniotomy (AC) has been used in increasing frequency in the past few decades. It has mainly been used for resection of intrinsic tumors, but also, rarely, for other pathologies. The vast majority of reports specific to one pathology, however, have focused on resection of low grade glioma in the awake setting. Tumors in eloquent areas have mainly been resected when the patient is awake for the purpose of preservation of function. Motor function is the most documented, and most successfully preserved function. Other functions are harder to localize with direct electrical stimulation (DES), and thus more difficult to preserve. The success rate of DES localization correlates to the rate of function preservation. The effect of AC on extent of resection is inconsistent in the literature. Other functions, such as sensory and visuospatial recognition, have been protected during AC, but this is best performed in large, referral centers that have experience with the procedure. Other benefits to AC, such as cost-effectiveness and reduction in patient pain and anxiety, have also been reported. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Prevention of adhesion formation in Wistar-albino rats by increased bowel movements achieved with oral Ricinus oil use for 8 days postoperatively: an experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahyaoglu, Serkan; Timur, Hakan; Kaba, Metin; Kahyaoglu, Inci; Sirvan, Levent; Cicek, Mahmut Nedim

    2012-12-01

    Adhesion formation frequently occurs after abdominopelvic surgery and can cause significant morbidity for patients. Meticulous hemostasis, minimal access surgery and utilization of surgical adjuvants intraoperatively are clinically useful measures to minimize adhesion formation. We investigated the clinical efficiency of oral Ricinus oil treatment for 8 days postoperatively to decrease adhesion formation in this case-control study in a rat model. Following computer-generated randomization, 24 female Wistar-albino rats were operated on, with 10 standard cautery lesions on the right uterine horn and two simple suture lesions on left uterine horn generated with absorbable material. Half (n=12) the rats received 0.13 g (0.2 ml) Ricinus oil emulsion (40 g/60 ml) via the oral route during the first 8 days postoperatively, and the remaining rats (n=11) were considered as controls. The extent, severity, degree, total adhesion scores and histopathological features of the adhesions were the main outcome measures. The degree and total adhesion formation scores in the Ricinus oil group and control group revealed significant differences in adhesion extent and severity. The total adhesion scores of the Ricinus oil and control groups were 3.00 ± 2.21 and 5.18 ± 2.78 respectively (P0.05). Ricinus oil treatment following abdominopelvic surgery for the 8-day period that covers the completion of tissue healing process may be a promising, cheap and cost-effective treatment strategy for patients. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Anaesthesia Management for Awake Craniotomy: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossaint, Rolf; Veldeman, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Background Awake craniotomy (AC) renders an expanded role in functional neurosurgery. Yet, evidence for optimal anaesthesia management remains limited. We aimed to summarise the latest clinical evidence of AC anaesthesia management and explore the relationship of AC failures on the used anaesthesia techniques. Methods Two authors performed independently a systematic search of English articles in PubMed and EMBASE database 1/2007-12/2015. Search included randomised controlled trials (RCTs), observational trials, and case reports (n>4 cases), which reported anaesthetic approach for AC and at least one of our pre-specified outcomes: intraoperative seizures, hypoxia, arterial hypertension, nausea and vomiting, neurological dysfunction, conversion into general anaesthesia and failure of AC. Random effects meta-analysis was used to estimate event rates for four outcomes. Relationship with anaesthesia technique was explored using logistic meta-regression, calculating the odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals [95%CI]. Results We have included forty-seven studies. Eighteen reported asleep-awake-asleep technique (SAS), twenty-seven monitored anaesthesia care (MAC), one reported both and one used the awake-awake-awake technique (AAA). Proportions of AC failures, intraoperative seizures, new neurological dysfunction and conversion into general anaesthesia (GA) were 2% [95%CI:1–3], 8% [95%CI:6–11], 17% [95%CI:12–23] and 2% [95%CI:2–3], respectively. Meta-regression of SAS and MAC technique did not reveal any relevant differences between outcomes explained by the technique, except for conversion into GA. Estimated OR comparing SAS to MAC for AC failures was 0.98 [95%CI:0.36–2.69], 1.01 [95%CI:0.52–1.88] for seizures, 1.66 [95%CI:1.35–3.70] for new neurological dysfunction and 2.17 [95%CI:1.22–3.85] for conversion into GA. The latter result has to be interpreted cautiously. It is based on one retrospective high-risk of bias study and significance was

  13. mRNA expression profile of prostaglandin D2 receptors in rat trigeminovascular system, and effect of prostaglandins in rat migraine models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sekeroglu, A.; Jansen-Olesen, I.; Gupta, S.

    2015-01-01

    processing structures in rat brain; 2.) To study the effect of the DP1 receptor antagonist, MK-0524, on PGD2-induced vasodilation of middle meningeal artery (MMA) in rat closed cranial window (CCW) model; 3.) To investigate if an i.v. infusion of prostaglandin (PG) mix, PGD2, PGE2 and PGI2 (iloprost...... receptor was highly expressed in trigeminal ganglion and dorsal rootganglion. MK-0524 significantly (62%, pMMA. No increase in p-ERK protein level was observed in the TVS after infusion of PG mix in awake rats. Neuronal activation markers, cFOS and EGR-1, were...... not changed in the trigeminal nucleus caudalis. Conclusions: PGD2 induced vasodilation of MMA is mainly mediated by activation of DP1 receptors. Furthermore, high expression of DP1 mRNA in TG and DRG suggest that PGD2 might play a role in migraine pathophysiology. However, infusion of PG mix in awake rats did...

  14. Awake surgery for hemispheric low-grade gliomas: oncological, functional and methodological differences between pediatric and adult populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trevisi, Gianluca; Roujeau, Thomas; Duffau, Hugues

    2016-10-01

    Brain mapping through a direct cortical and subcortical electrical stimulation during an awake craniotomy has gained an increasing popularity as a powerful tool to prevent neurological deficit while increasing extent of resection of hemispheric diffuse low-grade gliomas in adults. However, few case reports or very limited series of awake surgery in children are currently available in the literature. In this paper, we review the oncological and functional differences between pediatric and adult populations, and the methodological specificities that may limit the use of awake mapping in pediatric low-grade glioma surgery. This could be explained by the fact that pediatric low-grade gliomas have a different epidemiology and biologic behavior in comparison to adults, with pilocytic astrocytomas (WHO grade I glioma) as the most frequent histotype, and with WHO grade II gliomas less prone to anaplastic transformation than their adult counterparts. In addition, aside from the issue of poor collaboration of younger children under 10 years of age, some anatomical and functional peculiarities of children developing brain (cortical and subcortical myelination, maturation of neural networks and of specialized cortical areas) can influence direct electrical stimulation methodology and sensitivity, limiting its use in children. Therefore, even though awake procedure with cortical and axonal stimulation mapping can be adapted in a specific subgroup of children with a diffuse glioma from the age of 10 years, only few pediatric patients are nonetheless candidates for awake brain surgery.

  15. In Vivo Tumour Mapping Using Electrocorticography Alterations During Awake Brain Surgery: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boussen, Salah; Velly, Lionel; Benar, Christian; Metellus, Philippe; Bruder, Nicolas; Trébuchon, Agnès

    2016-09-01

    During awake brain surgery for tumour resection, in situ EEG recording (ECoG) is used to identify eloquent areas surrounding the tumour. We used the ECoG setup to record the electrical activity of cortical and subcortical tumours and then performed frequency and connectivity analyses in order to identify ECoG impairments and map tumours. We selected 16 patients with cortical (8) and subcortical (8) tumours undergoing awake brain surgery. For each patient, we computed the spectral content of tumoural and healthy areas in each frequency band. We computed connectivity of each electrode using connectivity markers (linear and non-linear correlations, phase-locking and coherence). We performed comparisons between healthy and tumour electrodes. The ECoG alterations were used to implement automated classification of the electrodes using clustering or neural network algorithms. ECoG alterations were used to image cortical tumours.Cortical tumours were found to profoundly alter all frequency contents (normalized and absolute power), with an increase in the δ activity and a decreases for the other bands (P < 0.05). Cortical tumour electrodes showed high level of connectivity compared to surrounding electrodes (all markers, P < 0.05). For subcortical tumours, a relative decrease in the γ1 band and in the alpha band in absolute amplitude (P < 0.05) were the only abnormalities. The neural network algorithm classification had a good performance: 93.6 % of the electrodes were classified adequately on a test subject. We found significant spectral and connectivity ECoG changes for cortical tumours, which allowed tumour recognition. Artificial neural algorithm pattern recognition seems promising for electrode classification in awake tumour surgery.

  16. Serotonin Decreases the Gain of Visual Responses in Awake Macaque V1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seillier, Lenka; Lorenz, Corinna; Kawaguchi, Katsuhisa; Ott, Torben; Nieder, Andreas; Pourriahi, Paria; Nienborg, Hendrikje

    2017-11-22

    Serotonin, an important neuromodulator in the brain, is implicated in affective and cognitive functions. However, its role even for basic cortical processes is controversial. For example, in the mammalian primary visual cortex (V1), heterogenous serotonergic modulation has been observed in anesthetized animals. Here, we combined extracellular single-unit recordings with iontophoresis in awake animals. We examined the role of serotonin on well-defined tuning properties (orientation, spatial frequency, contrast, and size) in V1 of two male macaque monkeys. We find that in the awake macaque the modulatory effect of serotonin is surprisingly uniform: it causes a mainly multiplicative decrease of the visual responses and a slight increase in the stimulus-selective response latency. Moreover, serotonin neither systematically changes the selectivity or variability of the response, nor the interneuronal correlation unexplained by the stimulus ("noise-correlation"). The modulation by serotonin has qualitative similarities with that for a decrease in stimulus contrast, but differs quantitatively from decreasing contrast. It can be captured by a simple additive change to a threshold-linear spiking nonlinearity. Together, our results show that serotonin is well suited to control the response gain of neurons in V1 depending on the animal's behavioral or motivational context, complementing other known state-dependent gain-control mechanisms. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Serotonin is an important neuromodulator in the brain and a major target for drugs used to treat psychiatric disorders. Nonetheless, surprisingly little is known about how it shapes information processing in sensory areas. Here we examined the serotonergic modulation of visual processing in the primary visual cortex of awake behaving macaque monkeys. We found that serotonin mainly decreased the gain of the visual responses, without systematically changing their selectivity, variability, or covariability. This

  17. The Cost of Brain Surgery: Awake vs Asleep Craniotomy for Perirolandic Region Tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eseonu, Chikezie I; Rincon-Torroella, Jordina; ReFaey, Karim; Quiñones-Hinojosa, Alfredo

    2017-08-01

    Cost effectiveness has become an important factor in the health care system, requiring surgeons to improve efficacy of procedures while reducing costs. An awake craniotomy (AC) with direct cortical stimulation (DCS) presents one method to resect eloquent region tumors; however, some authors assert that this procedure is an expensive alternative to surgery under general anesthesia (GA) with neuromonitoring. To evaluate the cost effectiveness and clinical outcomes between AC and GA patients. Retrospective analysis of a cohort of 17 patients with perirolandic gliomas who underwent an AC with DCS were case-control matched with 23 patients with perirolandic gliomas who underwent surgery under GA with neuromonitoring (ie, motor-evoked potentials, somatosensory-evoked potentials, phase reversal). Inpatient costs, quality-adjusted life years (QALY), extent of resection, and neurological outcome were compared between the groups. Total inpatient expense per patient was $34 804 in the AC group and $46 798 in the GA group ( P = .046). QALY score for the AC group was 0.97 and 0.47 for the GA group ( P = .041). The incremental cost per QALY for the AC group was $82 720 less than the GA group. Postoperative Karnofsky performance status was 91.8 in the AC group and 81.3 in the GA group (P = .047). Length of hospitalization was 4.12 days in the AC group and 7.61 days in the GA group ( P = .049). The total inpatient costs for awake craniotomies were lower than surgery under GA. This study suggests better cost effectiveness and neurological outcome with awake craniotomies for perirolandic gliomas. Copyright © 2017 by the Congress of Neurological Surgeons

  18. Continuous physical examination during subcortical resection in awake craniotomy patients: Its usefulness and surgical outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunyaratavej, Krishnapundha; Sangtongjaraskul, Sunisa; Lerdsirisopon, Surunchana; Tuchinda, Lawan

    2016-08-01

    To evaluate the value of physical examination as a monitoring tool during subcortical resection in awake craniotomy patients and surgical outcomes. Authors reviewed medical records of patients underwent awake craniotomy with continuous physical examination for pathology adjacent to the eloquent area. Between January 2006 and August 2015, there were 37 patients underwent awake craniotomy with continuous physical examination. Pathology was located in the left cerebral hemisphere in 28 patients (75.7%). Thirty patients (81.1%) had neuroepithelial tumors. Degree of resections were defined as total, subtotal, and partial in 16 (43.2%), 11 (29.7%) and 10 (27.0%) patients, respectively. Median follow up duration was 14 months. The reasons for termination of subcortical resection were divided into 3 groups as follows: 1) by anatomical landmark with the aid of neuronavigation in 20 patients (54%), 2) by reaching subcortical stimulation threshold in 8 patients (21.6%), and 3) by abnormal physical examination in 9 patients (24.3%). Among these 3 groups, there were statistically significant differences in the intraoperative (p=0.002) and early postoperative neurological deficit (p=0.005) with the lowest deficit in neuronavigation group. However, there were no differences in neurological outcome at later follow up (3-months p=0.103; 6-months p=0.285). There were no differences in the degree of resection among the groups. Continuous physical examination has shown to be of value as an additional layer of monitoring of subcortical white matter during resection and combining several methods may help increase the efficacy of mapping and monitoring of subcortical functions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Quality and Quantity of Memories in Patients Who Undergo Awake Brain Tumor Resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimek, Markus; van der Horst, Paul H; Hoeks, Sanne E; Stolker, Robert Jan

    2018-01-01

    Awake craniotomy is performed with increasing frequency for brain tumor surgery in eloquent areas; however, little is known about patients' memories of this procedure. Here we retrospectively analyzed the quality and quantity of memories in a series of patients treated following a standardized protocol. We treated 61 consecutive patients within 3 years, 48 of whom were alive when the study was performed. Each of these patients received a questionnaire eliciting information about their perioperative memories and perceptions. The perioperative process was broken down into steps, and for each step the patient was to judge the quantity (nothing-everything) and quality (very negative-very positive) of his or her memories. Thirty-six of the 48 patients completed the questionnaire (75%). The quantity of memories was quite incomplete, even for intraoperative moments when patients were awake and cooperative. On average, the quality of memories was neutral or positive. A higher quantity of memories was associated with a higher quality of memories. The most commonly reported sources of discomfort were placement of the Mayfield clamp, followed by laying on the operating room table with movement restriction, and irritation by the urinary catheter in situ. Awake craniotomy can be performed following our protocol in such a way that it is experienced as (very) comfortable. However, there are moments of discomfort, which can be managed by the team. Extensive preoperative preparation may be considered a crucial part of the procedure. Less amnesia seems to improve patient satisfaction. The results of this study can help guide protocol optimization, expectation management, and information for future patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Asleep-awake-asleep technique in children during strabismus surgery under sufentanil balanced anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lili, Xu; Zhiyong, Hu; Jianjun, Shen

    2012-12-01

    Both over- and undercorrection can occur in up to 10-15% of strabismus surgeries. Use of adjustable suture technique and an intraoperative awake test may decrease the incidence of over- or undercorrection. In this study, we investigated the ability to provide optimal conditions for intraoperative awake strabismus suture adjustment in children by means of target-controlled infusions (TCI) of propofol and remifentanil propofol compared with propofol and sufentanil. Forty-six ASA I-II patients undergoing strabismus surgery with intraoperative awakening were randomly assigned to anesthesia by TCI of propofol + sufentanil group (group SF) or propofol + remifentanil spontaneous breathing. Propofol was discontinued, and concentrations of the opioid TCIs were reduced to enable awake assessment of the mobility and position of the eye. Changes in intraocular pressure, respiratory function, hemodynamics, awakening time, and awaking quality were compared between the two groups. The degrees of sedation and analgesia were evaluated through the assessment of alertness and sedation scores (OAA/S) and visual analog scale scores (VAS). There was no significant difference in intraocular pressure at three sampling points between two groups (P > 0.05). The heart rate (HR) and mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) in group SF were significantly lower than group RF during laryngeal mask insertion (P breathing was maintained in all patients, and there was no significant difference in RR and Sp02 at T1-T11 between the groups (P > 0.05). There was no significant difference in the target effect-site concentration of propofol at T1-T10 between the groups (P > 0.05). The wake-up times in group SF were significantly longer than in group RF (P depression and apnea, oculocardiac reflex, coughing, groan and nausea, and vomiting was not significantly different between the groups (P > 0.05). Propofol combined with sufentanil or remifentanil can be suitable for planned intraoperative awakening for an

  1. Laser pulse propagation in a meter scale rubidium vapor/plasma cell in AWAKE experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Joulaei, Atefeh; Berti, Nicolas; Kasparian, Jerome; Mirzanejhad, Saeed; Muggli, Patric

    2016-01-01

    We present the results of numerical studies of laser pulse propagating in a 3.5 cm Rb vapor cell in the linear dispersion regime by using a 1D model and a 2D code that has been modified for our special case. The 2D simulation finally aimed at finding laser beam parameters suitable to make the Rb vapor fully ionized to obtain a uniform, 10 m-long, at least 1 mm in radius plasma in the next step for the AWAKE experiment.

  2. Chemical composition and physicochemical properties of green banana (Musa acuminata x balbisiana Colla cv. Awak) flour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haslinda, W H; Cheng, L H; Chong, L C; Noor Aziah, A A

    2009-01-01

    Flour was prepared from peeled and unpeeled banana Awak ABB. Samples prepared were subjected to analysis for determination of chemical composition, mineral, dietary fibre, starch and total phenolics content, antioxidant activity and pasting properties. In general, flour prepared from unpeeled banana was found to show enhanced nutrition values with higher contents of mineral, dietary fibre and total phenolics. Hence, flour fortified with peel showed relatively higher antioxidant activity. On the other hand, better pasting properties were shown when banana flour was blended with peel. It was found that a relatively lower pasting temperature, peak viscosity, breakdown, final viscosity and setback were evident in a sample blended with peel.

  3. Activation of locomotion in adult chronic spinal rats is achieved by transplantation of embryonic raphe cells reinnervating a precise lumbar level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribotta, M G; Provencher, J; Feraboli-Lohnherr, D; Rossignol, S; Privat, A; Orsal, D

    2000-07-01

    Traumatic lesions of the spinal cord yield a loss of supraspinal control of voluntary locomotor activity, although the spinal cord contains the necessary circuitry to generate the basic locomotor pattern. In spinal rats, this network, known as central pattern generator (CPG), was shown to be sensitive to serotonergic pharmacological stimulation. In previous works we have shown that embryonic raphe cells transplanted into the sublesional cord of adult rats can reinnervate specific targets, restore the lesion-induced increase in receptor densities of neurotransmitters, promote hindlimb weight support, and trigger a locomotor activity on a treadmill without any other pharmacological treatment or training. With the aim of discriminating whether the action of serotonin on CPG is associated to a specific level of the cord, we have transplanted embryonic raphe cells at two different levels of the sublesional cord (T9 and T11) and then performed analysis of the kinematic and EMG activity synchronously recorded during locomotion. Locomotor performances were correlated to the reinnervated level of the cord and compared to that of intact and transected nontransplanted animals. The movements expressed by T11 transplanted animals correspond to a well defined locomotor pattern comparable to that of the intact animals. On the contrary, T9 transplanted animals developed limited and disorganized movements as those of nontransplanted animals. The correlation of the locomotor performances with the level of reinnervation of the spinal cord suggests that serotonergic reinnervation of the L1-L2 level constitutes a key element in the genesis of this locomotor rhythmic activity. This is the first in vivo demonstration that transplanted embryonic raphe cells reinnervating a specific level of the cord activate a locomotor behavior.

  4. Association of Awake Bruxism with Khat, Coffee, Tobacco, and Stress among Jazan University Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quadri, Mir Faeq Ali; Mahnashi, Ali; Al Almutahhir, Ayman; Tubayqi, Hamzah; Hakami, Abdullah; Arishi, Mohamed; Alamir, Abdulwahab

    2015-01-01

    Objective. The objective is to assess the prevalence of bruxism among the university students and to check its association with their khat chewing habit. Materials and Methods. A cross-sectional descriptive study is designed using cluster random sampling. Pretested questionnaire was administered by a trained interviewer to assess awake bruxism and the use of variables like khat, coffee, tobacco, and stress. Chi-square test at 5% significance was used for assessing the association. Logistic regression was also performed after adjusting for covariates. Results. A high response rate (95%) was obtained as the distribution and collection of questionnaire was within an hour interval. 85% (63%, males; 22%, females) experienced an episode of bruxism at least one time in the past six months. Regression analysis revealed an association of stress (P = 0.00; OR = 5.902, 95% CI 2.614-13.325) and khat use (P = 0.05; OR = 1.629, 95% CI 0.360-7.368) with bruxism. Interestingly, it is observed that the one who chew khat experienced 3.56 times (95% CI; 2.62-11.22) less pain when compared to the nonusers. Conclusion. This study is the first of its kind to assess the association of bruxism with khat chewing. High amount of stress and khat use can be considered as important risk indicators for awake bruxism.

  5. Long-term facilitation of breathing is absent after episodes of hypercapnic hypoxia in awake humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diep, Tu Tuan; Khan, Tuba Rashid; Zhang, Richard; Duffin, James

    2007-05-14

    Despite the failure by many previous investigators to demonstrate a long-term facilitation of breathing following episodes of hypoxia in awake humans, we attempted to produce it using a pattern of hypercapnic hypoxic episodes similar to that experienced by obstructive sleep apnoea patients, reasoning that if long-term facilitation was relevant to these patients then it is appropriate to test the effectiveness of such episodes. Ten subjects drawn from the University student population were instrumented to measure ventilation, heart rate and end-tidal PCO2 and PO2 breath-by-breath while seated in a comfortable reclining chair. After an initial resting period breathing room air they experienced fifteen, 30-s episodes breathing 6% O2 and 5% CO2 separated by 90 s of breathing air. We examined the measured variables for an hour after the episodes but found no trends toward an increase in ventilation or decrease in end-tidal PCO2 that would indicate the presence of a long-term facilitation. We therefore concluded that long-term facilitation of ventilation was not demonstrated in awake humans using this pattern of stimuli.

  6. Comparison between Awake Endoscopy and Computed Tomography to Define Lingual Tonsil Hypertrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Jessica A; Gorelick, Gleb; Friedman, Michael

    2017-11-01

    Objectives To analyze correlations between endoscopic lingual tonsil grade (LTG) by the Friedman Lingual Tonsil Hypertrophy grading system and computed tomography (CT) measurements of lingual tonsil thickness (LTT). Study Design Retrospective chart review. Setting Single-center database, September 2016 to April 2017. Subjects and Methods Patients who received CT covering base of tongue and endoscopic LTG were included. LTT was measured on axial and sagittal CT. LTT measurements were compared against endoscopic LTG. One-way analysis of variance with Tukey's post hoc adjustment for multiple comparisons was performed. Results Seventy-five charts were included for a total of 150 LTT measurements. Axial CT measurements of LTG 1 and LTG 2 were each significantly different from LTG 3 ( P hypertrophy had a mean axial CT thickness of 6.45 ± 1.39 mm and mean sagittal CT thickness of 6.58 ± 1.53 mm, which was significantly different from both the mean axial CT thickness of 8.48 ± 1.52 mm and the mean sagittal CT thickness of 8.07 ± 1.16 mm in the LTG 3 group ( P hypertrophy. Conclusion Awake endoscopy grading of lingual tonsil hypertrophy is a subjective measurement that seems to correlate with objective CT measurements. LTT measurements of LTG 1 and LTG 2 on awake endoscopy differed significantly from LTG 3.

  7. Identifying timescales and possible precursors of the awake to asleep transition in EOG time series

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carniel, Roberto; Del Pin, Enrico; Budai, Riccardo; Pascolo, Paolo

    2005-01-01

    In this work we study the awake to asleep state transition in eye blinking activity. In this perspective the human electroculographic activity (EOG) was first experimentally investigated by means of a spectral analyses of the time series resulting for processes underlying both the brain activity and the eye dynamics. We studied the evolution of the spectral content both via the classical spectrogram and with the computation of summarizing scalar parameters: mean frequency, maximum frequency, spectral variance. With these tools we highlighted a significative dynamical change appearing before the transition from the awake to the asleep state, characterized by a general widening of the spectrum, that translates into a decrease of the maximum frequency, an increase of the average frequency and an increase of the spectral variance. Due to inherently high non-linearities involved, chaotic patterns were likely to occur in the experimental time series. These were analyzed therefore with the chaos theory. In particular we studied the time evolution of dynamical parameters as computed on different windows of the time series, i.e. optimal delay time as suggested by autocorrelation and mutual information on one side, embedding quality evaluation as suggested by the False Nearest Neighbours percentage on the other

  8. Representation of dynamic interaural phase difference in auditory cortex of awake rhesus macaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Brian H; Malone, Brian J; Semple, Malcolm N

    2009-04-01

    Neurons in auditory cortex of awake primates are selective for the spatial location of a sound source, yet the neural representation of the binaural cues that underlie this tuning remains undefined. We examined this representation in 283 single neurons across the low-frequency auditory core in alert macaques, trained to discriminate binaural cues for sound azimuth. In response to binaural beat stimuli, which mimic acoustic motion by modulating the relative phase of a tone at the two ears, these neurons robustly modulate their discharge rate in response to this directional cue. In accordance with prior studies, the preferred interaural phase difference (IPD) of these neurons typically corresponds to azimuthal locations contralateral to the recorded hemisphere. Whereas binaural beats evoke only transient discharges in anesthetized cortex, neurons in awake cortex respond throughout the IPD cycle. In this regard, responses are consistent with observations at earlier stations of the auditory pathway. Discharge rate is a band-pass function of the frequency of IPD modulation in most neurons (73%), but both discharge rate and temporal synchrony are independent of the direction of phase modulation. When subjected to a receiver operator characteristic analysis, the responses of individual neurons are insufficient to account for the perceptual acuity of these macaques in an IPD discrimination task, suggesting the need for neural pooling at the cortical level.

  9. Language mapping with verbs and sentences in awake surgery: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rofes, Adrià; Miceli, Gabriele

    2014-06-01

    Intraoperative language mapping in awake surgery is typically conducted by asking the patient to produce automatic speech and to name objects. These tasks might not map language with sufficient accuracy, as some linguistic processes can only be triggered by tasks that use verbs and sentences. Verb and sentence processing tasks are currently used during surgery, albeit sparsely. Medline, PubMed, and Web of Science records were searched to retrieve studies focused on language mapping with verbs/sentences in awake surgery. We review the tasks reported in the published literature, spell out the language processes assessed by each task, list the cortical and subcortical regions whose stimulation inhibited language processing, and consider the types of errors elicited by stimulation in each region. We argue that using verb tasks allows a more thorough evaluation of language functions. We also argue that verb tasks are preferable to object naming tasks in the case of frontal lesions, as lesion and neuroimaging data demonstrate that these regions play a critical role in verb and sentence processing. We discuss the clinical value of these tasks and the current limitations of the procedure, and provide some guidelines for their development. Future research should aim toward a differentiated approach to language mapping - one that includes the administration of standardized and customizable tests and the use of longitudinal neurocognitive follow-up studies. Further work will allow researchers and clinicians to understand brain and language correlates and to improve the current surgical practice.

  10. Generating pulsatility by pump speed modulation with continuous-flow total artificial heart in awake calves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukamachi, Kiyotaka; Karimov, Jamshid H; Sunagawa, Gengo; Horvath, David J; Byram, Nicole; Kuban, Barry D; Dessoffy, Raymond; Sale, Shiva; Golding, Leonard A R; Moazami, Nader

    2017-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of sinusoidal pump speed modulation of the Cleveland Clinic continuous-flow total artificial heart (CFTAH) on hemodynamics and pump flow in an awake chronic calf model. The sinusoidal pump speed modulations, performed on the day of elective sacrifice, were set at ±15 and ± 25% of mean pump speed at 80 bpm in four awake calves with a CFTAH. The systemic and pulmonary arterial pulse pressures increased to 12.0 and 12.3 mmHg (±15% modulation) and to 15.9 and 15.7 mmHg (±25% modulation), respectively. The pulsatility index and surplus hemodynamic energy significantly increased, respectively, to 1.05 and 1346 ergs/cm at ±15% speed modulation and to 1.51 and 3381 ergs/cm at ±25% speed modulation. This study showed that it is feasible to generate pressure pulsatility with pump speed modulation; the platform is suitable for evaluating the physiologic impact of pulsatility and allows determination of the best speed modulations in terms of magnitude, frequency, and profiles.

  11. "Awake" ECCO2R superseded intubation in a near-fatal asthma attack.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Thomas-Michael; Bence, Tibor; Brettner, Franz

    2017-01-01

    Near-fatal asthma attacks are life threatening events that often require mechanical ventilation. Extracorporeal carbon dioxide removal (ECCO 2 R) is, beside extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO), a well-established rescue option whenever ventilation gets to its limits. But there seems to be very rare experience with those techniques in avoiding mechanical ventilation in severe asthma attacks. A 67-year-old man with a near-fatal asthma attack deteriorated under non-invasive ventilation conditions. Beside pharmacological treatment, the intensivists decided to use an extracorporeal carbon dioxide removal system (ECCO 2 R) to avoid sedation and intubation. Within only a few hours, there was a breakthrough and the patient's status improved continuously. One and a half days later, weaning from ECCO 2 R was already completed. The discussion deals with several advantages of extracorporeal lung support in acute asthma, the potential of avoiding intubation and sedation, as well as the benefits of a conscious and spontaneously breathing patient. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) in general and ECCO 2 R in particular is a highly effective method for the treatment of an acute near-fatal asthma attack. Pathophysiological aspects favor the "awake" approach, without sedation, intubation, and mechanical ventilation. Therefore, experienced clinicians might consider "awake" ECCO 2 R in similar cases.

  12. Association of Awake Bruxism with Khat, Coffee, Tobacco, and Stress among Jazan University Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mir Faeq Ali Quadri

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The objective is to assess the prevalence of bruxism among the university students and to check its association with their khat chewing habit. Materials and Methods. A cross-sectional descriptive study is designed using cluster random sampling. Pretested questionnaire was administered by a trained interviewer to assess awake bruxism and the use of variables like khat, coffee, tobacco, and stress. Chi-square test at 5% significance was used for assessing the association. Logistic regression was also performed after adjusting for covariates. Results. A high response rate (95% was obtained as the distribution and collection of questionnaire was within an hour interval. 85% (63%, males; 22%, females experienced an episode of bruxism at least one time in the past six months. Regression analysis revealed an association of stress (P=0.00; OR = 5.902, 95% CI 2.614–13.325 and khat use (P=0.05; OR = 1.629, 95% CI 0.360–7.368 with bruxism. Interestingly, it is observed that the one who chew khat experienced 3.56 times (95% CI; 2.62–11.22 less pain when compared to the nonusers. Conclusion. This study is the first of its kind to assess the association of bruxism with khat chewing. High amount of stress and khat use can be considered as important risk indicators for awake bruxism.

  13. Propofol sedation during awake craniotomy for seizures: patient-controlled administration versus neurolept analgesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrick, I A; Craen, R A; Gelb, A W; Miller, L A; Kubu, C S; Girvin, J P; Parrent, A G; Eliasziw, M; Kirkby, J

    1997-06-01

    This prospective study evaluated the safety and efficacy of patient-controlled sedation (PCS) using propofol during awake seizure surgery performed under bupivacaine scalp blocks. Thirty-seven patients were randomized to receive either propofol PCS combined with a basal infusion of propofol (n = 20) or neurolept analgesia using an initial bolus dose of fentanyl and droperidol followed by a fentanyl infusion (n = 17). Both groups received supplemental fentanyl and dimenhydrinate for intraoperative pain and nausea, respectively. Comparisons were made between groups for sedation, memory, and cognitive function, patient satisfaction, and incidence of complications. Levels of intraoperative sedation and patient satisfaction were similar between groups. Memory and cognitive function were well preserved in both groups. The incidence of transient episodes of ventilatory rate depression (<8 bpm) was more frequent among the propofol patients (5 vs 0, P = 0.04), particularly after supplemental doses of opioid. Intraoperative seizures were more common among the neurolept patients (7 vs 0, P = 0.002). PCS using propofol represents an effective alternative to neurolept analgesia during awake seizure surgery performed in a monitored care environment.

  14. Awake fi beroptic intubation of a patient with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elif Bakı

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis is a rapidly progressive disease from the fi fth to sixth decades of life causing degeneration and death of the upper and lower motor neurons and no effective treatment. The diagnosis isdependent on the clinical presentation and consistent electrodiagnostic studies. Progressive denervation affects the muscles, causing muscular weakness and atrophy, when the ventilation muscles are affected deathdue to respiratory failure occurs within a few years. We present the case of a 54 years old, 180 cm height and 94 kg weight male patient with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis who underwent surgical treatment of thyroidcancer. Fiberoptic intubation was orally performed providing spontaneus breathing. Propofol was applied after passing vocal cords. Anesthesia was maintained with sevofl orane (%2 and a mixture of oxygen and airunder volume controlled ventilation. Rocuronium was used 20 mg at the beginning of the surgery. At the end of surgery, he wasn’t extubated and transferred to anesthesia intensive care unit. He was extubated after tenhours and he was awaked perfectly. The patient was discharged from intensive care unit after 24 hours and from hospital after ten days. We reported that amyotrophic lateral sclerosis patient with limited mouth opening who underwent thyroid surgery, using awake intubation.

  15. Fentanyl increases dopamine release in rat nucleus accumbens: involvement of mesolimbic mu- and delta-2-opioid receptors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yoshida, Y.; Koide, S.; Hirose, N.; Takada, K.; Tomiyama, K; Koshikawa, N.; Cools, A.R.

    1999-01-01

    The effects of the u-receptor agonist fentanyl on extracellular levels of dopamine in rat nucleus accumbens were studied in awake animals by in vivo brain microdialysis. Fentanyl dosedependently increased the levels of dopamine when given intravenously (ug/kg) or via a microdialysis probe placed

  16. Dopamine and noradrenaline efflux in the rat prefrontal cortex after classical aversive conditioning to an auditory cue

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Feenstra, M. G.; Vogel, M.; Botterblom, M. H.; Joosten, R. N.; de Bruin, J. P.

    2001-01-01

    We used bilateral microdialysis in the medial prefrontal cortex (PFC) of awake, freely moving rats to study aversive conditioning to an auditory cue in the controlled environment of the Skinner box. The presentation of the explicit conditioned stimuli (CS), previously associated with foot shocks,

  17. Higher nocturnal and awake oxygen saturations in children with sickle cell disease receiving hydroxyurea therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narang, Indra; Kadmon, Gili; Lai, Dennison; Dhanju, Simranpal; Kirby-Allen, Melanie; Odame, Isaac; Amin, Reshma; Lu, Zihang; Al-Saleh, Suhail

    2015-07-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea and intermittent nocturnal oxygen desaturations are highly prevalent in children with sickle cell disease and have been reported to contribute to associated morbidity, including vasoocclusive disease. Hydroxyurea (HU) is increasingly used to treat children with sickle cell disease and has been shown to decrease the number and severity of vasoocclusive crises. Although there has been an increase in the use of HU, the impact of HU on the prevalence of obstructive sleep apnea and nocturnal hypoxia are not well documented. To evaluate whether the use of HU is associated with a decreased frequency of obstructive sleep apnea and higher nocturnal and awake oxygen saturations (SaO2) in children with sickle cell disease. This was a retrospective, cross-sectional review of children with sickle cell disease referred to the sleep laboratory at the Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Canada. Polysomnogram data in children with sickle cell disease receiving HU therapy were compared with those not prescribed HU. Children with sickle cell disease receiving HU therapy (HU group, n = 37) were matched with children not receiving HU (no-HU group, n = 104). Obstructive sleep apnea was diagnosed in 14 of 37 (38%) and 54 of 104 (52%) in the HU group and no-HU groups, respectively (P = 0.14). The median obstructive apnea-hypopnea index was 0.9 and 1.9 events/h in the HU group and the no-HU group, respectively (P = 0.28). The HU group compared with the no-HU group had a significantly higher median awake SaO2 (98.6 and 96.2%, respectively; P children with sickle cell disease, the use of HU was associated with an increase in awake and nocturnal SaO2, despite there being no difference in the frequency of obstructive sleep apnea and the severity of the obstructive apnea-hypopnea index. Improving nocturnal SaO2 may be an important mechanism of action of HU therapy. The use of HU to improve nocturnal saturations across the severity spectrum of sickle

  18. Modafinil Increases Awake EEG Activation and Improves Performance in Obstructive Sleep Apnea during Continuous Positive Airway Pressure Withdrawal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, David; Bai, Xiao Xue; Williams, Shaun C.; Hua, Shu Cheng; Kim, Jong-Won; Marshall, Nathaniel S.; D'Rozario, Angela; Grunstein, Ronald R.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: We examined the changes in waking electroencephalography (EEG) biomarkers with modafinil during continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) withdrawal in patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) to investigate neurophysiological evidence for potential neurocognitive improvements. Design: Randomized double-blind placebo-controlled crossover study. CPAP was used for the first night and then withdrawn for 2 subsequent nights. Each morning after the 2 CPAP withdrawal nights, patients received either 200 mg modafinil or placebo. After a 5-w washout, the procedure repeated with the crossover drug. Setting: University teaching hospital. Participants: Stable CPAP users (n = 23 men with OSA) Measurement and Results: Karolinska Drowsiness Test (KDT) (awake EEG measurement with eyes open and closed), Psychomotor Vigilance Task (PVT), and driving simulator Performance were assessed bihourly during the 3 testing days following CPAP treatment and CPAP withdrawal nights. Compared to placebo, modafinil significantly increased awake EEG activation (faster EEG frequency) with increased alpha/delta (A/D) ratio (P Modafinil administration during continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) withdrawal increased awake EEG activation, which correlated to improved performance. This study provides supporting neurophysiological evidence that modafinil is a potential short-term treatment option during acute CPAP withdrawal. Citation: Wang D, Bai XX, Williams SC, Hua SC, Kim JW, Marshall NS, D'Rozario A, Grunstein RR. Modafinil increases awake EEG activation and improves performance in obstructive sleep apnea during continuous positive airway pressure withdrawal. SLEEP 2015;38(8):1297–1303. PMID:26158894

  19. Specificities of Awake Craniotomy and Brain Mapping in Children for Resection of Supratentorial Tumors in the Language Area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delion, Matthieu; Terminassian, Aram; Lehousse, Thierry; Aubin, Ghislaine; Malka, Jean; N'Guyen, Sylvie; Mercier, Philippe; Menei, Philippe

    2015-12-01

    In the pediatric population, awake craniotomy began to be used for the resection of brain tumor located close to eloquent areas. Some specificities must be taken into account to adapt this method to children. The aim of this clinical study is to not only confirm the feasibility of awake craniotomy and language brain mapping in the pediatric population but also identify the specificities and necessary adaptations of the procedure. Six children aged 11 to 16 were operated on while awake under local anesthesia with language brain mapping for supratentorial brain lesions (tumor and cavernoma). The preoperative planning comprised functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and neuropsychologic and psychologic assessment. The specific preoperative preparation is clearly explained including hypnosis conditioning and psychiatric evaluation. The success of the procedure was based on the ability to perform the language brain mapping and the tumor removal without putting the patient to sleep. We investigated the pediatric specificities, psychological experience, and neuropsychologic follow-up. The children experienced little anxiety, probably in large part due to the use of hypnosis. We succeeded in doing the cortical-subcortical mapping and removing the tumor without putting the patient to sleep in all cases. The psychological experience was good, and the neuropsychologic follow-up showed a favorable evolution. Preoperative preparation and hypnosis in children seemed important for performing awake craniotomy and contributing language brain mapping with the best possible psychological experience. The pediatrics specificities are discussed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Oral-Fluid Thiol-Detection Test Identifies Underlying Active Periodontal Disease Not Detected by the Visual Awake Examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Queck, Katherine E; Chapman, Angela; Herzog, Leslie J; Shell-Martin, Tamara; Burgess-Cassler, Anthony; McClure, George David

    2018-03-20

    Periodontal disease in dogs is highly prevalent but can only be accurately diagnosed by performing an anesthetized oral examination with periodontal probing and dental radiography. In this study, 114 dogs had a visual awake examination of the oral cavity and were administered an oral-fluid thiol-detection test prior to undergoing a a full-mouth anesthetized oral examination and digital dental radiographs. The results show the visual awake examination underestimated the presence and severity of active periodontal disease. The thiol-detection test was superior to the visual awake examination at detecting the presence and severity of active periodontal disease and was an indicator of progression toward alveolar bone loss. The thiol-detection test detected active periodontal disease at early stages of development, before any visual cues were present, indicating the need for intervention to prevent periodontal bone loss. Early detection is important because without intervention, dogs with gingivitis (active periodontal disease) progress to irreversible periodontal bone loss (stage 2+). As suggested in the current AAHA guidelines, a thiol-detection test administered in conjunction with the visual awake examination during routine wellness examinations facilitates veterinarian-client communication and mitigates under-diagnosis of periodontal disease and underutilization of dental services. The thiol-detection test can be used to monitor the periodontal health status of the conscious patient during follow-up examinations based on disease severity.

  1. Laser speckle imaging identification of increases in cortical microcirculatory blood flow induced by motor activity during awake craniotomy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klijn, Eva; Hulscher, Hester C.; Balvers, Rutger K.; Holland, Wim P. J.; Bakker, Jan; Vincent, Arnaud J. P. E.; Dirven, Clemens M. F.; Ince, Can

    2013-01-01

    The goal of awake neurosurgery is to maximize resection of brain lesions with minimal injury to functional brain areas. Laser speckle imaging (LSI) is a noninvasive macroscopic technique with high spatial and temporal resolution used to monitor changes in capillary perfusion. In this study, the

  2. Association of Masseter Muscle Activities during Awake and Sleep Periods with Self-Reported Anxiety, Depression, and Somatic Symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khawaja, Shehryar N; Iwasaki, Laura R; Dunford, Robert; Nickel, Jeffrey C; McCall, Willard; Crow, Heidi C; Gonzalez, Yoly

    The objective of this study was to determine if duty factors (DF) of low-magnitude MMA during awake and sleep periods were associated with self-reports of anxiety, depression, and somatic symptoms, and if so, whether or not any associations were modified by gender or the presence of pain. Limited information is currently available in the literature regarding the association of low-magnitude masseter muscle activities (MMA) in habitual environmental settings and the presence of psychological symptoms. Sixty-eight consenting participants were classified using the Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders examination and validated self-reporting psychological symptom evaluation questionnaires. Each subject also had masseter electromyography recordings during standardized biting tasks in 2 laboratory sessions to calibrate the in-field MMA collected during 3 awake and 3 sleep periods. During awake periods, subjects with self-reported depression and somatic symptoms had statistically high odds of having higher DF of low-magnitude MMA (defined by ≥ 75th percentile of sample). The association between high DF of low-magnitude MMA and self-reported depression symptoms was significantly augmented among male participants, whereas, the association between high DF of low-magnitude MMA and self-reported somatic symptoms was significantly increased among female participants without pain. These pilot data support associations of low-magnitude masseter muscle activities with self-reported depression and somatic symptoms during awake periods.

  3. A spike-timing code for discriminating conspecific vocalizations in the thalamocortical system of anesthetized and awake guinea pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huetz, Chloé; Philibert, Bénédicte; Edeline, Jean-Marc

    2009-01-14

    Understanding how communication sounds are processed and encoded in the central auditory system is critical to understanding the neural bases of acoustic communication. Here, we examined neuronal representations of species-specific vocalizations, which are communication sounds that many species rely on for survival and social interaction. In some species, the evoked responses of auditory cortex neurons are stronger in response to natural conspecific vocalizations than to their time-reversed, spectrally identical, counterparts. We applied information theory-based analyses to single-unit spike trains collected in the auditory cortex (n = 139) and auditory thalamus (n = 135) of anesthetized animals as well as in the auditory cortex (n = 119) of awake guinea pigs during presentation of four conspecific vocalizations. Few thalamic and cortical cells (information transmitted by the spike trains was quantified with a temporal precision of 10-50 ms, many cells (>75%) displayed a significant amount of information (i.e., >2SD above chance levels), especially in the awake condition. The computed correlation index between spike trains (R(corr), defined by Schreiber et al., 2003) indicated similar spike-timing reliability for both the natural and time-reversed versions of each vocalization, but higher reliability for awake animals compared with anesthetized animals. Based on temporal discharge patterns, even cells that were only weakly responsive to vocalizations displayed a significant level of information. These findings emphasize the importance of temporal discharge patterns as a coding mechanism for natural communication sounds, particularly in awake animals.

  4. Laser speckle imaging identification of increases in cortical microcirculatory blood flow induced by motor activity during awake craniotomy ; Clinical article

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. Klijn (Elko); M.E.J.L. Hulscher (Marlies); R.K. Balvers (Rutger); W.P.J. Holland (Wim); J. Bakker (Jan); A.J.P.E. Vincent (Arnoud); C.M.F. Dirven (Clemens); C. Ince (Can)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractObject. The goal of awake neurosurgery is to maximize resection of brain lesions with minimal injury to functional brain areas. Laser speckle imaging (LSI) is a noninvasive macroscopic technique with high spatial and temporal resolution used to monitor changes in capillary perfusion. In

  5. Awake craniotomy versus craniotomy under general anesthesia for the surgical treatment of insular glioma: choices and outcomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gravesteijn, B.Y. (B. Y.); Keizer, M.E. (M. E.); A. Vincent (Audrey); J.W. Schouten (Joost); R.J. Stolker (Robert); M. Klimek (Markus)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractObjective: To investigate differences in outcomes in patients who underwent surgery for insular glioma using an awake craniotomy (AC) vs. a craniotomy under general anesthesia (GA). Methods: Data from patients treated at our hospital between 2005 and 2015 were analyzed retrospectively.

  6. Accurate motor mapping in awake common marmosets using micro-electrocorticographical stimulation and stochastic threshold estimation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kosugi, Akito; Takemi, Mitsuaki; Tia, Banty

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Motor map has been widely used as an indicator of motor skills and learning, cortical injury, plasticity, and functional recovery. Cortical stimulation mapping using epidural electrodes is recently adopted for animal studies. However, several technical limitations still remain. Test......, in common marmosets. Approach. ECS was applied using the implanted μECoG electrode arrays in three adult common marmosets under awake conditions. Motor evoked potentials were recorded through electromyographical electrodes implanted in upper limb muscles. The motor threshold was calculated through...... motor threshold with acceptable precision. In vivo ECS mapping showed high test-retest reliability with respect to the excitability and location of the cortical forelimb motor representations. Significance. Using implanted μECoG electrode arrays and a modified motor threshold-hunting algorithm, we...

  7. Cognitive outcome after awake surgery for left and right hemisphere tumours

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elke De Witte

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Awake surgery in eloquent brain regions is performed to preserve language and other cognitive functions. Although in general, no major permanent cognitive deficits are found after awake brain surgery, clinically relevant impairments are detected and cognitive recovery takes longer than generally assumed (3 months (Santini et al., 2012; Satoer et al., 2014; Talacchi et al., 2012. However, as there is a lack of extensive cognitive follow-up data it is unknown when recovery takes place. In addition, the influence of critical language sites identified by direct electrical stimulation (DES and tumour variables (e.g. left/right tumour location, tumour grade on long-term cognitive findings remains unclear. METHODS: In this longitudinal study the short-term and long-term effects of awake surgery on cognition were investigated in 40 patients (29 patients with left and 11 with right hemisphere tumours. Language, memory, attentional, executive and visuospatial functions were assessed in the preoperative phase, at short-term follow-up (6 weeks postsurgery and at long-term follow-up (6 months postsurgery with a neuropsychological protocol. In addition, the effect of intraoperative critical language sites, left/right tumour location, hemispheric language dominance, extent of resection and adjuvant treatment on cognitive change was studied. RESULTS: Both pre- and postoperatively, the mean performance of the patients was worse (impairment = z-score below -2 than the performance of the normal population in the language domain, the memory domain, the attentional and executive domain (p .05. Awake surgery negatively affected language, attentional and executive functions but not memory and visuospatial functions. At 6 weeks postsurgery, performance on all language, attentional and executive tasks deteriorated (object/action naming, semantic/phonological fluency from DuLIP, Token test; Trail Making Test A & B, Stroop I, II, & III. At 6 months

  8. JACoW Safety instrumented systems and the AWAKE plasma control as a use case

    CERN Document Server

    Blanco Viñuela, Enrique; Fernández Adiego, Borja; Speroni, Roberto

    2018-01-01

    Safety is likely the most critical concern in many process industries, yet there is a general uncertainty on the proper engineering to reduce the risks and ensure the safety of persons or material at the same time as providing the process control system. Some of the reasons for this misperception are unclear requirements, lack of functional safety engineering knowledge or incorrect protection functionalities attributed to the BPCS (Basic Process Control System). Occasionally the control engineers are not aware of the hazards inherent to an industrial process and this causes an incorrect design of the overall controls. This paper illustrates the engineering of the SIS (Safety Instrumented System) and the BPCS of the plasma vapour controls of the AWAKE R&D; project, the first proton-driven plasma wakefield acceleration experiment in the world. The controls design and implementation refers to the IEC61511/ISA84 standard, including technological choices, design, operation and maintenance. Finally, the publica...

  9. Ultrafast CT in the diagnosis of sleep apnea during awake tidal breathing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galvin, J.R.; Rooholamini, S.A.; Stanford, W.

    1988-01-01

    With sleep there is normally a decrease in neural output to upper airway muscles. If this decrease is superimposed on a structurally abnormal airway, then sleep apnea may result. Ultrafast CT axially images the upper airway in near real time. The authors compared 11 awake patients with sleep apnea with 24 healthy volunteers during quiet tidal breathing. They found that apneic patients have a small oropharyngeal airway (31.3 mm 2 +- 30.2 vs 134.2 mm 2 +- 46.6[P=<.0001]). Apneic patients also have significant collapsibility of the nasopharynx (75% +- 18% vs 27% +- 14% [P=<.0001]). Ultrafast CT gives dynamic anatomic definition of the upper airway and provides a means to eulcidate further the pathogenesis of sleep apnea

  10. Age of language acquisition and cortical language organization in multilingual patients undergoing awake brain mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Coello, Alejandro; Havas, Viktória; Juncadella, Montserrat; Sierpowska, Joanna; Rodríguez-Fornells, Antoni; Gabarrós, Andreu

    2017-06-01

    OBJECTIVE Most knowledge regarding the anatomical organization of multilingualism is based on aphasiology and functional imaging studies. However, the results have still to be validated by the gold standard approach, namely electrical stimulation mapping (ESM) during awake neurosurgical procedures. In this ESM study the authors describe language representation in a highly specific group of 13 multilingual individuals, focusing on how age of acquisition may influence the cortical organization of language. METHODS Thirteen patients who had a high degree of proficiency in multiple languages and were harboring lesions within the dominant, left hemisphere underwent ESM while being operated on under awake conditions. Demographic and language data were recorded in relation to age of language acquisition (for native languages and early- and late-acquired languages), neuropsychological pre- and postoperative language testing, the number and location of language sites, and overlapping distribution in terms of language acquisition time. Lesion growth patterns and histopathological characteristics, location, and size were also recorded. The distribution of language sites was analyzed with respect to age of acquisition and overlap. RESULTS The functional language-related sites were distributed in the frontal (55%), temporal (29%), and parietal lobes (16%). The total number of native language sites was 47. Early-acquired languages (including native languages) were represented in 97 sites (55 overlapped) and late-acquired languages in 70 sites (45 overlapped). The overlapping distribution was 20% for early-early, 71% for early-late, and 9% for late-late. The average lesion size (maximum diameter) was 3.3 cm. There were 5 fast-growing and 7 slow-growing lesions. CONCLUSIONS Cortical language distribution in multilingual patients is not homogeneous, and it is influenced by age of acquisition. Early-acquired languages have a greater cortical representation than languages acquired

  11. Does the supplementary motor area keep patients with Ondine's curse syndrome breathing while awake?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lysandre Tremoureux

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Congenital central hypoventilation syndrome (CCHS is a rare neuro-respiratory disorder associated with mutations of the PHOX2B gene. Patients with this disease experience severe hypoventilation during sleep and are consequently ventilator-dependent. However, they breathe almost normally while awake, indicating the existence of cortical mechanisms compensating for the deficient brainstem generation of automatic breathing. Current evidence indicates that the supplementary motor area plays an important role in modulating ventilation in awake normal humans. We hypothesized that the wake-related maintenance of spontaneous breathing in patients with CCHS could involve supplementary motor area. METHODS: We studied 7 CCHS patients (5 women; age: 20-30; BMI: 22.1 ± 4 kg.m(-2 during resting breathing and during exposure to carbon dioxide and inspiratory mechanical constraints. They were compared with 8 healthy individuals. Segments of electroencephalographic tracings were selected according to ventilatory flow signal, from 2.5 seconds to 1.5 seconds after the onset of inspiration. After artefact rejection, 80 or more such segments were ensemble averaged. A slow upward shift of the EEG signal starting between 2 and 0.5 s before inspiration (pre-inspiratory potential was considered suggestive of supplementary motor area activation. RESULTS: In the control group, pre-inspiratory potentials were generally absent during resting breathing and carbon dioxide stimulation, and consistently identified in the presence of inspiratory constraints (expected. In CCHS patients, pre-inspiratory potentials were systematically identified in all study conditions, including resting breathing. They were therefore significantly more frequent than in controls. CONCLUSIONS: This study provides a neurophysiological substrate to the wakefulness drive to breathe that is characteristic of CCHS and suggests that the supplementary motor area contributes to this phenomenon

  12. Does the supplementary motor area keep patients with Ondine's curse syndrome breathing while awake?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremoureux, Lysandre; Raux, Mathieu; Hudson, Anna L; Ranohavimparany, Anja; Straus, Christian; Similowski, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Congenital central hypoventilation syndrome (CCHS) is a rare neuro-respiratory disorder associated with mutations of the PHOX2B gene. Patients with this disease experience severe hypoventilation during sleep and are consequently ventilator-dependent. However, they breathe almost normally while awake, indicating the existence of cortical mechanisms compensating for the deficient brainstem generation of automatic breathing. Current evidence indicates that the supplementary motor area plays an important role in modulating ventilation in awake normal humans. We hypothesized that the wake-related maintenance of spontaneous breathing in patients with CCHS could involve supplementary motor area. We studied 7 CCHS patients (5 women; age: 20-30; BMI: 22.1 ± 4 kg.m(-2)) during resting breathing and during exposure to carbon dioxide and inspiratory mechanical constraints. They were compared with 8 healthy individuals. Segments of electroencephalographic tracings were selected according to ventilatory flow signal, from 2.5 seconds to 1.5 seconds after the onset of inspiration. After artefact rejection, 80 or more such segments were ensemble averaged. A slow upward shift of the EEG signal starting between 2 and 0.5 s before inspiration (pre-inspiratory potential) was considered suggestive of supplementary motor area activation. In the control group, pre-inspiratory potentials were generally absent during resting breathing and carbon dioxide stimulation, and consistently identified in the presence of inspiratory constraints (expected). In CCHS patients, pre-inspiratory potentials were systematically identified in all study conditions, including resting breathing. They were therefore significantly more frequent than in controls. This study provides a neurophysiological substrate to the wakefulness drive to breathe that is characteristic of CCHS and suggests that the supplementary motor area contributes to this phenomenon. Whether or not this "cortical breathing" can be taken

  13. Pre-hospital emergency anaesthesia in awake hypotensive trauma patients: beneficial or detrimental?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crewdson, K; Rehn, M; Brohi, K; Lockey, D J

    2018-04-01

    The benefits of pre-hospital emergency anaesthesia (PHEA) are controversial. Patients who are hypovolaemic prior to induction of anaesthesia are at risk of severe cardiovascular instability post-induction. This study compared mortality for hypovolaemic trauma patients (without major neurological injury) undergoing PHEA with a patient cohort with similar physiology transported to hospital without PHEA. A retrospective database review was performed to identify patients who were hypotensive on scene [systolic blood pressure (SBP) pre-hospital clinicians to identify the likelihood of hypovolaemia. Primary outcome measure was mortality defined as death before hospital discharge. Two hundred and thirty-six patients were included; 101 patients underwent PHEA. Fifteen PHEA patients died (14.9%) compared with six non-PHEA patients (4.4%), P = 0.01; unadjusted OR for death was 3.73 (1.30-12.21; P = 0.01). This association remained after adjustment for age, injury mechanism, heart rate and hypovolaemia (adjusted odds ratio 3.07 (1.03-9.14) P = 0.04). Fifty-eight PHEA patients (57.4%) were hypovolaemic prior to induction of anaesthesia, 14 died (24%). Of 43 PHEA patients (42.6%) not meeting hypovolaemia criteria, one died (2%); unadjusted OR for mortality was 13.12 (1.84-578.21). After adjustment for age, injury mechanism and initial heart rate, the odds ratio for mortality remained significant at 9.99 (1.69-58.98); P = 0.01. Our results suggest an association between PHEA and in-hospital mortality in awake hypotensive trauma patients, which is strengthened when hypotension is due to hypovolaemia. If patients are hypovolaemic and awake on scene it might, where possible, be appropriate to delay induction of anaesthesia until hospital arrival. © 2018 The Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Chaos analysis of EEG during isoflurane-induced loss of righting in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacIver, M B; Bland, Brian H

    2014-01-01

    It has long been known that electroencephalogram (EEG) signals generate chaotic strange attractors and the shape of these attractors correlate with depth of anesthesia. We applied chaos analysis to frontal cortical and hippocampal micro-EEG signals from implanted microelectrodes (layer 4 and CA1, respectively). Rats were taken to and from loss of righting reflex (LORR) with isoflurane and behavioral measures were compared to attractor shape. Resting EEG signals at LORR differed markedly from awake signals, more similar to slow wave sleep signals, and easily discerned in raw recordings (high amplitude slow waves), and in fast Fourier transform analysis (FFT; increased delta power), in good agreement with previous studies. EEG activation stimulated by turning rats on their side, to test righting, produced signals quite similar to awake resting state EEG signals. That is, the high amplitude slow wave activity changed to low amplitude fast activity that lasted for several seconds, before returning to slow wave activity. This occurred regardless of whether the rat was able to right itself, or not. Testing paw pinch and tail clamp responses produced similar EEG activations, even from deep anesthesia when burst suppression dominated the spontaneous EEG. Chaotic attractor shape was far better at discerning between these awake-like signals, at loss of responses, than was FFT analysis. Comparisons are provided between FFT and chaos analysis of EEG during awake walking, slow wave sleep, and isoflurane-induced effects at several depths of anesthesia. Attractors readily discriminated between natural sleep and isoflurane-induced "delta" activity. Chaotic attractor shapes changed gradually through the transition from awake to LORR, indicating that this was not an on/off like transition, but rather a point along a continuum of brain states.

  15. Chaos analysis of EEG during isoflurane-induced loss of righting in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruce eMaciver

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available It has long been known that electroencephalogram (EEG signals generate chaotic strange attractors and the shape of these attractors correlate with depth of anesthesia. We applied chaos analysis to frontal cortical and hippocampal micro-EEG signals from implanted microelectrodes (layer 4 and CA1, respectively. Rats were taken to and from loss of righting reflex (LORR with isoflurane and behavioral measures were compared to attractor shape. Resting EEG signals at LORR differed markedly from awake signals, more similar to slow wave sleep signals, and easily discerned in raw recordings (high amplitude slow waves, and in fast Fourier transform analysis (FFT; increased delta power, in good agreement with previous studies. EEG activation stimulated by turning rats on their side, to test righting, produced signals quite similar to awake resting state EEG signals. That is, the high amplitude slow wave activity changed to low amplitude fast activity that lasted for several seconds, before returning to slow wave activity. This occurred regardless of whether the rat was able to right itself, or not. Testing paw pinch and tail clamp responses produced similar EEG activations, even from deep anesthesia when burst suppression dominated the spontaneous EEG. Chaotic attractor shape was far better at discerning between these awake-like signals, at loss of responses, than was FFT analysis. Comparisons are provided between FFT and chaos analysis of EEG during awake walking, slow wave sleep, and isoflurane-induced effects at several depths of anesthesia. Attractors readily discriminated between natural sleep and isoflurane-induced ‘delta’ activity. Chaotic attractor shapes changed gradually through the transition from awake to LORR, indicating that this was not an on/off like transition, but rather a point along a continuum of brain states.

  16. DO OPIOIDS EVOKE THE RELEASE OF SEROTONIN IN THE SPINAL-CORD - AN INVIVO MICRODIALYSIS STUDY OF THE REGULATION OF EXTRACELLULAR SEROTONIN IN THE RAT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MATOS, FF; ROLLEMA, H; BROWN, JL; BASBAUM, AI

    This study investigated the regulation of serotonin (5-HT) and its major metabolite 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) in the dorsal spinal cord of awake, freely moving rats, using microdialysis coupled to HPLC with electrochemical detection and tested the hypothesis that opioids exert their

  17. EFFECT OF PRECURSOR LOADING ON THE SYNTHESIS RATE AND RELEASE OF DOPAMINE AND SEROTONIN IN THE STRIATUM - A MICRODIALYSIS STUDY IN CONSCIOUS RATS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    WESTERINK, BHC; DEVRIES, JB

    The effects of systemic administration of tyrosine and phenylalanine on the extracellular levels of tyrosine and dopamine were determined by microdialysis in the striatum of awake rats. In addition, the effects of these precursors on in vivo 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA) formation were

  18. APOPO's tuberculosis research agenda: achievements, challenges ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    APOPO) recent use of specially trained African giant pouched rats as detectors of pulmonary tuberculosis in people living in Tanzania. It summarizes the achievements and challenges encountered over the years and outlines future prospects.

  19. Achieving Standardization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henningsson, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    competitive, national customs and regional economic organizations are seeking to establish a standardized solution for digital reporting of customs data. However, standardization has proven hard to achieve in the socio-technical e-Customs solution. In this chapter, the authors identify and describe what has......International e-Customs is going through a standardization process. Driven by the need to increase control in the trade process to address security challenges stemming from threats of terrorists, diseases, and counterfeit products, and to lower the administrative burdens on traders to stay...... to be harmonized in order for a global company to perceive e-Customs as standardized. In doing so, they contribute an explanation of the challenges associated with using a standardization mechanism for harmonizing socio-technical information systems....

  20. Achieving Standardization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henningsson, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    competitive, national customs and regional economic organizations are seeking to establish a standardized solution for digital reporting of customs data. However, standardization has proven hard to achieve in the socio-technical e-Customs solution. In this chapter, the authors identify and describe what has......International e-Customs is going through a standardization process. Driven by the need to increase control in the trade process to address security challenges stemming from threats of terrorists, diseases, and counterfeit products, and to lower the administrative burdens on traders to stay...... to be harmonized in order for a global company to perceive e-Customs as standardized. In doing so, they contribute an explanation of the challenges associated with using a standardization mechanism for harmonizing socio-technical information systems....

  1. Predictors of Failure of Awake Regional Anesthesia for Neonatal Hernia Repair : Data from the General Anesthesia Compared to Spinal Anesthesia Study-Comparing Apnea and Neurodevelopmental Outcomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frawley, Geoff; Bell, Graham; Disma, Nicola; Withington, Davinia E; de Graaff, Jurgen C; Morton, Neil S; McCann, Mary Ellen; Arnup, Sarah J; Bagshaw, Oliver; Wolfler, Andrea; Bellinger, David; Davidson, Andrew J; Absalom, Anthony

    BACKGROUND: Awake regional anesthesia (RA) is a viable alternative to general anesthesia (GA) for infants undergoing lower abdominal surgery. Benefits include lower incidence of postoperative apnea and avoidance of anesthetic agents that may increase neuroapoptosis and worsen neurocognitive

  2. Awake craniotomy for cortical language mapping and resection of an arteriovenous malformation adjacent to eloquent areas under general anesthesia — A hybrid approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pree Nimmannitya

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Surgery of arteriovenous malformation (AVM is sometimes challenging and carries a high risk of morbidity, especially when the AVM is located in an eloquent area of the brain. Unlike gliomas, awake craniotomy has not been widely used for resection of AVM. The authors present a case of an AVM in the left frontal lobe which was successfully removed with the aid of awake craniotomy with cortical language mapping. In conclusion, awake craniotomy for functional cortical mapping is beneficial for AVM resection, especially when the lesion is located in or adjacent to eloquent areas of the brain. A hybrid approach with functional mapping in the awake condition and AVM resection under general anesthesia may be useful in selected cases. Furthermore, en bloc resection with the nidus embedded in the brain parenchyma may be a useful means of removal to reduce operation time and intraoperative blood loss if there is no apparent functional cortex surrounding the AVM, as in the present case.

  3. Representasi Identitas Melalui Komunikasi Visual Dalam Komunitas Virtual Palanta Urang Awak Minangkabau

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elda - Franzia

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT In virtual community, identity represented through various form. A person as community member is appearing through profile picture and doing communication activity between members in virtual community. The communication held actively in verbal and visual communication form consists of message exchange and meaning through symbols that understand thoroughly based on culture and custom with certain characteristic differ to each ethnic groups. Palanta Urang Awak Minangkabau is one of the virtual communities in Facebook social network. As an active virtual community, the communication is ongoing intensely between members. Conversation and interaction are often beginning with image posting by member. This research is aim to explain the variety of visual communication form in this certain virtual community as part of virtual identity construction of Minangkabau ethnic group. The method is virtual observation and documentation, with semiotic method analysis in cultural studies approach. This research gave the understanding of image typology and cultural symbolism in Minangkabau culture, especially in the context of virtual community in Facebook. Keywords: identity, communication, visual, Minangkabau, Facebook ABSTRAK Dalam komunitas virtual, identitas direpresentasikan melalui berbagai bentuk. Individu yang menjadi anggota komunitas dihadirkan melalui foto profil dan melakukan aktivitas komunikasi antar individu dalam ruang komunitas virtual tersebut. Komunikasi berlangsung secara aktif meliputi tukar menukar pesan dan pemaknaan secara verbal dan visual melalui simbol-simbol penandaan yang dipahami bersama, dengan berbasis budaya dan adat dengan karakteristik tertentu yang berbeda antara etnis satu dengan yang lain. Palanta Urang Awak Minangkabau merupakan salah satu komunitas virtual di jejaring sosial Facebook. Sebagai komunitas virtual yang aktif, komunikasi berlangsung secara intens antar anggotanya. Percakapan dan interaksi sering kali

  4. Biofeedback for treatment of awake and sleep bruxism in adults: systematic review protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilovar, Sasa; Zolger, Danaja; Castrillon, Eduardo; Car, Josip; Huckvale, Kit

    2014-05-02

    Bruxism is a disorder of jaw-muscle activity characterised by repetitive clenching or grinding of the teeth which results in discomfort and damage to dentition. The two clinical manifestations of the condition (sleep and awake bruxism) are thought to have unrelated aetiologies but are palliated using similar techniques. The lack of a definitive treatment has prompted renewed interest in biofeedback, a behaviour change method that uses electronic detection to provide a stimulus whenever bruxism occurs. This systematic review aims to provide a comprehensive overview of the state of research into biofeedback for bruxism; to assess the efficacy and acceptability of biofeedback therapy in management of awake bruxism and, separately, sleep bruxism in adults; and to compare findings between the two variants. A systematic review of published literature examining biofeedback as an intervention directed at controlling primary bruxism in adults. We will search electronic databases and the grey literature using a predefined search strategy to identify randomised and non-randomised studies, technical reports and patents. Searches will not be restricted by language or date and will be expanded through contact with authors and experts, and by following up reference lists and citations. Two authors, working independently, will conduct screening of search results, study selection, data extraction and quality assessment and a third will resolve any disagreements. The primary outcomes of acceptability and effectiveness will be assessed using only randomised studies, segregated by bruxism subtype. A meta-analysis of these data will be conducted only if pre-defined conditions for quality and heterogeneity are met, otherwise the data will be summarized in narrative form. Data from non-randomised studies will be used to augment a narrative synthesis of the state of technical developments and any safety-related issues. PROSPERO registration number: CRD42013006880. Biofeedback is not new

  5. Evidence for Long-Timescale Patterns of Synaptic Inputs in CA1 of Awake Behaving Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolb, Ilya; Talei Franzesi, Giovanni; Wang, Michael; Kodandaramaiah, Suhasa B; Forest, Craig R; Boyden, Edward S; Singer, Annabelle C

    2018-02-14

    Repeated sequences of neural activity are a pervasive feature of neural networks in vivo and in vitro In the hippocampus, sequential firing of many neurons over periods of 100-300 ms reoccurs during behavior and during periods of quiescence. However, it is not known whether the hippocampus produces longer sequences of activity or whether such sequences are restricted to specific network states. Furthermore, whether long repeated patterns of activity are transmitted to single cells downstream is unclear. To answer these questions, we recorded intracellularly from hippocampal CA1 of awake, behaving male mice to examine both subthreshold activity and spiking output in single neurons. In eight of nine recordings, we discovered long (900 ms) reoccurring subthreshold fluctuations or "repeats." Repeats generally were high-amplitude, nonoscillatory events reoccurring with 10 ms precision. Using statistical controls, we determined that repeats occurred more often than would be expected from unstructured network activity (e.g., by chance). Most spikes occurred during a repeat, and when a repeat contained a spike, the spike reoccurred with precision on the order of ≤20 ms, showing that long repeated patterns of subthreshold activity are strongly connected to spike output. Unexpectedly, we found that repeats occurred independently of classic hippocampal network states like theta oscillations or sharp-wave ripples. Together, these results reveal surprisingly long patterns of repeated activity in the hippocampal network that occur nonstochastically, are transmitted to single downstream neurons, and strongly shape their output. This suggests that the timescale of information transmission in the hippocampal network is much longer than previously thought. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT We found long (≥900 ms), repeated, subthreshold patterns of activity in CA1 of awake, behaving mice. These repeated patterns ("repeats") occurred more often than expected by chance and with 10 ms

  6. Only a whisper away. A philosophical view of the awake patient's situation during regional anaesthetics and surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsson, Ann-Christin; Ekebergh, Margaretha; Larsson Mauléon, Annika; Almerud Österberg, Sofia

    2012-10-01

    In this study the awake patient's intraoperative situation and experiences during regional anaesthetics and surgery are reflected upon by using the work of the French philosopher Maurice Merleau-Ponty. Merleau-Ponty's phenomenological idea of the body as being at the centre of the world highlights the patient's embodied position and bestows significance onto the body as a whole, as a lived body. A case, based on the findings from a previous interview study, is presented as a contextual starting point where a patient goes from having a familiar body recognized as her own to having a partially anaesthetized body experienced as an unknown object. The intraoperative caring space is described in this context as the mutual ground where the awake patient and the nurse anaesthetist (NA) can interact to create meaning. The NA can act as the patient's bodily extension to bridge the gap between the patient's experiences and the situation. This calls for the NA's proximity and genuine presence in order to meet and understand the patient's awake experiences. Learning from the patient's situatedness gives information that is valuable for NAs to share with patients who are less experienced with this contextual situation. The challenge for the NA is not to perform routine-based care, but to acknowledge every patient's lifeworld and uniqueness thus enabling the patient to move easily along the mind-body-world continuum. The core of intraoperative care is to provide support and promote well-being of awake patients in the intraoperative environment. The use of a philosophical perspective is relevant for nurses who work in an intraoperative setting where patients undergo regional anaesthetics. This study shows how nursing research using phenomenological philosophy can help uncover new meanings known only to the patients living the experience. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  7. Diagnostic work up for language testing in patients undergoing awake craniotomy for brain lesions in language areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilotta, Federico; Stazi, Elisabetta; Titi, Luca; Lalli, Diana; Delfini, Roberto; Santoro, Antonio; Rosa, Giovanni

    2014-06-01

    Awake craniotomy is the technique of choice in patients with brain tumours adjacent to primary and accessory language areas (Broca's and Wernicke's areas). Language testing should be aimed to detect preoperative deficits, to promptly identify the occurrence of new intraoperative impairments and to establish the course of postoperative language status. Aim of this case series is to describe our experience with a dedicated language testing work up to evaluate patients with or at risk for language disturbances undergoing awake craniotomy for brain tumour resection. Pre- and intra operative testing was accomplished with 8 tests. Intraoperative evaluation was accomplished when patients were fully cooperative (Ramsey language testings were normal in 9 patients (45%), showed mild to moderate language deficit in 8 (40%) and severe language deficit or aphasic disorders in 3 (15%). Broca's area was identified in 15 patients, in all cases by counting arrest during stimulation and in 12 cases by naming arrest. In this article we describe our experience using a language testing work up to evaluate - pre, intra and postoperatively - patients undergoing awake craniotomy for brain tumour resection with preoperative language disturbances or at risk for postoperative language deficits. This approach allows a systematic evaluation and recording of language function status and can be accomplished even when a neuropsychologist or speech therapist are not involved in the operation crew.

  8. Tracheostomy as a bridge to spontaneous breathing and awake-ECMO in non-transplant surgical patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swol, J; Strauch, J T; Schildhauer, T A

    2017-05-01

    The tracheostomy is a frequently used procedure for the respiratory weaning of ventilated patients allows sedation free ECLS use in awake patient. The aim of this study is to assess the possibility and highlight the benefits of lowering the impact of sedation in surgical non-transplant patients on ECLS. The specific objective was to investigate the use of tracheostomy as a bridge to spontaneous breathing on ECLS. Of the 95 patients, 65 patients received a tracheostomy, and 5 patients were admitted with a tracheostoma. One patient was cannulated without intubation, one is extubated during ECLS course after 48 hours. 4 patients were extubated after weaning and the removal of ECLS. 19 patients died before the indication to tracheostomy was given. Tracheostomy can bridge to spontaneous breathing and awake-ECMO in non-transplant surgical patients. The "awake ECMO" strategy may avoid complications related to mechanical ventilation, sedation, and immobilization and provide comparable outcomes to other approaches for providing respiratory support. © 2017 The Authors. European Journal of Heart Failure © 2017 European Society of Cardiology.

  9. Modafinil Increases Awake EEG Activation and Improves Performance in Obstructive Sleep Apnea during Continuous Positive Airway Pressure Withdrawal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, David; Bai, Xiao Xue; Williams, Shaun C; Hua, Shu Cheng; Kim, Jong-Won; Marshall, Nathaniel S; D'Rozario, Angela; Grunstein, Ronald R

    2015-08-01

    We examined the changes in waking electroencephalography (EEG) biomarkers with modafinil during continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) withdrawal in patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) to investigate neurophysiological evidence for potential neurocognitive improvements. Randomized double-blind placebo-controlled crossover study. CPAP was used for the first night and then withdrawn for 2 subsequent nights. Each morning after the 2 CPAP withdrawal nights, patients received either 200 mg modafinil or placebo. After a 5-w washout, the procedure repeated with the crossover drug. University teaching hospital. Stable CPAP users (n = 23 men with OSA). Karolinska Drowsiness Test (KDT) (awake EEG measurement with eyes open and closed), Psychomotor Vigilance Task (PVT), and driving simulator Performance were assessed bihourly during the 3 testing days following CPAP treatment and CPAP withdrawal nights. Compared to placebo, modafinil significantly increased awake EEG activation (faster EEG frequency) with increased alpha/delta (A/D) ratio (P Modafinil administration during continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) withdrawal increased awake EEG activation, which correlated to improved performance. This study provides supporting neurophysiological evidence that modafinil is a potential short-term treatment option during acute CPAP withdrawal. © 2015 Associated Professional Sleep Societies, LLC.

  10. [Incidence and causes of early end in awake surgery for language mapping not directly related to eloquence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villalba, Gloria; Pacreu, Susana; Fernández-Candil, Juan Luis; León, Alba; Serrano, Laura; Conesa, Gerardo

    2016-01-01

    The incidence and causes that may lead to an early end (unfinished cortical/subcortical mapping) of awake surgery for language mapping are little known. A study was conducted on 41 patients with brain glioma located in the language area that had awake surgery under conscious sedation. Surgery was ended early in 6 patients. The causes were: tonic-clonic seizure (1), lack of cooperation due to fatigue/sleep (4), whether or not word articulation was involved, a decreased level of consciousness for ammonia encephalopathy that required endotracheal intubation (1). There are causes that could be expected and in some cases avoided. Tumour size, preoperative aphasia, valproate treatment, and type of anaesthesia used are variables to consider to avoid failure in awake surgery for language mapping. With these results, the following measures are proposed: l) If the tumour is large, perform surgery in two times to avoid fatigue, 2) if patient has a preoperative aphasia, do not use sedation during surgery to ensure that sleepiness does not cause worse word articulation, 3) if the patient is on valproate treatment, it is necessary to rule out the pre-operative symptoms that are not due to ammonia encephalopathy. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Española de Neurocirugía. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  11. The Use of the Target Cancellation Task to Identify Eloquent Visuospatial Regions in Awake Craniotomies: Technical Note.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conner, Andrew K; Glenn, Chad; Burks, Joshua D; McCoy, Tressie; Bonney, Phillip A; Chema, Ahmed A; Case, Justin L; Brunner, Scott; Baker, Cordell; Sughrue, Michael

    2016-11-17

    The success of awake craniotomies relies on the patient's performance of function-specific tasks that are simple, quick, and reproducible. Intraoperative identification of visuospatial function through cortical and subcortical mapping has utilized a variety of intraoperative tests, each with its own benefits and drawbacks. In light of this, we developed a simple software program that aids in preventing neglect by simulating a target-cancellation task on a portable electronic device. In this report, we describe the interactive target cancellation task and have reviewed seven consecutive patients who underwent awake craniotomy for parietal and/or posterior temporal infiltrating brain tumors of the non-dominant hemisphere. Each of these patients performed target cancellation and line bisection tasks intraoperatively. The outcomes of each patient and testing scenario are described. Positive intraoperative cortical and subcortical sites involved with visuospatial processing were identified in three of the seven patients using the target cancellation and confirmed utilizing the line-bisection task. No identification of visuospatial function was accomplished utilizing the line-bisection task alone. Complete visuospatial function mapping was completed in less than 10 minutes in all patients. No patients had preoperative or postoperative hemineglect. Our findings highlight the feasibility of the target cancellation technique for use during awake craniotomy to aid in avoiding postoperative hemineglect. Target cancellation may offer an alternative method of cortical and subcortical visuospatial mapping in patients unable to perform other commonly used modalities.

  12. Staying Awake and Aware: The Importance of Sleep in Psychiatric Nursing Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobin, Thomas; Tobin, Mary L

    2017-11-01

    Given that approximately 70 million Americans suffer from sleep-wake disorders and their under-recognized role in practice, psychiatric nurses may see, or may be already seeing, patients with undiagnosed sleep disorders. Assessment of sleep-wake disorders can and should be a part of psychiatric nursing education and practice. Many practicing clinicians lack formal training regarding sleep-wake issues and treatment. Even as sleep disturbances are common concerns among psychiatric populations, sleep-wake issues may go unrecognized. The article presents a stylized progression of care to enable clinicians to identify, address, and treat underlying sleep-wake disorders in psychiatric settings. The article recommends instituting screening procedures for sleep-wake issues and follow-up assessments, particularly overnight pulse oximetry and polysomnograms. Just as clinicians already screen for physical conditions that would affect psychiatric care, practitioners can evaluate patients for potential sleep-wake disorders as part of their existing practice and intake procedures. Further, the piece details implications for psychopharmacology as well as evidence from clinical practice. Psychiatric nurses should stay awake to the importance of sleep medicine and aware of how sleep-wake disorders can affect psychiatric populations.

  13. High-throughput mapping of brain-wide activity in awake and drug-responsive vertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Xudong; Wang, Shiqi; Yu, Xudong; Liu, Zhuguo; Wang, Fei; Li, Wai Tsun; Cheng, Shuk Han; Dai, Qiuyun; Shi, Peng

    2015-02-07

    The reconstruction of neural activity across complete neural circuits, or brain activity mapping, has great potential in both fundamental and translational neuroscience research. Larval zebrafish, a vertebrate model, has recently been demonstrated to be amenable to whole brain activity mapping in behaving animals. Here we demonstrate a microfluidic array system ("Fish-Trap") that enables high-throughput mapping of brain-wide activity in awake larval zebrafish. Unlike the commonly practiced larva-processing methods using a rigid gel or a capillary tube, which are laborious and time-consuming, the hydrodynamic design of our microfluidic chip allows automatic, gel-free, and anesthetic-free processing of tens of larvae for microscopic imaging with single-cell resolution. Notably, this system provides the capability to directly couple pharmaceutical stimuli with real-time recording of neural activity in a large number of animals, and the local and global effects of pharmacoactive drugs on the nervous system can be directly visualized and evaluated by analyzing drug-induced functional perturbation within or across different brain regions. Using this technology, we tested a set of neurotoxin peptides and obtained new insights into how to exploit neurotoxin derivatives as therapeutic agents. The novel and versatile "Fish-Trap" technology can be readily unitized to study other stimulus (optical, acoustic, or physical) associated functional brain circuits using similar experimental strategies.

  14. Does Global Astrocytic Calcium Signaling Participate in Awake Brain State Transitions and Neuronal Circuit Function?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaerby, Celia; Rasmussen, Rune; Andersen, Mie

    2017-01-01

    We continuously need to adapt to changing conditions within our surrounding environment, and our brain needs to quickly shift between resting and working activity states in order to allow appropriate behaviors. These global state shifts are intimately linked to the brain-wide release of the neuro......We continuously need to adapt to changing conditions within our surrounding environment, and our brain needs to quickly shift between resting and working activity states in order to allow appropriate behaviors. These global state shifts are intimately linked to the brain-wide release...... of the neuromodulators, noradrenaline and acetylcholine. Astrocytes have emerged as a new player participating in the regulation of brain activity, and have recently been implicated in brain state shifts. Astrocytes display global Ca(2+) signaling in response to activation of the noradrenergic system, but whether...... astrocytic Ca(2+) signaling is causative or correlative for shifts in brain state and neural activity patterns is not known. Here we review the current available literature on astrocytic Ca(2+) signaling in awake animals in order to explore the role of astrocytic signaling in brain state shifts. Furthermore...

  15. Desain Linear Quadratic Tracking Untuk Pendaratan Vertikal Pada Pesawat Tanpa Awak Quadrotor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luthfi Andria

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Dewasa ini, kemajuan Pesawat Tanpa Awak atau Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV menyebabkan permintaan dan penerapannya pada berbagai bidang seperti keamanan, militer dan lain-lain semakin meningkat. Quadrotor merupakan jenis UAV dengan proses lepas landas dan pendaratan vertikal di mana fitur ini memungkinkan UAV untuk pendaratan pada lahan yang sempit. Namun, fitur pendaratan vertikal pada quadrotor menyebabkan terjadinya turbulensi yang berasal dari angin hasil perputaran baling-baling quadrotor. Angin tersebut terpantul pada permukaan landasan dan kembali menuju baling-baling yang menyebabkan daya tekan kebawah pada quadrotor. Sesaat sebelum  pendaratan di mana turbulensi yang dihasilkan masih besar, rotor harus berputar lebih cepat untuk menghasilkan daya angkat yang lebih besar dari daya tekan kebawah yang dihasilkan oleh turbulensi. Sebaliknya, bila kecepatan rotor tetap besar pada saat daya tekan kebawah dari turbulensi mengecil, maka quadrotor terangkat dengan sangat cepat. Linear Quadratic Tracking (LQT merupakan sistem pengaturan yang keluarannya diatur agar mengikuti (tracking jalur yang telah ditetapkan melalui masukan. Tracking dilakukan pada ketinggian quadrotor agar mengikuti respon masukan yang telah ditentukan. Untuk rotasi dari quadrotor, akan dikendalikan dengan kontroler PID agar masing-masing sudut tidak lebih dari 0,48 radian. Hasil yang dicapai adalah kontroler LQT dan PID berhasil melakukan tracking sesuai dengan masukan yang diberikan dan menjaga kestabilan sudut.

  16. Functional properties of neurones in the posterior part of area 7 in awake monkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leinonen, L

    1980-03-01

    The posterolateral part of the parietal association cortex (area 7 of Brodmann) was investigated in three awake, behaving macaque monkeys using transdural microelectrode recording technique. Only one of the 114 cells isolated remained unidentified. Of the cells 79% responded to somesthetic (39%) or visual (23%) or both somesthetic and visual (17%) stimulation. The somesthetic receptive fields were large, covering, for instance, the whole arm or hand. Most receptive fields were on the upper extremities. Half of the somesthetically drivable cells had bilateral receptive fields. The visually drivable cells responded only to stimuli moving in a certain direction. The effective stimuli for most of the cells responding both to visual and somatosensory stimulation were: touching of the skin and visual stimuli moving towards the cutaneous receptive field. Of the cells 20% were active only during the monkey's own movements, most often during grasping and manipultion with fingers. The results indicate that the area studied is specialized in the control of hand movements, e. g. grasping, grooming and somesthetic recognition of the forms of objects.

  17. Preliminary Study for an RF photocathode based electron injector for awake project

    CERN Document Server

    Mete, Oznur; Burt, Graeme; Chattopadhyay, Swapan

    2014-01-01

    AWAKE project, a proton driven plasma wakefield acceleration (PDPWA) experiment is approved by CERN. The PDPWA scheme consists of a seeding laser, a drive beam to establish the accelerating wakefields within the plasma cell; and a witness beam to be accelerated. The drive beam protons will be provided by the CERN's Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS). The plasma ionisation will be performed by a seeding laser and the drive beam protons to produce the accelerating wakefields. After establishing the wakefields, witness beam, namely, electron beam from a dedicated source should be injected into the plasma cell. The primary goal of this experiment is to demonstrate acceleration of a 5-15$\\,$MeV single bunch electron beam up to 1$\\,$GeV in a 10$\\,$m of plasma. This paper explores the possibility of an RF photocathode as the electron source for this PDPWA scheme based on the existing PHIN photo-injector at CERN. The modifications to the existing design, preliminary beam dynamics simulations in order to provide the requi...

  18. Regional cerebral palmitate incorporation following transient bilateral carotid occlusion in awake gerbils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tone, O.; Miller, J.C.; Bell, J.M.; Rapoport, S.I.

    1987-01-01

    [ 14 C]Palmitate was injected intravenously in awake gerbils at various times after 5 minutes of bilateral carotid artery occlusion or a sham operation. Regional rates of incorporation of plasma palmitate into the hippocampus and other regions of the anterior circulation were determined relative to the mean rate of incorporation into regions of the posterior circulation using quantitative autoradiography and a ratio method of analysis. One day after bilateral carotid occlusion, relative palmitate incorporation was elevated significantly by 16% in the CA4 pyramidal cell layer and by 20% in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus compared with sham-operated gerbils. At 3 days, significant elevations of this magnitude were found in the CA3 and CA4 cell layers, whereas relative incorporation was reduced by 26% in the CA1 pyramidal cell layer. At 7 days, the only significant difference from control was a 15% elevated incorporation in the CA3 pyramidal cell layer. Histologic examination indicated substantial cell death in the CA1 pyramidal layer at 3 days, with extensive glial reaction and phagocytic invasion at 7 days. Our results suggest that the turnover of palmitate-containing lipids is reduced in the CA1 layer of the gerbil hippocampus but that lipid synthesis is stimulated in hippocampal regions (CA3, CA4, dentate gyrus) affected by but recovering from transient bilateral carotid occlusion

  19. AWAKE Design Report: A Proton-Driven Plasma Wakefield Acceleration Experiment at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Caldwell, A; Lotov, K; Muggli, P; Wing, M

    2013-01-01

    The AWAKE Collaboration has been formed in order to demonstrate proton driven plasma wakefield acceleration for the first time. This technology could lead to future colliders of high energy but of a much reduced length compared to proposed linear accelerators. The SPS proton beam in the CNGS facility will be injected into a 10m plasma cell where the long proton bunches will be modulated into significantly shorter micro-bunches. These micro-bunches will then initiate a strong wakefield in the plasma with peak fields above 1 GV/m that will be harnessed to accelerate a bunch of electrons from about 20MeV to the GeV scale within a few meters. The experimental program is based on detailed numerical simulations of beam and plasma interactions. The main accelerator components, the experimental area and infrastructure required as well as the plasma cell and the diagnostic equipment are discussed in detail. First protons to the experiment are expected at the end of 2015 and this will be followed by an initial 3–4 ye...

  20. Neuronal Representation of Social Information in the Medial Amygdala of Awake Behaving Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ying; Mathis, Alexander; Grewe, Benjamin F; Osterhout, Jessica A; Ahanonu, Biafra; Schnitzer, Mark J; Murthy, Venkatesh N; Dulac, Catherine

    2017-11-16

    The medial amygdala (MeA) plays a critical role in processing species- and sex-specific signals that trigger social and defensive behaviors. However, the principles by which this deep brain structure encodes social information is poorly understood. We used a miniature microscope to image the Ca 2+ dynamics of large neural ensembles in awake behaving mice and tracked the responses of MeA neurons over several months. These recordings revealed spatially intermingled subsets of MeA neurons with distinct temporal dynamics. The encoding of social information in the MeA differed between males and females and relied on information from both individual cells and neuronal populations. By performing long-term Ca 2+ imaging across different social contexts, we found that sexual experience triggers lasting and sex-specific changes in MeA activity, which, in males, involve signaling by oxytocin. These findings reveal basic principles underlying the brain's representation of social information and its modulation by intrinsic and extrinsic factors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Technical principles of direct bipolar electrostimulation for cortical and subcortical mapping in awake craniotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallud, J; Mandonnet, E; Corns, R; Dezamis, E; Parraga, E; Zanello, M; Spena, G

    2017-06-01

    Intraoperative application of electrical current to the brain is a standard technique during brain surgery for inferring the function of the underlying brain. The purpose of intraoperative functional mapping is to reliably identify cortical areas and subcortical pathways involved in eloquent functions, especially motor, sensory, language and cognitive functions. The aim of this article is to review the rationale and the electrophysiological principles of the use of direct bipolar electrostimulation for cortical and subcortical mapping under awake conditions. Direct electrical stimulation is a window into the whole functional network that sustains a particular function. It is an accurate (spatial resolution of about 5mm) and a reproducible technique particularly adapted to clinical practice for brain resection in eloquent areas. If the procedure is rigorously applied, the sensitivity of direct electrical stimulation for the detection of cortical and subcortical eloquent areas is nearly 100%. The main disadvantage of this technique is its suboptimal specificity. Another limitation is the identification of eloquent areas during surgery, which, however, could have been functionally compensated postoperatively if removed surgically. Direct electrical stimulation is an easy, accurate, reliable and safe invasive technique for the intraoperative detection of both cortical and subcortical functional brain connectivity for clinical purpose. In our opinion, it is the optimal technique for minimizing the risk of neurological sequelae when resecting in eloquent brain areas. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. The Challenge of Interfacing the Primary Beam Lines for the AWAKE Project at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Bracco, C; Gschwendtner, E; Meddahi, M; Petrenko, A; Velotti, FM

    2014-01-01

    The Proton Driven Plasma Wakefield Acceleration Experiment (AWAKE) at CERN foresees the simultaneous operation of a proton, a laser and an electron beam. The first stage of the experiment will consist in proving the self-modulation, in the plasma, of a long proton bunch into micro-bunches. The success of this experiment requires an almost perfect concentricity of the proton and laser beam, over the full length of the plasma cell. The complexity of integrating the laser into the proton beam line and fulfilling the strict requirements in terms of pointing precision of the proton beam at the plasma cell are described. The second stage of the experiment foresees also the injection of electron bunches to probe the accelerating wakefields driven by the proton beam. Studies were performed to evaluate the possibility of injecting the electron beam parallel and with an offset to the beam axis. This option would imply that protons and electrons will have to share the last few meters of a common beam line. Issues and po...

  3. Adverse cardiovascular effects of oxytetracycline preparations and vehicles in intact awake calves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, D R; Dodd, K T; Williams, J D; Adams, H R

    1981-08-01

    Comparisons were made of cardiovascular effects in intact, awake, previously instrumented calves given the following oxytetracycline (OXY) preparations and components: polyvinylpyrrolidine vehicle (PVP), OXY HCl in PVP (OXY-PVP), OXY HCl (USP) in saline solution, propylene glycol, 77.8% (PG), propylene glycol vehicle (PGV), and OXY HCl in PGV (OXY-PGV). The 3 preparations containing PG caused significant increases in pulmonary arterial pressures and significant decreases in cardiac output and stroke volume. Aortic pressures were significantly decreased, as were heart rates. Both pulmonic and systemic resistances were significantly increased. There were no direct effects measured on left ventricular contractility. The aqueous OXY caused no significant changes. The PVP preparation and vehicle caused no changes in pulmonary pressures, pulmonary resistance, cardiac output, or stroke volume. Significant increases were observed in aortic pressure, heart rate, and systemic resistance. Left ventricular contractility was not changed. Seemingly, the PG-induced changes were a result of histamine release which did not appear to be dependent on prior sensitization of the calves.

  4. Stimulation of the cardiopulmonary baroreflex enhances ventricular contractility in awake dogs: a mathematical analysis study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sala-Mercado, Javier A; Moslehpour, Mohsen; Hammond, Robert L; Ichinose, Masashi; Chen, Xiaoxiao; Evan, Sell; O'Leary, Donal S; Mukkamala, Ramakrishna

    2014-08-15

    The cardiopulmonary baroreflex responds to an increase in central venous pressure (CVP) by decreasing total peripheral resistance and increasing heart rate (HR) in dogs. However, the direction of ventricular contractility change is not well understood. The aim was to elucidate the cardiopulmonary baroreflex control of ventricular contractility during normal physiological conditions via a mathematical analysis. Spontaneous beat-to-beat fluctuations in maximal ventricular elastance (Emax), which is perhaps the best available index of ventricular contractility, CVP, arterial blood pressure (ABP), and HR were measured from awake dogs at rest before and after β-adrenergic receptor blockade. An autoregressive exogenous input model was employed to jointly identify the three causal transfer functions relating beat-to-beat fluctuations in CVP to Emax (CVP → Emax), which characterizes the cardiopulmonary baroreflex control of ventricular contractility, ABP to Emax, which characterizes the arterial baroreflex control of ventricular contractility, and HR to Emax, which characterizes the force-frequency relation. The CVP → Emax transfer function showed a static gain of 0.037 ± 0.010 ml(-1) (different from zero; P baroreflex. Following β-adrenergic receptor blockade, the CVP → Emax transfer function showed a static gain of 0.0007 ± 0.0113 ml(-1) (different from control; P baroreflex increases ventricular contractility through β-adrenergic receptor system mediation. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  5. The Dutch Linguistic Intraoperative Protocol: a valid linguistic approach to awake brain surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Witte, E; Satoer, D; Robert, E; Colle, H; Verheyen, S; Visch-Brink, E; Mariën, P

    2015-01-01

    Intraoperative direct electrical stimulation (DES) is increasingly used in patients operated on for tumours in eloquent areas. Although a positive impact of DES on postoperative linguistic outcome is generally advocated, information about the neurolinguistic methods applied in awake surgery is scarce. We developed for the first time a standardised Dutch linguistic test battery (measuring phonology, semantics, syntax) to reliably identify the critical language zones in detail. A normative study was carried out in a control group of 250 native Dutch-speaking healthy adults. In addition, the clinical application of the Dutch Linguistic Intraoperative Protocol (DuLIP) was demonstrated by means of anatomo-functional models and five case studies. A set of DuLIP tests was selected for each patient depending on the tumour location and degree of linguistic impairment. DuLIP is a valid test battery for pre-, intraoperative and postoperative language testing and facilitates intraoperative mapping of eloquent language regions that are variably located. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Awake intranasal insulin delivery modifies protein complexes and alters memory, anxiety, and olfactory behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marks, David R; Tucker, Kristal; Cavallin, Melissa A; Mast, Thomas G; Fadool, Debra A

    2009-05-20

    The role of insulin pathways in olfaction is of significant interest with the widespread pathology of diabetes mellitus and its associated metabolic and neuronal comorbidities. The insulin receptor (IR) kinase is expressed at high levels in the olfactory bulb, in which it suppresses a dominant Shaker ion channel (Kv1.3) via tyrosine phosphorylation of critical N- and C-terminal residues. We optimized a 7 d intranasal insulin delivery (IND) in awake mice to ascertain the biochemical and behavioral effects of insulin to this brain region, given that nasal sprays for insulin have been marketed notwithstanding our knowledge of the role of Kv1.3 in olfaction, metabolism, and axon targeting. IND evoked robust phosphorylation of Kv1.3, as well as increased channel protein-protein interactions with IR and postsynaptic density 95. IND-treated mice had an increased short- and long-term object memory recognition, increased anxiolytic behavior, and an increased odor discrimination using an odor habituation protocol but only moderate change in odor threshold using a two-choice paradigm. Unlike Kv1.3 gene-targeted deletion that alters metabolism, adiposity, and axonal targeting to defined olfactory glomeruli, suppression of Kv1.3 via IND had no effect on body weight nor the size and number of M72 glomeruli or the route of its sensory axon projections. There was no evidence of altered expression of sensory neurons in the epithelium. In mice made prediabetic via diet-induced obesity, IND was no longer effective in increasing long-term object memory recognition nor increasing anxiolytic behavior, suggesting state dependency or a degree of insulin resistance related to these behaviors.

  7. Awake canine fMRI predicts dogs’ preference for praise vs food

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Peter F.; Prichard, Ashley; Spivak, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Dogs are hypersocial with humans, and their integration into human social ecology makes dogs a unique model for studying cross-species social bonding. However, the proximal neural mechanisms driving dog–human social interaction are unknown. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging in 15 awake dogs to probe the neural basis for their preferences for social interaction and food reward. In a first experiment, we used the ventral caudate as a measure of intrinsic reward value and compared activation to conditioned stimuli that predicted food, praise or nothing. Relative to the control stimulus, the caudate was significantly more active to the reward-predicting stimuli and showed roughly equal or greater activation to praise vs food in 13 of 15 dogs. To confirm that these differences were driven by the intrinsic value of social praise, we performed a second imaging experiment in which the praise was withheld on a subset of trials. The difference in caudate activation to the receipt of praise, relative to its withholding, was strongly correlated with the differential activation to the conditioned stimuli in the first experiment. In a third experiment, we performed an out-of-scanner choice task in which the dog repeatedly selected food or owner in a Y-maze. The relative caudate activation to food- and praise-predicting stimuli in Experiment 1 was a strong predictor of each dog’s sequence of choices in the Y-maze. Analogous to similar neuroimaging studies of individual differences in human social reward, our findings demonstrate a neural mechanism for preference in domestic dogs that is stable within, but variable between, individuals. Moreover, the individual differences in the caudate responses indicate the potentially higher value of social than food reward for some dogs and may help to explain the apparent efficacy of social interaction in dog training. PMID:27521302

  8. Effect of superfused insulin on cerebral cortical glucose utilization in awake goats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pelligrino, D.A.; Miletich, D.J.; Albrecht, R.F.

    1987-01-01

    The effect on cortical cerebral glucose utilization (CMR glu ) of intracerebral insulin administration in awake goats was studied. The insulin was superfused in a mock cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) employing chronically implanted cranial windows. Two windows were implanted bilaterally: one window over an equivalent portion of each parietal cortex. With one window used to deliver insulin/CSF and the other used to simultaneously deliver CSF alone (control), changes in CMR glu were assessed using a modification of a sequential 2-[ 3 H]- then 2[ 14 C]deoxy-D-glucose (2DG) technique originally described by Altenau and Agranoff. Initial experiments employing 125 I-insulin demonstrated that the superfusion procedure increased insulin levels only in the outer 1 mm of cortical tissue exposed to insulin containing perfusate. Additional preliminary evaluations, using conditions known to alter CMR glu , generally established that present methods were adequate to induce and detect CMR glu changes. However, it was also shown experimentally and using a mathematical model that 2-[ 3 H]DG test/control tissue ratios could be influenced by subsequent changes in CMR glu and the dephosphorylation rate. Thus 3 H ratios could not be used to establish preexperimental test/control CMR glu relationships as the originally devised model assumed but could be employed to indicate changes in dephosphorylation. The mathematical model allowed for improved estimates of CMR glu changes from 2[ 14 C]DG/2-[ 3 H]DG test over control tissue ratios. Even with these corrections, insulin was estimated to cause no more than an 8-15% increase in cortical CMR glu . A very limited role for insulin, at least in cerebral cortical metabolic regulation, is thus indicated

  9. Awake canine fMRI predicts dogs' preference for praise vs food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Peter F; Prichard, Ashley; Spivak, Mark; Berns, Gregory S

    2016-12-01

    Dogs are hypersocial with humans, and their integration into human social ecology makes dogs a unique model for studying cross-species social bonding. However, the proximal neural mechanisms driving dog-human social interaction are unknown. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging in 15 awake dogs to probe the neural basis for their preferences for social interaction and food reward. In a first experiment, we used the ventral caudate as a measure of intrinsic reward value and compared activation to conditioned stimuli that predicted food, praise or nothing. Relative to the control stimulus, the caudate was significantly more active to the reward-predicting stimuli and showed roughly equal or greater activation to praise vs food in 13 of 15 dogs. To confirm that these differences were driven by the intrinsic value of social praise, we performed a second imaging experiment in which the praise was withheld on a subset of trials. The difference in caudate activation to the receipt of praise, relative to its withholding, was strongly correlated with the differential activation to the conditioned stimuli in the first experiment. In a third experiment, we performed an out-of-scanner choice task in which the dog repeatedly selected food or owner in a Y-maze. The relative caudate activation to food- and praise-predicting stimuli in Experiment 1 was a strong predictor of each dog's sequence of choices in the Y-maze. Analogous to similar neuroimaging studies of individual differences in human social reward, our findings demonstrate a neural mechanism for preference in domestic dogs that is stable within, but variable between, individuals. Moreover, the individual differences in the caudate responses indicate the potentially higher value of social than food reward for some dogs and may help to explain the apparent efficacy of social interaction in dog training. © The Author (2016). Published by Oxford University Press.

  10. Awake Intranasal Insulin Delivery Modifies Protein Complexes and Alters Memory, Anxiety, and Olfactory Behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marks, D.R.; Tucker, K.; Cavallin, M.A.; Mast, T.G.; Fadool, D.A.

    2009-01-01

    The role of insulin pathways in olfaction is of significant interest with the widespread pathology of Diabetes mellitus and its associated metabolic and neuronal co-morbidities. The insulin receptor kinase (IR) is expressed at high levels in the olfactory bulb (OB), where it suppresses a dominant Shaker ion channel (Kv1.3) via tyrosine phosphorylation of critical N- and C-terminal residues. We optimized a seven day intranasal insulin delivery (IND) in awake mice to ascertain the biochemical and behavioral effects of insulin to this brain region, given that nasal sprays for insulin have been marketed notwithstanding our knowledge of the role of Kv1.3 in olfaction, metabolism, and axon targeting. IND evoked robust phosphorylation of Kv1.3, as well as increased channel protein-protein interactions with IR and post-synaptic density 95. IND-treated mice had an increased short- and long-term object memory recognition, increased anxiolytic behavior, and an increased odor-discrimination using an odor habituation protocol but only moderate change in odor threshold using a two-choice paradigm. Unlike Kv1.3 gene-targeted deletion that alters metabolism, adiposity, and axonal targeting to defined olfactory glomeruli, suppression of Kv1.3 via IND had no effect on body weight nor the size and number of M72 glomeruli or the route of its sensory axon projections. There was no evidence of altered expression of sensory neurons in the epithelium. In mice made pre-diabetic via diet-induced obesity, IND was no longer effective in increasing long-term object memory recognition nor increasing anxiolytic behavior, suggesting state dependency or a degree of insulin resistance related to these behaviors. PMID:19458242

  11. On-line analysis of middle latency auditory evoked potentials (MLAEP) for monitoring depth of anaesthesia in laboratory rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, E W; Nygaard, M; Henneberg, S W

    1998-01-01

    in rats. The AEP was elicited with a click stimulus and monitored in an 80 ms window synchronised to the stimulus. The AEP was extracted applying an Auto Regressive Model with Exogenous Input (ARX-model) from which a Depth of Anaesthesia Index (DAI) was calculated. DAI was normalised to 100 while awake...... rats. The decrease in the DAI correlated well with the loss of stimulus response. In conclusion, MLAEP could be used as an indicator of depth of anaesthesia in rats during Hypnorm vet. and Dormicum administration. However studies applying other anaesthetic drugs should be carried out, before...... a conclusion of the general utility of the method can be made....

  12. [(11)C]Raclopride binding in the striatum of minimally restrained and free-walking awake mice in a positron emission tomography study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takuwa, Hiroyuki; Maeda, Jun; Ikoma, Yoko; Tokunaga, Masaki; Wakizaka, Hidekatsu; Uchida, Shouko; Kanno, Iwao; Taniguchi, Junko; Ito, Hiroshi; Higuchi, Makoto

    2015-12-01

    Anesthesia and restraint stress have profound impacts on brain functions, including neural activity and cerebrovascular function, possibly influencing functional and neurochemical positron emission tomography (PET) imaging data. For circumventing this effect, we developed an experimental system enabling PET imaging of free-walking awake mice with minimal restraints by fixing the head to a holder. The applicability of this system was investigated by performing PET imaging of D2 dopamine receptors with [(11)C]raclopride under the following three different conditions: (1) free-walking awake state; (2) 1.5% isoflurane anesthesia; and (3) whole-body restraint without anesthesia. [(11)C]raclopride binding potential (BP(ND)) values under isoflurane anesthesia and restrained awake state were significantly lower than under free-walking awake state (P transmissions could be sensitively captured by PET imaging of free-walking awake mice. We concluded that our system is of utility as an in vivo assaying platform for studies of brain functions and neurotransmission elements in small animals, such as those modeling neuropsychiatric disorders. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Awake Craniotomy vs Craniotomy Under General Anesthesia for Perirolandic Gliomas: Evaluating Perioperative Complications and Extent of Resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eseonu, Chikezie I; Rincon-Torroella, Jordina; ReFaey, Karim; Lee, Young M; Nangiana, Jasvinder; Vivas-Buitrago, Tito; Quiñones-Hinojosa, Alfredo

    2017-09-01

    A craniotomy with direct cortical/subcortical stimulation either awake or under general anesthesia (GA) present 2 approaches for removing eloquent region tumors. With a reported higher prevalence of intraoperative seizures occurring during awake resections of perirolandic lesions, oftentimes, surgery under GA is chosen for these lesions. To evaluate a single-surgeon's experience with awake craniotomies (AC) vs surgery under GA for resecting perirolandic, eloquent, motor-region gliomas. Between 2005 and 2015, a retrospective analysis of 27 patients with perirolandic, eloquent, motor-area gliomas that underwent an AC were case-control matched with 31 patients who underwent surgery under GA for gliomas in the same location. All patients underwent direct brain stimulation with neuromonitoring and perioperative risk factors, extent of resection, complications, and discharge status were assessed. The postoperative Karnofsky Performance Score (KPS) was significantly lower for the GA patients at 81.1 compared to the AC patients at 93.3 ( P = .040). The extent of resection for GA patients was 79.6% while the AC patients had an 86.3% resection ( P = .136). There were significantly more 100% total resections in the AC patients 25.9% compared to the GA group (6.5%; P = .041). Patients in the GA group had a longer mean length of hospitalization of 7.9 days compared to the AC group at 4.2 days ( P = .049). We show that AC can be performed with more frequent total resections, better postoperative KPS, shorter hospitalizations, as well as similar perioperative complication rates compared to surgery under GA for perirolandic, eloquent motor-region glioma. Copyright © 2017 by the Congress of Neurological Surgeons

  14. Lack of Responsiveness during the Onset and Offset of Sevoflurane Anesthesia Is Associated with Decreased Awake-Alpha Oscillation Power

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kara J. Pavone

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Anesthetic drugs are typically administered to induce altered states of arousal that range from sedation to general anesthesia (GA. Systems neuroscience studies are currently being used to investigate the neural circuit mechanisms of anesthesia-induced altered arousal states. These studies suggest that by disrupting the oscillatory dynamics that are associated with arousal states, anesthesia-induced oscillations are a putative mechanism through which anesthetic drugs produce altered states of arousal. However, an empirical clinical observation is that even at relatively stable anesthetic doses, patients are sometimes intermittently responsive to verbal commands during states of light sedation. During these periods, prominent anesthesia-induced neural oscillations such as slow-delta (0.1–4 Hz oscillations are notably absent. Neural correlates of intermittent responsiveness during light sedation have been insufficiently investigated. A principled understanding of the neural correlates of intermittent responsiveness may fundamentally advance our understanding of neural dynamics that are essential for maintaining arousal states, and how they are disrupted by anesthetics. Therefore, we performed a high-density (128 channels electroencephalogram (EEG study (n = 8 of sevoflurane-induced altered arousal in healthy volunteers. We administered temporally precise behavioral stimuli every 5 s to assess responsiveness. Here, we show that decreased eyes-closed, awake-alpha (8–12 Hz oscillation power is associated with lack of responsiveness during sevoflurane effect-onset and -offset. We also show that anteriorization—the transition from occipitally dominant awake-alpha oscillations to frontally dominant anesthesia induced-alpha oscillations—is not a binary phenomenon. Rather, we suggest that periods, which were defined by lack of responsiveness, represent an intermediate brain state. We conclude that awake-alpha oscillation, previously thought to be

  15. A sense of agency: An ethnographic exploration of being awake during mechanical ventilation in the intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laerkner, Eva; Egerod, Ingrid; Olesen, Finn; Hansen, Helle Ploug

    2017-10-01

    There is a current trend towards lighter or no sedation of mechanically ventilated patients in the intensive care unit. The advantages of less sedation have been demonstrated as shorter duration of mechanical ventilation and reduced length of stay in the intensive care unit and hospital. Non-sedated patients are more awake during mechanical ventilation, but little is known about how this affects the intensive care patient. To explore patients' experiences of being awake during critical illness and mechanical ventilation in the intensive care unit. The study was based on Interpretive Description, an applied inductive, qualitative approach with an ethnographic exploration of the patient experience. A longitudinal perspective was obtained through 13 months of fieldwork followed by two patient interviews after intensive care and after hospital discharge. Data were analyzed using thematic analysis. The fieldwork was conducted in two intensive care units at a university hospital in Denmark, where the no sedation strategy for mechanically ventilated patients was implemented. Twenty-eight patients were observed in the intensive care unit. Twenty patients, who had been awake for most of the time on mechanical ventilation, were interviewed during the first week after discharge from intensive care. Thirteen of these patients were interviewed again two to four months after discharge. Three themes were identified: "A sense of agency", "The familiar in the unfamiliar situation" and "Awareness of surrounding activities". Patients had the ability to interact from the first days of critical illness and a sense of agency was expressed through initiating, directing and participating in communication and other activities. Patients appreciated competent and compassionate nurses who were attentive and involved them as individual persons. Initiatives to enhance familiar aspects such as relatives, personal items and care, continuity and closeness of nurses contributed to the patients

  16. Inadvertent insertion of a nasogastric tube into both main bronchi of an awake patient: a case report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    The use of nasogastric tube is desirable for the short-term administration of calories when oral feeding is not possible. Although the insertion of nasogastric tubes has been described as being easy this is not without risks. An unusual case of malpositioning of a fine bore nasogastric tube into both main bronchi in a patient that was awake is reported. Respiratory complications of misplaced nasogastric tubes and the importance of a check chest x-ray following tube placement are discussed. PMID:19829883

  17. Decapitation in rats: latency to unconsciousness and the 'wave of death'.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clementina M van Rijn

    Full Text Available The question whether decapitation is a humane method of euthanasia in awake animals is being debated. To gather arguments in this debate, obsolete rats were decapitated while recording the EEG, both of awake rats and of anesthetized rats. Following decapitation a fast and global loss of power of the EEG was observed; the power in the 13-100 Hz frequency band, expressing cognitive activity, decreased according to an exponential decay function to half the initial value within 4 seconds. Whereas the pre-decapitation EEG of the anesthetized animals showed a burst suppression pattern quite different from the awake animals, the power in the postdecapitation EEG did not differ between the two groups. This might indicate that either the power of the EEG does not correlate well with consciousness or that consciousness is briefly regained in the anesthetized group after decapitation. Remarkably, after 50 seconds (awake group or 80 seconds (anesthetized group following decapitation, a high amplitude slow wave was observed. The EEG before this wave had more power than the signal after the wave. This wave might be due to a simultaneous massive loss of membrane potentials of the neurons. Still functioning ion channels, which keep the membrane potential intact before the wave, might explain the observed power difference. Two conclusions were drawn from this experiment. It is likely that consciousness vanishes within seconds after decapitation, implying that decapitation is a quick and not an inhumane method of euthanasia. It seems that the massive wave which can be recorded approximately one minute after decapitation reflects the ultimate border between life and death. This observation might have implications in the discussions on the appropriate time for organ donation.

  18. Differential Effects of Awake Glioma Surgery in “Critical” Language Areas on Cognition: 4 Case Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Djaina Satoer

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Awake surgery with electrocorticosubcortical stimulation is the golden standard treatment for gliomas in eloquent areas. Preoperatively, mostly mild cognitive disturbances are observed with postoperative deterioration. We describe pre- and postoperative profiles of 4 patients (P1–P4 with gliomas in “critical” language areas (“Broca,” “Wernicke,” and the arcuate fasciculus undergoing awake surgery to get insight into the underlying mechanism of neuroplasticity. Neuropsychological examination was carried out preoperatively (at T1 and postoperatively (at T2, T3. At T1, cognition of P1 was intact and remained stable. P2 had impairments in all cognitive domains at T1 with further deterioration at T2 and T3. At T1, P3 had impairments in memory and executive functions followed by stable recovery. P4 was intact at T1, followed by a decline in a language test at T2 and recovery at T3. Intraoperatively, in all patients language positive sites were identified. Patients with gliomas in “critical” language areas do not necessarily present cognitive disturbances. Surgery can either improve or deteriorate (existing cognitive impairments. Several factors may underlie the plastic potential of the brain, for example, corticosubcortical networks and tumor histopathology. Our findings illustrate the complexity of the underlying mechanism of neural plasticity and provide further support for a “hodotopical” viewpoint.

  19. Rapid and low-invasive functional brain mapping by realtime visualization of high gamma activity for awake craniotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamada, K; Ogawa, H; Kapeller, C; Prueckl, R; Guger, C

    2014-01-01

    For neurosurgery with an awake craniotomy, the critical issue is to set aside enough time to identify eloquent cortices by electrocortical stimulation (ECS). High gamma activity (HGA) ranging between 80 and 120 Hz on electrocorticogram (ECoG) is assumed to reflect localized cortical processing. In this report, we used realtime HGA mapping and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) for rapid and reliable identification of motor and language functions. Three patients with intra-axial tumors in their dominant hemisphere underwent preoperative fMRI and lesion resection with an awake craniotomy. All patients showed significant fMRI activation evoked by motor and language tasks. After the craniotomy, we recorded ECoG activity by placing subdural grids directly on the exposed brain surface. Each patient performed motor and language tasks and demonstrated realtime HGA dynamics in hand motor areas and parts of the inferior frontal gyrus. Sensitivity and specificity of HGA mapping were 100% compared to ECS mapping in the frontal lobe, which suggested HGA mapping precisely indicated eloquent cortices. The investigation times of HGA mapping was significantly shorter than that of ECS mapping. Specificities of the motor and language-fMRI, however, did not reach 85%. The results of HGA mapping was mostly consistent with those of ECS mapping, although fMRI tended to overestimate functional areas. This novel technique enables rapid and accurate functional mapping.

  20. Five-Minute Awake Snoring Test for Determining CPAP Pressures (Five-Minute CPAP Test): A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camacho, Macario; Ruoff, Chad M.; Kawai, Makoto; Modi, Rahul; Arbee, Jabri; Hekmat, Anahid; Robertson, Matthew; Certal, Victor; Capasso, Robson; Kushida, Clete A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To develop a quick, simple, bedside test for determining continuous positive airway pressures (CPAP) for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) patients. Study Design. Prospective case series at a tertiary medical center. Methods. The Five-Minute Awake Snoring Test for Determining CPAP (Five-Minute CPAP Test) was developed and tested. Patients wear a soft-gel nasal triangle mask while holding a tongue depressor with the wide section (1.75 cm) between the teeth. Fixed pressure nasal CPAP is applied while the patient simulates snoring at 4 centimeters of water pressure. The pressure is incrementally titrated up and then down to determine the lowest pressure at which the patient cannot snore (Quiet Pressure). Results. Overall, thirty-eight patients participated. All could simulate snoring. Correlation coefficients were statistically significant between Quiet Pressures and body mass index (r s = 0.60 [strong positive relationship], p = 0.0088), apnea-hypopnea index (r s = 0.49 [moderate positive relationship], p = 0.039), lowest oxygen saturation (r s = −0.47 [moderate negative relationship], p = 0.048), and oxygen desaturation index (r s = 0.62 [strong positive relationship], p = 0.0057). Conclusion. This pilot study introduces a new concept, which is the final product of over one year of exploration, development, and testing. Five-Minute CPAP Test is a quick, inexpensive, and safe bedside test based on supine awake simulated snoring with nasal CPAP. PMID:26881088

  1. Whisking-Related Changes in Neuronal Firing and Membrane Potential Dynamics in the Somatosensory Thalamus of Awake Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadia Urbain

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The thalamus transmits sensory information to the neocortex and receives neocortical, subcortical, and neuromodulatory inputs. Despite its obvious importance, surprisingly little is known about thalamic function in awake animals. Here, using intracellular and extracellular recordings in awake head-restrained mice, we investigate membrane potential dynamics and action potential firing in the two major thalamic nuclei related to whisker sensation, the ventral posterior medial nucleus (VPM and the posterior medial group (Pom, which receive distinct inputs from brainstem and neocortex. We find heterogeneous state-dependent dynamics in both nuclei, with an overall increase in action potential firing during active states. Whisking increased putative lemniscal and corticothalamic excitatory inputs onto VPM and Pom neurons, respectively. A subpopulation of VPM cells fired spikes phase-locked to the whisking cycle during free whisking, and these cells may therefore signal whisker position. Our results suggest differential processing of whisking comparing thalamic nuclei at both sub- and supra-threshold levels.

  2. Auditory properties in the parabelt regions of the superior temporal gyrus in the awake macaque monkey: an initial survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kajikawa, Yoshinao; Frey, Stephen; Ross, Deborah; Falchier, Arnaud; Hackett, Troy A; Schroeder, Charles E

    2015-03-11

    The superior temporal gyrus (STG) is on the inferior-lateral brain surface near the external ear. In macaques, 2/3 of the STG is occupied by an auditory cortical region, the "parabelt," which is part of a network of inferior temporal areas subserving communication and social cognition as well as object recognition and other functions. However, due to its location beneath the squamous temporal bone and temporalis muscle, the STG, like other inferior temporal regions, has been a challenging target for physiological studies in awake-behaving macaques. We designed a new procedure for implanting recording chambers to provide direct access to the STG, allowing us to evaluate neuronal properties and their topography across the full extent of the STG in awake-behaving macaques. Initial surveys of the STG have yielded several new findings. Unexpectedly, STG sites in monkeys that were listening passively responded to tones with magnitudes comparable to those of responses to 1/3 octave band-pass noise. Mapping results showed longer response latencies in more rostral sites and possible tonotopic patterns parallel to core and belt areas, suggesting the reversal of gradients between caudal and rostral parabelt areas. These results will help further exploration of parabelt areas. Copyright © 2015 the authors 0270-6474/15/354140-11$15.00/0.

  3. Five-Minute Awake Snoring Test for Determining CPAP Pressures (Five-Minute CPAP Test: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Macario Camacho

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To develop a quick, simple, bedside test for determining continuous positive airway pressures (CPAP for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA patients. Study Design. Prospective case series at a tertiary medical center. Methods. The Five-Minute Awake Snoring Test for Determining CPAP (Five-Minute CPAP Test was developed and tested. Patients wear a soft-gel nasal triangle mask while holding a tongue depressor with the wide section (1.75 cm between the teeth. Fixed pressure nasal CPAP is applied while the patient simulates snoring at 4 centimeters of water pressure. The pressure is incrementally titrated up and then down to determine the lowest pressure at which the patient cannot snore (Quiet Pressure. Results. Overall, thirty-eight patients participated. All could simulate snoring. Correlation coefficients were statistically significant between Quiet Pressures and body mass index (rs=0.60 [strong positive relationship], p=0.0088, apnea-hypopnea index (rs=0.49 [moderate positive relationship], p=0.039, lowest oxygen saturation (rs=-0.47 [moderate negative relationship], p=0.048, and oxygen desaturation index (rs=0.62 [strong positive relationship], p=0.0057. Conclusion. This pilot study introduces a new concept, which is the final product of over one year of exploration, development, and testing. Five-Minute CPAP Test is a quick, inexpensive, and safe bedside test based on supine awake simulated snoring with nasal CPAP.

  4. Effects of Voluntary Locomotion and Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide on the Dynamics of Single Dural Vessels in Awake Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yu-Rong; Drew, Patrick J

    2016-02-24

    The dura mater is a vascularized membrane surrounding the brain and is heavily innervated by sensory nerves. Our knowledge of the dural vasculature has been limited to pathological conditions, such as headaches, but little is known about the dural blood flow regulation during behavior. To better understand the dynamics of dural vessels during behavior, we used two-photon laser scanning microscopy (2PLSM) to measure the diameter changes of single dural and pial vessels in the awake mouse during voluntary locomotion. Surprisingly, we found that voluntary locomotion drove the constriction of dural vessels, and the dynamics of these constrictions could be captured with a linear convolution model. Dural vessel constrictions did not mirror the large increases in intracranial pressure (ICP) during locomotion, indicating that dural vessel constriction was not caused passively by compression. To study how behaviorally driven dynamics of dural vessels might be altered in pathological states, we injected the vasodilator calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), which induces headache in humans. CGRP dilated dural, but not pial, vessels and significantly reduced spontaneous locomotion but did not block locomotion-induced constrictions in dural vessels. Sumatriptan, a drug commonly used to treat headaches, blocked the vascular and behavioral the effects of CGRP. These findings suggest that, in the awake animal, the diameters of dural vessels are regulated dynamically during behavior and during drug-induced pathological states. Copyright © 2016 the authors 0270-6474/16/362503-14$15.00/0.

  5. [Case of awake intubation in semi-sitting position for a patient with myasthenia gravis combined with cervical disc hernia utilizing Pentax-AWS Airwayscope].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komasawa, Nobuyasu; Ueki, Ryusuke; Tomita, Yukihiko; Kaminoh, Yoshiroh; Tashiro, Chikara

    2011-01-01

    We report a case of awake intubation utilizing Pentax-AWS Airwayscope in semi-sitting position. A 74-year-old man with myasthenia gravis and cervical disc hernia was scheduled for distal gastrectomy under general anesthesia. He could not move his head due to severe cervical disc hernia and also could not sufficiently breathe due to the fatigue of respiratory muscles by myasthenia gravis in supine position. With fentanyl bolus administration and lidocaine spray for laryngotracheal anesthesia, we performed awake intubation in semi-sitting position with AWS from cranial side. The patient did not buck during intubation and no hemodynamic change was observed.

  6. Hypopharyngeal evaluation in obstructive sleep apnea with awake flexible laryngoscopy: Validation and updates to Cormack-Lehane and Modified Cormack-Lehane scoring systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torre, C; Zaghi, S; Camacho, M; Capasso, R; Liu, S Y

    2017-12-26

    To validate the use of Cormack-Lehane and Modified Cormack-Lehane scoring systems to classify patterns of hypopharyngeal airway visualization seen during awake flexible laryngoscopy among patients with obstructive sleep apnoea. Validation study using samples collected from a prospective database. University Medical Center. Data were obtained from a retrospective review of a prospective database of flexible fiberoptic examination recordings in 274 consecutive OSA subjects (Stanford Sleep Medicine/Surgery Clinic). Single still images from awake fiberoptic laryngoscopy examinations of the vocal cords from 90 different patients were presented to 2 experts and 4 novice raters. Raters used two grading systems (Cormack-Lehane scale and Modified Cormack-Lehane) to rate vocal cord visualization. Percent agreement and Cohen's kappa statistical analysis were used to evaluate inter-rater reliability and intrarater reliability for each grading system. Feedback from the participants was then used to propose updates to further improve upon the existing grading scales for their applicability to awake flexible endoscopy. The Cormack-Lehane and Modified Cormack-Lehane scale both communicate unobstructed and restricted views of the vocal cords reliably. Compared to the 4-grade scale, however, a modified 5-grade Vocal Cord Grading System allows for better objective communication of common variations in hypopharyngeal airway visualization. We propose a 5-Grade Vocal Cord Grading System that builds upon existing grading systems to allow for efficient and reliable communication of hypopharyngeal airway examination during awake fiberoptic laryngoscopy. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Apnea after Awake Regional and General Anesthesia in Infants : The General Anesthesia Compared to Spinal Anesthesia Study-Comparing Apnea and Neurodevelopmental Outcomes, a Randomized Controlled Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Davidson, Andrew J.; Morton, Neil S.; Arnup, Sarah J.; De Graaff, Jurgen C.; Disma, Nicola; Withington, Davinia E.; Frawley, Geoff; Hunt, Rodney W.; Hardy, Pollyanna; Khotcholava, Magda; Von Ungern Sternberg, Britta S.; Wilton, Niall; Tuo, Pietro; Salvo, Ida; Ormond, Gillian; Stargatt, Robyn; Locatelli, Bruno Guido; McCann, Mary Ellen; Lee, Katherine; Sheppard, Suzette; Hartmann, Penelope; Ragg, Philip; Backstrom, Marie; Costi, David; Von Ungern-Sternberg, Britta S.; Knottenbelt, Graham; Montobbio, Giovanni; Mameli, Leila; Giribaldi, Gaia; Prato, Alessio Pini; Mattioli, Girolamo; Wolfler, Andrea; Izzo, Francesca; Sonzogni, Valter; Van Gool, Jose T D G; Numan, Sandra C.; Kalkman, Cor J.; Hagenaars, J. H M; Absalom, Anthony R.; Hoekstra, Frouckje M.; Volkers, Martin J.; Furue, Koto; Gaudreault, Josee; Berde, Charles; Soriano, Sulpicio; Young, Vanessa; Sethna, Navil; Kovatsis, Pete; Cravero, Joseph P.; Bellinger, David; Marmor, Jacki; Lynn, Anne; Ivanova, Iskra; Hunyady, Agnes; Verma, Shilpa; Polaner, David; Thomas, Joss; Meuller, Martin; Haret, Denisa; Szmuk, Peter; Steiner, Jeffery; Kravitz, Brian; Suresh, Santhanam; Hays, Stephen R.; Taenzer, Andreas H.; Maxwell, Lynne G.; Williams, Robert K.; Bell, Graham T.; Dorris, Liam; Adey, Claire; Bagshaw, Oliver; Chisakuta, Anthony; Eissa, Ayman; Stoddart, Peter; Davis, Annette; Myles, Paul; Wolf, Andy; McIntosh, Neil; Carlin, John; Leslie, Kate; De Lima, Jonathan; Hammer, Greg; Field, David; Gebski, Val; Tibboel, Dick

    2015-01-01

    Background: Postoperative apnea is a complication in young infants. Awake regional anesthesia (RA) may reduce the risk; however, the evidence is weak. The General Anesthesia compared to Spinal anesthesia study is a randomized, controlled trial designed to assess the influence of general anesthesia

  8. Apnea after Awake Regional and General Anesthesia in Infants : The General Anesthesia Compared to Spinal Anesthesia Study-Comparing Apnea and Neurodevelopmental Outcomes, a Randomized Controlled Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Davidson, Andrew J; Morton, Neil S; Arnup, Sarah J; de Graaff, Jurgen C; Disma, Nicola; Withington, Davinia E; Frawley, Geoff; Hunt, Rodney W; Hardy, Pollyanna; Khotcholava, Magda; von Ungern Sternberg, Britta S; Wilton, Niall; Tuo, Pietro; Salvo, Ida; Ormond, Gillian; Stargatt, Robyn; Locatelli, Bruno Guido; McCann, Mary Ellen; Absalom, Anthony

    BACKGROUND: Postoperative apnea is a complication in young infants. Awake regional anesthesia (RA) may reduce the risk; however, the evidence is weak. The General Anesthesia compared to Spinal anesthesia study is a randomized, controlled trial designed to assess the influence of general anesthesia

  9. 1 APOPO's tuberculosis research agenda: achievements ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract: This article describes Anti-Persoonsmijnen Ontmijnende Product Ontwikkeling (APOPO) recent use of specially trained African giant pouched rats as detectors of pulmonary tuberculosis in people living in Tanzania. It summarizes the achievements and challenges encountered over the years and outlines future ...

  10. The use of sequential organ failure assessment parameters in an awake porcine model of severe Staphylococcus aureus sepsis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Karen E.; Nielsen, Ole L.; Birck, Malene M.

    2012-01-01

    The human sequential organ failure assessment (SOFA) scoring system is used worldwide in intensive care units for assessing the extent of organ dysfunction/failure in patients with severe sepsis. An increasing number of septic cases are caused by Gram-positive bacteria as Staphylococcus aureus....... The aim of the current study was to apply the human SOFA parameters in an awake, porcine model of severe S. aureus sepsis. Five pigs were inoculated intravenously with S. aureus and two control animals were sham-inoculated. Extensive clinical monitoring and sequential blood sampling was obtained...... the liver was affected earlier in pigs compared to humans. The use of human SOFA parameters was valuable in identifying dysfunctional/failing organs and showed consistency between this porcine model and human severe sepsis. Applying SOFA parameters in this model increased the relevance for comparison...

  11. The neuropharmacology of upper airway motor control in the awake and asleep states: implications for obstructive sleep apnoea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Horner Richard L

    2001-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Obstructive sleep apnoea is a common and serious breathing problem that is caused by effects of sleep on pharyngeal muscle tone in individuals with narrow upper airways. There has been increasing focus on delineating the brain mechanisms that modulate pharyngeal muscle activity in the awake and asleep states in order to understand the pathogenesis of obstructive apnoeas and to develop novel neurochemical treatments. Although initial clinical studies have met with only limited success, it is proposed that more rational and realistic approaches may be devised for neurochemical modulation of pharyngeal muscle tone as the relevant neurotransmitters and receptors that are involved in sleep-dependent modulation are identified following basic experiments.

  12. Application of Awake Craniotomy and Intraoperative Brain Mapping for Surgical Resection of Insular Gliomas of the Dominant Hemisphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alimohamadi, Maysam; Shirani, Mohammad; Shariat Moharari, Reza; Pour-Rashidi, Ahmad; Ketabchi, Mehdi; Khajavi, Mohammadreza; Arami, Mohamadali; Amirjamshidi, Abbas

    2016-08-01

    Radical resection of dominant insular gliomas is difficult because of their close vicinity with internal capsule, basal ganglia, and speech centers. Brain mapping techniques can be used to maximize the extent of tumor removal and to minimize postoperative morbidities by precise localization of eloquent cortical and subcortical areas. Patients with newly diagnosed gliomas of dominant insula were enrolled. The exclusion criteria were severe cognitive disturbances, communication difficulty, age greater than 75 years, severe obesity, difficult airways for intubation and severe cardiopulmonary diseases. All were evaluated preoperatively with contrast-enhanced brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), functional brain MRI, and diffusion tensor tractography of language and motor systems. All underwent awake craniotomy with the same anesthesiology protocol. Intraoperative monitoring included continuous motor-evoked potential, electromyography, electrocorticography, direct electrical stimulation of cortex, and subcortical tracts. The patients were followed with serial neurologic examination and imaging. Ten patients were enrolled (4 men, 6 women) with a mean age of 43.6 years. Seven patients suffered from low-grade glioma, and 3 patients had high-grade glioma. The most common clinical presentation was seizure followed by speech disturbance, hemiparesis, and memory loss. Extent of tumor resection ranged from 73% to 100%. No mortality or new major postoperative neurologic deficit was encountered. Seizure control improved in three fourths of patients with medical refractory epilepsy. In one patient with speech disorder at presentation, the speech problem became worse after surgery. Brain mapping during awake craniotomy helps to maximize extent of tumor resection while preserving neurologic function in patients with dominant insular lobe glioma. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. Rapid and minimum invasive functional brain mapping by real-time visualization of high gamma activity during awake craniotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Hiroshi; Kamada, Kyousuke; Kapeller, Christoph; Hiroshima, Satoru; Prueckl, Robert; Guger, Christoph

    2014-11-01

    Electrocortical stimulation (ECS) is the gold standard for functional brain mapping during an awake craniotomy. The critical issue is to set aside enough time to identify eloquent cortices by ECS. High gamma activity (HGA) ranging between 80 and 120 Hz on electrocorticogram is assumed to reflect localized cortical processing. In this report, we used real-time HGA mapping and functional neuronavigation integrated with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) for rapid and reliable identification of motor and language functions. Four patients with intra-axial tumors in their dominant hemisphere underwent preoperative fMRI and lesion resection with an awake craniotomy. All patients showed significant fMRI activation evoked by motor and language tasks. During the craniotomy, we recorded electrocorticogram activity by placing subdural grids directly on the exposed brain surface. Each patient performed motor and language tasks and demonstrated real-time HGA dynamics in hand motor areas and parts of the inferior frontal gyrus. Sensitivity and specificity of HGA mapping were 100% compared with ECS mapping in the frontal lobe, which suggested HGA mapping precisely indicated eloquent cortices. We found different HGA dynamics of language tasks in frontal and temporal regions. Specificities of the motor and language-fMRI did not reach 85%. The results of HGA mapping was mostly consistent with those of ECS mapping, although fMRI tended to overestimate functional areas. This novel technique enables rapid and accurate identification of motor and frontal language areas. Furthermore, real-time HGA mapping sheds light on underlying physiological mechanisms related to human brain functions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Success rates and complications of awake caudal versus spinal block in preterm infants undergoing inguinal hernia repair: A prospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahin Seyedhejazi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Inguinal hernia is a common disease in preterm infants necessitating surgical repair. Despite the increased risk of postoperative apnea in preterm infants, the procedure was conventionally performed under general anesthesia. Recently, regional anesthesia approaches, including spinal and caudal blocks have been proposed as safe and efficient alternative anesthesia methods in this group of patients. The current study evaluates awake caudal and spinal blocks in preterm infants undergoing inguinal hernia repair. Materials and Methods: In a randomized clinical trial, 66 neonates and infants (weight <5 kg undergoing inguinal hernia repair were recruited in Tabriz Teaching Children Hospital during a 12-month period. They were randomly divided into two equal groups; receiving either caudal block by 1 ml/kg of 0.25% bupivacaine plus 20 μg adrenaline (group C or spinal block by 1 mg/kg of 0.5% bupivacaine plus 20 μg adrenaline (group S. Vital signs and pain scores were documented during operation and thereafter up to 24 h after operation. Results: Decrease in heart rate and systolic blood pressure was significantly higher in group C throughout the study period (P < 0.05. The mean recovery time was significantly higher in group S (27.3 ± 5.5 min vs. 21.8 ± 9.3 min; P = 0.03. Postoperative need for analgesia was significantly more frequent in group S (75.8% vs. 36.4%; P = 0.001. Failure in anesthesia was significantly higher in group S (24.4% vs. 6.1%; P = 0.04. Conclusion: More appropriate success rate, duration of recovery and postoperative need of analgesics could contribute to caudal block being a superior anesthesia technique compared to spinal anesthesia in awaked preterm infants undergoing inguinal hernia repair.

  15. Advantages and disadvantages of intraoperative language tasks in awake surgery: a three-task approach for prefrontal tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rofes, A; Spena, G; Miozzo, A; Fontanella, M M; Miceli, G

    2015-12-01

    Multidisciplinary efforts are being made to provide surgical teams with sensitive and specific tasks for language mapping in awake surgery. Researchers and clinicians have elaborated different tasks over time. A fair amount of work has been directed to study the neurofunctional correlates of some of these tasks, and there is recent interest in their standardization. However, little discussion exists on the advantages and disadvantages that each task poses from the perspective of the cognitive neuroscience of language. Such an approach may be a relevant step to assess task validity, to avoid using tasks that tap onto similar processes, and to provide patients with a surgical treatment that ensures maximal tumor resection while avoiding postoperative language deficits. An understanding of the language components that each task entails may also be relevant to improve the current assessments and the ways in which tasks are administered, and to disentangle neurofunctional questions. We reviewed 17 language mapping tasks that have been used in awake surgery. Overt production tasks have been a preferred choice over comprehension tasks. Tasks tapping lexico-semantic processes, particularly object-naming, maintain their role as gold standards. Automated speech tasks are used to detect speech errors and to set the amplitude of the stimulator. Comprehension tasks, reading and writing tasks, and tasks that assess grammatical aspects of language may be regularly administered in the near future. We provide examples of a three-task approach we are administering to patients with prefrontal lesions. We believe that future advances in this area are contingent upon reviewing gold standards and introducing new assessment tools.

  16. Effect of Equal Daily Doses Achieved by Different Power Densities of Low-Level Laser Therapy at 635 nm on Open Skin Wound Healing in Normal and Diabetic Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Róbert Kilík

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective. Despite the fact that the molecular mechanism of low-level laser therapy (LLLT is not yet known, the exploitation of phototherapy in clinical medicine and surgery is of great interest. The present study investigates the effects of LLLT on open skin wound healing in normal and diabetic rats. Materials and Methods. Four round full-thickness skin wounds on dorsum were performed in male adult nondiabetic (n=24 and diabetic (n=24 Sprague–Dawley rats. AlGaInP (635 nm, wavelength; 5 J/cm2, daily dose was used to deliver power densities of 1, 5, and 15 mW/cm2 three times daily until euthanasia. Results. PMNL infiltration was lower in the irradiated groups (15 mW/cm2. The synthesis and organisation of collagen fibres were consecutively enhanced in the 5 mW/cm2 and 15 mW/cm2 groups compared to the others in nondiabetic rats. In the diabetic group the only significant difference was recorded in the ratio PMNL/Ma at 15 mW/cm2. A significant difference in the number of newly formed capillaries in the irradiated group (5, 15 mW/cm2 was recorded on day six after injury compared to the control group. Conclusion. LLLT confers a protective effect against excessive inflammatory tissue response; it stimulates neovascularization and the early formation of collagen fibres.

  17. A neural network confirms that physical exercise reverses EEG changes in depressed rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarbadhikari, S N

    1995-12-01

    The use of an artificial neural network (ANN) system to differentiate the EEG power density spectra in depressed from normal rats was tried. The beneficial effects of chronic physical exercise in reducing the effects of stress and therefore depression was also to be tested in animals by the same method. In this study, rats were divided into 4 groups, subjected to (i) chronic stress (D group); (ii) chronic exercise by treadmill running (EO group); (iii) exercise with stress (ES group) and (iv) handling (C group). The prefrontal cortical EEG, EMG and EOG were recorded simultaneously on paper and the digitized EEG signals were also stored in the hard-disk of a PC-AT through an ADC. After filtering the digitized signals, the EEG power spectra were calculated by an FFT routine. Three successive 4 s artefact-free epochs were averaged. The REM and NREM sleep periods as well as the awake period signals were analyzed separately. The FFT values from each of the 3 states, in the 4 groups of animals were tested by an ANN with 30 first layer neurons and a 2nd layer of a majority-vote-taker. The ANN could distinguish the depressed from the normal rats' EEG very well in REM (99%) sleep, NREM (95%) sleep and awake (81%) states. In most of the cases it identified the exercised rats' EEG as normal.

  18. School Size, Achievement, and Achievement Gaps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bradley J. McMillen

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available In order to examine the relationship between school size and achievement, a study was conducted using longitudinal achievement data from North Carolina for three separate cohorts of public school students (one elementary, one middle and one high school. Results revealed several interactions between size and student characteristics, all of which indicated that the achievement gaps typically existing between certain subgroups (i.e., more versus less-advantaged, lower versus higher-achieving were larger in larger schools. Results varied across the grade level cohorts and across subjects, but in general effects were more common in mathematics than in reading, and were more pronounced at the high school level. Study results are discussed in the context of educational equity and cost-effectiveness.

  19. Wide-Awake Primary Flexor Tendon Repair, Tenolysis, and Tendon Transfer

    OpenAIRE

    Tang, Jin Bo

    2015-01-01

    Tendon surgery is unique because it should ensure tendon gliding after surgery. Tendon surgery now can be performed under local anesthesia without tourniquet, by injecting epinephrine mixed with lidocaine, to achieve vasoconstriction in the area of surgery. This method allows the tendon to move actively during surgery to test tendon function intraoperatively and to ensure the tendon is properly repaired before leaving the operating table. I applied this method to primary flexor tendon repair ...

  20. The Effects of Changing Attention and Context in an Awake Offline Processing Period on Visual Long-Term Memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellmore, Timothy M; Feng, Anna; Ng, Kenneth; Dewan, Luthfunnahar; Root, James C

    2015-01-01

    There is accumulating evidence that sleep as well as awake offline processing is important for the transformation of new experiences into long-term memory (LTM). Yet much remains to be understood about how various cognitive factors influence the efficiency of awake offline processing. In the present study we investigated how changes in attention and context in the immediate period after exposure to new visual information influences LTM consolidation. After presentation of multiple naturalistic scenes within a working memory paradigm, recognition was assessed 30 min and 24 h later in three groups of subjects. One group of subjects engaged in a focused attention task [the Revised Attentional Network Task (R-ANT)] in the 30 min after exposure to the scenes. Another group of subjects remained in the testing room during the 30 min after scene exposure and engaged in no goal- or task-directed activities. A third group of subjects left the testing room and returned 30 min later. A signal detection analysis revealed no significant differences among the three groups in hits, false alarms, or sensitivity on the 30-min recognition task. At the 24-h recognition test, the group that performed the R-ANT made significantly fewer hits compared to the group that left the testing room and did not perform the attention ask. The group that performed the R-ANT and the group that remained in the testing room during the 30-min post-exposure interval made significantly fewer false alarms on the 24-h recognition test compared to the group that left the testing room. The group that stayed in the testing room and engaged in no goal- or task-directed activities exhibited significantly higher sensitivity (d') compared to the group that left the testing room and the group that performed the R-ANT task. Staying in the same context after exposure to new information and resting quietly with minimal engagement of attention results in the best ability to distinguish old from novel visual stimuli

  1. The Effects of Changing Attention and Context in an Awake Offline Processing Period on Visual Long-Term Memory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy Michael Ellmore

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available There is accumulating evidence that sleep as well as awake offline processing is important for the transformation of new experiences into long-term memory. Yet much remains to be understood about how various cognitive factors influence the efficiency of awake offline processing. In the present study we investigated how changes in attention and context in the immediate period after exposure to new visual information influences long-term memory consolidation. After presentation of multiple naturalistic scenes within a working memory paradigm, recognition was assessed 30 minutes and 24 hours later in three groups of subjects. One group of subjects engaged in a focused attention task (the Revised Attentional Network Task (R-ANT in the 30 minutes after exposure to the scenes. Another group of subjects remained in the testing room during the 30 minutes after scene exposure and engaged in no goal- or task-directed activities. A third group of subjects left the testing room and returned 30 minutes later. A signal detection analysis revealed no significant differences among the three groups in hits, false alarms, or sensitivity on the 30-minute recognition task. At the 24-hour recognition test, the group that performed the R-ANT made significantly fewer hits compared to the group that left the testing room and didn’t perform the attention ask. The group that performed the R-ANT and the group that remained in the testing room during the 30-minute post-exposure interval made significantly fewer false alarms on the 24-hour recognition test compared to the group that left the testing room. The group that stayed in the testing room and engaged in no goal- or task-directed activities exhibited significantly higher sensitivity (d’ compared to the group that left the testing room and the group that performed the R-ANT task. Staying in the same context after exposure to new information and resting quietly with minimal engagement of attention results in the

  2. arXiv A Method to Determine the Maximum Defocused Proton Radius of a Self-Modulated Proton Bunch in AWAKE

    CERN Document Server

    Turner, Marlene; Muggli, Patric

    The AWAKE experiment at CERN aims to drive GV/m plasma wakefields with a self-modulated proton drive bunch, and to use them for electron acceleration. During the self-modulation process, protons are defocused by the transverse plasma wakefields and form a halo around the focused bunch core. The two-screen setup integrated in AWAKE measures the transverse, time-integrated proton bunch distribution downstream the \\unit[10]{m} long plasma to detect defocused protons. By measuring the maximum radius of the defocused protons we attempt calculate properties of the self-modulation. In this article, we develop a routine to identify the maximum radius of the defocused protons, based on a standard contour method. We compare the maximum radius obtained from the contour to the logarithmic lineouts of the image to show that the determined radius identifies the edge of the distribution.

  3. The sensory-motor profile awake-A new tool for pre-, intra-, and postoperative assessment of sensory-motor function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Juliane; Jehna, Margit; Steinmann, Elisabeth; Mehdorn, Hubertus M; Synowitz, Michael; Hartwigsen, Gesa

    2016-08-01

    Awake craniotomy is a well-established procedure in surgery of intracranial tumors in eloquent areas. However, sufficiently standardized instruments for the assessment of sensory-motor function before, during and after the operation are currently lacking, despite their importance for evaluation of operative outcome. To address this issue, we designed a standardized assessment tool (the "sensory-motor profile awake scale"; SMP-a). The final scale consists of three motor sections (face, arm and leg) assessing both gross and fine motor skills and one sensory section. It differentiates between six grades of impairment and its tasks are applicable for intraoperative continuous monitoring of sensory-motor functions and supporting processes. We analyzed the data of 17 patients with intracranial tumors eligible for awake craniotomy who were preoperatively assessed with the SMP-a. In addition, we present an exemplary case. Our data support the assumption that the SMP-a is feasible in patients eligible for awake craniotomy, even in patients with symptoms of mild aphasia or more severe sensory-motor deficits caused by tumor recurrence. The exemplary case demonstrates the feasibility of repeated measures with the SMP-a in a tumor patient, including the adaption of tasks to the individual requirements of an intraoperative setting. This exploratory study suggests that the SMP-a might be a feasible rating scale in patients with intracranial tumors. The flexibility of the scale enables individual adaption, but preserves the standardized scoring system to allow comparison between assessment dates, patients and, hopefully in the future, institutions. However, future studies are mandatory to provide data on the instrument's diagnostic properties with respect to feasibility, objectivity, validity and reliability. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. “Awake” intraoperative functional MRI (ai-fMRI) for mapping the eloquent cortex: Is it possible in awake craniotomy?☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jun-Feng; Zhang, Han; Wu, Jin-Song; Yao, Cheng-Jun; Zhuang, Dong-Xiao; Qiu, Tian-Ming; Jia, Wen-Bin; Mao, Ying; Zhou, Liang-Fu

    2012-01-01

    As a promising noninvasive imaging technique, functional MRI (fMRI) has been extensively adopted as a functional localization procedure for surgical planning. However, the information provided by preoperative fMRI (pre-fMRI) is hampered by the brain deformation that is secondary to surgical procedures. Therefore, intraoperative fMRI (i-fMRI) becomes a potential alternative that can compensate for brain shifts by updating the functional localization information during craniotomy. However, previous i-fMRI studies required that patients be under general anesthesia, preventing the wider application of such a technique as the patients cannot perform tasks unless they are awake. In this study, we propose a new technique that combines awake surgery and i-fMRI, named “awake” i-fMRI (ai-fMRI). We introduced ai-fMRI to the real-time localization of sensorimotor areas during awake craniotomy in seven patients. The results showed that ai-fMRI could successfully detect activations in the bilateral primary sensorimotor areas and supplementary motor areas for all patients, indicating the feasibility of this technique in eloquent area localization. The reliability of ai-fMRI was further validated using intraoperative stimulation mapping (ISM) in two of the seven patients. Comparisons between the pre-fMRI-derived localization result and the ai-fMRI derived result showed that the former was subject to a heavy brain shift and led to incorrect localization, while the latter solved that problem. Additionally, the approaches for the acquisition and processing of the ai-fMRI data were fully illustrated and described. Some practical issues on employing ai-fMRI in awake craniotomy were systemically discussed, and guidelines were provided. PMID:24179766

  5. The female dragons awake: women, sport and society in the early years of the new China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, J

    2001-01-01

    This article, based on archival records, published documents, interviews with elite sportswomen and three regional case studies, deals with the radical social, economic, cultural and political changes in the early years of the Communist China, the consequent changes in women's lives and the eventual extraordinary impact on elite women's sport. It analyses the complicated relations between the communist system, gender ideology, sports policy, international politics and elite women's sport. With the establishment of a variety of sports institutions, systems and structures women in increasing numbers took part in competitive sport and produced even increasingly remarkable achievements.

  6. Efficacy and Safety of a Lidocaine and Ropivacaine Mixture for Scalp Nerve Block and Local Infiltration Anesthesia in Patients Undergoing Awake Craniotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaki, Tomohiro; Sugino, Shigekazu; Janicki, Piotr K; Ishioka, Yoshiya; Hatakeyama, Yosuke; Hayase, Tomo; Kaneuchi-Yamashita, Miki; Kohri, Naonori; Yamakage, Michiaki

    2016-01-01

    Mixtures of various local anesthetics, such as lidocaine and ropivacaine, have been widely used. However, their efficacy and safety for scalp nerve blocks and local infiltration during awake craniotomy have not been fully elucidated. We prospectively investigated 53 patients who underwent awake craniotomy. Scalp block was performed for the blockade of the supraorbital, supratrochlear, zygomaticotemporal, auriculotemporal, greater occipital, and lesser occipital nerves with a mixture containing equal volumes of 2% lidocaine and 0.75% ropivacaine, including 5 μg/mL of epinephrine. Infiltration anesthesia was applied at the site of skin incision using the same mixture. The study outcomes included changes in heart rate and blood pressure after head pinning and skin incision, and incidence of severe pain on emergence from anesthesia. Total doses and plasma concentrations of lidocaine and ropivacaine were measured at different time points after performing the block. The heart rate and blood pressure after head pinning were marginally, but significantly, increased when compared with baseline values. There were no significant differences in heart rate and blood pressure before and after the skin incision. Nineteen percent of the patients (10/53) complained of incisional pain at emergence from anesthesia. The highest observed blood concentrations of lidocaine and ropivacaine were 1.9±0.9 and 1.1±0.4 μg/mL, respectively. No acute anesthetic toxicity symptom was observed. Scalp block with a mixture of lidocaine and ropivacaine seems to provide effective and safe anesthetic management in patients undergoing awake craniotomy.

  7. Neural correlates of face and object perception in an awake chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes examined by scalp-surface event-related potentials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirokata Fukushima

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The neural system of our closest living relative, the chimpanzee, is a topic of increasing research interest. However, electrophysiological examinations of neural activity during visual processing in awake chimpanzees are currently lacking. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In the present report, skin-surface event-related brain potentials (ERPs were measured while a fully awake chimpanzee observed photographs of faces and objects in two experiments. In Experiment 1, human faces and stimuli composed of scrambled face images were displayed. In Experiment 2, three types of pictures (faces, flowers, and cars were presented. The waveforms evoked by face stimuli were distinguished from other stimulus types, as reflected by an enhanced early positivity appearing before 200 ms post stimulus, and an enhanced late negativity after 200 ms, around posterior and occipito-temporal sites. Face-sensitive activity was clearly observed in both experiments. However, in contrast to the robustly observed face-evoked N170 component in humans, we found that faces did not elicit a peak in the latency range of 150-200 ms in either experiment. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Although this pilot study examined a single subject and requires further examination, the observed scalp voltage patterns suggest that selective processing of faces in the chimpanzee brain can be detected by recording surface ERPs. In addition, this non-invasive method for examining an awake chimpanzee can be used to extend our knowledge of the characteristics of visual cognition in other primate species.

  8. Comparison of dexmedetomidine and sufentanil for conscious sedation in patients undergoing awake fibreoptic nasotracheal intubation: a prospective, randomised and controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, She-Liang; Xie, Yi-hong; Wang, Wen-Yuan; Hu, Shuang-Fei; Zhang, Yun-Long

    2014-01-01

    Fibreoptic intubation is a valuable technique for difficult airway management in which conscious sedation is paramount. To investigate the efficacy and safety of dexmedetomidine (DEX) and sufentanil (SUF) for conscious sedation during awake nasotracheal intubation under vision by a fibreoptic bronchoscope. Forty patients with anticipated difficult airways of American Society of Anesthesiologists I-II scheduled for awake fibreoptic nasotracheal intubation were randomised into two groups each containing 20 subjects. DEX group received DEX at a dose of 1.0 μg/kg over 10 min followed by a continuous infusion of 0.5 μg/kg per hour, while SUF group received SUF target controlled infusion in which the target plasma concentration was 0.3 ng/mL. The nasotracheal intubation conditions and the tolerance to nasotracheal intubation were observed; the occurrence of adverse events including hypertension, bradycardia and respiratory depression during nasotracheal intubation and post-surgical throat pain and hoarseness, and post-surgical memory score were recorded. Better nasotracheal intubation conditions and higher tolerance to intubation were observed in DEX group than those in SUF group (P memory score for sedation during awake fibreoptic nasotracheal intubation. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. arXiv Interferometer-based high-accuracy white light measurement of neutral rubidium density and gradient at AWAKE

    CERN Document Server

    Batsch, Fabian; Oez, Erdem; Moody, Joshua; Gschwendtner, Edda; Caldwell, Allen; Muggli, Patric

    The AWAKE experiment requires an automated online rubidium (Rb) plasma density and gradient diagnostic for densities between 1 and 10$\\cdot$10$^{14}$ cm$^{-3}$. A linear density gradient along the plasma source at the percent level may be useful to improve the electron acceleration process. Because of full laser ionization of Rb vapor to Rb$^{+}$ within a radius of 1 mm, the plasma density equals the vapor density. We measure the Rb vapor densities at both ends of the source, with high precision using, white light interferometry. At either source end, broadband laser light passes a remotely controlled Mach-Zehnder interferometer built out of single mode fibers. The resulting interference signal, influenced by dispersion in the vicinity of the Rb D1 and D2 transitions, is dispersed in wavelength by a spectrograph. Fully automated Fourier-based signal conditioning and a fit algorithm yield the density with an uncertainty between the measurements at both ends of 0.11 to 0.46 $\\%$ over the entire density range. T...

  10. Visual Responsiveness of Neurons in the Secondary Somatosensory Area and its Surrounding Parietal Operculum Regions in Awake Macaque Monkeys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hihara, Sayaka; Taoka, Miki; Tanaka, Michio; Iriki, Atsushi

    2015-01-01

    Previous neurophysiological studies performed in macaque monkeys have shown that the secondary somatosensory cortex (SII) is essentially engaged in the processing of somatosensory information and no other sensory input has been reported. In contrast, recent human brain-imaging studies have revealed the effects of visual and auditory stimuli on SII activity, which suggest multisensory integration in the human SII. To determine whether multisensory responses of the SII also exist in nonhuman primates, we recorded single-unit activity in response to visual and auditory stimuli from the SII and surrounding regions in 8 hemispheres from 6 awake monkeys. Among 1157 recorded neurons, 306 neurons responded to visual stimuli. These visual neurons usually responded to rather complex stimuli, such as stimulation of the peripersonal space (40.5%), observation of human action (29.1%), and moving-object stimulation outside the monkey's reach (23.9%). We occasionally applied auditory stimuli to visual neurons and found 10 auditory-responsive neurons that exhibited somatosensory responses. The visual neurons were distributed continuously along the lateral sulcus covering the entire SII, along with other somatosensory neurons. These results highlight the need to investigate novel functional roles—other than somesthetic sensory processing—of the SII. PMID:25962920

  11. Evaluation of the kappa-opioid receptor-selective tracer [{sup 11}C]GR103545 in awake rhesus macaques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schoultz, Bent W. [University of Oslo, Department of Chemistry, Oslo (Norway); Hjornevik, Trine; Willoch, Frode [University of Oslo, Centre for Molecular Biology and Neuroscience and Institute of Basic Medical Sciences, Oslo (Norway); Akershus University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Loerenskog (Norway); Marton, Janos [ABX Advanced Biochemical Compounds GmbH, Radeberg (Germany); Noda, Akihiro; Murakami, Yoshihiro; Miyoshi, Sosuke; Nishimura, Shintaro [Medical and Pharmacological Research Center Foundation, Basic Research Department, Hakui City, Ishikawa (Japan); Aarstad, Erik [University College of London, Institute of Nuclear Medicine, London (United Kingdom); Drzezga, Alexander [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Munich (Germany); Matsunari, Ichiro [Medical and Pharmacological Research Center Foundation, Clinical Research Department, Hakui City, Ishikawa (Japan); Henriksen, Gjermund [University of Oslo, Department of Chemistry, Oslo (Norway); Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Munich (Germany)

    2010-06-15

    The recent development in radiosynthesis of the {sup 11}C-carbamate function increases the potential of [{sup 11}C]GR103545, which for the last decade has been regarded as promising for imaging the kappa-opioid receptor ({kappa}-OR) with PET. In the present study, [{sup 11}C]GR103545 was evaluated in awake rhesus macaques. Separate investigations were performed to clarify the OR subtype selectivity of this compound. Regional brain uptake kinetics of [{sup 11}C]GR103545 was studied 0-120 min after injection. The binding affinity and opioid subtype selectivity of [{sup 11}C]GR103545 was determined in cells transfected with cloned human opioid receptors. In vitro binding assays demonstrated a high affinity of GR103545 for {kappa}-OR (K{sub i} = 0.02 {+-}0.01 nM) with excellent selectivity over {mu}-OR (6 x 10{sup 2}-fold) and {delta}-OR (2 x 10{sup 4}-fold). PET imaging revealed a volume of distribution (V{sub T}) pattern consistent with the known distribution of {kappa}-OR, with striatum = temporal cortex > cingulate cortex > frontal cortex > parietal cortex > thalamus > cerebellum. [{sup 11}C]GR103545 is selective for {kappa}-OR and holds promise for use to selectively depict and quantify this receptor in humans by means of PET. (orig.)

  12. Imaging of Neuronal Activity in Awake Mice by Measurements of Flavoprotein Autofluorescence Corrected for Cerebral Blood Flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manami Takahashi

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Green fluorescence imaging (e.g., flavoprotein autofluorescence imaging, FAI can be used to measure neuronal activity and oxygen metabolism in living brains without expressing fluorescence proteins. It is useful for understanding the mechanism of various brain functions and their abnormalities in age-related brain diseases. However, hemoglobin in cerebral blood vessels absorbs green fluorescence, hampering accurate assessments of brain function in animal models with cerebral blood vessel dysfunctions and subsequent cerebral blood flow (CBF alterations. In the present study, we developed a new method to correct FAI signals for hemoglobin-dependent green fluorescence reductions by simultaneous measurements of green fluorescence and intrinsic optical signals. Intrinsic optical imaging enabled evaluations of light absorption and scatters by hemoglobin, which could then be applied to corrections of green fluorescence intensities. Using this method, enhanced flavoprotein autofluorescence by sensory stimuli was successfully detected in the brains of awake mice, despite increases of CBF, and hemoglobin interference. Moreover, flavoprotein autofluorescence could be properly quantified in a resting state and during sensory stimulation by a CO2 inhalation challenge, which modified vascular responses without overtly affecting neuronal activities. The flavoprotein autofluorescence signal data obtained here were in good agreement with the previous findings from a condition with drug-induced blockade of cerebral vasodilation, justifying the current assaying methodology. Application of this technology to studies on animal models of brain diseases with possible changes of CBF, including age-related neurological disorders, would provide better understanding of the mechanisms of neurovascular coupling in pathological circumstances.

  13. Evaluation of the kappa-opioid receptor-selective tracer [11C]GR103545 in awake rhesus macaques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schoultz, Bent W.; Hjornevik, Trine; Willoch, Frode; Marton, Janos; Noda, Akihiro; Murakami, Yoshihiro; Miyoshi, Sosuke; Nishimura, Shintaro; Aarstad, Erik; Drzezga, Alexander; Matsunari, Ichiro; Henriksen, Gjermund

    2010-01-01

    The recent development in radiosynthesis of the 11 C-carbamate function increases the potential of [ 11 C]GR103545, which for the last decade has been regarded as promising for imaging the kappa-opioid receptor (κ-OR) with PET. In the present study, [ 11 C]GR103545 was evaluated in awake rhesus macaques. Separate investigations were performed to clarify the OR subtype selectivity of this compound. Regional brain uptake kinetics of [ 11 C]GR103545 was studied 0-120 min after injection. The binding affinity and opioid subtype selectivity of [ 11 C]GR103545 was determined in cells transfected with cloned human opioid receptors. In vitro binding assays demonstrated a high affinity of GR103545 for κ-OR (K i = 0.02 ±0.01 nM) with excellent selectivity over μ-OR (6 x 10 2 -fold) and δ-OR (2 x 10 4 -fold). PET imaging revealed a volume of distribution (V T ) pattern consistent with the known distribution of κ-OR, with striatum = temporal cortex > cingulate cortex > frontal cortex > parietal cortex > thalamus > cerebellum. [ 11 C]GR103545 is selective for κ-OR and holds promise for use to selectively depict and quantify this receptor in humans by means of PET. (orig.)

  14. Damage of the right dorsal superior longitudinal fascicle by awake surgery for glioma causes persistent visuospatial dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Riho; Kinoshita, Masashi; Miyashita, Katsuyoshi; Okita, Hirokazu; Genda, Ryoji; Yahata, Tetsutaro; Hayashi, Yutaka; Nakada, Mitsutoshi

    2017-12-07

    Patients with glioma frequently present with neuropsychological deficits preoperatively and/or postoperatively, and these deficits may remain after the chronic phase. However, little is known about postoperative recovery course of right hemispheric function. We therefore studied the characteristics and causes of persistent cognitive dysfunction in right cerebral hemispheric glioma. Eighteen patients who underwent awake surgery participated in this study. All patients who received preoperative neuropsychological examinations were assigned to two groups according to their test results: preoperative deficit and normal. They were reassessed 1 week and 3 months after surgery. The rates of remaining deficits in the deficit group at chronic phase were higher than those of the normal group for all functions. Despite preoperative normal function, the remaining rate for visuospatial cognitive deficits was the highest among all functions. The voxel-based lesion-symptom mapping analysis for visuospatial cognition revealed that a part of the medial superior and middle frontal gyri were resected with high probability in patients with low visuospatial cognitive accuracy. Our study indicates that in patients with preoperative neuropsychological deficits, these deficits tend to remain until the chronic phase. Visuospatial dysfunction frequently persists until the chronic phase, which might reflect damage to the superior longitudinal fasciclus I and II.

  15. Achieving Public Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abowitz, Kathleen Knight

    2011-01-01

    Public schools are functionally provided through structural arrangements such as government funding, but public schools are achieved in substance, in part, through local governance. In this essay, Kathleen Knight Abowitz explains the bifocal nature of achieving public schools; that is, that schools are both subject to the unitary Public compact of…

  16. Effects of head-out water immersion on the urinary excretion of phosphate, calcium and magnesium in the awake dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayus, J C; Frommer, J P; Eknoyan, G; Divine, G; Suki, W N

    1984-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to define the effects of heat-out water immersion on the urinary excretion of phosphate (UPO4V), calcium (UCaV), and magnesium (UMgV) in the awake dog. 53 dogs were divided into three groups: group I, time-control, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.; group II, immersion for 2 h, studied from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., and group III, immersion for 2 h, studied from 4 p.m. to 10 p.m. Our results show that head-out water immersion did not alter the spontaneous pattern of UPO4V. When immersion was performed from 1 p.m. to 3. p.m. (group II), it had no effect on UCaV but induced a significant increase in UMgV although fractional excretion of Mg (FEMg) remained unchanged. When immersion was performed from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. (group III), however, both UCaV and UMgV increased significantly. FECa also increased significantly in this group but FEMg again remained unchanged. The changes in UCaV were dissociated with UNaV. Changes in plasma PO4 (PPO4) and arterial pH were unrelated to changes in UCaV or UPO4V. Our findings show that head-out water immersion induces significant increases in UCaV and UMgV by mechanisms which are independent of parathyroid hormone (PTH) or acid base changes. The rise in UMgV seems to be related to an increase in the filtered load, while the increases in UCaV are secondary to changes in the renal tubular handling of calcium. Thus, under these experimental circumstances, Ca and Mg reabsorption seem to occur via different distal tubular pathways.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  17. Blood oxygenation level dependent signal and neuronal adaptation to optogenetic and sensory stimulation in somatosensory cortex in awake animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aksenov, Daniil P; Li, Limin; Miller, Michael J; Wyrwicz, Alice M

    2016-11-01

    The adaptation of neuronal responses to stimulation, in which a peak transient response is followed by a sustained plateau, has been well-studied. The blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) signal has also been shown to exhibit adaptation on a longer time scale. However, some regions such as the visual and auditory cortices exhibit significant BOLD adaptation, whereas other such as the whisker barrel cortex may not adapt. In the sensory cortex a combination of thalamic inputs and intracortical activity drives hemodynamic changes, although the relative contributions of these components are not entirely understood. The aim of this study is to assess the role of thalamic inputs vs. intracortical processing in shaping BOLD adaptation during stimulation in the somatosensory cortex. Using simultaneous fMRI and electrophysiology in awake rabbits, we measured BOLD, local field potentials (LFPs), single- and multi-unit activity in the cortex during whisker and optogenetic stimulation. This design allowed us to compare BOLD and haemodynamic responses during activation of the normal thalamocortical sensory pathway (i.e., both inputs and intracortical activity) vs. the direct optical activation of intracortical circuitry alone. Our findings show that whereas LFP and multi-unit (MUA) responses adapted, neither optogenetic nor sensory stimulation produced significant BOLD adaptation. We observed for both paradigms a variety of excitatory and inhibitory single unit responses. We conclude that sensory feed-forward thalamic inputs are not primarily responsible for shaping BOLD adaptation to stimuli; but the single-unit results point to a role in this behaviour for specific excitatory and inhibitory neuronal sub-populations, which may not correlate with aggregate neuronal activity. © 2016 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Chronic recordings reveal tactile stimuli can suppress spontaneous activity of neurons in somatosensory cortex of awake and anesthetized primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Hui-Xin; Reed, Jamie L; Franca, Joao G; Jain, Neeraj; Kajikawa, Yoshinao; Kaas, Jon H

    2016-04-01

    In somatosensory cortex, tactile stimulation within the neuronal receptive field (RF) typically evokes a transient excitatory response with or without postexcitatory inhibition. Here, we describe neuronal responses in which stimulation on the hand is followed by suppression of the ongoing discharge. With the use of 16-channel microelectrode arrays implanted in the hand representation of primary somatosensory cortex of New World monkeys and prosimian galagos, we recorded neuronal responses from single units and neuron clusters. In 66% of our sample, neuron activity tended to display suppression of firing when regions of skin outside of the excitatory RF were stimulated. In a small proportion of neurons, single-site indentations suppressed firing without initial increases in response to any of the tested sites on the hand. Latencies of suppressive responses to skin indentation (usually 12-34 ms) were similar to excitatory response latencies. The duration of inhibition varied across neurons. Although most observations were from anesthetized animals, we also found similar neuron response properties in one awake galago. Notably, suppression of ongoing neuronal activity did not require conditioning stimuli or multi-site stimulation. The suppressive effects were generally seen following single-site skin indentations outside of the neuron's minimal RF and typically on different digits and palm pads, which have not often been studied in this context. Overall, the characteristics of widespread suppressive or inhibitory response properties with and without initial facilitative or excitatory responses add to the growing evidence that neurons in primary somatosensory cortex provide essential processing for integrating sensory stimulation from across the hand. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  19. An automated and reliable method for breath detection during variable mask pressures in awake and sleeping humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chinh D Nguyen

    Full Text Available Accurate breath detection is crucial in sleep and respiratory physiology research and in several clinical settings. However, this process is technically challenging due to measurement and physiological artifacts and other factors such as variable leaks in the breathing circuit. Recently developed techniques to quantify the multiple causes of obstructive sleep apnea, require intermittent changes in airway pressure applied to a breathing mask. This presents an additional unique challenge for breath detection. Traditional algorithms often require drift correction. However, this is an empirical operation potentially prone to human error. This paper presents a new algorithm for breath detection during variable mask pressures in awake and sleeping humans based on physiological landmarks detected in the airflow or epiglottic pressure signal (Pepi. The algorithms were validated using simulated data from a mathematical model and against the standard visual detection approach in 4 healthy individuals and 6 patients with sleep apnea during variable mask pressure conditions. Using the flow signal, the algorithm correctly identified 97.6% of breaths with a mean difference±SD in the onsets of respiratory phase compared to expert visual detection of 23±89ms for inspiration and 6±56ms for expiration during wakefulness and 10±74ms for inspiration and 3±28 ms for expiration with variable mask pressures during sleep. Using the Pepi signal, the algorithm correctly identified 89% of the breaths with accuracy of 31±156ms for inspiration and 9±147ms for expiration compared to expert visual detection during variable mask pressures asleep. The algorithm had excellent performance in response to baseline drifts and noise during variable mask pressure conditions. This new algorithm can be used for accurate breath detection including during variable mask pressure conditions which represents a major advance over existing time-consuming manual approaches.

  20. Serial postoperative awake and sleep EEG and long-term seizure outcome after anterior temporal lobectomy for hippocampal sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Gennaro, Giancarlo; Casciato, Sara; D'Aniello, Alfredo; De Risi, Marco; Quarato, Pier Paolo; Mascia, Addolorata; Grammaldo, Liliana G; Meldolesi, Giulio N; Esposito, Vincenzo; Picardi, Angelo

    2014-07-01

    To test if postoperative prolonged awake and sleep EEG monitoring predict long-term seizure outcome in patients operated for drug-resistant temporal lobe epilepsy due to hippocampal sclerosis (TLE-HS). This longitudinal study includes 107 patients with MTLE-HS who underwent anterior temporal lobectomy (ATL), were followed for at least 5 years (mean 8.3, range 5-12), had postoperative EEG after 2 months and at least one prolonged video-EEG monitoring during both wakefulness and sleep after 12 and 24 months. At each follow-up visit, the presence of interictal epileptiform discharges (IED) was determined, and seizure outcome was evaluated. Sixty-six patients (62%) remained free from auras and seizures throughout the follow-up period. Twenty-six (24%), 22 (21%), and 16 (16%) patients had IED at the 2-month, 12-month, and 24-month follow-up, respectively. The presence of IED at each time point was found to be associated with seizure or aura recurrence. Sleep recording contributed to the identification of patients with IED, as half of patients with IED displayed anomalies in sleep EEG only. In multivariate analysis, the presence of IED 2 months after surgery was found to be associated with seizure or aura recurrence independent of pre-operative factors consistently reported as outcome predictors in the literature. The presence of IED in serial postoperative EEG including sleep recording may predict long-term seizure outcome after ATL for TLE-HS. Serial postoperative EEGs may contribute to outcome prediction and help making decision about medication withdrawal in patients operated for TLE-HS. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. The rat: a laboratory model for studies of the diving response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Qi; Juric, Rajko

    2010-01-01

    Underwater submersion in mammals induces apnea, parasympathetically mediated bradycardia, and sympathetically mediated peripheral vasoconstriction. These effects are collectively termed the diving response, potentially the most powerful autonomic reflex known. Although these physiological responses are directed by neurons in the brain, study of neural control of the diving response has been hampered since 1) it is difficult to study the brains of animals while they are underwater, 2) feral marine mammals are usually large and have brains of variable size, and 3) there are but few references on the brains of naturally diving species. Similar responses are elicited in anesthetized rodents after stimulation of their nasal mucosa, but this nasopharyngeal reflex has not been compared directly with natural diving behavior in the rat. In the present study, we compared hemodynamic responses elicited in awake rats during volitional underwater submersion with those of rats swimming on the water's surface, rats involuntarily submerged, and rats either anesthetized or decerebrate and stimulated nasally with ammonia vapors. We show that the hemodynamic changes to voluntary diving in the rat are similar to those of naturally diving marine mammals. We also show that the responses of voluntary diving rats are 1) significantly different from those seen during swimming, 2) generally similar to those elicited in trained rats involuntarily “dunked” underwater, and 3) generally different from those seen from dunking naive rats underwater. Nasal stimulation of anesthetized rats differed most from the hemodynamic variables of rats trained to dive voluntarily. We propose that the rat trained to dive underwater is an excellent laboratory model to study neural control of the mammalian diving response, and also suggest that some investigations may be done with nasal stimulation of decerebrate preparations to decipher such control. PMID:20093670

  2. Achieving excellence in training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mangin, A.M.; Solymossy, J.M.

    1983-01-01

    Operating a nuclear power plant is a uniquely challenging activity, requiring a high degree of competence from all who are involved. Achieving and maintaining this competence requires excellence in training. But what does excellence mean, and how do we achieve it. Based on the experience gained by INPO in plant training evaluations and accreditation activities, this paper describes some of the actions that can be taken to achieve the quality appropriate for nuclear power plant training. These actions are discussed in relation to the four phases of a performance-based training system: (1) needs analysis, (2) program design and development, (3) implementation, and (4) evaluation and improvement

  3. [Achievement of therapeutic objectives].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantilla, Teresa

    2014-07-01

    Therapeutic objectives for patients with atherogenic dyslipidemia are achieved by improving patient compliance and adherence. Clinical practice guidelines address the importance of treatment compliance for achieving objectives. The combination of a fixed dose of pravastatin and fenofibrate increases the adherence by simplifying the drug regimen and reducing the number of daily doses. The good tolerance, the cost of the combination and the possibility of adjusting the administration to the patient's lifestyle helps achieve the objectives for these patients with high cardiovascular risk. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Arteriosclerosis y Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  4. Adoptees' Educational Achievements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Rikke Fuglsang

    This study analyses educational achievement at age 20 for 3,180 non-kin adoptees and at age 25 for 1,559 non-kin adoptees in Denmark by comparing them to non-adoptees. The study also analyses whether there are within-group differences in the educational achievement of non-kin adoptees according...... to country of origin. The results suggest that the relatively small gap between non-kin adoptees’ and non-adoptees’ educational achievements widens between ages 20 and 25. Moreover, the results show some differences in educational outcomes among non-kin adoptees with different countries of origin....

  5. PET study of the [{sup 11}C]raclopride binding in the striatum of the awake cat: effects of anaesthetics and role of cerebral blood flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hassoun, Wadad; Ginovart, Nathalie; Zimmer, Luc; Gualda, Veronique; Bonnefoi, Frederic [CERMEP, Lyon (France); Le Cavorsin, Marion; Leviel, Vincent [CNRS UMR5123, Villeurbanne (France)

    2003-01-01

    Cats were trained to stay in a containment box, without developing any signs of behavioural stress, while their head was maintained in a position that allowed positron emission tomography (PET) experiments to be performed. The binding potential for [{sup 11}C]raclopride (BP{sub raclo}), a radioligand with good specificity for dopamine (DA) receptors of the D{sub 2} type, was measured in the striatum and in three experimental situations: awake, anaesthetised with ketamine (50 mg kg{sup -1} h{sup -1}; i.m.) and anaesthetised with halothane (1.5%). Non-specific binding was evaluated in the cerebellum. In the striatum of both sides, the BP{sub raclo} was unmodified by ketamine anaesthesia when compared with awake animals. In contrast, a large increase in BP{sub raclo} was observed under halothane anaesthesia. The non-specific binding of [{sup 11}C]raclopride, evaluated in the cerebellum, was also unchanged under ketamine anaesthesia but greatly increased under halothane anaesthesia. To evaluate whether changes in the cerebral blood flow (CBF) resulting from the different experimental situations could be at the root of these discrepancies, injections of [{sup 15}O]H{sub 2}O were performed; measurements revealed a drastically increased CBF under halothane anaesthesia and a slight enhancement under ketamine anaesthesia, when compared with the waking state. These results are the first to be obtained on this topic in awake cats, and show that the BP{sub raclo} is greatly dependent on alterations in the CBF. (orig.)

  6. Sleep in the Cape Mole Rat: A Short-Sleeping Subterranean Rodent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruger, Jean-Leigh; Gravett, Nadine; Bhagwandin, Adhil; Bennett, Nigel C; Archer, Elizabeth K; Manger, Paul R

    2016-01-01

    The Cape mole rat Georychus capensis is a solitary subterranean rodent found in the western and southern Cape of South Africa. This approximately 200-gram bathyergid rodent shows a nocturnal circadian rhythm, but sleep in this species is yet to be investigated. Using telemetric recordings of the electroencephalogram (EEG) and electromyogram (EMG) in conjunction with video recordings, we were able to show that the Cape mole rat, like all other rodents, has sleep periods composed of both rapid eye movement (REM) and slow-wave (non-REM) sleep. These mole rats spent on average 15.4 h awake, 7.1 h in non-REM sleep and 1.5 h in REM sleep each day. Cape mole rats sleep substantially less than other similarly sized terrestrial rodents but have a similar percentage of total sleep time occupied by REM sleep. In addition, the duration of both non-REM and REM sleep episodes was markedly shorter in the Cape mole rat than has been observed in terrestrial rodents. Interestingly, these features (total sleep time and episode duration) are similar to those observed in another subterranean bathyergid mole rat, i.e. Fukomys mechowii. Thus, there appears to be a bathyergid type of sleep amongst the rodents that may be related to their environment and the effect of this on their circadian rhythm. Investigating further species of bathyergid mole rats may fully define the emerging picture of sleep in these subterranean African rodents. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. Application of unfolding transformation in the random matrix theory to analyze in vivo neuronal spike firing during awake and anesthetized conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Risako Kato

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available General anesthetics decrease the frequency and density of spike firing. This effect makes it difficult to detect spike regularity. To overcome this problem, we developed a method utilizing the unfolding transformation which analyzes the energy level statistics in the random matrix theory. We regarded the energy axis as time axis of neuron spike and analyzed the time series of cortical neural firing in vivo. Unfolding transformation detected regularities of neural firing while changes in firing densities were associated with pentobarbital. We found that unfolding transformation enables us to compare firing regularity between awake and anesthetic conditions on a universal scale. Keywords: Unfolding transformation, Spike-timing, Regularity

  8. Disruption of glial function enhances electroacupuncture analgesia in arthritic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Shan; Chen, Wen-Ling; Wang, Pei-Fen; Zhao, Zhi-Qi; Zhang, Yu-Qiu

    2006-04-01

    Activated glia play a major role in mediating behavioral hypersensitive state following peripheral inflammation. Electroacupuncture is well known to relieve persistent inflammatory pain. The present study was undertaken to examine whether fluorocitrate, a glial metabolic inhibitor, could synergize electroacupuncture antagonizing thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia evoked by ankle joint inflammation. Monoarthritis of rat ankle joint was induced by an intra-articular injection of Complete Freund's Adjuvant (CFA). The paw withdrawal latency (PWL) from a thermal stimulus and paw withdrawal threshold (PWT) from von Frey hairs were measured in awake rats. Intrathecal (i.t.) injection of 1 nmol fluorocitrate markedly suppressed monoarthritis-induced thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia. Unilateral electroacupuncture stimulation of "Huantiao" (GB30) and "Yanglingquan" (GB34) acupuncture points (100/2 Hz alternation, 1-2-3 mA) significantly elevated the PWLs and PWTs for 45 min after cessation of electroacupuncture in monoarthritic rats. Co-application of 0.1 or 1 nmol fluorocitrate with electroacupuncture significantly potentiated electroacupuncture analgesia, although 0.1 nmol fluorocitrate alone had no effect on PWLs and PWTs in monoarthritic rats. These results suggested that electroacupuncture and disrupting glial function could synergistically antagonize inflammatory pain, which might provide a potential strategy for the treatment of arthritic pain.

  9. [Relationship between the prone position and achieving head control at 3 months].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Machado, J L; Rodríguez-Fuentes, G

    2013-10-01

    Owing to the significant increase of mild motor delays and the strong intolerance of infants to be placed on prone position observed in the Physiotherapy Unit of the Maternal and Children's University Hospital of the Canaries (HUMIC), a study was conducted to determine whether positioning infants in the prone position while awake affected the achievement and quality of head control at three months. A prospective comparative practice-based study of a representative sample of 67 healthy infants born in the HUMIC, and divided into an experimental group (n = 35) and control group (n = 32). The Alberta Infant Motor Scale (AIMS) and a parent questionnaire were used as measurement tools. The intervention consisted of regular home visits to the experimental group (from the first to the third month). The two groups were evaluated in their homes at the end of 3 months. The differences in mean raw score of the AIMS at 3 months were, 16.26 in the experimental group and 10.38 in control group (P<.001). The percentile mean was 94 in the experimental group, and less than 50 (42) in the control group. All of the experimental group babies achieved the head control, with only 8 in the control group (25%). The significant findings suggest a direct relationship between the time spent in the prone position when the baby is awake and the achievement of head control at three months. Copyright © 2012 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  10. Mechanical effects of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation of upper airway muscles in awake obstructive sleep apnoea subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rousseau, Eric; Gakwaya, Simon; Melo-Silva, César Augusto; Sériès, Frédéric

    2015-04-20

    -limitation pattern always occurred after PNMS. A decrease in V̇I,max and an increase in ΔV̇I occurred following rTMS applied during inspiration, and POro,peak values were more negative with both inspiratory and expiratory rTMS. The GGAmp also increased significantly from the second to the last rTMS expiratory train twitch. All other parameters remained unchanged. These results suggest the following conclusions: (i) rTMS does not improve UA mechanical properties in awake subjects with OSA; (ii) the activation pattern of UA muscles differs following isolated twitch and repetitive cortical stimulation of the genioglossus; and (iii) rTMS applied during expiration induces corticomotor facilitation. © 2015 The Authors. Experimental Physiology © 2015 The Physiological Society.

  11. Infusion of low dose glyceryl trinitrate has no consistent effect on burrowing behavior, running wheel activity and light sensitivity in female rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Sarah Louise T; Petersen, Steffen; Sørensen, Dorte Bratbo

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Glyceryl trinitrate induces headache during infusion to man and migraine patients develop an additional migraine attack a few hours after the infusion. Recently, we have moved this model into rat with the intention of developing an animal model predictive of migraine therapy...... trinitrate on these behaviors in female rats was observed. Results: Burrowing behavior and running wheel activity were stable in the individual rat between experiments. The burrowing behavior was significantly affected by the stage of estrous cycle. The other assays were stable throughout the cycle. None...... testing and the effect of i.v. glyceryl trinitrate infusion to awake rats in three behavioral assays. Of the assays evaluated, only light sensitivity was capable of detecting changes after glyceryl trinitrate infusion but, this was not repeatable. Thus, the infusion of a low dose glyceryl trinitrate...

  12. Comparison of high-definition oscillometry -- a non-invasive technology for arterial blood pressure measurement -- with a direct invasive method using radio-telemetry in awake healthy cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martel, Eric; Egner, Beate; Brown, Scott A; King, Jonathan N; Laveissiere, Arnaud; Champeroux, Pascal; Richard, Serge

    2013-12-01

    This study compared indirect blood pressure measurements using a non-invasive method, high-definition oscillometry (HDO), with direct measurements using a radio-telemetry device in awake cats. Paired measurements partitioned to five sub-ranges were collected in six cats using both methods. The results were analysed for assessment of correlation and agreement between the two methods, taking into account all pressure ranges, and with data separated in three sub-groups, low, normal and high ranges of systolic (SBP) and diastolic (DBP) blood pressure. SBP data displayed a mean correlation coefficient of 0.92 ± 0.02 that was reduced for low SBP. The agreement level evaluated from the whole data set was high and slightly reduced for low SBP values. The mean correlation coefficient of DBP was lower than for SBP (ie, 0.81 ± 0.02). The bias for DBP between the two methods was 22.3 ± 1.6 mmHg, suggesting that HDO produced lower values than telemetry. These results suggest that HDO met the validation criteria defined by the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine consensus panel and provided a faithful measurement of SBP in conscious cats. For DBP, results suggest that HDO tended to underestimate DBP. This finding is clearly inconsistent with the good agreement reported in dogs, but is similar to outcomes achieved in marmosets and cynomolgus monkeys, suggesting that this is not related to HDO but is species related. The data support that the HDO is the first and only validated non-invasive blood pressure device and, as such, it is the only non-invasive reference technique that should be used in future validation studies.

  13. arXiv Novel diagnostic for precise measurement of the modulation frequency of Seeded Self-Modulation via Coherent Transition Radiation in AWAKE

    CERN Document Server

    Braunmueller, F.; Alberti, S.; Muggli, P.

    We present the set-up and test-measurements of a waveguide-integrated heterodyne diagnostic for coherent transition radiation (CTR) in the AWAKE experiment. The goal of the proof-of-principle experiment AWAKE is to accelerate a witness electron bunch in the plasma wakefield of a long proton bunch that is transformed by Seeded Self-Modulation (SSM) into a train of proton micro-bunches. The CTR pulse of the self-modulated proton bunch is expected to have a frequency in the range of 90-300 GHz and a duration of 300-700 ps. The diagnostic set-up, which is designed to precisely measure the frequency and shape of this CTR-pulse, consists of two waveguide-integrated receivers that are able to measure simultaneously. They cover a significant fraction of the available plasma frequencies: the bandwidth 90-140 GHz as well as the bandwidth 255-270 GHz or 170-260 GHz in an earlier or a latter version of the set-up, respectively. The two mixers convert the CTR into a signal in the range of 5-20 GHz that is measured on a fa...

  14. Intraoperative monitoring of an aspect of executive functions: administration of the Stroop test in 9 adult patients during awake surgery for resection of frontal glioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wager, Michel; Du Boisgueheneuc, Foucaud; Pluchon, Claudette; Bouyer, Coline; Stal, Veronique; Bataille, Benoit; Guillevin, Carole Menuel; Gil, Roger

    2013-06-01

    Awake brain surgery allows extensive intraoperative monitoring of not only motor and sensory functions and language but also executive functions. To administer the Stroop test intraoperatively to avoid dramatic side effects such as akinetic mutism and to monitor executive functions in an attempt to optimize the benefit/risk balance of surgery. A series of 9 adult patients with frontal glioma were operated on for gross tumor resection under local anesthesia. All procedures involved the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC). Three types of response to the Stroop test were observed: 3 patients had a Stroop effect only for stimulation of the contralateral ACC; 3 patients had a Stroop effect for stimulation of the ipsilateral ACC; and 3 patients had no Stroop effect. Preoperative and postoperative neuropsychological and surgical results are presented and discussed. Stimulation sites eliciting a Stroop effect are compared with published image-based data, and insight provided by these surgical data regarding ACC function and plasticity is discussed. No operative complication related to intraoperative administration of the Stroop test was observed. Administration of the Stroop test during resection of gliomas involving the ACC in adult patients is an option for intraoperative monitoring of executive functions during awake surgery. Globally, these results suggest functional compensation, mediated by plasticity mechanisms, by contralateral homologous regions of the ACC in adult patients with frontal glioma.

  15. Comparative randomised study of GlideScope®video laryngoscope versus flexible fibre-optic bronchoscope for awake nasal intubation of oropharyngeal cancer patients with anticipated difficult intubation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahran, Essam Abd El-Halim; Hassan, Mohamed Elsayed

    2016-12-01

    Awake flexible fibre-optic bronchoscope (FFS) is the standard method of intubation in difficult airway in oral cancer patients. We decided to evaluate GlideScope ® video laryngoscope (GL) for intubation as compared to the standard FFS for nasal intubation in such patients. After the ethical committee approval, we included 54 oropharyngeal cancer patients divided randomly into two equal groups: Group G and Group F. After pre-medication and pre-oxygenation, awake nasal intubation was performed using GL in Group G and FFS in Group F. In both groups, we compared intubation time in seconds (mean ± standard deviation) (primary outcome), success rate of the first intubation attempt, percentage of Cormack and Lehane glottic score and incidence of complications. We assumed that GL could be a suitable alternative for the standard FFS in nasal intubation of patients with oropharyngeal cancer. Success rate of the first attempt and Cormack and Lehane glottic score were compared using Chi-square test. Intubation time in seconds was significantly shorter in Group G (70.85 ± 8.88 S) than in Group F (90.26 ± 9.41 S) with ( P Cormack and Lehane glottic Score I and II showed insignificant difference between both Group G (92.6%) and Group F (96.3%). We detected three cases of sore throat in each group. GlideScope ® could be a suitable alternative to FFS in nasal intubation of oropharyngeal cancer patients.

  16. Measurement of cortical functional activation in awake mice using two-photon microscopy and a novel pO2-sensitive probe(Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sencan, Ikbal; Esipova, Tatiana V.; Kilic, Kivilcim; Li, Baoqiang; Desjardins, Michèle; Yaseen, Mohammad A.; Wang, Hui; Jaswal, Rajeshwer S.; Kura, Sreekanth; Fu, Buyin; Boas, David A.; Devor, Anna; Sakadžić, Sava; Vinogradov, Sergei A.

    2017-02-01

    We characterized cortical microvascular PO2 and blood flow changes in response to whisker stimulation in awake mice. The measurements were performed by combining two-photon microscopy imaging of the cortical oxygenation and optical coherence tomography imaging of the cerebral blood flow. In order to perform fast spatio-temporally resolved measurements of PO2, we used a newly-developed oxygen-sensitive probe PtG-2P, which has significantly higher brightness than the established two-photon-enhanced oxygen sensor PtP-C343. We characterized the performance of the new probe in vivo and mapped the amplitudes and shapes (e.g. initial dip, overshoot, and post stimulus undershoot) of the PO2 changes as a function of the vessel type (e.g., arterioles, capillaries, and venules) and a distance from the activation center. The measurements in the awake mice are not affected by the confounding factors of anesthesia on the animal physiology, including the level of cerebral metabolism and the amplitude and speed of neuronal and vascular responses. Our results will help to understand changes in oxygenation and blood flow on the cortical microvascular scale, will lead to improved understanding of the cerebral physiology, pathophysiology and will improve quantitative interpretation of fMRI signals.

  17. Essays on Educational Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ampaabeng, Samuel Kofi

    2013-01-01

    This dissertation examines the determinants of student outcomes--achievement, attainment, occupational choices and earnings--in three different contexts. The first two chapters focus on Ghana while the final chapter focuses on the US state of Massachusetts. In the first chapter, I exploit the incidence of famine and malnutrition that resulted to…

  18. Correlates of Achievement Motivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiteside, Marilyn

    1978-01-01

    Undergraduates given a self-concept scale, a sentence completion exercise, and story cues related to academic achievement generally expressed positive attitudes toward success; but students of both sexes with high self-esteem tended to associate success with a male, and those with lower self-esteem attributed success to a female. (Author)

  19. Advancing Student Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walberg, Herbert J.

    2010-01-01

    For the last half century, higher spending and many modern reforms have failed to raise the achievement of students in the United States to the levels of other economically advanced countries. A possible explanation, says Herbert Walberg, is that much current education theory is ill informed about scientific psychology, often drawing on fads and…

  20. NCLB: Achievement Robin Hood?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bracey, Gerald W.

    2008-01-01

    In his "Wall Street Journal" op-ed on the 25th of anniversary of "A Nation At Risk", former assistant secretary of education Chester E. Finn Jr. applauded the report for turning U.S. education away from equality and toward achievement. It was not surprising, then, that in mid-2008, Finn arranged a conference to examine the…

  1. Activation-induced resetting of cerebral oxygen and glucose uptake in the rat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, P L; Linde, R; Hasselbalch, S G

    1998-01-01

    uptake increased disproportionately to cerebral oxygen uptake, and the cerebral oxygen to glucose uptake ratio was 4.2. The accumulated excess glucose uptake during 6 minutes of activation amounted to 2.4 micromol/g. Activation was terminated by closure of the sheltering box. In the postactivation period......In the clinical setting it has been shown that activation will increase cerebral glucose uptake in excess of cerebral oxygen uptake. To study this phenomenon further, this study presents an experimental setup that enables precise determination of the ratio between cerebral uptake of glucose...... and oxygen in the awake rat. Global CBF was measured by the Kety-Schmidt technique, and the ratio between cerebral uptake rates for oxygen, glucose, and lactate was calculated from cerebral arterial-venous differences. During baseline conditions, rats were kept in a closed box designed to minimize...

  2. A method for calculating the gas volume proportions and inhalation temperature of inert gas mixtures allowing reaching normothermic or hypothermic target body temperature in the awake rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacques H Abraini

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The noble gases xenon (Xe and helium (He are known to possess neuroprotective properties. Xe is considered the golden standard neuroprotective gas. However, Xe has a higher molecular weight and lower thermal conductivity and specific heat than those of nitrogen, the main diluent of oxygen (O2 in air, conditions that could impair or at least reduce the intrinsic neuroprotective properties of Xe by increasing the critical care patient's respiratory workload and body temperature. In contrast, He has a lower molecular weight and higher thermal conductivity and specific heat than those of nitrogen, but is unfortunately far less potent than Xe at providing neuroprotection. Therefore, combining Xe with He could allow obtaining, depending on the gas inhalation temperature and composition, gas mixtures with neutral or hypothermic properties, the latter being advantageous in term of neuroprotection. However, calculating the thermal properties of a mixture, whatever the substances – gases, metals, rubbers, etc. – is not trivial. To answer this question, we provide a graphical method to assess the volume proportions of Xe, He and O2 that a gas mixture should contain, and the inhalation temperature to which it should be administered to allow a clinician to maintain the patient at a target body temperature.

  3. A method for calculating the gas volume proportions and inhalation temperature of inert gas mixtures allowing reaching normothermic or hypothermic target body temperature in the awake rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraini, Jacques H; David, Hélène N; Blatteau, Jean-Éric; Risso, Jean Jacques; Vallée, Nicolas

    2017-01-01

    The noble gases xenon (Xe) and helium (He) are known to possess neuroprotective properties. Xe is considered the golden standard neuroprotective gas. However, Xe has a higher molecular weight and lower thermal conductivity and specific heat than those of nitrogen, the main diluent of oxygen (O2) in air, conditions that could impair or at least reduce the intrinsic neuroprotective properties of Xe by increasing the critical care patient's respiratory workload and body temperature. In contrast, He has a lower molecular weight and higher thermal conductivity and specific heat than those of nitrogen, but is unfortunately far less potent than Xe at providing neuroprotection. Therefore, combining Xe with He could allow obtaining, depending on the gas inhalation temperature and composition, gas mixtures with neutral or hypothermic properties, the latter being advantageous in term of neuroprotection. However, calculating the thermal properties of a mixture, whatever the substances - gases, metals, rubbers, etc . - is not trivial. To answer this question, we provide a graphical method to assess the volume proportions of Xe, He and O2 that a gas mixture should contain, and the inhalation temperature to which it should be administered to allow a clinician to maintain the patient at a target body temperature.

  4. High frequency action potential bursts (≥ 100 Hz) in L2/3 and L5B thick tufted neurons in anaesthetized and awake rat primary somatosensory cortex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.P.J. de Kock (Christiaan); B. Sakmann (Bert)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractHigh frequency (≥ 100 Hz) bursts of action potentials (APs) generated by neocortical neurons are thought to increase information content and, through back-propagation, to influence synaptic integration and efficacy in distal dendritic compartments. It was recently shown in acute slice

  5. Fear Expression Suppresses Medial Prefrontal Cortical Firing in Rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas F Giustino

    Full Text Available The medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC plays a crucial role in emotional learning and memory in rodents and humans. While many studies suggest a differential role for the prelimbic (PL and infralimbic (IL subdivisions of mPFC, few have considered the relationship between neural activity in these two brain regions recorded simultaneously in behaving animals. Importantly, how concurrent PL and IL activity relate to conditioned freezing behavior is largely unknown. Here we used single-unit recordings targeting PL and IL in awake, behaving rats during the acquisition and expression of conditioned fear. On Day 1, rats received either signaled or unsignaled footshocks in the recording chamber; an auditory conditioned stimulus (CS preceded signaled footshocks. Twenty-four hours later, animals were returned to the recording chamber (modified to create a novel context where they received 5 CS-alone trials. After fear conditioning, both signaled and unsignaled rats exhibited high levels of post-shock freezing that was associated with an enduring suppression of mPFC spontaneous firing, particularly in the IL of signaled rats. Twenty-four hours later, CS presentation produced differential conditioned freezing in signaled and unsignaled rats: freezing increased in rats that had received signaled shocks, but decreased in animals in the unsignaled condition (i.e., external inhibition. This group difference in CS-evoked freezing was mirrored in the spontaneous firing rate of neurons in both PL and IL. Interestingly, differences in PL and IL firing rate highly correlated with freezing levels. In other words, in the signaled group IL spontaneous rates were suppressed relative to PL, perhaps limiting IL-mediated suppression of fear and allowing PL activity to dominate performance, resulting in high levels of freezing. This was not observed in the unsignaled group, which exhibited low freezing. These data reveal that the activity of mPFC neurons is modulated by both

  6. Influence of narcotics on luminance and frequency modulated visual evoked potentials in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jehle, T; Ehlken, D; Wingert, K; Feuerstein, T J; Bach, M; Lagrèze, W A

    2009-06-01

    Quantification of visual function is essential for the impact of disease models and their treatment. Recently, we introduced a chronic implant model to record visual evoked potentials (VEP) in awake Brown-Norway rats. Here, we investigated the hemispheric distribution of VEP after monocular stimulation, the chronic electrode implantation and the influence of commonly used anesthetics. Potentials were recorded by electrodes, implanted epidurally over the superior colliculus. The entire visual field of the rat was stimulated. Flicker stimuli were modulated in luminance with a modulation depth from 5 to 80% at 7.5 Hz and flashes with a modulation depth of >95% in a frequency range of 2.9-38 Hz. Recordings were constant over 9 days. When one eye was blinded, the potentials recorded from the contralateral side were not affected, while the potentials of the ipsilateral side were markedly reduced. Further, potentials of awake animals were compared with those receiving general anesthetics. For one group of rats (n = 8), we administered isoflurane by inhalation in five concentrations. Four different groups (n = 7-11) were given choralhydrate (200 and 400 mg/kg) and the combination of ketamine/xyaline (65/7 or 130/14 mg/kg, respectively) intraperitoneally. Isoflurane depressed the VEP in a concentration-dependent manner. Treatment with chloralhydrate and ketamine/xyaline increased the VEP at low concentrations and depressed it in high concentrations. The new VEP paradigm assesses distinct qualities of contrast vision in rats. All tested narcotics alter VEP amplitudes and can be avoided.

  7. Surgery for gliomas involving the left inferior parietal lobule: new insights into the functional anatomy provided by stimulation mapping in awake patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maldonado, Igor Lima; Moritz-Gasser, Sylvie; de Champfleur, Nicolas Menjot; Bertram, Luc; Moulinié, Gérard; Duffau, Hugues

    2011-10-01

    Surgery in the left dominant inferior parietal lobule (IPL) is challenging because of a high density of somatosensory and language structures, both in the cortex and white matter. In the present study, on the basis of the results provided by direct cerebral stimulation in awake patients, the authors revisit the anatomofunctional aspects of surgery within the left IPL. Fourteen consecutive patients underwent awake craniotomy for a glioma involving the left IPL. Intraoperative motor, sensory, and language mapping was performed before and during the tumor removal, at both the cortical and subcortical levels, to optimize the extent of resection, which was determined based on functional boundaries. Anatomofunctional correlations were performed by combining the results of intraoperative mapping and those provided by pre- and postoperative MR imaging. At the cortical level, the primary somatosensory area (retrocentral gyrus) limited the resection anteriorly in all cases, at least partially. Less frequently, speech arrest or articulatory problems were observed within the parietal operculum (4 cases). The lateral limit was determined by language sites that were variably distributed. Anomia was the most frequent response (9 cases) at the posterior third of the superior (and/or middle) temporal gyrus. Posteriorly, less reproducible reorganized language sites were seldom observed in the posterior portion of the angular gyrus (2 cases). At the subcortical level, in addition to somatosensory responses due to stimulation of the thalamocortical pathways, articulatory disturbances were induced by stimulation of white matter in the anterior and lateral part of the surgical cavity (11 cases). This tract anatomically corresponds to the horizontal portion of the lateral segment of the superior longitudinal fascicle (SLF III). Deeper and superiorly, phonemic paraphasia was the main language disturbance (12 cases), elicited by stimulation of the posterosuperior portion of the arcuate

  8. Achievement in Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-03-01

    Naomi Moran, a student at the Arnewood School, New Milton, Hampshire was the first recipient of the `Achievement in Physics' prize awarded by the South Central Branch of The Institute of Physics. Naomi received an award certificate and cheque for £100 from Dr Ruth Fenn, Chairman of the Branch, at the annual Christmas lecture held at the University of Surrey in December. She is pictured with Dr Fenn and Steve Beith, physics teacher at the Arnewood School.  Photo Figure 1. Naomi Moran receiving her award (photograph courtesy of Peter Milford). The award is intended to celebrate personal achievement in physics at any level at age 16-17 and is not restricted to those who gain the highest academic results. Schools across the county were invited to nominate suitable candidates; Naomi's nomination by the school's deputy head of science impressed the judges because of her ability to grasp the most difficult parts of the subject quickly, in addition to the fact that she took her AS-level science in year 11 when she was only 16. She is currently studying A-level physics, chemistry and mathematics and hopes to continue her studies at university later this year.

  9. NATIC achievement report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-03-01

    This paper reports the achievements of the MAnufacturing Technology supported by advanced and integrated Information system through international Cooperation (MATIC) ended in March 1999. The MATIC project is intended to develop international information systems to support manufacturing process from design to production through an international network in order to upgrade the manufacturing and supporting industries in Asian countries. The project has been completed by support provided by a large number of Japanese corporations and research institutes, and the counterparts in China, Indonesia, Malaysia, Singapore and Thailand. The developed prototype systems cover the three areas of automobile, electronics, textile and apparel industries. Demonstration tests have verified the functions thereof. In the automobile industry field, development was made on a system to link Japanese research and development corporations with Indonesian parts making corporations, and a system to exchange technological data between Indonesia and Thailand. In the electronics industry field, development was performed on an electronic catalog system to link Indonesia, Malaysia, Singapore and Thailand. (NEDO)

  10. Achieving diagnosis by consensus

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kane, Bridget

    2009-08-01

    This paper provides an analysis of the collaborative work conducted at a multidisciplinary medical team meeting, where a patient’s definitive diagnosis is agreed, by consensus. The features that distinguish this process of diagnostic work by consensus are examined in depth. The current use of technology to support this collaborative activity is described, and experienced deficiencies are identified. Emphasis is placed on the visual and perceptual difficulty for individual specialities in making interpretations, and on how, through collaboration in discussion, definitive diagnosis is actually achieved. The challenge for providing adequate support for the multidisciplinary team at their meeting is outlined, given the multifaceted nature of the setting, i.e. patient management, educational, organizational and social functions, that need to be satisfied.

  11. Achieving Kaiser Permanente quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McHugh, Matthew D; Aiken, Linda H; Eckenhoff, Myra E; Burns, Lawton R

    2016-01-01

    The Kaiser Permanente model of integrated health delivery is highly regarded for high-quality and efficient health care. Efforts to reproduce Kaiser's success have mostly failed. One factor that has received little attention and that could explain Kaiser's advantage is its commitment to and investment in nursing as a key component of organizational culture and patient-centered care. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of Kaiser's nursing organization in promoting quality of care. This was a cross-sectional analysis of linked secondary data from multiple sources, including a detailed survey of nurses, for 564 adult, general acute care hospitals from California, Florida, Pennsylvania, and New Jersey in 2006-2007. We used logistic regression models to examine whether patient (mortality and failure-to-rescue) and nurse (burnout, job satisfaction, and intent-to-leave) outcomes in Kaiser hospitals were better than in non-Kaiser hospitals. We then assessed whether differences in nursing explained outcomes differences between Kaiser and other hospitals. Finally, we examined whether Kaiser hospitals compared favorably with hospitals known for having excellent nurse work environments-Magnet hospitals. Patient and nurse outcomes in Kaiser hospitals were significantly better compared with non-Magnet hospitals. Kaiser hospitals had significantly better nurse work environments, staffing levels, and more nurses with bachelor's degrees. Differences in nursing explained a significant proportion of the Kaiser outcomes advantage. Kaiser hospital outcomes were comparable with Magnet hospitals, where better outcomes have been largely explained by differences in nursing. An important element in Kaiser's success is its investment in professional nursing, which may not be evident to systems seeking to achieve Kaiser's advantage. Our results suggest that a possible strategy for achieving outcomes like Kaiser may be for hospitals to consider Magnet designation, a proven and

  12. Achieving closure at Fernald

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradburne, John; Patton, Tisha C.

    2001-02-25

    When Fluor Fernald took over the management of the Fernald Environmental Management Project in 1992, the estimated closure date of the site was more than 25 years into the future. Fluor Fernald, in conjunction with DOE-Fernald, introduced the Accelerated Cleanup Plan, which was designed to substantially shorten that schedule and save taxpayers more than $3 billion. The management of Fluor Fernald believes there are three fundamental concerns that must be addressed by any contractor hoping to achieve closure of a site within the DOE complex. They are relationship management, resource management and contract management. Relationship management refers to the interaction between the site and local residents, regulators, union leadership, the workforce at large, the media, and any other interested stakeholder groups. Resource management is of course related to the effective administration of the site knowledge base and the skills of the workforce, the attraction and retention of qualified a nd competent technical personnel, and the best recognition and use of appropriate new technologies. Perhaps most importantly, resource management must also include a plan for survival in a flat-funding environment. Lastly, creative and disciplined contract management will be essential to effecting the closure of any DOE site. Fluor Fernald, together with DOE-Fernald, is breaking new ground in the closure arena, and ''business as usual'' has become a thing of the past. How Fluor Fernald has managed its work at the site over the last eight years, and how it will manage the new site closure contract in the future, will be an integral part of achieving successful closure at Fernald.

  13. Predictors of failure of awake regional anesthesia for neonatal hernia repair: data from the General Anesthesia compared to Spinal anesthesia (GAS) study: comparing apnoea and neurodevelopmental outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frawley, Geoff; Bell, Graham; Disma, Nicola; Withington, Davinia E.; de Graaff, Jurgen C.; Morton, Neil S.; McCann, Mary Ellen; Arnup, Sarah J.; Bagshaw, Oliver; Wolfler, Andrea; Bellinger, David; Davidson, Andrew J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Awake regional anesthesia (RA) is a viable alternative to general anesthesia (GA) for infants undergoing lower abdominal surgery. Benefits include lower incidence of postoperative apnea and avoidance of anesthetic agents that may increase neuroapoptosis and worsen neurocognitive outcomes. The General Anesthesia compared to Spinal anesthesia (GAS) study compares neurodevelopmental outcomes following awake RA or GA in otherwise healthy infants. Our aim was to describe success and failure rates of RA in this study and report factors associated with failure. Methods This was a nested cohort study within a prospective randomized, controlled, observer blind, equivalence trial. Seven hundred twenty two infants ≤ 60 weeks postmenstrual age, scheduled for herniorrhaphy under anesthesia were randomly assigned to receive RA (spinal, caudal epidural or combined spinal caudal anesthetic) or GA with sevoflurane. The data of 339 infants, where spinal or combined spinal caudal anesthetic was attempted, was analyzed. Possible predictors of failure were assessed including: patient factors, technique, experience of site and anesthetist and type of local anesthetic. Results RA was sufficient for the completion of surgery in 83.2% of patients. Spinal anesthesia was successful in 86.9% of cases and combined spinal caudal anesthetic in 76.1%. Thirty four patients required conversion to GA and an additional 23 (6.8%) required brief sedation. Bloody tap on the first attempt at lumbar puncture was the only risk factor significantly associated with block failure (OR = 2.46). Conclusions The failure rate of spinal anesthesia was low. Variability in application of combined spinal caudal anesthetic limited attempts to compare the success of this technique to spinal alone. PMID:26001028

  14. Comparative randomised study of GlideScope® video laryngoscope versus flexible fibre-optic bronchoscope for awake nasal intubation of oropharyngeal cancer patients with anticipated difficult intubation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Essam Abd El-Halim Mahran

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Awake flexible fibre-optic bronchoscope (FFS is the standard method of intubation in difficult airway in oral cancer patients. We decided to evaluate GlideScope® video laryngoscope (GL for intubation as compared to the standard FFS for nasal intubation in such patients. Methods: After the ethical committee approval, we included 54 oropharyngeal cancer patients divided randomly into two equal groups: Group G and Group F. After pre-medication and pre-oxygenation, awake nasal intubation was performed using GL in Group G and FFS in Group F. In both groups, we compared intubation time in seconds (mean ± standard deviation (primary outcome, success rate of the first intubation attempt, percentage of Cormack and Lehane glottic score and incidence of complications. We assumed that GL could be a suitable alternative for the standard FFS in nasal intubation of patients with oropharyngeal cancer. Success rate of the first attempt and Cormack and Lehane glottic score were compared using Chi-square test. Results: Intubation time in seconds was significantly shorter in Group G (70.85 ± 8.88 S than in Group F (90.26 ± 9.41 S with (P < 0.001. The success rate of the first attempt intubation was slightly higher in Group G (81.5% than Group F (78.8%. Cormack and Lehane glottic Score I and II showed insignificant difference between both Group G (92.6% and Group F (96.3%. We detected three cases of sore throat in each group. Conclusion: GlideScope® could be a suitable alternative to FFS in nasal intubation of oropharyngeal cancer patients.

  15. Asleep Robot-Assisted Surgery for the Implantation of Subthalamic Electrodes Provides the Same Clinical Improvement and Therapeutic Window as Awake Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefranc, Michel; Zouitina, Yassine; Tir, Mélissa; Merle, Philippe; Ouendo, Martial; Constans, Jean-Marc; Godefroy, Olivier; Peltier, Johann; Krystkowiak, Pierre

    2017-10-01

    To study the impact of not performing awake clinical evaluation during the robot-assisted implantation of subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation (STN-DBS) electrodes on the stimulation parameters and clinical outcomes in patients with Parkinson disease (PD). A total of 23 patients with PD underwent robot-assisted surgery for the bilateral implantation of STN-DBS electrodes. Thirteen patients received general anesthesia (GA) and a limited intraoperative evaluation (side effects only), and the other 10 patients received local anesthesia (LA) and a full evaluation. The primary endpoint was the therapeutic window (TW), defined as the difference between the mean voltage threshold for motor improvement and the mean voltage threshold for side effects in the active contacts at 12 months after surgery. Motor scores were measured as well. The TW was similar in the LA and GA groups, with mean ± standard deviation values of 2.06 ± 0.53 V and 2.28 ± 0.99 V, respectively (P = 0.32). In the short term, the Unified Parkinson Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) III score in the "off-drug, on-stim" condition fell to a similar extent in the LA and GA groups (by 40.3% and 49%, respectively; P = 0.336), as did the UPDRS III score in the "on-stim, on-drug" condition (by 57% and 70.7%, respectively; P = 0.36). Asleep, robot-assisted implantation of STN-DBS electrodes (with accurate identification of the STN and positioning of the DBS lead) produced the same motor results and TW as awake surgery. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Noninvasive measurements of body composition and body water via quantitative magnetic resonance, deuterium water, and dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry in awake and sedated dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanghi, Brian M; Cupp, Carolyn J; Pan, Yuanlong; Tissot-Favre, Delphine G; Milgram, Norton W; Nagy, Tim R; Dobson, Howard

    2013-05-01

    To compare quantitative magnetic resonance (QMR), dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA), and deuterium oxide (D2O) methods for measurement of total body water (TBW), lean body mass (LBM), and fat mass (FM) in healthy dogs and to assess QMR accuracy. 58 Beagles (9 months to 11.5 years old). QMR scans were performed on awake dogs. A D2O tracer was administered (100 mg/kg, PO) immediately before dogs were sedated, which was followed by a second QMR or DXA scan. Jugular blood samples were collected before and 120 minutes after D2O administration. TBW, LBM, and FM determined via QMR were not significantly different between awake or sedated dogs, and means differed by only 2.0%, 2.2%, and 4.3%, respectively. Compared with results for D2O dilution, QMR significantly underestimated TBW (10.2%), LBM (13.4%), and FM (15.4%). Similarly, DXA underestimated LBM (7.3%) and FM (8.4%). A significant relationship was detected between FM measured via D2O dilution and QMR (r(2) > 0.89) or DXA (r(2) > 0.88). Even though means of TBW and LBM differed significantly between D2O dilution and QMR or DXA, values were highly related (r(2) > 0.92). QMR was useful for determining body composition in dogs and can be used to safely and rapidly acquire accurate data without the need for sedation or anesthesia. These benefits can facilitate frequent scans, particularly in geriatric, extremely young, or ill pets. Compared with the D2O dilution method, QMR correction equations provided accurate assessment over a range of body compositions.

  17. Learning-dependent and -independent enhancement of mitral/tufted cell glomerular odor responses following olfactory fear conditioning in awake mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Jordan M; Fletcher, Max L

    2018-04-18

    Associative fear learning produces fear toward the conditioned stimulus (CS) and often generalization, the expansion of fear from the CS to similar, unlearned stimuli. However, how fear learning affects early sensory processing of learned and unlearned stimuli in relation to behavioral fear responses to these stimuli remains unclear. We subjected male and female mice expressing the fluorescent calcium indicator GCaMP3 in olfactory bulb mitral and tufted cells to a classical olfactory fear conditioning paradigm. We then used awake, in vivo calcium imaging to quantify learning-induced changes in glomerular odor responses, which constitute the first site of olfactory processing in the brain. The results demonstrate that odor-shock pairing non-specifically enhances glomerular odor representations in a learning-dependent manner and increases representational similarity between the CS and non-conditioned odors, potentially priming the system towards generalization of learned fear. Additionally, CS-specific glomerular enhancements remain even when associative learning is blocked, suggesting two separate mechanisms lead to enhanced glomerular responses following odor-shock pairings. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT In the olfactory bulb (OB), odors are uniquely coded in a spatial map that represents odor identity, making the OB a unique model system for investigating how learned fear alters sensory processing. Classical fear conditioning causes fear of the conditioned stimulus (CS) and of neutral stimuli, known as generalization. Combining fear conditioning with fluorescent calcium imaging of OB glomeruli, we found enhanced glomerular responses of the CS as well as neutral stimuli in awake mice, which mirrors fear generalization. We report that CS and neutral stimuli enhancements are, respectively, learning- independent and learning-dependent. Together, these results reveal distinct mechanisms leading to enhanced OB processing of fear-inducing stimuli and provide important

  18. A gliotoxin model of occipital seizures in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirsattari, Seyed M; Shen, Bixia; Leung, L Stan; Rajakumar, Nagalingam

    2008-09-01

    Intracortical microinjection of fluorocitrate, a reversible inhibitor of glial tricarboxylic acid (TCA), results in impaired glial metabolism and epileptic seizures. To determine the potential contribution of epileptic activities to the metabolic properties of fluorocitrate, we investigated the seizure-inducing property of fluorocitrate at different doses. Twenty-seven male Sprague Dawley rats (250-400g) were studied with chronically implanted electrodes and cannulae in the occipital cortices. A week after surgery, awake behaving rats were injected with 0.2microl solution containing various concentrations of fluorocitrate or saline in the right occipital cortex; two sham-treated animals did not receive an injection. EEG was recorded with implanted electrodes. Thionin staining was used to verify injection sites. Twenty rats underwent immunohistochemistry for glial fibrilary acidic protein (GFAP) and neuronal nuclear-specific antigen (NeuN) 48h after the injections. Seizures developed within an hour of injection in all the rats that received > or =0.8nmol fluorocitrate and 2 of 4 rats that received 0.4nmol fluorocitrate. Five of 12 animals that received > or =1.2nmol fluorocitrate experienced status epilepticus. There was a significant increase in GFAP staining at the injection site in doses > or =0.8nmol fluorocitrate. There was only mild neuronal loss revealed by NeuN staining at the injection site in the animals that had received 1.6nmol flourocitrate. This study shows that fluorocitrate results in focal epileptic seizures with secondary generalization in a dose-dependent manner, including low doses of this agent previously used for studies of brain metabolism.

  19. Beneficial effects of regular exercise on sleep in old F344 rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco-Centurion, C A; Shiromani, P J

    2006-12-01

    With aging there is a significant decline in the normal architecture of sleep and a reduction in the diurnal amplitude of core body temperature. Regular moderate exercise has been shown to have a positive impact in the elderly and here we investigate whether sleep-wake patterning can also be improved. Young (3 months) and old (22 months) F344 rats were exercised once a day for 50min at night onset over an 8-week period. Thereafter, polysomnographic recordings were obtained immediately after exercise. To determine the lasting consequences of exercise, sleep was also recorded 2 days and 2 weeks after exercise had ended. Old rats that were exercised had a significant weight loss, were awake more during the last third of their active period, had less sleep fragmentation and the amplitude of the diurnal rhythm of core body temperature was significantly increased. Old exercised rats also had an overall increase in the amplitude of EEG power (0.5-16Hz) during wake and theta EEG power during REM sleep. In young rats regular exercise increased EEG delta power (0.5-4Hz) during NREM sleep. Our data indicate regular exercise in old rats improves sleep architecture, EEG power and diurnal rhythm of temperature.

  20. Recent achievements of SIRGAS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunini, C.; Sánchez, L.

    2008-05-01

    SIRGAS is the geocentric reference system for the Americas. Its definition corresponds to the IERS International Terrestrial Reference System (ITRS) and it is realized by a regional densification of the IERS International Terrestrial Reference Frame (ITRF). The SIRGAS activities are coordinated by three working groups: SIRGAS-WGI (Reference System) is committed to establish and maintain a continental-wide geocentric reference frame within the ITRF. This objective was initially accomplished through two continental GPS campaigns in 1995 and 2000, including 58 and 184 stations, respectively. Today, it is realized by around 130 continuously operating GNSS sites, which are processed weekly by the IGS Regional Network Associate Analysis Centre for SIRGAS (IGS- RNAAC-SIR). SIRGAS-WGII (Geocentric Datum) is primarily in charged of defining the SIRGAS geodetic datum in the individual countries, which is given by the origin, orientation and scale of the SIRGAS system, and the parameters of the GRS80 ellipsoid. It is concentrating on promoting and supporting the adoption of SIRGAS in the Latin American and Caribbean countries through national densifications of the continental network. SIRGAS- WGIII (Vertical Datum) is dedicated to the definition and realization of a unified vertical reference system within a global frame. Its central purpose is to refer the geopotential numbers (or physical heights) in all countries to one and the same equipotential surface (W0), which must be globally defined. This includes also the transformation of the existing height datums into the new system. This study shows the SIRGAS achievements of the last two years.

  1. Entrepreneur achievement. Liaoning province.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, R

    1994-03-01

    This paper reports the successful entrepreneurial endeavors of members of a 20-person women's group in Liaoning Province, China. Jing Yuhong, a member of the Family Planning Association at Shileizi Village, Dalian City, provided the basis for their achievements by first building an entertainment/study room in her home to encourage married women to learn family planning. Once stocked with books, magazines, pamphlets, and other materials on family planning and agricultural technology, dozens of married women in the neighborhood flocked voluntarily to the room. Yuhong also set out to give these women a way to earn their own income as a means of helping then gain greater equality with their husbands and exert greater control over their personal reproductive and social lives. She gave a section of her farming land to the women's group, loaned approximately US$5200 to group members to help them generate income from small business initiatives, built a livestock shed in her garden for the group to raise marmots, and erected an awning behind her house under which mushrooms could be grown. The investment yielded $12,000 in the first year, allowing each woman to keep more than $520 in dividends. Members then soon began going to fairs in the capital and other places to learn about the outside world, and have successfully ventured out on their own to generate individual incomes. Ten out of twenty women engaged in these income-generating activities asked for and got the one-child certificate.

  2. Vietnam: achievements and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran Tien Duc

    1999-01-01

    The Vietnamese Government's successful development of the National Population and Family Planning Program has contributed in raising people's awareness on population issues and changing their attitudes and behavior regarding fostering small families. It has also been found to be very effective in substantially decreasing fertility level. In addition, economic levels of many households have been greatly improved since the adoption of a renovation policy. The advancement of welfare accompanied by the provision of better basic social services, including health services, has boost people's health. Several factors behind the achievements of the National Population and Family Planning Program include: 1) Strengthening of the political commitment of national and local leaders; 2) Nationwide mobilization of mass organizations and NGOs; 3) A strong advocacy and information, education and communication program; 4) Provision of various kinds of contraceptives; 5) Effective management of the program by priority; and 6) Support of the international community. Despite such successes, Vietnam is facing a number of new issues such as enlargement of the work force, shifting migration patterns and accelerating urbanization, aging of population, and change of household structure. Nevertheless, the Government of Vietnam is preparing a New Population Strategy aimed to address these issues.

  3. Caffeine in the neonatal period induces long-lasting changes in sleep and breathing in adult rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montandon, Gaspard; Horner, Richard L; Kinkead, Richard; Bairam, Aida

    2009-11-15

    Caffeine is commonly used clinically to treat apnoeas and unstable breathing associated with premature birth. Caffeine antagonizes adenosine receptors and acts as an efficient respiratory stimulant in neonates. Owing to its persistent effects on adenosine receptor expression in the brain, neonatal caffeine administration also has significant effects on maturation of the respiratory control system. However, since adenosine receptors are critically involved in sleep regulation, and sleep also modulates breathing, we tested the hypothesis that neonatal caffeine treatment disrupts regulation of sleep and breathing in the adult rat. Neonatal caffeine treatment (15 mg kg(-1) day(-1)) was administered from postnatal days 3-12. At adulthood (8-10 weeks old), sleep and breathing were measured with a telemetry system and whole-body plethysmography respectively. In adult rats treated with caffeine during the neonatal period, sleep time was reduced, sleep onset latency was increased, and non-rapid eye movement (non-REM) sleep was fragmented compared to controls. Ventilation at rest was higher in caffeine-treated adult rats compared to controls across sleep/wake states. Hypercapnic ventilatory responses were significantly reduced in caffeine-treated rats compared to control rats across sleep/wake states. Additional experiments in adult anaesthetized rats showed that at similar levels of arterial blood gases, phrenic nerve activity was enhanced in caffeine-treated rats. This study demonstrates that administration of caffeine in the neonatal period alters respiratory control system activity in awake and sleeping rats, as well as in the anaesthetized rats, and also has persistent disrupting effects on sleep that are apparent in adult rats.

  4. Attitude Towards Physics and Additional Mathematics Achievement Towards Physics Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veloo, Arsaythamby; Nor, Rahimah; Khalid, Rozalina

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to identify the difference in students' attitude towards Physics and Additional Mathematics achievement based on gender and relationship between attitudinal variables towards Physics and Additional Mathematics achievement with achievement in Physics. This research focused on six variables, which is attitude towards…

  5. Online High School Achievement versus Traditional High School Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blohm, Katherine E.

    2017-01-01

    The following study examined the question of student achievement in online charter schools and how the achievement scores of students at online charter schools compare to achievement scores of students at traditional schools. Arizona has seen explosive growth in charter schools and online charter schools. A study comparing how these two types of…

  6. Effect of anesthesia on glucose production and utilization in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Penicaud, L.; Ferre, P.; Kande, J.; Leturque, A.; Issad, T.; Girard, J.

    1987-01-01

    This study was undertaken to determine the effects of pentobarbital anesthesia (50 mg/kg ip) on glucose kinetics and individual tissue glucose utilization in vivo, in chronically catheterized rats. Glucose turnover studies were carried out using [3- 3 H] glucose as tracer. A transient hyperglycemia and an increased glucose production were observed 3 min after induction of anesthesia. However, 40 min after induction of anesthesia, glycemia returned to the level observed in awake animals, whereas glucose turnover was decreased by 30% as compared with unanesthetized rats. These results are discussed with regard to the variations observed in plasma insulin, glucagon, and catecholamine levels. Glucose utilization by individual tissues was studied by the 2-[1- 3 H] deoxyglucose technique. A four- to fivefold decrease in glucose utilization was observed in postural muscles (soleus and adductor longus), while in other nonpostural muscles (epitrochlearis, tibialis anterior, extensor digitorum longus, and diaphragm) and other tissues (white and brown adipose tissues) anesthesia did not modify the rate of glucose utilization. A decrease in glucose utilization was also observed in the brain

  7. Effect of anesthesia on glucose production and utilization in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Penicaud, L.; Ferre, P.; Kande, J.; Leturque, A.; Issad, T.; Girard, J.

    1987-03-01

    This study was undertaken to determine the effects of pentobarbital anesthesia (50 mg/kg ip) on glucose kinetics and individual tissue glucose utilization in vivo, in chronically catheterized rats. Glucose turnover studies were carried out using (3-/sup 3/H) glucose as tracer. A transient hyperglycemia and an increased glucose production were observed 3 min after induction of anesthesia. However, 40 min after induction of anesthesia, glycemia returned to the level observed in awake animals, whereas glucose turnover was decreased by 30% as compared with unanesthetized rats. These results are discussed with regard to the variations observed in plasma insulin, glucagon, and catecholamine levels. Glucose utilization by individual tissues was studied by the 2-(1-/sup 3/H) deoxyglucose technique. A four- to fivefold decrease in glucose utilization was observed in postural muscles (soleus and adductor longus), while in other nonpostural muscles (epitrochlearis, tibialis anterior, extensor digitorum longus, and diaphragm) and other tissues (white and brown adipose tissues) anesthesia did not modify the rate of glucose utilization. A decrease in glucose utilization was also observed in the brain.

  8. Effects of isoflurane anesthesia and intravenous morphine self-administration on regional glucose metabolism ([18 F]FDG-PET) of male Sprague-Dawley rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Thomas Y; Nishida, Kevin S; Wilson, Colin M; Jaiswal, Shalini; Scott, Jessica; Hoy, Andrew R; Selwyn, Reed G; Dardzinski, Bernard J; Choi, Kwang H

    2017-04-01

    Although certain drugs of abuse are known to disrupt brain glucose metabolism (BGluM), the effects of opiates on BGluM are not well characterized. Moreover, preclinical positron emission tomography (PET) studies anesthetize animals during the scan, which limits clinical applications. We investigated the effects of (i) isoflurane anesthesia and (ii) intravenous morphine self-administration (MSA) on BGluM in rats. Jugular vein cannulated adult male Sprague-Dawley rats self-administered either saline (SSA) or morphine (0.5 mg/kg/infusion, 4 h/day for 12 days). All animals were scanned twice with [ 18 F]-fluoro-deoxy-glucose (FDG)-PET/CT at a baseline and at 2-day withdrawal from self-administration. After the IV injection of FDG, one batch of animals (n = 14) was anesthetized with isoflurane and the other batch (n = 16) was kept awake during the FDG uptake (45 min). After FDG uptake, all animals were anesthetized in order to perform a PET/CT scan (30 min). Isoflurane anesthesia, as compared to the awake condition, reduced BGluM in the olfactory, cortex, thalamus, and basal ganglia, while increasing BGluM in the midbrain, hypothalamus, hippocampus, and cerebellum. Morphine self-administered animals exhibited withdrawal signs (piloerection and increased defecation), drug seeking, and locomotor stimulation to morphine (0.5 mg/kg) during the 2 day withdrawal. The BGluM in the striatum was increased in the MSA group as compared to the SSA group; this effect was observed only in the isoflurane anesthesia, not the awake condition. These findings suggest that the choice of the FDG uptake condition may be important in preclinical PET studies and increased BGluM in the striatum may be associated with opiate seeking in withdrawal. © 2017 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Students’ Achievement Goals, Learning-Related Emotions and Academic Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lüftenegger, Marko; Klug, Julia; Harrer, Katharina; Langer, Marie; Spiel, Christiane; Schober, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    In the present research, the recently proposed 3 × 2 model of achievement goals is tested and associations with achievement emotions and their joint influence on academic achievement are investigated. The study was conducted with 388 students using the 3 × 2 Achievement Goal Questionnaire including the six proposed goal constructs (task-approach, task-avoidance, self-approach, self-avoidance, other-approach, other-avoidance) and the enjoyment and boredom scales from the Achievement Emotion Questionnaire. Exam grades were used as an indicator of academic achievement. Findings from CFAs provided strong support for the proposed structure of the 3 × 2 achievement goal model. Self-based goals, other-based goals and task-approach goals predicted enjoyment. Task-approach goals negatively predicted boredom. Task-approach and other-approach predicted achievement. The indirect effects of achievement goals through emotion variables on achievement were assessed using bias-corrected bootstrapping. No mediation effects were found. Implications for educational practice are discussed. PMID:27199836

  10. treated rats

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    aghomotsegin

    2014-01-08

    Jan 8, 2014 ... nucleus, bizarre segmentation; (I) shows hypersegmentation, bizarre segmentation of neutrophils in the shape of ring nucleus with polychromatophilic RBCs. 1998; Muller and Tobin, 1980). The current study shows that rats administered C. edulis hydro-ethanol extract, orally for 28 days, developed anemia, ...

  11. Hypothalamic L-Histidine Decarboxylase Is Up-Regulated During Chronic REM Sleep Deprivation of Rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gloria E Hoffman

    Full Text Available A competition of neurobehavioral drives of sleep and wakefulness occurs during sleep deprivation. When enforced chronically, subjects must remain awake. This study examines histaminergic neurons of the tuberomammillary nucleus of the posterior hypothalamus in response to enforced wakefulness in rats. We tested the hypothesis that the rate-limiting enzyme for histamine biosynthesis, L-histidine decarboxylase (HDC, would be up-regulated during chronic rapid eye movement sleep deprivation (REM-SD because histamine plays a major role in maintaining wakefulness. Archived brain tissues of male Sprague Dawley rats from a previous study were used. Rats had been subjected to REM-SD by the flowerpot paradigm for 5, 10, or 15 days. For immunocytochemistry, rats were transcardially perfused with acrolein-paraformaldehyde for immunodetection of L-HDC; separate controls used carbodiimide-paraformaldehyde for immunodetection of histamine. Immunolocalization of histamine within the tuberomammillary nucleus was validated using carbodiimide. Because HDC antiserum has cross-reactivity with other decarboxylases at high antibody concentrations, titrations localized L-HDC to only tuberomammillary nucleus at a dilution of ≥ 1:300,000. REM-SD increased immunoreactive HDC by day 5 and it remained elevated in both dorsal and ventral aspects of the tuberomammillary complex. Our results suggest that up-regulation of L-HDC within the tuberomammillary complex during chronic REM-SD may be responsible for maintaining wakefulness.

  12. Pentobarbital dose-dependently increases respiratory genioglossus muscle activity while impairing diaphragmatic function in anesthetized rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eikermann, Matthias; Fassbender, Philipp; Zaremba, Sebastian; Jordan, Amy S; Rosow, Carl; Malhotra, Atul; Chamberlin, Nancy L

    2009-06-01

    Anesthetics depress both ventilatory and upper airway dilator muscle activity and thus put the upper airway at risk for collapse. However, these effects are agent-dependent and may involve upper airway and diaphragm muscles to varying degrees. The authors assessed the effects of pentobarbital on upper airway dilator and respiratory pump muscle function in rats and compared these results with the effects of normal sleep. Tracheostomized rats were given increasing doses of pentobarbital to produce deep sedation then light and deep anesthesia, and negative pressure airway stimuli were applied (n = 11). To compare the effects of pentobarbital with those of natural sleep, the authors chronically instrumented rats (n = 10) with genioglossus and neck electromyogram and electroencephalogram electrodes and compared genioglossus activity during wakefulness, sleep (rapid eye movement and non-rapid eye movement), and pentobarbital anesthesia. Pentobarbital caused a dose-dependent decrease in ventilation and in phasic diaphragmatic electromyogram by 11 +/- 0.1%, but it increased phasic genioglossus electromyogram by 23 +/- 0.2%. Natural non-rapid eye movement sleep and pentobarbital anesthesia (10 mg/kg intraperitoneally) decreased respiratory genioglossus electromyogram by 61 +/- 29% and 45 +/- 35%, respectively, and natural rapid eye movement sleep caused the greatest decrease in phasic genioglossus electromyogram (95 +/- 0.3%). Pentobarbital in rats impairs respiratory genioglossus activity compared to the awake state, but the decrease is no greater than seen during natural sleep. During anesthesia, in the absence of pharyngeal airflow, phasic genioglossus activity is increased in a dose-dependent fashion.

  13. Optogenetic inhibition of dorsal medial prefrontal cortex attenuates stress-induced reinstatement of palatable food seeking in female rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calu, Donna J; Kawa, Alex B; Marchant, Nathan J; Navarre, Brittany M; Henderson, Mark J; Chen, Billy; Yau, Hau-Jie; Bossert, Jennifer M; Schoenbaum, Geoffrey; Deisseroth, Karl; Harvey, Brandon K; Hope, Bruce T; Shaham, Yavin

    2013-01-02

    Relapse to maladaptive eating habits during dieting is often provoked by stress. Recently, we identified a role of dorsal medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) neurons in stress-induced reinstatement of palatable food seeking in male rats. It is unknown whether endogenous neural activity in dorsal mPFC drives stress-induced reinstatement in female rats. Here, we used an optogenetic approach, in which female rats received bilateral dorsal mPFC microinjections of viral constructs coding light-sensitive eNpHR3.0-eYFP or control eYFP protein and intracranial fiber optic implants. Rats were food restricted and trained to lever press for palatable food pellets. Subsequently, pellets were removed, and lever pressing was extinguished; then the effect of bilateral dorsal mPFC light delivery on reinstatement of food seeking was assessed after injections of the pharmacological stressor yohimbine (an α-2 andrenoceptor antagonist) or pellet priming, a manipulation known to provoke food seeking in hungry rats. Dorsal mPFC light delivery attenuated yohimbine-induced reinstatement of food seeking in eNpHR3.0-injected but not eYFP-injected rats. This optical manipulation had no effect on pellet-priming-induced reinstatement or ongoing food-reinforced responding. Dorsal mPFC light delivery attenuated yohimbine-induced Fos immunoreactivity and disrupted neural activity during in vivo electrophysiological recording in awake rats. Optical stimulation caused significant outward currents and blocked electrically evoked action potentials in eNpHR3.0-injected but not eYFP-injected mPFC hemispheres. Light delivery alone caused no significant inflammatory response in mPFC. These findings indicate that intracranial light delivery in eNpHR3.0 rats disrupts endogenous dorsal mPFC neural activity that plays a role in stress-induced relapse to food seeking in female rats.

  14. The effect of deep vs. awake extubation on respiratory complications in high-risk children undergoing adenotonsillectomy: a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Ungern-Sternberg, Britta S; Davies, Kylie; Hegarty, Mary; Erb, Thomas O; Habre, Walid

    2013-09-01

    There is ongoing debate regarding the optimal timing for tracheal extubation in children at increased risk of perioperative respiratory adverse events, particularly following adenotonsillectomy. To assess the occurrence of perioperative respiratory adverse events in children undergoing elective adenotonsillectomy extubated under deep anaesthesia or when fully awake. Prospective, randomised controlled trial. Tertiary paediatric hospital. One hundred children (bronchospasm, persistent coughing, airway obstruction, desaturation children was associated with a greater incidence of persistent coughing (60 vs. 35%, P = 0.028), whereas the incidence of airway obstruction relieved by simple airway manoeuvres in children extubated while deeply anaesthetised was greater (26 vs. 8%, P = 0.03). There was no difference in the incidence of oxygen desaturation lasting more than 10 s. There was no difference in the overall incidence of perioperative respiratory adverse events. Both extubation techniques may be used in high-risk children undergoing adenotonsillectomy provided that the child is monitored closely in the postoperative period. Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry: ACTRN12609000387224.

  15. Performance, ability to stay awake, and tendency to fall asleep during the night after a diurnal sleep with temazepam or placebo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porcù, S; Bellatreccia, A; Ferrara, M; Casagrande, M

    1997-07-01

    Sleep loss and increased sleepiness on the job are among the most prevalent problems encountered by people involved in night shift work, especially in cases of abrupt shift of the wake-sleep cycle. In such conditions, detrimental effects on performance are well documented. In these situations, to avoid decrements of performance at night, one possibility is to use hypnotics for improving the quality and quantity of daytime sleep. In this study, we evaluated the effects of 20 mg of temazepam on daytime sleep, the subsequent levels of nocturnal alertness/sleepiness, and performance in a laboratory simulation of acute night shift. For evaluating alertness, sleepiness, and performance we used, respectively, the maintenance of wakefulness test (MWT), the multiple sleep latency test (MSLT), and two pencil and paper tests: digit symbol substitution test (DSST) and deux barrages test (DBT). All tests were administered four times at 2-hour intervals during the nighttime after daytime sleep. Results showed that the ability to maintain wakefulness (MWT) and to perform some visuo-attentive tasks were substantially maintained during the night. On the other hand, sleep tendency (MSLT) linearly increased during the night. Temazepam resulted in being an effective diurnal hypnotic, increasing total sleep time with no residual detrimental effects on sleepiness and performance and with an increase in the ability to stay awake.

  16. Correlation between severity of sleep apnea and upper airway morphology: Cephalometry and MD-CT study during awake and sleep states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heo, Jun-Young; Kim, Jung-Soo

    2011-01-01

    The data show that the evaluation of obstruction site in patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) should be performed in the sleep state rather than in wakefulness. The aim of this study was to identify correlation between severity of OSA as measured by the apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) and upper airway morphology examined by cephalometry and dynamic multidetector computed tomography (MD-CT) in awake and sleep states. Polysomnography and cephalometry were performed in 94 patients with snoring or OSA. Among them, 64 patients underwent MD-CT study. Thirteen cephalometric variables were measured. We analyzed the correlations between AHI and MD-CT measurements - minimal cross-sectional area (mCSA) and collapsibility index (CI) in high retropalate (HRP), low retropalate (LRP), high retroglossal (HRG), and low retroglossal (LRG) areas. Statistically significant correlations between the AHI and inferior displacement of the hyoid bone and pharyngeal length were identified in the cephalometric study. In wakefulness, AHI had a negative correlation with mCSA in the LRP area and a significant correlation with CI in LRP and HRG in MD-CT measurements. However, in the sleep state, the AHI had a negative correlation with mCSA in LRP, HRG, and LRG areas and a meaningful correlation with CI for the whole upper airway (HRP, LRP, HRG, and LRG).

  17. Taste quality and intensity of 100 stimuli as reported by rats: the taste-location association task

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shree Hari eGautam

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The interpretation of neural activity related to sensory stimulation requires an understanding of the subject's perception of the stimulation. Previous methods used to evaluate the perception of chemosensory stimuli by rodents have distinct limitations. We developed a novel behavioral paradigm, the taste-location association task, to complement these methods. First we tested if rats are able to learn associations between five basic taste stimuli and their spatial locations. This spatial task was based on 4 prototypical tastants and water. All four rats trained to perform the task reached levels of performance well above chance. Control trials demonstrated that the rats used only taste cues. Further, the learned stimulus set was resistant to interference, allowing for generalization experiments performed subsequently. We tested the rats' gustatory generalizations of 100 tastants to the five trained stimuli, both regarding their taste qualities as well as intensity ratings. The taste profiles generated by these experiments contribute to the understanding of how perception of the specific taste stimuli relate to the perception of the five basic taste qualities in intact behaving rats. In this large taste space we found that intensity plays a major role. Furthermore, umami stimuli were not reported as being similar to other basic tastants. Our new paradigm enables neurophysiological studies of taste-based learning and memory in awake, freely moving animals.

  18. Evidence for increased cellular uptake of glutamate and aspartate in the rat hippocampus during kainic acid seizures. A microdialysis study using the "indicator diffusion' method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruhn, T; Christensen, Thomas; Diemer, Nils Henrik

    1997-01-01

    Using a newly developed technique, based on microdialysis, which allows cellular uptake of glutamate and aspartate to be studied in awake animals, we investigated uptake of glutamate and aspartate in the hippocampal formation of rats during limbic seizures induced by systemical administration of ....... The results indicate that during KA-induced seizures, uptake of glutamate and aspartate is increased, possibly aimed at maintaining the extracellular homeostasis of these two excitatory amino acids.......Using a newly developed technique, based on microdialysis, which allows cellular uptake of glutamate and aspartate to be studied in awake animals, we investigated uptake of glutamate and aspartate in the hippocampal formation of rats during limbic seizures induced by systemical administration...... of kainic acid (KA). With [14C]mannitol as an extracellular reference substance, the cellular extraction of the test substance [3H]D-aspartate was measured at different stages of seizure-activity. The results were compared to those obtained in a sham operated control group. During severe generalized clonic...

  19. Achievements

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Banakar, V.K.

    A historic decision was taken by the Preparatory Commission of the International Seabed Authority (PRE-PCOM) on 17 th August 1987 It was decided to allocate to India exclusive rights for the exploration of polymetallic nodules in an area of about...

  20. Awake cardiopulmonary bypass to prevent hemodynamic collapse and loss of airway in a severely symptomatic patient with a mediastinal mass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Said, Sameh M; Telesz, Brian J; Makdisi, George; Quevedo, Fernando J; Suri, Rakesh M; Allen, Mark S; Mauermann, William J

    2014-10-01

    Management of a large mediastinal mass causing respiratory and hemodynamic compromise represents a major challenge during induction of anesthesia and surgical resection. The hemodynamic changes associated with anesthetic induction and initiation of positive-pressure ventilation can lead to acute hemodynamic collapse or inability to ventilate, or both. Initiation of cardiopulmonary bypass before anesthetic induction represents a safe alternative. We present a 37-year-old woman who underwent successful resection of a large anterior mediastinal mass through sternotomy. Cardiopulmonary bypass was instituted using the right femoral vessels under local analgesia to allow safe anesthetic induction. Her postoperative course was uneventful. This represents an example of a team approach to the management of a complex patient to achieve a successful outcome. Copyright © 2014 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Healthy Eating and Academic Achievement

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2014-12-09

    This podcast highlights the evidence that supports the link between healthy eating and improved academic achievement. It also identifies a few actions to support a healthy school nutrition environment to improve academic achievement.  Created: 12/9/2014 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 12/9/2014.

  2. Physical Activity and Academic Achievement

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2014-12-09

    This podcast highlights the evidence that supports the link between physical activity and improved academic achievement. It also identifies a few actions to support a comprehensive school physical activity program to improve academic achievement.  Created: 12/9/2014 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 12/9/2014.

  3. Peer relationships and academic achievement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krnjajić Stevan B.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available After their childhood, when children begin to establish more intensive social contacts outside family, first of all, in school setting, their behavior i.e. their social, intellectual, moral and emotional development is more strongly affected by their peers. Consequently, the quality of peer relationships considerably affects the process of adaptation and academic achievement and their motivational and emotional attitude towards school respectively. Empirical findings showed that there is bi-directional influence between peer relationships and academic achievement. In other words, the quality of peer relationships affects academic achievement, and conversely, academic achievement affects the quality of peer relationships. For example, socially accepted children exhibiting prosocial, cooperative and responsible forms of behavior in school most frequently have high academic achievement. On the other hand, children rejected by their peers often have lower academic achievement and are a risk group tending to delinquency, absenteeism and drop out of school. Those behavioral and interpersonal forms of competence are frequently more reliable predictors of academic achievement than intellectual abilities are. Considering the fact that various patterns of peer interaction differently exert influence on students' academic behavior, the paper analyzed effects of (a social competence, (b social acceptance/rejection, (c child's friendships and (d prosocial behavior on academic achievement.

  4. Chronic monitoring of cortical hemodynamics in behaving, freely-moving rats using a miniaturized head-mounted optical microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigal, Iliya; Gad, Raanan; Koletar, Margaret; Ringuette, Dene; Stefanovic, Bojana; Levi, Ofer

    2016-03-01

    Growing interest within the neurophysiology community in assessing healthy and pathological brain activity in animals that are awake and freely-behaving has triggered the need for optical systems that are suitable for such longitudinal studies. In this work we report label-free multi-modal imaging of cortical hemodynamics in the somatosensory cortex of awake, freely-behaving rats, using a novel head-mounted miniature optical microscope. The microscope employs vertical cavity surface emitting lasers (VCSELs) at three distinct wavelengths (680 nm, 795 nm, and 850 nm) to provide measurements of four hemodynamic markers: blood flow speeds, HbO, HbR, and total Hb concentration, across a > 2 mm field of view. Blood flow speeds are extracted using Laser Speckle Contrast Imaging (LSCI), while oxygenation measurements are performed using Intrinsic Optical Signal Imaging (IOSI). Longitudinal measurements on the same animal are made possible over the course of > 6 weeks using a chronic window that is surgically implanted into the skull. We use the device to examine changes in blood flow and blood oxygenation in superficial cortical blood vessels and tissue in response to drug-induced absence-like seizures, correlating motor behavior with changes in blood flow and blood oxygenation in the brain.

  5. Reductions in cortical alpha activity, enhancements in neural responses and impaired gap detection caused by sodium salicylate in awake guinea pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Joel I; Coomber, Ben; Wallace, Mark N; Palmer, Alan R

    2017-02-01

    Tinnitus chronically affects between 10-15% of the population but, despite its prevalence, the underlying mechanisms are still not properly understood. One experimental model involves administration of high doses of sodium salicylate, as this is known to reliably induce tinnitus in both humans and animals. Guinea pigs were implanted with chronic electrocorticography (ECoG) electrode arrays, with silver-ball electrodes placed on the dura over left and right auditory cortex. Two more electrodes were positioned over the cerebellum to monitor auditory brainstem responses (ABRs). We recorded resting-state and auditory evoked neural activity from awake animals before and 2 h following salicylate administration (350 mg/kg; i.p.). Large increases in click-evoked responses (> 100%) were evident across the whole auditory cortex, despite significant reductions in wave I ABR amplitudes (in response to 20 kHz tones), which are indicative of auditory nerve activity. In the same animals, significant decreases in 6-10 Hz spontaneous oscillations (alpha waves) were evident over dorsocaudal auditory cortex. We were also able to demonstrate for the first time that cortical evoked potentials can be inhibited by a preceding gap in background noise [gap-induced pre-pulse inhibition (PPI)], in a similar fashion to the gap-induced inhibition of the acoustic startle reflex that is used as a behavioural test for tinnitus. Furthermore, 2 h following salicylate administration, we observed significant deficits in PPI of cortical responses that were closely aligned with significant deficits in behavioural responses to the same stimuli. Together, these data are suggestive of neural correlates of tinnitus and oversensitivity to sound (hyperacusis). © 2016 The Authors. European Journal of Neuroscience published by Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Apnea after awake-regional and general anesthesia in infants: The General Anesthesia compared to Spinal anesthesia (GAS) study: comparing apnea and neurodevelopmental outcomes, a randomized controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Andrew J.; Morton, Neil S.; Arnup, Sarah J.; de Graaff, Jurgen C.; Disma, Nicola; Withington, Davinia E.; Frawley, Geoff; Hunt, Rodney W.; Hardy, Pollyanna; Khotcholava, Magda; von Ungern Sternberg, Britta S.; Wilton, Niall; Tuo, Pietro; Salvo, Ida; Ormond, Gillian; Stargatt, Robyn; Locatelli, Bruno Guido; McCann, Mary Ellen

    2015-01-01

    Background Post-operative apnea is a complication in young infants. Awake-regional anesthesia (RA) may reduce the risk; however the evidence is weak. The General Anesthesia compared to Spinal anesthesia (GAS) study is a randomized, controlled, trial designed to assess the influence of general anesthesia (GA) on neurodevelopment. A secondary aim is to compare rates of apnea after anesthesia. Methods Infants ≤ 60 weeks postmenstrual age scheduled for inguinal herniorraphy were randomized to RA or GA. Exclusion criteria included risk factors for adverse neurodevelopmental outcome and infants born < 26 weeks’ gestation. The primary outcome of this analysis was any observed apnea up to 12 hours post-operatively. Apnea assessment was unblinded. Results 363 patients were assigned to RA and 359 to GA. Overall the incidence of apnea (0 to 12 hours) was similar between arms (3% in RA and 4% in GA arms, Odds Ratio (OR) 0.63, 95% Confidence Intervals (CI): 0.31 to 1.30, P=0.2133), however the incidence of early apnea (0 to 30 minutes) was lower in the RA arm (1% versus 3%, OR 0.20, 95%CI: 0.05 to 0.91, P=0.0367). The incidence of late apnea (30 minutes to 12 hours) was 2% in both RA and GA arms (OR 1.17, 95%CI: 0.41 to 3.33, P=0.7688). The strongest predictor of apnea was prematurity (OR 21.87, 95% CI 4.38 to 109.24) and 96% of infants with apnea were premature. Conclusions RA in infants undergoing inguinal herniorraphy reduces apnea in the early post-operative period. Cardio-respiratory monitoring should be used for all ex-premature infants. PMID:26001033

  7. Apnea after Awake Regional and General Anesthesia in Infants: The General Anesthesia Compared to Spinal Anesthesia Study--Comparing Apnea and Neurodevelopmental Outcomes, a Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Andrew J; Morton, Neil S; Arnup, Sarah J; de Graaff, Jurgen C; Disma, Nicola; Withington, Davinia E; Frawley, Geoff; Hunt, Rodney W; Hardy, Pollyanna; Khotcholava, Magda; von Ungern Sternberg, Britta S; Wilton, Niall; Tuo, Pietro; Salvo, Ida; Ormond, Gillian; Stargatt, Robyn; Locatelli, Bruno Guido; McCann, Mary Ellen

    2015-07-01

    Postoperative apnea is a complication in young infants. Awake regional anesthesia (RA) may reduce the risk; however, the evidence is weak. The General Anesthesia compared to Spinal anesthesia study is a randomized, controlled trial designed to assess the influence of general anesthesia (GA) on neurodevelopment. A secondary aim is to compare rates of apnea after anesthesia. Infants aged 60 weeks or younger, postmenstrual age scheduled for inguinal herniorrhaphy, were randomized to RA or GA. Exclusion criteria included risk factors for adverse neurodevelopmental outcome and infants born less than 26 weeks gestation. The primary outcome of this analysis was any observed apnea up to 12 h postoperatively. Apnea assessment was unblinded. Three hundred sixty-three patients were assigned to RA and 359 to GA. Overall, the incidence of apnea (0 to 12 h) was similar between arms (3% in RA and 4% in GA arms; odds ratio [OR], 0.63; 95% CI, 0.31 to 1.30, P = 0.2133); however, the incidence of early apnea (0 to 30 min) was lower in the RA arm (1 vs. 3%; OR, 0.20; 95% CI, 0.05 to 0.91; P = 0.0367). The incidence of late apnea (30 min to 12 h) was 2% in both RA and GA arms (OR, 1.17; 95% CI, 0.41 to 3.33; P = 0.7688). The strongest predictor of apnea was prematurity (OR, 21.87; 95% CI, 4.38 to 109.24), and 96% of infants with apnea were premature. RA in infants undergoing inguinal herniorrhaphy reduces apnea in the early postoperative period. Cardiorespiratory monitoring should be used for all ex-premature infants.

  8. High-resolution manometric evaluation of the effects of cisapride and metoclopramide hydrochloride administered orally on lower esophageal sphincter pressure in awake dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kempf, Jennifer; Lewis, Fraser; Reusch, Claudia E; Kook, Peter H

    2014-04-01

    To evaluate the effects of cisapride and metoclopramide hydrochloride administered orally on the lower esophageal sphincter (LES) resting pressure in awake healthy dogs. 6 adult Beagles. Each dog was evaluated after administration of a single dose of cisapride (0.5 mg/kg), metoclopramide (0.5 mg/kg), or placebo (empty gelatin-free capsule) in 3 experiments performed at 3-week intervals. To measure LES pressure, a high-resolution manometry catheter equipped with 40 pressure sensors spaced 10 mm apart was used. For each experiment, LES pressure was recorded during a 20-minute period with a virtual electronic sleeve emulation before treatment (baseline) and at 1, 4, and 7 hours after drug or placebo administration. A linear mixed-effects model was used to test whether the 3 treatments affected LES pressure differently. In the cisapride, metoclopramide, and placebo experiments, median baseline LES pressures were 29.1, 30.5, and 29.0 mm Hg, respectively. For the cisapride, metoclopramide, and placebo treatments, median LES pressures at 1 hour after administration were 44.4, 37.8, and 36.6 mm Hg, respectively; median LES pressures at 4 hours after administration were 50.7, 30.6, and 31.1 mm Hg, respectively; and median LES pressures at 7 hours after administration were 44.3, 28.5, and 33.3 mm Hg, respectively. The LES pressures differed significantly only between the placebo and cisapride treatments. Results suggested that orally administered cisapride may be of benefit in canine patients for which an increase in LES pressure is desirable, whereas orally administered metoclopramide did not affect LES resting pressures in dogs.

  9. A regenerable potassium and phosphate sorbent system to enhance dialysis efficacy and device portability: a study in awake goats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wester, Maarten; Gerritsen, Karin G; Simonis, Frank; Boer, Walther H; Hazenbrink, Diënty H; Vaessen, Koen R; Verhaar, Marianne C; Joles, Jaap A

    2017-06-01

    Patients on standard intermittent haemodialysis suffer from strong fluctuations in plasma potassium and phosphate. Prolonged dialysis with a wearable device, based on continuous regeneration of a small volume of dialysate using ion exchangers, could moderate these fluctuations and offer increased clearance of these electrolytes. We report in vivo results on the efficacy of potassium and phosphate adsorption from a wearable dialysis device. We explore whether equilibration of ion exchangers at physiological Ca 2+ , Mg 2+ and hypotonic NaCl can prevent calcium/magnesium adsorption and net sodium release, respectively. Effects on pH and HCO3- were studied. Healthy goats were instrumented with a central venous catheter and dialysed. Potassium and phosphate were infused to achieve plasma concentrations commonly observed in dialysis patients. An adsorption cartridge containing 80 g sodium poly(styrene-divinylbenzene) sulphonate and 40 g iron oxide hydroxide beads for potassium and phosphate removal, respectively, was incorporated in a dialysate circuit. Sorbents were equilibrated and regenerated with a solution containing NaCl, CaCl 2 and MgCl 2 . Blood was pumped over a dialyser and dialysate was recirculated over the adsorption cartridge in a countercurrent direction. Potassium and phosphate adsorption was 7.7 ± 2.7 and 4.9 ± 1.3 mmol in 3 h, respectively. Adsorption capacity remained constant during consecutive dialysis sessions and increased with increasing K + and PO43-. Equilibration at physiological Ca 2+ and Mg 2+ prevented net adsorption, eliminating the need for post-cartridge calcium and magnesium infusion. Equilibration at hypotonic NaCl prevented net sodium release Fe 2+ and arterial pH did not change. Bicarbonate was adsorbed, which could be prevented by equilibrating at HCO3- 15 mM. We demonstrate clinically relevant, concentration-dependent, pH-neutral potassium and phosphate removal in vivo with small volumes of regenerable ion exchangers in our

  10. Reviewing nuclear power station achievement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howles, L.R.

    1976-01-01

    For measurement of nuclear power station achievement against original purchase the usual gross output figures are of little value since the term loosely covers many different definitions. An authentically designed output figure has been established which relates to net design output plus house load at full load. Based on these figures both cumulative and moving annual load factors are measured, the latter measuring the achievement over the last year, thus showing trends with time. Calculations have been carried out for all nuclear stations in the Western World with 150 MW(e) gross design output and above. From these are shown: moving annual load factor indicating relative station achievements for all the plants; cumulative load factors from which return of investment can be calculated; average moving annual load factors for the four types of system Magnox, PWR, HWR, and BWR; and a relative comparison of achievement by country in a few cases. (U.K.)

  11. [Theme: Achieving Quality Laboratory Projects.[.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinn, Glen C.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    The theme articles present strategies for achieving quality laboratory projects in vocational agriculture. They describe fundamentals of the construction of quality projects and stress the importance of quality instruction. (JOW)

  12. Student Health and Academic Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Kohl III HW, Dietz WH. Physical education and academic achievement in elementary school: data from the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study. American Journal of Public Health 2008;98(4):721–727. ...

  13. Using Design To Achieve Sustainability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sustainability is defined as meeting the needs of this generation without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their needs. This is a conditional statement that places the responsibility for achieving sustainability squarely in hands of designers and planners....

  14. Opioid microinjection into raphe magnus modulates cardiorespiratory function in mice and rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellman, Kevin M; Mendelson, Scott J; Mendez-Duarte, Marco A; Russell, James L; Mason, Peggy

    2009-11-01

    The raphe magnus (RM) participates in opioid analgesia and contains pain-modulatory neurons with respiration-related discharge. Here, we asked whether RM contributes to respiratory depression, the most prevalent lethal effect of opioids. To investigate whether opioidergic transmission in RM produces respiratory depression, we microinjected a mu-opioid receptor agonist, DAMGO, or morphine into the RM of awake rodents. In mice, opioid microinjection produced sustained decreases in respiratory rate (170 to 120 breaths/min), as well as heart rate (520 to 400 beats/min). Respiratory sinus arrhythmia, indicative of enhanced parasympathetic activity, was prevalent in mice receiving DAMGO microinjection. We performed similar experiments in rats but observed no changes in breathing rate or heart rate. Both rats and mice experienced significantly more episodes of bradypnea, indicative of impaired respiratory drive, after opioid microinjection. During spontaneous arousals, rats showed less tachycardia after opioid microinjection than before microinjection, suggestive of an attenuated sympathetic tone. Thus, activation of opioidergic signaling within RM produces effects beyond analgesia, including the unwanted destabilization of cardiorespiratory function. These adverse effects on homeostasis consequent to opioid microinjection imply a role for RM in regulating the balance of sympathetic and parasympathetic tone.

  15. Plasma kinetics of sup 125 I beta endorphin turnover in lean and obese Zucker rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodd, D.; Caston, A.L.; Green M.H.; Farrell, P.A. (Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park (United States))

    1990-02-26

    Plasma clearance kinetics for Beta Endorphin (BEP) are not well-defined and no definitive data exist for lean versus obese animals. To determine such kinetic parameters, a bolus of {sup 125}I BEP (1{mu}Ci/kg) was infused into awake lean(L) and obese(O) Zucker rats. Arterial blood samples were withdrawn initially at 20 seconds intervals and less frequently as a 3-hour experimental period progressed. Donor rat blood was infused (venous catheter) to replace withdrawn blood. At 180 minutes approximately 10% of the initial dose remained in the plasma. Clearance kinetics for {sup 125}I BEP were analyzed by compartmental analysis. A 3-component equation (i.e., 3 compartment model) provided the best fit for both L and O groups. Plasma transit times were very rapid; however, plasma fractional catabolic rate was low. Plasma mean residence time was similar for both groups (50 minutes) as was recycle time. These data suggest that BEP kinetics are similar in L and O rats, and that this peptide may undergo extensive recycling into and out of the plasma compartment. The identity of the other two compartments requires further investigation.

  16. Network Actions of Pentobarbital in the Rat Mesopontine Tegmentum on Sensory Inflow Through the Spinothalamic Tract

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namjoshi, Dhananjay R.; McErlane, Shelly A.; Taepavarapruk, Niwat; Soja, Peter J.

    2009-01-01

    The recent discovery of a barbiturate-sensitive “general anesthesia switch” mechanism localized in the rat brain stem mesopontine tegmental anesthesia area (MPTA) has challenged the current view of the nonspecific actions of general anesthetic agents in the CNS. In this study we provide electrophysiological evidence that the antinociception, which accompanies the behavioral state resembling general anesthesia following pentobarbital (PB) microinjections into the MPTA of awake rats, could be accompanied by the attenuation of sensory transmission through the spinothalamic tract (STT). Following bilateral microinjections of PB into the MPTA spontaneous firing rate (SFR), antidromic firing index (FI), and sciatic (Sc) as well as sural (Su) nerve-evoked responses (ER) of identified lumbar STT neurons in the isoflurane-anesthetized rat were quantified using extracellular recording techniques. Microinjections of PB into the MPTA significantly suppressed the SFR (47%), magnitudes of Sc- (26%) and Su-ER (36%), and FI (41%) of STT neurons. Microinjections of PB-free vehicle control did not alter any of the above-cited electrophysiological parameters. The results from this study suggest that antinociception, which occurs during the anesthesia-like state following PB microinjections into the MPTA, may be due, in part, to (in)direct inhibition of STT neurons via switching mechanism(s) located in the MPTA. This study provides a provenance for investigating electrophysiologically the actions on STT neurons of other current agents used clinically to maintain the state of general anesthesia. PMID:19458144

  17. Sleep/awake status throughout the night and circadian motor activity patterns in older nursing-home residents with or without dementia, and older community-dwelling people without dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kume, Yu; Kodama, Ayuto; Sato, Kotaro; Kurosawa, Satoko; Ishikawa, Takashi; Ishikawa, Sachiko

    2016-12-01

    Sleep disturbances are commonly observed in older nursing home residents, mainly in combination with dementia. However, sleep-associated circadian motor activity patterns have not been thoroughly investigated in Japanese nursing homes. The present study aimed to respectively clarify the effect of community living and the presence of dementia on sleep disturbances and interrupted activity rhythm of older nursing-home residents with or without dementia and older community-dwelling people without dementia. Actigraph devices worn on the participants' non-dominant wrists for seven days were used to collect objective measurements of the sleep/awake status throughout the night and the circadian motor activity patterns. The presence of dementia was assessed by a trained medical doctor using the residents' records and the Clinical Dementia Rating (CDR). The functional capacity of the participants was determined using the Barthel Index (BI). Fifty-one older people in Akita prefecture were included in the current study, consisting of 17 residents with dementia (mean age: 82.2 years), 17 residents without dementia (84.5 years), and 17 community-dwelling people (83.6 years). The results showed that older nursing-home residents with dementia had significantly a lower rate of sleep efficiency and a longer awake time throughout the night than the other groups. Older nursing-home residents with and without dementia had more fragmented rhythm than community-dwelling people without dementia. These results provide evidence of poor sleep/awake status throughout the night and interrupted circadian activity rhythms in nursing-home residents with and without dementia. However, further studies performed according to dementia classifications are needed.

  18. Dexmedetomidine for an awake fiber-optic intubation of a parturient with Klippel-Feil syndrome, Type I Arnold Chiari malformation and status post released tethered spinal cord presenting for repeat cesarean section

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanmay H. Shah

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Patients with Klippel-Feil Syndrome (KFS have congenital fusion of their cervical vertebrae due to a failure in the normal segmentation of the cervical vertebrae during the early weeks of gestation and also have myriad of other associated anomalies. Because of limited neck mobility, airway management in these patients can be a challenge for the anesthesiologist. We describe a unique case in which a dexmedetomidine infusion was used as sedation for an awake fiber-optic intubation in a parturient with Klippel-Feil Syndrome, who presented for elective cesarean delivery. A 36-yearold female, G2P1A0 with KFS (fusion of cervical vertebrae who had prior cesarean section for breech presentation with difficult airway management was scheduled for repeat cesarean delivery. After obtaining an informed consent, patient was taken in the operating room and non-invasive monitors were applied. Dexmedetomidine infusion was started and after adequate sedation, an awake fiberoptic intubation was performed. General anesthetic was administered after intubation and dexmedetomidine infusion was continued on maintenance dose until extubation. Klippel-Feil Syndrome (KFS is a rare congenital disorder for which the true incidence is unknown, which makes it even rare to see a parturient with this disease. Patients with KFS usually have other congenital abnormalities as well, sometimes including the whole thoraco-lumbar spine (Type III precluding the use of neuraxial anesthesia for these patients. Obstetric patients with KFS can present unique challenges in administering anesthesia and analgesia, primarily as it relates to the airway and dexmedetomidine infusion has shown promising result to manage the airway through awake fiberoptic intubation without any adverse effects on mother and fetus.

  19. Disciplinary climate and student achievement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sortkær, Bent; Reimer, David

    that the estimates based on school-level data might underestimate the relationship between disciplinary climate and student achievement. Finally we find evidence for gender differences in the association between disciplinary climate and student achievement that can partly be explained by gender-specific perceptions......Disciplinary climate has emerged as one of the single most important factors related to student achievement. Using data from the OECD Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) 2003 for Canada, Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Latvia and Norway we find a significant and nontrivial association...... between the perceived disciplinary climate in the classroom and students’ mathematics performance in Canada, Denmark and Norway. Furthermore we exploit country specific class-size rules in order to single out a subsample with classroom-level data (PISA is sampled by age and not by classes) and find...

  20. Mathematics Achievement by Immigrant Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gary G. Huang

    2000-05-01

    Full Text Available In this study, I examined academic achievement of immigrant children in the United States, Canada, England, Australia, and New Zealand. Analyzing data from the Third International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS, I gauged the performance gaps relating to the generation of immigration and the home language background. I found immigrant children's math and science achievement to be lower than the others only in England, the U.S., and Canada. Non-English language background was found in each country to relate to poor math and science learning and this disadvantage was stronger among native-born children—presumably children of indigenous groups—than among immigrant children. I also examined the school variation in math performance gaps, using hierarchical linear modeling (HLM to each country's data. The patterns in which language- and generation-related math achievement gaps varied between schools are different in the five countries.

  1. The Effects of Urethane on Rat Outer Hair Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingyu Fu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The cochlea converts sound vibration into electrical impulses and amplifies the low-level sound signal. Urethane, a widely used anesthetic in animal research, has been shown to reduce the neural responses to auditory stimuli. However, the effects of urethane on cochlea, especially on the function of outer hair cells, remain largely unknown. In the present study, we compared the cochlear microphonic responses between awake and urethane-anesthetized rats. The results revealed that the amplitude of the cochlear microphonic was decreased by urethane, resulting in an increase in the threshold at all of the sound frequencies examined. To deduce the possible mechanism underlying the urethane-induced decrease in cochlear sensitivity, we examined the electrical response properties of isolated outer hair cells using whole-cell patch-clamp recording. We found that urethane hyperpolarizes the outer hair cell membrane potential in a dose-dependent manner and elicits larger outward current. This urethane-induced outward current was blocked by strychnine, an antagonist of the α9 subunit of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor. Meanwhile, the function of the outer hair cell motor protein, prestin, was not affected. These results suggest that urethane anesthesia is expected to decrease the responses of outer hair cells, whereas the frequency selectivity of cochlea remains unchanged.

  2. A Toolbox for Optophysiological Experiments in Freely Moving Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanie Hardung

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Simultaneous recordings and manipulations of neural circuits that control the behavior of animals is one of the key techniques in modern neuroscience. Rapid advances in optogenetics have led to a variety of probes combining multichannel readout and optogenetic write in. Given the complexity of the brain, it comes as no surprise that the choice of the device is constrained by several factors such as the animal model, the structure and location of the brain area of interest, as well as the behavioral read out. Here we provide an overview of available devices for chronic simultaneous neural recordings and optogenetic manipulation in awake behaving rats. We focus on two fixed arrays and two moveable drives. For both options, we present data from one custom-made (in house and one commercially available device. Here we provide evidence that simultaneous neural recordings and optogenetic manipulations are feasible with all four tested devices. Further we give detailed information about the recording quality, and also contrast the different features of the probes. As we provide detailed information about equipment and building procedures for combined chronic multichannel readout and optogenetic control with maximum performance at minimized costs, this overview might help especially researchers who want to enter the field of in vivo optophysiology.

  3. The representation of social facial touch in rat barrel cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobrov, Evgeny; Wolfe, Jason; Rao, Rajnish P; Brecht, Michael

    2014-01-06

    Controlled presentation of stimuli to anesthetized [1] or awake [2] animals suggested that neurons in sensory cortices respond to elementary features [3, 4], but we know little about neuronal responses evoked by social interactions. Here we investigate processing in the barrel cortex of rats engaging in social facial touch [5, 6]. Sensory stimulation by conspecifics differs from classic whisker stimuli such as deflections, contact poles [7, 8], or textures [9, 10]. A large fraction of barrel cortex neurons responded to facial touch. Social touch responses peaked when animals aligned their faces and contacted each other by multiple whiskers with small, irregular whisker movements. Object touch was associated with larger, more regular whisker movements, and object responses were weaker than social responses. Whisker trimming abolished responses. During social touch, neurons in males increased their firing on average by 44%, while neurons in females increased their firing by only 19%. In females, socially evoked and ongoing firing rates were more than 1.5-fold higher in nonestrus than in estrus. Barrel cortex represented socially different contacts by distinct firing rates, and the variation of activity with sex and sexual status could contribute to the generation of gender-specific neural constructs of conspecifics. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Imaging brain activity during seizures in freely behaving rats using a miniature multi-modal imaging system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigal, Iliya; Koletar, Margaret M; Ringuette, Dene; Gad, Raanan; Jeffrey, Melanie; Carlen, Peter L; Stefanovic, Bojana; Levi, Ofer

    2016-09-01

    We report on a miniature label-free imaging system for monitoring brain blood flow and blood oxygenation changes in awake, freely behaving rats. The device, weighing 15 grams, enables imaging in a ∼ 2 × 2 mm field of view with 4.4 μm lateral resolution and 1 - 8 Hz temporal sampling rate. The imaging is performed through a chronically-implanted cranial window that remains optically clear between 2 to > 6 weeks after the craniotomy. This imaging method is well suited for longitudinal studies of chronic models of brain diseases and disorders. In this work, it is applied to monitoring neurovascular coupling during drug-induced absence-like seizures 6 weeks following the craniotomy.

  5. Time-series analysis of sleep wake stage of rat EEG using time-dependent pattern entropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishizaki, Ryuji; Shinba, Toshikazu; Mugishima, Go; Haraguchi, Hikaru; Inoue, Masayoshi

    2008-05-01

    We performed electroencephalography (EEG) for six male Wistar rats to clarify temporal behaviors at different levels of consciousness. Levels were identified both by conventional sleep analysis methods and by our novel entropy method. In our method, time-dependent pattern entropy is introduced, by which EEG is reduced to binary symbolic dynamics and the pattern of symbols in a sliding temporal window is considered. A high correlation was obtained between level of consciousness as measured by the conventional method and mean entropy in our entropy method. Mean entropy was maximal while awake (stage W) and decreased as sleep deepened. These results suggest that time-dependent pattern entropy may offer a promising method for future sleep research.

  6. Excitatory amino acid receptor-mediated transmission of somatosensory evoked potentials in the rat thalamus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klockgether, T

    1987-12-01

    1. To examine the role of excitatory amino acid receptors in the rat ventrobasal thalamic nucleus (v.b.t.n.) for the transmission of cortical somatosensory evoked potentials (s.e.p.s), potentials were recorded from the somatosensory cortex of barbiturate-anaesthetized and of unanaesthetized awake rats. The effects of microapplications of the selective N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) antagonist (-)-2-amino-7-phosphono-heptanoate ((-)AP7) and the broad-spectrum excitatory amino acid antagonist 1-(p-chlorobenzoyl)-piperazine-2,3-dicarboxylate (pCB-PzDA) into the thalamus on the amplitudes and latencies of cortical potentials were measured. 2. To define the receptor specificity of local microinjections of (-)AP7 and pCB-PzDA electroencephalogram (e.e.g.) recordings were made from the immediate vicinity of the injection cannula within the thalamus. (-)AP7 selectively antagonized epileptic discharges induced by NMDA, but not those by kainate, whereas pCB-PzDA antagonized epileptic discharges induced by both. 3. In both anaesthetized and unanaesthetized rats, microapplications of pCB-PzDA into the thalamus suppressed transmission of cortical potentials as indicated by a decrease of their amplitudes and an increase of their peak latencies. Further experiments in anaesthetized rats showed that pCB-PzDA exerted its effects in a dose-dependent and site-specific way. 4. In both anaesthetized and unanaesthetized rats, microapplications of (-)AP7 into the ventrobasal thalamus did not affect cortical potentials. 5. These results are consistent with the assumption that an excitatory amino acid serves as transmitter at thalamic synapses mediating transmission of cortical potentials, and that this transmitter interacts preferentially with non-NMDA receptors.

  7. Optogenetic conditioning of paradigm and pattern discrimination in the rat somatosensory system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenta Abe

    Full Text Available The rodent whisker-barrel cortical system is a model for studying somatosensory discrimination at high spatiotemporal precision. Here, we applied optogenetics to produce somatosensory inputs in the whisker area using one of transgenic rat lines, W-TChR2V4, which expresses channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2 in the mechanoreceptive nerve endings around whisker follicles. An awake W-TChR2V4 rat was head-fixed and irradiated by blue LED light on the whisker area with a paradigm conditioned with a reward. The Go task was designed so the rat is allowed to receive a reward, when it licked the nozzle within 5 s after photostimulation. The No-go task was designed so as the rat has to withhold licking for at least 5 s to obtain a reward after photostimulation. The Go-task conditioning was established within 1 hr of training with a reduction in the reaction time and increase of the success rate. To investigate the relationship between the spatiotemporal pattern of sensory inputs and the behavioral output, we designed a multi-optical fiber system that irradiates the whisker area at 9 spots in a 3×3 matrix. Although the Go-task conditioning was established using synchronous irradiation of 9 spots, the success rate was decreased with an increase of the reaction time for the asynchronous irradiation. After conditioning to the Go task, the rat responded to the blue LED flash irradiated on the barrel cortex, where many neurons also express ChR2, or photostimulation of the contralateral whisker area with a similar reaction time and success rate. Synchronous activation of the peripheral mechanoreceptive nerves is suggested to drive a neural circuit in the somatosensory cortex that efficiently couples with the decision. Our optogenetic system would enable the precise evaluation of the psychophysical values, such as the reaction time and success rate, to gain some insight into the brain mechanisms underlying conditioned behaviors.

  8. Optogenetic conditioning of paradigm and pattern discrimination in the rat somatosensory system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Kenta; Yawo, Hiromu

    2017-01-01

    The rodent whisker-barrel cortical system is a model for studying somatosensory discrimination at high spatiotemporal precision. Here, we applied optogenetics to produce somatosensory inputs in the whisker area using one of transgenic rat lines, W-TChR2V4, which expresses channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2) in the mechanoreceptive nerve endings around whisker follicles. An awake W-TChR2V4 rat was head-fixed and irradiated by blue LED light on the whisker area with a paradigm conditioned with a reward. The Go task was designed so the rat is allowed to receive a reward, when it licked the nozzle within 5 s after photostimulation. The No-go task was designed so as the rat has to withhold licking for at least 5 s to obtain a reward after photostimulation. The Go-task conditioning was established within 1 hr of training with a reduction in the reaction time and increase of the success rate. To investigate the relationship between the spatiotemporal pattern of sensory inputs and the behavioral output, we designed a multi-optical fiber system that irradiates the whisker area at 9 spots in a 3×3 matrix. Although the Go-task conditioning was established using synchronous irradiation of 9 spots, the success rate was decreased with an increase of the reaction time for the asynchronous irradiation. After conditioning to the Go task, the rat responded to the blue LED flash irradiated on the barrel cortex, where many neurons also express ChR2, or photostimulation of the contralateral whisker area with a similar reaction time and success rate. Synchronous activation of the peripheral mechanoreceptive nerves is suggested to drive a neural circuit in the somatosensory cortex that efficiently couples with the decision. Our optogenetic system would enable the precise evaluation of the psychophysical values, such as the reaction time and success rate, to gain some insight into the brain mechanisms underlying conditioned behaviors.

  9. Characterization of the spontaneous and gripping-induced immobility episodes on taiep rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortés, Ma Del Carmen; Gavito, Berenice; Ita, Martha L; Valencia, Jaime; Eguibar, José R

    2005-11-01

    In 1989, we described a new autosomic-recessive myelin-mutant rat that develops a progressive motor syndrome characterized by tremor, ataxia, immobility episodes (IEs), epilepsy, and paralysis. taiep is the acronym of these symptoms. The rat developed a hypomyelination, followed by demyelination. At an age of 7-8 months, taiep rats developed IEs, characterized electroencephalographically by REM sleep-like cortical activity. In our study, we analyzed the ontogeny of gripping-induced IEs between 5 and 18 months, their dependence to light-dark changes, sexual dimorphism, and susceptibility to mild stress. Our results showed that IEs start at an age of 6.5 months, with a peak frequency between 8.5 and 9.5 months. IEs have two peaks, one in the morning (0800-1000 h) and a second peak in the middle of the night (2300-0100 h). Spontaneous IEs showed an even distribution with a mean of 3 IEs every 2 h. IEs are sexually dimorphic being more common in male rats. The IEs can be induced by gripping the rat by the tail or the thorax, but most of the IEs were produced by gripping the tail. Mild stress produced by i.p. injection of physiological saline significantly decreased IEs. These results suggested that IEs are dependent on several biological variables, which are caused by hypomyelination, followed by demyelization, which causes alterations in the brainstem and hypothalamic mechanisms responsible for the sleep-wake cycle regulation, producing emergence of REM sleep-like behavior during awake periods. (c) 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  10. Achieving universal access to broadband

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Falch, Morten; Henten, Anders

    2009-01-01

    The paper discusses appropriate policy measures for achieving universal access to broadband services in Europe. Access can be delivered by means of many different technology solutions described in the paper. This means a greater degree of competition and affects the kind of policy measures...

  11. Epistemological Beliefs and Academic Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arslantas, Halis Adnan

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to identify the relationship between teacher candidates' epistemological beliefs and academic achievement. The participants of the study were 353 teacher candidates studying their fourth year at the Education Faculty. The Epistemological Belief Scale was used which adapted to Turkish through reliability and validity work by…

  12. Achievement goals affect metacognitive judgments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Kenji; Yue, Carole L.; Murayama, Kou; Castel, Alan D.

    2017-01-01

    The present study examined the effect of achievement goals on metacognitive judgments, such as judgments of learning (JOLs) and metacomprehension judgments, and actual recall performance. We conducted five experiments manipulating the instruction of achievement goals. In each experiment, participants were instructed to adopt mastery-approach goals (i.e., develop their own mental ability through a memory task) or performance-approach goals (i.e., demonstrate their strong memory ability through getting a high score on a memory task). The results of Experiments 1 and 2 showed that JOLs of word pairs in the performance-approach goal condition tended to be higher than those in the mastery-approach goal condition. In contrast, cued recall performance did not differ between the two goal conditions. Experiment 3 also demonstrated that metacomprehension judgments of text passages were higher in the performance-approach goal condition than in the mastery-approach goals condition, whereas test performance did not differ between conditions. These findings suggest that achievement motivation affects metacognitive judgments during learning, even when achievement motivation does not influence actual performance. PMID:28983496

  13. Faculty Desegregation and Student Achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Jimy M.

    1984-01-01

    In the largest district initially placed under court-ordered faculty desegregation. The influences of teacher turnover, experience, and racial isolation on elementary school student achievement in predominantly minority schools were examined. Findings suggest that poorly planned desegregation policies can have undesirable consequences, especially…

  14. Game Addiction and Academic Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahin, Mehmet; Gumus, Yusuf Yasin; Dincel, Sezen

    2016-01-01

    The primary aim of this study was to investigate the correlation between game addiction and academic achievement. The secondary aim was to adapt a self-report instrument to measure game addiction. Three hundred and seventy high school students participated in this study. Data were collected via an online questionnaire that included a brief…

  15. Working underground: Respiratory adaptations in the blind mole rat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widmer, Hans R.; Hoppeler, Hans; Nevo, Eviatar; Taylor, C. Richard; Weibel, Ewald R.

    1997-01-01

    Mole rats (Spalax ehrenbergi superspecies) perform the heavy work of digging their subterranean burrows in Israel under highly hypoxic/hypercapnic conditions. Unlike most other mammals, they can achieve high levels of metabolic rate under these conditions, while their metabolic rate at low work rates is depressed. We explored, by comparing mole rats with white rats, whether and how this is related to adaptations in the design of the respiratory system, which determines the transfer of O2 from the lung to muscle mitochondria. At the same body mass, mole rats were found to have a significantly smaller total skeletal muscle mass than ordinary white rats (−22%). In contrast, the fractional volume of muscle mitochondria was larger by 46%. As a consequence, both species had the same total amount of mitochondria and achieved, under normoxia, the same V̇O2max. Whereas the O2 transport capacity of the blood was not different, we found a larger capillary density (+31%) in the mole rat muscle, resulting in a reduced diffusion distance to mitochondria. The structural pulmonary diffusing capacity for O2 was greater in the mole rat (+44%), thus facilitating O2 uptake in hypoxia. We conclude that structural adaptations in lung and muscle tissue improve O2 diffusion conditions and serve to maintain high metabolic rates in hypoxia but have no consequences for achieving V̇O2max under normoxic conditions. PMID:9050905

  16. Metacognition, achievement goals, study strategies and academic achievement: pathways to achievement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vrugt, A.; Oort, F.J.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to develop and test a model of effective selfregulated learning. Based on effort expenditure we discerned effective self-regulators and less effective self-regulators. The model comprised achievement goals (mastery, performance-approach and -avoidance goals),

  17. Achieving excellence with limited resources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anson, L.W.; Spinney, R.W.

    1985-01-01

    The achievement of excellence in safety of nuclear power plant operation is dependent in part upon establishment of a performance-based training program. Developing such a program can be a laborious, time-consuming, and very expensive effort. Conducting job and task analyses, designing course outlines from learning objectives, developing training materials, evaluating program effectiveness and managing the training process and program through the out-years will exhaust any utility's training budget and staff. Because the achievement of excellence implies that training become in part performance-based, the question arises of how best to attain quality training yet still maintain a reasonable budget and staff workload. The answer lies not just in contracting the support necessary but making use of all available resources - training staff, contractor personnel in INPO

  18. Systems' optimization: Achieving the balance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus, Peter

    1994-04-01

    Fuel cells for stationary power generation applications are being pursued on a large scale worldwide in an effort to achieve commercialization before the turn of the century. Some aspects of system optimization are discussed illustrating the influence of basic system design possibilities. Design variants investigated include alternatives for anode and cathode gas supply and gas recycling, methods to achieve self-sufficiency on water for the reforming of natural gas, and recovery of unspent fuel from the anode exhaust. Especially in small systems for decentralized applications, e.g., industrial cogeneration, system simplification is decisive to bring down the capital cost of the balance-of-plant. Trade-offs between system complexity and efficiency are possible to optimize the economy. In large plants, high-temperature fuel cell can be supplemented with bottoming cycles for best fuel utilization. Gas turbines and steam turbines can be evaluated, having strong influence on the system design pressures and, therefore, system cost.

  19. When Sleeping Beauty First Awakes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Atkinson, David; Peijnenburg, Jeanne

    Ever since its introduction, the Sleeping Beauty Problem has been fought over by the halfers against the thirders. We distinguish three interpretations of the original problem as described in Adam Elga's seminal paper on the subject. Elga's intended interpretation leads to the position of the

  20. Defense economics: Achievements and challenges

    OpenAIRE

    Keith Hartley

    2007-01-01

    Defense economics is now an established part of economics. This article reviews its achievements as represented by papers published in the research journal Defense and Peace Economics. The range of topics in the journal is reviewed, especially since 2000, and major gaps in coverage are identified. A changing research agenda reflects new developments such as terrorism and international peacekeeping. Gaps remain such as the need for good quality case studies of conflict (e.g., Iraq) and of majo...

  1. School sport and academic achievement

    OpenAIRE

    Bradley, John L.; Keane, Francis; Crawford, Susan

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT BACKGROUND: Physical Education and School Sport (PESS) is an integral part of the school curriculum in Ireland. Historically the Healthy Body, Healthy Mind philosophy has promoted the inclusion of PESS alongside more cognitive school subjects and research suggests that PESS can promote cognitive function and provide educational benefits. However there is little research on how the choice of school sport influences academic achievement. This case study aims to investigate how partic...

  2. Achieving financial stability in Asia

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Achieving Financial Stability in Asia sets out to identify the elements which could restore confidence to the countries of the region and stabilise financial flows on a global basis. Thus, measures must be taken which include improving public and corporate governance, strengthening democracy and improving the efficiency of regulatory institutions. At the same time, emerging economies ought to be given a greater measure of participation in international regulatory bodies, so that any solutions...

  3. Predicting educational achievement from DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selzam, S; Krapohl, E; von Stumm, S; O'Reilly, P F; Rimfeld, K; Kovas, Y; Dale, P S; Lee, J J; Plomin, R

    2017-02-01

    A genome-wide polygenic score (GPS), derived from a 2013 genome-wide association study (N=127,000), explained 2% of the variance in total years of education (EduYears). In a follow-up study (N=329,000), a new EduYears GPS explains up to 4%. Here, we tested the association between this latest EduYears GPS and educational achievement scores at ages 7, 12 and 16 in an independent sample of 5825 UK individuals. We found that EduYears GPS explained greater amounts of variance in educational achievement over time, up to 9% at age 16, accounting for 15% of the heritable variance. This is the strongest GPS prediction to date for quantitative behavioral traits. Individuals in the highest and lowest GPS septiles differed by a whole school grade at age 16. Furthermore, EduYears GPS was associated with general cognitive ability (~3.5%) and family socioeconomic status (~7%). There was no evidence of an interaction between EduYears GPS and family socioeconomic status on educational achievement or on general cognitive ability. These results are a harbinger of future widespread use of GPS to predict genetic risk and resilience in the social and behavioral sciences.

  4. Creativity, knowledge and school achievement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maksić Slavica B.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available In the process of education the knowledge is acquired which is a necessary base for creativity. The problem of relations between creativity and knowledge in school context is posed as a problem of relations between creativity and academic performance due to the influence it has on personal and professional development of an individual. The paper presents the results of survey on relations between creativity, academic performance and academic preferences. Creativity was measured by the test for creative thinking - drawing production of Urban and Jellen, academic performance by general achievement, and academic preferences by a questionnaire. The sample comprised final primary school graders. Low and statistically significant positive correlation was found between creativity and school achievement in the sub-sample of girls. However, girls have a significantly better school achievement and prefer art as a school subject and the test administered demands visual art expression. Hence, it can not be claimed for sure that the obtained results reflect realistic differences in creativity between boys and girls. It is of vital importance for work in school the data that high creativity can be possessed by students who are failures at school. It has been concluded that initial step in the acquisition of knowledge that will contribute to student creative thinking and behavior is the development of cognitive flexibility.

  5. Rat Genome Database (RGD)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Rat Genome Database (RGD) is a collaborative effort between leading research institutions involved in rat genetic and genomic research to collect, consolidate,...

  6. Assessment of insulin resistance in fructose-fed rats with 125I-6-deoxy-6-iodo-D-glucose, a new tracer of glucose transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perret, Pascale; Slimani, Lotfi; Briat, Arnaud; Villemain, Daniele; Fagret, Daniel; Ghezzi, Catherine; Halimi, Serge; Demongeot, Jacques

    2007-01-01

    Insulin resistance, characterised by an insulin-stimulated glucose transport defect, is an important feature of the pre-diabetic state that has been observed in numerous pathological disorders. The purpose of this study was to assess variations in glucose transport in rats using 125 I-6-deoxy-6-iodo-D-glucose (6DIG), a new tracer of glucose transport proposed as an imaging tool to assess insulin resistance in vivo. Two protocols were performed, a hyperinsulinaemic-euglycaemic clamp and a normoinsulinaemic-normoglycaemic protocol, in awake control and insulin-resistant fructose-fed rats. The tracer was injected at steady state, and activity in 11 tissues and the blood was assessed ex vivo at several time points. A multicompartmental mathematical model was developed to obtain fractional transfer coefficients of 6DIG from the blood to the organs. Insulin sensitivity of fructose-fed rats, estimated by the glucose infusion rate, was reduced by 40% compared with control rats. At steady state, 6DIG uptake was significantly stimulated by insulin in insulin-sensitive tissues of control rats (basal versus insulin: diaphragm, p < 0.01; muscle, p < 0.05; heart, p < 0.001), whereas insulin did not stimulate 6DIG uptake in insulin-resistant fructose-fed rats. Moreover, in these tissues, the fractional transfer coefficients of entrance were significantly increased with insulin in control rats (basal vs insulin: diaphragm, p < 0.001; muscle, p < 0.001; heart, p < 0.01) whereas no significant changes were observed in fructose-fed rats. This study sets the stage for the future use of 6DIG as a non-invasive means for the evaluation of insulin resistance by nuclear imaging. (orig.)

  7. Achieving Universal Access to Broadband

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morten FALCH

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper discusses appropriate policy measures for achieving universal access to broadband services in Europe. Access can be delivered by means of many different technology solutions described in the paper. This means a greater degree of competition and affects the kind of policy measures to be applied. The paper concludes that other policy measure than the classical universal service obligation are in play, and discusses various policy measures taking the Lisbon process as a point of departure. Available policy measures listed in the paper include, universal service obligation, harmonization, demand stimulation, public support for extending the infrastructure, public private partnerships (PPP, and others.

  8. Noninvasive quantification of cerebral metabolic rate for glucose in rats using (18)F-FDG PET and standard input function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hori, Yuki; Ihara, Naoki; Teramoto, Noboru; Kunimi, Masako; Honda, Manabu; Kato, Koichi; Hanakawa, Takashi

    2015-10-01

    Measurement of arterial input function (AIF) for quantitative positron emission tomography (PET) studies is technically challenging. The present study aimed to develop a method based on a standard arterial input function (SIF) to estimate input function without blood sampling. We performed (18)F-fluolodeoxyglucose studies accompanied by continuous blood sampling for measurement of AIF in 11 rats. Standard arterial input function was calculated by averaging AIFs from eight anesthetized rats, after normalization with body mass (BM) and injected dose (ID). Then, the individual input function was estimated using two types of SIF: (1) SIF calibrated by the individual's BM and ID (estimated individual input function, EIF(NS)) and (2) SIF calibrated by a single blood sampling as proposed previously (EIF(1S)). No significant differences in area under the curve (AUC) or cerebral metabolic rate for glucose (CMRGlc) were found across the AIF-, EIF(NS)-, and EIF(1S)-based methods using repeated measures analysis of variance. In the correlation analysis, AUC or CMRGlc derived from EIF(NS) was highly correlated with those derived from AIF and EIF(1S). Preliminary comparison between AIF and EIF(NS) in three awake rats supported an idea that the method might be applicable to behaving animals. The present study suggests that EIF(NS) method might serve as a noninvasive substitute for individual AIF measurement.

  9. Cardiovascular Responses Induced by Obstructive Apnea Are Enhanced in Hypertensive Rats Due to Enhanced Chemoreceptor Responsivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angheben, Juliana M. M.; Schoorlemmer, Guus H. M.; Rossi, Marcio V.; Silva, Thiago A.; Cravo, Sergio L.

    2014-01-01

    Spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR), like patients with sleep apnea, have hypertension, increased sympathetic activity, and increased chemoreceptor drive. We investigated the role of carotid chemoreceptors in cardiovascular responses induced by obstructive apnea in awake SHR. A tracheal balloon and vascular cannulas were implanted, and a week later, apneas of 15 s each were induced. The effects of apnea were more pronounced in SHR than in control rats (Wistar Kyoto; WKY). Blood pressure increased by 57±3 mmHg during apnea in SHR and by 28±3 mmHg in WKY (papneas were induced two days later. The inactivation of chemoreceptors reduced the responses to apnea and abolished the difference between SHR and controls. The apnea-induced hypertension was 11±4 mmHg in SHR and 8±4 mmHg in WKY. The respiratory effort was 15±2 mmHg in SHR and 15±2 mmHg in WKY. The heart rate fell 63±18 bpm in SHR and 52±14 bpm in WKY. Similarly, when the chemoreceptors were unloaded by the administration of 100% oxygen, the responses to apnea were reduced. In conclusion, arterial chemoreceptors contribute to the responses induced by apnea in both strains, but they are more important in SHR and account for the exaggerated responses of this strain to apnea. PMID:24466272

  10. Cardiovascular and respiratory changes during slow-wave sleep in rats are associated with electrocorticogram desynchronization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.R. Dias-dos-Santos

    1997-11-01

    Full Text Available In awake rats a single recurrent larger tidal volume (deep breaths occurs at regular intervals, followed by oscillations in arterial pressure and heart rate. In the present study we recorded the changes in blood pressure, heart rate and ventilation during the wakefulness-sleep cycle identified by electrocorticographic records in order to determine whether the deep breaths and cardiovascular oscillations were associated with changes in the electrocorticogram. During several episodes of slow-wave sleep (SWS in 7 rats the deep breaths and oscillations in arterial pressure and heart rate were preceded by SWS desynchronization. The interval between deep breaths during SWS was 71 ± 4 s, the period between initial desynchronization and the generation of deep breaths was 3.98 ± 0.45 s and the duration of SWS desynchronization was 11 ± 0.65 s. Hypotension (-16 ± 1 mmHg and tachycardia (+15 ± 5 bpm were observed during deep breaths in the SWS state. These data indicate that the oscillations in arterial pressure and heart rate during SWS are associated with deep breaths, which in turn are preceded by desynchronization of the electrocorticogram in this state of sleep

  11. [Effect of electroacupuncture of different regions of the auricle on epileptic seizures in epilepsy rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Wei; Li, Yan-Hua; Rong, Pei-Jing; Li, Liang; Ben, Hui; Zhu, Bing

    2011-12-01

    To observe the anti-seizure effect of electroacupuncture (EA) at different sites regions of the auricle in awake rats. Sixty male SD rats were randomly divided into model, ear-apex, ear-outer-margin, earlobe, cymba-concha, cavitas-conchae groups (n = 10 in each group). A metal microelectrode (diameter: 50 microm) was implanted into the somatosensary cortex for recording the field potentials (FPs). Epileptic seizure model was established by intraperitoneal injection of pentylenetetrazol (PTZ, 60 mg/kg). EA (20 Hz, 1 mA) was applied to ear-apex, ear-outer-margin, earlobe, cymaba-concha and cavitas-conchae for 30 min, respectively. The epileptic behavior changes (scores) were determined in the light of Racine's method, and the epileptic seizure was assessed according to the epileptic FPs (5-folds above the basic amplitude) of the cerebral cortex. In comparison with the model group, the latency of the first seizure of epilepsy in the ear-outer-margin, earlobe, cymba-concha, cavitas-conchae groups were increased significantly (P epilepsy, and reducing the scores of the epileptic behavior and seizure duration (P 0.05). EA of cymba-concha and cavitas-conchae has a good effect in suppressing epileptic seizures, which may be mediated via the auricular branch of the vagus nerve.

  12. Comparison of thiopental, urethane, and pentobarbital in the study of experimental cardiology in rats in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zorniak, Michal; Mitrega, Katarzyna; Bialka, Szymon; Porc, Maurycy; Krzeminski, Tadeusz F

    2010-07-01

    Despite earlier research studying the influence of anesthetics in arrhythmia models, a lot of controversy remains. The aim was to compare the influence of three anesthetics (60 mg/kg thiopental, 1200 mg/kg urethane, 60 mg/kg pentobarbital intraperitoneally) on ventricular arrhythmias and to combine it with measured hemodynamic parameters to find the most suitable agent for such experiments. In the model of ischemia- and reperfusion-induced arrhythmias in Sprague-Dawley rats, after left anterior descending coronary artery occlusion (7 minutes) and reperfusion (15 minutes), the following parameters have been measured or calculated: mortality index; ventricular fibrillation and tachycardia incidence and duration; systolic, diastolic, and mean arterial blood pressure; heart rate; myocardial index of oxygen consumption; and plasma creatine kinase concentration. Evident depressive action of urethane on heart rate, blood pressures, and myocardial index of oxygen consumption should be reason enough to exclude it from use in such studies. Pentobarbital had no effect on arrhythmias, whereas thiopental was antiarrhythmic. Pentobarbital is the most suitable anesthetic offering stable hemodynamic values during arrhythmia studies. These hemodynamic values, which were similar to physiological values in awake rats, the long arrhythmia duration during reperfusion and approximately 50% mortality index are crucial parameters for evaluating antiarrhythmic drugs.

  13. Superphenix: technical and scientific achievements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guidez, Joel; Prele, Gerard

    2016-04-01

    In this book, the authors propose a synthesis of technical and scientific achievements related to the design, fabrication and eleven-year operation of Superphenix, the most powerful fast breeder reactor ever built and operated. They had the opportunity to use various and important archives maintained by the different involved institutions, actors and companies, such as the CEA with its MADONA database, AREVA and EDF. They address all the different fields: construction, chemistry, exploitation, handling, small and large components, materials, fuel manufacturing, environmental assessment, thermal hydraulics, the sodium-water reaction, sodium fires, the release of residual power, in-service inspection, and dismantling operations. Moreover, a chapter addresses design studies for Superphenix 2 and for the European Fast Reactor (EFR) which should be the successors of Superphenix

  14. Music training and mathematics achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheek, J M; Smith, L R

    1999-01-01

    Iowa Tests of Basic Skills (ITBS) mathematics scores of eighth graders who had received music instruction were compared according to whether the students were given private lessons. Comparisons also were made between students whose lessons were on the keyboard versus other music lessons. Analyses indicated that students who had private lessons for two or more years performed significantly better on the composite mathematics portion of the ITBS than did students who did not have private lessons. In addition, students who received lessons on the keyboard had significantly higher ITBS mathematics scores than did students whose lessons did not involve the keyboard. These results are discussed in relation to previous research on music training and mathematics achievement.

  15. Achieving Nuclear Sustainability through Innovation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    In 2000, the IAEA Member States recognized that concerted and coordinated research and development is needed to drive innovation that ensures that nuclear energy can help meet energy needs sustainably in the 21st century. Following an IAEA General Conference resolution, an international 'think tank' and dialogue forum were established. The resulting organization, the IAEA's International Project on Innovative Nuclear Reactors and Fuel Cycles (INPRO), helps nuclear technology holders and users coordinate the national and international studies, research and other activities needed to achieve innovations in nuclear reactor designs and fuel cycles. Currently, 38 countries plus the European Commission are participating in the project. This group includes both developing and developed economies that represent more than 75% of the world's population and 85% of its gross domestic product. INPRO undertakes collaborative projects among IAEA Member States, which analyse development scenarios and examine how nuclear energy can support the United Nations' goals for sustainable development in the 21st century. The results of these projects can be applied by IAEA Member States in their national nuclear energy strategies and can lead to international cooperation resulting in beneficial innovations in nuclear energy technology and its deployment. For example, INPRO studies the 'back end' of the fuel cycle, including recycling of spent fuel to increase resource use efficiency and to reduce the waste disposal burdens.

  16. School sport and academic achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, John; Keane, Francis; Crawford, Susan

    2013-01-01

    Physical Education and School Sport (PESS) is an integral part of the school curriculum in Ireland. Historically the "Healthy Body, Healthy Mind" philosophy has promoted the inclusion of PESS alongside more cognitive school subjects. Research suggests that PESS can promote cognitive function and provide educational benefits. However, there is little research on how the choice of school sport influences academic achievement. This study investigated how participation in school sport influences the Leaving Certificate points score in an Irish secondary school. In particular, the study will investigate how the particular sport chosen by students participating in school sport during their Leaving Certificate years influences their Leaving Certificate results. We recorded the Leaving Certificate scores and sports participation from 402 boys graduating from a secondary school in the Ireland during 2008-2011. Sports participation was assigned 1 of 4 categories: rugby, rowing, soccer, and no sport. Participation in sports during the Leaving Certificate years conferred a 25.4-point benefit to the final Leaving Certificate score. However, participation in rowing, the only individual sport available in the study, resulted in significantly higher Leaving Certificate scores than rugby, soccer and no sport (p benefit over the next highest group, rugby. Promoting participation in school sport and providing access to a range of team and individual sports throughout the secondary school years may be a beneficial way to improve students' Leaving Certificate results. © 2013, American School Health Association.

  17. Achieving excellence through organizational values.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeForest, C; Lazio, M M; Rayder, N

    1986-03-01

    By focusing on its mission values, a hospital can enhance the quality of patient care, improve staff morale, promote cost-effectiveness, and achieve a competitive advantage in the hospital marketplace. Since 1979 Saint Joseph Hospital, Kansas City, MO, has conducted a project to clarify and apply its values to the organization's overall direction and the everyday work setting. The project has proven that a concentration on mission values can benefit both the hospital's basic "spirit" and its bottom line. Twelve guiding principles are essential to creating a values-focused hospital: 1. Begin with a commitment. 2. Identify, involve, and educate "stakeholders". 3. Identify and use appropriate resources. 4. Assess organizational needs. 5. Identify the organization's values. 6. Translate mission values into everyday language. 7. Use an explicit, visible process built with a core set of process tools. 8. Document and showcase results. 9. Link the values work to the organization's overall direction and goals and to day-to-day management issues. 10. Think and act strategically. 11. Weave values focus into the fabric of the organization to ensure permanence and long-term success. 12. Model behavior on values.

  18. The dynamics of cortical neuronal activity in the first minutes after spontaneous awakening in rats and mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyazovskiy, Vladyslav V; Cui, Nanyi; Rodriguez, Alexander V; Funk, Chadd; Cirelli, Chiara; Tononi, Giulio

    2014-08-01

    Upon awakening from sleep, a fully awake brain state is not reestablished immediately, but the origin and physiological properties of the distinct brain state during the first min after awakening are unclear. To investigate whether neuronal firing immediately upon arousal is different from the remaining part of the waking episode, we recorded and analyzed the dynamics of cortical neuronal activity in the first 15 min after spontaneous awakenings in freely moving rats and mice. Intracortical recordings of the local field potential and neuronal activity in freely-moving mice and rats. Basic sleep research laboratory. WKY adult male rats, C57BL/6 adult male mice. N/A. In both species the average population spiking activity upon arousal was initially low, though substantial variability in the dynamics of firing activity was apparent between individual neurons. A distinct population of neurons was found that was virtually silent in the first min upon awakening. The overall lower population spiking initially after awakening was associated with the occurrence of brief periods of generalized neuronal silence (OFF periods), whose frequency peaked immediately after awakening and then progressively declined. OFF periods incidence upon awakening was independent of ongoing locomotor activity but was sensitive to immediate preceding sleep/wake history. Notably, in both rats and mice if sleep before a waking episode was enriched in rapid eye movement sleep, the incidence of OFF periods was initially higher as compared to those waking episodes preceded mainly by nonrapid eye movement sleep. We speculate that an intrusion of sleep-like patterns of cortical neuronal activity into the wake state immediately after awakening may account for some of the changes in the behavior and cognitive function typical of what is referred to as sleep inertia. Vyazovskiy VV, Cui N, Rodriguez AV, Funk C, Cirelli C, Tononi G. The dynamics of cortical neuronal activity in the first minutes after

  19. Achieving monospermy or preventing polyspermy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dale B

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Brian Dale Centre for Assisted Fertilization, Naples, Italy Abstract: Images of sea urchin oocytes with hundreds of spermatozoa attached to their surface have fascinated scientists for over a century and led to the idea that oocytes have evolved mechanisms to allow the penetration of one spermatozoon while repelling supernumerary spermatozoa. Popular texts have extrapolated this concept, to the mammals and amphibians, and in many cases to include all the Phyla. Here, it is argued that laboratory experiments, using sea urchin oocytes deprived of their extracellular coats and inseminated at high densities, are artifactual and that the experiments leading to the idea of a fast block to polyspermy are flawed. Under natural conditions, the number of spermatozoa at the site of fertilization is extremely low, compared with the numbers generated. The sperm:oocyte ratio is regulated first by dilution in externally fertilizing species and the female reproductive tract in those with internal fertilization, followed by a bottleneck created by the oocytes extracellular coats. In order to progress to the oocyte plasma membrane, the fertilizing spermatozoon must encounter and respond to a correct sequence of signals from the oocytes extracellular coats. Those that do not, are halted in their progression by defective signaling and fall to the wayside. Final success and entry is finely tuned by the spermatozoon anchoring to an actin-rich predetermined site on the plasma membrane. In this review, the variation in the form, function, and number of gametes produced across the animal kingdom and the many ways in which sperm–oocyte interactions are regulated to reduce numbers are discussed. Since in nature, final sperm:oocyte ratios approach unity it would appear that selective pressures have favored the achievement of monospermy, rather than the evolution of polyspermy preventing mechanisms. Keywords: monospermy, natural conditions, polyspermy, laboratory

  20. Extract and fraction from Ulmus wallichiana Planchon promote peak bone achievement and have a nonestrogenic osteoprotective effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharan, Kunal; Siddiqui, Jawed A; Swarnkar, Gaurav; Tyagi, Abdul Malik; Kumar, Avinash; Rawat, Preeti; Kumar, Manmeet; Nagar, Geet K; Arya, Kamal R; Manickavasagam, Lakshmi; Jain, Girish K; Maurya, Rakesh; Chattopadhyay, Naibedya

    2010-03-01

    This study aimed to determine the skeletal effects of total ethanolic extract (TEE) and its butanolic fraction (BF) from the stem-bark of Ulmus wallichiana, which is rich in C-glycosylated flavonoids, in growing rats (for peak bone [PB] achievement) and in ovariectomized (OVx) rats (for menopausal bone loss). TEE (750 mg kg(-1) d(-1)) and BF (50 mg kg(-1) d(-1)) were given orally for 10 weeks to weaning female Sprague-Dawley rats and for 12 weeks to adult OVx rats of the same strain, respectively. In studies with OVx rats, sham operated + vehicle, OVx + 17beta-estradiol, and OVx + vehicle groups served as various controls. Bone mineral density (BMD), biomechanical strength, bone histology, formations of osteoprogenitor cells, osteoid formation, and bone turnover/resorption markers were studied. Bioactive marker compounds in TEE and BF were analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography. One-way analysis of variance was used to test significance of effects. In growing rats, both TEE and BF increased BMD, bone strength, and bone formation rate, suggesting higher PB achievement. OVx rats treated with either TEE or BF exhibited increased BMD at various anatomical positions and improved bone strength and trabecular architecture compared with the OVx + vehicle group. Serum osteocalcin and urinary type 1 collagen degradation product levels in OVx rats treated with either TEE or BF were significantly lower than those of the OVx + vehicle group. Neither TEE nor BF exhibited uterine estrogenicity. Analysis of marker compounds revealed significant enrichment of two bioactive markers in BF over TEE. Derived from U wallichiana, BF at much a lower dose than TEE was effective in PB achievement and prevention of OVx-induced bone loss.

  1. SWEEP Project RAT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibsen, Lars Bo; Madsen, Søren; Petersen, L. B.

    This report presents the results from the design analyses made for the clustered suction caisson used as foundation for a Riser Access Tower (RAT). The RAT is intended built next to the K15-FA-1 Platform in the Dutch Sector of the North Sea.......This report presents the results from the design analyses made for the clustered suction caisson used as foundation for a Riser Access Tower (RAT). The RAT is intended built next to the K15-FA-1 Platform in the Dutch Sector of the North Sea....

  2. Rectal dexmedetomidine in rats: evaluation of sedative and mucosal effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Volkan Hanci

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: In this study, we investigated the anesthetic and mucosal effects of the rectal application of dexmedetomidine to rats. METHODS: Male Wistar albino rats weighing 250-300 g were divided into four groups: Group S (n = 8 was a sham group that served as a baseline for the normal basal values; Group C (n = 8 consisted of rats that received the rectal application of saline alone; Group IPDex (n = 8 included rats that received the intraperitoneal application of dexmedetomidine (100 µg kg-1; and Group RecDex (n = 8 included rats that received the rectal application of dexmedetomidine (100 µg kg-1. For the rectal drug administration, we used 22 G intravenous cannulas with the stylets removed. We administered the drugs by advancing the cannula 1 cm into the rectum, and the rectal administration volume was 1 mL for all the rats. The latency and anesthesia time (min were measured. Two hours after rectal administration, 75 mg kg-1 ketamine was administered for intraperitoneal anesthesia in all the groups, followed by the removal of the rats' rectums to a distal distance of 3 cm via an abdominoperineal surgical procedure. We histopathologically examined and scored the rectums. RESULTS: Anesthesia was achieved in all the rats in the Group RecDex following the administration of dexmedetomidine. The onset of anesthesia in the Group RecDex was significantly later and of a shorter duration than in the Group IPDEx (p < 0.05. In the Group RecDex, the administration of dexmedetomidine induced mild-moderate losses of mucosal architecture in the colon and rectum, 2 h after rectal inoculation. CONCLUSION: Although 100 µg kg-1 dexmedetomidine administered rectally to rats achieved a significantly longer duration of anesthesia compared with the rectal administration of saline, our histopathological evaluations showed that the rectal administration of 100 µg kg-1 dexmedetomidine led to mild-moderate damage to the mucosal structure of the

  3. An Analysis of High School Mathematics Achievement and English Language Arts Achievement as Predictors of Science Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Anthony C.

    2012-01-01

    Science assessments require students to read and comprehend questions and to solve mathematical problems. The purpose of this study is to determine whether the following variables can be used to predict science achievement: English language arts achievement, mathematics achievement, socioeconomic status (SES), limited English proficiency (LEP)…

  4. The Relationship among Achievement Motivation Orientations, Achievement Goals, and Academic Achievement and Interest: A Multiple Mediation Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abd-El-Fattah, Sabry M.; Patrick, Rosan R.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the present study is to examine the relationships among achievement motivation orientations and academic achievement and interest and whether achievement goals mediate these relationships. A sample of 503 students aged 14-16 years from 8 secondary schools in two Australia cities responded to a questionnaire package, comprising measures…

  5. Academic Self-Concept, Achievement Goals, and Achievement: Is Their Relation the Same for Academic Achievers and Underachievers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preckel, Franzis; Brunner, Martin

    2015-01-01

    This longitudinal study investigated the contribution of achievement goals and academic self-concept for the prediction of unexpected academic achievement (i.e., achievement that is higher or lower than expected with respect to students' cognitive ability) in general and when comparing groups of extreme over- and underachievers. Our sample…

  6. Rat Bite Fever

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Español Text Size Email Print Share Rat Bite Fever Page Content Article Body Rat-bite fever is a disease that occurs in humans who ... ingestion of contaminated food or milk products (Haverhill fever). Most cases in the United States are caused ...

  7. Colon of the rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindstroem, C.G.; Rosengren, J.-E.; Fork, F.-T.

    1979-01-01

    The anatomy and radiologic appearance of the colon in rats are described on the basis of 300 animals treated with carcinogenic agents and 40 normal rats. The macroscopic and microscopic appearance of the mucosa varies in the different parts of the colon. Lymphoid plaques are normal structures. The results justify a new anatomic nomenclature. (Auth.)

  8. Impaired mitochondrial respiration and protein nitration in the rat hippocampus after acute inhalation of combustion smoke

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Heung M.; Reed, Jason; Greeley, George H.; Englander, Ella W.

    2009-01-01

    Survivors of massive inhalation of combustion smoke endure critical injuries, including lasting neurological complications. We have previously reported that acute inhalation of combustion smoke disrupts the nitric oxide homeostasis in the rat brain. In this study, we extend our findings and report that a 30-minute exposure of awake rats to ambient wood combustion smoke induces protein nitration in the rat hippocampus and that mitochondrial proteins are a sensitive nitration target in this setting. Mitochondria are central to energy metabolism and cellular signaling and are critical to proper cell function. Here, analyses of the mitochondrial proteome showed elevated protein nitration in the course of a 24-hour recovery following exposure to smoke. Mass spectrometry identification of several significantly nitrated mitochondrial proteins revealed diverse functions and involvement in central aspects of mitochondrial physiology. The nitrated proteins include the ubiquitous mitochondrial creatine kinase, F1-ATP synthase α subunit, dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase (E3), succinate dehydrogenase Fp subunit, and voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC1) protein. Furthermore, acute exposure to combustion smoke significantly compromised the respiratory capacity of hippocampal mitochondria. Importantly, elevated protein nitration and reduced mitochondrial respiration in the hippocampus persisted beyond the time required for restoration of normal oxygen and carboxyhemoglobin blood levels after the cessation of exposure to smoke. Thus, the time frame for intensification of the various smoke-induced effects differs between blood and brain tissues. Taken together, our findings suggest that nitration of essential mitochondrial proteins may contribute to the reduction in mitochondrial respiratory capacity and underlie, in part, the brain pathophysiology after acute inhalation of combustion smoke

  9. Effect of tempol on myocardial vascular remodeling in female spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonacasa, B; Hernández, I; Fenoy, F J; Quesada, T; López, B

    2012-08-01

    The present study evaluated whether the treatment with the superoxide anion dismutase mimetic tempol prevents the worsening in hypertension and in myocardial vascular remodeling induced by ovariectomy in female spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). Experiments were performed in ten week old female SHRs randomly assigned to the groups: intact (INT: given vehicle; INT+T: treated with tempol, 90 mg/kg/day), ovariectomized (OVX: vehicle and OVX+T: tempol, respectively) and ovariectomized treated with 17β-estradiol (OVX+E2 and OVX+E2+T). Evolution of systolic blood pressure (SBP) was determined every other week in lightly restrained awake rats using a noninvasive computerized tail-cuff plethysmography system. At 18 weeks of age the heart was excised and structural changes in histopathological sections of coronary vessels were quantified on a computerized imaging system analyzer. SBP was significantly lower in female SHRs treated with tempol compared to the values measured in untreated animals. In the vascular remodeling of myocardial arterioles, OVX+T rats had a lower media cross sectional area and media-to-lumen ratio than those observed in the OVX SHR. Interestingly, treatment with tempol in the presence of estradiol (in female INT and OVX+E2 SHR ) increased media cross sectional area and wall-to-lumen ratio of myocardial arterioles, despite the fact that it lowered arterial pressure in those groups. These results indicate that tempol prevents arterial hypertension and blunts myocardial vascular remodeling in ovariectomized SHR. Paradoxically, when tempol is given in presence of estradiol it has a detrimental effect on myocardial arteriolar remodeling.

  10. N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor independent changes in expression of polysialic acid-neural cell adhesion molecule despite blockade of homosynaptic long-term potentiation and heterosynaptic long-term depression in the awake freely behaving rat dentate gyrus

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rodríguez Arellano, Jose Julio; Dallerac, G. M.; Tabuchi, M.; Davies, H.A.; Colyer, F. M.; Stewart, M.G.; Doyere, V.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 4, 03 (2008), s. 169-178 ISSN 1740-925X Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390703 Keywords : Adhesion molecules * hippocampus * synaptic plasticity Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 0.937, year: 2008

  11. Achievement motives, self-efficacy, achievement goals, and academic achievement at multiple stages of education: a longitudinal analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjørnebekk, Gunnar; Diseth, Age; Ulriksen, Robin

    2013-06-01

    The present study investigated the joint effects of achievement motives, self-efficacy, and achievement goals as predictors of subsequent academic achievement among educational science students. A longitudinal research design allowed for measurement of motivational variables at several stages of education during bachelor courses (subsequent to the introductory courses), firstly by measuring achievement motives, secondly by self-efficacy and achievement goals. Subsequently, students' academic achievement level was measured at four different points in time, until they finished the last course for their bachelor degrees. A multivariate path analysis showed consistent relations between the motivational variables. The motive to avoid failure positively predicted the adoption of avoidance goals (both mastery and performance) and negatively predicted self-efficacy. Academic achievement was mainly predicted by the motive for success and performance-avoidance goals. The path analysis also showed strong relationships between the examination grades at different points in time.

  12. Addressing Academic Dishonesty among the Highest Achievers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Angela D.; Murdock, Tamera B.; Grotewiel, Morgan M.

    2017-01-01

    Although research shows that higher-achieving students report engaging in cheating behaviors less frequently than lower-achieving students, the cheating rates among this population are still startling. Certain aspects of the context of being a high-achieving student support academic dishonesty. We investigate integrity among the highest achievers…

  13. FFTF operations - 1980 - a year of achievement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newland, D.J.; Bliss, R.J.

    1981-01-01

    The year 1980 saw FFTF achieve initial criticality, proceed through an intense maintenance and system testing period, and achieve a remarkably successful two-day full power (400 MW) demonstration run. These achievements were preceded by two and one-half years of plant startup activity

  14. Reduced capacity of autonomic and baroreflex control associated with sleep pattern in spontaneously hypertensive rats with a nondipping profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chieh-Wen; Kuo, Terry B J; Chen, Chun-Yu; Yang, Cheryl C H

    2017-03-01

    Ambulatory blood pressure (BP) monitoring with a lack of nocturnal BP fall (BP nondipping) has been reported to be more prevalent among hypertensive populations and is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease than in patients with dipping pattern. However, its underlying mechanism is not fully understood. This study hypothesized that spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs) with a nondipping profile have an exaggerated disruption of both autonomic functioning and sleep compared with Wistar-Kyoto rats (WKYs) with a nondipping profile. Continuous power spectral analysis of electroencephalogram, electromyogram, and cardiovascular variability was performed in WKYs and SHRs over 24 h. BP dipping was assessed as the percentage decline in SBP from dark active waking to light quiet sleep (lQS). According to the human definition of BP dipping (10%), we divided WKYs and SHRs into dipper and nondipper groups individually. Of the four groups, both parasympathetic activity and baroreflex sensitivity in sleep were the lowest in the SHR nondippers. Compared with the WKY nondippers, the SHR nondippers spent more time awake and less time asleep during the light period and the opposite during the dark period. Moreover, they showed more interruptions and a lower delta power percentage of lQS. Correlation analysis revealed that baroreflex sensitivity during lQS was correlated with the BP dipping percentage in SHRs. SHR nondippers exhibit poor sleep quality and impaired autonomic functioning to a greater degree than do SHR dippers and WKY nondippers, which may account for a higher cardiovascular risk in this population.

  15. Armodafinil, the R-enantiomer of modafinil: wake-promoting effects and pharmacokinetic profile in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisor, Jonathan P; Dement, William C; Aimone, Lisa; Williams, Michael; Bozyczko-Coyne, Donna

    2006-11-01

    Modafinil reduces the excessive sleepiness associated with narcolepsy, obstructive sleep apnea/hypopnea syndrome, and shift work sleep disorder. In rats, modafinil promotes dose-dependent increases in wake duration. The wake-promoting activity of the R-enantiomer of modafinil (armodafinil) was evaluated in WKY rats and compared to the classical stimulant, D-methamphetamine. Electroencephalographic and electromyographic signals were assessed via a tethered cranial implant. Body temperature and locomotor activity were assessed by telemetry via intraperitoneal implant. Rats (n=60, 12 per group) were subjected to one of five parallel treatments: armodafinil at 30, 100 and 300 mg/kg i.p.; D-methamphetamine, 1 mg/kg i.p. and vehicle. Armodafinil and D-methamphetamine increased time spent awake relative to vehicle. Armodafinil-evoked increases in wake duration were dose-dependent and proportional to plasma compound exposure. Induction of wakefulness by D-methamphetamine was associated with an approximately two-fold increase in locomotor activity during the 2-h period immediately following administration relative to vehicle. D-methamphetamine also increased body temperature over the same time interval. The dose of armodafinil (100 mg/kg, i.p.) that was closest to D-methamphetamine in its wake-promoting efficacy did not produce changes in either body temperature or the intensity of locomotor activity relative to vehicle. Acute rebound hypersomnolence, characterized by increases in non-rapid eye movement sleep (NREMS) as a percentage of time and NREMS bout duration and by a decreased frequency of brief awakenings following sleep deprivation, occurred following D-methamphetamine-but not armodafinil-induced wake in this rat model which has been shown to be predictive of human drug responses.

  16. Dichloroacetate prevents hypoxic lactic acidosis in rats | Bosco ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    acidosis, particularly in the cerebral tissue and the cerebrospinal fluid. Assess the efficiency of dichloroacetate in the prevention of hypoxia-induced lactic acidosis. We used adult rats, 3 months old, with a weight of 250-300 grams. Anesthesia was achieved by intraperitoneal injection of pentobarbital (Nembutal®), at the ...

  17. Three brief assessments of math achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, Eric T; Ashcraft, Mark H

    2012-12-01

    Because of wide disparities in college students' math knowledge-that is, their math achievement-studies of cognitive processing in math tasks also need to assess their individual level of math achievement. For many research settings, however, using existing math achievement tests is either too costly or too time consuming. To solve this dilemma, we present three brief tests of math achievement here, two drawn from the Wide Range Achievement Test and one composed of noncopyrighted items. All three correlated substantially with the full achievement test and with math anxiety, our original focus, and all show acceptable to excellent reliability. When lengthy testing is not feasible, one of these brief tests can be substituted.

  18. The Effect of Thyroid Hormone, Prostaglandin E2, and Calcium Gluconate on Orthodontic Tooth Movement and Root Resorption in Rats

    OpenAIRE

    Seifi, Massoud; Hamedi, Roya; Khavandegar, Zohre

    2015-01-01

    Statement of the Problem: A major objective of investigators is to clarify the role of metabolites in achievement of maximum tooth movement with minimal root damage during orthodontic tooth movement (OTM). Purpose: The aim of this study was to determine the effect of administration of thyroid hormone, prostaglandin E2, and calcium on orthodontic tooth movement and root resorption in rats. Materials and Method: Sixty four male Wistar rats were randomly divided into 8 groups of eight rat...

  19. Longtransplantatie bij de rat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marck, Klaas Willem

    1983-01-01

    Op grond van de resultaten van het hierboven beschreven onderzoek en de eraan gewijde beschouwingen zijn de volgende conclasies getrokken: 1. Orthotope linkszijdige longtransplantatie bij de rat is operatietechnisch mogelijk. 2. Longpercusiescintigrafie met radioactief ,,gelabelde" microbolletjes is

  20. Rat-bite fever

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streptobacillary fever; Streptobacillosis; Haverhill fever; Epidemic arthritic erythema; Spirillary fever; Sodoku ... Rat-bite fever can be caused by either of 2 different bacteria, Streptobacillus moniliformis or Spirillum minus. Both of these are ...

  1. Self-Esteem and Reading Achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweet, Anne E.; Burbach, Harold J.

    This study investigated the directionality of the relationship between self-esteem and reading achievement in 286 students in Lynchburg, Virginia. During the first year of the three-year study, subjects were fourth, fifth, and sixth graders. The Coopersmith Self-Esteem Inventory and the SRA Achievement Series subscales were administered; sex and…

  2. Subgroup Achievement and Gap Trends: Delaware

    Science.gov (United States)

    Center on Education Policy, 2010

    2010-01-01

    In grade 8 (the only grade in which subgroup trends were analyzed by achievement level), Delaware students showed consistent gains in math at the basic, proficient, and advanced levels for racial/ethnic subgroups, low income students, and boys and girls. There were mixed results in reading. Achievement gaps narrowed in both reading and math in…

  3. Subgroup Achievement and Gap Trends: Massachusetts, 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Center on Education Policy, 2010

    2010-01-01

    This paper profiles the student subgroup achievement and gap trends in Massachusetts for 2010. In grade 8 (the only grade in which subgroup trends were analyzed by achievement level), Massachusetts showed across-the-board gains--improvements in both reading and math at the basic, proficient and advanced levels for all racial/ethnic subgroups, low…

  4. Subgroup Achievement and Gap Trends: Illinois

    Science.gov (United States)

    Center on Education Policy, 2010

    2010-01-01

    In grade 8 (the only grade in which subgroup trends were analyzed by achievement level), Illinois students showed mostly gains in both reading and math at the basic, proficient, and advanced levels for racial/ethnic subgroups, low income students, and boys and girls. There was mixed progress made in narrowing achievement gaps in reading and math…

  5. Subgroup Achievement and Gap Trends: Kentucky, 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Center on Education Policy, 2010

    2010-01-01

    This paper profiles the student subgroup achievement and gap trends in Kentucky for 2010. In grade 8 (the only grade in which subgroup trends were analyzed by achievement level), Kentucky showed mostly gains in both reading and math at the basic, proficient, and advanced levels for racial/ethnic subgroups, low income students, and boys and girls.…

  6. Subgroup Achievement and Gap Trends: Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Center on Education Policy, 2010

    2010-01-01

    In grade 8 (the only grade in which subgroup trends were analyzed by achievement level), Florida students showed gains almost across the board in both reading and math at the basic, proficient, and advanced levels for racial/ethnic subgroups, low income students, and boys and girls. Progress has been made in narrowing achievement gaps in both…

  7. Youth Perspectives of Achievement: Is Money Everything?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matope, Jasmine; Badroodien, Azeem

    2015-01-01

    This article draws from a qualitative research project completed at Victoria High School (pseudonym) in Cape Town in 2012 which explored 13 learners' perspectives of achievement and its influence on their lives and thinking. The piece problematises and analyses taken-for-granted connections between money, achievement, youth aspirations and views…

  8. Razalas' Grouping Method and Mathematics Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar, Douglas A.

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to raise the achievement level of students in Integral Calculus using Direct Instruction with Razalas' Method of Grouping. The study employed qualitative and quantitative analysis relative to data generated by the Achievement Test and Math journal with follow-up interview. Within the framework of the limitations of the study, the…

  9. Achievement Goals and Means: A Cultural Comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niles, Sushila

    1998-01-01

    Achievement goals and means were examined with 259 Anglo Australian adults (individualist culture) and 300 Sri Lankans (collectivist culture). Results reflect an individualist orientation in preferred achievement goals among Australians. Sri Lankans, although predominantly more family and group oriented, also have important individual goals. Both…

  10. Teacher Evaluation Practices and Student Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyon, Lucy Kay

    2010-01-01

    Extensive research has been conducted on improving student academic achievement and techniques to improve student learning. There has been little research that addresses the relationship between student achievement and teacher performance. The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between performance-based teacher evaluation…

  11. Psychological Adjustment and Academic Achievement among Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmood, Khalid; Iqbal, Muhammad Maqsood

    2015-01-01

    This study was studied that emotional and behavioural problems of young students who are directly related to their academic achievement and thus play a vital role in the development of young learners carrier. This study helped to fill a gap by conducting an exploration of psychological adjustment and academic achievement among adolescents. It also…

  12. Subgroup Achievement and Gap Trends: Nevada, 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Center on Education Policy, 2010

    2010-01-01

    This paper profiles the student subgroup achievement and gap trends in Nevada for 2010. In grade 8 (the only grade in which subgroup trends were analyzed by achievement level), Nevada showed across-the-board gains--improvements in both reading and math at the basic, proficient and advanced levels for all racial/ethnic subgroups, low income…

  13. Personality, Approaches to Learning and Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanberg, Anne Berit; Martinsen, Oyvind Lund

    2010-01-01

    The present study investigated the relationships between the five-factor model of personality, approaches to learning and academic achievement. Based on the previous research, we expected approaches to have a mediating effect between personality and academic achievement. Six hundred and eighty-seven business students participated in a survey; 56%…

  14. A Multivariate Model of Achievement in Geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, MarLynn; Taasoobshirazi, Gita; Carr, Martha

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that several key variables influence student achievement in geometry, but no research has been conducted to determine how these variables interact. A model of achievement in geometry was tested on a sample of 102 high school students. Structural equation modeling was used to test hypothesized relationships among…

  15. TV Commercials as Achievement Scripts for Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geis, F. L.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Women who viewed four current, sex-stereotyped commercials emphasized homemaking over other achievement concerns in imagining their lives 10 years hence. Women who saw same commercials with sex roles reversed put significantly greater emphasis on their own achievement aspirations. Their more equal weighting of home and career matched men's. (CMG)

  16. Health and Nutrition: Preconditions for Educational Achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negussie, Birgit

    This paper discusses the importance of maternal and infant health for children's educational achievement. Education, health, and nutrition are so closely related that changes in one causes changes in the others. Improvement of maternal and preschooler health and nutrition is a precondition for improved educational achievement. Although parental…

  17. ethiopian students' achievement challenges in science education

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    IICBA01

    The results showed that strong relationship existed between science achievement and school resource ... achievement in particular occurs in a social context and that much of what is learned is gained through .... boys and girls in their academic self-concept of science and science learning in each category of academic ...

  18. High academic achievement in psychotic students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Defries, Z; Grothe, L

    1978-02-01

    The authors studied 21 schizophrenic and borderline college students who achieved B+ or higher grade averages and underwent psychotherapy while in college. High academic achievement was found to provide relief from feelings of worthlessness and ineffectuality resulting from poor relationships with parents, siblings, and peers. Psychotherapy and the permissive yet supportive college atmosphere reinforced the students' self-esteem.

  19. Sex differences in adults' motivation to achieve

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Sluis, S.; Vinkhuyzen, A.A.E.; Boomsma, D.I.; Posthuma, D.

    2010-01-01

    Achievement motivation is considered a prerequisite for success in academic as well as non-academic settings. We studied sex differences in academic and general achievement motivation in an adult sample of 338 men and 497 women (ages 18-70 years). Multi-group covariance and means structure analysis

  20. Achievement Goals of Medical Students and Physicians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babenko, Oksana; Daniels, Lia M.; White, Jonathan; Oswald, Anna; Ross, Shelley

    2018-01-01

    In achievement settings, the types of motivation individuals develop are crucial to their success and to the ways in which they respond to challenges. Considering the competitive nature of medical education and the high stakes of medical practice, it is important to know what types of motivation (conceptualized here as achievement goals) medical…

  1. Sex Differences in Adults' Motivation to Achieve

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Sluis, Sophie; Vinkhuyzen, Anna A. E.; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Posthuma, Danielle

    2010-01-01

    Achievement motivation is considered a prerequisite for success in academic as well as non-academic settings. We studied sex differences in academic and general achievement motivation in an adult sample of 338 men and 497 women (ages 18-70 years). Multi-group covariance and means structure analysis (MG-CMSA) for ordered categorical data was used…

  2. Information Technology Diffusion: Impact on Student Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Gregory M.; Lind, Mary L.

    2011-01-01

    For student achievement, the diffusion and adoption of information technology (IT) infrastructure enabled by special funding was posited to have a positive impact on student achievement. Four urban school districts provided the context for this study to assess the impact of IT adoption on standardized test scores.

  3. Mathematic Achievement of Canadian Private School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadigan, Francoise Jane; Wei, Yichun; Clifton, Rodney A.

    2013-01-01

    Very little Canadian research has examined the academic achievement of private school students. Data from The Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) 2003 were used to examine the achievement of private school students. The study found that private school students outperformed their public school peers. In addition, the students'…

  4. Achieving Metacognition through Cognitive Strategy Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apaydin, Marina; Hossary, Mohamad

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to present hands-on techniques that could help achieve higher forms of cognitive work of Bloom's learning taxonomy and progress toward self-actualization, the top of Maslow's hierarchy of needs. These results can be achieved by the combination of Apaydin's 3A approach and integrative learning.…

  5. Transoral intratracheal inoculation method for use with neonatal rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Burnes, J; López, A; Lemke, K; Dobbin, G

    2001-04-01

    Studying the effects of toxic and infective compounds on the respiratory system requires a reliable method for delivering inoculum into the distal region of the lung. Although transoral intratracheal inoculation methods have been well documented for adult rats, to the authors' knowledge, a reliable method has not been validated for neonatal rats. The purpose of the study reported here was to develop a simple method for transoral inoculation in rat neonates. Seven-day-old Fischer 344 rats were anesthetized with halothane, and a spinal needle was inserted in the tracheal lumen, by use of illumination and a modified otoscope. Meconium was injected into the lungs as a marker, and the neonates were kept under close observation. After euthanasia at 24 h, lungs were removed and fixed in formalin, and the microscopic distribution of the inoculum was assessed in the left, right cranial, middle, median, and caudal lung lobes. Microscopic examination of lungs indicated that intratracheal inoculation was achieved in 100% of neonatal lungs and the inoculum was consistently distributed in the alveoli of all pulmonary lobes. Important complications or mortality were not observed in the neonates. Intratracheal inoculation of neonatal rats is possible by use of a modified otoscope for transoral illumination. This technique is simple and reproducible and ensures, without complications, widespread distribution of inoculum in the lungs of neonatal rats.

  6. Enriching the hierarchical model of achievement motivation: autonomous and controlling reasons underlying achievement goals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michou, Aikaterini; Vansteenkiste, Maarten; Mouratidis, Athanasios; Lens, Willy

    2014-12-01

    The hierarchical model of achievement motivation presumes that achievement goals channel the achievement motives of need for achievement and fear of failure towards motivational outcomes. Yet, less is known whether autonomous and controlling reasons underlying the pursuit of achievement goals can serve as additional pathways between achievement motives and outcomes. We tested whether mastery approach, performance approach, and performance avoidance goals and their underlying autonomous and controlling reasons would jointly explain the relation between achievement motives (i.e., fear of failure and need for achievement) and learning strategies (Study 1). Additionally, we examined whether the autonomous and controlling reasons underlying learners' dominant achievement goal would account for the link between achievement motives and the educational outcomes of learning strategies and cheating (Study 2). Six hundred and six Greek adolescent students (Mage = 15.05, SD = 1.43) and 435 university students (Mage M = 20.51, SD = 2.80) participated in studies 1 and 2, respectively. In both studies, a correlational design was used and the hypotheses were tested via path modelling. Autonomous and controlling reasons underlying the pursuit of achievement goals mediated, respectively, the relation of need for achievement and fear of failure to aspects of learning outcomes. Autonomous and controlling reasons underlying achievement goals could further explain learners' functioning in achievement settings. © 2014 The British Psychological Society.

  7. Student academic achievement in college chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabibzadeh, Kiana S.

    General Chemistry is required for variety of baccalaureate degrees, including all medical related fields, engineering, and science majors. Depending on the institution, the prerequisite requirement for college level General Chemistry varies. The success rate for this course is low. The purpose of this study is to examine the factors influencing student academic achievement and retention in General Chemistry at the college level. In this study student achievement is defined by those students who earned grades of "C" or better. The dissertation contains in-depth studies on influence of Intermediate Algebra as a prerequisite compared to Fundamental Chemistry for student academic achievement and student retention in college General Chemistry. In addition the study examined the extent and manner in which student self-efficacy influences student academic achievement in college level General Chemistry. The sample for this part of the study is 144 students enrolled in first semester college level General Chemistry. Student surveys determined student self-efficacy level. The statistical analyses of study demonstrated that Fundamental Chemistry is a better prerequisite for student academic achievement and student retention. The study also found that student self-efficacy has no influence on student academic achievement. The significance of this study will be to provide data for the purpose of establishing a uniform and most suitable prerequisite for college level General Chemistry. Finally the variables identified to influence student academic achievement and enhance student retention will support educators' mission to maximize the students' ability to complete their educational goal at institutions of higher education.

  8. Ketamine-induced oscillations in the motor circuit of the rat basal ganglia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Jesús Nicolás

    Full Text Available Oscillatory activity can be widely recorded in the cortex and basal ganglia. This activity may play a role not only in the physiology of movement, perception and cognition, but also in the pathophysiology of psychiatric and neurological diseases like schizophrenia or Parkinson's disease. Ketamine administration has been shown to cause an increase in gamma activity in cortical and subcortical structures, and an increase in 150 Hz oscillations in the nucleus accumbens in healthy rats, together with hyperlocomotion.We recorded local field potentials from motor cortex, caudate-putamen (CPU, substantia nigra pars reticulata (SNr and subthalamic nucleus (STN in 20 awake rats before and after the administration of ketamine at three different subanesthetic doses (10, 25 and 50 mg/Kg, and saline as control condition. Motor behavior was semiautomatically quantified by custom-made software specifically developed for this setting.Ketamine induced coherent oscillations in low gamma (~ 50 Hz, high gamma (~ 80 Hz and high frequency (HFO, ~ 150 Hz bands, with different behavior in the four structures studied. While oscillatory activity at these three peaks was widespread across all structures, interactions showed a different pattern for each frequency band. Imaginary coherence at 150 Hz was maximum between motor cortex and the different basal ganglia nuclei, while low gamma coherence connected motor cortex with CPU and high gamma coherence was more constrained to the basal ganglia nuclei. Power at three bands correlated with the motor activity of the animal, but only coherence values in the HFO and high gamma range correlated with movement. Interactions in the low gamma band did not show a direct relationship to movement.These results suggest that the motor effects of ketamine administration may be primarily mediated by the induction of coherent widespread high-frequency activity in the motor circuit of the basal ganglia, together with a frequency

  9. Psychophysical correspondence between vibrotactile intensity and intracortical microstimulation for tactile neuroprostheses in rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devecioğlu, İsmail; Güçlü, Burak

    2017-02-01

    Objective. Recent studies showed that intracortical microstimulation (ICMS) generates artificial sensations which can be utilized as somatosensory feedback in cortical neuroprostheses. To mimic the natural psychophysical response, ICMS parameters are modulated according to psychometric equivalence functions (PEFs). PEFs match the intensity levels of ICMS and mechanical stimuli, which elicit equal detection probabilities, but they typically do not include the frequency as a control variable. We aimed to establish frequency-dependent PEFs for vibrotactile stimulation of the glabrous skin and ICMS in the primary somatosensory cortex of awake freely behaving rats. Approach. We collected psychometric data for vibrotactile and ICMS detection at three stimulation frequencies (40, 60 and 80 Hz). The psychometric data were fitted with a model equation of two independent variables (stimulus intensity and frequency) and four subject-dependent parameters. For each rat, we constructed a separate PEF which was used to estimate the ICMS current amplitude for a given displacement amplitude and frequency. The ICMS frequency was set equal to the vibrotactile frequency. We validated the PEFs in a modified task which included randomly selected probe trials presented either with a vibrotactile or an ICMS stimulus, and also at frequencies and intensity levels not tested before. Main results. The PEFs were generally successful in estimating the ICMS current intensities (no significant differences between vibrotactile and ICMS trials in Kolmogorov-Smirnov tests). Specifically, hit rates from both trial conditions were significantly correlated in 86% of the cases, and 52% of all data had perfect match in linear regression. Significance. The psychometric correspondence model presented in this study was constructed based on surface functions which define psychophysical detection probability as a function of stimulus intensity and frequency. Therefore, it may be used for the real

  10. Social and environmental contexts modulate sleep deprivation-induced c-Fos activation in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deurveilher, Samuel; Ryan, Nathan; Burns, Joan; Semba, Kazue

    2013-11-01

    People often sleep deprive themselves voluntarily for social and lifestyle reasons. Animals also appear to stay awake longer as a result of their natural curiosity to explore novel environments and interact socially with conspecifics. Although multiple arousal systems in the brain are known to act jointly to promote and maintain wakefulness, it remains unclear whether these systems are similarly engaged during voluntary vs. forced wakefulness. Using c-Fos immunohistochemistry, we compared neuronal responses in rats deprived of sleep for 2 h by gentle sensory stimulation, exploration under social isolation, or exploration with social interaction, and rats under undisturbed control conditions. In many arousal, limbic, and autonomic nuclei examined (e.g., anterior cingulate cortex and locus coeruleus), the two sleep deprivation procedures involving exploration were similarly effective, and both were more effective than sleep deprivation with sensory stimulation, in increasing the number of c-Fos immunoreactive neurons. However, some nuclei (e.g., paraventricular hypothalamic nucleus and select amygdala nuclei) were more responsive to exploration with social interaction, while others (e.g., histaminergic tuberomammillary nucleus) responded more strongly to exploration in social isolation. In the rostral basal forebrain, cholinergic and GABAergic neurons responded preferentially to exploration with social interaction, whereas resident neurons in general responded most strongly to exploration without social interaction. These results indicate that voluntary exploration with/without social interaction is more effective than forced sleep deprivation with gentle sensory stimulation for inducing c-Fos in arousal and limbic/autonomic brain regions, and suggest that these nuclei participate in different aspects of arousal during sustained voluntary wakefulness. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Facilitation of synaptic transmission and pain responses by CGRP in the amygdala of normal rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Guangchen

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP plays an important role in peripheral and central sensitization. CGRP also is a key molecule in the spino-parabrachial-amygdaloid pain pathway. Blockade of CGRP1 receptors in the spinal cord or in the amygdala has antinociceptive effects in different pain models. Here we studied the electrophysiological mechanisms of behavioral effects of CGRP in the amygdala in normal animals without tissue injury. Whole-cell patch-clamp recordings of neurons in the latero-capsular division of the central nucleus of the amygdala (CeLC in rat brain slices showed that CGRP (100 nM increased excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs at the parabrachio-amygdaloid (PB-CeLC synapse, the exclusive source of CGRP in the amygdala. Consistent with a postsynaptic mechanism of action, CGRP increased amplitude, but not frequency, of miniature EPSCs and did not affect paired-pulse facilitation. CGRP also increased neuronal excitability. CGRP-induced synaptic facilitation was reversed by an NMDA receptor antagonist (AP5, 50 μM or a PKA inhibitor (KT5720, 1 μM, but not by a PKC inhibitor (GF109203X, 1 μM. Stereotaxic administration of CGRP (10 μM, concentration in microdialysis probe into the CeLC by microdialysis in awake rats increased audible and ultrasonic vocalizations and decreased hindlimb withdrawal thresholds. Behavioral effects of CGRP were largely blocked by KT5720 (100 μM but not by GF109203X (100 μM. The results show that CGRP in the amygdala exacerbates nocifensive and affective behavioral responses in normal animals through PKA- and NMDA receptor-dependent postsynaptic facilitation. Thus, increased CGRP levels in the amygdala might trigger pain in the absence of tissue injury.

  12. Time course of changes in heart rate and blood pressure variability in rats with myocardial infarction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Aires

    Full Text Available Our aim was to determine the time course of changes in autonomic balance in the acute (1 and 3 days, sub-acute (7 days and chronic (28 days phases of myocardial infarction (MI in rats. Autonomic balance was assessed by temporal and spectral analyses of blood pressure variability (BPV and heart rate variability (HRV. Pulsatile blood pressure (BP recordings (30 min were obtained in awake and unrestrained male Wistar rats (N = 77; 8-10 weeks old with MI (coronary ligature or sham operation (SO. Data are reported as means±SE. The high frequency (HF component (n.u. of HRV was significantly lower in MI-1- (P0.05. This reduction was mainly due to attenuation of the low frequency (LF band of BPV in absolute and normalized units (SO-1=39.3±7%; SO-3=55±4.5%; SO-7=46.8±4.5%; SO-28=45.7±5%; MI-1=13±3.5%; MI-3=35±4.7%; MI-7=25±2.8%; MI-28=21.4±2.8%. The results suggest that the reduction in HRV was associated with decrease of the HF component of HRV suggesting recovery of the vagal control of heartbeats along the post-infarction healing period. The depression of BPV was more dependent on the attenuation of the LF component, which is linked to the baroreflex modulation of the autonomic balance.

  13. Personality and academic achievement in nniversity students

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    Isabel Niño de Guzmán

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available The correlations among personality, academic performance and other variables in 170 university students were studied, using two instruments validated into the population: the NEOPJ-R, and the EPPS. Other variables as age, study level, self perception of academic achievement and self perception of motivation, and sources of support were included. Jt was confirmed the reliability and validity of both tests and the correlations between them. The results showed associations among academic performance and conscientiousness, endurance,change, and aggression. The academic performance was better explained by achievements triving, deliberation, change, self perception of academic achievement and age.

  14. A mediation analysis of achievement motives, goals, learning strategies, and academic achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diseth, Age; Kobbeltvedt, Therese

    2010-12-01

    Previous research is inconclusive regarding antecedents and consequences of achievement goals, and there is a need for more research in order to examine the joint effects of different types of motives and learning strategies as predictors of academic achievement. To investigate the relationship between achievement motives, achievement goals, learning strategies (deep, surface, and strategic), and academic achievement in a hierarchical model. Participants were 229 undergraduate students (mean age: 21.2 years) of psychology and economics at the University of Bergen, Norway. Variables were measured by means of items from the Achievement Motives Scale (AMS), the Approaches and Study Skills Inventory for Students, and an achievement goal scale. Correlation analysis showed that academic achievement (examination grade) was positively correlated with performance-approach goal, mastery goal, and strategic learning strategies, and negatively correlated with performance-avoidance goal and surface learning strategy. A path analysis (structural equation model) showed that achievement goals were mediators between achievement motives and learning strategies, and that strategic learning strategies mediated the relationship between achievement goals and academic achievement. This study integrated previous findings from several studies and provided new evidence on the direct and indirect effects of different types of motives and learning strategies as predictors of academic achievement.

  15. Testosterone as a discriminative stimulus in male rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Ruth I; Vertelkina, Nina V; Antzoulatos, Eleni

    2011-11-01

    Testosterone and other anabolic-androgenic steroids (AAS) are reinforcing in animals, as determined by conditioned place preference or self-administration. Most drugs of abuse produce subjective effects on mood and perception that initiate and maintain drug taking. Whether AAS have similar effects is not known. Food-restricted male Sprague-Dawley rats (n=9) were tested for their ability to discriminate an injection of testosterone from the β-cyclodextrin vehicle using a standard two-lever operant paradigm. In drug discrimination, animals use the subjective effects of drug or vehicle to select the appropriate lever to obtain food pellets under an FR10 schedule of reinforcement. All rats demonstrated vigorous responding for food (1415.1±76.1 responses/20 min) with 94.9% of responses on the active lever. For the first 30 days, rats received 1mg/kg testosterone sc 30 min before testing. On Day 14, one rat achieved the discrimination criteria of 9/10 consecutive days with >90% responses on the active lever and ≤5 responses on the inactive lever before the first reinforcement. Subsequently, rats were tested with testosterone at different doses (2, 7.5, 15 mg/kg at 30 min before testing) and times (2mg/kg at 30 or 60 min before testing), each for 20 days. One additional rat demonstrated successful discrimination at Day 54 with 2mg/kg testosterone 60 min before testing. The remaining 7 rats failed to discriminate testosterone within 110 days. When analyzed according to less-stringent standards, 4 additional rats met criteria for testosterone discrimination. However, continued performance was not stable. Thus, testosterone was unable to consistently support drug discrimination. We conclude that testosterone does not produce rapid interoceptive effects (NIH DA12843 to RIW). Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. School Segregation and Racial Academic Achievement Gaps

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    Sean F. Reardon

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Although it is clear that racial segregation is linked to academic achievement gaps, the mechanisms underlying this link have been debated since James Coleman published his eponymous 1966 report. In this paper, I examine sixteen distinct measures of segregation to determine which is most strongly associated with academic achievement gaps. I find clear evidence that one aspect of segregation in particular—the disparity in average school poverty rates between white and black students’ schools—is consistently the single most powerful correlate of achievement gaps, a pattern that holds in both bivariate and multivariate analyses. This implies that high-poverty schools are, on average, much less effective than lower-poverty schools and suggests that strategies that reduce the differential exposure of black, Hispanic, and white students to poor schoolmates may lead to meaningful reductions in academic achievement gaps.

  17. Creative potential, creative achievement, and personal growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helson, R; Pals, J L

    2000-02-01

    We tested the idea that young people who have creative potential (are complex and unconventional) increase in intrapsychic awareness as they mature but often have difficulty with psychosocial growth, especially the development of a cohesive identity; and that for some women commitment to creative work solves the problem of psychosocial integration and leads to creative achievement. In a longitudinal sample of 109 women, these ideas were supported: Creative potential and creative achievement were both associated with intrapsychic growth but only creative achievement was associated with psychosocial growth. Regression analyses showed that the development of a cohesive identity from early to middle adulthood added to and interacted with creative potential in the prediction of creative achievement.

  18. Identifying Achievement Goals and Their Relationship to Academic Achievement in Undergraduate Pharmacy Students

    OpenAIRE

    Alrakaf, Saleh; Sainsbury, Erica; Rose, Grenville; Smith, Lorraine

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. To compare the achievement goal orientations of first-year with those of third-year undergraduate Australian pharmacy students and to examine the relationship of goal orientations to academic achievement.

  19. Achievement Goals, Learning Strategies and Language Achievement among Peruvian High School Students

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    Lennia Matos

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available We used an achievement goal framework to study the role of motivation in the academic context of a Peruvian sample of 8th to 10th grade high school students (N = 1505. The purpose of this cross-sectional study was to examine the relationship between students' achievement goals, their use of learning strategies and their academic achievement. Multiple Hierarchical Regressions Analyses identified, as predicted, positive effects of mastery goals, including more use of learning strategies and higher academic achievement, and negative effects of performance avoidance goals, including lower academic achievement. Mixed results were found for pursuing performance approach goals, which predicted a greater use of learning strategies, but were unrelated to academic achievement. The present findings support the external validity of achievement goal theory in a sample of students from a culture that is understudied in the achievement goal literature in particular and the motivational literature in general.

  20. Achievement goal profiles and developments in effort and achievement in upper elementary school

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hornstra, L.; Majoor, M.; Peetsma, T.

    2017-01-01

    Background The multiple goal perspective posits that certain combinations of achievement goals are more favourable than others in terms of educational outcomes. Aims This study aimed to examine longitudinally whether students’ achievement goal profiles and transitions between profiles are associated

  1. Optimal Achievable Encoding for Brain Machine Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-22

    AFRL-RH-WP-TP-2017-0001 Optimal Achievable Encoding for Brain- Machine Interface Eduardo Chichilnisky Leland Stanford Junior...Oct 2016 – 30 Sep 2017 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Optimal Achievable Encoding for Brain- Machine Interface 5b...required. First, we developed novel models of retinal encoding that improve upon the state of the art, by using machine learning methods to

  2. The Relationship Between Achievement Responsibility and Achievement Anxiety in relation to Psychopathological Symptoms

    OpenAIRE

    KAPIKIRAN, Necla ACUN

    2008-01-01

    In this study, the relationship between Intellectual Achievement Responsibility and Achievement Anxiety in relation to psychological symptoms has been analyzed by using a survey method. The sample population consisted of 594 ( 302 female and 286 male) high school students (1-2-3. Grades). To measure the Locus of Control in Academic Situations, Intellectual Achievement Responsibility Questionnaire (IAR), to determine the Anxiety in Academic Situations, Achievement Anxiety Testing (AAT) an...

  3. Special education and later academic achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrhardt, Jennifer; Huntington, Noelle; Molino, Janine; Barbaresi, William

    2013-02-01

    To determine whether grade at entry to special education is associated with improved reading achievement in children with reading disorders (RD) and whether the effect of grade at entry to special education differs by socioeconomic status (SES). The authors conducted a secondary data analysis using data from the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study-Kindergarten Cohort (ECLS-K), a nationally representative cohort of children followed longitudinally from kindergarten through eighth grade (1998-2007). Using data from the fifth grade wave of ECLS-K, the authors identified children with RD (n = 290). The outcome of interest was change in score on the reading achievement test, which was developed by ECLS-K staff, between first and fifth grade. Using multiple linear regression, the authors modeled outcome as a function of a child's grade at entry to special education, controlling for several covariates. Early entry to special education (by first grade vs second or third grade) was associated with larger gains in reading achievement between first and fifth grade (p special education by first grade versus second grade gained 4.5 more points on the reading achievement test (p special education by first grade versus third grade gained 1.7 more points on the reading achievement test (p special education between children from families of low and higher SES. For children with RD, early entry to special education is associated with improved reading achievement during elementary school.

  4. Effects of individualized assignments on biology achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kremer, Philip L.

    A pretest-posttest, randomized, two groups, experimental, factorial design compared effects of detailed and nondetailed assignments on biology achievement over seven and a half months. Detailed assignments (favoring field independence and induction) employed block diagrams and stepwise directions. Nondetailed assignments (favoring field dependence and deduction) virtually lacked these. The accessible population was 101 tenth grade preparatory school male students. The 95 students enrolled in first year biology constituted the sample. Two by three ANOVA was done on residualized posttest score means of the students. Totally, the detailed students achieved significantly higher than the nondetailed students. This significantly higher achievement was only true of detailed students in the middle thirds of the deviation intelligence quotient (DIQ) range and of the grade point average (G.P.A.) range after the breakdown into upper, middle, and lower thirds of intellectual capability (ability and achievement). The upper third detailed DIQ grouping indirectly achieved higher than its peers, whereas the lower detailed DIQ third achieved lower than its peers. Thus, high capability students apparently benefit from flow and block diagrams, inductions, field independence, and high structure, whereas low capability students may be hindered by these.

  5. Code Compliant School Buildings Boost Student Achievement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronald B. Lumpkin

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Much of the focus in the literature in raising student achievement has included parental involvement, principal leadership, quality of instruction, students’ socioeconomic status, curriculum, and use of technology. Limited empirical research relates the condition of the school building as a variable that affects student achievement. Furthermore, there is no research that has examined the impact of building codes on achievement outcomes in the state of Florida. This research determined whether academic achievement of 4th-, 8th-, 9th-, and 10th-grade students as measured by the mathematics and reading subtests of the Florida Comprehensive Achievement Test (FCAT increased in new school buildings compliant to the 2000 Florida State Requirements for Educational Facilities. A causal-comparative design determined whether the independent variables, old and new school building influenced student achievement as measured by students’ FCAT mathematics and reading subtest scores. The control group was two cohorts of 4th-, 8th-, 9th-, and 10th-grade students who attended school in old buildings. The experimental group was two cohorts of 4th-, 8th-, 9th-, and 10th-grade students who attended school in new buildings. Transition from an old school into a new school was the treatment. Two hypotheses were formulated for testing and the research question for the inquiry was whether the percentage of students passing the FCAT mathematics and reading subtests increases after transitioning from an old school building into a new 2000 UBC (Uniform Building Code compliant facility.

  6. ASSOCIATION BETWEEN EMOTIONAL VARIABLES AND SCHOOL ACHIEVEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Randler

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Recent psychological studies highlight emotional aspects, and they show an important role within individual learning processes. Hereby, positive emotions were supposed to positively influence learning and achievement processes and negative ones do the contrary. In this study, an educational unit “ecosystem lake” was used during which achievement (three tests and emotional variables (interest, well-being, anxiety and boredom; measured at the end of three pre-selected lessons were monitored. The research question was to explore correlations between emotional variables and the learning outcome of the teaching unit. Prior knowledge was regressed against the subsequent tests to account for its confounding effect. Regressions showed a highly significant influence of prior knowledge on the subsequent measurements of achievement. However, after accounting for prior knowledge, a positive correlation between interest/well-being and achievement and a negative correlation between anxiety/boredom and achievement was found. Further research and interventions should try to enhance positive emotions in biology lessons to positively influence achievement.

  7. Can the Academic Achievement of Korean Students Be Portrayed as a Product of "Shadow Achievement"?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyunjin

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of private tutoring expenditure on two types of Korean students' academic achievements as measured by standardized test achievement and by school performance achievement, applying 5-year data from Korean Educational Longitudinal Study (KELS). It was found that private tutoring expenditure…

  8. Predicting Physics Achievement: Attitude towards Physics, Self-Efficacy of Learning Physics, and Mathematics Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapucu, Serkan

    2017-01-01

    This study aims to explore the relationships among Turkish high school students' attitude towards physics, self-efficacy of learning physics, mathematics achievement, and physics achievement. To investigate the relationships, a unique questionnaire that identifies the attitude, self-efficacy and achievements were delivered to a total of 301 high…

  9. Social Perceptions of Achieving Students and Achievement Goals of Students in Malaysia and the Philippines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardo, Allan B. I.; Ismail, Rosnah

    2010-01-01

    The study investigates the hypothesis that country differences in achievement goals of students are associated with differences in how students with different achievement goals are perceived by students in different cultures. University students from Malaysia and the Philippine were asked to complete questionnaires on their achievement goals and…

  10. Influence of Emotional Intelligence and Need for Achievement on Interpersonal Relations and Academic Achievement of Undergraduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afolabi, Olukayode Ayooluwa; Ogunmwonyi, Edosa; Okediji, Abayomi

    2009-01-01

    This study examined influence of emotional intelligence and need for achievement on interpersonal relations and academic achievement of undergraduates. Questionnaires were administered to one hundred and ten (110) subjects. The independent variables are emotional intelligence and need for achievement, while the dependent variables are…

  11. Student self-esteem and academic achievement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milošević Nikoleta M.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available There is a growing belief that academic achievement is the product of a complex network of teacher-student relations, where the identity of successful and unsuccessful student is developing with high, moderate or low self-esteem level. Self-esteem is most often defined as a conscious cognitive-affective expression of self-evaluation which is one of the most immediate indicators of self-concept integration degree. A number of authors view high self-esteem level as an important prerequisite for high academic achievement. In contrast, academic achievement and other experiences related to teaching and learning are considered to exert significant influence on self-esteem and a student should be successful at school first so as to develop a positive self-image and his academic abilities. The debate on what comes first - self-esteem or academic achievement - is in its character more academic than practical. This claim is supported by an increasing number of studies indicating the dynamism and reciprocity of correlation between academic achievement and self-esteem. The paper gives recommendations for educational practice to promote self-esteem and development of personal and social responsibility, which contributes to better student academic achievement. It is pointed out that teacher education in the field is necessary and that self-esteem and responsibility must become essential segments of curricula. Teacher is expected to become sensitive to the needs of students who are at risk to be unsuccessful and to largely apply cooperative learning methods. Findings demonstrate that cooperative learning either sustain or increase student self-esteem, whereas traditional teaching methods, in general, lead to its decline. Cooperative relations improve student self-image in respect of academic abilities and social interactions. Positive feedback, peer support, more frequent experience of learning achievement leads mainly to general increase in self-esteem and

  12. Effect of corticotropin-releasing factor receptor antagonist on psychologically suppressed masculine sexual behavior in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miwa, Yoshiji; Nagase, Keiko; Oyama, Nobuyuki; Akino, Hironobu; Yokoyama, Osamu

    2011-03-01

    Corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) coordinates various responses of the body to stress, and CRF receptors are important targets of treatment for stress-related disorders. To investigate the effect of a nonselective CRF receptor antagonist, astressin, on suppression of masculine sexual behavior by psychological stress in rats. First, we investigated the influence of psychological stress, induced 2 hours per day for three consecutive days, on sexual behavior. Then, rats were divided into 4 groups: a control group, an astressin administration group (A), a psychological stress loading group (PS), and a psychological stress loading and astressin administration group (PS + A). The rats were exposed to sham or psychological stress for three consecutive days. After the last stress loading, the rats were injected with vehicle or astressin, and their sexual behavior was observed. We also measured serum levels of adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH). The effects of astressin on sexual behavior and serum levels of ACTH in rats affected by psychological stress were determined. Sexual behavior was reduced after psychological stress loading. The PS rats had significantly longer mount, intromission, and ejaculation latencies and lower ejaculation frequency than did the control, A, and PS + A rats. The intromission latency and ejaculation frequency in the PS + A rats did not achieve the level observed in the controls. There was no significant difference in these parameters between the control and A rats. Serum ACTH levels were significantly lower in PS + A rats than in PS rats. Psychologically suppressed masculine sexual behavior could be partially recovered with astressin administration in rats. These data provide a rationale for the further study of CRF receptor antagonists as novel agents for treating psychological sexual disorders. © 2010 International Society for Sexual Medicine.

  13. Cost Savings and Patient Experiences of a Clinic-Based, Wide-Awake Hand Surgery Program at a Military Medical Center: A Critical Analysis of the First 100 Procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhee, Peter C; Fischer, Michelle M; Rhee, Laura S; McMillan, Ha; Johnson, Anthony E

    2017-03-01

    Wide-awake, local anesthesia, no tourniquet (WALANT) hand surgery was developed to improve access to hand surgery care while optimizing medical resources. Hand surgery in the clinic setting may result in substantial cost savings for the United States Military Health Care System (MHS) and provide a safe alternative to performing similar procedures in the operating room. A prospective cohort study was performed on the first 100 consecutive clinic-based WALANT hand surgery procedures performed at a military medical center from January 2014 to September 2015 by a single hand surgeon. Cost savings analysis was performed by using the Medical Expense and Performance Reporting System, the standard cost accounting system for the MHS, to compare procedures performed in the clinic versus the operating room during the study period. A study specific questionnaire was obtained for 66 procedures to evaluate the patient's experience. For carpal tunnel release (n = 34) and A1 pulley release (n = 33), there were 85% and 70% cost savings by having the procedures performed in clinic under WALANT compared with the main operating room, respectively. During the study period, carpal tunnel release, A1 pulley release, and de Quervain release performed in the clinic instead of the operating room amounted to $393,100 in cost savings for the MHS. There were no adverse events during the WALANT procedure. A clinic-based WALANT hand surgery program at a military medical center results in considerable cost savings for the MHS. Economic/Decision Analysis IV. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Effects of Gender, Mathematics Anxiety and Achievement Motivation on College Students’ Achievement in Mathematics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajogbeje Oke James

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The urge to excel or perform maximally in mathematics varies from individual to individual because achievement motivation is often developed or learnt during socialization and learning experiences. The study examined the relationship between College of Education students’ achievement motivation and mathematics achievement, correlation coefficient between mathematics anxiety and college students’ achievement motivation as well as mathematics anxiety and mathematics achievement. The sample, 268 College of Education students offering mathematics as one of their subject combination, was selected using purposive sampling techniques. Three research instruments namely: Mathematics Anxiety Scale (MAS, Achievement Motivation Scale (AMS and Mathematics Achievement Test (MAT were used to collect data for the study. Data collected for the study were analyzed using correlational analysis and ANOVA. The results showed that a significantly low negative correlation coefficient existed between mathematics anxiety and mathematics achievement. There is a negative and significant correlation coefficient between mathematics anxiety and achievement motivation. Similarly, a positive and significant correlation coefficient also exists between achievement motivation and mathematics achievement. Based on the findings of the study, it was recommended that mathematics teachers should adopt activity based strategies and conducive learning environment in order to reduce college students’ anxieties in mathematics learning.

  15. Causal ordering of academic self-concept and achievement: effects of type of achievement measure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinxten, Maarten; De Fraine, Bieke; Van Damme, Jan; D'Haenens, Ellen

    2010-12-01

    The relation between academic self-concept and achievement has been examined in a large number of studies. The majority of these studies have found evidence for a reciprocal effects model. However, there is an ongoing debate on how students' achievement should be measured and whether the type of achievement indicator (grades, tests, teacher ratings) affects the causal pattern found in these studies. The study aims at clarifying how the types of achievement measures and the way they are modelled can affect the results of causal ordering studies. In that sense, the study will yield recommendations for researchers in this domain and also provide some direction for practitioners seeking ways to enhance their students' achievement and/or academic self-concept. Repeated measures of academic self-concept and achievement (standardized tests and teacher ratings) were examined in a sample of 1,753 students in Grades 7, 8, 10, and 12. Structural equation modelling was used. Several models (with different types and numbers of achievement measures) were compared. Only small differences were found between models using one or two indicators of achievement. All models generally supported the reciprocal effects model. However, the final model, wherein tests and teacher ratings were used as separate latent variables, showed different developmental patterns in the causal relation between academic self-concept and achievement. Researchers should interpret the results of causal ordering studies discerningly because the type of measure chosen as an indicator of achievement might affect the causal pattern between academic self-concept and achievement.

  16. Identifying achievement goals and their relationship to academic achievement in undergraduate pharmacy students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alrakaf, Saleh; Sainsbury, Erica; Rose, Grenville; Smith, Lorraine

    2014-09-15

    To compare the achievement goal orientations of first-year with those of third-year undergraduate Australian pharmacy students and to examine the relationship of goal orientations to academic achievement. The Achievement Goal Questionnaire was administered to first-year and third-year students during class time. Students' grades were obtained from course coordinators. More first-year students adopted performance-approach and mastery-approach goals than did third-year students. Performance-approach goals were positively correlated with academic achievement in the first year. Chinese Australian students scored the highest in adopting performance-approach goals. Vietnamese Australian students adopted mastery-avoidance goals more than other ethnicities. First-year students were more strongly performance approach goal-oriented than third-year students. Adopting performance-approach goals was positively correlated with academic achievement, while adopting avoidance goals was not. Ethnicity has an effect on the adoption of achievement goals and academic achievement.

  17. Factors Influencing Seminar Learning and Academic Achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spruijt, Annemarie; Leppink, Jimmie; Wolfhagen, Ineke; Bok, Harold; Mainhard, Tim; Scherpbier, Albert; van Beukelen, Peter; Jaarsma, Debbie

    2015-01-01

    Many veterinary curricula use seminars, interactive educational group formats in which some 25 students discuss questions and issues relating to course themes. To get indications on how to optimize the seminar learning process for students, we aimed to investigate relationships between factors that seem to be important for the seminar learning process, and to determine how these seminar factors account for differences in students' achievement scores. A 57-item seminar evaluation (USEME) questionnaire was administered to students right after they attended a seminar. In total, 80 seminars distributed over years 1, 2, and 3 of an undergraduate veterinary medicine curriculum were sampled and 988 questionnaires were handed in. Principal factor analysis (PFA) was conducted on 410 questionnaires to examine which items could be grouped together as indicators of the same factor, and to determine correlations between the derived factors. Multilevel regression analysis was performed to explore the effects of these seminar factors and students' prior achievement scores on students' achievement scores. Within the questionnaire, four factors were identified that influence the seminar learning process: teacher performance, seminar content, student preparation, and opportunities for interaction within seminars. Strong correlations were found between teacher performance, seminar content, and group interaction. Prior achievement scores and, to a much lesser extent, the seminar factor group interaction appeared to account for differences in students' achievement scores. The factors resulting from the present study and their relation to the method of assessment should be examined further, for example, in an experimental setup.

  18. Comparative Associations Between Achieved Bicultural Identity, Achieved Ego Identity, and Achieved Religious Identity and Adaptation Among Australian Adolescent Muslims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Rayya, Hisham M; Abu-Rayya, Maram H; White, Fiona A; Walker, Richard

    2018-04-01

    This study examined the comparative roles of biculturalism, ego identity, and religious identity in the adaptation of Australian adolescent Muslims. A total of 504 high school Muslim students studying at high schools in metropolitan Sydney and Melbourne, Australia, took part in this study which required them to complete a self-report questionnaire. Analyses indicated that adolescent Muslims' achieved religious identity seems to play a more important role in shaping their psychological and socio-cultural adaptation compared to adolescents' achieved bicultural identity. Adolescents' achieved ego identity tended also to play a greater role in their psychological and socio-cultural adaptation than achieved bicultural identity. The relationships between the three identities and negative indicators of psychological adaptation were consistently indifferent. Based on these findings, we propose that the three identity-based forces-bicultural identity development, religious identity attainment, and ego identity formation-be amalgamated into one framework in order for researchers to more accurately examine the adaptation of Australian adolescent Muslims.

  19. Achieving single channel, full duplex wireless communication

    KAUST Repository

    Choi, Jung Il

    2010-01-01

    This paper discusses the design of a single channel full-duplex wireless transceiver. The design uses a combination of RF and baseband techniques to achieve full-duplexing with minimal effect on link reliability. Experiments on real nodes show the full-duplex prototype achieves median performance that is within 8% of an ideal full-duplexing system. This paper presents Antenna Cancellation, a novel technique for self-interference cancellation. In conjunction with existing RF interference cancellation and digital baseband interference cancellation, antenna cancellation achieves the amount of self-interference cancellation required for full-duplex operation. The paper also discusses potential MAC and network gains with full-duplexing. It suggests ways in which a full-duplex system can solve some important problems with existing wireless systems including hidden terminals, loss of throughput due to congestion, and large end-to-end delays. Copyright 2010 ACM.

  20. Home media and children's achievement and behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofferth, Sandra L

    2010-01-01

    This study provides a national picture of the time American 6- to 12-year-olds spent playing video games, using the computer, and watching TV at home in 1997 and 2003, and the association of early use with their achievement and behavior as adolescents. Girls benefited from computer use more than boys, and Black children benefited more than White children. Greater computer use in middle childhood was associated with increased achievement for White and Black girls, and for Black but not White boys. Increased video game play was associated with an improved ability to solve applied problems for Black girls but lower verbal achievement for all girls. For boys, increased video game play was linked to increased aggressive behavior problems. © 2010 The Author. Child Development © 2010 Society for Research in Child Development, Inc.