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Sample records for avian leukosis virus

  1. Cell killing by avian leukosis viruses.

    OpenAIRE

    Weller, S K; Temin, H M

    1981-01-01

    Infection of chicken cells with a cytopathic avian leukosis virus resulted in the detachment of killed cells from the culture dish. The detached, dead cells contained more unintegrated viral DNA than the attached cells. These results confirm the hypothesis that cell killing after infection with a cytopathic avian leukosis virus is associated with accumulation of large amounts of unintegrated viral DNA. No accumulation of large amounts of integrated viral DNA was found in cells infected with c...

  2. Complete Genome Sequence of an American Avian Leukosis Virus Subgroup J Isolate That Causes Hemangiomas and Myeloid Leukosis

    OpenAIRE

    Malhotra, Sanandan; Justice, James; De Lee, Nathan; Li, Yingying; Zavala, Guillermo; Ruano, Miguel; Morgan, Robin; Beemon, Karen

    2015-01-01

    We report the complete genome sequence of avian leukosis virus subgroup J (ALV-J) isolate PDRC-59831, which causes myeloid leukosis and hemangiomas in chickens. This is an American ALV-J isolate, which was found in a 38-week-old broiler breeder chicken on a farm in Georgia in 2007.

  3. Role of endogenous avian leukosis virus and serotype 2 Marek’s disease virus in enhancement of spontaneous lymphoid-leukosis-like tumors in chickens

    Science.gov (United States)

    The influence of endogenous subgroup E avian Leukosis virus (ALV-E) and strain SB-1 of serotype 2 Marek’s disease virus (MDV) on the enhancement of spontaneous lymphoid leukosis (LL)-like tumors was studied in chickens of Avian Disease and Oncology Laboratory (ADOL) line named 0.TVB*S1, or RFS. This...

  4. Identification of New World Quails Susceptible to Infection with Avian Leukosis Virus Subgroup J.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plachý, Jiří; Reinišová, Markéta; Kučerová, Dana; Šenigl, Filip; Stepanets, Volodymyr; Hron, Tomáš; Trejbalová, Kateřina; Elleder, Daniel; Hejnar, Jiří

    2017-02-01

    The J subgroup of avian leukosis virus (ALV-J) infects domestic chickens, jungle fowl, and turkeys. This virus enters the host cell through a receptor encoded by the tvj locus and identified as Na(+)/H(+) exchanger 1. The resistance to avian leukosis virus subgroup J in a great majority of galliform species has been explained by deletions or substitutions of the critical tryptophan 38 in the first extracellular loop of Na(+)/H(+) exchanger 1. Because there are concerns of transspecies virus transmission, we studied natural polymorphisms and susceptibility/resistance in wild galliforms and found the presence of tryptophan 38 in four species of New World quails. The embryo fibroblasts of New World quails are susceptible to infection with avian leukosis virus subgroup J, and the cloned Na(+)/H(+) exchanger 1 confers susceptibility on the otherwise resistant host. New World quails are also susceptible to new avian leukosis virus subgroup J variants but resistant to subgroups A and B and weakly susceptible to subgroups C and D of avian sarcoma/leukosis virus due to obvious defects of the respective receptors. Our results suggest that the avian leukosis virus subgroup J could be transmitted to New World quails and establish a natural reservoir of circulating virus with a potential for further evolution.

  5. Aberrant expression of liver microRNA in chickens infected with subgroup J avian leukosis virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subgroup J avian leukosis virus (ALV-J) is an oncogenic retrovirus primarily causing myeloid leukosis (ML) in broilers. Although ALV is well under control in a few countries including the U.S.A., poultry industry in many parts of the world continues suffering from serious economic loss due to sporad...

  6. Screening for Recombinant Avian Leukosis Viruses in Cell Cultures Inoculated with Various Subgroups of Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chicken embryo fibroblasts (CEFs) prepared from ADOL SPF embryos were co-infected with different concentration ratios of subgroups A, J and E avian leukosis virus (ALV). Inoculated cultures were screened for recombination among the ALV strains. Potential recombinant viruses were purified by limiting...

  7. [Cross-species Transmission of Avian Leukosis Virus Subgroup J].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yanwei; He, Menglian; Zhang, Ji; Zhao, Manda; Wang, Guihua; Cheng, Ziqiang

    2016-01-01

    Avian leukosis virus subgroup J (ALV-J) is an avian retrovirus that can induce myelocytomas. A high-frequency mutation in gene envelope endows ALV-J with the potential for cross-species transmission. We wished to ascertain if the ALV-J can spread across species under selection pressure in susceptible and resistant hosts. First, we inoculated (in turn) two susceptible host birds (specific pathogen-free (SPF) chickens and turkeys). Then, we inoculated three resistant hosts (pheasants, quails and ducks) to detect the viral shedding, pathologic changes, and genetic evolution of different isolates. We found that pheasants and quails were infected under the selective pressure that accumulates stepwise in different hosts, and that ducks were not infected. Infection rates for SPF chickens and turkeys were 100% (16/16), whereas those for pheasants and quails were 37.5% (6/16) and 11.1% (3/27). Infected hosts showed immune tolerance, and inflammation and tissue damage could be seen in the liver, spleen, kidneys and cardiovascular system. Non-synonymous mutation and synonymous ratio (NS/S) analyses revealed the NS/S in hypervariable region (hr) 2 of pheasants and quails was 2.5. That finding suggested that mutation of isolates in pheasants and quails was induced by selective pressure from the resistant host, and that the hr2 region is a critical domain in cross-species transmission of ALV-J. Sequencing showed that ALV-J isolates from turkeys, pheasants and quails had moved away from the original virus, and were closer to the ALV-J prototype strain HPRS-103. However, the HPRS-103 strain cannot infect pheasants and quails, so further studies are needed.

  8. The FACT complex promotes avian leukosis virus DNA integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winans, Shelby; Larue, Ross C; Abraham, Carly M; Shkriabai, Nikolozi; Skopp, Amelie; Winkler, Duane; Kvaratskhelia, Mamuka; Beemon, Karen L

    2017-01-25

    All retroviruses need to integrate a DNA copy of their genome into the host chromatin. Cellular proteins regulating and targeting lentiviral and gammaretroviral integration in infected cells have been discovered, but the factors that mediate alpharetroviral avian leukosis virus (ALV) integration are unknown. Here, we have identified the FACT protein complex, which consists of SSRP1 and Spt16, as a principal cellular binding partner of ALV integrase (IN). Biochemical experiments with purified recombinant proteins show that SSRP1 and Spt16 are able to individually bind ALV IN, but only the FACT complex effectively stimulates ALV integration activity in vitro Likewise, in infected cells, the FACT complex promotes ALV integration activity with proviral integration frequency varying directly with cellular expression levels of the FACT complex. An increase in 2-LTR circles in the depleted FACT complex cell line indicates that this complex regulates the ALV life cycle at the level of integration. This regulation is shown to be specific to ALV, as disruption of the FACT complex did not inhibit either lentiviral or gammaretroviral integration in infected cells.

  9. Molecular characteristics and pathogenicity of an avian leukosis virus isolated from avian neurofibrosarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochi, Akihiro; Ochiai, Kenji; Nakamura, Sayuri; Kobara, Akiko; Sunden, Yuji; Umemura, Takashi

    2012-03-01

    Peripheral nerve sheath tumors (PNSTs) are rare in chickens and their etiology remains to be elucidated. In this study, a naturally occurring PNST in a Japanese native fowl (Gallus gallus domesticus) was pathologically examined and the strain of avian leukosis virus (ALV) isolated from the neoplasm was characterized by molecular biological analysis. The fowl presented with a firm subcutaneous mass in the neck. The mass, connected to the adjacent spinal cord (C9-14), was microscopically composed of highly cellular tissue of spindle cells arranged in interlacing bundles, streams, and palisading patterns with Verocay bodies and less cellular tissue with abundant collagen. Immunohistochemically, neoplastic cells were divided into two types: perineurial cells positive for vimentin, glucose transporter 1 (GLUT1), and claudin1; and Schwann cells positive for vimentin, occasionally positive for S-100 alpha/beta but negative for GLUT1. Based on these findings, a diagnosis of neurofibrosarcoma was made. The complete nucleotide sequence of an ALV strain, CTS_5371, isolated from the neoplasm was determined and phylogenetic analysis indicated that the strain was a novel recombinant virus from avian leukosis/sarcoma viruses previously reported. Additionally, experimental infection revealed that CTS_5371 induced the proliferation of Schwann cells and perineurial cells. These results suggest that this ALV strain has the ability to induce PNSTs in chickens.

  10. [Isolation and identification of avian leukosis virus-B from layer chickens infected with avian leukosis virus-J].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Gong-Zhen; Zhang, Hong-Hai; Liu, Qing; Qiu, Bo; Wang, Feng; Wang, Xiao-Wei; Chen, Hong-Bo; Cheng, Zi-Qiang

    2009-11-01

    Two strains of Avian leukosis virus subgroup B (ALV-B) were isolated for the first time in China Hy-line White on the cultured DF-1 cells which were inoculated tissue samples from by an ELISA assay, a histopathology examination and a PCR-based diagnosis. The results from the ELISA assay indicated that the positive rate of serum antibodies to ALV-B and ALV-J virus were 16.3% (15/92) and 13% (12/92), respectively. The histopathological examination indicated that two types of tumor cells existed at same focus in liver and spleen, which mainly were myelocytoma cells and lymphosarcoma cells. The PCR-based diagnosis were performed as follows: the cellular DNA was extracted from the inoculated DF-1 cells; the specific fragments of 1100 bp and 924 bp were obtained by a PCR system with the diagnostic primers of ALV-B and ALV-J; and the PCR results for ALV-A, MDV and REV were all negative. Then, the amplified fragments of the two ALV-B stains were partially sequenced and shown an identity of 92.8%,94.7% with the prototype strain of ALV-B (RSV Schmidt-ruppin B). The identities of two ALV-J strains with the prototype strain HPRS-103 at 96.9%, 91.5%; The identities of two ALV-J strains with the American prototype strain at 85.9%, 81.5%. Our study had shown that ALV-B was isolated for the first time from the ALV-J infected commercial layer flocks in China. It also indicated that the chance of genetic recombination among various subgroups of ALV was increased.

  11. Diversity in Avian Leukosis Virus Isolates From Single Outbreak of Myelocytomatosis in Commercial Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    In 1997, three white leghorn flocks were diagnosed with the first reported case of myelocytomatosis in commercial and field layer flocks. Moreover, the first naturally occurring recombinant avian leukosis virus (ALV) termed AF 115-4 (ALV-B/J) containing the envelope of ALV-B and long terminal repeat...

  12. Efficacy of an autophagy-targeted DNA vaccine against avian leukosis virus subgroup J

    Science.gov (United States)

    Infection with the avian leukosis virus subgroup J (ALV-J) can lead to neoplastic disease in chickens, inflicting significant economic losses to the poultry industry. Recent reports have identified inhibitory effects of ALV-J on autophagy, a process involving in innate and adaptive immunity. Inspire...

  13. Development and characterization of monoclonal antibodies to subgroup A avian leukosis virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Y; Li, X; Fu, L; Cui, Z; Li, W; Wu, Z; Sun, S

    2014-03-01

    Avian leukosis virus subgroup A (ALV-A) is a retrovirus which infects egg-type chickens and is the main pathogen of lymphoid leukosis (LL) and myeloid leukosis (ML). In order to greatly enhance the diagnosis and treatment of clinical avian leukemia, two monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) to ALV-A were developed by fusion between SP2/0 and spleen cells from mice immunized with expressed ALV-A env-gp85 protein. Using immunofluorescence assay (IFA), two MAbs reacted with ALV-A, but not with subgroups B and J of ALV. Western blot tests showed that molecular weight of ALV-A envelope glycoprotein recognized by MAbs was about 53 kD. Isotyping test revealed that two MAbs (A5C1 and A4C8) were IgG1 isotypes. These MAbs can be used for diagnosis and epidemiology of ALV-A.

  14. Absence of missense mutations in activated c-myc genes in avian leukosis virus-induced B-cell lymphomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hahn, M.; Hayward, W.S.

    1988-06-01

    The authors determined the nucleotide sequences of two independent DNA clones which contained the activated c-myc genes from avian leukosis virus-induced B-cell lymphomas. Neither of these c-myce genes contained missense mutations. This strongly supports the notion that the c-myc photo-oncogene in avian leukosis virus-induced B-cell lymphomas can be oncogenically activated by altered expression of the gene without a change in the primary structure of the gene product.

  15. Development of an antigen-capture ELISA for the detection of avian leukosis virus p27 antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Bingling; Li, Delong; Zhu, Haibo; Liu, Wen; Qin, Liting; Liu, Zaisi; Wu, Guan; Wang, Yongqiang; Qi, Xiaole; Gao, Honglei; Wang, Xiaomei; Gao, Yulong

    2013-02-01

    An antigen-capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (AC-ELISA) employing monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies against p27 was developed for the detection of the avian leukosis virus (ALV). The specificity of the optimized AC-ELISA was evaluated using avian leukosis virus subgroup J (ALV-J), avian leukosis virus subgroup A (ALV-A), avian leukosis virus subgroup B (ALV-B), avian infectious bronchitis virus (IBV), Marek's disease virus (MDV), avian infectious laryngotracheitis virus (ILTV), Fowlpox virus (FPV), infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV), Newcastle disease virus (NDV), avian reovirus (ARV), reticuloendotheliosis virus (REV), avian influenza virus (AIV) and Escherichia coli. The only specimens that yielded a strong signal were ALV-J, ALV-A and ALV-B, indicating that this assay is suitable for the detection of ALV. The limit of detection of this assay was 1.25 ng/ml of rp27 protein and 10(1.79)TCID(50) units of HLJ09MDJ-1 (ALV-J). Moreover, this AC-ELISA can detect ALV in cloacal swabs of chickens experimentally infected as early as 12 days post-infection. The AC-ELISA detected the virus in the albumin and cloacal swabs of naturally infected chickens, and the results were confirmed by PCR, indicating that the AC-ELISA was a suitable method for the detection of ALV. This test is rapid and sensitive and could be convenient for epidemiological studies and eradication programs.

  16. First finding of subgroup-E avian leukosis virus from wild ducks in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Ruijun; Han, Chunyan; Liu, Lanlan; Zeng, Xiangwei

    2014-10-10

    To analyze the status of avian leukosis virus subgroup E (ALV-E) in wild ducks in China, we collected 276 wild ducks, including 12 species, from four provinces of China. The PCR detection for ALV-E identified four samples as positive samples and the detection rate was 1.45%. The env sequences of ALV-E were cloned and sequenced. In gp85, genes of the four ALV-E strains showed a high homology (98.1-99.5%) with ev-1, ev-3, and SD0501 and more than 90% homology with other subgroup-A and subgroup-B avian leukosis viruses. However, they showed a slightly lower identity with subgroup-J (NX0101 and HPRS103), from 47.5 to 48.1%. Simultaneously, a further comparison with ALV-E representative isolates indicated that the amino acid substitutions of the four wild duck strains were distributed throughout the gp85. In total, these results suggested that the subgroup-E avian leukosis virus has been found in wild ducks in China.

  17. Study on the Pathogenicity of Chinese Strains of Subgroup J Avian Leukosis Viruses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DU Yan; CUI Zhi-zhong

    2002-01-01

    The pathogenicity of 4 Chinese strains of subgroup J avian leukosis viruses (ALV-J), SD9901,SD9902, YZ9901 and YZ9902, was studied. The results showed that only SD9902 among the 4 strains induced mortality from myeloid leukosis (ML). In the 12 meat-type chickens inoculated with SD9902 at 1-day-old, 9died between 22 days and 38 days after inoculation. No death or ML was found in chickens inoculated with the other 3 strains during the period of 6 months. These results suggested the SD9902 strain of ALV-J was an acute transforming virus, but SD9901, YZ9901 and YZ9902 were non-transforming viruses. All 4 Chinese strains did not induce any tumors in egg-type SPF chickens during 7 months after hatching when viruses were injected into 11-day-old embryos.

  18. Development of an endogenous virus-free line of chickens susceptible to all subgroups of avian leukosis virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Primary chicken embryo fibroblasts (CEF) from special specific pathogen free chicken lines are normally used for detection of contamination with avian leukosis viruses (ALV). The suitability and efficiency of such tests mostly depend on the susceptibility of CEF to varied subgroups of ALV. The ideal...

  19. The passage of cells can improve the detection rate of avian leukosis virus to facilitate the elimination of avian leukosis in chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiuzhen; Wang, Bo; Zhang, Peipei; Cheng, Hegang; Sun, Shuhong

    2013-12-01

    Avian leukosis (AL) is one of the most harmful diseases to the poultry industry in China. The detection of the avian leukosis virus (ALV) p27 antigen plays a decisive role in the elimination of avian leukosis. To explore the influence of passaging cells on the detection rate of the ALV p27 antigen, 21 aseptic anticoagulated blood samples were collected from 21 chickens for which the cloacal swabs were positive for the p27 antigen to inoculate two sets of cell culture plates containing DF1 cells. The cells were cultured for 4 d, one set was passaged, and the other set was not. After the DF1 cells had been cultured for 9 d, the ALV p27 antigen in the supernatants of the two sets was detected by ELISA. The results showed that the p27 antigen-positive rate for the passaged cells was 71.43% (15/21), higher than that of the cells that were directly cultured, which was 42.86%. There was a strong correlation, as high as 0.928, with respect to the S/P value of the p27 antigen in the supernatant between the two sets. In conclusion, there was a strong correlation between the results for the passaged and unpassaged cells, and the passage of cells greatly improved the detection of the p27 antigen.

  20. Immunity to Avian Leukosis Virus: Where Are We Now and What Should We Do?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Min; Zhang, Xiquan

    2016-01-01

    Avian leukosis virus (ALV) is an avian oncogenic retrovirus causing enormous economic losses in the global poultry industry. Although ALV-related research has lasted for more than a century, there are no vaccines to protect chickens from ALV infection. The interaction between chickens and ALV remains not fully understood especially with regard to the host immunity. The current review provides an overview of our current knowledge of innate and adaptive immunity induced by ALV infection. More importantly, we have pointed out the unknown area involved in ALV-related studies, which is worthy of our serious exploring in future. PMID:28066434

  1. Subgroup J avian leukosis virus induced histiocytic sarcomatosis occurs only in persistently viremic, but not immunotolerized meat-type chickens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Histiocytic proliferative lesions are sporadically reported in mammalian and avian species but the etiology and pathogenesis is not clear in most cases. However, in meat-type chickens, subgroup J avian leukosis virus (ALV J)-induced histiocytic sarcomatosis (HS) has been reported at a low incidence...

  2. Development of avian sarcoma and leukosis virus-based vector-packaging cell lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoker, A.W.; Bissell, M.J. (Univ. of California, Berkeley (USA))

    1988-03-01

    The authors have constructed an avian leukosis virus derivative with a 5{prime} deletion extending from within the tRNA primer binding site to a SacI site in the leader region. The aim was to remove cis-acting replicative and/or encapsidation sequences and to use this derivative, RAV-1{Psi}{sup {minus}}, to develop vector-packaging cell lines. They show that RAV-1{Psi}{sup {minus}} can be stably expressed in the quail cell line QT6 and chicken embryo fibroblasts and that it is completely replication deficient in both cell types. Moreover, they have demonstrated that QT6-derived lines expressing RAV-1{Psi}{sup {minus}} can efficiently package four structurally different replication-defective v-src expression vectors into infectious virus, with very low or undetectable helper virus release. These RAV-{Psi}{sup {minus}}-expressing cell lines comprise the first prototype avian sarcoma and leukosis virus-based vector-packaging system. The construction of our vectors has also shown us that a sequence present within gag, thought to facilitate virus packaging, is not necessary for efficient vector expression and high virus production. They show that quantitation and characterization of replication-defective viruses can be achieved with a sensitive immunocytochemical procedure, presenting an alternative to internal selectable vector markers.

  3. Use of molecularly cloned avian leukosis virus to study antigenic variation following infection of meat-type chickens

    Science.gov (United States)

    A molecularly cloned strain of subgroup J avian leukosis virus (ALV-J) termed R5-4 was used to study antigenic variation following infection of meat-type chickens. Chickens were inoculated with R5-4 virus at either 8 days of embryonation or at 1 week of age. Each chicken was housed in a separate is...

  4. Subgroup J Avian Leukosis Virus Neutralizing Antibody Escape Variants Contribute to Viral Persistence in Meat-Type Chickens

    Science.gov (United States)

    We have previously demonstrated a high incidence of chickens with persistent viremia even in the presence of neutralizing antibodies (NAb) against the inoculated parental virus (V+A+) in commercial meat-type chickens inoculated at hatch with Subgroup J avian leukosis virus (ALV J) field isolates. I...

  5. Identification of two novel multiple recombinant avian leukosis viruses in two different lines of layer chicken.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Liming; Shen, Yanwei; Wang, Guihua; Guo, Huijun; Liu, Jianzhu; Cheng, Ziqiang

    2013-10-01

    Avian leukosis virus (ALV) is the most common oncogenetic retrovirus that emerges spontaneously as a result of recombination between exogenous viruses, exogenous viruses and endogenous viruses, and exogenous viruses and non-homologous cellular genes. In the present study, two natural recombinant avian leukosis viruses (rALVs) (LC110515-5 and LC110803-5) carrying a subgroup C gp85 gene, a subgroup E gp37 gene, and a subgroup J 3'UTR and 3'LTR were isolated from two different lines of layer flocks, Black-bone silky fowl (BSF) and commercial layer chicken, that suffered from myeloid leukosis. Although tumours were not observed in rALV-infected individual chickens, other non-neoplastic inflammatory lesions were evident. The two rALVs were cultured on DF-1 cells and identified by PCR, immunofluorescence assay and gene sequencing. The gp85 nucleotide sequence in the two isolates displayed a high identity (>95 %) with that of the gp85 gene in ALV-C, but the identity was less than 90 % with ALV-A/B/D/E and only 51 % with ALV-J. Phylogenetic analysis of the nucleotide and amino acid sequences confirmed that the two isolates were recombinant between ALV-C, ALV-E and ALV-J. Subgroup C ALV is rarely found in field cases. This report is the first to provide evidence that ALV-C has recombined with ALV-E and ALV-J in two different chicken lines. The source and characteristics of the two rALVs and ALV-C need to be further investigated.

  6. Isolation, identification, and phylogenetic analysis of two avian leukosis virus subgroup J strains associated with hemangioma and myeloid leukosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuhao; Liu, Xuemei; Liu, Haixia; Xu, Chenggang; Liao, Yalin; Wu, Xiaochan; Cao, Weisheng; Liao, Ming

    2013-10-25

    Cases of myeloid leukosis and hemangioma associated with avian leukosis virus subgroup J (ALV-J) are becoming more frequent in China in commercial layer chickens and breeders of egg-type chickens. In this study, two strains of ALV-J (SCAU11-H and SCAU11-XG) associated with hemangioma and myelocytoma were isolated from commercial broiler breeder animals in 2011. Their full-length proviral sequences were analyzed, revealing several unique genetic differences between the two isolates, and suggesting that the two viruses were derived from two distinct lineages. Strain SCAU11-H showed high sequence homology to early Chinese isolates associated with hemangioma, while strain SCAU11-XG was genetically closer to the prototype strain, HPRS-103. The complete genomic nucleotide sequences of SCAU11-H and SCAU11-XG were 7471 bp and 7727 bp in length, respectively. They shared 94.8% identity with each other, and had 94.0-96.8% nucleotide identity to ALV-J reference isolates. Homology analysis of the env, pol, and gag genes of the two isolates and other references strains showed that the gag and pol genes of the two viruses were more conserved than the env gene. In addition, the two isolates had significant deletions and substitutions in their 3'-UTR regions, compared to HPRS-103. These results suggest that the env gene and the 3'-UTR regions in these ALV-J isolates have evolved rapidly, and might be involved in the oncogenic spectrum of ALV-J. The results of this study contribute to our further study of the relationship between ALV integration patterns and multi-pathotypes associated with ALV-J.

  7. Complete genome sequence of a J subgroup avian leukosis virus isolated from local commercial broilers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hongxin; Xue, Chunyi; Ji, Jun; Chang, Shuang; Shang, Huiqin; Zhang, Lingjun; Ma, Jingyun; Bi, Yingzuo; Xie, Qingmei

    2012-11-01

    Subgroup J avian leukosis virus (ALV-J) isolate GDKP1202 was isolated from a 50-day-old local yellow commercial broiler in the Guangdong province of China in 2012. Here we report the complete genomic sequence of the GDKP1202 isolate, which caused high mortality, serious growth suppression, thymic atrophy, and liver enlargement in commercial broilers. A novel potential binding site (5'-GGCACCTCC-3') for c-myb was identified in the GDKP1202 genome. These findings will provide additional insights into the molecular characteristics in the genomes and pathogenicity of ALV-J.

  8. Gene detection, virus isolation, and sequence analysis of avian leukosis viruses in Taiwan country chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Shu-Wei; Hsu, Meng-Fang; Wang, Ching-Ho

    2013-06-01

    Avian leukosis virus (ALV) infection in Taiwan Country chickens (TCCs) was investigated by using gene detection, virus isolation, and sequence analysis. The blood samples of 61 TCC flocks at market ages from a slaughter house were screened for exogenous ALVs using polymerase chain reaction to investigate the ALV infection status. The buffy coats from three breeder and four commercial chicken flocks were cocultured with DF-1 cells to isolate the virus. The full proviral DNA genomes of two ALV isolates were sequenced, analyzed, and compared with reference ALV strains. The gene detection results showed that 60 and 43 of the 61 flocks were infected with subgroup A of ALV (ALV-A) and subgroup J of ALV (ALV-J), respectively. Virus isolation results showed that five ALV-As and two ALV-Js were isolated from those seven TCC flocks. The full sequences of the isolates showed that isolate TW-3577 possessed a myeloblastosis-associated virus 1 gp85 coding region and an ALV-J 3'-untranslated region (3'UTR) and was similar to ordinary ALV-A. However, TW-3593 was unique. The 3'UTR of this isolate displayed high identity to endogenous counterpart sequence and its gp85 was different from all subgroups. This unique ALV is common in Taiwan.

  9. Complete genome sequence of an avian leukosis virus isolate associated with hemangioma and myeloid leukosis in egg-type and meat-type chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Jun; Li, Hongxin; Zhang, Huanmin; Xie, Qingmei; Chang, Shuang; Shang, Huiqin; Ma, Jingyun; Bi, Yingzuo

    2012-10-01

    Subgroup J avian leukosis virus (ALV-J) was first isolated from meat-type chickens that developed myeloid leukosis (ML). In recent years, field cases of hemangioma (HE) or HE and ML, rather than ML alone, have been reported in commercial layer flocks exposed to ALV-J with a high incidence in China. Here we report the complete genomic sequence of an ALV-J isolate that caused both HE and ML in egg-type and meat-type chickens in China. These findings will provide additional insights into the molecular characteristics in genomes, host range, and pathogenicity of ALV-J.

  10. gga-miR-375 plays a key role in tumorigenesis post subgroup J avian leukosis virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hongxin; Shang, Huiqing; Shu, Dingming; Zhang, Huanmin; Ji, Jun; Sun, Baoli; Li, Hongmei; Xie, Qingmei

    2014-01-01

    Avian leukosis is a neoplastic disease caused in part by subgroup J avian leukosis virus J (ALV-J). Micro ribonucleic acids (miRNAs) play pivotal oncogenic and tumour-suppressor roles in tumour development and progression. However, little is known about the potential role of miRNAs in avian leukosis tumours. We have found a novel tumour-suppressor miRNA, gga-miR-375, associated with avian leukosis tumorigenesis by miRNA microarray in a previous report. We have also previously studied the biological function of gga-miR-375; Overexpression of gga-miR-375 significantly inhibited DF-1 cell proliferation, and significantly reduced the expression of yes-associated protein 1 (YAP1) by repressing the activity of a luciferase reporter carrying the 3'-untranslated region of YAP1. This indicates that gga-miR-375 is frequently downregulated in avian leukosis by inhibiting cell proliferation through YAP1 oncogene targeting. Overexpression of gga-miR-375 markedly promoted serum starvation induced apoptosis, and there may be the reason why the tumour cycle is so long in the infected chickens. In vivo assays, gga-miR-375 was significantly downregulated in chicken livers 20 days after infection with ALV-J, and YAP1 was significantly upregulated 20 days after ALV-J infection (Pleukosis tumorigenesis.

  11. Avian leukosis virus subgroup A and B infection in wild birds of Northeast China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Delong; Qin, Liting; Gao, Honglei; Yang, Bo; Liu, Wansi; Qi, Xiaole; Wang, Yongqiang; Zeng, Xiangwei; Liu, Sidang; Wang, Xiaomei; Gao, Yulong

    2013-05-03

    To analyze the status of wild birds infected with avian leukosis virus (ALV) in China, we collected 300 wild birds from various areas. Virus isolation and PCR showed that wild birds were infected by ALV-A and ALV-B. Two ALV-A and 4 ALV-B env sequences were obtained by PCR using primers designed to detect ALV-A and -B respectively. Our results showed that the gp85 genes of the 2 ALV-A strains have the highest homology with RAV-1, 99.8%, and more than 92% homology with other American strains. However, the gp85 genes of the two ALV-A strains showed slightly lower homology with Chinese strains (87.2-92.6%). Additionally, the 4 ALV-B strains have high homology with the prototype strain (RAV-2), from 99.1 to 99.4%, but they have slightly lower identity with Schmidt-Ruppin B and Prague subgroup B, from 93.3 to 98.4%. The 4 ALV-B strains showed the lowest identity with SDAU09C2 and SDAU09E3 (90%). In total, these results suggested that avian leukosis virus has infected wild birds in China.

  12. Enhanced inhibition of Avian leukosis virus subgroup J replication by multi-target miRNAs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng Qing-Wen

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Avian leukosis virus (ALV is a major infectious disease that impacts the poultry industry worldwide. Despite intensive efforts, no effective vaccine has been developed against ALV because of mutations that lead to resistant forms. Therefore, there is a dire need to develop antiviral agents for the treatment of ALV infections and RNA interference (RNAi is considered an effective antiviral strategy. Results In this study, the avian leukosis virus subgroup J (ALV-J proviral genome, including the gag genes, were treated as targets for RNAi. Four pairs of miRNA sequences were designed and synthesized that targeted different regions of the gag gene. The screened target (i.e., the gag genes was shown to effectively suppress the replication of ALV-J by 19.0-77.3%. To avoid the generation of escape variants during virus infection, expression vectors of multi-target miRNAs were constructed using the multi-target serial strategy (against different regions of the gag, pol, and env genes. Multi-target miRNAs were shown to play a synergistic role in the inhibition of ALV-J replication, with an inhibition efficiency of viral replication ranging from 85.0-91.2%. Conclusion The strategy of multi-target miRNAs might be an effective method for inhibiting ALV replication and the acquisition of resistant mutations.

  13. Spontaenous Avian Leukosis Virus-like lymphomas in specific-pathogen-free chickens inoculated with serotype 2 Marek’s disease virus

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    Chickens of Avian Disease and Oncology Laboratory (ADOL) line alv6, known to develop spontaneous avian leukosis virus (ALV)-like lymphomas at two years of age or older, were inoculated either in-ovo, or at 1 day of age with strain SB-1 of serotype 2 Marek’s disease virus (MDV). Inoculated and uninoc...

  14. Development and evaluation of an immunochromatographic strip for rapid detection of capsid protein antigen p27 of avian leukosis virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Kun; Liang, You-zhi; Yin, Li-ping; Shao, Hong-xia; Ye, Jian-qiang; Qin, Ai-jian

    2015-09-01

    A rapid immunochromatographic strip for detecting capsid protein antigen p27 of avian leukosis virus was successfully developed based on two high-affinity monoclonal antibodies. The test strip could detect not only 600pg purified recombinant p27 protein but also quantified avian leukosis virus as low as 70 TCID50, which has comparative sensitivity to the commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) kit. For the evaluation of this test strip, 1100 samples consisting of cloacal swabs, meconium collected from the earliest stool of one day old chicken and virus isolates were assessed both by the strip and by the commercial ELISA kit. The agreement between these two tests was 93.91%, 93.42% and 100%, respectively. The sensitivity and specificity of the strip were also calculated by using the ELISA kit as the standard. This immunochromatographic strip provides advantages of rapid and simple detection of capsid protein antigen p27 of avian leukosis virus, which could be applied as an on-site testing assay and used for control and eradication programs of avian leukosis disease.

  15. GADD45ß, an anti-tumor gene, inhibits avian leukosis virus subgroup J replication in chickens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avian leukosis virus subgroup J (ALV-J) is a retrovirus that induces neoplasia, hepatomegaly, immunosuppression and poor performance in chickens. The tumorigenic and pathogenic mechanisms of ALV-J remain a hot topic. To explore anti-tumor genes that confer genetic resistance to ALV-J infection in ch...

  16. NHE1 gene associated with avian leukosis virus subgroup J infection in chicken.

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    Chen, Biao; Pan, Weiling; Zhang, Liangyu; Liu, Jing; Ouyang, Hongjia; Nie, Qinghua; Zhang, Xiquan

    2014-10-01

    As a kind of binding protein, the type 1 Na(+)/H(+) exchanger (NHE1) is a receptor for the highly pathogenic Avian leukosis viruses-J subgroup (ALV-J) in chicken. In order to investigate the potential effect of chicken NHE1 gene on leukosis, we compared its expression between ALV-J-affected and -unaffected chicken, screened variations across the whole gene, and then performed association analysis with ALV-J affected/unaffected trait in three un-related chicken populations. We found that the NHE1 gene expressed in four immune tissues including spleen, bursa fabricius, liver, and thymus, and its expression was significantly up-regulated in liver and thymus of ALV-J-affected chickens (with leukosis phenotype) compared to -unaffected ones (ALV-J-negative controls). Thirty-six single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) were identified in a 6,105 bp region of the chicken NHE1 gene, giving rise to every 170 bp per SNP. Two SNP of g.4405A>G and g.5886C>G were genotyped with PCR-RFLP method. Results showed that g.4405A>G was significantly associated (P G was significantly associated (P < 0.05) with ALV-J infection in SY. These results indicated that the NHE1 gene was related to ALV-J infection in chicken.

  17. Epitope mapping of a monoclonal antibody against the Gp85 of avian leukosis virus subgroup J.

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    Sun, Miao; Yu, Duo; Mo, Hongfei; Cao, Hong; Chen, Chen; Chen, Fuyong

    2012-06-01

    Avian leukosis virus subgroup J poses a great threat to the poultry industry in China. To reduce the economic losses, a quick method for detection of ALV-J antigen is required for diagnosis and identification of the congenitally transmitting hens. In this study, we report the production and evaluation of one monoclonal antibody (MAb) suitable for achieving these goals. The gp85 gene of avian leukosis virus subgroup J CAUHM01 China isolates was subcloned into the expression vectors pGEX-6p-1 and pET28a and successfully expressed in E. coli. After immunizing BALB/c mice with recombinant His-Jgp85 protein, splenic cells from immunized mice were fused with SP2/0 myeloma cells to produce hybridomas. We isolated and characterized one ALV-J gp85-specific MAb by determining its titer, affinity and IgG subclass. In addition, we performed epitope mapping and determined the epitope for the MAb 1E3 to be 81-92 aa of ALV-J gp85 protein (LPWDPQELDILG). Bioinformatics analysis and IFA studies revealed that this epitope is conserved among all ALV-J isolates and that this antibody could serve as a useful reagent for ALV-J detection and diagnosis.

  18. gga-miR-375 plays a key role in tumorigenesis post subgroup J avian leukosis virus infection.

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    Hongxin Li

    Full Text Available Avian leukosis is a neoplastic disease caused in part by subgroup J avian leukosis virus J (ALV-J. Micro ribonucleic acids (miRNAs play pivotal oncogenic and tumour-suppressor roles in tumour development and progression. However, little is known about the potential role of miRNAs in avian leukosis tumours. We have found a novel tumour-suppressor miRNA, gga-miR-375, associated with avian leukosis tumorigenesis by miRNA microarray in a previous report. We have also previously studied the biological function of gga-miR-375; Overexpression of gga-miR-375 significantly inhibited DF-1 cell proliferation, and significantly reduced the expression of yes-associated protein 1 (YAP1 by repressing the activity of a luciferase reporter carrying the 3'-untranslated region of YAP1. This indicates that gga-miR-375 is frequently downregulated in avian leukosis by inhibiting cell proliferation through YAP1 oncogene targeting. Overexpression of gga-miR-375 markedly promoted serum starvation induced apoptosis, and there may be the reason why the tumour cycle is so long in the infected chickens. In vivo assays, gga-miR-375 was significantly downregulated in chicken livers 20 days after infection with ALV-J, and YAP1 was significantly upregulated 20 days after ALV-J infection (P<0.05. We also found that expression of cyclin E, an important regulator of cell cycle progression, was significantly upregulated (P<0.05. Drosophila inhibitor of apoptosis protein 1 (DIAP1, which is related to caspase-dependent apoptosis, was also significantly upregulated after infection. Our data suggests that gga-miR-375 may function as a tumour suppressor thereby regulating cancer cell proliferation and it plays a key role in avian leukosis tumorigenesis.

  19. Further observations on serotype 2 Marek's disease virus-induced enhancement of spontaneous avian leukosis virus-like bursal lymphomas in ALVA6 transgenic chickens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breeders of the 2009 generation of Avian Disease and Oncology Laboratory transgenic chicken line ALVA6, known to be resistant to infection with subgroups A and E avian leukosis virus (ALV), were vaccinated at hatch with a trivalent Marek's disease (MD) vaccine containing serotypes 1, 2, and 3 Marek'...

  20. Genetic susceptibility to and presence of endogenous avian leukosis viruses impose no significant impact on survival days of chickens challenged with very virulent plus Marek's disease virus

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    Chicks of distinct genotypes at the tumor virus B locus (TVB) in combination with presence or absence of endogenous avian leukosis virus ev21 gene in their genomes were examined for survival day patterns after challenge with very virulent plus Marek’s disease virus (vv+MDV) in three consecutive tria...

  1. Detection of lymphoid leukosis tumors in white leghorn chickens of line ALV6 that is resistant to subgroups A and E avian leukosis virus and maintained under specific pathogen-free conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chickens from Avian Disease and Oncology Laboratory (ADOL) line alv6 that is known to be resistant to infection with subgroups A and E avian leukosis virus (ALV) were vaccinated at hatch with a Marek’s disease (MD) vaccine containing serotypes 1, 2 and 3 MD viruses, and were maintained under specifi...

  2. Diagnosis and sequence analysis of avian leukosis virus subgroup J isolated from Chinese Partridge Shank chickens.

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    Dong, Xuan; Zhao, Peng; Li, Weihua; Chang, Shuang; Li, Jianliang; Li, Yang; Ju, Sidi; Sun, Peng; Meng, Fanfeng; Liu, Juan; Cui, Zhizhong

    2015-04-01

    The diagnosis of avian leukosis virus subgroup J (ALV-J) infection in Chinese Partridge Shank chickens was confirmed by necropsy, histopathological examinations, antibody tests, viral isolation, immunofluorescence assays, and sequence analysis. Myelocytoma, myeloma, and fibrosarcoma were simultaneously found in Partridge Shank flock with ALV-J infection. Sequence analysis of the env genes of ALV-J demonstrated that both gp85 and gp37 were highly homologous among the three strains from local chickens of those among ALV-J strains isolated from white meat-type chickens. The phylogenetic trees indicated that the three strains isolated in this study were closely related to reference strains isolated in so-called Chinese yellow chickens and some strains isolated from white meat-type chickens, both from the USA and China. The observed ALV-J infection was the first report on Partridge Shank chickens, and myelocytoma, myeloma, and fibrosarcoma were found at the same time in this batch of local chickens.

  3. COP9 signalosome subunit 6 binds and inhibits avian leukosis virus integrase.

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    Wang, Zhanxin; Xu, Aotian; Hou, Xinhui; Chen, Fuyong; Cao, Weisheng; Yu, Jieshi; Liao, Ming; Tang, Jun

    2014-10-24

    The retroviral integrase plays an essential role in the integration of reverse-transcribed retroviral cDNA into the host cell genome, and serves as an important target for anti-viral therapeutics. In this study, we identified the COP9 signalosome subunit 6 (CSN6) as a novel avian leukosis virus (ALV) integrase binding protein. Co-immunoprecipitation and GST pull-down assays showed that CSN6 bound to ALV integrase likely through direct interaction of CSN6 to the catalytic core of the integrase. We further demonstrated CSN6 inhibited integrase activity in vitro; knockdown of CSN6 in DF-1 promoted ALV production. These results indicated that CSN6 may be a negative regulator of ALV replication by binding to and inhibiting integrase. Our findings provided the insight into the integrase-based host defense system and may have implications in the development of integrase-based anti-viral strategies.

  4. Advance in Detection Methods of Avian Leukosis Virus Subgroup J%J亚群禽白血病病毒检测方法的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杭柏林; 胡建和; 李杰; 刘丽艳; 王宪文; 王丽荣

    2011-01-01

    禽白血病(AL)是目前危害中国养鸡业的肿瘤性、传染性疾病之一.近年来,J亚群禽白血病较为流行.J亚群禽白血病病毒(ALV-J)是引起肉鸡和蛋鸡J亚群禽白血病的病原.主要综述了有关ALV-J的病原学、免疫学和分子生物学检测方法的研究进展.%Avian leukosis was a tumor infection disease harmed to chicken industry of China and prevalent in decade years. Avian leukosis virus subgroup J was the pathogeny of avian leukosis subgroup J of broilers and egg chickens. This paper summarized the advance in detection methods (etiology method, immunology method and molecular biology method) of avian leukosis virus subgroup J.

  5. Development of loop-mediated isothermal amplification for rapid detection of avian leukosis virus subgroup A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yongqiang; Kang, Zhonghui; Gao, Yulong; Qin, Liting; Chen, Lei; Wang, Qi; Li, Jiukuan; Gao, Honglei; Qi, Xiaole; Lin, Huan; Wang, Xiaomei

    2011-04-01

    This study aimed to establish a loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) method for distinguishing avian leukosis virus (ALV) subgroup A from other subgroups of the virus. On the basis of the results of sequence comparison and the sequence characteristics of ALV subgroups, a LAMP method was designed to target the gp85 segment for detection of ALV-A. Under optimal reaction conditions, ALV-A LAMP produced neither cross-reactions with other major subgroups (including subgroups J, B, C, and E) nor nonspecific reactions with other common avian infectious diseases. A sensitivity test showed that this method can detect 20 copies of proviral nucleic acid sequence within 45 min, which is 100 times more sensitive than the conventional polymerase chain reaction (PCR). This method can detect subgroup A virus rapidly and the results can be assessed based on color changes. The whole reaction process can be performed without opening the lid of the reaction tube, which reduces the possibility of contamination greatly and simplifies the detection process, indicating the considerable potential of this method for in situ application in the future.

  6. Development and application of real-time PCR for detection of subgroup J avian leukosis virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Liting; Gao, Yulong; Ni, Wei; Sun, Meiyu; Wang, Yongqiang; Yin, Chunhong; Qi, Xiaole; Gao, Honglei; Wang, Xiaomei

    2013-01-01

    Subgroup J avian leukosis virus (ALV-J) is an avian retrovirus that causes severe economic losses in the poultry industry. The early identification and removal of virus-shedding birds are important to reduce the spread of congenital and contact infections. In this study, a TaqMan-based real-time PCR method for the rapid detection and quantification of ALV-J with proviral DNA was developed. This method exhibited a high specificity for ALV-J. Moreover, the detection limit was as low as 10 viral DNA copies. The coefficients of variation (CVs) of both interassay and intra-assay reproducibility were less than 1%. The growth curves of ALV-J in DF-1 cells were measured by real-time PCR, yielding a trend line similar to those determined by 50% tissue culture infective dose (TCID(50)) and p27 antigen detection. Tissue samples suspected of ALV infection were evaluated using real-time PCR, virus isolation, and routine PCR, and the positivity rates were 60.1%, 41.6% and 44.5%, respectively. Our data indicated that the real-time PCR method provides a sensitive, specific, and reproducible diagnostic tool for the identification and quantification of ALV-J for clinical diagnosis and in laboratory research.

  7. Isolation and Metagenomic Identification of Avian Leukosis Virus Associated with Mortality in Broiler Chicken

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Avian leukosis virus (ALV) belongs to the family Retroviridae and causes considerable economic losses to the poultry industry. Following an outbreak associated with high mortality in a broiler flock in northern part of Malaysia, kidney tissues from affected chickens were submitted for virus isolation and identification in chicken embryonated egg and MDCK cells. Evidence of virus growth was indicated by haemorrhage and embryo mortality in egg culture. While viral growth in cell culture was evidenced by the development of cytopathic effects. The isolated virus was purified by sucrose gradient and identified using negative staining transmission electron microscopy. Further confirmation was achieved through next-generation sequencing and nucleotide sequence homology search. Analysis of the viral sequences using the NCBI BLAST tool revealed 99-100% sequence homology with exogenous ALV viral envelope protein. Phylogenetic analysis based on partial envelope sequences showed the Malaysian isolate clustered with Taiwanese and Japanese ALV strains, which were closer to ALV subgroup J, ALV subgroup E, and recombinant A/E isolates. Based on these findings, ALV was concluded to be associated with the present outbreak. It was recommended that further studies should be conducted on the molecular epidemiology and pathogenicity of the identified virus isolate. PMID:27597865

  8. Isolation and Metagenomic Identification of Avian Leukosis Virus Associated with Mortality in Broiler Chicken

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    Faruku Bande

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Avian leukosis virus (ALV belongs to the family Retroviridae and causes considerable economic losses to the poultry industry. Following an outbreak associated with high mortality in a broiler flock in northern part of Malaysia, kidney tissues from affected chickens were submitted for virus isolation and identification in chicken embryonated egg and MDCK cells. Evidence of virus growth was indicated by haemorrhage and embryo mortality in egg culture. While viral growth in cell culture was evidenced by the development of cytopathic effects. The isolated virus was purified by sucrose gradient and identified using negative staining transmission electron microscopy. Further confirmation was achieved through next-generation sequencing and nucleotide sequence homology search. Analysis of the viral sequences using the NCBI BLAST tool revealed 99-100% sequence homology with exogenous ALV viral envelope protein. Phylogenetic analysis based on partial envelope sequences showed the Malaysian isolate clustered with Taiwanese and Japanese ALV strains, which were closer to ALV subgroup J, ALV subgroup E, and recombinant A/E isolates. Based on these findings, ALV was concluded to be associated with the present outbreak. It was recommended that further studies should be conducted on the molecular epidemiology and pathogenicity of the identified virus isolate.

  9. A recombinant avian leukosis virus subgroup j for directly monitoring viral infection and the selection of neutralizing antibodies.

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    Qi Wang

    Full Text Available Avian leukosis virus subgroup J (ALV-J has induced serious clinical outbreaks and has become a serious infectious disease of chickens in China. We describe here the creation of a recombinant ALV-J tagged with the enhanced green fluorescent protein (named rHPRS-103EGFP. We successfully utilize the rHPRS-103EGFP to visualize viral infection and for development of a simplified serum-neutralization test.

  10. A recombinant avian leukosis virus subgroup j for directly monitoring viral infection and the selection of neutralizing antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qi; Li, Xiaofei; Ji, Xiaolin; Wang, Jingfei; Shen, Nan; Gao, Yulong; Qi, Xiaole; Wang, Yongqiang; Gao, Honglei; Zhang, Shide; Wang, Xiaomei

    2014-01-01

    Avian leukosis virus subgroup J (ALV-J) has induced serious clinical outbreaks and has become a serious infectious disease of chickens in China. We describe here the creation of a recombinant ALV-J tagged with the enhanced green fluorescent protein (named rHPRS-103EGFP). We successfully utilize the rHPRS-103EGFP to visualize viral infection and for development of a simplified serum-neutralization test.

  11. Development of a novel immuno-PCR for detection of avian leukosis virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Quan; Zhang, Jianjun; Shao, Hongxia; Wan, Zhimin; Tian, Xiaoyan; Yang, Jialiang; Pang, Mayun; Qian, Kun; Gao, Wei; Wang, Chengming; Qin, Aijian; Ye, Jianqiang

    2016-10-01

    Avian leukosis virus (ALV) is an important pathogen for various neoplasms, including lymphoid, myeloid, and erythroid neoplasms, and it causes significant economic loss in the poultry industry. Several efficient methods for the detection of ALV have been reported. However, these previously developed approaches are based on either PCR or immunoassays. Here, we used a proximity ligation technique and combined PCR with the immunoassay to develop a novel immuno-PCR (Im-PCR) approach for the detection of ALV. Our data showed that the Im-PCR had high specificity and sensitivity to ALV. The Im-PCR method selectively reacted to ALV but not to the other avian viruses tested. The limit of detection of Im-PCR could reach 0.5 TCID50. Moreover, the results of Im-PCR were in agreement with results from commercial ELISA when the clinical cloaca samples were used for ALV detection. The present results demonstrate that the novel Im-PCR method can be efficiently applied to detect ALV in a clinical setting. Our data also highlight that Im-PCR may have promising applications in the diagnosis of pathogens.

  12. [Cloning and expression of gp37 gene of avian leukosis virus subgroup J].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao-Wei; Liu, Qing; Xu, Qing-Qing; Cai, Li-Ming; Wang, Zhen-Zhen; Wang, Gui-Hua; Cheng, Zi-Qiang

    2012-03-01

    The transmembrane protein (TM) encoded by gp37 gene plays a critical role when virus fusion with cell membrane occurs. Several highly conserved regions in TM are important targets for antivirus studies. Studies on structure and function of TM will provide basic information for anti-retrovirus, especially for avian leukosis virus. In the study, gp37 gene was amplified by PCR from the Chinese strain ALV-J-WS0701. The gp37 gene was cloned into pMD18-T vector, and was sequenced. Then, pFast-BacHTb-gp37 vector was constructed and expressed by baculovirus expression vector system. The expression product of gp37 gene was analyzed by indirect immunofluorescence assay and Western blot. The results showed that positive green fluorescence was present in sf9 cells infected with recombinant virus and a protein band with a molecular weight of 21kD was present in Western blot. It is concluded that gp37 gene was expressed in sf9 cells infected with recombinant virus successfully.

  13. Avian leukosis virus subgroup J triggers caspase-1-mediated inflammatory response in chick livers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xue-lan; Shan, Wen-jie; Jia, Li-juan; Yang, Xu; Zhang, Jin-jing; Wu, Ya-rong; Xu, Fa-zhi; Li, Jin-nian

    2016-04-02

    Many pathogens trigger caspase-1-mediated innate immune responses. Avian leukosis virus subgroup J (ALV-J) causes serious immunosuppression and diverse tumors in chicks. The caspase-1 inflammasome mechanism of response to ALV-J invading remains unclear. Here we investigated the expression of caspase-1, the inflammasome adaptor NLRP3, IL-1β and IL-18 in response to ALV-J infection in the liver of chick. We found caspase-1 mRNA expression was elevated at 5 dpi and peaked at 7 dpi in ALV-J infected animals. Corresponding to this, the expressions of NLRP3 and proinflammatory cytokines IL-1β and IL-18 were significantly increased at 5 or 7 dpi. In addition, caspase-1 protein expression and inflammatory cell infiltration were induced after virus infection. These results indicated that ALV-J infection could trigger the caspase-1- mediated inflammatory response in chicks. Thus, an understanding of the inflammatory responses can provide a better insight into the pathogenicity of ALV-J and a possible anti-virus target for ALV-J infection.

  14. Cell-specific targeting of lentiviral vectors mediated by fusion proteins derived from Sindbis virus, vesicular stomatitis virus, or avian sarcoma/leukosis virus

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    Marino Michael P

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ability to efficiently and selectively target gene delivery vectors to specific cell types in vitro and in vivo remains one of the formidable challenges in gene therapy. We pursued two different strategies to target lentiviral vector delivery to specific cell types. In one of the strategies, vector particles bearing a membrane-bound stem cell factor sequence plus a separate fusion protein based either on Sindbis virus strain TR339 glycoproteins or the vesicular stomatitis virus G glycoprotein were used to selectively transduce cells expressing the corresponding stem cell factor receptor (c-kit. An alternative approach involved soluble avian sarcoma/leukosis virus receptors fused to cell-specific ligands including stem cell factor and erythropoietin for targeting lentiviral vectors pseudotyped with avian sarcoma/leukosis virus envelope proteins to cells that express the corresponding receptors. Results The titers of unconcentrated vector particles bearing Sindbis virus strain TR339 or vesicular stomatitis virus G fusion proteins plus stem cell factor in the context of c-kit expressing cells were up to 3.2 × 105 transducing units per ml while vector particles lacking the stem cell factor ligand displayed titers that were approximately 80 fold lower. On cells that lacked the c-kit receptor, the titers of stem cell factor-containing vectors were approximately 40 times lower compared to c-kit-expressing cells. Lentiviral vectors pseudotyped with avian sarcoma/leukosis virus subgroup A or B envelope proteins and bearing bi-functional bridge proteins encoding erythropoietin or stem cell factor fused to the soluble extracellular domains of the avian sarcoma/leukosis virus subgroup A or B receptors resulted in efficient transduction of erythropoietin receptor or c-kit-expressing cells. Transduction of erythropoietin receptor-expressing cells mediated by bi-functional bridge proteins was found to be dependent on the dose, the

  15. Cardiac pathology and molecular epidemiology by avian leukosis viruses in Japan.

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    Sayuri Nakamura

    Full Text Available Epidemiological studies suggest that retroviruses, including human immunodeficiency virus type 1, are associated with cardiomyopathy and myocarditis, but a causal relationship remains to be established. We encountered unusual cardiomyocyte hypertrophy and mitosis in Japanese native fowls infected with subgroup A of the avian leukosis viruses (ALVs-A, which belong to the genus Alpharetrovirus of the family Retroviridae and mainly induce lymphoid neoplasm in chickens. The affected hearts were evaluated by histopathology and immunohistochemistry, viral isolation, viral genome sequencing and experimental infection. There was non-suppurative myocarditis in eighteen fowls and seven of them had abnormal cardiomyocytes, which were distributed predominantly in the left ventricular wall and showed hypertrophic cytoplasm and atypical large nuclei. Nuclear chains and mitosis were frequently noted in these cardiomyocytes and immunohistochemistry for proliferating cell nuclear antigen supported the enhancement of mitotic activity. ALVs were isolated from all affected cases and phylogenic analysis of envSU genes showed that the isolates were mainly classified into two different clusters, suggesting viral genome diversity. In ovo experimental infection with two of the isolates was demonstrated to cause myocarditis and cardiomyocyte hypertrophy similar to those in the naturally occurring lesions and cardiac hamartoma (rhabdomyoma in a shorter period of time (at 70 days of age than expected. These results indicate that ALVs cause myocarditis as well as cardiomyocyte abnormality in chickens, implying a pathogenetic mechanism different from insertional mutagenesis and the existence of retrovirus-induced heart disorder.

  16. Inhibition of avian leukosis virus subgroup J replication by miRNA targeted against env.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Zhang, Zai-Ping; Tian, Jin; Xiao, Zhi-Guang; Meng, Qing-Wen

    2013-08-01

    No effective vaccine has been developed against the subgroup J avian leukosis virus (ALV-J). The genetic diversity of ALV-J might be related to the env gene, therefore, we selected conserved sequences of the env gene and designed interference sequence. In this study, microRNAs (miRNAs) were designed and synthesized, corresponding to conserved regions of the env gene. These miRNAs were cloned into the linearized eukaryotic expression vector. The recombinant plasmids were transfected into DF-1 cells. After transfection, the cells were inoculated with ALV-J. In reporter assays, the transfection efficiency is 80% by indirect immunofluorescence (IFA). Expression of the virus envelope glycoprotein was measured by IFA and western blotting assays. The relative expression of env gene was determined using quantitative PCR. Our results show that the mi-env 231 and mi-env 1384 could effectively suppress the replication of ALV-J with an efficiency of 68.7-75.2%. These data suggest that the miRNAs targeting the env can inhibit replication of ALV-J efficiently. This finding provides evidence that miRNAs could be used as a potential tool against ALV infection.

  17. [Identification of a new subgroup of avian leukosis virus isolated from Chinese indigenous chicken breeds].

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    Wang, Xin; Zhao, Peng; Cui, Zhi-Zhong

    2012-11-01

    In order to clarify Avian leukosis virus (ALV) characteristics from Chinese native chicken breeds, three ALV JS11C1, JS11C2 and JS11C3 were isolated from Chinese native breed "luhua" by inoculation of DF1 cell culture and detection of p27 antigen. Using PCR amplification of env gene, the amplified gp85 genes were analyzed and compared to all six chicken ALV subgroups reported. The gp85 genes of these three viruses were 1 005bp in length and encoded 335 amino acids, and the gp37 genes were 609bp and encoded 203 amino acids. The homology of gp85 among these three isolated strains was 91.9%-97.0%. Comparing to 18 stains of subgroup A, B, C, D, E published in GenBank, the homology was only in the range of 77.7%-84.6%, significantly lower than the gp85 homology observed within the common chicken subgroups A (88.2%-98.5%), B (91.6%-98.8%), and E (97.9%-99.4%). The gp85 homology compared with subgroup J was only 34.2%-36.5%. These results suggested that three isolated strains from Chinese native breed "luhua" belong to a new subgroup different from all six known subgroups from Chickens, and thus designated as subgroup K.

  18. Detection and molecular characterization of J subgroup avian leukosis virus in wild ducks in China.

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    Xiangwei Zeng

    Full Text Available To assess the status of avian leukosis virus subgroup J (ALV-J in wild ducks in China, we examined samples from 528 wild ducks, representing 17 species, which were collected in China over the past 3 years. Virus isolation and PCR showed that 7 ALV-J strains were isolated from wild ducks. The env genes and the 3'UTRs from these isolates were cloned and sequenced. The env genes of all 7 wild duck isolates were significantly different from those in the prototype strain HPRS-103, American strains, broiler ALV-J isolates and Chinese local chicken isolates, but showed close homology with those found in some layer chicken ALV-J isolates and belonged to the same group. The 3'UTRs of 7 ALV-J wild ducks isolates showed close homology with the prototype strain HPRS-103 and no obvious deletion was found in the 3'UTR except for a 1 bp deletion in the E element that introduced a binding site for c-Ets-1. Our study demonstrated the presence of ALV-J in wild ducks and investigated the molecular characterization of ALV-J in wild ducks isolates.

  19. Differential expression of microRNAs in avian leukosis virus subgroup J-induced tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qi; Gao, Yulong; Ji, Xiaolin; Qi, Xiaole; Qin, Liting; Gao, Honglei; Wang, Yongqiang; Wang, Xiaomei

    2013-02-22

    Avian leukosis virus subgroup J (ALV-J) has become pandemic and induced serious clinical outbreaks in chickens in China. In particular, ALV-J induced various clinical tumors in infected chickens, which caused enormous economic losses to poultry. In this study, an infectious clone from an epidemic ALV-J Chinese isolate designated HLJ09SH01 was constructed and rescued. The rescued virus (named rHLJ09SH01) was inoculated into specific-pathogen-free (SPF) layer chickens, and infected chickens were observed for 238 days to explore the oncogenicity of rHLJ09SH01. As a result, 57.9% of rHLJ09SH01-infected chickens produced tumors. Accumulating evidence shows that microRNAs (miRNAs) have a close relationship with tumorigenesis. To gain more insight into the tumorigenesis of ALV-J, a miRNA microarray was performed as part of an investigation of changes in host miRNA expression in a liver tumor from ALV-J infected chickens. The results showed that four miRNAs were significantly differentially expressed; these data were verified using real-time PCR. Bioinformatics analysis showed the differentially expressed miRNAs to be involved in some tumorigenesis-related signaling pathways, such as the MAPK signaling pathway and the Wnt signaling pathway, which may represent a possible signaling pathway that was involved in the ALV-J-induced tumorigenesis.

  20. Cardiac pathology and molecular epidemiology by avian leukosis viruses in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Sayuri; Ochiai, Kenji; Ochi, Akihiro; Yabushita, Hiroki; Abe, Asumi; Kishi, Sayaka; Sunden, Yuji; Umemura, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    Epidemiological studies suggest that retroviruses, including human immunodeficiency virus type 1, are associated with cardiomyopathy and myocarditis, but a causal relationship remains to be established. We encountered unusual cardiomyocyte hypertrophy and mitosis in Japanese native fowls infected with subgroup A of the avian leukosis viruses (ALVs-A), which belong to the genus Alpharetrovirus of the family Retroviridae and mainly induce lymphoid neoplasm in chickens. The affected hearts were evaluated by histopathology and immunohistochemistry, viral isolation, viral genome sequencing and experimental infection. There was non-suppurative myocarditis in eighteen fowls and seven of them had abnormal cardiomyocytes, which were distributed predominantly in the left ventricular wall and showed hypertrophic cytoplasm and atypical large nuclei. Nuclear chains and mitosis were frequently noted in these cardiomyocytes and immunohistochemistry for proliferating cell nuclear antigen supported the enhancement of mitotic activity. ALVs were isolated from all affected cases and phylogenic analysis of envSU genes showed that the isolates were mainly classified into two different clusters, suggesting viral genome diversity. In ovo experimental infection with two of the isolates was demonstrated to cause myocarditis and cardiomyocyte hypertrophy similar to those in the naturally occurring lesions and cardiac hamartoma (rhabdomyoma) in a shorter period of time (at 70 days of age) than expected. These results indicate that ALVs cause myocarditis as well as cardiomyocyte abnormality in chickens, implying a pathogenetic mechanism different from insertional mutagenesis and the existence of retrovirus-induced heart disorder.

  1. Efficient method to optimize antibodies using avian leukosis virus display and eukaryotic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Changming; Pike, Gennett M; Rinkoski, Tommy A; Correia, Cristina; Kaufmann, Scott H; Federspiel, Mark J

    2015-08-11

    Antibody-based therapeutics have now had success in the clinic. The affinity and specificity of the antibody for the target ligand determines the specificity of therapeutic delivery and off-target side effects. The discovery and optimization of high-affinity antibodies to important therapeutic targets could be significantly improved by the availability of a robust, eukaryotic display technology comparable to phage display that would overcome the protein translation limitations of microorganisms. The use of eukaryotic cells would improve the diversity of the displayed antibodies that can be screened and optimized as well as more seamlessly transition into a large-scale mammalian expression system for clinical production. In this study, we demonstrate that the replication and polypeptide display characteristics of a eukaryotic retrovirus, avian leukosis virus (ALV), offers a robust, eukaryotic version of bacteriophage display. The binding affinity of a model single-chain Fv antibody was optimized by using ALV display, improving affinity >2,000-fold, from micromolar to picomolar levels. We believe ALV display provides an extension to antibody display on microorganisms and offers virus and cell display platforms in a eukaryotic expression system. ALV display should enable an improvement in the diversity of properly processed and functional antibody variants that can be screened and affinity-optimized to improve promising antibody candidates.

  2. Molecular epidemiology of avian leukosis virus subgroup J in layer flocks in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yulong; Yun, Bingling; Qin, Liting; Pan, Wei; Qu, Yue; Liu, Zaisi; Wang, Yongqiang; Qi, Xiaole; Gao, Honglei; Wang, Xiaomei

    2012-03-01

    Avian leukosis virus subgroup J (ALV-J) was first isolated from meat-type chickens in 1988. No field cases of ALV-J infection or tumors in layer chickens were observed worldwide until 2004. However, layer flocks in China have experienced outbreaks of this virus in recent years. The molecular epidemiology of ALV-J strains isolated from layer flocks was investigated. The env genes of 77.8% (21/27) of the ALV-J layer isolates with a high degree of genetic variation were significantly different from the env genes of the prototype strain of ALV-J (HPRS-103) and American and Chinese strains from meat-type chickens (designated ALV-J broiler isolates). A total of 205 nucleotides were deleted from the 3' untranslated region of 89.5% (17/19) of the ALV-J layer isolates. Approximately 94.7% (16/17) of the layer isolates contained a complete E element of 146 to 149 residues. The U3 sequences of 84.2% (16/19) of the ALV-J layer isolates displayed less than 92.5% sequence homology to those of the ALV-J broiler isolates, although the transcriptional regulatory elements that are typical of avian retroviruses were highly conserved. Several unique nucleotide substitutions in the env gene, the U3 region, and the E element of most of the ALV-J layer isolates were detected. These results suggested that the env gene, E element, and U3 region in the ALV-J layer isolates have evolved rapidly and were significantly different from those of the ALV-J broiler isolates. These findings will contribute to a better understanding of the pathogenic mechanism of layer tumor diseases induced by ALV-J.

  3. Haemangiomas, leiomyosarcoma and myeloma caused by subgroup J avian leukosis virus in a commercial layer flock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Honglei; Qin, Mei; Xiao, Yihong; Yang, Feng; Ni, Wei; Liu, Sidang

    2010-12-01

    An outbreak of simultaneously occurring haemangiomas, leiomyosarcoma and myeloma was observed in a commercial layer flock in China. The sick chickens were extremely thin and dehydrated. Scattered haemangiomas were found on the claws, breast and wings. At necropsy, haemangiomas and some other nodular tumours were also found in the internal organs. In addition, diffuse enlargement of the liver and spleen appeared in some birds. Histopathologically, haemangiomas were typically cavernous haemangiomas and haemangioendothelioma. In the diffusely swollen liver and spleen, multifocal or widespread marrow tumour cells filled with ball-like acidophilic particles in cytosol were observed, which are the characteristic pathological changes of avian myelocytomatosis. The nodular tumour cells formed by muscle bundles were of variable size, irregular shape, poorly differentiated and malaligned. Immunohistochemistry for vimentin, cytokeratin, actin (smooth muscle) and actin (sarcomeric) and Masson's staining confirmed the different cell lineage of the nodular tumour, thus leading to the diagnosis of leiomyosarcoma. The seroprevalence of avian leukosis subgroup J (ALV-J) antibodies was 13.46% (7/52), while ALV-A/B and reticuloendotheliosis virus (REV) antibodies were not detectable. The DF-1 cells inoculated by virus extracted from liver samples from 24 infected chickens were cultured and the group-specific antigen (GSA) was identified by ELISA. All samples were positive for ALV, which was further identified as ALV-J by immunofluorescence assay (IFA). PCR analysis revealed that three isolates of ALV-J proviral sequence were close to the HPRS-103 prototype strain and other Chinese field strains isolated in recent years, while one isolate (DP01) had a lower homology with them. This is the first report that ALV-J infection caused the simultaneous occurrence of haemangiomas, leiomyosarcoma and myeloma in a commercial layer flock.

  4. Generation and evaluation of avian leukosis virus subgroup J envelope glycoprotein recombinant pseudovirions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhenjie; Cui, Lina; Wang, Liang; Yang, Zhikun; Cui, Zhizhong; Chang, Weishan

    2014-06-01

    Retroviral and lentiviral vector pseudotypes (based on human immunodeficiency virus type 1, HIV-1) have been used for stable and safe gene transfer because of their broad host ranges and high mechanical strength. In the present study, a recombinant avian leukosis virus subgroup J (ALV-J) polypeptide pseudotyped with lentivirus membrane glycoproteins gp85 and gp37, HIV/env-ALV, was generated, characterized in vitro and evaluated for its ability to infect natural host cells. We optimized the newly developed micro-neutralization (MN) assay using recombinant pseudovirion HIV/env-ALV expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein and well-characterized sera from chickens with confirmed ALV-J disease or virus-free controls. HIV/env-ALV could infect CEF and DF-1 but not pk15, 293FT, MDCK or VERO E6 cells, therefore demonstrating a cellular tropism similar to the wild-type ALV-J. The MN assay indicated that the IC50 values of positive sera offered a considerable advantage in both speed and accuracy. These results suggest that this pseudotyped lentivirus is a good model for studying the functions of ALV-J env and that the MN assay is a reliable serological method for assessing antibody levels in investigating the actual status of the current ALV-J epidemic. These recombinant pseudovirions may prove to be useful for studying ALV-J biology in lower biosafety level laboratory environments, and also for the detection and quantification of neutralizing antibodies to ALV-J in a manner akin to ELISA assays, but that would also be applicable to other viruses.

  5. Evaluation of a multi-epitope subunit vaccine against avian leukosis virus subgroup J in chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Qingqing; Ma, Xingjiang; Wang, Fangkun; Li, Hongmei; Zhao, Xiaomin

    2015-12-02

    The intricate sequence and antigenic variability of avian leukosis virus subgroup J (ALV-J) have led to unprecedented difficulties in the development of vaccines. Much experimental evidence demonstrates that ALV-J mutants have caused immune evasion and pose a challenge for traditional efforts to develop effective vaccines. To investigate the potential of a multi-epitope vaccination strategy to prevent chickens against ALV-J infections, a recombinant chimeric multi-epitope protein X (rCMEPX) containing both immunodominant B and T epitope concentrated domains selected from the major structural protein of ALV-J using bioinformatics approach was expressed in Escherichia coli Rosetta (DE3). Its immunogenicity and protective efficacy was studied in chickens. The results showed that rCMEPX could elicit neutralizing antibodies and cellular responses, and antibodies induced by rCMEPX could specifically recognize host cell naturally expressed ALV-J proteins, which indicated that the rCMEPX is a good immunogen. Challenge experiments showed 80% chickens that received rCMEPX were well protected against ALV-J challenge. This is the first report of a chimeric multi-epitope protein as a potential immunogen against ALV-J.

  6. A rapid profiling assay for avian leukosis virus subgroup E proviruses in chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutherford, Katherine; McLean, Nancy; Benkel, Bernhard F

    2014-03-01

    Endogenous retroviral elements (ERVs) are prolific components of the genomes of complex species, typically occupying more sequence space than do essential, protein-encoding genes. Much of what we know today about the structure and function, as well as the evolution and pathogenic potential, of ERVs was fleshed out over several decades during the last century using the avian leukosis virus subgroup E-related (ALVE) family of endogenous retroviruses of chickens as a model system. A critical enabling factor in the elucidation of ALVE structure and function is the ability to detect and unambiguously identify specific ALVE proviral elements and to develop accurate element profiles for individual chickens under study. Currently, the most common approach for ALVE locus detection involves element-specific PCR assays carried out using primers that target host DNA near the insertion site of the provirus (i.e., the upstream and downstream flanks of the unoccupied site). Here we describe a new approach for proviral detection that exploits restriction enzyme sites in flanking DNA to develop ALVE element profiles more rapidly than with assays currently in use. Moreover, unlike element-specific PCR tests, the "profiling" assay detects novel ALVEs for which insertion sites have not yet been identified as well as previously characterized elements.

  7. Identification of a novel B-cell epitope specific for avian leukosis virus subgroup J gp85 protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaofei; Zhu, Haibo; Wang, Qi; Sun, Jiashan; Gao, Yanni; Qi, Xiaole; Wang, Yongqiang; Gao, Honglei; Gao, Yulong; Wang, Xiaomei

    2015-04-01

    Avian leukosis virus subgroup J (ALV-J) is an avian oncogenic retrovirus that has caused severe economic losses in China. Gp85 protein is the main envelope protein and the most variable structural protein of ALV-J. It is also involved in virus neutralization. In this study, a specific monoclonal antibody, 4A3, was produced against the ALV-J gp85 protein. Immunofluorescence assays showed that 4A3 could react with different strains of ALV-J, including the British prototype isolate HPRS103, the American strains, an early Chinese broiler isolate, and layer isolates. A linear epitope on the gp85 protein was identified using a series of partially overlapping fragments spanning the gp85-encoding gene and subjecting them to western blot analysis. The results indicated that (134)AEAELRDFI(142) was the minimal linear epitope that could be recognized by mAb 4A3. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) revealed that chicken anti-ALV-J sera and mouse anti-ALV-J gp85 sera could also recognize the minimal linear epitope. Alignment analysis of amino acid sequences indicated that the epitope was highly conserved among 34 ALV-J strains. Furthermore, the epitope was not conserved among subgroup A and B of avian leukosis virus (ALV). Taken together, the mAb and the identified epitope may provide valuable tools for the development of new diagnostic methods for ALV-J.

  8. Isolation, identification and evolution analysis of a novel subgroup of avian leukosis virus isolated from a local Chinese yellow broiler in South China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avian leukosis virus (ALV) causes high mortality associated with tumor formation and decreased fertility, and results in major economic losses in the poultry industry worldwide. Recently, a putative novel ALV subgroup virus named ALV-K was observed in Chinese local chickens. In this study, a novel A...

  9. Novel sequences of subgroup J avian leukosis viruses associated with hemangioma in Chinese layer hens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pan Wei

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Avian leukosis virus subgroup J (ALV-J preferentially induces myeloid leukosis (ML in meat-type birds. Since 2008, many clinical cases of hemangioma rather than ML have frequently been reported in association with ALV-J infection in Chinese layer flocks. Results Three ALV-J strains associated with hemangioma were isolated and their proviral genomic sequences were determined. The three isolates, JL093-1, SD09DP03 and HLJ09MDJ-1, were 7,670, 7,670, and 7,633 nt in length. Their gag and pol genes were well conserved, with identities of 94.5-98.6% and 97.1-99.5%, respectively, with other ALV-J strains at the amino acid level (aa, while the env genes of the three isolates shared a higher aa identity with the env genes of other hemangioma strains than with those of ML strains. Interestingly, two novel 19-bp insertions in the U3 region in the LTR and 5' UTR, most likely derived from other retroviruses, were found in all the three isolates, thereby separately introducing one E2BP binding site in the U3 region in the LTR and RNA polymerase II transcription factor IIB and core promoter motif ten elements in the 5' UTR. Meanwhile, two binding sites in the U3 LTRs of the three isolates for NFAP-1 and AIB REP1 were lost, and a 1-base deletion in the E element of the 3' UTR of JL093-1 and SD09DP03 introduced a binding site for c-Ets-1. In addition to the changes listed above, the rTM of the 3' UTR was deleted in each of the three isolates. Conclusion Our study is the first to discovery the coexistence of two novel insertions in the U3 region in the LTR and the 5' UTR of ALV-J associated with hemangioma symptoms, and the transcriptional regulatory elements introduced should be taken into consideration in the occurrence of hemangioma.

  10. Isolation and identification of a subgroup A avian leukosis virus from imported meat-type grand-parent chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qing-chan; Zhao, Dong-min; Guo, Hui-jun; Cui, Zhi-zhong

    2010-04-01

    An exogenous avian leukosis virus (ALV) strain SDAU09C1 was isolated in DF-1 cells from one of 240 imported 1-day-old white meat-type grand parent breeder chicks. Inoculation of SDAU09C1 in ALV-free chickens induced antibody reactions specific to subgroup A or B. But gp85 amino acid sequence comparisons indicated that SDAU09C1 fell into subgroup A; it had homology of 88.8%-90.3% to 6 reference strains of subgroup A, much higher compared to other subgroups including subgroup B. This is the first report for ALV of subgroup A isolated from imported breeders.

  11. An avian leukosis virus subgroup J isolate with a Rous sarcoma virus-like 5'-LTR shows enhanced replication capability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yanni; Guan, Xiaolu; Liu, Yongzhen; Li, Xiaofei; Yun, Bingling; Qi, Xiaole; Wang, Yongqiang; Gao, Honglei; Cui, Hongyu; Liu, Changjun; Zhang, Yanping; Wang, Xiaomei; Gao, Yulong

    2015-01-01

    Avian leukosis virus subgroup J (ALV-J) was first isolated from meat-producing chickens that had developed myeloid leukosis. However, ALV-J infections associated with hemangiomas have occurred in egg-producing (layer) flocks in China. In this study, we identified an ALV-J layer isolate (HLJ13SH01) as a recombinant of ALV-J and a Rous sarcoma virus Schmidt-Ruppin B strain (RSV-SRB), which contained the RSV-SRB 5'-LTR and the other genes of ALV-J. Replication kinetic testing indicated that the HLJ13SH01 strain replicated faster than other ALV-J layer isolates in vitro. Sequence analysis indicated that the main difference between the two isolates was the 5'-LTR sequences, particularly the U3 sequences. A 19 nt insertion was uniquely found in the U3 region of the HLJ13SH01 strain. The results of a Dual-Glo luciferase assay revealed that the 19 nt insertion in the HLJ13SH01 strain increased the enhancer activity of the U3 region. Moreover, an additional CCAAT/enhancer element was found in the 19 nt insertion and the luciferase assay indicated that this element played a key role in increasing the enhancer activity of the 5'-U3 region. To confirm the potentiation effect of the 19 nt insertion and the CCAAT/enhancer element on virus replication, three infectious clones with 5'-U3 region variations were constructed and rescued. Replication kinetic testing of the rescued viruses demonstrated that the CCAAT/enhancer element in the 19 nt insertion enhanced the replication capacity of the ALV-J recombinant in vitro.

  12. Genetic mutations of avian leukosis virus subgroup J strains extended their host range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yanwei; Cai, Liming; Wang, Yanming; Wei, Rongrong; He, Menglian; Wang, Shanhui; Wang, Guihua; Cheng, Ziqiang

    2014-03-01

    The genetic diversity of avian leukosis virus subgroup J (ALV-J) is determined not only by the env gene, but also by its 3' UTR and 3' LTR. They all play important roles in extending the host range and tumour development. In the present study, one ALV-J strain (ZB110604-6) from Black-Bone Silky Fowl (BSF) and three ALV-J strains (ZB110604-3/4/5) from grey partridge (GP), which bore multiple tumours and breed in one house of Farm A, were demonstrated extending their host to GP, while two other ALV-J strains (LC110515-3/4) from BSF of Farm B could not infect the embryo fibroblast of GP. The BSF is a unique species of chicken in China, while the GP is a close relative of the pheasant that previously demonstrated resistance to ALV-J. Histopathology showed that various tumours were induced by ALV-J in the two species. Phylogenetic tree analysis showed that the isolates from Farms A and B, rather than species, belong to two different clusters of ALV-J. Genetic mutations analysis revealed that the isolates obtained from Farm A showed a higher frequency of mutation in the hypervariable region 2 domain than in other variable regions of the gp85 gene. From the nucleotide alignment of the 3' UTR and 3' LTR gene, and the spectrum of tumours observed in this study, we speculate that the deletions or mutations in the redundant transmembrane region, E element and U3 (CAAT boxes, CArG box and Y box) might associate with tumour formation and development. The extension of the host range of ALV-J to the GP suggested that housing different species together provides more opportunities for ALV-J to evolve rapidly.

  13. Efficacy of an autophagy-targeted DNA vaccine against avian leukosis virus subgroup J.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Zhenkai; Huang, Jianfei; Lei, Xiaoya; Yan, Yiming; Lu, Piaopiao; Zhang, Huanmin; Lin, Wencheng; Chen, Weiguo; Ma, Jingyun; Xie, Qingmei

    2017-02-01

    Infection with the avian leukosis virus subgroup J (ALV-J) can lead to neoplastic disease in chickens, inflicting significant economic losses to the poultry industry. Recent reports have identified inhibitory effects of ALV-J on autophagy, a process involving in innate and adaptive immunity. Inspired by this connection between autophagy and immunity, we developed a novel DNA vaccine against ALV-J which includes co-administration of rapamycin to stimulate autophagy. To measure the efficacy of the developed prototype vaccine, five experimental groups of seven-day-old chickens was immunized three times at three-week intervals respectively with vector, pVAX1-gp85, pVAX1-gp85-LC3, pVAX1-gp85+rapamycin and pVAX1-gp85-LC3+rapamycin through electroporation. We then tested their antibody titers, cytokine levels and cellular immune responses. The immunoprotective efficacy of the prototype vaccines against the challenge of the ALV-J GD1109 strain was also examined. The results showed that the combination of pVAX1-gp85-LC3 and rapamycin was able to induce the highest antibody titers, and enhance interleukin(IL)-2, IL-10 and interferon (IFN)-γ expression, and the chickens immunized with the combination of pVAX1-gp85-LC3 and rapamycin showed the highest percentage of CD3+CD8+T lymphocytes. Based on our results, we suggest that stimulating autophagy can improve the efficacy of DNA vaccines and that our DNA vaccine shows the potential of being a candidate vaccine against ALV-J. This study provides a novel strategy for developing vaccines against ALV-J.

  14. Intronic deletions of tva receptor gene decrease the susceptibility to infection by subgroup A avian sarcoma and leukosis virus subgroup A

    Science.gov (United States)

    The group of avian sarcoma and leukosis virus (ASLV) in chickens contains six highly related subgroups, A to E and J. Four genetic loci, tva, tvb, tvc and tvj, encode for corresponding receptors that determine the susceptibility to the ASLV subgroups. The prevalence of ASLV in hosts may have imposed...

  15. Effect of an in ovo infection with a Dutch avian leukosis virus subgroup J isolate on the growth and immunological performance of SPF broiler chickens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Landman, W.J.M.; Post, J.; Boonstra Blom, A.G.; Buyse, J.; Elbers, A.R.W.; Koch, G.

    2002-01-01

    The effect of an in ovo infection with a Dutch isolate of avian leukosis virus subgroup J (ALV-J) on the growth of specific pathogen free (SPF) broiler chickens was analysed. During this study, possible immune suppressive effects of ALV-J were assessed by measuring delayed-type hypersensitivity with

  16. Molecular epidemiology of J-subgroup avian leukosis virus isolated from meat-type chickens in South China between 2013 and 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avian leukosis virus subgroup J (ALV-J) caused high mortality rate associated with tumor formation and decreased fertility, which resulted in major economic losses in poultry industry worldwide. To assess the status of ALV-J infection in meat-type chickens in south China, molecular epidemiology of A...

  17. Identification of a linear B-cell epitope on the avian leukosis virus P27 protein using monoclonal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaofei; Qin, Liting; Zhu, Haibo; Sun, Yingjun; Cui, Xuezhi; Gao, Yadong; Qi, Xiaole; Wang, Yongqiang; Gao, Honglei; Gao, Yulong; Wang, Xiaomei

    2016-10-01

    Avian leukosis virus (ALV) is an avian oncogenic retrovirus that can induce various clinical tumors. The capsid protein P27 is the group-specific antigen of ALV and has many viral antigen sites that are easy to detect. In this study, we produced a monoclonal antibody (mAb), 3A9, that is specific for the P27 protein. A series of partially overlapping peptides were screened to define (181)PPSAR(185) as the minimal linear epitope recognized by mAb 3A9. The identified epitope could be recognized by chicken anti-ALV and mouse anti-ALV P27 sera. The epitope was highly conserved among a number of ALV-A, ALV-B and ALV-J strains. MAb 3A9 might be a valuable tool for the development of new immunodiagnostic approaches for ALV, and the defined linear epitope might help further our understanding of the antigenic structure of the P27 protein.

  18. Isolation and characterization of emerging subgroup J avian leukosis virus associated with hemangioma in egg-type chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Hanzhang; Zhang, Henan; Ning, Zhangyong; Chen, Ruiai; Zhang, Wenyan; Qing, Aijian; Xin, Chaoan; Yu, Kangzhen; Cao, Weisheng; Liao, Ming

    2011-08-05

    Subgroup J avian leukosis virus (ALV-J), first isolated in 1989, predominantly causes myeloid leukosis (ML) in meat-type or egg-type chicken. Since 2006, the clinical cases of hemangioma rather than ML in commercial layer flocks associated with ALV-J have been reported, but it was still not clear whether the novel oncogenic ALV-J had emerged. We characterized SCAU-HN06 isolate of ALV-J from hemangioma in commercial Roman layers through animal experiment and full-length proviral genome sequence analysis. The SPF white leghorn egg-type chickens infected with SCAU-HN06 in ovo at day 11 of incubation showed an overall incidence of 56% hemangioma and 8% renal tumor throughout the 22-week trial, the mortality rate was 16%. Most genes of SCAU-HN06 isolate showed high nucleotide sequence identity to JS09GY6 which was isolated from Hy-Line Variety Brown layers suffering hemangioma. The 19-bp insertion in leader sequence and one key deletion in E element were the common features of SCAU-HN06 and JS09GY6. SCAU-HN06 and those ALV-Js associated with hemangioma, possibly recombinants of ALV-J and other avian retrovirus, may share the same ancestor.

  19. Response of white leghorn chickens to infection with avian leukosis virus subgroup J and infectious bursal disease virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Susan M; Sellers, Holly S

    2012-03-01

    The effects of viral-induced immunosuppression on the infectious status (viremia and antibody) and shedding of avian leukosis virus (ALV) were studied. Experimental white leghorn chickens were inoculated with ALV subgroup J (ALV-J) and infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) at day of hatch with the ALV-J ADOL prototype strain Hcl, the Lukert strain of IBDV, or both. Appropriate groups were exposed a second time with the Lukert strain at 2 wk of age. Serum samples were collected at 2 and 4 wk of age for IBDV antibody detection. Samples for ALV-J viremia, antibody detection, and cloacal shedding were collected at 4, 10, 18, and 30 wk of age. The experiment was terminated at 30 wk of age, and birds were necropsied and examined grossly for tumor development. Neoplasias detected included hemangiomas, bile duct carcinoma, and anaplastic sarcoma of the nerve. Control birds and IBDV-infected birds were negative for ALV-J-induced viremia, antibodies, and cloacal shedding throughout experiment. By 10 wk, ALV-J-infected groups began to develop antibodies to ALV-J. However, at 18 wk the incidence of virus isolation increased in both groups, with a simultaneous decrease in antibody levels. At 30 wk, 97% of birds in the ALV-J group were virus positive and 41% were antibody positive. In the ALV-J/IDBV group, 96% of the birds were virus positive at 30 wk, and 27% had antibodies to ALV-J. In this study, infection with a mild classic strain of IBDV did not influence ALV-J infection or antibody production.

  20. The PI3K/Akt pathway is involved in early infection of some exogenous avian leukosis viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Shao-zhen; Cao, Wei-sheng; Liao, Ming

    2011-07-01

    Avian leukosis virus (ALV) is an enveloped and oncogenic retrovirus. Avian leukosis caused by the members of ALV subgroups A, B and J has become one of the major problems challenging the poultry industry in China. However, the cellular factors such as signal transduction pathways involved in ALV infection are not well defined. In this study, our data demonstrated that ALV-J strain NX0101 infection in primary chicken embryo fibroblasts or DF-1 cells was correlated with the activity and phosphorylation of Akt. Akt activation was initiated at a very early stage of infection independently of NX0101 replication. The specific phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitors LY294002 or wortmannin could suppress Akt phosphorylation, indicating that NX0101-induced Akt phosphorylation is PI3K-dependent. ALV-A strain GD08 or ALV-B strain CD08 infection also demonstrated a similar profile of PI3K/Akt activation. Treatment of DF-1 cells with the drug 5-(N, N-hexamethylene) amiloride that inhibits the activity of chicken Na(+)/H(+) exchanger type 1 significantly reduced Akt activation induced by NX0101, but not by GD08 and CD08. Akt activation triggered by GD08 or CD08 was abolished by clathrin-mediated endocytosis inhibitor chlorpromazine. Receptor-mediated endocytosis inhibitor dansylcadaverine had a negligible effect on all ALV-induced Akt phosphorylation. Moreover, viral replication of ALV was suppressed by LY294002 in a dose-dependent manner, which was due to the inhibition of virus infection by LY294002. These data suggest that the activation of the PI3K/Akt signalling pathway by exogenous ALV infection plays an important role in viral entry, yet the precise mechanism remains under further investigation.

  1. Recombinant Marek’s Disease Virus as a Vector-Based Vaccine against Avian Leukosis Virus Subgroup J in Chicken

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongzhen Liu

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Avian leukosis virus subgroup J (ALV-J is an immunosuppressive virus that causes considerable economic losses to the chicken industry in China. However, there is currently no effective vaccine to prevent ALV-J infection. In order to reduce the losses caused by ALV-J, we constructed two effective ALV-J vaccines by inserting the ALV-J (strain JL093-1 env or gag+env genes into the US2 gene of the Marek’s disease herpesviruses (MDV by transfection of overlapping fosmid DNAs, creating two recombinant MDVs, rMDV/ALV-gag+env and rMDV/ALV-env. Analysis of cultured chicken embryo fibroblasts infected with the rMDVs revealed that Env and Gag were successfully expressed and that there was no difference in growth kinetics in cells infected with rMDVs compared with that of cells infected with the parent MDV. Chickens vaccinated with either rMDV revealed that positive serum antibodies were induced. Both rMDVs also effectively reduced the rate of positive viremia in chicken flocks challenged with ALV-J. The protective effect provided by rMDV/ALV-env inoculation was slightly stronger than that provided by rMDV/ALV-gag+env. This represents the first study where a potential rMDV vaccine, expressing ALV-J antigenic genes, has been shown to be effective in the prevention of ALV-J. Our study also opens new avenues for the control of MDV and ALV-J co-infection.

  2. Recombinant Marek’s Disease Virus as a Vector-Based Vaccine against Avian Leukosis Virus Subgroup J in Chicken

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yongzhen; Li, Kai; Gao, Yulong; Gao, Li; Zhong, Li; Zhang, Yao; Liu, Changjun; Zhang, Yanping; Wang, Xiaomei

    2016-01-01

    Avian leukosis virus subgroup J (ALV-J) is an immunosuppressive virus that causes considerable economic losses to the chicken industry in China. However, there is currently no effective vaccine to prevent ALV-J infection. In order to reduce the losses caused by ALV-J, we constructed two effective ALV-J vaccines by inserting the ALV-J (strain JL093-1) env or gag+env genes into the US2 gene of the Marek’s disease herpesviruses (MDV) by transfection of overlapping fosmid DNAs, creating two recombinant MDVs, rMDV/ALV-gag+env and rMDV/ALV-env. Analysis of cultured chicken embryo fibroblasts infected with the rMDVs revealed that Env and Gag were successfully expressed and that there was no difference in growth kinetics in cells infected with rMDVs compared with that of cells infected with the parent MDV. Chickens vaccinated with either rMDV revealed that positive serum antibodies were induced. Both rMDVs also effectively reduced the rate of positive viremia in chicken flocks challenged with ALV-J. The protective effect provided by rMDV/ALV-env inoculation was slightly stronger than that provided by rMDV/ALV-gag+env. This represents the first study where a potential rMDV vaccine, expressing ALV-J antigenic genes, has been shown to be effective in the prevention of ALV-J. Our study also opens new avenues for the control of MDV and ALV-J co-infection. PMID:27827933

  3. Recombinant Marek's Disease Virus as a Vector-Based Vaccine against Avian Leukosis Virus Subgroup J in Chicken.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yongzhen; Li, Kai; Gao, Yulong; Gao, Li; Zhong, Li; Zhang, Yao; Liu, Changjun; Zhang, Yanping; Wang, Xiaomei

    2016-11-04

    Avian leukosis virus subgroup J (ALV-J) is an immunosuppressive virus that causes considerable economic losses to the chicken industry in China. However, there is currently no effective vaccine to prevent ALV-J infection. In order to reduce the losses caused by ALV-J, we constructed two effective ALV-J vaccines by inserting the ALV-J (strain JL093-1) env or gag+env genes into the US2 gene of the Marek's disease herpesviruses (MDV) by transfection of overlapping fosmid DNAs, creating two recombinant MDVs, rMDV/ALV-gag+env and rMDV/ALV-env. Analysis of cultured chicken embryo fibroblasts infected with the rMDVs revealed that Env and Gag were successfully expressed and that there was no difference in growth kinetics in cells infected with rMDVs compared with that of cells infected with the parent MDV. Chickens vaccinated with either rMDV revealed that positive serum antibodies were induced. Both rMDVs also effectively reduced the rate of positive viremia in chicken flocks challenged with ALV-J. The protective effect provided by rMDV/ALV-env inoculation was slightly stronger than that provided by rMDV/ALV-gag+env. This represents the first study where a potential rMDV vaccine, expressing ALV-J antigenic genes, has been shown to be effective in the prevention of ALV-J. Our study also opens new avenues for the control of MDV and ALV-J co-infection.

  4. Evidence of Avian Leukosis Virus Subgroup E and Endogenous Avian Virus in Marek’s Disease Vaccines Derived from Chicken Embryo Fibroblasts

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    N.R. Dhanutha

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to detect and characterize the endogenous ALVs in cell associated MD vaccine. Chicken embryo fibroblast cell associated Marek’s disease vaccine was tested for possible contamination with Avian Leukosis Viruses (ALVs. Initially the vaccine cell lysate was tested for presence of group specific antigen (p27 of ALVs by ELISA and found positive for GSA. Subsequently total DNA and RNA was isolated from vaccine CEFs and analyzed by PCR and RT-PCR using primers specific for ALV subgroups A-E and J. Subgroup specific PCR and RT-PCR revealed that the CEFs were positive for ALV-E and negative for all other exogenous ALV subgroups (ALV-A, B, C, D and J. Envelope gp85 gene sequence alignment and phylogenetic analysis further confirmed that the ALV sequences found in CEFs of MD vaccine were belongs to endogenous ALV-E. Further this sequence has high homology with endogenous loci ev-1, ev-3 and ev-6. Amplification of genomic DNA with endogenous virus locus specific primers revealed that the CEFs of MD vaccine possess ev-1 and ev-6 and negative for ev-3, ev-9 and ev-21. In conclusion, the data in this study clearly demonstrated that the cell associated commercial MD vaccine tested was contaminated with an endogenous subgroup E and also possess ev-loci such as ev1 and ev-6.

  5. A duplex real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction for the detection and quantitation of avian leukosis virus subgroups A and B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Gang; Cai, Wenbo; Liu, Xiaolei; Niu, Chengming; Gao, Caixia; Si, Changde; Zhang, Wei; Qu, Liandong; Han, Lingxia

    2011-05-01

    Avian leukosis is a disease that is spreading widely in the world causing large economic losses to the poultry industry. In this study, a duplex quantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) assay was developed to detect and quantify avian leukosis virus subgroups A and B (ALVA/B). The assay was optimised to measure viral gp85 and chicken housekeeping (β-actin) genes. The result showed that the assay was specific for reference strains of ALVA/B subtype and no cross-reaction was detected with ALV subtypes E and J or with four other non-ALV viruses. The assay detected as few as 56 gp85 cDNA copies and was 100-fold more sensitive than a conventional RT-PCR. Seventy clinical blood samples were evaluated by both the qRT-PCR and the conventional RT-PCR assay, and the results show that 65 samples were positive by the qRT-PCR compared with 43 by the conventional RT-PCR. When this assay was used to quantify the viral load in ALV-inoculated embryos from three congenic chicken lines, the embryos from the B21 line showed the highest viral load, whereas the lowest load was found in the B5 line. This assay provides a powerful tool for quantitative detection of the ALVA/B and for the study of host genetic resistance to avian leukosis.

  6. Different quasispecies with great mutations hide in the same subgroup J field strain of avian leukosis virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Yaqing; Li, Weihua; Dong, Xuan; Liu, Jinhua; Zhao, Peng

    2013-05-01

    Blood samples were collected from a local strain of chickens associated with serious tumor cases in Shandong Province. The samples were inoculated into chicken embryo fibroblast and DF-1 cells for virus isolation and identification, respectively. The inoculated cells were screened for three common chicken tumor viruses. Nine strains of avian leukosis virus subgroup J (ALV-J) were identified, and were designated LY1201-LY1209. The env gene from the LY1201 strain was amplified and cloned. All nine resultant env clones (clones 01-09) were sequenced, and the gp85 and gp37 amino acid regions were subjected to homology analysis. Clones 01 and 03 had 10 amino acid deletions in the gp85 region compared to the other seven clones, suggesting that at least two quasispecies with obvious mutations coexist in the same field strain. Among these nine clones, three had identical gp85 and gp37 sequences, and were recognized as the dominant LY1201 quasispecies. The amino acid sequence homology of gp37 and gp85 among the nine clones was 98.5%-100.0% and 96.6%-100.0% respectively, suggesting that the gp85 region of the env gene can better display the quasispecies diversity of ALV-J than gp37.

  7. Sequence analysis for the complete proviral genome of avian leukosis virus subgroup J associated with haemangiomas, leiomyosarcomas and myelomas in layer flocks.

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    Qu, Yue; Sun, Honglei; Sun, Meiyu; Li, Delong; Qin, Liting; Gao, Yulong; Wang, Xiaomei; Liu, Sidang

    2012-09-01

    Avian leukosis virus subgroup J (ALV-J) can cause a variety of neoplasms, including mainly myeloid leukosis (myelocytomatosis) and nephromas. Other tumours, such as histiocytic sarcoma (HS), haemangiosarcoma and mesothelioma, may also develop. In a previous article we described a case in which myeloid leukosis, haemangiomas and leiomyosarcomas appeared simultaneously in a commercial layer flock with infection by ALV-J. The present research was completed to understand the molecular characteristics of the ALV-J strain that induced clinical myeloid leukosis, haemangiomas and leiomyosarcomas. Two strains of ALV-J (SDAU1001 and SDAU1002) were isolated and identified, and their full-length sequences were analysed. The complete genome nucleotide sequences of these two isolates were different in length, 7652 nt and 7636 nt, respectively. They shared 98.9% identity with each other, and 93.4% to 97.8% nucleotide identity to the reference ALV-J isolates. A 19-nucleotide repeat sequence was identified in the primer binding site (PBS) leader region of isolate SDAU1001. A base substitution mutation (base 15 C-T) in this insertion was identified. However, the identical insertion at the same site was not found in SDAU1002. The gag and pol genes of the two viruses were more conserved than the env gene. One key deletion in the E element was a common feature of SDAU1001 and SDAU1002. SDAU1001 and SDAU1002, possibly recombinants of ALV-J and another avian retrovirus, may share the same ancestor. Co-infection by SDAU1001 and SDAU1002 isolates is a possible explanation why myeloid leukosis, haemangiomas, and leiomyosarcomas appeared simultaneously in the same commercial layer flock.

  8. Subgroup J avian leukosis virus infection of chicken dendritic cells induces apoptosis via the aberrant expression of microRNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Di; Dai, Manman; Zhang, Xu; Cao, Weisheng; Liao, Ming

    2016-02-01

    Subgroup J avian leukosis virus (ALV-J) is an oncogenic retrovirus that causes immunosuppression and enhances susceptibility to secondary infection. The innate immune system is the first line of defense in preventing bacterial and viral infections, and dendritic cells (DCs) play important roles in innate immunity. Because bone marrow is an organ that is susceptible to ALV-J, the virus may influence the generation of bone marrow-derived DCs. In this study, DCs cultured in vitro were used to investigate the effects of ALV infection. The results revealed that ALV-J could infect these cells during the early stages of differentiation, and infection of DCs with ALV-J resulted in apoptosis. miRNA sequencing data of uninfected and infected DCs revealed 122 differentially expressed miRNAs, with 115 demonstrating upregulation after ALV-J infection and the other 7 showing significant downregulation. The miRNAs that exhibited the highest levels of upregulation may suppress nutrient processing and metabolic function. These results indicated that ALV-J infection of chicken DCs could induce apoptosis via aberrant microRNA expression. These results provide a solid foundation for the further study of epigenetic influences on ALV-J-induced immunosuppression.

  9. Gp85 genetic diversity of avian leukosis virus subgroup J among different individual chickens from a native flock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yang; Fu, Jiayuan; Cui, Shuai; Meng, Fanfeng; Cui, Zhizhong; Fan, Jianhua; Chang, Shuang; Zhao, Peng

    2016-10-28

    To compare the genetic diversity and quasispecies evolution of avian leukosis virus (ALV) among different individuals, 5 chickens, raised in Shandong Provice of China, were randomly selected from a local chicken flock associated with serious tumor cases. Blood samples were collected and inoculated into chicken embryo fibroblast and DF-1 cell lines for virus isolation and identification, respectively, of Marek's disease virus (MDV), reticuloendotheliosis virus (REV), and ALV. Five strains of ALV subgroup J (ALV-J) were identified, and the gp85 gene from each strain was amplified and cloned. For each strain, about 20 positive clones of gp85 gene were selected for sequence analyses and the variability of the quasispecies of the 5 strains was compared. The results showed that the nuclear acid length of gp85 gene of 5 ALV-J isolates is 921 bp, 921 bp, 924 bp, 918 bp, and 912 bp respectively, and amino acid homologies of different gp85 clones from the 5 ALV-J strains were 99.3 to 100%, 99.3 to 100%, 99.4 to 100%, 98.4 to 100%, 99.0 to 100%, respectively. The proportions of dominant quasispecies were 65.0%, 85.0%, 85.0%, 50.0%, 84.2%, respectively, and homology of the gp85 among these dominant quasispecies was 89.2 to 92.5%. These data demonstrated the composition of the ALV-J quasispecies varied among infected individuals even within the same flock, and the dominant quasispecies continued to evolve both for their proportion and gene mutation.

  10. Gene expression changes in chicken NLRC5 signal pathway associated with in vitro avian leukosis virus subgroup J infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, L L; Xu, L; Guo, X M; Li, Z T; Wan, F; Liu, X P; Chen, G H; Chang, G B

    2016-03-18

    Nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like receptors (NLRs) play a key role in the innate immune response as pattern-recognition receptors. However, the role of NLRC5, which is a member of the NLR family, in NF-κB activation and MHC-I expression remains debatable. Infection with the J group avian leukosis virus (ALV-J) can result in immunosuppression and a subsequent increase in susceptibility to secondary infection. This results in huge economic losses to the poultry industry worldwide. Using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR), we investigated the mRNA expression levels of NLRC5 signal pathway-related genes in secondary chicken embryo fibroblasts 7 days after infection with ALV-J. The results indicated that, compared with the control groups, the expression levels of TLR7, MHC-I, and IL-18 increased significantly in the infected groups at 7 days post-infection (d.p.i.). The expression levels of NLRC5 and IL-6 were conspicuously downregulated at 7 d.p.i., but the expression levels of NF-κB, STAT1, and STAT3 were not significantly altered. These results suggest that NLRC5 and some genes involved in the NLRC5 pathway play a key role in antiviral immunity, typically the response to ALV-J infection. Moreover, MHC-I expression levels vary between different cell types.

  11. Genomic diversity of the Avian leukosis virus subgroup J gp85 gene in different organs of an infected chicken

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Fanfeng; Li, Xue; Fang, Jian; Gao, Yalong; Zhu, Lilong; Xing, Guiju; Tian, Fu; Gao, Yali; Dong, Xuan; Chang, Shuang; Zhao, Peng; Liu, Zhihao

    2016-01-01

    The genomic diversity of Avian leukosis virus subgroup J (ALV-J) was investigated in an experimentally infected chicken. ALV-J variants in tissues from four different organs of the same bird were re-isolated in DF-1 cells, and their gp85 gene was amplified and cloned. Ten clones from each organ were sequenced and compared with the original inoculum strain, NX0101. The minimum homology of each organ ranged from 96.7 to 97.6%, and the lowest homology between organs was only 94.9%, which was much lower than the 99.1% homology of inoculum NX0101, indicating high diversity of ALV-J, even within the same bird. The gp85 mutations from the left kidney, which contained tumors, and the right kidney, which was tumor-free, had higher non-synonymous to synonymous mutation ratios than those in the tumor-bearing liver and lungs. Additionally, the mutational sites of gp85 gene in the kidney were similar, and they differed from those in the liver and lung, implying that organ- or tissue-specific selective pressure had a greater influence on the evolution of ALV-J diversity. These results suggest that more ALV-J clones from different organs and tissues should be sequenced and compared to better understand viral evolution and molecular epidemiology in the field. PMID:27456778

  12. Differential expression of immune-related cytokine genes in response to J group avian leukosis virus infection in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yanni; Liu, Yongzhen; Guan, Xiaolu; Li, Xiaofei; Yun, Bingling; Qi, Xiaole; Wang, Yongqiang; Gao, Honglei; Cui, Hongyu; Liu, Changjun; Zhang, Yanping; Wang, Xiaomei; Gao, Yulong

    2015-03-01

    Infection with J group avian leukosis virus (ALV-J) can result in immunosuppression and subsequently increased susceptibility to secondary infection. The innate immune system is the first line defense system in prevention of further bacterial and viral infections. Cytokines play key roles in the innate immune system. In this study, we used RT-qPCR technology to test the cytokine mRNA expression levels in various immune tissues, including the spleen, bursa of fabricius and cecal tonsil, in the days following ALV-J infection. The results indicated that in the infected group, the expression levels of interleukin-6 (IL-6), IL-18, interferon-α (IFN-α) and IFN-γ significantly increased in the spleen and reached peak levels that were thousandfolds higher than baselines at 9-12 days post-infection (d.p.i.). The levels in the bursa of fabricius slightly increased, and the levels in the cecal tonsil were not significantly altered. Moreover, the pattern of the expression of these three cytokines in the spleens of the infected group was similar to the pattern of viremia of this group. These results suggest that the spleen plays an important role in the interaction between ALV-J infection and the innate immune system. This study contributes to the understanding of innate immune responses to ALV-J infection and also elucidates the mechanisms of the pathogenicity of ALV-J in chickens.

  13. GADD45β, an anti-tumor gene, inhibits avian leukosis virus subgroup J replication in chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xinheng; Yan, Zhuanqiang; Li, Xinjian; Lin, Wencheng; Dai, Zhenkai; Yan, Yiming; Lu, Piaopiao; Chen, Weiguo; Zhang, Huanmin; Chen, Feng; Ma, Jingyun; Xie, Qingmei

    2016-10-18

    Avian leukosis virus subgroup J (ALV-J) is a retroviruses that induces neoplasia, hepatomegaly, immunosuppression and poor performance in chickens. The tumorigenic and pathogenic mechanisms of ALV-J remain a hot topic. To explore anti-tumor genes that promote resistance to ALV-J infection in chickens, we bred ALV-J resistant and susceptible chickens (F3 generation). RNA-sequencing (RNA-Seq) of liver tissue from the ALV-J resistant and susceptible chickens identified 216 differentially expressed genes; 88 of those genes were up-regulated in the ALV-J resistant chickens (compared to the susceptible ones). We screened for significantly up-regulated genes (P J resistant chickens, based on their involvement in biological signaling pathways. Functional analyses showed that overexpression of GADD45β inhibited ALV-J replication. GADD45β could enhance defense against ALV-J infection and may be used as a molecular marker to identify ALV-J infections.

  14. Genomic diversity of the Avian leukosis virus subgroup J gp85 gene in different organs of an infected chicken.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Fanfeng; Li, Xue; Fang, Jian; Gao, Yalong; Zhu, Lilong; Xing, Guiju; Tian, Fu; Gao, Yali; Dong, Xuan; Chang, Shuang; Zhao, Peng; Cui, Zhizhong; Liu, Zhihao

    2016-12-30

    The genomic diversity of Avian leukosis virus subgroup J (ALV-J) was investigated in an experimentally infected chicken. ALV-J variants in tissues from four different organs of the same bird were re-isolated in DF-1 cells, and their gp85 gene was amplified and cloned. Ten clones from each organ were sequenced and compared with the original inoculum strain, NX0101. The minimum homology of each organ ranged from 96.7 to 97.6%, and the lowest homology between organs was only 94.9%, which was much lower than the 99.1% homology of inoculum NX0101, indicating high diversity of ALV-J, even within the same bird. The gp85 mutations from the left kidney, which contained tumors, and the right kidney, which was tumor-free, had higher non-synonymous to synonymous mutation ratios than those in the tumor-bearing liver and lungs. Additionally, the mutational sites of gp85 gene in the kidney were similar, and they differed from those in the liver and lung, implying that organ- or tissue-specific selective pressure had a greater influence on the evolution of ALV-J diversity. These results suggest that more ALV-J clones from different organs and tissues should be sequenced and compared to better understand viral evolution and molecular epidemiology in the field.

  15. Detection of avian leukosis virus subgroups in albumen of commercial and native fowl eggs using RT-PCR in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajabzadeh, Mostafa; Dadras, Habibollah; Mohammadi, Ali

    2010-12-01

    Avian leukosis viruses (ALVs) belong to Alpharetrovirus genus of the family Retroviridae that are widespread in nature. Different subgroups of ALV commonly infect egg-laying hens. They are responsible for economic losses due to both mortality and depressed performance in chickens. To investigate the presence of these viruses in chickens in Iran, 560 egg albumens were selected from different farms of Fars province, Iran. These eggs were obtained from flocks of two research centers of native fowl production (60 eggs), a broiler grandparent farm (100 eggs), three broiler breeder farms (300 eggs), and a commercial layer flock (100 eggs). Firstly, for primary screening a degenerative primer set (PU1 and PU2) were used in reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Positive cases were detected in 47 of 300 (15.7%) samples from three broiler breeders, 40 of 100 (40%) samples from commercial layer, 53 of 60 (88.3%) samples from flocks of two research centers of native fowl production, and none from the samples of broiler grandparent. Then RT-PCR was undertaken with primers PA1 and PA2 on the positive samples. RT-PCR analysis detected ALVs in two of 47 (4.3%) samples from three broiler breeders, 13 of 40 (32.5%) samples from commercial layer, and 19 of 53 (35.8%) samples from flocks of two research centers of native fowl production. The sequencing results showed that subgroup E of ALV was the most detected virus among chicken eggs and subgroup B was more prevalent in the eggs of native fowls. This is the first report of the ALV subgroup B and E in egg albumen in Iran.

  16. Purification of rabbit IgG, obtention of sheep anti rabbit IgG and their use in radioimmunoassay of avian leukosis virus p15

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Higuchi, Tomoko; Ogata, Hiroe; Veiga, Silvio Sanches; Nogueira, Zelia Maria [Instituto de Quimica, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Souza Felippe, Julia Maria Martins de [Instituto Adolfo Lutz, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Div. de Virus

    1988-01-01

    Immunoglobulin from rabbit serum was purified by ammonium sulphate precipitation followed by chromatography on DEA-cellulose and gel filtration in Sephadex G-200. The efficiency of all steps was followed by protein determination and profiles in sodium dodecyl-sulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Sheeps were immunized with purified IgG. The deep anti-rabbit IgG titre was evaluated by double immuno diffusion gel plates. The system rabbit serum vs sheep anti-rabbit IgG serum was used as precipitating system in radioimmunoassay of the retrovirus immunogens, in this case, p15 of avian leukosis virus. (author). 19 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  17. Synergetic effects of subgroup J avian leukosis virus and reticuloendotheliosis virus co-infection on growth retardation and immunosuppression in SPF chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Xuan; Ju, Sidi; Zhao, Peng; Li, Yang; Meng, Fanfeng; Sun, Peng; Cui, Zhizhong

    2014-08-27

    To further understand the effect of co-infection of subgroup J avian leukosis virus (ALV-J) and reticuloendotheliosis virus (REV) in specific-pathogen-free (SPF) white leghorn chickens, the experiment was made to study the pathogenicity, the weight of body and immune organs, response to newcastle disease virus (NDV) and avian influenza virus subtype H9 (AIV-H9) vaccination. Chickens were randomly divided into four groups, which includes injection groups (REV, ALV-J, REV plus ALV-J), and negative control group. The pathogenesis experiments indicated that chickens co-infected with REV and ALV-J had significantly higher mortality rate than those of the chickens infected with REV or ALV-J alone (P0.05) on bursa and thymus over body wt ratios, however, chickens co-infected with REV and ALV-J had significantly lower titers than REV-infected chickens and ALV-J-infected chickens on HI antibody titers to ND and AIV-H9 after vaccination (P<0.05). These findings suggested that the co-infection of REV and ALV-J caused more serious growth retardation and immunosuppression in SPF chickens.

  18. MicroRNA-23b Promotes Avian Leukosis Virus Subgroup J (ALV-J) Replication by Targeting IRF1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhenhui; Chen, Biao; Feng, Min; Ouyang, Hongjia; Zheng, Ming; Ye, Qiao; Nie, Qinghua; Zhang, Xiquan

    2015-05-18

    Avian leukosis virus subgroup J (ALV-J) can cause several different leukemia-like proliferative diseases in the hemopoietic system of chickens. Here, we investigated the transcriptome profiles and miRNA expression profiles of ALV-J-infected and uninfected chicken spleens to identify the genes and miRNAs related to ALV-J invasion. In total, 252 genes and 167 miRNAs were differentially expressed in ALV-J-infected spleens compared to control uninfected spleens. miR-23b expression was up-regulated in ALV-J-infected spleens compared with the control spleens, and transcriptome analysis revealed that the expression of interferon regulatory factor 1 (IRF1) was down-regulated in ALV-J-infected spleens compared to uninfected spleens. A dual-luciferase reporter assay showed that IRF1 was a direct target of miR-23b. miR-23b overexpression significantly (P = 0.0022) decreased IRF1 mRNA levels and repressed IRF1-3'-UTR reporter activity. In vitro experiments revealed that miR-23b overexpression strengthened ALV-J replication, whereas miR-23b loss of function inhibited ALV-J replication. IRF1 overexpression inhibited ALV-J replication, and IRF1 knockdown enhanced ALV-J replication. Moreover, IRF1 overexpression significantly (P = 0.0014) increased IFN-β expression. In conclusion, these results suggested that miR-23b may play an important role in ALV-J replication by targeting IRF1.

  19. Genetic Diversity of NHE1, Receptor for Subgroup J Avian Leukosis Virus, in Domestic Chicken and Wild Anseriform Species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markéta Reinišová

    Full Text Available J subgroup avian leukosis virus (ALV-J infects domestic chicken, jungle fowl, and turkey and enters the host cell through a receptor encoded by tvj locus and identified as Na+/H+ exchanger 1 (NHE1. The resistance to ALV-J in a great majority of examined galliform species was explained by deletions or substitutions of the critical tryptophan 38 in the first extracellular loop of NHE1, and genetic polymorphisms around this site predict the susceptibility or resistance of a given species or individual. In this study, we examined the NHE1 polymorphism in domestic chicken breeds and documented quantitative differences in their susceptibility to ALV-J in vitro. In a panel of chicken breeds assembled with the aim to cover the maximum variability encountered in domestic chickens, we found a completely uniform sequence of NHE1 extracellular loop 1 (ECL1 without any source of genetic variation for the selection of ALV-J-resistant poultry. In parallel, we studied the natural polymorphisms of NHE1 in wild ducks and geese because of recent reports on ALV-J positivity in feral Asian species. In anseriform species, we demonstrate a specific and highly conserved critical ECL1 sequence without any homologue of tryptophan 38 in accordance with the resistance of duck cells to prototype ALV-J. Last, we demonstrated that the new Asian strains of ALV-J have not evolved their envelope glycoprotein to the entry the duck cells. Our results contribute substantially to the current discussion of possible heterotransmission of ALV-J and its spill-over into the wild ducks and geese.

  20. Seroprevalence of Avian Leukosis Virus Antigen Using ELISA Technique in Exotic Broilers and Nigerian Local Chickens in Zaria, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. A. Sani

    Full Text Available In an attempt to determine the seroprevalence of avian leukosis virus (ALV in exotic broiler chickens and Nigerian local chickens in Zaria, Nigeria, a total of 600 sera (300 from exotic broiler chickens and 300 from Nigerian local chickens, obtained from the live bird market in Zaria, Nigeria, were tested for ALV p27 antigen by the antigen capture-enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ac-ELISA technique. The age range of the Nigerian local chickens sampled in this study was 6 – 24 months, while that of the exotic broiler chickens used in this study was 2-3 months. Fourteen out of the 300 sera obtained from the exotic broiler chickens tested positive to ALV p27 antigen, which represents 4.70%, while 180 of the 300 Nigerian local chicken sera were confirmed positive to the antigen, representing 60.00%. Thirteen (92.86% of the fourteen sera from the exotic broiler chickens were lowly positive (ELISA Units range of 10-20% to ALV p27 antigen, while only one (7.14% serum sample was moderately positive to ALV p27 antigen with an ELISA Unit of 29.33%. Of the 180 sera from the Nigerian local chickens that tested positive to ALV p27 antigen , 79 (43.89% were lowly positive with ELISA Units ranging from 10.67% to 21.33%, while 101 (56.11% serum samples were moderately positive to ALV p27 antigen with ELISA Units ranging from 28.0% to 73.33%. A higher seroprevalence of ALV was detected in Nigerian local chickens than the exotic broiler chickens. [Vet. World 2011; 4(8.000: 345-348

  1. Synergy of subgroup J avian leukosis virus and Eimeria tenella to increase pathogenesis in specific-pathogen-free chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Ning; Wang, Qi; Shi, Wenyan; Han, Linzhen; Wang, Jiazhong; Ma, Xingjiang; Li, Hongmei; Wang, Fangkun; Su, Shuai; Zhao, Xiaomin

    2016-09-01

    To investigate the effects of co-infections of subgroup J avian leukosis virus (ALV-J) and Eimeria tenella on the pathogenesis in specific-pathogen-free (SPF) white leghorn chickens, groups of chickens were infected with ALV-J strain NX0101 at one day of age or with E. tenella at 14 days of age or both. The control group was left uninfected and was mock-inoculated with phosphate buffer saline (PBS). Mortality rates, body weights, cecal lesions, and viremia of infected chickens in each group were evaluated. Immune status was evaluated by measuring several parameters: immune organ weight/body weight index, specific humoral responses to inactivated NDV vaccine and to inoculated E. tenella, proportions of blood CD3+CD4+ and CD3+CD8α+ lymphocytes and transcriptional levels of cytokines in blood and cecal tonsils. The results show that co-infections of ALV-J and E. tenella induced a higher mortality rate and a lower body weight in SPF chickens compared to single-pathogen infection. In co-infected chickens, ALV-J accelerated the disease symptoms induced by E. tenella, and the E. tenella extended the ALV-J viremia. Thymus atrophy, decrease in the humoral response levels to pathogens and the NDV vaccine, modifications in the blood lymphocyte sub-populations and transcriptional cytokine disorders were found in co-infected chickens compared to chickens infected with one pathogen alone and to controls. We underline a synergy between ALV-J and E. tenella that results in increasing pathogenesis in SPF chickens.

  2. Evaluation of a chimeric multi-epitope-based DNA vaccine against subgroup J avian leukosis virus in chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Qingqing; Cui, Ning; Ma, Xingjiang; Wang, Fangkun; Li, Hongmei; Shen, Zhiqiang; Zhao, Xiaomin

    2016-07-19

    The prokaryotic expressed recombinant chimeric multi-epitope protein X (rCMEPX) had been evaluated with good immunogenicity and protective efficacy against subgroup J avian leukosis virus (ALV-J) in our previous study. In the present research, we cloned the chimeric multi-epitope gene X into the eukaryotic expression vector pVAX1 to evaluate its potency as a DNA vaccine. The purified recombinant gp85 protein and rCMEPX were used as positive controls and a DNA prime-protein boost strategy was also studied. Six experimental groups of 7-day-old chickens (20 per group) were immunized intramuscularly three times at 2weeks interval with PBS, gp85, rCMEPX, pVAX1, pVAX-X and pVAX-X+rCMEPX respectively. The antibody titers and cellular immune responses were assayed after immunization. The efficacy of immunoprotection against the challenge of ALV-J NX0101 strain was also examined. The results showed that the DNA vaccine could elicit both neutralizing antibodies and cellular responses. Immune-challenge experiments showed good protection efficacy against ALV-J infection. Particularly, the regimen involving one priming pVAX-X and twice recombinant rCMEPX boosting, induced the highest antibody titers in all immunized groups. Our results suggest that the constructed chimeric multi-epitope DNA has potential for a candidate vaccine against ALV-J when used in proper prime-boost combinations. The data presented here may provide an alternative strategy for vaccine design in chicken ALV-J prevention.

  3. Genetic Diversity of NHE1, Receptor for Subgroup J Avian Leukosis Virus, in Domestic Chicken and Wild Anseriform Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinišová, Markéta; Plachý, Jiří; Kučerová, Dana; Šenigl, Filip; Vinkler, Michal; Hejnar, Jiří

    2016-01-01

    J subgroup avian leukosis virus (ALV-J) infects domestic chicken, jungle fowl, and turkey and enters the host cell through a receptor encoded by tvj locus and identified as Na+/H+ exchanger 1 (NHE1). The resistance to ALV-J in a great majority of examined galliform species was explained by deletions or substitutions of the critical tryptophan 38 in the first extracellular loop of NHE1, and genetic polymorphisms around this site predict the susceptibility or resistance of a given species or individual. In this study, we examined the NHE1 polymorphism in domestic chicken breeds and documented quantitative differences in their susceptibility to ALV-J in vitro. In a panel of chicken breeds assembled with the aim to cover the maximum variability encountered in domestic chickens, we found a completely uniform sequence of NHE1 extracellular loop 1 (ECL1) without any source of genetic variation for the selection of ALV-J-resistant poultry. In parallel, we studied the natural polymorphisms of NHE1 in wild ducks and geese because of recent reports on ALV-J positivity in feral Asian species. In anseriform species, we demonstrate a specific and highly conserved critical ECL1 sequence without any homologue of tryptophan 38 in accordance with the resistance of duck cells to prototype ALV-J. Last, we demonstrated that the new Asian strains of ALV-J have not evolved their envelope glycoprotein to the entry the duck cells. Our results contribute substantially to the current discussion of possible heterotransmission of ALV-J and its spill-over into the wild ducks and geese.

  4. Identification of a variant antigenic neutralizing epitope in hypervariable region 1 of avian leukosis virus subgroup J.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Minbo; Zhou, Defang; Li, Gen; Guo, Huijun; Liu, Jianzhu; Wang, Guihua; Zheng, Qiankun; Cheng, Ziqiang

    2016-03-08

    Avian leukosis virus subgroup J (ALV-J) is a hypervariable oncogenic retrovirus that causes great economic loss in poultry. Antigenic variations in the variable regions make the development of an effective vaccine a challenging task. In the present study, we identified a variant antigenic neutralizing epitope using reverse vaccinology methods. First, we predicted the B-cell epitopes in gp85 gene of ALV-J strains by DNAman and bioinformatics. Fourteen candidate epitopes were selected and linked in tandem with glycines or serines as a multi-epitope gene. The expressed protein of multi-epitope gene can induce high-titer antibody that can recognize nature ALV-J and neutralize the infectivity of ALV-J strains. Next, we identified a high effective epitope using eight overlapping fragments of gp85 gene reacting with mAb 2D5 and anti-multi-epitope sera. The identified epitope contained one of the predicted epitopes and localized in hyervariable region 1 (hr1), indicating a variant epitope. To better understand if the variants of the epitope have a good antigenicity, we synthesized four variants to react with mAb 2D5 and anti-ALV-J sera. The result showed that all variants could react with the two kinds of antibodies though they showed different antigenicity, while could not react with ALV-J negative sera. Thus, the variant antigenic neutralizing epitope was determined as 137-LRDFIA/E/TKWKS/GDDL/HLIRPYVNQS-158. The result shows a potential use of this variant epitopes as a novel multi-epitope vaccine against ALV-J in poultry.

  5. Heptad repeat 2-based peptides inhibit avian sarcoma and leukosis virus subgroup a infection and identify a fusion intermediate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Netter, Robert C; Amberg, Sean M; Balliet, John W; Biscone, Mark J; Vermeulen, Arwen; Earp, Laurie J; White, Judith M; Bates, Paul

    2004-12-01

    Fusion proteins of enveloped viruses categorized as class I are typified by two distinct heptad repeat domains within the transmembrane subunit. These repeats are important structural elements that assemble into the six-helix bundles characteristic of the fusion-activated envelope trimer. Peptides derived from these domains can be potent and specific inhibitors of membrane fusion and virus infection. To facilitate our understanding of retroviral entry, peptides corresponding to the two heptad repeat domains of the avian sarcoma and leukosis virus subgroup A (ASLV-A) TM subunit of the envelope protein were characterized. Two peptides corresponding to the C-terminal heptad repeat (HR2), offset from one another by three residues, were effective inhibitors of infection, while two overlapping peptides derived from the N-terminal heptad repeat (HR1) were not. Analysis of envelope mutants containing substitutions within the HR1 domain revealed that a single amino acid change, L62A, significantly reduced sensitivity to peptide inhibition. Virus bound to cells at 4 degrees C became sensitive to peptide within the first 5 min of elevating the temperature to 37 degrees C and lost sensitivity to peptide after 15 to 30 min, consistent with a transient intermediate in which the peptide binding site is exposed. In cell-cell fusion experiments, peptide inhibitor sensitivity occurred prior to a fusion-enhancing low-pH pulse. Soluble receptor for ASLV-A induces a lipophilic character in the envelope which can be measured by stable liposome binding, and this activation was found to be unaffected by inhibitory HR2 peptide. Finally, receptor-triggered conformational changes in the TM subunit were also found to be unaffected by inhibitory peptide. These changes are marked by a dramatic shift in mobility on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, from a subunit of 37 kDa to a complex of about 80 kDa. Biotinylated HR2 peptide bound specifically to the 80-kDa complex

  6. Distribution of viral antigen gp85 and provirus in various tissues from commercial meat-type and experimental white leghorn line 0 chickens with different subgroup J avian leukosis virus infection profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Immunohistochemistry (IHC) and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) were used to test for the presence of subgroup J avian leukosis virus (ALV J) envelope antigen gp85 and provirus, respectively in various tissues (adrenal gland, bone marrow, gonad, heart, kidney, liver, lung, pancreas, proventriculus, s...

  7. An Evaluation of the Infection Status and Source of Subgroup J Avian Leukosis Virus in Cloned Free-Range Layers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Pei-pei; LIU Shao-qiong; WANG Jian; WANG Bo; ZHAO Cheng-di; ZHANG Yong-guang; SUN Shu-hong

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, subgroup J avian leukosis virus (ALV-J) has been found to frequently infect layers in China. This virus is responsible for economic losses due to both mortality and decreased performance in chickens. In this study, 45-d-old cloned free-range layers were suspected to be infected with ALV and other immunosuppressive diseases because their feathers were unkempt and their growth rate was impaired. To estimate the infection status and determine the source of ALV-J in the flock, 30 cloacal swabs were randomly collected to measure the p27 antigen level by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Among the birds that were tested, 87%(26/30) were positive. In addition, 6 anticoagulant blood samples were aseptically collected at random from the flock when the layers were 60 d old. These samples were centrifuged to obtain the leukocytes, which were then used to inoculate chicken embryo fibroblast (CEF) cells for the identification of ALV-J by indirect immunofluorescence (IFA). Of the samples tested, 100%(6/6) were positive. The flock’s production performance was also investigated, and 10 layers were necropsied to evaluate pathological changes at 115 d of age. The flock never laid eggs even though they reached the age of the first laying (110 d). Furthermore, there were pathological changes present, including atrophy of the thymus and bursa of Fabricius, undeveloped ovaries, glandular stomach haemorrhage, and hepatosplenomegaly. Paraffin-embedded sections of intumescent liver and spleen were prepared for antigen localisation using IFA. Positive signals were prevalent in paraffin-embedded sections of the intumescent liver and spleen. Furthermore, provirus DNA was extracted from 4 cloned free-range layers, and 2 paternal parents (HR native cocks), and the gp85 gene of ALV-J was amplified by PCR to analyse the genetic variation. The results of the autogenous variation analysis showed that the 6 strains were 98.5-99.7%homologous. This study indicated that

  8. The avian retrovirus avian sarcoma/leukosis virus subtype A reaches the lipid mixing stage of fusion at neutral pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Earp, Laurie J; Delos, Sue E; Netter, Robert C; Bates, Paul; White, Judith M

    2003-03-01

    We previously showed that the envelope glycoprotein (EnvA) of avian sarcoma/leukosis virus subtype A (ASLV-A) binds to liposomes at neutral pH following incubation with its receptor, Tva, at >or=22 degrees C. We also provided evidence that ASLV-C fuses with cells at neutral pH. These findings suggested that receptor binding at neutral pH and >or=22 degrees C is sufficient to activate Env for fusion. A recent study suggested that two steps are necessary to activate avian retroviral Envs: receptor binding at neutral pH, followed by exposure to low pH (W. Mothes et al., Cell 103:679-689, 2000). Therefore, we evaluated the requirements for intact ASLV-A particles to bind to target bilayers and fuse with cells. We found that ASLV-A particles bind stably to liposomes in a receptor- and temperature-dependent manner at neutral pH. Using ASLV-A particles biosynthetically labeled with pyrene, we found that ASLV-A mixes its lipid envelope with cells within 5 to 10 min at 37 degrees C. Lipid mixing was neither inhibited nor enhanced by incubation at low pH. Lipid mixing of ASLV-A was inhibited by a peptide designed to prevent six-helix bundle formation in EnvA; the same peptide inhibits virus infection and EnvA-mediated cell-cell fusion (at both neutral and low pHs). Bafilomycin and dominant-negative dynamin inhibited lipid mixing of Sindbis virus (which requires low pH for fusion), but not of ASLV-A, with host cells. Finally, we found that, although EnvA-induced cell-cell fusion is enhanced at low pH, a mutant EnvA that is severely compromised in its ability to support infection still induced massive syncytia at low pH. Our results indicate that receptor binding at neutral pH is sufficient to activate EnvA, such that ASLV-A particles bind hydrophobically to and merge their membranes with target cells. Possible roles for low pH at subsequent stages of viral entry are discussed.

  9. Immunoregulatory effects of Taishan Pinus massoniana pollen polysaccharide on chicks co-infected with avian leukosis virus and Bordetella avium early in ovo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Fanxia; Xue, Cong; Wu, Cun; Zhao, Xue; Qu, Tinghe; He, Xiaohua; Guo, Zhongkun; Zhu, Ruiliang

    2014-04-01

    In recent years, co-infection of chicken embryos with immunosuppressive viruses and bacteria occurs with an annually increasing frequency. Consequently, studies on new and safe immunoregulators, especially plant polysaccharides, have become a popular topic in the poultry industry. In the present study, we selected 300 specific pathogen free embryonated eggs, which were injected with subgroup B avian leukosis virus (ALV-B) and Bordetella avium (B. avium) to establish an artificial co-infection model. The chicks that hatched from these co-infected embryonated eggs were treated with Taishan Pinus massoniana pollen polysaccharide (TPPPS). Results indicated that relevant indices in the co-infection group were significantly lower than that in B. avium-only group. Furthermore, pathogenicity of B. avium was exacerbated, with the chicks exhibiting decreased body weights. The TPPPS groups exhibited gradual improvements in immune function and developmental status. Therefore, in terms of improving immunologic function and production performance, TPPPS could be used as immunoregulator for immune responses.

  10. Genetic diversity and phylogenetic analysis of glycoprotein gp85 of avian leukosis virus subgroup J wild-bird isolates from Northeast China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Lili; Zeng, Xiangwei; Hua, Yuping; Gao, Qi; Fan, Zhaobin; Chai, Hongliang; Wang, Qi; Qi, Xiaole; Wang, Yongqiang; Gao, Honglei; Gao, Yulong; Wang, Xiaomei

    2014-07-01

    Avian leukosis virus subgroup J (ALV-J), first isolated in 1989, preferentially infects meat-type birds. Chinese layer flocks have experienced outbreaks of this virus since 2008. To analyze the status of ALV-J infection in wild birds in China, 585 wild birds collected from three provinces of Northeast China from 2010 to 2012 were tested, and six ALV-J strains were isolated for the first time. Furthermore, the gp85 genes of the six strains were amplified, cloned, and sequenced. The results indicated that two different ALV-J strains coexisted in Chinese wild birds from 2010 to 2012. These results not only expand the epidemiological data available for ALV-J and provide necessary information for the further understanding of the evolution of ALV-J, but they also highlight the potential role of wild-bird migration in the spread of ALV-J.

  11. Differentially expressed genes in a flock of Chinese local-breed chickens infected with a subgroup J avian leukosis virus using suppression subtractive hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Guiping; Zheng, Maiqing; Chen, Jilan; Wen, Jie; Wu, Chunmei; Li, Wenjuan; Liu, Libo; Zhang, Yuan

    2010-01-01

    Avian leukosis virus subgroup J (ALV-J) is a new type of virus that mainly induces myeloid leukosis (ML) in chickens. To further elucidate the pathogenesis of ALV-J infection and tumor development, expression profiles from the bone marrow tissue of 15 infected and 18 non-infected birds from a local-breed poultry-farm under naturally infected conditions, were analyzed by suppression-subtractive hybridization. The birds were diagnosed as ML+ (or ML-) by specific ALV-J detection methods, involving serological tests for antigens and antibodies, and RT-PCR to detect viral RNA. A total of 59 partial gene sequences were revealed by differential screening of 496 forward and 384 reverse subtracted cDNA clones. Of these, 22 identified genes, including 8 up-regulated and 14 down-regulated, were related to immune functions, these genes being, MHC B-G antigen, translationally-controlled tumor protein (TPT1/TPTC), transferrin and ferritin, hemoglobin and Carbonic anhydrase. Four of the down-regulated genes were selected for further analysis, in view of their predicted roles in infection and immunity by real-time qRT-PCR, using RNA collected from the same birds as those used for SSH. The four genes were expressed at significantly lower levels (p < 0.001) in ALV-J infected birds than in non-infected ones.

  12. Differentially expressed genes in a flock of Chinese local-breed chickens infected with a subgroup J avian leukosis virus using suppression subtractive hybridization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guiping Zhao

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Avian leukosis virus subgroup J (ALV-J is a new type of virus that mainly induces myeloid leukosis (ML in chickens. To further elucidate the pathogenesis of ALV-J infection and tumor development, expression profiles from the bone marrow tissue of 15 infected and 18 non-infected birds from a local-breed poultry-farm under naturally infected conditions, were analyzed by suppression-subtractive hybridization. The birds were diagnosed as ML+ (or ML- by specific ALV-J detection methods, involving serological tests for antigens and antibodies, and RT-PCR to detect viral RNA. A total of 59 partial gene sequences were revealed by differential screening of 496 forward and 384 reverse subtracted cDNA clones. Of these, 22 identified genes, including 8 up-regulated and 14 down-regulated, were related to immune functions, these genes being, MHC B-G antigen, translationally-controlled tumor protein (TPT1/TPTC, transferrin and ferritin, hemoglobin and Carbonic anhydrase. Four of the down-regulated genes were selected for further analysis, in view of their predicted roles in infection and immunity by real-time qRT-PCR, using RNA collected from the same birds as those used for SSH. The four genes were expressed at significantly lower levels (p < 0.001 in ALV-J infected birds than in non-infected ones.

  13. The long view: 40 years of avian leukosis research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, L N; Nair, V

    2012-01-01

    The present review is aimed at the non-specialist reader and is one of a number being written on important diseases of poultry to celebrate the 40th anniversary of the birth of Avian Pathology, the journal of the World Veterinary Poultry Association. The diseases of the avian leukosis complex have a number of features of distinction. They were the first neoplastic diseases in any species to be shown, 100 years ago, to be transmissible and caused by viruses, and have consequently been studied extensively by biomedical scientists as models for the role of viruses in cancer. They also became, from around the 1920s, the major cause of mortality and economic loss to the developed poultry industry, and were studied by agricultural scientists searching to understand and control them. The remit of the review is to cover research carried out over the 40 years since 1971, when the journal was founded. In this review on avian leukosis, an introductory summary is given of knowledge acquired over the preceding 60 years. Subsequently a selection is provided of discoveries, both fundamental and more applied, that seem to us to be of particular importance and interest. Much of the work was carried out by biomedical scientists interested in cancer. Probably the most significant was the discovery in the avian retroviruses of oncogenes that cause leukosis and other tumours and of their origin from proto-oncogenes in normal cells. These oncogenes are involved in cancer in many species, including chickens and humans. Other work was performed by agricultural scientists interested in poultry disease. Interests of the two groups have overlapped, particularly as a result of a shift of emphasis to molecular biology research.

  14. Quantitative iTRAQ LC-MS/MS Proteomics Reveals the Proteome Profiles of DF-1 Cells after Infection with Subgroup J Avian Leukosis Virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaofei Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Avian leukosis virus subgroup J (ALV-J is an avian oncogenic retrovirus that can induce various clinical tumors and has caused severe economic losses in China. To improve our understanding of the host cellular responses to virus infection and the pathogenesis of ALV-J infection, we applied isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ labeling coupled with multidimensional liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry to detect the protein changes in DF-1 cells infected and mock-infected with ALV-J. A total of 75 cellular proteins were significantly changed, including 33 upregulated proteins and 42 downregulated proteins. The reliability of iTRAQ-LC MS/MS was confirmed via real-time PCR. Most of these proteins were related to the physiological functions of metabolic processes, biosynthetic processes, responses to stimuli, protein binding, signal transduction, cell cytoskeleton, and so forth. We also found some proteins that play important roles in apoptosis and oncogenicity. The differentially expressed proteins identified may provide valuable information to elucidate the pathogenesis of virus infection and virus-host interactions.

  15. Diagnosis of Avian Leukosis Virus Subgroup J Infection in Luhua Chickens%芦花鸡J亚群白血病的综合诊断

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李宏民; 刘蒙达; 孙洪磊; 肖一红; 刘思当

    2010-01-01

    @@ 1989年,Pavne[1]圾其同事首次从肉种鸡群中分离出禽J亚群白血病病毒(avian leukosis virus subtype J,ALV-J).最初ALV-J主要引起成年肉鸡以骨髓细胞瘤为主的白血病,感染鸡群发生肿瘤,生产性能降低,死亡率增高,药费增加,鸡群有很高的发病率和死亡率,死亡高峰时每月死亡率可达6%,严重影响肉鸡业的健康发展[2-3].

  16. Identification of Avian Leukosis Virus Using Polymerase Chain Reaction and Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism(PCR/RFLP)%PCR/RFLP鉴别禽白血病病毒

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘公平; 刘福安; 赵振芬

    2001-01-01

    用PCR方法从禽白血病病毒(avian leukosis virus,ALV)亚群毒株RAV-1、RAV-2感染或未感染的SPF鸡胚成纤维细胞(CEF)分别扩增出1.2 kb基因片段。RAV-1囊膜基因可被BglⅡ分为2条相近的600 bp片段,RAV-2囊膜基因被BamHⅠ分为2条约600 bp片段,对照组基因片段(内源性病毒)不被BglⅡ和BamHⅠ切割。结果显示,ALV囊膜基因的PCR/RFLP可用于诊断禽白血病和鉴别不同的ALV毒株。

  17. Contamination rate of Avian Leukosis viruses among commercial Marek's Disease vaccines in Assiut, Egypt market using Reverse Transcriptase-Polymerase Chain Reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moemen A. Mohamed

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Avian leukosis viruses (ALVs in poultry may induce a variety of deleterious effects including tumors, increased mortalities, growth retardation and decrease in egg size and production that led to considerable economic losses. The identification of avian leukosis viruses (ALVs in imported Marek’s disease (MD vaccines has raised concern about transmission of these retroviruses to vaccine recipients esp. poultry breeding stocks, so Egypt as one of importing countries requires freedom of infection with ALVs in such vaccines. Subgroup specific RT-PCR was undertaken on isolated RNA from 13 obtained commercial MD vaccines using six pairs of primers that correspond to envelope glycoprotein gene (gp85 which determines possible contamination with the six ALV subgroups: A, B, C, D, E, and J. The results indicated that RT-PCR assay for ALV-gp85 subgroup-E was positive for eight out of thirteen (61.5% tested MD vaccines, while primers designed to detect subgroup A and J ALVs were positive for five out of thirteen (38.5% and two out of thirteen (7.7% respectively among examined vaccines. No ALVs was detected in 3/13 (23.07% of commercially examined vaccines by using any of six primer pairs. Finally, the using of RT-PCR assay provides us a new, sensitive approach for identifying ALVs as a contaminant agent that will help greatly in applying this method for equipped labs as a quality control measure for testing delivered MD vaccines before its administration in poultry breeding stocks as well eradication programs through identifying infected birds. [Vet. World 2010; 3(1.000: 8-12

  18. Rescue of avian leukosis subgroup-J-associated acutely transforming viruses carrying different lengths of the v-fps oncogene and analysis of their tumorigenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yixin; Fang, Lichun; Li, Jianliang; Li, Yang; Cui, Shuai; Sun, Xiaolong; Chang, Shuang; Zhao, Peng; Cui, Zhizhong

    2016-12-01

    In our previous study, six subgroup J strains of avian leukosis virus (ALV-J)-associated acutely transforming viruses carrying different lengths of the v-fps oncogene, designated as Fu-J and Fu-J1-5, were isolated and characterized from fibrosarcomas in ALV-J-infected chickens. In the present study, the oncogenic potential of Fu-J and Fu-J1-5 was investigated using a reverse genetics technique. Six replication-defective viruses, named rFu-J and rFu-J1-5, were rescued with the replication-competent rescued ALV-J strain rSDAU1005 as a helper virus by co-transfection of chicken embryo fibroblast monolayers with infectious clone plasmids. Experimental bird studies were performed, demonstrating that only the rescued rFu-J virus carrying the complete v-fps oncogene with rSDAU1005 as the helper virus could induce acute fibrosarcoma after inoculation in specific-pathogen-free (SPF) chickens. These results provide direct evidence that the replication-defective acutely transforming Fu-J virus, with the complete v-fps oncogene, was associated with acute fibrosarcoma in chickens infected with ALV-J in the field, as reported previously.

  19. Effects of polysaccharide on chicks co-infected with Bordetella avium and Avian leukosis virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Fanxia; Xue, Cong; Wu, Cun; Zhao, Xue; Qu, Tinghe; He, Xiaohua; Guo, Zhongkun; Zhu, Ruiliang

    2014-08-30

    Chicks' co-infection with immunosuppressive virus and bacteria seriously threaten the development of the poultry industry. In this study, a model was established in which chicks were injected with either subgroup B ALV (ALV-B)+Bordetella avium (B. avium), or ALV-B+B. avium+Taishan Pinus massoniana pollen polysaccharide (TPPPS), or B. avium only, or B. avium+TPPPS. The data showed that the group injected with ALV-B and B. avium exhibited significant inhibition of the immune function and therefore increased pathogenicity compared with the group injected with B. avium-only. Application of TPPPS effectively alleviated immunosuppression, and body weights increased sharply in the TPPPS groups compared with non-TPPPS groups. To some extent, TPPPS may reduce the proliferation of ALV-B. These results suggest that Pinus pollen polysaccharides are beneficial treating co-infections with immunosuppressive virus and bacteria and therefore have potential for development into safe and effective immunoregulator.

  20. Isolation, identification, and gp85 characterization of a subgroup A avian leukosis virus from a contaminated live Newcastle Disease virus vaccine, first report in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Peng; Dong, Xuan; Cui, Zhizhong

    2014-09-01

    To identify if any exogenous avian leukosis virus (ALV) exists in a live vaccine of poultry according to the directives of the Ministry of Agriculture of the People's Republic of China, a live vaccine strain of the Newcastle disease virus (NDV) was neutralized using an anti-NDV antibody, and was subsequently used to inoculate DF-1 cells to investigate the presence of exogenous ALV. The DF-1 cells were cultured for 21 d and subsequently screened using an ELISA for the p27 antigen of the ALV. An exogenous ALV, designated ALV-NDVP4, was identified. The nucleotide sequence of the gp85 gene of the ALV-NDVP4 was compared with those of the various subgroups of the ALV. The amino acid sequence identities for the predicted gp85 of the ALV-NDVP4 and those of the ALV reference strains ranged from 88.2 to 99.5% for the 12 of the subgroup A strains of ALV (ALV-A) and from 82.7 to 87.4% for the B, C, D, and E subgroup strains. The amino acid sequence identities for the gp85 of the ALV-NDVP4 and those of the subgroup J reference strains ranged from 48.7 to 49.9%. The ALV-NDVP4 shared the highest level of homology with the SDAU09C3 strain of ALV-A, which was isolated in China, suggesting a common origin. This is the first report of ALV-A contamination in a live vaccine for poultry in China. Our findings highlight the need for improved monitoring methods for poultry vaccine production.

  1. Development and application of a multiplex PCR method for rapid differential detection of subgroup A, B, and J avian leukosis viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Qi; Yun, Bingling; Wang, Qi; Jiang, Lili; Zhu, Haibo; Gao, Yanni; Qin, Liting; Wang, Yongqiang; Qi, Xiaole; Gao, Honglei; Wang, Xiaomei; Gao, Yulong

    2014-01-01

    Avian leukosis virus (ALV) subgroups A, B, and J are very common in poultry flocks and have caused serious economic losses in recent years. A multiplex PCR (mPCR) method for the detection of these three subgroups was developed and optimized in this study. We first designed a common forward primer, PF, and three downstream primers, AR, BR, and JR, which can amplify 715 bp for subgroup A, 515 bp for subgroup B, and 422 bp for subgroup J simultaneously in one reaction. The mPCR method produced neither cross-reactions with other subgroups of ALVs nor nonspecific reactions with other common avian viruses. The detection limit of the mPCR was as low as 1 × 10(3) viral DNA copies of each of the three subgroups. In animal experiments, the mPCR detected ALVs 2 to 4 days earlier than did virus isolation from whole-blood samples and cloaca swabs. Furthermore, a total of 346 clinical samples (including 127 tissue samples, 86 cloaca swabs, 59 albumen samples, and 74 whole-blood samples) from poultry flocks with suspected ALV infection were examined by mPCR, routine PCR, and virus isolation. The positive sample/total sample ratios for ALV-A, ALV-B, and ALV-J were 48% (166/346) as detected by mPCR and 48% (166/346) as detected by routine PCR. However, the positive sample/total sample ratio detected by virus isolation was 40% (138/346). The results of the mPCR and routine PCR were confirmed by sequencing the specific fragments. These results indicate that the mPCR method is rapid, specific, sensitive, and convenient for use in epidemiological studies of ALV, clinical detection of ALV, and ALV eradication programs.

  2. Genomic sequence analysis and biological characteristics of a rescued clone of avian leukosis virus strain JS11C1, isolated from indigenous chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Ning; Su, Shuai; Chen, Zimeng; Zhao, Xiaomin; Cui, Zhizhong

    2014-11-01

    The strain JS11C1, a member of a putative new subgroup of avian leukosis virus (ALV) that is different from all six known subgroups from chickens based on Gp85 amino acid sequence comparison, was isolated from Chinese native chicken breeds in 2012. In order to further study the genome structure, biological characteristics, and the evolutionary relationship of the virus with others of known subgroups from infected chickens, we determined the complete genome sequence, constructed an infectious clone of ALV strain JS11C1, and performed comparative analysis using the whole genome sequence or elements with that of other ALVs available in GenBank. The results showed that the full-length sequence of the JS11C1 DNA provirus genome was 7707 bp, which is consistent with a genetic organization typical of a replication-competent type C retrovirus lacking viral oncogenes. The rescued infectious clone of JS11C1 showed similar growth rate and biological characteristics to its original virus. All the comparison analyses based on whole genomes support the opinion that the new isolates are relatively distantly related to any known subgroups of ALVs and might be classified as a new subgroup.

  3. The critical time of avian leukosis virus subgroup J-mediated immunosuppression during early stage infection in specific pathogen-free chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Feng; Wang, Xiaowei; Chen, Hongbo; Liu, Jianzhu; Cheng, Ziqiang

    2011-09-01

    The critical time of avian leukosis virus subgroup J (ALV-J)-mediated immunosuppression was determined by body weight, relative immune organ weight, histopathology, and presence of group specific antigen and antibodies in specific pathogen-free (SPF) chickens. CD4(+) and CD8(+) cell activity in the spleen, total and differential leukocyte counts in blood, and viral RNA levels in spleen were measured. Significant growth suppression was observed in the two ALV-J-infected groups. A strong immune response by infected groups was present in spleen at 2-weeks-of-age, but after 4-weeks-of-age, the response decreased quickly. The thymus and bursa showed persistent immunosuppression until 4-weeks-of-age. Proliferation of fibroblasts and dendritic cells were observed in immune organs at 4- and 5-weeks-of-age. However, the granulocyte cell number was markedly lower in the infected groups than in the control group. In group 1 (day 1 infection) CD4(+) cells increased during the second week but significantly decreased during the fourth week, while group 2 (day 7 infection) showed the opposite effect. Viral RNA increased significantly by the fourth week. These data identify 3~4 weeks post-infection as the key time at which the ALV-J virus exerts its immunosuppressive effects on the host.

  4. The hr1 and fusion peptide regions of the subgroup B avian sarcoma and leukosis virus envelope glycoprotein influence low pH-dependent membrane fusion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angeline Rose Babel

    Full Text Available The avian sarcoma and leukosis virus (ASLV envelope glycoprotein (Env is activated to trigger fusion by a two-step mechanism involving receptor-priming and low pH fusion activation. In order to identify regions of ASLV Env that can regulate this process, a genetic selection method was used to identify subgroup B (ASLV-B virus-infected cells resistant to low pH-triggered fusion when incubated with cells expressing the cognate TVB receptor. The subgroup B viral Env (envB genes were then isolated from these cells and characterized by DNA sequencing. This led to identification of two frequent EnvB alterations which allowed TVB receptor-binding but altered the pH-threshold of membrane fusion activation: a 13 amino acid deletion in the host range 1 (hr1 region of the surface (SU EnvB subunit, and the A32V amino acid change within the fusion peptide of the transmembrane (TM EnvB subunit. These data indicate that these two regions of EnvB can influence the pH threshold of fusion activation.

  5. Molecular epidemiology of J-subgroup avian leukosis virus isolated from meat-type chickens in southern China between 2013 and 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Wencheng; Li, Xinjian; Dai, Zhenkai; Zhang, Xinheng; Chang, Shuang; Zhao, Peng; Zhang, Huanmin; Chen, Feng; Xie, Qingmei

    2016-11-01

    Members of avian leukosis virus subgroup J (ALV-J) cause various diseases associated with tumor formation and decreased fertility, resulting in major economic losses in the poultry industry worldwide. To assess the status of ALV-J infection in meat-type chickens in southern China, the molecular epidemiology of ALV-J strains was investigated. A total of 265 clinical samples collected from southern China from 2013 to 2014 were investigated in this study for the presence of ALV-J, which resulted in 12 virus isolates. Phylogenetic analysis showed that 91.7 % (11/12) of the ALV-J isolates have possessed high homology to Chinese layer isolates and belong to one subgroup. One of the ALV isolates (designated GD1411-1) was relatively closely related to the ALV-J broiler isolates, indicating that the GD1411-1 isolate might be a transition strain. Several unique nucleotide substitutions in gp85 and the U3 region were detected in all 12 ALV-J isolates. This study provides some interesting information on the molecular characterization of ALV-J isolates. These findings will be beneficial for understanding of the pathogenic mechanism of ALV-J infection.

  6. Avian leukosis virus subgroup J induces VEGF expression via NF-κB/PI3K-dependent IL-6 production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yanni; Zhang, Yao; Yao, Yongxiu; Guan, Xiaolu; Liu, Yongzhen; Qi, Xiaole; Wang, Yongqiang; Liu, Changjun; Zhang, Yanping; Gao, Honglei; Nair, Venugopal; Wang, Xiaomei; Gao, Yulong

    2016-12-06

    Avian leukosis virus subgroup J (ALV-J) is an oncogenic virus causing hemangiomas and myeloid tumors in chickens. Interleukin-6 (IL-6) is a multifunctional pro-inflammatory interleukin involved in many types of cancer. We previously demonstrated that IL-6 expression was induced following ALV-J infection in chickens. The aim of this study is to characterize the mechanism by which ALV-J induces IL-6 expression, and the role of IL-6 in tumor development. Our results demonstrate that ALV-J infection increases IL-6 expression in chicken splenocytes, peripheral blood lymphocytes, and vascular endothelial cells. IL-6 production is induced by the ALV-J envelope protein gp85 and capsid protein p27 via PI3K- and NF-κB-mediated signaling. IL-6 in turn induced expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-A and its receptor, VEGFR-2, in vascular endothelial cells and embryonic vascular tissues. Suppression of IL-6 using siRNA inhibited the ALV-J induced VEGF-A and VEGFR-2 expression in vascular endothelial cells, indicating that the ALV-J-induced VEGF-A/VEGFR-2 expression is mediated by IL-6. As VEGF-A and VEGFR-2 are important factors in oncogenesis, our findings suggest that ALV-J hijacks IL-6 to promote tumorigenesis, and indicate that IL-6 could potentially serve as a therapeutic target in ALV-J infections.

  7. A 205-nucleotide deletion in the 3' untranslated region of avian leukosis virus subgroup J, currently emergent in China, contributes to its pathogenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qi; Gao, Yulong; Wang, Yongqiang; Qin, Liting; Qi, Xiaole; Qu, Yue; Gao, Honglei; Wang, Xiaomei

    2012-12-01

    In the past 5 years, an atypical clinical outbreak of avian leukosis virus subgroup J (ALV-J), which contains a unique 205-nucleotide deletion in its 3' untranslated region (3'UTR), has become epidemic in chickens in China. To determine the role of the 205-nucleotide deletion in the pathogenicity of ALV-J, a pair of viruses were constructed and rescued. The first virus was an ALV-J Chinese isolate (designated HLJ09SH01) containing the 205-nucleotide deletion in its 3'UTR. The second virus was a chimeric clone in which the 3'UTR contains a 205-nucleotide sequence corresponding to a region of the ALV-J prototype virus. The replication and pathogenicity of the rescued viruses (rHLJ09SH01 and rHLJ09SH01A205) were investigated. Compared to rHLJ09SH01A205, rHLJ09SH01 showed a moderate growth advantage in vitro and in vivo, in addition to exhibiting a higher oncogenicity rate and lethality rate in layers and broilers. Increased vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A) and vascular endothelial growth receptor subtype 2 (VEGFR-2) expression was induced by rHLJ09SH01 more so than by rHLJ09SH01A205 during early embryonic vascular development, but this increased expression disappeared when the expression levels were normalized to the viral levels. This finding suggests that the expression of VEGF-A and VEGFR-2 is associated with viral replication and may also represent a novel molecular mechanism underlying the oncogenic potential of ALV-J. Overall, our findings not only indicate that the unique 205-nucleotide deletion in the ALV-J genome occurred naturally in China and contributes to increased pathogenicity but also point to the possible mechanism of ALV-J-induced oncogenicity.

  8. Isolation, identification and evolution analysis of a novel subgroup of avian leukosis virus isolated from a local Chinese yellow broiler in South China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xinjian; Lin, Wencheng; Chang, Shuang; Zhao, Peng; Zhang, Xinheng; Liu, Yang; Chen, Weiguo; Li, Baohong; Shu, Dingming; Zhang, Huanmin; Chen, Feng; Xie, Qingmei

    2016-10-01

    Avian leukosis virus (ALV) causes high mortality associated with tumor formation and decreased fertility, and results in major economic losses in the poultry industry worldwide. Recently, a putative novel ALV subgroup virus named ALV-K was observed in Chinese local chickens. In this study, a novel ALV strain named GD14LZ was isolated from a Chinese local yellow broiler in 2014. The proviral genome was sequenced and phylogenetically analyzed. The replication ability and pathogenicity of this virus were also evaluated. The complete proviral genome sequence of GD14LZ was 7482 nt in length, with a genetic organization typical of replication-competent type C retroviruses lacking viral oncogenes. Sequence analysis showed that the gag, pol and gp37 genes of GD14LZ have high sequence similarity to those of other ALV strains (A-E subgroups), especially to those of ALV-E. The gp85 gene of the GD14LZ isolate showed a low sequence similarity to those other ALV strains (A-E subgroups) but showed high similarity to strains previously described as ALV-K. Phylogenetic analysis of gp85 also suggested that the GD14LZ isolate was related to ALV-K strains. Further study showed that this isolate replicated more slowly and was less pathogenic than other ALV strains. These results indicate that the GD14LZ isolate belongs to the novel subgroup ALV-K and probably arose by recombination of ALV-K with endogenous viruses with low replication and pathogenicity. This virus might have existed in local Chinese chickens for a long time.

  9. Evolution of Avian Tumor Viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virus-induced neoplastic diseases of poultry, namely Marek’s disease (MD), induced by a herpesvirus, and the avian leukosis and reticuloendotheliosis induced by retroviruses, can cause significant economic losses from tumor mortality as well as poor performance. Successful control of MD is and has ...

  10. Low pH is required for avian sarcoma and leukosis virus Env-dependent viral penetration into the cytosol and not for viral uncoating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnard, Richard J O; Narayan, Shakti; Dornadula, Geethanjali; Miller, Michael D; Young, John A T

    2004-10-01

    A novel entry mechanism has been proposed for the avian sarcoma and leukosis virus (ASLV), whereby interaction with specific cell surface receptors activates or primes the viral envelope glycoprotein (Env), rendering it sensitive to subsequent low-pH-dependent fusion triggering in acidic intracellular organelles. However, ASLV fusion seems to proceed to a lipid mixing stage at neutral pH, leading to the suggestion that low pH might instead be required for a later stage of viral entry such as uncoating (L. J. Earp, S. E. Delos, R. C. Netter, P. Bates, and J. M. White. J. Virol. 77:3058-3066, 2003). To address this possibility, hybrid virus particles were generated with the core of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), a known pH-independent virus, and with subgroups A or B ASLV Env proteins. Infection of cells by these pseudotyped virions was blocked by lysosomotropic agents, as judged by inhibition of HIV-1 DNA synthesis. Furthermore, by using HIV-1 cores that contain a Vpr-beta-lactamase fusion protein (Vpr-BlaM) to monitor viral penetration into the cytosol, we demonstrated that virions bearing ASLV Env, but not HIV-1 Env, enter the cytosol in a low-pH-dependent manner. This effect was independent of the presence of the cytoplasmic tail of ASLV Env. These studies provide strong support for the model, indicating that low pH is required for ASLV Env-dependent viral penetration into the cytosol and not for viral uncoating.

  11. Role of gga-miR-221 and gga-miR-222 during Tumour Formation in Chickens Infected by Subgroup J Avian Leukosis Virus

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    Zhenkai Dai

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Subgroup J avian leukosis virus (ALV-J causes a neoplastic disease in infected chickens. Differential expression patterns of microRNAs (miRNAs are closely related to the formation and growth of tumors. (1 Background: This study was undertaken to understand how miRNAs might be related to tumor growth during ALV-J infection. We chose to characterize the effects of miR-221 and miR-222 on cell proliferation, migration, and apoptosis based on previous microarray data. (2 Methods: In vivo, the expression levels of miR-221 and miR-222 were significantly increased in the liver of ALV-J infected chickens (p < 0.01. Over-expression of gga-miR-221 and gga-miR-222 promoted the proliferation, migration, and growth of DF-1 cells, and decreased the expression of BCL-2 modifying factor (BMF making cells more resistant to apoptosis. (3 Results: Our results suggest that gga-miR-221 and gga-miR-222 may be tumour formation relevant gene in chicken that promote proliferation, migration, and growth of cancer cells, and inhibit apoptosis. BMF expression was significantly reduced in vivo 70 days after ALV-J infection. They may also play a pivotal role in tumorigenesis during ALV-J infection.

  12. Mutations in and Expression of the Tumor Suppressor Gene p53 in Egg-Type Chickens Infected With Subgroup J Avian Leukosis Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Q; Yulong, G; Liting, Q; Shuai, Y; Delong, L; Yubao, L; Lili, J; Sidang, L; Xiaomei, W

    2015-11-01

    To investigate the molecular mechanisms of the oncogenic effects of avian leukosis virus subgroup J (ALV-J), we examined mutations in and the expression of p53 in the myelocytomas distributed in the liver, spleen, trachea, and bone marrow, as well as in fibrosarcomas in the abdominal cavity and hemangiomas in skin from chickens that were naturally or experimentally infected with ALV-J. Two types of mutations in the p53 gene were detected in myelocytomas of both the experimentally infected and the naturally infected chickens and included point mutations and deletions. Two of the point mutations have not been reported previously. Partial complementary DNA clones with a 122-bp deletion in the p53 gene ORF and a 15-bp deletion in the C-terminus were identified in the myelocytomas. In addition, moderate expression of the mutant p53 protein was detected in the myelocytomas that were distributed in the liver, trachea, spleen, and bone marrow. Mutant p53 protein was not detected in the subcutaneous hemangiomas or in the abdominal fibrosarcomas associated with natural and experimental ALV-J infection, respectively. These results identify mutations associated with abnormal expression of p53 in ALV-J-associated myelocytomas, suggesting a role in tumorigenesis.

  13. Role of gga-miR-221 and gga-miR-222 during Tumour Formation in Chickens Infected by Subgroup J Avian Leukosis Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Zhenkai; Ji, Jun; Yan, Yiming; Lin, Wencheng; Li, Hongxin; Chen, Feng; Liu, Yang; Chen, Weiguo; Bi, Yingzuo; Xie, Qingmei

    2015-12-11

    Subgroup J avian leukosis virus (ALV-J) causes a neoplastic disease in infected chickens. Differential expression patterns of microRNAs (miRNAs) are closely related to the formation and growth of tumors. (1) BACKGROUND: This study was undertaken to understand how miRNAs might be related to tumor growth during ALV-J infection. We chose to characterize the effects of miR-221 and miR-222 on cell proliferation, migration, and apoptosis based on previous microarray data. (2) METHODS: In vivo, the expression levels of miR-221 and miR-222 were significantly increased in the liver of ALV-J infected chickens (p < 0.01). Over-expression of gga-miR-221 and gga-miR-222 promoted the proliferation, migration, and growth of DF-1 cells, and decreased the expression of BCL-2 modifying factor (BMF) making cells more resistant to apoptosis. (3) RESULTS: Our results suggest that gga-miR-221 and gga-miR-222 may be tumour formation relevant gene in chicken that promote proliferation, migration, and growth of cancer cells, and inhibit apoptosis. BMF expression was significantly reduced in vivo 70 days after ALV-J infection. They may also play a pivotal role in tumorigenesis during ALV-J infection.

  14. Infection of chicken bone marrow mononuclear cells with subgroup J avian leukosis virus inhibits dendritic cell differentiation and alters cytokine expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Di; Qiu, Qianqian; Zhang, Xu; Dai, Manman; Qin, Jianru; Hao, Jianjong; Liao, Ming; Cao, Weisheng

    2016-10-01

    Subgroup J avian leukosis virus (ALV-J) is an oncogenic retrovirus known to induce tumor formation and immunosuppression in infected chickens. One of the organs susceptible to ALV-J is the bone marrow, from which specialized antigen-presenting cells named dendritic cells (BM-DCs) are derived. Notably, these cells possess the unique ability to induce primary immune responses. In the present study, a method of cultivating and purifying DCs from chicken bone marrow in vitro was established to investigate the effects of ALV-J infection on BM-DC differentiation or generation. The results indicated that ALV-J not only infects the chicken bone marrow mononuclear cells but also appears to inhibit the differentiation and maturation of BM-DCs and to trigger apoptosis. Moreover, substantial reductions in the mRNA expression of TLR1, TLR2, TLR3, MHCI, and MHCII and in cytokine production were detected in the surviving BM-DCs following ALV-J infection. These findings indicate that ALV-J infection disrupts the process of bone marrow mononuclear cell differentiation into BM-DCs likely via altered antigen presentation, resulting in a downstream immune response in affected chickens.

  15. Preliminary Eradication for Avian leukosis Virus- J Subgroup in Wuhua Chicken%五华鸡J亚群禽白血病的初步净化

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李柔; 盛昌树; 徐前明; 陈兴勇; 耿照玉

    2015-01-01

    禽白血病是由白血病/肉瘤病毒群引起的禽类多种肿瘤型疾病的总称。该病目前尚未有有效的商品化疫苗,控制禽白血病最主要手段是病原体的净化。试验选用繁昌某五华种鸡场父母代鸡群为研究对象,前后5次采集血样共3059份,子代1日龄雏鸡肛门棉拭子采集样本1262份。ELISA 法对该群体进行了 J-亚群禽白血病(Avian leukosis virus-J subgroup, ALV-J)的抗原、抗体筛查,ALV p27抗原检测试剂盒检测了子代1日龄胎粪中 ALV p27含量。分析 ELISA检测 ALV-J 阳性率表明,种鸡 ALV-J 阳性率较高,达40%;五华鸡保种场的子代雏鸡第1~4批 ALV-J 阳性率分别为9.09%、5.53%、1.42%、1.30%。由此可见,该场五华鸡父母代鸡群经过1个世代,4批次子代的净化,取得较为理想的效果。分析结果可为后期 J 亚群禽白血病的持续净化提供基础数据。%Avian leukosis virus (ALV) is the most common oncogenetic retrovirus that emerges spontaneously as a result of recombination between exogenous viruses, exogenous viruses and endogenous viruses, and exogenous viruses and non-homologous cellular genes. While there are no effective commercialized vaccines, pathogen eradication might be more operational. Parental group from Fanchang Wuhua breed conservation station were used for pathogen eradication, 5 batches with a total of 3059 blood samples were collected during July 2012 to April 2013. In addition, 1262 anal swab samples from 1 day old chicks were also collected. Antigen and antibody of ALV-J from blood samples were screened using ELISA method. Anal swab samples were also detected using ALV p27 antigen detection kit. The results showed that positive ALV-J in parental group was high to 40%. ALV-J positive rate to the four batches was 9.09%、5.53%、1.42% and 1.30%, respectively. In conclusion, the ALV-J positive rate was controlled in a very low percentage in parental group after this

  16. Evolution of gp85 gene of subgroup J avian leukosis virus under the selective pressure of antibodies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Zhengfu; CUI Zhizhong

    2006-01-01

    Subgroup J Avian leucosis virus (ALV-J) strain NX0101 was inoculated into chicken embryo fibroblasts (CEF) monolayers in 6-well plates. The six wells of CEF inoculated with NX0101 were divided into groups A (without anti-ALV-J serum in the medium) and B (with anti-ALV-J serum in the medium), then viruses from each well of both groups were separately passed in CEF every 6 d and formed their independent passage lineages. For each lineage of both groups, gp85 genes of the viruses in the 10th, 20th and 30th passages were amplified, cloned and sequenced. The sequence data indicated that the homologies of gp85 at aa level between the primary virus and the passed viruses of different passages of 3 lineages in group A were 97.7%―99.7%; and the homologies of gp85 between the primary virus and the passed viruses of different passages of 3 lineages in group B were 93.8%―96.1%. Analysis of the ratios of nonsynonium (NS) vs synonium (S) mutations of nucleic acids demonstrated that NS/S in 3 highly variable (hr-) regions at aa#110―120, aa#141―151 and aa#189―194 of gp85 in 3 lineages of group A were 2 (8/4), 1(3/3) and 1.3 (4/3), however, NS/S in the same 3 hr-regions of group B were 4.1 (13/3), 4.7 (14/3) and 3.3 (11/3). This study is the first demonstration of influence of immune selective pressure on evolution of ALV-J gp85 by specific antibodies under the controlled in vitro experiments.

  17. Reversion to subgroup J avian leukosis virus viremia in seroconverted adult meat-type chickens exposed to chronic stress by adrenocorticotrophin treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandiri, A R; Gimeno, I M; Mays, J K; Reed, W M; Fadly, A M

    2012-09-01

    Chickens infected with subgroup J avian leukosis virus (ALV J) early in posthatch life develop viremia followed by a neutralizing antibody (Nab) response that may or may not be able to clear the viremia. Occasionally, chickens that do clear viremia by developing an efficient Nab response revert to viremia, and the factors responsible for this reversion are not clear. In this study, it was hypothesized that stress can cause seroconverted viremia-free chickens to revert to viremia. Adult (52-wk-old) male commercial meat-type chickens that were exposed to ALV J at hatch and had since cleared viremia and remained viremia-free for up to 40 wk, when subjected to chronic stress (for 14 days) induced by porcine adrenocorticotrophin (ACTH), reverted to viremia and cloacal shedding (2/6 [33%]). However, chickens that were contact-exposed to ALV J at 32 wk of age and had seroconverted failed to revert to viremia when subjected to similar chronic stress. Stress did not increase the susceptibility of adult meat-type chickens to ALV J infection by contact exposure. The lack of statistical significance due to the small sample size is a limitation of this study. However, in general, the results suggest that treatment of chickens with ACTH can cause reversion of viremia and cloacal shedding in ALV J-seroconverted adult male chickens that had been exposed to the virus at hatch, but not in chickens that were contact-exposed at 32 wk of age. The results warrant further studies with greater sample size to examine the role of stress in ALV J epidemiology.

  18. Isolation and identification of J-Avian Leukosis virus and gp85 gene cloning and expression%禽白血病J亚型病毒分离鉴定及其gp85基因克隆表达

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李广兴; 杨婷; 潘龙; 任晓峰; 王秀荣

    2013-01-01

    禽白血病(Avian leukosis)是由禽白血病病毒(Avian leukosis virus,ALV)和禽肉瘤病毒(Avain sacroma viurs,ASV)群中病毒引起禽类多种肿瘤性疾病统称.文章从临床疑似病鸡中经临床症状观察、病理学检查和分子生物学鉴定等方法分离出一株ALV J亚型病毒.从感染鸡病料提取前病毒DNA,根据NCBI发表ALV基因序列设计引物,扩增该病毒gp85基因,扩增出924 bp目的条带,利用pET-30a载体构建原核表达质粒,鉴定正确后转化入Rosetta中进行诱导表达,表达40 ku蛋白以包涵体形式存在,有良好免疫原性,为ALV进一步研究提供实验材料.%Avian Leukosis is caused by groups of avian leukemia virus (ALV) and avian sarcoma virus (ASV),which may lead to a variety of neoplastic diseases of fowls collectively.In this study,the ALV J subgroup virus was isolated and characterized regarding of clinic symptoms,pathological lesions and molecular biology techniques.Then,the proviral DNA of ALV-J virus was extracted from the diseased chicken materials.According to ALV-J virus gene sequences published in GenBank,specific primers were designed to clone the gp85 gene.The results showed that of the gp85 gene of 924 bp was amplified successfully.This gene was inserted into pET-30a vector resulting in a prokaryotic expression plasma pET-30a-gp85.After transformation of pET-30a-gp85 into E.coli Rosseta and induced expression,the molecular weight of recombinant gp85 protein 40 ku was expressed in the form of inclusion body.Western-blot indicated that the expressed protein has good immunogenicity.

  19. Co-infection of Avian Leukosis Virus and Salmonella pullorum with the Preliminary Eradication in Breeders of Chinese Local “ShouGuang” Chickens

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    Jian Qiang Huang, Jing Kai Xin, Cui Mao, Feng Zhong and Jia Qian Chai*

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The study was designed to investigate the infection status and to finish the preliminary eradication of avian leukosis virus (ALV and Salmonella pullorum (SP in breeders of Chinese local “ShouGuang” chickens. ALV antigen and antibody was tested via ELISA, and SP antibody was detected by serum plate agglutination test (SPAT. The etiology and pathology was also studied. The ALV-P27 antigen, ALV-A/B and SP antibody positive chickens were eliminated in turn, and then the negative were retained as the breeder flocks. The results showed that the positive rate of antigen to ALV-P27, antibody to ALV-A/B, ALV-J and SP was 57.8, 6.7, 0 and 17.8% in this breeder farm, respectively. The co-infection of ALV and SP was confirmed and the positive rate of both SP and ALV-P27 or ALV-A/B was 10 and 1%, respectively. There were obvious tumor nodules and lymphoid tumor cells in the comb, liver and spleen of the co-infected chickens. The degenerative and atrophic ovarian follicles, inflammatory cell infiltration in muscle biopsies were also found. The elimination rate of ALV-p27, ALV-A/B and SP positive chickens was 55.4, 13 and 6.1%, respectively. The final amount of the breeder conservation was 309 chickens. In conclusion, the co-infection of ALV-B and SP was found and more emphasis should be given on its prevention; the preliminary eradication of “ShouGuang” breeder chickens was finished.

  20. Molecular characteristics of the complete genome of a J-subgroup avian leukosis virus strain isolated from Eurasian teal in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Xiangwei; Gao, Yulong; Li, Delong; Hao, Ruijun; Liu, Wansi; Han, Chunyan; Gao, Honglei; Qi, Xiaole; Wang, Yongqiang; Liu, Lanlan; Wang, Xiaomei

    2014-10-01

    The J-subgroup avian leukosis virus (ALV-J) strain WB11098J was isolated from a wild Eurasian teal, and its proviral genomic sequences were determined. The complete proviral sequence of WB11098J was 7868 nt long. WB11098J was 95.3.9 % identical to the prototype strain HPRS-103, 94.2 % identical to the American strain ADOL-7501, 94.5-94.7 % identical to Chinese broiler isolates, 94.8-97.5 % identical to layer chicken isolates, and 94.4-95.0 % identical to Chinese local chicken isolates at the nucleotide level. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the WB11098J isolate shared the greatest homology with the layer strain SD09DP03 and was included in the same cluster. Interestingly, two 19-bp insertions in the U3 regions of the 5'LTR and 5'UTR that were most likely derived from other retroviruses were found in the WB11098J isolate. These insertions separately introduced one E2BP-binding site in the U3 region of the 5'LTR and a RNA polymerase II transcription factor IIB and core promoter motif of ten elements in the 5'UTR. A 5-bp deletion was identified in the U3 region of the 5'LTR. No nucleotides were deleted in the rTM or DR-1 regions in the 3'UTR. A 1-bp deletion was detected in the E element and introduced a specific and distinct binding site for c-Ets-1. Our study is the first to report the molecular characteristics of the complete genome of an ALV-J that was isolated from a wild bird and will provide necessary information for further understanding of the evolution of ALV-J.

  1. A 19-nucleotide insertion in the leader sequence of avian leukosis virus subgroup J contributes to its replication in vitro but is not related to its pathogenicity in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Xiaolin; Wang, Qi; Li, Xiaofei; Qi, Xiaole; Wang, Yongqiang; Gao, Honglei; Gao, Yulong; Wang, Xiaomei

    2014-01-01

    Subgroup J avian leukosis virus (ALV-J) was first isolated from meat-type chickens that had developed myeloid leukosis and since 2008, ALV-J infections in chickens have become widespread in China. A comparison of the sequence of ALV-J epidemic isolates with HPRS-103, the ALV-J prototype virus, revealed several distinct features, one of which is a 19-nucleotide (nt) insertion in the leader sequence. To determine the role of the 19-nt insertion in ALV-J pathogenicity, a pair of viruses were constructed and rescued. The first virus was an ALV-J Chinese isolate (designated rSD1009) containing the 19-nt insertion in its leader sequence. The second virus was a clone, in which the leader sequence had a deleted 19-nt sequence (designated rSD1009△19). Compared with rSD1009△19, rSD1009 displayed a moderate growth advantage in vitro. However, no differences were demonstrated in either viral replication or oncogenicity between the two rescued viruses in chickens. These results indicated that the 19-nt insertion contributed to ALV-J replication in vitro but was not related to its pathogenicity in vivo.

  2. A 19-nucleotide insertion in the leader sequence of avian leukosis virus subgroup J contributes to its replication in vitro but is not related to its pathogenicity in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaolin Ji

    Full Text Available Subgroup J avian leukosis virus (ALV-J was first isolated from meat-type chickens that had developed myeloid leukosis and since 2008, ALV-J infections in chickens have become widespread in China. A comparison of the sequence of ALV-J epidemic isolates with HPRS-103, the ALV-J prototype virus, revealed several distinct features, one of which is a 19-nucleotide (nt insertion in the leader sequence. To determine the role of the 19-nt insertion in ALV-J pathogenicity, a pair of viruses were constructed and rescued. The first virus was an ALV-J Chinese isolate (designated rSD1009 containing the 19-nt insertion in its leader sequence. The second virus was a clone, in which the leader sequence had a deleted 19-nt sequence (designated rSD1009△19. Compared with rSD1009△19, rSD1009 displayed a moderate growth advantage in vitro. However, no differences were demonstrated in either viral replication or oncogenicity between the two rescued viruses in chickens. These results indicated that the 19-nt insertion contributed to ALV-J replication in vitro but was not related to its pathogenicity in vivo.

  3. Viral proliferation and expression of tumor-related gene in different chicken embryo fibroblasts infected with different tumorigenic phenotypes of avian leukosis virus subgroup J.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Yajin; Liu, Litao; Niu, Yujuan; Qu, Yue; Li, Ning; Sun, Wei; Lv, Chuanwei; Wang, Pengfei; Zhang, Guihua; Liu, Sidang

    2016-10-01

    Subgroup J avian leukosis virus (ALV-J) causes a neoplastic disease in infected chickens. The ALV-J strain NX0101, which was isolated from broiler breeders in 2001, mainly induced formation of myeloid cell tumors. However, strain HN10PY01, which was recently isolated from laying hens, mainly induces formation of myeloid cell tumors and hemangioma. To identify the molecular pathological mechanism underlying changes in host susceptibility and tumor classification induced by these two types of ALV-J strains, chicken embryo fibroblasts derived from chickens with different genetic backgrounds (broiler breeders and laying hens) and an immortalized chicken embryo fibroblasts (DF-1) were prepared and infected with strain NX0101 or HN10PY01, respectively. The 50% tissue culture infective dose (TCID50) and levels of ALV group-specific antigen p27 and heat shock protein 70 in the supernatant collected from the ALV-J infected cells were detected. Moreover, mRNA expression levels of tumor-related genes p53, c-myc, and Bcl-2 in ALV-J-infected cells were quantified. The results indicated that the infection of ALV-J could significantly increase mRNA expression levels of p53, c-myc, and Bcl-2 Strain HN10PY01 exhibited a greater influence on the three tumor-related genes in each of the three types of cells when compared with strain NX0101, and the TCID50 and p27 levels in the supernatant collected from HN10PY01-infected cells were higher than those collected from NX0101-infected cells. These results indicate that the infection of the two ALV-J strains influenced the gene expression levels in the infected cells, while the newly isolated strain HN10PY01 showed higher replication ability in cells and induced higher expression levels of tumor-related genes in infected cells. Furthermore, virus titers and expression levels of tumor-related genes and cellular stress responses of cells with different genetic backgrounds when infected with each of the two ALV-J strain were different

  4. 9 CFR 113.31 - Detection of avian lymphoid leukosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ..., shall be done in chick embryo cell cultures. (1) Each vaccine virus, cytopathic to chick embryo... lymphoid leukosis virus can be propagated on cell culture during the 21-day growth period. If a vaccine... preparation of such questionable vaccine. (2) When cell cultures are tested, 5 ml of the final cell...

  5. 2009年湖北省鸡J亚群白血病的初步调查分析%Epidemiology of Avian Leukosis Virus in Some Regions of Hubei Province in 2009

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    罗青平; 张蓉蓉; 邵璐璐; 温国元; 杨峻; 杨前平; 邵华斌

    2010-01-01

    @@ 禽白血病(avian leukosis,AL)是由反转录病毒科甲型反转录病毒属禽反转录病毒(avian leukosis virus,ALV)引起的以禽类造血组织中某些细胞成分增生为主的各种可传染的肿瘤疾病.根据病毒中和试验宿主范围和囊膜糖蛋白的特性及其它一系列标准,将禽白血病/肉瘤群病毒划分为A到J 10个亚群,其中分离自鸡的有6个亚群(A、B、C、D、E、J).鸡J亚群白血病病毒(ALV-J)是1988年Payne等[1,2]首次从商品代肉用鸡中分离到并鉴定出的鸡白血病病毒的一个新亚群.

  6. Cloning and Identification of Envelope Gene gp85 of Avian Leukosis Virus%禽白血病病毒囊膜基因gp85片段的克隆与鉴定

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘公平; 刘福安; 赵振芬

    2001-01-01

    用PCR从禽白血病病毒(Avian Leukosis Virus,ALV)RAV-1,RAV-2感染或未感染的SPF鸡胚成纤维细胞(CEF)分别扩增出1.2kb囊膜基因片段。分别将上述PCR产物的KpnⅠ/SaⅡ酶切片段克隆到质粒pGEM-3zf(+)中得到3个重组子即pGEM-3zf-RAV-1 env、pGEM-3zf-RAV-2 env和pGEM-3zf-E env。酶切分析和序列测定结果表明克隆的PCR片段分别来自ALV RAV-1,RAV-2和内源性E亚群病毒,这为病毒囊膜基因gp85的表达及个体鸡遗传抗性的鉴定打下基础。%1.2kb PCR fragments were respectively obtained from SPF chicken embryo fibroblast cells (CEF),which were infected with Avian Leukosis Virus(ALV)RAV-1,RAV-2 or not with any ALV as control.These PCR products digested with KpnI and SalI were cloned into vector pGEM-3zf(+) respectively, three recombinant plasmids pGEM-3zf-RAV-1 env,pGEM-3zf-RAV-2 env, and pGEM-3zf-E env were obtained .The results of restriction analysis and sequence of the inserts of these three recombinant plasmids demonstrated that the cloned PCR fragments belonged to RAV-1,RAV-2,and E subgroup endogenous virus respectively.These provide a basis on the expressing of envelope gene gp85 of ALV and identificating the genetic resistant chicken against to ALV infection.

  7. Development of a Double-antibody Sandwich ELISA for Detection of Subgroup J Avian Leukosis Virus%J亚群禽白血病病毒双抗体夹心ELISA检测方法的建立

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    廖亚琳; 梁艺瑜; 王秀珑; 冯敏; 谭利强; 曹伟胜

    2013-01-01

    本研究利用J亚群禽白血病病毒(subgroup J avian leukosis virus,ALV-J)gp85单因子血清纯化后的抗体成功建立了检测ALV-J抗原的双抗体夹心ELISA方法(DAS-ELISA).结果表明,该方法具有良好的特异性、重复性和稳定性,对ALV-J抗原的最小检出量为0.165 μg/mL.用该法对48份临床血浆样品进行检测,结果与PCR方法的符合率达到85.2%.

  8. Preparation and Characterization of the Monoclonal Antibodies Against p27 Protein of Avian Leukosis Virus%禽白血病病毒 p27蛋白单克隆抗体的制备及鉴定

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谢华丽; 邵华斌; 杨峻; 程国富; 胡薛英; 谷长勤; 张万坡; 罗青平

    2013-01-01

    The purified recombinant protein p27 of avian leukosis virus as an immunogen was used to immu-niz Balb/c mice.By cell culture and monoclonal antibody of dilution method,mAb named 2F3,5C2 and 5C7 were prepared against avian leukosis virus p27 protein by fusing myeloma cell line SP2/0 with spleen lymphocytes of immunized Balb/c mice.By biological characteristic analysis,the number of three strain hybridoma cell chromosomes was about 90.Then immunological identifications were conducted by means of ELISA/Western blot and IFA,the three mAb against p27 protein of ALV possessed high antibody ti-ters and good specificity.The result showed that the three McAbs had good reactogenicity.These three McAbs can be used as a valuable tool for avian leukosis virus epitope analysis,the detection of the virus and Kit research.%以纯化的禽白血病病毒 p27重组蛋白作为免疫原,按常规方法免疫 Balb/c 小鼠,取其脾细胞与 SP2/0细胞融合,通过细胞培养和有限稀释法制备单克隆抗体,最终获得了3株能稳定分泌禽白血病病毒 p27蛋白单克隆抗体的细胞株2F3、5C2和5C7。经生物学特性分析,3株杂交瘤细胞染色体数均为90条左右,通过 ELISA、Western blot 和间接免疫荧光等方法对所获得的3株单克隆抗体进行了鉴定,证明3株单克隆抗体细胞株所分泌的抗体效价高,而且均能够和禽白血病病毒 p27蛋白特异性发生反应。说明该3株单克隆抗体均具有与禽白血病病毒 p27蛋白发生反应的反应原性。3株单克隆抗体的成功获得为禽白血病病毒抗原表位的分析,病毒的检测以及试剂盒的研发奠定了基础。

  9. The past, present and future in the studies of avian leukosis viruses%禽白血病病毒研究的过去、现在和将来

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    崔治中

    2012-01-01

    简要介绍了鸡的重要的肿瘤性病毒禽白血病病毒(ALV)研究的历史及其在现代分子生物学研究进展中的作用.对近10多年来,ALV在国内外鸡群中,特别是我国鸡群中的流行动态及相关研究做了综述.在此基础上,对ALV及其相关肿瘤方面有待进一步深入研究的目标和内容提出了展望.%In this review paper, we described the history in studies of the avian leukosis viruses (ALV), an important oncogenic virus in chickens, and its roles in morden molecular biology. A review was also made for epidemic situations of ALV infections in chickens aboad and especially in China during the recent ten years. Then the objectives and aspects for the further studies on ALVs and related tumongenesis are suggested.

  10. The Role of Avian leukosis virus Thansmembrane Protein in Membrane Fusion and Immunosuppression%禽白血病病毒跨膜蛋白在膜融合及免疫抑制中的作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘青; 成子强

    2008-01-01

    禽白血病病毒(Avian leukosis virus,ALV)入侵宿主细胞的关键是病毒囊膜与宿主细胞膜的融合,ALV在此过程中采用病毒-宿主细胞膜融合机制,这一机制的关键是病毒与细胞受体结合后跨膜蛋白一系列构象的变化.此外,ALV入侵宿主细胞后会引起严重的免疫抑制,继而引发肿瘤的产生.在对一些与ALV有相同感染机制的病毒的研究中发现,引起免疫抑制的关键区也是跨膜蛋白.因此进一步在分子水平上深入研究跨膜蛋白有助于正确认识病毒侵染的本质,做到更为有效的预防与治疗ALV感染.

  11. Effective signal-on photoelectrochemical immunoassay of subgroup J avian leukosis virus based on Bi2S3 nanorods as photosensitizer and in situ generated ascorbic acid for electron donating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Bing; Qiao, Fengmin; Chen, Lijian; Zhao, Zhen; Yin, Huanshun; Ai, Shiyun

    2014-04-15

    A universal and effective photoelectrochemical (PEC) immunosensing device was fabricated on an indium tin oxide (ITO) electrode for sensitive and specific detection of subgroup J of avian leukosis virus (ALVs-J) based on a signal-on strategy. Bismuth sulfide (Bi2S3) nanorods, with good morphology, high crystallinity and differentiated PEC properties, were selected as the photoelectrochemical species and synthesized by a facile hydrothermal method. On the basis of alkaline phosphatase catalytic chemistry to in situ produce ascorbic acid for electron donating, an enhanced photocurrent was obtained. Due to the dependence of the photocurrent signal on the concentration of generated electron donor, an exquisite immunosandwich protocol was successfully constructed for PEC detection of ALVs-J with a linear range from 10(2.14) to 10(3.65) TCID50/mL. The detection limit was 10(2.08) TCID50/mL (S/N=3), and high stability and specificity were obtained. The strategy provides a fast and sensitive method for ALVs-J analysis and opens a general format for future development of PEC immunoanalysis.

  12. 安徽省五华鸡J亚群禽白血病的鉴定及其病理学观察%DIAGNOSIS AND PATHOLOGICAL OBSERVATIONS ON AVIAN LEUKOSIS VIRUS SUBGROUP J IN WUHUA CHICKENS IN ANHUI PROVNCE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡晓苗; 戴银; 潘孝成; 赵瑞宏; 周学利; 侯宏艳; 夏松林; 盛昌树; 杨文超

    2012-01-01

    为调查安徽省五华鸡J亚群禽白血病(Avian leukosis virus subgroup J,ALV-J)的感染情况,采用ELISA对五华鸡进行P27抗原和ALV-J抗体检测.挑选5只抗原抗体阳性鸡进行PCR检测,同时将5只抗原抗体阳性鸡和5只抗原抗体阴性鸡进行剖检,制作病理切片.其中1只鸡PCR检测为阳性,能扩增出545 bp条带,PCR检测阳性的鸡其心脏有肿瘤、脾脏肿大等病理学变化;组织切片发现心脏、肝脏、脾、肾、肺等组织内有弥漫性髓细胞样瘤细胞或髓细胞瘤病灶,髓细胞样瘤细胞的细胞质内可见嗜酸性颗粒.结果表明五华鸡已经感染了ALV-J,且部分鸡个体已经发病.

  13. env基因对J亚群禽白血病病毒体外感染和复制能力的影响%Effects of env Gene on Subgroup J Avian Leukosis Virus Infection and Replication

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴晓婵; 李娇; 曹伟胜; 廖明

    2013-01-01

    为探讨env基因对J亚群禽白血病病毒(subgroup J avian leukosis virus,ALV-J)体外感染和复制能力的影响,本研究利用反向遗传方法构建重组病毒,将血管瘤病变型ALV-J HN06株中env元件替换至髓细胞瘤病变型ALV-J NX0101株的相应位置,成功构建了重组质粒pNX-HNenv.重组毒株能在DF-1细胞上稳定增殖,并能被JE9特异性单抗识别,证明获得了具有感染性的重组病毒NX-HNenv株.结果显示,同一亚群内env基因的替换对病毒的体外感染和复制能力无明显影响.

  14. ISOLATION AND IDENTIFICATION OF SUBGROUP A AVIAN LEUKOSIS VIRUS FROM CHICKENS OF A LOCAL BREED%地方品系鸡中一株A亚群鸡白血病病毒的分离和鉴定

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱美真; 吴玉宝; 崔治中

    2009-01-01

    将种蛋孵化到9~11 d,分别制备成鸡胚成纤维细胞(chicken fibroblast cells,CEF)培养,再将其细胞上清接种对内源性白血病病毒(avian leukosis virus,ALV)有抵抗力的DF1细胞,从山东某地方品系种蛋中分离到一株外源性ALV,SDAU09E1.用PCR扩增其囊膜蛋白基因(env)并隆测序后,将其gp85序列与已发表的各亚群ALV比较分析表明,该毒株与A亚群6个毒株同源性最高,为89.1%~90.9%,而与已发表的鸡的A、C、D、E亚群ALV的gp85的同源性仅在73.2%~87.9%之间,与目前国内最常见的J亚群的gp85的同源性更是低至30.3%~32.4%.这是我国地方品系鸡群中第一次分离和鉴定出ALV-A及其gp85基因.

  15. 间接ELISA检测抗禽白血病病毒抗体方法的建立%Development of an Indirect ELISA for the Detection of Antibodies Against Avian Leukosis Virus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    仇钰; 秦爱建; 钱琨; 金文杰; 胡序明; 沈海玉

    2010-01-01

    禽白血病病毒(Avian leukosis virus,ALV)是禽白血病的病原,可引起鸡的免疫抑制和肿瘤.净化种鸡群是控制ALV的主要方法之一.本研究将ALV的p27基因克隆到表达栽体pGEX-6P-1,在大肠杆菌中获得了高效表达,以纯化后的p27-GST融合蛋白为抗原包被,经过条件优化,建立了检测鸡血清中抗ALV抗体的间接ELISA方法.与IFA检测结果比较,该方法比IDEXX ELISA试剂盒有更高的符合率.可用于禽白血病病毒感染根除的大规模检测,并具有低成本、易操作的特点,能同时检测到针对ALV所有亚群的抗体.

  16. Establ ishment and Appl ication of PCR Method for Detecting Subgroup J Avian Leukosis Virus (ALV-J)%J亚群禽白血病病毒PCR检测方法的构建与应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王璇; 文正常; 杨粤黔; 潘淑惠

    2014-01-01

    The PCR method with simplicity,rapidity,accuracy and direction to detect suspected chicken infected with ALV-J was established based on one pairs of specific primers designed from the env gene sequence of ALV in GenBank and the PCR method was used in specific and sensitiveness tests and clinical application.The results showed that the amplification results of ALV-J by the established PCR method accord with the expected fragment and the amplification results of avian reticuloendothelial cell hyperplasia virus,Newcastle disease virus and Marek's disease virus by the established PCR method all are negative,which indicates that the established PCR method with good specificity and sensitiveness can be used in detection of ALV-J infection,molecular epidemiological investigation and rapid identification of toxic strain separation.%为建立简单、快速、准确、直接对疑似感染J 亚群禽白血病病毒(Subgroup J of avian leukosis virus,ALV-J)鸡进行检测的PCR方法,根据GenBank中禽白血病病毒env基因序列设计1对特异性引物,构建了检测J亚群禽白血病病毒的PCR方法,并进行了特异性、敏感性试验和临床应用。结果表明:应用所构建的PCR方法对J亚群禽白血病病毒进行检测,其扩增结果与预期片段相符,对禽网状内皮细胞增生病病毒、鸡新城疫病毒和马立克氏病病毒的扩增结果均为阴性。说明,所构建的 PCR检测方法具有较好的特异性和敏感性,可用于J亚群禽白血病病毒感染的检测、分子流行病学调查和分离毒株的快速鉴定。

  17. Apoptosis of chicken bursal cells caused by avian leukosis virus subtype J and reticuloendotheliosis virus%ALV-J和REV诱导雏鸡腔上囊细胞凋亡试验

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘玉洁; 夏培农; 李丰宜

    2009-01-01

    禽白血病/肉瘤病毒群可引起禽类的多种肿瘤性疾病[1]。1988年英国的Payne及其同事又从肉用型鸡群中分离得到了一株新的白血病病毒,命名为J亚群禽白血病病毒(avian leukosis virussubgroup J,ALV0)。该亚型主要感染肉鸡,可使肉仔鸡早期发生白血病,并可造成免疫抑制[2]。

  18. Construction and Virus Rescue of Infectious Molecular Clones of Subgroup J Avian Myeloid Leukosis Virus%1株髓细胞瘤型J亚群禽白血病病毒感染性克隆的构建与病毒拯救

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林艳; 夏静; 邹年莉; 郭明萍; 王富妍; 赵扬; 文心田; 曹三杰; 黄勇

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to construct the infectious molecular clone with molecular marker of subgroup J avian myeloid leukosis virus (ALV-J) strain SCGS-1.A full-length infectious clone of ALV-J (pUC-SCGS) was constructed by cloning and combining of three fragments using PCR method from SCGS-1.Sal Ⅰ site was introduced on 4684nt of SCGS-1 by overlapping PCR to form another infectious clone and named pUC-△SCGS.The two plasmids,pUCSCGS and pUC-△SCGS,were transfected into CEF,and the rescued viruses were detected by PCR,avian leukosis virus antigen test kit and indirect immunofluorescence assay (IFA).Digestion and sequence analysis revealed that the infectious clone pUC-SCGS and pUC-△SCGS were constructed correctly.PCR,ELISA test and IFA results showed that the 3rd and 4th generation of rescued virus were positive,while the controlled CEF were negative.Rescued virus and the virus with molecular marker of subgroup J avian myeloid leukosis virus were successfully constructed,named rSCGS-1 and r△SCGS-1.%为构建髓细胞瘤型J亚群禽白血病病毒(avian leukosis virus,ALV-J) SCGS-1株前病毒cDNA分子标记感染性克隆,根据SCGS-1全基因测序结果,分3段进行全序列PCR扩增,顺次连接至pUC19,构建SCGS-1株前病毒cDNA感染性克隆pUC-SCGS;通过重叠PCR方法对SCGS-1基因组进行沉默突变,在4 684位点引入Sal I位点,构建SCGS-1株分子标记感染性克隆pUC-△SCGS;以pUC-SCGS和pUC-△SCGS重组质粒转染CEF进行病毒拯救,并通过PCR、间接免疫荧光与双抗体夹心ELISA进行拯救病毒检测.结果显示,成功构建pUC-SCGS与pUC-△SCGS重组质粒,转染后盲传第3代、第4代细胞与上清中均检测到拯救病毒;间接免疫荧光与抗原ELISA方法分别在CEF细胞和上清中检测到ALV-J抗原.成功拯救获得分子标记ALV-J.

  19. 禽白血病病毒J亚群env基因的克隆和序列分析%Cloning and Sequencing of Envelope Gene of Subgroup J Avian Leukosis Virus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    秦爱建; LucyLee; 等

    2001-01-01

    应用多聚酶链反应(PCR)的方法扩增出ADOL-4817毒株的囊膜 蛋白env基因,并克隆进大肠杆菌。经核酸序列分析证明,env基因的大小为1?746 ?bp,其中gp85 和gp37由1?554?bp组成,可翻译成517个氨基酸,分子量为57.7?kD。根 据糖基化位点N-X-S/T的特点,发现ADOL-4817的env蛋白有15个潜在的糖基化位点。 同源性分析证明,ADOL-4817的env基因与其它ALV-J的env基因序列同源性为88.8 %~92.4%,而与外源性ALVs 的相应序列的同源性仅为40.5%~51.4%,然而,与内源性的EAV -HP毒株的类env 基因的同源性高达91.2%; 另外,ADOL-4817毒株的gp37 在C末端 多了13个氨基酸。这些结果提示,ALV-J的env基因存在广泛的变异性, env基因 可能来源于内源性和外源性ALVs 的重组。%The envelope gene of ADOL-4817 strain of avian leukosis viru s subgroup J (ALV-J) was amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and clo ned into TA vector. The sequence analysis results showed that the envelope gene is composed of 1?746 bp, 1?554 bp of which could be translated into 517 amino acids for gp85 and gp37. The molecular weight of envelope protein is 57.7kD. T here are 15 potential glycosylation sites in the envelope protein, 13 of which i s located in gp85. Analysis of sequences of envelope gene indicate that ADOL -4817 showed high degree of sequence identity to other ALV-J strains, and m ost close ly related to the like-envelope gene of endogenous virus EAV-HP but divergent from these of other ALV subgroup A-E . These data support the hypothesis that envelope gene of avian leukosis virus subgroup J maybe acquired by recombination with expressed sequences.

  20. DNA Cloning and Sequence Analysis of Partial env Gene of Avian Leukosis Virus Subgroup J in Wuhua Chicken Flocks%五华鸡J亚群白血病病毒env部分基因的和序列分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    戴银; 张丹俊; 胡晓苗; 赵瑞宏

    2011-01-01

    The partial sequence of avian leukosis virus subgroup J (ALV-J) env gene was cloned by PCR in Anhui province, which was named as ALV-J-envl. And we compared ALV-J-envl with the partial sequence of eight ALV-J env genes in the GenBank database. The results showed that ALV-J infection in Wuhua chicken was found in Anhui province. Alignment of nine gene sequences of ALV-J env, the homology between ALV-J-envl and the other sequences ranged from 94. 2% to 96. 6%. The result revealed that the env gene from different strains had the mutation at nucleotide sequence. However, the highest homology with ALV-J-envl were HQ425636 and HM235665 gene sequences isolated from strains in China, and they gathered together in the evolutionary tree, indicating a close genetic relationship, and they evolved from common strains. The lowest homology with ALV-J-envl was the gene sequence of AY312965 isolated from Malaysia, it could be further confirmed by phylogenetic analysis.%本试验通过PCR技术获得了安徽省地方品种五华鸡禽白血病病毒J亚群(avian leukosis virus subgroup J,ALV-J)env部分基因序列AL V-J-env1,并将该序列与GenBank数据库中登录的8条env基因相应序列进行了比对分析.结果表明,五华鸡已经感染了J亚群禽白血病,且部分鸡个体已经发病.通过分析可见,AL V-J-env1与所比较的基因序列同源性介于94.2%~96.6%之间,说明不同毒株之间的env基因有一定变异.但与ALV J-env1同源性最高的是来自于中国ALV-J毒株的HQ425636和HM235665基因序列,且在进化树中聚集为一组,暗示它们之间亲缘关系较近,由共同的毒株进化而来.与ALV-J-env1同源性最低的是来源于马来西亚毒株的AY312965基因序列,遗传进化分析也进一步证实,两者之间亲缘关系较远.

  1. 禽白血病病毒p19基因末端片段在大肠杆菌中的表达%Expression of p19 Gene of Avian Leukosis Virus in Escherichia coli

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘公平; 赵振芬; 刘福安

    2001-01-01

    Based on avian leukosis virus ( ALV) p19 gene terminal nucleotide sequence, a 82 bp double-stranded DNA fragment was chemically synthesized and cloned into the expression vector pGEMEX-1. The sequencing result indicated th at the cloned fragment was a correct version of the one designed both in nucleot ide sequence and in its open reading frame. The recombinant was used to transfor m E.coli BL21 (DE3). The cloned fragment was expressed as a fused protein wi th T7 gene 10 leader peptide and was shown to be 34 kD in size on SDS-PAGE gel when induced with 1 mmol/L IPTG. The expression product was able to bind immunol ogically to rabbit anti-ALV serum in Western-blot assay and is being tested to differentiate exogenous from endogenous ALV.%根据禽白血病病毒(ALV)p19基因末端序列合成一条82?bp的双链DNA片段,将其克隆到表达质粒pGEMEX-1中,序列分析结果与设计的相符。重组表达质粒转化的 大肠杆菌BL21(DE3)经 IPTG诱导后产生34kD融合表达产物,与理论值相符;Western-blo t分析表明该表达产物能与兔抗ALV血清发生反应。

  2. Sequence analysis for the complete proviral genome of subgroup J Avian Leukosis virus associated with hemangioma: a special 11 bp deletion was observed in U3 region of 3'UTR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zou Nianli

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Avian Leukosis virus (ALV of subgroup J (ALV-J belong to retroviruses, which could induce tumors in domestic and wild birds. Myelocytomatosis was the most common neoplasma observed in infected flocks; however, few cases of hemangioma caused by ALV-J were reported in recent year. Results An ALV-J strain SCDY1 associated with hemangioma was isolated and its proviral genomic sequences were determined. The full proviral sequence of SCDY1 was 7489 nt long. Homology analysis of the env, pol and gag gene between SCDY1 and other strains in GenBank were 90.3-94.2%, 96.6-97.6%, and 94.3-96.5% at nucleotide level, respectively; while 85.1-90.7%, 97.4-98.7%, and 96.2-98.4% at amino acid level, respectively. Alignment analysis of the genomic sequence of ALV-J strains by using HPRS-103 as reference showed that a special 11 bp deletion was observed in U3 region of 3'UTR of SCDY1 and another ALV-J strain NHH isolated from case of hemangioma, and the non-functional TM and E element were absent in the genome of SCDY1, but the transcriptional regulatory elements including C/EBP, E2BP, NFAP-1, CArG box and Y box were highly conserved. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that all analyzed ALV-J strains could be separated into four groups, and SCDY1 as well as another strain NHH were included in the same cluster. Conclusion The variation in envelope glycoprotein was higher than other genes. The genome sequence of SCDY1 has a close relationship with that of another ALV-J strain NHH isolated from case of hemangioma. A 11 bp deletion observed in U3 region of 3'UTR of genome of ALV-J isolated from case of hemangioma is interesting, which may be associated with the occurrence of hemangioma.

  3. MiR-34b-5p Suppresses Melanoma Differentiation-Associated Gene 5 (MDA5) Signaling Pathway to Promote Avian Leukosis Virus Subgroup J (ALV-J)-Infected Cells Proliferaction and ALV-J Replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhenhui; Luo, Qingbin; Xu, Haiping; Zheng, Ming; Abdalla, Bahareldin Ali; Feng, Min; Cai, Bolin; Zhang, Xiaocui; Nie, Qinghua; Zhang, Xiquan

    2017-01-01

    Avian leukosis virus subgroup J (ALV-J) is an oncogenic retrovirus that has a similar replication cycle to multiple viruses and therefore can be used as a model system for viral entry into host cells. However, there are few reports on the genes or microRNAs (miRNAs) that are responsible for the replication of ALV-J. Our previous miRNA and RNA sequencing data showed that the expression of miR-34b-5p was significantly upregulated in ALV-J-infected chicken spleens compared to non-infected chicken spleens, but melanoma differentiation-associated gene 5 (MDA5) had the opposite expression pattern. In this study, a dual-luciferase reporter assay showed that MDA5 is a direct target of miR-34b-5p. In vitro, overexpression of miR-34b-5p accelerated the proliferation of ALV-J-infected cells by inducing the progression from G2 to S phase and it promoted cell migration. Ectopic expression of MDA5 inhibited ALV-J-infected cell proliferation, the cell cycle and cell migration, and knockdown of MDA5 promoted proliferation, the cell cycle and migration. In addition, during ALV-J infections, MDA5 can detect virus invasion and it triggers the MDA5 signaling pathway. MDA5 overexpression can activate the MDA5 signaling pathway, and thus it can inhibit the mRNA and protein expression of the ALV-J env gene and it can suppress virion secretion. In contrast, in response to the knockdown of MDA5 by small interfering RNA (siRNA) or an miR-34b-5p mimic, genes in the MDA5 signaling pathway were significantly downregulated (P J env and the sample-to-positive ratio of virion in the supernatants were increased. This indicates that miR-34b-5p is able to trigger the MDA5 signaling pathway and affect ALV-J infections. Together, these results suggest that miR-34b-5p targets MDA5 to accelerate the proliferation and migration of ALV-J-infected cells, and it promotes ALV-J replication, via the MDA5 signaling pathway.

  4. 黑豆皮花色苷抗禽白血病病毒A亚群活性的研究%Study on the effect of anthocyanin from black soybean seed coat resistance subgroup A avian leukosis virus activity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    雷用东; 王丹; 童军茂; 张莉; 马越; 张超; 赵晓燕

    2013-01-01

    To study the inhibitory action of anthocyanins from black soybean seed coat (ABSC) to subgroup A avian leukosis virus (ALV-A) in vitro.ABSC powder was chosen as the raw material and its anthocyanins structure was identified by HPLC-MS.Then in vitro, MTT assay and cell morphological changes were used to observe the cytotoxic effect of ABSC on monolayer DF-1 cells, and cell model was used to research ABSCs prevention and treatment roles in the ALV-A-infected different phase.The result showed that the extract of black soybean seed coat contained four major anthocyanins, the one of the main component was cyanidin-3-glucoside.When mass concentration of ABSC was less than 20μg/mL, DF-1 cells was well-grown without the cell toxicity. Introduced ALV-A to DF-1, ABSC could restrain the proliferation of ALV-A under the 20μg/mL, and inhibition effect was dose-response in the security concentration range.In summary, anthocyanins from black soybean seed coat of 12μg/mL had significantly inhibitory effect for DF-1 cell induced by ALV-A.%为探寻黑豆皮花色苷(anthocyanins from black soybean seed coat,ABSC)抗禽白血病病毒A亚群(subgroup Aavian leukosis virus,ALV-A)的活性效果 本文以ABSC粉为原料,采用高效液相色谱仪与质谱仪联机(HPLC-MS)的方法鉴定了其花色苷主要活性成分,随后采用体外实验,应用MTT法和观察细胞形态法检测了ABSC对鸡成纤维细胞系(DF-1)的细胞毒性,建立细胞模型,研究加入ABSC后对ALV-A的预防和治疗作用 结果表明:黑豆皮花色苷粉中含四种花色苷成分,其中主要为矢车菊色素-3-葡萄糖苷;ABSC对DF-1无细胞毒性的最大相对安全质量浓度为20μg/mL; ABSC在安全浓度范围内能抑制A LV-A的增殖,且抑制程度成剂量关系 结论,ABSC质量浓度为12 μg/mL能够显著抑制ALV-A诱导的DF-1细胞形态变化,降低调亡.

  5. Endogenous avian leukosis viral loci in the Red Jungle Fowl genome assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benkel, Bernhard; Rutherford, Katherine

    2014-12-01

    The current build (galGal4) of the genome of the ancestor of the modern chicken, the Red Jungle Fowl, contains a single endogenous avian leukosis viral element (ALVE) on chromosome 1 (designated RSV-LTR; family ERVK). The assembly shows the ALVE provirus juxtaposed with a member of a second family of avian endogenous retroviruses (designated GGERV20; family ERVL); however, the status of the 3' end of the ALVE element as well as its flanking region remain unclear due to a gap in the reference genome sequence. In this study, we filled the gap in the assembly using a combination of long-range PCR (LR-PCR) and a short contig present in the unassembled portion of the reference genome database. Our results demonstrate that the ALVE element (ALVE-JFevB) is inserted into the putative envelope region of a GGERV20 element, roughly 1 kbp from its 3' end, and that ALVE-JFevB is complete, and depending on its expression status, potentially capable of directing the production of virus. Moreover, the unassembled portion of the genome database contains junction fragments for a second, previously characterized endogenous proviral element, ALVE-6.

  6. 禽白血病病毒J亚群囊膜蛋白env基因的克隆和表达%Cloning and Expression of Envelope Gene of Subgroup J Avian Leukosis Virus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    秦爱建; LucyLee; 等

    2001-01-01

    禽白血病病毒J亚群(ALV-J)是90年代鉴定出的ALV的新亚群,其囊膜蛋白env基因序别与ALVA-E亚群有相当大的差别。为研究ALV-Jenv基因及其表达产物的特点,用PCR方法扩增出ADOL-4817毒株的env基因,并克隆进TA载体,经电泳鉴定大小为1.7kb。将克隆出的env基因与杆状病毒pBlue-Bac4表达质粒DNA连接,构建成转移性载体pBac4817env,通过与Bac-N-Blue杆状病毒DNA共转染,获得了重组病毒rBac4817env-2。该重组杆状病毒感染Sf9细胞,能高效表达env基因产物。免疫荧光分析结果证明,单克隆抗体G2或多价兔抗envgp37血清能识别Sf9细胞中重组env基因表达的特异性抗原;Westernblotting分析结果表明,表达的重组基因产物的分子量大小约为90kD~94kD。用这些重组基因产物免疫鸡可以诱导鸡产生出高滴度的抗ALV-J特异性抗体。这一结果提示,这种杆状病毒表达的重组基因产物有助于ALV-Jenv基因生物学特性的深入研究。%Avian leukosis viurs subgroup J(ALV-J)was identified in 1990's,which causes myelocytic myeloid leukosis(ML)in meat-type chicken. The envelope(env)gene of ADOL-4817 strain of ALV-J was amplified by polymerase chain reaction(PCR)and cloned into TA vector. The size of env gene is about 1.7kb. A transfer vector pBac4817-env was constructed by ligation of env gene DNA and pBlue-Bac4 plasmid DNA. By cotransfecting Sf9 cells with both Bac-N-Blue baculovirus DNA and pBac4817-env DNA, a recombinant baculovirus, rBac4817-env-2 was obtained. Immunofluorescence assay showed that the recombinant env gene products were expressed in Sf9 cells infected with rBac4817-env-2. The molecular weight of expressed protein was 90 kD-94 kD by Western blotting. The recombinant gene products induced antibodies to ALV-J virus in chickens. These results suggested that the expressed recombinant env gene products will be very useful in studying the biological characterization of env

  7. 禽白血病病毒J亚群诱导蛋鸡群多种肿瘤%Mutipal Tumors Induced by Avian Leukosis Virus Subgroup J in Layer Flock

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈洪博; 于琳琳; 姜艳萍; 王玥; 王峰; 王晓伟; 王桂花; 成子强

    2011-01-01

    In August 2009, low produce peak was observed by farm owner in Hy-line layer chicken flock at Tai'an in Shandong province. The rate of produce only was 60%-70%, and the mortality was up to 20% at age of 31-week. The ill chickens were diagnosed as avian leukosis virus subgroup J infection by gross observation, pathology, PCR and immunohistochemistry. Except myelocytomas, fibrosarcomas, histiocytic sarcomas, intestinal adenocarcinoma and hemangioendothelioma were also observed in same or different organs. Fibrosarcomas exist single in ill chicken, and the other tumors were concurrent with myelocytomas. The histopathology detail characters of tumors were described in this paper. The etiology and mechanism of transmmition and tumor spectrum expended of ALV-J need to be further studied.%2009年8月,山东泰安某海兰褐商品蛋鸡场,开产后产蛋率只有60%~70%,31周龄时,死亡率突然增加,最高达20%.患病鸡经大体剖检、病理组织学、PCR和免疫组织化学检测确诊为J亚群禽白血病.病理组织学检测发现送检鸡除了髓细胞瘤外,还存在明显的纤维肉瘤、组织肉瘤、腺癌和血管内皮瘤等肿瘤.纤维肉瘤单独存在,组织肉瘤、腺癌和血管内皮瘤分别和髓细胞瘤混合存在,本文详细描述了各肿瘤的组织学特点.ALV-J从肉种鸡传向商品蛋鸡后引起肿瘤谱扩展的原因和机制值得进一步研究.

  8. Inhibition of avian tumor viruses by vector-based RNA interference

    Science.gov (United States)

    RNA interference (RNAi) has been shown to reduce the replication of certain animal viruses both in cell culture and in live animals. We developed RNAi-based anti-viral strategies against two important chicken pathogens: avian leukosis virus (ALV) and Marek’s Disease virus MDV). Entry plasmids conta...

  9. Enzootic bovine leukosis and Bovine leukemia virus

    OpenAIRE

    Amauri Alcindo Alfieri; Alice Fernandes Alfieri; Luis Álvaro Leuzzi Junior

    2004-01-01

    All over de World the Enzootic Bovine Leukosis is a important viral infection in cattle herds. This revision points out topics relative to the etiological agent, clinical signals, diagnosis methods, control and prophylaxis of the infection.A Leucose Enzoótica Bovina é uma infecção viral amplamente disseminada em rebanhos bovinos de todo o mundo. Esta revisão tem por objetivo apresentar tópicos relacionados ao agente etiológico, à doença clínica e aos métodos de diagnóstico, controle e profila...

  10. Control of bovine leukosis virus in a dairy herd by a change in dehorning.

    OpenAIRE

    DiGiacomo, R F; Hopkins, S G; Darlington, R L; Evermann, J F

    1987-01-01

    Following the demonstration that bovine leukosis virus was transmitted in calves by gouge dehorning, electrical dehorning at a younger age was implemented in a commercial Holstein herd. Subsequently, annual testing of the herd revealed a decline in the prevalence of bovine leukosis virus antibodies as older cattle dehorned by the former method were replaced by younger cattle dehorned by the latter method.

  11. Molecular-genetic analysis of field isolates of Avian Leucosis Viruses in the Russian Federation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Commercial poultry farms in 14 regions of Russian Federation were monitored for avian leukosis virus (ALV) infection using virus isolation tests and serology. Results indicated the presence of two subgroups of ALV in farms located in 11 of 14 regions. Analysis of the genomes of 12 field isolates of...

  12. Avian influenza virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avian influenza (AI) is caused by type A influenza virus, a member of the Orthomyxoviridae family. AI viruses are serologically categorized into 16 hemagglutinin (H1-H16) and 9 neuraminidase (N1-N9) subtypes. All subtypes have been identified in birds. Infections by AI viruses have been reported in ...

  13. 蛋鸡淋巴白血病的诊断%Diagnosis of Avian Lymphoid Leukosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘金霞

    2012-01-01

    2011年某蛋鸡场部分病鸡内脏发生增生性肿瘤性疾病,经流行病学调查、临床诊断及实验室检测,确诊为鸡J亚型淋巴白血病.文章就该病例的诊断过程做了详细阐述,并对禽常见传染性肿瘤病的鉴别、白血病的预防和控制进行了归纳总结.%Some suspected avian lekosis samples were got from one chicken farm in Tongzhou. After epidemiological survey, clinical diagnosis and experiment detection, confirmed diagnosis conclusion was lymphoid leukosis. This article mainly e-laborated the diagosis process of the case and summarized the identification, prevention and control measure of lymphoid leukosis.

  14. 芦花鸡J亚群禽白血病的综合诊断%Diagnosis of Avian Leukosis Subgroup J in Luhua Chickens

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李宏民; 刘蒙达; 孙洪磊; 肖一红; 刘思当

    2011-01-01

    @@ 1989年,Payne及其同事首次从肉种鸡群中分离出J亚群禽白血病病毒(avian leukosis virus subtype J,ALV-J)[1].最初ALV-J主要引起成年肉鸡以骨髓细胞瘤为主的白血病,感染鸡群发生肿瘤,生产性能降低,死亡率增高,死亡高峰时每月死亡率可达6%[2],严重影响肉鸡业的健康发展[3].

  15. 禽白血病病毒p27蛋白在大肠杆菌中的表达和多克隆抗体的制备%Expression of p27 Protein of Avian Leukosis Virus in Escherichia coli and Preparation of Its Polyclonal Antibody

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    毛娅卿; 王嘉; 吴涛; 王哲; 蒋桃珍

    2014-01-01

    p27 protein gene from avian leukosis virus was cloned and constructed with plasmid pET-28a(+) . The recombinant protein p27 was expressed in an E. coli strain BL21(DE3) with IPTG induction and detected by Western blot with horseradish peroxidase labeled rabbit-anti-p27 antibodies. After that,the protein was purified to above 95% of purity by affinity chromatography with Ni-NTA agarose column. The anti-sera against p27 protein was obtained by immunizing rabbit with the purified recombinant p27 protein. The specificity of polyclonal antibody was about 1 ∶ 256000 after detected by ELISA. The results show that the p27 protein expressed by E. coli has good antigenicity and can replace the purified virus protein for detection of avian leukosis virus.%将禽白血病病毒p27基因克隆并构建重组表达质粒pET28a-p27,在大肠杆菌BL21中经IP TG诱导后产生可溶性表达蛋白。表达的蛋白用Western blot进行活性检测,其能与辣根过氧化物酶标记的兔抗p27抗体发生特异性反应;采用金属螯和层析对表达蛋白进行纯化,其纯度约为95%;用纯化的表达蛋白p27免疫家兔制备抗血清,ELISA抗体效价可达1∶25600。研究结果表明,大肠杆菌表达的p27蛋白具有良好的抗原性,可以替代纯化病毒蛋白用于禽白血病病毒检测。

  16. 笃斯越桔花色苷抗禽白血病病毒A亚群活性的试验研究%Study on the Effect of Anthocyanin from Vaccinium uliginosum L.Resistance Avian Leukosis Virus Subgroup A Activity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张莉; 雷用东; 盖丽丽; 赵晓燕; 童军茂; 王丹; 马越; 张超

    2013-01-01

    To investigate whether the anthocyanins from Vaccinium uliginosum L.( AVU) could inhibit Avian Leukosis Virus subgroup A ( ALV-A) on the DF-1 cell by in vitro studies .The anthocyanins structure of sample was i-dentified by HPLC-MS.The DF-1 cells were pretreated with the ALV-A for 1 hour and then exposed to the low dose of the extracts of the anthocyanins for an additional 24 to 96 hours.The cell viability was determined by MTT assay .The DF-1 morphological changes were observed .We found that the extracts of Vaccinium uliginosum L.contained six major anthocyanins ,the one of the main component was cyaniding-3-glucoside .The 40 to 80μg/mL AVU resulted in inhibi-tion of Avian Leukosis Virus subgroup A infection and reduction of apoptosis compared with control .Moreover , we found that 60μg/mL AVU was significantly inhibited the activity of the ALV-A and increased the growth of DF-1 cells.%为探讨笃斯越桔花色苷( Anthocyanin from Vaccinium uliginosum L.,AVU)抑制禽白血病病毒A亚群( Avian leukosis virus subgroup A ,ALV-A)的生物活性作用。以笃斯越桔花色苷粉为试验材料,采用高效液相色谱仪与质谱仪联机( HPLC-MS)方法鉴定其花色苷主要活性成分,将AVU作用于感染ALV-A的DF-1鸡胚成纤维细胞( DF-1细胞)单层表面,通过检测AVU对感染ALV-A的DF-1细胞形态学变化及采用MTT法测定细胞存活情况来研究AVU的抗病毒作用。结果表明,笃斯越桔花色苷粉中含6种花色苷活性成分,其中主要为矢车菊色素-3-葡萄糖苷;AVU对DF-1细胞的最大安全质量浓度为80μg/mL;AVU在40~80μg/mL安全浓度范围内能抑制ALV-A的增殖,且抑制程度与剂量呈一定相关性;AVU质量浓度为60μg/mL能够显著抑制ALV-A对DF-1细胞感染。

  17. 2009年湖北省禽白血病的流行特点%Prevalent Characteristics of Avian Leukosis in Hubei Province in 2009

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    罗青平; 张蓉蓉; 温国元; 邵华斌; 艾地云; 王红琳; 罗玲; 杨前平; 杨峻

    2010-01-01

    @@ 禽白血病(Avian Leukosis,AL)是由反转录病毒科甲型反转录病毒属禽反转录病毒(AvianLeukosi Svirus,ALV)引起的以禽类造血组织中某些细胞成分增生为主的各种可传染的肿瘤疾病、免疫抑制病.

  18. 商品蛋鸡血管瘤和髓细胞瘤型J亚群禽白血病的分子诊断及病理学研究%PATHOLOGICAL AND MOLECULAR FINDINGS OF SUBGROUP J AVIAN LEUKOSIS VIRUS INDUCED HEMANGIOMA AND MYELOID LEUKOSIS IN COMMERCIAL LAYER CHICKENS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴晓平; 钱琨; 沈海玉; 王平平; 邵红霞; 金文杰; 秦爱建

    2009-01-01

    对江苏商品蛋鸡6个鸡场临床表现严重血管瘤鸡群的送检样品进行了病理学分析,结果发现,送检的6只商品蛋鸡均可见体表血管瘤,内脏主要在肝、脾、肌胃和肠系膜表面的大小不等的血管瘤,引起严重的肝破裂、脾脏失血和肌胃失血,6个病例中有4个病例出现血管瘤和髓样细胞瘤并存.追踪检测父母代蛋鸡表明,父母代蛋鸡场的各个日龄鸡群均存在不同程度的丁亚群禽白血病病毒(Avian Leukosis Vivus Subgroup J,ALV-J感染;而送检商品病鸡均呈现病毒血症而抗体阴性,提示垂直传播的可能;ALV-J特异性RT-PCR结果显示,6个样品均存在AJV-J感染;对扩增克隆的部分序列分析可见,此六株病毒之间同源性为97.9%~99.6%,而与原型毒HPRS103之间的同源性则较低(94.6%~95.2%),与同为蛋鸡分离毒株AY360088和SD07LK1同源性为94.2%~95.0 %.

  19. Analysis report about the detection result of Avian leukosis virus subgroup J antibody and A, B subtype antibody at part of chiken breeding farms in Wuping County%武平县部分鸡场禽白血病J亚群和A、B亚群抗体检测与分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘辉兰

    2014-01-01

    采用禽白血病抗体ELISA检测试剂盒,对武平县境内三个黄羽品种鸡采集6个场272份血清进行禽白血病A、B 亚型抗体(ALV-AB)和J亚型抗体(ALV-J)检测。结果表明:武平县三个黄羽品种鸡群中存在ALV-J亚型和AB亚型自然感染现象,其中 ALV-AB抗体阳性率为27.6%(75/272),ALV-J抗体阳性率为20.6%(56/272),同时具有ALV-AB抗体和ALV-J抗体的阳性率为11%(30/272);不同鸡群的ALV感染有所不同,广西三黄鸡>长汀河田鸡>武平象洞鸡、商品鸡>种鸡。%Adopt avian leukosis virus antibody ELISA kit to do a detection about avian leukemia A, B subtype antibody (ALV-A B) and J subtype antibody (ALV-J), based on 272 serum samples collected from 3 types of Huang Yu chicken breeds in Wuping County town. The result is that these 3 types of Huang Yu chiken have ALV-J and AB subtypes natural infection.The ALV-AB antibody make up 27.6% (75 /272), while ALV-J antibody was 20.6% (56 /272). 11 percent of the chiken have both of antibody. Different chikens have differrent ALV injection situation, following is in descending order: Guangxi San Huang chiken > Changting Hetian chiken>Wuping Xiangdong chiken,Commodity chicken>Breeder.

  20. Establishment of a new bovine leukosis virus producing cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beier, D; Riebe, R; Blankenstein, P; Starick, E; Bondzio, A; Marquardt, O

    2004-11-01

    Due to the prevalence of different bovine leukosis virus (BLV) species in the cattle population in Europe, problems may arise in the serological diagnosis of BLV infections. In addition, earlier investigations demonstrated that contamination of the BLV antigen-producing cell culture systems by bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) may give rise to misinterpretation of serological test results after BVDV vaccination of cattle. By co-cultivation of peripheral leukocytes of a BLV-infected cow with a permanent sheep kidney cell line, a new BLV-producing cell line named PO714 was established. This line carries a BLV provirus of the Belgian species and has been tested to be free of a variety of possibly contaminating viruses and mycoplasms. Investigations of a panel of well-characterised sera by agar gel immunodiffusion (AGID) and capture ELISA (cELISA) tests using antigen prepared from this new cell line in comparison with antigen of the well-known cell line FLK/BLV yielded comparable results. False positive results caused by BVDV cross-reactions could be eliminated when tests were carried out with antigen derived from the new cell line.

  1. Research Advances on Hemangioma of Avian Leukosis%血管瘤型禽白血病研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    侯新华; 刘东; 王义; 左青山; 孙健; 李彬; 杜元钊

    2012-01-01

    就血管瘤型禽白血病抗原特征、流行病学、临床及解剖症状、诊断方法和预防控制措施等几方面进行了综述。%The antigen,epidemiology,clinic,anatomy,diagnosis methods and preventive control aspects of hemangioma of avian leukosis were reviewed in this paper.

  2. 我国地方品种鸡分离到的一个禽白血病病毒新亚群的鉴定%Identification of a New Subgroup of Avian Leukosis Virus Isolated from Chinese Indigenous Chicken Breeds

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王鑫; 赵鹏; 崔治中

    2012-01-01

    为探明我国地方品种鸡群禽白血病病毒(Avian leukosis virus,ALV)的特点,通过接种DF-1细胞及细胞培养上清液p27抗原的检测,从芦花鸡中分离得到三株外源性ALV禽白血病病毒,分别是JS11C1、JS11C2和JS11C3,并对其进行亚群鉴定分析.用PCR方法扩增env基因测序,并与已知鸡源各亚群ALV的囊膜蛋白(gp85)作氨基酸同源性比较.这三株ALV的env基因的gp85大小为1 005bp,编码335个氨基酸;env基因的gp37大小为609bp,编码203个氨基酸.三个毒株之间gp85的同源性为91.9%~97.0%.与A、B、C、D和E五个经典亚群在GenBank中已发表的18个毒株的gp85的同源性仅在77.7%~84.6%间,显著低于鸡群中常见的A、B、E各亚群内的同源性范围(分别为88.2%~98.5%,91.6%~98.8%和97.9%~99.4%),而与J亚群参考株的同源性更是只有34.2%~36.5%.上述结果表明,芦花鸡分离到的三株病毒可能是不同于鸡源ALV已知6个亚群的一个新亚群,按国际上对ALV亚群分类的习惯,初步将其定名为K亚群.%In order to clarify Avian leukosis virus(ALV) characteristics from Chinese native chicken breeds, three ALV JS11C1, JS11C2 and JS11C3 were isolated from Chinese native breed "luhua" by inoculation of DF1 cell culture and detection of p27 antigen. Using PCR amplification of env gene, the amplified gp85 genes were analyzed and compared to all six chicken ALV subgroups reported. The gp85 genes of these three viruses were 1 005bp in length and encoded 335 amino acids, and the gp37 genes were 609bp and encoded 203 amino acids. The homology of gp85 among these three isolated strains was 91. 9%-97. 0%. Comparing to 18 stains of subgroup A, B, C, D, E published in GenBank, the homology was only in the range of 77. 7%-84. 6%, significantly lower than the gp85 homology observed within the common chicken subgroups A(88.2%-98. 5%), B (91. 6%-98. 8%), and E(97. 9%-99. 4%). The gp85 homology compared with subgroup J was

  3. Development and characterization of monoclonal antibody to subgroup A and B avian leukosis virus%一株A和B亚群禽白血病病毒特异性单克隆抗体的制备及其特性

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邱玉玉; 李晓霞; 武专昌; 崔治中; 孙淑红; 张显忠

    2011-01-01

    Objective:Development and characterization of monoclonal antibody to subgroup A and B avian leukosis virus.Methods:The env-gp85 gene of ALV-A-SDAU09C1 was subcloned into the prokaryotic expressing vector pET32a and recombinant vector pET32a-SDAU09C1-gp85 was transformed into Escherichia coli strain BL21 for expression under the induction of IPTG.After IPTG induction,there was a new protein band about 53 kD on SDS-PAGE.The expressed proteins were vaccinated into Balb/c mice.Results:One Mab(A6D1),which reacted with all exogenous subgroups of AL-AB but not with endogenous subgroup J,was obtained.Using immunofluorescence assay(IFA),A6D1 reacted with 3 ALV-A and 1 ALV-B ,but not with 4 ALV-J.Western B lot showed that molecular weight of ALV AB enve-lope glycoprotein or unglycosylated envelope protein recognized by Mabs was about 53kD.Conclusion:A6D1 can be used for diagnosis and epidemology of ALV-AB,which compensated for only the subgroup JALV could be used in clinical.%目的:制备A和B亚群禽白血病病毒(Avian leukosis virus,ALV)特异性单克隆抗体.方法:用ALV-A-SDAU09C1株的env-gp85基因的PCR产物构建重组表达性质粒pET32a-SDAU09C1- gp85,经IPTG诱导后,表达分子量为53 kD的ALV-A囊膜gp85蛋白与GST的融合蛋白,将表达产物免疫BALB/c小鼠,取其脾脏细胞与骨髓瘤细胞SP2/0进行融合,筛选杂交瘤细胞株.结果:获得了1株(A6D1株)能与A和B亚群ALV发生反应但不与J亚群ALV反应的杂交瘤细胞株.Western blot试验结果表明,单克隆抗体识别的A和B亚群ALV囊膜糖蛋白的分子量为53 kD.在IFA中,这株单克隆抗体可以与所试验的3株ALV-A和1株ALV-B毒株反应,而与4株ALV-J亚群的毒株不反应.结论:A6D1株单克隆抗体可以用于A和B亚群ALV感染的诊断和流行病学调查,弥补了目前只有J亚群ALV特异性单克隆抗体可用的不足.

  4. Study of the Correlation between TCID50 and p27 Antigen of Subgroup B Avian Leukosis Virus%B亚群禽白血病病毒SDAU09C2株的TCID50与p27抗原之间的相关性研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李薛; 董宣; 赵鹏; 牛星; 崔治中

    2013-01-01

    为了研究B亚群禽白血病病毒(ALV-B)的半数细胞培养物感染量(TCID50)与p27抗原的酶联免疫吸附试验(ELISA)的S/P值之间的相关性,本试验将ALV-B SDAU09C2株接种鸡胚成纤维细胞(CEF细胞),换维持液后连续10 d取样,检测10d的TCID50值与p27抗原的S/P值之间的相关性;同时,将该毒株在DF-1细胞系上传代至20代,取其中的第1、5、10、15和20代分别进行TCID50滴度的测定和p27抗原检测.结果表明,在CEF细胞上接种的ALV-B SDAU09C2株连续10 d的TCID50值与p27抗原之间存在显著的正相关(r=0.94002;P<0.0001);在DF-1细胞系上传的不同代数之间也呈显著正相关(r=0.96449;P=0.0080).由此可推测ALV-B的TCID50与p27抗原呈显著正相关,可以用ELISA法测得的p27抗原的S/P值来估测病毒的TCID50值.%To study the correlation between 50% tissue-culture infective dose (TCID50) value and p27 antigen's S/P value of subgroup B avian leukosis virus and discuss their significance, chicken embryo fibroblast (CEF) cells were inoculated with subgroup B avian leukosis virus strain SDAU09C2 and samples were taken continuously for ten days after changing maintenance media. The correlations between TCID50 value and p27 antigen's S/P value of ten days were then detected. Simultaneously, DF-1 cells were inoculated with it and passed to 20 generations. Samples taken from 1st, 5th, 10th, 15th and 20th generation were received the TCID50 titer determination and the p27 antigen examination separately. A significant Pearson correlation was found between them in CEF cells (r=0. 85277;P<0. 0001) and in DF-1 cells 0=0. 93000; P = 0. 0220). This study provided an important parameter for predicting TCID50 by detecting the p27 antigen's S/P value.

  5. 禽白血病A亚群病毒gp85的单因子血清制备及其特异性鉴定%Mono-specific serum preparation and specificity of gp85 gene of subgroup A Avian Leukosis Virus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张恒; 李传龙; 杨明; 崔治中

    2011-01-01

    [目的]为了研究出一种能够针对A亚群禽白血病的快速特异性诊断试剂.[方法]将A亚群禽白血病病毒(ALV-A)SDAU09E1株接种于DF1细胞上,以感染细胞DNA为模板,通过PCR方法扩增出1023 bp的ALV-A-gp85基因.将其正确阅读框架插入表达载体PET-32a(+)中,实现在BL21(Rosetta)宿主菌中表达.将纯化的融合蛋白常规免疫小鼠,制备得抗血清.[结果]实验成功获得52.8 kDa的重组融合蛋白,且具有良好的免疫原性.间接免疫荧光试验(IFA)表明该血清可与ALV-A和ALV-B反应,但不与ALV-J反应.[结论]该实验首次在国内外研制出能用于鉴别性检测经典的A/B亚群ALV的单因子血清,可与ALV-J特异性单抗互补作用于外源性ALV感染的鉴别性诊断.我国鸡群同时受经典的ALV-A/B和新出现的ALV-J困扰,鉴别诊断非常必要,研究这种试剂具有较高的实用价值.%[Objective]In order to get a rapid specific diagnostic reagent for subgroup A Avian Leukosis Virus detection.[Methods]The Avian Leukosis Virus Subgroup A(ALV-A) SDAU09E1 strain was inoculated into DF1 cells,an ALV-A-gp85 DNA fragment of 1023bp was amplified from infected cells and inserted into PET-32a( + ) plasmid at the location between restriction endonucleases BamH Ⅰ and Not Ⅰ sites.The recombinant plasmid PET-SDAU09E1-gp85 was transformed into E coli.BL21 ( Rosetta) for gp85 gene expression.Then we used the purified recombinant fusion protein to immunize 6 weeks old Kunming white mice, and the antiserum were prepared.[Results]The recombinant ALV-A gp85 fusion protein with a molecular weight of 52.8kDa demonstrated a good antigenecity.Mon-specific serum produced by vaccinated mice came out reactive with subgroups A and B ALV ( ALV-A and ALV-B but not subgroup J ALV) by the indirect immunofluorescence ( IFA ) method.[Conclusion]This was the first time to demonstrate a mono-specific antiserum specific to ALV-A and ALV-B, it could be used for differential diagnosis of

  6. Isolation and identification of the subgroup J avian leukosis virus associated with clinical multiple tumours in Sanhuang layers and pathological observation%三黄鸡临床多发性肿瘤相关的J亚群禽白血病病毒的分离鉴定及其病理学观察

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    齐新永; 张维谊; 鞠厚斌; 邓波; 周锦萍; 刘建; 王曲直

    2011-01-01

    为研究蛋鸡多发性肿瘤的病因,本实验对病鸡肿瘤组织进行病毒分离、培养及PCR检测,均扩增出针对J亚群禽白血病病毒(ALV-J)gp85基因序列的阳性条带;组织病理学观察显示发病鸡呈现髓细胞瘤、血管瘤以及纤维肉瘤等多发性肿瘤的病理变化;肿瘤细胞通过血液转移、浸润,在肝和脾组织形成局灶性或弥漫性肿瘤病灶.免疫组化染色显示肿瘤组织内,部分肿瘤细胞呈现阳性反应,表明只有部分肿瘤细胞存在ALV-J感染,而大部分肿瘤细胞检测结果呈阴性.这些病毒检测为阴性的肿瘤细胞可能是正常细胞转化为肿瘤细胞大量克隆化增殖的结果.%To understand the causes of multiple tumors, clinic tumor samples were collected from affected Sanhuang layers to isolate virus in chick embryo fibroblast (CEF). Both of the tusse samples and virus isolation in CEFs were positive, detected by RT-PCR with specific primers for gp85 gene of subgroup J avian leukosis virus (ALV-J). Histopathologic examination of tissue samples showed that the multiple mmours were myelocytoma, hemangioma or fibrosarcoma due to tumor cells transferred and infiltrated by blood to forme focal or diffusing neoplastic lesions in liver and spleen. Through immunohistological localization,some tumor cells showed positive which indicated only partial tumor cells were infected by ALV-J, while most tumor cells showed negative. indicating most tumor cells were proliferation resulting from normal transferred cells.

  7. Identification of lymphoproliferative disease virus in wild turkeys (Meleagris gallopavo) in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viral-associated lymphoproliferative neoplasia in domestic poultry is caused by infection with a herpesvirus (Marek’s disease virus) or three species of retroviruses [Reticuloendotheliosis virus (REV), Avian leukosis/sarcoma virus, lymphoproliferative disease virus (LPDV)]. Previously, retroviral n...

  8. Role of Virus-Encoded microRNAs in Avian Viral Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongxiu Yao

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available With total dependence on the host cell, several viruses have adopted strategies to modulate the host cellular environment, including the modulation of microRNA (miRNA pathway through virus-encoded miRNAs. Several avian viruses, mostly herpesviruses, have been shown to encode a number of novel miRNAs. These include the highly oncogenic Marek’s disease virus-1 (26 miRNAs, avirulent Marek’s disease virus-2 (36 miRNAs, herpesvirus of turkeys (28 miRNAs, infectious laryngotracheitis virus (10 miRNAs, duck enteritis virus (33 miRNAs and avian leukosis virus (2 miRNAs. Despite the closer antigenic and phylogenetic relationship among some of the herpesviruses, miRNAs encoded by different viruses showed no sequence conservation, although locations of some of the miRNAs were conserved within the repeat regions of the genomes. However, some of the virus-encoded miRNAs showed significant sequence homology with host miRNAs demonstrating their ability to serve as functional orthologs. For example, mdv1-miR-M4-5p, a functional ortholog of gga-miR-155, is critical for the oncogenicity of Marek’s disease virus. Additionally, we also describe the potential association of the recently described avian leukosis virus subgroup J encoded E (XSR miRNA in the induction of myeloid tumors in certain genetically-distinct chicken lines. In this review, we describe the advances in our understanding on the role of virus-encoded miRNAs in avian diseases.

  9. Avian influenza virus and Newcastle disease virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avian influenza virus (AIV) and Newcastle disease virus (NDV) severely impact poultry egg production. Decreased egg yield and hatchability, as well as misshapen eggs, are often observed during infection with AIV and NDV, even with low-virulence strains or in vaccinated flocks. Data suggest that in...

  10. Avian Influenza A Virus Infections in Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... their saliva, mucous and feces. Human infections with bird flu viruses can happen when enough virus gets into ... Virus (CVV) for a Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza (Bird Flu) Virus ” for more information on this process. ...

  11. Molecular characterization of Indonesia avian influenza virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.L.P.I. Dharmayanti

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Avian influenza outbreaks in poultry have been reported in Java island since August 2003. A total of 14 isolates of avian influenza virus has been isolated from October 2003 to October 2004. The viruses have been identified as HPAI H5N1 subtype. All of them were characterized further at genetic level and also for their pathogenicity. Phylogenetic analysis showed all of the avian influenza virus isolates were closely related to avian influenza virus from China (A/Duck/China/E319-2/03(H5N1. Molecular basis of pathogenicity in HA cleavage site indicated that the isolates of avian influenza virus have multiple basic amino acid (B-X-B-R indicating that all of the isolates representing virulent avian influenza virus (highly pathogenic avian influenza virus.

  12. Molecular patterns of avian influenza A viruses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KOU Zheng; LEI FuMin; WANG ShengYue; ZHOU YanHong; LI TianXian

    2008-01-01

    Avian influenza A viruses could get across the species barrier and be fatal to humans. Highly patho-genic avian influenza H5N1 virus was an example. The mechanism of interspecies transmission is not clear as yet. In this research, the protein sequences of 237 influenza A viruses with different subtypes were transformed into pseudo-signals. The energy features were extracted by the method of wavelet packet decomposition and used for virus classification by the method of hierarchical clustering. The clustering results showed that five patterns existed in avian influenza A viruses, which associated with the phenotype of interspecies transmission, and that avian viruses with patterns C and E could across species barrier and those with patterns A, B and D might not have the abilities. The results could be used to construct an early warning system to predict the transmissibility of avian influenza A viruses to humans.

  13. J亚群禽白血病病毒 SUJ及兔 IgGFc基因在腺病毒表达系统中的融合表达%Fusion expression of subgroup J avian leukosis virus gp85 gene with rabbit IgGFc gene in adenovirus expression system and its application

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    梅梅; 钱科; 唐应华; 秦爱建; 侯继波

    2016-01-01

    To obtain the fusion protein of subgroup J avian leukosis virus ( ALV-J) envelope protein gp85 and rabbit IgGFc, ALV-J gp85 gene fused with rabbit IgGFc was expressed by adenovirus expression system. The ALV-J gp85 ( SU) and rabbit IgGFc ( rIgGFc) gene were digested from plasmid pcDNA3. 1-SUJ-rIgGFc with XhoⅠand KpnⅠand cloned into pShuttle-CMV to construct the recombinant plasmid pShuttle-CMV-SUJ-rIgGFc which was transformed into BJ5183-AD-1 competent cells containing pAdeasy-1 to construct the recombinant adenovirus plasmid pAd-SUJ-rIgGFc. The recombinant adenovirus was obtained by transfecting the recom-binant plasmid pAd-SUJ-rIgGFc into 293T cells. The fusion pro-tein can be recognized by mAb JE9 specific to gp85 of ALV-J and antibodies against rabbit IgG with the molecular weight about 9. 5× 104. The result of Co-IP showed that the fusion protein SUJ-rIgGFc reacted with the membrane proteins from DF1 cells and produced differential proteins, indicative of the specific re-action between fused protein and the protein from host cells of ALV-J.%为获得J亚群禽白血病病毒( ALV-J)囊膜蛋白gp85和兔IgGFc的融合蛋白,通过腺病毒表达系统融合表达ALV-J SUJ和兔IgGFc( rIgGFc)基因。将pcDNA3.1-SUJ-rIgGFc用XhoⅠ、KpnⅠ进行双酶切,获得SUJ-rIgGFc基因,将其克隆至 pShuttle-CMV 质粒,构建穿梭载体 pShuttle-CMV-SUJ-rIgGFc,重组质粒转化含 pAdeasy-1的BJ5183-AD-1感受态细胞,获得重组腺病毒质粒 pAd-SUJ-rIgGFc,最后转染人293T细胞。表达的融合蛋白可被ALV-J单克隆抗体JE9以及羊抗兔IgG识别,重组蛋白的分子量大小约9.5×104,且与JE9及羊抗兔IgG都有很好的反应性;免疫共沉淀试验结果显示融合蛋白可与DF1细胞膜蛋白混合物反应并获得差异蛋白。该融合蛋白可与ALV-J宿主细胞蛋白发生特异性反应。

  14. 一例血管瘤型禽白血病的诊断%The diagnosis of hemangioma type of avian leukosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈乙娥

    2014-01-01

    The lab diagnosis has been conducted for the affected chickens from a farm using histopathological method.The pathology were observed in tissue slides of swollen liver and kidney. The DNA samples were extracted for that detected against long terminal re-peat (LTR) gene by nested PCR method in one tube. It was demonstrated that this disease was hemangioma caused by ectogenic avian leukosis virus.%采用病理组织学方法对某养殖户发病死亡鸡进行观察,在肝、肾观察到大量红细胞和组织细胞病变;提取发病鸡DNA样本,以单管巢式PCR方法检测外源性禽白血病病毒长末端重复序列(LTR),扩增出一条预期长度带,证实该次疫病为外源性禽白血病病毒引发的血管瘤型禽白血病。

  15. Peroxidase-linked assay for detection of antibodies against bovine leukosis virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Castro, Clarissa C; Nunes, Cristina F; Finger, Paula F; Siedler, Bianca S; Dummer, Luana; de Lima, Marcelo; Leite, Fábio P L; Fischer, Geferson; Vargas, Gilberto D'A; Hübner, Silvia de O

    2013-01-01

    A peroxidase linked assay (PLA) was designed to screen bovine sera for the presence of specific antibodies against bovine leukosis virus (BLV). Out of 201 samples of bovine sera analyzed, 52.2% were considered positive by PLA, 26.4% by AGID, and 38.9% by ELISA. Western blotting analyses excluded 27 samples found to be positive by PLA. PLA showed 100% of sensitivity when compared with AGID and ELISA. Specificity was 64.8% and 78%, respectively (kappa coefficients were 0.70 and 0.83). These findings indicate that PLA can be used as an alternative method for the diagnosis of BLV infection in cattle.

  16. Investigation of some hematological and blood biochemical parameters in cattle spontaneously infected with bovine leukosis virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandev Nikolay

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to follow out the alterations in some haematological and blood biochemical parameters in cattle spontaneously infected with enzootic bovine leukosis virus with regard to the invivodifferentiation of bovine leukosis stages. The experiment included 76 cows at various ages and body weight. Serological leukosis tests were done by agar-gel immunodiffusion test with a commercial kit of Synbiotiсs (France, containing standardised gp 51 antigen and positive serum approved by the EU. On the basis of haematological results, the cows were divided into three groups: first group – EBL-seropositive with normal haemogramme; second group – EBL seropositive with altered haemogramme and third group – controls. In cows from the first and the second group, a statistically significantly increased blood cell counts was established compared to healthy controls. The total WBC were increased in the second group (leukocytosis up to 33.21×109/l vs reference range of 5-10×109/l as well as lymphocyte percentages (lymphocytosis – 81.89% (reference 40–63%. A reduction in the proportion of neutrophils to 12.78% (relative neutropenia vs the reference range of 22-49% and monocytes (monocytopenia to 1.78% (reference range 2–6% was observed. A statistically significant reduction in Ca concentrations (4.41 mg/dl and higher inorganic phosphate levels (5.28 mg/dl were established in cows from the second group. Also, ASAT activity was considerably lower – 47.03 U/l, while alkaline phosphatase increased slightly within the reference range up to 167.68 U/l and 165.81 U/l in groups one and two, respectively. The present haematological and whole blood/serum biochemical results in cows spontaneously infected with EBL virus could be used as prognostic markers of the course of the disease, to distinguish the stages of infection with regard to alive diagnostics.

  17. Biological Characterization of CVRM2-BAC, A Recombinant CV1988 Virus Containing an REV LTR Insertion

    Science.gov (United States)

    It has been previously reported that avian retroviruses, i.e. avian leukosis virus (ALV) and reticoloendotheliosis virus (REV), integrate in the Marek’s disease virus genome affecting MDV pathogenicity. RM-2 is an attenuated serotype 1 MDV virus generated by insertion of the REV LTR in the genome of...

  18. 9 CFR 381.82 - Diseases of the leukosis complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Diseases of the leukosis complex. 381... Carcasses and Parts § 381.82 Diseases of the leukosis complex. Carcasses of poultry affected with any one or more of the several forms of the avian leukosis complex shall be condemned....

  19. Advance of research on avian lekosis virus%禽白血病病毒研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘公平; 赵振芬; 刘福安

    2000-01-01

    @@ 禽白血病是由禽白血病病毒(avian lekosis virus,ALV)引起的以造血细胞恶性增生为主的一类传染病,包括淋巴细胞性白血病,成红细胞性白血病,成髓细胞白血病和髓细胞样白血病,对养禽业危害最大的是禽淋巴细胞性白血病(lymphoid leukosis,LL).

  20. Pathologic Research of Lymphocytic Subgroup J-Avian Leukosis in Qingyuan Local Chicken%淋巴细胞性J亚群禽白血病病理学观察

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邓桦; 武云飞; 卢玉葵; 王政富; 杨鸿; 马春全

    2011-01-01

    本研究旨在探讨日益复杂和多样的J亚群禽白血病的肿瘤病理表现.在流行病学调查基础上,对广东省4个集约型清远麻鸡种鸡场的禽白血病病原进行了分离鉴定和PCR检测,确诊其病原为禽白血病毒J亚群(ALV-J).通过病理组织学研究发现,这些鸡场ALV-J的主要病理表现为淋巴细胞性肿瘤(82.9%),其次为血管瘤型肿瘤(11.4%),髓细胞性肿瘤仅为5.7%.淋巴细胞性肿瘤主要出现在内脏实质器官,肝脏、脾脏、肾脏、肺脏、腺胃和胰腺等器官明显肿胀,实质中可见大小不一的灰白色肿瘤结节,切面均质柔软.肿瘤的实质主要由典型的成淋巴细胞和淋巴样瘤细胞构成,病理性核分裂像多见.研究结果证实,清远麻鸡出现了一种新的J亚群禽白血病表现形式,即淋巴细胞性J亚群禽白血病,在国内外尚属首次报道.%This experiment was conducted to explore the complicated tumor manifestation of avian leucosis subgroup J. On the basis of epidemiology survey of four Qingyuan local layer chicken farms in Guangdong province, then the avian leucosis virus was isolated and detected by PCR test, and avian leucosis virus subgroup J (ALV-J) was definite diagnosed as the pathogen. The histopathologic study showed that the most tumorous manifestation was lymphocytic leucosis (82. 9%), and then was hemangioma (11. 4%), myeloid leukosis was 5. 7%. Abnormal proliferation of lymphocytic leukosis was occurred mainly in parenchymatous organs, including heavy swollen of liver, spleen, kidney, lung, proventriculus and pancreas. There were many ivory-white tumors and nodules occurred in the parenchyma, and the sections were homogeneous and soft. The solid components of tumors were typical lymphoblast and neoplastic lymphoid cells, and many phanerous pathologic nuclear mitotic figures were observed. Those results confirmed that there appeared a novel tumorous manifestation in Qingyuan local chicken, lymphocytic

  1. Prevention and Treatment of Avian Influenza A Viruses in People

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... their saliva, mucous and feces. Human infections with bird flu viruses can happen when enough virus gets into ... Virus (CVV) for a Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza (Bird Flu) Virus ” for more information on this process. ...

  2. Association between bovine-leukosis virus seroprevalence and herd-level productivity on US dairy farms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ott, S L; Johnson, R; Wells, S J

    2003-12-12

    Bovine-leukosis virus (BLV; also termed 'bovine-leukemia virus') is a retrovirus that primarily affects lymphoid tissue of dairy and beef cattle. Our objective was to investigate the association between BLV infection and annual value of production (AVP) on dairy herds within the United States, as part of the USDA National Animal Health Monitoring System's 1996 dairy study. 1006 herds (in 20 states) with at least 30 dairy cows were interviewed during 1996. The agar-gel immunodiffusion test was used to detect serum antibodies to BLV. 10-40 cows from each herd were tested and each tested cow was classified as negative or positive based on results of a single test. A multivariable regression model was used with the 976 herds with complete data for analysis. When compared to herds with no test-positive cows, herds with test-positive cows produced 218 kg per cow (i.e. 3%) less milk. The average reduction in AVP was $59 per cow for test-positive herds relative to test-negative herds. For the dairy industry as a whole, BLV seropositivity was associated with loss to producers of $285 million and $240 million for consumers. Most of this $525 million industry loss was due to reduced milk production in test-positive herds.

  3. Analysis of Avian Hepatitis E Virus from Chickens, China

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Qin; Zhou, En Min; Dong, Shi Wei; Qiu, Hong Kai; Zhang, Lu; Hu, Shou Bin; Zhao, Fei Fei; Jiang, Shi Jin; Sun, Ya Ni

    2010-01-01

    Avian hepatitis E virus (HEV) has been identified in chickens; however, only 4 complete or near-complete genomic sequences have been reported. We found that the near-complete genomic sequence of avian HEV in chickens from China shared the highest identity (98.3%) with avian HEV from Europe and belonged to avian HEV genotype 3.

  4. Analysis of avian hepatitis E virus from chickens, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Qin; Zhou, En Min; Dong, Shi Wei; Qiu, Hong Kai; Zhang, Lu; Hu, Shou Bin; Zhao, Fei Fei; Jiang, Shi Jin; Sun, Ya Ni

    2010-09-01

    Avian hepatitis E virus (HEV) has been identified in chickens; however, only 4 complete or near-complete genomic sequences have been reported. We found that the near-complete genomic sequence of avian HEV in chickens from China shared the highest identity (98.3%) with avian HEV from Europe and belonged to avian HEV genotype 3.

  5. Protection of chickens against avian hepatitis E virus (avian HEV) infection by immunization with recombinant avian HEV capsid protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, H; Zhou, E M; Sun, Z F; Meng, X J

    2007-04-12

    Avian hepatitis E virus (avian HEV) is an emerging virus associated with hepatitis-splenomegaly syndrome in chickens in North America. Avian HEV is genetically and antigenically related to human HEV, the causative agent of hepatitis E in humans. In the lack of a practical animal model, avian HEV infection in chickens has been used as a model to study human HEV replication and pathogenesis. A 32 kDa recombinant ORF2 capsid protein of avian HEV expressed in Escherichia coli was found having similar antigenic structure as that of human HEV containing major neutralizing epitopes. To determine if the capsid protein of avian HEV can be used as a vaccine, 20 chickens were immunized with purified avian HEV recombinant protein with aluminum as adjuvant and another 20 chickens were mock immunized with KLH precipitated in aluminum as controls. Both groups of chickens were subsequently challenged with avian HEV. All the tested mock-immunized control chickens developed typical avian HEV infection characterized by viremia, fecal virus shedding and seroconversion to avian HEV antibodies. Gross hepatic lesions were also found in portion of these chickens. In contrast, none of the tested chickens immunized with avian HEV capsid protein had detectable viremia, fecal virus shedding or observable gross hepatitis lesions. The results from this study suggested that immunization of chickens with avian HEV recombinant ORF2 capsid protein with aluminum as adjuvant can induce protective immunity against avian HEV infection. Chickens are a useful small animal model to study anti-HEV immunity and pathogenesis.

  6. Histopathological Observation and PCR Diagnosis of Avian Leukosis in Qingyuan MA Chicken%清远麻鸡禽白血病病理组织学观察和PCR诊断

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄兴国; 王政富; 高明超; 蔡丽丽; 王俊峰; 黄淑坚

    2012-01-01

    15 Qingyuan MA chickens which appeared obviously clinical symptom and were tested to be avian leukosis positive were selected. The tumor organs, such as liver, spleen, kidney and so on, were carried on histopathology and PCR diagnosis. The pathology tissue slices from organs of liver, kidney, spleen, marrow, gland stomach, heart, lung, pancreatic gland ovary and so on, were observed, results showed that the proliferation of massive lymphoblasts or scatter and of small lympho-myelocytes were observed. The PCR identification indicated that all 15 samples can amplify a fragment about a length of 545 bp, which consisted with the expected size. The results suggested that all 15 isolates were the ALV-J avian Leukosis viruses.%本试验选择临床症状明显、经禽白血病抗原检测为阳性的15只祖代清远麻鸡,采集肝脏、脾脏、肾脏等器官进行病理组织学观察和PCR诊断.结果显示,从病理组织切片中观察到肝脏、肾脏、脾脏、骨髓、腺胃、心脏、肺脏、胰腺和卵巢等组织中有大量的淋巴母细胞呈灶状增生或散在分布,以及少量的成髓细胞增生.禽白血病病毒主要侵害祖代清远麻鸡机体的内脏器官和骨髓,对大脑等神经组织损害较轻;PCR扩增结果表明,所采集的15份样品均能扩增出545 bp左右的特异性片段,证明15份组织样品中均存在J亚型禽白血病病毒.

  7. The Helper Activities of Different Avian Viruses for Propagation of Recombinant Avian Adeno-Associated Virus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG An-ping; SUN Huai-chang; WANG Jian-ye; WANG Yong-juan; YUAN Wei-feng

    2007-01-01

    To compare the helper activities of different avian viruses for propagation of recombinant avian adeno-associated virus (rAAAV), AAV-293 cells were cotransfected with the AAAV vector pAITR-GFP containing green fluorescent protein (GFP) gene, the AAAV helper vector pcDNA-ARC expressing the rep and cap genes, and the adenovirus helper vector pHelper expressing Ad5 E2A, E4, and VA-RNA genes. Chicken embryonic fibroblast (CEF) or chicken embryonic liver (CEL) cells were cotransfected with the AAAV vector and the AAAV helper vector, followed by infection with Marek's disease virus (MDV), avian adenovirus, chicken embryo lethal orphan (CELO) virus or infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV). Infectious rAAAV particles generated by the two strategies were harvested and titrated on CEF and CEL cells. A significantly higher viral titer was obtained with the helper activity provided by the pHelper vector than by MDV or CELO virus. Further experiments showed that rAAAV-mediated green fluorescent protein (gfp) expression was overtly enhanced by MDV or CELO virus super infection or treatment with sodium butyric acid, but not by IBDV super infection. These data demonstrated that MDV and CELO viruses could provide weak helper activity for propagation of rAAAV, and rAAAV-mediated transgene expression could be enhanced by super infection with the helper viruses.

  8. DETEKSI DINI PENYAKIT TUMOR SEL DARAH MYELOSIT LEUKOSIS MELALUI PEMERIKSAAN ULAS DARAH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dewi Ratih Agungpriyono

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Myelocytes blood cell tumor in chicken is a disease caused by retrovirus, avian leukosis virus subgroup J (ALV-J. The virus has the same group as human retrovirus (HIV which caused AIDS, but the avian type possesses oncogenic properties, that could induce cell transformation and tumor formation. ALV-J stimulates the bone marrow's myelocytes and transforms them into tumor cell myelocytoma. The tumor cells then metastasis through the circulatory system causing myeloid leukosis and tumor cells accumulation in various internal organs or myelocytomatosis. This study was done on the base of the leukosis behavior of the tumor. The finding of the metastasis tumor cell in the blood smear examination is thought could be use as the diagnostic clue of the disease. Blood smear from sick chickens are collected and stained with some chemical staining substance such as may grunwald-giemsa, hematoxyllin eosin, periodic acid Schiff, congo red, toluidine blue, and sudan black B. Cytochemistry character of the blood cells was observed using light microscope. The result showed that myelocytes granules were best observed using hematoxyllin eosin, periodic acid Schiff, congo red and toluidine blue while may grunwald-giemsa, and sudan black B could not differentiate the granules. By this method, the field veterinarian will able to screen the suspected chicken flock for myeloid leukosis earlier than the occurrence of tumor formation.

  9. Pathobiology and subgroup specificity of disease induced by Rous associated virus 7 (RAV-7)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carter, J.Y.

    1983-01-01

    When Rous associated virus 7 (RAV-7) was injected intravenously into 10-day old chicken embryos, a disease syndrome developed which was characterized by stunting, hyperlipidemia, hypothyroidism, and hyperinsulinemia. Stocks of RAV-7, a subgroup C avian leukosis virus, were obtained by end-point purification on chick embryo fibroblast cells. The size of the viral RNA was 8.2 kb and the protein banding pattern on polyacrylamide gels was typical of avian leukosis viruses. These results indicated that RAV-7 was a non-defective avian leukosis virus and no sarcoma or defective leukemia viruses were present in the RAV-7 stock. RAV-7 induced a unique disease syndrome although infection by three other subgroup C avian leukosis viruses (tdB77, tdPrC, and RAV-49) resulted in an identical lymphoblastoid infiltration of the thyroid and pancreas. An examination of disease induced by avian leukosis viruses from subgroups A, B, D, and F showed that infection by any of these subgroups did not result in the typical RAV-7 disease syndrome.

  10. Putative Novel Genotype of Avian Hepatitis E Virus, Hungary, 2010

    OpenAIRE

    Bányai, Krisztián; Tóth, Ádám György; Ivanics, Éva; Glávits, Róbert; Szentpáli-Gavallér, Katalin; Dán, Ádám

    2012-01-01

    To explore the genetic diversity of avian hepatitis E virus strains, we characterized the near-complete genome of a strain detected in 2010 in Hungary, uncovering moderate genome sequence similarity with reference strains. Public health implications related to consumption of eggs or meat contaminated by avian hepatitis E virus, or to poultry handling, require thorough investigation.

  11. Putative novel genotype of avian hepatitis E virus, Hungary, 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bányai, Krisztián; Tóth, Ádám György; Ivanics, Éva; Glávits, Róbert; Szentpáli-Gavallér, Katalin; Dán, Ádám

    2012-08-01

    To explore the genetic diversity of avian hepatitis E virus strains, we characterized the near-complete genome of a strain detected in 2010 in Hungary, uncovering moderate genome sequence similarity with reference strains. Public health implications related to consumption of eggs or meat contaminated by avian hepatitis E virus, or to poultry handling, require thorough investigation.

  12. Avian Influenza Viruses in Water Birds, Africa 1

    OpenAIRE

    Gaidet, Nicolas; Dodman, Tim; Caron, Alexandre; Balança, Gilles; Desvaux, Stephanie; Goutard, Flavie; Cattoli, Giovanni; Lamarque, François; Hagemeijer, Ward; Monicat, François

    2007-01-01

    We report the first large-scale surveillance of avian influenza viruses in water birds conducted in Africa. This study shows evidence of avian influenza viruses in wild birds, both Eurasian and Afro-tropical species, in several major wetlands of Africa.

  13. Ribonucleoprotein of avian infectious bronchitis virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, H A; Dourmashkin, R R; Macnaughton, M R

    1981-03-01

    The ribonucleoprotein (RNP) of avian infectious bronchitis virus (IBV) was examined by electron microscopy after shadowing with carbon/platinum. Linear RNP strands up to 6.7 microns in length, from three IVB strains, were sensitive to both pancreatic RNase and to proteases. These strands were obtained from spontaneously disrupted complete particles but not from disrupted incomplete particles that lacked RNP. They were also released from Nonidet P40-disrupted particles and could be isolated on sucrose density gradients at a density of 1.27 g/ml. In some cases, helical RNP complexes associated with virus particles were observed that were similar to RNPs of human coronavirus strain 229E and mouse hepatitis virus strain 3.

  14. Seroprevalence of avian hepatitis E virus and avian leucosis virus subgroup J in chicken flocks with hepatitis syndrome, China

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Yani; Du, Taofeng; Liu, Baoyuan; Syed, Shahid Faraz; Chen, Yiyang; Li, Huixia; Wang, Xinjie; Zhang, Gaiping; Zhou, En-Min; Zhao, Qin

    2016-01-01

    Background From 2014 to 2015 in China, many broiler breeder and layer hen flocks exhibited a decrease in egg production and some chickens developed hepatitis syndrome including hepatomegaly, hepatic necrosis and hemorrhage. Avian hepatitis E virus (HEV) and avian leucosis virus subgroup J (ALV-J) both cause decreasing in egg production, hepatomegaly and hepatic hemorrhage in broiler breeder and layer hens. In the study, the seroprevalence of avian HEV and ALV-J in these flocks emerging the di...

  15. Deteksi Antibodi Serum Terhadap Virus Avian influenza pada Ayam Buras

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darmawi Darmawi

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Detection on Serum Antibodies of Native Chickens to Avian influenza Virus ABSTRACT.  An important approach of controlling against Avian Influenza should be determined to detect the antibody titres of bird flu caused by Influenza virus H5N1 in Indonesia. The aim of the present study was to detect the antibodies to Avian Influenza in serum of native chickens. This study utilized 123 serum samples collected from the axilaris vein (left or right of native chickens. Antibody titres were examined using Hemaglutination Inhibition (HI. The result showed that indication of natural infection by Avian Influenza (H5N1 in native chickens, as shown that out of 123 serum samples, 16 (13,01% were tested positive by HI, while only 10 (8,13% were tested protective to Avian influenza infection. Based on the results we obtained, a conclusion that natural infection by Avian influenza virus stimulated variety level of formation antibody titres in native chickens.

  16. Avian influenza virus and free-ranging wild birds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dierauf, Leslie A.; Karesh, W.B.; Ip, Hon S.; Gilardi, K.V.; Fischer, John R.

    2006-01-01

    Recent media and news reports and other information implicate wild birds in the spread of highly pathogenic avian influenza in Asia and Eastern Europe. Although there is little information concerning highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses in wild birds, scientists have amassed a large amount of data on low-pathogenicity avian influenza viruses during decades of research with wild birds. This knowledge can provide sound guidance to veterinarians, public health professionals, the general public, government agencies, and other entities with concerns about avian influenza.

  17. Infection of Avian Pox Virus in Oriental Turtle-Doves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyung-Yeon Eo1, Young-Hoan Kim2, Kwang-Hyun Cho3, Jong-Sik Jang4, Tae-Hwan Kim5, Dongmi Kwak5 and Oh-Deog Kwon5*

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Three Oriental Turtle-doves (Streptopelia orientalis exhibiting lethargy, dyspnea, poor physical condition, and poor flight endurance, were rescued and referred to the Animal Health Center, Seoul Zoo, Korea. The doves had wart-like lesions on the legs and head. All of them died the following day after arrival, with the exception of one that survived for 6 days. Diphtheritic membranes on the tongue and oral mucosa were apparent at necropsy. Avian pox virus infection was suspected based on the proliferative skin lesions and oral diphtheritic lesions. Infection of the avian pox virus was confirmed by PCR using primers specific to the 4b core protein gene of avian pox virus. All cases were diagnosed with avian pox virus infection. This is believed to be the first description on natural infection of avian pox in Oriental Turtle-doves in Korea.

  18. 9 CFR 113.208 - Avian Encephalomyelitis Vaccine, Killed Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ..., Killed Virus. 113.208 Section 113.208 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Killed Virus Vaccines § 113.208 Avian Encephalomyelitis Vaccine, Killed Virus....

  19. Avian Influenza: Mixed Infections and Missing Viruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David E. Wentworth

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available A high prevalence and diversity of avian influenza (AI viruses were detected in a population of wild mallards sampled during summer 2011 in California, providing an opportunity to compare results obtained before and after virus culture. We tested cloacal swab samples prior to culture by matrix real-time PCR, and by amplifying and sequencing a 640bp portion of the hemagglutinin (HA gene. Each sample was also inoculated into embryonated chicken eggs, and full genome sequences were determined for cultured viruses. While low matrix Ct values were a good predictor of virus isolation from eggs, samples with high or undetectable Ct values also yielded isolates. Furthermore, a single passage in eggs altered the occurrence and detection of viral strains, and mixed infections (different HA subtypes were detected less frequently after culture. There is no gold standard or perfect reference comparison for surveillance of unknown viruses, and true negatives are difficult to distinguish from false negatives. This study showed that sequencing samples prior to culture increases the detection of mixed infections and enhances the identification of viral strains and sequences that may have changed or even disappeared during culture.

  20. Avian influenza: mixed infections and missing viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsay, LeAnn L; Kelly, Terra R; Plancarte, Magdalena; Schobel, Seth; Lin, Xudong; Dugan, Vivien G; Wentworth, David E; Boyce, Walter M

    2013-08-05

    A high prevalence and diversity of avian influenza (AI) viruses were detected in a population of wild mallards sampled during summer 2011 in California, providing an opportunity to compare results obtained before and after virus culture. We tested cloacal swab samples prior to culture by matrix real-time PCR, and by amplifying and sequencing a 640bp portion of the hemagglutinin (HA) gene. Each sample was also inoculated into embryonated chicken eggs, and full genome sequences were determined for cultured viruses. While low matrix Ct values were a good predictor of virus isolation from eggs, samples with high or undetectable Ct values also yielded isolates. Furthermore, a single passage in eggs altered the occurrence and detection of viral strains, and mixed infections (different HA subtypes) were detected less frequently after culture. There is no gold standard or perfect reference comparison for surveillance of unknown viruses, and true negatives are difficult to distinguish from false negatives. This study showed that sequencing samples prior to culture increases the detection of mixed infections and enhances the identification of viral strains and sequences that may have changed or even disappeared during culture.

  1. PCR检测血液样品方法在禽白血病净化中的应用研究%Application of PCR for Detection of Blood Samples in Avian Leukosis Eradication

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈静; 程合刚; 王波; 王世新; 王丹; 王海明; 孙淑红

    2014-01-01

    本研究选择山东某地方品种祖代种公鸡的177份血液样品和177份泄殖腔棉拭子样品为试验材料,应用ELISA、病毒分离、PCR等方法对禽白血病病毒(Avian leukosis virus,ALV) p27抗原进行检测.结果显示,血清、泄殖腔棉拭子ALV-p27抗原阳性率分别为20.34% (36/177)、26.55% (47/177);病毒分离率为1.70%(3/177),血液样品PCR方法检出J亚群ALV(ALV-J)阳性率为0.56%(1/177),序列分析结果显示为ALV-J,但该血液样品的病毒分离结果为阴性.研究表明,PCR检测血液样品方法的应用有助于减少禽白血病净化所需的病毒分离结果的可能缺漏.在此基础上,优化并进一步拓展对其他亚群ALV的PCR方法检测,可作为禽白血病经典净化方法的有力补充,并加快我国地方品种鸡禽白血病的净化进程.

  2. Aerosolized avian influenza virus by laboratory manipulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Zhiping

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Avian H5N1 influenza viruses present a challenge in the laboratory environment, as they are difficult to collect from the air due to their small size and relatively low concentration. In an effort to generate effective methods of H5N1 air removal and ensure the safety of laboratory personnel, this study was designed to investigate the characteristics of aerosolized H5N1 produced by laboratory manipulations during research studies. Results Normal laboratory procedures used to process the influenza virus were carried out independently and the amount of virus polluting the on-site atmosphere was measured. In particular, zootomy, grinding, centrifugation, pipetting, magnetic stirring, egg inoculation, and experimental zoogenetic infection were performed. In addition, common accidents associated with each process were simulated, including breaking glass containers, syringe injection of influenza virus solution, and rupturing of centrifuge tubes. A micro-cluster sampling ambient air pollution collection device was used to collect air samples. The collected viruses were tested for activity by measuring their ability to induce hemagglutination with chicken red blood cells and to propagate in chicken embryos after direct inoculation, the latter being detected by reverse-transcription PCR and HA test. The results showed that the air samples from the normal centrifugal group and the negative-control group were negative, while all other groups were positive for H5N1. Conclusions Our findings suggest that there are numerous sources of aerosols in laboratory operations involving H5N1. Thus, laboratory personnel should be aware of the exposure risk that accompanies routine procedures involved in H5N1 processing and take proactive measures to prevent accidental infection and decrease the risk of virus aerosol leakage beyond the laboratory.

  3. Protecting poultry workers from exposure to avian influenza viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacMahon, Kathleen L; Delaney, Lisa J; Kullman, Greg; Gibbins, John D; Decker, John; Kiefer, Max J

    2008-01-01

    Emerging zoonotic diseases are of increasing regional and global importance. Preventing occupational exposure to zoonotic diseases protects workers as well as their families, communities, and the public health. Workers can be protected from zoonotic diseases most effectively by preventing and controlling diseases in animals, reducing workplace exposures, and educating workers. Certain avian influenza viruses are potential zoonotic disease agents that may be transmitted from infected birds to humans. Poultry workers are at risk of becoming infected with these viruses if they are exposed to infected birds or virus-contaminated materials or environments. Critical components of worker protection include educating employers and training poultry workers about occupational exposure to avian influenza viruses. Other recommendations for protecting poultry workers include the use of good hygiene and work practices, personal protective clothing and equipment, vaccination for seasonal influenza viruses, antiviral medication, and medical surveillance. Current recommendations for protecting poultry workers from exposure to avian influenza viruses are summarized in this article.

  4. The challenges of avian influenza virus: mechanism, epidemiology and control

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    George F. GAO; Pang-Chui SHAW

    2009-01-01

    @@ Early 2009, eight human infection cases of H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) virus, with 5 death cases, were reported in China. This again made the world alert on a possible pandemic worldwide, probably caused by avian-origin influenza virus. Again H5N1 is in the spotlight of the world, not only for the scientists but also for the ordinary people. How much do we know about this virus? Where will this virus go and where did it come? Can we avoid a possible pandemic of influenza? Will the human beings conquer this devastating agent? Obviously we can list more questions than we know the answers.

  5. Detection of monoclonal integration of bovine leukemia virus proviral DNA as a malignant marker in two enzootic bovine leukosis cases with difficult clinical diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, Saori; Horiuchi, Noriyuki; Matsumoto, Kotaro; Kobayashi, Yoshiyasu; Kawazu, Shin-Ichiro; Inokuma, Hisashi

    2015-07-01

    Monoclonal integration of bovine leukemia virus (BLV) proviral DNA into bovine genomes was detected in peripheral blood from two clinical cases of enzootic bovine leukosis (EBL) without enlargement of superficial lymph nodes. A BLV-specific probe hybridized with 1 to 3 EcoRI and HindIII fragments in these 2 atypical EBL cattle by Southern blotting and hybridization, as well as in 3 typical EBL cattle. The probe also hybridized to a large number of EcoRI and HindIII fragments in 5 cattle with persistent leukosis. These results suggest that the detection of monoclonal integration of BLV provirus into the host genome may serve as a marker of monoclonal proliferation and malignancy in difficult to diagnose EBL cattle.

  6. Avian influenza in shorebirds: experimental infection of ruddy turnstones (Arenaria interpres) with avian influenza virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Jeffrey S.; Krauss, Scott; Franson, J. Christian; TeSlaa, Joshua L.; Nashold, Sean W.; Stallknecht, David E.; Webby, Richard J.; Webster, Robert G.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Low pathogenic avian influenza viruses (LPAIV) have been reported in shorebirds, especially at Delaware Bay, USA, during spring migration. However, data on patterns of virus excretion, minimal infectious doses, and clinical outcome are lacking. The ruddy turnstone (Arenaria interpres) is the shorebird species with the highest prevalence of influenza virus at Delaware Bay. Objectives: The primary objective of this study was to experimentally assess the patterns of influenza virus excretion, minimal infectious doses, and clinical outcome in ruddy turnstones. Methods: We experimentally challenged ruddy turnstones using a common LPAIV shorebird isolate, an LPAIV waterfowl isolate, or a highly pathogenic H5N1 avian influenza virus. Cloacal and oral swabs and sera were analyzed from each bird. Results: Most ruddy turnstones had pre-existing antibodies to avian influenza virus, and many were infected at the time of capture. The infectious doses for each challenge virus were similar (103·6–104·16 EID50), regardless of exposure history. All infected birds excreted similar amounts of virus and showed no clinical signs of disease or mortality. Influenza A-specific antibodies remained detectable for at least 2 months after inoculation. Conclusions: These results provide a reference for interpretation of surveillance data, modeling, and predicting the risks of avian influenza transmission and movement in these important hosts.

  7. Rapidly expanding range of highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Jeffrey S.; Dusek, Robert J.; Spackman, Erica

    2015-01-01

    The movement of highly pathogenic avian influenza (H5N8) virus across Eurasia and into North America and the virus’ propensity to reassort with co-circulating low pathogenicity viruses raise concerns among poultry producers, wildlife biologists, aviculturists, and public health personnel worldwide. Surveillance, modeling, and experimental research will provide the knowledge required for intelligent policy and management decisions.

  8. Detecting emerging transmissibility of avian influenza virus in human households.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michiel van Boven

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Accumulating infections of highly pathogenic H5N1 avian influenza in humans underlines the need to track the ability of these viruses to spread among humans. A human-transmissible avian influenza virus is expected to cause clusters of infections in humans living in close contact. Therefore, epidemiological analysis of infection clusters in human households is of key importance. Infection clusters may arise from transmission events from (i the animal reservoir, (ii humans who were infected by animals (primary human-to-human transmission, or (iii humans who were infected by humans (secondary human-to-human transmission. Here we propose a method of analysing household infection data to detect changes in the transmissibility of avian influenza viruses in humans at an early stage. The method is applied to an outbreak of H7N7 avian influenza virus in The Netherlands that was the cause of more than 30 human-to-human transmission events. The analyses indicate that secondary human-to-human transmission is plausible for the Dutch household infection data. Based on the estimates of the within-household transmission parameters, we evaluate the effectiveness of antiviral prophylaxis, and conclude that it is unlikely that all household infections can be prevented with current antiviral drugs. We discuss the applicability of our method for the detection of emerging human-to-human transmission of avian influenza viruses in particular, and for the analysis of within-household infection data in general.

  9. Active surveillance for avian influenza virus, Egypt, 2010-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayali, Ghazi; Kandeil, Ahmed; El-Shesheny, Rabeh; Kayed, Ahmed S; Gomaa, Mokhtar M; Maatouq, Asmaa M; Shehata, Mahmoud M; Moatasim, Yassmin; Bagato, Ola; Cai, Zhipeng; Rubrum, Adam; Kutkat, Mohamed A; McKenzie, Pamela P; Webster, Robert G; Webby, Richard J; Ali, Mohamed A

    2014-04-01

    Continuous circulation of influenza A(H5N1) virus among poultry in Egypt has created an epicenter in which the viruses evolve into newer subclades and continue to cause disease in humans. To detect influenza viruses in Egypt, since 2009 we have actively surveyed various regions and poultry production sectors. From August 2010 through January 2013, >11,000 swab samples were collected; 10% were positive by matrix gene reverse transcription PCR. During this period, subtype H9N2 viruses emerged, cocirculated with subtype H5N1 viruses, and frequently co-infected the same avian host. Genetic and antigenic analyses of viruses revealed that influenza A(H5N1) clade 2.2.1 viruses are dominant and that all subtype H9N2 viruses are G1-like. Cocirculation of different subtypes poses concern for potential reassortment. Avian influenza continues to threaten public and animal health in Egypt, and continuous surveillance for avian influenza virus is needed.

  10. Detection of monoclonal integration of bovine leukemia virus proviral DNA as a malignant marker in two enzootic bovine leukosis cases with difficult clinical diagnosis

    OpenAIRE

    Miura, Saori; HORIUCHI, Noriyuki; Matsumoto, Kotaro; KOBAYASHI, Yoshiyasu; Kawazu, Shin-ichiro; INOKUMA, Hisashi

    2015-01-01

    Monoclonal integration of bovine leukemia virus (BLV) proviral DNA into bovine genomes was detected in peripheral blood from two clinical cases of enzootic bovine leukosis (EBL) without enlargement of superficial lymph nodes. A BLV-specific probe hybridized with 1 to 3 EcoRI and HindIII fragments in these 2 atypical EBL cattle by Southern blotting and hybridization, as well as in 3 typical EBL cattle. The probe also hybridized to a large number of EcoRI and HindIII fragments in 5 cattle with ...

  11. Research update: Avian Disease and Oncology Laboratory avian tumor viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genomics and Immunogenetics Use of genomics to identify QTL, genes, and proteins associated with resistance to Marek’s disease. Marek’s disease (MD), a lymphoproliferative disease caused by the highly oncogenic herpesvirus Marek's disease virus (MDV), continues to be a major disease concern to the p...

  12. Migratory birds reinforce local circulation of avian influenza viruses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhagen, J.H.G.; Van Dijk, J.G.B.; Vuong, O.; Lexmond, P.; Klaassen, M.R.J.; Fouchier, R.A.M

    2014-01-01

    Migratory and resident hosts have been hypothesized to fulfil distinct roles in infectious disease dynamics. However, the contribution of resident and migratory hosts to wildlife infectious disease epidemiology, including that of low pathogenic avian influenza virus (LPAIV) in wild birds, has largel

  13. Migratory birds reinforce local circulation of avian influenza viruses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.H. Verhagen (Josanne); J.G.B. Dijk (Jacintha); O. Vuong (Spronken); T.M. Bestebroer (Theo); P. Lexmond (Pascal); M. Klaassen (Marcel); R.A.M. Fouchier (Ron)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractMigratory and resident hosts have been hypothesized to fulfil distinct roles in infectious disease dynamics. However, the contribution of resident and migratory hosts to wildlife infectious disease epidemiology, including that of low pathogenic avian influenza virus (LPAIV) in wild birds

  14. Avian Influenza A (H7N9) Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this? Submit Button Past Newsletters Avian Influenza A (H7N9) Virus Language: English Español Recommend on Facebook ... Fourth Epidemic — China, September 2015–August 2016." H7N9 Outbreak Characterization H7N9 infections in people and poultry ...

  15. Rapidly expanding range of highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    The recent introduction of highly pathogenic avian influenza virus (HPAIV) H5N8 into Europe and North America poses significant risks to poultry industries and wildlife populations and warrants continued and heightened vigilance. First discovered in South Korean poultry and wild birds in early 2014...

  16. First characterization of avian influenza viruses from Greenland 2014

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartby, Christina Marie; Krog, Jesper Schak; Ravn Merkel, Flemming;

    2016-01-01

    In late February 2014, unusually high numbers of wild birds, thick-billed murre (Uria lomvia), were found dead at the coast of South Greenland. To investigate the cause of death, 45 birds were submitted for laboratory examinations in Denmark. Avian influenza viruses (AIVs) with subtypes H11N2...

  17. Pathogenicity of highly pathogenic avian influenza virus in mammals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. de Wit (Emmie); Y. Kawaoka (Yoshihiro); M.D. de Jong (Menno); R.A.M. Fouchier (Ron)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractIn recent years, there has been an increase in outbreaks of highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) in poultry. Occasionally, these outbreaks have resulted in transmission of influenza viruses to humans and other mammals, with symptoms ranging from conjunctivitis to pneumonia and death.

  18. Avian hepatitis E virus in chickens, Taiwan, 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Ingrid W-Y; Tsai, Hsiang-Jung

    2014-01-01

    A previously unidentified strain of avian hepatitis E virus (aHEV) is now endemic among chickens in Taiwan. Analysis showed that the virus is 81.5%-86.5% similar to other aHEVs. In Taiwan, aHEV infection has been reported in chickens without aHEV exposure, suggesting transmission from asymptomatic cases or repeated introduction through an unknown common source(s).

  19. Genetic variation at the tumor virus B locus in commercial and labratory chicken populations assessed by a medium-throughput or a high-throughput assay

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, H.M.; Bacon, L.D.; Heidari, M.; Muir, W.M.; Groenen, M.A.M.; Albers, G.A.; Rattink, A.P.

    2007-01-01

    The tumour virus B (TVB) locus encodes cellular receptors mediating infection by three subgroups of avian leukosis virus (B, D, and E). Three major alleles, TVB*S1, TVB*S3, and TVB*R, have been described. TVB*S1 encodes a cellular receptor mediating infection of subgroups B, D, and E. TVB*S3 encodes

  20. Detection of evolutionarily distinct avian influenza a viruses in antarctica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurt, Aeron C; Vijaykrishna, Dhanasekaran; Butler, Jeffrey; Baas, Chantal; Maurer-Stroh, Sebastian; Silva-de-la-Fuente, M Carolina; Medina-Vogel, Gonzalo; Olsen, Bjorn; Kelso, Anne; Barr, Ian G; González-Acuña, Daniel

    2014-05-06

    ABSTRACT Distinct lineages of avian influenza viruses (AIVs) are harbored by spatially segregated birds, yet significant surveillance gaps exist around the globe. Virtually nothing is known from the Antarctic. Using virus culture, molecular analysis, full genome sequencing, and serology of samples from Adélie penguins in Antarctica, we confirmed infection by H11N2 subtype AIVs. Their genetic segments were distinct from all known contemporary influenza viruses, including South American AIVs, suggesting spatial separation from other lineages. Only in the matrix and polymerase acidic gene phylogenies did the Antarctic sequences form a sister relationship to South American AIVs, whereas distant phylogenetic relationships were evident in all other gene segments. Interestingly, their neuraminidase genes formed a distant relationship to all avian and human influenza lineages, and the polymerase basic 1 and polymerase acidic formed a sister relationship to the equine H3N8 influenza virus lineage that emerged during 1963 and whose avian origins were previously unknown. We also estimated that each gene segment had diverged for 49 to 80 years from its most closely related sequences, highlighting a significant gap in our AIV knowledge in the region. We also show that the receptor binding properties of the H11N2 viruses are predominantly avian and that they were unable to replicate efficiently in experimentally inoculated ferrets, suggesting their continuous evolution in avian hosts. These findings add substantially to our understanding of both the ecology and the intra- and intercontinental movement of Antarctic AIVs and highlight the potential risk of an incursion of highly pathogenic AIVs into this fragile environment. IMPORTANCE Avian influenza viruses (AIVs) are typically maintained and spread by migratory birds, resulting in the existence of distinctly different viruses around the world. However, AIVs have not previously been detected in Antarctica. In this study, we

  1. Inhibition of avian leukosis virus replication by vector-based RNA interference

    Science.gov (United States)

    RNAi has recently emerged as a promising antiviral technique in vertebrates. To date, most studies have used exogenous short interfering RNAs (siRNAs) to inhibit viral replication, though vectors expressing short hairpin RNAs (shRNA-mirs) in the context of a modified endogenous micro-RNA (miRNA) are...

  2. Avian hepatitis E virus, vaccines and methods of protecting against avian hepatitis-splenomegaly syndrome and mammalian hepatitis E

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    The present invention relates to a novel isolated avian hepatitis E virus having a nucleotide sequence set forth in SEQ ID NO:1 or its complementary strand. The invention further concerns immunogenic compositions comprising this new virus or recombinant products such as the nucleic acid and vaccines that protect an avian or mammalian species from viral infection or hepatitis-splenomegaly syndrome caused by the hepatitis E virus. Also included in the scope of the invention is a method for prop...

  3. Determination and analysis of the complete genomic sequence of avian hepatitis E virus (avian HEV) and attempts to infect rhesus monkeys with avian HEV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, F F; Sun, Z F; Emerson, S U; Purcell, R H; Shivaprasad, H L; Pierson, F W; Toth, T E; Meng, X J

    2004-06-01

    Avian hepatitis E virus (avian HEV), recently identified from a chicken with hepatitis-splenomegaly syndrome in the United States, is genetically and antigenically related to human and swine HEVs. In this study, sequencing of the genome was completed and an attempt was made to infect rhesus monkeys with avian HEV. The full-length genome of avian HEV, excluding the poly(A) tail, is 6654 bp in length, which is about 600 bp shorter than that of human and swine HEVs. Similar to human and swine HEV genomes, the avian HEV genome consists of a short 5' non-coding region (NCR) followed by three partially overlapping open reading frames (ORFs) and a 3'NCR. Avian HEV shares about 50 % nucleotide sequence identity over the complete genome, 48-51 % identity in ORF1, 46-48 % identity in ORF2 and only 29-34 % identity in ORF3 with human and swine HEV strains. Significant genetic variations such as deletions and insertions, particularly in ORF1 of avian HEV, were observed. However, motifs in the putative functional domains of ORF1, such as the helicase and methyltransferase, were relatively conserved between avian HEV and mammalian HEVs, supporting the conclusion that avian HEV is a member of the genus Hepevirus. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that avian HEV represents a branch distinct from human and swine HEVs. Swine HEV infects non-human primates and possibly humans and thus may be zoonotic. An attempt was made to determine whether avian HEV also infects across species by experimentally inoculating two rhesus monkeys with avian HEV. Evidence of virus infection was not observed in the inoculated monkeys as there was no seroconversion, viraemia, faecal virus shedding or serum liver enzyme elevation. The results from this study confirmed that avian HEV is related to, but distinct from, human and swine HEVs; however, unlike swine HEV, avian HEV is probably not transmissible to non-human primates.

  4. Susceptibility of swine to H5 and H7 low pathogenic avian influenza viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    The ability of pigs to become infected with low pathogenic avian influenza (LPAI) viruses from an avian reservoir, and then generate mammalian adaptable influenza A viruses (IAVs) is difficult to determine. Yet, it is an important link to understanding any relationship between LPAI virus ecology and...

  5. Avian influenza A viruses: from zoonosis to pandemic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard, Mathilde; de Graaf, Miranda; Herfst, Sander

    2014-05-01

    Zoonotic influenza A viruses originating from the animal reservoir pose a threat for humans, as they have the ability to trigger pandemics upon adaptation to and invasion of an immunologically naive population. Of particular concern are the H5N1 viruses that continue to circulate in poultry in numerous countries in Europe, Asia and Africa, and the recently emerged H7N9 viruses in China, due to their relatively high number of human fatalities and pandemic potential. To start a pandemic, zoonotic influenza A viruses should not only acquire the ability to attach to, enter and replicate in the critical target cells in the respiratory tract of the new host, but also efficiently spread between humans by aerosol or respiratory droplet transmission. Here, we discuss the latest advances on the genetic and phenotypic determinants required for avian influenza A viruses to adapt to and transmit between mammals.

  6. Antigenic properties of avian hepatitis E virus capsid protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Qin; Syed, Shahid Faraz; Zhou, En-Min

    2015-10-22

    Avian hepatitis E virus (HEV) is the main causative agent of big liver and spleen disease and hepatitis-splenomegaly syndrome in chickens, and is genetically and antigenically related to mammalian HEVs. HEV capsid protein contains immunodominant epitopes and induces a protective humoral immune response. A better understanding of the antigenic composition of this protein is critically important for the development of effective vaccine and sensitive and specific serological assays. To date, six linear antigenic domains (I-VI) have been characterized in avian HEV capsid protein and analyzed for their applications in the serological diagnosis and vaccine design. Domains I and V induce strong immune response in chickens and are common to avian, human, and swine HEVs, indicating that the shared epitopes hampering differential diagnosis of avian HEV infection. Domains III and IV are not immunodominant and elicit a weak immune response. Domain VI, located in the N-terminal region of the capsid protein, can also trigger an intense immune response, but the anti-domain VI antibodies are transient. The protection analysis showed that the truncated capsid protein containing the C-terminal 268 amino acid residues expressed by the bacterial system can provide protective immunity against avian HEV infection in chickens. However, the synthetic peptides incorporating the different linear antigenic domains (I-VI) and epitopes are non-protective. The antigenic composition of avian HEV capsid protein is altogether complex. To develop an effective vaccine and accurate serological diagnostic methods, more conformational antigenic domains or epitopes are to be characterized in detail.

  7. Comparison of the copy numbers of bovine leukemia virus in the lymph nodes of cattle with enzootic bovine leukosis and cattle with latent infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somura, Yoshiko; Sugiyama, Emi; Fujikawa, Hiroshi; Murakami, Kenji

    2014-10-01

    To establish a diagnostic index for predicting enzootic bovine leukosis (EBL), proviral bovine leukemia virus (BLV) copies in whole blood, lymph nodes and spleen were examined by quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR). Cattle were divided into two groups, EBL and BLV-infected, based on meat inspection data. The number of BLV copies in all specimens of EBL cattle was significantly higher than those of BLV-infected cattle (p < 0.0001), and the number of BLV copies in the lymph nodes was particularly large. Over 70 % of the superficial cervical, medial iliac and jejunal lymph nodes from EBL cattle had more than 1,000 copies/10 ng DNA, whereas lymph nodes from BLV-infected cattle did not. These findings suggest that the cattle harboring more than 1,000 BLV copies may be diagnosed with EBL.

  8. Molecular epidemiology of bovine leukemia virus associated with enzootic bovine leukosis in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumura, Keiko; Inoue, Emi; Osawa, Yoshiaki; Okazaki, Katsunori

    2011-01-01

    Bovine leukemia virus (BLV) infection of cattle has been increasing yearly in Japan although several European countries have successfully eradicated the infection. In the present study, phylogenetic analysis on the env gene obtained from 64 tumor samples found in different regions in Japan was carried out in order to define the genetic background of BLV strains prevailing in the country. Most of the Japanese isolates were found to reside in the consensus cluster or genotype 1 of BLV strains (Rodriguez et al., 2009). Out of them, 21 isolates and 10 isolates exhibited the identical sequences, respectively. Only one isolate was classified into the different genotype related to the US isolates. Analysis on the deduced amino acids of gp51 demonstrated the sequence diversity in the neutralizing domain. These data may indicate that two major populations of BLV prevailed throughout Japan, whereas antigenic variants also exist. It was further proved that multiple invasion of the genetically different BLV strains have occurred in Japan.

  9. Avian Hepatitis E Virus Infection in Organic Layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crespo, Rocio; Opriessnig, Tanja; Uzal, Francisco; Gerber, Priscilla F

    2015-09-01

    Between 2012 and 2014, 141 chickens from 10 organic layer flocks with a history of severe drop in egg production (up to 40%) and slight increased mortality (up to 1% per week) were submitted to the Avian Health and Food Safety Laboratory (Puyallup, WA). At necropsy, the most common finding was pinpoint white foci on the liver and regressed ova without any other remarkable lesions. Histologically, there was multifocal mild-to-severe acute necrotizing hepatitis present. No significant bacteria were recovered from liver samples, and tests for mycotoxins were negative. Twenty-six serum samples from four affected flocks tested were positive for avian hepatitis E virus (HEV) immunoglobulin Y antibodies. Avian HEV RNA was detected in 10 livers of chickens from two different affected flocks. The avian HEV was characterized by sequencing and determined to belong to genotype 2. The diagnosis of a clinical manifest HEV was based solely on the demonstration of specific viral RNA and the absence of other causative agents in samples from flocks, as the clinical sings and pathologic lesions were atypical.

  10. Fraction of bovine leukemia virus-infected dairy cattle developing enzootic bovine leukosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsutsui, Toshiyuki; Kobayashi, Sota; Hayama, Yoko; Yamamoto, Takehisa

    2016-02-01

    Enzootic bovine leucosis (EBL) is a transmissible disease caused by the bovine leukemia virus that is prevalent in cattle herds in many countries. Only a small fraction of infected animals develops clinical symptoms, such as malignant lymphosarcoma, after a long incubation period. In the present study, we aimed to determine the fraction of EBL-infected dairy cattle that develop lymphosarcoma and the length of the incubation period before clinical symptoms emerge. These parameters were determined by a mathematical modeling approach based on the maximum-likelihood estimation method, using the results of a nationwide serological survey of prevalence in cattle and passive surveillance records. The best-fit distribution to estimate the disease incubation period was determined to be the Weibull distribution, with a median and average incubation period of 7.0 years. The fraction of infected animals developing clinical disease was estimated to be 1.4% with a 95% confidence interval of 1.2-1.6%. The parameters estimated here contribute to an examination of efficient control strategies making quantitative evaluation available.

  11. Diffferential innate responses of chickens and ducks to low pathogenic avian influenza virus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cornelissen, J.B.W.J.; Post, J.; Peeters, B.P.H.; Vervelde, L.; Rebel, J.M.J.

    2012-01-01

    Ducks and chickens are hosts of avian influenza virus, each with distinctive responses to infection. To understand these differences, we characterized the innate immune response to low pathogenicity avian influenza virus H7N1 infection in chickens and ducks. Viral RNA was detected in the lungs of ch

  12. Modelling the Innate Immune Response against Avian Influenza Virus in Chicken

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hagenaars, T J; Fischer, E A J; Jansen, C A; Rebel, J M J; Spekreijse, D; Vervelde, L; Backer, J A; de Jong, M C M; Koets, A P

    2016-01-01

    At present there is limited understanding of the host immune response to (low pathogenic) avian influenza virus infections in poultry. Here we develop a mathematical model for the innate immune response to avian influenza virus in chicken lung, describing the dynamics of viral load, interferon-α, -β

  13. Modelling the innate immune response against avian influenza virus in chicken

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hagenaars, T.J.; Fischer, E.A.J.; Jansen, C.A.; Rebel, J.M.J.; Spekreijse, D.; Vervelde, L.; Backer, J.A.; Jong, de M.C.M.; Koets, A.P.

    2016-01-01

    At present there is limited understanding of the host immune response to (low pathogenic) avian influenza virus infections in poultry. Here we develop a mathematical model for the innate immune response to avian influenza virus in chicken lung, describing the dynamics of viral load, interferon-α,

  14. Human Infection with Avian Influenza A(H7N9) Virus - China

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Biorisk reduction Human infection with avian influenza A(H7N9) virus – China Disease outbreak news 18 January 2017 ... laboratory-confirmed human infection with avian influenza A(H7N9) virus and on 12 January 2017, the Health ...

  15. Pathogenesis of avian influenza A (H5N1) viruses in pigs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background. Genetic reassortment of avian influenza H5N1 viruses with currently circulating human influenza A strains is one possibility that could lead to efficient human-to-human transmissibility. Domestic pigs which are susceptible to infection with both human and avian influenza A viruses are o...

  16. Infection of children with avian-human reassortant influenza virus from pigs in Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.C.J. Claas (Eric); Y. Kawaoka (Yoshihiro); J.C. de Jong (Jan); N. Masurel (Nic); R.G. Webster (Robert)

    1994-01-01

    textabstractPigs have been proposed to act as the intermediate hosts in the generation of pandemic human influenza strains by reassortment of genes from avian and human influenza virus strains. The circulation of avian-like H1N1 influenza viruses in European pigs since 1979 and the detection of huma

  17. Zoonosis Update on H9N2 Avian Influenza Virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul Ahad*, Masood Rabbani, Altaf Mahmood1, Zulfiqar Hussan Kuthu2, Arfan Ahmad and Muhammad Mahmudur Rahman3

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Influenza A viruses infect various mammals like human, horse, pig and birds as well. A total of 16 hemagglutinin (HA and 9 neuraminidase (NA subtypes have been identified. Most of the combinations are found in birds and relatively few have been isolated from mammals. Although there is no report of human to human transmission till to date, several cases of H5N1, H7N7 and H9N2 identified in humans since 1997 raised serious concern for health and veterinary profession. This review paper will focus H9N2 avian influenza virus (AIV with special emphasis on zoonosis. The virus H9N2 though not highly pathogenic like H5N1 but can be virulent through antigenic drift and shift.

  18. Surveillance of avian influenza viruses in Papua New Guinean poultry, June 2011 to April 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonduo, Marinjho; Wong, Sook-San; Kapo, Nime; Ominipi, Paskalis; Abdad, Mohammad; Siba, Peter; McKenzie, Pamela; Webby, Richard; Horwood, Paul

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the circulation of avian influenza viruses in poultry populations throughout Papua New Guinea to assess the risk to the poultry industry and human health. Oropharyngeal swabs, cloacal swabs and serum were collected from 537 poultry from 14 provinces of Papua New Guinea over an 11-month period (June 2011 through April 2012). Virological and serological investigations were undertaken to determine the prevalence of avian influenza viruses. Neither influenza A viruses nor antibodies were detected in any of the samples. This study demonstrated that avian influenza viruses were not circulating at detectable levels in poultry populations in Papua New Guinea during the sampling period. However, avian influenza remains a significant risk to Papua New Guinea due to the close proximity of countries having previously reported highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses and the low biosecurity precautions associated with the rearing of most poultry populations in the country.

  19. Heterogeneity and Seroprevalence of a Newly Identified Avian Hepatitis E Virus from Chickens in the United States

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, F. F.; Haqshenas, G.; Shivaprasad, H L; Guenette, D. K.; Woolcock, P. R.; Larsen, C. T.; Pierson, F.W.; F Elvinger; Toth, T. E.; Meng, X. J.

    2002-01-01

    We recently identified and characterized a novel virus, designated avian hepatitis E virus (avian HEV), from chickens with hepatitis-splenomegaly syndrome (HS syndrome) in the United States. Avian HEV is genetically related to but distinct from human and swine HEVs. To determine the extent of genetic variation and the seroprevalence of avian HEV infection in chicken flocks, we genetically identified and characterized 11 additional avian HEV isolates from chickens with HS syndrome and assessed...

  20. Subtype Identification of Avian Influenza Virus on DNA Microarray

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Xiu-rong; YU Kang-zhen; DENG Guo-hua; SHI Rui; LIU Li-ling; QIAO Chuan-ling; BAO Hong-mei; KONG Xian-gang; CHEN Hua-lan

    2005-01-01

    We have developed a rapid microarray-based assay for the reliable detection of H5, H7 and H9 subtypes of avian influenza virus (AIV). The strains used in the experiment were A/Goose/Guangdong/1/96 (H5N1), A/African starling/983/79 (H7N1) and A/Turkey/Wiscosin/1/66 (H9N2). The capture DNAs clones which encoding approximate 500-bp avian influenza virus gene fragments obtained by RT-PCR, were spotted on a slide-bound microarray. Cy5-1abeled fluorescent cDNAs,which generated from virus RNA during reverse transcription were hybridized to these capture DNAs. These capture DNAs contained multiple fragments of the hemagglutinin and matrix protein genes of AIV respectively, for subtyping and typing AIV. The arrays were scanned to determine the probe binding sites. The hybridization pattern agreed approximately with the known grid location of each target. The results show that DNA microarray technology provides a useful diagnostic method for AIV.

  1. [Detection and description of avian hepatitis E virus isolated in China--a review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Qin; Sun, Yani; Zhou, Enmin

    2012-03-04

    Avian hepatitis E virus (HEV), a member of Hepeviridae family, is genetically and antigenically related with human and swine HEV in the family. Since its discovery, avian HEV infection has been investigated in many countries from serology and molecular epidemiology studies. At present, five complete or near complete genomes of avian HEV isolates were reported in GenBank and were divided into three genotypes. The complete genome of avian HEV contains 3 ORFs of which ORF2 gene encodes capsid protein containing the primary epitopes of viral particles and is target gene for serodiagnostic antigen and vaccine candidate. Because avian HEV infection has significant impact on the poultry industry and potential zoonotic transmission, the researches on avian HEV have been given much attention. We here give a broad review of the research update on the aetiology, pathogenesis and the antigenicity of capsid protein of avian HEV based on identification of Chinese avian HEV isolate.

  2. Transcriptomics of host-virus interactions: immune responses to avian influenza virus in chicken

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reemers, S.S.N.

    2010-01-01

    Upon entry of the respiratory tract avian influenza virus (AIV) triggers early immune responses in the host that are aimed to prevent or in case of already established infection control this infection. Although much research is performed to elucidate the course of events that follow after AIV infect

  3. Previous infection with a mesogenic strain of Newcastle disease virus affects infection with highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses in chickens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avian influenza virus (AIV) and Newcastle disease virus (NDV) are two of the most important viruses affecting poultry worldwide, but little is known on the interactions between these two viruses when infecting birds. In a previous study we found that infection of chickens with a mesogenic strain of...

  4. Epidemiological Study of Avian Leukosis on Layer Chickens with Different Stains in Shandong Province%山东不同品系蛋鸡禽白血病流行病学调查

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨凤; 孙洪磊; 倪伟; 车国喜; 刘思当

    2011-01-01

    In order to investigate the prevalence status of avian leukosis virus infection in Shandong province, 3882 serum samples, 2428 cloacal swab samples and 41 suspected-case samples were collected from different areas of Shandong province for respectively detection through methods of serology, pathology and etiology. The test results indicated that P27 antigen and ALV antibody were positive in all stains of layer chickens including grandparent flock, the p27 antigen and antibody's positive rates of ALV-A/B, ALV-J, REV were 19. 36%, 9. 29%, 5. 18%,13. 77%, respectively. The main groups getting disease were Commercial flock and parent flock,while there're also some Hy-Iine brown grandparent flock got disease. The pathology diagnosis indicates that the tumors mainly include myelocytoma (27/41) , hemangioma (7/41) , fibrosarcoma (2/41), leiomyosarcoma (2/41) and MD (5/41). Among the 41 samples, 33 samples were positive for ALV-J (80. 49%), and 22 samples were positive for MDV (53. 66%), the co-infection rate was 43. 9%. Among 17 virus stains isolated, the sequence homology of gp85 gene of ALV-J were ranged from 94. 0% to 100%. The 17 isolated virus stains shared 94. 3% to 98. 7%identity with HPRS-103, and shared low homology with other strains (84. 4%-96. 8%). These results indicated that ALV infection existed in all stains of layer chickens in Shandong province and co-infection with MDV, REV were occured. Myelocytoma and hemangioma were the main clinical symptoms of sick chickens.%为了解山东不同品系蛋鸡白血病流行情况,作者采集了山东各地区主要引进品系及地方品种鸡的血清3882份、棉拭子2428份和疑似病例41例,对采集样品分别进行了血清学、病理学及病原学检测.结果表明:包括祖代鸡在内的各品系蛋鸡群P27抗原阳性率为19.36%;ALV-A/B亚型抗体阳性率9.29%、ALV-J亚型抗体阳性率5.18%、REV抗体阳性率13.77%;发病鸡群主要是商品鸡群和父母代

  5. Detection of avian nephritis virus in Australian chicken flocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewson, Kylie A; O'Rourke, Denise; Noormohammadi, Amir H

    2010-09-01

    Avian nephritis virus (ANV) is thought to infect poultry flocks worldwide, but no confirmed case has been reported in Australia. The first such case is described in this study. Cases of young chickens with clinical signs of dehydration and diarrhea were submitted to our laboratory and histopathology detected interstitial nephritis. Vaccine strains of infectious bronchitis virus were detected in some of these cases but were not considered to be the causative agent. A total of seven fresh submissions from broiler chicken flocks were collected at 8-11 days of age. Degenerate PCR primers were designed based on published ANV polymerase gene sequences and used to analyze historic cases as well as the fresh submissions. Six of the seven fresh submissions, and one historic case, were positive for ANV with nucleotide sequencing confirming these results. These results establish ANV as an infectious pathogen circulating in Australian poultry.

  6. China makes an impressive breakthrough in avian influenza virus research - Discovering the "heart" of avian infl uenza virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Y G; Wu, J F; Li, X

    2009-02-01

    The successive appearance of strains of epizootic avian influenza A virus with the subtype H5N1 in China has attracted considerable concern from the public and Chinese authorities. According to the latest WHO estimates as of February 2, 2009, the number of H5N1 virus deaths in China totaled 25, second only to Indonesia and Viet Nam (http://www.who.int/csr/disease/avian_influenza/country/cases_table_2009_02_02/en/index.html). The H5N1 virus is highly contagious among birds and is fatal when transmitted to humans, though the means by which this occurs is still unknown. Owing to the possible variation of the H5N1 prototype virus, together with the fact that it has the propensity to exchange genes with influenza viruses from other species, humans have no natural immunity to the virus. Despite years of efforts, the exact pathogenesis of H5N1 transmission to humans is still not completely clear, nor is potential human-tohuman transmission as could lead to an epidemic or even worldwide pandemic (Enserink M. Science. 2009; 323:324). Unfortunately, current antiviral treatment and therapeutic measures cannot effectively overcome this virulent virus that causes highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI). Researchers from around the world are working to study the virology of influenza viruses, including their methods of infiltration, replication, and transcription, to elucidate the mechanisms of unremitting viral infection in terms of aspects such as the virus, host, and environment. These researchers are also working to identify potential molecular targets related to H5N1 for anti-influenza drug intervention. A recent H5N1-related study from China provides encouraging information. According to the People's Daily (Renmin Ribao), a newspaper out of Beijing, professor Liu Yingfang, academician Rao Zihe, and fellow researchers from more than 6 research centers, including the Institute of Biophysics Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nankai University, and Tsinghua University, have

  7. Influenza viruses and the evolution of avian influenza virus H5N1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skeik, Nedaa; Jabr, Fadi I

    2008-05-01

    Although small in size and simple in structure, influenza viruses are sophisticated organisms with highly mutagenic genomes and wide antigenic diversity. They are species-specific organisms. Mutation and reassortment have resulted in newer viruses such as H5N1, with new resistance against anti-viral medications, and this might lead to the emergence of a fully transmissible strain, as occurred in the 1957 and 1968 pandemics. Influenza viruses are no longer just a cause of self-limited upper respiratory tract infections; the H5N1 avian influenza virus can cause severe human infection with a mortality rate exceeding 50%. The case death rate of H5N1 avian influenza infection is 20 times higher than that of the 1918 infection (50% versus 2.5%), which killed 675000 people in the USA and almost 40 million people worldwide. While the clock is still ticking towards what seems to be inevitable pandemic influenza, on April 17, 2007 the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved the first vaccine against the avian influenza virus H5N1 for humans at high risk. However, more research is needed to develop a more effective and affordable vaccine that can be given at lower doses.

  8. Methods to detect avian inlfuenza virus for food safety surveillance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI Ping; Shu Geng; LI Ting-ting; LI Yu-shui; FENG Ting; WU Hua-nan

    2015-01-01

    Avian inlfuenza (AI), caused by the inlfuenza A virus, has been a global concern for public health. AI outbreaks not only impact the poultry production, but also give rise to a risk in food safety caused by viral contamination of poultry products in the food supply chain. Distinctions in AI outbreak between strains H5N1 and H7N9 indicate that early detection of the AI virus in poultry is crucial for the effective warning and control of AI to ensure food safety. Therefore, the establishment of a poultry surveilance system for food safety by early detection is urgent and critical. In this article, methods to detect AI virus, including current methods recommended by the World Health Organization (WHO) and the World Organisation for Animal Health (Ofifce International des Epizooties, OIE) and novel techniques not commonly used or commercialized are reviewed and evaluated for feasibility of use in the poultry surveillance system. Conventional methods usualy applied for the purpose of AI diagnosis face some practical chalenges to establishing a comprehensive poultry surveilance program in the poultry supply chain. Diverse development of new technologies can meet the speciifc requirements of AI virus detec-tion in various stages or scenarios throughout the poultry supply chain where onsite, rapid and ultrasensitive methods are emphasized. Systematic approaches or integrated methods ought to be employed according to the application scenarios at every stage of the poultry supply chain to prevent AI outbreaks.

  9. An optimized polymerase chain reaction assay to identify avian virus vaccine contamination with Chicken anemia virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amer, Haitham M; Elzahed, Hanan M; Elabiare, Elham A; Badawy, Ahmed A; Yousef, Ausama A

    2011-01-01

    The use of embryonating chicken eggs in preparation of avian virus vaccines is the principle cause for contamination with Chicken anemia virus (CAV). Identification of CAV in contaminated vaccines relies on the expensive, tedious, and time-consuming practice of virus isolation in lymphoblastoid cell lines. The experience of the last 2 decades indicates that polymerase chain reaction is extending to replace most of the classic methods for detection of infectious agents. In the present report, a simple, rapid, and accurate polymerase chain reaction method for detection of CAV in poultry vaccines is described. Oligonucleotide primers homologous to highly conserved sequences of the VP1 gene were used to amplify a fragment of 676 bp. The developed assay was specific for detecting CAV from different sources, with no cross reactivity with many avian viruses. No inter- and intra-assay variations were observed. The analytical sensitivity of the test was high enough to detect 5 TCID(50) (50% tissue culture infective dose) of the virus per reaction; however, different factors related to the vaccine matrix showed considerable effects on the detection limit. In conclusion, this method may represent a suitable alternative to virus isolation for identification of CAV contamination of poultry virus vaccines.

  10. Phylogenetics and pathogenesis of early avian influenza viruses (H5N2), Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prior to the first officially recognized outbreaks of highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) in poultry in Nigeria, in February 2006, an effort based at the poultry diagnostic clinic of the University of Ibadan Veterinary Teaching Hospital, was underway to isolate avian influenza viruses from sick...

  11. Comparative susceptibility of waterfowl and gulls to highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N1 virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wild avian species in the Orders Anseriformes (ducks, geese, swans) and Charadriiformes (gulls, terns, shorebirds) have traditionally been considered the natural reservoirs for avian influenza viruses (AIV) and morbidity or mortality is rarely associated with AIV infection in these hosts. However, ...

  12. Risk Perceptions for Avian Influenza Virus Infection among Poultry Workers, China

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Qi; Liu, Linqing; Pu, Juan; Zhao, Jingyi; Sun, Yipeng; Shen, Guangnian; Wei, Haitao; Zhu, Junjie; Zheng, Ruifeng; Xiong, Dongyan; Liu, Xiaodong; Liu, Jinhua

    2013-01-01

    To determine risk for avian influenza virus infection, we conducted serologic surveillance for H5 and H9 subtypes among poultry workers in Beijing, China, 2009–2010, and assessed workers’ understanding of avian influenza. We found that poultry workers had considerable risk for infection with H9 subtypes. Increasing their knowledge could prevent future infections.

  13. Pandemic potential of avian influenza A (H7N9) viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Tokiko; Watanabe, Shinji; Maher, Eileen A; Neumann, Gabriele; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro

    2014-11-01

    Avian influenza viruses rarely infect humans, but the recently emerged avian H7N9 influenza viruses have caused sporadic infections in humans in China, resulting in 440 confirmed cases with 122 fatalities as of 16 May 2014. In addition, epidemiologic surveys suggest that there have been asymptomatic or mild human infections with H7N9 viruses. These viruses replicate efficiently in mammals, show limited transmissibility in ferrets and guinea pigs, and possess mammalian-adapting amino acid changes that likely contribute to their ability to infect mammals. In this review, we summarize the characteristic features of the novel H7N9 viruses and assess their pandemic potential.

  14. Seasonal and pandemic human influenza viruses attach better to human upper respiratory tract epithelium than avian influenza viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Riel, Debby; den Bakker, Michael A; Leijten, Lonneke M E; Chutinimitkul, Salin; Munster, Vincent J; de Wit, Emmie; Rimmelzwaan, Guus F; Fouchier, Ron A M; Osterhaus, Albert D M E; Kuiken, Thijs

    2010-04-01

    Influenza viruses vary markedly in their efficiency of human-to-human transmission. This variation has been speculated to be determined in part by the tropism of influenza virus for the human upper respiratory tract. To study this tropism, we determined the pattern of virus attachment by virus histochemistry of three human and three avian influenza viruses in human nasal septum, conchae, nasopharynx, paranasal sinuses, and larynx. We found that the human influenza viruses-two seasonal influenza viruses and pandemic H1N1 virus-attached abundantly to ciliated epithelial cells and goblet cells throughout the upper respiratory tract. In contrast, the avian influenza viruses, including the highly pathogenic H5N1 virus, attached only rarely to epithelial cells or goblet cells. Both human and avian viruses attached occasionally to cells of the submucosal glands. The pattern of virus attachment was similar among the different sites of the human upper respiratory tract for each virus tested. We conclude that influenza viruses that are transmitted efficiently among humans attach abundantly to human upper respiratory tract, whereas inefficiently transmitted influenza viruses attach rarely. These results suggest that the ability of an influenza virus to attach to human upper respiratory tract is a critical factor for efficient transmission in the human population.

  15. Practical aspects of vaccination of poultry against avian influenza virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spackman, Erica; Pantin-Jackwood, Mary J

    2014-12-01

    Although little has changed in vaccine technology for avian influenza virus (AIV) in the past 20 years, the approach to vaccination of poultry (chickens, turkeys and ducks) for avian influenza has evolved as highly pathogenic AIV has become endemic in several regions of the world. Vaccination for low pathogenicity AIV is also becoming routine in regions where there is a high level of field challenge. In contrast, some countries will not use vaccination at all and some will only use it on an emergency basis during eradication efforts (i.e. stamping-out). There are pros and cons to each approach and, since every outbreak situation is different, no one method will work equally well in all situations. Numerous practical aspects must be considered when developing an AIV control program with vaccination as a component, such as: (1) the goals of vaccination must be defined; (2) the population to be vaccinated must be clearly identified; (3) there must be a plan to obtain and administer good quality vaccine in a timely manner and to achieve adequate coverage with the available resources; (4) risk factors for vaccine failure should be mitigated as much as possible; and, most importantly, (5) biosecurity must be maintained as much as possible, if not enhanced, during the vaccination period.

  16. Replication and adaptive mutations of low pathogenic avian influenza viruses in tracheal organ cultures of different avian species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henning Petersen

    Full Text Available Transmission of avian influenza viruses (AIV between different avian species may require genome mutations that allow efficient virus replication in a new species and could increase virulence. To study the role of domestic poultry in the evolution of AIV we compared replication of low pathogenic (LP AIV of subtypes H9N2, H7N7 and H6N8 in tracheal organ cultures (TOC and primary embryo fibroblast cultures of chicken, turkey, Pekin duck and homing pigeon. Virus strain-dependent and avian species-related differences between LPAIV were observed in growth kinetics and induction of ciliostasis in TOC. In particular, our data demonstrate high susceptibility to LPAIV of turkey TOC contrasted with low susceptibility of homing pigeon TOC. Serial virus passages in the cells of heterologous host species resulted in adaptive mutations in the AIV genome, especially in the receptor-binding site and protease cleavage site of the hemagglutinin. Our data highlight differences in susceptibility of different birds to AIV viruses and emphasizes potential role of poultry in the emergence of new virus variants.

  17. PCR Based Evidence of Reticuloendotheliosis Virus Infection in Chickens from Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasan Ongor and Hakan Bulut1*

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available In this study, presence of avian leukosis virus (ALV and reticuloendotheliosis virus (REV was investigated in neoplastic cases observed in breeder hens older than 20 weeks in commercial broiler breeders. Tumor samples were examined by PCR combined with primer sets specific for ALV and REV. It was found that the tumors were REV-originated. This is the first report showing the presence of REV infection in Turkey.

  18. Avian Influenza Virus A (H5N1), Detected through Routine Surveillance, in Child, Bangladesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alamgir, A.S.M.; Sultana, Rebecca; Islam, M. Saiful; Rahman, Mustafizur; Fry, Alicia M.; Shu, Bo; Lindstrom, Stephen; Nahar, Kamrun; Goswami, Doli; Haider, M. Sabbir; Nahar, Sharifun; Butler, Ebonee; Hancock, Kathy; Donis, Ruben O.; Davis, Charles T.; Zaman, Rashid Uz; Luby, Stephen P.; Uyeki, Timothy M.; Rahman, Mahmudur

    2009-01-01

    We identified avian influenza virus A (H5N1) infection in a child in Bangladesh in 2008 by routine influenza surveillance. The virus was of the same clade and phylogenetic subgroup as that circulating among poultry during the period. This case illustrates the value of routine surveillance for detection of novel influenza virus. PMID:19751601

  19. Highly pathogenic avian influenza virus and generation of novel reassortants, United States, 2014-2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asian highly pathogenic avian influenza A(H5N8) viruses spread into North America in 2014 during autumn bird migration. Complete genome sequencing and phylogenetic analysis of 32 H5 viruses identified novel H5N1, H5N2, and H5N8 viruses that emerged in late 2014 through reassortment with North Americ...

  20. Gene expression responses to highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N1 virus infections in ducks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Differences in host response to infection with avian influenza (AI) viruses were investigated by identifying genes differentially expressed in tissues of infected ducks. Clear differences in pathogenicity were observed among ducks inoculated with five H5N1 HPAI viruses. Virus titers in tissues cor...

  1. Inactivation of avian influenza virus in chicken litter as a potential method to decontaminate poultry houses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Full cleaning and disinfection of a poultry house after an avian influenza virus (AIV) outbreak is expensive and labor intensive. An alternative to full house cleaning and disinfection is to inactivate the virus with high temperatures within the house. Litter in the house normally has a high virus...

  2. Preferential recognition of avian-like receptors in human influenza A H7N9 viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Rui; de Vries, Robert P; Zhu, Xueyong; Nycholat, Corwin M; McBride, Ryan; Yu, Wenli; Paulson, James C; Wilson, Ian A

    2013-12-06

    The 2013 outbreak of avian-origin H7N9 influenza in eastern China has raised concerns about its ability to transmit in the human population. The hemagglutinin glycoprotein of most human H7N9 viruses carries Leu(226), a residue linked to adaptation of H2N2 and H3N2 pandemic viruses to human receptors. However, glycan array analysis of the H7 hemagglutinin reveals negligible binding to humanlike α2-6-linked receptors and strong preference for a subset of avian-like α2-3-linked glycans recognized by all avian H7 viruses. Crystal structures of H7N9 hemagglutinin and six hemagglutinin-glycan complexes have elucidated the structural basis for preferential recognition of avian-like receptors. These findings suggest that the current human H7N9 viruses are poorly adapted for efficient human-to-human transmission.

  3. The challenges of avian influenza virus:mechanism,epidemiology and control

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    George; F.GAO; Pang-Chui; SHAW

    2009-01-01

    Early 2009, eight human infection cases of H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) virus, with 5 death cases, were reported in China. This again made the world alert on a possible pandemic worldwide, probably caused by

  4. Migratory birds reinforce local circulation of avian influenza viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhagen, Josanne H; van Dijk, Jacintha G B; Vuong, Oanh; Bestebroer, Theo; Lexmond, Pascal; Klaassen, Marcel; Fouchier, Ron A M

    2014-01-01

    Migratory and resident hosts have been hypothesized to fulfil distinct roles in infectious disease dynamics. However, the contribution of resident and migratory hosts to wildlife infectious disease epidemiology, including that of low pathogenic avian influenza virus (LPAIV) in wild birds, has largely remained unstudied. During an autumn H3 LPAIV epizootic in free-living mallards (Anas platyrhynchos) - a partially migratory species - we identified resident and migratory host populations using stable hydrogen isotope analysis of flight feathers. We investigated the role of migratory and resident hosts separately in the introduction and maintenance of H3 LPAIV during the epizootic. To test this we analysed (i) H3 virus kinship, (ii) temporal patterns in H3 virus prevalence and shedding and (iii) H3-specific antibody prevalence in relation to host migratory strategy. We demonstrate that the H3 LPAIV strain causing the epizootic most likely originated from a single introduction, followed by local clonal expansion. The H3 LPAIV strain was genetically unrelated to H3 LPAIV detected both before and after the epizootic at the study site. During the LPAIV epizootic, migratory mallards were more often infected with H3 LPAIV than residents. Low titres of H3-specific antibodies were detected in only a few residents and migrants. Our results suggest that in this LPAIV epizootic, a single H3 virus was present in resident mallards prior to arrival of migratory mallards followed by a period of virus amplification, importantly associated with the influx of migratory mallards. Thus migrants are suggested to act as local amplifiers rather than the often suggested role as vectors importing novel strains from afar. Our study exemplifies that a multifaceted interdisciplinary approach offers promising opportunities to elucidate the role of migratory and resident hosts in infectious disease dynamics in wildlife.

  5. Migratory birds reinforce local circulation of avian influenza viruses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josanne H Verhagen

    Full Text Available Migratory and resident hosts have been hypothesized to fulfil distinct roles in infectious disease dynamics. However, the contribution of resident and migratory hosts to wildlife infectious disease epidemiology, including that of low pathogenic avian influenza virus (LPAIV in wild birds, has largely remained unstudied. During an autumn H3 LPAIV epizootic in free-living mallards (Anas platyrhynchos - a partially migratory species - we identified resident and migratory host populations using stable hydrogen isotope analysis of flight feathers. We investigated the role of migratory and resident hosts separately in the introduction and maintenance of H3 LPAIV during the epizootic. To test this we analysed (i H3 virus kinship, (ii temporal patterns in H3 virus prevalence and shedding and (iii H3-specific antibody prevalence in relation to host migratory strategy. We demonstrate that the H3 LPAIV strain causing the epizootic most likely originated from a single introduction, followed by local clonal expansion. The H3 LPAIV strain was genetically unrelated to H3 LPAIV detected both before and after the epizootic at the study site. During the LPAIV epizootic, migratory mallards were more often infected with H3 LPAIV than residents. Low titres of H3-specific antibodies were detected in only a few residents and migrants. Our results suggest that in this LPAIV epizootic, a single H3 virus was present in resident mallards prior to arrival of migratory mallards followed by a period of virus amplification, importantly associated with the influx of migratory mallards. Thus migrants are suggested to act as local amplifiers rather than the often suggested role as vectors importing novel strains from afar. Our study exemplifies that a multifaceted interdisciplinary approach offers promising opportunities to elucidate the role of migratory and resident hosts in infectious disease dynamics in wildlife.

  6. Avian infectious bronchitis virus in Brazil: a highly complex virus meets a highly susceptible host population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PE Brandão

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Infectious bronchitis (IB is a highly aggressive disease for poultry in terms of symptoms and economic losses, and the control of this disease is difficult if flocks are not protected against type-specific challenges by the Avian infectious bronchitis virus (IBV. This article summarizes data presented by the author at the Workshop on Infectious Bronchitis 2009 on IB and IBV, including future developments on the field.

  7. It is not just AIV: From avian to swine-origin influenza virus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO George F; SUN YePing

    2010-01-01

    @@ In March and early April 2009, a new swine-origin influenza A (H1N1) virus (S-OIV) emerged in Mexico and the United States.The virus spreads worldwide by human-to-human transmission.Within a few weeks, it reached a pandemic level.The virus is a novel reassorment virus.It contains gene fragments of influenza virus of swine, avian and human emerged from a triple reassortant virus circulating in North American swine.The source triple-reassortant itself comprised genes derived from avian (PB2 and PA), human H3N2 (PB1) and classical swine (HA, NP and NS) lineages.In contrast, the NA and M gene segments have their origin in the Eurasian avian-like swine H1N1 lineage (Figure 1).

  8. Evidence of infection with H4 and H11 avian influenza viruses among Lebanese chicken growers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghazi Kayali

    Full Text Available Human infections with H5, H7, and H9 avian influenza viruses are well documented. Exposure to poultry is the most important risk factor for humans becoming infected with these viruses. Data on human infection with other low pathogenicity avian influenza viruses is sparse but suggests that such infections may occur. Lebanon is a Mediterranean country lying under two major migratory birds flyways and is home to many wild and domestic bird species. Previous reports from this country demonstrated that low pathogenicity avian influenza viruses are in circulation but highly pathogenic H5N1 viruses were not reported. In order to study the extent of human infection with avian influenza viruses in Lebanon, we carried out a seroprevalence cross-sectional study into which 200 poultry-exposed individuals and 50 non-exposed controls were enrolled. We obtained their sera and tested it for the presence of antibodies against avian influenza viruses types H4 through H16 and used a questionnaire to collect exposure data. Our microneutralization assay results suggested that backyard poultry growers may have been previously infected with H4 and H11 avian influenza viruses. We confirmed these results by using a horse red blood cells hemagglutination inhibition assay. Our data also showed that farmers with antibodies against each virus type clustered in a small geographic area suggesting that unrecognized outbreaks among birds may have led to these human infections. In conclusion, this study suggests that occupational exposure to chicken is a risk factor for infection with avian influenza especially among backyard growers and that H4 and H11 influenza viruses may possess the ability to cross the species barrier to infect humans.

  9. Inhibiting avian influenza virus shedding using a novel RNAi antiviral vector technology: proof of concept in an avian cell model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linke, Lyndsey M; Wilusz, Jeffrey; Pabilonia, Kristy L; Fruehauf, Johannes; Magnuson, Roberta; Olea-Popelka, Francisco; Triantis, Joni; Landolt, Gabriele; Salman, Mo

    2016-03-01

    Influenza A viruses pose significant health and economic threats to humans and animals. Outbreaks of avian influenza virus (AIV) are a liability to the poultry industry and increase the risk for transmission to humans. There are limitations to using the AIV vaccine in poultry, creating barriers to controlling outbreaks and a need for alternative effective control measures. Application of RNA interference (RNAi) techniques hold potential; however, the delivery of RNAi-mediating agents is a well-known obstacle to harnessing its clinical application. We introduce a novel antiviral approach using bacterial vectors that target avian mucosal epithelial cells and deliver (small interfering RNA) siRNAs against two AIV genes, nucleoprotein (NP) and polymerase acidic protein (PA). Using a red fluorescent reporter, we first demonstrated vector delivery and intracellular expression in avian epithelial cells. Subsequently, we demonstrated significant reductions in AIV shedding when applying these anti-AIV vectors prophylactically. These antiviral vectors provided up to a 10,000-fold reduction in viral titers shed, demonstrating in vitro proof-of-concept for using these novel anti-AIV vectors to inhibit AIV shedding. Our results indicate this siRNA vector technology could represent a scalable and clinically applicable antiviral technology for avian and human influenza and a prototype for RNAi-based vectors against other viruses.

  10. [Detection of an NA gene molecular marker in H7N9 subtype avian influenza viruses by pyrosequencing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yong-Gang; Liu, Hua-Lei; Wang, Jing-Jing; Zheng, Dong-Xia; Zhao, Yun-Ling; Ge, Sheng-Qiang; Wang, Zhi-Liang

    2014-07-01

    This study aimed to establish a method for the detection and identification of H7N9 avian influenza viruses based on the NA gene by pyrosequencing. According to the published NA gene sequences of the avian influenza A (H7N9) virus, a 15-nt deletion was found in the NA gene of H7N9 avian influenza viruses. The 15-nt deletion of the NA gene was targeted as the molecular marker for the rapid detection and identification of H7N9 avian influenza viruses by pyrosequencing. Three H7N9 avian influenza virus isolates underwent pyrosequencing using the same assay, and were proven to have the same 15-nt deletion. Pyrosequencing technology based on the NA gene molecular marker can be used to identify H7N9 avian influenza viruses.

  11. Reticuloendotheliosis virus: Detection of immunological relationship to mammalian type C retroviruses. [/sup 125/I tracer technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charman, H.P.; Gilden, R.V.; Oroszlan, S.

    1979-03-01

    Reticuloendotheliosis virus (REV) p30 shares cross-reactive determinants and a common NH/sub 2/-terminal tripeptide with mammalian type C viral p30's. An interspecies competition radioimmunoassay was developed, using iodinated REV p30 and a broadly reactive antiserum to mammalian virus p30's. The avian leukosis-sarcoma viruses and mammalian non-type C retroviruses did not compete in this assay. Previous data indicating that the REV group is not represented completely in normal avian cell DNA lead us to speculate that this may be the first example of interclass transmission, albeit in the remote past, among the Retroviridae.

  12. Ascorbic acid inhibits replication and infectivity of avian RNA tumor virus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BISSELL, MINA J; HATIE, CARROLL; FARSON, DEBORAH A.; SCHWARZ, RICHARD I.; SOO, WHAI-JEN

    1980-04-01

    Ascorbic acid, at nontoxic concentrations, causes a substantial reduction in the ability of avian tumor viruses to replicate in both primary avian tendon cells and chicken embryo fibroblasts. The virus-infected cultures appear to be less transformed in the presence of ascorbic acid by the criteria of morphology, reduced glucose uptake, and increased collagen synthesis. The vitamin does not act by altering the susceptibility of the cells to initial infection and transformation, but instead appears to interfere with the spread of infection through a reduction in virus replication and virus infectivity. The effect is reversible and requires the continuous presence of the vitamin in the culture medium.

  13. First Characterization of Avian Influenza Viruses from Greenland 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartby, Christina Marie; Krog, Jesper Schak; Merkel, Flemming; Holm, Elisabeth; Larsen, Lars Erik; Hjulsager, Charlotte Kristiane

    2016-05-01

    In late February 2014, unusually high numbers of wild thick-billed murres (Uria lomvia) were found dead on the coast of South Greenland. To investigate the cause of death, 45 birds were submitted for laboratory examination in Denmark. Avian influenza viruses (AIVs) with subtypes H11N2 and low pathogenic H5N1 were detected in some of the birds. Characterization of the viruses by full genome sequencing revealed that all the gene segments belonged to the North American lineage of AIVs. The seemingly sparse and mixed subtype occurrence of low pathogenic AIVs in these birds, in addition to the emaciated appearance of the birds, suggests that the murre die-off was due to malnutrition as a result of sparse food availability or inclement weather. Here we present the first characterization of AIVs isolated in Greenland, and our results support the idea that wild birds in Greenland may be involved in the movement of AIV between North America and Europe.

  14. Surveillance of avian influenca viruses in farmed poultry in 2009 in Republic of Macedonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cvetkovik Iskra

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to determine the presence and distribution or to confirm the absence of avian influenca viruses in farmed poultry in the poultry production systems 1 and 2 from the eight statistical regions in R. Macedonia. Total number of 1215 cloacal swabs from poultry were sampled. Each sample was processed and analysed by both molecular (RRT-PCR and classical virology methods (virus isolation and identification. All samples gave negative result for presence of avian influenza viruses. Commercial poultry production systems have biosecurity measures preventing the entry of pathogens i.e avian influenza viruses, therefore resulting with no circulation of these viruses in the sampled farmed poultry flocks.

  15. Immunodominant epitopes mapped by synthetic peptides on the capsid protein of avian hepatitis E virus are non-protective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Hailong; Zhou, E M; Sun, Z F; Meng, X J

    2008-03-01

    Avian hepatitis E virus (avian HEV) was recently discovered in chickens with hepatitis-splenomegaly syndrome in the United States. The open reading frame 2 (ORF2) protein of avian HEV has been shown to cross-react with human and swine HEV ORF2 proteins, and immunodominant antigenic epitopes on avian HEV ORF2 protein were identified in the predicted antigenic domains by synthetic peptides. However, whether these epitopes are protective against avian HEV infection has not been investigated. In this study, groups of chickens were immunized with keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH)-conjugated peptides and recombinant avian HEV ORF2 antigen followed by challenge with avian HEV virus to assess the protective capacity of these peptides containing the epitopes. While avian HEV ORF2 protein showed complete protection against infection, viremia and fecal virus shedding were found in all peptide-immunized chickens. Using purified IgY from normal, anti-peptide, and anti-avian HEV ORF2 chicken sera, an in-vitro neutralization and in-vivo monitoring assay was performed to further evaluate the neutralizing ability of anti-peptide IgY. Results showed that none of the anti-peptide IgY can neutralize avian HEV in vitro, as viremia, fecal virus shedding, and seroconversion appeared similarly in chickens inoculated with avian HEV mixed with anti-peptide IgY and chickens inoculated with avian HEV mixed with normal IgY. As expected, chickens inoculated with the avian HEV and anti-avian HEV ORF2 IgY mixture did not show detectable avian HEV infection. Taken together, the results of this study demonstrated that immunodominant epitopes on avian HEV ORF2 protein identified by synthetic peptides are non-protective, suggesting protective neutralizing epitope on avian HEV ORF2 may not be linear as is human HEV.

  16. Diverse uses of feathers with emphasis on diagnosis of avian viral infections and vaccine virus monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I Davidson

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The large amounts of feathers produced by the poultry industry, that is considered as a waste was explored for possible uses in various industries, such as meals for animals, biofuels, biodegradable plastic materials, combating water pollution and more. That review mentions these uses, but concentrate on the utilization of feathers for the diagnosis of viral infections and for monitoring vaccine viruses in chickens after vaccination. The viral diseases in which diagnosis using nucleic acids extracted from the feather shafts was described are, Marek's disease virus, circoviruses, chicken anemia virus, fowlpox virus, avian retroviruses, avian influenza virus and infectious laryngotracheitis virus. In two cases, of Marek's disease virus and of infectious laryngotracheitis virus, the differentiation of vaccine and wild-type viruses from feather shafts was made possible, thus allowing for monitoring the vaccination efficacy. The present review demonstrates also the stability of DNA viruses in feather shafts, and the possible evaluation of environmental dissemination of pathogens. When viruses are transmitted vertically, like in the cases of the retrovirus REV, a teratogenic effect on the development of feathers of the day-old newly hatched chick might occur in the case of avian influenza and the chicken anemia virus, which might indicate on a viral infection.

  17. Leukosis/Sarcoma Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    The leukosis/sarcoma (L/S) group of diseases designates a variety of transmissible benign and malignant neoplasms of chickens caused by members that belong to the family Retroviridae. Because the expansion of the literature on this disease, it is no longer feasible to cite all relevant publications ...

  18. Tracking the Evolution of Polymerase Genes of Influenza A Viruses during Interspecies Transmission between Avian and Swine Hosts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karnbunchob, Nipawit; Omori, Ryosuke; Tessmer, Heidi L.; Ito, Kimihito

    2016-01-01

    Human influenza pandemics have historically been caused by reassortant influenza A viruses using genes from human and avian viruses. This genetic reassortment between human and avian viruses has been known to occur in swine during viral circulation, as swine are capable of circulating both avian and human viruses. Therefore, avian-to-swine transmission of viruses plays an important role in the emergence of new pandemic strains. The amino acids at several positions on PB2, PB1, and PA are known to determine the host range of influenza A viruses. In this paper, we track viral transmission between avian and swine to investigate the evolution on polymerase genes associated with their hosts. We traced viral transmissions between avian and swine hosts by using nucleotide sequences of avian viruses and swine viruses registered in the NCBI GenBank. Using BLAST and the reciprocal best hits technique, we found 32, 33, and 30 pairs of avian and swine nucleotide sequences that may be associated with avian-to-swine transmissions for PB2, PB1, and PA genes, respectively. Then, we examined the amino acid substitutions involved in these sporadic transmissions. On average, avian-to-swine transmission pairs had 5.47, 3.73, and 5.13 amino acid substitutions on PB2, PB1, and PA, respectively. However, amino acid substitutions were distributed over the positions, and few positions showed common substitutions in the multiple transmission events. Statistical tests on the number of repeated amino acid substitutions suggested that no specific positions on PB2 and PA may be required for avian viruses to infect swine. We also found that avian viruses that transmitted to swine tend to process I478V substitutions on PB2 before interspecies transmission events. Furthermore, most mutations occurred after the interspecies transmissions, possibly due to selective viral adaptation to swine. PMID:28082971

  19. When animal viruses attack: SARS and avian influenza.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Paul J; Krilov, Leonard R

    2005-01-01

    SARS and avian influenza have many common features. They both arose in Asia and originated from animal viruses. They both have the potential to become pandemics because human beings lack antibodies to the animal-derived antigens present on the viral surface and rapid dissemination can occur from the relative ease and availability of high speed and far-reaching transportation methods. Pediatricians, in particular, should remain alert about the possibility of pandemic illnesses in their patients. Annual rates of influenza in children may be 1.5 to 3 times those in the adult population, and infection rates during a community epidemic may exceed 40% in preschool-aged children and 30% in school-aged children. Infected children also play a central role in disseminating influenza, as they are the major point of entry for the virus into the household, from which adults spread disease into the community. Of course, children younger than 24 months also are at high risk for complications from influenza. A 1999 Centers for Disease Control and Prevention projection of an influenza pandemic in the US paints a grim picture: 89,000 to 207,000 deaths, 314,000 to 734,000 hospitalizations, 18 million to 42 million outpatient visits, and 20 million to 47 million additional illnesses, at a cost to society of at least dollars 71.3 billion to dollars 166.5 billion. High-risk patients (15% of the population) would account for approximately 84% of all deaths. Although SARS has been kind to the pediatric population so far, there are no guarantees that future outbreaks would be as sparing. To aid readers in remaining up-to-date with SARS and avian influenza, some useful websites are listed in the Sidebar. Two masters of suspense, Alfred Hitchcock and Stephen King, may have been closer to the truth than they ever would have believed. Both birds and a super flu could bring about the end of civilization as we know it. But all is not lost--to paraphrase Thomas Jefferson, the price of health is

  20. Genomic Signatures for Avian H7N9 Viruses Adapting to Humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guang-Wu Chen

    Full Text Available An avian influenza A H7N9 virus emerged in March 2013 and caused a remarkable number of human fatalities. Genome variability in these viruses may provide insights into host adaptability. We scanned over 140 genomes of the H7N9 viruses isolated from humans and identified 104 positions that exhibited seven or more amino acid substitutions. Approximately half of these substitutions were identified in the influenza ribonucleoprotein (RNP complex. Although PB2 627K of the avian virus promotes replication in humans, 45 of the 147 investigated PB2 sequences retained the E signature at this position, which is an avian characteristic. We discovered 10 PB2 substitutions that covaried with K627E. An RNP activity assay showed that Q591K, D701N, and M535L restored the polymerase activity in human cells when 627K transformed to an avian-like E. Genomic analysis of the human-isolated avian influenza virus is crucial in assessing genome variability, because relationships between position-specific variations can be observed and explored. In this study, we observed alternative positions that can potentially compensate for PB2 627K, a well-known marker for cross-species infection. An RNP assay suggested Q591K, D701N, and M535L as potential markers for an H7N9 virus capable of infecting humans.

  1. Genetic versus antigenic differences among highly pathogenic H5N1 avian influenza A viruses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peeters, Ben; Reemers, Sylvia; Dortmans, Jos; Vries, de Erik; Jong, de Mart; Zande, van de Saskia; Rottier, Peter J.M.; Haan, de Cornelis A.M.

    2017-01-01

    Highly pathogenic H5N1 avian influenza A viruses display a remarkable genetic and antigenic diversity. We examined to what extent genetic distances between several H5N1 viruses from different clades correlate with antigenic differences and vaccine performance. H5-specific antisera were generated, an

  2. Avian encephalomyelitis virus is a picornavirus and is most closely related to hepatitis A virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marvil, P; Knowles, N J; Mockett, A P; Britton, P; Brown, T D; Cavanagh, D

    1999-03-01

    The complete RNA genome of avian encephalomyelitis virus (AEV) has been molecularly cloned and sequenced. This revealed AEV to be a member of the Picornaviridae and consequently it is the first avian picornavirus for which the genome has been sequenced. Excluding the poly(A) tail the genome comprises 7032 nucleotides, which is shorter than that of any mammalian picornavirus sequenced to date. An open reading frame commencing at nucleotide 495 and terminating at position 6896 (6402 nucleotides) potentially encodes a polyprotein of 2134 amino acids. The polyprotein sequence has 39% overall amino acid identity with hepatitis A virus (HAV; genus Hepatovirus), compared to 19 to 21% for viruses from the other five picornavirus genera. Eleven cleavage products were predicted. The highest identity (49%) with HAV was in the P1 region, encoding the capsid proteins. The 5' and 3' untranslated regions (UTRs) comprise 494 and 136 nucleotides, respectively. The 5' UTR is the shortest of any picornavirus sequenced to date and, unlike HAV, it does not contain a long polypyrimidine tract.

  3. Multiple reassortment events among highly pathogenic avian influenza A(H5N1) viruses detected in Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerloff, Nancy A; Khan, Salah Uddin; Balish, Amanda; Shanta, Ireen S; Simpson, Natosha; Berman, Lashondra; Haider, Najmul; Poh, Mee Kian; Islam, Ausraful; Gurley, Emily; Hasnat, Md Abdul; Dey, T; Shu, Bo; Emery, Shannon; Lindstrom, Stephen; Haque, Ainul; Klimov, Alexander; Villanueva, Julie; Rahman, Mahmudur; Azziz-Baumgartner, Eduardo; Ziaur Rahman, Md; Luby, Stephen P; Zeidner, Nord; Donis, Ruben O; Sturm-Ramirez, Katharine; Davis, C Todd

    2014-02-01

    In Bangladesh, little is known about the genomic composition and antigenicity of highly pathogenic avian influenza A(H5N1) viruses, their geographic distribution, temporal patterns, or gene flow within the avian host population. Forty highly pathogenic avian influenza A(H5N1) viruses isolated from humans and poultry in Bangladesh between 2008 and 2012 were analyzed by full genome sequencing and antigenic characterization. The analysis included viruses collected from avian hosts and environmental sampling in live bird markets, backyard poultry flocks, outbreak investigations in wild birds or poultry and from three human cases. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that the ancestors of these viruses reassorted (1) with other gene lineages of the same clade, (2) between different clades and (3) with low pathogenicity avian influenza A virus subtypes. Bayesian estimates of the time of most recent common ancestry, combined with geographic information, provided evidence of probable routes and timelines of virus spread into and out of Bangladesh.

  4. Diagnosis of Avian Leukosis Virus Subgroup A and Avian Leukosis Virus Subgroup J Infection in Breeding Chicken%A、J亚群禽白血病病毒感染肉用种鸡的诊断

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李先桥; 史开志; 罗明星; 吴松成; 汪德生

    2009-01-01

    通过流行病学调查、剖检病变和组织病学观察,结合PCR技术检测病原核酸,确诊肉用种鸡群发生了由ALV-A和ALV-J感染而导致的淋巴细胞性白血病和骨髓细胞瘤型白血病.在检测的6只病鸡中,6只病鸡均感染了ALV-J,2只病鸡感染了ALV-A.

  5. Avian Influenza A(H5N1) Virus in Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayali, Ghazi; Kandeil, Ahmed; El-Shesheny, Rabeh; Kayed, Ahmed S; Maatouq, Asmaa M; Cai, Zhipeng; McKenzie, Pamela P; Webby, Richard J; El Refaey, Samir; Kandeel, Amr; Ali, Mohamed A

    2016-03-01

    In Egypt, avian influenza A subtype H5N1 and H9N2 viruses are enzootic in poultry. The control plan devised by veterinary authorities in Egypt to prevent infections in poultry focused mainly on vaccination and ultimately failed. Recently, widespread H5N1 infections in poultry and a substantial increase in the number of human cases of H5N1 infection were observed. We summarize surveillance data from 2009 through 2014 and show that avian influenza viruses are established in poultry in Egypt and are continuously evolving genetically and antigenically. We also discuss the epidemiology of human infection with avian influenza in Egypt and describe how the true burden of disease is underestimated. We discuss the failures of relying on vaccinating poultry as the sole intervention tool. We conclude by highlighting the key components that need to be included in a new strategy to control avian influenza infections in poultry and humans in Egypt.

  6. Identification and characterization of H2N3 avian influenza virus from backyard poultry and comparison with novel H2N3 swine influenza virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killian, Mary Lea; Zhang, Yan; Panigrahy, Brundaban; Trampel, Darrell; Yoon, Kyoung-Jin

    2011-12-01

    In early 2007, H2N3 influenza virus was isolated from a duck and a chicken in two separate poultry flocks in Ohio. Since the same subtype influenza virus with hemagglutinin (H) and neuraminidase (N) genes of avian lineage was also identified in a swine herd in Missouri in 2006, the objective of this study was to characterize and compare the genetic, antigenic, and biologic properties of the avian and swine isolates. Avian isolates were low pathogenic by in vivo chicken pathogenicity testing. Sequencing and phylogenetic analyses revealed that all genes of the avian isolates were comprised of avian lineages, whereas the swine isolates contained contemporary swine internal gene segments, demonstrating that the avian H2N3 viruses were not directly derived from the swine virus. Sequence comparisons for the H and N genes demonstrated that the avian isolates were similar but not identical to the swine isolates. Accordingly, the avian and swine isolates were also antigenically related as determined by hemagglutination-inhibition (HI) and virus neutralization assays, suggesting that both avian and swine isolates originated from the same group of H2N3 avian influenza viruses. Although serological surveys using the HI assay on poultry flocks and swine herds in Ohio did not reveal further spread of H2 virus from the index flocks, surveillance is important to ensure the virus is not reintroduced to domestic swine or poultry. Contemporary H2N3 avian influenza viruses appear to be easily adaptable to unnatural hosts such as poultry and swine, raising concern regarding the potential for interspecies transmission of avian viruses to humans.

  7. El virus influenza y la gripe aviar Influenza virus and avian flu

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Libia Herrero-Uribe

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available En este artículo se presenta una revisión del virus influenza,su biología,sus mecanismos de variación antigénica,las pandemias que ha producido y la prevención mediante las vacunas y medicamentos antivirales.Se analizan las razones por las cuales aparece el virus H5N1 que produce la fiebre aviar en humanos,la patogénesis de este virus y las estrategias para su prevención.Se informa sobre el plan de preparación para la pandemia en los niveles nacional e internacional.This article presents a review of Influenza virus,its biology,its mechanism of antigenic variation and its prevention by vaccination and the use of antivirals.The pandemics produced by this virus through history are presented.The appearance of the avian flu virus H5N1 is analyzed and its pathogenesis and strategies of prevention are discussed.National and international information about pandemic preparedness is presented.

  8. The Influence of Ecological Factors on the Transmission and Stability of Avian Influenza Virus in the Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dyah Ayu Hewajuli

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Ecology is a science studying the correlation among organisms and some environmental factors. Ecological factors play an important role to transmit Avian Influenza (AI virus and influence its stability in the environment. Avian Influenza virus is classified as type A virus and belong to Orthomyxoviridae family. The virus can infect various vertebrates, mainly birds and mammals, including human. Avian Influenza virus transmission can occur through bird migration. The bird migration patterns usually occur in the large continent covers a long distance area within a certain periode hence transmit the virus from infected birds to other birds and spread to the environment. The biotic (normal flora microbes and abiotic (physical and chemical factors play important role in transmitting the virus to susceptible avian species and influence its stability in the environment. Disinfectant can inactivate the AI virus in the environment but its effectivity is influenced by the concentration, contact time, pH, temperature and organic matter.

  9. Respiratory immune responses in the chicken; Towards development of mucosal avian influenza virus vaccines

    OpenAIRE

    de Geus, E.D.

    2012-01-01

    Several important poultry pathogens, including avian influenza virus (AIV), enter the host through the mucosae of the respiratory tract (RT) and subsequently disseminate towards other organs in the body. Therefore, animal health significantly depends on the control of infection in the lung tissue by the RT immune system. There is limited knowledge of the lung-associated immune system in poultry, which might be a consequence of the unique and complex anatomy and function of the avian lung. The...

  10. Genome characterisation of the newly discovered avian influenza A H5N7 virus subtype combination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bragstad, K.; Jørgensen, Poul Henrik; Handberg, K.J.;

    2007-01-01

    In Denmark, in 2003, a previously unknown subtype combination of avian influenza A virus, H5N7 (A/Mallard/Denmark/64650/03), was isolated from a flock of 12,000 mallards. The H5N7 subtype combination might be a reassortant between recent European avian influenza A H5, H7, and a third subtype....../Duck/Hong Kong/3096/99 (H6N2) and A/WDk/ST/1737/2000 (H6N8), respectively. All genes of the H5N7 strain were of avian origin, and no further evidence of pathogenicity to humans has been found....

  11. Egg whites from eggs of chickens infected experimentally with avian hepatitis E virus contain infectious virus, but evidence of complete vertical transmission is lacking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, H; Zhou, E M; Sun, Z F; Meng, X-J

    2007-05-01

    Avian hepatitis E virus (HEV) is genetically and antigenically related to human HEV. Vertical transmission of HEV has been reported in humans, but not in other animals. In this study, we showed that avian HEV could be detected in chicken egg-white samples. Subsequently, avian HEV in egg white was found to be infectious, as evidenced by the appearance of viraemia, faecal virus shedding and seroconversion in chickens inoculated with avian HEV-positive egg white, but not in chickens inoculated with HEV-negative egg white. To further assess the possibility of vertical transmission of avian HEV, batches of embryonated eggs from infected hens were hatched, and hatched chicks were monitored for evidence of avian HEV infection. However, no virus was detected in samples collected from the hatched chicks throughout this study, suggesting that avian HEV could not complete the vertical transmission cycle. The possible implications of our findings are also discussed.

  12. The variable codons of H5N1 avian influenza A virus haemagglutinin genes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mark; J.GIBBS; Robert; W.MURPHY

    2008-01-01

    We investigated the selection pressures on the haemagglutinin genes of H5N1 avian influenza viruses using fixed effects likelihood models. We found evidence of positive selection in the sequences from isolates from 1997 to 2007, except viruses from 2000. The haemagglutinin sequences of viruses from southeast Asia, Hong Kong and mainland China were the most polymorphic and had similar nonsyn-onymous profiles. Some sites were positively selected in viruses from most regions and a few of these sites displayed different amino acid patterns. Selection appeared to produce different outcomes in vi-ruses from Europe, Africa and Russia and from different host types. One position was found to be positively selected for human isolates only. Although the functions of some positively selected posi-tions are unknown, our analysis provided evidence of different temporal, spatial and host adaptations for H5N1 avian influenza viruses.

  13. Antigenic Characterization of H3 Subtypes of Avian Influenza A Viruses from North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Elizabeth; Long, Li-Ping; Zhao, Nan; Hall, Jeffrey S.; Baroch, John A.; Nolting, Jacqueline; Senter, Lucy; Cunningham, Frederick L.; Pharr, G. Todd; Hanson, Larry; Slemons, Richard; DeLiberto, Thomas J.; Wan, Xiu-Feng

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Besides humans, H3 subtypes of influenza A viruses (IAVs) can infect various animal hosts including avian, swine, equine, canine, and sea mammals. These H3 viruses are both antigenically and genetically diverse. Here we characterized the antigenic diversity of contemporary H3 avian IAVs recovered from migratory birds in North America. Hemagglutination inhibition (HI) assays were performed on 37 H3 isolates of avian IAVs recovered from 2007 to 2011 using generated reference chicken sera. These isolates were recovered from samples taken in the Atlantic, Mississippi, Central, and Pacific waterfowl migration flyways. Antisera to all the tested H3 isolates cross-reacted with each other, and, to a lesser extent, with those to H3 canine and H3 equine IAVs. Antigenic cartography showed that the largest antigenic distance among the 37 avian IAVs is about 4 units, and each unit corresponds to a 2log2 difference in the HI titer. However, none of the tested H3 IAVs cross-reacted with ferret sera derived from contemporary swine and human IAVs. Our results showed that the H3 avian IAVs we tested lacked significant antigenic diversity, and these viruses were antigenically different from those circulating in swine and human populations. This suggests that H3 avian IAVs in North American waterfowl are antigenically relatively stable. PMID:27309078

  14. Effect of receptor binding domain mutations on receptor binding and transmissibility of avian influenza H5N1 viruses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maines, Taronna R; Chen, Li-Mei; Van Hoeven, Neal;

    2011-01-01

    Although H5N1 influenza viruses have been responsible for hundreds of human infections, these avian influenza viruses have not fully adapted to the human host. The lack of sustained transmission in humans may be due, in part, to their avian-like receptor preference. Here, we have introduced...

  15. An emerging avian influenza A virus H5N7 is a genetic reassortant of highly pathogenic genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bragstad, K.; Jørgensen, Poul Henrik; Handberg, Kurt;

    2006-01-01

    We full genome characterised the newly discovered avian influenza virus H5N7 subtype combination isolated from a stock of Danish game ducks to investigate the composition of the genome and possible features of high pathogenicity. It was found that the haemagglutinin and the acidic polymerase genes...... low pathogenic avian influenza A viruses. (c) 2006 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved....

  16. Reassortment ability of the 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza virus with circulating human and avian influenza viruses: public health risk implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stincarelli, Maria; Arvia, Rosaria; De Marco, Maria Alessandra; Clausi, Valeria; Corcioli, Fabiana; Cotti, Claudia; Delogu, Mauro; Donatelli, Isabella; Azzi, Alberta; Giannecchini, Simone

    2013-08-01

    Exploring the reassortment ability of the 2009 pandemic H1N1 (A/H1N1pdm09) influenza virus with other circulating human or avian influenza viruses is the main concern related to the generation of more virulent or new variants having implications for public health. After different coinfection experiments in human A549 cells, by using the A/H1N1pdm09 virus plus one of human seasonal influenza viruses of H1N1 and H3N2 subtype or one of H11, H10, H9, H7 and H1 avian influenza viruses, several reassortant viruses were obtained. Among these, the HA of H1N1 was the main segment of human seasonal influenza virus reassorted in the A/H1N1pdm09 virus backbone. Conversely, HA and each of the three polymerase segments, alone or in combination, of the avian influenza viruses mainly reassorted in the A/H1N1pdm09 virus backbone. Of note, A/H1N1pdm09 viruses that reassorted with HA of H1N1 seasonal human or H11N6 avian viruses or carried different combination of avian origin polymerase segments, exerted a higher replication effectiveness than that of the parental viruses. These results confirm that reassortment of the A/H1N1pdm09 with circulating low pathogenic avian influenza viruses should not be misjudged in the prediction of the next pandemic.

  17. Clinical characteristics of human infection with a novel avian-origin influenza A(H10N8) virus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Wei; Wan Jianguo; Qian Kejian; Liu Xiaoqing; Xiao Zuke; Sun Jian; Zeng Zhenguo

    2014-01-01

    Background Novel influenza A viruses of avian-origin may be the precursors of pandemic strains.This descriptive study aims to introduce a novel avian-origin influenza A (H10N8) virus which can infect humans and cause severe diseases.Methods Collecting clinical data of three cases of human infection with a novel reassortment avian influenza A (H10N8)virus in Nanchang,Jiangxi Province,China.Results Three cases of human infection with a new reassortment avian influenza A(H10N8) virus were described,of which two were fatal cases,and one was severe case.These cases presented with severe pneumonia that progressed to acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and intractable respiratory failure.Conclusion This novel reassortment avian influenza A (H10N8) virus in China resulted in fatal human infections,and should be added to concerns in clinical practice.

  18. The pandemic potential of avian influenza A(H7N9) virus: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanner, W D; Toth, D J A; Gundlapalli, A V

    2015-12-01

    In March 2013 the first cases of human avian influenza A(H7N9) were reported to the World Health Organization. Since that time, over 650 cases have been reported. Infections are associated with considerable morbidity and mortality, particularly within certain demographic groups. This rapid increase in cases over a brief time period is alarming and has raised concerns about the pandemic potential of the H7N9 virus. Three major factors influence the pandemic potential of an influenza virus: (1) its ability to cause human disease, (2) the immunity of the population to the virus, and (3) the transmission potential of the virus. This paper reviews what is currently known about each of these factors with respect to avian influenza A(H7N9). Currently, sustained human-to-human transmission of H7N9 has not been reported; however, population immunity to the virus is considered very low, and the virus has significant ability to cause human disease. Several statistical and geographical modelling studies have estimated and predicted the spread of the H7N9 virus in humans and avian species, and some have identified potential risk factors associated with disease transmission. Additionally, assessment tools have been developed to evaluate the pandemic potential of H7N9 and other influenza viruses. These tools could also hypothetically be used to monitor changes in the pandemic potential of a particular virus over time.

  19. Respiratory transmission of an avian H3N8 influenza virus isolated from a harbour seal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsson, Erik A.; Ip, Hon S.; Hall, Jeffrey S.; Yoon, Sun W.; Johnson, Jordan; Beck, Melinda A.; Webby, Richard J.; Schultz-Cherry, Stacey

    2014-01-01

    The ongoing human H7N9 influenza infections highlight the threat of emerging avian influenza viruses. In 2011, an avian H3N8 influenza virus isolated from moribund New England harbour seals was shown to have naturally acquired mutations known to increase the transmissibility of highly pathogenic H5N1 influenza viruses. To elucidate the potential human health threat, here we evaluate a panel of avian H3N8 viruses and find that the harbour seal virus displays increased affinity for mammalian receptors, transmits via respiratory droplets in ferrets and replicates in human lung cells. Analysis of a panel of human sera for H3N8 neutralizing antibodies suggests that there is no population-wide immunity to these viruses. The prevalence of H3N8 viruses in birds and multiple mammalian species including recent isolations from pigs and evidence that it was a past human pandemic virus make the need for surveillance and risk analysis of these viruses of public health importance.

  20. Prevalence, transmission and impact of bovine leukosis in Michigan dairies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bovine leukosis, caused by infection with the retrovirus bovine leukemia virus (BLV), has been characterized as a contagious, but practically benign disease of the immune system. National Animal Health Monitoring Surveys in 1996 and 2007 indicate complacency has resulted in high prevalence of infect...

  1. In ovo and in vitro susceptibility of American alligators (Alligator mississippiensis) to avian influenza virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temple, Bradley L; Finger, John W; Jones, Cheryl A; Gabbard, Jon D; Jelesijevic, Tomislav; Uhl, Elizabeth W; Hogan, Robert J; Glenn, Travis C; Tompkins, S Mark

    2015-01-01

    Avian influenza has emerged as one of the most ubiquitous viruses within our biosphere. Wild aquatic birds are believed to be the primary reservoir of all influenza viruses; however, the spillover of H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) and the recent swine-origin pandemic H1N1 viruses have sparked increased interest in identifying and understanding which and how many species can be infected. Moreover, novel influenza virus sequences were recently isolated from New World bats. Crocodilians have a slow rate of molecular evolution and are the sister group to birds; thus they are a logical reptilian group to explore susceptibility to influenza virus infection and they provide a link between birds and mammals. A primary American alligator (Alligator mississippiensis) cell line, and embryos, were infected with four, low pathogenic avian influenza (LPAI) strains to assess susceptibility to infection. Embryonated alligator eggs supported virus replication, as evidenced by the influenza virus M gene and infectious virus detected in allantoic fluid and by virus antigen staining in embryo tissues. Primary alligator cells were also inoculated with the LPAI viruses and showed susceptibility based upon antigen staining; however, the requirement for trypsin to support replication in cell culture limited replication. To assess influenza virus replication in culture, primary alligator cells were inoculated with H1N1 human influenza or H5N1 HPAI viruses that replicate independent of trypsin. Both viruses replicated efficiently in culture, even at the 30 C temperature preferred by the alligator cells. This research demonstrates the ability of wild-type influenza viruses to infect and replicate within two crocodilian substrates and suggests the need for further research to assess crocodilians as a species potentially susceptible to influenza virus infection.

  2. The eradication experience of enzootic bovine leukosis from Lithuania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acaite, J; Tamosiunas, V; Lukauskas, K; Milius, J; Pieskus, J

    2007-11-15

    Before 1985 the situation regarding enzootic bovine leukosis (EBL) in Lithuanian cattle was described only haphazardly. In 1986 serological investigations were initiated together with an eradication programme. The EBL bovine leukosis virus (BLV) situation was monitored by the Institute of Immunology Vilnius University, national and regional veterinary laboratories. Starting in 1986 all EBL-positive cattle were separated from negative cattle into BLV-infected and BLV-free herds. To create the latter, calves were fed pasteurized milk. The seroprevalence in 1990 was 7.29%, but it steadily declined to 0.32% in 2006.

  3. Identification of two neutralization epitopes on the capsid protein of avian hepatitis E virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, E-M; Guo, H; Huang, F F; Sun, Z F; Meng, X J

    2008-02-01

    Avian hepatitis E virus (avian HEV) is genetically and antigenically related to human HEV, the causative agent of hepatitis E. To identify the neutralizing epitopes on the capsid (ORF2) protein of avian HEV, four mAbs (7B2, 1E11, 10A2 and 5G10) against recombinant avian HEV ORF2 protein were generated. mAbs 7B2, 1E11 and 10A2 blocked each other for binding to avian HEV ORF2 protein in a competitive ELISA, whereas 5G10 did not block the other mAbs, suggesting that 7B2, 1E11 and 10A2 recognize the same or overlapping epitopes and 5G10 recognizes a different one. The epitopes recognized by 7B2, 1E11 and 10A2, and by 5G10 were mapped by Western blotting between aa 513 and 570, and between aa 476 and 513, respectively. mAbs 1E11, 10A2 and 5G10 were shown to bind to avian HEV particles in vitro, although only 5G10 reacted to viral antigens in transfected LMH cells. To assess the neutralizing activities of the mAbs, avian HEV was incubated in vitro with each mAb before inoculation into specific-pathogen-free chickens. Both viraemia and faecal virus shedding were delayed in chickens inoculated with the mixtures of avian HEV and 1E11, 10A2 or 5G10, suggesting that these three mAbs partially neutralize avian HEV.

  4. Previous infection with virulent strains of Newcastle disease virus reduces highly pathogenic avian influenza virus replication, disease, and mortality in chickens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avian influenza virus (AIV) and Newcastle disease virus (NDV) are two of the most important viruses affecting poultry worldwide, but little is known about the interaction between these two viruses when simultaneously co-infecting the same host, especially in areas of the world where both viruses are...

  5. Construction of an infectious cDNA clone of avian hepatitis E virus (avian HEV) recovered from a clinically healthy chicken in the United States and characterization of its pathogenicity in specific-pathogen-free chickens

    OpenAIRE

    Kwon, Hyuk Moo; LeRoith, Tanya; Pudupakam, R. S.; Pierson, F. William; Huang, Yao-Wei; Dryman, Barbara A.; Meng, Xiang-Jin

    2010-01-01

    A genetically distinct strain of avian hepatitis E virus (avian HEV-VA strain) was isolated from a healthy chicken in Virginia, and thus it is important to characterize and compare its pathogenicity with the prototype strain (avian HEV-prototype) isolated from a diseased chicken. Here we first constructed an infectious clone of the avian HEV-VA strain. Capped RNA transcripts from the avian HEV-VA clone were replication-competent after transfection of LMH chicken liver cells. Chickens inoculat...

  6. Short communication: Milk ELISA status for bovine leukosis virus infection is not associated with milk production in dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorge, U S; Lissemore, K; Cantin, R; Kelton, D F

    2011-10-01

    The objective of this study was to assess whether the milk ELISA status for antibodies against bovine leukemia virus was associated with 305-d milk production in Canadian dairy cattle. Test results and test-day production data from 19,785 dairy cows were available for analysis. A linear mixed model was used with the estimated 305-d milk production as the outcome and lactation number, somatic cell count, calving season, days in milk, and breed as fixed effects. Herd nested in province was included as random effect. In conclusion, bovine leukemia virus antibody milk ELISA status was not associated with milk production.

  7. Delayed-onset enzootic bovine leukosis possibly caused by superinfection with bovine leukemia virus mutated in the pol gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Tadaaki; Inoue, Emi; Mori, Hiroshi; Osawa, Yoshiaki; Okazaki, Katsunori

    2015-08-01

    Bovine leukemia virus (BLV) is the causative agent of enzootic bovine leucosis (EBL), to which animals are most susceptible at 4-8 years of age. In this study, we examined tumor cells associated with EBL in an 18-year-old cow to reveal that the cells carried at least two different copies of the virus, one of which was predicted to encode a reverse transcriptase (RT) lacking ribonuclease H activity and no integrase. Such a deficient enzyme may exhibit a dominant negative effect on the wild-type RT and cause insufficient viral replication, resulting in delayed tumor development in this cow.

  8. Sustained live poultry market surveillance contributes to early warnings for human infection with avian influenza viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Shisong; Bai, Tian; Yang, Lei; Wang, Xin; Peng, Bo; Liu, Hui; Geng, Yijie; Zhang, Renli; Ma, Hanwu; Zhu, Wenfei; Wang, Dayan; Cheng, Jinquan; Shu, Yuelong

    2016-08-03

    Sporadic human infections with the highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) A (H5N6) virus have been reported in different provinces in China since April 2014. From June 2015 to January 2016, routine live poultry market (LPM) surveillance was conducted in Shenzhen, Guangdong Province. H5N6 viruses were not detected until November 2015. The H5N6 virus-positive rate increased markedly beginning in December 2015, and viruses were detected in LPMs in all districts of the city. Coincidently, two human cases with histories of poultry exposure developed symptoms and were diagnosed as H5N6-positive in Shenzhen during late December 2015 and early January 2016. Similar viruses were identified in environmental samples collected in the LPMs and the patients. In contrast to previously reported H5N6 viruses, viruses with six internal genes derived from the H9N2 or H7N9 viruses were detected in the present study. The increased H5N6 virus-positive rate in the LPMs and the subsequent human infections demonstrated that sustained LPM surveillance for avian influenza viruses provides an early warning for human infections. Interventions, such as LPM closures, should be immediately implemented to reduce the risk of human infection with the H5N6 virus when the virus is widely detected during LPM surveillance.

  9. The hemagglutinin structure of an avian H1N1 influenza A virus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Tianwei; Wang, Gengyan; Li, Anzhang; Zhang, Qian; Wu, Caiming; Zhang, Rongfu; Cai, Qixu; Song, Wenjun; Yuen, Kwok-Yung; (U. Hong Kong); (Inter. Inst. Infect. Imm.); (Xiamen)

    2009-09-15

    The interaction between hemagglutinin (HA) and receptors is a kernel in the study of evolution and host adaptation of H1N1 influenza A viruses. The notion that the avian HA is associated with preferential specificity for receptors with Sia{alpha}2,3Gal glycosidic linkage over those with Sia{alpha}2,6Gal linkage is not all consistent with the available data on H1N1 viruses. By x-ray crystallography, the HA structure of an avian H1N1 influenza A virus, as well as its complexes with the receptor analogs, was determined. The structures revealed no preferential binding of avian receptor analogs over that of the human analog, suggesting that the HA/receptor binding might not be as stringent as is commonly believed in determining the host receptor preference for some subtypes of influenza viruses, such as the H1N1 viruses. The structure also showed difference in glycosylation despite the preservation of related sequences, which may partly contribute to the difference between structures of human and avian origin.

  10. Analysis of epitopes in the capsid protein of avian hepatitis E virus by using monoclonal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Shiwei; Zhao, Qin; Lu, Mingzhe; Sun, Peiming; Qiu, Hongkai; Zhang, Lu; Lv, Junhua; Zhou, En-Min

    2011-02-01

    Avian hepatitis E virus (HEV) is related genetically and antigenically to human and swine HEVs and capsid protein of avian HEV shares approximately 48-49% amino acid sequence identities with those of human and swine HEVs. Six monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) were produced and used to locate different epitopes in the ORF2 region of aa 339-570 of avian HEV Chinese isolate. The results showed that five epitopes were located in the aa 339-414 region and one in the aa 510-515 region. Two epitopes located in aa 339-355 and aa 384-414 regions are the immunodominant epitopes on the surface of the avian HEV particles as demonstrated by immune capture of viral particles and immunohistochemical detection of the ORF2 antigens with two MAbs.

  11. Landscape attributes driving avian influenza virus circulation in the Lake Alaotra region of Madagascar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laure Guerrini

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available While the spatial pattern of the highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N1 virus has been studied throughout Southeast Asia, little is known on the spatial risk factors for avian influenza in Africa. In the present paper, we combined serological data from poultry and remotely sensed environmental factors in the Lake Alaotra region of Madagascar to explore for any association between avian influenza and landscape variables. Serological data from cross-sectional surveys carried out on poultry in 2008 and 2009 were examined together with a Landsat 7 satellite image analysed using supervised classification. The dominant landscape features in a 1-km buffer around farmhouses and distance to the closest water body were extracted. A total of 1,038 individual bird blood samples emanating from 241 flocks were analysed, and the association between avian influenza seroprevalence and these landcape variables was quantified using logistic regression models. No evidence of the presence of H5 or H7 avian influenza subtypes was found, suggesting that only low pathogenic avian influenza (LPAI circulated. Three predominant land cover classes were identified around the poultry farms: grassland savannah, rice paddy fields and wetlands. A significant negative relationship was found between LPAI seroprevalence and distance to the closest body of water. We also found that LPAI seroprevalence was higher in farms characterised by predominant wetlands or rice landscapes than in those surrounded by dry savannah. Results from this study suggest that if highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N1 virus were introduced in Madagascar, the environmental conditions that prevail in Lake Alaotra region may allow the virus to spread and persist.

  12. Direct production losses and treatment costs from bovine viral diarrhoea virus, bovine leukosis virus, Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis, and Neospora caninum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Junwook; VanLeeuwen, John A; Weersink, Alfons; Keefe, Gregory P

    2002-09-30

    Our purpose was to determine direct production losses (milk loss, premature voluntary culling and reduced slaughter value, mortaliy loss, and abortion and reproductive loss) and treatmetn costs (veterinary services, medication cost, and extra farm labour cost) due to four infectious diseases in the maritime provinces of Canada: bovine viral diarrhoea (BVD), enzootic bovine leukosis (EBL), Johne's Disease (JD), and neosporosis. We used a partial-budget model, and incorporated risk and sensitivity analyses to identify the effects of uncertainty on costs. Total annual costs for an average, infected, 50 cow herd were: JD$ 2472; BVD$ 2421; neosporosis $ 2304; EBL$ 806. The stochastic nature of the proportion of infected herds and prevalence of infection within a herd were used to estimate probability distributions for these ex post costs. For all diseases, these distributions were right skewed. A sensitivity analysis showed the largest effect on costs was due to milk yield effects. For example, changing milk production loss from 0 to 5% for BVD increased the costs for the disease by 266%.

  13. Glycan-functionalized graphene-FETs toward selective detection of human-infectious avian influenza virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ono, Takao; Oe, Takeshi; Kanai, Yasushi; Ikuta, Takashi; Ohno, Yasuhide; Maehashi, Kenzo; Inoue, Koichi; Watanabe, Yohei; Nakakita, Shin-ichi; Suzuki, Yasuo; Kawahara, Toshio; Matsumoto, Kazuhiko

    2017-03-01

    There are global concerns about threat of pandemic caused by the human-infectious avian influenza virus. To prevent the oncoming pandemic, it is crucial to analyze the viral affinity to human-type or avian-type sialoglycans with high sensitivity at high speed. Graphene-FET (G-FET) realizes such high-sensitive electrical detection of the targets, owing to graphene’s high carrier mobility. In the present study, G-FET was functionalized using sialoglycans and employed for the selective detection of lectins from Sambucus sieboldiana and Maackia amurensis as alternatives of the human and avian influenza viruses. Glycan-functionalized G-FET selectively monitored the sialoglycan-specific binding reactions at subnanomolar sensitivity.

  14. H7N9 avian influenza A virus and the perpetual challenge of potential human pandemicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morens, David M; Taubenberger, Jeffery K; Fauci, Anthony S

    2013-07-09

    ABSTRACT The ongoing H7N9 influenza epizootic in China once again presents us questions about the origin of pandemics and how to recognize them in early stages of development. Over the past ~135 years, H7 influenza viruses have neither caused pandemics nor been recognized as having undergone human adaptation. Yet several unusual properties of these viruses, including their poultry epizootic potential, mammalian adaptation, and atypical clinical syndromes in rarely infected humans, suggest that they may be different from other avian influenza viruses, thus questioning any assurance that the likelihood of human adaptation is low. At the same time, the H7N9 epizootic provides an opportunity to learn more about the mammalian/human adaptational capabilities of avian influenza viruses and challenges us to integrate virologic and public health research and surveillance at the animal-human interface.

  15. The changing nature of avian influenza A virus (H5N1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Yohei; Ibrahim, Madiha S; Suzuki, Yasuo; Ikuta, Kazuyoshi

    2012-01-01

    Highly pathogenic avian influenza A virus subtype H5N1 has been endemic in some bird species since its emergence in 1996 and its ecology, genetics and antigenic properties have continued to evolve. This has allowed diverse virus strains to emerge in endemic areas with altered receptor specificity, including a new H5 sublineage with enhanced binding affinity to the human-type receptor. The pandemic potential of H5N1 viruses is alarming and may be increasing. We review here the complex dynamics and changing nature of the H5N1 virus that may contribute to the emergence of pandemic strains.

  16. Genetic Reassortment Among the Influenza Viruses (Avian Influenza, Human Influenza and Swine Influenza in Pigs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dyah Ayu Hewajuli

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Influenza A virus is a hazardous virus and harm to respiratory tract. The virus infect birds, pigs, horses, dogs, mammals and humans. Pigs are important hosts in ecology of the influenza virus because they have two receptors, namely NeuAc 2,3Gal and NeuAc 2,6Gal which make the pigs are sensitive to infection of influenza virus from birds and humans and genetic reassortment can be occurred. Classical swine influenza H1N1 viruses had been circulated in pigs in North America and other countries for 80 years. In 1998, triple reassortant H3N2 swine influenza viruses that contains genes of human influenza A virus (H3N2, swine influenza virus (H1N1 and avian influenza are reported as cause an outbreaks in pigs in North America. Furthermore, the circulation of triple reassortant H3N2 swine influenza virus resulting reassortant H1N1 swine influenza and reassortant H1N2 swine influenza viruses cause infection in humans. Humans who were infected by triple reassortant swine influenza A virus (H1N1 usually made direct contact with pigs. Although without any clinical symptoms, pigs that are infected by triple reassortant swine influenza A (H1N1 can transmit infection to the humans around them. In June 2009, WHO declared that pandemic influenza of reassortant H1N1 influenza A virus (novel H1N1 has reached phase 6. In Indonesia until 2009, there were 1005 people were infected by H1N1 influenza A and 5 of them died. Novel H1N1 and H5N1 viruses have been circulated in humans and pigs in Indonesia. H5N1 reassortant and H1N1 viruses or the seasonal flu may could arise because of genetic reassortment between avian influenza and humans influenza viruses that infect pigs together.

  17. Two special topics on the avian influenza virus and on epigenetics,have drawn much attention

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU YongLin

    2010-01-01

    @@ Several excellent well-organized reviews and research papers on two special topics, "The challenges of avian influenza virus: mechanism, epidemiology, and control" and "Molecular epigenetics: dawn of a new era of biomedical research", published in the 2009 edition of Science in China Series C: Life Sciences, have drawn much attention.

  18. Subclinical avian influenza A(H5N1) virus infection in human, Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Mai Quynh; Horby, Peter; Fox, Annette; Nguyen, Hien Tran; Le Nguyen, Hang Khanh; Hoang, Phuong Mai Vu; Nguyen, Khanh Cong; de Jong, Menno D; Jeeninga, Rienk E; Rogier van Doorn, H; Farrar, Jeremy; Wertheim, Heiman F L

    2013-10-01

    Laboratory-confirmed cases of subclinical infection with avian influenza A(H5N1) virus in humans are rare, and the true number of these cases is unknown. We describe the identification of a laboratory-confirmed subclinical case in a woman during an influenza A(H5N1) contact investigation in northern Vietnam.

  19. Evolution of highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N1 viruses in Egypt indicating progressive adaptation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) virus of the H5N1 subtype was first diagnosed in poultry in Egypt in 2006, and since then the disease became enzootic in poultry throughout the country affecting the poultry industry and village poultry as well as infecting humans. Vaccination has been used ...

  20. The pause on avian H5N1 influenza virus transmission research should be ended

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.A.M. Fouchier (Ron); A. García-Sastre (Adolfo); Y. Kawaoka (Yoshihiro)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractA voluntary 60-day pause on avian H5N1 influenza virus transmission research was announced in January 2012 by the international community of influenza scientists engaged in this work to provide time to explain the benefits of such work and the risk mitigation measures in place. Subsequen

  1. Surveillance for avian influenza viruses in wild birds in Denmark and Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjulsager, Charlotte Kristiane; Breum, Solvej Østergaard; Trebbien, Ramona;

    Avian influenza (AI) is a disease of major threat to poultry production. Surveillance of AI in wild birds contributes to the control of AI. In Denmark (DK) and Greenland (GL), extensive surveillance of AI viruses in the wild bird population has been conducted. The surveillance aimed at detecting...

  2. H5N1 avian influenza virus: human cases reported in southern China.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Crofts, J.; Paget, J.; Karcher, F.

    2003-01-01

    Two cases of confirmed influenza due to the avian influenza A H5N1 virus were reported last week in Hong Kong (1). The cases occurred in a Hong Kong family who had recently visited Fujian province in southern China. The daughter, aged 8 years, died following a respiratory illness. The cause of her d

  3. Genetic Analysis of Avian Influenza Virus from Wild Birds and Mallards Reared for Shooting in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Handberg, Kurt; Therkildsen, O. R.; Jørgensen, Poul Henrik

    2010-01-01

    Denmark forms a geographical bottleneck along the migration route of many water birds breeding from northeastern Canada to north Siberia that gather to winter in Europe and Africa. Potentially, the concentration of such large numbers of water birds enhances the risk of avian influenza virus (AIV...

  4. Risk for Avian Influenza Virus Exposure at Human–Wildlife Interface

    OpenAIRE

    Siembieda, J; Johnson, CK; Boyce, W; Sandrock, C; Cardona, C.

    2008-01-01

    To assess risk for human exposure to avian influenza viruses (AIV), we sampled California wild birds and marine mammals during October 2005-August 2007and estimated human-wildlife contact. Waterfowl hunters were 8 times more likely to have contact with AIV-infected wildlife than were persons with casual or occupational exposures (p

  5. Respiratory immune responses in the chicken; Towards development of mucosal avian influenza virus vaccines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Geus, E.D.

    2012-01-01

    Several important poultry pathogens, including avian influenza virus (AIV), enter the host through the mucosae of the respiratory tract (RT) and subsequently disseminate towards other organs in the body. Therefore, animal health significantly depends on the control of infection in the lung tissue by

  6. Transcription factor regulation and cytokine expression following in vitro infection of primary chicken cell culture with low pathogenic avian influenza virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avian influenza virus (AIV) induced proinflammatory cytokine expression is believed to contribute to the disease pathogenesis following infection. However, there is limited information on the avian immune response to infection with low pathogenic avian influenza virus (LPAIV). To gain a better under...

  7. Ocorrência de leucose enzoótica bovina na microrregião da Serra de Botucatu Occurrence of bovine leukosis virus in the microregion of the Serra de Botucatu, SP, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Megid

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was characterize the positivity of the bovine leukosis virus in the Microregion of the Serra de Botucatu. Sera from 1193 bovine from 65 properties of the Microregion of the Serra de Botucatu were evaluated throught ELISA test. All the evaluated animals were adult and 16 of them only were male; 85.5% were crossbred, 6.45% Nellore and 8% dutch. Of the analyzed samples, 618 sera had resulted positive to the test. In only one flock it was not found seroreagents animals, the regional positivity was 52% (the seropositivity in the properties varied of 10% to 67%, the higher the percentage of positivity was in the animals of the dutch race (94.7%, followed for the crossbred (43.7%. The high percentage of positivity of the disease in our region is distinguished.

  8. Serological prevalence, genetic identification, and characterization of the first strains of avian hepatitis E virus from chickens in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Hyuk Moo; Sung, Haan Woo; Meng, Xiang-Jin

    2012-10-01

    Avian hepatitis E virus (avian HEV) is associated with hepatitis-splenomegaly (HS) syndrome or big liver and spleen disease in chickens. At least three genotypes of avian HEV have been identified from chickens worldwide. A total of 297 serum samples collected from chickens in 35 flocks in Korea were tested for avian HEV antibody with an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The results showed that approximately 57 % of chicken flocks and 28 % of chickens from Korea were positive for antibodies to avian HEV. Thirteen pooled fecal samples from chickens were tested for avian HEV RNA by RT-PCR, and three fecal samples were positive. The partial helicase and capsid genes of the Korean avian HEV isolates were determined, and sequence analyses revealed that the Korean avian HEV isolates were clustered together and closely related to the genotype 1 avian HEV from Australia. The complete genomic sequence of a Korean avian HEV strain HH-F9 from a broiler breeder was determined, and shown to be 6,653 nt in length, excluding the poly (A) tail, which is 1 nt shorter than the prototype avian HEV from chicken with HS syndrome in the United States. Compared to the full-length sequences of other 5 known avian HEV strains worldwide, the Korean avian HEV shared approximately 83-97 % nucleotide sequence identity. The finding that Korean avian HEV belongs to genotype 1 avian HEV which was previously identified only from chickens in Australia has significant implication in understanding the global epidemiology of avian HEV.

  9. Serological Evidence of Inter-Species Transmission of H9N2 Avian Influenza Virus in Poultry, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Mehdi Hadipour

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Ducks and in-contact backyard chickens on 20 smallholder backyard farms in 4 districts of Shiraz, Southwest of Iran, were monitored for antibodies against H9N2 avian influenza virus using hemagglutinationinhibition (HI test. A total of 200 unvaccinated ducks and backyard chickens were sampled. The mean H I titers and seroprevalence in ducks and backyard chickens were 8.3, 5.7 and 78.4, 62.9%, respectively. Results of this study revealed that the Scavenging ducks are the natural reservoir of avian influenza viruses and play an important role in the epidemiology of H9N2 avian influenza virus infection.

  10. Sialic acid content in human saliva and anti-influenza activity against human and avian influenza viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limsuwat, Nattavatchara; Suptawiwat, Ornpreya; Boonarkart, Chompunuch; Puthavathana, Pilaipan; Wiriyarat, Witthawat; Auewarakul, Prasert

    2016-03-01

    It was shown previously that human saliva has higher antiviral activity against human influenza viruses than against H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses, and that the major anti-influenza activity was associated with sialic-acid-containing molecules. To further characterize the differential susceptibility to saliva among influenza viruses, seasonal influenza A and B virus, pandemic H1N1 virus, and 15 subtypes of avian influenza virus were tested for their susceptibility to human and chicken saliva. Human saliva showed higher hemagglutination inhibition (HI) and neutralization (NT) titers against seasonal influenza A virus and the pandemic H1N1 viruses than against influenza B virus and most avian influenza viruses, except for H9N2 and H12N9 avian influenza viruses, which showed high HI and NT titers. To understand the nature of sialic-acid-containing anti-influenza factors in human saliva, α2,3- and α2,6-linked sialic acid was measured in human saliva samples using a lectin binding and dot blot assay. α2,6-linked sialic acid was found to be more abundant than α2,3-linked sialic acid, and a seasonal H1N1 influenza virus bound more efficiently to human saliva than an H5N1 virus in a dot blot analysis. These data indicated that human saliva contains the sialic acid type corresponding to the binding preference of seasonal influenza viruses.

  11. ZOONOTIC POTENTIAL OF HIGHLY PATHOGENIC AVIAN H7N3 INFLUENZA VIRUSES FROM PAKISTAN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aamir, Uzma B.; Naeem, Khalid; Ahmed, Zaheer; Obert, Caroline A; Franks, John; Krauss, Scott; Seiler, Patrick; Webster, Robert G.

    2009-01-01

    H5 and H7 avian influenza viruses can become highly pathogenic in chickens after interspecies transmission. These viruses have transmitted directly to humans from birds in Eurasia and Africa (H5N1), the Netherlands (H7N7), and Canada (H7N3). Here we report antigenic, sequence, and phylogenetic analyses of H7N3 viruses isolated from chickens in Pakistan from 1995 to 2002. We compared the pathogenic and zoonotic potential of the Pakistani viruses in avian and mammalian hosts. In chickens, all of the isolates showed high pathogenicity with poor transmissibility to contact birds. Viral shedding from the trachea and cloaca was equivalent, but cloacal shedding occurred longer; dissemination of virus into the tissues was widespread. In contrast, the viruses replicated poorly in 6-week-old mallard ducks. In mammalian hosts, of the two Pakistani H7N3/02 viruses that caused weight loss, one also caused 40% mortality in mice without prior adaptation, and preliminary experiments in ferrets showed significant virus multiplication in the lungs, intestine, and conjunctiva. We conclude that the H7N3/02 isolates from Pakistan show limited antigenic drift and have evolved slowly during their 8-year circulation in chickens; however, these viruses have the potential to infect mammals. PMID:19535120

  12. A Review of the Antiviral Susceptibility of Human and Avian Influenza Viruses over the Last Decade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ding Yuan Oh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Antivirals play an important role in the prevention and treatment of influenza infections, particularly in high-risk or severely ill patients. Two classes of influenza antivirals have been available in many countries over the last decade (2004–2013, the adamantanes and the neuraminidase inhibitors (NAIs. During this period, widespread adamantane resistance has developed in circulating influenza viruses rendering these drugs useless, resulting in the reliance on the most widely available NAI, oseltamivir. However, the emergence of oseltamivir-resistant seasonal A(H1N1 viruses in 2008 demonstrated that NAI-resistant viruses could also emerge and spread globally in a similar manner to that seen for adamantane-resistant viruses. Previously, it was believed that NAI-resistant viruses had compromised replication and/or transmission. Fortunately, in 2013, the majority of circulating human influenza viruses remain sensitive to all of the NAIs, but significant work by our laboratory and others is now underway to understand what enables NAI-resistant viruses to retain the capacity to replicate and transmit. In this review, we describe how the susceptibility of circulating human and avian influenza viruses has changed over the last ten years and describe some research studies that aim to understand how NAI-resistant human and avian influenza viruses may emerge in the future.

  13. Development and application of an indirect ELISA for detection of antibodies against avian hepatitis E virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Qin; Sun, Yani; Zhao, Jinan; Hu, Shoubin; Zhao, Feifei; Chen, Fuyong; Clavijo, Alfonso; Zhou, En-Min; Xiao, Yihong

    2013-01-01

    An indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (iELISA) that could detect immunoglobulin G antibodies against avian hepatitis E virus (HEV) was developed. This assay employs a truncated C-terminal 268-amino acid recombinant ORF2 protein from an avian HEV genotype 3 strain isolated in China (CaHEV) as the coating antigen. The antigen concentration and serum dilution were optimized using a checkerboard titration. A cut-off value of 0.368 at OD(450nm) was determined by testing 120 positive and 200 negative chicken sera for avian HEV antibodies using the two-graph receiver operating characteristic (TG-ROC) analysis. This iELISA has a sensitivity of 96.1% and a specificity of 95.8%. The overall agreement between the iELISA and a corresponding Western blot was 97%. The iELISA was used to evaluate the seroprevalence of avian HEV in poultry farms in the Shandong province. The avian HEV seropositive rate of 35.9% was determined by testing 1871 serum samples that were collected from 10 chicken flocks ranged from 10 to 60 weeks of age. The iELISA that was developed in this study can be used for detection of immunoglobulin G antibodies against avian HEV.

  14. The past, present and the future prevalent and the prevention and control of avian leukemia J subgroup in China--Enlightenment for animal disease prevention and control in China%我国鸡群J亚群白血病流行的过去、现在和将来及其防控--对我国动物疫病防控的启示

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    崔治中

    2015-01-01

    Avian leukosis virus (ALV) is a kind of retroviruse cause polytype tumor in poultry, include 10 subgroups from group A to J. Subgroup J of avian leukosis virus (ALV-J) was identified and isolated at the end of the eighties by Payne. Since first isolated in China in 1999, ALV-J has been spread from fryer to layer and local strain chicken. This article made a brief introduc-tion of the prevalent and the prevention and control of ALV in China, in order to make a new en-lightenment for animal disease prevention and control in China.%禽白血病病毒(avian leukosis virus, ALV)是一种能引起禽类多种类型肿瘤的反转录病毒,包括A-J等10个亚群。其中J亚群禽白血病病毒(Subgroup J of avian leukosis virus, ALV-J)是20世纪80年代末Payne等首先从肉鸡中分离鉴定出来的亚群。自1999年我国首次分离ALV-J以来,ALV-J已从肉用鸡群向蛋用型鸡群和地方品系鸡群传播。本文对我国鸡群J亚群白血病流行的过去、现在和将来及其防控作以简要介绍,以期对我国动物疫病防控产生新的启示。

  15. Evolution of highly pathogenic avian H5N1 influenza viruses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Macken, Catherine A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Green, Margaret A [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    Highly pathogenic avian H5N1 viruses have circulated in Southeast Asia for more than a decade, are now endemic in parts of this region, and have also spread to more than 60 countries on three continents. The evolution of these viruses is characterized by frequent reassortment events that have created a significant number of different genotypes, both transient and longer lasting. However, fundamental questions remain about the generation and perpetuation of this substantial genetic diversity. These gaps in understanding may, in part, be due to the difficulties of genotyping closely related viruses, and limitations in the size of the data sets used in analysis. Using our recently published novel genotyping procedure ('two-time test'), which is amenable to high throughput analysis and provides an increased level of resolution relative to previous analyses, we propose a detailed model for the evolution and diversification of avian H5N1 viruses. Our analysis suggests that (i) all current H5N1 genotypes are derived from a single, clearly defined sequence of initial reassortment events; (ii) reassortment of the polymerase and NP genes may have played an important role in avian H5N1 virus evolution; (iii) the current genotype Z viruses have diverged into three distinguishable sub-genotypes in the absence of reassortment; (iv) some potentially significant molecular changes appear to be correlated with particular genotypes (for example, reassortment of the internal genes is often paralleled by a change in the HA clade); and (v) as noted in earlier studies of avian influenza A virus evolution, novel segments are typically derived from different donors (i.e., there is no obvious pattern of gene linkage in reassortment). The model of avian H5N1 viral evolution by reassortment and mutation that emerges from our study provides a context within which significant amino acid changes may be revealed; it also may help in predicting the 'success' of newly emerging

  16. Little evidence of subclinical avian influenza virus infections among rural villagers in Cambodia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory C Gray

    Full Text Available In 2008, 800 adults living within rural Kampong Cham Province, Cambodia were enrolled in a prospective cohort study of zoonotic influenza transmission. After enrollment, participants were contacted weekly for 24 months to identify acute influenza-like illnesses (ILI. Follow-up sera were collected at 12 and 24 months. A transmission substudy was also conducted among the family contacts of cohort members reporting ILI who were influenza A positive. Samples were assessed using serological or molecular techniques looking for evidence of infection with human and avian influenza viruses. Over 24 months, 438 ILI investigations among 284 cohort members were conducted. One cohort member was hospitalized with a H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI virus infection and withdrew from the study. Ninety-seven ILI cases (22.1% were identified as influenza A virus infections by real-time RT-PCR; none yielded evidence for AIV. During the 2 years of follow-up, 21 participants (3.0% had detectable antibody titers (≥ 1:10 against the studied AIVs: 1 against an avian-like A/Migratory duck/Hong Kong/MPS180/2003(H4N6, 3 against an avian-like A/Teal/Hong Kong/w312/97(H6N1, 9 (3 of which had detectible antibody titers at both 12- and 24-month follow-up against an avian-like A/Hong Kong/1073/1999(H9N2, 6 (1 detected at both 12- and 24-month follow-up against an avian-like A/Duck/Memphis/546/74(H11N9, and 2 against an avian-like A/Duck/Alberta/60/76(H12N5. With the exception of the one hospitalized cohort member with H5N1 infection, no other symptomatic avian influenza infections were detected among the cohort. Serological evidence for subclinical infections was sparse with only one subject showing a 4-fold rise in microneutralization titer over time against AvH12N5. In summary, despite conducting this closely monitored cohort study in a region enzootic for H5N1 HPAI, we were unable to detect subclinical avian influenza infections, suggesting either that these

  17. Little Evidence of Subclinical Avian Influenza Virus Infections among Rural Villagers in Cambodia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Gregory C.; Krueger, Whitney S.; Chum, Channimol; Putnam, Shannon D.; Wierzba, Thomas F.; Heil, Gary L.; Anderson, Benjamin D.; Yasuda, Chadwick Y.; Williams, Maya; Kasper, Matthew R.; Saphonn, Vonthanak; Blair, Patrick J.

    2014-01-01

    In 2008, 800 adults living within rural Kampong Cham Province, Cambodia were enrolled in a prospective cohort study of zoonotic influenza transmission. After enrollment, participants were contacted weekly for 24 months to identify acute influenza-like illnesses (ILI). Follow-up sera were collected at 12 and 24 months. A transmission substudy was also conducted among the family contacts of cohort members reporting ILI who were influenza A positive. Samples were assessed using serological or molecular techniques looking for evidence of infection with human and avian influenza viruses. Over 24 months, 438 ILI investigations among 284 cohort members were conducted. One cohort member was hospitalized with a H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) virus infection and withdrew from the study. Ninety-seven ILI cases (22.1%) were identified as influenza A virus infections by real-time RT-PCR; none yielded evidence for AIV. During the 2 years of follow-up, 21 participants (3.0%) had detectable antibody titers (≥1∶10) against the studied AIVs: 1 against an avian-like A/Migratory duck/Hong Kong/MPS180/2003(H4N6), 3 against an avian-like A/Teal/Hong Kong/w312/97(H6N1), 9 (3 of which had detectible antibody titers at both 12- and 24-month follow-up) against an avian-like A/Hong Kong/1073/1999(H9N2), 6 (1 detected at both 12- and 24-month follow-up) against an avian-like A/Duck/Memphis/546/74(H11N9), and 2 against an avian-like A/Duck/Alberta/60/76(H12N5). With the exception of the one hospitalized cohort member with H5N1 infection, no other symptomatic avian influenza infections were detected among the cohort. Serological evidence for subclinical infections was sparse with only one subject showing a 4-fold rise in microneutralization titer over time against AvH12N5. In summary, despite conducting this closely monitored cohort study in a region enzootic for H5N1 HPAI, we were unable to detect subclinical avian influenza infections, suggesting either that these

  18. Avian Influenza in Birds

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this? Submit Button Past Newsletters Avian Influenza in Birds Language: English Español Recommend on Facebook Tweet ... illness. Top of Page Avian Influenza in Wild Birds Avian influenza A viruses have been isolated from ...

  19. The Development of Pathogenicity of Avian Influenza Virus Isolated from Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Haryadi Wibowo

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Highly pathogenic avian infl uenza outbreak in Indonesia has been reported in various poultry due toH5N1 subtype. The presence of multiple basic amino acids within the cleavage site of HA glycoprotein hasbeen identifi ed to be associated with the pathogenicity of avian infl uenza virus. The study was retrospectivestudy which was designed to characterize the cleavage site and fusion site region of haemagglutinin gene ofAIV isolated from various poultry in 2003 to 2013. Isolation, Identifi cation and propagation were carried outto collect viral stock. For virus detection, reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR method on H5 and N1 genefragment was performed. All of RT-PCR HA gene positive products were sequenced for further nucleotideanalysis and to determine the nucleotide composition at the targeted fragment. The results are all AIV isolateswere identifi ed as H5N1 subtype. The sequence analyses revealed some motives of basic amino acid motivethat were classifi ed as highly pathogenic avian infl uenza virus. Further analyses on fusion domain of all AIVisolated during the period 2003 to 2013 showed conserved amino acid.Keywords: avian infl uenza, haemagglutinin, cleavage site, basic amino acid, fusion site

  20. Sensitivity to. gamma. rays of avian sarcoma and murine leukemia viruses. [/sup 60/Co, uv

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toyoshima, K. (Osaka Univ., Japan); Niwa, O.; Yutsudo, M.; Sugiyama, H.; Tahara, S.; Sugahara, T.

    1980-09-01

    The direct inactivation of avian and murine oncoviruses by ..gamma.. rays was examined using /sup 60/Co as a ..gamma..-ray source. The inactivation of murine leukemia virus (M-MuLV) followed single-hit kinetics while the subgroup D Schmidt-Ruppin strain of avian sarcoma virus (SR-RSV D) showed multihit inactivation kinetics with an extrapolation number of 5. The two viruses showed similar uv-inactivation kinetics. The genomic RNA of the SR-RSV D strain was degraded by ..gamma.. irradiation faster than its infectivity, but viral clones isolated from the foci formed after ..gamma.. irradiation had a complete genome. These results suggest that SR-RSV D has a strong repair function, possibly connected with reverse transcriptase activity.

  1. Interspecies transmission and host restriction of avian H5N1 influenza virus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Di; LIU XiaoLing; YAN JingHua; LIU Wen-Jun; GAO George Fu

    2009-01-01

    Long-term endemicity of avian H5N1 influenza virus in poultry and continuous sporadic human infec-tions in several countries has raised the concern of another potential pandemic influenza. Suspicion of the avian origin of the previous pandemics results in the close investigation of the mechanism of in-terspecies transmission. Entry and fusion is the first step for the H5N1 influenza virus to get into the host cells affecting the host ranges. Therefore receptor usage study has been a major focus for the last few years. We now know the difference of the sialic acid structures and distributions in different spe-cies, even in the different parts of the same host. Many host factors interacting with the influenza virus component proteins have been identified and their role in the host range expansion and interspecies transmission is under detailed scrutiny. Here we review current progress in the receptor usage and host factors.

  2. New avian influenza A virus subtype combination H5N7 identified in Danish mallard ducks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bragstad, K.; Jørgensen, Poul Henrik; Handberg, Kurt;

    2005-01-01

    7, was identified. The HA gene showed great. sequence similarity to the highly pathogenic avian influenza A virus (HPAIV) A/Chicken/ftaly/312/97 (H5N2); however, the cleavage site sequence between HA1 and HA2 had a motif typical for low pathogenic avian influenza viruses (LPAIV). The full-length NA......During the past years increasing incidences of influenza A zoonosis have made it of uppermost importance to possess methods for rapid and precise identification and characterisation of influenza A Viruses. We present here a convenient one-step RT-PCR method that will amplify full......-length haemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) directly from clinical samples and from all known subtypes of influenza A. We applied the method on samples collected in September 2003 from a Danish flock of mallards with general health problems and by this a previously undescribed influenza A subtype combination, H5N...

  3. Interspecies transmission and host restriction of avian H5N1 influenza virus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO; George; Fu

    2009-01-01

    Long-term endemicity of avian H5N1 influenza virus in poultry and continuous sporadic human infections in several countries has raised the concern of another potential pandemic influenza. Suspicion of the avian origin of the previous pandemics results in the close investigation of the mechanism of interspecies transmission. Entry and fusion is the first step for the H5N1 influenza virus to get into the host cells affecting the host ranges. Therefore receptor usage study has been a major focus for the last few years. We now know the difference of the sialic acid structures and distributions in different species, even in the different parts of the same host. Many host factors interacting with the influenza virus component proteins have been identified and their role in the host range expansion and interspecies transmission is under detailed scrutiny. Here we review current progress in the receptor usage and host factors.

  4. Structural Basis for the Development of Avian Virus Capsids That Display Influenza Virus Proteins and Induce Protective Immunity

    OpenAIRE

    Pascual, Elena; Mata, Carlos P.; Gómez-Blanco, Josué; Moreno, Noelia; Bárcena, Juan; Blanco, Esther; Rodríguez-Frandsen, Ariel; Nieto, Amelia; Carrascosa, José L.; Castón, José R.

    2014-01-01

    Bioengineering of viruses and virus-like particles (VLPs) is a well-established approach in the development of new and improved vaccines against viral and bacterial pathogens. We report here that the capsid of a major avian pathogen, infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV), can accommodate heterologous proteins to induce protective immunity. The structural units of the ∼70-nm-diameter T=13 IBDV capsid are trimers of VP2, which is made as a precursor (pVP2). The pVP2 C-terminal domain has an am...

  5. Generation of influenza virus from avian cells infected by Salmonella carrying the viral genome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangmin Zhang

    Full Text Available Domestic poultry serve as intermediates for transmission of influenza A virus from the wild aquatic bird reservoir to humans, resulting in influenza outbreaks in poultry and potential epidemics/pandemics among human beings. To combat emerging avian influenza virus, an inexpensive, heat-stable, and orally administered influenza vaccine would be useful to vaccinate large commercial poultry flocks and even migratory birds. Our hypothesized vaccine is a recombinant attenuated bacterial strain able to mediate production of attenuated influenza virus in vivo to induce protective immunity against influenza. Here we report the feasibility and technical limitations toward such an ideal vaccine based on our exploratory study. Five 8-unit plasmids carrying a chloramphenicol resistance gene or free of an antibiotic resistance marker were constructed. Influenza virus was successfully generated in avian cells transfected by each of the plasmids. The Salmonella carrier was engineered to allow stable maintenance and conditional release of the 8-unit plasmid into the avian cells for recovery of influenza virus. Influenza A virus up to 10⁷ 50% tissue culture infective doses (TCID50/ml were recovered from 11 out of 26 co-cultures of chicken embryonic fibroblasts (CEF and Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK cells upon infection by the recombinant Salmonella carrying the 8-unit plasmid. Our data prove that a bacterial carrier can mediate generation of influenza virus by delivering its DNA cargoes into permissive host cells. Although we have made progress in developing this Salmonella influenza virus vaccine delivery system, further improvements are necessary to achieve efficient virus production, especially in vivo.

  6. Molecular Characterizations of Surface Proteins Hemagglutinin and Neuraminidase from Recent H5Nx Avian Influenza Viruses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Hua; Carney, Paul J.; Mishin, Vasiliy P.; Guo, Zhu; Chang, Jessie C.; Wentworth, David E.; Gubareva, Larisa V.; Stevens, James; Schultz-Cherry, S.

    2016-04-06

    ABSTRACT

    During 2014, a subclade 2.3.4.4 highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) A(H5N8) virus caused poultry outbreaks around the world. In late 2014/early 2015, the virus was detected in wild birds in Canada and the United States, and these viruses also gave rise to reassortant progeny, composed of viral RNA segments (vRNAs) from both Eurasian and North American lineages. In particular, viruses were found with N1, N2, and N8 neuraminidase vRNAs, and these are collectively referred to as H5Nx viruses. In the United States, more than 48 million domestic birds have been affected. Here we present a detailed structural and biochemical analysis of the surface antigens of H5N1, H5N2, and H5N8 viruses in addition to those of a recent human H5N6 virus. Our results with recombinant hemagglutinin reveal that these viruses have a strict avian receptor binding preference, while recombinantly expressed neuraminidases are sensitive to FDA-approved and investigational antivirals. Although H5Nx viruses currently pose a low risk to humans, it is important to maintain surveillance of these circulating viruses and to continually assess future changes that may increase their pandemic potential.

    IMPORTANCEThe H5Nx viruses emerging in North America, Europe, and Asia pose a great public health concern. Here we report a molecular and structural study of the major surface proteins of several H5Nx influenza viruses. Our results improve the understanding of these new viruses and provide important information on their receptor preferences and susceptibilities to antivirals, which are central to pandemic risk assessment.

  7. Identification of B-cell epitopes in the capsid protein of avian hepatitis E virus (avian HEV) that are common to human and swine HEVs or unique to avian HEV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, H; Zhou, E-M; Sun, Z F; Meng, X-J; Halbur, P G

    2006-01-01

    Avian hepatitis E virus (avian HEV) was recently discovered in chickens from the USA that had hepatitis-splenomegaly (HS) syndrome. The complete genomic sequence of avian HEV shares about 50 % nucleotide sequence identity with those of human and swine HEVs. The open reading frame 2 (ORF2) protein of avian HEV has been shown to cross-react with human and swine HEV ORF2 proteins, but the B-cell epitopes in the avian HEV ORF2 protein have not been identified. Nine synthetic peptides from the predicted four antigenic domains of the avian HEV ORF2 protein were synthesized and corresponding rabbit anti-peptide antisera were generated. Using recombinant ORF2 proteins, convalescent pig and chicken antisera, peptides and anti-peptide rabbit sera, at least one epitope at the C terminus of domain II (possibly between aa 477-492) that is unique to avian HEV, one epitope in domain I (aa 389-410) that is common to avian, human and swine HEVs, and one or more epitopes in domain IV (aa 583-600) that are shared between avian and human HEVs were identified. Despite the sequence difference in ORF2 proteins between avian and mammalian HEVs and similar ORF2 sequence between human and swine HEV ORF2 proteins, rabbit antiserum against peptide 6 (aa 389-399) recognized only human HEV ORF2 protein, suggesting complexity of the ORF2 antigenicity. The identification of these B-cell epitopes in avian HEV ORF2 protein may be useful for vaccine design and may lead to future development of immunoassays for differential diagnosis of avian, swine and human HEV infections.

  8. Environmental and demographic determinants of avian influenza viruses in waterfowl across the contiguous United States.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew L Farnsworth

    Full Text Available Outbreaks of avian influenza in North American poultry have been linked to wild waterfowl. A first step towards understanding where and when avian influenza viruses might emerge from North American waterfowl is to identify environmental and demographic determinants of infection in their populations. Laboratory studies indicate water temperature as one determinant of environmental viral persistence and we explored this hypothesis at the landscape scale. We also hypothesized that the interval apparent prevalence in ducks within a local watershed during the overwintering season would influence infection probabilities during the following breeding season within the same local watershed. Using avian influenza virus surveillance data collected from 19,965 wild waterfowl across the contiguous United States between October 2006 and September 2009 We fit Logistic regression models relating the infection status of individual birds sampled on their breeding grounds to demographic characteristics, temperature, and interval apparent prevalence during the preceding overwintering season at the local watershed scale. We found strong support for sex, age, and species differences in the probability an individual duck tested positive for avian influenza virus. In addition, we found that for every seven days the local minimum temperature fell below zero, the chance an individual would test positive for avian influenza virus increased by 5.9 percent. We also found a twelve percent increase in the chance an individual would test positive during the breeding season for every ten percent increase in the interval apparent prevalence during the prior overwintering season. These results suggest that viral deposition in water and sub-freezing temperatures during the overwintering season may act as determinants of individual level infection risk during the subsequent breeding season. Our findings have implications for future surveillance activities in waterfowl and domestic

  9. Wind-mediated spread of low-pathogenic avian influenza virus into the environment during outabreaks at commercial poultry farms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Jonges (Marcel); Van Leuken, J. (Jeroen); I.M. Wouters (Inge M); G. Koch (Guus); A. Meijer (Adam); M.P.G. Koopmans D.V.M. (Marion)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractAvian influenza virus-infected poultry can release a large amount of virus-contaminated droppings that serve as sources of infection for susceptible birds. Much research so far has focused on virus spread within flocks. However, as fecal material or manure is a major constituent of airbo

  10. Bronchointerstitial pneumonia in guinea pigs following inoculation with H5N1 high pathogenicity avian influenza virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    The H5N1 high pathogenicity avian influenza (HPAI) viruses have caused widespread disease of poultry in Asia, Africa and the Middle East, and sporadic human infections. The guinea pig model has been used to study human H3N2 and H1N1 influenza viruses, but knowledge is lacking on H5N1 HPAI virus inf...

  11. Wind-mediated spread of low-pathogenic avian influenza virus into the environment during outabreaks at commercial poultry farms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jonges, Marcel; Leuken, Van Jeroen; Wouters, Inge; Koch, Guus; Meijer, Adam; Koopmans, Marion

    2015-01-01

    Avian influenza virus-infected poultry can release a large amount of virus-contaminated droppings that serve as sources of infection for susceptible birds. Much research so far has focused on virus spread within flocks. However, as fecal material or manure is a major constituent of airborne poult

  12. Genomic sequences of human infection of avian-origin influenza A(H7N9) virus in Zhejiang province

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈寅

    2013-01-01

    Objective To analyze the etiology and genomic sequences of human infection of avian-origin influenza A (H7N9) virus from Zhejiang province.Methods Viral RNA was extracted from patients of suspected H7N9

  13. DNA microarrays immobilized on unmodified plastics in a microfluidic biochip for rapid typing of Avian Influenza Virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yi, Sun; Perch-Nielsen, Ivan R.; Dufva, Martin;

    2011-01-01

    , a portable cyclic olefin copolymer (COC) microarray device containing eight individually addressable microfluidic channels was developed for fast identification of Avian Influenza Virus (AIV) by DNA hybridization. This plastic biochip offers benefits of low fabrication cost and parallel processing...

  14. Heterogeneity and seroprevalence of a newly identified avian hepatitis e virus from chickens in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, F F; Haqshenas, G; Shivaprasad, H L; Guenette, D K; Woolcock, P R; Larsen, C T; Pierson, F W; Elvinger, F; Toth, T E; Meng, X J

    2002-11-01

    We recently identified and characterized a novel virus, designated avian hepatitis E virus (avian HEV), from chickens with hepatitis-splenomegaly syndrome (HS syndrome) in the United States. Avian HEV is genetically related to but distinct from human and swine HEVs. To determine the extent of genetic variation and the seroprevalence of avian HEV infection in chicken flocks, we genetically identified and characterized 11 additional avian HEV isolates from chickens with HS syndrome and assessed the prevalence of avian HEV antibodies from a total of 1,276 chickens of different ages and breeds from 76 different flocks in five states (California, Colorado, Connecticut, Virginia, and Wisconsin). An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay using a truncated recombinant avian HEV ORF2 antigen was developed and used to determine avian HEV seroprevalence. About 71% of chicken flocks and 30% of chickens tested in the study were positive for antibodies to avian HEV. About 17% of chickens younger than 18 weeks were seropositive, whereas about 36% of adult chickens were seropositive. By using a reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) assay, we tested 21 bile samples from chickens with HS syndrome in California, Connecticut, New York, and Wisconsin for the presence of avian HEV RNA. Of the 21 bile samples, 12 were positive for 30- to 35-nm HEV-like virus particles by electron microscopy (EM). A total of 11 of the 12 EM-positive bile samples and 6 of the 9 EM-negative bile samples were positive for avian HEV RNA by RT-PCR. The sequences of a 372-bp region within the helicase gene of 11 avian HEV isolates were determined. Sequence analyses revealed that the 11 field isolates of avian HEV had 78 to 100% nucleotide sequence identities to each other, 79 to 88% identities to the prototype avian HEV, 76 to 80% identities to chicken big liver and spleen disease virus, and 56 to 61% identities to other known strains of human and swine HEV. The data from this study indicated that, like swine and human

  15. Construction of an infectious cDNA clone of avian hepatitis E virus (avian HEV) recovered from a clinically healthy chicken in the United States and characterization of its pathogenicity in specific-pathogen-free chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Hyuk Moo; LeRoith, Tanya; Pudupakam, R S; Pierson, F William; Huang, Yao-Wei; Dryman, Barbara A; Meng, Xiang-Jin

    2011-01-27

    A genetically distinct strain of avian hepatitis E virus (avian HEV-VA strain) was isolated from a healthy chicken in Virginia, and thus it is important to characterize and compare its pathogenicity with the prototype strain (avian HEV-prototype) isolated from a diseased chicken. Here we first constructed an infectious clone of the avian HEV-VA strain. Capped RNA transcripts from the avian HEV-VA clone were replication-competent after transfection of LMH chicken liver cells. Chickens inoculated intrahepatically with RNA transcripts of avian HEV-VA clone developed active infection as evidenced by fecal virus shedding, viremia, and seroconversion. To characterize the pathogenicity, RNA transcripts of both avian HEV-VA and avian HEV-prototype clones were intrahepatically inoculated into the livers of chickens. Avian HEV RNA was detected in feces, serum and bile samples from 10/10 avian HEV-VA-inoculated and 9/9 avian HEV-prototype-inoculated chickens although seroconversion occurred only in some chickens during the experimental period. The histopathological lesion scores were lower for avian HEV-VA group than avian HEV-prototype group in the liver at 3 and 5 weeks post-inoculation (wpi) and in the spleen at 3 wpi, although the differences were not statistically significant. The liver/body weight ratio, indicative of liver enlargement, of both avian HEV-VA and avian HEV-prototype groups were significantly higher than that of the control group at 5 wpi. Overall, the avian HEV-VA strain still induces histological liver lesions even though it was isolated from a healthy chicken. The results also showed that intrahepatic inoculation of chickens with RNA transcripts of avian HEV infectious clone may serve as an alternative for live virus in animal pathogenicity studies.

  16. Genome-wide association mapping and pathway analysis of leukosis incidence in a US Holstein cattle population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdalla, E A; Peñagaricano, F; Byrem, T M; Weigel, K A; Rosa, G J M

    2016-08-01

    Bovine leukosis virus is an oncogenic virus that infects B cells, causing bovine leukosis disease. This disease is known to have a negative impact on dairy cattle production and, because no treatment or vaccine is available, finding a possible genetic solution is important. Our objective was to perform a comprehensive genetic analysis of leukosis incidence in dairy cattle. Data on leukosis occurrence, pedigree and molecular information were combined into multitrait GBLUP models with milk yield (MY) and somatic cell score (SCS) to estimate genetic parameters and to perform whole-genome scans and pathway analysis. Leukosis data were available for 11 554 Holsteins daughters of 3002 sires from 112 herds in 16 US states. Genotypes from a 60K SNP panel were available for 961 of those bulls as well as for 2039 additional bulls. Heritability for leukosis incidence was estimated at about 8%, and the genetic correlations of leukosis disease incidence with MY and SCS were moderate at 0.18 and 0.20 respectively. The genome-wide scan indicated that leukosis is a complex trait, possibly modulated by many genes. The gene set analysis identified many functional terms that showed significant enrichment of genes associated with leukosis. Many of these terms, such as G-Protein Coupled Receptor Signaling Pathway, Regulation of Nucleotide Metabolic Process and different calcium-related processes, are known to be related to retrovirus infection. Overall, our findings contribute to a better understanding of the genetic architecture of this complex disease. The functional categories associated with leukosis may be useful in future studies on fine mapping of genes and development of dairy cattle breeding strategies.

  17. Transmission of avian influenza A viruses among species in an artificial barnyard.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenna E Achenbach

    Full Text Available Waterfowl and shorebirds harbor and shed all hemagglutinin and neuraminidase subtypes of influenza A viruses and interact in nature with a broad range of other avian and mammalian species to which they might transmit such viruses. Estimating the efficiency and importance of such cross-species transmission using epidemiological approaches is difficult. We therefore addressed this question by studying transmission of low pathogenic H5 and H7 viruses from infected ducks to other common animals in a quasi-natural laboratory environment designed to mimic a common barnyard. Mallards (Anas platyrhynchos recently infected with H5N2 or H7N3 viruses were introduced into a room housing other mallards plus chickens, blackbirds, rats and pigeons, and transmission was assessed by monitoring virus shedding (ducks or seroconversion (other species over the following 4 weeks. Additional animals of each species were directly inoculated with virus to characterize the effect of a known exposure. In both barnyard experiments, virus accumulated to high titers in the shared water pool. The H5N2 virus was transmitted from infected ducks to other ducks and chickens in the room either directly or through environmental contamination, but not to rats or blackbirds. Ducks infected with the H7N2 virus transmitted directly or indirectly to all other species present. Chickens and blackbirds directly inoculated with these viruses shed significant amounts of virus and seroconverted; rats and pigeons developed antiviral antibodies, but, except for one pigeon, failed to shed virus.

  18. Enzootic bovine leukosis and Bovine leukemia virus/ Leucose enzoótica bovina e vírus da leucemia bovina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amauri Alcindo Alfieri

    2001-05-01

    Full Text Available All over de World the Enzootic Bovine Leukosis is a important viral infection in cattle herds. This revision points out topics relative to the etiological agent, clinical signals, diagnosis methods, control and prophylaxis of the infection.A Leucose Enzoótica Bovina é uma infecção viral amplamente disseminada em rebanhos bovinos de todo o mundo. Esta revisão tem por objetivo apresentar tópicos relacionados ao agente etiológico, à doença clínica e aos métodos de diagnóstico, controle e profilaxia da infecção.

  19. Recombination in Avian Gamma-Coronavirus Infectious Bronchitis Virus

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Recombination in the family Coronaviridae has been well documented and is thought to be a contributing factor in the emergence and evolution of different coronaviral genotypes as well as different species of coronavirus. However, there are limited data available on the frequency and extent of recombination in coronaviruses in nature and particularly for the avian gamma-coronaviruses where only recently the emergence of a turkey coronavirus has been attributed solely to recombination. In this ...

  20. Biological features of novel avian influenza A (H7N9) virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jianfang; Wang, Dayan; Gao, Rongbao; Zhao, Baihui; Song, Jingdong; Qi, Xian; Zhang, Yanjun; Shi, Yonglin; Yang, Lei; Zhu, Wenfei; Bai, Tian; Qin, Kun; Lan, Yu; Zou, Shumei; Guo, Junfeng; Dong, Jie; Dong, Libo; Zhang, Ye; Wei, Hejiang; Li, Xiaodan; Lu, Jian; Liu, Liqi; Zhao, Xiang; Li, Xiyan; Huang, Weijuan; Wen, Leying; Bo, Hong; Xin, Li; Chen, Yongkun; Xu, Cuilin; Pei, Yuquan; Yang, Yue; Zhang, Xiaodong; Wang, Shiwen; Feng, Zijian; Han, Jun; Yang, Weizhong; Gao, George F; Wu, Guizhen; Li, Dexin; Wang, Yu; Shu, Yuelong

    2013-07-25

    Human infection associated with a novel reassortant avian influenza H7N9 virus has recently been identified in China. A total of 132 confirmed cases and 39 deaths have been reported. Most patients presented with severe pneumonia and acute respiratory distress syndrome. Although the first epidemic has subsided, the presence of a natural reservoir and the disease severity highlight the need to evaluate its risk on human public health and to understand the possible pathogenesis mechanism. Here we show that the emerging H7N9 avian influenza virus poses a potentially high risk to humans. We discover that the H7N9 virus can bind to both avian-type (α2,3-linked sialic acid) and human-type (α2,6-linked sialic acid) receptors. It can invade epithelial cells in the human lower respiratory tract and type II pneumonocytes in alveoli, and replicated efficiently in ex vivo lung and trachea explant culture and several mammalian cell lines. In acute serum samples of H7N9-infected patients, increased levels of the chemokines and cytokines IP-10, MIG, MIP-1β, MCP-1, IL-6, IL-8 and IFN-α were detected. We note that the human population is naive to the H7N9 virus, and current seasonal vaccination could not provide protection.

  1. Living with avian FLU--Persistence of the H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza virus in Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Njabo, Kevin Yana; Zanontian, Linda; Sheta, Basma N; Samy, Ahmed; Galal, Shereen; Schoenberg, Frederic Paik; Smith, Thomas B

    2016-05-01

    H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza virus (HPAIV) continues to cause mortality in poultry and threaten human health at a panzootic scale in Egypt since it was reported in 2006. While the early focus has been in Asia, recent evidence suggests that Egypt is an emerging epicenter for the disease. Despite control measures, epizootic transmission of the disease continues. Here, we investigate the persistence of HPAIV across wild passerine birds and domestic poultry between 2009 and 2012 and the potential risk for continuous viral transmission in Egypt. We use a new weighted cross J-function to investigate the degree and spatial temporal nature of the clustering between sightings of infected birds of different types, and the risk of infection associated with direct contact with infected birds. While we found no infection in wild birds, outbreaks occurred year round between 2009 and 2012, with a positive interaction between chickens and ducks. The disease was more present in the years 2010 and 2011 coinciding with the political unrest in the country. Egypt thus continues to experience endemic outbreaks of avian influenza HPAIV in poultry and an increased potential risk of infection to other species including humans. With the current trends, the elimination of the HPAIV infection is highly unlikely without a complete revamp of current policies. The application of spatial statistics techniques to these types of data may help us to understand the characteristics of the disease and may subsequently allow practitioners to explore possible preventive solutions.

  2. Occurrence of avian Plasmodium and West Nile virus in culex species in Wisconsin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, T.; Irwin, P.; Hofmeister, E.; Paskewitz, S.M.

    2010-01-01

    The occurrence of multiple pathogens in mosquitoes and birds could affect the dynamics of disease transmission. We collected adult Culex pipiens and Cx. restuans (Cx. pipiens/restuans hereafter) from sites in Wisconsin and tested them for West Nile virus (WNV) and for avian malaria (Plasmodium). Gravid Cx. pipiens/restuans were tested for WNV using a commercial immunoassay, the RAMP?? WNV test, and positive results were verified by reverse transcriptasepolymerase chain reaction. There were 2 WNV-positive pools of Cx. pipiens/restuans in 2006 and 1 in 2007. Using a bias-corrected maximum likelihood estimation, the WNV infection rate for Cx. pipiens/restuans was 5.48/1,000 mosquitoes in 2006 and 1.08/1,000 mosquitoes in 2007. Gravid Cx. pipiens or Cx. restuans were tested individually for avian Plasmodium by a restriction enzymebased assay. Twelve mosquitoes were positive for avian Plasmodium (10.0), 2 were positive for Haemoproteus, and 3 were positive for Leucocytozoon. There were 4 mixed infections, with mosquitoes positive for >1 of the hemosporidian parasites. This work documents a high rate of hemosporidian infection in Culex spp. and illustrates the potential for co-infections with other arboviruses in bird-feeding mosquitoes and their avian hosts. In addition, hemosporidian infection rates may be a useful tool for investigating the ecological dynamics of Culex/avian interactions. ?? 2010 by The American Mosquito Control Association, Inc.

  3. Cross-recognition of avian H5N1 influenza virus by human cytotoxic T-lymphocyte populations directed to human influenza A virus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.H.C.M. Kreijtz (Joost); G. de Mutsert (Gerrie); C.A. van Baalen (Carel); R.A.M. Fouchier (Ron); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert); G.F. Rimmelzwaan (Guus)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractSince the number of human cases of infection with avian H5N1 influenza viruses is ever increasing, a pandemic outbreak caused by these viruses is feared. Therefore, in addition to virus-specific antibodies, there is considerable interest in immune correlates of protection against these v

  4. Evidence of widespread infection of avian hepatitis E virus (avian HEV) in chickens from Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peralta, Bibiana; Biarnés, Mar; Ordóñez, Germán; Porta, Ramón; Martín, Marga; Mateu, Enric; Pina, Sonia; Meng, Xiang-Jin

    2009-05-28

    In the present work, 262 serum samples and 29 faeces pools from chickens coming from 29 healthy flocks were analysed by RT-PCR for detection of avian HEV and by ELISA using an aHEV derived antigen for detection of anti-HEV IgG. Additionally, other 300 randomly selected serum samples were also analysed by RT-PCR. Seven serum samples were positive to RNA detection. Sequence analysis of both the helicase and the capsid genes revealed that the Spanish isolates were clustered together and close related to those strains from the United States isolated from farms with HSS. On the serology study, 26/29 flocks had at least one positive animal (89.7%) and chickens older than 40 weeks were found to have higher seropositivities compared to the rest of age groups. Within positive farms, the proportion of positive animals ranged from 20% to 80%. This is the first report of aHEV sequences in chickens from Europe. Further studies are needed to elucidate the clinical significance of avian HEV infections in Europe.

  5. Distribution of sialic acid receptors and influenza A viruses of avian and swine origin and in experimentally infected pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trebbien, Ramona; Larsen, Lars Erik; Viuff, Birgitte M.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Pigs are considered susceptible to influenza A virus infections from different host origins because earlier studies have shown that they have receptors for both avian (sialic acid-alpha-2,3-terminal saccharides (SAalpha- 2,3)) and swine/human (SA-alpha-2,6) influenza viruses in the up......Background: Pigs are considered susceptible to influenza A virus infections from different host origins because earlier studies have shown that they have receptors for both avian (sialic acid-alpha-2,3-terminal saccharides (SAalpha- 2,3)) and swine/human (SA-alpha-2,6) influenza viruses...

  6. Avian influenza A (H7N9) virus infection in humans: epidemiology, evolution, and pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husain, Matloob

    2014-12-01

    New human influenza A virus strains regularly emerge causing seasonal epidemics and occasional pandemics. Lately, several zoonotic avian influenza A strains have been reported to directly infect humans. In early 2013, a novel avian influenza A virus (H7N9) strain was discovered in China to cause severe respiratory disease in humans. Since then, over 450 human cases of H7N9 infection have been discovered and 165 of them have died. Multiple epidemiological, phylogenetic, in vivo, and in vitro studies have been done to determine the origin and pathogenesis of novel H7N9 strain. This article reviews the literature related to the epidemiology, evolution, and pathogenesis of the H7N9 strain since its discovery in February 2013 till August 2014. The data available so far indicate that H7N9 was originated by a two-step reassortment process in birds and transmitted to humans through direct contact with live-bird markets. H7N9 is a low-pathogenic avian virus and contains several molecular signatures for adaptation in mammals. The severity of the respiratory disease caused by novel H7N9 virus in humans can be partly attributed to the age, sex, and underlying medical conditions of the patients. A universal influenza vaccine is not available, though several strain-specific H7N9 candidate vaccine viruses have been developed. Further, novel H7N9 virus is resistant to antiviral drug amantadine and some H7N9 isolates have acquired the resistance to neuraminidase-inhibitors. Therefore, constant surveillance and prompt control measures combined with novel research approaches to develop alternative and effective anti-influenza strategies are needed to overcome influenza A virus.

  7. Surveillance of avian influenza viruses in migratory birds in Egypt, 2003-09.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soliman, Atef; Saad, Magdi; Elassal, Emad; Amir, Ehab; Plathonoff, Chantal; Bahgat, Verina; El-Badry, Maha; Ahmed, Lu'ay S; Fouda, Mostafa; Gamaleldin, Mohammed; Mohamed, Nahed Abd-Elal; Salyer, Stephanie; Cornelius, Claire; Barthel, Robert

    2012-07-01

    Migratory (particularly aquatic) birds are the major natural reservoirs for type A influenza viruses. However, their role in transmitting highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) viruses is unclear. Egypt is a "funnel" zone of wild bird migration pathways from Central Asia and Europe to Eastern and Central Africa ending in South Africa. We sought to detect and isolate avian influenza viruses in migratory birds in Egypt. During September 2003-February 2009, the US Naval Medical Research Unit Number 3, Cairo, Egypt, in collaboration with the Egyptian Ministry of Environment, obtained cloacal swabs from 7,894 migratory birds captured or shot by hunters in different geographic areas in Egypt. Samples were processed by real-time reverse transcriptase PCR for detection of the influenza A matrix gene. Positive samples were processed for virus isolation in specific-pathogen-free embryonated eggs and isolates were subtyped by PCR and partial sequencing. Ninety-five species of birds were collected. Predominant species were Green-Winged Teal (Anas carolinensis; 32.0%, n=2,528), Northern Shoveler (Anas clypeata; 21.4%, n=1,686), and Northern Pintail (Anas acuta; 11.1%, n=877). Of the 7,894 samples, 745 (9.4%) were positive for the influenza A matrix gene (mainly from the above predominant species). Thirteen of the 745 (1.7%) were H5-positive by PCR (11 were low-pathogenic avian influenza and two were HPAI H5N1). The prevalences of influenza A was among regions were 10-15%, except in Middle Egypt (4%). Thirty-nine influenza isolates were obtained from PCR-positive samples. Seventeen subtypes of avian influenza viruses (including H5N1 and H7N7) were classified from 39 isolates using PCR and partial sequencing. Only one HPAI H5N1 was isolated in February 2006, from a wild resident Great Egret (Ardea alba). No major die-offs or sick migratory birds were detected during the study. We identified avian influenza virus subtypes not previously reported in Egypt. The HPAI H5N1 isolated

  8. Avian hepatitis B viruses: Molecular and cellular biology, phylogenesis, and host tropism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The human hepatitis B virus (HBV) and the duck hepatitis B virus (DHBV) share several fundamental features.Both viruses have a partially double-stranded DNA genome that is replicated via a RNA intermediate and the coding open reading frames (ORFs) overlap extensively.In addition, the genomic and structural organization,as well as replication and biological characteristics, are very similar in both viruses. Most of the key features of hepadnaviral infection were first discovered in the DHBV model system and subsequently confirmed for HBV.There are, however, several differences between human HBV and DHBV. This review will focus on the molecular and cellular biology, evolution, and host adaptation of the avian hepatitis B viruses with particular emphasis on DHBV as a model system.

  9. Avian influenza a virus in wild birds in highly urbanized areas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josanne H Verhagen

    Full Text Available Avian influenza virus (AIV surveillance studies in wild birds are usually conducted in rural areas and nature reserves. Less is known of avian influenza virus prevalence in wild birds located in densely populated urban areas, while these birds are more likely to be in close contact with humans. Influenza virus prevalence was investigated in 6059 wild birds sampled in cities in the Netherlands between 2006 and 2009, and compared with parallel AIV surveillance data from low urbanized areas in the Netherlands. Viral prevalence varied with the level of urbanization, with highest prevalence in low urbanized areas. Within cities virus was detected in 0.5% of birds, while seroprevalence exceeded 50%. Ring recoveries of urban wild birds sampled for virus detection demonstrated that most birds were sighted within the same city, while few were sighted in other cities or migrated up to 2659 km away from the sample location in the Netherlands. Here we show that urban birds were infected with AIVs and that urban birds were not separated completely from populations of long-distance migrants. The latter suggests that wild birds in cities may play a role in the introduction of AIVs into cities. Thus, urban bird populations should not be excluded as a human-animal interface for influenza viruses.

  10. Avian H11 influenza virus isolated from domestic poultry in a Colombian live animal market

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Bluhm, Pedro; Karlsson, Erik A; Ciuoderis, Karl A; Cortez, Valerie; Marvin, Shauna A; Hamilton-West, Christopher; Schultz-Cherry, Stacey; Osorio, Jorge E

    2016-01-01

    Live animal markets (LAMs) are an essential source of food and trade in Latin American countries; however, they can also serve as ‘hotbeds' for the emergence and potential spillover of avian influenza viruses (AIV). Despite extensive knowledge of AIV in Asian LAMs, little is known about the prevalence South American LAMs. To fill this gap in knowledge, active surveillance was carried out at the major LAM in Medellin, Colombia between February and September 2015. During this period, overall prevalence in the market was 2.67% and a North American origin H11N2 AIV most similar to a virus isolated from Chilean shorebirds asymptomatically spread through multiple bird species in the market resulting in 17.0% positivity at peak of infection. Phenotypically, the H11 viruses displayed no known molecular markers associated with increased virulence in birds or mammals, had α2,3-sialic acid binding preference, and caused minimal replication in vitro and little morbidity in vivo. However, the Colombian H11N2 virus replicated and transmitted effectively in chickens explaining the spread throughout the market. Genetic similarity to H11 viruses isolated from North and South American shorebirds suggest that the LAM occurrence may have resulted from a wild bird to domestic poultry spillover event. The ability to spread in domestic poultry as well as potential for human infection by H11 viruses highlight the need for enhanced AIV surveillance in South America in both avian species and humans. PMID:27924808

  11. Estimation of transmission parameters of H5N1 avian influenza virus in chickens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annemarie Bouma

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite considerable research efforts, little is yet known about key epidemiological parameters of H5N1 highly pathogenic influenza viruses in their avian hosts. Here we show how these parameters can be estimated using a limited number of birds in experimental transmission studies. Our quantitative estimates, based on Bayesian methods of inference, reveal that (i the period of latency of H5N1 influenza virus in unvaccinated chickens is short (mean: 0.24 days; 95% credible interval: 0.099-0.48 days; (ii the infectious period of H5N1 virus in unvaccinated chickens is approximately 2 days (mean: 2.1 days; 95%CI: 1.8-2.3 days; (iii the reproduction number of H5N1 virus in unvaccinated chickens need not be high (mean: 1.6; 95%CI: 0.90-2.5, although the virus is expected to spread rapidly because it has a short generation interval in unvaccinated chickens (mean: 1.3 days; 95%CI: 1.0-1.5 days; and (iv vaccination with genetically and antigenically distant H5N2 vaccines can effectively halt transmission. Simulations based on the estimated parameters indicate that herd immunity may be obtained if at least 80% of chickens in a flock are vaccinated. We discuss the implications for the control of H5N1 avian influenza virus in areas where it is endemic.

  12. Avian H11 influenza virus isolated from domestic poultry in a Colombian live animal market.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Bluhm, Pedro; Karlsson, Erik A; Ciuoderis, Karl A; Cortez, Valerie; Marvin, Shauna A; Hamilton-West, Christopher; Schultz-Cherry, Stacey; Osorio, Jorge E

    2016-12-07

    Live animal markets (LAMs) are an essential source of food and trade in Latin American countries; however, they can also serve as 'hotbeds' for the emergence and potential spillover of avian influenza viruses (AIV). Despite extensive knowledge of AIV in Asian LAMs, little is known about the prevalence South American LAMs. To fill this gap in knowledge, active surveillance was carried out at the major LAM in Medellin, Colombia between February and September 2015. During this period, overall prevalence in the market was 2.67% and a North American origin H11N2 AIV most similar to a virus isolated from Chilean shorebirds asymptomatically spread through multiple bird species in the market resulting in 17.0% positivity at peak of infection. Phenotypically, the H11 viruses displayed no known molecular markers associated with increased virulence in birds or mammals, had α2,3-sialic acid binding preference, and caused minimal replication in vitro and little morbidity in vivo. However, the Colombian H11N2 virus replicated and transmitted effectively in chickens explaining the spread throughout the market. Genetic similarity to H11 viruses isolated from North and South American shorebirds suggest that the LAM occurrence may have resulted from a wild bird to domestic poultry spillover event. The ability to spread in domestic poultry as well as potential for human infection by H11 viruses highlight the need for enhanced AIV surveillance in South America in both avian species and humans.

  13. Preparation of Anti-Idiotypic Antibody against Avian Influenza Virus Subtype H9

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Baoquan Li; Jun Peng; Zhongxiang Niu; Xunhe Yin; Faxiao Liu

    2005-01-01

    To generate monoclonal anti-idiotypic antibodies (mAb2) against avian influenza virus subtype H9 (H9 AIV),BALB/c mice were immunized with purified chicken anti-H9-AIV IgG and the splenocytes of immunized mice were fused with myeloma cells NS-1. Hybridoma cells were screened by indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays with both chicken and rabbit anti-H9-AIV IgG as coating antigens. One hybridoma cell clone secreting monoclonal antibody against idiotypes shared by both chicken and rabbit anti-H9-AIV IgG was established. Experiments demonstrated the mAb2 was able to inhibit the binding of hemagglutinin to anti-H9-AIV IgG and to induce chickens to generate hemagglutination inhibition antibodies, indicating this anti-species-sharing-idiotypic antibody bore the internal image of hemagglutinin on avian influenza virus. Cellular & Molecular Immunology. 2005;2(2):155-157.

  14. Preparation of Anti-Idiotypic Antibody against Avian Influenza Virus Subtype H9

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BaoquanLi; JunPeng; ZhongxiangNiu; XunheYin; FaxiaoLiu

    2005-01-01

    To generate monoclonal anti-idiotypic antibodies (mAb2) against avian influenza virus subtype H9 (H9 AIV), BALB/c mice were immunized with purified chicken anti-H9-AIV IgG and the splenocytes of immunized mice were fused with myeloma cells NS-1. Hybridoma cells were screened by indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays with both chicken and rabbit anti-H9-AIV IgG as coating antigens. One hybridoma cell clone secreting monoclonal antibody against idiotypes shared by both chicken and rabbit anti-H9-AIV IgG was established. Experiments demonstrated the mAb2 was able to inhibit the binding of hemagglutinin to anti-H9-AIV IgG and to induce chickens to generate hemagglutination inhibition antibodies, indicating this anti-species-sharing-idiotypic antibody bore the internal image of hemagglutinin on avian influenza virus. Cellular & Molecular Immunology. 2005;2(2):155-157.

  15. J亚群禽白血病的研究进展%Recent Development in J Subgroup Avian Leucosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    童淑梅; 赵振华; 杨玉莹

    2007-01-01

      J亚群禽白血病病毒(Avian leukosis virus subgroup J,ALV-J)出现以来的十几年间,已然在世界范围内广泛传播.由于诱发肿瘤、患鸡胴体废弃、产蛋性能下降和其它未知的对鸡群生产性能的影响,ALV-J给养禽业带来巨大经济损失和严重威胁[1].……

  16. 禽流感病原学研究进展%Etiology Research Progress of Avian Influenza Virus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    田伟; 仇铮; 姜丽萍; 丛秋实

    2014-01-01

    禽流感(avian influenza, AI)是由A型禽流感病毒(avian influenza virus, AIV)引起的一种禽类的感染疾病综合征。本文通过对禽流感病毒的结构和分子生物学特征等的描述,为H5N1禽流感病毒致病机理的认识及临床诊断提供帮助。%Avian influenza is an infection disease syndrome caused by type A in fluenza virus. According to the study of structure and molecular biology of the H5N1 avian influenza virus in ducks, its pathogenic mechanism and clinical diagrosis were studied.

  17. Distribution of sialic acid receptors and influenza A viruses of avian and swine origin and in experimentally infected pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trebbien, Ramona; Larsen, Lars Erik; Viuff, Birgitte M.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Pigs are considered susceptible to influenza A virus infections from different host origins because earlier studies have shown that they have receptors for both avian (sialic acid-alpha-2,3-terminal saccharides (SAalpha- 2,3)) and swine/human (SA-alpha-2,6) influenza viruses...... in the upper respiratory tract. Furthermore, experimental and natural infections in pigs have been reported with influenza A virus from avian and human sources. Methods: This study investigated the receptor distribution in the entire respiratory tract of pigs using specific lectins Maackia Amurensis (MAA) I......, and II, and Sambucus Nigra (SNA). Furthermore, the predilection sites of swine influenza virus (SIV) subtypes H1N1 and H1N2 as well as avian influenza virus (AIV) subtype H4N6 were investigated in the respiratory tract of experimentally infected pigs using immunohistochemical methods. Results: SIV...

  18. Novel Polymerase Gene Mutations for Human Adaptation in Clinical Isolates of Avian H5N1 Influenza Viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arai, Yasuha; Kawashita, Norihito; Daidoji, Tomo; Ibrahim, Madiha S; El-Gendy, Emad M; Takagi, Tatsuya; Takahashi, Kazuo; Suzuki, Yasuo; Ikuta, Kazuyoshi; Nakaya, Takaaki; Shioda, Tatsuo; Watanabe, Yohei

    2016-04-01

    A major determinant in the change of the avian influenza virus host range to humans is the E627K substitution in the PB2 polymerase protein. However, the polymerase activity of avian influenza viruses with a single PB2-E627K mutation is still lower than that of seasonal human influenza viruses, implying that avian viruses require polymerase mutations in addition to PB2-627K for human adaptation. Here, we used a database search of H5N1 clade 2.2.1 virus sequences with the PB2-627K mutation to identify other polymerase adaptation mutations that have been selected in infected patients. Several of the mutations identified acted cooperatively with PB2-627K to increase viral growth in human airway epithelial cells and mouse lungs. These mutations were in multiple domains of the polymerase complex other than the PB2-627 domain, highlighting a complicated avian-to-human adaptation pathway of avian influenza viruses. Thus, H5N1 viruses could rapidly acquire multiple polymerase mutations that function cooperatively with PB2-627K in infected patients for optimal human adaptation.

  19. Lemna (duckweed) expressed hemagglutinin from avian influenza H5N1 protects chickens against H5N1 high pathogenicity avian influenza virus challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    In the last two decades, transgenic plants have been explored as safe and cost effective alternative expression platforms for producing recombinant proteins. In this study, a synthetic hemagglutinin (HA) gene from the high pathogenicity avian influenza (HPAI) virus A/chicken/Indonesia/7/2003 (H5N1)...

  20. Generation and infectivity titration of an infectious stock of avian hepatitis E virus (HEV) in chickens and cross-species infection of turkeys with avian HEV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Z F; Larsen, C T; Huang, F F; Billam, P; Pierson, F W; Toth, T E; Meng, X J

    2004-06-01

    Avian hepatitis E virus (HEV), a novel virus identified from chickens with hepatitis-splenomegaly syndrome in the United States, is genetically and antigenically related to human HEV. In order to further characterize avian HEV, an infectious viral stock with a known infectious titer must be generated, as HEV cannot be propagated in vitro. Bile and feces collected from specific-pathogen-free (SPF) chickens experimentally infected with avian HEV were used to prepare an avian HEV infectious stock as a 10% suspension of positive fecal and bile samples in phosphate-buffered saline. The infectivity titer of this infectious stock was determined by inoculating 1-week-old SPF chickens intravenously with 200 microl of each of serial 10-fold dilutions (10(-2) to 10(-6)) of the avian HEV stock (two chickens were inoculated with each dilution). All chickens inoculated with the 10(-2) to 10(-4) dilutions of the infectious stock and one of the two chickens inoculated with the 10(-5) dilution, but neither of the chickens inoculated with the 10(-6) dilution, became seropositive for anti-avian HEV antibody at 4 weeks postinoculation (wpi). Two serologically negative contact control chickens housed together with chickens inoculated with the 10(-2) dilution also seroconverted at 8 wpi. Viremia and shedding of virus in feces were variable in chickens inoculated with the 10(-2) to 10(-5) dilutions but were not detectable in those inoculated with the 10(-6) dilution. The infectivity titer of the infectious avian HEV stock was determined to be 5 x 10(5) 50% chicken infectious doses (CID(50)) per ml. Eight 1-week-old turkeys were intravenously inoculated with 10(5) CID(50) of avian HEV, and another group of nine turkeys were not inoculated and were used as controls. The inoculated turkeys seroconverted at 4 to 8 wpi. In the inoculated turkeys, viremia was detected at 2 to 6 wpi and shedding of virus in feces was detected at 4 to 7 wpi. A serologically negative contact control turkey housed

  1. Avian influenza A viruses: From zoonosis to pandemic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Richard (Mathilde); M.T. de Graaf (Marieke); S. Herfst (Sander)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractZoonotic influenza A viruses originating from the animal reservoir pose a threat for humans, as they have the ability to trigger pandemics upon adaptation to and invasion of an immunologically naive population. Of particular concern are the H5N1 viruses that continue to circulate in poul

  2. Characterization of low-pathogenicity H5N1 avian influenza viruses from North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spackman, Erica; Swayne, David E.; Suarez, David L.; Senne, Dennis A.; Pedersen, Janice C.; Killian, Mary Lea; Pasick, John; Handel, Katherine; Somanathan Pillai, Smitha; Lee, Chang-Won; Stallknecht, David; Slemons, Richard; Ip, Hon S.; Deliberto, Tom

    2007-01-01

    Wild-bird surveillance in North America for avian influenza (AI) viruses with a goal of early identification of the Asian H5N1 highly pathogenic AI virus has identified at least six low-pathogenicity H5N1 AI viruses between 2004 and 2006. The hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) genes from all 6 H5N1 viruses and an additional 38 North American wild-bird-origin H5 subtype and 28 N1 subtype viruses were sequenced and compared with sequences available in GenBank by phylogenetic analysis. Both HA and NA were phylogenetically distinct from those for viruses from outside of North America and from those for viruses recovered from mammals. Four of the H5N1 AI viruses were characterized as low pathogenicity by standard in vivo pathotyping tests. One of the H5N1 viruses, A/MuteSwan/MI/451072-2/06, was shown to replicate to low titers in chickens, turkeys, and ducks. However, transmission of A/MuteSwan/MI/451072-2/06 was more efficient among ducks than among chickens or turkeys based on virus shed. The 50% chicken infectious dose for A/MuteSwan/MI/451072-2/06 and three other wild-waterfowl-origin H5 viruses were also determined and were between 105.3 and 107.5 50% egg infective doses. Finally, seven H5 viruses representing different phylogenetic clades were evaluated for their antigenic relatedness by hemagglutination inhibition assay, showing that the antigenic relatedness was largely associated with geographic origin. Overall, the data support the conclusion that North American H5 wild-bird-origin AI viruses are low-pathogenicity wild-bird-adapted viruses and are antigenically and genetically distinct from the highly pathogenic Asian H5N1 virus lineage.

  3. Pathogenicity and Transmission of H5 and H7 Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza Viruses in Mallards.

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    Pantin-Jackwood, Mary J; Costa-Hurtado, Mar; Shepherd, Eric; DeJesus, Eric; Smith, Diane; Spackman, Erica; Kapczynski, Darrell R; Suarez, David L; Stallknecht, David E; Swayne, David E

    2016-11-01

    Wild aquatic birds have been associated with the intercontinental spread of H5 subtype highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) viruses of the A/goose/Guangdong/1/96 (Gs/GD) lineage during 2005, 2010, and 2014, but dispersion by wild waterfowl has not been implicated with spread of other HPAI viruses. To better understand why Gs/GD H5 HPAI viruses infect and transmit more efficiently in waterfowl than other HPAI viruses, groups of mallard ducks were challenged with one of 14 different H5 and H7 HPAI viruses, including a Gs/GD lineage H5N1 (clade 2.2) virus from Mongolia, part of the 2005 dispersion, and the H5N8 and H5N2 index HPAI viruses (clade 2.3.4.4) from the United States, part of the 2014 dispersion. All virus-inoculated ducks and contact exposed ducks became infected and shed moderate to high titers of the viruses, with the exception that mallards were resistant to Ck/Pennsylvania/83 and Ck/Queretaro/95 H5N2 HPAI virus infection. Clinical signs were only observed in ducks challenged with the H5N1 2005 virus, which all died, and with the H5N8 and H5N2 2014 viruses, which had decreased weight gain and fever. These three viruses were also shed in higher titers by the ducks, which could facilitate virus transmission and spread. This study highlights the possible role of wild waterfowl in the spread of HPAI viruses.

  4. Novel antiviral activity of neuraminidase inhibitors against an avian influenza a virus

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    Ohuchi Masanobu

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neuraminidase (NA inhibitors used for influenza therapy are believed to prevent the release of progeny virus from the surface of an infected cell. In this study, we found that NA inhibitors have a novel antiviral function against an avian influenza virus. Results Madin-Darby canine kidney cells, commonly used for the isolation and propagation of the influenza virus, were infected with an avian influenza viral strain A/chicken/German/N/49(H10N7 (H10/chicken or a human influenza viral strain A/Osaka/981/98(H3N2 (H3/Osaka virus. Cells were incubated in a medium without or with a NA inhibitor, oseltamivir carboxylate (GS4071, from 1 to 13 h post infection (p.i.. Infected cells were washed 12 h p.i. to remove GS4071, incubated for 1 h without GS4071, and assayed for virus production. Incubation with GS4071 decreased the production of infectious viruses. When H10/chicken virus-infected cells were incubated with GS4071 from 12 to 13 h p.i. (i.e., 1 h before the virus production assay, the inhibitory effect was clearly observed, however, the same was not evident for H3/Osaka virus-infected cells. Furthermore, viral protein synthesis in infected cells was not affected by GS4071. Using a scanning electron microscope, many single spherical buds were observed on the surface of H3/Osaka virus-infected cells incubated without GS4071, whereas many aggregated particles were observed on the surface of cells incubated with GS4071. However, many long tubular virus-like structures, with no aggregated particles, were observed on the surface of H10/chicken virus-infected cells incubated with GS4071. The same results were obtained when another NA inhibitor, zanamivir, was used. Conclusions These results indicate that NA inhibitors interfered with virus particle formation in the H10/chicken virus-infected cells, in which the inhibitor caused the formation of long tubular virus-like structures instead of spherical virus particles.

  5. Pandemic and Avian Influenza A Viruses in Humans: Epidemiology, Virology, Clinical Characteristics, and Treatment Strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hui; Cao, Bin

    2017-03-01

    The intermittent outbreak of pandemic influenza and emergence of novel avian influenza A virus is worldwide threat. Although most patients present with mild symptoms, some deteriorate to severe pneumonia and even death. Great progress in the understanding of the mechanism of disease pathogenesis and a series of vaccines has been promoted worldwide; however, incidence, morbidity, and mortality remains high. To step up vigilance and improve pandemic preparedness, this article elucidates the virology, epidemiology, pathogenesis, clinical characteristics, and treatment of human infections by influenza A viruses, with an emphasis on the influenza A(H1N1)pdm09, H5N1, and H7N9 subtypes.

  6. Prevalence of antibodies to type A influenza virus in wild avian species using two serologic assays

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    Brown, Justin D.; Luttrell, M. Page; Berghaus, Roy D.; Kistler, Whitney; Keeler, Shamus P.; Howey, Andrea; Wilcox, Benjamin; Hall, Jeffrey; Niles, Larry; Dey, Amanda; Knutsen, Gregory; Fritz, Kristen; Stallknecht, David E.

    2010-01-01

    Serologic testing to detect antibodies to avian influenza (AI) virus has been an underused tool for the study of these viruses in wild bird populations, which traditionally has relied on virus isolation and reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). In a preliminary study, a recently developed commercial blocking enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (bELISA) had sensitivity and specificity estimates of 82% and 100%, respectively, for detection of antibodies to AI virus in multiple wild bird species after experimental infection. To further evaluate the efficacy of this commercial bELISA and the agar gel immunodiffusion (AGID) test for AI virus antibody detection in wild birds, we tested 2,249 serum samples collected from 62 wild bird species, representing 10 taxonomic orders. Overall, the bELISA detected 25.4% positive samples, whereas the AGID test detected 14.8%. At the species level, the bELISA detected as many or more positive serum samples than the AGID in all 62 avian species. The majority of positive samples, detected by both assays, were from species that use aquatic habitats, with the highest prevalence from species in the orders Anseriformes and Charadriiformes. Conversely, antibodies to AI virus were rarely detected in the terrestrial species. The serologic data yielded by both assays are consistent with the known epidemiology of AI virus in wild birds and published reports of host range based on virus isolation and RT-PCR. The results of this research are also consistent with the aforementioned study, which evaluated the performance of the bELISA and AGID test on experimental samples. Collectively, the data from these two studies indicate that the bELISA is a more sensitive serologic assay than the AGID test for detecting prior exposure to AI virus in wild birds. Based on these results, the bELISA is a reliable species-independent assay with potentially valuable applications for wild bird AI surveillance.

  7. Estimating Risks of Inapparent Avian Exposure for Human Infection: Avian Influenza Virus A (H7N9) in Zhejiang Province, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Erjia; Zhang, Renjie; Li, Dengkui; Wei, Xiaolin; Wang, Xiaomeng; Lai, Poh-Chin

    2017-01-01

    Inapparent avian exposure was suspected for the sporadic infection of avian influenza A(H7N9) occurring in China. This type of exposure is usually unnoticed and difficult to model and measure. Infected poultry with avian influenza H7N9 virus typically remains asymptomatic, which may facilitate infection through inapparent poultry/bird exposure, especially in a country with widespread practice of backyard poultry. The present study proposed a novel approach that integrated ecological and case-control methods to quantify the risk of inapparent avian exposure on human H7N9 infection. Significant associations of the infection with chicken and goose densities, but not with duck density, were identified after adjusting for spatial clustering effects of the H7N9 cases across multiple geographic scales of neighborhood, community, district and city levels. These exposure risks varied geographically in association with proximity to rivers and lakes that were also proxies for inapparent exposure to avian-related environment. Males, elderly people, and farmers were high-risk subgroups for the virus infection. These findings enable health officials to target educational programs and awareness training in specific locations to reduce the risks of inapparent exposure. PMID:28054599

  8. The immunological relationship between filtrable agent, Salmonella and murine leukosis

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    Hamazaki,Yukio

    1977-12-01

    Full Text Available Salmonella typhimurium was invariably isolated from our J strain murine leukosis. Immunization of D103 mice with either inactivated Salmonella typhimurium or the cell-free extract of leukosis inhibited the transplantation of leukosis. The adoptive immunization of D103 mice with spleen cells of Strong A mice immunized with either Salmonella or the cell-free extract of leukosis inhibited the transplantation of leukosis. The addition of either Salmonella or the cell-free extract of leukosis inhibited the migration of macrophages of leukosis spleen in tissue culture. Strong A mice is non-susceptible to J strain leukosis. However, inoculation of neonatal Strong A mice with the cell-free extract of leukosis produced a susceptibility to the transplantation of leukosis. These results suggest that both a filtrable agent and Salmonella typhimurium are present in cells of this leukosis and might be etiologically related to the leukosis.

  9. Construction and characterization of infectious cDNA clones of a chicken strain of hepatitis E virus (HEV), avian HEV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, F F; Pierson, F W; Toth, T E; Meng, X J

    2005-09-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV), the causative agent of hepatitis E, is an important human pathogen. Increasing evidence indicates that hepatitis E is a zoonosis. Avian HEV was recently discovered in chickens with hepatitis-splenomegaly syndrome in the USA. Like swine HEV from pigs, avian HEV is also genetically and antigenically related to human HEV. The objective of this study was to construct and characterize an infectious cDNA clone of avian HEV for future studies of HEV replication and pathogenesis. Three full-length cDNA clones of avian HEV, pT7-aHEV-5, pT7G-aHEV-10 and pT7G-aHEV-6, were constructed and their infectivity was tested by in vitro transfection of leghorn male hepatoma (LMH) chicken liver cells and by direct intrahepatic inoculation of specific-pathogen-free (SPF) chickens with capped RNA transcripts from the three clones. The results showed that the capped RNA transcripts from each of the three clones were replication competent when transfected into LMH cells as demonstrated by detection of viral antigens with avian HEV-specific antibodies. SPF chickens intrahepatically inoculated with the capped RNA transcripts from each of the three clones developed active avian HEV infections as evidenced by seroconversion to avian HEV antibodies, viraemia and faecal virus shedding. The infectivity was further confirmed by successful infection of naïve chickens with the viruses recovered from chickens inoculated with the RNA transcripts. The results indicated that all three cDNA clones of avian HEV are infectious both in vitro and in vivo. The availability of these infectious clones for a chicken strain of HEV now affords an opportunity to study the mechanisms of HEV cross-species infection and tissue tropism by constructing chimeric viruses among human, swine and avian HEVs.

  10. Isolation and characterization of highly pathogenic avian influenza virus subtype H5N1 from donkeys

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    Abdel-Ghany Ahmad E

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The highly pathogenic H5N1 is a major avian pathogen that crosses species barriers and seriously affects humans as well as some mammals. It mutates in an intensified manner and is considered a potential candidate for the possible next pandemic with all the catastrophic consequences. Methods Nasal swabs were collected from donkeys suffered from respiratory distress. The virus was isolated from the pooled nasal swabs in specific pathogen free embryonated chicken eggs (SPF-ECE. Reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR and sequencing of both haemagglutingin and neuraminidase were performed. H5 seroconversion was screened using haemagglutination inhibition (HI assay on 105 donkey serum samples. Results We demonstrated that H5N1 jumped from poultry to another mammalian host; donkeys. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the virus clustered within the lineage of H5N1 from Egypt, closely related to 2009 isolates. It harboured few genetic changes compared to the closely related viruses from avian and humans. The neuraminidase lacks oseltamivir resistant mutations. Interestingly, HI screening for antibodies to H5 haemagglutinins in donkeys revealed high exposure rate. Conclusions These findings extend the host range of the H5N1 influenza virus, possess implications for influenza virus epidemiology and highlight the need for the systematic surveillance of H5N1 in animals in the vicinity of backyard poultry units especially in endemic areas.

  11. Novel avian influenza A (H7N9 virus induces impaired interferon responses in human dendritic cells.

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    Veera Arilahti

    Full Text Available In March 2013 a new avian influenza A(H7N9 virus emerged in China and infected humans with a case fatality rate of over 30%. Like the highly pathogenic H5N1 virus, H7N9 virus is causing severe respiratory distress syndrome in most patients. Based on genetic analysis this avian influenza A virus shows to some extent adaptation to mammalian host. In the present study, we analyzed the activation of innate immune responses by this novel H7N9 influenza A virus and compared these responses to those induced by the avian H5N1 and seasonal H3N2 viruses in human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (moDCs. We observed that in H7N9 virus-infected cells, interferon (IFN responses were weak although the virus replicated as well as the H5N1 and H3N2 viruses in moDCs. H7N9 virus-induced expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines remained at a significantly lower level as compared to H5N1 virus-induced "cytokine storm" seen in human moDCs. However, the H7N9 virus was extremely sensitive to the antiviral effects of IFN-α and IFN-β in pretreated cells. Our data indicates that different highly pathogenic avian viruses may show considerable differences in their ability to induce host antiviral responses in human primary cell models such as moDCs. The unexpected appearance of the novel H7N9 virus clearly emphasizes the importance of the global influenza surveillance system. It is, however, equally important to systematically characterize in normal human cells the replication capacity of the new viruses and their ability to induce and respond to natural antiviral substances such as IFNs.

  12. Hampered foraging and migratory performance in swans infected with low-pathogenic avian influenza A virus.

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    Jan A van Gils

    Full Text Available It is increasingly acknowledged that migratory birds, notably waterfowl, play a critical role in the maintenance and spread of influenza A viruses. In order to elucidate the epidemiology of influenza A viruses in their natural hosts, a better understanding of the pathological effects in these hosts is required. Here we report on the feeding and migratory performance of wild migratory Bewick's swans (Cygnus columbianus bewickii Yarrell naturally infected with low-pathogenic avian influenza (LPAI A viruses of subtypes H6N2 and H6N8. Using information on geolocation data collected from Global Positioning Systems fitted to neck-collars, we show that infected swans experienced delayed migration, leaving their wintering site more than a month after uninfected animals. This was correlated with infected birds travelling shorter distances and fuelling and feeding at reduced rates. The data suggest that LPAI virus infections in wild migratory birds may have higher clinical and ecological impacts than previously recognised.

  13. Heparan sulfate is a selective attachment factor for the avian coronavirus infectious bronchitis virus Beaudette.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madu, Ikenna G; Chu, Victor C; Lee, Hwajin; Regan, Andrew D; Bauman, Beverley E; Whittaker, Gary R

    2007-03-01

    The avian coronavirus infectious bronchitis virus (IBV) strain Beaudette is an embryo-adapted virus that has extended species tropism in cell culture. In order to understand the acquired tropism of the Beaudette strain, we compared the S protein sequences of several IBV strains. The Beaudette strain was found to contain a putative heparan sulfate (HS)-binding site, indicating that the Beaudette virus may use HS as a selective receptor. To ascertain the requirements of cell-surface HS for Beaudette infectivity, we assayed for infectivity in the presence of soluble heparin as a competitor and determined infectivity in mutant cell lines with no HS or glycosaminoglycan expression. Our results indicate that HS plays a role as an attachment factor for IBV, working in concert with other factors like sialic acid to mediate virus binding to cells, and may explain in part the extended tropism of IBV Beaudette.

  14. C-Terminal Amino Acids 471-507 of Avian Hepatitis E Virus Capsid Protein Are Crucial for Binding to Avian and Human Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xinquan; Bilic, Ivana; Marek, Ana; Glösmann, Martin; Hess, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The infection of chickens with avian Hepatitis E virus (avian HEV) can be asymptomatic or induces clinical signs characterized by increased mortality and decreased egg production in adult birds. Due to the lack of an efficient cell culture system for avian HEV, the interaction between virus and host cells is still barely understood. In this study, four truncated avian HEV capsid proteins (ORF2-1 - ORF2-4) with an identical 338aa deletion at the N-terminus and gradual deletions from 0, 42, 99 and 136aa at the C-terminus, respectively, were expressed and used to map the possible binding site within avian HEV capsid protein. Results from the binding assay showed that three truncated capsid proteins attached to avian LMH cells, but did not penetrate into cells. However, the shortest construct, ORF2-4, lost the capability of binding to cells suggesting that the presence of amino acids 471 to 507 of the capsid protein is crucial for the attachment. The construct ORF2-3 (aa339-507) was used to study the potential binding of avian HEV capsid protein to human and other avian species. It could be demonstrated that ORF2-3 was capable of binding to QT-35 cells from Japanese quail and human HepG2 cells but failed to bind to P815 cells. Additionally, chicken serum raised against ORF2-3 successfully blocked the binding to LMH cells. Treatment with heparin sodium salt or sodium chlorate significantly reduced binding of ORF2-3 to LMH cells. However, heparinase II treatment of LMH cells had no effect on binding of the ORF2-3 construct, suggesting a possible distinct attachment mechanism of avian as compared to human HEV. For the first time, interactions between avian HEV capsid protein and host cells were investigated demonstrating that aa471 to 507 of the capsid protein are needed to facilitate interaction with different kind of cells from different species.

  15. West Nile virus antibodies in avian species of Georgia, USA: 2000-2004.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbs, Samantha E J; Allison, Andrew B; Yabsley, Michael J; Mead, Daniel G; Wilcox, Benjamin R; Stallknecht, David E

    2006-01-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) was first isolated in the state of Georgia in the summer of 2001. As amplifying hosts of WNV, avian species play an important role in the distribution and epidemiology of the virus. The objective of this study was to identify avian species that are locally involved as potential amplifying hosts of WNV and can serve as indicators of WNV transmission over the physiographic and land use variation present in the southeastern United States. Avian serum samples (n=14,077) from 83 species of birds captured throughout Georgia during the summers of 2000-2004 were tested by a plaque reduction neutralization test for antibodies to WNV and St. Louis encephalitis virus. Over the 5-year period, WNV-neutralizing antibodies were detected in 869 (6.2%) samples. The WNV seroprevalence increased significantly throughout the study and was species dependent. The highest antibody prevalence rates were detected in rock pigeons (Columba livia), northern cardinals (Cardinalis cardinalis), common ground doves (Columbina passerina), grey catbirds (Deumetella carolinensis), and northern mockingbirds (Mimus polyglottos). Northern cardinals, in addition to having high geometric mean antibody titers and seroprevalence rates, were commonly found in all land use types and physiographic regions. Rock pigeons, common ground doves, grey catbirds, and northern mockingbirds, although also having high seroprevalence rates and high antibody titers against WNV, were more restricted in their distribution and therefore may be of more utility when attempting to assess exposure rates in specific habitat types. Of all species tested, northern cardinals represent the best potential avian indicator species for widespread serologic-based studies of WNV throughout Georgia due to their extensive range, ease of capture, and high antibody rates and titers. Due to the large geographic area covered by this species, their utility as a WNV sentinel species may include most of the eastern United

  16. Characterization of antigenic domains and epitopes in the ORF3 protein of a Chinese isolate of avian hepatitis E virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Qin; Sun, Ya-ni; Hu, Shou-bin; Wang, Xin-jie; Xiao, Yi-hong; Hsu, Walter H; Xiao, Shu-qi; Wang, Cheng-bao; Mu, Yang; Hiscox, Julian A; Zhou, En-Min

    2013-12-27

    Avian hepatitis E virus (HEV) is an emerging virus associated with the big liver and spleen disease or hepatitis-splenomegaly syndrome in chickens and subclinical infections by the virus are also common. The complete genome of avian HEV contains three open-reading frames (ORFs) in which ORF2 protein is part of virus particles and thus contains primary epitopes. Antigenic epitopes of avian HEV ORF2 protein have been described but those associated with the ORF3 have not. To analyze the antigenic domains and epitopes in the ORF3 protein of a Chinese isolate of avian HEV (CaHEV), we generated a series of antigens comprised of the complete ORF3 and also five truncated overlapping ORF3 peptides. The antibodies used in this study were mouse antisera and monoclonal antibodies against ORF3, positive chicken sera from Specific Pathogen Free chickens experimentally infected with CaHEV and clinical chicken sera. Using these antigens and antibodies, we identified three antigenic domains at amino acids (aa) 1-28, 55-74 and 75-88 in which aa 75-88 was a dominant domain. The dominant domain contained at least two major epitopes since field chickens infected with avian HEV produced antibodies against the domain and epitopes. These results provide useful information for future development of immunoassays for the diagnosis of avian HEV infection.

  17. Avian influenza virus (H5N1; effects of physico-chemical factors on its survival

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    Hameed Sajid

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Present study was performed to determine the effects of physical and chemical agents on infective potential of highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI H5N1 (local strain virus recently isolated in Pakistan during 2006 outbreak. H5N1 virus having titer 108.3 ELD50/ml was mixed with sterilized peptone water to get final dilution of 4HA units and then exposed to physical (temperature, pH and ultraviolet light and chemical (formalin, phenol crystals, iodine crystals, CID 20, virkon®-S, zeptin 10%, KEPCIDE 300, KEPCIDE 400, lifebuoy, surf excel and caustic soda agents. Harvested amnio-allantoic fluid (AAF from embryonated chicken eggs inoculated with H5N1 treated virus (0.2 ml/egg was subjected to haemagglutination (HA and haemagglutination inhibition (HI tests. H5N1 virus lost infectivity after 30 min at 56°C, after 1 day at 28°C but remained viable for more than 100 days at 4°C. Acidic pH (1, 3 and basic pH (11, 13 were virucidal after 6 h contact time; however virus retained infectivity at pH 5 (18 h, 7 and 9 (more than 24 h. UV light was proved ineffectual in inactivating virus completely even after 60 min. Soap (lifebuoy®, detergent (surf excel® and alkali (caustic soda destroyed infectivity after 5 min at 0.1, 0.2 and 0.3% dilution. All commercially available disinfectants inactivated virus at recommended concentrations. Results of present study would be helpful in implementing bio-security measures at farms/hatcheries levels in the wake of avian influenza virus (AIV outbreak.

  18. Isolation and characterization of H7N9 avian influenza A virus from humans with respiratory diseases in Zhejiang, China.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, Y.; Mao, H.; Yan, J.; Zhang, L.; Sun, Y.; Wang, X.; Chen, Y.; Lu, Y.; Chen, E.; Lv, H.; Gong, L.; Li, Z.; Gao, J.; Xu, C.; Feng, Y.; Ge, Q.; Xu, B.; Xu, F.; Yang, Z.; Zhao, C.; Han, J.; Koch, G.; Li, H.; Shu, Y.L.; Chen, Z.

    2014-01-01

    In 2013, the novel reassortant avian-origin influenza A (H7N9) virus was reported in China. Through enhanced surveillance, infection by the H7N9 virus in humans was first identified in Zhejiang Province. Real-time reverse-transcriptase-polymerase-chain-reaction (RT-PCR) was used to confirm the infec

  19. Marked endotheliotropism of highly pathogenic avian influenza virus H5N1 following intestinal inoculation in cats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reperant, Leslie A; van de Bildt, Marco W G; van Amerongen, Geert; Leijten, Lonneke M E; Watson, Simon; Palser, Anne; Kellam, Paul; Eissens, Anko C; Frijlink, Hendrik W; Osterhaus, Albert D M E; Kuiken, Thijs; Frijlink, Henderik

    2012-01-01

    Highly pathogenic avian influenza virus (HPAIV) H5N1 can infect mammals via the intestine; this is unusual since influenza viruses typically infect mammals via the respiratory tract. The dissemination of HPAIV H5N1 following intestinal entry and associated pathogenesis are largely unknown. To assess

  20. Marked endotheliotropism of highly pathogenic avian influenza virus H5N1 following intestinal inoculation in cats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.A. Reperant (Leslie); M.W.G. van de Bildt (Marco); G. van Amerongen (Geert); L.M.E. Leijten (Lonneke); S. Watson (Sarah)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractHighly pathogenic avian influenza virus (HPAIV) H5N1 can infect mammals via the intestine; this is unusual since influenza viruses typically infect mammals via the respiratory tract. The dissemination of HPAIV H5N1 following intestinal entry and associated pathogenesis are largely unknow

  1. In vitro evolution of H5N1 avian influenza virus toward human-type receptor specificity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Li-Mei; Blixt, Klas Ola; Stevens, James;

    2012-01-01

    Acquisition of a2-6 sialoside receptor specificity by a2-3 specific highly-pathogenic avian influenza viruses (H5N1) is thought to be a prerequisite for efficient transmission in humans. By in vitro selection for binding a2-6 sialosides, we identified four variant viruses with amino acid...

  2. Rapid sample preparation for detection and identification of avian influenza virus from chicken faecal samples using magnetic bead microsystem

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dhumpa, Raghuram; Bu, Minqiang; Handberg, Kurt;

    2010-01-01

    Avian influenza virus (AIV) is an infectious agent of birds and mammals. AIV is causing huge economic loss and can be a threat to human health. Reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) has been used as a method for the detection and identification of AIV virus. Although RT...

  3. Identification and characterization of avian hepatitis E virus genotype 2 from chickens with hepatitis-splenomegaly syndrome in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Hyun-Woo; Lee, Byung-Woo; Sung, Haan Woo; Yoon, Byung-Il; Kwon, Hyuk Moo

    2016-10-01

    A new avian hepatitis E virus (HEV) GI-B was identified in broiler breeders with hematomas, liver rupture, and splenomegaly, along with excessive abdominal fat, in Korea. Previously, genotype 1 had been identified in avian HEV strains in Korea. Complete sequence analyses revealed that the new avian HEV clustered in genotype 2, which has been identified in the USA and Spain; the GI-B isolate was closely related to the USA prototype avian HEV isolated from a chicken with hepatitis-splenomegaly syndrome. Although some HEV genotypes show a geographical distribution pattern, the discovery of genotype 2 in addition to genotype 1 in Korea suggests that the geographical grouping might be reconsidered. These findings have important implications for understanding the global epidemiology and spread of avian HEV.

  4. Detection of Markers of Increased Virulence Non Structural protein (NS I Avian Influenza Virus H5N1 from Indonesia=DETEKSI PENANDA PENINGKATAN VIRULENSI NON STRUKTURAL PROTEIN (NS1 VIRUS AVIAN INFLUENZA H5N1 ASAL INDONESIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arief Mulyono

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available ENGLISHAbstractNS1 protein is a multifunction protein that plays key role of pathogenesis and virulence of avians influenza virus H5N1. The amino acid substitution at the position P42S, D92E, F103I, M106I and 5 amino acid deletion at the position 80 to 84 in NS1 protein reported increasing virulence of avians influenza virus H5N1. Several studies showed avians influenza virus H5N1 in Indonesia has dynamic changed. This study aimed to analyze the markers of virulence of NS1 protein sequences of all H5N1 virus isolates from Indonesia. The source of NS1 protein sequence data gene obtained from GeneBank and Gisaid. Data were analyzed using Bioedit software. The Results showed the isolates from Indonesia had substitutions P42S and 5 amino acids deletions at positions 80-84 resulting in the potential for increased virulence of the virus. However, amino acid substitution at the position D92E, F103L and M106I substitution were not found.INDONESIANAbstrakProtein NS1 adalah protein multifungsi yang memainkan peran kunci dalam patogenesis dan virulensi virus avian influenza H5N1. Substitusi asam amino P42S, D92E, F103I, M106I, dan delesi 5 asam amino di posisi 80 - 84 dilaporkan meningkatkan virulensi virus avian influenza H5N1. Beberapa penelitian menunjukkan bahwa virus avian influenza di Indonesia mengalami perubahan dinamis. Studi ini akan menganalisis motif asam amino yang menjadi penanda peningkatan virulensi pada sekuen protein NS1 virus avian influenza H5N1 asal Indonesia. Data sekuen asam amino protein NS1 diperoleh dari database GeneBank dan Gisaid. Analisis data menggunakan Bioedit software. Hasil analisis menunjukkan subtitusi asam amino dari prolin ke serin di posisi 42 (P42S dan delesi 5 asam amino di posisi 80 – 84 telah ditemukan pada virus avian influenza asal Indonesia, akan tetapi tidak ditemukan substitusi asam amino aspartat ke glutamat diposisi no 92 (D92E dan tidak ada yang mengalami 2 substitusi asam amino sekaligus diposisi 103

  5. Genetically Diverse Low Pathogenicity Avian Influenza A Virus Subtypes Co-Circulate among Poultry in Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerloff, Nancy A; Khan, Salah Uddin; Zanders, Natosha; Balish, Amanda; Haider, Najmul; Islam, Ausraful; Chowdhury, Sukanta; Rahman, Mahmudur Ziaur; Haque, Ainul; Hosseini, Parviez; Gurley, Emily S; Luby, Stephen P; Wentworth, David E; Donis, Ruben O; Sturm-Ramirez, Katharine; Davis, C Todd

    2016-01-01

    Influenza virus surveillance, poultry outbreak investigations and genomic sequencing were assessed to understand the ecology and evolution of low pathogenicity avian influenza (LPAI) A viruses in Bangladesh from 2007 to 2013. We analyzed 506 avian specimens collected from poultry in live bird markets and backyard flocks to identify influenza A viruses. Virus isolation-positive specimens (n = 50) were subtyped and their coding-complete genomes were sequenced. The most frequently identified subtypes among LPAI isolates were H9N2, H11N3, H4N6, and H1N1. Less frequently detected subtypes included H1N3, H2N4, H3N2, H3N6, H3N8, H4N2, H5N2, H6N1, H6N7, and H7N9. Gene sequences were compared to publicly available sequences using phylogenetic inference approaches. Among the 14 subtypes identified, the majority of viral gene segments were most closely related to poultry or wild bird viruses commonly found in Southeast Asia, Europe, and/or northern Africa. LPAI subtypes were distributed over several geographic locations in Bangladesh, and surface and internal protein gene segments clustered phylogenetically with a diverse number of viral subtypes suggesting extensive reassortment among these LPAI viruses. H9N2 subtype viruses differed from other LPAI subtypes because genes from these viruses consistently clustered together, indicating this subtype is enzootic in Bangladesh. The H9N2 strains identified in Bangladesh were phylogenetically and antigenically related to previous human-derived H9N2 viruses detected in Bangladesh representing a potential source for human infection. In contrast, the circulating LPAI H5N2 and H7N9 viruses were both phylogenetically and antigenically unrelated to H5 viruses identified previously in humans in Bangladesh and H7N9 strains isolated from humans in China. In Bangladesh, domestic poultry sold in live bird markets carried a wide range of LPAI virus subtypes and a high diversity of genotypes. These findings, combined with the seven year

  6. Genetically Diverse Low Pathogenicity Avian Influenza A Virus Subtypes Co-Circulate among Poultry in Bangladesh.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nancy A Gerloff

    Full Text Available Influenza virus surveillance, poultry outbreak investigations and genomic sequencing were assessed to understand the ecology and evolution of low pathogenicity avian influenza (LPAI A viruses in Bangladesh from 2007 to 2013. We analyzed 506 avian specimens collected from poultry in live bird markets and backyard flocks to identify influenza A viruses. Virus isolation-positive specimens (n = 50 were subtyped and their coding-complete genomes were sequenced. The most frequently identified subtypes among LPAI isolates were H9N2, H11N3, H4N6, and H1N1. Less frequently detected subtypes included H1N3, H2N4, H3N2, H3N6, H3N8, H4N2, H5N2, H6N1, H6N7, and H7N9. Gene sequences were compared to publicly available sequences using phylogenetic inference approaches. Among the 14 subtypes identified, the majority of viral gene segments were most closely related to poultry or wild bird viruses commonly found in Southeast Asia, Europe, and/or northern Africa. LPAI subtypes were distributed over several geographic locations in Bangladesh, and surface and internal protein gene segments clustered phylogenetically with a diverse number of viral subtypes suggesting extensive reassortment among these LPAI viruses. H9N2 subtype viruses differed from other LPAI subtypes because genes from these viruses consistently clustered together, indicating this subtype is enzootic in Bangladesh. The H9N2 strains identified in Bangladesh were phylogenetically and antigenically related to previous human-derived H9N2 viruses detected in Bangladesh representing a potential source for human infection. In contrast, the circulating LPAI H5N2 and H7N9 viruses were both phylogenetically and antigenically unrelated to H5 viruses identified previously in humans in Bangladesh and H7N9 strains isolated from humans in China. In Bangladesh, domestic poultry sold in live bird markets carried a wide range of LPAI virus subtypes and a high diversity of genotypes. These findings, combined with the

  7. Updated values for molecular diagnosis for highly pathogenic avian influenza virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakurai, Akira; Shibasaki, Futoshi

    2012-08-01

    Highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) viruses of the H5N1 strain pose a pandemic threat. H5N1 strain virus is extremely lethal and contagious for poultry. Even though mortality is 59% in infected humans, these viruses do not spread efficiently between humans. In 1997, an outbreak of H5N1 strain with human cases occurred in Hong Kong. This event highlighted the need for rapid identification and subtyping of influenza A viruses (IAV), not only to facilitate surveillance of the pandemic potential of avian IAV, but also to improve the control and treatment of infected patients. Molecular diagnosis has played a key role in the detection and typing of IAV in recent years, spurred by rapid advances in technologies for detection and characterization of viral RNAs and proteins. Such technologies, which include immunochromatography, quantitative real-time PCR, super high-speed real-time PCR, and isothermal DNA amplification, are expected to contribute to faster and easier diagnosis and typing of IAV.

  8. Spatial assessment of the potential risk of avian influenza A virus infection in three raptor species in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    MORIGUCHI, Sachiko; ONUMA, Manabu; GOKA, Koichi

    2016-01-01

    Avian influenza A, a highly pathogenic avian influenza, is a lethal infection in certain species of wild birds, including some endangered species. Raptors are susceptible to avian influenza, and spatial risk assessment of such species may be valuable for conservation planning. We used the maximum entropy approach to generate potential distribution models of three raptor species from presence-only data for the mountain hawk-eagle Nisaetus nipalensis, northern goshawk Accipiter gentilis and peregrine falcon Falco peregrinus, surveyed during the winter from 1996 to 2001. These potential distribution maps for raptors were superimposed on avian influenza A risk maps of Japan, created from data on incidence of the virus in wild birds throughout Japan from October 2010 to March 2011. The avian influenza A risk map for the mountain hawk-eagle showed that most regions of Japan had a low risk for avian influenza A. In contrast, the maps for the northern goshawk and peregrine falcon showed that their high-risk areas were distributed on the plains along the Sea of Japan and Pacific coast. We recommend enhanced surveillance for each raptor species in high-risk areas and immediate establishment of inspection systems. At the same time, ecological risk assessments that determine factors, such as the composition of prey species, and differential sensitivity of avian influenza A virus between bird species should provide multifaceted insights into the total risk assessment of endangered species. PMID:26972333

  9. Spatial assessment of the potential risk of avian influenza A virus infection in three raptor species in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriguchi, Sachiko; Onuma, Manabu; Goka, Koichi

    2016-08-01

    Avian influenza A, a highly pathogenic avian influenza, is a lethal infection in certain species of wild birds, including some endangered species. Raptors are susceptible to avian influenza, and spatial risk assessment of such species may be valuable for conservation planning. We used the maximum entropy approach to generate potential distribution models of three raptor species from presence-only data for the mountain hawk-eagle Nisaetus nipalensis, northern goshawk Accipiter gentilis and peregrine falcon Falco peregrinus, surveyed during the winter from 1996 to 2001. These potential distribution maps for raptors were superimposed on avian influenza A risk maps of Japan, created from data on incidence of the virus in wild birds throughout Japan from October 2010 to March 2011. The avian influenza A risk map for the mountain hawk-eagle showed that most regions of Japan had a low risk for avian influenza A. In contrast, the maps for the northern goshawk and peregrine falcon showed that their high-risk areas were distributed on the plains along the Sea of Japan and Pacific coast. We recommend enhanced surveillance for each raptor species in high-risk areas and immediate establishment of inspection systems. At the same time, ecological risk assessments that determine factors, such as the composition of prey species, and differential sensitivity of avian influenza A virus between bird species should provide multifaceted insights into the total risk assessment of endangered species.

  10. Sequence analysis and comparison of avian hepatitis E viruses from Australia and Europe indicate the existence of different genotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilic, Ivana; Jaskulska, Barbara; Basic, Ana; Morrow, Chris J; Hess, Michael

    2009-04-01

    Avian hepevirus infections were detected in chickens suffering from big liver and spleen disease or hepatitis-splenomegaly syndrome in Australia, the USA and Europe. Available data indicate their genetic relationship to mammalian hepatitis E virus (HEV). In the present study, the near-complete genomic sequences of an Australian and a European isolate of avian hepatitis E virus (avian HEV) are reported for the first time. Furthermore, the phylogenetic relationship to other avian HEVs is determined. Sequence analyses of these isolates identified major genetic differences among avian HEVs. Most of them are located within the open reading frame (ORF)1 region, although only a few lie within conserved motifs of predicted domains. Non-silent mutations in the ORF2 region suggest the presence of potentially different epitopes among avian HEV isolates. Finally, phylogenetic analysis confirmed the distant relationship to mammalian HEV and additionally suggested that the avian HEVs can be separated into three different genotypes: 1 (Australia), 2 (USA) and 3 (Europe), indicating a geographical distribution pattern.

  11. Evaluation of Nobuto filter paper strips for the detection of avian influenza virus antibody in waterfowl

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dusek, Robert J.; Hall, Jeffrey S.; Nashold, Sean W.; TeSlaa, Joshua L.; Ip, Hon S.

    2011-01-01

    The utility of using Nobuto paper strips for the detection of avian influenza antibodies was examined in mallards (Anas platyrhynchos) experimentally infected with low pathogenic avian influenza viruses. Blood was collected 2 wk after infection and was preserved either as serum or whole blood absorbed onto Nobuto strips. Analysis of samples using a commercially available blocking enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay revealed comparable results (≥96% sensitivity for all methods) between sera stored at -30 C and the Nobuto strip preservation method even when the Nobuto strips were stored up to 3 mo at room temperature (RT). Significant differences were detected in the ratio of sample absorbance to negative control absorbance for Nobuto strips stored at RT compared with sera stored at -30 C, although these differences did not affect the ability of the test to reliably detect positive and negative samples. Nobuto strips are a convenient and sensitive alternative to the collection of serum samples when maintaining appropriate storage temperatures is difficult.

  12. Effect of Infection with a Mesogenic Strain of Newcastle Disease Virus on Infection with Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza Virus in Chickens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little is known on the interactions between avian influenza virus (AIV) and Newcastle disease virus (NDV) when coinfecting the same poultry host. In a previous study we found that infection of chickens with a mesogenic strain of NDV (mNDV) can reduce highly pathogenic AIV (HPAIV) replication, clinic...

  13. Pulmonary immunization of chickens using non-adjuvanted spray-freeze dried whole inactivated virus vaccine completely protects against highly pathogenic H5N1 avian influenza virus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peeters, Ben; Tonnis, Wouter F; Murugappan, Senthil; Rottier, Peter; Koch, Guus; Frijlink, Henderik W; Huckriede, Anke; Hinrichs, Wouter L J

    2014-01-01

    Highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N1 virus is a major threat to public health as well as to the global poultry industry. Most fatal human infections are caused by contact with infected poultry. Therefore, preventing the virus from entering the poultry population is a priority. This is, howe

  14. Inactivation of avian influenza virus, newcastle disease virus and goose parvovirus using solution of nano-sized scallop shell powder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thammakarn, Chanathip; Satoh, Keisuke; Suguro, Atsushi; Hakim, Hakimullah; Ruenphet, Sakchai; Takehara, Kazuaki

    2014-09-01

    Scallop shell powder produced by calcination process - the average diameter of the powder particles being 20 µm (SSP) - was further ground into nano-sized particles, with average diameter of 500 nm, here designated CaO-Nano. Solution of CaO-Nano could inactivate avian influenza virus within 5 sec, whereas the solution of SSP could not even after 1 hr incubation. CaO-Nano solution could also inactivate Newcastle disease virus and goose parvovirus within 5 sec and 30 sec, respectively. The virus-inactivating capacity (neutralizing index: NI>3) of the solution was not reduced by the presence of 20% fetal bovine serum. CaO-Nano solution seems to be a good candidate of materials for enhancement of biosecurity in farms.

  15. Antibodies to H5 subtype avian influenza virus and Japanese encephalitis virus in northern pintails (Anas acuta) sampled in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramey, Andy M.; Spackman, Erica; Yeh, Jung-Yong; Fujita, Go; Konishi, Kan; Reed, John A.; Wilcox, Benjamin R.; Brown, Justin D.; Stallknecht, David E.

    2013-01-01

    Blood samples from 105 northern pintails (Anas acuta) captured on Hokkaido, Japan were tested for antibodies to avian influenza virus (AIV), Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV), and West Nile virus (WNV) to assess possible involvement of this species in the spread of economically important and potentially zoonotic pathogens. Antibodies to AIV were detected in 64 of 105 samples (61%). Of the 64 positives, 95% and 81% inhibited agglutination of two different H5 AIV antigens (H5N1 and H5N9), respectively. Antibodies to JEV and WNV were detected in five (5%) and none of the samples, respectively. Results provide evidence for prior exposure of migrating northern pintails to H5 AIV which couldhave implications for viral shedding and disease occurrence. Results also provide evidence for limited involvement of this species in the transmission and spread of flaviviruses during spring migration.

  16. Duplex PCR assay for the detection of avian adeno virus and chicken anemia virus prevalent in Pakistan

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    Iqbal Aqib

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Avian Adeno viruses and Chicken Anemia Viruses cause serious economic losses to the poultry industry of Pakistan each year. Timely and efficient diagnosis of the viruses is needed in order to practice prevention and control strategies. In the first part of this study, we investigated broilers, breeder and Layer stocks for morbidity and mortality rates due to AAV and CAV infections and any co-infections by examining signs and symptoms typical of their infestation or post mortem examination. In the second part of the study, we developed a duplex PCR assay for the detection of AAV and CAV which is capable to simultaneously detect both the viral types prevalent in Pakistan with high sensitivity and 100% specificity.

  17. Synergistic Effect of S224P and N383D Substitutions in the PA of H5N1 Avian Influenza Virus Contributes to Mammalian Adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jiasheng; Xu, Jing; Shi, Jianzhong; Li, Yanbing; Chen, Hualan

    2015-05-22

    The adaptation of H5N1 avian influenza viruses to human poses a great threat to public health. Previous studies indicate the adaptive mutations in viral polymerase of avian influenza viruses are major contributors in overcoming the host species barrier, with the majority of mammalian adaptive mutations occurring in the PB2 protein. However, the adaptive mutations in the PA protein of the H5N1 avian influenza virus are less defined and poorly understood. In this study, we identified the synergistic effect of the PA/224P + 383D of H5N1 avian influenza viruses and its ability to enhance the pathogenicity and viral replication in a mammalian mouse model. Interestingly, the signature of PA/224P + 383D mainly exists in mammalian isolates of the H5N1 influenza virus and pdmH1N1 influenza virus, providing a potential pathway for the natural adaptation to mammals which imply the effects of natural adaptation to mammals. Notably, the mutation of PA/383D, which is highly conserved in avian influenza viruses, increases the polymerase activity in both avian and human cells, and may have roles in maintaining the avian influenza virus in their avian reservoirs, and jumping species to infect humans.

  18. Enhanced virulence of clade 2.3.2.1 highly pathogenic avian influenza A(H5N1) viruses in ferrets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sporadic avian to human transmission of highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) A (H5N1) viruses necessitates the analysis of currently circulating and evolving clades to assess their potential risk. Following the spread and sustained circulation of clade 2 viruses across multiple continents, num...

  19. Development of a blocking ELISA for detection of antibodies against avian hepatitis E virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Baoyuan; Zhao, Qin; Sun, Yani; Wang, Xinjie; Zhao, Jinan; Du, Taofeng; Wang, Chengbao; Xiao, Shuqi; Mu, Yang; Zhang, Gaiping; Luo, Jianxun; Hsu, Walter H; Zhou, En-Min

    2014-08-01

    A blocking enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (bELISA) was developed for the detection of immunoglobulin G antibodies against avian hepatitis E virus (HEV). In the bELISA, the coating antigen was a truncated protein containing C-terminal 268-amino acid region of ORF2 from an avian HEV strain isolated in China (CaHEV) and blocking antibody was a monoclonal antibody (mAb) 1H5 recognizing the epitope within amino acids 384-414 in the C-terminal 268-amino acid region. The concentration of blocking mAb 1H5 was determined as that yielded an OD450nm value of 1.0 for binding to the coating antigen and the antigen concentration and serum dilution were optimized using a checkerboard titration. A cut-off value of 20.7% at the mean percent inhibition plus 3 standard deviations was determined by testing 265 negative sera. The bELISA had a sensitivity of 98.3% by testing 116 positive sera from chickens infected experimentally with CaHEV and had no cross-reaction with other anti-avian virus antibodies. The compliance rates of the bELISA with indirect ELISA and Western blot were 83.7% and 93.3%, respectively, by testing 300 field chicken sera. These results suggested that the bELISA developed in this study can be used for detection of antibodies against avian HEV and showed high reproducibility compared with indirect ELISA and Western blot methods.

  20. Isolation and characterization of virus of highly pathogenic avian influenza H5 subtype of chicken from outbreaks in Indonesia

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    Agus Wiyono

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available A study on the isolation and characterization of Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza of chicken from outbreaks in Indonesia was conducted at Indonesian Research Institute for Veterinary Science. Outbreaks of avian disease had been reported in Indonesia since August 2003 affecting commercial layer, broiler, quail, and ostrich and also native chicken with showing clinical signs such as cyanosis of wattle and comb, nasal discharges and hypersalivation, subcutaneous ptechiae on foot and leg, diarre and sudden high mortality. The aim of this study is to isolate and characterize the causal agent of the disease. Samples of serum, feather follicle, tracheal swab, as well as organs of proventriculus, intestine, caecal tonsil, trachea and lungs were collected from infected animals. Serum samples were tested haemaglutination/haemaglutination inhibition to Newcastle Disease and Egg Drop Syndrome viruses. Isolation of virus of the causal agent of the outbreak was conducted from samples of feather follicle, tracheal swab, and organs using 11 days old specific pathogen free (SPF embryonated eggs. The isolated viruses were then characterised by agar gel precipitation test using swine influenza reference antisera, by haemaglutination inhibition using H1 to H15 reference antisera, and by electron microscope examination. The pathogenicity of the viruses was confirmed by intravenous pathogenicity index test and its culture in Chicken Embryo Fibroblast primary cell culture without addition of trypsin. The study revealed that the causative agent of the outbreaks of avian disease in Indonesia was avian influenza H5 subtype virus based upon serological tests, virus isolation and characterization using swine influenza reference antisera, and electron microscope examination. While subtyping of the viruses using H1 to H15 reference antisera suggested that the virus is very likely to be an avian influenza H5N1 subtype virus. The pathogenicity test confirmed that the viruses

  1. Avian influenza virus ecology in Iceland shorebirds: intercontinental reassortment and movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Jeffrey S; Hallgrimsson, Gunnar Thor; Suwannanarn, Kamol; Sreevatsen, Srinand; Ip, Hon S; Magnusdottir, Ellen; TeSlaa, Joshua L; Nashold, Sean W; Dusek, Robert J

    2014-12-01

    Shorebirds are a primary reservoir of avian influenza viruses (AIV). We conducted surveillance studies in Iceland shorebird populations for 3 years, documenting high serological evidence of AIV exposure in shorebirds, primarily in Ruddy Turnstones (Arenaria interpres; seroprevalence=75%). However, little evidence of virus infection was found in these shorebird populations and only two turnstone AIVs (H2N7; H5N1) were able to be phylogenetically examined. These analyses showed that viruses from Iceland shorebirds were primarily derived from Eurasian lineage viruses, yet the H2 hemagglutinin gene segment was from a North American lineage previously detected in a gull from Iceland the previous year. The H5N1 virus was determined to be low pathogenic, however the PB2 gene was closely related to the PB2 from highly pathogenic H5N1 isolates from China. Multiple lines of evidence suggest that the turnstones were infected with at least one of these AIV while in Iceland and confirm Iceland as an important location where AIV from different continents interact and reassort, creating new virus genomes. Mounting data warrant continued surveillance for AIV in wild birds in the North Atlantic, including Canada, Greenland, and the northeast USA to determine the risks of new AI viruses and their intercontinental movement in this region.

  2. Avian influenza virus ecology in Iceland shorebirds: intercontinental reassortment and movement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Jeffrey S.; Hallgrimsson, Gunnar Thor; Suwannanarn, Kamol; Sreevatsen, Srinand; Ip, Hon S.; TeSlaa, Joshua L.; Nashold, Sean W.; Dusek, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    Shorebirds are a primary reservoir of avian influenza viruses (AIV). We conducted surveillance studies in Iceland shorebird populations for 3 years, documenting high serological evidence of AIV exposure in shorebirds, primarily in Ruddy Turnstones (Arenaria interpres; seroprevalence = 75%). However, little evidence of virus infection was found in these shorebird populations and only two turnstone AIVs (H2N7; H5N1) were able to be phylogenetically examined. These analyses showed that viruses from Iceland shorebirds were primarily derived from Eurasian lineage viruses, yet the H2 hemagglutinin gene segment was from a North American lineage previously detected in a gull from Iceland the previous year. The H5N1 virus was determined to be low pathogenic, however the PB2 gene was closely related to the PB2 from highly pathogenic H5N1 isolates from China. Multiple lines of evidence suggest that the turnstones were infected with at least one of these AIV while in Iceland and confirm Iceland as an important location where AIV from different continents interact and reassort, creating new virus genomes. Mounting data warrant continued surveillance for AIV in wild birds in the North Atlantic, including Canada, Greenland, and the northeast USA to determine the risks of new AI viruses and their intercontinental movement in this region.

  3. The antigenic property of the H5N1 avian influenza viruses isolated in central China

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    Zou Wei

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Three influenza pandemics outbroke in the last century accompanied the viral antigen shift and drift, resulting in the change of antigenic property and the low cross protective ability of the existed antibody to the newly emerged pandemic virus, and eventually the death of millions of people. The antigenic characterizations of the viruses isolated in central China in 2004 and 2006–2007 were investigated in the present study. Results Hemagglutinin inhibition assay and neutralization assay displayed differential antigenic characteristics of the viruses isolated in central China in two periods (2004 and 2006–2007. HA genes of the viruses mainly located in two branches in phylogeny analysis. 53 mutations of the deduced amino acids of the HA genes were divided into 4 patterns. Mutations in pattern 2 and 3 showed the main difference between viruses isolated in 2004 and 2006–2007. Meanwhile, most amino acids in pattern 2 and 3 located in the globular head of the HA protein, and some of the mutations evenly distributed at the epitope sites. Conclusions The study demonstrated that a major antigenic drift had occurred in the viruses isolated in central China. And monitoring the antigenic property should be the priority in preventing the potential pandemic of H5N1 avian influenza virus.

  4. Emergence of Enteric Viruses in Production Chickens Is a Concern for Avian Health

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    Elena Mettifogo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Several viruses have been identified in recent years in the intestinal contents of chickens and turkeys with enteric problems, which have been observed in commercial farms worldwide, including Brazil. Molecular detection of these viruses in Brazil can transform to a big threat for poultry production due to risk for intestinal integrity. This disease is characterized by severely delayed growth, low uniformity, lethargy, watery diarrhea, delayed feed consumption, and a decreased conversion rate. Chicken astrovirus (CAstV, rotavirus, reovirus, chicken parvovirus (ChPV, fowl adenovirus of subgroup I (FAdV-1, and avian nephritis virus (ANV were investigated using the conventional polymerase chain reaction (PCR and the reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR. In addition, the infectious bronchitis virus (IBV, which may play a role in enteric disease, was included. The viruses most frequently detected, either alone or in concomitance with other viruses, were IBV, ANV, rotavirus, and CAstV followed by parvovirus, reovirus, and adenovirus. This study demonstrates the diversity of viruses in Brazilian chicken flocks presenting enteric problems characterized by diarrhea, growth retard, loss weight, and mortality, which reflects the multicausal etiology of this disease.

  5. Seroepizootiological investigations of animals from Obedska bara locality for presence of Avian influenza virus

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    Đuričić Bosiljka

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The disease caused by Influenza viruses has been well known for a very long time. In the recent period there has been noted an occurrence of pandemics caused by Influenza viruses type A with a high rate of mortality. The ongoing pandemic caused by avian influenza virus serotype H9N9 began in Hong Kong in 1992, and another pandemic caused by serotype H5N1 began in China (Hong Kong in 1999. The world wide spreading of these viruses occurred due to migratory birds. Avian influenza was confirmed in Serbia in 2007. The goal of this study was to examine whether the avian influenza viruses type A circulate in the region of the Obedska bara marsh, which is a famous resort for many birds in Serbia, as well as many birds migrating from Europe to Africa and vice versa. The samples of blood sera of many animal species (123 samples from fowl, 64 samples from donkeys, 40 samples from horses were tested by serologic reaction of inhibition of haemmaglutination (IHA for the presence of antibodies to influenza A subtypes H5N1, H5N2, H5N3, H7N1 and H7N2. Also, the samples of blood sera of experimental chicken exposed to wild life in Obedska bara (sentinel species were tested. Antibodies to subtypes H5N1, H5N2, H5N3, H7N1 and H7N2 were found in chicken from Dec, Boljevci, Petrovcic and Kupinovo villages but no antibodies were found in blood sera from hams from Dobanovci, Jakovo, Becmen and Surcin villages. From 23 samples from ducks antibodies were detected in 3 samples, and from 22 geese blood sera antibodies were found in 4 samples. From a total of 40 horse blood sera tested one was tested positive, and from 64 donkey sera 17 were positive for the presence of antibodies for avian influenza type A. In blood sera of experimental chicken antibodies were found by subtype H5N1 with corrections with H5N2 and H7N1.

  6. Use of FTA sampling cards for molecular detection of avian influenza virus in wild birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeler, Shamus P; Ferro, Pamela J; Brown, Justin D; Fang, Xingwang; El-Attrache, John; Poulson, Rebecca; Jackwood, Mark W; Stallknecht, David E

    2012-03-01

    Current avian influenza (AI) virus surveillance programs involving wild birds rely on sample collection methods that require refrigeration or low temperature freezing to maintain sample integrity for virus isolation and/or reverse-transcriptase (RT) PCR. Maintaining the cold chain is critical for the success of these diagnostic assays but is not always possible under field conditions. The aim of this study was to test the utility of Finders Technology Associates (FTA) cards for reliable detection of AI virus from cloacal and oropharyngeal swabs of wild birds. The minimum detectable titer was determined, and the effect of room temperature storage was evaluated experimentally using multiple egg-propagated stock viruses (n = 6). Using real time RT-PCR, we compared results from paired cloacal swab and samples collected on FTA cards from both experimentally infected mallards (Anasplatyrhynchos) and hunter-harvested waterfowl sampled along the Texas Gulf Coast. Based on the laboratory trials, the average minimal detectable viral titer was determined to be 1 x 10(4.7) median embryo infectious dose (EID50)/ml (range: 1 x 10(4.3) to 1 x 10(5.4) EID50/ml), and viral RNA was consistently detectable on the FTA cards for a minimum of 20 days and up to 30 days for most subtypes at room temperature (23 C) storage. Real-time RT-PCR of samples collected using the FTA cards showed fair to good agreement in live birds when compared with both real-time RT-PCR and virus isolation of swabs. AI virus detection rates in samples from several wild bird species were higher when samples were collected using the FTA cards compared with cloacal swabs. These results suggest that FTA cards can be used as an alternative sample collection method when traditional surveillance methods are not possible, especially in avian populations that have historically received limited testing or situations in which field conditions limit the ability to properly store or ship swab samples.

  7. Intersubtype Reassortments of H5N1 Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza Viruses Isolated from Quail.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Tinh Huu; Than, Van Thai; Thanh, Hien Dang; Hung, Vu-Khac; Nguyen, Duc Tan; Kim, Wonyong

    2016-01-01

    H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) viruses are considered a threat to national animal industries, causing production losses and high mortality in domestic poultry. In recent years, quail has become a popular terrestrial poultry species raised for production of meat and eggs in Asia. In this study, to better understand the roles of quail in H5N1 viral evolution, two H5N1-positive samples, designated A/quail/Vietnam/CVVI-49/2010 (CVVI-49/2010) and A/quail/Vietnam/CVVI-50/2014 (CVVI-50/2014), were isolated from quail during H5N1 outbreaks in Vietnam, and their whole genome were analyzed. The phylogenetic analysis reveals new evolutionary variation in the worldwide H5N1 viruses. The quail HA genes were clustered into clades 1.1.1 (CVVI-49/2010) and clade 2.3.2.1c (CVVI-50/2014), which may have evolved from viruses circulating from chickens and/or ducks in Cambodia, mainland of China, Taiwan, Indonesia, and South Korea in recent years. Interestingly, the M2 gene of the CVVI-49/2010 strain contained amino acid substitutions at position 26L-I and 31S-N that are related to amantadine-resistance. In particular, the CVVI-50/2014 strain revealed evidence of multiple intersubtype reassortment events between virus clades 2.3.2.1c, 2.3.2.1b, and 2.3.2.1a. Data from this study supports the possible role of quail as an important intermediate host in avian influenza virus evolution. Therefore, additional surveillance is needed to monitor these HPAI viruses both serologically and virologically in quail.

  8. Prevalence of Antibodies to H9N2 Avian Influenza Virus in Backyard Chickens around Maharlou Lake in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Mehdi Hadipour*, Gholamhossein Habibi and Amir Vosoughi

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Backyard chickens play an important role in the epidemiology of H9N2 avian influenza virus infection. Close contact of backyard chickens with migratory birds, especially with aquatic birds, as well as neighboring poultry farms, may pose the risk of transmitting avian influenza virus, but little is known about the disease status of backyard poultry. A H9N2 avian influenza virus seroprevalence survey was carried out in 500 backyard chickens from villages around Maharlou lake in Iran, using the hemagglutination-inhibition (HI test. The studied backyard chickens had not been previously vaccinated and showed no clinical signs of disease. The overall HI titer and seroprevalence against H9N2 were 7.73 and 81.6%, respectively.

  9. Fluorescence biosensor based on CdTe quantum dots for specific detection of H5N1 avian influenza virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoa Nguyen, Thi; Dieu Thuy Ung, Thi; Hien Vu, Thi; Tran, Thi Kim Chi; Quyen Dong, Van; Khang Dinh, Duy; Liem Nguyen, Quang

    2012-09-01

    This report highlights the fabrication of fluorescence biosensors based on CdTe quantum dots (QDs) for specific detection of H5N1 avian influenza virus. The core biosensor was composed of (i) the highly luminescent CdTe/CdS QDs, (ii) chromatophores extracted from bacteria Rhodospirillum rubrum, and (iii) the antibody of β-subunit. This core part was linked to the peripheral part of the biosensor via a biotin-streptavidin-biotin bridge and finally connected to the H5N1 antibody to make it ready for detecting H5N1 avian influenza virus. Detailed studies of each constituent were performed showing the image of QDs-labeled chromatophores under optical microscope, proper photoluminescence (PL) spectra of CdTe/CdS QDs, chromatophores and the H5N1 avian influenza viruses.

  10. Natural Infection with Avian Hepatitis E Virus and Marek's Disease Virus in Brown Layer Chickens in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shuqing; Wang, Liyuan; Sun, Shuhong

    2016-09-01

    In the present study, avian hepatitis E virus (HEV) and serotype-1 strains of Marek's disease virus (MDV-1) were detected from a flock of 27-wk-old brown layer hens in China, accompanied by an average daily mortality of 0.44%. Postmortem examination of 25 sick hens and five apparently healthy hens selected randomly from the flock showed significant pathologic changes consistent with hepatitis-splenomegaly syndrome (HSS), including hepatomegaly, peritoneal fluid, and hepatic subcapsular hemorrhages. Microscopic examination of these livers showed multifocal necrotizing hepatitis and mild lymphocytic infiltration. These liver samples were investigated for HEV by reverse-transcription PCR. The overall detection rate of HEV RNA in samples of sick chickens was about 56% (14/25), while in samples from apparently healthy hens, it was 80% (4/5). Sequencing analysis of three 242-base-pair fragments of the helicase gene revealed 95.5% to 97.9% nucleotide identity compared with published avian HEV genotype 3, whereas identities demonstrated only 77.3% to 86.0% similarity when compared with genotypes 1, 2, and 4. Unexpectedly, the MDV meq gene was detected in livers from both apparently healthy chickens (2/5) and sick chickens (12/25) by PCR analysis. The meq gene (396 base pairs) was determined to belong to MDV-1 by further sequencing. The co-infection rate of avian HEV and MDV in this flock was 30% (9/30). This is the first report of dual infection of a nonenvelope RNA virus (HEV) with a herpesvirus (MDV) in chickens in China.

  11. Kidney alkaline phosphatase in mercuric chloride injected chicks resistant and susceptible to leukosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, V.L.; McIntyre, J.A.; Bearse, G.E.

    1969-01-01

    Two strains of chickens were selected for resistance and susceptibility to avian leukosis. Researchers found that the resistant chicks retained two to four times as much mercury in the liver and kidneys as did the susceptible chicks following injection of mercuric chloride or phenylmercuric acetate. Differences in alkaline phosphatase in the kidneys of the resistant and susceptible chicks, and the effect of the mercuric chloride injection on the alkaline phosphatase activity were reported in this paper. 19 references, 2 tables.

  12. Seroprevalence survey of H9N2 avian influenza virus in backyard chickens around the Caspian Sea in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MM Hadipour

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Since 1998, an epidemic of avian influenza occurred in the Iranian poultry industry. The identified agent presented low pathogenicity, and was subtyped as an H9N2 avian influenza virus. Backyard chickens can play an important role in the epidemiology of H9N2 avian influenza virus infection. Close contact of backyard chickens with migratory birds, especially with aquatic birds, as well as neighboring poultry farms, may pose the risk of transmitting avian influenza virus, but little is known about the disease status of backyard poultry. A H9N2 avian influenza virus seroprevalence survey was carried out in 700 backyard chickens from villages around the Caspian Sea, Northern Iran, using the hemagglutination-inhibition (HI test. The studied backyard chickens had not been previously vaccinated and showed no clinical signs of disease. The mean antibody titers found were 6.8, 7.5, 5.9, 7.2, 5.7, 6.4, 6.2 and the seroprevalence was 76.2%, 79.5%, 68.18%, 78.27%, 65%, 72.31% and 71.4% as found in seven villages. Overall HI titer and seroprevalence against H9N2 were 6.52 and 72.98%, respectively.

  13. Molecular detection of avian pox virus from nodular skin and mucosal fibrinonecrotic lesions of Iranian backyard poultry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gholami-Ahangaran, Majid; Zia-Jahromi, Noosha; Namjoo, Abdolrasul

    2014-02-01

    In recent years, some outbreaks of skin lesions suspected to be avian pox were observed in the backyard poultry in different parts of western areas in Iran. Consequently, 328 backyard poultries with suspected signs of avian pox virus infection were sampled. All birds showed nodular lesions on unfeathered head skin and/or fibronecrotic lesions on mucus membrane of the oral cavity and upper respiratory tract. For histopathological analysis, the sections of tissue samples from cutaneous lesions of examined birds were stained with H&E method. For PCR, after DNA extraction a 578-bp fragment of avian pox virus from 4b core protein gene was amplified. Results showed 217 and 265 out of 328 (66.1 and 80.7%, respectively) samples were positive for avian pox virus on histopathological and PCR examination, respectively. In this study, the samples that had intracytoplasmic inclusion bodies on pathologic examination were PCR positive. This study revealed that PCR is a valuable tool for identification of an avian pox virus and that the frequency of pox infection in backyard poultry in western areas of Iran is high.

  14. Avian influenza A virus PB2 promotes interferon type I inducing properties of a swine strain in porcine dendritic cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ocana-Macchi, Manuela; Ricklin, Meret E.; Python, Sylvie; Monika, Gsell-Albert [Institute of Virology and Immunoprophylaxis, Mittelhaeusern (Switzerland); Stech, Juergen; Stech, Olga [Friedrich-Loeffler Institut, Greifswald-Insel Riems (Germany); Summerfield, Artur, E-mail: artur.summerfield@ivi.admin.ch [Institute of Virology and Immunoprophylaxis, Mittelhaeusern (Switzerland)

    2012-05-25

    The 2009 influenza A virus (IAV) pandemic resulted from reassortment of avian, human and swine strains probably in pigs. To elucidate the role of viral genes in host adaptation regarding innate immune responses, we focussed on the effect of genes from an avian H5N1 and a porcine H1N1 IAV on infectivity and activation of porcine GM-CSF-induced dendritic cells (DC). The highest interferon type I responses were achieved by the porcine virus reassortant containing the avian polymerase gene PB2. This finding was not due to differential tropism since all viruses infected DC equally. All viruses equally induced MHC class II, but porcine H1N1 expressing the avian viral PB2 induced more prominent nuclear NF-{kappa}B translocation compared to its parent IAV. The enhanced activation of DC may be detrimental or beneficial. An over-stimulation of innate responses could result in either pronounced tissue damage or increased resistance against IAV reassortants carrying avian PB2.

  15. Assembly and immunological properties of a bivalent virus-like particle (VLP) for avian influenza and Newcastle disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Huifang; Xue, Chunyi; Lv, Lishan; Wang, Wei; Liu, Qiliang; Liu, Kang; Chen, Xianxian; Zheng, Jing; Li, Xiaoming; Cao, Yongchang

    2013-12-26

    Avian influenza virus (AIV) and Newcastle disease virus (NDV) are both important pathogens in poultry worldwide. The protection of poultry from avian influenza and Newcastle disease can be achieved through vaccination. We embarked on the development of a bivalent vaccine that would allow for a single immunization against both avian influenza and Newcastle disease. We constructed a chimeric virus-like particle (VLP) that is composed of the M1 protein and HA protein of avian influenza virus and a chimeric protein containing the cytoplasmic and transmembrane domains of AIV neuraminidase protein (NA) and the ectodomain of the NDV hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) protein (NA/HN). The single immunization of chickens with the chimeric VLP vaccine induced both AIV H5- and NDV-specific antibodies. The HI titers and specific antibodies elicited by the chimeric VLPs were statistically similar to those elicited in animals vaccinated with the corresponding commercial monovalent vaccines. Chickens vaccinated with chimeric VLP vaccine and then challenged with the Newcastle disease F48E9 virus displayed complete protection. Overall, the chimeric VLP vaccine elicits strong immunity and can protect against Newcastle disease virus challenge.

  16. Immune Efficacy of a Recombinant Fowlpox Virus Co-Ex-pressing HA and NA Genes of Avian Influenza Virus in SPF Chickens

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIAO Chuan-ling; JIANG Yong-ping; YU Kang-zhen; TIAN Guo-bin; CHEN Hua-lan

    2004-01-01

    A recombinant fowlpox virus co-expressing Haemagglutinin(HA)and Neuraminidase(NA)named as rFPV-HA-NA was produced by HA and NA gene of A/Goose/Guangdong/3/96(H5N1)isolate of avian influenza virus recombined into the genome of fowlpox virus. In this study,to evaluate its ability of protecting chickens against challenge with a lethal dose of highly pathogenic isolates of avian influenza virus,eight-week-old specificpathogenic-free(SPF)chickens were vaccinated with recombinant virus or the wildtypefowlpox virus by wing-web puncture. After challenge 4 weeks with 10 LD50 highly pathogenic avian influenza virus H5N1 and H7N1 isolate,all chickens vaccinated with recombinant virus were protected,while the chickens vaccinated with the wildtype fowlpox virus or unvaccinated controls experienced 100% mortality respectively following challenge. This complete protection was accompanied by the high levels of specific antibody response to the respectivecomponents of the recombinant virus.

  17. The Protection Efficacity of DNA Vaccine Encoding Hemagglutinin of H5 Subtype Avian Influenza Virus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Yong-ping; YU Kang-zhen; DENG Guo-hua; TIAN Guo-bin; QIAO Chuan-ling; CHEN Hua-lan

    2004-01-01

    The DNA vaccine pCIHA5 encoding hemagglutinin can protect SPF chicken against lethal H5N1 avian influenza virus challenge. The more characters about its protection efficacity were studied. The protective rates in 10, 40, 70, 100 and 150μg groups immunized with pCIHA5 were 12.5 (1/8), 58.3 (7/12), 72.7 (8/11), 50.0 (6/12) and 66.7% (8/12), respectively. The protective rates in 5, 20, 35 and 50μg groups were 145.5 (5/11), 58.3 (7/12), 58.3 (7/12) and 91.7% (11/12), respectively. The 70, 100 and 5μg groups have virus shedding of 1/8, 2/6 and 1/5. Though the inactived oil-emulsion vaccine has high HI antibody titers and 100% protective rate, the AGP antibody could be detected after vaccination. Results show that the pCIHA5 is fit to boost by intramuscular injection. This would be useful to the study on gene engineering vaccine of avian influenza virus.

  18. Avian nephritis virus (ANV) on Brazilian chickens farms: circulating genotypes and intra-genotypic diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinoza, Luis Luna; Beserra, Laila A R; Soares, Rodrigo M; Gregori, Fabio

    2016-12-01

    Avian nephritis virus (ANV), which belongs to the family Astroviridae, is associated with different clinical manifestations (including enteric disorders). Despite being frequently found in the avian industry worldwide, information regarding genetic features of these viruses in Brazil is scarce. Therefore, sixty fecal sample pools (5-6 birds of the same flock), representing 60 poultry farms from six Brazilian States, were screened using an astrovirus-specific hemi-nested-PCR assay targeting the conserved ORF1b gene, followed by nucleotide sequencing of amplified products. PCR and phylogenetic analysis confirmed the detection of 21 positive samples to ANV (35 %). In order to investigate the genetic diversity represented by these viruses, amplification, cloning and phylogenetic analysis of the deduced amino acid sequence of ORF2 gene were attempted. Eight samples were successfully cloned (generating 32 clones in total) and sequenced. Based on phylogenetic analysis of ORF2, sequences defined in this study were classified into three genotypes: genotype 5, which has already been described in birds, and two other novel genotypes, tentatively named genotype 8 and 9, all of which occurred in single or mixed infections. Moreover, high intra-genotypic diversity and co-circulation of distinct strains in a same host population were observed. This study revealed the presence of new strains of ANV in Brazilian poultry and their circulation in commercial chicken flocks.

  19. Genetic identification of avian hepatitis E virus (HEV) from healthy chicken flocks and characterization of the capsid gene of 14 avian HEV isolates from chickens with hepatitis-splenomegaly syndrome in different geographical regions of the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Z F; Larsen, C T; Dunlop, A; Huang, F F; Pierson, F W; Toth, T E; Meng, X-J

    2004-03-01

    Avian hepatitis E virus (HEV), a novel virus identified from chickens with hepatitis-splenomegaly (HS) syndrome, is genetically and antigenically related to human HEV. Recently, it was found that avian HEV antibody is also prevalent in healthy chickens. A prospective study was done on a known seropositive but healthy chicken farm to identify avian HEV isolates from healthy chickens. Fourteen chickens were randomly selected, tagged and monitored under natural conditions for 19 weeks. All 14 chickens were seronegative at the beginning of the study at 12 weeks of age. By 21 weeks of age, all 14 chickens had seroconverted to avian HEV antibody. None of the chickens had any sign of HS syndrome. Partial helicase gene and capsid gene sequences of avian HEV isolates recovered from a healthy chicken were determined and found to share 75-97 % nucleotide sequence identity with the corresponding regions of avian HEV isolates from chickens with HS syndrome. Thus far, only one strain of avian HEV from a chicken with HS syndrome has been genetically characterized for its capsid gene, therefore the capsid gene region of an additional 14 isolates from chickens with HS syndrome were also characterized. The capsid genes of avian HEV isolates from chickens with HS syndrome were found to be heterogeneic, sharing 76-100 % nucleotide sequence identity with each other. This study indicates that avian HEV is enzootic in chicken flocks and spreads subclinically among chickens in the United States and that the virus is heterogeneic.

  20. Contact variables for exposure to avian influenza H5N1 virus at the human-animal interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabinowitz, P; Perdue, M; Mumford, E

    2010-06-01

    Although the highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N1 virus continues to cause infections in both avian and human populations, the specific zoonotic risk factors remain poorly understood. This review summarizes available evidence regarding types of contact associated with transmission of H5N1 virus at the human-animal interface. A systematic search of the published literature revealed five analytical studies and 15 case reports describing avian influenza transmission from animals to humans for further review. Risk factors identified in analytical studies were compared, and World Health Organization-confirmed cases, identified in case reports, were classified according to type of contact reported using a standardized algorithm. Although cases were primarily associated with direct contact with sick/unexpectedly dead birds, some cases reported only indirect contact with birds or contaminated environments or contact with apparently healthy birds. Specific types of contacts or activities leading to exposure could not be determined from data available in the publications reviewed. These results support previous reports that direct contact with sick birds is not the only means of human exposure to avian influenza H5N1 virus. To target public health measures and disease awareness messaging for reducing the risk of zoonotic infection with avian influenza H5N1 virus, the specific types of contacts and activities leading to transmission need to be further understood. The role of environmental virus persistence, shedding of virus by asymptomatic poultry and disease pathophysiology in different avian species relative to human zoonotic risk, as well as specific modes of zoonotic transmission, should be determined.

  1. Characterization of H3N6 avian influenza virus isolated from a wild white pelican in Zambia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simulundu, Edgar; Mweene, Aaron S; Tomabechi, Daisuke; Hang'ombe, Bernard M; Ishii, Akihiro; Suzuki, Yuka; Nakamura, Ichiro; Sawa, Hirofumi; Sugimoto, Chihiro; Ito, Kimihito; Kida, Hiroshi; Saiwana, Lewis; Takada, Ayato

    2009-01-01

    We characterized an influenza virus isolated from a great white pelican in Zambia. Phylogenetic analysis showed that all of its gene segments belonged to the Eurasian lineage and that they appear to have evolved in distinct geographical regions in Europe, Asia, and Africa, suggesting reassortment of virus genes maintained in wild aquatic birds whose flyways overlap across these continents. It is notable that this virus might possess some genes of the same origin as those of highly pathogenic H7 and H5 viruses isolated in Eurasia. The present study underscores the need for continued monitoring of avian influenza viruses in Eurasia and Africa.

  2. Putative human and avian risk factors for avian influenza virus infections in backyard poultry in Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheta, Basma M; Fuller, Trevon L; Larison, Brenda; Njabo, Kevin Y; Ahmed, Ahmed Samy; Harrigan, Ryan; Chasar, Anthony; Abdel Aziz, Soad; Khidr, Abdel-Aziz A; Elbokl, Mohamed M; Habbak, Lotfy Z; Smith, Thomas B

    2014-01-10

    Highly pathogenic influenza A virus subtype H5N1 causes significant poultry mortality in the six countries where it is endemic and can also infect humans. Egypt has reported the third highest number of poultry outbreaks (n=1084) globally. The objective of this cross-sectional study was to identify putative risk factors for H5N1 infections in backyard poultry in 16 villages in Damietta, El Gharbia, Fayoum, and Menofia governorates from 2010-2012. Cloacal and tracheal swabs and serum samples from domestic (n=1242) and wild birds (n=807) were tested for H5N1 via RT-PCR and hemagglutination inhibition, respectively. We measured poultry rearing practices with questionnaires (n=306 households) and contact rates among domestic and wild bird species with scan sampling. Domestic birds (chickens, ducks, and geese, n=51) in three governorates tested positive for H5N1 by PCR or serology. A regression model identified a significant correlation between H5N1 in poultry and the practice of disposing of dead poultry and poultry feces in the garbage (F=15.7, p<0.0001). In addition, contact between domestic and wild birds was more frequent in villages where we detected H5N1 in backyard flocks (F=29.5, p<0.0001).

  3. Identification of one peptide which inhibited infectivity of avian infectious bronchitis virus in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Purified avian infectious bronchitis virus (IBV) was used to screen a random phage display peptide library. After the fourth panning, 10 positive phages were sequenced and characterized. The phages specifically inhibited IBV infectivity in HeLa cells and blocked IBV haemagglutination. One linear peptide "GSH HRH VHS PFV" from the positive phages with the highest neutralization titer was synthesized and this peptide inhibited IBV infection in HeLa as well. The results may contribute to development of antiviral therapeutics for IBV and studying the determinants for viral and cell interaction.

  4. Efficient Sensing of Avian Influenza Viruses by Porcine Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Artur Summerfield

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available H5N1 influenza A virus (IAV infections in human remain rare events but have been associated with severe disease and a higher mortality rate compared to infections with seasonal strains. An excessive release of pro-inflammatory cytokine together with a greater virus dissemination potential have been proposed to explain the high virulence observed in human and other mammalian and avian species. Among the cells involved in the cytokine storm, plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDC could play an important role considering their unique capacity to secrete massive amounts of type I interferon (IFN. Considering the role of IFN as a major component of antiviral responses as well as in priming inflammatory responses, we aimed to characterize the induction of IFN-α release upon infection with IAV originating from various avian and mammalian species in a comparative way. In our porcine pDC model, we showed that the viral components triggering IFN responses related to the ability to hemagglutinate, although virosomes devoid of viral RNA were non-stimulatory. Heat-treatment at 65 °C but not chemical inactivation destroyed the ability of IAV to stimulate pDC. All IAV tested induced IFN-α but at different levels and showed different dose-dependencies. H5 and H7 subtypes, in particular H5N1, stimulated pDC at lower doses when compared to mammalian IAV. At high viral doses, IFN-α levels reached by some mammalian IAV surpassed those induced by avian isolates. Although sialic acid-dependent entry was demonstrated, the α-2,3 or α-2,6 binding specificity alone did not explain the differences observed. Furthermore, we were unable to identify a clear role of the hemagglutinin, as the IFN-a doses-response profiles did not clearly differ when viruses with all genes of identical avian origin but different HA were compared. This was found with IAV bearing an HA derived from either a low, a high pathogenic H5N1, or a human H3. Stimulation of pDC was associated with p

  5. Surveillance for Avian Influenza Viruses in Wild Birds in Denmark and Greenland, 2007–10

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjulsager, Charlotte Kristiane; Breum, Solvej Østergaard; Trebbien, Ramona;

    2012-01-01

    In Denmark and Greenland, extensive surveillance of avian influenza (AI) viruses in wild bird populations has been conducted from 2007 through 2010. In Denmark, the surveillance consisted of passive surveillance of wild birds found dead or sick across Denmark and active surveillance of apparently...... were birds that were found dead. In Greenland, samples were collected mainly from fecal droppings in breeding areas. Samples from 3555 live and apparently healthy wild birds were tested. All swab samples were tested by pan-influenza reverse transcriptase–PCR (RT-PCR), and the positive samples were...

  6. Detection of American lineage low pathogenic avian influenza viruses in Uria lomvia in Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjulsager, Charlotte Kristiane; Hartby, Christina Marie; Krog, Jesper Schak

    of Denmark. Five birds were randomly selected for diagnostic investigation and samples were taken from the cadavers (pooled oropharyngeal swabs, cloacal swabs, lung/trachea/heart tissues and liver/spleen/kidney tissues, and separate preparation of stomach from a single bird). Avian influenza virus (AIV...... screened for AIV in oropharyngeal and cloacal swab specimens from each bird by RT-PCR. American lineage H11N2 AIV was detected in both oropharyngeal and cloacal swabs from one bird, and American lineage low pathogenic AIV with subtype H5N1 was detected in the cloacal swab from another bird. The sparse...

  7. Systemic distribution of different low pathogenic avian influenza (LPAI viruses in chicken

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Post Jacob

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Since we were able to isolate viable virus from brain and lung of H7N1 low pathogenic avian influenza virus (LPAIV infected chickens, we here examined the distribution of different LPAIV strains in chickens by measuring the viral AI RNA load in multiple organs. Subtypes of H5 (H5N1, H5N2, H7 (H7N1, H7N7 and H9 (H9N2, of chicken (H5N2, H7N1, H7N7, H9N2, or mallard (H5N1 origin were tested. The actual presence of viable virus was evaluated with virus isolation in organs of H7N7 inoculated chickens. Findings Viral RNA was found by PCR in lung, brain, intestine, peripheral blood mononuclear cells, heart, liver, kidney and spleen from chickens infected with chicken isolated LPAIV H5N2, H7N1, H7N7 or H9N2. H7N7 virus could be isolated from lung, ileum, heart, liver, kidney and spleen, but not from brain, which was in agreement with the data from the PCR. Infection with mallard isolated H5N1 LPAIV resulted in viral RNA detection in lung and peripheral blood mononuclear cells only. Conclusion We speculate that chicken isolated LPAI viruses are spreading systemically in chicken, independently of the strain.

  8. Field Investigation on the Prevalence of Avian Influenza Virus Infection in Some Localities in Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah N. Alkhalaf

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to find out prevalence and types of avian influenza virus (AIV among broilers, native chickens, ducks and pigeons in Saudi Arabia. Field investigation was carried out in four localities including Al-Qassim, Hail, Al-Jouf and Northern Border regions. Serum sample, tracheal and cloacal swabs were collected from broilers (n=1561, layers (n=988, ducks (n=329 and pigeons (n=450 from these localities and tested for three different avian influenza viruses (H9, H5 and H3 using Enzyme linked immunosorbent (ELISA test, hamagglutination inhibition (HI test and polymerase chain reaction (PCR. All tested samples were negative for H5 and H3 viruses. In contrast, all positive results were found to be for H9 AI virus using PCR, ELISA and HI test. Chicken sera tested by ELISA for AIV revealed the highest positive samples in Northern Border regions (45.71%, followed by Al-Jouf (29.65%, Al-Qassim (23.98% and Hial (20.94% with non-significant difference (χ2=5.983; P=0.112. HI test carried out on duck sera revealed 35.90% prevalence of antibodies against AIV. PCR amplification resulted in 34.28 and 21.36% positive samples in ducks and chickens, respectively. The highest (45.71% PCR positive chicken samples were from Northern Border regions, followed by Al-Jouf (24.13%, Al-Qassim (19.30% and Hail (16.69% with significant difference (χ2=7.620; P=0.055. All tested pigeons samples were negative for the three virus serotypes included in the study.

  9. Evidence of genotypes 1 and 3 of avian hepatitis E virus in wild birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xinquan; Bilic, Ivana; Troxler, Salome; Hess, Michael

    2017-01-15

    Although the presence of four genotypes of avian hepatitis E virus (HEV) in chickens has been demonstrated, its natural host range is still barely known. In this study, swab samples from 626 wild birds originating from 62 bird species were investigated for HEV detection by molecular methods. The aim was to explore the cross-species infection of avian HEV and to compare the genetic diversity between strains infecting chicken and wild birds. In total, 8 positive samples from 4 different bird species (song thrush, little owl, feral pigeon and common buzzard) were identified and further confirmed by partial sequencing of ORF3. Based on a 237bp fragment of the capsid gene retrieved from 5 samples, phylogenetic analysis revealed the presence of avian HEV genotypes 1 and 3 in wild birds. The wild bird isolates shared 82.7-84.8% and 85.7-100% nucleotide sequence identity, respectively, to chicken isolates from the corresponding genotype. For two of the genotype 1 samples (14-2901 and 14-2906), from feral pigeons, genotype assignment could be also confirmed by phylogenetic analysis based on partial nucleotide sequence of the helicase gene. For the first time, the appearance of genotype 1 in Europe was detected, which together with close genetic relationship between HEVs present in chickens and wild birds indicates cross-species transmission.

  10. Evaluation of Nobuto filter paper strips for the detection of avian influenza virus antibody in waterfowl

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dusek, R.J.; Hall, J.S.; Nashold, S.W.; Teslaa, J.L.; Ip, H.S.

    2011-01-01

    The utility of using Nobuto paper strips for the detection of avian influenza antibodies was examined in mallards (Anas platyrhynchos) experimentally infected with low pathogenic avian influenza viruses. Blood was collected 2 wk after infection and was preserved either as serum or whole blood absorbed onto Nobuto strips. Analysis of samples using a commercially available blocking enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay revealed comparable results (???96% sensitivity for all methods) between sera stored at -30 C and the Nobuto strip preservation method even when the Nobuto strips were stored up to 3 mo at room temperature (RT). Significant differences were detected in the ratio of sample absorbance to negative control absorbance for Nobuto strips stored at RT compared with sera stored at -30 C, although these differences did not affect the ability of the test to reliably detect positive and negative samples. Nobuto strips are a convenient and sensitive alternative to the collection of serum samples when maintaining appropriate storage temperatures is difficult. ?? 2011 American Association of Avian Pathologists.

  11. Serosurveillance study on transmission of H5N1 virus during a 2006 avian influenza epidemic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceyhan, M; Yildirim, I; Ferraris, O; Bouscambert-Duchamp, M; Frobert, E; Uyar, N; Tezer, H; Oner, A F; Buzgan, T; Torunoglu, M A; Ozkan, B; Yilmaz, R; Kurtoglu, M G; Laleli, Y; Badur, S; Lina, B

    2010-09-01

    In 2006 an outbreak of avian influenza A(H5N1) in Turkey caused 12 human infections, including four deaths. We conducted a serological survey to determine the extent of subclinical infection caused by the outbreak. Single serum samples were collected from five individuals with avian influenza whose nasopharyngeal swabs tested positive for H5 RNA by polymerase chain reaction, 28 family contacts of the cases, 95 poultry cullers, 75 individuals known to have had contact with diseased chickens and 81 individuals living in the region with no known contact with infected chickens and/or patients. Paired serum samples were collected from 97 healthcare workers. All sera were tested for the presence of neutralizing antibodies by enzyme-linked immunoassay, haemagglutination inhibition and microneutralization assays. Only one serum sample, from a parent of an avian influenza patient, tested positive for H5N1 by microneutralization assay. This survey shows that there was minimal subclinical H5N1 infection among contacts of human cases and infected poultry in Turkey in 2006. Further, the low rate of subclinical infection following contact with diseased poultry gave further support to the reported low infectivity of the virus.

  12. Nucleic acid-based detection of influenza A virus subtypes H7 and N9 with a special emphasis on the avian H7N9 virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalthoff, D; Bogs, J; Harder, T; Grund, C; Pohlmann, A; Beer, M; Hoffmann, B

    2014-03-13

    In 2013, a novel influenza A virus of subtype H7N9 was transmitted from avian sources to humans in China, causing severe illness and substantial mortality. Rapid and sensitive diagnostic approaches are the basis of epidemiological studies and of utmost importance for the detection of infected humans and animals. We developed various quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-qPCR) assays for (i) the generic detection of the haemagglutinin (HA) gene of H7 viruses or the neuraminidase (NA) gene of N9 viruses, and (ii) the specific detection of HA and NA of the novel avian H7N9/2013 virus. The sensitivity of the newly developed assays was compared with previously published PCRs, and the specificity of all RT-qPCRs was examined using a panel of 42 different H7 and 16 different N9 isolates. Furthermore, we analysed the performance of the RT-qPCR assays with dilution series and diagnostic samples obtained from animal experiments. Our study provides a comprehensive set of RT-qPCR assays for the reliable detection of the novel avian H7N9 virus, with high sensitivity and improved and tailored specificity values compared with published assays. Finally, we also present data about the robustness of a duplex assay for the simultaneous detection of HA and NA of the avian influenza H7N9/2013 virus.

  13. Antecedent avian immunity limits tangential transmission of West Nile virus to humans.

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    Jennifer L Kwan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: West Nile virus (WNV is a mosquito-borne flavivirus maintained and amplified among birds and tangentially transmitted to humans and horses which may develop terminal neuroinvasive disease. Outbreaks typically have a three-year pattern of silent introduction, rapid amplification and subsidence, followed by intermittent recrudescence. Our hypothesis that amplification to outbreak levels is contingent upon antecedent seroprevalence within maintenance host populations was tested by tracking WNV transmission in Los Angeles, California from 2003 through 2011. METHODS: Prevalence of antibodies against WNV was monitored weekly in House Finches and House Sparrows. Tangential or spillover transmission was measured by seroconversions in sentinel chickens and by the number of West Nile neuroinvasive disease (WNND cases reported to the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health. RESULTS: Elevated seroprevalence in these avian populations was associated with the subsidence of outbreaks and in the antecedent dampening of amplification during succeeding years. Dilution of seroprevalence by recruitment resulted in the progressive loss of herd immunity following the 2004 outbreak, leading to recrudescence during 2008 and 2011. WNV appeared to be a significant cause of death in these avian species, because the survivorship of antibody positive birds significantly exceeded that of antibody negative birds. Cross-correlation analysis showed that seroprevalence was negatively correlated prior to the onset of human cases and then positively correlated, peaking at 4-6 weeks after the onset of tangential transmission. Antecedent seroprevalence during winter (Jan - Mar was negatively correlated with the number of WNND cases during the succeeding summer (Jul-Sep. CONCLUSIONS: Herd immunity levels within after hatching year avian maintenance host populations <10% during the antecedent late winter and spring period were followed on three occasions by

  14. PATHOLOGICAL AND VIRALOGICAL ANALYSIS OF A FIBROSARCOMA CASE INDUCED BY AVIAN LEUCOSIS VIRUS SUBGROUP A%一例A亚型禽白血病病毒引起的纤维肉瘤的病理学和病毒学分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王鑫; 齐鹏飞; 杜艳; 王丽; 李传龙; 李德庆; 赵鹏; 崔治中

    2011-01-01

    将禽白血病A亚型(Avian leukosis virus subgroup A,ALV-A)SDAU09C3毒株人工感染SPF引起的肾脏和肝脏纤维细胞样肉瘤进行病理组织学观察,同时检测是否有其它肿瘤相关病毒感染,另外,应用PCR扩增病毒囊膜蛋白gp85基因,并对其基因编码的氨基酸序列与原攻毒株比较分析.结果显示,SDAU09C3毒株引起的肿瘤,主要为纤维细胞肉瘤,胶原纤维较少,细胞及纤维排列极不规则.病毒学检测证明发病鸡只存在ALV-A的感染,而ALV-J、马立克氏病病毒(Marek's disease virus,MDV)、网状内皮增生症病毒(Reticuloendotheliosis virus,REV)均为阴性.所分离的ALV-A病毒的囊膜蛋白gp85基因编码的氨基酸序列与原攻毒株同源性为99.5%.

  15. The Avian Encephalomyelitis Virus (AEV 5’ Untranslated Region Contains an IRES with Similarity to the Hepatitis C Virus IRES

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    M Bakhshesh

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Cap-independent internal initiation of protein synthesis has been shown to occur on a number of viral and cellular mRNAs. Initiation of protein synthesis is directed by an internal ribosome entry site (IRES element within the 5’ untranslated region (UTR of the mRNA. Avian encephalomyelitis virus (AEV belongs to the picornavirus family and shares protein sequence similarity with hepatitis A virus (HAV. Because of this, it was assigned to the hepatovirus genus. We have demonstrated that the 494 nucleotide 5’ UTR of this virus genome contains an internal ribosome entry site (IRES element. However, in contrast to the HAV IRES, the AEV IRES functions efficiently in the presence of cleaved eIF4G, suggesting functional differences exist. Furthermore, comparison of the AEV IRES sequence with that of the hepatitis C virus (HCV IRES revealed areas of striking similarity, especially in the region of the ribosome binding site. The AEV IRES is thus very similar to the recently described IRES from the picornavirus porcine teschovirus; this IRES also shows similarity to the HCV IRES. These results suggest that these viruses may have exchanged sequences during evolution.

  16. Phylogenetic and pathogenic analyses of avian influenza A H5N1 viruses isolated from poultry in Vietnam.

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    Dongming Zhao

    Full Text Available Despite great efforts to control the infection of poultry with H5N1 viruses, these pathogens continue to evolve and spread in nature, threatening public health. Elucidating the characteristics of H5N1 avian influenza virus will benefit disease control and pandemic preparation. Here, we sequenced the genomes of 15 H5N1 avian influenza viruses isolated in Vietnam in 2006 and 2007 and performed phylogenetic analyses to compare these sequences with those of other viruses available in the public databases. Molecular characterization of the H5N1 viruses revealed that seven genetically distinct clades of H5N1 viruses have appeared in Vietnam. Clade 2.3.4 viruses existed in Vietnam as early as 2005. Fifteen viruses isolated during 2006 and 2007 belonged to clade 1 and clade 2.3.4, and were divided into five genotypes. Reassortants between the clade 1 and clade 2.3.4 viruses were detected in both North and South Vietnam. We also assessed the replication and pathogenicity of these viruses in mice and found that these isolates replicated efficiently and exhibited distinct virulence in mice. Our results provide important information regarding the diversity of H5N1 viruses in nature.

  17. Dinamika Seroprevalensi Virus Avian Influenza H5 pada Itik di Pasar Unggas Beringkit dan Galiran

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    I Gusti Ngurah Narendra Putra

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE Live Bird Market (LBM has a high potential for spreading Avian Influenza Virus (AIV between fowls or from fowl to human. Up to now, a dinamic of avian flue incidents at many LBMs in Bali has not been reported. This research aimed to reveal a dynamic of seroprevalences of avian influenza in ducks at Beringkit (Badung and Galiran (Kelungkung LBMs. A total of 35 duck blood samples was collected from each of LBMs. Sampling was conducted monthly from March to August, 2012 . AIV antibody of duck serum was measured using Rapid Hemagglutination Inhibition (Rapid HI test. Seroprevalence differences were analyzes with Chi-square (?2 Nonparametric statistical test. The results showed that seroprevalences of AIV H5 in ducks at Beringkit and Galiran LBMs were very high, ranged from 68.6% to 100% and 65.7% to 97.1% respectively. A Dynamic of AIV H5 seroprevalences in ducks at Beringkit and Galiran LBM had a similar pattern, except in July 2012. This indicates that VAI H5 has been circulating for a long time and has been to be an endemic virus infection in ducks at LBMs in Bali. It can be suggested that an Avian Influenza Virus monitoring should be done continuously over a long period. /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; text-align:justify; line-height:150%; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin;}

  18. Prospective study of avian influenza virus infections among rural Thai villagers.

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    Whitney S Krueger

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In 2008, 800 rural Thai adults living within Kamphaeng Phet Province were enrolled in a prospective cohort study of zoonotic influenza transmission. Serological analyses of enrollment sera suggested this cohort had experienced subclinical avian influenza virus (AIV infections with H9N2 and H5N1 viruses. METHODS: After enrollment, participants were contacted weekly for 24 mos for acute influenza-like illnesses (ILI. Cohort members confirmed to have influenza A infections were enrolled with their household contacts in a family transmission study involving paired sera and respiratory swab collections. Cohort members also provided sera at 12 and 24 months after enrollment. Serologic and real-time RT-PCR assays were performed against avian, swine, and human influenza viruses. RESULTS: Over the 2 yrs of follow-up, 81 ILI investigations in the cohort were conducted; 31 (38% were identified as influenza A infections by qRT-PCR. Eighty-three household contacts were enrolled; 12 (14% reported ILIs, and 11 (92% of those were identified as influenza infections. A number of subjects were found to have slightly elevated antibodies against avian-like A/Hong Kong/1073/1999(H9N2 virus: 21 subjects (2.7% at 12-months and 40 subjects (5.1% at 24-months. Among these, two largely asymptomatic acute infections with H9N2 virus were detected by >4-fold increases in annual serologic titers (final titers 1:80. While controlling for age and influenza vaccine receipt, moderate poultry exposure was significantly associated with elevated H9N2 titers (adjusted OR = 2.3; 95% CI, 1.04-5.2 at the 24-month encounter. One subject had an elevated titer (1:20 against H5N1 during follow-up. CONCLUSIONS: From 2008-10, evidence for AIV infections was sparse among this rural population. Subclinical H9N2 AIV infections likely occurred, but serological results were confounded by antibody cross-reactions. There is a critical need for improved serological diagnostics to more

  19. Antibodies against avian-like A (H1N1) swine influenza virus among swine farm residents in eastern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Xiuchen; Yin, Xin; Rao, Baizhong; Xie, Chunfang; Zhang, Pengchao; Qi, Xian; Wei, Ping; Liu, Huili

    2014-04-01

    In 2007, the avian-like H1N1 virus (A/swine/Zhejiang/1/07) was first isolated in pigs in China. Recently, it was reported that a 3-year-old boy was infected with avian-like A (H1N1) swine influenza virus (SIV) in Jiangsu Province, China. To investigate the prevalence of avian-like A (H1N1) SIV infection among swine farm residents in eastern China, an active influenza surveillance program was conducted on swine farms in this region from May 21, 2010 through April 22, 2012. A total of 1,162 participants were enrolled, including 1,136 persons from 48 pig farms, as well as 26 pig farm veterinarians. A total of 10.7% and 7.8% swine farm residents were positive for antibodies against avian-like A (H1N1) SIV by HI and NT assay, respectively, using 40 as the cut-off antibody titer. Meanwhile, all the serum samples collected from a control of healthy city residents were negative against avian-like A (H1N1) SIV. As the difference in numbers of antibody positive samples between the swine farm residents and health city residents controls was statistically significant (P = 0.002), these data suggest that occupational exposure to pigs may increase swine farm residents' and veterinarians' risk of avian-like A (H1N1) SIV infection in eastern China. This study provides the first data on avian-like A (H1N1) SIV infections in humans in China; the potential for avian-like A (H1N1) SIV entering the human population should also be taken into consideration.

  20. Avian influenza virus (H11N9 in migratory shorebirds wintering in the Amazon Region, Brazil.

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    Jansen de Araujo

    Full Text Available Aquatic birds are the natural reservoir for avian influenza viruses (AIV. Habitats in Brazil provide stopover and wintering sites for water birds that migrate between North and South America. The current study was conducted to elucidate the possibility of the transport of influenza A viruses by birds that migrate annually between the Northern and Southern Hemispheres. In total, 556 orotracheal/cloacal swab samples were collected for influenza A virus screening using real-time RT-PCR (rRT-PCR. The influenza A virus-positive samples were subjected to viral isolation. Four samples were positive for the influenza A matrix gene by rRT-PCR. From these samples, three viruses were isolated, sequenced and characterized. All positive samples originated from a single bird species, the ruddy turnstone (Arenaria interpres, that was caught in the Amazon region at Caeté Bay, Northeast Pará, at Ilha de Canelas. To our knowledge, this is the first isolation of H11N9 in the ruddy turnstone in South America.

  1. Avian influenza H5N1 virus infections in vaccinated commercial and backyard poultry in Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafez, M H; Arafa, A; Abdelwhab, E M; Selim, A; Khoulosy, S G; Hassan, M K; Aly, M M

    2010-08-01

    In this paper, we describe results from a high-pathogenic H5N1 avian influenza virus (AIV) surveillance program in previously H5-vaccinated commercial and family-backyard poultry flocks that was conducted from 2007 to 2008 by the Egyptian National Laboratory for Veterinary Quality Control on Poultry Production. The real-time reverse transcription PCR assay was used to detect the influenza A virus matrix gene and detection of the H5 and N1 subtypes was accomplished using a commercially available kit real-time reverse transcription PCR assay. The virus was detected in 35/3,610 (0.97%) and 27/8,682 (0.31%) of examined commercial poultry farms and 246/816 (30%) and 89/1,723 (5.2%) of backyard flocks in 2007 and 2008, respectively. Positive flocks were identified throughout the year, with the highest frequencies occurring during the winter months. Anti-H5 serum antibody titers in selected commercial poultry ranged from poultry in Egypt to combat H5N1 AIV, continuous circulation of the virus in vaccinated commercial and backyard poultry was reported and the efficacy of the vaccination using a challenge model with the current circulating field virus should be revised.

  2. North Atlantic migratory bird flyways provide routes for intercontinental movement of avian influenza viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dusek, Robert J.; Hallgrimsson, Gunnar T.; Ip, Hon S.; Jónsson, Jón E.; Sreevatsan, Srinand; Nashold, Sean W.; TeSlaa, Joshua L.; Enomoto, Shinichiro; Halpin, Rebecca A.; Lin, Xudong; Federova, Nadia; Stockwell, Timothy B.; Dugan, Vivien G.; Wentworth, David E.; Hall, Jeffrey S.

    2014-01-01

    Avian influenza virus (AIV) in wild birds has been of increasing interest over the last decade due to the emergence of AIVs that cause significant disease and mortality in both poultry and humans. While research clearly demonstrates that AIVs can move across the Pacific or Atlantic Ocean, there has been no data to support the mechanism of how this occurs. In spring and autumn of 2010 and autumn of 2011 we obtained cloacal swab samples from 1078 waterfowl, gulls, and shorebirds of various species in southwest and west Iceland and tested them for AIV. From these, we isolated and fully sequenced the genomes of 29 AIVs from wild caught gulls (Charadriiformes) and waterfowl (Anseriformes) in Iceland. We detected viruses that were entirely (8 of 8 genomic segments) of American lineage, viruses that were entirely of Eurasian lineage, and viruses with mixed American-Eurasian lineage. Prior to this work only 2 AIVs had been reported from wild birds in Iceland and only the sequence from one segment was available in GenBank. This is the first report of finding AIVs of entirely American lineage and Eurasian lineage, as well as reassortant viruses, together in the same geographic location. Our study demonstrates the importance of the North Atlantic as a corridor for the movement of AIVs between Europe and North America.

  3. PRODUKSI KOLOSTRUM ANTIVIRUS AVIAN INFLUENZA DALAM RANGKA PENGENDALIAN INFEKSI VIRUS FLU BURUNG

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    A. Esfandari

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available This experiment was conducted to study the prospect of bovine colostrum utilization to produce specific antibody as passive immunotherapy against avian influenza. Pregnant Frisian Holstein cows were injected with commercial killed Avian Influenza (AI vaccine given double doses subcutaneously three times every two weeks. Prior to vaccination, the cows were given immunomodulator 0.1 mg.kg-1 BW administered orally for three days. The animals then were injected by inactive H5N1 antigent without adjuvant intravenously to meet the dose of 104 HAU. Blood samples were collected to detect anti AI antibody using Enzyme Linked Jmmunosorbent Assay technique. Colostral samples were analysed to detect antibody against AI using Haemagglutination Inhibition technique. IgG stabilities were tested against enzyme, pH, and spray dried prosessing with inlet dan outlet temperature of 1400C and 520C.repectively. The colostral lgG efficacy on neutralizing H5N1 virus activity was determined in vitro (by using Serum Neutralization Test and protective titer measurement and in ovo (challenge test by using Embryonic Chicken Egg. The result indicated that serum antibody against H5N1 was detected one week after the second vaccination. Titer of colostral antibody against H5N1 was high (28 . Biological activity of colostral IgG remain stable at pH 5-7 and after spraying-drying prosessing, but decreased after treatment by trypsin and pepsin enzymes. The neutralization test showed that the fresh and spray dried colostral IgG against H5N1 were able to neutralize 107 EID50 AI virus H5N1 with neutralization index of 1.1 and 1.0, respectively. In conclusion, pregnant Frisian Holstein cows injected with commercial killed Avian Influenza (AI vaccine were able to produce colostral lgG against AI H5Nl

  4. The Genomic Contributions of Avian H1N1 Influenza A Viruses to the Evolution of Mammalian Strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koçer, Zeynep A; Carter, Robert; Wu, Gang; Zhang, Jinghui; Webster, Robert G

    2015-01-01

    Among the influenza A viruses (IAVs) in wild aquatic birds, only H1, H2, and H3 subtypes have caused epidemics in humans. H1N1 viruses of avian origin have also caused 3 of 5 pandemics. To understand the reappearance of H1N1 in the context of pandemic emergence, we investigated whether avian H1N1 IAVs have contributed to the evolution of human, swine, and 2009 pandemic H1N1 IAVs. On the basis of phylogenetic analysis, we concluded that the polymerase gene segments (especially PB2 and PA) circulating in North American avian H1N1 IAVs have been reintroduced to swine multiple times, resulting in different lineages that led to the emergence of the 2009 pandemic H1N1 IAVs. Moreover, the similar topologies of hemagglutinin and nucleoprotein and neuraminidase and matrix gene segments suggest that each surface glycoprotein coevolved with an internal gene segment within the H1N1 subtype. The genotype of avian H1N1 IAVs of Charadriiformes origin isolated in 2009 differs from that of avian H1N1 IAVs of Anseriformes origin. When the antigenic sites in the hemagglutinin of all 31 North American avian H1N1 IAVs were considered, 60%-80% of the amino acids at the antigenic sites were identical to those in 1918 and/or 2009 pandemic H1N1 viruses. Thus, although the pathogenicity of avian H1N1 IAVs could not be inferred from the phylogeny due to the small dataset, the evolutionary process within the H1N1 IAV subtype suggests that the circulation of H1N1 IAVs in wild birds poses a continuous threat for future influenza pandemics in humans.

  5. Epitope mapping of neutralizing monoclonal antibody in avian influenza A H5N1 virus hemagglutinin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohkura, Takashi; Kikuchi, Yuji; Kono, Naoko; Itamura, Shigeyuki; Komase, Katsuhiro; Momose, Fumitaka; Morikawa, Yuko

    2012-02-03

    The global spread of highly pathogenic avian influenza A H5N1 viruses raises concerns about more widespread infection in the human population. Pre-pandemic vaccine for H5N1 clade 1 influenza viruses has been produced from the A/Viet Nam/1194/2004 strain (VN1194), but recent prevalent avian H5N1 viruses have been categorized into the clade 2 strains, which are antigenically distinct from the pre-pandemic vaccine. To understand the antigenicity of H5N1 hemagglutinin (HA), we produced a neutralizing monoclonal antibody (mAb12-1G6) using the pre-pandemic vaccine. Analysis with chimeric and point mutant HAs revealed that mAb12-1G6 bound to the loop (amino acid positions 140-145) corresponding to an antigenic site A in the H3 HA. mAb12-1G6 failed to bind to the mutant VN1194 HA when only 3 residues were substituted with the corresponding residues of the clade 2.1.3.2 A/Indonesia/5/05 strain (amino acid substitutions at positions Q142L, K144S, and S145P), suggesting that these amino acids are critical for binding of mAb12-1G6. Escape mutants of VN1194 selected with mAb12-1G6 carried a S145P mutation. Interestingly, mAb12-1G6 cross-neutralized clade 1 and clade 2.2.1 but not clade 2.1.3.2 or clade 2.3.4 of the H5N1 virus. We discuss the cross-reactivity, based on the amino acid sequence of the epitope.

  6. Genetic structure of avian influenza viruses from ducks of the Atlantic flyway of North America.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanyan Huang

    Full Text Available Wild birds, including waterfowl such as ducks, are reservoir hosts of influenza A viruses. Despite the increased number of avian influenza virus (AIV genome sequences available, our understanding of AIV genetic structure and transmission through space and time in waterfowl in North America is still limited. In particular, AIVs in ducks of the Atlantic flyway of North America have not been thoroughly investigated. To begin to address this gap, we analyzed 109 AIV genome sequences from ducks in the Atlantic flyway to determine their genetic structure and to document the extent of gene flow in the context of sequences from other locations and other avian and mammalian host groups. The analyses included 25 AIVs from ducks from Newfoundland, Canada, from 2008-2011 and 84 available reference duck AIVs from the Atlantic flyway from 2006-2011. A vast diversity of viral genes and genomes was identified in the 109 viruses. The genetic structure differed amongst the 8 viral segments with predominant single lineages found for the PB2, PB1 and M segments, increased diversity found for the PA, NP and NS segments (2, 3 and 3 lineages, respectively, and the highest diversity found for the HA and NA segments (12 and 9 lineages, respectively. Identification of inter-hemispheric transmissions was rare with only 2% of the genes of Eurasian origin. Virus transmission between ducks and other bird groups was investigated, with 57.3% of the genes having highly similar (≥99% nucleotide identity genes detected in birds other than ducks. Transmission between North American flyways has been frequent and 75.8% of the genes were highly similar to genes found in other North American flyways. However, the duck AIV genes did display spatial distribution bias, which was demonstrated by the different population sizes of specific viral genes in one or two neighbouring flyways compared to more distant flyways.

  7. Clinical manifestations of bovine leukosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sorensen, D.K.

    1979-01-01

    The diagnosis of animals infected with BLV can be accurately identified with the available serologic tests. Diagnosis of animals in the incipient stage of leukosis is extremely difficult and can only be diagnosed by a positive tissue biopsy. Animals with frank tumor involvement can be suspected and diagnosed on a tentative clinical basis on the signs reported. Positive diagnosis must be made on the basis of a biopsy of the tumor or in some cases on a hemotological examination.

  8. Serum thymidine kinase activity as a useful marker for bovine leukosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamoto, Leo; Ohbayashi, Tetsu; Matsumoto, Kotaro; Kobayashi, Yoshiyasu; Inokuma, Hisashi

    2009-11-01

    Serum thymidine kinase (TK) activity has recently been evaluated as a serum marker for human and canine hematopoietic neoplasms. The purpose of the current study was to establish the significance of serum TK activity in the diagnosis of bovine leukosis. The discrimination value for TK activity was set at 5.4 U/l based on the receiver operating characteristic curve. In the group of clinically healthy cows, only 2 out of 83 cows (2.4%) had serum TK activity above the discrimination value. In contrast, 19 out of 20 cows (95.0%) with bovine leukosis showed serum TK activity above the discrimination value, although only 7 of 79 (8.9%) cows diagnosed with diseases other than bovine leukosis showed elevated serum TK activity. Thymidine kinase activities of all Bovine leukemia virus-positive cows with or without lymphocytosis were below the discrimination value. Sensitivity and specificity of measuring serum TK activity as a diagnostic tool for bovine leukosis was 95.0% and 95.9%, respectively. Results indicate that serum TK activity may be a marker for bovine leukosis.

  9. Rapid detection of avian influenza virus in chicken fecal samples by immunomagnetic capture reverse transcriptase–polymerase chain reaction assay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dhumpa, Raghuram; Handberg, Kurt; Jørgensen, Poul Henrik;

    2011-01-01

    Avian influenza virus (AIV) causes great economic losses for the poultry industry worldwide and threatens the human population with a pandemic. The conventional detection method for AIV involves sample preparation of viral RNA extraction and purification from raw sample such as bird droppings. In...

  10. Comparative Pathogenesis of an Avian H5N2 and a Swine H1N1 Influenza Virus in Pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Vleeschauwer, Annebel; Atanasova, Kalina; Van Borm, Steven

    2009-01-01

    Pigs are considered intermediate hosts for the transmission of avian influenza viruses (AIVs) to humans but the basic organ pathogenesis of AIVs in pigs has been barely studied. We have used 42 four-week-old influenza naive pigs and two different inoculation routes (intranasal and intratracheal) ...

  11. Highly pathogenic avian influenza A (H5N1) virus in wildlife: diagnostics, epidemiology and molecular characteristics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keawcharoen, J.

    2010-01-01

    Since 2003, highly pathogenic avian influenza virus subtype H5N1 outbreaks have been reported in Southeast Asia causing high mortality in poultry and have also been found to cross the species barrier infecting human and other mammalian species. Thailand is one of the countries severely affected by t

  12. Characterization of cytokine expression induced by avian influenza virus infection with real-time RT-PCR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowledge of how birds react to infection from avian influenza virus is critical to understanding disease pathogenesis and host response. The use of real-time (R), reverse-transcriptase (RT), PCR to measure innate immunity, including cytokine and interferon gene expression, has become a standard tec...

  13. Historical Prevalence and Distribution of Avian Influenza Virus A(H7N9) among Wild Birds

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2013-12-19

    Dr. Mike Miller reads an abridged version of the Emerging Infectious Diseases’ dispatch, Historical Prevalence and Distribution of Avian Influenza Virus A(H7N9) among Wild Birds.  Created: 12/19/2013 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 12/24/2013.

  14. Surveillance for highly pathogenic avian influenza virus in wild birds during outbreaks in domestic poultry, Minnesota, 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennelle, Christopher S.; Carstensen, Michelle; Hildebrand, Erik C.; Cornicelli, Louis; Wolf, Paul C.; Grear, Daniel; Ip, Hon S.; VanDalen, Kaci K.; Minicucci, Larissa A.

    2016-01-01

    In 2015, a major outbreak of highly pathogenic avian influenza virus (HPAIV) infection devastated poultry facilities in Minnesota, USA. To clarify the role of wild birds, we tested 3,139 waterfowl fecal samples and 104 sick and dead birds during March 9–June 4, 2015. HPAIV was isolated from a Cooper’s hawk but not from waterfowl.

  15. Cloning and Expression of Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza Virus Full-Length Nonstructural Gene in Pichia pastoris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. B. Abubakar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Avian influenza (AI is a highly contagious and rapidly evolving pathogen of major concern to the poultry industry and human health. Rapid and accurate detection of avian influenza virus is a necessary tool for control of outbreaks and surveillance. The AI virus A/Chicken/Malaysia/5858/2004 (H5N1 was used as a template to produce DNA clones of the full-length NS1 genes via reverse transcriptase synthesis of cDNA by PCR amplification of the NS1 region. Products were cloned into pCR2.0 TOPO TA plasmid and subsequently subcloned into pPICZαA vector to construct a recombinant plasmid. Recombinant plasmid designated as pPICZαA-NS1 gene was confirmed by PCR colony screening, restriction enzyme digestion, and nucleotide sequence analysis. The recombinant plasmid was transformed into Pichia pastoris GS115 strain by electroporation, and expressed protein was identified by SDS-PAGE and western blotting. A recombinant protein of approximately ~28 kDa was produced. The expressed protein was able to bind a rabbit polyclonal antibody of nonstructural protein (NS1 avian influenza virus H5N1. The result of the western blotting and solid-phase ELISA assay using H5N1 antibody indicated that the recombinant protein produced retained its antigenicity. This further indicates that Pichia pastoris could be an efficient expression system for a avian influenza virus nonstructural (NS1.

  16. Induction of respiratory immune responses in the chicken; implications for development of mucosal avian influenza virus vaccines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geus, de E.D.; Rebel, J.M.J.; Vervelde, L.

    2012-01-01

    The risk and the size of an outbreak of avian influenza virus (AIV) could be restricted by vaccination of poultry. A vaccine used for rapid intervention during an AIV outbreak should be safe, highly effective after a single administration and suitable for mass application. In the case of AIV, aeroso

  17. Distribution patterns of influenza virus receptors and viral attachment patterns in the respiratory and intestinal tracts of seven avian species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Costa Taiana

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This study assessed the presence of sialic acid α-2,3 and α-2,6 linked glycan receptors in seven avian species. The respiratory and intestinal tracts of the chicken, common quail, red-legged partridge, turkey, golden pheasant, ostrich, and mallard were tested by means of lectin histochemistry, using the lectins Maackia amurensis agglutinin II and Sambucus nigra agglutinin, which show affinity for α-2,3 and α-2,6 receptors, respectively. Additionally, the pattern of virus attachment (PVA was evaluated with virus histochemistry, using an avian-origin H4N5 virus and a human-origin seasonal H1N1 virus. There was a great variation of receptor distribution among the tissues and avian species studied. Both α-2,3 and α-2,6 receptors were present in the respiratory and intestinal tracts of the chicken, common quail, red-legged partridge, turkey, and golden pheasant. In ostriches, the expression of the receptor was basically restricted to α-2,3 in both the respiratory and intestinal tracts and in mallards the α-2,6 receptors were absent from the intestinal tract. The results obtained with the lectin histochemistry were, in general, in agreement with the PVA. The differential expression and distribution of α-2,3 and α-2,6 receptors among various avian species might reflect a potentially decisive factor in the emergence of new viral strains.

  18. Avian Influenza A(H7N9) Virus Infection in 2 Travelers Returning from China to Canada, January 20151

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, Catharine; Gustafson, Reka; Purych, Dale B.; Tang, Patrick; Bastien, Nathalie; Krajden, Mel; Li, Yan

    2016-01-01

    In January 2015, British Columbia, Canada, reported avian influenza A(H7N9) virus infection in 2 travelers returning from China who sought outpatient care for typical influenza-like illness. There was no further spread, but serosurvey findings showed broad population susceptibility to H7N9 virus. Travel history and timely notification are critical to emerging pathogen detection and response. PMID:26689320

  19. Full-genome analysis of avian influenza A(H5N1) virus from a human, North America, 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pabbaraju, Kanti; Tellier, Raymond; Wong, Sallene; Li, Yan; Bastien, Nathalie; Tang, Julian W; Drews, Steven J; Jang, Yunho; Davis, C Todd; Fonseca, Kevin; Tipples, Graham A

    2014-05-01

    Full-genome analysis was conducted on the first isolate of a highly pathogenic avian influenza A(H5N1) virus from a human in North America. The virus has a hemagglutinin gene of clade 2.3.2.1c and is a reassortant with an H9N2 subtype lineage polymerase basic 2 gene. No mutations conferring resistance to adamantanes or neuraminidase inhibitors were found.

  20. Comprehensive mapping of common immunodominant epitopes in the West Nile virus nonstructural protein 1 recognized by avian antibody responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Encheng Sun

    Full Text Available West Nile virus (WNV is a mosquito-borne flavivirus that primarily infects birds but occasionally infects humans and horses. Certain species of birds, including crows, house sparrows, geese, blue jays and ravens, are considered highly susceptible hosts to WNV. The nonstructural protein 1 (NS1 of WNV can elicit protective immune responses, including NS1-reactive antibodies, during infection of animals. The antigenicity of NS1 suggests that NS1-reactive antibodies could provide a basis for serological diagnostic reagents. To further define serological reagents for diagnostic use, the antigenic sites in NS1 that are targeted by host immune responses need to be identified and the potential diagnostic value of individual antigenic sites also needs to be defined. The present study describes comprehensive mapping of common immunodominant linear B-cell epitopes in the WNV NS1 using avian WNV NS1 antisera. We screened antisera from chickens, ducks and geese immunized with purified NS1 for reactivity against 35 partially overlapping peptides covering the entire WNV NS1. This study identified twelve, nine and six peptide epitopes recognized by chicken, duck and goose antibody responses, respectively. Three epitopes (NS1-3, 14 and 24 were recognized by antibodies elicited by immunization in all three avian species tested. We also found that NS1-3 and 24 were WNV-specific epitopes, whereas the NS1-14 epitope was conserved among the Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV serocomplex viruses based on the reactivity of avian WNV NS1 antisera against polypeptides derived from the NS1 sequences of viruses of the JEV serocomplex. Further analysis showed that the three common polypeptide epitopes were not recognized by antibodies in Avian Influenza Virus (AIV, Newcastle Disease Virus (NDV, Duck Plague Virus (DPV and Goose Parvovirus (GPV antisera. The knowledge and reagents generated in this study have potential applications in differential diagnostic approaches and