WorldWideScience

Sample records for aviation

  1. Aviation Dentistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakshmi; Sakthi, D Sri

    2014-01-01

    With the rapid expansion of the airline industry in all sectors, dentists should pay special attention to crews and frequent flyers, due to change of pressure in-flight, that cause different types of oro-facial pain. Aviation dentistry deals with evaluation, principles of prevention, treatment of diseases, disorders or conditions which are related to oral cavity and maxillofacial area or adjacent and associated structures and their impact on people who travel or on aircrew members and flight restrictions. Dentists should prevent the creation of in-flight hazards when they treat aircrew members and frequent flyers. PMID:24783162

  2. Aviation Lubricants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lansdown, A. R.; Lee, S.

    Aviation lubricants must be extremely reliable, withstand high specific loadings and extreme environmental conditions within short times. Requirements are critical. Piston engines increasingly use multi-grade oils, single grades are still used extensively, with anti-wear and anti-corrosion additives for some classes of engines. The main gas turbine lubricant problem is transient heat exposure, the main base oils used are synthetic polyol esters which minimise thermal degradation. Aminic anti-oxidants are used together with anti-wear/load-carrying, corrosion inhibitor and anti-foam additives. The majority of formulation viscosities are 5 cSt at 100°C. Other considerations are seal compatibility and coking tendency.

  3. Aviation Expo Taking off

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Xinwen; Bai Yifeng

    2007-01-01

    @@ The 12nd Beijing Aviation Expo(Aviation Expo/China 2007) was held this September 19-22 at the China International Exhibition Center.Beijing Aviation Expo is the ONLY aviation exhibition (Civil & Military,including Airport & Air Traffic Control) organized in Beijing,taking place every two years.It is also the most influential aviation exhibition with the longest history in China.

  4. Environmentally Responsible Aviation Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Created in 2009 as part of NASA's Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate's Integrated Systems Research Program, the Environmentally Responsible Aviation...

  5. Towards sustainable aviation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Upham, Paul; Maughan, Janet; Raper, David; Thomas, Callum (eds.)

    2003-02-15

    Aviation is integral to the global economy but it is also one of the main obstacles to environmentally sustainable development. It is one of the world's fastest growing - and most polluting - industries. What can be done to retain the economic and other benefits it brings, without the associated pollution, noise, congestion and loss of countryside? In this volume, industry, policy and research experts examine how to address the problems, and what it would take to achieve genuinely sustainable aviation - looking at technological, policy and demand-management options. Without far-reaching changes the problems caused by aviation can only multiply and worsen. This work seeks to take an important step in diagnosing the problems and in pointing towards their solutions. Contents: Part 1: Trends and Issues - Introduction - Organizational and growth trends in air transport - Social and economic benefits - Human health impacts - Global atmospheric impacts - Aircraft noise, community relations and stakeholder involvement. Part 2: Mitigations and Potential Solutions - Environmental management and the aviation industry - The potential for modal substitution - Airfreight and global supply chains - The potential offered by aircraft and engine technologies - Climate policy for civil aviation. Part 3: Multi-sector commentaries. (Author)

  6. Federal Aviation Administration Curriculum Guide for Aviation Magnet Schools Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strickler, Mervin K., Jr.

    The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) and its predecessor organizations, Civil Aeronautics Agency (CAA) and the Civil Aeronautics Administration (CAA) have pioneered the use of aviation education in working with schools and colleges of the nation to attain their objectives. This publication includes: a brief history of the role of aviation in…

  7. Politics of aviation fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vivent, Jacques

    1922-01-01

    In short, the "politics of aviation" lies in a few propositions: the need of having as large a number of fields as possible and of sufficient area; the utilization of the larger part of the existing military fields; the selection of uncultivated or unproductive fields, whenever technical conditions permit; ability to disregard (save in exceptional cases) objections of an agricultural nature.

  8. Aviation environmental technology and science

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Yanzhong

    2008-01-01

    Expatiating on the impact of aviation on the environment and aviation environmental protection projects are ex- pounded, and analyzing on the atmosphere pollution and effects on the aviation noise of aircraft discharge. Researching the approach to control aircraft exhaust pollution and noise pollution, and proposing the technology and management measures to reduce air pollution.

  9. Guidelines for Federal Aviation Administration Regional Aviation Education Coordinators and Aviation Education Facilitators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strickler, Mervin K., Jr.

    This publication is designed to provide both policy guidance and examples of how to work with various constituencies in planning and carrying out appropriate Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) aviation education activities. Information is provided on the history of aerospace/aviation education, FAA educational materials, aerospace/aviation…

  10. Corporate Social Responsibility in Aviation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Edwin D.

    2006-01-01

    The dialog within aviation management education regarding ethics is incomplete without a discussion of corporate social responsibility (CSR). CSR research requires discussion involving: (a) the current emphasis on CSR in business in general and aviation specifically; (b) business and educational theory that provide a basis for aviation companies to engage in socially responsible actions; (c) techniques used by aviation and aerospace companies to fulfill this responsibility; and (d) a glimpse of teaching approaches used in university aviation management classes. The summary of this research suggests educators explain CSR theory and practice to students in industry and collegiate aviation management programs. Doing so extends the discussion of ethical behavior and matches the current high level of interest and activity within the aviation industry toward CSR.

  11. Aviation risk management

    OpenAIRE

    El-Ashry, A.E.M.E.

    1986-01-01

    Risk management is considered to be an application of general concepts in scientific management of a particular problem of exposure to risk of loss. It is concerned with identifying objectives, analysing the data regarding the nature of the problem, evaluating the pure risks deriving from the nature of the business and choosing or finding the most suitable method or methods of handling these risks; aiming to control them and their effects as well as minimizing the cost. The field of aviation ...

  12. Entrepreneurship within General Aviation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullmann, Brian M.

    1995-01-01

    Many modern economic theories place great importance upon entrepreneurship in the economy. Some see the entrepreneur as the individual who bears risk of operating a business in the face of uncertainty about future conditions and who is rewarded through profits and losses. The 20th century economist Joseph Schumpter saw the entrepreneur as the medium by which advancing technology is incorporated into society as businesses seek competitive advantages through more efficient product development processes. Due to the importance that capitalistic systems place upon entrepreneurship, it has become a well studied subject with many texts to discuss how entrepreneurs can succeed in modern society. Many entrepreneuring and business management courses go so far as to discuss the characteristic phases and prominent challenges that fledgling companies face in their efforts to bring a new product into a competitive market. However, even with all of these aids, start-up companies fail at an enormous rate. Indeed, the odds of shepherding a new company through the travails of becoming a well established company (as measured by the ability to reach Initial Public Offering (IPO)) have been estimated to be six in 1,000,000. Each niche industry has characteristic challenges which act as barriers to entry for new products into that industry. Thus, the applicability of broad generalizations is subject to limitations within niche markets. This paper will discuss entrepreneurship as it relates to general aviation. The goals of this paper will be to: introduce general aviation; discuss the details of marrying entrepreneurship with general aviation; and present a sample business plan which would characterize a possible entrepreneurial venture.

  13. 75 FR 6433 - Federal Aviation Administration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-09

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Notice of Availability of a Draft Environmental Assessment and Public...: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of Availability of a Draft Environmental... Chicago, Illinois. SUMMARY: The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) proposes to fund, construct,...

  14. 77 FR 64837 - Federal Aviation Administration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-23

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Fourth Meeting: RTCA Special Committee 227, Standards of Navigation Performance AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT). ACTION... 15, 2012. Kathy Hitt, Management Analyst, Business Operations Group, Federal Aviation...

  15. 78 FR 41183 - Federal Aviation Administration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-09

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Meeting: RTCA Program Management Committee AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT). ACTION: Notice of RTCA Program Management.... Paige Williams, Management Analyst, NextGen, Business Operations Group, Federal Aviation...

  16. 76 FR 78966 - Federal Aviation Administration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-20

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Approval of Noise Compatibility Program for Kona International Airport at Keahole, Keahole, North Kona, HI AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration, DOT. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) announces its findings on the noise compatibility...

  17. 75 FR 12809 - Federal Aviation Administration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-17

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Notice of Intent To Rule on Request To Release Airport Property at the Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport, DFW Airport, Texas AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA... Aviation Administration, Southwest Region, Airports Division, Texas Airports Development Office,...

  18. COPRA Aviation Security Research Roadmap

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hasberg, M.P.; Leisman, L.; Voorde, I. van de; Weissbrodt, J.

    2013-01-01

    The EU funded project COPRA (Comprehensive European Approach to the Protection of Civil Aviation) developed a roadmap for future research activities, which could lead to a more resilient, flexible and comprehensive approach. Tackling 70 existing and potential threats to aviation (security) identifie

  19. Safer Aviation Materials Tested

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palaszewski, Bryan A.

    2001-01-01

    A series of thermally stable polymer samples were tested. These materials are called low heat release materials and are designed for aircraft interior decorative materials. The materials are designed to give off a minimum amount of noxious gases when heated, which increases the possibility that people can escape from a burning aircraft. New cabin materials have suitably low heat release so that fire does not spread, toxic chemicals are not given off, and the fire-emergency escape time for crew and passengers is lengthened. These low heat-release materials have a variety of advantages and applications: interiors for ground-based facilities, interiors of space vehicles, and many commercial fire-protection environments. A microscale combustion calorimeter at the Federal Aviation Administration's (FAA) Technical Center tested NASA Langley Research Center materials samples. The calorimeter is shown. A sharp, quantitative, and reproducible heat-release-rate peak is obtained in the microscale heat-release-rate test. The newly tested NASA materials significantly reduced the heat release capacity and total heat release. The thermal stability and flammability behavior of the samples was very good. The new materials demonstrated a factor of 4 reduction in total heat release over ULTEM (a currently used material). This information is provided in the following barchart. In other tests, the materials showed greater than a factor 9 reduction in heat-release capacity over ULTEM. The newly tested materials were developed for low dielectric constant, low color, and good solubility. A scale up of the material samples is needed to determine the repeatability of the performance in larger samples. Larger panels composed of the best candidate materials will be tested in a larger scale FAA Technical Center fire facility. The NASA Glenn Research Center, Langley (Jeff Hinkley), and the FAA Technical Center (Richard Lyon) cooperatively tested these materials for the Accident Mitigation

  20. Aviation and Remote Sensing Programs

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Efficiency and effectiveness of aerial photograph acquisition by the Region 3 Aviation Program will be improved with use of newly purchased upgrades for the...

  1. 76 FR 17353 - Aviation Communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-29

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 87 Aviation Communications AGENCY: Federal Communications Commission. ACTION: Final rule; suspension of effectiveness. SUMMARY: In this document, the Federal Communications...

  2. Office of Aviation Safety Infrastructure

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Transportation — The Office of Aviation Safety Infrastructure (AVS INF) provides authentication and access control to AVS network resources for users. This is done via a distributed...

  3. China Gradually Deregulates Aviation Fuels Market

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    @@ China will gradually deregulate the aviation fuels market to allow the oil and petrochemical enterprises to become shareholders of China Aviation Fuels Corporation (CAFC) so that the aviation fuels suppliers can operate at a lower cost. Deregulation of the air fuels market aims at reduction of aviation fuels price to spur development of China's air transportation industry.

  4. Aviation Systems Test and Integration Lab (AvSTIL)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Aviation Systems Test and Integration Laboratory offers an innovative approach to aviation system and subsystem testing by fully immersing aviation platforms in...

  5. Distributed Aviation Concepts and Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Mark D.

    2008-01-01

    Aviation has experienced one hundred years of evolution, resulting in the current air transportation system dominated by commercial airliners in a hub and spoke infrastructure. While the first fifty years involved disruptive technologies that required frequent vehicle adaptation, the second fifty years produced a stable evolutionary optimization of decreasing costs with increasing safety. This optimization has resulted in traits favoring a centralized service model with high vehicle productivity and cost efficiency. However, it may also have resulted in a system that is not sufficiently robust to withstand significant system disturbances. Aviation is currently facing rapid change from issues such as environmental damage, terrorism threat, congestion and capacity limitations, and cost of energy. Currently, these issues are leading to a loss of service for weaker spoke markets. These catalysts and a lack of robustness could result in a loss of service for much larger portions of the aviation market. The impact of other competing transportation services may be equally important as casual factors of change. Highway system forecasts indicate a dramatic slow down as congestion reaches a point of non-linearly increasing delay. In the next twenty-five years, there is the potential for aviation to transform itself into a more robust, scalable, adaptive, secure, safe, affordable, convenient, efficient and environmentally friendly system. To achieve these characteristics, the new system will likely be based on a distributed model that enables more direct services. Short range travel is already demonstrating itself to be inefficient with a centralized model, providing opportunities for emergent distributed services through air-taxi models. Technologies from the on-demand revolution in computers and communications are now available as major drivers for aviation on-demand adaptation. Other technologies such as electric propulsion are currently transforming the automobile

  6. 78 FR 13395 - Federal Aviation Administration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-27

    ... of October 23, 2012 (77 FR 64836) would require placement of fill on submerged lands jointly managed... Federal Aviation Administration Notice of Availability of Draft Alaska National Interest Lands Conservation Act (ANILCA) Section 810 Subsistence Evaluation. AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration...

  7. 76 FR 2745 - Federal Aviation Administration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-14

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Federal Aviation Administration Eighty-Fourth Meeting: RTCA Special Committee 159: Global Positioning System (GPS) AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of RTCA Special...

  8. 78 FR 25524 - Federal Aviation Administration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-01

    ... TRANSPORTATION Federal Aviation Administration Notice of Request To Release Airport Property AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of Intent to Rule on Request to Release Airport Property..., Airports Compliance Specialist, Federal Aviation Administration, Airports Division, ACE- 610C, 901...

  9. Aviation Medicine: global historical perspectives and the development of Aviation Medicine alongside the growth of Singapore's aviation landscape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, W H; Low, R; Singh, J

    2011-05-01

    Aviation Medicine traces its roots to high altitude physiology more than 400 years ago. Since then, great strides have been made in this medical specialty, initially catalysed by the need to reduce pilot medical attrition during the World Wars, and more recently, fuelled by the explosive growth in globalised commercial air travel. This paper traces the historical milestones in Aviation Medicine, and maps its development in Singapore since the 1960s. Advancements in military aviation platforms and technology as well as the establishment of Singapore as an international aviation hub have propelled Aviation Medicine in Singapore to the forefront of many domains. These span Aviation Physiology training, selection medical standards, performance maximisation, as well as crew and passenger protection against communicable diseases arising from air travel. The year 2011 marks the centennial milestone of the first manned flight in Singapore, paving the way for further growth of Aviation Medicine as a mature specialty in Singapore.

  10. Aviation Medicine: global historical perspectives and the development of Aviation Medicine alongside the growth of Singapore's aviation landscape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, W H; Low, R; Singh, J

    2011-05-01

    Aviation Medicine traces its roots to high altitude physiology more than 400 years ago. Since then, great strides have been made in this medical specialty, initially catalysed by the need to reduce pilot medical attrition during the World Wars, and more recently, fuelled by the explosive growth in globalised commercial air travel. This paper traces the historical milestones in Aviation Medicine, and maps its development in Singapore since the 1960s. Advancements in military aviation platforms and technology as well as the establishment of Singapore as an international aviation hub have propelled Aviation Medicine in Singapore to the forefront of many domains. These span Aviation Physiology training, selection medical standards, performance maximisation, as well as crew and passenger protection against communicable diseases arising from air travel. The year 2011 marks the centennial milestone of the first manned flight in Singapore, paving the way for further growth of Aviation Medicine as a mature specialty in Singapore. PMID:21633764

  11. Taxation of United States general aviation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobieralski, Joseph Bernard

    General aviation in the United States has been an important part of the economy and American life. General aviation is defined as all flying excluding military and scheduled airline operations, and is utilized in many areas of our society. The majority of aircraft operations and airports in the United States are categorized as general aviation, and general aviation contributes more than one percent to the United States gross domestic product each year. Despite the many benefits of general aviation, the lead emissions from aviation gasoline consumption are of great concern. General aviation emits over half the lead emissions in the United States or over 630 tons in 2005. The other significant negative externality attributed to general aviation usage is aircraft accidents. General aviation accidents have caused over 8000 fatalities over the period 1994-2006. A recent Federal Aviation Administration proposed increase in the aviation gasoline tax from 19.4 to 70.1 cents per gallon has renewed interest in better understanding the implications of such a tax increase as well as the possible optimal rate of taxation. Few studies have examined aviation fuel elasticities and all have failed to study general aviation fuel elasticities. Chapter one fills that gap and examines the elasticity of aviation gasoline consumption in United States general aviation. Utilizing aggregate time series and dynamic panel data, the price and income elasticities of demand are estimated. The price elasticity of demand for aviation gasoline is estimated to range from -0.093 to -0.185 in the short-run and from -0.132 to -0.303 in the long-run. These results prove to be similar in magnitude to automobile gasoline elasticities and therefore tax policies could more closely mirror those of automobile tax policies. The second chapter examines the costs associated with general aviation accidents. Given the large number of general aviation operations as well as the large number of fatalities and

  12. Aviation turbulence processes, detection, prediction

    CERN Document Server

    Lane, Todd

    2016-01-01

    Anyone who has experienced turbulence in flight knows that it is usually not pleasant, and may wonder why this is so difficult to avoid. The book includes papers by various aviation turbulence researchers and provides background into the nature and causes of atmospheric turbulence that affect aircraft motion, and contains surveys of the latest techniques for remote and in situ sensing and forecasting of the turbulence phenomenon. It provides updates on the state-of-the-art research since earlier studies in the 1960s on clear-air turbulence, explains recent new understanding into turbulence generation by thunderstorms, and summarizes future challenges in turbulence prediction and avoidance.

  13. Wind energy and aviation interests - interim guidelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-07-01

    The impact on aviation of increasing the number of wind farms in the United Kingdom is discussed by the Wind Energy, Defence and Civil Aviation Interests Working Group, comprising the Department of Trade and Industry, the Civil Aviation Authority, the Ministry of Defence, and the British Wind Energy Association. The report offers guidance to wind farm developers, local authorities and statutory consultees within the aviation community: the main thrust of the guidelines is to support the UK Government's wind energy targets. Although the document does not contain in-depth technical discussions, it does provide references to such information.

  14. Collegiate Aviation Research and Education Solutions to Critical Safety Issues. UNO Aviation Monograph Series. UNOAI Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, Brent, Ed.

    This document contains four papers concerning collegiate aviation research and education solutions to critical safety issues. "Panel Proposal Titled Collegiate Aviation Research and Education Solutions to Critical Safety Issues for the Tim Forte Collegiate Aviation Safety Symposium" (Brent Bowen) presents proposals for panels on the following…

  15. Characteristics of successful aviation leaders of Oklahoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutz, Mary N. Hill

    Scope and method of study. The purpose of the study was to examine the personal traits, skills, practices, behaviors, background, academic, and career success patterns of selected aviation leaders in Oklahoma. A purposive sample of 18 leaders who had achieved a top-ranked position of aviation leadership in an organization or a position of influence in the community was selected for interview. The leaders chosen for interview came from a variety of aviation organizations including government, academia, military, corporate aviation, and air carrier leadership as well as community leadership (specifically those aviation personnel who were engaged in a political or civic leadership role). Findings and conclusions. This study identified no common career choices, educational, family, or other background factors exclusively responsible for leadership success of all of the participants. Some of the more significant findings were that a high percentage of the leaders held undergraduate and advanced degrees; however, success had been achieved by some who had little or no college education. Aviation technical experience was not a prerequisite for aviation leadership success in that a significant number of the participants held no airman rating and some had entered positions of aviation leadership from non-aviation related careers. All had received some positive learning experience from their family background even those backgrounds which were less than desirable. All of the participants had been involved in volunteer civic or humanitarian leadership roles, and all had received numerous honors. The most frequently identified value expressed by the leaders was honesty; the predominant management style was participative with a strong backup style for directing, the most important skills were communication and listening skills, and the most frequently mentioned characteristics of success were honesty, credibility, vision, high standards, love for aviation and fiscal

  16. PROSPECTS OF COOPERATION OF UKRAINE International aviation organizations

    OpenAIRE

    О.Т. ПОЛТОРАЦЬКА

    2013-01-01

    Analyzed the classification of international aviation organizations and offered suggestions on the State Comprehensive program of aviation industry of Ukraine for the period until 2010, in accordance with the method, which is recommended by international aviation organizations.

  17. Resilience Safety Culture in Aviation Organisations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akselsson, R.; Koornneef, F.; Stewart, S.; Ward, M.

    2009-01-01

    Chapter 2: Resilience Safety Culture in Aviation Organisations The European Commission HILAS project (Human Integration into the Lifecycle of Aviation Systems - a project supported by the European Commission’s 6th Framework between 2005-2009) was focused on using human factors knowledge and methodo

  18. The Politics of Aviation English Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alderson, J. Charles

    2011-01-01

    The International Civil Aviation Association has developed a set of Language Proficiency Requirements (LPRs) and a Language Proficiency Rating Scale, which seeks to define proficiency in the language needed for aviation purposes at six different levels. Pilots, air traffic controllers and aeronautical station operators are required to achieve at…

  19. China Aviation Oil Acquires Overseas Oil Company

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    @@ China Aviation Oil (Singapore) announced an acquisition of a 20.6 percent stake in Singapore Petroleum Company (SPC) from Satya Capital Inc Ltd, the largest investment the company has ever made in its history. China Aviation Oil (Singapore),which is the largest Chinese enterprise Singapore,will become the second largest shareholder of SPC after the acquisition.

  20. 78 FR 14912 - International Aviation Safety Assessment (IASA) Program Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-08

    ... aviation legislation, (2) specific operating regulations, (3) organization structure ] and safety oversight... International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO). The FAA maintains and publishes a country-by-country...

  1. First Shanghai International Aviation Symposium Held

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    <正>Shanghai held its first international aviation symposium at its Portman Ritz-Carlton from April 28 to 30 in order to promote the sustainable development of the civil aviation industry in East China and the Yangtze Delta. The forum was also considered as an accelerating effort to build Shanghai into an international air hub. CAAC Minister Yang Yuanyuan and Shanghai Mayor Han Zheng delivered opening speeches.Yang said: "Priority should be given to the human spirit when we step up effort to build the city into an air hub. We aim to let more common people benefit from the development of civil aviation."

  2. Global Simulation of Aviation Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sridhar, Banavar; Ng, Hok Kwan; Li, Jinhua; Sheth, Kapil; Morando, Alex

    2016-01-01

    The simulation and analysis of global air traffic is limited due to a lack of simulation tools and the difficulty in accessing data sources. This paper provides a global simulation of aviation operations combining flight plans and real air traffic data with historical commercial city-pair aircraft type and schedule data and global atmospheric data. The resulting capability extends the simulation and optimization functions of NASA's Future Air Traffic Management Concept Evaluation Tool (FACET) to global scale. This new capability is used to present results on the evolution of global air traffic patterns from a concentration of traffic inside US, Europe and across the Atlantic Ocean to a more diverse traffic pattern across the globe with accelerated growth in Asia, Australia, Africa and South America. The simulation analyzes seasonal variation in the long-haul wind-optimal traffic patterns in six major regions of the world and provides potential time-savings of wind-optimal routes compared with either great circle routes or current flight-plans if available.

  3. Microwave Radiometer for Aviation Safety Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — SBIR Phase I Project proposes a new passive microwave airborne sensor for in flight icing hazard detection, Microwave Radiometer for Aviation Safety. A feasibility...

  4. 76 FR 39884 - Aviation Security Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-07

    ... customer satisfaction TSA is engendering across affected constituencies. This committee has experience... TSA to gather customer and stakeholder input concerning the effectiveness of security actions and... aviation security measures to the Administrator of TSA. The committee will meet approximately twice...

  5. 78 FR 25337 - Federal Aviation Administration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-30

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Federal Aviation Administration Agency Information Collection Activities: Requests for Comments; Clearance... Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice and request for comments. SUMMARY: In accordance with the...

  6. Proactive Management of Aviation System Safety Risk

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Aviation safety systems have undergone dramatic changes over the past fifty years. If you take a look at the early technology in this area, you'll see that there...

  7. Cooperative Demonstration Program To Train Aviation Maintenance Technicians. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alabama Aviation and Technical Coll., Ozark.

    The Alabama Aviation and Technical College, working with representatives of the aviation industry, the military, the Alabama Department of Aeronautics, and the Federal Aviation Administration, developed a training program for aviation maintenance technicians. The program also aimed to emphasize and expand opportunities for minorities, females, and…

  8. World experience in aviation companies staffing executive and administrative personnel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.N. Shkoda

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Leading international aviation companies experience in staffing executive and administrative personnel is considered in the article. The author analyzes staffing specifics of such aviation companies as Southwest Airlines, Lufthansa AG, and work of such staffing agencies as Aeropeople Aerotek in this direction. It is defined that Ukrainian aviation companies should use world leading aviation companies experience.

  9. Aviation, Carbon, and the Clean Air Act

    OpenAIRE

    Richardson, Nathan

    2012-01-01

    This paper explores the policy options available to the United States for regulating greenhouse gas emissions from aircraft under existing law: the Clean Air Act (CAA). Europe has unilaterally and controversially moved to include aviation emissions in its Emissions Trading System. The United States can, however, allow its airlines to escape this requirement by imposing “equivalent” regulation. U.S. aviation emissions rules could also have significant environmental benefits and would limit dom...

  10. Global Commercial Aviation Emissions Inventory for 2004

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkerson, J.; Balasubramanian, S.; Malwitz, A.; Wayson, R.; Fleming, G.; Jacobson, M. Z.; Naiman, A.; Lele, S.

    2008-12-01

    In 2004, the global commercial aircraft fleet included more than 13,000 aircraft flying over 30 billion km, burning more than 100 million tons of fuel. All this activity incurs substantial amounts of fossil-fuel combustion products at the cruise altitude within the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere that could potentially affect the atmospheric composition and climate. These emissions; such as CO, CO2, PM, NOx, SOx, are not distributed uniformly over the earth, so understanding the temporal and spatial distributions is an important component for modeling aviation climate impacts. Previous studies for specific years have shown that nearly all activity occurs in the northern hemisphere, and most is within mid-latitudes. Simply scaling older data by the annual global industry growth of 3-5 percent may provide emission trends which are not representative of geographically varying growth in aviation sector that has been noted over the past years. India, for example, increased its domestic aviation activity recently by 46 percent in one year. Therefore, it is important that aircraft emissions are best characterized and represented in the atmospheric models for impacts analysis. Data containing all global commercial flights for 2004 was computed using the Federal Aviation Administration's Aviation Environmental Design Tool (AEDT) and provided by the Volpe National Transportation Systems Center. The following is a summary of this data which illustrates the global aviation footprint for 2004, and provides temporal and three-dimensional spatial distribution statistics of several emissions constituents.

  11. GASP- GENERAL AVIATION SYNTHESIS PROGRAM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galloway, T. L.

    1994-01-01

    The General Aviation Synthesis Program, GASP, was developed to perform tasks generally associated with the preliminary phase of aircraft design. GASP gives the analyst the capability of performing parametric studies in a rapid manner during preliminary design efforts. During the development of GASP, emphasis was placed on small fixed-wing aircraft employing propulsion systems varying from a single piston engine with a fixed pitch propeller through twin turboprop/turbofan systems as employed in business or transport type aircraft. The program is comprised of modules representing the various technical disciplines of design, integrated into a computational flow which ensures that the interacting effects of design variables are continuously accounted for in the aircraft sizing procedures. GASP provides a useful tool for comparing configurations, assessing aircraft performance and economics, and performing tradeoff and sensitivity studies. By utilizing GASP, the impact of various aircraft requirements and design factors may be studied in a systematic manner, with benefits being measured in terms of overall aircraft performance and economics. The GASP program consists of a control module and six "technology" submodules which perform the various independent studies required in the design of general aviation or small transport type aircraft. The six technology modules include geometry, aerodynamics, propulsion, weight and balance, mission analysis, and economics. The geometry module calculates the dimensions of the synthesized aircraft components based on such input parameters as number of passengers, aspect ratio, taper ratio, sweep angles, and thickness of wing and tail surfaces. The aerodynamics module calculates the various lift and drag coefficients of the synthesized aircraft based on inputs concerning configuration geometry, flight conditions, and type of high lift device. The propulsion module determines the engine size and performance for the synthesized aircraft

  12. NASA Alternative Aviation Fuel Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, B. E.; Beyersdorf, A. J.; Thornhill, K. L., II; Moore, R.; Shook, M.; Winstead, E.; Ziemba, L. D.; Crumeyrolle, S.

    2015-12-01

    We present an overview of research conducted by NASA Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate to evaluate the performance and emissions of "drop-in" alternative jet fuels, highlighting experiment design and results from the Alternative Aviation Fuel Experiments (AAFEX-I & -II) and Alternative Fuel-Effects on Contrails and Cruise Emissions flight series (ACCESS-I & II). These projects included almost 100 hours of sampling exhaust emissions from the NASA DC-8 aircraft in both ground and airborne operation and at idle to takeoff thrust settings. Tested fuels included Fischer-Tropsch (FT) synthetic kerosenes manufactured from coal and natural-gas feedstocks; Hydro-treated Esters and Fatty-Acids (HEFA) fuels made from beef-tallow and camelina-plant oil; and 50:50 blends of these alternative fuels with Jet A. Experiments were also conducted with FT and Jet A fuels doped with tetrahydrothiophene to examine the effects of fuel sulfur on volatile aerosol and contrail formation and microphysical properties. Results indicate that although the absence of aromatic compounds in the alternative fuels caused DC-8 fuel-system leaks, the fuels did not compromise engine performance or combustion efficiency. And whereas the alternative fuels produced only slightly different gas-phase emissions, dramatic reductions in non-volatile particulate matter (nvPM) emissions were observed when burning the pure alternative fuels, particularly at low thrust settings where particle number and mass emissions were an order of magnitude lower than measured from standard jet fuel combustion; 50:50 blends of Jet A and alternative fuels typically reduced nvPM emissions by ~50% across all thrust settings. Alternative fuels with the highest hydrogen content produced the greatest nvPM reductions. For Jet A and fuel blends, nvPM emissions were positively correlated with fuel aromatic and naphthalene content. Fuel sulfur content regulated nucleation mode aerosol number and mass concentrations within aging

  13. Understanding Aviation English as a Lingua Franca: Perceptions of Korean Aviation Personnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyejeong; Elder, Catherine

    2009-01-01

    Researchers exploring the use of language use in radiotelephony communication have tended to focus on the limitations of the non-native English user and the threats which their limited control of English may pose for aviation safety (e.g. Atsushi, 2003, 2004). Hence the recent International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) policy places the onus…

  14. International Civil Aviation Co-operation Reinforced Wu Nianzu attends Asia Aviation Exhibition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    <正>Wu Nianzu, chairman and president of the Shanghai Airport (Group) Company, was invited by Huang Wenliang, director of Singapore Civil Aviation Administration, to attend 2004 Asia Aviation Exhibition held in Singapore on February 22 to 28. His party included Wang Guangdi, vice president of the company.They attended the opening ceremony, visited the

  15. Aviation Weather Observations for Supplementary Aviation Weather Reporting Stations (SAWRS) and Limited Aviation Weather Reporting Stations (LAWRS). Federal Meteorological Handbook No. 9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Department of Transportation, Washington, DC.

    This handbook provides instructions for observing, identifying, and recording aviation weather at Limited Aviation Weather Reporting Stations (LAWRS) and Supplementary Aviation Weather Reporting Stations (SAWRS). Official technical definitions, meteorological and administrative procedures are outlined. Although this publication is intended for use…

  16. Aviation Safety Reporting System: Process and Procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connell, Linda J.

    1997-01-01

    The Aviation Safety Reporting System (ASRS) was established in 1976 under an agreement between the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). This cooperative safety program invites pilots, air traffic controllers, flight attendants, maintenance personnel, and others to voluntarily report to NASA any aviation incident or safety hazard. The FAA provides most of the program funding. NASA administers the program, sets its policies in consultation with the FAA and aviation community, and receives the reports submitted to the program. The FAA offers those who use the ASRS program two important reporting guarantees: confidentiality and limited immunity. Reports sent to ASRS are held in strict confidence. More than 350,000 reports have been submitted since the program's beginning without a single reporter's identity being revealed. ASRS removes all personal names and other potentially identifying information before entering reports into its database. This system is a very successful, proof-of-concept for gathering safety data in order to provide timely information about safety issues. The ASRS information is crucial to aviation safety efforts both nationally and internationally. It can be utilized as the first step in safety by providing the direction and content to informed policies, procedures, and research, especially human factors. The ASRS process and procedures will be presented as one model of safety reporting feedback systems.

  17. Selected supplies prognosis problems of aviation techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Żurek, J.; Czapla, R.

    2016-06-01

    Aviation technology, i.e. aircraft, control and airfield infrastructure wear out, become defective and need servicing. It seems indispensible to maintain facilities and spare parts at a level necessary to keep the technology in commission. The paper discusses the factors influencing spare parts supply requirements to secure air operations. Aviation technology has been classified with regard to various criteria, which influence the choice of supply management strategies, along with availability and aircraft exploitation cost. The method of optimization of the stock for a complex system characterized by series reliability structure according to the wear-out and cost criteria assuming Poisson's process of demand has been presented.

  18. Computer technology forecast study for general aviation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seacord, C. L.; Vaughn, D.

    1976-01-01

    A multi-year, multi-faceted program is underway to investigate and develop potential improvements in airframes, engines, and avionics for general aviation aircraft. The objective of this study was to assemble information that will allow the government to assess the trends in computer and computer/operator interface technology that may have application to general aviation in the 1980's and beyond. The current state of the art of computer hardware is assessed, technical developments in computer hardware are predicted, and nonaviation large volume users of computer hardware are identified.

  19. National volcanic ash operations plan for aviation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ,; ,

    2007-01-01

    The National Aviation Weather Program Strategic Plan (1997) and the National Aviation Weather Initiatives (1999) both identified volcanic ash as a high-priority informational need to aviation services. The risk to aviation from airborne volcanic ash is known and includes degraded engine performance (including flameout), loss of visibility, failure of critical navigational and operational instruments, and, in the worse case, loss of life. The immediate costs for aircraft encountering a dense plume are potentially major—damages up to $80 million have occurred to a single aircraft. Aircraft encountering less dense volcanic ash clouds can incur longer-term costs due to increased maintenance of engines and external surfaces. The overall goal, as stated in the Initiatives, is to eliminate encounters with ash that could degrade the in-flight safety of aircrews and passengers and cause damage to the aircraft. This goal can be accomplished by improving the ability to detect, track, and forecast hazardous ash clouds and to provide adequate warnings to the aviation community on the present and future location of the cloud. To reach this goal, the National Aviation Weather Program established three objectives: (1) prevention of accidental encounters with hazardous clouds; (2) reduction of air traffic delays, diversions, or evasive actions when hazardous clouds are present; and (3) the development of a single, worldwide standard for exchange of information on airborne hazardous materials. To that end, over the last several years, based on numerous documents (including an OFCMsponsored comprehensive study on aviation training and an update of Aviation Weather Programs/Projects), user forums, and two International Conferences on Volcanic Ash and Aviation Safety (1992 and 2004), the Working Group for Volcanic Ash (WG/VA), under the OFCM-sponsored Committee for Aviation Services and Research, developed the National Volcanic Ash Operations Plan for Aviation and Support of the

  20. Formation of communication skills of aviation specialists

    OpenAIRE

    Коваленко, Ольга Олександрівна

    2012-01-01

    Culture of the professional communication is the basis of the professional activity. It is spoken about the process of formation of the professional communication culture, where communication, professionalism of the communication are foundation of it in personal oriented studying by means of creative technologies; examined about peculiarities, and defined conditions of formation of professional oral skills culture of future aviation specialists.

  1. Impact of aviation upon the atmosphere. Introduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carpentier, J. [Comite Avion-Ozone, 75 - Paris (France)

    1997-12-31

    The commercial air traffic, either for business or for tourism will induce a special increase of long haul flights, with cruising altitudes of about 10 to 12 km. These altitudes correspond to the upper troposphere for the low latitudes (tropical zones) and to the lower stratosphere for middle and high latitudes. The prospect of a world air traffic multiplied by a factor 2 within the next fifteen years, with an increasing part of the long-haul flights, raises the problem of the impact of aircraft emissions on the upper troposphere and on the lower stratosphere. The air traffic growth which is forecast for the next two decades as well as for long term will be larger than the GDP growth. But technical progress concerning airframes, engines, navigation systems and improvements of air traffic control and airports will keep the aircraft emissions growth at a rate which will not exceed the GDP growth rate. The aviation`s share of global anthropogenic emissions will remain lower than 3 percent. The regulations related to NO{sub x} emissions from aircraft will reduce the aviation`s share of nitrogen oxides from human sources at a level of 1 percent. (R.P.)

  2. Aviation Structural Mechanic H1 & C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naval Education and Training Command, Pensacola, FL.

    The rate training manual and nonresident career course presents materials for individualized study that will assist Aviation Structural Mechanics in Hydraulics (AMH) in meeting the occupational requirements of their rating. The study materials seek to improve job skills among Navy petty officers in conjunction with their on-the-job training as…

  3. Synthetic and Biomass Alternate Fueling in Aviation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendricks, Robert C.; Bushnell, Dennis M.

    2009-01-01

    Must use earth's most abundant natural resources - Biomass, Solar, Arid land (43%), Seawater (97%) with nutrients (80%) plus brackish waters and nutrients resolve environmental triangle of conflicts energy-food-freshwater and ultrafine particulate hazards. Requires Paradigm Shift - Develop and Use Solar* for energy; Biomass for aviation and hybrid-electric-compressed air mobility fueling with transition to hydrogen long term.

  4. Airline Careers. Aviation Careers Series. Revised.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaharevitz, Walter

    This booklet, one in a series on aviation careers, outlines the variety of careers available in airlines. The first part of the booklet provides general information about careers in the airline industry, including salaries, working conditions, job requirements, and projected job opportunities. In the main part of the booklet, the following 22 job…

  5. Improving Fuel Statistics for Danish Aviation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winther, M.

    Islands, obtained with the NERI model. In addition a complete overview of the aviation fuel use from the two latter areas is given, based on fuel sale information from Statistics Greenland and Statistics Faroe Islands, and fuel use data from airline companies. The fuel use figures are presented on a level...

  6. Airport Careers. Aviation Careers Series. Revised.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaharevitz, Walter

    This booklet, one in a series on aviation careers, outlines the variety of careers available in airports. The first part of the booklet provides general information about careers at airports, while the main part of the booklet outlines the following nine job categories: airport director, assistant airport director, engineers, support personnel,…

  7. 78 FR 16756 - International Civil Aviation Organization's (ICAO) Dangerous Goods Panel; Notice of Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-18

    ... Federal Aviation Administration International Civil Aviation Organization's (ICAO) Dangerous Goods Panel... meeting. SUMMARY: In preparation for the International Civil Aviation Organization's (ICAO) Dangerous... prepares for the International Civil Aviation Organization's Dangerous Goods Panel's (ICAO DGP's)...

  8. 76 FR 11308 - Aviation Noise Impacts Roadmap Annual Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-01

    ... on health and welfare; noise in national parks and wilderness; aircraft noise modeling; and costs of... TRANSPORTATION Federal Aviation Administration Aviation Noise Impacts Roadmap Annual Meeting AGENCY: Federal... interested persons that the First Annual Meeting of the Aviation Noise Impacts Roadmap will be held on...

  9. Absolute cross-section of turbojet aviation engine calculation

    OpenAIRE

    Ryabokon, Evgen

    2012-01-01

    The calculation method of three-dimensional model of turbojet aviation engine is offered, thus the form of turbine vanes with spiralling is described like parametric surface. The method allows make the calculation of absolute cross-section (ACS) of turbojet aviation engines with different geometrical parameters. The calculation results of ACS of aviation engine are presented.

  10. 14 CFR Special Federal Aviation... - Process for Requesting Waiver of Mandatory Separation Age for a Federal Aviation Administration...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Process for Requesting Waiver of Mandatory Separation Age for a Federal Aviation Administration Air Traffic Control Specialist In Flight Service... Federal Special Federal Aviation Regulation No. 103 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION...

  11. Synthetic and Biomass Alternate Fueling in Aviation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendricks, R. C.; Bushnell, D. M.

    2009-01-01

    While transportation fueling can accommodate a broad range of alternate fuels, aviation fueling needs are specific, such as the fuel not freezing at altitude or become too viscous to flow properly or of low bulk energy density that shortens range. The fuel must also be compatible with legacy aircraft, some of which are more than 50 years old. Worldwide, the aviation industry alone uses some 85-95 billion gallons of hydrocarbon-based fossil fuel each year, which is about 10% of the transportation industry. US civil aviation alone consumes nearly 14 billion gallons. The enormity of the problem becomes overwhelming, and the aviation industry is taking alternate fueling issues very seriously. Biofuels (algae, cyanobacteria, halophytes, weeds that use wastelands, wastewater and seatwater), when properly sourced, have the capacity to be drop-in fuel replacements for petroleum fuels. As such, biojet from such sources solves the aviation CO2 emissions issue without the downsides of 'conventional' biofuels, such as competing with food and fresh water resources. Of the many current fundamental problems, the major biofuel problem is cost. Both research and development and creative engineering are required to reduce these biofuels costs. Research is also ongoing in several 'improvement' areas including refining/processing and biologics with greater disease resistance, greater bio-oil productivity, reduced water/nutrient requirements, etc. The authors' current research is aimed at aiding industry efforts in several areas. They are considering different modeling approaches, growth media and refining approaches, different biologic feedstocks, methods of sequestering carbon in the processes, fuel certification for aviation use and, overall, ensuring that biofuels are feasible from all aspects - operability, capacity, carbon cycle and financial. The authors are also providing common discussion grounds/opportunities for the various parties, disciplines and concerned organization to

  12. General Aviation Pilots' Perceived Usage and Valuation of Aviation Weather Information Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latorella, Kara; Lane, Suzanne; Garland, Daniel

    2002-01-01

    Aviation suffers many accidents due to the lack of good weather information in flight. Existing aviation weather information is difficult to obtain when it is most needed and is not well formatted for in-flight use. Because it is generally presented aurally, aviation weather information is difficult to integrate with spatial flight information and retain for reference. Efforts, by NASA's Aviation Weather Information (AWIN) team and others, to improve weather information accessibility, usability and decision aiding will enhance General Aviation (GA) pilots' weather situation awareness and decision-making and therefore should improve the safety of GA flight. Consideration of pilots' economic concerns will ensure that in-flight weather information systems are financially accessible to GA pilots as well. The purpose of this survey was to describe how aviation operator communities gather and use weather information as well as how weather related decisions are made between flight crews and supporting personnel. Pilots of small GA aircraft experience the most weather-related accidents as well as the most fatal weather related accident. For this reason, the survey design and advertisement focused on encouraging participation from GA pilots. Perhaps as a result of this emphasis, most responses, 97 responses or 85% of the entire response set, were from GA pilots, This paper presents only analysis of these GA pilots' responses. The insights provided by this survey regarding GA pilots' perceived value and usage of current aviation weather information. services, and products provide a basis for technological approaches to improve GA safety. Results of this survey are discussed in the context of survey limitations and prior work, and serve as the foundation for a model of weather information value, guidance for the design of in-flight weather information systems, and definition of further research toward their development.

  13. Which future for aviation bio-fuels?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This collective report proposes a detailed overview of the evolution of aviation fuels and bio-fuels from technological, regulatory and economic points of view. It also proposes a road-map for possible future evolutions, and outlines the different assessments between American and European countries regarding the predictions for the beginning of industrial production and use of bio-jet-fuel. After having recalled international objectives, an overview of European and French commitments for technological and operational advances, and a discussion of the role of bio-fuels in the carbon cycle, the report presents various technical constraints met in aircraft industry and describes the role bio-fuels may have. The next part proposes an overview of bio-fuels which are industrially produced in the world in 2013. The authors then focus on aviation bio-fuels (main production processes, thermo-chemical processes), discuss the political context, and examine obstacles, partnerships and the role of public authorities

  14. Synthetic and Biomass Alternate Fueling in Aviation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendricks, R.C.; Bushnell, D.M.

    2009-01-01

    Worldwide, aviation alone uses 85 to 95 billion gallons of nonrenewable fossil fuel per year (2008). General transportation fueling can accommodate several different fuels; however, aviation fuels have very specific requirements. Biofuels have been flight demonstrated, are considered renewable, have the capacity to become "drop-in" replacements for Jet-A fuel, and solve the CO2 climate change problem. The major issue is cost; current biomass biofuels are not economically competitive. Biofuel feedstock sources being researched are halophytes, algae, cyanobacteria, weeds-to-crops, wastes with contingent restraints on use of crop land, freshwater, and climate change. There are five major renewable energy sources: solar thermal, solar photovoltaic, wind, drilled geothermal and biomass, each of which have an order of magnitude greater capacity to meet all energy needs. All five address aspects of climate change; biomass has massive potential as an energy fuel feedstock.

  15. Risk Assessment Techniques for Civil Aviation Security

    OpenAIRE

    Demichela, Micaela

    2011-01-01

    Following the 9/11 terrorists attacks a strong economical effort was made to improve and adapt aviation security, both in infrastructures as in airplanes. National and international guidelines were promptly developed with the objective of creating a security management system able to supervise the identification of risks and the definition and optimisation of control measures. Risk assessment techniques are thus crucial in the above process, since an incorrect risk identification and quantifi...

  16. Full Throttle: Reforming Canada's Aviation Policy

    OpenAIRE

    Benjamin Dachis

    2014-01-01

    Federal government policies are a major cause of high costs throughout the aviation supply chain, often leading Canadians to waste time and money by seeking lower fares at nearby US airports, or not travel at all. High fuel taxes and onerous foreign ownership and airline-specific policies are harming the competitiveness of airlines. Meanwhile, airports have been transformed from the rundown state they were in when operated by the federal government to become world leaders in customer service ...

  17. Perspectives for Sustainable Aviation Biofuels in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luís A. B. Cortez

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aviation industry has set ambitious goals to reduce carbon emissions in coming decades. The strategy involves the use of sustainable biofuels, aiming to achieve benefits from environmental, social, and economic perspectives. In this context, Brazilian conditions are favorable, with a mature agroindustry that regularly produces automotive biofuel largely adopted by Brazilian road vehicles, while air transportation has been growing at an accelerating pace and a modern aircraft industry is in place. This paper presents the main conclusions and recommendations from a broad assessment of the technological, economic, and sustainability challenges and opportunities associated with the development of drop-in aviation biofuels in Brazil. It was written by a research team that prepared the initial reports and conducted eight workshops with the active participation of more than 30 stakeholders encompassing the private sector, government institutions, NGOs, and academia. The main outcome was a set of guidelines for establishing a new biofuels industry, including recommendations for (a filling the identified research and development knowledge gaps in the production of sustainable feedstock; (b overcoming the barriers in conversion technology, including scaling-up issues; (c promoting greater involvement and interaction between private and government stakeholders; and (d creating a national strategy to promote the development of aviation biofuels.

  18. Aviation graduates' competencies, 2000--2007: Perceptions of aviation educators and industry representatives in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridewell, John B.

    This study surveyed the perceptions of collegiate aviation educators, collegiate aviation institution representatives, and aviation industry stakeholders who were members of the University Aviation Association as of February 5, 2007. Survey forms were sent to 353 prospective participants and there was an overall response rate of 47.6%. The survey consisted of a list of 16 knowledge and skill competencies with Likert-type responses for each participant to indicate the level of importance each placed upon those competencies for collegiate aviation graduates and of the level of satisfaction each had that collegiate aviation graduates actually possessed those competencies upon graduation. Two open-ended questions pertained to the strengths and weaknesses of collegiate aviation programs or their graduates. Another allowed for general comments. The statistical analyses indicated that all three groups were most satisfied with graduates' technical skills and least satisfied with communications skills. Analyses indicated that a balance of technical skills and a liberal education was essential for program success. All knowledge and skill competencies were shown to have high to very high importance levels, but only medium to high satisfaction levels. Results indicated that graduates were perceived to possess all stated competencies, but to a lesser degree than desired. Successful collegiate aviation programs existed, but there was room for improvement. Success was program or graduate speck, with no ubiquitous definition of what constituted a successful collegiate aviation program. Aviation industry needs must be addressed by academia for any collegiate aviation program to be successful, but results indicated that the aviation industry needs to take a larger role in the development and refinement of collegiate aviation programs. Finances for institutions, programs, and students were a major concern for the foreseeable future. Administrators should consider how their actions

  19. Sensors and Systems to Enhance Aviation Safety Against Weather Hazards

    OpenAIRE

    Mahapatra, Pravas R; Zrnic, Dusan S

    1991-01-01

    Weather-related factors are among major causes of aviation hazards, passenger discomfort, poor airline schedule-keeping, and poor operating economy. A variety of new high-technology electronic sensors and systems for aviation weather are being developed and installed across the US. The aviation weather monitoring system of the future will be centered around Doppler weather radars which offer the best combination of coverage, resolution, and agility for this purpose, and are able to detect and...

  20. Naval aviation aging wiring: prognostic and diagnostic solutions

    OpenAIRE

    Nieto, Mark E.

    2000-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited The Navy and Marine Corps provide key forward-presence, crisis response and war-fighting capabilities to our nation's leaders and joint commanders. Naval Aviation plays a central role in every naval mission. Unfortunately, the tools of naval aviation's power, its aircraft, are becoming alarmingly old. The average age of the naval aviation inventory is in excess of eighteen years old. The nerve center of today's sophisticated aircraft, ...

  1. Recent trends in aviation turbine fuel properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, R.

    1982-01-01

    Plots and tables, compiled from Department of Energy (and predecessor agency) inspection reports from 1969 to 1980, present ranges, averages, extremes, and trends for most of the 22 properties of Jet A aviation turbine fuel. In recent years, average values of aromatics content, mercaptan sulfur content, distillation temperature of 10 percent recovered, smoke point, and freezing point show small but recognizable trends toward their specification limits. About 80 percent of the fuel samples had at least one property near specification, defined as within a standard band about the specification limit. By far the most common near-specification properties were aromatics content, smoke point, and freezing point.

  2. Aviation security x-ray detection challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, T.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, a review of the background and some drivers are provided for X-ray screening for aviation security. Some of the key considerations are highlighted along with impacts of the image-based approaches and signature approaches. The role of information theory is discussed along with some recent work that may influence the technical direction by posing the question: "what measurements, parameters and metrics should be considered in future system design?" A path forward should be based on information theory, however electronic machines will likely interface with humans and be dollar-cost driven, so ultimately solutions must consider additional parameters other than only technical performance factors.

  3. A psychologist's view of validating aviation systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Earl S.; Wagner, Dan

    1994-01-01

    All systems, no matter what they are designed to do, have shortcomings that may make them less productive than was hoped during the initial development. Such shortcomings can arise at any stage of development: from conception to the end of the implementation life cycle. While systems failure and errors of a lesser magnitude can occur as a function of mechanical or software breakdown, the majority of such problems, in aviation are usually laid on the shoulders of the human operator and, to a lesser extent, on human factors. The operator bears the responsibility and blame even though, from a human factors perspective, error may have been designed into the system. Human factors is not a new concept in aviation. The name may be new, but the issues related to operators in the loop date back to the industrial revolution of the nineteenth century and certainly to the aviation build-up for World War I. During this first global confrontation, military services from all sides discovered rather quickly that poor selection and training led to drastically increased personnel losses. While hardware design became an issue later, the early efforts were primarily focused on increased care in pilot selection and on their training. This actually involved early labor-intensive simulation, using such devices as sticks and chairs mounted on rope networks which could be manually moved in response to control input. The use of selection criteria and improved training led to more viable person-machine systems. More pilots survived training and their first ten missions in the air, a rule of thumb arrived at by experience which predicted ultimate survival better than any other. This rule was to hold through World War II. At that time, personnel selection and training became very sophisticated based on previous standards. Also, many psychologists were drafted into Army Air Corps programs which were geared towards refining the human factor. However, despite the talent involved in these programs

  4. Aviation System Analysis Capability Executive Assistant Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Eileen; Villani, James A.; Osman, Mohammed; Godso, David; King, Brent; Ricciardi, Michael

    1998-01-01

    In this technical document, we describe the design developed for the Aviation System Analysis Capability (ASAC) Executive Assistant (EA) Proof of Concept (POC). We describe the genesis and role of the ASAC system, discuss the objectives of the ASAC system and provide an overview of components and models within the ASAC system, and describe the design process and the results of the ASAC EA POC system design. We also describe the evaluation process and results for applicable COTS software. The document has six chapters, a bibliography, three appendices and one attachment.

  5. Global, regional and local health impacts of civil aviation emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yim, Steve H. L.; Lee, Gideon L.; Lee, In Hwan; Allroggen, Florian; Ashok, Akshay; Caiazzo, Fabio; Eastham, Sebastian D.; Malina, Robert; Barrett, Steven R. H.

    2015-03-01

    Aviation emissions impact surface air quality at multiple scales—from near-airport pollution peaks associated with airport landing and take off (LTO) emissions, to intercontinental pollution attributable to aircraft cruise emissions. Previous studies have quantified aviation’s air quality impacts around a specific airport, in a specific region, or at the global scale. However, no study has assessed the air quality and human health impacts of aviation, capturing effects on all aforementioned scales. This study uses a multi-scale modeling approach to quantify and monetize the air quality impact of civil aviation emissions, approximating effects of aircraft plume dynamics-related local dispersion (˜1 km), near-airport dispersion (˜10 km), regional (˜1000 km) and global (˜10 000 km) scale chemistry and transport. We use concentration-response functions to estimate premature deaths due to population exposure to aviation-attributable PM2.5 and ozone, finding that aviation emissions cause ˜16 000 (90% CI: 8300-24 000) premature deaths per year. Of these, LTO emissions contribute a quarter. Our estimate shows that premature deaths due to long-term exposure to aviation-attributable PM2.5 and O3 lead to costs of ˜21 bn per year. We compare these costs to other societal costs of aviation and find that they are on the same order of magnitude as global aviation-attributable climate costs, and one order of magnitude larger than aviation-attributable accident and noise costs.

  6. Aviation Accidents and Stock Market Reaction: Evidence from Borsa Istanbul

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ender Demir

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Behavioral finance literature shows that a variety of mood variables affect the stock prices. Aviation accidents are uncommon that generally cause a high number of casualties. Therefore, they have a strong social repercussion in the country. This negative sentiment driven by bad mood might affect the investment decisions of investors. This study examines the effect of aviation accidents on Borsa Istanbul Index and Borsa Istanbul Transportation Index. Turkish aviation companies had only 5 serious accidents from 1990 to 2013. On the contrary to the previous findings, it is found that the aviation disasters do not have any effect on the stock market.

  7. Russian eruption warning systems for aviation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neal, C.; Girina, O.; Senyukov, S.; Rybin, A.; Osiensky, J.; Izbekov, P.; Ferguson, G.

    2009-01-01

    More than 65 potentially active volcanoes on the Kamchatka Peninsula and the Kurile Islands pose a substantial threat to aircraft on the Northern Pacific (NOPAC), Russian Trans-East (RTE), and Pacific Organized Track System (PACOTS) air routes. The Kamchatka Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT) monitors and reports on volcanic hazards to aviation for Kamchatka and the north Kuriles. KVERT scientists utilize real-time seismic data, daily satellite views of the region, real-time video, and pilot and field reports of activity to track and alert the aviation industry of hazardous activity. Most Kurile Island volcanoes are monitored by the Sakhalin Volcanic Eruption Response Team (SVERT) based in Yuzhno-Sakhalinsk. SVERT uses daily moderate resolution imaging spectroradiometer (MODIS) satellite images to look for volcanic activity along this 1,250-km chain of islands. Neither operation is staffed 24 h per day. In addition, the vast majority of Russian volcanoes are not monitored seismically in real-time. Other challenges include multiple time-zones and language differences that hamper communication among volcanologists and meteorologists in the US, Japan, and Russia who share the responsibility to issue official warnings. Rapid, consistent verification of explosive eruptions and determination of cloud heights remain significant technical challenges. Despite these difficulties, in more than a decade of frequent eruptive activity in Kamchatka and the northern Kuriles, no damaging encounters with volcanic ash from Russian eruptions have been recorded. ?? Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2009.

  8. 26 CFR 48.4091-3 - Aviation fuel; conditions to allowance of refunds of aviation fuel tax under section 4091(d).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ..., multiple copies of the first producer's report should be made at the stage that the aviation fuel is... with respect to taxed aviation fuel that is held by a registered aviation fuel producer. No credit... the aviation fuel was paid to the government by an importer or producer (the first producer) and...

  9. 78 FR 59413 - International Civil Aviation Organization's (ICAO) Dangerous Goods Panel; Notice of Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-26

    ... Federal Aviation Administration International Civil Aviation Organization's (ICAO) Dangerous Goods Panel... meeting. SUMMARY: In preparation for the International Civil Aviation Organization's (ICAO) Dangerous...-HazMat@faa.gov . Please include your name, organization, email address, and indicate whether you...

  10. 77 FR 14856 - Public Meeting With Interested Persons To Discuss the Proposed Federal Aviation Administration...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-13

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Public Meeting With Interested Persons To Discuss the Proposed Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Draft Technical Standard Order (TSO)-C199 Establishing the Minimum... Administration (DOT). ACTION: Notice of public meetings. SUMMARY: The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA)...

  11. 32 CFR 855.18 - Aviation fuel and oil purchases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Aviation fuel and oil purchases. 855.18 Section..., Air Force Stock Fund and DPSC Assigned Item Procedures, 5 purchase of Air Force fuel and oil may be... AIRCRAFT USE OF UNITED STATES AIR FORCE AIRFIELDS Civil Aircraft Landing Permits § 855.18 Aviation fuel...

  12. Taking Flight: Education and Training for Aviation Careers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Janet S., Ed.; Oster, Clinton V., Jr., Ed.

    This book reports on a study of education and training for civilian aviation careers. Following an overview of the study in chapter 1, chapter 2 provides the context for the analysis by first sketching the evolution of the aviation industry, then describing the key characteristics of the current industry and its workforce. Among the issues…

  13. 78 FR 55327 - Advisory Committee for Aviation Consumer Protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-10

    ... Office of the Secretary Advisory Committee for Aviation Consumer Protection AGENCY: Office of the.... SUMMARY: This notice announces the fifth meeting of the Advisory Committee for Aviation Consumer.... Department of Transportation, 1200 New Jersey Ave. SE., Washington, DC 20590; 202-366-9342 (phone),...

  14. 77 FR 43137 - Aviation Environmental and Energy Policy Statement

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-23

    ... to air quality-related health effects, as do emissions from all combustion processes, and are causing... progress in energy efficiency and pioneering advances in sustainable alternative aviation fuels will be key... issue for general aviation since more than 200,000 piston-engine aircraft rely on leaded AvGas for...

  15. Private Airlines to Appear in Civil Aviation Market

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    Exposed by North China Aviation Bureau, Dazhong and Aokai, two airlines based on private capitals, have handed in their establishment applications to the North China Aviation Bureau, along with the reports on feasibility study.At present, they have passed the preliminary examination of the Bureau and are waiting for the reply from CAAC. Private airlines with low operation costs are expected

  16. 75 FR 32508 - Harris Stratex Networks Corporation, Currently Known As Aviat U.S., Inc., dba Aviat Networks, Inc...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-08

    ... Employment and Training Administration Harris Stratex Networks Corporation, Currently Known As Aviat U.S., Inc., dba Aviat Networks, Inc., Production Division, Including On-Site Leased Workers From Manpower, Green Resources and Volt Technical Resources, San Antonio, TX; Amended Certification...

  17. State of the Art on Alternative Fuels in Aviation. SWAFEA. Sustainable Way for Alternative Fuels and Energy in Aviation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blakey, S.; Novelli, P.; Costes, P.; Bringtown, S.; Christensen, D.; Sakintuna, B.; Peineke, C.; Jongschaap, R.E.E.; Conijn, J.G.; Rutgers, B.; Valot, L.; Joubert, E.; Perelgritz, J.F.; Filogonio, A.; Roetger, T.; Prieur, A.; Starck, L.; Jeuland, N.; Bogers, P.; Midgley, R.; Bauldreay, J.; Rollin, G.; Rye, L.; Wilson, C.

    2010-01-01

    Currently, the aviation sector uses petroleum derived liquid fuels as the energy carrier of choice for flight. In light the present environmental, economical and political concerns as to the sustainability of this energy source, the question of which alternatives the aviation sector should pursue in

  18. Urgent epidemic control mechanism for aviation networks

    KAUST Repository

    Peng, Chengbin

    2011-01-01

    In the current century, the highly developed transportation system can not only boost the economy, but also greatly accelerate the spreading of epidemics. While some epidemic diseases may infect quite a number of people ahead of our awareness, the health care resources such as vaccines and the medical staff are usually locally or even globally insufficient. In this research, with the network of major aviation routes as an example, we present a method to determine the optimal locations to allocate the medical service in order to minimize the impact of the infectious disease with limited resources. Specifically, we demonstrate that when the medical resources are insufficient, we should concentrate our efforts on the travelers with the objective of effectively controlling the spreading rate of the epidemic diseases. © 2011 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

  19. Job Satisfaction among Turkish Business Aviation Technicians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tevfik Uyar

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The most applicable models in safety management put the human factors, employers’ attitudes and behaviors at the center. This study reports an investigation of job satisfaction among business aviation technicians. A demographic information form and Job Satisfaction Survey (JSS were used to collect data from 44 individuals. Data was analyzed using ANOVA and Student’s t-test. Our results show that there is significant difference in total job satisfaction levels with regard to marital status while other personal factors are not related to the total job satisfaction levels. However several sub dimensions of job satisfaction are affected by the workers’ military or civilian origin, their training background, types of companies they work in or their license category. No difference is found in age and position groups. Secondly, study shows that technicians are the most satisfied from the nature of their work, while they are the least satisfied by operational procedures.

  20. Outlook for alternative energy sources. [aviation fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Card, M. E.

    1980-01-01

    Predictions are made concerning the development of alternative energy sources in the light of the present national energy situation. Particular emphasis is given to the impact of alternative fuels development on aviation fuels. The future outlook for aircraft fuels is that for the near term, there possibly will be no major fuel changes, but minor specification changes may be possible if supplies decrease. In the midterm, a broad cut fuel may be used if current development efforts are successful. As synfuel production levels increase beyond the 1990's there may be some mixtures of petroleum-based and synfuel products with the possibility of some shale distillate and indirect coal liquefaction products near the year 2000.

  1. Russian Aviation Business: Critical Areas For Benchmarking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Vepreva

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Russian aviation business has faced a challenge. There are only two ways to proceed - either to change quickly and effectively or stay and slowly loose positions. Best practices of production systems creation from 3 world famous production companies were analyzed in order to come to the result, which is a basic fundament for production system. Fundament consists of four major columns living under major ideologies: first, supply chain management, production and internal logistics processes with supplier-customer ideology, second, human resources management process with deployed function of personnel development, third, quality management process serving and steering the production process and forth, management structure adjusted according to the process value-based approach.

  2. Potential global jamming transition in aviation networks

    CERN Document Server

    Ezaki, Takahiro

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a nonlinear transport model for an aviation network. The takeoff rate from an airport is characterized by the degree of ground congestion. Due to the effect of "surface congestion," the performance of an airport deteriorates because of inefficient configurations of waiting aircraft on the ground. Using a simple transport model, we performed simulations on a U. S. airport network and found a global jamming transition induced by local surface congestion. From a physical perspective, the mechanism of the transition is studied analytically and the resulting aircraft distribution is discussed considering system dynamics. This study shows that the knowledge of the relationship between a takeoff rate and a congestion level on the ground is vital for efficient air traffic operations.

  3. Federal Aviation Administration retained savings program proposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Federal legislation allows federal agencies to retain up to 50% of the savings associated with implementing energy efficiency and water conservation measures and practices. Given budget pressures to reduce expenditures, the use of retained savings to fund additional projects represents a source of funds outside of the traditional budget cycle. The Southwest Region Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has tasked Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to develop a model retained savings program for Southwest Region FAA use and as a prototype for consideration by the FAA. PNNL recommends the following steps be taken in developing a Southwest Region FAA retained savings program: Establish a retained savings mechanism. Determine the level at which the retained savings should be consolidated into a fund. The preliminary recommendation is to establish a revolving efficiency loan fund at the regional level. Such a mechanism allows some consolidation of savings to fund larger projects, while maintaining a sense of facility ownership in that the funds will remain within the region

  4. The United States national volcanic ash operations plan for aviation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albersheim, Steven; Guffanti, Marianne

    2009-01-01

    Volcanic-ash clouds are a known hazard to aviation, requiring that aircraft be warned away from ash-contaminated airspace. The exposure of aviation to potential hazards from volcanoes in the United States is significant. In support of existing interagency operations to detect and track volcanic-ash clouds, the United States has prepared a National Volcanic Ash Operations Plan for Aviation to strengthen the warning process in its airspace. The US National Plan documents the responsibilities, communication protocols, and prescribed hazard messages of the Federal Aviation Administration, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, US Geological Survey, and Air Force Weather Agency. The plan introduces a new message format, a Volcano Observatory Notice for Aviation, to provide clear, concise information about volcanic activity, including precursory unrest, to air-traffic controllers (for use in Notices to Airmen) and other aviation users. The plan is online at http://www.ofcm.gov/p35-nvaopa/pdf/FCM-P35-2007-NVAOPA.pdf. While the plan provides general operational practices, it remains the responsibility of the federal agencies involved to implement the described procedures through orders, directives, etc. Since the plan mirrors global guidelines of the International Civil Aviation Organization, it also provides an example that could be adapted by other countries.

  5. Comparison of global 3-D aviation emissions datasets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. C. Olsen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aviation emissions are unique from other transportation emissions, e.g., from road transportation and shipping, in that they occur at higher altitudes as well as at the surface. Aviation emissions of carbon dioxide, soot, and water vapor have direct radiative impacts on the Earth's climate system while emissions of nitrogen oxides (NOx, sulfur oxides, carbon monoxide (CO, and hydrocarbons (HC impact air quality and climate through their effects on ozone, methane, and clouds. The most accurate estimates of the impact of aviation on air quality and climate utilize three-dimensional chemistry-climate models and gridded four dimensional (space and time aviation emissions datasets. We compare five available aviation emissions datasets currently and historically used to evaluate the impact of aviation on climate and air quality: NASA-Boeing 1992, NASA-Boeing 1999, QUANTIFY 2000, Aero2k 2002, and AEDT 2006 and aviation fuel usage estimates from the International Energy Agency. Roughly 90% of all aviation emissions are in the Northern Hemisphere and nearly 60% of all fuelburn and NOx emissions occur at cruise altitudes in the Northern Hemisphere. While these datasets were created by independent methods and are thus not strictly suitable for analyzing trends they suggest that commercial aviation fuelburn and NOx emissions increased over the last two decades while HC emissions likely decreased and CO emissions did not change significantly. The bottom-up estimates compared here are consistently lower than International Energy Agency fuelburn statistics although the gap is significantly smaller in the more recent datasets. Overall the emissions distributions are quite similar for fuelburn and NOx with regional peaks over the populated land masses of North America, Europe, and East Asia. For CO and HC there are relatively larger differences. There are however some distinct differences in the altitude distribution

  6. Comparison of global 3-D aviation emissions datasets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. C. Olsen

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Aviation emissions are unique from other transportation emissions, e.g., from road transportation and shipping, in that they occur at higher altitudes as well as at the surface. Aviation emissions of carbon dioxide, soot, and water vapor have direct radiative impacts on the Earth's climate system while emissions of nitrogen oxides (NOx, sulfur oxides, carbon monoxide (CO, and hydrocarbons (HC impact air quality and climate through their effects on ozone, methane, and clouds. The most accurate estimates of the impact of aviation on air quality and climate utilize three-dimensional chemistry-climate models and gridded four dimensional (space and time aviation emissions datasets. We compare five available aviation emissions datasets currently and historically used to evaluate the impact of aviation on climate and air quality: NASA-Boeing 1992, NASA-Boeing 1999, QUANTIFY 2000, Aero2k 2002, and AEDT 2006 and aviation fuel usage estimates from the International Energy Agency. Roughly 90% of all aviation emissions are in the Northern Hemisphere and nearly 60% of all fuelburn and NOx emissions occur at cruise altitudes in the Northern Hemisphere. While these datasets were created by independent methods and are thus not strictly suitable for analyzing trends they suggest that commercial aviation fuelburn and NOx emissions increased over the last two decades while HC emissions likely decreased and CO emissions did not change significantly. The bottom-up estimates compared here are consistently lower than International Energy Agency fuelburn statistics although the gap is significantly lower in the more recent datasets. Overall the emissions distributions are quite similar for fuelburn and NOx while for CO and HC there are relatively larger differences. There are however some distinct differences in the altitude distribution of emissions in certain regions for the Aero2k dataset.

  7. NASA atmospheric effects of aviation projects: Status and plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wesoky, Howard L.; Thompson, Anne M.; Stolarski, Richard S.

    1994-01-01

    NASA's Atmospheric Effects of Aviation Project is developing a scientific basis for assessment of the atmospheric impact of subsonic and supersonic aviation. Issues addressed include predicted ozone changes and climatic impact, and related uncertainties. A primary goal is to assist assessments of United Nations scientific organizations and, hence, consideration of emission standards by the International Civil Aviation Organization. Project focus is on simulation of atmospheric processes by computer models, but studies of aircraft operations, laboratory studies, and remote and in situ observations of chemical, dynamic, and radiative processes are also included.

  8. Flight plan: taking responsibility for aviation emissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kimber, Hugo

    2007-07-01

    Aviation emissions make up less than 2 per cent of the world total, but are rising fast. These environmental costs must be balanced with development gains, however: air travel can hugely benefit poor countries' economies. The good news is that much can be done to curb emissions while keeping those benefits on board. Workable tools and guidelines for passengers, travel providers, government and airlines are waiting in the wings. A vital area for improvement is the way emissions are reported and calculated. Airlines, travel providers and carbon companies currently report emissions using a hotchpotch of methods, all producing varying results. Basing reports on fuel usage will make standardised ecolabelling possible. With an informed choice, passengers can buy tickets strategically and so encourage airlines to use more efficient technology. Airports can integrate ways of limiting emissions into their daily operations, while governments can invest in better air traffic control. Collective responsibility — and action — could make flying a much more sustainable means of travel.

  9. Sustainability Reporting in the Aviation sector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katherine Miles Hill [Global Reporting Initiative (Netherlands)

    2008-09-30

    The Global Reporting Initiative (GRI) G3 Guidelines are the de-facto standard for sustainability reporting. Thousands of organizations around the world base their annual sustainability report on the GRI G3 Guidelines, including many within the aviation sector, including leading airports, aerospace manufacturers and airlines. The Guidelines are principles based and contain Disclosures on Management Approach and Performance Indicators. To report on the performance indicators a company needs to measure and manage its entities. By doing so targets can be set to improve performance over the years, on sustainability topics ranging from community investment to CO{sub 2} emissions. Each company is different and therefore each company needs to conduct a materiality test to assess which indicators to use, based on Stakeholder Assessments and Decisions and Significance of Economic, Environmental and Social Impacts. Using the Guidelines means that you have a tool for clear and comparable communication with your stakeholders and measuring your performance on sustainability topics like CO{sub 2} emissions. By measuring CO{sub 2} emissions overtime in a uniform way and publishing the emissions in your sustainability report, your stakeholders will appreciate your honesty and better understand when you experience difficulties in meeting your targets to limit the emissions. Additionally it will allow you to be able to benchmark your company against other companies in your sector.

  10. Failure Analysis of Aviation Torsional Springs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HOU Weiguo; ZHANG Weifang; LIU Xiao; WANG Zongren; DING Meili

    2011-01-01

    Cracks and fractures occur during the assembly process to a type of torsional springs used in the aviation mechanism.Besides visual examination,other experimental techniques used for the investigation are:1) fracture characteristics,damage morphology and ffactography by scanning electron microscopy(SEM),2) spectrum analysis of covering,3) metallographic observation of cracks and 4) hydrogen content testing.The results are obtained through the analysis of manufacture process and experimental data.Since no changes of microstructure are found,failures are irrelevant to the material.The cracks and fractures initiate on the inner surface,cracks initiate before the cadmium plating and after the winding.No obvious stress corrosion cracks are found near the crack source region.The opening direction of cracks is consistent with the residual tensile stress of the spring inner surface,and the springs are easy to contact hydrogen media between the spring winding and the cadmium plating.The cracks are caused by hydrogen-induced delayed cracking under the action of the residual tensile stress and hydrogen.

  11. INFORMATION SECURITY AS PART OF CIVIL AVIATION SECURITY.

    OpenAIRE

    Золотар, О.О.

    2010-01-01

    In the article problems concerning understanding of the main point of information security of civil aviation field are investigated, and also suggestions for the field's law improvement are worked out.

  12. Discovering Anomalous Aviation Safety Events Using Scalable Data Mining Algorithms

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The worldwide civilian aviation system is one of the most complex dynamical systems created. Most modern commercial aircraft have onboard flight data recorders that...

  13. Greener Aviation with Virtual Sensors: A Case Study

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The environmental impact of aviation is enormous given the fact that in the US alone there are nearly 6 million flights per year of commercial aircraft. This...

  14. Estimated revenues of VAT and fuel tax on aviation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korteland, M.; Faber, J.

    2013-07-15

    International aviation is exempt from VAT, both on their inputs (e.g. on fuel or aircraft) and on their revenues (e.g. on tickets). In the EU, aviation fuel is also exempt from the minimum fuel excise tariffs. This report calculates the potential revenues of VAT on tickets and fuel tax on jet fuel. If VAT were to be levied on tickets while other aviation taxes were simultaneously abolished, this would yield revenues in the order of EUR 7 billion. Excise duty on jet fuel would raise revenues in the order of EUR 20 billion. These figures do not take into account the impact of the cost increases on demand for aviation into account. Since higher costs will reduce demand, the estimates can be considered an upper bound.

  15. Multi-function Fiber Laser Kinetic Aviation Hazard Sensor Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Fibertek proposes a multi-function, high energy, eye-safe 1550 nm band pulsed fiber-laser lidar system for airborne sensing of various kinetic aviation hazards. The...

  16. The Participation of Ukrainian Companies in Building the Mechanisms for Naval Aviation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrey I. Kharuk

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The main program for the development and production of equipment for naval aviation, carried out in Ukraine in 1910 - 1980. The author comes to the conclusion that naval aviation has never been a priority area for the Ukrainian aviation industry. However, throughout its history, the aircrafts intended for naval aviation, developed and in some cases introduced into serial production.

  17. Prospective Safety Analysis and the Complex Aviation System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Brian E.

    2013-01-01

    Fatal accident rates in commercial passenger aviation are at historic lows yet have plateaued and are not showing evidence of further safety advances. Modern aircraft accidents reflect both historic causal factors and new unexpected "Black Swan" events. The ever-increasing complexity of the aviation system, along with its associated technology and organizational relationships, provides fertile ground for fresh problems. It is important to take a proactive approach to aviation safety by working to identify novel causation mechanisms for future aviation accidents before they happen. Progress has been made in using of historic data to identify the telltale signals preceding aviation accidents and incidents, using the large repositories of discrete and continuous data on aircraft and air traffic control performance and information reported by front-line personnel. Nevertheless, the aviation community is increasingly embracing predictive approaches to aviation safety. The "prospective workshop" early assessment tool described in this paper represents an approach toward this prospective mindset-one that attempts to identify the future vectors of aviation and asks the question: "What haven't we considered in our current safety assessments?" New causation mechanisms threatening aviation safety will arise in the future because new (or revised) systems and procedures will have to be used under future contextual conditions that have not been properly anticipated. Many simulation models exist for demonstrating the safety cases of new operational concepts and technologies. However the results from such models can only be as valid as the accuracy and completeness of assumptions made about the future context in which the new operational concepts and/or technologies will be immersed. Of course that future has not happened yet. What is needed is a reasonably high-confidence description of the future operational context, capturing critical contextual characteristics that modulate

  18. Risk-based Aviation Security Diffusion and Acceptance

    OpenAIRE

    Beech, George M.

    2012-01-01

    The Transportation Security Administration (TSA) is continually under public pressure to improve aviation security screening for air passengers while simultaneously protecting the public from all perceived threats to commercial aviation. Applying acceptance models to predict passengers intentions to use voluntary security programs could lead to more efficient deployment of technology and procedures or the termination of a security program before significant government resources are dedicated ...

  19. Environmental impact assessment and optimisation of commercial aviation

    OpenAIRE

    Howe, Stuart

    2011-01-01

    The aviation industry represents approximately 3% of global greenhouse gas emissions, however with significant growth expected over the coming decades this proportion is expected to increase. Continued governmental and social pressure to reduce global emissions is posing a challenging question to the industry; how to improve environmental efficiency and reduce emissions with increasing industry growth. The environmental impact of aviation globally is discussed, examining the...

  20. Perception of ethics in the Icelandic Aviation Sector

    OpenAIRE

    Nicolas Jeanne

    2015-01-01

    This Master’s thesis deals with perception of ethics in the Icelandic aviation sector. It offers a qualitative study to answer the following central research questions: what is the perception of the ethical environment in the aviation sector of Iceland by its top-managers? To introduce the study, a literature review presents an overview of the concepts of ethics, corruption and bribery as well as culture and corporate social responsibility. A special focus is proposed on the different school ...

  1. Unequal Bargaining? Australia's Aviation Trade Relations with the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, Russell

    2001-01-01

    International aviation trade bargaining is distinguished by its use of a formal process of bilateral bargaining based on the reciprocal exchange of rights by states. Australia-United States aviation trade relations are currently without rancour, but this has not always been the case and in the late 1980s and early 1990s, their formal bilateral aviation negotiations were a forum for a bitter conflict between two competing international aviation policies. In seeking to explain the bilateral aviation outcomes between Australia and the United States and how Australia has sought to improve upon these, analytical frameworks derived from international political economy were considered, along with the bilateral bargaining process itself. The paper adopts a modified neorealist model and concludes that to understand how Australia has sought to improve upon these aviation outcomes, neorealist assumptions that relative power capabilities determine outcomes must be qualified by reference to the formal bilateral bargaining process. In particular, Australia's use of this process and its application of certain bargaining tactics within that process remain critical to understanding bilateral outcomes.

  2. Aviation and programmatic analyses; Volume 1, Task 1: Aviation data base development and application. [for NASA OAST programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-01-01

    A method was developed for using the NASA aviation data base and computer programs in conjunction with the GE management analysis and projection service to perform simple and complex economic analysis for planning, forecasting, and evaluating OAST programs. Capabilities of the system are discussed along with procedures for making basic data tabulations, updates and entries. The system is applied in an agricultural aviation study in order to assess its value for actual utility in the OAST working environment.

  3. State of the Art on Alternative Fuels in Aviation. SWAFEA. Sustainable Way for Alternative Fuels and Energy in Aviation.

    OpenAIRE

    Blakey, S.; Novelli, P.; Costes, P.; Bringtown, S.; Christensen, D.; Sakintuna, B.; Peineke, C.; Jongschaap, R. E. E.; Conijn, J.G.; Rutgers, B.; Valot, L.; E Joubert; Perelgritz, J.F.; Filogonio, A.; Roetger, T.

    2010-01-01

    Currently, the aviation sector uses petroleum derived liquid fuels as the energy carrier of choice for flight. In light the present environmental, economical and political concerns as to the sustainability of this energy source, the question of which alternatives the aviation sector should pursue in the future has emerged. Among these concerns, the environmental impact of fossil fuel use on global warming and air quality is of major importance, while the impact of volatile oil prices and the ...

  4. Determination of service life of aviation lubricants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuznetsov, V.G.; Novosartov, G.T.; Echin, A.I.; Bakunin, V.N.

    1985-11-01

    A method of evaluating the quality of expensive lubricants was developed based on determination of thermo-oxidative stability on a TSM-1 apparatus. This allowed measurement of the content of additives and qualitative properties associated with them during oxidation under laboratory conditions. By developing graphs showing dependence of operating properties sharply degrade was determined. This minimum additive content became the criterion for assessing the working capability of the lubricant and determining the limiting length of its service. Thus, for lubricant B-3V, the most important operating characteristics are thermooxidative stability and critical loading. Samples were tested for the additives PODFA and kaptaks and for indicators of antioxidative and antiseizing properties. Experiments showed little change in characteristics during 10 h of oxidation. Laboratory tests showed that the critical loading began to drop when the kaptaks level fell below 0.2%, so this was taken as the minimal acceptable level. Similarly, for lubricant IPM-10, the most important operating property is its thermo-oxidative stability. Tests showed that indicators of thermo-oxidative stability all began to fall when the antioxidative additive fell below 0.1%. This approach allows rapid determination of service criteria for any aviation lubricant with critical additives. In a practical test, B-3V lubricant had been changed in the MI-8 helicopter every 200-300 h, although its kaptaks level was still 0.65%; even at 900 hours it had fallen to only 0.36%. This would allow the service life to be tripled, a conclusion verified by determination of physicochemical and operating properties of the lubricant at that point. 4 references, 2 figures.

  5. High Speed Mobility Through On-Demand Aviation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Mark D.; Goodrich, Ken; Viken, Jeff; Smith, Jeremy; Fredericks, Bill; Trani, Toni; Barraclough, Jonathan; German, Brian; Patterson, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Game changing advances come about by the introduction of new technologies at a time when societal needs create the opportunity for new market solutions. A unique opportunity exists for NASA to bring about such a mobility revolution in General Aviation, extendable to other aviation markets, to maintain leadership in aviation by the United States. This report outlines the research carried out so far under NASA's leadership towards developing a new mobility choice, called Zip Aviation1,2,3. The feasibility, technology and system gaps that need to be addressed, and pathways for successful implementation have been investigated to guide future investment. The past decade indicates exciting trends in transportation technologies, which are quickly evolving. Automobiles are embracing automation to ease driver tasks as well as to completely control the vehicle with added safety (Figure 1). Electric propulsion is providing zero tail-pipe emission vehicles with dramatically lower energy and maintenance costs. These technologies have not yet been applied to aviation, yet offer compelling potential benefits across all aviation markets, and in particular to General Aviation (GA) as an early adopter market. The benefits of such an adoption are applicable in the following areas: ?? Safety: The GA market experiences accident rates that are substantially higher than automobiles or commercial airlines, with 7.5 fatal accidents per 100 million vehicle miles compared to 1.3 for automobiles and.068 for airlines. Approximately 80% of these accidents are caused by some form of pilot error, with another 13% caused by single point propulsion system failure. ?? Emissions: Environmental constraints are pushing for the elimination of 100Low Lead (LL) fuel used in most GA aircraft, with aviation fuel the #1 source of lead emissions into the environment. Aircraft also have no emission control systems (i.e. no catalytic converters etc.), so they are gross hydrocarbon polluters compared to

  6. Government, Including: Air Traffic Controllers, Aviation Safety Inspectors, Airspace Systems Inspection Pilots, Accident Investigators, Electronics Technicians, Engineers, Meteorologists. Aviation Careers Series. Revised.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaharevitz, Walter

    This booklet, one in a series on aviation careers, outlines the variety of careers in aviation available in federal, state, and local governmental agencies. The first part of the booklet provides general information about civil aviation careers with the federal government, including pay scales, job classifications, and working conditions.…

  7. Sustainable development – the key for green aviation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria MRAZOVA

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The aviation industry has always been seeking the technological progress that will optimise the economic, operational and environmental way of flying. In the first part of this study the author describes the impact of the CO2 emissions on the climate change. Also, the author emphasises the fact that once again the aviation environment is asking for new breakthroughs to face the challenge of the aviation’s sustainable growth. Airbus and its approach with the least possible impact on environment are introduced in the last part of this paper. Additionally, the environmental way of greener aviation is illustrated by examples of fuel consumption and CO2 emissions measurements made for several selected airlines.

  8. SHM reliability and implementation - A personal military aviation perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindgren, Eric A.

    2016-02-01

    Structural Health Monitoring has been proposed as a solution to address the needs of military aviation to reduce the time and cost to perform nondestructive inspections. While the potential to realize significant benefits exist, there are considerations that have to be addressed before such systems can be integrated into military platforms. Some considerations are pervasive to all aviation, such as how to assess the reliability and reproducible capability of these systems. However, there are other challenges unique to military aviation that must be overcome before these types of systems can be used. This presentation and paper are intended as a complement to the review of the outcome of the SAE G-11 SHM committee special workshop on SHM reliability in April of 2015. It will address challenges unique to military aviation that stem from different approaches to managing structural integrity (i.e. safety), frequency of use, design differences, various maintenance practices, and additional descriptions addressing differences in the execution of inspections. The objective of this presentation is to improve the awareness of the research and development community to the different and unique requirements found in military aviation, including the differences between countries, services, and aircraft type. This information should assist the research and development community in identifying and attacking key challenges. It is not intended to be comprehensive overview of all stakeholders' perspectives, but to serve as a launch point for additional discussion and exploration of opportunities to realize the potential of Structural Health Monitoring to assist in the management of military aviation assets. The views expressed in this publication are those of the author and do not reflect the official policy or position of the United States Air Force, Department of Defense, or the United States Government.

  9. Examination of commercial aviation operational energy conservation strategies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1978-10-01

    Forty-seven fuel conservation strategies are identified for commercial aviation and the fuel saving potential, costs, constraints, and current implementation levels of these options are examined. This assessment is based on a comprehensive review of published data and discussions with representatives from industry and government. Analyses were performed to quantify the fuel saving potential of each option, and to assess the fuel savings achieved to date by the airline industry. Those options requiring further government support for option implementation were identified, rated, and ranked in accordance with a rating methodology developed in the study. Finally, recommendations are made for future government efforts in the area of fuel conservation in commercial aviation.

  10. General aviation design synthesis utilizing interactive computer graphics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galloway, T. L.; Smith, M. R.

    1976-01-01

    Interactive computer graphics is a fast growing area of computer application, due to such factors as substantial cost reductions in hardware, general availability of software, and expanded data communication networks. In addition to allowing faster and more meaningful input/output, computer graphics permits the use of data in graphic form to carry out parametric studies for configuration selection and for assessing the impact of advanced technologies on general aviation designs. The incorporation of interactive computer graphics into a NASA developed general aviation synthesis program is described, and the potential uses of the synthesis program in preliminary design are demonstrated.

  11. Present and potential security threats posed to civil aviation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanislav SZABO

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Aircraft presents ideal object for terrorist attack. Apart from the risks posed by possible terrorist attacks on airborne aircraft, air terrorism includes the threats to general aviation on the ground, including airports and surrounding infrastructure. Air oriented terrorism in all of its forms can undermine public confidence in the safety of air travel, which could result in negative effects for certain airlines and other firms in aviation industry due to decline in passenger travel and cargo shipment. This article is giving an overview about the redoubtable present and potential future threats posed to in-flight security, and possibilities and solutions how to mitigate the risks on acceptable level.

  12. A method for monitoring nuclear absorption coefficients of aviation fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprinkle, Danny R.; Shen, Chih-Ping

    1989-01-01

    A technique for monitoring variability in the nuclear absorption characteristics of aviation fuels has been developed. It is based on a highly collimated low energy gamma radiation source and a sodium iodide counter. The source and the counter assembly are separated by a geometrically well-defined test fuel cell. A computer program for determining the mass attenuation coefficient of the test fuel sample, based on the data acquired for a preset counting period, has been developed and tested on several types of aviation fuel.

  13. 75 FR 11552 - Intent To Request Renewal From OMB of One Current Public Collection of Information: Aviation...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-11

    ... surveying travelers to measure customer satisfaction of aviation security in an effort to more efficiently... Collection of Information: Aviation Security Customer Satisfaction Performance Measurement Passenger Survey...; Aviation Security Customer Satisfaction Performance Measurement Passenger Survey. TSA, with OMB's...

  14. IT interdependence and the economic fairness of cyber-security regulations for civil aviation.

    OpenAIRE

    De Gramatica, M.; Massacci, F.; Shim, W.; Tedeschi, A.; Williams, J.

    2015-01-01

    Interviews about emerging cybersecurity threats and a cybersecurity public policy economic model for civil aviation illustrate stakeholders' concerns: interdependency issues can lead to aviation regulations that put smaller airports at a disadvantage.

  15. 78 FR 15110 - Aviation Rulemaking Advisory Committee; Engine Bird Ingestion Requirements-New Task

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-08

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Aviation Rulemaking Advisory Committee; Engine Bird Ingestion Requirements... and assess the adequacy of certain portions of the existing engine bird ingestion requirements. This... bird ingestion type certification standards for aircraft turbine engines to better address the...

  16. 75 FR 73158 - Executive Committee of the Aviation Rulemaking Advisory Committee; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-29

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Federal Aviation Administration Executive Committee of the Aviation Rulemaking Advisory Committee... (PIWG) c. Charter Renewal d. ``One Stop Shopping'' Web Site e. Committee Manual Revisions 2. Issue...

  17. 75 FR 29567 - Extension of Agency Information Collection Activity Under OMB Review: Aviation Security Customer...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-26

    ... March 11, 2010. 75 FR 11552. The collection involves surveying travelers to measure customer... OMB Review: Aviation Security Customer Satisfaction Performance Measurement Passenger Survey AGENCY...; Aviation Security Customer Satisfaction Performance Measurement Passenger Survey. TSA, with OMB's...

  18. 78 FR 46594 - Extension of Agency Information Collection Activity Under OMB Review: Aviation Security Customer...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-01

    ... May 30, 2013, 78 FR 32416. The collection involves surveying travelers to measure customer... OMB Review: Aviation Security Customer Satisfaction Performance Measurement Passenger Survey AGENCY.... Information Collection Requirement Title: Aviation Security Customer Satisfaction Performance...

  19. Atmospheric effects of aviation. Bringing together science, technology and policy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wesoky, H.L.; Friedl, R.R. [National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Washington, DC (United States)

    1997-12-31

    Sustained growth of the aviation industry could be threatened by environmental concerns. But collaboration of scientists, technologists and policy makers is helping to assess potential problems, and to consider appropriate measures for control of aircraft emissions. The structure of that collaboration is discussed along with status of the scientific assessments. (author) 15 refs.

  20. Lessons of History: Organizational Factors in Three Aviation Mishaps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merlin, Peter William

    2013-01-01

    This presentation examines organizational factors that contributed to three aircraft mishaps and provides analysis of lessons learned. Three historical aviation mishaps were studied from a human factors perspective, and organizational factors identified and analyzed. These case studies provide valuable lessons for understanding the interaction of people with aircraft systems and with each other during flight operations.

  1. A STEM-Based, High School Aviation Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surra, Alex; Litowitz, Len S.

    2015-01-01

    The authors describe a vocational training course that was developed to give more than just an overview of how aircraft work, or a course on how to fly. This training course was a half-year course in aviation technology. Powered flight is an area of interest for many students, and the intent of creating a curriculum rich with science, technology,…

  2. Travel, speed and entertainment in cinema territories and aviation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Luís Jesus Fernandes

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Book review and critical reading of a book that crosses cinema and the aviation transport, a work that understands the latter as a territory of cinema diffusion. The films shown in the aircraft are designed to entertain the passengers, keep them calm, but also to promote marketing campaigns and lifestyles.

  3. NASA Green Propulsion Technologies Pushing Aviation to New Heights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Free, James M.; Jennings, Francis T.; Adanich, Emery; Del Rosario, Ruben; Felder, James L.

    2014-01-01

    Center Director Free is providing the Keynote at the Disruptive Propulsion Conference, sponsored by Cranfield University, Cranfield, Bedfordshire, England in November. Director Free will be presenting a PowerPoint presentation titled, NASA Green Propulsion Technologies Pushing Aviation to New Heights at both the conference and a meeting at the Royal Aeronautical Society.

  4. Measurement of doses to aviator pilots using thermoluminescent dosemeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the development of their work, the aviator pilots are exposed at high levels of natural radiation of bottom caused mainly by the cosmic radiation of galactic origin and lot. For such reason, the Metropolitan Autonomous University (UAM) and the Union Association of Aviator Pilots (ASPA), subscribed an agreement with the purpose of to measure the doses of ionizing radiation received by the aviator pilots of diverse air companies that man different types of airships and to determine if these doses surpass the one limit of 0.11 mSv/h settled down by the IAEA for the public in general; and if therefore, these workers should be considered as personnel occupationally exposed. In this work the obtained results when measuring the absorbed dose received by Mexican civil aviator pilots during the development of their work, using thermoluminescent dosemeters of LiF:Mg,Cu,P + Ptfe of national production are presented. The obtained results during the years of 2001 and 2002 show that the monthly doses received by the pilots surpass the one it limits established for the public in general, for what they should be considered as personnel occupationally exposed. (Author)

  5. Hydrocarbon Biocomponents use in Aviation Fuels - Preliminary Analysis of Issues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gawron Bartosz

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Article is related to the aspect of the introduction of biofuels to power turbine aircraft engines. The paper presents the current trends in the use of alternative fuels in aviation and the problems connected with the introduction of hydrocarbon biocomponents. It is pointed to the need to take research and implementation works in the field of the subject, also in Poland.

  6. Sustainability, Organizational Learning, and Lessons Learned from Aviation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourdehnad, John; Smith, Peter A. C.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: While the importance of organizational learning for sustainability has been stressed by a number of authors in the literature, the practicalities of how organizational leaders might foster such learning are seldom treated. This paper seeks to demonstrate that there is much that could be learned from the aviation industry about…

  7. NASA's Role in Aeronautics: A Workshop. Volume IV - General Aviation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Academy of Sciences - National Research Council, Washington, DC. Assembly of Engineering.

    The central task of a 1980 workshop on the role of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) in aeronautics was to examine the relationship of NASA's research capabilities to the state of U.S. aviation and to make recommendations about NASA's future role in aeronautics. The findings and recommendations of the Panel on General…

  8. NASA's Role in Aeronautics: A Workshop. Volume II - Military Aviation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Academy of Sciences - National Research Council, Washington, DC. Assembly of Engineering.

    The central task of a 1980 workshop on the role of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) in aeronautics was to examine the relationship of NASA's research capabilities to the state of U.S. aviation and to make recommendations about NASA's future role in aeronautics. The findings and recommendations of the Panel on Military…

  9. 78 FR 29669 - Airworthiness Directives; DASSAULT AVIATION Airplanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-21

    ... Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034, February 26, 1979), (3) Will not affect intrastate aviation in Alaska... fire, either in an engine or the Auxiliary Power Unit (APU) or the rear compartment, possibly resulting... manufacturing batch number for the charge indicator installed on each engine and auxiliary power unit (APU)...

  10. Strategic Management as a Key to Educating the New Aviation Professional

    OpenAIRE

    Dostaler, Isabelle; Flouris, Triant

    2007-01-01

    Differences and similarities between management and strategic management are discussed in this article and a framework for the aviation strategic management process is proposed. The steps of the aviation strategic management process include 1) scanning the aviation environment, 2) analyzing the aviation organization, 3) formulating the corporate strategy, 4) formulating the business strategy, and 5) implementing the corporate and business strategies through the formulation of functional strat...

  11. Greenhouse gas emissions from international aviation and allocation options

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report is part of the outcome of a project funded by the Danish Environmental Protection Agency (DEPA). The project was initiated to update DEPA on ongoing developments in the field of air transport and environment. The background for starting up such a project is that aviation, due to the prospects for future growth in demand for air travel and freight volumes, may become a more significant source of emissions of greenhouse gases in the future. Another reason for DEPA to take up the subject is that DEPA needs an update on why the Parties to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) have not yet been able to agree upon a methodology to allocate emissions of greenhouse gases from international aviation between countries. Only emissions from domestic air transport are included in the national inventories on annual national greenhouse gas emissions reported by Parties to the UNFCCC while emissions associated with fuel used for international aviation activities are to be reported separately. Consequently, emissions from international aviation are not included under the so-called Kyoto Protocol that sets out targets for reductions of national emissions of greenhouse gases to be fulfilled by the period 2008-2012. Parties to the UNFCCC and the UNFCCC Subsidiary Body for Scientific and Technological Advice (SBSTA) have been discussing different possibilities for allocating emissions from international aviation to Parties, but so far no agreement has been reached on this subject. A main problem seems to be that if emissions are allocated to the country where the fuel is sold some Parties that have large sales of fuel for transit passengers will have to bear a larger burden than countries with no large hub airports. The basic problem seems to be that an airline registered in one country can carry passengers and freight originating from another country to a third country. Article 2.2 of the Kyoto Protocol states that 'the Parties included in

  12. 32 CFR 766.13 - Sale of aviation fuel, oil, services and supplies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Sale of aviation fuel, oil, services and... aviation fuel, oil, services and supplies. (a) General policy. In accordance with sections 1107 and 1108 of... Aviation fuel, oil, services, and supplies are not sold to civil aircraft in competition with...

  13. 76 FR 47423 - Aviation Fuel and Oil Operating Limitations; Policy Memorandum

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-05

    ... Administration 14 CFR Part 33 Aviation Fuel and Oil Operating Limitations; Policy Memorandum AGENCY: Federal... the issuance of policy memorandum for Aviation Fuel and Oil Operating Limitations. This policy... (ECO) when evaluating compliance with the standards for aviation fuel and oil operating...

  14. 77 FR 27538 - Aviation Rulemaking Advisory Committee-Continuing a Task

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-10

    ... (ARAC)--New Task (76 FR 21936). The March 2012 ARAC Executive Committee meeting included a discussion of... Federal Aviation Administration Aviation Rulemaking Advisory Committee--Continuing a Task AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of continuing a task assignment for the...

  15. CAOHC RESTRUCTURE AVIATION OIL CORPORATION WITH BIG-TWO OIL GIANTS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    @@ China National Petroleum Corporation (CNPC),China Petrochemical Corporation (Sinopec) and China Aviation Oil Holding Company (CAOHC)signed a framework agreement in Beijing on November 8, 2004 to establish a limited aviation oil company on the basis of China Aviation Oil Supply Corporation, one of CAOHC's core companies. The new company is expected to be set up in 2005.

  16. 14 CFR 243.11 - Transmission of information after an aviation disaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... aviation disaster. 243.11 Section 243.11 Aeronautics and Space OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY, DEPARTMENT OF... of information after an aviation disaster. (a) Each covered airline shall inform the Managing... upon learning of an aviation disaster involving a covered flight segment operated by that carrier....

  17. The Status of Women Faculty in Four-Year Aviation Higher Education Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ison, David C.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate the status of women's participation in full-time, non-engineering aviation baccalaureate programs in the United States. In addition, the involvement of women in academic aviation leadership positions (such as chair, dean, or director) was evaluated. Of 353 full-time aviation faculty members employed at 60…

  18. 77 FR 53250 - International Civil Aviation Organization's (ICAO) Dangerous Goods Panel; Notice of Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-31

    ... regard to Annex 6 6.5: Coordination with international organizations (e.g. UPU) Agenda Item 7: Other... Federal Aviation Administration International Civil Aviation Organization's (ICAO) Dangerous Goods Panel... meeting. SUMMARY: In preparation for the International Civil Aviation Organization's (ICAO)...

  19. Mapping automotive like controls to a general aviation aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Christopher G.

    The purpose of this thesis was to develop fly-by-wire control laws enabling a general aviation aircraft to be flown with automotive controls, i.e. a steering wheel and gas/brake pedals. There was a six speed shifter used to change the flight mode of the aircraft. This essentially allows the pilot to have control over different aspects of the flight profile such as climb/descend or cruise. A highway in the sky was used to aid in the navigation since it is not intuitive to people without flight experience how to navigate from the sky or when to climb and descend. Many believe that general aviation could become as widespread as the automobile. Every person could have a personal aircraft at their disposal and it would be as easy to operate as driving an automobile. The goal of this thesis is to fuse the ease of drivability of a car with flight of a small general aviation aircraft. A standard automotive control hardware setup coupled with variably autonomous control laws will allow new pilots to fly a plane as easily as driving a car. The idea is that new pilots will require very little training to become proficient with these controls. Pilots with little time to stay current can maintain their skills simply by driving a car which is typically a daily activity. A human factors study was conducted to determine the feasibility of the applied control techniques. Pilot performance metrics were developed to compare candidates with no aviation background and experienced pilots. After analyzing the relative performance between pilots and non-pilots, it has been determined that the control system is robust and easy to learn. Candidates with no aviation experience whatsoever can learn to fly an aircraft as safely and efficiently as someone with hundreds of hours of flight experience using these controls.

  20. Certification of alternative aviation fuels and blend components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson III, George R. (Southwest Research Institute, 6220 Culebra Road, San Antonio, Texas 78238 (United States)); Edwards, Tim; Corporan, Edwin (United States Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio 45433 (United States)); Freerks, Robert L. (Rentech, Incorporated, 1331 17th Street, Denver, Colorado 80202 (United States))

    2013-01-15

    Aviation turbine engine fuel specifications are governed by ASTM International, formerly known as the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) International, and the British Ministry of Defence (MOD). ASTM D1655 Standard Specification for Aviation Turbine Fuels and MOD Defence Standard 91-91 are the guiding specifications for this fuel throughout most of the world. Both of these documents rely heavily on the vast amount of experience in production and use of turbine engine fuels from conventional sources, such as crude oil, natural gas condensates, heavy oil, shale oil, and oil sands. Turbine engine fuel derived from these resources and meeting the above specifications has properties that are generally considered acceptable for fuels to be used in turbine engines. Alternative and synthetic fuel components are approved for use to blend with conventional turbine engine fuels after considerable testing. ASTM has established a specification for fuels containing synthesized hydrocarbons under D7566, and the MOD has included additional requirements for fuels containing synthetic components under Annex D of DS91-91. New turbine engine fuel additives and blend components need to be evaluated using ASTM D4054, Standard Practice for Qualification and Approval of New Aviation Turbine Fuels and Fuel Additives. This paper discusses these specifications and testing requirements in light of recent literature claiming that some biomass-derived blend components, which have been used to blend in conventional aviation fuel, meet the requirements for aviation turbine fuels as specified by ASTM and the MOD. The 'Table 1' requirements listed in both D1655 and DS91-91 are predicated on the assumption that the feedstocks used to make fuels meeting these requirements are from approved sources. Recent papers have implied that commercial jet fuel can be blended with renewable components that are not hydrocarbons (such as fatty acid methyl esters). These are not allowed blend

  1. Overview of Aviation Fuel Markets for Biofuels Stakeholders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davidson, C.; Newes, E.; Schwab, A.; Vimmerstedt, L.

    2014-07-01

    This report is for biofuels stakeholders interested the U.S. aviation fuel market. Jet fuel production represents about 10% of U.S. petroleum refinery production. Exxon Mobil, Chevron, and BP top producers, and Texas, Louisiana, and California are top producing states. Distribution of fuel primarily involves transport from the Gulf Coast to other regions. Fuel is transported via pipeline (60%), barges on inland waterways (30%), tanker truck (5%), and rail (5%). Airport fuel supply chain organization and fuel sourcing may involve oil companies, airlines, airline consortia, airport owners and operators, and airport service companies. Most fuel is used for domestic, commercial, civilian flights. Energy efficiency has substantially improved due to aircraft fleet upgrades and advanced flight logistic improvements. Jet fuel prices generally track prices of crude oil and other refined petroleum products, whose prices are more volatile than crude oil price. The single largest expense for airlines is jet fuel, so its prices and persistent price volatility impact industry finances. Airlines use various strategies to manage aviation fuel price uncertainty. The aviation industry has established goals to mitigate its greenhouse gas emissions, and initial estimates of biojet life cycle greenhouse gas emissions exist. Biojet fuels from Fischer-Tropsch and hydroprocessed esters and fatty acids processes have ASTM standards. The commercial aviation industry and the U.S. Department of Defense have used aviation biofuels. Additional research is needed to assess the environmental, economic, and financial potential of biojet to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and mitigate long-term upward price trends, fuel price volatility, or both.

  2. An analysis of students' perceptions to Just Culture in the aviation industry: A study of a Midwest aviation training program (case study)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Lazo Akram

    The research will focus on the discussion of the ways in which the top-down nature of Safety Management Systems (SMS) can be used to create `Just Culture' within the aviation industry. Specific focus will be placed on an aviation program conducted by an accredited university, with the institution in focus being the midwest aviation training program. To this end, a variety of different aspects of safety culture in aviation and aviation management will be considered. The focus on the implementation strategies vital for the existence of a `Just Culture' within the aviation industry in general, and particularly within the aforementioned institution's aerospace program. Some ideas and perspectives will be subsequently suggested and designed for implementation, within the institution's program. The aspect of enhancing the overall safety output gained, from the institution, as per standards set within the greater American Aviation industry will be examined. Overall, the paper will seek to showcase the vital importance of implementing the SMS standardization model in the institution's Aerospace program, while providing some areas of concern. Such concerns will be based on a number of issues, which are pertinent to the overall enhancement of the institution's observance of aviation safety. This will be both in general application of an SMS, as well as personalized/ specific applications in areas in need of improvement. Overall, through the paper, the author hopes to provide a better understanding of the institution's placement, with regard to not only aviation safety, but also the implementation of an effective `Just Culture' within the program.

  3. Impacts of aviation fuel sulfur content on climate and human health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapadia, Zarashpe Z.; Spracklen, Dominick V.; Arnold, Steve R.; Borman, Duncan J.; Mann, Graham W.; Pringle, Kirsty J.; Monks, Sarah A.; Reddington, Carly L.; Benduhn, François; Rap, Alexandru; Scott, Catherine E.; Butt, Edward W.; Yoshioka, Masaru

    2016-08-01

    Aviation emissions impact both air quality and climate. Using a coupled tropospheric chemistry-aerosol microphysics model we investigate the effects of varying aviation fuel sulfur content (FSC) on premature mortality from long-term exposure to aviation-sourced PM2.5 (particulate matter with a dry diameter of < 2.5 µm) and on the global radiation budget due to changes in aerosol and tropospheric ozone. We estimate that present-day non-CO2 aviation emissions with a typical FSC of 600 ppm result in ˜ 3600 [95 % CI: 1310-5890] annual premature mortalities globally due to increases in cases of cardiopulmonary disease and lung cancer, resulting from increased surface PM2.5 concentrations. We quantify the global annual mean combined radiative effect (REcomb) of non-CO2 aviation emissions as -13.3 mW m-2; from increases in aerosols (direct radiative effect and cloud albedo effect) and tropospheric ozone. Ultra-low sulfur jet fuel (ULSJ; FSC = 15 ppm) has been proposed as an option to reduce the adverse health impacts of aviation-induced PM2.5. We calculate that swapping the global aviation fleet to ULSJ fuel would reduce the global aviation-induced mortality rate by ˜ 620 [95 % CI: 230-1020] mortalities a-1 and increase REcomb by +7.0 mW m-2. We explore the impact of varying aviation FSC between 0 and 6000 ppm. Increasing FSC increases aviation-induced mortality, while enhancing climate cooling through increasing the aerosol cloud albedo effect (CAE). We explore the relationship between the injection altitude of aviation emissions and the resulting climate and air quality impacts. Compared to the standard aviation emissions distribution, releasing aviation emissions at the ground increases global aviation-induced mortality and produces a net warming effect, primarily through a reduced CAE. Aviation emissions injected at the surface are 5 times less effective at forming cloud condensation nuclei, reducing the aviation-induced CAE by a factor of 10. Applying high FSCs at

  4. Wind turbines and aviation interests - European experience and practice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jago, P.; Taylor, N.

    2002-07-01

    The approach of other European countries to the effects of wind turbines on civil and military aviation has been studied in order to determine the applicability of these experiences to UK stakeholders. The background to the study is traced, and the restriction on the siting of turbines due to the hazards posed to aviation and defence interests, and the potential effects on radar for air traffic control, defence and low flying aircraft are examined. The planning and siting issues in different European countries, the planning system in the UK, and the safeguarding of aerodromes and military sites are discussed along with issues involved in low flying aircraft and search and rescue operations, and the marking and illumination of wind farms.

  5. Improving Aviation Safety with information Visualization: A Flight Simulation Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aragon, Cecilia R.; Hearst, Marti

    2005-01-01

    Many aircraft accidents each year are caused by encounters with invisible airflow hazards. Recent advances in aviation sensor technology offer the potential for aircraft-based sensors that can gather large amounts of airflow velocity data in real-time. With this influx of data comes the need to study how best to present it to the pilot - a cognitively overloaded user focused on a primary task other than that of information visualization. In this paper, we present the results of a usability study of an airflow hazard visualization system that significantly reduced the crash rate among experienced helicopter pilots flying a high fidelity, aerodynamically realistic fixed-base rotorcraft flight simulator into hazardous conditions. We focus on one particular aviation application, but the results may be relevant to user interfaces in other operationally stressful environments.

  6. Data and Models Needed to Support Civil Aviation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onsager, Terrance; Biesecker, D. A.; Berger, Thomas; Rutledge, Robert

    2016-07-01

    The effective utilization of existing data and models is an important element in advancing the goals of the COSPAR/ILWS space weather roadmap. This is recommended to be done through innovative approaches to data utilization, including data driving, data assimilation, and ensemble modeling. This presentation will focus on observations and models needed to support space weather services for civil aviation and commercial space transportation. The service needs for aviation will be discussed, and an overview will be given of some of the existing data and models that can provide these services. Efforts underway to define the requirements for real-time data and to assess current modeling capabilities will be described. Recommendations will be offered for internationally coordinated activities that could identify priorities and further the roadmap goals.

  7. Modern Communication Devices in the General Aviation Aircraft Maintenance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Novák

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this article is to design a software that enables an integration of modern communication devices in the process of general aviation aircraft maintenance. The theoretical part deals with the legislative requirements of both maintenance and management processes for continuing airworthiness. The practical part focusses on software design and automation of the processes. An important part of the article is a chapter about economic evaluation based on the proposal of the solution.

  8. Visual analysis of orthokeratology on myopia reduction for aviators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitsui, Iwane

    2005-04-01

    Ortho-K was indicated for sixty eyes of thirty aviators, twenty-one pilots and nine flight attendants, with age of 34.5 on the average. Uncorrected visual acuity (UCVA) was originally 20/30 or worse in all cases. The mean spherical equivalent (SE) was -3.69 Diopters (D). The same ophthalmologist designed full costumed reverse geometry Advanced Orthokeratology lenses for each patient. All the patients were followed at least two years wearing of Advanced Ortho-K lenses. The follow up examinations on auto-refraction, auto-keratometry, uncorrected and corrected visual acuity, intra-ocular pressure, corneal endothelial cells, corneal thickness and curve, and corneal shape were performed in the morning, 10am to 12am. 94% of the patients improved in UCVA up to 20/20 or better, 87% of them improved up to 20/15 or better, and 67% of them improved up to 20/10. The mean SEs improved to -1.90+/-1.00D during six months, -1.49+/-1.03D during one year, and -0.73+/-0.94D during two years. Astigmatism slightly increased by 0.38D on the average, however, it did not cause any serious problems for aviation tasks even during night. Intraocular pressure did not increase and corneal endothelial cells did not decrease. Other ophthalmologic examinations showed normal conditions and any complications were not observed throughout the period. Advanced Ortho-K was evaluated to be safe and effective enough for also aviators with myopia. It can be recommended one of the options of reduction of myopia for aviators. Evaluations on night vision and night glare are planned for further studies.

  9. Cognitive aging and flight performances in general aviation pilots

    OpenAIRE

    Causse, Mickael; Dehais, Frédéric; Arexis, Mahé; Pastor, Josette

    2011-01-01

    International audience Unlike professional pilots who are limited by the FAA's age rule, no age limit is defined in general aviation. Our overall goal was to examine how age-related cognitive decline impacts piloting performance and weather-related decision-making. This study relied on three components: cognitive assessment (in particular executive functioning), pilot characteristics (age and flight experience), and flight performance. The results suggest that in comparison to chronologica...

  10. Active Fluid Borne Noise Reduction for Aviation Hydraulic Pumps

    OpenAIRE

    Waitschat, Arne; Thielecke, Frank; Behr, Robert M.; Heise, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    The aviation environment holds challenging application constraints for efficient hydraulic system noise reduction devices. Besides strong limits on component weight and size, high safety and reliability standards demand simple solutions. Hence, basic silencers like inline expansion chambers and Helmholtz-Resonators are state-of-the-art aboard commercial aircrafts. Unfortunately, they do not meet today’s noise attenuation aims regarding passenger comfort and equipment durability. Significant a...

  11. Analysis of Lean Initiatives in the Production of Naval Aviators

    OpenAIRE

    Prebula, Albert J., III

    2012-01-01

    The Department of the Navy is dealing with shrinking budgets and increased training requirements for the production of Naval Aviators for 4th and 5th generation Navy aircraft. Lean and Six Sigma strategies are routinely used in todays manufacturing processes. The U.S. military is saving billions of dollars by implementing quality improvement methods such as Lean Six Sigma, and these savings could grow even faster as the Department of Defense takes steps to expand these initiatives throughout ...

  12. Oxygen extended sooting index of FAME blends with aviation kerosene

    OpenAIRE

    Llamas Lois, Alberto; Canoira López, Laureano

    2013-01-01

    The use of biofuels in the aviation sector has economic and environmental benefits. Among the options for the production of renewable jet fuels, hydroprocessed esters and fatty acids (HEFA) have received predominant attention in comparison with fatty acid methyl esters (FAME), which are not approved as additives for jet fuels. However, the presence of oxygen in methyl esters tends to reduce soot emissions and therefore particulate matter emissions. This sooting tendency is quantified in this ...

  13. Augmented reality application utility for aviation maintenance work instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourcho, John Bryan

    Current aviation maintenance work instructions do not display information effectively enough to prevent costly errors and safety concerns. Aircraft are complex assemblies of highly interrelated components that confound troubleshooting and can make the maintenance procedure difficult (Drury & Gramopadhye, 2001). The sophisticated nature of aircraft maintenance necessitates a revolutionized training intervention for aviation maintenance technicians (United States General Accounting Office, 2003). Quite simply, the paper based job task cards fall short of offering rapid access to technical data and the system or component visualization necessary for working on complex integrated aircraft systems. Possible solutions to this problem include upgraded standards for paper based task cards and the use of integrated 3D product definition used on various mobile platforms (Ropp, Thomas, Lee, Broyles, Lewin, Andreychek, & Nicol, 2013). Previous studies have shown that incorporation of 3D graphics in work instructions allow the user to more efficiently and accurately interpret maintenance information (Jackson & Batstone, 2008). For aircraft maintenance workers, the use of mobile 3D model-based task cards could make current paper task card standards obsolete with their ability to deliver relevant, synchronized information to and from the hangar. Unlike previous versions of 3D model-based definition task cards and paper task cards, which are currently used in the maintenance industry, 3D model based definition task cards have the potential to be more mobile and accessible. Utilizing augmented reality applications on mobile devices to seamlessly deliver 3D product definition on mobile devices could increase the efficiency, accuracy, and reduce the mental workload for technicians when performing maintenance tasks (Macchiarella, 2004). This proposal will serve as a literary review of the aviation maintenance industry, the spatial ability of maintenance technicians, and benefits of

  14. Costs of IQ Loss from Leaded Aviation Gasoline Emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfe, Philip J; Giang, Amanda; Ashok, Akshay; Selin, Noelle E; Barrett, Steven R H

    2016-09-01

    In the United States, general aviation piston-driven aircraft are now the largest source of lead emitted to the atmosphere. Elevated lead concentrations impair children's IQ and can lead to lower earnings potentials. This study is the first assessment of the nationwide annual costs of IQ losses from aircraft lead emissions. We develop a general aviation emissions inventory for the continental United States and model its impact on atmospheric concentrations using the community multi-scale air quality model (CMAQ). We use these concentrations to quantify the impacts of annual aviation lead emissions on the U.S. population using two methods: through static estimates of cohort-wide IQ deficits and through dynamic economy-wide effects using a computational general equilibrium model. We also examine the sensitivity of these damage estimates to different background lead concentrations, showing the impact of lead controls and regulations on marginal costs. We find that aircraft-attributable lead contributes to $1.06 billion 2006 USD ($0.01-$11.6) in annual damages from lifetime earnings reductions, and that dynamic economy-wide methods result in damage estimates that are 54% larger. Because the marginal costs of lead are dependent on background concentration, the costs of piston-driven aircraft lead emissions are expected to increase over time as regulations on other emissions sources are tightened. PMID:27494542

  15. Airborne volcanic ash; a global threat to aviation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neal, Christina A.; Guffanti, Marianne C.

    2010-01-01

    The world's busy air traffic corridors pass over or downwind of hundreds of volcanoes capable of hazardous explosive eruptions. The risk to aviation from volcanic activity is significant - in the United States alone, aircraft carry about 300,000 passengers and hundreds of millions of dollars of cargo near active volcanoes each day. Costly disruption of flight operations in Europe and North America in 2010 in the wake of a moderate-size eruption in Iceland clearly demonstrates how eruptions can have global impacts on the aviation industry. Airborne volcanic ash can be a serious hazard to aviation even hundreds of miles from an eruption. Encounters with high-concentration ash clouds can diminish visibility, damage flight control systems, and cause jet engines to fail. Encounters with low-concentration clouds of volcanic ash and aerosols can accelerate wear on engine and aircraft components, resulting in premature replacement. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with national and international partners, is playing a leading role in the international effort to reduce the risk posed to aircraft by volcanic eruptions.

  16. COURSES IN THE FIELD OF CIVIL AVIATION SECURITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr UCHROŃSKI

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Polish accession to the EU and which consequently adapt Polish law to EU standards drew attention to the aviation community on the need for training and improvement of the quality of work people employed at the airport. Similarly, the subject was developed in the protection of civil aviation. Here, however, the direct stimulus for the formation of all kinds of regulations were the events in the USA 11.09.2001 r. It was then that apart from the obvious need to introduce more restrictive rules related to the security control of passengers and their luggage, it was also noted for staff training, their skills, threat detection and appropriate response to all types of custom passenger behavior. Then also placed special emphasis on quality control work, which is reflected in even the National Training Programme and the National Quality Control Programme, which are designed, on the one hand, professional prepare of the screeners for the implementation of the their statutory tasks, on the other hand, has created a tool to supervise the quality of the work done by this group of workers. Awareness of the human factor as an element that could significantly affect the level of airport security makes this factor is particularly treated in the protection of civil aviation. The consequences of human error, resulting from an act of conscious or unintentional, may in fact be catastrophic for the airport, the carrier and passengers.

  17. Including International Aviation in the EU Emissions Trading Scheme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kopsch, Fredrik

    2011-07-01

    Starting on January 1 st, 2012, the international aviation sector will be included into the already existing EU ETS. All air crafts departing and arriving within the European Union will be obliged to hold permits corresponding to their total emissions of CO{sub 2} for those routes. Since emissions from the international aviation sector are not included under the Kyoto Protocol, the European Commission has decided to introduce a trading barrier between the sectors in order not to jeopardize the Kyoto targets. The purpose of this paper is to analyse the potential loss in cost-effectiveness of introducing such a trading barrier between two sectors taking into account that damage from emissions is not necessarily uniform. A theoretical model is developed to address the question and it is found that, at least for the case with linking the international aviation sector to the stationary sources within the EU ETS, the trading barrier might be unwarranted as it might lead to higher damage from emissions as compared to alternative ways to link the trading sectors. However, it should be stressed that this finding is not general and caution should be taken in the future when linking emission trading schemes as, depending on the heterogeneity of emission damage, a trading barrier might very well be justified

  18. Potential Carbon Negative Commercial Aviation through Land Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendricks, Robert C.

    2008-01-01

    Brazilian terra preta soil and char-enhanced soil agricultural systems have demonstrated both enhanced plant biomass and crop yield and functions as a carbon sink. Similar carbon sinking has been demonstrated for both glycophyte and halophyte plants and plant roots. Within the assumption of 3.7 t-C/ha/yr soils and plant root carbon sinking, it is possible to provide carbon neutral U.S. commercial aviation using about 8.5% of U.S. arable lands. The total airline CO2 release would be offset by carbon credits for properly managed soils and plant rooting, becoming carbon neutral for carbon sequestered synjet processing. If these lands were also used to produce biomass fuel crops such as soybeans at an increased yield of 60 bu/acre (225gal/ha), they would provide over 3.15 10(exp 9) gallons biodiesel fuel. If all this fuel were refined into biojet it would provide a 16% biojet-84% synjet blend. This allows the U.S. aviation industry to become carbon negative (carbon negative commercial aviation through carbon credits). Arid land recovery could yield even greater benefits.

  19. Cognitive responses to hypobaric hypoxia: implications for aviation training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neuhaus C

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Christopher Neuhaus,1,2 Jochen Hinkelbein2,31Department of Anesthesiology, Heidelberg University Hospital, Ruprecht Karls University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg, 2Emergency Medicine and Air Rescue Working Group, German Society of Aviation and Space Medicine (DGLRM, Munich, 3Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, University Hospital of Cologne, Cologne, GermanyAbstract: The aim of this narrative review is to provide an overview on cognitive responses to hypobaric hypoxia and to show relevant implications for aviation training. A principal element of hypoxia-awareness training is the intentional evocation of hypoxia symptoms during specific training sessions within a safe and controlled environment. Repetitive training should enable pilots to learn and recognize their personal hypoxia symptoms. A time span of 3–6 years is generally considered suitable to refresh knowledge of the more subtle and early symptoms especially. Currently, there are two different technical approaches available to induce hypoxia during training: hypobaric chamber training and reduced-oxygen breathing devices. Hypoxia training for aircrew is extremely important and effective, and the hypoxia symptoms should be emphasized clearly to aircrews. The use of tight-fitting masks, leak checks, and equipment checks should be taught to all aircrew and reinforced regularly. It is noteworthy that there are major differences in the required quality and quantity of hypoxia training for both military and civilian pilots.Keywords: cognitive response, aviation training, pilot, hypoxia, oxygen, loss of consciousness

  20. Low-energy gamma ray attenuation characteristics of aviation fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Jag J.; Shen, Chih-Ping; Sprinkle, Danny R.

    1990-01-01

    Am241 (59.5 keV) gamma ray attenuation characteristics were investigated in 270 aviation fuel (Jet A and Jet A-1) samples from 76 airports around the world as a part of world wide study to measure the variability of aviation fuel properties as a function of season and geographical origin. All measurements were made at room temperature which varied from 20 to 27 C. Fuel densities (rho) were measured concurrently with their linear attenuation coefficients (mu), thus providing a measure of mass attenuation coefficient (mu/rho) for the test samples. In 43 fuel samples, rho and mu values were measured at more than one room temperature, thus providing mu/rho values for them at several temperatures. The results were found to be independent of the temperature at which mu and rho values were measured. It is noted that whereas the individual mu and rho values vary considerably from airport to airport as well as season to season, the mu/rho values for all samples are constant at 0.1843 + or - 0.0013 cu cm/gm. This constancy of mu/rho value for aviation fuels is significant since a nuclear fuel quantity gauging system based on low energy gamma ray attenuation will be viable throughout the world.

  1. ASSESSMENT OF RUNWAY ACCIDENT HAZARDS IN NIGERIA AVIATION SECTOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akinyemi Olasunkanmi Oriola

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Aviation crashes all over the world have recently been on the high rise, stemming from negligence, mechanical faults, weather, ground control errors, pilot errors, taxing and maintenance crew errors as probable reasons for such accidents. This study models the probabilistic risk assessment of runway accident hazards in Nigeria aviation sector. Six categories of runway accident hazards with their corresponding basic events were identified and modeled using fault tree analysis method of probabilistic risk assessment. The six categories of runway accident hazards are runway surface conditions, weather conditions, collision risk, aircraft system failure, approach/takeoff procedures and human factors. The Fault Tree developed is a system of OR-gates and the weights for each hazard were derived through a domain/expert opinion. The estimated probability of occurrence of runway accident which is the top event of the Fault Tree model is 0.2624. Fault Tree Analysis; thus, identifies the most likely root causes of runway accident through importance measures. The results of the analysis show close relationship of runway accidents in Nigeria aviation sector with aircraft system failure, approach/takeoff procedures, human factor, weather conditions and collision risk.

  2. Impacts of aviation fuel sulfur content on climate and human health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Z. Kapadia

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Aviation emissions impact both air quality and climate. Using a coupled tropospheric chemistry-aerosol microphysics model we investigate the effects of varying aviation fuel sulfur content (FSC on premature mortality from long-term exposure to aviation-sourced PM2.5 (particulate matter with a dry diameter of 2 aviation emissions with a typical FSC of 600 ppm result in 3597 (95 % CI: 1307–5888 annual mortalities globally due to increases in cases of cardiopulmonary disease and lung cancer, resulting from increased surface PM2.5 concentrations. We quantify the global annual mean combined radiative effect (REcomb of non-CO2 aviation emissions as −13.3 mW m−2; from increases in aerosols (direct radiative effect and cloud albedo effect and tropospheric ozone. Ultra-low sulfur jet fuel (ULSJ; FSC =15 ppm has been proposed as an option to reduce the adverse health impacts of aviation-induced PM2.5. We calculate that swapping the global aviation fleet to ULSJ fuel would reduce the global aviation-induced mortality rate by 624 (95 % CI: 227–1021 mortalities a−1 and increase REcomb by +7.0 mW m−2. We explore the impact of varying aviation FSC between 0–6000 ppm. Increasing FSC increases annual mortality, while enhancing climate cooling through increasing the aerosol cloud albedo effect (aCAE. We explore the relationship between the injection altitude of aviation emissions and the resulting climate and air quality impacts. Compared to the standard aviation emissions distribution, releasing aviation emissions at the ground increases global aviation-induced mortality and produces a net warming effect, primarily through a reduced aCAE. Aviation emissions injected at the surface are 5 times less effective at forming cloud condensation nuclei, reducing the aviation-induced aCAE by a factor of 10. Applying high FSCs at aviation cruise altitudes combined with ULSJ fuel at lower altitudes result in reduced aviation-induced mortality and increased

  3. Aeronautics and Aviation Science: Careers and Opportunities Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Texter, P. Cardie

    1998-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration funded project, Aeronautics and Aviation Science: Careers and Opportunities has been in operation since July, 1995. This project operated as a collaboration with Massachusetts Corporation for Educational Telecommunications, the Federal Aviation Administration, Bridgewater State College and four targeted "core sites" in the greater Boston area. In its first and second years, a video series on aeronautics and aviation science was developed and broadcast via "live, interactive" satellite feed. Accompanying teacher and student supplementary instructional materials for grades 6-9 were produced and disseminated by the Massachusetts Corporation for Educational Telecommunications (MCET). In the MCET grant application it states that project Take Off! in its initial phase would recruit and train teachers at "core" sites in the greater Boston area, as well as opening participation to other on-line users of MCET's satellite feeds. "Core site" classrooms would become equipped so that teachers and students might become engaged in an interactive format which aimed at not only involving the students during the "live" broadcast of the instructional video series, but which would encourage participation in electronic information gathering and sharing among participants. As a Take Off! project goal, four schools with a higher than average proportion of minority and underrepresented youth were invited to become involved with the project to give these students the opportunity to consider career exploration and development in the field of science aviation and aeronautics. The four sites chosen to participate in this project were: East Boston High School, Dorchester High School, Randolph Junior-Senior High School and Malden High School. In year 3 Dorchester was unable to continue to fully participate and exited out. Danvers was added to the "core site" list in year 3. In consideration of Goals 2000, the National Science Foundation

  4. Reassessing the position of Aviation English: from a special language to English for Specific Purposes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Aiguo

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available “Aviation English” is not only confined to pilots and air traffic controllers (ATC, it also refers to English on general terms in aeronautical and/or aviation universities. It can be designed as integrated ESP (English for Specific Purposes curricula for students in the fields of aeronautics and/or aviation. Learners of ESP are supposed to master the vocabulary in their specific discipline as well as the English language skills. This paper explores the possibility of establishing Aviation English as an ESP specialty in aeronautical and/or aviation colleges and universities. Needs analysis has been made and curricula designed for an integrated course of study in the Chinese context, so that learners of ESP can learn the target language more effectively and meet the standards set by the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO. It reconsiders the ESP theories and aims to develop a possible approach to ESP teaching more suitable for the Chinese learners.

  5. A human error analysis and model of naval aviation maintenance related mishaps

    OpenAIRE

    Schmorrow, Dylan D.

    1998-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited Naval Aviation is in the midst of a major transformation as it attempts to come to terms with the demands of maintaining operational readiness in the face of diminishing budgets and reduced manning. Diminishing operating and procurement budgets mean that Naval Aviation is for the most part "making do" with existing aircraft. Over the past decade, one in four Naval Aviation mishaps were partially attributable to maintenance err...

  6. SUSTAINABLE GROWTH OF THE COMMERCIAL AVIATION INDUSTRY IN MALAYSIA USING A SYSTEM DYNAMICS APPROACH

    OpenAIRE

    Tan, B. S.; Yap, E. H.

    2015-01-01

    The environmental impact of the commercial aviation industry for an emerging economy like Malaysia is under-studied. The focus on the subject has thus far concentrated either on non geographical performance of the aviation industry or technical performance of aircrafts and that leaves the sustainability of the commercial aviation industry for an economy, or more specifically, an emerging economy least understood. Hence, this paper aims to investigate the sustainability of the growth of the...

  7. Happy Landings: The Aviation Life of Purdue University’s Ralph S. Johnson

    OpenAIRE

    Meyer, Matthew D

    2015-01-01

    Purdue University has enjoyed a rich and vibrant association with aviation, ranging from the work of Amelia Earhart to the achievements of Neil Armstrong. Through their dedication, its graduates have become the engineers, the aviators, and the astronauts who have helped to make American history. One such graduate who worked tirelessly to improve aviation was Ralph S. Johnson. A native of Goodland, Indiana, Johnson graduated from Purdue with a bachelor’s degree in mechanical engineering in 193...

  8. Features of the mechanism of administrative and legal regulation of the civil aviation

    OpenAIRE

    Хом’яченко, Світлана Іванівна; Єряшов, Євген Кузьмович

    2014-01-01

    The article is devoted to research of features of mechanism of administrative and law regulations of civil aviation activity. The vision of author on this type of the branch regulations is also given through the norms of the Air Code of Ukraine. English abstract S. Khomiachenko, Ye. Yeriashov Features of the mechanism of administrative and legal regulation of the civil aviation The article is devoted to research of features of mechanism of administrative and law regulations of civil aviation ...

  9. Evidence of impact of aviation on cirrus cloud formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. S. Zerefos

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available This work examines changes in cirrus cloud cover in possible association with aviation activities at congested air corridors. The analysis is based on the latest version of the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project D2 data set and covers the period 1984&ndash1998. Over areas with heavy air traffic, the effect of large-scale modes of natural climate variability such as ENSO, QBO and NAO as well as the possible influence of the tropopause variability, were first removed from the cloud data set in order to calculate long-term changes of observed cirrus cloudiness. The results show increasing trends in cirrus cloud coverage, between 1984 and 1998, over the high air traffic corridors of North America, North Atlantic and Europe, which in the summertime only over the North Atlantic are statistically significant at the 99.5% confidence level (2.6% per decade. In wintertime however, statistically significant changes at the 95% confidence level are found over North America, amounting to +2.1% per decade. Statistically significant increases at the 95% confidence level are also found for the annual mean cirrus cloud coverage over the North Atlantic air corridor (1.2% per decade. Over adjacent locations with lower air traffic, the calculated trends are statistically insignificant and in most cases negative both during winter and summer in regions studied. Moreover, it is shown that the longitudinal distribution of decadal changes in cirrus cloudiness along the latitude belt centered at the North Atlantic air corridor, parallels the spatial distribution of fuel consumption from highflying air traffic, providing an independent test of possible impact of aviation on contrail cirrus formation. Results from this study are compared with other studies and different periods of records and it appears as evidenced in this and in earlier studies that there exists general agreement on the aviation effect on high cloud trends.

  10. Suppression of chlorine activation on aviation-produced volatile particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. K. Meilinger

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available We examine the effect of nm-sized aircraft-induced aqueous sulfuric acid (H2SO4/H2O particles on atmospheric ozone as a function of temperature. Our calculations are based on a previously derived parameterization for the regional-scale perturbations of the sulfate surface area density due to air traffic in the North Atlantic Flight Corridor (NAFC and a chemical box model. We confirm large scale model results that at temperatures T > 210 K additional ozone loss -- mainly caused by hydrolysis of BrONO2 and N2O5 -- scales in proportion with the aviation-produced increase of the background aerosol surface area. However, at lower temperatures (< 210 K we isolate two effects which efficiently reduce the aircraft-induced perturbation: (1 background particles growth due to H2O and HNO3 uptake enhance scavenging losses of aviation-produced liquid particles and (2 the Kelvin effect efficiently limits chlorine activation on the small aircraft-induced droplets by reducing the solubility of chemically reacting species. These two effects lead to a substantial reduction of heterogeneous chemistry on aircraft-induced volatile aerosols under cold conditions. In contrast we find contrail ice particles to be potentially important for heterogeneous chlorine activation and ozone depletion. These features have not been taken into consideration in previous global studies of the atmospheric impact of aviation. Therefore, to parameterize them in global chemistry and transport models, we propose the following parameterisation: scale the hydrolysis reactions by the aircraft-induced surface area increase, and neglect heterogeneous chlorine reactions on liquid plume particles but not on ice contrails and aircraft induced ice clouds.

  11. Suppression of chlorine activation on aviation-produced volatile particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. K. Meilinger

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available We examine the effect of nanometer-sized aircraft-induced aqueous sulfuric acid (H2SO4/H2O particles on atmospheric ozone as a function of temperature. Our calculations are based on a previously derived parameterization for the regional-scale perturbations of the sulfate surface area density due to air traffic in the North Atlantic Flight Corridor (NAFC and a chemical box model. We confirm large scale model results that at temperatures T>210 K additional ozone loss -- mainly caused by hydrolysis of BrONO2 and N2O5 -- scales in proportion with the aviation-produced increase of the background aerosol surface area. However, at lower temperatures (2O and HNO3 uptake enhance scavenging losses of aviation-produced liquid particles and (2 the Kelvin effect efficiently limits chlorine activation on the small aircraft-induced droplets by reducing the solubility of chemically reacting species. These two effects lead to a substantial reduction of heterogeneous chemistry on aircraft-induced volatile aerosols under cold conditions. In contrast we find contrail ice particles to be potentially important for heterogeneous chlorine activation and reductions in ozone levels. These features have not been taken into consideration in previous global studies of the atmospheric impact of aviation. Therefore, to parameterize them in global chemistry and transport models, we propose the following parameterisation: scale the hydrolysis reactions by the aircraft-induced surface area increase, and neglect heterogeneous chlorine reactions on liquid plume particles but not on ice contrails and aircraft induced ice clouds.

  12. Recent technical advances in general purpose mobile Satcom aviation terminals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sydor, John T.

    1990-01-01

    A second general aviation amplitude companded single sideband (ACSSB) aeronautical terminal was developed for use with the Ontario Air Ambulance Service (OAAS). This terminal is designed to have automatic call set up and take down and to interface with the Public Service Telephone Network (PSTN) through a ground earth station hub controller. The terminal has integrated RF and microprocessor hardware which allows such functions as beam steering and automatic frequency control to be software controlled. The terminal uses a conformal patch array system to provide almost full azimuthal coverage. Antenna beam steering is executed without relying on aircraft supplied orientation information.

  13. Take Off! Aeronautics and Aviation Science: Careers and Opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    Funded by National Aeronautic and Space Administration's High Performance Computing and Communications/ Learning Technologies Project (HPCC/LTP) Cooperative Agreement, Aeronautics and aviation Science: Careers and Opportunities was operative from July 1995 through July 1998. This project operated as a collaboration with Massachusetts Corporation for Educational Telecommunications, the Federal Aviation Administration, Bridgewater State College and four targeted "core sites" in the greater Boston area: Dorchester, Malden, East Boston and Randolph. In its first and second years, a video series with a participatory website on aeronautics and aviation science was developed and broadcast via "live, interactive" satellite feed. Accompanying teacher and student supplementary instructional materials for grades 6-12 were produced and disseminated by the Massachusetts Corporation for Educational Telecommunications (MCET). In year three, the project team redesigned the website, edited 14 videos to a five part thematic unit, and developed a teacher's guide to the video and web materials supplement for MAC and PC platforms, aligned with national standards. In the MCET grant application it states that project Take Off! in its initial phase would recruit and train teachers at "core" sites in the greater Boston area, as well as opening participation to other on-line users of MCET's satellite feeds. "Core site" classrooms would become equipped so that teachers and students might become engaged in an interactive format which aimed at not only involving the students during the "live" broadcast of the instructional video series, but which would encourage participation in electronic information gathering and sharing among participants. As a Take Off! project goal, four schools with a higher than average proportion of minority and underrepresented youth were invited to become involved with the project to give these students the opportunity to consider career exploration and development

  14. Preliminary design studies of an advanced general aviation aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Ron; Demoss, Shane; Dirkzwager, AB; Evans, Darryl; Gomer, Charles; Keiter, Jerry; Knipp, Darren; Seier, Glen; Smith, Steve; Wenninger, ED

    1991-01-01

    The preliminary design results are presented of the advanced aircraft design project. The goal was to take a revolutionary look into the design of a general aviation aircraft. Phase 1 of the project included the preliminary design of two configurations, a pusher, and a tractor. Phase 2 included the selection of only one configuration for further study. The pusher configuration was selected on the basis of performance characteristics, cabin noise, natural laminar flow, and system layouts. The design was then iterated to achieve higher levels of performance.

  15. JOHN WESTON, THE "GRANDFATHER OF AVIATION IN SOUTH AFRICA"

    OpenAIRE

    J.J. Oberholzer

    2012-01-01

    In "Militaria" 2/1 (1970) mention was made of M. J. L. Weston, D.Sc., F.R.G.S., F.R.S.A., A.I.E.E. in relation to the training of our first military aircraft pilots and the proposed establishment of a South African Air Force as well as a South African Flying School (p. 14 et seq). He was a consulting engineer and one of the foremost stalwarts in the field of civil and military aviation and the manufacture of aircraft in our country. Dr. Weston directed a request at the beginning of 1913, as m...

  16. Quality Training and Learning in Aviation: Problems of Alignment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Phillip J.; Lehrer, Henry R.; Telfer, Ross A.

    2001-01-01

    The challenge of producing training programs that lead to quality learning outcomes is ever present in aviation, especially when economic and regulatory pressures are brought into the equation. Previous research by Telfer & Moore (1997) indicates the importance of appropriate alignment of beliefs about learning across all levels of an organization from the managerial level, through the instructor/check and training level, to the pilots and other crew. This paper argues for a central focus on approaches to learning and training that encourage understanding, problem solving and application. Recent research in the area is emphasized as are methods and techniques for enhancing deeper learning.

  17. 78 FR 21700 - Aviation Rulemaking Advisory Committee Meeting on Transport Airplane and Engine Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-11

    ... Engine Issues AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of public meeting...) Transportation Airplane and Engine (TAE) Subcommittee to discuss transport airplane and engine issues. DATES:...

  18. 77 FR 40699 - Aviation Rulemaking Advisory Committee Teleconference on Transport Airplane and Engine Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-10

    ... Airplane and Engine Issues AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of public... Committee (ARAC) to discuss transport airplane and engine (TAE) issues. DATES: The teleconference...

  19. 78 FR 57672 - Aviation Rulemaking Advisory Committee Meeting on Transport Airplane and Engine Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-19

    ... Engine Issues AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of public meeting...) Transport Airplane and Engine (TAE) Subcommittee to discuss TAE issues. DATES: The meeting is scheduled...

  20. 76 FR 60115 - Aviation Rulemaking Advisory Committee Meeting on Transport Airplane and Engine Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-28

    ... Engine Issues AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of public meeting...) to discuss transport airplane and engine (TAE) issues. DATES: The meeting is scheduled for...

  1. 76 FR 14115 - Aviation Rulemaking Advisory Committee Meeting on Transport Airplane and Engine Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-15

    ... Engine Issues AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of public meeting... ] (ARAC) to discuss transport airplane and engine (TAE) issues. DATES: The meeting is scheduled...

  2. 77 FR 24759 - Aviation Rulemaking Advisory Committee Meeting on Transport Airplane and Engine Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-25

    ... Engine Issues AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of public meeting...) to discuss transport airplane and engine (TAE) issues. DATES: The meeting is scheduled for...

  3. ANALYZING AVIATION SAFETY REPORTS: FROM TOPIC MODELING TO SCALABLE MULTI-LABEL CLASSIFICATION

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ANALYZING AVIATION SAFETY REPORTS: FROM TOPIC MODELING TO SCALABLE MULTI-LABEL CLASSIFICATION AMRUDIN AGOVIC*, HANHUAI SHAN, AND ARINDAM BANERJEE Abstract. The...

  4. ARMD Strategic Thrust 6: Assured Autonomy for Aviation Transformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballin, Mark; Holbrook, Jon; Sharma, Shivanjli

    2016-01-01

    In collaboration with the external community and other government agencies, NASA will develop enabling technologies, standards, and design guidelines to support cost-effective applications of automation and limited autonomy for individual components of aviation systems. NASA will also provide foundational knowledge and methods to support the next epoch. Research will address issues of verification and validation, operational evaluation, national policy, and societal cost-benefit. Two research and development approaches to aviation autonomy will advance in parallel. The Increasing Autonomy (IA) approach will seek to advance knowledge and technology through incremental increases in machine-based support of existing human-centered tasks, leading to long-term reallocation of functions between humans and machines. The Autonomy as a New Technology (ANT) approach seeks advances by developing technology to achieve goals that are not currently possible using human-centered concepts of operation. IA applications are mission-enhancing, and their selection will be based on benefits achievable relative to existing operations. ANT applications are mission-enabling, and their value will be assessed based on societal benefit resulting from a new capability. The expected demand for small autonomous unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) provides an opportunity for development of ANT applications. Supervisory autonomy may be implemented as an expansion of the number of functions or systems that may be controlled by an individual human operator. Convergent technology approaches, such as the use of electronic flight bags and existing network servers, will be leveraged to the maximum extent possible.

  5. Errors in Aviation Decision Making: Bad Decisions or Bad Luck?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orasanu, Judith; Martin, Lynne; Davison, Jeannie; Null, Cynthia H. (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Despite efforts to design systems and procedures to support 'correct' and safe operations in aviation, errors in human judgment still occur and contribute to accidents. In this paper we examine how an NDM (naturalistic decision making) approach might help us to understand the role of decision processes in negative outcomes. Our strategy was to examine a collection of identified decision errors through the lens of an aviation decision process model and to search for common patterns. The second, and more difficult, task was to determine what might account for those patterns. The corpus we analyzed consisted of tactical decision errors identified by the NTSB (National Transportation Safety Board) from a set of accidents in which crew behavior contributed to the accident. A common pattern emerged: about three quarters of the errors represented plan-continuation errors, that is, a decision to continue with the original plan despite cues that suggested changing the course of action. Features in the context that might contribute to these errors were identified: (a) ambiguous dynamic conditions and (b) organizational and socially-induced goal conflicts. We hypothesize that 'errors' are mediated by underestimation of risk and failure to analyze the potential consequences of continuing with the initial plan. Stressors may further contribute to these effects. Suggestions for improving performance in these error-inducing contexts are discussed.

  6. Fuzzy Logic Decoupled Longitudinal Control for General Aviation Airplanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duerksen, Noel

    1996-01-01

    It has been hypothesized that a human pilot uses the same set of generic skills to control a wide variety of aircraft. If this is true, then it should be possible to construct an electronic controller which embodies this generic skill set such that it can successfully control difference airplanes without being matched to a specific airplane. In an attempt to create such a system, a fuzzy logic controller was devised to control throttle position and another to control elevator position. These two controllers were used to control flight path angle and airspeed for both a piston powered single engine airplane simulation and a business jet simulation. Overspeed protection and stall protection were incorporated in the form of expert systems supervisors. It was found that by using the artificial intelligence techniques of fuzzy logic and expert systems, a generic longitudinal controller could be successfully used on two general aviation aircraft types that have very difference characteristics. These controllers worked for both airplanes over their entire flight envelopes including configuration changes. The controllers for both airplanes were identical except for airplane specific limits (maximum allowable airspeed, throttle lever travel, etc.). The controllers also handled configuration changes without mode switching or knowledge of the current configuration. This research validated the fact that the same fuzzy logic based controller can control two very different general aviation airplanes. It also developed the basic controller architecture and specific control parameters required for such a general controller.

  7. Fuzzy Logic Decoupled Lateral Control for General Aviation Airplanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duerksen, Noel

    1997-01-01

    It has been hypothesized that a human pilot uses the same set of generic skills to control a wide variety of aircraft. If this is true, then it should be possible to construct an electronic controller which embodies this generic skill set such that it can successfully control different airplanes without being matched to a specific airplane. In an attempt to create such a system, a fuzzy logic controller was devised to control aileron or roll spoiler position. This controller was used to control bank angle for both a piston powered single engine aileron equipped airplane simulation and a business jet simulation which used spoilers for primary roll control. Overspeed, stall and overbank protection were incorporated in the form of expert systems supervisors and weighted fuzzy rules. It was found that by using the artificial intelligence techniques of fuzzy logic and expert systems, a generic lateral controller could be successfully used on two general aviation aircraft types that have very different characteristics. These controllers worked for both airplanes over their entire flight envelopes. The controllers for both airplanes were identical except for airplane specific limits (maximum allowable airspeed, throttle ]ever travel, etc.). This research validated the fact that the same fuzzy logic based controller can control two very different general aviation airplanes. It also developed the basic controller architecture and specific control parameters required for such a general controller.

  8. Future directions of fuel efficiency in aviation industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria MRAZOVA

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available A major goal for the aviation community is reducing fuel consumption. Nowadays we can see so much effort to design a modern aircrafts that offer weight and low fuel burn savings. This study could help to understand the long way during the production of the efficient engine such as PurePower and it shows us many advantages in fuel economy. In the second part of this study the author describes technological enhancements and inevitable measures for the improvement of fuel economy. Current fuel efficient engines and future innovations in aircraft designs are introduced in the third part of the thesis. It also shows a great vision in improving aircraft performance and reducing fuel consumption. Anyway, it is too early to say which of many researching ways will lead to viable solutions, but the air transport industry is committed to support advanced technological innovations. Also, technologies are constantly being deployed and researched by the aviation industry to continuously increase performance. But we cannot forget that our effort to achieve an increased efficiency in terms of fuel consumption is still pushing the industry further.

  9. Pedagogical Strategies for Training Future Technicians in American Aviation Schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pazyura Natalia

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to the question of improvement of quality and efficiency of professional training of future technicians in aviation industry in the American educational establishments. Main attention is paid to the studies of pedagogical technologies, which are used for the sake of qualitative and efficient training of specialists of aviation industry. The main purpose of vocational education and training is to help students to develop a way of thinking that would enable them in understanding the technical systems and master learning at the conceptual level. It is a well known fact that researches of pedagogical technologies are aimed at the development of mental models. They are important because: first - they make possible a reduction of time for training.That is rather essential taking into account the fact how much time the “transformation” of a student’s level of knowledge from a novice to an experienced worker takes. The researches of pedagogical technologies help to find a optimum ways for acquisition of expert type of thinking. Secondly, pedagogical technologies help to cut down expenses on training. This is especially topical during professional training of technicians, who are to better understand structural, functional, behavioral aspects of technical systems. In addition, they must effectively operate in troubleshooting in the system which also shortens financial expenses on the maintenance of equipment.

  10. [Safety in intensive care medicine. Can we learn from aviation?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graf, J; Pump, S; Maas, W; Stüben, U

    2012-05-01

    Safety is of extraordinary value in commercial aviation. Therefore, sophisticated and complex systems have been developed to ensure safe operation. Within this system, the pilots are of specific concern: they form the human-machine interface and have a special responsibility in controlling and monitoring all aircraft systems. In order to prepare pilots for their challenging task, specific selection of suitable candidates is crucial. In addition, for every commercial pilot regulatory requirements demand a certain number of simulator training sessions and check flights to be completed at prespecified intervals. In contrast, career choice for intensive care medicine most likely depends on personal reasons rather than eligibility or aptitude. In intensive care medicine, auditing, licensing, or mandatory training are largely nonexistent. Although knowledge of risk management and safety culture in aviation can be transferred to the intensive care unit, the diversity of corporate culture and tradition of leadership and training will represent a barrier for the direct transfer of standards or procedures. To accomplish this challenging task, the analysis of appropriate fields of action with regard to structural requirements and the process of change are essential. PMID:22526119

  11. Aviation Model: A Fine-Scale Numerical Weather Prediction System for Aviation Applications at the Hong Kong International Airport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wai-Kin Wong

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The Hong Kong Observatory (HKO is planning to implement a fine-resolution Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP model for supporting the aviation weather applications at the Hong Kong International Airport (HKIA. This new NWP model system, called Aviation Model (AVM, is configured at a horizontal grid spacing of 600 m and 200 m. It is based on the WRF-ARW (Advance Research WRF model that can have sufficient computation efficiency in order to produce hourly updated forecasts up to 9 hours ahead on a future high performance computer system with theoretical peak performance of around 10 TFLOPS. AVM will be nested inside the operational mesoscale NWP model of HKO with horizontal resolution of 2 km. In this paper, initial numerical experiment results in forecast of windshear events due to seabreeze and terrain effect are discussed. The simulation of sea-breeze-related windshear is quite successful, and the headwind change observed from flight data could be reproduced in the model forecast. Some impacts of physical processes on generating the fine-scale wind circulation and development of significant convection are illustrated. The paper also discusses the limitations in the current model setup and proposes methods for the future development of AVM.

  12. PROTOZOA IN SUBSURFACE SEDIMENTS FROM SITE CONTAMI- NATED WITH AVIATION GASOLINE OR JET FUEL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Numbers of protozoa in the subsurface of aviation gasoline and jet fuel spill areas at a Coast Guard base at Traverse City, Mich., were determined. Boreholes were drilled in an uncontaminated location, in contaminated but untreated parts of the fuel plumes, and in the aviation ga...

  13. 77 FR 46147 - Aviation Proceedings, Agreements Filed the Week Ending June 30, 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-02

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Office of the Secretary Aviation Proceedings, Agreements Filed the Week Ending June 30, 2012 The following Agreements were filed with the Department of Transportation under the Sections 412 and 414 of the Federal Aviation Act, as amended (49...

  14. 78 FR 39435 - Aviation Proceedings, Agreements filed the week ending May 25, 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-01

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Office of the Secretary Aviation Proceedings, Agreements filed the week ending May 25, 2013 The following Agreements were filed with the Department of Transportation under the Sections 412 and 414 of the Federal Aviation Act, as amended (49...

  15. 78 FR 33466 - Aviation Proceedings, Agreements Filed the Week Ending May 11, 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-04

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Office of the Secretary Aviation Proceedings, Agreements Filed the Week Ending May 11, 2013 The following Agreements were filed with the Department of Transportation under the Sections 412 and 414 of the Federal Aviation Act, as amended (49...

  16. 77 FR 31421 - Aviation Proceedings, Agreements Filed the Week Ending May 12, 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-25

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Office of the Secretary Aviation Proceedings, Agreements Filed the Week Ending May 12, 2012 The following Agreements were filed with the Department of Transportation under the Sections 412 and 414 of the Federal Aviation Act, as amended (49...

  17. 75 FR 32835 - Aviation Proceedings, Agreements Filed the Week Ending May 29, 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-09

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Office of the Secretary Aviation Proceedings, Agreements Filed the Week Ending May 29, 2010 The following Agreements were filed with the Department of Transportation under the sections 412 and 414 of the Federal Aviation Act, as amended (49...

  18. 76 FR 21419 - Aviation Proceedings, Agreements Filed the Week Ending April 2, 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-15

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Office of the Secretary Aviation Proceedings, Agreements Filed the Week Ending April 2, 2011 The following Agreements were filed with the Department of Transportation under the Sections 412 and 414 of the Federal Aviation Act, as amended (49...

  19. 76 FR 38265 - Aviation Proceedings, Agreements Filed the Week Ending June 4, 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-29

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Office of the Secretary Aviation Proceedings, Agreements Filed the Week Ending June 4, 2011 The following Agreements were filed with the Department of Transportation under the Sections 412 and 414 of the Federal Aviation Act, as amended (49...

  20. 76 FR 42762 - Aviation Proceedings, Agreements Filed the Week Ending July 9, 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-19

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Office of the Secretary Aviation Proceedings, Agreements Filed the Week Ending July 9, 2011 The following Agreements were filed with the Department of Transportation under the Sections 412 and 414 of the Federal Aviation Act, as amended (49...

  1. 77 FR 72252 - Airworthiness Directives; Reims Aviation S.A. Airplanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-05

    ...: stephan.lapagne@reims-aviation.fr ; Internet: www.geciaviation.com/en/f406.html . You may review copies of... 12866, (2) Is not a ``significant rule'' under the DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034... 57; email: stephan.lapagne@reims-aviation.fr ; Internet: www.geciaviation.com/en/f406.html . You...

  2. Bayesian Network Assessment Method for Civil Aviation Safety Based on Flight Delays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huawei Wang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Flight delays and safety are the principal contradictions in the sound development of civil aviation. Flight delays often come up and induce civil aviation safety risk simultaneously. Based on flight delays, the random characteristics of civil aviation safety risk are analyzed. Flight delays have been deemed to a potential safety hazard. The change rules and characteristics of civil aviation safety risk based on flight delays have been analyzed. Bayesian networks (BN have been used to build the aviation operation safety assessment model based on flight delay. The structure and parameters learning of the model have been researched. By using BN model, some airline in China has been selected to assess safety risk of civil aviation. The civil aviation safety risk of BN model has been assessed by GeNIe software. The research results show that flight delay, which increases the safety risk of civil aviation, can be seen as incremental safety risk. The effectiveness and correctness of the model have been tested and verified.

  3. Unweathered and weathered aviation kerosine: Chemical characterization and effects on hatching success of duck eggs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albers, P.H.; Gay, M.L.

    1982-01-01

    Effects of weathered aviation kerosine from a pipeline rupture in northern Virginia on mallard egg hatchability. Artificially-incubated mallard eggs were exposed by eggshell application to several amounts of weathered and unweathered aviation kerosine on day 6 of incubation. Measured hatching success of eggs and characterized the kerosine according to 14 aliphatic and 9 aromatic compounds.

  4. Aircraft Fuel, Hydraulic and Pneumatic Systems (Course Outlines), Aviation Mechanics 3 (Air Frame): 9067.01.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dade County Public Schools, Miami, FL.

    This document presents an outline for a 135-hour course designed to familiarize the student with the operation, inspection, and repair of aircraft fuel, hydraulic, and pneumatic systems. It is designed to help the trainee master the knowledge and skills necessary to become an aviation airframe mechanic. The aviation airframe maintenance technician…

  5. Aviation Accidents: CRM to Maintaining the Share of Airlines. Case Study on Accidents Airlines in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alnuaimi, Qussay A. B.

    2015-01-01

    We present Aviation Cost Risk management (CRM) methodology designed for Airlines Company, who needs to run projects beyond their normal. These airlines are critical to the survival of these organizations, such as the development and performance. The Aviation crisis can have considerable impact upon the value of the firm. Risk managers must focus…

  6. Perceived Leadership Styles and Effectiveness of Aviation Program Leaders: A Four-Frame Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Ryan

    2012-01-01

    The aviation industry and higher education environments are ever-changing due to a multitude of economic and external variables. The leaders of aviation higher education programs must successfully lead their organization and followers in preparing student graduates for the industry that awaits them upon graduation. This study examined the…

  7. 77 FR 33777 - General Aviation Safety Forum: Climbing to the Next Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-07

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] NATIONAL TRANSPORTATION SAFETY BOARD General Aviation Safety Forum: Climbing to the Next Level The National Transportation Safety...-20, 2012 in Washington, DC. The event, ``General Aviation Safety: Climbing to the Next Level,''...

  8. Liquid explosives. The threat to civil aviation and the European response

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruiter, C.J. de; Lemmens, O.M.E.J.

    2008-01-01

    This paper deals with the specific group of homemade liquid high explosives in relation to aviation security. The sudden and irrefutable focus on homemade explosives and liquid explosives in particular after the 2006 defeated attacks in London, made the aviation security community realize that the s

  9. 78 FR 275 - Airworthiness Directives; REIMS Aviation S.A. Airplanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-03

    ... 12866, (2) Is not a ``significant rule'' under the DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034... Directives; REIMS Aviation S.A. Airplanes AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), Department of Transportation (DOT). ACTION: Notice of proposed rulemaking (NPRM). SUMMARY: We propose to adopt a...

  10. 76 FR 8892 - Removal of Expired Federal Aviation Administration Regulations and References

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-16

    ...-28, 183-14] Removal of Expired Federal Aviation Administration Regulations and References AGENCY... Special Federal Aviation Regulations (SFARs) and cross-references, as well as other expired or obsolete..., 135.153, 183.61(a)(1), 183.63, and corresponding references. The following tables are presented...

  11. Evidence of impact of aviation on cirrus cloud formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. S. Zerefos

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available This work examines changes in cirrus cloud cover (CCC in possible association with aviation activities at congested air corridors. The analysis is based on the latest version of the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project D2 data set and covers the period 1984-1998. Over the studied areas, the effect of large-scale modes of natural climate variability such as ENSO, QBO and NAO as well as the possible influence of the tropopause variability, were first removed from the cloud data set in order to calculate long-term changes of observed cirrus cloudiness. The results show increasing trends in (CCC between 1984 and 1998 over the high air traffic corridors of North America, North Atlantic and Europe. Of these upward trends, only in the summertime over the North Atlantic and only in the wintertime over North America are statistically significant (exceeding +2.0% per decade. Over adjacent locations with low air traffic, the calculated trends are statistically insignificant and in most cases negative both during winter and summer in the regions studied. These negative trends, over low air traffic regions, are consistent with the observed large scale negative trends seen in (CCC over most of the northern middle latitudes and over the tropics. Moreover, further investigation of vertical velocities over high and low air traffic regions provide evidence that the trends of opposite signs in (CCC over these regions, do not seem to be caused by different trends in dynamics. It is also shown that the longitudinal distribution of decadal changes in (CCC along the latitude belt centered at the North Atlantic air corridor, parallels the spatial distribution of fuel consumption from highflying air traffic, providing an independent test of possible impact of aviation on contrail cirrus formation. The correlation between the fuel consumption and the longitudinal variability of (CCC is significant (+0.7 over the middle latitudes but not over the tropics

  12. [Research and workshop on alternative fuels for aviation. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-09-01

    The Renewable Aviation Fuels Development Center (RAFDC) at Baylor University was granted U. S. Department of Energy (US DOE) and Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) funds for research and development to improve the efficiency in ethanol powered aircraft, measure performance and compare emissions of ethanol, Ethyl Tertiary Butyl Ether (ETBE) and 100 LL aviation gasoline. The premise of the initial proposal was to use a test stand owned by Engine Components Inc. (ECI) based in San Antonio, Texas. After the grant was awarded, ECI decided to close down its test stand facility. Since there were no other test stands available at that time, RAFDC was forced to find additional support to build its own test stand. Baylor University provided initial funds for the test stand building. Other obstacles had to be overcome in order to initiate the program. The price of the emission testing equipment had increased substantially beyond the initial quote. Rosemount Analytical Inc. gave RAFDC an estimate of $120,000.00 for a basic emission testing package. RAFDC had to find additional funding to purchase this equipment. The electronic ignition unit also presented a series of time consuming problems. Since at that time there were no off-the-shelf units of this type available, one had to be specially ordered and developed. FAA funds were used to purchase a Super Flow dynamometer. Due to the many unforeseen obstacles, much more time and effort than originally anticipated had to be dedicated to the project, with much of the work done on a volunteer basis. Many people contributed their time to the program. One person, mainly responsible for the initial design of the test stand, was a retired engineer from Allison with extensive aircraft engine test stand experience. Also, many Baylor students volunteered to assemble the. test stand and continue to be involved in the current test program. Although the program presented many challenges, which resulted in delays, the RAFDC's test

  13. SUSTAINABLE GROWTH OF THE COMMERCIAL AVIATION INDUSTRY IN MALAYSIA USING A SYSTEM DYNAMICS APPROACH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. S. TAN

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The environmental impact of the commercial aviation industry for an emerging economy like Malaysia is under-studied. The focus on the subject has thus far concentrated either on non geographical performance of the aviation industry or technical performance of aircrafts and that leaves the sustainability of the commercial aviation industry for an economy, or more specifically, an emerging economy least understood. Hence, this paper aims to investigate the sustainability of the growth of the commercial aviation industry in Malaysia and its impact upon the environment using a system dynamics approach. VENSIM is employed to model the commercial aviation industry in Malaysia as a dynamic system to evaluate the CO2 emitted from each component within the industry in order to forecast its overall CO2 emission. Results from the analysis show that sustainable growth can be affected by adopting short and long term strategies identified in this study.

  14. International aviation emissions to 2025. Can emissions be stabilised without restricting demand?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    International aviation is growing rapidly, resulting in rising aviation greenhouse gas emissions. Concerns about the growth trajectory of the industry and emissions have led to calls for market measures such as emissions trading and carbon levies to be introduced to restrict demand and prompt innovation. This paper provides an overview of the science on aviation's contribution to climate change, analyses key trends in the industry since 1990, projects international civil aviation emissions to 2025 and analyses the emission intensity improvements that are necessary to offset rising international demand. The findings suggest international aviation carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions will increase by more than 110 per cent between 2005 and 2025 (from 416 Mt to between 876 and 1013 Mt) and that it is unlikely emissions could be stabilised at levels consistent with risk averse climate targets without restricting demand. (author)

  15. The Development of the Carrier Aviation Support System Architecture Using DoDAF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung Do Lee

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This study describes a development of aircraft carrier aviation support system architecture using DoDAF. The aircraft carrier, warship doing role of mobile sea airbase in offensive and defensive mission, is super system that is comprised of carrier itself and carrier-based air wing. Performing critical role in step with aviation operations in carrier-air wing interactions, the aviation support system of aircraft carrier is also system of systems. It is required to complex and integrated approach based on systems engineering in establishing concept of this complex systems. In this view, this study established an operational scenario and derived operational requirements by identifying aviation operations environment on deck of aircraft carrier. It is presented the operational architecture of the carrier aviation support system by using DoDAF and CASE tool CORE.

  16. JOHN WESTON, THE "GRANDFATHER OF AVIATION IN SOUTH AFRICA"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.J. Oberholzer

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available In "Militaria" 2/1 (1970 mention was made of M. J. L. Weston, D.Sc., F.R.G.S., F.R.S.A., A.I.E.E. in relation to the training of our first military aircraft pilots and the proposed establishment of a South African Air Force as well as a South African Flying School (p. 14 et seq. He was a consulting engineer and one of the foremost stalwarts in the field of civil and military aviation and the manufacture of aircraft in our country. Dr. Weston directed a request at the beginning of 1913, as mentioned in this publication, to the then Under Secretary for Defence, with a view to acquiring the authority to train military aircraft pilots, but without success.

  17. FLYING DOWN TO RIO: AMERICAN COMMERCIAL AVIATION, THE GOOD NEIGHBOR POLICY AND WORLD WAR TWO, 1939-45

    OpenAIRE

    Erik Benson

    2001-01-01

    This article will address the role of American commercial aviation in the Good Neighbor policy during the period of World War Two. The Good Neighbor was a complex policy, and American commercial aviation both reflected and augmented this complexity. Through the early years of thew orld war, American commercial aviation proved to be a valuable instrument for promoting hemispheric unity. Yet as the war progressed, commercial aviation became a catalyst for conflict and an indicator of the demise...

  18. Life-cycle analysis of alternative aviation fuels in GREET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elgowainy, A.; Han, J.; Wang, M.; Carter, N.; Stratton, R.; Hileman, J.; Malwitz, A.; Balasubramanian, S. (Energy Systems)

    2012-07-23

    The Greenhouse gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy use in Transportation (GREET) model, developed at Argonne National Laboratory, has been expanded to include well-to-wake (WTWa) analysis of aviation fuels and aircraft. This report documents the key WTWa stages and assumptions for fuels that represent alternatives to petroleum jet fuel. The aviation module in GREET consists of three spreadsheets that present detailed characterizations of well-to-pump and pump-to-wake parameters and WTWa results. By using the expanded GREET version (GREET1{_}2011), we estimate WTWa results for energy use (total, fossil, and petroleum energy) and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions (carbon dioxide, methane, and nitrous oxide) for (1) each unit of energy (lower heating value) consumed by the aircraft or (2) each unit of distance traveled/ payload carried by the aircraft. The fuel pathways considered in this analysis include petroleum-based jet fuel from conventional and unconventional sources (i.e., oil sands); Fisher-Tropsch (FT) jet fuel from natural gas, coal, and biomass; bio-jet fuel from fast pyrolysis of cellulosic biomass; and bio-jet fuel from vegetable and algal oils, which falls under the American Society for Testing and Materials category of hydroprocessed esters and fatty acids. For aircraft operation, we considered six passenger aircraft classes and four freight aircraft classes in this analysis. Our analysis revealed that, depending on the feedstock source, the fuel conversion technology, and the allocation or displacement credit methodology applied to co-products, alternative bio-jet fuel pathways have the potential to reduce life-cycle GHG emissions by 55-85 percent compared with conventional (petroleum-based) jet fuel. Although producing FT jet fuel from fossil feedstock sources - such as natural gas and coal - could greatly reduce dependence on crude oil, production from such sources (especially coal) produces greater WTWa GHG emissions compared with petroleum jet

  19. Life-Cycle Analysis of Alternative Aviation Fuels in GREET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elgowainy, A. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Han, J. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Wang, M. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Carter, N. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Stratton, R. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Hileman, J. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Malwitz, A. [Volpe National Transportation Systems Center, Cambridge, MA (United States); Balasubramanian, S. [Volpe National Transportation Systems Center, Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2012-06-01

    The Greenhouse gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy use in Transportation (GREET) model, developed at Argonne National Laboratory, has been expanded to include well-to-wake (WTWa) analysis of aviation fuels and aircraft. This report documents the key WTWa stages and assumptions for fuels that represent alternatives to petroleum jet fuel. The aviation module in GREET consists of three spreadsheets that present detailed characterizations of well-to-pump and pump-to-wake parameters and WTWa results. By using the expanded GREET version (GREET1_2011), we estimate WTWa results for energy use (total, fossil, and petroleum energy) and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions (carbon dioxide, methane, and nitrous oxide) for (1) each unit of energy (lower heating value) consumed by the aircraft or(2) each unit of distance traveled/ payload carried by the aircraft. The fuel pathways considered in this analysis include petroleum-based jet fuel from conventional and unconventional sources (i.e., oil sands); Fisher-Tropsch (FT) jet fuel from natural gas, coal, and biomass; bio-jet fuel from fast pyrolysis of cellulosic biomass; and bio-jet fuel from vegetable and algal oils, which falls under the American Society for Testing and Materials category of hydroprocessed esters and fatty acids. For aircraft operation, we considered six passenger aircraft classes and four freight aircraft classes in this analysis. Our analysis revealed that, depending on the feedstock source, the fuel conversion technology, and the allocation or displacement credit methodology applied to co-products, alternative bio-jet fuel pathways have the potential to reduce life-cycle GHG emissions by 55–85 percent compared with conventional (petroleum-based) jet fuel. Although producing FT jet fuel from fossil feedstock sources — such as natural gas and coal — could greatly reduce dependence on crude oil, production from such sources (especially coal) produces greater WTWa GHG emissions compared with petroleum jet

  20. Analysis of trends in aviation maintenance risk: An empirical approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Safety is paramount in the airline industry. A significant amount of effort has been devoted to reducing mechanical failures and pilot errors. Recently, more attention has been devoted to the contribution of maintenance to accidents and incidents. This study investigates and quantifies the contribution of maintenance, both in terms of frequency and severity, to passenger airline risk by analyzing three different sources of data from 1999 to 2008: 769 NTSB accident reports, 3242 FAA incident reports, and 7478 FAA records of fines and other legal actions taken against airlines and associated organizations. We analyze several safety related metrics and develop an aviation maintenance risk scorecard that collects these metrics to synthesize a comprehensive track record of maintenance contribution to airline accidents and incidents. We found for example that maintenance-related accidents are approximately 6.5 times more likely to be fatal than accidents in general, and that when fatalities do occur, maintenance accidents result in approximately 3.6 times more fatalities on average. Our analysis of accident trends indicates that this contribution to accident risk has remained fairly constant over the past decade. Our analysis of incidents and FAA fines and legal actions also revealed similar trends. We found that at least 10% of incidents involving mechanical failures such as ruptured hydraulic lines can be attributed to maintenance, suggesting that there may be issues surrounding both the design of and compliance with maintenance plans. Similarly 36% of FAA fines and legal actions involve inadequate maintenance, with recent years showing a decline to about 20%, which may be a reflection of improved maintenance practices. Our results can aid industry and government in focusing resources to continue improving aviation safety.

  1. KREAM: Korean Radiation Exposure Assessment Model for Aviation Route Dose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, J.; Dokgo, K.; Choi, E. J.; Kim, K. C.; Kim, H. P.; Cho, K. S. F.

    2014-12-01

    Since Korean Air has begun to use the polar route from Seoul/ICN airport to New York/JFK airport on August 2006, there are explosive needs for the estimation and prediction against cosmic radiation exposure for Korean aircrew and passengers in South Korea from public. To keep pace with those needs of public, Korean government made the law on safety standards and managements of cosmic radiation for the flight attendants and the pilots in 2013. And we have begun to develop our own Korean Radiation Exposure Assessment Model (KREAM) for aviation route dose since last year funded by Korea Meteorological Administration (KMA). GEANT4 model and NRLMSIS 00 model are used for calculation of the energetic particles' transport in the atmosphere and for obtaining the background atmospheric neutral densities depending on altitude. For prediction the radiation exposure in many routes depending on the various space weather effects, we constructed a database from pre-arranged simulations using all possible combinations of R, S, and G, which are the space weather effect scales provided by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). To get the solar energetic particles' spectrum at the 100 km altitude which we set as a top of the atmospheric layers in the KREAM, we use ACE and GOES satellites' proton flux observations. We compare the results between KREAM and the other cosmic radiation estimation programs such as CARI-6M which is provided by the Federal Aviation Agency (FAA). We also validate KREAM's results by comparison with the measurement from Liulin-6K LET spectrometer onboard Korean commercial flights and Korean Air Force reconnaissance flights.

  2. 75 FR 11921 - Heritage Aviation, Ltd., Including On-Site Leased Workers From Global Technical Services and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-12

    ... the Federal Register on February 16, 2010 (75 FR 7033). At the request of the State Agency, the... Employment and Training Administration Heritage Aviation, Ltd., Including On-Site Leased Workers From Global... workers of Heritage Aviation, including on-site leased workers from Heritage Aviation, Ltd, including...

  3. Aviation and healthcare: a comparative review with implications for patient safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapur, Narinder; Parand, Anam; Soukup, Tayana; Reader, Tom; Sevdalis, Nick

    2016-01-01

    Safety in aviation has often been compared with safety in healthcare. Following a recent article in this journal, the UK government set up an Independent Patient Safety Investigation Service, to emulate a similar well-established body in aviation. On the basis of a detailed review of relevant publications that examine patient safety in the context of aviation practice, we have drawn up a table of comparative features and a conceptual framework for patient safety. Convergence and divergence of safety-related behaviours across aviation and healthcare were derived and documented. Key safety-related domains that emerged included Checklists, Training, Crew Resource Management, Sterile Cockpit, Investigation and Reporting of Incidents and Organisational Culture. We conclude that whilst healthcare has much to learn from aviation in certain key domains, the transfer of lessons from aviation to healthcare needs to be nuanced, with the specific characteristics and needs of healthcare borne in mind. On the basis of this review, it is recommended that healthcare should emulate aviation in its resourcing of staff who specialise in human factors and related psychological aspects of patient safety and staff wellbeing. Professional and post-qualification staff training could specifically include Cognitive Bias Avoidance Training, as this appears to play a key part in many errors relating to patient safety and staff wellbeing. PMID:26770817

  4. Auction theory and its potential use in the Army aviation bonus system

    OpenAIRE

    Verenna, Tony Koplin.

    2007-01-01

    The United States Army is increasing its force by 65,000 troops over the next few years. Included in this increase are Army aviators. Retention of the current soldiers in uniform is becoming very difficult as the deployment schedule of the current Global War on Terrorism wears down the individual aviator. Army Aviation is included in this build up of forces, yet it must also compete with the amount of jobs becoming available as the baby boomer generation retires and leaves gaps in both the c...

  5. Ethics Education in University Aviation Management Programs in the US. Part 1; The Need

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oderman, Dale B.

    2002-01-01

    This three-part study examines how four-year universities in the United States with baccalaureate programs in aviation management include ethics instruction in their curricula. Based on a literature review, no research exists to describe the current status of teaching ethics to aviation students. Yet concurrently, unethical activities reported in the media involving the aviation industry indicates the need for such programs. Part One of this study justifies the need for ethics education and develops a series of hypotheses to evaluate the current status of ethics instruction, which was investigated and will be reported on in Parts Two and Three of this study, respectively.

  6. NALDA (Naval Aviation Logistics Data Analysis) CAI (computer aided instruction)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Handler, B.H. (Oak Ridge K-25 Site, TN (USA)); France, P.A.; Frey, S.C.; Gaubas, N.F.; Hyland, K.J.; Lindsey, A.M.; Manley, D.O. (Oak Ridge Associated Universities, Inc., TN (USA)); Hunnum, W.H. (North Carolina Univ., Chapel Hill, NC (USA)); Smith, D.L. (Memphis State Univ., TN (USA))

    1990-07-01

    Data Systems Engineering Organization (DSEO) personnel developed a prototype computer aided instruction CAI system for the Naval Aviation Logistics Data Analysis (NALDA) system. The objective of this project was to provide a CAI prototype that could be used as an enhancement to existing NALDA training. The CAI prototype project was performed in phases. The task undertaken in Phase I was to analyze the problem and the alternative solutions and to develop a set of recommendations on how best to proceed. The findings from Phase I are documented in Recommended CAI Approach for the NALDA System (Duncan et al., 1987). In Phase II, a structured design and specifications were developed, and a prototype CAI system was created. A report, NALDA CAI Prototype: Phase II Final Report, was written to record the findings and results of Phase II. NALDA CAI: Recommendations for an Advanced Instructional Model, is comprised of related papers encompassing research on computer aided instruction CAI, newly developing training technologies, instructional systems development, and an Advanced Instructional Model. These topics were selected because of their relevancy to the CAI needs of NALDA. These papers provide general background information on various aspects of CAI and give a broad overview of new technologies and their impact on the future design and development of training programs. The paper within have been index separately elsewhere.

  7. Thermal cracking of aviation kerosene for scramjet applications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Thermal cracking of China No.3 aviation kerosene was studied experimentally and analytically under supercritical conditions relevant to regenerative cooling system for Mach-6 scramjet applications. A two-stage heated tube system with cracked products collection/analysis was used and it can achieve a fuel temperature range of 700―1100 K,a pressure range of 3.5―4.5 MPa and a residence time of ap-proximately 0.5―1.3 s. Compositions of the cracked gaseous products and mass flow rate of the kerosene flow at varied temperatures and pressures were obtained experimentally. A one-step lumped model was developed with the cracked mixtures grouped into three categories:unreacted kerosene,gaseous products and residuals including liquid products and carbon deposits. Based on the model,fuel conversion on the mass basis,the reaction rate and the residence time were estimated as functions of temperature. Meanwhile,a sonic nozzle was used for the control of the mass flow rate of the cracked kerosene,and correlation of the mass flow rate gives a good agreement with the measurements.

  8. Aviation System Analysis Capability Air Carrier Investment Model-Cargo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Jesse; Santmire, Tara

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of the Aviation System Analysis Capability (ASAC) Air Cargo Investment Model-Cargo (ACIMC), is to examine the economic effects of technology investment on the air cargo market, particularly the market for new cargo aircraft. To do so, we have built an econometrically based model designed to operate like the ACIM. Two main drivers account for virtually all of the demand: the growth rate of the Gross Domestic Product (GDP) and changes in the fare yield (which is a proxy of the price charged or fare). These differences arise from a combination of the nature of air cargo demand and the peculiarities of the air cargo market. The net effect of these two factors are that sales of new cargo aircraft are much less sensitive to either increases in GDP or changes in the costs of labor, capital, fuel, materials, and energy associated with the production of new cargo aircraft than the sales of new passenger aircraft. This in conjunction with the relatively small size of the cargo aircraft market means technology improvements to the cargo aircraft will do relatively very little to spur increased sales of new cargo aircraft.

  9. Flying Wings. A New Paradigm for Civil Aviation?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Martinez-Val

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Over the last 50 years, commercial aviation has been mainly based what is currently called the conventional layout, characterized by a slender fuselage mated to a high aspect ratio wing, with aft-tail planes and pod-mounted engines under the wing. However, it seems that this primary configuration is approaching an asymptote in its productivity and performance characteristics. One of the most promising configurations for the future is the flying wing in its distinct arrangements: blended-wing-body, C-wing, tail-less aircraft, etc. These layouts might provide significant fuel savings and, hence, a decrease in pollution. This configuration would also reduce noise in take-off and landing. All this explains the great deal of activity carried out by the aircraft industry and by numerous investigators to perform feasibility and conceptual design studies of this aircraft layout to gain better knowledge of its main characteristics: productivity, airport compatibility, passenger acceptance, internal architecture, emergency evacuation, etc. The present paper discusses the main features of flying wings, their advantages over conventional competitors, and some key operational issues, such as evacuation and vortex wake intensity. 

  10. Psychophysiological Assessment of Fatigue in Commercial Aviation Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, Norma; Cowings, Patricia; Toscano, William

    2012-01-01

    The overall goal of this study is to improve our understanding of crew work hours, workload, sleep, fatigue, and performance, and the relationships between these variables on actual flight deck performance. Specifically, this study will provide objective measures of physiology and performance, which may benefit investigators in identifying fatigue levels of operators in commercial aviation and provide a way to better design strategies to limit crew fatigue. This research was supported by an agreement between NASA Ames Research Center and easyJet Airline Company, Ltd., Luton, UK. Twenty commercial pilots volunteered to participant in the study that included 15 flight duty days. Participants wore a Zephyr Bioharness ambulatory physiological monitor each flight day, which measured their heart rate, respiration rate, skin temperature, activity and posture. In addition, pilots completed sleep log diaries, self-report scales of mood, sleepiness and workload, and a Performance Vigilance Task (PVT). All data were sent to NASA researchers for processing and analyses. Heart rate variability data of several subjects were subjected to a spectral analysis to examine power in specific frequency bands. Increased power in low frequency band was associated with reports of higher subjective sleepinesss in some subjects. Analyses of other participants data are currently underway.

  11. Relevant Market in Commercial Aviation of the European Union

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakub Kociubiński

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to provide a brief overview of the issue of definition of relevant market in civil aviation within the European Union. The liberalization of the market since the early 1990s has led to a rapid increase in the number of airlines operating in the EU. The increase in the competitiveness of the market has brought many positive changes for passengers, such as lower fares and a better network of connections. At the same time it has created a risk that the airlines, in order to gain a competitive edge, would infringe the rules of competition. This is especially important in the context of the phenomenon that is the development of the airline alliances, which could lead to an abuse of a dominant position. A clear definition of the relevant market is a first step in an assessment of whether such an abuse occurred. This paper focus on the elements that Internal Market regulator, the European Commission, takes into consideration when defining relevant market in the airline industry.

  12. Multiple Kernel Learning for Heterogeneous Anomaly Detection: Algorithm and Aviation Safety Case Study

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The world-wide aviation system is one of the most complex dynamical systems ever developed and is generating data at an extremely rapid rate. Most modern commercial...

  13. An Application of CICCT Accident Categories to Aviation Accidents in 1988-2004

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Joni K.

    2007-01-01

    Interventions or technologies developed to improve aviation safety often focus on specific causes or accident categories. Evaluation of the potential effectiveness of those interventions is dependent upon mapping the historical aviation accidents into those same accident categories. To that end, the United States civil aviation accidents occurring between 1988 and 2004 (n=26,117) were assigned accident categories based upon the taxonomy developed by the CAST/ICAO Common Taxonomy Team (CICTT). Results are presented separately for four main categories of flight rules: Part 121 (large commercial air carriers), Scheduled Part 135 (commuter airlines), Non-Scheduled Part 135 (on-demand air taxi) and Part 91 (general aviation). Injuries and aircraft damage are summarized by year and by accident category.

  14. 75 FR 47311 - Extension of Agency Information Collection Activity Under OMB Review: Aviation Security...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-05

    ... security costs and information reasonably necessary to complete an audit. This requirement includes... SECURITY Transportation Security Administration Extension of Agency Information Collection Activity Under OMB Review: Aviation Security Infrastructure Fee Records Retention AGENCY: Transportation...

  15. 78 FR 4856 - Extension of Agency Information Collection Activity Under OMB Review: Aviation Security...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-23

    ... carrier's calendar year 2000 security costs and information reasonably necessary to complete an audit... SECURITY Transportation Security Administration Extension of Agency Information Collection Activity Under OMB Review: Aviation Security Infrastructure Fee Records Retention AGENCY: Transportation...

  16. 76 FR 62321 - Airworthiness Directives; Aviation Communication & Surveillance Systems (ACSS) Traffic Alert and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-07

    ... Communication & Surveillance Systems (ACSS) Traffic Alert and Collision Avoidance System (TCAS) Units AGENCY... certain Aviation Communication & Surveillance Systems (ACSS) traffic alert and collision avoidance system...) traffic alert and collision avoidance system (TCAS) units with part numbers identified in ACSS...

  17. Object-Oriented Bayesian Networks (OOBN) for Aviation Accident Modeling and Technology Portfolio Impact Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Ann T.; Ancel, Ersin; Jones, Sharon M.

    2012-01-01

    The concern for reducing aviation safety risk is rising as the National Airspace System in the United States transforms to the Next Generation Air Transportation System (NextGen). The NASA Aviation Safety Program is committed to developing an effective aviation safety technology portfolio to meet the challenges of this transformation and to mitigate relevant safety risks. The paper focuses on the reasoning of selecting Object-Oriented Bayesian Networks (OOBN) as the technique and commercial software for the accident modeling and portfolio assessment. To illustrate the benefits of OOBN in a large and complex aviation accident model, the in-flight Loss-of-Control Accident Framework (LOCAF) constructed as an influence diagram is presented. An OOBN approach not only simplifies construction and maintenance of complex causal networks for the modelers, but also offers a well-organized hierarchical network that is easier for decision makers to exploit the model examining the effectiveness of risk mitigation strategies through technology insertions.

  18. 49 CFR 1511.7 - Remittance of Aviation Security Infrastructure Fees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Fees of $1,000 or more must be remitted by electronic funds transfer. (2) Aviation Security Infrastructure Fees under $1,000 may be remitted by electronic funds transfer, check, money order, wire...

  19. The Dunning-Kruger Effect and SIUC University’s Aviation Students

    OpenAIRE

    Pavel, Samuel R.; Robertson, Michael F.; Harrison, Bryan T.

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes a two-part study on the Dunning-Kruger effect in SIUC University’s aviation students. The Dunning-Kruger effect indicates that individuals with lower skill or knowledge levels have unrealistic positive images of their capabilities compared to their peers. Results indicate that the Dunning-Kruger effect is present in SIUC aviation students. Students scoring lower on both a grammar test and a pilot knowledge test grossly overestimated their ability, while higher scoring stu...

  20. The Aviation Certification Requirements And 16g Advanced Dynamic Crash Test

    OpenAIRE

    Özlü, Özgür; AYHAN, Vezir; Cesur, İdris

    2013-01-01

    Companies aspiring to serve in international air space are liable to ensure various security criteria. Therefore, they have to put air vehicles or vehicle equipments they have produced through various tests according to requirements and they have to finalize certification process. In aviation industry, success criterion is specified by ensuring air worthiness; in other words maximizing human security. In aviation businness, seat certification is evaluated in terms of its competency in withsta...

  1. Assessing the Severity of Color Vision Loss with Implications for Aviation and other Occupational Environments

    OpenAIRE

    RODRIGUEZ-CARMONA, M.; O'Neill-Biba, M.; Barbur, J. L.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: The Ishihara Test (IT) is arguably the most sensitive and commonly used color vision test within aviation and other occupational environments, but when no errors are allowed; 20% of normal trichromats fail the test. The number of allowed errors varies in different occupations and sometimes within the same environment (such as aviation) in order to reflect the difficulties of the color-related tasks. The implicit assumption is that the plates can be ranked in order of difficulty....

  2. Impact of Advanced Propeller Technology on Aircraft/Mission Characteristics of Several General Aviation Aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keiter, I. D.

    1982-01-01

    Studies of several General Aviation aircraft indicated that the application of advanced technologies to General Aviation propellers can reduce fuel consumption in future aircraft by a significant amount. Propeller blade weight reductions achieved through the use of composites, propeller efficiency and noise improvements achieved through the use of advanced concepts and improved propeller analytical design methods result in aircraft with lower operating cost, acquisition cost and gross weight.

  3. Deploying contrail forecasting service to reduce the impact of aviation on Environment

    OpenAIRE

    Chhajed, Tejashree Rakumar

    2016-01-01

    The principal objective of this thesis is to propose a Contrail forecasting Service for Aviation(ConSA) and a ConSA client to demonstrate the service. The subject is motivated by the fact that Contrails have a very harmful effect on the environment and it has been researched thoroughly by scientists. But still we do not have an infrastructure to include these researches in the Aviation industry. This thesis has been conducted at Airbus Defence and Space, Friedrichshafen, Germany. The ...

  4. Workload Influence on Fatigue Related Psychological and Physiological Performance Changes of Aviators

    OpenAIRE

    Jin Ma; Ru-Meng Ma; Xi-Wen Liu; Ka Bian; Zhi-Hong Wen; Xiao-Jing Li; Zuo-Ming Zhang; Wen-Dong Hu

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: We evaluated a variety of non-invasive physiological technologies and a series of test approaches for examination of aviator performances under conditions of mental workload in order to provide a standard real-time test for physiological and psychological pilot fatigue assessments. METHODS: Twenty-one male aviators were selected for a simulated flight in a hypobaric cabin with artificial altitude conditions of 2400 meter above sea level. The simulated flight lasted for 1.5 h, and w...

  5. Evaluating alternative network configurations and resource allocations for deployed Marine Corps aviation logistics units

    OpenAIRE

    Jabin, Joshua M.

    2009-01-01

    Approved for public release, distribution unlimited This thesis develops a model and performs analysis to estimate the operational effectiveness of the Marine Aviation Logistics Support Program II (MALSP II) under different system configurations and resource allocation policies. MALSP II is designed to protect the aviation logistics system from uncertain, possibly high variance, demand that could have a significant detrimental impact on the material readiness of deployed aircraft. Altho...

  6. An Integrated Framework for Fostering Human Factor Sustainability and Increased Safety in Aviation Ramp Operations

    OpenAIRE

    Hubbard, Sarah M; Lopp, Denver

    2015-01-01

    The aviation work environment has one of the highest accident rates of any industry sector in the United States, resulting in significant costs for both employee injuries and equipment damage. In fact, injury rates exceed rates found in areas that are widely recognized as hazardous, such as construction and mining, and it is estimated that aircraft ground damage costs are as high as 5 billion to 10 billion dollars per year. Purdue University’s Aviation Technology Department has conducted nume...

  7. The impact of the European Union Emissions Trading Scheme on US aviation

    OpenAIRE

    Malina, Robert; McConnachie, Dominic; Winchester, Niven Stewart; Wollersheim, Christoph; Paltsev, Sergey; Waitz, Ian A.

    2011-01-01

    We estimate the economic impacts on US airlines that may arise from the inclusion of aviation in the European Union Emissions Trading Scheme from 2012 to 2020. We find that the Scheme would only have a small impact on US airlines and emissions, and that aviation operations would continue to grow. If carriers pass on all additional costs, including the opportunity costs associated with free allowances, to consumers, profits for US carriers will increase. Windfall gains from free allowances may...

  8. Automating the aviation command safety assessment survey as an Enterprise Information System (EIS)

    OpenAIRE

    Held, Jonathan S.; Mingo, Fred J.

    1999-01-01

    The Aviation Command Safety Assessment (ACSA) is a questionnaire survey methodology developed to evaluate a Naval Aviation Command's safety climate, culture, and safety program effectiveness. This survey was a manual process first administered in the fall of 1996. The primary goal of this thesis is to design, develop, and test an Internet-based, prototype model for administering this survey using new technologies that allow automated survey submission and analysis. The result of this thesis i...

  9. NASA Aviation Safety Program Weather Accident Prevention/weather Information Communications (WINCOMM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feinberg, Arthur; Tauss, James; Chomos, Gerald (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Weather is a contributing factor in approximately 25-30 percent of general aviation accidents. The lack of timely, accurate and usable weather information to the general aviation pilot in the cockpit to enhance pilot situational awareness and improve pilot judgment remains a major impediment to improving aviation safety. NASA Glenn Research Center commissioned this 120 day weather datalink market survey to assess the technologies, infrastructure, products, and services of commercial avionics systems being marketed to the general aviation community to address these longstanding safety concerns. A market survey of companies providing or proposing to provide graphical weather information to the general aviation cockpit was conducted. Fifteen commercial companies were surveyed. These systems are characterized and evaluated in this report by availability, end-user pricing/cost, system constraints/limits and technical specifications. An analysis of market survey results and an evaluation of product offerings were made. In addition, recommendations to NASA for additional research and technology development investment have been made as a result of this survey to accelerate deployment of cockpit weather information systems for enhancing aviation safety.

  10. Alternative bio-based fuels for aviation: the clean airports program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Renewable Aviation Fuels Development Center at Baylor University in Waco, Texas, has been designated as the national coordinator of the Clean Airports Program. The U.S. Dept. of Energy (US DOE) conferred this designation in March 1996. This program, a spin-off of the Clean Cities Program, was initiated to increase the use of alternative fuels in aviation. The two major fuels used in aviation are the current piston engine aviation gasoline and the current turbine engine fuel. The environmental impact of each of these fuels is significant. Aviation gasoline (100LL), currently used in the general aviation piston engine fleet, contributes 100% of the emissions containing lead in the U.S. today. Turbine engine fuel (jet fuel) produces two major environmental impacts: a local one, in the vicinity of the airports, and a global impact on climate change. The Clean Airports Program was established to achieve and maintain clean air at and in the vicinity of airports, through the use of alternative fuel-powered air and ground transportation vehicles. (author)

  11. Temporal and spatial variability in the aviation NOx-related O3 impact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aviation NOx emissions promote tropospheric ozone formation, which is linked to climate warming and adverse health effects. Modeling studies have quantified the relative impact of aviation NOx on O3 in large geographic regions. As these studies have applied forward modeling techniques, it has not been possible to attribute O3 formation to individual flights. Here we apply the adjoint of the global chemistry–transport model GEOS-Chem to assess the temporal and spatial variability in O3 production due to aviation NOx emissions, which is the first application of an adjoint to this problem. We find that total aviation NOx emitted in October causes 40% more O3 than in April and that Pacific aviation emissions could cause 4–5 times more tropospheric O3 per unit NOx than European or North American emissions. Using this sensitivity approach, the O3 burden attributable to 83 000 unique scheduled civil flights is computed individually. We find that the ten highest total O3-producing flights have origins or destinations in New Zealand or Australia. The top ranked O3-producing flights normalized by fuel burn cause 157 times more normalized O3 formation than the bottom ranked ones. These results show significant spatial and temporal heterogeneity in environmental impacts of aviation NOx emissions. (letter)

  12. Alternate Communications Spectrum Study (ACSS) for Aviation Data Links (ADL)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matolak, David W.

    2003-01-01

    The aim of the work was to identify the key factors involved in the use of alternate spectrum in various bands for a future integrated CNS data link. The study focused on systems and spectral bands that can deliver VDL-or-higher data rates in a two-way communication setting (including air-ground, ground-air, and air-air modes of operation), with multiple platforms (aircraft) operating in the same local environment. We begin with a review of the initial task list, and the final task list. The final task list contained a focus upon spectral availability and related systems that could be affected by the deployment of a new aviation data link (ADL) system. Most of this addresses the lower few layers of the communications protocol stack. A brief review of current related efforts in the aeronautical community is then provided, in which we describe several systems and programs of interest. Participation in some of these efforts is recommended. We also delineate several of the advantages and disadvantages of these system/efforts, in view of anticipated requirements of a new ADL. Desired attributes of a new ADL system are then discussed, and a connection with existing systems is made. The need to consider a wider set of alternative systems and technologies is described, and the beneficial aspects of a particular transmission technique- spread spectrum-are discussed. We then discuss in more detail several potential spectral regions, in terms of propagation conditions, available technology, spectrum availability, and waveform selection. Some comments on the need for standardization are also provided. We note that none of the existing systems described will likely meet the full range of desired features of a new ADL, but that several systems and spectral regions offer promise in terms of one or more characteristics. A system design and analysis approach is then provided. In this, we again focus on the lower few layers of the protocol stack, and aim to capture the main features

  13. Applications of human error analysis to aviation and space operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, W.R.

    1998-07-01

    For the past several years at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) we have been working to apply methods of human error analysis to the design of complex systems. We have focused on adapting human reliability analysis (HRA) methods that were developed for Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA) for application to system design. We are developing methods so that human errors can be systematically identified during system design, the potential consequences of each error can be assessed, and potential corrective actions (e.g. changes to system design or procedures) can be identified. These applications lead to different requirements when compared with HR.As performed as part of a PSA. For example, because the analysis will begin early during the design stage, the methods must be usable when only partial design information is available. In addition, the ability to perform numerous ''what if'' analyses to identify and compare multiple design alternatives is essential. Finally, since the goals of such human error analyses focus on proactive design changes rather than the estimate of failure probabilities for PRA, there is more emphasis on qualitative evaluations of error relationships and causal factors than on quantitative estimates of error frequency. The primary vehicle we have used to develop and apply these methods has been a series of projects sponsored by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) to apply human error analysis to aviation operations. The first NASA-sponsored project had the goal to evaluate human errors caused by advanced cockpit automation. Our next aviation project focused on the development of methods and tools to apply human error analysis to the design of commercial aircraft. This project was performed by a consortium comprised of INEEL, NASA, and Boeing Commercial Airplane Group. The focus of the project was aircraft design and procedures that could lead to human errors during

  14. FORMING MANAGEMENT IMPACTS IN AVIATION COMPANIES ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT ADMINISTRATION SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria Prokhorova

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Oriented reflective approach to management involves restructuring of goal, ideal and pragmatic, creating a program of action, organizing, correcting, control the definition of the new strategy. This process is only possible with multidimensional analysis and reflection of all the administrative restructuring process and its elements in determining and planning activities, creating conditions of restructuring, predicting outcomes and consequences of making a choice of ways to solve problems means to achieve the goal of information called ' bonds with participants restructuring process and correction flow management process based on continuous reflection. Methods: Development of the system of economic development now requires the use of mechanisms for continuous monitoring of internal and external environment to identify factors that threaten businesses. Rest of this is possible through the use of diagnostic tests: static analysis, expert diagnosis, linear and dynamic programming. Results: Built as part of the study economic and mathematical models can determine the status and level of economic development potential of aerospace companies that were investigated, confirming the need for action to manage economic development. To develop the mechanism of competition in the aircraft building sector must: implementation in practice of management motivation mechanisms to ensure the appropriate level of interest in the functioning of airlines on the basis of private property; formation of economic market institutions in the field of aircraft construction, affecting the creation of a competitive environment. Discussion: Stipulates that in difficult economic crisis positive results can be achieved managers who are constantly looking for original approaches to inclusion in the development process by aligning internal external opportunities generated by market. It is concluded that aviation business management in times of economic instability or

  15. Application of human error analysis to aviation and space operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, W.R.

    1998-03-01

    For the past several years at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) the authors have been working to apply methods of human error analysis to the design of complex systems. They have focused on adapting human reliability analysis (HRA) methods that were developed for Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA) for application to system design. They are developing methods so that human errors can be systematically identified during system design, the potential consequences of each error can be assessed, and potential corrective actions (e.g. changes to system design or procedures) can be identified. The primary vehicle the authors have used to develop and apply these methods has been a series of projects sponsored by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) to apply human error analysis to aviation operations. They are currently adapting their methods and tools of human error analysis to the domain of air traffic management (ATM) systems. Under the NASA-sponsored Advanced Air Traffic Technologies (AATT) program they are working to address issues of human reliability in the design of ATM systems to support the development of a free flight environment for commercial air traffic in the US. They are also currently testing the application of their human error analysis approach for space flight operations. They have developed a simplified model of the critical habitability functions for the space station Mir, and have used this model to assess the affects of system failures and human errors that have occurred in the wake of the collision incident last year. They are developing an approach so that lessons learned from Mir operations can be systematically applied to design and operation of long-term space missions such as the International Space Station (ISS) and the manned Mars mission.

  16. The Aviation System Analysis Capability Air Carrier Cost-Benefit Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaier, Eric M.; Edlich, Alexander; Santmire, Tara S.; Wingrove, Earl R.., III

    1999-01-01

    To meet its objective of assisting the U.S. aviation industry with the technological challenges of the future, NASA must identify research areas that have the greatest potential for improving the operation of the air transportation system. Therefore, NASA is developing the ability to evaluate the potential impact of various advanced technologies. By thoroughly understanding the economic impact of advanced aviation technologies and by evaluating how the new technologies will be used in the integrated aviation system, NASA aims to balance its aeronautical research program and help speed the introduction of high-leverage technologies. To meet these objectives, NASA is building the Aviation System Analysis Capability (ASAC). NASA envisions ASAC primarily as a process for understanding and evaluating the impact of advanced aviation technologies on the U.S. economy. ASAC consists of a diverse collection of models and databases used by analysts and other individuals from the public and private sectors brought together to work on issues of common interest to organizations in the aviation community. ASAC also will be a resource available to the aviation community to analyze; inform; and assist scientists, engineers, analysts, and program managers in their daily work. The ASAC differs from previous NASA modeling efforts in that the economic behavior of buyers and sellers in the air transportation and aviation industries is central to its conception. Commercial air carriers, in particular, are an important stakeholder in this community. Therefore, to fully evaluate the implications of advanced aviation technologies, ASAC requires a flexible financial analysis tool that credibly links the technology of flight with the financial performance of commercial air carriers. By linking technical and financial information, NASA ensures that its technology programs will continue to benefit the user community. In addition, the analysis tool must be capable of being incorporated into the

  17. The global impact of the transport sectors on atmospheric aerosol in 2030 – Part 2: Aviation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Righi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available We use the EMAC (ECHAM/MESSy Atmospheric Chemistry global climate-chemistry model coupled to the aerosol module MADE (Modal Aerosol Dynamics model for Europe, adapted for global applications to simulate the impact of aviation emissions on global atmospheric aerosol and climate in 2030. Emissions of short-lived gas and aerosol species follow the four Representative Concentration Pathways (RCPs designed in support of the Fifth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. We compare our findings with the results of a previous study with the same model configuration focusing on year 2000 emissions. We also characterize the aviation results in the context of the other transport sectors presented in a companion paper. In spite of a relevant increase in aviation traffic volume and resulting emissions of aerosol (black carbon and aerosol precursor species (nitrogen oxides and sulfur dioxide, the aviation effect on particle mass concentration in 2030 remains quite negligible (on the order of a few ng m-3, about one order of magnitude less than the increase in concentration due to other emission sources. Due to the relatively small size of the aviation-induced aerosol, however, the increase in particle number concentration is significant in all scenarios (about 1000 cm-3, mostly affecting the northern mid-latitudes at typical flight altitudes (7–12 km. This largely contributes to the overall change in particle number concentration between 2000 and 2030, which results also in significant climate effects due to aerosol-cloud interactions. Aviation is the only transport sector for which a larger impact on the Earth's radiation budget is simulated in the future: The aviation-induced RF in 2030 is more than doubled with respect to the year 2000 value of −15 mW m-2, with a maximum value of −63 mW m-2 simulated for RCP2.6.

  18. Job satisfaction among United States Navy and Marine Corps Aviation Officers - a study of the impact on career retention

    OpenAIRE

    Sullivan, Daniel J.

    1998-01-01

    United States Naval Aviation Officer retention has been identified by senior-level personnel managers as one of the largest challenges faced by the services in recent years. In robust economic times all branches of the armed forces face the challenge of retaining sufficient highly-trained volunteers. The aviation community is disproportionately affected due to the long lead time associated with aviation officer training and the potential for long-term lucrative civilian job opportunities comp...

  19. 66 Years of the Chicago Convention on International Civil Aviation - New Trends in the International Law of the Air

    OpenAIRE

    Krasnicka, Izabela

    2010-01-01

    The international law of aviation (law of the air) is one of the most dynamic fields of public international law. The Chicago Convention on International Civil Aviation dates back to 1944, and is still the fundamental set of rules regarding the use of air territory of the states. However, a growing number of bilateral, multilateral and regional agreements dedicated to the civil aviation, especially international air transportation, must be taken into account. What used to be called a “Chicago...

  20. Melting Behavior of Volcanic Ash relevant to Aviation Ash Hazard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, W.; Hess, K.; Lavallee, Y.; Cimarelli, C.; Dingwell, D. B.

    2013-12-01

    Volcanic ash is one of the major hazards caused by volcanic eruptions. In particular, the threat to aviation from airborne volcanic ash has been widely recognized and documented. In the past 12 years, more than 60 modern jet airplanes, mostly jumbo jets, have been damaged by drifting clouds of volcanic ash that have contaminated air routes and airport facilities. Seven of these encounters are known to have caused in-flight loss of engine power to jumbo jets carrying a total of more than 2000 passengers. The primary cause of engine thrust loss is that the glass in volcanic ash particles is generated at temperatures far lower than the temperatures in the combustion chamber of a jet engine ( i.e. > 1600 oC) and when the molten volcanic ash particles leave this hottest section of the engine, the resolidified molten volcanic ash particles will be accumulated on the turbine nozzle guide vanes, which reduced the effective flow of air through the engine ultimately causing failure. Thus, it is essential to investigate the melting process and subsequent deposition behavior of volcanic ash under gas turbine conditions. Although few research studies that investigated the deposition behavior of volcanic ash at the high temperature are to be found in public domain, to the best our knowledge, no work addresses the formation of molten volcanic ash. In this work, volcanic ash produced by Santiaguito volcano in Guatemala in November 8, 2012 was selected for study because of their recent activity and potential hazard to aircraft safety. We used the method of accessing the behavior of deposit-forming impurities in high temperature boiler plants on the basis of observations of the change in shape and size of a cylindrical coal ash to study the sintering and fusion phenomena as well as determine the volcanic ash melting behavior by using characteristic temperatures by means of hot stage microscope (HSM), different thermal analysis (DTA) and Thermal Gravimetric Analysis (TGA) to

  1. History of Turkish Air Force Aviation School and the Process of Transition to Air Force Academy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osman YALÇIN

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Turkish aviation has started as a military entity. The foundation of ‘’Tayyare Komisyonu’’ (Airplane Comission in June 1, 1911 has been accepted as the official starting point. The organization of aviation includes pilot training, airplane supply, fondation of aviation school, establishment of combatant units, and building the air vehicles with local and national endeavour. Later, air defense systems, meteorology, training observers, machine specialist and technicians has gained importance as well. Turkish aviation has been built upon the ruins of the last wars of Ottoman Empire. After the invasion of the British and the French, Ottoman aviators moved to Maltepe and then to various parts of Anatolia eventually. During the Independence War, aviation school was founded in Eskişehir, moved to Adana, Konya, and came back to Adana again. After the Greek forces were expelled from Anatolia via İzmir, aviation school was moved to İzmir. In 1925, it was brought back to Eskişehir on October 1, 1951. After WWII, the duration of training in order to be a pilot was six years. In 1929, aviation school turned out to be an academic institution as well. On October 1, 1951, Air Force Academy was established in Eskişehir. Due to high sound of jet air planes, the academy was moved to İzmir in 1954. Education and training were restructured there and the quality was raised. In 1967, Air Force Academy was moved back to Yeşilköy where Turkish aviation was born some 47 years ago. Due to academic diversity and rich culture heritage, a productive period has started in Istanbul. Air Force Academy has been an institution offering BA level education since 2001 whose process goes back to 1990s. Around 90 civilian and 50 military academicians conduct education and research per year. Military training including Yalova encampment site, affective domain training, and sports activities are also conducted as well. With a 103 years history and around 16.000 graduates

  2. 75 FR 54939 - The Future of Aviation Advisory Committee (FAAC) Subcommittee on Labor and World-Class Workforce...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-09

    ... dignity and respect in the workplace; and (3) the impact of Next Generation Air Transportation System on... Human Resources, Federal Aviation Administration, 800 Independence Avenue, SW., Washington, DC...

  3. FLYING DOWN TO RIO: AMERICAN COMMERCIAL AVIATION, THE GOOD NEIGHBOR POLICY AND WORLD WAR TWO, 1939-45

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik Benson

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available This article will address the role of American commercial aviation in the Good Neighbor policy during the period of World War Two. The Good Neighbor was a complex policy, and American commercial aviation both reflected and augmented this complexity. Through the early years of thew orld war, American commercial aviation proved to be a valuable instrument for promoting hemispheric unity. Yet as the war progressed, commercial aviation became a catalyst for conflict and an indicator of the demise of the Good Neighbor policy.

  4. Causal Factors and Adverse Events of Aviation Accidents and Incidents Related to Integrated Vehicle Health Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reveley, Mary S.; Briggs, Jeffrey L.; Evans, Joni K.; Jones, Sharon M.; Kurtoglu, Tolga; Leone, Karen M.; Sandifer, Carl E.

    2011-01-01

    Causal factors in aviation accidents and incidents related to system/component failure/malfunction (SCFM) were examined for Federal Aviation Regulation Parts 121 and 135 operations to establish future requirements for the NASA Aviation Safety Program s Integrated Vehicle Health Management (IVHM) Project. Data analyzed includes National Transportation Safety Board (NSTB) accident data (1988 to 2003), Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) incident data (1988 to 2003), and Aviation Safety Reporting System (ASRS) incident data (1993 to 2008). Failure modes and effects analyses were examined to identify possible modes of SCFM. A table of potential adverse conditions was developed to help evaluate IVHM research technologies. Tables present details of specific SCFM for the incidents and accidents. Of the 370 NTSB accidents affected by SCFM, 48 percent involved the engine or fuel system, and 31 percent involved landing gear or hydraulic failure and malfunctions. A total of 35 percent of all SCFM accidents were caused by improper maintenance. Of the 7732 FAA database incidents affected by SCFM, 33 percent involved landing gear or hydraulics, and 33 percent involved the engine and fuel system. The most frequent SCFM found in ASRS were turbine engine, pressurization system, hydraulic main system, flight management system/flight management computer, and engine. Because the IVHM Project does not address maintenance issues, and landing gear and hydraulic systems accidents are usually not fatal, the focus of research should be those SCFMs that occur in the engine/fuel and flight control/structures systems as well as power systems.

  5. Legal environment and operation of general aviation aerodromes – the overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henryk JAFERNIK

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The functioning of general aviation aerodromes in Poland are regulated by more than 20 national and international legal acts. Knowledge about air law and its application ensures safe operations and flights at aerodromes and airfields. This paper summarizes source of law for general aviation and associated with its development strategies and reports. In the development of general aviation important role play small aerodromes, which are a “meeting point” for air transport sector and local economy, increase investments and tourism attractiveness of the region as well as are "meaningful way for the development of the region". Despite this, there is no legal act comprehensively regulating the issue of financial support for investment at important local aerodromes.

  6. Current concepts of oral and maxillofacial rehabilitation and treatment in aviation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuce, Esra; Koçer, Gulperi; Çini, Turan Atila

    2016-01-01

    Aerospace medicine is the medical discipline responsible for assessing and conserving the health, safety, and performance of individuals involved in air and space travel. With the upward trend in airline travel, flight-related oral conditions requiring treatment have become a source of concern for aircrew members. Awareness and treatment of any potential physiological problems for these aircrews have always been critical components of aviation safety. In a flight situation, oral and maxillofacial problems may in fact become life-threatening clinical conditions. The unusual nature of aerospace medicine requires practitioners to have unique expertise. Special attention to aerospace medicine will open the way for professionals to develop and apply their skills and capabilities. Both dentists and aviators should be aware of the issues involved in aviation dentistry. This article presents the principles of prevention, treatment guidelines, and dental-related flight restrictions. PMID:27599281

  7. Developing Quantum Dot Phosphor-Based Light-Emitting Diodes for Aviation Lighting Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fengbing Wu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We have investigated the feasibility of employing quantum dot (QD phosphor-based light-emitting diodes (LEDs in aviation applications that request Night Vision Imaging Systems (NVIS compliance. Our studies suggest that the emerging QD phosphor-based LED technology could potentially be superior to conventional aviation lighting technology by virtue of the marriage of tight spectral control and broad wavelength tunability. This largely arises from the fact that the optical properties of semiconductor nanocrystal QDs can be tailored by varying the nanocrystal size without any compositional changes. It is envisioned that the QD phosphor-based LEDs hold great potentials in cockpit illumination, back light sources of monitor screens, as well as the LED indicator lights of aviation panels.

  8. Integrated Framework for Understanding Relationship Between Human Error and Aviation Safety

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐锡东

    2009-01-01

    Introducing a framework for understanding the relationship between human error and aviation safety from mul-tiple perspectives and using multiple models. The first part of the framework is the perspective of individual operator using the information processing model. The second part is the group perspective with the Crew Re-source Management (CRM) model. The third and final is the organization perspective using Reason's Swiss cheese model. Each of the perspectives and models has been in existence for a long time, but the integrated framework presented allows a systematic understanding of the complex relationship between human error and aviation safety, along with the numerous factors that cause or influence error. The framework also allows the i-dentification of mitigation measures to systematically reduce human error and improve aviation safety.

  9. EU Accession and Civil Aviation Regimes: Malta and Cyprus as a Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papatheodorou, Andreas; Busuttil, Louis

    2003-01-01

    Aviation deregulation is usually a challenging and demanding task and accession to the European Union requires that all candidate states should harmonize their legislation in the context of the European Common Aviation Area. Malta and Cyprus, the small Mediterranean island-states to join the EU in 2004, will have to abandon any protectionist policies in favour of their flag-carriers and let them survive in a liberal framework. The paper discusses the implications of this regime change for civil aviation in Malta and Cyprus and in addition to the airline industry, it examines the impacts on the complementary tourism sector. Unless carrying capacity limits are understood, the islands may become victims of successful airline liberalisation. The paper concludes by stressing the need for sustainable development and active policy making. Keywords: carrying capacity, Cyprus, air transport deregulation, Malta, tourism

  10. BASICS OF FORMATION FOR A CONTROLLING SYSTEMS AT THE ENTERPRISES OF THE AVIATION INDUSTRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kruglova Irina Sergeevna

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of this article is to present the need for the introduction of elements system of controlling of large industrial plants, particularly in the aviation sector, as at this stage there is a need for understanding the most modern management techniques. Research in this area is based on the practical experience of individual aviation companies, as well as their work in cooperation, the general trend of industrial corporations to understand the need for the introduction of innovative control systems. The article provides a stepwise algorithm for setting the controlling system as a strategic structure to integrate all areas of life of the enterprise for the purpose of providing information in any necessary form. The results of this work may be useful to specialists in the field of management, changing as well as the financial and economic services industry aviation sector.

  11. Investigation of aviation emission impacts on global tropospheric chemistry and climate using a size-resolved aerosol-chemistry model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapadia, Zarashpe; Spracklen, Dominick; Arnold, Stephen; Borman, Duncan; Mann, Graham; Pringle, Kirsty; Monks, Sarah; Reddington, Carly; Rap, Alexandru; Scott, Catherine

    2014-05-01

    Aviation is responsible for 3% of global anthropogenic CO2 emissions, but 2-14% of anthropogenic induced climate warming due to contributions from short lived climate forcers. The global civil aviation fleet is projected to double by 2026 in relation to a 2006 baseline and so will play a substantial role in future climate change. Uncertainty in the net impact of aviation on climate is largely due to uncertainty in the impacts of aviation emissions on ozone and aerosol. To study the impact of aviation emissions we use the GLOMAP-mode global aerosol microphysics model coupled to the 3-D chemical transport model TOMCAT. GLOMAP-mode has been extended to include treatment of nitrate aerosol. We include a full suite of non-CO2 aviation emissions (including NOX, SO2, HCs, BC and OC) in the model. We combined the simulated changes in ozone and aerosol with a 3D radiative transfer model to quantify the radiative effect due to aviation non-CO2 emissions. We find that aviation emissions increase O3 concentrations by up to 5.3% in the upper troposphere (UT), broadly matching previous studies. Black carbon (BC) and organic carbon (OC) concentrations increase by 26.5% and 14.6% respectively in the UT, whereas nitrate aerosol is reduced in some regions due to co-emission of NOX and SO2 In the UT, aviation emissions increase both total aerosol number as well as the concentration of particles greater than 70 nm diameter (N70). Entrainment of these particles into the free troposphere results in aviation emissions also increasing N70 in the boundary layer, causing a cooling through the first aerosol indirect effect. We explore differences in these responses compared with those simulated when using the recommended aviation emissions from CMIP5 (5th Climate Model Intercomparison Project), which only include NOX and BC emissions. Our results suggest that aviation emissions of SO2 and HCs neglected by CMIP5 produce important effects on ozone, aerosol number, and N70. We suggest CMIP5

  12. Personal traits and a sense of job-related stress in a military aviation crew

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Čabarkapa Milanko

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Accelerated technological and organizational changes in numerous professions lead to increase in jobrelated stress. Since these changes are particularly common in military aviation, this study examined the way military aviation crew experiences job-related stress during a regular aviation drill, depending on particular social-demographic factors and personal traits. Methods. The modified Cooper questionnaire was used to examine the stress related factors at work. The questionnaire was adapted for the aviation crew in the army environment. Personal characteristics were examined using the NEO-PI-R personality inventory. The study included 50 examinees (37 pilots and 13 other crew members employed in the Serbian Army. The studies were performed during routine physical examinations at the Institute for Aviation Medicine during the year 2007. Statistical analysis of the study results contained descriptive analysis, one-way analysis of variance and correlation analysis. Results. It was shown that army aviation crew works under high stress. The highest stress value had the intrinsic factor (AS = 40.94 and role in organisation (AS = 39.92, while the lowest one had the interpersonal relationship factor (AS = 29.98. The results also showed that some social-demographic variables (such as younger examinees, shorter working experience and neuroticism as a personality trait, were in correlation with job-related stress. Conclusion. Stress evaluation and certain personality characteristics examination can be used for the devalopment of the basic anti-stress programs and measures in order to achieve better psychological selection, adaptation career leadership and organization of military pilots and other crew members.

  13. Brigadier General Theodore C Lyster [correction of Lister], MD: father of American aviation medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrios, J; O'Leary, J P

    2000-07-01

    Aviation medicine came into existence as a recognized entity when certain standards were established during and shortly after World War I. During this time, accident rates were high. In fact, a larger number of pilots were dying in accidents than in combat. Figures from Great Britain's casualty list at the close of the first year of World War I indicated that for every 100 aviators killed, 60 died as a result of some individual physical defect, 30 from some form of recklessness or careless behavior, 8 as a result of some mechanical defect in the airplane, and only 2 at the hands of the enemy. Aviators were found to be in poor physical condition. Because there were no established regulations with regard to workloads, aviators were frequently found to have been flying to a point beyond exhaustion. Because of workload, chronic fatigue, and emotional stress, aviators were constantly called upon to perform superhuman feats when not in peak physical condition. Errors in judgement were common. The majority of pilots lost weight as a somatic sign of stress. This was recognized by Theodore Lyster [corrected] who had recently been appointed as the Chief Surgeon, Aviation Section of the U.S. Army. Such problems were not diagnosed by medical officers because they were not trained to recognize them. Theodore Charles Lyster [corrected] was the son of Captain William J. and Martha Doughty Lyster [corrected]. He was an Army "brat" who entered the world on July 10, 1875. His childhood was spent in various posts around the country. At the age of 7, Lyster [corrected] contracted yellow fever while living in Fort Brown, TX. The boy was treated by William Gorgas, a young post surgeon. Gorgas was credited with the young boy's recovery. Later, Gorgas was to marry Lyster's [corrected] aunt making Lyster [corrected] his nephew by marriage. Having survived the yellow fever infection, young Lyster [corrected] had a lifelong immunity to the disease. PMID:10917489

  14. Cross-Cultural Barriers to Effective Communication in Aviation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, U.; Orasanu, J.; Davison, J.; Rosekind, Mark R. (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    Communication is essential to safe flight, as evidenced by several accidents in which crew communicates was found to have contributed to the accidents. This chapter documents the essential role of explicit efficient communication to flight safety with a global context. It addresses communication between flight crews and air traffic controllers in regions a the world where pilots and controllers speak different native languages, as well as cases in which crew members within the flight deck represent different native languages and cultures. It also addresses problems associated with "exporting" crew resource management training programs to parts of the world which values and norms differ from those of the United States, where these programs were initially developed. This chapter is organized around several central questions: (1) What are various kinds of communication failures and what are their consequences; (2) What are the causes of communication failure; (3) What are features of effective crew communication; (4) What can be done to enhance communication success? To explore a wider range of communication failures than available from accident reports, we examined a set of incident reports from the Aviation Safety Reporting System. These could be classified into three major categories: those in which language actually interfered with transmission of a message; those in which transmission was adequate but the context was not expressed unambiguously and thus the message received was not the same as the message intended; and those in which the message was received as intended, but was not adequately understood or acted upon, mainly because of cultural factors. The consequences of failed communication can be flight errors (such as when a clearance is not received correctly), loss of situation awareness, or failure of crew members (or ATC and pilots) to build a shared understanding of a situation. Causes of misunderstanding can be traced to a number of sources, often

  15. A revolutionary approach to composite construction and flight management systems for small, general aviation airplanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roskam, Jan; Wenninger, ED

    1992-01-01

    The design studies for two composite general aviation airplanes are presented. The main consideration for both of the designs was to avoid the typical 'metal replacement' philosophy that has hindered the widespread use of composites in general aviation aircraft. The first design is for a low wing aircraft based on the Smith Aircraft Corporation GT-3 Global Trainer. The second aircraft is a composite version of the Cessna 152. The project was conducted as a graduate level design class under the auspices of the KU/NASA/USRA Advanced Design Program in aeronautics. The results obtained from the Fall semester of 1991 and the Spring semester of 1992 are presented.

  16. [Specific individual characteristics of aviation specialists of small professional groups with different levels of psychological compatibility].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tret'iakov, N V

    1990-01-01

    Professional interaction of members of small groups of aviation operators was subject to psychophysiological analysis. Using the study of professional interaction of operators and the theory of operational mediation of personality relations, the major parameters characterizing psychological compatibility were determined. The practical application of these characteristics helped select small groups of aviation specialists, who differed largely in their psychological compatibility, compare them in terms of a great number of personality parameters, and define their various combinations. The list of variants presented may help better describe and predict psychological compatibility of members of small professional groups.

  17. Design study of a low cost civil aviation GPS receiver system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cnossen, R.; Gilbert, G. A.

    1979-01-01

    A low cost Navstar receiver system for civil aviation applications was defined. User objectives and constraints were established. Alternative navigation processing design trades were evaluated. Receiver hardware was synthesized by comparing technology projections with various candidate system designs. A control display unit design was recommended as the result of field test experience with Phase I GPS sets and a review of special human factors for general aviation users. Areas requiring technology development to ensure a low cost Navstar Set in the 1985 timeframe were identified.

  18. Industry Issue Paper: The United States—European Union Open Aviation Area: The American Perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Hofer, Christian; Dresner, Martin

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a comprehensive analysis of current United States–European Union (U.S.–E.U.) aviation relations. Following a brief historical review, the proposed North-Atlantic Open Aviation Area is discussed. Specifically, the associated economic benefits are assessed, and the causes of the current deadlock in U.S.–E.U. negotiations are analyzed. Particular attention is paid to the interests and actions of U.S. stakeholders, most notably U.S. airlines, labor organizations, the Departmen...

  19. A method for monitoring the variability in nuclear absorption characteristics of aviation fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprinkle, Danny R.; Shen, Chih-Ping

    1988-01-01

    A technique for monitoring variability in the nuclear absorption characteristics of aviation fuels has been developed. It is based on a highly collimated low energy gamma radiation source and a sodium iodide counter. The source and the counter assembly are separated by a geometrically well-defined test fuel cell. A computer program for determining the mass attenuation coefficient of the test fuel sample, based on the data acquired for a preset counting period, has been developed and tested on several types of aviation fuel.

  20. Developing an ICAO Criteria Aviation English Proficiency Test for CAAC Pilots

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Aisha

    2008-01-01

    Since the ICAO new aviation language requirement comes into being in 2003, several tester organizations try to develop tests for pilots. Recently CAAC has tried to develop ICAO criteria Aviation English Proficiency Test for Pilots. But, does Chinese pilots' language proficiency satisfy the ICAO requirements? How to test a pilot's language ability? How to develop ICAO standard test? To explore the keys to these questions, the paper has applied the theoretical framework in development of the test, in construction of the tests and in scoring.

  1. 77 FR 18297 - Air Traffic Noise, Fuel Burn, and Emissions Modeling Using the Aviation Environmental Design Tool...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-27

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Air Traffic Noise, Fuel Burn, and Emissions Modeling Using the Aviation... one airport, or includes actions above 3,000 feet , noise modeling will be conducted using [the Noise... required tool for noise, fuel burn, and emissions modeling of air traffic airspace and procedure...

  2. Aircraft Landing Gear, Ice and Rain Control Systems (Course Outline), Aviation Mechanics 3 (Air Frame):9067.02.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dade County Public Schools, Miami, FL.

    This document presents an outline for a 135-hour course designed to familiarize the student with operation, inspection, troubleshooting, and repair of aircraft landing gear, ice and rain control systems. It is designed to help the trainee master the knowledge and skills necessary to become an aviation airframe mechanic. The aviation airframe…

  3. 78 FR 32416 - Intent To Request Renewal From OMB of One Current Public Collection of Information: Aviation...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-30

    ... travelers to measure customer satisfaction of aviation security in an effort to more efficiently manage... for the first time. The new questions will allow TSA to better measure customer satisfaction with Risk... Collection of Information: Aviation Security Customer Satisfaction Performance Measurement Passenger...

  4. Flying with doctors: Experiences with the application of 6 techniques from aviation industry in the Rotterdam Eye Hospital

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.F. de Korne (Dirk); U.F. Hiddema (Frans); F.G. Bleeker (Fred); N.S. Klazinga (Niek)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractIntoduction. Aviation industry is often put forward as an example in creating safer health care. Comparing aviation and health care, there are similarities in using technology, working with highly specialized professional teams and the need for dealing with risk and uncertainties (Sexton

  5. [Visual tests and their score for selection of candidates to higher aviation schools].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okovitov, V V

    1996-01-01

    In the majority of countries the requirements to refraction and visual acuity into the distance of candidates to aviation schools are extremely high. However, despite rigorous selection the number of students expelled from aviation schools for the reason of myopia remains impressive and even tends to rise. Aside from high incidence of myopia, this is the consequence of considerable visual loading of students and low-informative methods of examination. Simple and easy accommodation tests, the so-called visual loading tests, were applied to 628 candidates to aviation students. Analysis of results showed high informative merits of two procedures, i.e. Evaluation of stability of the visual acuity into the distance (VAD), and Determination of VAD recovery time following preliminary accommodation loading. Subjects with hypermetropia of up to 2.0 dioptres had the best VAD stability. This index was slightly lower in emmetrops; the least VAD stability margin was found in myopathic subjects. After accommodation loading, the VAD recovery time increased by more than 0.75 dioptres in the myopathic subjects and 2.0 dioptres in the hypermetropic subjects. Hence, the visual loading tests show promise as procedures worthy to be included into the program of medical selection of candidates to aviation students. PMID:8974605

  6. 14 CFR Special Federal Aviation... - Prohibition Against Certain Flights Within the Territory and Airspace of Iraq

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... that are subject to the requirements of 14 CFR parts 119, 121, or 135, each person who deviates from... the Territory and Airspace of Iraq Federal Special Federal Aviation Regulation No. 77 Aeronautics and... No. 77—Prohibition Against Certain Flights Within the Territory and Airspace of Iraq 1....

  7. Indirect economic drivers for end-of-life handling in the aviation sector

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Brito, M.P.; Van der Laan, E.A.; Moleveld, M.

    2009-01-01

    An important issue that is getting increasing attention in the aviation sector is the handling of end-of-life aircraft. Traditionally, retired aircraft are parked in the desert waiting for a buyer, but more attractive options are available. There is some literature on direct economic factors influen

  8. Multiple Kernel Learning for Heterogeneous Anomaly Detection: Algorithm and Aviation Safety Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Santanu; Srivastava, Ashok N.; Matthews, Bryan L.; Oza, Nikunj C.

    2010-01-01

    The world-wide aviation system is one of the most complex dynamical systems ever developed and is generating data at an extremely rapid rate. Most modern commercial aircraft record several hundred flight parameters including information from the guidance, navigation, and control systems, the avionics and propulsion systems, and the pilot inputs into the aircraft. These parameters may be continuous measurements or binary or categorical measurements recorded in one second intervals for the duration of the flight. Currently, most approaches to aviation safety are reactive, meaning that they are designed to react to an aviation safety incident or accident. In this paper, we discuss a novel approach based on the theory of multiple kernel learning to detect potential safety anomalies in very large data bases of discrete and continuous data from world-wide operations of commercial fleets. We pose a general anomaly detection problem which includes both discrete and continuous data streams, where we assume that the discrete streams have a causal influence on the continuous streams. We also assume that atypical sequence of events in the discrete streams can lead to off-nominal system performance. We discuss the application domain, novel algorithms, and also discuss results on real-world data sets. Our algorithm uncovers operationally significant events in high dimensional data streams in the aviation industry which are not detectable using state of the art methods

  9. 78 FR 60995 - Aviation Rulemaking Advisory Committee Meeting on Transport Airplane and Engine Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-02

    ... Engine Issues AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of rescheduled public... Rulemaking Advisory Committee (ARAC) Transport Airplane and Engine (TAE) Subcommittee to discuss TAE issues. A number of issues have arisen that may affect the Committee's ability to have an effective...

  10. 77 FR 60005 - Aviation Rulemaking Advisory Committee Meeting on Transport Airplane and Engine Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-01

    ... Airplane and Engine Issues'' (77 FR 59243), in FR Doc. 2012-23709, that published on September 26, 2012... Engine Issues AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of public meeting...) to discuss transport airplane and engine (TAE) issues. It also withdraws the notice...

  11. Aviation Trends Related to Atmospheric Environment Safety Technologies Project Technical Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reveley, Mary S.; Withrow, Colleen A.; Barr, Lawrence C.; Evans, Joni K.; Leone, Karen M.; Jones, Sharon M.

    2014-01-01

    Current and future aviation safety trends related to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Atmospheric Environment Safety Technologies Project's three technical challenges (engine icing characterization and simulation capability; airframe icing simulation and engineering tool capability; and atmospheric hazard sensing and mitigation technology capability) were assessed by examining the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) accident database (1989 to 2008), incidents from the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) accident/incident database (1989 to 2006), and literature from various industry and government sources. The accident and incident data were examined for events involving fixed-wing airplanes operating under Federal Aviation Regulation (FAR) Parts 121, 135, and 91 for atmospheric conditions related to airframe icing, ice-crystal engine icing, turbulence, clear air turbulence, wake vortex, lightning, and low visibility (fog, low ceiling, clouds, precipitation, and low lighting). Five future aviation safety risk areas associated with the three AEST technical challenges were identified after an exhaustive survey of a variety of sources and include: approach and landing accident reduction, icing/ice detection, loss of control in flight, super density operations, and runway safety.

  12. Armed Service Vocational Aptitude Battery Scores and Aviation Electrician's Mate Class "A" School Attrition Rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Hershel M.

    A study investigated the use of the Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery (ASVAB) subtests and combinations of subtest composites as placement qualifiers for the Aviation Electrician's Mate AEA(A1) school. It examined the relationship of the independent variables Arithmetic Reasoning; Math Knowledge; General Science; and Composite ASVAB score…

  13. 75 FR 57546 - The Future of Aviation Advisory Committee (FAAC) Environment Subcommittee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-21

    ... be held at InterContinental Chicago O'Hare Hotel, Field Room, 5300 North River Road, Rosemont, IL... Transportation to ensure the competitiveness of the U.S. aviation industry and its capability to manage... held at the InterContinental Chicago O'Hare Hotel, Field Room, 5300 North River Road, Rosemont,...

  14. A Comparison of the Preferred Teaching Styles of Oklahoma Aviation Maintenance Instructors and Flight Instructors

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Deann Marie

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the preferred teaching styles of Oklahoma aviation maintenance instructors and flight instructors. The scope of this study included maintenance instructors in CareerTech schools (Part 147 programs) and ground/flight instructors in Part 141 flight schools in Oklahoma. The methodology included administering…

  15. Epidemiological Survey of Dyslipidemia in Civil Aviators in China from 2006 to 2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rongfu Zhao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. This study aimed to analyze blood lipid levels, temporal trend, and age distribution of dyslipidemia in civil aviators in China. Methods. The 305 Chinese aviators were selected randomly and followed up from 2006 to 2011. Their total cholesterol (TC, triglyceride (TG, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C, and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C levels were evaluated annually. Mean values for each parameter by year were compared using a linear mixed-effects model. The temporal trend of borderline high, high, and low status for each index and of overall borderline high, hyperlipidemia, and dyslipidemia by year was tested using a generalized linear mixed model. Results. The aviators' TC (F=4.33, P<0.01, HDL-C (F=23.25, P<0.01, and LDL-C (F=6.13, P<0.01 values differed across years. The prevalence of dyslipidemia (F=5.53, P<0.01, borderline high (F=6.52, P<0.01, and hyperlipidemia (F=3.90, P<0.01 also differed across years. The prevalence rates for hyperlipidemia and dyslipidemia were the highest in the 41–50-year-old and 31–40-year-old groups. Conclusions. Civil aviators in China were in high dyslipidemia and borderline high level and presented with dyslipidemia younger than other Chinese populations.

  16. A Study of EL2 Pilots' Radio Communication in the General Aviation Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estival, Dominique; Molesworth, Brett

    2009-01-01

    This paper reports on the preliminary stages of a project designed to investigate communication problems in General Aviation and assess the utility of language technologies as a means of mitigation. The study presented in this paper is the first of a three-part study, in which we aim to investigate the extent to which the English language…

  17. State of the Art on Alternative Fuels in Aviation. Executive summary

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blakey, S.; Novelli, P.; Costes, P.; Bringtown, S.; Christensen, D.; Sakintuna, B.; Peineke, C.; Jongschaap, R.E.E.; Conijn, J.G.; Rutgers, B.; Valot, L.; Joubert, E.; Perelgritz, J.F.; Filogonio, A.; Roetger, T.; Prieur, A.; Starck, L.; Jeuland, N.; Bogers, P.; Midgley, R.; Bauldreay, J.; Rollin, G.; Rye, L.; Wilson, C.

    2010-01-01

    This paper summarises the findings from the SWAFEA preliminary state of the art study. It covers trends in aspects of future air transport, potential candidate fuels and associated feedstock along with sustainability and economical issues relevant for alternative fuels in aviation..

  18. Model-based aviation advice on distal volcanic ash clouds by assimilating aircraft in situ measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fu, G.; Heemink, A.; Lu, S.; Segers, A.; Weber, K.; Lin, H.X.

    2016-01-01

    The forecast accuracy of distal volcanic ash clouds is important for providing valid aviation advice during volcanic ash eruption. However, because the distal part of volcanic ash plume is far from the volcano, the influence of eruption information on this part becomes rather indirect and uncertain,

  19. 14 CFR Special Federal Aviation... - Prohibition Against Certain Flights Within the Territory and Airspace of Somalia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... CFR parts 119, 121, or 135, each person who deviates from this rule must, within 10 days of the... the Territory and Airspace of Somalia Federal Special Federal Aviation Regulation No. 107 Aeronautics... Regulation No. 107—Prohibition Against Certain Flights Within the Territory and Airspace of Somalia...

  20. Ethics Education in University Aviation Management Programs in the US: Part One--The Need.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oderman, Dale B.

    2002-01-01

    Examines how universities in the United States offering degrees in aviation management include ethics instruction in their curricula. Discusses the first part of a study that justifies the need for ethics education and develops hypotheses to evaluate the current status of ethics instruction, which will be reported on in subsequent parts of the…

  1. Descriptive and analytical epidemiology of accidents in five categories of sport aviation aircraft

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Doorn, R.R.A.; de Voogt, A.J.

    2011-01-01

    The present study reports and compares causes of, and factors contributing to, 2,118 documented accidents of sport aviation represented by diverse aircraft types including balloons and blimps, gliders, gyroplanes, and ultralights. For the 26-year period, accidents were aircraft-specific regarding da

  2. Significant factors of aviation insurance and risk management strategy: an empirical study of Taiwanese airline carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yi Hsin; Chang, Yu Hern

    2008-04-01

    Aviation insurance premiums have become a heavy burden for the airline industry since September 11, 2001. Although the industry must constantly balance its operations between profitability and safety, the reality is that airlines are in the business of making money. Therefore, their ability to reduce cost and manage risk is a key factor for success. Unlike past research, which used subjective judgment methods, this study applied quantitative historical data (1999-2000) and gray relation analysis to identify the primary factors influencing ratemaking for aviation insurance premiums. An empirical study of six airlines in Taiwan was conducted to determine these factors and to analyze the management strategies used to deal with them. Results showed that the loss experience and performance of individual airlines were the key elements associated with aviation insurance premiums paid by each airline. By identifying and understanding the primary factors influencing ratemaking for aviation insurance, airlines will better understand their relative operational strengths and weaknesses, and further help top management identify areas for further improvement. Knowledge of these factors combined with effective risk management strategies, may result in lower premiums and operating costs for airline companies. PMID:18419661

  3. Thermodynamic properties of three component solutions aviation kerosene-oil-H-hexane depending on temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of experimental-theoretical studies of thermodynamic properties of three component solutions aviation kerosene-oil-H-hexane depending on temperature at atmospheric pressure are given. On the basis of law of corresponding states the empirical equation is obtained. By using the empirical equation the thermodynamic properties of studied solutions could be defined.

  4. Safety Management and Risk Modelling in Aviation: The challenge of quantifying management influences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lin, P.H.

    2011-01-01

    Aviation accidents result from a combination of many different causal factors ( human errors, technical failures, environmental and organisational influences). Increasing interest over the past two decades in causal modelling of organisational factors has been motivated by the desire to understand t

  5. Challenges of Using Audio-Visual Aids as Warm-Up Activity in Teaching Aviation English

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahin, Mehmet; Sule, St.; Seçer, Y. E.

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to find out the challenges encountered in the use of video as audio-visual material as a warm-up activity in aviation English course at high school level. This study is based on a qualitative study in which focus group interview is used as the data collection procedure. The participants of focus group are four instructors teaching…

  6. Projected Impact of Compositional Verification on Current and Future Aviation Safety Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reveley, Mary S.; Withrow, Colleen A.; Leone, Karen M.; Jones, Sharon M.

    2014-01-01

    The projected impact of compositional verification research conducted by the National Aeronautic and Space Administration System-Wide Safety and Assurance Technologies on aviation safety risk was assessed. Software and compositional verification was described. Traditional verification techniques have two major problems: testing at the prototype stage where error discovery can be quite costly and the inability to test for all potential interactions leaving some errors undetected until used by the end user. Increasingly complex and nondeterministic aviation systems are becoming too large for these tools to check and verify. Compositional verification is a "divide and conquer" solution to addressing increasingly larger and more complex systems. A review of compositional verification research being conducted by academia, industry, and Government agencies is provided. Forty-four aviation safety risks in the Biennial NextGen Safety Issues Survey were identified that could be impacted by compositional verification and grouped into five categories: automation design; system complexity; software, flight control, or equipment failure or malfunction; new technology or operations; and verification and validation. One capability, 1 research action, 5 operational improvements, and 13 enablers within the Federal Aviation Administration Joint Planning and Development Office Integrated Work Plan that could be addressed by compositional verification were identified.

  7. Significant factors of aviation insurance and risk management strategy: an empirical study of Taiwanese airline carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yi Hsin; Chang, Yu Hern

    2008-04-01

    Aviation insurance premiums have become a heavy burden for the airline industry since September 11, 2001. Although the industry must constantly balance its operations between profitability and safety, the reality is that airlines are in the business of making money. Therefore, their ability to reduce cost and manage risk is a key factor for success. Unlike past research, which used subjective judgment methods, this study applied quantitative historical data (1999-2000) and gray relation analysis to identify the primary factors influencing ratemaking for aviation insurance premiums. An empirical study of six airlines in Taiwan was conducted to determine these factors and to analyze the management strategies used to deal with them. Results showed that the loss experience and performance of individual airlines were the key elements associated with aviation insurance premiums paid by each airline. By identifying and understanding the primary factors influencing ratemaking for aviation insurance, airlines will better understand their relative operational strengths and weaknesses, and further help top management identify areas for further improvement. Knowledge of these factors combined with effective risk management strategies, may result in lower premiums and operating costs for airline companies.

  8. 75 FR 14652 - Aviation Proceedings, Agreements Filed the Week Ending March 13, 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-26

    ... Office of the Secretary Aviation Proceedings, Agreements Filed the Week Ending March 13, 2010 The...: DOT-OST-2010-0060. Date Filed: March 8, 2010. Parties: Members of the International Air Transport... South West Pacific (Memo 1364). Intended effective date: for travel on/after: 1 June 2010. Docket...

  9. 78 FR 11978 - Airworthiness Directives; Reims Aviation S.A. Airplanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-21

    ...: stephan.lapagne@reims-aviation.fr ; Internet: www.geciaviation.com/en/f406.html . You may review copies of... was published in the Federal Register on December 5, 2012 (77 FR 72252). That NPRM proposed to correct.... We received no comments on the NPRM (77 FR 72252, December 5, 2012) or on the determination of...

  10. Collaborative Aviation Weather Statement - An Impact-based Decision Support Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blondin, Debra

    2016-04-01

    Historically, convection causes the highest number of air traffic constraints on the United States National Air Space (NAS). Increased NAS predictability allows traffic flow managers to more effectively initiate, amend or terminate planned or active traffic management initiatives, resulting in more efficient use of available airspace. A Collaborative Aviation Weather Statement (CAWS) is an impact-based decision support tool used for the timely delivery of high-confidence, high-relevance aviation convective weather forecasts to air traffic managers. The CAWS is a graphical and textual forecast produced by a collaborative team of meteorologists from the Aviation Weather Center (AWC), Center Weather Service Units, and airlines to bring attention to high impact areas of thunderstorms. The CAWS addresses thunderstorm initiation or movement into the airports having the highest volume of traffic or into traffic sensitive jet routes. These statements are assessed by planners at the Federal Aviation Administration's (FAA) Air Route Traffic Control Centers and are used for planning traffic management initiatives to balance air traffic flow across the United States. The FAA and the airline industry use the CAWS to plan, manage, and execute operations in the NAS, thereby improving the system efficiency and safety and also saving dollars for industry and the traveling public.

  11. 26 CFR 48.4082-6 - Kerosene; exemption for aviation-grade kerosene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 16 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Kerosene; exemption for aviation-grade kerosene. 48.4082-6 Section 48.4082-6 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY... model certificate provided in paragraph (e)(3) of this section, and contains all information...

  12. ASEAN SINGLE AVIATION MARKET AND INDONESIA - WILL IT SURVIVE AGAINST THE GIANTS?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruwantissa Indranath Abeyratne

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available  To say that Indonesia is an enigma in air transport is an understatement.  On the one hand,  the  demand for air transport in Indonesia is higher in proportion to its GDP per capita.  Its economy can be expected to grow 6% to 10% annually. A single aviation market could add another 6% to 10% growth in sheer demand.  It is one of the wealthiest countries in the world, being the 16th richest country currently, and, according to an Airbus forecast,   will be the 7th richest in 2030.  Yet its airports are badly in need of expansion, its infrastructure is bursting at its seems, and above all, its airlines are strongly resisting liberalization of air transport in the region for fear of being wiped out by stronger contenders in the region.  Against this backdrop, it is incontrovertible that Indonesia's civil aviation is intrinsically linked to regional and global considerations.  Indonesia's archipelagic topography makes its people heavily reliant on safe, regular and reliable air services that may connect them not only internally but also to the outside world.A single aviation market in the ASEAN region will bring both benefits to Indonesia and challengers to its air transport sector. This article discusses the economic and regulatory challenges that Indonesia faces with the coming into effect of the ASEAN Single Aviation market in 2015.

  13. Estimating the climate and air quality benefits of aviation fuel and emissions reductions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorbian, Christopher S.; Wolfe, Philip J.; Waitz, Ian A.

    2011-05-01

    In this study we consider the implications of our current understanding of aviation climate impacts as it relates to the ratio of non-CO 2 to CO 2 effects from aviation. We take as inputs recent estimates from the literature of the magnitude of the component aviation impacts and associated uncertainties. We then employ a simplified probabilistic impulse response function model for the climate and a range of damage functions to estimate the ratio of non-CO 2 to CO 2 impacts of aviation for a range of different metrics, scientific assumptions, future background emissions scenarios, economic growth scenarios, and discount rates. We take cost-benefit analysis as our primary context and thus focus on integral metrics that can be related to damages: the global warming potential, the time-integrated change in surface temperature, and the net present value of damages. We also present results based on an endpoint metric, the global temperature change potential. These latter results would be more appropriate for use in a cost-effectiveness framework (e.g., with a well-defined policy target for the anthropogenic change in surface temperature at a specified time in the future). We find that the parameter that most influences the ratio of non-CO 2 to CO 2 impacts of aviation is the discount rate, or analogously the time window used for physical metrics; both are expressions of the relative importance of long-lived versus short-lived impacts. Second to this is the influence of the radiative forcing values that are assumed for aviation-induced cloudiness effects. Given the large uncertainties in short-lived effects from aviation, and the dominating influence of discounting or time-windowing, we find that the choice of metric is relatively less influential. We express the ratios of non-CO 2 to CO 2 impacts on a per unit fuel burn basis so that they can be multiplied by a social cost of carbon to estimate the additional benefits of fuel burn reductions from aviation beyond those

  14. Bio-aviation fuel production from hydroprocessing castor oil promoted by the nickel-based bifunctional catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Siyang; Zhu, Qingqing; Guan, Qingxin; He, Liangnian; Li, Wei

    2015-05-01

    Bio-aviation fuel was firstly synthesized by hydroprocessing castor oil in a continuous-flow fixed-bed microreactor with the main objective to obtain the high yield of aviation fuel and determine the elemental compositions of the product phases as well as the reaction mechanism. Highest aviation range alkane yields (91.6 wt%) were achieved with high isomer/n-alkane ratio (i/n) 4.4-7.2 over Ni supported on acidic zeolites. In addition, different fuel range alkanes can be obtained by adjusting the degree of hydrodeoxygenation (HDO) and hydrocracking. And the observations are rationalized by a set of reaction pathways for the various product phases.

  15. The Operation Efficiency Evaluation for Listed Companies of China Aviation Industry Based on DEA and Malmquist Index

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIA Wei-li; CHENG Jun-heng; WU Peng; GONG Shu-yan

    2012-01-01

    The data envelopment analysis (DEA) is used to evaluate operation efficiency of 17 listed companies in China aviation industry from 2006 to 2011, and make longitudinal analysis for the operation efficiency. In addition, the reason of changing efficiency is dynamically evaluated by Malmquist productivity index. The empirical results show that average operation efficiency of 17 listed companies in China aviation industry is less than 1, which means that the operation activities of aviation industry exist diseconomies characteristic, technological progress efficiency is a major influenced factor

  16. The military-technical aspect in activities of Kharkiv aviation plant (60-s – 80-s of XX century

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andriy Kharuk

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The article examines the main trends in military programs implemented in Kharkiv aviation plant. The issue of creation of military models of the passenger aircrafts Tu-124 and Tu-134, production of Tu-141 drones, cruise missiles Ch-55 and light military transport aircraft An-72 at this enterprise is described. It is shown that production of military equipment was taking a significant share in total production of Kharkiv aviation plant (Kharkiv Aviation Production Association in 1960-1980. The analysis is based mainly on published materials and can be further studied in relevant archives.

  17. You Should Be the Specialist! Weak Mental Rotation Performance in Aviation Security Screeners – Reduced Performance Level in Aviation Security with No Gender Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krüger, Jenny K.; Suchan, Boris

    2016-01-01

    Aviation security screeners analyze a large number of X-ray images per day and seem to be experts in mentally rotating diverse kinds of visual objects. A robust gender-effect that men outperform women in the Vandenberg & Kuse mental rotation task has been well documented over the last years. In addition it has been shown that training can positively influence the overall task-performance. Considering this, the aim of the present study was to investigate whether security screeners show better performance in the Mental Rotation Test (MRT) independently of gender. Forty-seven security screeners of both sexes from two German airports were examined with a computer based MRT. Their performance was compared to a large sample of control subjects. The well-known gender-effect favoring men on mental rotation was significant within the control group. However, the security screeners did not show any sex differences suggesting an effect of training and professional performance. Surprisingly this specialized group showed a lower level of overall MRT performance than the control participants. Possible aviation related influences such as secondary effects of work-shift or expertise which can cumulatively cause this result are discussed. PMID:27014142

  18. You Should Be the Specialist! Weak Mental Rotation Performance in Aviation Security Screeners - Reduced Performance Level in Aviation Security with No Gender Effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krüger, Jenny K; Suchan, Boris

    2016-01-01

    Aviation security screeners analyze a large number of X-ray images per day and seem to be experts in mentally rotating diverse kinds of visual objects. A robust gender-effect that men outperform women in the Vandenberg & Kuse mental rotation task has been well documented over the last years. In addition it has been shown that training can positively influence the overall task-performance. Considering this, the aim of the present study was to investigate whether security screeners show better performance in the Mental Rotation Test (MRT) independently of gender. Forty-seven security screeners of both sexes from two German airports were examined with a computer based MRT. Their performance was compared to a large sample of control subjects. The well-known gender-effect favoring men on mental rotation was significant within the control group. However, the security screeners did not show any sex differences suggesting an effect of training and professional performance. Surprisingly this specialized group showed a lower level of overall MRT performance than the control participants. Possible aviation related influences such as secondary effects of work-shift or expertise which can cumulatively cause this result are discussed.

  19. But you should be the specialist! Weak Mental Rotation Performance in Aviation Security Screeners.Reduced performance level in aviation security with no gender effect.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenny Kathinka Krüger

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Aviation security screeners analyze a large number of X-ray images per day and seem to be experts in mentally rotating diverse kinds of visual objects. A robust gender-effect that men outperform women in the Vandenberg & Kuse mental rotation task has been well documented over the last years. In addition it has been shown that training can positively influence the overall task-performance. Considering this, the aim of the present study was to investigate whether security screeners show better performance in the Mental Rotation Test (MRT independently of gender. Forty-seven security screeners of both sexes from two German airports were examined with a computer based MRT. Their performance was compared to a large sample of control subjects. The well-known gender-effect favoring men on mental rotation was significant within the control group. However, the security screeners did not show any sex differences suggesting an effect of training and professional performance. Surprisingly this specialized group showed a lower level of overall MRT performance than the control participants. Possible aviation related influences such as secondary effects of work-shift or expertise which can cumulatively cause this result are discussed.

  20. Aviation or space policy: New challenges for the insurance sector to private human access to space

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Oijhuizen Galhego Rosa, Ana Cristina

    2013-12-01

    The phenomenon of private human access to space has introduced a new set of problems in the insurance sector. Orbital and suborbital space transportation will surely be unique commercial services for this new market. Discussions are under way regarding space insurance, in order to establish whether this new market ought to be regulated by aviation or space law. Alongside new definitions, infrastructures, legal frameworks and liability insurances, the insurance sector has also been introducing a new approach. In this paper, I aim to analyse some of the possibilities of new premiums, capacities, and policies (under aviation or space insurance rules), as well as the new insurance products related to vehicles, passengers and third party liability. This paper claims that a change toward new insurance regimes is crucial, due to the current stage in development of space tourism and the urgency to adapt insurance rules to support future development in this area.

  1. State-of-the-art research progress of aviation biofuel using biomass wastes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Guanyi

    2014-01-01

    This paper introduced the aviation biofuel technologies,among which the Fischer-Tropsch(FT)syn-thesis and the renewable jet fuel process provide alternative fuels for the potential environmental benefit of re-duced life cycle greenhouse gas(GHG)emissions and the economic benefits associated with increased fuel availability and lower fuel costs. Tianjin University developed a new method(C-LTM process)to produce wide-cut aviation biofuel from fatty acid methyl esters. All renewable jet fuel processes are low capital cost processes for producing high quality synthetic paraffinic kerosene(SPK)that has superior product properties to other op-tions available today with higher cetane number,lower cloud point and lower emissions,and it can be used in today’s tanks,pipelines,pumps and automobiles without any changes,which will save significant expense for renewable grows.

  2. State-of-the-art research progress of aviation biofuel using biomass wastes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Guanyi

    2014-01-01

    This paper introduced the aviation biofuel technologies, among which the Fischer-Tropsch (FT) syn- thesis and the renewable jet fuel process provide alternative fuels for the potential environmental benefit of re- duced life cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and the economic benefits associated with increased fuel availability and lower fuel costs. Tianjin University developed a new method (C-LTM process ) to produce wide- cut aviation biofuel from fatty acid methyl esters. All renewable jet fuel processes are low capital cost processes for producing high quality synthetic paraffinic kerosene (SPK) that has superior product properties to other op- tions available today with higher cetane number, lower cloud point and lower emissions, and it can be used in today' s tanks, pipelines, pumps and automobiles without any changes, which will save significant expense for renewable grows.

  3. Risk-Averse Evolutionary Game Model of Aviation Joint Emergency Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Pan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We study effects of risk-averse attitude of both participators in aviation joint emergency response on the coevolution of cooperation mechanisms and individual preferences between airport and nonprofit organization. First, based on the current aviation joint emergency mechanism in China, we put forward two mechanisms to select the joint nonprofit organization, including reputation cooperation and bidding competition. Meanwhile, we consider two preferences including altruism and selfishness. Then we build replicator dynamics equations using the theory of conditional value-at-risk (CVaR taking risk aversion attitude into account. Finally, we introduce the factor of government and give all participators some suggestions. We show that the risk-averse attitude of the other game participator affects the one participator’s decision and the effects subject to some parameters.

  4. Workload management and geographic disorientation in aviation incidents: A review of the ASRS data base

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Henry P.; Tham, Mingpo; Wickens, Christopher D.

    1993-01-01

    NASA's Aviation Safety Reporting System (ASRS) incident reports are reviewed in two related areas: pilots' failures to appropriately manage tasks, and breakdowns in geographic orientation. Examination of 51 relevant reports on task management breakdowns revealed that altitude busts and inappropriate runway usee were the most frequently reported consequences. Task management breakdowns appeared to occur at all levels of expertise, and prominent causal factors were related to breakdowns in crew communications, over-involvement with the flight management system and, for small (general aviation) aircraft, preoccupation with weather. Analysis of the 83 cases of geographic disorientation suggested that these too occurred at all levels of pilot experience. With regard to causal factors, a majority was related to poor cockpit resource management, in which inattention led to a loss of geographic awareness. Other leading causes were related to poor weather and poor decision making. The potential of the ASRS database for contributing to research and design issues is addressed.

  5. Differences in Characteristics of Aviation Accidents during 1993-2012 Based on Flight Purpose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Joni K.

    2016-01-01

    Usually aviation accidents are categorized and analyzed within flight conduct rules (Part 121, Part 135, Part 91) because differences in accident rates within flight rules have been demonstrated. Even within a particular flight rule the flights have different purposes. For many, Part 121 flights are synonymous with scheduled passenger transport, and indeed this is the largest group of Part 121 accidents. But there are also non-scheduled (charter) passenger transport and cargo flights. The primary purpose of the analysis reported here is to examine the differences in aviation accidents based on the purpose of the flight. Some of the factors examined are the accident severity, aircraft characteristics and accident occurrence categories. Twenty consecutive years of data were available and utilized to complete this analysis.

  6. Enhancement of Aviation Fuel Thermal Stability Characterization Through Application of Ellipsometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browne, Samuel Tucker; Wong, Hubert; Hinderer, Cameron Branch; Klettlinger, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    ASTM D3241/Jet Fuel Thermal Oxidation Tester (JFTOT) procedure, the standard method for testing thermal stability of conventional aviation turbine fuels is inherently limited due to the subjectivity in the color standard for tube deposit rating. Quantitative assessment of the physical characteristics of oxidative fuel deposits provides a more powerful method for comparing the thermal oxidation stability characteristics of fuels, especially in a research setting. We propose employing a Spectroscopic Ellipsometer to determine the film thickness and profile of oxidative fuel deposits on JFTOT heater tubes. Using JP-8 aviation fuel and following a modified ASTM D3241 testing procedure, the capabilities of the Ellipsometer will be demonstrated by measuring oxidative fuel deposit profiles for a range of different deposit characteristics. The testing completed in this report was supported by the NASA Fundamental Aeronautics Subsonics Fixed Wing Project

  7. Design and flight testing of a digital optimal control general aviation autopilot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broussard, J. R.; Downing, D. R.; Bryant, W. H.

    1982-01-01

    This paper presents the designs of Proportional-Integral-Filter (PIF) autopilots for a General Aviation (NAVION) aircraft. The PIF autopilots use modern control theory to determine heading select and altitude select and hold autopilot modes. The PIF control law uses typical General Aviation sensors for state feedback; command error integration for command tracking; digital complimentary filtering and analog prefiltering for sensor noise suppression; a control filter for computation delay accommodation; and the incremental form to eliminate trim values in implementation. Theoretical developments for the control law are described which combine the sampled-data regulator with command generator tracking for use as a digital flight control system. The digital PIF autopilots are evaluated using closed-loop eigenvalues and simulations. Successful flight test results for the PIF autopilots are presented for different turbulence conditions and quadratic weights.

  8. Relating aviation service difficulty reports to accident data for safety trend prediction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fullwood, R.; Hall, R.; Martinez, G.; Uryasev, S.

    1996-03-13

    This work explores the hypothesis that Service Difficulty Reports (SDR - primarily inspection reports) are related to Accident Incident Data System (AIDS - reports primarily compiled from National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) accident investigations). This work sought and found relations between equipment operability reported in the SDR and aviation safety reported in AIDS. Equipment is not the only factor in aviation accidents, but it is the factor reported in the SDR. Two approaches to risk analysis were used: (1) The conventional method, in which reporting frequencies are taken from a data base (SDR), and used with an aircraft reliability block diagram model of the critical systems to predict aircraft failure, and (2) Shape analysis that uses the magnitude and shape of the SDR distribution compared with the AIDS distribution to predict aircraft failure.

  9. Integrating Safety in the Aviation System: Interdepartmental Training for Pilots and Maintenance Technicians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattson, Marifran; Petrin, Donald A.; Young, John P.

    2001-01-01

    The study of human factors has had a decisive impact on the aviation industry. However, the entire aviation system often is not considered in researching, training, and evaluating human factors issues especially with regard to safety. In both conceptual and practical terms, we argue for the proactive management of human error from both an individual and organizational systems perspective. The results of a multidisciplinary research project incorporating survey data from professional pilots and maintenance technicians and an exploratory study integrating students from relevant disciplines are reported. Survey findings suggest that latent safety errors may occur during the maintenance discrepancy reporting process because pilots and maintenance technicians do not effectively interact with one another. The importance of interdepartmental or cross-disciplinary training for decreasing these errors and increasing safety is discussed as a primary implication.

  10. Aviation-oriented Mobility Management Method in IP/LEO Satellite Networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guo Xin; Zhang Jun; Zhang Tao; Ding Yanwen

    2008-01-01

    Taking into chief consideration the features of aviation nodes in satellite networks,such as high moving speed,long communication distance,and high connection frequency,this article proposes an aviatiun-oriented mobility management method for IP/low earth orbit (LEO) satellite networks.By introducing the concept of ground station real-time coverage area,the proposed method uses ground-station-based IP addressing method and cell paging scheme to decrease the frequency of IP binding update requests as well as the paging cost.In comparison with the paging mobile IP (P-MIP) method and the handover-independent IP mobility management method,as is verified by the mathematical analysis and simulation,the proposed method could decrease the management cost.It also possesses better ability to support the aviation nodes because it is subjected to fewer influences from increased node speeds and newly coming connection rates.

  11. Environmental, economic and social impact of aviation biofuel production in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cremonez, Paulo André; Feroldi, Michael; de Jesus de Oliveira, Carlos; Teleken, Joel Gustavo; Alves, Helton José; Sampaio, Silvio Cézar

    2015-03-25

    The Brazilian aviation industry is currently developing biofuel technologies that can maintain the operational and energy demands of the sector, while reducing the dependence on fossil fuels (mainly kerosene) and greenhouse gas emissions. The aim of the current research was to identify the major environmental, economic and social impacts arising from the production of aviation biofuels in Brazil. Despite the great potential of these fuels, there is a significant need for improved routes of production and specifically for lower production costs of these materials. In addition, the productive chains of raw materials for obtaining these bioenergetics can be linked to environmental impacts by NOx emissions, extensive use of agricultural land, loss of wildlife and intensive water use, as well as economic, social and political impacts.

  12. CERTIFICATION - The final and critical stage of every civil or military aviation program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasile STEFAN

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available As a general rule the final step in every aviation program is the certification of the airplane, an important step in which the airplane, the engins and the equipments are checked by an authority or commission according to the airworthiness rules. The main scope of the certification is to promote a safe aviation product and to protect the general public from unnecessary risk. In all the contries the national authorieties require a civil certificability for all the parts or equipments and a full aircraft certification for a new or wholly modified airplane. The military aircrafts must pased and respond to a specific way of certification and many actual efforts are done in order to unify the diffrent national rules in this field. This paper presents the existing situation in the certification of civil and military airplans and the actual measures done for the unification of certification procedures in the world.

  13. Military aviation noise:noise-induced hearing impairment and noise protection

    OpenAIRE

    Kuronen, P. (Pentti)

    2004-01-01

    Abstract This research on military aviation noise was conducted because the personnel working with military aircraft were concerned about noise induced hearing damage. In addition, comprehensive data on hearing impairments and occupational exposure of military pilots in the Finnish Air Force was not available. Moreover, data on the effects of overflight noise of military jets was necessary for the evaluation of noise induced hearing deteriorations of members of the ...

  14. Prototyping a web-enabled decision support system to improve capacity management of aviation training

    OpenAIRE

    Booth, William D.

    2005-01-01

    For organizations with training pipelines, this study offers insight to help identify and minimize undesirable effects which may result from often unavoidable demand variations within a resource and time constrained environment. The highly complex Naval aviation training process is used as a case study. However, any organization with a training pipeline may find this study to be useful. Within a training pipeline, like any resource constrained production line, variability may cause undesirabl...

  15. Techno-economic environmental risk analysis of advanced biofuels for civil aviation

    OpenAIRE

    Lokesh, Kadambari

    2015-01-01

    Commercial aviation has demonstrated its ability to be a key driver of global socio-economic growth to this date. This growth, resulting from an ever increasing need for air-travel, has been observed to be environmentally unsustainable. Any technological enhancements to the upcoming fleet of aircraft or operational improvements have been overshadowed by this very demand for air-travel. Any further investigation into innovative concepts and optimisation approaches bring in trade-off difficulti...

  16. Development of ergonomic and esthetic protective clothes for workers of civil aviation

    OpenAIRE

    Rubaka, A.; Lutsker, T.; Ostapenko, N.; Kolosnichenko, M.

    2016-01-01

    In article the design ergonomic decision of protective clothes for maintaining a wrecking in civil aviation is offered. On the basis of studying of service conditions it is developed a new design of protective overalls which is esthetically and ergonomically expedient. By association of already known constructive knots, such as volume elbow pieces and kneecaps, folds in a zone of shovels, strap and buckles for adjustment on a figure, air vents, etc.; and creations of new constructive knots, s...

  17. Design Methodology of the Structure of Postal Express Mail Networks of Aviation Channels in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    On the basis of the postal area center office system, the continuous space approximation is used to study the structure of postal express mail networks of aviation channels in China. Tradeoffs among sorting, handling, transportation, administrative and facilities costs are examined. The optimizing design methodology proposed in this paper can be used to analyze and design the postal express mail network. The objective is to minimize the total system cost.

  18. The Taxation Effects of Tourism Under Aviation Deregulation in a Small Open Economy

    OpenAIRE

    Ming-Min Lo; Gong-Liang Tang; Cheng-Yih Hong; Jian-Fa Li

    2015-01-01

    In the past four years, Chinese tourists’ consumption in Taiwan has contributed to the Taiwanese economy. However, there is a limited literature documenting the actual tax effects under the aviation deregulation. Based on the models established by Leontief (1966) and Miyazawa (2002) and by adding the effective tax rate, which is employed by the Japan National Tourism Organization (2010), the present study measures the indirect tax, the personal income tax, and the corporate income tax resul...

  19. Analysis of admissibility of central tendency measures to estimate aviation operator progress

    OpenAIRE

    Борсук, Сергій Павлович

    2015-01-01

    Human role in ensuring flight safety in the system " flight crew – aircraft – medium – air traffic service unit" is considered. The possibility of the training process modeling using stochastic models is shown. The components of the stationary stochastic model of the aviation operator training process were determined. Eleven central tendency measures: arithmetic mean, geometric mean, harmonic mean, three previous measures using weight coefficients, median, mode, Tukey's test, trimmed mean, Wi...

  20. A Computer Model to Estimate Commercial Aviation Fuel Consumption and Emissions in the Continental United States

    OpenAIRE

    Zou, Zhihao

    2013-01-01

    A comprehensive model is developed to estimate and predict the fuel consumption and emissions by domestic commercial aviation in the Continental United States. Most of the existing fuel consumption and emission models are limited in their ability to predict the annual fuel burn for air transportation at the national level. For example, those models either require real track data or are developed only to model single flight scenarios.  The model developed in this thesis is part of a software f...

  1. [The principles of aviation support for rescue-evacuation operations in eliminating the consequences of disasters].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berezhnov, E S; Golovchits, V N

    1993-01-01

    Analysing practical results of an Air Force participation in liquidation of the earthquake consequences in Armenia, 1988, and after technological catastrophe in Bashkiria, 1989, the authors substantiate the role and significance of air transportation in the system of rescue and evacuation measures, define main tasks for aviation, propose methods for calculation of required number of aircraft and its types. The data cited in this article have formed a basis for the principles of air support during rescue and evacuation procedures. PMID:8484227

  2. Determinants of Customers’ Satisfaction in the Nigerian Aviation Industry Using Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP) Model

    OpenAIRE

    B. E A. Oghojafor; Adebola Glorious Adekoya

    2014-01-01

    The aviation industry in Africa‟s most populous nation has been experiencing an explosive growth in recent years with older domestic operators fighting competing new players. The expansion has given Nigerians a wider choice of airlines, many of them flying with new or recently refurbished aircraft, which have helped reverse the country‟s situation for air safety in the wake of a spate of crashes six years ago. This paper applied the Analytic Hierarchy Process to identify the deter...

  3. Determinants of Customers’ Satisfaction in the Nigerian Aviation Industry Using Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP) Model

    OpenAIRE

    B. E A. Oghojafor

    2014-01-01

    The aviation industry in Africa?s most populous nation has been experiencing an explosive growth in recent years with older domestic operators fighting competing new players. The expansion has given Nigerians a wider choice of airlines, many of them flying with new or recently refurbished aircraft, which have helped reverse the country?s situation for air safety in the wake of a spate of crashes six years ago. This paper applied the Analytic Hierarchy Process to identify the determinants of c...

  4. A critical analysis of airline safety management with reference to pilots and aviation authority officers

    OpenAIRE

    Ho, Li-Chi

    1996-01-01

    When we consider regional differences in air safety, a call for regional solutions is needed. This research probes the current situation in Taiwan and part of Asia from a regional perspective, aiming to better understand safety management in this region. Data was drawn from an extensive survey involving both airline pilots and aviation authority officers. The research investigated respondents' perceptions in airline safety management, and examined at their opinions about the ro...

  5. Adjust the method of the FMEA to the requirements of the aviation industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrzej FELLNER

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The article presents a summary of current methods used in aviation and rail transport. It also contains a proposal to adjust the method of the FMEA to the latest requirements of the airline industry. The authors suggested tables of indicators Zn, Pr and Dt necessary to implement FMEA method of risk analysis taking into account current achievements aerospace and rail safety. Also proposed acceptable limits of the RPN number which allows you to classify threats.

  6. Assessing the Relationship between Airlines' Maintenance Outsourcing and Aviation Professionals' Job Satisfaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCamey, Rotorua

    The current economic and security challenges placed an additional burden on U.S. airlines to provide optimum service at reasonable costs to the flying public. In efforts to stay competitive, U.S. airlines increased foreign-based outsourcing of aircraft major repair and overhaul (MRO) mainly to reduce labor costs and conserve capital. This concentrated focus on outsourcing and restructuring, ignored job dissatisfaction among remaining employees which could reduce and or eliminate an airline's competitiveness. The purpose of this quantitative study was (a) to assess the relationship between increased levels of foreign-based MRO outsourcing and aviation professionals' job satisfaction (Y1); (b) to assess the influence of increased levels of foreign-based outsourcing on MRO control (Y2), MRO error rate (Y3), and MRO technical punctuality (Y4) as perceived by aviation professionals; and (c) to assess the influence of increased levels of foreign-based MRO outsourcing on technical skills (Y5) and morale ( Y6) as perceived by aviation professionals. The survey instrument was utilized based on Paul Spector's Job Satisfaction Questionnaire and MRO specific questions. A random sample of 300 U.S. airline participants was requested via MarketTools to meet required sample size of 110 as determined through a priori power analysis. Study data rendered 198 useable surveys of 213 total responses, and correlation, multiple regression, and ANOVA methods were used to test study hypotheses. The Spearman's rho for (Y 1) was statistically significant, p = .010 and multiple regression was statistically significant, p < .001. A one-way ANOVA indicated participants differed in their opinions of (Y2) through (Y6), Recommendations for future research include contrasting domestic and global MRO providers, and examining global aircraft parts suppliers and aviation technical training.

  7. Simulation and Optimization Methods for Assessing the Impact of Aviation Operations on the Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sridhar, Banavar; Chen, Neil; Ng, Hok K.

    2010-01-01

    There is increased awareness of anthropogenic factors affecting climate change and urgency to slow the negative impact. Greenhouse gases, oxides of Nitrogen and contrails resulting from aviation affect the climate in different and uncertain ways. This paper develops a flexible simulation and optimization software architecture to study the trade-offs involved in reducing emissions. The software environment is used to conduct analysis of two approaches for avoiding contrails using the concepts of contrail frequency index and optimal avoidance trajectories.

  8. Volcanic Ash and Aviation - the 2014 Eruptions of Kelut and Sangeang Api, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tupper, A. C.; Jansons, E.

    2014-12-01

    Two significant eruptions in Indonesia during the first part of 2014 have highlighted the continuing challenges of safe air traffic management around volcanic ash clouds. The stratospheric eruption of Kelut (also known as Kelud) in Java late on 13 February 2014 resulted in widespread aviation disruption over Indonesia and at least one serious volcanic ash encounter from an international airline. An upper-tropospheric eruption of Sangeang Api in the Lesser Sunda Islands on 30 May 2014 did not result in any known aircraft encounters, but did result in many delays and flight cancellations between Indonesia and Australia. In both cases, the eruption and resultant ash clouds were relatively well observed, if subject to the usual issues in characterising such clouds. For example, as tropical eruptions frequently reach 15 km amsl and above due to the height of the tropical tropopause, it is frequently very difficult to provide an accurate estimation of conditions at the cruising levels of aircraft, at 10-11 km (or lower for shorter domestic routes). More critically, the challenge of linking operational results from two scientific professions (volcanology and meteorology) with real-time aviation users remains strongly evident. Situational awareness of domestic and international airlines, ground-based monitoring and communications prior to and during the eruption, receiving and sharing pilot reports of volcanic ash, and appropriate flight responses all remain inadequate even in relatively fine conditions, with an unacceptable ongoing risk of serious aviation encounters should improvements not be made. Despite the extensive efforts of the International Civil Aviation Organization, World Meteorological Organization, and all partners in the International Airways Volcano Watch, and despite the acceleration of work on the issue since 2010, volcanic ash management remains sub-optimal.

  9. Prospects of Russian industrial development on the global market (the case of business aviation industry)

    OpenAIRE

    Anna A. Dokukina

    2013-01-01

    The global macroeconomic environment continues to be uncertain with the U.S. economy treading fastidiously on its recovery path, the Euro-zone debt crisis refusing to abate, and the most emerging markets at-tempting to stoke up economic growth momentum with a slight shift in overarching focus from merely combating inflation to adoption of a more balanced approach. The significance of Business Aviation as an important part of national economies and a tool for the progress of entrepreneurship t...

  10. Quantification of aldehydes emissions from alternative and renewable aviation fuels using a gas turbine engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hu; Altaher, Mohamed A.; Wilson, Chris W.; Blakey, Simon; Chung, Winson; Rye, Lucas

    2014-02-01

    In this research three renewable aviation fuel blends including two HEFA (Hydrotreated Ester and Fatty Acid) blends and one FAE (Fatty Acids Ethyl Ester) blend with conventional Jet A-1 along with a GTL (Gas To Liquid) fuel have been tested for their aldehydes emissions on a small gas turbine engine. Three strong ozone formation precursors: formaldehyde, acetaldehyde and acrolein were measured in the exhaust at different operational modes and compared to neat Jet A-1. The aim is to assess the impact of renewable and alternative aviation fuels on aldehydes emissions from aircraft gas turbine engines so as to provide informed knowledge for the future deployment of new fuels in aviation. The results show that formaldehyde was a major aldehyde species emitted with a fraction of around 60% of total measured aldehydes emissions for all fuels. Acrolein was the second major emitted aldehyde species with a fraction of ˜30%. Acetaldehyde emissions were very low for all the fuels and below the detention limit of the instrument. The formaldehyde emissions at cold idle were up to two to threefold higher than that at full power. The fractions of formaldehyde were 6-10% and 20% of total hydrocarbon emissions in ppm at idle and full power respectively and doubled on a g kg-1-fuel basis.

  11. Transition, Training, and Assessment of Multispectral Composite Imagery in Support of the NWS Aviation Forecast Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuell, Kevin; Jedlovec, Gary; Leroy, Anita; Schultz, Lori

    2015-01-01

    The NASA/Short-term Prediction, Research, and Transition (SPoRT) Program works closely with NOAA/NWS weather forecasters to transition unique satellite data and capabilities into operations in order to assist with nowcasting and short-term forecasting issues. Several multispectral composite imagery (i.e. RGB) products were introduced to users in the early 2000s to support hydrometeorology and aviation challenges as well as incident support. These activities lead to SPoRT collaboration with the GOES-R Proving Ground efforts where instruments such as MODIS (Aqua, Terra) and S-NPP/VIIRS imagers began to be used as near-realtime proxies to future capabilities of the Advanced Baseline Imager (ABI). One of the composite imagery products introduced to users was the Night-time Microphysics RGB, originally developed by EUMETSAT. SPoRT worked to transition this imagery to NWS users, provide region-specific training, and assess the impact of the imagery to aviation forecast needs. This presentation discusses the method used to interact with users to address specific aviation forecast challenges, including training activities undertaken to prepare for a product assessment. Users who assessed the multispectral imagery ranged from southern U.S. inland and coastal NWS weather forecast offices (WFOs), to those in the Rocky Mountain Front Range region and West Coast, as well as highlatitude forecasters of Alaska. These user-based assessments were documented and shared with the satellite community to support product developers and the broad users of new generation satellite data.

  12. Production of microscopic algae for its consequent use as aviation fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maekawa, T.; Akamatsu, N. [Research Inst. of Tsukuba Bio-tech Corp., Ibaraki (Japan); Jia, J.; Intabon, K. [Tsukuba Univ., Ibaraki (Japan); Terazawa, Y. [Nakamura Gakuen Univ. Fukuoka (Japan). Nourishment Science Dept.

    2010-07-01

    There is a large market for aviation fuel in Japan's aviation industry whose annual demand for aviation fuel is 12 million KL. In this study, a biofuel was produced from microscopic algae for use as jet fuel at an industrial scale. In order to comply with the cap-and-trade environmental policy of the European Union, algal oil as a biomass fuel must represent 3 per cent , 5 per cent and 10 per cent of total annual demand by 2011, 2013, and 2020, respectively. The microscopic algae Euglena gracilis was used in this study. Its lipid concentration was about 20 per cent. The extraction residue contains a high-density protein that can be used in animal feed. The electricity required to supply the light needed to cultivate E. gracilis ranged from 180 MW to 900 MW for 4 L of bioreactor medium. The maximum quantity of photons needed in the cultivation liquid was determined along with the light intensity required during the start up period for the cultivation of E. gracilis. Continuous harvesting in high yields of E. gracilis kept the density of the dry matter of E. gracilis between 0.5 g/l to1.5 g/l. It was concluded that the liquid used to cultivate E. gracilis should be sterilized by maintaining a low pH level by blowing carbon dioxide into the liquid.

  13. An Examination of Commercial Aviation Accidents and Incidents Related to Integrated Vehicle Health Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reveley, Mary S.; Briggs, Jeffrey L.; Thomas, Megan A.; Evans, Joni K.; Jones, Sharon M.

    2011-01-01

    The Integrated Vehicle Health Management (IVHM) Project is one of the four projects within the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Aviation Safety Program (AvSafe). The IVHM Project conducts research to develop validated tools and technologies for automated detection, diagnosis, and prognosis that enable mitigation of adverse events during flight. Adverse events include those that arise from system, subsystem, or component failure, faults, and malfunctions due to damage, degradation, or environmental hazards that occur during flight. Determining the causal factors and adverse events related to IVHM technologies will help in the formulation of research requirements and establish a list of example adverse conditions against which IVHM technologies can be evaluated. This paper documents the results of an examination of the most recent statistical/prognostic accident and incident data that is available from the Aviation Safety Information Analysis and Sharing (ASIAS) System to determine the causal factors of system/component failures and/or malfunctions in U.S. commercial aviation accidents and incidents.

  14. Effects of decarbonising international shipping and aviation on climate mitigation and air pollution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • A global emissions trading scheme is applied to international aviation and shipping. • We couple an energy–environment–economy model with an atmospheric model. • 65% reduction on CO2 emissions in 2050 reduces other pollutants emissions. • Climate effects are reduced and air quality is improved by the scheme. - Abstract: This paper assesses the effects of a global emissions trading scheme (GETS) for international aviation and shipping as a way of reducing emissions of both greenhouse gases (GHG) and other atmospheric emissions that lead to air pollution. A prior assessment of such integration requires the coupling of energy–environment–economy (E3) global modelling of mitigation policies with the atmospheric modelling of pollution sources, mixing and deposition. We report the methodology and results of coupling of the E3MG model and the global atmospheric model, p-TOMCAT. We assess the effects of GETS on the concentrations of atmospheric gases and on the radiative forcing, comparing a GETS scenario to a reference BASE scenario with higher use of fossil fuels. The paper assesses the outcome of GETS for atmospheric composition and radiative forcing for 2050. GETS on international shipping and aviation reduces their CO2 and non-CO2 emissions up to 65%. As a consequence atmospheric concentrations are modified and the radiative forcing due to international transport is reduced by different amounts as a function of the pollutant studied (15% for CO2, 35% for methane and up to 50% for ozone)

  15. Relating aviation service difficulty reports to accident data for safety trend prediction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fullwood, R.R.; Hall, R.E.; Martinez-Guridi, G.; Uryasev, S. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Sampath, S.G. [Federal Aviation Administration, Atlantic City, NJ (United States)

    1996-10-01

    A synthetic model of scheduled-commercial U.S. aviation fatalities was constructed from linear combinations of the time-spectra of critical systems reporting using 5.5 years of Service Difficulty Reports (SDR){sup 2} and Accident Incident Data System (AIDS) records{sup 3}. This model, used to predict near-future trends in aviation accidents, was tested by using the first 36 months of data to construct the synthetic model which was used to predict fatalities during the following eight months. These predictions were tested by comparison with the fatality data. A reliability block diagram (RBD) and third-order extrapolations also were used as predictive models and compared with actuality. The synthetic model was the best predictor because of its use of systems data. Other results of the study are a database of service difficulties for major aviation systems, and a rank ordering of systems according to their contribution to the synthesis. 4 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

  16. Crew Factors in Flight Operations XV: Alertness Management in General Aviation Education Module

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosekind, Mark R.; Co, Elizabeth L.; Neri, David F.; Oyung, Raymond L.; Mallis, Melissa M.; Cannon, Mary M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Regional operations encompass a broad range of pilots and equipment. This module is intended to help all those involved in regional aviation, including pilots, schedulers, dispatchers, maintenance technicians, policy makers, and others, to understand the physiological factors underlying fatigue, how flight operations affect fatigue, and what can be done to counteract fatigue and maximize alertness and performance in their operations. The overall purpose of this module is to promote aviation safety, performance, and productivity. It is intended to meet three specific objectives: (1) to explain the current state of knowledge about the physiological mechanisms underlying fatigue; (2) to demonstrate how this knowledge can be applied to improving flight crew sleep, performance, and alertness; and (3) to offer strategies for alertness management. Aviation Safety Reporting System (ASRS) and National Transportation Safety Board (NISH) reports are used throughout this module to demonstrate that fatigue is a safety issue in the regional operations community. The appendices at the end of this module include the ASRS reports used for the examples contained in this publication, brief introductions to sleep disorders and relaxation techniques, summaries of relevant NASA publications, and a list of general readings on sleep, sleep disorders, and circadian rhythms.

  17. Fighting climate change in the air: lessons from the EU directive on global aviation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole de Paula Domingos

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The European Union's (EU decision to include aviation into the Emissions Trade Scheme was heatedly contested. Countries around the world, but mainly the Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa group (BRICS and the US, denounced the EU's initiate as illegal and unilateral. Following a decade of frustrated negotiations at the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO, this paper interrogates why such measure, in principle climate-friendly, inspired so much global resentment. I argue that concerns with competitiveness and risks of legal inconsistency are important, but insufficient elements to explain the core of the conflict. The paper suggests that the EU was strongly criticized because third countries perceived this action as an imposed solution, which fostered an environment of distrust. Therefore, I claim that the problem has more to do with a normative divide than with a substantive divergence on what should be done regarding aviation emissions. My analysis is informed by the present literature on the links between trade and climate change, but gives particular weight to first-hand information through interviews with key stakeholders. The paper is divided in three parts. First, it presents the scope of the EU directive in historical perspective. Second, it explores the EU's measure through three different angles: legal, economical and political. The final part explores some possible solutions to overcome these divergences.

  18. Demonstration and implementation of ethanol as an aviation fuel. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-01-01

    The objectives of the program were to demonstrate the viability of ethanol as an aviation fuel at appropriate locations and audiences in the participating Biomass Energy Program Regions, and to promote implementation projects in the area. Seven demonstrations were to be performed during the Summer 1995 through December 1996 period. To maximize the cost effectiveness of the program, additional corporate co-sponsorships were sought at each demonstration site and the travel schedule was arranged to take advantage of appropriate events taking place in the vicinity of the schedule events or enroute. This way, the original funded amount was stretched to cover another year of activities increasing the number of demonstrations from seven to thirty-nine. While the Renewable Aviation Fuels Development Center (RAFDC) contract focused on ethanol as an aviation fuel, RAFDC also promoted the broader use of ethanol as a transportation fuel. The paper summarizes locations and occasions, and gives a brief description of each demonstration/exhibit/presentation held during the term of the project. Most of the demonstrations took place at regularly scheduled air shows, such as the Oshkosh, Wisconsin Air Show. The paper also reviews current and future activities in the areas of certification, emission testing, the international Clean Airports Program, air pollution monitoring with instrumented aircraft powered by renewable fuels, training operation and pilot project on ethanol, turbine fuel research, and educational programs.

  19. Temporal and spatial variability in the aviation NO[subscript x]-related O[subscript 3] impact

    OpenAIRE

    Koo, Jamin; Wang, Qiqi; Gilmore, Christopher Kenneth; Barrett, Steven

    2013-01-01

    Aviation NO[subscript x] emissions promote tropospheric ozone formation, which is linked to climate warming and adverse health effects. Modeling studies have quantified the relative impact of aviation NO[subscript x] on O[subscript 3] in large geographic regions. As these studies have applied forward modeling techniques, it has not been possible to attribute O[subscript 3] formation to individual flights. Here we apply the adjoint of the global chemistry–transport model GEOS-Chem to assess th...

  20. Pilot Designed Aircraft Displays in General Aviation: An Exploratory Study and Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conaway, Cody R.

    From 2001-2011, the General Aviation (GA) fatal accident rate remained unchanged (Duquette & Dorr, 2014) with an overall stagnant accident rate between 2004 and 2013. The leading cause, loss of control in flight (NTSB, 2015b & 2015c) due to pilot inability to recognize approach to stall/spin conditions (NTSB, 2015b & 2016b). In 2013, there were 1,224 GA accidents in the U.S., accounting for 94% of all U.S. aviation accidents and 90% of all U.S. aviation fatalities that year (NTSB, 2015c). Aviation entails multiple challenges for pilots related to task management, procedural errors, perceptual distortions, and cognitive discrepancies. While machine errors in airplanes have continued to decrease over the years, human error still has not (NTSB, 2013). A preliminary analysis of a PC-based, Garmin G1000 flight deck was conducted with 3 professional pilots. Analyses revealed increased task load, opportunities for distraction, confusing perceptual ques, and hindered cognitive performance. Complex usage problems were deeply ingrained in the functionality of the system, forcing pilots to use fallible work arounds, add unnecessary steps, and memorize knob turns or button pushes. Modern computing now has the potential to free GA cockpit designs from knobs, soft keys, or limited display options. Dynamic digital displays might include changes in instrumentation or menu structuring depending on the phase of flight. Airspeed indicators could increase in size to become more salient during landing, simultaneously highlighting pitch angle on Attitude Indicators and automatically decluttering unnecessary information for landing. Likewise, Angle-of-Attack indicators demonstrate a great safety and performance advantage for pilots (Duquette & Dorr, 2014; NTSB, 2015b & 2016b), an instrument typically found in military platforms and now the Icon A5, light-sport aircraft (Icon, 2016). How does the design of pilots' environment---the cockpit---further influence their efficiency and

  1. Risk management of aviation maintenance%机务维修风险管理研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张晓全; 曹钧; 于露

    2012-01-01

    Aviation maintenance was vital for the safety of flight. With the continuing development of civil aviation, the lack of aviation maintenance ability was increasingly serious, so it was necessary to carry out risk management. The SHELL model was taken as the risk identification tool at first. The aviation maintenance risk factors were classified and analyzed in accordance with life (L) factors/Life and life (L-L) factors/ Life and Software (L-S) factors/ Life and Hardware ( L-H) factors/ Life and Environmental factors ( L-E) factors to get the muster of risk factors. Then the fuzzy analytic network process was applied as the tool of risk assessment to quantitatively analyze the importance of risk factors according to the characteristic that risk factors influence each other. Based on the results of risk assessment, the corresponding risk control measures were put forward such as reinforcing maintenance resources management; making the just safety culture; perfecting the construction of the aviation maintenance technicians ; improving the aviation maintenance condition. The result indicated that the study was significant for the aviation maintenance risk management because it could help to systemically identify risk factors, scientifically assess risk factors and make reasonable risk control measures.%机务维修是影响飞行安全的重要环节,随着我国民航业的不断发展,机务维修能力不足的问题日益严重,急需进行风险管理研究.首先选择SHELL模型进行风险因素识别,从人员(L)、人员与人员(L-L)、人员与软件(L-S)、人员与硬件(L-H)、人员与环境(L-E)方面系统的识别出机务维修风险因素;在此基础上,针对机务维修风险因素相互影响的特点,选择模糊网络分析法进行风险评价,得出权重排序;针对评价结果,提出相应的风险控制措施:加强维修资源管理、建立良好的安全文化、强化维修队伍建设、改善维修工作条件.最终结果

  2. Economic interrelationships and impacts of the aviation/aerospace industry in the state of Florida using input-output analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whealan George, Kelly

    The study provided a detailed description of the interrelatedness of the aviation and aerospace industry with principal industries in Florida and Volusia County (VC) using Input-Output (IO) analysis. Additionally, this research provided an economic impact analysis of the creation of a university research park in Daytona Beach (DB). The economic impact measures included not only direct economic output and industry employment descriptions but also described the multiplier effects in the form of indirect and induced impacts using data for 2012. This research concluded the average labor income of the aviation and aerospace industry was higher than average labor income in Florida and VC. A substantive difference between the Florida and VC average labor income for the aviation and aerospace industry existed because VC's aerospace sector was only concentrated in the search, detection, and navigation instruments manufacturing sector. VC's transport by air sector was one-fifth the size of Florida's. Differences in the aviation and aerospace industry composition between Florida and VC are important because the economic impacts from a shock to the entire aviation and aerospace industry will be distributed differently. Since the aviation and aerospace average labor income is higher than the average labor income in Florida and VC, it would be a positive move for Florida's economy to attract and grow the aviation and aerospace industry. It would be highly unlikely that the entirety of newly created jobs would be resourced from the local population. Nonetheless, growing the aviation and aerospace industry jobs would have a positive influence on the region's economy and tax revenues. It would be a desirable course of action to spur the growth of this sector, as its direct effect would culminate with additional jobs in Florida that would bring higher wage jobs to the state. The interdependencies of the aviation and aerospace industry in Florida and VC with other industries had a

  3. A volcanic activity alert-level system for aviation: review of its development and application in Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    An alert-level system for communicating volcano hazard information to the aviation industry was devised by the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) during the 1989–1990 eruption of Redoubt Volcano. The system uses a simple, color-coded ranking that focuses on volcanic ash emissions: Green—normal background; Yellow—signs of unrest; Orange—precursory unrest or minor ash eruption; Red—major ash eruption imminent or underway. The color code has been successfully applied on a regional scale in Alaska for a sustained period. During 2002–2011, elevated color codes were assigned by AVO to 13 volcanoes, eight of which erupted; for that decade, one or more Alaskan volcanoes were at Yellow on 67 % of days and at Orange or Red on 12 % of days. As evidence of its utility, the color code system is integrated into procedures of agencies responsible for air-traffic management and aviation meteorology in Alaska. Furthermore, it is endorsed as a key part of globally coordinated protocols established by the International Civil Aviation Organization to provide warnings of ash hazards to aviation worldwide. The color code and accompanying structured message (called a Volcano Observatory Notice for Aviation) comprise an effective early-warning message system according to the United Nations International Strategy for Disaster Reduction. The aviation color code system currently is used in the United States, Russia, New Zealand, Iceland, and partially in the Philippines, Papua New Guinea, and Indonesia. Although there are some barriers to implementation, with continued education and outreach to Volcano Observatories worldwide, greater use of the aviation color code system is achievable.

  4. Effect of Aviation Fuel Type and Fuel Injection Conditions on the Spray Characteristics of Pressure Swirl and Hybrid Air Blast Fuel Injectors

    OpenAIRE

    Feddema, Rick Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Feddema, Rick T. M.S.M.E., Purdue University, December 2013. Effect of Aviation Fuel Type and Fuel Injection Conditions on the Spray Characteristics of Pressure Swirl and Hybrid Air Blast Fuel Injectors. Major Professor: Dr. Paul E. Sojka, School of Mechanical Engineering Spray performance of pressure swirl and hybrid air blast fuel injectors are central to combustion stability, combustor heat management, and pollutant formation in aviation gas turbine engines. Next generation aviation gas...

  5. Psychophysiological Sensing and State Classification for Attention Management in Commercial Aviation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrivel, Angela R.; Liles, Charles; Stephens, Chad L.; Ellis, Kyle K.; Prinzel, Lawrence J.; Pope, Alan T.

    2016-01-01

    Attention-related human performance limiting states (AHPLS) can cause pilots to lose airplane state awareness (ASA), and their detection is important to improving commercial aviation safety. The Commercial Aviation Safety Team found that the majority of recent international commercial aviation accidents attributable to loss of control inflight involved flight crew loss of airplane state awareness, and that distraction of various forms was involved in all of them. Research on AHPLS, including channelized attention, diverted attention, startle / surprise, and confirmation bias, has been recommended in a Safety Enhancement (SE) entitled "Training for Attention Management." To accomplish the detection of such cognitive and psychophysiological states, a broad suite of sensors has been implemented to simultaneously measure their physiological markers during high fidelity flight simulation human subject studies. Pilot participants were asked to perform benchmark tasks and experimental flight scenarios designed to induce AHPLS. Pattern classification was employed to distinguish the AHPLS induced by the benchmark tasks. Unimodal classification using pre-processed electroencephalography (EEG) signals as input features to extreme gradient boosting, random forest and deep neural network multiclass classifiers was implemented. Multi-modal classification using galvanic skin response (GSR) in addition to the same EEG signals and using the same types of classifiers produced increased accuracy with respect to the unimodal case (90 percent vs. 86 percent), although only via the deep neural network classifier. These initial results are a first step toward the goal of demonstrating simultaneous real time classification of multiple states using multiple sensing modalities in high-fidelity flight simulators. This detection is intended to support and inform training methods under development to mitigate the loss of ASA and thus reduce accidents and incidents.

  6. Toward a Concept of Operations for Aviation Weather Information Implementation in the Evolving National Airspace System

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAdaragh, Raymon M.

    2002-01-01

    The capacity of the National Airspace System is being stressed due to the limits of current technologies. Because of this, the FAA and NASA are working to develop new technologies to increase the system's capacity which enhancing safety. Adverse weather has been determined to be a major factor in aircraft accidents and fatalities and the FAA and NASA have developed programs to improve aviation weather information technologies and communications for system users The Aviation Weather Information Element of the Weather Accident Prevention Project of NASA's Aviation Safety Program is currently working to develop these technologies in coordination with the FAA and industry. This paper sets forth a theoretical approach to implement these new technologies while addressing the National Airspace System (NAS) as an evolving system with Weather Information as one of its subSystems. With this approach in place, system users will be able to acquire the type of weather information that is needed based upon the type of decision-making situation and condition that is encountered. The theoretical approach addressed in this paper takes the form of a model for weather information implementation. This model addresses the use of weather information in three decision-making situations, based upon the system user's operational perspective. The model also addresses two decision-making conditions, which are based upon the need for collaboration due to the level of support offered by the weather information provided by each new product or technology. The model is proposed for use in weather information implementation in order to provide a systems approach to the NAS. Enhancements to the NAS collaborative decision-making capabilities are also suggested.

  7. Accident-precipitating factors for crashes in turbine-powered general aviation aircraft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Douglas D; Stolzer, Alan

    2016-01-01

    General aviation (14CFR Part 91) accounts for 83% of civil aviation fatalities. While much research has focused on accident causes/pilot demographics in this aviation sector, studies to identify factors leading up to the crash (accident-precipitating factors) are few. Such information could inform on pre-emptive remedial action. With this in mind and considering the paucity of research on turbine-powered aircraft accidents the study objectives were to identify accident-precipitating factors and determine if the accident rate has changed over time for such aircraft operating under 14CFR Part 91. The NTSB Access database was queried for accidents in airplanes (engines and occurring between 1989 and 2013. We developed and utilized an accident-precipitating factor taxonomy. Statistical analyses employed logistic regression, contingency tables and a generalized linear model with Poisson distribution. The "Checklist/Flight Manual Not Followed" was the most frequent accident-precipitating factor category and carried an excess risk (OR 2.34) for an accident with a fatal and/or serious occupant injury. This elevated risk reflected an over-representation of accidents with fatal and/or serious injury outcomes (pengine aircraft are more frequent than their single engine counterparts and the decline (50%) in the turbine aircraft accident rate over the study period was likely due, in part, to a 6-fold increased representation of single engine airplanes. In conclusion, our study is the first to identify novel precursive factors for accidents involving turbine aircraft operating under 14CFR Part 91. This research highlights areas that should receive further emphasis in training/recurrency in a pre-emptive attempt to nullify candidate accident-precipitating factor(s).

  8. Federal Aviation Administration (FAA airworthiness certification for ceramic matrix composite components in civil aircraft systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonczy Stephen T.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ceramic matrix composites (CMCs are being designed and developed for engine and exhaust components in commercial aviation, because they offer higher temperature capabilities, weight savings, and improved durability compared to metals. The United States Federal Aviation Administration (FAA issues and enforces regulations and minimum standards covering the safe manufacture, operation, and maintenance of civil aircraft. As new materials, these ceramic composite components will have to meet the certification regulations of the FAA for “airworthiness”. The FAA certification process is defined in the Federal Aviation Regulations (Title 14 of the Code of Federal Regulations, FAA policy statements, orders, advisory circulars, technical standard orders, and FAA airworthiness directives. These regulations and documents provide the fundamental requirements and guidelines for design, testing, manufacture, quality assurance, registration, operation, inspection, maintenance, and repair of aircraft systems and parts. For metallic parts in aircraft, the FAA certification and compliance process is well-established for type and airworthiness certification, using ASTM and SAE standards, the MMPDS data handbook, and FAA advisory circulars. In a similar manner for polymer matrix composites (PMC, the PMC industry and the FAA have jointly developed and are refining parallel guidelines for polymer matrix composites (PMCs, using guidance in FAA circulars and the CMH-17 PMC handbook. These documents discuss design methods and codes, material testing, property data development, life/durability assessment, production processes, QA procedures, inspection methods, operational limits, and repairs for PMCs. For ceramic composites, the FAA and the CMC and aerospace community are working together (primarily through the CMH-17 CMC handbook to define and codify key design, production, and regulatory issues that have to be addressed in the certification of CMC components in

  9. Accident-precipitating factors for crashes in turbine-powered general aviation aircraft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Douglas D; Stolzer, Alan

    2016-01-01

    General aviation (14CFR Part 91) accounts for 83% of civil aviation fatalities. While much research has focused on accident causes/pilot demographics in this aviation sector, studies to identify factors leading up to the crash (accident-precipitating factors) are few. Such information could inform on pre-emptive remedial action. With this in mind and considering the paucity of research on turbine-powered aircraft accidents the study objectives were to identify accident-precipitating factors and determine if the accident rate has changed over time for such aircraft operating under 14CFR Part 91. The NTSB Access database was queried for accidents in airplanes (turbine engines and occurring between 1989 and 2013. We developed and utilized an accident-precipitating factor taxonomy. Statistical analyses employed logistic regression, contingency tables and a generalized linear model with Poisson distribution. The "Checklist/Flight Manual Not Followed" was the most frequent accident-precipitating factor category and carried an excess risk (OR 2.34) for an accident with a fatal and/or serious occupant injury. This elevated risk reflected an over-representation of accidents with fatal and/or serious injury outcomes (pturbine aircraft accident rate over the study period was likely due, in part, to a 6-fold increased representation of single engine airplanes. In conclusion, our study is the first to identify novel precursive factors for accidents involving turbine aircraft operating under 14CFR Part 91. This research highlights areas that should receive further emphasis in training/recurrency in a pre-emptive attempt to nullify candidate accident-precipitating factor(s). PMID:26590507

  10. The Aviator

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Howard Hughes-visionary airplane tycoon, unbuttoned movie mogul, insatiable woman-chaser and mad recluse of Las Vegas-is one of the great, wild figures of American history, a fascinating denizen of both America's shining public and dark private realms. A massively wealthy and powerful nabob who seemed trapped in a teenage boy's fantasy world, Hughes and his story are subjects too vast and tumultuous to capturen any one movie-even a great one.

  11. Panel Discussion: New Directions in Human Reliability Analysis for Oil & Gas, Cybersecurity, Nuclear, and Aviation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harold S. Blackman; Ronald Boring; Julie L. Marble; Ali Mosleh; Najmedin Meshkati

    2014-10-01

    This panel will discuss what new directions are necessary to maximize the usefulness of HRA techniques across different areas of application. HRA has long been a part of Probabilistic Risk Assessment in the nuclear industry as it offers a superior standard for risk-based decision-making. These techniques are continuing to be adopted by other industries including oil & gas, cybersecurity, nuclear, and aviation. Each participant will present his or her ideas concerning industry needs followed by a discussion about what research is needed and the necessity to achieve cross industry collaboration.

  12. Finding a needle in a haystack: toward a psychologically informed method for aviation security screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ormerod, Thomas C; Dando, Coral J

    2015-02-01

    Current aviation security systems identify behavioral indicators of deception to assess risks to flights, but they lack a strong psychological basis or empirical validation. We present a new method that tests the veracity of passenger accounts. In an in vivo double-blind randomized-control trial conducted in international airports, security agents detected 66% of deceptive passengers using the veracity test method compared with less than 5% using behavioral indicator recognition. As well as revealing advantages of veracity testing over behavioral indicator identification, the study provides the highest levels to date of deception detection in a realistic setting where the known base rate of deceptive individuals is low.

  13. A Study of Aviation Weapon Equipment Maintenance Based on the Semi-Markov Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Based on the Semi-Markov mathematical description, the multiple states of maintenance processes for aviation weapon equipment are studied. Six kinds of maintenance states are determined and the Semi-Markov model of the maintenance process is given. According to maintenance characteristic, the multiple states maintenance processes are divided into the wait, use and alternate stages.Through using the mathematical model for the different stages, the probability in different states and effective index on different stages are obtained. These results are available to the maintenance practice.

  14. Introduction of Enhanced Vision System and its Application for General Aviation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roman Matyáš

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Enhanced Vision System (EVS technology has been developing since 1980s. The research itself has been mainly focused on controlling Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs. In this area, some methods were successfully tested, from take-off to landing. This paper is meant to be an introduction for further research and testing within general aviation area for use of EVS technology by high experienced as well as low experienced pilots in order to increase the level of safety during critical stages of flight.

  15. Software in military aviation and drone mishaps: Analysis and recommendations for the investigation process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Software plays a central role in military systems. It is also an important factor in many recent incidents and accidents. A safety gap is growing between our software-intensive technological capabilities and our understanding of the ways they can fail or lead to accidents. Traditional forms of accident investigation are poorly equipped to trace the sources of software failure, for instance software does not age in the same way that hardware components fail over time. As such, it can be hard to trace the causes of software failure or mechanisms by which it contributed to accidents back into the development and procurement chain to address the deeper, systemic causes of potential accidents. To identify some of these failure mechanisms, we examined the database of the Air Force Accident Investigation Board (AIB) and analyzed mishaps in which software was involved. Although we have chosen to focus on military aviation, many of the insights also apply to civil aviation. Our analysis led to several results and recommendations. Some were specific and related for example to specific shortcomings in the testing and validation of particular avionic subsystems. Others were broader in scope: for instance, we challenged both the investigation process (aspects of) and the findings in several cases, and we provided recommendations, technical and organizational, for improvements. We also identified important safety blind spots in the investigations with respect to software, whose contribution to the escalation of the adverse events was often neglected in the accident reports. These blind spots, we argued, constitute an important missed learning opportunity for improving accident prevention, and it is especially unfortunate at a time when Remotely Piloted Air Systems (RPAS) are being integrated into the National Airspace. Our findings support the growing recognition that the traditional notion of software failure as non-compliance with requirements is too limited to capture the

  16. NASA Environmentally Responsible Aviation Hybrid Wing Body Flow-Through Nacelle Wind Tunnel CFD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuh, Michael J.; Garcia, Joseph A.; Carter, Melissa B.; Deere, Karen A.; Tompkins, Daniel M.; Stremel, Paul M.

    2016-01-01

    Wind tunnel tests of a 5.75 scale model of the Boeing Hybrid Wing Body (HWB) configuration were conducted in the NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) 14x22 and NASA Ames Research Center (ARC) 40x80 low speed wind tunnels as part of the NASA Environmentally Responsible Aviation (ERA) Project. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations of the flow-through nacelle (FTN) configuration of this model were performed before and after the testing. This paper presents a summary of the experimental and CFD results for the model in the cruise and landing configurations.

  17. An Updated Examination of Aviation Accidents Associated with Turbulence, Wind Shear and Thunderstorm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Joni K.

    2014-01-01

    One of the technical challenges within the Atmospheric Environment Safety Technologies (AEST) Project of the Aviation Safety Program was to "improve and expand remote sensing and mitigation of hazardous atmospheric environments and phenomena"1. In 2012, the author performed an analysis comparing various characteristics of accidents associated with different types of atmospheric hazard environments2. This document reports an update to that analysis which was done in preparation for presenting these findings at the 2015 annual meeting of the Transportation Research Board. Specifically, an additional three years of data were available, and a time-trend analysis was added.

  18. Analysis of emission data from global commercial aviation: 2004 and 2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkerson, J. T.; Jacobson, M. Z.; Malwitz, A.; Balasubramanian, S.; Wayson, R.; Fleming, G.; Naiman, A. D.; Lele, S. K.

    2010-07-01

    The global commercial aircraft fleet in 2006 flew 31.26 million flights, burned 188.20 million metric tons of fuel, and covered 38.68 billion kilometers. This activity emitted substantial amounts of fossil-fuel combustion products within the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere that affect atmospheric composition and climate. The emissions products, such as carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, oxides of nitrogen, sulfur compounds, and particulate matter, are not emitted uniformly over the Earth, so understanding the temporal and spatial distributions is important for modeling aviation's climate impacts. Global commercial aircraft emission data for 2004 and 2006, provided by the Volpe National Transportation Systems Center, were computed using the Federal Aviation Administration's Aviation Environmental Design Tool (AEDT). Continuous improvement in methodologies, including changes in AEDT's horizontal track methodologies, and an increase in availability of data make some differences between the 2004 and 2006 inventories incomparable. Furthermore, the 2004 inventory contained a significant over-count due to an imperfect data merge and daylight savings error. As a result, the 2006 emissions inventory is considered more representative of actual flight activity. Here, we analyze both 2004 and 2006 emissions, focusing on the latter, and provide corrected totals for 2004. Analysis of 2006 flight data shows that 92.5% of fuel was burned in the Northern Hemisphere, 69.0% between 30N and 60N latitudes, and 74.6% was burned above 7 km. This activity led to 162.25 Tg of carbon from CO2 emitted globally in 2006, more than half over three regions: the United States (25.5%), Europe (14.6), and East Asia (11.1). Despite receiving less than one percent of global emissions, the Arctic receives a uniformly dispersed concentration of emissions with 95.2% released at altitude where they have longer residence time than surface emissions. Finally, 85.2% of all flights by number in 2006

  19. The comparative metrological estimation of methods of emission spectral analysis for wear products in aviation oils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alchimov, A.B.; Drobot, S.I.; Drokov, V.G.; Zarubin, V.P.; Kazmirov, A.D.; Skodaev, Y.D.; Podrezov, A.M. [Applied Physics Institute of Irkutsk State University, Irkutsk (Russian Federation)

    1997-12-31

    The comparison of different spectral methods of analysis for wear diagnostics of aircraft engines has been carried out. It is shown that known techniques of determination of metals content in aviation oils with the use the spectrometers MFS (Russia) and MOA (USA) give a low accuracy of measurements. As an alternative the method of wear diagnostics on the base of a scintillation spectrometer is suggested. This method possess far better metrological properties in comparison with those on the base of the spectrometer MFS and MOA. (orig.) 6 refs.

  20. Nobody seems to speak English here today: Enhancing assessment and training in aviation English

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Douglas

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In 2003 the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO strengthened the provisions that English be made available for international radiotelephony communication. ICAO also developed standards for English proficiency for international pilots and air traffic controllers. However, these standards are applied variably from country to country and in no country are native speakers of English tested for their ability to employ what has been termed "interactional competence" when using English for intercultural communication. Problems with this situation are reviewed and suggestions made for improving English assessment and training.

  1. Input/output models for general aviation piston-prop aircraft fuel economy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweet, L. M.

    1982-01-01

    A fuel efficient cruise performance model for general aviation piston engine airplane was tested. The following equations were made: (1) for the standard atmosphere; (2) airframe-propeller-atmosphere cruise performance; and (3) naturally aspirated engine cruise performance. Adjustments are made to the compact cruise performance model as follows: corrected quantities, corrected performance plots, algebraic equations, maximize R with or without constraints, and appears suitable for airborne microprocessor implementation. The following hardwares are recommended: ignition timing regulator, fuel-air mass ration controller, microprocessor, sensors and displays.

  2. General aviation internal combustion engine research programs at NASA-Lewis Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, E. A.

    1978-01-01

    An update is presented of non-turbine general aviation engine programs underway at the NASA-Lewis Research Center in Cleveland, Ohio. The program encompasses conventional, lightweight diesel and rotary engines. Its three major thrusts are: (a) reduced SFC's; (b) improved fuels tolerance; and (c) reducing emissions. Current and planned future programs in such areas as lean operation, improved fuel management, advanced cooling techniques and advanced engine concepts, are described. These are expected to lay the technology base, by the mid to late 1980's, for engines whose life cycle fuel costs are 30 to 50% lower than today's conventional engines.

  3. General aviation internal-combustion engine research programs at NASA-Lewis Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, E. A.

    1978-01-01

    An update is presented of non-turbine general aviation engine programs. The program encompasses conventional, lightweight diesel and rotary engines. It's three major thrusts are: (1) reduced SFC's; (2) improved fuels tolerance; and (3) reduced emissions. Current and planned future programs in such areas as lean operation, improved fuel management, advanced cooling techniques and advanced engine concepts, are described. These are expected to lay the technology base, by the mid to latter 1980's, for engines whose life cycle fuel costs are 30 to 50% lower than today's conventional engines.

  4. An investigation of aviator problem-solving skills as they relate to amount of total flight time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guilkey, James Elwood, Jr.

    As aircraft become increasingly more reliable, safety issues have shifted towards the human component of flight, the pilot. Jensen (1995) indicated that 80% of all General Aviation (GA) accidents are the result, at least in part, of errors committed by the aviator. One major focus of current research involves aviator decision making (ADM). ADM combines a broad range of psychological factors including personality, attitude, and motivation. This approach fails to isolate certain key components such as aviator problem-solving (APS) which are paramount to safe operations. It should be noted that there is a clear delineation between problem-solving and decision making and not assume that they are homogenous. For years, researchers, industry, and the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) have depended on total flight hours as the standard by which to judge aviator expertise. A pilot with less than a prescribed number of hours is considered a novice while those above that mark are considered experts. The reliance on time as a predictor of performance may be accurate when considering skills which are required on every flight (i.e., takeoff and landing) but we can't assume that this holds true for all aspects of aviator expertise. Complex problem-solving for example, is something that is rarely faced during the normal course of flying. In fact, there are a myriad of procedures and FAA mandated regulations designed to assist pilots in avoiding problems. Thus, one should not assume that aviator problem-solving skills will increase over time. This study investigated the relationship between problem-solving skills of general aviation pilots and total number of flight hours. It was discovered that flight time is not a good predictor of problem-solving performance. There were two distinct strategies that were identified in the study. The first, progressive problem solving (PPS) was characterized by a stepwise method in which pilots gathered information, formulated hypotheses, and

  5. Symbology Development for General Aviation Synthetic Vision Primary Flight Displays for the Approach and Missed-Approach Modes of Flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartolone, Anthony P.; Hughes, Monica F.; Wong, Douglas T.; Takallu, Mohammad A.

    2004-01-01

    Spatial disorientation induced by inadvertent flight into instrument meteorological conditions (IMC) continues to be a leading cause of fatal accidents in general aviation. The Synthetic Vision Systems General Aviation (SVS-GA) research element, an integral part of NASA s Aviation Safety and Security Program (AvSSP), is investigating a revolutionary display technology designed to mitigate low visibility events such as controlled flight into terrain (CFIT) and low-visibility loss of control (LVLoC). The integrated SVS Primary Flight Display (SVS-PFD) utilizes computer generated 3-dimensional imagery of the surrounding terrain augmented with flight path guidance symbology. This unique combination will provide GA pilots with an accurate representation of their environment and projection of their flight path, regardless of time of day or out-the-window (OTW) visibility. The initial Symbology Development for Head-Down Displays (SD-HDD) simulation experiment examined 16 display configurations on a centrally located high-resolution PFD installed in NASA s General Aviation Work Station (GAWS) flight simulator. The results of the experiment indicate that situation awareness (SA) can be enhanced without having a negative impact on flight technical error (FTE), by providing a general aviation pilot with an integrated SVS display to use when OTW visibility is obscured.

  6. Ideas of Constructing Digital Aviation Maintenance System%数字化航空维修体系构想

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘斌; 蔡海鹏

    2012-01-01

    Digital maintenance is a general need and trend for aviation maintenance system, and to construct a net - centralized digital aviation maintenance system is a system engineering, value engi- neering and strategy engineering. There are some ideas on how to construct a digital aviation mainte- nance system after discussing its necessity and significance.%数字化维修对航空修理系统是大势所需、大势所趋。构建“网络中心化”的数字化航空维修体系,是一项系统工程、价值工程和战略工程。从数字化维修的必要性和意义,设想如何构建数字化航空维修体系。

  7. Modeling the present and future impact of aviation on climate: an AOGCM approach with online coupled chemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Huszar

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available This work assesses the impact of emissions from global aviation on climate, while focus is given on the temperature response. Our work is among the first that use an Atmosphere Ocean General Circulation Model (AOGCM online coupled with stratospheric chemistry and the chemistry of mid-troposphere relevant for aviation emissions. Compared to previous studies where either the chemical effects of aviation emissions were investigated using global chemistry transport models or the climate impact of aviation was under focus implementing prescribed perturbation fields or simplified chemistry schemes, our study uses emissions as inputs and provides the climate response as output. The model we use is the Météo-France CNRM-CM5.1 earth system model extended with the REPROBUS stratospheric scheme. The timehorizon of our interest is 1940–2100 assuming the A1B SRES scenario. We investigate the present and future impact of the most relevant aviation emissions (CO2, NOx, contrail and contrail induced cirrus – CIC as well as the impact of the non-CO2 emissions and the "Total" aviation impact. Aviation produced aerosol is not considered in the study.

    The general conclusion is that the aviation emissions result in a less pronounced climate signal than previous studies suggest. Moreover this signal is more unique at higher altitudes (above the mid-troposphere than near the surface.

    The global averaged near surface CO2 impact reaches around 0.1 °C by the end of the 21st century and can be even negative in the middle of the century. The non-CO2 impact remains positive during the whole 21st century reaching 0.2 °C in its second half. A similar warming is calculated for the CIC effect. The NOx emissions impact is almost negligible in our simulations, as the aviation induced ozone production was small in the model's chemical scheme. As a consequence the non-CO2 signal

  8. Model-based aviation advice on distal volcanic ash clouds by assimilating aircraft in situ measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Guangliang; Heemink, Arnold; Lu, Sha; Segers, Arjo; Weber, Konradin; Lin, Hai-Xiang

    2016-07-01

    The forecast accuracy of distal volcanic ash clouds is important for providing valid aviation advice during volcanic ash eruption. However, because the distal part of volcanic ash plume is far from the volcano, the influence of eruption information on this part becomes rather indirect and uncertain, resulting in inaccurate volcanic ash forecasts in these distal areas. In our approach, we use real-life aircraft in situ observations, measured in the northwestern part of Germany during the 2010 Eyjafjallajökull eruption, in an ensemble-based data assimilation system combined with a volcanic ash transport model to investigate the potential improvement on the forecast accuracy with regard to the distal volcanic ash plume. We show that the error of the analyzed volcanic ash state can be significantly reduced through assimilating real-life in situ measurements. After a continuous assimilation, it is shown that the aviation advice for Germany, the Netherlands and Luxembourg can be significantly improved. We suggest that with suitable aircrafts measuring once per day across the distal volcanic ash plume, the description and prediction of volcanic ash clouds in these areas can be greatly improved.

  9. Cosmic radiation in aviation: radiological protection of Air France aircraft crew.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desmaris, G

    2016-06-01

    Cosmic radiation in aviation has been a concern since the 1960s, and measurements have been taken for several decades by Air France. Results show that aircraft crew generally receive 3-4 mSv y(-1) for 750 boarding hours. Compliance with the trigger level of 6 mSv y(-1) is achieved by route selection. Work schedules can be developed for pregnant pilots to enable the dose to the fetus to be kept below 1 mSv. Crew members are informed of their exposition and the potential health impact. The upcoming International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) report on cosmic radiation in aviation will provide an updated guidance. A graded approach proportionate with the time of exposure is recommended to implement the optimisation principle. The objective is to keep exposures of the most exposed aircraft members to reasonable levels. ICRP also recommends that information about cosmic radiation be disseminated, and that awareness about cosmic radiation be raised in order to favour informed decision-making by all concerned stakeholders. PMID:27044363

  10. European CO2 emission trends: A decomposition analysis for water and aviation transport sectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A decomposition analysis is used to investigate the main factors influencing the CO2 emissions of European transport activities for the period 2001–2008. The decomposition method developed by Sun has been used to investigate the carbon dioxide emissions intensity, the energy intensity, the structural changes and the economy activity growth effects for the water and the aviation transport sectors. The analysis is based on Eurostat data and results are presented for 14 Member States, Norway and EU27. Results indicate that economic growth has been the main factor behind the carbon dioxide emissions increase in EU27 both for water and aviation transport activities. -- Highlights: ► Decomposition analysis is used to investigate factors that influenced the energy-related CO2 emissions of European transport. ► Economic growth has been the main factor affecting the energy-related CO2 emissions increases. ► Investigating the CO2 emissions drivers is the first step to define energy efficiency policies and emission reduction strategies.

  11. Analysis of Technological Innovation and Environmental Performance Improvement in Aviation Sector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeonghoon Mo

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The past oil crises have caused dramatic improvements in fuel efficiency in all industrial sectors. The aviation sector—aircraft manufacturers and airlines—has also made significant efforts to improve the fuel efficiency through more advanced jet engines, high-lift wing designs, and lighter airframe materials. However, the innovations in energy-saving aircraft technologies do not coincide with the oil crisis periods. The largest improvement in aircraft fuel efficiency took place in the 1960s while the high oil prices in the 1970s and on did not induce manufacturers or airlines to achieve a faster rate of innovation. In this paper, we employ a historical analysis to examine the socio-economic reasons behind the relatively slow technological innovation in aircraft fuel efficiency over the last 40 years. Based on the industry and passenger behaviors studied and prospects for alternative fuel options, this paper offers insights for the aviation sector to shift toward more sustainable technological options in the medium term. Second-generation biofuels could be the feasible option with a meaningful reduction in aviation’s lifecycle environmental impact if they can achieve sufficient economies of scale.

  12. GENERALIZED LANDSCAPE THEORY: AGENT-BASED APPROACH TO ALLIANCE FORMATIONS IN CIVIL AVIATION INDUSTRY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kyoichi Kijima

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to generalize Landscape theory proposed by R.Axelrod and, then, to apply it to the civil aviation industry for simulating alliance formations in it. Landscape theory provides a well-known agent-based simulation model for analyzing alliance (or coalition) formation process. When a set N of agents or autonomous decision makers is given, the theory assumes that each agent tries to make a coalition in such a way that the resulting alliance minimizes its frustration. The theory is essentially based on two premises. One is that a propensity is symmetric,i.e., the propensity of agent i toward j is exactly the same as that of j toward i for anyagents i and j in N. The other is that the number of alliances is restricted to two, i.e., at any moment N is partitioned into two parties. Though the two basic premises underpin the theory and make the model simple and operational, they do not always reflect alliance formation processes in a realistic way. A generalized Landscape theory that this paper proposes removes them and allows asymmetric propensity and existence of alliances of any number. Since the premises are essential for the model, the generalization requires a drastic reconstruction of the whole idea of the theory. Finally, we analyze a real alliance formation process in the civil aviation industry.This analysis provides interesting insights about the industry as well as some validation of our generalized Landscape theory.

  13. Aviation Emissions Impact Ambient Ultrafine Particle Concentrations in the Greater Boston Area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudda, N; Simon, M C; Zamore, W; Brugge, D; Durant, J L

    2016-08-16

    Ultrafine particles are emitted at high rates by jet aircraft. To determine the possible impacts of aviation activities on ambient ultrafine particle number concentrations (PNCs), we analyzed PNCs measured from 3 months to 3.67 years at three sites within 7.3 km of Logan International Airport (Boston, MA). At sites 4.0 and 7.3 km from the airport, average PNCs were 2- and 1.33-fold higher, respectively, when winds were from the direction of the airport compared to other directions, indicating that aviation impacts on PNC extend many kilometers downwind of Logan airport. Furthermore, PNCs were positively correlated with flight activity after taking meteorology, time of day and week, and traffic volume into account. Also, when winds were from the direction of the airport, PNCs increased with increasing wind speed, suggesting that buoyant aircraft exhaust plumes were the likely source. Concentrations of other pollutants [CO, black carbon (BC), NO, NO2, NOx, SO2, and fine particulate matter (PM2.5)] decreased with increasing wind speed when winds were from the direction of the airport, indicating a different dominant source (likely roadway traffic emissions). Except for oxides of nitrogen, other pollutants were not correlated with flight activity. Our findings point to the need for PNC exposure assessment studies to take aircraft emissions into consideration, particularly in populated areas near airports. PMID:27490267

  14. Assessing Knowledge Retention of an Immersive Serious Game vs. a Traditional Education Method in Aviation Safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chittaro, Luca; Buttussi, Fabio

    2015-04-01

    Thanks to the increasing availability of consumer head-mounted displays, educational applications of immersive VR could now reach to the general public, especially if they include gaming elements (immersive serious games). Safety education of citizens could be a particularly promising domain for immersive serious games, because people tend not to pay attention to and benefit from current safety materials. In this paper, we propose an HMD-based immersive game for educating passengers about aviation safety that allows players to experience a serious aircraft emergency with the goal of surviving it. We compare the proposed approach to a traditional aviation safety education method (the safety card) used by airlines. Unlike most studies of VR for safety knowledge acquisition, we do not focus only on assessing learning immediately after the experience but we extend our attention to knowledge retention over a longer time span. This is a fundamental requirement, because people need to retain safety procedures in order to apply them when faced with danger. A knowledge test administered before, immediately after and one week after the experimental condition showed that the immersive serious game was superior to the safety card. Moreover, subjective as well as physiological measurements employed in the study showed that the immersive serious game was more engaging and fear-arousing than the safety card, a factor that can contribute to explain the obtained superior retention, as we discuss in the paper. PMID:26357103

  15. Incentive-based regulation of CO2 emissions from international aviation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We explore the possibilities of using incentive-based environmental regulations of CO2 emissions from international civil aviation. In theory incentive-based instruments such as an emission charge or a tradable emission permit system are better regulations than so-called command-and-control regulations such as emission limits or technology standards. However, the implementation of these instruments is a complex issue. We therefore describe and discuss how an emission charge and a tradable emission permit system for international aviation should be designed in order to improve efficiency. We also compare these two types of regulations. In brief, we find that an emission charge and a tradable emission permit system in which the permits are auctioned have more or less the same characteristics. The main advantage of a tradable emission permit system is that the effect, in terms of emission reductions, is known. On the other hand, we show that under uncertainty an emission charge is preferred. The choice of regulation is a political decision and it does not seem likely that an environmental charge or a tradable emission permit system would be implemented without consideration of the costs of the regulation. Revenue-neutral charges or gratis distribution of permits would, for this reason, be realistic choices of regulations. However, such actions are likely to result in less stringent regulations and other negative welfare effects.(author)

  16. Synthesis of high density aviation fuel with cyclopentanol derived from lignocellulose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Xueru; Li, Ning; Li, Guangyi; Wang, Wentao; Yang, Jinfan; Cong, Yu; Wang, Aiqin; Wang, Xiaodong; Zhang, Tao

    2015-03-01

    For the first time, renewable high density aviation fuels were synthesized at high overall yield (95.6%) by the Guerbet reaction of cyclopentanol which can be derived from lignocellulose, followed by the hydrodeoxygenation (HDO). The solvent-free Guerbet reaction of cyclopentanol was carried out under the co-catalysis of solid bases and Raney metals. Among the investigated catalyst systems, the combinations of magnesium-aluminium hydrotalcite (MgAl-HT) and Raney Ni (or Raney Co) exhibited the best performances. Over them, high carbon yield (96.7%) of C10 and C15 oxygenates was achieved. The Guerbet reaction products were further hydrodeoxygenated to bi(cyclopentane) and tri(cyclopentane) over a series of Ni catalysts. These alkanes have high densities (0.86 g mL-1 and 0.91 g mL-1) and can be used as high density aviation fuels or additives to bio-jet fuel. Among the investigated HDO catalysts, the 35 wt.% Ni-SiO2-DP prepared by deposition-precipitation method exhibited the highest activity.

  17. Evaluating Behaviorally Oriented Aviation Maintenance Resource Management (MRM) Training and Programs: Methods, Results, and Conclusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, James C.; Thomas, Robert L., III

    2003-01-01

    Assessment of the impact of Aviation Resource Management Programs on aviation culture and performance has compelled a considerable body of research (Taylor & Robertson, 1995; Taylor, 1998; Taylor & Patankar, 2001). In recent years new methods have been applied to the problem of maintenance error precipitated by factors such as the need for self-assessment of communication and trust. The present study - 2002 -- is an extension of that past work. This research project was designed as the conclusion of a larger effort to help understand, evaluate and validate the impact of Maintenance Resource Management (MRM) training programs, and other MRM interventions on participant attitudes, opinions, behaviors, and ultimately on enhanced safety performance. It includes research and development of evaluation methodology as well as examination of psychological constructs and correlates of maintainer performance. In particular, during 2002, three issues were addressed. First, the evaluation of two (independent & different) MRM programs for changing behaviors was undertaken. In one case we were able to further apply the approach to measuring written communication developed during 2001 (Taylor, 2002; Taylor & Thomas, 2003). Second, the MRM/TOQ surveys were made available for completion on the internet. The responses from these on-line surveys were automatically linked to a results calculator (like the one developed and described in Taylor, 2002) to aid industry users in analyzing and evaluating their local survey data on the internet. Third, the main trends and themes from our research about MRM programs over the past dozen years were reviewed.

  18. Parametric Modeling Investigation of a Radially-Staged Low-Emission Aviation Combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heath, Christopher M.

    2016-01-01

    Aviation gas-turbine combustion demands high efficiency, wide operability and minimal trace gas emissions. Performance critical design parameters include injector geometry, combustor layout, fuel-air mixing and engine cycle conditions. The present investigation explores these factors and their impact on a radially staged low-emission aviation combustor sized for a next-generation 24,000-lbf-thrust engine. By coupling multi-fidelity computational tools, a design exploration was performed using a parameterized annular combustor sector at projected 100% takeoff power conditions. Design objectives included nitrogen oxide emission indices and overall combustor pressure loss. From the design space, an optimal configuration was selected and simulated at 7.1, 30 and 85% part-power operation, corresponding to landing-takeoff cycle idle, approach and climb segments. All results were obtained by solution of the steady-state Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations. Species concentrations were solved directly using a reduced 19-step reaction mechanism for Jet-A. Turbulence closure was obtained using a nonlinear K-epsilon model. This research demonstrates revolutionary combustor design exploration enabled by multi-fidelity physics-based simulation.

  19. Lean blowout limits of a gas turbine combustor operated with aviation fuel and methane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Wei; Huang, Yong

    2016-05-01

    Lean blowout (LBO) limits is critical to the operational performance of combustion systems in propulsion and power generation. The swirl cup plays an important role in flame stability and has been widely used in aviation engines. Therefore, the effects of swirl cup geometry and flow dynamics on LBO limits are significant. An experiment was conducted for studying the lean blowout limits of a single dome rectangular model combustor with swirl cups. Three types of swirl cup (dual-axial swirl cup, axial-radial swirl cup, dual-radial swirl cup) were employed in the experiment which was operated with aviation fuel (Jet A-1) and methane under the idle condition. Experimental results showed that, with using both Jet A-1 and methane, the LBO limits increase with the air flow of primary swirler for dual-radial swirl cup, while LBO limits decrease with the air flow of primary swirler for dual-axial swirl cup. In addition, LBO limits increase with the swirl intensity for three swirl cups. The experimental results also showed that the flow dynamics instead of atomization poses a significant influence on LBO limits. An improved semi-empirical correlation of experimental data was derived to predict the LBO limits for gas turbine combustors.

  20. Producing aviation gasoline based on light-weight fractions of reformat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanatarov, M.A.; Abdul' minev, K.G.; Akhmetov, A.F.; Guseynov, A.M.; Taranets, E.A.

    1984-01-01

    Data are presented (fract. compos. o.ch., aromatic carbon content, yield) characterizing the stable catalysate and fractions (fr) which boil out before 150/sup 0/C and the reforming catalysate. It has been shown that the latter satisfies the GOST requirements for aviation fuel in fractional composition and can be used as base components. In order to bring the aromatic carbon and purified section (m.m.) content to the required level, it is necessary to include in the composite gasoline isocomponents. Based on the main fr of reformat 140/sup 0/, the following fuel composite was compiled,%: 61 fr of low quality 140/sup 0/, 30 alkylate with purified part 91 (m.m.), 9 directly distilled gasoline fr of low quality 85/sup 0/ with purified part (m.m.) 74. It is shown that the obtained fuel composite satisfies the GOST requirements for aviation gasoline G-95/130. The residual fr of reformat with 140/sup 0/ containing over 98% aromatic carbon can be used as the solvent for the paint industry.

  1. The effect of cosmic ray intensity variations and geomagnetic disturbances on the physiological state of aviators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papailiou, M.; Mavromichalaki, H.; Kudela, K.; Stetiarova, J.; Dimitrova, S.; Giannaropoulou, E.

    2011-09-01

    Over the last few years various researches have reached the conclusion that cosmic ray variations and geomagnetic disturbances are related to the condition of the human physiological state. In this study medical data regarding 4018 Slovak aviators were analyzed in relation to daily variations of cosmic ray and geomagnetic activity. Specifically daily data concerning mean values of heart rate which were registered during the medical examinations of the Slovak aviators, were related to daily variations of cosmic ray intensity, as measured by the Neutron Monitor Station on Lomnicky Stit (http://neutronmonitor.ta3.sk/realtime.php3) and the high resolution neutron monitor database (http://www.nmdb.eu) and daily variations of Dst and Ap geomagnetic indices. All subjects were men in good health of age 18-60 yrs. This particular study refers to the time period from 1 January 1994 till 31 December 2002. Statistical methods were applied to establish a statistical significance of the effect of geomagnetic activity levels and cosmic ray intensity variations on the aforementioned physiological parameters for the whole group. The Pearson r-coefficients were calculated and the Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) method was applied to establish the statistical significance levels (p-values) of the effect of geomagnetic activity and cosmic ray intensity variations on heart rate up to three days before and three days after the respective events. Results show that there is an underlying effect of geomagnetic activity and cosmic ray intensity variations on the cardiovascular functionality.

  2. Applying decision trial and evaluation laboratory as a decision tool for effective safety management system in aviation transport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ifeanyichukwu Ebubechukwu Onyegiri

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, in the aviation industry, the weak engineering controls and lapses associated with safety management systems (SMSs are responsible for the seemingly unprecedented disasters. A previous study has confirmed the difficulties experienced by safety managers with SMSs and the need to direct research to this area of investigation for more insights and progress in the evaluation and maintenance of SMSs in the aviation industry. The purpose of this work is to examine the application of Decision Trial and Evaluation Laboratory (DEMATEL to the aviation industry in developing countries with illustration using the Nigerian aviation survey data for the validation of the method. The advantage of the procedure over other decision making methods is in its ability to apply feedback in its decision making. It also affords us the opportunity of breaking down the complex aviation SMS components and elements which are multi-variate in nature through the analysis of the contributions of the diverse system criteria from the perspective of cause and effects, which in turn yields easier and yet more effective aviation transportation accident pre-corrective actions. In this work, six revised components of an SMS were identified and DEMATEL was applied to obtain their direct and indirect impacts and influences on the overall SMS performance. Data collection was by the survey questionnaire, which served as the initial direct-relation matrix, coded in Matlab software for establishing the impact relation map (IRM. The IRM was then plotted in MS Excel spread-sheet software. From our results, safety structure and regulation has the highest impact level on an SMS with a corresponding positive relation level value. In conclusion, the results agree with those of previous researchers that used grey relational analysis. Thus, DEMATEL serves as a great tool and resource for the safety manager.

  3. Modeling the present and future impact of aviation on climate: an AOGCM approach with online coupled chemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Huszar

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Our work is among the first that use an atmosphere-ocean general circulation model (AOGCM with online chemistry to evaluate the impact of future aviation emissions on temperature. Other particularities of our study include non-scaling to the aviation emissions, and the analysis of models' transient response using ensemble simulations. The model we use is the Météo-France CNRM-CM5.1 earth system model extended with the REPROBUS chemistry scheme. The time horizon of our interest is 1940–2100, assuming the A1B SRES scenario. We investigate the present and future impact of aviation emissions of CO2, NOx and H2O on climate, taking into account changes in greenhouse gases, contrails and contrail-induced cirrus (CIC. As in many transport-related impact studies, we distinguish between the climate impacts of CO2 emissions and those of non-CO2 emissions. Aviation-produced aerosol is not considered in the study. Our modeling system simulated a notable sea-ice bias in the Arctic, and therefore results concerning the surface should be viewed with caution. The global averaged near-surface CO2 impact reaches around 0.1 K by the end of the 21st century, while the non-CO2 impact reaches 0.2 K in the second half of the century. The NOx emissions impact is almost negligible in our simulations, as our aviation-induced ozone production is small. As a consequence, the non-CO2 signal is very similar to the CIC signal. The seasonal analysis shows that the strongest warming due to aviation is modeled for the late summer and early autumn. In the stratosphere, a significant cooling is attributed to aviation CO2 emissions (−0.25 K by 2100. A −0.3 K temperature decrease is modeled when considering all the aviation emissions, but no significant signal appears from the CIC or NOx forcings in the stratosphere.

  4. Modeling the present and future impact of aviation on climate: an AOGCM approach with online coupled chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    P. Huszar; Teyssèdre, H.; M. Michou; Voldoire, A.; Olivié, D. J. L.; D. Saint-Martin; Cariolle, D.; Senesi, S.; D. Salas y Melia; Alias, A.; Karcher, F.; Ricaud, P.; T. Halenka

    2013-01-01

    Our work is among the first that use an atmosphere-ocean general circulation model (AOGCM) with online chemistry to evaluate the impact of future aviation emissions on temperature. Other particularities of our study include non-scaling to the aviation emissions, and the analysis of models' transient response using ensemble simulations. The model we use is the Météo-France CNRM-CM5.1 earth system model extended with the REPROBUS chemistry scheme. The time horizon of our interest is 1940–2100, ...

  5. Psychophysiological and other factors affecting human performance in accident prevention and investigation. [Comparison of aviation with other industries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klinestiver, L.R.

    1980-01-01

    Psychophysiological factors are not uncommon terms in the aviation incident/accident investigation sequence where human error is involved. It is highly suspect that the same psychophysiological factors may also exist in the industrial arena where operator personnel function; but, there is little evidence in literature indicating how management and subordinates cope with these factors to prevent or reduce accidents. It is apparent that human factors psychophysological training is quite evident in the aviation industry. However, while the industrial arena appears to analyze psychophysiological factors in accident investigations, there is little evidence that established training programs exist for supervisors and operator personnel.

  6. Analysis of Aviation Safety Reporting System Incident Data Associated With the Technical Challenges of the Vehicle Systems Safety Technology Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Withrow, Colleen A.; Reveley, Mary S.

    2014-01-01

    This analysis was conducted to support the Vehicle Systems Safety Technology (VSST) Project of the Aviation Safety Program (AVsP) milestone VSST4.2.1.01, "Identification of VSST-Related Trends." In particular, this is a review of incident data from the NASA Aviation Safety Reporting System (ASRS). The following three VSST-related technical challenges (TCs) were the focus of the incidents searched in the ASRS database: (1) Vechicle health assurance, (2) Effective crew-system interactions and decisions in all conditions; and (3) Aircraft loss of control prevention, mitigation, and recovery.

  7. Cases from the aerospace medicine residents' teaching file. Case #42. An aviator with concentration deficit, Lyme disease organic diagnostic evaluation, and a somatoform disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, P J; Carpenter, F E

    1991-04-01

    An aviator with concentration deficit, Lyme disease organic diagnostic evaluation, and a somatoform disorder. The clinical presentation, evaluation and diagnosis of an aviator being evaluated for vague cognitive deficits of episodic and long duration with a history of rigid ideation concerning Lyme disease. The patient was diagnosed as having an atypical somatoform disorder. The aeromedical disposition of this patient is also presented.

  8. 26 CFR 48.4041-11 - Tax-free sales of fuel for use in noncommercial aviation only if sellers and certain purchasers...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 16 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Tax-free sales of fuel for use in noncommercial aviation only if sellers and certain purchasers are registered. 48.4041-11 Section 48.4041-11 Internal... noncommercial aviation only if sellers and certain purchasers are registered. (a) In general. Any sale of...

  9. Kamchatka and North Kurile Volcano Explosive Eruptions in 2015 and Danger to Aviation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girina, Olga; Melnikov, Dmitry; Manevich, Alexander; Demyanchuk, Yury; Nuzhdaev, Anton; Petrova, Elena

    2016-04-01

    There are 36 active volcanoes in the Kamchatka and North Kurile, and several of them are continuously active. In 2015, four of the Kamchatkan volcanoes (Sheveluch, Klyuchevskoy, Karymsky and Zhupanovsky) and two volcanoes of North Kurile (Alaid and Chikurachki) had strong and moderate explosive eruptions. Moderate gas-steam activity was observing of Bezymianny, Kizimen, Avachinsky, Koryaksky, Gorely, Mutnovsky and other volcanoes. Strong explosive eruptions of volcanoes are the most dangerous for aircraft because they can produce in a few hours or days to the atmosphere and the stratosphere till several cubic kilometers of volcanic ash and aerosols. Ash plumes and the clouds, depending on the power of the eruption, the strength and wind speed, can travel thousands of kilometers from the volcano for several days, remaining hazardous to aircraft, as the melting temperature of small particles of ash below the operating temperature of jet engines. The eruptive activity of Sheveluch volcano began since 1980 (growth of the lava dome) and is continuing at present. Strong explosive events of the volcano occurred in 2015: on 07, 12, and 15 January, 01, 17, and 28 February, 04, 08, 16, 21-22, and 26 March, 07 and 12 April: ash plumes rose up to 7-12 km a.s.l. and extended more 900 km to the different directions of the volcano. Ashfalls occurred at Ust'-Kamchatsk on 16 March, and Klyuchi on 30 October. Strong and moderate hot avalanches from the lava dome were observing more often in the second half of the year. Aviation color code of Sheveluch was Orange during the year. Activity of the volcano was dangerous to international and local aviation. Explosive-effusive eruption of Klyuchevskoy volcano lasted from 01 January till 24 March. Strombolian explosive volcanic activity began from 01 January, and on 08-09 January a lava flow was detected at the Apakhonchich chute on the southeastern flank of the volcano. Vulcanian activity of the volcano began from 10 January. Ashfalls

  10. Aviation Sector in India: A Cross Boundary Comparison Priority on Air India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joyita Banerji

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available According to International Air Transport Association‘s (IATA Airline Industry Forecast 2012-2016, India's domestic air travel market would be among the top five globally, experiencing the second highest growth rate at CAGR of 13.1%.India has the potential to become the third largest aviation market by 2020 and the largest by 2030. There is large untapped potential for growth due to the fact that access to aviation is still a dream for nearly 99.5 per cent of its population. Financial year 2012-2013 shows an increase of revenue by 30,164.3 million in comparison to the base year. All these borrowings are part of Turnaround Plan to ease Air India out of the debt burden of Rs 40,000 Crores. It would be wrong, however to say that such capital infusion has yielded no results. After the implementation of the financial restructuring plan as approved by the UPA in 2012, the operating losses have halved from Rs 5,138.69 Crores in FY 2012 to Rs. 2,171.40 Crores in FY 2015 while net loss has climbed down from Rs. 7,559.74 Crores in FY 2012 to Rs.5,547.47 Crores in FY 2015. The airline had demanded around Rs 1,777 Crores more than the budgeted from the current government. This unexplained cut means that the airline is distressed and might lead to deficit of government guaranteed loans which in turn will lead to compulsory borrowings from banks. If the banks are restricted to lend to the Company that is functioning at a loss of Rs 21.71 Billion, then Air India might have to raise funds from the market at higher cost further putting stress on its already besieged . At a time when the Aviation Sector seems on a high, it is demotivating that Air India‘s prospects to raise capital from the public seems shaky at best. The National Carrier had also approached the FinMin to allow it to raise Rs 10,000 Crore as capital in the form of tax free Bonds. The Government turned sour on the proposal and was reluctant to act as a guarantor in such a deal.

  11. Aviation without limits. Luchtvaart grenzeloos; Een studie naar het energieverbruik en de specifieke milieubelasting van luchtvaart, gerelateerd aan de bij de voortstuwing gebruikte brandstoffen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoogenstrijd, G.J.

    1993-10-01

    The objective of the title study is to determine whether limits will arise to the predicted growth of commercial aviation because of its associated environmental impact. First, a general description of aviation is given, followed by an outline of the current world aviation fuel consumption, which mainly consists of kerosene consumption in the Northern hemisphere. Also the nature and scale of emissions, caused by aviation, are reviewed. Next, attention is paid to the chemical and physical processes in the atmosphere, related to the aircraft emissions, as well as the environmental effects of the different gases. Model studies show that the impact of emissions can be substantial. Subsequently, the developments of aviation of the last decade and the expected potential developments are considered. During the last decade the emission indices of CO, VOC and soot decreased, whereas the index of NO[sub x] increased. Most of the forecasts assume a doubling of the volume of world civil aviation in the period 1988-2000. No saturation of growth is expected after the year 2000. An average annual fuel growth rate of 2.5% in the period 1990-2010 is forecasted by the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO). Finally, the energy consumption and emissions of different modes of transportation are compared with data for aviation. The comparisons show that there is a strong difference in emissions. Per passenger kilometer NO[sub x] emissions by aircraft are in between the emissions of cars and trains and the CO[sub 2] emissions are in the same order of magnitude as those caused by road transport. From the results of the title study it appears that data on emissions and environmental impact of aviation are unreliable. It is concluded that the (current potential) environmental impact of aviation may be significant and that an increase is likely to occur. 30 figs., 25 tabs., 1 appendix, 80 refs.

  12. Aviation-oriented Micromachining Technology-Micro-ECM in Pure Water

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bao Huaiqian; Xu Jiawen; Li Ying

    2008-01-01

    This article proposes a precise and ecofriendly micromachining technology for aerospace application called electrochemical machining in pure water (PW-ECM). On the basis of the principles of water dissociation, a series of test setups and tests are devised and performed under different conditions. These tests explain the need for technological conditions realizing PW-ECM, and further explore the technological principles. The results from the tests demonstrate a successful removal of electrolytic slime by means of ultrasonic vibration of the workpiece. To ensure the stability and reliability of PW-ECM process, a new combined rnachining method of PW-ECM assisted with ultrasonic vibration (PW-ECM/USV) is devised. Trilateral and square cavities and holes as well as a group of English alphabets are worked out on a stainless steel plate. It is eonfirmed that PW-ECM will be probably an efficient new aviation precision machining method.

  13. NASA-ONERA Collaboration on Human Factors in Aviation Accidents and Incidents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Ashok N.; Fabiani, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    This is the first annual report jointly prepared by NASA and ONERA on the work performed under the agreement to collaborate on a study of the human factors entailed in aviation accidents and incidents, particularly focused on the consequences of decreases in human performance associated with fatigue. The objective of this agreement is to generate reliable, automated procedures that improve understanding of the levels and characteristics of flight-crew fatigue factors whose confluence will likely result in unacceptable crew performance. This study entails the analyses of numerical and textual data collected during operational flights. NASA and ONERA are collaborating on the development and assessment of automated capabilities for extracting operationally significant information from very large, diverse (textual and numerical) databases; much larger than can be handled practically by human experts.

  14. Air shower simulation for WASAVIES: warning system for aviation exposure to solar energetic particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, T; Kataoka, R; Yasuda, H; Yashiro, S; Kuwabara, T; Shiota, D; Kubo, Y

    2014-10-01

    WASAVIES, a warning system for aviation exposure to solar energetic particles (SEPs), is under development by collaboration between several institutes in Japan and the USA. It is designed to deterministically forecast the SEP fluxes incident on the atmosphere within 6 h after flare onset using the latest space weather research. To immediately estimate the aircrew doses from the obtained SEP fluxes, the response functions of the particle fluxes generated by the incidence of monoenergetic protons into the atmosphere were developed by performing air shower simulations using the Particle and Heavy Ion Transport code system. The accuracy of the simulation was well verified by calculating the increase count rates of a neutron monitor during a ground-level enhancement, combining the response function with the SEP fluxes measured by the PAMELA spectrometer. The response function will be implemented in WASAVIES and used to protect aircrews from additional SEP exposure.

  15. GASP- General Aviation Synthesis Program. Volume 1: Main program. Part 1: Theoretical development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hague, D.

    1978-01-01

    The General Aviation synthesis program performs tasks generally associated with aircraft preliminary design and allows an analyst the capability of performing parametric studies in a rapid manner. GASP emphasizes small fixed-wing aircraft employing propulsion systems varying froma single piston engine with fixed pitch propeller through twin turboprop/ turbofan powered business or transport type aircraft. The program, which may be operated from a computer terminal in either the batch or interactive graphic mode, is comprised of modules representing the various technical disciplines integrated into a computational flow which ensures that the interacting effects of design variables are continuously accounted for in the aircraft sizing procedure. The model is a useful tool for comparing configurations, assessing aircraft performance and economics, performing tradeoff and sensitivity studies, and assessing the impact of advanced technologies on aircraft performance and economics.

  16. Landing approach evaluation of an integrated CRT display for general aviation aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talbot, P. D.; Stinnett, G. W., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    A flight director adaptable to general aviation aircraft was evaluated for the landing approach task in a twin turbojet business aircraft. The flight director combined aircraft heading, pitch and roll atitude, and ILS (Instrument Landing System) signals into a single picture on a small cathode ray tube (CRT) to give the pilot an integrated picture of the aircraft situation. The display is unique in that it presents the information on a CRT and gives quasi-command signals to the pilot. The particular display investigated was a preproduction version of the Kaiser Model FP-50 flight director. Approaches made with visual references only, with a conventional ILS displacement instrument, and with the CRT display were compared in terms of tracking performance and pilot workload. Tracking performance of three research pilots using the CRT display was superior to that using the conventional ILS instrument and comparable to that under VFR conditions. Pilot workload (based on pilot comments) was not clearly decreased.

  17. Low frequency noise in a quiet, clean, general aviation turbofan engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huff, R. G.; Groesbeck, D. E.; Goodykoontz, J. H.

    1984-01-01

    A quiet, clean, general aviation, turbofan engine was instrumented to measure the fluctuating pressures in the combustor, turbine exit duct, engine nozzle and the far field. Both a separate flow nozzle and an internal mixer nozzle were tested. The fluctuating pressure data are presented in overall pressure and power levels and in spectral plots. The combustor data are compared to recent theory and found to be in excellent agreement. The results indicate that microphone correction procedures for elevated mean pressures are questionable. Ordinary coherence function analysis suggests the presence of an additional low frequency noise source downstream of the turbine that is due to the turbine itself. Low frequency narrowband data and coherence function analysis are presented.

  18. Aviation Fuel Gauging Sensor Utilizing Multiple Diaphragm Sensors Incorporating Polymer Optical Fiber Bragg Gratings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marques, C. A. F.; Pospori, A.; Saez-Rodriguez, D.;

    2016-01-01

    A high-performance fuel gauging sensor is described that uses five diaphragm-based pressure sensors, which are monitored using a linear array of polymer optical fiber Bragg gratings. The sensors were initially characterized using water, revealing a sensitivity of 98 pm/cm for four of the sensors...... and 86 pm/cm for the fifth. The discrepancy in the sensitivity of the fifth sensor has been explained as being a result of the annealing of the other four sensors. Initial testing in JET A-1 aviation fuel revealed the unsuitability of silicone rubber diaphragms for prolonged usage in fuel. A second set...... of sensors manufactured with a polyurethane-based diaphragm showed no measurable deterioration over a three month period immersed in fuel. These sensors exhibited a sensitivity of 39 pm/cm, which is less than the silicone rubber devices due to the stiffer nature of the polyurethane material used....

  19. The Development of Jomo Kenyatta International Airport as a Regional Aviation Hub

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irandu, Evaristus M.; Rhoades, Dawna L.

    2006-01-01

    Air transportation plays an important role in the social and economic development of the global system and the countries that seek to participate in it. As Africa seeks to take its place in the global economy, it is increasingly looking to aviation as the primary means of connecting its people and goods with the world. It has been suggested that Africa as a continent needs to move toward a system of hubs to optimize its scarce resources. Jomo Kenyatta International Airport in Nairobi, Kenya, is one of the airports in the eastern region of Africa that is seeking to fill this role. This paper discusses the prospects for success and the challenges that it will need to overcome, including projections through 2020 for the growth in passenger and cargo traffic.

  20. Economic impact and effectiveness of radiation protection measures in aviation during a ground level enhancement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthiä Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In addition to the omnipresent irradiation from galactic cosmic rays (GCR and their secondary products, passengers and aircraft crew may be exposed to radiation from solar cosmic rays during ground level enhancements (GLE. In general, lowering the flight altitude and changing the flight route to lower latitudes are procedures applicable to immediately reduce the radiation exposure at aviation altitudes. In practice, however, taking such action necessarily leads to modifications in the flight plan and the consequential, additional fuel consumption constrains the mitigating measures. In this work we investigate in a case study of the ground level event of December 13th 2006 how potential mitigation procedures affect the total radiation exposure during a transatlantic flight from Seattle to Cologne taking into account constraints concerning fuel consumption and range.

  1. Interplanetary particle transport simulation for warning system for aviation exposure to solar energetic particles

    CERN Document Server

    Kubo, Yûki; Sato, Tatsuhiko

    2015-01-01

    Solar energetic particles (SEPs) are one of the extreme space weather phenomena. A huge SEP event increases the radiation dose received by aircrews, who should be warned of such events as early as possible. We developed a warning system for aviation exposure to SEPs. This article describes one component of the system, which calculates the temporal evolution of the SEP intensity and the spectrum immediately outside the terrestrial magnetosphere. To achieve this, we performed numerical simulations of SEP transport in interplanetary space, in which interplanetary SEP transport is described by the focused transport equation. We developed a new simulation code to solve the equation using a set of stochastic differential equations. In the code, the focused transport equation is expressed in a magnetic field line coordinate system, which is a non-orthogonal curvilinear coordinate system. An inverse Gaussian distribution is employed as the injection profile of SEPs at an inner boundary located near the Sun. We applie...

  2. Biofuels as an Alternative Energy Source for Aviation-A Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDowellBomani, Bilal M.; Bulzan, Dan L.; Centeno-Gomez, Diana I.; Hendricks, Robert C.

    2009-01-01

    The use of biofuels has been gaining in popularity over the past few years because of their ability to reduce the dependence on fossil fuels. As a renewable energy source, biofuels can be a viable option for sustaining long-term energy needs if they are managed efficiently. We investigate past, present, and possible future biofuel alternatives currently being researched and applied around the world. More specifically, we investigate the use of ethanol, cellulosic ethanol, biodiesel (palm oil, algae, and halophytes), and synthetic fuel blends that can potentially be used as fuels for aviation and nonaerospace applications. We also investigate the processing of biomass via gasification, hydrolysis, and anaerobic digestion as a way to extract fuel oil from alternative biofuels sources.

  3. Social impacts of civil aviation and implications for R and D policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayo, L. H.

    1971-01-01

    An attempt was made to identify social impacts, both beneficial and detrimental, which would or could flow from the introduction of advanced civil aviation systems. A broad range of social impact areas was investigated which included economic, environmental, political, sociological, psychological, legal, and urban/regional developmental factors. Data are arranged into two major parts. In the first part, a series of Major Policy Issues are identified and discussed which appear, on the basis of the social impact study, to merit serious consideration. The discussion of each "Issue' is presented both to explain its relevance and to raise considerations which will bear on its satisfactory resolution. The second part views the same overall body of information in a different manner: a series of "Findings' are pointed out from which more concrete guidance for R and D policy can be derived, and a set of "Candidate Basic Federal Undertakings' thus derived are presented.

  4. Measurement of doses to aviator pilots using thermoluminescent dosemeters; Medicion de la dosis a pilotos aviadores usando dosimetros termoluminiscentes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azorin N, J.; Cruz C, D. [UAM-I, 09340 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Rivera M, T. [IPN, ESIME Culhuacan (Mexico)]. e-mail: azorin@xanum.uam.mx

    2004-07-01

    During the development of their work, the aviator pilots are exposed at high levels of natural radiation of bottom caused mainly by the cosmic radiation of galactic origin and lot. For such reason, the Metropolitan Autonomous University (UAM) and the Union Association of Aviator Pilots (ASPA), subscribed an agreement with the purpose of to measure the doses of ionizing radiation received by the aviator pilots of diverse air companies that man different types of airships and to determine if these doses surpass the one limit of 0.11 mSv/h settled down by the IAEA for the public in general; and if therefore, these workers should be considered as personnel occupationally exposed. In this work the obtained results when measuring the absorbed dose received by Mexican civil aviator pilots during the development of their work, using thermoluminescent dosemeters of LiF:Mg,Cu,P + Ptfe of national production are presented. The obtained results during the years of 2001 and 2002 show that the monthly doses received by the pilots surpass the one it limits established for the public in general, for what they should be considered as personnel occupationally exposed. (Author)

  5. 75 FR 67805 - The Future of Aviation Advisory Committee (FAAC) Subcommittee on Labor and World-Class Workforce...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-03

    ... subcommittee will examine certain issues affecting the future employment requirements of the aviation industry... culture of dignity and respect in the workplace by incorporating core workers' human rights conventions... ``Special Accommodations'' listed in the subject line of the message by close of business on...

  6. 78 FR 32576 - Proposed Airworthiness Design Standards; AQUILA Aviation by Excellence GmbH, Model AT01

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-31

    ... oil designation. (4) For two-stroke engines, fuel/oil ratio. (h) Placards. Placards required by CS-VLA... developed by the Joint Aviation Authority, and under Title 14 of the Code of Federal Regulations and two additional design criteria issued on September 2, 2003 (68 FR 56809) The regulation applicable to the...

  7. 75 FR 9920 - Intent To Request Renewal From OMB of One Current Public Collection of Information: Aviation...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-04

    ...'s costs of providing civil aviation security services, and as authorized by 49 U.S.C. 44940, TSA... all information applicable to the carrier's calendar year 2000 security costs and information.... The subject records may be used by TSA to make determinations regarding security-related costs...

  8. 78 FR 75336 - Notice of Intent To Grant an Exclusive License; Aviation Devices and Electronic Components, L.L.C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-11

    ...The Department of the Navy hereby gives notice of its intent to grant to Aviation Devices and Electronic Components, L.L.C. located at 1810 Mony Street, Ft. Worth, Texas 76102, a revocable, nonassignable, exclusive license throughout all the contracting states of the European Patent Convention, Japan, India, Mexico, Canada, Brazil, Russian Federation, Australia, Indonesia, Taiwan, Thailand,......

  9. The Layout Planning of Aviation Logistic Park%航空港物流园区的布置规划

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡箫; 钱媛

    2013-01-01

    The construction of aviation logistics park is an important strategy in the development of aviation and logistics industry.This article discussed the relation between the various functional areas of aviation logistics park through the analysis of aviation logistics park's features and functions.Combined with the general pattern of logistics park,we carried out the spatial layout planning to Zhengzhou Airport Logistics Park,using the traditional SLP planning method.%航空物流园区的建设是航空业和物流业发展的一个重要战略,文中通过分析航空物流园区的特点和功能,探讨了航空物流园区各功能区之间的关系。结合物流园区布置的一般模式,以郑州航空港物流园区为例,利用SLP规划方法对其进行了空间布局规划。

  10. Comparative analysis of social, demographic, and flight-related attributes between accident and nonaccident general aviation pilots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urban, R F

    1984-04-01

    This investigation represents an exploratory examination of several differentiating social and demographic characteristics for a sample of calendar year 1978 Colorado-resident nonfatal accident-involved pilots and a random sample of nonaccident general aviation (i.e., nonairline) pilots. During 1979-1980 80 currently active pilots were interviewed by the author, and information concerning the standard demographic variables, in addition to several social, psychological, and flying-related items, was obtained. The sample was generated from commercially available data files derived from U.S. Government records and consisted of 46 accident and 34 nonaccident pilots who resided within a 100-mi radius of Denver, east of the Rocky Mountains. Descriptively, the respondents represented a broad spectrum of general aviation, including: corporate pilots, "crop dusters," builders of amateur experimental aircraft, and recreational fliers. Application of stepwise discriminant analysis revealed that the pilots' education, political orientation, birth order, percent of flying for business purposes, participation in nonflying aviation activities, number of years of flying experience, and an index of aviation procedural noncompliance yielded statistically significant results. Furthermore, utilization of the classification capability of discriminant analysis produced a mathematical function which correctly allocated 78.5% of the cases into the appropriate groups, thus contributing to a 56.5% proportionate reduction in error over a random effects model. No relationship was found between accident involvement and several indicators of social attachments, socioeconomic status, and a number of measures of flying exposure. PMID:6732683

  11. 76 FR 41757 - Mahan Airways, et al.; Modification of Temporary Denial Order To Add Zarand Aviation as a Denied...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-15

    ...: \\1\\ The February 25, 2011 Order was published in the Federal Register on March 7, 2011. See 76 FR.../Gatewick Aviation Services, G#22 Dubai Airport Free Zone, P.O. Box 393754, Dubai, United Arab Emirates; and P.O. Box 52404, Dubai, United Arab Emirates; and Mohamed Abdulla Alqaz Building, Al Maktoum...

  12. Ethics Education in University Aviation Management Programs in the US: Part Two B--Statistical Analysis of Current Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oderman, Dale

    2003-01-01

    Part Two B of a three-part study examined how 40 universities with baccalaureate programs in aviation management include ethics education in the curricula. Analysis of responses suggests that there is strong support for ethics instruction and that active department head involvement leads to higher levels of planned ethics inclusion. (JOW)

  13. Ethics Education in University Aviation Management Programs in the U.S.: Part Two A--The Current Status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oderman, Dale B.

    2003-01-01

    Responses from 41 of 61 college aviation management programs indicated that 12 include ethics as a required course; 24 count an elective course toward graduation, but only 1 offers the course in the department; 22 include ethics in other courses. Few programs have faculty researching ethics, an ethics committee, or guest speakers/seminars on the…

  14. Aircraft Wood Structures, Covering and Finishing Methods (Course Outline), Aviation Mechanics 2 (Air Frame): 9065.01.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dade County Public Schools, Miami, FL.

    This document presents an outline for a 135-hour course designed to familiarize the student with aircraft wood structures and related Federal Aviation Agency requirements. Topics outlined are identification of defects on wood samples, defining terms used on wood structures, inspecting wood structure together with servicing and repair of wood…

  15. The “Matilda” Steamer – On the History of the First Experiments with Naval Aviation in Russia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roman V. Lapshin

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This work examines the history of the “Matilda” steamer – the first ever ship in Russia capable of carrying airplanes. Although the results of the experiments did not become outstanding, they served as a point of departure for subsequent experiments with aviation in the Black Sea Fleet.

  16. Surface Modification of Titanium by Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Treatment for Adhesive Bonding and Its Application to Aviation and Space

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akram, M.; Bhowmik, S.; Jansen, K.; Ernst, L.J.

    2010-01-01

    Titanium is one of the most effective materials for structural application of space craft and aviation. Titanium alloys are widely used in solid rocket booster cases, guidance control pressure vessel and other different applications demanding light weight and reliability. Aerospace industry is also

  17. 76 FR 17841 - Record of Decision (ROD) for the Realignment, Growth, and Stationing of Army Aviation Assets

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-31

    ... of approximately 2,700 Soldiers and 113 helicopters. As part of this decision, Joint Base Lewis-Mc... Department of the Army Record of Decision (ROD) for the Realignment, Growth, and Stationing of Army Aviation... decision to proceed with the implementation of Alternative 3 (preferred alternative). Specific details...

  18. Determination of the Emissions from an Aircraft Auxiliary Power Unit (APU) during the Alternative Aviation Fuel Experiment (AAFEX)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The emissions from a Garrett-AiResearch (now Honeywell) Model GTCP85-98CK APU were determined as part of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA's) Alternative Aviation Fuels Experiment using both JP-8 and a coal-derived Fischer Tropsch fuel (FT-2). Measurements...

  19. MEMS 航空微时代%MEMS Era of Aviation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩颖

    2013-01-01

    MEMS(Micro Electron Mechanic Systems)技术是从专用集成电路(ASIC)技术发展过来的,已经在电子产品、汽车工业、机械、化工及医药等各领域得到广泛的应用。近年来, MEMS器件在航空领域的应用越来越受到各国重视。本文首先介绍了MEMS加速度计、 MEMS陀螺仪、MEMS-IMU惯性导航组合系统等目前在航空领域有一定应用前景的MEMS传感器,对这些传感器在国外的应用研究进行了汇总,最后,介绍国内已有初步进展的MEMS传感器设计应用,并指出我国的航空微时代的研究方向。%Micro electron mechanic system ( MEMS ) technology develops on ASIC , and has widely used in electronics, automotive, machinery, chemical and pharmaceutical fields , and so on.In recent years, more countries pay attention to MEMS devices in the aviation field .This paper introduces the promising MEMS devices firstly , such as MEMS accelerometer , MEMS gyroscope , MEMS-IMU, then in-vestigates and summarizes the foreign studies of these sensors .Finally, it introduces the initial progress of MEMS sensor in China , and points out the direction of MEMS aviation .

  20. SPACE 365: Upgraded App for Aviation and Space-Related Information and Program Planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, S.; Maples, J. E.; Castle, C. E.

    2014-12-01

    Foreknowledge of upcoming events and anniversary dates can be extraordinarily valuable in the planning and preparation of a variety of aviation and Space-related educational programming. Alignment of programming with items "newsworthy" enough to attract media attention on their own can result in effective program promotion at low/no cost. Similarly, awareness and avoidance of dates upon which media and public attention will likely be elsewhere can keep programs from being lost in the noise.NASA has created a useful and entertaining app called "SPACE 365" to help supply that foreknowledge. The app contains an extensive database of historical aviation and Space exploration-related events, along with other events and birthdays to provide socio-historical context, as well as an extensive file of present and future space missions, complete with images and videos. The user can search by entry topic category, date, and key words. Upcoming Events allows the user to plan, participate, and engage in significant "don't miss" happenings.The historical database was originally developed for use at the National Air and Space Museum, then expanded significantly to include more NASA-related information. The CIMA team at NASA MSFC, sponsored by the Planetary Science Division, added NASA current events and NASA educational programming information, and are continually adding new information and improving the functionality and features of the app. Features of SPACE 365 now include: NASA Image of the Day, Upcoming NASA Events, Event Save, Do Not Miss, and Ask Dr. Steve functions, and the CIMA team recently added a new start page and added improved search and navigation capabilities. App users can now socialize the Images of the Day via Twitter, Pinterest, Facebook, and other social media outlets.SPACE 365 is available at no cost from both the Apple appstore and GooglePlay, and has helped NASA, NASM, and other educators plan and schedule programming events. It could help you, too!

  1. Could some aviation deep vein thrombosis be a form of decompression sickness?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzzacott, Peter; Mollerlokken, Andreas

    2016-10-01

    Aviation deep vein thrombosis is a challenge poorly understood in modern aviation. The aim of the present project was to determine if cabin decompression might favor formation of vascular bubbles in commercial air travelers. Thirty commercial flights were taken. Cabin pressure was noted at take-off and at every minute following, until the pressure stabilized. These time-pressure profiles were imported into the statistics program R and analyzed using the package SCUBA. Greatest pressure differentials between tissues and cabin pressures were estimated for 20, 40, 60, 80 and 120 min half-time compartments. Time to decompress ranged from 11 to 47 min. The greatest drop in cabin pressure was from 1022 to 776 mBar, equivalent to a saturated diver ascending from 2.46 msw depth. Mean pressure drop in flights >2 h duration was 193 mBar, while mean pressure drop in flights cabin pressure was commensurate with that found to cause bubbles in man. Both the US Navy and the Royal Navy mandate far slower decompression from states of saturation, being 1.7 and 1.9 mBar/min respectively. The median overall rate of decompression found in this study was 8.5 mBar/min, five times the rate prescribed for USN saturation divers. The tissues associated with hypobaric bubble formation are likely slower than those associated with bounce diving, with 60 min a potentially useful index. PMID:27106903

  2. An Economic Analysis on the Civil Aviation Congestion%民航拥堵的经济学解释

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周端明

    2011-01-01

    This paper analyzes the ultimate causes for 2010 civil aviation congestion in the perspective of economics.The monopoly of civil aviation oligarch gives rise to the strong and rigid prices in China,so that the price is neither a useful method in regulating the imbalance between demand and supply of market,nor an effective means of aviation company in competing for a certain share of market.Consequently,the time of arrival is taken as a major aspect for competition among those companies.While given the fact of rigid prices,the best profitable strategy of aviation company is to narrow the gap from other companies,which naturally leads to the situation that many airlines of various aviation companies arrive at the port simultaneously in the golden period of time,thus the congestion will inevitably occur.For this reason,the final solution to the problem of aviation congestion is to stimulate the competition,break the old patterns of oligarch monopoly,and make full use of the price to readjust the imbalance of demand and supply.%中国民航市场寡头垄断的市场格局导致价格刚性的存在,使价格不能成为调整市场供需失衡的基本工具,同时,价格也不能成为航空公司争夺市场份额的竞争手段。为此,航空公司把到站时间作为竞争的基本手段。但是,在价格刚性情况下,航空公司的最优产品定位策略是尽可能地缩小与其他公司之间的差异,导致黄金时点多个航空公司航班到港,造成民航拥堵。因此,治理民航拥堵的根本对策在于引入竞争,打破寡头垄断的市场格局,充分发挥价格调整供需失衡的作用。

  3. Communication Research in Aviation and Space Operations: Symptoms and Strategies of Crew Coordination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanki, Barbara G.; Hart, Sandra G. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    The day-to-day operators of today's aerospace systems work under increasing pressures to accomplish more with less. They work in operational systems which are complex, technology-based, and high-risk; in which incidents and accidents have far-reaching and costly consequences. For these and other reasons, there is concern that the safety net formerly built upon redundant systems and abundant resources may become overburdened. Although we know that human ingenuity can overcome incredible odds, human nature can also fail in unpredictable ways. Over the last 20 years, a large percentage of aviation accidents and incidents have been attributed to human errors rather than hardware or environmental factors alone. A class of errors have been identified which are not due to a lack of individual, technical competencies. Rather, they are due to the failure of teams to utilize readily available resources or information in a timely fashion. These insights began a training revolution in the aviation industry called Cockpit Resource Management, which later became known as Crew Resource Management (CRM) as its concepts and applications extended to teams beyond the flightdeck. Then, as now, communication has been a cornerstone in CRM training since crew coordination and resource management largely resides within information transfer processes--both within flightcrews, and between flightcrews and the ground operations teams that support them. The research I will describe takes its roots in CRM history as we began to study communication processes in order to discover symptoms of crew coordination problems, as well as strategies of effective crew management. On the one hand, communication is often the means or the tool by which team members manage their resources, solve problems, maintain situational awareness and procedural discipline. Conversely, it is the lack of planning and resource management, loss of vigilance and situational awareness, and non-standard communications that are

  4. Landing on empty: estimating the benefits from reducing fuel uplift in US Civil Aviation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Airlines and Air Navigation Service Providers are united in their goal to reduce fuel consumption. While changes to flight operations and technology investments are the focus of a number of studies, our study is among the first to investigate an untapped source of aviation fuel consumption: excess contingency fuel loading. Given the downside risk of fuel exhaustion of diverting to an alternate airport, airline dispatchers may load excess fuel onto an aircraft. Such conservatism comes at a cost of consuming excess fuel, as fuel consumed is a function of, among other factors, aircraft weight. The aim of this paper is to quantify, on a per-flight basis, the fuel burned due to carrying fuel beyond what is needed for foreseeable contingencies, and thereby motivate research, federal guidance, and investments that allow airline dispatchers to reduce fuel uplift while maintaining near zero risks of fuel exhaustion. We merge large publicly available aviation and weather databases with a detailed dataset from a major US airline. Upon estimating factors that capture the quantity fuel consumed due to carrying a pound of weight for a range of aircraft types, we calculate the cost and greenhouse gas emissions from carrying unused fuel on arrival and additional contingency fuel above a conservative buffer for foreseeable contingencies. We establish that the major US carrier does indeed load fuel conservatively. We find that 4.48% of the fuel consumed by an average flight is due to carrying unused fuel and 1.04% of the fuel consumed by an average flight is due to carrying additional contingency fuel above a reasonable buffer. We find that simple changes in flight dispatching that maintain a statistically minimal risk of fuel exhaustion could result in yearly savings of 338 million lbs of CO2, the equivalent to the fuel consumed from 4760 flights on midsized commercial aircraft. Moreover, policy changes regarding maximum fuel loads or investments that reduce uncertainty or increase

  5. A system-of-systems modeling methodology for strategic general aviation design decision-making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Won, Henry Thome

    General aviation has long been studied as a means of providing an on-demand "personal air vehicle" that bypasses the traffic at major commercial hubs. This thesis continues this research through development of a system of systems modeling methodology applicable to the selection of synergistic product concepts, market segments, and business models. From the perspective of the conceptual design engineer, the design and selection of future general aviation aircraft is complicated by the definition of constraints and requirements, and the tradeoffs among performance and cost aspects. Qualitative problem definition methods have been utilized, although their accuracy in determining specific requirement and metric values is uncertain. In industry, customers are surveyed, and business plans are created through a lengthy, iterative process. In recent years, techniques have developed for predicting the characteristics of US travel demand based on travel mode attributes, such as door-to-door time and ticket price. As of yet, these models treat the contributing systems---aircraft manufacturers and service providers---as independently variable assumptions. In this research, a methodology is developed which seeks to build a strategic design decision making environment through the construction of a system of systems model. The demonstrated implementation brings together models of the aircraft and manufacturer, the service provider, and most importantly the travel demand. Thus represented is the behavior of the consumers and the reactive behavior of the suppliers---the manufacturers and transportation service providers---in a common modeling framework. The results indicate an ability to guide the design process---specifically the selection of design requirements---through the optimization of "capability" metrics. Additionally, results indicate the ability to find synergetic solutions, that is solutions in which two systems might collaborate to achieve a better result than acting

  6. Quality assurance and risk management: Perspectives on Human Factors Certification of Advanced Aviation Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Robert M.; Macleod, Iain S.

    1994-01-01

    This paper is based on the experience of engineering psychologists advising the U.K. Ministry of Defense (MoD) on the procurement of advanced aviation systems that conform to good human engineering (HE) practice. Traditional approaches to HE in systems procurement focus on the physical nature of the human-machine interface. Advanced aviation systems present increasingly complex design requirements for human functional integration, information processing, and cognitive task performance effectiveness. These developing requirements present new challenges for HE quality assurance (QA) and risk management, requiring focus on design processes as well as on design content or product. A new approach to the application of HE, recently adopted by NATO, provides more systematic ordering and control of HE processes and activities to meet the challenges of advanced aircrew systems design. This systematic approach to HE has been applied by MoD to the procurement of mission systems for the Royal Navy Merlin helicopter. In MoD procurement, certification is a judicial function, essentially independent of the service customer and industry contractor. Certification decisions are based on advice from MoD's appointed Acceptance Agency. Test and evaluation (T&E) conducted by the contractor and by the Acceptance Agency provide evidence for certification. Certification identifies limitations of systems upon release to the service. Evidence of compliance with HE standards traditionally forms the main basis of HE certification and significant non-compliance could restrict release. The systems HE approach shows concern for the quality of processes as well as for the content of the product. Human factors certification should be concerned with the quality of HE processes as well as products. Certification should require proof of process as well as proof of content and performance. QA criteria such as completeness, consistency, timeliness, and compatibility provide generic guidelines for

  7. An investigation of effect of biodiesel and aviation fuel jeta-1 mixtures performance and emissions on diesel engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yamik Hasan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Biodiesel is an alternative fuel for diesel engines which doesn’t contain pollutants and sulfur; on the contrary it contains oxygen. In addition, both physical and chemical properties of sunflower oil methyl ester (SME are identical to diesel fuel. Conversely, diesel and biodiesel fuels are widely used with some additives to reduce viscosity, increase the amount of cetane, and improve combustion efficiency. This study uses diesel fuel, SME and its mixture with aviation fuel JetA-1 which are widely used in the aviation industry. . Fuel mixtures were used in 1-cylinder, 4-stroke diesel engine under full load and variable engine speeds. In this experiment, engine performance and emission level are investigated. As a conclusion, as the JetA-1 ratio increases in the mixture, lower nitrogen oxide (NOx emission is measured. Also, specific fuel consumption is lowered.

  8. The development and deployment of a nexrad education/training module for use by general aviation pilots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Erin Anne

    The purpose of this research was to investigate whether an education/ training module on NEXRAD and its products developed using Instructional Systems design criteria would be effective for General aviation pilots. Numerous studies have documented that General Aviation pilots are in need of additional education and training on weather concepts. A thorough needs analysis and literature review determined that training was the best way to address this problem. An education/training module and assessments were developed from scratch using strict instructional design criteria. Sixty students from Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University participated in live testing of the module. Participants were separated into control and experimental groups and took a pre-test and post-test. Statistical analysis showed that participants who received training scored significantly better between pre- and post-tests. Experimental group participants scored significantly higher than those in the control group on both a radar knowledge test as well as scenario-based questions.

  9. A study of influences of the workers' compensation and injury management regulations on aviation safety at a workplace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Devinder K; Nikraz, Hamid; Chen, Yongqing

    2016-01-01

    As the aviation industries developed, so too did the recognition that there must be an effective regulatory framework to address issues related to the workers' compensation and rehabilitation. All employees would like to work and return home safely from their workplace. Therefore, the efficient management of workplace injury and disease reduces the cost of aviation operations and improves flight safety. Workers' compensation and injury management laws regulate a majority of rehabilitation and compensation issues, but achieving an injury-free workplace remains a major challenge for the regulators. This paper examines the clauses of the workers' compensation and injury management laws of Western Australia related to workplace safety, compensation, and rehabilitations of the injured workers. It also discusses various provisions of common law under the relevant workers' health injury management legislations.

  10. An off-line dual maximum resource bin packing model for solving the maintenance problem in the aviation industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Cristian Gruia

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available In the aviation industry, propeller motor engines have a lifecycle of several thousand hours of flight and the maintenance is an important part of their lifecycle. The present article considers a multi-resource, priority-based case scheduling problem, which is applied in a Romanian manufacturing company, that repairs and maintains helicopter and airplane engines at a certain quality level imposed by the aviation standards. Given a reduced budget constraint, the management’s goal is to maximize the utilization of their resources (financial, material, space, workers, by maintaining a prior known priority rule. An Off-Line Dual Maximum Resource Bin Packing model, based on a Mixed Integer Programming model is thus presented. The obtained results show an increase with approx. 25% of the Just in Time shipping of the engines to the customers and approx. 12,5% increase in the utilization of the working area.

  11. 航空器材库存控制方法研究%Aviation Supplies Inventory Control Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘臣宇; 王庆斌

    2014-01-01

    Aviation supplies inventory number? When ordering? How much of each order? This is the key aviation supplies in-ventory control. Under certain circumstances funding, in order to ensure the completion of combat training tasks, but also to avoid waste, application inventory control model for inventory quantity decisions can solve these problems.%航空器材库存多少?何时订货?每次订购多少?这是航空器材库存控制的关键。在经费一定的情况下,为了确保各项战训任务的完成,同时还要避免浪费,应用库存控制模型进行库存数量决策可以很好地解决这些问题。

  12. Identification of Federal Aviation Administration regulations and procedures that impact fuel consumption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mckinly, J.B.

    1979-10-01

    The impact of the Federal Aviation Regulations (FARs) on fuel conservation in the air-transportation system. To date there exist over 89 identifiable fuel-conservation program and research areas. Operational constraints in the areas of FARs and Air Traffic Control (ATC), which hinder further fuel savings in any of the 89 program and research areas, are identified. The nature of this investigation presents an update of analyses from previous FAA, DOE, and NASA publications from a DOE viewpoint. The short duration and cost constraints of this study did not allow an assessment of safety, social, or any of the broader impacts of the regulations. However, this study was not intended to solve all of the regulatory problems. Rather, this was a cursory review of the FARs intended to pinpoint those fuel inefficient regulations which could be changed to improve the overall fuel-conservation effort in the air transportation industry. The program and research areas identified as being negatively impacted by FARs were analyzed to quantify the fuel savings available through revision or removal of those constraints. A recommended list of new R and D initiatives are proposed in order to improve fuel efficiency of the FARs in the air-transportation industry.

  13. An Examination of Aviation Accidents Associated with Turbulence, Wind Shear and Thunderstorm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Joni K.

    2013-01-01

    The focal point of the study reported here was the definition and examination of turbulence, wind shear and thunderstorm in relation to aviation accidents. NASA project management desired this information regarding distinct subgroups of atmospheric hazards, in order to better focus their research portfolio. A seven category expansion of Kaplan's turbulence categories was developed, which included wake turbulence, mountain wave turbulence, clear air turbulence, cloud turbulence, convective turbulence, thunderstorm without mention of turbulence, and low altitude wind shear, microburst or turbulence (with no mention of thunderstorms).More than 800 accidents from flights based in the United States during 1987-2008 were selected from a National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) database. Accidents were selected for inclusion in this study if turbulence, thunderstorm, wind shear or microburst was considered either a cause or a factor in the accident report, and each accident was assigned to only one hazard category. This report summarizes the differences between the categories in terms of factors such as flight operations category, aircraft engine type, the accident's geographic location and time of year, degree of injury to aircraft occupants, aircraft damage, age and certification of the pilot and the phase of flight at the time of the accident.

  14. Ethanol for agricultural aviation: challenges and potential; Etanol na aviacao agricola: desafios e potencial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hausen, Roberto Begnis; Romano, Leonardo Nabaes [Universidade Federal de Santa Maria (PPGEA/UFSM), RS (Brazil). Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Engenharia Agricola], Emails: rbhausen@gmail.com, romano@smail.ufsm.br; Martins, Mario Eduardo Santos [Universidade Federal de Santa Maria (UFSM), RS (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Mecanica], E-mail: marioturbo@gmail.com; Schlosser, Jose Fernando [Universidade Federal de Santa Maria (PPGEA/UFSM), RS (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Rural. Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Engenharia Agricola], E-mail: josefernandoschlosser@gmail.com; Trindade Junior, Airton Luiz [Universidade Federal de Santa Maria (UFSM), RS (Brazil)], E-mail: trindade.airton@gmail.com

    2010-07-01

    The aim of this paper is to show that the gains from the use of ethanol as fuel in agricultural aviation may be even greater to if the aircraft engine is specially designed for that purpose, and to obtain a truly 'green' engine, neutral regarding carbon emissions. Using computational tools, development methods and project management, the engine can be fully developed to be used specifically as an agricultural aircraft propellant operating with ethanol. In Brazil, the current fleet of agricultural airplanes has around 1400 aircrafts and almost all operating with AvGas. There is already in Brazil an aircraft, manufactured by a Brazilian aircraft manufacturer, that uses a conversion kit for the original engine to use ethanol as fuel. The use of ethanol has great technical and economic feasibility when compared to AvGas, even with the low efficiency of the current application. Operational improvement and gains with cost reduction can be already observed. However, with a specific design those gains could be with the low efficiency of the current application. Operational improvement and gains with cost reduction can be already observed. However, with a specific design those gains could be more expressive due to increased engine fuel efficiency and power. (author)

  15. Selling safety: the use of celebrities in improving awareness of safety in commercial aviation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molesworth, Brett R C; Seneviratne, Dimuth; Burgess, Marion

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influential power of a celebrity to convey key safety messages in commercial aviation using a pre-flight safety briefing video. In addition, the present research sought to examine the effectiveness of subtitles in aiding the recall of these important messages as well as how in-cabin aircraft noise affects recall of this information. A total of 101 participants were randomly divided into four groups (no noise without subtitles, no noise with subtitles, noise without subtitles and noise with subtitles) and following exposure to a pre-recorded pre-flight safety briefing video were tested for recall of key safety messages within that video. Participants who recognised and recalled the name of the celebrity in the safety briefing video recalled significantly more of the messages than participants who did not recognise the celebrity. Subtitles were also found to be effective, however, only in the presence of representative in-cabin aircraft noise. Practitioner Summary: Passenger attention to pre-flight safety briefings on commercial aircraft is poor. Utilising the celebrity status of a famous person may overcome this problem. Results suggest that celebrities do increase the recall of safety-related information.

  16. Learning from Aviation to Improve Safety in the Operating Room - a Systematic Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda S. G. L. Wauben

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Lessons learned from other high-risk industries could improve patient safety in the operating room (OR. This review describes similarities and differences between high-risk industries and describes current methods and solutions within a system approach to reduce errors in the OR. PubMed and Scopus databases were systematically searched for relevant articles written in the English language published between 2000 and 2011. In total, 25 articles were included, all within the medical domain focusing on the comparison between surgery and aviation. In order to improve safety in the OR, multiple interventions have to be implemented. Additionally, the healthcare organization has to become a ‘learning organization’ and the OR team has to become a team with shared responsibilities and flat hierarchies. Interpersonal and technical skills can be trained by means of simulation and can be supported by implementing team briefings, debriefings and cross-checks. However, further development and research is needed to prove if these solutions are useful, practical, and actually increase safety.

  17. Conceptual Design and Structural Optimization of NASA Environmentally Responsible Aviation (ERA) Hybrid Wing Body Aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinlan, Jesse R.; Gern, Frank H.

    2016-01-01

    Simultaneously achieving the fuel consumption and noise reduction goals set forth by NASA's Environmentally Responsible Aviation (ERA) project requires innovative and unconventional aircraft concepts. In response, advanced hybrid wing body (HWB) aircraft concepts have been proposed and analyzed as a means of meeting these objectives. For the current study, several HWB concepts were analyzed using the Hybrid wing body Conceptual Design and structural optimization (HCDstruct) analysis code. HCDstruct is a medium-fidelity finite element based conceptual design and structural optimization tool developed to fill the critical analysis gap existing between lower order structural sizing approaches and detailed, often finite element based sizing methods for HWB aircraft concepts. Whereas prior versions of the tool used a half-model approach in building the representative finite element model, a full wing-tip-to-wing-tip modeling capability was recently added to HCDstruct, which alleviated the symmetry constraints at the model centerline in place of a free-flying model and allowed for more realistic center body, aft body, and wing loading and trim response. The latest version of HCDstruct was applied to two ERA reference cases, including the Boeing Open Rotor Engine Integration On an HWB (OREIO) concept and the Boeing ERA-0009H1 concept, and results agreed favorably with detailed Boeing design data and related Flight Optimization System (FLOPS) analyses. Following these benchmark cases, HCDstruct was used to size NASA's ERA HWB concepts and to perform a related scaling study.

  18. An architecture and model for cognitive engineering simulation analysis - Application to advanced aviation automation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corker, Kevin M.; Smith, Barry R.

    1993-01-01

    The process of designing crew stations for large-scale, complex automated systems is made difficult because of the flexibility of roles that the crew can assume, and by the rapid rate at which system designs become fixed. Modern cockpit automation frequently involves multiple layers of control and display technology in which human operators must exercise equipment in augmented, supervisory, and fully automated control modes. In this context, we maintain that effective human-centered design is dependent on adequate models of human/system performance in which representations of the equipment, the human operator(s), and the mission tasks are available to designers for manipulation and modification. The joint Army-NASA Aircrew/Aircraft Integration (A3I) Program, with its attendant Man-machine Integration Design and Analysis System (MIDAS), was initiated to meet this challenge. MIDAS provides designers with a test bed for analyzing human-system integration in an environment in which both cognitive human function and 'intelligent' machine function are described in similar terms. This distributed object-oriented simulation system, its architecture and assumptions, and our experiences from its application in advanced aviation crew stations are described.

  19. Operator modeling in commerical aviation: Cognitive models, intelligent displays, and pilot's assistants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govindaraj, T.; Mitchell, C. M.

    1994-01-01

    One of the goals of the National Aviation Safety/Automation program is to address the issue of human-centered automation in the cockpit. Human-centered automation is automation that, in the cockpit, enhances or assists the crew rather than replacing them. The Georgia Tech research program focused on this general theme, with emphasis on designing a computer-based pilot's assistant, intelligent (i.e, context-sensitive) displays, and an intelligent tutoring system for understanding and operating the autoflight system. In particular, the aids and displays were designed to enhance the crew's situational awareness of the current state of the automated flight systems and to assist the crew's situational awareness of the current state of the automated flight systems and to assist the crew in coordinating the autoflight system resources. The activities of this grant included: (1) an OFMspert to understand pilot navigation activities in a 727 class aircraft; (2) an extension of OFMspert to understand mode control in a glass cockpit, Georgia Tech Crew Activity Tracking System (GT-CATS); (3) the design of a training system to teach pilots about the vertical navigation portion of the flight management system -VNAV Tutor; and (4) a proof-of-concept display, using existing display technology, to facilitate mode awareness, particularly in situations in which controlled flight into terrain (CFIT) is a potential.

  20. Highly selective condensation of biomass-derived methyl ketones as a source of aviation fuel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacia, Eric R; Balakrishnan, Madhesan; Deaner, Matthew H; Goulas, Konstantinos A; Toste, F Dean; Bell, Alexis T

    2015-05-22

    Aviation fuel (i.e., jet fuel) requires a mixture of C9 -C16 hydrocarbons having both a high energy density and a low freezing point. While jet fuel is currently produced from petroleum, increasing concern with the release of CO2 into the atmosphere from the combustion of petroleum-based fuels has led to policy changes mandating the inclusion of biomass-based fuels into the fuel pool. Here we report a novel way to produce a mixture of branched cyclohexane derivatives in very high yield (>94 %) that match or exceed many required properties of jet fuel. As starting materials, we use a mixture of n-alkyl methyl ketones and their derivatives obtained from biomass. These synthons are condensed into trimers via base-catalyzed aldol condensation and Michael addition. Hydrodeoxygenation of these products yields mixtures of C12 -C21 branched, cyclic alkanes. Using models for predicting the carbon number distribution obtained from a mixture of n-alkyl methyl ketones and for predicting the boiling point distribution of the final mixture of cyclic alkanes, we show that it is possible to define the mixture of synthons that will closely reproduce the distillation curve of traditional jet fuel. PMID:25891778

  1. Sensitivity Analysis for Safety Design Verification of General Aviation Reciprocating Aircraft Engine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAO Jiaokun; DING Shuiting

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents an application of global sensitivity analysis for system safety analysis of reciprocating aircraft engine.Compared with local sensitivity analysis results,global sensitivity analysis could provide more information on parameter interactions,which are significant in complex system safety analysis.First,a deterministic aviation reciprocating engine thermodynamics model is developed and parameters of interest are defined as random variables.Then,samples are generated by Monte Carlo method for the parameters used in engine model on the basis of definition of factor distribution.Eventually,results from engine model are generated and importance indices are calculated.Based on the analysis results,design is improved to satisfy the airworthiness requirements.The results reveal that by using global sensitivity analysis,the parameters could be ranked with respect to their importance,including first order indices and total sensitivity indices.By reducing the uncertainty of parameters and adjusting the range of inputs,safety criteria would be satisfied.

  2. An integrated decision-making framework for transportation architectures: Application to aviation systems design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewe, Jung-Ho

    The National Transportation System (NTS) is undoubtedly a complex system-of-systems---a collection of diverse 'things' that evolve over time, organized at multiple levels, to achieve a range of possibly conflicting objectives, and never quite behaving as planned. The purpose of this research is to develop a virtual transportation architecture for the ultimate goal of formulating an integrated decision-making framework. The foundational endeavor begins with creating an abstraction of the NTS with the belief that a holistic frame of reference is required to properly study such a multi-disciplinary, trans-domain system. The culmination of the effort produces the Transportation Architecture Field (TAF) as a mental model of the NTS, in which the relationships between four basic entity groups are identified and articulated. This entity-centric abstraction framework underpins the construction of a virtual NTS couched in the form of an agent-based model. The transportation consumers and the service providers are identified as adaptive agents that apply a set of preprogrammed behavioral rules to achieve their respective goals. The transportation infrastructure and multitude of exogenous entities (disruptors and drivers) in the whole system can also be represented without resorting to an extremely complicated structure. The outcome is a flexible, scalable, computational model that allows for examination of numerous scenarios which involve the cascade of interrelated effects of aviation technology, infrastructure, and socioeconomic changes throughout the entire system.

  3. Emergence of green business models: The case of algae biofuel for aviation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emergent business models seek to take advantage of new market mechanisms driven by technological changes, particularly those related to the production and delivery of clean or sustainable energy. Such business models often function at the intersection of various industries, with global views, and the resulting systems have distinct social, political, environmental, economic, technological, and business dimensions. Such holistic systems are not only difficult to develop but also require support from a broad range of actors with effective regulations and policies in place, such that the firm functions within a framework that integrates various factors. This study substantiates such a framework by detailing the nascent algae-based bio-fuel industry that caters to the aviation sector while arguing that businesses in the energy industry can emerge as a next-practice platform that drive a sixth wave of innovation. The framework begins with three basic enablers, innovation, flexibility, and sustainability, and explains how value from renewable energy technologies can be created and captured sustainably and innovatively with new market mechanisms implemented by firms with green business models. - Highlights: • We develop a framework that enables the emergence of green energy business models. • We present a case study on the algae based biofuel system for airline industry. • The green business models in energy are global in nature and are next practice platforms. • New market mechanisms and policy measures lead to sustainable energy business models. • Innovation, flexibility and sustainability are the basic enablers of the framework

  4. The NASA Environmentally Responsible Aviation Project/General Electric Open Rotor Test Campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Zante, Dale

    2013-01-01

    The Open Rotor is a modern version of the UnDucted Fan (UDF) that was flight tested in the late 1980's through a partnership between NASA and General Electric (GE). Tests were conducted in the 9'x15' Low Speed Wind Tunnel and the 8'x6' Supersonic Wind Tunnel starting in late 2009 and completed in early 2012. Aerodynamic and acoustic data were obtained for takeoff, approach and cruise simulations. GE was the primary partner, but other organizations were involved such as Boeing and Airbus who provided additional hardware for fuselage simulations. This test campaign provided the acoustic and performance characteristics for modern open rotor blades designs." NASA and GE conducted joint systems analysis to evaluate how well new blade designs would perform on a B737 class aircraft, and compared the results to an advanced higher bypass ratio turbofan." Acoustic shielding experiments were performed at NASA GRC and Boeing LSAF facilities to provide data for noise estimates of unconventional aircraft configurations with Open Rotor propulsion systems." The work was sponsored by NASA's aeronautics programs, including the Subsonic Fixed Wing (SFW) and the Environmentally Responsible Aviation (ERA) projects."

  5. Remaining useful life prediction based on the Wiener process for an aviation axial piston pump

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Xingjian; Lin Siru; Wang Shaoping; He Zhaomin; Zhang Chao

    2016-01-01

    An aviation hydraulic axial piston pump’s degradation from comprehensive wear is a typical gradual failure model. Accurate wear prediction is difficult as random and uncertain char-acteristics must be factored into the estimation. The internal wear status of the axial piston pump is characterized by the return oil flow based on fault mechanism analysis of the main frictional pairs in the pump. The performance degradation model is described by the Wiener process to predict the remaining useful life (RUL) of the pump. Maximum likelihood estimation (MLE) is performed by utilizing the expectation maximization (EM) algorithm to estimate the initial parameters of the Wiener process while recursive estimation is conducted utilizing the Kalman filter method to estimate the drift coefficient of the Wiener process. The RUL of the pump is then calculated accord-ing to the performance degradation model based on the Wiener process. Experimental results indi-cate that the return oil flow is a suitable characteristic for reflecting the internal wear status of the axial piston pump, and thus the Wiener process-based method may effectively predicate the RUL of the pump.

  6. High-Speed Imaging of Shock-Wave Motion in Aviation Security Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, B. W.; Settles, G. S.; Miller, J. D.; Keane, B. T.; Gatto, J. A.

    2001-11-01

    A high-speed drum camera is used in conjunction with Penn State's Full-Scale Schlieren Facility to capture blast wave phenomena in aviation security scenarios. Several hundred photographic frames at a rate of 45k frames/sec allow the imaging of entire explosive events typical of blasts inside an aircraft fuselage. The large (2.3 x 2.9 m) schlieren field-of-view further allows these experiments to be done at or near full-scale. Shock waves up to Mach 1.3 are produced by detonating small balloons filled with an oxygen-acetylene gas mixture. Blasts underneath actual aircraft seats occupied by mannequins reveal shock motion inside a passenger cabin. Blasts were also imaged within the luggage container of a 3/5-scale aircraft fuselage, including hull-holing, as occurred in the Pan Am 103 incident. Drum-camera frames are assembled into digital video clips of several seconds duration, which will be shown in the presentation. These brief movies provide the first-ever visualization of shock motion due to explosions onboard aircraft. They also illustrate the importance of shock imaging in aircraft-hardening experiments, and they provide data to validate numerical predictions of such events. Supported by FAA Grant 99-G-032.

  7. [Clinico-diagnostic and expert characteristics of noncoronary cardiac rhythm disorders in state aviation pilots].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagovitsyn, A V; Ardashev, V N; Voronkov, Yu I

    2013-01-01

    Structure and prevalence of various forms of noncoronary heart diseases (NCHD) and cardiac rhythm disorders (CRD) in state aviation pilots, as well as rates of ensuing grounding were studied. The total of 220 NCHD and 100 essentially healthy pilots were examined. Cardiovascular clinical and functional investigations consisted of physical examination, ECG, dispersion mapping (DM ECG), provocative tests and other techniques used for pilots' certification. Effectiveness of the clinical and instrumental methods of diagnosing arrhythmias was evaluated. CRD presence was verified by Holter monitoring. Extrasystoles prevalence was recorded in NCHD pilots; clinically significant forms of the diseases were commonly detected in pilots with chronic infections of the tonsils. In addition, radiodiagnostics of the immune status was applied to confirm the role of infection and immunology factor. DM ECG screening for differentiation between the norm and pathology was found useful in detecting early metabolic shifts and CVS functional evaluation. These results provided the basis for guidelines concerning medical expertise of pilots with noncoronary arrhythmias. PMID:24032165

  8. Communications System Architecture Development for Air Traffic Management and Aviation Weather Information Dissemination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Seana; Olson, Matt; Blythe, Doug; Heletz, Jacob; Hamilton, Griff; Kolb, Bill; Homans, Al; Zemrowski, Ken; Decker, Steve; Tegge, Cindy

    2000-01-01

    This document is the NASA AATT Task Order 24 Final Report. NASA Research Task Order 24 calls for the development of eleven distinct task reports. Each task was a necessary exercise in the development of comprehensive communications systems architecture (CSA) for air traffic management and aviation weather information dissemination for 2015, the definition of the interim architecture for 2007, and the transition plan to achieve the desired End State. The eleven tasks are summarized along with the associated Task Order reference. The output of each task was an individual task report. The task reports that make up the main body of this document include Task 5, Task 6, Task 7, Task 8, Task 10, and Task 11. The other tasks provide the supporting detail used in the development of the architecture. These reports are included in the appendices. The detailed user needs, functional communications requirements and engineering requirements associated with Tasks 1, 2, and 3 have been put into a relational database and are provided electronically.

  9. Curing Pressure Influence of Out-of-Autoclave Processing on Structural Composites for Commercial Aviation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasileios M. Drakonakis

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Autoclaving is a process that ensures the highest quality of carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP composite structures used in aviation. During the autoclave process, consolidation of prepreg laminas through simultaneous elevated pressure and temperature results in a uniform high-end material system. This work focuses on analyzing in a fundamental way the applications of pressure and temperature separately during prepreg consolidation. A controlled pressure vessel (press-clave has been designed that applies pressure during the curing process while the temperature is being applied locally by heat blankets. This vessel gives the ability to design manufacturing processes with different pressures while applying temperature at desired regions of the composite. The pressure role on the curing extent and its effect on the interlayer region are also tested in order to evaluate the consolidation of prepregs to a completely uniform material. Such studies may also be used to provide insight into the morphology of interlayer reinforcement concepts, which are widely used in the featherweight composites. Specimens manufactured by press-clave, which separates pressure from heat, are analytically tested and compared to autoclaved specimens in order to demonstrate the suitability of the press-clave to manufacture high-quality composites with excessively reduced cost.

  10. Predicting Airspace Capacity Impacts Using the Consolidated Storm Prediction for Aviation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Carl

    2010-01-01

    Convective weather is currently the largest contributor to air traffic delays in the United States. In order to make effective traffic flow management decisions to mitigate these delays, weather forecasts must be made as early and as accurately as possible. A forecast product that could be used to mitigate convective weather impacts is the Consolidated Storm Prediction for Aviation. This product provides forecasts of cloud water content and convective top heights at 0- to 8-hour look-ahead times. The objective of this study was to examine a method of predicting the impact of convective weather on air traffic sector capacities using these forecasts. Polygons representing forecast convective weather were overlaid at multiple flight levels on a sector map to calculate the fraction of each sector covered by weather. The fractional volume coverage was used as the primary metric to determine convection s impact on sectors. Results reveal that the forecasts can be used to predict the probability and magnitude of weather impacts on sector capacity up to eight hours in advance.

  11. Airmanship on the ground: how the aviation industry can fundamentally change the way first responders manage complex emergencies

    OpenAIRE

    Fields-Spack, Ryan

    2015-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited Police and fire departments today are challenged with an increasing frequency of complex emergencies and a continuing cultural divide. Devoted people from both agencies are actively working to improve their response capability. Rather than solving the problem solely in house, other disciplines may be able to help. This thesis investigated what the aviation industry could teach the emergency services field about how to approach complex ...

  12. Relationship between Security and Human Rights in Counter-Terrorism: A Case of Introducing Body Scanners in Civil Aviation

    OpenAIRE

    Prezelj Iztok

    2015-01-01

    Changes in security environment after the end of Cold War and 9/11 have strongly affected our security concepts and paradigms. In the field of counter-terrorism, a serious conceptual and practical debate on the relationship between security and human rights and freedoms has begun. The goal of this paper is to reflect on this complex relationship at the conceptual level and introduce the empirical debate on this relationship in the field of civil aviation (case of introducing body scanners). T...

  13. An analysis of the factors affecting the net operating result at Naval Aviation Depot Cherry Point, North Carolina

    OpenAIRE

    Griffith, Scott M.

    2002-01-01

    This thesis explains the current process involved in establishing stabilized rates for the Naval Aviation Depot (NADEP) Cherry Point, North Carolina. Existing data were examined to aid in understanding the process for determining stabilized rates, workload standards, and workload allocation. Additionally, this research provides an analysis of the inputs to the rate setting process to determine which has the most influence on the financial operating result. A general history of working capital...

  14. Evaluation of organizational self-assessment tools and methodologies to measure continuous process improvement for the Naval Aviation Enterprise

    OpenAIRE

    Kaehler. Theodore J.

    2006-01-01

    The Naval Aviation Enterprise (NAE) has created a program called AIRSpeed to deliver the efficiency gains of continuous process improvement (CPI). NAE leadership seeks a self-assessment tool to measure how well AIRSpeed has been implemented, including possible areas for improvement. This thesis studies the origins of continuous process improvement, the value of assessment, and current assessment methodologies. Key concepts are cited for the use of organizational assessment tools. The objectiv...

  15. Deployed virtual consulting: the fusion of wearable computing, collaborative technology, augmented reality and intelligent agents to support fleet aviation maintenance

    OpenAIRE

    Nasman, James M.

    2004-01-01

    This thesis addresses the need of Naval Aviation Maintenance to streamline and more effectively manage the process of technical consultation aboard deployed aircraft carriers. The current process involves the physical transportation of an appropriate technician to the carrier to perform required maintenance and/or repairs. In light of the technology currently available this process becomes obviously obsolete, overly costly and needlessly time consuming. By implementing wireless technology in ...

  16. Research to assess impacts on developing countries of measures to address emissions in the international aviation and shipping sectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anger, A. [Cambridge University, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Faber, J.; Koopman, M. [CE Delft, Delft (Netherlands); Van Velzen, A. [Transport Analysis and Knowledge Systems TAKS, s.l. (Netherlands); Long, K.; Pollitt, H.; Barker, T. [Cambridge Econometrics, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Comberti, C.; Fazekas, D.; Blachowicz, A. [Climate Strategies, London (United Kingdom)

    2013-02-15

    The greenhouse gas emissions of international aviation and maritime transport are projected to increase rapidly over the coming decades, despite significant improvements in the fuel efficiency of aircraft and ships. In order to address their growth, Market Based Measures (MBMs) have been proposed to complement technical and operational measures. These measures are being discussed in ICAO (the UN organization for civil aviation) and IMO (the UN organization for maritime transport). One of the main issues in the debate has been the impact of MBMs on developing countries and especially on remote economies. This report quantifies the economic impacts of MBMs on ten case study economies and globally. The case study economies have been selected in the expectation that they would be relatively highly impacted because of their remoteness and/or dependence on international aviation or maritime transport. This report shows that the decrease in GDP is less than 0.01% on average and significantly less than 0.1% for all but a few of the case study countries. Countries with a higher dependency on tourism and trade are likely to experience greater economic impacts as market-based measures raise the costs of aviation and maritime transport; they impact economies due to increased prices for passenger travel and exported and imported goods. Some of these countries are small island states that are also vulnerable to climate change impacts. Undesired economic impacts on developing countries can be addressed effectively by a combination of measures such as exemptions of certain routes, lump sum rebates, and investments in infrastructure efficiency and development of more efficient ships and aircraft.

  17. The impact of new and emerging technologies in the commercial aviation maintenance, repair, and overhaul industry a Delphi study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Janet

    Purpose. The purpose of this study was to identify new or emerging technological trends and events that are likely to occur between now and 2017 that will have an impact on the commercial aviation maintenance, repair, and overhaul (MRO) industry. Further, it was the purpose of this study to examine those technological trends and events believed to provide the greatest impact and, given the experts' analysis, identify the feasibility of implementation. Methodology. This descriptive study utilized the Delphi method with a panel of twenty-four experts comprised of practitioners, theorists, and futurists. A priority matrix was utilized to determine the impact and feasibility of trend and events. Findings. The experts identified fifty-three trends and events that will impact the commercial aviation maintenance, repair, and overhaul (MRO) industry. Analysis of the priority matrix revealed eighteen trends and events were of high priority and high feasibility. Conclusions. The responses from the expert panel were examined and the findings analyzed. The following are the conclusions constructed from the data provided by the Delphi panel of experts: (1) the need to respond to the demands of the maintenance, repair, and overhaul (MRO) industry such as down time, efficiency, cost, and environmental concerns by implementing new technology, (2) the demand to integrate and implement new technology as indicative of the priority matrix scoring high importance/high feasibility, (3) to proactively address the inadequate professional development in new technologies, and (4) the consensus reached by the panel of experts of importance and feasibility of implementation of new technologies encompass eighteen trends and events. Implications and recommendations for action. The implementation of new and emerging technological advances in the commercial aviation maintenance, repair, and overhaul (MRO) industry between now and 2017 will be dependent on the technologies' capacity to reduce

  18. An Exploratory Study: Correlations Between Occupational Stressors, Coping Mechanisms, and Job Performance Among Chinese Aviation Maintenance Technicians

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Yu; Keller, Julius C.; Huang, Chenyu; Fanjoy, Richard O.

    2016-01-01

    Aviation maintenance technicians play a vital role in air transportation. These workers are responsible for keeping aircraft airworthy and executing safety responsibilities. Undesirable stress levels may have a negative impact on work performance (Mowday, Porter, & Steers, 2013). Poor work performance may manifest in safety violations, absenteeism, turnover, and disengagement. These outcomes may disrupt an organization’s operation and negatively impact the financial bottom line. This mixed-me...

  19. Cleaning of aviation hydraulic and motor oils from emulsion water and mechanical con-taminants in quazi-permanent electric field

    OpenAIRE

    B. B. Гаража; С. А. Халиль

    1999-01-01

    Presented are the results of experimental research of cleaning efficiency of aviation hydraulic and motor oils by means of full-scale polarization electrodehydrator from emulsion water and me­chanical contaminants under laboratory and industrial conditions

  20. New Generation Meteorological Satellite Imager Aviation Decision Support Applications for Detection of Convection, Turbulence, and Volcanic Ash

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feltz, Wayne

    2016-04-01

    A suite of aviation related decision support products have been in development to meet GOES-R science requirements since 2008 and are being evaluated to assess meteorological hazards to aircraft in flight derived from the current generation of European Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager (SEVIRI) imager data. This presentation will focus on GOES-R Advanced Baseline Imager (ABI) measurement requirements relating to satellite-based aviation convective, turbulence, and volcanic ash/SO2 products that can be applied globally on next generation geostationary imagers including the Japanese Himawari, South Korean COMS (AMI), and European Metop-SG imagers. These new methodologies have relevance on current generation GOES and SEVIRI imagers, and overview will include discussion on how product utility has been improved through satellite GOES-R/JPSS Proving Ground NOAA testbed activities. Satellite-based decision support for aviation context toward improvement of future air transportation route planning and warning for the general public with emphasis on successfully bridging research to operations will also be discussed with anticipated October 2016 launch of GOES-R.