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Sample records for awaiting liver transplantation

  1. Percutaneous laser ablation of hepatocellular carcinoma in patients with liver cirrhosis awaiting liver transplantation

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    Pompili, Maurizio, E-mail: mpompili@rm.unicatt.i [Department of Internal Medicine, Universita Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Largo A. Gemelli, 8, 00168 Roma (Italy); Pacella, Claudio Maurizio, E-mail: claudiomauriziopacella@gmail.co [Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Interventional Radiology, Ospedale Regina Apostolorum, Via S. Francesco D' Assisi, 50, 00041 Albano Laziale (RM) (Italy); Francica, Giampiero, E-mail: giampierofrancica@tin.i [Department of Interventional Ultrasound, Presidio Ospedaliero Camilliani, S. Maria della Pieta, Via S. Rocco, 9, 80026 Casoria (Namibia) (Italy); Angelico, Mario, E-mail: angelico@med.uniroma2.i [Hepatology Unit, Universita di Tor Vergata, Viale Oxford, 81, 00133 Rome (Italy); Tisone, Giuseppe, E-mail: tisone@med.uniroma2.i [Transplant and General Surgery Unit, Universita di Tor Vergata, Ospedale S. Eugenio, Piazzale dell' Umanesimo 10-00144 Rome (Italy); Craboledda, Paolo, E-mail: paolo.craboledda@virgilio.i [Department of Pathology, Ospedale S. Eugenio, Piazzale dell' Umanesimo, 10-00144 Rome (Italy); Nicolardi, Erica; Rapaccini, Gian Ludovico; Gasbarrini, Giovanni [Department of Internal Medicine, Universita Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Largo A. Gemelli, 8, 00168 Roma (Italy)

    2010-06-15

    Objective: The aim of this study was to determine the effectiveness and safety of percutaneous laser ablation for the treatment of cirrhotic patients with hepatocellular carcinoma awaiting liver transplantation. Materials and methods: The data of 9 male cirrhotic patients (mean age 50 years, range 45-60 years) with 12 biopsy proven nodules of hepatocellular carcinoma (mean diameter 2.0 cm, range 1.0-3.0 cm) treated by laser ablation before liver transplantation between June 2000 and January 2006 were retrospectively reviewed. Laser ablation was carried out by inserting 300 nm optical fibers through 21-Gauge needles (from two to four) positioned under ultrasound guidance into the target lesions. A continuous wave Neodymium:Yttrium Aluminium Garnet laser was used. Transarterial chemoembolization prior to liver transplantation was performed in two incompletely ablated tumors. Results: No procedure-related major complications were recorded. During the waiting time to liver transplantation local tumor progression after ablation occurred in 3 nodules (25%). At histological examination of the explanted livers complete necrosis was found in 8 nodules (66.7%, all treated exclusively with laser ablation), partial necrosis >50% in 3 nodules (25%), and partial necrosis <50% in 1 nodule. Conclusion: In patients with cirrhotic livers awaiting liver transplantation, percutaneous laser ablation is safe and effective for the management of small hepatocellular carcinoma.

  2. Percutaneous laser ablation of hepatocellular carcinoma in patients with liver cirrhosis awaiting liver transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: The aim of this study was to determine the effectiveness and safety of percutaneous laser ablation for the treatment of cirrhotic patients with hepatocellular carcinoma awaiting liver transplantation. Materials and methods: The data of 9 male cirrhotic patients (mean age 50 years, range 45-60 years) with 12 biopsy proven nodules of hepatocellular carcinoma (mean diameter 2.0 cm, range 1.0-3.0 cm) treated by laser ablation before liver transplantation between June 2000 and January 2006 were retrospectively reviewed. Laser ablation was carried out by inserting 300 nm optical fibers through 21-Gauge needles (from two to four) positioned under ultrasound guidance into the target lesions. A continuous wave Neodymium:Yttrium Aluminium Garnet laser was used. Transarterial chemoembolization prior to liver transplantation was performed in two incompletely ablated tumors. Results: No procedure-related major complications were recorded. During the waiting time to liver transplantation local tumor progression after ablation occurred in 3 nodules (25%). At histological examination of the explanted livers complete necrosis was found in 8 nodules (66.7%, all treated exclusively with laser ablation), partial necrosis >50% in 3 nodules (25%), and partial necrosis <50% in 1 nodule. Conclusion: In patients with cirrhotic livers awaiting liver transplantation, percutaneous laser ablation is safe and effective for the management of small hepatocellular carcinoma.

  3. From listing to transplant: nephrologic monitoring in cirrhotic patients awaiting liver transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umbro, I; Tinti, F; Fiacco, F; Zavatto, A; Di Natale, V; Ginanni Corradini, S; Rossi, M; Poli, L; Berloco, P B; Mitterhofer, A P

    2013-09-01

    Nephrologic monitoring of end-stage liver disease (ESLD) patients is part of evaluation for orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT). The numerous causes of renal dysfunction in ESLD patients sometimes relate to the extent of liver damage or sometimes more closely to organic nephropathy. The aim of this study was to evaluate renal function through a specific nephrologic form applied in our outpatient clinic to optimize nephrologic monitoring in ESLD patients awaiting OLT. We enrolled 69 cirrhotic patients (56 men, 13 women) awaiting OLT from April 2008 to January 2012. All patients were evaluated at listing and every 3 months until OLT. The most interesting result was the stable values of serum creatinine from listing to transplantation. We think that dedicated liver transplant nephrologic evaluation is important in the follow-up of ESLD patients awaiting OLT, because the presence of renal dysfunction may represent an important criterion for specific therapeutic interventions to minimize pre-OLT renal injuries that limit the effect of impaired renal function on patient outcomes.

  4. Resistive index and MELD-Na: nephrologic monitoring in cirrhotic patients awaiting liver transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umbro, I; Tinti, F; Fiacco, F; Zavatto, A; Piselli, P; Di Natale, V; Lai, S; Vitarelli, A; Corradini, S Ginanni; Rossi, M; Poli, L; Berloco, P B; Mitterhofer, A P

    2013-09-01

    Renal dysfunction in cirrhotic patients is primarily related to disturbances in circulatory function. In decompensated cirrhosis, ascites and water retention are associated with development of dilutional hyponatremia. The arterial resistive index (RI) is a measure of resistance to arterial flow within the renal vascular bed. Hyponatremia is an independent predictor of mortality in patients with ascites. The aim of this study was to evaluate intrarenal RI in end-stage liver disease (ESLD) patients awaiting liver transplantation (LT) and its association with renal and hepatic function as assessed by Model for End-Stage Liver Disease (MELD) and MELD-Na scores. We evaluated 40 cirrhotic patients (23 males, 17 females) awaiting LT from January 2009 to January 2012. Twenty-six of the 40 patients (65%) showed a renal RI ≥ 0.70, the normal value according to standard reported evaluations. Patients with RI ≥ 0.70 showed significantly higher MELD and MELD-Na scores as well as greater higher serum creatinine and lower serum sodium concentrations compared with subject displaying RI <0.70. The most relevant result of our study was the strong association between elevated renal RI in ESLD patients and advanced liver dysfunction, as demonstrated by MELD and MELD-Na scores, hyponatremia, ascites, and acute renal failure episodes. In conclusion, this study suggested that intrarenal RI assessment should be considered in the clinical and nephrologic monitoring of cirrhotic patients awaiting LT.

  5. Risk Factors for Portal Vein Thrombosis in Patients With Cirrhosis Awaiting Liver Transplantation in Shiraz, Iran

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    Bagheri Lankarani

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background Portal vein thrombosis is a fairly common and potentially life-threatening complication in patients with liver cirrhosis. The risk factors for portal vein thrombosis in these patients are still not fully understood. Objectives This study aimed to investigate the associations between various risk factors in cirrhotic patients and the development of portal vein thrombosis. Patients and Methods In this case-control study performed at the Shiraz organ transplantation center, Iran, we studied 219 patients (> 18 years old with liver cirrhosis, who were awaiting liver transplants in our unit, from November 2010 to May 2011. The patients were evaluated by history, physical examination, and laboratory tests, including factor V Leiden, prothrombin gene mutation, Janus Kinase 2 (JAK2 mutation, and serum levels of protein C, protein S, antithrombin III, homocysteine, factor VIII, and anticardiolipin antibodies. Results There was no statistically significant difference in the assessed hypercoagulable states between patients with or without portal vein thrombosis. A history of previous variceal bleeding with subsequent endoscopic treatment in patients with portal vein thrombosis was significantly higher than in those without it (P = 0.013, OR: 2.526, 95% CI: 1.200 - 5.317. Conclusions In our population of cirrhotic patients, treatment of variceal bleeding predisposed the patients to portal vein thrombosis, but hypercoagulable disorders by themselves were not associated with portal vein thrombosis.

  6. Limitations of the MELD score in predicting mortality or need for removal from waiting list in patients awaiting liver transplantation

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    Schmidt Jan

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Decompensated cirrhosis is associated with a poor prognosis and liver transplantation provides the only curative treatment option with excellent long-term results. The relative shortage of organ donors renders the allocation algorithms of organs essential. The optimal strategy based on scoring systems and/or waiting time is still under debate. Methods Data sets of 268 consecutive patients listed for single-organ liver transplantation for nonfulminant liver disease between 2003 and 2005 were included into the study. The Model for End-Stage Liver Disease (MELD and Child-Turcotte-Pugh (CTP scores of all patients at the time of listing were used for calculation. The predictive ability not only for mortality on the waiting list but also for the need for withdrawal from the waiting list was calculated for both scores. The Mann-Whitney-U Test was used for the univariate analysis and the AUC-Model for discrimination of the scores. Results In the univariate analysis comparing patients who are still on the waiting list and patients who died or were removed from the waiting list due to poor conditions, the serum albumin, bilirubin INR, and CTP and MELD scores as well as the presence of ascites and encephalopathy were significantly different between the groups (p Comparing the predictive abilities of CTP and MELD scores, the best discrimination between patients still alive on the waiting list and patients who died on or were removed from the waiting list was achieved at a CTP score of ≥9 and a MELD score of ≥14.4. The sensitivity and specificity to identify mortality or severe deterioration for CTP was 69.0% and 70.5%, respectively; for MELD, it was 62.1% and 72.7%, respectively. This result was supported by the AUC analysis showing a strong trend for superiority of CTP over MELD scores (AUROC 0.73 and 0.68, resp.; p = 0.091. Conclusion The long term prediction of mortality or removal from waiting list in patients awaiting liver

  7. Treatment of alcohol use disorder patients affected by liver cirrhosis and/or hepatocellular carcinoma awaiting liver transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Testino, Gianni; Leone, Silvia; Borro, Paolo

    2016-08-01

    Alcohol is one of the top three priority areas for public health worldwide. Alcohol is the second leading cause of liver disease, and 45-60% of cirrhosis deaths are alcohol related. In the United States it represents 30% of liver transplants and in Europe 50%. Twenty to 40% of cases of steatosis evolve into steatohepatitis, and l8-20% directly into liver cirrhosis; 20-40% of cases of steatohepatitis evolve into cirrhosis and 4-5% into hepatocellular carcinoma. This cascade of events takes 5 to 40 years. The temporal variability is related to the genetic pattern of the subject and the presence of associated risk factors. Thirty to 40% of patients with alcoholic liver disease (ALD) suffer from HCV, and 70% of HCV patients have a history of risky / harmful alcohol consumption. A severe clinical condition is certainly the overlap of acute alcoholic hepatitis (AAH) with a framework of HCV-related chronic hepatitis: acute chronic liver failure (ACLF). In the case of decompensated cirrhosis, severe AAH or ACLF non responder to medical therapy the indication, in selected patients, is certainly liver transplantation (LT). ALD treatment is important, but not very effective if abstention is not reached. In case of liver disease related or correlated to LT such as decompensated cirrhosis, severe AAH or ACLF the possibility of anticraving therapy is restricted to metadoxine and baclofen. In all alcohol use disorder patients with ALD psycho-social therapy and attendance at SHG groups it is mandatory, even in post-transplant period. PMID:27148681

  8. Regression of Hypervascular Nodules in a Patient with Wilson's Disease Awaiting Liver Transplantation

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    Alcindo Pissaia

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the regressive course over one year of hypervascular nodules in a patient with Wilson's disease. CT revealed multiple, enhancing nodules (up to 3 cm in diameter detected in the liver in the early arterial phase after the administration of intravenous contrast material. Most of these nodules became isodense in the portal venous phase. After one year of efficient therapy combining d-penicillamine and zinc acetate, most of the nodules had disappeared, while the liver contours had become more regular. To our knowledge, the regression of large hypervascular nodules has not previously been reported in patients with Wilson's disease.

  9. Liver Transplant

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home > Your Liver > Liver Disease Information > Liver Transplant Liver Transplant Explore this section to learn more about liver ... harmful substances from your blood. What is a liver transplant? A liver transplant is the process of replacing ...

  10. Telaprevir-containing regimen for treatment of hepatitis C virus infection in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma awaiting liver transplantation: a case series

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    Torres HA

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Harrys A Torres,1 Ahmed Kaseb,2 Parag Mahale,1 Ethan Miller,3 Catherine Frenette4 1Department of Infectious Diseases, Infection Control and Employee Health, 2Department of Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology, 3Department of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, USA; 4Department of Liver Transplantation, Weill Cornell Medical College, The Methodist Hospital, Houston, TX, USA Abstract: In patients who undergo liver transplantation (LT, allograft failure secondary to hepatitis C virus (HCV recurrence after LT accounts for two-thirds of graft failures and deaths. Achievement of sustained virologic response before LT eliminates the risk of HCV recurrence. Only a limited number of studies have evaluated the role of antiviral treatment before LT. No published data are available regarding the use of HCV protease inhibitors before LT. We report our experience using the combination of telaprevir, pegylated interferon alfa-2a (PegIFN alfa-2a, and ribavirin in three patients with HCV-associated hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC awaiting LT. Two patients had not received, and one had had a partial response to HCV therapy (PegIFN alfa-2a plus ribavirin. All three patients had genotype 1b and were started on telaprevir and full doses of PegIFN alfa-2a and ribavirin. Treatment was planned to be continued until the day of LT or 48 weeks total, whichever came first. One patient still had detectable HCV RNA after 24 weeks of antivirals and was, therefore, excluded from further analysis. The other two patients had undetectable HCV RNA at the end of antiviral therapy. In one of these patients, HCV RNA remained undetectable after LT; the other patient experienced viral relapse. HCV therapy was tolerated by all patients; no patient required permanent discontinuation of therapy because of toxic effects. All three patients experienced hematologic toxic effects. Only one patient required treatment

  11. Liver transplant

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... transplant - series References Keefe EB. Hepatic failure and liver transplantation. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's Cecil ... Elsevier; 2011:chap 157. Martin P, Rosen HR. Liver transplantation. In: Feldman M, Friedman LS, Brandt LJ, eds. ...

  12. Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of the Impact of Computed Tomography-Assessed Skeletal Muscle Mass on Outcome in Patients Awaiting or Undergoing Liver Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Vugt, J L A; Levolger, S; de Bruin, R W F; van Rosmalen, J; Metselaar, H J; IJzermans, J N M

    2016-08-01

    Liver transplant outcome has improved considerably as a direct result of optimized surgical and anesthesiological techniques and organ allocation programs. Because there remains a shortage of human organs, strict selection of transplant candidates remains of paramount importance. Recently, computed tomography (CT)-assessed low skeletal muscle mass (i.e. sarcopenia) was identified as a novel prognostic parameter to predict outcome in liver transplant candidates. A systematic review and meta-analysis on the impact of CT-assessed skeletal muscle mass on outcome in liver transplant candidates were performed according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analysis guidelines. Nineteen studies, including 3803 patients in partly overlapping cohorts, fulfilled the inclusion criteria. The prevalence of sarcopenia ranged from 22.2% to 70%. An independent association between low muscle mass and posttransplantation and waiting list mortality was described in 4 of the 6 and 6 of the 11 studies, respectively. The pooled hazard ratios of sarcopenia were 1.84 (95% confidence interval 1.11-3.05, p = 0.02) and 1.72 (95% confidence interval 0.99-3.00, p = 0.05) for posttransplantation and waiting list mortality, respectively, independent of Model for End-stage Liver Disease score. Less-consistent evidence suggested a higher complication rate, particularly infections, in sarcopenic patients. In conclusion, sarcopenia is an independent predictor for outcome in liver transplantation patients and could be used for risk assessment. PMID:26813115

  13. Liver transplantation

    OpenAIRE

    Rodríguez-Perálvarez, M; De La Mata, M; Burroughs, A K

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review: Long-term survival of liver transplant recipients is threatened by increased rates of de-novo malignancy and recurrence of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), both events tightly related to immunosuppression. Recent findings: There is accumulating evidence linking increased exposure to immunosuppressants and carcinogenesis, particularly concerning calcineurin inhibitors (CNIs), azathioprine and antilymphocyte agents. A recent study including 219 HCC transplanted patients sh...

  14. Immunological aspects of liver cell transplantation

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    Oldhafer, Felix; Bock, Michael; Falk, Christine S.; Florian W R Vondran

    2016-01-01

    Within the field of regenerative medicine, the liver is of major interest for adoption of regenerative strategies due to its well-known and unique regenerative capacity. Whereas therapeutic strategies such as liver resection and orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) can be considered standards of care for the treatment of a variety of liver diseases, the concept of liver cell transplantation (LCTx) still awaits clinical breakthrough. Success of LCTx is hampered by insufficient engraftment/lo...

  15. Liver transplant - series (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... depending on the degree of illness. After liver transplantation, patients must take immunosuppressive medications for the rest of their lives to prevent immune rejection of the transplanted organ.

  16. Contribuição da quimioembolização de hepatocarcinomas em pacientes cirróticos na espera pelo transplante hepático Contribution of transcatheter arterial chemoembolization of hepatocellular carcinomas in cirrhotic patients awaiting liver transplantation

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    Luís Francisco Langer

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar os resultados da quimioembolização arterial do hepatocarcinoma em pacientes portadores de fígado cirrótico candidatos ao transplante hepático. MATERIAIS E MÉTODOS: Vinte e três pacientes cirróticos e portadores de hepatocarcinoma, candidatos para o transplante hepático, foram submetidos a múltiplas sessões de quimioembolização hepática com mitomicina C associadamente com lipiodol, avaliando-se prospectivamente: a níveis séricos de alfa-fetoproteína; b tamanho tumoral; c permanência do paciente dentro dos critérios de viabilidade para o transplante hepático; d grau de disfunção hepática. RESULTADOS: O nível sérico médio de alfa-fetoproteína sofreu uma redução nos primeiros 13 meses, de 43%. O tamanho médio do tumor no maior eixo, após o seguimento médio de 13,5 meses, foi de 3,2 cm, e de acordo com os critérios da Organização Mundial da Saúde, este tamanho médio mostrou-se como doença estável neste período. O tempo médio de sobrevivência foi de 14 meses. CONCLUSÃO: O uso pré-transplante da quimioembolização com um esquema terapêutico adequadamente escolhido demonstrou, através do presente ensaio, apresentar poucas complicações e contra-indicações e considerável eficácia antitumoral. Embora a terapêutica adotada tenha aumentado a sobrevida, em comparação a dados históricos de evolução do hepatocarcinoma, este aumento não teve a mesma dimensão que o tempo médio de espera para a realização do transplante, sendo, dessa forma, necessária a associação de outras estratégias para prolongar o tempo de sobrevida ou a redução no tempo de espera do doente.OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the results of hepatocellular carcinoma arterial chemoembolization in cirrhotic patients awaiting liver transplantation. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Twenty-three cirrhotic patients with hepatocellular carcinoma awaiting liver transplantation were submitted to multiple sessions of chemoembolization

  17. MedlinePlus: Liver Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... End-Stage Liver Disease (PELD) (United Network for Organ Sharing) - PDF Specifics Living Donor Liver Transplantation (American Society of Transplantation) - PDF Images Liver transplant - slideshow Available in Spanish Statistics and Research U.S. Hospitals with Liver Transplant Centers ( ...

  18. Liver Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to follow a treatment regimen a lack of psychosocial support In addition, the transplant candidate may decide ... is a challenging and complex surgery with significant risks to the donor, including death. According to the ...

  19. Liver and lung transplantation in cystic fibrosis: an adult cystic fibrosis centre's experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivam, S; Al-Hindawi, Y; Di Michiel, J; Moriarty, C; Spratt, P; Jansz, P; Malouf, M; Plit, M; Pleass, H; Havryk, A; Bowen, D; Haber, P; Glanville, A R; Bye, P T P

    2016-07-01

    Liver disease develops in one-third of patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). It is rare for liver disease to have its onset after 20 years of age. Lung disease, however, is usually more severe in adulthood. A retrospective analysis was performed on nine patients. Three patients required lung transplantation approximately a decade after liver transplant, and another underwent combined liver and lung transplants. Four additional patients with liver transplants are awaiting assessment for lung transplants. One patient is awaiting combined liver and lung transplants. With increased survival in CF, several patients may require more than single organ transplantation. PMID:27405894

  20. Liver transplantation in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narasimhan, Gomathy; Kota, Venugopal; Rela, Mohamed

    2016-07-01

    Liver transplantation as an established form of treatment for end-stage liver disease has gained acceptance in India over the last 10 years. Liver transplantation in India has unique features that have contributed to the growth of both deceased donor and living donor transplantations of which living donor currently dominates the picture. Living donor contributes to 80% and deceased donor to 20% of the liver transplants currently performed in India. The majority of these transplants are performed within the private sector with public sector hospitals lagging behind significantly. This article gives an overview of the evolution of liver transplantation in India and the potential future challenges. Liver Transplantation 22 1019-1024 2016 AASLD. PMID:27082718

  1. Doença coronária obstrutiva em hepatopatas crônicos que aguardam transplante hepático Enfermedad coronaria obstructiva en hepatópatas crónicos que aguardan trasplante hepático Obstructive coronary disease in patients with chronic liver disease awaiting liver transplantation

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    Moacir Fernandes de Godoy

    2011-01-01

    with ALF with and without obstructive coronary disease. METHODS: Evaluation of risk factors for CAD in 119 patients in a referral center for liver transplantation, with the following characteristics: patients older than 40 years of age with ALV who underwent coronary angiography. RESULTS: Obstructive coronary disease was detected in 21 (17.6% of the cases. These patients had really low cholesterol levels, of which 129.0 ± 53.5 mg/dl averaging 117.0 mg/dl in liver disease patients with normal coronary arteries and 135.4 ± 51.7 mg/dl averaging 122.0 mg/dl in liver disease patients with obstructive coronary artery disease (P = 0.8215. In multivariate logistic regression, age, sex, body mass index and the presence of diabetes, smoking and alcohol consumption were not statistically significant in distinguishing groups. Nor was there an association with the etiology of the ALF. In turn, hypertension was proven to be relevant in association with CAD (P = 0.0474. CONCLUSION: Only hypertension was a risk factor with statistical significance for the development of CAD in patients with ALF awaiting liver transplantation. Because it is a modifiable risk factor, this finding guides the practice of therapeutic attitudes in an attempt to prevent or delay the development of CAD in these patients.

  2. Kidney transplantation after liver transplantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-Yang Wu; Hang Liu; Wei Liu; Han Li; Xiao-Dong Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Kidney transplantation after liver transplanta-tion (KALT) offers longer survival and a better quality of life to liver transplantation recipients who develop chronic renal failure. This article aimed to discuss the efifcacy and safety of KALT compared with other treatments. The medical records of 5 patients who had undergone KALT were retrospectively studied, together with a literature review of studies. Three of them developed chronic renal failure after liver transplanta-tion because of calcineurin inhibitor (CNI)-induced neph-rotoxicity, while the others had lupus nephritis or non-CNI drug-induced nephrotoxicity. No mortality was observed in the 5 patients. Three KALT cases showed good prognoses, maintaining a normal serum creatinine level during entire follow-up period. Chronic rejection occurred in the other two patients, and a kidney graft was removed from one of them. Our data suggested that KALT is a good alternative to dialysis for liver transplantation recipients. The cases also indicate that KALT can be performed with good long-term survival.

  3. Liver transplantation in the United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuberger, James

    2016-08-01

    Liver transplantation (LT) services in the United Kingdom are provided by 7 designated transplant centers for a population of approximately 64 million. The number of deceased organ donors has grown, and in 2014-2015 it was 1282 (570 donation after circulatory death and 772 donation after brain death). Donor risk is increasing. In 2014-2015, there were 829 LTs from deceased and 38 from living donors. The common causes for transplantation are liver cell cancer, viral hepatitis, and alcohol-related liver disease. Livers are allocated first nationally to super-urgent listed patients and then on a zonal basis. The United Kingdom will be moving toward a national allocation scheme. The median interval between listing and transplantation is 152 days for adults awaiting their first elective transplant. Of the adults listed for the first elective transplant, 68% underwent transplantation at Scotland. National Health Service Blood and Transplant (NHSBT) promotes organ donation, maintains the organ donor register, obtains consent, and undertakes donor characterization and offering. NHSBT also maintains the national waiting list, develops and applies selection and allocation policies, monitors outcomes, and maintains the UK National Transplant Registry and commissions a national organ retrieval service. Liver Transplantation 22 1129-1135 2016 AASLD. PMID:27081833

  4. Living Donor Liver Transplantation

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    ... What are Some Benefits of a Living-donor Liver Transplant? In the U.S., more than 17,500 patients ... 1,700 patients die each year while waiting. Liver transplants are given to patients on the basis of ...

  5. Endovascular management in liver transplantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kyu-Bo Sung

    2006-01-01

    @@ Liver transplantation was developed for the treatment of hepatic failure, and the first human liver transplantation was done in 1963. From the 1990 s,liver transplantation was generally accepted as a treatment modality for both end-stage liver disease and selected liver malignancies. Initially, liver transplantation was started with deceased donor whole-size liver transplantation (whole-size LT) as in other organ transplantation, but there is now a shortage of deceased liver donors has occurred. As a solution, deceased donor split liver transplantation (split LT) began in 1989 and living donor liver transplantation (LDLT) in the early 1990 s. Current liver transplantation techniques include whole-size LT, reduced-size liver transplantation (reduced-size LT), split LT and single or dual LDLT. Two donors give a part of their livers to one adult recipient simultaneously in dual LDLT.

  6. About the Operation: Liver Transplant

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... There are two very different surgical approaches to liver transplantation: the orthotopic and the heterotopic approach, both of ... liver to the intestines. Heterotopic Approach . In heterotopic liver transplantation, the recipient's liver is left in place and ...

  7. Split liver transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yersiz, H; Cameron, A M; Carmody, I; Zimmerman, M A; Kelly, B S; Ghobrial, R M; Farmer, D G; Busuttil, R W

    2006-03-01

    Seventy-five thousand Americans develop organ failure each year. Fifteen percent of those on the list for transplantation die while waiting. Several possible mechanisms to expand the organ pool are being pursued including the use of extended criteria donors, living donation, and split deceased donor transplants. Cadaveric organ splitting results from improved understanding of the surgical anatomy of the liver derived from Couinaud. Early efforts focused on reduced-liver transplantation (RLT) reported by both Bismuth and Broelsch in the mid-1980s. These techniques were soon modified to create both a left lateral segment graft appropriate for a pediatric recipient and a right trisegment for an appropriately sized adult. Techniques of split liver transplantation (SLT) were also modified to create living donor liver transplantation. Pichlmayr and Bismuth reported successful split liver transplantation in 1989 and Emond reported a larger series of nine split procedures in 1990. Broelsch and Busuttil described a technical modification in which the split was performed in situ at the donor institution with surgical division completed in the heart beating cadaveric donor. In situ splitting reduces cold ischemia, simplifies identification of biliary and vascular structures, and reduces reperfusion hemorrhage. However, in situ splits require specialized skills, prolonged operating room time, and increased logistical coordination at the donor institution. At UCLA over 120 in situ splits have been performed and this technique is the default when an optimal donor is available. Split liver transplantation now accounts for 10% of adult transplantations at UCLA and 40% of pediatric transplantations.

  8. Liver transplantation in Ireland.

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    Iqbal, Masood; Elrayah, Elgaily A; Traynor, Oscar; McCormick, P Aiden

    2016-07-01

    The Irish National Liver Transplant program commenced in 1993 in St. Vincent's University Hospital in Dublin. It is an adult-only program and is the only liver transplant program in Ireland. Pediatric recipients are referred to King's College Hospital in the United Kingdom. To date, almost 1000 adult liver transplants have been performed. Current 1-year patient survival is 93%, and 5-year survival is 79%. The program is fully funded by the government health service. There is a close collaboration with the United Kingdom Organ Donation and Transplant Directorate, and there is an arrangement for organ sharing for super-urgent transplants. Traditionally, organ donation rates have been high in Ireland. However, demand for liver transplant has increased over the past 20 years, and waiting lists are now lengthening. Deceased cardiac death donation is now being considered, but there are no plans for living related donor liver transplant. Donor coordinators have recently been appointed to the major hospitals in Ireland, and it is hoped that this initiative will lead to an increase in organ donation rates. Liver Transplantation 22 1014-1018 2016 AASLD. PMID:27065358

  9. Imaging in liver transplantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Settimo Caruso; Roberto Miraglia; Luigi Maruzzelli; Salvatore Gruttadauria; Angelo Luca; Bruno Gridelli

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to illustrate the role of noninvasive imaging tools such as ultrasonography, multidetector row computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging in the evaluation of pediatric and adult liver recipients and potential liver donors, and in the detection of potential complications arising from liver transplantation.

  10. Idiopathic Organ Transplant Chorioretinopathy after Liver Transplantation

    OpenAIRE

    Maria Fernanda Abalem; Pedro Carlos Carricondo; Sergio Luis Gianotti Pimentel; Walter Yukihiko Takahashi

    2015-01-01

    Idiopathic organ transplant chorioretinopathy is a rare disease associated with kidney and heart transplantation. We present a case secondary to liver transplantation including its multimodal imaging, differential diagnosis, and physiopathology discussion.

  11. Liver Biopsy in Liver Transplant Recipients

    OpenAIRE

    Van Ha, Thuong G.

    2004-01-01

    Liver biopsy has been used in the assessment of the nature and course of liver diseases and to monitor treatments. In nontransplanted patients, liver biopsies have been well described. Less has been written on the biopsies of transplanted livers. In the liver transplant population, liver biopsy remains the “gold standard” for the diagnosis of rejection. The transplanted liver has additional considerations that can make biopsy less routine and more challenging.

  12. Living Related Liver Transplantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Living Related Liver Transplantation (LRLT)is a new strategy, which offers the option of a lifesaving procedure to patients suffering from end - stage liver disease, and the experience indicates that the results are better than cadaveric liver transplantation. It promises to decrease the waiting time for liver transplantation significantly and to reduce the number of patients dying on the waiting list. The selection of a suitable donor and the techniques of operation are of paramount importance for LRLT to minimize the risk for the recipient and the donor, and achieve better outcome for patient. 1 -year recipient survival rate of LRLT is over 90% and 5 -year recipient survival rate of LRLT is about 80%. LRLT has been becoming standard and normal operation in many western transplant centers.

  13. About the Operation: Liver Transplant

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Heart/Lung Kidney Pancreas Kidney/Pancreas Liver Intestine Liver Transplant There are two very different surgical approaches to liver transplantation: the orthotopic and the heterotopic approach, both of ...

  14. Biliary complications following liver transplantation

    OpenAIRE

    Kochhar, Gursimran; Parungao, Jose Mari; Hanouneh, Ibrahim A; Parsi, Mansour A

    2013-01-01

    Biliary tract complications are the most common complications after liver transplantation. These complications are encountered more commonly as a result of increased number of liver transplantations and the prolonged survival of transplant patients. Biliary complications remain a major source of morbidity in liver transplant patients, with an incidence of 5%-32%. Post liver transplantation biliary complications include strictures (anastomotic and non-anastomotic), leaks, stones, sphincter of ...

  15. Pediatric liver transplantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Marco Spada; Silvia Riva; Giuseppe Maggiore; Davide Cintorino; Bruno Gridelli

    2009-01-01

    In previous decades, pediatric liver transplantation has become a state-of-the-art operation with excellent success and limited mortality. Graft and patient survival have continued to improve as a result of improvements in medical, surgical and anesthetic management, organ availability, immunosuppression, and identification and treatment of postoperative complications. The utilization of split-liver grafts and living-related donors has provided more organs for pediatric patients. Newer immunosuppression regimens, including induction therapy, have had a significant impact on graft and patient survival. Future developments of pediatric liver transplantation will deal with long-term followup, with prevention of immunosuppression-related complications and promotion of as normal growth as possible. This review describes the state-of-the-art in pediatric liver transplantation.

  16. Liver transplantation in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tacke, Frank; Kroy, Daniela C; Barreiros, Ana Paula; Neumann, Ulf P

    2016-08-01

    Liver transplantation (LT) is a well-accepted procedure for end-stage liver disease in Germany. In 2015, 1489 patients were admitted to the waiting list (including 1308 new admissions), with the leading etiologies being fibrosis and cirrhosis (n = 349), alcoholic liver disease (n = 302), and hepatobiliary malignancies (n = 220). Organ allocation in Germany is regulated within the Eurotransplant system based on urgency as expressed by the Model for End-Stage Liver Disease score. In 2015, only 894 LTs (n = 48 from living donors) were performed at 23 German transplant centers, reflecting a shortage of organs. Several factors may contribute to the low number of organ donations. The German transplant legislation only accepts donation after brain death (not cardiac death), whereas advances in neurosurgery and a more frequently requested "palliative care" approach render fewer patients suitable as potential donors. The legislation further requires the active consent of the donor or first-degree relatives before donation. Ongoing debates within the German transplant field address the optimal management of patients with alcoholic liver cirrhosis, hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), and cholangiocarcinoma and measures to increase living donor transplantations. As a result of irregularities at mainly 4 German transplant centers that were exposed in 2012, guiding principles updated by the German authorities have since implemented strict rules (including internal and external auditing, the 8-eyes principle, mandatory repeated testing for alcohol consumption) to prohibit any manipulations in organ allocation. In conclusion, we will summarize important aspects on the management of LT in Germany, discuss legal and organizational aspects, and highlight challenges mainly related to the relative lack of organ donations, increasing numbers of extended criteria donors, and the peculiarities of the recipient patients. Liver Transplantation 22 1136-1142 2016 AASLD.

  17. Liver transplantation in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tacke, Frank; Kroy, Daniela C; Barreiros, Ana Paula; Neumann, Ulf P

    2016-08-01

    Liver transplantation (LT) is a well-accepted procedure for end-stage liver disease in Germany. In 2015, 1489 patients were admitted to the waiting list (including 1308 new admissions), with the leading etiologies being fibrosis and cirrhosis (n = 349), alcoholic liver disease (n = 302), and hepatobiliary malignancies (n = 220). Organ allocation in Germany is regulated within the Eurotransplant system based on urgency as expressed by the Model for End-Stage Liver Disease score. In 2015, only 894 LTs (n = 48 from living donors) were performed at 23 German transplant centers, reflecting a shortage of organs. Several factors may contribute to the low number of organ donations. The German transplant legislation only accepts donation after brain death (not cardiac death), whereas advances in neurosurgery and a more frequently requested "palliative care" approach render fewer patients suitable as potential donors. The legislation further requires the active consent of the donor or first-degree relatives before donation. Ongoing debates within the German transplant field address the optimal management of patients with alcoholic liver cirrhosis, hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), and cholangiocarcinoma and measures to increase living donor transplantations. As a result of irregularities at mainly 4 German transplant centers that were exposed in 2012, guiding principles updated by the German authorities have since implemented strict rules (including internal and external auditing, the 8-eyes principle, mandatory repeated testing for alcohol consumption) to prohibit any manipulations in organ allocation. In conclusion, we will summarize important aspects on the management of LT in Germany, discuss legal and organizational aspects, and highlight challenges mainly related to the relative lack of organ donations, increasing numbers of extended criteria donors, and the peculiarities of the recipient patients. Liver Transplantation 22 1136-1142 2016 AASLD. PMID:27082951

  18. Themes of liver transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starzl, Thomas E; Fung, John J

    2010-06-01

    Liver transplantation was the product of five interlocking themes. These began in 1958-1959 with canine studies of then theoretical hepatotrophic molecules in portal venous blood (Theme I) and with the contemporaneous parallel development of liver and multivisceral transplant models (Theme II). Further Theme I investigations showed that insulin was the principal, although not the only, portal hepatotrophic factor. In addition to resolving long-standing controversies about the pathophysiology of portacaval shunt, the hepatotrophic studies blazed new trails in the regulation of liver size, function, and regeneration. They also targeted inborn metabolic errors (e.g., familial hyperlipoproteinemia) whose palliation by portal diversion presaged definitive correction with liver replacement. Clinical use of the Theme II transplant models depended on multiple drug immunosuppression (Theme III, Immunology), guided by an empirical algorithm of pattern recognition and therapeutic response. Successful liver replacement was first accomplished in 1967 with azathioprine, prednisone, and antilymphoid globulin. With this regimen, the world's longest surviving liver recipient is now 40 years postoperative. Incremental improvements in survival outcome occurred (Theme IV) when azathioprine was replaced by cyclosporine (1979), which was replaced in turn by tacrolimus (1989). However, the biologic meaning of alloengraftment remained enigmatic until multilineage donor leukocyte microchimerism was discovered in 1992 in long-surviving organ recipients. Seminal mechanisms were then identified (clonal exhaustion-deletion and immune ignorance) that linked organ engraftment and the acquired tolerance of bone marrow transplantation and eventually clarified the relationship of transplantation immunology to the immunology of infections, neoplasms, and autoimmune disorders. With this insight, better strategies of immunosuppression have evolved. As liver and other kinds of organ transplantation

  19. Liver transplantation in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Rosa, Gloria; Fondevila, Constantino; Navasa, Miquel

    2016-09-01

    Liver transplantation (LT) activity started in Spain in 1984 and has exceeded 23,700 interventions, with more than 1000 transplants performed yearly. Every hospital needs official authorization to perform a LT, which implies the obligation to register all patients on the national waiting list. The Spanish National Transplant Organization (ONT) provides essential support for organ procurement, allocation, and management of the waiting list at a national level. Liver allocation is center-oriented as all available organs are referred to the ONT for the whole country. The allocation rules for LT are made according to disease severity after consensus among professionals from every transplant center and ratified by representatives of the regional health authorities. Authorization and location/distribution of transplant centers are regulated by the country (Spain) and by the different regions according to the Real Decreto 1723/2012. For a total population of 47,850,795 inhabitants, there are 24 centers for LT for adults (1 team/2 million people) and 5 for LT for children (1 team/9.5 million people). Nonbiliary cirrhosis, particularly alcohol- and hepatitis C virus-related cirrhosis (60%), and tumors, mainly hepatocellular carcinoma (19%), are the most common indications for LT in Spain. Unusual causes of LT include metabolic diseases like Wilson's disease, familial amyloid polyneuropathy and hyperoxaluria type I, polycystic kidney and liver disease, and some tumors (epithelioid hemangioendothelioma and neuroendocrine tumors). Important efforts are now being undertaken to improve the quality and transplantability of extended criteria livers, in particular those arising from DCD, which represent the greatest opportunity to expand the donor pool. These efforts have to be addressed to adapt the organ preservation procedures, be it through the application of regional perfusion in situ or the use of machine perfusion preservation ex situ. Liver Transplantation 22 1259-1264 2016

  20. Racial and Ethnic Differences in Mortality in Children Awaiting Heart Transplant in the United States

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, Tajinder P; Gauvreau, Kimberlee; Thiagarajan, Ravi; Blume, Elizabeth D.; Piercey, Gary; Almond, Christopher

    2009-01-01

    Racial differences in outcomes are well known in children after heart transplant (HT) but not in children awaiting HT. We assessed racial and ethnic differences in wait-list mortality in children < 18 years old listed for primary HT in the United States during 1999–2006 using multivariable Cox models. Of 3299 listed children, 58% were listed as white, 20% as black, 16% as Hispanic, 3% as Asian and 3% were defined as “Other”. Mortality on the wait-list was 14%, 19%, 21%, 17% and 27% for white,...

  1. [Running through the liver transplantation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grecu, F

    2003-01-01

    An overview of the organization, timing and developing of the liver transplantation is difficult to be made in terms of multiple sequences and a great variety of activities during the developing of such activity. A well-trained transplant team must carry out the potential donor, the liver grafts manipulation and the graft receptor, in the condition of a competitive medical system. A summary presentation, showing the essentials of the proceedings in liver transplantation could be assimilated as a guide of multidisciplinary sequences that leads to the completion of the liver grafting. The common feature of all that means the liver transplantation and generally in organ transplantation is the performance and exactingness.

  2. Orthotopic liver transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liver transplantation is a life-saving therapeutic option in many patients with end-stage liver disease. Experience with MR imaging of the liver allograft is limited, however. This paper reports twenty-one patients who had undergone liver transplantation studied with MR imaging. A perivascular collar surrounding the portal vein was demonstrated in all 21 patients. In 17 of them, the collar was also observed around peripheral portal branches. The collar had low signal intensity (SI) on T1-weighted and high SI on multiecho images. Perihilar fluid collections that were connected to the perivascular collar were demonstrated in four patients. Laboratory analysis of the aspirated fluid demonstrated liver lymph in three patients. The perivascular collar appears to be related to impaired lymph drainage from surgical interruption of lymphatic vessels. In contrast to recent CT reports, however, a perivascular collar around peripheral portal venous branches does not appear to be a sign specific for rejection, since only two of the 17 patients with a peripheral perivascular collar had rejection at the time of MR imaging. The authors conclude that perivascular collar is a normal finding in hepatic transplants. It should not be mistaken for dilated bile ducts. A perivascular collar around peripheral portal branches does not correlate to rejection

  3. Medical Aspects of Liver Transplantation

    OpenAIRE

    Van Thiel, David H.; Schade, Robert R.; GAVALER, JUDITH S.; Shaw, Byers W.; Iwatsuki, Shunzaburo; Starzl, Thomas E.

    1984-01-01

    The methods used to screen prospective candidates for orthotopic liver transplantation are described. Both the indication and the contraindications for the procedure are discussed. The timing of the procedure during the course of an individual candidate’s liver disease is also discussed. Additionally, the institutional requirements of a liver transplant center are identified. Finally, the problems experienced by a liver transplant patient and his physician during the postoperative period are ...

  4. Liver resection in liver transplant recipients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gabriele Marangoni; Walid Faraj; Harsheet Sethi; Mohamed Rela; Paolo Muiesan; Nigel Heaton

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Liver resection after liver transplantation is a relatively uncommon procedure. Indications for liver resection include hepatic artery thrombosis (HAT), non-anastomotic biliary stricture (ischemic biliary lesions), liver abscess, liver trauma and recurrence of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Organ shortage and lower survival after re-transplantation have encouraged us to make attempts at graft salvage. METHODS: Eleven resections at a mean of 59 months after liver transplantation were made over 18 years. Indications for liver resection included HCC recurrence in 4 patients, ischemic cholangiopathy, segmental HAT, sepsis and infected hematoma in 2 each, and ischemic segmentⅣafter split liver transplantation in 1. RESULTS: There was no perioperative mortality. Morbidity included one re-laparotomy for small bowel perforation, one bile leak treated conservatively, one right subphrenic collection, one wound infection and 5 episodes of Gram-negative sepsis. One patient underwent re-transplantation 4 months after resection for chronic rejection. There were 3 deaths, two from HCC recurrence and one from post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder. The overall mean follow-up after resection was 48 months. CONCLUSIONS: Liver resection in liver transplant recipients is safe, and has good outcome in selected patients and avoids re-transplantation in the majority of patients. Recipients with recurrent HCC in graft may beneift from resection, but cure is uncommon.

  5. Liver Transplantation in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bittencourt, Paulo Lisboa; Farias, Alberto Queiroz; Couto, Claudia Alves

    2016-09-01

    Over 1700 liver transplantations (LTs) are performed annually in Brazil. In absolute terms, the country performs more LT surgeries than anywhere else in Latin America and is third worldwide. However, due to its increasing population and inadequate donor organ supply, the country averages 5-10 LTs per million population, far lower than required. There is a marked heterogeneity in organ donation and LT activity throughout the country. Access to LT in the underprivileged North, Midwest, and Northeast regions of Brazil is scarce. Major challenges for the future of LT in Brazil will be to increase organ donation and access to LT. The reduction of those geographical disparities in donation, organ procurement, and LT due to political and financial constraints is of utmost importance. Liver Transplantation 22 1254-1258 2016 AASLD. PMID:27228568

  6. Living-donor liver transplantation: current perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobritto, Steven; Kato, Tomoaki; Emond, Jean

    2012-11-01

    The disparity between the number of available deceased liver donors and the number of patients awaiting transplantation continues to be an ongoing issue predisposing to death on the liver transplant waiting list. Deceased donor shortage strategies including the use of extended donor-criteria deceased donor grafts, split liver transplants, and organs harvested after cardiac death have fallen short of organ demand. Efforts to raise donor awareness are ongoing, but the course has been arduous to date. Living donor transplantation is a means to access an unlimited donor organ supply and offers potential advantages to deceased donation. Donor safety remains paramount demanding improvements and innovations in both the donor and recipient operations to ensure superior outcomes. The specialty operation is best preformed at centers with specific expertise and shuttling of select patients to these centers supported by third party payers is critical. Training future surgeons at centers with this specific experience can help disseminate this technology to improve local availability. Ongoing research in immunosuppression minimization, withdrawal and tolerance induction may make living donation a desired first-line operation rather than a necessary albeit less-desirable option. This chapter summarizes the progress of living liver donation and its potential applications. PMID:23397534

  7. Split-liver transplantation : An underused resource in liver transplantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rogiers, Xavier; Sieders, Egbert

    2008-01-01

    Split-liver transplantation is an efficient tool to increase the number of liver grafts available for transplantation. More than 15 years after its introduction only the classical splitting technique has reached broad application. Consequently children are benefiting most from this possibility. Full

  8. Liver transplantation in the UK

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SR Bramhall; E Minford; B Gunson; JAC Buckels

    2001-01-01

    Introduction: This paper provides a review of the practice of liver transplantation with the main emphasis on UK practice and indications for transplantation.``Referral and Assessment: This section reviews the process of referral and assessment of patients with liver disease with reference to UK practice.``Donor Organs: The practice of brainstem death and cadaveric organ donation is peculiar to individual countries and rates of donation and potential areas of improvement are addressed.``Operative Technique: The technical innovations that have led to liver transplantation becoming a semi-elective procedure are reviewed. Specific emphasis is made to the role of liver reduction and splitting and living related liver transplantation and how this impacts on UK practice are reviewed. The complications of liver transplantation are also reviewed with reference to our own unit.``Imrnunosuppression: The evolution of immunosuppression and its impact on liver transplantation are reviewed with some reference to future protocols.Retransplantation: The role of retransplantation is reviewed.``Outcome and Survival: The results of liver transplantation are reviewed with specific emphasis on our own experience.``Future: The future of liver transplantation is addressed.``

  9. Alcoholic Liver Disease and Liver Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallegos-Orozco, Juan F; Charlton, Michael R

    2016-08-01

    Excessive alcohol use is a common health care problem worldwide and is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Alcoholic liver disease represents the second most frequent indication for liver transplantation in North America and Europe. The pretransplant evaluation of patients with alcoholic liver disease should aim at identifying those at high risk for posttransplant relapse of alcohol use disorder, as return to excessive drinking can be deleterious to graft and patient survival. Carefully selected patients with alcoholic liver disease, including those with severe alcoholic hepatitis, will have similar short-term and long-term outcomes when compared with other indications for liver transplantation. PMID:27373614

  10. Interventional Radiology in Liver Transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiology is a key specialty within a liver transplant program. Interventional techniques not only contribute to graft and recipient survival but also allow appropriate patient selection and ensure that recipients with severe liver decompensation, hepatocellular carcinoma or portal hypertension are transplanted with the best chance of prolonged survival. Equally inappropriate selection for these techniques may adversely affect survival. Liver transplantation is a dynamic field of innovative surgical techniques with a requirement for interventional radiology to parallel these developments. This paper reviews the current practice within a major European center for adult and pediatric transplantation

  11. Liver transplantation in Jehovah's witnesses

    OpenAIRE

    DETRY, Olivier; DE ROOVER, Arnaud; Delwaide, Jean; KABA, Abdourahmane; Joris, Jean; Damas, Pierre; Lamy, Maurice; Honore, Pierre; Meurisse, Michel

    2001-01-01

    For religious reasons, Jehovah's witnesses refuse transfusion of blood products (red cells, platelets, plasma), but may accept organ transplantation. The authors developed a multidisciplinary protocol for liver transplantation in Jehovah's witnesses. In a 6-year period, nine Jehovah's witness patients were listed for liver transplantation. They received preoperative erythropoietin therapy, with iron and folic acid that allowed significant haematocrit increase. Two patients underwent partial s...

  12. Liver transplantation at Mount Sinai.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim-Schluger, L; Florman, S S; Gondolesi, G; Emre, S; Sheiner, P A; Fishbein, T M; Schwartz, M E; Miller, C M

    2000-01-01

    Nearly 2000 liver transplants have been performed over the past 12 years at Mount Sinai, with a recent exponential growth in living donor surgeries. Living-donor liver transplantation has emerged as an important option for our patients with end-stage liver disease. We are only beginning to recognize fully the advantages that 'scheduled' liver transplantation can offer. In this era of severe cadaver organ shortages, living donation offers patients the option of liver replacement in a timely fashion, before life-threatening complications of hepatic failure and/or carcinoma progression prohibit transplantation. The next era of transplantation at Mount Sinai will bring significant increases in the number of transplants performed with living donors, with projections of over 50% of the total transplants each year expected to involve living donations. We are committed to offering this option while recognizing that donor safety remains paramount and cannot be overemphasized. Proper donor and recipient selection, as well as surgical experience are imperative to success with this technically demanding procedure. Recurrent disease after transplantation, particularly with hepatitis C, remains a challenge clinically. Further investigations into the pathogenesis of the rapid progression of recurrent hepatitis C need to be addressed. Living donor transplantation could be an important option for these patients and would allow timely transplantation and the potential for improved survival in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma. PMID:11512318

  13. Liver transplantation for Wilson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schilsky, Michael L

    2014-05-01

    Although Wilsons's disease (WD) may be treated with copper chelation (to remove copper) or zinc salts (to prevent absorption) to alleviate or prevent symptom development in most patients, there are WD patients for whom medical therapy is inadequate and survival would be unlikely without liver transplantation. Liver transplantation is indicated for the ∼5% of WD patients with acute liver failure as the first presentation of disease, most commonly in the second decade of life, or those who present with end-stage liver disease and severe hepatic insufficiency, most commonly in the third and fourth decades. Liver transplantation restores normal biliary copper excretion (thereby preventing disease recurrence) and promotes removal of copper from extrahepatic sites. Outcomes of liver transplantation for WD are excellent, including both cadaveric and living donors.

  14. Liver transplant in HCC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio I. Duque Duque

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available

     

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC is the fifth most common cancer worldwide, and is the leading cause of death in cirrhotic individuals. 80% of HCC develops in cirrhotic patients. Unfortunately only 20 to 25% of patients can have a radical treatment, like resection, liver transplantation (LT, or percutaneous ablation. The other 75 to 80% of patients can only have supportive care.

    There is no evidence to establish the optimal first-line treatment for early HCC (one tumor of 5 cm or less, in patients with well preserved liver function, because of the lack of RCTs comparing these radical therapies. Resection and transplantation achieve a very good outcome (5-year survival of 60 to 70% but with very different recurrence rates (60-70% and 15-20% respectively. Due to the lack of liver donors, these two techniques compete as the first option for treatment in cirrhotic patients with well preserved liver function and only one tumor.

    There is no question in considering LT as the best option for patients with liver function impairment (Child-Pugh B-C patients and early tumors (less than three tumors of less than three centimeters. LT provides cure of both the neoplastic disease and the underlying liver disease. There are a few numbers of reports that shows a decrease in the overall survival, from an intention-to treat perspective as a result of the impact of dropouts from the waiting list because of death or progression. These numbers can be as high as 20%. Adjuvant therapies during the waiting period, although intuitively effective, have not had an impact on the outcome. Expansion of the accepted Milan criteria (single nodule <5 cm, two or three nodules <3 cm has been advocated by some groups

  15. Liver transplantation in polycystic liver disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krohn, Paul S; Hillingsø, Jens; Kirkegaard, Preben

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Polycystic liver disease (PLD) is a rare, hereditary, benign disorder. Hepatic failure is uncommon and symptoms are caused by mass effects leading to abdominal distension and pain. Liver transplantation (LTX) offers fully curative treatment, but there is still some controversy about...... whether it is a relevant modality considering the absence of liver failure, relative organ shortage, perioperative risks and lifelong immunosuppression. The purpose of this study was to review our experience of LTX for PLD and to compare the survival with the overall survival of patients who underwent LTX....../kidney transplantation. One patient had undergone kidney transplantation 10 years earlier. RESULTS: Median follow-up was 55 months. One patient who underwent combined transplantation died after 5.4 months because of multiorgan failure after re-LTX, and one patient, with well-functioning grafts, died of lymphoma after 7...

  16. Acute liver failure and liver transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akamatsu, Nobuhisa; Sugawara, Yasuhiko; Kokudo, Norihiro

    2013-08-01

    Acute liver failure (ALF) is defined by the presence of coagulopathy (International Normalized Ratio ≥ 1.5) and hepatic encephalopathy due to severe liver damage in patients without pre-existing liver disease. Although the mortality due to ALF without liver transplantation is over 80%, the survival rates of patients have considerably improved with the advent of liver transplantation, up to 60% to 90% in the last two decades. Recent large studies in Western countries reported 1, 5, and 10-year patient survival rates after liver transplantation for ALF of approximately 80%, 70%, and 65%, respectively. Living donor liver transplantation (LDLT), which has mainly evolved in Asian countries where organ availability from deceased donors is extremely scarce, has also improved the survival rate of ALF patients in these regions. According to recent reports, the overall survival rate of adult ALF patients who underwent LDLT ranges from 60% to 90%. Although there is still controversy regarding the graft type, optimal graft volume, and ethical issues, LDLT has become an established treatment option for ALF in areas where the use of deceased donor organs is severely restricted. PMID:25343108

  17. Lipids in liver transplant recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hüsing, Anna; Kabar, Iyad; Schmidt, Hartmut H

    2016-03-28

    Hyperlipidemia is very common after liver transplantation and can be observed in up to 71% of patients. The etiology of lipid disorders in these patients is multifactorial, with different lipid profiles observed depending on the immunosuppressive agents administered and the presence of additional risk factors, such as obesity, diabetes mellitus and nutrition. Due to recent improvements in survival of liver transplant recipients, the prevention of cardiovascular events has become more important, especially as approximately 64% of liver transplant recipients present with an increased risk of cardiovascular events. Management of dyslipidemia and of other modifiable cardiovascular risk factors, such as hypertension, diabetes and smoking, has therefore become essential in these patients. Treatment of hyperlipidemia after liver transplantation consists of life style modification, modifying the dose or type of immunosuppressive agents and use of lipid lowering agents. At the start of administration of lipid lowering medications, it is important to monitor drug-drug interactions, especially between lipid lowering agents and immunosuppressive drugs. Furthermore, as combinations of various lipid lowering drugs can lead to severe side effects, such as myopathies and rhabdomyolysis, these combinations should therefore be avoided. To our knowledge, there are no current guidelines targeting the management of lipid metabolism disorders in liver transplant recipients. This paper therefore recommends an approach of managing lipid abnormalities occurring after liver transplantation. PMID:27022213

  18. Multimodality postoperative imaging of liver transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liver transplantation is the only effective and definitive treatment for patients with end-stage liver disease. The shortage of cadaveric livers has lead to the increasing use of split-liver transplantation and living-donor liver transplantation, but the expansion of the donor pool has increased the risk for postoperative vascular and biliary complications. Early recognition of the imaging appearances of the various postoperative complications of liver transplantation is crucial for both graft and patient survival. This review describes the imaging findings of normal and abnormal transplanted liver parenchyma and of vascular and biliary post-transplantation complications. (orig.)

  19. Hepatitis C and liver transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Robert S.

    2005-08-01

    Liver transplantation is a life-saving therapy to correct liver failure, portal hypertension and hepatocellular carcinoma arising from hepatitis C infection. But despite the successful use of living donors and improvements in immunosuppression and antiviral therapy, organ demand continues to outstrip supply and recurrent hepatitis C with accelerated progression to cirrhosis of the graft is a frequent cause of graft loss and the need for retransplantation. Appropriate selection of candidates and timing of transplantation, coupled with better pre- and post-transplant antiviral therapy, are needed to improve outcomes.

  20. Liver transplantation for nontransplant physicians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amany AbdelMaqsod Sholkamy

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Many of the nontransplant physicians who manage hepatic patients (internists and hepatologists keep asking about liver transplantation. The purpose of this article is to highlight important topics a nontransplant colleague may require in his practice. There are many topics in this respect; however, three most important topics need to be highlighted; those are; the time of referral to transplantation, the indications and contraindications and the metabolic issues regarding a transplanted patient. Still, there are no clear guidelines for the management of many of the metabolic issues regarding liver transplanted patients. And this why, collaborative efforts of transplant and nontransplant physicians are needed to conduct multicenter, long term randomized controlled trials and proper follow up programs.

  1. Excellent survival after liver transplantation for isolated polycystic liver disease : an European Liver Transplant Registry study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Keimpema, Loes; Nevens, Frederik; Adam, Rene; Porte, Robert J.; Fikatas, Panagiotis; Becker, Thomas; Kirkegaard, Preben; Metselaar, Herold J.; Drenth, Joost P. H.

    2011-01-01

    Patients with end-stage isolated polycystic liver disease (PCLD) suffer from incapacitating symptoms because of very large liver volumes. Liver transplantation (LT) is the only curative option. This study assesses the feasibility of LT in PCLD. We used the European Liver Transplant Registry (ELTR) d

  2. Excellent survival after liver transplantation for isolated polycystic liver disease: an European Liver Transplant Registry study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Keimpema, Loes; Nevens, Frederik; Adam, René;

    2011-01-01

    Patients with end-stage isolated polycystic liver disease (PCLD) suffer from incapacitating symptoms because of very large liver volumes. Liver transplantation (LT) is the only curative option. This study assesses the feasibility of LT in PCLD. We used the European Liver Transplant Registry (ELTR...

  3. Excellent survival after liver transplantation for isolated polycystic liver disease: an European Liver Transplant Registry study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keimpema, L. van; Nevens, F.; Adam, R.; Porte, R.J.; Fikatas, P.; Becker, T.; Kirkegaard, P.; Metselaar, H.J.; Drenth, J.P.H.

    2011-01-01

    Patients with end-stage isolated polycystic liver disease (PCLD) suffer from incapacitating symptoms because of very large liver volumes. Liver transplantation (LT) is the only curative option. This study assesses the feasibility of LT in PCLD. We used the European Liver Transplant Registry (ELTR) d

  4. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy and liver transplantation

    OpenAIRE

    Muralidharan, Vijayaragavan; Christophi, Chris

    2007-01-01

    Liver transplantation is the treatment of choice for end stage liver disease and is often used for primary liver malignancies. The main limitation of its wider application is the availability of suitable donor organs. The use of marginal donor organs, split-liver transplantation and living-related liver transplantation techniques contribute to increase the donor pool. However, the use of these techniques is associated with a higher risk of post transplantation organ dysfunction, predominantly...

  5. Living donor liver transplantation for patients with alcoholic liver disease

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Yo-Han; Hwang, Shin; Ahn, Chul-Soo; Kim, Ki-Hun; Moon, Deok-Bog; Ha, Tae-Yong; Song, Gi-Won; Jung, Dong-Hwan; Park, Gil-Chun; Namgoong, Jung-Man; Park, Hyung-Woo; Park, Chun-Soo; Kang, Sung-Hwa; Jung, Bo-Hyeon; Lee, Sung-Gyu

    2013-01-01

    Backgrounds/Aims Since most transplantation studies for alcoholic liver disease (ALD) were performed on deceased donor liver transplantation, little was known following living donor liver transplantation (LDLT). Methods The clinical outcome of 18 ALD patients who underwent LDLT from Febraury 1997 to December 2004 in a large-volume liver transplantation center was assessed retrospectively. Results The model for end-stage liver disease score was 23±11, and mean pretransplant abstinence period w...

  6. The history of liver transplantation in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moray, Gökhan; Arslan, Gülnaz; Haberal, Mehmet

    2014-03-01

    Liver transplantation is the definitive treatment for end-stage liver diseases. The first successful liver transplant was performed in the United States by Thomas Starzl in 1967. The first successful solid organ transplant in Turkey was a living-related kidney transplant performed by Dr. Haberal in 1975. After much effort by Dr. Haberal, the Turkish parliament enacted a law about organ transplantation in 1979. After clinical and experimental studies, the first liver transplant in Turkey was performed by Dr. Haberal in 1988. The first successful partial living-donor liver transplant in children in Turkey was performed by the same team on March 15, 1990. On April 24, 1990, the first living-donor liver transplant was performed on a child in Turkey using a left lateral segment by Dr. Haberal and coworkers. On May 16, 1992, Dr. Haberal performed a simultaneous living-donor liver and kidney transplantation to an adult from the same donor. There currently are 30 liver transplantation centers in Turkey. According to data from the Ministry of Health, there presently are 2065 patients in Turkey who are waiting for a liver transplantation. From January 2002 to June 2013, there were 6091 liver transplants performed in Turkey (4020 living-donor [66% ] and 2071 deceased donor liver transplants [34% ]). From January 2011 to June 2013, there were 2514 patients who had liver transplants in Turkey, and 437 patients (17%) died. The number of liver transplants per year in Turkey reached 1000 transplants in 2012 and more than 1150 transplants in 2013 (15.1/million/y). Therefore, Turkey has one of the highest volumes of liver transplantation per population worldwide, with 90% survival within 1 year after transplantation.

  7. Liver transplantation: immunosuppression and oncology

    OpenAIRE

    Rodríguez-Perálvarez, Manuel; de la Mata, Manuel; Burroughs, Andrew K.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review Long-term survival of liver transplant recipients is threatened by increased rates of de-novo malignancy and recurrence of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), both events tightly related to immunosuppression. Recent findings There is accumulating evidence linking increased exposure to immunosuppressants and carcinogenesis, particularly concerning calcineurin inhibitors (CNIs), azathioprine and antilymphocyte agents. A recent study including 219 HCC transplanted patients showed t...

  8. Primary sclerosing cholangitis and liver transplantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klompmaker, IJ; Haagsma, EB; Jansen, PLM; Slooff, MJH

    1996-01-01

    Primary sclerosing cholangitis is a chronic disease, strongly associated with ulcerative colitis and cholangiocarcinoma. Ulcerative colitis itself does not influence the liver transplant results. However; intensified screening after liver transplantation for carcinoma of the colon may be necessary.

  9. Transplantation in autoimmune liver diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Marcus Mottershead; James Neuberger

    2008-01-01

    Liver transplantation remains an effective treatment for those with end-stage disease and with intractable liver-related symptoms.The shortage of organs for transplantation has resulted in the need for rationing.A variety of approaches to selection and allocation have been developed and vary from country to country.The shortage of donors has meant that new approaches have to be adopted to make maximal use of the available organs;these include splitting grafts,use of extended criteria livers,livers from nonheart-beating donors and from living donors.Post transplantation, most patients will need life-long immunosuppression,although a small proportion can have immunosuppression successfully withdrawn.Newer immunosuppressive drugs and different strategies may allow a more targeted approach with a reduction in sideeffects and so improve the patient and graft survival.For autoimmune diseases, transplantation is associated with significant improvement in the quality and length of life.Disease may recur after transplantation and may affect patient and graft survival.

  10. Getting a New Liver: Facts about Liver Transplants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... surgeons, transplant nurse coordinators, financial counselor, and the psychosocial team. If the committee decides a transplant is ... committee will recommend against liver transplant as the risks are likely to outweigh the benefits. The Waiting ...

  11. Periop erative treatment of liver transplantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shengbin Zhang ∗; Rui Liu; Shipeng Song; Weiqing Wang; Jin Zhao; Xiaoshi Dong

    2014-01-01

    A case of liver transplantation in the department of general surgery of the third affiliated hospital of Inner Mongolia medical school was collected and analyzed on the basis of diagnosis, physical examination and treatment. Liver transplantation was very complicated, accompanied by various postoperative complications. So this paper aims to share experience of perioperative management of liver transplantation among physicians.

  12. When Your Child Needs a Liver Transplant

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... enough liver tissue to have a normal-sized liver within a few weeks of transplantation. Determining When Surgery Is Needed If your doctor thinks your child might benefit from a liver transplant, you'll be referred to a transplant ...

  13. Ventilatory strategy during liver transplantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Henrik; Grocott, Hilary P; Niemann, Mads;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: As measured by near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS), cerebral oxygenation (ScO2) may be reduced by hyperventilation in the anhepatic phase of liver transplantation surgery (LTx). Conversely, the brain may be subjected to hyperperfusion during reperfusion of the grafted liver. We...... liver, ScO2 increased by 5.5% (3.8-7.3%), EtCO2 by 0.7 kPa (0.5-0.8 kPa), and VE by 0.6 L/min (0.3-0.9 L/min; all P

  14. Outcomes of Chinese Patients with End-stage Pulmonary Disease while Awaiting Lung Transplantation: A Single-center Study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wen-Xin He; Yu-Ling Yang; Yan Xia; Nan Song; Ming Liu; Peng Zhang; Jiang Fan

    2016-01-01

    Background: The factors affecting the outcome of patients referred for lung transplantation (LTx) still have not been investigated extensively.The aim of this study was to characterize the patient outcomes and identify the prognostic factors for death while awaiting the LTx.Methods: From January 2003 to November 2013, the clinical data of 103 patients with end-stage lung disease that had been referred for LTx to Department of Thoracic Surgery, Shanghai Pulmonary Hospital were analyzed retrospectively.The relationship between predictors and survival was evaluated using the Kaplan-Meier method and the Cox proportional hazards model.Results: Twenty-five patients (24.3%) died while awaiting the LTx.Fifty patients (48.5%) underwent LTx, and 28 patients (27.2%) were still on the waitlist.Compared to the candidates with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) had a higher mortality while awaiting the LTx (40.0% vs.12.3%, P =0.003).Patients requiring mechanical ventilation (MV) had a higher mortality while waiting than others (50.0% vs.20.2%, P =0.038).Two variables, using MV and IPF but not COPD as primary disease, emerged as significant independent risk factors for death on the waitlist (hazard ratio [HR] =56.048, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 3.935-798.263, P =0.003 and HR =14.859, 95% CI: 2.695-81.932, P =0.002, respectively).Conclusion: The type of end-stage lung disease, pulmonary hypertension, and MV may be distinctive prognostic factors for death while awaiting the LTx.

  15. Liver transplantation: history, outcomes and perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meirelles Júnior, Roberto Ferreira; Salvalaggio, Paolo; Rezende, Marcelo Bruno de; Evangelista, Andréia Silva; Guardia, Bianca Della; Matielo, Celso Eduardo Lourenço; Neves, Douglas Bastos; Pandullo, Fernando Luis; Felga, Guilherme Eduardo Gonçalves; Alves, Jefferson André da Silva; Curvelo, Lilian Amorim; Diaz, Luiz Gustavo Guedes; Rusi, Marcela Balbo; Viveiros, Marcelo de Melo; Almeida, Marcio Dias de; Pedroso, Pamella Tung; Rocco, Rodrigo Andrey; Meira Filho, Sérgio Paiva

    2015-01-01

    In 1958 Francis Moore described the orthotopic liver transplantation technique in dogs. In 1963, Starzl et al. performed the first liver transplantation. In the first five liver transplantations no patient survived more than 23 days. In 1967, stimulated by Calne who used antilymphocytic serum, Starzl began a successful series of liver transplantation. Until 1977, 200 liver transplantations were performed in the world. In that period, technical problems were overcome. Roy Calne, in 1979, used the first time cyclosporine in two patients who had undergone liver transplantation. In 1989, Starzl et al. reported a series of 1,179 consecutives patients who underwent liver transplantation and reported a survival rate between one and five years of 73% and 64%, respectively. Finally, in 1990, Starzl et al. reported successful use of tacrolimus in patents undergoing liver transplantation and who had rejection despite receiving conventional immunosuppressive treatment. Liver Transplantation Program was initiated at Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein in 1990 and so far over 1,400 transplants have been done. In 2013, 102 deceased donors liver transplantations were performed. The main indications for transplantation were hepatocellular carcinoma (38%), hepatitis C virus (33.3%) and alcohol liver cirrhosis (19.6%). Of these, 36% of patients who underwent transplantation showed biological MELD score > 30. Patient and graft survival in the first year was, 82.4% and 74.8%, respectively. A major challenge in liver transplantation field is the insufficient number of donors compared with the growing demand of transplant candidates. Thus, we emphasize that appropriated donor/receptor selection, allocation and organ preservation topics should contribute to improve the number and outcomes in liver transplantation. PMID:25993082

  16. Liver transplantation for Wilson disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catana, Andreea M; Medici, Valentina

    2012-01-27

    The aim of this paper is to review the current status of liver transplantation (LT) for Wilson disease (WD), focusing on indications and controversies, especially in patients with neuropsychiatric disease, and on identification of acute liver failure (ALF) cases related to WD. LT remains the treatment of choice for patients with ALF, as initial presentation of WD or when anti-copper agents are stopped, and for patients with chronic liver disease progressed to cirrhosis, unresponsive to chelating medications or not timely treated with copper chelating agents. The indication for LT in WD remains highly debated in patients with progressive neurological deterioration and failure to improve with appropriate medical treatment. In case of Wilsonian ALF, early identification is key as mortality is 100% without emergency LT. As many of the copper metabolism parameters are believed to be less reliable in ALF, simple biochemical tests have been proposed for diagnosis of acute WD with good sensitivity and specificity. LT corrects copper metabolism and complications resulting from WD with excellent 1 and 5 year survival. Living related liver transplantation represents an alternative to deceased donor LT with excellent long-term survival, without disease recurrence. Future options may include hepatocyte transplantation and gene therapy. Although both of these have shown promising results in animal models of WD, prospective human studies are much needed to demonstrate their long-term beneficial effects and their potential to replace the need for medical therapy and LT in patients with WD. PMID:22312450

  17. Liver transplantation for polycystic liver and massive hepatomegaly

    OpenAIRE

    Gruttadauria, Salvatore; Di Francesco, Fabrizio; Gridelli, Bruno

    2010-01-01

    Liver tumor and other benign liver diseases such as polycystic liver disease can cause massive hepatomegaly and may represent an indication for liver transplantation (LT) in some instances. In this setting, LT can be extremely difficult and challenging due to its decreased mobility and access to vascular supply. Benefit from either a right or a left partial liver resection during the transplant procedure has been advocated to safely accomplish the hepatectomy of the native liver. Although we ...

  18. End-of-life care in a COPD patient awaiting lung transplantation: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schols Jos MGA

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract COPD is nowadays the main indication for lung transplantation. In appropriately selected patients with end stage COPD, lung transplantation may improve quality of life and prognosis of survival. However, patients with end stage COPD may die while waiting for lung transplantation. Palliative care is important to address the needs of patients with end stage COPD. This case report shows that in a patient with end stage COPD listed for lung transplantation offering palliative care and curative-restorative care concurrently may be problematic. If the requirements to remain a transplantation candidate need to be met, the possibilities for palliative care may be limited. Discussing the possibilities of palliative care and the patient's treatment preferences is necessary to prevent that end-of-life care needs of COPD patients dying while listed for lung transplantation are not optimally addressed. The patient's end-of-life care preferences may ask for a clear distinction between the period in which palliative and curative-restorative care are offered concurrently and the end-of-life care period. This may be necessary to allow a patient to spend the last stage of life according to his or her wishes, even when this implicates that lung transplantation is not possible anymore and the patient will die because of end stage COPD.

  19. Pediatric liver transplantation in 31 consecutive children

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHEN Zhong-yang; WANG Zi-fa; ZHU Zhi-jun; ZANG Yun-jin; ZHENG Hong; DENG Yong-lin; PAN Cheng; CHEN Xin-guo

    2008-01-01

    Background Although liver transplantation has become a standard therapy for end-stage liver diseases, the experience of pediatric liver transplantation is limited in China. In this article we report our experience in pediatric liver transplantation, and summarize its characters in their indications, surgical techniques, and postoperative managements. Methods Thirty-one children (≤18 years old) underwent liver transplantation in our centers. The mean age at transplantation was 12.4 years old (ranged from 5 months to 18 years) with 7 children being less than 4 years of age at transplantation. The most common diagnosis of patients who underwent liver transplantation were biliary atresia, Wilson's disease, primary biliary cirrhosis, glycogen storage disease, hepatoblastoma, urea cycle defects, fulminant hepatic failure, etc. The surgical procedures included 12 standard (without venovenous bypass), 6 pigyback, 6 reduced-size, 3 split, 3 living donor liver transplantation, and 1 Domino liver transplantation. The triple-drug (FK506, steroid, and mycophenolate mofetil) immunosuppressive regimen was used in most of patients. Patients were followed up for a mean of 21.8 months. Results Five of the 31 patients died during perioperative time; mortality rate was 16.1%. The reasons of death were infections, primary non-function, heart failure, and hypovolemic shock. Postoperative complications in 10 patients included biliary leakage, acute rejection, abdominal infection, hepatitis B virus (HBV) or hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, and pulmonary infection. Overall patient cumulative survival rate at 1-, 3-, and 5-year was 78.1%, 62.6%, 62.6%, respectively.Conclusions The most common indications of pediatric liver transplantation were congenital end-stage liver diseases. According to patients' age and body weight, standard, piggyback, reduced-size, split, or living donor liver transplantation should be performed. Pediatric liver transplantation especially requires higher

  20. [Liver transplants from living donors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogiers, X; Danninger, F; Malagó, M; Knoefel, W T; Gundlach, M; Bassas, A; Burdelski, M; Broelsch, C E

    1996-03-01

    In this article the authors discuss the advantages of Living Related Liver Transplantation (LRLT), criteria for the selection of donors and the standard operation technique. Among a total of 241 liver transplantation (LTx), 42 LRLT were performed at the University of Hamburg between October 1, 1991 and December 19, 1994. The body weight of recipients for LRLT ranged from 4,6 to 39 kg, with 64,2% having less than 10 kg. The volume of the donor left lateral liver lobe ranged from 100 cc to 350 cc. The average one year survival rate among electively operated patients-status 3-4 (UNOS 1995 classification) was 86.7%, two year survival rate 83.3%. The main advantages of LRLT are consired the following: 1. Absence of mortality on the waiting list, 2. Optimal timing of the transplantation (elective procedure, patient in a good condition), 3. Excellent organ (no primary non function), 4. A possible immunologic advantage, 5. Relief of the waiting list for cadaveric organs, 6. Psychological benefit for the family, 7. Cost effectiveness. Potential candidates for living donation with more than one cardiovascular risk factors were excluded. Social and psychological reasons leading to rejection of candidates were as follows: unstable family structure, expected professional or financial difficulties after living donation or withdrawal from consent. LRLT gives parents of a child with TLD a chance to avoid the risk of death on the waiting list or primary non function of the graft. LRLT has therefore established an important place in pediatric liver transplantation. PMID:8768973

  1. Bile acids for liver-transplanted patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poropat, Goran; Giljaca, Vanja; Stimac, Davor;

    2010-01-01

    Liver transplantation has become a widely accepted form of treatment for numerous end-stage liver diseases. Bile acids may decrease allograft rejection after liver transplantation by changing the expression of major histocompatibility complex class molecules in bile duct epithelium and central vein...

  2. Bile acids for liver-transplanted patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Weikeng; Gluud, C

    2005-01-01

    Liver transplantation has become a widely accepted form of treatment for numerous end-stage liver diseases. Bile acids may decrease the degree of allograft rejection after liver transplantation by changing the expression of major histocompatibility complex class molecules in bile duct epithelium...

  3. Doctors Look for Liver Transplant Alternatives

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    @@ Robert Pennington, a 19 - year - old boy, suffers from liver disease. His name was put on a transplant waiting list, but no livers were available. Then Dr. Marlon Levy, a transplant surgeon at Baylor University Medical Center, offered an alternative: a procedure2 using a dead pig's liver. But not a liver from an ordinary pig, "They're genetically modified3 to try to prevent a reaction between the human blood and the pig liver" , Levy said.

  4. Liver transplantation:Yesterday,today and tomorrow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Osman Abbasoglu

    2008-01-01

    With the advances in technical skills,management of postoperative complications and improvements in immunosuppressive drugs,liver transplantation is the standard treatment for many patients with chronic liver disease.Today,shortage of donor organs seems to be the major limiting factor for the application of liver transplantation.This review focuses on five issues that are challenging to clinical practice of liver transplantation and relevant to gastroenterologists.These include living donor liver transplantation,recurrent viral hepatitis,non-heart-beating donors,hepatocellular carcinoma,and ABO incompatible livertransplantation.Living donor and non-heart beating donor transplantations were initiated as a solution to increase the donor organ pool and it is expected that there will be an increase in the number of these donors.Recurrent hepatitis C and hepatocellular carcinoma following liver transplantation are among major problems and ongoing research in these diseases may lead to better outcomes in these recipients.

  5. Technetium-99m galactosyl-neoglycoalbumin (Tc-NGA) liver imaging: Application in liver transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tc-NGA is a new liver imaging agent which binds to hepatic binding protein [HBP], a hepatocyte-specific membrane receptor. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the potential role of Tc-NGA imaging in liver transplantation. The molar Tc-NGA dose was standardized according to patient weight (0.7 nmole/kg). After a 30 minute dynamic imaging study (5 mCi, IV), kinetic analysis of time activity data (heart, liver), provided values for receptor concentration, [HBP], and hepatic blood flow, Q. Eleven Tc-NGA imaging studies were performed in transplant candidates and 22 studies were performed in seven transplant recipients. Preservation damage was manifested by diffuse patchiness in tracer distribution which resolved during the following two weeks. Histologically proven, localized hepatic infarcts were demonstrated in three recipients. Lobar infarction was demonstrated in one recipient. Hepatic regeneration was later demonstrated in this patient after hepatic lobectomy. Hepatic blood flow was markedly decreased in the early postoperative period, but improved with time. Increased [HBP] was demonstrated with regeneration. Markedly decreased [HBP] and Q were obtained in several candidates who died awaiting transplantation. These studies indicate that TC-NGA liver imaging provides a valuable new means for: (1) evaluation of preservation damage, (2) early demonstration of hepatic infarction, (3) evaluation of hepatic rejection, and (4) selection of patients for hepatic transplantation

  6. A struggle to survive: the experience of awaiting pediatric heart transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anthony, Samantha J; Nicholas, David B; Regehr, Cheryl; West, Lori J

    2014-12-01

    Despite the establishment of heart transplantation as a life-saving therapy for children and adolescents, little research has focused on the biopsychosocial impact of the transplant process. Few studies have captured the subjective experiences of young heart transplant recipients. This study examined the experiences and perspectives of children and adolescents during the pretransplant phase of waiting for a donor organ. Grounded theory methods guided data collection and analysis. A total of 27 adolescents participated in semistructured qualitative interviews. Findings illuminate the waiting period for pediatric heart transplantation to be a pervasive experience, with consequent impact on physical, psychological, and social well-being. Participants described various biopsychosocial processes and experiences that occurred during this time, with data analysis yielding themes reflecting notions of "struggling to survive," including physical limitations, lethargy, social isolation, discomfort with physical appearance, and academic issues. This research identifies the pretransplant experience as a period framed within a text of debilitation and negative self-perceptions related to health and well-being. Supporting children and their families as they navigate this complex and uncertain journey is merited, and results invite further interventional development and research.

  7. Transoesophageal echocardiography during liver transplantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lesley; De; Pietri; Federico; Mocchegiani; Chiara; Leuzzi; Roberto; Montalti; Marco; Vivarelli; Vanni; Agnoletti

    2015-01-01

    Liver transplantation(LT) has become the standard of care for patients with end stage liver disease. The allocation of organs, which prioritizes the sickest patients, has made the management of liver trans-plant candidates more complex both as regards their comorbidities and their higher risk of perioperative complications. Patients undergoing LT frequently display considerable physiological changes during the pro-cedures as a result of both the disease process and the surgery. Transoesophageal echocardiography(TEE), which visualizes dynamic cardiac function and overall contractility, has become essential for perioperative LT management and can optimize the anaesthetic management of these highly complex patients. More-over, TEE can provide useful information on volume status and the adequacy of therapeutic interventions and can diagnose early intraoperative complications, such as the embolization of large vessels or development of pulmonary hypertension. In this review, directed at clinicians who manage TEE during LT, we show why the procedure merits a place in challenging anaesthetic environment and how it can provide essential information in the perioperative management of compromised patients undergoing this very complex surgical procedure.

  8. Ex Vivo Costimulatory Blockade to Generate Regulatory T Cells From Patients Awaiting Kidney Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guinan, E C; Cole, G A; Wylie, W H; Kelner, R H; Janec, K J; Yuan, H; Oppatt, J; Brennan, L L; Turka, L A; Markmann, J

    2016-07-01

    Short-term outcomes of kidney transplantation have improved dramatically, but chronic rejection and regimen-related toxicity continue to compromise overall patient outcomes. Development of regulatory T cells (Tregs) as a means to decrease alloresponsiveness and limit the need for pharmacologic immunosuppression is an active area of preclinical and clinical investigation. Nevertheless, the immunomodulatory effects of end-stage renal disease on the efficacy of various strategies to generate and expand recipient Tregs for kidney transplantation are incompletely characterized. In this study, we show that Tregs can be successfully generated from either freshly isolated or previously cryopreserved uremic recipient (responder) and healthy donor (stimulator) peripheral blood mononuclear cells using the strategy of ex vivo costimulatory blockade with belatacept during mixed lymphocyte culture. Moreover, these Tregs maintain a CD3(+) CD4(+) CD25(+) CD127(lo) surface phenotype, high levels of intracellular FOXP3 and significant demethylation of the FOXP3 Treg-specific demethylation region on allorestimulation with donor stimulator cells. These data support evaluation of this simple, brief Treg production strategy in clinical trials of mismatched kidney transplantation. PMID:26790369

  9. Heterotopic Auxiliary Liver Transplantation with Portal Flow

    OpenAIRE

    Laureano Lorente; Jaime Arias; Maria Angeles Aller; José Ignacio Ispizua; José Rodriguez; Hipólito Durán

    1990-01-01

    One of the causes of auxiliary liver transplantation failure is the inter-liver competition between the host liver and the graft for the hepatotrophic factors of the portal blood. We have developed an experimental model of heterotopic partial (30%) liver isotransplant using Wistar rats so as to study this competition. Splenoportography and dissection demonstrate the existence of collateral circulation. The collaterals at 90 days post-transplant (PT) consisted of veins from the portal vein to ...

  10. Pneumatosis intestinalis after liver transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate clinical features and CT findings of pneumatois intestinalis in recipients following liver transplantation and to determine whether certain clinical and CT findings enable differentiation of indolent pneumatois intestinalis from fulminant cases. Materials and methods: This retrospective study was approved by our institutional review board, with informed consent waived. Among 2080 liver transplantation recipients at our institution between January 1998 and April 2008, 22 (1%) presented with pneumatois intestinalis on postoperative follow-up. Patients were divided into recovery and mortality groups, and then clinical features and CT findings were compared between two groups. Results: Although indolent pneumatois intestinalis more frequently presented incidentally (61%) after 2 weeks of surgery (89%) than fulminant pneumatois intestinalis (0, 50%), there were no statistically significant differences (P = .14, .09). Right colon was affected in the recovery group without exception (n = 18,100%), and all four patients (100%) in mortality group showed small bowel involvement (P < .05). Caliber changes of superior mesenteric artery and vein in mortality group were significantly greater (49.6%, 67.0%) than those in recovery group (101.7%, 99.0%) (P < .05, respectively). Pneumatois intestinalis in mortality group more commonly accompanied portomesenteric air-embolism, visceral infarction, hemorrhagic ascites, and small bowel ileus than indolent counterpart (P < .05, respectively). Conclusion: Typical indolent pneumatois intestinalis is found incidentally later than 2 weeks of liver transplantation surgery, but there is some overlap between indolent and fulminant pneumatois intestinalis in terms of onset and mode of presentation. Among CT findings, grave signs are small bowel involvement, caliber changes in mesenteric vessels, portomesenteric air-embolism, visceral infarction, hemorrhagic ascites, and small bowel ileus.

  11. U.S. Hospitals with Liver Transplant Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a Transplant Center > Transplant Centers US Hospitals with Liver Transplant Centers State Center Name or Code Click on ... Adjustment Models (Transplant Programs) Risk-Adjustment Models (OPO) Transplant Report Timeline OPO Report ... of Information Act | Privacy Policy | Disclaimers | Accessibility

  12. Human herpesvirus-6 infection in liver transplantation

    OpenAIRE

    HÀrmÀ, Maiju

    2007-01-01

    Rejection and infections are the two most common complications after liver transplantation. Human herpesvirus-6 (HHV-6) belongs to the betaherpesviruses, together with its close relatives cytomegalovirus (CMV) and human herpesvirus-7 (HHV-7). The impact of CMV in liver transplantation is well characterized, but the roles of the other two betaherpesviruses have been acknowledged only recently. Although, HHV-6 reactivation after transplantation is usually asymptomatic, the virus may infect the ...

  13. Liver transplantation for polycystic liver and massive hepatomegaly

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Salvatore; Gruttadauria; Fabrizio; di; Francesco; Bruno; Gridelli

    2010-01-01

    Liver tumor and other benign liver diseases such as polycystic liver disease can cause massive hepatomegaly and may represent an indication for liver transplantation(LT)in some instances.In this setting,LT can be extremely difficult and challenging due to its decreased mobility and access to vascular supply.Benefit from either a right or a left partial liver resection during the transplant procedure has been advocated to safely accomplish the hepatectomy of the native liver.Although we believe that partial ...

  14. Transplantable liver production plan: "Yamaton"--liver project, Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hata, Toshiyuki; Uemoto, Shinji; Kobayashi, Eiji

    2013-10-01

    Organ grafts developed in the xenogeneic pig scaffold are expected to resolve most issues of donor safety and ethical concerns about living-donor liver transplantation in Japan. We have been working on so-called "Yamaton" projects to develop transplantable organs using genetically engineered pigs. Our goal is to produce chimeric livers with human parenchyma in such pigs. The Yamaton-Liver project demonstrated the proof of concept by showing that rat-mouse chimeric livers could develop in mice and be successfully transplanted into syngeneic or allogeneic rats. Under conventional immunosuppression, the transplanted livers showed long-term function and protection against rejection. Because chimeric liver grafts have xenogeneic components, additional strategies, such as humanization of pig genes, induction of hematopoietic chimeras in donors, and replacement of pig endothelial cells with human ones, might be required in clinical use. Our projects still need to overcome various hurdles but can bring huge benefits to patients in the future. PMID:23896578

  15. Liver transplantation in mitochondrial respiratory chain disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sokal, EM; Sokol, R; Cormier, [No Value; Lacaille, F; McKiernan, P; Van Spronsen, FJ; Bernard, O; Saudubray, JM

    1999-01-01

    Mitochondrial respiratory chain disease may lead to neonatal or late onset liver failure, requiring liver transplantation. In rare cases, the disease is restricted to the liver and the patient is cured after surgery. More frequently, other organs are simultaneously involved and neuromuscular or othe

  16. Successful twin pregnancy after orthotopic liver transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coelho Júlio Cezar Uili

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available AIM: Report of a case of successful twin pregnancy following liver transplantation. PATIENT AND METHOD: A 42-year-old nulliparous-woman was subjected to an orthotopic liver transplantation due to Budd-Chiari syndrome. Sixteen months after the transplantation, an ultrasonography revealed twin pregnancy. Her prenatal course was uneventful, except for mild arterial hypertension. The immunosuppressive agents used during pregnancy were cyclosporine and prednisone. RESULT: The patient gave birth to two healthy girls at 37 weeks of gestation. The patient's postpartum course was uneventful with normal liver and renal function tests. CONCLUSION: Following successful pregnancy, women may become pregnant and give birth to normal children, including twins

  17. Liver transplantation and artificial liver support in fulminant hepatic failure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Feng Zhu; Gui-Hua Chen; Xiao-Shun He; Min-Qiang Lu; Guo-Dong Wang; Chang-Jie Cai,; Yang Yang and; Jie-Fu Huang

    2001-01-01

    @@ INTRODUCTIONFulminant hepatic failure(FHF)is a severe disease with devastating consequences;the incidence is high in China.Before the availability of liver transplantation,the mortality rate was more than 80%[1,2].The advent of liver transplantation revolutionized the outcome of FHF[3,4].However,many patients were unwilling to accept liver transplantation until very late,hence most of them died because of donor shortage and urgency of the disease[5-7],To overcome he problems,we performed orthotopic liver transplantation(OLT)in combination with artificial liver support(ALS) in the treatment of FHF in the past 2 years with satisfactory results.Our experience was reported below.

  18. Two-stage liver transplantation: an effective procedure in urgent conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montalti, Roberto; Busani, Stefano; Masetti, Michele; Girardis, Massimo; Di Benedetto, Fabrizio; Begliomini, Bruno; Rompianesi, Gianluca; Rinaldi, Laura; Ballarin, Roberto; Pasetto, Alberto; Gerunda, Giorgio E

    2010-01-01

    Temporary portocaval shunt and total hepatectomy is a technique used in the presence of toxic liver syndrome because of fulminant hepatic failure, hepatic trauma, primary non-function (PNF), and eclampsia. We performed this technique on four patients. An indication for anhepatic state was severe hemodynamic instability in three of them. Etiologies of these three patients were as follows: PNF after liver transplantation, ischemic hepatitis after right hepatic artery embolization, and massive reperfusion syndrome during a liver transplantation. In the fourth patient, during the liver transplantation when hepatic artery was ligated, a kidney carcinoma in the donor graft was discovered. We decided to complete the hepatectomy and to construct a temporary portocaval shunt. Mean anhepatic phases were 19 h and 15 min. All patients survived the two-stage liver transplantation procedure without major complications. Our cases demonstrated that temporary portocaval shunt while awaiting urgent liver transplantation could be an effective "bridge" in selected patients who develop toxic liver syndrome; however, a short time between portocaval shunt and transplantation and careful intensive care managements are mandatory.

  19. Liver biopsy in evaluation of complications following liver transplantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ying-Yan Yu; Jun Ji; Guang-Wen Zhou; Bai-Yong Shen; Hao Chen; Ji-Qi Yan; Cheng-Hong Peng; Hong-Wei Li

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To analyze the role of liver biopsies in differential diagnosis after liver transplantation.METHODS: A total of 50 biopsies from 27 patients with liver dysfunction out of 52 liver transplantation cases were included. Biopsies were obtained 0-330 d after operation,in which, 44 were fine needle biopsies, another 6 were wedge biopsies during surgery. All tissues were stained with haemotoxylin-eosin. Histochemical or immunohistochemical stain was done.RESULTS: The rate of acute rejection in detected cases and total transplantation cases was 48.2% and 25.0%,chronic rejection rate in detected cases and total transplantation cases was 14.8% and 7.7%, preservation-reperfusion injury in detected cases and total transplantation cases was 25.9% and 13.5%, hepatic artery thrombosis rate in detected cases and total transplantation cases was 11.1% and 5.8%,intrahepatic biliary injury rate in detected cases and total transplantation cases was 7.4 % and 3.8%, CMV infection rate in detected cases and total transplantation cases was 3.7% and 1.9%, hepatitis B recurrence rate in detected cases and total transplantation cases was 3.7% and 1.9%, the ratio of suspicious drug-induced hepatic injury in detected cases and total transplantation cases was 11.1% and 5.8%.CONCLUSION: Acute rejection and preservation-reperfusion injury are the major factors in early liver dysfunction after liver transplantation. Hepatic artery thrombosis and prolonged cold preservation may result in intrahepatic biliary injury. Acute rejection and viral infection may involve in the pathogenesis of chronic rejection. Since there are no specific lesions in drug-induced hepatic injury, the diagnosis must closely combine clinical history and rule out other possible complications.

  20. Liver transplantation and risk of bleeding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groenland, Theo H. N.; Porte, Robert J.; Metselaar, Herold J.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose of review Blood loss in orthotopic liver transplantation has declined during the past decade. Recent papers addressed this issue and emphasized its importance, because there is a significant correlation between intraoperative blood transfusion requirements and postoperative morbidity. This r

  1. Sirolimusasprimaryimmunosuppressantfor calcineurininhibitor-relatedrenalinsufifciency after liver transplantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yong-Jiu Yang; Da-Zhi Chen; Li-Xin Li; Qiang He; Hua Fan; Zhong-Kui Jin; Ren Lang; Jian-Tao Kou; Peng Li; De-Hong Xie

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND:Calcineurin inhibitor-related renal toxicity affects patient and graft survival in transplant recipients. This study aimed to determine whether sirolimus is effective and safe in treating renal insufifciency related to tacrolimus after liver transplantation. METHODS: Tacrolimus for primary immunosuppression was used in 16 patients after liver transplantation. Patients with a creatinine level higher than 132.6μmol/L were eligible for conversion to sirolimus. Simultaneously, the dose of tacrolimus was decreased to half. Blood urea nitrogen, creatinine, tacrolimus level, liver function and rejection episodes were monitored dynamically. RESULTS:All patients showed improvement of renal function after conversion to sirolimus. Blood creatinine level was reduced from 146.8±92.4 to 105.3±71.3μmol/L (P CONCLUSION:Sirolimus can be safely used in liver transplant recipients suffering from tacrolimus-related renal insufifciency.

  2. Living donor liver transplantation in the USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Peter T W; Testa, Giuliano

    2016-04-01

    Living donor liver transplant (LDLT) accounts for a small volume of the transplants in the USA. Due to the current liver allocation system based on the model for end-stage liver disease (MELD), LDLT has a unique role in providing life-saving transplantation for patients with low MELD scores and significant complications from portal hypertension, as well as select patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Donor safety is paramount and has been a topic of much discussion in the transplant community as well as the general media. The donor risk appears to be low overall, with a favorable long-term quality of life. The latest trend has been a gradual shift from right-lobe grafts to left-lobe grafts to reduce donor risk, provided that the left lobe can provide adequate liver volume for the recipient. PMID:27115007

  3. Historical perspective of living donor liver transplantation

    OpenAIRE

    Chan, See Ching; Fan, Sheung Tat

    2008-01-01

    Living donor liver transplantation (LDLT) has gone through its formative years and established as a legitimate treatment when a deceased donor liver graft is not timely or simply not available at all. Nevertheless, LDLT is characterized by its technical complexity and ethical controversy. These are the consequences of a single organ having to serve two subjects, the donor and the recipient, instantaneously. The transplant community has a common ground on assuring donor safety while achieving ...

  4. Cardiac evaluation of liver transplant candidates

    OpenAIRE

    Mandell, Mercedes Susan; Lindenfeld, JoAnn; Tsou, Mei-Yung; Zimmerman, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Physicians previously thought that heart disease was rare in patients with end stage liver disease. However, recent evidence shows that the prevalence of ischemic heart disease and cardiomyopathy is increased in transplant candidates compared to most other surgical candidates. Investigators estimate that up to 26% of all liver transplant candidates have at least one critical coronary artery stenosis and that at least half of these patients will die perioperatively of cardiac complications. Ca...

  5. FUNGAL INFECTIONS IN LIVER TRANSPLANT RECIPIENTS1

    OpenAIRE

    Wajszczuk, Charles P.; Dummer, J. Stephen; Ho, Monto; Van Thiel, David H.; Starzl, Thomas E.; Iwatsuki, Shunzaburo; Shaw, Byers

    1985-01-01

    Sixty-two adults who underwent orthotopic liver transplantations between February 1981 and June 1983 were followed for a mean of 170 days after the operation. Twenty-six patients developed 30 episodes of significant fungal infection. Candida species and Torulopsis glabrata were responsible for 22 episodes and Aspergillus species for 6. Most fungal infections occurred in the first month after transplantation. In the first 8 weeks after transplantation, death occurred in 69% (18/26) of patients...

  6. Postoperative doppler evaluation of liver transplants

    OpenAIRE

    Rupan Sanyal; Zarzour, Jessica G.; Ganeshan, Dakshina M; Puneet Bhargava; Chandana G Lall; Mark D Little

    2014-01-01

    Doppler ultrasound plays an important role in the postoperative management of hepatic transplantation, by enabling early detection and treatment of various vascular complications. This article describes the normal Doppler findings following liver transplantation and reviews the imaging appearances of various vascular complications associated with it. The article also discusses transient waveform abnormalities, often seen on a post-transplant Doppler examination, and the importance of differen...

  7. Graft loss after pediatric liver transplantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sieders, E; Peeters, PMJG; TenVergert, EM; de Jong, KP; Porte, RJ; Zwaveling, JH; Bijleveld, CMA; Gouw, ASH; Slooff, MJH

    2002-01-01

    Objective To describe the epidemiology and causes of graft loss after pediatric liver transplantation and to identify risk factors. Summary Background Data Graft failure after transplantation remains an important problem. It results in patient death or retransplantation, resulting in lower survival

  8. Central nervous system complications after liver transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jeong-Min; Jung, Keun-Hwa; Lee, Soon-Tae; Chu, Kon; Roh, Jae-Kyu

    2015-08-01

    We investigated the diversity of central nervous system complications after liver transplantation in terms of clinical manifestations and temporal course. Liver transplantation is a lifesaving option for end stage liver disease patients but post-transplantation neurologic complications can hamper recovery. Between 1 January 2001 and 31 December 2010, patients who had undergone liver transplantation at a single tertiary university hospital were included. We reviewed their medical records and brain imaging data and classified central nervous system complications into four categories including vascular, metabolic, infectious and neoplastic. The onset of central nervous system complications was grouped into five post-transplantation intervals including acute (within 1 month), early subacute (1-3 months), late subacute (3-12 months), chronic (1-3 years), and long-term (after 3 years). During follow-up, 65 of 791 patients (8.2%) experienced central nervous system complications, with 30 occurring within 1 month after transplantation. Vascular etiology was the most common (27 patients; 41.5%), followed by metabolic (23; 35.4%), infectious (nine patients; 13.8%), and neoplastic (six patients). Metabolic encephalopathy with altered consciousness was the most common etiology during the acute period, followed by vascular disorders. An initial focal neurologic deficit was detected in vascular and neoplastic complications, whereas metabolic and infectious etiologies presented with non-focal symptoms. Our study shows that the etiology of central nervous system complications after liver transplantation changes over time, and initial symptoms can help to predict etiology.

  9. Liver Transplantation: Past Accomplishments and Future Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William J Wall

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Liver transplantation has evolved from a rare and risky operation of questionable therapeutic value to the preferred treatment for an extensive list of end-stage liver diseases. Superior immunosuppression (cyclosporine, and improvements in surgery and anesthesia brought liver grafting to its current level of success. Nearly 60,000 liver transplants have been performed, and survival rates are very good; however liver grafting faces serious immediate and long term challenges, mainly due to the widening gap between donor supply and recipient demand. Increasing numbers of sick candidates, recurrent disease (especially hepatitis C and recidivism rates after transplantation for alcoholic cirrhosis will force increasingly difficult decisions on candidate selection and priority listing of potential recipients. Although xenotransplantation may be the ultimate solution, it has its own specific set of biological and societal challenges - the full extent of which should be revealed in the next several years.

  10. Orthotopic liver transplantation for giant liver haemangioma: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, Undine G; Bucher, Julian N; Schoenberg, Markus B; Benzing, Christian; Schmelzle, Moritz; Gradistanac, Tanja; Strocka, Steffen; Hau, Hans-Michael; Bartels, Michael

    2015-12-24

    In liver haemangiomas, the risk of complication rises with increasing size, and treatment can be obligatory. Here we present a case of a 46-year-old female who suffered from a giant haemangioma causing severe portal hypertension and vena cava compression, leading to therapy refractory ascites, hyponatremia and venostasis-associated thrombosis with pulmonary embolism. The patients did not experience tumour rupture or consumptive coagulopathy. Surgical resection was impossible because of steatosis of the non-affected liver. Orthotopic liver transplantation was identified as the only treatment option. The patient's renal function remained stable even though progressive morbidity and organ allocation were improbable according to the patient's lab model for end-stage liver disease (labMELD) score. Therefore, non-standard exception status was approved by the European organ allocation network "Eurotransplant". The patient underwent successful orthotopic liver transplantation 16 mo after admission to our centre. Our case report indicates the underrepresentation of morbidity associated with refractory ascites in the labMELD-based transplant allocation system, and it indicates the necessity of promptly applying for non-standard exception status to enable transplantation in patients with a severe clinical condition but low labMELD score. Our case highlights the fact that liver transplantation should be considered early in patients with non-resectable, symptomatic benign liver tumours. PMID:26722664

  11. [Living donor liver transplantation in adults].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, U P; Neuhaus, P; Schmeding, M

    2010-09-01

    The worldwide shortage of adequate donor organs implies that living donor liver transplantation represents a valuable alternative to cadaveric transplantation. In addition to the complex surgical procedure the correct identification of eligible donors and recipients plays a decisive role in living donor liver transplantation. Donor safety must be of ultimate priority and overrules all other aspects involved. In contrast to the slightly receding numbers in Europe and North America, in recent years Asian programs have enjoyed constantly increasing living donor activity. The experience of the past 15 years has clearly demonstrated that technical challenges of both bile duct anastomosis and venous outflow of the graft significantly influence postoperative outcome. While short-term in-hospital morbidity remains increased compared to cadaveric transplantation, long-term survival of both graft and patient are comparable or even better than in deceased donor transplantation. Especially for patients expecting long waiting times under the MELD allocation system, living donor liver transplantation offers an excellent therapeutic alternative. Expanding the so-called "Milan criteria" for HCC patients with the option for living donor liver transplantation is currently being controversially debated.

  12. Approaches to optimize immunosuppression after liver transplantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ö. Tapirdamaz (Özlem)

    2014-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Since its advent 51 years ago, liver transplantation (LT) has progressed from an experimental treatment to an accepted therapeutic modality that has reversed the gloomy prognosis of end stage liver disease. The great success of LT is for the major part due to calcineuri

  13. Liver transplantation in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Polak, Wojciech G.; Soyama, Akihiko; Slooff, Maarten J. H.

    2008-01-01

    Liver transplantation has a definitive place in the treatment of patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in a cirrhotic liver. Patients with a tumor load within the Milan criteria have excellent survival comparable to survival in patients with benign indications. When tumor load exceeds the Mil

  14. Primary Liver Transplantation for Autoimmune Hepatitis : A Comparative Analysis of the European Liver Transplant Registry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schramm, Christoph; Bubenheim, Michael; Adam, Rene; Karam, Vincent; Buckels, John; O'Grady, John G.; Jamieson, Neville; Pollard, Stephen; Neuhaus, Peter; Manns, Michael M.; Porte, Robert; Castaing, Denis; Paul, Andreas; Traynor, Oscar; Garden, James; Friman, Styrbjorn; Ericzon, Bo-Goran; Fischer, Lutz; Vitko, Stefan; Krawczyk, Marek; Metselaar, Herold J.; Foss, Aksel; Kilic, Murat; Rolles, Keith; Burra, Patrizia; Rogiers, Xavier; Lohse, Ansgar W.

    2010-01-01

    The principal aim of this study was to compare the probability of and potential risk factors for death and graft loss after primary adult and pediatric liver transplantation in patients undergoing transplantation for autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) to those in patients undergoing transplantation for prim

  15. Perioperative Care of the Liver Transplant Patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keegan, Mark T; Kramer, David J

    2016-07-01

    With the evolution of surgical and anesthetic techniques, liver transplantation has become "routine," allowing for modifications of practice to decrease perioperative complications and costs. There is debate over the necessity for intensive care unit admission for patients with satisfactory preoperative status and a smooth intraoperative course. Postoperative care is made easier when the liver graft performs optimally. Assessment of graft function, vigilance for complications after the major surgical insult, and optimization of multiple systems affected by liver disease are essential aspects of postoperative care. The intensivist plays a vital role in an integrated multidisciplinary transplant team. PMID:27339683

  16. Management of HCV Infection and Liver Transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available A major challenge facing liver transplant recipients and their physicians is recurrence of hepatitis C virus infection following otherwise technically successful liver transplantation. Recurrent infection leads to diminished graft and patient survival. Although a number or predictors of severe recurrence have been identified, no definitive strategy has been developed to prevent recurrence. Generally the tempo of hepatitis C recurrence is gauged by serial liver biopsies with the decision to intervene with antiviral therapy based on local philosophy and expertise. Treating hepatitis C in this population has a number of major challenges including diminished patient tolerance for side-effects as well as managing the patient's immunesuppression. However sustained viral responses are possible with the potential to reduce the impact of recurrent hepatitis on the graft. However recurrent hepatitis C virus infection will remain the most frequent form of recurrent disease in liver transplant programs for the foreseeable future.

  17. Overview of immunosuppression in liver transplantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Anjana A Pillai; Josh Levitsky

    2009-01-01

    Continued advances in surgical techniques and immunosuppressive therapy have allowed liver transplantation to become an extremely successful treatment option for patients with end-stage liver disease. Beginning with the revolutionary discovery of cyclosporine in the 1970s, immunosuppressive regimens have evolved greatly and current statistics confirm one-year graft survival rates in excess of 80%. Immunosuppressive regimens include calcineurin inhibitors, anti-metabolites, mTOR inhibitors, steroids and antibody-based therapies. These agents target different sites in the T cell activation cascade, usually by inhibiting T cell activation or via T cell depletion. They are used as induction therapy in the immediate periand post-operative period, as long-term maintenance medications to preserve graft function and as salvage therapy for acute rejection in liver transplant recipients. This review will focus on existing immunosuppressive agents for liver transplantation and consider newer medications on the horizon.

  18. INTRATHYMIC INOCULATION OF LIVER SPECIFIC ANTIGEN ALLEVIATES LIVER TRANSPLANT REJECTION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    贾长库; 郑树森; 朱有法

    2004-01-01

    Objective To study the effects of liver specific antigen (LSA) on liver allotransplantation rejection. Methods Orthotopic liver transplantation was performed in this study. Group Ⅰ: syngeneic control (Wistar-to-Wistar); Group Ⅱ: acute rejection (SD-to-Wistar). Group Ⅲ: thymic inoculation of SD rat LSA day 7 before transplantation. The observation of general condition and survival time, rejection grades and the NF-κB activity of splenocytes were used to analyze severity of acute rejection and immune state of animals in different groups. Results The general condition of group Ⅰ was fair post transplantation with no sign of rejection. All recipients of group Ⅱ died within days 9 to 13 post transplantation with median survival time of 10.7 ±1.37 days. As for group Ⅲ, 5 out of 6 recipients survived for a long period with remarkably better general condition than that of group Ⅱ. Its rejection grades were significantly lower than group Ⅱ (P< 0.05).NF-κB activity was only detected in group Ⅰ between days 5 and 7 after transplantation, whereas high activity of NF-κB was detected at all points in group Ⅱ and low NF-κB activity was detected in group Ⅲ which was significantly lower than that of group Ⅱ (P < 0.05). Conclusions LSA is an important transplantation antigen directly involved in the immunorejection of liver transplantation. Intrathymic inoculation of LSA can alleviate the rejection of liver allotransplantation,grafts survive for a period of time thereby, allowing a novel way to liver transplantation immunotolerance.

  19. The value of living donor liver transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaoli; Gong, Junhua; Gong, JianPing

    2012-12-31

    Living donor liver transplantation (LDLT) is a very successful procedure that develops liver resources in case of worldwide shortages. As the technology has developed so much in the past 2 decades, LDLT has the same good prognosis as DDLT. However, LDLT still has lots of ethical & technical problems. It causes great psychiatric, physical and psychosocial harm to donors. Also, it has some negative effects on society by providing a platform for organ trade. Therefore, there is much controversy about the social value of LDLT. After review of recent papers, we find much progress can be made in inspiring the public to become organ donors and creating donation model new to improve the consent rate for solid organ donation from deceased donors. That is the key strategy for increasing the liver supply. With this serious shortage of organs, liver donor transplantation still has its advantages, but we should not place all our hopes on LDLT to increase the liver supply. We all need to try our best to increase donor awareness and promote organ donor registration--when cadaver organs could meet the needs for liver transplantation, living donor liver transplants would not be necessary. PMID:23274332

  20. Acute liver failure due to Varicella zoster virus infection after lung transplantation: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verleden, G M; Vos, R; Van Raemdonck, D E; Laleman, W; Vanaudenaerde, B M

    2012-06-01

    Most adults are Varicella zoster virus (VZV)-positive at the age of 20 years. Some, however, remain antibody-negative and may develop primary chicken pox during adulthood. We report a patient with Williams-Campbell syndrome who underwent double-lung transplantation while being VZV-negative. One year after the successful procedure, he was admitted with fulminant hepatic failure and some cutaneous vesicles in his face. Despite a rapid diagnosis of VZV infection and treatment with acyclovir, his situation deteriorated within 24 hours and while awaiting an urgent liver transplantation, he developed multiple organ failure and died. PMID:22664036

  1. Trasplante hepático Liver transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. I. Herrero

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available El trasplante hepático es una opción terapéutica eficaz para las enfermedades hepáticas terminales. Las principales indicaciones del trasplante hepático son la cirrosis hepática, los tumores hepáticos (fundamentalmente, el hepatocarcinoma y la insuficiencia hepática aguda grave. Con el paso de los años, las contraindicaciones absolutas para el trasplante se han ido reduciendo. La técnica quirúrgica también ha sufrido modificaciones. Los resultados del trasplante hepático han mejorado, de forma que la supervivencia al año del trasplante está próxima al 90% y a los cinco años, un 80% de los pacientes trasplantados siguen vivos.Liver transplantation is an efficient therapeutic option for terminal hepatic diseases. The principal indications of liver transplantation are hepatic cirrhosis, hepatic tumours (mainly, hepotocellular carcinoma and acute liver failure. Over the years, the absolute contraindications for a transplant have lessened. Surgical techniques have also undergone changes. The results of liver transplant have improved so that survival one year after the transplant is close to 90% and after five years some 80% of transplanted patients continue to live.

  2. Human herpesvirus 6 infections after liver transplantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rima Camille Abdel Massih; Raymund R Razonable

    2009-01-01

    Human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6) infections occur in > 95% of humans. Primary infection, which occurs in early childhood as an asymptomatic illness or manifested clinically as roseola infantum, leads to a state of subclinical viral persistence and latency. Reactivation of latent HHV-6 is common after liver transplantation, possibly induced and facilitated by allograft rejection and immunosuppressive therapy. Since the vast majority of humans harbor the virus in a latent state, HHV-6 infections after liver transplantation are believed to be mostly due to endogenous reactivation or superinfection (reactivation in the transplanted organ). In a minority of cases, however,primary HHV-6 infection may occur when an HHV-6 negative individual receives a liver allograft from an HHV-6 positive donor. The vast majority of documented HHV-6 infections after liver transplantation are asymptomatic. In a minority of cases, HHV-6 has been implicated as a cause of febrile illness with rash and myelosuppression, hepatitis, pneumonitis, and encephalitis after liver transplantation. In addition,HHV-6 has been associated with a variety of indirect effects such as allograft rejection, and increased predisposition and severity of other infections including cytomegalovirus (CMV), hepatitis C virus, and opportunistic fungi. Because of the uncommon nature of the clinical illnesses directly attributed to HHV-6, there is currently no recommended HHV-6- specific approach to prevention. However, ganciclovir and valganciclovir, which are primarily intended for the prevention of CMV disease, are also active against HHV-6 and may prevent its reactivation after transplantation. The treatment of established HHV-6 disease is usually with intravenous ganciclovir, cidofovir,or foscarnet, complemented by reduction in the degree of immunosuppression. This article reviews the current advances in the pathogenesis, clinical diagnosis, and therapeutic modalities against HHV6 in the setting of liver transplantation.

  3. Split-liver transplantation – an alternative to increase the number of liver transplantation recipients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Lupaşcu

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Split-liver transplantation (SLT is a procedure in which one cadaver donor liver is divided to provide grafts for two recipients. SLT has been performed for over a decade after the initial reports from Europe and USA. Despite the potential for increased organ supply, the practice proves that SLT is seldom performed, accounting for less than 2% of total liver transplant procedures. Difficulties to widespread application of SLT include technical and logistical issues pertaining to both donors and recipients.

  4. Split-liver transplantation – an alternative to increase the number of liver transplantation recipients

    OpenAIRE

    C. Lupaşcu; Lerut, J.

    2013-01-01

    Split-liver transplantation (SLT) is a procedure in which one cadaver donor liver is divided to provide grafts for two recipients. SLT has been performed for over a decade after the initial reports from Europe and USA. Despite the potential for increased organ supply, the practice proves that SLT is seldom performed, accounting for less than 2% of total liver transplant procedures. Difficulties to widespread application of SLT include technical and logistical issues pertaining to both donors ...

  5. Advances in liver transplantation allocation systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schilsky, Michael L; Moini, Maryam

    2016-03-14

    With the growing number of patients in need of liver transplantation, there is a need for adopting new and modifying existing allocation policies that prioritize patients for liver transplantation. Policy should ensure fair allocation that is reproducible and strongly predictive of best pre and post transplant outcomes while taking into account the natural history of the potential recipients liver disease and its complications. There is wide acceptance for allocation policies based on urgency in which the sickest patients on the waiting list with the highest risk of mortality receive priority. Model for end-stage liver disease and Child-Turcotte-Pugh scoring system, the two most universally applicable systems are used in urgency-based prioritization. However, other factors must be considered to achieve optimal allocation. Factors affecting pre-transplant patient survival and the quality of the donor organ also affect outcome. The optimal system should have allocation prioritization that accounts for both urgency and transplant outcome. We reviewed past and current liver allocation systems with the aim of generating further discussion about improvement of current policies. PMID:26973389

  6. Liver Transplantation for Hepatitis C and Alcoholic Liver Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Carbone

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available End-stage liver disease due to hepatitis C (HCV and cirrhosis from alcohol (ALD are the commonest indications for liver transplantation in the western countries. Up to one third of HCV-infected transplant candidates have a history of significant alcohol intake prior to transplantation. However, there are few data available about the possible interaction between alcohol and HCV in the post-transplant setting. Patients with both HCV and alcohol are more likely to die on the waiting list than those with ALD and HCV alone. However, after transplantation, non-risk adjusted graft and patient survival of patients with HCV + ALD are comparable to those of patients with HCV cirrhosis or ALD cirrhosis alone. In the short and medium term HCV recurrence after transplant in patients with HCV + ALD cirrhosis does not seem more aggressive than that in patients with HCV cirrhosis alone. A relapse in alcohol consumption in patients with HCV + ALD cirrhosis does not have a major impact on graft survival. The evidence shows that, as is currently practiced, HCV + ALD as an appropriate indication for liver transplantation. However, these data are based on retrospective analyses with relatively short follow-up so the conclusions must be treated with caution.

  7. [Nutritional support in liver transplantation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planas, M; Farriol, M; Schwartz, S; López, J; Pérez, A; Padró, J B

    1991-01-01

    Given the malnutrition present in patients suffering from advanced hepatic illness, as well as the implications of this in the post-hepatic transplant period, a study was made of various biochemical parameters (prealbumin, retinol-bound protein, zinc, magnesium, cholesterol and amino acid pattern) as indicators of the nutritional condition of a series of 15 patients who underwent hepatic transplants and required total parenteral nutrition (TPN) during the first 10 post-transplant days. Before the transplants were carried out, all the patients studied showed a decrease in all evaluated parameters. Ten days after the transplant, and having been fed parenterally during this time, the different parameters corrected themselves, with the exception of cholesterol. TPN, administered with enrichment of branched amino acids by 35%, practically normalized the plasma amino acid pattern. PMID:1764532

  8. Arterioportal Fistula Following Liver Biopsy: Three Cases Occurring in Liver Transplant Recipients

    OpenAIRE

    Jabbour, Nicolas; Reyes, Jorge; Zajko, Albert; Nour, Bakr; Tzakis, Andreas G.; Starzl, Thomas E.; Van Thiel, David H.

    1995-01-01

    Liver biopsy is a diagnostic procedure which is utilized frequently in liver transplant recipients. Here we report the experience of the University of Pittsburgh with an unusual complication of this procedure occurring in liver transplant recipients.

  9. Liver transplantation for erythropoietic protoporphyria in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wahlin, Staffan; Stal, Per; Adam, Rene;

    2011-01-01

    Liver transplantation is an established lifesaving treatment for patients with severe protoporphyric liver disease, but disease recurrence in the graft occurs for the majority of recipients. Severe burn injuries may occur when protective light filters are not used with surgical luminaires. Motor...... neuropathy with an unclear pathogenesis is a frequent complication. We retrospectively studied 35 transplants performed for protoporphyric liver disease in 31 European patients between 1983 and 2008. Most of the patients were male (61.3%), and the mean age at the time of primary transplantation was 39 years...... (range = 9-60 years). The overall patient survival rates were 77% at 1 year and 66% at 5 and 10 years. The overall rate of disease recurrence in the graft was 69%. Forty-three percent of the patients experienced recurrence within a year, but this was often a transient finding that was associated...

  10. Quality of Life in Spanish Patients with Liver Transplant

    OpenAIRE

    Pérez-San-Gregorio, M.A; Martín-Rodríguez, A; Pérez-Bernal, J; Maldonado, M.D

    2010-01-01

    Background: Liver transplantation is the optimal method of treatment in patients with end-stage liver failure. Transplantation medicine has significantly progressed in the last time, but some psychology and psychosomatic problems still remain unsolved. Health-Related Quality of Life (HRQL) in liver transplant is considered a useful measure of evolutionary process of the illness. Objective: The authors analyzed the evolution of HRQL in pre-transplant (waiting-list patients) and post-transplant...

  11. Historical perspective of living donor liver transplantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    See Ching Chan; Sheung Tat Fan

    2008-01-01

    Living donor liver transplantation (LDLT) has gone through its formative years and established as a legitimate treatment when a deceased donor liver graft is not timely or simply not available at all. Nevertheless,LDLT is characterized by its technical complexity and ethical controversy. These are the consequences of a single organ having to serve two subjects, the donor and the recipient, instantaneously. The transplant community has a common ground on assuring donor safety while achieving predictable recipient success. With this background, a reflection of the development of LDLT may be appropriate to direct future research and patient- care efforts on this life-saving treatment alternative.

  12. Celecoxib-induced cholestatic liver failure requiring orthotopic liver transplantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ihab I El Hajj; Shahid M Malik; Hany R Alwakeel; Obaid S Shaikh; Eizaburo Sasatomi; Hossam M Kandil

    2009-01-01

    Selective cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitors are widely used due to their efficacy and good safety profile.However, recent case reports have described varying degrees of liver injuries associated with the use of COX-2 inhibitors. We report the case of a patient who developed acute cholestatic hepatitis progressing to hepatic failure requiring liver transplantation, following a 3-d course of celecoxib for treatment of generalized muscle aches and pains. The clinical presentation, the laboratory data, as well as the liver histopathology were supportive of the putative diagnosis of drug induced liver injury.

  13. Acute Renal Failure in Liver Transplant Patients: Indian Study

    OpenAIRE

    Naik, Pradeep; Premsagar, B.; Mallikarjuna, M.

    2013-01-01

    The acute renal failure is the frequent medical complication observed in liver transplant patients. The objective of this study was to determine the cause of acute renal failure in post liver transplant patients. A total of 70 patients who underwent (cadaveric 52, live 18) liver transplantation were categorized based on clinical presentation into two groups, namely hepatorenal failure (HRF, n = 29), and Hepatic failure (HF, n = 41). All the patients after the liver transplant had received tac...

  14. A successful pregnancy following liver transplantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guang-Dong Pan; Lu-Nan Yan; Bo Li; Yong Zeng; Tian-Fu Wen; Ji-Chun Zhao; Wen-Tao Wang; Jia-Yin Yang

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The safety and possibility of pregnancy following liver transplantation has been the hot topic in transplant. A case is reported with a review the of literature. METHOD: The data of a 22-year-old pregnant patient with end-stage liver disease who had undergone orthotopic liver transplantation in September 28, 2000 were analyzed retrospectively. RESULTS: After surgery, the patient was uneventfully recovered and was pregnant at the time of the 33rd month postoperation. The patient experienced a rejection on the 8th week of pregnancy and was successfully treated at this hospital. The patient was closely monitored throughout her pregnancy, and received routine antenatal care with respect to sonographic screening. Caesarean section was performed in March 18, 2004, and a health live-born infant weighing 2000 g was delivered at full-term. After the delivery, the patient was satisfactory with her health and the baby was healthy. CONCLUSION:Under close monitoring, successful pregnancy following liver transplantation is possible and safe in women with end-stage liver diseases.

  15. Early postoperative complications following liver transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Andrea R; Platz, Klaus-Peter; Kremer, Bernd

    2004-10-01

    Liver transplantation is a highly successful treatment for patients with end-stage liver disease and acute liver failure. However, serious postoperative complications can significantly compromise patient survival. Complications can be technical, medical, or immunological in nature. The risk of developing early postoperative complications is associated with the patient's preoperative condition, the quality of the donor liver, the quality of the donor and recipient procedure, initial graft function, and perioperative anaesthesiological and intensive care management. The patient's preoperative condition can include gastrointestinal bleeding, acute renal failure, a requirement for cathecholamines or mechanical ventilation, and prolonged encephalopathy for the most detrimental risk factors for developing early postoperative complications. The necessity for prolonged mechanical ventilation or the requirement for reintubation after transplantation can significantly increase the risk of developing pneumonia, sepsis, and multiple organ dysfunction. A decrease in infectious and other complications can be achieved by early postoperative enteral nutition, including the application of probiotics. PMID:15494284

  16. Current developments in pediatric liver transplantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    In 1953, the pioneer of human orthotopic liver transplantation(LT), Thomas E Starzl, was the first to attemptan orthotopic liver transplant into a 3 years old patientsuffering from biliary atresia. Thus, the first LT in humanswas attempted in a disease, which, up until today,remains the main indication for pediatric LT (pLT). Duringthe last sixty years, refinements in diagnostics and surgicaltechnique, the introduction of new immunosuppressivemedications and improvements in perioperative pediatriccare have established LT as routine procedure forchildhood acute and chronic liver failure as well asinherited liver diseases. In contrast to adult recipients,pLT differs greatly in indications for LT, allocation practice,surgical technique, immunosuppression and postoperativelife-long aftercare. Many aspects are focus ofongoing preclinical and clinical research. The presentreview gives an overview of current developments andthe clinical outcome of pLT, with a focus on alternativesto full-size deceased-donor organ transplantation.

  17. Pediatric liver transplantation%儿童肝移植

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    夏强

    2012-01-01

    Pediatric liver transplantation has long been developed in the western world.Currently,favorable outcomes after liver transplantation have been achieved in pediatric recipients and the postoperative 5-year survival rate reached 80% in western transplantation centers.In the mainland China,pediatric liver transplantation started quite recently and there is still a big gap compared with western centers.In addition,there is unbalanced development between adult and pediatric recipients due to surgical difficulties and undesirable outcomes following pediatric liver transplantation.The operation methods of pediatric liver transplantation include whole liver transplantation,reduced-size liver transplantation,living donor liver transplantation and split liver transplantation.Perioperative complications of pediatric liver transplantation mainly include portal vein thrombosis,hepatic artery thrombosis,intra-abdominal bleeding,infections,rejection,bile leakage and biliary strictures.While the long-term complications are infections,post-transplantation lymphoproliferative disorders,acute and chronic rejections caused by poor compliance with immunosuppressive therapy.Perioperative complications have been reduced recently thanks to improvement of surgical techniques.With the highly-prolonged survival period,long-term postoperative complications have been playing a significant role in recipients' survival rates.Management of long-term follow-up and compliance has been the next focus of pediatric liver transplantation.

  18. What I Need to Know about Liver Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Disease Organizations ​​ (PDF, 341 KB)​​​​​ Alternate Language URL What I need to know about Liver Transplantation Page ... my daily activities? Points to Remember Clinical Trials What is liver transplantation? Liver transplantation is surgery to ...

  19. Procalcitonin in liver transplant patients--yet another stone turned

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jens-Ulrik; Lundgren, Jens D

    2008-01-01

    Liver transplantation has been reported to initiate increases in procalcitonin levels, in the absence of bacterial infection. The results of a study investigating the course of procalcitonin levels over several days after liver transplantation in noninfected patients were recently reported in...... undergoing liver transplantation with and without bacterial infection are needed....

  20. Portal Interventions in Liver Transplant Recipients

    OpenAIRE

    Saad, Wael E. A.

    2012-01-01

    Portal vein interventions in liver transplant recipients represent a group of interventions in the management of several disease entities including portal vein stenosis, portal vein thrombosis, and recurrent liver cirrhosis with portal hypertension with and without gastric varices. The procedures performed in these patient populations include portal vein angioplasty with or without stent placement for portal vein stenosis, portal vein thrombolysis with or without stent placement for portal ve...

  1. Liver protection strategies in liver transplantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jun-JunJia; Jian-HuiLi; LiJiang; Bin-YiLin; LiWang; RongSu; LinZhou; Shu-SenZheng

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Liver  transplantation  is  the  therapy  of choice for patients with end-stage liver diseases. However, the gap between the low availability of organs and high demand is  continuously  increasing.  Innovative  strategies  for  organ protection are necessary to expand donor pool and to achieve better outcomes for liver transplantation. The present review analyzed and compared various strategies of liver protection. DATA SOURCES: Databases such as PubMed, Embase and Ovid were searched for the literature related to donor liver protection strategies  using  following  key  words:  "ischemia  reperfusion injury", "graft preservation", "liver transplantation", "machine perfusion"  and  "conditioning".  Of  the  146  studies  identified, only those with cutting edge strategies were analyzed. RESULTS: A variety of therapeutic approaches were proposed to alleviate graft ischemia/reperfusion injury, which included static cold storage, machine perfusion (hypothermic, normo-thermic  and  subnormothermic),  manual  conditioning  (pre, post  and  remote),  and  pharmacological  conditioning.  Evi-dences from animal experiments and clinical trials suggested that  all  these  strategies  could  potentially  protect  liver  graft; however, their clinical applications are limited partially due to their own disadvantages. CONCLUSIONS: There  are  a  plenty  of  methods  suggested to decrease the degree of donor liver transplantation-related injury. However, none of these approaches is perfect in clinical practice.  More  translational  researches  (molecular  and  clini-cal

  2. Recurrence of cholestatic liver disease after living donor liver transplantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sumihito Tamura; Masatoshi Hakuuchi; Yasuhiko Sugawara; Junichi Kaneko; Junichi Togashi; Yuichi Matsui; Noriyo Yamashiki; Norihiro Kokudo

    2008-01-01

    End-stage liver disease,due to cholestatic liver diseases with an autoimmune background such as primary biliary cirrhosis(PBC)and primary sclerosing cholangitis(PSC),is considered a good indication for liver transplantation.Excellent overall patient and graft outcomes,based mostly on the experience from deceased donor liver ransplantation(DDLT),have been reported.Due to the limited number of oraan donations from deceased donors in most Asian countries,living donor liver transplantation(LDLT)is the mainstream treatment for end-stage liver disease,including that resulting from PBC and PSC.Although the initial experiences with LDLT for PBC and PSC seem satisfactory or comparable to that with DLT,some aspects,including the timing of transplantation,the risk of recurrent disease,and its long-term clinical implications,require further evaluation.Whether or not the long-term outcomes of LDLT from a biologically related donor are equivalent to that of DDLT requires further observations.The clinical course following LDLT may be affected by he genetic background shared between the recipient and the living related donor.(C)2008 The WJG Press.All rights reserved.

  3. Liver transplantation at the University of Chicago.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millis, J M; Alonso, E M; Piper, J B; Bruce, D S; Newell, K A; Woodle, E S; Baker, A L; Whitington, P F; Thistlethwaite, J R

    1995-01-01

    Over the past 5 years, we have employed several strategies to increase the donor pool for both the pediatric and adult populations. The innovative expansion of the donor pool with the use living-related donors for children and cadaveric, high-risk donors for adults has increased our ability to serve our recipients and transplant them at an earlier stage in the disease process, thereby improving survival. As Hepatitis C is now the leading indication for liver transplantation in the adult population, the investigation of the natural history of Hepatitis C prior to and after transplantation provides a major challenge and is currently a focus of both laboratory and clinical efforts. For those recipients of Hepatitis C-positive-donor livers, determining the role of recipient and donor genotypes in the progression of recurrent hepatitis should help define the proper utilization of these organs. For patients on CsA-based immunosuppression regimens who experience steroid-resistant rejection, tacrolimus has proved to be extremely effective in reversing the rejection episodes and maintaining normal graft function. The long-term results of this therapy appear to be superior to OKT3 therapy. The recipients of living-related liver transplantation continue to have a survival advantage in comparison to recipients of cadaveric grafts. The donor operation can be routinely performed with minimal risk. Because of the superior results achieved and minimal donor risks, we feel that providing the option of living-donor transplantation is ethically justified, and medically necessary. Despite the encouraging results from living-donor transplantation, unexpected complications including portal vein complications and hepatic artery thrombosis have forced technical modifications of the original technique which may have implications to pediatric liver transplantation in general. As the volume of pediatric liver transplants and the number of immmunosuppressive regimens have increased over the

  4. Liver transplantation and diagnostic radiology: Socioeconomic issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: For calculating cost-effectiveness in the context of diagnosis related groups (DRG) we analysed all radiological examinations for 56 consecutive liver transplantations during the primary stay in the surgical department (1052 chest X-rays, 296 ultrasonographies, 216 colour coded duplex sonographies, 72 cholangiographies, 35 CT, 23 angiographies, one MRI and one embolisation). Methods: For calculation we used the reimbursement that the surgical wards received per patient day and the special fee for liver transplantation. We compared this with the refunds received by the department of radiology. Results: The hospital was reimbursed a total of 143 785.80 DM per patient. The diagnostic and interventional procedures that were requested for the 56 patients amounted to a total of 225 118.63 DM and 4019.96 DM per patient, respectively. Conclusions: This means that only 2.8% of all the costs during and after liver transplantation were caused by the radiological examinations. This represents only a small portion of the expenses during the time in hospital, taking into account especially that patients after liver transplantation are at high risk for developing complications. (orig.)

  5. Cyclosporin versus tacrolimus for liver transplanted patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haddad, E M; McAlister, V C; Renouf, E;

    2006-01-01

    Most liver transplant recipients receive either cyclosporin or tacrolimus to prevent rejection. Both drugs inhibit calcineurin phosphatase which is thought to be the mechanism of their anti-rejection effect and principle toxicities. The drugs have different pharmacokinetic profiles and potencies...

  6. Biliary complications after orthotopic liver transplantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karimian, Negin; Westerkamp, Andrie C.; Porte, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of reviewThe incidence, pathogenesis and management of the most common biliary complications are summarized, with an emphasis on nonanastomotic biliary strictures (NAS) and potential strategies to prevent NAS after liver transplantation.Recent findingsNAS have variable presentations in time

  7. Transfusion practice in orthotopic liver transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devi Allanki

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Liver transplant procedures require the most blood components, despite the fact that blood use in liver transplantation has declined dramatically over the last decade. Liver transplant recipients present unique challenges, not only in terms of blood supply, but also requirements for specialized blood components, serologic problems, and immunologic effects of transfusion on both the allograft and the recipient. The cause of intraoperative blood loss in liver transplantation is multifactorial, due to both technical factors and poor coagulation control. This procedure carries the risk of massive blood loss, which requires massive transfusions and is associated with postoperative infections, reduced graft survival, multi-organ dysfunction, and higher risk of mortality. Efforts to reduce intraoperative bleeding leading to limitation of blood transfusions are desirable to improve results and also to control costs. Method of literature search: The name of topic is typed and searched in Google search.The name of topic is typed and searched in PubMed search. Related articles were also searched. Some standard books in Transfusion Medicine were also referred.

  8. Experimental vascular graft for liver transplantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kobori, L; Nemeth, T; Nemes, B; Dallos, G; Sotonyi, P; Fehervari, [No Value; Patonai, A; Slooff, MJH; Jaray, J; De Jong, KP

    2003-01-01

    Hepatic artery thrombosis is a major cause of graft failure in liver transplantation. Use of donor interponates are common, but results are controversial because of necrosis or thrombosis after rejection. Reperfusion injury, hypoxia and free radical production determinate the survival. The aim of th

  9. [Anaesthesia in connection with liver transplantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Secher, N.H.; Nissen, P.; Swiatek, F.A.;

    2008-01-01

    The anaesthetic plan for liver transplantation focuses on maintaining central blood volume and thereby cerebral oxygenation. Normovolaemia represents a central blood volume that establishes a maximal venous oxygen saturation, and a value of 85% (78-90%) is maintained during the operation by...

  10. Splenic artery aneurysms in liver transplant patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kobori, L; de Jong, KP; Peeters, PMJG; Klompmaker, IJ; Kok, T; Haagsma, EB; Slooff, MJH

    1997-01-01

    Background/Aims: The purpose of the study was to investigate the incidence of Methods: Medical records and the pre- and 1-year postoperative angiograms of 337 liver transplant patients were reviewed to assess the presence and characteristics of these aneurysms. Results: Forty-five patients with aneu

  11. Cardiac evaluation of liver transplant candidates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mercedes Susan Mandell; JoAnn Lindenfeld; Mei-Yung Tsou; Michael Zimmerman

    2008-01-01

    Physicians previously thought that heart disease was rare in patients with end stage liver disease. However, recent evidence shows that the prevalence of ischemic heart disease and cardiomyopathy is increased in transplant candidates compared to most other surgical candidates. Investigators estimate that up to 26% of all liver transplant candidates have at least one critical coronary artery stenosis and that at least half of these patients will die perioperatively of cardiac complications. Cardiomyopathy also occurs in greater frequency. While all patients with advanced cardiac disease have defects in cardiac performance, a larger than expected number of patients have classical findings of dilated, restrictive and hypertropic cardiomyopathy. This may explain why up to 56% of patients suffer from hypoxemia due to pulmonary edema following transplant surgery. There is considerable controversy on how to screen transplant candidates for the presence of heart disease. Questions focus upon, which patients should be screened and what tests should be used. This review examines screening strategies for transplant candidates and details the prognostic value of common tests used to identify ischemic heart disease. We also review the physiological consequences of cardiomyopathy in transplant candidates and explore the specific syndrome of "cirrhotic cardiomyopathy".

  12. Living donor liver transplantation in Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amer, Khaled E; Marwan, Ibrahim

    2016-04-01

    In Egypt there is no doubt that chronic liver diseases are a major health concern. Hepatitis C virus (HCV) prevalence among the 15-59 years age group is estimated to be 14.7%. The high prevalence of chronic liver diseases has led to increasing numbers of Egyptian patients suffering from end stage liver disease (ESLD), necessitating liver transplantation (LT). We reviewed the evolution of LT in Egypt and the current status. A single center was chosen as an example to review the survival and mortality rates. To date, deceased donor liver transplantation (DDLT) has not been implemented in any program though Egyptian Parliament approved the law in 2010. Living donor liver transplantation (LDLT) seemed to be the only logical choice to save many patients who are in desperate need for LT. By that time, there was increase in number of centers doing LDLT (13 centers) and increase in number of LDLT cases [2,400] with improvement of the results. Donor mortality rate is 1.66 per 1,000 donors; this comprised four donors in the Egyptian series. The exact recipient survival is not accurately known however, and the one-year, three-year and five-year survival were 73.17%, 70.83% and 64.16% respectively in the International Medical Center (IMC) in a series of 145 adult to adult living donor liver transplantation (AALDLT) cases. There was no donor mortality in this series. LDLT are now routinely and successfully performed in Egypt with reasonable donor and recipient outcomes. Organ shortage remains the biggest hurdle facing the increasing need for LT. Although LDLT had reasonable outcomes, it carries considerable risks to healthy donors. For example, it lacks cadaveric back up, and is not feasible for all patients. The initial success in LDLT should drive efforts to increase the people awareness about deceased organ donation in Egypt. PMID:27115003

  13. CT before and after liver transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In our retrospective study, we evaluated the role of CT in cases of liver transplantation. 118 examinations (37 pre- and 81 post-operative) were carried out in 46 transplant recipients. Pre-operatively CT was used to exclude retro-peritoneal secondary lesions, although ultrasound was superior in the region of the porta hepatis. Patency of the portal vein can be established by means of duplex sonography and CT, portography is indicated only in exceptional circumstances. Post-operative complications (abscesses, hematomas, infarcts) can be demonstrated by CT. CT-guided fine needle biopsies and percutaneous drainage can be carried out post-operatively, even under difficult conditions. Liver cell necrosis, if extensive, represents a serious risk to transplant survival. CT may clarify this, while other problems and differential diagnosis may be solved by angiography. (orig.)

  14. Adult liver transplantation at UCL: update 2002.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerut, J; Matthys, J; Lemaire, J; Van Thuyne, V; Ciccarelli, O; Goffette, P; Peeters, A; Aunac, S; Boddeus, M; Carlier, M A; Danse, E; De Kock, M; De Reyck, Ch; Donataccio, M; Geubel, A; Gonze, D; Goubau, P; Latinne, D; Laterre, P F; Luts, A; Cool, G; Otte, J B; Horsmans, Y; Martinez, J; Orlando, G; Rahier, J; Reding, R; Reynaert, M; Starkel, P; Sempoux, Ch; Talpe, St; Van Obbergh, L; Veyckemans, F; Wallemacq, P; Wittebolle, X; Roggen, F

    2004-01-01

    The authors present the results of a single centre study of 587 liver transplants performed in 522 adults during the period 1984-2002. Results have improved significantly over time due to better pre-, peri- and post-transplant care. One, five, ten and fifteen year actuarial survivals for the whole patient group are 81.2; 69.8; 58.9 and 51.2%. The high incidence of de novo tumors (12.3%), of cardiovascular diseases (7.5%) and of end-stage renal function (3.6%) should be further incentives to tailor the immunosuppression to the individual patient and to direct the attention of the transplant physician to the long-term quality of life of the liver recipient. PMID:15285577

  15. Primary liver transplantation for autoimmune hepatitis: A comparative analysis of the European liver transplant registry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. Schramm (Christoph); M. Bubenheim (Michael); R. Adam (René); V. Karam (Vincent); J. Buckels (John); J.G. O'Grady (John); N. Jamieson (Neville); S. Pollard (Stephen); P. Neuhaus (Peter); M.M. Manns (Michael); R.J. Porte (Robert); D. Castaing (Denis); A. Paul (Anna); O. Traynor (Oscar); J. Garden (James); S. Friman (Styrbjörn); B.G. Ericzon; L. Fischer (Lutz); S. Vitko (Stefan); M. Krawczyk (Marek); H.J. Metselaar (Herold); A. Foss (Aksel); M. Kilic (Murat); K. Rolles (Keith); P. Burra (Patrizia); X. Rogiers (Xavier); A.W. Lohse (Ansgar)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractThe principal aim of this study was to compare the probability of and potential risk factors for death and graft loss after primary adult and pediatric liver transplantation in patients undergoing transplantation for autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) to those in patients undergoing transplantat

  16. Recent advance in living donor liver transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashikura, Yasuhiko; Kawasaki, Seiji; Miyagawa, Shinichi; Terada, Masaru; Ikegami, Toshihiko; Nakazawa, Yuichi; Urata, Koichi; Chisuwa, Hisanao; Ogino, Shiro; Makuuchi, Masatoshi

    2002-02-01

    Living donor liver transplantation (LDLT)has been performed in more than 2000 cases around the world. This procedure is considered to have certain advantages over cadaveric liver transplantation, because detailed preoperative evaluation of the donor liver is possible and superior graft quality is available. The indication has recently been widened to include adult patients. The results of LDLT have been reported to be very good. In this article,several considerations on LDLT,including living donor selection and application to adult patients, are discussed. Between June 1990 and March 2001, 143 patients underwent LDLT at Shinshu University Hospital. During this period, 160 patients were determined to be candidates for liver transplantation in our institution, and 185 candidates were evaluated as potential donors for these patients. Thirty-eight of 185 donor candidates were excluded for reasons including liver dysfunction and withdrawal of consent. The recipients included 60 adults, 50 (83%) of whom are currently alive. Taking into account the worldwide shortage of cadaveric organ donation,the importance of LDLT will probably never diminish. This procedure should be established on the basis of profound consideration of donor safety as well as accumulated expertise of hepatobiliary surgery. PMID:11865355

  17. Propylthiouracil-Induced Acute Liver Failure: Role of Liver Transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andres F. Carrion

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Propylthiouracil- (PTU- induced hepatotoxicity is rare but potentially lethal with a spectrum of liver injury ranging from asymptomatic elevation of transaminases to fulminant hepatic failure and death. We describe two cases of acute hepatic failure due to PTU that required liver transplantation. Differences in the clinical presentation, histological characteristics, and posttransplant management are described as well as alternative therapeutic options. Frequent monitoring for PTU-induced hepatic dysfunction is strongly advised because timely discontinuation of this drug and implementation of noninvasive therapeutic interventions may prevent progression to liver failure or even death.

  18. Post-transplant metabolic syndrome in children and adolescents after liver transplant: a systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Perito, Emily Rothbaum; Lau, Audrey; Rhee, Sue; Roberts, John P.; Rosenthal, Philip

    2012-01-01

    In long-term follow-up, 18-67% of pediatric liver transplant recipients are overweight or obese— with rates varying by age and pre-transplant weight status. Similar prevalence of post-transplant obesity is seen in adults. Adults also develop post-transplant metabolic syndrome, with consequent cardiovascular disease, at rates that exceed age and gender-matched populations. Post-transplant metabolic syndrome has never been studied in pediatric liver transplant recipients—a growing population as...

  19. The International Liver Transplant Society Guideline on Living Liver Donation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Charles M; Durand, Francois; Heimbach, Julie K; Kim-Schluger, Leona; Lee, Sung-Gyu; Lerut, Jan; Lo, Chung-Mau; Quintini, Cristiano; Pomfret, Elizabeth Anne

    2016-06-01

    The following guideline represents the position of the International Liver Transplantation Society (ILTS) on key preoperative, operative, and postoperative aspects surrounding living liver donation. These recommendations were developed from experts in the field from around the world. The authors conducted an analysis of the National Library of Medicine indexed literature on "living donor liver transplantation" [Medline search] using Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation methodology. Writing was guided by the ILTS Policy on the Development and Use of Practice Guidelines (www.ilts.org). ILTS members, and many more nonmembers, were invited to comment. Recommendations have been based on information available at the time of final submission (March 2016). The lack of randomized controlled trials in this field to date is acknowledged and is reflected in the grading of evidence. Intended for use by physicians, these recommendations support specific approaches to the diagnostic, therapeutic, and preventive aspects of care.

  20. Rescue Living-donor Liver Transplantation for Liver Failure Following Hepatectomy for Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Chan, See Ching; Sharr, William Wei; Chan, Albert Chi Yan; Chok, Kenneth Siu Ho; Lo, Chung Mau

    2013-01-01

    Liver failure following major hepatectomy for hepatocellular carcinoma is a known but uncommon mode of early treatment failure. When post-hepatectomy liver failure becomes progressive, the only effective treatment for rescuing the patient is liver transplantation. Deceased-donor liver transplantation in this situation is often not feasible because of the shortage of deceased-donor liver grafts. Proceeding with living-donor liver transplantation is an ethical challenge because of the possibili...

  1. BONE MINERAL DENSITY AFTER LIVER TRANSPLANTATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. P. Buzulina

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Bone mineral density (BMD was estimated twice in 18 recipents of ortotopic liver transplantation. There was decreased BMD in axial so as in peripheral skeleton in early time and in vertebral or hip Ward triangle in late time following transplantation being lower in primary biliary cirrosis then in cirrosis following chronic virus hepatitis despite tacrolimus immunosupression without prednisolon. Tacrolimus immunosupression with prednisolon in primary biliary cirrosis patients in late postoperative time was associated with hard BMD lowering which correlated with glucocorticoid therapy duration and prednisolon cumulative dosis. 

  2. SEVERE IMMUNE HEMOLYTIC ANEMIA AFTER LIVER TRANSPLANTATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. I. Sushkov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Clinical case of successful treatment of severe immune hemolytic anemia after liver transplantation is represen- ted in this article. The cause of complication was so-called passenger lymphocyte syndrome (a type of graft- versus-host disease. Two plasmapheresis sessions and Ig (0.5 g/kg in combination with increased maintenance immunosuppression with a short course of oral methylprednisolone in a total dose of 150 mg during 12 days were effective. The patient was discharged from hospital 34 days after transplantation in a satisfactory condition with a stable hemoglobin level. 

  3. Caroli's disease and orthotopic liver transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habib, Shahid; Shakil, Obaid; Couto, Osvaldo F; Demetris, Anthony J; Fung, John J; Marcos, Amadeo; Chopra, Kapil

    2006-03-01

    Caroli's disease is a rare congenital hepatic disease, characterized by segmental dilatation of the biliary tree. Patients who have recurrent bouts of biliary infection, particularly those with complications related to portal hypertension, may require orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT). Few case reports have described the outcome of OLT in patients with Caroli's disease and to date there is no large series reported in the literature. We retrospectively analyzed the outcome of OLT in patients with Caroli's disease who underwent OLT between 1982 and 2002 at Starzl Transplantation Institute, University of Pittsburgh. Patients were identified and data was collected by computerized search of the electronic database system. All patients had confirmation of diagnosis by histopathology of explanted liver. A total of 33 patients with Caroli's disease were listed for liver transplantation, 3 of whom were excluded, as they were not transplanted. A total of 90% had signs of hepatic decompensation at the time of OLT. Median posttransplantation follow-up was 7.7 yr. Short-term graft and patient survival at 1 month was 83% and 86%, whereas overall long-term graft survival rates at 1, 5, and 10 yr were 73%, 62%, and 53%, respectively, and patient survival rates were 76%, 65%, and 56%, respectively. Long-term outcome in patients who survived the first year after transplantation was significantly better. Their survival rate at 5 and 10 yr was 90% and 78%. On univariable analysis, recipient age, donor male gender, coexistent congenital hepatic fibrosis, and re-OLT were associated with poor patient survival. Eight patients were retransplanted, 3 of whom had primary nonfunction. A total of 13 patients died; the most common cause of death being sepsis and cardiovascular complications. Patients who died of sepsis had cholangitis pre-OLT. In conclusion, OLT is a form of curative and life-saving therapy in patients with Caroli's disease, especially in those with decompensated liver

  4. Spiral CT of hypervascular liver tumors and liver transplants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper evaluates the accuracy of spiral CT with bolus contrast material injection in delineation of hypervascular liver tumors and follow-up of liver transplants. Spiral CT scans were obtained on a Somatom Plus (Siemens) in 35 patients with hypervascular liver tumors (22 hepatocellular carcinoma [HCC], 8 focal nodular hyperplasia, 3 adenomas, 2 metastases) and in 80 patients with liver transplants. A contrast material bolus of 100 mL was administered with a flow of 3 mL/sec. The whole liver was investigated in one breath hold (24 seconds) with a table feed of 10 mm/sec. Images 5 mm thick were reconstructed from the data set. These images were compared with conventional incremental dynamic CT scans (contrast material bolus 100 mL; flow 1 mL/s). Spiral CT showed the whole tumor volume hyperattenuated due to the arterial hypervascularization in all 35 cases. In incremental dynamic CT, all tumors appeared hypoattenuated compared with the liver

  5. Pediatric liver transplantation: a North American perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerkar, Nanda; Lakhole, Arathi

    2016-08-01

    Liver transplantation (LT) is an important component in the therapeutic armamentarium of managing end-stage liver disease. In North American children, biliary atresia remains the most common indication for LT compared to hepatitis C in adults, while hepatoblastoma is the most common liver tumor requiring LT, versus Hepatocellular carcinoma in adults. Rejection, lymphoproliferative disease, renal insufficiency, metabolic syndrome, recurrent disease, 'de novo' autoimmune hepatitis and malignancy require careful surveillance and prompt action in adults and children after LT. In children, specific attention to EBV viremia, growth, development, adherence and transition to the adult services is also required. Antibody mediated rejection and screening for donor specific antibodies is becoming important in managing liver graft dysfunction. Biomarkers to identify and predict tolerance are being developed. Machine perfusion and stem cells (iPS) to synthesize organs are generating interest and are a focus for research. PMID:26982346

  6. Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease and Metabolic Syndrome after Liver Transplant

    OpenAIRE

    Stefano Gitto; Erica Villa

    2016-01-01

    Liver transplant is the unique curative therapy for patients with acute liver failure or end-stage liver disease, with or without hepatocellular carcinoma. Increase of body weight, onset of insulin resistance and drug-induced alterations of metabolism are reported in liver transplant recipients. In this context, post-transplant diabetes mellitus, hyperlipidemia, and arterial hypertension can be often diagnosed. Multifactorial illnesses occurring in the post-transplant period represent signifi...

  7. Aspergillus endophthalmitis in orthotopic liver transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hosseini Hamid

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available In this report, we describe a patient with drug-induced liver failure who developed endogenous endophthalmitis after liver transplantation. Our patient′s clinical course was so fulminant that the eye was lost in less than 1 month, without any response to therapy. Recognition of this infection is important because many patients die of disseminated Aspergillus infection, which may be detected early with bedside funduscopic examination by an ophthalmologist. Probably if the patient had referred to us earlier, it may have been possible to save the eye.

  8. Human herpesvirus 6 infections after liver transplantation

    OpenAIRE

    Abdel Massih, Rima Camille; Razonable, Raymund R.

    2009-01-01

    Human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6) infections occur in > 95% of humans. Primary infection, which occurs in early childhood as an asymptomatic illness or manifested clinically as roseola infantum, leads to a state of subclinical viral persistence and latency. Reactivation of latent HHV-6 is common after liver transplantation, possibly induced and facilitated by allograft rejection and immunosuppressive therapy. Since the vast majority of humans harbor the virus in a latent state, HHV-6 infections aft...

  9. Bioethics of living donor liver transplantation

    OpenAIRE

    Chan, See-Ching; 陳詩正.

    2013-01-01

    Bioethics has been central to living donor liver transplantation (LDLT), which mandates a high recipient benefit and an acceptably low donor risk. The double equipoise imposes the contextual features of this already technically complex treatment. This research aimed at looking into key bioethical issues of LDLT in the light of the contemporary practice standards. In adult LDLT, in order to provide a partial graft of adequate size, donor right hepatectomy is often required. This procedure...

  10. Hepatitis B and liver transplantation: 2008 update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckebaum, Susanne; Sotiropoulos, Georgios C; Gerken, Guido; Cicinnati, Vito R

    2009-01-01

    The ultimate goal of treatment is suppression of viral replication to undetectable HBV-DNA levels prior to and after liver transplantation (LT) to prevent infection of the newly transplanted liver. Most published data are available from therapy with lamivudine (LAM) in pre- and post-transplant HBV patients. Add-on therapy with adefovir dipivoxil (ADV) in pre-transplant LAM-resistant patients has been shown to represent an effective antiviral strategy leading to hepatic recompensation in many cases and, eventually, removal from the waiting list. Newer nucleos(t)ide analogues such as entecavir, tenofovir and telbivudine have shown lower resistance rates than LAM and more antiviral potency in studies in the non-transplant setting. Combined hepatitis B immune globulin (HBIG) and nucleos(t)ide analogue therapy have been widely adopted as the most effective treatment strategy against recurrent HBV disease after LT. Many programs have evaluated lower doses or a shorter duration of HBIG and intramuscular versus intravenous routes of administration. Active immunisation using recombinant HBV vaccines, including the S, pre-S1 and pre-S2 regions, and those with immunostimulatory adjuvants, seem to be more immunogenic than the currently available vaccines and have been used in studies to replace HBIG. Furthermore, it has been shown that immune memory against HBV can be adoptively transferred from organ donors to transplant recipients. Nucleos(t)ide analogue combination therapies might provide an alternative to the current treatment paradigm with costly HBIG; however, experience with this new treatment regimen is very limited and controlled clinical studies are urgently warranted to investigate its safety and efficacy and to determine which nucleos(t)ide analogue combinations will be the most promising in the long term after LT. PMID:18816503

  11. Predictors and impacts of hospital readmissions following liver transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yataco, Maria; Cowell, Alissa; David, Waseem; Keaveny, Andrew P; Taner, C Burcin; Patel, Tushar

    2016-01-01

    While liver transplantation is the definitive therapy for end stage liver disease, it remains a major procedure, with many potential complications. Hospital readmissions after the initial hospitalization for liver transplantation can be associated with adverse outcomes, increased cost, and resource utilization. Our aim was to define the incidence and reasons for hospital readmission after liver transplant and the impact of readmissions on patient outcomes. We retrospectively analyzed 30- and 90-day readmission rates and indications in patients who underwent liver transplant at a large-volume transplant center over a 3-year period. Four hundred seventy-nine adult patients underwent their first liver transplant during the study period. The 30-day readmission rate was 29.6%. Recipient and donor age, etiology of liver disease, biological Model for End-Stage Liver Disease score, and cold ischemia time were similar between patients who were readmitted within 30 days and those who were not readmitted. Readmissions occurred in 25% of patients who were hospitalized prior to liver transplant compared to 30% who were admitted for liver transplant. The most common indications for readmission were infection, severe abdominal pain, and biliary complications. Early discharge from hospital (fewer than 7 days after liver transplant), was not associated with readmission; however, a prolonged hospital stay after liver transplant was associated with an increased risk of readmission (p = 0.04). In conclusion, patients who undergo liver transplant have a high rate of readmission. In our cohort, readmissions were unrelated to pre-existing recipient or donor factors, but were associated with a longer hospital stay after liver transplant. PMID:27049489

  12. Motion – Patients with Primary Sclerosing Cholangitis Should Undergo Early Liver Transplantation: Arguments against the Motion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey S Crippin

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Liver transplantation is an accepted form of treatment for patients with primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC and can provide long term survival. Cholangiocarcinoma occurs in 10% to 20% of patients with PSC, is difficult to diagnose and has a poor prognosis. It has been proposed that liver transplantation be undertaken early in the course of the PSC, before cancer develops. Such a proposal would have significant implications for the method of assigning priority to patients awaiting liver transplantation. Other patients on the waiting list would experience further delays, while there is no proven benefit for PSC patients. Few patients with this disease are removed from the waiting list because they developed cancer. If one were to state that PSC patients warrant special consideration because of the hypothetical risk of cholangiocarcinoma, the same argument could be applied to patients with hepatitis C and other causes of cirrhosis, who are at increased risk of hepatocellular carcinoma. The transplant allocation system is applied in an equitable fashion to patients with a large variety of liver diseases. Alteration of this system to benefit a small number of patients with PSC would violate the principles on which it was created, and cannot be justified.

  13. Cognitive performance in pediatric liver transplant recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaller, T; Langguth, N; Petermann, F; Ganschow, R; Nashan, B; Schulz, K-H

    2013-11-01

    To date, the course of cognitive development in children after liver transplantation (Ltx) is poorly understood. Cognitive performance, however, is crucial in all developmental stages and for educational achievement. This cross-sectional single-center study examined the prevalence of long-term cognitive impairment in a cohort of 64 pediatric patients after Ltx. Median age at Ltx was 12 months. The revised Wechsler Intelligence Scale IV was administered to assess cognitive performance. Patients were compared with an age- and gender-matched group of children without a chronic health condition. Liver transplanted children performed significantly worse in three of four cognitive domains as well as in the Total Intelligence Quotient (Total IQ) (p = 0.017 to p = 0.005). Liver transplant recipients showed substantially more "serious delays" (IQ IQ (p = 0.05 to p = 0.01). The strongest association was revealed between height at Ltx and Verbal Comprehension (R(2)  = 0.21), Perceptual Reasoning (R(2)  = 0.30), Working Memory (R(2)  = 0.23) and Total IQ (R(2)  = 0.25). Our results indicate a high impact of primary diagnosis and height percentile at Ltx even on children's long-term cognitive performance. PMID:24102763

  14. Domino liver transplant: influence on the number of donors and transplant coordination.

    OpenAIRE

    Nunes, F.; Valente, M.; Pereira, R.; Amil, M

    2004-01-01

    Transplant Proc. 2004 May;36(4):916-7. Domino liver transplant: influence on the number of donors and transplant coordination. Nunes F, Valente M, Pereira R, Amil M. General Hospital Santo António, Porto, Portugal. Abstract The shortage of organs forces coordinators to seek new forms of generating organs for transplantation of the increasing numbers of patients on waiting lists. A recent technique called sequential transplant or domino liver transplan...

  15. Liver transplantation for hepatocellular carcinoma in Uruguay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text:introduction and objectives: Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC)is the 6th neoplasia in frequency and the 1st cause of death in cirrhotic patients. Today it is one of the main indications for transplantation liver in early stages. The stated goal is to describe our experience in transplant HCC liver by defining epidemiology, imaging, pathological (A P)and variables of prognostic relevance. Methods: A descriptive, observational and retrospective cirrhotic patients with HCC in tracking National Transplant Program Liver of Uruguay in the period 16/06/2009-28/09/2012. For the diagnosis and staging us criteria rely on Barcelona Clinic Liver Cancer (BCLC)and Milan. Results: Epidemiology: 16 patients were evaluated for transplantation for HCC, and there were 2 cases of incidental diagnosis post-transplant (N = 18). 17 were men. The mean age was 57 years. 15 were detected under surveillance program. The most prevalent etiologies were alcohol- and HCV infection. Diagnosis and Staging: All patients underwent three-phase CT, MRI required 9. 10 had single lesion, 6 had 2 or 3 lesions and 2 cases were diagnosed by image. 11 patients met Milan criteria. The average value of alpha-fetoprotein (AFP)was 225 ng / ml, only in 4 cases was greater than 50 ng / ml. Staging according BCLC: 13 were A, 2 B, 2 C and 1 D. entry to list and transplant: The patient with stage D did not enter. 2 are under evaluation. 13 entered list of which 1 is currently listed, 3 out of list, by progression, 2nd neoplasia and death sepsis. Finally, 9 patients were transplanted for HCC (18 % of the indications for transplantation). The average wait time listed was 45 (0-128)days. Of the 11 patients transplanted with HCC die in block, 1 for sepsis and another relapse. The remaining 8 have not recurred and are alive to date with normal AFP. A P findings, prognostic markers: In 3 had single lesion, 5 had 2 or 3 lesions, and 3 > 3 lesions. Six were within Milan criteria. the total tumor size was > 10 cm in 3

  16. Transdiaphragnatic exposure for direct atrioatrial anastomosis in liver transplantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Zhe-yu; YAN Lü-nan; ZENG Yong; WEN Tian-fu; LI Bo; ZHAO Ji-chun; WANG Wen-tao; YANG Jia-yin; XU Ming-qing

    2010-01-01

    Background Liver transplantation in Budd-Chiari syndrome remains controversial; however, some improved techniques lead to better results. We report medium-term follow-up results of liver transplantation with atrioatrial anastomosis for Budd-Chiari syndrome and explore the indications of liver transplantation with atrioatrial anastomosis for patients with end stage liver disease.Methods Nine patients (six Budd-Chiari syndromes, one end stage hepatolithiasis, one hepatocellular carcinoma and one incurable alveolar echinococcosis) underwent liver transplantation with atrioatrial anastomosis in West China Hospital of Sichuan University from 1999 to 2006. Eight liver transplants used cadaveric orthotopic livers and one a living donor liver. The operative technique was transdiaphragmatic exposure for direct atrioatrial anastomosis and replacement of inferior vena cava by cryopreserved vena cava graft with the help of venovenous bypass.Results All liver transplantations were successful. Two patients contracted pulmonary infection and acute rejection took place in another case. With proper treatment, all patients recovered well and had good quality of life. To date, they have been followed up for more than 24 months. The only death followed recurrence of hepatic carcinoma three years after liver transplantation.Conclusions Transdiaphragmatic exposure for direct atrioatrial anastomosis and the cryopreserved vena cava graftreplacement of inferior vena cava are possible for patients with end stage liver disease thus extending the indications of liver transplantation.

  17. Role of NK, NKT cells and macrophages in liver transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahrner, René; Dondorf, Felix; Ardelt, Michael; Settmacher, Utz; Rauchfuss, Falk

    2016-01-01

    Liver transplantation has become the treatment of choice for acute or chronic liver disease. Because the liver acts as an innate immunity-dominant organ, there are immunological differences between the liver and other organs. The specific features of hepatic natural killer (NK), NKT and Kupffer cells and their role in the mechanism of liver transplant rejection, tolerance and hepatic ischemia-reperfusion injury are discussed in this review. PMID:27468206

  18. Liver surgery and transplantation in China:Progress and Challenges

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LAU W Y; LAI E C H

    2007-01-01

    From the limited but available information,we traced the history of developments of liver surgery and transplantation in China.Liver surgery first started in the late 1950s in China,and it soon flourished mainly because of the great demand in liver surgery and the emergence of a number of giants in liver surgery.We recognized and honoured the important contributions of these Chinese pioneers in portal hypertension,recurrent pyogenic cholangitis,hepatocellular carcinoma and liver transplantation.

  19. De novo autoimmune hepatitis after liver transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohse, Ansgar W; Weiler-Norman, Christina; Burdelski, Martin

    2007-10-01

    The Kings College group was the first to describe a clinical syndrome similar to autoimmune hepatitis in children and young adults transplanted for non-immune mediated liver diseases. They coined the term "de novo autoimmune hepatitis". Several other liver transplant centres confirmed this observation. Even though the condition is uncommon, patients with de novo AIH are now seen in most of the major transplant centres. The disease is usually characterized by features of acute hepatitis in otherwise stable transplant recipients. The most characteristic laboratory hallmark is a marked hypergammaglobulinaemia. Autoantibodies are common, mostly ANA. We described also a case of LKM1-positivity in a patients transplanted for Wilson's disease, however this patients did not develop clinical or histological features of AIH. Development of SLA/LP-autoantibodies is also not described. Therefore, serologically de novo AIH appears to correspond to type 1 AIH. Like classical AIH patients respond promptly to treatment with increased doses of prednisolone and azathioprine, while the calcineurin inhibitors cyclosporine or tacrolimus areof very limited value - which is not surprising, as almost all patients develop de novo AIH while receiving these drugs. Despite the good response to treatment, most patients remain a clinical challenge as complete stable remissions are uncommon and flares, relapses and chronic disease activity can often occur. Pathogenetically this syndrome is intriguing. It is not clear, if the immune response is directed against allo-antigens, neo-antigens in the liver, or self-antigens, possibly shared by donor and host cells. It is very likely that the inflammatory milieu due to alloreactive cells in the transplanted organ contribute to the disease process. Either leading to aberrant antigen presentation, or providing co-stimulatory signals leading to the breaking of self-tolerance. The development of this disease in the presence of treatment with calcineurin

  20. Approach to a case of multiple irregular red cell antibodies in a liver transplant recipient: Need for developing competence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravi C Dara

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Liver transplant procedure acts as a challenge for transfusion services in terms of specialized blood components, serologic problems, and immunologic effects of transfusion. Red cell alloimmunization in patients awaiting a liver transplant complicate the process by undue delay or unavailability of compatible red blood cell units. Compatible blood units can be provided by well-equipped immunohematology laboratory, which has expertise in resolving these serological problems. This report illustrates resolution of a case with multiple alloantibodies using standard techniques, particularly rare antisera. Our case re-emphasizes the need for universal antibody screening in all patients as part of pretransfusion testing, which helps to identify atypical antibodies and plan for appropriate transfusion support well in time. We recommend that the centers, especially the ones that perform complex procedures like solid organ transplants and hematological transplants should have the necessary immunohematological reagents including rare antisera to resolve complex cases of multiple antibodies as illustrated in this case.

  1. Cardiac Work-Up Protocol for Liver Transplant Candidates: Experience from a Single Liver Transplant Centre

    OpenAIRE

    Ye, Carrie; Saincher, Meghana; Tandon, Puneeta; Meeberg, Glenda; Williams, Randy; Burak, Kelly W; Bain, Vincent G.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Ischemic cardiac events can cause significant morbidity and mortality postliver transplantation; however, no validated protocols to screen patients before transplantation exist.OBJECTIVES: To report the introduction of a noninvasive cardiac screening protocol used at the Liver Unit, University of Calgary (Calgary, Alberta); to determine whether the protocol decreases use of coronary angiograms; and to compare cardiac outcomes using the new protocol with an appropriately matched hi...

  2. Replacement of Diseased Mouse Liver by Hepatic Cell Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhim, Jonathan A.; Sandgren, Eric P.; Degen, Jay L.; Palmiter, Richard D.; Brinster, Ralph L.

    1994-02-01

    Adult liver has the unusual ability to fully regenerate after injury. Although regeneration is accomplished by the division of mature hepatocytes, the replicative potential of these cells is unknown. Here, the replicative capacity of adult liver cells and their medical usefulness as donor cells for transplantation were investigated by transfer of adult mouse liver cells into transgenic mice that display an endogenous defect in hepatic growth potential and function. The transplanted liver cell populations replaced up to 80 percent of the diseased recipient liver. These findings demonstrate the enormous growth potential of adult hepatocytes, indicating the feasibility of liver cell transplantation as a method to replace lost or diseased hepatic parenchyma.

  3. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation after living-related liver transplant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gedik, Ender; Çelik, Muhammet Reha; Otan, Emrah; Dişli, Olcay Murat; Erdil, Nevzat; Bayındır, Yaşar; Kutlu, Ramazan; Yılmaz, Sezai

    2015-04-01

    Various types of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation methods have been used in liver transplant operations. The main indications are portopulmonary or hepatopulmonary syndromes and other cardiorespiratory failure syndromes that are refractory to conventional therapy. There is little literature available about extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, especially after liver transplant. We describe our experience with 2 patients who had living-related liver transplant. A 69-year-old woman had refractory aspergillosis pneumonia and underwent pumpless extracorporeal lung assist therapy 4 weeks after liver transplant. An 8-month-old boy with biliary atresia underwent urgent liver transplant; he received venoarterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation therapy on postoperative day 1. Despite our unsuccessful experience with 2 patients, extracorporeal membrane oxygenation and pumpless extracorporeal lung assist therapy for liver transplant patients may improve prognosis in selected cases. PMID:25894176

  4. Challenging hepatitis C-infected liver transplant patients

    OpenAIRE

    Oliver M; Chiodo Ortiz C; Ortiz J.

    2016-01-01

    Madeleine Oliver,1 Christopher Chiodo Ortiz,2 Jorge Ortiz31University of Toledo College of Medicine, Toledo, OH, 2Bucknell University, Lewisburg, PA, 3Department of Transplant Surgery, University of Toledo Medical Center, Toledo, OH, USA Abstract: Caring for liver transplant patients suffering from chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a challenging task for transplant surgeons and primary physicians alike. HCV is the leading cause of liver transplantation in the USA and comes with a ...

  5. A Phase I Trial of Epstein-Barr Virus Gp350 Vaccine for Children With Chronic Kidney Disease Awaiting Transplantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rees, L.; Tizard, E.J.; Morgan, A.J.; Cubitt, W.D.; Finerty, S.; Oyewole-Eletu, T.A.; Owen, K.; Royed, C.; Stevens, S.J.C.; Shroff, R.C.; Tanday, M.K.; Wilson, A.; Middeldorp, J.M.; Amlot, P.L.; Steven, N.M.

    2009-01-01

    Background. Vaccination against Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), inducing an antibody response to the envelope glycoprotein gp350, might protect EBV-negative children with chronic kidney disease from lymphoproliferative disease after transplantation. Methods. A phase I trial recruited children with chronic

  6. Liver transplantation in Turkey: historical review and future perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbulut, Sami; Yilmaz, Sezai

    2015-07-01

    Since the first successful liver transplantation by Starzl et al. in 1967, liver transplantation has become the standard therapy for many liver diseases, mainly chronic liver disease. Most liver transplantations performed in Europe and North America utilize deceased donors while a considerable portion of organ requirements is supplied by living donors in Asian countries including Turkey. The actual history of solid organ transplantation in Turkey began with the pioneering work of Dr. Haberal in collaboration with Thomaz E. Starzl in 1974 in Colorado University at Denver. The first successful solid organ transplantation in Turkey was accomplished by Haberal in 1975 with a living donor renal transplantation. Subsequently, legislations no 2238 and 2594 dated 1979 and 1982, respectively, were passed, paving the way for cadaveric tissue/organ utilization and preservation in Turkey. The first deceased donor liver transplantation and the first living donor liver transplantation were performed in 1988 and 1990, respectively. There are currently 45 liver transplantation centers in Turkey. Of these, 25 are state universities, 8 are private (foundation) universities, 9 are private hospitals, and 3 are training and research hospitals belonging to the Ministry of Health. A total of 7152 liver transplantations were performed in Turkey between January 2002 and May 2014. Of these, 4848 (67.8%) used living donors and 2304 (32.2%) used deceased donors. These figures indicate that, despite widespread organ donation campaigns and media-sponsored propaganda, desired targets have not been met yet in providing deceased organ donation. Despite unsatisfactory levels attained in supplying deceased donors, both the number of annual liver transplantations and improvements in overall survival rates of organ transplanted patients continues to increase. Actually, the one-year patient survival rate after liver transplantation in 2013 was 80.5%. This rate is getting better with each passing year

  7. Chemoembolization Decreases Drop-Off Risk of Hepatocellular Carcinoma Patients on the Liver Transplant List

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction: The drop-off risk for patients awaiting liver transplantation for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is 22%. Transplant liver availability is expected to worsen, resulting in longer waiting times and increased drop-off rates. Our aim was to determine whether chemoembolization can decrease this risk. Patients and Methods: Eighty-seven consecutive HCC patients listed for liver transplant (Milan criteria) underwent statistical comparability adjustments using the propensity score (Wilcoxon, Fisher’s, and chi-square tests). Forty-three nonchemoembolization patients and 22 chemoembolization patients were comparable for Child-Pugh and Model for End-Stage Liver Disease scores, tumor size and number, alpha fetoprotein (AFP) levels, and cause of cirrhosis. We calculated the risk of dropping off the transplant list by assigning a transplant time to those who dropped off (equal probability with patients who were on the list longer than the patient in question). The significance level was obtained by calculating the simulation distribution of the difference compared with the permutations of chemoembolization versus nonchemoembolization assignment of the patients. Kaplan–Meier estimators (log-rank test) were used to determine survival rates. Results: Median follow-up was 187 ± 110 weeks (range 38 to 435, date of diagnosis). The chemoembolization group had an 80% drop-off risk decrease (15% nonchemoembolization versus 3% chemoembolization, p = 0.04). Although survival was better for the chemoembolization group, it did not reach statistical significance. Two-year survival for the nonchemoembolization and chemoembolization group was 57.3% ± 7.1% and 76.0% ± 7.9%, respectively (p = 0.078). Conclusions: Chemoembolization appears to result in a significant decrease in the risk of dropping off liver transplant list for patients with HCC and results in a tendency toward longer survival.

  8. Scoring systems for predicting mortality after liver transplantation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heng-Chih Pan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Liver transplantation can prolong survival in patients with end-stage liver disease. We have proposed that the Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA score calculated on post-transplant day 7 has a great discriminative power for predicting 1-year mortality after liver transplantation. The Chronic Liver Failure-Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (CLIF-SOFA score, a modified SOFA score, is a newly developed scoring system exclusively for patients with end-stage liver disease. This study was designed to compare the CLIF-SOFA score with other main scoring systems in outcome prediction for liver transplant patients. METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed medical records of 323 patients who had received liver transplants in a tertiary care university hospital from October 2002 to December 2010. Demographic parameters and clinical characteristic variables were recorded on the first day of admission before transplantation and on post-transplantation days 1, 3, 7, and 14. RESULTS: The overall 1-year survival rate was 78.3% (253/323. Liver diseases were mostly attributed to hepatitis B virus infection (34%. The CLIF-SOFA score had better discriminatory power than the Child-Pugh points, Model for End-Stage Liver Disease (MELD score, RIFLE (risk of renal dysfunction, injury to the kidney, failure of the kidney, loss of kidney function, and end-stage kidney disease criteria, and SOFA score. The AUROC curves were highest for CLIF-SOFA score on post-liver transplant day 7 for predicting 1-year mortality. The cumulative survival rates differed significantly for patients with a CLIF-SOFA score ≤8 and those with a CLIF-SOFA score >8 on post-liver transplant day 7. CONCLUSION: The CLIF-SOFA score can increase the prediction accuracy of prognosis after transplantation. Moreover, the CLIF-SOFA score on post-transplantation day 7 had the best discriminative power for predicting 1-year mortality after liver transplantation.

  9. HIDA scans in the management of liver transplant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rejection is the most challenging diagnostic and management problem in liver transplantation today. Physicians generally alter immunosuppressive therapy based on the patient's clinical appearance and serum liver function studies. Liver biopsy can be helpful in the management of these patients but is not without morbidity and mortality in this high risk group. Here the authors report on their experience with serial HIDA scans in the management of liver transplant patients. 33 HIDA scans were performed on a total of 12 liver transplant recipients. Based on this experience, the authors have reached the following conclusions: HIDA scans can be a useful tool to aid the liver transplant surgeon in the diagnosis of early hepatic rejection, biliary obstruction, space occupying lesions (abscess, infarct, tumor) and biliary leakage. It should be used routinely in the monitoring of liver transplant recipients

  10. Differences in portal hemodynamics between whole liver transplantation and living donor liver transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Shui-Ming; Zhang, Qi-Shun; Zhou, Guang-Wen; Huang, Shi-Feng; Lu, Hai-Ming; Peng, Cheng-Hong

    2010-11-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the differences in portal hemodynamics between whole liver transplantation and living donor liver transplantation (LDLT). Twenty patients who underwent LDLT (the L group) and 42 patients who underwent whole liver transplantation (the W group) were enrolled, and colored Doppler ultrasonography was performed preoperatively and on postoperative days (PODs) 1, 3, 5, 7, 30, and 90. The changes in the portal blood flow velocity (PBV) and portal blood flow volume (PBF) were monitored. The graft and spleen sizes were measured with angiographic computed tomography, and upper endoscopy was used to measure esophageal varices on PODs 14, 30, and 90. Although the portal venous pressure (PVP) decreased after graft implantation, it was higher in the L group with a smaller graft size ratio (25.7 ± 5.1 cm H₂O for the L group and 18.5 ± 4.6 cm H₂O for the W group, P transplantation; however, the PBF and PBV peaks were significantly higher in the W group. The postoperative PVP and graft volume were greatly related to PBF on POD 1. Grafts in the L group regenerated rapidly after the operation, and the volume increased from 704 ± 115 to 1524 ± 281 mL as early as 1 month after transplantation. A rapid improvement in splenomegaly was observed in both groups. An improvement in esophageal varices was observed in the W group on POD 14 after transplantation, whereas no change was observed in the L group. The portal venous flow in patients with portal hypertension showed a high perfusion state after LDLT, but in contrast to whole liver transplantation, the PVP elevation after LDLT postponed the closing time of the collateral circulation and affected the recovery from splenomegaly.

  11. The role of liver transplantation for hilar cholangiocarcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Durgatosh Pandey; Kang-Hoe Lee; Kai-Chah Tan

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND:Hilar cholangiocarcinoma is a devastating disease. Surgery is the only potentially curative modality. However, the results of surgical resection for hilar cholangiocarcinomas are disappointing. The introduction of liver transplantation for this condition has brought new hope for the management of this disease. The aim of this review is to discuss the role of liver transplantation in this disease. DATA SOURCES:A MEDLINE search was conducted for the articles on liver transplantation for hilar cholangiocarcinoma. Their results have been compiled and compared with the existing literature on resection for this disease. RESULTS:The earlier series on liver transplantation for hilar cholangiocarcinoma were not encouraging because of poor patient selection. The Mayo Clinic protocol of neoadjuvant chemoradiation followed by liver transplantation has shown remarkable success (survival at 1-, 3-, and 5-year post-transplantation being 92%, 82%, and 82%, respectively). With better patient selection and integration of neoadjuvant chemoradiation, the long-term survival is superior to that of the patients who undergo resection, as shown by the published literature on resection. The limitations of organ availability can be overcome by the living donor liver transplantation programme. This review article discusses the rationale, pros and cons of liver transplantation vis-à-vis resection for hilar cholangiocarcinoma. CONCLUSIONS:Liver transplantation, especially living donor liver transplantation, is a new and exciting alternative to resection for hilar cholangiocarcinoma. Integration of neoadjuvant chemoradiation has the potential to further improve the curative potential of liver transplantation. The strategy of combining neoadjuvant chemoradiation and liver transplantation brings new hope for the treatment of this dififcult disease.

  12. Bioengineered transplantable porcine livers with re-endothelialized vasculature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, In Kap; Peng, Li; Peloso, Andrea; Smith, Charesa J; Dhal, Abritee; Deegan, Daniel B; Zimmerman, Cindy; Clouse, Cara; Zhao, Weixin; Shupe, Thomas D; Soker, Shay; Yoo, James J; Atala, Anthony

    2015-02-01

    Donor shortage remains a continued challenge in liver transplantation. Recent advances in tissue engineering have provided the possibility of creating functional liver tissues as an alternative to donor organ transplantation. Small bioengineered liver constructs have been developed, however a major challenge in achieving functional bioengineered liver in vivo is the establishment of a functional vasculature within the scaffolds. Our overall goal is to bioengineer intact livers, suitable for transplantation, using acellular porcine liver scaffolds. We developed an effective method for reestablishing the vascular network within decellularized liver scaffolds by conjugating anti-endothelial cell antibodies to maximize coverage of the vessel walls with endothelial cells. This procedure resulted in uniform endothelial attachment throughout the liver vasculature extending to the capillary bed of the liver scaffold and greatly reduced platelet adhesion upon blood perfusion in vitro. The re-endothelialized livers, when transplanted to recipient pigs, were able to withstand physiological blood flow and maintained for up to 24 h. This study demonstrates, for the first time, that vascularized bioengineered livers, of clinically relevant size, can be transplanted and maintained in vivo, and represents the first step towards generating engineered livers for transplantation to patients with end-stage liver failure. PMID:25433603

  13. Gastric volvulus as a complication of liver transplant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franco, Arie; Vaughan, Kevin G. [Children' s Hospital of Pittsburgh, Department of Radiology, Pittsburgh (United States); Vukcevic, Zoran; Mazariegos, George V. [Children' s Hospital of Pittsburgh, Department Transplant Surgery, Pittsburgh (United States); Thomas, Stephen [University of Pittsburgh Presbyterian Hospital, Department of Radiology, Pittsburgh (United States)

    2005-03-01

    We report a patient who developed mesenteroaxial gastric volvulus after a liver transplantation. We hypothesize that this complication may have been related to the ligation of the hepatogastric ligament done to mobilize the liver during hepatectomy. (orig.)

  14. What I Need to Know about Liver Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... another transplant is possible. [ Top ] How do I take care of my liver after I leave the hospital? ... prescription follow your doctor’s instructions about how to take care of your new liver have blood tests and ...

  15. Review on immunosuppression in liver transplantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    The optimal level of immunosuppression in solid organtransplantation, in particular for the liver, is a delicatebalance between the benefit of preventing rejection andthe adverse side effects of immunosuppression. Thereis uncertainty about when this level is achieved in anyindividual recipient. Immunosuppression regimens varybetween individual centers and changes with time as new agents and data are available. Presently concernsabout the adverse side effects of calcineurin inhibitor,the main class of immunosuppressive agents used inliver transplantation (LT), has led to consideration of theuse of antibody induction therapies for patients at higherrisk of developing adverse side effects. The longevityof the transplanted organ is potentially improved bybetter management of rejection episodes and specialconsideration for tailoring of immunosuppression to theindividual with viral hepatitis C, hepatocellular carcinomaor pregnancy. This review provides an overview of thecurrent strategies for post LT immunosuppression anddiscusses modifications to consider for special patientpopulations.

  16. Two cases of hepatobiliary scintigraphy of liver transplantation in rejection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanegawa, Kimio; Nishiyama, Syouji; Muraji, Toshihiro (Kobe Children' s Hospital, Hyogo (Japan)); Ishii, Kazunari; Kouno, Michio

    1992-04-01

    We report two patients with liver transplantation who underwent hepatobiliary scintigraphy in rejection. In the first patient, hepatobiliary scintigraphy showed dilatation of bile duct but it showed good clearance from the liver. In the second patient, hepatobiliary scintigraphy showed delayed clearance from the liver. Both patients recovered from rejection. There were four main complications, including vascular and biliary abnormality, infection, and rejection, after liver transplantation. Hepatobiliary scintigraphy showed almost the same findings except for biliary complication, so it was difficult to distinguish between infection and rejection. But hepatobiliary scintigraphy may be useful to evaluate transplanted liver function in rejection. (author).

  17. Interventional therapy of complications after liver transplantation: hepatic artery thombosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Resolution of the complications after liver transplantation is one of the important factors related to prognosis. Hepatic artery thombosis (HAT) after liver transplantation can lead directly to trans- planted liver undergone necrosis, biloma formation and liver functional exhaustion. The early diagnosis with Color Doppler which should be the first method of choice, CTA, MRA and angiography could lead to exact demonstration, and proper treatment can result in better prognosis. The microinvasive techniques such as local thrombolysis, balloon dilatation and stent placement are safe and effective for treatment of hepatic artery thombosis. The vascular reconstruction and oxygen hyperbaric are effective therapeutic methods. Repeat liver transplantation is still the last important choice for survival. (authors)

  18. Two cases of hepatobiliary scintigraphy of liver transplantation in rejection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report two patients with liver transplantation who underwent hepatobiliary scintigraphy in rejection. In the first patient, hepatobiliary scintigraphy showed dilatation of bile duct but it showed good clearance from the liver. In the second patient, hepatobiliary scintigraphy showed delayed clearance from the liver. Both patients recovered from rejection. There were four main complications, including vascular and biliary abnormality, infection, and rejection, after liver transplantation. Hepatobiliary scintigraphy showed almost the same findings except for biliary complication, so it was difficult to distinguish between infection and rejection. But hepatobiliary scintigraphy may be useful to evaluate transplanted liver function in rejection. (author)

  19. Transplantation With Livers From Deceased Donors Older Than 75 Years

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorsen, Trygve; Aandahl, Einar Martin; Bennet, William;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The availability of donor organs limits the number of patients in need who are offered liver transplantation. Measures to expand the donor pool are crucial to prevent on-list mortality. The aim of this study was to evaluate the use of livers from deceased donors who were older than 75...... years. METHODS: Fifty-four patients who received a first liver transplant (D75 group) from 2001 to 2011 were included. Donor and recipient data were collected from the Nordic Liver Transplant Registry and medical records. The outcome was compared with a control group of 54 patients who received a liver...

  20. Visceral Artery Aneurysms in Liver Transplant Candidates and in Patients after Liver Transplantation

    OpenAIRE

    Umberto Maggi; Daniele Dondossola; Dario Consonni; Stefano Gatti; Rossella Arnoldi; Manuela Bossi; Giorgio Rossi

    2011-01-01

    There are only few reviews concerning visceral aneurysms in cirrhotics, and a small number of papers on visceral aneurysms in liver transplant patients. The present paper investigates this condition in both groups of patients in a 10-year-retrospective study.

  1. REDUCED-SIZE LIVER-TRANSPLANTATION, SPLIT LIVER-TRANSPLANTATION, AND LIVING-RELATED LIVER-TRANSPLANTATION IN RELATION TO THE DONOR ORGAN SHORTAGE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    SLOOFF, MJH

    1995-01-01

    Because of the shortage of cadaveric donors, three techniques of partial liver grafting have been developed. These techniques are placed in perspective in relation to the organ shortage. Reduced size liver transplantation (RSLTx) is widely used and has results comparable to those from whole liver gr

  2. Pediatric Liver Transplantation: Unique Concerns for the Critical Care Team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilhartz, Jacob L; Shieck, Victoria L

    2016-01-01

    Liver transplantation originated in children more than 50 years ago, and these youngest patients, while comprising the minority of liver transplant recipients nationwide, can have some of the best and most rewarding outcomes. The indications for liver transplantation in children are generally more diverse than those seen in adult patients. This diversity in underlying cause of disease brings with it increased complexity for all who care for these patients. Children, still being completely dependent on others for survival, also require a care team that is able and ready to work with parents and family in addition to the patient at the center of the process. In this review, we aim to discuss diagnoses of particular uniqueness or importance to pediatric liver transplantation. We also discuss the evaluation of a pediatric patient for liver transplant, the system for allocating them a new liver, and also touch on postoperative concerns that are unique to the pediatric population. PMID:27254643

  3. Intracardiac Thrombosis during Adult Liver Transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Moguilevitch

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Intracardiac thrombosis (ICT and pulmonary embolism (PE during adult liver transplantation are rare but potentially lethal complications. They are often overlooked because of significant diagnostic challenges. The combination of hemodynamic compromise and transesophageal echocardiography (TEE findings allows for correct diagnosis. A large variety of putative risk factors for ICT and PE have been suggested, but these events are considered to be multifactorial. There are different proposed treatment modalities for these devastating complications. Unfortunately, in spite of growing knowledge in this area, intraoperative and postoperative mortalities remain very high. The retrospective nature of the study of these events makes the case reports extremely valuable.

  4. Diarrhea complicating enteral feeding after liver transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benya, R; Damle, P; Mobarhan, S

    1990-03-01

    In this case report we present in detail the complex nature of enteral feeding, diarrhea, hypoalbuminemia, and edema in a critically ill patient. We also discuss the use of a peptide-elemental formula in this patient, who suffered continuous diarrhea for 15 weeks after liver transplantation. Use of this formula was associated with cessation of the diarrhea and permitted adequate nutritional delivery. After 26 weeks of mechanical pulmonary ventilation, extubation was possible. This case illustrates the ineffectiveness of parenteral albumin infusions for treatment of enteral edema and demonstrates the restoration of normal intestinal absorptive capacity when ultrafiltration was instituted and the patient's generalized edematous state was corrected. PMID:2106103

  5. [FEATURES LIVER TRANSPLANTATION IN PORTAL VEIN THROMBOSIS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbasov, P A

    2015-07-01

    In 2012 - 2013 years in 265 patients for liver transplantation was performed, including in 224 (84.5%)--from a living donor, in 41 (15.5%)--from the dead body. Using a Foley catheter to stop bleeding, and the imposition of vascular sutures during endovenectomy in portal vein thrombosis (PVT) and its possible damage under all conditions. In particular, PVT IV degree (Grade IV) in order to restore blood flow in the graft using the left gastric and renal vein is an alternative, if they are cryopreserved vein may be suitably used.

  6. LIVER TRANSPLANTATION IN KRASNODAR: FIRST RESULTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.Y. Popov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Since April 2010 to December 2011 were performed 35 orthotopic transplantations of cadaveric whole liver. The indication for surgery was liver cirrhosis of different etiologies: 6 – autoimmune, 5 – primary biliary cirrhosis, 2 – toxic, 4 – unspecified, 18 – virus, two of which with the outcome in hepatocellular carcinoma. Caval anastomosis formed mainly «end-to-side». In five cases, to increase the arterial perfusion of the graft, we ligated the splenic artery. Surgical complications in the early postoperative period were seen in 4 patients (11.4%. In the late period we observed stricture of bile duct in 4 patients (11.4%. In their treatment we used various combinations of minimally invasive and open surgical procedures. 2 patients died (5.7% – one of them on the sixth day because of intrahepatic portal vein thrombosis, another one in 6 months with a recurrence of autoimmune cirrhosis and humoral graft rejection. 

  7. Flupirtine-induced hepatic failure requiring orthotopic liver transplant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Fritz; Glanemann, Matthias; Rudolph, Birgit; Seehofer, Daniel; Neuhaus, Peter

    2011-08-01

    We present the case of a 48-year-old otherwise healthy man who required an urgent liver transplant owing to acute liver failure after flupirtine treatment. After 3 months of daily flupirtine intake as treatment for pseudoradicular pain syndrome, he presented at our institution with signs of jaundice and hepatic encephalopathy. Laboratory results showed elevated liver transaminases, and the liver histopathology supported the assumed drug-induced liver injury. After listing him for an urgent liver transplant, he was given a liver graft from a 21-year-old man. Despite a rejection episode on day 11 after the surgery (which was successfully treated by steroid pulse therapy), the postoperative course was uneventful and the patient recovered completely. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a liver transplant for acute liver failure after taking flupirtine. PMID:21819373

  8. Liver transplantation in adults:Choosing the appropriate timing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Maria; Siciliano; Lucia; Parlati; Federica; Maldarelli; Massimo; Rossi; Stefano; Ginanni; Corradini

    2012-01-01

    Liver transplantation is indicated in patients with acute liver failure,decompensated cirrhosis,hepatocellular carcinoma and rare liver-based genetic defects that trigger damage of other organs.Early referral to a transplant center is crucial in acute liver failure due to the high mortality with medical therapy and its unpredictable evolution.Referral to a transplant center should be considered when at least one complication of cirrhosis occurs during its natural history.However,because of the shortage of organ donors and the short-term mortality after liver transplantation on one hand and the possibility of managing the complications of cirrhosis with other treatments on the other,patients are carefully selected by the transplant center to ensure that transplantation is indicated and that there are no medical,surgical and psychological contraindications.Patients approved for transplantation are placed on the transplant waiting list and prioritized according to disease severity.Thus,the appropriate timing of transplantation depends on recipient disease severity and,although this is still a matter of debate,also on donor quality.These two variables are known to determine the "transplant benefit"(i.e.,when the expected patient survival is better with,than without,transplantation) and should guide donor allocation.

  9. Successful living donor liver transplant in a very small child

    OpenAIRE

    Vijay Kumar; Raman Raina

    2010-01-01

    Liver transplantation in small children poses perioperative challenges that are different from those seen in adults. We present our successful anaesthetic experience in a 7-month-old infant who has been the youngest case of successful living donor liver transplant performed in our institution till the day this article was being prepared.

  10. Nocardia Brain Abscess in a Liver Transplant Recipient

    OpenAIRE

    Moon, Jung Hyeon; Cho, Won-Sang; Kang, Hyun-Seung; Kim, Jeong Eun

    2011-01-01

    Nocardia brain abscess is rare. We report on a unique case of N. farcinica brain abscess in a liver transplant recipient, following Aspergillus fumigatus pneumonia. A 43-year-old liver transplant recipient presented with altered mentality at 2 months after A. fumigates pneumonia. He was successfully treated with surgical removal and antibiotic therapy with trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole and ceftriaxone.

  11. Studies of Pediatric Liver Transplantation (SPLIT) : Year 2000 outcomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kane, R; Solomon, H; Friedman, B; Heffron, T; DePaolo, J; Sokol, RJ; Karrer, F; Narkewicz, MR; Orban-Eller, K; Maller, ES; Higuchi, N; Mazariegos, G; Smith, A; Atkison, P; Bucuvalas, J; Balistreri, WF; Ryckman, F; Klekamp, C; Roden, J; D'Amico, L; Alonso, EM; Superina, R; Whitington, PF; Mladucky, P; Lokar, J; Andrews, WS; Daniel, J; Fioravante, [No Value; Lindblad, AS; Anand, R; Brown, D; Inman, P; Covington, L; Brock, K; Mekki, Q; Fecteau, A; DeLuca, E; Scheimann, A; Colombani, P; Alford, MK; Wise, B; Shokouh-Amiri, H; Grewal, HP; Powell, SL; Freese, DK; Greseth, J; Fisher, R; Akyeampong, M; Behnke, M; Baliga, P; Johnson, T; Emre, S; Shneider, B; Novak, R; Alvarez, F; Viau, C; Shepherd, R; Nadler, M; Cox, K; So, S; Bush, L; Goss, JA; Karpen, S; Doster, S; McDiarmid, S; Phillips, H; Smith, LJ; Jones, AB; Kneteman, N; Lavine, J; Hall, K; Rosenthal, P; Stritzel, S; Millis, JM; Kelly, S; Gonzalez-Peralta, RP; Langham, M; Mackay, E; Tzakis, AG; Romero, R; Miller, B; Weppler, D; Bunchman, T; Holmes, R; Shieck, [No Value; Horslen, S; Shaw, BW; Andersen, D; Lichtman, S; Kassmann, B; Mieles, L; Quiros, R; Irish-Feltner, J; Kalayoglu, M; D'Alessandro, A; Knechtle, S; Spaith, E

    2001-01-01

    Background. Initiated in 1995, the Studies of Pediatric Liver Transplantation (SPLIT) registry database is a cooperative research network of pediatric transplantation centers in the United States and Canada. The primary objectives are to characterize and follow trends in transplant indications, tran

  12. Reversible sinusoidal obstruction syndrome associated with tacrolimus following liver transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Tian; Feng, Xiao-Wen; Geng, Lei; Zheng, Shu-Sen

    2015-01-01

    Sinusoidal obstruction syndrome (SOS), previously known as hepatic veno-occlusive disease, is a rare disorder in solid organ transplant patients, and is an uncommon complication after liver transplantation. Severe SOS with hepatic failure causes considerable mortality. Tacrolimus has been reported to be an offending agent, which potentially plays a role in the pathophysiological process of SOS. SOS due to tacrolimus has been reported in lung and pancreatic transplantations, but has never been described in a liver transplant recipient. Herein, we present a case of SOS after liver transplantation, which was possibly related to tacrolimus. A 27-year-old man developed typical symptoms of SOS with painful hepatomegaly, ascites and jaundice after liver transplantation, which regressed following withdrawal of tacrolimus. By excluding other possible predisposing factors, we concluded that tacrolimus was the most likely cause of SOS. PMID:26034381

  13. Liver transplantation: review of the literature. Part 3: medical complications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The first attempted orthotopic liver transplantation, in 1963, involved a child with biliary atresia, who died on the operating table as a result of uncontrollable coagulopathy. Improvements in immunosuppression, surgical technique, medical imaging and postoperative care, as well as more stringent patient selection, have allowed the development of liver transplantation and its universal acceptance as the treatment for a variety of liver diseases. The radiologist plays a major role in the multidisciplinary transplantation team and must be familiar with each stage of orthotopic liver transplantation and its associated complications. In the first article of this series, the authors reviewed the anatomic features and current concepts relevant to orthotopic liver transplantation. In the second article, they discussed the vascular and biliary complications of the operation. This, the third and final article in the series, covers the medical complications. (author)

  14. Simultaneous liver-pancreas transplantation for cystic fibrosis-related liver disease : A multicenter experience

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bandsma, R. H. J.; Bozic, M. A.; Fridell, J. A.; Crull, M. H.; Molleston, J.; Avitzur, Y.; Mozer-Glassberg, Y.; Gonzalez-Peralta, R. P.; Hodik, M.; Fecteau, A.; de Angelis, M.; Durie, P.; Ng, V. L.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Diabetes is associated with increased morbidity and mortality in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). While liver transplantation is well established for CF-related liver disease (CFLD), the role of simultaneous liver pancreas transplantation is less understood. Methods: We polled 81 pedi

  15. Comprehensive ultrasound assessment of complications post-liver transplantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Brien, J. [Department of Radiology, Adelaide and Meath Incorporating the National Children' s Hospital, Tallaght, Dublin 24 (Ireland)], E-mail: juliemarobrien@yahoo.com; Buckley, A.R. [Division of Abdominal Imaging, Department of Radiology, Vancouver General Hospital, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Browne, R. [Department of Radiology, Adelaide and Meath Incorporating the National Children' s Hospital, Tallaght, Dublin 24 (Ireland)

    2010-04-15

    Human liver transplantation for end-stage liver disease was first performed in 1963. Refinements in surgical technique and new immunosuppressive regimens have improved outcomes. Today, transplant patients have a 5-year survival rate of approximately 75%. Nevertheless, significant complications still occur. Ultrasonography (US), is the initial imaging modality of choice allowing bedside assessment for detection and follow-up of early and delayed graft complications, and facilitating interventional procedures. This review outlines the role of ultrasound in post-transplantation assessment.

  16. Comprehensive ultrasound assessment of complications post-liver transplantation.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Brien, J

    2010-04-01

    Human liver transplantation for end-stage liver disease was first performed in 1963. Refinements in surgical technique and new immunosuppressive regimens have improved outcomes. Today, transplant patients have a 5-year survival rate of approximately 75%. Nevertheless, significant complications still occur. Ultrasonography (US), is the initial imaging modality of choice allowing bedside assessment for detection and follow-up of early and delayed graft complications, and facilitating interventional procedures. This review outlines the role of ultrasound in post-transplantation assessment.

  17. Acute renal failure in liver transplant patients: Indian study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naik, Pradeep; Premsagar, B; Mallikarjuna, M

    2015-01-01

    The acute renal failure is the frequent medical complication observed in liver transplant patients. The objective of this study was to determine the cause of acute renal failure in post liver transplant patients. A total of 70 patients who underwent (cadaveric 52, live 18) liver transplantation were categorized based on clinical presentation into two groups, namely hepatorenal failure (HRF, n = 29), and Hepatic failure (HF, n = 41). All the patients after the liver transplant had received tacrolimus, mycophenolate and steroids. We analyzed the modification of diet in renal disease, (MDRD) serum urea, creatinine and albumin before and after 5th and 30th day of liver transplant and data was categorized into survivors and non-survivors group. In HRF survivor group, serum creatinine, and urea levels were high and, albumin, MDRD were low in pre- transplant and reached to normal levels on 30th day of post transplant, and 79.3 % of patients in this group showed resumption of normal kidney function. On the contrary in HRF nonsurvivor group, we did not observed any significant difference and 20.7 % of patients showed irreversible changes after the liver transplant. In HF survivor group, 82.9 % of liver failure patients did not show any deviation in serum creatinine, urea, albumin and MDRD, whereas in HF non survivor group, 17.1 % of liver failure patients who had HCV positive before the transplant developed acute renal failure. The levels of creatinine, urea, albumin and MDRD were normal before the transplant and on day 30th, the levels of albumin and MDRD were significantly low whereas serum urea, creatinine levels were high. In conclusion, based on these observations, an diagnosis and treatment of Acute renal failure is important among the liver transplantation cases in the early postoperative period.

  18. Evaluation of liver transplant candidates: A pulmonary perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Bozbas Serife; Eyuboglu Fusun

    2011-01-01

    Chronic liver disease is one of the leading causes of mortality and morbidity in the worldwide adult population. Liver transplant is the gold standard therapy for end-stage liver disease and many patients are on the waiting list for a transplant. A variety of pulmonary disorders are encountered in cirrhotic patients. Pleura, lung parenchyma, and pulmonary vasculature may be affected in these patients. Hypoxemia is relatively common and can be asymptomatic. Hepatopulmonary syndrome should be i...

  19. Application of a medical image processing system in liver transplantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chi-Hua Fang; Xiao-Feng Li; Zhou Li; Ying-Fang Fan; Chao-Min Lu; Yan-Peng Huang; Feng-Ping Peng

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: At present, imaging is used not only to show the form of images, but also to make three-dimensional (3D) reconstructions and visual simulations based on original data to guide clinical surgery. This study aimed to assess the use of a medical image-processing system in liver transplantation surgery. METHODS: The data of abdominal 64-slice spiral CT scan were collected from 200 healthy volunteers and 37 liver cancer patients in terms of hepatic arterial phase, portal phase, and hepatic venous phase. A 3D model of abdominal blood vessels including the abdominal aorta system, portal vein system, and inferior vena cava system was reconstructed by an abdominal image processing system to identify vascular variations. Then, a 3D model of the liver was reconstructed in terms of hepatic segmentation and liver volume was calculated. The FreeForm modeling system with a PHANTOM force feedback device was used to simulate the real liver transplantation environment, in which the total process of liver transplantation was completed. RESULTS: The reconstructed model of the abdominal blood vessels and the liver was clearly demonstrated to be three-dimensionally consistent with the anatomy of the liver, in which the variations of abdominal blood vessels were identiifed and liver segmentation was performed digitally. In the model, liver transplantation was simulated subsequently, and different modus operandi were selected successfully. CONCLUSION: The digitized medical image processing system may be valuable for liver transplantation.

  20. Liver transplantation in Greek children: 15 years experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitrios Takoudas

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Liver transplantation (LT is the only available live-saving procedure for children with irreversible liver failure. This paper reports our experience from the follow-up of 16 Greek children with end-stage liver failure who underwent a LT. Over a period of 15 years, 16 pediatric liver recipients received follow up after being subjected to OLT (orthotopic liver transplantation due to end-stage liver failure. Nine children initially presented with extrahepatic biliary atresia, 2 with acute liver failure after toxic mushroom ingestion, 2 with intrahepatic cholestasis, 2 with metabolic diseases and one with hepatoblastoma. Ten children received a liver transplant in the Organ Transplantation Unit of Aristotle University of Thessaloniki and the rest in other transplant centers. Three transplants came from a living-related donor and 13 from a deceased donor. Six children underwent immunosuppressive treatment with cyclo­sporine, mycophenolate mofetil and corticosteroids, and 7 with tacrolimus, mycophenolate mofetil and corticosteroids. Three out of 16 children died within the first month after the transplantation due to post-transplant complications. Three children presented with acute rejection and one with chronic organ rejection which was successfully managed. Five children presented with cytomegalovirus infection, 5 with Epstein-Barr virus, 2 with HSV1,2, 2 with ParvoB19 virus, 2 with varicella-zoster virus and one with C. Albicans infection. One child presented with upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage and one with small biliary paucity. A satisfying outcome was achieved in most cases, with good graft function, except for the patient with small biliary paucity who required re-transplantation. The long-term clinical course of liver transplanted children is good under the condition that they are attended in specialized centers.

  1. Possible beneift of splenectomy in liver transplantation for autoimmune hepatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan-Tian Xu; De-Jie Liu; Fan-Ying Meng; Guang-Bing Li; Jun Liu

    2014-01-01

    Liver transplantation for autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) is usually successful with excellent long-term outcomes, but primary disease may recur. The recurrence of AIH is a signiifcant cause of graft loss. This study was to analyze the effect of splenectomy in preventing AIH relapse. The clinical courses of 12 patients who had transplantation for AIH were analyzed retrospectively. All patients were subjected to transplantation for end-stage liver disease caused by chronic AIH. Based on the duration of immunosuppressive treatment before liver transplantation, simultaneous splenectomy was performed in ten patients. Two patients underwent liver transplantation without splenectomy, one of them developed recurrent AIH and died from graft failure caused by AIH relapse. However, no episode of AIH recurrence was observed in patients who had undergone simultaneous splenectomy. Splenectomy might be an option to prevent AIH relapse in some patients with high risk factors.

  2. Current status of auxiliary partial orthotopic liver transplantation for acute liver failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rela, Mohamed; Kaliamoorthy, Ilankumaran; Reddy, Mettu Srinivas

    2016-09-01

    Auxiliary partial orthotopic liver transplantation (APOLT) is a technique of liver transplantation (LT) where a partial liver graft is implanted in an orthotopic position after leaving behind a part of the native liver. APOLT was previously considered technically challenging with results inferior to orthotopic liver transplantation. Results of this procedure have continued to improve with improving surgical techniques and a better understanding of the natural history of acute liver failure (ALF) and liver regeneration. The procedure is being increasingly accepted as a valid treatment option for ALF-especially in children. This article reviews the historical background to this operation, advances in the technique, and its current place in the management of ALF. Liver Transplantation 22 1265-1274 2016 AASLD. PMID:27357489

  3. Idiopathic extensive peliosis hepatis treated with liver transplantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hyodo, Masanobu; Mogensen, Anne Mellon; Larsen, Peter Nørgaard;

    2004-01-01

    complicating liver cirrhosis. Extensive peliosis with liver cirrhosis is a rare condition. Only two cases, caused by contraceptives and treated by liver transplantation, are reported in the English-language literature. We could find no cause other than alcohol abuse lasting several years in this patient...

  4. Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder presented as small bowel intussusception in adult liver transplant patient

    OpenAIRE

    Joo, Sun Hyung; Acun, Zeki; Stefanovic, Alexandra; Blieden, Clifford R.; Ikpatt, Offiong F.; Moon, Jang

    2011-01-01

    Intestinal obstruction after liver transplant is a rare complication, with diverse clinical manifestations. Intestinal adhesion is the most common cause. However, internal hernia, abdominal wall hernia, and neoplasm are also reported. Intussusception is another rare cause of intestinal obstruction, which has been reported primarily in pediatric patients. Herein, we report a case of intestinal obstruction from intussusception in an adult liver transplant patient associated with post-transplant...

  5. Outcomes of Technical Variant Liver Transplantation versus Whole Liver Transplantation for Pediatric Patients: A Meta-Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Ye

    Full Text Available To overcome the shortage of appropriate-sized whole liver grafts for children, technical variant liver transplantation has been practiced for decades. We perform a meta-analysis to compare the survival rates and incidence of surgical complications between pediatric whole liver transplantation and technical variant liver transplantation.To identify relevant studies up to January 2014, we searched PubMed/Medline, Embase, and Cochrane library databases. The primary outcomes measured were patient and graft survival rates, and the secondary outcomes were the incidence of surgical complications. The outcomes were pooled using a fixed-effects model or random-effects model.The one-year, three-year, five-year patient survival rates and one-year, three-year graft survival rates were significantly higher in whole liver transplantation than technical variant liver transplantation (OR = 1.62, 1.90, 1.65, 1.78, and 1.62, respectively, p<0.05. There was no significant difference in five-year graft survival rate between the two groups (OR = 1.47, p = 0.10. The incidence of portal vein thrombosis and biliary complications were significantly lower in the whole liver transplantation group (OR = 0.45 and 0.42, both p<0.05. The incidence of hepatic artery thrombosis was comparable between the two groups (OR = 1.21, p = 0.61.Pediatric whole liver transplantation is associated with better outcomes than technical variant liver transplantation. Continuing efforts should be made to minimize surgical complications to improve the outcomes of technical variant liver transplantation.

  6. Interventional therapy of complications after liver transplantation: hepatic artery stricture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hepatic artery stricture (HAS) after liver transplantation can lead directly to transplanted liver function exhaustion and complications of biliary system. The early diagnosis and treatment are crucial for better prognosis. Doppler ultrasound is the first method of choice, and angiography can give further clear dignosis. The balloon dilatation is still effective for hepatic arterial stenosis. With the more adaptable usage of oronary stent, if possible, would reveal more promising result especially for tortuous stenotic hepatic artery. The vascular reconstruction or repeated liver transplantation is still the effective therapeutic methods. (authors)

  7. Liver transplantation in the Nordic countries - An intention to treat and post-transplant analysis from The Nordic Liver Transplant Registry 1982-2013

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fosby, Bjarte; Melum, Espen; Bjøro, Kristian;

    2015-01-01

    AIM AND BACKGROUND: The Nordic Liver Transplant Registry (NLTR) accounts for all liver transplants performed in the Nordic countries since the start of the transplant program in 1982. Due to short waiting times, donor liver allocation has been made without considerations of the model of end...... at the end of 2013 for 6019 patients out of whom 5198 were transplanted. Data for recipient and donor characteristics and relevant end-points retransplantation and death are manually curated on an annual basis to allow for statistical analysis and the annual report. RESULTS: Primary sclerosing cholangitis......, acute hepatic failure, alcoholic liver disease, primary biliary cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma are the five most frequent diagnoses (accounting for 15.3%, 10.8%, 10.6%, 9.3% and 9.0% of all transplants, respectively). Median waiting time for non-urgent liver transplantation during the last 10...

  8. Outcomes and mechanisms of ischemic preconditioning in liver transplantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sheng Yan; Li-Ming Jin; Yuan-Xing Liu; Lin Zhou; Hai-Yang Xie; Shu-Sen Zheng

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Liver transplantation is so far the most effective therapeutic modality for end-stage liver diseases, but ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury represents a critical barrier to liver transplantation. Primary graft dysfunction and small-for-size syndrome are closely associated with I/R injury. Ischemic preconditioning (IPC) is deifned as a brief period of liver ischemia followed by reperfusion, and has demonstrated protections against a prolonged I/R injury and improved the capacity of regeneration. The article aimed to review IPC literatures for the understanding of the effects of IPC on I/R injury involving in the procurement of donor liver and protective mechanisms. DATA SOURCES: A literature search of MEDLINE and Web of Science databases using "liver transplantation", "liver regeneration", "hepatectomy", "ischemia/reperfusion" and"ischemic preconditioning"was performed, and then a large amount of related data was collected. RESULTS: The literature search provided a huge amount of evidence for the protective effects of IPC on I/R injury in liver transplantation, including reduction of blood loss in hepatectomy, intraoperative hemodynamic stability and its signiifcant role in liver regeneration. The mechanism involves in balancing inlfammatory cytokines, enhancing energy status and mitigating microcirculatory disturbance. CONCLUSION: IPC plays an essential role in hepatectomy before and after harvest of living donor liver and implantation of liver graft.

  9. SINGLE-CENTER EXPERIENCE OF ABO-INCOMPATIBLE LIVER TRANSPLANTATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. Gautier

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Since 2008 up to 2010 eight ABO-incompatible liver transplantations have been performed in our center: one of them was urgent liver transplantation to adult patient from deceased donor, other seven were transplantations of left lateral segment to children from living relative donors. Own experience, as well as world one, proves, that barrier of ABO-incompatibility can be overcome more successfully in liver transplantation, particularly in pediatric population, that in other solid organs transplantation. Good results can be achieved even with less ag- gressive immunosuppressive therapy. Recipient conditioning before operation can significantly improve results of ABO-incompatible liver transplantation, but as own experience has shown, often there’s no need to hold some special preparation of children, because their anti-ABO antibodies are very low or absent before transplantation and do not increase after it. Thereby ABO-incompatible liver transplantation is reasonable in urgent cases and in pediatric population because of the limited pull of living relative donors for children. 

  10. Underutilization of palliative care services in the liver transplant population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kathpalia, Priya; Smith, Alexander; Lai, Jennifer C

    2016-01-01

    AIM To evaluate use of palliative care services in patients with end-stage liver disease who do not have access to liver transplant. METHODS Evaluated were end-stage liver disease patients who were removed from the liver transplant wait-list or died prior to transplant at a single transplant center over a 2-year period. Those who were removed due to noncompliance or ultimately transplanted elsewhere were excluded from this study. Patient characteristics associated with palliative care consultation were assessed using logistic regression analysis. RESULTS Six hundred and eighty-three patients were listed for liver transplant in 2013-2014 with 107 (16%) dying (n = 62) or removed for clinical decompensation prior to liver transplant (n = 45): Median age was 58 years, and the majority were male (66%), Caucasian (53%), had Child C cirrhosis (61%) or hepatocellular carcinoma (52%). The palliative care team was consulted in only 18 of the 107 patients (17%) who died or were removed, 89% of which occurred as inpatients. Half of these consultations occurred within 72 h of death. In univariable analysis, patients of younger age, white race, and higher end-stage liver disease scores at time of listing and delisting were more likely to receive palliative care services. Only younger age [Odds ratio (OR) = 0.92; P = 0.02] and Caucasian race (OR = 4.90; P = 0.02) were still associated with integration of palliative care services through multivariable analysis. CONCLUSION Palliative care services are grossly underutilized in older, non-white patients with cirrhosis on the liver transplant wait-list. We encourage early integration of these services into clinical decision-making in the transplant population, with further studies aimed at understanding barriers to consultation. PMID:27683638

  11. Quality of life after liver transplantation with old donor graft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria José Nascimento Flor

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to compare the quality of life of liver transplant patients who received liver from donor aged ≤60 or >60 years old. Methods: a prospective study with a sample of 141 recipients from liver donors aged equal to or less than 60 years and recipients of elderly donor liver, in a reference center. Authors used a tool for identification and the Short Form-36. The Student-t and Mann-Whitney tests were applied for comparison between groups. Results: there were higher levels of quality of life with a statistically significant difference: Group A in social aspect (p=0.02 and Group B >50 months of transplantation (p=0.05 in physical component summary. Conclusion: the quality of life of liver receptors from older donor livers was similar to those who received a graft from younger donors in most dimensions. Transplanting time had a positive impact on the quality of life of elderly recipients.

  12. HIV-Positive-to-HIV-Positive Liver Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calmy, A; van Delden, C; Giostra, E; Junet, C; Rubbia Brandt, L; Yerly, S; Chave, J-P; Samer, C; Elkrief, L; Vionnet, J; Berney, T

    2016-08-01

    Most countries exclude human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive patients from organ donation because of concerns regarding donor-derived HIV transmission. The Swiss Federal Act on Transplantation has allowed organ transplantation between HIV-positive donors and recipients since 2007. We report the successful liver transplantation from an HIV-positive donor to an HIV-positive recipient. Both donor and recipient had been treated for many years with antiretroviral therapy and harbored multidrug-resistant viruses. Five months after transplantation, HIV viremia remains undetectable. This observation supports the inclusion of appropriate HIV-positive donors for transplants specifically allocated to HIV-positive recipients. PMID:27109874

  13. Hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal function in men with liver cirrhosis before and after liver transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno T. Zacharias

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the influence of end-stage liver disease and orthotopic liver transplantation in the pituitary function and hormone metabolism before and after liver transplantation. Methods: In a prospective study, serum levels of follicle stimulating hormone (FSH, luteinizing hormone (LH, estradiol (E2 and prolactin (PRL of 30 male patients with cirrhosis were determined two to four hours before and six months after liver transplantation. The results were compared according to the Model for End-stage Liver Disease (MELD. Results: male patients with liver cirrhosis have hypogonadism. FSH was normal, but inappropriately low due to androgen failure; E2 and PRL, on their turn, were high. After liver transplantation, FSH and LH levels increased (p 18. The severity of cirrhosis had no influence on FSH, PRL and LH.

  14. COMBINED LIVER-PANCREAS TRANSPLANTATION: THE FIRST RUSSIAN EXPERIENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. Gautier

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Combined liver-pancreas transplantation is considered to be a reasonable treatment of patients with end-stage liver disease and concomitant insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, so it may become a standard treatment of this category of patients. As known, diabetes mellitus negatively affects the long-term results of isolated liver transplantation and increases a risk of posttransplant complications. Notwithstanding the widening range of indi- cations for simultaneous liver-pancreas transplantation and advances of transplantology, this operation continues to be a rare event in world medical practice. In May 2010 in Academician V.I. Shumakov Federal Research Cen- ter of Transplantology and Artificial Organs there was performed a first in Russia simultaneous liver-pancreas transplantation to 17-years old recipient, suffering with liver cirrhosis (as a result of autoimmune hepatitis and concomitant insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. In this article we give an overview of indications for simultaneous liver-pancreas transplantation, different ope- rative techniques, immunological aspects and immunosuppression regimes, as well as we describe the first in Russian experience of such transplantation

  15. Diet and nutrition therapy in pre-liver transplant patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Neha Bakshi; Kalyani Singh

    2016-01-01

    Malnutrition is universaly prevalent among pre-liver transplantation patients. Malnutrition among cirrhotic patients had been associated to increased morbidity and mortality rates. Also, severely malnourished patients before the transplant surgery have a higher rate of complications and a decreased overal survival rate after liver transplantation. In light of the high incidence of malnutrition and associated complications, it is essential to initiate treatment as early as it is assessed. This review addresses the aetiologies of malnutrition and appropriate treatment strategies to correct it in pre-liver transplant phase. Treatment should focus on maintaining nutrient intake and correcting various nutritional deifciencies. The dietician plays an integral role as part of the transplant team by providing appropriate nutrition therapy for solving various nutrition problems.

  16. Transplantation of fetal liver epithelial progenitor cells ameliorates experimental liver fibrosis in mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jin-Fang Zheng; Li-Jian Liang; Chang-Xiong Wu; Jin-Song Chen; Zhen-Sheng Zhang

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effect of transplanted fetal liver epithelial progenitor (FLEP) cells on liver fibrosis in mice.METHODS: FLEP cells were isolated from embryonal day (ED) 14 BALB/c mice and transplanted into female syngenic BALB/c mice (n = 60). After partial hepatectomy (PH), diethylnitrosamine (DEN) was administered to induce liver fibrosis. Controls received FLEP cells and non-supplemented drinking water, the model group received DEN-spiked water, and the experimental group received FLEP cells and DEN.Mice were killed after 1, 2, and 3 mo, and alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), hyaluronic acid (HA), and laminin (LN) in serum,and hydroxyproline (Hyp) content in liver were assessed.Alpha-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) of liver was tested by immunohistochemistry. Transplanted male mice FLEP cells were identified by immunocytochemistry for sry (sex determination region for Y chromosome) protein.RESULTS: Serum ALT, AST, HA, and LN were markedly reduced by transplanted FLEP cells. Liver Hyp content and α-SMA staining in mice receiving FLEP cells were lower than that of the model group, which was consistent with altered liver pathology. Transplanted cells proliferated and differentiated into hepatocytes and bile duct epithelial cells with 30%-50% repopulation in the liver fibrosis induced by DEN after 3 mo.CONCLUSION: Transplanted FLEP cells proliferate and differentiate into hepatocytes and bile duct epithelial cells with high repopulation capacity in the fiberized liver induced by DEN, which restores liver function and reduces liver fibrosis.

  17. Characteristics of Oral Abnormalities in Liver Transplant Candidates

    OpenAIRE

    Guggenheimer, J.; Close, J. M.; Eghtesad, B; Shay, C.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Several oral mucosal abnormalities have been reported to occur more frequently in patients with liver disease. It has, however, not been determined if these conditions are related to the disease or are manifestations of extraneous factors not associated with the liver pathology. Objective: To identify and quantify oral abnormalities in candidates for liver transplantation, and to determine whether these conditions were correlated with the type of liver disease or were the result o...

  18. Effects of different mitogens on intrasplenic liver tissue transplants in comparison to orthotopic liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupp, Amelie; Lucas, Norma; Tralls, Manuela; Fuchs, Udo; Danz, Manfred

    2003-06-01

    Ectopic liver cell transplants, when compared to orthotopic liver, can serve as a tool to study topic influences on liver cell differentiation, multiplication, function and responsiveness to xenobiotics. The aim of the present study was to evaluate, if characteristic effects of mitogens are exerted in both liver and intrasplenic liver cell transplants in a similar manner. Fetal liver tissue suspensions were transplanted into the spleens of adult male syngenic rats. Four months later, transplant recipients and controls were treated with fluorene (FEN), fluorenone (FON), 2-acetylaminofluorene (AAF), N-nitrosodibenzylamine (NDBA) or the solvent 48 hours before sacrifice. The following parameters were assessed within livers and spleens: mitotic activity of hepatocytes, glycogen content, cytochrome P450 (P450) isoforms expression, P450 mediated monooxygenase functions, tissue content of lipid peroxides (LPO) and of reduced and oxidized glutathione (GSH; GSSG). In both orthotopic livers and intrasplenic transplants FEN, FON or NDBA administration increased the mitotic activity of the hepatocytes. Treatment with the mitogens caused a distinct and characteristic induction of the P450 isoforms expression and of the respective monooxygenase functions in the livers and (with certain differences) also in the transplants. FEN and FON slightly increased, AAF and NDBA reduced liver glycogen content. The latter effect was also seen in the transplants. NDBA administration caused a slight increase in tissue LPO content in livers, but not in spleens. Additionally, AAF or NDBA treatment led to an elevation of liver (but not of spleen) GSH and GSSG concentrations. The results of the present investigation show that characteristic effects of mitogens on orthotopic liver occur with certain differences also in ectopic liver cell transplants.

  19. [The Application of Machine Perfusion on Clinical Liver Transplantation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Fenggang; Zhu, Haoyang; Yan, Xiaopeng; Liu, Chang; Zhang, Xiaogang; Lv, Yi

    2015-11-01

    Liver transplantation is the only way to treat end-stage liver disease. In order to overcome the shortage of donor, marginal donors have been used widely, which bring about a series of problems. Machine perfusion can stimulate the circulation in vivo and is beneficial for the protection of liver. It could also improve the graft function and reduce postoperative complications, which makes it a hot spot in recent years. The aim of this study is to summarize the current status and prospects of application of machine perfusion on clinical liver transplantation.

  20. Interventional therapy of complications after liver transplantation: arterial steal syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arterial steal syndrome (ASS), a scarce complication after liver transplantation, is characterized by hepatic arterial hypoperfusion of the graft caused by a shifting of blood flow into the splenic, left gastric, or gastroduodenal arteries. It can lead to stricture formation of biliary system and transplanted liver function exhaustion. The early diagnosis and treatment are important for protecting the transplanted liver function. Dynamic CDFI after liver transplantation as a routine is necessary to find out the suspected lesions, and transcatheter angiography as the gold standardization can give clear dignosis. Embolization of splenic artery is minimally invasive, successful and less complication treatment for ASS and especially the coil embolization of middle segment of splenic artery is the best choice. (authors)

  1. CT-guided percutaneous biopsy for transplanted liver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To study the technique and clinical significance of percutaneous biopsy of transplanted liver guided by CT. Methods: 19 transplanted liver were undergone 25 times of percutaneous biopsy and the pathomorphologic changes were demonstrated by HE staining. Results: The successful rate of the percutaneous biopsy was 100% for all the 25 times of this procedure, including acute rejection on 9 episodes, preservation perfusion retrauma in 6, bile duct strictures in 4, drug-induced injury in 4, chronic rejection in 1 and acute hepatic necrosis in 1. Conclusions: CT-guided percutaneous biopsy is an important method for diagnosing transplanted liver injury and providing great value for distinguishment of the causes for transplanted liver injury. (authors)

  2. Haemostasis monitoring during sequential aortic valve replacement and liver transplantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sieders, E.; De Somer, F.; Bouchez, S.; Szegedi, L.; Van Belleghem, Y.; Colle, I.; Troisi, R.

    2010-01-01

    Despite advances in anaesthesiological and surgical techniques, cardiac surgery in cirrhotic patients remains hazardous. This report outlines our experience with haemostasis monitoring in two consecutive cases of sequential aortic valve replacement and liver transplantation. Clotting disturbances pr

  3. Cyclosporin versus tacrolimus as primary immunosuppressant after liver transplantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McAlister, V C; Haddad, E; Renouf, E;

    2006-01-01

    A systematic review of randomized clinical trials (RCT) was undertaken to evaluate the beneficial and harmful effects of immunosuppression with cyclosporin versus tacrolimus for liver transplanted patients. MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane Central and Hepato-Biliary Group Controlled Trials Registers wer...

  4. Hepatic haemangioendothelioma in adults: excellent outcome following liver transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerut, Jan P; Orlando, Giuseppe; Sempoux, Christine; Ciccarelli, Olga; Van Beers, Bernard E; Danse, Etienne; Horsmans, Yves; Rahier, Jacques; Roggen, Francine

    2004-05-01

    Hepatic epithelioid haemangioendotheliomas (HEHEs) are rare, low-grade vascular tumours. Five adults with HEHEs and one adult with a vascular tumour showing combined features of haemangioma and haemangioendothelioma underwent liver transplantation. Two HEHE patients had extrahepatic metastases at the time of transplantation. Median survival time following diagnosis was 10.7 years (range 40 months to 195 months). One patient needed resection of a HEHE in the breast 13 years post-transplantation. All six patients are surviving free from disease 22 to 166 months after transplantation (median 77 months). One HEHE-patient who had been treated for 8 years for vertebral and cerebral localisations is free of disease without immunosuppression 56 months after transplantation. We can conclude that liver transplantation is a valuable treatment for hepatic haemangioendothelioma, even in cases of extrahepatic localisation of the disease. PMID:15114438

  5. Impact of human herpes virus 6 in liver transplantation

    OpenAIRE

    Razonable, Raymund R.; Lautenschlager, Irmeli

    2010-01-01

    Human herpes virus 6 (HHV-6) infects > 95% of humans. Primary infection which occurs mostly during the first 2 years of life in the form of roseola infantum, non-specific febrile illness, or an asymptomatic illness, results in latency. Reactivation of latent HHV-6 is common after liver transplantation. Since the majority of human beings harbor the latent virus, HHV-6 infections after liver transplantation are most probably caused by endogenous reactivation or superinfection. In a minority of ...

  6. Posttransplant Sarcopenia: An Underrecognized Early Consequence of Liver Transplantation

    OpenAIRE

    Dasarathy, Srinivasan

    2013-01-01

    Liver transplantation is believed to reverse the clinical and metabolic abnormalities of cirrhosis. Reduced skeletal muscle mass or sarcopenia contributes to increased mortality and adverse consequences of cirrhosis. Failure of reversal of sarcopenia of cirrhosis after liver transplantation is not well recognized. Six temporally, geographically, and methodologically distinct follow-up studies in 304 cirrhotics reported conflicting data on changes in indirect measures of skeletal muscle mass a...

  7. Incidence and Management of Colorectal Cancer in Liver Transplant Recipients

    OpenAIRE

    Nishihori, Taiga; Strazzabosco, Mario; Saif, Muhammad Wasif

    2008-01-01

    Liver transplant recipients are at an increased risk of developing de novo malignancies because of the prolonged immunosuppression necessary to avoid acute and chronic rejections. Skin cancers and lymphoproliferative diseases are the most common malignancies, but the overall incidence of colon cancer in this patient population does differ from that of the general population. Therefore, colorectal cancer (CRC) is a major health concern in liver transplant recipients. Furthermore, there are uni...

  8. Physical activity and metabolic syndrome in liver transplant recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallwitz, Eric R; Loy, Veronica; Mettu, Praveen; Von Roenn, Natasha; Berkes, Jamie; Cotler, Scott J

    2013-10-01

    There is a high prevalence of metabolic syndrome in liver transplant recipients, a population that tends to be physically inactive. The aim of this study was to characterize physical activity and evaluate the relationship between physical activity and metabolic syndrome after liver transplantation. A cross-sectional analysis was performed in patients more than 3 months after transplantation. Metabolic syndrome was classified according to National Cholesterol Education Panel Adult Treatment Panel III guidelines. Physical activity, including duration, frequency, and metabolic equivalents of task (METs), was assessed. The study population consisted of 204 subjects, with 156 more than 1 year after transplantation. The median time after transplantation was 53.5 months (range = 3-299 months). The mean duration of exercise was 90 ± 142 minutes, and the mean MET score was 3.6 ± 1.5. Metabolic syndrome was observed in 58.8% of all subjects and in 63.5% of the subjects more than 1 year after transplantation. In a multivariate analysis involving all subjects, metabolic syndrome was associated with a time after transplantation greater than 1 year [odds ratio (OR) = 2.909, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.389-6.092] and older age (OR = 1.036, 95% CI = 1.001-1.072). A second analysis was performed for only patients more than 1 year after transplantation. In a multivariate analysis, metabolic syndrome was associated with lower exercise intensity (OR = 0.690, 95% CI = 0.536-0.887), older age (OR = 1.056, 95% CI = 1.014-1.101), and pretransplant diabetes (OR = 4.246, 95% CI = 1.300-13.864). In conclusion, metabolic syndrome is common after liver transplantation, and the rate is significantly higher in patients more than 1 year after transplantation. The observation that exercise intensity is inversely related to metabolic syndrome after transplantation is novel and suggests that physical activity might provide a means for reducing metabolic syndrome complications in liver

  9. Organ preservation and viability in kidney and liver transplantation

    OpenAIRE

    Maathuis, Marcus Hubertus Johannes

    2008-01-01

    Organ preservation for transplantation. The easy way or best method? Kidney and liver transplantations are routinely performed nowadays to treat end stage organ diseases. However, the increasing gap between demand and supply, has necessitated the transplantation community to expand donor criteria and accept donor organs which sustained more damage. Organ preservation should maintain organ viability after an organ has been disconnected from the circulation in the donor. At this moment static c...

  10. Reversible sinusoidal obstruction syndrome associated with tacrolimus following liver transplantation

    OpenAIRE

    Shen, Tian; Feng, Xiao-Wen; Geng, Lei; Zheng, Shu-Sen

    2015-01-01

    Sinusoidal obstruction syndrome (SOS), previously known as hepatic veno-occlusive disease, is a rare disorder in solid organ transplant patients, and is an uncommon complication after liver transplantation. Severe SOS with hepatic failure causes considerable mortality. Tacrolimus has been reported to be an offending agent, which potentially plays a role in the pathophysiological process of SOS. SOS due to tacrolimus has been reported in lung and pancreatic transplantations, but has never been...

  11. Interventional radiology procedures in adult patients who underwent liver transplantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Roberto Miraglia; Luigi Maruzzelli; Settimo Caruso; Mariapina Milazzo; Gianluca Marrone; Giuseppe Mamone; Vincenzo Carollo; Salvatore Gruttadauria; Angelo Luca; Bruno Gridelli

    2009-01-01

    Interventional radiology has acquired a key role in every liver transplantation (LT) program by treating the majority of vascular and non-vascular post-transplant complications, improving graft and patient survival and avoiding, in the majority of cases, surgical revision and/or re-transplantation. The aim of this paper is to review indications, technical consideration, results achievable and potential complications of interventional radiology procedures after deceased donor LT and living related adult LT.

  12. End-Stage Renal Disease after Liver Transplantation in Patients with Pre-Transplant Chronic Kidney Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Bahirwani, Ranjeeta; Forde, Kimberly A.; Mu, Yifei; Lin, Fred; Reese, Peter; Goldberg, David; Abt, Peter; Reddy, K. Rajender; Levine, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    Renal dysfunction prior to liver transplantation has a marked impact on post-transplant kidney outcomes. The aim of this study was to assess post-transplant renal function in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) receiving orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) alone.

  13. Alteration of Brain Oxygenation During "Piggy Back" Liver Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panzera, Piercarmine; Greco, Luigi; Carravetta, Giuseppe; Gentile, Antonella; Catalano, Giorgio; Cicco, Giuseppe; Memeo, Vincenzo

    Relevant changes in cerebral circulation occur during "Piggy Back" liver transplantation. Particularly at the washout-reperfusion time the cerebral perfusion suddenly changes from its lowest to its highest values. Further investigation is required to evaluate whether patients with the greatest change in cerebral oxygenation at this time point will suffer neurological complications after transplantation.

  14. Challenging hepatitis C-infected liver transplant patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver M

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Madeleine Oliver,1 Christopher Chiodo Ortiz,2 Jorge Ortiz31University of Toledo College of Medicine, Toledo, OH, 2Bucknell University, Lewisburg, PA, 3Department of Transplant Surgery, University of Toledo Medical Center, Toledo, OH, USA Abstract: Caring for liver transplant patients suffering from chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV infection is a challenging task for transplant surgeons and primary physicians alike. HCV is the leading cause of liver transplantation in the USA and comes with a myriad of complications that increase morbidity and mortality. This review focuses on patient follow-up, spanning from before the liver transplant occurs to the patient's long-term health. Pretransplant, both donor and recipient variables, must be carefully chosen to ensure optimal surgical success. Risk factors must be identified and HCV viral load must be reduced to a minimum. In addition to standard transplant complications, HCV patients suffer from additional problems, such as fibrosing cholestatic hepatitis and widespread viremia. Physicians must focus on the balance of immunosuppressive and antiviral medications, while considering possible side effects from these potent drugs. Over the years following surgery, physicians must identify any signs of failing liver health, as HCV-positive patients have an increased risk for cirrhosis and certain life-threatening malignancies. Keywords: liver transplant, hepatitis C virus, postoperative, cirrhosis, donor and recipient variables, viremia

  15. Three-dimensional print of a liver for preoperative planning in living donor liver transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zein, Nizar N; Hanouneh, Ibrahim A; Bishop, Paul D; Samaan, Maggie; Eghtesad, Bijan; Quintini, Cristiano; Miller, Charles; Yerian, Lisa; Klatte, Ryan

    2013-12-01

    The growing demand for liver transplantation and the concomitant scarcity of cadaveric livers have increased the need for living donor liver transplantation (LDLT). Ensuring the safety of donors and recipients is critical. The preoperative identification of the vascular and biliary tract anatomy with 3-dimensional (3D) printing may allow better preoperative surgical planning, avert unnecessary surgery in patients with potentially unsuitable anatomy, and thereby decrease the complications of liver transplant surgery. We developed a protocol and successfully 3D-printed synthetic livers (along with their complex networks of vascular and biliary structures) replicating the native livers of 6 patients: 3 living donors and 3 respective recipients who underwent LDLT. To our knowledge, these are the first complete 3D-printed livers. Using standardized preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative assessments, we demonstrated identical anatomical and geometrical landmarks in the 3D-printed models and native livers.

  16. Significance and specificity of vascular anastomosis in liver transplantation: Our experience

    OpenAIRE

    Nenezić Dragoslav; Tasić Nebojša; Ilijevski Nenad; Radak Đorđe

    2007-01-01

    Introduction Transplantation is the method of choice in the treatment of terminal liver diseases with acute and structural damage of liver tissue and congenital liver diseases. Objective The aim of our study was to determine specificity and significance of vascular anastomosis in liver transplantation by postoperative evaluation of vascular anastomosis function. Method The study included 16 patients with 16 liver transplantations and one re-do liver transplantation. In all patients, preoperat...

  17. Liver transplantation in PBC and PSC: indications and disease recurrence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbone, Marco; Neuberger, James

    2011-06-01

    Primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) and primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) represent major indications for liver transplantation (LT). Despite the steady increase in the incidence and prevalence of PBC, the number of liver transplants for PBC has fallen in recent years, whereas the number of transplants for PSC has remained stable. Indications for LT for PBC and PSC are no different from those of other causes of chronic liver disease, apart from some disease-specific indications. PBC and PSC have more favourable outcomes after LT, compared to viral hepatitis and alcohol-associated liver disease. Numerous studies have clearly demonstrated that PBC and PSC recur after LT. The diagnosis of recurrent disease should be made on agreed criteria. The impact of recurrent disease on survival is unclear. Study of recurrent PBC and PSC may provide a better understanding of the mechanisms of these diseases in the native liver.

  18. Current status and perspectives in split liver transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauterio, Andrea; Di Sandro, Stefano; Concone, Giacomo; De Carlis, Riccardo; Giacomoni, Alessandro; De Carlis, Luciano

    2015-10-21

    Growing experience with the liver splitting technique and favorable results equivalent to those of whole liver transplant have led to wider application of split liver transplantation (SLT) for adult and pediatric recipients in the last decade. Conversely, SLT for two adult recipients remains a challenging surgical procedure and outcomes have yet to improve. Differences in organ shortages together with religious and ethical issues related to cadaveric organ donation have had an impact on the worldwide distribution of SLT. Despite technical refinements and a better understanding of the complex liver anatomy, SLT remains a technically and logistically demanding surgical procedure. This article reviews the surgical and clinical advances in this field of liver transplantation focusing on the role of SLT and the issues that may lead a further expansion of this complex surgical procedure. PMID:26494957

  19. Cardiac Failure after Liver Transplantation Requiring a Biventricular Assist Device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita Jermyn

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Increased hepatic iron load in extrahepatic organs of cirrhotic patients with and without hereditary hemochromatosis portends a poorer long term prognosis after liver transplant. Hepatic as well as nonhepatic iron overload is associated with increased infectious and postoperative complications, including cardiac dysfunction. In this case report, we describe a cirrhotic patient with alpha 1 antitrypsin deficiency and nonhereditary hemochromatosis (non-HFE that developed cardiogenic shock requiring mechanical circulatory support for twenty days after liver transplant. Upon further investigation, she was found to have significant iron deposition in both the liver and heart biopsies. Her heart regained complete and sustained recovery following ten days of mechanical biventricular support. This case highlights the importance of preoperatively recognizing extrahepatic iron deposition in patients referred for liver transplantation irrespective of etiology of liver disease as this may prevent postoperative complications.

  20. Recipient-derived hepatocytes in liver transplants: a rare event in sex-mismatched transplants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogt, Franz; Beyser, Kurt H; Poremba, Christopher; Zimmerman, Robert L; Khettry, Urmila; Ruschoff, Josef

    2002-07-01

    Bone marrow-derived stem cells have been shown to engraft and populate native tissues during repair and in transplanted animal tissues. Very few studies have been performed in humans to evaluate the possibility of stem cell engraftment in transplanted tissues. In human renal transplants, recipient cells have been demonstrated within vascular and interstitial structures. In a previous study of patients with hepatic transplants, hepatocytes with XY chromosome patterns have been detected in sex-mismatched female to male transplanted livers in a small number of cases. Because of the possibility of Y chromosome microchimerism of females with male offspring, we analyzed the presence of X and Y chromosomes in liver biopsies of 13 patients with sex-mismatched liver transplants (8 female to male, 5 male to female) and long transplant to biopsy intervals (1.2 to 12 years; mean, 4.5 years). We were able to detect recipient-specific sex chromosomal patterns in inflammatory cells by fluorescent in situ hybridization/immunohistochemistry combination within the liver parenchyma but not within hepatocytes. In conclusion, recipient engraftment of stem cells may be an early feature in liver transplant but may be an infrequent persistent feature in long-term grafts.

  1. Societal reintegration following cadaveric orthotopic liver transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Ryan; Hurton, Scott; Ayloo, Subhashini; Cwinn, Mathew; De Coutere-Bosse, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Background Studies on patients’ societal reintegration following orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) are scarce. Methods Between September 2006 and January 2008, all adults who were alive after 3 years post OLT were included in this prospective cohort study. Validated questionnaires were administered to all candidates with the primary aim of investigating the rate of their social re-integration following OLT and potential barriers they might have encountered. Results Among 157 eligible patients 110 (70%) participated. Mean participants’ age was 57 years (SD 11.4) and 43% were females. Prior to OLT, 75% of patients were married and 6% were divorced. Following OLT there was no significant difference in marital status. Employment rate fell from 72% to 30% post-OLT. Patients who had been employed in either low-skill or advanced-skill jobs were less likely to return to work. After OLT, personal income fell an average of 4,363 Canadian dollars (CAN$) (SD 20,733) (P=0.03) but the majority of recipients (80%) reported high levels of satisfaction for their role in society. Conclusions Although patients’ satisfaction post-OLT is high, employment status is likely to be negatively affected for individuals who are not self-employed. Strategies to assist recipients in returning to their pre-OLT jobs should be developed to improve patients’ economical status and societal ability to recoup resources committed for OLT. PMID:27275465

  2. Credential Application Awaiting Information

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — When a Credential application or required documentation is incomplete, an Awaiting Information letter is issued. The application process cannot continue until all...

  3. Post-transplantation lymphoproliferative disorder in transplanted liver : a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Post-transplantation lymphoproliferative disorder occurs in transplant recipients in whom immunosuppressive therapy has compromised the immune system. In patients who have undergone transplants, suppressor T lymphocyte function is suppressed, leading to unbridled B lymphocyte proliferation. We encountered a case with post-transplantation lymphoproliferative disorder which manifested as a focal hepatic mass in transplanted liver. This mass was isoechoic, with a peripheral hypoechoic halo on ultrasonogram, while on all three phases of helical CT scan, low attenuation without contrast enhancement was seen. (author). 6 refs., 1 fig

  4. Establishment of animal model of dual liver transplantation in rat.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Zhang

    Full Text Available The animal model of the whole-size and reduced-size liver transplantation in both rat and mouse has been successfully established. Because of the difficulties and complexities in microsurgical technology, the animal model of dual liver transplantation was still not established for twelve years since the first human dual liver transplantation has been made a success. There is an essential need to establish this animal model to lay a basic foundation for clinical practice. To study the physiological and histopathological changes of dual liver transplantation, "Y" type vein from the cross part between vena cava and two iliac of donor and "Y' type prosthesis were employed to recanalize portal vein and the bile duct between dual liver grafts and recipient. The dual right upper lobes about 45-50% of the recipient liver volume were taken as donor, one was orthotopically implanted at its original position, the other was rotated 180° sagitally and heterotopically positioned in the left upper quadrant. Microcirculation parameters, liver function, immunohistochemistry and survival were analyzed to evaluate the function of dual liver grafts. No significant difference in the hepatic microcirculatory flow was found between two grafts in the first 90 minutes after reperfusion. Light and electronic microscope showed the liver architecture was maintained without obvious features of cellular destruction and the continuity of the endothelium was preserved. Only 3 heterotopically positioned graft appeared patchy desquamation of endothelial cell, mitochondrial swelling and hepatocytes cytoplasmic vacuolization. Immunohistochemistry revealed there is no difference in hepatocyte activity and the ability of endothelia to contract and relax after reperfusion between dual grafts. Dual grafts made a rapid amelioration of liver function after reperfusion. 7 rats survived more than 7 days with survival rate of 58.3.%. Using "Y" type vein and bile duct prosthesis, we

  5. Spontaneous Clearance of Hepatitis C after Liver and Renal Transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CH Dale

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Spontaneous clearance of hepatitis C virus (HCV is rare in immunocompromised patients, such as those who have undergone organ transplantation. It has been recognized that patients receiving liver transplantation for HCV-related disease have decreased graft and patient survival compared with those transplanted for other etiologies. There is a growing trend toward treating HCV recurrence aggressively after liver transplantation. For other organ transplant recipients with concurrent HCV, treatment is not often an option, given the high rates of graft rejection and loss secondary to interferon and its immunomodulatory effects. Although spontaneous clearance of HCV has been reported in recipients of solitary liver and renal transplants, a common factor arising in these cases has been previous exposure to interferon. To date, no reports of spontaneous clearance of HCV RNA have been reported in a multiorgan transplant recipient. A case of spontaneous clearance of HCV RNA in an immunocompromised patient, within five months of simultaneous liver and kidney retransplantation is described. Importantly, this patient had no previous exposure to interferon.

  6. The two tales of coagulation in liver transplantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Warnaar, Nienke; Lisman, Ton; Porte, Robert J.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose of review Hemostatic alterations in cirrhosis involve molecular pathways that both promote and stabilize blood clotting and pathways that mediate clot dissolution. Orthotopic liver transplantation for end-stage liver disease historically was a long and risky procedure, accompanied by substan

  7. Efifcacy and safety of moderately steatotic donor liver in transplantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Feng Gao; Xiao Xu; Qi Ling; Jian Wu; Lin Zhou; Hai-Yang Xie; Hui-Ping Wang; Shu-Sen Zheng

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The discrepancy between available livers and requests for transplantation has forced many centers to use marginal donors in order to expand the donor pool. Many previous studies have demonstrated controversial results of the application of steatotic liver grafts. The aim of the present study was to summarize our experience and evaluate the value of steatotic liver grafts. METHODS: The clinical and follow-up data of 24 adult patients receiving moderately steatotic liver grafts (30%-60%) from May 2003 to June 2005 (group 1) were analyzed. After matching for age, gender, model for end-stage liver diseases score and cold ischemia time, another 24 patients receiving liver grafts with steatosis less than 30%were chosen as the control group (group 2). The patient and graft outcomes were compared between the two groups. RESULTS: No difference of liver and kidney functions in the ifrst post-transplant week was found between the two groups (P>0.05). Neither the incidence of early allograft dysfunction and acute kidney injury nor the patient survival rates (3 months, 6 months and 1 year) showed differences between groups 1 and 2 (P>0.05). CONCLUSION: Moderately steatotic liver grafts provide adequate function in the ifrst phase after transplantation and can be used for transplantation.

  8. Two cases of combined liver-kidney transplantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Objectives To report the clinical experiences of srmultaneous hepatorenal transplantation. Methods We performed simultaneous hepatorenal transplantation in one patient with liver cirrhosis of hepatitis B and uremia of chronic nephritis on February 1,1999 and one patient with liver cirrhosis of hepatitis B complicated by hepatorenal syndrome on March 12, 1999.The donors were heart arrest cases. Rapid multiple organ harvesting techniques and UW solution infusion in situ were used. Liver and kidney transplantation were orthotopic and ordinary methods, respectively. Immunosuppressive drugs consisted of cyclosporine, Cellcept, ALG and sortstso steroids. Lamividine was used os day 50 and day 40 postoparation, respectively. Results Both transplanted organs rapidly achieved normal function postoperation and the patients recovered well but suffered mild kidney rejection day 110 postopemtion in No 1 patient. In No 2 patient, acute renal function failure, mental symptoms, muscle spasm,cerebral artery thrombosis, inhalation poeumonia and chronic liver graft rejection ensured sequentially but were controlled.The patients have survived for more than nine and eight months, respectively, with normal life quality. Conclusions Combined hepatorenal transplant is a radical treatment method for liver and kidney function failure and requires more comprehensive techniques than isolated single organ transplantation.Preventing the recurrence of hepatitis B by oral lamividine may be a kdy to long-term survival.

  9. Diagnosis and treatment of fungal infection after liver transplantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI Xian-jie; LU Shao-cheng; HE Lei; L(U) Fang; LIANG Yu-rong; LUO Ying; JI Wen-bin; ZHAO Zhi-ming

    2011-01-01

    Background Liver transplantation is the most effective treatment for end-stage liver diseases;however,infections after transplantation can seriously affect the patient's health. The aim of this research was to investigate the diagnosis and treatment of fungal infection following liver transplantation.Methods Clinical data for 232 liver transplant patients at risk of fungal infection were examined for the presence of fungus in the blood,fluid,sputum,urine and stools of patients and by chest or abdominal CT scans. Patients diagnosed with a fungal infection were treated with Fluconazole or,if this was not effective,Voriconazole or Amphotericin B.Immunosuppressive therapy was also reviewed.Results Thirty-seven of 232 (15.9%) patients were diagnosed with a fungal infection,which occurred 4 to 34 days post-transplantation. Candida infections were diagnosed in 23 cases (62.2%) and Aspergillus infections in 12 cases (32.4%). Twenty-one cases were effectively treated with Fluconazole,11 cases with Voriconazole,and two cases with Amphotericin B;however,three cases were not effectively treated with any of the antifungal agents. Overall,treatment was effective in 91.9% of patients.Conclusions Fungal infection has a significant influence on survival rate after liver transplantation. Imaging studies,and pathogenic and biopsy examinations can diagnose fungal infections,which can be effectively treated with antifungal agents such as Fluconazole,Voriconazole or Amphotericin B.

  10. Does situs inversus totalis preclude liver donation in living donor liver transplantation? A series of 3 cases from single institution

    OpenAIRE

    Selvakumar N.; Neerav Goyal; Mohammed Nayeem; Sandeep Vohra; Subash Gupta

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Liver transplantation (LT) is the gold standard for decompensated Chronic Liver Disease (CLD) in individuals satisfying the selection criteria. Organ scarcity is the rate limiting step in liver transplantation across the globe. Expanding the donor pool is practiced by transplant surgeons across the globe in view of perennial donor organ scarcity and ever increasing organ demand. Presentation of case: We have presented series of 3 cases of liver transplantation (LT) with modif...

  11. Liver transplantation for polycystic liver with massive hepatomegaly: A case report

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei-Wei Jiang; Feng Zhang; Li-Yong Pu; Xue-Hao Wang; Lian-Bao Kong

    2009-01-01

    A previous study has shown that liver or combined liver-kidney transplantation can be a valuable surgical technique for the treatment of polycystic liver disease.Herein, we present the case of a 35-year-old woman with polycystic liver disease, who underwent orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) on November 11, 2008.The whole-size graft was taken from a deceased donor (a 51-year-old man who died of a heart attack).Resection in a patient with massive hepatomegaly is very difficult. Thus, after intercepting the portal hepatic vein, left hepatectomy was performed, then the vena cava was intercepted, the second and third porta hepatic isolated, and finally, right hepatectomy was performed. OLT was performed successfully.The recipient did well after transplantation. This case suggested that OLT is an effective therapeutic option for polycystic liver disease and left hepatectomy can be performed first during OLT if the liver is over enlarged.

  12. Modifications in combined liver-small bowel transplantation in pigs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Feng Jiang; Zhen-Yu Yin; Xiao-Dong Ni; You-Sheng Li; Ning Li; Jie-Shou Li

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To introduce combined liver-small bowel transplantation in pigs.METHODS: Eighteen transplantations in 36 large white pigs were performed. Three modifications in combined liver-small bowel transplantation model were applied: Veno-venous bypass was not used. Preservation of the donor duodenum and head of pancreas in continuity with the combined graft to avoid biliary reconstruction. The splenic vein of donor was anastomosed end-to-end with the portal vein of recipients by the formation of a "cuff".RESULTS: Without immunosuppressive therapy, 72-hour survival rate of the transplanted animals was 72% (13/18).Five of 18 pigs operated died of respiratory failure (3 cases)and bleeding during hepatectomy (2 cases). The longest survival time of animals was 6 days.CONCLUSION: Our surgical modifications are feasible and reliable, which have made the transplantation in pigs simpler and less aggressive, and thus these can be used for preclinical study.

  13. Genetic Diversity of Hepatitis C Virus Predicts Recurrent Disease after Liver Transplantation

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Hui; Sullivan, Daniel G.; Feuerborn, Nathan; McArdle, Susan; Bekele, Kirubeal; Pal, Sampa; Yeh, Matthew; Carithers, Robert L.; Perkins, James D.; Gretch, David R.

    2010-01-01

    Approximately 20% of patients receiving liver transplants for end-stage hepatitis C rapidly develop severe allograph fibrosis within the first 24 months after transplant. Hepatitis C virus (HCV) variants were studied in 56 genotype 1-infected subjects with end-stage hepatitis C disease at the time before and 12-month after liver transplant, and post-transplant outcome was followed with serial liver biopsies. In 15 cases, pre-transplant HCV genetic diversity was studied in detail in liver (n=1...

  14. Liver transplantation for severe hepatic trauma: Experience from a single center

    OpenAIRE

    Delis, Spiros G; Bakoyiannis, Andreas; Selvaggi, Gennaro; Weppler, Debbie; Levi, David; Tzakis, Andreas G.

    2009-01-01

    Liver transplantation has been reported in the literature as an extreme intervention in cases of severe and complicated hepatic trauma. The main indications for liver transplant in such cases were uncontrollable bleeding and postoperative hepatic insufficiency. We here describe four cases of orthotopic liver transplantation after penetrating or blunt liver trauma. The indications were liver failure, extended liver necrosis, liver gangrene and multiple episodes of gastrointestinal bleeding rel...

  15. Perceptions of post-transplant recidivism in liver transplantation for alcoholic liver disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yoshikuni; Kawaguchi; Yasuhiko; Sugawara; Nobuhisa; Akamatsu; Junichi; Kaneko; Tomohiro; Tanaka; Sumihito; Tamura; Taku; Aoki; Yoshihiro; Sakamoto; Kiyoshi; Hasegawa; Norihiro; Kokudo

    2014-01-01

    Although alcoholic liver disease(ALD) is regarded as a common indication for liver transplantation(LT), debatable issues exist on the requirement for preceding alcoholic abstinence, appropriate indication criteria, predictive factors for alcoholic recidivism, and outcomes following living-donor LT. In most institutions, an abstinence period of six months before LT has been adopted as a mandatory selection criterion. Data indicating that pre-transplant abstinence is an associated predictive factor for alcoholic recidivism supports the reasoning behind this. However, conclusive evidence about the benefit of adopting an abstinence period is yet to be established. On the other hand, a limited number of reports available on living-donor LT experiences for ALD patients suggest that organ donations from relatives have no suppressive effect on alcoholic recidivism. Prevention of alcoholic recidivism has proved to be the most important treatment after LT based on the resultant inferior long-term outcome of patients. Further evaluations are still needed to establish strategies before and after LT for ALD.

  16. Portopulmonary Hypertension and Liver Transplant: Recent Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosarderelioglu, Caglar; Cosar, Arif M; Gurakar, Merve; Pustavoitau, Aliaksei; Russell, Stuart D; Dagher, Nabil N; Gurakar, Ahmet

    2016-04-01

    Portopulmonary hypertension is one of the main pulmonary conditions affecting patients with liver disease and/or portal hypertension. Other conditions include hepatopulmonary syndrome and hepatic hydrothorax. Portopulmonary hypertension is caused by pulmonary vasoconstriction and increased pulmonary vascular resistance. It develops as a result of portal hypertension with or without liver disease and is associated with a higher morbidity and mortality. However, portopulmonary hypertension is usually asymptomatic; the most common symptoms are dyspnea, fatigue, and peripheral edema. All liver transplant candidates should be screened for potential portopulmonary hypertension because its coexistence can affect survival rates after transplant. All patients with cirrhosis who present with dyspnea should also be screened. Transthoracic echocardiography is a noninvasive, useful method for screening, but right heart-sided catheterization remains the criterion standard for diagnosis. Portopulmonary hypertension carries a poor prognosis without liver transplant, and its severe form is considered to be a contraindication for liver transplant. Treating patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension-specific therapies before liver transplant for moderate and severe portopulmonary hypertension appears to be beneficial. PMID:27015528

  17. Preoperative cardiovascular investigations in liver transplant candidate: An update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sehgal, Lalit; Srivastava, Piyush; Pandey, Chandra Kant; Jha, Amit

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular complications are a major cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with end-stage liver disease (ESLD) undergoing liver transplantation. Identifying candidates at the highest risk of postoperative cardiovascular complications is the cornerstone for optimizing the outcome. Ischaemic heart disease contributes to major portion of cardiovascular complications and therefore warrants evaluation in the preoperative period. Patients of ESLD usually demonstrate increased cardiac output, compromised ventricular response to stress, low systemic vascular resistance and occasionally bradycardia. Despite various recommendations for preoperative evaluation of cardiovascular disease in liver transplant candidates, a considerable controversy on screening methodology persists. This review critically focuses on the rapidly expanding body of evidence for diagnosis and risk stratification of cardiovascular disorder in liver transplant candidates. PMID:26962249

  18. The 2-stage liver transplant: 3 clinical scenarios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gedik, Ender; Bıçakçıoğlu, Murat; Otan, Emrah; İlksen Toprak, Hüseyin; Işık, Burak; Aydın, Cemalettin; Kayaalp, Cüneyt; Yılmaz, Sezai

    2015-04-01

    The main goal of 2-stage liver transplant is to provide time to obtain a new liver source. We describe our experience of 3 patients with 3 different clinical conditions. A 57-year-old man was retransplanted successfully with this technique due to hepatic artery thrombosis. However, a 38-year-old woman with fulminant toxic hepatitis and a 5-year-old-boy with abdominal trauma had poor outcome. This technique could serve as a rescue therapy for liver transplant patients who have toxic liver syndrome or abdominal trauma. These patients required intensive support during long anhepatic states. The transplant team should decide early whether to use this technique before irreversible conditions develop. PMID:25894175

  19. Antibody induction versus corticosteroid induction for liver transplant recipients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Penninga, Luit; Wettergren, André; Wilson, Colin H;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Liver transplantation is an established treatment option for end-stage liver failure. To date, no consensus has been reached on the use of immunosuppressive T-cell specific antibody induction compared with corticosteroid induction of immunosuppression after liver transplantation....... OBJECTIVES: To assess the benefits and harms of T-cell specific antibody induction versus corticosteroid induction for prevention of acute rejection in liver transplant recipients. SEARCH METHODS: We searched The Cochrane Hepato-Biliary Group Controlled Trials Register, the Cochrane Central Register...... of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, EMBASE, Science Citation Index Expanded, and the World Health Organization (WHO) International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) on 30 September 2013 together with reference checking, citation searching, contact with trial authors and pharmaceutical companies...

  20. Liver transplant structure and function: Evaluation by HIDA scanning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forty-one patients who had received liver transplants at UCLA underwent a total of 146 HIDA imaging studies over an 18-month period. Sixty-seven scans were normal; and 79 were abnormal and accurately indicated 118 abnormalities of hepatic structure or function. Structural abnormalities, confirmed on US, included infarcts (five patients), extravasation of bile (two), ischemia (two), biliary obstruction (two), and perihepatic abscess (one). Liver function was graded based on relative uptake and excretion of HIDA. In four patients with hepatocellular dysfunction, In-111 white blood cell scanning was helpful in identifying cytomegalovirus as the etiology. In the UCLA liver transplant program, HIDA has played a key role in demarcating the various causes of hepatic dysfunction in liver transplant recipients. It is currently the first diagnostic study of choice for evaluating these patients at the center

  1. Prognostic and diagnostic value of procalcitonin in the post-transplant setting after liver transplantation

    OpenAIRE

    Perrakis, Aristotelis; Stirkat, Falk; Croner, Roland S; Vassos, Nikolaos; Raptis, Dimitrios; Yedibela, Süleyman; Hohenberger, Werner; Müller, Volker

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The aim of the study was to assess the diagnostic accuracy of procalcitonin (PCT) as a marker for complications and as a prognostic factor for mortality after liver transplantation. Material and methods Liver transplant patients between January 2007 and April 2011 were prospectively included in the study. Procalcitonin serum concentration was recorded before, 6 h after reperfusion and then daily. Postoperative clinical course was prospectively analyzed from admission to discharge...

  2. STAT4-associated natural killer cell tolerance following liver transplantation

    OpenAIRE

    Jamil, K M; Hydes, T.J.; Cheent, K.S.; Cassidy, S A; Traherne, J. A.; Jayaraman, J.; Trowsdale, J.; Alexander, G J; Little, A M; McFarlane, H.; Heneghan, M. A.; Purbhoo, M.A.; Khakoo, S I

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Natural killer (NK) cells are important mediators of liver inflammation in chronic liver disease. The aim of this study was to investigate why liver transplants (LTs) are not rejected by NK cells in the absence of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) matching, and to identify a tolerogenic NK cell phenotype. Design: Phenotypic and functional analyses on NK cells from 54 LT recipients were performed, and comparisons made with healthy controls. Further investigation was performed using ...

  3. Combination of liver biopsy with MELD-XI scores for post-transplant outcome prediction in patients with advanced heart failure and suspected liver dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farr, Maryjane; Mitchell, James; Lippel, Matthew; Kato, Tomoko S.; Jin, Zhezhen; Ippolito, Paul; Dove, Lorna; Jorde, Ulrich P.; Takayama, Hiroo; Emond, Jean; Naka, Yoshifumi; Mancini, Donna; Lefkowitch, Jay H.; Schulze, P. Christian

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Functional and structural liver abnormalities may be found in patients with advanced heart failure (HF). The Model of End-Stage Liver Disease Excluding INR (MELD-XI) score allows functional risk stratification of HF patients on and off anti-coagulation awaiting heart transplantation (HTx), but these scores may improve or worsen depending on bridging therapies and during time on the waiting list. Liver biopsy is sometimes performed to assess for severity of fibrosis. Uncertainty remains whether biopsy in addition to MELD-XI improves prediction of adverse outcomes in patients evaluated for HTx. METHODS Sixty-eight patients suspected of advanced liver disease underwent liver biopsy as part of their HTx evaluation. A liver risk score (fibrosis-on-biopsy + 1) × MELD-XI was generated for each patient. RESULTS Fifty-two patients were listed, of whom 14 had mechanical circulatory support (MCS). Thirty-six patients underwent transplantation and 27 patients survived ≥1 year post-HTx (74%, as compared with 88% average 1-year survival in HTx patients without suspected liver disease; p ventilation times (55.6% vs 11.1%, p = 0.013) and severe bleeding events (44.4% vs 11.1%, p = 0.049). The liver risk score at evaluation for HTx also predicted 1-year mortality after HTx listing (p < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS Patients with HF and advanced liver dysfunction are high-risk HTx candidates. Liver biopsy in addition to MELD-XI improves risk stratification of patients with advanced HF and suspected irreversible liver dysfunction. PMID:25851466

  4. Evaluation of liver transplant candidates: A pulmonary perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bozbas Serife

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic liver disease is one of the leading causes of mortality and morbidity in the worldwide adult population. Liver transplant is the gold standard therapy for end-stage liver disease and many patients are on the waiting list for a transplant. A variety of pulmonary disorders are encountered in cirrhotic patients. Pleura, lung parenchyma, and pulmonary vasculature may be affected in these patients. Hypoxemia is relatively common and can be asymptomatic. Hepatopulmonary syndrome should be investigated in hypoxic cirrhotic patients. Gas exchange abnormalities are common and are generally correlated with the severity of liver disease. Both obstructive and restrictive types of airway disease can be present. Abnormal diffusion capacity is the most frequently observed pulmonary function disorder in patients with cirrhosis. Hepatic hydrothorax is another finding which is usually seen in conjunction with, but occasionally without ascites. Portopulmonary hypertension is a complication of long standing liver dysfunction and when severe, is accepted as a containdication to liver transplant. Since respiratory disorders are common and have significant impact on postoperative outcome in patients undergoing liver transplant, a careful preoperative pulmonary assessment is important.

  5. Normothermic machine perfusion for donor liver preservation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tolboom, H.

    2012-01-01

    Currently, liver transplantation is the only treatment for end-stage liver failure. Unfortunately, a sever shortage of donor organs causes significant mortality amongst patients awaiting transplantation. The donor organ shortage could be alleviated by using organs that are normally not accepted for

  6. Liver transplantation in the Nordic countries – An intention to treat and post-transplant analysis from The Nordic Liver Transplant Registry 1982–2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fosby, Bjarte; Melum, Espen; Bjøro, Kristian; Bennet, William; Rasmussen, Allan; Andersen, Ina Marie; Castedal, Maria; Olausson, Michael; Wibeck, Christina; Gotlieb, Mette; Gjertsen, Henrik; Toivonen, Leena; Foss, Stein; Makisalo, Heikki; Nordin, Arno; Sanengen, Truls; Bergquist, Annika; Larsson, Marie E.; Soderdahl, Gunnar; Nowak, Greg; Boberg, Kirsten Muri; Isoniemi, Helena; Keiding, Susanne; Foss, Aksel; Line, Pål-Dag; Friman, Styrbjörn; Schrumpf, Erik; Ericzon, Bo-Göran; Höckerstedt, Krister; Karlsen, Tom H.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Aim and background. The Nordic Liver Transplant Registry (NLTR) accounts for all liver transplants performed in the Nordic countries since the start of the transplant program in 1982. Due to short waiting times, donor liver allocation has been made without considerations of the model of end-stage liver disease (MELD) score. We aimed to summarize key outcome measures and developments for the activity up to December 2013. Materials and methods. The registry is integrated with the operational waiting-list and liver allocation system of Scandiatransplant (www.scandiatransplant.org) and accounted at the end of 2013 for 6019 patients out of whom 5198 were transplanted. Data for recipient and donor characteristics and relevant end-points retransplantation and death are manually curated on an annual basis to allow for statistical analysis and the annual report. Results. Primary sclerosing cholangitis, acute hepatic failure, alcoholic liver disease, primary biliary cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma are the five most frequent diagnoses (accounting for 15.3%, 10.8%, 10.6%, 9.3% and 9.0% of all transplants, respectively). Median waiting time for non-urgent liver transplantation during the last 10-year period was 39 days. Outcome has improved over time, and for patients transplanted during 2004–2013, overall one-, five- and 10-year survival rates were 91%, 80% and 71%, respectively. In an intention-to-treat analysis, corresponding numbers during the same time period were 87%, 75% and 66%, respectively. Conclusion. The liver transplant program in the Nordic countries provides comparable outcomes to programs with a MELD-based donor liver allocation system. Unique features comprise the diagnostic spectrum, waiting times and the availability of an integrated waiting list and transplant registry (NLTR). PMID:25959101

  7. Immunosupression in liver transplant for hepatocellular carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Carlos Restrepo Restrepo

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available

    The hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC has turned into a frequent indication for liver transplant. The reports of different series indicate that it represents at least 12% of all liver transplants in Europe. But what kind of inmunosuppression is better in these patients is an unanswered question. Our intension with this review is to give basic information to define which would be the best immunosuppression alternative. There is enough information on the relationship between immunosuppression and cancer, as it is seen in states of primary immunodeficiency or infection with the Human Immunodeficiency virus (HIV. The immune system offers a state of permanent guard to avoid the arousal of neoplasic diseases in immunocompetent patients and from this point of view it has been seen that in immunosuppressed patients there is an association with this condition and the development of lymphoproliferative disorders, which can range from reversible diseases (polyclonal proliferation of B type lymphocytes to the development of a lymphoma and other types of tumors, like the ones observed in skin, genital region or oropharynx. Colon tumors and breast tumors have not been associated with immunosuppression. Immunosuppressive medication takes part in a different manner in the development of tumors, it has been said that steroids that are associated with some tumors, especially those regarding skin, paradoxically have a protective role in the development of lymph tissue tumors.

    It has been said about Azathioprine and Mycophenolate mofetil (MMF that its immunosuppressive effect is an antiproliferative type of immunosuppression, inhibiting the synthesis of purinic nucleotides, especially in lymphocytes. Azathioprine has been involved in the development of hepatic tumors, especially in the era previous

  8. Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease and Metabolic Syndrome after Liver Transplant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Gitto

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Liver transplant is the unique curative therapy for patients with acute liver failure or end-stage liver disease, with or without hepatocellular carcinoma. Increase of body weight, onset of insulin resistance and drug-induced alterations of metabolism are reported in liver transplant recipients. In this context, post-transplant diabetes mellitus, hyperlipidemia, and arterial hypertension can be often diagnosed. Multifactorial illnesses occurring in the post-transplant period represent significant causes of morbidity and mortality. This is especially true for metabolic syndrome. Non-alcoholic steatosis and steatohepatitis are hepatic manifestations of metabolic syndrome and after liver transplant both recurrent and de novo steatosis can be found. Usually, post-transplant steatosis shows an indolent outcome with few cases of fibrosis progression. However, in the post-transplant setting, both metabolic syndrome and steatosis might play a key role in the stratification of morbidity and mortality risk, being commonly associated with cardiovascular disease. The single components of metabolic syndrome can be treated with targeted drugs while lifestyle intervention is the only reasonable therapeutic approach for transplant patients with non-alcoholic steatosis or steatohepatitis.

  9. The utility of the model for end-stage liver disease score: a reliable guide for liver transplant candidacy and, for select patients, simultaneous hospice referral.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medici, Valentina; Rossaro, Lorenzo; Wegelin, Jacob A; Kamboj, Amit; Nakai, Junko; Fisher, Kelli; Meyers, Frederick J

    2008-08-01

    Patients with chronic liver disease are referred late to hospice or never referred. There are several barriers to timely referral. First, liver transplantation (LT) and hospice care have always been perceived as mutually exclusive. Yet the criteria for hospice referral and for LT are more similar than different (for example, advanced liver disease and imminent death). Second, physicians, patients, and families have not had a reliable metric to guide referral. However, many patients wait for transplantation but never receive an organ. We hypothesized that the Model for End-Stage Liver Disease (MELD) score already in use to prioritize LT could be used in selected patients for concurrent hospice referral. Furthermore, we hypothesized that patients awaiting LT can receive hospice care and remain eligible for transplantation. Patients with advanced or end-stage liver disease were referred to the University of California Davis Health System hospice program. We correlated the MELD score at admission to length of stay (LOS) in hospice. A total of 157 end-stage liver disease patients were admitted to the hospice service. At the time of hospice admission the mean MELD score was 21 (range, 6-45). The mean length of hospice stay was 38 days (range, 1-329 days). A significant correlation was observed between hospice LOS and MELD score at hospice admission (P < 0.01). Six patients were offered a liver graft while on the combined (LT and hospice) program. MELD can be used to guide clinician recommendation to families about hospice care, achieving one of the national benchmark goals of increasing hospice care duration beyond the current median of 2-3 weeks. A higher MELD score might augment physician judgment as to hospice referral. Hospice care for selected patients may be an effective strategy to improve the care of end-stage liver disease patients waiting for LT. PMID:18668666

  10. Management of Candida infections in liver transplant recipients: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lingegowda PB

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Pushpalatha B Lingegowda,1–3 Tan Ban Hock1,2,4,5 1Department of Infectious Diseases, Singapore General Hospital, 2DUKE-NUS Graduate Medical School, 3Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore, 4SingHealth Internal Medicine Residency Program, 5Faculty of Medicine, National University of Singapore, Singapore Abstract: Liver transplantation has emerged as a widely accepted lifesaving therapeutic option for many patients with a variety of liver diseases. Improved surgical and medical management has led to significant improvements in post-transplant survival rates with a 1 year and 5 year patient survival of 87% and 73%, respectively. A high mortality rate due to infections during the first post-transplant year persists. Invasive candidiasis is recognized as a significant problem associated with high morbidity and mortality. Recent surveillance data has helped to understand the changes in the epidemiology and the evolving trends in the use of antifungal agents for prophylaxis and treatment combined with the challenges of managing these invasive fungal infections, which has led the transplant community to explore the best management strategies. The emergence of resistant fungi and excess costs in managing these invasive fungal infections has added to the complexities of management. In this context, current perspectives in the management of Candida infections in liver transplant recipients will be reviewed. Keywords: Candida infections, management, liver transplant

  11. Monogenic diseases that can be cured by liver transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagiuoli, Stefano; Daina, Erica; D'Antiga, Lorenzo; Colledan, Michele; Remuzzi, Giuseppe

    2013-09-01

    While the prevalence of most diseases caused by single-gene mutations is low and defines them as rare conditions, all together, monogenic diseases account for approximately 10 in every 1000 births according to the World Health Organisation. Orthotopic liver transplantation (LT) could offer a therapeutic option in monogenic diseases in two ways: by substituting for an injured liver or by supplying a tissue that can replace a mutant protein. In this respect, LT may be regarded as the correction of a disease at the level of the dysfunctional protein. Monogenic diseases that involve the liver represent a heterogeneous group of disorders. In conditions associated with predominant liver parenchymal damage (i.e., genetic cholestatic disorders, Wilson's disease, hereditary hemochromatosis, tyrosinemia, α1 antitrypsin deficiency), hepatic complications are the major source of morbidity and LT not only replaces a dysfunctional liver but also corrects the genetic defect and effectively cures the disease. A second group includes liver-based genetic disorders characterised by an architecturally near-normal liver (urea cycle disorders, Crigler-Najjar syndrome, familial amyloid polyneuropathy, primary hyperoxaluria type 1, atypical haemolytic uremic syndrome-1). In these defects, extrahepatic complications are the main source of morbidity and mortality while liver function is relatively preserved. Combined transplantation of other organs may be required, and other surgical techniques, such as domino and auxiliary liver transplantation, have been attempted. In a third group of monogenic diseases, the underlying genetic defect is expressed at a systemic level and liver involvement is just one of the clinical manifestations. In these conditions, LT might only be partially curative since the abnormal phenotype is maintained by extrahepatic synthesis of the toxic metabolites (i.e., methylmalonic acidemia, propionic acidemia). This review focuses on principles of diagnosis, management

  12. Gut perforation after orthotopic liver transplantation in adults

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jun Xiong; Shen You; Xiao-Shun He

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To describe cases of gut perforation after orthotopic liver transplantation.METHODS: Data were colleted from our center database and medical records. Six of 187 patients (3.2%)who underwent orthotopic liver transplantation from January to December 2005 developed gut perforation.All patients were male with an average age of 46 years.Modified piggyback liver transplantation was performed at the Organ Transplantation Center, First Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-Sen University.RESULTS: Previous operation, steroid therapy, and prolonged portal venous cross clamp time, poor nutritional status and iatrogenic injury were found to be its ecological factors. The patients with gut perforation were found to have fever, increased leukocytes, mild abdominal pain and tenderness. The median portal venous clamp time was 63 min (range 45-72 min),median cold ischaemia time was 11.3 h (range 7-15 h).Median intraoperative blood loss was 500 mL (range 100-1200 mL) and median operation time was 8.8 h (range 6-12 h). None of the six patients developed acute cellular rejection. White cell count was above 18 × 109/L in five patients (neutrophilic leukocytes were above 90%) and 1.5 × 109/L in one patient. Bacterial culture in drainage liquid revealed enterococci in five patients. Of the 6 patients undergoing orthotopic liver transplantation, 3 survived and 3 died after modified piggyback liver transplantation.CONCLUSION: Gut perforation occurs after orthotopic liver transplantation in adults. A careful and minimal dissection during OLT, longer retention of the stomach tube, and reducing the portal clamp time and steroid dose should be taken into consideration. If gut perforation is not prevented, then early diagnosis,preferably through detection of enterococci may ensure better survival.

  13. [Diagnosis of rejection in a transplanted liver].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sticová, Eva; Honsová, Eva

    2015-01-01

    Despite advances in immunosupressive therapy rejection remains the most common complication of liver transplantation in both the early and the late post-transplant period. Unlike other solid organs, liver graft rejection has some specific characteristics likely attributable to the unique immunobiologic properties and the remarkable regenerative capabilities of liver parenchyma. Acute cellular rejection is the most frequent type of the rejection episode in the liver allograft, whereas chronic (ductopenic) rejection and humoral rejection are uncommon. Since the clinical findings are not entirely characteristic, histopathological evaluation of liver biopsy remains the gold standard in the diagnosis of rejection. However, the close cooperation between the pathologist and the clinician is essential for the correct interpretation of morphologic changes.

  14. Aggressive Recurrence of Primary Hepatic Epithelioid Haemangioendothelioma after Liver Transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qusay A. Abdoh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available HEHE is a rare neoplasm of vascular origin that occurs in the liver; UNOS reported a favorable outcome after liver transplantation in 110 patients with 1-year and 5-year survival of 80% and 64%. Case Report. A 40-year-old lady presented with a three-month history of right upper abdominal pain with nausea, vomiting, and significant loss of weight associated with scleral icterus and progressive abdominal distension. Examination revealed jaundice, hepatomegaly, and ascites. Serum bilirubin was 26.5 mg/dL and ALP was 552 CT. Abdomen and pelvis showed diffuse infiltrative neoplastic process of the liver with a mass effect and stretching of the hepatic and portal veins, in addition to bile duct dilatation. Viral hepatitis markers were negative and serum alpha fetoprotein was within reference range. Liver biopsy was consistent with HEHE, with positive endothelial markers (CD31, CD34, and factor VIII-related antigen. She underwent living related liver transplantation on June 2013 and was discharged after 20 days with normal liver enzymes. Four months later, she presented with diffuse disease recurrence. Liver biopsy confirmed disease recurrence; she received supportive treatment and unfortunately she died 2 weeks later. Conclusion. HEHE can have rapid and aggressive recurrence after liver transplantation.

  15. Combined small bowel and reduced auxiliary liver transplantation: case report

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei-Jie Zhang; Dun-Gui Liu; Qi-Fa Ye; Bo Sha; Fan-Jun Zhen; Hui Guo; Sui-Sheng Xia

    2002-01-01

    AIM: To present a case of combined small bowel andreduced auxiliary liver transplantation.METHODS: A 55-year-old patient with short bowelsyndrome and TPN-related liver dysfunction received smallbowel transplantation combined with a reduced auxiliaryliver graft. A liver was added to restore the patient′s liverfunction and to protect the intestinal allograft from rejection.His own liver was not removed.RESULTS: Without donor pretreatment and by conventionalimmunosuppresive therapy following transplantation, thepatient experienced had only one episode of mild intestinalrejection, which was easily reversed by treatment withMethylprednisolone. No liver rejection occurred.Unfortunately, the patient died of heart and lung failure30d after transplantation, despite successful graftreplacement. Histopathologic examination of specimens afterdeath demonstrated normal structure in both intestinal andliver grafts.CONCLUSION: The auxiliary liver graft might play a role inpreventing intestinal allograft rejection. However, theobservation period in this case is short. Further study isneeded to determine the risks, effect on the protecting thesmall-bowel from rejection, and feasibility of generalapplication of this procedure.

  16. Cytomegalovirus infection after liver transplantation: Current concepts and challenges

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Raymund Rabe Razonable

    2008-01-01

    Cytomegalovirus(CMV)is a common viral pathogen that influences the outcome of liver transplantation.In addition to the direct effects of CMV syndrome and tissue-invasive diseases,CMV is associated with an increased predisposition to acute and chronic allograft rejection,accelerated hepatitis C recurrence,and other opportunistic infections,as well as reduced overall patient and allograft survival.Risk factors for CMV disease are often interrelated,and include CMV D+/R-serostatus,acute rejection,female gender,age,use of high-dose mycophenolate mofetil and prednisone,and the overall state of immunity.In addition to the role of CHV-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocytes,there are data to suggest that functionality of the innate immune system contributes to CMV disease pathogenesis.In one study,liver transplant recipients with a specific polymorphism in innate immune molecules known as Toll-like receptors were more likely to develop higher Ievels of CMV replication and clinical disease.Because of the direct and indirect adverse effects of CMV disease,its prevention,whether through antiviral prophylaxis or preemptive therapy,is an essential component in improving the outcome of liver transplantation.In the majority of transplant centers,antiviral prophylaxis is the preferred strategy over preemptive therapy for the prevention of CMV disease in CMV-seronegative recipients of liver allografts from CMV-seropositive donors(D+/R-).However,the major drawback of antiviral prophylaxis is the occurrence of delayed-onset primary CMV disease.In several prospective and retrospective studies,the incidence of delayed-onset primary CMV disease ranged from 16% to 47% of CMV D+/R-liver transplant recipients.Current data suggests that delayed-onset CMV disease is associated with increased mortality after liver transplantation.Therefore,optimized strategies for prevention and novel drugs with unique modes of action are needed.Currently,a randomized controlled clinical trial is being

  17. Use of extracorporeal liver assist device and auxiliary liver transplantation in fulminant hepatic failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, M; Ellis, A J; Wendon, J A; Heaton, N; Rela, M; Buxton-Thomas, M; Hughes, R D; Portmann, B C; Williams, R

    1997-04-01

    The case history of a 14-year-old boy with fulminant hepatic failure secondary to non-A, non-B hepatitis who fulfilled selection criteria for orthotopic liver transplantation is described. Two forms of liver support were used (extracorporeal liver assist device and an auxiliary partial orthotopic liver transplantation) to provide additional time to allow spontaneous recovery to occur. During the 66 h of extracorporeal haemoperfusion through the device, haemodynamic stability was maintained along with improvements in serum bilirubin (555 to 381 mumol/l), and international normalized ratio (INR) (3.7 to 2.9). Deterioration in these parameters was observed following cessation of treatment and 10 h later, after a donor liver had become available, an auxiliary transplant was performed. Clinical recovery, though initially slow, was eventually complete, with histopathological and scintigraphic evidence of full liver regeneration at 3 months. Withdrawal of his immunosuppressive drugs began at 6 months and was complete by 14 months after auxiliary transplantation. He has since remained well with normal liver function tests. Temporary liver support may provide additional time for spontaneous recovery of the native liver to occur in selected cases of fulminant hepatic failure, even when criteria are fulfilled for orthotopic liver grafting. PMID:9160207

  18. MELD score measured day 10 after orthotopic liver transplantation predicts death and re-transplantation within the first year

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rostved, Andreas A; Lundgren, Jens D; Hillingsø, Jens;

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The impact of early allograft dysfunction on the outcome after liver transplantation is yet to be established. We explored the independent predictive value of the Model for End-Stage Liver Disease (MELD) score measured in the post-transplant period on the risk of mortality or re......-transplantation. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Retrospective cohort study on adults undergoing orthotopic deceased donor liver transplantation from 2004 to 2014. The MELD score was determined prior to transplantation and daily until 21 days after. The risk of mortality or re-transplantation within the first year was assessed...

  19. The Origin of New-Onset Diabetes After Liver Transplantation: Liver, Islets, or Gut?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Qi; Xu, Xiao; Wang, Baohong; Li, Lanjuan; Zheng, Shusen

    2016-04-01

    New-onset diabetes is a frequent complication after solid organ transplantation. Although a number of common factors are associated with the disease, including recipient age, body mass index, hepatitis C infection, and use of immunosuppressive drugs, new-onset diabetes after liver transplantation (NODALT) has the following unique aspects and thus needs to be considered its own entity. First, a liver graft becomes the patient's primary metabolic regulator after liver transplantation, but this would not be the case for kidney or other grafts. The metabolic states, as well as the genetics of the graft, play crucial roles in the development of NODALT. Second, dysfunction of the islets of Langerhans is common in cirrhotic patients and would be exacerbated by immunosuppressive agents, particularly calcineurin inhibitors. On the other hand, minimized immunosuppressive protocols have been widely advocated in liver transplantation because of liver tolerance (immune privilege). Third and last, through the "gut-liver axis," graft function is closely linked to gut microbiota, which is now considered an important metabolic organ and known to independently influence the host's metabolic homeostasis. Liver transplant recipients present with specific gut microbiota that may be prone to trigger metabolic disorders. In this review, we proposed 3 possible sites for the origin of NODALT, which are liver, islets, and gut, to help elucidate the underlying mechanism of NODALT.

  20. The cost effectiveness of lung transplantation compared with that of heart and liver transplantation in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ouwens, JP; van Enckevort, PJ; TenVergert, EM; Bonsel, GJ; van der Bij, W; Haagsma, EB; Rutten, FFH; Slooff, MJH; Koeter, GH

    2003-01-01

    This study was performed to assess the main reasons for the unfavorable cost effectiveness of lung transplantation compared with that of heart and liver transplantation. Costs, effects, and cost-effectiveness ratios of Dutch lung, heart, and liver transplantation programs were compared. The data are

  1. Epidemiology of fungal infections in liver transplant recipients: a six-year study of a large Brazilian liver transplantation centre

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle Zicker

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Liver transplant seems to be an effective option to prolong survival in patients with end-stage liver disease, although it still can be followed by serious complications. Invasive fungal infections (ifi are related to high rates of morbidity and mortality. The epidemiology of fungal infections in Brazilian liver transplant recipients is unknown. The aim of this observational and retrospective study was to determine the incidence and epidemiology of fungal infections in all patients who underwent liver transplantation at Albert Einstein Israeli Hospital between 2002-2007. A total of 596 liver transplants were performed in 540 patients. Overall, 77 fungal infections occurred in 68 (13% patients. Among the 77 fungal infections, there were 40 IFI that occurred in 37 patients (7%. Candida and Aspergillus species were the most common etiologic agents. Candida species accounted for 82% of all fungal infections and for 67% of all IFI, while Aspergillus species accounted for 9% of all fungal infections and for 17% of all IFI. Non-albicans Candida species were the predominant Candida isolates. Invasive aspergillosis tended to occur earlier in the post-transplant period. These findings can contribute to improve antifungal prophylaxis and therapy practices in Brazilian centres.

  2. Cystic duct remnant mucocele in a liver transplant recipient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahlawat, Sushil K. [Georgetown University Hospital, Department of Medicine, Division of Gastroenterology, Washington, DC (United States); University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, New Jersey Medical School, Newark, NJ (United States); Fishbien, Thomas M. [Georgetown University Hospital, Department of Medicine, Division of Gastroenterology, Washington, DC (United States); Haddad, Nadim G. [Georgetown University Hospital, Department of Surgery, Division of Transplant Surgery, Washington, DC (United States)

    2008-08-15

    Cystic duct remnant mucocele is an extremely rare complication of liver transplantation in children. Surgical correction is usually required for cystic duct remnant mucocele when it causes biliary obstruction. We describe a 14-month-old liver transplant recipient who presented with biliary obstruction 1 month after orthotopic liver transplantation with an end-to-end choledochocholedocal biliary anastomosis for hepatoblastoma. US, CT and cholangiography findings were consistent with mucocele of the allograft cystic duct remnant. Surgery was not needed in our patient because the mucocele and biliary obstruction had resolved on repeat imaging most likely due to guidewire manipulation during cholangiography, resulting in opening of the cystic duct remnant orifice and drainage into the common duct. (orig.)

  3. Chemoembolization for recurrent hepatocellular carcinoma after liver transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To evaluate the interventional chemoembolization in treating unresectable recurrent hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) after liver transplantation. Methods: Twelve patients with unresectable recurrent HCC underwent one or more cycles (mean 2.25 cycles) of transarteria] chemoembolization (TACE) after liver transplantation. The results were evaluated by follow-up CT scans and were classified into four grades. The survival rate was calculated by using Kaplan-Meier survival curve. Results: No severe complications developed during follow-up period. Of the total twelve patients, targeted tumor showed a reduction in size by 30% in 7 (58.3%) after TACE. However, intrahepatic recurrence or extrahepatic metastasis occurred in 11 patients (91.3%). Conclusion: Our data obtained from this study indicates that TACE treatment seems to produce an effective tumor response for targeted recurrent HCC after liver transplantation. (authors)

  4. Cystic duct remnant mucocele in a liver transplant recipient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cystic duct remnant mucocele is an extremely rare complication of liver transplantation in children. Surgical correction is usually required for cystic duct remnant mucocele when it causes biliary obstruction. We describe a 14-month-old liver transplant recipient who presented with biliary obstruction 1 month after orthotopic liver transplantation with an end-to-end choledochocholedocal biliary anastomosis for hepatoblastoma. US, CT and cholangiography findings were consistent with mucocele of the allograft cystic duct remnant. Surgery was not needed in our patient because the mucocele and biliary obstruction had resolved on repeat imaging most likely due to guidewire manipulation during cholangiography, resulting in opening of the cystic duct remnant orifice and drainage into the common duct. (orig.)

  5. Internal Hernia in a Liver Transplant Recipien: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hironori Hayashi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Biliary complications have great importance for liver transplant recipients because of affecting long-term prognosis. In rare situations, an internal hernia of the Roux-en-Y loop cause graft injury. A 42-year-old woman with a history of living donor liver transplantation 6 years ago presented with prolonged graft injury during the past 6 months. She suddenly developed ileus of the small bowel with internal hernia through the defect of the mesentery around the Roux-en-Y limb of the hepaticojejunostomy. Emergent surgery was performed to reduce the hernia and volvulus; also the mesenteric rent was closed with interrupted suture of silk. Internal hernia of the small bowel after liver transplantation is rare but causes graft injury due to associated biliary complications and rapid deterioration of patient’s condition.

  6. Liver transplantation in Latin America: the state-of-the-art and future trends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvalaggio, Paolo R; Caicedo, Juan C; de Albuquerque, Luiz Carneiro; Contreras, Alan; Garcia, Valter D; Felga, Guilherme E; Maurette, Rafael J; Medina-Pestana, José O; Niño-Murcia, Alejandro; Pacheco-Moreira, Lucio F; Rocca, Juan; Rodriguez-Davalos, Manuel; Ruf, Andres; Rusca, Luis A Caicedo; Vilatoba, Mario

    2014-08-15

    We reviewed the current status of liver transplantation in Latin America. We used data from the Latin American and Caribbean Transplant Society and national organizations and societies, as well as information obtained from local transplant leaders. Latin America has a population of 589 million (8.5% of world population) and more than 2,500 liver transplantations are performed yearly (17% of world activity), resulting in 4.4 liver transplants per million people (pmp) per year. The number of liver transplantations grows at 6% per year in the region, particularly in Brazil. The top liver transplant rates were found in Argentina (10.4 pmp), Brazil (8.4 pmp), and Uruguay (5.5 pmp). The state of liver transplantation in some countries rivals those in developed countries. Model for End-Stage Liver Disease-based allocation, split, domino, and living-donor adult and pediatric transplantations are now routinely performed with outcomes comparable to those in advanced economies. In contrast, liver transplantation is not performed in 35% of Latin American countries and lags adequate resources in many others. The lack of adequate financial coverage, education, and organization is still the main limiting factor in the development of liver transplantation in Latin America. The liver transplant community in the region should push health care leaders and authorities to comply with the Madrid and Istambul resolutions on organ donation and transplantation. It must pursue fiercely the development of registries to advance the science and quality control of liver transplant activities in Latin America.

  7. Immunoregulatory profiles in liver transplant recipients on different immunosuppressive agents

    OpenAIRE

    Levitsky, Josh; Miller, Joshua; Wang, Edward; Rosen, Anne; Flaa, Cathy; Abecassis, Michael; Mathew, James; Tambur, Anat

    2009-01-01

    We compared peripheral blood immunophenotyping in 31 adult liver transplant recipients on differing long-term immunosuppressive (IS) monotherapy with and without peri-transplantation alemtuzumab (AL) induction. All patients had been stable on monotherapy with either sirolimus (SRL) (n = 10) or without SRL (tacrolimus (TAC) (n = 10), mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) (n = 11)) for more than 6 months. Five-color flow cytometry for putative “regulatory” T and dendritic cells as well as serum assays fo...

  8. Post liver transplantation lymphoproliferative disorder mimics recurrence of hepatocellular carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Poovorawan, Kittiyod; Linlawan, Sittikorn; Wisedopas, Naruemon; Komolmit, Piyawat

    2013-01-01

    We report a case of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-related postliver transplantation lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) in a patient with post liver transplant which initially presented in a CT scan image mimicking recurrence of hepatocellular carcinoma. Histopathology showed atypical plasma cell-like infiltration, and immunohistochemistry confirmed diagnosis of EBV-associated diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. Typical imaging from dynamic phases contrast CT scan might not accurately diagnose recurren...

  9. Comparative Effectiveness of Liver Transplant Strategies for End-Stage Liver Disease Patients on Renal Replacement Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Chang, Yaojen; Gallon, Lorenzo; Jay, Colleen; Shetty, Kirti; Ho, Bing; Levitsky, Josh; Baker, Talia; Ladner, Daniela; Friedewald, John; Abecassis, Michael; Hazen, Gordon; Skaro, Anton I.

    2014-01-01

    There are complex risk-benefit trade-offs of different transplantation strategies for end-stage liver disease patients on renal support. Using a Markov discrete-time state transition model, we compare survival for this group under 3 strategies: simultaneous liver-kidney transplant, liver transplant alone followed by immediate kidney transplant if renal function does not recover or placement on the kidney wait list. Patients are followed for 30 years from age 50. Probabilities of events were s...

  10. Liver transplantation for hepatic metastatic pancreatic insulinoma with a survival over five years

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Xiao-bo; YANG Jie; XU Ming-qing; YAN Lü-nan

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) are one subgroup of gastroenteropancreatic NETs.Its main characteristics are slow growth,frequent metastasis to the liver,and limited to the liver for long periods.In patients with irresectable liver metastatic NET,liver transplantation is the only radical treatment.About 160 cases of liver transplantation for liver metastatic NET have been reported worldwide.However.there is no such report of liver transplantation for hepatic metastatic NET in China by now.We herein report a case of liver transplantation for hepatic metastatic pancreatic insulinoma with a survival of over 5 years.

  11. Liver transplantation for severe hepatic trauma: Experience from a single center

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Spiros G Delis; Andreas Bakoyiannis; Gennaro Selvaggi; Debbie Weppler; David Levi; Andreas G Tzakis

    2009-01-01

    Liver transplantation has been reported in the literature as an extreme intervention in cases of severe and complicated hepatic trauma. The main indications for liver transplant in such cases were uncontrollable bleeding and postoperative hepatic insufficiency. We here describe four cases of orthotopic liver transplantation after penetrating or blunt liver trauma. The indications were liver failure, extended liver necrosis, liver gangrene and multiple episodes of gastrointestinal bleeding related to portal hypertension, respectively. One patient died due to postoperative cerebral edema. The other three patients recovered well and remain on immunosuppression. Liver transplantation should be considered as a saving procedure in severe hepatic trauma, when all other treatment modalities fail.

  12. Massive haemorrhage in liver transplantation: Consequences, prediction and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleland, Stuart; Corredor, Carlos; Ye, Jia Jia; Srinivas, Coimbatore; McCluskey, Stuart A

    2016-06-24

    From its inception the success of liver transplantation has been associated with massive blood loss. Massive transfusion is classically defined as > 10 units of red blood cells within 24 h, but describing transfusion rates over a shorter period of time may reduce the potential for survival bias. Both massive haemorrhage and transfusion are associated with increased risk of mortality and morbidity (need for dialysis/surgical site infection) following liver transplantation although causality is difficult to prove due to the observational design of most trials. The blood loss associated with liver transplantation is multifactorial. Portal hypertension secondary to cirrhosis results in extensive collateral circulation, which can bleed during hepatectomy particular if portal pressures are increased. Avoiding volume loading and maintenance of a low central venous pressure together with the use of vasopressors have been shown to reduce blood loss and transfusion during liver transplantation, but may increase the risk of renal impairment post-operatively. Coagulation defects may be present pre-transplant, but haemostasis is often re-balanced due to a deficit in both pro- and anti-coagulation factors. Further derangement of haemostasis may develop in the anhepatic and neohepatic phases due to absent hepatic metabolic function, hyperfibrinolysis and platelet sequestration in the donor liver. Point-of-care tests of coagulation such as the viscoelastic tests rotation thromboelastometry/thromboelastometry allow and more accurate and rapid assessment of these derangements in coagulation and guide the use of factor replacement and antifibrinolytics. Transfusion protocols guided by these tests have been shown to reduce transfusion rates compared with conventional coagulation tests, but have not shown improvements in mortality or morbidity. Pre-operative factors associated with massive transfusion include previous surgery, re-do transplantation, the aetiology and severity of liver

  13.  Liver transplantation followed by autologous stem cell transplantation for acute liver failure caused by AL amyloidosis. Case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elnegouly, Mayada; Specht, Katja; Zoller, Heinz; Matevossian, Edouard; Bassermann, Florian; Umgelter, Andreas

    2016-01-01

     Hepatic involvement in AL amyloidosis may present as acute liver failure. Historically, liver transplantation in these cases has achieved poor outcomes due to progress of amyloidosis and non-hepatic organ damage. In the era of bortezomib treatment, the prognosis of AL amyloidosis has been markedly improved and may also result in better post-transplant outcomes. We present a case of isolated acute liver failure caused by AL amyloidosis, bridged to transplantation with bortezomib and treated with sequential orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) and autologous stem cell transplantation. The patient is in stable remission 3 years after OLT. PMID:27236160

  14. Long-term prognosis for transplant-free survivors of paracetamol-induced acute liver failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jepsen, P; Schmidt, L E; Larsen, F S;

    2010-01-01

    The prognosis for transplant-free survivors of paracetamol-induced acute liver failure remains unknown.......The prognosis for transplant-free survivors of paracetamol-induced acute liver failure remains unknown....

  15. Rapid height growth after liver transplantation in adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szili, Balázs; Görög, Dénes; Gerlei, Zsuzsanna; Győri, Gabriella; Lakatos, Péter; Takács, István

    2016-08-01

    Glycogen storage disease Ib is a rare, inherited metabolic disorder caused by glucose-6-phosphatase translocase deficiency. Its main symptoms are hypoglycemia, hyperlipidemia, neutropenia, hepatomegaly, liver adenomas and short stature. The exact mechanism of short stature in this disease is unclear, the most feasible possibility is that it is caused by impairment of growth-hormone and insulin-like growth factor I axis. Here we report the case of a patient who showed typical symptoms of glycogen storage disease Ib since his infancy, his height being under 1 percentile since then. Later-developed hypothyroidism and hypogonadism have also contributed to his short stature. Hypothyroidism was treated but sexual steroid substitution was not started because of an increased risk of hepatic adenomas. Because he developed hepatic adenoma at the age of 23, he had to undergo orthotopic liver transplantation. At the time of the transplantation his height was 128cm. The transplantation was followed by rapid height growth; our patient's height reached 160.3cm 62months after transplantation. We observed that while his IGF-I level increased, his GH level remained unchanged. During the post-transplantation period we ensured adequate calcium and vitamin D supplementation, leaving hormonal substitution unchanged. According to our knowledge, this is the first report of a rapid height growth as big as 32cm, of an individual over the age of 20, not related to endocrine treatment but liver transplantation. PMID:27041087

  16. Adrenal hemorrhage after orthotopic liver transplantation: MR appearance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this paper is to describe the MR imaging findings of right adrenal hemorrhage after orthotopic liver transplantation. Twenty-seven orthotopic liver transplantation patients underwent MR studies of the liver and/or biliary system. Patients were referred to MR examination because of suspected biliary complications (n=22) or for evaluation of mass lesions (n=5). The standard MR protocol included T1-weighted spin-echo (SE) or gradient-recalled echo (GRE) images and T2-weighted turbo SE (TSE) images with fat suppression. In addition, cholangiography pulse sequences and/or contrast-enhanced T1-weighted images were obtained according to specific indications. In 2 patients a right adrenal mass was detected at MR imaging. Three to 4 weeks after transplantation, the lesions were markedly hyperintense on T2-weighted images and showed a hypointense capsule. Follow-up MR examinations revealed a slight decrease in size and a change in morphology. Computed tomography examinations of these 2 patients, obtained 10 weeks after transplantation, showed resolution of the hemorrhage and transformation into a cystic lesion in one case and a complete resolution of the hemorrhage and a normal right adrenal gland in the other case. Adrenal hemorrhage after liver transplantation shows typical MR features and should not be mistaken for an adrenal tumor or a postoperative abscess. (orig.)

  17. Fontan-associated liver disease: Implications for heart transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenway, Steven C; Crossland, David S; Hudson, Mark; Martin, Steven R; Myers, Robert P; Prieur, Tim; Hasan, Asif; Kirk, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Chronic liver diseases are associated with multiple complications, including cirrhosis, portal hypertension, ascites, synthetic dysfunction and hepatocellular carcinoma, and these processes are increasingly recognized in post-Fontan patients. Fontan-associated liver disease (FALD) can be defined as abnormalities in liver structure and function that result from the Fontan circulation and are not related to another disease process. FALD arises due to chronic congestion of the liver created by the elevated venous pressure and low cardiac output of the Fontan circulation, which may be superimposed on previous liver injury. Pathology studies have generally shown that FALD worsens as time post-Fontan increases, but the prevalence of FALD is not well defined because the majority of Fontan patients, even those with significant hepatic fibrosis, appear to be asymptomatic and biochemical or functional hepatic abnormalities are usually subtle or absent. Alternate non-invasive investigations, derived from the study of other chronic liver diseases, have been tested in small series of pediatric and adult Fontan patients, but they have been confounded by congestion and do not correlate well with liver biopsy findings. Liver disease can complicate Fontan circulatory failure and may even be significant enough to be considered a contraindication to heart transplantation or require combined heart-liver transplantation. The search for the optimal management strategy continues in the setting of increasing numbers of Fontan patients surviving to adulthood and being referred for heart transplantation. Thus, in this review we attempt to define the scope and significance of FALD and address transplant-related assessment and management of this challenging disorder. PMID:26586487

  18. Relevance of ADAMTS13 to liver transplantation andsurgery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    A disintegrin-like and metalloproteinase with thrombospondintype-1 motifs 13 (ADAMTS13) specificallycleaves unusually-large von Willebrand factor (VWF)multimers under high shear stress, and down-regulatesVWF function to form platelet thrombi. Deficiency ofplasma ADAMTS13 activity induces a life-threateningsystemic disease, termed thrombotic microangiopathy(TMA) including thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura(TTP). Children with advanced biliary cirrhosis due tocongenital biliary atresia sometimes showed pathologicalfeatures of TMA, with a concomitant decrease of plasmaADAMTS13 activity. Disappearance of their clinicalfindings of TTP after successful liver transplantationsuggested that the liver is a major organ producingplasma ADAMTS13. In situ hybridization analysis showedthat ADAMTS13 was produced by hepatic stellate cells.Subsequently, it was found that ADADTS13 was notmerely responsible to development of TMA and TTP,but also related to some kinds of liver dysfunction afterliver transplantation. Ischemia-reperfusion injury andacute rejection in liver transplant recipients were oftenassociated with marked decrease of ADAMTS13 andconcomitant formation of unusually large VWF multimerswithout findings of TMA/TTP. The similar phenomenonwas observed also in patients who underwent hepatectomyfor liver tumors. Imbalance between ADAMTS13and VWF in the hepatic sinusoid might cause liverdamage due to microcirculatory disturbance. It can becalled as "local TTP like mechanism" which plays a crucialrole in liver dysfunction after liver transplantation andsurgery.

  19. Chemotherapy or Liver Transplantation for Nonresectable Liver Metastases From Colorectal Cancer?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dueland, Svein; Guren, Tormod K; Hagness, Morten;

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE:: The primary objective was to compare overall survival (OS) in patients with colorectal cancer (CRC) with nonresectable liver-only metastases treated by liver transplantation or chemotherapy. BACKGROUND:: CRC is the third most common cancer worldwide. About 50% of patients will develop...... metastatic disease primarily to the liver and the lung. The majority of patients with liver metastases receive palliative chemotherapy, with a median OS of trial patients of about 2 years, and less than 10% are alive at 5 years. METHODS:: Patients with nonresectable liver-only CRC metastases underwent liver...... transplantation in the SECA study (n = 21). Disease-free survival (DFS) and OS of patients included in the SECA study were compared with progression-free survival (PFS) and OS in a similar cohort of CRC patients with liver-only disease included in a first-line chemotherapy study, the NORDIC VII study (n = 47...

  20. Evaluation of regeneration of liver function in pig model of auxiliary partial liver transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To establish a pig model of auxiliary partial liver transplantation and observe the liver function regeneration of host liver and graft. Methods: The portal vein providing for the host liver were gradually contracted; the donor hepatic veins were eng-to-side anastomosed to inferior vena cava in host caudal; graft was transplanted into the space under the host liver, part of receivers relieved portal vein angiography and color Doppler flow imaging was performed 3 days after surgery. Liver function of double livers in relievers was checked up, 3 days and 1 week after surgery respectively. Results: After surgery 10 relievers survived over 1 week, blood enzymology from hepatic vein of grafts 1 week after surgery were not ameliorative significantly compared with those 3 days after surgery (P > 0.05). Blood enzymology indexes from hepatic veins of grafts 1 week after surgery were were improved significantly compared with 3 days after surgery (P < 0.05). The graft did not reveal atrophic and gained favorable function. Conclusion: Favorable regeneration in the auxiliary partial liver transplantation model has achieved. Ideal foundation has been established for simulating and investigating human auxiliary liver transplantation. (authors)

  1. Assessment of adult patients with chronic liver failure for liver transplantation in 2015: who and when?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCaughan, G W; Crawford, M; Sandroussi, C; Koorey, D J; Bowen, D G; Shackel, N A; Strasser, S I

    2016-04-01

    In 2015, there are a few absolute contraindications to liver transplantation. In adult patients, survival post-liver transplant is excellent, with 1-year survival rate >90% and 5-year survival rates >80% and predicted median allograft survival beyond 20 years. Patients with a Child-Turcotte Pugh score ≥9 or a model for end-stage liver disease (MELD) score >15 should be referred for liver transplantation, with patients who have a MELD score >17 showing a 1-year survival benefit with liver transplantation. A careful selection of hepatocellular cancer patients results in excellent outcomes, while consideration of extra-hepatic disease (reversible vs irreversible) and social support structures are crucial to patient assessment. Alcoholic liver disease remains a challenge, and the potential to cure hepatitis C virus infection together with the emerging issue of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease-associated chronic liver failure will change the landscape of the who in the years ahead. The when will continue to be determined largely by the severity of liver disease based on the MELD score for the foreseeable future. PMID:27062203

  2. Diagnosis and treatment of spinal tuberculosis after liver transplantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peng-Cheng Gu; Rong-Huan Wu; Xiang-Jin Lin

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Spinal tuberculosis is a common disease in orthopedic clinical practice; however, it is seldom reported after organ transplantation. The aim of this study was to investigate the diagnosis and treatment of spinal tuberculosis after organ transplantation. METHOD: Two cases were diagnosed as spinal tuberculosis after liver transplantation and were treated with socarboxazide, rifampicin, streptomycin and ethambutol for more than one year. RESULTS: After treatment with anti-tuberculosis drugs for several months, the symptoms of both patients clearly improved. Back pain disappeared, and erythrocyte sedimentation and body temperature returned to normal. CONCLUSIONS: We should highly suspect spinal tuberculosis if notalgia and night sweats are present after organ transplantation. Anti-tuberculosis therapy is an effective treatment for spinal tuberculosis after organ transplantation.

  3. Acute Kidney Disease After Liver and Heart Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Ana P; Vella, John P

    2016-03-01

    After transplantation of nonrenal solid organs, an acute decline in kidney function develops in the majority of patients. In addition, a significant number of nonrenal solid organ transplant recipients develop chronic kidney disease, and some develop end-stage renal disease, requiring renal replacement therapy. The incidence varies depending on the transplanted organ. Acute kidney injury after nonrenal solid organ transplantation is associated with prolonged length of stay, cost, increased risk of death, de novo chronic kidney disease, and end-stage renal disease. This overview focuses on the risk factors for posttransplant acute kidney injury after liver and heart transplantation, integrating discussion of proteinuria and chronic kidney disease with emphasis on pathogenesis, histopathology, and management including the use of mechanistic target of rapamycin inhibition and costimulatory blockade.

  4. Clinical application of modern ultrasound techniques after liver transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teegen, Eva Maria; Denecke, Timm; Eisele, Robert; Lojewski, Christian; Neuhaus, Peter; Chopra, Sascha Santosh

    2016-10-01

    Liver transplantation has been established as a first-line therapy for a number of indications. Conventional ultrasound and contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) are methods of choice during the postoperative period as a safe and fast tool to detect potential complications and to enable early intervention if necessary. CEUS increases diagnostic quality and is an appropriate procedure for the examination of vessels and possibly bile ducts. This article presents the state of the art of ultrasound application during the early period after liver transplantation. It addresses common vascular complications and describes the identification of postoperative abnormal findings using ultrasound and CEUS.

  5. Residual amoebic liver abscess in a prospective renal transplant recipient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashish V Choudhrie

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Amoebic liver abscess (ALA is by far the most common extraintestinal manifestation of invasive amoebiasis. The vast majority of these resolve with treatment; however, a small percentage of the treated ALAs are known to persist asymptomatically. Herein, we present a prospective renal allograft recipient with a residual liver abscess who had a successful renal transplant after treatment. In our opinion, persistence of a radiological finding of residual abscess in the absence of clinical disease does not appear to be a contraindication to renal transplantation.

  6. Kidney and liver transplantation in children with fibrocystic liver-kidney disease: data from the US Scientific Registry of Transplant Recipients: 1990-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Jessica W; Furth, Susan L; Ruebner, Rebecca L

    2014-11-01

    The natural history and survival of children with fibrocystic liver-kidney disease undergoing solid organ transplantation have infrequently been described. We report outcomes in a cohort of US children with fibrocystic liver-kidney disease receiving solid organ transplants over 20 yr. Retrospective cohort study of pediatric transplant recipients with diagnoses of fibrocystic liver-kidney disease from 1/1990 to 3/2010, using data from the SRTR. Subjects were categorized by the first transplanted organ: LT, KT, or SLK. Primary outcomes were death, re-transplant, transplant of the alternate organ, or initiation of dialysis. Seven hundred and sixteen subjects were transplanted in this period. Median age at first transplant was 9.7 yr. Of the LT, 14 (19%) required a second liver transplant at median of 0.2 yr, and five (7%) required kidney transplant or dialysis at a median of 9.0 yr. Of the KT, 188 (31%) required a second kidney transplant or dialysis at a median of 5.9 yr. Twenty-nine (5%) subsequently received liver transplant at a median of 6.0 yr. Among patients in this registry, far more children underwent kidney than liver transplants. The risk of subsequently needing transplantation of an alternate organ was low.

  7. Epstein-Barr virus infection in paediatric liver transplant recipients: detection of the virus in post-transplant tonsillectomy specimens

    OpenAIRE

    Meru, N; Davison, S.; Whitehead, L; Jung, A.(FERMILAB, 60510, Batavia, IL, USA); Mutimer, D; Rooney, N; Kelly, D.; Niedobitek, G.

    2001-01-01

    Aims—Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease (PTLD) is an important and serious complication in transplant patients. Recent studies have suggested that quantitative assessment of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection in transplant patients might help to identify those at risk of developing PTLD. Therefore, tonsils from paediatric liver transplant recipients were studied for evidence of EBV infection.

  8. Radiological intervention in postoperative complications following liver transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Postoperative complications contribute significantly to the morbidity and mortality of liver transplant patients. The management of these complications requires a multidisciplinary approach in which interventional radiology plays an integral role. Indications, techniques, and results of radiological interventions in the management of the liver transplant patient are presented. Material and methods: During a 10-year period, 52 out of 420 liver transplant recipients underwent radiological interventions, including angioplasty (n=20), embolization (n=2), percutaneous drainage (n=11), and biliary interventions (n=19). Results: Nine out of ten arterial stenoses located at the anastomoses (n=8), within the liver (n=1) and in the coeliac trunk (n=1) were successfully treated by balloon dilatation. Angioplasty of supra- or infrahepatic anastomotic stenoses of the IVC (n=5) provided long-term success only in combination with stent implantation. Portal vein stenoses and chronic thrombosis were treated by balloon dilatation and stent insertion via transhepatic catheterization of the portal vein. Late strictures of bile-duct anastomoses can be managed by ante- or retrograde interventions. If biliary complications are related to inflammatory or septic problems, the prognosis of graft survival is poor. Conclusion: Interventional radiological procedures are very useful in the management of vascular and biliary complications after liver transplantation. These techniques provide a cure in many situations, and thus, surgical interventions may be avoided in selected cases. (orig.)

  9. Reduced-size liver transplantation for glycogen storage disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hao-Feng Ji; Wei-Lin Wang; Yan Shen; Min Zhang; Ting-Bo Liang; Jian Wu; Xiao Xu; Sheng Yan; Shu-Sen Zheng

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Glycogen storage disease (GSD) is an inherited metabolic disorder in which the concentration and/or structure of glycogen in tissues is abnormal. Essentially, abnormalities in all known enzymes involved in the synthesis or degradation of glycogen and glucose have been found to cause some type of GSD. Liver and muscle have abundant quantities of glycogen and are the most common and seriously affected tissues. This study was to assess reduced-size liver transplantation for the treatment of GSD. METHODS: The clinical data from one case of GSD typeⅠ with hepatic adenoma was retrospectively analyzed. The clinical manifestations were hepatomegaly, delayed puberty, growth retardation, sexual immaturity, hypoglycemia, and lactic acidosis, which made the young female patient eligible for reduced-size liver transplantation. RESULTS: The patient recovered uneventfully with satisfactory outcome, including 12 cm growth in height and 5 kg increase in weight during 16 months after successful reduced-size liver transplantation. She has been living a normal life for 4 years so far. CONCLUSIONS: Reduced-size liver transplantation is an effective treatment for GSD with hepatomegaly and hepatic adenoma. Delayed puberty, growth retardation, hypoglycemia and lactic acidosis can be cured by surgery.

  10. Research of combined liver-kidney transplantation model in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiageng Zhu; Jun Li; Ruipeng Jia; Jianghao Su; Mingshun Shen; Zhigang Cao

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To set up a simple and reliable rat model of combined liver-kidney transplantation. Methods: SD rats served as both donors and recipients. 4℃ sodium lactate Ringer's was infused from portal veins to donated livers,and from abdominal aorta to donated kidneys, respectively. Anastomosis of the portal vein and the inferior vena cava (IVC) inferior to the right kidney between the graft and the recipient was performed by a double cuff method, then the superior hepatic vena cava with suture. A patch of donated renal artery was anastomosed to the recipient abdominal aorta. The urethra and bile duct were reconstructed with a simple inside bracket. Results: Among 65 cases of combined liver-kidney transplantation, the success rate in the late 40 cases was 77.5%. The function of the grafted liver and kidney remained normal. Conclusion: This rat model of combined liver-kidney transplantation can be established in common laboratory conditions with high success rate and meet the needs of renal transplantation experiment.

  11. Physician predictions of graft survival following liver transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feurer, Irene D.; Austin, Mary T.; Porayko, Michael K.; Wright, J. Kelly; Lorenzi, Nancy M.; Pinson, C. Wright; Aronsky, Dominik

    2007-01-01

    Introduction. Due to the scarcity of cadaveric livers, clinical judgment must be used to avoid futile transplants. However, the accuracy of human judgment for predicting outcomes following liver transplantation is unknown. The study aim was to assess expert clinicians’ ability to predict graft survival and to compare their performance to published survival models. Materials and methods. Pre-transplant case summaries were prepared based on 16 actual, randomly selected liver transplants. Clinicians specializing in the care of liver transplant patients were invited to assess the likelihood of 90-day graft survival for each case using (1) a 4-point Likert scale ranging from poor to excellent, and (2) a visual analog scale denoting the probability of survival. Four published models were also used to predict survival for the 16 cases. Results. Completed instruments were received from 50 clinicians. Prognostic estimates on the two scales were highly correlated (median r=0.88). Individual clinicians’ predictive ability was 0.61±0.13, by area under the receiver operating characteristic curve. The performance of published models was MELD 0.59, Desai 0.66, Ghobrial 0.61, and Thuluvath 0.45. For three cases, clinicians consistently overestimated the probability of survival (87±10%, 89±9%, 86±9%); these patients had early graft failures caused by postoperative complications. Discussion. Clinicians varied in their ability to predict survival for a set of pre-transplant scenarios, but performed similarly to published models. When clinicians overestimated the chance of transplant success, either sepsis or hepatic artery thrombosis was involved; such events may be hard to predict before surgery. PMID:18345303

  12. The price of donation after cardiac death in liver transplantation : a prospective cost-effectiveness study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Hilst, Christian S.; IJtsma, Alexander J. C.; Bottema, Jan T.; van Hoek, Bart; Dubbeld, Jeroen; Metselaar, Herold J.; Kazemier, Geert; van den Berg, Aad P.; Porte, Robert J.; Slooff, Maarten J. H.

    2013-01-01

    This study aims to perform a detailed prospective observational multicenter cost-effectiveness study by comparing liver transplantations with Donation after Brain Death (DBD) and Donation after Cardiac Death (DCD) grafts. All liver transplantations in the three Dutch liver transplant centers between

  13. Organ Allocation for Liver Transplantation According to the Public Opinion

    OpenAIRE

    Danesh, Ahmad; NEDJAT, Saharnaz; Asghari, Fariba; Jafarian, Ali; FOTOUHI, Akbar

    2012-01-01

    Background Although liver transplantation is the last resort for treating end stage liver diseases, this medical procedure is not available for all needful patients because of inadequate organ supply. Therefore, guidelines have been developed by medical experts to regulate the process. Some professionals believe that medical criteria are inadequate for organ allocation in all situations and may not secure fairness of organ allocation. Objectives The current study has been designed to identify...

  14. Periodontal Management of a Patient Undergoing Liver Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clozza, Emanuele; Segelnick, Stuart L; Sigal, Samuel H; Rovner, Deborah N; Weinberg, Mea A

    2016-01-01

    This case report describes the periodontal management of a patient with end-stage liver disease undergoing liver transplantation. In the first part of this article, all medical and dental findings are reported to elaborate adequate diagnoses. A patient-specific treatment plan was structured given the challenging periodontal and systemic scenarios. The second part describes the periodontal therapy delivered in close interaction with the referring physicians. Last, the article reviews current principles and protocols in managing these patients. PMID:26901304

  15. Orthotropic liver transplantation for intractable neurological manifestations of Wilson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutariya, Vaibhav K; Tank, Anad H; Modi, Pranjal R

    2015-01-01

    Wilson's disease (WD) is an inherited autosomal recessive disorder characterized by copper accumulation and toxicity, affecting mainly the liver and brain. Orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) is the definitive therapy for patients with WD. Acute fulminant hepatic failure and decompensated cirrhosis are well-established indications for OLT. Patients with severe neurologic impairment can also be benefited by OLT. Here, we present a patient who underwent OLT for isolated neurological WD.

  16. Distal Splenorenal Shunt for Portal Vein Thrombosis after Liver Transplantation

    OpenAIRE

    Marino, Ignazio R.; Esquivel, Carlos O.; Zajko, Albert B.; Malatack, Jeffrey; Scantlebury, Velma P.; Shaw, Byers W.; Starzl, Thomas E.

    1989-01-01

    A 17-yr-old female received a liver transplant for type I glycogen storage disease. A year later, when she experienced variceal gastrointestinal hemorrhage, an angiogram revealed thrombosis of the portal vein with hepatopetal collateral channels. A distal splenorenal shunt was performed because of failure of sclerotherapy to control subsequent bleeding episodes and the fact that the liver function was normal. This patient continues to have normal hepatic function with a patent splenorenal shu...

  17. Proteomic analysis of tyrosine phosphorylation during human liver transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boutros Tarek

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ischemia-reperfusion (I/R causes a dramatic reprogramming of cell metabolism during liver transplantation and can be linked to an alteration of the phosphorylation level of several cellular proteins. Over the past two decades, it became clear that tyrosine phosphorylation plays a pivotal role in a variety of important signalling pathways and was linked to a wide spectrum of diseases. Functional profiling of the tyrosine phosphoproteome during liver transplantation is therefore of great biological significance and is likely to lead to the identification of novel targets for drug discovery and provide a basis for novel therapeutic strategies. Results Using liver biopsies collected during the early phases of organ procurement and transplantation, we aimed at characterizing the global patterns of tyrosine phosphorylation during hepatic I/R. A proteomic approach, based on the purification of tyrosine phosphorylated proteins followed by their identification using mass spectrometry, allowed us to identify Nck-1, a SH2/SH3 adaptor, as a potential regulator of I/R injury. Using immunoblot, cell fractionation and immunohistochemistry, we demonstrate that Nck-1 phosphorylation, expression and localization were affected in liver tissue upon I/R. In addition, mass spectrometry identification of Nck-1 binding partners during the course of the transplantation also suggested a dynamic interaction between Nck-1 and actin during I/R. Conclusion Taken together, our data suggest that Nck-1 may play a role in I/R-induced actin reorganization, which was previously reported to be detrimental for the hepatocytes of the transplanted graft. Nck-1 could therefore represent a target of choice for the design of new organ preservation strategies, which could consequently help to reduce post-reperfusion liver damages and improve transplantation outcomes.

  18. Evaluation of 100 patients for living donor liver transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trotter, J F; Wachs, M; Trouillot, T; Steinberg, T; Bak, T; Everson, G T; Kam, I

    2000-05-01

    The initial success of living donor liver transplantation (LDLT) in the United States has resulted in a growing interest in this procedure. The impact of LDLT on liver transplantation will depend in part on the proportion of patients considered medically suitable for LDLT and the identification of suitable donors. We report the outcome of our evaluation of the first 100 potential transplant recipients for LDLT at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center (Denver, CO). All patients considered for LDLT had first been approved for conventional liver transplantation by the Liver Transplant Selection Committee and met the listing criteria of United Network for Organ Sharing status 1, 2A, or 2B. Once listed, those patients deemed suitable for LDLT were given the option to consider LDLT and approach potential donors. Donors were evaluated with a preliminary screening questionnaire, followed by formal evaluation. Of the 100 potential transplant recipients evaluated, 51 were initially rejected based on recipient characteristics that included imminent cadaveric transplantation (8 patients), refusal of evaluation (4 patients), lack of financial approval (6 patients), and medical, psychosocial, or surgical problems (33 patients). Of the remaining 49 patients, considered ideal candidates for LDLT, 24 patients were unable to identify a suitable donor for evaluation. Twenty-six donors were evaluated for the remaining 25 potential transplant recipients. Eleven donors were rejected: 9 donors for medical reasons and 2 donors who refused donation after being medically approved. The remaining 15 donor-recipient pairs underwent LDLT. Using our criteria for the selection of recipients and donors for LDLT gave the following results: (1) 51 of 100 potential transplant recipients (51%) were rejected for recipient issues, (2) only 15 of the remaining 49 potential transplant recipients (30%) were able to identify an acceptable donor, and (3) 15 of 100 potential living donor

  19. Using old liver grafts for liver transplantation: where are the limits?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Romero, Carlos; Caso Maestro, Oscar; Cambra Molero, Félix; Justo Alonso, Iago; Alegre Torrado, Cristina; Manrique Municio, Alejandro; Calvo Pulido, Jorge; Loinaz Segurola, Carmelo; Moreno González, Enrique

    2014-08-21

    The scarcity of ideal liver grafts for orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) has led transplant teams to investigate other sources of grafts in order to augment the donor liver pool. One way to get more liver grafts is to use marginal donors, a not well-defined group which includes mainly donors > 60 years, donors with hypernatremia or macrosteatosis > 30%, donors with hepatitis C virus or hepatitis B virus positive serologies, cold ischemia time > 12 h, non-heart-beating donors, and grafts from split-livers or living-related donations. Perhaps the most practical and frequent measure to increase the liver pool, and thus to reduce waiting list mortality, is to use older livers. In the past years the results of OLT with old livers have improved, mainly due to better selection and maintenance of donors, improvements in surgical techniques in donors and recipients, and intra- and post-OLT management. At the present time, sexagenarian livers are generally accepted, but there still exists some controversy regarding the use of septuagenarian and octogenarian liver grafts. The aim of this paper is to briefly review the aging process of the liver and reported experiences using old livers for OLT. Fundamentally, the series of septuagenarian and octogenarian livers will be addressed to see if there is a limit to using these aged grafts.

  20. A staged approach for a lung-liver transplant patient using ex vivo reconditioned lungs first followed by an urgent liver transplantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van De Wauwer, Caroline; Verschuuren, Erik A. M.; Nossent, George D.; van der Bij, Wim; den Hamer, Inez J.; Klinkenberg, Theo J.; van den Berg, Aad P.; de Boer, Marieke T.; Mariani, Massimo A.; Erasmus, Michiel E.

    2015-01-01

    Combined lung-liver transplantation is a logistically challenging procedure hampered by shortage of organ donors. We describe the case of a young patient with end-stage lung disease due to of cystic fibrosis and liver cirrhosis who needed combined lung-liver transplantation. The long waiting for thi

  1. MARS therapy, the bridging to liver retransplantation – Three cases from the Hungarian liver transplant program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazakas, János; Zádori, Gergely; Görög, Dénes; Kóbori, László; Dabasi, Eszter; Mándli, Tamás; Piros, László; Smudla, Anikó; Szabó, Tamás; Toronyi, Éva; Tóth, Szabolcs; Tőzsér, Gellért; Végső, Gyula; Doros, Attila; Nemes, Balázs

    2013-01-01

    Besides orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) there is no long-term and effective replacement therapy for severe liver failure. Artificial extracorporeal liver supply devices are able to reduce blood toxin levels, but do not replace any synthetic function of the liver. Molecular adsorbent recirculating system (MARS) is one of the methods that can be used to treat fulminant acute liver failure (ALF) or acute on chronic liver failure (AoCLF). The primary non-function (PNF) of the newly transplanted liver manifests in the clinical settings exactly like acute liver failure. MARS treatment can reduce the severity of complications by eliminating blood toxins, so that it can help hepatic encephalopathy (HE), hepatorenal syndrome (HRS), and the high rate mortality of cerebral herniation. This might serve as a bridging therapy before orthotopic liver retransplantation (reOLT). Three patients after a first liver transplantation became candidate for urgent MARS treatment as a bridging solution prior to reOLT in our center. Authors report these three cases, fo-cusing on indications, MARS sessions, clinical courses, and final outcomes. PMID:24265893

  2. Liver transplantation in polycystic liver disease: a relevant treatment modality for adults?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krohn, P.S.; Hillingso, J.G.; Kirkegaard, P.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Polycystic liver disease (PLD) is a rare, hereditary, benign disorder. Hepatic failure is uncommon and symptoms are caused by mass effects leading to abdominal distension and pain. Liver transplantation (LTX) offers fully curative treatment, but there is still some controversy about...... whether it is a relevant modality considering the absence of liver failure, relative organ shortage, perioperative risks and lifelong immunosuppression. The purpose of this study was to review our experience of LTX for PLD and to compare the survival with the overall survival of patients who underwent LTX....../kidney transplantation. One patient had undergone kidney transplantation 10 years earlier. RESULTS: Median follow-up was 55 months. One patient who underwent combined transplantation died after 5.4 months because of multiorgan failure after re-LTX, and one patient, with well-functioning grafts, died of lymphoma after 7...

  3. Pre-Liver Transplant: Tips Versus Distal Splenorenal Shunt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas W. Faust

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Recurrent variceal bleeding in liver transplant candidates with end-stage liver disease can complicate or even prohibit a subsequent transplant procedure (OLT. Endoscopic sclero-therapy and medical therapy are considered as first-line management with surgical shunts reserved for refractory situations. Surgical shunts can be associated with a high mortality in this population and may complicate subsequent OLT. The transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS has been recommended in these patients as a bridge to OLT. This is a new modality that has not been compared with previously established therapies such as the distal splenorenal shunt (DSRS. In this study we report our experience with 35 liver transplant recipients who had a previous TIPS (18 patients or DSRS (17 patients for variceal bleeding. The TIPS group had a significantly larger proportion of critically ill and Child-Pugh C patients. Mean operating time was more prolonged in the DSRS group (P=0.014 but transfusion requirements were similar. Intraoperative portal vein blood flow measurements averaged 2132±725 ml/min in the TIPS group compared with 1120±351ml/min in the DSRS group (P<0.001. Arterial flows were similar. Mean ICU and hospital stays were similar. There were 3 hospital mortalities in the DSRS group and none in the TIPS group (P=0.1. We conclude that TIPS is a valuable tool in the management of recurrent variceal bleeding prior to liver transplantation. Intra0Perative hemodynamic measurements suggest a theoretical advantage with TIPS. In a group of patients with advanced liver disease we report an outcome that is similar to patients treated with DSRS prior to liver transplantation. The role of TIPS in the treatment of nontransplant candidates remains to be clarified.

  4. Metabolic syndrome after liver transplantation: Preventable illness or common consequence?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Eric R Kallwitz

    2012-01-01

    The metabolic syndrome is common after liver transplant being present in approximately half of recipients.It has been associated with adverse outcomes such as progression of hepatitis C and major vascular events.As the United States population ages and the rate of obesity increases,prevention of the metabolic syndrome in the post-transplant population deserves special consideration.Currently,the metabolic syndrome after transplant appears at least two times more common than observed rates in the general population.Specific guidelines for patients after transplant does not exist,therefore prevention rests upon knowledge of risk factors and the presence of modifiable elements.The current article will focus on risk factors for the development of the metabolic syndrome after transplant,will highlight potentially modifiable factors and propose potential areas for intervention.As in the non-transplant population,behavioral choices might have a major role.Opportunities exist in this regard for health prevention studies incorporating lifestyle changes.Other factors such as the need for immunosuppression,and the changing characteristics of wait listed patients are not modifiable,but are important to know in order to identifypersons at higher risk.Although immunosuppression after transplant is unavoidable,the contribution of different agents to the development of components of the metabolic syndrome is also discussed.Ultimately,an increased risk of the metabolic syndrome after transplant is likely unavoidable,however,there are many opportunities to reduce the prevalence.

  5. Hepatic tissue engineering: from transplantation to customized cell-based liver directed therapies from the laboratory

    OpenAIRE

    Fiegel, Henning C; Kaufmann, Peter M; Bruns, Helge; Kluth, Dietrich; Horch, Raymund E.; Vacanti, Joseph P.; Kneser, Ulrich

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Today, liver transplantation is still the only curative treatment for liver failure due to end-stage liver diseases. Donor organ shortage, high cost and the need of immunosuppressive medications are still the major limitations in the field of liver transplantation. Thus, alternative innovative cell-based liver directed therapies, for example, liver tissue engineering, are under investigation with the aim that in future an artificial liver tissue could be created and be used for the r...

  6. Systematic review and validation of prognostic models in liver transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Matthew; Lewsey, James D; Sharpin, Carlos; Gimson, Alexander; Rela, Mohammed; van der Meulen, Jan H P

    2005-07-01

    A model that can accurately predict post-liver transplant mortality would be useful for clinical decision making, would help to provide patients with prognostic information, and would facilitate fair comparisons of surgical performance between transplant units. A systematic review of the literature was carried out to assess the quality of the studies that developed and validated prognostic models for mortality after liver transplantation and to validate existing models in a large data set of patients transplanted in the United Kingdom (UK) and Ireland between March 1994 and September 2003. Five prognostic model papers were identified. The quality of the development and validation of all prognostic models was suboptimal according to an explicit assessment tool of the internal, external, and statistical validity, model evaluation, and practicality. The discriminatory ability of the identified models in the UK and Ireland data set was poor (area under the receiver operating characteristic curve always smaller than 0.7 for adult populations). Due to the poor quality of the reporting, the methodology used for the development of the model could not always be determined. In conclusion, these findings demonstrate that currently available prognostic models of mortality after liver transplantation can have only a limited role in clinical practice, audit, and research. PMID:15973726

  7. Anastomotic biliary strictures after liver transplantation : Causes and consequences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verdonk, RC; Buis, CI; Porte, RJ; Van der Jagt, EJ; Limburg, AJ; Van den Berg, AP; Slooff, MJH; Peeters, PMJG; de Jong, KP; Kleibeuker, JH; Haagsma, EB

    2006-01-01

    We retrospectively studied the prevalence, presentation, results of treatment, and graft and patient survival of grafts developing an anastomotic biliary stricture (AS) in 531 adult liver transplantations performed between 1979 and 2003. Clinical and laboratory information was obtained from the hosp

  8. Bilateral chondrolysis of the hip following liver transplantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chechik, Ofir; Dekel, Samuel [Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center, Department of Orthopedic Surgery ' B' , Tel Aviv (Israel)]|[Tel Aviv University, Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv (Israel)

    2009-03-15

    A 32-year-old woman with bilateral hip chondrolysis diagnosed 2 years following allogeneic liver transplantation is described. Severe osteoarthritis was demonstrated on physical examination, serial radiographs and magnetic resonance imaging. Only four cases of chondrolysis in solid organ recipients have been described in the literature. (orig.)

  9. Intraoperative hemodynamic monitoring during liver transplantation: goals and devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nissen, Peter; Frederiksen, H J; Secher, N H

    2010-01-01

    With the introduction of orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) almost 40 years ago, changes in the cardiovascular system that manifest during the different phases of the operation combined, sometimes with massive hemorrhage in likely critically ill patients have been a challenge. Here hemodynami...

  10. INFERIOR VENA-CAVA OBSTRUCTION AFTER ORTHOTOPIC LIVER-TRANSPLANTATION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BROUWERS, MAM; DEJONG, KP; PEETERS, PMJG; BIJLEVELD, CMA; KLOMPMAKER, IJ; SLOOFF, MJH

    1994-01-01

    Post-operative inferior vena cava (IVC) obstruction is reported as an uncommon complication after orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT). We report 6 cases after 245 OLT's in the period between March '79 and December '92. Compression or torsion of the IVC or a technical problem were underlying cause

  11. New insights into the coagulopathy of liver disease and liver transplantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M Senzolo; P Burra; E Cholongitas; AK Burroughs

    2006-01-01

    The liver is an essential player in the pathway of coagulation in both primary and secondary haemostasis.Only von Willebrand factor is not synthetised by the liver, thus liver failure is associated with impairment of coagulation. However, recently it has been shown that the delicate balance between pro and antithrombotic factors synthetised by the liver might be reset to a lower level in patients with chronic liver disease. Therefore,these patients might not be really anticoagulated in stable condition and bleeding may be caused only when additional factors, such as infections, supervene. Portal hypertension plays an important role in coagulopathy in liver disease, reducing the number of circulating platelets, but platelet function and secretion of thrombopoietin have been also shown to be impaired in patients with liver disease. Vitamin K deficiency may coexist, so that abnormal clotting factors are produced due to lack of gamma carboxylation. Moreover during liver failure, there is a reduced capacity to clear activated haemostatic proteins and protein inhibitor complexes from the circulation. Usually therapy for coagulation disorders in liver disease is needed only during bleeding or before invasive procedures. When end stage liver disease occurs, liver transplantation is the only treatment available, which can restore normal haemostasis, and correct genetic clotting defects, such as haemophilia or factor V Leiden mutation. During liver transplantation haemorrage may occur due to the pre-existing hypocoagulable state, the collateral circulation caused by portal hypertension and increased fibrinolysis which occurs during this surgery.

  12. Factors influencing liver and spleen volume changes after donor hepatectomy for living donor liver transplantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, Ji Hee; Ryeom, Hunku; Song, Jung Hup [Kyungpook National University Hospital, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-11-15

    To define the changes in liver and spleen volumes in the early postoperative period after partial liver donation for living-donor liver transplantation (LDLT) and to determine factors that influence liver and spleen volume changes. 27 donors who underwent partial hepatectomy for LDLT were included in this study. The rates of liver and spleen volume change, measured with CT volumetry, were correlated with several factors. The analyzed factors included the indocyanine green (ICG) retention rate at 15 minutes after ICG administration, preoperative platelet count, preoperative liver and splenic volumes, resected liver volume, resected-to-whole liver volume ratio (LV{sub R}/LV{sub W}), resected liver volume to the sum of whole liver and spleen volume ratio [LV{sub R}/(LV{sub W} + SV{sub 0})], and pre and post hepatectomy portal venous pressures. In all hepatectomy donors, the volumes of the remnant liver and spleen were increased (increased rates, 59.5 ± 50.5%, 47.9 ± 22.6%). The increment rate of the remnant liver volume revealed a positive correlation with LV{sub R}/LV{sub W} (r = 0.759, p < 0.01). The other analyzed factors showed no correlation with changes in liver and spleen volumes. The spleen and remnant liver volumes were increased at CT volumetry performed 2 weeks after partial liver donation. Among the various analyzed factors, LV{sub R}/LV{sub W} influences the increment rate of the remnant liver volume.

  13. Cytomegalovirus and chronic allograft rejection in liver transplantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liang-Hui Gao; Shu-Sen Zheng

    2004-01-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) remains one of the most frequent viral infections and the most common cause of death after liver transplantation (LT). Chronic allograft liver rejection remains the major obstacle to long-term allograft survival and CMV infection is one of the suggested risk factors for chronic allograft rejection. The precise relationship between cytomegalovirus and chronic rejection remains uncertain.This review addresses the morbidity of cytomegalovirus infection and the risk factors associated with it, the relationship between cytomegalovirus and chronic allograft liver rejection and the potential mechanisms of it.

  14. Scintigraphic patterns of veno-occlusive disease in liver transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernstine, Hanna; Mor, Eytan; Ben Ari, Ziv; Belinki, Alexander; Hardoff, Ruth

    2004-05-01

    Venous vascular complications in liver transplant recipients are rare. Diagnosis is usually based on clinical criteria and typical findings on liver biopsy. The scintigraphic patterns of posttransplant liver veno-occlusive disease are described, and the value of follow-up studies is suggested. The authors present 2 patients who developed posttransplantation hepatic veno-occlusive disease. The first patient had a severe form of the disease and a fatal outcome. The second patient had a mild to moderate form of this disorder with complete resolution following treatment. PMID:15069326

  15. Risk factors of severe ischemic biliary complications after liver transplantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ming-FengWang; Zhong-Kui Jin; Da-Zhi Chen; Xian-Liang Li; Xin Zhao; Hua Fan

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Ischemia-related biliary tract complications remain high after orthotopic liver transplantation. Severe ischemic biliary complications often involve the hepatic duct bifurcation and left hepatic duct, resulting finally in obstructive jaundice. Prevention and management of such complications remain a challenge for transplant surgeons. METHODS: All 160 patients were followed up for at least 180 days after transplantation. One-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and comparative univariate analysis were made using 3 groups (no complications; mild complications;severe complications), to analyze risk factors associated with biliary complications. Multiple logistic regression and linear regression analysis were used to analyze independent risk factors for severe ischemic biliary complications, after excluding other confounding factors. RESULTS: By ANOVA and comparative univariate analysis, the risk factors associated with biliary complications were preoperative bilirubin level (P=0.007) and T-tube stenting of the anastomosis (P=0.016). Multiple logistic regression analysis showed that the use of T-tube and preoperative serum bilirubin were not independent risk factors for severe ischemic biliary complications after orthotopic liver transplantation. Chi-square analysis indicated that in the incidence of severe ischemic biliary lesions, bile duct second warm ischemic time longer than 60 minutes was a significant risk factor. Linear regression demonstrated a negative correlation between cold preservation time and warm ischemia time. CONCLUSIONS: Preoperative serum bilirubin level and the use of T-tube stenting of the anastomosis were independent risk factors for biliary complications after liver transplantation, but not for severe ischemic biliary complications. The second warm ischemia time of bile duct longer than 60 minutes and prolonged bile duct second warm ischemia time combined with cold preservation time were significant risk factors for severe

  16. Arcuate ligament syndrome inducing hepatic artery thrombosis after liver transplantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi-Jun Jiang; Ting-Bo Liang; Xiao-Ning Feng; Wei-Lin Wang; Yan Shen; Min Zhang; Jian Wu; Xiao Xu; Shu-Sen Zheng

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hepatic artery thrombosis (HAT) is a frequent complication following liver transplantation, but it is rarely caused by arcuate ligament compression of the celiac artery. This article mainly describes our experience in managing a patient with celiac artery stenosis and HAT after liver transplantation. METHODS: A 44-year-old man with a 15-year history of hepatitis B was admitted to our hospital for hepatocellular carcinoma. Before the operation, he received trans-arterial chemoembolization once, and pretransplant MR angiography indicated a suspected stenosis at the initiation of the celiac artery, while color Doppler showed normal blood lfow in the arterial system. In this case, orthotopic liver transplantation was performed for radical cure of hepatocellular carcinoma. However, B-ultrasonography detected poor blood lfow in the intra- and extra-hepatic artery on the ifrst posttransplant day, and during exploratory laparotomy a thrombus was found in the hepatic artery. Thus, re-transplantation was conducted with a bypass between the graft hepatic artery and the recipient abdominal aorta with the donor's splenic artery. RESULTS: The patient made an uneventful recovery and color Doppler showed good blood lfow in the artery and portal system. Histology conifrmed extensive thrombosis in the left and right hepatic artery of the explanted graft, indicating HAT. CONCLUSIONS: Although HAT caused by celiac trunk compression is rarely reported in liver transplantation, the diagnosis should be considered in patients with pretransplant hepatic artery stenosis on angiography and abnormal blood lfow on B-ultrasonography. Once HAT is formed, treatment such as thrombectomy or re-transplantation should be performed as early as possible.

  17. Hepatobiliary function scintigraphy (HBFS) in auxiliary partial liver transplantation - results and analysis of animal study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After transplantation of an auxiliary liver lobe, hepatobiliary function scintigraphy (HBFS) using 99mTc-diethyl-IDA was performed for evaluation of the double liver system in healthy domestic pigs. Evaluation was performed using the parameters time activity curves, trend scans and count density rates (transplant versus host liver). Compared to the host liver the transplant revealed a complex impairment of the radiopharmaceuticals biokinetics. The results show that postoperative damage of transplants can be assessed early by scintigraphy as a quantitative measure for the individual function of transplant and host liver in the postoperative phase. (orig.)

  18. Recurrence and rejection in liver transplantation for primary sclerosing cholangitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bjarte Fosby; Tom H Karlsen; Espen Melum

    2012-01-01

    Primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) is a chronic progressive inflammatory disease affecting the bile ducts, leading to fibrosis and eventually cirrhosis in most patients. Its etiology is unknown and so far no effective medical therapy is available. Liver transplantation (LTX) is the only curative treatment and at present PSC is the main indication for LTX in the Scandinavian countries. Close to half of the PSC patients experience one or more episodes of acute cellular rejection (ACR) following transplantation and approximately 1/5 of the transplanted patients develop recurrent disease in the graft. In addition, some reports indicate that ACR early after LTX for PSC can influence the risk for recurrent disease. For these important post-transplantation entities affecting PSC patients, we have reviewed the current literature on epidemiology, pathogenesis, treatment and the possible influence of rejection on the risk of recurrent disease in the allograft.

  19. Carcinoma pós-transplante hepático Carcinoma after liver transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Júlio Cezar Uili Coelho

    2001-08-01

    Full Text Available The number of organ transplantation has increasing worldwide. Several authors have reported an increase in cancer incidence in these patients. There is a marked increase of a variety of tumors. However, common cancers seen in the general population showed no increase. The authors describe a case of a 42-year-old male with alcoholic cirrhosis who underwent orthotopic liver transplantation. The patient developed an uncommon solid tumor two years post transplantation, an epidermoid carcinoma of the pharynx. Radical radiotherapy of the palate was performed and no change was made in immunosuppression therapy. Ten months later the patient is doing well with no evidence of local recurrence or metastatic disease.

  20. Liver transplantation for hepatic and neurological Wilson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geissler, I; Heinemann, K; Rohm, S; Hauss, J; Lamesch, P

    2003-06-01

    Wilson's disease (WD) is an autosomal-recessive inherited disorder of copper metabolism characterized by excessive deposition of copper throughout the body. If medical treatment fails in cases of fulminant hepatic failure and progressive hepatic dysfunction due to advanced cirrhosis, liver transplantation (OLTx) has been demonstrated to be a valuable treatment option. Between December 1993 and December 2002, 225 OLTxs in 198 patients were performed in our institution. In this consecutive series six patients (three females and three males) were liver grafted for WD. The follow-up ranged from 3 to 7 years. All patients are alive with well-functioning grafts at present. The ceruloplasmin levels increased after transplantation and remained normal. The Kayser-Fleischer ring disappeared in all patients, and urinary copper excretion normalized. The neurological manifestations in the two patients with severe neurological symptoms showed after 2 to 5 years a downward tendency; in one the ataxic movements disappeared completely. The psychiatric disorder in one patient disappeared as well the mild neurological symptoms in the patient with CHILD A cirrhosis. These two patients are fully recovered and returned to work. OLTx should be considered as a treatment option in patients with severe progressive neurological deficits even in cases with stable liver function since liver grafting definitely cures the underlying biochemical defect. In such cases an early decision for liver transplantation is justified because neurological deficits may become irreversible.

  1. Negative outcomes after liver transplantation in patients with alcoholic liver disease beyond the fifth post-transplant year.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grąt, Michał; Lewandowski, Zbigniew; Grąt, Karolina; Wronka, Karolina Maria; Krasnodębski, Maciej; Barski, Krzysztof; Zborowska, Hanna; Patkowski, Waldemar; Zieniewicz, Krzysztof; Krawczyk, Marek

    2014-10-01

    Although up to 50% of patients with alcoholic liver disease (ALD) resume alcohol consumption after liver transplantation (LT), numerous studies indicate that long-term results are not compromised. This study focused on evaluating the impact of ALD on outcomes up to and beyond the fifth year after LT. Among the 432 primary LT recipients included in this study, 97 underwent transplantation for ALD. Alcohol relapse rate at 10 yr was 33.5%, with younger recipient age being the only independent predictor (p = 0.019). Survival of patients with ALD (77.0%) was similar to those without (79.0%) up to the fifth post-transplant year (p = 0.655) but worse during the five subsequent years among the five-yr survivors (70.6% vs. 92.9%; p = 0.002). ALD was an independent risk factor for poorer survival beyond the fifth post-transplant year (p = 0.049), but not earlier (p = 0.717). Conversely, alcohol relapse increased the risk of death only during the first five post-transplant years (p = 0.039). There were no significant differences regarding graft failure incidence between ALD and non-ALD recipients up to the fifth post-transplant year (7.3% vs. 11.6%; p = 0.255) and beyond (12.9% vs. 5.0%; p = 0.126). In conclusion, pre-transplant diagnosis of ALD yields negative effects on post-transplant outcomes beyond the fifth post-transplant year, not attributable to recidivism.

  2. The Groningen hypothermic liver perfusion system for improved preservation in organ transplantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plaats, Arjan van der

    2005-01-01

    End-stage liver diseases are nowadays effectively treated by transplantation of the affected liver. The transplantation procedure includes procurement of the liver from the donor and subsequently transport of the liver from donor to receiving patient (Chapter 1). To bridge the timespan of transport

  3. Delayed Gastric Emptying after Living Donor Hepatectomy for Liver Transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanjay Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Delayed gastric emptying is a significant postoperative complication of living donor hepatectomy for liver transplantation and may require endoscopic or surgical intervention in severe cases. Although the mechanism of posthepatectomy delayed gastric emptying remains unknown, vagal nerve injury during intraoperative dissection and adhesion formation postoperatively between the stomach and cut liver surface are possible explanations. Here, we present the first reported case of delayed gastric emptying following fully laparoscopic hepatectomy for living donor liver transplantation. Additionally, we also present a case in which symptoms developed after open right hepatectomy, but for which dissection for left hepatectomy was first performed. Through our experience and these two specific cases, we favor a neurovascular etiology for delayed gastric emptying after hepatectomy.

  4. Role of ischaemic preconditioning in liver regeneration following major liver resection and transplantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    D Gomez; S Homer-Vanniasinkam; AM Graham; KR Prasad

    2007-01-01

    Liver ischaemic preconditioning (IPC) is known to protect the liver from the detrimental effects of ischaemicreperfusion injury (IRI), which contributes significantly to the morbidity and mortality following major liver surgery.Recent studies have focused on the role of IPC in liver regeneration, the precise mechanism of which are not completely understood. This review discusses the current understanding of the mechanism of liver regeneration and the role of IPC in this setting. Relevant articles were reviewed from the published literature using the Medline database. The search was performed using the keywords "liver", "ischaemic reperfusion", "ischaemic preconditioning", "regeneration", "hepatectomy"and "transplantation". The underlying mechanism of liver regeneration is a complex process involving the interaction of cytokines, growth factors and the metabolic demand of the liver. IPC, through various mediators, promotes liver regeneration by up-regulating growthpromoting factors and suppresses growth-inhibiting factors as well as damaging stresses. The increased understanding of the cellular mechanisms involved in IPC will enable the development of alternative treatment modalities aimed at promoting liver regeneration following major liver resection and transplantation.

  5. An ethical dilemma: malignant melanoma in a 51-year-old patient awaiting simultaneous kidney and pancreas transplantation for type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirby, L C; Banerjee, A; Augustine, T; Douglas, J F

    2016-07-01

    Malignant melanoma is a high-risk skin cancer that, in potential transplant recipients, is considered a substantial contraindication to solid organ transplantation due to significant risk of recurrence with immunosuppression. Current guidelines stipulate waiting between 3 and 10 years after melanoma diagnosis. However, in young patients with end-stage organ failure and malignant melanoma, complex ethical and moral issues arise. Assessment of the true risk associated with transplantation in these patients is difficult due to lack of prospective data, but an autonomous patient can make a decision that clinicians may perceive to be high risk. The national and worldwide shortage of available organs also has to be incorporated into the decision to maximize the net benefit and minimize the risk of graft failure and mortality. The incidence of malignant melanoma worldwide is increasing faster than that of any other cancer and continues to pose ethically challenging decisions for transplant specialists evaluating recipients for solid organ transplantation. PMID:27484276

  6. Liver transplantation for acute liver failure accompanied by severe acute pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirino, Izumi; Fujimoto, Yasuhiro; Hata, Koichiro; Uemoto, Shinji

    2016-01-01

    The role of liver transplantation (LT) in acute liver failure (ALF) complicated by severe acute pancreatitis is still unclear. We here report a case of deceased-donor LT for idiopathic ALF accompanied by severe acute pancreatitis. A 58-year-old man with no history of liver disease presented with idiopathic ALF and acute pancreatitis. After careful consideration, he received a liver from a deceased donor. Following surgery, the patient's liver function rapidly reverted to normal level and the acute pancreatitis simultaneously subsided. The patient later developed a pancreatic pseudocyst, which was treated successfully with combination interventional radiology. LT can be considered for ALF associated with severe acute pancreatitis if there is no clinical evidence of an absolute contraindication for organ transplantation, such as systemic or local infection. Moreover, we recommend a close follow-up by ultrasonography to allow early detection and treatment of pancreatic pseudocysts following surgery. PMID:27600056

  7. Liver transplantation and combined liver-heart transplantation in patients with familial amyloid polyneuropathy: a single-center experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barreiros, Ana-Paula; Post, Felix; Hoppe-Lotichius, Maria; Linke, Reinhold P; Vahl, Christian F; Schäfers, Hans-Joachim; Galle, Peter R; Otto, Gerd

    2010-03-01

    Liver transplantation (LT) is the only curative option for patients with familial amyloid polyneuropathy (FAP) at present. Twenty patients with FAP underwent LT between May 1998 and June 2007. Transthyretin mutations included predominantly the Val30Met mutation but also 10 other mutations. Seven patients received a pacemaker prior to LT, and because of impairment of mechanical cardiac function, 4 combined heart-liver transplants were performed, 1 simultaneously and 3 sequentially. The first patient, who underwent simultaneous transplantation, died. Seven patients died after LT, with 5 dying within the first year after transplantation. The causes of death were cardiac complications (4 patients), infections (2 patients), and malnutrition (1 patient). One-year survival was 75.0%, and 5-year survival was 64.2%. Gly47Glu and Leu12Pro mutations showed an aggressive clinical manifestation: 2 patients with the Gly47Glu mutation, the youngest patients of all the non-Val30Met patients, suffered from severe cardiac symptoms leading to death despite LT. Two siblings with the Leu12Pro mutation, who presented only with grand mal seizures, died after LT because of sepsis. In conclusion, the clinical course in patients with FAP is very variable. Cardiac symptoms occurred predominantly in patients with non-Val30Met mutations and prompted combined heart-liver transplantation in 4 patients. Although early LT in Val30Met is indicated in order to halt the typical symptoms of polyneuropathy, additional complications occurring predominantly with other mutations may prevail and lead to life-threatening complications or a fatal outcome. Combined heart-liver transplantation should be considered in patients with restrictive cardiomyopathy. PMID:20209591

  8. Profile of a Liver Transplant Follow-Up Clinic in a Nontransplant Canadian Urban Centre

    OpenAIRE

    Bazylewski, R; Rosser, BG; Cohen, A; Kaita, KDE; Minuk, GY

    1997-01-01

    Care of the growing number of liver transplant recipients will increasingly fall on the referring centres. Thus, there is a need to define more clearly the demographic, clinical and laboratory profiles of liver transplant recipients, particularly in the setting of a centre where a liver transplantation program does not exist. The present study documented these features in 37 patients attending an adult ambulatory care clinic in an urban, nonliver transplant centre. Mean ± SD age of the study ...

  9. Outcomes and management of viral hepatitis and human immunodeficiency virus co-infection in liver transplantation

    OpenAIRE

    Congly, Stephen E; Doucette, Karen E; Coffin, Carla S

    2014-01-01

    Liver transplantation for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) positive patients with viral hepatitis co-infection is increasingly offered in many North American and European liver transplant centers. Prior studies have demonstrated acceptable post-transplant outcomes and no increased risk of HIV complications in patients co-infected with hepatitis B virus (HBV). However, liver transplantation in HIV positive patients with hepatitis C virus (HCV) has poorer outcomes overall, requiring careful s...

  10. Long-term graft outcome of pediatric liver transplantation in Copenhagen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yamauchi, Yasushi; Yamashita, Yuichi; Wettergren, Andre;

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Graft loss after liver transplantation remains a significant problem, especially in pediatric patients. The aim of this study was to assess our initial series of pediatric liver transplantation and to identify the risk factors that influence graft outcome. METHODS: The first 51...... types have disappeared. CONCLUSIONS: To improve graft survival after pediatric liver transplantation, the timely referral of potential recipients to the transplant team and employing a meticulous technique during the operation, particularly for the technical-variant graft, are required....

  11. THE EXPERIENCE OF WAITING LIST MANAGEMENT FOR LIVER TRANSPLANTATION IN EKATERINBURG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. N. Bessonova

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Gaining the experience of liver transplantation waiting list formation is the important condition of transplant cen- ter successful work. In the era of transplant organ shortage careful medical examination of the patient before the operation and detection of unfavorable facts and transplantation contraindications are of paramount importance. At the same time evaluation of the structure of potential liver transplant recipients category allows to develop maximal effective management of waiting list patients and prevention of fatal complications before operation. 

  12. Late-onset acute rejection after living donor liver transplantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nobuhisa Akamatsu; Yasuhiko Sugawara; Sumihito Tamura; Junichi Keneko; Yuichi Matsui; Kiyoshi Hasegawa; Masatoshi Makuuchi

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the incidence and risk factors of late-onset acute rejection (LAR) and to clarify the effectiveness of our immunosuppressive regime consisting of life-long administration of tacrolimus and steroids.METHODS: Adult living donor liver transplantation recipients (n = 204) who survived more than 6 mo after living donor liver transplantation were enrolled.Immunosuppression was achieved using tacrolimus and methylprednisolone. When adverse effects of tacrolimus were detected, the patient was switched to cyclosporine. Six months after transplantation,tacrolimus or cyclosporine was carefully maintained at a therapeutic level. The methylprednisolone dosage was maintained at 0.05 mg/kg per day by oral administration.Acute rejections that occurred more than 6 mo after the operation were defined as late-onset. The median followup period was 34 mo.RESULTS: LAR was observed in 15 cases (7%) and no chronic rejection was observed. The incidence of hyperlipidemia, chronic renal failure, new-onset posttransplantation diabetes, and deep fungal infection were 13%, 2%, 24%, and 17%, respectively. Conversion from tacrolimus to cyclosporine was required in 38 patients (19%). Multivariate analysis revealed that a cyclosporinebased regimen was significantly associated with LAR.CONCLUSION: Both LAR and drug-induced adverse events happen at a low incidence, supporting the safety and efficacy of the present immunosuppression regimen for living donor liver transplantation.

  13. Living donor liver transplantation in Taiwan-challenges beyond surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillai, Vinod G; Chen, Chao-Long

    2016-04-01

    Taiwan has a high prevalence of hepatitis B and C viral infections, and consequently a high burden of chronic liver diseases. Liver transplantation (LT) began in Taiwan in 1984, and living donor liver transplantation (LDLT) in 1994. Education and collaboration between physicians on a national and international scale were important factors in the development of transplantation in East Asia. Technical innovations in donor hepatectomy, vascular and biliary reconstruction, and interventional radiology, perioperative management of transplant patients and development of associated specialties have enabled achievement of excellent results after both adult and pediatric LDLT. The establishment of rigorous protocols to withstand strict medico-legal scrutiny, combined with technical excellence has contributed to excellent surgical outcomes. The socioeconomic development of Taiwan and the first nationwide hepatitis B vaccination program in the world have also contributed to the decrease in disease burden and improvement of quality of healthcare. This article examines the factors enabling the development of LT in Taiwan, the innovations that have contributed to excellent outcomes, and indicates the future prospects of LDLT in Taiwan. PMID:27115009

  14. Liver graft regeneration in right lobe adult living donor liver transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Y-F; Huang, T-L; Chen, T-Y; Tsang, L L-C; Ou, H-Y; Yu, C-Y; Concejero, A; Wang, C-C; Wang, S-H; Lin, T-S; Liu, Y-W; Yang, C-H; Yong, C-C; Chiu, K-W; Jawan, B; Eng, H-L; Chen, C-L

    2009-06-01

    Optimal portal flow is one of the essentials in adequate liver function, graft regeneration and outcome of the graft after right lobe adult living donor liver transplantation (ALDLT). The relations among factors that cause sufficient liver graft regeneration are still unclear. The aim of this study is to evaluate the potential predisposing factors that encourage liver graft regeneration after ALDLT. The study population consisted of right lobe ALDLT recipients from Chang Gung Memorial Hospital-Kaohsiung Medical Center, Taiwan. The records, preoperative images, postoperative Doppler ultrasound evaluation and computed tomography studies performed 6 months after transplant were reviewed. The volume of the graft 6 months after transplant divided by the standard liver volume was calculated as the regeneration ratio. The predisposing risk factors were compiled from statistical analyses and included age, recipient body weight, native liver disease, spleen size before transplant, patency of the hepatic venous graft, graft weight-to-recipient weight ratio (GRWR), posttransplant portal flow, vascular and biliary complications and rejection. One hundred forty-five recipients were enrolled in this study. The liver graft regeneration ratio was 91.2 +/- 12.6% (range, 58-151). The size of the spleen (p = 0.00015), total portal flow and GRWR (p = 0.005) were linearly correlated with the regeneration rate. Patency of the hepatic venous tributary reconstructed was positively correlated to graft regeneration and was statistically significant (p = 0.017). Splenic artery ligation was advantageous to promote liver regeneration in specific cases but splenectomy did not show any positive advantage. Spleen size is a major factor contributing to portal flow and may directly trigger regeneration after transplant. Control of sufficient portal flow and adequate hepatic outflow are important factors in graft regeneration.

  15. Operative timing of liver transplantation for patients with severe hepatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qiu-Cheng Cai; Wei-Ming Wei; Fan Pan; Shao-Geng Zhang; Hua Lin; Yi Jiang; Li-Zhi Lv; Huan-Zhang Hu; Xiao-Jin Zhang; Yong-Biao Chen; Shao-Hua Chen; Kun Zhang; Fang Yang

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Fulminant hepatic failure manifests a rapid onset, serious complications, and a high mortality, but still there is a possibility of recovery. Once the patient is able to pass a crisis, the liver is able to regenerate completely and regain its normal function. Therefore it is of vital importance to determine the eligible timing for transplantation. Premature surgery might result in a loss of the chance of internal medical treatment and misuse of liver resources, whereas delayed surgery might increase the difficulty of treatment in the preoperative period and the possibility of complications and medical expense, which eventually result in decreased rate of success and survival. This problem remains worldwide how to choose the optional timing of operation. METHODS: Thirty-six patients with severe hepatitis were treated by orthotopic liver transplantation. The distribution of MELD scores in these patients was: 10-19 in 8 patients, 20-29 in 10, 30-39 in 11, and 40 in 7. They were divided into two groups: MELD score RESULTS: The 1-year survival rate of the MELD score CONCLUSION: This study shows that when the MELD score is <30 it may be the optimal time to perform liver transplantation for patients with severe hepatitis.

  16. Accuracy of Hepatobiliary Scintigraphy after Liver Transplantation and Liver Resection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Eckenschwiller

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims. Biliary complications are the most frequent complications after common liver surgeries. In this study, accuracy of hepatobiliary scintigraphy (HBS and impact of hyperbilirubinemia were evaluated. Methods. Between November 2007 and February 2016, 131 patients underwent hepatobiliary scintigraphy after having liver surgery. 39 patients with 42 scans after LTX (n=13 or hepatic resection (n=26 were evaluated in the study; 27 were male, with mean age 60 years. The subjects underwent hepatobiliary scintigraphy with Tc-99m labeled Mebrofenin. The results were compared to ERCP as gold standard performed within one month after HBS. We calculated sensitivity, specificity, PPV, and NPV. We compared LTX patients to patients with other liver surgeries. Furthermore the influence of hyperbilirubinemia on HBS scans was evaluated. Results. HBS always provided the correct diagnosis in cases of bile leak in the liver-resected group (14/14. Overall diagnostic accuracy was 76% (19/25 in this group and 54% (7/13 in the LTX group. False negative (FN diagnoses occurred more often among LTX patients (p=0.011. Hyperbilirubinemia (>5 mg/dL significantly influenced the excretion function of the liver, prolonging HBS’s time-activity-curve (p=0.001. Conclusions. Hepatobiliary scintigraphy is a reliable tool to detect biliary complications, but reduced accuracy must be considered after LTX.

  17. Brucella infection with pancytopenia after pediatric liver transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polat, K Y; Tosun, M S; Ertekin, V; Aydinli, B; Emre, S

    2012-06-01

    Brucellosis is considered the most widespread zoonosis in the world. It has been reported that the prevalence of seropositivity among the Turkish population varies from 3% to 14%. We present a case of brucellosis after pediatric liver transplantation. A 15-year-old boy with the diagnosis of neuro Wilson's disease underwent deceased-donor liver transplantation. The postoperative immunosuppressive protocol consisted of steroids and tacrolimus. Two months after the operation the patient experienced fever to 40°C. The patient complained of poor appetite, headache, and diarrhea. He had had pancytopenia. Despite administration of appropriate antibiotics, antiviral and antifungal agents, fever persisted for > 1 month. Multiple blood, urine, stool, and sputum cultures were negative. Bone marrow aspirate revealed hypocellularity. Liver biopsy was performed, but rejection was not observed on biopsy specimen. Brucella serology was positive and Brucella agglutination titer was 1:320. Bone marrow culture was positive for Brucella but blood culture was negative. The patient was then treated with oral doxycycline and rifampin for 8 weeks. No previous case report about Brucella infection after liver transplantation has appeared in the literature, to our knowledge; our case is presented as the first. Bone marrow hypoplasia is a rare feature of Brucella infection. Our patient with brucellosis and pancytopenia had had hypocellular bone marrow. The clinical and hematologic findings resolved with treatment of the infection. Brucella infection should be suspected in liver transplanted recipients with fever of unknown origin, especially in a recipient who has lived in an endemic area. Brucella also should be considered as a possible diagnosis in patients with pancytopenia.

  18. Interventional management of hepatic venous outflow obstruction after liver transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To discuss the technique and efficacy of interventional management for the treatment of hepatic venous outflow obstruction (HVO) after liver transplantation. Methods: The clinical data of 5 patients with HVO developed after liver transplantation, including split (n=2) and living donor (n =3) liver transplantation, were retrospectively analyzed. Stent placement was performed in 4 cases and percutaneous transluminal angioplasty in one case. The technical points of interventional management were discussed. Results: Interventional management was performed via the percutaneous hepatic vein approach in 3 patients and via the right internal jugular venous access in 2 patients. Judged from hepatic venography, the location of HVO was at the anastomotic stoma of left- or right-hepatic vein with inferior vena cava (n=3 ) or at the anastomotic stoma of middle hepatic vein with right hepatic vein (n=2). Interventional technical success was achieved in all 5 patients. After the procedure, the venous pressure gradient, i.e. the blood pressure difference between the hepatic artery and the right atrium, was significantly reduced from (15.4 ± 5.6)mmHg to(1.9 ±1.2) mmHg. During the follow-up period of 9-482 days, no restenosis was found on Doppler sonographic manifestations. The liver enzyme and/or bilirubin which were markedly elevated before procedure returned to normal after the procedure in 4 patients except one patient who died of multiple-organs failure at the 9th day after the treatment. In two patients with large quantity of ascites and upper digestive tract bleeding, the ascites receded and the bleeding stopped after the procedure. Conclusion: Hepatic venous outflow obstruction is a rare, but potentially fatal, complication after liver transplantation and interventional management with stent placement or percutaneous transluminal angioplasty is an effective and safe treatment for it. (authors)

  19. Recurrent hepatitis C after living donor liver transplantation detected by Tc-99m GSA liver scintigraphy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaibori, Masaki; Ha-Kawa, Sang Kil; Uchida, Yoichiro; Ishizaki, Morihiko; Hijikawa, Takeshi; Saito, Takamichi; Imamura, Atsushi; Hirohara, Junko; Uemura, Yoshiko; Tanaka, Koichi; Kamiyama, Yasuo

    2006-11-01

    Recurrence of hepatitis C virus (HCV) after living donor liver transplantation was investigated using technetium-99m- diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid-galactosyl human serum albumin (Tc-99m-GSA) liver scintigraphy. Four patients with decompensated cirrhosis due to HCV infection were retrospectively reviewed in this study. Scintigraphy was performed to determine the hepatic uptake ratio of the tracer corrected for disappearance from the blood, as well as the maximal removal rate of the tracer by hepatocytes, as parameters of hepatic functional reserve. In all patients, serum HCV ribonucleic acid (RNA) was detected 3 months after transplantation. The corrected hepatic uptake ratio and removal rate showed little change after transplantation in two patients without the recurrence of HCV infection. In another two patients, these levels were decreased at 3 months after transplantation. In one patient, recurrent HCV infection was diagnosed by confirmatory histologic examination at 12 months after transplantation. In the other patient, both levels declined further at 8 months. Although treatment was initiated with a combination of interferon plus ribavirin, this patient died of progressive hepatic failure. In conclusion, a decrease in scintigraphic parameters at 3 months after transplantation suggests recurrent HCV infection affecting the graft. Tc-99m-GSA liver scintigraphy is a useful noninvasive method for evaluating graft functional reserve. PMID:16977504

  20. Factors influencing liver and spleen volume changes after donor hepatectomy for living donor liver transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To define the changes in liver and spleen volumes in the early postoperative period after partial liver donation for living-donor liver transplantation (LDLT) and to determine factors that influence liver and spleen volume changes. 27 donors who underwent partial hepatectomy for LDLT were included in this study. The rates of liver and spleen volume change, measured with CT volumetry, were correlated with several factors. The analyzed factors included the indocyanine green (ICG) retention rate at 15 minutes after ICG administration, preoperative platelet count, preoperative liver and splenic volumes, resected liver volume, resected-to-whole liver volume ratio (LVR/LVW), resected liver volume to the sum of whole liver and spleen volume ratio [LVR/(LVW + SV0)], and pre and post hepatectomy portal venous pressures. In all hepatectomy donors, the volumes of the remnant liver and spleen were increased (increased rates, 59.5 ± 50.5%, 47.9 ± 22.6%). The increment rate of the remnant liver volume revealed a positive correlation with LVR/LVW (r = 0.759, p R/LVW influences the increment rate of the remnant liver volume.

  1. Brain metastasis of hepatocellular carcinoma detected after liver transplantation Metástase cerebral de carcinoma hepatocelular após transplante de fígado

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Vianey Callado França

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available AIM: We report the case of a patient with hepatocellular carcinoma submitted to liver transplantation, who subsequently manifested tumor recurrence initially as brain metastasis. CASE DESCRIPTION: A 48-year-old male cirrhotic patient with hepatitis C infection, and two focal hepatic lesions, had a cytologic and histologic diagnosis of hepatocellular carcinoma. Before transplant, he was submitted to adjuvant treatment with a combination of arterial embolization and intratumoral ethanol injection. In the 3rd month post-liver transplantation, the patient developed headache, nausea and vomiting, without any neurological impairment. Brain computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging identified an expansive hypervascular lesion with internal bleeding. Evaluation of the surgical explant revealed macroscopic invasion of portal vessels. CONCLUSION: Brain metastasis of a hepatocellular carcinoma after liver transplantation may occur. This metastasis may have occurred before or soon after the transplant. Patients with hepatocellular carcinoma, awaiting liver transplant, should be screened for cerebral metastasis. Vascular invasion may indicate hematogenic dissemination of the tumor.OBJETIVO: Relatar o caso de paciente com carcinoma hepatocelular submetido a transplante de fígado, que subseqüentemente manifestou recurrência tumoral em cérebro após o transplante. DESCRIÇÃO DO CASO: Homem de 48 anos de idade, com cirrose hepática secundária à infecção pelo vírus da hepatite C, com duas lesões focais hepáticas diagnosticadas como carcinoma hepatocelular pela citologia e histologia. Antes do transplante, foi submetido a tratamento coadjuvante com embolização da artéria hepática e injeção intra-tumoral de etanol. No terceiro mês pós-transplante, o paciente apresentou cefaléia, náuseas e vômitos, sem déficit neurológico focal. Tomografia computadorizada e ressonância magnética de crânio identificaram lesão expansiva

  2. Donor safety and remnant liver volume in living donor liver transplantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zheng-Rong Shi; Lu-Nan Yan; Cheng-You Du

    2012-01-01

    AIM:To evaluate the relationship between donor safety and remnant liver volume in right lobe living donor liver transplantation (LDLT).METHODS:From July 2001 to January 2009,our liver transplant centers carried out 197 LDLTs.The clinical data from 151 cases of adult right lobe living donors (not including the middle hepatic vein) were analyzed.The conditions of the three groups of donors were well matched in terms of the studied parameters.The donors' preoperative data,intraoperative and postoperative data were calculated for the three groups:Group 1 remnant liver volume (RLV) < 35%,group 2 RLV 36%-40%,and group 3 RLV > 40%.Comparisons included the different remnant liver volumes on postoperative liver function recovery and the impact of systemic conditions.Correlations between remnant liver volume and post-operative complications were also analyzed.RESULTS:The donors' anthroposomatology data,operation time,and preoperative donor blood test indicators were calculated for the three groups.No significant differences were observed between the donors' gender,age,height,weight,and operation time.According to the Chengdu standard liver volume formula,the total liver volume of group 1 was 1072.88 ± 131.06 mL,group 2 was 1043.84 ± 97.11 mL,and group 3 was 1065.33 ± 136.02 mL.The three groups showed no statistically significant differences.When the volume of the remnant liver was less than 35% of the total liver volume,the volume of the remnant had a significant effect on the recovery of liver function and intensive care unit time.In addition,the occurrence of complications was closely related to the remnant liver volume.When the volume of the remnant liver was more than 35% of the total liver volume,the remnant volume change had no significant effect on donor recovery.CONCLUSION:To ensure donor safety,the remnant liver volume should be greater than the standard liver volume (35%) in right lobe living donor liver transplantation.

  3. Liver transplantation at the Ochsner Clinic: programmatic expansion and outcomes improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmody, Ian C; Reichman, Trevor W; Bohorquez, Humberto; Cohen, Ari J; Bruce, David S; Therapondos, George; Girgrah, Nigel; Joshi, Shobha; Loss, George E

    2012-01-01

    Liver transplantation has become the best and most durable treatment for both acute and chronic liver disease. Over 1400 liver transplants have been performed at the Ochsner Clinic since the first successful transplant in 1987. Since its inception, the program has gone through several changes and advancements and has become one of the largest liver transplant programs in the United States. We have helped evolve steroid sparing immunosuppression and the use of extended criteria, donor organs. Establishment of criteria for the selection of recipients for re-transplantation has resulted in better than expected short and long-term results. Our center has faced the challenge of Hurricane Katrina and overcome it. We have improved steadily in both outcomes and transplants performed. The Ochnser Clinic Liver Transplant program will continue to improve access and outcomes for all patients with liver disease.

  4. ABO-Nonidentical Liver Transplantation in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, J C; Roberts, J P

    2016-08-01

    Under the United Network for Organ Sharing (UNOS) policy, deceased donor livers may be offered to ABO-nonidentical candidates at each given Model for End-Stage Liver Disease (MELD) score and to blood type B candidates at MELD ≥30. To evaluate ABO-nonidentical liver transplantation (LT) in the United States, we examined all adult LT non-status 1 candidates, recipients and deceased liver donors from 2013 to 2015. There were 34 920 LT candidates (47% type O, 38% type A, 12% type B, 3% type AB) and 10 479 deceased liver donors (47% type O, 38% type A, 12% type B, 3% type AB). ABO-nonidentical LT occurred in 2%, 3%, 20% and 36% of types O, A, B and AB recipients, respectively, which led to a net liver loss of 6% for type O and 2% for type A recipients but a net liver gain of 14% for type B and 55% for type AB recipients. The LT MELD scores of ABO-identical versus -nonidentical recipients were 29 versus 34 for type O, 29 versus 19 for type A, 25 versus 38 for type B, and 22 versus 28 for type AB (p liver supply for candidates with blood types B and AB but decreased supply for type O and A candidates. We urge refinement of UNOS policy surrounding ABO-nonidentical LT. PMID:26932134

  5. [Pregnancy following liver transplantation and during immunosuppression with cyclosporine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Günter, H H; Mauz, S; Ringe, B; Niesert, S

    1990-05-11

    Orthotopic liver transplantation had been performed in 1983 in a now 40-year-old woman in the terminal stage of posthepatitis liver cirrhosis with recurrent oesophageal bleedings and precoma from complete liver-cell failure. She became pregnant in 1988 while under immunosuppression with cyclosporin (2.1-2.7 mg/kg body-weight) and prednisolone (5 or 7.5 mg daily in rotation). Pregnancy proceeded without complication and there were no side effects from cyclosporin. After premature membrane rupture in the 39th week of pregnancy uterine inertia developed during oxytocin stimulation of contractions, and caesarean section was performed. The female infant was normally developed without any malformations. Liver, kidney and adrenal functions were normal, as was haemopoiesis. But possible late sequelae of cyclosporin treatment in the child cannot as yet be assessed because of the short follow-up. PMID:2338057

  6. Liver transplantation for hepatocellular carcinoma - factors influencing outcome and disease-free survival

    OpenAIRE

    Fahrner, René; Dondorf, Felix; Ardelt, Michael; Dittmar, Yves; Settmacher, Utz; Rauchfuß, Falk

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma is one of the leading causes of cancer-related death worldwide. Liver transplantation can be a curative treatment in selected patients. However, there are several factors that influence disease-free survival after transplantation. This review addresses the pre-, intra- and postoperative factors that influence the risk of tumor recurrence after liver transplantation.

  7. Current status of adult-to-adult living donor liver transplantation: surgical techniques and innovations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN Lü-nan; WU Hong; CHEN Zhe-yu; LIN Yi-xin

    2009-01-01

    @@ In response to critical organ shortage, transplant surgeons have utilized living donors in an attempt to decrease the mortality rate associated with waiting on the liver transplant list. Although the surgical techniques were first utilized clinically 15 years ago, the application of living donor liver transplantation (LDLT) has been somewhat limited by the steep learning curve associated with developing a program.

  8. Liver transplantation in transthyretin amyloidosis: issues and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Andreia; Rocha, Ana; Lobato, Luísa

    2015-03-01

    Hereditary transthyretin amyloidosis (ATTR) is a rare worldwide autosomal dominant disease caused by the systemic deposition of an amyloidogenic variant of transthyretin (TTR), which is usually derived from a single amino acid substitution in the TTR gene. More than 100 mutations have been described, with V30M being the most prevalent. Each variant has a different involvement, although peripheral neuropathy and cardiomyopathy are the most common. Orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) was implemented as the inaugural disease-modifying therapy because the liver produces the circulating unstable TTR. In this review, we focus on the results and long-term outcomes of OLT for ATTR after more than 2063 procedures and 23 years of experience. After successful OLT, neuropathy and organ impairment are not usually reversed, and in some cases, the disease progresses. The overall 5-year survival rate is approximately 100% for V30M patients and 59% for non-ATTR V30M patients. Cardiac-related death and septicemia are the main causes of mortality. Lower survival is related to malnutrition, a longer duration of disease, cardiomyopathy, and a later onset (particularly for males). Deposits, which are composed of a mixture of truncated and full-length TTR (type A) fibrils, have been associated with posttransplant myocardial dysfunction. A higher incidence of early hepatic artery thrombosis of the graft has also been documented for these patients. Liver-kidney/heart transplantation is an alternative for patients with advanced renal disease or heart failure. The sequential procedure, in which ATTR livers are reused in patients with liver disease, reveals that neuropathy in the recipient may appear as soon as 6 years after OLT, and ATTR deposits may appear even earlier. Long-term results of trials with amyloid protein stabilizers or disrupters, silencing RNA, and antisense oligonucleotides will highlight the value and limitations of liver transplantation. PMID:25482846

  9. The Need to Handicap the Recipient's Native Liver in the Rat Model of Heterotopic Auxiliary Liver Transplantation

    OpenAIRE

    Ye-Dong Fan; Marleen Praet; Bernard De Hemptinne

    1999-01-01

    In the rat model of heterotopic auxiliary liver transplantation (HALTx), the opinion varies on whether and how the recipient's native liver should be handicapped. To avoid atrophy of the transplanted organ, in this study, two different handicaps were evaluated and their effects on post-operative animal survival and liver biology are described. With a sole portacaval shunt (group 1) all rats survived longer than 3 months. An additional handicap of the liver with either a 68% partial hepatectom...

  10. Yersinia enterocolitica Infection Simulating Lymphoproliferative Disease, after Liver Transplant

    OpenAIRE

    Jakobovich, E.; Koplewitz, B.; Marva, E; Granot, E

    2014-01-01

    We describe a 14-year-old girl, who was 13 y after liver transplantation for biliary atresia with an unremarkable postoperative course. She presented with fever of up to 40°C, extreme fatigue, malaise, anorexia, and occasional vomiting. On physical examination the only finding was splenomegaly. Lab results showed hyperglobulinemia and an elevated sedimentation rate. Liver function tests were normal except for mild elevation of γGTP. Abdominal U/S and CT demonstrated an enlarged spleen with re...

  11. Subchondral insufficiency fracture of the femoral head after liver transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A 53-year-old woman developed a subchondral insufficiency fracture of the right femoral head after undergoing a liver transplantation. Radiographs obtained at her first visit demonstrated a slight subchondral collapse in the superolateral portion of the femoral head. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) disclosed an irregular, discontinuous, low-intensity band on the T1-weighted image. After 7 months of conservative treatment, the hip pain and the radiograph abnormalities had both disappeared. On the follow-up T1-weighted MR image obtained 17 months after the onset, the band of low signal intensity was not obvious. A subchondral insufficiency fracture is one of the diagnoses to be considered in patients presenting with hip pain after a liver transplantation. (orig.)

  12. Subchondral insufficiency fracture of the femoral head after liver transplantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iwasaki, Kenyu; Yamamoto, Takuaki; Nakashima, Yasuharu; Mawatari, Taro; Motomura, Goro; Ikemura, Satoshi; Iwamoto, Yukihide [Kyushu University, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Fukuoka (Japan)

    2009-09-15

    A 53-year-old woman developed a subchondral insufficiency fracture of the right femoral head after undergoing a liver transplantation. Radiographs obtained at her first visit demonstrated a slight subchondral collapse in the superolateral portion of the femoral head. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) disclosed an irregular, discontinuous, low-intensity band on the T1-weighted image. After 7 months of conservative treatment, the hip pain and the radiograph abnormalities had both disappeared. On the follow-up T1-weighted MR image obtained 17 months after the onset, the band of low signal intensity was not obvious. A subchondral insufficiency fracture is one of the diagnoses to be considered in patients presenting with hip pain after a liver transplantation. (orig.)

  13. Comprehensive risk assessment for early neurologic complications after liver transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Si-Yuan; Chen, Teng-Wei; Feng, An-Chieh; Fan, Hsiu-Lung; Hsieh, Chung-Bao; Chung, Kuo-Piao

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To determine risk factors for early neurologic complications (NCs) after liver transplantation from perspective of recipient, donor, and surgeon. METHODS: In all, 295 adult recipients were enrolled consecutively between August 2001 and February 2014 from a single medical center in Taiwan. Any NC in the first 30 d post-liver transplantation, and perioperative variables from multiple perspectives were collected and analyzed. The main outcome was a 30-d NC. Generalized additive models were used to detect the non-linear effect of continuous variables on outcome, and to determine cut-off values for categorizing risk. Risk factors were identified using multiple logistic regression analysis. RESULTS: In all, 288 recipients were included, of whom 142 (49.3%) experienced at least one NC, with encephalopathy being the most common 106 (73%). NCs prolonged hospital stay (35.15 ± 43.80 d vs 20.88 ± 13.58 d, P 27.6 kg/m2, Child-Pugh class C, history of preoperative hepatoencephalopathy or mental disorders, day 7 tacrolimus level > 8.9 ng/mL, and postoperative intra-abdominal infection were more likely associated with NCs. Novel risk factors for NCs were donor age < 22 or ≥ 40 years, male-to-male gender matching, graft-recipient weight ratio 0.9%-1.9%, and sequence of transplantation between 31 and 174. CONCLUSION: NCs post- liver transplantation occurs because of factors related to recipient, donor, and surgeon. Our results provide a basis of risk stratification for surgeon to minimize neurotoxic factors during transplantation. PMID:27350733

  14. Recurrence of primary sclerosing cholangitis in pediatric liver transplant recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkat, Veena L; Ranganathan, Sarangarajan; Mazariegos, George V; Sun, Qing; Sindhi, Rakesh

    2014-06-01

    There is little detailed clinical information on recurrent primary sclerosing cholangitis (rPSC) after liver transplantation in children. Our purpose was to describe the characteristics of children who had experienced rPSC after liver transplantation so that we could identify potential risk factors for recurrence. Clinical information for pediatric patients undergoing transplantation for primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) was retrospectively reviewed, and variables related to the pretransplant diagnosis of PSC and posttransplant variables were abstracted. The studied variables included the following: cytomegalovirus/Epstein-Barr virus status, early/late rejection, induction regimen, immunosuppression in the first year, steroid-resistant rejection, diagnosis of inflammatory bowel disease, and human leukocyte antigen markers commonly associated with PSC. A diagnosis of rPSC was made on the basis of radiographic features, histology, or both. Twelve patients underwent liver transplantation for PSC between 1993 and 2012. Patients received tacrolimus for maintenance immunosuppression after induction with steroids (n = 6) or thymoglobulin (n = 6). Three patients were diagnosed with rPSC 44, 60, and 62 months after transplantation. A fourth patient underwent retransplantation for graft failure with features of both hepatic artery stenosis and rPSC. This patient had distinct histological features of rPSC in the second graft. Three of the 4 patients were 7 years old or younger at the diagnosis of PSC. The patient and graft survival rates were similar for the steroid and thymoglobulin groups. All 4 children with rPSC received steroid-free thymoglobulin induction. In conclusion, our observation of an association between thymoglobulin, and age less than 10 years at the diagnosis of PSC, and rPSC adds to the existing suggestion of a link between the immune environment and the pathogenesis of rPSC. Defining the natural history of rPSC and searching for the etiology and

  15. Primary graft dysfunction after liver transplantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Bo Chen; Ming-Qing Xu

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Primary  graft  dysfunction  (PGD)  causes complications in liver transplantation, which result in poor prognosis. Recipients who develop PGD usually experience a longer intensive care unit and hospital stay and have higher mortality and graft loss rates compared with those without graft dysfunction. However, because of the lack of universally accepted deifnition, early diagnosis of graft dysfunction is dififcult. Additionally, numerous factors affect the allograft function after transplantation, making the prediction of PGD more dififcult. The present review was to analyze the literature available on PGD and to propose a deifnition. DATA SOURCE: A search of PubMed (up to the end of 2012) for English-language articles relevant to PGD was performed to clarify the characteristics, risk factors, and possible treatments or interventions for PGD. RESULTS: There is no pathological diagnostic standard; many documented deifnitions of PGD are different. Many factors, such as donor status, procurement and transplant process and recipient illness may affect the function of graft, and ischemia-reperfusion injury is considered the direct cause. Potential managements which are helpful to improve graft function were investigated. Some of them are promising. CONCLUSIONS: Our analyses suggested that the deifnition of PGD should include one or more of the following variables: (1) bilirubin ≥10 mg/dL on postoperative day 7; (2) international normalized ratio ≥1.6 on postoperative day 7; and (3)

  16. Oncological Impact of M-Tor Inhibitor Immunosuppressive Therapy after Liver Transplantation for Hepatocellular Carcinoma: Review of the Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarantino, Giuseppe; Magistri, Paolo; Ballarin, Roberto; Di Francia, Raffaele; Berretta, Massimiliano; Di Benedetto, Fabrizio

    2016-01-01

    Background: Hepatocellular Carcinoma (HCC) represents the fifth most common malignancy and the third cancer-related cause of death worldwide. Hepatitis B (HBV) and C (HCV) viral infections and alcohol abuse are the principal etiological factors for HCC. Liver transplantation (LT) is oncologically the preferable approach to HCC, as it can remove all the intrahepatic tumor foci, and also the oncogenic cirrhotic liver. The use of mTOR inhibitors (mTORi) for immunosuppression after LT for HCC has been proposed due to rapamycin antitumor activity. We decided to review the literature to clarify the oncological role of mTORi after liver transplantation for HCC, analyzing both present condition and future perspectives. Material and Methods: A systematic literature search was performed using PubMed, EMBASE, Scopus, and the Cochrane Library Central. The search was limited to studies in humans and to those reported in the English language in the period of time between January 2005 and December 2015. Results: The literature search yielded 93 articles; after duplicates were removed, 77 titles and abstracts were reviewed. Most relevant data and papers are herein reported and discussed. Conclusions: So far, the use of mTORi is encouraging in terms of oncological outcomes for patients underwent LT for HCC, both for prevention and treatment of HCC recurrence although definitive data are still awaited.

  17. Liver transplant recipient with concomitant cutaneous and visceral leishmaniasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozcan, Deren; Seçkin, Deniz; Allahverdiyev, Adil M; Weina, Peter J; Aydin, Hakan; Ozçay, Figen; Haberal, Mehmet

    2007-03-01

    Diagnosis of leishmaniasis in immunosuppressed patients may be a serious challenge for physicians because of the major clinical and laboratory differences with immunocompetent patients. In immunosuppressed patients, the disease is characterized usually by disseminated visceral involvement, atypical cutaneous lesions and persistent negativity of diagnostic tests. Here, we report an eight-yr-old liver transplant recipient with concomitant cutaneous and visceral leishmaniasis in whom the cutaneous lesion led to the diagnosis of systemic involvement. PMID:17300508

  18. Histopathological changes in the liver after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation

    OpenAIRE

    Sloane, JP; Farthing, MJG; Powles, RL

    1980-01-01

    Postmortem and surgical specimens of liver from 20 patients who had undergone allogeneic bone marrow transplantation for a variety of disorders were examined. The lesions fell into five major categories: bile duct atypia often associated with portal tract fibrosis (8 cases), veno-occlusive disease (2 cases), small foci of non-zonal hepatocyte necrosis (3 cases), opportunistic infections (3 cases), and a miscellaneous group of non-specific abnormalities. Our findings, in conjunction with those...

  19. Medicaid enrollment after liver transplantation: Effects of medicaid expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tumin, Dmitry; Hayes, Don; Washburn, W Kenneth; Tobias, Joseph D; Black, Sylvester M

    2016-08-01

    Liver transplantation (LT) recipients in the United States have low rates of paid employment, making some eligible for Medicaid public health insurance after transplant. We test whether recent expansions of Medicaid eligibility increased Medicaid enrollment and insurance coverage in this population. Patients of ages 18-59 years receiving first-time LTs in 2009-2013 were identified in the United Network for Organ Sharing registry and stratified according to insurance at transplantation (private versus Medicaid/Medicare). Posttransplant insurance status was assessed through June 2015. Difference-in-difference multivariate competing-risks models stratified on state of residence estimated effects of Medicaid expansion on Medicaid enrollment or use of uninsured care after LT. Of 12,837 patients meeting inclusion criteria, 6554 (51%) lived in a state that expanded Medicaid eligibility. Medicaid participation after LT was more common in Medicaid-expansion states (25%) compared to nonexpansion states (19%; P expansion (January 1, 2014), the hazard of posttransplant Medicaid enrollment increased in states participating in Medicaid expansion (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.5; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.1-2.0; P = 0.01), but not in states opting out of Medicaid expansion (HR = 0.8; 95% CI = 0.5-1.3; P = 0.37), controlling for individual characteristics and time-invariant state-level factors. No effects of Medicaid expansion on the use of posttransplant uninsured care were found, regardless of private or government insurance status at transplantation. Medicaid expansion increased posttransplant Medicaid enrollment among patients who had private insurance at transplantation, but it did not improve overall access to health insurance among LT recipients. Liver Transplantation 22 1075-1084 2016 AASLD.

  20. Donation after cardio-circulatory death liver transplantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hieu Le Dinh; Arnaud de Roover; Abdour Kaba; Séverine Lauwick; Jean Joris; Jean Delwaide; Pierre Honoré

    2012-01-01

    The renewed interest in donation after cardio-circulatory death (DCD) started in the 1990s following the limited success of the transplant community to expand the donation after brain-death (DBD) organ supply and following the request of potential DCD families.Since then,DCD organ procurement and transplantation activities have rapidly expanded,particularly for nonvital organs,like kidneys.In liver transplantation (LT),DCD donors are a valuable organ source that helps to decrease the mortality rate on the waiting lists and to increase the availability of organs for transplantation despite a higher risk of early graft dysfunction,more frequent vascular and ischemia-type biliary lesions,higher rates of re-listing and re-transplantation and lower graft survival,which are obviously due to the inevitable warm ischemia occurring during the declaration of death and organ retrieval process.Experimental strategies intervening in both donors and recipients at different phases of the transplantation process have focused on the attenuation of ischemia-reperfusion injury and already gained encouraging results,and some of them have found their way from pre-clinical success into clinical reality.The future of DCD-LT is promising.Concerted efforts should concentrate on the identification of suitable donors (probably Maastricht category Ⅲ DCD donors),better donor and recipient matching (high risk donors to low risk recipients),use of advanced organ preservation techniques (oxygenated hypothermic machine perfusion,normothermic machine perfusion,venous systemic oxygen persufflation),and pharmacological modulation (probably a multi-factorial biologic modulation strategy) so that DCD liver allografts could be safely utilized and attain equivalent results as DBD-LT.

  1. Update and actual trends on bacterial infections following liver transplantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jose Luis del Pozo

    2008-01-01

    Recent advances in effective antimicrobial prophylactic strategies have led to a decline in the incidence of opportunistic infections in liver transplant recipients.However, morbidity and mortality due to infectious diseases remain as major problems. Bacterial infections occurring early after transplant are mainly related to the technical aspects of the procedure. By contrast,after the first postoperative days and beyond, the nature and variety of infectious complications change.Opportunistic bacterial infections are uncommon after 6 mo in patients receiving stable and reduced maintenance doses of immunosuppression with good graft function and little is documented about these cases in the literature. Transplant recipients may be more susceptible to some pathogens, such as the Nocardia species, Legionella species, Listeria monocytogenes , Mycoplasma species, Salmonella species or Rhodococcus equi. Respiratory infections due to capsulated bacteria, such as Streptococcus pneumoniae and Haemophilus influenza, can be lifethreatening if not promptly treated in this population.These late bacterial infections may be very difficult to recognize and treat in this population. In this article,we review what has been described in the literature with regards to late bacterial infections following liver transplantation.

  2. Melatonin role preventing steatohepatitis and improving liver transplantation results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteban-Zubero, Eduardo; García-Gil, Francisco Agustín; López-Pingarrón, Laura; Alatorre-Jiménez, Moisés Alejandro; Ramírez, José Manuel; Tan, Dun-Xian; García, José Joaquín; Reiter, Russel J

    2016-08-01

    Liver steatosis is a prevalent process that is induced due to alcoholic or non-alcoholic intake. During the course of these diseases, the generation of reactive oxygen species, followed by molecular damage to lipids, protein and DMA occurs generating organ cell death. Transplantation is the last-resort treatment for the end stage of both acute and chronic hepatic diseases, but its success depends on ability to control ischemia-reperfusion injury, preservation fluids used, and graft quality. Melatonin is a powerful endogenous antioxidant produced by the pineal gland and a variety of other because of its efficacy in organs; melatonin has been investigated to improve the outcome of organ transplantation by reducing ischemia-reperfusion injury and due to its synergic effect with organ preservation fluids. Moreover, this indolamine also prevent liver steatosis. That is important because this disease may evolve leading to an organ transplantation. This review summarizes the observations related to melatonin beneficial actions in organ transplantation and ischemic-reperfusion models. PMID:27022943

  3. Cytomegalovirus infection following liver transplantation: review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanj, S S; Sharara, A I; Clavien, P A; Hamilton, J D

    1996-03-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) remains a major cause of problems following solid organ transplantation, accounting for a significant increase in morbidity and affiliated costs. Infection with CMV following orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) is commonly seen as a result of marked cell-mediated immunosuppression and is an independent risk factor for opportunistic and fungal infections. The role of CMV infection in acute cellular or chronic rejection remains unclear. Recent advances in diagnostic modalities, particularly the use of the antigenemia assay and the polymerase chain reaction, have provided ways to quantitate viral load during infection or disease, as well as providing a useful marker of response to therapy. Ganciclovir remains the best antiviral agent for the treatment of CMV disease, but the use of combination therapy with other antivirals or CMV immunoglobulin may improve outcome for patients with severe disease. The ideal prophylactic therapy for patients undergoing OLT remains to be identified, as tested regimens have shown variable efficacy when analyzed with regard to defined risk groups. The use of risk group-specific prophylaxis may prove to be most successful, however, in terms of efficacy and cost savings. Future advances in basic CMV virology and transplant immunology will be essential in defining rational approaches to control and prevention of CMV infection and disease following liver transplantation. PMID:8852975

  4. Still's Disease in a Pediatric Patient after Liver Transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan-Carlos Meza

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Still's disease (SD is a multisystemic inflammatory disease characterized by persistent arthritis and in many cases with fever of unknown origin. Diagnosis of SD is challenging because of nonspecific characteristics and especially in the case of a patient with solid organ transplantation and immunosuppressive therapy where multiple causes of fever are possible. There is no diagnostic test for SD, even though some useful diagnostic criteria or laboratory findings, such as serum ferritin levels, have been proposed, and useful imaging studies for the diagnosis or followup of SD have not been developed. We report the case of a 9-year-old child who presented with high grade fever associated with joint pain after a history of liver transplantation and immunosuppressive therapy. Laboratory tests showed increased acute phase reactants, elevated ferritin, and leukocytosis. An 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (18F-FDG PET was performed identifying abnormal hypermetabolic areas localized in spleen, transplanted liver, and bone marrow secondary to inflammatory process. All infectious, autoimmune, and malignant causes were ruled out. A diagnosis of SD was performed and a steroid-based regimen was initiated with adequate response and no evidence of recurrence. To our knowledge this is the first case of SD following a solid organ transplant.

  5. Liver transplantation: an appraisal of the present situation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otto, Gerd

    2013-01-01

    Liver transplantation (LT) is an established approach to treatment of end-stage liver diseases, metabolic diseases and early hepatocellular carcinoma, and the results of this procedure have improved considerably. MELD allocation and the great number of transplant centers had a negative influence on outcome in Germany. Typical surgical issues following transplantation are vascular thrombosis and the development of biliary lesions. Nonanastomotic strictures impact graft survival and cause considerable posttransplant morbidity. Nonsurgical issues in LT are hepatitis C reinfection, selection of appropriate patients with hepatocellular carcinoma and individualized immunosuppression. In hepatitis C the new antiviral drugs (protease and polymerase inhibitors) are promising tools to prevent reinfection. Nephrotoxicity caused by calcineurin inhibitors - which remain the mainstay of immunosuppression - can only partially be avoided. So far, alternative forms of treatment using mycophenolic acid and mTOR inhibitors cannot totally replace calcineurin inhibitors. In view of graft scarcity, we need to think about a benefit-based model of liver allocation which focuses on the optimal use of this resource. Deciding on this form of organ allocation requires an ethical consensus: not the most urgent patient is the first candidate to receive a graft, but rather the patient who is supposed to have the greatest benefit. PMID:23797139

  6. Interventional treatment on vascular and biliary complications after liver transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To evaluate the value of angiography and cholangiography on the diagnosis and interventional treatment on vascular and biliary complications after liver transplantation. Methods: Sixteen of 46 patients (15 males, 1 female, 17-60 years old) after orthotopic liver transplantation received angiography due to abnormal ultrasonography or edema of lower limbs, or cholangiography due to progressing jaundice. 15 cases received angiography and proved vascular complications and 4 cases received cholangiography and biliary complications were found. 3 of them appeared both vascular and biliary complications. Results: Hepatic artery complication was the most common complication (seen in 9/16 patients), including hepatic artery thrombosis or stenosis (6/9), bleeding (2/9) and hepatic artery-dissecting aneurysm (1/9). One case with hepatic artery thrombosis received transcatheter thrombolysis and two cases with bleeding received coil embolization. Stenosis of inferior vena cava and portal vein were observed in 6 and 2 patients respectively. After balloon angioplasty or stent placement, clinical symptom of all cases alleviated. Biliary complications including biliary stricture and anastomotic bile leak occurred in 4 patients. Jaundice decreased after percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography and drainage. Conclusion: Interventional methods offered both diagnosis and mini-invasive treatment for patients after liver transplantation with vascular and biliary complications. Balloon angiography and stent placement of venous stenosis is an useful procedure for the treatment of these problems

  7. Interventional management for biliary tract complications following liver transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To investigate the role of interventional procedures in the management of biliary tract complications following liver transplantation, and so as the effect of t-tube indwelling. Methods: A review was made of data collected from 55 patients in two groups designated according to t-tube indwelling (28)or not (27). Data were retrospectively analyzed in terms of interventional procedures performed, and outcomes. Results: A total of 55 liver transplantation patients survived more than 1 month after interventional treatment for biliary tract complications, including 11 only with a drainage T-tube, the other 44 (80.0%) with one or more interventional procedures such as PTBD, balloon dilation to cure obstructive jaundice. Additionally 8 cases undertook stenting for hepatic artery, hepatic vein or portal vein stenosis. Conclusions: Interventional procedures are safe and effective for most patients with biliary tract complications following liver transplantation, with easy repetition in performance, including T-tube indwelling to provide a route for further diagnosis and treatment. Yet it is necessary to have other various interventional managements for the whole intact satisfaction of patients. (authors)

  8. NEOPTERIN IN PEDIATRIC LIVING-DONOR LIVER TRANSPLANT PATIENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. P. Shevchenko

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Neopterin (NP is a marker of macrophages activation and is used for monitoring rejection in patients after heart, renal transplantation. The aim of the study was to evaluate plasma levels of NP in children before and after living-donor liver transplantation (LDLT and its relationship with the postoperative course. The study included 72 children with end-stage liver disease (ESLD, aged 17 ± 11 (4–28 months before and after LDLT, 15 healthy children aged 9.9 ± 5.7 (3–21 months and 38 adult living-related liver donors, aged 37 ± 19 (18–56 years. In children with ESLD pre-transplant plasma levels of NP (25.2 ± 19.9 nmol/l was significantly higher than in healthy donors or healthy children (5.5 ± 3.4 and 6.3 ± 2.7 nmol/l, resp., p < 0.01. After LDLT plasma level of NP was higher in children, who had graft dysfunction at days 28–32 (61.9 ± 30.9 nmol/l after LDLT than in children who had no graft dysfunction (24.0 ± 5.6 nmol/l. The measurement of NP concentrations may be useful for monitoring of the postoperative course. 

  9. Orthotopic liver transplant for multifocal lymphangioendotheliomatosis with thrombocytopenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Christine H; Zhou, Shengmei; Alexopoulos, Sophoclis; Wang, Larry; Baron, Howard I; Genyk, Yuri; Kerkar, Nanda

    2016-05-01

    An eight-yr-old female with a history of multifocal lymphangioendotheliomatosis and thrombocytopenia presented for MVT. The patient had multiple vascular lesions in the skin and stomach in infancy. Although her cutaneous lesions resolved with vincristine and methylprednisolone, her gastric lesions persisted. Eight yr later, she was diagnosed with portal hypertension and decompensating liver function despite therapy with bevacizumab, propranolol, furosemide, and spironolactone. Upon presentation, she was found to have a Kasabach-Merritt-like coagulopathy in association with multiple lesions in her GI tract and persistent gastric lesions. Although treatment with methylprednisolone and sirolimus normalized her coagulation factors and d-dimer levels, she never developed sustained improvement in her thrombocytopenia. Her liver function continued to deteriorate and she developed hepatorenal syndrome. Given better outcomes after OLT in comparison with MVT, she underwent OLT, with the plan to manage her GI lesions with APC post-transplant. Post-transplant, her liver function and coagulopathy normalized, and GI tract lesions disappeared upon screening with capsule endoscopy. The patient is doing well, without recurrence of either GI lesions or thrombocytopenia, at 18 months after transplantation. PMID:26917412

  10. Transjugular liver biopsy in liver transplant patients using an 18-gauge automated core biopsy needle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aim of this retrospective study is to evaluate accuracy and safety of transjugular liver biopsy using an 18-gauge automated core biopsy needle, in patients underwent liver transplantation. 183 consecutively transjugular liver biopsy were performed in 115 liver transplant patients. An 18-gauge automated core needle biopsy was used in all patients. Technical success was achieved in 182 procedures (99.5%). In one patient we were not able to obtain a liver sample. The mean number of passages was 1.43 (range 1–5). Mean number of fragments was 2 (range 1–12). Mean total length of the specimens was 1.7 cm (range 0.5–3.4 cm). The specimen was adequate for diagnosis in 172 (94.5%) cases and suboptimal or inadequate in 10 (4.5%). Suboptimal or inadequate samples were associated with higher number of passages (2.0 vs. 1.4, p < 0.012), higher number of fragments (4.3 vs. 1.9, p < 0.0001) and decreased total length of the specimens (0.99 vs. 1.73, p < 0.03). As only complication one patient (0.5%) had a large perihepatic hematoma requiring blood transfusion. In conclusion using an 18-gauge automated core needle biopsy, in most liver transplant recipients, an accurate diagnosis can be obtained with one or two passages. This is associated with a low risk of complications.

  11. Tc-99m-galactosyl-neoglycoalbumin (Tc-NGA) liver imaging: Potential application in liver transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tc-NGA is a hepatocyte receptor-specific imaging agent whose uptake by the liver has been shown to be dependent upon blood flow and receptor concentration. The combination of anatomic and physiologic information obtained with Tc-NGA may provide a new tool for studying hepatic function in liver transplant recipients. To evaluate the potential role of Tc-NGA in liver transplant recipients, studies were performed in four groups of pigs: controls (n=18); common bile duct (CBD) ligation (n=8); orthotopic liver transplant (n=9); and acute hepatic artery ligation (n=1). Serial studies performed in two animals with CBD ligation demonstrated normal imaging anatomy with minor changes in the hepatic time-activity curves when compared to control studies. Studies in liver-transplanted animals showed significant changes in the hepatic time-activity curves during acute rejection and in preservation-related ischemic injury. Tc-NGA also demonstrated focal areas of hepatic infarction in a hepatic allograft within 24 hours of transplantation. The hepatic artery ligation study showed massive changes in the hepatic time-activity curve within two hours after ligation, with a diffuse decrease in hepatic activity. These results indicate that: (1) extrahepatic biliary tract obstruction causes only minor changes in Tc-NGA uptake; (2) Tc-NGA uptake by the liver is very sensitive to acute hepatic ischemia; (3) Tc-NGA may indicate the presence of preservation damage in the early postoperative period; and (4) Tc-NGA hepatic time-activity curves demonstrate significant changes during acute rejection

  12. Prognostic factors for late mortality after liver transplantation for benign end-stage liver disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Ying-cai; LU Min-qiang; YANG Yang; CHEN Gui-hua; ZHANG Qi; LI Hua; ZHANG Jian; WANG Gen-shu; XU Chi; YI Shu-hong; YI Hui-min; CAI Chang-jie

    2011-01-01

    Background There are increasing numbers of patients who survive more than one year after liver transplantation.Many studies have focused on the early mortality of these patients.However,the factors affecting long-term survival are not fully understood.This study aims to evaluate prognostic factors predicting long-term survival and to explore measures for improving the survival outcomes of patients who underwent liver transplantation for benign end-stage liver diseases.Methods The causes of late death after liver transplantation and potential prognostic factors were retrospectively analyzed for 221 consecutive patients who underwent liver transplantation from October 2003 to June 2008.Twenty-seven variables were assessed using the Kaplan-Meier method,and those variables found to be univariately significant at P <0.10 were entered into a backward step-down Cox proportional hazard regression analysis to identify the independent prognostic factors influencing the recipients' long-term survival.Results Twenty-eight recipients died one year after liver transplantation.The major causes of late mortality were infectious complications,biliary complications,and Hepatitis B virus recurrence/reinfection.After Cox analysis,the five remaining co-variables were:age,ABO blood group,cold ischemia time,post-infection region,and biliary complications.Conclusions The major causes of late mortality were infection,biliary complications and Hepatitis B virus recurrence/reinfection.Five variables (Age,ABO blood group,cold ischemia time,infection,and biliary complications) had significant impacts on patient survival.

  13. Liver transplant outcomes using ideal donation after circulatory death livers are superior to using older donation after brain death donor livers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scalea, Joseph R; Redfield, Robert R; Foley, David P

    2016-09-01

    Multiple reports have demonstrated that liver transplantation following donation after circulatory death (DCD) is associated with poorer outcomes when compared with liver transplantation from donation after brain death (DBD) donors. We hypothesized that carefully selected, underutilized DCD livers recovered from younger donors have excellent outcomes. We performed a retrospective study of the United Network for Organ Sharing database to determine graft survivals for patients who received liver transplants from DBD donors of age ≥ 60 years, DBD donors liver transplants were performed in the United States. Of these, 41,181 (78.8%) underwent transplantation with livers from DBD donors of age livers from DCD donors livers of age livers ≥ age 60 years (P livers; of these, 111 (83.4%) were from donors livers (age livers > 60 years old. Careful donor organ and recipient selection can lead to excellent results, despite previous reports suggesting otherwise. Increased acceptance of these DCD livers would lead to shorter wait list times and increased national liver transplant rates. Liver Transplantation 22 1197-1204 2016 AASLD. PMID:27314220

  14. Usefulness of liver stiffness measurement during acute cellular rejection in liver transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crespo, Gonzalo; Castro-Narro, Graciela; García-Juárez, Ignacio; Benítez, Carlos; Ruiz, Pablo; Sastre, Lydia; Colmenero, Jordi; Miquel, Rosa; Sánchez-Fueyo, Alberto; Forns, Xavier; Navasa, Miquel

    2016-03-01

    Liver stiffness measurement (LSM) is a useful method to estimate liver fibrosis and portal hypertension. The inflammatory process that takes place in post-liver transplant acute cellular rejection (ACR) may also increase liver stiffness. We aimed to explore the association between liver stiffness and the severity of ACR, as well as to assess the relationship between liver stiffness and response to rejection treatment in a prospective study that included 27 liver recipients with biopsy-proven ACR, 30 stable recipients with normal liver tests, and 30 hepatitis C virus (HCV)-infected LT recipients with histologically diagnosed HCV recurrence. Patients with rejection were stratified into 2 groups (mild and moderate/severe) according to the severity of rejection evaluated with the Banff score. Routine biomarkers and LSM with FibroScan were performed at the time of liver biopsy (baseline) and at 7, 30, and 90 days in patients with rejection and at baseline in control patients. Median baseline liver stiffness was 5.9 kPa in the mild rejection group, 11 kPa in the moderate/severe group (P = 0.001), 4.2 kPa in stable recipients (P = 0.02 versus mild rejection), and 13.6 kPa in patients with recurrent HCV (P = 0.17 versus moderate/severe rejection). The area under the receiver operator characteristic curve of LSM to discriminate mild versus moderate/severe ACR was 0.924, and a LSM value of 8.5 kPa yielded a positive predictive value of 100% to diagnose moderate/severe rejection. Liver stiffness improved in 7%, 21%, and 64% of patients with moderate/severe rejection at 7, 30, and 90 days. In conclusion, according to the results of this exploratory study, LSM is associated with the severity of ACR in liver transplantation and thus may be of help in its assessment. PMID:26609794

  15. Effect of living donor liver transplantation on outcome of children with inherited liver disease and hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozçay, Figen; Canan, Oğuz; Bilezikçi, Banu; Torgay, Adnan; Karakayali, Hamdi; Haberal, Mehmet

    2006-01-01

    We described six children with heritable liver disease and hepatocellular carcinoma treated with living-related liver transplantation. Underlying liver diseases were type-1 tyrosinemia (three patients), progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis type II (two patients), and Wilson's disease (one patient). Two of the tumors were found incidentally during liver transplantation. Number of nodules was 12, 15, 3, 2, and 1 (in two patients). Three patients were treated with chemotherapy before the procedure. Chemotherapy was not given to any patient after liver transplantation. The mean follow-up was 17.7 +/- 6 months (range: 7-24). All patients are tumor recurrence free. Both graft and patient survival rates are 100% at a median of 18.5 months follow-up. Physicians in charge of treating children with heritable liver disease should screen them periodically for the development of hepatocellular carcinoma. Liver transplantation may offer these children better survival rates.

  16. Post-transplant diabetes mellitus in liver transplantation:Hangzhou experience

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao Xu; Qi Ling; Zeng-Lei He; Feng Gao; Shu-Sen Zheng

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a frequent and serious complication in patients with liver diseases. We aimed to assess the prevalence and consequences of post-transplant DM (PTDM) in Chinese patients with HBV-related liver diseases and to determine the possible risk factors. METHODS: Altogether 165 patients with HBV infection and undergoing cadaveric related liver transplantation (LT) were enrolled. The clinical data of patients with (PTDM group) and without PTDM (non-PTDM group) were compared.. RESULTS: Of the 165 patients, 28 had DM and 12 had impaired fasting glucose (IFG) before LT. Patients with pre-transplant DM or IFG had a survival rate similar to that of the others. Forty patients (24.2%) developed PTDM with a mean time of 36±17 days (range 2-300 days) after LT. Of those, 32 developed PTDM within 3 months post-LT and 29 needed insulin treatment. Pre-transplant hepatic encephalopathy and tacrolimus application were found more frequently in the PTDM group than in the non-PTDM group. The plasma tacrolimus levels were notably higher at 1 and 3 months post-LT in the PTDM group than those in the non-PTDM group. Compared to the non-PTDM group, the PTDM group showed remarkably poorer survival and tumor-free survival in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma, and signiifcantly higher incidence of sepsis, fungal infection, chronic kidney diseases and biliary complications after LT. CONCLUSIONS: Pre-transplant DM did not affect the patient survival after LT. Since PTDM is common, it has a negative impact on outcome and may contribute to tumor recurrence. Pre-transplant hepatic encephalopathy, a tacrolimus-based regimen, and high levels of tacrolimus are clearly associated with the occurrence of PTDM.

  17. Current techniques for AB0-incompatible living donor liver transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rummler, Silke; Bauschke, Astrid; Bärthel, Erik; Jütte, Heike; Maier, Katrin; Ziehm, Patrice; Malessa, Christina; Settmacher, Utz

    2016-01-01

    For a long time, it was considered medical malpractice to neglect the blood group system during transplantation. Because there are far more patients waiting for organs than organs available, a variety of attempts have been made to transplant AB0-incompatible (AB0i) grafts. Improvements in AB0i graft survival rates have been achieved with immunosuppression regimens and plasma treatment procedures. Nevertheless, some grafts are rejected early after AB0i living donor liver transplantation (LDLT) due to antibody mediated rejection or later biliary complications that affect the quality of life. Therefore, the AB0i LDLT is an option only for emergency situations, and it requires careful planning. This review compares the treatment possibilities and their effect on the patients’ graft outcome from 2010 to the present. We compared 11 transplant center regimens and their outcomes. The best improvement, next to plasma treatment procedures, has been reached with the prophylactic use of rituximab more than one week before AB0i LDLT. Unfortunately, no standardized treatment protocols are available. Each center treats its patients with its own scheme. Nevertheless, the transplant results are homogeneous. Due to refined treatment strategies, AB0i LDLT is a feasible option today and almost free of severe complications. PMID:27683633

  18. Consecutive en-bloc liver (30%)-pancreas-duodenum-spleen-stomach transplant in Lewis rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, C H; Hong, I C; Lee, S; Nam, S; Bai, S; Kim, K; Pivetti, C D; Niewiadomski, S T; Wolf, P; Gittes, R F

    2003-01-01

    It is well-known that 30% of the remaining liver mass, following partial hepatectomy, regenerates to full original mass within 2 weeks in rats. In order to carry the transplanted rat liver to repeated transplantation, a technique of combining 30% of the liver with the pancreaticoduodenum and spleen transplantation is performed in this consecutive organ transplantation study. Our laboratory observed several 37-month-old transplanted rats by carrying through 2-3 generations, and histological disclosure were made. Because the partial liver transplants did not regenerate after the transplantation with other splanchnic organs, this technique is not so difficult though subsequent surgical maneuvers are needed and the liver histology proved entirely normal in every aspect when followed beyond the rat's life span of 24 months.

  19. Liver repopulation and correction of metabolic liver disease by transplanted adult mouse pancreatic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, X; Al-Dhalimy, M; Lagasse, E; Finegold, M; Grompe, M

    2001-02-01

    The emergence of cells with hepatocellular properties in the adult pancreas has been described in several experimental models. To determine whether adult pancreas contains cells that can give rise to therapeutically useful and biochemically normal hepatocytes, we transplanted suspensions of wild-type mouse pancreatic cells into syngeneic recipients deficient in fumarylacetoacetate hydrolase and manifesting tyrosinemia. Four of 34 (12%) mutant mice analyzed were fully rescued by donor-derived cells and had normal liver function. Ten additional mice (29%) showed histological evidence of donor-derived hepatocytes in the liver. Previous work has suggested that pancreatic liver precursors reside within or close to pancreatic ducts. We therefore performed additional transplantations using either primary cell suspensions enriched for ducts or cultured ducts. Forty-four mutant mice were transplanted with cells enriched for pancreatic duct cells, but only three of the 34 (9%) recipients analyzed displayed donor-derived hepatocytes. In addition, 28 of the fumarylacetoacetate hydrolase-deficient mice were transplanted with cultured pancreatic duct cells, but no donor-derived hepatocytes were observed. Our results demonstrate for the first time that adult mouse pancreas contains hepatocyte progenitor cells capable of significant therapeutic liver reconstitution. However, contrary to previous reports, we were unable to detect these cells within the duct compartment. PMID:11159194

  20. Preoperative CT evaluation of potential donors in living donor liver transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeep Vohra

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Living donor liver transplantation is an effective, life sustaining surgical treatment in patients with end-stage liver disease and a successful liver transplant requires a close working relationship between the radiologist and the transplant surgeon. There is extreme variability in hepatic vascular anatomy; therefore, preoperative imaging of potential liver donors is crucial not only in donor selection but also helps the surgeons in planning their surgical approach. In this article, we elaborate important aspects in evaluation of potential liver donors on multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT and the utility of MDCT in presurgical assessment of the hepatic parenchyma, relevant hepatic vascular anatomy and segmental liver volumes.

  1. Hypophosphatemia after Right Hepatectomy for Living Donor Liver Transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly W Burak

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypophosphatemia has been described in patients undergoing right hepatectomy for liver cancer and in living donors for liver transplantation who also received total parenteral nutrition. At the study centre, significant hypophosphatemia (0.36 mmol/L or less requiring intravenous replacement was seen in two of the first nine living donors for adult-to-adult liver transplantation. To determine the frequency of hypophosphatemia in living donors, the authors obtained phosphate levels on stored serum samples from postoperative days 0, 1, 3 and 7 in all nine patients, none of whom were on total parenteral nutrition. Within the first week, hypophosphatemia developed in 55.6% of patients and phosphate levels returned to normal by day 7 in all nine patients. One patient had normal phosphate levels during the first week, but had profound hypophosphatemia (0.32 mmol/L on day 14 when he presented with a Staphylococcus aureus infection of a bile collection and significant hypoxemia. The extent of hepatectomy and the rate of liver regeneration, estimated by baseline and postoperative day 7 volumetric computed tomography scans, did not correlate with the development of hypophosphatemia. In conclusion, hypophosphatemia is common in living donors undergoing right hepatectomy and may be associated with complications. All living donors should be monitored for the development of hypophosphatemia during the first two postoperative weeks.

  2. Post–Endoscopic Retrograde Cholangiopancreaticography complications in liver transplanted patients, a single-center experience

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ambrus, R B; Svendsen, Lars Bo; Hillingsø, J G;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Complications in the biliary tract occur in 5%-30% after liver transplantation and the main part of the complications is successfully managed with endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreaticography (ERCP). The incidence and risk factors for post-ERCP complications in liver transplantation...... patients are not well described. Our objective was to define the frequency of post-ERCP complications in liver transplantation patients at the Abdominal Center, Rigshospitalet, the only Liver Transplantation Center in Denmark. METHODS: Retrospective study of all ERCPs performed in liver transplantation...... cholangitis occurred after two procedures, respectively. Multivariate analysis concerning overall complications identified biliary sphincterotomy (p = 0.006) and time since liver transplantation within 90 days postoperatively (p = 0.044) as risk factors for post-ERCP complications. Specifically concerning...

  3. Liver transplant outcomes using ideal donation after circulatory death livers are superior to using older donation after brain death donor livers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scalea, Joseph R; Redfield, Robert R; Foley, David P

    2016-09-01

    Multiple reports have demonstrated that liver transplantation following donation after circulatory death (DCD) is associated with poorer outcomes when compared with liver transplantation from donation after brain death (DBD) donors. We hypothesized that carefully selected, underutilized DCD livers recovered from younger donors have excellent outcomes. We performed a retrospective study of the United Network for Organ Sharing database to determine graft survivals for patients who received liver transplants from DBD donors of age ≥ 60 years, DBD donors  60 years old. Careful donor organ and recipient selection can lead to excellent results, despite previous reports suggesting otherwise. Increased acceptance of these DCD livers would lead to shorter wait list times and increased national liver transplant rates. Liver Transplantation 22 1197-1204 2016 AASLD.

  4. Portal vein thrombosis and outcomes in pediatric liver transplant candidates and recipients in the United States

    OpenAIRE

    Waits, Seth; Wojcik, Brandon M.; Cai, Shijie; Mathur, Amit K; Englesbe, Michael J.

    2011-01-01

    The effect of occlusive portal vein thrombosis (PVT) on the mortality of pediatric liver transplant candidates and recipients is poorly defined. Using standard multivariable techniques, we studied the relationship between PVT and waiting list and post-transplant survival using data from the Scientific Registry of Transplant Recipients between September 2001 and December 2007. A total of 5,087 candidates and 3,630 liver transplant recipients were evaluated during the period. PVT was found in 1...

  5. Enhanced apoptosis in post-liver transplant hepatitis C: Effects of virus and immunosuppressants

    OpenAIRE

    Lim, Eu Jin; Chin, Ruth; Angus, Peter W.; Torresi, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    Hepatitis C (HCV)-infected patients have a poorer survival post-liver transplantation compared to patients transplanted for other indications, since HCV recurrence post-transplant is universal and commonly follows an aggressive course. There is increasing evidence that in the non-transplant setting, induction of hepatocyte apoptosis is one of the main mechanisms by which HCV drives liver inflammation and fibrosis, and that HCV proteins directly promote apoptosis. Recent studies have shown tha...

  6. Cardiac evaluation in pediatric patients waiting for liver transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Mohsen Dehghani, Naser Honar, Hamid Amoozegar, Ahad Eshraghian, Mohammad Borzooei, Mohammad Hadi Imanieh, Seyed Ali Malek-Hosseini

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cardiovascular abnormalities are among common complication in patients with cirrhosis waiting for liver transplantation (LT. The aim of the present study was to investigate cardiac abnormalities among pediatric liver transplant candidates.Methods: We prospectively evaluated the pediatric patient aged less than 18 years listed for LT between 2006 and 2008. Besides history taking and physical examination all the patients underwent electrocardiogram, chest radiograph, contrast echocardiography and color Doppler echocardiography, as well as arterial blood gas analyses.Results: Totally 89 patients with mean age of 8.1±4.6 years were included in the study. The most common causes for liver disease were cryptogenic cirrhosis followed by biliary atresia and autoimmune cirrhosis. Clubbing was found in 27 out of 89 patients and was the most common abnormalities in physical examination. In 22 patients (24.7% heart murmur was heard by a pediatric cardiologist. Sixty nine patients (77.5% had normal cardiac findings in chest radiograph. Cardiomegaly was found in 17 (19.1% patients as the most common abnormal finding in chest radiograph. Electrocardiogram showed sinus tachycardia in 16 (18% patients. Eleven patients (12.4% had tricuspid regurgitation as the most common abnormal findings in echocardiography. Thirteen (14.6% patients had positive contrast echocardiography in favor of intrapulmonary shunt.Conclusion: As the leading cause of post transplant death after graft rejection are cardiovascular complications cardiac evaluation should be considered in all pediatric patients before LT to lower morbidity and mortality during and after transplantation.

  7. Liver transplantation for hepatocellular carcinoma:an update

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ali Zarrinpar; Fady Kaldas; RonaldW Busuttil

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a heterogeneous malignancy with multiple etiologies, high incidence, and high mortality. The standard surgical management for patients with HCC consists of locoregional ablation, surgical resection, or liver transplantation, depending on the background state of the liver. Eighty percent of patients initially presenting with HCC are unresectable, either due to the extent of tumor or the level of underlying hepatic dysfunction. While in patients with no evidence of cirrhosis and good hepatic function resection has been the surgical treatment of choice, it is contraindicated in patients with moderate to severe cirrhosis. Liver transplantation is the optimal surgical treatment. DATA  SOURCES: PubMed search of recent articles (from January 2000 to March 2011) was performed looking for relevant articles about hepatocellular carcinoma and its treatment. Additional articles were identified by evaluating references from selected articles. RESULTS: Here we review criteria for transplantation, the types, indications, and role of locoregional therapy in treating the cancer and in downstaging for possible later transplantation. We also summarize the contribution of immunosuppression and adjuvant chemotherapy in the management and prevention of HCC recurrence. Finally we discuss recent advances in imaging, tumor biology, and genomics as we delineate the remaining challenges for the diagnosis and treatment of this disease. CONCLUSIONS: Much can be improved in the diagnosis and treatment of HCC. A great challenge will be to improve patient selection to criteria based on tumor biology. Another will be to incorporate systemic agents post-operatively in patients at high risk for recurrence, paying close attention to efficacy and safety. The future direction of the effort in treating HCC will be to stimulate prospective trials, develop molecular imaging of lymphovascular invasion, to improve recipient selection, and to investigate

  8. Longterm results of liver transplantation from donation after circulatory death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blok, Joris J; Detry, Olivier; Putter, Hein; Rogiers, Xavier; Porte, Robert J; van Hoek, Bart; Pirenne, Jacques; Metselaar, Herold J; Lerut, Jan P; Ysebaert, Dirk K; Lucidi, Valerio; Troisi, Roberto I; Samuel, Undine; den Dulk, A Claire; Ringers, Jan; Braat, Andries E

    2016-08-01

    Donation after circulatory death (DCD) liver transplantation (LT) may imply a risk for decreased graft survival, caused by posttransplantation complications such as primary nonfunction or ischemic-type biliary lesions. However, similar survival rates for DCD and donation after brain death (DBD) LT have been reported. The objective of this study is to determine the longterm outcome of DCD LT in the Eurotransplant region corrected for the Eurotransplant donor risk index (ET-DRI). Transplants performed in Belgium and the Netherlands (January 1, 2003 to December 31, 2007) in adult recipients were included. Graft failure was defined as either the date of recipient death or retransplantation whichever occurred first (death-uncensored graft survival). Mean follow-up was 7.2 years. In total, 126 DCD and 1264 DBD LTs were performed. Kaplan-Meier survival analyses showed different graft survival for DBD and DCD at 1 year (77.7% versus 74.8%, respectively; P = 0.71), 5 years (65.6% versus 54.4%, respectively; P = 0.02), and 10 years (47.3% versus 44.2%, respectively; P = 0.55; log-rank P = 0.038). Although there was an overall significant difference, the survival curves almost reach each other after 10 years, which is most likely caused by other risk factors being less in DCD livers. Patient survival was not significantly different (P = 0.59). Multivariate Cox regression analysis showed a hazard ratio of 1.7 (P end of circulation until aortic cold perfusion, over 25 minutes was associated with a lower graft survival in univariate analysis of all DCD transplants (P = 0.002). In conclusion, DCD LT has an increased risk for diminished graft survival compared to DBD. There was no significant difference in patient survival. DCD allografts with a first WIT > 25 minutes have an increased risk for a decrease in graft survival. Liver Transplantation 22 1107-1114 2016 AASLD. PMID:27028896

  9. Role of Nurses in Early Ambulation of Living Donor Liver Transplant Recipients

    OpenAIRE

    Sato, Orie; Osanai, Yumiko; Urushidate, Chie; Yamaguchi, Tomoko; Narumi, Shunji; Umehara, Minoru; Toyoki, Yoshikazu; Sugai, Michihiro; Hakamada, Kenichi; Kimura, Toshiko

    2013-01-01

    [Introduction] Liver transplant recipients suffer more complications than do patients undergoing other gastroenterological surgeries. Many factors inhibit ambulation in liver transplant patients, such as the level of restriction to bed rest and length of stay in the intensive care unit( ICU). Patients thus face ambulation difficulties. Support for ambulation is one of the major daily tasks of nurses. We reviewed the ambulation situations of patients who underwent living donor liver transplant...

  10. Liver transplant and hepatitis C in methadone maintenance therapy: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Bourgeois James A; Craemer Elana; Lester Laura; Ransibrahmanakul Kanat; Prosser Colette C; Hancock Meredith M; Rossaro Lorenzo

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Methadone maintenance therapy for the treatment of opioid dependence continues to carry a social stigma. Until recently, patients on methadone were not considered for liver transplantation. We describe the first case of a patient on methadone who received a liver transplant for end stage liver disease and was successfully treated for recurrent hepatitis C. More than five years post transplant and three years post viral clearance, the patient continues to do well and is stable on low-...

  11. Radiofrequency ablation of recurrent cholangiocarcinoma after orthotopic liver transplantation - a case report

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rakesh Rai; Derek Manas; John Rose

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To report the use of radiofrequency ablation in the treatment of recurrenct cholangiocarcinoma in the transplanted liver.METHODS: A lady who underwent orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) for intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma recurrence of tumour 13 mo after tralsplantation inspite of adjuvant chemotherapy. Her recurrent tumour was treated with radiofrequency ablation.RESULTS: She survived for 18 mo following the recurrence of her tumour.CONCLUSION: Radiofrequency ablation can be used safely in the transplanted liver to treat recurrent tumour.

  12. Cholesterol metabolism in cholestatic liver disease and liver transplantation: From molecular mechanisms to clinical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemes, Katriina; Åberg, Fredrik; Gylling, Helena; Isoniemi, Helena

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this review is to enlighten the critical roles that the liver plays in cholesterol metabolism. Liver transplantation can serve as gene therapy or a source of gene transmission in certain conditions that affect cholesterol metabolism, such as low-density-lipoprotein (LDL) receptor gene mutations that are associated with familial hypercholesterolemia. On the other hand, cholestatic liver disease often alters cholesterol metabolism. Cholestasis can lead to formation of lipoprotein X (Lp-X), which is frequently mistaken for LDL on routine clinical tests. In contrast to LDL, Lp-X is non-atherogenic, and failure to differentiate between the two can interfere with cardiovascular risk assessment, potentially leading to prescription of futile lipid-lowering therapy. Statins do not effectively lower Lp-X levels, and cholestasis may lead to accumulation of toxic levels of statins. Moreover, severe cholestasis results in poor micellar formation, which reduces cholesterol absorption, potentially impairing the cholesterol-lowering effect of ezetimibe. Apolipoprotein B-100 measurement can help distinguish between atherogenic and non-atherogenic hypercholesterolemia. Furthermore, routine serum cholesterol measurements alone cannot reflect cholesterol absorption and synthesis. Measurements of serum non-cholesterol sterol biomarkers - such as cholesterol precursor sterols, plant sterols, and cholestanol - may help with the comprehensive assessment of cholesterol metabolism. An adequate cholesterol supply is essential for liver-regenerative capacity. Low preoperative and perioperative serum cholesterol levels seem to predict mortality in liver cirrhosis and after liver transplantation. Thus, accurate lipid profile evaluation is highly important in liver disease and after liver transplantation. PMID:27574546

  13. Liver transplant for 70 patients with end-stage liver diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yi Jiang; Yong-Biao Chen; Fan Pan; Li-Zhi Lv; Qiu-Cheng Cai; Kun Zhang; Huan-Zhang Hu; Shao-Geng Zhang; Fang Yang; Wei-Ming Wei; Xiao-Jin Zhang

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Liver transplantation has evolved as a successful treatment for patients with end-stage liver cirrhosis and acute liver failure. Postoperative survival rates have increased to 90%in 1 year and 80%in 5 years as a result of improvements in immunosuppression, perioperative management and surgical techniques. However, a wide range of postoperative complications are of technical or medical origin. This study was undertaken to determine the relationship between the technical improvements and optimal timing of surgery and its outcome. METHODS: From April 1999 to October 2005, typical orthotopic or piggyback liver transplantation was performed in 70 patients (58 men and 12 women, aged 19-74 years). Twenty-four patients had liver carcinoma and cirrhosis, and 46 had benign liver disease. RESULTS:All patients survived the operation and 14 died in the ifrst month after surgery because of respiratory failure (6), respiratory failure accompanied by acute renal failure (4), intra-abdominal hemorrhage and infection (2), and cerebral edema (2). A total of 76 complications occurred in the 70 patients after operation: pneumonia (34), right pleural effusion (11), bile leakage (7), postoperative intra-abdominal hemorrhage and infection (4), acute renal failure (4), acute rejection (3), wound infection (2), biliary tract stenosis (2), severe cholangitis derived from cholelith (2), morphological alteration of biliary tree (2), cerebral edema (2), empyema (1), chronic rejection (1), and wound hematoma (1). Finally, 33 patients survived more than 6 months, 16 more than 1 year, 4 more than 2 years, and 2 more than 6 years after operation. The perioperative survival rate was 80%in this series. CONCLUSIONS: Liver transplantation is an effective treatment for patients with end-stage liver disease. To obtain good results, improvements of surgical technique, optimal timing and better postoperative care are needed.

  14. Caudal shif ting of hepatic vein anastomosis inright liver living donor liver transplantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sheung Tat Fan

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In right liver living donor liver trans-plantation, hepatic venous anastomosis is performed using the recipient's right hepatic vein oriifce. There may be situations that the portal vein is short or the right liver graft is small, leading to dififculty in portal vein, hepatic artery or duct-to-duct anastomosis. METHODS: The recipient's right hepatic vein oriifce is closed partially for 2 cm at the cranial end or totally, and a new venotomy is made caudal to the right hepatic vein oriifce. Hepatic vein anastomosis is performed with the new venotomy. RESULTS: The distance between the liver graft hilum and hepatoduodenal ligament is reduced. Portal vein, hepatic artery and biliary anastomosis could be performed without tension or conduit. CONCLUSION: Caudal shifting of hepatic vein anasto-mosis facilitates implantation of a right liver living donor graft.

  15. Review of Natural History, Benefits and Risk Factors Pediatric Liver Transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manoochehr Karjoo

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Liver or hepatic transplantation (LT is the replacement of a diseased liver with part or whole healthy liver from another person (allograft. Human liver transplants were first performed by Thomas Starzl in the United States and Roy Calne in Cambridge, England in 1963 and 1967, respectively. Liver transplantation is a viable treatment option for end-stage liver disease and acute liver failure. Pediatric patients account for about 12.5% of liver transplant recipients. The most commonly used technique is orthotopic transplantation, in which the native liver is removed and replaced by the donor organ in the same anatomic location as the original liver. Cirrhosis, or liver injury, is a common reason why adults need liver transplants and children with bile duct disease issues are often the candidates. Survival statistics depend greatly on the age of donor, age of recipient, skill of the transplant center, compliance of the recipient, whether the organ came from a living or cadaveric donor and overall health of the recipient. Survival rates improve almost yearly, due to improved techniques and medications.

  16. Sex-Based Disparities in Liver Transplant Rates in the United States

    OpenAIRE

    Mathur, Amit K; Schaubel, Douglas E.; Gong, Qi; Guidinger, Mary K.; Merion, Robert M.

    2011-01-01

    We sought to characterize sex-based differences in access to deceased donor liver transplantation. Scientific Registry of Transplant Recipients data was used to analyze n=78,998 adult candidates listed before (8/1997–2/2002) or after (2/2002–2/2007) implementation of Model for End-stage Liver Disease (MELD)-based liver allocation. The primary outcome was deceased donor liver transplant. Cox regression was used to estimate covariate-adjusted differences in transplant rates by sex. Females repr...

  17. Copper metabolism after living related liver transplantation for Wilson's disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xue-Hao Wang; Feng Cheng; Feng Zhang; Xiang-Cheng Li; Jian-Ming Qian; Lian-Bao Kong; Hao Zhang; Guo-Qiang Li

    2003-01-01

    AlM: Liver transplantation is indicated for Wilson's disease(WD) patients with the fulminant form and end-stage liverfailure. The aim of this study was to review our experiencewith living-related liver transplantation (LRLT) for WD.METHODS: A retrospective review was made for WDundergoing LRLT at our hospital from January 2001 toFebuary 2003.RESULTS: LRLT was carried out in 15 patients with WD,one of them had fulminant hepatic failure and the others had end-stage hepatic insufficiency. The mean age of the patients was 14.5±2.5 years (range 6 to 20 years). All the recipients had low serum ceruloplasmin levels with a mean value of 126.8±34t.8 mg/L before transplantation. The serum ceruloplasmin levels increased to an average of 238.6±34.4mg/L after LRLT at the latest evaluation, between 2 and 27months after transplantation. A marked reduction in urinary copper excretion was observed in all the recipients after transplantation. Among the eight recipients with preoperative Kayser-Fleischer (K-F) rings, this abnormality resolved completely after LRLT in five patients and partially in three.All the recipients are alive and remain well, and none has developed signs of recurrent WD after a mean follow-up period of 15.4±9.3 months (range 2-27 months) except one who died of severe rejection. The donors were 14t mothers and 1 father. The serum ceruloplasmin levels were within normal limits in all the donors (mean: 220±22.4 mg/L). The mean donor age was 35.0±4.0 years (range, 30 to 45 years).Two donors had biliary leakage and required reoperation.Grafts were harvested as follows: four right lobe grafts without hepatic middle vein and eleven left lobe grafts with hepatic middle vein. The grafts were blood group-compatible in all recibents. Two patients had hepatic artery thrombosis and underwent retransplantation.CONCLUSION: LRLT is a curative procedure in Wilson's disease manifested as fulminant hepatic failure and/or endstage hepatic insufficiency. After liver

  18. Radiologic evaluation of biliary tract complications after liver transplantation: Experience with 57 transplants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Initial attempts at human liver transplantation were marred by serious biliary tract complication in nearly 50% of patients. Recent improvements in patient selection, operative technique, and postoperative care have resulted in fewer complications and lower morbidity. Careful cholangiographic evaluaton is necessary in identifying biliary tract complications and planning management. The authors report their institutional experience with 57 liver transplantations from February 1984 to April 1988. Cholangiography revealed biliary tract complications in 25% of cases. Major complications (leak, stenosis, bile fistula) were seen in eight patients, and minor complications (subhepatic leak after T-tube removal, intraductal mucous plug, T-tube malposition or occlusion) were noted in six. Interventional procedures were performed in four cases

  19. Experience with molecular adsorbent recirculating system treatment in 20 children listed for high-urgency liver transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lexmond, Willem S; Van Dael, Carin M L; Scheenstra, René; Goorhuis, Joanne F; Sieders, Egbert; Verkade, Henkjan J; Van Rheenen, Patrick F; Kömhoff, Martin

    2015-03-01

    For more than 10 years, children at our national center for pediatric liver transplantation (LT) have been treated with Molecular Adsorbent Recirculating System (MARS) liver dialysis as a bridging therapy to high-urgency LT. Treatment was reserved for 20 patients with the highest degrees of hepatic encephalopathy (HE; median grade = 3.5). Death from neurological sequelae was considered imminent for these patients, and this was further reflected in significantly higher international normalized ratios and ammonia levels and worse prognostic liver indices (Model for End-Stage Liver Disease/Pediatric End-Stage Liver Disease scores and liver injury units) in comparison with 32 wait-listed patients who did not receive MARS dialysis. MARS therapy was generally well tolerated, with a reduction in thrombocytes and hemorrhaging as the most common side effects. HE improvement was documented in 30% of the treated patients, but progression to grade IV encephalopathy occurred in 45% of the patients despite the treatment. Serum ammonia, bilirubin, bile acid, and creatinine levels significantly decreased during treatment. Eighty percent of MARS-treated patients survived to undergo LT, and their survival was equivalent to that of non-MARS-treated patients with severe liver failure (69%, P = 0.52). The heterogeneity between MARS-treated patients and non-MARS-treated patients in our cohort precluded a statistical evaluation of a benefit from MARS for patient survival. Our data demonstrate the safety of MARS even in the most severely ill patients awaiting LT, but strategies that promote the more rapid and widespread availability of high-quality donor organs remain of critical importance for improving patient survival in cases of severe acute liver failure. PMID:25366362

  20. Liver transplantation for Wilson's disease in pediatric patients: decision making and timing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narumi, S; Umehara, M; Toyoki, Y; Ishido, K; Kudo, D; Kimura, N; Kobayashi, T; Sugai, M; Hakamada, K

    2012-03-01

    Transplantation for Wilson's disease occupies 1/3 of the cases for metabolic diseases in Japan. At the end of 2009, 109 transplantations had been performed including three deceased donor cases in the Japanese registry. We herein discuss problems of transplantation for Wilson's disease as well as its indication, timing, and social care. We retrospectively reviewed four fulminant cases and two chronic cases who underwent living donor liver transplantation. There were two boys and two girls. Four adolescents of average age 11.3 years underwent living donor liver transplantation. Duration from onset to transplantation ranged from 10 to 23 days. Average Model for End-stage Liver Disease (MELD) score was 27.8 (range=24-31). All patients were administrated chelates prior to transplantation. MELD, New Wilson's index, Japanese scoring for liver transplantation, and liver atrophy were useful tools for transplantation decision making; however, none of them was an independent decisive tool. Clinical courses after transplantation were almost uneventful. One girl, however, developed an acute rejection episode due to noncompliance at 3 years after transplantation. All patients currently survive without a graft loss. No disease recurrence had been noted even using living related donors. Two adults evaluated for liver transplantation were listed for deceased donor liver transplantation. Both candidates developed cirrhosis despite long-term medical treatment. There were no appropriate living donors for them. There are many problems in transplantation for Wilson's disease. The indications for liver transplantation should be considered individually using some decision-making tools. The safety of the living donor should be paid the most attention.

  1. [Needle tract seeding of hepatocellular carcinoma after liver transplantation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mrzljak, Anna; Kardum-Skelin, Ika; Blasković, Darko; Skegro, Dinko; Jadrijević, Stipislav; Colić-Cvrlje, Vesna

    2011-09-01

    Ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration cytology (FNAC) and core needle biopsy (CNB) are effective methods for the diagnosis of focal hepatic lesions. In case of neoplastic lesions, however, this may be followed by the seeding of malignant cells along the needle tract. We report a case of subcutaneous needle tract seeding of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) 25 months after liver transplantation. A 57-year-old man with compensated hepatitis-B-related liver cirrhosis was diagnosed with HCC by CNB, and the lesion was resected. Ten months after the procedure, FNAC of a small hepatic lesion confirmed tumor recurrence. The patient was successfully transplanted and 25 months later, a subcutaneous tumor appeared on the abdominal wall over the previous site of puncture without further dissemination of the disease. Total resection of the lesion confirmed HCC. It remains undetermined whether the seeding appeared after FNAC or CNB. After 18-month follow-up the patient was uneventful. The objectives of this report are to present clinical aspects and outcome of HCC needle tract seeding in a transplanted patient, discussing the problems and pitfalls of diagnostic workup and management of HCC. PMID:23126051

  2. Liver transplantation for cholangiocarcinoma:Current status and new insights

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gonzalo; Sapisochín; Elena; Fernández; de; Sevilla; Juan; Echeverri; Ramón; Charco

    2015-01-01

    Cholangiocarcinoma is a malignant tumor of the biliary system that can be classified into intrahepatic(i CCA),perihiliar(ph CCA) and distal. Initial experiences with orthotopic liver transplantation(OLT) for patientswith i CCA and ph CCA had very poor results and this treatment strategy was abandoned. In the last decade,thanks to a strict selection process and a neoadjuvant chemoradiation protocol,the results of OLT for patients with non-resectable phC CA have been shown to be excellent and this strategy has been extended worldwide in selected transplant centers. Intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma is a growing disease in most countries and can be diagnosed both in cirrhotic and in non-cirrhotic livers. Even though OLT is contraindicated in most centers,recent investigations analyzing patients that were transplanted with a misdiagnosis of HCC and were found to have an iC CA have shown encouraging results. There is some information suggesting that patients with early stages of the disease could benefit from OLT. In this review we analyze the current stateof-the-art of OLT for cholangiocarcinoma as well as the new insights and future perspectives.

  3. Redox factor-1 may mediate the repair of multiple organ injuries after liver transplantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Zhi-peng; ZHU Yu-bing; Aminbuhe; GONG Ke; ZHU Bin; FAN Qing; LIAN Dong-bo

    2013-01-01

    Background Apurinic apyrimidinic endonuclease/redox effector factor 1 (APE1/Ref-1) is an important enzyme in the repair of reactive oxygen species-induced DNA damage,and its expression/activation can be induced by reactive oxygen species.The aim of this research was to investigate the relationship between multiple-organ injuries and expression of Ref-1 in the early period after liver transplantation.Methods One hundred and fifty adult male Wistar rats were divided randomly into three groups:liver transplantation,sham surgery,and untreated control.After liver transplantation,animals were sacrificed at different time points.Hepatic and renal functions were analyzed by serology.Histology,apoptotic levels,and Ref-1 expression were examined by immunohistochemistry in the liver,kidneys,intestines,and lungs.Results Serum levels of alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase peaked 6 hours after liver transplantation and decreased appreciably after 12 hours in the transplantation group,suggesting that the degree of liver injury in the early period after transplantation peaked at 6 hours and then decreased.Pathological analyses showed that hepatic tissues were more severely injured in the transplantation group than in the sham and untreated groups.A considerable number of infiltrating inflammatory cells was observed around the portal vein in the transplantation group.Injuries to the kidneys,intestines,and lungs were milder after liver transplantation.Apoptotic levels increased after liver transplantation in all four organs examined.Ref-1 expression was higher in the transplantation group in the early period after liver transplantation than in the sham surgery and untreated control groups.Conclusion Ref-1 expression induced by ischemia-reperfusion injury may have a critical role in repairing multiple-organ injuries after liver transplantation.

  4. A Case of Living Donor Liver Transplant Recipient Treated With Novel Blood Purification “Plasma Diafiltration”

    OpenAIRE

    HAYASHI, HIRONORI; Takamura, Hiroyuki; Taniguchi, Takumi; Nakanuma, Shin-ichi; Nakagawara, Hisatoshi; Tajima, Hidehiro; KITAGAWA, HIROHISA; ONISHI, ICHIRO; Tani, Takashi; OHTA, TETSUO

    2013-01-01

    Blood purification therapy is indispensable for liver transplant recipients. The case of a living donor liver transplant recipient who represented graft insufficiency and was supported by novel blood purification “plasma diafiltration” immediately after operation is presented. A 60-year-old woman was referred for living donor liver transplant because of liver cirrhosis due to hepatitis C. Elective living donor liver transplant was performed, but the graft was small for size. Thus, the signs o...

  5. Nutrition for children with cholestatic liver disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Los, E. Leonie; Lukovac, Sabina; Werner, Anniek; Dijkstra, Tietie; Verkade, Henkjan J.; Rings, Edmond H. H. M.; Cooke, RJ; Vandenplas, Y; Wahn, U

    2007-01-01

    Cholestatic liver disease (CLD) in children negatively affects nutritional status, growth and development, which all lead to an increased risk of morbidity and mortality. This is illustrated by the fact that the clinical outcome of children with CLD awaiting a liver transplantation is in part predic

  6. ADULT RESPIRATORY DISTRESS SYNDROME SECONDARY TO END-STAGE LIVER DISEASE—SUCCESSFUL OUTCOME FOLLOWING LIVER TRANSPLANTATION1

    OpenAIRE

    Doyle, Howard R.; Marino, Ignazio R.; Miro, Adelaida; Scott, Victor; Martin, Maureen; Fung, John; Kramer, David; Starzl, Thomas E.

    1993-01-01

    The adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) complicating liver failure carries a 100% mortality. Two cases of ARDS that resolved following liver transplantation have been reported, one associated with acute allograft rejection, and the second due to sepsis. There is, however, a great reluctance to transplant these very-high-risk patients. We report the first series of patients with ARDS secondary to liver failure who successfully underwent OLTX. No patient had sepsis or pneumonia. Posttran...

  7. Outcomes of patients with benign liver diseases undergoing living donor versus deceased donor liver transplantation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuan Li

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND/AIMS: The number of people undergoing living donor liver transplantation (LDLT has increased rapidly in many transplant centres. Patients considering LDLT need to know whether LDLT is riskier than deceased donor liver transplantation (DDLT. The aim of this study was to compare the outcomes of patients undergoing LDLT versus DDLT. METHODS: A total of 349 patients with benign liver diseases were recruited from 2005 to 2011 for this study. LDLT was performed in 128 patients, and DDLT was performed in 221 patients. Pre- and intra-operative variables for the two groups were compared. Statistically analysed post-operative outcomes include the postoperative incidence of complication, biliary and vascular complication, hepatitis B virus (HBV recurrence, long-term survival rate and outcomes of emergency transplantation. RESULTS: The waiting times were 22.10±15.31 days for the patients undergoing LDLT versus 35.81±29.18 days for the patients undergoing DDLT. The cold ischemia time (CIT was 119.34±19.75 minutes for the LDLT group and 346±154.18 for DDLT group. LDLT group had higher intraoperative blood loss, but red blood cell (RBC transfusion was not different. Similar ≥ Clavien III complications, vascular complications, hepatitis B virus (HBV recurrence and long-term survival rates were noted. LDLT patients suffered a higher incidence of biliary complications in the early postoperative days. However, during the long-term follow-up period, biliary complication rates were similar between the two groups. The long-term survival rate of patients undergoing emergency transplantation was lower than of patients undergoing elective transplantation. However, no significant difference was observed between emergency LDLT and emergency DDLT. CONCLUSIONS: Patients undergoing LDLT achieved similar outcomes to patients undergoing DDLT. Although LDLT patients may suffer a higher incidence of early biliary complications, the total biliary complication

  8. Malaria after living donor liver transplantation:report of two cases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Durgatosh Pandey; Kan-Hoe Lee; Sin-Yew Wong; Kai-Chah Tan

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND:Infectious complications are common during the postoperative course of a liver transplant recipient. Malaria, however, is a rare complication in such a setting. METHOD:We report post-transplantation malaria causing elevation of liver enzymes in two recipients. RESULTS:Both patients who had undergone living donor liver transplantation showed elevated levels of liver enzymes and fever during the postoperative course. Investigations (including liver biopsy in one patient) were initially inconclusive in determining the cause of liver dysfunction. The diagnosis of malaria was established in both cases by peripheral blood smear. Liver function transiently worsened with antimalarial treatment but subsequently became normal. CONCLUSION:This report highlights the importance of excluding such uncommon causes of post-transplantation liver dysfunction, especially when either the recipient or the donor comes from a region endemic for malaria.

  9. Echocardiography for the detection of portopulmonary hypertension in liver transplant candidates : An analysis of cutoff values

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raevens, Sarah; Colle, Isabelle; Reyntjens, Koen; Geerts, Anja; Berrevoet, Frederik; Rogiers, Xavier; Troisi, Roberto I.; Van Vlierberghe, Hans; De Pauw, Michel

    2013-01-01

    Portopulmonary hypertension (POPH), a complication of chronic liver disease, may be a contraindication to liver transplantation (LT) because of the elevated risk of peritransplant and posttransplant morbidity and mortality. Because POPH is frequently asymptomatic, screening with echocardiography is

  10. Calcineurin inhibitor minimisation versus continuation of calcineurin inhibitor treatment for liver transplant recipients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Penninga, Luit; Wettergren, Andre; Chan, An-Wen;

    2012-01-01

    The therapeutic success of liver transplantation has been largely attributable to the development of effective immunosuppressive treatment regimens. In particular, calcineurin inhibitors were essential in reducing acute rejection and improving early survival. Currently, more than 90% of all liver...

  11. Relative Quantification of Several Plasma Proteins during Liver Transplantation Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parviainen, Ville; Joenväärä, Sakari; Tukiainen, Eija; Ilmakunnas, Minna; Isoniemi, Helena; Renkonen, Risto

    2011-01-01

    Plasma proteome is widely used in studying changes occurring in human body during disease or other disturbances. Immunological methods are commonly used in such studies. In recent years, mass spectrometry has gained popularity in high-throughput analysis of plasma proteins. In this study, we tested whether mass spectrometry and iTRAQ-based protein quantification might be used in proteomic analysis of human plasma during liver transplantation surgery to characterize changes in protein abundances occurring during early graft reperfusion. We sampled blood from systemic circulation as well as blood entering and exiting the liver. After immunodepletion of six high-abundant plasma proteins, trypsin digestion, iTRAQ labeling, and cation-exchange fractionation, the peptides were analyzed by reverse phase nano-LC-MS/MS. In total, 72 proteins were identified of which 31 could be quantified in all patient specimens collected. Of these 31 proteins, ten, mostly medium-to-high abundance plasma proteins with a concentration range of 50–2000 mg/L, displayed relative abundance change of more than 10%. The changes in protein abundance observed in this study allow further research on the role of several proteins in ischemia-reperfusion injury during liver transplantation and possibly in other surgery. PMID:22187521

  12. Population pharmacokinetics of remifentanil in patients undergoing orthotopic liver transplantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Li-ping; YANG Lu; BI Shan-shan; LU Wei; ZHANG Xian-hua; ZHAI Suo-di; DUAN Li-ping

    2009-01-01

    Backgroud Little is known about the influence of liver transplantation on the pharmacokinetics of most anesthetic drugs. The goal of this study was to study the population pharmacokinetics of remifentanil in the different phases of orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) and the influence of relevant factors.Methods Thirteen adult patients undergoing OLT were enrolled. A single bolus infusion of remifentanil 5 μg/kg was administered during the preanhepatic, anhepatic and neohepatic phases of OLT. Arterial blood samples of 1.5 ml were collected at 0 (baseline), 1, 2, 3, 5, 7, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30, 45, 60 and 90 minutes after drug administration. Remifentanil concentration was assayed by high-performance liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry (HPLC/MS/MS). Population pharmacokinetic modeling was performed using nonlinear mixed-effects modeling (NONMEM).Results The pharmacokinetics of remifentanil in patients undergoing OLT was best described by a two-compartment open model. The pharmacokinetic parameters were not influenced by age, gender, operative phase, blood temperature, rehydration volume, or blood loss volume during sampling. The volume of distribution in the central compartment (V1) and the volume of distribution in the peripheral compartment (V2) were influenced by body weight. Conclusions The population pharmacokinetics of remifentanil in patients undergoing OLT can be well described by a two-compartment open model. The functional status of the liver does not significantly affect the pharmacokinetics of remifentanil, but the body weight is an influential factor of V1 and V2.

  13. Sirolimus-associated interstitial pneumonitis in a liver transplant recipient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sirolimus is an immunosuppressive drug that has been used during the past few years. Sirolimus is indicated in rescue therapies and to reduce the secondary toxic effects of calcineurin inhibitors. This drug has been associated with infrequent but severe pulmonary toxicity. Cases of interstitial pneumonitis, bronchiolitis obliterans with organizing pneumonia, and alveolar proteinosis have been described. We describe a case of pulmonary toxicity associated with the use of sirolimus in a 59-yr-old liver transplant recipient. We also review all reported cases of sirolimus-associated lung toxicity among liver transplantation recipients, with the intention of understanding the risk factors, the clinical picture and the outcomes of this complication. Five cases have been reported since January 2000, including the present case. Clinical presentation is similar, with fever, dyspnoea, fatigue, cough, and hemoptysis. Discontinuation of the drug led to resolution of clinical and radiographic findings. Sirolimus-induced pulmonary toxicity is a serious condition and should be considered in the differential diagnosis of liver recipients presenting with respiratory findings. Discontinuation of the drug is associated with resolution of the pulmonary compromise

  14. Relative quantification of several plasma proteins during liver transplantation surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parviainen, Ville; Joenväärä, Sakari; Tukiainen, Eija; Ilmakunnas, Minna; Isoniemi, Helena; Renkonen, Risto

    2011-01-01

    Plasma proteome is widely used in studying changes occurring in human body during disease or other disturbances. Immunological methods are commonly used in such studies. In recent years, mass spectrometry has gained popularity in high-throughput analysis of plasma proteins. In this study, we tested whether mass spectrometry and iTRAQ-based protein quantification might be used in proteomic analysis of human plasma during liver transplantation surgery to characterize changes in protein abundances occurring during early graft reperfusion. We sampled blood from systemic circulation as well as blood entering and exiting the liver. After immunodepletion of six high-abundant plasma proteins, trypsin digestion, iTRAQ labeling, and cation-exchange fractionation, the peptides were analyzed by reverse phase nano-LC-MS/MS. In total, 72 proteins were identified of which 31 could be quantified in all patient specimens collected. Of these 31 proteins, ten, mostly medium-to-high abundance plasma proteins with a concentration range of 50-2000 mg/L, displayed relative abundance change of more than 10%. The changes in protein abundance observed in this study allow further research on the role of several proteins in ischemia-reperfusion injury during liver transplantation and possibly in other surgery.

  15. Relative Quantification of Several Plasma Proteins during Liver Transplantation Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ville Parviainen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Plasma proteome is widely used in studying changes occurring in human body during disease or other disturbances. Immunological methods are commonly used in such studies. In recent years, mass spectrometry has gained popularity in high-throughput analysis of plasma proteins. In this study, we tested whether mass spectrometry and iTRAQ-based protein quantification might be used in proteomic analysis of human plasma during liver transplantation surgery to characterize changes in protein abundances occurring during early graft reperfusion. We sampled blood from systemic circulation as well as blood entering and exiting the liver. After immunodepletion of six high-abundant plasma proteins, trypsin digestion, iTRAQ labeling, and cation-exchange fractionation, the peptides were analyzed by reverse phase nano-LC-MS/MS. In total, 72 proteins were identified of which 31 could be quantified in all patient specimens collected. Of these 31 proteins, ten, mostly medium-to-high abundance plasma proteins with a concentration range of 50–2000 mg/L, displayed relative abundance change of more than 10%. The changes in protein abundance observed in this study allow further research on the role of several proteins in ischemia-reperfusion injury during liver transplantation and possibly in other surgery.

  16. An improved animal model of orthotopic liver transplantation in swine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG Shu-guo; DONG Jia-hong; LENG Jian-jun; FENG Xiao-bin; MA Zheng-wei; YAN Yi

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To establish a swine model of orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) which has high standardization, superior reproducibility and stability. Methods: The rate of success, reproducibility and stability were investigated on the modification of OLTs in closed miniature swine with series of improvements. Results: 20 OLTs were performed on the basis of improvements in experimental animals,surgical procedures and operative monitorings. The mean operation time and anhepatic phase was (181±25.8) and (28.43.2) min respectively, which were significantly shorter than those of the previous re ports. Liver function of the animals recovered shortly after operation. One-week survival rate was 90%,and 15 animals survived more than 1 month. The incidence of vascular and biliary complications was lower in animals with long-term survival. Conclusion: The improved animal model of OLTs in swine is easy to operate with high standardization and rate of success, superior reproducibility and stability. It is an ideal model for series studies related to liver transplantation in big animals.

  17. Acute paranoid psychosis as sole clinical presentation of hepatic artery thrombosis after living donor liver transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Obed Aiman

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hepatic artery thrombosis is a devastating complication after orthotopic liver transplantation often requiring revascularization or re-transplantation. It is associated with considerably increased morbidity and mortality. Acute cognitive dysfunction such as delirium or acute psychosis may occur after major surgery and may be associated with the advent of surgical complications. Case presentation Here we describe a case of hepatic artery thrombosis after living-donor liver transplantation which was not preceded by signs of liver failure but rather by an episode of acute psychosis. After re-transplantation the patient recovered without sequelae. Conclusion This case highlights the need to remain cautious when psychiatric disorders occur in patients after liver transplantation. The diagnostic procedures should not be restricted to medical or neurological causes of psychosis alone but should also focus vascular complications related to orthotopic liver transplantation.

  18. Measuring Coping Behavior in Liver Transplant Candidates: A Psychometric Analysis of the Brief COPE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amoyal, Nicole; Fernandez, Anne C; Ng, Reuben; Fehon, Dwain C

    2016-09-01

    Liver transplant candidates must cope with significant physiological and psychological challenges. The Brief COPE is a frequently used measure of coping behavior; however, knowledge of the scale's factor structure and construct validity is limited with regard to liver transplant candidates. This study assessed the validity of the Brief COPE in 120 liver transplant candidates using exploratory factor analysis. Results revealed a 6-factor solution, only 2 of which were consistent with the original scale assignments. Construct validity of the 6 Brief COPE scales yielded in this study was demonstrated. The results indicate that the Brief COPE is valid, reliable, and can be meaningfully interpreted in liver transplant patients. Future research should confirm this factor structure and examine its predictive validity prior to widespread use among liver transplant patients. Suggestions are presented for enhancing the care of transplant candidates by promoting the use of adaptive coping mechanisms to manage distress.

  19. Endoscopic management of post-liver transplant biliary complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girotra, Mohit; Soota, Kaartik; Klair, Jagpal S; Dang, Shyam M; Aduli, Farshad

    2015-05-16

    Biliary complications are being increasingly encountered in post liver transplant patients because of increased volume of transplants and longer survival of these recipients. Overall management of these complications may be challenging, but with advances in endoscopic techniques, majority of such patients are being dealt with by endoscopists rather than the surgeons. Our review article discusses the recent advances in endoscopic tools and techniques that have proved endoscopic retrograde cholangiography with various interventions, like sphincterotomy, bile duct dilatation, and stent placement, to be the mainstay for management of most of these complications. We also discuss the management dilemmas in patients with surgically altered anatomy, where accessing the bile duct is challenging, and the recent strides towards making this prospect a reality. PMID:25992185

  20. Significance and specificity of vascular anastomosis in liver transplantation: Our experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nenezić Dragoslav

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Transplantation is the method of choice in the treatment of terminal liver diseases with acute and structural damage of liver tissue and congenital liver diseases. Objective The aim of our study was to determine specificity and significance of vascular anastomosis in liver transplantation by postoperative evaluation of vascular anastomosis function. Method The study included 16 patients with 16 liver transplantations and one re-do liver transplantation. In all patients, preoperative angiography and postoperative duplex sonographic and angiographic evaluation of vascular anastomosis were performed. Results Preoperative angiographic evaluation did not reveal anomalies in liver blood vessels of transplant candidates. In one patient, we identified and angiographically confirmed stenosis on anastomosis of the hepatic artery on the 7th postoperative day. In another patient, we had artificial thrombosis of the hepatic artery branch due to the liver biopsy. Conclusion The successful performance of vascular anastomosis in liver transplantation is significant for adequate liver graft perfusion, good postoperative graft function and overall outcome of the liver transplantation.

  1. Recurrence of autoimmune liver disease and inflammatory bowel disease after pediatric liver transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liberal, Rodrigo; Vergani, Diego; Mieli-Vergani, Giorgina

    2016-09-01

    Approximately 10% of children with autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) and 30% of those with sclerosing cholangitis (SC) require liver transplantation (LT). LT is indicated in patients who present with fulminant hepatic failure (ie, with encephalopathy) and in those who develop end-stage liver disease despite treatment. After LT, recurrent AIH is reported in approximately 30% of patients and recurrent SC in up to 50%. Diagnosis of recurrence is based on biochemical abnormalities, seropositivity for autoantibodies, interface hepatitis on histology, steroid dependence, and, for SC, presence of cholangiopathy. Recurrence of SC after LT is often associated with poorly controlled inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Recurrence may even appear years after LT; therefore, steroid-based immunosuppression should be maintained at a higher dose than that used for patients transplanted for nonautoimmune liver diseases. Although the impact of recurrent disease on graft function is controversial, it seems that in pediatric LT recipients recurrence of AIH or SC is associated with compromised graft survival. Exacerbation of preexistent IBD may be observed after LT for SC or AIH, and IBD appears to have a more aggressive course than before LT. In addition, IBD can develop de novo following LT. Liver Transplantation 22 1275-1283 2016 AASLD. PMID:27257963

  2. Transplantation after blunt trauma to the liver: a valuable option or just a "waste of organs"?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heuer M

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective Liver injury due to trauma is a rare indication for transplantation. The main indications in such cases were uncontrollable bleeding and insufficient hepatic function. Because of poor results, liver transplantation in these patients is occasionally described as "waste of organs", however based on insufficient data. This study aims to report our experience and to critically question the indication of transplantation in these patients. Methods All liver transplantations at our institution were reviewed retrospectively. This covered 1,529 liver transplants between September 1987 and December 2008. Of them, 6 transplants were performed due to motor-vehicle accidents which caused uncontrollable acute liver trauma in 4 patients. The patients' peri-operative course, short- and long-term outcomes were analyzed. Results Five deceased-donor liver transplantations (4 full size, 1 split and 1 living donor (right transplantation were performed. The median GCS score was 9/15; the median MELD score was 15. Postoperative complications were observed in 3 patients, requiring re-operation in 2. After a median (range follow-up of 32.95 (10.3-55.6 months, 2 patients are alive and remain well on immunosuppression. Conclusion Liver transplantation in patients with otherwise surgically uncontrollable acute liver injury can be indicated as a life saving procedure and can be performed successfully in highly selected cases.

  3. Liver transplantation for hepatocellular carcinoma beyond the Milan criteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiao; Lu, Di; Ling, Qi; Wei, Xuyong; Wu, Jian; Zhou, Lin; Yan, Sheng; Wu, Liming; Geng, Lei; Ke, Qinghong; Gao, Feng; Tu, Zhenhua; Wang, Weilin; Zhang, Min; Shen, Yan; Xie, Haiyang; Jiang, Wenshi; Wang, Haibo; Zheng, Shusen

    2016-01-01

    Objective Liver transplantation is an optimal radical therapy for selected patients with hepatocellular carcinoma. The stringent organ allocation system driven by the Milan criteria has been challenged by alternative sets of expanded criteria. Careful analysis is needed to prove that the Milan criteria can be expanded safely and effectively. Design This study collectively reviewed 6012 patients of hepatocellular carcinoma from the China Liver Transplant Registry. Expanded criteria were evaluated to characterise an optimised expansion with acceptable outcomes beyond the Milan criteria. Results Compared with the Milan criteria, Valencia, University of California, San Francisco, University Clinic of Navarra and Hangzhou criteria provided an expansion of 12.4%, 16.3%, 19.6%, and 51.5%, respectively. The post-transplant survivals of patients fulfilling the expanded criteria were comparable to that of the Milan criteria. The analysis of net reclassification improvement and area under the receiver operating characteristic curves showed an excellent efficiency in recurrence prediction for the expanded criteria compared with the Milan criteria. In patients exceeding Milan but fulfilling the Hangzhou criteria (N=1352), α-fetoprotein (AFP) >100 ng/mL and tumour burden>8 cm were the only two independent prognostic factors (p8 cm but AFP≤100 ng/mL) and type B (tumour burden >8 cm but AFP between 100 and 400 ng/mL). Type A showed significantly higher 5-year tumour-free survival rates compared with type B (p<0.001). Conclusions The Milan criteria can be expanded safely and effectively. The prognostic stratification system based on the Hangzhou criteria serves as a hierarchy of transplant candidates for hepatocellular carcinoma. PMID:25804634

  4. Liver cell transplantation for Crigler-Najjar syndrome type I: Update and perspectives

    OpenAIRE

    Lysy, Philippe; Najimi, Mustapha; Stéphenne, Xavier; Bourgois, Annick; Smets, Françoise; Sokal, Etienne

    2008-01-01

    Liver cell transplantation is an attractive technique to treat liver-based inborn errors of metabolism. The feasibility and efficacy of the procedure has been demonstrated, leading to medium term partial metabolic control of various diseases. Crigler-Najjar is the paradigm of such diseases in that the host liver is lacking one function with an otherwise normal parenchyma. The patient is at permanent risk for irreversible brain damage. The goal of liver cell transplantation is to reduce serum ...

  5. Postperfusion Syndrome in Cadaveric Liver Transplantations: A Retrospective Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydınlı, Bahar; Karadeniz, Ümit; Demir, Aslı; Güçlü, Çiğdem Yıldırım; Kazancı, Dilek; Koçulu, Rabia; Haytural, Candan; Özgök, Ayşegül; Bostancı, Erdal Birol; Zorlu, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the factors that affects the postperfusion syndrome in cadaveric liver transplantations and the effect of the postperfusion syndrome on discharge from the hospital. Methods Patients who underwent cadaveric liver transplantations between 2007 and 2013 were scanned retrospectively. Intraoperative anaesthesia records, intensive care unit follow-up forms and discharge reports were examined from patient files. Overall, 43 patients having complete data were included in the study. The postperfusion syndrome is defined as asystoli or a decrease in mean arterial pressure of more than 30%, which occurred in the first 5 min of reperfusion and continued for 1 min. Patients were divided into two groups: those who had the postperfusion syndrome and those who did not. Results The number of patients who had the postperfusion syndrome was 25 of 43 (58.1%). The MELD score of patients without the postperfusion syndrome was calculated as 16.9±3.2 and that of patients with the postperfusion syndrome was 19.7±3.6. A statistically significant relationship was detected between the postperfusion syndrome occurrence and a high MELD score (p=0.013). The diastolic blood pressure just before reperfusion was statistically lower in the group with the postperfusion syndrome than in the other group (p=0.023, 50±8 vs. 58±11). According to the logistic regression analysis, the MELD score and the decrease in diastolic blood pressure before reperfusion were defined as independent predictive factors. Conclusion According to the study, the ratio for having the postperfusion syndrome was found to be 58.1%. The independent predictor factors affecting the postperfusion syndrome were detected as the MELD score and the decrease in diastolic blood pressure before reperfusion. The postperfusion syndrome during orthotropic liver transplantation is an important issue for anaesthesiologists. The awareness of the related factors with the postperfusion syndrome may help in the development

  6. Usefulness of preoperative Doppler Ultrasonography in liver transplant recipients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate the usefulness to of Doppler ultrasound (DUS) as a preoperative radiologic examination for the liver transplant recipients and to compare its diagnostic efficacy with computed tomography (CT). Among one hundred three liver transplant recipients, fifty three subjects who underwent both DUS and triphasic helical CT preoperatively were included in this study (age range: 19-62 yrs, mean age 43 yrs, M:F=4.3:1). Retrospective comparison between DUS and CT scan was performed using the following parameters: (1) the presence or absence of hepatic tumor and portal vein thrombosis, (2) the patency of the main portal vein (PV) and hepatic vein (HV), (3) the size of the proper hepatic artery and main portal vein, (4) the flow velocity and direction of hepatic vasculatures (hepatic artery, portal vein, and hepatic vein), (5) the diagnosis of hepatic parenchymal disease, and (6) the extrahepatic manifestations of hepatic parenchymal disease. However, this study was particularly focused on whether DUS could offer additional information over CT. Among seventeen surgically confirmed hepatic tumors (14 hepatocellular carcinomas and two cholangiocarcinomas), 11 hepatocellular carcinomas (85%) and two cholangiocarcinoms (100%) were detected on CT scan while only six hepatocellular carcinomas (46%) and one cholangiocarcinoma (50%) were detected on DUS. For the evaluation of portal vein thrombosis, 12 cases with thrombi on CT scan and seven thrombi on DUS were detected, respectively.Twenty percent of main PV and fifteen percent of HV were not clearly delineated on DUS whose CT scan demonstrated the patent PV and HV in these cases. The size of the proper hepatic artery and main portal vein measurable on CT scan in all cases while 89% of the proper hepatic artery and 94% of the main PV were measurable on DUS. Doppler waveforms of the hepatic artery and portal vein were obtained in 94% and 89% of all patients, respectively, and the direction of all portal veins was all

  7. Usefulness of preoperative Doppler Ultrasonography in liver transplant recipients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Jee Hee; Lee, Won Jae; Kim, Seung Hoon; Lee, Soon Jin; Lim, Hyo Keun; Lim, Jae Hoon [Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-03-15

    To evaluate the usefulness to of Doppler ultrasound (DUS) as a preoperative radiologic examination for the liver transplant recipients and to compare its diagnostic efficacy with computed tomography (CT). Among one hundred three liver transplant recipients, fifty three subjects who underwent both DUS and triphasic helical CT preoperatively were included in this study (age range: 19-62 yrs, mean age 43 yrs, M:F=4.3:1). Retrospective comparison between DUS and CT scan was performed using the following parameters: (1) the presence or absence of hepatic tumor and portal vein thrombosis, (2) the patency of the main portal vein (PV) and hepatic vein (HV), (3) the size of the proper hepatic artery and main portal vein, (4) the flow velocity and direction of hepatic vasculatures (hepatic artery, portal vein, and hepatic vein), (5) the diagnosis of hepatic parenchymal disease, and (6) the extrahepatic manifestations of hepatic parenchymal disease. However, this study was particularly focused on whether DUS could offer additional information over CT. Among seventeen surgically confirmed hepatic tumors (14 hepatocellular carcinomas and two cholangiocarcinomas), 11 hepatocellular carcinomas (85%) and two cholangiocarcinoms (100%) were detected on CT scan while only six hepatocellular carcinomas (46%) and one cholangiocarcinoma (50%) were detected on DUS. For the evaluation of portal vein thrombosis, 12 cases with thrombi on CT scan and seven thrombi on DUS were detected, respectively.Twenty percent of main PV and fifteen percent of HV were not clearly delineated on DUS whose CT scan demonstrated the patent PV and HV in these cases. The size of the proper hepatic artery and main portal vein measurable on CT scan in all cases while 89% of the proper hepatic artery and 94% of the main PV were measurable on DUS. Doppler waveforms of the hepatic artery and portal vein were obtained in 94% and 89% of all patients, respectively, and the direction of all portal veins was all

  8. Terapia nutricional no transplante hepático Nutritional therapy in liver transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mônica Beatriz PAROLIN

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available Racional - Deficiências nutricionais, por vezes graves, são comuns em pacientes com insuficiência hepática, candidatos a transplante de fígado. A terapia nutricional pode corrigir total ou parcialmente tais deficiências, melhorando as condições clínicas e o prognóstico desses indivíduos, frente ao grande desafio do transplante hepático. Objetivos - Breve revisão do papel do fígado no metabolismo dos diversos nutrientes. Descrição dos métodos de avaliação do estado nutricional, traçando-se as bases da terapia nutricional segundo condições hepáticas diversas, no pré e pós-transplante, em relação às necessidades calóricas e dos diversos nutrientes. Apresentação de intervenções nutricionais, no controle das complicações metabólicas resultantes do uso de drogas imunossupressoras. Conclusão - A terapia nutricional é valiosa aliada no tratamento clínico de pacientes candidatos ou já submetidos ao transplante hepático, contribuindo para um prognóstico favorável e para a melhora da qualidade de vida desses indivíduos.Background - Malnutrition, sometimes severe is common in patients with chronic hepatic diseases who are candidates for liver transplantation. Nutritional therapy can induce partial or total correction of such deficiencies, improving clinical conditions and prognosis of patients who face the great defiance of liver transplantation. Aims - Brief revision of hepatic role in the metabolism of several nutrients. Description of available methods of dietary therapy and its application both under different abnormal hepatic conditions and pre and post-transplant periods. The role of nutritional intervention in metabolic side effects due to immunosuppressive drugs. Conclusion - Nutritional therapy is a valuable adjuvant resource to the clinical treatment of candidates and submitted patients to hepatic transplantation providing better prognosis and improved life quality.

  9. Yersinia enterocolitica Infection Simulating Lymphoproliferative Disease, after Liver Transplant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Jakobovich

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe a 14-year-old girl, who was 13 y after liver transplantation for biliary atresia with an unremarkable postoperative course. She presented with fever of up to 40°C, extreme fatigue, malaise, anorexia, and occasional vomiting. On physical examination the only finding was splenomegaly. Lab results showed hyperglobulinemia and an elevated sedimentation rate. Liver function tests were normal except for mild elevation of γGTP. Abdominal U/S and CT demonstrated an enlarged spleen with retroperitoneal and mesenteric lymph nodes enlargement. An exhaustive evaluation for infectious causes, autoimmune conditions, and malignancy was negative. A full recovery after 5 months prompted testing for self-limited infectious etiologies. Yersinia enterocolitica infection was diagnosed.

  10. Early steroid withdrawal after liver transplantation for hepatocellular carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the impact of early steroid withdrawal on the incidence of rejection, tumor recurrence and complications after liver transplantation for advancedstage hepatocellular carcinoma.METHODS: Fifty-four patients underwent liver transplantation for advanced-stage hepatocellular carcinoma from April 2003 to June 2005. These cases were divided into a steroid-withdrawal group (group A, n = 28) and a steroid-maintenance group (group B,n = 26). In group A, steroid was withdrawn 3 mo after transplantation. In group B, steroid was continuously used postoperatively. The incidence of rejection, 6-mo and 1-year recurrence rate of carcinoma, 1-year survival rate, mean serum tacrolimus trough level, and liver and kidney function were compared between the two groups.RESULTS: In the two groups, no statistical difference was observed in the incidence of rejection (14.3 vs 11.5%, P > 0.05), mean serum tacrolimus trough levels (6.9 ± 1.4 vs 7.1 ± 1.1 μg/L, P > 0.05), liver and kidney function after 6 mo [alanine aminotransferase (ALT):533 ± 183 vs 617 ± 217 nka/L, P > 0.05; creatinine:66 ± 18 vs 71 ± 19 μmol/L, P > 0.05], 6-mo recurrence rate of carcinoma (25.0 vs 42.3%, P > 0.05), and 1-year survival rate (64.2 vs 46.1%, P > 0.05). The 1-year tumor recurrence rate (39.2 vs 69.2%, P < 0.05), serum cholesterol level (3.9 ± 1.8 vs 5.9 ± 2.6 mmol/L, P < 0.01)and fasting blood sugar (5.1 ± 2.1 vs 8.9 ± 3.6 mmol/L,P < 0.01) were significantly different. These were lower in the steroid-withdrawal group than in the steroidmaintenance group.CONCLUSION: Early steroid withdrawal was safe after liver transprantation in patients with advanced-stage hepatocellular carcinoma. When steroids were withdrawn 3 mo post-operation, the incidence of rejection did not increase, and there was no demand to maintain tacrolimus at a high level. In contrast, the tumor recurrence rate and the potential of adverse effects decreased significantly. This may have led to an

  11. Biopsychosocial functioning among cirrhotic patients in various stages of transplant process in comparison to liver transplant recipients

    OpenAIRE

    Agustín Martín-Rodríguez; María A. Pérez-San-Gregorio; Elisabeth Domínguez-Cabello; Eduardo Fernández-Jiménez; Ángel Bernardos-Rodríguez

    2014-01-01

    Background: Although assessment of pre and posttransplant quality of life is a current scientific target; it has not yet been carried out throughout the entire transplant process. Aims: 1) To analyze differences in mental health and quality of life at prewaiting list study, waiting list, and post transplant phases; 2) to analyze correlation between these quality of life and affective variables and Model for End Stage Liver Disease (MELD) scores. Methods: Two liver patient groups were recruite...

  12. P08.10SINGLE BRAIN METASTASIS 9 YEARS AFTER ORTHOTOPIC LIVER TRANSPLANT WITH HISTOLOGICAL NEGATIVE EXPIANTED LIVER: CASE REPORT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fornaro, R.; Agnoletti, A.; Specchia, F.M. Calamo; Garbossa, D.; Lanotte, M.; Ducati, A.

    2014-01-01

    We describe the case of a 67 years old man, that underwent orthotopic liver transplant (OLT) in 2004 for cirrhosis. Native liver hystological examination was negative for focal hepatocarcinoma (HCC) areas. In 2008, during regular follow up, pulmonary lesions were found and diagnosed as hepatocarcinoma metastasis.In 2013, patient accused vertigo and dizziness: neuroimaging showed a cerebellar lesion. Hystological diagnosis was HCC metastases. The peculiarity is the onset of lung metastasis after transplant, with negative analysis on native liver, and brain metastasis after stable disease. This case is also relevant due to long survival related to the unavailability of many oncologic therapies in transplanted patients.

  13. Supply and demand for liver transplant surgery: Are we training enough surgeons?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuttle-Newhall, J. E.; Pietrobon, R.; Marroquin, C. E.; Collins, B. H.; Desai, D. M.; Kuo, P. C.; Pappas, T. N.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of our study is to determine whether the current level of transplant fellow training is sufficient to meet the future demand for liver transplantation in the United States. Historical data from the Nationwide Inpatient Samples (NIS) for the years 1998 through 2003 were used to construct an estimate of the annual number of liver transplant procedures currently being performed in the United States, and the number projected for each year through 2020. Estimates for the current and future number of surgeons performing liver transplant procedures were also constructed using the same database. The NIS database was used because current national transplant registries do not include information on the number of surgeons performing liver transplant procedures. Using historical data derived from the NIS database, we project that the estimated number of liver transplant procedures per surgeon will remain relatively stable through 2020, with each surgeon performing an average of 12.9 procedures in 2020 compared to 12.9 currently. We conclude that the relationship between demand for liver transplantation in the United States and the supply of liver transplant surgeons will remain stable over the next 15 years. PMID:18695755

  14. Questions and Answers for Transplant Candidates about Model for End-Stage Liver Disease (MELD) and Pediatric End-Stage ....

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... developed a system for prioritizing candidates waiting for liver transplants based on statistical formulas that are very accurate for predicting who needs a liver transplant most urgently. The MELD (Model for End Stage ...

  15. Diagnostic and Therapeutic Challenges in a Liver Transplant Recipient with Central Nervous System Invasive Aspergillosis

    OpenAIRE

    Dionissios, Neofytos; Shmuel, Shoham; Kerry, Dierberg; Katharine, Le; Simon, Dufresne; Sean, Zhang X; Kieren, Marr A

    2012-01-01

    This is a case report of central nervous system (CNS) invasive aspergillosis (IA) in a liver transplant recipient, which illustrates the utility of enzyme-based diagnostic tools for the timely and accurate diagnosis of IA, the treatment challenges and poor outcomes associated with CNS IA in liver transplant recipients.

  16. New criteria for liver transplantation in adults : the combined Groningen and Rotterdam protocol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, PLM

    1998-01-01

    A combined protocol for liver transplantation has been written by the teams of Groningen and Rotterdam. This is to ensure that the criteria for selection and timing of liver transplantation, and the procedures for patient evaluation, are identical or at least very similar. Also, the waiting list pro

  17. Childhood Abuse, Nonadherence, and Medical Outcome in Pediatric Liver Transplant Recipients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shemesh, Eyal; Annunziato, Rachel A.; Yehuda, Rachel; Shneider, Benjamin L.; Newcorn, Jeffrey H.; Hutson, Carolyn; Cohen, Judith A.; Briere, John; Gorman, Jack M.; Emre, Sukru

    2007-01-01

    Objective: The study assessed the relationship between a history of child abuse, nonadherence to medications, and medical outcome in children who had a liver transplant. Method: Abuse history for children and adolescents ages 8 to 21 who underwent a liver transplantation at Mount Sinai Medical Center in New York was obtained in interviews in 2002.…

  18. Immunosuppression after liver transplantation for primary sclerosing cholangitis influences activity of inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Kristin Kaasen; Lindström, Lina; Cvancarova, Milada;

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have shown conflicting results regarding the course of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) after liver transplantation in patients with primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC). We studied the progression of IBD in patients with PSC who have undergone liver transplantation. We also...... studied risk factors, including medical therapy, that could influence on IBD disease activity....

  19. Resolution of severe graft steatosis following dual-graft living donor liver transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, DeokBog; Lee, SungGyu; Hwang, Shin; Kim, KiHun; Ahn, ChulSoo; Park, KwangMin; Ha, TaeYong; Song, GiWon

    2006-07-01

    Although severely steatotic liver grafts are not suitable for transplantation, they have been used when other, more optimal donors were not available, especially for living donor liver transplantation (LDLT) using two liver grafts. Here we present two cases of dual-graft LDLT in which the recipients showed rapid and complete clearing of fat from livers with previously severe steatosis. In the first case, two left lateral segment grafts were used, one of which was 70% steatotic. Preoperative and posttransplant two-week liver-to-spleen computed tomography-value (L/S) ratios were 0.48 and 1.25, respectively. A liver biopsy taken two weeks after transplantation showed that the fatty changes had almost disappeared. The second case used one left lobe and one left lateral segment graft, the latter of which was 80% steatotic. Preoperative and two-week L/S ratio were 0.58 and 1.34, respectively, and a liver biopsy taken two weeks after transplantation showed less than 3% steatosis. The two donors of the severely steatotic liver grafts recovered uneventfully. These findings show that the fat content of the liver grafts was rapidly removed after transplantation. This observation is helpful in understanding the recovery sequences following transplantation of steatotic liver grafts, as well as expanding the acceptability of steatotic liver grafts.

  20. Simplified technique for auxiliary orthotopic liver transplantation using a whole graft

    Science.gov (United States)

    ROCHA-SANTOS, Vinicius; NACIF, Lucas Souto; PINHEIRO, Rafael Soares; DUCATTI, Liliana; ANDRAUS, Wellington; D'ALBURQUERQUE, Luiz Carneiro

    2015-01-01

    Background Acute liver failure is associated with a high mortality rate and the main purposes of treatment are to prevent cerebral edema and infections, which often are responsible for patient death. The orthotopic liver transplantation is the gold standard treatment and improves the 1-year survival. Aim To describe an alternative technique to auxiliary liver transplant on acute liver failure. Method Was performed whole auxiliary liver transplantation as an alternative technique for a partial auxiliary liver transplantation using a whole liver graft from a child removing the native right liver performed a right hepatectomy. The patient met the O´Grady´s criteria and the rational to indicate an auxiliary orthotopic liver transplantation was the acute classification without hemodynamic instability or renal failure in a patient with deterioration in consciousness. Results The procedure improved liver function and decreased intracranial hypertension in the postoperative period. Conclusion This technique can overcome some postoperative complications that are associated with partial grafts. As far as is known, this is the first case of auxiliary orthotopic liver transplantation in Brazil. PMID:26176253

  1. Donor transmitted and de novo cancer after liver transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Rajeev; Neuberger, James

    2014-05-28

    Cancers in solid organ recipients may be classified as donor transmitted, donor derived, de novo or recurrent. The risk of donor-transmitted cancer is very low and can be reduced by careful screening of the donor but cannot be abolished and, in the United Kingdom series is less than 0.03%. For donors with a known history of cancer, the risks will depend on the nature of the cancer, the interventions given and the interval between diagnosis and organ donation. The risks of cancer transmission must be balanced against the risks of death awaiting a new graft and strict adherence to current guidelines may result increased patient death. Organs from selected patients, even with high-grade central nervous system (CNS) malignancy and after a shunt, can, in some circumstances, be considered. Of potential donors with non-CNS cancers, whether organs may be safely used again depends on the nature of the cancer, the treatment and interval. Data are scarce about the most appropriate treatment when donor transmitted cancer is diagnosed: sometimes substitution of agents and reduction of the immunosuppressive load may be adequate and the impact of graft removal should be considered but not always indicated. Liver allograft recipients are at increased risk of some de novo cancers, especially those grafted for alcohol-related liver disease and hepatitis C virus infection. The risk of lymphoproliferative disease and cancers of the skin, upper airway and bowel are increased but not breast. Recipients should be advised to avoid risk behavior and monitored appropriately. PMID:24876738

  2. Imaging of Kaposi sarcoma in a transplanted liver: A rare case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saumya Gupta

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In post-transplant patients, de novo malignancies such as post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease (PTLD, lung carcinoma, renal cell carcinoma, cutaneous malignancies, and Kaposi sarcoma are now seen. The immunotherapy used to prevent graft failure indirectly increases their risk. We present a rare case of visceral Kaposi sarcoma in a patient with orthotopic liver transplant.

  3. Clonal Origin of Hepatocellular Carcinoma and Recurrence After Liver Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhenglu; Gong, Weihua; Shou, Dawei; Zhang, Luzhou; Gu, Xiangqian; Wang, Yuliang; Teng, Dahong; Zheng, Hong

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND This study aimed to determine whether patterns of tumor clonal origin in pluri-nodular hepatocellular carcinoma (PNHC) could serve as an indicator of tumor recurrence following liver transplantation. MATERIAL AND METHODS Tumor tissue samples from 60 PNHC patients who underwent liver transplantation were examined. The diagnosis of patients conformed to the University of California San Francisco (UCSF) standards for pluri-nodular hepatocellular carcinoma. We performed loss of heterozygosity tests at multiple microsatellite sites to determine the clonal origins of the tumors. Clinical information, pathological data, preoperative serum alpha-feto protein (AFP) and postoperative follow-ups were obtained and correlations between the clonal origin of the tumor, tumor-free survival, pathological characteristics, and AFP levels in serum were studied. RESULTS A total of 165 tumor nodules were collected. Tumor clonal origins were identified as intrahepatic metastasis (IM; 41.67%), multicentric occurrence (MO; 55%) or unidentified (3.33%). Three-year tumor-free survival for the IM group was 48% compared to 75.76% in the MO group (pAFP concentration for these groups was 226.80 μg/L (2.78-3000 μg/L) and 24.59 μg/L (1.16-531. 30 μg/L; pAFP levels, the risk of recurrence can be established in advance. PMID:27487734

  4. Percutaneous Management of Biliary Strictures After Pediatric Liver Transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We analyze our experience with the management of biliary strictures (BSs) in 27 pediatric patients who underwent liver transplantation with the diagnosis of BS. Mean recipient age was 38 months (range, 2.5-182 months). In all patients percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography, biliary catheter placement, and bilioplasty were performed. In 20 patients the stenoses were judged resolved by percutaneous balloon dilatation and the catheters removed. Mean number of balloon dilatations performed was 4.1 (range, 3-6). No major complications occurred. All 20 patients are symptom-free with respect to BS at a mean follow-up of 13 months (range, 2-46 months). In 15 of 20 patients (75%) one course of percutaneous stenting and bilioplasty was performed, with no evidence of recurrence of BS at a mean follow-up of 15 months (range, 2-46 months). In 4 of 20 patients (20%) two courses of percutaneous stenting and bilioplasty were performed; the mean time to recurrence was 9.8 months (range, 2.4-24 months). There was no evidence of recurrence of BS at a mean follow-up of 12 months (range, 2-16 months). In 1 of 20 patients (5%) three courses of percutaneous stenting and bilioplasty were performed; there was no evidence of recurrence of BS at a mean follow-up of 10 months. In conclusion, BS is a major problem following pediatric liver transplantation. Radiological percutaneous treatment is safe and effective, avoiding, in most cases, surgical revision of the anastomosis.

  5. Risk factors for invasive fungal infections in liver transplant recipients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIAO Yong; Thomas Hartmann; AO Jun-hong; YANG Rong-ya

    2012-01-01

    To the editor:Invasive fungal infections (IFIs) are significant complications in liver transplant recipients, which are associated with high morbidity/mortality and higher healthcare costs.The incidence of IFIs is mainly influenced by the patients'clinical condition,the level of immune suppression,surgical factors,and the technical complexity of the surgery.We read with great interest the research article by Shi et al.1 Although they have reached a high curative ratio with their "experiential" therapy based on their previous clinical experience,they did not provide us with detailed,definite criteria for identifying suspected patients and allowing for their early "experiential" treatment.Updated,standardized guidelines from the Invasive Fungal Infections Cooperative Group in Europe and the Mycoses Study Group in the United States provide definitions of patients,who are eligible for enrollment in clinical trials.The "Probable" and "Possible" IFIs were defined based on specific host factors,clinical manifestations of fungal infection and mycological findings.The current diagnostic methods for fungal infections lack sensitivity and specificity,so understanding the risk factors associated with fungal infections in liver transplant recipients may improve identification of high-risk patients and guide appropriate initiation of early antifungal treatment.

  6. LIVER TRANSPLANTATION. A SINGLE CENTER EXPERIENCE OF 100 CASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Granov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A single center experience of first 100 liver transplantations (LTs is summarized. Analysis of trends in cadaver donor population and waiting list status changes, and also of early and late postoperative complications are presented. 100 LTs were performed for 95 patients (pts, retransplantation – 4 pts; one patient received 3 liver transplants (female – 55 pts, male – 40 pts, mean age – 39.9 ± 12.1 years. Cumulative 1-year survival rate of pts by Kaplan–Meyer was 91%, 3-year – 83%. Biliary complications were revealed in 9% of pts during 2–9 months after LT. 77 pts have been regularly observed in outpatient clinic, mean age – 44 ± 9.2 years, male – 35, fema- le – 42, follow-up period – 1 months up to 13 years after LT. 3.9% remained invalid with limitation of ability to work, 61.8% have been working, 22.3% were capable to work, retirees were 10.5%. Development of preoperati- ve planning, adequate organ selection will allow to improve the results of LT. Study of hematopoietic stem cells role will expand tools of prognosis of posttransplant complications. 

  7. Cirrhotic cardiomyopathy: Implications for the perioperativemanagement of liver transplant patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Suehana Rahman; Susan V Mallett

    2015-01-01

    Cirrhotic cardiomyopathy is a disease that has onlyrecently been recognised as a definitive clinical entity.In the setting of liver cirrhosis, it is characterizedby a blunted inotropic and chronotropic responseto stress, impaired diastolic relaxation of themyocardium and prolongation of the QT interval inthe absence of other known cardiac disease. A keypathological feature is the persistent over-activationof the sympathetic nervous system in cirrhosis, whichleads to down-regulation and dysfunction of theβ-adrenergic receptor. Diagnosis can be made using acombination of echocardiography (resting and stress),tissue Doppler imaging, cardiac magnetic resonanceimaging, 12-lead electrocardiogram and measurementof biomarkers. There are significant implications of cirrhoticcardiomyopathy in a number of clinical situations in whichthere is an increased physiological demand, whichcan lead to acute cardiac decompensation and heartfailure. Prior to transplantation there is an increasedrisk of hepatorenal syndrome, cardiac failure followingtransjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt insertionand increased risk of arrhythmias during acutegastrointestinal bleeding. Liver transplantation presentsthe greatest physiological challenge with a furtherrisk of acute cardiac decompensation. Peri-operativemanagement should involve appropriate choice of graftand minimization of large fluctuations in preload andafterload. The avoidance of cardiac failure during thisperiod has important prognostic implications, as thereis evidence to suggest a long-term resolution of theabnormalities in cirrhotic cardiomyopathy.

  8. Seronegative Herpes simplex Associated Esophagogastric Ulcer after Liver Transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edouard Matevossian

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Herpes simplex infection is characterized by acute or subacute infection, often followed by a chronic carrier state. Consecutive recurrences may flare up if immunocompromise occurs. Herpes simplex associated esophagitis or duodenal ulcer have been reported in immunocompromised patients due to neoplasm, HIV/AIDS or therapeutically induced immune deficiency. Here we report the case of an HSV-DNA seronegative patient who developed grade III dysphagia 13 days after allogeneic liver transplantation. Endoscopy revealed an esophageal-gastric ulcer, and biopsy histopathology showed a distinct fibroplastic and capillary ulcer pattern highly suspicious for viral infection. Immunohistochemistry staining revealed a distinct nuclear positive anti-HSV reaction. Antiviral therapy with acyclovir and high-dose PPI led to a complete revision of clinical symptoms within 48 h. Repeat control endoscopy after 7 days showed complete healing of the former ulcer site at the gastroesophageal junction. Although the incidence of post-transplantation Herpes simplex induced gastroesophageal disease is low, the viral HSV ulcer may be included into a differential diagnosis if dysphagia occurs after transplantation even if HSV-DNA PCR is negative.

  9. Tolerance in liver transplantation: Biomarkers and clinical relevance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baroja-Mazo, Alberto; Revilla-Nuin, Beatriz; Parrilla, Pascual; Martínez-Alarcón, Laura; Ramírez, Pablo; Pons, José Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Transplantation is the optimal treatment for end-stage organ failure, and modern immunosuppression has allowed important progress in short-term outcomes. However, immunosuppression poorly influences chronic rejection and elicits chronic toxicity in current clinical practice. Thus, a major goal in transplantation is to understand and induce tolerance. It is well established that human regulatory T cells expressing the transcription factor FoxP3 play important roles in the maintenance of immunological self-tolerance and immune homeostasis. The major regulatory T cell subsets and mechanisms of expansion that are critical for induction and long-term maintenance of graft tolerance and survival are being actively investigated. Likewise, other immune cells, such as dendritic cells, monocyte/macrophages or natural killer cells, have been described as part of the process known as “operational tolerance”. However, translation of these results towards clinical practice needs solid tools to identify accurately and reliably patients who are going to be tolerant. In this way, a plethora of genetic and cellular biomarkers is raising and being validated worldwide in large multi-center clinical trials. Few of the studies performed so far have provided a detailed analysis of the impact of immunosuppression withdrawal on pre-existing complications derived from the long-term administration of immunosuppressive drugs and the side effects associated with them. The future of liver transplantation is aimed to develop new therapies which increase the actual low tolerant vs non-tolerant recipients ratio. PMID:27678350

  10. Prevalence and factors associated with dyslipidemia after liver transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hélem de Sena Ribeiro

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to determine the prevalence of abnormal total cholesterol (TC, low density lipoprotein (LDL, high density lipoprotein (HDL and triglycerides in patients undergoing liver transplantation (LTx and to identify predictors of these disorders. Methods: cross-sectional study to assess the prevalence of dyslipidemia in patients undergoing LTx. Demographic, socioeconomic, clinical, anthropometric and dietetic data were collected to determine the association with dyslipidemia using univariate and multivariate statistical analysis. Results: 136 patients were evaluated, 68.1% of which had at least one type of dyslipidemia. The triglyceride level was high in 32.4% of cases, with low HDL in 49.3% of patients and high LDL levels in only 8.8%. High total cholesterol was observed in 16.2% of the study population and was associated with the recommendation for transplantation due to ethanolic cirrhosis (OR = 2.7 and a greater number of hours slept per night (OR = 1.5. Conclusion: many patients presented dyslipidemia after transplantation, demonstrating the need for interventions in relation to modifiable factors associated with dyslipidemias that can mitigate or prevent these disorders.

  11. Intervention for pleural effusions and ascites following liver transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background. Small volumes of fluid in the pleural and peritoneal cavities are common after paediatric liver transplantation. Occasionally, larger fluid collections develop and need intervention by aspiration or insertion of a drain. Objective. To assess the incidence of moderate and large pleural and peritoneal fluid collections following paediatric liver transplantation, the need for intervention and the outcome following radiological and non-radiological treatment, with the ultimate objective of recommending a treatment protocol for such post-operative fluid collections. Materials and methods. A total of 184 consecutive liver grafts in 164 children were reviewed. Results. Of 184 grafts, 31 (16.8 %) developed excessive fluid collections requiring intervention (19 pleural effusions, 8 ascites and 4 effusions and ascites). The effusions were first diagnosed between days 1 and 44 after transplant and the ascites between days 1 and 14. The initial diagnosis was made radiologically in 21 (91 %) of 23 pleural effusions and in 10 (83 %) of 12 ascites. No identifiable cause or association was seen in 18 (58 %) of 31 cases. The mean duration of the pleural effusions and ascites, from onset of treatment to resolution, ranged from 33 ± 42 days (SD) to 35 ± 48 days and from 36 ± 47 days to 39 ± 46 days respectively. Comparison of the modes of interventional treatment (i. e. unguided, radiological and surgical) showed no statistically significant difference in the outcome of the management. Conclusions. Post-transplantation pleural effusions and ascites requiring intervention are often without definite cause. They are more common with reduced grafts, but this cannot completely explain the occurrence or the protracted duration of accumulation in spite of combined interventional management. The outcome of treatment is not significantly influenced by the mode of intervention except in cases where surgical intervention is indicated. Patients could be managed effectively

  12. The kinetics of donor HLA class I-specific antibody absorption following a combined split liver and kidney transplant

    OpenAIRE

    Key, Tim; Watson, Christopher J.; Menna R. Clatworthy; O'Rourke, Cheryl M.; Goodman, Reyna S; Taylor, Craig J.; Butler, Andrew J.

    2010-01-01

    Hyperacute rejection of a transplanted liver is rare even when the recipient has circulating donor-specific alloantibodies (DSA). There is also evidence that a transplanted liver may provide immunological protection for other organs transplanted from the same donor. We monitored the kinetics of circulating DSA in a highly sensitized recipient of a combined split liver and kidney transplant and demonstrated a reduction in antibody titres immediately after liver perfusion. The absorption of DSA...

  13. Profile of health-related quality of life outcomes after liver transplantation: univariate effects and multivariate models

    OpenAIRE

    Russell, R. T.; Feurer, I. D.; Wisawatapnimit, P.; Lillie, E. S.; Castaldo, E. T.; Wright Pinson, C.

    2008-01-01

    Aim. To test the effects of pre- and post-transplant clinical covariates on post-transplant health-related quality of life (HRQOL) score profiles in liver transplant recipients. Material and methods. HRQOL was measured before and after transplantation using the SF-36® Health Survey. Clinical data [diagnosis, model of end-stage liver disease (MELD) score, post-transplant rejection and infection episodes], pre-transplant functional performance (FP), and demographics were collected. Multivariate...

  14. The observation and nursing of patients receiving interventional management for biliary complications occurred after liver transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To discuss the perioperative nursing norm for patients who are suffering from biliary complications occurred after liver transplantation and who will receive interventional management to treat the complications. Methods: Interventional therapies were performed in 20 patients with biliary complications due to liver transplantation. The interventional procedures performed in 20 cases included percutaneous biliary drainage (n = 13), percutaneous biliary balloon dilatation (n = 5) and biliary stent implantation (n = 7). The clinical results were observed and analyzed. Results: Biliary tract complications occurred after liver transplantation were seen frequently. Proper interventional management could markedly improve the successful rate of liver transplantation and increase the survival rate of the patients. In accordance with the individual condition, proper nursing measures should be taken promptly and effectively. Conclusion: Conscientious and effective nursing can contribute to the early detection of biliary complications and, therefore, to improve the survival rate of both the transplanted liver and the patients. (authors)

  15. Gastric Metastasis of Hepatocellular Carcinoma With Gastrointestinal Bleeding After Liver Transplant: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, L; Zhang, W H; Meng, F P; Ma, X M; Shen, L J; Jin, B; Li, H W; Han, J; Zhou, G D; Liu, S H

    2015-10-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) metastasis of hepatocellular carcinoma is very rare. This is the first report of post-transplantation gastric metastasis. A 43-year-old man with a history of hepatitis B-related hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in the right anterior segment of the liver received an orthotopic liver transplant. Three months after the transplantation, pulmonary metastasis was found by chest computed tomography, and he received 1 course of gamma knife treatment. He complained of melena with anemia 17 months post liver transplantation. Abdominal CT scan showed new occupying lesions in the liver and a mass in the stomach and around the spleen with embolus in the splenic vein. Endoscopy revealed a large irregular cauliflower-like mass in fundus with ulceration and bleeding on the surface. He received symptomatic treatment, but died of cancer-related bleeding 4 months later. GI bleeding may due to gastric metastasis after liver transplantation.

  16. Gastric Metastasis of Hepatocellular Carcinoma With Gastrointestinal Bleeding After Liver Transplant: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, L; Zhang, W H; Meng, F P; Ma, X M; Shen, L J; Jin, B; Li, H W; Han, J; Zhou, G D; Liu, S H

    2015-10-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) metastasis of hepatocellular carcinoma is very rare. This is the first report of post-transplantation gastric metastasis. A 43-year-old man with a history of hepatitis B-related hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in the right anterior segment of the liver received an orthotopic liver transplant. Three months after the transplantation, pulmonary metastasis was found by chest computed tomography, and he received 1 course of gamma knife treatment. He complained of melena with anemia 17 months post liver transplantation. Abdominal CT scan showed new occupying lesions in the liver and a mass in the stomach and around the spleen with embolus in the splenic vein. Endoscopy revealed a large irregular cauliflower-like mass in fundus with ulceration and bleeding on the surface. He received symptomatic treatment, but died of cancer-related bleeding 4 months later. GI bleeding may due to gastric metastasis after liver transplantation. PMID:26518968

  17. Monday blues of deceased-donor liver transplantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    See Ching Chan; Wing Chiu Dai; Chung Mau Lo; Banny Lam; Yuen Man Kwan; Wai Yi Ho; Sheung Tat Fan

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There is a constant and global shortage of deceased-donor organs for transplantation. Ways to identify areas for securing potential deceased-donor organs may improve the supply and hence benefit more patients in need of transplantation. METHODS: We looked into the disparity of the number of deceased-donor liver transplantation (DDLT) performed at our hospital on different days of the weeks from January 2000 to the end of December 2009 (237 DDLTs). The number of DDLT performed on each day was compared with the other days of the week. RESULTS: It was apparent that there were fewer DDLTs on Mondays, as shown by the numbers of DDLT performed on different days of the week in an ascending order: Monday 18 (7.6%), Sunday 30 (12.7%), Thursday 34 (14.3%), Friday 36 (15.2%), Wednesday 38 (16.0%), Tuesday 40 (16.9%), and Saturday 41 (17.3%). The difference reached statistical significance when Monday was compared with Tuesday (P=0.019), Wednesday (P=0.010), Friday (P=0.021), and Saturday (P=0.007). It was twice as unlikely a DDLT would be performed on Monday as compared with other days. Such a trend did not change even with an increase in the number of deceased-donor liver grafts in the last year. As consent to donation was obtained from the donor family the day before DDLT, fewer consents were thus obtained on Sundays. CONCLUSION: These findings suggested that deceased-donor organ donation activities were less active on Sundays and could be improved. This further raises the concern of possible wastage of potential cases of organ donation.

  18. Argus versus manual methods to measure liver volume of living liver transplant donors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To investigate the feasibility of measuring liver volume with Argus method. Methods: Thirty-two healthy liver transplant donor candidates underwent liver MRI on a 3.0 T MR unit. Volume interpolated body examination (VIBE) was performed after the administration of gadobenate dimeglumine. The VIBE data was transferred to the diagnostic workstation, and then multiple planar reconstruction (MPR) images were acquired. Firstly, two observers manually drawn the liver shape and calculated three volumes: the whole liver volume and right lobes volumes include middle hepatic vein (MHV) and exclude MHV, respectively. Secondly, the same data was transferred to Argus software, calculated that three volumes. Each measurement time was recorded. Actual graft volume (the right lobe)was measured during surgery. The correlation between right lobes volume of two measurements and actual graft volume was analyzed. The time needed for Argus and that needed for manual method were compared with paired t test. Results: The right lobe volumes measured by Argus, manually and surgery method were (813±187), (807±181) and (713±137) mm3, respectively. Argus method and manual method showed good correlation with surgery method, and the correlation coefficients were 0.897 (Argus method) and 0.884(manual method), respectively. The time for manual method and Argus method were(44.3±2.7) and (12.2±1.0)min, respectively. There was significant difference between Argus and manual methods (t=76.39, P<0.05). Conclusion: Compared with manual method, use of the Liver volumetric measurement by Argus software not only correlated well with Actual graft volume, but also saves time. Argus has potential clinical value for volumetric measurement in living liver transplant donors. (authors)

  19. Sarcopenia and liver transplant: The relevance of too little muscle mass

    OpenAIRE

    Kallwitz, Eric R

    2015-01-01

    Loss of muscle mass and function is a common occurrence in both patients with decompensated cirrhosis and those undergoing liver transplantation. Sarcopenia is associated with morbidity and mortality before and after liver transplantation. The ability of skeletal muscle mass to recover after transplant is questionable, and long term adverse events associated with persistent sarcopenia have not been well studied. Limited data is available examining mechanisms by which decreased muscle mass mig...

  20. Living donor liver transplantation to patients with hepatitis C virus cirrhosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yasuhiko Sugawara; Masatoshi Makuuchi

    2006-01-01

    Living donor liver transplantation (LDLT) is an alternative therapeutic option for patients with end-stage hepatitis C virus (HCV) cirrhosis because of the cadaveric organ shortage. HCV infection is now a leading indication for LDLT among adults worldwide, and there is a worse prognosis with HCV recurrence. The antivirus strategy after transplantation, however, is currently under debate.Recent updates on the clinical and therapeutic aspects of living donor liver transplantation for HCV are discussed in the present review.