WorldWideScience

Sample records for avitaminosis

  1. Activity of retinene palmitasynthetase and retinene palmitatehydrolase in the small intestine mucosa and membranes of its cells in white rats affected by A-avitaminosis and irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leutskij, K.M.; Sovtysik, D.D.

    1977-01-01

    A combined action of A-avitaminosis and ionizing radiation on the activity of retinenepalmitatesynthetase and retinenepalmitatehydrolase in the small intestine mucosa and cell membranes of white rats has been investigated. The activity of retinenepalmitatehydrolase has been shown to decrease in the irradiated animals deficient in vitamin A as compared to the control nonirradiated animals. The activity of retinenepalmitatesynthetase affected by a combination of A-avitaminosis and irradiation increases as compared to the control nonirradiated rats both in the small intestine mucosa and its cell membranes

  2. [Direct stimulatory action of blood serum, vitamin D3, and its hydroxy-analogs on calcium transport in the small intestine of chicks in vitro].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauman, V K; Andrushaite, R E; Berzin', N I; Valinietse, M Iu; Val'dman, A R

    1980-12-01

    A study was made of the effect of blood serum, vitamin D3 and its hydroxy-analogs (25-hydroxyvitamin D4. 1 alpha-hydroxyvitamin D3) on Ca2+ transport across the wall of the noninverted small sac of D-avitaminosis chicken during incubation in vitro. It was shown that blood serum from chickens fed vitamin D3 in different doses (50--20 000 IU) and at varying time (1--72 h) before sacrifice produced a marked stimulating action on the cation transport 10 min after administration into the intestinal cavity as compared with the effect produced by the serum from D-avitaminosis chickens. Administration into the intestine of vitamin D3 or its hydroxy-analogs in physiological doses (6.25--25.0 ng) also significantly stimulated Ca+ transport over 10 min of incubation.

  3. USSR Report: Life Sciences, Biomedical and Behavioral Sciences, No. 40

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-09-02

    MEDITSINSKIKH NAUK SSSR, No 11, NOT 82) 72 Pressing Problems of Infant Nutrition (T. Sh. Sharmanov, K. S. Ladodo; VESTNIK AKADEMII MEDITSINSKIKH...antioxidants (a-tocopherol, ubiquinone and others) that regulate lipid oxidation. In the presence of artificially induced nutritional E avitaminosis in...produced bright pigmentation of strain 1. The iron sulfate is a strong stimulus for biosynthesis of the pigment. Aminoacids in a dose of 500 mg

  4. VITAMIN DEFICIENCY IN CHILDREN: MAIN CAUSES, FORMS, AND MEANS OF PREVENTION IN INFANTS AND PRESCHOOL CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.Yu. Volkova

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The lecture deals with the main causes of development of hypo vitaminoses in infants and preschool children, with the emphasis made on the lack of pathognomonic signs of vitamin in sufficiency, showing the demands for the essential vitamins, and describing the natural sources of their entering the human body. The authors compare the composition of various multivitamin preparations registered in Russian the liquid dosage form convenient for use in 1ctoc7cyearcold children.Key words: avitaminosis, hypovitaminosis, prevention, infants, children.

  5. On the relation of vitamin A to the protein biosynthesis in the organism of intact animals and during the action of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leutskij, K.M.; Baran, M.M.; Batsura, A.F.

    1975-01-01

    Rats were investigated to determine the separate and joint effects of A-avitaminosis and ionizing radiation on protein biosynthesis in the tunica mucosa of the small intestine (cpm/10 mg ribosomal protein; M+-m). X-raying of control and A-avitaminotic animals was shown to result in decline of protein synthesis by 20 and 47 per cent, respectively. The joint action of A-avitaminosis in and irradiation of the organism enhanced the resultant variations in protein biosynthesis, which subsequently decreased by 60 per cent. Vitamin A-alcohol, introduced in the form of an aqueous emulsion into the incubation medium in vitro, was found to affect protein biosynthesis. Retinol (3 μg/ml) introduced in vitro increased inclusion of 14 C-leucine in the proteins of the acellular protein-synthesizing system in control and A-avitaminotic animals by 15 and 38 per cent, respectively. Addition of retinol (6μg/ml) increased inclusion of 14 C-leucine in control and A-avitaminotic rats by 11 and 18 per cent, respectively. Protein synthesis was found to have reliably increased by 17 per cent following introduction of retinol (3 μg) into the incubation medium of irradiated control animals. Protein biosynthesis was assumed to be the principal irradiation-affected stage in the system of biochemical processes in the intestine [ru

  6. [Content of free and bound thiamine diphosphate in the liver hyaloplasm of vitamine B1 deficient rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostrovskiĭ, Iu M; Voskoboev, A I; Gritsenko, E A; Grushnik, V V

    1979-01-01

    The amount of free and protein-bound thiamin diphosphate (TDP) in the liver hyaloplasm of B1 vitamin deficient rats has been measured. In the norm the content of protein-bound TDP remains stable (4.5--4.7 micrograms/g tissue) and does not grow upon thiamin injections. The level of the free coenzyme varies appreciably: in the B1-avitaminotic state the content of free TDP decreases, and in the B1-saturated condition it may exceed the norm 4 times. In the liver this enzyme occurs only as a holoenzyme. In case of B1 vitamin deficiency in the diet the transketolase apoform cannot be detected in the liver. A new model for rapid generation of B1-avitaminosis characterized by a significantly lower level of free and bound TDP is described.

  7. ASCORBIC ACID STATUS IN PREGNANCY AND POSTPARTUM WOMEN IN ENUGU, SOUTH-EAST, NIGERIA: ARE VITAMIN SUPPLEMENTS SUFFICIENT?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Pregnancy has been shown to be a period of stress, during which the nutritional needs of the foetus is dependent on that of the mother. It is also a condition exhibiting increased susceptibility to oxidative stress, leading to potential damage. Ascorbic acid is a strong antioxidant as well as a reducing agent and is increasingly utilized to normalize the pro-oxidant - antioxidant balance during pregnancy. Since ascorbic acid cannot be synthesized by the body, leading to total dependence on exogenous supply in diets, there is need to evaluate the level of the vitamin in pregnant women and determine their predisposition or otherwise to avitaminosis C. Ascorbic acid levels of 60 apparently healthy pregnant women, aged between 20-40 years old and attending the antenatal clinic at the UNTH, Enugu, 60 age-matched women in their postpartum and 60 age-matched non-pregnant women (controls were assayed using the 2,4-dinitrophenyl hydrazine method. The serum ascorbic acid levels were significantly lower (P and lt;0.05 in pregnant women, showing a steady decline with gestational age increase. There were statistically significant decreases (P and lt;0.05 in the second and third trimesters whereas a significant increase (P and lt;0.05 was observed in the postpartum period, when compared to the controls. The serum levels of ascorbic acid were decreased significantly as pregnancy progresses; in spite of the supplements given Significant increases in the postpartum period may be attributed to the absence of oxidative stress and recovery from stress. Additional supplementation and increased dietary intake should be encouraged in pregnant women.

  8. Ecología y Salud Indígena

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Pinzón Sánchez

    1989-09-01

    Full Text Available

    Uno de los pocos estudios hechos en el país desde el punto de vista de la Salud Pública y realizado en terreno sobre población indígena, es el estudio médico-antropológico de la Amazonia Colombiana realizado por el Doctor Ney Guzmán Gómez, de la Universidad del Valle en 1968. (1

    A pesar de algunas deficiencias en el análisis antropológico, es el primer buen estudio de ese tipo, en donde se combinan los datos cualitativos y cuantitativos del nivel de salud, de un Universo Poblacional de 2.478 personas de las cuales 2.158 (87% eran indígenas, moradores de las riberas de los grandes ríos del trapecio amazónico; Putumayo, Caraparaná, Igaraparaná, Pupuña, Icatué y perteneciente a los grupos étnicos: Witotos, Borás y Ticunas.

    Los indicadores más relevantes y que nos recuerdan la situación del país a comienzos de este siglo, son:

    1. Pirámide poblacional con predominio de menores de 15 años.(54%
    2. Elevadas tasas de natalidad 62 x 1000
    3. Elevada tasa de mortalidad general 20 x 1000 – Con una elevada tasa de mortalidad de menores de una añ0 87 x 1000
    4. Edad media al morir ................................25,5 años
    5. Las principales causas de mortalidad:
    – Gastroenteritis ...................16%
    – Tuberculosis ...............10%
    – Anemia.......... 6%
    – Colitis. ........................... 6%
    – Accidentes de selva............................. 6%
    – Bronconeumonía................................. 4%
    – Sarampión.................................... 2%
    6. Las principales causas de morbilidad clínica fueron:
    – Poli parasitismo intestinal................................... 30%
    – Enfermedades respiratorias............................14%
    – Enfermedades de la piel ............................. 6%
    Avitaminosis y anemia.............................. 6%
    – Gastroenteritis...................................4

  9. Expanding the Spectrum of Genes Involved in Huntington Disease Using a Combined Clinical and Genetic Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariani, Louise-Laure; Tesson, Christelle; Charles, Perrine; Cazeneuve, Cécile; Hahn, Valérie; Youssov, Katia; Freeman, Leorah; Grabli, David; Roze, Emmanuel; Noël, Sandrine; Peuvion, Jean-Noel; Bachoud-Levi, Anne-Catherine; Brice, Alexis; Stevanin, Giovanni; Durr, Alexandra

    2016-09-01

    Huntington disease (HD), a prototypic monogenic disease, is caused by an expanded CAG repeat in the HTT gene exceeding 35 units. However, not all patients with an HD phenotype carry the pathological expansion in HTT, and the positive diagnosis rate is poor. To examine patients with HD phenotypes to determine the frequency of HD phenocopies with typical features of HD but without pathological CAG repeat expansions in HTT in an attempt to improve the positive diagnosis rate. Between January 1, 2004, and April 18, 2011, a total of 226 consecutive index patients with an HD phenotype were referred to specialized clinics of the French National Huntington Disease Reference Centre for Rare Diseases. They underwent detailed clinical examination and follow-up, as well as neuropsychological, biological, imaging, and genetic examinations. Nucleotide expansions in JPH3, ATN1, TBP, and C9ORF72 and mutations in PRNP, as well as acquired conditions commonly causing HD phenocopies, were first screened. The diagnostic rate of HD phenocopies and frequency of other etiologies using deep clinical phenotyping and next generation sequencing. Our goal was to improve the genetic diagnosis of HD phenocopies and to identify new HD related genes. One hundred ninety-eight patients carried a pathological CAG repeat expansion in HTT, whereas 28 patients (12 women and 16 men) did not. Huntington disease phenocopies accounted for 12.4%, and their mean (SD) age at onset was similar to those of the HD-HTT group (47.3 [12.7] years vs 50.3 [16.4] years, P = .29). We first identified 3 patients with abnormal CTG expansions in JPH3, a fourth patient with an antiphospholipid syndrome, and a fifth patient with B12 avitaminosis. A custom-made 63-gene panel was generated based on clinical evolution and exome sequencing. It contained genes responsible for HD phenocopies and other neurodegenerative conditions, as well as candidate genes from exome sequencing in 3 index cases with imaging features of brain

  10. Net selectivity on the Great Lakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Oosten, John

    1936-01-01

    -processed meal. At the end of ten weeks only 60 per cent of the quail survived and the average live weight was only 138 grams.....When the level of dried whey was raised to 5 per cent to provide a margin of safety against abnormal feather growth (resulting partly from riboflavin deficiency), the number of survivals was nearly as high as on the diet containing 14 per cent sardine meal, but the average live weight per bird was only 139 grams. The difference between this weight and that for the birds on Diet 11 (3% dried whey) was not statistically significant.....The general rating for the diet was as high as that for Diet 11, when ground wheat replaced ground millet in the diet containing 3 per cent dried whey. Survival of birds was 5 per cent-units lower, the average live weight was about the same, and efficiency of feed utilization was higher.....Using D-activated animal sterol as a source of vitamin D and yellow corn and a good grade of alfalfa leaf meal as sources of vitamin A, fish oils were omitted from the diets without causing symptons of avitaminosis. However because of the instability of vitamin A in storage, it is advisable to include sufficient fish oil, if obtainable, in quail diets to supply at least 2,000 I. U. of vitamin A per pound of feed on a total feed basis.

  11. Wartime diet for growing bobwhite quail

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nestler, R.B.; Llewellyn, L.; Benner, M.

    1944-01-01

    -processed meal. At the end of ten weeks only 60 per cent of the quail survived and the average live weight was only 138 grams.....When the level of dried whey was raised to 5 per cent to provide a margin of safety against abnormal feather growth (resulting partly from riboflavin deficiency), the number of survivals was nearly as high as on the diet containing 14 per cent sardine meal, but the average live weight per bird was only 139 grams. The difference between this weight and that for the birds on Diet 11 (3% dried whey) was not statistically significant.....The general rating for the diet was as high as that for Diet 11, when ground wheat replaced ground millet in the diet containing 3 per cent dried whey. Survival of birds was 5 per cent-units lower, the average live weight was about the same, and efficiency of feed utilization was higher.....Using D-activated animal sterol as a source of vitamin D and yellow corn and a good grade of alfalfa leaf meal as sources of vitamin A, fish oils were omitted from the diets without causing symptons of avitaminosis. However because of the instability of vitamin A in storage, it is advisable to include sufficient fish oil, if obtainable, in quail diets to supply at least 2,000 I. U. of vitamin A per pound of feed on a total feed basis.