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Sample records for awake monkeys composed

  1. Fast optical signal not detected in awake behaving monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radhakrishnan, Harsha; Vanduffel, Wim; Deng, Hong Ping; Ekstrom, Leeland; Boas, David A; Franceschini, Maria Angela

    2009-04-01

    While the ability of near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) to measure cerebral hemodynamic evoked responses (slow optical signal) is well established, its ability to measure non-invasively the 'fast optical signal' is still controversial. Here, we aim to determine the feasibility of performing NIRS measurements of the 'fast optical signal' or Event-Related Optical Signals (EROS) under optimal experimental conditions in awake behaving macaque monkeys. These monkeys were implanted with a 'recording well' to expose the dura above the primary visual cortex (V1). A custom-made optical probe was inserted and fixed into the well. The close proximity of the probe to the brain maximized the sensitivity to changes in optical properties in the cortex. Motion artifacts were minimized by physical restraint of the head. Full-field contrast-reversing checkerboard stimuli were presented to monkeys trained to perform a visual fixation task. In separate sessions, two NIRS systems (CW4 and ISS FD oximeter), which previously showed the ability to measure the fast signal in human, were used. In some sessions EEG was acquired simultaneously with the optical signal. The increased sensitivity to cortical optical changes with our experimental setup was quantified with 3D Monte Carlo simulations on a segmented MRI monkey head. Averages of thousands of stimuli in the same animal, or grand averages across the two animals and across repeated sessions, did not lead to detection of the fast optical signal using either amplitude or phase of the optical signal. Hemodynamic responses and visual evoked potentials were instead always detected with single trials or averages of a few stimuli. Based on these negative results, despite the optimal experimental conditions, we doubt the usefulness of non-invasive fast optical signal measurements with NIRS.

  2. A 4-channel 3 Tesla phased array receive coil for awake rhesus monkey fMRI and diffusion MRI experiments.

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    Khachaturian, Mark Haig

    2010-01-01

    Awake monkey fMRI and diffusion MRI combined with conventional neuroscience techniques has the potential to study the structural and functional neural network. The majority of monkey fMRI and diffusion MRI experiments are performed with single coils which suffer from severe EPI distortions which limit resolution. By constructing phased array coils for monkey MRI studies, gains in SNR and anatomical accuracy (i.e., reduction of EPI distortions) can be achieved using parallel imaging. The major challenges associated with constructing phased array coils for monkeys are the variation in head size and space constraints. Here, we apply phased array technology to a 4-channel phased array coil capable of improving the resolution and image quality of full brain awake monkey fMRI and diffusion MRI experiments. The phased array coil is that can adapt to different rhesus monkey head sizes (ages 4-8) and fits in the limited space provided by monkey stereotactic equipment and provides SNR gains in primary visual cortex and anatomical accuracy in conjunction with parallel imaging and improves resolution in fMRI experiments by a factor of 2 (1.25 mm to 1.0 mm isotropic) and diffusion MRI experiments by a factor of 4 (1.5 mm to 0.9 mm isotropic).

  3. PET measured evoked cerebral blood flow responses in an awake monkey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perlmutter, J.S.; Lich, L.L.; Margenau, W.; Buchholz, S.

    1991-01-01

    We have developed a method to measure task-related regional cerebral blood flow (BF) responses in an awake, trained monkey using positron emission tomography (PET) and H215O. We trained an animal with operant conditioning using only positive reinforcement to climb unassisted into a modified primate chair that was then positioned in the PET scanner. A special headholder and acrylic skull cap permitted precise placement and accurate repositioning. We measured BF qualitatively with bolus injection of H215O and 40-s scan. Each session included scans at rest interposed with scans during vibration of a forepaw. Regional responses were identified using subtraction image analysis. After global normalization, a resting image was subtracted on a pixel-by-pixel basis from a comparable image collected during vibration. The region of peak response occurred in contralateral sensorimotor cortex with a mean magnitude of 11.6% (+/- 3.2%) of the global mean value for 10 separate experiments, significantly greater than the mean qualitative BF change (0.4 +/- 3.6%; p less than 0.00001) in the same region for seven rest-rest pairs. This newly developed technique forms the basis for a wide variety of experiments

  4. Auditory properties in the parabelt regions of the superior temporal gyrus in the awake macaque monkey: an initial survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kajikawa, Yoshinao; Frey, Stephen; Ross, Deborah; Falchier, Arnaud; Hackett, Troy A; Schroeder, Charles E

    2015-03-11

    The superior temporal gyrus (STG) is on the inferior-lateral brain surface near the external ear. In macaques, 2/3 of the STG is occupied by an auditory cortical region, the "parabelt," which is part of a network of inferior temporal areas subserving communication and social cognition as well as object recognition and other functions. However, due to its location beneath the squamous temporal bone and temporalis muscle, the STG, like other inferior temporal regions, has been a challenging target for physiological studies in awake-behaving macaques. We designed a new procedure for implanting recording chambers to provide direct access to the STG, allowing us to evaluate neuronal properties and their topography across the full extent of the STG in awake-behaving macaques. Initial surveys of the STG have yielded several new findings. Unexpectedly, STG sites in monkeys that were listening passively responded to tones with magnitudes comparable to those of responses to 1/3 octave band-pass noise. Mapping results showed longer response latencies in more rostral sites and possible tonotopic patterns parallel to core and belt areas, suggesting the reversal of gradients between caudal and rostral parabelt areas. These results will help further exploration of parabelt areas. Copyright © 2015 the authors 0270-6474/15/354140-11$15.00/0.

  5. A Pressure Injection System for Investigating the Neuropharmacology of Information Processing in Awake Behaving Macaque Monkey Cortex.

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    Veith, Vera K; Quigley, Cliodhna; Treue, Stefan

    2016-03-14

    The top-down modulation of feed-forward cortical information processing is functionally important for many cognitive processes, including the modulation of sensory information processing by attention. However, little is known about which neurotransmitter systems are involved in such modulations. A practical way to address this question is to combine single-cell recording with local and temporary neuropharmacological manipulation in a suitable animal model. Here we demonstrate a technique combining acute single-cell recordings with the injection of neuropharmacological agents in the direct vicinity of the recording electrode. The video shows the preparation of the pressure injection/recording system, including preparation of the substance to be injected. We show a rhesus monkey performing a visual attention task and the procedure of single-unit recording with block-wise pharmacological manipulations.

  6. Frequency-dependent spatiotemporal profiles of visual responses recorded with subdural ECoG electrodes in awake monkeys: Differences between high- and low-frequency activity.

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    Takaura, Kana; Tsuchiya, Naotsugu; Fujii, Naotaka

    2016-01-01

    Electrocorticography (ECoG) constitutes a powerful and promising neural recording modality in humans and animals. ECoG signals are often decomposed into several frequency bands, among which the so-called high-gamma band (80-250Hz) has been proposed to reflect local cortical functions near the cortical surface below the ECoG electrodes. It is typically assumed that the lower the frequency bands, the lower the spatial resolution of the signals; thus, there is not much to gain by analyzing the event-related changes of the ECoG signals in the lower-frequency bands. However, differences across frequency bands have not been systematically investigated. To address this issue, we recorded ECoG activity from two awake monkeys performing a retinotopic mapping task. We characterized the spatiotemporal profiles of the visual responses in the time-frequency domain. We defined the preferred spatial position, receptive field (RF), and response latencies of band-limited power (BLP) (i.e., alpha [3.9-11.7Hz], beta [15.6-23.4Hz], low [30-80Hz] and high [80-250Hz] gamma) for each electrode and compared them across bands and time-domain visual evoked potentials (VEPs). At the population level, we found that the spatial preferences were comparable across bands and VEPs. The high-gamma power showed a smaller RF than the other bands and VEPs. The response latencies for the alpha band were always longer than the latencies for the other bands and fastest in VEPs. Comparing the response profiles in both space and time for each cortical region (V1, V4+, and TEO/TE) revealed regional idiosyncrasies. Although the latencies of visual responses in the beta, low-, and high-gamma bands were almost identical in V1 and V4+, beta and low-gamma BLP occurred about 17ms earlier than high-gamma power in TEO/TE. Furthermore, TEO/TE exhibited a unique pattern in the spatial response profile: the alpha and high-gamma responses tended to prefer the foveal regions, whereas the beta and low-gamma responses

  7. [Awake craniotomy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobyakov, G L; Lubnin, A Yu; Kulikov, A S; Gavrilov, A G; Goryaynov, S A; Poddubskiy, A A; Lodygina, K S

    2016-01-01

    Awake craniotomy is a neurosurgical intervention aimed at identifying and preserving the eloquent functional brain areas during resection of tumors located near the cortical and subcortical language centers. This article provides a review of the modern literature devoted to the issue. The anatomical rationale and data of preoperative functional neuroimaging, intraoperative electrophysiological monitoring, and neuropsychological tests as well as the strategy of active surgical intervention are presented. Awake craniotomy is a rapidly developing technique aimed at both preserving speech and motor functions and improving our knowledge in the field of speech psychophysiology.

  8. Default Mode of Brain Function in Monkeys

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    Mantini, Dante; Gerits, Annelis; Nelissen, Koen; Durand, Jean-Baptiste; Joly, Olivier; Simone, Luciano; Sawamura, Hiromasa; Wardak, Claire; Orban, Guy A.; Buckner, Randy L.; Vanduffel, Wim

    2013-01-01

    Human neuroimaging has revealed a specific network of brain regions—the default-mode network (DMN)—that reduces its activity during goal-directed behavior. So far, evidence for a similar network in monkeys is mainly indirect, since, except for one positron emission tomography study, it is all based on functional connectivity analysis rather than activity increases during passive task states. Here, we tested whether a consistent DMN exists in monkeys using its defining property. We performed a meta-analysis of functional magnetic resonance imaging data collected in 10 awake monkeys to reveal areas in which activity consistently decreases when task demands shift from passive tasks to externally oriented processing. We observed task-related spatially specific deactivations across 15 experiments, implying in the monkey a functional equivalent of the human DMN. We revealed by resting-state connectivity that prefrontal and medial parietal regions, including areas 9/46d and 31, respectively, constitute the DMN core, being functionally connected to all other DMN areas. We also detected two distinct subsystems composed of DMN areas with stronger functional connections between each other. These clusters included areas 24/32, 8b, and TPOC and areas 23, v23, and PGm, respectively. Such a pattern of functional connectivity largely fits, but is not completely consistent with anatomical tract tracing data in monkeys. Also, analysis of afferent and efferent connections between DMN areas suggests a multisynaptic network structure. Like humans, monkeys increase activity during passive epochs in heteromodal and limbic association regions, suggesting that they also default to internal modes of processing when not actively interacting with the environment. PMID:21900574

  9. Morphology and Anatomy Characteristic of Pisang Awak (Musa paradisiaca cv. Awak in West Kalimantan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ari Sunandar

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Indonesia is the origin and center of diversity of banana. One of an edible banana in Indonesia is Pisang Awak (Musa paradisiaca cv. Awak . In West Kalimantan, the ripe Pisang Awak has been processed into sale (dried banana. The aims of this research were to describe the morphological and anatomical character of Pisang Awak in West Kalimantan, Indonesia. In this study, Pisang Awak were collected from Padang Tikar I village, Batu Ampar Sub-district, Kubu Raya district, West Kalimantan. Morphological characterizations were conducted by following the instruction on Descriptors for Banana (Musa spp. from IPGRI. The root, leaf blade, and petiole were fixed in FAA solution. Root, leaf, and petiole anatomy preparats were made by paraffin method. The lamina of Pisang Awak consisted of adaxial epidermis, two hypodermis layers, two palisade layers, spongy layer, bundle sheath cell, abaxial epidermis, laticifer. The petiole of Pisang Awak composed of three tissue systems, i.e., epidermis layer, parenchyma tissue and vascular tissue. The root of Pisang Awak consists of two epidermis layers, parenchyma and vascular cylinder. In the future, morphological and anatomical character in Pisang Awak could be applied as the basis of information for breeding programs of banana cultivars and classification.

  10. Anaesthesia for awake craniotomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Girija Prasad Rath

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Awake craniotomy is a neurosurgical procedure during which the patient remains awake as a whole or during some part of the surgery. Although not a new procedure, it has regained its importance since last two decades following the advent of newer drugs along with improvised techniques. The role of anesthesiologist during this procedure is of paramount importance. In this review, we discussed the anesthetic management during awake craniotomy and re-emphasized on the avoidance of intraoperative untoward events with appropriate patient selection.

  11. Responsiveness in Behaving Monkeys and Human Subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-07-31

    Status of Current Research - Statement of Work Each study involving awake , behaving monkey neurophysiological recording used a behavioral paradigm that...anesthesia. A craniotomy was performed at approximately A+ 14.5mm. The recording chamber then was fixed to the skull at a lateral angle of 8’ from

  12. Awake Craniotomy and Coaching

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruis, Carla; Huenges Wajer, Irene; Robe, Pierre; van Zandvoort, Martine

    2014-01-01

    Background: The importance of monitoring cognition during awake craniotomy has been well described in previous studies. The relevance of being coached during such a procedure has received less attention and questions still remain unanswered about what factors are the most important herein.

  13. [Awake craniotomy for brain tumours].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milos, Peter; Metcalf, Kerstin; Vigren, Patrick; Lindehammar, Hans; Nilsson, Malin; Boström, Sverre

    2016-10-11

    Awake craniotomy for brain tumours  Awake neurosurgery is a useful method in lesions near eloquent brain areas, particularly low-grade gliomas.The aim is to maximise tumour resection and preserve neurological function. We performed 40 primary awake surgeries and 8 residual surgeries. Patients were operated awake throughout the procedure or with a laryngeal mask and general anaesthesia during the opening stage and then awake during intracerebral surgery. Language and motor function were mapped with direct cortical stimulation, motor evoked potential and standardised neurological testing. Radiologically, complete resection was achieved in 18 out of 40 patients in the primary surgeries. Full neurological recovery at three months was observed in 29 patients. Of the 11 patients with persisting neurological deficits at three months, symptoms were present preoperatively in 9 patients. We conclude that awake surgery, combined with intraoperative neurophysiological methods, is a safe method to improve treatment for low-grade gliomas.

  14. Small Composers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holgersen, Sven-Erik; Bruun, Peter; Tjagvad, Mette

    2018-01-01

    the study: What expectations do the class teacher and the professional musicians have to the creative practice, i.e. to the collaboration and to the musical outcome? To which extent do the collaborating partners share a common understanding of the aim, content and method of the workshop? How do the roles......The present chapter discusses roles and responsibilities of the collaborating partners in a creative music workshop called Small Composers. The aim is to be attentive to a number of potential alterations implicated by the collaborating partners’ different backgrounds. The following questions guided...... and responsibilities of the collaborating partners become visible through the practice? How do the professional identities of the teacher and the musicians become visible and what are the implications for the workshop as a musical community of practice?...

  15. Awake craniotomy for tumor resection

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammadali Attari; Sohrab Salimi

    2013-01-01

    Surgical treatment of brain tumors, especially those located in the eloquent areas such as anterior temporal, frontal lobes, language, memory areas, and near the motor cortex causes high risk of eloquent impairment. Awake craniotomy displays major rule for maximum resection of the tumor with minimum functional impairment of the Central Nervous System. These case reports discuss the use of awake craniotomy during the brain surgery in Alzahra Hospital, Isfahan, Iran. A 56-year-old woman with le...

  16. Awake craniotomy for tumor resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attari, Mohammadali; Salimi, Sohrab

    2013-01-01

    Surgical treatment of brain tumors, especially those located in the eloquent areas such as anterior temporal, frontal lobes, language, memory areas, and near the motor cortex causes high risk of eloquent impairment. Awake craniotomy displays major rule for maximum resection of the tumor with minimum functional impairment of the Central Nervous System. These case reports discuss the use of awake craniotomy during the brain surgery in Alzahra Hospital, Isfahan, Iran. A 56-year-old woman with left-sided body hypoesthesia since last 3 months and a 25-year-old with severe headache of 1 month duration were operated under craniotomy for brain tumors resection. An awake craniotomy was planned to allow maximum tumor intraoperative testing for resection and neurologic morbidity avoidance. The method of anesthesia should offer sufficient analgesia, hemodynamic stability, sedation, respiratory function, and also awake and cooperative patient for different neurological test. Airway management is the most important part of anesthesia during awake craniotomy. Tumor surgery with awake craniotomy is a safe technique that allows maximal resection of lesions in close relationship to eloquent cortex and has a low risk of neurological deficit.

  17. Awake craniotomy for tumor resection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammadali Attari

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Surgical treatment of brain tumors, especially those located in the eloquent areas such as anterior temporal, frontal lobes, language, memory areas, and near the motor cortex causes high risk of eloquent impairment. Awake craniotomy displays major rule for maximum resection of the tumor with minimum functional impairment of the Central Nervous System. These case reports discuss the use of awake craniotomy during the brain surgery in Alzahra Hospital, Isfahan, Iran. A 56-year-old woman with left-sided body hypoesthesia since last 3 months and a 25-year-old with severe headache of 1 month duration were operated under craniotomy for brain tumors resection. An awake craniotomy was planned to allow maximum tumor intraoperative testing for resection and neurologic morbidity avoidance. The method of anesthesia should offer sufficient analgesia, hemodynamic stability, sedation, respiratory function, and also awake and cooperative patient for different neurological test. Airway management is the most important part of anesthesia during awake craniotomy. Tumor surgery with awake craniotomy is a safe technique that allows maximal resection of lesions in close relationship to eloquent cortex and has a low risk of neurological deficit.

  18. Laminar Differences in Associative Memory Signals in Monkey Perirhinal Cortex.

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    Vogels, Rufin

    2016-10-19

    New research published in Neuron describes assignment of cortical layer to single neurons recorded in awake monkeys. Applying the procedure to perirhinal cortex, Koyano et al. (2016) found marked and unsuspected differences among layers in the coding of associative memory signals. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. Awake right hemisphere brain surgery.

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    Hulou, M Maher; Cote, David J; Olubiyi, Olutayo I; Smith, Timothy R; Chiocca, E Antonio; Johnson, Mark D

    2015-12-01

    We report the indications and outcomes of awake right hemispheric brain surgery, as well as a rare patient with crossed aphasia. Awake craniotomies are often performed to protect eloquent cortex. We reviewed the medical records for 35 of 96 patients, in detail, who had awake right hemisphere brain operations. Intraoperative cortical mapping of motor and/or language function was performed in 29 of the 35 patients. A preoperative speech impairment and left hand dominance were the main indicators for awake right-sided craniotomies in patients with right hemisphere lesions. Four patients with lesion proximity to eloquent areas underwent awake craniotomies without cortical mapping. In addition, one patient had a broncho-pulmonary fistula, and another had a recent major cardiac procedure that precluded awake surgery. An eloquent cortex representation was identified in 14 patients (48.3%). Postoperatively, seven of 17 patients (41.1%) who presented with weakness, experienced improvements in their motor functions, 11 of 16 (68.7%) with seizures became seizure-free, and seven of nine (77.7%) with moderate to severe headaches and one of two with a visual field deficit improved significantly. There were also improvements in speech and language functions in all patients who presented with speech difficulties. A right sided awake craniotomy is an excellent option for left handed patients, or those with right sided cortical lesions that result in preoperative speech impairments. When combined with intraoperative cortical mapping, both speech and motor function can be well preserved. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Wide Awake Hand Surgery.

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    Lied, Line; Borchgrevink, Grethe E; Finsen, Vilhjalmur

    2017-09-01

    "Wide awake hand surgery", where surgery is performed in local anaesthesia with adrenaline, without sedation or a tourniquet, has become widespread in some countries. It has a number of potential advantages and we wished to evaluate it among our patients. All 122 patients treated by this method during one year were evaluated by the surgeons and the patients on a numerical scale from 0 (best/least) to 10 (worst/most). Theatre time was compared to that recorded for a year when regional or general anaesthesia had been used. The patients' mean score for the general care they had received was 0.1 (SD 0.6), for pain during lidocaine injection 2.4 (SD 2.2), for pain during surgery 0.9 (SD 1.5), and for other discomfort during surgery 0.5 (SD 1.4). Eight reported that they would want general anaesthesia if they were to be operated again. The surgeons' mean evaluation of bleeding during surgery was 1.6 (SD 1.8), oedema during surgery 0.4 (SD 1.1), general disadvantages with the method 1.0 (SD 1.6) and general advantages 6.5 (SD 4.3). The estimation of advantages was 9.9 (DS 0.5) for tendon suture. 28 patients needed intra-operative additional anaesthesia. The proportion was lower among trained hand surgeons and fell significantly during the study period. Non-surgical theatre time was 46 (SD 15) minutes during the study period and 55 (SD 22) minutes during the regional/general period (p theatre.

  1. Monkey cortex through fMRI glasses.

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    Vanduffel, Wim; Zhu, Qi; Orban, Guy A

    2014-08-06

    In 1998 several groups reported the feasibility of fMRI experiments in monkeys, with the goal to bridge the gap between invasive nonhuman primate studies and human functional imaging. These studies yielded critical insights in the neuronal underpinnings of the BOLD signal. Furthermore, the technology has been successful in guiding electrophysiological recordings and identifying focal perturbation targets. Finally, invaluable information was obtained concerning human brain evolution. We here provide a comprehensive overview of awake monkey fMRI studies mainly confined to the visual system. We review the latest insights about the topographic organization of monkey visual cortex and discuss the spatial relationships between retinotopy and category- and feature-selective clusters. We briefly discuss the functional layout of parietal and frontal cortex and continue with a summary of some fascinating functional and effective connectivity studies. Finally, we review recent comparative fMRI experiments and speculate about the future of nonhuman primate imaging. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Patient acceptance of awake craniotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrede, Karsten H; Stieglitz, Lennart H; Fiferna, Antje; Karst, Matthias; Gerganov, Venelin M; Samii, Madjid; von Gösseln, Hans-Henning; Lüdemann, Wolf O

    2011-12-01

    The aim of this study was to objectively assess the patients' acceptance for awake craniotomy in a group of neurosurgical patients, who underwent this procedure for removal of lesions in or close to eloquent brain areas. Patients acceptance for awake craniotomy under local anesthesia and conscious sedation was assessed by a formal questionnaire (PPP33), initially developed for general surgery patients. The results are compared to a group of patients who had brain surgery under general anesthesia and to previously published data. The awake craniotomy (AC) group consisted of 37 male and 9 female patients (48 craniotomies) with age ranging from 18 to 71 years. The general anesthesia (GA) group consisted of 26 male and 15 female patients (43 craniotomies) with age ranging from 26 to 83 years. All patients in the study were included in the questionnaire analysis. In comparison to GA the overall PPP33 score for AC was higher (p=0.07), suggesting better overall acceptance for AC. The subscale scores for AC were also significantly better compared to GA for the two subscales "postoperative pain" (p=0.02) and "physical disorders" (p=0.01) and equal for the other 6 subscales. The results of the overall mean score and the scores for the subscales of the PPP33 questionnaire verify good patients' acceptance for AC. Previous studies have shown good patients' acceptance for awake craniotomy, but only a few times using formal approaches. By utilizing a formal questionnaire we could verify good patient acceptance for awake craniotomy for the treatment of brain tumors in or close to eloquent areas. This is a novel approach that substantiates previously published experiences. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Surgeon-patient communication during awake procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Claire S; Guyton, Kristina; Pariser, Joseph J; Siegler, Mark; Schindler, Nancy; Langerman, Alexander

    2017-06-01

    Surgeons are increasingly performing procedures on awake patients. Communication during such procedures is complex and underexplored in the literature. Surgeons were recruited from the faculty of 2 hospitals to participate in an interview regarding their approaches to communication during awake procedures. Three researchers used the constant comparative method to transcribe, code, and review interviews until saturation was reached. Twenty-three surgeons described the advantages and disadvantages of awake procedures, their communication with the awake patient, their interactions with staff and with trainees, the environment of awake procedures, and how communication in this context is taught and learned. Surgeons recognized communication during awake procedures as important and reported varied strategies for ensuring patient comfort in this context. However, they also acknowledged challenges with multiparty communication during awake procedures, especially in balancing commitments to teaching with their duty to comfort the patient. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Neuronal Correlates of Auditory Streaming in Monkey Auditory Cortex for Tone Sequences without Spectral Differences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanislava Knyazeva

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This study finds a neuronal correlate of auditory perceptual streaming in the primary auditory cortex for sequences of tone complexes that have the same amplitude spectrum but a different phase spectrum. Our finding is based on microelectrode recordings of multiunit activity from 270 cortical sites in three awake macaque monkeys. The monkeys were presented with repeated sequences of a tone triplet that consisted of an A tone, a B tone, another A tone and then a pause. The A and B tones were composed of unresolved harmonics formed by adding the harmonics in cosine phase, in alternating phase, or in random phase. A previous psychophysical study on humans revealed that when the A and B tones are similar, humans integrate them into a single auditory stream; when the A and B tones are dissimilar, humans segregate them into separate auditory streams. We found that the similarity of neuronal rate responses to the triplets was highest when all A and B tones had cosine phase. Similarity was intermediate when the A tones had cosine phase and the B tones had alternating phase. Similarity was lowest when the A tones had cosine phase and the B tones had random phase. The present study corroborates and extends previous reports, showing similar correspondences between neuronal activity in the primary auditory cortex and auditory streaming of sound sequences. It also is consistent with Fishman’s population separation model of auditory streaming.

  5. Neuronal Correlates of Auditory Streaming in Monkey Auditory Cortex for Tone Sequences without Spectral Differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knyazeva, Stanislava; Selezneva, Elena; Gorkin, Alexander; Aggelopoulos, Nikolaos C; Brosch, Michael

    2018-01-01

    This study finds a neuronal correlate of auditory perceptual streaming in the primary auditory cortex for sequences of tone complexes that have the same amplitude spectrum but a different phase spectrum. Our finding is based on microelectrode recordings of multiunit activity from 270 cortical sites in three awake macaque monkeys. The monkeys were presented with repeated sequences of a tone triplet that consisted of an A tone, a B tone, another A tone and then a pause. The A and B tones were composed of unresolved harmonics formed by adding the harmonics in cosine phase, in alternating phase, or in random phase. A previous psychophysical study on humans revealed that when the A and B tones are similar, humans integrate them into a single auditory stream; when the A and B tones are dissimilar, humans segregate them into separate auditory streams. We found that the similarity of neuronal rate responses to the triplets was highest when all A and B tones had cosine phase. Similarity was intermediate when the A tones had cosine phase and the B tones had alternating phase. Similarity was lowest when the A tones had cosine phase and the B tones had random phase. The present study corroborates and extends previous reports, showing similar correspondences between neuronal activity in the primary auditory cortex and auditory streaming of sound sequences. It also is consistent with Fishman's population separation model of auditory streaming.

  6. Monkey Business

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackwood, Christine Horvatis

    2012-01-01

    A ballerina, a gladiator, a camper, a baseball player, a surfer, and a shopper; these are just a few of the amazing monkeys that the author's seventh graders created from papier-mache. This project provided an opportunity for students to express themselves through the creation of sculptural characters based on their own interests, hobbies, and…

  7. Composing and Arranging Careers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Elliott; And Others

    1977-01-01

    With the inspiration, the originality, the skill and craftsmanship, the business acumen, the patience, and the luck, it's possible to become a classical composer, pop/rock/country composer, jingle composer, or educational composer. Describes these careers. (Editor/RK)

  8. How I do it: Awake craniotomy.

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    Hill, Ciaran Scott; Severgnini, Flavio; McKintosh, Edward

    2017-01-01

    Awake craniotomy allows continuous assessment of a patient's clinical and neurological status during open brain surgery. This facilitates early detection of interference with eloquent cortex, and hence can allow a surgeon to maximize resection margins without compromising neurological function. Awake craniotomy requires an effective scalp blockade, intraoperative assessment, and a carefully co-ordinated theatre team. A variety of clinical and electrophysiological techniques can be used to assess cortical function. Effective scalp blockade and awake craniotomy provides the opportunity to intraoperatively assess cortical function in the awake patient, thus providing an important neurosurgical option for lesions near eloquent cortex.

  9. Awake fiberoptic or awake video laryngoscopic tracheal intubation in patients with anticipated difficult airway management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenstock, Charlotte Vallentin; Thøgersen, Bente; Afshari, Arash

    2012-01-01

    Awake flexible fiberoptic intubation (FFI) is the gold standard for management of anticipated difficult tracheal intubation. The purpose of this study was to compare awake FFI to awake McGrath® video laryngoscope, (MVL), (Aircraft Medical, Edinburgh, Scotland, United Kingdom) intubation in patients...... with an anticipated difficult intubation. The authors examined the hypothesis that MVL intubation would be faster than FFI....

  10. My Career: Composer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morganelli, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    In this article, the author talks about his career as a composer and offers some advice for aspiring composers. The author works as a composer in the movie industry, creating music that supports a film's story. Other composers work on television shows, and some do both television and film. The composer uses music to tell the audience what kind of…

  11. Awake craniotomy: improving the patient's experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potters, Jan-Willem; Klimek, Markus

    2015-10-01

    Awake craniotomy patients are exposed to various stressful stimuli while their attention and vigilance is important for the success of the surgery. We describe several recent findings on the perception of awake craniotomy patients and address nonpharmacological perioperative factors that enhance the experience of awake craniotomy patients. These factors could also be applicable to other surgical patients. Proper preoperative counseling gives higher patient satisfaction and should be individually tailored to the patient. Furthermore, there is a substantial proportion of patients who have significant pain or fear during an awake craniotomy procedure. There is a possibility that this could induce post-traumatic stress disorder or related symptoms. Preoperative preparation is of utmost importance in awake craniotomy patients, and a solid doctor-patient relationship is an important condition. Nonpharmacological intraoperative management should focus on reduction of fear and pain by adaptation of the environment and careful and well considered communication.

  12. Anaesthetic management for awake craniotomy in brain glioma ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The awake brain surgery is an innovative approach in the treatment of tumors in the functional areas of the brain. There are various anesthetic techniques for awake craniotomy (AC), including asleep-awake-asleep technique, monitored anesthesia care, and the recent introduced awakeawake- awake method. We describe ...

  13. Awake Craniotomy: A New Airway Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivasankar, Chitra; Schlichter, Rolf A; Baranov, Dimitry; Kofke, W Andrew

    2016-02-01

    Awake craniotomies have been performed regularly at the University of Pennsylvania since 2004. Varying approaches to airway management are described for this procedure, including intubation with an endotracheal tube and use of a laryngeal mask airway, simple facemask, or nasal cannula. In this case series, we describe the successful use (i.e., no need for endotracheal intubation related to inadequate gas exchange) of bilateral nasopharyngeal airways in 90 patients undergoing awake craniotomies. The use of nasopharyngeal airways can ease the transition between the asleep and awake phases of the craniotomy without the need to stimulate the airway. Our purpose was to describe our experience and report adverse events related to this technique.

  14. Pediatric Awake Craniotomy for Brain Lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akay, Ali; Rükşen, Mete; Çetin, H Yurday; Seval, H Özer; İşlekel, Sertaç

    2016-01-01

    Awake craniotomy is a special method to prevent motor deficits during the resection of lesions that are located in, or close to, functional areas. Although it is more commonly performed in adult patients, reports of pediatric cases undergoing awake craniotomy are limited in the literature. In our clinic, where we frequently use awake craniotomy in adult patients, we performed this method in 2 selected pediatric cases for lesion surgery. At an early age, these 2 cases diagnosed with epilepsy presented cerebral lesions, but since the lesions enclosed functional areas, surgical resection was not regarded as a treatment option at this time. In these 2 pediatric cases, we successfully completed lesion surgery with awake craniotomy. The method and the techniques employed during surgery are presented concomitant with other reports in the literature. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  15. [Awake craniotomy: analysis of complicated cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulikov, A S; Kobyakov, G L; Gavrilov, A G; Lubnin, A Yu

    2015-01-01

    Awake craniotomy is recognized as method that can decrease the frequency of neurological complications after surgery for gliomas located near eloquent brain regions. Unfortunately good neurological outcome can't be ensured even by using of this technique. This paper discusses reasons and possible ways of prevention of such complications. 162 awake craniotomies were performed in our clinic. 152 of patients were discharged from the clinic with good outcome. In 10 (6%) cases sustained severe neurological deficit was noted. These complications were associated with anatomic or ischemic injury of subcortical pathways and internal capsule. Awake craniotomy is effective instrument of brain language mapping and prevention of neurological deterioration. Severe neurological complications of awake craniotomy are associated with underestimate neurosurgical risks, especially in terms of blood vessel injury and depth of resection. The main way of prevention of such complications is meticulous planning of operation and adequate using of mapping facilities.

  16. Ethical challenges with awake craniotomy for tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirsch, Brandon; Bernstein, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Awake brain surgery is useful for the treatment of a number of conditions such as epilepsy and brain tumor, as well as in functional neurosurgery. Several studies have been published regarding clinical results and outcomes of patients who have undergone awake craniotomy but few have dealt with related ethical issues. The authors undertake to explore broadly the ethical issues surrounding awake brain surgery for tumor resection to encourage further consideration and discussion. Based on a review of the literature related to awake craniotomy and in part from the personal experience of the senior author, we conducted an assessment of the ethical issues associated with awake brain tumor surgery. The major ethical issues identified relate to: (1) lack of data; (2) utilization; (3) conflict of interest; (4) informed consent; (5) surgical innovation; and (6) surgical training. The authors respectfully suggest that the selection of patients for awake craniotomy needs to be monitored according to more consistent, objective standards in order to avoid conflicts of interest and potential harm to patients.

  17. The clinical management of awake bruxism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Ronald E; Auclair Clark, Wendy

    2017-06-01

    Awake bruxism is a common clinical condition that often goes undetected, often leading to pain or damaged teeth and restorations. The authors searched electronic databases regarding the treatment and effects of awake bruxism compared with those of sleep bruxism. The authors used the search terms diurnal bruxism and oral parafunction. The authors combined information from relevant literature with clinical experience to establish a recommended protocol for diagnosis and treatment. The authors found articles regarding the diagnosis and treatment of bruxism. The authors combined information from the articles with a review of clinical cases to establish a treatment protocol for awake bruxism. Literature and clinical experience indicate a lack of patient awareness and, thus, underreporting of awake bruxism. As a result, myriad dental consequences can occur from bruxism. The authors propose a need for increased awareness, for both patients and professionals, particularly of the number of conditions related to awake bruxism. Clinicians should look for clinical signs and symptoms of awake bruxism and use minimally invasive treatment modalities. Copyright © 2017 American Dental Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. AWAKE starts the equipment installation phase

    CERN Multimedia

    Antonella Del Rosso

    2015-01-01

    AWAKE is the proof-of-principle experiment whose aim is to use protons to generate powerful wakefields to accelerate an electron beam. With accelerator gradients hundreds of times higher than those used in current systems, this technique could revolutionise the field of particle acceleration. Installed in the tunnel previously used by the CNGS facility, AWAKE is completing the service installation phase and will receive the plasma cell in the coming months.   The AWAKE proton line with all the magnets installed. (Image: AWAKE collaboration.) AWAKE is the world’s first proton-driven plasma wakefield acceleration experiment. In AWAKE, a beam of protons from the SPS will be travelling through a plasma cell and this will generate a wakefield that, in turn, will accelerate an electron beam. A laser will ionise the gas in the plasma cell and seed the self-modulation instability that will trigger the wakefield in the plasma. The project aims to prove that the plasma wakefield can be driv...

  19. The asleep-awake technique using propofol-remifentanil anaesthesia for awake craniotomy for cerebral tumours

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Karsten Skovgaard

    2008-01-01

    Background and objective: We retrospectively reviewed the first 25 planned cases of awake craniotomies using the 'asleep-awake' technique, an alternative to the often-used 'asleep-awake-asleep' technique. Methods: The patients were anaesthetized using propofol/remifentanil anaesthesia, a laryngeal...... mask and controlled ventilation according to a protocol defined before the start of this series of patients. The patients were awakened before the brain mapping and were kept awake throughout the rest of the procedure allowing for additional mapping and modification of the resection of the turnout...... to obtain a tight laryngeal mask. All of the 23 patients were awake as from when the mapping session began and throughout the rest of the operation. In five cases the resection of the tumour was modified as symptoms emerged. These symptoms all subsided in due course. No case of hypoxia was recorded...

  20. [Raman spectra of monkey cerebral cortex tissue].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Ji-chun; Guo, Jian-yu; Cai, Wei-ying; Wang, Zu-geng; Sun, Zhen-rong

    2010-01-01

    Monkey cerebral cortex, an important part in the brain to control action and thought activities, is mainly composed of grey matter and nerve cell. In the present paper, the in situ Raman spectra of the cerebral cortex of the birth, teenage and aged monkeys were achieved for the first time. The results show that the Raman spectra for the different age monkey cerebral cortex exhibit most obvious changes in the regions of 1000-1400 and 2800-3000 cm(-1). With monkey growing up, the relative intensities of the Raman bands at 1313 and 2885 cm(-1) mainly assigned to CH2 chain vibrational mode of lipid become stronger and stronger whereas the relative intensities of the Raman bands at 1338 and 2932 cm(-1) mainly assigned to CH3 chain vibrational mode of protein become weaker and weaker. In addition, the two new Raman bands at 1296 and 2850 cm(-1) are only observed in the aged monkey cerebral cortex, therefore, the two bands can be considered as a character or "marker" to differentiate the caducity degree with monkey growth In order to further explore the changes, the relative intensity ratios of the Raman band at 1313 cm(-1) to that at 1338 cm(-1) and the Raman band at 2885 cm(-1) to that at 2 932 cm(-1), I1313/I1338 and I2885/I2932, which are the lipid-to-protein ratios, are introduced to denote the degree of the lipid content. The results show that the relative intensity ratios increase significantly with monkey growth, namely, the lipid content in the cerebral cortex increases greatly with monkey growth. So, the authors can deduce that the overmuch lipid is an important cause to induce the caducity. Therefore, the results will be a powerful assistance and valuable parameter to study the order of life growth and diagnose diseases.

  1. Predicting sleepiness during an awake craniotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoi, Chihiro; Hiromitsu, Kentaro; Saito, Shoko; Yamada, Ryoji; Shinoura, Nobusada; Midorikawa, Akira

    2015-12-01

    An awake craniotomy is a safe neurological surgical technique that minimizes the risk of brain damage. During the course of this surgery, the patient is asked to perform motor or cognitive tasks, but some patients exhibit severe sleepiness. Thus, the present study investigated the predictive value of a patient's preoperative neuropsychological background in terms of sleepiness during an awake craniotomy. Thirty-seven patients with brain tumor who underwent awake craniotomy were included in this study. Prior to craniotomy, the patient evaluated cognitive status, and during the surgery, each patient's performance and attitude toward cognitive tasks were recorded by neuropsychologists. The present findings showed that the construction and calculation abilities of the patients were moderately correlated with their sleepiness. These results indicate that the preoperative cognitive functioning of patients was related to their sleepiness during the awake craniotomy procedure and that the patients who exhibited sleepiness during an awake craniotomy had previously experienced reduced functioning in the parietal lobe. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Evaluation of Language Function under Awake Craniotomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    KANNO, Aya; MIKUNI, Nobuhiro

    2015-01-01

    Awake craniotomy is the only established way to assess patients’ language functions intraoperatively and to contribute to their preservation, if necessary. Recent guidelines have enabled the approach to be used widely, effectively, and safely. Non-invasive brain functional imaging techniques, including functional magnetic resonance imaging and diffusion tensor imaging, have been used preoperatively to identify brain functional regions corresponding to language, and their accuracy has increased year by year. In addition, the use of neuronavigation that incorporates this preoperative information has made it possible to identify the positional relationships between the lesion and functional regions involved in language, conduct functional brain mapping in the awake state with electrical stimulation, and intraoperatively assess nerve function in real time when resecting the lesion. This article outlines the history of awake craniotomy, the current state of pre- and intraoperative evaluation of language function, and the clinical usefulness of such functional evaluation. When evaluating patients’ language functions during awake craniotomy, given the various intraoperative stresses involved, it is necessary to carefully select the tasks to be undertaken, quickly perform all examinations, and promptly evaluate the results. As language functions involve both input and output, they are strongly affected by patients’ preoperative cognitive function, degree of intraoperative wakefulness and fatigue, the ability to produce verbal articulations and utterances, as well as perform synergic movement. Therefore, it is essential to appropriately assess the reproducibility of language function evaluation using awake craniotomy techniques. PMID:25925758

  3. Evaluation of Language Function under Awake Craniotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanno, Aya; Mikuni, Nobuhiro

    2015-01-01

    Awake craniotomy is the only established way to assess patients' language functions intraoperatively and to contribute to their preservation, if necessary. Recent guidelines have enabled the approach to be used widely, effectively, and safely. Non-invasive brain functional imaging techniques, including functional magnetic resonance imaging and diffusion tensor imaging, have been used preoperatively to identify brain functional regions corresponding to language, and their accuracy has increased year by year. In addition, the use of neuronavigation that incorporates this preoperative information has made it possible to identify the positional relationships between the lesion and functional regions involved in language, conduct functional brain mapping in the awake state with electrical stimulation, and intraoperatively assess nerve function in real time when resecting the lesion. This article outlines the history of awake craniotomy, the current state of pre- and intraoperative evaluation of language function, and the clinical usefulness of such functional evaluation. When evaluating patients' language functions during awake craniotomy, given the various intraoperative stresses involved, it is necessary to carefully select the tasks to be undertaken, quickly perform all examinations, and promptly evaluate the results. As language functions involve both input and output, they are strongly affected by patients' preoperative cognitive function, degree of intraoperative wakefulness and fatigue, the ability to produce verbal articulations and utterances, as well as perform synergic movement. Therefore, it is essential to appropriately assess the reproducibility of language function evaluation using awake craniotomy techniques.

  4. Serotonin Decreases the Gain of Visual Responses in Awake Macaque V1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seillier, Lenka; Lorenz, Corinna; Kawaguchi, Katsuhisa; Ott, Torben; Nieder, Andreas; Pourriahi, Paria; Nienborg, Hendrikje

    2017-11-22

    Serotonin, an important neuromodulator in the brain, is implicated in affective and cognitive functions. However, its role even for basic cortical processes is controversial. For example, in the mammalian primary visual cortex (V1), heterogenous serotonergic modulation has been observed in anesthetized animals. Here, we combined extracellular single-unit recordings with iontophoresis in awake animals. We examined the role of serotonin on well-defined tuning properties (orientation, spatial frequency, contrast, and size) in V1 of two male macaque monkeys. We find that in the awake macaque the modulatory effect of serotonin is surprisingly uniform: it causes a mainly multiplicative decrease of the visual responses and a slight increase in the stimulus-selective response latency. Moreover, serotonin neither systematically changes the selectivity or variability of the response, nor the interneuronal correlation unexplained by the stimulus ("noise-correlation"). The modulation by serotonin has qualitative similarities with that for a decrease in stimulus contrast, but differs quantitatively from decreasing contrast. It can be captured by a simple additive change to a threshold-linear spiking nonlinearity. Together, our results show that serotonin is well suited to control the response gain of neurons in V1 depending on the animal's behavioral or motivational context, complementing other known state-dependent gain-control mechanisms. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Serotonin is an important neuromodulator in the brain and a major target for drugs used to treat psychiatric disorders. Nonetheless, surprisingly little is known about how it shapes information processing in sensory areas. Here we examined the serotonergic modulation of visual processing in the primary visual cortex of awake behaving macaque monkeys. We found that serotonin mainly decreased the gain of the visual responses, without systematically changing their selectivity, variability, or covariability. This

  5. Anaesthesia for awake craniotomy is safe and well-tolerated

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jakob Hessel; Olsen, Karsten Skovgaard

    2010-01-01

    Awake craniotomy for tumour resection has been performed at Glostrup Hospital since 2004. We describe and discuss the various anaesthetic approaches for such surgery and retrospectively analyse the 44 planned awake craniotomies performed at Glostrup Hospital. The surgery falls into four phases......: craniotomy, mapping, tumour resection and closing. Three methods are being used: monitored anaesthetic care, asleep-awake-asleep and asleep-awake (AA)....

  6. Composability in quantum cryptography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller-Quade, Joern; Renner, Renato

    2009-01-01

    If we combine two secure cryptographic systems, is the resulting system still secure? Answering this question is highly nontrivial and has recently sparked a considerable research effort, in particular, in the area of classical cryptography. A central insight was that the answer to the question is yes, but only within a well-specified composability framework and for carefully chosen security definitions. In this article, we review several aspects of composability in the context of quantum cryptography. The first part is devoted to key distribution. We discuss the security criteria that a quantum key distribution (QKD) protocol must fulfill to allow its safe use within a larger security application (e.g. for secure message transmission); and we demonstrate-by an explicit example-what can go wrong if conventional (non-composable) security definitions are used. Finally, to illustrate the practical use of composability, we show how to generate a continuous key stream by sequentially composing rounds of a QKD protocol. In the second part, we take a more general point of view, which is necessary for the study of cryptographic situations involving, for example, mutually distrustful parties. We explain the universal composability (UC) framework and state the composition theorem that guarantees that secure protocols can securely be composed to larger applications. We focus on the secure composition of quantum protocols into unconditionally secure classical protocols. However, the resulting security definition is so strict that some tasks become impossible without additional security assumptions. Quantum bit commitment is impossible in the UC framework even with mere computational security. Similar problems arise in the quantum bounded storage model and we observe a trade-off between the UC and the use of the weakest possible security assumptions.

  7. Genome Editing of Monkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhen; Cai, Yijun; Sun, Qiang

    2017-01-01

    Gene-modified monkey models would be particularly valuable in biomedical and neuroscience research. Virus-based transgenic and programmable nucleases-based site-specific gene editing methods (TALEN, CRISPR-cas9) enable the generation of gene-modified monkeys with gain or loss of function of specific genes. Here, we describe the generation of transgenic and knock-out (KO) monkeys with high efficiency by lentivirus and programmable nucleases.

  8. Awake craniotomy. A patient`s perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajunaid, Khalid M; Ajlan, Abdulrazag M

    2015-07-01

    To report the personal experiences of patients undergoing awake craniotomy for brain tumor resection. We carried out a qualitative descriptive survey of patients` experiences with awake craniotomies for brain tumor resection. The survey was conducted through a standard questionnaire form after the patient was discharged from the hospital. Of the 9 patients who met the inclusion criteria and underwent awake craniotomy, 3 of those patients reported no recollection of the operation. Five patients had auditory recollections from the operation. Two-thirds (6/9) reported that they did not perceive pain. Five patients remembered the head clamp fixation, and 2 of those patients classified the pain from the clamp as moderate. None of the patients reported that the surgery was more difficult than anticipated. Awake craniotomy for surgical resection of brain tumors was well tolerated by patients. Most patients reported that they do not recall feeling pain during the operation. However, we feel that further work and exploration are needed in order to achieve better control of pain and discomfort during these types of operations.

  9. New opportunities in glioma therapy - awake craniotomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Golebiowska

    2017-09-01

    Study reveals the growing importance of awake surgery with simultaneous necessity for new pre-operative technologies, which can support the greater outcomes of the surgeries. Apart from that, the concerns of the ethical matter can be withdrawn if the valid algorythms and guidelines are applied for this procedure.

  10. Anesthesia for awake craniotomy: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelson Davi Bolzani

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Background and objectives: Some intracranial procedures are achievable with patients awake, however, there are challenges ranging from patient compliance to homeostasis. The aim of this study is to present a case of intracranial surgery for removal of a tumor in the left parietal lobe with the patient awake during the procedure. Case report: After patient selection and psychological preparation, the proposed excision of the left parietal lobe lesion in the waking state was clarified and accepted. Continuous infusion of propofol and remifentanil was administered to maintain a Ramsay score of 2-3. The bilateral scalp blockade was performed with ropivacaine. The Mayfield head fixation device was installed and drapes adjusted to maintain the airway and eyes accessible for mapping with electrical stimulation and tumor excision. For dura mater incision, a pad with 2% lidocaine was applied for 3 minutes. The surgery was uneventful. The patient was discharged on the seventh day of hospitalization without presenting complication. Conclusion: Although the maintenance of analgesia and hemodynamic stability was a challenge with the patient awake, the target-controlled infusion of propofol provided the desired level of consciousness, remifentanil titrated analgesia and sedation without drug accumulation, and the blockade with ropivacaine provided satisfactory analgesia. We conclude that the anesthetic technique was satisfactory for our patient. Keywords: Craniotomy awake, Neurosurgery, Propofol, Remifentanil, Ropivacaine

  11. The neurolinguistic approach to awake surgery reviewed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Witte, Elke; Mariën, Peter

    2013-02-01

    Intraoperative direct electrical stimulation (DES) is increasingly used in patients operated on for tumours in critical language areas. Although a positive impact of DES on postoperative linguistic outcome is generally advocated, the literature is only scantily documented with information about the linguistic methods applied in awake surgery. This article critically reviews the neurolinguistic procedures currently used in awake studies. Based on an extensive review of the literature, an overview is given of the language mapping techniques applied in brain tumour surgery. Studies investigating linguistic testing and outcome in awake surgery were analysed. Information about the timing of the assessment(s), the linguistic tasks, the linguistic stimuli and the indication for awake surgery was also discussed. Intraoperative DES remains the 'gold standard' for language mapping, but pre- and postoperative non-invasive mapping methods are important adjuncts. In the pre- and postoperative phase, standardised linguistic test batteries are generally used to assess language function. In the intraoperative phase, only naming and number counting are commonly applied. Most often no detailed information about the linguistic stimuli is provided and no standardised protocols measuring different linguistic levels have been described. Awake surgery with DES is a useful tool for preserving linguistic functions in patients undergoing surgery in critical brain regions. However, no studies exist that apply a well-balanced and standardised linguistic protocol to reliably identify the critical language zones. The availability of a standardised linguistic protocol might substantially increase intraoperative comfort and might improve outcome and quality of life. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Composing Interfering Abstract Protocols

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-01

    Tecnologia , Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Caparica, Portugal. This document is a companion technical report of the paper, “Composing Interfering Abstract...a Ciência e Tecnologia (Portuguese Foundation for Science and Technology) through the Carnegie Mellon Portugal Program under grant SFRH / BD / 33765

  13. [Anesthesiological management of awake craniotomy : Asleep-awake-asleep technique or without sedation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seemann, M; Zech, N; Graf, B; Hansen, E

    2015-02-01

    Awake craniotomy is indicated in deep brain stimulation (DBS) for treatment of certain movement disorders, such as in Parkinson disease patients or in the surgery of brain tumors in close vicinity to the language area. The standard procedure is the asleep-awake-asleep technique where general anesthesia or analgosedation is intermittently interrupted for neurological testing. In DBS the intraoperative improvement of symptoms, stereotactic navigation and microelectrode reading guide to the optimal position. In brain tumor resection, reversible functional impairments during electrical stimulation on the brain surface (brain mapping) show the exact individual position of eloquent or motoric areas that should be protected.The anesthesiology procedures used are very variable. It is a balancing act between overdosing of anesthetics with impairment of respiration and alertness and underdosing with pain, strain and stress for the patient. For the asleep-awake-asleep technique high acceptance but also frequent and partly severe complications have been reported. The psychological stress for the patient can be immense. Obviously, a feeling of being left alone and being at someone's mercy is not adequately treated by drugs and performance of the neurological tests is undoubtedly better and more reliable with less pharmacological impairment. Cranial nerve blocks can reduce the amount of anesthetics as they provide analgesia of the scalp more efficiently than local infiltration. With these nerve blocks, a strong therapeutic relationship and a specific communication, sedatives can be avoided and the need for opioids markedly reduced or abolished. The suggestive communication promotes for instance dissociation to an inner safe refuge, as well as reframing of disturbing noises and sensations. Each of the methods applied for awake craniotomy can profit from the principles of this awake-awake-awake technique.

  14. Path to AWAKE: Evolution of the concept

    CERN Document Server

    Caldwell, A.; Amorim, L.; Apsimon, R.; Argyropoulos, T.; Assmann, R.; Bachmann, A.-M.; Batsch, F.; Bauche, J.; Berglyd Olsen, V.K.; Bernardini, M.; Bingham, R.; Biskup, B.; Bohl, T.; Bracco, C.; Burrows, P.N.; Burt, G.; Buttenschön, B.; Butterworth, A.; Cascella, M.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chevallay, E.; Cipiccia, S.; Damerau, H.; Deacon, L.; Dirksen, P.; Doebert, S.; Dorda, U.; Elsen, E.; Farmer, J.; Fartoukh, S.; Fedosseev, V.; Feldbaumer, E.; Fiorito, R.; Fonseca, R.; Friebel, F.; Geschonke, G.; Goddard, B.; Gorn, A.A.; Grulke, O.; Gschwendtner, E.; Hansen, J.; Hessler, C.; Hillenbrand, S.; Hofle, W.; Holloway, J.; Huang, C.; Hüther, M.; Jaroszynski, D.; Jensen, L.; Jolly, S.; Joulaei, A.; Kasim, M.; Keeble, F.; Kersevan, R.; Kumar, N.; Li, Y.; Liu, S.; Lopes, N.; Lotov, K.V.; Lu, W.; Machacek, J.; Mandry, S.; Martin, I.; Martorelli, R.; Martyanov, M.; Mazzoni, S.; Meddahi, M.; Merminga, L.; Mete, O.; Minakov, V.A.; Mitchell, J.; Moody, J.; Müller, A.-S.; Najmudin, Z.; Noakes, T.C.Q.; Norreys, P.; Osterhoff, J.; Öz, E.; Pardons, A.; Pepitone, K.; Petrenko, A.; Plyushchev, G.; Pozimski, J.; Pukhov, A.; Reimann, O.; Rieger, K.; Roesler, S.; Ruhl, H.; Rusnak, T.; Salveter, F.; Savard, N.; Schmidt, J.; von der Schmitt, H.; Seryi, A.; Shaposhnikova, E.; Sheng, Z.M.; Sherwood, P.; Silva, L.; Simon, F.; Soby, L.; Sosedkin, A.P.; Spitsyn, R.I.; Tajima, T.; Tarkeshian, R.; Timko, H.; Trines, R.; Tückmantel, T.; Tuev, P.V.; Turner, M.; Velotti, F.; Verzilov, V.; Vieira, J.; Vincke, H.; Wei, Y.; Welsch, C.P.; Wing, M.; Xia, G.; Yakimenko, V.; Zhang, H.; Zimmermann, F.

    2016-09-01

    This report describes the conceptual steps in reaching the design of the AWAKE experiment currently under construction at CERN. We start with an introduction to plasma wakefield acceleration and the motivation for using proton drivers. We then describe the self-modulation instability --- a key to an early realization of the concept. This is then followed by the historical development of the experimental design, where the critical issues that arose and their solutions are described. We conclude with the design of the experiment as it is being realized at CERN and some words on the future outlook. A summary of the AWAKE design and construction status as presented in this conference is given in [1].

  15. Awake, Offline Processing during Associative Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bursley, James K; Nestor, Adrian; Tarr, Michael J; Creswell, J David

    2016-01-01

    Offline processing has been shown to strengthen memory traces and enhance learning in the absence of conscious rehearsal or awareness. Here we evaluate whether a brief, two-minute offline processing period can boost associative learning and test a memory reactivation account for these offline processing effects. After encoding paired associates, subjects either completed a distractor task for two minutes or were immediately tested for memory of the pairs in a counterbalanced, within-subjects functional magnetic resonance imaging study. Results showed that brief, awake, offline processing improves memory for associate pairs. Moreover, multi-voxel pattern analysis of the neuroimaging data suggested reactivation of encoded memory representations in dorsolateral prefrontal cortex during offline processing. These results signify the first demonstration of awake, active, offline enhancement of associative memory and suggest that such enhancement is accompanied by the offline reactivation of encoded memory representations.

  16. Awake, Offline Processing during Associative Learning.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James K Bursley

    Full Text Available Offline processing has been shown to strengthen memory traces and enhance learning in the absence of conscious rehearsal or awareness. Here we evaluate whether a brief, two-minute offline processing period can boost associative learning and test a memory reactivation account for these offline processing effects. After encoding paired associates, subjects either completed a distractor task for two minutes or were immediately tested for memory of the pairs in a counterbalanced, within-subjects functional magnetic resonance imaging study. Results showed that brief, awake, offline processing improves memory for associate pairs. Moreover, multi-voxel pattern analysis of the neuroimaging data suggested reactivation of encoded memory representations in dorsolateral prefrontal cortex during offline processing. These results signify the first demonstration of awake, active, offline enhancement of associative memory and suggest that such enhancement is accompanied by the offline reactivation of encoded memory representations.

  17. Modulation-Frequency-Specific Adaptation in Awake Auditory Cortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beitel, Ralph E.; Vollmer, Maike; Heiser, Marc A.; Schreiner, Christoph E.

    2015-01-01

    Amplitude modulations are fundamental features of natural signals, including human speech and nonhuman primate vocalizations. Because natural signals frequently occur in the context of other competing signals, we used a forward-masking paradigm to investigate how the modulation context of a prior signal affects cortical responses to subsequent modulated sounds. Psychophysical “modulation masking,” in which the presentation of a modulated “masker” signal elevates the threshold for detecting the modulation of a subsequent stimulus, has been interpreted as evidence of a central modulation filterbank and modeled accordingly. Whether cortical modulation tuning is compatible with such models remains unknown. By recording responses to pairs of sinusoidally amplitude modulated (SAM) tones in the auditory cortex of awake squirrel monkeys, we show that the prior presentation of the SAM masker elicited persistent and tuned suppression of the firing rate to subsequent SAM signals. Population averages of these effects are compatible with adaptation in broadly tuned modulation channels. In contrast, modulation context had little effect on the synchrony of the cortical representation of the second SAM stimuli and the tuning of such effects did not match that observed for firing rate. Our results suggest that, although the temporal representation of modulated signals is more robust to changes in stimulus context than representations based on average firing rate, this representation is not fully exploited and psychophysical modulation masking more closely mirrors physiological rate suppression and that rate tuning for a given stimulus feature in a given neuron's signal pathway appears sufficient to engender context-sensitive cortical adaptation. PMID:25878263

  18. [AWAKE CRANIOTOMY: IN SEARCH FOR OPTIMAL SEDATION].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulikova, A S; Sel'kov, D A; Kobyakov, G L; Shmigel'skiy, A V; Lubnin, A Yu

    2015-01-01

    Awake craniotomy is a "gold standard"for intraoperative brain language mapping. One of the main anesthetic challenge of awake craniotomy is providing of optimal sedation for initial stages of intervention. The goal of this study was comparison of different technics of anesthesia for awake craniotomy. Materials and methods: 162 operations were divided in 4 groups: 76 cases with propofol sedation (2-4mg/kg/h) without airway protection; 11 cases with propofol sedation (4-5 mg/kg/h) with MV via LMA; 36 cases of xenon anesthesia; and 39 cases with dexmedetomidine sedation without airway protection. Results and discussion: brain language mapping was successful in 90% of cases. There was no difference between groups in successfulness of brain mapping. However in the first group respiratory complications were more frequent. Three other technics were more safer Xenon anesthesia was associated with ultrafast awakening for mapping (5±1 min). Dexmedetomidine sedation provided high hemodynamic and respiratory stability during the procedure.

  19. Anesthesia for awake craniotomy: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolzani, Nelson Davi; Junqueira, Daisy de Oliveira Pollon; Ferrari, Paulo André Pinheiro Fernandes; Ferrari, Antonio Fernandes; Gaia, Felipe; Tapajós, Caroline Moraes; Junior, José Francisco Cursino de Moura; Neto, Edmundo Pereira de Souza

    2013-01-01

    Some intracranial procedures are achievable with patients awake, however, there are challenges ranging from patient compliance to homeostasis. The aim of this study is to present a case of intracranial surgery for removal of a tumor in the left parietal lobe with the patient awake during the procedure. After patient selection and psychological preparation, the proposed excision of the left parietal lobe lesion in the waking state was clarified and accepted. Continuous infusion of propofol and remifentanil was administered to maintain a Ramsay score of 2-3. The bilateral scalp blockade was performed with ropivacaine. The Mayfield head fixation device was installed and drapes adjusted to maintain the airway and eyes accessible for mapping with electrical stimulation and tumor excision. For dura mater incision, a pad with 2% lidocaine was applied for 3 minutes. The surgery was uneventful. The patient was discharged on the seventh day of hospitalization without presenting complication. Although the maintenance of analgesia and hemodynamic stability was a challenge with the patient awake, the target-controlled infusion of propofol provided the desired level of consciousness, remifentanil titrated analgesia and sedation without drug accumulation, and the blockade with ropivacaine provided satisfactory analgesia. We conclude that the anesthetic technique was satisfactory for our patient. Copyright © 2013 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  20. Path to AWAKE: Evolution of the concept

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caldwell, A. [Max Planck Institute for Physics, Föhringer Ring 6, 80805 München (Germany); Adli, E. [University of Oslo, 0316 Oslo (Norway); Amorim, L. [GoLP/Instituto de Plasmas e Fusão Nuclear, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, Lisbon (Portugal); Apsimon, R. [Cockcroft Institute, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Lancaster University, Lancaster LA1 4YR (United Kingdom); Argyropoulos, T. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Assmann, R. [DESY, Notkestrasse 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Bachmann, A.-M.; Batsch, F. [Max Planck Institute for Physics, Föhringer Ring 6, 80805 München (Germany); Bauche, J. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Berglyd Olsen, V.K. [University of Oslo, 0316 Oslo (Norway); Bernardini, M. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Bingham, R. [STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Didcot OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Biskup, B. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Czech Technical University, Zikova 1903/4, 166 36 Praha 6 (Czech Republic); Bohl, T.; Bracco, C. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Burrows, P.N. [John Adams Institute for Accelerator Science, Oxford (United Kingdom); University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 2JD (United Kingdom); Burt, G. [Cockcroft Institute, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Lancaster University, Lancaster LA1 4YR (United Kingdom); Buttenschön, B. [Max Planck Institute for Plasma Physics, Wendelsteinstr. 1, 17491 Greifswald (Germany); Butterworth, A. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Cascella, M. [UCL, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); and others

    2016-09-01

    This paper describes the conceptual steps in reaching the design of the AWAKE experiment currently under construction at CERN. We start with an introduction to plasma wakefield acceleration and the motivation for using proton drivers. We then describe the self-modulation instability – a key to an early realization of the concept. This is then followed by the historical development of the experimental design, where the critical issues that arose and their solutions are described. We conclude with the design of the experiment as it is being realized at CERN and some words on the future outlook. A summary of the AWAKE design and construction status as presented in this conference is given in Gschwendtner et al. [1]. - Highlights: • Proton-driven plasma wakefield acceleration is proposed to bring electron bunches to high energies. • The self-modulation instability allows the use of existing proton bunches. • Schemes for overcoming the varying wake phase velocity were developed. • AWAKE will demonstrate proton-driven plasma wakefield acceleration for the first time.

  1. Spontaneous high-gamma band activity reflects functional organization of auditory cortex in the awake macaque.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukushima, Makoto; Saunders, Richard C; Leopold, David A; Mishkin, Mortimer; Averbeck, Bruno B

    2012-06-07

    In the absence of sensory stimuli, spontaneous activity in the brain has been shown to exhibit organization at multiple spatiotemporal scales. In the macaque auditory cortex, responses to acoustic stimuli are tonotopically organized within multiple, adjacent frequency maps aligned in a caudorostral direction on the supratemporal plane (STP) of the lateral sulcus. Here, we used chronic microelectrocorticography to investigate the correspondence between sensory maps and spontaneous neural fluctuations in the auditory cortex. We first mapped tonotopic organization across 96 electrodes spanning approximately two centimeters along the primary and higher auditory cortex. In separate sessions, we then observed that spontaneous activity at the same sites exhibited spatial covariation that reflected the tonotopic map of the STP. This observation demonstrates a close relationship between functional organization and spontaneous neural activity in the sensory cortex of the awake monkey. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Composers on stage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Groth, Sanne Krogh

    A trend on the scene of contemporary music is composers going on stage, performing their pieces themselves. Within a discourse of popular music, this is more the rule than exception, but when it comes to the context of contemporary scored music, the historical and aesthetic context differs......, and something quite different is undergoing. This paper intends to discuss three examples of performances in which the composer’s appearance on stage was an important part of the piece, - both when it came to the role as a performer and as an individual person – as representer and presenter. The paper intends...

  3. The COMPOSE Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balletta, P.; Biagini, M.; Gallinaro, G.; Vernucci, A.

    2003-07-01

    This paper provides an overview of the on-going project COMPOSE, an EC co-funded project aiming to define, specify and validate an innovative mobile-services scenario in support of travellers, and to demonstrate the effectiveness of the new proposed location-based value-added services. COMPOSE is supported by organisations belonging to numerous categories covering, as a whole, the entire value-chain of infomobility services provision to the final user. The project team comprises, in addition to the affiliations of the authors, also Teleatlas (NL), ARS T&TT (NL), Alcatel-Bell Space (B), Skysoft (P), Hitech Marketing (A) and MobileGis (IR). The paper describes the services that will be offered to users, encompassing both the pre-trip and the on-trip framework, presents the overall hybrid system architecture also including a via-satellite component based upon the Wideband-CDMA (W-CDMA) technique adopted in UMTS, discusses the access solutions envisaged for that component permitting multiple feeder-link stations to share the CDMA multiplex capacity by directly transmitting their codes to the satellite, and illustrates the results of some computer simulations intended to assess the performance of said access solutions, with regard to the effects of the inevitable up- link frequency errors and transponder non-linearity.

  4. Ethograms indicate stable well-being during prolonged training phases in rhesus monkeys used in neurophysiological research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hage, Steffen R; Ott, Torben; Eiselt, Anne-Kathrin; Jacob, Simon N; Nieder, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Awake, behaving rhesus monkeys are widely used in neurophysiological research. Neural signals are typically measured from monkeys trained with operant conditioning techniques to perform a variety of behavioral tasks in exchange for rewards. Over the past years, monkeys' psychological well-being during experimentation has become an increasingly important concern. We suggest objective criteria to explore whether training sessions during which the monkeys work under controlled water intake over many days might affect their behavior. With that aim, we analyzed a broad range of species-specific behaviors over several months ('ethogram') and used these ethograms as a proxy for the monkeys' well-being. Our results show that monkeys' behavior during training sessions is unaffected by the duration of training-free days in-between. Independently of the number of training-free days (two or nine days) with ad libitum food and water supply, the monkeys were equally active and alert in their home group cages during training phases. This indicates that the monkeys were well habituated to prolonged working schedules and that their well-being was stably ensured during the training sessions.

  5. Awake craniotomy and multilingualism: language testing during anaesthesia for awake craniotomy in a bilingual patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costello, T G

    2014-08-01

    An awake craniotomy for epilepsy surgery is presented where a bilingual patient post-operatively reported temporary aphasia of his first language (Spanish). This case report discusses the potential causes for this clinical presentation and methods to prevent the occurrence of this in future patients undergoing this form of surgery. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. CERN AWAKE Facility Readiness for First Beam

    CERN Document Server

    Bracco, Chiara; Butterworth, Andrew; Damerau, Heiko; Döbert, Steffen; Fedosseev, Valentin; Feldbaumer, Eduard; Gschwendtner, Edda; Höfle, Wolfgang; Pardons, Ans; Shaposhnikova, Elena; Vincke, Helmut

    2016-01-01

    The AWAKE project at CERN was approved in August 2013 and since then a big effort was made to be able to probe the acceleration of electrons before the "2019-2020 Long Shutdown". The next steps in this challenging schedule will be a dry run of all the beam line systems, at the end of the HW commissioning in June 2016, and the first proton beam sent to the plasma cell one month later. The current status of the project is presented together with an outlook over the foreseen works for operation with electrons in 2018.

  7. Awake Craniotomy Anesthesia: A Comparison of the Monitored Anesthesia Care and Asleep-Awake-Asleep Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eseonu, Chikezie I; ReFaey, Karim; Garcia, Oscar; John, Amballur; Quiñones-Hinojosa, Alfredo; Tripathi, Punita

    2017-08-01

    Commonly used sedation techniques for an awake craniotomy include monitored anesthesia care (MAC), using an unprotected airway, and the asleep-awake-asleep (AAA) technique, using a partially or totally protected airway. We present a comparative analysis of the MAC and AAA techniques, evaluating anesthetic management, perioperative outcomes, and complications in a consecutive series of patients undergoing the removal of an eloquent brain lesion. Eighty-one patients underwent awake craniotomy for an intracranial lesion over a 9-year period performed by a single-surgeon and a team of anesthesiologists. Fifty patients were treated using the MAC technique, and 31 were treated using the AAA technique. A retrospective analysis evaluated anesthetic management, intraoperative complications, postoperative outcomes, pain management, and complications. The MAC and AAA groups had similar preoperative patient and tumor characteristics. Mean operative time was shorter in the MAC group (283.5 minutes vs. 313.3 minutes; P = 0.038). Hypertension was the most common intraoperative complication seen (8% in the MAC group vs. 9.7% in the AAA group; P = 0.794). Intraoperative seizure occurred at a rate of 4% in the MAC group and 3.2% in the AAA group (P = 0.858). Awake cases were converted to general anesthesia in no patients in the MAC group and in 1 patient (3.2%) in the AAA group (P = 0.201). No cases were aborted in either group. The mean hospital length of stay was 3.98 days in the MAC group and 3.84 days in the AAA group (P = 0.833). Both the MAC and AAA sedation techniques provide an efficacious and safe method for managing awake craniotomy cases and produce similar perioperative outcomes, with the MAC technique associated with shorter operative time. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Awake craniotomy may further improve neurological outcome of intraoperative MRI-guided brain tumor surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuominen, Juho; Yrjänä, Sanna; Ukkonen, Anssi; Koivukangas, John

    2013-10-01

    Results of awake craniotomy are compared to results of resections done under general anesthesia in patients operated with IMRI control. We hypothesized that stimulation of the cortex and white matter during awake surgery supplements IMRI control allowing for safer resection of eloquent brain area tumors. The study group consisted of 20 consecutive patients undergoing awake craniotomy with IMRI control. Resection outcome of these patients was compared to a control group of 20 patients operated in the same IMRI suite but under general anesthesia without cortical stimulation. The control group was composed of those patients whose age, sex, tumor location, recurrence and histology best matched to patients in study group. Cortical stimulation identified functional cortex in eight patients (40 %). Postoperatively the neurological condition in 16 patients (80 %) in the study group was unchanged or improved compared with 13 patients (65 %) in the control group. In both groups, three patients (15 %) had transient impairment symptoms. There was one patient (5 %) with permanent neurological impairment in the study group compared to four patients (20 %) in the control group. These differences between groups were not statistically significant. There was no surgical mortality in either group and the overall infection rate was 5 %. Mean operation time was 4 h 45 min in the study group and 3 h 15 min in the control group. The study consisted of a limited patient series, but it implies that awake craniotomy with bipolar cortical stimulation may help to reduce the risk of postoperative impairment following resection of tumors located in or near speech and motor areas also under IMRI control.

  9. Awake craniotomy for supratentorial gliomas: why, when and how?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, George M; Bernstein, Mark

    2012-09-01

    Awake craniotomy has become an increasingly utilized procedure in the treatment of supratentorial intra-axial tumors. The popularity of this procedure is partially attributable to improvements in intraoperative technology and anesthetic techniques. The application of awake craniotomy to the field of neuro-oncology has decreased iatrogenic postoperative neurological deficits, allowed for safe maximal tumor resection and improved healthcare resource stewardship by permitting early patient discharge. In this article, we review recent evidence for the utility of awake craniotomy in the resection of gliomas and describe the senior author's experience in performing this procedure. Furthermore, we explore innovative applications of awake craniotomy to outpatient tumor resections and the conduct of neurosurgery in resource-poor settings. We conclude that awake craniotomy is an effective and versatile neurosurgical procedure with expanding applications in neuro-oncology.

  10. [Awake craniotomy. Considerations in special situations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solera Ruiz, I; Uña Orejón, R; Valero, I; Laroche, F

    2013-01-01

    Awake craniotomy was the earliest surgical procedure known, and it has become fashionable again. In the past it was used for the surgical management of intractable epilepsy, but nowadays, its indications are increasing, and it is a widely recognized technique for the resection of mass lesions involving the eloquent cortex, and for deep brain stimulation. The procedure is safe, provides excellent results, and saves money and resources. The anesthesiologist should know the principles underlying neuroanesthesia, the technique of scalp blockade, and the sedation protocols, as well as feeling comfortable with advanced airway management. The main anesthetic aim is to keep patients cooperating when required (analgesia-based anesthesia). This review attempts to summarize the most recent evidence from the clinical literature, a long as the number of patients undergoing craniotomies in the awake state are increasing, specifically in the pediatric population. Copyright © 2011 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  11. Preparing to perform an awake fiberoptic intubation.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Walsh, M E

    2012-02-03

    Fiberoptically guided tracheal intubation represents one of the most important advances in airway management to occur in the past thirty years. Perhaps its most important role is in management of the anticipated difficult airway. This is a situation in which the dangers of encountering the life-threatening "can\\'t intubate, can\\'t ventilate" situation can be avoided by placement of an endotracheal tube while the patient is awake. Although skill at the procedure of endoscopy is obviously necessary in this setting, these authors hold that success or failure of the technique frequently depends on the adequacy of preparation. These measures include 1) pre-operative assessment of the patient; 2) careful explanation of what lies in store; 3) "setting the stage"; 4) preparing the equipment to be used; and 5) preparing the patient (antisialogue, sedation, application of topical anesthesia to the upper airway). If these preparatory measures are carried out meticulously, the likelihood of performing a successful and comfortable awake fiberoptic tracheal intubation is greatly increased.

  12. The AWAKE Experimental Facility at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Gschwendtner, E; Bracco, C; Butterworth, A; Cipiccia, S; Doebert, S; Fedosseev, V; Feldbaumer, E; Hessler, C; Hofle, W; Martyanov, M; Meddahi, M; Osborne, J; Pardons, A; Petrenko, A; Vincke, H

    2014-01-01

    AWAKE, an Advanced Wakefield Experiment is launched at CERN to verify the proton driven plasma wakefield acceleration concept. Proton bunches at 400 GeV/c will be extracted from the CERN SPS and sent along a 750 m long proton line to a plasma cell, a Rubidium vapour source, where the proton beam drives wakefields reaching accelerating gradients of several gigavolts per meter. A high power laser pulse will copropagate within the proton bunch creating the plasma by ionizing the (initially) neutral gas. An electron beam will be injected into the plasma cell to probe the accelerating wakefield. The AWAKE experiment will be installed in the CNGS facility. First proton beam to the plasma cell is expected by end 2016. The installation planning and the baseline parameters of the experiment are shown. The design of the experimental area and the integration of the new beam-lines as well as the experimental equipment are presented. The needed modifications of the infrastructure in the facility and a few challenges are h...

  13. Teaching Composing with an Identity as a Teacher-Composer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, Jennie

    2012-01-01

    I enjoy composing and feel able to write songs that I like and which feel significant to me. This has not always been the case and the change had nothing to do with my school education or my degree. Composing at secondary school did not move beyond Bach and Handel pastiche. I did not take any composing courses during my degree. What did influence…

  14. Composing the Curriculum: Teacher Identity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Rebecca

    2012-01-01

    What is composing and how is it valued? What does a good education in composing look like; what constraints hinder it and is it possible to overcome such constraints? Can composing be a personal, creative and valuable activity for the school student? What role does the teacher play in all of this? These are questions that I discuss in this…

  15. Comparison of Conscious Sedation and Asleep-Awake-Asleep Techniques for Awake Craniotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilmen, Ozlem Korkmaz; Akcil, Eren Fatma; Oguz, Abdulvahap; Vehid, Hayriye; Tunali, Yusuf

    2017-01-01

    Since awake craniotomy (AC) has become a standard of care for supratentorial tumour resection, especially in the motor and language cortex, determining the most appropriate anaesthetic protocol is very important. The aim of this retrospective study is to compare the effectiveness of conscious sedation (CS) to "awake-asleep-awake" (AAA) techniques for supratentorial tumour resection. Forty-two patients undergoing CS and 22 patients undergoing AAA were included in the study. The primary endpoint was to compare the CS and AAA techniques with respect to intraoperative pain and agitation in patients undergoing supratentorial tumour resection. The secondary endpoint was comparison of the other intraoperative complications. This study results show that the incidence of intraoperative agitation and seizure were lower in the AAA group than in the CS group. Intraoperative blood pressures were significantly higher in the CS group than in the AAA group during the pinning and incision, but the level of blood pressures did not need antihypertensive treatment. Otherwise, blood pressures were significantly higher in the AAA group than in the CS group during the neurological examination and the severity of hypertension needed statistically significant more antihypertensive treatment in the AAA group. As a result of hypertension, the amount of intraoperative bleeding was higher in the AAA group than in the CS group. In conclusion, the AAA technique may provide better results with respect to agitation and seizure, but intraoperative hypertension needed a vigilant follow-up especially in the wake-up period. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Ammonia encephalopathy and awake craniotomy for brain language mapping: cause of failed awake craniotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villalba Martínez, G; Fernández-Candil, J L; Vivanco-Hidalgo, R M; Pacreu Terradas, S; León Jorba, A; Arroyo Pérez, R

    2015-05-01

    We report the case of an aborted awake craniotomy for a left frontotemporoinsular glioma due to ammonia encephalopathy on a patient taking Levetiracetam, valproic acid and clobazam. This awake mapping surgery was scheduled as a second-stage procedure following partial resection eight days earlier under general anesthesia. We planned to perform the surgery with local anesthesia and sedation with remifentanil and propofol. After removal of the bone flap all sedation was stopped and we noticed slow mentation and excessive drowsiness prompting us to stop and control the airway and proceed with general anesthesia. There were no post-operative complications but the patient continued to exhibit bradypsychia and hand tremor. His ammonia level was found to be elevated and was treated with an infusion of l-carnitine after discontinuation of the valproic acid with vast improvement. Ammonia encephalopathy should be considered in patients treated with valproic acid and mental status changes who require an awake craniotomy with patient collaboration. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  17. Lung function measurement in awake young children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisgaard, H; Klug, B

    1995-01-01

    ) and transcutaneous measurements of oxygen tension (Ptc,O2) were compared with concomitant measurements of specific airway resistance (sRaw) and forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) by whole body plethysmography and spirometry, respectively, during methacholine challenge in 21 young children aged 4-6 yrs...... to methacholine in young children aged 4-6 yrs. This implies that ZIOS, Rint and Ptc,O2 provide convenient indices of changes in lung function. Their combined use will be useful for monitoring airway diseases of young children.......The aim of the study was to evaluate methods applicable in a clinical setting for monitoring of changes in lung function in awake young children. Impedance measurements by the impulse oscillation technique (ZIOS), respiratory resistance measurements by the interrupter technique (Rint...

  18. Awake craniotomy for brain tumor: indications, technique and benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dziedzic, Tomasz; Bernstein, Mark

    2014-12-01

    Increasing interest in the quality of life of patients after treatment of brain tumors has led to the exploration of methods that can improve intraoperative assessment of neurological status to avoid neurological deficits. The only method that can provide assessment of all eloquent areas of cerebral cortex and white matter is brain mapping during awake craniotomy. This method helps ensure that the quality of life and the neuro-oncological result of treatment are not compromised. Apart from the medical aspects of awake surgery, its economic issues are also favorable. Here, we review the main aspects of awake brain tumor surgery. Neurosurgical, neuropsychological, neurophysiological and anesthetic issues are briefly discussed.

  19. Awake craniotomy in a depressed and agitated patient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Shuaibi, Khalid M.

    2010-01-01

    Depressed patients with brain tumors are often not referred to awake craniotomy because of concern of uncooperation which may increase the risk of perioperative complications. This report describes an interesting case of awake craniotomy for frontal lobe glioma in a 41-year-old woman undergoing language and motor mapping intraoperatively. As she was fearful and apprehensive and was on antidepressant therapy to control depression, the author adopted general anesthesia with laryngeal mask airway during initial stage of skull pinning and craniotomy procedures. Then, the patient reverted to awake state to continue the intended neurosurgical procedure. The patient tolerated the situation satisfactorily and was cooperative till the finish, without any event. PMID:25885087

  20. The History of Awake Craniotomy in Hospital Universiti Sains Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    WAN HASSAN, Wan Mohd Nazaruddin

    2013-01-01

    Awake craniotomy is a brain surgery performed on awake patients and is indicated for certain intracranial pathologies. These include procedures that require an awake patient for electrocorticographic mapping or precise electrophysiological recordings, resection of lesions located close to or in the motor and speech of the brain, or minor intracranial procedures that aim to avoid general anaesthesia for faster recovery and earlier discharge. This type of brain surgery is quite new and has only recently begun to be performed in a few neurosurgical centres in Malaysia. The success of the surgery requires exceptional teamwork from the neurosurgeon, neuroanaesthesiologist, and neurologist. The aim of this article is to briefly describe the history of awake craniotomy procedures at our institution. PMID:24643321

  1. Anaesthetic technique during awake craniotomy. Case report and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.M. Madriz-Godoy

    2016-07-01

    Results: This case was managed with a scalp nerve block as local anaesthesia plus intravenous sedation without airway instrumentation. We reviewed the literature about patient management during awake craniotomy.

  2. Anaesthesia for awake craniotomy: A retrospective study of 54 cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Navdeep Sokhal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: The anaesthetic challenge of awake craniotomy is to maintain adequate sedation, analgesia, respiratory and haemodynamic stability in an awake patient who should be able to co-operate during intraoperative neurological assessment. The current literature, sharing the experience on awake craniotomy, in Indian context, is minimal. Hence, we carried out a retrospective study with the aim to review and analyse the anaesthetic management and perioperative complications in patients undergoing awake craniotomy, at our centre. Methods: Medical records of 54 patients who underwent awake craniotomy for intracranial lesions over a period of 10 years were reviewed, retrospectively. Data regarding anaesthetic management, intraoperative complications and post-operative course were recorded. Results: Propofol (81.5% and dexmedetomidine (18.5% were the main agents used for providing conscious sedation to facilitate awake craniotomy. Hypertension (16.7% was the most commonly encountered complication during intraoperative period, followed by seizures (9.3%, desaturation (7.4%, tight brain (7.4%, and shivering (5.6%. The procedure had to be converted to general anaesthesia in one of patients owing to refractory brain bulge. The incidence of respiratory and haemodynamic complications were comparable in the both groups (P > 0.05. There was less incidence of intraoperative seizures in patients who received propofol (P = 0.03. In post-operative period, 20% of patients developed new motor deficit. Mean intensive care unit stay was 2.8 ± 1.9 day (1-14 days and mean hospital stay was 7.0 ± 5.0 day (3-30 days. Conclusions: ′Conscious sedation′ was the technique of choice for awake craniotomy, at our institute. Fentanyl, propofol, and dexmedetomidine were the main agents used for this purpose. Patients receiving propofol had less incidence of intraoperative seizure. Appropriate selection of patients, understanding the procedure of surgery, and

  3. Patient response to awake craniotomy - a summary overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milian, Monika; Tatagiba, Marcos; Feigl, Guenther C

    2014-06-01

    Awake craniotomy is a valuable procedure since it allows brain mapping and live monitoring of eloquent brain functions. The advantage of minimizing resource utilization is also emphasized by some physicians in North America. Data on how well an awake craniotomy is tolerated by patients and how much stress it creates is available from different studies, but this topic has not consequently been summarized in a review of the available literature. Therefore, it is the purpose of this review to shed more light on the still controversially discussed aspect of an awake craniotomy. We reviewed the available English literature published until December 2013 searching for studies that investigated patients' responses to awake craniotomies. Twelve studies, published between 1998 and 2013, including 396 patients with awake surgery were identified. Eleven of these 12 studies set the focus on the perioperative time, one study focused on the later postoperative time. The vast majority of patients felt well prepared and overall satisfaction with the procedure was high. In the majority of studies up to 30 % of the patients recalled considerable pain and 10-14 % experienced strong anxiety during the procedure. The majority of patients reported that they would undergo an awake craniotomy again. A post traumatic stress disorder was present neither shortly nor years after surgery. However, a normal human response to such an exceptional situation can for instance be the delayed appearance of unintentional distressing recollections of the event despite the patients' satisfaction concerning the procedure. For selected patients, an awake craniotomy presents the best possible way to reduce the risk of surgery related neurological deficits. However, benefits and burdens of this type of procedure should be carefully considered when planning an awake craniotomy and the decision should serve the interests of the patient.

  4. Awake craniotomy: A qualitative review and future challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghazanwy, Mahmood; Chakrabarti, Rajkalyan; Tewari, Anurag; Sinha, Ashish

    2014-01-01

    Neurosurgery in awake patients incorporates newer technologies that require the anesthesiologists to update their skills and evolve their methodologies. They need effective communication skills and knowledge of selecting the right anesthetic drugs to ensure adequate analgesia, akinesia, along with patient satisfaction with the anesthetic conduct throughout the procedure. The challenge of providing adequate anesthetic care to an awake patient for intracranial surgery requires more than routine vigilance about anesthetic management. PMID:25422613

  5. Awake craniotomy: A qualitative review and future challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmood Ghazanwy

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurosurgery in awake patients incorporates newer technologies that require the anesthesiologists to update their skills and evolve their methodologies. They need effective communication skills and knowledge of selecting the right anesthetic drugs to ensure adequate analgesia, akinesia, along with patient satisfaction with the anesthetic conduct throughout the procedure. The challenge of providing adequate anesthetic care to an awake patient for intracranial surgery requires more than routine vigilance about anesthetic management.

  6. Anaesthesia for awake craniotomy: A retrospective study of 54 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokhal, Navdeep; Rath, Girija Prasad; Chaturvedi, Arvind; Dash, Hari Hara; Bithal, Parmod Kumar; Chandra, P Sarat

    2015-05-01

    The anaesthetic challenge of awake craniotomy is to maintain adequate sedation, analgesia, respiratory and haemodynamic stability in an awake patient who should be able to co-operate during intraoperative neurological assessment. The current literature, sharing the experience on awake craniotomy, in Indian context, is minimal. Hence, we carried out a retrospective study with the aim to review and analyse the anaesthetic management and perioperative complications in patients undergoing awake craniotomy, at our centre. Medical records of 54 patients who underwent awake craniotomy for intracranial lesions over a period of 10 years were reviewed, retrospectively. Data regarding anaesthetic management, intraoperative complications and post-operative course were recorded. Propofol (81.5%) and dexmedetomidine (18.5%) were the main agents used for providing conscious sedation to facilitate awake craniotomy. Hypertension (16.7%) was the most commonly encountered complication during intraoperative period, followed by seizures (9.3%), desaturation (7.4%), tight brain (7.4%), and shivering (5.6%). The procedure had to be converted to general anaesthesia in one of patients owing to refractory brain bulge. The incidence of respiratory and haemodynamic complications were comparable in the both groups (P > 0.05). There was less incidence of intraoperative seizures in patients who received propofol (P = 0.03). In post-operative period, 20% of patients developed new motor deficit. Mean intensive care unit stay was 2.8 ± 1.9 day (1-14 days) and mean hospital stay was 7.0 ± 5.0 day (3-30 days). 'Conscious sedation' was the technique of choice for awake craniotomy, at our institute. Fentanyl, propofol, and dexmedetomidine were the main agents used for this purpose. Patients receiving propofol had less incidence of intraoperative seizure. Appropriate selection of patients, understanding the procedure of surgery, and judicious use of sedatives or anaesthetic agents are key to the

  7. Anaesthesia for awake craniotomy is safe and well-tolerated.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Jakob Hessel; Olsen, Karsten Skovgaard

    2010-10-01

    Awake craniotomy for tumour resection has been performed at Glostrup Hospital since 2004. We describe and discuss the various anaesthetic approaches for such surgery and retrospectively analyse the 44 planned awake craniotomies performed at Glostrup Hospital. The surgery falls into four phases: craniotomy, mapping, tumour resection and closing. Three methods are being used: monitored anaesthetic care, asleep-awake-asleep and asleep-awake (AA). Anaesthesia is induced and maintained with propofol and remifentanil. A laryngeal mask (LM) is used as an airway during the craniotomy phase. In the AA method, patients are mapped and the tumour is resected while the patient is awake. A total of 41 of 44 planned AA craniotomies were performed. Three had to be converted into general anaesthesia (GA) due to tight brain, leaking LM and tumour haemorrhage, respectively. The following complications were observed: bradycardia 10%, leaking LM 5%, nausea 10%, vomiting 5%, focal seizures 28%, generalized seizures 10%, hypoxia 2%, hypotension 5% and hypertension 2%. Our results comply well with the international literature in terms of complications related to haemodynamics, respiration, seizures, vomiting and nausea and in terms of patient satisfaction. Awake craniotomy is a well-tolerated procedure with potential benefits. More prospective randomized studies are required.

  8. Awake Craniotomy: First-Year Experiences and Patient Perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joswig, Holger; Bratelj, Denis; Brunner, Thomas; Jacomet, Alfred; Hildebrandt, Gerhard; Surbeck, Werner

    2016-06-01

    Awake craniotomy for brain lesions in or near eloquent brain regions enables neurosurgeons to assess neurologic functions of patients intraoperatively, reducing the risk of permanent neurologic deficits and increasing the extent of resection. A retrospective review was performed of a consecutive series of patients with awake craniotomies in the first year of their introduction to our tertiary non-university-affiliated neurosurgery department. Operation time, complications, and neurologic outcome were assessed, and patient perception of awake craniotomy was surveyed using a mailed questionnaire. There were 24 awake craniotomies performed in 22 patients for low-grade/high-grade gliomas, cavernomas, and metastases (average 2 cases per month). Mean operation time was 205 minutes. Failure of awake craniotomy because of intraoperative seizures with subsequent postictal impaired testing or limited cooperation occurred in 2 patients. Transient neurologic deficits occurred in 29% of patients; 1 patient sustained a permanent neurologic deficit. Of the 18 patients (82%) who returned the questionnaire, only 2 patients recalled significant fear during surgery. Introducing awake craniotomy to a tertiary non-university-affiliated neurosurgery department is feasible and resulted in reasonable operation times and complication rates and high patient satisfaction. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Anesthetic considerations for awake craniotomy: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cassiano Hamacek de Freitas

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and objectives: The conscious patient cooperation during neurological procedures has become necessary for the delimitation of areas to be managed by a neurosurgeon, with better results in the treatment of tumor lesions, vascular or epileptic foci, and lesser sequelae. The need for perioperative awareness (responsiveness to commands challenges anesthesiologists to further ensure patient safety during the procedure. Several techniques have been described for this purpose. Case report: In this case, interaction with the patient during brain tumor resection enabled a broad approach of the tumor lesion, limited by deficits in speech and naming observed during surgical manipulation, avoiding major consequences. The chosen technique was deepening of general anesthesia during surgical times of most painful stimulus with intraoperative awakening of the patient. Conclusions: Patient selection, an exhaustive explanation of the procedure to him, and the selection of drugs are crucial for a successful procedure. Laryngeal mask is useful in times requiring greater depth and anesthetic ventilation control, primarily in situations where endotracheal intubation may be hindered by the position. The continuous infusion of remifentanil and adjuncts in the awake period associated adequate analgesia and full consciousness.

  10. Anesthetic considerations for awake craniotomy: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cassiano Hamacek de Freitas

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Background and objectives: The conscious patient cooperation during neurological procedures has become necessary for the delimitation of areas to be managed by a neurosurgeon, with better results in the treatment of tumor lesions, vascular or epileptic foci, and lesser sequelae. The need for perioperative awareness (responsiveness to commands challenges anesthesiologists to further ensure patient safety during the procedure. Several techniques have been described for this purpose. Case report: In this case, interaction with the patient during brain tumor resection enabled a broad approach of the tumor lesion, limited by deficits in speech and naming observed during surgical manipulation, avoiding major consequences. The chosen technique was deepening of general anesthesia during surgical times of most painful stimulus with intraoperative awakening of the patient. Conclusions: Patient selection, an exhaustive explanation of the procedure to him, and the selection of drugs are crucial for a successful procedure. Laryngeal mask is useful in times requiring greater depth and anesthetic ventilation control, primarily in situations where endotracheal intubation may be hindered by the position. The continuous infusion of remifentanil and adjuncts in the awake period associated adequate analgesia and full consciousness. Resumo: Justificativa e objetivos: A colaboração consciente do paciente durante procedimentos neurológicos tem se tornado necessária para delimitar áreas a serem abordadas pelo neurocirurgião, com melhores resultados no tratamento de lesões tumorais, vasculares ou focos epiléticos e minimização de sequelas. A necessidade de consciência perioperatória e responsividade a comandos desafia o anestesiologista a garantir ainda a segurança do paciente durante o procedimento. Várias técnicas têm sido descritas para esse fim. Relato de caso: No presente caso, a interação com paciente durante ressecção de tumor cerebral

  11. Nonopioid anesthesia for awake craniotomy: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, Diane L; Naruse, Robert; Gold, Michele

    2010-02-01

    Awake craniotomy is becoming more popular as a neurosurgical technique that allows for increased tumor resection and decreased postoperative neurologic morbidity. This technique, however, presents many challenges to both the neurosurgeon and anesthetist. An ASA class II, 37-year-old man with recurrent oligodendroglioma presented for repeated craniotomy. Prior craniotomy under general anesthesia resulted in residual neurologic deficits. An awake craniotomy was planned to allow for intraoperative testing for maximum tumor resection and avoidance of neurologic morbidity. The patient was sedated with propofol, and bupivacaine was infiltrated for placement of Mayfield tongs and skin incision. Following exposure of brain tissue, propofol infusion was discontinued to allow for patient cooperation during the procedure. Speech, motor, and sensory testing occurred during tumor resection until resection stopped after onset of weakness in the right arm. The propofol infusion was resumed while the cranium was closed and Mayfield tongs removed. The patient was awake, alert, oriented, and able to move all extremities but had residual weakness in the right forearm. Awake craniotomy requires appropriate patient selection, knowledge of the surgeon's skill, and a thorough anesthesia plan. This case report discusses the clinical and anesthetic management for awake craniotomy and reviews the literature.

  12. Awake craniotomy anesthetic management using dexmedetomidine, propofol, and remifentanil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prontera, Andrea; Baroni, Stefano; Marudi, Andrea; Valzania, Franco; Feletti, Alberto; Benuzzi, Francesca; Bertellini, Elisabetta; Pavesi, Giacomo

    2017-01-01

    Awake craniotomy allows continuous monitoring of patients' neurological functions during open surgery. Anesthesiologists have to sedate patients in a way so that they are compliant throughout the whole surgical procedure, nevertheless maintaining adequate analgesia and anxiolysis. Currently, the use of α2-receptor agonist dexmedetomidine as the primary hypnotic-sedative medication is increasing. Nine patients undergoing awake craniotomy were treated with refined monitored anesthesia care (MAC) protocol consisting of a combination of local anesthesia without scalp block, low-dose infusion of dexmedetomidine, propofol, and remifentanil, without the need of airways management. The anesthetic protocol applied in our study has the advantage of decreasing the dose of each drug and thus reducing the occurrence of side effects. All patients had smooth and rapid awakenings. The brain remained relaxed during the entire procedure. In our experience, this protocol is safe and effective during awake brain surgery. Nevertheless, prospective randomized trials are necessary to confirm the optimal anesthetic technique to be used.

  13. Implantable electrode for recording nerve signals in awake animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ninomiya, I.; Yonezawa, Y.; Wilson, M. F.

    1976-01-01

    An implantable electrode assembly consisting of collagen and metallic electrodes was constructed to measure simultaneously neural signals from the intact nerve and bioelectrical noises in awake animals. Mechanical artifacts, due to bodily movement, were negligibly small. The impedance of the collagen electrodes, measured in awake cats 6-7 days after implantation surgery, ranged from 39.8-11.5 k ohms at a frequency range of 20-5 kHz. Aortic nerve activity and renal nerve activity, measured in awake conditions using the collagen electrode, showed grouped activity synchronous with the cardiac cycle. Results indicate that most of the renal nerve activity was from postganglionic sympathetic fibers and was inhibited by the baroceptor reflex in the same cardiac cycle.

  14. Voluntary running enhances glymphatic influx in awake behaving, young mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Holstein-Rathlou, Stephanie; Petersen, Nicolas Caesar; Nedergaard, Maiken

    2018-01-01

    that exercise would also stimulate glymphatic activity in awake, young mice with higher baseline glymphatic function. Therefore, we assessed glymphatic function in young female C57BL/6J mice following five weeks voluntary wheel running and in sedentary mice. The active mice ran a mean distance of 6km daily. We...... of the cortex, but also in the middle cerebral artery territory. While glymphatic activity was higher under ketamine/xylazine anesthesia, we saw a decrease in glymphatic function during running in awake mice after five weeks of wheel running. In summary, daily running increases CSF flux in widespread areas...

  15. Knowledge Uncertainty and Composed Classifier

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Klimešová, Dana; Ocelíková, E.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 1, č. 2 (2007), s. 101-105 ISSN 1998-0140 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10750506 Keywords : Boosting architecture * contextual modelling * composed classifier * knowledge management, * knowledge * uncertainty Subject RIV: IN - Informatics, Computer Science

  16. Dimensions of the Composing Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freedman, Aviva

    As a by-product of a study concerning how university level writers develop new genres of discourse, a study was undertaken to examine what factors or dimensions affect the composing process of university writers. Six undergraduate students at Carleton University in Ottawa participated, making available to researchers information about how they…

  17. What Do Monkey Calls Mean?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlenker, Philippe; Chemla, Emmanuel; Zuberbühler, Klaus

    2016-12-01

    A field of primate linguistics is gradually emerging. It combines general questions and tools from theoretical linguistics with rich data gathered in experimental primatology. Analyses of several monkey systems have uncovered very simple morphological and syntactic rules and have led to the development of a primate semantics that asks new questions about the division of semantic labor between the literal meaning of monkey calls, additional mechanisms of pragmatic enrichment, and the environmental context. We show that comparative studies across species may validate this program and may in some cases help in reconstructing the evolution of monkey communication over millions of years. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  18. Awake percutaneous tracheostomy as an alternative to open ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Southern African Journal of Anaesthesia and Analgesia is co-published by Medpharm Publications, NISC (Pty) Ltd and Informa UK .... anaesthesiologist on call for emergency awake tracheostomy. ... to the intensive care unit (ICU) for further monitoring, ventilatory .... Advances in the field of ultrasound technology have made.

  19. Anxiety in the preoperative phase of awake brain tumor surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruis, Carla; Huenges Wajer, I.M.C.; Robe, Pierre; van Zandvoort, Martine

    OBJECTIVE: Awake surgery emerges as a standard of care for brain tumors located in or near eloquent areas. Levels of preoperative anxiety in patients are important, because anxiety can influence cognitive performance and participation, hence altering the outcome of the procedure. In this study we

  20. Awake craniotomy anesthetic management using dexmedetomidine, propofol, and remifentanil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prontera A

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Andrea Prontera,1 Stefano Baroni,2 Andrea Marudi,2 Franco Valzania,3 Alberto Feletti,1 Francesca Benuzzi,4 Elisabetta Bertellini,2 Giacomo Pavesi1 1Department of Neurosurgery, Nuovo Ospedale Civile SAgostino-Estense, 2Department of Anesthesiology, Nuovo Ospedale Civile SAgostino-Estense, 3Department of Neurology, Nuovo Ospedale Civile S Agostino-Estense, 4Department of Neuroscience, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Modena, Italy Introduction: Awake craniotomy allows continuous monitoring of patients’ neurological functions during open surgery. Anesthesiologists have to sedate patients in a way so that they are compliant throughout the whole surgical procedure, nevertheless maintaining adequate analgesia and anxiolysis. Currently, the use of α2-receptor agonist dexmedetomidine as the primary hypnotic–sedative medication is increasing.Methods: Nine patients undergoing awake craniotomy were treated with refined monitored anesthesia care (MAC protocol consisting of a combination of local anesthesia without scalp block, low-dose infusion of dexmedetomidine, propofol, and remifentanil, without the need of airways management.Results: The anesthetic protocol applied in our study has the advantage of decreasing the dose of each drug and thus reducing the occurrence of side effects. All patients had smooth and rapid awakenings. The brain remained relaxed during the entire procedure.Conclusion: In our experience, this protocol is safe and effective during awake brain surgery. Nevertheless, prospective randomized trials are necessary to confirm the optimal anesthetic technique to be used. Keywords: dexmedetomidine, awake surgery, anesthesia

  1. Anxiety in the preoperative phase of awake brain tumor surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruis, C.; Huenges Wajer, I.M.C.; Robe, Pierre; van Zandvoort, M.J.E.

    Objective Awake surgery emerges as a standard of care for brain tumors located in or near eloquent areas. Levels of preoperative anxiety in patients are important, because anxiety can influence cognitive performance and participation, hence altering the outcome of the procedure. In this study we

  2. Awake craniotomy using electromagnetic navigation technology without rigid pin fixation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morsy, Ahmed A; Ng, Wai Hoe

    2015-11-01

    We report our institutional experience using an electromagnetic navigation system, without rigid head fixation, for awake craniotomy patients. The StealthStation® S7 AxiEM™ navigation system (Medtronic, Inc.) was used for this technique. Detailed preoperative clinical and neuropsychological evaluations, patient education and contrast-enhanced MRI (thickness 1.5mm) were performed for each patient. The AxiEM Mobile Emitter was typically placed in a holder, which was mounted to the operating room table, and a non-invasive patient tracker was used as the patient reference device. A monitored conscious sedation technique was used in all awake craniotomy patients, and the AxiEM Navigation Pointer was used for navigation during the procedure. This offers the same accuracy as optical navigation, but without head pin fixation or interference with intraoperative neurophysiological techniques and surgical instruments. The application of the electromagnetic neuronavigation technology without rigid head fixation during an awake craniotomy is accurate, and offers superior patient comfort. It is recommended as an effective adjunctive technique for the conduct of awake surgery. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. An unusual case of repeated venous air embolism during awake ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Keywords: awake craniotomy, burr hole, deep brain stimulation, neurosurgery, venous air embolism. Introduction ... surgery started with the right burr hole and after the dura mater was opened, the ... opened. The patient was initially comfortable but then developed ... The surgery for the insertion of DBS on the left side was.

  4. Intraoperative seizures and seizures outcome in patients underwent awake craniotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Yang; Peizhi, Zhou; Xiang, Wang; Yanhui, Liu; Ruofei, Liang; Shu, Jiang; Qing, Mao

    2016-11-25

    Awake craniotomies (AC) could reduce neurological deficits compared with patients under general anesthesia, however, intraoperative seizure is a major reason causing awake surgery failure. The purpose of the study was to give a comprehensive overview the published articles focused on seizure incidence in awake craniotomy. Bibliographic searches of the EMBASE, MEDLINE,were performed to identify articles and conference abstracts that investigated the intraoperative seizure frequency of patients underwent AC. Twenty-five studies were included in this meta-analysis. Among the 25 included studies, one was randomized controlled trials and 5 of them were comparable studies. The pooled data suggested the general intraoperative seizure(IOS) rate for patients with AC was 8%(fixed effect model), sub-group analysis identified IOS rate for glioma patients was 8% and low grade patients was 10%. The pooled data showed early seizure rates of AC patients was 11% and late seizure rates was 35%. This systematic review and meta-analysis shows that awake craniotomy is a safe technique with relatively low intraoperative seizure occurrence. However, few RCTs were available, and the acquisition of further evidence through high-quality RCTs is highly recommended.

  5. Case report: Awake insertion of the intubating laryngeal mask ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Case report: Awake insertion of the intubating laryngeal mask airway using dexmedetomidine sedation. P Dhar, TR Tedore. Abstract. No Abstract. Full Text: EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT · http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/22201173.2003.10872999.

  6. Initial Experience with Awake Craniotomy In Sudan | Mohamed ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    especially if the tumour is located in the anterior temporal or frontal lobes, near motor, language, or memory areas of the brain. Awake craniotomy has been proposed aiming for maximum resection with minimum impairment of neurological function. The technique should provide adequate sedation, analgesia, respiratory ...

  7. Descriptive Study: Anesthesia for Awake Craniotomy in Siriraj Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saipin Muangman

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: The purpose of awake craniotomy is to test neurological functions to ensure accurate lesion surgery and lessen postoperative neurological complications. There are several methods to provide anesthesia during awake craniotomy including local anesthesia infiltration, local anesthesia plus conscious sedation, general anesthesia and wake-up during surgery and sleep again (asleep-awake-asleep or AAA. Each method has its pro and con with different complications. In Siriraj Hospital, there was no prior study of anesthetic techniques and complications of awake craniotomy. Methods: The retrospective descriptive study of awake craniotomy was carried out with 60 patients in Siriraj Hospital 2007-2011. Results: There were 35 males (58.3% with average age 40.7±12.6 years and weight 64.2±12 kilograms undergoing awake craniotomy. Twenty patients (33.3% presented with seizure before surgery. Most diagnosis was oligodendroglioma in 25 patients (41.7%, mostly at the frontal lobe (44 patients or 73.3%. The most common position was supine(46patientsor76.7%. ICU lengthof stay was1.4±0.9(0,6days. Hospital stay was11.1±9 (4,55days. Total intravenous anesthesia (TIVA was mostlyused(52patientsor90% while18patients (30% received scalp block. Most patients (85% did not require nasal airways while 8 patients (13.3% did, and only 1 patient (1.7% required laryngeal mask airway (LMA to help open up air passage. The drugs used during asleep1 and asleep2 were propofol together with dexmedetomidine and fentanyl in 34 patients (56.7% and 23 patients (38.3%, respectively. Whilebeingawake (15patientsor20%,dexmedetomidine and/or fentanyl were administered. Complications during anesthesia were hypertension (33.3%, hypotension (26.7%, upper airway obstruction(23.3%, bradycardia (15%, tachycardia (10%, seizure (1.7% andnausea (1.7%. Conclusion: The most common anesthesia method inSiriraj Hospital for awake craniotomy was TIVA (90%, using propofol together with

  8. Epidurography with metrizamide in Rhesus monkeys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kido, D.K.; Baker, R.A.; Saubermann, A.; Salem, J.; Schoene, W.C.; Fournier, P.

    1980-01-01

    Epidurography with metrizamide was performed on 9 Rhesus monkeys; physiologic saline was substituted for metrizamide in 3 control monkeys. Metrizamide successfully outlined the epidural space without causing any adverse clinical effects or direct tissue injury. (Auth.)

  9. Composing and decomposing data types

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bahr, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    restrictive, disallowing subtypings that lead to more than one possible injection and should therefore be considered programming errors. Furthermore, from this refined subtyping constraint we derive a new constraint to express type isomorphism. We show how this isomorphism constraint allows us to decompose......Wouter Swierstra's data types à la carte is a technique to modularise data type definitions in Haskell. We give an alternative implementation of data types à la carte that offers more flexibility in composing and decomposing data types. To achieve this, we refine the subtyping constraint, which...... is at the centre of data types à la carte. On the one hand this refinement is more general, allowing subtypings that intuitively should hold but were not derivable beforehand. This aspect of our implementation removes previous restrictions on how data types can be combined. On the other hand our refinement is more...

  10. Composing Music with Complex Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaofan; Tse, Chi K.; Small, Michael

    In this paper we study the network structure in music and attempt to compose music artificially. Networks are constructed with nodes and edges corresponding to musical notes and their co-occurrences. We analyze sample compositions from Bach, Mozart, Chopin, as well as other types of music including Chinese pop music. We observe remarkably similar properties in all networks constructed from the selected compositions. Power-law exponents of degree distributions, mean degrees, clustering coefficients, mean geodesic distances, etc. are reported. With the network constructed, music can be created by using a biased random walk algorithm, which begins with a randomly chosen note and selects the subsequent notes according to a simple set of rules that compares the weights of the edges, weights of the nodes, and/or the degrees of nodes. The newly created music from complex networks will be played in the presentation.

  11. Spontaneous Metacognition in Rhesus Monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosati, Alexandra G; Santos, Laurie R

    2016-09-01

    Metacognition is the ability to think about thinking. Although monitoring and controlling one's knowledge is a key feature of human cognition, its evolutionary origins are debated. In the current study, we examined whether rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta; N = 120) could make metacognitive inferences in a one-shot decision. Each monkey experienced one of four conditions, observing a human appearing to hide a food reward in an apparatus consisting of either one or two tubes. The monkeys tended to search the correct location when they observed this baiting event, but engaged in information seeking-by peering into a center location where they could check both potential hiding spots-if their view had been occluded and information seeking was possible. The monkeys only occasionally approached the center when information seeking was not possible. These results show that monkeys spontaneously use information about their own knowledge states to solve naturalistic foraging problems, and thus provide the first evidence that nonhumans exhibit information-seeking responses in situations with which they have no prior experience. © The Author(s) 2016.

  12. Vicarious Learning from Human Models in Monkeys

    OpenAIRE

    Falcone, Rossella; Brunamonti, Emiliano; Genovesio, Aldo

    2012-01-01

    We examined whether monkeys can learn by observing a human model, through vicarious learning. Two monkeys observed a human model demonstrating an object-reward association and consuming food found underneath an object. The monkeys observed human models as they solved more than 30 learning problems. For each problem, the human models made a choice between two objects, one of which concealed a piece of apple. In the test phase afterwards, the monkeys made a choice of their own. Learning was app...

  13. Enclosure for small animals during awake animal imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goddard, Jr., James S

    2013-11-26

    An enclosure or burrow restrains an awake animal during an imaging procedure. A tubular body, made from a radiolucent material that does not attenuate x-rays or gamma rays, accepts an awake animal. A proximal end of the body includes an attachment surface that corresponds to an attachment surface of an optically transparent and optically uniform window. An anti-reflective coating may be applied to an inner surface, an outer surface, or both surfaces of the window. Since the window is a separate element of the enclosure and it is not integrally formed as part of the body, it can be made with optically uniform thickness properties for improved motion tracking of markers on the animal with a camera during the imaging procedure. The motion tracking information is then used to compensate for animal movement in the image.

  14. Out-of-Body Experience During Awake Craniotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bos, Eelke M; Spoor, Jochem K H; Smits, Marion; Schouten, Joost W; Vincent, Arnaud J P E

    2016-08-01

    The out-of-body experience (OBE), during which a person feels as if he or she is spatially removed from the physical body, is a mystical phenomenon because of its association with near-death experiences. Literature implicates the cortex at the temporoparietal junction (TPJ) as the possible anatomic substrate for OBE. We present a patient who had an out-of-body experience during an awake craniotomy for resection of low-grade glioma. During surgery, stimulation of subcortical white matter in the left TPJ repetitively induced OBEs, in which the patient felt as if she was floating above the operating table looking down on herself. We repetitively induced OBE by subcortical stimulation near the left TPJ during awake craniotomy. Diffusion tensor imaging tractography implicated the posterior thalamic radiation as a possible substrate for autoscopic phenomena. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Anaesthetic Considerations of Awake Craniotomy: An Upcoming Entity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jui Lagoo

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Awake craniotomy was historically advocated for resistant epilepsy surgery. Presently, its role has widened for resection of lesions abutting or invading the eloquent cortex. It aims at maximizing resection while minimizing neurological damage. Anaesthetic challenges include providing sufficient depth of anaesthesia, full cooperation and consciousness during cortical mapping, smooth transition between anaesthesia and consciousness, airway protection, haemodynamic stability, patient immobility and co-operation. Communication and co-operation between the patient and surgical and anaesthesia teams is vital. We report safe conduct of monitored anaesthesia care by the combined use of dexmedetomidine and scalp nerve blocks for tumour resection. This technique ensured haemodynamic stability, decreased stress response to painful stimuli and improved patient tolerance. As awake craniotomy is an upcoming technique, knowledge about anaesthetic implications, challenges and techniques will help in optimum management.

  16. Get the Monkey off Your Back

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciabattini, David; Custer, Timothy J.

    2008-01-01

    Monkeys are the problems that need solutions, the tasks that need to be accomplished, the decisions that need to be made, and the actions that need to be taken. According to a theory, people carry monkeys around on their backs until they can successfully shift their burden to someone else and the monkey leaps from one back to the next. Managers…

  17. The influence of awake craniotomy on postoperative neuropsychology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YANG Ming-yuan

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective To assess the neuropsychological function and quality of life of the patients after awake craniotomy (AC. Methods A case-control study was conducted among 81 patients who underwent awake craniotomy, and a 1-to-1 control group (matched by age, gender, degree of education, tumor location and characteristic undergoing general anesthesia (GA in glioma resections was assembled. The incidence of postoperative neurological deficits, psychological disorders and recurrence were investigated during telephone follow-ups, and Medical Outcomes Study Short Form 36 (SF-36 was adopted to evaluate the life quality of patients. Results Almost 73 pairs of patients fulfilled the survey of AC and GA group respectively. There were 21 patients and 28 patients with postoperative neurological deficits, and 12 patients and 8 patients with psychological disorders in AC and GA group respectively. Thirty patients of AC group had the recollection of being awake during the surgery. There were 9 patients in CA group having long-term ( > 6 months neurological deficits, which was less than the number of GA group (18 patients, P = 0.038. According to the assessment in short-term, medium-term and long-term postoperative neurological deficits, there was no significant difference in the quality-of-life scores between the two groups (P > 0.05, for all. Conclusion Awake craniotomy can be the main method for removing the lesions located in or close to functional areas with lower incidence of long?term postoperative neurological deficits, and it has no significant impact on the psychological status and the quality of life postoperatively.

  18. Pediatric awake craniotomy and intra-operative stimulation mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balogun, James A; Khan, Osaama H; Taylor, Michael; Dirks, Peter; Der, Tara; Carter Snead Iii, O; Weiss, Shelly; Ochi, Ayako; Drake, James; Rutka, James T

    2014-11-01

    The indications for operating on lesions in or near areas of cortical eloquence balance the benefit of resection with the risk of permanent neurological deficit. In adults, awake craniotomy has become a versatile tool in tumor, epilepsy and functional neurosurgery, permitting intra-operative stimulation mapping particularly for language, sensory and motor cortical pathways. This allows for maximal tumor resection with considerable reduction in the risk of post-operative speech and motor deficits. We report our experience of awake craniotomy and cortical stimulation for epilepsy and supratentorial tumors located in and around eloquent areas in a pediatric population (n=10, five females). The presenting symptom was mainly seizures and all children had normal neurological examinations. Neuroimaging showed lesions in the left opercular (n=4) and precentral or peri-sylvian regions (n=6). Three right-sided and seven left-sided awake craniotomies were performed. Two patients had a history of prior craniotomy. All patients had intra-operative mapping for either speech or motor or both using cortical stimulation. The surgical goal for tumor patients was gross total resection, while for all epilepsy procedures, focal cortical resections were completed without any difficulty. None of the patients had permanent post-operative neurologic deficits. The patient with an epileptic focus over the speech area in the left frontal lobe had a mild word finding difficulty post-operatively but this improved progressively. Follow-up ranged from 6 to 27 months. Pediatric awake craniotomy with intra-operative mapping is a precise, safe and reliable method allowing for resection of lesions in eloquent areas. Further validations on larger number of patients will be needed to verify the utility of this technique in the pediatric population. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Music is Beneficial for Awake Craniotomy Patients: A Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jadavji-Mithani, Radhika; Venkatraghavan, Lashmi; Bernstein, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Patients undergoing awake craniotomy may experience high levels of stress. Minimizing anxiety benefits patients and surgeons. Music has many therapeutic effects in altering human mood and emotion. Tonality of music as conveyed by composition in major or minor keys can have an impact on patients' emotions and thoughts. Assessing the effects of listening to major and minor key musical pieces on patients undergoing awake craniotiomy could help in the design of interventions to alleviate anxiety, stress and tension. Twenty-nine patients who were undergoing awake craniotomy were recruited and randomly assigned into two groups: Group 1 subjects listened to major key music and Group 2 listened to minor key compositions. Subjects completed a demographics questionnaire, a pre- and post-operative Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI) and a semi-structured open-ended interview. RESULTS were analyzed using modified thematic analysis through open and axial coding. Overall, patients enjoyed the music regardless of the key distinctions and stated they benefitted from listening to the music. No adverse reactions to the music were found. Subjects remarked that the music made them feel more at ease and less anxious before, during and after their procedure. Patients preferred either major key or minor key music but not a combination of both. Those who preferred major key pieces said it was on the basis of tonality while the individuals who selected minor key pieces stated that tempo of the music was the primary factor. Overall, listening to music selections was beneficial for the patients. Future work should further investigate the effects of audio interventions in awake surgery through narrative means.

  20. [A Case of Psychogenic Tremor during Awake Craniotomy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kujirai, Kazumasa; Kamata, Kotoe; Uno, Toshihiro; Hamada, Keiko; Ozaki, Makoto

    2016-01-01

    A 31-year-old woman with a left frontal and parietal brain tumor underwent awake craniotomy. Propofol/remifentanil general anesthesia was induced. Following craniotomy, anesthetic administrations ceased. The level of consciousness was sufficient and she was not agitated. However, the patient complained of nausea 70 minutes into the awake phase. Considering the adverse effects of antiemetics and the upcoming surgical strategy, we did not give any medications. Nausea disappeared spontaneously while the operation was suspended. When surgical intervention extended to the left caudate nucleus, involuntary movement, classified as a tremor, with 5-6 Hz frequency, abruptly occurred on her left forearm. The patient showed emotional distress. Tremor appeared on her right forearm and subsequently spread to her lower extremities. Intravenous midazolam and fentanyl could not reduce her psychological stress. Since the tremor disturbed microscopic observation, general anesthesia was induced. Consequently, the tremor disappeared and did not recur. Based on the anatomical ground and the medication status, her involuntary movement was diagnosed as psychogenic tremor. Various factors can induce involuntary movements. In fact, intraoperative management of nausea and vomiting takes priority during awake craniotomy, but we should be reminded that some antiemetics potentially induce involuntary movement that could be caused by surgery around basal ganglia.

  1. Voluntary running enhances glymphatic influx in awake behaving, young mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Holstein-Rathlou, Stephanie; Petersen, Nicolas Caesar; Nedergaard, Maiken

    2018-01-01

    Vascular pathology and protein accumulation contribute to cognitive decline, whereas exercise can slow vascular degeneration and improve cognitive function. Recent investigations suggest that glymphatic clearance measured in aged mice while anesthetized is enhanced following exercise. We predicted that exercise would also stimulate glymphatic activity in awake, young mice with higher baseline glymphatic function. Therefore, we assessed glymphatic function in young female C57BL/6J mice following five weeks voluntary wheel running and in sedentary mice. The active mice ran a mean distance of 6km daily. We injected fluorescent tracers in cisterna magna of awake behaving mice and in ketamine/xylazine anesthetized mice, and later assessed tracer distribution in coronal brain sections. Voluntary exercise consistently increased CSF influx during wakefulness, primarily in the hypothalamus and ventral parts of the cortex, but also in the middle cerebral artery territory. While glymphatic activity was higher under ketamine/xylazine anesthesia, we saw a decrease in glymphatic function during running in awake mice after five weeks of wheel running. In summary, daily running increases CSF flux in widespread areas of the mouse brain, which may contribute to the pro-cognitive effects of exercise. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Awake craniotomy and electrophysiological mapping for eloquent area tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chacko, Ari George; Thomas, Santhosh George; Babu, K Srinivasa; Daniel, Roy Thomas; Chacko, Geeta; Prabhu, Krishna; Cherian, Varghese; Korula, Grace

    2013-03-01

    An awake craniotomy facilitates radical excision of eloquent area gliomas and ensures neural integrity during the excision. The study describes our experience with 67 consecutive awake craniotomies for the excision of such tumours. Sixty-seven patients with gliomas in or adjacent to eloquent areas were included in this study. The patient was awake during the procedure and intraoperative cortical and white matter stimulation was performed to safely maximize the extent of surgical resection. Of the 883 patients who underwent craniotomies for supratentorial intraaxial tumours during the study period, 84 were chosen for an awake craniotomy. Sixty-seven with a histological diagnosis of glioma were included in this study. There were 55 men and 12 women with a median age of 34.6 years. Forty-two (62.6%) patients had positive localization on cortical stimulation. In 6 (8.9%) patients white matter stimulation was positive, five of whom had responses at the end of a radical excision. In 3 patients who developed a neurological deficit during tumour removal, white matter stimulation was negative and cessation of the surgery did not result in neurological improvement. Sixteen patients (24.6%) had intraoperative neurological deficits at the time of wound closure, 9 (13.4%) of whom had persistent mild neurological deficits at discharge, while the remaining 7 improved to normal. At a mean follow-up of 40.8 months, only 4 (5.9%) of these 9 patients had persistent neurological deficits. Awake craniotomy for excision of eloquent area gliomas enable accurate mapping of motor and language areas as well as continuous neurological monitoring during tumour removal. Furthermore, positive responses on white matter stimulation indicate close proximity of eloquent cortex and projection fibres. This should alert the surgeon to the possibility of postoperative deficits to change the surgical strategy. Thus the surgeon can resect tumour safely, with the knowledge that he has not damaged

  3. Vicarious learning from human models in monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falcone, Rossella; Brunamonti, Emiliano; Genovesio, Aldo

    2012-01-01

    We examined whether monkeys can learn by observing a human model, through vicarious learning. Two monkeys observed a human model demonstrating an object-reward association and consuming food found underneath an object. The monkeys observed human models as they solved more than 30 learning problems. For each problem, the human models made a choice between two objects, one of which concealed a piece of apple. In the test phase afterwards, the monkeys made a choice of their own. Learning was apparent from the first trial of the test phase, confirming the ability of monkeys to learn by vicarious observation of human models.

  4. Vicarious learning from human models in monkeys.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rossella Falcone

    Full Text Available We examined whether monkeys can learn by observing a human model, through vicarious learning. Two monkeys observed a human model demonstrating an object-reward association and consuming food found underneath an object. The monkeys observed human models as they solved more than 30 learning problems. For each problem, the human models made a choice between two objects, one of which concealed a piece of apple. In the test phase afterwards, the monkeys made a choice of their own. Learning was apparent from the first trial of the test phase, confirming the ability of monkeys to learn by vicarious observation of human models.

  5. A Retrospective Study of Success, Failure, and Time Needed to Perform Awake Intubation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Thomas T; Gal, Jonathan S; DeMaria, Samuel; Lin, Hung-Mo; Levine, Adam I; Hyman, Jaime B

    2016-07-01

    Awake intubation is the standard of care for management of the anticipated difficult airway. The performance of awake intubation may be perceived as complex and time-consuming, potentially leading clinicians to avoid this technique of airway management. This retrospective review of awake intubations at a large academic medical center was performed to determine the average time taken to perform awake intubation, its effects on hemodynamics, and the incidence and characteristics of complications and failure. Anesthetic records from 2007 to 2014 were queried for the performance of an awake intubation. Of the 1,085 awake intubations included for analysis, 1,055 involved the use of a flexible bronchoscope. Each awake intubation case was propensity matched with two controls (1:2 ratio), with similar comorbidities and intubations performed after the induction of anesthesia (n = 2,170). The time from entry into the operating room until intubation was compared between groups. The anesthetic records of all patients undergoing awake intubation were also reviewed for failure and complications. The median time to intubation for patients intubated post induction was 16.0 min (interquartile range: 13 to 22) from entrance into the operating room. The median time to intubation for awake patients was 24.0 min (interquartile range: 19 to 31). The complication rate was 1.6% (17 of 1,085 cases). The most frequent complications observed were mucous plug, endotracheal tube cuff leak, and inadvertent extubation. The failure rate for attempted awake intubation was 1% (n = 10). Awake intubations have a high rate of success and low rate of serious complications and failure. Awake intubations can be performed safely and rapidly.

  6. Formal monkey linguistics : The debate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schlenker, Philippe; Chemla, Emmanuel; Schel, Anne M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/413333450; Fuller, James; Gautier, Jean Pierre; Kuhn, Jeremy; Veselinović, Dunja; Arnold, Kate; Cäsar, Cristiane; Keenan, Sumir; Lemasson, Alban; Ouattara, Karim; Ryder, Robin; Zuberbühler, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    We explain why general techniques from formal linguistics can and should be applied to the analysis of monkey communication - in the areas of syntax and especially semantics. An informed look at our recent proposals shows that such techniques needn't rely excessively on categories of human language:

  7. Neural correlates of face and object perception in an awake chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes examined by scalp-surface event-related potentials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirokata Fukushima

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The neural system of our closest living relative, the chimpanzee, is a topic of increasing research interest. However, electrophysiological examinations of neural activity during visual processing in awake chimpanzees are currently lacking. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In the present report, skin-surface event-related brain potentials (ERPs were measured while a fully awake chimpanzee observed photographs of faces and objects in two experiments. In Experiment 1, human faces and stimuli composed of scrambled face images were displayed. In Experiment 2, three types of pictures (faces, flowers, and cars were presented. The waveforms evoked by face stimuli were distinguished from other stimulus types, as reflected by an enhanced early positivity appearing before 200 ms post stimulus, and an enhanced late negativity after 200 ms, around posterior and occipito-temporal sites. Face-sensitive activity was clearly observed in both experiments. However, in contrast to the robustly observed face-evoked N170 component in humans, we found that faces did not elicit a peak in the latency range of 150-200 ms in either experiment. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Although this pilot study examined a single subject and requires further examination, the observed scalp voltage patterns suggest that selective processing of faces in the chimpanzee brain can be detected by recording surface ERPs. In addition, this non-invasive method for examining an awake chimpanzee can be used to extend our knowledge of the characteristics of visual cognition in other primate species.

  8. Effect of melatonin on sleep disorders in a monkey model of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belaid, Hayat; Adrien, Joelle; Karachi, Carine; Hirsch, Etienne C; François, Chantal

    2015-10-01

    To evaluate and compare the effects of melatonin and levodopa (L-dopa) on sleep disorders in a monkey model of Parkinson's disease. The daytime and nighttime sleep patterns of four macaques that were rendered parkinsonian by administration of 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) were recorded using polysomnography in four conditions: at baseline, during the parkinsonian condition; after administration of L-dopa, and after administration of a combination of melatonin with L-dopa. It was confirmed that MPTP intoxication induces sleep disorders, with sleep episodes during daytime and sleep fragmentation at nighttime. L-dopa treatment significantly reduced the awake time during the night and tended to improve all other sleep parameters, albeit not significantly. In comparison to the parkinsonian condition, combined treatment with melatonin and L-dopa significantly increased total sleep time and sleep efficiency, and reduced the time spent awake during the night in all animals. A significant decrease in sleep latencies was also observed in three out of four animals. Compared with L-dopa alone, combined treatment with melatonin and L-dopa significantly improved all these sleep parameters in two animals. On the other hand, combined treatment had no effect on sleep architecture and daytime sleep. These data demonstrated, for the first time, objective improvement on sleep parameters of melatonin treatment in MPTP-intoxicated monkeys, showing that melatonin treatment has a real therapeutic potential to treat sleep disturbances in people with Parkinson's disease. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Teaching and sustainably implementing awake craniotomy in resource-poor settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howe, Kathryn L; Zhou, Guosheng; July, Julius; Totimeh, Teddy; Dakurah, Thomas; Malomo, Adefolarin O; Mahmud, Muhammad R; Ismail, Nasiru J; Bernstein, Mark A

    2013-12-01

    Awake craniotomy for brain tumor resection has the benefit of avoiding a general anesthetic and decreasing associated costs (e.g., intensive care unit beds and intravenous line insertion). In low- and middle-income countries, significant resource limitations for the system and individual make awake craniotomy an ideal tool, yet it is infrequently used. We sought to determine if awake craniotomy could be effectively taught and implemented safely and sustainably in low- and middle-income countries. A neurosurgeon experienced in the procedure taught awake craniotomy to colleagues in China, Indonesia, Ghana, and Nigeria during the period 2007-2012. Patients were selected on the basis of suspected intraaxial tumor, absence of major dysphasia or confusion, and ability to tolerate the positioning. Data were recorded by the local surgeons and included preoperative imaging, length of hospital admission, final pathology, postoperative morbidity, and mortality. Awake craniotomy was performed for 38 cases of suspected brain tumor; most procedures were completed independently. All patients underwent preoperative computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging. In 64% of cases, patients remained in the hospital Awake craniotomy was successfully taught and implemented in 6 neurosurgical centers in China, Indonesia, Ghana, and Nigeria. Awake craniotomy is safe, resource-sparing, and sustainable. The data suggest awake craniotomy has the potential to significantly improve access to neurosurgical care in resource-challenged settings. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. A case of loss of consciousness with contralateral acute subdural haematoma during awake craniotomy

    OpenAIRE

    Kamata, Kotoe; Maruyama, Takashi; Nitta, Masayuki; Ozaki, Makoto; Muragaki, Yoshihiro; Okada, Yoshikazu

    2014-01-01

    We are reporting the case of a 56-year-old woman who developed loss of consciousness during awake craniotomy. A thin subdural haematoma in the contralateral side of the craniotomy was identified with intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging and subsequently removed. Our case indicates that contralateral acute subdural haematoma could be a cause of deterioration of the conscious level during awake craniotomy.

  11. A case of loss of consciousness with contralateral acute subdural haematoma during awake craniotomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamata, Kotoe; Maruyama, Takashi; Nitta, Masayuki; Ozaki, Makoto; Muragaki, Yoshihiro; Okada, Yoshikazu

    2014-01-01

    We are reporting the case of a 56-year-old woman who developed loss of consciousness during awake craniotomy. A thin subdural haematoma in the contralateral side of the craniotomy was identified with intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging and subsequently removed. Our case indicates that contralateral acute subdural haematoma could be a cause of deterioration of the conscious level during awake craniotomy. PMID:25301378

  12. Anaesthesia for awake craniotomy: A report of two cases in national ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Anaesthesia for neurosurgery while the patient remains awake requires a highly motivated patient and provision of high safety standard. Resection of brain tumours may cause neurological sequelae especially in the eloquent cortex depending on the site and size of tumour. Awake craniotomy which allows monitoring and ...

  13. Comparison of jaw muscle EMG activity in awake and sleep bruxers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Castrillon, Eduardo; Dreyer Nielsen, Patricia; Haugland, Morten

    2015-01-01

    , Scandinavian Center for Orofacial Neuroscience (SCON), Aarhus, DENMARK; M. Haugland, DELTA, Copenhagen, DENMARK; W. Yachida, T. Arima, Hokkaido University, Hokkaido, JAPAN; Group Author Abstracts: ABSTRACT: Objectives: Background: Bruxism has two different circadian manifestations (awake and sleep) that have...... been proposed to have different underlying pathophysiology. Objectives: To compare the characteristics of multiple days EMG assessment of the anterior temporalis muscles between patients with self-reported awake bruxism, sleep bruxism and healthy individuals. Methods: Methods: Participants...... with possible sleep bruxism (n=9) or awake bruxism (n=9) bruxism were included in an open study and compared with healthy individuals during awake (n=9) and sleep (n=7) states. All participants were assessed for a minimum of 4 days (awake or sleep) with a portable single-channel EMG recorder. The outcome...

  14. Avalanche analysis from multi-electrode ensemble recordings in cat, monkey and human cerebral cortex during wakefulness and sleep.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nima eDehghani

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Self-organized critical states are found in many natural systems, from earthquakes to forest fires, they have also been observed in neural systems, particularly, in neuronal cultures. However, the presence of critical states in the awake brain remains controversial. Here, we compared avalanche analyses performed on different in vivo preparations during wakefulness, slow-wave sleep and REM sleep, using high-density electrode arrays in cat motor cortex (96 electrodes, monkey motor cortex and premotor cortex and human temporal cortex (96 electrodes in epileptic patients. In neuronal avalanches defined from units (up to 160 single units, the size of avalanches never clearly scaled as power-law, but rather scaled exponentially or displayed intermediate scaling. We also analyzed the dynamics of local field potentials (LFPs and in particular LFP negative peaks (nLFPs among the different electrodes (up to 96 sites in temporal cortex or up to 128 sites in adjacent motor and pre-motor cortices. In this case, the avalanches defined from nLFPs displayed power-law scaling in double logarithmic representations, as reported previously in monkey. However, avalanche defined as positive LFP (pLFP peaks, which are less directly related to neuronal firing, also displayed apparent power-law scaling. Closer examination of this scaling using the more reliable cumulative distribution function (CDF and other rigorous statistical measures, did not confirm power-law scaling. The same pattern was seen for cats, monkey and human, as well as for different brain states of wakefulness and sleep. We also tested other alternative distributions. Multiple exponential fitting yielded optimal fits of the avalanche dynamics with bi-exponential distributions. Collectively, these results show no clear evidence for power-law scaling or self-organized critical states in the awake and sleeping brain of mammals, from cat to man.

  15. Mapping oxygen concentration in the awake mouse brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, Declan G; Parpaleix, Alexandre; Roche, Morgane; Charpak, Serge

    2016-01-01

    Although critical for brain function, the physiological values of cerebral oxygen concentration have remained elusive because high-resolution measurements have only been performed during anesthesia, which affects two major parameters modulating tissue oxygenation: neuronal activity and blood flow. Using measurements of capillary erythrocyte-associated transients, fluctuations of oxygen partial pressure (Po2) associated with individual erythrocytes, to infer Po2 in the nearby neuropil, we report the first non-invasive micron-scale mapping of cerebral Po2 in awake, resting mice. Interstitial Po2 has similar values in the olfactory bulb glomerular layer and the somatosensory cortex, whereas there are large capillary hematocrit and erythrocyte flux differences. Awake tissue Po2 is about half that under isoflurane anesthesia, and within the cortex, vascular and interstitial Po2 values display layer-specific differences which dramatically contrast with those recorded under anesthesia. Our findings emphasize the importance of measuring energy parameters non-invasively in physiological conditions to precisely quantify and model brain metabolism. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12024.001 PMID:26836304

  16. Surgical and anesthesiological considerations of awake craniotomy: Cerrahpasa experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanus, Galip Zihni; Yuksel, Odhan; Tunali, Yusuf; Ozkara, Cigdem; Yeni, Naz; Ozlen, Fatma; Tanriverdi, Taner; Ozyurt, Emin; Uzan, Mustafa

    2015-01-01

    Awake craniotomy (AC) with electrical cortical stimulation has become popular during the last ten years although the basic principles were introduced almost 50 years ago. The aim of this paper is to share with the readers our experience in 25 patients who underwent AC with electrical stimulation. Twenty-five patients who underwent AC between 2010 and 2013 are the subjects of this paper. All patients were diagnosed with intraaxial lesions involving the functional area itself or very close to it by preoperative imaging. During surgery, the functional area was demonstrated by cortical electrical stimulation and resection aimed to preserve it in order to avoid an irreversible functional deficit. Total resection was possible in 80% while in 20% subtotal resection had to be performed because of involvement of the functional area itself. The neurological complication rate was found to be 16% (4 patients) and all were transient. No complication regarding anesthesia was noted. Awake craniotomy in selected patients is very effective, safe and practical for supratentorial lesions close to the eloquent area. Complications related to the surgery itself are uncommon and general anesthesia is avoided. The hospital stay including the intensive care unit is short which makes it very economical surgical procedure.

  17. Attentional modulation of cell-class-specific gamma-band synchronization in awake monkey area v4.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vinck, M.; Womelsdorf, T.; Buffalo, E.A.; Desimone, R.; Fries, P.

    2013-01-01

    Selective visual attention is subserved by selective neuronal synchronization, entailing precise orchestration among excitatory and inhibitory cells. We tentatively identified these as broad (BS) and narrow spiking (NS) cells and analyzed their synchronization to the local field potential in two

  18. Steroid metabolism by monkey and human spermatozoa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajalakshmi, M.; Sehgal, A.; Pruthi, J.S.; Anand-Kumar, T.C.

    1983-01-01

    Freshly ejaculated spermatozoa from monkey and human were washed and incubated with tritium labelled androgens or estradiol to study the pattern of spermatozoa steroid metabolism. When equal concentrations of steroid substrates were used for incubation, monkey and human spermatozoa showed very similar pattern of steroid conversion. Spermatozoa from both species converted testosterone mainly to androstenedione, but reverse conversion of androstenedione to testosterone was negligible. Estradiol-17 beta was converted mainly to estrone. The close similarity between the spermatozoa of monkey and men in their steroid metabolic pattern indicates that the rhesus monkey could be an useful animal model to study the effect of drugs on the metabolic pattern of human spermatozoa

  19. Failed awake craniotomy: a retrospective analysis in 424 patients undergoing craniotomy for brain tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nossek, Erez; Matot, Idit; Shahar, Tal; Barzilai, Ori; Rapoport, Yoni; Gonen, Tal; Sela, Gal; Korn, Akiva; Hayat, Daniel; Ram, Zvi

    2013-02-01

    Awake craniotomy for removal of intraaxial tumors within or adjacent to eloquent brain regions is a well-established procedure. However, awake craniotomy failures have not been well characterized. In the present study, the authors aimed to analyze and assess the incidence and causes for failed awake craniotomy. The database of awake craniotomies performed at Tel Aviv Medical Center between 2003 and 2010 was reviewed. Awake craniotomy was considered a failure if conversion to general anesthesia was required, or if adequate mapping or monitoring could not have been achieved. Of 488 patients undergoing awake craniotomy, 424 were identified as having complete medical, operative, and anesthesiology records. The awake craniotomies performed in 27 (6.4%) of these 424 patients were considered failures. The main causes of failure were lack of intraoperative communication with the patient (n = 18 [4.2%]) and/or intraoperative seizures (n = 9 [2.1%]). Preoperative mixed dysphasia (p awake craniotomy group, a significantly lower rate of gross-total resection was achieved (83% vs 54%, p = 0.008), there was a higher incidence of short-term speech deterioration postoperatively (6.1% vs 23.5%, p = 0.0017) as well as at 3 months postoperatively (2.3% vs 15.4%, p = 0.0002), and the hospitalization period was longer (4.9 ± 6.2 days vs 8.0 ± 10.1 days, p awake craniotomy were associated with a lower incidence of gross-total resection and increased postoperative morbidity. The majority of awake craniotomy failures were preventable by adequate patient selection and avoiding side effects of drugs administered during surgery.

  20. Cup tool use by squirrel monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckmaster, Christine L; Hyde, Shellie A; Parker, Karen J; Lyons, David M

    2015-12-01

    Captive-born male and female squirrel monkeys spontaneously 'invented' a cup tool use technique to Contain (i.e., hold and control) food they reduced into fragments for consumption and to Contain water collected from a valve to drink. Food cup use was observed more frequently than water cup use. Observations indicate that 68% (n = 39/57) of monkeys in this population used a cup (a plastic slip cap) to Contain food, and a subset of these monkeys, 10% (n = 4/39), also used a cup to Contain water. Cup use was optional and did not replace, but supplemented, the hand/arm-to-mouth eating and direct valve drinking exhibited by all members of the population. Strategies monkeys used to bring food and cups together for food processing activity at preferred upper-level perching areas, in the arboreal-like environment in which they lived, provides evidence that monkeys may plan food processing activity with the cups. Specifically, prior to cup use monkeys obtained a cup first before food, or obtained food and a cup from the floor simultaneously, before transporting both items to upper-level perching areas. After food processing activity with cups monkeys rarely dropped the cups and more often placed the cups onto perching. Monkeys subsequently returned to use cups that they previously placed on perching after food processing activity. The latter behavior is consistent with the possibility that monkeys may keep cups at preferred perching sites for future food processing activity and merits experimental investigation. Reports of spontaneous tool use by squirrel monkeys are rare and this is the first report of population-level tool use. These findings offer insights into the cognitive abilities of squirrel monkeys and provide a new context for behavior studies with this genus and for comparative studies with other primates. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Spider monkey, Muriqui and Woolly monkey relationships revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lima, Margarida Maria Celeira; Sampaio, Iracilda; Vieira, Ricardo dos Santos; Schneider, Horacio

    2007-01-01

    The taxonomic relationships among the four genera of the Atelidae family, Alouatta (Howler), Ateles (Spider), Lagothrix (Woolly) and Brachyteles (Muriqui), have been the subject of great debate. In general, almost all authors agree with the assignment of Howler monkeys as the basal genus, either in its own tribe Alouattini or in the subfamily Alouattinae, but they disagree on the associations among the other members of the family. Muriquis have been grouped with Spider monkeys based on the fact that they share various behavioral and morphological characteristics. Cladistic analyses using morphological, biochemical, karyotype and behavioral characteristics depicted a phylogenetic tree that places Howler as the basal genus and the remaining genera in an unresolved politomy. More recent studies using molecular data have suggested that Muriqui and Woolly monkeys are sister groups. However, a recent study based on nuclear and mtDNA argued that politomy is what best represents the relationships among Spider, Woolly and Muriqui. To contribute to this debate we have added new data from two nuclear genes, Transferrin and von Willebrand Factor, and using an alignment of 17,997 bp we demonstrate that a total analysis strongly supports the Muriqui-Woolly clade. A gene-to-gene approach showed that four of the eight nuclear genes provide support for the Muriqui-Woolly clade, two strongly and two moderately, while none of the eight genes provide support for any alternative arrangement. The mitochondrial genes were not able to resolve the politomy. A possible reason for the difficulty in resolving atelid relationships may be the short period of time separating each cladogenetic event in the evolutionary process that shaped this family.

  2. High-frequency oscillations in human and monkey neocortex during the wake-sleep cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Van Quyen, Michel; Muller, Lyle E; Telenczuk, Bartosz; Halgren, Eric; Cash, Sydney; Hatsopoulos, Nicholas G; Dehghani, Nima; Destexhe, Alain

    2016-08-16

    Beta (β)- and gamma (γ)-oscillations are present in different cortical areas and are thought to be inhibition-driven, but it is not known if these properties also apply to γ-oscillations in humans. Here, we analyze such oscillations in high-density microelectrode array recordings in human and monkey during the wake-sleep cycle. In these recordings, units were classified as excitatory and inhibitory cells. We find that γ-oscillations in human and β-oscillations in monkey are characterized by a strong implication of inhibitory neurons, both in terms of their firing rate and their phasic firing with the oscillation cycle. The β- and γ-waves systematically propagate across the array, with similar velocities, during both wake and sleep. However, only in slow-wave sleep (SWS) β- and γ-oscillations are associated with highly coherent and functional interactions across several millimeters of the neocortex. This interaction is specifically pronounced between inhibitory cells. These results suggest that inhibitory cells are dominantly involved in the genesis of β- and γ-oscillations, as well as in the organization of their large-scale coherence in the awake and sleeping brain. The highest oscillation coherence found during SWS suggests that fast oscillations implement a highly coherent reactivation of wake patterns that may support memory consolidation during SWS.

  3. High-frequency oscillations in human and monkey neocortex during the wake–sleep cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Van Quyen, Michel; Muller, Lyle E.; Telenczuk, Bartosz; Halgren, Eric; Cash, Sydney; Hatsopoulos, Nicholas G.; Dehghani, Nima; Destexhe, Alain

    2016-01-01

    Beta (β)- and gamma (γ)-oscillations are present in different cortical areas and are thought to be inhibition-driven, but it is not known if these properties also apply to γ-oscillations in humans. Here, we analyze such oscillations in high-density microelectrode array recordings in human and monkey during the wake–sleep cycle. In these recordings, units were classified as excitatory and inhibitory cells. We find that γ-oscillations in human and β-oscillations in monkey are characterized by a strong implication of inhibitory neurons, both in terms of their firing rate and their phasic firing with the oscillation cycle. The β- and γ-waves systematically propagate across the array, with similar velocities, during both wake and sleep. However, only in slow-wave sleep (SWS) β- and γ-oscillations are associated with highly coherent and functional interactions across several millimeters of the neocortex. This interaction is specifically pronounced between inhibitory cells. These results suggest that inhibitory cells are dominantly involved in the genesis of β- and γ-oscillations, as well as in the organization of their large-scale coherence in the awake and sleeping brain. The highest oscillation coherence found during SWS suggests that fast oscillations implement a highly coherent reactivation of wake patterns that may support memory consolidation during SWS. PMID:27482084

  4. Children Composing and the Tonal Idiom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roels, Johanna Maria; Van Petegem, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Existing studies have demonstrated how children compose, experiment and use their imagination within the conventions of the tonal idiom with functional harmony. However, one area of research that has hardly been explored is how tonality emerges in the compositions of children who compose by transforming their own non-musical ideas, such as their…

  5. Adolescents' Dialogic Composing with Mobile Phones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, Julie

    2016-01-01

    This 14-month study examined the phone-based composing practice of three adolescents. Given the centrality of mobile phones to youth culture, the researcher sought to create a description of the participants' composing practices with these devices. Focal participants were users of Twitter and Instagram, two social media platforms that are usually…

  6. Sleep bruxism, awake bruxism and sleep quality among Brazilian dental students: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serra-Negra, Júnia Maria; Scarpelli, Ana Carolina; Tirsa-Costa, Débora; Guimarães, Flávia Helena; Pordeus, Isabela Almeida; Paiva, Saul Martins

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the association of sleep bruxism, awake bruxism and sleep quality among dental students of the Federal University of Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, Brazil. A cross-sectional study was performed including 183 Brazilian dental students aged from 17 to 46 years old. The complete course curriculum consists of 9 semesters. Students enrolled in the first semester, the middle semester and the final semester of the course participated in the survey. The PSQI-BR (the Brazilian version of the Pittsburgh Sleep Questionnaire Index) was used for data collection. The PSQI-BR was distributed during lecture classes. Sleep bruxism and awake bruxism diagnosis was based on self-reported data. Descriptive analysis, Kruskal-Wallis, Mann-Whitney and Poisson regression with robust estimator were the statistical tests used. Sleep bruxism prevalence was 21.5% and awake bruxism prevalence was 36.5%. Sleep duration components were associated with sleep bruxism (PR=1.540; 95% CI: 1.00-2.37) and awake bruxism (PR=1.344; 95% CI: 1,008-1,790). There was an association between awake bruxism and habitual sleep efficiency component (PR=1.323; 95% CI: 1.03-1.70). Sleep disturbance component and awake bruxism were associated (PR=1.533; 95% CI: 1.03-2.27). Poor sleep quality was an important factor among dental students, who reported sleep bruxism as well as among those who presented awake bruxism.

  7. Patients' perceptions of awake and outpatient craniotomy for brain tumor: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khu, Kathleen Joy; Doglietto, Francesco; Radovanovic, Ivan; Taleb, Faisal; Mendelsohn, Daniel; Zadeh, Gelareh; Bernstein, Mark

    2010-05-01

    Routine and nonselective use of awake and outpatient craniotomy for supratentorial tumors has been shown to be safe and effective from a medical standpoint. In this study the authors aim was to explore patients' perceptions about awake and outpatient craniotomy. Qualitative research methodology was used. Two semistructured, open-ended interviews were conducted with 27 participants, who were ambulatory adult patients who underwent craniotomy for brain tumor excision between October 2008 and April 2009. The participants were each assigned to one of the following categories: 1) awake outpatient; 2) awake inpatient; 3) outpatient under general anesthesia; and 4) inpatient under general anesthesia. Interviews were audiotaped and transcribed, and the data were subjected to thematic analysis. The following 6 overarching themes emerged from the data: 1) patients had a positive experience with awake craniotomy; 2) patient satisfaction with outpatient surgery was high; 3) patients understood the rationale behind awake surgery; 4) patients were surprised that brain surgery can be done on an outpatient basis; 5) trust in one's surgeon was important; and 6) patients were more concerned about the disease than the procedure. The results reflected positively on the patients' awake and outpatient surgery experience, but there were some areas that require improvement, specifically perioperative pain control and postoperative care. These insights on patients' perspectives can lead to better delivery of care, and ultimately, improved health outcomes.

  8. Anesthetic approach to high-risk patients and prolonged awake craniotomy using dexmedetomidine and scalp block.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garavaglia, Marco M; Das, Sunit; Cusimano, Michael D; Crescini, Charmagne; Mazer, C David; Hare, Gregory M T; Rigamonti, Andrea

    2014-07-01

    Awake craniotomy with intraoperative speech or motor testing is relatively contraindicated in cases requiring prolonged operative times and in patients with severe medical comorbidities including anxiety, anticipated difficult airway, obesity, large tumors, and intracranial hypertension. The anesthetic management of neurosurgical patients who possess these contraindications but would be optimally treated by an awake procedure remains unclear. We describe a new anesthetic approach for awake craniotomy that did not require any airway manipulation, utilizing a bupivacaine-based scalp nerve block, and dexmedetomidine as the primary hypnotic-sedative agent. Using this technique, we provided optimal operative conditions to perform awake craniotomy facilitating safe tumor resection, while utilizing intraoperative electrocorticography for motor and speech mapping in a cohort of 10 patients at a high risk for airway compromise and complications associated with patient comorbidities. All patients underwent successful awake craniotomy, intraoperative mapping, and tumor resection with adequate sedation for up to 9 hours (median 3.5 h, range 3 to 9 h) without any loss of neurological function, airway competency, or the need to provide any active rescue airway management. We report 4 of these cases that highlight our experience: 1 case required prolonged surgery because of the complexity of tumor resection and 3 patients had important medical comorbidities and/or relative contraindication for an awake procedure. Dexmedetomidine, with concurrent scalp block, is an effective and safe anesthetic approach for awake craniotomy. Dexmedetomidine facilitates the extension procedure complexity and duration in patients who might traditionally not be considered to be candidates for this procedure.

  9. Autoshaping in Japanese Monkeys (Macaca Fuscata)

    OpenAIRE

    Itakura, Shoji; Fushimi, Takao; Asano, Toshio; Shoji, Itakura; Takao, Fushimi; Toshio, Asano

    1992-01-01

    Three Japanese monkeys were exposed to autoshaping and omission procedures. The Japanese momkeys seemed to be more sensitive to response-reinforcer contingency than to stimulus-reinforcer contingency. These results were compared with pigeons and squirrel monkeys in the previous reports.

  10. On Loss Aversion in Capuchin Monkeys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silberberg, Alan; Roma, Peter G.; Huntsberry, Mary E.; Warren-Boulton, Frederick R.; Sakagami, Takayuki; Ruggiero, Angela M.; Suomi, Stephen J.

    2008-01-01

    Chen, Lakshminarayanan, and Santos (2006) claim to show in three choice experiments that monkeys react rationally to price and wealth shocks, but, when faced with gambles, display hallmark, human-like biases that include loss aversion. We present three experiments with monkeys and humans consistent with a reinterpretation of their data that…

  11. The electron accelerator for the AWAKE experiment at CERN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pepitone, K., E-mail: kevin.pepitone@cern.ch [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Doebert, S., E-mail: steffen.doebert@cern.ch [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Burt, G. [The University of Lancaster, Lancaster (United Kingdom); Chevallay, E.; Chritin, N.; Delory, C.; Fedosseev, V.; Hessler, Ch.; McMonagle, G. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Mete, O. [The University of Manchester, Manchester (United Kingdom); Verzilov, V. [Triumf, Vancouver (Canada); Apsimon, R. [The University of Lancaster, Lancaster (United Kingdom)

    2016-09-01

    The AWAKE collaboration prepares a proton driven plasma wakefield acceleration experiment using the SPS beam at CERN. A long proton bunch extracted from the SPS interacts with a high power laser and a 10 m long rubidium vapour plasma cell to create strong wakefields allowing sustained electron acceleration. The electron bunch to probe these wakefields is supplied by a 20 MeV electron accelerator. The electron accelerator consists of an RF-gun and a short booster structure. This electron source should provide beams with intensities between 0.1 and 1 nC, bunch lengths between 0.3 and 3 ps and an emittance of the order of 2 mm mrad. The wide range of parameters should cope with the uncertainties and future prospects of the planned experiments. The layout of the electron accelerator, its instrumentation and beam dynamics simulations are presented.

  12. Characterization of Some Morphological Parameters of Orbicularis Oculi Motor Neurons in the Monkey

    OpenAIRE

    McNeal, DW; Ge, J; Herrick, JL; Stilwell-Morecraft, KS; Morecraft, RJ

    2007-01-01

    The primate facial nucleus is a prominent brainstem structure that is composed of cell bodies giving rise to axons forming the facial nerve. It is musculotopically organized, but we know little about the morphological features of its motor neurons. Using the Lucifer yellow intracellular filling method, we examined 17 morphological parameters of motor neurons innervating the monkey orbicularis oculi (OO) muscle, which plays an important role in eye lid closure and voluntary and emotional facia...

  13. Critical evaluation of colon submucosal microdialysis in awake, mobile rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norbert Cibicek

    Full Text Available Sensors able to record large bowel physiology and biochemistry in situ in awake rodents are lacking. Microdialysis is a mini-invasive technique that may be utilized to continuously deliver or recover low-molecular substances from various tissues. In this experiment we evaluated the feasibility of in vivo microdialysis to monitor extracellular fluid chemistry in the descending colon submucosa of conscious, freely moving rodents. Following surgical implantation of a microdialysis probe, male Wistar rats were housed in metabolic cages where they were analgized and clinically followed for four days with free access to standard diet and water. To assess local microcirculation and probe function, glucose, lactate, glucose-to-lactate ratio and urea clearance were determined in the dialysates from the three postoperative days with focus on the final 24-h period. In an attempt to mitigate the expected tissue inflammatory response, one group of animals had the catheters perfused with 5-aminosalicylic acid-enriched medium with final concentration 1 μmol/L. For verification of probe position and the assessment of the surrounding foreign body reaction, standard histological and immunohistochemical methods were employed. Microdialysis of rat gut is associated with considerable technical challenges that may lead to the loss of probe function and high drop-out rate. In this setting, limited data did not allow to draw any firm conclusion regarding local anti-inflammatory effectiveness of 5-aminosalicylic acid perfusion. Although intestinal microdialysis may be suitable for larger anesthetized animals, low reproducibility of the presented method compromises its routine experimental use in awake and freely moving small-sized rodents.

  14. Default-mode-like network activation in awake rodents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaymin Upadhyay

    Full Text Available During wakefulness and in absence of performing tasks or sensory processing, the default-mode network (DMN, an intrinsic central nervous system (CNS network, is in an active state. Non-human primate and human CNS imaging studies have identified the DMN in these two species. Clinical imaging studies have shown that the pattern of activity within the DMN is often modulated in various disease states (e.g., Alzheimer's, schizophrenia or chronic pain. However, whether the DMN exists in awake rodents has not been characterized. The current data provides evidence that awake rodents also possess 'DMN-like' functional connectivity, but only subsequent to habituation to what is initially a novel magnetic resonance imaging (MRI environment as well as physical restraint. Specifically, the habituation process spanned across four separate scanning sessions (Day 2, 4, 6 and 8. At Day 8, significant (p<0.05 functional connectivity was observed amongst structures such as the anterior cingulate (seed region, retrosplenial, parietal, and hippocampal cortices. Prior to habituation (Day 2, functional connectivity was only detected (p<0.05 amongst CNS structures known to mediate anxiety (i.e., anterior cingulate (seed region, posterior hypothalamic area, amygdala and parabracial nucleus. In relating functional connectivity between cingulate-default-mode and cingulate-anxiety structures across Days 2-8, a significant inverse relationship (r = -0.65, p = 0.0004 was observed between these two functional interactions such that increased cingulate-DMN connectivity corresponded to decreased cingulate anxiety network connectivity. This investigation demonstrates that the cingulate is an important component of both the rodent DMN-like and anxiety networks.

  15. Anaesthetic management of supratentorial tumor craniotomy using awake-throughout approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shafiq, F.; Salim, F.; Parkash, J.

    2017-01-01

    The authors are reporting an anaesthetic management of patient presenting with left parietal lobe space occupying lesion and scheduled for Awake-craniotomy. Awake-throughout approach using scalp block was planned. Among techniques reported for keeping patient awake during the surgery, this one is really underutilized. The successful conduct requires thorough preoperative assessment and psychological preparation. We used powerpoint presentation as a preoperative teaching tool. The anatomical landmark technique was used to institute scalp block, where individual nerves were targeted bilaterally. Patient remained stable throughout and participated actively in intraoperative neurological monitoring. Postoperative period showed remarkable recovery, better pain control, and shorter length of stay in hospital. (author)

  16. Anaesthetic Management of Supratentorial Tumor Craniotomy Using Awake-Throughout Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafiq, Faraz; Salim, Fahad; Enam, Ather; Parkash, Jai; Faheem, Mohammad

    2017-12-01

    The authors are reporting an anaesthetic management of patient presenting with left parietal lobe space occupying lesion and scheduled for Awake-craniotomy. Awake-throughout approach using scalp block was planned. Among techniques reported for keeping patient awake during the surgery, this one is really underutilized. The successful conduct requires thorough preoperative assessment and psychological preparation. We used powerpoint presentation as a preoperative teaching tool. The anatomical landmark technique was used to institute scalp block, where individual nerves were targeted bilaterally. Patient remained stable throughout and participated actively in intraoperative neurological monitoring. Postoperative period showed remarkable recovery, better pain control, and shorter length of stay in hospital.

  17. Awake insertion of a Laryngeal Mask Airway-Proseal™ as alternative to awake fiberoptic intubation in management of anticipated difficult airway in ambulatory surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matilde Zaballos

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and objectives The decision whether to manage an ambulatory patient with a previously documented difficult airway with a supraglottic device remain controversial. We report an awake insertion of a Laryngeal Mask Airway Proseal™ in a patient with known difficult airway scheduled for ambulatory surgery. Case report A 46-yr-old woman was programmed as a day case surgery for breast nodule resection. Her anesthetic record included an impossible intubation with cancelation of surgery and subsequent awake fibroscopic intubation. She reported emotional distress with the previous experience and declined this approach. In view of the previous experience, an awake airway control with a Laryngeal Mask Airway Proseal™ was planned after explaining and reassuring the patient. After adequate topicalisation, a size 4 Laryngeal Mask Airway Proseal™ was successfully inserted after two attempts, and their patency was confirmed by capnography. Anesthesia was induced intravenously and the surgery was uneventful. Conclusion We describe a feasible alternative strategy to awake intubation in a patient with known difficult airway undergoing ambulatory surgery. In this specific clinical situation, if tracheal intubation is deemed unnecessary, awake supraglottic airway might allow adequate ventilation and their use should be considered.

  18. Long-term imaging in awake mice using removable cranial windows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glickfeld, Lindsey L.; Kerlin, Aaron M.; Reid, R. Clay; Bonin, Vincent; Schafer, Dorothy P.; Andermann, Mark L.

    2015-01-01

    Cranial window implants in head-fixed rodents are becoming a preparation of choice for stable optical access to large areas of cortex over extended periods of time. Here, we provide a highly detailed and reliable surgical protocol for a cranial window implantation procedure for chronic widefield and cellular imaging in awake, head-fixed mice, which enables subsequent window removal and replacement in the weeks and months following the initial craniotomy. This protocol has facilitated awake, chronic imaging in adolescent as well as adult mice over several months from a large number of cortical brain regions; targeted virus and tracer injections from data obtained using prior awake functional mapping; and functionally-targeted two-photon imaging across all cortical layers in awake mice using a microprism attachment to the cranial window. Collectively, these procedures extend the reach of chronic imaging of cortical function and dysfunction in behaving animals. PMID:25275789

  19. Pediatric awake craniotomy for seizure focus resection with dexmedetomidine sedation-a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheshadri, Veena; Chandramouli, B A

    2016-08-01

    Resection of lesions near the eloquent cortex of brain necessitates awake craniotomy to reduce the risk of permanent neurologic deficits during surgery. There are limited reports of anesthetic management of awake craniotomy in pediatric patients. This report is on use of dexmedetomidine sedation for awake craniotomy in a 11-year-old child, without any airway adjuncts throughout the procedure. Dexmedetomidine infusion administered at a dosage of 0.2 to 0.7μg kg(-1) h(-1) provided adequate sedation for the entire procedure. There were no untoward incidents or any interference with electrocorticography, intraoperative stimulation, and functional mapping. Adequate preoperative visits and counseling of patient and parents regarding course and nature of events along with well-planned intraoperative management are of utmost importance in a pediatric age group for successful intraoperative awake craniotomy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Scalp Block for Awake Craniotomy in a Patient With a Frontal Bone Mass: A Case Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amiri, Hamid Reza; Kouhnavard, Marjan; Safari, Saeid

    2012-01-01

    “Anesthesia” for awake craniotomy is a unique clinical condition that requires the anesthesiologist to provide changing states of sedation and analgesia, to ensure optimal patient comfort without interfering with electrophysiologic monitoring and patient cooperation, and also to manipulate cerebral and systemic hemodynamics while guaranteeing adequate ventilation and patency of airways. Awake craniotomy is not as popular in developing countries as in European countries. This might be due to the lack of information regarding awake craniotomy and its benefits among the neurosurgeons and anesthetists in developing countries. From the economic perspective, this procedure may decrease resource utilization by reducing the use of invasive monitoring, the duration of the operation, and the length of postoperative hospital stay. All these reasons also favor its use in the developing world, where the availability of resources still remains a challenge. In this case report we presented a successful awake craniotomy in patient with a frontal bone mass. PMID:24904791

  1. Entropy-guided use of a unique cocktail in awake craniotomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Itee Chowdhury

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The major benefit of awake craniotomy is to enable a tailored resection that can theoretically maximize the extent of the tumor resection and can minimize the neurological damages. There is still no consensus as to the best anesthetic technique. We describe here a case report where a combination of propofol infusion and dexmedetomidine along with intermittent doses of fentanyl, and fentanyl patch was used with entropy monitoring to assess the depth of sedation in a patient for awake craniotomy.

  2. Nuclear weapon testing and the monkey business

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murthy, M.S.S.

    1978-01-01

    Reasons for India's total ban on the export of rhesus monkeys to U.S. have been explained. The major reason is that some of the animals were used in nuclear weapon related radiation experiments. This was a clear violation of a stricture in the agreement about supply of monkeys. The stricture prohibited the use of animals for research concerning military operations, including nuclear weapon testing. It is pleaded that a strict enforcement of strictures rather than a total ban on the export of monkeys would be better in the interest of advancement of knowledge in human medicine and disease control. (M.G.B.)

  3. Pain during awake craniotomy for brain tumor resection. Incidence, causes, consequences and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontaine, D; Almairac, F

    2017-06-01

    Awake craniotomy for brain tumor resection is usually well-tolerated and most of the patients are satisfied. However, in studies reporting the patients' postoperative perception of the awake craniotomy procedure, about half of them have experienced some degree of intraoperative pain. Pain was mild (intensity between 1 and 2 on the visual analogical score) short lasting in most cases, and did not challenge the procedure. Pain was reported as moderate in about 25% and exceptionally severe. We conducted a preliminary survey among French centers (n=9) routinely performing awake craniotomy. Neurosurgeons' opinions were concordant with patient's reports. Intraoperative pain exceptionally challenged the awake craniotomy procedure or led to changes in the resection strategy. For neurosurgeons, the most challenging causes of intraoperative pain were the patient's inadequate installation, the contact of surgical tools with pain-sensitive intracranial structures, especially the dura mater of the skull base, falx cerebri, and the leptomeninges of the lateral fissure and neighboring sulci. Strategies to deal with these causes included focusing the patient on the intraoperative functional tests to distract their attention away from the pain, and avoiding contacts with the pain-sensitive intracranial structures during the awake phase. Adequate preoperative patient information and preparation, trained anesthesiologists and application of recommendations for awake craniotomy procedures as well as adaptation of surgical technique to avoid contact with pain-sensitive intracranial structures are key factors to prevent intraoperative pain and ensure patient's postoperative satisfaction. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Patients' perspective on awake craniotomy for brain tumors-single center experience in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leal, Rafael Teixeira Magalhaes; da Fonseca, Clovis Orlando; Landeiro, Jose Alberto

    2017-04-01

    Awake craniotomy with brain mapping is the gold standard for eloquent tissue localization. Patients' tolerability and satisfaction have been shown to be high; however, it is a matter of debate whether these findings could be generalized, since patients across the globe have their own cultural backgrounds and may perceive and accept this procedure differently. We conducted a prospective qualitative study about the perception and tolerability of awake craniotomy in a population of consecutive brain tumor patients in Brazil between January 2013 and April 2015. Seventeen patients were interviewed using a semi-structured model with open-ended questions. Patients' thoughts were grouped into five categories: (1) overall perception: no patient considered awake craniotomy a bad experience, and most understood the rationale behind it. They were positively surprised with the surgery; (2) memory: varied from nothing to the entire surgery; (3) negative sensations: in general, it was painless and comfortable. Remarks concerning discomfort on the operating table were made; (4) postoperative recovery: perception of the postoperative period was positive; (5) previous surgical experiences versus awake craniotomy: patients often preferred awake surgery over other surgery under general anesthesia, including craniotomies. Awake craniotomy for brain tumors was well tolerated and yielded high levels of satisfaction in a population of patients in Brazil. This technique should not be avoided under the pretext of compromising patients' well-being.

  5. Technical Aspects of Awake Craniotomy with Mapping for Brain Tumors in a Limited Resource Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leal, Rafael Teixeira Magalhaes; Barcellos, Bruno Mendonça; Landeiro, Jose Alberto

    2018-05-01

    Brain tumor surgery near or within eloquent regions is increasingly common and is associated with a high risk of neurologic injury. Awake craniotomy with mapping has been shown to be a valid method to preserve neurologic function and increase the extent of resection. However, the technique used varies greatly among centers. Most count on professionals such as neuropsychologists, speech therapists, neurophysiologists, or neurologists to help in intraoperative patient evaluation. We describe our technique with the sole participation of neurosurgeons and anesthesiologists. A retrospective review of 19 patients who underwent awake craniotomies for brain tumors between January 2013 and February 2017 at a tertiary university hospital was performed. We sought to identify and describe the most critical stages involved in this surgery as well as show the complications associated with our technique. Preoperative preparation, positioning, anesthesia, brain mapping, resection, and management of seizures and pain were stages deemed relevant to the accomplishment of an awake craniotomy. Sixteen percent of the patients developed new postoperative deficit. Seizures occurred in 24%. None led to awake craniotomy failure. We provide a thorough description of the technique used in awake craniotomies with mapping used in our institution, where the intraoperative patient evaluation is carried out solely by neurosurgeons and anesthesiologists. The absence of other specialized personnel and equipment does not necessarily preclude successful mapping during awake craniotomy. We hope to provide helpful information for those who wish to offer function-guided tumor resection in their own centers. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Awake tracheal intubation using Pentax airway scope in 30 patients: A Case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Payal Kajekar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Pentax airway scope (AWS has been successfully used for managing difficult intubations. In this case series, we aimed to evaluate the success rate and time taken to complete intubation, when AWS was used for awake tracheal intubation. Methods: We prospectively evaluated the use of AWS for awake tracheal intubation in 30 patients. Indication for awake intubation, intubation time, total time to complete tracheal intubation, laryngoscopic view (Cormack and Lehane grade, total dose of local anaesthetic used, anaesthetists rating and patient′s tolerance of the procedure were recorded. Results: The procedure was successful in 25 out of the 30 patients (83%. The mean (standard deviation intubation time and total time to complete the tracheal intubation was 5.4 (2.4 and 13.9 (3.7 min, respectively in successful cases. The laryngeal view was grade 1 in 24 and grade 2 in one of 25 successful intubations. In three out of the five patients where the AWS failed, awake tracheal intubation was successfully completed with the assistance of flexible fibre optic scope (FOS. Conclusion: Awake tracheal intubation using AWS was successful in 83% of patients. Success rate can be further improved using a combination of AWS and FOS. Anaesthesiologists who do not routinely use FOS may find AWS easier to use for awake tracheal intubation using an oral route.

  7. Endogenous New World primate type C viruses isolated from owl monkey (Aotus trivirgatus) kidney cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todaro, G J; Sherr, C J; Sen, A; King, N; Daniel, M D; Fleckenstein, B

    1978-01-01

    A type C virus (OMC-1) detected in a culture of owl monkey kidney cells resembled typical type C viruses morphologically, but was slightly larger than previously characterized mammalian type C viruses. OMC-1 can be transmitted to bat lung cells and cat embryo fibroblasts. The virions band at a density of 1.16 g/ml in isopycnic sucrose density gradients and contain reverse transcriptase and a 60-65S RNA genome composed of approximately 32S subunits. The reverse transcriptase is immunologically and biochemically distinct from the polymerases of othe retroviruses. Radioimmunoassays directed to the interspecies antigenic determinants of the major structure proteins of other type C viruses do not detect a related antigen in OMC-1. Nucleic acid hybridization experiments using labeled viral genomic RNA or proviral cDNA transcripts to normal cellular DNA of different species show that OMC-1 is an endogenous virus with multiple virogene copies (20-50 per haploid genome) present in normal owl monkey cells and is distinct from previously isolated type C and D viruses. Sequences related to the OMC-1 genome can be detected in other New World monkeys. Thus, similar to the Old World primates (e.g., baboons as a prototype), the New World monkeys contain endogenous type C viral genes that appear to have been transmitted in the primate germ line. Images PMID:76312

  8. Same/different concept learning by capuchin monkeys in matching-to-sample tasks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina Truppa

    Full Text Available The ability to understand similarities and analogies is a fundamental aspect of human advanced cognition. Although subject of considerable research in comparative cognition, the extent to which nonhuman species are capable of analogical reasoning is still debated. This study examined the conditions under which tufted capuchin monkeys (Cebus apella acquire a same/different concept in a matching-to-sample task on the basis of relational similarity among multi-item stimuli. We evaluated (i the ability of five capuchin monkeys to learn the same/different concept on the basis of the number of items composing the stimuli and (ii the ability to match novel stimuli after training with both several small stimulus sets and a large stimulus set. We found the first evidence of same/different relational matching-to-sample abilities in a New World monkey and demonstrated that the ability to match novel stimuli is within the capacity of this species. Therefore, analogical reasoning can emerge in monkeys under specific training conditions.

  9. Same/Different Concept Learning by Capuchin Monkeys in Matching-to-Sample Tasks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truppa, Valentina; Piano Mortari, Eva; Garofoli, Duilio; Privitera, Sara; Visalberghi, Elisabetta

    2011-01-01

    The ability to understand similarities and analogies is a fundamental aspect of human advanced cognition. Although subject of considerable research in comparative cognition, the extent to which nonhuman species are capable of analogical reasoning is still debated. This study examined the conditions under which tufted capuchin monkeys (Cebus apella) acquire a same/different concept in a matching-to-sample task on the basis of relational similarity among multi-item stimuli. We evaluated (i) the ability of five capuchin monkeys to learn the same/different concept on the basis of the number of items composing the stimuli and (ii) the ability to match novel stimuli after training with both several small stimulus sets and a large stimulus set. We found the first evidence of same/different relational matching-to-sample abilities in a New World monkey and demonstrated that the ability to match novel stimuli is within the capacity of this species. Therefore, analogical reasoning can emerge in monkeys under specific training conditions. PMID:21858225

  10. Cytogenesis in the monkey retina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    La Vail, M.M.; Rapaport, D.H.; Rakic, P.

    1991-01-01

    Time of cell origin in the retina of the rhesus monkey (Macaca mulatta) was studied by plotting the number of heavily radiolabeled nuclei in autoradiograms prepared from 2- to 6-month-old animals, each of which was exposed to a pulse of 3H-thymidine (3H-TdR) on a single embryonic (E) or postnatal (P) day. Cell birth in the monkey retina begins just after E27, and approximately 96% of cells are generated by E120. The remaining cells are produced during the last (approximately 45) prenatal days and into the first several weeks after birth. Cell genesis begins near the fovea, and proceeds towards the periphery. Cell division largely ceases in the foveal and perifoveal regions by E56. Despite extensive overlap, a class-specific sequence of cell birth was observed. Ganglion and horizontal cells, which are born first, have largely congruent periods of cell genesis with the peak between E38 and E43, and termination around E70. The first labeled cones were apparent by E33, and their highest density was achieved between E43 and E56, tapering to low values at E70, although some cones are generated in the far periphery as late as E110. Amacrine cells are next in the cell birth sequence and begin genesis at E43, reach a peak production between E56 and E85, and cease by E110. Bipolar cell birth begins at the same time as amacrines, but appears to be separate from them temporally since their production reaches a peak between E56 and E102, and persists beyond the day of birth. Mueller cells and rod photoreceptors, which begin to be generated at E45, achieve a peak, and decrease in density at the same time as bipolar cells, but continue genesis at low density on the day of birth. Thus, bipolar, Mueller, and rod cells have a similar time of origin

  11. Music and emotion-a composer's perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douek, Joel

    2013-01-01

    This article takes an experiential and anecdotal look at the daily lives and work of film composers as creators of music. It endeavors to work backwards from what practitioners of the art and craft of music do instinctively or unconsciously, and try to shine a light on it as a conscious process. It examines the role of the film composer in his task to convey an often complex set of emotions, and communicate with an immediacy and universality that often sit outside of common language. Through the experiences of the author, as well as interviews with composer colleagues, this explores both concrete and abstract ways in which music can bring meaning and magic to words and images, and as an underscore to our daily lives.

  12. Basic Math in Monkeys and College Students

    OpenAIRE

    Beran, Michael J

    2008-01-01

    Recent behavioral and neuroimaging studies with humans and monkeys provide compelling evidence of shared numerical capacities across species. Our understanding of the emergence of human mathematical competence is well-served by these kinds of comparative assessments.

  13. Effect of nitroglycerin on myocardial collateral conductance in awake dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brazzamano, S.; Rembert, J.C.; Greenfield, J.C. Jr.

    1988-01-01

    Conductance of the coronary collateral circulation during the course of two abrupt circumflex coronary occlusions was measured in awake dogs ∼ 2 wk after collateral vessels were stimulated to develop. The pressure gradient from the central aorta to the distal circumflex coronary artery was measured, and myocardial blood flow was determined by 9-μm radioactive microspheres at 30 s and 4 min after coronary occlusions. Collateral conductance was calculated as mean collateral blood flow divided by the mean aorta-coronary pressure gradient. Before nitroglycerin, collateral conductance increased in all eight dogs from 30 s to 4 min. After nitroglycerin administration, the conductance at 30 s increased from the prenitroglycerin control value to 0.014 ± 0.012 ml·min -1 ·g -1 ·mmHg -1 . The mean change in conductance from 30 s to 4 min postnitroglycerin was significantly less than during prenitroglycerin. These data indicate that an increase in conductance during coronary occlusion occurs even in the immature collateral circulation. This effect presumably takes place in the arterial smooth muscle at the origin of the collateral vasculature

  14. Electroacupuncture-Assisted Craniotomy on an Awake Patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidhu, Amritpal; Murgahayah, Trushna; Narayanan, Vairavan; Chandran, Hari; Waran, Vicknes

    2017-01-01

    Although acupuncture has existed for over 2000 years, its application as an anesthetic aid began in the 1950s in China. The first surgical procedure performed under acupuncture anesthesia was a tonsillectomy. Soon thereafter, major and minor surgical procedures took place with electroacupuncture alone providing the anesthesia. The procedures performed were diverse, ranging from cardiothoracic surgery to dental extractions. Usage of acupuncture anesthesia, specifically in neurosurgery, has been well documented in hospitals across China, especially in Beijing, dating back to the 1970s. We present a case of a 65-year-old man who presented with right-sided body weakness. He had a past medical history of uncontrolled diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and obstructive sleep apnea requiring use of a nasal continuous positive airway pressure device during sleep. We performed a computed tomography brain scan, which revealed a left-sided acute on chronic subdural hemorrhage. Due to his multiple comorbidities, we decided to perform the surgical procedure under electroacupuncture anesthesia. The aim of this case report is to describe a craniotomy performed under electroacupuncture on an elderly patient with multiple comorbidities who was awake during the procedure and in whom this procedure, if it had been performed under general anesthesia, would have carried high risk. Copyright © 2016 Medical Association of Pharmacopuncture Institute. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Electroacupuncture-Assisted Craniotomy on an Awake Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amritpal Sidhu

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Although acupuncture has existed for over 2000 years, its application as an anesthetic aid began in the 1950s in China. The first surgical procedure performed under acupuncture anesthesia was a tonsillectomy. Soon thereafter, major and minor surgical procedures took place with electroacupuncture alone providing the anesthesia. The procedures performed were diverse, ranging from cardiothoracic surgery to dental extractions. Usage of acupuncture anesthesia, specifically in neurosurgery, has been well documented in hospitals across China, especially in Beijing, dating back to the 1970s. We present a case of a 65-year-old man who presented with right-sided body weakness. He had a past medical history of uncontrolled diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and obstructive sleep apnea requiring use of a nasal continuous positive airway pressure device during sleep. We performed a computed tomography brain scan, which revealed a left-sided acute on chronic subdural hemorrhage. Due to his multiple comorbidities, we decided to perform the surgical procedure under electroacupuncture anesthesia. The aim of this case report is to describe a craniotomy performed under electroacupuncture on an elderly patient with multiple comorbidities who was awake during the procedure and in whom this procedure, if it had been performed under general anesthesia, would have carried high risk.

  16. Intrinsic connectivity of neural networks in the awake rabbit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Matthew P; Weiss, Craig; Procissi, Daniel; Disterhoft, John F; Wang, Lei

    2016-04-01

    The way in which the brain is functionally connected into different networks has emerged as an important research topic in order to understand normal neural processing and signaling. Since some experimental manipulations are difficult or unethical to perform in humans, animal models are better suited to investigate this topic. Rabbits are a species that can undergo MRI scanning in an awake and conscious state with minimal preparation and habituation. In this study, we characterized the intrinsic functional networks of the resting New Zealand White rabbit brain using BOLD fMRI data. Group independent component analysis revealed seven networks similar to those previously found in humans, non-human primates and/or rodents including the hippocampus, default mode, cerebellum, thalamus, and visual, somatosensory, and parietal cortices. For the first time, the intrinsic functional networks of the resting rabbit brain have been elucidated demonstrating the rabbit's applicability as a translational animal model. Without the confounding effects of anesthetics or sedatives, future experiments may employ rabbits to understand changes in neural connectivity and brain functioning as a result of experimental manipulation (e.g., temporary or permanent network disruption, learning-related changes, and drug administration). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Neural representation of face familiarity in an awake chimpanzee

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirokata Fukushima

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Evaluating the familiarity of faces is critical for social animals as it is the basis of individual recognition. In the present study, we examined how face familiarity is reflected in neural activities in our closest living relative, the chimpanzee. Skin-surface event-related brain potentials (ERPs were measured while a fully awake chimpanzee observed photographs of familiar and unfamiliar chimpanzee faces (Experiment 1 and human faces (Experiment 2. The ERPs evoked by chimpanzee faces differentiated unfamiliar individuals from familiar ones around midline areas centered on vertex sites at approximately 200 ms after the stimulus onset. In addition, the ERP response to the image of the subject’s own face did not significantly diverge from those evoked by familiar chimpanzees, suggesting that the subject’s brain at a minimum remembered the image of her own face. The ERPs evoked by human faces were not influenced by the familiarity of target individuals. These results indicate that chimpanzee neural representations are more sensitive to the familiarity of conspecific than allospecific faces.

  18. Dexmedetomidine versus Remifentanil for Sedation during Awake Fiberoptic Intubation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davide Cattano

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This study compared remifentanil and dexmedetomidine as awake fiberoptic intubation (AFOI anesthetics. Thirty-four adult ASA I-III patients were enrolled in a double-blinded randomized pilot study to receive remifentanil (REM or dexmedetomidine (DEX for sedation during AFOI (nasal and oral. Thirty patients completed the study and received 2 mg midazolam IV and topical anesthesia. The REM group received a loading dose of 0.75 mcg/kg followed by an infusion of 0.075 mcg/kg/min. The DEX group received a loading dose of 0.4 mcg/kg followed by an infusion of 0.7 mcg/kg/hr. Time to sedation, number of intubation attempts, Ramsay sedation scale (RSS score, bispectral index (BIS, and memory recall were recorded. All thirty patients were successfully intubated by AFOI (22 oral intubations/8 nasal. First attempt success rate with AFOI was higher in the REM group than the DEX group, 72% and 38% (P=0.02, respectively. The DEX group took longer to attain RSS of ≥3 and to achieve BIS <80, as compared to the REM group. Postloading dose verbal recall was poorer in the DEX group. Dexmedetomidine seems a useful adjunct for patients undergoing AFOI but is dependent on dosage and time. Further studies in the use of dexmedetomidine for AFOI are warranted.

  19. P10.05 Establishment of team work awake craniotomy: clinical experience in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, P.; Chang, W.; Chao, Y.; Toh, C.; Wei, K.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: Awake craniotomy provides the opportunity to maximize both extent of resection and preservation of neurological function. Serial preoperative and postoperative neurobehavial evaluation, magnetic resonance image examination and intraoperative task investigation need multidisciplinary experts to cooperate. Materials and Methods: From 2013, we gradually establish our team for awake craniotomy. Patient who had brain tumor with the symptom of aphasia or hemiparesis and are willing to cooperate would be entered the protocol of awake craniotomy. Patients would receive complete preoperative neurobehavial examination by psychologists and speech therapists and magnetic resonance image included diffuse tensor image. During operation, Patients went through asleep-awake-asleep anesthetic techniques. Direct electric stimulation was used for both cortical and subcortical mapping. Navigation included information of lesion and important fiber tract guided the direction of excision. Rehabilitation doctor performed the tasks and decided the positive response caused by stimulation or excisional procedure. After operation, post-operative image and neurobehavial examination would be performed within one week, 3 months, 6 months and one year later Results: We scheduled awake craniotomy on almost every Tuesday. In recent 89 patients who received awake craniotomy, Twenty-five participants with recurrent tumor underwent the operation. Seven patients received twice and one patient received three times of awake craniotomy. Two patients had controllable intraoperative seizure attack. Early termination of awake status was found in two patients due to general discomfort. Patients with modest preoperative performance status still benefit from the operation. Neurobehavioral functions improved over time and some specific feature correlate to certain aspect of quality of life. The grading of tumor and the extension of resection influence the recovery of neurobehavioral

  20. An Area Efficient Composed CORDIC Architecture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AGUIRRE-RAMOS, F.

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This article presents a composed architecture for the CORDIC algorithm. CORDIC is a widely used technique to calculate basic trigonometric functions using only additions and shifts. This composed architecture combines an initial coarse stage to approximate sine and cosine functions, and a second stage to finely tune those values while CORDIC operates on rotation mode. Both stages contribute to shorten the algorithmic steps required to fully execute the CORDIC algorithm. For comparison purposes, the Xilinx CORDIC logiCORE IP and previously reported research are used. The proposed architecture aims at reducing hardware resources usage as its key objective.

  1. Awake craniotomy, electrophysiologic mapping, and tumor resection with high-field intraoperative MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parney, Ian F; Goerss, Stephan J; McGee, Kiaran; Huston, John; Perkins, William J; Meyer, Frederic B

    2010-05-01

    Awake craniotomy and electrophysiologic mapping (EPM) is an established technique to facilitate the resection of near eloquent cortex. Intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging (iMRI) is increasingly used to aid in the resection of intracranial lesions. Standard draping protocols in high-field iMRI units make awake craniotomies challenging, and only two groups have previously reported combined EPM and high-field iMRI. We present an illustrative case describing a simple technique for combining awake craniotomy and EPM with high-field iMRI. A movable platter is used to transfer the patient from the operating table to a transport trolley and into the adjacent MRI and still maintaining the patient's surgical position. This system allows excess drapes to be removed, facilitating awake craniotomy. A 57-year-old right-handed man presented with new onset seizures. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a large left temporal mass. The patient underwent an awake, left frontotemporal craniotomy. The EPM demonstrated a single critical area for speech in his inferior frontal gyrus. After an initial tumor debulking, the scalp flap was loosely approximated, the wound was covered with additional drapes, and the excess surrounding drapes were trimmed. An iMRI was obtained. The image-guidance system was re-registered and the patient was redraped. Additional resection was performed, allowing extensive removal of what proved to be an anaplastic astrocytoma. The patient tolerated this well without any new neurological deficits. Standard protocols for positioning and draping in high-field iMRI units make awake craniotomies problematic. This straightforward technique for combined awake EPM and iMRI may facilitate safe removal of large lesions in eloquent cortex. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Development of a safe and pragmatic awake craniotomy program at Maine Medical Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rughani, Anand I; Rintel, Theodor; Desai, Rajiv; Cushing, Deborah A; Florman, Jeffrey E

    2011-01-01

    Awake craniotomy offers an excellent means of performing intraoperative mapping and optimizing surgical resection of brain tumors. Awake craniotomy relies on a strong collaboration between anesthesiologists, neurosurgeons, and operating room staff. The authors recently introduced awake craniotomy for tumor resection at the Maine Medical Center and propose that it can be performed safely, effectively, and efficiently in a high-volume community hospital. We describe a practical approach to performing awake craniotomy involving streamlined anesthetic protocols and simplified intraoperative testing parameters in a carefully selected group of patients. Our first 25 patients are retrospectively reviewed with particular attention to the anesthetic protocol, the extent of resection, the operative time, post-operative complications, the length of hospitalization, and their functional status at follow-up. The authors established an anesthetic protocol based primarily on midazolam, fentanyl, propofol, and local anesthetic. The authors note that all but one patient was able to tolerate the awake procedure. Gross total resection was achieved in nearly 80% of patients with a glial tumor. Operative time was short, averaging 159 minutes of entire anesthesia care. Length of stay averaged 3.7 days. Persistent new post-operative deficits were noted in 2 of 25 patients. There was no substantial difference in total hospital charges for patients undergoing awake craniotomy when compared to a matched historical control. With attention focused on patient selection and a streamlined anesthetic protocol, the authors were able to successfully implement an awake craniotomy protocol in a community setting with satisfying results, including low operative morbidity, short operative times, low anesthetic complications, and excellent patient tolerance.

  3. Awake craniotomy for excision of arteriovenous malformations? A qualitative comparison study with stereotactic radiosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, David Yuen Chung; Chan, Danny Tat Ming; Zhu, Cannon Xian Lun; Kan, Patricia Kwok Yee; Ng, Amelia Yikjin; Hsieh, Yi-Pin Sonia; Abrigo, Jill; Poon, Wai Sang; Wong, George Kwok Chu

    2018-05-01

    Treatment of arteriovenous malformations (AVM) located at the eloquent area has been a challenge. Awake brain mapping allows identification of a non-eloquent gyrus for intervention and can potentially facilitate resection with preservation of functions. An alternative treatment option is stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). The objective of this study was to perform a qualitative comparison of the treatment outcome of awake AVM excision versus SRS. We conducted a 13-year retrospective review of AVM excision under awake craniotomy performed at Prince of Wales Hospital, Hong Kong, from 2003 to 2016. Patients' presentation, Spetzler-Martin (SM) grading, rate of obliteration and complication were reviewed and analyzed with the modified radiosurgery-based AVM score (RS score). Six patients had excision of AVM under awake mapping during this period of time. Two were SM Grade II and four were SM Grade III. Five located at the peri-rolandic region while one at the temporal language area. None had failed mapping. Five out of six achieved complete obliteration (83.3%). Qualitative comparative analysis had revealed better treatment outcome with awake AVM excision as compared to SRS with the obliteration rate of 100% versus 96% for RS score ≤1.00, 100% versus 78% for RS score 1.01-1.50, and 66% versus 50% for RS score >2.00 respectively. In conclusion, awake mapping and excision of AVMs at the eloquent area is feasible. Qualitative comparative analysis had revealed higher obliteration rate with awake AVM excision as compared to SRS. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Awake craniotomy induces fewer changes in the plasma amino acid profile than craniotomy under general anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hol, Jaap W; Klimek, Markus; van der Heide-Mulder, Marieke; Stronks, Dirk; Vincent, Arnoud J; Klein, Jan; Zijlstra, Freek J; Fekkes, Durk

    2009-04-01

    In this prospective, observational, 2-armed study, we compared the plasma amino acid profiles of patients undergoing awake craniotomy to those undergoing craniotomy under general anesthesia. Both experimental groups were also compared with a healthy, age-matched and sex-matched reference group not undergoing surgery. It is our intention to investigate whether plasma amino acid levels provide information about physical and emotional stress, as well as pain during awake craniotomy versus craniotomy under general anesthesia. Both experimental groups received preoperative, perioperative, and postoperative dexamethasone. The plasma levels of 20 amino acids were determined preoperative, perioperative, and postoperatively in all groups and were correlated with subjective markers for pain, stress, and anxiety. In both craniotomy groups, preoperative levels of tryptophan and valine were significantly decreased whereas glutamate, alanine, and arginine were significantly increased relative to the reference group. Throughout time, tryptophan levels were significantly lower in the general anesthesia group versus the awake craniotomy group. The general anesthesia group had a significantly higher phenylalanine/tyrosine ratio, which may suggest higher oxidative stress, than the awake group throughout time. Between experimental groups, a significant increase in large neutral amino acids was found postoperatively in awake craniotomy patients, pain was also less and recovery was faster. A significant difference in mean hospitalization time was also found, with awake craniotomy patients leaving after 4.53+/-2.12 days and general anesthesia patients after 6.17+/-1.62 days; P=0.012. This study demonstrates that awake craniotomy is likely to be physically and emotionally less stressful than general anesthesia and that amino acid profiling holds promise for monitoring postoperative pain and recovery.

  5. Studies in Composing Hydrogen Atom Wavefunctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Putnam, Lance Jonathan; Kuchera-Morin, JoAnn; Peliti, Luca

    2015-01-01

    We present our studies in composing elementary wavefunctions of a hydrogen-like atom and identify several relationships between physical phenomena and musical composition that helped guide the process. The hydrogen-like atom accurately describes some of the fundamental quantum mechanical phenomen...

  6. Novel Ultrathin Membranes Composed of Organic Ions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chaban, Vitaly V.; Verspeek, Bram; Khandelia, Himanshu

    2013-01-01

    of artificial bilayers composed of long-chained organic ions, such as dodecyltrimethylammonium (DMA(+)) and perfluorooctaonate (PFO-). Various ratios of DMA/PFO surfactants result in bilayers of different stability, thickness, area per molecule, and density profiles. In our quest for water filtration, we...

  7. The Composer in the Liberal Arts College

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Elliott

    2011-01-01

    This essay explores the role of music composition within the curriculum of a typical small liberal arts college and the faculty composer's role(s) in facilitating the study of composition. The relationship between composition and campus performance is discussed, particularly in light of the increased emphasis on performance in formerly all-male…

  8. Composing Networks: Writing Practices on Mobile Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swarts, Jason

    2016-01-01

    This article is an investigation of composing practices through which people create networks with mobile phones. By looking through the lens of actor-network theory, the author portrays the networking activity of mobile phone users as translation, what Latour describes as an infralanguage to which different disciplinary perspectives can be…

  9. Anaesthetic management for awake craniotomy in brain glioma resection: initial experience in Military Hospital Mohamed V of Rabat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meziane, Mohammed; Elkoundi, Abdelghafour; Ahtil, Redouane; Guazaz, Miloudi; Mustapha, Bensghir; Haimeur, Charki

    2017-01-01

    The awake brain surgery is an innovative approach in the treatment of tumors in the functional areas of the brain. There are various anesthetic techniques for awake craniotomy (AC), including asleep-awake-asleep technique, monitored anesthesia care, and the recent introduced awake-awake-awake method. We describe our first experience with anesthetic management for awake craniotomy, which was a combination of these techniques with scalp nerve block, and propofol/rémifentanil target controlled infusion. A 28-year-oldmale underwent an awake craniotomy for brain glioma resection. The scalp nerve block was performed and a low sedative state was maintained until removal of bone flap. During brain glioma resection, the patient awake state was maintained without any complications. Once, the tumorectomy was completed, the level of anesthesia was deepened and a laryngeal mask airway was inserted. A well psychological preparation, a reasonable choice of anesthetic techniques and agents, and continuous team communication were some of the key challenges for successful outcome in our patient.

  10. Binding kinetics of 11C-N-methyl piperidyl benzilate (11C-NMPB) in a rhesus monkey brain using the cerebellum as a reference region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itoh, Takashi; Tanaka, Masayasu; Suzuki, Kasutoshi; Kobayashi, Kaoru; Inoue, Osamu

    2005-01-01

    The binding kinetics of' 11 C-N-methyl piperidyl benzilate ( 11 C-NMPB) in rhesus monkey brain were studied using animal positron emission tomography (PET) (SHR2000). This study is intended to assess the validity of the method using the cerebellum as a reference region, and to evaluate the effects of anesthesia on 11 C -NMPB binding. Two monkeys, anesthetized with ketamine, received intravenous 11 C-NMPB alone (370-760 MBq, 11 C-NMPB accumulated densely in the striatum and cerebral cortex with time. In contrast, the tracer accumulation significantly decreased with increased doses of nonradioactive NMPB. In the cerebellum, on the other hand, the accumulation of 11 C-NMPB remained low and the tracer was slowly eliminated from the brain following the injection. 11 C-NMPB binding in the cerebellum was barely affected by the increased dose of nonradioactive NMPB. We thus concluded that the specific 11 C-NMPB binding was negligible in the cerebellum, and performed simplified evaluation of 11 C-NMPB binding in each brain region by a graphical method using the cerebellum as a reference region. PET was conducted 26 times, in total both in ketamine-anesthetized and awake monkeys (n=3 each). Measurements of 11 C-NMPB binding showed good run-to-run reproducibility within individual animals. When 11 C-NMPB binding was compared between ketamine-treated and awake animals, a significant increase in 11 C-NMPB binding was observed in the striatum but not in other brain regions of ketamine-treated animals. (author)

  11. Composing chaotic music from the letter m

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotiropoulos, Anastasios D.

    Chaotic music is composed from a proposed iterative map depicting the letter m, relating the pitch, duration and loudness of successive steps. Each of the two curves of the letter m is based on the classical logistic map. Thus, the generating map is xn+1 = r xn(1/2 - xn) for xn between 0 and 1/2 defining the first curve, and xn+1 = r (xn - 1/2)(1 - xn) for xn between 1/2 and 1 representing the second curve. The parameter r which determines the height(s) of the letter m varies from 2 to 16, the latter value ensuring fully developed chaotic solutions for the whole letter m; r = 8 yielding full chaotic solutions only for its first curve. The m-model yields fixed points, bifurcation points and chaotic regions for each separate curve, as well as values of the parameter r greater than 8 which produce inter-fixed points, inter-bifurcation points and inter-chaotic regions from the interplay of the two curves. Based on this, music is composed from mapping the m- recurrence model solutions onto actual notes. The resulting musical score strongly depends on the sequence of notes chosen by the composer to define the musical range corresponding to the range of the chaotic mathematical solutions x from 0 to 1. Here, two musical ranges are used; one is the middle chromatic scale and the other is the seven- octaves range. At the composer's will and, for aesthetics, within the same composition, notes can be the outcome of different values of r and/or shifted in any octave. Compositions with endings of non-repeating note patterns result from values of r in the m-model that do not produce bifurcations. Scores of chaotic music composed from the m-model and the classical logistic model are presented.

  12. Newly Identified CYP2C93 Is a Functional Enzyme in Rhesus Monkey, but Not in Cynomolgus Monkey

    OpenAIRE

    Uno, Yasuhiro; Uehara, Shotaro; Kohara, Sakae; Iwasaki, Kazuhide; Nagata, Ryoichi; Fukuzaki, Koichiro; Utoh, Masahiro; Murayama, Norie; Yamazaki, Hiroshi

    2011-01-01

    Cynomolgus monkey and rhesus monkey are used in drug metabolism studies due to their evolutionary closeness and physiological resemblance to human. In cynomolgus monkey, we previously identified cytochrome P450 (P450 or CYP) 2C76 that does not have a human ortholog and is partly responsible for species differences in drug metabolism between cynomolgus monkey and human. In this study, we report characterization of CYP2C93 cDNA newly identified in cynomolgus monkey and rhesus monkey. The CYP2C9...

  13. The effect of single low-dose dexamethasone on vomiting during awake craniotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamata, Kotoe; Morioka, Nobutada; Maruyama, Takashi; Komayama, Noriaki; Nitta, Masayuki; Muragaki, Yoshihiro; Kawamata, Takakazu; Ozaki, Makoto

    2016-12-01

    Intraoperative vomiting leads to serious respiratory complications that could influence the surgical decision-making process for awake craniotomy. However, the use of antiemetics is still limited in Japan. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of prophylactically administered single low-dose dexamethasone on the incidence of vomiting during awake craniotomy. The frequency of hyperglycemia was also examined. We conducted a retrospective case review of awake craniotomy for glioma resection between 2012 and 2015. Of the 124 patients, 91 were included in the analysis. Dexamethasone was not used in 43 patients and the 48 remaining patients received an intravenous bolus of 4.95 mg dexamethasone at anesthetic induction. Because of stable operating conditions, no one required conscious sedation throughout functional mapping and tumor resection. Although dexamethasone pretreatment reduced the incidence of intraoperative vomiting (P = 0.027), the number of patients who complained of nausea was comparable (P = 0.969). No adverse events related to vomiting occurred intraoperatively. Baseline blood glucose concentration did not differ between each group (P = 0.143), but the samples withdrawn before emergence (P = 0.018), during the awake period (P awake craniotomy cases. However, as even a small dose of dexamethasone increases the risk for hyperglycemia, antiemetic prophylaxis with dexamethasone should be administered after careful consideration. Monitoring of perioperative blood glucose concentration is also necessary.

  14. The Potential Benefits of Awake Craniotomy for Brain Tumor Resection: An Anesthesiologist's Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Lingzhong; Berger, Mitchel S; Gelb, Adrian W

    2015-10-01

    Awake craniotomy for brain tumor resection is becoming a standard of care for lesions residing within or in close proximity to regions presumed to have language or sensorimotor function. Evidence shows an improved outcome including greater extent of resection, fewer late neurological deficits, shorter hospital stay, and longer survival after awake brain tumor resection compared with surgery under general anesthesia. The surgeon's ability to maximize tumor resection within the constraint of preserving neurological function by intraoperative stimulation mapping in an awake patient is credited for this advantageous result. It is possible that the care provided by anesthesiologists, especially the avoidance of certain components of general endotracheal anesthesia, may also be important in the outcome of awake brain tumor resection. We present our interpretation of the evidence that we believe substantiates this proposition. However, due to the lack of direct evidence based on randomized-controlled trials and the heterogeneity of anesthetic techniques used for awake craniotomy, our perspective is largely speculative and hypothesis generating that needs to be validated or refuted by future quality research.

  15. AWAKE CRANIOTOMY USING DEXMEDETOMIDINE INFUSION AND SCALP BLOCK: OUR EXPERIENCE IN SERIES OF CASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MSSV Prasad

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Awake craniotomy for removal of intracranial tumors is most challenging procedure. The critical aspect of awake craniotomy is to maintain adequate analgesia and sedation, hemodynamic stability, airway safety, while keeping the patient immobile for duration of surgery, cooperative for neurological testing. AIM OF THE STUDY: Dexmedetomidine is good analgesic, sedative and has anaesthetic-sparing properties without causing significant respiratory depression. [1] We are reporting cases series of awake craniotomy under monitored anesthesia care using dexmedetomidine infusion as an adjuvant to scalp block, titrating the sedation level by BIS monitoring. MATERIALS AND METHODS: after careful patient selection and psychological preparation Monitored Anesthesia care(MAC was provided by continuous infusion of Dexmedetomidine at a rate of 0.2-0.5 mcg/kg/min titrating sedation level to a BIS value of 70-90%. Bilateral scalp block was administered using 0.5% bupivacaine. For dura mater incision, a pad with 2% lidocaine was applied for 3 minutes. The tumor removal was complete with no neurological deficiency. All the patients were discharged on 5th postoperative day without complications and with full patient satisfaction. CONCLUSION: We conclude that monitored anesthesia care with dexmedetomidine infusion and scalp block for awake craniotomy is a safe and efficacious. Absence of complications and high patient satisfaction score makes this technique close to an ideal technique for awake craniotomy.

  16. Awake craniotomy for assisting placement of auditory brainstem implant in NF2 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Qiangyi; Yang, Zhijun; Wang, Zhenmin; Wang, Bo; Wang, Xingchao; Zhao, Chi; Zhang, Shun; Wu, Tao; Li, Peng; Li, Shiwei; Zhao, Fu; Liu, Pinan

    2018-06-01

    Auditory brainstem implants (ABIs) may be the only opportunity for patients with NF2 to regain some sense of hearing sensation. However, only a very small number of individuals achieved open-set speech understanding and high sentence scores. Suboptimal placement of the ABI electrode array over the cochlear nucleus may be one of main factors for poor auditory performance. In the current study, we present a method of awake craniotomy to assist with ABI placement. Awake surgery and hearing test via the retrosigmoid approach were performed for vestibular schwannoma resections and auditory brainstem implantations in four patients with NF2. Auditory outcomes and complications were assessed postoperatively. Three of 4 patients who underwent awake craniotomy during ABI surgery received reproducible auditory sensations intraoperatively. Satisfactory numbers of effective electrodes, threshold levels and distinct pitches were achieved in the wake-up hearing test. In addition, relatively few electrodes produced non-auditory percepts. There was no serious complication attributable to the ABI or awake craniotomy. It is safe and well tolerated for neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2) patients using awake craniotomy during auditory brainstem implantation. This method can potentially improve the localization accuracy of the cochlear nucleus during surgery.

  17. Outcome of elderly patients undergoing awake-craniotomy for tumor resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossman, Rachel; Nossek, Erez; Sitt, Razi; Hayat, Daniel; Shahar, Tal; Barzilai, Ori; Gonen, Tal; Korn, Akiva; Sela, Gal; Ram, Zvi

    2013-05-01

    Awake-craniotomy allows maximal tumor resection, which has been associated with extended survival. The feasibility and safety of awake-craniotomy and the effect of extent of resection on survival in the elderly population has not been established. The aim of this study was to compare surgical outcome of elderly patients undergoing awake-craniotomy to that of younger patients. Outcomes of consecutive patients younger and older than 65 years who underwent awake-craniotomy at a single institution between 2003 and 2010 were retrospectively reviewed. The groups were compared for clinical variables and surgical outcome parameters, as well as overall survival. A total of 334 young (45.4 ± 13.2 years, mean ± SD) and 90 elderly (71.7 ± 5.1 years) patients were studied. Distribution of gender, mannitol treatment, hemodynamic stability, and extent of tumor resection were similar. Significantly more younger patients had a better preoperative Karnofsky Performance Scale score (>70) than elderly patients (P = 0.0012). Older patients harbored significantly more high-grade gliomas (HGG) and brain metastases, and fewer low-grade gliomas (P Awake-craniotomy is a well-tolerated and safe procedure, even in elderly patients. Gross total tumor resection in elderly patients with HGG was associated with prolonged survival. The data suggest that favorable prognostic factors for patients with malignant brain tumors are also valid in elderly patients.

  18. Finger pressure adjustments to various object configurations during precision grip in humans and monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viaro, Riccardo; Tia, Banty; Coudé, Gino; Canto, Rosario; Oliynyk, Andriy; Salmas, Paola; Masia, Lorenzo; Sandini, Giulio; Fadiga, Luciano

    2017-06-01

    In this study, we recorded the pressure exerted onto an object by the index finger and the thumb of the preferred hand of 18 human subjects and either hand of two macaque monkeys during a precision grasping task. The to-be-grasped object was a custom-made device composed by two plates which could be variably oriented by a motorized system while keeping constant the size and thus grip dimension. The to-be-grasped plates were covered by an array of capacitive sensors to measure specific features of finger adaptation, namely pressure intensity and centroid location and displacement. Kinematic measurements demonstrated that for human subjects and for monkeys, different plate configurations did not affect wrist velocity and grip aperture during the reaching phase. Consistently, at the instant of fingers-plates contact, pressure centroids were clustered around the same point for all handle configurations. However, small pressure centroid displacements were specifically adopted for each configuration, indicating that both humans and monkeys can display finger adaptation during precision grip. Moreover, humans applied stronger thumb pressure intensity, performed less centroid displacement and required reduced adjustment time, as compared to monkeys. These pressure patterns remain similar when different load forces were required to pull the handle, as ascertained by additional measurements in humans. The present findings indicate that, although humans and monkeys share common features in motor control of grasping, they differ in the adjustment of fingertip pressure, probably because of skill and/or morphology divergences. Such a precision grip device may form the groundwork for future studies on prehension mechanisms. © 2017 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Composability-Centered Convolutional Neural Network Pruning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, Xipeng [North Carolina State University; Guan, Hui [North Carolina State University; Lim, Seung-Hwan [ORNL; Patton, Robert M. [ORNL

    2018-02-01

    This work studies the composability of the building blocks ofstructural CNN models (e.g., GoogleLeNet and Residual Networks) in thecontext of network pruning. We empirically validate that a networkcomposed of pre-trained building blocks (e.g. residual blocks andInception modules) not only gives a better initial setting fortraining, but also allows the training process to converge at asignificantly higher accuracy in much less time. Based on thatinsight, we propose a {\\em composability-centered} design for CNNnetwork pruning. Experiments show that this new scheme shortens theconfiguration process in CNN network pruning by up to 186.8X forResNet-50 and up to 30.2X for Inception-V3, and meanwhile, the modelsit finds that meet the accuracy requirement are significantly morecompact than those found by default schemes.

  20. Systems and Methods for Composable Analytics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-29

    simplistic module that performs a mathematical operation on two numbers. The most important method is the Execute() method. This will get called when it is...addition, an input control is also specified in the example below. In this example, the mathematical operator can only be chosen from a preconfigured...approaches. Some of the industries that could benefit from Composable Analytics include pharmaceuticals, health care, insurance, actuaries , and

  1. Gene Composer in a structural genomics environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lorimer, Don; Raymond, Amy; Mixon, Mark; Burgin, Alex; Staker, Bart; Stewart, Lance

    2011-01-01

    For structural biology applications, protein-construct engineering is guided by comparative sequence analysis and structural information, which allow the researcher to better define domain boundaries for terminal deletions and nonconserved regions for surface mutants. A database software application called Gene Composer has been developed to facilitate construct design. The structural genomics effort at the Seattle Structural Genomics Center for Infectious Disease (SSGCID) requires the manipulation of large numbers of amino-acid sequences and the underlying DNA sequences which are to be cloned into expression vectors. To improve efficiency in high-throughput protein structure determination, a database software package, Gene Composer, has been developed which facilitates the information-rich design of protein constructs and their underlying gene sequences. With its modular workflow design and numerous graphical user interfaces, Gene Composer enables researchers to perform all common bioinformatics steps used in modern structure-guided protein engineering and synthetic gene engineering. An example of the structure determination of H1N1 RNA-dependent RNA polymerase PB2 subunit is given

  2. Somatosensory deficits in monkeys treated with misonidazole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maurissen, J.P.J.; Conroy, P.J.; Passalacqua, W.; Von Burg, R.; Weiss, B.; Sutherland, R.M.

    1981-01-01

    Misonidazole, a hypoxic cell radiosensitizer, can produce peripheral sensory disorders in humans. It has been studied in monkeys with a computer-controlled system for evaluating vibration sensitivity. Monkeys were trained to report when vibration was stimulating the finger tip. Sinusoidal vibrations of several frequencies were presented. Two monkeys were dosed with misonidazole and their vibration sensitivity tested. They received a dose of 3 g/m 2 (about 180 mg/kg) twice weekly over a period of 6 to 10 weeks. An amplitude-frequency detection function was determined for each monkey before and after drug treatment. An analysis of covariance comparing polynomial regressions was performed. A significant difference (p < 0.001) was found between control and experimental curves in both monkeys. Pharmacokinetic data indicated a half-life of the drug in blood of about 4 to 5 hr. The overall half-life for elimination did not increase throughout prolonged treatment with msonidazole. Neither motor nor sensory nerve conduction velocity was reduced after treatment

  3. AWAKE, The Advanced Proton Driven Plasma Wakefield Acceleration Experiment at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Gschwendtner, E.; Amorim, L.; Apsimon, R.; Assmann, R.; Bachmann, A.M.; Batsch, F.; Bauche, J.; Berglyd Olsen, V.K.; Bernardini, M.; Bingham, R.; Biskup, B.; Bohl, T.; Bracco, C.; Burrows, P.N.; Burt, G.; Buttenschon, B.; Butterworth, A.; Caldwell, A.; Cascella, M.; Chevallay, E.; Cipiccia, S.; Damerau, H.; Deacon, L.; Dirksen, P.; Doebert, S.; Dorda, U.; Farmer, J.; Fedosseev, V.; Feldbaumer, E.; Fiorito, R.; Fonseca, R.; Friebel, F.; Gorn, A.A.; Grulke, O.; Hansen, J.; Hessler, C.; Hofle, W.; Holloway, J.; Huther, M.; Jaroszynski, D.; Jensen, L.; Jolly, S.; Joulaei, A.; Kasim, M.; Keeble, F.; Li, Y.; Liu, S.; Lopes, N.; Lotov, K.V.; Mandry, S.; Martorelli, R.; Martyanov, M.; Mazzoni, S.; Mete, O.; Minakov, V.A.; Mitchell, J.; Moody, J.; Muggli, P.; Najmudin, Z.; Norreys, P.; Oz, E.; Pardons, A.; Pepitone, K.; Petrenko, A.; Plyushchev, G.; Pukhov, A.; Rieger, K.; Ruhl, H.; Salveter, F.; Savard, N.; Schmidt, J.; Seryi, A.; Shaposhnikova, E.; Sheng, Z.M.; Sherwood, P.; Silva, L.; Soby, L.; Sosedkin, A.P.; Spitsyn, R.I.; Trines, R.; Tuev, P.V.; Turner, M.; Verzilov, V.; Vieira, J.; Vincke, H.; Wei, Y.; Welsch, C.P.; Wing, M.; Xia, G.; Zhang, H.

    2016-01-01

    The Advanced Proton Driven Plasma Wakefield Acceleration Experiment (AWAKE) aims at studying plasma wakefield generation and electron acceleration driven by proton bunches. It is a proof-of-principle R&D experiment at CERN and the world's first proton driven plasma wakefield acceleration experiment. The AWAKE experiment will be installed in the former CNGS facility and uses the 400 GeV/c proton beam bunches from the SPS. The first experiments will focus on the self-modulation instability of the long (rms ~12 cm) proton bunch in the plasma. These experiments are planned for the end of 2016. Later, in 2017/2018, low energy (~15 MeV) electrons will be externally injected to sample the wakefields and be accelerated beyond 1 GeV. The main goals of the experiment will be summarized. A summary of the AWAKE design and construction status will be presented.

  4. Asleep-awake-asleep craniotomy: a comparison with general anesthesia for resection of supratentorial tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajan, Shobana; Cata, Juan P; Nada, Eman; Weil, Robert; Pal, Rakhi; Avitsian, Rafi

    2013-08-01

    The anesthetic plan for patients undergoing awake craniotomy, when compared to craniotomy under general anesthesia, is different, in that it requires changes in states of consciousness during the procedure. This retrospective review compares patients undergoing an asleep-awake-asleep technique for craniotomy (group AW: n = 101) to patients undergoing craniotomy under general anesthesia (group AS: n = 77). Episodes of desaturation (AW = 31% versus AS = 1%, p awake-asleep craniotomies with propofol-dexmedetomidine infusion had less hemodynamic response to pinning and emergence, and less overall narcotic use compared to general anesthesia. Despite a higher incidence of temporary episodes of desaturation and hypoventilation, no adverse clinical consequences were seen. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. [Successful airway management using i-gel in 7 patients undergoing awake craniotomy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsunami, Katsuaki; Sanuki, Michiyoshi; Yasuuji, Masakazu; Nakanuno, Ryuichi; Kato, Takahiro; Kawamoto, Masashi

    2014-07-01

    In order to secure airway during awake craniotomy, we used i-gel to perform positive-pressure ventilation in 7 patients for their anesthetic management. During removal of a tumor around the motor speech center, anesthetic management including asleep-awake-asleep technique was applied for speech testing. The technique, insertion and re-insertion of i-gel, was needed and it was easy in all the patients. During positive-pressure ventilation, peak pressure, tidal volume both for inspiration and expiration, and endtidal-CO2 were not markedly altered. Leakage around i-gel, and its differences between inspiration and expiration were negligible, while the tidal volume was adequate. We conclude that i-gel is useful for anesthetic management for awake craniotomy procedure for both securing airway and ventilation.

  6. The First Awake Clipping of a Brain Aneurysm in Malaysia and in ASEAN: Achieving International Standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idris, Zamzuri; Kandasamy, Regunath; Neoh, Yee Yik; Abdullah, Jafri Malin; Wan Hassan, Wan Mohd Nazaruddin; Mat Hassan, Mohd Erham

    2018-02-01

    World-renowned neurosurgeon, Professor Saleem Abdulrauf, has been featured in several medical journals for his successful "Awake Brain Aneurysm Surgery". Regarded as a "world first", this surgery, involves clipping un-ruptured brain aneurysms while patients are awake. Only one or two neurosurgery centres worldwide are capable of this. Performing the surgery while the patient is awake lowers risks of brain ischemia with neurological deficits and ventilator associated morbidities. The technique has been viewed as the start of a new era in brain surgery. Physicians from the Universiti Sains Malaysia (USM) School of Medical Sciences, at the Health Campus in Kelantan, headed by Professor Dr Zamzuri Idris (neurosurgeon) and Dr Wan Mohd Nazaruddin Wan Hassan (neuroanaesthetist), recently performed a similar procedure, the first such surgery in Malaysia and Southeast Asia. The USM team can therefore be considered to be among the first few to have done this brain surgery and achieved successful patient outcomes.

  7. [Non-verbal communication of patients submitted to heart surgery: from awaking after anesthesia to extubation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werlang, Sueli da Cruz; Azzolin, Karina; Moraes, Maria Antonieta; de Souza, Emiliane Nogueira

    2008-12-01

    Preoperative orientation is an essential tool for patient's communication after surgery. This study had the objective of evaluating non-verbal communication of patients submitted to cardiac surgery from the time of awaking from anesthesia until extubation, after having received preoperative orientation by nurses. A quantitative cross-sectional study was developed in a reference hospital of the state of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil, from March to July 2006. Data were collected in the pre and post operative periods. A questionnaire to evaluate non-verbal communication on awaking from sedation was applied to a sample of 100 patients. Statistical analysis included Student, Wilcoxon, and Mann Whittney tests. Most of the patients responded satisfactorily to non-verbal communication strategies as instructed on the preoperative orientation. Thus, non-verbal communication based on preoperative orientation was helpful during the awaking period.

  8. Association of temporomandibular disorder pain with awake and sleep bruxism in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sierwald, Ira; John, Mike T; Schierz, Oliver; Hirsch, Christian; Sagheri, Darius; Jost-Brinkmann, Paul-Georg; Reissmann, Daniel R

    2015-07-01

    Parafunctional habits such as clenching or grinding (bruxism) during daytime and at night are considered to have a great impact on the etiopathogenesis of temporomandibular disorders (TMD). However, the size of the effect and how daytime activities interact with nocturnal activities is not yet clear. The aim of this study was to assess the association of TMD pain with both awake and sleep bruxism in adults. In this case-control study, data of a consecutive sample of 733 TMD patients (cases; mean age ± SD: 41.4 ± 16.3 years; 82% women) with at least one pain-related TMD diagnosis according to the German version of the Research Diagnostic Criteria for TMD (RDC/TMD) and of a community-based probability sample of 890 subjects (controls; mean age ± SD: 40.4 ± 11.8 years; 57% female) without TMD were evaluated. Clenching or grinding while awake and/or asleep was assessed with self-reports. Association of TMD pain with awake and sleep bruxism was analyzed using multiple logistic regression analyses and controlled for potential confounders. Odds ratios (OR) with corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated. While 11.2% of the controls reported clenching or grinding while awake, this proportion was significantly higher in TMD patients (33.9%; p bruxism (OR 1.8; CI 1.4-2.4). However, risk for TMD pain substantially increased in cases of simultaneous presence of awake and sleep bruxism (OR 7.7; CI 5.4-11.1). When occurring separately, awake and sleep bruxism are significant risk factors for TMD pain. In case of simultaneous presence, the risk for TMD pain is even higher.

  9. Efficacy and safety of dexmedetomidine infusion for patients undergoing awake craniotomy: An observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahajan, Charu; Rath, Girija Prasad; Singh, Gyaninder Pal; Mishra, Nitasha; Sokhal, Suman; Bithal, Parmod Kumar

    2018-01-01

    The goal of awake craniotomy is to maintain adequate sedation, analgesia, respiratory, and hemodynamic stability and also to provide a cooperative patient for neurologic testing. An observational study carried out to evaluate the efficacy of dexmedetomidine sedation for awake craniotomy. Adult patients with age >18 year who underwent awake craniotomy for intracranial tumor surgery were enrolled. Those who were uncooperative and had difficult airway were excluded from the study. In the operating room, the patients received a bolus dose of dexmedetomidine 1 μg/kg followed by an infusion of 0.2-0.7 μg/kg/h (bispectral index target 60-80). Once the patients were sedated, scalp block was given with bupivacaine 0.25%. The data on hemodynamics at various stages of the procedure, intraoperative complications, total amount of fentanyl used, intravenous fluids required, blood loss and transfusion, duration of surgery, Intensive Care Unit (ICU), and hospital stay were collected. The patients were assessed for Glasgow outcome scale (GOS) score and patient satisfaction score (PSS). A total of 27 patients underwent awake craniotomy during a period of 2 years. Most common intraoperative complication was seizures; observed in five patients (18.5%). None of these patients experienced any episode of desaturation. Two patients had tight brain for which propofol boluses were administered. The average fentanyl consumption was 161.5 ± 85.0 μg. The duration of surgery, ICU, and hospital stays were 231.5 ± 90.5 min, 14.5 ± 3.5 h, and 4.7 ± 1.5 days, respectively. The overall PSS was 8 and GOS was good in all the patients. The use of dexmedetomidine infusion with regional scalp block in patients undergoing awake craniotomy is safe and efficacious. The absence of major complications and higher PSS makes it close to an ideal agent for craniotomy in awake state.

  10. Monkey Bites among US Military Members, Afghanistan, 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Katheryn A.

    2012-01-01

    Bites from Macaca mulatta monkeys, native to Afghanistan, can cause serious infections. To determine risk for US military members in Afghanistan, we reviewed records for September–December 2011. Among 126 animal bites and exposures, 10 were monkey bites. Command emphasis is vital for preventing monkey bites; provider training and bite reporting promote postexposure treatment. PMID:23017939

  11. Effect of sound intensity on tonotopic fMRI maps in the unanesthetized monkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanji, Kazuyo; Leopold, David A; Ye, Frank Q; Zhu, Charles; Malloy, Megan; Saunders, Richard C; Mishkin, Mortimer

    2010-01-01

    The monkey's auditory cortex includes a core region on the supratemporal plane (STP) made up of the tonotopically organized areas A1, R, and RT, together with a surrounding belt and a lateral parabelt region. The functional studies that yielded the tonotopic maps and corroborated the anatomical division into core, belt, and parabelt typically used low-amplitude pure tones that were often restricted to threshold-level intensities. Here we used functional magnetic resonance imaging in awake rhesus monkeys to determine whether, and if so how, the tonotopic maps and the pattern of activation in core, belt, and parabelt are affected by systematic changes in sound intensity. Blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) responses to groups of low- and high-frequency pure tones 3-4 octaves apart were measured at multiple sound intensity levels. The results revealed tonotopic maps in the auditory core that reversed at the putative areal boundaries between A1 and R and between R and RT. Although these reversals of the tonotopic representations were present at all intensity levels, the lateral spread of activation depended on sound amplitude, with increasing recruitment of the adjacent belt areas as the intensities increased. Tonotopic organization along the STP was also evident in frequency-specific deactivation (i.e. "negative BOLD"), an effect that was intensity-specific as well. Regions of positive and negative BOLD were spatially interleaved, possibly reflecting lateral inhibition of high-frequency areas during activation of adjacent low-frequency areas, and vice versa. These results, which demonstrate the strong influence of tonal amplitude on activation levels, identify sound intensity as an important adjunct parameter for mapping the functional architecture of auditory cortex.

  12. Mobility and verbal communication patients undergoing awake craniotomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioannis Sapountzis

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The surgical treatment of gliomas in traffic areas, speech is aimed at the maximum ablation, with minimal postoperative neurological deficit. The election procedure is craniectomy with the patient conscious (awake craniotomy. The conscious craniotomy with intraoperative mapping of the cerebral cortex, superior to conventional craniotomy microsurgery in resection rates during hospitalization and recovery time of the operated patients with lesions in speech and movement area. Purpose: The aim of the research was to study cases with brain gliomas in rolandeio area and literary centers, the investigation and study of preoperative neurological status and imaging findings of patients and end their correlation with the postoperative course and outcome of patients. Methods: This is a study population of 43 patients of Neurosurgery Clinic of General Hospital «G. Gennimatas» with gliomas in the movement and speech area treated surgically within four years. Statistical analysis was done using the SPSS15. Preoperative and postoperative classification based on the examination of muscle strength and speech became into four groups: I – without focal motor, II – mild motor, III – moderate kinetic, IV – heavy motor deficit and finally two groups regarding disorders word: a- undisturbed and B with speech disorders . Macroscopically complete removal of over 95%, defined as the absence hearth space-occupying lesion in the postoperative CT scan . Results: The age of patients ranged from 26-69 years with a mean of 43.7 years. Among patients who underwent craniectomy, complete removal was achieved in 36 patients (83.75% and partly in 7 patients (16.3%. Postoperatively 6 patients (18.6% showed improvement of motor deficit, 23 patients (53.49% experienced unchanging muscle strength, 12 patients (27.91% showed a kinetic deterioration in 9 patients (20.93% first observed – emfanizomenes speech disorders, referred to as complications. Conclusions

  13. Inflammatory Profile of Awake Function-Controlled Craniotomy and Craniotomy under General Anesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus Klimek

    2009-01-01

    Results. Plasma IL-6 level significantly increased with time similarly in both groups. No significant plasma IL-8 and IL-10 change was observed in both experimental groups. The VAS pain score was significantly lower in the awake group compared to the anesthesia group at 12 hours postoperative. Postoperative anxiety and stress declined similarly in both groups. Conclusion. This study suggests that awake function-controlled craniotomy does not cause a significantly different inflammatory response than craniotomy performed under general anesthesia. It is also likely that function-controlled craniotomy does not cause a greater emotional challenge than tumor resection under general anesthesia.

  14. Basic math in monkeys and college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantlon, Jessica F; Brannon, Elizabeth M

    2007-12-01

    Adult humans possess a sophisticated repertoire of mathematical faculties. Many of these capacities are rooted in symbolic language and are therefore unlikely to be shared with nonhuman animals. However, a subset of these skills is shared with other animals, and this set is considered a cognitive vestige of our common evolutionary history. Current evidence indicates that humans and nonhuman animals share a core set of abilities for representing and comparing approximate numerosities nonverbally; however, it remains unclear whether nonhuman animals can perform approximate mental arithmetic. Here we show that monkeys can mentally add the numerical values of two sets of objects and choose a visual array that roughly corresponds to the arithmetic sum of these two sets. Furthermore, monkeys' performance during these calculations adheres to the same pattern as humans tested on the same nonverbal addition task. Our data demonstrate that nonverbal arithmetic is not unique to humans but is instead part of an evolutionarily primitive system for mathematical thinking shared by monkeys.

  15. Radiation-induced emesis in monkeys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mattsson, J.L.; Yochmowitz, M.G.

    1980-01-01

    To determine the emesis ED 50 for 60 Co radiation, 15 male rhesus monkeys were exposed to whole-body radiation doses ranging from 350 to 550 rad midline tissue dose. An up-and-down sequence of exposures was used. Step size between doses was 50 rad, and dose rate was 20 rad/min. There had been no access to food for 1 to 2 h. The ED 50 +- SE was found to be 446 +- 27 rad. To determine the effect of motion on emesis ED 50 , six more monkeys were exposed to 60 Co radiation as above, except that the chair in which they were seated was oscillated forward and backward 5 to 15 0 (pitch axis) at a variable rate not exceeding 0.3 Hz. Radioemesis ED 50 +- SE with motion was 258 +- 19 rad, a value significantly lower (P < 0.01) than for stationary monkeys

  16. William Byrd: Political and Recusant Composer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariel Foshay Bacon

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Amidst the pendulum of political and religious upheaval that pervaded England throughout the sixteenth and seventeenth century, William Byrd stands as one of the best loved and lauded composers. Byrd succeeded in the secular and sacred realms, contributing great works to the Anglican Church, popularizing the English madrigal and producing prolific amounts of sacred music. However, in a time where one’s religious beliefs were often linked with political loyalty, Byrd defied his monarch’s established and enforced Protestant religion, composing politically charged music for recusant use in clandestine Catholic Church services. His themes were aligned with the Jesuit mission and his texts were often drawn from the lips of martyred Catholics at the gallows; their last words forever immortalized by Byrd for the furthering of the Jesuit cause and the Counter-Reformation. The examination of sources by prominent Byrd scholars, an analyses of Byrd’s ‘political’ compositions and a study of the social and historical background are used to place Byrd within the appropriate context, prove his recusant and political leanings, and analyze his precarious relationship with the English monarch, Elizabeth I. It is shown that Byrd could not have proceeded with his recusant practices, personally or musically, had it not been for his status as a composer, as well as Byrd’s shrewdness in procuring diplomatic relationships with high persons at court and with Queen Elizabeth I through the Chapel Royal. Finally, Byrd’s success at writing for the Anglican Church service and popular secular music showcased his ability to take a moderate stance in situations that benefitted his status with the crown

  17. Q&A: The AI composer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spinney, Laura

    2017-09-01

    Computer scientist Luc Steels uses artificial intelligence to explore the origins and evolution of language. He is best known for his 1999-2001 Talking Heads Experiment, in which robots had to construct a language from scratch to communicate with each other. Now Steels, who works at the Free University of Brussels (VUB), has composed an opera based on the legend of Faust, with a twenty-first-century twist. He talks about Mozart as a nascent computer programmer, how music maps onto language, and the blurred boundaries of a digitized world.

  18. Clasp Together: Composing for Mind and Machine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Harry Whalley

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper will explore questions of agency, control and interaction and the embodied nature of musical performance in relation to the use of human-computer interaction (HCI, through the experimental work Clasp Together (beta 2 for small ensemble and live electronics by J. Harry Whalley. This practice-led research is situated at the intersection of music neurotechnology for sound synthesis and brain-computer interfaces (BCI, and explores the use of neural patterns from Electroencephalography (EEG as a control instrument. The composition departed from the traditional composer/performer paradigm by including both non-instrumental physical gestures and cognitive or emotive instructions integrated into the score.

  19. "Imagine your neighbor mows the lawn": a pilot study of psychological sequelae due to awake craniotomy: clinical article.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milian, Monika; Luerding, Ralf; Ploppa, Annette; Decker, Karlheinz; Psaras, Tsambika; Tatagiba, Marcos; Gharabaghi, Alireza; Feigl, Guenther C

    2013-06-01

    Although it has been reported that awake neurosurgical procedures are well tolerated, the long-term occurrence of general psychological sequelae has not yet been investigated. This study assessed the frequency and effects of psychological symptoms after an awake craniotomy on health-related quality of life (HRQOL). Sixteen patients undergoing an awake surgery were surveyed with a self-developed questionnaire, the Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Inventory For Awake Surgery Patients, which adopts the core components of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (Fourth Edition) posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) criteria. The mean time between surgery and data collection was 97.3 ± 93.2 weeks. Health-related quality of life was assessed with the 36-Item Short Form Health Survey. Forty-four percent of the patients stated that they had experienced either repetitive distressing recollections or dreams related to the awake surgery, 18.8% stated persistent avoidance of stimuli associated with the awake surgery, and symptoms of increased arousal occurred in 62.5%. Two patients presented with postoperative psychological sequelae resembling PTSD symptoms. Younger age at surgery and female sex were risk factors for symptoms of increased arousal. The experience of intense anxiety during awake surgery appears to favor the development of postsurgical PTSD symptoms, while recurrent distressing recollections particularly affect HRQOL negatively. In many cases awake craniotomy is necessary to preserve language and motor function. However, in some cases awake craniotomy can lead to postoperative psychological sequelae resembling PTSD symptoms. Therefore, possible long-term effects of an awake surgery should be considered and discussed with the patient when planning this type of surgery.

  20. Social ultrasonic vocalization in awake head-restrained mouse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Weiner

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Numerous animal species emit vocalizations in response to various social stimuli. The neural basis of vocal communication has been investigated in monkeys, songbirds, rats, bats and invertebrates resulting in deep insights into motor control, neural coding and learning. Mice, which recently became very popular as a model system for mammalian neuroscience, also utilize ultrasonic vocalizations (USVs during mating behavior. However, our knowledge is lacking of both the behavior and its underlying neural mechanism. We developed a novel method for head-restrained male mice (HRMM to interact with non-restrained female mice (NRFM and show that mice can emit USVs in this context. We first recorded USVs in free arena with non-restrained male mice (NRMM and NRFM. Of the NRMM, which vocalized in the free arena, the majority could be habituated to also vocalize while head-restrained but only when a female mouse was present in proximity. The USVs emitted by HRMM are similar to the USVs of NRMM in the presence of a female mouse in their spectral structure, inter syllable interval distribution and USV sequence length, and therefore are interpreted as social USVs. By analyzing vocalizations of NRMM, we established criteria to predict which individuals are likely to vocalize while head fixed based on the USV rate and average syllable duration. To characterize the USVs emitted by HRMM, we analyzed the syllable composition of HRMM and NRMM and found that USVs emitted by HRMM have higher proportions of USVs with complex spectral representation, supporting previous studies showing that mice social USVs are context dependent. Our results suggest a way to study the neural mechanisms of production and control of social vocalization in mice using advanced methods requiring head fixation.

  1. Social Ultrasonic Vocalization in Awake Head-Restrained Mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiner, Benjamin; Hertz, Stav; Perets, Nisim; London, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Numerous animal species emit vocalizations in response to various social stimuli. The neural basis of vocal communication has been investigated in monkeys, songbirds, rats, bats, and invertebrates resulting in deep insights into motor control, neural coding, and learning. Mice, which recently became very popular as a model system for mammalian neuroscience, also utilize ultrasonic vocalizations (USVs) during mating behavior. However, our knowledge is lacking of both the behavior and its underlying neural mechanism. We developed a novel method for head-restrained male mice (HRMM) to interact with non-restrained female mice (NRFM) and show that mice can emit USVs in this context. We first recorded USVs in a free arena with non-restrained male mice (NRMM) and NRFM. Of the NRMM, which vocalized in the free arena, the majority could be habituated to also vocalize while head-restrained but only when a female mouse was present in proximity. The USVs emitted by HRMM are similar to the USVs of NRMM in the presence of a female mouse in their spectral structure, inter-syllable interval distribution, and USV sequence length, and therefore are interpreted as social USVs. By analyzing the vocalizations of NRMM, we established criteria to predict which individuals are likely to vocalize while head fixed based on the USV rate and average syllable duration. To characterize the USVs emitted by HRMM, we analyzed the syllable composition of HRMM and NRMM and found that USVs emitted by HRMM have a higher proportion of USVs with complex spectral representation, supporting previous studies showing that mice social USVs are context dependent. Our results suggest a way to study the neural mechanisms of production and control of social vocalization in mice using advanced methods requiring head fixation.

  2. [Mental disease in two classical music composers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rempelakos, L; Poulakou-Rebelakou, E; Ploumpidis, D

    2012-01-01

    A study οn two neglected classical music composers suffering a not syphilitic mental disease, is attempted here, syphilis of the central nervous system being frequent in that time. A brief overview on the psychiatric ailments of many great composers reveals suicide attempts and more or less severe depression following external events. The issue of a possible relationship between mental disease and (musical) creativity can be discussed, as mood swings and a certain tendency to melancholia are frequent features of a talented brain (a fact that can also be detected in their works). The first case presented here is Hans Rott from Austria, the beloved student of Anton Bruckner, who was considered to be at least equal to his famous classmate Gustav Mahler. The great expectations of his teacher and his friends suddenly came to an end, when he suffered a crisis of schizophrenia and was hospitalized in an insane asylum in Lower Austria. The tragic psychiatric adventure of the young musician lasted almost four years. He was diagnosed as a case of "hallucinatory insanity" and "persecution mania" by the medical staff, before dying of tuberculosis, aged only 26, and having completed only one symphony and several smaller works. His name came again on surface only a century after his death, when in 1989 his Symphony in E Major was discovered and premiered with great success, permitting to its creator a posthumous recognition, among Bruckner and Mahler. The second case of mental illness is that of the Armenian Komitas Vardapet. He was an orphan who grew up in theological schools and became a monk and later a priest, though he spent some years in Berlin in order to develop his musical skills. He is considered to be an authority of Armenian ecclesiastic music, introducing polyphony in the Armenian Church's music and collecting numerous traditional songs from all parts of Armenia. In 1915, during the Armenian genocide he was deported, tortured but finally saved, due to interventions

  3. The Sleep Elaboration-Awake Pruning (SEAP) theory of memory: long term memories grow in complexity during sleep and undergo selection while awake. Clinical, psychopharmacological and creative implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charlton, Bruce G; Andras, Peter

    2009-07-01

    Long term memory (LTM) systems need to be adaptive such that they enhance an organism's reproductive fitness and self-reproducing in order to maintain their complexity of communications over time in the face of entropic loss of information. Traditional 'representation-consolidation' accounts conceptualize memory adaptiveness as due to memories being 'representations' of the environment, and the longevity of memories as due to 'consolidation' processes. The assumption is that memory representations are formed while an animal is awake and interacting with the environment, and these memories are consolidated mainly while the animal is asleep. So the traditional view of memory is 'instructionist' and assumes that information is transferred from the environment into the brain. By contrast, we see memories as arising endogenously within the brain's LTM system mainly during sleep, to create complex but probably maladaptive memories which are then simplified ('pruned') and selected during the awake period. When awake the LTM system is brought into a more intense interaction with past and present experience. Ours is therefore a 'selectionist' account of memory, and could be termed the Sleep Elaboration-Awake Pruning (or SEAP) theory. The SEAP theory explains the longevity of memories in the face of entropy by the tendency for memories to grow in complexity during sleep; and explains the adaptiveness of memory by selection for consistency with perceptions and previous memories during the awake state. Sleep is therefore that behavioural state during which most of the internal processing of the system of LTM occurs; and the reason sleep remains poorly understood is that its primary activity is the expansion of long term memories. By re-conceptualizing the relationship between memory, sleep and the environment; SEAP provides a radically new framework for memory research, with implications for the measurement of memory and the design of empirical investigations in clinical

  4. Neural mechanisms of transient neocortical beta rhythms: Converging evidence from humans, computational modeling, monkeys, and mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, Maxwell A.; Lee, Shane; Law, Robert; Haegens, Saskia; Thorn, Catherine A.; Hämäläinen, Matti S.; Moore, Christopher I.; Jones, Stephanie R.

    2016-01-01

    Human neocortical 15–29-Hz beta oscillations are strong predictors of perceptual and motor performance. However, the mechanistic origin of beta in vivo is unknown, hindering understanding of its functional role. Combining human magnetoencephalography (MEG), computational modeling, and laminar recordings in animals, we present a new theory that accounts for the origin of spontaneous neocortical beta. In our MEG data, spontaneous beta activity from somatosensory and frontal cortex emerged as noncontinuous beta events typically lasting drive targeting proximal and distal dendrites of pyramidal neurons, where the defining feature of a beta event was a strong distal drive that lasted one beta period (∼50 ms). This beta mechanism rigorously accounted for the beta event profiles; several other mechanisms did not. The spatial location of synaptic drive in the model to supragranular and infragranular layers was critical to the emergence of beta events and led to the prediction that beta events should be associated with a specific laminar current profile. Laminar recordings in somatosensory neocortex from anesthetized mice and awake monkeys supported these predictions, suggesting this beta mechanism is conserved across species and recording modalities. These findings make several predictions about optimal states for perceptual and motor performance and guide causal interventions to modulate beta for optimal function. PMID:27469163

  5. Art Music by Caribbean Composers: Guadeloupe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gangelhoff, Christine

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Guadeloupe retains more than its colonial and cultural roots from France. It has been an Overseas Department of that country since 1946. Many of the art-musical styles of Guadeloupe are derived from the ballroom and couple-dance traditions of old, reinvented in a creole tradition: quadrilles, waltzes, biguines and mazurkas (Gerstin, 2007-2011. Two of the most influential and consumed popular music genres are gwoka and compas. The Festival Internationale Saint-Georges, held annually since 2010, was created to celebrate the music of Saint-Georges, to promote artists of colour and to perform classical music written by composers of African descent, though the main focus of the festival is classical music.

  6. Art Music by Caribbean Composers: Guadeloupe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Gangelhoff

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Guadeloupe retains more than its colonial and cultural roots from France. It has been an Overseas Department of that country since 1946. Many of the art-musical styles of Guadeloupe are derived from the ballroom and couple-dance traditions of old, reinvented in a creole tradition: quadrilles, waltzes, biguines and mazurkas (Gerstin, 2007-2011. Two of the most influential and consumed popular music genres are gwoka and compas. The Festival Internationale Saint-Georges, held annually since 2010, was created to celebrate the music of Saint-Georges, to promote artists of colour and to perform classical music written by composers of African descent, though the main focus of the festival is classical music.

  7. Nailed timber beams with I composed section

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Luís Nunes de Góes

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The employment of built-up timber beams, made of commercial dimensions pieces, is becoming increasingly important in timber structures in Brazil, mainly due to the ever-growing scarcity of timber elements in larger sizes. The built-up system has vast application, from beams for residential buildings to girders for small bridges. The objective of this work is the theoretical and experimental study of nailed timber beams with composed cross section I. The design procedure of EUROCODE 5/93 and NBR 7190/97 are shown and evaluated, as well as the theory about the subject matter. The experimental evaluation of the theoretical models was made by means of bending tests in prototypes of built-up timber beams. The obtained results shows that the EUROCODE 5/93 procedure is the most indicated for evaluating effective bending stiffness, normal and shear stresses as well as the load on fasteners.

  8. Composing Models of Geographic Physical Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofer, Barbara; Frank, Andrew U.

    Processes are central for geographic information science; yet geographic information systems (GIS) lack capabilities to represent process related information. A prerequisite to including processes in GIS software is a general method to describe geographic processes independently of application disciplines. This paper presents such a method, namely a process description language. The vocabulary of the process description language is derived formally from mathematical models. Physical processes in geography can be described in two equivalent languages: partial differential equations or partial difference equations, where the latter can be shown graphically and used as a method for application specialists to enter their process models. The vocabulary of the process description language comprises components for describing the general behavior of prototypical geographic physical processes. These process components can be composed by basic models of geographic physical processes, which is shown by means of an example.

  9. Analysis of prostate-specific antigen transcripts in chimpanzees, cynomolgus monkeys, baboons, and African green monkeys.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James N Mubiru

    Full Text Available The function of prostate-specific antigen (PSA is to liquefy the semen coagulum so that the released sperm can fuse with the ovum. Fifteen spliced variants of the PSA gene have been reported in humans, but little is known about alternative splicing in nonhuman primates. Positive selection has been reported in sex- and reproductive-related genes from sea urchins to Drosophila to humans; however, there are few studies of adaptive evolution of the PSA gene. Here, using polymerase chain reaction (PCR product cloning and sequencing, we study PSA transcript variant heterogeneity in the prostates of chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes, cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis, baboons (Papio hamadryas anubis, and African green monkeys (Chlorocebus aethiops. Six PSA variants were identified in the chimpanzee prostate, but only two variants were found in cynomolgus monkeys, baboons, and African green monkeys. In the chimpanzee the full-length transcript is expressed at the same magnitude as the transcripts that retain intron 3. We have found previously unidentified splice variants of the PSA gene, some of which might be linked to disease conditions. Selection on the PSA gene was studied in 11 primate species by computational methods using the sequences reported here for African green monkey, cynomolgus monkey, baboon, and chimpanzee and other sequences available in public databases. A codon-based analysis (dN/dS of the PSA gene identified potential adaptive evolution at five residue sites (Arg45, Lys70, Gln144, Pro189, and Thr203.

  10. Technical Note: On The Usage and Development of the AWAKE Web Server and Web Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Berger, Dillon Tanner

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this technical note is to give a brief explanation of the AWAKE Web Server, the current web applications it serves, and how to edit, maintain, and update the source code. The majority of this paper is dedicated to the development of the server and its web applications.

  11. Stay Awake Behind the Wheel (A Minute of Health with CDC)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2016-11-10

    Being a safe driver requires complete focus on the road and the cars around you. This podcast discusses the importance of staying awake while driving.  Created: 11/10/2016 by MMWR.   Date Released: 11/10/2016.

  12. Inflammatory Profile of Awake Function-Controlled Craniotomy and Craniotomy under General Anesthesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimek, Markus; Hol, Jaap W.; Wens, Stephan; Heijmans-Antonissen, Claudia; Niehof, Sjoerd; Vincent, Arnaud J.; Klein, Jan; Zijlstra, Freek J.

    2009-01-01

    Background. Surgical stress triggers an inflammatory response and releases mediators into human plasma such as interleukins (ILs). Awake craniotomy and craniotomy performed under general anesthesia may be associated with different levels of stress. Our aim was to investigate whether those procedures cause different inflammatory responses. Methods. Twenty patients undergoing craniotomy under general anesthesia and 20 patients undergoing awake function-controlled craniotomy were included in this prospective, observational, two-armed study. Circulating levels of IL-6, IL-8, and IL-10 were determined pre-, peri-, and postoperatively in both patient groups. VAS scores for pain, anxiety, and stress were taken at four moments pre- and postoperatively to evaluate physical pain and mental duress. Results. Plasma IL-6 level significantly increased with time similarly in both groups. No significant plasma IL-8 and IL-10 change was observed in both experimental groups. The VAS pain score was significantly lower in the awake group compared to the anesthesia group at 12 hours postoperative. Postoperative anxiety and stress declined similarly in both groups. Conclusion. This study suggests that awake function-controlled craniotomy does not cause a significantly different inflammatory response than craniotomy performed under general anesthesia. It is also likely that function-controlled craniotomy does not cause a greater emotional challenge than tumor resection under general anesthesia. PMID:19536349

  13. Early Experience with Combining Awake Craniotomy and Intraoperative Navigable Ultrasound for Resection of Eloquent Region Gliomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moiyadi, Aliasgar; Shetty, Prakash

    2017-03-01

    Introduction  Optimal resection of tumors in eloquent locations requires a combination of intraoperative imaging and functional monitoring during surgery. Combining awake surgery with intraoperative magnetic resonanceis logistically challenging. Navigable ultrasound (US) is a useful alternative in such cases. Methods  A total of 22 subjects with eloquent tumors were operated on (1 intended biopsy and 21 intended radical resections) using combined modality three-dimensional (3D) US and awake craniotomy with intraoperative clinical monitoring. We describe the technical details for these cases specifically addressing the feasibility of combining the two modalities. Results  US was used for resection control in 18 cases. There were technical limitations in three cases. Transient intraoperative worsening was encountered in eight, necessitating premature termination of the procedure. All patients tolerated the awake procedure well. Mean duration of the surgery was 3.2 hours. Radical resections were obtained in 14 of 18 where this was intended and in 12 of the 13 where there was no adverse intraoperative monitoring event prompting premature termination of the resection. Conclusions  Combining awake surgery with 3DUS is feasible and beneficial. It does not entail any additional surgical workflow modification or patient discomfort. This combined modality intraoperative monitoring can be beneficial for eloquent region tumors. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  14. Tumor location and IDH1 mutation may predict intraoperative seizures during awake craniotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonen, Tal; Grossman, Rachel; Sitt, Razi; Nossek, Erez; Yanaki, Raneen; Cagnano, Emanuela; Korn, Akiva; Hayat, Daniel; Ram, Zvi

    2014-11-01

    Intraoperative seizures during awake craniotomy may interfere with patients' ability to cooperate throughout the procedure, and it may affect their outcome. The authors have assessed the occurrence of intraoperative seizures during awake craniotomy in regard to tumor location and the isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) status of the tumor. Data were collected in 137 consecutive patients who underwent awake craniotomy for removal of a brain tumor. The authors performed a retrospective analysis of the incidence of seizures based on the tumor location and its IDH1 mutation status, and then compared the groups for clinical variables and surgical outcome parameters. Tumor location was strongly associated with the occurrence of intraoperative seizures. Eleven patients (73%) with tumor located in the supplementary motor area (SMA) experienced intraoperative seizures, compared with 17 (13.9%) with tumors in the other three non-SMA brain regions (p awake craniotomy compared with patients who have a tumor in non-SMA frontal areas and other brain regions. The IDH1 mutation was more common in SMA region tumors compared with other brain regions, and may be an additional risk factor for the occurrence of intraoperative seizures.

  15. Awake craniotomy in a patient with ejection fraction of 10%: considerations of cerebrovascular and cardiovascular physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Lingzhong; Weston, Stephen D; Chang, Edward F; Gelb, Adrian W

    2015-05-01

    A 37-year-old man with nonischemic 4-chamber dilated cardiomyopathy and low-output cardiac failure (estimated ejection fraction of 10%) underwent awake craniotomy for a low-grade oligodendroglioma resection under monitored anesthesia care. The cerebrovascular and cardiovascular physiologic challenges and our management of this patient are discussed. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. Surgery-Independent Language Function Decline in Patients Undergoing Awake Craniotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonen, Tal; Sela, Gal; Yanakee, Ranin; Ram, Zvi; Grossman, Rachel

    2017-03-01

    Despite selection process before awake-craniotomy, some patients experience an unexpected decline in language functions in the operating room (OR), compared with their baseline evaluation, which may impair their functional monitoring. To investigate this phenomenon we prospectively compared language function the day before surgery and on entrance to the OR. Data were collected prospectively from consecutive patients undergoing awake-craniotomy with intraoperative cortical mapping for resection of gliomas affecting language areas. Language functions of 79 patients were evaluated and compared 1-2 days before surgery and after entering the OR. Changes in functional linguistic performance were analyzed with respect to demographic, clinical, and pathologic characteristics. There was a significant decline in language function, beyond sedation effect, after entering the OR, (from median/interquartile range: 0.94/0.72-0.98 to median/interquartile range: 0.86/0.51-0.94; Z = -7.19, P awake-craniotomy may experience a substantial decline in language functioning after entering the OR. Tumor grade and the presence of preoperative language deficits were significant risk factors for this phenomenon, suggesting a possible relation between cognitive reserve, psychobehavioral coping abilities and histologic features of a tumor involving language areas. Capturing and identifying this unique population of patients who are prone to experience such language decline may improve our ability in the future to select patients eligible for awake-craniotomy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Inflammatory profile of awake function-controlled craniotomy and craniotomy under general anesthesia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Klimek (Markus); J.W. Hol (Jaap Willem); S.C.A. Wens (Stephan); C. Heijmans-Antonissen (Claudia); S.P. Niehof (Sjoerd); A.J. Vincent (Arnaud); J. Klein (Jan); F.J. Zijlstra (Freek)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractBackground. Surgical stress triggers an inflammatory response and releases mediators into human plasma such as interleukins (ILs). Awake craniotomy and craniotomy performed under general anesthesia may be associated with different levels of stress. Our aim was to investigate whether

  18. Awake craniotomy in a developmentally delayed blind man with cognitive deficits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burbridge, Mark; Raazi, Mateen

    2013-04-01

    To describe the complex perioperative considerations and anesthetic management of a cognitively delayed blind adult male who underwent awake craniotomy to remove a left anterior temporal lobe epileptic focus. A 28-yr-old left-handed blind cognitively delayed man was scheduled for awake craniotomy to resect a left anterior temporal lobe epileptic focus due to intractable epilepsy despite multiple medications. His medical history was also significant for retinopathy of prematurity that rendered him legally blind in both eyes and an intracerebral hemorrhage shortly after birth that resulted in a chronic brain injury and developmental delay. His cognitive capacity was comparable with that of an eight year old. Since patient cooperation was the primary concern during the awake electrocorticography phase of surgery, careful assessment of the patient's ability to tolerate the procedure was undertaken. There was extensive planning between surgeons and anesthesiologists, and a patient-specific pharmacological strategy was devised to facilitate surgery. The operation proceeded without complication, the patient has remained seizure-free since the procedure, and his quality of life has improved dramatically. This case shows that careful patient assessment, effective interdisciplinary communication, and a carefully tailored anesthetic strategy can facilitate an awake craniotomy in a potentially uncooperative adult patient with diminished mental capacity and sensory deficits.

  19. Feasibility and safety of inducing modest hypothermia in awake patients with acute stroke through surface cooling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kammersgaard, L P; Rasmussen, B H; Jørgensen, Henrik Stig

    2000-01-01

    Hypothermia reduces neuronal damage in animal stroke models. Whether hypothermia is neuroprotective in patients with acute stroke remains to be clarified. In this case-control study, we evaluated the feasibility and safety of inducing modest hypothermia by a surface cooling method in awake patients...

  20. Intraoperative Subcortical Electrical Mapping of the Optic Tract in Awake Surgery Using a Virtual Reality Headset.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazerand, Edouard; Le Renard, Marc; Hue, Sophie; Lemée, Jean-Michel; Klinger, Evelyne; Menei, Philippe

    2017-01-01

    Brain mapping during awake craniotomy is a well-known technique to preserve neurological functions, especially the language. It is still challenging to map the optic radiations due to the difficulty to test the visual field intraoperatively. To assess the visual field during awake craniotomy, we developed the Functions' Explorer based on a virtual reality headset (FEX-VRH). The impaired visual field of 10 patients was tested with automated perimetry (the gold standard examination) and the FEX-VRH. The proof-of-concept test was done during the surgery performed on a patient who was blind in his right eye and presenting with a left parietotemporal glioblastoma. The FEX-VRH was used intraoperatively, simultaneously with direct subcortical electrostimulation, allowing identification and preservation of the optic radiations. The FEX-VRH detected 9 of the 10 visual field defects found by automated perimetry. The patient who underwent an awake craniotomy with intraoperative mapping of the optic tract using the FEX-VRH had no permanent postoperative visual field defect. Intraoperative visual field assessment with the FEX-VRH during direct subcortical electrostimulation is a promising approach to mapping the optical radiations and preventing a permanent visual field defect during awake surgery for epilepsy or tumor. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Membrane Potential Dynamics of Spontaneous and Visually Evoked Gamma Activity in V1 of Awake Mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Perrenoud, Q.; Pennartz, C.M.A.; Gentet, L.J.

    2016-01-01

    Cortical gamma activity (30-80 Hz) is believed to play important functions in neural computation and arises from the interplay of parvalbumin-expressing interneurons (PV) and pyramidal cells (PYRs). However, the subthreshold dynamics underlying its emergence in the cortex of awake animals remain

  2. Beam studies and experimental facility for the AWAKE experiment at CERN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bracco, Chiara; Gschwendtner, Edda; Petrenko, Alexey; Timko, Helga; Argyropoulos, Theodoros; Bartosik, Hannes; Bohl, Thomas; Esteban Müller, Juan; Goddard, Brennan; Meddahi, Malika; Pardons, Ans; Shaposhnikova, Elena; Velotti, Francesco M.; Vincke, Helmut

    2014-01-01

    A Proton Driven Plasma Wakefield Acceleration Experiment has been proposed as an approach to eventually accelerate an electron beam to the TeV energy range in a single plasma section. To verify this novel technique, a proof of principle R and D experiment, AWAKE, is planned at CERN using 400 GeV proton bunches from the SPS. An electron beam will be injected into the plasma cell to probe the accelerating wakefield. The AWAKE experiment will be installed in the CNGS facility profiting from existing infrastructure where only minor modifications need to be foreseen. The design of the experimental area and the proton and electron beam lines are shown. The achievable SPS proton bunch properties and their reproducibility have been measured and are presented. - Highlights: • A proton driven plasma wakefield experiment using the first time protons as drive beam is proposed. • The integration of AWAKE experiment, the proton, laser and electron beam line in an existing CERN facility is demonstrated. • The necessary modifications in the experimental facility are presented. • Proton beam optics and a new electron beam line are adapted to match with the required beam parameters. • Short high-intensity bunches were studied in the SPS to guide the design parameters of the AWAKE project

  3. a-Band Oscillations in Intracellular Membrane Potentials of Dentate Gyrus Neurons in Awake Rodents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Ross W.; Strowbridge, Ben W.

    2014-01-01

    The hippocampus and dentate gyrus play critical roles in processing declarative memories and spatial information. Dentate granule cells, the first relay in the trisynaptic circuit through the hippocampus, exhibit low spontaneous firing rates even during locomotion. Using intracellular recordings from dentate neurons in awake mice operating a…

  4. Canine distemper outbreak in rhesus monkeys, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Wei; Zheng, Ying; Zhang, Shoufeng; Fan, Quanshui; Liu, Hua; Zhang, Fuqiang; Wang, Wei; Liao, Guoyang; Hu, Rongliang

    2011-08-01

    Since 2006, canine distemper outbreaks have occurred in rhesus monkeys at a breeding farm in Guangxi, People's Republic of China. Approximately 10,000 animals were infected (25%-60% disease incidence); 5%-30% of infected animals died. The epidemic was controlled by vaccination. Amino acid sequence analysis of the virus indicated a unique strain.

  5. Nutritional and health status of woolly monkeys

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ange-van Heugten, K.D.; Timmer, S.; Jansen, W.L.; Verstegen, M.W.A.

    2008-01-01

    Woolly monkeys (Lagothrix lagotricha and L. flavicauda) are threatened species in the wild and in captivity. Numerous zoological institutions have historically kept Lagothrix lagotricha spp., but only a few of them have succeeded in breeding populations. Therefore the majority of institutions that

  6. Canine Distemper Outbreak in Rhesus Monkeys, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Wei; Zheng, Ying; Zhang, Shoufeng; Fan, Quanshui; Liu, Hua; Zhang, Fuqiang; Wang, Wei; Liao, Guoyang

    2011-01-01

    Since 2006, canine distemper outbreaks have occurred in rhesus monkeys at a breeding farm in Guangxi, People’s Republic of China. Approximately 10,000 animals were infected (25%–60% disease incidence); 5%–30% of infected animals died. The epidemic was controlled by vaccination. Amino acid sequence analysis of the virus indicated a unique strain. PMID:21801646

  7. Computing Arm Movements with a Monkey Brainet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramakrishnan, Arjun; Ifft, Peter J; Pais-Vieira, Miguel; Byun, Yoon Woo; Zhuang, Katie Z; Lebedev, Mikhail A; Nicolelis, Miguel A L

    2015-07-09

    Traditionally, brain-machine interfaces (BMIs) extract motor commands from a single brain to control the movements of artificial devices. Here, we introduce a Brainet that utilizes very-large-scale brain activity (VLSBA) from two (B2) or three (B3) nonhuman primates to engage in a common motor behaviour. A B2 generated 2D movements of an avatar arm where each monkey contributed equally to X and Y coordinates; or one monkey fully controlled the X-coordinate and the other controlled the Y-coordinate. A B3 produced arm movements in 3D space, while each monkey generated movements in 2D subspaces (X-Y, Y-Z, or X-Z). With long-term training we observed increased coordination of behavior, increased correlations in neuronal activity between different brains, and modifications to neuronal representation of the motor plan. Overall, performance of the Brainet improved owing to collective monkey behaviour. These results suggest that primate brains can be integrated into a Brainet, which self-adapts to achieve a common motor goal.

  8. Integrase of Mason-Pfizer monkey virus

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Snášel, Jan; Krejčík, Zdeněk; Jenčová, Věra; Rosenberg, Ivan; Ruml, Tomáš; Alexandratos, J.; Gustchina, A.; Pichová, Iva

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 272, č. 1 (2005), s. 203-216 ISSN 1742-464X R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA4055304 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4055905 Keywords : integrase * Mason-Pfizer monkey virus * HIV-1 Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry

  9. Peripheral refraction in normal infant rhesus monkeys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Li-Fang; Ramamirtham, Ramkumar; Huang, Juan; Qiao-Grider, Ying; Smith, Earl L.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose To characterize peripheral refractions in infant monkeys. Methods Cross-sectional data for horizontal refractions were obtained from 58 normal rhesus monkeys at 3 weeks of age. Longitudinal data were obtained for both the vertical and horizontal meridians from 17 monkeys. Refractive errors were measured by retinoscopy along the pupillary axis and at eccentricities of 15, 30, and 45 degrees. Axial dimensions and corneal power were measured by ultrasonography and keratometry, respectively. Results In infant monkeys, the degree of radial astigmatism increased symmetrically with eccentricity in all meridians. There were, however, initial nasal-temporal and superior-inferior asymmetries in the spherical-equivalent refractive errors. Specifically, the refractions in the temporal and superior fields were similar to the central ametropia, but the refractions in the nasal and inferior fields were more myopic than the central ametropia and the relative nasal field myopia increased with the degree of central hyperopia. With age, the degree of radial astigmatism decreased in all meridians and the refractions became more symmetrical along both the horizontal and vertical meridians; small degrees of relative myopia were evident in all fields. Conclusions As in adult humans, refractive error varied as a function of eccentricity in infant monkeys and the pattern of peripheral refraction varied with the central refractive error. With age, emmetropization occurred for both central and peripheral refractive errors resulting in similar refractions across the central 45 degrees of the visual field, which may reflect the actions of vision-dependent, growth-control mechanisms operating over a wide area of the posterior globe. PMID:18487366

  10. Emergent Awake tracheostomy--The five-year experience at an urban tertiary care center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Christina H; Friedman, Remy; White, Priscilla E; Mady, Leila J; Kalyoussef, Evelyne

    2015-11-01

    There are few studies that discuss the issues surrounding emergent awake tracheostomy. We aim to review the indications, anesthesia used, complications, and outcomes of patients undergoing urgent awake tracheostomy. Chart review. Medical charts of patients who underwent an emergent awake tracheostomy at our institution-affiliated tertiary care center over a 5-year period from 2009 to 2014 were reviewed. Data were collected from inpatient, outpatient, and operative records. Sixty-eight patients underwent emergent awake tracheostomy. Over half presented with hoarseness (n=37, 54.4%) and/or stridor (n=37, 54.4%). Acute upper airway obstruction secondary to malignancy was the most common indication and accounted for 58 cases (85.3%). Thirty-nine (70.1%) of the 55 patients with squamous cell carcinoma presented with advanced disease (stage III or IV). Other indications included glottic or subglottic stenosis (4.4%), failure to intubate (2.9%), and other (7.4%). Local anesthesia was used alone in 35.3% of cases and in combination with conscious sedation in 64.7% of cases. Mild bleeding occurred postoperatively in five patients (7.4%). There were no other postoperative complications. Nineteen patients were lost to follow-up. The mean follow-up of 49 patients was 7.2 weeks, ranging from 2 to 261 weeks. Long-term complications occurred in three patients and included tracheitis 7.4% and suprastomal granuloma 2.9%. Eleven patients (22%) were decannulated at a mean of 11.8 months following tracheostomy. Emergent awake tracheostomy should be considered in patients with impeding airway obstruction and is a safe and effective method to secure an airway in these patients. 4. © 2015 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  11. Re-Composing the Digital Present

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy Barker

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the temporality that is produced in some recent and historical examples of media art. In exploring works by Janet Cardiff, Dennis Del Favero, and Omer Fast, I use the philosophy of Michel Serres and Gilles Deleuze to understand the convergence of temporalities that are composed in the digital present, as one moment in time overlays another moment. Developing Serres' concept of multi-temporality and Deleuze's philosophy of time and memory into a means to understand the non-linear time presented in these works, I argue that the different compositional strategies enacted by these artists provide the aesthetic grounding to experience “temporal thickness.” From here I investigate the interactive digital artworks Frames by Grahame Weinbren and Can You See Me Now? by the artist group Blast Theory. In this investigation, I understand interaction with technology, and the way that it shapes our sensory and processual experience, as a specifically temporal and temporalizing transaction, where human movements in the present are overlayed by technological processes.

  12. Organic and Non-Organic Language Disorders after Awake Brain Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elke De Witte

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Awake surgery with Direct Electrical Stimulation (DES is considered the ‘gold standard’ to resect brain tumours in the language dominant hemisphere (De Witte & Mariën, 2013. Although transient language impairments are common in the immediate postoperative phase, permanent postoperative language deficits seem to be rare (Duffau, 2007. Milian et al. (2014 stated that most patients tolerate the awake procedure well and would undergo a similar procedure again. However, postoperative psychological symptoms including recurrent distressing dreams and persistent avoidance of stimuli have been recorded following awake surgery (Goebel, Nabavi, Schubert, & Mehdorn, 2010; Milian et al., 2014. To the best of our knowledge, psychogenic language disturbances have never been described after awake surgery. In general, only a handful of non-organic, psychogenic language disorders have been reported in the literature (De Letter et al., 2012. We report three patients with left brain tumours (see table 1 who presented linguistic symptoms after awake surgery that were incompatible with the lesion location, suggesting a psychogenic origin. METHODS: Neurocognitive (language, memory, executive functions investigations were carried out before, during and after awake surgery (6 weeks, 6 months postsurgery on the basis of standardised tests. Pre- and postoperative (fMRI images, DTI results and intraoperative DES findings were analysed. A selection of tasks was used to map language intraoperatively (De Witte et al., 2013. In the postoperative phase spontaneous speech and behavioural phenomena to errors were video-recorded. RESULTS: Preoperative language tests did not reveal any speech or language problems. Intraoperatively, eloquent sites were mapped and preserved enabling good language skills at the end of the awake procedure. However, assessments in the first weeks postsurgery disclosed language and behavioural symptoms that support the hypothesis of a

  13. Head Rotation Detection in Marmoset Monkeys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simhadri, Sravanthi

    Head movement is known to have the benefit of improving the accuracy of sound localization for humans and animals. Marmoset is a small bodied New World monkey species and it has become an emerging model for studying the auditory functions. This thesis aims to detect the horizontal and vertical rotation of head movement in marmoset monkeys. Experiments were conducted in a sound-attenuated acoustic chamber. Head movement of marmoset monkey was studied under various auditory and visual stimulation conditions. With increasing complexity, these conditions are (1) idle, (2) sound-alone, (3) sound and visual signals, and (4) alert signal by opening and closing of the chamber door. All of these conditions were tested with either house light on or off. Infra-red camera with a frame rate of 90 Hz was used to capture of the head movement of monkeys. To assist the signal detection, two circular markers were attached to the top of monkey head. The data analysis used an image-based marker detection scheme. Images were processed using the Computation Vision Toolbox in Matlab. The markers and their positions were detected using blob detection techniques. Based on the frame-by-frame information of marker positions, the angular position, velocity and acceleration were extracted in horizontal and vertical planes. Adaptive Otsu Thresholding, Kalman filtering and bound setting for marker properties were used to overcome a number of challenges encountered during this analysis, such as finding image segmentation threshold, continuously tracking markers during large head movement, and false alarm detection. The results show that the blob detection method together with Kalman filtering yielded better performances than other image based techniques like optical flow and SURF features .The median of the maximal head turn in the horizontal plane was in the range of 20 to 70 degrees and the median of the maximal velocity in horizontal plane was in the range of a few hundreds of degrees per

  14. Comparison of propofol pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic models for awake craniotomy: A prospective observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soehle, Martin; Wolf, Christina F; Priston, Melanie J; Neuloh, Georg; Bien, Christian G; Hoeft, Andreas; Ellerkmann, Richard K

    2015-08-01

    Anaesthesia for awake craniotomy aims for an unconscious patient at the beginning and end of surgery but a rapidly awakening and responsive patient during the awake period. Therefore, an accurate pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) model for propofol is required to tailor depth of anaesthesia. To compare the predictive performances of the Marsh and the Schnider PK/PD models during awake craniotomy. A prospective observational study. Single university hospital from February 2009 to May 2010. Twelve patients undergoing elective awake craniotomy for resection of brain tumour or epileptogenic areas. Arterial blood samples were drawn at intervals and the propofol plasma concentration was determined. The prediction error, bias [median prediction error (MDPE)] and inaccuracy [median absolute prediction error (MDAPE)] of the Marsh and the Schnider models were calculated. The secondary endpoint was the prediction probability PK, by which changes in the propofol effect-site concentration (as derived from simultaneous PK/PD modelling) predicted changes in anaesthetic depth (measured by the bispectral index). The Marsh model was associated with a significantly (P = 0.05) higher inaccuracy (MDAPE 28.9 ± 12.0%) than the Schnider model (MDAPE 21.5 ± 7.7%) and tended to reach a higher bias (MDPE Marsh -11.7 ± 14.3%, MDPE Schnider -5.4 ± 20.7%, P = 0.09). MDAPE was outside of accepted limits in six (Marsh model) and two (Schnider model) of 12 patients. The prediction probability was comparable between the Marsh (PK 0.798 ± 0.056) and the Schnider model (PK 0.787 ± 0.055), but after adjusting the models to each individual patient, the Schnider model achieved significantly higher prediction probabilities (PK 0.807 ± 0.056, P = 0.05). When using the 'asleep-awake-asleep' anaesthetic technique during awake craniotomy, we advocate using the PK/PD model proposed by Schnider. Due to considerable interindividual variation, additional monitoring of anaesthetic depth is

  15. Clinical outcomes of asleep vs awake deep brain stimulation for Parkinson disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodsky, Matthew A; Anderson, Shannon; Murchison, Charles; Seier, Mara; Wilhelm, Jennifer; Vederman, Aaron; Burchiel, Kim J

    2017-11-07

    To compare motor and nonmotor outcomes at 6 months of asleep deep brain stimulation (DBS) for Parkinson disease (PD) using intraoperative imaging guidance to confirm electrode placement vs awake DBS using microelectrode recording to confirm electrode placement. DBS candidates with PD referred to Oregon Health & Science University underwent asleep DBS with imaging guidance. Six-month outcomes were compared to those of patients who previously underwent awake DBS by the same surgeon and center. Assessments included an "off"-levodopa Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) II and III, the 39-item Parkinson's Disease Questionnaire, motor diaries, and speech fluency. Thirty participants underwent asleep DBS and 39 underwent awake DBS. No difference was observed in improvement of UPDRS III (+14.8 ± 8.9 vs +17.6 ± 12.3 points, p = 0.19) or UPDRS II (+9.3 ± 2.7 vs +7.4 ± 5.8 points, p = 0.16). Improvement in "on" time without dyskinesia was superior in asleep DBS (+6.4 ± 3.0 h/d vs +1.7 ± 1.2 h/d, p = 0.002). Quality of life scores improved in both groups (+18.8 ± 9.4 in awake, +8.9 ± 11.5 in asleep). Improvement in summary index ( p = 0.004) and subscores for cognition ( p = 0.011) and communication ( p < 0.001) were superior in asleep DBS. Speech outcomes were superior in asleep DBS, both in category (+2.77 ± 4.3 points vs -6.31 ± 9.7 points ( p = 0.0012) and phonemic fluency (+1.0 ± 8.2 points vs -5.5 ± 9.6 points, p = 0.038). Asleep DBS for PD improved motor outcomes over 6 months on par with or better than awake DBS, was superior with regard to speech fluency and quality of life, and should be an option considered for all patients who are candidates for this treatment. NCT01703598. This study provides Class III evidence that for patients with PD undergoing DBS, asleep intraoperative CT imaging-guided implantation is not significantly different from awake microelectrode recording-guided implantation in improving motor outcomes at 6 months. © 2017

  16. Metabolism of lithocholic and chenodeoxycholic acids in the squirrel monkey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, H.; Hamada, M.; Kato, F.

    1985-01-01

    Metabolism of lithocholic acid (LCA) and chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA) was studied in the squirrel monkey to clarify the mechanism of the lack of toxicity of CDCA in this animal. Radioactive LCA was administered to squirrel monkeys with biliary fistula. Most radioactivity was excreted in the bile in the form of unsulfated lithocholyltaurine. The squirrel monkey thus differs from humans and chimpanzees, which efficiently sulfate LCA, and is similar to the rhesus monkey and baboon in that LCA is poorly sulfated. When labeled CDCA was orally administered to squirrel monkeys, less than 20% of the dosed radioactivity was recovered as LCA and its further metabolites in feces over 3 days, indicating that bacterial metabolism of CDCA into LCA is strikingly less than in other animals and in humans. It therefore appears that LCA, known as a hepatotoxic secondary bile acid, is not accumulated in the squirrel monkey, not because of its rapid turnover through sulfation, but because of the low order of its production

  17. Composing Interactive Dance Pieces for the MotionComposer, a device for Persons with Disabilities

    OpenAIRE

    Bergsland, Andreas; Wechsler, Robert

    2015-01-01

    The authors have developed a new hardware/software device for persons with disabilities (the MotionComposer), and in the process created a number of interactive dance pieces for non- disabled professional dancers. The paper briefly describes the hardware and motion tracking software of the device before going into more detail concerning the mapping strategies and sound design applied to three interactive dance pieces. The paper concludes by discussing a particular philosophy championing trans...

  18. Combination of Continuous Dexmedetomidine Infusion with Titrated Ultra-Low-Dose Propofol-Fentanyl for an Awake Craniotomy; Case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samaresh Das

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available An awake craniotomy is a continuously evolving technique used for the resection of brain tumours from the eloquent cortex. We report a 29-year-old male patient who presented to the Khoula Hospital, Muscat, Oman, in 2016 with a two month history of headaches and convulsions due to a space-occupying brain lesion in close proximity with the left motor cortex. An awake craniotomy was conducted using a scalp block, continuous dexmedetomidine infusion and a titrated ultra-low-dose of propofol-fentanyl. The patient remained comfortable throughout the procedure and the intraoperative neuropsychological tests, brain mapping and tumour resection were successful. This case report suggests that dexmedetomidine in combination with titrated ultra-low-dose propofolfentanyl are effective options during an awake craniotomy, ensuring optimum sedation, minimal disinhibition and a rapid recovery. To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first awake craniotomy conducted successfully in Oman.

  19. Combination of Continuous Dexmedetomidine Infusion with Titrated Ultra-Low-Dose Propofol-Fentanyl for an Awake Craniotomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Samaresh; Al-Mashani, Ali; Suri, Neelam; Salhotra, Neeraj; Chatterjee, Nilay

    2016-01-01

    An awake craniotomy is a continuously evolving technique used for the resection of brain tumours from the eloquent cortex. We report a 29-year-old male patient who presented to the Khoula Hospital, Muscat, Oman, in 2016 with a two month history of headaches and convulsions due to a space-occupying brain lesion in close proximity with the left motor cortex. An awake craniotomy was conducted using a scalp block, continuous dexmedetomidine infusion and a titrated ultra-low-dose of propofolfentanyl. The patient remained comfortable throughout the procedure and the intraoperative neuropsychological tests, brain mapping and tumour resection were successful. This case report suggests that dexmedetomidine in combination with titrated ultra-low-dose propofolfentanyl are effective options during an awake craniotomy, ensuring optimum sedation, minimal disinhibition and a rapid recovery. To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first awake craniotomy conducted successfully in Oman. PMID:27606116

  20. Use of movable high-field-strength intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging with awake craniotomies for resection of gliomas: preliminary experience.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Leuthardt, Eric C

    2011-07-01

    Awake craniotomy with electrocortical mapping and intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging (iMRI) are established techniques for maximizing tumor resection and preserving function, but there has been little experience combining these methodologies.

  1. Hemorrhoids: an experimental model in monkeys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Plapler Hélio

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Hemorrhoids are a matter of concern due to a painful outcome. We describe a simple, easy and reliable experimental model to produce hemorrhoids in monkeys. METHODS: 14 monkeys (Cebus apella were used. After general anesthesia, hemorrhoids were induced by ligation of the inferior hemorrhoidal vein, which is very alike to humans. The vein was located through a perianal incision, dissected and ligated with a 3-0 vicryl. The skin was sutured with a 4-0 catgut thread. Animals were kept in appropriate cages and evaluated daily. RESULTS: Nine days later there were hemorrhoidal piles in the anus in fifty percent (50% of the animals. Outcome was unremarkable. There was no bleeding and all animals showed no signs of pain or suffering. CONCLUSION: This is an affordable and reliable experimental model to induce hemorrhoids for experimental studies.

  2. Radioprotective effectiveness of adeturone in monkey experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikolov, I.; Pantev, T.; Rogozkin, P.; Chertkov, K.; Dikovenko, E.; Kosarenkov, V.

    1976-01-01

    The radioprotective effect of adeturone (adenosine triphsophate salt of AET) was tested on 28 monkeys (Macaca mulata). The animals were gamma-irradiated (cobalt 60) with a dose of 680 R (17,6 R/min, LDsub(100/18)). Adeturone was administered intravenously for 5 minutes, from 6 to 15 minutes before irradiation in a dose of 150 mg/kg (1/2 of thr maximal tolerable dose). It was found that adeturone administration before the absolute lethal irradiation will ensure survival of 50 % of the monkeys. Radiation sickness in protected animals runs a milder course as shown by the duration of the latency period, the manifestation of the hemorrhagic syndrome, the leukopenia and erythrocytes in the peripheral blood. Some symptoms do not appear at all (diarrhoea) or develop later(hyperthermia, hypodynamia). (A.B.)

  3. What do monkeys' music choices mean?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamont, Alexandra M

    2005-08-01

    McDermott and Hauser have recently shown that although monkeys show some types of preferences for sound, preferences for music are found only in humans. This suggests that music might be a relatively recent adaptation in human evolution. Here, I focus on the research methods used by McDermott and Hauser, and consider the findings in relation to infancy research and music psychology.

  4. Nutritional manipulation of primate retinas, III: Effects of lutein or zeaxanthin supplementation on adipose tissue and retina of xanthophyll-free monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Elizabeth J; Neuringer, Martha; Russell, Robert M; Schalch, Wolfgang; Snodderly, D Max

    2005-02-01

    Macular pigment (MP) is composed of the xanthophylls lutein (L) and zeaxanthin (Z) and may help to prevent age-related macular degeneration or retard its progression. In this study the effects of L or Z supplementation on carotenoid levels was examined in serum, adipose tissue, and retina in rhesus monkeys with no previous intake of xanthophylls. From birth to 7 to 16 years of age, 18 rhesus monkeys were fed semipurified diets containing all essential nutrients but no xanthophylls. Six were supplemented with pure L and 6 with pure Z at 3.9 micromol/kg per day for 24 to 101 weeks. At baseline and at 4- to 12-week intervals, carotenoids in adipose tissue were measured by HPLC. At study completion, carotenoids in serum and retina (central 4 mm, 8-mm annulus, and the periphery) were determined. Results were compared with data from control monkeys fed a standard laboratory diet. Monkeys fed xanthophyll-free diets had no L or Z in serum or tissues. After L or Z supplementation, serum and adipose tissue concentrations significantly increased in the supplemented groups. Both L and 3R,3'S-Z (RSZ or meso-Z, not present in the diet) were incorporated into retinas of monkeys supplemented with L, with RSZ present only in the macula (central 4 mm). All-trans Z, but no RSZ, accumulated in retinas of monkeys supplemented with Z. L is the precursor of RSZ, a major component of macular pigment. Xanthophyll-free monkeys can accumulate retinal xanthophylls and provide a valuable model for examining their uptake and conversion.

  5. Resection of Gliomas with and without Neuropsychological Support during Awake Craniotomy—Effects on Surgery and Clinical Outcome

    OpenAIRE

    Anna Kelm; Nico Sollmann; Nico Sollmann; Sebastian Ille; Sebastian Ille; Bernhard Meyer; Florian Ringel; Florian Ringel; Sandro M. Krieg; Sandro M. Krieg

    2017-01-01

    BackgroundDuring awake craniotomy for tumor resection, a neuropsychologist (NP) is regarded as a highly valuable partner for neurosurgeons. However, some centers do not routinely involve an NP, and data to support the high influence of the NP on the perioperative course of patients are mostly lacking.ObjectiveThe aim of this study was to investigate whether there is a difference in clinical outcomes between patients who underwent awake craniotomy with and without the attendance of an NP.Metho...

  6. Placental Transport of Zidovudine in the Rhesus Monkey

    OpenAIRE

    Ridgway III, Louis E.; King, Thomas S.; Henderson, George I.; Schenker, Steven; Schenken, Robert S.

    1993-01-01

    Objective: This study was undertaken to characterize the pharmacokinetics of zidovudine (ZDV) and ZDV-glucuronide (ZDVG) in the material and :fetal circulations of the rhesus monkey. Methods: Cannulas were placed in the maternal external jugular and the fetal internal jugular and carotid artery in 8 pregnant monkeys at .120–130 days gestation. ZDV (3.5 mg/kg) was administered to 5 monkeys and ZDVG (3.5 mg/kg) to 3 monkeys as single intravenous bolus infusions through the maternal catheter. Ma...

  7. Benefits of awake uniportal pulmonary resection in a patient with a previous contralateral lobectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvez, Carlos; Navarro-Martinez, Jose; Bolufer, Sergio; Lirio, Francisco; Mafe, Juan Jose; Rivera, Maria Jesus; Roca, Joaquin; Baschwitz, Benno

    2014-09-01

    Surgical resection of a contralateral recurrence of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is indicated in patients without evidence of disseminated disease and considered functionally operable. General anesthesia and double-lumen intubation involves one lobe ventilation in a patient treated with a previous lobectomy, thus increasing the risks of ventilator-induced injuries and the morbidity. Awake procedures facilitate the surgery decreasing the anesthetic and surgical times, keeping the diaphragm motion and diminishing the ventilator-induced injuries into the remaining contralateral lobe. We present a 43-year-old woman with a previous left-lower lobectomy for a 3.1-cm mucinous adenocarcinoma 15 months before without nodal involvement, who presents a right-lower lobe 8-mm cavitated nodule, with evident radiological growth and fine-needle aspiration concordant with mucinous adenocarcinoma. We suggest an awake procedure with locoregional epidural anesthesia.

  8. arXiv Simulation Study of an LWFA-based Electron Injector for AWAKE Run 2

    CERN Document Server

    Williamson, B.; Doebert, S.; Karsch, S.; Muggli, P.

    The AWAKE experiment aims to demonstrate preservation of injected electron beam quality during acceleration in proton-driven plasma waves. The short bunch duration required to correctly load the wakefield is challenging to meet with the current electron injector system, given the space available to the beamline. An LWFA readily provides short-duration electron beams with sufficient charge from a compact design, and provides a scalable option for future electron acceleration experiments at AWAKE. Simulations of a shock-front injected LWFA demonstrate a 43 TW laser system would be sufficient to produce the required charge over a range of energies beyond 100 MeV. LWFA beams typically have high peak current and large divergence on exiting their native plasmas, and optimisation of bunch parameters before injection into the proton-driven wakefields is required. Compact beam transport solutions are discussed.

  9. Beam studies and experimental facility for the AWAKE experiment at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Bracco, Chiara; Petrenko, Alexey; Timko, Helga; Argyropoulos, Theodoros; Bartosik, Hannes; Bohl, Thomas; Esteban Müller, Juan; Goddard, Brennan; Meddahi, Malika; Pardons, Ans; Shaposhnikova, Elena; Velotti, Francesco M; Vincke, Helmut

    2014-01-01

    A Proton Driven Plasma Wakefield Acceleration Experiment has been proposed as an approach to eventually accelerate an electron beam to the TeV energy range in a single plasma section. To verify this novel technique, a proof of principle R&D experiment, AWAKE, is planned at CERN using 400 GeV proton bunches from the SPS. An electron beam will be injected into the plasma cell to probe the accelerating wakefield. The AWAKE experiment will be installed in the CNGS facility profiting from existing infrastructure where only minor modifications need to be foreseen. The design of the experimental area and the proton and electron beam lines are shown. The achievable SPS proton bunch properties and their reproducibility have been measured and are presented.

  10. Conscious sedation for awake craniotomy in intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging operating theater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takrouri, Mohamad Said Maani; Shubbak, Firas A.; Al Hajjaj, Aisha; Maestro, Rolando F. Del; Soualmi, Lahbib; Alkhodair, Mashael H.; Alduraiby, Abrar M.; Ghanem, Najeeb

    2010-01-01

    This case report describes the first case in intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging operating theater (iMRI OT) (BrainSuite®) of awake craniotomy for frontal lobe glioma excision in a 24-year-old man undergoing eloquent cortex language mapping intraoperatively. As he was very motivated to take pictures of him while being operated upon, the authors adapted conscious sedation technique with variable depth according to Ramsey's scale, in order to revert to awake state to perform the intended neurosurgical procedure. The patient tolerated the situation satisfactorily and was cooperative till the finish, without any event. We elicit in this report the special environment of iMRI OT for lengthy operation in pinned fixed patient having craniotomy. PMID:25885085

  11. Evolving Models of Pavlovian Conditioning: Cerebellar Cortical Dynamics in Awake Behaving Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michiel M. ten Brinke

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Three decades of electrophysiological research on cerebellar cortical activity underlying Pavlovian conditioning have expanded our understanding of motor learning in the brain. Purkinje cell simple spike suppression is considered to be crucial in the expression of conditional blink responses (CRs. However, trial-by-trial quantification of this link in awake behaving animals is lacking, and current hypotheses regarding the underlying plasticity mechanisms have diverged from the classical parallel fiber one to the Purkinje cell synapse LTD hypothesis. Here, we establish that acquired simple spike suppression, acquired conditioned stimulus (CS-related complex spike responses, and molecular layer interneuron (MLI activity predict the expression of CRs on a trial-by-trial basis using awake behaving mice. Additionally, we show that two independent transgenic mouse mutants with impaired MLI function exhibit motor learning deficits. Our findings suggest multiple cerebellar cortical plasticity mechanisms underlying simple spike suppression, and they implicate the broader involvement of the olivocerebellar module within the interstimulus interval.

  12. Behavioral effects of acclimatization to restraint protocol used for awake animal imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Michael D; Pira, Ashley S; Febo, Marcelo

    2013-07-15

    Functional MRI in awake rats involves acclimatization to restraint to minimize motion. We designed a study to examine the effects of an acclimatization protocol (5 days of restraint, 60 min per day) on the emission of 22-kHz ultrasonic vocalizations and performance in a forced swim test (FST). Our results showed that USV calls are reduced significantly by days 3, 4 and 5 of acclimatization. Although the rats showed less climbing activity (and more immobility) in FST on day 5 compared to the 1st day of restraint acclimatization, the difference was not detected once the animals were given a 2-week hiatus. Overall, we showed that animals adapt to the restraint over a five-day period; however, restraint may introduce confounding behavioral outcomes that may hinder the interpretation of results derived from awake rat imaging. The present data warrants further testing of the effects of MRI restraint on behavior. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Beam Transfer Line Design for a Plasma Wakefield Acceleration Experiment (AWAKE) at the CERN SPS

    CERN Document Server

    Bracco, C; Brethoux, D; Clerc, V; Goddard, B; Gschwendtner, E; Jensen, L K; Kosmicki, A; Le Godec, G; Meddahi, M; Muggli, P; Mutin, C; Osborne, O; Papastergiou, K; Pardons, A; Velotti, F M; Vincke, H

    2013-01-01

    The world’s first proton driven plasma wakefield acceleration experiment (AWAKE) is presently being studied at CERN. The experimentwill use a high energy proton beam extracted from the SPS as driver. Two possible locations for installing the AWAKE facility were considered: the West Area and the CNGS beam line. The previous transfer line from the SPS to the West Area was completely dismantled in 2005 and would need to be fully re-designed and re-built. For this option, geometric constraints for radiation protection reasons would limit the maximum proton beam energy to 300 GeV. The existing CNGS line could be used by applying only minor changes to the lattice for the final focusing and the interface between the proton beam and the laser, required for plasma ionisation and bunch-modulation seeding. The beam line design studies performed for the two options are presented.

  14. Universally composable protocols with relaxed set-up assumptions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barak, Boaz; Canetti, Ran; Nielsen, Jesper Buus

    2004-01-01

    A desirable goal for cryptographic protocols is to guarantee security when the protocol is composed with other protocol instances. Universally composable (UC) protocols provide this guarantee in a strong sense: A protocol remains secure even when composed concurrently with an unbounded number of ...

  15. Layer-specific high-frequency spiking in the prefrontal cortex of awake rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zimbo Saroeni Raymond Maria Boudewijns

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Cortical pyramidal neurons show irregular in vivo action potential (AP spiking with high frequency bursts occurring on sparse background activity. Somatic APs can backpropagate from soma into basal and apical dendrites and locally generate dendritic calcium spikes. The critical AP frequency for generation of such dendritic calcium spikes can be very different depending on cell-type or brain area involved. Previously, it was shown in vitro that calcium electrogenesis can also be induced in L(ayer 5 pyramidal neurons of prefrontal cortex (PFC. It remains an open question whether somatic burst spiking and resulting dendritic calcium electrogenesis also occur in morphologically more compact L2/3 pyramidal neurons. Furthermore, it is not known whether critical frequencies that trigger dendritic calcium electrogenesis occur in PFC under awake conditions in vivo. Here, we addressed these issues and found that pyramidal neurons in both PFC L2/3 and L5 in awake rats spike APs in short bursts, but with different probabilities. The critical frequency for calcium electrogenesis in vitro was layer-specific and lower in L5 neurons compared to L2/3. Taking the in vitro critical frequency as predictive measure for dendritic electrogenesis during in vivo spontaneous activity, supracritical bursts in vivo were observed in a larger fraction of L5 neurons compared to L2/3 neurons but with similar incidence within these subpopulations. Together, these results show that in PFC of awake rats, AP spiking occurs at frequencies that are relevant for dendritic calcium electrogenesis and suggest that in awake rat PFC, dendritic calcium electrogenesis may be involved in neuronal computation.

  16. Biofeedback for treatment of awake and sleep bruxism in adults: systematic review protocol

    OpenAIRE

    Ilovar, Sasa; Zolger, Danaja; Castrillon, Eduardo; Car, Josip; Huckvale, Kit

    2014-01-01

    Background Bruxism is a disorder of jaw-muscle activity characterised by repetitive clenching or grinding of the teeth which results in discomfort and damage to dentition. The two clinical manifestations of the condition (sleep and awake bruxism) are thought to have unrelated aetiologies but are palliated using similar techniques. The lack of a definitive treatment has prompted renewed interest in biofeedback, a behaviour change method that uses electronic detection to provide a stimulus when...

  17. Characterization of scale-free properties of human electrocorticography in awake and slow wave sleep states

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John M Zempel

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Like many complex dynamic systems, the brain exhibits scale-free dynamics that follow power law scaling. Broadband power spectral density (PSD of brain electrical activity exhibits state-dependent power law scaling with a log frequency exponent that varies across frequency ranges. Widely divergent naturally occurring neural states, awake and slow wave sleep (SWS periods, were used evaluate the nature of changes in scale-free indices. We demonstrate two analytic approaches to characterizing electrocorticographic (ECoG data obtained during Awake and SWS states. A data driven approach was used, characterizing all available frequency ranges. Using an Equal Error State Discriminator (EESD, a single frequency range did not best characterize state across data from all six subjects, though the ability to distinguish awake and SWS states in individual subjects was excellent. Multisegment piecewise linear fits were used to characterize scale-free slopes across the entire frequency range (0.2-200 Hz. These scale-free slopes differed between Awake and SWS states across subjects, particularly at frequencies below 10 Hz and showed little difference at frequencies above 70 Hz. A Multivariate Maximum Likelihood Analysis (MMLA method using the multisegment slope indices successfully categorized ECoG data in most subjects, though individual variation was seen. The ECoG spectrum is not well characterized by a single linear fit across a defined set of frequencies, but is best described by a set of discrete linear fits across the full range of available frequencies. With increasing computational tractability, the use of scale-free slope values to characterize EEG data will have practical value in clinical and research EEG studies.

  18. Prospective study of awake craniotomy used routinely and nonselectively for supratentorial tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serletis, Demitre; Bernstein, Mark

    2007-07-01

    The authors prospectively assessed the value of awake craniotomy used nonselectively in patients undergoing resection of supratentorial tumors. The demographic features, presenting symptoms, tumor location, histological diagnosis, outcomes, and complications were documented for 610 patients who underwent awake craniotomy for supratentorial tumor resection. Intraoperative brain mapping was used in 511 cases (83.8%). Mapping identified eloquent cortex in 115 patients (22.5%) and no eloquent cortex in 396 patients (77.5%). Neurological deficits occurred in 89 patients (14.6%). In the subset of 511 patients in whom brain mapping was performed, 78 (15.3%) experienced postoperative neurological worsening. This phenomenon was more common in patients with preoperative neurological deficits or in those individuals in whom mapping successfully identified eloquent tissue. Twenty-five (4.9%) of the 511 patients suffered intraoperative seizures, and two of these individuals required intubation and induction of general anesthesia after generalized seizures occurred. Four (0.7%) of the 610 patients developed wound complications. Postoperative hematomas developed in seven patients (1.1%), four of whom urgently required a repeated craniotomy to allow evacuation of the clot. Two patients (0.3%) required readmission to the hospital soon after being discharged. There were three deaths (0.5%). Awake craniotomy is safe, practical, and effective during resection of supratentorial lesions of diverse pathological range and location. It allows for intraoperative brain mapping that helps identify and protect functional cortex. It also avoids the complications inherent in the induction of general anesthesia. Awake craniotomy provides an excellent alternative to surgery of supratentorial brain lesions in patients in whom general anesthesia has been induced.

  19. Awake Fibreoptic Intubation in the Sitting Position in a Patient with a Huge Goitre

    OpenAIRE

    K C, Suhas; Shetty, Sukhen N; S, Padmanabha

    2015-01-01

    A 46-year-old woman was anesthetized for total thyroidectomy. The thyroid was massive, deviating the trachea to the right and causing attenuation of the trachea radiologically. She had symptoms of respiratory obstruction in the supine position. Awake FOB-guided intubation was done in sitting position after airway topicalisation, and the airway was intubated with difficulty with 7.0 mm cuffed orotracheal tube. We describe this case in detail and discuss the significance of careful approach to ...

  20. Imaging circulating tumor cells in freely moving awake small animals using a miniaturized intravital microscope.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Sarah Sasportas

    Full Text Available Metastasis, the cause for 90% of cancer mortality, is a complex and poorly understood process involving the invasion of circulating tumor cells (CTCs into blood vessels. These cells have potential prognostic value as biomarkers for early metastatic risk. But their rarity and the lack of specificity and sensitivity in measuring them render their interrogation by current techniques very challenging. How and when these cells are circulating in the blood, on their way to potentially give rise to metastasis, is a question that remains largely unanswered. In order to provide an insight into this "black box" using non-invasive imaging, we developed a novel miniature intravital microscopy (mIVM strategy capable of real-time long-term monitoring of CTCs in awake small animals. We established an experimental 4T1-GL mouse model of metastatic breast cancer, in which tumor cells express both fluorescent and bioluminescent reporter genes to enable both single cell and whole body tumor imaging. Using mIVM, we monitored blood vessels of different diameters in awake mice in an experimental model of metastasis. Using an in-house software algorithm we developed, we demonstrated in vivo CTC enumeration and computation of CTC trajectory and speed. These data represent the first reported use we know of for a miniature mountable intravital microscopy setup for in vivo imaging of CTCs in awake animals.

  1. Imaging circulating tumor cells in freely moving awake small animals using a miniaturized intravital microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasportas, Laura Sarah; Gambhir, Sanjiv Sam

    2014-01-01

    Metastasis, the cause for 90% of cancer mortality, is a complex and poorly understood process involving the invasion of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) into blood vessels. These cells have potential prognostic value as biomarkers for early metastatic risk. But their rarity and the lack of specificity and sensitivity in measuring them render their interrogation by current techniques very challenging. How and when these cells are circulating in the blood, on their way to potentially give rise to metastasis, is a question that remains largely unanswered. In order to provide an insight into this "black box" using non-invasive imaging, we developed a novel miniature intravital microscopy (mIVM) strategy capable of real-time long-term monitoring of CTCs in awake small animals. We established an experimental 4T1-GL mouse model of metastatic breast cancer, in which tumor cells express both fluorescent and bioluminescent reporter genes to enable both single cell and whole body tumor imaging. Using mIVM, we monitored blood vessels of different diameters in awake mice in an experimental model of metastasis. Using an in-house software algorithm we developed, we demonstrated in vivo CTC enumeration and computation of CTC trajectory and speed. These data represent the first reported use we know of for a miniature mountable intravital microscopy setup for in vivo imaging of CTCs in awake animals.

  2. Awake Craniotomy for Tumor Resection: Further Optimizing Therapy of Brain Tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehdorn, H Maximilian; Schwartz, Felix; Becker, Juliane

    2017-01-01

    In recent years more and more data have emerged linking the most radical resection to prolonged survival in patients harboring brain tumors. Since total tumor resection could increase postoperative morbidity, many methods have been suggested to reduce the risk of postoperative neurological deficits: awake craniotomy with the possibility of continuous patient-surgeon communication is one of the possibilities of finding out how radical a tumor resection can possibly be without causing permanent harm to the patient.In 1994 we started to perform awake craniotomy for glioma resection. In 2005 the use of intraoperative high-field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was included in the standard tumor therapy protocol. Here we review our experience in performing awake surgery for gliomas, gained in 219 patients.Patient selection by the operating surgeon and a neuropsychologist is of primary importance: the patient should feel as if they are part of the surgical team fighting against the tumor. The patient will undergo extensive neuropsychological testing, functional MRI, and fiber tractography in order to define the relationship between the tumor and the functionally relevant brain areas. Attention needs to be given at which particular time during surgery the intraoperative MRI is performed. Results from part of our series (without and with ioMRI scan) are presented.

  3. [Difficult Ventilation Requiring Emergency Endotracheal Intubation during Awake Craniotomy Managed by Laryngeal Mask Airway].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, Asako; Mizota, Toshiyuki; Tanaka, Tomoharu; Segawa, Hajime; Fukuda, Kazuhiko

    2016-04-01

    We report a case of difficult ventilation requiring emergency endotracheal intubation during awake craniotomy managed by laryngeal mask airway (LMA). A 45-year-old woman was scheduled to receive awake craniotomy for brain tumor in the frontal lobe. After anesthetic induction, airway was secured using ProSeal LMA and patient was mechanically ventilated in pressure-control mode. Patient's head was fixed with head-pins at anteflex position, and the operation started. About one hour after the start of the operation, tidal volume suddenly decreased. We immediately started manual ventilation, but the airway resistance was extremely high and we could not adequately ventilate the patient. We administered muscle relaxant for suspected laryngospasm, but ventilatory status did not improve; so we decided to conduct emergency endotracheal intubation. We tried to intubate using Airwayscope or LMA-Fastrach, but they were not effective in our case. Finally trachea was intubated using transnasal fiberoptic bronchoscopy. We discuss airway management during awake craniotomy, focusing on emergency endotracheal intubation during surgery.

  4. Successful Insular Glioma Removal in a Deaf Signer Patient During an Awake Craniotomy Procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metellus, Philippe; Boussen, Salah; Guye, Maxime; Trebuchon, Agnes

    2017-02-01

    Resection of tumors located within the insula of the dominant hemisphere represents a technical challenge because of the complex anatomy, including the surrounding vasculature, and the relationship to functional (motor and language) structures. We report here the case of a successful resection of a left insular glioma in a native deaf signer during an awake craniotomy. The patient, a congenitally deaf right-handed patient who is a native user of sign language, presented with a seizure 1 week before he was referred to our department. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a left heterogeneous insular tumor enhanced after intravenous gadolinium infusion. Because of its deep and dominant hemisphere location, an awake craniotomy was decided. The patient was evaluated intraoperatively using object naming, text reading, and sign repetition tasks. An isolated inferior frontal gyrus site evoked repeated object naming errors. A transopercular parietal approach was performed and allowed the successful removal of the tumor under direct electric stimulation and electrocorticography. To our knowledge, this is the first report of successful removal of a left insular tumor without any functional sequelae in a native deaf signer using intraoperative direct cerebral stimulation during an awake craniotomy. The methodology used also provides the first evidence of the actual anatomo-functional organization of language in deaf signers. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Is a wake-up call in order? Review of the evidence for awake craniotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paldor, Iddo; Drummond, Katharine J; Awad, Mohammed; Sufaro, Yuval Z; Kaye, Andrew H

    2016-01-01

    Awake craniotomy (AC) has been used in increasing frequency in the past few decades. It has mainly been used for resection of intrinsic tumors, but also, rarely, for other pathologies. The vast majority of reports specific to one pathology, however, have focused on resection of low grade glioma in the awake setting. Tumors in eloquent areas have mainly been resected when the patient is awake for the purpose of preservation of function. Motor function is the most documented, and most successfully preserved function. Other functions are harder to localize with direct electrical stimulation (DES), and thus more difficult to preserve. The success rate of DES localization correlates to the rate of function preservation. The effect of AC on extent of resection is inconsistent in the literature. Other functions, such as sensory and visuospatial recognition, have been protected during AC, but this is best performed in large, referral centers that have experience with the procedure. Other benefits to AC, such as cost-effectiveness and reduction in patient pain and anxiety, have also been reported. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Auditory ERPs to stimulus deviance in an awake chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes: towards hominid cognitive neurosciences.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ari Ueno

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: For decades, the chimpanzee, phylogenetically closest to humans, has been analyzed intensively in comparative cognitive studies. Other than the accumulation of behavioral data, the neural basis for cognitive processing in the chimpanzee remains to be clarified. To increase our knowledge on the evolutionary and neural basis of human cognition, comparative neurophysiological studies exploring endogenous neural activities in the awake state are needed. However, to date, such studies have rarely been reported in non-human hominid species, due to the practical difficulties in conducting non-invasive measurements on awake individuals. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We measured auditory event-related potentials (ERPs of a fully awake chimpanzee, with reference to a well-documented component of human studies, namely mismatch negativity (MMN. In response to infrequent, deviant tones that were delivered in a uniform sound stream, a comparable ERP component could be detected as negative deflections in early latencies. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The present study reports the MMN-like component in a chimpanzee for the first time. In human studies, various ERP components, including MMN, are well-documented indicators of cognitive and neural processing. The results of the present study validate the use of non-invasive ERP measurements for studies on cognitive and neural processing in chimpanzees, and open the way for future studies comparing endogenous neural activities between humans and chimpanzees. This signifies an essential step in hominid cognitive neurosciences.

  7. Laser pulse propagation in a meter scale rubidium vapor/plasma cell in AWAKE experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joulaei, A. [Max-Planck Institute for Physics, Munich (Germany); University of Mazandaran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Moody, J. [Max-Planck Institute for Physics, Munich (Germany); Berti, N.; Kasparian, J. [University of Geneva (Switzerland); Mirzanejhad, S. [University of Mazandaran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Muggli, P. [Max-Planck Institute for Physics, Munich (Germany)

    2016-09-01

    We present the results of numerical studies of laser pulse propagating in a 3.5 cm Rb vapor cell in the linear dispersion regime by using a 1D model and a 2D code that has been modified for our special case. The 2D simulation finally aimed at finding laser beam parameters suitable to make the Rb vapor fully ionized to obtain a uniform, 10 m-long, at least 1 mm in radius plasma in the next step for the AWAKE experiment. - Highlights: • Discussion the AWAKE plasma source based on photoionization of rubidium vapor with a TW/cm^2 Intensity laser with a spectrum across valence ground state transition resonances. • Examines the propagation of the AWAKE ionization laser through rubidium vapor at design density on a small scale and reduced intensity with a linear numerical model compared to experimental results. • Discusses physics of pulse propagation through the vapor at high intensity regime where strong ionization occurs within the laser pulse.

  8. Is non-awake surgery for supratentorial adult low-grade glioma treatment still feasible?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffau, Hugues

    2018-01-01

    In this short review, the author performs a database search, summarizes, and discusses studies that provide information on the need to perform awake surgery to preserve quality of life/return to work of adult patients who undergo resection for a supratentorial low-grade glioma (LGG). Based upon the currently available data, the author concludes that in LGG, patients with no or only mild deficits at diagnosis, non-awake surgery can no longer be achieved. Indeed, awake craniotomy with intrasurgical electrical mapping has resulted in an increase of the extent of resection and overall survival in LGG. Furthermore, in order to resume a normal familial, social, and professional life, LGG patients with a prolonged survival expectancy have to benefit not only from language mapping when the tumor involves the left "dominant" hemisphere, but also from intraoperative mapping of sensorimotor, visuospatial, higher cognitive, and emotional functions under local anesthesia, even for gliomas situated within presumed "non-language" areas such as the right "non-dominant" hemisphere. In other words, the ultimate goal is to map the functional connectome for each patient in order to perform the resection up to the eloquent networks and then to optimize the onco-functional balance of LGG surgery. To this end, an objective neuropsychological assessment has to be achieved in a more systematic manner before and after resection. Early postoperative cognitive rehabilitation is also recommended, whenever needed.

  9. PERANCANGAN SISTEM TELE-NAVIGATION PADA PESAWAT TANPA AWAK (MICRO UAV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agus Basukesti

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Sistem navigasi pada pengoperasian pesawat tanpa awak (Micro UAV saat ini terdapat 2 cara yaitu dengan cara pandangan manual (line of sight dan sistem autopilot. Sistem navigasi line of sight memiliki kelemahan jangkauan pesawat tanpa awak hanya pada radius 200 meter karena keterbatasan penglihatan dari pengendali. Metode autopilot adalah metode kendali pesawat dengan algoritma lock position and homing. Sistem autopilot bekerja dengan cara mencari koordinat posisi yang dituju kemudian kembali ke lokasi awal. Keunggulan teknologi ini adalah pesawat dapat menjangkau jarak yang cukup jauh. Akan tetapi metode ini memiliki kelemahan yaitu pesawat harus terbang tinggi dan pesawat belum bisa menghindari halangan seperti gedung pencakar langit maupun pepohonan tinggi. Dalam penelitian ini dirancang sebuah sistem tele-navigasi yang merupakan modifikasi sistem navigasi line of sight dan autopilot sehingga dapat menutupi kelemahan dari masing masing metode navigasi yang ada saat ini. metode penelitian yang digunakan dalam penelitian ini adalah metode eksperimen yaitu dengan membuat pilot plan sistem Tele-navigasi yang selanjutnya akan diuji dengan pesawat tanpa awak (micro UAV jenis flying wing. Metode dokumentasi dan metode studi pustaka juga digunakan untuk melengkapi data teknis alat yang digunakan sehingga dapat dilakukan analisis mendalam terhadap performa alat yang dirancang. Kata kunci: line of sight, lock position and homing, autopilot, micro UAV.

  10. Anaesthesia Management for Awake Craniotomy: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevanovic, Ana; Rossaint, Rolf; Veldeman, Michael; Bilotta, Federico; Coburn, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Awake craniotomy (AC) renders an expanded role in functional neurosurgery. Yet, evidence for optimal anaesthesia management remains limited. We aimed to summarise the latest clinical evidence of AC anaesthesia management and explore the relationship of AC failures on the used anaesthesia techniques. Two authors performed independently a systematic search of English articles in PubMed and EMBASE database 1/2007-12/2015. Search included randomised controlled trials (RCTs), observational trials, and case reports (n>4 cases), which reported anaesthetic approach for AC and at least one of our pre-specified outcomes: intraoperative seizures, hypoxia, arterial hypertension, nausea and vomiting, neurological dysfunction, conversion into general anaesthesia and failure of AC. Random effects meta-analysis was used to estimate event rates for four outcomes. Relationship with anaesthesia technique was explored using logistic meta-regression, calculating the odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals [95%CI]. We have included forty-seven studies. Eighteen reported asleep-awake-asleep technique (SAS), twenty-seven monitored anaesthesia care (MAC), one reported both and one used the awake-awake-awake technique (AAA). Proportions of AC failures, intraoperative seizures, new neurological dysfunction and conversion into general anaesthesia (GA) were 2% [95%CI:1-3], 8% [95%CI:6-11], 17% [95%CI:12-23] and 2% [95%CI:2-3], respectively. Meta-regression of SAS and MAC technique did not reveal any relevant differences between outcomes explained by the technique, except for conversion into GA. Estimated OR comparing SAS to MAC for AC failures was 0.98 [95%CI:0.36-2.69], 1.01 [95%CI:0.52-1.88] for seizures, 1.66 [95%CI:1.35-3.70] for new neurological dysfunction and 2.17 [95%CI:1.22-3.85] for conversion into GA. The latter result has to be interpreted cautiously. It is based on one retrospective high-risk of bias study and significance was abolished in a sensitivity analysis of only

  11. Awake craniotomy to maximize glioma resection: methods and technical nuances over a 27-year period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hervey-Jumper, Shawn L; Li, Jing; Lau, Darryl; Molinaro, Annette M; Perry, David W; Meng, Lingzhong; Berger, Mitchel S

    2015-08-01

    Awake craniotomy is currently a useful surgical approach to help identify and preserve functional areas during cortical and subcortical tumor resections. Methodologies have evolved over time to maximize patient safety and minimize morbidity using this technique. The goal of this study is to analyze a single surgeon's experience and the evolving methodology of awake language and sensorimotor mapping for glioma surgery. The authors retrospectively studied patients undergoing awake brain tumor surgery between 1986 and 2014. Operations for the initial 248 patients (1986-1997) were completed at the University of Washington, and the subsequent surgeries in 611 patients (1997-2014) were completed at the University of California, San Francisco. Perioperative risk factors and complications were assessed using the latter 611 cases. The median patient age was 42 years (range 13-84 years). Sixty percent of patients had Karnofsky Performance Status (KPS) scores of 90-100, and 40% had KPS scores less than 80. Fifty-five percent of patients underwent surgery for high-grade gliomas, 42% for low-grade gliomas, 1% for metastatic lesions, and 2% for other lesions (cortical dysplasia, encephalitis, necrosis, abscess, and hemangioma). The majority of patients were in American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) Class 1 or 2 (mild systemic disease); however, patients with severe systemic disease were not excluded from awake brain tumor surgery and represented 15% of study participants. Laryngeal mask airway was used in 8 patients (1%) and was most commonly used for large vascular tumors with more than 2 cm of mass effect. The most common sedation regimen was propofol plus remifentanil (54%); however, 42% of patients required an adjustment to the initial sedation regimen before skin incision due to patient intolerance. Mannitol was used in 54% of cases. Twelve percent of patients were active smokers at the time of surgery, which did not impact completion of the intraoperative mapping

  12. Anaesthesia Management for Awake Craniotomy: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Stevanovic

    Full Text Available Awake craniotomy (AC renders an expanded role in functional neurosurgery. Yet, evidence for optimal anaesthesia management remains limited. We aimed to summarise the latest clinical evidence of AC anaesthesia management and explore the relationship of AC failures on the used anaesthesia techniques.Two authors performed independently a systematic search of English articles in PubMed and EMBASE database 1/2007-12/2015. Search included randomised controlled trials (RCTs, observational trials, and case reports (n>4 cases, which reported anaesthetic approach for AC and at least one of our pre-specified outcomes: intraoperative seizures, hypoxia, arterial hypertension, nausea and vomiting, neurological dysfunction, conversion into general anaesthesia and failure of AC. Random effects meta-analysis was used to estimate event rates for four outcomes. Relationship with anaesthesia technique was explored using logistic meta-regression, calculating the odds ratios (OR and 95% confidence intervals [95%CI].We have included forty-seven studies. Eighteen reported asleep-awake-asleep technique (SAS, twenty-seven monitored anaesthesia care (MAC, one reported both and one used the awake-awake-awake technique (AAA. Proportions of AC failures, intraoperative seizures, new neurological dysfunction and conversion into general anaesthesia (GA were 2% [95%CI:1-3], 8% [95%CI:6-11], 17% [95%CI:12-23] and 2% [95%CI:2-3], respectively. Meta-regression of SAS and MAC technique did not reveal any relevant differences between outcomes explained by the technique, except for conversion into GA. Estimated OR comparing SAS to MAC for AC failures was 0.98 [95%CI:0.36-2.69], 1.01 [95%CI:0.52-1.88] for seizures, 1.66 [95%CI:1.35-3.70] for new neurological dysfunction and 2.17 [95%CI:1.22-3.85] for conversion into GA. The latter result has to be interpreted cautiously. It is based on one retrospective high-risk of bias study and significance was abolished in a sensitivity analysis of

  13. Monkeying around: Use of Survey Monkey as a Tool for School Social Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massat, Carol Rippey; McKay, Cassandra; Moses, Helene

    2009-01-01

    This article describes the use of an online survey tool called Survey Monkey, which can be used by school social workers and school social work educators for evaluation of practice, needs assessment, and program evaluation. Examples of questions are given. Principles of writing good survey questions are described. (Contains 2 tables and 1…

  14. Locomotor Anatomy and Behavior of Patas Monkeys (Erythrocebus patas with Comparison to Vervet Monkeys (Cercopithecus aethiops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrienne L. Zihlman

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Patas monkeys (Erythrocebus patas living in African savanna woodlands and grassland habitats have a locomotor system that allows them to run fast, presumably to avoid predators. Long fore- and hindlimbs, long foot bones, short toes, and a digitigrade foot posture were proposed as anatomical correlates with speed. In addition to skeletal proportions, soft tissue and whole body proportions are important components of the locomotor system. To further distinguish patas anatomy from other Old World monkeys, a comparative study based on dissection of skin, muscle, and bone from complete individuals of patas and vervet monkeys (Cercopithecus aethiops was undertaken. Analysis reveals that small adjustments in patas skeletal proportions, relative mass of limbs and tail, and specific muscle groups promote efficient sagittal limb motion. The ability to run fast is based on a locomotor system adapted for long distance walking. The patas’ larger home range and longer daily range than those of vervets give them access to highly dispersed, nutritious foods, water, and sleeping trees. Furthermore, patas monkeys have physiological adaptations that enable them to tolerate and dissipate heat. These features all contribute to the distinct adaptation that is the patas monkeys’ basis for survival in grassland and savanna woodland areas.

  15. Transmission of naturally occurring lymphoma in macaque monkeys.

    OpenAIRE

    Hunt, R D; Blake, B J; Chalifoux, L V; Sehgal, P K; King, N W; Letvin, N L

    1983-01-01

    Spontaneously occurring rhesus monkey lymphomas were transmitted into healthy rhesus monkeys by using tumor cell suspensions. The naturally arising tumors included an immunoblastic sarcoma and an undifferentiated lymphoma. Recipient animals developed undifferentiated lymphomas, poorly differentiated lymphomas, or parenchymal lymphoproliferative abnormalities suggestive of early lesions of lymphoma. Some of these animals developed such opportunistic infections as cytomegalovirus hepatitis and ...

  16. Evaluation of diabetes determinants in woolly monkeys (Lagothrix lagotricha)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ange-van Heugten, K.D.; Burns, R.; Verstegen, M.W.A.; Jansen, W.L.; Ferket, P.R.; Heugten, E.

    2007-01-01

    Woolly monkeys (Lagothrix lagotricha) are a threatened specie in the wild with limited successful management in captivity due to diagnosed hypertension and suspected diabetic conditions. Six woolly monkeys with known hypertension problems were tested to determine if diabetes mellitus and current

  17. Perceptual Learning: 12-Month-Olds' Discrimination of Monkey Faces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fair, Joseph; Flom, Ross; Jones, Jacob; Martin, Justin

    2012-01-01

    Six-month-olds reliably discriminate different monkey and human faces whereas 9-month-olds only discriminate different human faces. It is often falsely assumed that perceptual narrowing reflects a permanent change in perceptual abilities. In 3 experiments, ninety-six 12-month-olds' discrimination of unfamiliar monkey faces was examined. Following…

  18. Radioimmunoassay of parathyroid hormone (parathyrin) in monkey and man

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hargis, G.K.; Williams, G.A.; Reynolds, W.A.; Kawahara, W.; Jackson, B.; Bowser, E.N.; Pitkin, R.M.

    1977-01-01

    A radioimmunoassay for rhesus monkey and human innumoreactive parathyrin was developed in which a selected anti-bovine parathyrin antiserum, radioiodinated purified bovine parathyrin tracer, and human parathyroid tissue-culture media standards were used. The resulting data indicate that the method is sensitive, specific, accurate and reproducible; it is valid for both the rhesus monkey and the human; the serum immunoreactive parathyrin concentration of the monkey is essentially the same as that in man; monkey immunoreactive parathyrin responds to changes in serum calcium concentration similarly to that in man; and the rhesus monkey is therefore a suitable species in which to study parathyroid physiology, from which conclusions can be applied to the human

  19. Neurotoxic response of infant monkeys to methylmercury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Willes, R.F.; Truelove, J.F.; Nera, E.A.

    1978-02-01

    Four infant monkeys were dosed orally with 500 ..mu..g Hg/kg body wt./day (as methylmercury (MeHg) chloride dissolved sodium carbonate) beginning at 1 day of age. Neurological and behavioral signs of MeHg toxicity and blood Hg levels were monitored weekly. At first sign of MeHg intoxication, dosing with MeHg was terminated and the infants were monitored to assess reversal of the signs of MeHg toxicity. The first signs of MeHg toxicity, exhibited as a loss in dexterity and locomotor ability, were observed after 28 to 29 days of treatment; the blood Hg levels were 8.0 to 9.4 ..mu..g Hg/g blood. Dosing was terminated at 28 to 29 days of treatment but the signs of MeHg toxicity continued to develop. The infants became ataxic, blind, comatose and were necropsied at 35 to 43 days after initiating treatment with MgHg. The mercury concentrations in tissues analyzed after necropsy were highest in liver followed by occipital cortex and renal cortex. The mean blood/brain ratio was 0.21 +- 0.4. Histopathologic lesions were marked in the cerebrum with less severe lesions in the cerebellar nuclei. The Purkinje and granular cells of the cerebellar vermis appeared histologically normal. Lesions were not observed in the peripheral nervous system. The signs of MeHg intoxication, the tissue distribution of MeHg and histopathologic lesions observed in the infant monkeys were similar to those reported for adult monkeys.

  20. Neurotoxic response of infant monkeys to methylmercury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willes, R F; Truelove, J F; Nera, E A

    1978-02-01

    Four infant monkeys were dosed orally with 500 microgram Hg/kg body wt./day /as methylmercury (MeHg) chloride dissolved sodium carbonate) beginning at 1 day of age. Neurological and behavioral signs of MeHg toxicity and blood Hg levels were monitored weekly. At first sign of MeHg intoxication, dosing with MeHg was terminated and the infants were monitored to assess reversal of the signs of MeHg toxicity. The first signs of MeHg toxicity, exhibited as a loss in dexterity and locomotor ability, were observed after 28--29 days of treatment; the blood Hg levels were 8.0--9.4 microgram Hg/g blood. Dosing was terminated at 28--29 days of treatment but the signs of MeHg toxicity continued to develop. The infants became ataxic, blind, comatose and were necropsied at 35--43 days after initiating treatment with MgHg. The mercury concentrations in tissues analyzed after necropsy were highest in liver (55.8 +/- 3.2 microgram Hg/g) followed by occipital cortex (35.6 +/- 4.8 microgram Hg/g) renal cortex (32.8 +/- 1.6 microgram Hg/g). The frontal and temporal cortices had 27.0 +/- 3.4 and 29.6 +/- 4.9 microgram Hg/g respectively while the cerebellar Hg concentration averaged 13.0 +/- 1.5 microgram Hg/g. The mean blood/brain ratio was 0.21 +/- 0.4. Histopathologic lesions were marked in the cerebrum with less severe lesions in the cerebellar nuclei. The Purkinje and granular cells of the cerebellar vermis appeared histologically normal. Lesions were not observed in the peripheral nervous system. The signs of MeHg intoxication, the tissue distribution of MeHg and histopathologic lesions observed in the infant monkeys were similar to those reported for adult monkeys.

  1. Face Pareidolia in the Rhesus Monkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taubert, Jessica; Wardle, Susan G; Flessert, Molly; Leopold, David A; Ungerleider, Leslie G

    2017-08-21

    Face perception in humans and nonhuman primates is rapid and accurate [1-4]. In the human brain, a network of visual-processing regions is specialized for faces [5-7]. Although face processing is a priority of the primate visual system, face detection is not infallible. Face pareidolia is the compelling illusion of perceiving facial features on inanimate objects, such as the illusory face on the surface of the moon. Although face pareidolia is commonly experienced by humans, its presence in other species is unknown. Here we provide evidence for face pareidolia in a species known to possess a complex face-processing system [8-10]: the rhesus monkey (Macaca mulatta). In a visual preference task [11, 12], monkeys looked longer at photographs of objects that elicited face pareidolia in human observers than at photographs of similar objects that did not elicit illusory faces. Examination of eye movements revealed that monkeys fixated the illusory internal facial features in a pattern consistent with how they view photographs of faces [13]. Although the specialized response to faces observed in humans [1, 3, 5-7, 14] is often argued to be continuous across primates [4, 15], it was previously unclear whether face pareidolia arose from a uniquely human capacity. For example, pareidolia could be a product of the human aptitude for perceptual abstraction or result from frequent exposure to cartoons and illustrations that anthropomorphize inanimate objects. Instead, our results indicate that the perception of illusory facial features on inanimate objects is driven by a broadly tuned face-detection mechanism that we share with other species. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  2. Psychophysical chromatic mechanisms in macaque monkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoughton, Cleo M; Lafer-Sousa, Rosa; Gagin, Galina; Conway, Bevil R

    2012-10-24

    Chromatic mechanisms have been studied extensively with psychophysical techniques in humans, but the number and nature of the mechanisms are still controversial. Appeals to monkey neurophysiology are often used to sort out the competing claims and to test hypotheses arising from the experiments in humans, but psychophysical chromatic mechanisms have never been assessed in monkeys. Here we address this issue by measuring color-detection thresholds in monkeys before and after chromatic adaptation, employing a standard approach used to determine chromatic mechanisms in humans. We conducted separate experiments using adaptation configured as either flickering full-field colors or heterochromatic gratings. Full-field colors would favor activity within the visual system at or before the arrival of retinal signals to V1, before the spatial transformation of color signals by the cortex. Conversely, gratings would favor activity within the cortex where neurons are often sensitive to spatial chromatic structure. Detection thresholds were selectively elevated for the colors of full-field adaptation when it modulated along either of the two cardinal chromatic axes that define cone-opponent color space [L vs M or S vs (L + M)], providing evidence for two privileged cardinal chromatic mechanisms implemented early in the visual-processing hierarchy. Adaptation with gratings produced elevated thresholds for colors of the adaptation regardless of its chromatic makeup, suggesting a cortical representation comprised of multiple higher-order mechanisms each selective for a different direction in color space. The results suggest that color is represented by two cardinal channels early in the processing hierarchy and many chromatic channels in brain regions closer to perceptual readout.

  3. Total lymphoid irradiation in rhesus monkeys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vriesendorp, H.M.; Maat, B.; Hogeweg, B.

    Total lymphoid irradiation (TLI) consists of three contiguous fields, a mantle, an inverted Y and a spleen field. TLI induces a state of immunosuppression in patients with Hodgkin disease or in small rodents. Infusion of allogeneic bone marrow cells into mice after TLI led to the development split haemopoietic chimerism and indefinite survival of skin grafts from the bone marrow donor. A protocol for TLI was developed for rhesus monkeys to attempt to verify these interesting observations in a pre-clinical animal model. (Auth.)

  4. Distribution and abundance of sacred monkeys in Igboland, southern Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Lynne R; Tanimola, Adebowale A; Olubode, Oluseun S; Garshelis, David L

    2009-07-01

    Although primates are hunted on a global scale, some species are protected against harassment and killing by taboos or religious doctrines. Sites where the killing of sacred monkeys or the destruction of sacred groves is forbidden may be integral to the conservation of certain species. In 2004, as part of a distribution survey of Sclater's guenon (Cercopithecus sclateri) in southern Nigeria, we investigated reports of sacred monkeys in the Igbo-speaking region of Nigeria. We confirmed nine new sites where primates are protected as sacred: four with tantalus monkeys (Chlorocebus tantalus) and five with mona monkeys (Cercopithecus mona). During 2004-2006, we visited two communities (Akpugoeze and Lagwa) previously known to harbor sacred populations of Ce. sclateri to estimate population abundance and trends. We directly counted all groups and compared our estimates with previous counts when available. We also estimated the size of sacred groves and compared these with grove sizes reported in the literature. The mean size of the sacred groves in Akpugoeze (2.06 ha, n = 10) was similar to others in Africa south of the Sahel, but larger than the average grove in Lagwa (0.49 ha, n = 15). We estimated a total population of 124 Sclater's monkeys in 15 groups in Lagwa and 193 monkeys in 20 groups in Akpugoeze. The Akpugoeze population was relatively stable over two decades, although the proportion of infants declined, and the number of groups increased. As Sclater's monkey does not occur in any official protected areas, sacred populations are important to the species' long-term conservation. Despite the monkeys' destruction of human crops, most local people still adhere to the custom of not killing monkeys. These sites represent ideal locations in which to study the ecology of Sclater's monkey and human-wildlife interactions. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  5. Birth Location, Migration and Clustering of Important Composers: Historical Patterns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borowiecki, Karol; O’Hagan, John

    2010-01-01

    and 1899. This information is compiled from the large, Grove Music Online (2009) encyclopedia. There is also some discussion of the biases evident in choosing “significant” composers. The data show a marked level ofmigration of important composers going back many centuries suggesting that the phenomenon......This article examines the 522 most important composers in the last 800 years, as identified by Charles Murray (2003), in terms of their birth location and migration. It also examines detailed patterns of migration and tendencies to cluster in certain cities for those composers born between 1750...

  6. Cross-sectional study of anxiety symptoms and self-report of awake and sleep bruxism in female TMD patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavares, Luisa Maria Faria; da Silva Parente Macedo, Leonora Cristina; Duarte, Cristina Maria Rabelais; de Goffredo Filho, Gilberto Senechal; de Souza Tesch, Ricardo

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the relationship between levels of anxiety symptoms and prevalence of self-report of awake and sleep bruxism in patients with temporomandibular disorders (TMD). One hundred and eighty-one female patients, aged 19-77 years, were consecutively evaluated. The patients were selected from among those who sought treatment at the TMD and Orofacial Pain Outpatient Clinic of the Petrópolis School of Medicine. All patients completed the questionnaire and underwent clinical examination, both components of the RDC/TMD, in addition to answering questions pertaining to the assessment of levels of anxiety symptoms, taken from the Symptom Check List 90 self-report instrument. The subjects were classified according to the presence of self-reported only awake bruxism, only sleep bruxism, both, or none. A logistic regression procedure was performed to evaluate the possible association through odds ratio between anxiety symptoms and self-reported awake or sleep bruxism. The cofactors for each outcome were age, self-reported bruxism during the circadian period other than the one being evaluated, and the use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors. It was possible to demonstrate the presence of a positive and statistically significant relationship between anxiety levels and self-reported awake bruxism. This finding was not observed in those subjects who reported sleep bruxism. A positive relationship was found between self-reported awake bruxism and levels of anxiety symptoms, but not between sleep bruxism and anxiety.

  7. Scleral Biomechanics in the Aging Monkey Eye

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girard, Michaël J. A.; Suh, J-K. Francis; Bottlang, Michael; Burgoyne, Claude F.; Downs, J. Crawford

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the age-related differences in the inhomogeneous, anisotropic, nonlinear biomechanical properties of posterior sclera from old (22.9 ± 5.3 years) and young (1.5 ± 0.7 years) rhesus monkeys. Methods The posterior scleral shell of each eye was mounted on a custom-built pressurization apparatus, then intraocular pressure (IOP) was elevated from 5 to 45 mmHg while the 3D displacements of the scleral surface were measured using speckle interferometry. Each scleral shell geometry was digitally reconstructed from data generated by a 3D digitizer (topography) and 20 MHz ultrasounds (thickness). An inverse finite element (FE) method incorporating a fiber-reinforced constitutive model was used to extract a unique set of biomechanical properties for each eye. Displacements, thickness, stress, strain, tangent modulus, structural stiffness, and preferred collagen fiber orientation were mapped for each posterior sclera. Results The model yielded 3-D deformations of posterior sclera that matched well with those observed experimentally. The posterior sclera exhibited inhomogeneous, anisotropic, nonlinear mechanical behavior. The sclera was significantly thinner (p = 0.038), and tangent modulus and structural stiffness were significantly higher in old monkeys (p biomechanics, and potentially contribute to age-related susceptibility to glaucomatous vision loss. PMID:19494203

  8. Explicit information reduces discounting behavior in monkeys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John ePearson

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Animals are notoriously impulsive in common laboratory experiments, preferring smaller, sooner rewards to larger, delayed rewards even when this reduces average reward rates. By contrast, the same animals often engage in natural behaviors that require extreme patience, such as food caching, stalking prey, and traveling long distances to high quality food sites. One possible explanation for this discrepancy is that standard laboratory delay discounting tasks artificially inflate impulsivity by subverting animals’ common learning strategies. To test this idea, we examined choices made by rhesus macaques in two variants of a standard delay discounting task. In the conventional variant, post-reward delays were uncued and adjusted to render total trial length constant; in the second, all delays were cued explicitly. We found that measured discounting was significantly reduced in the cued task, with discount rates well below those reported in studies using the standard uncued design. When monkeys had complete information, their decisions were more consistent with a strategy of reward rate maximization. These results indicate that monkeys, and perhaps other animals, are more patient than is normally assumed, and that laboratory measures of delay discounting may overstate impulsivity.

  9. Subarachnoid administration of iohexol in cynomolgus monkeys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drobeck, H.P.; Mayes, B.A.; Barbolt, T.A.; Fabian, R.J.; Kimball, J.P.; Slighter, R.R. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    A non-ionic diagnostic medium, iohexol, was administered by subarachnoid injection to groups of six cynomolgus monkeys and compared with the vehicle, physiologically normal saline, and/or saline of equal osmolality to determine its potential for increasing total protein and leucocyte levels in cerebrospinal fluid. Also investigated was the effect of repeated spinal taps not subsequently followed by the intrathecal injection of test or control articles. In the monkey, unlike man, low-level leucocyte counts were consistently observed following initial withdrawal of spinal fluid. Elevated leucocyte and total protein levels were observed in the present investigations one day to a week after intrathecal injection of radiopaque, vehicle or saline solution. Total protein returned to normal levels earlier than did leucocyte counts. However, repeated needle puncture alone was found to be sufficient to cause an elevation of leucocytes 3 to 4 times the baseline level, while inflammatory effects were observed histologically only when autopsy was performed soon after the final spinal tap. (orig.)

  10. Marmoset monkeys evaluate third-party reciprocity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawai, Nobuyuki; Yasue, Miyuki; Banno, Taku; Ichinohe, Noritaka

    2014-05-01

    Many non-human primates have been observed to reciprocate and to understand reciprocity in one-to-one social exchanges. A recent study demonstrated that capuchin monkeys are sensitive to both third-party reciprocity and violation of reciprocity; however, whether this sensitivity is a function of general intelligence, evidenced by their larger brain size relative to other primates, remains unclear. We hypothesized that highly pro-social primates, even with a relatively smaller brain, would be sensitive to others' reciprocity. Here, we show that common marmosets discriminated between human actors who reciprocated in social exchanges with others and those who did not. Monkeys accepted rewards less frequently from non-reciprocators than they did from reciprocators when the non-reciprocators had retained all food items, but they accepted rewards from both actors equally when they had observed reciprocal exchange between the actors. These results suggest that mechanisms to detect unfair reciprocity in third-party social exchanges do not require domain-general higher cognitive ability based on proportionally larger brains, but rather emerge from the cooperative and pro-social tendencies of species, and thereby suggest this ability evolved in multiple primate lineages. © 2014 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  11. The use of camera traps to identify the set of scavengers preying on the carcass of a golden snub-nosed monkey (Rhinopithecus roxellana).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zhi-Pang; Qi, Xiao-Guang; Garber, Paul A; Jin, Tong; Guo, Song-Tao; Li, Sheng; Li, Bao-Guo

    2014-01-01

    There exists very limited information on the set of scavengers that feed on the carcasses of wild primates. Here, we describe, based on information collected using a remote camera trap, carnivores consuming/scavenging the carcass of a wild golden snub-nosed monkey (Rhinopithecus roxellana) in the Laohegou Nature Reserve, Sichuan, China. During a 3 month behavioral and ecology study of a band of golden snub-nosed monkeys (March through May 2013), we encountered the carcass of an adult male (male golden snub-nosed monkeys weigh approximately 12-16 kg). After examining the dead monkey, we returned it to the death site and set out a camera trap to record the behavior and identity of scavengers. Over the course of 25 days, we collected 4145 photographs taken by the camera trap. Scavengers identified from these photographs include a masked civet (Paguma larvata), Asiatic black bear (Ursus thibetanus), large-billed crow (Corvus macrorhynchos) and the chestnut rat (Rattus fulvescens). No member of the golden snub-nosed monkey's social group, which was composed of approximately 120 individuals, was found to return to the general area of the death site. The masked civet fed principally on the face and intestines of the corpse at night, while the black bear consumed most of the body of the dead monkey during both the daytime and nighttime. These two taxa consumed virtually the entire carcass in one week. We suggest that the use of camera traps offers a powerful research tool to identify the scavenger community of a given ecosystem.

  12. Suicide and sleep: Is it a bad thing to be awake when reason sleeps?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perlis, Michael L.; Grandner, Michael A.; Chakravorty, Subhajit; Bernert, Rebecca A.; Brown, Gregory K.; Thase, Michael E.

    2016-01-01

    Suicide is the second leading cause of death, worldwide, for those between the ages of 24 and 44 y old. In 2013, more than 41,000 suicides occurred in the United States. These statistics underscore the need to 1) understand why people die by suicide and 2) identify risk factors that are potentially modifiable. While it has been posited that sleep disturbance may represent one such factor, systematic research in this arena did not begin until the 2000s. Since that time, sleep disturbance has been reliably identified as a risk factor for suicidal ideation, suicide attempts, and suicide. While insomnia, nightmares, and other sleep disorders have each been found to contribute to the risk for suicidal ideation and behavior, it is also possible that these factors share some common variance. One possibility is that sleep disturbance results in being awake at night, and being awake at night also confers risk. The hypothesis proffered here is that being awake when one is not biologically prepared to be so results in “hypofrontality” and diminished executive function, and that this represents a common pathway to suicidal ideation and behavior. Such a proposition is highly testable under a variety of possible protocols. The current review summarizes the extant literature on suicide rates by time-of-day, and discusses circadian, psychosocial, and neuro-cognitive explanations of risk. Such a focus promises to enhance our understanding of how sleep disturbance may confer risk, allows for the identification of future lines of research, and further justifies the need for interventions that promote good sleep continuity among at-risk individuals. PMID:26706755

  13. In Vivo Tumour Mapping Using Electrocorticography Alterations During Awake Brain Surgery: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boussen, Salah; Velly, Lionel; Benar, Christian; Metellus, Philippe; Bruder, Nicolas; Trébuchon, Agnès

    2016-09-01

    During awake brain surgery for tumour resection, in situ EEG recording (ECoG) is used to identify eloquent areas surrounding the tumour. We used the ECoG setup to record the electrical activity of cortical and subcortical tumours and then performed frequency and connectivity analyses in order to identify ECoG impairments and map tumours. We selected 16 patients with cortical (8) and subcortical (8) tumours undergoing awake brain surgery. For each patient, we computed the spectral content of tumoural and healthy areas in each frequency band. We computed connectivity of each electrode using connectivity markers (linear and non-linear correlations, phase-locking and coherence). We performed comparisons between healthy and tumour electrodes. The ECoG alterations were used to implement automated classification of the electrodes using clustering or neural network algorithms. ECoG alterations were used to image cortical tumours.Cortical tumours were found to profoundly alter all frequency contents (normalized and absolute power), with an increase in the δ activity and a decreases for the other bands (P < 0.05). Cortical tumour electrodes showed high level of connectivity compared to surrounding electrodes (all markers, P < 0.05). For subcortical tumours, a relative decrease in the γ1 band and in the alpha band in absolute amplitude (P < 0.05) were the only abnormalities. The neural network algorithm classification had a good performance: 93.6 % of the electrodes were classified adequately on a test subject. We found significant spectral and connectivity ECoG changes for cortical tumours, which allowed tumour recognition. Artificial neural algorithm pattern recognition seems promising for electrode classification in awake tumour surgery.

  14. Awake craniotomy for glioma resection: Technical aspects and initial results in a single institution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trimble, Gillian; McStravick, Clodagh; Farling, Peter; Megaw, Katie; McKinstry, Steven; Smyth, Graham; Law, Gillian; Courtney, Heather; Quigley, Gavin; Flannery, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Although variations in the technique of awake craniotomy (AC) have been widely reported, a key member of this interdisciplinary procedure is the healthcare professional performing assessments of neurological function during resection. The expertise of the latter will depend on the neurological function to be tested and on available resources of the institution. This report details our initial experience of an AC service utilizing the expertise of a speech and language therapist (SLT) and an experienced neuro-physiotherapist (NP) to monitor patient function during glioma resection. Forty-five patients underwent 50 AC procedures for eloquently located gliomas over a 3-year period. Patients with a glioma involving speech or sensorimotor areas were assessed preoperatively by the SLT/NP respectively. The same therapist monitored the patient's neurological function intraoperatively and executed a rehabilitation program tailored to the needs of the patient in the postoperative period. Three patients underwent biopsy only, due to intraoperative seizures precluding intraoperative mapping (2 cases) or speech arrest on stimulation of a small recurrent tumor. The remaining 47 cases were suitable for repetitive neurological assessment "awake" during tumor debulking. One patient with a large sensorimotor tumor developed intraoperative hemiparesis due to outward brain herniation (which recovered postoperatively). Ten patients developed a new or worsened neurological deficit in the initial postoperative period (6 were detected intraoperatively), of which 5 eventually had resolution and returned to baseline function within 2 weeks. In our initial experience based anecdotally on a previous similar "non-awake" caseload, we have found AC with the input of the SLT/NP to be a key component in ensuring optimal functional outcomes for patients with gliomas in eloquently located areas.

  15. The Cost of Brain Surgery: Awake vs Asleep Craniotomy for Perirolandic Region Tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eseonu, Chikezie I; Rincon-Torroella, Jordina; ReFaey, Karim; Quiñones-Hinojosa, Alfredo

    2017-08-01

    Cost effectiveness has become an important factor in the health care system, requiring surgeons to improve efficacy of procedures while reducing costs. An awake craniotomy (AC) with direct cortical stimulation (DCS) presents one method to resect eloquent region tumors; however, some authors assert that this procedure is an expensive alternative to surgery under general anesthesia (GA) with neuromonitoring. To evaluate the cost effectiveness and clinical outcomes between AC and GA patients. Retrospective analysis of a cohort of 17 patients with perirolandic gliomas who underwent an AC with DCS were case-control matched with 23 patients with perirolandic gliomas who underwent surgery under GA with neuromonitoring (ie, motor-evoked potentials, somatosensory-evoked potentials, phase reversal). Inpatient costs, quality-adjusted life years (QALY), extent of resection, and neurological outcome were compared between the groups. Total inpatient expense per patient was $34 804 in the AC group and $46 798 in the GA group ( P = .046). QALY score for the AC group was 0.97 and 0.47 for the GA group ( P = .041). The incremental cost per QALY for the AC group was $82 720 less than the GA group. Postoperative Karnofsky performance status was 91.8 in the AC group and 81.3 in the GA group (P = .047). Length of hospitalization was 4.12 days in the AC group and 7.61 days in the GA group ( P = .049). The total inpatient costs for awake craniotomies were lower than surgery under GA. This study suggests better cost effectiveness and neurological outcome with awake craniotomies for perirolandic gliomas. Copyright © 2017 by the Congress of Neurological Surgeons

  16. Electrocorticographic Frequency Alteration Mapping of Speech Cortex during an Awake Craniotomy: Case Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breshears, J.; Sharma, M.; Anderson, N.R.; Rashid, S.; Leuthardt, E.C.

    2010-01-01

    Objective Traditional electrocortical stimulation (ECS) mapping is limited by the lengthy serial investigation (one location at a time) and the risk of afterdischarges in localizing eloquent cortex. Electrocorticographic frequency alteration mapping (EFAM) allows the parallel investigation of many cortical sites in much less time and with no risk of afterdischarges because of its passive nature. We examined its use with ECS in the context of language mapping during an awake craniotomy for a tumor resection. Clinical Presentation The patient was a 61-year-old right-handed Caucasian male who presented with headache and mild aphasia. Imaging demonstrated a 3-cm cystic mass in the posterior temporal-parietal lobe. The patient underwent an awake craniotomy for the mapping of his speech cortex and resection of the mass. Intervention Using a 32-contact electrode array, electrocorticographic signals were recorded from the exposed cortex as the patient participated in a 3-min screening task involving active (patient naming visually presented words) and rest (patient silent) conditions. A spectral comparison of the 2 conditions revealed specific cortical locations associated with activation during speech. The patient was then widely mapped using ECS. Three of 4 sites identified by ECS were also identified passively and in parallel by EFAM, 2 with statistical significance and the third by qualitative inspection. Conclusion EFAM was technically achieved in an awake craniotomy patient and had good concordance with ECS mapping. Because it poses no risk of afterdischarges and offers substantial time savings, EFAM holds promise for future development as an adjunct intraoperative mapping tool. Additionally, the cortical signals obtained by this modality can be utilized for localization in the presence of a tumor adjacent to the eloquent regions. PMID:19940544

  17. Continuous physical examination during subcortical resection in awake craniotomy patients: Its usefulness and surgical outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunyaratavej, Krishnapundha; Sangtongjaraskul, Sunisa; Lerdsirisopon, Surunchana; Tuchinda, Lawan

    2016-08-01

    To evaluate the value of physical examination as a monitoring tool during subcortical resection in awake craniotomy patients and surgical outcomes. Authors reviewed medical records of patients underwent awake craniotomy with continuous physical examination for pathology adjacent to the eloquent area. Between January 2006 and August 2015, there were 37 patients underwent awake craniotomy with continuous physical examination. Pathology was located in the left cerebral hemisphere in 28 patients (75.7%). Thirty patients (81.1%) had neuroepithelial tumors. Degree of resections were defined as total, subtotal, and partial in 16 (43.2%), 11 (29.7%) and 10 (27.0%) patients, respectively. Median follow up duration was 14 months. The reasons for termination of subcortical resection were divided into 3 groups as follows: 1) by anatomical landmark with the aid of neuronavigation in 20 patients (54%), 2) by reaching subcortical stimulation threshold in 8 patients (21.6%), and 3) by abnormal physical examination in 9 patients (24.3%). Among these 3 groups, there were statistically significant differences in the intraoperative (p=0.002) and early postoperative neurological deficit (p=0.005) with the lowest deficit in neuronavigation group. However, there were no differences in neurological outcome at later follow up (3-months p=0.103; 6-months p=0.285). There were no differences in the degree of resection among the groups. Continuous physical examination has shown to be of value as an additional layer of monitoring of subcortical white matter during resection and combining several methods may help increase the efficacy of mapping and monitoring of subcortical functions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Clinical outcomes from maximum-safe resection of primary and metastatic brain tumors using awake craniotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groshev, Anastasia; Padalia, Devang; Patel, Sephalie; Garcia-Getting, Rosemarie; Sahebjam, Solmaz; Forsyth, Peter A; Vrionis, Frank D; Etame, Arnold B

    2017-06-01

    To retrospectively analyze outcomes in patients undergoing awake craniotomies for tumor resection at our institution in terms of extent of resection, functional preservation and length of hospital stay. All cases of adults undergoing awake-craniotomy from September 2012-February 2015 were retrospectively reviewed based on an IRB approved protocol. Information regarding patient age, sex, cancer type, procedure type, location, hospital stay, extent of resection, and postoperative complications was extracted. 76 patient charts were analyzed. Resected cancer types included metastasis to the brain (41%), glioblastoma (34%), WHO grade III anaplastic astrocytoma (18%), WHO grade II glioma (4%), WHO grade I glioma (1%), and meningioma (1%). Over a half of procedures were performed in the frontal lobes, followed by temporal, and occipital locations. The most common indication was for motor cortex and primary somatosensory area lesions followed by speech. Extent of resection was gross total for 59% patients, near-gross total for 34%, and subtotal for 7%. Average hospital stay for the cohort was 1.7days with 75% of patients staying at the hospital for only 24h or less post surgery. In the postoperative period, 67% of patients experienced improvement in neurological status, 21% of patients experienced no change, 7% experienced transient neurological deficits, which resolved within two months post op, 1% experienced transient speech deficit, and 3% experienced permanent weakness. In a consecutive series of 76 patients undergoing maximum-safe resection for primary and metastatic brain tumors, awake-craniotomy was associated with a short hospital stay and low postoperative complications rate. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Fast and Accurate Rat Head Motion Tracking With Point Sources for Awake Brain PET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, Alan; Staelens, Steven; Stroobants, Sigrid; Verhaeghe, Jeroen

    2017-07-01

    To avoid the confounding effects of anesthesia and immobilization stress in rat brain positron emission tomography (PET), motion tracking-based unrestrained awake rat brain imaging is being developed. In this paper, we propose a fast and accurate rat headmotion tracking method based on small PET point sources. PET point sources (3-4) attached to the rat's head are tracked in image space using 15-32-ms time frames. Our point source tracking (PST) method was validated using a manually moved microDerenzo phantom that was simultaneously tracked with an optical tracker (OT) for comparison. The PST method was further validated in three awake [ 18 F]FDG rat brain scans. Compared with the OT, the PST-based correction at the same frame rate (31.2 Hz) reduced the reconstructed FWHM by 0.39-0.66 mm for the different tested rod sizes of the microDerenzo phantom. The FWHM could be further reduced by another 0.07-0.13 mm when increasing the PST frame rate (66.7 Hz). Regional brain [ 18 F]FDG uptake in the motion corrected scan was strongly correlated ( ) with that of the anesthetized reference scan for all three cases ( ). The proposed PST method allowed excellent and reproducible motion correction in awake in vivo experiments. In addition, there is no need of specialized tracking equipment or additional calibrations to be performed, the point sources are practically imperceptible to the rat, and PST is ideally suitable for small bore scanners, where optical tracking might be challenging.

  20. Suicide and sleep: Is it a bad thing to be awake when reason sleeps?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perlis, Michael L; Grandner, Michael A; Chakravorty, Subhajit; Bernert, Rebecca A; Brown, Gregory K; Thase, Michael E

    2016-10-01

    Suicide is the second leading cause of death, worldwide, for those between the ages of 24 and 44 y old. In 2013, more than 41,000 suicides occurred in the United States. These statistics underscore the need to 1) understand why people die by suicide and 2) identify risk factors that are potentially modifiable. While it has been posited that sleep disturbance may represent one such factor, systematic research in this arena did not begin until the 2000s. Since that time, sleep disturbance has been reliably identified as a risk factor for suicidal ideation, suicide attempts, and suicide. While insomnia, nightmares, and other sleep disorders have each been found to contribute to the risk for suicidal ideation and behavior, it is also possible that these factors share some common variance. One possibility is that sleep disturbance results in being awake at night, and being awake at night also confers risk. The hypothesis proffered here is that being awake when one is not biologically prepared to be so results in "hypofrontality" and diminished executive function, and that this represents a common pathway to suicidal ideation and behavior. Such a proposition is highly testable under a variety of possible protocols. The current review summarizes the extant literature on suicide rates by time-of-day, and discusses circadian, psychosocial, and neurocognitive explanations of risk. Such a focus promises to enhance our understanding of how sleep disturbance may confer risk, allows for the identification of future lines of research, and further justifies the need for interventions that promote good sleep continuity among at-risk individuals. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Qualitative assessment of awake nasopharyngoscopy for prediction of oral appliance treatment response in obstructive sleep apnoea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherland, Kate; Chan, Andrew S L; Ngiam, Joachim; Darendeliler, M Ali; Cistulli, Peter A

    2018-01-23

    Clinical methods to identify responders to oral appliance (OA) therapy for obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) are needed. Awake nasopharyngoscopy during mandibular advancement, with image capture and subsequent processing and analysis, may predict treatment response. A qualitative assessment of awake nasopharyngoscopy would be simpler for clinical practice. We aimed to determine if a qualitative classification system of nasopharyngoscopic observations reflects treatment response. OSA patients were recruited for treatment with a customised two-piece OA. A custom scoring sheet was used to record observations of the pharyngeal airway (velopharynx, oropharynx, hypopharynx) during supine nasopharyngoscopy in response to mandibular advancement and performance of the Müller manoeuvre. Qualitative scores for degree ( 75%), collapse pattern (concentric, anteroposterior, lateral) and diameter change (uniform, anteroposterior, lateral) were recorded. Treatment outcome was confirmed by polysomnography after a titration period of 14.6 ± 9.8 weeks. Treatment response was defined as (1) Treatment AHI  50% AHI reduction and (3) > 50% AHI reduction. Eighty OSA patients (53.8% male) underwent nasopharyngoscopy. The most common naspharyngoscopic observation with mandibular advancement was a small ( 75% velopharyngeal collapse on performance of the Müller manoeuvre. Mandibular advancement reduced the observed level of pharyngeal collapse at all three pharyngeal regions (p < 0.001). None of the nasopharyngoscopic qualitative scores differed between responder and non-responder groups. Qualitative assessment of awake nasopharyngoscopy appears useful for assessing the effect of mandibular advancement on upper airway collapsibility. However, it is not sensitive enough to predict oral appliance treatment outcome.

  2. Long-range traveling waves of activity triggered by local dichoptic stimulation in V1 of behaving monkeys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhiyong; Heeger, David J.; Blake, Randolph

    2014-01-01

    Traveling waves of cortical activity, in which local stimulation triggers lateral spread of activity to distal locations, have been hypothesized to play an important role in cortical function. However, there is conflicting physiological evidence for the existence of spreading traveling waves of neural activity triggered locally. Dichoptic stimulation, in which the two eyes view dissimilar monocular patterns, can lead to dynamic wave-like fluctuations in visual perception and therefore, provides a promising means for identifying and studying cortical traveling waves. Here, we used voltage-sensitive dye imaging to test for the existence of traveling waves of activity in the primary visual cortex of awake, fixating monkeys viewing dichoptic stimuli. We find clear traveling waves that are initiated by brief, localized contrast increments in one of the monocular patterns and then, propagate at speeds of ∼30 mm/s. These results demonstrate that under an appropriate visual context, circuitry in visual cortex in alert animals is capable of supporting long-range traveling waves triggered by local stimulation. PMID:25343785

  3. Chemical composition and physicochemical properties of green banana (Musa acuminata x balbisiana Colla cv. Awak) flour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haslinda, W H; Cheng, L H; Chong, L C; Noor Aziah, A A

    2009-01-01

    Flour was prepared from peeled and unpeeled banana Awak ABB. Samples prepared were subjected to analysis for determination of chemical composition, mineral, dietary fibre, starch and total phenolics content, antioxidant activity and pasting properties. In general, flour prepared from unpeeled banana was found to show enhanced nutrition values with higher contents of mineral, dietary fibre and total phenolics. Hence, flour fortified with peel showed relatively higher antioxidant activity. On the other hand, better pasting properties were shown when banana flour was blended with peel. It was found that a relatively lower pasting temperature, peak viscosity, breakdown, final viscosity and setback were evident in a sample blended with peel.

  4. Challenges in pediatric neuroanesthesia: awake craniotomy, intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging, and interventional neuroradiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClain, Craig D; Landrigan-Ossar, Mary

    2014-03-01

    This article gives a review of 3 challenges in caring for children undergoing neurosurgical and neurointerventional procedures. Anesthesiologists may have experience with certain aspects of these situations but may not have extensive experience with each clinical setting. This review addresses issues with awake craniotomy, intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging, and neurointerventional procedures in children with neurologic disease. Familiarization with these complex clinical scenarios and their unique considerations allows the anesthesiologist to deliver optimal care and helps facilitate the best possible outcome for these patients. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Laser pulse propagation in a meter scale rubidium vapor/plasma cell in AWAKE experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Joulaei, Atefeh; Berti, Nicolas; Kasparian, Jerome; Mirzanejhad, Saeed; Muggli, Patric

    2016-01-01

    We present the results of numerical studies of laser pulse propagating in a 3.5 cm Rb vapor cell in the linear dispersion regime by using a 1D model and a 2D code that has been modified for our special case. The 2D simulation finally aimed at finding laser beam parameters suitable to make the Rb vapor fully ionized to obtain a uniform, 10 m-long, at least 1 mm in radius plasma in the next step for the AWAKE experiment.

  6. Bunch rotation tests at SPS flat top for the AWAKE experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Argyropoulos, T; Bohl, T; Esteban Müller, J F; Petrenko, A; Shaposhnikova, E; Timko, H

    2013-01-01

    This note summarises the results of two MDs on bunch rotation at SPS flat top. The first MD was carried out on 11th July 2012 with the Q26 optics, while the second MD on the 30th October 2012 used the Q20 optics. To obtain a short bunch length, which is important for the plasma wake-field acceleration project AWAKE, the bunches have been rotated in longitudinal phase space on the SPS flat top. The aim of the MDs was to obtain first estimates of what bunch length, intensity, and transverse emittances - which are crucial for the project - can be achieved for high-intensity single bunches.

  7. Oculomotor Behavior Metrics Change According to Circadian Phase and Time Awake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn-Evans, Erin E.; Tyson, Terence L.; Cravalho, Patrick; Feick, Nathan; Stone, Leland S.

    2017-01-01

    There is a need for non-invasive, objective measures to forecast performance impairment arising from sleep loss and circadian misalignment, particularly in safety-sensitive occupations. Eye-tracking devices have been used in some operational scenarios, but such devices typically focus on eyelid closures and slow rolling eye movements and are susceptible to the intrusion of head movement artifacts. We hypothesized that an expanded suite of oculomotor behavior metrics, collected during a visual tracking task, would change according to circadian phase and time awake, and could be used as a marker of performance impairment.

  8. Composer: Authoring Tool for iTV Programs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.L. Guimarães (Rodrigo); R.M.R. Costa; L.F.G. Soares

    2008-01-01

    htmlabstractThis paper presents Composer, an authoring tool to help creating interactive TV programs for the Brazilian Terrestrial Digital TV System. In Composer, several abstractions are defined creating different document views (structural, temporal, layout and textual). One of these views, the

  9. FeelSound : Collaborative Composing of Acoustic Music

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fikkert, Wim; Hakvoort, Michiel; van der Vet, Paul; Nijholt, Anton

    2009-01-01

    FeelSound is a multi-user application for collaboratively composing music in an entertaining way. Up to four composers can jointly create acoustic music on a top-projection multitouch sensitive table. The notes of an acoustic instrument are represented on a harmonic table and, by drawing shapes on

  10. Affective evolutionary music composition with MetaCompose

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scirea, Marco; Togelius, Julian; Eklund, Peter

    2017-01-01

    This paper describes the MetaCompose music generator, a compositional, extensible framework for affective music composition. In this context ‘affective’ refers to the music generator’s ability to express emotional information. The main purpose of MetaCompose is to create music in real-time that can...

  11. The Links between Handwriting and Composing for Y6 Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medwell, Jane; Strand, Steve; Wray, David

    2009-01-01

    Although handwriting is often considered a matter of presentation, a substantial body of international research suggests that the role of handwriting in children's composing has been neglected. Automaticity in handwriting is now seen as of key importance in composing but this proposition is relatively untested in the UK and the assumption has been…

  12. Grammar for College Writing: A Sentence-Composing Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killgallon, Don; Killgallon, Jenny

    2010-01-01

    Across America, in thousands of classrooms, from elementary school to high school, the time-tested sentence-composing approach has given students tools to become better writers. Now the authors present a much anticipated sentence-composing grammar worktext for college writing. This book presents a new and easier way to understand grammar: (1) Noun…

  13. Dissociation of item and source memory in rhesus monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basile, Benjamin M; Hampton, Robert R

    2017-09-01

    Source memory, or memory for the context in which a memory was formed, is a defining characteristic of human episodic memory and source memory errors are a debilitating symptom of memory dysfunction. Evidence for source memory in nonhuman primates is sparse despite considerable evidence for other types of sophisticated memory and the practical need for good models of episodic memory in nonhuman primates. A previous study showed that rhesus monkeys confused the identity of a monkey they saw with a monkey they heard, but only after an extended memory delay. This suggests that they initially remembered the source - visual or auditory - of the information but forgot the source as time passed. Here, we present a monkey model of source memory that is based on this previous study. In each trial, monkeys studied two images, one that they simply viewed and touched and the other that they classified as a bird, fish, flower, or person. In a subsequent memory test, they were required to select the image from one source but avoid the other. With training, monkeys learned to suppress responding to images from the to-be-avoided source. After longer memory intervals, monkeys continued to show reliable item memory, discriminating studied images from distractors, but made many source memory errors. Monkeys discriminated source based on study method, not study order, providing preliminary evidence that our manipulation of retention interval caused errors due to source forgetting instead of source confusion. Finally, some monkeys learned to select remembered images from either source on cue, showing that they did indeed remember both items and both sources. This paradigm potentially provides a new model to study a critical aspect of episodic memory in nonhuman primates. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Distinct neuronal interactions in anterior inferotemporal areas of macaque monkeys during retrieval of object association memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirabayashi, Toshiyuki; Tamura, Keita; Takeuchi, Daigo; Takeda, Masaki; Koyano, Kenji W; Miyashita, Yasushi

    2014-07-09

    In macaque monkeys, the anterior inferotemporal cortex, a region crucial for object memory processing, is composed of two adjacent, hierarchically distinct areas, TE and 36, for which different functional roles and neuronal responses in object memory tasks have been characterized. However, it remains unknown how the neuronal interactions differ between these areas during memory retrieval. Here, we conducted simultaneous recordings from multiple single-units in each of these areas while monkeys performed an object association memory task and examined the inter-area differences in neuronal interactions during the delay period. Although memory neurons showing sustained activity for the presented cue stimulus, cue-holding (CH) neurons, interacted with each other in both areas, only those neurons in area 36 interacted with another type of memory neurons coding for the to-be-recalled paired associate (pair-recall neurons) during memory retrieval. Furthermore, pairs of CH neurons in area TE showed functional coupling in response to each individual object during memory retention, whereas the same class of neuron pairs in area 36 exhibited a comparable strength of coupling in response to both associated objects. These results suggest predominant neuronal interactions in area 36 during the mnemonic processing, which may underlie the pivotal role of this brain area in both storage and retrieval of object association memory. Copyright © 2014 the authors 0270-6474/14/349377-12$15.00/0.

  15. Resting state functional connectivity magnetic resonance imaging integrated with intraoperative neuronavigation for functional mapping after aborted awake craniotomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batra, Prag; Bandt, S. Kathleen; Leuthardt, Eric C.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Awake craniotomy is currently the gold standard for aggressive tumor resections in eloquent cortex. However, a significant subset of patients is unable to tolerate this procedure, particularly the very young or old or those with psychiatric comorbidities, cardiopulmonary comorbidities, or obesity, among other conditions. In these cases, typical alternative procedures include biopsy alone or subtotal resection, both of which are associated with diminished surgical outcomes. Case Description: Here, we report the successful use of a preoperatively obtained resting state functional connectivity magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) integrated with intraoperative neuronavigation software in order to perform functional cortical mapping in the setting of an aborted awake craniotomy due to loss of airway. Conclusion: Resting state functional connectivity MRI integrated with intraoperative neuronavigation software can provide an alternative option for functional cortical mapping in the setting of an aborted awake craniotomy. PMID:26958419

  16. Diagnostic work up for language testing in patients undergoing awake craniotomy for brain lesions in language areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilotta, Federico; Stazi, Elisabetta; Titi, Luca; Lalli, Diana; Delfini, Roberto; Santoro, Antonio; Rosa, Giovanni

    2014-06-01

    Awake craniotomy is the technique of choice in patients with brain tumours adjacent to primary and accessory language areas (Broca's and Wernicke's areas). Language testing should be aimed to detect preoperative deficits, to promptly identify the occurrence of new intraoperative impairments and to establish the course of postoperative language status. Aim of this case series is to describe our experience with a dedicated language testing work up to evaluate patients with or at risk for language disturbances undergoing awake craniotomy for brain tumour resection. Pre- and intra operative testing was accomplished with 8 tests. Intraoperative evaluation was accomplished when patients were fully cooperative (Ramsey awake craniotomy for brain tumour resection with preoperative language disturbances or at risk for postoperative language deficits. This approach allows a systematic evaluation and recording of language function status and can be accomplished even when a neuropsychologist or speech therapist are not involved in the operation crew.

  17. A Time-Composable Operating System for the Patmos Processor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ziccardi, Marco; Schoeberl, Martin; Vardanega, Tullio

    2015-01-01

    -composable operating system, on top of a time-composable processor, facilitates incremental development, which is highly desirable for industry. This paper makes a twofold contribution. First, we present enhancements to the Patmos processor to allow achieving time composability at the operating system level. Second......, we extend an existing time-composable operating system, TiCOS, to make best use of advanced Patmos hardware features in the pursuit of time composability.......In the last couple of decades we have witnessed a steady growth in the complexity and widespread of real-time systems. In order to master the rising complexity in the timing behaviour of those systems, rightful attention has been given to the development of time-predictable computer architectures...

  18. Dissecting the mechanisms of squirrel monkey (Saimiri boliviensis) social learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopper, Lm; Holmes, An; Williams, LE; Brosnan, Sf

    2013-01-01

    Although the social learning abilities of monkeys have been well documented, this research has only focused on a few species. Furthermore, of those that also incorporated dissections of social learning mechanisms, the majority studied either capuchins (Cebus apella) or marmosets (Callithrix jacchus). To gain a broader understanding of how monkeys gain new skills, we tested squirrel monkeys (Saimiri boliviensis) which have never been studied in tests of social learning mechanisms. To determine whether S. boliviensis can socially learn, we ran "open diffusion" tests with monkeys housed in two social groups (N = 23). Over the course of 10 20-min sessions, the monkeys in each group observed a trained group member retrieving a mealworm from a bidirectional task (the "Slide-box"). Two thirds (67%) of these monkeys both learned how to operate the Slide-box and they also moved the door significantly more times in the direction modeled by the trained demonstrator than the alternative direction. To tease apart the underlying social learning mechanisms we ran a series of three control conditions with 35 squirrel monkeys that had no previous experience with the Slide-box. The first replicated the experimental open diffusion sessions but without the inclusion of a trained model, the second was a no-information control with dyads of monkeys, and the third was a 'ghost' display shown to individual monkeys. The first two controls tested for the importance of social support (mere presence effect) and the ghost display showed the affordances of the task to the monkeys. The monkeys showed a certain level of success in the group control (54% of subjects solved the task on one or more occasions) and paired controls (28% were successful) but none were successful in the ghost control. We propose that the squirrel monkeys' learning, observed in the experimental open diffusion tests, can be best described by a combination of social learning mechanisms in concert; in this case, those

  19. Comment on "Monkey vocal tracts are speech-ready".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieberman, Philip

    2017-07-01

    Monkey vocal tracts are capable of producing monkey speech, not the full range of articulate human speech. The evolution of human speech entailed both anatomy and brains. Fitch, de Boer, Mathur, and Ghazanfar in Science Advances claim that "monkey vocal tracts are speech-ready," and conclude that "…the evolution of human speech capabilities required neural change rather than modifications of vocal anatomy." Neither premise is consistent either with the data presented and the conclusions reached by de Boer and Fitch themselves in their own published papers on the role of anatomy in the evolution of human speech or with the body of independent studies published since the 1950s.

  20. Loss of metabolites from monkey striatum during PET with FDOPA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cumming, P; Munk, O L; Doudet, D

    2001-01-01

    constants using data recorded during 240 min of FDOPA circulation in normal monkeys and in monkeys with unilateral 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) lesions. Use of the extended models increased the magnitudes of K(D)(i) and k(D)(3) in striatum; in the case of k(D)(3), variance...... of the estimate was substantially improved upon correction for metabolite loss. The rate constants for metabolite loss were higher in MPTP-lesioned monkey striatum than in normal striatum. The high correlation between individual estimates of k(Lin)(cl) and k(DA)(9) suggests that both rate constants reveal loss...

  1. Awake language mapping and 3-Tesla intraoperative MRI-guided volumetric resection for gliomas in language areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Junfeng; Wu, Jinsong; Yao, Chengjun; Zhuang, Dongxiao; Qiu, Tianming; Hu, Xiaobing; Zhang, Jie; Gong, Xiu; Liang, Weimin; Mao, Ying; Zhou, Liangfu

    2013-09-01

    The use of both awake surgery and intraoperative MRI (iMRI) has been reported to optimize the maximal safe resection of gliomas. However, there has been little research into combining these two demanding procedures. We report our unique experience with, and methodology of, awake surgery in a movable iMRI system, and we quantitatively evaluate the contribution of the combination on the extent of resection (EOR) and functional outcome of patients with gliomas involving language areas. From March 2011 to November 2011, 30 consecutive patients who underwent awake surgery with iMRI guidance were prospectively investigated. The EOR was assessed by volumetric analysis. Language assessment was conducted before surgery and 1 week, 1 month, 3 months and 6 months after surgery using the Aphasia Battery of Chinese. Awake language mapping integrated with 3.0 Tesla iMRI was safely performed for all patients. An additional resection was conducted in 11 of 30 patients (36.7%) after iMRI. The median EOR significantly increased from 92.5% (range, 75.1-97.0%) to 100% (range, 92.6-100%) as a result of iMRI (p<0.01). Gross total resection was achieved in 18 patients (60.0%), and in seven of those patients (23.3%), the gross total resection could be attributed to iMRI. A total of 12 patients (40.0%) suffered from transient language deficits; however, only one (3.3%) patient developed a permanent deficit. This study demonstrates the potential utility of combining awake craniotomy with iMRI; it is safe and reliable to perform awake surgery using a movable iMRI. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Comparative analysis of monotherapy versus duotherapy antiseizure drug management for postoperative seizure control in patients undergoing an awake craniotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eseonu, Chikezie I; Eguia, Francisco; Garcia, Oscar; Kaplan, Peter W; Quiñones-Hinojosa, Alfredo

    2018-06-01

    OBJECTIVE Postoperative seizures are a common complication in patients undergoing an awake craniotomy, given the cortical manipulation during tumor resection and the electrical cortical stimulation for brain mapping. However, little evidence exists about the efficacy of postoperative seizure prophylaxis. This study aims to determine the most appropriate antiseizure drug (ASD) management regimen following an awake craniotomy. METHODS The authors performed a retrospective analysis of data pertaining to patients who underwent an awake craniotomy for brain tumor from 2007 to 2015 performed by a single surgeon. Patients were divided into 2 groups, those who received a single ASD (the monotherapy group) and those who received 2 types of ASDs (the duotherapy group). Patient demographics, symptoms, tumor characteristics, hospitalization details, and seizure outcome were evaluated. Multivariable logistic regression was used to evaluate numerous clinical variables associated with postoperative seizures. RESULTS A total of 81 patients underwent an awake craniotomy for tumor resection of an eloquent brain lesion. Preoperative baseline characteristics were comparable between the 2 groups. The postoperative seizure rate was 21.7% in the monotherapy group and 5.7% in the duotherapy group (p = 0.044). Seizure outcome at 6 months' follow-up was assessed with the Engel classification scale. The duotherapy group had a significantly higher proportion of seizure-free (Engel Class I) patients than the monotherapy group (90% vs 60%, p = 0.027). The length of stay was similar, 4.02 days in the monotherapy group and 4.51 days in the duotherapy group (p = 0.193). The 90-day readmission rate was higher for the monotherapy group (26.1% vs 8.5% in the duotherapy group, p = 0.044). Multivariate logistic regression showed that preoperative seizure history was a significant predictor for postoperative seizures following an awake craniotomy (OR 2.08, 95% CI 0.56-0.90, p awake craniotomy and may

  3. A Case Report of Onyx Pulmonary Arterial Embolism Contributing to Hypoxemia During Awake Craniotomy for Arteriovenous Malformation Resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolly, Brian T; Kosky, Jenna L; Koht, Antoun; Hemmer, Laura B

    2017-02-15

    A healthy 26-year-old man with cerebral arteriovenous malformation underwent staged endovascular embolization with Onyx followed by awake craniotomy for resection. The perioperative course was complicated by tachycardia and severe intraoperative hypoxemia requiring significant oxygen supplementation. Postoperative chest computed tomography (CT) revealed hyperattenuating Onyx embolization material within the pulmonary vasculature, and an electrocardiogram indicated possible right heart strain, supporting clinically significant embolism. With awake arteriovenous malformation resection following adjunctive Onyx embolization becoming increasingly employed for lesions involving the eloquent cortex, anesthesiologists need to be aware of pulmonary migration of Onyx material as a potential contributor to significant perioperative hypoxemia.

  4. High-Flow Nasal Oxygen in Patient With Obstructive Sleep Apnea Undergoing Awake Craniotomy: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Jaclyn W M; Kong, Amy H S; Lam, Sau Yee; Woo, Peter Y M

    2017-12-15

    Patients with obstructive sleep apnea are frequently considered unsuitable candidates for awake craniotomy due to anticipated problems with oxygenation, ventilation, and a potentially difficult airway. At present, only a handful of such accounts exist in the literature. Our report describes the novel use of high-flow nasal oxygen therapy for a patient with moderate obstructive sleep apnea who underwent an awake craniotomy under deep sedation. The intraoperative application of high-flow nasal oxygen therapy achieved satisfactory oxygenation, maintained the partial carbon dioxide pressure within a reasonable range even during periods of deep sedation, permitted responsive patient monitoring during mapping, and provided excellent patient and surgeon satisfaction.

  5. Transplantation of adult monkey neural stem cells into a contusion spinal cord injury model in rhesus macaque monkeys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nemati, Shiva Nemati; Jabbari, Reza; Hajinasrollah, Mostafa

    2014-01-01

    , therefore, to explore the efficacy of adult monkey NSC (mNSC) in a primate SCI model. MATERIALS AND METHODS: In this experimental study, isolated mNSCs were analyzed by flow cytometry, immunocytochemistry, and RT-PCR. Next, BrdU-labeled cells were transplanted into a SCI model. The SCI animal model...... on Tarlov's scale and our established behavioral tests for monkeys. CONCLUSION: Our findings have indicated that mNSCs can facilitate recovery in contusion SCI models in rhesus macaque monkeys. Additional studies are necessary to determine the im- provement mechanisms after cell transplantation....

  6. Status of the proton and electron transfer lines for the AWAKE Experiment at CERN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, J.S., E-mail: janet.schmidt@cern.ch [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Bauche, J. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Biskup, B. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Czech Technical University, Prague (Czech Republic); Bracco, C.; Doebert, S.; Goddard, B.; Gschwendtner, E.; Jensen, L.K.; Jones, O.R.; Mazzoni, S.; Meddahi, M.; Pepitone, K.; Petrenko, A.; Velotti, F.M.; Vorozhtsov, A. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland)

    2016-09-01

    The AWAKE project at CERN is planned to study proton driven plasma wakefield acceleration with an externally injected electron beam. Therefore two transfer lines are being designed in order to provide the proton beam from the SPS and the electron beam from an RF gun to the plasma cell. The commissioning of the proton line will take place in 2016 for the first phase of the experiment, which is focused on the self-modulation of a 12 cm long proton bunch in the plasma. The electron line will be added for the second phase of AWAKE in 2017, when the wakefield will be probed with an electron beam of 10–20 MeV/c. The challenge for these transfer lines lies in the parallel operation of the proton, electron and laser beam used to ionize the plasma and seed the self-modulation. These beams, of different characteristics, need to be synchronized and positioned for optimized injection conditions into the wakefield. This task requires great flexibility in the transfer line optics. The status of these designs will be presented in this paper.

  7. Association of Awake Bruxism with Khat, Coffee, Tobacco, and Stress among Jazan University Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mir Faeq Ali Quadri

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The objective is to assess the prevalence of bruxism among the university students and to check its association with their khat chewing habit. Materials and Methods. A cross-sectional descriptive study is designed using cluster random sampling. Pretested questionnaire was administered by a trained interviewer to assess awake bruxism and the use of variables like khat, coffee, tobacco, and stress. Chi-square test at 5% significance was used for assessing the association. Logistic regression was also performed after adjusting for covariates. Results. A high response rate (95% was obtained as the distribution and collection of questionnaire was within an hour interval. 85% (63%, males; 22%, females experienced an episode of bruxism at least one time in the past six months. Regression analysis revealed an association of stress (P=0.00; OR = 5.902, 95% CI 2.614–13.325 and khat use (P=0.05; OR = 1.629, 95% CI 0.360–7.368 with bruxism. Interestingly, it is observed that the one who chew khat experienced 3.56 times (95% CI; 2.62–11.22 less pain when compared to the nonusers. Conclusion. This study is the first of its kind to assess the association of bruxism with khat chewing. High amount of stress and khat use can be considered as important risk indicators for awake bruxism.

  8. "Awake" ECCO2R superseded intubation in a near-fatal asthma attack.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Thomas-Michael; Bence, Tibor; Brettner, Franz

    2017-01-01

    Near-fatal asthma attacks are life threatening events that often require mechanical ventilation. Extracorporeal carbon dioxide removal (ECCO 2 R) is, beside extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO), a well-established rescue option whenever ventilation gets to its limits. But there seems to be very rare experience with those techniques in avoiding mechanical ventilation in severe asthma attacks. A 67-year-old man with a near-fatal asthma attack deteriorated under non-invasive ventilation conditions. Beside pharmacological treatment, the intensivists decided to use an extracorporeal carbon dioxide removal system (ECCO 2 R) to avoid sedation and intubation. Within only a few hours, there was a breakthrough and the patient's status improved continuously. One and a half days later, weaning from ECCO 2 R was already completed. The discussion deals with several advantages of extracorporeal lung support in acute asthma, the potential of avoiding intubation and sedation, as well as the benefits of a conscious and spontaneously breathing patient. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) in general and ECCO 2 R in particular is a highly effective method for the treatment of an acute near-fatal asthma attack. Pathophysiological aspects favor the "awake" approach, without sedation, intubation, and mechanical ventilation. Therefore, experienced clinicians might consider "awake" ECCO 2 R in similar cases.

  9. The discriminatory value of cardiorespiratory interactions in distinguishing awake from anaesthetised states: a randomised observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenwright, D A; Bernjak, A; Draegni, T; Dzeroski, S; Entwistle, M; Horvat, M; Kvandal, P; Landsverk, S A; McClintock, P V E; Musizza, B; Petrovčič, J; Raeder, J; Sheppard, L W; Smith, A F; Stankovski, T; Stefanovska, A

    2015-12-01

    Depth of anaesthesia monitors usually analyse cerebral function with or without other physiological signals; non-invasive monitoring of the measured cardiorespiratory signals alone would offer a simple, practical alternative. We aimed to investigate whether such signals, analysed with novel, non-linear dynamic methods, would distinguish between the awake and anaesthetised states. We recorded ECG, respiration, skin temperature, pulse and skin conductivity before and during general anaesthesia in 27 subjects in good cardiovascular health, randomly allocated to receive propofol or sevoflurane. Mean values, variability and dynamic interactions were determined. Respiratory rate (p = 0.0002), skin conductivity (p = 0.03) and skin temperature (p = 0.00006) changed with sevoflurane, and skin temperature (p = 0.0005) with propofol. Pulse transit time increased by 17% with sevoflurane (p = 0.02) and 11% with propofol (p = 0.007). Sevoflurane reduced the wavelet energy of heart (p = 0.0004) and respiratory (p = 0.02) rate variability at all frequencies, whereas propofol decreased only the heart rate variability below 0.021 Hz (p cardiorespiratory synchronisation time was increased (p < 0.05). A classification analysis based on an optimal set of discriminatory parameters distinguished with 95% success between the awake and anaesthetised states. We suggest that these results can contribute to the design of new monitors of anaesthetic depth based on cardiovascular signals alone. © 2015 The Authors. Anaesthesia published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland.

  10. Intact skull chronic windows for mesoscopic wide-field imaging in awake mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silasi, Gergely; Xiao, Dongsheng; Vanni, Matthieu P.; Chen, Andrew C. N.; Murphy, Timothy H.

    2016-01-01

    Background Craniotomy-based window implants are commonly used for microscopic imaging, in head-fixed rodents, however their field of view is typically small and incompatible with mesoscopic functional mapping of cortex. New Method We describe a reproducible and simple procedure for chronic through-bone wide-field imaging in awake head-fixed mice providing stable optical access for chronic imaging over large areas of the cortex for months. Results The preparation is produced by applying clear-drying dental cement to the intact mouse skull, followed by a glass coverslip to create a partially transparent imaging surface. Surgery time takes about 30 minutes. A single set-screw provides a stable means of attachment for mesoscale assessment without obscuring the cortical field of view. Comparison with Existing Methods We demonstrate the utility of this method by showing seed-pixel functional connectivity maps generated from spontaneous cortical activity of GCAMP6 signals in both awake and anesthetized mice. Conclusions We propose that the intact skull preparation described here may be used for most longitudinal studies that do not require micron scale resolution and where cortical neural or vascular signals are recorded with intrinsic sensors. PMID:27102043

  11. Anesthesia for awake craniotomy: a how-to guide for the occasional practitioner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Lingzhong; McDonagh, David L; Berger, Mitchel S; Gelb, Adrian W

    2017-05-01

    Awake craniotomy (AC), defined as the performance of at least part of an open cranial procedure with the patient awake, has been tied to beneficial outcomes compared with similar surgery under general anesthesia. Improved anesthetic techniques have made a major contribution to the increasing popularity of AC. However, the heterogeneity of practice among institutions doing large numbers of ACs raises questions (often among those who only occasionally perform AC - i.e., practitioners in low-volume AC institutions) as to the ideal anesthetic technique for AC. The procedure presents a variety of decision-making dilemmas, the origins of which are the varying institutional preferences, lack of quality evidence, and several practice controversies. Evidence-based data that support a single anesthetic algorithm for AC are sparse. In this narrative review, the technical nuances of 13 aspects of anesthetic care for AC are discussed based on institutional preferences and available evidence, and the various controversies and research priorities are discussed. The skills, experience, and commitment of both the surgeon and the anesthesiologist are large variables that are likely more important than what the literature suggests about "best" techniques for AC. Optimizing patient outcome is the fundamental goal of the anesthesiologist.

  12. A novel tablet computer platform for advanced language mapping during awake craniotomy procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Melanie A; Tam, Fred; Garavaglia, Marco M; Golestanirad, Laleh; Hare, Gregory M T; Cusimano, Michael D; Schweizer, Tom A; Das, Sunit; Graham, Simon J

    2016-04-01

    A computerized platform has been developed to enhance behavioral testing during intraoperative language mapping in awake craniotomy procedures. The system is uniquely compatible with the environmental demands of both the operating room and preoperative functional MRI (fMRI), thus providing standardized testing toward improving spatial agreement between the 2 brain mapping techniques. Details of the platform architecture, its advantages over traditional testing methods, and its use for language mapping are described. Four illustrative cases demonstrate the efficacy of using the testing platform to administer sophisticated language paradigms, and the spatial agreement between intraoperative mapping and preoperative fMRI results. The testing platform substantially improved the ability of the surgeon to detect and characterize language deficits. Use of a written word generation task to assess language production helped confirm areas of speech apraxia and speech arrest that were inadequately characterized or missed with the use of traditional paradigms, respectively. Preoperative fMRI of the analogous writing task was also assistive, displaying excellent spatial agreement with intraoperative mapping in all 4 cases. Sole use of traditional testing paradigms can be limiting during awake craniotomy procedures. Comprehensive assessment of language function will require additional use of more sophisticated and ecologically valid testing paradigms. The platform presented here provides a means to do so.

  13. Awake fi beroptic intubation of a patient with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elif Bakı

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis is a rapidly progressive disease from the fi fth to sixth decades of life causing degeneration and death of the upper and lower motor neurons and no effective treatment. The diagnosis isdependent on the clinical presentation and consistent electrodiagnostic studies. Progressive denervation affects the muscles, causing muscular weakness and atrophy, when the ventilation muscles are affected deathdue to respiratory failure occurs within a few years. We present the case of a 54 years old, 180 cm height and 94 kg weight male patient with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis who underwent surgical treatment of thyroidcancer. Fiberoptic intubation was orally performed providing spontaneus breathing. Propofol was applied after passing vocal cords. Anesthesia was maintained with sevofl orane (%2 and a mixture of oxygen and airunder volume controlled ventilation. Rocuronium was used 20 mg at the beginning of the surgery. At the end of surgery, he wasn’t extubated and transferred to anesthesia intensive care unit. He was extubated after tenhours and he was awaked perfectly. The patient was discharged from intensive care unit after 24 hours and from hospital after ten days. We reported that amyotrophic lateral sclerosis patient with limited mouth opening who underwent thyroid surgery, using awake intubation.

  14. Identifying timescales and possible precursors of the awake to asleep transition in EOG time series

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carniel, Roberto; Del Pin, Enrico; Budai, Riccardo; Pascolo, Paolo

    2005-01-01

    In this work we study the awake to asleep state transition in eye blinking activity. In this perspective the human electroculographic activity (EOG) was first experimentally investigated by means of a spectral analyses of the time series resulting for processes underlying both the brain activity and the eye dynamics. We studied the evolution of the spectral content both via the classical spectrogram and with the computation of summarizing scalar parameters: mean frequency, maximum frequency, spectral variance. With these tools we highlighted a significative dynamical change appearing before the transition from the awake to the asleep state, characterized by a general widening of the spectrum, that translates into a decrease of the maximum frequency, an increase of the average frequency and an increase of the spectral variance. Due to inherently high non-linearities involved, chaotic patterns were likely to occur in the experimental time series. These were analyzed therefore with the chaos theory. In particular we studied the time evolution of dynamical parameters as computed on different windows of the time series, i.e. optimal delay time as suggested by autocorrelation and mutual information on one side, embedding quality evaluation as suggested by the False Nearest Neighbours percentage on the other

  15. Generating pulsatility by pump speed modulation with continuous-flow total artificial heart in awake calves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukamachi, Kiyotaka; Karimov, Jamshid H; Sunagawa, Gengo; Horvath, David J; Byram, Nicole; Kuban, Barry D; Dessoffy, Raymond; Sale, Shiva; Golding, Leonard A R; Moazami, Nader

    2017-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of sinusoidal pump speed modulation of the Cleveland Clinic continuous-flow total artificial heart (CFTAH) on hemodynamics and pump flow in an awake chronic calf model. The sinusoidal pump speed modulations, performed on the day of elective sacrifice, were set at ±15 and ± 25% of mean pump speed at 80 bpm in four awake calves with a CFTAH. The systemic and pulmonary arterial pulse pressures increased to 12.0 and 12.3 mmHg (±15% modulation) and to 15.9 and 15.7 mmHg (±25% modulation), respectively. The pulsatility index and surplus hemodynamic energy significantly increased, respectively, to 1.05 and 1346 ergs/cm at ±15% speed modulation and to 1.51 and 3381 ergs/cm at ±25% speed modulation. This study showed that it is feasible to generate pressure pulsatility with pump speed modulation; the platform is suitable for evaluating the physiologic impact of pulsatility and allows determination of the best speed modulations in terms of magnitude, frequency, and profiles.

  16. Representation of dynamic interaural phase difference in auditory cortex of awake rhesus macaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Brian H; Malone, Brian J; Semple, Malcolm N

    2009-04-01

    Neurons in auditory cortex of awake primates are selective for the spatial location of a sound source, yet the neural representation of the binaural cues that underlie this tuning remains undefined. We examined this representation in 283 single neurons across the low-frequency auditory core in alert macaques, trained to discriminate binaural cues for sound azimuth. In response to binaural beat stimuli, which mimic acoustic motion by modulating the relative phase of a tone at the two ears, these neurons robustly modulate their discharge rate in response to this directional cue. In accordance with prior studies, the preferred interaural phase difference (IPD) of these neurons typically corresponds to azimuthal locations contralateral to the recorded hemisphere. Whereas binaural beats evoke only transient discharges in anesthetized cortex, neurons in awake cortex respond throughout the IPD cycle. In this regard, responses are consistent with observations at earlier stations of the auditory pathway. Discharge rate is a band-pass function of the frequency of IPD modulation in most neurons (73%), but both discharge rate and temporal synchrony are independent of the direction of phase modulation. When subjected to a receiver operator characteristic analysis, the responses of individual neurons are insufficient to account for the perceptual acuity of these macaques in an IPD discrimination task, suggesting the need for neural pooling at the cortical level.

  17. Disrupting neural activity related to awake-state sharp wave-ripple complexes prevents hippocampal learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nokia, Miriam S; Mikkonen, Jarno E; Penttonen, Markku; Wikgren, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Oscillations in hippocampal local-field potentials (LFPs) reflect the crucial involvement of the hippocampus in memory trace formation: theta (4-8 Hz) oscillations and ripples (~200 Hz) occurring during sharp waves are thought to mediate encoding and consolidation, respectively. During sharp wave-ripple complexes (SPW-Rs), hippocampal cell firing closely follows the pattern that took place during the initial experience, most likely reflecting replay of that event. Disrupting hippocampal ripples using electrical stimulation either during training in awake animals or during sleep after training retards spatial learning. Here, adult rabbits were trained in trace eyeblink conditioning, a hippocampus-dependent associative learning task. A bright light was presented to the animals during the inter-trial interval (ITI), when awake, either during SPW-Rs or irrespective of their neural state. Learning was particularly poor when the light was presented following SPW-Rs. While the light did not disrupt the ripple itself, it elicited a theta-band oscillation, a state that does not usually coincide with SPW-Rs. Thus, it seems that consolidation depends on neuronal activity within and beyond the hippocampus taking place immediately after, but by no means limited to, hippocampal SPW-Rs.

  18. Sleeping sites and latrines of spider monkeys in continuous and fragmented rainforests: implications for seed dispersal and forest regeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arturo González-Zamora

    Full Text Available Spider monkeys (Ateles geoffroyi use sites composed of one or more trees for sleeping (sleeping sites and sleeping trees, respectively. Beneath these sites/trees they deposit copious amounts of dung in latrines. This behavior results in a clumped deposition pattern of seeds and nutrients that directly impacts the regeneration of tropical forests. Therefore, information on the density and spatial distribution of sleeping sites and latrines, and the characteristics (i.e., composition and structure of sleeping trees are needed to improve our understanding of the ecological significance of spider monkeys in influencing forest composition. Moreover, since primate populations are increasingly forced to inhabit fragmented landscapes, it is important to assess if these characteristics differ between continuous and fragmented forests. We assessed this novel information from eight independent spider monkey communities in the Lacandona rainforest, Mexico: four continuous forest sites and four forest fragments. Both the density of sleeping sites and latrines did not differ between forest conditions. Latrines were uniformly distributed across sleeping sites, but the spatial distribution of sleeping sites within the areas was highly variable, being particularly clumped in forest fragments. In fact, the average inter-latrine distances were almost double in continuous forest than in fragments. Latrines were located beneath only a few tree species, and these trees were larger in diameter in continuous than fragmented forests. Because latrines may represent hotspots of seedling recruitment, our results have important ecological and conservation implications. The variation in the spatial distribution of sleeping sites across the forest indicates that spider monkeys likely create a complex seed deposition pattern in space and time. However, the use of a very few tree species for sleeping could contribute to the establishment of specific vegetation associations

  19. Sleeping sites and latrines of spider monkeys in continuous and fragmented rainforests: implications for seed dispersal and forest regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Zamora, Arturo; Arroyo-Rodríguez, Víctor; Oyama, Ken; Sork, Victoria; Chapman, Colin A; Stoner, Kathryn E

    2012-01-01

    Spider monkeys (Ateles geoffroyi) use sites composed of one or more trees for sleeping (sleeping sites and sleeping trees, respectively). Beneath these sites/trees they deposit copious amounts of dung in latrines. This behavior results in a clumped deposition pattern of seeds and nutrients that directly impacts the regeneration of tropical forests. Therefore, information on the density and spatial distribution of sleeping sites and latrines, and the characteristics (i.e., composition and structure) of sleeping trees are needed to improve our understanding of the ecological significance of spider monkeys in influencing forest composition. Moreover, since primate populations are increasingly forced to inhabit fragmented landscapes, it is important to assess if these characteristics differ between continuous and fragmented forests. We assessed this novel information from eight independent spider monkey communities in the Lacandona rainforest, Mexico: four continuous forest sites and four forest fragments. Both the density of sleeping sites and latrines did not differ between forest conditions. Latrines were uniformly distributed across sleeping sites, but the spatial distribution of sleeping sites within the areas was highly variable, being particularly clumped in forest fragments. In fact, the average inter-latrine distances were almost double in continuous forest than in fragments. Latrines were located beneath only a few tree species, and these trees were larger in diameter in continuous than fragmented forests. Because latrines may represent hotspots of seedling recruitment, our results have important ecological and conservation implications. The variation in the spatial distribution of sleeping sites across the forest indicates that spider monkeys likely create a complex seed deposition pattern in space and time. However, the use of a very few tree species for sleeping could contribute to the establishment of specific vegetation associations typical of the

  20. An Approach for Composing Services Based on Environment Ontology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangjun Cai

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Service-oriented computing is revolutionizing the modern computing paradigms with its aim to boost software reuse and enable business agility. Under this paradigm, new services are fabricated by composing available services. The problem arises as how to effectively and efficiently compose heterogeneous services facing the high complexity of service composition. Based on environment ontology, this paper introduces a requirement-driven service composition approach. We propose the algorithms to decompose the requirement, the rules to deduct the relation between services, and the algorithm for composing service. The empirical results and the comparison with other services’ composition methodologies show that this approach is feasible and efficient.

  1. Short parietal lobe connections of the human and monkey brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Catani, Marco; Robertsson, Naianna; Beyh, Ahmad

    2017-01-01

    projections were reconstructed for both species and results compared to identify similarities or differences in tract anatomy (i.e., trajectories and cortical projections). In addition, post-mortem dissections were performed in a human brain. The largest tract identified in both human and monkey brains...... and angular gyri of the inferior parietal lobule in humans but only to the supramarginal gyrus in the monkey brain. The third tract connects the postcentral gyrus to the anterior region of the superior parietal lobule and is more prominent in monkeys compared to humans. Finally, short U-shaped fibres...... and monkeys with some differences for those areas that have cytoarchitectonically distinct features in humans. The overall pattern of intraparietal connectivity supports the special role of the inferior parietal lobule in cognitive functions characteristic of humans....

  2. Thermoregulatory Responses of Febrile Monkeys During Microwave Exposure

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Adair, E

    1997-01-01

    .... In a controlled ambient temperature of 26 degrees C, autonomic mechanisms of heat production and heat loss were measured in febrile squirrel monkeys during 30-min exposures to 450 or 2450 MHz CW MW...

  3. Single subcutaneous dosing of cefovecin in rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bakker, J.; Thuesen, Line Risager; Braskamp, G.

    2011-01-01

    was to determine whether cefovecin is a suitable antibiotic to prevent skin wound infection in rhesus monkeys. Therefore, the pharmacokinetics (PK) of cefovecin after a single subcutaneous injection at 8 mg/kg bodyweight in four rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) and sensitivity of bacterial isolates from fresh skin...... wounds were determined. After administration, blood, urine, and feces were collected, and concentrations of cefovecin were determined. Further, the minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) for bacteria isolated from fresh skin wounds of monkeys during a health control program were determined. The mean...... maximum plasma concentration (C(max) ) of cefovecin was 78 µg/mL and was achieved after 57 min. The mean apparent long elimination half-life (t½) was 6.6 h and excretion occurred mainly via urine. The MIC for the majority of the bacteria examined was >100 µg/mL. The PK of cefovecin in rhesus monkeys...

  4. jMonkeyEngine 3.0 cookbook

    CERN Document Server

    Edén, Rickard

    2014-01-01

    If you are a jMonkey developer or a Java developer who is interested to delve further into the game making process to expand your skillset and create more technical games, then this book is perfect for you.

  5. Preference transitivity and symbolic representation in capuchin monkeys (Cebus apella.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elsa Addessi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Can non-human animals comprehend and employ symbols? The most convincing empirical evidence comes from language-trained apes, but little is known about this ability in monkeys. Tokens can be regarded as symbols since they are inherently non-valuable objects that acquire an arbitrarily assigned value upon exchange with an experimenter. Recent evidence suggested that capuchin monkeys, which diverged from the human lineage 35 million years ago, can estimate, represent and combine token quantities. A fundamental and open question is whether monkeys can reason about symbols in ways similar to how they reason about real objects. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we examined this broad question in the context of economic choice behavior. Specifically, we assessed whether, in a symbolic context, capuchins' preferences satisfy transitivity--a fundamental trait of rational decision-making. Given three options A, B and C, transitivity holds true if A > or = B, B > or = C and A > or = C (where > or = indicates preference. In this study, we trained monkeys to exchange three types of tokens for three different foods. We then compared choices monkeys made between different types of tokens with choices monkeys made between the foods. Qualitatively, capuchins' preferences revealed by the way of tokens were similar to those measured with the actual foods. In particular, when choosing between tokens, monkeys displayed strict economic preferences and their choices satisfied transitivity. Quantitatively, however, values measured by the way of tokens differed systematically from those measured with the actual foods. In particular, for any pair of foods, the relative value of the preferred food increased when monkeys chose between the corresponding tokens. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results indicate that indeed capuchins are capable of treating tokens as symbols. However, as they do so, capuchins experience the cognitive burdens imposed by symbolic

  6. Depth perception from moving cast shadow in macaque monkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizutani, Saneyuki; Usui, Nobuo; Yokota, Takanori; Mizusawa, Hidehiro; Taira, Masato; Katsuyama, Narumi

    2015-07-15

    In the present study, we investigate whether the macaque monkey can perceive motion in depth using a moving cast shadow. To accomplish this, we conducted two experiments. In the first experiment, an adult Japanese monkey was trained in a motion discrimination task in depth by binocular disparity. A square was presented on the display so that it appeared with a binocular disparity of 0.12 degrees (initial position), and moved toward (approaching) or away from (receding) the monkey for 1s. The monkey was trained to discriminate the approaching and receding motion of the square by GO/delayed GO-type responses. The monkey showed a significantly high accuracy rate in the task, and the performance was maintained when the position, color, and shape of the moving object were changed. In the next experiment, the change in the disparity was gradually decreased in the motion discrimination task. The results showed that the performance of the monkey declined as the distance of the approaching and receding motion of the square decreased from the initial position. However, when a moving cast shadow was added to the stimulus, the monkey responded to the motion in depth induced by the cast shadow in the same way as by binocular disparity; the reward was delivered randomly or given in all trials to prevent the learning of the 2D motion of the shadow in the frontal plane. These results suggest that the macaque monkey can perceive motion in depth using a moving cast shadow as well as using binocular disparity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Monkey Feeding Assay for Testing Emetic Activity of Staphylococcal Enterotoxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Keun Seok

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcal enterotoxins (SEs) are unique bacterial toxins that cause gastrointestinal toxicity as well as superantigenic activity. Since systemic administration of SEs induces superantigenic activity leading to toxic shock syndrome that may mimic enterotoxic activity of SEs such as vomiting and diarrhea, oral administration of SEs in the monkey feeding assay is considered as a standard method to evaluate emetic activity of SEs. This chapter summarizes and discusses practical considerations of the monkey feeding assay used in studies characterizing classical and newly identified SEs.

  8. Present and potential distribution of Snub-nosed Monkey

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nüchel, Jonas; Bøcher, Peder Klith; Svenning, Jens-Christian

    are the Snub-nosed Monkeys (Rhinopithecus), a temperate-subtropical East Asian genus. We use species distribution modeling to assess the following question of key relevancy for conservation management of Rhinopithecus; 1. Which climatic factors determine the present distribution of Rhinopithecus within...... distribution of Rhinopithecus within the region, considering climate, habitat availability and the locations of nature reserves. Keywords: biodiversity, biogeography, conservation, China, snub-nosed monkey, rhinopithecus, primates, species distribution modeling...

  9. Stroke, music, and creative output: Alfred Schnittke and other composers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zagvazdin, Yuri

    2015-01-01

    Alfred Schnittke (1934-1998), a celebrated Russian composer of the twentieth century, suffered from several strokes which affected his left cerebral hemisphere. The disease, however, did not diminish his musical talent. Moreover, he stated that his illness in a way facilitated his work. The composer showed amazingly high productivity after his first and second injuries of the central nervous system. The main topic of this chapter is the effect of strokes on Schnittke's output, creativity, and style of music. A brief biography of the composer with the chronology of his brain hemorrhages is included. In addition, the influence of cerebrovascular lesions on creative potential of other prominent composers such as Benjamin Britten, Jean Langlais, Vissarion Shebalin, Igor Stravinsky, and Ira Randall Thompson is discussed. © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Control of Working Memory in Rhesus Monkeys (Macaca mulatta)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Hsiao-Wei; Hampton, Robert R.

    2014-01-01

    Cognitive control is critical for efficiently using the limited resources in working memory. It is well established that humans use rehearsal to increase the probability of remembering needed information, but little is known in nonhumans, with some studies reporting the absence of active control and others subject to alternative explanations. We trained monkeys in a visual matching-to-sample paradigm with a post-sample memory cue. Monkeys either saw a remember cue that predicted the occurrence of a matching test that required memory for the sample, or a forget cue that predicted a discrimination test that did not require memory of the sample. Infrequent probe trials on which monkeys were given tests of the type not cued on that trial were used to assess whether memory was under cognitive control. Our procedures controlled for reward expectation and for the surprising nature of the probes. Monkeys matched less accurately after forget cues, while discrimination accuracy was equivalent in the two cue conditions. We also tested monkeys with lists of two consecutive sample images that shared the same cue. Again, memory for expected memory tests was superior to that on unexpected tests. Together these results show that monkeys cognitively control their working memory. PMID:25436219

  11. Intrapericardial Denervation: Responses to Water Immersion in Rhesus Monkeys

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKeever, Kenneth H.; Keil, Lanny C.; Sandler, Harold

    1995-01-01

    Eleven anesthetized rhesus monkeys were used to study cardiovascular, renal, and endocrine alterations associated with 120 min of head-out water immersion. Five animals underwent complete intrapericardial denervation using the Randall technique, while the remaining six monkeys served as intact controls. Each animal was chronically instrumented with an electromagnetic flow probe on the ascending aorta, a strain gauge pressure transducer implanted in the apex of the left ventricle (LV), and electrocardiogram leads anchored to the chest wall and LV. During immersion, LV end-diastolic pressure, urine flow, glomerular filtration rate, sodium excretion, and circulating atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) each increased (P less than 0.05) for intact and denervated monkeys. There were no alterations in free water clearance in either group during immersion, yet fractional excretion of free water increased (P less than 0.05) in the intact monkeys. Plasma renin activity (PRA) decreased (P less than 0.05) during immersion in intact monkeys but not the denervated animals. Plasma vasopressin (PVP) concentration decreased (P less than 0.05) during the first 30 min of immersion in both groups but was not distinguishable from control by 60 min of immersion in denervated monkeys. These data demonstrate that complete cardiac denervation does not block the rise in plasma ANP or prevent the natriuresis associated with head-out water immersion. The suppression of PVP during the first minutes of immersion after complete cardiac denervation suggests that extracardiac sensing mechanisms associated with the induced fluid shifts may be responsible for the findings.

  12. Newly identified CYP2C93 is a functional enzyme in rhesus monkey, but not in cynomolgus monkey.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuhiro Uno

    Full Text Available Cynomolgus monkey and rhesus monkey are used in drug metabolism studies due to their evolutionary closeness and physiological resemblance to human. In cynomolgus monkey, we previously identified cytochrome P450 (P450 or CYP 2C76 that does not have a human ortholog and is partly responsible for species differences in drug metabolism between cynomolgus monkey and human. In this study, we report characterization of CYP2C93 cDNA newly identified in cynomolgus monkey and rhesus monkey. The CYP2C93 cDNA contained an open reading frame of 490 amino acids approximately 84-86% identical to human CYP2Cs. CYP2C93 was located in the genomic region, which corresponded to the intergenic region in the human genome, indicating that CYP2C93 does not correspond to any human genes. CYP2C93 mRNA was expressed predominantly in the liver among 10 tissues analyzed. The CYP2C93 proteins heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli metabolized human CYP2C substrates, diclofenac, flurbiprofen, paclitaxel, S-mephenytoin, and tolbutamide. In addition to a normal transcript (SV1, an aberrantly spliced transcript (SV2 lacking exon 2 was identified, which did not give rise to a functional protein due to frameshift and a premature termination codon. Mini gene assay revealed that the genetic variant IVS2-1G>T at the splice site of intron 1, at least partly, accounted for the exon-2 skipping; therefore, this genotype would influence CYP2C93-mediated drug metabolism. SV1 was expressed in 6 of 11 rhesus monkeys and 1 of 8 cynomolgus monkeys, but the SV1 in the cynomolgus monkey was nonfunctional due to a rare null genotype (c.102T>del. These results suggest that CYP2C93 can play roles as a drug-metabolizing enzyme in rhesus monkeys (not in cynomolgus monkeys, although its relative contribution to drug metabolism has yet to be validated.

  13. Specificities of Awake Craniotomy and Brain Mapping in Children for Resection of Supratentorial Tumors in the Language Area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delion, Matthieu; Terminassian, Aram; Lehousse, Thierry; Aubin, Ghislaine; Malka, Jean; N'Guyen, Sylvie; Mercier, Philippe; Menei, Philippe

    2015-12-01

    In the pediatric population, awake craniotomy began to be used for the resection of brain tumor located close to eloquent areas. Some specificities must be taken into account to adapt this method to children. The aim of this clinical study is to not only confirm the feasibility of awake craniotomy and language brain mapping in the pediatric population but also identify the specificities and necessary adaptations of the procedure. Six children aged 11 to 16 were operated on while awake under local anesthesia with language brain mapping for supratentorial brain lesions (tumor and cavernoma). The preoperative planning comprised functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and neuropsychologic and psychologic assessment. The specific preoperative preparation is clearly explained including hypnosis conditioning and psychiatric evaluation. The success of the procedure was based on the ability to perform the language brain mapping and the tumor removal without putting the patient to sleep. We investigated the pediatric specificities, psychological experience, and neuropsychologic follow-up. The children experienced little anxiety, probably in large part due to the use of hypnosis. We succeeded in doing the cortical-subcortical mapping and removing the tumor without putting the patient to sleep in all cases. The psychological experience was good, and the neuropsychologic follow-up showed a favorable evolution. Preoperative preparation and hypnosis in children seemed important for performing awake craniotomy and contributing language brain mapping with the best possible psychological experience. The pediatrics specificities are discussed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Impact of preoperative functional magnetic resonance imaging during awake craniotomy procedures for intraoperative guidance and complication avoidance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trinh, Victoria T; Fahim, Daniel K; Maldaun, Marcos V C; Shah, Komal; McCutcheon, Ian E; Rao, Ganesh; Lang, Frederick; Weinberg, Jeffrey; Sawaya, Raymond; Suki, Dima; Prabhu, Sujit S

    2014-01-01

    We wanted to study the role of functional MRI (fMRI) in preventing neurological injury in awake craniotomy patients as this has not been previously studied. To examine the role of fMRI as an intraoperative adjunct during awake craniotomy procedures. Preoperative fMRI was carried out routinely in 214 patients undergoing awake craniotomy with direct cortical stimulation (DCS). In 40% of our cases (n = 85) fMRI was utilized for the intraoperative localization of the eloquent cortex. In the other 129 cases significant noise distortion, poor task performance and nonspecific BOLD activation precluded the surgeon from using the fMRI data. Compared with DCS, fMRI had a sensitivity and specificity, respectively, of 91 and 64% in Broca's area, 93 and 18% in Wernicke's area and 100 and 100% in motor areas. A new intraoperative neurological deficit during subcortical dissection was predictive of a worsened deficit following surgery (p awake craniotomy procedures. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  15. Laser speckle imaging identification of increases in cortical microcirculatory blood flow induced by motor activity during awake craniotomy ; Clinical article

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. Klijn (Elko); M.E.J.L. Hulscher (Marlies); R.K. Balvers (Rutger); W.P.J. Holland (Wim); J. Bakker (Jan); A.J.P.E. Vincent (Arnoud); C.M.F. Dirven (Clemens); C. Ince (Can)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractObject. The goal of awake neurosurgery is to maximize resection of brain lesions with minimal injury to functional brain areas. Laser speckle imaging (LSI) is a noninvasive macroscopic technique with high spatial and temporal resolution used to monitor changes in capillary perfusion. In

  16. Laser speckle imaging identification of increases in cortical microcirculatory blood flow induced by motor activity during awake craniotomy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klijn, Eva; Hulscher, Hester C.; Balvers, Rutger K.; Holland, Wim P. J.; Bakker, Jan; Vincent, Arnaud J. P. E.; Dirven, Clemens M. F.; Ince, Can

    2013-01-01

    The goal of awake neurosurgery is to maximize resection of brain lesions with minimal injury to functional brain areas. Laser speckle imaging (LSI) is a noninvasive macroscopic technique with high spatial and temporal resolution used to monitor changes in capillary perfusion. In this study, the

  17. Awake craniotomy versus craniotomy under general anesthesia for the surgical treatment of insular glioma: choices and outcomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gravesteijn, B.Y. (B. Y.); Keizer, M.E. (M. E.); A. Vincent (Audrey); J.W. Schouten (Joost); R.J. Stolker (Robert); M. Klimek (Markus)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractObjective: To investigate differences in outcomes in patients who underwent surgery for insular glioma using an awake craniotomy (AC) vs. a craniotomy under general anesthesia (GA). Methods: Data from patients treated at our hospital between 2005 and 2015 were analyzed retrospectively.

  18. Measurement of lung function in awake 2-4-year-old asthmatic children during methacholine challenge and acute asthma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klug, B; Bisgaard, H

    1996-01-01

    This study evaluated three techniques for testing of lung function in young awake children. We compared measurements by the forced or impulse oscillation technique (IOS), the interrupter technique (IT), and transcutaneous measurements of oxygen (tcPo2) with concomitant measurements of specific ai...

  19. REAL-TIME MEASUREMENT OF AIRWAY RESPONSES TO SULOFUR DIOXIDE (SO2) IN AN INTACT, AWAKE GUINEA PIG MODEL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Real-time measurment of airway responses to Sulfur Dioxide (SO2) in an intact, awake guinea pig model. J Stanek1,2, Q Krantz2, J Nolan2, D Winsett2, W Watkinson2, and D Costa2. 1College of Veterinary Medicine, NCSU, Raleigh, NC, USA; 2Pulmonary Toxicology Branch, ETD, NHEERL, US...

  20. Oral-Fluid Thiol-Detection Test Identifies Underlying Active Periodontal Disease Not Detected by the Visual Awake Examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Queck, Katherine E; Chapman, Angela; Herzog, Leslie J; Shell-Martin, Tamara; Burgess-Cassler, Anthony; McClure, George David

    Periodontal disease in dogs is highly prevalent but can only be accurately diagnosed by performing an anesthetized oral examination with periodontal probing and dental radiography. In this study, 114 dogs had a visual awake examination of the oral cavity and were administered an oral-fluid thiol-detection test prior to undergoing a a full-mouth anesthetized oral examination and digital dental radiographs. The results show the visual awake examination underestimated the presence and severity of active periodontal disease. The thiol-detection test was superior to the visual awake examination at detecting the presence and severity of active periodontal disease and was an indicator of progression toward alveolar bone loss. The thiol-detection test detected active periodontal disease at early stages of development, before any visual cues were present, indicating the need for intervention to prevent periodontal bone loss. Early detection is important because without intervention, dogs with gingivitis (active periodontal disease) progress to irreversible periodontal bone loss (stage 2+). As suggested in the current AAHA guidelines, a thiol-detection test administered in conjunction with the visual awake examination during routine wellness examinations facilitates veterinarian-client communication and mitigates under-diagnosis of periodontal disease and underutilization of dental services. The thiol-detection test can be used to monitor the periodontal health status of the conscious patient during follow-up examinations based on disease severity.

  1. NCOG-06. Usability and validity of a phone battery to assess language functions in brain tumor patients undergoing awake surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Witte, E. de; Piai, V.; Dronkers, N.F.; Berger, M.S.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: A wake surgery in eloquent brain regions is performed to preserve language functions. Although in general no major permanent language deficits are found after awake brain surgery, clinically relevant impairments are detected (Satoer et al., 2014). Unfortunately, follow-up of tumor

  2. Ex vivo evaluation of the serotonin 1A receptor partial agonist [³H]CUMI-101 in awake rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palner, Mikael; Underwood, Mark D; Kumar, Dileep J S

    2011-01-01

    [³H]CUMI-101 is a 5-HT(1A) partial agonist, which has been evaluated for use as a positron emission tracer in baboon and humans. We sought to evaluate the properties of [³H]CUMI-101 ex vivo in awake rats and determine if [³H]CUMI-101 can measure changes in synaptic levels of serotonin after diffe...

  3. Spiking in primary somatosensory cortex during natural whisking in awake head-restrained rats is cell-type specific

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Kock, C.P.J.; Sakmann, B.

    2009-01-01

    Sensation involves active movement of sensory organs, but it remains unknown how position or movement of sensory organs is encoded in cortex. In the rat whisker system, each whisker is represented by an individual cortical (barrel) column. Here, we quantified in awake, head-fixed rats the impact of

  4. Visually Evoked 3-5 Hz Membrane Potential Oscillations Reduce the Responsiveness of Visual Cortex Neurons in Awake Behaving Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Einstein, Michael C; Polack, Pierre-Olivier; Tran, Duy T; Golshani, Peyman

    2017-05-17

    Low-frequency membrane potential ( V m ) oscillations were once thought to only occur in sleeping and anesthetized states. Recently, low-frequency V m oscillations have been described in inactive awake animals, but it is unclear whether they shape sensory processing in neurons and whether they occur during active awake behavioral states. To answer these questions, we performed two-photon guided whole-cell V m recordings from primary visual cortex layer 2/3 excitatory and inhibitory neurons in awake mice during passive visual stimulation and performance of visual and auditory discrimination tasks. We recorded stereotyped 3-5 Hz V m oscillations where the V m baseline hyperpolarized as the V m underwent high amplitude rhythmic fluctuations lasting 1-2 s in duration. When 3-5 Hz V m oscillations coincided with visual cues, excitatory neuron responses to preferred cues were significantly reduced. Despite this disruption to sensory processing, visual cues were critical for evoking 3-5 Hz V m oscillations when animals performed discrimination tasks and passively viewed drifting grating stimuli. Using pupillometry and animal locomotive speed as indicators of arousal, we found that 3-5 Hz oscillations were not restricted to unaroused states and that they occurred equally in aroused and unaroused states. Therefore, low-frequency V m oscillations play a role in shaping sensory processing in visual cortical neurons, even during active wakefulness and decision making. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT A neuron's membrane potential ( V m ) strongly shapes how information is processed in sensory cortices of awake animals. Yet, very little is known about how low-frequency V m oscillations influence sensory processing and whether they occur in aroused awake animals. By performing two-photon guided whole-cell recordings from layer 2/3 excitatory and inhibitory neurons in the visual cortex of awake behaving animals, we found visually evoked stereotyped 3-5 Hz V m oscillations that disrupt

  5. The Ulster Cycle: Cultural Significance for Irish Composers

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    Angela Goff

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available For more than three hundred years, Irish composers have engaged with tales from early Irish saga-literature which comprises four main series: Mythological, Ulster and Fenian cycles as well as the Cycle of Kings. This literary corpus dates from 600–1200 CE and is amongst the oldest in Europe. The fragmented history of the literature reveals a continuity of tradition in that the ancient sagas evolved from the oral Irish tradition, were gradually recorded in Irish, and kept alive in modern times through translation into the English language. The timelessness and social impact of these sagas, centuries after they were documented, resonate with Irish composers through the identification of local features and/or universal themes of redemption, triumph or tragedy depicted in the literature. The focus here is on sagas from the Ulster Cycle as they have been most celebrated by Irish composers; the majority of which have been composed since Thomas Kinsella’s successful translation of the Táin Bó Cuailnge in 1969. How the composers chose to embrace the Irish past lies in each composer’s execution of the peculiar local and universal themes exhibited in the sagas. The aim of this article is to initiate an interdisciplinary discussion of the cultural significance of this literary corpus for Irish composers by exploring an area of Irish musicological discourse that has not been hitherto documented. A brief literary background to the Ulster Cycle leads to a discussion of what prompted the composers to engage with Ulster Cycle themes at a particular time in their respective careers. An exploration of the various stylistic features employed in selected works sheds light on the cultural ideologies that prevailed in Ireland at the time of their respective composition.

  6. Awake craniotomy for gliomas in a high-field intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging suite: analysis of 42 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maldaun, Marcos V C; Khawja, Shumaila N; Levine, Nicholas B; Rao, Ganesh; Lang, Frederick F; Weinberg, Jeffrey S; Tummala, Sudhakar; Cowles, Charles E; Ferson, David; Nguyen, Anh-Thuy; Sawaya, Raymond; Suki, Dima; Prabhu, Sujit S

    2014-10-01

    The object of this study was to describe the experience of combining awake craniotomy techniques with high-field (1.5 T) intraoperative MRI (iMRI) for tumors adjacent to eloquent cortex. From a prospective database the authors obtained and evaluated the records of all patients who had undergone awake craniotomy procedures with cortical and subcortical mapping in the iMRI suite. The integration of these two modalities was assessed with respect to safety, operative times, workflow, extent of resection (EOR), and neurological outcome. Between February 2010 and December 2011, 42 awake craniotomy procedures using iMRI were performed in 41 patients for the removal of intraaxial tumors. There were 31 left-sided and 11 right-sided tumors. In half of the cases (21 [50%] of 42), the patient was kept awake for both motor and speech mapping. The mean duration of surgery overall was 7.3 hours (range 4.0-13.9 hours). The median EOR overall was 90%, and gross-total resection (EOR ≥ 95%) was achieved in 17 cases (40.5%). After viewing the first MR images after initial resection, further resection was performed in 17 cases (40.5%); the mean EOR in these cases increased from 56% to 67% after further resection. No deficits were observed preoperatively in 33 cases (78.5%), and worsening neurological deficits were noted immediately after surgery in 11 cases (26.2%). At 1 month after surgery, however, worsened neurological function was observed in only 1 case (2.3%). There was a learning curve with regard to patient positioning and setup times, although it did not adversely affect patient outcomes. Awake craniotomy can be safely performed in a high-field (1.5 T) iMRI suite to maximize tumor resection in eloquent brain areas with an acceptable morbidity profile at 1 month.

  7. Classifying Multiple Types of Hand Motions Using Electrocorticography During Intraoperative Awake Craniotomy & Seizure Monitoring Processes - Case Studies

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    Tao eXie

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In this work, some case studies were conducted toclassify several kinds of hand motions from electrocorticography(ECoG signals during intraoperative awake craniotomy &extraoperative seizure monitoring processes. Four subjects (P1,P2 with intractable epilepsy during seizure monitoring and P3,P4 with brain tumor during awake craniotomy participatedin the experiments. Subjects performed three types of handmotions (Grasp, Thumb-finger motion and Index-finger motioncontralateral to the motor cortex covered with ECoG electrodes.Two methods were used for signal processing. Method I:autoregressive (AR model with burg method was applied toextract features, and additional waveform length (WL featurehas been considered, finally the linear discriminative analysis(LDA was used as the classifier. Method II: stationary subspaceanalysis (SSA was applied for data preprocessing, and thecommon spatial pattern (CSP was used for feature extractionbefore LDA decoding process. Applying method I, the threeclassaccuracy of P1□P4 were 90.17%, 96.00%, 91.77% and92.95% respectively. For method II, the three-class accuracy ofP1□P4 were 72.00%, 93.17%, 95.22% and 90.36% respectively.This study verified the possibility of decoding multiple handmotion types during an awake craniotomy, which is the firststep towards dexterous neuroprosthetic control during surgicalimplantation, in order to verify the optimal placement of electrodes.The accuracy during awake craniotomy was comparableto results during seizure monitoring. This study also indicatedthat ECoG was a promising approach for precise identificationof eloquent cortex during awake craniotomy, and might forma promising BCI system that could benefit both patients andneurosurgeons.

  8. Classifying multiple types of hand motions using electrocorticography during intraoperative awake craniotomy and seizure monitoring processes—case studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Tao; Zhang, Dingguo; Wu, Zehan; Chen, Liang; Zhu, Xiangyang

    2015-01-01

    In this work, some case studies were conducted to classify several kinds of hand motions from electrocorticography (ECoG) signals during intraoperative awake craniotomy & extraoperative seizure monitoring processes. Four subjects (P1, P2 with intractable epilepsy during seizure monitoring and P3, P4 with brain tumor during awake craniotomy) participated in the experiments. Subjects performed three types of hand motions (Grasp, Thumb-finger motion and Index-finger motion) contralateral to the motor cortex covered with ECoG electrodes. Two methods were used for signal processing. Method I: autoregressive (AR) model with burg method was applied to extract features, and additional waveform length (WL) feature has been considered, finally the linear discriminative analysis (LDA) was used as the classifier. Method II: stationary subspace analysis (SSA) was applied for data preprocessing, and the common spatial pattern (CSP) was used for feature extraction before LDA decoding process. Applying method I, the three-class accuracy of P1~P4 were 90.17, 96.00, 91.77, and 92.95% respectively. For method II, the three-class accuracy of P1~P4 were 72.00, 93.17, 95.22, and 90.36% respectively. This study verified the possibility of decoding multiple hand motion types during an awake craniotomy, which is the first step toward dexterous neuroprosthetic control during surgical implantation, in order to verify the optimal placement of electrodes. The accuracy during awake craniotomy was comparable to results during seizure monitoring. This study also indicated that ECoG was a promising approach for precise identification of eloquent cortex during awake craniotomy, and might form a promising BCI system that could benefit both patients and neurosurgeons. PMID:26483627

  9. Ultrafast CT in the diagnosis of sleep apnea during awake tidal breathing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galvin, J.R.; Rooholamini, S.A.; Stanford, W.

    1988-01-01

    With sleep there is normally a decrease in neural output to upper airway muscles. If this decrease is superimposed on a structurally abnormal airway, then sleep apnea may result. Ultrafast CT axially images the upper airway in near real time. The authors compared 11 awake patients with sleep apnea with 24 healthy volunteers during quiet tidal breathing. They found that apneic patients have a small oropharyngeal airway (31.3 mm 2 +- 30.2 vs 134.2 mm 2 +- 46.6[P=<.0001]). Apneic patients also have significant collapsibility of the nasopharynx (75% +- 18% vs 27% +- 14% [P=<.0001]). Ultrafast CT gives dynamic anatomic definition of the upper airway and provides a means to eulcidate further the pathogenesis of sleep apnea

  10. JACoW Safety instrumented systems and the AWAKE plasma control as a use case

    CERN Document Server

    Blanco Viñuela, Enrique; Fernández Adiego, Borja; Speroni, Roberto

    2018-01-01

    Safety is likely the most critical concern in many process industries, yet there is a general uncertainty on the proper engineering to reduce the risks and ensure the safety of persons or material at the same time as providing the process control system. Some of the reasons for this misperception are unclear requirements, lack of functional safety engineering knowledge or incorrect protection functionalities attributed to the BPCS (Basic Process Control System). Occasionally the control engineers are not aware of the hazards inherent to an industrial process and this causes an incorrect design of the overall controls. This paper illustrates the engineering of the SIS (Safety Instrumented System) and the BPCS of the plasma vapour controls of the AWAKE R&D; project, the first proton-driven plasma wakefield acceleration experiment in the world. The controls design and implementation refers to the IEC61511/ISA84 standard, including technological choices, design, operation and maintenance. Finally, the publica...

  11. Awake Surgery for a Violin Player: Monitoring Motor and Music Performance, A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piai, Vitória; Vos, Sandra H; Idelberger, Reinhard; Gans, Pauline; Doorduin, Jonne; Ter Laan, Mark

    2018-02-27

    We report the case of a professional violin player who underwent an awake craniotomy to resect a tumor in the left supplementary motor area, an area involved in motor planning. A careful pre- and intraoperative monitoring plan for music performance and complex motor function was established that could be used in combination with cortical stimulation. The patient suffered an epileptic seizure during cortical stimulation. The monitoring of complex motor and musical functions was implemented with the patient playing the violin while the resection was performed. Almost complete resection was achieved with no notable postoperative deficits contributing to functional impairment. The multidisciplinary approach, involving neurosurgery, neuropsychology, anesthesiology, and clinical neurophysiology, allowed us to successfully cope with the theoretical and practical challenges associated with tailored care for a professional musician. The music and motor monitoring plan is reported in detail to enable other sites to reproduce and adapt it accordingly.

  12. Prevalence of sleep bruxism and awake bruxism in different chronotype profiles: Hypothesis of an association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serra-Negra, J M; Lobbezoo, F; Martins, C C; Stellini, E; Manfredini, D

    2017-04-01

    Sleep (SB) and awake bruxism (AB) recognize a multifactorial etiology and have a relationship with several psychological factors. Psychological disorders have recently been associated also with the chronotype, which is the propensity for an individual to be especially active at a particular time during a 24-h period. Based on the chronotype, the two extreme profiles are morningness and eveningness individuals. Due to the relationship that both the chronotype and bruxism have with psychological factors and the fact that performing tasks not compatible with chronotype can trigger stress, this review presents the hypothesis that the prevalence of SB and AB can differ with the various chronotype profiles. New perspectives for the study of bruxism etiology may emerge from investigations on the topic. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Pleural liquid clearance rate measured in awake sheep by the volume of dilution method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broaddus, V.C.; Wiener-Kronish, J.P.; Berthiaume, Y.; Staub, N.C.

    1986-01-01

    The authors reported 24h clearance of mock pleural effusions measured terminally in sheep. To measure effusion volume at different times in the same sheep, they injected 111 In-transferrin and measured its dilution. In 5 sheep with effusions of known sizes, the method was accurate to +/-10%. In 5 awake sheep, the authors injected 10 ml/kg of a 1% protein solution via a non-penetrating rib capsule. At 6h, the authors measured the volume by the dilution method and at 24h by direct recovery. The clearance rate in each animal was constant at 2.9-6.0%/h (average 4.8 +/- 1.3%/h). This new method gives a reliable two point clearance rate and requires fewer animals

  14. Does Global Astrocytic Calcium Signaling Participate in Awake Brain State Transitions and Neuronal Circuit Function?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaerby, Celia; Rasmussen, Rune; Andersen, Mie

    2017-01-01

    of the neuromodulators, noradrenaline and acetylcholine. Astrocytes have emerged as a new player participating in the regulation of brain activity, and have recently been implicated in brain state shifts. Astrocytes display global Ca(2+) signaling in response to activation of the noradrenergic system, but whether...... astrocytic Ca(2+) signaling is causative or correlative for shifts in brain state and neural activity patterns is not known. Here we review the current available literature on astrocytic Ca(2+) signaling in awake animals in order to explore the role of astrocytic signaling in brain state shifts. Furthermore......We continuously need to adapt to changing conditions within our surrounding environment, and our brain needs to quickly shift between resting and working activity states in order to allow appropriate behaviors. These global state shifts are intimately linked to the brain-wide release...

  15. Cognitive outcome after awake surgery for left and right hemisphere tumours

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elke De Witte

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Awake surgery in eloquent brain regions is performed to preserve language and other cognitive functions. Although in general, no major permanent cognitive deficits are found after awake brain surgery, clinically relevant impairments are detected and cognitive recovery takes longer than generally assumed (3 months (Santini et al., 2012; Satoer et al., 2014; Talacchi et al., 2012. However, as there is a lack of extensive cognitive follow-up data it is unknown when recovery takes place. In addition, the influence of critical language sites identified by direct electrical stimulation (DES and tumour variables (e.g. left/right tumour location, tumour grade on long-term cognitive findings remains unclear. METHODS: In this longitudinal study the short-term and long-term effects of awake surgery on cognition were investigated in 40 patients (29 patients with left and 11 with right hemisphere tumours. Language, memory, attentional, executive and visuospatial functions were assessed in the preoperative phase, at short-term follow-up (6 weeks postsurgery and at long-term follow-up (6 months postsurgery with a neuropsychological protocol. In addition, the effect of intraoperative critical language sites, left/right tumour location, hemispheric language dominance, extent of resection and adjuvant treatment on cognitive change was studied. RESULTS: Both pre- and postoperatively, the mean performance of the patients was worse (impairment = z-score below -2 than the performance of the normal population in the language domain, the memory domain, the attentional and executive domain (p .05. Awake surgery negatively affected language, attentional and executive functions but not memory and visuospatial functions. At 6 weeks postsurgery, performance on all language, attentional and executive tasks deteriorated (object/action naming, semantic/phonological fluency from DuLIP, Token test; Trail Making Test A & B, Stroop I, II, & III. At 6 months

  16. Characterization of nociceptive behavioural responses in the awake pig following UV–B-induced inflammation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    di Giminiani, Pierpaolo; Petersen, Lars J.; Herskin, Mette S

    2014-01-01

    due to its great homology with humans. Methods The skin in the flank of awake pigs was irradiated by a UV-B light source (1 J/cm2) and changes in thermal and mechanical sensitivity 24 and 48 h following irradiation were measured via assessment of nociceptive behaviours. Results Thermal sensitivity...... skin site than at the control site 24 and 48 h following irradiation (P UV-B irradiation (P = 0.092). Following the inflammatory challenge, the mechanical sensitivity was higher at the site...... of irradiation compared with the control skin at both 24 and 48 h (P UV-B inflammation in porcine skin, but they were not capable of providing a clear indication...

  17. Wave aberrations in rhesus monkeys with vision-induced ametropias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramamirtham, Ramkumar; Kee, Chea-su; Hung, Li-Fang; Qiao-Grider, Ying; Huang, Juan; Roorda, Austin; Smith, Earl L.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between refractive errors and high-order aberrations in infant rhesus monkeys. Specifically, we compared the monochromatic wave aberrations measured with a Shack-Hartman wavefront sensor between normal monkeys and monkeys with vision-induced refractive errors. Shortly after birth, both normal monkeys and treated monkeys reared with optically induced defocus or form deprivation showed a decrease in the magnitude of high-order aberrations with age. However, the decrease in aberrations was typically smaller in the treated animals. Thus, at the end of the lens-rearing period, higher than normal amounts of aberrations were observed in treated eyes, both hyperopic and myopic eyes and treated eyes that developed astigmatism, but not spherical ametropias. The total RMS wavefront error increased with the degree of spherical refractive error, but was not correlated with the degree of astigmatism. Both myopic and hyperopic treated eyes showed elevated amounts of coma and trefoil and the degree of trefoil increased with the degree of spherical ametropia. Myopic eyes also exhibited a much higher prevalence of positive spherical aberration than normal or treated hyperopic eyes. Following the onset of unrestricted vision, the amount of high-order aberrations decreased in the treated monkeys that also recovered from the experimentally induced refractive errors. Our results demonstrate that high-order aberrations are influenced by visual experience in young primates and that the increase in high-order aberrations in our treated monkeys appears to be an optical byproduct of the vision-induced alterations in ocular growth that underlie changes in refractive error. The results from our study suggest that the higher amounts of wave aberrations observed in ametropic humans are likely to be a consequence, rather than a cause, of abnormal refractive development. PMID:17825347

  18. Neurosyphilis in Anglo-American Composers and Jazz Musicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breitenfeld, Darko; Kust, Davor; Breitenfeld, Tomislav; Prpić, Marin; Lucijanić, Marko; Zibar, Davor; Hostić, Vedran; Franceschi, Maja; Bolanča, Ante

    2017-09-01

    Syphilis is a sexually transmitted, systemic disease caused by the spirochete bacterium Treponema pallidum. The most common mechanism of transmission is sexual intercourse. Although there are several hypotheses, the exact origin of the disease remains unknown. Newly published evidence suggests that the hypothesis supporting the theory of the American origin of the disease is the valid one. Among 1500 analyzed pathographies of composers and musicians, data on ten Anglo-American composers and jazz musicians having suffered from neurosyphilis (tertiary stage of the disease) were extracted for this report. In this group of Anglo-American composers and musicians, most of them died from progressive paralysis while still in the creative phase of life. Additionally, diagnoses of eleven other famous neurosyphilitic composers, as well as basic biographic data on ten less known composers that died from neurosyphilis-progressive paralysis are also briefly mentioned. In conclusion, neurosyphilis can cause serious neurological damage, as well as permanent disability or death, preventing further work and skill improvement.

  19. Age of language acquisition and cortical language organization in multilingual patients undergoing awake brain mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Coello, Alejandro; Havas, Viktória; Juncadella, Montserrat; Sierpowska, Joanna; Rodríguez-Fornells, Antoni; Gabarrós, Andreu

    2017-06-01

    OBJECTIVE Most knowledge regarding the anatomical organization of multilingualism is based on aphasiology and functional imaging studies. However, the results have still to be validated by the gold standard approach, namely electrical stimulation mapping (ESM) during awake neurosurgical procedures. In this ESM study the authors describe language representation in a highly specific group of 13 multilingual individuals, focusing on how age of acquisition may influence the cortical organization of language. METHODS Thirteen patients who had a high degree of proficiency in multiple languages and were harboring lesions within the dominant, left hemisphere underwent ESM while being operated on under awake conditions. Demographic and language data were recorded in relation to age of language acquisition (for native languages and early- and late-acquired languages), neuropsychological pre- and postoperative language testing, the number and location of language sites, and overlapping distribution in terms of language acquisition time. Lesion growth patterns and histopathological characteristics, location, and size were also recorded. The distribution of language sites was analyzed with respect to age of acquisition and overlap. RESULTS The functional language-related sites were distributed in the frontal (55%), temporal (29%), and parietal lobes (16%). The total number of native language sites was 47. Early-acquired languages (including native languages) were represented in 97 sites (55 overlapped) and late-acquired languages in 70 sites (45 overlapped). The overlapping distribution was 20% for early-early, 71% for early-late, and 9% for late-late. The average lesion size (maximum diameter) was 3.3 cm. There were 5 fast-growing and 7 slow-growing lesions. CONCLUSIONS Cortical language distribution in multilingual patients is not homogeneous, and it is influenced by age of acquisition. Early-acquired languages have a greater cortical representation than languages acquired

  20. Pre-hospital emergency anaesthesia in awake hypotensive trauma patients: beneficial or detrimental?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crewdson, K; Rehn, M; Brohi, K; Lockey, D J

    2018-04-01

    The benefits of pre-hospital emergency anaesthesia (PHEA) are controversial. Patients who are hypovolaemic prior to induction of anaesthesia are at risk of severe cardiovascular instability post-induction. This study compared mortality for hypovolaemic trauma patients (without major neurological injury) undergoing PHEA with a patient cohort with similar physiology transported to hospital without PHEA. A retrospective database review was performed to identify patients who were hypotensive on scene [systolic blood pressure (SBP) < 90 mmHg], and GCS 13-15. Patient records were reviewed independently by two pre-hospital clinicians to identify the likelihood of hypovolaemia. Primary outcome measure was mortality defined as death before hospital discharge. Two hundred and thirty-six patients were included; 101 patients underwent PHEA. Fifteen PHEA patients died (14.9%) compared with six non-PHEA patients (4.4%), P = 0.01; unadjusted OR for death was 3.73 (1.30-12.21; P = 0.01). This association remained after adjustment for age, injury mechanism, heart rate and hypovolaemia (adjusted odds ratio 3.07 (1.03-9.14) P = 0.04). Fifty-eight PHEA patients (57.4%) were hypovolaemic prior to induction of anaesthesia, 14 died (24%). Of 43 PHEA patients (42.6%) not meeting hypovolaemia criteria, one died (2%); unadjusted OR for mortality was 13.12 (1.84-578.21). After adjustment for age, injury mechanism and initial heart rate, the odds ratio for mortality remained significant at 9.99 (1.69-58.98); P = 0.01. Our results suggest an association between PHEA and in-hospital mortality in awake hypotensive trauma patients, which is strengthened when hypotension is due to hypovolaemia. If patients are hypovolaemic and awake on scene it might, where possible, be appropriate to delay induction of anaesthesia until hospital arrival. © 2018 The Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Sildenafil delays the intestinal transit of a liquid meal in awake rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.R.V Graça

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Sildenafil slows down the gastric emptying of a liquid test meal in awake rats and inhibits the contractility of intestinal tissue strips. We studied the acute effects of sildenafil on in vivo intestinal transit in rats. Fasted, male albino rats (180-220 g, N = 44 were treated (0.2 mL, iv with sildenafil (4 mg/kg or vehicle (0.01 N HCl. Ten minutes later they were fed a liquid test meal (99m technetium-labeled saline injected directly into the duodenum. Twenty, 30 or 40 min after feeding, the rats were killed and transit throughout the gastrointestinal tract was evaluated by progression of the radiotracer using the geometric center method. The effect of sildenafil on mean arterial pressure (MAP was monitored in a separate group of rats (N = 14. Data (medians within interquartile ranges were compared by the Mann-Whitney U-test. The location of the geometric center was significantly more distal in vehicle-treated than in sildenafil-treated rats at 20, 30, and 40 min after test meal instillation (3.3 (3.0-3.6 vs 2.9 (2.7-3.1; 3.8 (3.4-4.0 vs 2.9 (2.5-3.1, and 4.3 (3.9-4.5 vs 3.4 (3.2-3.7, respectively; P < 0.05. MAP was unchanged in vehicle-treated rats but decreased by 25% (P < 0.05 within 10 min after sildenafil injection. In conclusion, besides transiently decreasing MAP, sildenafil delays the intestinal transit of a liquid test meal in awake rats.

  2. XVII CENTURY TURKISH DIVAN POETS WHOSE WORKS HAVE BEEN COMPOSED

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    Mehmet Nuri PARMAKSIZ

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Classical Turkish poetry and classical Turkish music have been inseparable art branches for centuries. The best examples of music and poems created in the same periods have been the most prominent proof of this. One of these periods without doubt have been 17th century. It has been observed that composers demand divan poetry of 17thand 18thcentury greatly. Mystical poems constitute most of the poems composed in these centuries. Almost all of the poems in the divans of some mystic divan poets have been composed. In this study, the poets in the mentioned century have been determined and then the poems in the new and previous repertoires of these poets have been tried to reveal with screening and comparasion methods .

  3. Composers on Stage: Ambiguous Authorship in Contemporary Music Performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Groth, Sanne Krogh

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, workflows within the field of contemporary classical music have changed drastically. Increasingly, composers are active in the process of creating and co-creating performances, not only the auditory dimensions but also the visual design and theatrical staging. The practice has...... but involving themselves in other ways. The article explores the ambivalent authorship at stake in these performances, arguing that they appear to be projects that reveal the processes of musical performance in ways that undermine the Romantic idea of the composer while concurrently celebrating that very same...... idea through their exposition and staging of the composer. The examples used to illustrate my argument are analyses of All the Time (Hodkinson, 2001), Buenos Aires (Steen-Andersen 2014) and Ord for Ord (Rønsholdt, 2014)...

  4. Serotonin shapes risky decision making in monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Arwen B; Kuhn, Cynthia M; Platt, Michael L

    2009-12-01

    Some people love taking risks, while others avoid gambles at all costs. The neural mechanisms underlying individual variation in preference for risky or certain outcomes, however, remain poorly understood. Although behavioral pathologies associated with compulsive gambling, addiction and other psychiatric disorders implicate deficient serotonin signaling in pathological decision making, there is little experimental evidence demonstrating a link between serotonin and risky decision making, in part due to the lack of a good animal model. We used dietary rapid tryptophan depletion (RTD) to acutely lower brain serotonin in three macaques performing a simple gambling task for fluid rewards. To confirm the efficacy of RTD experiments, we measured total plasma tryptophan using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with electrochemical detection. Reducing brain serotonin synthesis decreased preference for the safe option in a gambling task. Moreover, lowering brain serotonin function significantly decreased the premium required for monkeys to switch their preference to the risky option, suggesting that diminished serotonin signaling enhances the relative subjective value of the risky option. These results implicate serotonin in risk-sensitive decision making and, further, suggest pharmacological therapies for treating pathological risk preferences in disorders such as problem gambling and addiction.

  5. Rhesus monkeys attribute perceptions to others.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flombaum, Jonathan I; Santos, Laurie R

    2005-03-08

    Paramount among human cognitive abilities is the capacity to reason about what others think, want, and see--a capacity referred to as a theory of mind (ToM). Despite its importance in human cognition, the extent to which other primates share human ToM capacities has for decades remained a mystery. To date, primates [1, 2] have performed poorly in behavioral tasks that require ToM abilities, despite the fact that some macaques are known to encode social stimuli at the level of single neurons [3-5]. Here, we presented rhesus macaques with a more ecologically relevant ToM task in which subjects could "steal" a contested grape from one of two human competitors. In six experiments, monkeys selectively retrieved the grape from an experimenter who was incapable of seeing the grape rather than an experimenter who was visually aware. These results suggest that rhesus macaques possess an essential component of ToM: the ability to deduce what others perceive on the basis of where they are looking. These results converge with new findings illustrating the importance of competitive paradigms in apes [6]. Moreover, they raise the possibility that, in primates, cortical cells thought to encode where others are looking [7] may encode what those individuals see as well.

  6. Ritornelo: composição passo a passo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvio Ferraz

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper intents to present the mecanism of « objects incrustation » and the « continuous variation of composition techniques » – operators that guided the composition of Ritornelo, for flute and percussion. The article also focus the relation between these strategies and an especific way to compose where sound and musical objects don’t assume the first position in the compositional plan. The technical aspects of Ritornelo’s composition are also related to a way of composing withouth a previous plan, at the same time, it doesn’t follow the cause-effect logic present ed in more tradicional musical improvisation.

  7. Construction and evaluation of novel rhesus monkey adenovirus vaccine vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbink, Peter; Maxfield, Lori F; Ng'ang'a, David; Borducchi, Erica N; Iampietro, M Justin; Bricault, Christine A; Teigler, Jeffrey E; Blackmore, Stephen; Parenteau, Lily; Wagh, Kshitij; Handley, Scott A; Zhao, Guoyan; Virgin, Herbert W; Korber, Bette; Barouch, Dan H

    2015-02-01

    Adenovirus vectors are widely used as vaccine candidates for a variety of pathogens, including HIV-1. To date, human and chimpanzee adenoviruses have been explored in detail as vaccine vectors. The phylogeny of human and chimpanzee adenoviruses is overlapping, and preexisting humoral and cellular immunity to both are exhibited in human populations worldwide. More distantly related adenoviruses may therefore offer advantages as vaccine vectors. Here we describe the primary isolation and vectorization of three novel adenoviruses from rhesus monkeys. The seroprevalence of these novel rhesus monkey adenovirus vectors was extremely low in sub-Saharan Africa human populations, and these vectors proved to have immunogenicity comparable to that of human and chimpanzee adenovirus vaccine vectors in mice. These rhesus monkey adenoviruses phylogenetically clustered with the poorly described adenovirus species G and robustly stimulated innate immune responses. These novel adenoviruses represent a new class of candidate vaccine vectors. Although there have been substantial efforts in the development of vaccine vectors from human and chimpanzee adenoviruses, far less is known about rhesus monkey adenoviruses. In this report, we describe the isolation and vectorization of three novel rhesus monkey adenoviruses. These vectors exhibit virologic and immunologic characteristics that make them attractive as potential candidate vaccine vectors for both HIV-1 and other pathogens. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  8. Analogical reasoning in a capuchin monkey (Cebus apella).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Erica Hoy; Fragaszy, Dorothy M

    2008-05-01

    Previous evidence has suggested that analogical reasoning (recognizing similarities among object relations when the objects themselves are dissimilar) is limited to humans and apes. This study investigated whether capuchin monkeys (Cebus apella) can use analogical reasoning to solve a 3-dimensional search task. The task involved hiding a food item under 1 of 2 or 3 plastic cups of different sizes and then allowing subjects to search for food hidden under the cup of analogous size in their own set of cups. Four monkeys were exposed to a series of relational matching tasks. If subjects reached criterion on these tasks, they were exposed to relational transfer tasks involving novel stimuli. Three of the monkeys failed to reach criterion on the basic relational matching tasks and therefore were not tested further. One monkey, however, revealed above-chance performance on a series of transfer tasks with 3 novel stimuli. This evidence suggests that contrary to previous arguments, a member of a New World monkey species can solve an analogical problem. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2008 APA, all rights reserved.

  9. [Monkey-pox, a model of emergent then reemergent disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georges, A J; Matton, T; Courbot-Georges, M C

    2004-01-01

    The recent emergence of monkey pox in the United States of America highlights the problem (known for other infectious agents) of dissemination of pathogens outside their endemic area, and of subsequent global threats of variable gravity according to agents. It is a real emergency since monkey pox had been confined to Africa for several decades, where small epidemics occurred from time to time, monkey pox is a "miniature smallpox" which, in Africa, evolves on an endemic (zoonotic) mode with, as reservoirs, several species of wild rodents (mainly squirrels) and some monkey species. It can be accidentally transmitted to man then develops as epidemics, sometimes leading to death. The virus was imported in 2003 in the United States of America, via Gambia rats and wild squirrels (all African species), and infected prairie dogs (which are now in fashion as pets), then crossed the species barrier to man. In the United States of America, screening campaigns, epidemiological investigations, and subsequent treatments led to a rapid control of the epidemic, which is a model of emergent disease for this country. Therapeutic and preventive measures directly applicable to monkey pox are discussed. They can also be applied against other pox virus infections (including smallpox). The risk of criminal introduction of pox viruses is discussed since it is, more than ever, a real worldwide threat.

  10. Economic choices reveal probability distortion in macaque monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stauffer, William R; Lak, Armin; Bossaerts, Peter; Schultz, Wolfram

    2015-02-18

    Economic choices are largely determined by two principal elements, reward value (utility) and probability. Although nonlinear utility functions have been acknowledged for centuries, nonlinear probability weighting (probability distortion) was only recently recognized as a ubiquitous aspect of real-world choice behavior. Even when outcome probabilities are known and acknowledged, human decision makers often overweight low probability outcomes and underweight high probability outcomes. Whereas recent studies measured utility functions and their corresponding neural correlates in monkeys, it is not known whether monkeys distort probability in a manner similar to humans. Therefore, we investigated economic choices in macaque monkeys for evidence of probability distortion. We trained two monkeys to predict reward from probabilistic gambles with constant outcome values (0.5 ml or nothing). The probability of winning was conveyed using explicit visual cues (sector stimuli). Choices between the gambles revealed that the monkeys used the explicit probability information to make meaningful decisions. Using these cues, we measured probability distortion from choices between the gambles and safe rewards. Parametric modeling of the choices revealed classic probability weighting functions with inverted-S shape. Therefore, the animals overweighted low probability rewards and underweighted high probability rewards. Empirical investigation of the behavior verified that the choices were best explained by a combination of nonlinear value and nonlinear probability distortion. Together, these results suggest that probability distortion may reflect evolutionarily preserved neuronal processing. Copyright © 2015 Stauffer et al.

  11. Responses of squirrel monkeys to their experimentally modified mobbing calls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fichtel, Claudia; Hammerschmidt, Kurt

    2003-05-01

    Previous acoustic analyses suggested emotion-correlated changes in the acoustic structure of squirrel monkey (Saimiri sciureus) vocalizations. Specifically, calls given in aversive contexts were characterized by an upward shift in frequencies, often accompanied by an increase in amplitude. In order to test whether changes in frequencies or amplitude are indeed relevant for conspecific listeners, playback experiments were conducted in which either frequencies or amplitude of mobbing calls were modified. Latency and first orienting response were measured in playback experiments with six adult squirrel monkeys. After broadcasting yaps with increased frequencies or amplitude, squirrel monkeys showed a longer orienting response towards the speaker than after the corresponding control stimuli. Furthermore, after broadcasting yaps with decreased frequencies or amplitude, squirrel monkeys showed a shorter orienting response towards the speaker than after the corresponding manipulated calls with higher frequencies or amplitude. These results suggest that changes in frequencies or amplitude were perceived by squirrel monkeys, indicating that the relationship between call structure and the underlying affective state of the caller agreed with the listener's assessment of the calls. However, a simultaneous increase in frequencies and amplitude did not lead to an enhanced response, compared to each single parameter. Thus, from the receiver's perspective, both call parameters may mutually replace each other.

  12. Evaluation of monkey intraocular pressure by rebound tonometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Wenhan; Cao, Guiqun; Qiu, Jinghua; Ma, Jia; Li, Ni; Yu, Man; Yan, Naihong; Chen, Lei; Pang, Iok-Hou

    2009-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the usefulness of the TonoVet™ rebound tonometer in measuring intraocular pressure (IOP) of monkeys. Methods The accuracy of the TonoVet™ rebound tonometer was determined in cannulated eyes of anesthetized rhesus monkeys where IOP was controlled by adjusting the height of a connected perfusate reservoir. To assess the applicability of the equipment through in vivo studies, the diurnal fluctuation of IOP and effects of IOP-lowering compounds were evaluated in monkeys. Results IOP readings generated by the TonoVet™ tonometer correlated very well with the actual pressure in the cannulated monkey eye. The linear correlation had a slope of 0.922±0.014 (mean±SEM, n=4), a y-intercept of 3.04±0.61, and a correlation coefficient of r2=0.97. Using this method, diurnal IOP fluctuation of the rhesus monkey was demonstrated. The tonometer was also able to detect IOP changes induced by pharmacologically active compounds. A single topical ocular instillation (15 μg) of the rho kinase inhibitor, H1152, produced a 5–6 mmHg reduction (pmonkey eye. PMID:19898690

  13. Monkey brain damage from radiation in the therapeutic range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakagaki, H.; Brunhart, G.; Kemper, T.L.; Caveness, W.F.

    1976-01-01

    Twelve Macaca mulatta monkeys received 200 rads of supervoltage radiation to the whole brain per day, 5 days a week. The course in four monkeys was 4 weeks for a total dose of 4000 rads; in four monkeys, 6 weeks for 6000 rads; and in four monkeys, 8 weeks for 8000 rads. Four unirradiated monkeys served as controls. One from each group, sacrificed at 6 and 12 months from start of irradiation, is reported here. The results from 4000 rads were negligible; those from 8000 rads, profound, with gross brain destruction. The results from 6000 rads, within the therapeutic range, included at 6 months punctate necrotic lesions, 1 mm or less, widely scattered but with a predilection for the forebrain white matter. The reaction to these lesions ranged from an early macrophage response to calcification. Some were accompanied by focal edema. There were occasional examples of vascular endothelial proliferation. In addition, there were patches of dilated capillaries or telangiectasia. Twelve months after 6000 rads there were a few mineralized lesions and innumerable minute deposits of calcium and iron. A more active process was suggested by widely disseminated areas of telangiectasia, 6 to 12 mm in extent. The clinical course from this exposure included papilledema from the third to the sixth month and depressed visual evoked response accompanied by delta activity in the electroencephalogram from the sixth to the twelfth month

  14. Surgical benefits of combined awake craniotomy and intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging for gliomas associated with eloquent areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motomura, Kazuya; Natsume, Atsushi; Iijima, Kentaro; Kuramitsu, Shunichiro; Fujii, Masazumi; Yamamoto, Takashi; Maesawa, Satoshi; Sugiura, Junko; Wakabayashi, Toshihiko

    2017-10-01

    OBJECTIVE Maximum extent of resection (EOR) for lower-grade and high-grade gliomas can increase survival rates of patients. However, these infiltrative gliomas are often observed near or within eloquent regions of the brain. Awake surgery is of known benefit for the treatment of gliomas associated with eloquent regions in that brain function can be preserved. On the other hand, intraoperative MRI (iMRI) has been successfully used to maximize the resection of tumors, which can detect small amounts of residual tumors. Therefore, the authors assessed the value of combining awake craniotomy and iMRI for the resection of brain tumors in eloquent areas of the brain. METHODS The authors retrospectively reviewed the records of 33 consecutive patients with glial tumors in the eloquent brain areas who underwent awake surgery using iMRI. Volumetric analysis of MRI studies was performed. The pre-, intra-, and postoperative tumor volumes were measured in all cases using MRI studies obtained before, during, and after tumor resection. RESULTS Intraoperative MRI was performed to check for the presence of residual tumor during awake surgery in a total of 25 patients. Initial iMRI confirmed no further tumor resection in 9 patients (36%) because all observable tumors had already been removed. In contrast, intraoperative confirmation of residual tumor during awake surgery led to further tumor resection in 16 cases (64%) and eventually an EOR of more than 90% in 8 of 16 cases (50%). Furthermore, EOR benefiting from iMRI by more than 15% was found in 7 of 16 cases (43.8%). Interestingly, the increase in EOR as a result of iMRI for tumors associated mainly with the insular lobe was significantly greater, at 15.1%, than it was for the other tumors, which was 8.0% (p = 0.001). CONCLUSIONS This study revealed that combining awake surgery with iMRI was associated with a favorable surgical outcome for intrinsic brain tumors associated with eloquent areas. In particular, these benefits were

  15. Composable power management with energy and power budgets per application

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nelson, A.; Molnos, A.M.; Goossens, K.G.W.

    2011-01-01

    Embedded Multiprocessor Systems-on-Chip (MPSoCs) commonly run multiple applications at once. These applications may have different time criticalities, i.e. non real-time, soft real-time, and firm or hard real-time. Application-level composability is used to provide each application with its own

  16. The Nigerian Art Music Composer, His Training, Vocal Compositions ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The music arena has undergone some changes within the past decades in Nigeria; partly due to contact of Nigerians with music of the other world cultures and due to intercultural borrowings within Nigeria. This trend has been a masterminding force in the shaping of the musical arena in Nigeria with the art music composer ...

  17. Composing with New Technology: Teacher Reflections on Learning Digital Video

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce, David L.; Chiu, Ming Ming

    2015-01-01

    This study explores teachers' reflections on their learning to compose with new technologies in the context of teacher education and/or teacher professional development. English language arts (ELA) teachers (n = 240) in 15 courses learned to use digital video (DV), completed at least one DV group project, and responded to open-ended survey…

  18. Sound Computational Interpretation of Formal Encryption with Composed Keys

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laud, P.; Corin, R.J.; In Lim, J.; Hoon Lee, D.

    2003-01-01

    The formal and computational views of cryptography have been related by the seminal work of Abadi and Rogaway. In their work, a formal treatment of encryption that uses atomic keys is justified in the computational world. However, many proposed formal approaches allow the use of composed keys, where

  19. Teaching Effective Communication Skills with ACE: Analyzing, Composing, & Evaluating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Lisa Gueldenzoph; Shwom, Barbara

    2011-01-01

    Most business communication classes teach students to use a writing process to compose effective documents. Students practice the process by applying it to various types of writing with various purposes-reports, presentations, bad news letters, persuasive memos, etc. However, unless students practice that process in other contexts outside of the…

  20. Composes organiques et activités antioxydantes de Ampelocissus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SARAH

    31 juil. 2015 ... additives or the necessary supplements in the food preserving. Key words: Composed organic, activity antioxidant, Ampelocissus multistriata. INTRODUCTION. Sur le plan physiologique, les végétaux verts en cours de croissance utilisent l'énergie que leur fournit la lumière solaire captée par les feuilles.

  1. Quiet Grove in a Savage Garden: A Composer's Bicameral Reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohlen, Donald

    2004-01-01

    This author, a composer, states that music has been the primal generator of his existence and the definition of living creatively; and that understanding the bicameral reality of creativity through a study of the nature of consciousness involves a symbiotic host of disciplines. In the study of the occurrence of "creativity," consciousness as well…

  2. Component Composability Issues in Object-Oriented Programming

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aksit, Mehmet; Tekinerdogan, B.

    1997-01-01

    Building software from reusable components is considered important in reducing development costs. Object-oriented languages such as C++, Smalltalk and Java, however, are not capable of expressing certain aspects of applications in a composable way. Software engineers may experience difficulties in

  3. Comparative plasma lipidome between human and cynomolgus monkey: are plasma polar lipids good biomarkers for diabetic monkeys?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guanghou Shui

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Non-human primates (NHP are now being considered as models for investigating human metabolic diseases including diabetes. Analyses of cholesterol and triglycerides in plasma derived from NHPs can easily be achieved using methods employed in humans. Information pertaining to other lipid species in monkey plasma, however, is lacking and requires comprehensive experimental analysis. METHODOLOGIES/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We examined the plasma lipidome from 16 cynomolgus monkey, Macaca fascicularis, using liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (LC/MS. We established novel analytical approaches, which are based on a simple gradient elution, to quantify polar lipids in plasma including (i glycerophospholipids (phosphatidylcholine, PC; phosphatidylethanolamine, PE; phosphatidylinositol, PI; phosphatidylglycerol, PG; phosphatidylserine, PS; phosphatidic acid, PA; (ii sphingolipids (sphingomyelin, SM; ceramide, Cer; Glucocyl-ceramide, GluCer; ganglioside mannoside 3, GM3. Lipidomic analysis had revealed that the plasma of human and cynomolgus monkey were of similar compositions, with PC, SM, PE, LPC and PI constituting the major polar lipid species present. Human plasma contained significantly higher levels of plasmalogen PE species (p<0.005 and plasmalogen PC species (p<0.0005, while cynomolgus monkey had higher levels of polyunsaturated fatty acyls (PUFA in PC, PE, PS and PI. Notably, cynomolgus monkey had significantly lower levels of glycosphingolipids, including GluCer (p<0.0005 and GM(3 (p<0.0005, but higher level of Cer (p<0.0005 in plasma than human. We next investigated the biochemical alterations in blood lipids of 8 naturally occurring diabetic cynomolgus monkeys when compared with 8 healthy controls. CONCLUSIONS: For the first time, we demonstrated that the plasma of human and cynomolgus monkey were of similar compositions, but contained different mol distribution of individual molecular species. Diabetic monkeys

  4. Neural Monkey: An Open-source Tool for Sequence Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helcl Jindřich

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we announce the development of Neural Monkey – an open-source neural machine translation (NMT and general sequence-to-sequence learning system built over the TensorFlow machine learning library. The system provides a high-level API tailored for fast prototyping of complex architectures with multiple sequence encoders and decoders. Models’ overall architecture is specified in easy-to-read configuration files. The long-term goal of the Neural Monkey project is to create and maintain a growing collection of implementations of recently proposed components or methods, and therefore it is designed to be easily extensible. Trained models can be deployed either for batch data processing or as a web service. In the presented paper, we describe the design of the system and introduce the reader to running experiments using Neural Monkey.

  5. Movement disorders induced in monkeys by chronic haloperidol treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiss, B; Santelli, S; Lusink, G

    1977-01-01

    After several months of treatment, Cebus apella, Cebus albifrons, and Saimiri sciurea monkeys maintained on haloperidol, in doses of 0.5 or 1.0 mg/kg orally 5 days per week, began to display severe movement disorders, typically 1 to 6 h post-drug. Cebus monkeys exhibited violent, uncontrolled movements that flung the animals about the cage. Such episodes usually lasted only a few minutes, recurring several times during the period following drug ingestion. Writhing and bizarre postures dominated the response in S. sciurea. Cessation of drug treatment produced no distinctive after-effects. When tested as long as 508 days after the last administration, however, Cebus monkeys responded to haloperidol with several episodes of hyperkinesis, even at challenge doses considerably lower than those in the original treatment.

  6. Evaluation of Ambu® aScope™ 2 in awake nasotracheal intubation in anticipated difficult airway using conventional or facilitated technique: A randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omyma Shehata Mohamed Khalifa

    2015-10-01

    Conclusion: The aScope 2 provided a high success rate in awake nasotracheal intubation in patients with anticipated difficult airway and the use of a facilitated technique shortened the time needed to perform successful videoscopic intubation.

  7. Right Hemisphere Cognitive Functions: From Clinical and Anatomic Bases to Brain Mapping During Awake Craniotomy Part I: Clinical and Functional Anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, Florian; Lemée, Jean-Michel; Ter Minassian, Aram; Menei, Philippe

    2018-05-12

    The nondominant hemisphere (usually the right) is responsible for primary cognitive functions such as visuospatial and social cognition. Awake surgery using direct electric stimulation for right cerebral tumor removal remains challenging because of the complexity of the functional anatomy and difficulties in adapting standard bedside tasks to awake surgery conditions. An understanding of semiology and anatomic bases, along with an analysis of the available cognitive tasks for visuospatial and social cognition per operative mapping allow neurosurgeons to better appreciate the functional anatomy of the right hemisphere and its relevance to tumor surgery. In this article, the first of a 2-part review, we discuss the anatomic and functional basis of right hemisphere function. Whereas part II of the review focuses primarily on semiology and surgical management of right-sided tumors under awake conditions, this article provides a comprehensive review of knowledge underpinning awake surgery on the right hemisphere. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Anesthetic management with scalp nerve block and propofol/remifentanil infusion during awake craniotomy in an adolescent patient -A case report-

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Bohyun; Park, Jin-Woo; Byon, Hyo-Jin; Kim, Jin-Tae; Kim, Chong Sung

    2010-01-01

    Despite of various neurophysiologic monitoring methods under general anesthesia, functional mapping at awake state during brain surgery is helpful for conservation of speech and motor function. But, awake craniotomy in children or adolescents is worrisome considering their emotional friabilities. We present our experience on anesthetic management for awake craniotomy in an adolescent patient. The patient was 16 years old male who would undergo awake craniotomy for removal of brain tumor. Scalp nerve block was done with local anesthetics and we infused propofol and remifentanil with target controlled infusion. The patient endured well and was cooperative before scalp suture, but when surgeon sutured scalp, he complained of pain and was suddenly agitated. We decided change to general anesthesia. Neurosurgeon did full neurologic examinations and there was no neurologic deficit except facial palsy of right side. Facial palsy had improved with time. PMID:21286435

  9. Awake craniotomy for cortical language mapping and resection of an arteriovenous malformation adjacent to eloquent areas under general anesthesia — A hybrid approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pree Nimmannitya

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Surgery of arteriovenous malformation (AVM is sometimes challenging and carries a high risk of morbidity, especially when the AVM is located in an eloquent area of the brain. Unlike gliomas, awake craniotomy has not been widely used for resection of AVM. The authors present a case of an AVM in the left frontal lobe which was successfully removed with the aid of awake craniotomy with cortical language mapping. In conclusion, awake craniotomy for functional cortical mapping is beneficial for AVM resection, especially when the lesion is located in or adjacent to eloquent areas of the brain. A hybrid approach with functional mapping in the awake condition and AVM resection under general anesthesia may be useful in selected cases. Furthermore, en bloc resection with the nidus embedded in the brain parenchyma may be a useful means of removal to reduce operation time and intraoperative blood loss if there is no apparent functional cortex surrounding the AVM, as in the present case.

  10. Comparative imaging study on monkeys with hemi-parkinsonism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Wei; Yu Xiaoping; Mao Jun; Liu Sheng; Wang Xiaoyi; Peng Guangchun; Wang Ruiwen

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To study the imaging appearance of experimental Parkinson's disease (PD) and to evaluate the different medical imaging exams on PD. Methods: CT, MRI, SPECT (dopamine transporter imaging and regional cerebral blood flow imaging, DAT imaging and rCBF imaging), and PET (glucose metabolism imaging) were performed on 8 monkeys before and after the infusion of MPTP into unilateral internal carotid artery to develop hemi-Parkinsonism models. Results: Hemi-Parkinsonism models were successfully induced on all 8 monkeys. On DAT imaging, the uptake values of the lesioned striatums decreased obviously after the MPTP treatment and were lower than that of the contralateral ones. The glucose metabolic rates of the lesioned striatums and thalamus in PD models were lower, compared to that of the healthy monkeys and that of the contralateral sides of themselves. Neither DAT nor glucose metabolism abnormalities was found on both the contralateral sides of the healthy and PD monkeys. On MRI images before MPTP treatment, only 4 of 8 PD models showed hypointense in bilateral globus pallidus. No abnormal MRI findings occurred in the first 2 months after injection of MPTP. At tile third month, hypointense appeared in globus pallidus of three monkeys. Enlarged hyposignal region in globus pallidus were found in three models. Of the above 6 monkeys, two appeared hypointense in putamina. Substantia nigra demonstrated no abnormalities before and after MPTP treatment. All rCBF and CT images were normal. Conclusion: The decreased density of DAT and decreased glucose metabolism on experimental PD can be showed early by DAT imaging and glucose metabolism imaging, MRI can show abnormal signal in the basal ganglia of PD but it is later than DAT and glucose metabolism imaging. CT and rCBF find no abnormality on PD

  11. Socialization of adult owl monkeys (Aotus sp.) in Captivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Lawrence E; Coke, C S; Weed, J L

    2017-01-01

    Social housing has often been recommended as one-way to address the psychological well-being of captive non-human primates. Published reports have examined methods to socialize compatible animals by forming pairs or groups. Successful socialization rates vary depending on the species, gender, and environment. This study presents a retrospective look at pairing attempts in two species of owl monkeys, Aotus nancymaae and A. azarae, which live in monogamous pairs in the wild. The results of 477 pairing attempt conducted with captive, laboratory housed owl monkeys and 61 hr of behavioral observations are reported here. The greatest success pairing these owl monkeys occurred with opposite sex pairs, with an 82% success rate. Opposite sex pairs were more successful when females were older than males. Female-female pairs were more successful than male-male (MM) pairs (62% vs 40%). Successful pairs stayed together between 3 and 7 years before the animals were separated due to social incompatibility. Vigilance, eating, and sleeping during introductions significantly predicted success, as did the performance of the same behavior in both animals. The results of this analysis show that it is possible to give captive owl monkeys a social alternative even if species appropriate social partners (i.e., opposite sex partners) are not available. The focus of this report is a description of one potential way to enhance the welfare of a specific new world primate, the owl monkey, under laboratory conditions. More important is how the species typical social structure of owl monkeys in nature affects the captive management of this genus. Am. J. Primatol. 79:e22521, 2017. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Comparison of dexmedetomidine and propofol for conscious sedation in awake craniotomy: a prospective, double-blind, randomized, and controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, She-liang; Zheng, Jia-yin; Zhang, Jun; Wang, Wen-yuan; Jin, Tao; Zhu, Jing; Zhang, Qi

    2013-11-01

    It has been reported that dexmedetomidine (DEX) can be used for conscious sedation in awake craniotomy, but few data exist to compare DEX versus propofol (PRO). To compare the efficacy and safety of DEX versus PRO for conscious sedation in awake craniotomy. Thirty patients of American Society of Anesthesiologists grade I-II scheduled for awake craniotomy, were randomized into 2 groups each containing 15 subjects. Group D received DEX and group P received PRO. Two minutes after tracheal intubation (T1), PRO (target plasma concentration) was titrated down to 1 to 4 µg/mL in group P. In group D, PRO was discontinued and DEX was administered 1.0 µg/kg followed by a maintenance dose of 0.2 to 0.7 µg/kg/h. The surgeon preset the anticipated awake point-in-time (T0) preoperatively. Ten minutes before T0 (T3), DEX was titrated down to 0.2 µg/kg/h in group D, PRO was discontinued and normal saline (placebo) 5 mL/h was infused in group P. Arousal time, quality of revival and adverse events during the awake period, degree of satisfaction from surgeons and patients were recorded. Arousal time was significantly shorter in group D than in group P (P awake period in group D was similar to that of group P (P = .68). The degree of satisfaction of surgeons was significantly higher in group D than in group P (P awake period (P > .05). Either DEX or PRO can be effectively and safely used for conscious sedation in awake craniotomy. Comparing the two, DEX produced a shorter arousal time and a higher degree of surgeon satisfaction.

  13. Kandungan Vitamin pada Bahan Dasar MP-ASI Tepung Campuran Pisang Awak dengan Tepung Beras serta Sumbangannya Terhadap Angka Kecukupan Gizi Bayi

    OpenAIRE

    Harahap, Yunita

    2015-01-01

    The complementary feeding given to babies older than 6 months. The complementary feeding different types of materials adapted to the manufacture of the local food supply. Awak banana has one of Indonesian eminent local food that used as complementary feeding. This descriptive research aimed to know the vitamins content from mixed flour of awak banana and rice flour and the contribution of vitamins (RDA). In this research, analyzed the content of fat soluble vitamins by Ultra Performance Li...

  14. Reproductive function of monkeys subjected to chronic irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Artem'eva, N.S.; Kosichenko, L.P.; Andreeva, A.V.; Zvereva, G.A.

    1976-01-01

    Marked functional disorders have been detected in reproductive glands of eight female monkeys (as compared to twelve control animals) subjected to protracted (up to eight years) irradiation (cumulative doses 826-3282 R). Irradiated monkeys exhibited a drastically decreased reproductive capacity, early menopause and sterility. Irradiation of preadolescent animals inhibited, in most cases, the puberty processes and disturbed sex cycles. Structural disorders in sex glands, inhibition of the processes of maturation and ovulation of folloculi, death of the mass of germ cells, atypical vegetations of the integmentary epithelium, sclerosing and cystic degeneration of the glandular tissue have been revealed

  15. "Zeroing" in on mathematics in the monkey brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beran, Michael J

    2016-03-01

    A new study documented that monkeys showed selective neuronal responding to the concept of zero during a numerical task, and that there were two distinct classes of neurons that coded the absence of stimuli either through a discrete activation pattern (zero or not zero) or a continuous one for which zero was integrated with other numerosities in the relative rate of activity. These data indicate that monkeys, like humans, have a concept of zero that is part of their analog number line but that also may have unique properties compared to other numerosities.

  16. Comparison of Object Recognition Behavior in Human and Monkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajalingham, Rishi; Schmidt, Kailyn

    2015-01-01

    Although the rhesus monkey is used widely as an animal model of human visual processing, it is not known whether invariant visual object recognition behavior is quantitatively comparable across monkeys and humans. To address this question, we systematically compared the core object recognition behavior of two monkeys with that of human subjects. To test true object recognition behavior (rather than image matching), we generated several thousand naturalistic synthetic images of 24 basic-level objects with high variation in viewing parameters and image background. Monkeys were trained to perform binary object recognition tasks on a match-to-sample paradigm. Data from 605 human subjects performing the same tasks on Mechanical Turk were aggregated to characterize “pooled human” object recognition behavior, as well as 33 separate Mechanical Turk subjects to characterize individual human subject behavior. Our results show that monkeys learn each new object in a few days, after which they not only match mean human performance but show a pattern of object confusion that is highly correlated with pooled human confusion patterns and is statistically indistinguishable from individual human subjects. Importantly, this shared human and monkey pattern of 3D object confusion is not shared with low-level visual representations (pixels, V1+; models of the retina and primary visual cortex) but is shared with a state-of-the-art computer vision feature representation. Together, these results are consistent with the hypothesis that rhesus monkeys and humans share a common neural shape representation that directly supports object perception. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT To date, several mammalian species have shown promise as animal models for studying the neural mechanisms underlying high-level visual processing in humans. In light of this diversity, making tight comparisons between nonhuman and human primates is particularly critical in determining the best use of nonhuman primates to

  17. Functional analysis of aldehyde oxidase using expressed chimeric enzyme between monkey and rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoh, Kunio; Asakawa, Tasuku; Hoshino, Kouichi; Adachi, Mayuko; Fukiya, Kensuke; Watanabe, Nobuaki; Tanaka, Yorihisa

    2009-01-01

    Aldehyde oxidase (AO) is a homodimer with a subunit molecular mass of approximately 150 kDa. Each subunit consists of about 20 kDa 2Fe-2S cluster domain storing reducing equivalents, about 40 kDa flavine adenine dinucleotide (FAD) domain and about 85 kDa molybdenum cofactor (MoCo) domain containing a substrate binding site. In order to clarify the properties of each domain, especially substrate binding domain, chimeric cDNAs were constructed by mutual exchange of 2Fe-2S/FAD and MoCo domains between monkey and rat. Chimeric monkey/rat AO was referred to one with monkey type 2Fe-2S/FAD domains and a rat type MoCo domain. Rat/monkey AO was vice versa. AO-catalyzed 2-oxidation activities of (S)-RS-8359 were measured using the expressed enzyme in Escherichia coli. Substrate inhibition was seen in rat AO and chimeric monkey/rat AO, but not in monkey AO and chimeric rat/monkey AO, suggesting that the phenomenon might be dependent on the natures of MoCo domain of rat. A biphasic Eadie-Hofstee profile was observed in monkey AO and chimeric rat/monkey AO, but not rat AO and chimeric monkey/rat AO, indicating that the biphasic profile might be related to the properties of MoCo domain of monkey. Two-fold greater V(max) values were observed in monkey AO than in chimeric rat/monkey AO, and in chimeric monkey/rat AO than in rat AO, suggesting that monkey has the more effective electron transfer system than rat. Thus, the use of chimeric enzymes revealed that 2Fe-2S/FAD and MoCo domains affect the velocity and the quantitative profiles of AO-catalyzed (S)-RS-8359 2-oxidation, respectively.

  18. Reference values of clinical chemistry and hematology parameters in rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Younan; Qin, Shengfang; Ding, Yang; Wei, Lingling; Zhang, Jie; Li, Hongxia; Bu, Hong; Lu, Yanrong; Cheng, Jingqiu

    2009-01-01

    Rhesus monkey models are valuable to the studies of human biology. Reference values for clinical chemistry and hematology parameters of rhesus monkeys are required for proper data interpretation. Whole blood was collected from 36 healthy Chinese rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) of either sex, 3 to 5 yr old. Routine chemistry and hematology parameters, and some special coagulation parameters including thromboelastograph and activities of coagulation factors were tested. We presented here the baseline values of clinical chemistry and hematology parameters in normal Chinese rhesus monkeys. These data may provide valuable information for veterinarians and investigators using rhesus monkeys in experimental studies.

  19. Delayed response task performance as a function of age in cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Darusman, H S; Call, J; Sajuthi, D

    2014-01-01

    We compared delayed response task performance in young, middle-aged, and old cynomolgus monkeys using three memory tests that have been used with non-human primates. Eighteen cynomolgus monkeys-6 young (4-9 years), 6 middle-aged (10-19 years), and 6 old (above 20 years)-were tested. In general......, the old monkeys scored significantly worse than did the animals in the two other age groups. Longer delays between stimulus presentation and response increased the performance differences between the old and younger monkeys. The old monkeys in particular showed signs of impaired visuo-spatial memory...

  20. Long term lung clearance and cellular retention of cadmium in rats and monkeys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oberdorster, G.; Cox, C.; Baggs, R.

    1987-01-01

    The paper describes experiments to determine the long term lung clearance and cellular retention of cadmium in rats and monkeys. The rats and monkeys were exposed to 109 Cd Cl 2 aerosols, and one monkey was exposed to 115 CdO particles. The thoracic activity of the respective Cd isotopes was measured with time after exposure, for both species. Accumulation of 109 Cd in the kidneys of the monkeys exposed to 109 Cd Cl 2 was also examined, and autoradiographs of lung sections of these monkeys were also prepared. The results showed that the cadmium accumulated differently in the lungs of the rats and primates. (U.K.)

  1. Emergence of Cryptosporidium hominis Monkey Genotype II and Novel Subtype Family Ik in the Squirrel Monkey (Saimiri sciureus) in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xuehan; Xie, Na; Li, Wei; Zhou, Ziyao; Zhong, Zhijun; Shen, Liuhong; Cao, Suizhong; Yu, Xingming; Hu, Yanchuan; Chen, Weigang; Peng, Gangneng

    2015-01-01

    A single Cryptosporidium isolate from a squirrel monkey with no clinical symptoms was obtained from a zoo in Ya'an city, China, and was genotyped by PCR amplification and DNA sequencing of the small-subunit ribosomal RNA (SSU rRNA), 70-kDa heat shock protein (HSP70), Cryptosporidium oocyst wall protein, and actin genes. This multilocus genetic characterization determined that the isolate was Cryptosporidium hominis, but carried 2, 10, and 6 nucleotide differences in the SSU rRNA, HSP70, and actin loci, respectively, which is comparable to the variations at these loci between C. hominis and the previously reported monkey genotype (2, 3, and 3 nucleotide differences). Phylogenetic studies, based on neighbor-joining and maximum likelihood methods, showed that the isolate identified in the current study had a distinctly discordant taxonomic status, distinct from known C. hominis and also from the monkey genotype, with respect to the three loci. Restriction fragment length polymorphisms of the SSU rRNA gene obtained from this study were similar to those of known C. hominis but clearly differentiated from the monkey genotype. Further subtyping was performed by sequence analysis of the gene encoding the 60-kDa glycoprotein (gp60). Maximum homology of only 88.3% to C. hominis subtype IdA10G4 was observed for the current isolate, and phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that this particular isolate belonged to a novel C. hominis subtype family, IkA7G4. This study is the first to report C. hominis infection in the squirrel monkey and, based on the observed genetic characteristics, confirms a new C. hominis genotype, monkey genotype II. Thus, these results provide novel insights into genotypic variation in C. hominis.

  2. Combined Awake Craniotomy with Endoscopic Port Surgery for Resection of a Deep-Seated Temporal Lobe Glioma: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lance Bodily

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The authors describe the combination of awake craniotomy and minimally invasive endoscopic port surgery to resect a high-grade glioma located near eloquent structures of the temporal lobe. Combined minimally invasive techniques such as these may facilitate deep tumor resection within eloquent regions of the brain, allowing minimum white matter dissection. Technical aspects of this procedure, a case outcome involving this technique, and the direction of further investigations for the utility of these techniques are discussed.

  3. Evidence for Long-Timescale Patterns of Synaptic Inputs in CA1 of Awake Behaving Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolb, Ilya; Talei Franzesi, Giovanni; Wang, Michael; Kodandaramaiah, Suhasa B; Forest, Craig R; Boyden, Edward S; Singer, Annabelle C

    2018-02-14

    Repeated sequences of neural activity are a pervasive feature of neural networks in vivo and in vitro In the hippocampus, sequential firing of many neurons over periods of 100-300 ms reoccurs during behavior and during periods of quiescence. However, it is not known whether the hippocampus produces longer sequences of activity or whether such sequences are restricted to specific network states. Furthermore, whether long repeated patterns of activity are transmitted to single cells downstream is unclear. To answer these questions, we recorded intracellularly from hippocampal CA1 of awake, behaving male mice to examine both subthreshold activity and spiking output in single neurons. In eight of nine recordings, we discovered long (900 ms) reoccurring subthreshold fluctuations or "repeats." Repeats generally were high-amplitude, nonoscillatory events reoccurring with 10 ms precision. Using statistical controls, we determined that repeats occurred more often than would be expected from unstructured network activity (e.g., by chance). Most spikes occurred during a repeat, and when a repeat contained a spike, the spike reoccurred with precision on the order of ≤20 ms, showing that long repeated patterns of subthreshold activity are strongly connected to spike output. Unexpectedly, we found that repeats occurred independently of classic hippocampal network states like theta oscillations or sharp-wave ripples. Together, these results reveal surprisingly long patterns of repeated activity in the hippocampal network that occur nonstochastically, are transmitted to single downstream neurons, and strongly shape their output. This suggests that the timescale of information transmission in the hippocampal network is much longer than previously thought. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT We found long (≥900 ms), repeated, subthreshold patterns of activity in CA1 of awake, behaving mice. These repeated patterns ("repeats") occurred more often than expected by chance and with 10 ms

  4. Biofeedback for treatment of awake and sleep bruxism in adults: systematic review protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilovar, Sasa; Zolger, Danaja; Castrillon, Eduardo; Car, Josip; Huckvale, Kit

    2014-05-02

    Bruxism is a disorder of jaw-muscle activity characterised by repetitive clenching or grinding of the teeth which results in discomfort and damage to dentition. The two clinical manifestations of the condition (sleep and awake bruxism) are thought to have unrelated aetiologies but are palliated using similar techniques. The lack of a definitive treatment has prompted renewed interest in biofeedback, a behaviour change method that uses electronic detection to provide a stimulus whenever bruxism occurs. This systematic review aims to provide a comprehensive overview of the state of research into biofeedback for bruxism; to assess the efficacy and acceptability of biofeedback therapy in management of awake bruxism and, separately, sleep bruxism in adults; and to compare findings between the two variants. A systematic review of published literature examining biofeedback as an intervention directed at controlling primary bruxism in adults. We will search electronic databases and the grey literature using a predefined search strategy to identify randomised and non-randomised studies, technical reports and patents. Searches will not be restricted by language or date and will be expanded through contact with authors and experts, and by following up reference lists and citations. Two authors, working independently, will conduct screening of search results, study selection, data extraction and quality assessment and a third will resolve any disagreements. The primary outcomes of acceptability and effectiveness will be assessed using only randomised studies, segregated by bruxism subtype. A meta-analysis of these data will be conducted only if pre-defined conditions for quality and heterogeneity are met, otherwise the data will be summarized in narrative form. Data from non-randomised studies will be used to augment a narrative synthesis of the state of technical developments and any safety-related issues. PROSPERO registration number: CRD42013006880. Biofeedback is not new

  5. Optical methods and integrated systems for brain imaging in awake, untethered animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murari, Kartikeya

    Imaging is a powerful tool for biomedical research offering non-contact and minimally or non-invasive means of investigating at multiple scales---from single molecules to large populations of cells. Imaging in awake, behaving animals is an emerging field that offers the additional advantage of being able to study physiological processes and structures in a more natural state than what is possible in tissue slices or even in anesthetized animals. To date, most imaging in awake animals has used optical fiber bundles or electrical cables to transfer signals to traditional imaging-system components. However, the fibers or cables tether the animal and greatly limit the kind and duration of animal behavior that can be studied using imaging methods. This work involves three distinct yet related approaches to fulfill the goal of imaging in unanesthetized, unrestrained animals---optical techniques for functional and structural imaging, development of novel photodetectors and the design of miniaturized imaging systems. I hypothesized that the flow within vessels might act as a contrast-enhancing agent and improve the visualization of vascular architecture using laser speckle imaging. When imaging rodent cerebral vasculature I saw a two to four fold increase in the contrast-to-noise ratios and was able to visualize 10--30% more vascular features over reflectance techniques. I designed a complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) photodetector array that was comparable in sensitivity and noise performance to cooled CCD sensors, able to image fluorescence from a single cell, while running at faster frame rates. Next, I designed an imaging system weighing under 6 grams and occupying less than 4 cm3. The system incorporated multispectral illumination, adjustable focusing optics and the high-sensitivity CMOS imager. I was able to implement a variety of optical modalities with the system and performed reflectance, fluorescence, spectroscopic and laser speckle imaging with my

  6. Functional connectivity structure of cortical calcium dynamics in anesthetized and awake mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Patrick W; Brier, Lindsey M; Bauer, Adam Q; Baxter, Grant A; Kraft, Andrew W; Reisman, Matthew D; Bice, Annie R; Snyder, Abraham Z; Lee, Jin-Moo; Culver, Joseph P

    2017-01-01

    The interplay between hemodynamic-based markers of cortical activity (e.g. fMRI and optical intrinsic signal imaging), which are an indirect and relatively slow report of neural activity, and underlying synaptic electrical and metabolic activity through neurovascular coupling is a topic of ongoing research and debate. As application of resting state functional connectivity measures is extended further into topics such as brain development, aging and disease, the importance of understanding the fundamental physiological basis for functional connectivity will grow. Here we extend functional connectivity analysis from hemodynamic- to calcium-based imaging. Transgenic mice (n = 7) expressing a fluorescent calcium indicator (GCaMP6) driven by the Thy1 promoter in glutamatergic neurons were imaged transcranially in both anesthetized (using ketamine/xylazine) and awake states. Sequential LED illumination (λ = 454, 523, 595, 640nm) enabled concurrent imaging of both GCaMP6 fluorescence emission (corrected for hemoglobin absorption) and hemodynamics. Functional connectivity network maps were constructed for infraslow (0.009-0.08Hz), intermediate (0.08-0.4Hz), and high (0.4-4.0Hz) frequency bands. At infraslow and intermediate frequencies, commonly used in BOLD fMRI and fcOIS studies of functional connectivity and implicated in neurovascular coupling mechanisms, GCaMP6 and HbO2 functional connectivity structures were in high agreement, both qualitatively and also quantitatively through a measure of spatial similarity. The spontaneous dynamics of both contrasts had the highest correlation when the GCaMP6 signal was delayed with a ~0.6-1.5s temporal offset. Within the higher-frequency delta band, sensitive to slow wave sleep oscillations in non-REM sleep and anesthesia, we evaluate the speed with which the connectivity analysis stabilized and found that the functional connectivity maps captured putative network structure within time window lengths as short as 30 seconds

  7. A Framework For Efficient Homomorphic Universally Composable Commitments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    David, Bernardo Machado

    primitives and protocols while retaining security guarantees. Moreover, commitments with homomorphic properties enable significantly more efficient constructions of protocols for applications such as zero knowledge proofs, two-party computation through garbled circuits and multiparty computation. However......, achieving universal composability for commitment schemes often sacrifices both concrete and asymptotic efficiency, specially if homomorphic properties are required. In this thesis we bridge the gap between stand alone and universally composable commitment schemes, for which we achieve optimal efficiency...... related to a statistical security parameter as a setup. The rest of our constructions leverage secret sharing and coding theory techniques, including a novel method for verifying that a large number of strings are codewords of a given linear code with linear complexity....

  8. Comparison of high-definition oscillometry -- a non-invasive technology for arterial blood pressure measurement -- with a direct invasive method using radio-telemetry in awake healthy cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martel, Eric; Egner, Beate; Brown, Scott A; King, Jonathan N; Laveissiere, Arnaud; Champeroux, Pascal; Richard, Serge

    2013-12-01

    This study compared indirect blood pressure measurements using a non-invasive method, high-definition oscillometry (HDO), with direct measurements using a radio-telemetry device in awake cats. Paired measurements partitioned to five sub-ranges were collected in six cats using both methods. The results were analysed for assessment of correlation and agreement between the two methods, taking into account all pressure ranges, and with data separated in three sub-groups, low, normal and high ranges of systolic (SBP) and diastolic (DBP) blood pressure. SBP data displayed a mean correlation coefficient of 0.92 ± 0.02 that was reduced for low SBP. The agreement level evaluated from the whole data set was high and slightly reduced for low SBP values. The mean correlation coefficient of DBP was lower than for SBP (ie, 0.81 ± 0.02). The bias for DBP between the two methods was 22.3 ± 1.6 mmHg, suggesting that HDO produced lower values than telemetry. These results suggest that HDO met the validation criteria defined by the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine consensus panel and provided a faithful measurement of SBP in conscious cats. For DBP, results suggest that HDO tended to underestimate DBP. This finding is clearly inconsistent with the good agreement reported in dogs, but is similar to outcomes achieved in marmosets and cynomolgus monkeys, suggesting that this is not related to HDO but is species related. The data support that the HDO is the first and only validated non-invasive blood pressure device and, as such, it is the only non-invasive reference technique that should be used in future validation studies.

  9. The methodology of composing the exercises system with fit balls.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Voronov N.P.

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The original methodology of composing the exercises system with fit balls was considered. More than 10 publications were analysed. On the lesson with fit balls the problem was revealed. In the experiment took part 30 students at the age from 18 till 21. All the famous exercises were systematized. As a result, a big attractiveness and assimilability of the proposed complex was revealed. The effectiveness of the complex of physical exercises with fit balls for students was proved.

  10. Semantic Service Discovery Techniques for the composable web

    OpenAIRE

    Fernández Villamor, José Ignacio

    2013-01-01

    This PhD thesis contributes to the problem of resource and service discovery in the context of the composable web. In the current web, mashup technologies allow developers reusing services and contents to build new web applications. However, developers face a problem of information flood when searching for appropriate services or resources for their combination. To contribute to overcoming this problem, a framework is defined for the discovery of services and resources. In this framework, thr...

  11. Tracheostomy as a bridge to spontaneous breathing and awake-ECMO in non-transplant surgical patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swol, J; Strauch, J T; Schildhauer, T A

    2017-05-01

    The tracheostomy is a frequently used procedure for the respiratory weaning of ventilated patients allows sedation free ECLS use in awake patient. The aim of this study is to assess the possibility and highlight the benefits of lowering the impact of sedation in surgical non-transplant patients on ECLS. The specific objective was to investigate the use of tracheostomy as a bridge to spontaneous breathing on ECLS. Of the 95 patients, 65 patients received a tracheostomy, and 5 patients were admitted with a tracheostoma. One patient was cannulated without intubation, one is extubated during ECLS course after 48 hours. 4 patients were extubated after weaning and the removal of ECLS. 19 patients died before the indication to tracheostomy was given. Tracheostomy can bridge to spontaneous breathing and awake-ECMO in non-transplant surgical patients. The "awake ECMO" strategy may avoid complications related to mechanical ventilation, sedation, and immobilization and provide comparable outcomes to other approaches for providing respiratory support. © 2017 The Authors. European Journal of Heart Failure © 2017 European Society of Cardiology.

  12. Training anesthesiology residents in providing anesthesia for awake craniotomy: learning curves and estimate of needed case load.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilotta, Federico; Titi, Luca; Lanni, Fabiana; Stazi, Elisabetta; Rosa, Giovanni

    2013-08-01

    To measure the learning curves of residents in anesthesiology in providing anesthesia for awake craniotomy, and to estimate the case load needed to achieve a "good-excellent" level of competence. Prospective study. Operating room of a university hospital. 7 volunteer residents in anesthesiology. Residents underwent a dedicated training program of clinical characteristics of anesthesia for awake craniotomy. The program was divided into three tasks: local anesthesia, sedation-analgesia, and intraoperative hemodynamic management. The learning curve for each resident for each task was recorded over 10 procedures. Quantitative assessment of the individual's ability was based on the resident's self-assessment score and the attending anesthesiologist's judgment, and rated by modified 12 mm Likert scale, reported ability score visual analog scale (VAS). This ability VAS score ranged from 1 to 12 (ie, very poor, mild, moderate, sufficient, good, excellent). The number of requests for advice also was recorded (ie, resident requests for practical help and theoretical notions to accomplish the procedures). Each task had a specific learning rate; the number of procedures necessary to achieve "good-excellent" ability with confidence, as determined by the recorded results, were 10 procedures for local anesthesia, 15 to 25 procedures for sedation-analgesia, and 20 to 30 procedures for intraoperative hemodynamic management. Awake craniotomy is an approach used increasingly in neuroanesthesia. A dedicated training program based on learning specific tasks and building confidence with essential features provides "good-excellent" ability. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. [Incidence and causes of early end in awake surgery for language mapping not directly related to eloquence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villalba, Gloria; Pacreu, Susana; Fernández-Candil, Juan Luis; León, Alba; Serrano, Laura; Conesa, Gerardo

    2016-01-01

    The incidence and causes that may lead to an early end (unfinished cortical/subcortical mapping) of awake surgery for language mapping are little known. A study was conducted on 41 patients with brain glioma located in the language area that had awake surgery under conscious sedation. Surgery was ended early in 6 patients. The causes were: tonic-clonic seizure (1), lack of cooperation due to fatigue/sleep (4), whether or not word articulation was involved, a decreased level of consciousness for ammonia encephalopathy that required endotracheal intubation (1). There are causes that could be expected and in some cases avoided. Tumour size, preoperative aphasia, valproate treatment, and type of anaesthesia used are variables to consider to avoid failure in awake surgery for language mapping. With these results, the following measures are proposed: l) If the tumour is large, perform surgery in two times to avoid fatigue, 2) if patient has a preoperative aphasia, do not use sedation during surgery to ensure that sleepiness does not cause worse word articulation, 3) if the patient is on valproate treatment, it is necessary to rule out the pre-operative symptoms that are not due to ammonia encephalopathy. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Española de Neurocirugía. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  14. Restraint training for awake functional brain scanning of rodents can cause long-lasting changes in pain and stress responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low, Lucie A; Bauer, Lucy C; Pitcher, Mark H; Bushnell, M Catherine

    2016-08-01

    With the increased interest in longitudinal brain imaging of awake rodents, it is important to understand both the short-term and long-term effects of restraint on sensory and emotional processing in the brain. To understand the effects of repeated restraint on pain behaviors and stress responses, we modeled a restraint protocol similar to those used to habituate rodents for magnetic resonance imaging scanning, and studied sensory sensitivity and stress hormone responses over 5 days. To uncover lasting effects of training, we also looked at responses to the formalin pain test 2 weeks later. We found that while restraint causes acute increases in the stress hormone corticosterone, it can also cause lasting reductions in nociceptive behavior in the formalin test, coupled with heightened corticosterone levels and increased activation of the "nociceptive" central nucleus of the amygdala, as seen by Fos protein expression. These results suggest that short-term repeated restraint, similar to that used to habituate rats for awake functional brain scanning, could potentially cause long-lasting changes in physiological and brain responses to pain stimuli that are stress-related, and therefore could potentially confound the functional activation patterns seen in awake rodents in response to pain stimuli.

  15. Nanoscale biomemory composed of recombinant azurin on a nanogap electrode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Yong-Ho; Lee, Taek; Choi, Jeong-Woo; Park, Hyung Ju; Yun, Wan Soo; Min, Junhong

    2013-01-01

    We fabricate a nanoscale biomemory device composed of recombinant azurin on nanogap electrodes. For this, size-controllable nanogap electrodes are fabricated by photolithography, electron beam lithography, and surface catalyzed chemical deposition. Moreover, we investigate the effect of gap distance to optimize the size of electrodes for a biomemory device and explore the mechanism of electron transfer from immobilized protein to a nanogap counter-electrode. As the distance of the nanogap electrode is decreased in the nanoscale, the absolute current intensity decreases according to the distance decrement between the electrodes due to direct electron transfer, in contrast with the diffusion phenomenon of a micro-electrode. The biomemory function is achieved on the optimized nanogap electrode. These results demonstrate that the fabricated nanodevice composed of a nanogap electrode and biomaterials provides various advantages such as quantitative control of signals and exclusion of environmental effects such as noise. The proposed bioelectronics device, which could be mass-produced easily, could be applied to construct a nanoscale bioelectronics system composed of a single biomolecule. (paper)

  16. Composing the theme of city to be diverse and sustainable

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiranegara, H. W.

    2018-01-01

    To give a path for developing a city needs a theme. City’s goal stated in a document of a spatial plan were too broad and insufficient detail in giving a direction. To make more detail and precise, every city has to compose a city theme. It is developed based on the potential, the uniqueness, the excellence, and the sustainability of its human resources, natural resources, and man-made resources. An integration among the three of resources which have the highest score become a theme of the city. The aim of this research was to formulate the conceptual framework to compose a city theme. The research design was the interview survey in Banda Aceh, Banjarmasin, and Kupang. Informants were the government officials, academics, figures, the private sector and public who considered related to the intended information being collected. Having set the conceptual framework, the interview directed to check the implementation in realities. The result was that the conceptual framework could accommodate the phenomenon of composing the theme of the city. Yet, it was a preliminary in nature and needed more research to get a complete result.

  17. Evaluating the habitat of the critically endangered Kipunji monkey ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effective conservation of threatened species requires a good understanding of their habitat. Most primates are threatened by tropical forest loss. One population of the critically endangered kipunji monkey Rungwecebus kipunji occurs in a restricted part of one forest in southern Tanzania. This restricted range is something of ...

  18. Phylogenetic tests of a Cercopithecus monkey hybrid reveal X ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A captive Cercopithecus nictitans × C. cephus male was examined at loci on the X- and Y-chromosomes as a test of previously described phylogenetic methods for identifying hybrid Cercopithecus monkeys. The results confirm the reliability of such assays, indicating that they can be of immediate utility for studies of wild ...

  19. Food and Feeding Habits of Mona Monkey Cercopithecus Mona in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The feeding habits of mona monkey Cercopithecus mona in Ayede/Isan forest reserve, Ayede, Ekiti State, Nigeria were studied for six months. Direct observation was used in the data collection. The study area was visited two days per week between 0600-1100hours and 1600-1800hours for the six months in the forest ...

  20. Discovery of a Cynomolgus Monkey Family With Retinitis Pigmentosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Yasuhiro; Nishiguchi, Koji M; Miya, Fuyuki; Shimozawa, Nobuhiro; Funatsu, Jun; Nakatake, Shunji; Fujiwara, Kohta; Tachibana, Takashi; Murakami, Yusuke; Hisatomi, Toshio; Yoshida, Shigeo; Yasutomi, Yasuhiro; Tsunoda, Tatsuhiko; Nakazawa, Toru; Ishibashi, Tatsuro; Sonoda, Koh-Hei

    2018-02-01

    To accelerate the development of new therapies, an inherited retinal degeneration model in a nonhuman primate would be useful to confirm the efficacy in preclinical studies. In this study, we describe the discovery of retinitis pigmentosa in a cynomolgus monkey (Macaca fascicularis) pedigree. First, screening with fundus photography was performed on 1443 monkeys at the Tsukuba Primate Research Center. Ophthalmic examinations, such as indirect ophthalmoscopy, ERGs using RETeval, and optic coherent tomography (OCT) measurement, were then performed to confirm diagnosis. Retinal degeneration with cystoid macular edema was observed in both eyes of one 14-year-old female monkey. In her examinations, the full-field ERGs were nonrecordable and the outer layer of the retina in the parafoveal area was not visible on OCT imaging. Moreover, less frequent pigmentary retinal anomalies also were observed in her 3-year-old nephew. His full-field ERGs were almost nonrecordable and the outer layer was not visible in the peripheral retina. His father was her cousin (the son of her mother's older brother) and his mother was her younger half-sibling sister with a different father. The hereditary nature is highly probable (autosomal recessive inheritance suspected). However, whole-exome analysis performed identified no pathogenic mutations in these monkeys.

  1. The Monkey Kid: A Personal Glimpse into the Cultural Revolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita M. Andrew

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Wang, Xiao-Yen (Director/Writer, 'The Monkey Kid '(1995. San Francisco, Calif.: Beijing–San Francisco Film Group. Also released in France by Les Films du Parodoxe under the title, 'La Mome Singe '(1997. 95 minutes. Mandarin Chinese with English subtitles.

  2. GLP-1 receptor localization in monkey and human tissue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pyke, Charles; Heller, R Scott; Kirk, Rikke K

    2014-01-01

    and increase heart rate. Using a new monoclonal antibody for immunohistochemistry, we detected GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R) in important target organs in humans and monkeys. In the pancreas, GLP-1R was predominantly localized in β-cells with a markedly weaker expression in acinar cells. Pancreatic ductal epithelial...

  3. Response of sublethally irradiated monkeys to a replicating viral antigen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hilmas, D.E.; Spertzel, R.O.

    1975-01-01

    Temporal effects of exposure to sublethal, total-body x radiation (400 R) on responses to vaccination with the attenuated Venezuelan equine encephalomyelitis vaccine virus, TC-83, were examined in rhesus monkeys. Viremia, often with delayed onset, was prolonged even when irradiation preceded vaccination by 28 days. Virus titers were increased, particularly in groups irradiated 4 or 7 days before vaccination. Delay in appearance of hemagglutination-inhibition and serum-neutralizing antibody correlated closely with persistence of viremia in irradiated-vaccinated monkeys. The temporal course of antibody response was markedly affected by the interval between irradiation and injection of this replicating antigen. With longer intervals between irradiation and vaccination, the somewhat depressed antibody responses approached normal or surpassed those of nonirradiated monkeys. Vaccination 14 days after radiation exposure resulted in lethality to 8 of 12 monkeys, apparently as a result of secondary infection. The additional lymphopenic stress due to the effect of TC-83, superimposed on the severely depressed hematopoietic competence at 14 days, undoubtedly contributed to this increased susceptibility to latent infection

  4. Call Combinations in Monkeys: Compositional or Idiomatic Expressions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Kate; Zuberbuhler, Klaus

    2012-01-01

    Syntax is widely considered the feature that most decisively sets human language apart from other natural communication systems. Animal vocalisations are generally considered to be holistic with few examples of utterances meaning something other than the sum of their parts. Previously, we have shown that male putty-nosed monkeys produce call…

  5. Toxoplasmosis in a colony of New World monkeys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dietz, H.H.; Henriksen, P.; Bille-Hansen, Vivi

    1997-01-01

    In a colony of New World monkeys five tamarins (Saguinus oedipus, Saguinus labiatus and Leontopithecus rosal. rosal.), three marmosets (Callithrix jacchus and Callithrix pygmaea) and one saki (Pithecia pithecia) died suddenly. The colony comprised 16 marmosets, 10 tamarins and three sakis. The ma...

  6. Risky business: rhesus monkeys exhibit persistent preferences for risky options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Eric R; Kralik, Jerald D

    2014-01-01

    Rhesus monkeys have been shown to prefer risky over safe options in experiential decision-making tasks. These findings might be due, however, to specific contextual factors, such as small amounts of fluid reward and minimal costs for risk-taking. To better understand the factors affecting decision-making under risk in rhesus monkeys, we tested multiple factors designed to increase the stakes including larger reward amounts, distinct food items rather than fluid reward, a smaller number of trials per session, and risky options with greater variation that also included non-rewarded outcomes. We found a consistent preference for risky options, except when the expected value of the safe option was greater than the risky option. Thus, with equivalent mean utilities between the safe and risky options, rhesus monkeys appear to have a robust preference for the risky options in a broad range of circumstances, akin to the preferences found in human children and some adults in similar tasks. One account for this result is that monkeys make their choices based on the salience of the largest payoff, without integrating likelihood and value across trials. A related idea is that they fail to override an impulsive tendency to select the option with the potential to obtain the highest possible outcome. Our results rule out strict versions of both accounts and contribute to an understanding of the diversity of risky decision-making among primates.

  7. Servants, Managers and Monkeys: New Perspectives on Leadership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buskey, Frederick C.

    2014-01-01

    In this article the author questions whether the understanding of teaching and leading is the same today as it was last year? The chances are that the concept of what it means to be a teacher and a leader has changed. After describing three leadership types: servants, managers, and monkeys, Buskey suggest several things that are needed to improve…

  8. Can monkeys make investments based on maximized pay-off?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie Steelandt

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Animals can maximize benefits but it is not known if they adjust their investment according to expected pay-offs. We investigated whether monkeys can use different investment strategies in an exchange task. We tested eight capuchin monkeys (Cebus apella and thirteen macaques (Macaca fascicularis, Macaca tonkeana in an experiment where they could adapt their investment to the food amounts proposed by two different experimenters. One, the doubling partner, returned a reward that was twice the amount given by the subject, whereas the other, the fixed partner, always returned a constant amount regardless of the amount given. To maximize pay-offs, subjects should invest a maximal amount with the first partner and a minimal amount with the second. When tested with the fixed partner only, one third of monkeys learned to remove a maximal amount of food for immediate consumption before investing a minimal one. With both partners, most subjects failed to maximize pay-offs by using different decision rules with each partner' quality. A single Tonkean macaque succeeded in investing a maximal amount to one experimenter and a minimal amount to the other. The fact that only one of over 21 subjects learned to maximize benefits in adapting investment according to experimenters' quality indicates that such a task is difficult for monkeys, albeit not impossible.

  9. Structural study of Mason-Pfizer monkey virus protease

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Veverka, V.; Bauerová, Helena; Hrabal, R.; Pichová, Iva

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 269, - (2002), s. 57-58 ISSN 0014-2956. [Meeting of the Federation of European Biochemical Societies /28./. 20.10.2002-25.10.2002, Istanbul] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/00/1241 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4055905 Keywords : Mason-Pfizer monkey virus Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry

  10. Implicit and Explicit Learning Mechanisms Meet in Monkey Prefrontal Cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chafee, Matthew V; Crowe, David A

    2017-10-11

    In this issue, Loonis et al. (2017) provide the first description of unique synchrony patterns differentiating implicit and explicit forms of learning in monkey prefrontal networks. Their results have broad implications for how prefrontal networks integrate the two learning mechanisms to control behavior. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Monkeys Exhibit Prospective Memory in a Computerized Task

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Theodore A.; Beran, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    Prospective memory (PM) involves forming intentions, retaining those intentions, and later executing those intended responses at the appropriate time. Few studies have investigated this capacity in animals. Monkeys performed a computerized task that assessed their ability to remember to make a particular response if they observed a PM cue embedded…

  12. Play Initiating Behaviors and Responses in Red Colobus Monkeys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worch, Eric A.

    2012-01-01

    Red colobus monkeys are playful primates, making them an important species in which to study animal play. The author examines play behaviors and responses in the species for its play initiation events, age differences in initiating frequency and initiating behavior, and the types of social play that result from specific initiating behaviors. Out…

  13. Dynamic ensemble coding of saccades in the monkey superior colliculus.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goossens, H.H.L.M.; Opstal, A.J. van

    2006-01-01

    The deeper layers of the midbrain superior colliculus (SC) contain a topographic motor map in which a localized population of cells is recruited for each saccade, but how the brain stem decodes the dynamic SC output is unclear. Here we analyze saccade-related responses in the monkey SC to test a new

  14. Monkey-derived monoclonal antibodies against Plasmodium falciparum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stanley, H.A.; Reese, R.T.

    1985-01-01

    A system has been developed that allows efficient production of monkey monoclonal antibodies from owl monkeys. Splenocytes or peripheral blood lymphocytes from monkeys immune to the human malarial parasite, Plasmodium falciparum, were fused with P3X63 Ag8.653 mouse myelomas. The resulting hybridomas were screened by an indirect fluorescent antibody test for the production of monkey monoclonal antibodies (mAb) reactive with P. falciparum. Most of the mAb reacted with the P. falciparum merozoites and immunoprecipitated a parasite-derived glycoprotein having a relative molecular weight of 185,000. These mAb gave a minimum of five different immunoprecipitation patterns, thus demonstrating that a large number of polypeptides obtained when parasitized erythrocytes are solubilized share epitopes with this large glycoprotein. In addition, mAb were obtained that reacted with antigens associated with the infected erythrocyte membrane. One of these mAb bound a M/sub r/ 95,000 antigen. Radioimmunoprecipitation assays using 125 T-antibodies were done

  15. Regional cerebral palmitate incorporation following transient bilateral carotid occlusion in awake gerbils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tone, O.; Miller, J.C.; Bell, J.M.; Rapoport, S.I.

    1987-11-01

    (/sup 14/C)Palmitate was injected intravenously in awake gerbils at various times after 5 minutes of bilateral carotid artery occlusion or a sham operation. Regional rates of incorporation of plasma palmitate into the hippocampus and other regions of the anterior circulation were determined relative to the mean rate of incorporation into regions of the posterior circulation using quantitative autoradiography and a ratio method of analysis. One day after bilateral carotid occlusion, relative palmitate incorporation was elevated significantly by 16% in the CA4 pyramidal cell layer and by 20% in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus compared with sham-operated gerbils. At 3 days, significant elevations of this magnitude were found in the CA3 and CA4 cell layers, whereas relative incorporation was reduced by 26% in the CA1 pyramidal cell layer. At 7 days, the only significant difference from control was a 15% elevated incorporation in the CA3 pyramidal cell layer. Histologic examination indicated substantial cell death in the CA1 pyramidal layer at 3 days, with extensive glial reaction and phagocytic invasion at 7 days. Our results suggest that the turnover of palmitate-containing lipids is reduced in the CA1 layer of the gerbil hippocampus but that lipid synthesis is stimulated in hippocampal regions (CA3, CA4, dentate gyrus) affected by but recovering from transient bilateral carotid occlusion.

  16. Regional cerebral palmitate incorporation following transient bilateral carotid occlusion in awake gerbils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tone, O.; Miller, J.C.; Bell, J.M.; Rapoport, S.I.

    1987-01-01

    [ 14 C]Palmitate was injected intravenously in awake gerbils at various times after 5 minutes of bilateral carotid artery occlusion or a sham operation. Regional rates of incorporation of plasma palmitate into the hippocampus and other regions of the anterior circulation were determined relative to the mean rate of incorporation into regions of the posterior circulation using quantitative autoradiography and a ratio method of analysis. One day after bilateral carotid occlusion, relative palmitate incorporation was elevated significantly by 16% in the CA4 pyramidal cell layer and by 20% in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus compared with sham-operated gerbils. At 3 days, significant elevations of this magnitude were found in the CA3 and CA4 cell layers, whereas relative incorporation was reduced by 26% in the CA1 pyramidal cell layer. At 7 days, the only significant difference from control was a 15% elevated incorporation in the CA3 pyramidal cell layer. Histologic examination indicated substantial cell death in the CA1 pyramidal layer at 3 days, with extensive glial reaction and phagocytic invasion at 7 days. Our results suggest that the turnover of palmitate-containing lipids is reduced in the CA1 layer of the gerbil hippocampus but that lipid synthesis is stimulated in hippocampal regions (CA3, CA4, dentate gyrus) affected by but recovering from transient bilateral carotid occlusion

  17. AWAKE Design Report: A Proton-Driven Plasma Wakefield Acceleration Experiment at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Caldwell, A; Lotov, K; Muggli, P; Wing, M

    2013-01-01

    The AWAKE Collaboration has been formed in order to demonstrate proton driven plasma wakefield acceleration for the first time. This technology could lead to future colliders of high energy but of a much reduced length compared to proposed linear accelerators. The SPS proton beam in the CNGS facility will be injected into a 10m plasma cell where the long proton bunches will be modulated into significantly shorter micro-bunches. These micro-bunches will then initiate a strong wakefield in the plasma with peak fields above 1 GV/m that will be harnessed to accelerate a bunch of electrons from about 20MeV to the GeV scale within a few meters. The experimental program is based on detailed numerical simulations of beam and plasma interactions. The main accelerator components, the experimental area and infrastructure required as well as the plasma cell and the diagnostic equipment are discussed in detail. First protons to the experiment are expected at the end of 2015 and this will be followed by an initial 3–4 ye...

  18. Cardiorespiratory interactions during periodic breathing in awake chronic heart failure patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinna, G D; Maestri, R; Mortara, A; La Rovere, M T

    2000-03-01

    We applied spectral techniques to the analysis of cardiorespiratory signals [instantaneous lung volume (ILV), instantaneous tidal volume (ITV), arterial O(2) saturation (Sa(O(2))) at the ear, heart rate (HR), systolic (SAP), and diastolic (DAP) arterial pressure] during nonapneic periodic breathing (PB) in 29 awake chronic heart failure (CHF) patients and estimated the timing relationships between respiratory and slow cardiovascular (cardiorespiratory interactions during PB and 2) to test the hypothesis of a central vasomotor origin of PB. All cardiovascular signals were characterized by a dominant (>/=84% of total power) oscillation at the frequency of PB (mean +/- SE: 0.022 +/- 0.0008 Hz), highly coherent (>/=0.89), and delayed with respect to ITV (ITV-HR, 2.4 +/- 0.72 s; ITV-SAP, 6.7 +/- 0.65 s; ITV-DAP, 3.2 +/- 0.61 s; P cardiorespiratory rhythm led by the ventilatory oscillation and suggest that 1) the cyclic increase in inspiratory drive and cardiopulmonary reflexes and 2) mechanical effects of PB-induced changes in intrathoracic pressure are the more likely sources of the HR and blood pressure oscillations, respectively. The timing relationship between ITV and blood pressure signals excludes the possibility that PB represents the effect of a central vasomotor rhythm.

  19. High-throughput mapping of brain-wide activity in awake and drug-responsive vertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Xudong; Wang, Shiqi; Yu, Xudong; Liu, Zhuguo; Wang, Fei; Li, Wai Tsun; Cheng, Shuk Han; Dai, Qiuyun; Shi, Peng

    2015-02-07

    The reconstruction of neural activity across complete neural circuits, or brain activity mapping, has great potential in both fundamental and translational neuroscience research. Larval zebrafish, a vertebrate model, has recently been demonstrated to be amenable to whole brain activity mapping in behaving animals. Here we demonstrate a microfluidic array system ("Fish-Trap") that enables high-throughput mapping of brain-wide activity in awake larval zebrafish. Unlike the commonly practiced larva-processing methods using a rigid gel or a capillary tube, which are laborious and time-consuming, the hydrodynamic design of our microfluidic chip allows automatic, gel-free, and anesthetic-free processing of tens of larvae for microscopic imaging with single-cell resolution. Notably, this system provides the capability to directly couple pharmaceutical stimuli with real-time recording of neural activity in a large number of animals, and the local and global effects of pharmacoactive drugs on the nervous system can be directly visualized and evaluated by analyzing drug-induced functional perturbation within or across different brain regions. Using this technology, we tested a set of neurotoxin peptides and obtained new insights into how to exploit neurotoxin derivatives as therapeutic agents. The novel and versatile "Fish-Trap" technology can be readily unitized to study other stimulus (optical, acoustic, or physical) associated functional brain circuits using similar experimental strategies.

  20. Neural correlates of sensorimotor gating: A metabolic positron emission tomography study in awake rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cathrin eRohleder

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Impaired sensorimotor gating occurs in neuropsychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia and can be measured using the prepulse inhibition (PPI paradigm of the acoustic startle response. This assay is frequently used to validate animal models of neuropsychiatric disorders and to explore the therapeutic potential of new drugs. The underlying neural network of PPI has been extensively studied with invasive methods and genetic modifications. However, its relevance for healthy untreated animals and the functional interplay between startle- and PPI-related areas during a PPI session is so far unknown. Therefore, we studied awake rats in a PPI paradigm, startle control and background noise control, combined with behavioral [18F]fluoro-2-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET. Subtractive analyses between conditions were used to identify brain regions involved in startle and PPI processing in well-hearing Black hooded rats. For correlative analysis with regard to the amount of PPI we also included hearing-impaired Lister hooded rats that startled more often, because their hearing threshold was just below the lowest prepulses. Metabolic imaging showed that the brain areas proposed for startle and PPI mediation are active during PPI paradigms in healthy untreated rats. More importantly, we show for the first time that the whole PPI modulation network is active during passive PPI sessions, where no selective attention to prepulse or startle stimulus is required. We conclude that this reflects ongoing monitoring of stimulus significance and constant adjustment of sensorimotor gating.

  1. Effects of music listening on anxiety and physiological responses in patients undergoing awake craniotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Pao-Yuan; Huang, Mei-Lin; Lee, Wen-Ping; Wang, Chi; Shih, Whei-Mei

    2017-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the effects of music listening on the level of anxiety and physiological responses for awake craniotomy. An experimental design with randomization was applied in this study. Participants in experimental group (19 patients) selected and listened music at their preferences in the waiting room and throughout the entire surgical procedure in addition to usual care while control group (19 patients) only gave usual care. State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI), heartbeat, breathing, and blood pressure were collected for analysis. The results of this study showed that after music listening, there was significant decrease in the level of anxiety (pawake craniotomy patients. The results of this study can provide perioperative nursing care in providing music listening when patients were in the waiting room and during surgery to reduce the anxiety so as to reach the goal of human care and improve perioperative nursing care. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  2. Technical principles of direct bipolar electrostimulation for cortical and subcortical mapping in awake craniotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallud, J; Mandonnet, E; Corns, R; Dezamis, E; Parraga, E; Zanello, M; Spena, G

    2017-06-01

    Intraoperative application of electrical current to the brain is a standard technique during brain surgery for inferring the function of the underlying brain. The purpose of intraoperative functional mapping is to reliably identify cortical areas and subcortical pathways involved in eloquent functions, especially motor, sensory, language and cognitive functions. The aim of this article is to review the rationale and the electrophysiological principles of the use of direct bipolar electrostimulation for cortical and subcortical mapping under awake conditions. Direct electrical stimulation is a window into the whole functional network that sustains a particular function. It is an accurate (spatial resolution of about 5mm) and a reproducible technique particularly adapted to clinical practice for brain resection in eloquent areas. If the procedure is rigorously applied, the sensitivity of direct electrical stimulation for the detection of cortical and subcortical eloquent areas is nearly 100%. The main disadvantage of this technique is its suboptimal specificity. Another limitation is the identification of eloquent areas during surgery, which, however, could have been functionally compensated postoperatively if removed surgically. Direct electrical stimulation is an easy, accurate, reliable and safe invasive technique for the intraoperative detection of both cortical and subcortical functional brain connectivity for clinical purpose. In our opinion, it is the optimal technique for minimizing the risk of neurological sequelae when resecting in eloquent brain areas. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. The role of awake craniotomy in reducing intraoperative visual field deficits during tumor surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfson, Racheal; Soni, Neil; Shah, Ashish H.; Hosein, Khadil; Sastry, Ananth; Bregy, Amade; Komotar, Ricardo J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Homonymous hemianopia due to damage to the optic radiations or visual cortex is a possible consequence of tumor resection involving the temporal or occipital lobes. The purpose of this review is to present and analyze a series of studies regarding the use of awake craniotomy (AC) to decrease visual field deficits following neurosurgery. Materials and Methods: A literature search was performed using the Medline and PubMed databases from 1970 and 2014 that compared various uses of AC other than intraoperative motor/somatosensory/language mapping with a focus on visual field mapping. Results: For the 17 patients analyzed in this study, 14 surgeries resulted in quadrantanopia, 1 in hemianopia, and 2 without visual deficits. Overall, patient satisfaction with AC was high, and AC was a means to reduce surgery-related complications and cost related with the procedure. Conclusion AC is a safe and tolerable procedure that can be used effectively to map optic radiations and the visual cortices in order to preserve visual function during resection of tumors infiltrating the temporal and occipital lobes. In the majority of cases, a homonymous hemianopia was prevented and patients were left with a quadrantanopia that did not interfere with daily function. PMID:26396597

  4. Chromatic and Achromatic Spatial Resolution of Local Field Potentials in Awake Cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Michael; Li, Xiaobing; Lashgari, Reza; Kremkow, Jens; Bereshpolova, Yulia; Swadlow, Harvey A; Zaidi, Qasim; Alonso, Jose-Manuel

    2015-10-01

    Local field potentials (LFPs) have become an important measure of neuronal population activity in the brain and could provide robust signals to guide the implant of visual cortical prosthesis in the future. However, it remains unclear whether LFPs can detect weak cortical responses (e.g., cortical responses to equiluminant color) and whether they have enough visual spatial resolution to distinguish different chromatic and achromatic stimulus patterns. By recording from awake behaving macaques in primary visual cortex, here we demonstrate that LFPs respond robustly to pure chromatic stimuli and exhibit ∼2.5 times lower spatial resolution for chromatic than achromatic stimulus patterns, a value that resembles the ratio of achromatic/chromatic resolution measured with psychophysical experiments in humans. We also show that, although the spatial resolution of LFP decays with visual eccentricity as is also the case for single neurons, LFPs have higher spatial resolution and show weaker response suppression to low spatial frequencies than spiking multiunit activity. These results indicate that LFP recordings are an excellent approach to measure spatial resolution from local populations of neurons in visual cortex including those responsive to color. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press.

  5. Inhibition shapes selectivity to vocalizations in the inferior colliculus of awake mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zachary eMayko

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The inferior colliculus (IC is a major center for integration of auditory information as itreceives ascending projections from a variety of brainstem nuclei as well as descending projectionsfrom the thalamus and auditory cortex. The ascending projections are both excitatory andinhibitory and their convergence at the IC results in a microcircuitry that is important forshaping responses to simple, binaural, and modulated sounds in the IC. Here, we examined therole inhibition plays in shaping selectivity to vocalizations in the IC of awake, normal-hearingadult mice (CBA/CaJ strain. Neurons in the IC of mice show selectivity in their responses tovocalizations, and we hypothesized that this selectivity is created by inhibitory microcircuitryin the IC. We compared single unit responses in the IC to pure tones and a variety of ultrasonicmouse vocalizations before and after iontophoretic application of GABAA receptor (GABAARand glycine receptor (GlyR antagonists. The most pronounced effects of blocking GABAAR andGlyR on IC neurons were to increase spike rates and broaden excitatory frequency tuning curvesin response to pure tone stimuli, and to decrease selectivity to vocalizations. Thus, inhibitionplays an important role in creating selectivity to vocalizations in the inferior colliculus.

  6. The Challenge of Interfacing the Primary Beam Lines for the AWAKE Project at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Bracco, C; Gschwendtner, E; Meddahi, M; Petrenko, A; Velotti, FM

    2014-01-01

    The Proton Driven Plasma Wakefield Acceleration Experiment (AWAKE) at CERN foresees the simultaneous operation of a proton, a laser and an electron beam. The first stage of the experiment will consist in proving the self-modulation, in the plasma, of a long proton bunch into micro-bunches. The success of this experiment requires an almost perfect concentricity of the proton and laser beam, over the full length of the plasma cell. The complexity of integrating the laser into the proton beam line and fulfilling the strict requirements in terms of pointing precision of the proton beam at the plasma cell are described. The second stage of the experiment foresees also the injection of electron bunches to probe the accelerating wakefields driven by the proton beam. Studies were performed to evaluate the possibility of injecting the electron beam parallel and with an offset to the beam axis. This option would imply that protons and electrons will have to share the last few meters of a common beam line. Issues and po...

  7. Methotrexate-induced intestinal mucositis delays gastric emptying and gastrointestinal transit of liquids in awake rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro M. G. Soares

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Methotrexate and other anticancer agents can induce intestinal mucositis, which is one of the most common limiting factor that prevent further dose escalation of the methotrexate. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the gastric emptying and gastrointestinal transit of liquids in methotrexate-induced intestinal mucositis. METHODS: Wistar rats received methotrexate (2.5 mg/kg/day for 3 days, subcutaneously or saline. After 1, 3 and 7 days, sections of duodenum, jejunum and ileum were removed for assessment of epithelial damage and myeloperoxidase activity (biochemical marker of granulocyte infiltration. Others rats were pre-treated with methotrexate or saline, gavage-fed after 3 or 7 days with a standard test liquid meal, and sacrificed 10, 20 or 30-min later. Gastric and small intestine dye recoveries were measured by spectrophotometry. RESULTS: After 3 days of methotrexate, there was an epithelial intestinal damage in all segments, with myeloperoxidase activity increase in both in duodenum and ileum. Seven days after methotrexate, we observed a complete reversion of this intestinal damage. There was an increase in gastric dye recoveries after 10, 20, and 30-min post-prandial intervals after 3 days, but not after 7 days, of methotrexate. Intestine dye recoveries were decreased in the first and second segments at 10 min, in the third at 20 min, and in the second and third at 30 min, only after 3 days of methotrexate treatment. CONCLUSION: Methotrexate-induced intestinal mucositis delays gastric emptying and gastrointestinal transit of liquids in awake rats.

  8. Characterizing Alzheimer's disease severity via resting-awake EEG amplitude modulation analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco J Fraga

    Full Text Available Changes in electroencephalography (EEG amplitude modulations have recently been linked with early-stage Alzheimer's disease (AD. Existing tools available to perform such analysis (e.g., detrended fluctuation analysis, however, provide limited gains in discriminability power over traditional spectral based EEG analysis. In this paper, we explore the use of an innovative EEG amplitude modulation analysis technique based on spectro-temporal signal processing. More specifically, full-band EEG signals are first decomposed into the five well-known frequency bands and the envelopes are then extracted via a Hilbert transform. Each of the five envelopes are further decomposed into four so-called modulation bands, which were chosen to coincide with the delta, theta, alpha and beta frequency bands. Experiments on a resting-awake EEG dataset collected from 76 participants (27 healthy controls, 27 diagnosed with mild-AD, and 22 with moderate-AD showed significant differences in amplitude modulations between the three groups. Most notably, i delta modulation of the beta frequency band disappeared with an increase in disease severity (from mild to moderate AD, ii delta modulation of the theta band appeared with an increase in severity, and iii delta modulation of the beta frequency band showed to be a reliable discriminant feature between healthy controls and mild-AD patients. Taken together, it is hoped that the developed tool can be used to assist clinicians not only with early detection of Alzheimer's disease, but also to monitor its progression.

  9. The Dutch Linguistic Intraoperative Protocol: a valid linguistic approach to awake brain surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Witte, E; Satoer, D; Robert, E; Colle, H; Verheyen, S; Visch-Brink, E; Mariën, P

    2015-01-01

    Intraoperative direct electrical stimulation (DES) is increasingly used in patients operated on for tumours in eloquent areas. Although a positive impact of DES on postoperative linguistic outcome is generally advocated, information about the neurolinguistic methods applied in awake surgery is scarce. We developed for the first time a standardised Dutch linguistic test battery (measuring phonology, semantics, syntax) to reliably identify the critical language zones in detail. A normative study was carried out in a control group of 250 native Dutch-speaking healthy adults. In addition, the clinical application of the Dutch Linguistic Intraoperative Protocol (DuLIP) was demonstrated by means of anatomo-functional models and five case studies. A set of DuLIP tests was selected for each patient depending on the tumour location and degree of linguistic impairment. DuLIP is a valid test battery for pre-, intraoperative and postoperative language testing and facilitates intraoperative mapping of eloquent language regions that are variably located. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Resection of Gliomas with and without Neuropsychological Support during Awake Craniotomy—Effects on Surgery and Clinical Outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Kelm

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundDuring awake craniotomy for tumor resection, a neuropsychologist (NP is regarded as a highly valuable partner for neurosurgeons. However, some centers do not routinely involve an NP, and data to support the high influence of the NP on the perioperative course of patients are mostly lacking.ObjectiveThe aim of this study was to investigate whether there is a difference in clinical outcomes between patients who underwent awake craniotomy with and without the attendance of an NP.MethodsOur analysis included 61 patients, all operated on for resection of a presumably language-eloquent glioma during an awake procedure. Of these 61 cases, 47 surgeries were done with neuropsychological support (NP group, whereas 14 surgeries were performed without an NP (non-NP group due to a language barrier between the NP and the patient. For these patients, neuropsychological assessment was provided by a bilingual resident.ResultsBoth groups were highly comparable regarding age, gender, preoperative language function, and tumor grades (glioma WHO grades 1–4. Gross total resection (GTR was achieved more frequently in the NP group (NP vs. non-NP: 61.7 vs. 28.6%, P = 0.04, which also had shorter durations of surgery (NP vs. non-NP: 240.7 ± 45.7 vs. 286.6 ± 54.8 min, P < 0.01. Furthermore, the rate of unexpected tumor residuals (estimation of the intraoperative extent of resection vs. postoperative imaging was lower in the NP group (NP vs. non-NP: 19.1 vs. 42.9%, P = 0.09, but no difference was observed in terms of permanent surgery-related language deterioration (NP vs. non-NP: 6.4 vs. 14.3%, P = 0.48.ConclusionWe need professional neuropsychological evaluation during awake craniotomies for removal of presumably language-eloquent gliomas. Although these procedures are routinely carried out with an NP, this is one of the first studies to provide data supporting the NP’s crucial role. Despite the small group size, our study shows

  11. Prevalence and potential factors associated with probable sleep or awake bruxism and dentin hypersensitivity in undergraduate students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neusa Barros DANTAS-NETA

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To measure the prevalence of probable sleep or awake bruxism and cervical dentin hypersensitivity of undergraduate students and to determine the symptoms associated with these conditions.METHODOLOGY: This was a cross-sectional study. A diagnosis of probable bruxism was reached when students reported clenching or grinding of the teeth during sleep and/or wakefulness, and when they also presented some of the signs and symptoms of bruxism and masseter muscle pain on palpation. Cervical dentinal hypersensitivity was diagnosed by testing for sensitivity to pain in the cervical region of the teeth. Pain was triggered either by touch (using a #5 probe or by an air jet spray. The sample consisted of 306 university students aged between 19 and 35 years old. The data were stored and analysed using SPSS software, version 15.0 for Windows.RESULT: The prevalence of probable bruxism was 34.3%, with no predominance regarding sex. Probable awake bruxism was more prevalent (61.9%, mostly occurring when the individual reported being in a state of mental concentration (63.1%. There was no association between probable sleep or awake bruxism and dentin hypersensitivity (p = 0.195. Individuals with probable sleep bruxism had increased odds of having muscular pain in the face upon waking (OR = 14.14, 95% CI 5.06-39.55, and those with probable awake bruxism had a increased odds of having facial muscle fatigue when chewing or talking for a long time (OR = 2.88, 95% CI 1.53-5.43 and muscular pain in the face upon waking (OR = 5.31, 95% CI 1.93-14.62.CONCLUSION: The prevalence of probable bruxism was 34.3% and that of HDC was 57.8%, with 22.2% of these subjects also showing probable bruxism. Individuals with probable bruxism tended to have a higher odds of facial pain when they awakened and when chewing or talking for long periods. There were no associations between probable sleep and awake bruxism and cervical dentin hypersensitivity.

  12. ANALYSING EFFICIENCY OF AGGRESSIVE ETF-COMPOSED PORTFOLIO STRATEGIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anton Zaviyalov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The article investigates investment characteristics of Exchange Traded Funds, a unique category of mutual funds which can be traded like any common equity on any stock exchange through authorized broker companies. One can buy and sell ETFs during the entire trading session, one can open short positions using ETFs and trade on margin. ETF price is determined by supply and demand and due to arbitrage, prices are very close to net asset values (NAV. ETFs attract both individual and institutional investors because they combine the benefits of open-end and closed-end funds. The article explores the results of statistical research to find a principal opportunity to implement an "aggressive" ETF-composed portfolio strategy which can secure stable above-market returns. To put it otherwise, the research aims to test the market efficiency hypothesis in the sector of ETF-composed portfolios. The research methodology centers on statistically testing the null hypothesis whether the average S&P500 return and each of the ETF-composed portfolio strategies average returns are equal to zero. To test such a hypothesis one should perform t-tests with several significance levels. If the null hypothesis is rejected on a certain significance level, this would mean that the average return of the portfolio strategy is significantly different from the average return of the S&P500 index. Based on the results of the t-tests, one can conclude whether the above-mentioned market segment is inefficient or partially inefficient, which would mean one can find an "aggressive"strategy to secure stable above-market returns.

  13. The clinician's guide to composing effective business plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ettinger, Alan B; Blondell, Catherine

    2011-01-01

    In today's challenging healthcare environment, clinicians need to understand the fundamentals of financial analysis, which are the underpinnings of their clinical programs, especially when seeking administrative support for new initiatives. The business plan for new clinical program initiatives is composed of diverse elements such as the mission statement, market and competitive analyses, operations plan, and financial analysis. Armed with a basic knowledge of financial analysis of clinical programs, as well as forward-looking analysis of an initiative's added value, the healthcare provider can work much more effectively with administration in developing or creating new healthcare program initiatives.

  14. Rhesus monkeys see who they hear: spontaneous cross-modal memory for familiar conspecifics.

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    Ikuma Adachi

    Full Text Available Rhesus monkeys gather much of their knowledge of the social world through visual input and may preferentially represent this knowledge in the visual modality. Recognition of familiar faces is clearly advantageous, and the flexibility and utility of primate social memory would be greatly enhanced if visual memories could be accessed cross-modally either by visual or auditory stimulation. Such cross-modal access to visual memory would facilitate flexible retrieval of the knowledge necessary for adaptive social behavior. We tested whether rhesus monkeys have cross-modal access to visual memory for familiar conspecifics using a delayed matching-to-sample procedure. Monkeys learned visual matching of video clips of familiar individuals to photographs of those individuals, and generalized performance to novel videos. In crossmodal probe trials, coo-calls were played during the memory interval. The calls were either from the monkey just seen in the sample video clip or from a different familiar monkey. Even though the monkeys were trained exclusively in visual matching, the calls influenced choice by causing an increase in the proportion of errors to the picture of the monkey whose voice was heard on incongruent trials. This result demonstrates spontaneous cross-modal recognition. It also shows that viewing videos of familiar monkeys activates naturally formed memories of real monkeys, validating the use of video stimuli in studies of social cognition in monkeys.

  15. THEORETICAL FOUNDATIONS OF COMPOSING A REFERENCE BOOK OF REGIONAL TOPONYMS

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    Ilyin Dmitriy Yuryevich

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the linguistic issues of composing a reference book of regional toponyms – a genre that requires special consideration in national lexicography. The assortment of these issues gave the possibility to carry out complex description of regional toponyms on the basis of semantic, functional, and orpthologuos criteria that let unify the names of Volgograd region settlements that are registered in various documents. The significance of the composed reference book is determined by several factors – the presence of local subsystems of geographical names in Russian toponymy; the inconsistency of current orthography norms on using capital letter in compound proprius names and fused-with-hyphen spelling of toponyms and off-toponym derivations; the lack of linguistically justified explanation of peculiarities of grammatical norms in the field of proper names use. The reference book of regional toponyms is based on the object description (toponymic vocabulary, principles of lexical units selection (description of spelling and grammatical properties of toponyms, encyclopedic information, the glossary (full list of toponyms of Volgograd region, typical article. The articles in the reference book are arranged in lexicographical zones with grammatical and semantic markers, lexicographical illustrations, other lexicographical labels, word etymology including. The reference book on Volgograd region toponymy is addressed to executive and administration authorities, journalists, regional ethnographers.

  16. Awake intranasal insulin delivery modifies protein complexes and alters memory, anxiety, and olfactory behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marks, David R; Tucker, Kristal; Cavallin, Melissa A; Mast, Thomas G; Fadool, Debra A

    2009-05-20

    The role of insulin pathways in olfaction is of significant interest with the widespread pathology of diabetes mellitus and its associated metabolic and neuronal comorbidities. The insulin receptor (IR) kinase is expressed at high levels in the olfactory bulb, in which it suppresses a dominant Shaker ion channel (Kv1.3) via tyrosine phosphorylation of critical N- and C-terminal residues. We optimized a 7 d intranasal insulin delivery (IND) in awake mice to ascertain the biochemical and behavioral effects of insulin to this brain region, given that nasal sprays for insulin have been marketed notwithstanding our knowledge of the role of Kv1.3 in olfaction, metabolism, and axon targeting. IND evoked robust phosphorylation of Kv1.3, as well as increased channel protein-protein interactions with IR and postsynaptic density 95. IND-treated mice had an increased short- and long-term object memory recognition, increased anxiolytic behavior, and an increased odor discrimination using an odor habituation protocol but only moderate change in odor threshold using a two-choice paradigm. Unlike Kv1.3 gene-targeted deletion that alters metabolism, adiposity, and axonal targeting to defined olfactory glomeruli, suppression of Kv1.3 via IND had no effect on body weight nor the size and number of M72 glomeruli or the route of its sensory axon projections. There was no evidence of altered expression of sensory neurons in the epithelium. In mice made prediabetic via diet-induced obesity, IND was no longer effective in increasing long-term object memory recognition nor increasing anxiolytic behavior, suggesting state dependency or a degree of insulin resistance related to these behaviors.

  17. Effect of superfused insulin on cerebral cortical glucose utilization in awake goats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pelligrino, D.A.; Miletich, D.J.; Albrecht, R.F.

    1987-01-01

    The effect on cortical cerebral glucose utilization (CMR glu ) of intracerebral insulin administration in awake goats was studied. The insulin was superfused in a mock cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) employing chronically implanted cranial windows. Two windows were implanted bilaterally: one window over an equivalent portion of each parietal cortex. With one window used to deliver insulin/CSF and the other used to simultaneously deliver CSF alone (control), changes in CMR glu were assessed using a modification of a sequential 2-[ 3 H]- then 2[ 14 C]deoxy-D-glucose (2DG) technique originally described by Altenau and Agranoff. Initial experiments employing 125 I-insulin demonstrated that the superfusion procedure increased insulin levels only in the outer 1 mm of cortical tissue exposed to insulin containing perfusate. Additional preliminary evaluations, using conditions known to alter CMR glu , generally established that present methods were adequate to induce and detect CMR glu changes. However, it was also shown experimentally and using a mathematical model that 2-[ 3 H]DG test/control tissue ratios could be influenced by subsequent changes in CMR glu and the dephosphorylation rate. Thus 3 H ratios could not be used to establish preexperimental test/control CMR glu relationships as the originally devised model assumed but could be employed to indicate changes in dephosphorylation. The mathematical model allowed for improved estimates of CMR glu changes from 2[ 14 C]DG/2-[ 3 H]DG test over control tissue ratios. Even with these corrections, insulin was estimated to cause no more than an 8-15% increase in cortical CMR glu . A very limited role for insulin, at least in cerebral cortical metabolic regulation, is thus indicated

  18. Distinct BOLD activation profiles following central and peripheral oxytocin administration in awake rats

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    Craig F Ferris

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available A growing body of literature has suggested that intranasal oxytocin (OT or other systemic routes of administration can alter prosocial behavior, presumably by directly activating OT sensitive neural circuits in the brain. Yet there is no clear evidence that OT given peripherally can cross the blood-brain-barrier at levels sufficient to engage the OT receptor. To address this issue we examined changes in blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD signal intensity in response to peripheral OT injections (0.1, 0.5 or 2.5 mg/kg during functional magnetic resonance (fMRI in awake rats imaged at 7.0 tesla. These data were compared to OT (1ug/5 µl given directly to the brain via the lateral cerebroventricle. Using a 3D annotated MRI atlas of the rat brain segmented into 171 brain areas and computational analysis we reconstructed the distributed integrated neural circuits identified with BOLD fMRI following central and peripheral OT. Both routes of administration caused significant changes in BOLD signal within the first 10 min of administration. As expected, central OT activated a majority of brain areas known to express a high density of OT receptors e.g., lateral septum, subiculum, shell of the accumbens, bed nucleus of the stria terminalis. This profile of activation was not matched by peripheral OT. The change in BOLD signal to peripheral OT did not show any discernible dose-response. Interestingly, peripheral OT affected all subdivisions of the olfactory bulb, in addition to the cerebellum and several brainstem areas relevant to the autonomic nervous system, including the solitary tract nucleus. The results from this imaging study do not support a direct central action of peripheral OT on the brain. Instead, the patterns of brain activity suggest that peripheral OT may interact at the level of the olfactory bulb and through sensory afferents from the autonomic nervous system to influence brain activity.

  19. “Next Door” intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging for awake craniotomy: Preliminary experience and technical note

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathias, Roger Neves; de Aguiar, Paulo Henrique Pires; da Luz Oliveira, Evandro Pinto; Verst, Silvia Mazzali; Vieira, Vinícius; Docema, Marcos Fernando; Calfat Maldaun, Marcos Vinícius

    2016-01-01

    Background: During glioma surgery “maximal safe resection” must be the main goal. Intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging (iMRI) associated with awake craniotomy (AC) is a valuable tool to achieve this objective. In this article, AC with a “next-door” iMRI concept is described in a stepwise protocol. Methods: This is a retrospective analysis of 18 patients submitted to AC using iMRI; a stepwise protocol is also discussed. Results: The mean age was 41.7 years. Hemiparesis, aphasia, and seizures were the main initial symptoms of the patients. Sixty-six percent of the tumors were located in the left hemisphere. All tumors were near or within eloquent areas. Fifty-three percent of the cases were glioblastomas multiforme and 47% of the patients had low grade gliomas. The mean surgical time and iMRI time were 4 h 4 min and 30 min, respectively. New resection was performed in 33% after iMRI. Extent of resection (EOR) higher than 95% was possible in 66.7% of the patients. The main reason of EOR lower than 95% was positive mapping of eloquent areas (6 patients). Eighty percent of the patients experienced improvement of their deficits immediately after the surgery or had a stable clinical status whereas 20% had neurological deterioration, however, all of them improved after 30 days. Conclusion: AC associated with “next-door” iMRI is a complex procedure, but if performed using a meticulous technique, it may improve the overall tumor resection and safety of the patients. PMID:28144477

  20. Sex differences in neural activation following different routes of oxytocin administration in awake adult rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumais, Kelly M; Kulkarni, Praveen P; Ferris, Craig F; Veenema, Alexa H

    2017-07-01

    The neuropeptide oxytocin (OT) regulates social behavior in sex-specific ways across species. OT has promising effects on alleviating social deficits in sex-biased neuropsychiatric disorders. However little is known about potential sexually dimorphic effects of OT on brain function. Using the rat as a model organism, we determined whether OT administered centrally or peripherally induces sex differences in brain activation. Functional magnetic resonance imaging was used to examine blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) signal intensity changes in the brains of awake rats during the 20min following intracerebroventricular (ICV; 1μg/5μl) or intraperitoneal (IP; 0.1mg/kg) OT administration as compared to baseline. ICV OT induced sex differences in BOLD activation in 26 out of 172 brain regions analyzed, with 20 regions showing a greater volume of activation in males (most notably the nucleus accumbens and insular cortex), and 6 regions showing a greater volume of activation in females (including the lateral and central amygdala). IP OT also elicited sex differences in BOLD activation with a greater volume of activation in males, but this activation was found in different and fewer (10) brain regions compared to ICV OT. In conclusion, exogenous OT modulates neural activation differently in male versus female rats with the pattern and magnitude, but not the direction, of sex differences depending on the route of administration. These findings highlight the need to include both sexes in basic and clinical studies to fully understand the role of OT on brain function. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.