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Sample records for awake monkeys composed

  1. Real-Time Dopamine Measurement in Awake Monkeys

    OpenAIRE

    Schluter, Erik W.; Mitz, Andrew R.; Cheer, Joseph F.; Averbeck, Bruno B.

    2014-01-01

    Fast-scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV) is often used to measure real-time dopamine (DA) concentrations in awake, behaving rodents. Extending this technique to work in monkeys would provide a platform for advanced behavioral studies and a primate model for preclinical research. The present study demonstrates the feasibility of DA recordings in two awake monkeys (Macaca mulatta) using a mixture of techniques adapted from rodent, primate and brain slice work. We developed a long carbon fiber electr...

  2. Real-time dopamine measurement in awake monkeys.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik W Schluter

    Full Text Available Fast-scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV is often used to measure real-time dopamine (DA concentrations in awake, behaving rodents. Extending this technique to work in monkeys would provide a platform for advanced behavioral studies and a primate model for preclinical research. The present study demonstrates the feasibility of DA recordings in two awake monkeys (Macaca mulatta using a mixture of techniques adapted from rodent, primate and brain slice work. We developed a long carbon fiber electrode to operate in the larger primate brain. This electrode was lowered into the striatum each day using a recording chamber and a detachable micromanipulator system. A manipulator also moved one or more tungsten stimulating electrodes into either the nearby striatum or the ventral tegmental area/substantia nigra pars compacta (VTA/SNc. We developed an electrical stimulation controller to reduce artifacts during electrical stimulation. We also introduce a stimulation-based methodology for estimating distances between electrodes in the brain. Dopamine responses within the striatum were evoked by either stimulation of the striatum near the FSCV electrode, or stimulation within the VTA/SNc. Unexpected juice rewards also evoked dopamine responses in the ventral striatum. Thus, we demonstrate that robust dopamine responses can be recorded from awake, behaving primates with FSCV. In addition, we describe how a stimulation technique borrowed from the neuroprosthetics field can activate the distributed monkey midbrain dopamine system in a way that mimics rodent VTA stimulation.

  3. A 4-channel 3 Tesla phased array receive coil for awake rhesus monkey fMRI and diffusion MRI experiments

    OpenAIRE

    Khachaturian, Mark Haig

    2010-01-01

    Awake monkey fMRI and diffusion MRI combined with conventional neuroscience techniques has the potential to study the structural and functional neural network. The majority of monkey fMRI and diffusion MRI experiments are performed with single coils which suffer from severe EPI distortions which limit resolution. By constructing phased array coils for monkey MRI studies, gains in SNR and anatomical accuracy (i.e., reduction of EPI distortions) can be achieved using parallel imaging. The major...

  4. Long-term optical imaging of intrinsic signals in anesthetized and awake monkeys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roe, Anna W.

    2007-04-01

    Some exciting new efforts to use intrinsic signal optical imaging methods for long-term studies in anesthetized and awake monkeys are reviewed. The development of such methodologies opens the door for studying behavioral states such as attention, motivation, memory, emotion, and other higher-order cognitive functions. Long-term imaging is also ideal for studying changes in the brain that accompany development, plasticity, and learning. Although intrinsic imaging lacks the temporal resolution offered by dyes, it is a high spatial resolution imaging method that does not require application of any external agents to the brain. The bulk of procedures described here have been developed in the monkey but can be applied to the study of surface structures in any in vivo preparation.

  5. Coherent 25- to 35-Hz Oscillations in the Sensorimotor Cortex of Awake Behaving Monkeys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murthy, Venkatesh N.; Fetz, Eberhard E.

    1992-06-01

    Synchronous 25- to 35-Hz oscillations were observed in local field potentials and unit activity in sensorimotor cortex of awake rhesus monkeys. The oscillatory episodes occurred often when the monkeys retrieved raisins from a Kluver board or from unseen locations using somatosensory feedback; they occurred less often during performance of repetitive wrist flexion and extension movements. The amplitude, duration, and frequency of oscillations were not directly related to movement parameters in behaviors studied so far. The occurrence of the oscillations was not consistently related to bursts of activity in forearm muscles, but cycle-triggered averages of electromyograms revealed synchronous modulation in flexor and extensor muscles. The phase of the oscillations changed continuously from the surface to the deeper layers of the cortex, reversing their polarity completely at depths exceeding 800 μm. The oscillations could become synchronized over a distance of 14 mm mediolaterally in precentral cortex. Coherent oscillations could also occur at pre- and postcentral sites separated by an estimated tangential intracortical distance of 20 mm. Activity of single units was commonly seen to burst in synchrony with field potential oscillations. These findings suggest that such oscillations may facilitate interactions between cells during exploratory and manipulative movements, requiring attention to sensorimotor integration.

  6. PET measured evoked cerebral blood flow responses in an awake monkey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have developed a method to measure task-related regional cerebral blood flow (BF) responses in an awake, trained monkey using positron emission tomography (PET) and H215O. We trained an animal with operant conditioning using only positive reinforcement to climb unassisted into a modified primate chair that was then positioned in the PET scanner. A special headholder and acrylic skull cap permitted precise placement and accurate repositioning. We measured BF qualitatively with bolus injection of H215O and 40-s scan. Each session included scans at rest interposed with scans during vibration of a forepaw. Regional responses were identified using subtraction image analysis. After global normalization, a resting image was subtracted on a pixel-by-pixel basis from a comparable image collected during vibration. The region of peak response occurred in contralateral sensorimotor cortex with a mean magnitude of 11.6% (+/- 3.2%) of the global mean value for 10 separate experiments, significantly greater than the mean qualitative BF change (0.4 +/- 3.6%; p less than 0.00001) in the same region for seven rest-rest pairs. This newly developed technique forms the basis for a wide variety of experiments

  7. Spatial structure of neuronal receptive field in awake monkey secondary visual cortex (V2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lu; She, Liang; Chen, Ming; Liu, Tianyi; Lu, Haidong D; Dan, Yang; Poo, Mu-ming

    2016-02-16

    Visual processing depends critically on the receptive field (RF) properties of visual neurons. However, comprehensive characterization of RFs beyond the primary visual cortex (V1) remains a challenge. Here we report fine RF structures in secondary visual cortex (V2) of awake macaque monkeys, identified through a projection pursuit regression analysis of neuronal responses to natural images. We found that V2 RFs could be broadly classified as V1-like (typical Gabor-shaped subunits), ultralong (subunits with high aspect ratios), or complex-shaped (subunits with multiple oriented components). Furthermore, single-unit recordings from functional domains identified by intrinsic optical imaging showed that neurons with ultralong RFs were primarily localized within pale stripes, whereas neurons with complex-shaped RFs were more concentrated in thin stripes. Thus, by combining single-unit recording with optical imaging and a computational approach, we identified RF subunits underlying spatial feature selectivity of V2 neurons and demonstrated the functional organization of these RF properties. PMID:26839410

  8. The stimulus-evoked population response in visual cortex of awake monkey is a propagating wave

    OpenAIRE

    Muller, Lyle; Reynaud, Alexandre; Chavane, Frédéric; Destexhe, Alain

    2014-01-01

    Propagating waves occur in many excitable media and were recently found in neural systems from retina to neocortex. While propagating waves are clearly present under anaesthesia, whether they also appear during awake and conscious states remains unclear. One possibility is that these waves are systematically missed in trial-averaged data, due to variability. Here we present a method for detecting propagating waves in noisy multichannel recordings. Applying this method to single-trial voltage-...

  9. Selectivity for grasp in local field potential and single neuron activity recorded simultaneously from M1 and F5 in the awake macaque monkey

    OpenAIRE

    Spinks, R.L.; Kraskov, A.; Brochier, T.; Umilta, M. A.; Lemon, R. N.

    2008-01-01

    The selectivity for object-specific grasp in local field potentials (LFPs) was investigated in two awake macaque monkeys trained to observe, reach out, grasp and hold one of six objects presented in a pseudorandom order. Simultaneous, multiple electrode recordings were made from the hand representations of primary motor cortex (M1) and ventral premotor cortex (area F5). LFP activity was well developed during the observation and hold periods of the task, especially in the beta-frequency range ...

  10. Bursting thalamic responses in awake monkey contribute to visual detection and are modulated by corticofugal feedback

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth L Grieve

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The lateral geniculate nucleus is the gateway for visual information en route to the visual cortex. Neural activity is characterized by the existence of 2 firing modes: burst and tonic. Originally associated with sleep, bursts have now been postulated to be a part of the normal visual response, structured to increase the probability of cortical activation, able to act as a “wake-up” call to the cortex. We investigated a potential role for burst in the detection of novel stimuli by recording neuronal activity in the LGN of behaving monkeys during a visual detection task. Our results show that bursts are often the neuron’s first response, and are more numerous in the response to attended target stimuli than to unattended distractor stimuli. Bursts are indicators of the task novelty, as repetition decreased bursting. Because the primary visual cortex is the major modulatory input to the LGN, we compared the results obtained in control conditions with those observed when cortical activity was reduced by TMS. This cortical deactivation reduced visual response related bursting by 90%. These results highlight a novel role for the thalamus, able to code higher order image attributes as important as novelty early in the thalamo-cortical conversation.

  11. A Pressure Injection System for Investigating the Neuropharmacology of Information Processing in Awake Behaving Macaque Monkey Cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veith, Vera K; Quigley, Cliodhna; Treue, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    The top-down modulation of feed-forward cortical information processing is functionally important for many cognitive processes, including the modulation of sensory information processing by attention. However, little is known about which neurotransmitter systems are involved in such modulations. A practical way to address this question is to combine single-cell recording with local and temporary neuropharmacological manipulation in a suitable animal model. Here we demonstrate a technique combining acute single-cell recordings with the injection of neuropharmacological agents in the direct vicinity of the recording electrode. The video shows the preparation of the pressure injection/recording system, including preparation of the substance to be injected. We show a rhesus monkey performing a visual attention task and the procedure of single-unit recording with block-wise pharmacological manipulations. PMID:27023110

  12. Awake Craniotomy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Awake Craniotomy Methodist University Hospital Memphis, TN April 21, 2009 Welcome to the Neuroscience Institute at Methodist University Hospital in Memphis, Tennessee. Methodist ...

  13. Awake Craniotomy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... doing an operation in the brain with the patient awake during part of that operation. Obviously during most surgery patients are asleep or under anesthesia. So the difference ...

  14. Awake Craniotomy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... that we’re doing an operation in the brain with the patient awake during part of that ... when we’re working in and around their brain. The moderator of the webcast is Dr. Allen ...

  15. Awake Craniotomy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... in the literature. And it seems to provide benefits that we like in terms of the sleep ... as a surgeon, that’s one of the great benefits having the patient awake. Because if we have ...

  16. Awake Craniotomy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... possible and yet preserve her important function located right next to the tumor. I couldn’t imagine ... very awake. In fact, they look pretty asleep right now, and why is that? Well this is ...

  17. Awake Craniotomy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... speech or both. An awake craniotomy is not something that’s available at every hospital. In fact, it ... part of the bone. This isn’t really something painful for the patient. No. In our experience ...

  18. Awake Craniotomy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to have the patient awake whenever the patient’s performance is required during the course of the operation. ... later in the surgery. Then we begin the process of allowing Shila to wake up, and that ...

  19. Awake Craniotomy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... going to close you up and turn the medicine on. At this point, we let Shila go ... awake craniotomy patients, again, because we’re using drugs that wear off really very quickly, it allows ...

  20. Awake Craniotomy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... In today’s broadcast you will be part of history by watching the first awake craniotomy webcast in ... ll feel claustrophobic. This woman already has a history of claustrophobia, and we certainly don’t want ...

  1. Awake Craniotomy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to have the patient awake whenever the patient’s performance is required during the course of the operation. ... an area of her brain that was near control centers for motor function. Obviously different regions of ...

  2. Awake Craniotomy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... during most surgery patients are asleep or under anesthesia. So the difference for an awake craniotomy is ... certified nurse anesthetist, Hamm is with the Medical Anesthesia Group and has more than 30 years experience ...

  3. Awake Craniotomy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... patients who run the risk of either losing motor function or speech or both. An awake craniotomy ... He said, “This tumor is pressing against the motor skill that tells you left side to work.” ...

  4. Imaging of Awake Animals

    OpenAIRE

    Wilkinson, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The 3Rs of reduction, refinement and replacement are the guiding principles of animal research and embedded in national and international legislation regulating the use of animals in scientific procedures. Awake imaging by MRI of rodents can offer a reduction by increasing the quality of scientific data through longitudinal imaging using less animals by avoiding a serial sacrifice design and refinement through reducing the stressful effects animals are exposed to, in comparison to existing mo...

  5. Covert Shifts of Spatial Attention in the Macaque Monkey

    OpenAIRE

    Caspari, Natalie; Janssens, Thomas; Mantini, Dante; Vandenberghe, Rik; Vanduffel, Wim

    2015-01-01

    In the awake state, shifts of spatial attention alternate with periods of sustained attention at a fixed location or object. Human fMRI experiments revealed the critical role of the superior parietal lobule (SPL) in shifting spatial attention, a finding not predicted by human lesion studies and monkey electrophysiology. To investigate whether a potential homolog of the human SPL shifting region exists in monkeys (Macaca mulatta), we adopted an event-related fMRI paradigm that closely resemble...

  6. Awake fiberoptic or awake video laryngoscopic tracheal intubation in patients with anticipated difficult airway management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenstock, Charlotte Vallentin; Thøgersen, Bente; Afshari, Arash;

    2012-01-01

    Awake flexible fiberoptic intubation (FFI) is the gold standard for management of anticipated difficult tracheal intubation. The purpose of this study was to compare awake FFI to awake McGrath® video laryngoscope, (MVL), (Aircraft Medical, Edinburgh, Scotland, United Kingdom) intubation in patients...

  7. The asleep-awake technique using propofol-remifentanil anaesthesia for awake craniotomy for cerebral tumours

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Karsten Skovgaard

    2008-01-01

    Background and objective: We retrospectively reviewed the first 25 planned cases of awake craniotomies using the 'asleep-awake' technique, an alternative to the often-used 'asleep-awake-asleep' technique. Methods: The patients were anaesthetized using propofol/remifentanil anaesthesia, a laryngeal...

  8. Awake operative videothoracoscopic pulmonary resections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pompeo, Eugenio; Mineo, Tommaso C

    2008-08-01

    The authors' initial experience with awake videothoracoscopic lung resection suggests that these procedures can be easily and safely performed under sole thoracic epidural anesthesia with no mortality and negligible morbidity. One major concern was that operating on a ventilating lung would render surgical maneuvers more difficult because of the lung movements and lack of a sufficient operating space. Instead, the open pneumothorax created after trocar insertion produces a satisfactory lung collapse that does not hamper surgical maneuvers. These results contradict the accepted assumption that the main prerequisite for allowing successful thoracoscopic lung surgery is general anesthesia with one-lung ventilation. No particular training is necessary to accomplish an awake pulmonary resection for teams experienced in thoracoscopic surgery, and conversions to general anesthesia are mainly caused by the presence of extensive fibrous pleural adhesions or the development of intractable panic attacks. Overall, awake pulmonary resection is easily accepted and well tolerated by patients, as confirmed by the high anesthesia satisfaction score, which was better than in nonawake control patients. Nonetheless, thoracic epidural anesthesia has potential complications, including epidural hematoma, spinal cord injury, and phrenic nerve palsy caused by inadvertently high anesthetic level, but these never occurred in the authors' experience. Further concerns relate to patient participation in operating room conversations or risk for development of perioperative panic attacks. However, the authors have found that reassuring the patient during the procedure, explaining step-by-step what is being performed, and even showing the ongoing procedure on the operating video can greatly improve the perioperative wellness and expectations of patients, particularly if the procedure is performed for oncologic diseases. Panic attacks occurred in few patients and could be usually managed through

  9. Composing and Arranging Careers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Elliott; And Others

    1977-01-01

    With the inspiration, the originality, the skill and craftsmanship, the business acumen, the patience, and the luck, it's possible to become a classical composer, pop/rock/country composer, jingle composer, or educational composer. Describes these careers. (Editor/RK)

  10. AWAKE starts the equipment installation phase

    CERN Multimedia

    Antonella Del Rosso

    2015-01-01

    AWAKE is the proof-of-principle experiment whose aim is to use protons to generate powerful wakefields to accelerate an electron beam. With accelerator gradients hundreds of times higher than those used in current systems, this technique could revolutionise the field of particle acceleration. Installed in the tunnel previously used by the CNGS facility, AWAKE is completing the service installation phase and will receive the plasma cell in the coming months.   The AWAKE proton line with all the magnets installed. (Image: AWAKE collaboration.) AWAKE is the world’s first proton-driven plasma wakefield acceleration experiment. In AWAKE, a beam of protons from the SPS will be travelling through a plasma cell and this will generate a wakefield that, in turn, will accelerate an electron beam. A laser will ionise the gas in the plasma cell and seed the self-modulation instability that will trigger the wakefield in the plasma. The project aims to prove that the plasma wakefield can be driv...

  11. My Career: Composer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morganelli, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    In this article, the author talks about his career as a composer and offers some advice for aspiring composers. The author works as a composer in the movie industry, creating music that supports a film's story. Other composers work on television shows, and some do both television and film. The composer uses music to tell the audience what kind of…

  12. macaque monkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel L. Kimmel

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available From human perception to primate neurophysiology, monitoring eye position is critical to the study of vision, attention, oculomotor control, and behavior. Two principal techniques for the precise measurement of eye position—the long-standing sclera-embedded search coil and more recent optical tracking techniques—are in use in various laboratories, but no published study compares the performance of the two methods simultaneously in the same primates. Here we compare two popular systems—a sclera-embedded search coil from C-N-C Engineering and the EyeLink 1000 optical system from SR Research—by recording simultaneously from the same eye in the macaque monkey while the animal performed a simple oculomotor task. We found broad agreement between the two systems, particularly in positional accuracy during fixation, measurement of saccade amplitude, detection of fixational saccades, and sensitivity to subtle changes in eye position from trial to trial. Nonetheless, certain discrepancies persist, particularly elevated saccade peak velocities, post-saccadic ringing, influence of luminance change on reported position, and greater sample-to-sample variation in the optical system. Our study shows that optical performance now rivals that of the search coil, rendering optical systems appropriate for many if not most applications. This finding is consequential, especially for animal subjects, because the optical systems do not require invasive surgery for implantation and repair of search coils around the eye. Our data also allow laboratories using the optical system in human subjects to assess the strengths and limitations of the technique for their own applications.

  13. Awake, Offline Processing during Associative Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nestor, Adrian; Tarr, Michael J.; Creswell, J. David

    2016-01-01

    Offline processing has been shown to strengthen memory traces and enhance learning in the absence of conscious rehearsal or awareness. Here we evaluate whether a brief, two-minute offline processing period can boost associative learning and test a memory reactivation account for these offline processing effects. After encoding paired associates, subjects either completed a distractor task for two minutes or were immediately tested for memory of the pairs in a counterbalanced, within-subjects functional magnetic resonance imaging study. Results showed that brief, awake, offline processing improves memory for associate pairs. Moreover, multi-voxel pattern analysis of the neuroimaging data suggested reactivation of encoded memory representations in dorsolateral prefrontal cortex during offline processing. These results signify the first demonstration of awake, active, offline enhancement of associative memory and suggest that such enhancement is accompanied by the offline reactivation of encoded memory representations. PMID:27119345

  14. Path to AWAKE: Evolution of the concept

    CERN Document Server

    Caldwell, A; Amorim, L; Apsimon, R; Argyropoulos, T; Assmann, R; Bachmann, A -M; Batsch, F; Bauche, J; Olsen, V K Berglyd; Bernardini, M; Bingham, R; Biskup, B; Bohl, T; Bracco, C; Burrows, P N; Burt, G; Buttenschon, B; Butterworth, A; Cascella, M; Chattopadhyay, S; Chevallay, E; Cipiccia, S; Damerau, H; Deacon, L; Dirksen, P; Doebert, S; Dorda, U; Elsen, E; Farmer, J; Fartoukh, S; Fedosseev, V; Feldbaumer, E; Fiorito, R; Fonseca, R; Friebel, F; Geschonke, G; Goddard, B; Gorn, A A; Grulke, O; Gschwendtner, E; Hansen, J; Hessler, C; Hillenbrand, S; Hofle, W; Holloway, J; Huang, C; Huther, M; Jaroszynski, D; Jensen, L; Jolly, S; Joulaei, A; Kasim, M; Keeble, F; Kersevan, R; Kumar, N; Li, Y; Liu, S; Lopes, N; Lotov, K V; Lu, W; Machacek, J; Mandry, S; Martin, I; Martorelli, R; Martyanov, M; Mazzoni, S; Meddahi, M; Merminga, L; Mete, O; Minakov, V A; Mitchell, J; Moody, J; Muller, A -S; Najmudin, Z; Noakes, T C Q; Norreys, P; Osterhoff, J; Oz, E; Pardons, A; Pepitone, K; Petrenko, A; Plyushchev, G; Pozimski, J; Pukhov, A; Reimann, O; Rieger, K; Roesler, S; Ruhl, H; Rusnak, T; Salveter, F; Savard, N; Schmidt, J; von der Schmitt, H; Seryi, A; Shaposhnikova, E; Sheng, Z M; Sherwood, P; Silva, L; Simon, F; Soby, L; Sosedkin, A P; Spitsyn, R I; Tajima, T; Tarkeshian, R; Timko, H; Trines, R; Tueckmantel, T; Tuev, P V; Turner, M; Velotti, F; Verzilov, V; Vieira, J; Vincke, H; Wei, Y; Welsch, C P; Wing, M; Xia, G; Yakimenko, V; Zhang, H; Zimmermann, F

    2015-01-01

    This report describes the conceptual steps in reaching the design of the AWAKE experiment currently under construction at CERN. We start with an introduction to plasma wakefield acceleration and the motivation for using proton drivers. We then describe the self-modulation instability --- a key to an early realization of the concept. This is then followed by the historical development of the experimental design, where the critical issues that arose and their solutions are described. We conclude with the design of the experiment as it is being realized at CERN and some words on the future outlook. A summary of the AWAKE design and construction status as presented in this conference is given in [1].

  15. Path to AWAKE: Evolution of the concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldwell, A.; Adli, E.; Amorim, L.; Apsimon, R.; Argyropoulos, T.; Assmann, R.; Bachmann, A.-M.; Batsch, F.; Bauche, J.; Berglyd Olsen, V. K.; Bernardini, M.; Bingham, R.; Biskup, B.; Bohl, T.; Bracco, C.; Burrows, P. N.; Burt, G.; Buttenschön, B.; Butterworth, A.; Cascella, M.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chevallay, E.; Cipiccia, S.; Damerau, H.; Deacon, L.; Dirksen, P.; Doebert, S.; Dorda, U.; Elsen, E.; Farmer, J.; Fartoukh, S.; Fedosseev, V.; Feldbaumer, E.; Fiorito, R.; Fonseca, R.; Friebel, F.; Geschonke, G.; Goddard, B.; Gorn, A. A.; Grulke, O.; Gschwendtner, E.; Hansen, J.; Hessler, C.; Hillenbrand, S.; Hofle, W.; Holloway, J.; Huang, C.; Hüther, M.; Jaroszynski, D.; Jensen, L.; Jolly, S.; Joulaei, A.; Kasim, M.; Keeble, F.; Kersevan, R.; Kumar, N.; Li, Y.; Liu, S.; Lopes, N.; Lotov, K. V.; Lu, W.; Machacek, J.; Mandry, S.; Martin, I.; Martorelli, R.; Martyanov, M.; Mazzoni, S.; Meddahi, M.; Merminga, L.; Mete, O.; Minakov, V. A.; Mitchell, J.; Moody, J.; Müller, A.-S.; Najmudin, Z.; Noakes, T. C. Q.; Norreys, P.; Osterhoff, J.; Öz, E.; Pardons, A.; Pepitone, K.; Petrenko, A.; Plyushchev, G.; Pozimski, J.; Pukhov, A.; Reimann, O.; Rieger, K.; Roesler, S.; Ruhl, H.; Rusnak, T.; Salveter, F.; Savard, N.; Schmidt, J.; von der Schmitt, H.; Seryi, A.; Shaposhnikova, E.; Sheng, Z. M.; Sherwood, P.; Silva, L.; Simon, F.; Soby, L.; Sosedkin, A. P.; Spitsyn, R. I.; Tajima, T.; Tarkeshian, R.; Timko, H.; Trines, R.; Tückmantel, T.; Tuev, P. V.; Turner, M.; Velotti, F.; Verzilov, V.; Vieira, J.; Vincke, H.; Wei, Y.; Welsch, C. P.; Wing, M.; Xia, G.; Yakimenko, V.; Zhang, H.; Zimmermann, F.

    2016-09-01

    This paper describes the conceptual steps in reaching the design of the AWAKE experiment currently under construction at CERN. We start with an introduction to plasma wakefield acceleration and the motivation for using proton drivers. We then describe the self-modulation instability - a key to an early realization of the concept. This is then followed by the historical development of the experimental design, where the critical issues that arose and their solutions are described. We conclude with the design of the experiment as it is being realized at CERN and some words on the future outlook. A summary of the AWAKE design and construction status as presented in this conference is given in Gschwendtner et al. [1].

  16. Spontaneous high-gamma band activity reflects functional organization of auditory cortex in the awake macaque.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukushima, Makoto; Saunders, Richard C; Leopold, David A; Mishkin, Mortimer; Averbeck, Bruno B

    2012-06-01

    In the absence of sensory stimuli, spontaneous activity in the brain has been shown to exhibit organization at multiple spatiotemporal scales. In the macaque auditory cortex, responses to acoustic stimuli are tonotopically organized within multiple, adjacent frequency maps aligned in a caudorostral direction on the supratemporal plane (STP) of the lateral sulcus. Here, we used chronic microelectrocorticography to investigate the correspondence between sensory maps and spontaneous neural fluctuations in the auditory cortex. We first mapped tonotopic organization across 96 electrodes spanning approximately two centimeters along the primary and higher auditory cortex. In separate sessions, we then observed that spontaneous activity at the same sites exhibited spatial covariation that reflected the tonotopic map of the STP. This observation demonstrates a close relationship between functional organization and spontaneous neural activity in the sensory cortex of the awake monkey. PMID:22681693

  17. Composing for Cars

    OpenAIRE

    Parkinson, Adam; Tanaka, Atau

    2013-01-01

    The authors report on composing a piece for RoadMusic, an interactive music project which generates and manipulates music for the passengers and driver in a car, using sensor information gathered from the surroundings and from the movements of the car. We present a literature review which brings together related works in the diverse fields of Automotive UI, musical mappings, generative music and sonification. We then describe our strategies for composing for this novel system, and the uni...

  18. Composability in quantum cryptography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    If we combine two secure cryptographic systems, is the resulting system still secure? Answering this question is highly nontrivial and has recently sparked a considerable research effort, in particular, in the area of classical cryptography. A central insight was that the answer to the question is yes, but only within a well-specified composability framework and for carefully chosen security definitions. In this article, we review several aspects of composability in the context of quantum cryptography. The first part is devoted to key distribution. We discuss the security criteria that a quantum key distribution (QKD) protocol must fulfill to allow its safe use within a larger security application (e.g. for secure message transmission); and we demonstrate-by an explicit example-what can go wrong if conventional (non-composable) security definitions are used. Finally, to illustrate the practical use of composability, we show how to generate a continuous key stream by sequentially composing rounds of a QKD protocol. In the second part, we take a more general point of view, which is necessary for the study of cryptographic situations involving, for example, mutually distrustful parties. We explain the universal composability (UC) framework and state the composition theorem that guarantees that secure protocols can securely be composed to larger applications. We focus on the secure composition of quantum protocols into unconditionally secure classical protocols. However, the resulting security definition is so strict that some tasks become impossible without additional security assumptions. Quantum bit commitment is impossible in the UC framework even with mere computational security. Similar problems arise in the quantum bounded storage model and we observe a trade-off between the UC and the use of the weakest possible security assumptions.

  19. CERN AWAKE Facility Readiness for First Beam

    CERN Document Server

    Bracco, Chiara; Butterworth, Andrew; Damerau, Heiko; Döbert, Steffen; Fedosseev, Valentin; Feldbaumer, Eduard; Gschwendtner, Edda; Höfle, Wolfgang; Pardons, Ans; Shaposhnikova, Elena; Vincke, Helmut

    2016-01-01

    The AWAKE project at CERN was approved in August 2013 and since then a big effort was made to be able to probe the acceleration of electrons before the "2019-2020 Long Shutdown". The next steps in this challenging schedule will be a dry run of all the beam line systems, at the end of the HW commissioning in June 2016, and the first proton beam sent to the plasma cell one month later. The current status of the project is presented together with an outlook over the foreseen works for operation with electrons in 2018.

  20. Anaesthesia for awake craniotomy is safe and well-tolerated

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jakob Hessel; Olsen, Karsten Skovgaard

    2010-01-01

    Awake craniotomy for tumour resection has been performed at Glostrup Hospital since 2004. We describe and discuss the various anaesthetic approaches for such surgery and retrospectively analyse the 44 planned awake craniotomies performed at Glostrup Hospital. The surgery falls into four phases: c...

  1. Preparing to perform an awake fiberoptic intubation.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Walsh, M E

    2012-02-03

    Fiberoptically guided tracheal intubation represents one of the most important advances in airway management to occur in the past thirty years. Perhaps its most important role is in management of the anticipated difficult airway. This is a situation in which the dangers of encountering the life-threatening "can\\'t intubate, can\\'t ventilate" situation can be avoided by placement of an endotracheal tube while the patient is awake. Although skill at the procedure of endoscopy is obviously necessary in this setting, these authors hold that success or failure of the technique frequently depends on the adequacy of preparation. These measures include 1) pre-operative assessment of the patient; 2) careful explanation of what lies in store; 3) "setting the stage"; 4) preparing the equipment to be used; and 5) preparing the patient (antisialogue, sedation, application of topical anesthesia to the upper airway). If these preparatory measures are carried out meticulously, the likelihood of performing a successful and comfortable awake fiberoptic tracheal intubation is greatly increased.

  2. The AWAKE Experimental Facility at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Gschwendtner, E; Bracco, C; Butterworth, A; Cipiccia, S; Doebert, S; Fedosseev, V; Feldbaumer, E; Hessler, C; Hofle, W; Martyanov, M; Meddahi, M; Osborne, J; Pardons, A; Petrenko, A; Vincke, H

    2014-01-01

    AWAKE, an Advanced Wakefield Experiment is launched at CERN to verify the proton driven plasma wakefield acceleration concept. Proton bunches at 400 GeV/c will be extracted from the CERN SPS and sent along a 750 m long proton line to a plasma cell, a Rubidium vapour source, where the proton beam drives wakefields reaching accelerating gradients of several gigavolts per meter. A high power laser pulse will copropagate within the proton bunch creating the plasma by ionizing the (initially) neutral gas. An electron beam will be injected into the plasma cell to probe the accelerating wakefield. The AWAKE experiment will be installed in the CNGS facility. First proton beam to the plasma cell is expected by end 2016. The installation planning and the baseline parameters of the experiment are shown. The design of the experimental area and the integration of the new beam-lines as well as the experimental equipment are presented. The needed modifications of the infrastructure in the facility and a few challenges are h...

  3. Avalanche Analysis from Multielectrode Ensemble Recordings in Cat, Monkey, and Human Cerebral Cortex during Wakefulness and Sleep

    OpenAIRE

    Nima eDehghani; Hatsopoulos, Nicholas G.; Haga, Zach D.; Rebecca eParker; Bradley eGreger; Eric eHalgren; Sydney S Cash; Alain eDestexhe

    2012-01-01

    Self-organized critical states are found in many natural systems, from earthquakes to forest fires, they have also been observed in neural systems, particularly, in neuronal cultures. However, the presence of critical states in the awake brain remains controversial. Here, we compared avalanche analyses performed on different in vivo preparations during wakefulness, slow-wave sleep, and REM sleep, using high density electrode arrays in cat motor cortex (96 electrodes), monkey motor cortex and ...

  4. Lung function measurement in awake young children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisgaard, H; Klug, B

    1995-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate methods applicable in a clinical setting for monitoring of changes in lung function in awake young children. Impedance measurements by the impulse oscillation technique (ZIOS), respiratory resistance measurements by the interrupter technique (Rint) and...... lung function was ZIOS > sRaw > Ptc,O2 > FEV1 > Rint. ZIOS was significantly more sensitive than all subsequent methods, and Ptc,O2 was significantly more sensitive than FEV1. ZIOS, sRaw and Rint, but not Ptc,O2 and FEV1, detected the subclinical increase in bronchial muscle tone in the children during...... methacholine in young children aged 4-6 yrs. This implies that ZIOS, Rint and Ptc,O2 provide convenient indices of changes in lung function. Their combined use will be useful for monitoring airway diseases of young children....

  5. Composers on stage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Groth, Sanne Krogh

    A trend on the scene of contemporary music is composers going on stage, performing their pieces themselves. Within a discourse of popular music, this is more the rule than exception, but when it comes to the context of contemporary scored music, the historical and aesthetic context differs...... to rise the following questions: What happens to the status of the author, when he suddenly (re-)appears on stage? How is this appearance to be understood in both a contemporary and historical context: Is it the musical virtuous appearing again, are we witnessing musical works turning...... Rønsholdt’s Documentary Concert (2013) and Johannes Kreidler Fremdarbeit (2009)....

  6. Molecular Imaging of Conscious, Unrestrained Mice with AwakeSPECT

    OpenAIRE

    Baba, Justin S.; Endres, Christopher J.; Foss, Catherine A.; Nimmagadda, Sridhar; Jung, Hyeyun; Goddard, James S.; Lee, Seungjoon; McKisson, John; Smith, Mark F.; Stolin, Alexander V.; Weisenberger, Andrew G.; Pomper, Martin G.

    2013-01-01

    We have developed a SPECT imaging system, AwakeSPECT, to enable molecular brain imaging of untrained mice that are conscious, unanesthetized, and unrestrained. We accomplished this with head tracking and motion correction techniques.

  7. Dexmedetomidine Use for Awake Nasotraceal Fiberoptic Intubation: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dilek Gunay Canpolat

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Awake fiberoptic nasotracheal intubation is usually performed in patients with an anticipated difficult airway. For patient comfort, it%u2019s important to provide adequate level of sedation. In this case, we discussed our experience with the literature about usage of dexmedetomidine in nasotracheal awake fiberoptic intubation for the expected difficult airway in a patient with bilateral temporomandibular joint ankylosis and limited mouth opening who was planned to deformity repair under general anesthesia.

  8. Molecular Imaging of Conscious, Unrestrained Mice with AwakeSPECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baba, Justin S. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory; Endres, Christopher J. [Johns Hopkins, Baltimore; Foss, Catherine A. [Johns Hopkins, Baltimore; Nimmagadda, Sridhar [Johns Hopkins, Baltimore; Jung, Hyeyun [Johns Hopkins, Baltimore; Goddard, James S. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory; Lee, Seung Joon [JLAB; McKisson, John [JLAB; Smith, Mark F. [University of Maryland; Stolin, Alexander V. [West Virginia University; Weisenberger, Andrew G. [JLAB; Pomper, Martin G. [Johns Hopkins, Baltimore

    2013-06-01

    We have developed a SPECT imaging system, AwakeSPECT, to enable molecular brain imaging of untrained mice that are conscious, unanesthetized, and unrestrained. We accomplished this with head tracking and motion correction techniques. Methods: The capability of the system for motion-corrected imaging was demonstrated with a ^99mTc-pertechnetate phantom, ^99mTc-methylene diphosphonate bone imaging, and measurement of the binding potential of the dopamine transporter radioligand ^123I-ioflupane in mouse brain in the awake and anesthetized (isoflurane) states. Stress induced by imaging in the awake state was assessed through measurement of plasma corticosterone levels. Results: AwakeSPECT provided high-resolution bone images reminiscent of those obtained from CT. The binding potential of ^123I-ioflupane in the awake state was on the order of 50% of that obtained with the animal under anesthesia, consistent with previous studies in nonhuman primates. Levels of stress induced were on the order of those seen in other behavioral tasks and imaging studies of awake animals. Conclusion: These results demonstrate the feasibility of SPECT molecular brain imaging of mice in the conscious, unrestrained state and demonstrate the effects of isoflurane anesthesia on radiotracer uptake.

  9. Molecular Imaging of Conscious, Unrestrained Mice with AwakeSPECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baba, Justin S [ORNL; Endres, Christopher [Johns Hopkins University; Foss, Catherine [Johns Hopkins University; Nimmagadda, Sridhar [Johns Hopkins University; Jung, Hyeyun [Johns Hopkins University; Goddard Jr, James Samuel [ORNL; Lee, Seung Joon [Jefferson Lab; McKisson, John [Jefferson Lab; Smith, Mark F. [University of Maryland School of Medicine, The, Baltimore, MD; Stolin, Alexander [West Virginia University, Morgantown; Weisenberger, Andrew G. [Jefferson Lab; Pomper, Martin [Johns Hopkins University

    2013-01-01

    We have developed a SPECT imaging system, AwakeSPECT, to enable molecular brain imaging of untrained mice that are conscious, unanesthetized, and unrestrained. We accomplished this with head tracking and motion correction techniques. Methods: The capability of the system for motion-corrected imaging was demonstrated with a 99mTc-pertechnetate phantom, 99mTcmethylene diphosphonate bone imaging, and measurement of the binding potential of the dopamine transporter radioligand 123I-ioflupane in mouse brain in the awake and anesthetized (isoflurane) states. Stress induced by imaging in the awake state was assessed through measurement of plasma corticosterone levels. Results: AwakeSPECT provided high-resolution bone images reminiscent of those obtained from CT. The binding potential of 123I-ioflupane in the awake state was on the order of 50% of that obtained with the animal under anesthesia, consistent with previous studies in nonhuman primates. Levels of stress induced were on the order of those seen in other behavioral tasks and imaging studies of awake animals. Conclusion: These results demonstrate the feasibility of SPECT molecular brain imaging of mice in the conscious, unrestrained state and demonstrate the effects of isoflurane anesthesia on radiotracer uptake.

  10. Molecular Imaging of Conscious, Unrestrained Mice with AwakeSPECT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baba, Justin S.; Endres, Christopher J.; Foss, Catherine A.; Nimmagadda, Sridhar; Jung, Hyeyun; Goddard, James S.; Lee, Seungjoon; McKisson, John; Smith, Mark F.; Stolin, Alexander V.; Weisenberger, Andrew G.; Pomper, Martin G.

    2014-01-01

    We have developed a SPECT imaging system, AwakeSPECT, to enable molecular brain imaging of untrained mice that are conscious, unanesthetized, and unrestrained. We accomplished this with head tracking and motion correction techniques. Methods: The capability of the system for motion-corrected imaging was demonstrated with a 99mTc-pertechnetate phantom, 99mTcmethylene diphosphonate bone imaging, and measurement of the binding potential of the dopamine transporter radioligand 123I-ioflupane in mouse brain in the awake and anesthetized (isoflurane) states. Stress induced by imaging in the awake state was assessed through measurement of plasma corticosterone levels. Results: AwakeSPECT provided high-resolution bone images reminiscent of those obtained from CT. The binding potential of 123I-ioflupane in the awake state was on the order of 50% of that obtained with the animal under anesthesia, consistent with previous studies in nonhuman primates. Levels of stress induced were on the order of those seen in other behavioral tasks and imaging studies of awake animals. Conclusion: These results demonstrate the feasibility of SPECT molecular brain imaging of mice in the conscious, unrestrained state and demonstrate the effects of isoflurane anesthesia on radiotracer uptake. PMID:23536223

  11. THE CLEVER MONKEYS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    付惠娟

    2004-01-01

    A man was walking through a forest. He had a few caps in his hands. In the forest there were a lot of monkeys. The day was hot, so he decided to have a rest under a tree. I-le put one cap on his head and lay down to sleep.

  12. Humans Can Pass Staph Germs to Monkeys

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_160157.html Humans Can Pass Staph Germs to Monkeys Scientists found ... green monkeys in The Gambia were acquired from humans. Most of the human-to-monkey transmission likely ...

  13. Monkeys Move Robotic Wheelchairs with Their Thoughts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_157593.html Monkeys Move Robotic Wheelchairs With Their Thoughts Scientists say technology might ... made it possible for monkeys to operate a robotic wheelchair using only the monkey's thoughts say the ...

  14. Commissioning Preparation of the AWAKE Proton Beam Line

    CERN Document Server

    Schmidt, Janet; Bracco, Chiara; Goddard, Brennan; Gorbonosov, Roman; Gourber-Pace, Marine; Gschwendtner, Edda; Jensen, Lars; Jones, Owain Rhodri; Kain, Verena; Mazzoni, Stefano; Meddahi, Malika

    2016-01-01

    The AWAKE experiment at CERN will use a proton bunch with an momentum of 400 GeV/c from the SPS to drive large amplitude wakefields in a plasma. This will require a ~830 m long transfer line from the SPS to the experiment. The prepa- rations for the beam commissioning of the AWAKE proton transfer line are presented in this paper. They include the detailed planning of the commissioning steps, controls and beam instrumentation specifications as well as operational tools, which are developed for the steering and monitoring of the beam line. The installation of the transfer line has been finished and first beam is planned in summer 2016.

  15. Mirror neurons in a New World monkey, common marmoset

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wataru eSuzuki

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Mirror neurons respond when executing a motor act and when observing others’ similar act. So far, mirror neurons have been found only in macaques, humans and songbirds. To investigate the degree of phylogenetic specialization of mirror neurons during the course of their evolution, we determined whether mirror neurons with similar properties to macaques occur in a New World monkey, the common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus. The ventral premotor cortex (PMv, where mirror neurons have been reported in macaques, is difficult to identify in marmosets, since no sulcal landmarks exist in the frontal cortex. We addressed this problem using in vivo connection imaging methods. That is, we first identified cells responsive to others’ grasping action in a clear landmark, the superior temporal sulcus (STS, under anesthesia, and injected fluorescent tracers into the region. By fluorescence stereomicroscopy, we identified clusters of labelled cells in the ventrolateral frontal cortex, which were confirmed to be within the ventrolateral frontal cortex including PMv after sacrifice. We next implanted electrodes into the ventrolateral frontal cortex and STS and recorded single/multi-units under an awake condition. As a result, we found neurons in the ventrolateral frontal cortex with characteristic mirror properties quite similar to those in macaques. This finding suggests that mirror neurons occur in a common ancestor of New and Old World monkeys and its common properties are preserved during the course of primate evolution.

  16. How Composers Compose: In Search of the Questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Bernard W.

    2004-01-01

    The Genesis Project is a multi-phase research project designed for the purpose of developing an in-depth understanding of the nature of musical creativity by investigating how composers compose. In this first phase of the project, an understanding of the four dimensions of musical creativity: (1) the "person", (2) the compositional "process", (3)…

  17. Closing capacity in awake and anesthetized-paralyzed man

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Functional residual capacity (FRC), closing capacity (CC), and (FRC--CC) were determined in 61 supine patients using the 133Xe bolus test. In 28 of the 61 patients measurements were made both while the patients were awake and during anesthesia-paralysis. both FRC and CC decreased significantly after induction of anesthesia-paralysis. The magnitude of the reduction in CC, but not of FRC, was dependent on the relationship between FRC and CC in the awake state. Patients whose FRC was larger than their CC while awake (group I) showed less decrease in CC than FRC, i.e., (FRC--CC) decreased. By contrast, those patients whose CC was larger than their FRC while awake (group II) showed a greater decrease in CC than in FRC, i.e., (FRC--CC) became less negative. The reduction in CC after induction of anesthesia-paralysis may result from an increased elastic recoil of the lung. The larger reduction in CC in group II patients may have been due to a larger increase in elastic recoil, possibly due to the development of atelactasis

  18. The Rubato Composer Music Software

    CERN Document Server

    Milmeister, Gerard; Thalmann, Florian

    2009-01-01

    The Rubato Composer system is open to arbitrary extension and is freely available under the GPL license. This title gives an introduction to the theory of module categories and the theory of denotators, as well as the design of a software system, called Rubato Composer, which is an implementation of the category-theoretic concept framework.

  19. Tropes of the Composing Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrington, Phillip K.

    1986-01-01

    Offers a montage of the most important revisions of the four master tropes--metaphor, metonymy, synecdoche, and irony--for the composing process itself. Discusses the capacity of tropes to prefigure ideological stances toward language and writing. (EL)

  20. Enclosure for small animals during awake animal imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goddard, Jr., James S

    2013-11-26

    An enclosure or burrow restrains an awake animal during an imaging procedure. A tubular body, made from a radiolucent material that does not attenuate x-rays or gamma rays, accepts an awake animal. A proximal end of the body includes an attachment surface that corresponds to an attachment surface of an optically transparent and optically uniform window. An anti-reflective coating may be applied to an inner surface, an outer surface, or both surfaces of the window. Since the window is a separate element of the enclosure and it is not integrally formed as part of the body, it can be made with optically uniform thickness properties for improved motion tracking of markers on the animal with a camera during the imaging procedure. The motion tracking information is then used to compensate for animal movement in the image.

  1. Sonographically guided superior laryngeal nerve block during awake fiberoptic intubation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawka, Andrew; Tang, Raymond; Vaghadia, Himat

    2015-04-15

    We report 5 patients who underwent ultrasound-guided superior laryngeal nerve block before awake intubation and general anesthesia. We used a 8- to 15-MHz hockey stick-shaped ultrasound transducer (HST15-8/20 linear probe, Ultrasonix) to visualize the superior laryngeal nerve. A 3.8-cm 25-G needle was inserted in real time and directed toward the superior laryngeal nerve followed by circumferential placement of local anesthetic. All 5 patients tolerated subsequent awake fiberoptic intubation with either minimal or no sedation. Sonographically guided superior laryngeal nerve block may be useful in patients where identification of landmarks in the neck is difficult as a result of patient anatomy. PMID:25867195

  2. Avoidance and management of trigeminocardiac reflex complicating awake-craniotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhu, Vikram C; Bamber, Norman I; Shea, John F; Jellish, W Scott

    2008-12-01

    The trigeminocardiac reflex occurs from manipulation or stimulation of peripheral branches or the central component of the trigeminal nerve and consists of bradycardia, hypotension, apnea, and increased gastric motility. The efferent limb of the response is mediated by the vagus nerve. This 65-year-old Caucasian male suffered an episode of bradycardia progressing to transient asystole during the course of an awake-craniotomy procedure for tumor resection. The cardiac rhythm changes resolved with administration of intravenous atropine, removal of the precipitating stimulus, and application of topical anesthetic on the dura of the middle cranial fossa. The trigeminocardiac response may complicate the course of a craniotomy and may place an awake, unintubated patient at increased risk for morbidity. The reflex may be prevented by anesthetizing the dura innervated by the trigeminal nerve via injection or topical application of local anesthetic. If encountered, removal of the stimulus, airway protection, and administration of vagolytic medications are measures that need to be considered. PMID:18845385

  3. The influence of awake craniotomy on postoperative neuropsychology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YANG Ming-yuan

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective To assess the neuropsychological function and quality of life of the patients after awake craniotomy (AC. Methods A case-control study was conducted among 81 patients who underwent awake craniotomy, and a 1-to-1 control group (matched by age, gender, degree of education, tumor location and characteristic undergoing general anesthesia (GA in glioma resections was assembled. The incidence of postoperative neurological deficits, psychological disorders and recurrence were investigated during telephone follow-ups, and Medical Outcomes Study Short Form 36 (SF-36 was adopted to evaluate the life quality of patients. Results Almost 73 pairs of patients fulfilled the survey of AC and GA group respectively. There were 21 patients and 28 patients with postoperative neurological deficits, and 12 patients and 8 patients with psychological disorders in AC and GA group respectively. Thirty patients of AC group had the recollection of being awake during the surgery. There were 9 patients in CA group having long-term ( > 6 months neurological deficits, which was less than the number of GA group (18 patients, P = 0.038. According to the assessment in short-term, medium-term and long-term postoperative neurological deficits, there was no significant difference in the quality-of-life scores between the two groups (P > 0.05, for all. Conclusion Awake craniotomy can be the main method for removing the lesions located in or close to functional areas with lower incidence of long?term postoperative neurological deficits, and it has no significant impact on the psychological status and the quality of life postoperatively.

  4. Plasma and CSF oxytocin levels after intranasal and intravenous oxytocin in awake macaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Sara M; Samineni, Sridhar; Allen, Philip C; Stockinger, Diane; Bales, Karen L; Hwa, Granger G C; Roberts, Jeffrey A

    2016-04-01

    Oxytocin (OT) is a neuropeptide that mediates a variety of complex social behaviors in animals and humans. Intranasal OT has been used as an experimental therapeutic for human conditions characterized by deficits in social functioning, especially autism spectrum disorder and schizophrenia. However, it is currently under intense debate whether intranasal delivery of OT reaches the central nervous system. In this study, four female rhesus macaques were implanted with chronic intrathecal catheters and used to investigate the pharmacokinetic profile of OT in the central nervous system and the peripheral vasculature following intravenous (IV) and intranasal (IN) administration of OT. In a randomized, crossover design, OT was given to four awake monkeys at three different doses based on body weight (0.1IU/kg; 1IU/kg; 5IU/kg). A time course of concurrent cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and plasma samples were taken following administration. We found a dose-dependent effect of IV OT treatment on plasma OT levels, which peaked at 5min post-dose and gradually returned to baseline by 120min. In contrast, a change in CSF OT was only observed at the highest IV dose (5IU/kg) at 15min post-dose and gradually returned to baseline by 120min. After IN administration, there was no significant change in plasma OT at any of the three doses. However, at the highest dose level, we found a significant increase in CSF OT at 15-30min post- dose. The results of this study in light of recent, similar publications highlight the importance of methodological consistency across studies. This study also establishes a non-human primate model that can provide a stable platform for carrying out serial sampling from the central nervous system and peripheral vasculature concurrently. PMID:26826355

  5. Awake tracheal intubation using Pentax airway scope in 30 patients: A Case series

    OpenAIRE

    Payal Kajekar; Cyprian Mendonca; Rati Danha; Carl Hillermann

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims: Pentax airway scope (AWS) has been successfully used for managing difficult intubations. In this case series, we aimed to evaluate the success rate and time taken to complete intubation, when AWS was used for awake tracheal intubation. Methods: We prospectively evaluated the use of AWS for awake tracheal intubation in 30 patients. Indication for awake intubation, intubation time, total time to complete tracheal intubation, laryngoscopic view (Cormack and Lehane grade), to...

  6. Knowledge Uncertainty and Composed Classifier

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Klimešová, Dana; Ocelíková, E.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 1, č. 2 (2007), s. 101-105. ISSN 1998-0140 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10750506 Keywords : Boosting architecture * contextual modelling * composed classifier * knowledge management , * knowledge * uncertainty Subject RIV: IN - Informatics, Computer Science

  7. Composing Scalable Nonlinear Algebraic Solvers

    OpenAIRE

    Brune, Peter R.; Knepley, Matthew G.; Smith, Barry F.; Tu, Xuemin

    2016-01-01

    Most efficient linear solvers use composable algorithmic components, with the most common model being the combination of a Krylov accelerator and one or more preconditioners. A similar set of concepts may be used for nonlinear algebraic systems, where nonlinear composition of different nonlinear solvers may significantly improve the time to solution. We describe the basic concepts of nonlinear composition and preconditioning and present a number of solvers applicable to nonlinear partial diff...

  8. Covert shifts of spatial attention in the macaque monkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caspari, Natalie; Janssens, Thomas; Mantini, Dante; Vandenberghe, Rik; Vanduffel, Wim

    2015-05-20

    In the awake state, shifts of spatial attention alternate with periods of sustained attention at a fixed location or object. Human fMRI experiments revealed the critical role of the superior parietal lobule (SPL) in shifting spatial attention, a finding not predicted by human lesion studies and monkey electrophysiology. To investigate whether a potential homolog of the human SPL shifting region exists in monkeys (Macaca mulatta), we adopted an event-related fMRI paradigm that closely resembled a human experiment (Molenberghs et al., 2007). In this paradigm, a pair of relevant and irrelevant shapes was continuously present on the horizontal meridian. Subjects had to covertly detect a dimming of the relevant shape while ignoring the irrelevant dimmings. The events of interest consisted of the replacement of one stimulus pair by the next. During shift but not stay events, the relevant shape of the new pair appeared at the contralateral position relative to the previous one. Spatial shifting events activated parietal areas V6/V6A and medial intraparietal area, caudo-dorsal visual areas, the most posterior portion of the superior temporal sulcus, and several smaller frontal areas. These areas were not activated during passive stimulation with the same sensory stimuli. During stay events, strong direction-sensitive attention signals were observed in a distributed set of contralateral visual, temporal, parietal, and lateral prefrontal areas, the vast majority overlapping with the sensory stimulus representation. We suggest medial intraparietal area and V6/V6A as functional counterparts of human SPL because they contained the most widespread shift signals in the absence of contralateral stay activity, resembling the functional characteristics of the human SPL shifting area. PMID:25995460

  9. An experimental social relation between two monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boren, J J

    1966-11-01

    A technique was developed for studying the reinforcement of one organism by another. Two pairs of monkeys served as subjects in adjoining but separate lever-pressing chambers. However, they were in visual, aural, and tactile contact with each other. After both pairs were trained to tolerate delays of reinforcement and one pair was trained under stimulus control to exchange reinforcements, monkey A of each pair pressed a lever to feed monkey B, and monkey B pressed to feed monkey A. The experiment sought to determine if this social interaction could be maintained. With a free responding procedure where the monkeys could work at any time in any order, the social relation proved unstable. After several oscillations in which one monkey did most of the responding and the other monkey did most of the eating, the reinforcement frequency for both pairs of animals decreased to very low levels. The final outcome would have been starvation had the experimenter not intervened. PMID:4961522

  10. Epidurography with metrizamide in Rhesus monkeys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Epidurography with metrizamide was performed on 9 Rhesus monkeys; physiologic saline was substituted for metrizamide in 3 control monkeys. Metrizamide successfully outlined the epidural space without causing any adverse clinical effects or direct tissue injury. (Auth.)

  11. Portable Zika Test Shows Promise in Monkeys

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_158704.html Portable Zika Test Shows Promise in Monkeys Easy-to-use ... News) -- A fast, inexpensive test that detects the Zika virus in monkeys might be useful for doctors ...

  12. Portable Zika Test Shows Promise in Monkeys

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_158704.html Portable Zika Test Shows Promise in Monkeys Easy-to-use ... News) -- A fast, inexpensive test that detects the Zika virus in monkeys might be useful for doctors ...

  13. Neural correlates of face and object perception in an awake chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes examined by scalp-surface event-related potentials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirokata Fukushima

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The neural system of our closest living relative, the chimpanzee, is a topic of increasing research interest. However, electrophysiological examinations of neural activity during visual processing in awake chimpanzees are currently lacking. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In the present report, skin-surface event-related brain potentials (ERPs were measured while a fully awake chimpanzee observed photographs of faces and objects in two experiments. In Experiment 1, human faces and stimuli composed of scrambled face images were displayed. In Experiment 2, three types of pictures (faces, flowers, and cars were presented. The waveforms evoked by face stimuli were distinguished from other stimulus types, as reflected by an enhanced early positivity appearing before 200 ms post stimulus, and an enhanced late negativity after 200 ms, around posterior and occipito-temporal sites. Face-sensitive activity was clearly observed in both experiments. However, in contrast to the robustly observed face-evoked N170 component in humans, we found that faces did not elicit a peak in the latency range of 150-200 ms in either experiment. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Although this pilot study examined a single subject and requires further examination, the observed scalp voltage patterns suggest that selective processing of faces in the chimpanzee brain can be detected by recording surface ERPs. In addition, this non-invasive method for examining an awake chimpanzee can be used to extend our knowledge of the characteristics of visual cognition in other primate species.

  14. Systems Biology of the Vervet Monkey

    OpenAIRE

    Jasinska, Anna J.; Schmitt, Christopher A.; Susan K Service; Cantor, Rita M.; Dewar, Ken; James D. Jentsch; Kaplan, Jay R; Turner, Trudy R.; Warren, Wesley C.; George M Weinstock; Woods, Roger P.; Freimer, Nelson B.

    2013-01-01

    Nonhuman primates (NHP) provide crucial biomedical model systems intermediate between rodents and humans. The vervet monkey (also called the African green monkey) is a widely used NHP model that has unique value for genetic and genomic investigations of traits relevant to human diseases. This article describes the phylogeny and population history of the vervet monkey and summarizes the use of both captive and wild vervet monkeys in biomedical research. It also discusses the effort of an inter...

  15. The extensometer--use in spontaneously ventilating awake volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brimacombe, J; MacFie, A; Masters, A

    1992-10-01

    The extensometer is a new device with potential in the field of respiratory pattern analysis. This paper describes the physical principles upon which the extensometer depends and also assesses its performance as a noninvasive respiratory monitor in respect of its ability to measure tidal volume and to determine obstructive breathing patterns in awake volunteers in the supine position over a limited time period. Further developments of the device are outlined and the current status of torso transducers in anaesthesia and intensive care are discussed. PMID:1443482

  16. Awake anesthesia for resection of gliomas located in eloquent brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WANG De-xiang

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Intraoperative awake anesthesia is a safe and reliable method performed in glioma surgery in brain eloquent areas, for the purpose of a maximum resection of the lesions and protection of brain function. Plasma target-controlled infusion (TCI is used in the course of opening cranium and closing cranium to maintain optimal sedation, which is supplemented by excellent scalp nerve block for analgesia, and a laryngeal mask is used to secure the patient's airway. During cerebral function monitoring and lesion excision, appropriately modifying the plasma concentration of propofol TCI can make the patient achieve optimal sedation.

  17. Sardinian composers of contemporary music

    OpenAIRE

    Giglio, Consuelo

    2012-01-01

    The meeting point between the school headed by Franco Oppo and the rich traditional music of the island gave birth in Sardinia to an intense fl owering in the fi eld of New Music, with a strong feeling of belonging and a constant call for a positive concept of identity. Thus, since the time of Oppo (1935) and his contemporary Vittorio Montis, we come across many composers that differ between each other but are almost always recognizably “Sardinian”. Oppo has been one of the mos...

  18. The King Vision™ video laryngoscope for awake intubation: series of cases and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaszynska E

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Ewelina Gaszynska, Tomasz GaszynskiDepartment of Emergency Medicine and Disaster Medicine, Medical University of Lodz, Lodz, PolandAbstract: Intubation of patients with a supraglottic mass causing obstruction of the glottis remains a difficult problem for the experienced anesthesiologist. Awake fiberscopic endotracheal intubation is the recommended approach in such cases; however, use of a video laryngoscope for awake intubation can be an alternative to a fiberscope. Here we present two cases of awake intubation using a King Vision™ video laryngoscope in patients with a supraglottic mass, and a literature review on use of video laryngoscopes for awake intubation. After topical anesthesia and sedation with opioids, the patients were successfully intubated.Keywords: airway management, difficult airway, awake intubation, video laryngoscope

  19. Breeding monkeys for biomedical research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourne, G. H.; Golarzdebourne, M. N.; Keeling, M. E.

    1973-01-01

    Captive bred rhesus monkeys show much less pathology than wild born animals. The monkeys may be bred in cages or in an outdoor compound. Cage bred animals are not psychologically normal which makes then unsuited for some types of space related research. Compound breeding provides contact between mother and infant and an opportunity for the infants to play with their peers which are important requirements to help maintain their behavioral integrity. Offspring harvested after a year in the compound appear behaviorally normal and show little histopathology. Compound breeding is also an economical method for the rapid production of young animals. The colony can double its size about every two and a half years.

  20. Organists and organ music composers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foerch, Christian; Hennerici, Michael G

    2015-01-01

    Clinical case reports of patients with exceptional musical talent and education provide clues as to how the brain processes musical ability and aptitude. In this chapter, selected examples from famous and unknown organ players/composers are presented to demonstrate the complexity of modified musical performances as well as the capacities of the brain to preserve artistic abilities: both authors are active organists and academic neurologists with strong clinical experience, practice, and knowledge about the challenges to play such an outstanding instrument and share their interest to explore potentially instrument-related phenomena of brain modulation in specific transient or permanent impairments. We concentrate on the sites of lesions, suggested pathophysiology, separate positive (e.g., seizures, visual or auditory hallucinations, or synesthesia [an involuntary perception produced by stimulation of another sense]) and negative phenomena (e.g., amusia, aphasia, neglect, or sensory-motor deficits) and particularly address aspects of recent concepts of temporary and permanent network disorders. PMID:25684298

  1. Avalanche analysis from multi-electrode ensemble recordings in cat, monkey and human cerebral cortex during wakefulness and sleep.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nima eDehghani

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Self-organized critical states are found in many natural systems, from earthquakes to forest fires, they have also been observed in neural systems, particularly, in neuronal cultures. However, the presence of critical states in the awake brain remains controversial. Here, we compared avalanche analyses performed on different in vivo preparations during wakefulness, slow-wave sleep and REM sleep, using high-density electrode arrays in cat motor cortex (96 electrodes, monkey motor cortex and premotor cortex and human temporal cortex (96 electrodes in epileptic patients. In neuronal avalanches defined from units (up to 160 single units, the size of avalanches never clearly scaled as power-law, but rather scaled exponentially or displayed intermediate scaling. We also analyzed the dynamics of local field potentials (LFPs and in particular LFP negative peaks (nLFPs among the different electrodes (up to 96 sites in temporal cortex or up to 128 sites in adjacent motor and pre-motor cortices. In this case, the avalanches defined from nLFPs displayed power-law scaling in double logarithmic representations, as reported previously in monkey. However, avalanche defined as positive LFP (pLFP peaks, which are less directly related to neuronal firing, also displayed apparent power-law scaling. Closer examination of this scaling using the more reliable cumulative distribution function (CDF and other rigorous statistical measures, did not confirm power-law scaling. The same pattern was seen for cats, monkey and human, as well as for different brain states of wakefulness and sleep. We also tested other alternative distributions. Multiple exponential fitting yielded optimal fits of the avalanche dynamics with bi-exponential distributions. Collectively, these results show no clear evidence for power-law scaling or self-organized critical states in the awake and sleeping brain of mammals, from cat to man.

  2. AWAKE CRANIOTOMY USING DEXMEDETOMIDINE INFUSION AND SCALP BLOCK: OUR EXPERIENCE IN SERIES OF CASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annapurna Sarma

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Awake craniotomy is an important technique used for brain tumour excision from eloquent cortex. Awake craniotomy allows maximum resection of the tumor with minimum functional impairment . The critical aspect is to maintain adequate analgesia and sedation, hemodynamic stability, airway safety, while keeping the patient awake and cooperative for neurological testing. AIM OF THE STUDY: We are reporting cases series of awake craniotomy under monito red anesthesia care using dexmedetomidine infusion as an adjuvant to scalp block, titrating the sedation level by BIS monitoring. MATERIALS AND METHODS: After careful patient selection and psychological preparation Monitored Anesthesia Care was provided by continuous infusion of dexmedetomidine at a rate of 0.2 - 0.5ug/kg/min titrating sedation score to BIS value of 70 - 90. Bilateral scalp block was administered using 0.5% bupivacaine. For dura mater incision, a pad with 2% lidocaine was applied for 3 minutes . The tumor removal was complete with no neurological deficiency. All the patients were discharged on 5 th postoperative day without complications and with full patient satisfaction. CONCLUSION: We conclude that monitored anesthesia care with dexmedetomidine infusion and scalp block for awake craniotomy is safe and efficacious. Absence of complications and high patient satisfaction score makes this technique close to an ideal technique for awake craniotomy. KEYWORDS: Awake craniotomy; Dexmedetomidine; Scalp b lock; BIS index

  3. Links from complex spikes to local plasticity and motor learning in the cerebellum of awake-behaving monkeys

    OpenAIRE

    Medina, Javier F.; Lisberger, Stephen G.

    2008-01-01

    The hypothesis of cerebellar learning proposes that complex spikes in Purkinje cells engage mechanisms of plasticity in the cerebellar cortex; in turn, changes in the cerebellum depress the simple spike response of Purkinje cells to a given stimulus and cause the adaptive modification of a motor behavior. Although many elements of this hypothesis have been supported by prior experiments, the links between complex spikes, simple spike plasticity, and behavior have not yet been examined simulta...

  4. Nociceptive responses to thermal and mechanical stimulations in awake pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    di Giminiani, Pierpaolo; Petersen, Lars Jelstrup; Herskin, Mette S.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Porcine skin exhibits a high degree of homology to human skin, and the pig has recently been used as a cutaneous pain model. However, before the full potential of this novel in vivo cutaneous pain model can be achieved, several methodological aspects related to the management of awake...... animal studies in a large species require further examination. This manuscript describes the initial development of a porcine model of cutaneous nociception and focuses on interactions between the sensory modality, body size and the anatomical location of the stimulation site. METHODS: Pigs of different...... body sizes (30 and 60 kg) were exposed to thermal (CO(2) laser) and mechanical (pressure application measurement device) stimulations to the flank and the hind legs in a balanced order. The median response latency and the type of behavioural response were recorded. RESULTS: Small pigs exhibited...

  5. WIDE AWAKE mediates the circadian timing of sleep onset.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Sha; Lamaze, Angelique; Liu, Qili; Tabuchi, Masashi; Yang, Yong; Fowler, Melissa; Bharadwaj, Rajnish; Zhang, Julia; Bedont, Joseph; Blackshaw, Seth; Lloyd, Thomas E; Montell, Craig; Sehgal, Amita; Koh, Kyunghee; Wu, Mark N

    2014-04-01

    How the circadian clock regulates the timing of sleep is poorly understood. Here, we identify a Drosophila mutant, wide awake (wake), that exhibits a marked delay in sleep onset at dusk. Loss of WAKE in a set of arousal-promoting clock neurons, the large ventrolateral neurons (l-LNvs), impairs sleep onset. WAKE levels cycle, peaking near dusk, and the expression of WAKE in l-LNvs is Clock dependent. Strikingly, Clock and cycle mutants also exhibit a profound delay in sleep onset, which can be rescued by restoring WAKE expression in LNvs. WAKE interacts with the GABAA receptor Resistant to Dieldrin (RDL), upregulating its levels and promoting its localization to the plasma membrane. In wake mutant l-LNvs, GABA sensitivity is decreased and excitability is increased at dusk. We propose that WAKE acts as a clock output molecule specifically for sleep, inhibiting LNvs at dusk to promote the transition from wake to sleep. PMID:24631345

  6. The electron accelerator for the AWAKE experiment at CERN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pepitone, K.; Doebert, S.; Burt, G.; Chevallay, E.; Chritin, N.; Delory, C.; Fedosseev, V.; Hessler, Ch.; McMonagle, G.; Mete, O.; Verzilov, V.; Apsimon, R.

    2016-09-01

    The AWAKE collaboration prepares a proton driven plasma wakefield acceleration experiment using the SPS beam at CERN. A long proton bunch extracted from the SPS interacts with a high power laser and a 10 m long rubidium vapour plasma cell to create strong wakefields allowing sustained electron acceleration. The electron bunch to probe these wakefields is supplied by a 20 MeV electron accelerator. The electron accelerator consists of an RF-gun and a short booster structure. This electron source should provide beams with intensities between 0.1 and 1 nC, bunch lengths between 0.3 and 3 ps and an emittance of the order of 2 mm mrad. The wide range of parameters should cope with the uncertainties and future prospects of the planned experiments. The layout of the electron accelerator, its instrumentation and beam dynamics simulations are presented.

  7. Monkeys match and tally quantities across senses

    OpenAIRE

    Jordan, Kerry E.; Maclean, Evan L.; Brannon, Elizabeth M.

    2008-01-01

    We report here that monkeys can actively match the number of sounds they hear to the number of shapes they see and present the first evidence that monkeys sum over sounds and sights. In Experiment 1, two monkeys were trained to choose a simultaneous array of 1-9 squares that numerically matched a sample sequence of shapes or sounds. Monkeys numerically matched across (audio-visual) and within (visual-visual) modalities with equal accuracy and transferred to novel numerical values. In Experime...

  8. Pediatric awake craniotomy for seizure focus resection with dexmedetomidine sedation-a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheshadri, Veena; Chandramouli, B A

    2016-08-01

    Resection of lesions near the eloquent cortex of brain necessitates awake craniotomy to reduce the risk of permanent neurologic deficits during surgery. There are limited reports of anesthetic management of awake craniotomy in pediatric patients. This report is on use of dexmedetomidine sedation for awake craniotomy in a 11-year-old child, without any airway adjuncts throughout the procedure. Dexmedetomidine infusion administered at a dosage of 0.2 to 0.7μg kg(-1) h(-1) provided adequate sedation for the entire procedure. There were no untoward incidents or any interference with electrocorticography, intraoperative stimulation, and functional mapping. Adequate preoperative visits and counseling of patient and parents regarding course and nature of events along with well-planned intraoperative management are of utmost importance in a pediatric age group for successful intraoperative awake craniotomy. PMID:27290976

  9. High-frequency oscillations in human and monkey neocortex during the wake-sleep cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Van Quyen, Michel; Muller, Lyle E; Telenczuk, Bartosz; Halgren, Eric; Cash, Sydney; Hatsopoulos, Nicholas G; Dehghani, Nima; Destexhe, Alain

    2016-08-16

    Beta (β)- and gamma (γ)-oscillations are present in different cortical areas and are thought to be inhibition-driven, but it is not known if these properties also apply to γ-oscillations in humans. Here, we analyze such oscillations in high-density microelectrode array recordings in human and monkey during the wake-sleep cycle. In these recordings, units were classified as excitatory and inhibitory cells. We find that γ-oscillations in human and β-oscillations in monkey are characterized by a strong implication of inhibitory neurons, both in terms of their firing rate and their phasic firing with the oscillation cycle. The β- and γ-waves systematically propagate across the array, with similar velocities, during both wake and sleep. However, only in slow-wave sleep (SWS) β- and γ-oscillations are associated with highly coherent and functional interactions across several millimeters of the neocortex. This interaction is specifically pronounced between inhibitory cells. These results suggest that inhibitory cells are dominantly involved in the genesis of β- and γ-oscillations, as well as in the organization of their large-scale coherence in the awake and sleeping brain. The highest oscillation coherence found during SWS suggests that fast oscillations implement a highly coherent reactivation of wake patterns that may support memory consolidation during SWS. PMID:27482084

  10. The King Vision™ video laryngoscope for awake intubation: series of cases and literature review

    OpenAIRE

    Gaszynska E; Gaszynski T

    2014-01-01

    Ewelina Gaszynska, Tomasz GaszynskiDepartment of Emergency Medicine and Disaster Medicine, Medical University of Lodz, Lodz, PolandAbstract: Intubation of patients with a supraglottic mass causing obstruction of the glottis remains a difficult problem for the experienced anesthesiologist. Awake fiberscopic endotracheal intubation is the recommended approach in such cases; however, use of a video laryngoscope for awake intubation can be an alternative to a fiberscope. Here we present two cases...

  11. The King Vision™ video laryngoscope for awake intubation: series of cases and literature review

    OpenAIRE

    Gaszynski, Tomasz

    2014-01-01

    Ewelina Gaszynska, Tomasz GaszynskiDepartment of Emergency Medicine and Disaster Medicine, Medical University of Lodz, Lodz, PolandAbstract: Intubation of patients with a supraglottic mass causing obstruction of the glottis remains a difficult problem for the experienced anesthesiologist. Awake fiberscopic endotracheal intubation is the recommended approach in such cases; however, use of a video laryngoscope for awake intubation can be an alternative to a fiberscope. Here we present two cases...

  12. Organic and Non-Organic Language Disorders after Awake Brain Surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Elke De Witte; Erik Robert; Peter Mariën

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Awake surgery with Direct Electrical Stimulation (DES) is considered the ‘gold standard’ to resect brain tumours in the language dominant hemisphere (De Witte & Mariën, 2013). Although transient language impairments are common in the immediate postoperative phase, permanent postoperative language deficits seem to be rare (Duffau, 2007). Milian et al. (2014) stated that most patients tolerate the awake procedure well and would undergo a similar procedure again. However, postopera...

  13. Awake seizures after pure sleep-related epilepsy: a systematic review and implications for driving law

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas, Rhys H.; King, Will H; Johnston, Ann; Smith, Philip EM

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Who with sleep seizures is safe to drive? Driving law is controversial; ineligibility varies between individual US states and EU countries. Current UK driving law is strongly influenced by a single-centre study from 1974 where most participants were not taking antiepileptic drugs (AEDs). However, pure sleep-related epilepsy is often fully controlled on medication, and its withdrawal can provoke awake seizures. This systematic review asked, `What is the risk of awake se...

  14. Awake tracheal intubation using Pentax airway scope in 30 patients: A Case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Payal Kajekar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Pentax airway scope (AWS has been successfully used for managing difficult intubations. In this case series, we aimed to evaluate the success rate and time taken to complete intubation, when AWS was used for awake tracheal intubation. Methods: We prospectively evaluated the use of AWS for awake tracheal intubation in 30 patients. Indication for awake intubation, intubation time, total time to complete tracheal intubation, laryngoscopic view (Cormack and Lehane grade, total dose of local anaesthetic used, anaesthetists rating and patient′s tolerance of the procedure were recorded. Results: The procedure was successful in 25 out of the 30 patients (83%. The mean (standard deviation intubation time and total time to complete the tracheal intubation was 5.4 (2.4 and 13.9 (3.7 min, respectively in successful cases. The laryngeal view was grade 1 in 24 and grade 2 in one of 25 successful intubations. In three out of the five patients where the AWS failed, awake tracheal intubation was successfully completed with the assistance of flexible fibre optic scope (FOS. Conclusion: Awake tracheal intubation using AWS was successful in 83% of patients. Success rate can be further improved using a combination of AWS and FOS. Anaesthesiologists who do not routinely use FOS may find AWS easier to use for awake tracheal intubation using an oral route.

  15. Neural representation of face familiarity in an awake chimpanzee

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirokata Fukushima

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Evaluating the familiarity of faces is critical for social animals as it is the basis of individual recognition. In the present study, we examined how face familiarity is reflected in neural activities in our closest living relative, the chimpanzee. Skin-surface event-related brain potentials (ERPs were measured while a fully awake chimpanzee observed photographs of familiar and unfamiliar chimpanzee faces (Experiment 1 and human faces (Experiment 2. The ERPs evoked by chimpanzee faces differentiated unfamiliar individuals from familiar ones around midline areas centered on vertex sites at approximately 200 ms after the stimulus onset. In addition, the ERP response to the image of the subject’s own face did not significantly diverge from those evoked by familiar chimpanzees, suggesting that the subject’s brain at a minimum remembered the image of her own face. The ERPs evoked by human faces were not influenced by the familiarity of target individuals. These results indicate that chimpanzee neural representations are more sensitive to the familiarity of conspecific than allospecific faces.

  16. Intrinsic connectivity of neural networks in the awake rabbit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Matthew P; Weiss, Craig; Procissi, Daniel; Disterhoft, John F; Wang, Lei

    2016-04-01

    The way in which the brain is functionally connected into different networks has emerged as an important research topic in order to understand normal neural processing and signaling. Since some experimental manipulations are difficult or unethical to perform in humans, animal models are better suited to investigate this topic. Rabbits are a species that can undergo MRI scanning in an awake and conscious state with minimal preparation and habituation. In this study, we characterized the intrinsic functional networks of the resting New Zealand White rabbit brain using BOLD fMRI data. Group independent component analysis revealed seven networks similar to those previously found in humans, non-human primates and/or rodents including the hippocampus, default mode, cerebellum, thalamus, and visual, somatosensory, and parietal cortices. For the first time, the intrinsic functional networks of the resting rabbit brain have been elucidated demonstrating the rabbit's applicability as a translational animal model. Without the confounding effects of anesthetics or sedatives, future experiments may employ rabbits to understand changes in neural connectivity and brain functioning as a result of experimental manipulation (e.g., temporary or permanent network disruption, learning-related changes, and drug administration). PMID:26774609

  17. Carotid endarterectomy in awake patients: safety, tolerability and results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Célio Teixeira Mendonça

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To analyze the results of 125 carotid endarterectomies under loco-regional anesthesia, with selective use of shunt and bovine pericardium patch. Methods: One hundred and seventeen patients with stenosis ≥ 70% in the internal carotid artery on duplex-scan + arteriography or magnetic resonance angiography underwent 125 carotid endarterectomies. Intraoperative pharmacological cerebral protection included intravenous administration of alfentanil and dexametasone. Clopidogrel, aspirin and statins were used in all cases. Seventy-seven patients were males (65.8%. Mean age was 70.8 years, ranging from 48 to 88 years. Surgery was performed to treat symptomatic stenosis in 69 arteries (55.2% and asymptomatic stenosis in 56 arteries (44.8%. Results: A carotid shunt was used in 3 cases (2.4% due to signs and symptoms of cerebral ischemia after carotid artery clamping during the operation, and all 3 patients had a good outcome. Bovine pericardium patch was used in 71 arteries ≤ 6 mm in diameter (56.8%. Perioperative mortality was 0.8%: one patient died from a myocardial infarction. Two patients (1.6% had minor ipsilateral strokes with good recovery, and 2 patients (1.6% had non-fatal myocardial infarctions with good recovery. The mean follow-up period was 32 months. In the late postoperative period, there was restenosis in only three arteries (2.4%. Conclusion: Carotid artery endarterectomy can be safely performed in the awake patient, with low morbidity and mortality rates.

  18. Functional Connectivity Hubs and Networks in the Awake Marmoset Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annabelle Marie Belcher

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In combination with advances in analytical methods, resting-state fMRI is allowing unprecedented access to achieve a better understanding of the network organization of the brain. Increasing evidence suggests that this architecture may incorporate highly functionally connected nodes, or hubs, and we have recently proposed local functional connectivity density (lFCD mapping to identify highly-connected nodes in the human brain. Here we imaged awake nonhuman primates to test whether, like the human brain, the marmoset brain contains functional connectivity hubs. Ten adult common marmosets (Callithrix jacchus were acclimated to mild, comfortable restraint using individualized helmets. Following restraint training, resting BOLD data were acquired during eight consecutive 10 min scans for each subject. lFCD revealed prominent cortical and subcortical hubs of connectivity across the marmoset brain; specifically, in primary and secondary visual cortices (V1/V2, higher-order visual association areas (A19M/V6[DM], posterior parietal and posterior cingulate areas (PGM and A23b/A31, thalamus, dorsal and ventral striatal areas (caudate, putamen, lateral septal nucleus, and anterior cingulate cortex (A24a. lFCD hubs were highly connected to widespread areas of the brain, and further revealed significant network-network interactions. These data provide a baseline platform for future investigations in a nonhuman primate model of the brain’s network topology.

  19. Ventilation and diaphragm activity during sustained hypoxia in awake canines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimura, Naoyuki; Ji, Michael; Jagers, Jenny Suneby; Katagiri, Masato; Easton, Paul A

    2015-10-01

    In humans, isocapnic hypoxia sustained for 20-30 min elicits a biphasic ventilatory response with an initial increased peak followed by a roll-off to a lesser, intermediate plateau. However, it is uncertain if this hypoxic roll-off is common for all mammals, as canines have been a notable exception. We examined the effect of moderate isocapnic hypoxia (SpO2 80%) sustained for 20 min in 13 adult, awake, intact canines. The ventilatory response to sustained isocapnic hypoxia in these canines was not maintained: after an initial brisk response, ventilation declined significantly to an intermediate plateau. The hypoxic ventilatory decline occurred via a decrease in tidal volume, without change in breathing frequency. Distinct from airflow, costal diaphragm EMG showed a concurrent decline during sustained isocapnic hypoxia. However, the change in ventilation during sustained hypoxia in canines was very different from the response in humans. Although some decline in ventilation during sustained hypoxia may be common to all mammals, there are notable differences among species. PMID:26099798

  20. Intermediate filaments in monkey kidney TC7 cells: focal centers and interrelationship with other cytoskeletal systems.

    OpenAIRE

    Celis, J E; Small, J V; Larsen, P M; Fey, S J; De Mey, J.; Celis, A

    1984-01-01

    Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis of intermediate-sized filament-enriched cytoskeletons of epithelial monkey kidney TC7 cells has shown that they are composed of at least two keratins (isoelectric focusing 36, Mr = 48,500; IEF 46, Mr = 43,500; HeLa protein catalogue number) and vimentin. Indirect immunofluorescence as well as immunoelectron microscopy using antibodies directed against specific polypeptides sometimes revealed a discontinuous staining of keratin-containing filaments. Indirect...

  1. Radioimmunoassay for rhesus monkey gonadotropins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heterologous double-antibody radioimmunoassay methods are described for the measurement of circulating levels of rhesus monkey (Macaca mulatta) FSH and LH; the latter assay is also applicable to rhesus chorionic gonadotropin (CG) estimations. The FSH assay utilizes purified rat FSH for trace, either of two anti-human FSH antisera and a semipurified rhesus pituitary standard. The LH assay utilizes purified ovine LH for trace, an anti-human CG antiserum and the same rhesus pituitary standard. The use of these systems obviates the necessity of purifying rhesus gonadotropins which are required for the development of homologous radioimmunoassay systems. (U.S.)

  2. The composing process in technical communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masse, R. E.

    1981-01-01

    The theory and application of the composing process in technical communications is addressed. The composing process of engineers, some implications for composing research for the teaching and research of technical communication, and an interpretation of the processes as creative experience are also discussed. Two areas of technical communications summarized concern: the rhetorical features of technical communications, and the theoretical background for a process-based view, a problem-solving approach to technical writing.

  3. Pre-Columbian monkey tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haslam, Michael; Luncz, Lydia V; Staff, Richard A; Bradshaw, Fiona; Ottoni, Eduardo B; Falótico, Tiago

    2016-07-11

    Stone tools reveal worldwide innovations in human behaviour over the past three million years [1]. However, the only archaeological report of pre-modern non-human animal tool use comes from three Western chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes verus) sites in Côte d'Ivoire, aged between 4.3 and 1.3 thousand years ago (kya) [2]. This anthropocentrism limits our comparative insight into the emergence and development of technology, weakening our evolutionary models [3]. Here, we apply archaeological techniques to a distinctive stone tool assemblage created by a non-human animal in the New World, the Brazilian bearded capuchin monkey (Sapajus libidinosus). Wild capuchins at Serra da Capivara National Park (SCNP) use stones to pound open defended food, including locally indigenous cashew nuts [4], and we demonstrate that this activity dates back at least 600 to 700 years. Capuchin stone hammers and anvils are therefore the oldest non-human tools known outside of Africa, opening up to scientific scrutiny questions on the origins and spread of tool use in New World monkeys, and the mechanisms - social, ecological and cognitive - that support primate technological evolution. PMID:27404235

  4. America's Women Composers: Up from the Footnotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pool, Jeannie G.

    1979-01-01

    This article presents an overview on women composers in the United States from the eighteenth century to the present. It also lists women's musical organizations, selected references on women in music, and available recordings of works by American women composers. (SJL)

  5. Awake brain mapping of cortex and subcortical pathways in brain tumor surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freyschlag, C F; Duffau, H

    2014-12-01

    Awake surgery is not a new technique: this is a new philosophy. Indeed, in surgery for diffuse gliomas performed in awake patients, the goal is not anymore to remove a "tumor mass" according to oncological boundaries (which in essence do not exist in infiltrating neoplasms), but to resect a part of the brain invaded by a chronic tumoral disease, according to functional limits both at cortical and subcortical levels. Therefore, intraoperative electrical mapping is accepted as the gold standard in order to gain information about the functionality of the underlying tissue when performing neuro-oncological surgery. This review should give the reader an overview of principles and indications of mapping of eloquent cortex and subcortical pathways with practical considerations for cerebral tumors. In gliomas, awake mapping has been demonstrated as increasing the surgical indications in so-called "critical areas" with nonetheless a significant decrease of postoperative morbidity‑while maximizing the extent of resection. Beyond clinical implications, awake surgery represents a unique opportunity to study neural networks underpinning sensorimotor, visuospatial, language, executive and even behavioral functions in humans. This led to propose new models of connectomics, breaking with the localizationist view of brain processing, and opening the window to the concept of neuroplasticity. In summary, awake mapping enables to make a link between surgical neurooncology and cognitive neurosciences, to improve both survival and quality of life of glioma patients. PMID:25418274

  6. Awake brain tumor resection during pregnancy: Decision making and technical nuances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Lingzhong; Han, Seunggu J; Rollins, Mark D; Gelb, Adrian W; Chang, Edward F

    2016-02-01

    The co-occurrence of primary brain tumor and pregnancy poses unique challenges to the treating physician. If a rapidly growing lesion causes life-threatening mass effect, craniotomy for tumor debulking becomes urgent. The choice between awake craniotomy versus general anesthesia becomes complicated if the tumor is encroaching on eloquent brain because considerations pertinent to both patient safety and oncological outcome, in addition to fetal wellbeing, are involved. A 31-year-old female at 30 weeks gestation with twins presented to our hospital seeking awake craniotomy to resect a 7 × 6 × 5 cm left frontoparietal brain tumor with 7 mm left-to-right subfalcine herniation on imaging that led to word finding difficulty, dysfluency, right upper extremity paralysis, and right lower extremity weakness. She had twice undergone tumor debulking under general anesthesia during the same pregnancy at an outside hospital at 16 weeks and 28 weeks gestation. There were considerations both for and against awake brain tumor resection over surgery under general anesthesia. The decision-making process and the technical nuances related to awake brain tumor resection in this neurologically impaired patient are discussed. Awake craniotomy benefits the patient who harbors a tumor that encroaches on the eloquent brain by allowing a greater extent of resection while preserving the language and sensorimotor function. It can be successfully done in pregnant patients who are neurologically impaired. The patient should be motivated and well informed of the details of the process. A multidisciplinary and collaborative effort is also crucial. PMID:26498092

  7. Meal-contingent intestinal lymph sampling from awake, unrestrained rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Myrtha; Dai, Yunting; Tso, Patrick; Langhans, Wolfgang

    2012-06-15

    Standard procedures for intestinal lymph collection involve continuous, quantitative drainage of the lymph fluid in anesthetized or restrained animals that are often euthanized within 48 h. We here describe a novel technique for the nonocclusive cannulation of the major intestinal lymph duct in rats that allows for repetitive in vivo sampling of intestinal lymph from unrestrained, awake, and ad libitum-fed animals. The distinctive feature of this novel technique is that a 5- to 7-mm long piece of Vialon tubing (OD/ID: 0.8/0.7 mm) with a small hole in its wall is first implanted into the major intestinal lymph duct for stabilization. The tapered tip (OD: ≈0.1 mm) of the catheter is then inserted into the hole of the tubing and fixed in place with a polyamid suture and a drop of tissue glue. In our hands, catheters implanted this way remain patent for up to 6 wk after surgery. In an initial experiment we collected lymph from six adult rats before (0) and 15, 30, 45, 60, 75, 90, 120, and 180 min (120 μl, each) after the onset of isocaloric (12.5 kcal) low-fat (LF) or high-fat (HF) test meals and measured active glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1). Intestinal lymphatic GLP-1 concentration increased (P < 0.05) from ≈4 pmol/l (0 min) to a peak of 33 ± 6 (means ± SE) or 22 ± 4 pmol/l at 15 (HF) or 30 min (LF) after meal onset and gradually returned to baseline levels by 180 min. With this new technique fewer animals are required to generate physiologically relevant data for various aspects of gastrointestinal physiology that involve the lymphatic system. Furthermore, the advantage of this system is that the animal can act as its own control when the effect of different experimental protocols is tested. PMID:22513747

  8. Nuclear weapon testing and the monkey business

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reasons for India's total ban on the export of rhesus monkeys to U.S. have been explained. The major reason is that some of the animals were used in nuclear weapon related radiation experiments. This was a clear violation of a stricture in the agreement about supply of monkeys. The stricture prohibited the use of animals for research concerning military operations, including nuclear weapon testing. It is pleaded that a strict enforcement of strictures rather than a total ban on the export of monkeys would be better in the interest of advancement of knowledge in human medicine and disease control. (M.G.B.)

  9. Chromosome painting defines genomic rearrangements between red howler monkey subspecies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Consigliere, S; Stanyon, R; Koehler, U; Agoramoorthy, G; Wienberg, J

    1996-06-01

    We hybridized whole human chromosome-specific DNA libraries to chromosomes of two supposed subspecies of Alouatta seniculus: Alouatta seniculus sara and Alouatta seniculus arctoides. The number of hybridization signals per haploid set is 42 in A. s. sara and 43 in A. s. arctoidea; the two karyotypes differ by at least 16 chromosomal rearrangements, including numerous translocations. An unusual sex chromosome system is shared by both taxa. The sex chromosome system results from a Y translocation with a chromosome homologous to parts of human chromosome 3/15 and can be described as X1X2Y1Y2/X1X1X2X2 (male/female). Both red howlers also have microchromosomes, a highly unusual karyological trait not found in other higher primates. These microchromosomes are not hybridized by any human chromosome paint and therefore are probably composed of repetitive DNA. It is well known that New World monkeys have high karyological variability. It is probable that molecular cytogenetic analyses including chromosome painting will permit an accurate reconstruction of the phylogeny of these monkeys and help establish the ancestral karyotype for higher primates. PMID:8817065

  10. Binding kinetics of 11C-N-methyl piperidyl benzilate (11C-NMPB) in a rhesus monkey brain using the cerebellum as a reference region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The binding kinetics of' 11C-N-methyl piperidyl benzilate (11C-NMPB) in rhesus monkey brain were studied using animal positron emission tomography (PET) (SHR2000). This study is intended to assess the validity of the method using the cerebellum as a reference region, and to evaluate the effects of anesthesia on 11C -NMPB binding. Two monkeys, anesthetized with ketamine, received intravenous 11C-NMPB alone (370-760 MBq, 11C-NMPB accumulated densely in the striatum and cerebral cortex with time. In contrast, the tracer accumulation significantly decreased with increased doses of nonradioactive NMPB. In the cerebellum, on the other hand, the accumulation of 11C-NMPB remained low and the tracer was slowly eliminated from the brain following the injection. 11C-NMPB binding in the cerebellum was barely affected by the increased dose of nonradioactive NMPB. We thus concluded that the specific 11C-NMPB binding was negligible in the cerebellum, and performed simplified evaluation of 11C-NMPB binding in each brain region by a graphical method using the cerebellum as a reference region. PET was conducted 26 times, in total both in ketamine-anesthetized and awake monkeys (n=3 each). Measurements of 11C-NMPB binding showed good run-to-run reproducibility within individual animals. When 11C-NMPB binding was compared between ketamine-treated and awake animals, a significant increase in 11C-NMPB binding was observed in the striatum but not in other brain regions of ketamine-treated animals. (author)

  11. AWAKE, The Advanced Proton Driven Plasma Wakefield Acceleration Experiment at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Gschwendtner, E; Amorim, L.; Apsimon, R.; Assmann, R.; Bachmann, A.M.; Batsch, F.; Bauche, J.; Olsen, V.K. Berglyd; Bernardini, M.; Bingham, R.; Biskup, B.; Bohl, T.; Bracco, C.; Burrows, P.N.; Burt, G.; Buttenschon, B.; Butterworth, A.; Caldwell, A.; Cascella, M.; Chevallay, E.; Cipiccia, S.; Damerau, H.; Deacon, L.; Dirksen, P.; Doebert, S.; Dorda, U.; Farmer, J.; Fedosseev, V.; Feldbaumer, E.; Fiorito, R.; Fonseca, R.; Friebel, F.; Gorn, A.A.; Grulke, O.; Hansen, J.; Hessler, C.; Hofle, W.; Holloway, J.; Huther, M.; Jaroszynski, D.; Jensen, L.; Jolly, S.; Joulaei, A.; Kasim, M.; Keeble, F.; Li, Y.; Liu, S.; Lopes, N.; Lotov, K.V.; Mandry, S.; Martorelli, R.; Martyanov, M.; Mazzoni, S.; Mete, O.; Minakov, V.A.; Mitchell, J.; Moody, J.; Muggli, P.; Najmudin, Z.; Norreys, P.; Oz, E.; Pardons, A.; Pepitone, K.; Petrenko, A.; Plyushchev, G.; Pukhov, A.; Rieger, K.; Ruhl, H.; Salveter, F.; Savard, N.; Schmidt, J.; Seryi, A.; Shaposhnikova, E.; Sheng, Z.M.; Sherwood, P.; Silva, L.; Soby, L.; Sosedkin, A.P.; Spitsyn, R.I.; Trines, R.; Tuev, P.V.; Turner, M.; Verzilov, V.; Vieira, J.; Vincke, H.; Wei, Y.; Welsch, C.P.; Wing, M.; Xia, G.; Zhang, H.

    2015-01-01

    The Advanced Proton Driven Plasma Wakefield Acceleration Experiment (AWAKE) aims at studying plasma wakefield generation and electron acceleration driven by proton bunches. It is a proof-of-principle R&D experiment at CERN and the world's first proton driven plasma wakefield acceleration experiment. The AWAKE experiment will be installed in the former CNGS facility and uses the 400 GeV/c proton beam bunches from the SPS. The first experiments will focus on the self-modulation instability of the long (rms ~12 cm) proton bunch in the plasma. These experiments are planned for the end of 2016. Later, in 2017/2018, low energy (~15 MeV) electrons will be externally injected to sample the wakefields and be accelerated beyond 1 GeV. The main goals of the experiment will be summarized. A summary of the AWAKE design and construction status will be presented.

  12. [Awake intubation with landiolol and dexmedetomidine in a patient with anxiety neurosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagamine, Tatsunari; Komasawa, Nobuyasu; Fujitate, Yasutaka; Kuzukawa, Yosuke; Kitano, Manabu; Minami, Toshiaki

    2014-08-01

    We report a successful case of awake intubation in a patient with anxiety neurosis via continuous administration of landiolol and dexmedetomidine. A 52-year-old woman weighing 46.8 kg with anxiety neurosis experienced postoperative bleeding after left-side thyroidectomy and was scheduled for emergent hemostasis under general anesthesia Due to swelling of the neck, we anticipated a difficult airway and decided to perform awake intubation. She showed extreme insecurity and shivering, and initially did not agree to the procedure. To calm her anxiety and panic, we continuously administered 10 microg x kg(-1). min(-1) landiolol and 1.0 microg x kg(-1) hr(-1) dexmedetomidine. After 10 minutes, her shivering disappeared, and she agreed to undergo awake intubation, which was performed with the Pentax-AWS Airwayscope and thin Intlock blade. The patient bucked slightly during intubation but hemodynamic changes were minimal. PMID:25199332

  13. AWAKE, The Advanced Proton Driven Plasma Wakefield Acceleration Experiment at CERN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gschwendtner, E.; Adli, E.; Amorim, L.; Apsimon, R.; Assmann, R.; Bachmann, A.-M.; Batsch, F.; Bauche, J.; Berglyd Olsen, V. K.; Bernardini, M.; Bingham, R.; Biskup, B.; Bohl, T.; Bracco, C.; Burrows, P. N.; Burt, G.; Buttenschön, B.; Butterworth, A.; Caldwell, A.; Cascella, M.; Chevallay, E.; Cipiccia, S.; Damerau, H.; Deacon, L.; Dirksen, P.; Doebert, S.; Dorda, U.; Farmer, J.; Fedosseev, V.; Feldbaumer, E.; Fiorito, R.; Fonseca, R.; Friebel, F.; Gorn, A. A.; Grulke, O.; Hansen, J.; Hessler, C.; Hofle, W.; Holloway, J.; Hüther, M.; Jaroszynski, D.; Jensen, L.; Jolly, S.; Joulaei, A.; Kasim, M.; Keeble, F.; Li, Y.; Liu, S.; Lopes, N.; Lotov, K. V.; Mandry, S.; Martorelli, R.; Martyanov, M.; Mazzoni, S.; Mete, O.; Minakov, V. A.; Mitchell, J.; Moody, J.; Muggli, P.; Najmudin, Z.; Norreys, P.; Öz, E.; Pardons, A.; Pepitone, K.; Petrenko, A.; Plyushchev, G.; Pukhov, A.; Rieger, K.; Ruhl, H.; Salveter, F.; Savard, N.; Schmidt, J.; Seryi, A.; Shaposhnikova, E.; Sheng, Z. M.; Sherwood, P.; Silva, L.; Soby, L.; Sosedkin, A. P.; Spitsyn, R. I.; Trines, R.; Tuev, P. V.; Turner, M.; Verzilov, V.; Vieira, J.; Vincke, H.; Wei, Y.; Welsch, C. P.; Wing, M.; Xia, G.; Zhang, H.

    2016-09-01

    The Advanced Proton Driven Plasma Wakefield Acceleration Experiment (AWAKE) aims at studying plasma wakefield generation and electron acceleration driven by proton bunches. It is a proof-of-principle R&D experiment at CERN and the world's first proton driven plasma wakefield acceleration experiment. The AWAKE experiment will be installed in the former CNGS facility and uses the 400 GeV/c proton beam bunches from the SPS. The first experiments will focus on the self-modulation instability of the long (rms ~12 cm) proton bunch in the plasma. These experiments are planned for the end of 2016. Later, in 2017/2018, low energy (~15 MeV) electrons will be externally injected into the sample wakefields and be accelerated beyond 1 GeV. The main goals of the experiment will be summarized. A summary of the AWAKE design and construction status will be presented.

  14. Same/different concept learning by capuchin monkeys in matching-to-sample tasks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina Truppa

    Full Text Available The ability to understand similarities and analogies is a fundamental aspect of human advanced cognition. Although subject of considerable research in comparative cognition, the extent to which nonhuman species are capable of analogical reasoning is still debated. This study examined the conditions under which tufted capuchin monkeys (Cebus apella acquire a same/different concept in a matching-to-sample task on the basis of relational similarity among multi-item stimuli. We evaluated (i the ability of five capuchin monkeys to learn the same/different concept on the basis of the number of items composing the stimuli and (ii the ability to match novel stimuli after training with both several small stimulus sets and a large stimulus set. We found the first evidence of same/different relational matching-to-sample abilities in a New World monkey and demonstrated that the ability to match novel stimuli is within the capacity of this species. Therefore, analogical reasoning can emerge in monkeys under specific training conditions.

  15. Physiology responses of Rhesus monkeys to vibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajebrahimi, Zahra; Ebrahimi, Mohammad; Alidoust, Leila; Arabian Hosseinabadi, Maedeh

    Vibration is one of the important environmental factors in space vehicles that it can induce severe physiological responses in most of the body systems such as cardiovascular, respiratory, skeletal, endocrine, and etc. This investigation was to assess the effect of different vibration frequencies on heart rate variability (HRV), electrocardiograms (ECG) and respiratory rate in Rhesus monkeys. Methods: two groups of rhesus monkey (n=16 in each group) was selected as control and intervention groups. Monkeys were held in a sitting position within a specific fixture. The animals of this experiment were vibrated on a table which oscillated right and left with sinusoidal motion. Frequency and acceleration for intervention group were between the range of 1 to 2000 Hz and +0.5 to +3 G during 36 weeks (one per week for 15 min), respectively. All of the animals passed the clinical evaluation (echocardiography, sonography, radiography and blood analysis test) before vibration test and were considered healthy and these tests repeated during and at the end of experiments. Results and discussions: Our results showed that heart and respiratory rates increased significantly in response to increased frequency from 1 to 60 Hz (p controls. There were no significant differences in heart and respiratory rate from 60 t0 2000 Hz among studied groups. All monkeys passed vibration experiment successfully without any arrhythmic symptoms due to electrocardiography analysis. Conclusion: Our results indicate that vibration in low frequency can effect respiratory and cardiovascular function in rhesus monkey. Keywords: Vibration, rhesus monkey, heart rate, respiratory rate

  16. Subtitusi Tepung Pisang Awak (Musa Paradisiaca Var Awak) dan Ikan Lele Dumbo (Clarias Garipinus) Dalam Pembuatan Biskuit Serta Uji Daya Terimanya

    OpenAIRE

    Sari, Rini Puspa

    2015-01-01

    Banana ‘awak’ ripe flour (Musa paradisiaca var. Awak) and dumbo catfish (Clarias Garapinus) can be processed into biscuit. Biscuit is one of additional food that can full fill the needs of toddler nutrient. Biscuits had sweet taste and interesting shape. This research purpose to determine the acceptability test and nutritional content of biscuits substitution banana ‘awak’ flour and dumbo catfish. The type of research was an experiment conducted by completely randomized design using two fa...

  17. "Awake" extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO): pathophysiology, technical considerations, and clinical pioneering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langer, Thomas; Santini, Alessandro; Bottino, Nicola; Crotti, Stefania; Batchinsky, Andriy I; Pesenti, Antonio; Gattinoni, Luciano

    2016-01-01

    Venovenous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (vv-ECMO) has been classically employed as a rescue therapy for patients with respiratory failure not treatable with conventional mechanical ventilation alone. In recent years, however, the timing of ECMO initiation has been readdressed and ECMO is often started earlier in the time course of respiratory failure. Furthermore, some centers are starting to use ECMO as a first line of treatment, i.e., as an alternative to invasive mechanical ventilation in awake, non-intubated, spontaneously breathing patients with respiratory failure ("awake" ECMO). There is a strong rationale for this type of respiratory support as it avoids several side effects related to sedation, intubation, and mechanical ventilation. However, the complexity of the patient-ECMO interactions, the difficulties related to respiratory monitoring, and the management of an awake patient on extracorporeal support together pose a major challenge for the intensive care unit staff. Here, we review the use of vv-ECMO in awake, spontaneously breathing patients with respiratory failure, highlighting the pros and cons of this approach, analyzing the pathophysiology of patient-ECMO interactions, detailing some of the technical aspects, and summarizing the initial clinical experience gained over the past years. PMID:27357690

  18. a-Band Oscillations in Intracellular Membrane Potentials of Dentate Gyrus Neurons in Awake Rodents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Ross W.; Strowbridge, Ben W.

    2014-01-01

    The hippocampus and dentate gyrus play critical roles in processing declarative memories and spatial information. Dentate granule cells, the first relay in the trisynaptic circuit through the hippocampus, exhibit low spontaneous firing rates even during locomotion. Using intracellular recordings from dentate neurons in awake mice operating a…

  19. Evaluation of Gastrointestinal Motility in Awake Rats: A Learning Exercise for Undergraduate Biomedical Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, M. A. N.; Souza, M. H. L. P.; Palheta, R. C., Jr.; Cruz, P. R. M.; Medeiros, B. A.; Rola, F. H.; Magalhaes, P. J. C.; Troncon, L. E. A.; Santos, A. A.

    2009-01-01

    Current medical curricula devote scarce time for practical activities on digestive physiology, despite frequent misconceptions about dyspepsia and dysmotility phenomena. Thus, we designed a hands-on activity followed by a small-group discussion on gut motility. Male awake rats were randomly submitted to insulin, control, or hypertonic protocols.…

  20. Feasibility and safety of inducing modest hypothermia in awake patients with acute stroke through surface cooling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kammersgaard, L P; Rasmussen, B H; Jørgensen, Henrik Stig;

    2000-01-01

    Hypothermia reduces neuronal damage in animal stroke models. Whether hypothermia is neuroprotective in patients with acute stroke remains to be clarified. In this case-control study, we evaluated the feasibility and safety of inducing modest hypothermia by a surface cooling method in awake patients...

  1. Universally Composable Proactive Threshold RSA Signature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HONG Xuan; CHEN Ke-fei; LONG Yu

    2008-01-01

    Recently some efforts were made towards capturing the security requirements within the composable security framework.This modeling has some significant advantages in designing and analyzing complex systems.The threshold signature was discussed and a definition was given based on the universal composability framework,which is proved to be equivalent to the standard security definition.Furthermore,a simple,efficient and proactive threshold RSA signature protocol was presented.It is proved to be correct,consistent and unforgeable relative to the environment that at most t-1 parties are corrupted in each proactive stage.It is also secure under the universal composability framework.It is a UC based security and is proved to be equivalent to the standard security.

  2. Rectenna composed of a circular microstrip antenna

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Itoh, K.; Ohgane, T.; Ogawa, Y.

    1986-01-01

    One of the big problems in the SPS system is reradiation of the harmonic waves generated by the rectifying diode. The authors proposed the use of a circular microstrip antenna (CMSA), since the CMSA has no higher resonance-harmonic of integer multiple of the dominant resonance frequency. However, characteristics of a large rectenna array of CMSA's have not been clarified. This paper is concerned with the absorption efficiency of the rectenna composed of the CMSA. The efficiency is estimated explicitly using an infinite array model. The results show that the absorption efficiency of the infinite rectenna array composed of the CMSA is 100%. Also, this paper considers the effect of the losses of the composed of the CMSA is 100%. Also, this paper considers the effect of the losses of the CMSA. 4 references, 4 figures.

  3. Effect of sound intensity on tonotopic fMRI maps in the unanesthetized monkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanji, Kazuyo; Leopold, David A; Ye, Frank Q; Zhu, Charles; Malloy, Megan; Saunders, Richard C; Mishkin, Mortimer

    2010-01-01

    The monkey's auditory cortex includes a core region on the supratemporal plane (STP) made up of the tonotopically organized areas A1, R, and RT, together with a surrounding belt and a lateral parabelt region. The functional studies that yielded the tonotopic maps and corroborated the anatomical division into core, belt, and parabelt typically used low-amplitude pure tones that were often restricted to threshold-level intensities. Here we used functional magnetic resonance imaging in awake rhesus monkeys to determine whether, and if so how, the tonotopic maps and the pattern of activation in core, belt, and parabelt are affected by systematic changes in sound intensity. Blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) responses to groups of low- and high-frequency pure tones 3-4 octaves apart were measured at multiple sound intensity levels. The results revealed tonotopic maps in the auditory core that reversed at the putative areal boundaries between A1 and R and between R and RT. Although these reversals of the tonotopic representations were present at all intensity levels, the lateral spread of activation depended on sound amplitude, with increasing recruitment of the adjacent belt areas as the intensities increased. Tonotopic organization along the STP was also evident in frequency-specific deactivation (i.e. "negative BOLD"), an effect that was intensity-specific as well. Regions of positive and negative BOLD were spatially interleaved, possibly reflecting lateral inhibition of high-frequency areas during activation of adjacent low-frequency areas, and vice versa. These results, which demonstrate the strong influence of tonal amplitude on activation levels, identify sound intensity as an important adjunct parameter for mapping the functional architecture of auditory cortex. PMID:19631273

  4. Optimised motion tracking for positron emission tomography studies of brain function in awake rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andre Z Kyme

    Full Text Available Positron emission tomography (PET is a non-invasive molecular imaging technique using positron-emitting radioisotopes to study functional processes within the body. High resolution PET scanners designed for imaging rodents and non-human primates are now commonplace in preclinical research. Brain imaging in this context, with motion compensation, can potentially enhance the usefulness of PET by avoiding confounds due to anaesthetic drugs and enabling freely moving animals to be imaged during normal and evoked behaviours. Due to the frequent and rapid motion exhibited by alert, awake animals, optimal motion correction requires frequently sampled pose information and precise synchronisation of these data with events in the PET coincidence data stream. Motion measurements should also be as accurate as possible to avoid degrading the excellent spatial resolution provided by state-of-the-art scanners. Here we describe and validate methods for optimised motion tracking suited to the correction of motion in awake rats. A hardware based synchronisation approach is used to achieve temporal alignment of tracker and scanner data to within 10 ms. We explored the impact of motion tracker synchronisation error, pose sampling rate, rate of motion, and marker size on motion correction accuracy. With accurate synchronisation (20 Hz, and a small head marker suitable for awake animal studies, excellent motion correction results were obtained in phantom studies with a variety of continuous motion patterns, including realistic rat motion (<5% bias in mean concentration. Feasibility of the approach was also demonstrated in an awake rat study. We conclude that motion tracking parameters needed for effective motion correction in preclinical brain imaging of awake rats are achievable in the laboratory setting. This could broaden the scope of animal experiments currently possible with PET.

  5. Malaria in cynomolgus monkeys used in toxicity studies in Japan

    OpenAIRE

    Ohta, Etsuko; Nagayama, Yuko; Koyama, Naoki; Kakiuchi, Dai; Hosokawa, Satoru

    2015-01-01

    Plasmodium spp. protozoa cause malaria and are known to infect humans and a variety of animal species including macaque monkeys. Here we report both our experience with malaria recrudescence in cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis) in a toxicity study and the results of a survey on Plasmodium infection in cynomolgus monkeys imported to Japan for laboratory use. A cynomolgus monkey from the toxicity study presented with severe anemia and Plasmodium protozoa in erythrocytes on a thin blood s...

  6. Studies in Composing Hydrogen Atom Wavefunctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Putnam, Lance Jonathan; Kuchera-Morin, JoAnn; Peliti, Luca

    2015-01-01

    We present our studies in composing elementary wavefunctions of a hydrogen-like atom and identify several relationships between physical phenomena and musical composition that helped guide the process. The hydrogen-like atom accurately describes some of the fundamental quantum mechanical phenomen...

  7. Radiation-induced emesis in monkeys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To determine the emesis ED50 for 60Co radiation, 15 male rhesus monkeys were exposed to whole-body radiation doses ranging from 350 to 550 rad midline tissue dose. An up-and-down sequence of exposures was used. Step size between doses was 50 rad, and dose rate was 20 rad/min. There had been no access to food for 1 to 2 h. The ED50 +- SE was found to be 446 +- 27 rad. To determine the effect of motion on emesis ED50, six more monkeys were exposed to 60Co radiation as above, except that the chair in which they were seated was oscillated forward and backward 5 to 150 (pitch axis) at a variable rate not exceeding 0.3 Hz. Radioemesis ED50 +- SE with motion was 258 +- 19 rad, a value significantly lower (P < 0.01) than for stationary monkeys

  8. Functional anatomy and interaction of fast and slow visual pathways in macaque monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chi-Ming; Lakatos, Peter; Shah, Ankoor S; Mehta, Ashesh D; Givre, Syndee J; Javitt, Daniel C; Schroeder, Charles E

    2007-07-01

    We measured the timing, areal distribution, and laminar profile of fast, wavelength-insensitive and slower, wavelength-sensitive responses in V1 and extrastriate areas, using laminar current-source density analysis in awake macaque monkeys. There were 3 main findings. 1) We confirmed previously reported significant ventral-dorsal stream latency lags at the level of V4 (V4 mean = 38.7 ms vs. middle temporal mean = 26.9 ms) and inferotemporal cortex (IT mean = 43.4 ms vs. dorsal bank of the superior temporal sulcus mean = 33.9 ms). 2) We found that wavelength-sensitive inputs in areas V1, V4, and IT lagged the wavelength-insensitive responses by significant margins; this lag increased over successive levels of the system. 3) We found that laminar activation profiles in V4 and IT were inconsistent with "feedforward" input through the ascending ventral cortical pathway; the likely alternative input routes include both lateral inputs from the dorsal stream and direct inputs from nonspecific thalamic neurons. These findings support a "Framing" Model of ventral stream visual processing in which rapidly conducted inputs, mediated by one or more accessory pathways, modulate the processing of more slowly conducted feedforward inputs. PMID:16950866

  9. Organic and Non-Organic Language Disorders after Awake Brain Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elke De Witte

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Awake surgery with Direct Electrical Stimulation (DES is considered the ‘gold standard’ to resect brain tumours in the language dominant hemisphere (De Witte & Mariën, 2013. Although transient language impairments are common in the immediate postoperative phase, permanent postoperative language deficits seem to be rare (Duffau, 2007. Milian et al. (2014 stated that most patients tolerate the awake procedure well and would undergo a similar procedure again. However, postoperative psychological symptoms including recurrent distressing dreams and persistent avoidance of stimuli have been recorded following awake surgery (Goebel, Nabavi, Schubert, & Mehdorn, 2010; Milian et al., 2014. To the best of our knowledge, psychogenic language disturbances have never been described after awake surgery. In general, only a handful of non-organic, psychogenic language disorders have been reported in the literature (De Letter et al., 2012. We report three patients with left brain tumours (see table 1 who presented linguistic symptoms after awake surgery that were incompatible with the lesion location, suggesting a psychogenic origin. METHODS: Neurocognitive (language, memory, executive functions investigations were carried out before, during and after awake surgery (6 weeks, 6 months postsurgery on the basis of standardised tests. Pre- and postoperative (fMRI images, DTI results and intraoperative DES findings were analysed. A selection of tasks was used to map language intraoperatively (De Witte et al., 2013. In the postoperative phase spontaneous speech and behavioural phenomena to errors were video-recorded. RESULTS: Preoperative language tests did not reveal any speech or language problems. Intraoperatively, eloquent sites were mapped and preserved enabling good language skills at the end of the awake procedure. However, assessments in the first weeks postsurgery disclosed language and behavioural symptoms that support the hypothesis of a

  10. Compose Real-world Service With Context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guoping Zhang

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Advances in the areas of smart embedded devices, computing and networking are leading to the emergence of the Internet of Things (IoT composed of millions of heterogeneous devices. These devices will be interconnected, providing and consuming information available on the network and cooperate. As the improvement of the performance of industrial processes, the service-oriented approach can be adopted for smart embedded devices. Each device can offer its functionality as services. In such infrastructures, traditional web service compositions can not adapt to the dynamic environment for the Internet of Things. In this paper, we propose an approach to compose services with context. It can not only adapt to dynamic environment for the Internet of Things, but also satisfy the user’s preferences. We first build context ontology to describe the scenario for user. According to context information, the service composition process is presented.

  11. MELEC: Meta-Level Evolutionary Composer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andres Calvo

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Genetic algorithms (GA’s are global search mechanisms that have been applied to many disciplines including music composition. Computer system MELEC composes music using evolutionary computation on two levels: the object and the meta. At the object-level, MELEC employs GAs to compose melodic motifs and iteratively refine them through evolving generations. At the meta-level, MELEC forms the overall musical structure by concatenating the generated motifs in an order that depends on the evolutionary process. In other words, the structure of the music is determined by a geneological traversal of the algorithm’s execution sequence. In this implementation, we introduce a new data structure that tracks the execution of the GA, the Genetic Algorithm Traversal Tree, and uses its traversal to define the musical structure. Moreover, we employ a Fibonacci-based fitness function to shape the melodic evolution.

  12. Composed Scattering Model for Direct Volume Rendering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蔡文立; 石教英

    1996-01-01

    Based on the equation of transfer in transport theory of optical physics,a new volume rendering model,called composed scattering model(CSM),is presented.In calculating the scattering term of the equation,it is decomposed into volume scattering intensity and surface scattering intensity,and they are composed with the boundary detection operator as the weight function.This proposed model differs from the most current volume rendering models in the aspect that in CSM segmentation and illumination intensity calculation are taken as two coherent parts while in existing models they are regarded as two separate ones.This model has been applied to the direct volume rendering of 3D data sets obtained by CT and MRI.The resultant images show not only rich details but also clear boundary surfaces.CSM is demonstrated to be an accurate volume rendering model suitable for CT and MRI data sets.

  13. Composable Industrial Internet Applications for Tiered Architectures

    OpenAIRE

    Harper, K. Eric; de Gooijer, Thijmen; Smiley, Karen

    2016-01-01

    A single vendor cannot provide complete IIoT end-to-end solutions because cooperation is required from multiple parties. Interoperability is a key architectural quality. Composability of capabilities, information and configuration is the prerequisite for interoperability, supported by a data storage infrastructure and defined set of interfaces to build applications. Secure collection, transport and storage of data and algorithms are expectations for collaborative participation in any IIoT sol...

  14. Use of movable high-field-strength intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging with awake craniotomies for resection of gliomas: preliminary experience.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Leuthardt, Eric C

    2011-07-01

    Awake craniotomy with electrocortical mapping and intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging (iMRI) are established techniques for maximizing tumor resection and preserving function, but there has been little experience combining these methodologies.

  15. Tension setting for extensor indicis proprius to extensor pollicis longus transfer using the wide-awake approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cihan Sahin

    2015-08-01

    Conclusion: Tendon transfers using the wide-awake approach provides the benefit of improved tendon tension setting with active movement and minimal risks of complication. [Hand Microsurg 2015; 4(2.000: 39-43

  16. Universally composable anonymous Hash certification model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Fan; MA JianFeng; SangJae MOON

    2007-01-01

    Ideal function is the fundamental component in the universally composable security model. However, the certification ideal function defined in the universally composable security model realizes the identity authentication by binding identity to messages and the signature, which fails to characterize the special security requirements of anonymous authentication with other kind of certificate. Therefore,inspired by the work of Marten, an anonymous hash certification ideal function and a more universal certificate CA model are proposed in this paper. We define the security requirements and security notions for this model in the framework of universal composable security and prove in the plain model (not in the random-oracle model) that these security notions can be achieved using combinations of a secure digital signature scheme, a symmetrical encryption mechanism, a family of pseudorandom functions, and a family of one-way collision-free hash functions. Considering the limitation of wireless environment and computation ability of wireless devices, this anonymous Hash certification ideal function is realized by using symmetry primitives.

  17. Gene Composer in a structural genomics environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For structural biology applications, protein-construct engineering is guided by comparative sequence analysis and structural information, which allow the researcher to better define domain boundaries for terminal deletions and nonconserved regions for surface mutants. A database software application called Gene Composer has been developed to facilitate construct design. The structural genomics effort at the Seattle Structural Genomics Center for Infectious Disease (SSGCID) requires the manipulation of large numbers of amino-acid sequences and the underlying DNA sequences which are to be cloned into expression vectors. To improve efficiency in high-throughput protein structure determination, a database software package, Gene Composer, has been developed which facilitates the information-rich design of protein constructs and their underlying gene sequences. With its modular workflow design and numerous graphical user interfaces, Gene Composer enables researchers to perform all common bioinformatics steps used in modern structure-guided protein engineering and synthetic gene engineering. An example of the structure determination of H1N1 RNA-dependent RNA polymerase PB2 subunit is given

  18. Analisis Kandungan Inulin pada Pisang Barangan (Musa acuminata Colla), Pisang Awak (Musa paradisiaca var Awak) dan pisang kepok (Musa acuminata balbisiana Colla)

    OpenAIRE

    Wahyuningsih, Defi

    2015-01-01

    Inulin is a substance of food that has a function as a prebiotic that is good for the development and activity of nonpathogenic bacteria in the digestive system. One source of inulin is bananas. Bananas are consumed by all people ranging from infants to adults. Inulin in bananas can help improve the health. One of which is to increase the body's immunity with his role as a prebiotic. This study aims to determine the content of inulin on banana barangan , banana awak , and banana kepok well...

  19. Anatomical localization of Cav3.1 calcium channels and electrophysiological effects of T-type calcium channel blockade in the motor thalamus of MPTP-treated monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devergnas, Annaelle; Chen, Erdong; Ma, Yuxian; Hamada, Ikuma; Pittard, Damien; Kammermeier, Stefan; Mullin, Ariana P; Faundez, Victor; Lindsley, Craig W; Jones, Carrie; Smith, Yoland; Wichmann, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Conventional anti-Parkinsonian dopamine replacement therapy is often complicated by side effects that limit the use of these medications. There is a continuing need to develop nondopaminergic approaches to treat Parkinsonism. One such approach is to use medications that normalize dopamine depletion-related firing abnormalities in the basal ganglia-thalamocortical circuitry. In this study, we assessed the potential of a specific T-type calcium channel blocker (ML218) to eliminate pathologic burst patterns of firing in the basal ganglia-receiving territory of the motor thalamus in Parkinsonian monkeys. We also carried out an anatomical study, demonstrating that the immunoreactivity for T-type calcium channels is strongly expressed in the motor thalamus in normal and 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP)-treated monkeys. At the electron microscopic level, dendrites accounted for >90% of all tissue elements that were immunoreactive for voltage-gated calcium channel, type 3.2-containing T-type calcium channels in normal and Parkinsonian monkeys. Subsequent in vivo electrophysiologic studies in awake MPTP-treated Parkinsonian monkeys demonstrated that intrathalamic microinjections of ML218 (0.5 μl of a 2.5-mM solution, injected at 0.1-0.2 μl/min) partially normalized the thalamic activity by reducing the proportion of rebound bursts and increasing the proportion of spikes in non-rebound bursts. The drug also attenuated oscillatory activity in the 3-13-Hz frequency range and increased gamma frequency oscillations. However, ML218 did not normalize Parkinsonism-related changes in firing rates and oscillatory activity in the beta frequency range. Whereas the described changes are promising, a more complete assessment of the cellular and behavioral effects of ML218 (or similar drugs) is needed for a full appraisal of their anti-Parkinsonian potential. PMID:26538609

  20. Evolving Models of Pavlovian Conditioning: Cerebellar Cortical Dynamics in Awake Behaving Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michiel M. ten Brinke

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Three decades of electrophysiological research on cerebellar cortical activity underlying Pavlovian conditioning have expanded our understanding of motor learning in the brain. Purkinje cell simple spike suppression is considered to be crucial in the expression of conditional blink responses (CRs. However, trial-by-trial quantification of this link in awake behaving animals is lacking, and current hypotheses regarding the underlying plasticity mechanisms have diverged from the classical parallel fiber one to the Purkinje cell synapse LTD hypothesis. Here, we establish that acquired simple spike suppression, acquired conditioned stimulus (CS-related complex spike responses, and molecular layer interneuron (MLI activity predict the expression of CRs on a trial-by-trial basis using awake behaving mice. Additionally, we show that two independent transgenic mouse mutants with impaired MLI function exhibit motor learning deficits. Our findings suggest multiple cerebellar cortical plasticity mechanisms underlying simple spike suppression, and they implicate the broader involvement of the olivocerebellar module within the interstimulus interval.

  1. Beam Transfer Line Design for a Plasma Wakefield Acceleration Experiment (AWAKE) at the CERN SPS

    CERN Document Server

    Bracco, C; Brethoux, D; Clerc, V; Goddard, B; Gschwendtner, E; Jensen, L K; Kosmicki, A; Le Godec, G; Meddahi, M; Muggli, P; Mutin, C; Osborne, O; Papastergiou, K; Pardons, A; Velotti, F M; Vincke, H

    2013-01-01

    The world’s first proton driven plasma wakefield acceleration experiment (AWAKE) is presently being studied at CERN. The experimentwill use a high energy proton beam extracted from the SPS as driver. Two possible locations for installing the AWAKE facility were considered: the West Area and the CNGS beam line. The previous transfer line from the SPS to the West Area was completely dismantled in 2005 and would need to be fully re-designed and re-built. For this option, geometric constraints for radiation protection reasons would limit the maximum proton beam energy to 300 GeV. The existing CNGS line could be used by applying only minor changes to the lattice for the final focusing and the interface between the proton beam and the laser, required for plasma ionisation and bunch-modulation seeding. The beam line design studies performed for the two options are presented.

  2. 5-aminolevulinic acid guidance during awake craniotomy to maximise extent of safe resection of glioblastoma multiforme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corns, Robert; Mukherjee, Soumya; Johansen, Anja; Sivakumar, Gnanamurthy

    2015-01-01

    Overall survival for patients with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) has been consistently shown to improve when the surgeon achieves a gross total resection of the tumour. It has also been demonstrated that surgical adjuncts such as 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA) fluorescence--which delineates malignant tumour tissue--normal brain tissue margin seen using violet-blue excitation under an operating microscope--helps achieve this. We describe the case of a patient with recurrent left frontal GBM encroaching on Broca's area (eloquent brain). Gross total resection of the tumour was achieved by combining two techniques, awake resection to prevent damage to eloquent brain and 5-ALA fluorescence guidance to maximise the extent of tumour resection.This technique led to gross total resection of all T1-enhancing tumour with the avoidance of neurological deficit. The authors recommend this technique in patients when awake surgery can be tolerated and gross total resection is the aim of surgery. PMID:26177997

  3. Benefits of awake uniportal pulmonary resection in a patient with a previous contralateral lobectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvez, Carlos; Navarro-Martinez, Jose; Bolufer, Sergio; Lirio, Francisco; Mafe, Juan Jose; Rivera, Maria Jesus; Roca, Joaquin; Baschwitz, Benno

    2014-09-01

    Surgical resection of a contralateral recurrence of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is indicated in patients without evidence of disseminated disease and considered functionally operable. General anesthesia and double-lumen intubation involves one lobe ventilation in a patient treated with a previous lobectomy, thus increasing the risks of ventilator-induced injuries and the morbidity. Awake procedures facilitate the surgery decreasing the anesthetic and surgical times, keeping the diaphragm motion and diminishing the ventilator-induced injuries into the remaining contralateral lobe. We present a 43-year-old woman with a previous left-lower lobectomy for a 3.1-cm mucinous adenocarcinoma 15 months before without nodal involvement, who presents a right-lower lobe 8-mm cavitated nodule, with evident radiological growth and fine-needle aspiration concordant with mucinous adenocarcinoma. We suggest an awake procedure with locoregional epidural anesthesia. PMID:25405168

  4. Behavioral effects of acclimatization to restraint protocol used for awake animal imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Michael D; Pira, Ashley S; Febo, Marcelo

    2013-07-15

    Functional MRI in awake rats involves acclimatization to restraint to minimize motion. We designed a study to examine the effects of an acclimatization protocol (5 days of restraint, 60 min per day) on the emission of 22-kHz ultrasonic vocalizations and performance in a forced swim test (FST). Our results showed that USV calls are reduced significantly by days 3, 4 and 5 of acclimatization. Although the rats showed less climbing activity (and more immobility) in FST on day 5 compared to the 1st day of restraint acclimatization, the difference was not detected once the animals were given a 2-week hiatus. Overall, we showed that animals adapt to the restraint over a five-day period; however, restraint may introduce confounding behavioral outcomes that may hinder the interpretation of results derived from awake rat imaging. The present data warrants further testing of the effects of MRI restraint on behavior. PMID:23562621

  5. Analysis of prostate-specific antigen transcripts in chimpanzees, cynomolgus monkeys, baboons, and African green monkeys.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James N Mubiru

    Full Text Available The function of prostate-specific antigen (PSA is to liquefy the semen coagulum so that the released sperm can fuse with the ovum. Fifteen spliced variants of the PSA gene have been reported in humans, but little is known about alternative splicing in nonhuman primates. Positive selection has been reported in sex- and reproductive-related genes from sea urchins to Drosophila to humans; however, there are few studies of adaptive evolution of the PSA gene. Here, using polymerase chain reaction (PCR product cloning and sequencing, we study PSA transcript variant heterogeneity in the prostates of chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes, cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis, baboons (Papio hamadryas anubis, and African green monkeys (Chlorocebus aethiops. Six PSA variants were identified in the chimpanzee prostate, but only two variants were found in cynomolgus monkeys, baboons, and African green monkeys. In the chimpanzee the full-length transcript is expressed at the same magnitude as the transcripts that retain intron 3. We have found previously unidentified splice variants of the PSA gene, some of which might be linked to disease conditions. Selection on the PSA gene was studied in 11 primate species by computational methods using the sequences reported here for African green monkey, cynomolgus monkey, baboon, and chimpanzee and other sequences available in public databases. A codon-based analysis (dN/dS of the PSA gene identified potential adaptive evolution at five residue sites (Arg45, Lys70, Gln144, Pro189, and Thr203.

  6. Aging: Lessons for Elderly People from Monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crockford, Catherine

    2016-07-11

    As life expectancy increases, health in the elderly is a growing issue. Health is linked to remaining socially active, but the elderly typically narrow their social networks. The social life of aging monkeys shows interesting parallels, indicating social patterns may be rooted in evolution. PMID:27404240

  7. Canine Distemper Outbreak in Rhesus Monkeys, China

    OpenAIRE

    Qiu, Wei; Zheng, Ying; Zhang, Shoufeng; Fan, Quanshui; Liu, Hua; Zhang, Fuqiang; Wang, Wei; Liao, Guoyang; Hu, Rongliang

    2011-01-01

    Since 2006, canine distemper outbreaks have occurred in rhesus monkeys at a breeding farm in Guangxi, People’s Republic of China. Approximately 10,000 animals were infected (25%–60% disease incidence); 5%–30% of infected animals died. The epidemic was controlled by vaccination. Amino acid sequence analysis of the virus indicated a unique strain.

  8. Integrase of Mason-Pfizer monkey virus

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Snášel, Jan; Krejčík, Zdeněk; Jenčová, Věra; Rosenberg, Ivan; Ruml, Tomáš; Alexandratos, J.; Gustchina, A.; Pichová, Iva

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 272, č. 1 (2005), s. 203-216. ISSN 1742-464X R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA4055304 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4055905 Keywords : integrase * Mason-Pfizer monkey virus * HIV-1 Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry

  9. Characterization of scale-free properties of human electrocorticography in awake and slow wave sleep states

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John M Zempel

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Like many complex dynamic systems, the brain exhibits scale-free dynamics that follow power law scaling. Broadband power spectral density (PSD of brain electrical activity exhibits state-dependent power law scaling with a log frequency exponent that varies across frequency ranges. Widely divergent naturally occurring neural states, awake and slow wave sleep (SWS periods, were used evaluate the nature of changes in scale-free indices. We demonstrate two analytic approaches to characterizing electrocorticographic (ECoG data obtained during Awake and SWS states. A data driven approach was used, characterizing all available frequency ranges. Using an Equal Error State Discriminator (EESD, a single frequency range did not best characterize state across data from all six subjects, though the ability to distinguish awake and SWS states in individual subjects was excellent. Multisegment piecewise linear fits were used to characterize scale-free slopes across the entire frequency range (0.2-200 Hz. These scale-free slopes differed between Awake and SWS states across subjects, particularly at frequencies below 10 Hz and showed little difference at frequencies above 70 Hz. A Multivariate Maximum Likelihood Analysis (MMLA method using the multisegment slope indices successfully categorized ECoG data in most subjects, though individual variation was seen. The ECoG spectrum is not well characterized by a single linear fit across a defined set of frequencies, but is best described by a set of discrete linear fits across the full range of available frequencies. With increasing computational tractability, the use of scale-free slope values to characterize EEG data will have practical value in clinical and research EEG studies.

  10. Development of a simultaneous optical/PET imaging system for awake mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takuwa, Hiroyuki; Ikoma, Yoko; Yoshida, Eiji; Tashima, Hideaki; Wakizaka, Hidekatsu; Shinaji, Tetsuya; Yamaya, Taiga

    2016-09-01

    Simultaneous measurements of multiple physiological parameters are essential for the study of brain disease mechanisms and the development of suitable therapies to treat them. In this study, we developed a measurement system for simultaneous optical imaging and PET for awake mice. The key elements of this system are the OpenPET, optical imaging and fixation apparatus for an awake mouse. The OpenPET is our original open-type PET geometry, which can be used in combination with another device because of the easily accessible open space of the former. A small prototype of the axial shift single-ring OpenPET was used. The objective lens for optical imaging with a mounted charge-coupled device camera was placed inside the open space of the AS-SROP. Our original fixation apparatus to hold an awake mouse was also applied. As a first application of this system, simultaneous measurements of cerebral blood flow (CBF) by laser speckle imaging (LSI) and [11C]raclopride-PET were performed under control and 5% CO2 inhalation (hypercapnia) conditions. Our system successfully obtained the CBF and [11C]raclopride radioactivity concentration simultaneously. Accumulation of [11C]raclopride was observed in the striatum where the density of dopamine D2 receptors is high. LSI measurements could be stably performed for more than 60 minutes. Increased CBF induced by hypercapnia was observed while CBF under the control condition was stable. We concluded that our imaging system should be useful for investigating the mechanisms of brain diseases in awake animal models.

  11. An interpretative phenomenological analysis of the patient experience of awake craniotomy: brain tumour diagnosis to discharge

    OpenAIRE

    Fletcher, Kimberley J.; Das Nair, Roshan; Macniven, Jamie A; Basu, Surajit; Byrne, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. Previous research exploring the patient experience of awake craniotomy (AC) has yielded contrasting accounts. The current study aimed to explore the lived experience of having undergone an AC in the United Kingdom. Design. This was a qualitative, semi-structured interview study. Interviews were audio-recorded and transcribed verbatim. Data were analysed using interpretative phenomenological analysis (IPA). Methods. Seven participants (three males, four females) who had und...

  12. Benefits of awake uniportal pulmonary resection in a patient with a previous contralateral lobectomy

    OpenAIRE

    Galvez, Carlos; Navarro-Martinez, Jose; Bolufer, Sergio; Lirio, Francisco; Mafe, Juan Jose; Rivera, Maria Jesus; Roca, Joaquin; Baschwitz, Benno

    2014-01-01

    Surgical resection of a contralateral recurrence of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is indicated in patients without evidence of disseminated disease and considered functionally operable. General anesthesia and double-lumen intubation involves one lobe ventilation in a patient treated with a previous lobectomy, thus increasing the risks of ventilator-induced injuries and the morbidity. Awake procedures facilitate the surgery decreasing the anesthetic and surgical times, keeping the diaphra...

  13. Awake brain tumor resection during pregnancy: Decision making and technical nuances

    OpenAIRE

    Meng, L.; Han, SJ; Rollins, MD; Gelb, AW; Chang, EF

    2016-01-01

    © Published by Elsevier Ltd. The co-occurrence of primary brain tumor and pregnancy poses unique challenges to the treating physician. If a rapidly growing lesion causes life-threatening mass effect, craniotomy for tumor debulking becomes urgent. The choice between awake craniotomy versus general anesthesia becomes complicated if the tumor is encroaching on eloquent brain because considerations pertinent to both patient safety and oncological outcome, in addition to fetal wellbeing, are invol...

  14. Association of Awake Bruxism with Khat, Coffee, Tobacco, and Stress among Jazan University Students

    OpenAIRE

    Mir Faeq Ali Quadri; Ali Mahnashi; Ayman Al Almutahhir; Hamzah Tubayqi; Abdullah Hakami; Mohamed Arishi; Abdulwahab Alamir

    2015-01-01

    Objective. The objective is to assess the prevalence of bruxism among the university students and to check its association with their khat chewing habit. Materials and Methods. A cross-sectional descriptive study is designed using cluster random sampling. Pretested questionnaire was administered by a trained interviewer to assess awake bruxism and the use of variables like khat, coffee, tobacco, and stress. Chi-square test at 5% significance was used for assessing the association. Logistic re...

  15. Biofeedback for treatment of awake and sleep bruxism in adults: systematic review protocol

    OpenAIRE

    Ilovar, Sasa; Zolger, Danaja; Castrillon, Eduardo; Car, Josip; Huckvale, Kit

    2014-01-01

    Background Bruxism is a disorder of jaw-muscle activity characterised by repetitive clenching or grinding of the teeth which results in discomfort and damage to dentition. The two clinical manifestations of the condition (sleep and awake bruxism) are thought to have unrelated aetiologies but are palliated using similar techniques. The lack of a definitive treatment has prompted renewed interest in biofeedback, a behaviour change method that uses electronic detection to provide a stimulus when...

  16. The Neural Consequences of Repeated Cocaine Exposure Revealed by Functional MRI in Awake Rats

    OpenAIRE

    Febo, Marcelo; Segarra, Annabell C.; Nair, Govind; Schmidt, Karl; Duong, Timothy Q.; Ferris, Craig F.

    2005-01-01

    The use of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in animal models of cocaine addiction is an invaluable tool for investigating the neuroadaptations that lead to this psychiatric disorder. We used blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) MRI in awake rats to identify the neuronal circuits affected by repeated cocaine administration. Rats were given an injection of cocaine (15 mg/kg, i.p.) or its vehicle for 7 days, abstained from injections for 1 week, and challenged with an intracerebrovent...

  17. Off-pump awake coronary artery bypass grafting under high thoracic epidural anesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bharat Paliwal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Conventionally general anesthesia has been the preferred anesthetic technique for coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG. Ever since the first awake CABG the concept though appearing promising is still being continually evaluated. From the Indian perspective, the practice has been largely limited to certain institutions and seems to be not widely practiced across India. This case reports our experience with this technique from the western part of the country.

  18. Improvisation: Performer as Co-composer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyle Schick

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Elements of musical improvisation have been present throughout the medieval, renaissance, and baroque eras, however, improvisation had the most profound recorded presence in the baroque era. Improvisation is inherently a living practice and leaves little documentation behind for historians to study, but however elusive, it is still important to trace where instances of this improvised art appear throughout the eras listed above. It is also interesting to trace what role improvisation would later have in realizing the Baroque ideals of emotional expression, virtuosity, and individuality. This paper seeks to focus on a few of the best documented mediums of improvisation within each era. During the medieval period, improvisation took on the form of improvised counterpoint against a plainsong. In the renaissance, improvised harmony of faburden and the contenance angloise is this paper’s selected example. In the Baroque, this study seeks to describe several areas where improvisation appears such as the art of improvised accompaniment from figured bass symbols, the practice of expressive ornamentation on a written melody, and improvised vocal embellishments and cadenzas of the da capo aria. A final aim of this research is to provide examples to clarify the definition of improvisation as the degree to which the composer of a musical work has given control of its realization to the performer. Treatises and ear witness accounts of improvised musical forms provided primary sources. Other sources used in this research included writings on performance practices of different historical eras and writings on the changing relationship between the composer and the performer. This paper also consults writings on how improvised music was perceived historically as opposed to composed music.

  19. Imaging circulating tumor cells in freely moving awake small animals using a miniaturized intravital microscope.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Sarah Sasportas

    Full Text Available Metastasis, the cause for 90% of cancer mortality, is a complex and poorly understood process involving the invasion of circulating tumor cells (CTCs into blood vessels. These cells have potential prognostic value as biomarkers for early metastatic risk. But their rarity and the lack of specificity and sensitivity in measuring them render their interrogation by current techniques very challenging. How and when these cells are circulating in the blood, on their way to potentially give rise to metastasis, is a question that remains largely unanswered. In order to provide an insight into this "black box" using non-invasive imaging, we developed a novel miniature intravital microscopy (mIVM strategy capable of real-time long-term monitoring of CTCs in awake small animals. We established an experimental 4T1-GL mouse model of metastatic breast cancer, in which tumor cells express both fluorescent and bioluminescent reporter genes to enable both single cell and whole body tumor imaging. Using mIVM, we monitored blood vessels of different diameters in awake mice in an experimental model of metastasis. Using an in-house software algorithm we developed, we demonstrated in vivo CTC enumeration and computation of CTC trajectory and speed. These data represent the first reported use we know of for a miniature mountable intravital microscopy setup for in vivo imaging of CTCs in awake animals.

  20. Agonism and dominance in female blue monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klass, Keren; Cords, Marina

    2015-12-01

    Agonistic behavior features prominently in hypotheses that explain how social variation relates to ecological factors and phylogenetic constraints. Dominance systems vary along axes of despotism, tolerance, and nepotism, and comparative studies examine cross-species patterns in these classifications. To contribute to such studies, we present a comprehensive picture of agonistic behavior and dominance relationships in wild female blue monkeys (Cercopithecus mitis), an arboreal guenon, with data from 9 groups spanning 18 years. We assessed where blue monkeys fall along despotic, tolerant, and nepotistic spectra, how their dominance system compares to other primates, primarily cercopithecines, and whether their agonistic behavior matches socioecological model predictions. Blue monkeys showed low rates of mainly low-intensity agonism and little counter-aggression. Rates increased with rank and group size. Dominance asymmetry varied at different organizational levels, being more pronounced at the level of interactions than dyad or group. Hierarchies were quite stable, had moderate-to-high linearity and directional consistency and moderate steepness. There was clear maternal rank inheritance, but inconsistent adherence to Kawamura's rules. There was little between-group variation, although hierarchy metrics showed considerable variation across group-years. Overall, blue monkeys have moderately despotic, moderately tolerant, and nepotistic dominance hierarchies. They resemble other cercopithecines in having significantly linear and steep hierarchies with a generally stable, matriline-based structure, suggesting a phylogenetic basis to this aspect of their social system. Blue monkeys most closely match Sterck et al.'s [1997] Resident-Nepotistic-Tolerant dominance category, although they do not fully conform to predictions of any one socioecological model. Our results suggest that socioecological models might better predict variation within than across clades, thereby

  1. [Mental disease in two classical music composers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rempelakos, L; Poulakou-Rebelakou, E; Ploumpidis, D

    2012-01-01

    A study οn two neglected classical music composers suffering a not syphilitic mental disease, is attempted here, syphilis of the central nervous system being frequent in that time. A brief overview on the psychiatric ailments of many great composers reveals suicide attempts and more or less severe depression following external events. The issue of a possible relationship between mental disease and (musical) creativity can be discussed, as mood swings and a certain tendency to melancholia are frequent features of a talented brain (a fact that can also be detected in their works). The first case presented here is Hans Rott from Austria, the beloved student of Anton Bruckner, who was considered to be at least equal to his famous classmate Gustav Mahler. The great expectations of his teacher and his friends suddenly came to an end, when he suffered a crisis of schizophrenia and was hospitalized in an insane asylum in Lower Austria. The tragic psychiatric adventure of the young musician lasted almost four years. He was diagnosed as a case of "hallucinatory insanity" and "persecution mania" by the medical staff, before dying of tuberculosis, aged only 26, and having completed only one symphony and several smaller works. His name came again on surface only a century after his death, when in 1989 his Symphony in E Major was discovered and premiered with great success, permitting to its creator a posthumous recognition, among Bruckner and Mahler. The second case of mental illness is that of the Armenian Komitas Vardapet. He was an orphan who grew up in theological schools and became a monk and later a priest, though he spent some years in Berlin in order to develop his musical skills. He is considered to be an authority of Armenian ecclesiastic music, introducing polyphony in the Armenian Church's music and collecting numerous traditional songs from all parts of Armenia. In 1915, during the Armenian genocide he was deported, tortured but finally saved, due to interventions

  2. CONCISE: Compressed 'n' Composable Integer Set

    CERN Document Server

    Colantonio, Alessandro

    2010-01-01

    Bit arrays, or bitmaps, are used to significantly speed up set operations in several areas, such as data warehousing, information retrieval, and data mining, to cite a few. However, bitmaps usually use a large storage space, thus requiring compression. Nevertheless, there is a space-time tradeoff among compression schemes. The Word Aligned Hybrid (WAH) bitmap compression trades some space to allow for bitwise operations without first decompressing bitmaps. WAH has been recognized as the most efficient scheme in terms of computation time. In this paper we present CONCISE (Compressed 'n' Composable Integer Set), a new scheme that enjoys significatively better performances than those of WAH. In particular, when compared to WAH, our algorithm is able to reduce the required memory up to 50%, by having similar or better performance in terms of computation time. Further, we show that CONCISE can be efficiently used to manipulate bitmaps representing sets of integral numbers in lieu of well-known data structures such...

  3. Head Rotation Detection in Marmoset Monkeys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simhadri, Sravanthi

    Head movement is known to have the benefit of improving the accuracy of sound localization for humans and animals. Marmoset is a small bodied New World monkey species and it has become an emerging model for studying the auditory functions. This thesis aims to detect the horizontal and vertical rotation of head movement in marmoset monkeys. Experiments were conducted in a sound-attenuated acoustic chamber. Head movement of marmoset monkey was studied under various auditory and visual stimulation conditions. With increasing complexity, these conditions are (1) idle, (2) sound-alone, (3) sound and visual signals, and (4) alert signal by opening and closing of the chamber door. All of these conditions were tested with either house light on or off. Infra-red camera with a frame rate of 90 Hz was used to capture of the head movement of monkeys. To assist the signal detection, two circular markers were attached to the top of monkey head. The data analysis used an image-based marker detection scheme. Images were processed using the Computation Vision Toolbox in Matlab. The markers and their positions were detected using blob detection techniques. Based on the frame-by-frame information of marker positions, the angular position, velocity and acceleration were extracted in horizontal and vertical planes. Adaptive Otsu Thresholding, Kalman filtering and bound setting for marker properties were used to overcome a number of challenges encountered during this analysis, such as finding image segmentation threshold, continuously tracking markers during large head movement, and false alarm detection. The results show that the blob detection method together with Kalman filtering yielded better performances than other image based techniques like optical flow and SURF features .The median of the maximal head turn in the horizontal plane was in the range of 20 to 70 degrees and the median of the maximal velocity in horizontal plane was in the range of a few hundreds of degrees per

  4. Metabolism of lithocholic and chenodeoxycholic acids in the squirrel monkey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metabolism of lithocholic acid (LCA) and chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA) was studied in the squirrel monkey to clarify the mechanism of the lack of toxicity of CDCA in this animal. Radioactive LCA was administered to squirrel monkeys with biliary fistula. Most radioactivity was excreted in the bile in the form of unsulfated lithocholyltaurine. The squirrel monkey thus differs from humans and chimpanzees, which efficiently sulfate LCA, and is similar to the rhesus monkey and baboon in that LCA is poorly sulfated. When labeled CDCA was orally administered to squirrel monkeys, less than 20% of the dosed radioactivity was recovered as LCA and its further metabolites in feces over 3 days, indicating that bacterial metabolism of CDCA into LCA is strikingly less than in other animals and in humans. It therefore appears that LCA, known as a hepatotoxic secondary bile acid, is not accumulated in the squirrel monkey, not because of its rapid turnover through sulfation, but because of the low order of its production

  5. Metabolism of lithocholic and chenodeoxycholic acids in the squirrel monkey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, H.; Hamada, M.; Kato, F.

    1985-09-01

    Metabolism of lithocholic acid (LCA) and chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA) was studied in the squirrel monkey to clarify the mechanism of the lack of toxicity of CDCA in this animal. Radioactive LCA was administered to squirrel monkeys with biliary fistula. Most radioactivity was excreted in the bile in the form of unsulfated lithocholyltaurine. The squirrel monkey thus differs from humans and chimpanzees, which efficiently sulfate LCA, and is similar to the rhesus monkey and baboon in that LCA is poorly sulfated. When labeled CDCA was orally administered to squirrel monkeys, less than 20% of the dosed radioactivity was recovered as LCA and its further metabolites in feces over 3 days, indicating that bacterial metabolism of CDCA into LCA is strikingly less than in other animals and in humans. It therefore appears that LCA, known as a hepatotoxic secondary bile acid, is not accumulated in the squirrel monkey, not because of its rapid turnover through sulfation, but because of the low order of its production.

  6. Differences of monkey and human overt attention under natural conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Einhäuser, Wolfgang; Kruse, Wolfgang; Hoffmann, Klaus-Peter; König, Peter

    2006-01-01

    Rhesus monkeys are widely used as animal models of human attention. Such research rests upon the assumption that similar mechanisms underlie attention in both species. Here, we directly compare the influence of low-level stimulus features on overt attention in monkeys and humans under natural conditions. We recorded eye-movements in humans and rhesus monkeys during free-viewing of natural images. We find that intrinsic low-level features, such luminance-contrast, texture-contrast and...

  7. Maintenance of microflora suppression in irradiated monkeys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After at least two weeks of decontamination, rhesus monkeys were submitted to a total body irradiation of 8.5 Gy, followed by a bone marrow graft. In the following weeks, a number of colonizations were found. Twenty-seven colonizations were known to be present on the day of irradiation. Sixteen colonizations were due to microorganisms suppressed before irradiation. Thirty-two colonizations were considered as exogenous. Only a few colonizations in the irradiated animals could not be controlled. Irradiation caused severe diarrhoea in decontaminated animals, leading to a life-threatening loss of water and electrolytes. When this loss was corrected, the monkeys survived for prolonged periods following irradiation. The amount of food consumed, which contained antibiotics, had no effect on the faecal concentration. The addition of solid food particles, however, resulted in a much lower faecal concentration. No significant antibiotic serum levels were found. (orig.)

  8. Hemorrhoids: an experimental model in monkeys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Plapler Hélio

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Hemorrhoids are a matter of concern due to a painful outcome. We describe a simple, easy and reliable experimental model to produce hemorrhoids in monkeys. METHODS: 14 monkeys (Cebus apella were used. After general anesthesia, hemorrhoids were induced by ligation of the inferior hemorrhoidal vein, which is very alike to humans. The vein was located through a perianal incision, dissected and ligated with a 3-0 vicryl. The skin was sutured with a 4-0 catgut thread. Animals were kept in appropriate cages and evaluated daily. RESULTS: Nine days later there were hemorrhoidal piles in the anus in fifty percent (50% of the animals. Outcome was unremarkable. There was no bleeding and all animals showed no signs of pain or suffering. CONCLUSION: This is an affordable and reliable experimental model to induce hemorrhoids for experimental studies.

  9. Spontaneous pericardial mesothelioma in a rhesus monkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, M; Mansfield, K G

    1999-06-01

    Spontaneous tumors in nonhuman primates are of great importance. A spontaneous pericardial mesothelioma was observed in an 18-year-old female rhesus monkey. Grossly, the visceral pericardium was multifocally irregular and thickened with tan discoloration and was soft in consistency. Histologically, the pericardium contained highly in-folded branching fronds lined by a single layer of cuboidal cells. Tumor invaded into approximately half of the thickness of the atrial and ventricular muscles. Tumor penetration was not observed into the atrial or ventricular cavity. Within the myocardium, neoplastic cells formed glandular structures which were lined by cuboidal to columnar cells. Neoplastic cells were weakly positive with PAS and strongly positive for colloid iron and alcian blue. Immunohistochemically, neoplastic cells were positive for both vimentin and cytokeratin and negative with CEA and Leu-M1, indicating mesothelial origin. To the best of the authors' knowledge, this is the first report of a spontaneous pericardial mesothelioma in a rhesus monkey. PMID:10475114

  10. Auditory looming perception in rhesus monkeys

    OpenAIRE

    Ghazanfar, Asif A.; Neuhoff, John G.; Logothetis, Nikos K.

    2002-01-01

    The detection of approaching objects can be crucial to the survival of an organism. The perception of looming has been studied extensively in the visual system, but remains largely unexplored in audition. Here we show a behavioral bias in rhesus monkeys orienting to “looming” sounds. As in humans, the bias occurred for harmonic tones (which can reliably indicate single sources), but not for broadband noise. These response biases to looming sounds are consistent with an evolved neural mechanis...

  11. What do monkeys' music choices mean?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamont, Alexandra M

    2005-08-01

    McDermott and Hauser have recently shown that although monkeys show some types of preferences for sound, preferences for music are found only in humans. This suggests that music might be a relatively recent adaptation in human evolution. Here, I focus on the research methods used by McDermott and Hauser, and consider the findings in relation to infancy research and music psychology. PMID:16006174

  12. A freely-moving monkey treadmill model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Justin D.; Nuyujukian, Paul; Freifeld, Oren; Gao, Hua; Walker, Ross; Ryu, Stephen I.; Meng, Teresa H.; Murmann, Boris; Black, Michael J.; Shenoy, Krishna V.

    2014-08-01

    Objective. Motor neuroscience and brain-machine interface (BMI) design is based on examining how the brain controls voluntary movement, typically by recording neural activity and behavior from animal models. Recording technologies used with these animal models have traditionally limited the range of behaviors that can be studied, and thus the generality of science and engineering research. We aim to design a freely-moving animal model using neural and behavioral recording technologies that do not constrain movement. Approach. We have established a freely-moving rhesus monkey model employing technology that transmits neural activity from an intracortical array using a head-mounted device and records behavior through computer vision using markerless motion capture. We demonstrate the flexibility and utility of this new monkey model, including the first recordings from motor cortex while rhesus monkeys walk quadrupedally on a treadmill. Main results. Using this monkey model, we show that multi-unit threshold-crossing neural activity encodes the phase of walking and that the average firing rate of the threshold crossings covaries with the speed of individual steps. On a population level, we find that neural state-space trajectories of walking at different speeds have similar rotational dynamics in some dimensions that evolve at the step rate of walking, yet robustly separate by speed in other state-space dimensions. Significance. Freely-moving animal models may allow neuroscientists to examine a wider range of behaviors and can provide a flexible experimental paradigm for examining the neural mechanisms that underlie movement generation across behaviors and environments. For BMIs, freely-moving animal models have the potential to aid prosthetic design by examining how neural encoding changes with posture, environment and other real-world context changes. Understanding this new realm of behavior in more naturalistic settings is essential for overall progress of basic

  13. Rhesus monkeys know when they remember

    OpenAIRE

    Hampton, Robert R.

    2001-01-01

    Humans are consciously aware of some memories and can make verbal reports about these memories. Other memories cannot be brought to consciousness, even though they influence behavior. This conspicuous difference in access to memories is central in taxonomies of human memory systems but has been difficult to document in animal studies, suggesting that some forms of memory may be unique to humans. Here I show that rhesus macaque monkeys can report the presence or absence...

  14. Monkey cortex through fMRI glasses

    OpenAIRE

    Vanduffel, Wim; Zhu, Qi; Orban, Guy A.

    2014-01-01

    In 1998 several groups reported the feasibility of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) experiments in monkeys, with the goal to bridge the gap between invasive nonhuman primate studies and human functional imaging. These studies yielded critical insights in the neuronal underpinnings of the BOLD signal. Furthermore, the technology has been successful in guiding electrophysiological recordings and identifying focal perturbation targets. Finally, invaluable information was obtained con...

  15. Monkey Gamer: Automatic profiling of Android games

    OpenAIRE

    Santos, Javier; Nadjm-Tehrani, Simin; Prem Bianzino, Aruna

    2014-01-01

    Creation of smartphone applications has undergone a massive explosion in recent years and there is an urgent need for evaluation of their resource efficiency, trustworthiness and reliability. A large proportion of these apps are going to be within the gaming area. In this paper we classify game apps on the basis of their development process, their I/O process and their interaction level. We present Monkey Gamer, a software to automatically play a large class of Android games and collect execu...

  16. Malaria in cynomolgus monkeys used in toxicity studies in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohta, Etsuko; Nagayama, Yuko; Koyama, Naoki; Kakiuchi, Dai; Hosokawa, Satoru

    2016-01-01

    Plasmodium spp. protozoa cause malaria and are known to infect humans and a variety of animal species including macaque monkeys. Here we report both our experience with malaria recrudescence in cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis) in a toxicity study and the results of a survey on Plasmodium infection in cynomolgus monkeys imported to Japan for laboratory use. A cynomolgus monkey from the toxicity study presented with severe anemia and Plasmodium protozoa in erythrocytes on a thin blood smear and was subsequently diagnosed with symptomatic malaria. In this animal, congestion and accumulation of hemozoin (malaria pigment) in macrophages were noted in the enlarged and darkly discolored spleen. As a follow-up for the experience, spleen sections from 800 cynomolgus monkeys in toxicity studies conducted between 2003 and 2013 were retrospectively examined for hemozoin deposition as a marker of Plasmodium infection. The origin of the animals included Cambodia, China, Indonesia, and Vietnam. Hemozoin deposition was confirmed in 44% of all examined monkeys. Monkeys from Indonesia showed the highest incidence of hemozoin deposition (approx. 80%). A high prevalence of Plasmodium infection in laboratory monkeys was also confirmed with polymerase chain reaction (PCR) by using Plasmodium genus-specific primers. Although Japan is not a country with endemic malaria, it is important to be aware of the prevalence and potential impact of background infection with Plasmodium spp. and recrudescence of symptomatic malaria in imported laboratory monkeys on pharmaceutical toxicity studies. PMID:26989299

  17. Basic math in monkeys and college students.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica F Cantlon

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Adult humans possess a sophisticated repertoire of mathematical faculties. Many of these capacities are rooted in symbolic language and are therefore unlikely to be shared with nonhuman animals. However, a subset of these skills is shared with other animals, and this set is considered a cognitive vestige of our common evolutionary history. Current evidence indicates that humans and nonhuman animals share a core set of abilities for representing and comparing approximate numerosities nonverbally; however, it remains unclear whether nonhuman animals can perform approximate mental arithmetic. Here we show that monkeys can mentally add the numerical values of two sets of objects and choose a visual array that roughly corresponds to the arithmetic sum of these two sets. Furthermore, monkeys' performance during these calculations adheres to the same pattern as humans tested on the same nonverbal addition task. Our data demonstrate that nonverbal arithmetic is not unique to humans but is instead part of an evolutionarily primitive system for mathematical thinking shared by monkeys.

  18. Functional recordings from awake, behaving rodents through a microchannel based regenerative neural interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gore, Russell K.; Choi, Yoonsu; Bellamkonda, Ravi; English, Arthur

    2015-02-01

    Objective. Neural interface technologies could provide controlling connections between the nervous system and external technologies, such as limb prosthetics. The recording of efferent, motor potentials is a critical requirement for a peripheral neural interface, as these signals represent the user-generated neural output intended to drive external devices. Our objective was to evaluate structural and functional neural regeneration through a microchannel neural interface and to characterize potentials recorded from electrodes placed within the microchannels in awake and behaving animals. Approach. Female rats were implanted with muscle EMG electrodes and, following unilateral sciatic nerve transection, the cut nerve was repaired either across a microchannel neural interface or with end-to-end surgical repair. During a 13 week recovery period, direct muscle responses to nerve stimulation proximal to the transection were monitored weekly. In two rats repaired with the neural interface, four wire electrodes were embedded in the microchannels and recordings were obtained within microchannels during proximal stimulation experiments and treadmill locomotion. Main results. In these proof-of-principle experiments, we found that axons from cut nerves were capable of functional reinnervation of distal muscle targets, whether regenerating through a microchannel device or after direct end-to-end repair. Discrete stimulation-evoked and volitional potentials were recorded within interface microchannels in a small group of awake and behaving animals and their firing patterns correlated directly with intramuscular recordings during locomotion. Of 38 potentials extracted, 19 were identified as motor axons reinnervating tibialis anterior or soleus muscles using spike triggered averaging. Significance. These results are evidence for motor axon regeneration through microchannels and are the first report of in vivo recordings from regenerated motor axons within microchannels in a small

  19. BOLD fMRI in awake prairie voles: A platform for translational social and affective neuroscience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yee, J R; Kenkel, W M; Kulkarni, P; Moore, K; Perkeybile, A M; Toddes, S; Amacker, J A; Carter, C S; Ferris, C F

    2016-09-01

    The advancement of neuroscience depends on continued improvement in methods and models. Here, we present novel techniques for the use of awake functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in the prairie vole (Microtus ochrogaster) - an important step forward in minimally-invasive measurement of neural activity in a non-traditional animal model. Imaging neural responses in prairie voles, a species studied for its propensity to form strong and selective social bonds, is expected to greatly advance our mechanistic understanding of complex social and affective processes. The use of ultra-high-field fMRI allows for recording changes in region-specific activity throughout the entire brain simultaneously and with high temporal and spatial resolutions. By imaging neural responses in awake animals, with minimal invasiveness, we are able to avoid the confound of anesthesia, broaden the scope of possible stimuli, and potentially make use of repeated scans from the same animals. These methods are made possible by the development of an annotated and segmented 3D vole brain atlas and software for image analysis. The use of these methods in the prairie vole provides an opportunity to broaden neuroscientific investigation of behavior via a comparative approach, which highlights the ethological relevance of pro-social behaviors shared between voles and humans, such as communal breeding, selective social bonds, social buffering of stress, and caregiving behaviors. Results using these methods show that fMRI in the prairie vole is capable of yielding robust blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) signal changes in response to hypercapnic challenge (inhaled 5% CO2), region-specific physical challenge (unilateral whisker stimulation), and presentation of a set of novel odors. Complementary analyses of repeated restraint sessions in the imaging hardware suggest that voles do not require acclimation to this procedure. Taken together, awake vole fMRI represents a new arena of neurobiological

  20. Cardiorespiratory effects of a 5HT2 antagonist (R51703) in awake and anesthetized dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doherty, T J; McDonell, W N; Dyson, D H; Black, W D

    1996-01-01

    To investigate cardiorespiratory effects of an experimental 5-hydroxytryptamine receptor antagonist (R51703) with sedative properties, intramuscular doses of the drug were studied in 6 awake dogs of mixed breed, and in 6 anesthetized beagles. Two doses (0.2 and 0.4 mg/kg) of R51703 and a saline control were studied in the awake dogs using a randomized crossover trial. Subsequently, the higher dose of R51703 was included as a component of halothane anesthesia to determine whether the halothane sparing effect of R51703 produced a beneficial alteration of hemodynamic function. Data were obtained at equipotent halothane/R51703 (H/R) and halothane/saline (H/S) doses equivalent to 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0 MAC. In awake dogs, heart rates tended to be lower in dogs sedated with R51703, significantly so at 30 min for both doses, and at 90 and 120 min for the 0.2 and 0.4 mg/kg doses, respectively (P conscious dogs and there was no evidence of respiratory depression. In the anesthetized dogs, at equipotent MAC, CI tended to be lower with H/R than with H/S, though the difference was not significant. Heart rate and stroke volume index also tended to be lower in the dogs treated with R51703, while systemic vascular resistance tended to be higher: these changes were not significant. Mean and SBP were higher at each MAC multiple in the H/R group. It was concluded that the halothane sparing effect of R51703 did not substantially improve hemodynamic function compared to the use of halothane alone at equipotent doses. PMID:8809379

  1. MATLAB-based automated patch-clamp system for awake behaving mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Niraj S; Siegel, Jennifer J; Taylor, William; Chitwood, Raymond A; Johnston, Daniel

    2015-08-01

    Automation has been an important part of biomedical research for decades, and the use of automated and robotic systems is now standard for such tasks as DNA sequencing, microfluidics, and high-throughput screening. Recently, Kodandaramaiah and colleagues (Nat Methods 9: 585-587, 2012) demonstrated, using anesthetized animals, the feasibility of automating blind patch-clamp recordings in vivo. Blind patch is a good target for automation because it is a complex yet highly stereotyped process that revolves around analysis of a single signal (electrode impedance) and movement along a single axis. Here, we introduce an automated system for blind patch-clamp recordings from awake, head-fixed mice running on a wheel. In its design, we were guided by 3 requirements: easy-to-use and easy-to-modify software; seamless integration of behavioral equipment; and efficient use of time. The resulting system employs equipment that is standard for patch recording rigs, moderately priced, or simple to make. It is written entirely in MATLAB, a programming environment that has an enormous user base in the neuroscience community and many available resources for analysis and instrument control. Using this system, we obtained 19 whole cell patch recordings from neurons in the prefrontal cortex of awake mice, aged 8-9 wk. Successful recordings had series resistances that averaged 52 ± 4 MΩ and required 5.7 ± 0.6 attempts to obtain. These numbers are comparable with those of experienced electrophysiologists working manually, and this system, written in a simple and familiar language, will be useful to many cellular electrophysiologists who wish to study awake behaving mice. PMID:26084901

  2. Railway Station Role in Composing Urban Conflicts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa Conticelli

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Despite railway infrastructure was the structural framework on which modern European States were developed, contributing to unify territories and to the establishment of Nations, right from the beginning, the relationship between railway and city has been characterized by physical, functional and social conflicts, mainly because of a lack of integration between infrastructural and urban policies, which have been produced strong conflicts during decades. These critical situations have concentrated on the railway stations surrounding areas, which have started symbolizing the main conflicts that are taking place inside the cities.Similarly to what happened in the XIX century, today railway is a strategic infrastructure for the European territory development, thanks to the introduction of high speed transport systems and the promotion of rail transport as a more sustainable transportation system, which can quickly connect metropolitan central areas, more and more impenetrable by private vehicles, and key functions centres for the contemporary urban systems.In this framework, railway stations are becoming public places representing a complex society which is more and more dedicated to motion; thus they offer an unmissable chance not only to carry out urban development and spatial cohesion policies, but also to compose old tensions caused by the sharing of physical space, which is more and more scarce and valuable, and by ghettoization phenomena which have been produced at local scale, between rail infrastructure and the surrounding urban context. Today, such conflicts are growing and they are involving many actors who express a lot of different interests, needs and expectations, relating to the station areas’ destiny.Starting from the analysis of some conflicting situations between rail stations and the surrounding areas which have took place until today, this paper investigates some recent renewal interventions on Italian and European main railway

  3. Laser pulse propagation in a meter scale rubidium vapor/plasma cell in AWAKE experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joulaei, A.; Moody, J.; Berti, N.; Kasparian, J.; Mirzanejhad, S.; Muggli, P.

    2016-09-01

    We present the results of numerical studies of laser pulse propagating in a 3.5 cm Rb vapor cell in the linear dispersion regime by using a 1D model and a 2D code that has been modified for our special case. The 2D simulation finally aimed at finding laser beam parameters suitable to make the Rb vapor fully ionized to obtain a uniform, 10 m-long, at least 1 mm in radius plasma in the next step for the AWAKE experiment.

  4. Laser pulse propagation in a meter scale rubidium vapor/plasma cell in AWAKE experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Joulaei, Atefeh; Berti, Nicolas; Kasparian, Jerome; Mirzanejhad, Saeed; Muggli, Patric

    2015-01-01

    We present the results of numerical studies of laser pulse propagating in a 3.5 cm Rb vapor cell in the linear dispersion regime by using a 1D model and a 2D code that has been modified for our special case. The 2D simulation finally aimed at finding laser beam parameters suitable to make the Rb vapor fully ionized to obtain a uniform, 10 m-long, at least 1 mm in radius plasma in the next step for the AWAKE experiment.

  5. Effects of Permanent Separation from Mother on Infant Monkeys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suomi, Stephen; And Others

    1973-01-01

    A study designed to investigate the effects of permanent maternal separation in infant rhesus monkeys, 60, 90, and 120 days of age, and housed individually or in Paris. Monkeys separated at 90 days and housed individually showed the highest levels of disturbance. (DP)

  6. Evaluation of diabetes determinants in woolly monkeys (Lagothrix lagotricha)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ange-van Heugten, K.D.; Burns, R.; Verstegen, M.W.A.; Jansen, W.L.; Ferket, P.R.; Heugten, E.

    2007-01-01

    Woolly monkeys (Lagothrix lagotricha) are a threatened specie in the wild with limited successful management in captivity due to diagnosed hypertension and suspected diabetic conditions. Six woolly monkeys with known hypertension problems were tested to determine if diabetes mellitus and current dai

  7. Brain tumors induced by radiation in rhesus monkeys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two out of four pubescent rhesus monkeys, which received 1,500 rads of supervoltage X-irradiation, showed malignant brain tumors afer the survival of 52 and 102 weeks each. Since the incidence of spontaneous developing brain tumors in monkeys cited in the literatures was quite low, the tumors in the present series may have been radiation induced. (author)

  8. Serum Chemistry concentrations of captive Woolly Monkeys (Lagothrix Lagotricha)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ange-van Heugten, K.D.; Verstegen, M.W.A.; Ferket, P.; Stoskopf, M.; Heugten, van E.

    2008-01-01

    Woolly monkeys (Lagothrix sp.) are threatened species and numerous zoos have failed to sustain successful populations. The most common causes of death in captive woolly monkeys are related to pregnancy and hypertension. The objective of this retrospective study was to evaluate serum concentrations o

  9. Fatal Infection of a Pet Monkey with Human herpesvirus 1

    OpenAIRE

    Huemer, Hartwig P.; Larcher, Clara; Czedik-Eysenberg, Thomas; Nowotny, Norbert; Reifinger, Martin

    2002-01-01

    Concerns have been raised about pet monkeys as a potential threat to humans. We report the opposite situation, a danger to pets that arises from humans. Similar to herpesvirus B (Cercopithecine herpesvirus 1), which endangers humans but not its host species, Human herpesvirus 1 can act as a “killer virus” when crossing the species barrier to New World monkeys.

  10. Comparative studies of squirrel monkeys (Saimiri) and titi monkeys (Callicebus) in travel tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fragaszy, D M

    1980-01-01

    Squirrel and titi monkeys were observed in a series of experiments in which the subjects' task was to move to a distant goal along above-ground pathways. The pathways were entirely visible to the subjects in all experiments. However, visual cues along the pathways (in Experiment I) and physical and spatial properties of the pathways (in Experiments II and III) were varied systematically in order to determine what effect features had upon selection of travel paths for monkeys of each species. Marked performance differences between the species were evident in these experiments, including differences in latency to move past the choice point, proportion of trials in which the shortest route was chosen first, and changes over test sessions in frequency of initial choice of the shortest route. In particular, titis tended to move past the choice point more slowly than squirrel monkeys; to pay more attention to distant properties of the pathways prior to making a decision, especially after experience in the test setting; and to prefer habitual pathways when these were available, whereas squirrel monkeys preferred novel routes when these were available. The relative "optimality" of decision making in these tasks in relation to species-typical modes of traveling and foraging in natural habitats is discussed. An alternative view of decision making, in which optimality is not assumed to be the only decision-making strategy, is suggested as an appropriate vehicle for further investigation into the sources of short-term variability in choice behavior. PMID:7223106

  11. Locomotor Anatomy and Behavior of Patas Monkeys (Erythrocebus patas with Comparison to Vervet Monkeys (Cercopithecus aethiops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrienne L. Zihlman

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Patas monkeys (Erythrocebus patas living in African savanna woodlands and grassland habitats have a locomotor system that allows them to run fast, presumably to avoid predators. Long fore- and hindlimbs, long foot bones, short toes, and a digitigrade foot posture were proposed as anatomical correlates with speed. In addition to skeletal proportions, soft tissue and whole body proportions are important components of the locomotor system. To further distinguish patas anatomy from other Old World monkeys, a comparative study based on dissection of skin, muscle, and bone from complete individuals of patas and vervet monkeys (Cercopithecus aethiops was undertaken. Analysis reveals that small adjustments in patas skeletal proportions, relative mass of limbs and tail, and specific muscle groups promote efficient sagittal limb motion. The ability to run fast is based on a locomotor system adapted for long distance walking. The patas’ larger home range and longer daily range than those of vervets give them access to highly dispersed, nutritious foods, water, and sleeping trees. Furthermore, patas monkeys have physiological adaptations that enable them to tolerate and dissipate heat. These features all contribute to the distinct adaptation that is the patas monkeys’ basis for survival in grassland and savanna woodland areas.

  12. Mismatch responses in the awake rat: evidence from epidural recordings of auditory cortical fields.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabienne Jung

    Full Text Available Detecting sudden environmental changes is crucial for the survival of humans and animals. In the human auditory system the mismatch negativity (MMN, a component of auditory evoked potentials (AEPs, reflects the violation of predictable stimulus regularities, established by the previous auditory sequence. Given the considerable potentiality of the MMN for clinical applications, establishing valid animal models that allow for detailed investigation of its neurophysiological mechanisms is important. Rodent studies, so far almost exclusively under anesthesia, have not provided decisive evidence whether an MMN analogue exists in rats. This may be due to several factors, including the effect of anesthesia. We therefore used epidural recordings in awake black hooded rats, from two auditory cortical areas in both hemispheres, and with bandpass filtered noise stimuli that were optimized in frequency and duration for eliciting MMN in rats. Using a classical oddball paradigm with frequency deviants, we detected mismatch responses at all four electrodes in primary and secondary auditory cortex, with morphological and functional properties similar to those known in humans, i.e., large amplitude biphasic differences that increased in amplitude with decreasing deviant probability. These mismatch responses significantly diminished in a control condition that removed the predictive context while controlling for presentation rate of the deviants. While our present study does not allow for disambiguating precisely the relative contribution of adaptation and prediction error processing to the observed mismatch responses, it demonstrates that MMN-like potentials can be obtained in awake and unrestrained rats.

  13. The discriminatory value of cardiorespiratory interactions in distinguishing awake from anaesthetised states: a randomised observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenwright, D A; Bernjak, A; Draegni, T; Dzeroski, S; Entwistle, M; Horvat, M; Kvandal, P; Landsverk, S A; McClintock, P V E; Musizza, B; Petrovčič, J; Raeder, J; Sheppard, L W; Smith, A F; Stankovski, T; Stefanovska, A

    2015-12-01

    Depth of anaesthesia monitors usually analyse cerebral function with or without other physiological signals; non-invasive monitoring of the measured cardiorespiratory signals alone would offer a simple, practical alternative. We aimed to investigate whether such signals, analysed with novel, non-linear dynamic methods, would distinguish between the awake and anaesthetised states. We recorded ECG, respiration, skin temperature, pulse and skin conductivity before and during general anaesthesia in 27 subjects in good cardiovascular health, randomly allocated to receive propofol or sevoflurane. Mean values, variability and dynamic interactions were determined. Respiratory rate (p = 0.0002), skin conductivity (p = 0.03) and skin temperature (p = 0.00006) changed with sevoflurane, and skin temperature (p = 0.0005) with propofol. Pulse transit time increased by 17% with sevoflurane (p = 0.02) and 11% with propofol (p = 0.007). Sevoflurane reduced the wavelet energy of heart (p = 0.0004) and respiratory (p = 0.02) rate variability at all frequencies, whereas propofol decreased only the heart rate variability below 0.021 Hz (p < 0.05). The phase coherence was reduced by both agents at frequencies below 0.145 Hz (p < 0.05), whereas the cardiorespiratory synchronisation time was increased (p < 0.05). A classification analysis based on an optimal set of discriminatory parameters distinguished with 95% success between the awake and anaesthetised states. We suggest that these results can contribute to the design of new monitors of anaesthetic depth based on cardiovascular signals alone. PMID:26350998

  14. Awake fi beroptic intubation of a patient with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elif Bakı

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis is a rapidly progressive disease from the fi fth to sixth decades of life causing degeneration and death of the upper and lower motor neurons and no effective treatment. The diagnosis isdependent on the clinical presentation and consistent electrodiagnostic studies. Progressive denervation affects the muscles, causing muscular weakness and atrophy, when the ventilation muscles are affected deathdue to respiratory failure occurs within a few years. We present the case of a 54 years old, 180 cm height and 94 kg weight male patient with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis who underwent surgical treatment of thyroidcancer. Fiberoptic intubation was orally performed providing spontaneus breathing. Propofol was applied after passing vocal cords. Anesthesia was maintained with sevofl orane (%2 and a mixture of oxygen and airunder volume controlled ventilation. Rocuronium was used 20 mg at the beginning of the surgery. At the end of surgery, he wasn’t extubated and transferred to anesthesia intensive care unit. He was extubated after tenhours and he was awaked perfectly. The patient was discharged from intensive care unit after 24 hours and from hospital after ten days. We reported that amyotrophic lateral sclerosis patient with limited mouth opening who underwent thyroid surgery, using awake intubation.

  15. Identifying timescales and possible precursors of the awake to asleep transition in EOG time series

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work we study the awake to asleep state transition in eye blinking activity. In this perspective the human electroculographic activity (EOG) was first experimentally investigated by means of a spectral analyses of the time series resulting for processes underlying both the brain activity and the eye dynamics. We studied the evolution of the spectral content both via the classical spectrogram and with the computation of summarizing scalar parameters: mean frequency, maximum frequency, spectral variance. With these tools we highlighted a significative dynamical change appearing before the transition from the awake to the asleep state, characterized by a general widening of the spectrum, that translates into a decrease of the maximum frequency, an increase of the average frequency and an increase of the spectral variance. Due to inherently high non-linearities involved, chaotic patterns were likely to occur in the experimental time series. These were analyzed therefore with the chaos theory. In particular we studied the time evolution of dynamical parameters as computed on different windows of the time series, i.e. optimal delay time as suggested by autocorrelation and mutual information on one side, embedding quality evaluation as suggested by the False Nearest Neighbours percentage on the other

  16. Indirect Self-Modulation Instability Measurement Concept for the AWAKE Proton Beam

    CERN Document Server

    Turner, M; Biskup, B; Burger, S; Gschwendtner, E; Lotov, K V; Mazzoni, S; Vincke, H

    2015-01-01

    AWAKE, the Advanced Proton-Driven Plasma Wakefield Acceleration Experiment, is a proof-of-principle R&D experiment at CERN using a 400 GeV/c proton beam from the CERN SPS (longitudinal beam size sigma_z = 12 mm) which will be sent into a 10 m long plasma section with a nominal density of approx. 7x10^14 atoms/cm3 (plasma wavelength lambda_p = 1.2mm). In this paper we show that by measuring the time integrated transverse profile of the proton bunch at two locations downstream of the AWAKE plasma, information about the occurrence of the self-modulation instability (SMI) can be inferred. In particular we show that measuring defocused protons with an angle of 1 mrad corresponds to having electric fields in the order of GV/m and fully developed self-modulation of the proton bunch. Additionally, by measuring the defocused beam edge of the self-modulated bunch, information about the growth rate of the instability can be extracted. If hosing instability occurs, it could be detected by measuring a non-uniform defo...

  17. Right Cortical and Axonal Structures Eliciting Ocular Deviation During Electrical Stimulation Mapping in Awake Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montemurro, Nicola; Herbet, Guillaume; Duffau, Hugues

    2016-07-01

    To investigate the neural network underpinning eye movements, a cortical and subcortical intraoperative mapping using direct electrical stimulation (DES) was achieved in six awake patients during surgery for a right frontal low-grade glioma. We assessed the relationship between the occurrence of ocular deviation during both cortical and axonal DES and the anatomic location for each response. The corresponding stimulation sites were reported on a standard brain template for visual analysis and between-subjects comparisons. Our results showed that DES of the cortical frontal eye field (FEF) elicited horizontal (anterior FEF) or upward (posterior FEF) eye movements in 3 patients, supporting the fact that FEF comprises several distinct functional subregions. In addition, subcortical stimulation of the white matter tracts underneath the FEF evoked conjugate contraversive ocular deviation in 3 other patients. Interestingly, this region seems to be a crossroad between the fronto-striatal tract, the frontal aslant tract, the inferior fronto-occipital fascicle and the superior longitudinal fascicle. No deficits in eye movements were observed following surgery. To our knowledge, this is the first study reporting ocular deviation during axonal electrostimulation mapping of the white matter fibers in awake patients. Therefore, our original data issued from DES give new insights into the cortical and subcortical structures involved in the control of eye movements and their strong relationships with other functional pathways. PMID:27067598

  18. Disrupting neural activity related to awake-state sharp wave-ripple complexes prevents hippocampal learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miriam Shirin Nokia

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Oscillations in hippocampal local-field potentials reflect the crucial involvement of the hippocampus in memory trace formation: theta (4-8 Hz oscillations and ripples (~200 Hz occurring during sharp waves are thought to mediate encoding and consolidation, respectively. During sharp wave-ripple complexes (SPW-Rs, hippocampal cell firing closely follows the pattern that took place during the initial experience, most likely reflecting replay of that event. Disrupting hippocampal ripples using electrical stimulation either during training in awake animals or during sleep after training retards spatial learning. Here, adult rabbits were trained in trace eyeblink conditioning, a hippocampus-dependent associative learning task. A bright light was presented to the animals during the inter-trial interval, when awake, either during SPW-Rs or irrespective of their neural state. Learning was particularly poor when the light was presented following SPW-Rs. While the light did not disrupt the ripple itself, it elicited a theta-band oscillation, a state that does not usually coincide with SPW-Rs. Thus, it seems that consolidation depends on neuronal activity within and beyond the hippocampus taking place immediately after, but by no means limited to, hippocampal SPW-Rs.

  19. Association of Awake Bruxism with Khat, Coffee, Tobacco, and Stress among Jazan University Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mir Faeq Ali Quadri

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The objective is to assess the prevalence of bruxism among the university students and to check its association with their khat chewing habit. Materials and Methods. A cross-sectional descriptive study is designed using cluster random sampling. Pretested questionnaire was administered by a trained interviewer to assess awake bruxism and the use of variables like khat, coffee, tobacco, and stress. Chi-square test at 5% significance was used for assessing the association. Logistic regression was also performed after adjusting for covariates. Results. A high response rate (95% was obtained as the distribution and collection of questionnaire was within an hour interval. 85% (63%, males; 22%, females experienced an episode of bruxism at least one time in the past six months. Regression analysis revealed an association of stress (P=0.00; OR = 5.902, 95% CI 2.614–13.325 and khat use (P=0.05; OR = 1.629, 95% CI 0.360–7.368 with bruxism. Interestingly, it is observed that the one who chew khat experienced 3.56 times (95% CI; 2.62–11.22 less pain when compared to the nonusers. Conclusion. This study is the first of its kind to assess the association of bruxism with khat chewing. High amount of stress and khat use can be considered as important risk indicators for awake bruxism.

  20. A novel tablet computer platform for advanced language mapping during awake craniotomy procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Melanie A; Tam, Fred; Garavaglia, Marco M; Golestanirad, Laleh; Hare, Gregory M T; Cusimano, Michael D; Schweizer, Tom A; Das, Sunit; Graham, Simon J

    2016-04-01

    A computerized platform has been developed to enhance behavioral testing during intraoperative language mapping in awake craniotomy procedures. The system is uniquely compatible with the environmental demands of both the operating room and preoperative functional MRI (fMRI), thus providing standardized testing toward improving spatial agreement between the 2 brain mapping techniques. Details of the platform architecture, its advantages over traditional testing methods, and its use for language mapping are described. Four illustrative cases demonstrate the efficacy of using the testing platform to administer sophisticated language paradigms, and the spatial agreement between intraoperative mapping and preoperative fMRI results. The testing platform substantially improved the ability of the surgeon to detect and characterize language deficits. Use of a written word generation task to assess language production helped confirm areas of speech apraxia and speech arrest that were inadequately characterized or missed with the use of traditional paradigms, respectively. Preoperative fMRI of the analogous writing task was also assistive, displaying excellent spatial agreement with intraoperative mapping in all 4 cases. Sole use of traditional testing paradigms can be limiting during awake craniotomy procedures. Comprehensive assessment of language function will require additional use of more sophisticated and ecologically valid testing paradigms. The platform presented here provides a means to do so. PMID:26473779

  1. Status of the proton and electron transfer lines for the AWAKE Experiment at CERN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, J. S.; Bauche, J.; Biskup, B.; Bracco, C.; Doebert, S.; Goddard, B.; Gschwendtner, E.; Jensen, L. K.; Jones, O. R.; Mazzoni, S.; Meddahi, M.; Pepitone, K.; Petrenko, A.; Velotti, F. M.; Vorozhtsov, A.

    2016-09-01

    The AWAKE project at CERN is planned to study proton driven plasma wakefield acceleration with an externally injected electron beam. Therefore two transfer lines are being designed in order to provide the proton beam from the SPS and the electron beam from an RF gun to the plasma cell. The commissioning of the proton line will take place in 2016 for the first phase of the experiment, which is focused on the self-modulation of a 12 cm long proton bunch in the plasma. The electron line will be added for the second phase of AWAKE in 2017, when the wakefield will be probed with an electron beam of 10-20 MeV/c. The challenge for these transfer lines lies in the parallel operation of the proton, electron and laser beam used to ionize the plasma and seed the self-modulation. These beams, of different characteristics, need to be synchronized and positioned for optimized injection conditions into the wakefield. This task requires great flexibility in the transfer line optics. The status of these designs will be presented in this paper.

  2. Indirect self-modulation instability measurement concept for the AWAKE proton beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, M.; Petrenko, A.; Biskup, B.; Burger, S.; Gschwendtner, E.; Lotov, K. V.; Mazzoni, S.; Vincke, H.

    2016-09-01

    AWAKE, the Advanced Proton-Driven Plasma Wakefield Acceleration Experiment, is a proof-of-principle R&D experiment at CERN using a 400 GeV / c proton beam from the CERN SPS (longitudinal beam size σz = 12 cm) which will be sent into a 10 m long plasma section with a nominal density of ≈ 7 ×1014 atoms /cm3 (plasma wavelength λp = 1.2 mm). In this paper we show that by measuring the time integrated transverse profile of the proton bunch at two locations downstream of the AWAKE plasma, information about the occurrence of the self-modulation instability (SMI) can be inferred. In particular we show that measuring defocused protons with an angle of 1 mrad corresponds to having electric fields in the order of GV/m and fully developed self-modulation of the proton bunch. Additionally, by measuring the defocused beam edge of the self-modulated bunch, information about the growth rate of the instability can be extracted. If hosing instability occurs, it could be detected by measuring a non-uniform defocused beam shape with changing radius. Using a 1 mm thick Chromox scintillation screen for imaging of the self-modulated proton bunch, an edge resolution of 0.6 mm and hence an SMI saturation point resolution of 1.2 m can be achieved.

  3. Plasma Hormone Concentrations in Monkeys after Spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grindeland, Richard E.; Mukku, V. R.; Dotsenko, R.; Gosselink, K. L.; Bigbee, A. J.; Helwig, D.; Hargens, Alan R. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effects of a 12.5 day spaceflight on the endocrine status of Rhesus monkeys. Male monkeys (three to four years old; 4 kg) were adapted to chair restraint and trained for 20 months. Blood samples were obtained from four control (C) and two flight (F) monkeys preflight (PF), post-flight (Recovery-R; days 0, 3, 11, and 17), and before and after a mission length simulation (S). Cortisol, T4, T3, testosterone (T), and IGF-1 were measured by RIA (radioimmunassay). Growth hormone (GH) was measured by an in vitro bioassay. Cortisol (16-34 ug/dl), T4 (3.9-7.4 ug/dl), and T (0.2-0.4 mg/ml) did not differ between F and C or between PF, R, and S samples. The low T values reflect the immaturity of the animals. In F, T3 fell from C levels of 208 +/- 4 ng/dl to 44 on R+0 and 150 on R+3, then returned to C. F showed a 55% decrease in GH at R+0 and decreases of 93, 89, and 80%, respectively, at R+3, 11, and 17. IGF-1 decreased from PF levels of 675 ng/ml to 365 (R+0) and 243 (R+3), but returned to C at R+11. GH and IGF-1 levels before and after S did not differ from each other or from C. The cause of the transitory decrease in T3 is unknown. The suppressed GH levels for 17 days after flight may reflect reduced proprioceptive input during flight. The faster recovery of IGF-1 suggests that factors other than reduced GH secretion are involved.

  4. Volume effects in Rhesus monkey spinal cord

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An experiment was conducted to test for the existence of a volume effect in radiation myelopathy using Rhesus monkeys treated with clinically relevant field sizes and fractionation schedules. Five groups of Rhesus monkeys were irradiated using 2.2 Gy per fraction to their spinal cords. Three groups were irradiated with 8 cm fields to total doses of 70.4, 77, and 83.6 Gy. Two additional groups were irradiated to 70.4 Gy using 4 and 16 cm fields. The incidence of paresis expressed within 2 years following the completion of treatment was determined for each group. Maximum likelihood estimation was used to determine parameters of a logistic dose response function. The volume effect was modeled using the probability model in which the probability of producing a lesion in an irradiated volume is governed by the probability of the occurrence of independent events. This is a two parameter model requiring only the estimates of the parameters of the dose-response function for the reference volume, but not needing any additional parameters for describing the volume effect. The probability model using a logistic dose-response function fits the data well with the D50 = 75.8 Gy for the 8-cm field. No evidence was seen for a difference in sensitivities for different anatomical levels of the spinal cord. Most lesions were type 3, combined white matter parenchymal and vascular lesions. Latent periods did not differ significantly from those of type 3 lesions in humans. The spinal cord exhibits a volume effect that is well described by the probability model. Because the dose response function for radiation myelopathy is steep, the volume effect is modest. The Rhesus monkey remains the animal model most similar to humans in dose response, histopathology, and latency for radiation myelopathy. 22 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  5. Distribution and abundance of sacred monkeys in Igboland, southern Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Lynne R; Tanimola, Adebowale A; Olubode, Oluseun S; Garshelis, David L

    2009-07-01

    Although primates are hunted on a global scale, some species are protected against harassment and killing by taboos or religious doctrines. Sites where the killing of sacred monkeys or the destruction of sacred groves is forbidden may be integral to the conservation of certain species. In 2004, as part of a distribution survey of Sclater's guenon (Cercopithecus sclateri) in southern Nigeria, we investigated reports of sacred monkeys in the Igbo-speaking region of Nigeria. We confirmed nine new sites where primates are protected as sacred: four with tantalus monkeys (Chlorocebus tantalus) and five with mona monkeys (Cercopithecus mona). During 2004-2006, we visited two communities (Akpugoeze and Lagwa) previously known to harbor sacred populations of Ce. sclateri to estimate population abundance and trends. We directly counted all groups and compared our estimates with previous counts when available. We also estimated the size of sacred groves and compared these with grove sizes reported in the literature. The mean size of the sacred groves in Akpugoeze (2.06 ha, n = 10) was similar to others in Africa south of the Sahel, but larger than the average grove in Lagwa (0.49 ha, n = 15). We estimated a total population of 124 Sclater's monkeys in 15 groups in Lagwa and 193 monkeys in 20 groups in Akpugoeze. The Akpugoeze population was relatively stable over two decades, although the proportion of infants declined, and the number of groups increased. As Sclater's monkey does not occur in any official protected areas, sacred populations are important to the species' long-term conservation. Despite the monkeys' destruction of human crops, most local people still adhere to the custom of not killing monkeys. These sites represent ideal locations in which to study the ecology of Sclater's monkey and human-wildlife interactions. PMID:19408287

  6. Which senses play a role in nonhuman primate food selection? A comparison between squirrel monkeys and spider monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laska, Matthias; Freist, Pamela; Krause, Stephanie

    2007-03-01

    In order to optimize foraging efficiency and avoid toxicosis, animals must be able to detect, discriminate, and learn about the predictive signals of potential food. Primates are typically regarded as animals that rely mainly on their highly developed visual systems, and little is known about the role that the other senses may play in food selection. It was therefore the aim of the present study to assess which senses are involved in the evaluation of food by two species of New World primates: the squirrel monkey and the spider monkey. To this end, six animals per species were repeatedly presented with both familiar and novel food items, and their behavior was videotaped and analyzed. To obtain a further indication of the relative importance of visual and chemosensory cues, the animals were also presented with familiar food items that were experimentally modified in color, odor, or both color and odor. The results demonstrate that squirrel monkeys and spider monkeys use olfactory, gustatory, and tactile cues in addition to visual information to evaluate novel food, whereas they mainly inspect familiar food items visually prior to consumption. Our findings also show that in both species the use of nonvisual cues decreased rapidly with repeated presentations of novel food, suggesting a fast multimodal learning process. Further, the two species clearly differ in their relative use of nonvisual cues when evaluating novel or modified food, with spider monkeys relying more on olfactory cues than squirrel monkeys, and squirrel monkeys relying more on tactile cues compared to spider monkeys. PMID:17146790

  7. Awake Craniotomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... is required during the course of the operation. Let’s go ahead and take a look at some of ... to four, please, on the milliamps here. Okay. Let’s go again on the talking please. Let’s do the ...

  8. Awake Craniotomy

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    Full Text Available ... is required during the course of the operation. Let’s go ahead and take a look at some of ... to four, please, on the milliamps here. Okay. Let’s go again on the talking please. Let’s do the ...

  9. Awake Craniotomy

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    Full Text Available ... site of Shila’s previous surgery to allow us access down to the skull, and ultimately down to ... then removing sections of bone that allow us access to where the tumor is located. We set ...

  10. Awake Craniotomy

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    Full Text Available ... you.” I said, “Okay.” I said, “I’m game if you are.” Shila was sent for a ... and you have to remind her about the environment and what’s going on. We do our best ...

  11. Awake Craniotomy

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    Full Text Available ... only site for adult neurological clinical research and development and features the area’s only neuro intensive care ... low-dose medications, or we can give more local anesthesia to make sure they’re comfortable. That’s ...

  12. Awake Craniotomy

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    Full Text Available ... probe. An ultrasound is another technique that we use to localize the tumor. We talked earlier about ... real-time information that we can compare and use in addition to stealth. So by using both ...

  13. Awake Craniotomy

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    Full Text Available ... and features the area’s only neuro intensive care unit. In today’s broadcast you will be part of ... it’s not just her hand as a total unit but actually even individual fingers. You want to ...

  14. Awake Craniotomy

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    Full Text Available ... the scattered mitoses in it. There is some necrosis. Has she had radiation? I don’t think ... pieces of skull bone. We close up the skin and scalp. And at that point, we’re ...

  15. Awake Craniotomy

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    Full Text Available ... That’s how the brain works, by bursts of electricity between cells, and normally those bursts are very ... In someone who has seizures, those bursts of electricity get out of control, and they become too ...

  16. Awake Craniotomy

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    Full Text Available ... In someone who has seizures, those bursts of electricity get out of control, and they become too large or too long in duration, and we can actually measure that through this grid, which hooks up to ...

  17. Awake Craniotomy

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    Full Text Available ... navigation system works is that we have a reference arc that’s being placed and seen by a ... a probe that we can touch against the reference arc, measured with a camera, and we then ...

  18. Awake Craniotomy

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    Full Text Available ... development and features the area’s only neuro intensive care unit. In today’s broadcast you will be part ... brain tumor centers are offering this type of care, and I feel like we’re fortunate here ...

  19. Awake Craniotomy

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    Full Text Available ... We want to take that tissue and we send it off to our pathology doctors. The pathology ... fairly large-sized tumor, and we’ll now send this off for additional analysis by the pathology ...

  20. Awake Craniotomy

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    Full Text Available ... if you are.” Shila was sent for a functional MRI to determine the exact location of her tumor. A functional MRI creates a map of the brain that ... give the surgeons pinpoint precision while operating. The functional MRI was very different. It was a lot ...

  1. Awake Craniotomy

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    Full Text Available ... near control centers for motor function. Obviously different regions of the brain control different functions, and it’s ... to the skull, and ultimately down to the region of the tumor. The first sections of the ...

  2. Awake Craniotomy

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    Full Text Available ... of years and yet she’s carried on with life and has not allowed it to slow her ... may be some limitations posed by that, but life is still there and there’s still a lot ...

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    Full Text Available ... these areas, particularly underlying these numbers, there are connection wires that are connecting one area of the ... tasks as we do this. One of the connections between tumor and normal tissue are these small ...

  4. Awake Craniotomy

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    Full Text Available ... huh. Okay. We’re going to be just measuring a few things, looking at a few things ... that’s literally what we’re doing. We’re measuring electrical activity in the brain. 6 That’s how ...

  5. Awake Craniotomy

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    Full Text Available ... type of procedure. So really only highly specialized brain tumor centers are offering this type of care, and ... you know already had a surgery for a brain tumor. Her tumor had reoccurred after a previous surgery ...

  6. Awake Craniotomy

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    Full Text Available ... the brain. On the other hand, we do need valuable real-time information about the location of the tumor while we’ ... to get these patients to give you motor information is not just the ... toes, but you actually need to feel the intensity of their squeeze. You ...

  7. Awake Craniotomy

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    Full Text Available ... us with that is what’s called the “Stealth Navigation Device.” We take an MRI scan of patient. ... trying to reach. 3 The way that this navigation system works is that we have a reference ...

  8. Awake Craniotomy

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    Full Text Available ... mapping where we want her to perform different tasks. And we start out with some speech tasks, just because that’s the easier to understand and ... able to ask the patient to do certain tasks while we measure the function of different parts ...

  9. Awake Craniotomy

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    Full Text Available ... and you have to remind her about the environment and what’s going on. We do our best to try and make sure that she feels as comfortable whenever she wakes up and that she doesn’t feel alone. Shila? Shila, talk to me now. You doing all right? Miss Mullins, It’s Dr. Sills, everything’s going fine. ...

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    Full Text Available ... who can interact with us at the very time when we’re working in and around their ... She’s a wife, mother, and doting grandmother. Spending time with the grandbabies, that’s a big job. It’s ...

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    Full Text Available ... bleeding. In fact, it’s pretty common, in our experience, that we may spend more time actually making sure there’s not bleeding than the time it took us to remove the tumor, simply because of this critical importance of avoiding bleeding after surgery. All right. You ...

  12. Awake Craniotomy

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    Full Text Available ... Murphy, and he said, “I know a wonderful doctor.” And he said, “I think he can handle ... you got. You got it. Now who’s your doctor? Dr. Sills. That’s super. He’s doing your surgery ...

  13. Awake Craniotomy

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    Full Text Available ... reassuring for the patient but also for the family. This is your Aunt Pearl. Is that it? ... room, in the UCI; physical therapists; occupational therapists; social workers; nutrition consultants. It’s the interplay and interaction ...

  14. Awake Craniotomy

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    Full Text Available ... the yuck feeling. The Methodist University Hospital, the staff, the surgeons, the hospital stay and all was ... anywhere else and had the care and the staff that I had. You know, they were all ...

  15. Awake Craniotomy

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    Full Text Available ... function is located where based just on the anatomy of the brain. That’s why it is important ... to higher level’s, depending on each individual patient’s anatomy and the particular tumor that we’re taking ...

  16. Awake Craniotomy

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    Full Text Available ... teaching site for the University of Tennessee Health Science Center’s Neurological and Surgical Residency Program, which, in ... associate professor at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center. Joining Dr. Sills is Wayne Hamm, a ...

  17. Awake Craniotomy

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    Full Text Available ... brain. 6 That’s how the brain works, by bursts of electricity between cells, and normally those bursts are very controlled and are of a certain ... certain duration. In someone who has seizures, those bursts of electricity get out of control, and they ...

  18. Awake Craniotomy

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    Full Text Available ... tissue and we send it off to our pathology doctors. The pathology doctors will take that small sample of tissue, ... send this off for additional analysis by the pathology doctors. That analysis will take place over the ...

  19. Awake Craniotomy

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    Full Text Available ... as good as you are now?” And my words to him was, “Are you ready?” Miss Mullins ... and abnormal parts of the brain, in other words those parts that are involved with the tumor, ...

  20. Awake Craniotomy

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    Full Text Available ... times the tumor merges into the surrounding brain tissue. I often tell patients that these tumors grow ... in a body. It shows us the different tissue, because tumors usually have a different consistency to ...

  1. Awake Craniotomy

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    Full Text Available ... principle teaching site for the University of Tennessee Health Science Center’s Neurological and Surgical Residency Program, which, ... an associate professor at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center. Joining Dr. Sills is Wayne Hamm, ...

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    Full Text Available ... like weeds grow in your yard, where bad cells grow in among good cells, and it becomes difficult to tell where that ... have pain receptors. You have to have nerve cells designed to feel pain. And we simply don’ ...

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    Full Text Available ... Memphis, TN April 21, 2009 Welcome to the Neuroscience Institute at Methodist University Hospital in Memphis, Tennessee. ... programs in the nation. The Methodist University Hospital Neuroscience Institute is also the only site for adult ...

  4. Awake Craniotomy

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    Full Text Available ... but we’re also trying to evaluate the patient’s compliance with our request. Right. And there’s something to be said about motor planning. In other words, to make a motion is not simply ... very well with those treatments. We continue to see her regularly and to ...

  5. Awake Craniotomy

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    Full Text Available ... in the Mid-South with the team-training, skill, and cooperation among neurosurgeons and anesthesiologists to perform ... it is a procedure that requires expertise and skill primarily on the side of the anesthesia team, ...

  6. Awake Craniotomy

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    Full Text Available ... type of ultrasound probe used, for example, at looking at a baby in a mother’s womb or ... going to be just measuring a few things, looking at a few things up here, so you ...

  7. Awake Craniotomy

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    Full Text Available ... cause some bleeding after surgery, which can obviously cause problems. So we spend a great deal of time going around carefully sealing those off. Here we are injecting a material that actually looks like tooth paste but actually is a collagen type of material that will lay against the surface ...

  8. Awake Craniotomy

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    Full Text Available ... we could disrupt some of those wires and communication, and that’s why it’s important that the patient ... function. And, again, here you see our GPS-type probe, the Stealth probe that we’re putting ...

  9. Awake Craniotomy

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    Full Text Available ... surgeons in the room on cases such as these so that they can tackle these tough decisions that need to be made. Methodist ... they see; and when will they see it. These are the things that we like to go ...

  10. Awake Craniotomy

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    Full Text Available ... activity in the brain. 6 That’s how the brain works, by bursts of electricity between cells, and normally those bursts are very controlled and ... that will lay against the surface of the brain and help to seal off some of those very, ... to allow some of the blood cells to come in and seal themselves off and ...

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    Full Text Available ... nurse anesthetist, Hamm is with the Medical Anesthesia Group and has more than 30 years experience in ... colleague, Wayne Hamm anesthetist with the Medical Anesthesia Group. Both of us work here at the Methodist ...

  12. Awake Craniotomy

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    Full Text Available ... later in the surgery. Then we begin the process of allowing Shila to wake up, and that is a gradual process that occurs over a few minute’s time. At ... seizures, those bursts of electricity get out of control, and they become too large or too long ...

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    Full Text Available ... to reach. 3 The way that this navigation system works is that we have a reference arc ... we’re using the Stealth probe, the navigation system that we talked about before. And as we ...

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    Full Text Available ... also the only site for adult neurological clinical research and development and features the area’s only neuro ... doesn’t the brain hurt? It’s a great question, and we also try to make sure patients ...

  15. Awake Craniotomy

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    Full Text Available ... a little cold? Uh-huh. She’s a little built shivery. We got her warming blanket on her. ... final measurements, making sure there’s no abnormal seizure activity that we see and ... occupational therapists; social workers; nutrition consultants. It’s ...

  16. Awake Craniotomy

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    Full Text Available ... will wake up inside of a tent-like structure, and it’s very important that they understand that they’re going to wake up not seeing anything external, but they will have a light on the inside. ...

  17. Awake Craniotomy

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    Full Text Available ... All I’m saying is I need some water. Everything okay there? Yeah. Good. All right. Let’s ... features, she went on to receive both radiation therapy and some chemotherapy, and she has done very ...

  18. Awake Craniotomy

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    Full Text Available ... and Spine Institute. Dr. Sills is the program director for the neuroscience institute at Methodist University Hospital ... University of Tennessee Health Science Center and the director of the skull-based tumors program at Methodist ...

  19. Awake Craniotomy

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    Full Text Available ... shows us pictures of the brain in different dimensions, and then we have a probe that we ... updates this and show us pictures in three dimensions and also gives us some sense of our ...

  20. Awake Craniotomy

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    Full Text Available ... they can expect to maybe hear a loud noise or use of a piece of equipment, something ... be affected by the tumor. And the net effect of that is still impaired movement. Still rigid ...

  1. Awake Craniotomy

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    Full Text Available ... me permanently, and I think that was a good idea, you know, because there, again, he took ... your yard, where bad cells grow in among good cells, and it becomes difficult to tell where ...

  2. Awake Craniotomy

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    Full Text Available ... TV screen showing us where we are in relationship to the tumor tissue and also to the ... aggressive is this tumor and what is its relationship to the normal brain tissue. That’s important information ...

  3. Awake Craniotomy

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    Full Text Available ... again with the help of Mark and the EEG team to make sure that there does not ... inspiration and courage through her surgery. To view brain tumor case studies, you can visit our virtual brain ...

  4. Awake Craniotomy

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    Full Text Available ... function. And, again, here you see our GPS-type probe, the Stealth probe that we’re putting ... give us the first initial impression of what type of tumor this is and what grade of ...

  5. Awake Craniotomy

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    Full Text Available ... every hospital. In fact, it takes a very unique hospital because it is a procedure that requires ... left side.” He said, “This tumor is pressing against the motor skill that tells you left side ...

  6. Awake Craniotomy

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    Full Text Available ... Shila Mullins enjoys the outdoor. She likes to help people and does so often. She’s a wife, ... border is. So one of the devices that helps us with that is what’s called the “Stealth ...

  7. Awake Craniotomy

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    Full Text Available ... a map of the brain that indicates where language, motor, and sensory areas are located. It is ... Now we have moved on from talking about language to looking at motor function, and so we’ ...

  8. Awake Craniotomy

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    Full Text Available ... you.” I said, “Okay.” I said, “I’m game if you are.” Shila was sent for a ... function? Well, again, as you saw on the video, we have a demonstration in terms of the ...

  9. Awake Craniotomy

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    Full Text Available ... left side.” He said, “This tumor is pressing against the motor skill that tells you left side ... skull, or skin and see where we are against the patient’s MRI study. This has been a ...

  10. Awake Craniotomy

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    Full Text Available ... You’re doing great. I’m not hurting. Good. You’re making our job really easy. This is ... Seven, six, five, four, three, two, one. Very good. You want to do it one more time. Ten, ...

  11. Awake Craniotomy

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    Full Text Available ... Memphis, Tennessee. Methodist University Hospital is the principle teaching site for the University of Tennessee Health Science ... a map of the brain that indicates where language, motor, and sensory areas are located. It is ...

  12. Awake Craniotomy

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    Full Text Available ... m Allen Sills, neurosurgeon, and I’m joined today by my colleague, Wayne Hamm anesthetist with the Medical Anesthesia Group. Both of us work here at the Methodist University Hospital here in Memphis, Tennessee. And we’re talking today about our patient, Shila, who you have already ...

  13. Awake Craniotomy

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    Full Text Available ... All I could think about was being a vegetable. So I called Dr. Sills, made the appointment, ... function is located where based just on the anatomy of the brain. That’s why it is important ...

  14. Awake Craniotomy

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    Full Text Available ... room, in the UCI; physical therapists; occupational therapists; social workers; nutrition consultants. It’s the interplay and interaction of all these people on the team pulling ...

  15. Awake Craniotomy

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    Full Text Available ... the function of her brain, with the ultimate goal, Wayne, of making it as safe as we ... her regular activities. And obviously that was our goal as well to make sure that she got ...

  16. Awake Craniotomy

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    Full Text Available ... was having surgery for the first time. It causes us to take a little bit more time ... surrounding the tumor, and any of those can cause some bleeding after surgery, which can obviously cause ...

  17. Awake Craniotomy

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    Full Text Available ... years ago, and her tumor remained under good control; however as we watched it over time, her ... an area of her brain that was near control centers for motor function. Obviously different regions of ...

  18. Awake Craniotomy

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    Full Text Available ... people and does so often. She’s a wife, mother, and doting grandmother. Spending time with the grandbabies, ... example, at looking at a baby in a mother’s womb or many other applications in a body. ...

  19. Awake Craniotomy

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    Full Text Available ... Neuroscience Institute is also the only site for adult neurological clinical research and development and features the ... the largest collection of case studies on the Internet. For more information on the Neuroscience Institute and ...

  20. Awake Craniotomy

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    Full Text Available ... onto a picture of landmarks on the patient’s skin and skull. And then when the patient is ... can create a model of the skull, the skin, and the brain, which allow us to then ...

  1. Awake Craniotomy

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    Full Text Available ... aggressive is this tumor and what is its relationship to the normal brain tissue. That’s important information ... some bleeding after surgery, which can obviously cause problems. So we spend a great deal of time ...

  2. Awake Craniotomy

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    Full Text Available ... benefits that we like in terms of the sleep and then it also allow us to have ... patient emerges from anesthesia, the first part, the sleep part of the procedure, she will wake up ...

  3. Awake Craniotomy

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    Full Text Available ... University Hospital. In difficult cases such as this, it’s always nice to have the experience of two ... something that’s available at every hospital. In fact, it takes a very unique hospital because it is ...

  4. Awake Craniotomy

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    Full Text Available ... And there’s something to be said about motor planning. In other words, to make a motion is ... reassuring for the patient but also for the family. This is your Aunt Pearl. Is that it? ...

  5. Awake Craniotomy

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    Full Text Available ... 10 now it’s time to get down to business and take the tumor out. As we do ... we could disrupt some of those wires and communication, and that’s why it’s important that the patient ...

  6. Awake Craniotomy

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    Full Text Available ... of her tumor. A functional MRI creates a map of the brain that indicates where language, motor, ... key parts of the surgery in order to map out the function of her brain, with the ...

  7. Awake Craniotomy

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    Full Text Available ... up all of your fingers. Open your hand wide. Very good. Now grip my hand. Good girl. ... still at least some function there. In other words, we’re not completely disrupting that function. We ...

  8. Awake Craniotomy

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    Full Text Available ... sure she’s comfortable. And that comes in the form of padding and that comes in the form of how she lays. The most important thing ... be, but typically we’re looking at milder forms of seizure, which is what we see here. ...

  9. Awake Craniotomy

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    Full Text Available ... On the other hand, we do need valuable real-time information about the location of the tumor ... about the Stealth station, but ultrasound gives us real-time information that we can compare and use ...

  10. Awake nasotracheal fiberoptic intubation and self-positioning followed by anesthesia induction in prone patients: A pilot observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heng, Lei; Wang, Ming-Yu; Sun, Hou-Liang; Zhu, Shan-Shan

    2016-08-01

    Anesthesia followed by placement in the prone position takes time and may result in complications. This study aimed to evaluate the feasibility of awake nasotracheal fiberoptic intubation and self-positioning followed by anesthesia induction in prone-positioned patients under general anesthesia.Sixty-two patients (ASA physical status I-II) scheduled for awake nasotracheal fiberoptic intubation and prone self-positioning before surgery under general anesthesia were selected. Patient preparation began with detailed preoperative counseling regarding the procedure. Premedication with sedative and antisialagogue was followed by airway anesthesia with topical lidocaine; then, awake nasotracheal fiberoptic intubation was carried out. The patients then positioned themselves comfortably before induction of general anesthesia. The changes in systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), heart rate (HR), incidence of coughing or gagging, and rate pressure product (RPP) were assessed. Statistical analysis was performed with repeated-measures one-way analysis of variance.Fifty-eight of the 62 patients completed prone self-positioning smoothly. Compared with values before intubation, SBP, DBP, HR, and RPP were slightly increased after intubation, although the difference was not statistically significant (P > 0.05). One patient had moderate coughing and 1 patient had gagging during prone self-positioning, which were tolerable.These findings indicated that awake nasotracheal fiberoptic intubation and self-positioning followed by induction of anesthesia is safe and feasible alternative to routine prone positioning after induction of general anesthesia. PMID:27512858

  11. Measurement of lung function in awake 2-4-year-old asthmatic children during methacholine challenge and acute asthma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klug, B; Bisgaard, H

    1996-01-01

    This study evaluated three techniques for testing of lung function in young awake children. We compared measurements by the forced or impulse oscillation technique (IOS), the interrupter technique (IT), and transcutaneous measurements of oxygen (tcPo2) with concomitant measurements of specific...

  12. Ex vivo evaluation of the serotonin 1A receptor partial agonist [³H]CUMI-101 in awake rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palner, Mikael; Underwood, Mark D; Kumar, Dileep J S;

    2011-01-01

    [³H]CUMI-101 is a 5-HT(1A) partial agonist, which has been evaluated for use as a positron emission tracer in baboon and humans. We sought to evaluate the properties of [³H]CUMI-101 ex vivo in awake rats and determine if [³H]CUMI-101 can measure changes in synaptic levels of serotonin after diffe...

  13. A novel melano-lysosome in the retinal epithelium of rhesus monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouras, Peter; Brown, Kristy; Ivert, Lena; Neuringer, Martha

    2011-12-01

    The large phagocytic load that confronts the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) is thought to play a possible role in the pathogenesis of age related macular degeneration (AMD) that afflicts both humans and monkeys. Our knowledge of how RPE degrades phagosomes and other intra-cellular material by lysosomal action is still rudimentary. In this paper we examine organelles that play a role in this process, melanosome, lysosomes and phagosomes, in the RPE of young and old rhesus monkeys in order to better understand lysosomal autophagy and heterophagy in the RPE and its possible role in AMD. We used electron microscopy to detect and describe the characteristics of melanosomes and lysosome-like organelles in the macular RPE of rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) that were 1, 6, 24, 24, 26 and 35 years of age. The measurements include the number, shape and size of these organelles located in the basal, middle and apical regions of RPE cells. Phaagosomes were also examined but not counted or measured for size or shape because of their rarity. Melanosomes were homogeneously dark with a circular or elliptical shape and decreased in number with age. Smaller melanosomes were more common at the basal side of the RPE. Among the small melanosomes, we found an organelle that was losing melanin in varying degrees; in some cases was nearly devoid of melanin. Because of the melanin loss, we considered this organelle to be a unique type of autophagic melano-lysosome, which we called a Type 1 lysosome. We found another organelle, more canonically lysosomal, which we called a Type 2 lysosome. This organelle was composed of a light matrix containing melanosomes in various stages of degradation. Type 2 lysosomes without melanosomes were rare. Type 2 lysosomes increased while Type 1 decreased in number with age. Phagosomes were rare in both young and old monkeys. They made close contact with Type 2 lysosomes which we considered responsible for their degradation. Melanosomes are being lost from

  14. Can Rhesus Monkey Learn Executive Attention?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Bramlett-Parker

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available A growing body of data indicates that, compared to humans, rhesus monkeys perform poorly on tasks that assess executive attention, or voluntary control over selection for processing, particularly under circumstances in which attention is attracted elsewhere by competing stimulus control. In the human-cognition literature, there are hotly active debates about whether various competencies such as executive attention, working memory capacity, and fluid intelligence can be improved through training. In the current study, rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta completed an attention-training intervention including several inhibitory-control tasks (a Simon task, numerical Stroop task, global/local interference task, and a continuous performance task to determine whether generalized improvements would be observed on a version of the Attention Network Test (ANT of controlled attention, which was administered before and after the training intervention. Although the animals demonstrated inhibition of prepotent responses and improved in executive attention with practice, this improvement did not generalize to the ANT at levels consistently better than were observed for control animals. Although these findings fail to encourage the possibility that species differences in cognitive competencies can be ameliorated through training, they do advance our understanding of the competition between stimulus-control and cognitive-control in performance by nonhuman and human primates.

  15. Can Rhesus Monkey Learn Executive Attention?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bramlett-Parker, Jessica; Washburn, David A

    2016-01-01

    A growing body of data indicates that, compared to humans, rhesus monkeys perform poorly on tasks that assess executive attention, or voluntary control over selection for processing, particularly under circumstances in which attention is attracted elsewhere by competing stimulus control. In the human-cognition literature, there are hotly active debates about whether various competencies such as executive attention, working memory capacity, and fluid intelligence can be improved through training. In the current study, rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) completed an attention-training intervention including several inhibitory-control tasks (a Simon task, numerical Stroop task, global/local interference task, and a continuous performance task) to determine whether generalized improvements would be observed on a version of the Attention Network Test (ANT) of controlled attention, which was administered before and after the training intervention. Although the animals demonstrated inhibition of prepotent responses and improved in executive attention with practice, this improvement did not generalize to the ANT at levels consistently better than were observed for control animals. Although these findings fail to encourage the possibility that species differences in cognitive competencies can be ameliorated through training, they do advance our understanding of the competition between stimulus-control and cognitive-control in performance by nonhuman and human primates. PMID:27304969

  16. Vestibuloocular reflex of rhesus monkeys after spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Bernard; Kozlovskaia, Inessa; Raphan, Theodore; Solomon, David; Helwig, Denice; Cohen, Nathaniel; Sirota, Mikhail; Iakushin, Sergei

    1992-01-01

    The vestibuloocular reflex (VOR) of two rhesus monkeys was recorded before and after 14 days of spaceflight. The gain (eye velocity/head velocity) of the horizontal VOR, tested 15 and 18 h after landing, was approximately equal to preflight values. The dominant time constant of the animal tested 15 h after landing was equivalent to that before flight. During nystagmus induced by off-vertical axis rotation (OVAR), the latency, rising time constant, steady-state eye velocity, and phase of modulation in eye velocity and eye position with respect to head position were similar in both monkeys before and after flight. There were changes in the amplitude of modulation of horizontal eye velocity during steady-state OVAR and in the ability to discharge stored activity rapidly by tilting during postrotatory nystagmus (tilt dumping) after flight: OVAR modulations were larger, and tilt dumping was lost in the one animal tested on the day of landing and for several days thereafter. If the gain and time constant of the horizontal VOR exchange in microgravity, they must revert to normal soon after landing. The changes that were observed suggest that adaptation to microgravity had caused alterations in way that the central nervous system processes otolith input.

  17. Spaceflight and immune responses of rhesus monkeys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonnenfeld, Gerald; Morton, Darla S.; Swiggett, Jeanene P.; Hakenewerth, Anne M.; Fowler, Nina A.

    1995-01-01

    The effects of restraint on immunological parameters was determined in an 18 day ARRT (adult rhesus restraint test). The monkeys were restrained for 18 days in the experimental station for the orbiting primate (ESOP), the chair of choice for Space Shuttle experiments. Several immunological parameters were determined using peripheral blood, bone marrow, and lymph node specimens from the monkeys. The parameters included: response of bone marrow cells to GM-CSF (granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor), leukocyte subset distribution, and production of IFN-a (interferon-alpha) and IFN-gamma (interferon-gamma). The only parameter changed after 18 days of restraint was the percentage of CD8+ T cells. No other immunological parameters showed changes due to restraint. Handling and changes in housing prior to the restraint period did apparently result in some restraint-independent immunological changes. Handling must be kept to a minimum and the animals allowed time to recover prior to flight. All experiments must be carefully controlled. Restraint does not appear to be a major issue regarding the effects of space flight on immune responses.

  18. Thermoregulatory responses of rhesus monkeys during spaceflight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulzman, F M; Ferraro, J S; Fuller, C A; Moore-Ede, M C; Klimovitsky, V; Magedov, V; Alpatov, A M

    1992-03-01

    This study examines the activity, axillary temperature (T(ax)), and ankle skin temperature (Tsk) of two male Rhesus monkeys exposed to microgravity in space. The animals were flown on a Soviet biosatellite mission (COSMOS 1514). Measurements on the flight animals, as well as synchronous flight controls, were performed in the Soviet Union. Additional control studies were performed in the United States to examine the possible role of metabolic heat production in the T(ax) response observed during the spaceflight. All monkeys were exposed to a 24-h light-dark cycle (LD 16:8) throughout these studies. During weightlessness, T(ax) in both flight animals was lower than on earth. The largest difference (0.75 degree C) occurred during the night. There was a reduction in mean heart rate and Tsk during flight. This suggests a reduction in both heat loss and metabolic rate during spaceflight. Although the circadian rhythms in all variables were present during flight, some differences were noted. For example, the amplitude of the rhythms in Tsk and activity were attenuated. Furthermore, the T(ax) and activity rhythms did not have precise 24.0 hour periods and may have been externally desynchronized from the 24-h LD cycle. These data suggest a weakening of the coupling between the internal circadian pacemaker and the external LD synchronizer. PMID:1523235

  19. Explicit information reduces discounting behavior in monkeys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John ePearson

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Animals are notoriously impulsive in common laboratory experiments, preferring smaller, sooner rewards to larger, delayed rewards even when this reduces average reward rates. By contrast, the same animals often engage in natural behaviors that require extreme patience, such as food caching, stalking prey, and traveling long distances to high quality food sites. One possible explanation for this discrepancy is that standard laboratory delay discounting tasks artificially inflate impulsivity by subverting animals’ common learning strategies. To test this idea, we examined choices made by rhesus macaques in two variants of a standard delay discounting task. In the conventional variant, post-reward delays were uncued and adjusted to render total trial length constant; in the second, all delays were cued explicitly. We found that measured discounting was significantly reduced in the cued task, with discount rates well below those reported in studies using the standard uncued design. When monkeys had complete information, their decisions were more consistent with a strategy of reward rate maximization. These results indicate that monkeys, and perhaps other animals, are more patient than is normally assumed, and that laboratory measures of delay discounting may overstate impulsivity.

  20. Recognition memory and the medial temporal lobe: from monkey research to human pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meunier, M; Barbeau, E

    2013-01-01

    This review provides a historical overview of decades of research on recognition memory, the process that allows both humans and animals to tell familiar from novel items. The emphasis is put on how monkey research improved our understanding of the medial temporal lobe (MTL) role and how tasks designed for monkeys influenced research in humans. The story starts in the early 1950s. Back then, memory was not a fashionable scientific topic. It was viewed as a function of the whole brain and not of specialized brain areas. All that changed in 1957-1958 when Brenda Milner, a neuropsychologist from Montreal, described patient H.M. He forgot all events as he lived them despite a fully preserved intelligence. He had received a MTL resection to relieve epilepsy. H.M. (1926-2008) would become the most influential patient in brain science. Which structures among those included in H.M.'s large lesion were important for recognition memory could not be evaluated in humans. It was gradually understood only after the successful development of a monkey model of human amnesia by Mishkin in 1978. Selective lesions and two behavioral tasks, delayed nonmatching-to-sample and visual paired comparison, were used to distinguish the contribution of the hippocampus from that of adjacent cortical areas. Driven by findings in non-human primates, human research on recognition memory is now trying to solve the question of whether the different structures composing MTL contributes to familiarity and recollection, the two possible forms taken by recognition. We described in particular two French patients, FRG and JMG, whose deficits support the currently dominant model attributing to the perirhinal cortex a critical role in recognition memory. Research on recognition memory has implications for the clinician as it may help understanding the cognitive deficits observed in different diseases. An illustration of such approach, linking basic and applied research, is provided for Alzheimer's disease

  1. Anesthesia of wild red howler monkeys (Alouatta seniculus) with medetomidine/ketamine and reversal by atipamezole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vié, J C; De Thoisy, B; Fournier, P; Fournier-Chambrillon, C; Genty, C; Kéravec, J

    1998-01-01

    Wild red howler monkeys (Alouatta seniculus) were translocated during the flooding of the forest at a hydroelectric dam site in French Guiana. For a variety of minor clinical procedures, 96 monkeys were anesthetized with various intramuscular injections of combinations of medetomidine and ketamine. The howler population was composed of healthy animals (42 males and 54 females) of various ages. Medetomidine (150 micrograms/kg) associated with ketamine (4 mg/kg) gave the best results and was used on 63 animals. The injection rapidly resulted in complete immobilization with good to excellent myorelaxation. The induction stage was quiet, with absence of both corneal and pedal withdrawal reflexes in 57 animals after 2.9 +/- 1.4 min. Six animals required an additional injection. Rectal temperature and respiratory and heart rates decreased during anesthesia, whereas relative oxyhemoglobin saturation increased. One death occurred during anesthesia. One abortion and one death also occurred the day following anesthesia but were more probably a result of capture stress. Atipamezole given i.m. at a dose of five times the medetomidine dose 38.4 +/- 8.0 min after the anesthetic injection led to standing recovery in 7.1 +/- 4.5 min. Spontaneous recovery occurred in 17 animals before the atipamezole injection after an average of 30.6 +/- 9.6 min. Total recovery time was shorter in young animals. Medetomidine/ketamine induced good myorelaxation and provided considerably shortened immobilization duration, which are two notable advantages for field studies. We recommend this association for short procedures including minor surgery in red howler monkeys. PMID:9702284

  2. The Thatcher illusion in squirrel monkeys (Saimiri sciureus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakata, Ryuzaburo; Osada, Yoshihisa

    2012-07-01

    Like humans, Old World monkeys are known to use configural face processing to distinguish among individuals. The ability to recognize an individual through the perception of subtle differences in the configuration of facial features plays an important role in social cognition. To test this ability in New World monkeys, this study examined whether squirrel monkeys experience the Thatcher illusion, a measure of face processing ability in which changes in facial features are difficult to detect in an inverted face. In the experiment, the monkeys were required to distinguish between a target face and each of the three kinds of distracter faces whose features were altered to be different from those of the target. For each of the pairs of target and distracter faces, four rotation-based combinations of upright and inverted face presentations were used. The results revealed that when both faces were inverted and the eyes of the distracter face were altered by rotating them at an angle of 180° from those of the target face, the monkeys' discrimination learning was obstructed to a greater extent than it was under the other conditions. Thus, these results suggest that the squirrel monkey does experience the Thatcher illusion. Furthermore, it seems reasonable to assume that squirrel monkeys can utilize information about facial configurations in individual recognition and that this facial configuration information could be useful in their social communications. PMID:22411620

  3. Tissue tropism of simian immunodeficiency virus in rhesus monkeys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) is a T-lymphotropic lentivirus that is genetically, immunologically, and morphologically related to the human immunodeficiency viruses type 1 and 2 (HIV-1, HIV-2). In rhesus monkeys, SIV induces a progressively fatal immunodeficiency syndrome strikingly similar to human acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). The tissue and cellular tropism of SIV was determined by immunocytochemistry and in situ hybridization using a 3.48 kilobase SIV envelope gene probe labeled with biotin, 35S, or 3H. Probes labeled with 35S nonspecifically bound to tissue eosinophils and produced poor signal resolution compared to tritium labeled probes. Biotin labeled probes did not detect SIV under similar hybridization conditions. Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues produced strong hybridization signal with superior morphology compared to frozen tissues. Gastrointestinal, respiratory, and lymphoid tissues most frequently contained SIV RNA. The distribution of SIV did not correlate with sex, or viral inoculum, but was most extensive in animals with SIV induced granulomatous encephalitis. SIV was most frequently observed in lymphocytes and macrophages. In the brain focal granulomas were composed almost entirely of EBM11+, lysozyme+, macrophages which contained large amounts of SIV RNA and p27 core protein detected by the monoclonal antibody R1C7. Cells away from granulomas in the brain parenchyma and around blood vessels contained virus and were compatible with oligodendrocytes and astrocytes. Lymph nodes in follicular hyperplasia contained small numbers of SIV positive cells compatible with lymphocytes in the paracortex and mantle zones as well as in cells of the germinal center. Lymph nodes in various stages of follicular depletion with expanded paracortices contained large numbers of cells with SIV RNA in lymphocytes and macrophages

  4. Peri-infarct depolarizations during focal ischemia in the awake Spontaneously Hypertensive Rat. Minimizing anesthesia confounds in experimental stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudo, K; Zhao, L; Nowak, T S

    2016-06-14

    Anesthesia profoundly impacts peri-infarct depolarizations (PIDs), but only one prior report has described their monitoring during experimental stroke in awake animals. Since temporal patterns of PID occurrence are model specific, the current study examined PID incidence during focal ischemia in the awake Spontaneously Hypertensive Rat (SHR), and documented the impact of both prior and concurrent isoflurane anesthesia. For awake recordings, electrodes were implanted under isoflurane anesthesia 1day to 5weeks prior to occlusion surgery. Rats were then subjected to permanent or transient (2h) tandem occlusion of the middle cerebral and ipsilateral common carotid arteries, followed by PID monitoring for up to 3days. Comparison perfusion imaging studies evaluated PID-associated hyperemic transients during permanent ischemia under anesthesia at varied intervals following prior isoflurane exposure. Prior anesthesia attenuated PID number at intervals up to 1week, establishing 2weeks as a practical recovery duration following surgical preparation to avoid isoflurane preconditioning effects. PIDs in awake SHR were limited to the first 4h after permanent occlusions. Maintaining anesthesia during this interval reduced PID number, and prolonged their occurrence through several hours following anesthesia termination. Although PID number otherwise correlated with infarct size, PID suppression by anesthesia was not protective in the absence of reperfusion. PIDs persisted up to 36h after transient occlusions. These results differ markedly from the one previous report of such monitoring in awake Sprague-Dawley rats, which found an extended biphasic PID time course during 24h after both permanent and transient filament occlusions. PID occurrence closely reflects the time course of infarct progression in the respective models, and may be more useful than absolute PID number as an index of ongoing pathology. PMID:27026594

  5. Classifying Multiple Types of Hand Motions Using Electrocorticography During Intraoperative Awake Craniotomy & Seizure Monitoring Processes - Case Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao eXie

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In this work, some case studies were conducted toclassify several kinds of hand motions from electrocorticography(ECoG signals during intraoperative awake craniotomy &extraoperative seizure monitoring processes. Four subjects (P1,P2 with intractable epilepsy during seizure monitoring and P3,P4 with brain tumor during awake craniotomy participatedin the experiments. Subjects performed three types of handmotions (Grasp, Thumb-finger motion and Index-finger motioncontralateral to the motor cortex covered with ECoG electrodes.Two methods were used for signal processing. Method I:autoregressive (AR model with burg method was applied toextract features, and additional waveform length (WL featurehas been considered, finally the linear discriminative analysis(LDA was used as the classifier. Method II: stationary subspaceanalysis (SSA was applied for data preprocessing, and thecommon spatial pattern (CSP was used for feature extractionbefore LDA decoding process. Applying method I, the threeclassaccuracy of P1□P4 were 90.17%, 96.00%, 91.77% and92.95% respectively. For method II, the three-class accuracy ofP1□P4 were 72.00%, 93.17%, 95.22% and 90.36% respectively.This study verified the possibility of decoding multiple handmotion types during an awake craniotomy, which is the firststep towards dexterous neuroprosthetic control during surgicalimplantation, in order to verify the optimal placement of electrodes.The accuracy during awake craniotomy was comparableto results during seizure monitoring. This study also indicatedthat ECoG was a promising approach for precise identificationof eloquent cortex during awake craniotomy, and might forma promising BCI system that could benefit both patients andneurosurgeons.

  6. Sensory-Driven Enhancement of Calcium Signals in Individual Purkinje Cell Dendrites of Awake Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farzaneh Najafi

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Climbing fibers (CFs are thought to contribute to cerebellar plasticity and learning by triggering a large influx of dendritic calcium in the postsynaptic Purkinje cell (PC to signal the occurrence of an unexpected sensory event. However, CFs fire about once per second whether or not an event occurs, raising the question of how sensory-driven signals might be distinguished from a background of ongoing spontaneous activity. Here, we report that in PC dendrites of awake mice, CF-triggered calcium signals are enhanced when the trigger is a sensory event. In addition, we show that a large fraction of the total enhancement in each PC dendrite can be accounted for by an additional boost of calcium provided by sensory activation of a non-CF input. We suggest that sensory stimulation may modulate dendritic voltage and calcium concentration in PCs to increase the strength of plasticity signals during cerebellar learning.

  7. Cognitive outcome after awake surgery for left and right hemisphere tumours

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elke De Witte

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Awake surgery in eloquent brain regions is performed to preserve language and other cognitive functions. Although in general, no major permanent cognitive deficits are found after awake brain surgery, clinically relevant impairments are detected and cognitive recovery takes longer than generally assumed (3 months (Santini et al., 2012; Satoer et al., 2014; Talacchi et al., 2012. However, as there is a lack of extensive cognitive follow-up data it is unknown when recovery takes place. In addition, the influence of critical language sites identified by direct electrical stimulation (DES and tumour variables (e.g. left/right tumour location, tumour grade on long-term cognitive findings remains unclear. METHODS: In this longitudinal study the short-term and long-term effects of awake surgery on cognition were investigated in 40 patients (29 patients with left and 11 with right hemisphere tumours. Language, memory, attentional, executive and visuospatial functions were assessed in the preoperative phase, at short-term follow-up (6 weeks postsurgery and at long-term follow-up (6 months postsurgery with a neuropsychological protocol. In addition, the effect of intraoperative critical language sites, left/right tumour location, hemispheric language dominance, extent of resection and adjuvant treatment on cognitive change was studied. RESULTS: Both pre- and postoperatively, the mean performance of the patients was worse (impairment = z-score below -2 than the performance of the normal population in the language domain, the memory domain, the attentional and executive domain (p .05. Awake surgery negatively affected language, attentional and executive functions but not memory and visuospatial functions. At 6 weeks postsurgery, performance on all language, attentional and executive tasks deteriorated (object/action naming, semantic/phonological fluency from DuLIP, Token test; Trail Making Test A & B, Stroop I, II, & III. At 6 months

  8. Replicability and Heterogeneity of Awake Unrestrained Canine fMRI Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berns, Gregory S.; Brooks, Andrew; Spivak, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Previously, we demonstrated the possibility of fMRI in two awake and unrestrained dogs. Here, we determined the replicability and heterogeneity of these results in an additional 11 dogs for a total of 13 subjects. Based on an anatomically placed region-of-interest, we compared the caudate response to a hand signal indicating the imminent availability of a food reward to a hand signal indicating no reward. 8 of 13 dogs had a positive differential caudate response to the signal indicating reward. The mean differential caudate response was 0.09%, which was similar to a comparable human study. These results show that canine fMRI is reliable and can be done with minimal stress to the dogs. PMID:24324719

  9. Comparison of jaw muscle EMG activity in awake and sleep bruxers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Castrillon, Eduardo; Dreyer Nielsen, Patricia; Haugland, Morten;

    2015-01-01

    been proposed to have different underlying pathophysiology. Objectives: To compare the characteristics of multiple days EMG assessment of the anterior temporalis muscles between patients with self-reported awake bruxism, sleep bruxism and healthy individuals. Methods: Methods: Participants with...... significantly higher EMG activity when compared against both, healthy individuals during sleep state and possible sleep bruxers (P<0.02). Conclusions: Conclusion: This study demonstrates a remarkable high EMG activities in awaken state. Further studies will be needed to characterize the intensity and duration...... of the jaw muscle activity in different populations of self-reported bruxers and non-bruxers. Financial Interest Disclosure: Morten Haughland works for DELTA A/S that has commercial agreement with SUNSTAR that produces Grindcare (portable EMG device)...

  10. Ultrafast CT in the diagnosis of sleep apnea during awake tidal breathing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With sleep there is normally a decrease in neural output to upper airway muscles. If this decrease is superimposed on a structurally abnormal airway, then sleep apnea may result. Ultrafast CT axially images the upper airway in near real time. The authors compared 11 awake patients with sleep apnea with 24 healthy volunteers during quiet tidal breathing. They found that apneic patients have a small oropharyngeal airway (31.3 mm2 +- 30.2 vs 134.2 mm2 +- 46.6[P=<.0001]). Apneic patients also have significant collapsibility of the nasopharynx (75% +- 18% vs 27% +- 14% [P=<.0001]). Ultrafast CT gives dynamic anatomic definition of the upper airway and provides a means to eulcidate further the pathogenesis of sleep apnea

  11. Audio Classical Composer Identification by Deep Neural Network

    OpenAIRE

    Hu, Zhen; Fu, Kun; Zhang, Changshui

    2013-01-01

    Audio Classical Composer Identification (ACC) is an important problem in Music Information Retrieval (MIR) which aims at identifying the composer for audio classical music clips. The famous annual competition, Music Information Retrieval Evaluation eXchange (MIREX), also takes it as one of the four training&testing tasks. We built a hybrid model based on Deep Belief Network (DBN) and Stacked Denoising Autoencoder (SDA) to identify the composer from audio signal. As a matter of copyright, spon...

  12. A Bivariate Analogue to the Composed Product of Polynomials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Donald Mills; Kent M. Neuerburg

    2003-01-01

    The concept of a composed product for univariate polynomials has been explored extensively by Brawley, Brown, Carlitz, Gao,Mills, et al. Starting with these fundamental ideas andutilizing fractional power series representation(in particular, the Puiseux expansion) of bivariate polynomials, we generalize the univariate results. We define a bivariate composed sum,composed multiplication,and composed product (based on function composition). Further, we investigate the algebraic structure of certain classes of bivariate polynomials under these operations. We also generalize a result of Brawley and Carlitz concerningthe decomposition of polynomials into irreducibles.

  13. Analysis of the virogenes related to the rhesus monkey endogenous type C retrovirus in monkeys and apes.

    OpenAIRE

    Tainsky, M A

    1981-01-01

    Molecular hybridization studies were carried out by using a [3H]complementary DNA (cDNA) probe to compare the endogenous type C retrovirus of rhesus monkeys (MMC-1) with other known retroviruses and related sequences in various primate DNAs. The genomic RNA of the endogenous type C retrovirus of stumptail monkeys (MAC-1) was found to be highly related to the MMC-1 cDNA probe, whereas the other retroviral RNAs tested showed no homology. Related sequences were found in Old World monkey DNAs and...

  14. Alveolar Echinococcosis Infection in a Monkey (Ateles Geoffroyi In Mashhad, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Kazemi Mehrjerdi

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Alveolar echinococcosis (AE, which is caused by ingestion of eggs of the fox tapeworm Echinococcus multilocularis, is the most potentially lethal parasitic infection because of its tendency to invade and proliferate in the liver and the difficulty in treatment. This article describes a case of alveolar echinococcosis found in Ateles geoffroyi in Mashhad, Iran. The cysts were characterized as an alveolar structure, composed of numerous small vesicles in liver, abdominal cavity, retroperitoneum and lungs. A characteristic feature of these vesicles was its exogenous tumor-like proliferation. These cysts were filled with numerous protoscoleces suggesting a potential role of this monkey in cycle of transmission. Up to now, this is probably the first report of alveolar echinococcosis in A. geoffroyi in the world.

  15. Keep children away from macaque monkeys!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bréhin, Camille; Debuisson, Cécile; Mansuy, Jean-Michel; Niphuis, Henk; Buitendijk, Hester; Mengelle, Catherine; Grouteau, Erick; Claudet, Isabelle

    2016-03-01

    To warn physicians and parents about the risk of macaque bites, we present two pediatric cases (a 4-year-old boy and a 10-year-old girl) of bites sustained while on holiday. The young boy developed febrile dermohypodermitis and was hospitalized for IV antibiotic treatment. He received an initial antirabies vaccine while still in the holiday destination. Except for local wound disinfection and antibiotic ointment, the girl did not receive any specific treatment while abroad. Both were negative for simian herpes PCR. When travelling in countries or cities with endemic simian herpes virus, parents should keep children away from monkeys. Travel agencies, pediatricians and family physicians should better inform families about the zoonotic risk. PMID:26984356

  16. Sleeping sites and latrines of spider monkeys in continuous and fragmented rainforests: implications for seed dispersal and forest regeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arturo González-Zamora

    Full Text Available Spider monkeys (Ateles geoffroyi use sites composed of one or more trees for sleeping (sleeping sites and sleeping trees, respectively. Beneath these sites/trees they deposit copious amounts of dung in latrines. This behavior results in a clumped deposition pattern of seeds and nutrients that directly impacts the regeneration of tropical forests. Therefore, information on the density and spatial distribution of sleeping sites and latrines, and the characteristics (i.e., composition and structure of sleeping trees are needed to improve our understanding of the ecological significance of spider monkeys in influencing forest composition. Moreover, since primate populations are increasingly forced to inhabit fragmented landscapes, it is important to assess if these characteristics differ between continuous and fragmented forests. We assessed this novel information from eight independent spider monkey communities in the Lacandona rainforest, Mexico: four continuous forest sites and four forest fragments. Both the density of sleeping sites and latrines did not differ between forest conditions. Latrines were uniformly distributed across sleeping sites, but the spatial distribution of sleeping sites within the areas was highly variable, being particularly clumped in forest fragments. In fact, the average inter-latrine distances were almost double in continuous forest than in fragments. Latrines were located beneath only a few tree species, and these trees were larger in diameter in continuous than fragmented forests. Because latrines may represent hotspots of seedling recruitment, our results have important ecological and conservation implications. The variation in the spatial distribution of sleeping sites across the forest indicates that spider monkeys likely create a complex seed deposition pattern in space and time. However, the use of a very few tree species for sleeping could contribute to the establishment of specific vegetation associations

  17. Developmental changes of cognitive vocal control in monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hage, Steffen R; Gavrilov, Natalja; Nieder, Andreas

    2016-06-01

    The evolutionary origins of human language are obscured by the scarcity of essential linguistic characteristics in non-human primate communication systems. Volitional control of vocal utterances is one such indispensable feature of language. We investigated the ability of two monkeys to volitionally utter species-specific calls over many years. Both monkeys reliably vocalized on command during juvenile periods, but discontinued this controlled vocal behavior in adulthood. This emerging disability was confined to volitional vocal production, as the monkeys continued to vocalize spontaneously. In addition, they continued to use hand movements as instructed responses during adulthood. This greater vocal flexibility of monkeys early in ontogeny supports the neoteny hypothesis in human evolution. This suggests that linguistic capabilities were enabled via an expansion of the juvenile period during the development of humans. PMID:27252457

  18. INTERCEPTIVE EFFECTS OF EPOSTANE IN RATS AND RHESUS MONKEYS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LINZhong-Ming; LIUChang-Guan; CHENHui-Qing; LIWei-Kang; XURui-Ying

    1989-01-01

    Interceptives arc defined as agents which interrupt pregnancy after implantation.Epostane, a potent 3β-hydroxysteruid dehydrogenase inhibitor, possessed interceptive activities in rats and rhesus monkeys. In rats, day 10 and day 11 of pregnancy were the

  19. jMonkeyEngine 3.0 cookbook

    CERN Document Server

    Edén, Rickard

    2014-01-01

    If you are a jMonkey developer or a Java developer who is interested to delve further into the game making process to expand your skillset and create more technical games, then this book is perfect for you.

  20. Dissecting the mechanisms of squirrel monkey (Saimiri boliviensis social learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LM Hopper

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Although the social learning abilities of monkeys have been well documented, this research has only focused on a few species. Furthermore, of those that also incorporated dissections of social learning mechanisms, the majority studied either capuchins (Cebus apella or marmosets (Callithrix jacchus. To gain a broader understanding of how monkeys gain new skills, we tested squirrel monkeys (Saimiri boliviensis which have never been studied in tests of social learning mechanisms. To determine whether S. boliviensis can socially learn, we ran “open diffusion” tests with monkeys housed in two social groups (N = 23. Over the course of 10 20-min sessions, the monkeys in each group observed a trained group member retrieving a mealworm from a bidirectional task (the “Slide-box”. Two thirds (67% of these monkeys both learned how to operate the Slide-box and they also moved the door significantly more times in the direction modeled by the trained demonstrator than the alternative direction. To tease apart the underlying social learning mechanisms we ran a series of three control conditions with 35 squirrel monkeys that had no previous experience with the Slide-box. The first replicated the experimental open diffusion sessions but without the inclusion of a trained model, the second was a no-information control with dyads of monkeys, and the third was a ‘ghost’ display shown to individual monkeys. The first two controls tested for the importance of social support (mere presence effect and the ghost display showed the affordances of the task to the monkeys. The monkeys showed a certain level of success in the group control (54% of subjects solved the task on one or more occasions and paired controls (28% were successful but none were successful in the ghost control. We propose that the squirrel monkeys’ learning, observed in the experimental open diffusion tests, can be best described by a combination of social learning mechanisms in concert

  1. Comparison of Plasmodium falciparum infections in Panamanian and Colombian owl monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossan, R N; Harper, J S; Davidson, D E; Escajadillo, A; Christensen, H A

    1985-11-01

    Parameters of blood-induced infections of the Vietnam Oak Knoll, Vietnam Smith, and Uganda Palo Alto strains of Plasmodium falciparum studied in 395 Panamanian owl monkeys in this laboratory between 1976-1984 were compared with those reported from another laboratory for 665 Colombian owl monkeys, studied between 1968-1975, and, at the time, designated Aotus trivirgatus griseimembra. The virulence of these strains was less in Panamanian than in Colombian owl monkeys, as indicated by lower mortality rates of the Panamanian monkeys during the first 30 days of patency. Maximum parasitemias of the Vietnam Smith and Uganda Palo Alto strain, in Panamanian owl monkeys dying during the first 15 days of patent infection, were significantly higher than in Colombian owl monkeys. Panamanian owl monkeys that survived the primary attack had significantly higher maximum parasitemias than the surviving Colombian owl monkeys. Peak parasitemias were attained significantly earlier after patency in Panamanian than in Colombian owl monkeys, irrespective of the strain of P. falciparum. More Panamanian than Colombian owl monkeys evidenced self-limited infection after the primary attack of either the Vietnam Smith or Uganda Palo Alto strain. The duration of the primary attacks and recrudescences were significantly shorter in Panamanian than in Colombian owl monkeys. Mean peak parasitemias during recrudescence were usually higher in Panamanian owl monkeys than in Colombian monkeys. Differences of infection parameters were probably attributable, in part, to geographical origin of the two monkey hosts and parasite strains. PMID:3914842

  2. Performing monkeys of Bangladesh: characterizing their source and genetic variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, M Kamrul; Feeroz, M Mostafa; Jones-Engel, Lisa; Engel, Gregory A; Akhtar, Sharmin; Kanthaswamy, Sree; Smith, David Glenn

    2016-04-01

    The acquisition and training of monkeys to perform is a centuries-old tradition in South Asia, resulting in a large number of rhesus macaques kept in captivity for this purpose. The performing monkeys are reportedly collected from free-ranging populations, and may escape from their owners or may be released into other populations. In order to determine whether this tradition involving the acquisition and movement of animals has influenced the population structure of free-ranging rhesus macaques in Bangladesh, we first characterized the source of these monkeys. Biological samples from 65 performing macaques collected between January 2010 and August 2013 were analyzed for genetic variation using 716 base pairs of mitochondrial DNA. Performing monkey sequences were compared with those of free-ranging rhesus macaque populations in Bangladesh, India and Myanmar. Forty-five haplotypes with 116 (16 %) polymorphic nucleotide sites were detected among the performing monkeys. As for the free-ranging rhesus population, most of the substitutions (89 %) were transitions, and no indels (insertion/deletion) were observed. The estimate of the mean number of pair-wise differences for the performing monkey population was 10.1264 ± 4.686, compared to 14.076 ± 6.363 for the free-ranging population. Fifteen free-ranging rhesus macaque populations were identified as the source of performing monkeys in Bangladesh; several of these populations were from areas where active provisioning has resulted in a large number of macaques. The collection of performing monkeys from India was also evident. PMID:26758818

  3. The renal microvasculature of the monkey: an anatomical investigation.

    OpenAIRE

    Horacek, M J; Earle, A M; Gilmore, J. P.

    1986-01-01

    Twelve monkeys, Macaca fascicularis and Macaca mulatta, were investigated to study their renal microvasculature. After death, all monkeys were perfused with heparinised isotonic saline to flush their vascular systems. The kidneys were then perfused with silicone rubber and examined. The silicone rubber injections allowed description of afferent arterioles and several efferent vascular patterns observed in the subcapsular, midcortical, and inner cortical regions. The medullary vasculature was ...

  4. Longitudinal Analysis of Early Stage Sarcopenia in Aging Rhesus Monkeys

    OpenAIRE

    McKiernan, Susan H; Colman, Ricki; Lopez, Marisol; Beasley, T.Mark; Weindruch, Richard; Aiken, Judd M.

    2008-01-01

    We present a longitudinal study using the rhesus monkey to determine biochemical and histological changes in vastus lateralis (VL) muscle fibers and whether these changes correlate with muscle mass loss. Dual energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) was used to determine body weight, body fat and to estimate upper leg muscle mass in twelve adult male rhesus monkeys over 12 years. Muscle mass (MM) was evaluated at years six, nine and twelve of the study. Concurrently, VL muscle biopsy samples were co...

  5. Facial expression recognition in rhesus monkeys, Macaca mulatta

    OpenAIRE

    Parr, Lisa A.; Heintz, Matthew

    2009-01-01

    The ability to recognize and accurately interpret facial expressions is critically important for nonhuman primates that rely on these nonverbal signals for social communication. Despite this, little is known about how nonhuman primates, particularly monkeys, discriminate between facial expressions. In the present study, seven rhesus monkeys were required to discriminate four categories of conspecific facial expressions using a matching-to-sample task. In experiment 1, the matching pair showed...

  6. Preference transitivity and symbolic representation in capuchin monkeys (Cebus apella.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elsa Addessi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Can non-human animals comprehend and employ symbols? The most convincing empirical evidence comes from language-trained apes, but little is known about this ability in monkeys. Tokens can be regarded as symbols since they are inherently non-valuable objects that acquire an arbitrarily assigned value upon exchange with an experimenter. Recent evidence suggested that capuchin monkeys, which diverged from the human lineage 35 million years ago, can estimate, represent and combine token quantities. A fundamental and open question is whether monkeys can reason about symbols in ways similar to how they reason about real objects. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we examined this broad question in the context of economic choice behavior. Specifically, we assessed whether, in a symbolic context, capuchins' preferences satisfy transitivity--a fundamental trait of rational decision-making. Given three options A, B and C, transitivity holds true if A > or = B, B > or = C and A > or = C (where > or = indicates preference. In this study, we trained monkeys to exchange three types of tokens for three different foods. We then compared choices monkeys made between different types of tokens with choices monkeys made between the foods. Qualitatively, capuchins' preferences revealed by the way of tokens were similar to those measured with the actual foods. In particular, when choosing between tokens, monkeys displayed strict economic preferences and their choices satisfied transitivity. Quantitatively, however, values measured by the way of tokens differed systematically from those measured with the actual foods. In particular, for any pair of foods, the relative value of the preferred food increased when monkeys chose between the corresponding tokens. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results indicate that indeed capuchins are capable of treating tokens as symbols. However, as they do so, capuchins experience the cognitive burdens imposed by symbolic

  7. TRANSFERRIN: VARIATIONS IN BLOOD SERUM OF RED HOWLER MONKEYS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    SCHOEN, M A; ARENDS, T

    1964-11-01

    Blood serum samples from 33 red howler monkeys (Alouatta seniculus) were examined. Three different phenotypes were found and denominated A, B, and C. Four serums could not be classified because their transferrin apparently did not bind iron-59, possibly owing to saturation. A difference was observed in the electrophoretic migration and pattern of the transferrins in these monkeys compared with those of other primates. PMID:14197564

  8. Evaluation of Ambu® aScope™ 2 in awake nasotracheal intubation in anticipated difficult airway using conventional or facilitated technique: A randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omyma Shehata Mohamed Khalifa

    2015-10-01

    Conclusion: The aScope 2 provided a high success rate in awake nasotracheal intubation in patients with anticipated difficult airway and the use of a facilitated technique shortened the time needed to perform successful videoscopic intubation.

  9. Awake craniotomy for cortical language mapping and resection of an arteriovenous malformation adjacent to eloquent areas under general anesthesia — A hybrid approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pree Nimmannitya

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Surgery of arteriovenous malformation (AVM is sometimes challenging and carries a high risk of morbidity, especially when the AVM is located in an eloquent area of the brain. Unlike gliomas, awake craniotomy has not been widely used for resection of AVM. The authors present a case of an AVM in the left frontal lobe which was successfully removed with the aid of awake craniotomy with cortical language mapping. In conclusion, awake craniotomy for functional cortical mapping is beneficial for AVM resection, especially when the lesion is located in or adjacent to eloquent areas of the brain. A hybrid approach with functional mapping in the awake condition and AVM resection under general anesthesia may be useful in selected cases. Furthermore, en bloc resection with the nidus embedded in the brain parenchyma may be a useful means of removal to reduce operation time and intraoperative blood loss if there is no apparent functional cortex surrounding the AVM, as in the present case.

  10. Hypermedia Composing: Questions Arising from Writing in Three Dimensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garthwait, Abigail

    2001-01-01

    Observes four sixth graders composing nonfiction projects for an integrated unit on Canadian studies, using hypermedia. Ponders issues raised when students compose in hypermedia including evaluating nontraditional projects, developing a sense of audience, conventions of the medium, use of visuals to convey information, engaged students, and…

  11. Birth Location, Migration and Clustering of Important Composers: Historical Patterns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borowiecki, Karol; O’Hagan, John

    2010-01-01

    1899. This information is compiled from the large, Grove Music Online (2009) encyclopedia. There is also some discussion of the biases evident in choosing “significant” composers. The data show a marked level ofmigration of important composers going back many centuries suggesting that the phenomenon of...

  12. The Links between Handwriting and Composing for Y6 Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medwell, Jane; Strand, Steve; Wray, David

    2009-01-01

    Although handwriting is often considered a matter of presentation, a substantial body of international research suggests that the role of handwriting in children's composing has been neglected. Automaticity in handwriting is now seen as of key importance in composing but this proposition is relatively untested in the UK and the assumption has been…

  13. Frustrative nonreward and pituitary-adrenal activity in squirrel monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, D M; Fong, K D; Schrieken, N; Levine, S

    2000-12-01

    Little is known about frustration-induced changes in stress physiology in humans and nonhuman primates. Here we assess in two experiments with squirrel monkeys plasma levels of pituitary-adrenal stress hormones in conditions designed to provoke frustrative nonreward. In the first experiment 18 prepubertal monkeys were trained to feed from one of eight sites, and then tested without food at any of the sites. These monkeys responded with significant increases in cortisol and adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH). In the second experiment 18 adult monkeys were trained to feed from one of eight sites, and then tested after food was moved to a different foraging site. Nine monkeys found food at the relocated site, discontinued foraging at the previously baited site, and responded with decreases in cortisol. The other nine monkeys failed to find the relocated site, initially increased their visits to the previously baited site, and responded with elevations in cortisol and ACTH. In keeping with comparable findings in rats, our observations indicate that frustrative nonreward elicits ACTH-stimulated secretion of cortisol in primates. PMID:11239675

  14. A Time-Composable Operating System for the Patmos Processor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ziccardi, Marco; Schoeberl, Martin; Vardanega, Tullio

    2015-01-01

    -composable operating system, on top of a time-composable processor, facilitates incremental development, which is highly desirable for industry. This paper makes a twofold contribution. First, we present enhancements to the Patmos processor to allow achieving time composability at the operating system level. Second......, we extend an existing time-composable operating system, TiCOS, to make best use of advanced Patmos hardware features in the pursuit of time composability.......In the last couple of decades we have witnessed a steady growth in the complexity and widespread of real-time systems. In order to master the rising complexity in the timing behaviour of those systems, rightful attention has been given to the development of time-predictable computer architectures...

  15. Kandungan Vitamin pada Bahan Dasar MP-ASI Tepung Campuran Pisang Awak dengan Tepung Beras serta Sumbangannya Terhadap Angka Kecukupan Gizi Bayi

    OpenAIRE

    Harahap, Yunita

    2015-01-01

    The complementary feeding given to babies older than 6 months. The complementary feeding different types of materials adapted to the manufacture of the local food supply. Awak banana has one of Indonesian eminent local food that used as complementary feeding. This descriptive research aimed to know the vitamins content from mixed flour of awak banana and rice flour and the contribution of vitamins (RDA). In this research, analyzed the content of fat soluble vitamins by Ultra Performance Li...

  16. Evaluation of awake burr hole drainage for chronic subdural hematoma in geriatric patients: a retrospective analysis of 3 years

    OpenAIRE

    Serdal Albayrak; ibrahim Burak Atci; Necati Ucler; Hakan Yilmaz; Metin Kaplan

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The goal of this research was to evaluate the effectiveness of burr hole drainage under local anesthesia in geriatric patients with chronic subdural hematoma. Material and Methods: This retrospective study involved 21 geriatric patients with chronic subdural hematoma who applied to the department of neurosurgery in an education and research hospital between 2011 and 2014. Sedoanalgesia was performed on 21 patients, then awake burr hole drainage was performed after scalp and perios...

  17. Neuroplasticity to a Single-episode Traumatic Stress Revealed by Resting-state fMRI in Awake Rats

    OpenAIRE

    Liang, Zhifeng; King, Jean; Zhang, Nanyin

    2014-01-01

    Substantial evidence has suggested that the brain structures of the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and amygdala (AMYG) are implicated in the pathophysiology of stress-related disorders. However, little is known with respect to the system-level adaptation of their neural circuitries to the perturbations of traumatic stressors. By utilizing behavioral tests and an awake animal imaging approach, in the present study we non-invasively investigated the impact of single-episode predator odor expos...

  18. Formation and maintenance of ventilatory long-term facilitation require NMDA but not non-NMDA receptors in awake rats

    OpenAIRE

    McGuire, Michelle; Liu, Chun; Cao, Ying; Ling, Liming

    2008-01-01

    N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonism in the phrenic motonucleus area eliminates phrenic long-term facilitation (pLTF; a persistent augmentation of phrenic nerve activity after episodic hypoxia) in anesthetized rats. However, whether NMDA antagonism can eliminate ventilatory LTF (vLTF) in awake rats is unclear. The role of non-NMDA receptors in LTF is also unknown. Serotonin receptor antagonism before, but not after, episodic hypoxia eliminates pLTF, suggesting that serotonin recept...

  19. Awake Glidescope® intubation in a patient with a huge and fixed supraglottic mass -A case report-

    OpenAIRE

    Choi, Guen Seok; Park, Sang Il; Lee, Eun Ha; Yoon, Seok Hwa

    2010-01-01

    Intubating patients with a huge, fixed supraglottic mass causing an obstruction of the glottis is difficult to most anesthesiologists. We attempted awake fiberoptic orotracheal intubation assisted by Glidescope® Videolaryngoscope (GVL) following topical anesthesia with 4% lidocaine spray and remifentanil infusion. The glottis could not be identified by the GVL view. However, by entering toward the right side of the mass with bronchoscope, the glottis was found. Due to stiffness of the mass, w...

  20. An Approach for Composing Services Based on Environment Ontology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangjun Cai

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Service-oriented computing is revolutionizing the modern computing paradigms with its aim to boost software reuse and enable business agility. Under this paradigm, new services are fabricated by composing available services. The problem arises as how to effectively and efficiently compose heterogeneous services facing the high complexity of service composition. Based on environment ontology, this paper introduces a requirement-driven service composition approach. We propose the algorithms to decompose the requirement, the rules to deduct the relation between services, and the algorithm for composing service. The empirical results and the comparison with other services’ composition methodologies show that this approach is feasible and efficient.

  1. PLACID: un planificateur pour composer dynamiquement des Services IHM

    OpenAIRE

    Yoann, Gabillon; Gaëlle, Calvary; Humbert, Fiorino

    2014-01-01

    La Composition Dynamique de Services a pour but de composer un système interactif à partir d’un ensemble de services disponibles correspondant à des composants.Un composant est constitué d’une partie fonctionnelle et d’une partie Interface Homme-Machine (IHM). En Génie Logiciel, la grande majorité de la littérature se concentre sur la composition dynamique de services fonctionnels.Si l’on fait l’hypothèse qu’un service IHM peut aussi être composé, cela entraine une nouvelle problématique de r...

  2. Optical methods and integrated systems for brain imaging in awake, untethered animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murari, Kartikeya

    Imaging is a powerful tool for biomedical research offering non-contact and minimally or non-invasive means of investigating at multiple scales---from single molecules to large populations of cells. Imaging in awake, behaving animals is an emerging field that offers the additional advantage of being able to study physiological processes and structures in a more natural state than what is possible in tissue slices or even in anesthetized animals. To date, most imaging in awake animals has used optical fiber bundles or electrical cables to transfer signals to traditional imaging-system components. However, the fibers or cables tether the animal and greatly limit the kind and duration of animal behavior that can be studied using imaging methods. This work involves three distinct yet related approaches to fulfill the goal of imaging in unanesthetized, unrestrained animals---optical techniques for functional and structural imaging, development of novel photodetectors and the design of miniaturized imaging systems. I hypothesized that the flow within vessels might act as a contrast-enhancing agent and improve the visualization of vascular architecture using laser speckle imaging. When imaging rodent cerebral vasculature I saw a two to four fold increase in the contrast-to-noise ratios and was able to visualize 10--30% more vascular features over reflectance techniques. I designed a complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) photodetector array that was comparable in sensitivity and noise performance to cooled CCD sensors, able to image fluorescence from a single cell, while running at faster frame rates. Next, I designed an imaging system weighing under 6 grams and occupying less than 4 cm3. The system incorporated multispectral illumination, adjustable focusing optics and the high-sensitivity CMOS imager. I was able to implement a variety of optical modalities with the system and performed reflectance, fluorescence, spectroscopic and laser speckle imaging with my

  3. A comparative assessment of hand preference in captive red howler monkeys, Alouatta seniculus and yellow-breasted capuchin monkeys, Sapajus xanthosternos.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasibah Sfar

    Full Text Available There are two major theories that attempt to explain hand preference in non-human primates-the 'task complexity' theory and the 'postural origins' theory. In the present study, we proposed a third hypothesis to explain the evolutionary origin of hand preference in non-human primates, stating that it could have evolved owing to structural and functional adaptations to feeding, which we refer to as the 'niche structure' hypothesis. We attempted to explore this hypothesis by comparing hand preference across species that differ in the feeding ecology and niche structure: red howler monkeys, Alouatta seniculus and yellow-breasted capuchin monkeys, Sapajus xanthosternos. The red howler monkeys used the mouth to obtain food more frequently than the yellow-breasted capuchin monkeys. The red howler monkeys almost never reached for food presented on the opposite side of a wire mesh or inside a portable container, whereas the yellow-breasted capuchin monkeys reached for food presented in all four spatial arrangements (scattered, on the opposite side of a wire mesh, inside a suspended container, and inside a portable container. In contrast to the red howler monkeys that almost never acquired bipedal and clinging posture, the yellow-breasted capuchin monkeys acquired all five body postures (sitting, bipedal, tripedal, clinging, and hanging. Although there was no difference between the proportion of the red howler monkeys and the yellow-breasted capuchin monkeys that preferentially used one hand, the yellow-breasted capuchin monkeys exhibited an overall weaker hand preference than the red howler monkeys. Differences in hand preference diminished with the increasing complexity of the reaching-for-food tasks, i.e., the relatively more complex tasks were perceived as equally complex by both the red howler monkeys and the yellow-breasted capuchin monkeys. These findings suggest that species-specific differences in feeding ecology and niche structure can influence

  4. A comparative assessment of hand preference in captive red howler monkeys, Alouatta seniculus and yellow-breasted capuchin monkeys, Sapajus xanthosternos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sfar, Nasibah; Mangalam, Madhur; Kaumanns, Werner; Singh, Mewa

    2014-01-01

    There are two major theories that attempt to explain hand preference in non-human primates-the 'task complexity' theory and the 'postural origins' theory. In the present study, we proposed a third hypothesis to explain the evolutionary origin of hand preference in non-human primates, stating that it could have evolved owing to structural and functional adaptations to feeding, which we refer to as the 'niche structure' hypothesis. We attempted to explore this hypothesis by comparing hand preference across species that differ in the feeding ecology and niche structure: red howler monkeys, Alouatta seniculus and yellow-breasted capuchin monkeys, Sapajus xanthosternos. The red howler monkeys used the mouth to obtain food more frequently than the yellow-breasted capuchin monkeys. The red howler monkeys almost never reached for food presented on the opposite side of a wire mesh or inside a portable container, whereas the yellow-breasted capuchin monkeys reached for food presented in all four spatial arrangements (scattered, on the opposite side of a wire mesh, inside a suspended container, and inside a portable container). In contrast to the red howler monkeys that almost never acquired bipedal and clinging posture, the yellow-breasted capuchin monkeys acquired all five body postures (sitting, bipedal, tripedal, clinging, and hanging). Although there was no difference between the proportion of the red howler monkeys and the yellow-breasted capuchin monkeys that preferentially used one hand, the yellow-breasted capuchin monkeys exhibited an overall weaker hand preference than the red howler monkeys. Differences in hand preference diminished with the increasing complexity of the reaching-for-food tasks, i.e., the relatively more complex tasks were perceived as equally complex by both the red howler monkeys and the yellow-breasted capuchin monkeys. These findings suggest that species-specific differences in feeding ecology and niche structure can influence the perception of

  5. Male-directed infanticide in spider monkeys (Ateles spp.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, Sara; Di Fiore, Anthony; Champion, Jane; Pavelka, Mary Susan; Páez, Johanna; Link, Andrés

    2015-04-01

    Infanticide is considered a conspicuous expression of sexual conflict amongst mammals, including at least 35 primate species. Here we describe two suspected and one attempted case of intragroup infanticide in spider monkeys that augment five prior cases of observed or suspected infanticide in this genus. Contrary to the typical pattern of infanticide seen in most primate societies, where infants are killed by conspecifics independent of their sex, all eight cases of observed or suspected infanticide in spider monkeys have been directed toward male infants within their first weeks of life. Moreover, although data are still scant, infanticides seem to be perpetrated exclusively by adult males against infants from their own social groups and are not associated with male takeovers or a sudden rise in male dominance rank. Although the slow reproductive cycles of spider monkeys might favor the presence of infanticide because of the potential to shorten females' interbirth intervals, infanticide is nonetheless uncommon among spider monkeys, and patterns of male-directed infanticide are not yet understood. We suggest that given the potentially close genetic relationships among adult males within spider monkey groups, and the need for males to cooperate with one another in territorial interactions with other groups of related males, infanticide may be expected to occur primarily where the level of intragroup competition among males outweighs that of competition between social groups. Finally, we suggest that infanticide in spider monkeys may be more prevalent than previously thought, given that it may be difficult for observers to witness cases of infanticide or suspected infanticide that occur soon after birth in taxa that are characterized by high levels of fission-fusion dynamics. Early, undetected, male-biased infanticide could influence the composition of spider monkey groups and contribute to the female-biased adult sex ratios often reported for this genus. PMID

  6. Comparison of high-definition oscillometry -- a non-invasive technology for arterial blood pressure measurement -- with a direct invasive method using radio-telemetry in awake healthy cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martel, Eric; Egner, Beate; Brown, Scott A; King, Jonathan N; Laveissiere, Arnaud; Champeroux, Pascal; Richard, Serge

    2013-12-01

    This study compared indirect blood pressure measurements using a non-invasive method, high-definition oscillometry (HDO), with direct measurements using a radio-telemetry device in awake cats. Paired measurements partitioned to five sub-ranges were collected in six cats using both methods. The results were analysed for assessment of correlation and agreement between the two methods, taking into account all pressure ranges, and with data separated in three sub-groups, low, normal and high ranges of systolic (SBP) and diastolic (DBP) blood pressure. SBP data displayed a mean correlation coefficient of 0.92 ± 0.02 that was reduced for low SBP. The agreement level evaluated from the whole data set was high and slightly reduced for low SBP values. The mean correlation coefficient of DBP was lower than for SBP (ie, 0.81 ± 0.02). The bias for DBP between the two methods was 22.3 ± 1.6 mmHg, suggesting that HDO produced lower values than telemetry. These results suggest that HDO met the validation criteria defined by the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine consensus panel and provided a faithful measurement of SBP in conscious cats. For DBP, results suggest that HDO tended to underestimate DBP. This finding is clearly inconsistent with the good agreement reported in dogs, but is similar to outcomes achieved in marmosets and cynomolgus monkeys, suggesting that this is not related to HDO but is species related. The data support that the HDO is the first and only validated non-invasive blood pressure device and, as such, it is the only non-invasive reference technique that should be used in future validation studies. PMID:23813147

  7. Stroke, music, and creative output: Alfred Schnittke and other composers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zagvazdin, Yuri

    2015-01-01

    Alfred Schnittke (1934-1998), a celebrated Russian composer of the twentieth century, suffered from several strokes which affected his left cerebral hemisphere. The disease, however, did not diminish his musical talent. Moreover, he stated that his illness in a way facilitated his work. The composer showed amazingly high productivity after his first and second injuries of the central nervous system. The main topic of this chapter is the effect of strokes on Schnittke's output, creativity, and style of music. A brief biography of the composer with the chronology of his brain hemorrhages is included. In addition, the influence of cerebrovascular lesions on creative potential of other prominent composers such as Benjamin Britten, Jean Langlais, Vissarion Shebalin, Igor Stravinsky, and Ira Randall Thompson is discussed. PMID:25684289

  8. Achieving timing composability with measurement-based probabilistic timing analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Kosmidis, Leonidas; Quiñones Moreno, Eduardo; Abella Ferrer, Jaume; Vardanega, Tulio; Cazorla Almeida, Francisco Javier

    2013-01-01

    Probabilistic Timing Analysis (PTA) allows complex hardware acceleration features, which defeat classic timing analysis, to be used in hard real-time systems. PTA can do that because it drastically reduces intrinsic dependence on execution history. This distinctive feature is a great facilitator to time composability, which is a must for industry needing incremental development and qualification. In this paper we show how time composability is achieved in PTA-conformant systems an...

  9. Race, community, and conflict in the jazz composers guild

    OpenAIRE

    Piekut, Benjamin

    2009-01-01

    Following the success of his avant-garde festival, “The October Revolution in Jazz,” trumpeter and composer Bill Dixon founded the Jazz Composers Guild in the fall of 1964. The organization included Cecil Taylor, Sun Ra, Paul and Carla Bley, Archie Shepp, Roswell Rudd, Burton Greene, and John Tchicai, among others. One of the first significant attempts at self-determination by jazz musicians, the Guild sought to reori- ent the exploitative working conditions of the major c...

  10. New thing? Gender and sexuality in the jazz composers guild

    OpenAIRE

    Piekut, Benjamin

    2010-01-01

    Trumpeter and composer Bill Dixon founded the Jazz Composers Guild in the fall of 1964. The organization included Cecil Taylor, Sun Ra, Paul and Carla Bley, Archie Shepp, Roswell Rudd, Burton Greene, and John Tchicai, among others. The Guild’s short history was marked by conflict both within the organization and with other figures in the jazz underground, such as Amiri Baraka. Scholarship has explained these conflicts in terms of race and class, overlooking a hidden history of gender and sexu...

  11. A novel approach to automatic music composing: Using genetic algorithm

    OpenAIRE

    Daylamani Zad, Damon; Araabi, Babak N.; Lucas, Caru

    2006-01-01

    Artificial music composition is one of the ever rising problems of computer science. Genetic Algorithm has been one of the most useful means in our hands to solve optimization problems. By use of precise assumptions and adequate fitness function it is possible to change the music composing into an optimization problem. This paper proposes a new genetic algorithm for composing music. Considering entropy of the notes distribution as a factor of fitness function and developing mutation and cross...

  12. Concentric scheme of monkey auditory cortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosaki, Hiroko; Saunders, Richard C.; Mishkin, Mortimer

    2003-04-01

    The cytoarchitecture of the rhesus monkey's auditory cortex was examined using immunocytochemical staining with parvalbumin, calbindin-D28K, and SMI32, as well as staining for cytochrome oxidase (CO). The results suggest that Kaas and Hackett's scheme of the auditory cortices can be extended to include five concentric rings surrounding an inner core. The inner core, containing areas A1 and R, is the most densely stained with parvalbumin and CO and can be separated on the basis of laminar patterns of SMI32 staining into lateral and medial subdivisions. From the inner core to the fifth (outermost) ring, parvalbumin staining gradually decreases and calbindin staining gradually increases. The first ring corresponds to Kaas and Hackett's auditory belt, and the second, to their parabelt. SMI32 staining revealed a clear border between these two. Rings 2 through 5 extend laterally into the dorsal bank of the superior temporal sulcus. The results also suggest that the rostral tip of the outermost ring adjoins the rostroventral part of the insula (area Pro) and the temporal pole, while the caudal tip adjoins the ventral part of area 7a.

  13. Microsatellite polymorphisms of Sichuan golden monkeys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PAN Deng; LI Ying; HU Hongxing; MENG Shijie; MEN Zhengrning; FU Yunxin; ZHANG Yaping

    2005-01-01

    Previous study using protein electrophoresis shows no polymorphism in 44 nuclear loci of Sichuan golden monkey (Rhinopithecus roxellana), which limits our understandings of its population genetic patterns in the nuclear genome. In order to obtain sufficient information, we scanned 14 microsatellite loci in a sample of 32 individuals from its three major habitats (Minshan, Qinling and Shennongjia). A considerable amount of polymorphisms were detected. The average heterozygosities in the local populations were all above 0.5. The differentiations among local populations were significant. There was evidence of geneflow among subpopulations, but geneflow between Qinling and Shennongjia local populations was the weakest. Minshan and Qinling populations might have gone through recent bottlenecks. The estimation of the ratio of the effective population sizes among local populations was close to that from census sizes. Comparisons to available mitochondria data suggested that R. roxellana's social structures played an important role in shaping its population genetic patterns. Our study showed that the polymorphism level of R. roxellana was no higher than other endangered species; therefore, measures should be taken to preserve genetic diversity of this species.

  14. Patterns of mineral lick visitation by spider monkeys and howler monkeys in Amazonia: are licks perceived as risky areas?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Link, Andres; Galvis, Nelson; Fleming, Erin; Di Fiore, Anthony

    2011-04-01

    Mineral licks--also known as "salados," "saladeros," or "collpas"--are specific sites in tropical and temperate ecosystems where a large diversity of mammals and birds come regularly to feed on soil. Although the reasons for vertebrate geophagy are not completely understood, animals are argued to obtain a variety of nutritional and health benefits from the ingestion of soil at mineral licks. We studied the temporal patterns of mineral lick use by white-bellied spider monkey (Ateles belzebuth) and red howler monkey (Alouatta seniculus) in a lowland rain forest in Amazonian Ecuador. Using camera and video traps at four different mineral licks, combined with behavioral follows of one group of spider monkeys, we documented rates of mineral lick visitation by both primate species and the relative frequency and intensity of mineral lick use by spider monkeys. On the basis of 1,612 days and 888 nights of mineral lick monitoring, we found that A. belzebuth and A. seniculus both visit mineral licks frequently throughout the year (on average ∼14% of days for both species), and mineral lick visitation was influenced by short-term environmental conditions (e.g. sunny and dry weather). For spider monkeys, the area surrounding the lick was also the most frequently and most intensively used region within the group's home range. The fact that spider monkeys spent long periods at the lick area before coming to the ground to obtain soil, and the fact that both species visited the lick preferentially during dry sunny conditions (when predator detectability is presumed to be relatively high) and visited simultaneously more often than expected by chance, together suggest that licks are indeed perceived as risky areas by these primates. We suggest that howler and spider monkeys employ behavioral strategies aimed at minimizing the probability of predation while visiting the forest floor at risky mineral lick sites. PMID:21328597

  15. Masking and scrambling in the auditory thalamus of awake rats by Gaussian and modulated noises.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Eugene M; West, Morris F; Bedenbaugh, Purvis H

    2004-10-12

    This paper provides a look at how modulated broad-band noises modulate the thalamic response evoked by brief probe sounds in the awake animal. We demonstrate that noise not only attenuates the response to probe sounds (masking) but also changes the temporal response pattern (scrambling). Two brief probe sounds, a Gaussian noise burst and a brief sinusoidal tone, were presented in silence and in three ongoing noises. The three noises were targeted at activating the auditory system in qualitatively distinct ways. Dynamic ripple noise, containing many random tone-like elements, is targeted at those parts of the auditory system that respond well to tones. International Collegium of Rehabilitative Audiology noise, comprised of the sum of several simultaneous streams of Schroeder-phase speech, is targeted at those parts of the auditory system that respond well to modulated sounds but lack a well defined response to tones. Gaussian noise is targeted at those parts of the auditory system that respond to acoustic energy regardless of modulation. All noises both attenuated and decreased the precise temporal repeatability of the onset response to probe sounds. In addition, the modulated noises induced context-specific changes in the temporal pattern of the response to probe sounds. Scrambling of the temporal response pattern may be a direct neural correlate of the unfortunate experience of being able to hear, but not understand, speech sounds in noisy environments. PMID:15452349

  16. Plasmodium simium/Plasmodium vivax infections in southern brown howler monkeys from the Atlantic Forest

    OpenAIRE

    Daniela Camargos Costa; Vanessa Pecini da Cunha; Gabriela Maria Pereira de Assis; Júlio César de Souza Junior; Zelinda Maria Braga Hirano; Mércia Eliane de Arruda; Flora Satiko Kano; Luzia Helena Carvalho; Cristiana Ferreira Alves de Brito

    2014-01-01

    Blood infection by the simian parasite, Plasmodium simium, was identified in captive (n = 45, 4.4%) and in wild Alouatta clamitans monkeys (n = 20, 35%) from the Atlantic Forest of southern Brazil. A single malaria infection was symptomatic and the monkey presented clinical and haematological alterations. A high frequency of Plasmodium vivax-specific antibodies was detected among these monkeys, with 87% of the monkeys testing positive against P. vivax antigens. These findings highlight the po...

  17. The renal vascular system of the monkey: a gross anatomical description.

    OpenAIRE

    Horacek, M J; Earle, A M; Gilmore, J. P.

    1987-01-01

    This study was conducted on two species of monkeys, Macaca fascicularis and Macaca mulatta, to describe their gross renal vascular morphology. After death, twelve monkeys were perfused with isotonic saline to flush their vascular systems. The monkeys were then perfused either with latex or methyl methacrylate, or both, one into the arterial and the other into the venous system. The results indicated that there were six to eight arterial segments in the monkey kidney, each supplied by a segmen...

  18. Endocrine responses in the rhesus monkey during acute cold exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lotz, W.G.; Saxton, J.L. (Naval Aerospace Medical Research Lab., Pensacola, FL (United States))

    1991-03-11

    The authors studied five young male rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta), 3.4 to 6.7 kg, to determine the relationship between fluid balance hormones and urine production during acute, dry cold exposure. Each monkey served as its own control in duplicate experimental sessions at 6C or 26C. A 6-h experimental session consisted of 120 min equilibration at 26C, 120 min experimental exposure, and 120 min recovery at 26C. Urinary and venous catheters were inserted on the morning of a session. Rectal (Tre) and skin temperatures were monitored continuously. Blood samples were taken at 0, 30, 60 and 120 min of exposure, and at 60 min postexposure. Plasma was analyzed for arginine vasopressin (AVP), atrial natriuretic factor (ANF), plasma renin activity (PRA), plasma aldosterone (PA), and osmolality. Urine samples were analyzed for osmolality, electrolytes, and creatinine. Mean Tre was 1.6C lower after 120 min at 6C than at 26C. Urine volume and osmolality were not altered by cold exposure, as they are in humans and rats. Vasopressin and PA increased sharply, with mean plasma levels in monkeys exposed to cold more than threefold and tenfold, respectively, the levels in monkeys exposed at 26C. In contrast, ANF, PRA, and plasma osmolality were not significantly changed by cold exposure. The absence of a cold-induced diuresis in the monkey may be related to the marked increase in plasma AVP level.

  19. Responses of squirrel monkeys to their experimentally modified mobbing calls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fichtel, Claudia; Hammerschmidt, Kurt

    2003-05-01

    Previous acoustic analyses suggested emotion-correlated changes in the acoustic structure of squirrel monkey (Saimiri sciureus) vocalizations. Specifically, calls given in aversive contexts were characterized by an upward shift in frequencies, often accompanied by an increase in amplitude. In order to test whether changes in frequencies or amplitude are indeed relevant for conspecific listeners, playback experiments were conducted in which either frequencies or amplitude of mobbing calls were modified. Latency and first orienting response were measured in playback experiments with six adult squirrel monkeys. After broadcasting yaps with increased frequencies or amplitude, squirrel monkeys showed a longer orienting response towards the speaker than after the corresponding control stimuli. Furthermore, after broadcasting yaps with decreased frequencies or amplitude, squirrel monkeys showed a shorter orienting response towards the speaker than after the corresponding manipulated calls with higher frequencies or amplitude. These results suggest that changes in frequencies or amplitude were perceived by squirrel monkeys, indicating that the relationship between call structure and the underlying affective state of the caller agreed with the listener's assessment of the calls. However, a simultaneous increase in frequencies and amplitude did not lead to an enhanced response, compared to each single parameter. Thus, from the receiver's perspective, both call parameters may mutually replace each other.

  20. Chronic experimental infection by Trypanosoma cruzi in Cebus apella monkeys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Riarte

    1995-12-01

    Full Text Available Twenty young male Cebus apella monkeys were infected with CAl Trypanosoma cruzi strain and reinfected with CA l or Tulahuen T.cruzi strains, with different doses and parasite source. Subpatent parasitemia was usually demonstrated in acute and chronic phases. Patent parasitemia was evident in one monkey in the acute phase and in four of them in the chronic phase after re-inoculations with high doses of CAl strain. Serological conversion was observed in all monkeys; titers were low, regardless of the methods used to investigate anti-T. cruzi specific antibodies. Higher titers were induced only when re-inoculations were perfomed with the virulent Tulahuén strain or high doses of CAl strain. Clinical electrocardiographic and ajmaline test evaluations did not reveal changes between infected and control monkeys. Histopathologically, cardiac lesions were always characterized by focal or multifocal mononuclear infiltrates and/or isolated fibrosis, as seen during the acute and chronic phases; neither amastigote nests nor active inflammation and fibrogenic processes characteristic of human acute and chronic myocarditis respectively, were observed. These morphological aspects more closely resemble those found in the "indeterminate phase" and contrast with the more diffuse and progressive pattern of the human chagasic myocarditis. All monkeys survived and no mortality was observed.

  1. Unrecognized "AIDS" in Monkeys, 1969-1980: Explanations and Implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammett, Theodore M; Bronson, Roderick T

    2016-06-01

    AIDS was recognized in humans in 1981 and a simian form was described in the years 1983 to 1985. However, beginning in the late 1960s, outbreaks of opportunistic infections of AIDS were seen in monkeys in the United States. This apparent syndrome went unrecognized at the time. We have assembled those early cases in monkeys and offer reasons why they did not result in earlier recognition of simian or human AIDS, including weaknesses in understanding disease mechanisms, absence of evidence of human retroviruses, and a climate of opinion that devalued investigation of infectious disease and immunologic origins of disease. The "epistemological obstacle" explains important elements of this history in that misconceptions blocked understanding of the dependent relationship among viral infection, immunodeficiency, and opportunistic diseases. Had clearer understanding of the evidence from monkeys allowed human AIDS to be recognized earlier, life-saving prevention and treatment interventions might have been implemented sooner. PMID:27077355

  2. A more consistent intraluminal rhesus monkey model of ischemic stroke

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bo Zhao; Fauzia Akbary; Shengli Li; Jing Lu; Feng Ling; Xunming Ji; Guowei Shang; Jian Chen; Xiaokun Geng; Xin Ye; Guoxun Xu; Ju Wang; Jiasheng Zheng; Hongjun Li

    2014-01-01

    Endovascular surgery is advantageous in experimentally induced ischemic stroke because it causes fewer cranial traumatic lesions than invasive surgery and can closely mimic the pathophysiol-ogy in stroke patients. However, the outcomes are highly variable, which limits the accuracy of evaluations of ischemic stroke studies. In this study, eight healthy adult rhesus monkeys were randomized into two groups with four monkeys in each group:middle cerebral artery occlusion at origin segment (M1) and middle cerebral artery occlusion at M2 segment. The blood lfow in the middle cerebral artery was blocked completely for 2 hours using the endovascular microcoil placement technique (1 mm × 10 cm) (undetachable), to establish a model of cerebral ischemia. The microcoil was withdrawn and the middle cerebral artery blood lfow was restored. A revers-ible middle cerebral artery occlusion model was identiifed by hematoxylin-eosin staining, digital subtraction angiography, magnetic resonance angiography, magnetic resonance imaging, and neurological evaluation. The results showed that the middle cerebral artery occlusion model was successfully established in eight adult healthy rhesus monkeys, and ischemic lesions were apparent in the brain tissue of rhesus monkeys at 24 hours after occlusion. The rhesus monkeys had symp-toms of neurological deifcits. Compared with the M1 occlusion group, the M2 occlusion group had lower infarction volume and higher neurological scores. These experimental ifndings indicate that reversible middle cerebral artery occlusion can be produced with the endovascular microcoil technique in rhesus monkeys. The M2 occluded model had less infarction and less neurological impairment, which offers the potential for application in the ifeld of brain injury research.

  3. Molecular systematics and biogeography of the Neotropical monkey genus, Alouatta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortés-Ortiz, L; Bermingham, E; Rico, C; Rodríguez-Luna, E; Sampaio, I; Ruiz-García, M

    2003-01-01

    We take advantage of the broad distribution of howler monkeys from Mexico to Argentina to provide a historical biogeographical analysis on a regional scale that encompasses the entire Neotropics. The phylogenetic relationships among 9 of the 10 recognized Alouatta species were inferred using three mitochondrial and two nuclear genes. The nuclear gene regions provided no phylogenetic resolution among howler monkey species, and were characterized by very low levels of sequence divergence between Alouatta and the Ateles outgroup. The mtDNA genes, on the other hand, produced a well-resolved phylogeny, which indicated that the earliest split among howler monkeys separated cis- and trans-Andean clades. Eight monophyletic mtDNA haplotype clades were identified, representing six named species in South America, including Alouatta seniculus, Alouatta sara, Alouatta macconelli, Alouatta caraya, Alouatta belzebul, and Alouatta guariba, and two in Mesoamerica, Alouatta pigra and Alouatta palliata. Molecular clock-based estimates of branching times indicated that contemporary howler monkey species originated in the late Miocene and Pliocene, not the Pleistocene. The causes of Alouatta diversification were more difficult to pin down, although we posit that the initial cis-, trans-Andean split in the genus was caused by the late Miocene completion of the northern Andes. Riverine barriers to dispersal and putative forest refuges can neither be discounted nor distinguished as causes of speciation in many cases, and one, the other or both have likely played a role in the diversification of South American howler monkeys. Finally, we estimated the separation of Mesoamerican A. pigra and A. palliata at 3Ma, which corresponds to the completion date of the Panama Isthmus promoting a role for this earth history event in the speciation of Central American howler monkeys. PMID:12470939

  4. Genomic diversity and evolution of papillomaviruses in rhesus monkeys.

    OpenAIRE

    Chan, S. Y.; Bernard, H U; Ratterree, M.; Birkebak, T A; Faras, A J; Ostrow, R S

    1997-01-01

    We are studying the diversity of and relationships among papillomaviruses (PVs) to understand the modes and timescales of PV evolution and in the hope of finding animal PVs that may serve as model systems for disease caused by human PVs (HPVs). Toward this goal, we have examined 326 genital samples from rhesus monkeys and long-tailed macaques with a PCR protocol optimized for detecting genital HPV types. In 28 of the rhesus monkey samples, we found amplicons derived from 12 different and nove...

  5. Virulence of Avian Influenza A Viruses for Squirrel Monkeys

    OpenAIRE

    Murphy, Brian R.; Hinshaw, Virginia S.; Sly, D. Lewis; London, William T.; Hosier, Nanette T.; Wood, Frank T.; Webster, Robert G.; Chanock, Robert M.

    1982-01-01

    Ten serologically distinct avian influenza A viruses were administered to squirrel monkeys and hamsters to compare their replication and virulence with those of human influenza A virus, A/Udorn/307/72 (H3N2). In squirrel monkeys, the 10 avian influenza A viruses exhibited a spectrum of replication and virulence. The levels of virus replication and clinical response were closely correlated. Two viruses, A/Mallard/NY/6874/78 (H3N2) and A/Pintail/Alb/121/79 (H7N8), resembled the human virus in t...

  6. "Zeroing" in on mathematics in the monkey brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beran, Michael J

    2016-03-01

    A new study documented that monkeys showed selective neuronal responding to the concept of zero during a numerical task, and that there were two distinct classes of neurons that coded the absence of stimuli either through a discrete activation pattern (zero or not zero) or a continuous one for which zero was integrated with other numerosities in the relative rate of activity. These data indicate that monkeys, like humans, have a concept of zero that is part of their analog number line but that also may have unique properties compared to other numerosities. PMID:26494578

  7. Reproductive function of monkeys subjected to chronic irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marked functional disorders have been detected in reproductive glands of eight female monkeys (as compared to twelve control animals) subjected to protracted (up to eight years) irradiation (cumulative doses 826-3282 R). Irradiated monkeys exhibited a drastically decreased reproductive capacity, early menopause and sterility. Irradiation of preadolescent animals inhibited, in most cases, the puberty processes and disturbed sex cycles. Structural disorders in sex glands, inhibition of the processes of maturation and ovulation of folloculi, death of the mass of germ cells, atypical vegetations of the integmentary epithelium, sclerosing and cystic degeneration of the glandular tissue have been revealed

  8. Universally composable protocols with relaxed set-up assumptions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barak, Boaz; Canetti, Ran; Nielsen, Jesper Buus;

    2004-01-01

    A desirable goal for cryptographic protocols is to guarantee security when the protocol is composed with other protocol instances. Universally composable (UC) protocols provide this guarantee in a strong sense: A protocol remains secure even when composed concurrently with an unbounded number of......-defined distribution. Furthermore, carrying out many interesting tasks in a UC manner and without honest majority or set-up assumptions is impossible, even if ideally authenticated communication is provided. A natural question is thus whether there exist more relaxed set-up assumptions than the CRS model that still...... allow for UC protocols. We answer this question in the affirmative: we propose alternative and relaxed set-up assumptions and show that they suffice for reproducing the general feasibility results for UC protocols in the CRS model. These alternative assumptions have the flavor of a "public...

  9. XVII CENTURY TURKISH DIVAN POETS WHOSE WORKS HAVE BEEN COMPOSED

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Nuri PARMAKSIZ

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Classical Turkish poetry and classical Turkish music have been inseparable art branches for centuries. The best examples of music and poems created in the same periods have been the most prominent proof of this. One of these periods without doubt have been 17th century. It has been observed that composers demand divan poetry of 17thand 18thcentury greatly. Mystical poems constitute most of the poems composed in these centuries. Almost all of the poems in the divans of some mystic divan poets have been composed. In this study, the poets in the mentioned century have been determined and then the poems in the new and previous repertoires of these poets have been tried to reveal with screening and comparasion methods .

  10. Composed planar Hall effect sensors with dual-mode operation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladislav Mor

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available We present a composed planar Hall effect sensor with two modes of operation: (a an ON mode where the composed sensor responds to magnetic field excitations similarly to the response of a regular planar Hall effect sensor, and (b an OFF mode where the response is negligible. The composed planar Hall effect sensor switches from the OFF mode to the ON mode when it is exposed to a magnetic field which exceeds a certain threshold determined by the sensor design. The features of this sensor make it useful as a switch triggered by magnetic field and as a sensing device with memory, as its mode of operation indicates exposure to a magnetic field larger than a certain threshold without the need to be activated during the exposure itself.

  11. Adaptation of the Panama II strain of Plasmodium falciparum to Panamanian owl monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossan, R N; Baerg, D C

    1987-09-01

    The Panama II strain of Plasmodium falciparum, acquired at the second passage level in splenectomized Colombian owl monkeys, was adapted to owl monkeys of Panamanian origin. Patent infections were induced in 22 of 27 unaltered and 20 of 21 splenectomized recipients during 19 serial passages. The infections were significantly more virulent in splenectomized than normal Panamanian owl monkeys, however recrudescences in seven normal monkeys achieved peak parasitemias 48 times greater than in the primary attack. These results describe the first reproducible infections of indigenous falciparum malaria in Panamanian owl monkeys. PMID:3310680

  12. Nicotine effects on regional cerebral blood flow in awake, resting tobacco smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domino, E F; Minoshima, S; Guthrie, S; Ohl, L; Ni, L; Koeppe, R A; Zubieta, J K

    2000-12-01

    The hypothesis for this research was that regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) would increase following nasal nicotine administration to overnight abstinent tobacco smokers in relationship to the known brain distribution of nicotinic cholinergic receptors (nAChRs). Nine male and nine female healthy adult smokers were studied. They abstained overnight from tobacco products for 10 or more hours prior to study the next morning. Nicotine nasal spray was given in doses of 1-2.5 mg total with half in each nostril while the subject was awake and resting in a supine position. Oleoresin of pepper solution in a similar volume was used as an active placebo to control for the irritating effects of nicotine. Both substances were given single blind to the subjects. Positron emission tomography (PET) with H(2)(15)O was used to measure rCBF. The data from each subject volunteer were normalized to global activity to better assess regional brain changes. Both nasal nicotine and pepper spray produced similar increases in CBF in somesthetic area II, consistent with the irritant effects of both substances. The mean rCBF effects of nasal pepper were subtracted from those of nasal nicotine to determine the actions of nicotine alone. The latter produced increases in rCBF in the thalamus, pons, Brodman area 17 of the visual cortex, and cerebellum. Some brain areas that contain a large number of nAChRs, such as the thalamus, showed an increase in CBF. Other areas that have few nAChRs, such as the cerebellum, also showed an increase in relative CBF. The hippocampal/parahippocampal areas showed greater regional decreases (left) and lesser increases (right) in CBF that correlated with the increase in plasma arterial nicotine concentrations. The results obtained indicate complex primary and secondary effects of nicotine in which only some regional brain CBF changes correlate with the known distribution of nAChR. No gender differences were noted. PMID:11020234

  13. Distinct BOLD activation profiles following central and peripheral oxytocin administration in awake rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Craig F Ferris

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available A growing body of literature has suggested that intranasal oxytocin (OT or other systemic routes of administration can alter prosocial behavior, presumably by directly activating OT sensitive neural circuits in the brain. Yet there is no clear evidence that OT given peripherally can cross the blood-brain-barrier at levels sufficient to engage the OT receptor. To address this issue we examined changes in blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD signal intensity in response to peripheral OT injections (0.1, 0.5 or 2.5 mg/kg during functional magnetic resonance (fMRI in awake rats imaged at 7.0 tesla. These data were compared to OT (1ug/5 µl given directly to the brain via the lateral cerebroventricle. Using a 3D annotated MRI atlas of the rat brain segmented into 171 brain areas and computational analysis we reconstructed the distributed integrated neural circuits identified with BOLD fMRI following central and peripheral OT. Both routes of administration caused significant changes in BOLD signal within the first 10 min of administration. As expected, central OT activated a majority of brain areas known to express a high density of OT receptors e.g., lateral septum, subiculum, shell of the accumbens, bed nucleus of the stria terminalis. This profile of activation was not matched by peripheral OT. The change in BOLD signal to peripheral OT did not show any discernible dose-response. Interestingly, peripheral OT affected all subdivisions of the olfactory bulb, in addition to the cerebellum and several brainstem areas relevant to the autonomic nervous system, including the solitary tract nucleus. The results from this imaging study do not support a direct central action of peripheral OT on the brain. Instead, the patterns of brain activity suggest that peripheral OT may interact at the level of the olfactory bulb and through sensory afferents from the autonomic nervous system to influence brain activity.

  14. Awake reactivation of emotional memory traces through hippocampal-neocortical interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Voogd, Lycia D; Fernández, Guillén; Hermans, Erno J

    2016-07-01

    Emotionally arousing experiences are typically well remembered not only due to immediate effects at encoding, but also through further strengthening of subsequent consolidation processes. A large body of research shows how neuromodulatory systems promote synaptic consolidation. However, how emotionally arousing experiences alter systems-level interactions, presumably a consequence of modifications at a synaptic level, remains unclear. Animal models predict that memory traces are maintained by spontaneous reactivations across hippocampal-neocortical circuits during "offline" periods such as post-learning rest, and suggest this might be stronger for emotional memories. The present study was designed to test this hypothesis in humans using functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Participants underwent a two-category localizer paradigm followed by a categorical differential delay fear conditioning paradigm interleaved with blocks of awake rest. Counterbalanced across participants, exemplars of one category (CS+), but not the other (CS-), were paired with mild electrical shocks. Fear recall (differential conditioned pupil dilation) was tested 24h later. Analyses of the localizer paradigm replicate earlier work showing category-specific response patterns in neocortical higher-order visual regions. Critically, we show that during post-learning rest, spontaneous reactivation of these neocortical patterns was stronger for the CS+ than the CS- category. Furthermore, hippocampal connectivity with the regions exhibiting these reactivations predicted strength of fear recall 24h later. We conclude that emotional arousal during learning promotes spontaneous post-learning reactivation of neocortical representations of recent experiences, which leads to better memory when coinciding with hippocampal connectivity. Our findings reveal a systems-level mechanism that may explain the persistence of long-term memory for emotional experiences. PMID:27095308

  15. Ventilatory stability to transient CO2 disturbances in hyperoxia and normoxia in awake humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, J; Bruce, E N

    1997-08-01

    Modarreszadeh and Bruce (J. Appl. Physiol. 76: 2765-2775, 1994) proposed that continuous random disturbances in arterial PCO2 are more likely to elicit ventilatory oscillation patterns that mimic periodic breathing in normoxia than in hyperoxia. To test this hypothesis experimentally, in nine awake humans we applied pseudorandom binary inspired CO2 fraction stimulation in normoxia and hyperoxia to derive the closed-loop and open-loop ventilatory responses to a brief CO2 disturbance in terms of impulse responses and transfer functions. The closed-loop impulse response has a significantly higher peak value [0.143 +/- 0.071 vs. 0.079 +/- 0.034 (SD) l . min-1 . 0.01 l CO2-1, P = 0.014] and a significantly shorter 50% response duration (42.7 +/- 13.3 vs. 72.3 +/- 27.6 s, P = 0.020) in normoxia than in hyperoxia. Therefore, the ventilatory responses to transient CO2 disturbances are less damped (but generally not oscillatory) in normoxia than in hyperoxia. For the closed-loop transfer function, the gain in normoxia increased significantly (P < 0.0005), while phase delay decreased significantly (P < 0.0005). The gain increased by 108.5, 186.0, and 240.6%, while phase delay decreased by 26.0, 18.1, and 17.3%, at 0. 01, 0.03, and 0.05 Hz, respectively. Changes in the same direction were found for the open-loop system. Generally, an oscillatory ventilatory response to a small transient CO2 disturbance is unlikely during wakefulness. However, changes in parameters that lead to additional increases in chemoreflex loop gain are more likely to initiate oscillations in normoxia than in hyperoxia. PMID:9262442

  16. Metabolism of plasma-derived B-methyl-heptadecanoic acid in adult, awake rat brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors have determined the utilization of [1-14C]-3-methyl-heptadecanoic acid (BHM), a beta-methyl fatty acid analog considered unable to undergo beta-oxidation, by brain in awake, 3 month-old Fischer-344 rats. BMH purity, structure, and mass were verified by TLC, NMR, and EI-MS. The distribution of radioactivity between CO2, water-soluble metabolites, lipids, and proteins was measured in plasma and brain after an intravenous bolus administration. Plasma radioactivity decreased rapidly within 20 min after injection, whereas the proportion of plasma 14CO2 increased to represent 20% of plasma radioactivity from 10-20 min, 6% at 1 h, and less thereafter. Total brain radioactivity peaked at 45 min, and decreased by 50% at 4 h and by 70% at 48 h. The proportion of label in the lipid fraction initially declined very rapidly, representing only 15% of total brain radioactivity at 1 h with 70 and 15% in the water-soluble and protein fractions. However, by 4 h, the lipid, protein, and aqueous compartments contained 30, 25, and 45% of the brain label, respectively, and 50, 35, and 15% at 48 h. Amino acids comprised most of the water-soluble radioactivity, with the combined glutamate and glutamine pools containing 60-70% of the aqueous label from 5 min to 6 h. Therefore, in addition to being incorporated into brain lipids, significant oxidation of BMH occurred, labelling brain amino acids and proteins, such that the decrease in brain radioactivity primarily represents decreasing water-soluble radioactivity

  17. Cerebral metabolism of plasma [14C]palmitate in awake, adult rat: subcellular localization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Following intravenous injection of [U-14C]palmitate in awake adult rats, whole brain radioactivity reached a broad maximum between 15-60 min, then declined rapidly to reach a relatively stable level between 4 hr and 20 hr. At 44 hr total radioactivity was 57% of the 4 hr value (p less than 0.05). About 50% of palmitate which entered the brain from the blood was oxidized rapidly, producing 14C-labeled water-soluble components which later left the cytosol. Radioactivity in the cytosolic fraction peaked at 45 min and then declined, coincident with the decline in total brain radioactivity. Membrane fractions were rapidly labeled to levels which remained relatively stable from 1 to 44 hr. Increases in the relative distributions of radioactivity were seen between 1 and 4 hr for the microsomal and mitochondrial fractions, and beyond 4 hr for the synaptic and myelin membrane fractions (p less than 0.05). Radioactivity in membrane fractions was 80-90% lipid, 5-13% water-soluble components and 3-17% protein. The proportion of label in membrane-associated protein increased with time. Proportions of radioactivity in the combined membrane fractions increased from 65% to 76% to 80% at 4, 20 and 44 hr, respectively. The results show that plasma-derived palmitate enters oxidative and synthetic pathways to an equal extent, immediately after entry into the brain. At and after 4 hr, the radiolabel resides predominantly in stable membrane lipids and protein. Brain radioactivity at 4 hr can be used therefore, to examine incorporation of palmitate into lipids in vivo, in different experimental conditions

  18. Measurement of Electroretinograms and Visually Evoked Potentials in Awake Moving Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomiyama, Yusuke; Fujita, Kosuke; Nishiguchi, Koji M; Tokashiki, Naoyuki; Daigaku, Reiko; Tabata, Kitako; Sugano, Eriko; Tomita, Hiroshi; Nakazawa, Toru

    2016-01-01

    The development of new treatments for intractable retinal diseases requires reliable functional assessment tools for animal models. In vivo measurements of neural activity within visual pathways, including electroretinogram (ERG) and visually evoked potential (VEP) recordings, are commonly used for such purposes. In mice, the ERG and VEPs are usually recorded under general anesthesia, a state that may alter sensory transduction and neurotransmission, but seldom in awake freely moving mice. Therefore, it remains unknown whether the electrophysiological assessment of anesthetized mice accurately reflects the physiological function of the visual pathway. Herein, we describe a novel method to record the ERG and VEPs simultaneously in freely moving mice by immobilizing the head using a custom-built restraining device and placing a rotatable cylinder underneath to allow free running or walking during recording. Injection of the commonly used anesthetic mixture xylazine plus ketamine increased and delayed ERG oscillatory potentials by an average of 67.5% and 36.3%, respectively, compared to unanesthetized mice, while having minimal effects on the a-wave and b-wave. Similarly, components of the VEP were enhanced and delayed by up to 300.2% and 39.3%, respectively, in anesthetized mice. Our method for electrophysiological recording in conscious mice is a sensitive and robust means to assess visual function. It uses a conventional electrophysiological recording system and a simple platform that can be built in any laboratory at low cost. Measurements using this method provide objective indices of mouse visual function with high precision and stability, unaffected by anesthetics. PMID:27257864

  19. Neuropeptides in the posterodorsal medial amygdala modulate central cardiovascular reflex responses in awake male rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The rat posterodorsal medial amygdala (MePD) links emotionally charged sensory stimuli to social behavior, and is part of the supramedullary control of the cardiovascular system. We studied the effects of microinjections of neuroactive peptides markedly found in the MePD, namely oxytocin (OT, 10 ng and 25 pg; n=6/group), somatostatin (SST, 1 and 0.05 μM; n=8 and 5, respectively), and angiotensin II (Ang II, 50 pmol and 50 fmol; n=7/group), on basal cardiovascular activity and on baroreflex- and chemoreflex-mediated responses in awake adult male rats. Power spectral and symbolic analyses were applied to pulse interval and systolic arterial pressure series to identify centrally mediated sympathetic/parasympathetic components in the heart rate variability (HRV) and arterial pressure variability (APV). No microinjected substance affected basal parameters. On the other hand, compared with the control data (saline, 0.3 µL; n=7), OT (10 ng) decreased mean AP (MAP50) after baroreflex stimulation and increased both the mean AP response after chemoreflex activation and the high-frequency component of the HRV. OT (25 pg) increased overall HRV but did not affect any parameter of the symbolic analysis. SST (1 μM) decreased MAP50, and SST (0.05 μM) enhanced the sympathovagal cardiac index. Both doses of SST increased HRV and its low-frequency component. Ang II (50 pmol) increased HRV and reduced the two unlike variations pattern of the symbolic analysis (P<0.05 in all cases). These results demonstrate neuropeptidergic actions in the MePD for both the increase in the range of the cardiovascular reflex responses and the involvement of the central sympathetic and parasympathetic systems on HRV and APV

  20. Acute blood volume expansion delays the gastrointestinal transit of a charcoal meal in awake rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de-Oliveira G.R.

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study evaluates the effect of blood volume expansion on the gastrointestinal transit of a charchoal meal (2.5 ml of an aqueous suspension consisting of 5% charcoal and 5% gum arabic in awake male Wistar rats (200-270 g. On the day before the experiments, the rats were anesthetized with ether, submitted to left jugular vein cannulation and fasted with water ad libitum until 2 h before the gastrointestinal transit measurement. Blood volume expansion by iv infusion of 1 ml/min Ringer bicarbonate in volumes of 3, 4 or 5% body weight delayed gastrointestinal transit at 10 min after test meal administration by 21.3-26.7% (P<0.05, but no effect was observed after 1 or 2% body weight expansion. The effect of blood volume expansion (up to 5% body weight on gastrointestinal transit lasted for at least 60 min (P<0.05. Mean arterial pressure increased transiently and central venous pressure increased and hematocrit decreased (P<0.05. Subdiaphragmatic vagotomy and yohimbine (3 mg/kg prevented the delay caused by expansion on gastrointestinal transit, while atropine (0.5 mg/kg, L-NAME (2 mg/kg, hexamethonium (10 mg/kg, prazosin (1 mg/kg or propranolol (2 mg/kg were ineffective. These data show that blood volume expansion delays the gastrointestinal transit of a charcoal meal and that vagal and yohimbine-sensitive pathways appear to be involved in this phenomenon. The delay in gastrointestinal transit observed here, taken together with the modifications of gastrointestinal permeability to salt and water reported by others, may be part of the mechanisms involved in liquid excess management.

  1. Neuropeptides in the posterodorsal medial amygdala modulate central cardiovascular reflex responses in awake male rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quagliotto, E. [Departamento de Ciências Básicas da Saúde/Fisiologia, Universidade Federal de Ciências da Saúde de Porto Alegre, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Programa de Pós-Graduação em Neurociências, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Casali, K.R. [Instituto de Ciência e Tecnologia, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, São José dos Campos, SP (Brazil); Dal Lago, P. [Departamento de Fisioterapia, Universidade Federal de Ciências da Saúde de Porto Alegre, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Rasia-Filho, A.A. [Departamento de Ciências Básicas da Saúde/Fisiologia, Universidade Federal de Ciências da Saúde de Porto Alegre, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Programa de Pós-Graduação em Neurociências, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil)

    2014-11-21

    The rat posterodorsal medial amygdala (MePD) links emotionally charged sensory stimuli to social behavior, and is part of the supramedullary control of the cardiovascular system. We studied the effects of microinjections of neuroactive peptides markedly found in the MePD, namely oxytocin (OT, 10 ng and 25 pg; n=6/group), somatostatin (SST, 1 and 0.05 μM; n=8 and 5, respectively), and angiotensin II (Ang II, 50 pmol and 50 fmol; n=7/group), on basal cardiovascular activity and on baroreflex- and chemoreflex-mediated responses in awake adult male rats. Power spectral and symbolic analyses were applied to pulse interval and systolic arterial pressure series to identify centrally mediated sympathetic/parasympathetic components in the heart rate variability (HRV) and arterial pressure variability (APV). No microinjected substance affected basal parameters. On the other hand, compared with the control data (saline, 0.3 µL; n=7), OT (10 ng) decreased mean AP (MAP{sub 50}) after baroreflex stimulation and increased both the mean AP response after chemoreflex activation and the high-frequency component of the HRV. OT (25 pg) increased overall HRV but did not affect any parameter of the symbolic analysis. SST (1 μM) decreased MAP{sub 50}, and SST (0.05 μM) enhanced the sympathovagal cardiac index. Both doses of SST increased HRV and its low-frequency component. Ang II (50 pmol) increased HRV and reduced the two unlike variations pattern of the symbolic analysis (P<0.05 in all cases). These results demonstrate neuropeptidergic actions in the MePD for both the increase in the range of the cardiovascular reflex responses and the involvement of the central sympathetic and parasympathetic systems on HRV and APV.

  2. Vincristine delays gastric emptying and gastrointestinal transit of liquid in awake rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.A. Peixoto Júnior

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available We evaluated the effects of vincristine on the gastrointestinal (GI motility of awake rats and correlated them with the course of vincristine-induced peripheral neuropathy. Vincristine or saline was injected into the tail vein of male Wistar rats (180-250 g on alternate days: 50 µg/kg (5 doses, N = 10, 100 µg/kg (2, 3, 4 and 5 doses, N = 49 or 150 µg/kg (1, 2, or 5 doses, N = 37. Weight and stool output were measured daily for each animal. One day after completing the vincristine treatment, the animals were fasted for 24 h, gavage-fed with a test meal and sacrificed 10 min later to measure gastric emptying (GE, GI transit and colon weight. Sensory peripheral neuropathy was evaluated by hot plate testing. Chronic vincristine treatments with total cumulative doses of at least 250 µg/kg significantly decreased GE by 31-59% and GI transit by 55-93%. The effect of 5 doses of vincristine (150 µg/kg on GE did not persist for more than 1 week. Colon weight increased after 2 and 5 doses of vincristine (150 µg/kg. Fecal output decreased up to 48 h after the fifth dose of vincristine (150 µg/kg. Vincristine decreased the heat pain threshold 1 day after 5 doses of 50-100 µg/kg or after 3-5 doses of 150 µg/kg. This effect lasted for at least 2 weeks after the fifth dose. Chronic intravenous vincristine treatment delayed GE and GI transit of liquid. This effect correlated with the peak increase in colon weight but not with the pain threshold changes.

  3. Measurement of Electroretinograms and Visually Evoked Potentials in Awake Moving Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokashiki, Naoyuki; Daigaku, Reiko; Tabata, Kitako; Sugano, Eriko; Tomita, Hiroshi; Nakazawa, Toru

    2016-01-01

    The development of new treatments for intractable retinal diseases requires reliable functional assessment tools for animal models. In vivo measurements of neural activity within visual pathways, including electroretinogram (ERG) and visually evoked potential (VEP) recordings, are commonly used for such purposes. In mice, the ERG and VEPs are usually recorded under general anesthesia, a state that may alter sensory transduction and neurotransmission, but seldom in awake freely moving mice. Therefore, it remains unknown whether the electrophysiological assessment of anesthetized mice accurately reflects the physiological function of the visual pathway. Herein, we describe a novel method to record the ERG and VEPs simultaneously in freely moving mice by immobilizing the head using a custom-built restraining device and placing a rotatable cylinder underneath to allow free running or walking during recording. Injection of the commonly used anesthetic mixture xylazine plus ketamine increased and delayed ERG oscillatory potentials by an average of 67.5% and 36.3%, respectively, compared to unanesthetized mice, while having minimal effects on the a-wave and b-wave. Similarly, components of the VEP were enhanced and delayed by up to 300.2% and 39.3%, respectively, in anesthetized mice. Our method for electrophysiological recording in conscious mice is a sensitive and robust means to assess visual function. It uses a conventional electrophysiological recording system and a simple platform that can be built in any laboratory at low cost. Measurements using this method provide objective indices of mouse visual function with high precision and stability, unaffected by anesthetics. PMID:27257864

  4. Auditory Function in Rhesus Monkeys: Effects of Aging and Caloric Restriction in the Wisconsin Monkeys Five Years Later

    OpenAIRE

    Fowler, Cynthia G.; Chiasson, Kirstin Beach; Leslie, Tami Hanson; Thomas, Denise; Beasley, T. Mark; Kemnitz, Joseph W; Weindruch, Richard

    2010-01-01

    Caloric restriction (CR) slows aging in many species and protects some animals from age-related hearing loss (ARHL), but the effect on humans is not yet known. Because rhesus monkeys are long-lived primates that are phylogenically closer to humans than other research animals are, they provide a better model for studying the effects of CR in aging and ARHL. Subjects were from the pool of 55 rhesus monkeys aged 15–28 years who had been in the Wisconsin study on CR and aging for 8–13.5 years. Di...

  5. Stronger efferent suppression of cochlear neural potentials by contralateral acoustic stimulation in awake than in anesthetized chinchilla

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristian eAedo

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available There are two types of sensory cells in the mammalian cochlea, inner hair cells, which make synaptic contact with auditory-nerve afferent fibers, and outer hair cells that are innervated by crossed and uncrossed medial olivocochlear (MOC efferent fibers. Contralateral acoustic stimulation activates the uncrossed efferent MOC fibers reducing cochlear neural responses, thus modifying the input to the central auditory system. The chinchilla, among all studied mammals, displays the lowest percentage of uncrossed MOC fibers raising questions about the strength and frequency distribution of the contralateral-sound effect in this species. On the other hand, MOC effects on cochlear sensitivity have been mainly studied in anesthetized animals and since the MOC-neuron activity depends on the level of anesthesia, it is important to assess the influence of anesthesia in the strength of efferent effects. Seven adult chinchillas (Chinchilla laniger were chronically implanted with round-window electrodes in both cochleae. We compared the effect of contralateral sound in awake and anesthetized condition. Compound action potentials (CAP and cochlear microphonics (CM were measured in the ipsilateral cochlea in response to tones in absence and presence of contralateral sound. Control measurements performed after middle-ear muscles section in one animal discarded any possible middle-ear reflex activation. Contralateral sound produced CAP amplitude reductions in all chinchillas, with suppression effects greater by about 1-3 dB in awake than in anesthetized animals. In contrast, CM amplitude increases of up to 1.9 dB were found in only three awake chinchillas. In both conditions the strongest efferent effects were produced by contralateral tones at frequencies equal or close to those of ipsilateral tones. Contralateral CAP suppressions for 1-6 kHz ipsilateral tones corresponded to a span of uncrossed MOC fiber innervation reaching at least the central third of the

  6. Composing Software from Multiple Concerns: A Model and Composition Anomalies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergmans, Lodewijk M.J.; Aksit, Mehmet

    2000-01-01

    Constructing software from components is considered to be a key requirement for managing the complexity of software. Separation of concerns makes only sense if the realizations of these concerns can be composed together effectively into a working program. Various publications have shown that composa

  7. LINEAR SINGULAR INTEGRAL EQUATION ON DOMAINS COMPOSED BY BALLS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    For domains composed by balls in Cn, this paper studies the boundary behaviour of Cauchy type integrals with discrete holomorphic kernels and the corresponding linear singular integral equation on each piece of smooth lower dimensional edges on the boundary of the domain.

  8. Domain-Specific Languages for Composable Editor Plugins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kats, L.C.L.; Kalleberg, K.T.; Visser, E.

    2009-01-01

    This paper is a pre-print of: Lennart C. L. Kats, Karl T. Kalleberg, Eelco Visser. Domain-Specific Languages for Composable Editor Plugins. In T. Ekman and J. Vinju, editors, Proceedings of the Ninth Workshop on Language Descriptions, Tools, and Applications (LDTA’09), Electronic Notes in Theoretica

  9. How One Class with One Computer Composed Music

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, Jack

    2004-01-01

    Music composition is a rewarding activity for students. Through composition, teachers not only address National Standard 4 (composing and arranging music within specified guidelines), but also cover other areas of the music curriculum such as singing, notation, improvisation, form, style, tempo, dynamics, music vocabulary, and assessment. During…

  10. When Did Classic Composers Make Their Best Work?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franses, Philip Hans

    2016-01-01

    This Research Note shows that classic composers created their best works when they were at a similar age when creators in other domains did their best work, namely when they were at an age that represented around 60% of their life span. This finding is very similar to earlier results for painters and authors.

  11. Readers as Writers Composing from Sources. Technical Report No. 18.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spivey, Nancy Nelson; King, James R.

    A study of discourse synthesis (readers/writers composing new texts by selecting, organizing, and connecting content from source texts) examined the performance of accomplished and less accomplished readers in the 6th, 8th, and 10th grades on a report-writing task. Over a 3-day period 60 English/language arts students wrote informational reports…

  12. Teaching Effective Communication Skills with ACE: Analyzing, Composing, & Evaluating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Lisa Gueldenzoph; Shwom, Barbara

    2011-01-01

    Most business communication classes teach students to use a writing process to compose effective documents. Students practice the process by applying it to various types of writing with various purposes-reports, presentations, bad news letters, persuasive memos, etc. However, unless students practice that process in other contexts outside of the…

  13. Noise composed of multiplication of two dichotomous noises

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Jing-Hui

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we introduce a noise which is composed of multiplication of two dichotomous noises, and derive the probability density and the statistical properties of this noise. The obtained results can help study the resonant activation phenomenon, the phenomenon of stochastic resonance, the transport of particles, and the nonequilibrium (phase) transition for the systems driven by this noise.

  14. Sleeping sites choice by a wild group of howler monkeys (Alouatta belzebul) in the Atlantic Forest of Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Martin‑Klimoczko, Lucille; Meunier, Hélène; Moura, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Study of primates sleeping habits is important to understand their behaviour and adaptations. Red-handed howler monkey is a new world monkey which is classified as Vulnerable in the IUCN red list. The present study aims to understand the choice of sleeping trees by these monkeys to facilitate the establishment of an adapted conservation plan. Indeed, data were collected in a fragmented landscape of the Atlantic Forest, following a wild monkey group from dawn to dusk. Trees criteria and monkey...

  15. The Initial Disparity Vergence Elicited With Single and Dual Grating Stimuli in Monkeys: Evidence for Disparity Energy Sensing and Nonlinear Interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Miura, K.; Sugita, Y; Matsuura, K; Inaba, N; Kawano, K.; Miles, F. A.

    2008-01-01

    We recorded the initial vertical vergence eye movements elicited in monkeys at short latency (∼70 ms) when the two eyes see one-dimensional (1D) horizontal grating patterns that are identical except for a phase difference (disparity) of one-quarter wavelength. With gratings composed of single sine waves, responses were always compensatory, showing Gaussian dependence on log spatial frequency (on average: peak = 0.75 cycles/deg; SD = 0.74; r2 = 0.980) and monotonic dependence on log contrast w...

  16. Monkey-derived monoclonal antibodies against Plasmodium falciparum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stanley, H.A.; Reese, R.T.

    1985-09-01

    A system has been developed that allows efficient production of monkey monoclonal antibodies from owl monkeys. Splenocytes or peripheral blood lymphocytes from monkeys immune to the human malarial parasite, Plasmodium falciparum, were fused with P3X63 Ag8.653 mouse myelomas. The resulting hybridomas were screened by an indirect fluorescent antibody test for the production of monkey monoclonal antibodies (mAb) reactive with P. falciparum. Most of the mAb reacted with the P. falciparum merozoites and immunoprecipitated a parasite-derived glycoprotein having a relative molecular weight of 185,000. These mAb gave a minimum of five different immunoprecipitation patterns, thus demonstrating that a large number of polypeptides obtained when parasitized erythrocytes are solubilized share epitopes with this large glycoprotein. In addition, mAb were obtained that reacted with antigens associated with the infected erythrocyte membrane. One of these mAb bound a M/sub r/ 95,000 antigen. Radioimmunoprecipitation assays using /sup 125/T-antibodies were done.

  17. Monkey hybrid stem cells develop cellular features of Huntington's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorthongpanich Chanchao

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pluripotent stem cells that are capable of differentiating into different cell types and develop robust hallmark cellular features are useful tools for clarifying the impact of developmental events on neurodegenerative diseases such as Huntington's disease. Additionally, a Huntington's cell model that develops robust pathological features of Huntington's disease would be valuable for drug discovery research. Results To test this hypothesis, a pluripotent Huntington's disease monkey hybrid cell line (TrES1 was established from a tetraploid Huntington's disease monkey blastocyst generated by the fusion of transgenic Huntington's monkey skin fibroblast and a wild-type non-transgenic monkey oocyte. The TrES1 developed key Huntington's disease cellular pathological features that paralleled neural development. It expressed mutant huntingtin and stem cell markers, was capable of differentiating to neural cells, and developed teratoma in severely compromised immune deficient (SCID mice. Interestingly, the expression of mutant htt, the accumulation of oligomeric mutant htt and the formation of intranuclear inclusions paralleled neural development in vitro , and even mutant htt was ubiquitously expressed. This suggests the development of Huntington's disease cellular features is influenced by neural developmental events. Conclusions Huntington's disease cellular features is influenced by neural developmental events. These results are the first to demonstrate that a pluripotent stem cell line is able to mimic Huntington's disease progression that parallels neural development, which could be a useful cell model for investigating the developmental impact on Huntington's disease pathogenesis.

  18. Present and potential distribution of Snub-nosed Monkey

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nüchel, Jonas; Bøcher, Peder Klith; Svenning, Jens-Christian

    Snub-nosed Monkeys (Rhinopithecus), a temperate-subtropical East Asian genus. We use species distribution modeling to assess the following question of key relevancy for conservation management of Rhinopithecus; 1. Which climatic factors determine the present distribution of Rhinopithecus within...

  19. Play Initiating Behaviors and Responses in Red Colobus Monkeys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worch, Eric A.

    2012-01-01

    Red colobus monkeys are playful primates, making them an important species in which to study animal play. The author examines play behaviors and responses in the species for its play initiation events, age differences in initiating frequency and initiating behavior, and the types of social play that result from specific initiating behaviors. Out…

  20. ‘‘What's wrong with my monkey?''

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsson, I. Anna S.; Sandøe, Peter

    2010-01-01

    acceptable to use animals as models of human disease; whether it is acceptable to genetically modify animals; and whether these animals' being monkeys makes a difference. The analysis considers the prospect of transgenic marmoset studies coming to replace transgenic mouse studies and lesion studies in...

  1. Prospective and Retrospective Metacognitive Abilities in Rhesus Monkeys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Ding

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Metacognition refers to a knowledge of one’s own cognitive abilities and one’s aptitude to alter these abilities if necessary. Previous research from our lab shows that monkeys exhibit metacognitive abilities by accurately judging their own performance on perceptual and serial working memory tasks. The present study includes two phases during which a monkey makes retrospective and prospective judgments of confidence. In the retrospective phase of this experiment, the subject completes a recall task, and then judges his performance on the test phase by choosing from high and low-risk confidence choices. In the prospective task, the monkey makes his confidence judgment before the test, instead judging how well he learned during the study phase. An analysis of results indicates that monkeys can immediately transfer the ability to make metacognitive judgments from the serial working memory tasks in previous experiments to retrospective and prospective recall tasks in the present study. These findings underline the similarity between the non-human primate and human abilities to make confidence judgments. Further, they are the first evidence to date of a non-human primate making a prospective judgment of future performance, suggesting that the ability to use a metacognitive state to control one’s actions is not uniquely human.

  2. Toxoplasmosis in a colony of New World monkeys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dietz, H.H.; Henriksen, P.; Bille-Hansen, Vivi;

    1997-01-01

    In a colony of New World monkeys five tamarins (Saguinus oedipus, Saguinus labiatus and Leontopithecus rosal. rosal.), three marmosets (Callithrix jacchus and Callithrix pygmaea) and one saki (Pithecia pithecia) died suddenly. The colony comprised 16 marmosets, 10 tamarins and three sakis. The ma...

  3. Individual differences in rhesus monkeys' demand for drugs of abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koffarnus, Mikhail N; Hall, Amy; Winger, Gail

    2012-09-01

    A relatively small percentage of humans who are exposed to drugs of abuse eventually become addicted to or dependent on those drugs. These individual differences in likelihood of developing drug addiction may reflect behavioral, neurobiological or genetic correlates of drug addiction and are therefore important to model. Behavioral economic measures of demand establish functions whose overall elasticity (rate of decrease in consumption as price increases) reflects the reinforcing effectiveness of various stimuli, including drugs. Using these demand functions, we determined the reinforcing effectiveness of five drugs of abuse (cocaine, remifentanil, ketamine, methohexital and ethanol) in 10 rhesus monkeys with histories of intravenous drug-taking. There was a continuum of reinforcing effectiveness across the five drugs, with cocaine and remifentanil showing the most reinforcing effectiveness. There was also a continuum of sensitivity of the monkeys; two of the 10 animals, in particular, showed greater demand for the drugs than did the remaining eight monkeys. In addition, monkeys that demonstrated greater demand for one drug tended to show greater demand for all drugs but did not show a similar relatively greater demand for sucrose pellets. These findings suggest that the tendency to find drugs to be reinforcing is a general one, not restricted to particular drugs and also, that a minority of animals show a substantially enhanced sensitivity to the reinforcing effects of drugs. The possibility that differences in responsiveness to the reinforcing effects of drugs may form the basis of individual differences in drug-taking in humans should be considered. PMID:21762288

  4. Computed tomography of virally induced monkey brain tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thirty-five (35) Japanese monkeys (Macaca fuscata) were inoculated intracerebrally with chickembryo fibroblasts which were producing the Schmidt-Ruppin strain of the Rous sarcoma virus. These were then studied by means of computed tomography (CT) to detect brain tumors. Tumors were induced in 54.3% (19/35), with an average latency of 32.6 (15 - 43) days before a CT image appeared. The brains were sectioned into 5-mm slices, coplanar with the CT images. Various CT features, such as necrosis, hemorrhage, and peritumoral edema, correlated with the pathological findings. Contrast-enhanced CT detected tumors greater than 4-6 mm in diameter, and it was accurate within 2 mm in determining. Following brain tumors by CT in 6 monkeys revealed changes in the tumor size. One monkey was treated by differential hypothermia following craniectomy; the therapeutic effect and the tumor size, as subsequently evaluated for six months, revealed tumor regression during the initial 5 weeks, followed by stabilization and late (6 months) progression. The large brain size, 90-110 grams in adults, and the availability of these monkeys make them an excellent model system for neurological, neurosurgical, CT, and multimodality therapeutic experimentation. (author)

  5. Risky business: Rhesus monkeys exhibit persistent preferences for risky options

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EricRXu

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Rhesus monkeys appear to prefer risky over safe options in experiential decision-making tasks. These findings might be due, however, to specific contextual factors in the tasks used to date, such as a large number of successive trials and small ‘stakes’, i.e., small amounts of fluid reward. In the present experiment, we increased the stakes and used a small number of trials in order to explore the generality of risky decision-making in monkeys. We found a consistent preference for risky options, except when the expected value of the safe option was greater than the risky option. Thus, with equivalent mean utilities between the safe and risky options, rhesus monkeys appear to have a robust preference for the risky options in a broad range of circumstances, akin to the preferences found in human children and some adults in similar tasks. One account for this result is that monkeys make their choices based on the salience of the largest payoff, without integrating likelihood and value across trials. A related idea is that they fail to override an impulsive tendency to select the option with the potential to obtain the highest possible payoff. Our results rule out both accounts and contribute to an understanding of the diversity of risky decision-making among primates.

  6. Servants, Managers and Monkeys: New Perspectives on Leadership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buskey, Frederick C.

    2014-01-01

    In this article the author questions whether the understanding of teaching and leading is the same today as it was last year? The chances are that the concept of what it means to be a teacher and a leader has changed. After describing three leadership types: servants, managers, and monkeys, Buskey suggest several things that are needed to improve…

  7. Biologic Data of Cynomolgus Monkeys Maintained under Laboratory Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosso, Marilena Caterina; Badino, Paola; Ferrero, Giulio; Costa, Roberto; Cordero, Francesca; Steidler, Stephanie

    2016-01-01

    The cynomolgus monkey (Macaca fascicularis) is a well-known non-human primate species commonly used in non-clinical research. It is important to know basal clinical pathology parameters in order to have a reference for evaluating any potential treatment-induced effects, maintaining health status among animals and, if needed, evaluating correct substantiative therapies. In this study, data from 238 untreated cynomolgus monkeys (119 males and 119 females of juvenile age, 2.5 to 3.5 years) kept under laboratory conditions were used to build up a reference database of clinical pathology parameters. Twenty-two hematology markers, 24 clinical chemistry markers and two blood coagulation parameters were analyzed. Gender-related differences were evaluated using statistical analyses. To assess the possible effects of stress induced by housing or handling involved in treatment procedures, 78 animals (35 males and 35 females out of 238 juvenile monkeys and four adult males and four adult females) were used to evaluate cortisol, corticosterone and behavioral assessment over time. Data were analyzed using a non-parametric statistical test and machine learning approaches. Reference clinical pathology data obtained from untreated animals may be extremely useful for investigators employing cynomolgus monkeys as a test system for non-clinical safety studies. PMID:27280447

  8. Monkeys Exhibit Prospective Memory in a Computerized Task

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Theodore A.; Beran, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    Prospective memory (PM) involves forming intentions, retaining those intentions, and later executing those intended responses at the appropriate time. Few studies have investigated this capacity in animals. Monkeys performed a computerized task that assessed their ability to remember to make a particular response if they observed a PM cue embedded…

  9. The Monkey Kid: A Personal Glimpse into the Cultural Revolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita M. Andrew

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Wang, Xiao-Yen (Director/Writer, 'The Monkey Kid '(1995. San Francisco, Calif.: Beijing–San Francisco Film Group. Also released in France by Les Films du Parodoxe under the title, 'La Mome Singe '(1997. 95 minutes. Mandarin Chinese with English subtitles.

  10. Call Combinations in Monkeys: Compositional or Idiomatic Expressions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Kate; Zuberbuhler, Klaus

    2012-01-01

    Syntax is widely considered the feature that most decisively sets human language apart from other natural communication systems. Animal vocalisations are generally considered to be holistic with few examples of utterances meaning something other than the sum of their parts. Previously, we have shown that male putty-nosed monkeys produce call…

  11. Patterns of cognitive decline in aged rhesus monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herndon, J G; Moss, M B; Rosene, D L; Killiany, R J

    1997-08-01

    Although cognitive decline has been well established as a consequence of aging in non-human primate models, the prevalence or frequency of impairment for specific age ranges has not been described. The first aim of this study was to estimate prevalence of cognitive impairment on each of the six tests of cognitive performance by comparing the performance of early-aged (19-23 years old), advanced-aged (24-28 years old), and oldest-aged (29+ years old) monkeys to that of young adults (acquisition of the delayed non-matching-to-sample task (DNMS); (2) performance of the DNMS with a delay of 120 sec; (3) the spatial condition of the delayed recognition span test (DRST); (4) the color condition of the DRST; (5) spatial reversal learning; and (6) object reversal learning. Early-aged monkeys displayed prevalence rates of impairment significantly greater than zero on all tasks except the DRST-color. The highest prevalence of impairment was observed in this age group in a task measuring spatial memory (DRST). Significant trends toward progressively higher impairment rates in advanced-aged and oldest-aged monkeys were observed for DNMS-acquisition, DRST-color and spatial reversal learning tasks. A linear transformation of standardized scores on the six cognitive tests was derived by means of principal components analysis (PCA). The first PCA (PCA1) included data from 30 monkeys with available data on all six measures, and yielded a composite measure which declined linearly with increasing age (r = -0.74). A second PCA (PCA2) was performed on data from 53 monkeys for which three test scores (DNMS-acquisition, DNMS-120s delay, and DRST-spatial condition) were available. The composite score derived from this analysis was highly correlated (r = 0.93) with the composite score from PCA1, suggesting that a score based on only three tests may provide an adequate classification of global cognitive ability. PMID:9331471

  12. The Principle of Navigation Constellation Composed of SIGSO Communication Satellites

    CERN Document Server

    Ji, Hai-Fu; Ai, Guo-Xiang; Shi, Hu-Li

    2012-01-01

    The Chinese Area Positioning System (CAPS), a navigation system based on GEO communication satellites, was developed in 2002 by astronomers at Chinese Academy of Sciences. Extensive positioning experiments of CAPS have been performed since 2005. On the basis of CAPS, this paper studies the principle of navigation constellation composed of Slightly Inclined Geostationary Orbit (SIGSO) communication satellites. SIGSO satellites are derived from end-of-life Geostationary Orbit (GEO) satellites under inclined orbit operation. Considering the abundant frequency resources of SIGSO satellites, multi-frequency observations could be conducted to enhance the precision of pseudorange measurements and ameliorate the positioning performence. The constellation composed of two GEO satellites and four SIGSO satellites with inclination of 5 degrees can provide the most territory of China with 24-hour maximum PDOP less than 42. With synthetic utilization of the truncated precise (TP) code and physical augmentation factor in fo...

  13. A Novel Method to Test Dependable Composed Service Components

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khaled Farj

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Assessing Web service systems performance and their dependability are crucial for the development of today’s applications. Testing the performance and Fault Tolerance Mechanisms (FTMs of composed service components is hard to be measured at design time due to service instability is often caused by the nature of the network conditions. Using a real internet environment for testing systems is difficult to set up and control. We have introduced a fault injection toolkit that emulates a WAN within a LAN environment between composed service components and offers full control over the emulated environment in addition to the capability to inject network-related faults and application specific faults. The toolkit also generates background workloads on the system under test so as to produce more realistic results. We describe an experiment that has been performed to examine the impact of fault tolerance protocols deployed at a service client by using our toolkit system.

  14. Boiling heat transfer in porous media composed of particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The boiling heat transfer in the porous media composed of spherical fuel elements exerts significant influences on the reactor's efficiency and safety. In the present study an experimental setup was designed and the boiling heat transfer in the porous media composed of spheres of regular distribution was investigated. Four spheres with diameters of 5mm, 6mm, 7mm and 8mm were used in the test sections. The greater particle diameter led to lower heat transfer coefficient, and resulted in higher wall superheat of original nucleation boiling. The variation of heat transfer coefficient was divided into three groups according to two-phase flow patterns and void fraction. A correlation of heat transfer coefficient was proposed with a mean relative deviation of ± 16%. (author)

  15. Modeling and Composing Scenario-Based Requirements with Aspects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araujo, Joao; Whittle, Jon; Ki, Dae-Kyoo

    2004-01-01

    There has been significant recent interest, within the Aspect-Oriented Software Development (AOSD) community, in representing crosscutting concerns at various stages of the software lifecycle. However, most of these efforts have concentrated on the design and implementation phases. We focus in this paper on representing aspects during use case modeling. In particular, we focus on scenario-based requirements and show how to compose aspectual and non-aspectual scenarios so that they can be simulated as a whole. Non-aspectual scenarios are modeled as UML sequence diagram. Aspectual scenarios are modeled as Interaction Pattern Specifications (IPS). In order to simulate them, the scenarios are transformed into a set of executable state machines using an existing state machine synthesis algorithm. Previous work composed aspectual and non-aspectual scenarios at the sequence diagram level. In this paper, the composition is done at the state machine level.

  16. A precise and minimally invasive approach to optogenetics in the awake primate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nassi, Jonathan J.; Cetin, Ali H.; Roe, Anna W.; Callaway, Edward M.; Deisseroth, Karl; Reynolds, John H.

    2013-03-01

    Optogenetics has proven to be a powerful tool for understanding the function of specific cell types and circuits within the central nervous system and establishing a causal link between their activity and behavior. Its application in non-human primates has been slow to develop. One challenge has been the damage caused by transdural delivery of viruses and light to the brain. Here, we report optogenetic activation of neuronal responses in the alert and behaving monkey after replacement of the native dura with a transparent artificial dura. This approach enables the use of fine glass micropipettes to inject virus with minimal damage and transdural illumination, obviating the damage that would otherwise occur as a result of lowering optical fibers into the brain. It also permits visualization of the underlying cortical micro-vasculature, which has proven to be helpful in targeting electrodes and laser illumination to the virus location. This approach promises to greatly assist in the dissection of cortical circuits underlying visual perception and behavior.

  17. Semi-permeable vesicles composed of natural clay

    OpenAIRE

    Subramaniam, Anand B.; Wan, Jiandi; Gopinath, Arvind; Stone, Howard A.

    2010-01-01

    We report a simple route to form robust, inorganic, semi-permeable compartments composed of montmorillonite, a natural plate-like clay mineral that occurs widely in the environment. Mechanical forces due to shear in a narrow gap assemble clay nanoplates from an aqueous suspension onto air bubbles. Translucent vesicles suspended in a single-phase liquid are produced when the clay-covered air bubbles are exposed to a variety of water-miscible organic liquids. These vesicles of clay are mechanic...

  18. A Novel Method to Test Dependable Composed Service Components

    OpenAIRE

    Khaled Farj; Adel Smeda

    2016-01-01

    Assessing Web service systems performance and their dependability are crucial for the development of today’s applications. Testing the performance and Fault Tolerance Mechanisms (FTMs) of composed service components is hard to be measured at design time due to service instability is often caused by the nature of the network conditions. Using a real internet environment for testing systems is difficult to set up and control. We have introduced a fault injection toolkit that emulate...

  19. Mesoscopic Models of Plants Composed of Metallic Nanowires

    OpenAIRE

    Strukova, Galina K.; Strukov, Gennady V.; Postnova, Evgeniya Yu.; Rusanov, Alexander Yu.; Veshchunov, Ivan S.

    2013-01-01

    Various metallic structures of complex shape resembling living plant organisms (biomimetics) are produced as a result of selfassembly of nanowires growing on porous membranes in the course of pulse current electrodeposition. These structures occur if the electroplating is continued after the nanowires appear on the membrane surface. By varying the membrane ge- ometry, pulse current electroplating parameters, and alternating electrodeposition from two baths composed of a variety of electrolyte...

  20. Semantic Service Discovery Techniques for the composable web

    OpenAIRE

    Fernández Villamor, José Ignacio

    2012-01-01

    This PhD thesis contributes to the problem of resource and service discovery in the context of the composable web. In the current web, mashup technologies allow developers reusing services and contents to build new web applications. However, developers face a problem of information flood when searching for appropriate services or resources for their combination. To contribute to overcoming this problem, a framework is defined for the discovery of services and resources. In this framework, thr...

  1. The methodology of composing the exercises system with fit balls.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Voronov N.P.

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The original methodology of composing the exercises system with fit balls was considered. More than 10 publications were analysed. On the lesson with fit balls the problem was revealed. In the experiment took part 30 students at the age from 18 till 21. All the famous exercises were systematized. As a result, a big attractiveness and assimilability of the proposed complex was revealed. The effectiveness of the complex of physical exercises with fit balls for students was proved.

  2. Evaluation of third-party reciprocity by squirrel monkeys (Saimiri sciureus) and the question of mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, James R; Bucher, Benoit; Kuroshima, Hika; Fujita, Kazuo

    2016-07-01

    Social evaluation during third-party interactions emerges early in human ontogeny, and it has been shown in adult capuchin monkeys who witness violations of reciprocity in object exchanges: Monkeys were less inclined to accept food from humans who refused to reciprocate with another human. A recent study reporting similar evidence in marmoset monkeys raised the possibility that such evaluations might be based on species' inherent cooperativeness. We tested a species not renowned for cooperativeness-squirrel monkeys-using the procedure used with marmosets and found a similar result. This finding rules out any crucial role for cooperative tendencies in monkeys' responses to unfair exchanges. We then tested squirrel monkeys using procedures more similar to those used in the original study with capuchins. Squirrel monkeys again accepted food less frequently from non-reciprocators, but unlike capuchins, they also strongly preferred reciprocators. We conclude that neither squirrel monkeys nor marmoset monkeys engaged in emotional bookkeeping of the type that probably underlies social evaluation in capuchin monkeys; instead, they employed one or more simple behavioral rules. Further comparative studies are required to clarify the mechanisms underlying social evaluation processes across species. PMID:27021433

  3. The Creative Studio Practice of Contemporary Dance Music Sampling Composers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin Morey

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper seeks to investigate some of the considerations that inform and help to determine the creative studio practice of contemporary sampling composers. Collaborative writing and production, specifically the co-opted collaboration implicit in using samples, will be assessed to consider those aspects of the production process which the participants consider to be authorial. These considerations include acts of listening, selecting and editing. In examining these matters this paper places emphasis on how sampling composers actively constrain their options in order to promote a creative relationship with their musical material. Techniques such as, firstly, traditional sample manipulation, secondly, the use of a sample as an initial building block for a composition from which the sample is then removed and, finally, live performance in the studio which is subsequently cut up and treated as a sample, will be discussed. Case studies, in the form of semi-structured interviews with sampling composers, will be drawn upon to assess approaches to and views about these forms of studio composition.

  4. Ordinal judgments of symbolic stimuli by capuchin monkeys (Cebus apella) and rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta): the effects of differential and nondifferential reward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beran, Michael J; Harris, Emily H; Evans, Theodore A; Klein, Emily D; Chan, Betty; Flemming, Timothy M; Washburn, David A

    2008-02-01

    Ordinal learning was investigated in capuchin monkeys (Cebus apella) and rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta). In Experiment 1, both species were presented with pairings of the Arabic numerals 0 to 9. Some monkeys were given food rewards equal to the value of the numeral selected and some were rewarded with a single pellet only for choosing the higher numeral within the pair. Both species learned to select the larger numeral, but only rhesus monkeys that were differentially rewarded performed above chance levels when presented with novel probe pairings. In Experiment 2, the monkeys were first presented with arrays of 5 familiar numerals (from the range 0 to 9) and then arrays of 5 novel letters (from the range A to J) with the same reward outcomes in place as in Experiment 1. Both species performed better with the numerals, suggesting that an ordinal sequence of all stimuli had been learned during Experiment 1, rather than a matrix of two-choice discriminations. PMID:18298281

  5. Human-Rhesus Monkey conflict at Rampur Village under Monohardi Upazila in Narsingdi District of Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.F. Ahsan

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Human-Rhesus monkey conflicts were recorded at Rampur Village under Khidirpur Union Parishad of Monohardi upazila under Narsingdi District in Bangladesh from April to September 2012. There were three groups of Rhesus monkeys living in the area. The focal study group comprised 26 individuals (4 adult males, 6 adult females, 10 juveniles and 6 infants. The monkeys consumed parts of 10 plant species. From the questionnaire survey, it was found that the greatest damage caused by monkeys was on betel leaf vines and the least damage on vegetables. Eighty percent respondents opted to conserve the monkeys and 20% opined status quo. Some restricted areas (especially khas lands may be identified and planted with some fruit trees for survival of monkeys and for reducing conflicts with humans.

  6. Electrical stimulation of the substantia nigra reticulata : Detection of neuronal extracellular GABA in the ventromedial thalamus and its regulatory mechanism using microdialysis in awake rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmerman, W; Westerink, BHC

    1997-01-01

    A combination of electrical stimulation and microdialysis was used to study the nigrothalamic gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA)ergic system and its regulatory mechanisms in awake rats. Extracellular GABA levels in the ventromedial nucleus of the thalamus were detected in S-min fractions collected befor

  7. EXTRACELLULAR GAMMA-AMINOBUTYRIC-ACID IN THE SUBSTANTIA-NIGRA RETICULATA MEASURED BY MICRODIALYSIS IN AWAKE RATS - EFFECTS OF VARIOUS STIMULANTS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    TIMMERMAN, W; WESTERINK, BHC

    1995-01-01

    The gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-ergic system in the substantia nigra reticulata (SNR) was challenged by local infusion of various receptor-specific agents to obtain additional information on the physiological significance of extracellular GABA levels as measured by microdialysis in awake rats. No

  8. Brief Report: Approaches to [Superscript 31]P-MRS in Awake, Non-Sedated Children with and without Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Laura C.; Scott-Van Zeeland, Ashley A.; Hamilton, Gavin; Lincoln, Alan; Golomb, Beatrice A.

    2012-01-01

    We piloted a suite of approaches aimed to facilitate a successful series of up to four brain and muscle [superscript 31]Phosphorus-Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy ([superscript 31]P-MRS) scans performed in one session in 12 "awake", non-sedated subjects (ages 6-18), 6 with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and 6 controls. We targeted advanced…

  9. Universally Composable Efficient Multiparty Computation from Threshold Homomorphic Encryption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damgård, Ivan Bjerre; Nielsen, Jesper Buus

    We present a new general multiparty computation protocol for the cryptographic scenario which is universally composable — in particular, it is secure against an active and adaptive adversary, corrupting any minority of the parties. The protocol is as efficient as the best known statically secure...... solutions, in particular the number of bits broadcast (which dominates the complexity) is Ω (nk |C|), where n is the number of parties, k is a security parameter, and |C| is the size of a circuit doing the desired computation. Unlike previous adaptively secure protocols for the cryptographic model, our...

  10. Synchronized oscillation in a modular neural network composed of columns

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Su; QI Xianglin; HU Hong; WANG Yunjiu

    2005-01-01

    The columnar organization is a ubiquitous feature in the cerebral cortex. In this study, a neural network model simulating the cortical columns has been constructed. When fed with random pulse input with constant rate, a column generates synchronized oscillations, with a frequency varying from 3 to 43 Hz depending on parameter values. The behavior of the model under periodic stimulation was studied and the input-output relationship was non-linear. When identical columns were sparsely interconnected, the column oscillator could be locked in synchrony. In a network composed of heterogeneous columns, the columns were organized by intrinsic properties and formed partially synchronized assemblies.

  11. Efficacy of niclosamide as a potential antipenetrant (TAP) against cercariae of Schistosoma mansoni monkeys

    OpenAIRE

    John I. Bruce; Robert Miller; Lawrence Lightner; Subbiah Yoganathan

    1992-01-01

    A 1% (W/V) formulation of Niclosamide (2', 5-Dichloro-4-nitrosalicylanilide) (TAP) was tested on Cebus apella monkeys as a topical prophylatic against schistosomiasis mansoni. Two experiments were conducted using the same formulation. In the first experiment, the TAP provided complete protection against schistosomiasis for 3 days. Of the 4 monkeys treated with TAP 7 days before exposure to Schistosoma mansoni cercariae, 2 were completely protected. The remaining 2 monkeys of the 7 day treatme...

  12. Lens diameter and thickness as a function of age and pharmacologically stimulated accommodation in rhesus monkeys

    OpenAIRE

    Wendt, Mark; Croft, Mary Ann; McDonald, Jared; Kaufman, Paul L; Glasser, Adrian

    2008-01-01

    Uncertainty exists regarding accommodative and age changes in lens diameter and thickness in humans and monkeys. In this study, unaccommodated and accommodated refraction, lens diameter, and lens thickness were measured in rhesus monkeys across a range of ages. Iridectomized eyes were studied in 33 anesthetized monkeys aged 4–23 years. Refraction was measured using a Hartinger coincidence refractometer and lens thickness was measured with A-scan ultrasound. Lens diameters were measured with i...

  13. Simian virus 40-induced disease in rhesus monkeys with simian acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    OpenAIRE

    Horvath, C J; Simon, M A; Bergsagel, D. J.; Pauley, D. R.; King, N W; Garcea, R L; Ringler, D. J.

    1992-01-01

    Simian virus 40 (SV40) disease was diagnosed in four rhesus monkeys that died with SIV-induced acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). One juvenile monkey seroconverted for SV40 6 months after inoculation with SIV and developed severe bilateral tubulointerstitial nephritis. In contrast, progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) occurred in two adult monkeys that were seropositive for SV40 before SIV inoculation, as well as a third adult that was naturally infected with SIV and serop...

  14. An assessment of memory awareness in tufted capuchin monkeys (Cebus apella)

    OpenAIRE

    Basile, Benjamin M.; Hampton, Robert R.; Suomi, Stephen J.; Murray, Elisabeth A.

    2008-01-01

    Humans, apes, and rhesus monkeys demonstrate memory awareness by collecting information when ignorant and acting immediately when informed. In this study, five capuchin monkeys searched for food after either watching the experimenter bait one of four opaque tubes (seen trials), or not watching (unseen trials). Monkeys with memory awareness should look into the tubes before making a selection only on unseen trials because on seen trials they already know the location of the food. In Experiment...

  15. Topsoil as affected by dung deposition under resting places of red howler monkey (Alouatta seniculus)

    OpenAIRE

    Pouvelle, Sandrine; Feer, François; Ponge, Jean-François

    2008-01-01

    The short-term influence of dung deposition and the further redistribution of dung by dung beetles were studied under a resting place of the red howler monkey (Alouatta seniculus) living in tropical rainforests of South America. Monkey dung was experimentally clumped on the field in a place used by troops of howler monkeys for resting in the Nouragues Reserve Station, French Guiana. Dung-treated plots were sampled serially over three weeks and compared with controls located in their immediate...

  16. Differential Cellular Tropism of Lentivirus and Adeno-Associated Virus in the Brain of Cynomolgus Monkey

    OpenAIRE

    An, Heeyoung; Cho, Doo-Wan; Lee, Seung Eun; Yang, Young-Su; Han, Su-Cheol; Lee, C. Justin

    2016-01-01

    Many researchers are using viruses to deliver genes of interest into the brains of laboratory animals. However, certain target brain cells are not easily infected by viruses. Moreover, the differential tropism of different viruses in monkey brain is not well established. We investigated the cellular tropism of lentivirus and adeno-associated virus (AAV) toward neuron and glia in the brain of cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascularis). Lentivirus and AAV were injected into putamen of the monkey br...

  17. Diffusion dynamics of socially learned foraging techniques in squirrel monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claidière, Nicolas; Messer, Emily J E; Hoppitt, William; Whiten, Andrew

    2013-07-01

    Social network analyses and experimental studies of social learning have each become important domains of animal behavior research in recent years yet have remained largely separate. Here we bring them together, providing the first demonstration of how social networks may shape the diffusion of socially learned foraging techniques. One technique for opening an artificial fruit was seeded in the dominant male of a group of squirrel monkeys and an alternative technique in the dominant male of a second group. We show that the two techniques spread preferentially in the groups in which they were initially seeded and that this process was influenced by monkeys' association patterns. Eigenvector centrality predicted both the speed with which an individual would first succeed in opening the artificial fruit and the probability that they would acquire the cultural variant seeded in their group. These findings demonstrate a positive role of social networks in determining how a new foraging technique diffuses through a population. PMID:23810529

  18. Monkeying with the Goodness-of-Fit Test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Marsaglia

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available The familiar Σ(OBS - EXP 2/EXP goodness-of-fit measure is commonly used to test whether an observed sequence came from the realization of n independent identically distributed (iid discrete random variables. It can be quite effective for testing for identical distribution, but is not suited for assessing independence, as it pays no attention to the order in which output values are received. This note reviews a way to adjust or tamper, that is, monkey-with the classical test to make it test for independence as well as identical distribution--in short, to test for both the i's in iid, using monkey tests similar to those in the Diehard Battery of Tests of Randomness (Marsaglia 1995.

  19. Prefrontal activity predicts monkeys' decisions during an auditory category task

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung Hoon Lee

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The neural correlates that relate auditory categorization to aspects of goal-directed behavior, such as decision-making, are not well understood. Since the prefrontal cortex plays an important role in executive function and the categorization of auditory objects, we hypothesized that neural activity in the prefrontal cortex (PFC should predict an animal's behavioral reports (decisions during a category task. To test this hypothesis, we tested PFC activity that was recorded while monkeys categorized human spoken words (Russ et al., 2008b. We found that activity in the ventrolateral PFC, on average, correlated best with the monkeys' choices than with the auditory stimuli. This finding demonstrates a direct link between PFC activity and behavioral choices during a non-spatial auditory task.

  20. Vitamin D Status in Monkey Candidates for Space Flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnaud, S. B.; Wronski, T. J.; Koslovskeya, I.; Dotsenko, R.; Navidi, M.; Wade, Charles E. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    In preparation for the Cosmos 2229 Biosatellite space flight experiments in Rhesus monkeys, we evaluated the status of vitamin D in animals of different origins: candidates for space flight raised in Moscow (IMBP) and animals housed at Ames Research Ctr. (ARC) for pilot studies. Diets at IMBP were natural foods found by analysis to contain 1.4% Ca, 2.8% P andng/ml,p<.001) in IMBP than ARC animals. 1,25D (174156 vs. 212+77 pg/ml), Pi and AP were similar. In bone, osteoid and osteoblast surfaces averaged 38114% and 33+15% in all, with %vol. of osteoid higher in IMBP than ARC monkeys of the same BW (p<.05) Indices of bone formation were inversely related to 25D, not 1,25D. Of interest are similar 1,25D levels associated with a wide range of substrate and extensive osteoid in bone of D replete animals.

  1. I.v. cocaine induces rapid, transient excitation of striatal neurons via its action on peripheral neural elements: single-cell, iontophoretic study in awake and anesthetized rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiyatkin, E A; Brown, P L

    2007-09-21

    Cocaine's (COC) direct interaction with the dopamine (DA) transporter is usually considered the most important action underlying the psychomotor stimulant and reinforcing effects of this drug. However, some physiological, behavioral and psycho-emotional effects of COC are very rapid and brief and they remain intact during DA receptor blockade, suggesting possible involvement of peripheral non-DA neural mechanisms. To assess this issue, single-unit recording with microiontophoresis was used to examine changes in impulse activity of dorsal and ventral striatal neurons to i.v. COC (0.25-0.5 mg/kg) in the same rats under two conditions: awake with DA receptor blockade and anesthetized with urethane. In the awake preparation approximately 70% striatal neurons showed rapid and transient (latency approximately 6 s, duration approximately 15 s) COC-induced excitations. These effects were stronger in ventral than dorsal striatum. During anesthesia, these phasic effects were fully blocked and COC slowly decreased neuronal discharge rate. Cocaine-methiodide (COC-M), a derivative that cannot cross the blood-brain barrier, also caused phasic excitations in the awake, but not anesthetized condition. In contrast to regular COC, COC-M had no tonic effect on discharge rate in either preparation. Most striatal neurons that were phasically excited by both COC forms also showed short-latency excitations during tail-touch and tail-pinch in the awake preparation, an effect strongly attenuated during anesthesia. Finally, most striatal neurons that in awake conditions were phasically excited by somato-sensory stimuli and COC salts were also excited by iontophoretic glutamate (GLU). Although striatal neurons were sensitive to GLU in both preparations, the response magnitude at the same GLU current was higher in awake than anesthetized conditions. These data suggest that in awake animals i.v. COC, like somato-sensory stimuli, transiently excites striatal neurons via its action on peripheral

  2. The effects of normal aging on myelinated nerve fibers in monkey central nervous system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan Peters

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The effects of aging on myelinated nerve fibers of the central nervous system are complex. Many myelinated nerve fibers in white matter degenerate and are lost, leading to some disconnections between various parts of the central nervous system. Other myelinated nerve fibers are affected differently, because only their sheaths degenerate, leaving the axons intact. Such axons are remyelinated by a series of internodes that are much shorter than the original ones and are composed of thinner sheaths. Thus the myelin-forming cells of the central nervous system, the oligodendrocytes, remain active during aging. Indeed, not only do these neuroglial cell remyelinate axons, with age they also continue to add lamellae to the myelin sheaths of intact nerve fibers, so that sheaths become thicker. It is presumed that the degeneration of myelin sheaths is due to the degeneration of the parent oligodendrocyte, and that the production of increased numbers of internodes as a consequence of remyelination requires additional oligodendrocytes. Whether there is a turnover of oligodendrocytes during life has not been studied in primates, but it has been established that over the life span of the monkey, there is a substantial increase in the numbers of oligodendrocytes. While the loss of some myelinated nerve fibers leads to some disconnections, the degeneration of other myelin sheaths and the subsequent remyelination of axons by shorter internodes slow down the rate conduction along nerve fibers. These changes affect the integrity and timing in neuronal circuits, and there is evidence that they contribute to cognitive decline.

  3. Indiscriminate recombination in simian virus 40-infected monkey cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Winocour, E; Keshet, I

    1980-01-01

    DNA transfection of African green monkey BSC-1 cells with simian virus 40 (SV40) DNA and bacterial virus phi X174 replicative form DNA ("cotransfection") yielded stocks containing SV40/phi X174 recombinant virus, which was detected by an infectious-center in situ plaque hybridization procedure and which was sensitive to anti-SV40 antiserum. The recombinant virus replicated during serial passage. Restriction endonuclease cleavage of the SV40/phi X174 DNA indicated that several different types ...

  4. Trial Outcome and Associative Learning Signals in the Monkey Hippocampus

    OpenAIRE

    Wirth, Sylvia; Avsar, Emin; Chiu, Cindy C.; Sharma, Varun; Smith, Anne C.; Emery N Brown; Suzuki, Wendy A.

    2009-01-01

    In tasks of associative learning, animals establish new links between unrelated items by using information about trial outcome to strengthen correct/rewarded associations and modify incorrect/unrewarded ones. To study how hippocampal neurons convey information about reward and trial outcome during new associative learning, we recorded hippocampal neurons as monkeys learned novel object-place associations. A large population of hippocampal neurons (50%) signaled trial outcome by differentiatin...

  5. Titi monkey call sequences vary with predator location and type.

    OpenAIRE

    Casar, C.; Zuberbuhler, K.; Young, R. J.; Byrne, R.W.

    2013-01-01

    Animal alarm calls can encode information about a predator's category, size, distance or threat level. In non-human primates, alarm calls typically refer to broad classes of disturbances, in some instances to specific predators. Here, we present the results of a field experiment with a New World primate, the black-fronted titi monkey (Callicebus nigrifrons), designed to explore the information conveyed by their alarm call system. Adults produced sequences consisting of two main alarm call typ...

  6. Direct demonstration of retroviral recombination in a rhesus monkey.

    OpenAIRE

    Wooley, D P; Smith, R A; Czajak, S; Desrosiers, R C

    1997-01-01

    Recombination may be an important mechanism for increasing variation in retroviral populations. Retroviral recombination has been demonstrated in tissue culture systems by artificially creating doubly infected cells. Evidence for retroviral recombination in vivo is indirect and is based principally on the identification of apparently mosaic human immunodeficiency virus type 1 genomes from phylogenetic analyses of viral sequences. We infected a rhesus monkey with two different molecularly clon...

  7. Whole-Genome Transcription Profiling of Rhesus Monkey Rhadinovirus

    OpenAIRE

    DITTMER, DIRK P; Gonzalez, Carlos M.; Vahrson, Wolfgang; DeWire, Scott M.; Hines-Boykin, Rebecca; Damania, Blossom

    2005-01-01

    Rhesus monkey rhadinovirus (RRV) and Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV; also called human herpesvirus 8) belong to the gamma-2 grouping of herpesviruses. RRV and KSHV share a high degree of sequence similarity, and their genomes are organized in a similar fashion. RRV serves as an excellent animal model system to study the gamma herpesvirus life cycle both in vitro and in vivo. We have developed a high-sensitivity, high-throughput, high-specificity real-time quantitative reverse t...

  8. Biological Rhythms and Temperature Regulation in Rhesus Monkeys During Spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, Charles A. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    This program examined the influence of microgravity on temperature regulation and circadian timekeeping systems in Rhesus monkeys. Animals flown on the Soviet Biosatellite COSMOS 2229 were exposed to 11 2/3 days of microgravity. The circadian patterns temperature regulation, heart rate and activity were monitored constantly. This experiment has extended previous observations from COSMOS 1514 and 2044, as well as provided insights into the physiological mechanisms that produce these changes.

  9. Neurochemical Phenotypes of Myenteric Neurons in the Rhesus Monkey

    OpenAIRE

    Noorian, Ali Reza; Taylor, Georgia M.; Annerino, Dana M.; Greene, James G.

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the neurochemical composition of the enteric nervous system (ENS) is critical for elucidating neurological function in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract in health and disease. Despite their status as the closest models of human neurological systems, relatively little is known about enteric neurochemistry in nonhuman primates. We describe neurochemical coding of the enteric nervous system, specifically the myenteric plexus, of the rhesus monkey (Macaca mulatta) by immunohistochemis...

  10. Rhesus Monkeys Behave As If They Perceive the Duncker Illusion

    OpenAIRE

    Zivotofsky, A. Z.; Goldberg, M. E.; Powell, K. D.

    2005-01-01

    The visual system uses the pattern of motion on the retina to analyze the motion of objects in the world, and the motion of the observer him/herself. Distinguishing between retinal motion evoked by movement of the retina in space and retinal motion evoked by movement of objects in the environment is computationally difficult, and the human visual system frequently misinterprets the meaning of retinal motion. In this study, we demonstrate that the visual system of the Rhesus monkey also misint...

  11. Extraction and Analysis of Cortisol from Human and Monkey Hair

    OpenAIRE

    Meyer, Jerrold; Novak, Melinda; Hamel, Amanda; Rosenberg, Kendra

    2014-01-01

    The stress hormone cortisol (CORT) is slowly incorporated into the growing hair shaft of humans, nonhuman primates, and other mammals. We developed and validated a method for CORT extraction and analysis from rhesus monkey hair and subsequently adapted this method for use with human scalp hair. In contrast to CORT "point samples" obtained from plasma or saliva, hair CORT provides an integrated measure of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical (HPA) system activity, and thus physiological stres...

  12. Pharmacokinetics of bisphenol A in neonatal and adult rhesus monkeys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is a high-production volume industrial chemical used in the manufacture of polycarbonate plastic products and epoxy resin-based food can liners. The presence of BPA in urine of > 90% of Americans aged 6-60 is controversial because of the potential for endocrine disruption, particularly during perinatal development, as suggested by in vitro, experimental animal, and epidemiological studies. The current study used LC/MS/MS to measure serum pharmacokinetics of aglycone (active) and conjugated (inactive) BPA in adult and neonatal rhesus monkeys by oral (PND 5, 35, 70) and intravenous injection (PND 77) routes using d6-BPA to avoid sample contamination. The concentration-time profiles observed in adult monkeys following oral administration of 100 μg/kg bw were remarkably similar to those previously reported in human volunteers given a similar dose; moreover, minimal pharmacokinetic differences were observed between neonatal and adult monkeys for the receptor-active aglycone form of BPA. Circulating concentrations of BPA aglycone were quite low following oral administration (< 1% of total), which reflects the redundancy of active UDP-glucuronosyl transferase isoforms in both gut and liver. No age-related changes were seen in internal exposure metrics for aglycone BPA in monkeys, a result clearly different from developing rats where significant inverse age-related changes, based on immaturity of Phase II metabolism and renal excretion, were recently reported. These observations imply that any toxicological effect observed in rats from early postnatal exposures to BPA could over-predict those possible in primates of the same age, based on significantly higher internal exposures and overall immaturity at birth.

  13. Temple Monkeys and Health Implications of Commensalism, Kathmandu, Nepal

    OpenAIRE

    Jones-Engel, Lisa; Engel, Gregory A.; Heidrich, John; Chalise, Mukesh; Poudel, Narayan; Viscidi, Raphael; Peter A Barry; Allan, Jonathan S; Grant, Richard; Kyes, Randy

    2006-01-01

    The threat of zoonotic transmission of infectious agents at monkey temples highlights the necessity of investigating the prevalence of enzootic infectious agents in these primate populations. Biological samples were collected from 39 rhesus macaques at the Swoyambhu Temple and tested by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, Western blot, polymerase chain reaction, or combination of these tests for evidence of infection with rhesus cytomegalovirus (RhCMV), Cercopithecine herpesvirus 1 (CHV-1), si...

  14. Habitat degradation impacts black howler monkey (Alouatta pigra) gastrointestinal microbiomes

    OpenAIRE

    Amato, Katherine R.; Yeoman, Carl J.; Kent, Angela; Righini, Nicoletta; Carbonero, Franck; Estrada, Alejandro; Rex Gaskins, H; Stumpf, Rebecca M.; Yildirim, Suleyman; Torralba, Manolito; Gillis, Marcus; Wilson, Brenda A.; Nelson, Karen E; White, Bryan A; Leigh, Steven R

    2013-01-01

    The gastrointestinal (GI) microbiome contributes significantly to host nutrition and health. However, relationships involving GI microbes, their hosts and host macrohabitats remain to be established. Here, we define clear patterns of variation in the GI microbiomes of six groups of Mexican black howler monkeys (Alouatta pigra) occupying a gradation of habitats including a continuous evergreen rainforest, an evergreen rainforest fragment, a continuous semi-deciduous forest and captivity. High ...

  15. Spontaneous number representation in semi-free-ranging rhesus monkeys.

    OpenAIRE

    Hauser, M D; Carey, S; Hauser, L B

    2000-01-01

    Previous research has shown that animals possess considerable numerical abilities. However, this work was based on experiments involving extensive training, a small number of captive subjects and relatively artificial testing procedures. We present the results of experiments on over 200 semi-free-ranging rhesus monkeys using a task which involves no training and mimics a natural foraging problem. The subjects observed two experimenters place pieces of apple, one at a time, into each of two op...

  16. The "vegetarian brain": chatting with monkeys and pigs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filippi, Massimo; Riccitelli, Gianna; Meani, Alessandro; Falini, Andrea; Comi, Giancarlo; Rocca, Maria A

    2013-09-01

    An array of brain regions in the fronto-parietal and temporal lobes cooperates to process observation and execution of actions performed by other individuals. Using functional MRI, we hypothesized that vegetarians and vegans might show brain responses to mouth actions performed by humans, monkeys, and pigs different from omnivores. We scanned 20 omnivores, 19 vegetarians, and 21 vegans while watching a series of silent videos, which presented a single mouth action performed by a human, a monkey, and a pig. Compared to omnivores, vegetarians and vegans have increased functional connectivity between regions of the fronto-parietal and temporal lobes versus the cerebellum during observation of mouth actions performed by humans and, to the same degree, animals. Vegans also had increased connectivity with the supplementary motor area. During human mouth actions, increased amygdala activity in vegetarians and vegans was found. More critically, vegetarians recruited the right middle frontal gyrus and insula, which are involved in social mirroring, whereas vegans activated the left inferior frontal gyrus and middle temporal gyrus, which are part of the mirror neuron system. Monkey mouth actions triggered language network activity in both groups, which might be due to the attempt to decode monkey mouth gesture, with an additional recruitment of associative temporo-occipital areas in vegans, whereas pig mouth actions activated empathy-related regions, including the anterior cingulum. These results support the role of the action observation-execution matching system in social cognition, which enables us to interact not only with our conspecifics but also with species in phylogenetic proximity to humans. PMID:23052545

  17. Playing Educational Math Games at Home: The Monkey Tales Case

    OpenAIRE

    Derboven, Jan; Zaman, Bieke; Geerts, David; De Grooff, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    In research on educational games, the majority of studies have been executed in controlled school settings: the home as a context in which educational games are played, is still underexplored. However, the home context is becoming more important, as children are increasingly encouraged or even required to engage with learning content at home through educational games. In this article, we describe a study of Monkey Tales, an educational math game targeted at primary school children. Using a co...

  18. Capuchin monkeys display affiliation towards humans who imitate them

    OpenAIRE

    Paukner, Annika; Suomi, Stephen J.; Visalberghi, Elisabetta; Ferrari, Pier F.

    2009-01-01

    During social interactions, humans often unconsciously and unintentionally imitate the behaviors of others, which increases rapport, liking, and empathy between interaction partners. This effect is thought to be an evolutionary adaptation facilitating group living, and may therefore be shared with other primate species. Here we show that capuchin monkeys, a highly social primate species, prefer human imitators in a variety of ways: they look longer at imitators, spend more time in proximity t...

  19. Immunocytochemical Evidence that Monkey Rod Bipolar Cells Use GABA

    OpenAIRE

    Lassová, Luisa; Fina, Marie; Sulaiman, Pyroja; Vard, Noga

    2010-01-01

    Certain bipolar cells in most species immunostain for GABA or its synthesizing enzyme, GAD. However it is unknown whether they actually release GABA, and if so, from which cellular compartment, and by what release mechanism. We investigated these questions in monkey retina where rod bipolar cells immunostain for GABA. We found that rod bipolar cells immunostain for one isoform of GAD, GAD65, in their somas, dendrites, and axon terminals. Near the fovea, the somatic stain of rod bipolar cells ...

  20. Cloning and Comparison of Factor X from Rhesus Monkey (Macaca mulatta)

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Younan; Qin, Shengfang; Tan, Weidong; Lu, Yanrong; Jie ZHANG; Li, Hongxia; Bu, Hong; Cheng, Jingqiu

    2009-01-01

    The reliability of the rhesus monkey as an important experimental animal depends on its genetic concordance with human. During our assessment of the rhesus monkey as a preclinical model for coagulation-related research, we cloned the full-length cDNA of rhesus monkey factor X (FX) and compared its genetic characteristics and coagulation activity with those of human FX. The full-length cDNA of rhesus monkey FX was 1683 bp in length, corresponding to 487 coding amino acids and sharing 94.71% nu...

  1. Plasmodium simium/Plasmodium vivax infections in southern brown howler monkeys from the Atlantic Forest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Camargos Costa

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Blood infection by the simian parasite, Plasmodium simium, was identified in captive (n = 45, 4.4% and in wild Alouatta clamitans monkeys (n = 20, 35% from the Atlantic Forest of southern Brazil. A single malaria infection was symptomatic and the monkey presented clinical and haematological alterations. A high frequency of Plasmodium vivax-specific antibodies was detected among these monkeys, with 87% of the monkeys testing positive against P. vivax antigens. These findings highlight the possibility of malaria as a zoonosis in the remaining Atlantic Forest and its impact on the epidemiology of the disease.

  2. Ecological interaction and phylogeny, studying functionality on composed networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Claudia P. T.; Fonseca, Carlos Roberto; Corso, Gilberto

    2012-02-01

    We study a class of composed networks that are formed by two tree networks, TP and TA, whose end points touch each other through a bipartite network BPA. We explore this network using a functional approach. We are interested in how much the topology, or the structure, of TX (X=A or P) determines the links of BPA. This composed structure is a useful model in evolutionary biology, where TP and TA are the phylogenetic trees of plants and animals that interact in an ecological community. We make use of ecological networks of dispersion of fruits, which are formed by frugivorous animals and plants with fruits; the animals, usually birds, eat fruits and disperse their seeds. We analyse how the phylogeny of TX determines or is correlated with BPA using a Monte Carlo approach. We use the phylogenetic distance among elements that interact with a given species to construct an index κ that quantifies the influence of TX over BPA. The algorithm is based on the assumption that interaction matrices that follows a phylogeny of TX have a total phylogenetic distance smaller than the average distance of an ensemble of Monte Carlo realisations. We find that the effect of phylogeny of animal species is more pronounced in the ecological matrix than plant phylogeny.

  3. THEORETICAL FOUNDATIONS OF COMPOSING A REFERENCE BOOK OF REGIONAL TOPONYMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilyin Dmitriy Yuryevich

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the linguistic issues of composing a reference book of regional toponyms – a genre that requires special consideration in national lexicography. The assortment of these issues gave the possibility to carry out complex description of regional toponyms on the basis of semantic, functional, and orpthologuos criteria that let unify the names of Volgograd region settlements that are registered in various documents. The significance of the composed reference book is determined by several factors – the presence of local subsystems of geographical names in Russian toponymy; the inconsistency of current orthography norms on using capital letter in compound proprius names and fused-with-hyphen spelling of toponyms and off-toponym derivations; the lack of linguistically justified explanation of peculiarities of grammatical norms in the field of proper names use. The reference book of regional toponyms is based on the object description (toponymic vocabulary, principles of lexical units selection (description of spelling and grammatical properties of toponyms, encyclopedic information, the glossary (full list of toponyms of Volgograd region, typical article. The articles in the reference book are arranged in lexicographical zones with grammatical and semantic markers, lexicographical illustrations, other lexicographical labels, word etymology including. The reference book on Volgograd region toponymy is addressed to executive and administration authorities, journalists, regional ethnographers.

  4. Amyloid fibrils composed of hexameric peptides attenuate neuroinflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurnellas, Michael P; Adams, Chris M; Sobel, Raymond A; Steinman, Lawrence; Rothbard, Jonathan B

    2013-04-01

    The amyloid-forming proteins tau, αB crystallin, and amyloid P protein are all found in lesions of multiple sclerosis (MS). Our previous work established that amyloidogenic peptides from the small heat shock protein αB crystallin (HspB5) and from amyloid β fibrils, characteristic of Alzheimer's disease, were therapeutic in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), reflecting aspects of the pathology of MS. To understand the molecular basis for the therapeutic effect, we showed a set of amyloidogenic peptides composed of six amino acids, including those from tau, amyloid β A4, major prion protein (PrP), HspB5, amylin, serum amyloid P, and insulin B chain, to be anti-inflammatory and capable of reducing serological levels of interleukin-6 and attenuating paralysis in EAE. The chaperone function of the fibrils correlates with the therapeutic outcome. Fibrils composed of tau 623-628 precipitated 49 plasma proteins, including apolipoprotein B-100, clusterin, transthyretin, and complement C3, supporting the hypothesis that the fibrils are active biological agents. Amyloid fibrils thus may provide benefit in MS and other neuroinflammatory disorders. PMID:23552370

  5. Capuchin monkeys do not show human-like pricing effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catapano, Rhia; Buttrick, Nicholas; Widness, Jane; Goldstein, Robin; Santos, Laurie R

    2014-01-01

    Recent work in judgment and decision-making has shown that a good's price can have irrational effects on people's preferences. People tend to prefer goods that cost more money and assume that such expensive goods will be more effective, even in cases where the price of the good is itself arbitrary. Although much work has documented the existence of these pricing effects, unfortunately little work has addressed where these price effects come from in the first place. Here we use a comparative approach to distinguish between different accounts of this bias and to explore the origins of these effects. Specifically, we test whether brown capuchin monkeys (Cebus apella) are also susceptible to pricing effects within the context of an experimentally trained token economy. Using a capuchin population previously trained in a token market, we explored whether monkeys used price as an indicator of value across four experiments. Although monkeys demonstrated an understanding of which goods had which prices (consistently shifting preferences to cheaper goods when prices were increased), we observed no evidence that such price information affected their valuation of different kinds of goods. These results suggest that human pricing effects may involve more sophisticated human-unique cognitive capacities, such as an understanding of market forces and signaling. PMID:25520677

  6. Capuchin monkeys do not show human-like pricing effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rhia eCatapano

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Recent work in judgment and decision-making has shown that a good’s price can have irrational effects on people’s preferences. People tend to prefer goods that cost more money and assume that such expensive goods will be more effective, even in cases where the price of the good is itself arbitrary. Although much work has documented the existence of these pricing effects, unfortunately little work has addressed where these price effects come from in the first place. Here we use a comparative approach to distinguish between different accounts of this bias and to explore the origins of these effects. Specifically, we test whether brown capuchin monkeys (Cebus apella are also susceptible to pricing effects within the context of an experimentally trained token economy. Using a capuchin population previously trained in a token market, we explored whether monkeys used price as an indicator of value across four experiments. Although monkeys demonstrated an understanding of which goods had which prices (consistently shifting preferences to cheaper goods when prices were increased, we observed no evidence that such price information affected their valuation of different kinds of goods. These results suggest that human price effects may involve more sophisticated human-unique cognitive capacities, such as an understanding of market forces and signaling.

  7. Testing NF-κB-based therapy in hemiparkinsonian monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Susanta; Roy, Avik; Jana, Arundhati; Ghosh, Sankar; Kordower, Jeffrey H; Pahan, Kalipada

    2012-09-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is the most common human neurodegenerative disorder affecting movement, balance, flexibility, and coordination. Despite intense investigation, no effective therapy is available to stop the onset PD or halt its progression. The primate model of PD is considered to be one of the best available models for human PD. Since neuroinflammation plays an important role in the pathogenesis of PD and NF-κB, a proinflammatory transcription factor, participates in the transcription of many proinflammatory molecules, this study evaluates the ability of a peptide corresponding to the NF-κB essential modifier (NEMO)-binding domain (NBD) of IκB kinase (IKK)α or IKKβ to protect dopaminergic neurons in hemiparkinsonian monkeys. First, we found that NF-κB was activated within the substantia nigra pars compacta of 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP)-intoxicated hemiparkinsonian monkeys. However, intramuscular injection of wild type NBD (wtNBD) peptide reduced nigral activation of NF-κB and expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase, protected both the nigrostriatal axis and neurotransmitters, and improved motor functions in hemiparkinsonian monkeys. These findings were specific as mutated NBD peptide did not exhibit such effects. These results may help in the translation of NF-κB-based therapy to PD clinics. PMID:22661311

  8. Prenatal methylmercury exposure affects spatial vision in adult monkeys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decades of research have demonstrated that exposure to methylmercury (MeHg), a ubiquitous environmental pollutant, can have both early and long-term neurobehavioral consequences in exposed offspring. The present study assessed visual functioning in adult macaque monkeys (Macaca fascicularis) exposed in utero to 0, 50, 70, or 90 μg/kg/day of MeHg hydroxide. Twenty-one full-term, normal birth weight offspring (9 controls, 12 exposed) were tested at approximately 11-14.5 years of age on a visual contrast sensitivity task. A forced-choice tracking procedure was utilized with spatial frequencies of 1, 4, 10, and 20 cycles per degree of visual angle. On each test session, a single spatial frequency was presented across five levels of contrast, each differing by 3 dB. Methylmercury-exposed monkeys exhibited reduced contrast sensitivity thresholds, particularly at the higher spatial frequencies. The degree of visual impairment was not related to MeHg body burden or clearance and almost half of the exposed animals were unimpaired. The results from this study demonstrate that chronic in utero MeHg exposure, at subclinical levels, is associated with permanent adverse effects on spatial vision in adult monkeys

  9. Hippocampal formation lesions produce memory impairment in the rhesus monkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beason-Held, L L; Rosene, D L; Killiany, R J; Moss, M B

    1999-01-01

    There is much debate over the role of temporal lobe structures in the ability to learn and retain new information. To further assess the contributions of the hippocampal formation (HF), five rhesus monkeys received stereotactically placed ibotenic acid lesions of this region without involvement of surrounding ventromedial temporal cortices. After surgery, the animals were trained on two recognition memory tasks: the Delayed Non-Match to Sample (DNMS) task, which tests the ability to remember specific trial unique stimuli, and the Delayed Recognition Span Task (DRST), which tests the ability to remember an increasing array of stimuli. Relative to normal control monkeys, those with HF lesions demonstrated significant impairments in both learning and memory stages of the DNMS task. Additionally, the HF group was significantly impaired on spatial, color, and object versions of the DRST. Contrary to suggestions that damage to the entorhinal and parahippocampal cortices is required to produce significant behavioral deficits in the monkey, these results demonstrate that selective damage to the HF is sufficient to produce impairments on tasks involving delayed recognition and memory load. This finding illustrates the importance of the HF in the acquisition and retention of new information. PMID:10560927

  10. High-speed recording of neural spikes in awake mice and flies with a fluorescent voltage sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Yiyang; Huang, Cheng; Li, Jin Zhong; Grewe, Benjamin F.; Zhang, Yanping; Eismann, Stephan; Schnitzer, Mark J.

    2016-01-01

    Genetically encoded voltage indicators (GEVIs) are a promising technology for fluorescence readout of millisecond-scale neuronal dynamics. Previous GEVIs had insufficient signaling speed and dynamic range to resolve action potentials in live animals. We coupled fast voltage-sensing domains from a rhodopsin protein to bright fluorophores through resonance energy transfer. The resulting GEVIs are sufficiently bright and fast to report neuronal action potentials and membrane voltage dynamics in awake mice and flies, resolving fast spike trains with 0.2-millisecond timing precision at spike detection error rates orders of magnitude better than previous GEVIs. In vivo imaging revealed sensory-evoked responses, including somatic spiking, dendritic dynamics, and intracellular voltage propagation. These results empower in vivo optical studies of neuronal electrophysiology and coding and motivate further advancements in high-speed microscopy. PMID:26586188

  11. The neuropharmacology of upper airway motor control in the awake and asleep states: implications for obstructive sleep apnoea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Horner Richard L

    2001-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Obstructive sleep apnoea is a common and serious breathing problem that is caused by effects of sleep on pharyngeal muscle tone in individuals with narrow upper airways. There has been increasing focus on delineating the brain mechanisms that modulate pharyngeal muscle activity in the awake and asleep states in order to understand the pathogenesis of obstructive apnoeas and to develop novel neurochemical treatments. Although initial clinical studies have met with only limited success, it is proposed that more rational and realistic approaches may be devised for neurochemical modulation of pharyngeal muscle tone as the relevant neurotransmitters and receptors that are involved in sleep-dependent modulation are identified following basic experiments.

  12. Music and the Nature: Input of the Czech Composers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemec, Vaclav; Nemcova, Lidmila

    2014-05-01

    Extraordinary occasions for art of any kind - music, creative graphic and plastic arts, literature (classic, modern incl. science fiction), theatre, cinema, etc. - exist to harmonise individual personal interests with those of the humanity well-being and of the Nature and also to cultivate individual spirituality and the appropriate values. Arts can be applied as irreplaceable means for making any human being better, for improving his sense for solidarity and for increasing his ethical sensibility. An interest for the art should be cultivated already since the childhood. - How much of inspiration for numerous composers all over the world has been given by the Nature, how much of inspiration for people who by listening to such a music are increasing nobility of their behaviour as well as their friendly approach to the Nature. - Many classical music works have been written with a strong inspiration by the Nature itself from the past until today. The actual Year of the Czech Music gives the possibility to present the most famous Czech composers inspired by the Nature (selected examples only): Bedřich Smetana (1824 - 1884): At the sea shore - a concert etude for piano inspired by his stay in Göteborg (Sweden); Vltava (Moldau) - a symphonic poem from the cycle "My country" inspired by the river crossing Bohemia from the South to Prague; From the Bohemian woods and meadows - another symphonic poem from the same cycle. Antonín Dvořák (1841 - 1904): V přírodě (In the Nature) - a work for orchestra Leoš Janáček (1854 - 1928): Příhody li\\vsky Bystrou\\vsky (The Cunning Little Vixen) - an opera situated mostly in a forest. Josef Bohuslav Foerster (1859-1951): Velké širé rodné lány (Big large native fields) - a choir for men singers inspired by the nature in the region where the composer as a boy from Prague was visiting his grand-father. Vítězslav Novák (1870 - 1949): In Tatra mountains - a symphonic poem expressing the author's passion for the famous

  13. Topical airway anesthesia for awake fiberoptic intubation: Comparison between airway nerve blocks and nebulized lignocaine by ultrasonic nebulizer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babita Gupta

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Overview: Awake fiberoptic bronchoscope (FOB guided intubation is the gold standard of airway management in patients with cervical spine injury. It is essential to sufficiently anesthetize the upper airway before the performance of awake FOB guided intubation in order to ensure patient comfort and cooperation. This randomized controlled study was performed to compare two methods of airway anesthesia, namely ultrasonic nebulization of local anesthetic and performance of airway blocks. Materials and Methods: A total of 50 adult patients with cervical spine injury were randomly allocated into two groups. Group L received airway anesthesia through ultrasonic nebulization of 10 ml of 4% lignocaine and Group NB received airway blocks (bilateral superior laryngeal and transtracheal recurrent laryngeal each with 2 ml of 2% lignocaine and viscous lignocaine gargles. FOB guided orotracheal intubation was then performed. Hemodynamic variables at baseline and during the procedure, patient recall, vocal cord visibility, ease of intubation, coughing/gagging episodes, and signs of lignocaine toxicity were noted. Results: The observations did not reveal any significant differences in demographics or hemodynamic parameters at any time during the study. However, the time taken for intubation was significantly lower in Group NB as compared with the Group L. Group L had an increased number of coughing/gagging episodes as compared with Group NB. Vocal cord visibility and ease of intubation were better in patients who received airway blocks and hence the amount of supplemental lignocaine used was less in this group. Overall patient comfort was better in Group NB with fewer incidences of unpleasant recalls as compared with Group L. Conclusion: Upper airway blocks provide better quality of anesthesia than lignocaine nebulization as assessed by patient recall of procedure, coughing/gagging episodes, ease of intubation, vocal cord visibility, and time taken to intubate.

  14. A simple and novel method to monitor breathing and heart rate in awake and urethane-anesthetized newborn rodents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph M Zehendner

    Full Text Available Rodents are most useful models to study physiological and pathophysiological processes in early development, because they are born in a relatively immature state. However, only few techniques are available to monitor non-invasively heart frequency and respiratory rate in neonatal rodents without restraining or hindering access to the animal. Here we describe experimental procedures that allow monitoring of heart frequency by electrocardiography (ECG and breathing rate with a piezoelectric transducer (PZT element without hindering access to the animal. These techniques can be easily installed and are used in the present study in unrestrained awake and anesthetized neonatal C57/Bl6 mice and Wistar rats between postnatal day 0 and 7. In line with previous reports from awake rodents we demonstrate that heart rate in rats and mice increases during the first postnatal week. Respiratory frequency did not differ between both species, but heart rate was significantly higher in mice than in rats. Further our data indicate that urethane, an agent that is widely used for anesthesia, induces a hypoventilation in neonates whilst heart rate remains unaffected at a dose of 1 g per kg body weight. Of note, hypoventilation induced by urethane was not detected in rats at postnatal 0/1. To verify the detected hypoventilation we performed blood gas analyses. We detected a respiratory acidosis reflected by a lower pH and elevated level in CO2 tension (pCO2 in both species upon urethane treatment. Furthermore we found that metabolism of urethane is different in P0/1 mice and rats and between P0/1 and P6/7 in both species. Our findings underline the usefulness of monitoring basic cardio-respiratory parameters in neonates during anesthesia. In addition our study gives information on developmental changes in heart and breathing frequency in newborn mice and rats and the effects of urethane in both species during the first postnatal week.

  15. Advantages and disadvantages of intraoperative language tasks in awake surgery: a three-task approach for prefrontal tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rofes, A; Spena, G; Miozzo, A; Fontanella, M M; Miceli, G

    2015-12-01

    Multidisciplinary efforts are being made to provide surgical teams with sensitive and specific tasks for language mapping in awake surgery. Researchers and clinicians have elaborated different tasks over time. A fair amount of work has been directed to study the neurofunctional correlates of some of these tasks, and there is recent interest in their standardization. However, little discussion exists on the advantages and disadvantages that each task poses from the perspective of the cognitive neuroscience of language. Such an approach may be a relevant step to assess task validity, to avoid using tasks that tap onto similar processes, and to provide patients with a surgical treatment that ensures maximal tumor resection while avoiding postoperative language deficits. An understanding of the language components that each task entails may also be relevant to improve the current assessments and the ways in which tasks are administered, and to disentangle neurofunctional questions. We reviewed 17 language mapping tasks that have been used in awake surgery. Overt production tasks have been a preferred choice over comprehension tasks. Tasks tapping lexico-semantic processes, particularly object-naming, maintain their role as gold standards. Automated speech tasks are used to detect speech errors and to set the amplitude of the stimulator. Comprehension tasks, reading and writing tasks, and tasks that assess grammatical aspects of language may be regularly administered in the near future. We provide examples of a three-task approach we are administering to patients with prefrontal lesions. We believe that future advances in this area are contingent upon reviewing gold standards and introducing new assessment tools. PMID:26159550

  16. Formation and maintenance of ventilatory long-term facilitation require NMDA but not non-NMDA receptors in awake rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuire, Michelle; Liu, Chun; Cao, Ying; Ling, Liming

    2008-09-01

    N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonism in the phrenic motonucleus area eliminates phrenic long-term facilitation (pLTF; a persistent augmentation of phrenic nerve activity after episodic hypoxia) in anesthetized rats. However, whether NMDA antagonism can eliminate ventilatory LTF (vLTF) in awake rats is unclear. The role of non-NMDA receptors in LTF is also unknown. Serotonin receptor antagonism before, but not after, episodic hypoxia eliminates pLTF, suggesting that serotonin receptors are required for induction, but not maintenance, of pLTF. However, because NMDA and non-NMDA ionotropic glutamate receptors are directly involved in mediating the inspiratory drive to phrenic, hypoglossal, and intercostal motoneurons, we hypothesized that these receptors are required for both formation and maintenance of vLTF. vLTF, induced by five episodes of 5-min poikilocapnic hypoxia (10% O(2)) with 5-min normoxia intervals, was measured with plethysmography in conscious adult male Sprague-Dawley rats. Either (+/-)-2-amino-5-phosphonovaleric acid (APV; NMDA antagonist, 1.5 mg/kg) or 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (CNQX; non-NMDA antagonist, 10 mg/kg) was systemically (ip) injected approximately 30 min before hypoxia. APV was also injected immediately after or 20 min after episodic hypoxia in additional groups. As control, vehicle was similarly injected in each rat 1-2 days before. Regardless of being injected before or after episodic hypoxia, vehicle did not alter vLTF ( approximately 23%), whereas APV eliminated vLTF while having little effect on baseline ventilation or hypoxic ventilatory response. In contrast, CNQX enhanced vLTF ( approximately 34%) while decreasing baseline ventilation. Collectively, these results suggest that activation of NMDA but not non-NMDA receptors is necessary for formation and maintenance of vLTF in awake rats. PMID:18583381

  17. Success rates and complications of awake caudal versus spinal block in preterm infants undergoing inguinal hernia repair: A prospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahin Seyedhejazi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Inguinal hernia is a common disease in preterm infants necessitating surgical repair. Despite the increased risk of postoperative apnea in preterm infants, the procedure was conventionally performed under general anesthesia. Recently, regional anesthesia approaches, including spinal and caudal blocks have been proposed as safe and efficient alternative anesthesia methods in this group of patients. The current study evaluates awake caudal and spinal blocks in preterm infants undergoing inguinal hernia repair. Materials and Methods: In a randomized clinical trial, 66 neonates and infants (weight <5 kg undergoing inguinal hernia repair were recruited in Tabriz Teaching Children Hospital during a 12-month period. They were randomly divided into two equal groups; receiving either caudal block by 1 ml/kg of 0.25% bupivacaine plus 20 μg adrenaline (group C or spinal block by 1 mg/kg of 0.5% bupivacaine plus 20 μg adrenaline (group S. Vital signs and pain scores were documented during operation and thereafter up to 24 h after operation. Results: Decrease in heart rate and systolic blood pressure was significantly higher in group C throughout the study period (P < 0.05. The mean recovery time was significantly higher in group S (27.3 ± 5.5 min vs. 21.8 ± 9.3 min; P = 0.03. Postoperative need for analgesia was significantly more frequent in group S (75.8% vs. 36.4%; P = 0.001. Failure in anesthesia was significantly higher in group S (24.4% vs. 6.1%; P = 0.04. Conclusion: More appropriate success rate, duration of recovery and postoperative need of analgesics could contribute to caudal block being a superior anesthesia technique compared to spinal anesthesia in awaked preterm infants undergoing inguinal hernia repair.

  18. Decreased gastric emptying and gastrointestinal and intestinal transits of liquid after complete spinal cord transection in awake rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gondim F. de-A.A.

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available We studied the effect of complete spinal cord transection (SCT on gastric emptying (GE and on gastrointestinal (GI and intestinal transits of liquid in awake rats using the phenol red method. Male Wistar rats (N = 65 weighing 180-200 g were fasted for 24 h and complete SCT was performed between C7 and T1 vertebrae after a careful midline dorsal incision. GE and GI and intestinal transits were measured 15 min, 6 h or 24 h after recovery from anesthesia. A test meal (0.5 mg/ml phenol red in 5% glucose solution was administered intragastrically (1.5 ml and the animals were sacrificed by an iv thiopental overdose 10 min later to evaluate GE and GI transit. For intestinal transit measurements, 1 ml of the test meal was administered into the proximal duodenum through a cannula inserted into a gastric fistula. GE was inhibited (P<0.05 by 34.3, 23.4 and 22.7%, respectively, at 15 min, 6 h and 24 h after SCT. GI transit was inhibited (P<0.05 by 42.5, 19.8 and 18.4%, respectively, at 15 min, 6 h and 24 h after SCT. Intestinal transit was also inhibited (P<0.05 by 48.8, 47.2 and 40.1%, respectively, at 15 min, 6 h and 24 h after SCT. Mean arterial pressure was significantly decreased (P<0.05 by 48.5, 46.8 and 41.5%, respectively, at 15 min, 6 h and 24 h after SCT. In summary, our report describes a decreased GE and GI and intestinal transits in awake rats within the first 24 h after high SCT.

  19. A Simple and Novel Method to Monitor Breathing and Heart Rate in Awake and Urethane-Anesthetized Newborn Rodents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zehendner, Christoph M.; Luhmann, Heiko J.; Yang, Jenq-Wei

    2013-01-01

    Rodents are most useful models to study physiological and pathophysiological processes in early development, because they are born in a relatively immature state. However, only few techniques are available to monitor non-invasively heart frequency and respiratory rate in neonatal rodents without restraining or hindering access to the animal. Here we describe experimental procedures that allow monitoring of heart frequency by electrocardiography (ECG) and breathing rate with a piezoelectric transducer (PZT) element without hindering access to the animal. These techniques can be easily installed and are used in the present study in unrestrained awake and anesthetized neonatal C57/Bl6 mice and Wistar rats between postnatal day 0 and 7. In line with previous reports from awake rodents we demonstrate that heart rate in rats and mice increases during the first postnatal week. Respiratory frequency did not differ between both species, but heart rate was significantly higher in mice than in rats. Further our data indicate that urethane, an agent that is widely used for anesthesia, induces a hypoventilation in neonates whilst heart rate remains unaffected at a dose of 1 g per kg body weight. Of note, hypoventilation induced by urethane was not detected in rats at postnatal 0/1. To verify the detected hypoventilation we performed blood gas analyses. We detected a respiratory acidosis reflected by a lower pH and elevated level in CO2 tension (pCO2) in both species upon urethane treatment. Furthermore we found that metabolism of urethane is different in P0/1 mice and rats and between P0/1 and P6/7 in both species. Our findings underline the usefulness of monitoring basic cardio-respiratory parameters in neonates during anesthesia. In addition our study gives information on developmental changes in heart and breathing frequency in newborn mice and rats and the effects of urethane in both species during the first postnatal week. PMID:23658756

  20. COMPOSE-HPC: A Transformational Approach to Exascale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernholdt, David E [ORNL; Allan, Benjamin A. [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL); Armstrong, Robert C. [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL); Chavarria-Miranda, Daniel [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Dahlgren, Tamara L. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Elwasif, Wael R [ORNL; Epperly, Tom [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Foley, Samantha S [ORNL; Hulette, Geoffrey C. [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL); Krishnamoorthy, Sriram [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Prantl, Adrian [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Panyala, Ajay [Louisiana State University; Sottile, Matthew [Galois, Inc.

    2012-04-01

    The goal of the COMPOSE-HPC project is to 'democratize' tools for automatic transformation of program source code so that it becomes tractable for the developers of scientific applications to create and use their own transformations reliably and safely. This paper describes our approach to this challenge, the creation of the KNOT tool chain, which includes tools for the creation of annotation languages to control the transformations (PAUL), to perform the transformations (ROTE), and optimization and code generation (BRAID), which can be used individually and in combination. We also provide examples of current and future uses of the KNOT tools, which include transforming code to use different programming models and environments, providing tests that can be used to detect errors in software or its execution, as well as composition of software written in different programming languages, or with different threading patterns.

  1. Optimal arrangement of meta-atoms composing metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Yi-Chen; Dudley, Richard; Fiddy, Michael A.

    2012-03-01

    In order to better understand how to improve the performance of a superlens, structural and geometrical arrangements of meta-atoms are investigated. Each meta-atom (i.e. the unit element composing a metamaterial) in our study is an asymmetric 3D "S"-shaped resonator. This structure radiates an enhanced scattered field at several possible resonant frequencies, some of which are out of phase with the incident wave. We retrieve the effective parameters of different metamaterials and discuss the role of meta-atom symmetries and dimensions in affecting the effective refractive index of a metamaterial slab. Relative locations and orientations of individual meta-atoms are investigated to provide desired properties with low loss despite the inevitable finite size of each meta-atom. The results presented provide insights for designing superlenses, resonant antennas, and other potential applications.

  2. Drugs composed of polysaccharides obtained from lipopolysaccharides extracted from bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This invention concerns a protection and control agent against irradiation in living beings, composed of polysaccharides, called PS, obtained from lipopolysaccharides (LPS), which in turn are extracted from Gram-negative bacteria after separation of the major part and preferably all the initial lipid content of these LPS's. The molecular weight of the PS ingredients, once purified, is between 8,000 and 35,000 and mainly around 10,000. They contain: around 50 to 70% carbon hydrates by weight; around 1 to 8% hexoamines by weight; around 1 to 5% amino-compounds, among which 1 to 2% amino-acids by weight less than 1% and preferably no fatty acids or lipids and their phosphorus content is around 0.2 to 0.5% by weight

  3. Proton-induced reactions on naturally composed zirconium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sauerwein, Anne; Erbacher, Philipp; Glorius, Jan; Goerres, Joachim; Sonnabend, Kerstin [Institut fuer Angewandte Physik, Goethe Universitaet Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Stech, Edward; Wiescher, Michael [Institute for Structure and Nuclear Astrophysics (ISNAP), University of Notre Dame, Indiana, USA (United States); Joint Institute of Nuclear Astrophysics (United States)

    2014-07-01

    Most reaction rates for the so-called p process, which produces the p nuclei, are adopted from Hauser-Feshbach-model (HFM) calculations. In order to improve the accuracy of theoretically predicted reaction rates, an improvement of its nuclear physics input is required. For this reason naturally composed zirconium was bombarded with protons at energies between 2 MeV and 10 MeV in order to determine cross sections of seven (p,γ) and (p,n) reactions using the activation technique. The irradiations and the γ-ray spectroscopy took place at the ISNAP of the University of Notre Dame, USA. These measurements allow systematic investigations of the proton-optical model potentials, an important input of the HFM, from the neutron closed-shell isotope {sup 90}Zr to the double subshell-closed isotope {sup 96}Zr. In this contribution we present our preliminary results.

  4. Proton-induced reactions on naturally composed zirconium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Most reaction rates for the so-called p process, which produces the p nuclei, are adopted from Hauser-Feshbach-model (HFM) calculations. In order to improve the accuracy of theoretically predicted reaction rates, an improvement of its nuclear physics input is required. For this reason naturally composed zirconium was bombarded with protons at energies between 2 MeV and 10 MeV in order to determine cross sections of seven (p,γ) and (p,n) reactions using the activation technique. The irradiations and the γ-ray spectroscopy took place at the ISNAP of the University of Notre Dame, USA. These measurements allow systematic investigations of the proton-optical model potentials, an important input of the HFM, from the neutron closed-shell isotope 90Zr to the double subshell-closed isotope 96Zr. In this contribution we present our preliminary results.

  5. Universally Composable Multiparty Computation with Partially Isolated Parties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damgård, Ivan Bjerre; Nielsen, Jesper Buus; Wichs, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    assume that a player (Alice) can partially isolate another player (Bob) for a brief portion of the computation and prevent Bob from communicating more than some limited number of bits with the environment. For example, isolation might be achieved by asking Bob to put his functionality on a tamper......It is well known that universally composable multiparty computation cannot, in general, be achieved in the standard model without setup assumptions when the adversary can corrupt an arbitrary number of players. One way to get around this problem is by having a trusted third party generate some......-proof hardware token and assuming that Alice can prevent this token from communicating to the outside world. Alternatively, Alice may interact with Bob directly but in a special office which she administers and where there are no high-bandwidth communication channels to the outside world. We show that, under...

  6. Stereo Matching of Planar Curves Composed of Time Stamped Points

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Shuwen; Zhang Tianxu

    2006-01-01

    Matching features such as curve segments in stereo images play a very important role in scene reconstruction. In this paper, a stereo matching algorithm for the trajectories composed of time stamped points is proposed. Based on time stamped points, planar curve match measurements are given first, such as time constraint, cross-ratio invariant constraint and epipolar geometry constraint;then, a trajectory matching method is proposed based on epipolar geometry constraint and cross-ratio invariant constraint. In order to match the planar curve segments projected by perspective projection system, the curve start time and end time are selected first to prepare match candidates. Then, the epipolar equation is used to discard the unmatched curve segment candidates. At last, a cross ratio invariant constraint is used to find the most matched curve segments. If their match measurement is higher than the specialized threshold, a candidate with the least cross ratio difference is then selected as the match result; otherwise, no match is found. Unlike the conventional planar curve segments matching algorithm, this paper presents a weakly calibrated binocular stereo vision system which is based on wide baseline. The stamped points are obtained by targets detecting method of flying objects from image sequences.Due to wide baseline, there must exist the projection not in epipolar monotonic order or the curve segments located in very short distance and keeping the epipolar monotonic order. By using the method mentioned above, experiments are made to match planar curve segments not only in epipolar monotonic order but also not in epipolar monotonic order. The results show that the performance of our curve matching algorithm is effective for matching the arc-like planar trajectories composed of time stamped points.

  7. No effects of dioxin singly on limb malformations in macaque monkeys through epidemiological and treated studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asaoka, Kazuo; Iida, Hiroko [Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Primate Research Insitute, Dept. of Molecular and Cellular Biochemistry; Watanabe, Kunio [Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Primate Research Institute, Field Research Center; Goda, Hiroshi [Towa Kagaku Co., Ltd. (Japan); Ihara, Toshio; Nagata, Ryoichi [Shin Nippon Biomedical Laboratories, Ltd. (Japan). Safety Research Facility; Yasuda, Mineo [Hiroshima International Univ. (Japan). Fac. of Health Sciences, Dept. of Clinical Engineering; Kubata, Shunichiro [Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Life Science, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences

    2004-09-15

    Human populations exposed with highly dioxin were suspected to be caused immunological dysfunctions, carcinogenesis, and developmental and reproductive dysfunctions. Because of species resemblances, the dioxin effects have been investigating using monkeys as a model for assessment of dioxin exposure on human health. Since 1957 the limb malformations of monkeys in Japan have been reported. The higher frequency of them was found in provisional groups of monkeys who were given the same kind of food for human. The chromosomal abnormalities are excluded from the factor for the congenital limb malformations that are still producing in Japan. In this study, the relations between dioxin and the limb malformations of macaque monkeys were estimated by the epidemiological and administered researches. The dioxin levels in monkeys were measured at two districts that one has the provisional groups including monkeys with limb malformations and the other has breeding groups never seeing the malformations for a long time. TEQ was calculated by the levels of dioxin isomers in the monkeys and the values show no difference between the two places and between the individuals with and without the limb malformations. 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) was administered via subcutaneous to pregnant rhesus monkeys from the day 20 of gestation to the day 90 after birth. The exposed babies, including the offspring and died in neonatal, had observed normal limbs in the range of 30-300 ng TCDD /kg of body weight.

  8. Dynamic Response-by-Response Models of Matching Behavior in Rhesus Monkeys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Brian; Glimcher, Paul W.

    2005-01-01

    We studied the choice behavior of 2 monkeys in a discrete-trial task with reinforcement contingencies similar to those Herrnstein (1961) used when he described the matching law. In each session, the monkeys experienced blocks of discrete trials at different relative-reinforcer frequencies or magnitudes with unsignalled transitions between the…

  9. Nutritional analysis and intervention in the captive woolly monkey (Lagothric lagotricha)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ange-van Heugten, K.D.

    2008-01-01

    Woolly monkeys (Lagothrix ssp.) are a threatened species in the wild and are extremely difficult to breed and successfully maintain in captivity. The majority of health complications in woolly monkeys (WM) may be of nutritional origin. The objectives of this thesis were to: 1) determine the current

  10. Fecal and Salivary Cortisol Concentrations in Woolly (Lagothrix ssp. and Spider Monkeys (Ateles spp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberly D. Ange-van Heugten

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Detrimental physiological effects due to stressors can contribute to the low captive success of primates. The objective of this research was to investigate the potential impact of diet composition on cortisol concentrations in feces and saliva in woolly (n=27 and spider monkeys (n=61. The research was conducted in three studies: the first investigated spider monkeys in the United States, the second investigated spider monkeys within Europe, and the third investigated woolly monkeys within Europe. Fecal cortisol in spider monkeys in US zoos varied (P=.07 from 30 to 66 ng/g. The zoo with the highest fecal cortisol also had the highest salivary cortisol (P≤.05. For European zoos, fecal cortisol differed between zoos for both spider and woolly monkeys (P≤.05. Spider monkeys had higher fecal cortisol than woolly monkeys (P≤.05. Zoos with the highest dietary carbohydrates, sugars, glucose, and fruit had the highest cortisol. Cortisol was highest for zoos that did not meet crude protein requirements and fed the lowest percentage of complete feeds and crude fiber. Differences among zoos in housing and diets may increase animal stress. The lifespan and reproductive success of captive primates could improve if stressors are reduced and dietary nutrients optimized.

  11. Generation of transgenic cynomolgus monkeys that express green fluorescent protein throughout the whole body.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seita, Yasunari; Tsukiyama, Tomoyuki; Iwatani, Chizuru; Tsuchiya, Hideaki; Matsushita, Jun; Azami, Takuya; Okahara, Junko; Nakamura, Shinichiro; Hayashi, Yoshitaka; Hitoshi, Seiji; Itoh, Yasushi; Imamura, Takeshi; Nishimura, Masaki; Tooyama, Ikuo; Miyoshi, Hiroyuki; Saitou, Mitinori; Ogasawara, Kazumasa; Sasaki, Erika; Ema, Masatsugu

    2016-01-01

    Nonhuman primates are valuable for human disease modelling, because rodents poorly recapitulate some human diseases such as Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's disease amongst others. Here, we report for the first time, the generation of green fluorescent protein (GFP) transgenic cynomolgus monkeys by lentivirus infection. Our data show that the use of a human cytomegalovirus immediate-early enhancer and chicken beta actin promoter (CAG) directed the ubiquitous expression of the transgene in cynomolgus monkeys. We also found that injection into mature oocytes before fertilization achieved homogenous expression of GFP in each tissue, including the amnion, and fibroblasts, whereas injection into fertilized oocytes generated a transgenic cynomolgus monkey with mosaic GFP expression. Thus, the injection timing was important to create transgenic cynomolgus monkeys that expressed GFP homogenously in each of the various tissues. The strategy established in this work will be useful for the generation of transgenic cynomolgus monkeys for transplantation studies as well as biomedical research. PMID:27109065

  12. A Deficit in Face-Voice Integration in Developing Vervet Monkeys Exposed to Ethanol during Gestation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zangenehpour, Shahin; Javadi, Pasha; Ervin, Frank R;

    2014-01-01

    used an intersensory matching procedure to investigate audiovisual perception of socially relevant stimuli in young FAE vervet monkeys. Here we show a domain-specific deficit in audiovisual integration of socially relevant stimuli. When FAE monkeys were shown a pair of side-by-side videos of a monkey....... However, a group of normally developing monkeys exhibited a significant preference for the non-matching video. This inability to integrate and thereby discriminate audiovisual stimuli was confined to the integration of faces and voices as revealed by the monkeys' ability to match a dynamic face...... to a complex tone or a black-and-white checkerboard to a pure tone, presumably based on duration and/or onset-offset synchrony. Together, these results suggest that prenatal ethanol exposure negatively affects a specific domain of audiovisual integration. This deficit is confined to the integration...

  13. Effects of selective neonatal temporal lobe lesions on socioemotional behavior in infant rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachevalier, J; Málková, L; Mishkin, M

    2001-06-01

    Normal infant monkeys and infant monkeys with neonatal damage to either the medial temporal lobe or the inferior temporal visual area were assessed in dyadic social interactions at 2 and 6 months of age. Unlike the normal infant monkeys, which developed strong affiliative bonds and little or no behavioral disturbances, the lesioned monkeys (each of which was observed with an unoperated control) exhibited socioemotional abnormalities and aberrant behaviors. The socioemotional changes predominated at 6 months of age and were particularly severe in monkeys with medial temporal lesions. In both the pattern and time course, the socioemotional deficits produced by the neonatal medial temporal lesions bear a striking resemblance to the behavioral syndrome in children with autism. Further analysis of these lesion-induced abnormalities in nonhuman primates may therefore provide insight into this debilitating human developmental disorder. PMID:11439445

  14. Ion transport mediated by copolymers composed of polyoxyethylene and polyoxypropylene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Block copolymers composed of polyoxyethylene and polyoxypropylene were found to increase the influx of Na+ and the efflux of K+ from human erythrocytes. They were, however, ineffective at promoting the transport of 45Ca2+. The size of the ion fluxes induced by the copolymers correlated with their efficacy in stimulating inflammation. These compounds were also found to induce conductance increases in planar lipid bilayers in a nonvoltage dependent and nonstepwise manner. In both experimental systems, ion transport was facilitated only under temperature and ionic-strength conditions in which the polymers form aggregates in aqueous solution. In neither system did the concentration dependence of transport activity exhibit a pronounced cooperativity. These observations are consistent with the view that aqueous monomers of these surface active agents partition into the membrane, where they facilitate the conductive movement of monovalent cations by means of a carrier type mechanism. As a novel class of ionophores, these substances are of practical interest because they can be water soluble and are potentially reversible

  15. Coaxial nanocable composed by imogolite and carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez, M.; González, R. I.; Munoz, F.; Valdivia, J. A.; Rogan, J.; Kiwi, M.

    2015-12-01

    The discovery and development of Carbon Nanotubes (CNTs) at the beginning of the 1990s has driven a major part of solid state research. The electronic properties of the CNTs have generated a large number of ideas, as building coaxial nanocables. In this work we propose a possible type of such nanocables, which is formed by three nanostructures: two conducting CNTs, where one of them is covered by an insulator (an inorganic oxide nanotube: the imogolite aluminosilicate). The theoretical calculations were carried out using the density functional tight-binding formalism, by means of the DFTB+ code. This formalism allows to calculate the band structure, which compares favorably with DFT calculations, but with a significantly lower computational cost. As a first step, we reproduce the calculations of already published results, where the formation of a nanocable composed by one CNT and the imogolite as an insulator. Afterwards, we simulate the band structure for the proposed structure to study the feasibility of the coaxial nanocable. Finally, using classical MD simulations, we study the possible mechanisms of formation of these nanocables.

  16. Composable Analytic Systems for next-generation intelligence analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiBona, Phil; Llinas, James; Barry, Kevin

    2015-05-01

    Lockheed Martin Advanced Technology Laboratories (LM ATL) is collaborating with Professor James Llinas, Ph.D., of the Center for Multisource Information Fusion at the University at Buffalo (State of NY), researching concepts for a mixed-initiative associate system for intelligence analysts to facilitate reduced analysis and decision times while proactively discovering and presenting relevant information based on the analyst's needs, current tasks and cognitive state. Today's exploitation and analysis systems have largely been designed for a specific sensor, data type, and operational context, leading to difficulty in directly supporting the analyst's evolving tasking and work product development preferences across complex Operational Environments. Our interactions with analysts illuminate the need to impact the information fusion, exploitation, and analysis capabilities in a variety of ways, including understanding data options, algorithm composition, hypothesis validation, and work product development. Composable Analytic Systems, an analyst-driven system that increases flexibility and capability to effectively utilize Multi-INT fusion and analytics tailored to the analyst's mission needs, holds promise to addresses the current and future intelligence analysis needs, as US forces engage threats in contested and denied environments.

  17. Hierarchical spatial heterogeneity in liquid crystals composed of graphene oxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shundo, Atsuomi; Hori, Koichiro; Penaloza, David P; Matsumoto, Yuji; Okumura, Yasushi; Kikuchi, Hirotsugu; Lee, Kyung Eun; Kim, Sang Ouk; Tanaka, Keiji

    2016-08-10

    Graphene oxide (GO) is a class of two-dimensional materials with a thickness of about 1 nm and a broad distribution of lateral dimension commonly approaching several micrometers. A dispersion of GOs in water often forms a liquid crystal, which is expected to be a promising precursor for the fabrication of carbon-based materials with well-ordered structures. To accelerate the application of GO-based liquid crystals, their structures and physical properties at various sizes must be well understood. To that end, we examined the local rheological properties of GO-based liquid crystals in the nematic phase using a particle tracking technique, where local properties can be accessed by observing the thermal motion of embedded probe particles. Particle diffusion was spatially heterogeneous, and depended on the size of the particles. Such a size-dependent heterogeneity can be associated with a hierarchical local environment, which is time-dependent for this system. The anisotropic particle diffusion originated from particles trapped in between the GO layers and in isotropic-like regions. The aggregation states of the GO dispersion composed of nematic and isotropic-like regions were observed using confocal laser scanning microscopy. PMID:27464002

  18. [Alexander Borodin--physician, chemist, scientist, teacher and composer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vik, T

    1998-12-10

    Concert programmes and CD covers suggest that the Russian composer Alexander Borodin (1833-87) was also a great scientist. In this article we examine this proposition. Borodin was born in St. Petersburg as the illegitimate son of a Russian nobleman. As a boy his talents ranged from music to chemistry and languages. Borodin studied medicine at the Medico-Surgical Academy in St. Petersburg from 1850 to 1855 and defended his doctoral thesis on the similarity between arsenic and phosphoric acid in 1858. He did not, however, feel comfortable in his role as a doctor, and soon started to work as a chemist. In 1864 he was appointed professor of chemistry at the Medico-Surgical Academy. In 1861, Borodin attended the first international congress of chemistry in Karlsruhe, and he was among the founders of the Russian Chemical Society in 1868. He published 42 articles and was a friend of Dmitri Mendeleev, the scientist who described the periodic system. In 1872, Borodin started the first medical courses for women in Russia. It seems warranted to conclude that Alexander Borodin was indeed a great scientist and university teacher, though his immortality was earned by his leisure time activities. PMID:9914755

  19. World Energy Scenarios: Composing energy futures to 2050

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The World Energy Scenarios: Composing energy futures to 2050 is the result of a three-year study conducted by over 60 experts from nearly 30 countries, with modelling provided by the Paul Scherrer Institute. The report assesses two contrasting policy scenarios, the more consumer driven Jazz scenario and the more voter-driven Symphony scenario with a key differentiator being the ability of countries to pass through the Doha Climate Gateway. The WEC scenarios use an explorative approach to assess what is actually happening in the world now, to help gauge what will happen in the future and the real impact of today's choices on tomorrow's energy landscape. Rather than telling policy-makers and senior energy leaders what to do in order to achieve a specific policy goal, the WEC's World Energy Scenarios allow them to test the key assumptions that decision-makers decide to better shape the energy of tomorrow This document includes the French and English versions of the executive summary and the English version of the full report

  20. Coaxial nanocable composed by imogolite and carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramírez, M.; González, R. I.; Munoz, F.; Valdivia, J. A.; Rogan, J.; Kiwi, M. [Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Chile, Casilla 653, Santiago, 7800024 (Chile); Centro para el Desarrollo de la Nanociencia y la Nanotecnología, CEDENNA, Avda. Ecuador 3493, Santiago, 9170124 (Chile)

    2015-12-31

    The discovery and development of Carbon Nanotubes (CNTs) at the beginning of the 1990s has driven a major part of solid state research. The electronic properties of the CNTs have generated a large number of ideas, as building coaxial nanocables. In this work we propose a possible type of such nanocables, which is formed by three nanostructures: two conducting CNTs, where one of them is covered by an insulator (an inorganic oxide nanotube: the imogolite aluminosilicate). The theoretical calculations were carried out using the density functional tight-binding formalism, by means of the DFTB+ code. This formalism allows to calculate the band structure, which compares favorably with DFT calculations, but with a significantly lower computational cost. As a first step, we reproduce the calculations of already published results, where the formation of a nanocable composed by one CNT and the imogolite as an insulator. Afterwards, we simulate the band structure for the proposed structure to study the feasibility of the coaxial nanocable. Finally, using classical MD simulations, we study the possible mechanisms of formation of these nanocables.