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Sample records for avian intestinal response

  1. The Bacterial Species Campylobacter jejuni Induce Diverse Innate Immune Responses in Human and Avian Intestinal Epithelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel A. John

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Campylobacter remain the major cause of human gastroenteritis in the Developed World causing a significant burden to health services. Campylobacter are pathogens in humans and chickens, although differences in mechanistic understanding are incomplete, in part because phenotypic strain diversity creates inconsistent findings. Here, we took Campylobacter jejuni isolates (n = 100 from multi-locus sequence typed collections to assess their pathogenic diversity, through their inflammatory, cytotoxicity, adhesion, invasion and signaling responses in a high-throughput model using avian and human intestinal epithelial cells. C. jejuni induced IL-8 and CXCLi1/2 in human and avian epithelial cells, respectively, in a MAP kinase-dependent manner. In contrast, IL-10 responses in both cell types were PI 3-kinase/Akt-dependent. C. jejuni strains showed diverse levels of invasion with high invasion dependent on MAP kinase signaling in both cell lines. C. jejuni induced diverse cytotoxic responses in both cell lines with cdt-positive isolates showing significantly higher toxicity. Blockade of endocytic pathways suggested that invasion by C. jejuni was clathrin- and dynamin-dependent but caveolae- independent in both cells. In contrast, IL-8 (and CXCLi1/2 production was dependent on clathrin, dynamin, and caveolae. This study is important because of its scale, and the data produced, suggesting that avian and human epithelial cells use similar innate immune pathways where the magnitude of the response is determined by the phenotypic diversity of the Campylobacter species.

  2. Innate immune gene expression differentiates the early avian intestinal response between Salmonella and Campylobacter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaughnessy, Ronan G; Meade, Kieran G; Cahalane, Sarah; Allan, Brenda; Reiman, Carla; Callanan, John J; O'Farrelly, Cliona

    2009-12-15

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium and Campylobacter jejuni are major human pathogens, yet colonise chickens without causing pathology. The aim of this study was to compare intestinal innate immune responses to both bacterial species, in a 4-week-old broiler chicken model. Challenged and control birds were sacrificed and tissue samples taken for histopathology and RNA extraction. No significant clinical or pathological changes were observed in response to infection with either bacterial species. Expression of selected genes involved in pathogen detection and the innate immune response were profiled in caecal tissues by quantitative real-time PCR. TLR4 and TLR21 gene expression was transiently increased in response to both bacterial species (Pimmune genes in both infection models shed light on the tailored responses of the host immune system to specific microbes. It is further evidence that innate regulation of these responses is an important prerequisite to preventing development of disease.

  3. Brachyspira pilosicoli-induced avian intestinal spirochaetosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline I. Le Roy

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Avian intestinal spirochaetosis (AIS is a common disease occurring in poultry that can be caused by Brachyspira pilosicoli, a Gram-negative bacterium of the order Spirochaetes. During AIS, this opportunistic pathogen colonises the lower gastrointestinal (GI tract of poultry (principally, the ileum, caeca, and colon, which can cause symptoms such as diarrhoea, reduced growth rate, and reduced egg production and quality. Due to the large increase of bacterial resistance to antibiotic treatment, the European Union banned in 2006 the prophylactic use of antibiotics as growth promoters in livestock. Consequently, the number of outbreaks of AIS has dramatically increased in the UK resulting in significant economic losses. This review summarises the current knowledge about AIS infection caused by B. pilosicoli and discusses various treatments and prevention strategies to control AIS.

  4. Systemic Virus distribution and host responses in brain and intestine of chickens infected with low pathogenic and high pathogenic avian influenza virus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Post, J.; Burt, D.W.; Cornelissen, J.B.W.J.; Broks, V.C.M.; Zoelen, van D.; Peeters, B.P.H.; Rebel, J.M.J.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Avian influenza virus (AIV) is classified into two pathotypes, low pathogenic (LP) and high pathogenic ( HP), based on virulence in chickens. Differences in pathogenicity between HPAIV and LPAIV might eventually be related to specific characteristics of strains, tissue tropism and host r

  5. Effects of crude oil ingestion on avian intestinal function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eastin, W.C.; Murray, H.C.

    1981-01-01

    Intestinal function in mallard ducklings (Anas platyrhynchos) on a freshwater regime was studied after a 7-day dietary ingestion of 0.25% and 2.5% Prudhoe Bay crude oil (PBCO) or a 2.5% paraffin mixture with an in vivo luminal perfusion technique. Dietary ingestion of 2.5% PBCO may have an effect on the integrity of the duckling intestine. There were no significant effects of PBCO on the absorption of Na, Cl, K, or H2O compared with control animals. The ducklings fed 2.5% paraffin had a significant depression in Na and H2O absorption compared with controls. However, this depression dose not seem to be related to an effect on intestinal mucosa Na-K-ATPase activity.

  6. Marked endotheliotropism of highly pathogenic avian influenza virus H5N1 following intestinal inoculation in cats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.A. Reperant (Leslie); M.W.G. van de Bildt (Marco); G. van Amerongen (Geert); L.M.E. Leijten (Lonneke); S. Watson (Sarah)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractHighly pathogenic avian influenza virus (HPAIV) H5N1 can infect mammals via the intestine; this is unusual since influenza viruses typically infect mammals via the respiratory tract. The dissemination of HPAIV H5N1 following intestinal entry and associated pathogenesis are largely unknow

  7. Marked endotheliotropism of highly pathogenic avian influenza virus H5N1 following intestinal inoculation in cats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reperant, Leslie A; van de Bildt, Marco W G; van Amerongen, Geert; Leijten, Lonneke M E; Watson, Simon; Palser, Anne; Kellam, Paul; Eissens, Anko C; Frijlink, Hendrik W; Osterhaus, Albert D M E; Kuiken, Thijs; Frijlink, Henderik

    2012-01-01

    Highly pathogenic avian influenza virus (HPAIV) H5N1 can infect mammals via the intestine; this is unusual since influenza viruses typically infect mammals via the respiratory tract. The dissemination of HPAIV H5N1 following intestinal entry and associated pathogenesis are largely unknown. To assess

  8. Marked endotheliotropism of highly pathogenic avian influenza virus H5N1 following intestinal inoculation in cats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.A. Reperant (Leslie); M.W.G. van de Bildt (Marco); G. van Amerongen (Geert); L.M.E. Leijten (Lonneke); S. Watson (Sarah)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractHighly pathogenic avian influenza virus (HPAIV) H5N1 can infect mammals via the intestine; this is unusual since influenza viruses typically infect mammals via the respiratory tract. The dissemination of HPAIV H5N1 following intestinal entry and associated pathogenesis are largely

  9. Regulation of intestinal IgA responses

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    Xiong, Na; Hu, Shaomin

    2015-01-01

    The intestine harbors enormous numbers of commensal bacteria and is under frequent attack from food-borne pathogens and toxins. A properly regulated immune response is critical for homeostatic maintenance of commensals and for protection against infection and toxins in the intestine. IgA isotype antibodies function specifically in mucosal sites such as the intestines to help maintain intestinal health by binding to and regulating commensal microbiota, pathogens and toxins. IgA antibodies are produced by intestinal IgA antibody-secreting plasma cells generated in gut-associated lymphoid tissues from naïve B cells in response to stimulations of the intestinal bacteria and components. Research on generation, migration, and maintenance of IgA-secreting cells is important in our effort to understand the biology of IgA responses and to help better design vaccines against intestinal infections. PMID:25837997

  10. Endocrine regulation of ion transport in the avian lower intestine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laverty, Gary; Elbrønd, Vibeke Sødring; Árnason, Sighvatur S.

    2006-01-01

    acid cotransporters, while the coprodeum is relatively inactive. Following acclimation to low salt diets, however, both colon and coprodeum shift to a pattern of high expression of electrogenic sodium channels, and the colonic cotransporter activity is simultaneously downregulated. These changes...... in the transport patterns seem to be regulated, at least in part, by aldosterone. Our recent work with this tissue has focused on whether aldosterone alone can account for the low salt pattern of transport. Other work has looked at the changes in morphology and in proportions of cell types that occur during...... chronic acclimation to high or low salt diets, and on a cAMP-activated chloride secretion pathway. Recent findings suggesting effects of other hormones on lower intestinal transport are also presented....

  11. Avian resistance to Campylobacter jejuni colonization is associated with an intestinal immunogene expression signature identified by mRNA sequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Connell

    Full Text Available Campylobacter jejuni is the most common cause of human bacterial gastroenteritis and is associated with several post-infectious manifestations, including onset of the autoimmune neuropathy Guillain-Barré syndrome, causing significant morbidity and mortality. Poorly-cooked chicken meat is the most frequent source of infection as C. jejuni colonizes the avian intestine in a commensal relationship. However, not all chickens are equally colonized and resistance seems to be genetically determined. We hypothesize that differences in immune response may contribute to variation in colonization levels between susceptible and resistant birds. Using high-throughput sequencing in an avian infection model, we investigate gene expression associated with resistance or susceptibility to colonization of the gastrointestinal tract with C. jejuni and find that gut related immune mechanisms are critical for regulating colonization. Amongst a single population of 300 4-week old chickens, there was clear segregation in levels of C. jejuni colonization 48 hours post-exposure. RNAseq analysis of caecal tissue from 14 C. jejuni-susceptible and 14 C. jejuni-resistant birds generated over 363 million short mRNA sequences which were investigated to identify 219 differentially expressed genes. Significantly higher expression of genes involved in the innate immune response, cytokine signaling, B cell and T cell activation and immunoglobulin production, as well as the renin-angiotensin system was observed in resistant birds, suggesting an early active immune response to C. jejuni. Lower expression of these genes in colonized birds suggests suppression or inhibition of a clearing immune response thus facilitating commensal colonization and generating vectors for zoonotic transmission. This study describes biological processes regulating C. jejuni colonization of the avian intestine and gives insight into the differential immune mechanisms incited in response to commensal

  12. Precision-cut intestinal slices as a culture system to analyze the infection of differentiated intestinal epithelial cells by avian influenza viruses.

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    Punyadarsaniya, Darsaniya; Winter, Christine; Mork, Ann-Kathrin; Amiri, Mahdi; Naim, Hassan Y; Rautenschlein, Silke; Herrler, Georg

    2015-02-01

    Many viruses infect and replicate in their host via the intestinal tract, e.g. many picornaviruses, several coronaviruses and avian influenza viruses of waterfowl. To analyze infection of enterocytes is a challenging task as culture systems for differentiated intestinal epithelial cells are not readily available and often have a life span that is too short for infection studies. Precision-cut intestinal slices (PCIS) from chicken embryos were prepared and shown that the epithelial cells lining the lumen of the intestine are viable for up to 4 days. Using lectin staining, it was demonstrated that α2,3-linked sialic acids, the preferred receptor determinants of avian influenza viruses, are present on the apical side of the epithelial cells. Furthermore, the epithelial cells (at the tips) of the villi were shown to be susceptible to infection by an avian influenza virus of the H9N2 subtype. This culture system will be useful to analyze virus infection of intestinal epithelial cells and it should be applicable also to the intestine of other species. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Distribution patterns of influenza virus receptors and viral attachment patterns in the respiratory and intestinal tracts of seven avian species

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    Costa Taiana

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This study assessed the presence of sialic acid α-2,3 and α-2,6 linked glycan receptors in seven avian species. The respiratory and intestinal tracts of the chicken, common quail, red-legged partridge, turkey, golden pheasant, ostrich, and mallard were tested by means of lectin histochemistry, using the lectins Maackia amurensis agglutinin II and Sambucus nigra agglutinin, which show affinity for α-2,3 and α-2,6 receptors, respectively. Additionally, the pattern of virus attachment (PVA was evaluated with virus histochemistry, using an avian-origin H4N5 virus and a human-origin seasonal H1N1 virus. There was a great variation of receptor distribution among the tissues and avian species studied. Both α-2,3 and α-2,6 receptors were present in the respiratory and intestinal tracts of the chicken, common quail, red-legged partridge, turkey, and golden pheasant. In ostriches, the expression of the receptor was basically restricted to α-2,3 in both the respiratory and intestinal tracts and in mallards the α-2,6 receptors were absent from the intestinal tract. The results obtained with the lectin histochemistry were, in general, in agreement with the PVA. The differential expression and distribution of α-2,3 and α-2,6 receptors among various avian species might reflect a potentially decisive factor in the emergence of new viral strains.

  14. Intestinal invasion of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium in the avian host is dose dependent and does not depend on motility and chemotaxis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, John Elmerdahl; Hoegh-Andersen, Kirsten Hobolt; Rosenkrantz, Jesper Tjørnholt;

    2013-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) can invade in the intestine of the avian host, and knowledge on the mechanisms that govern this is potentially important for prevention of disease. This study investigated the invasion of S. Typhimurium in the avian host and to which extent...... functional flagella or chemotaxis genes. In support of the results from intestinal loop experiments, flagella and chemotaxis genes were not significantly important to the outcome of an oral infection. The results showed that S. Typhimurium invasion in the avian host was dose dependent and was not affected...

  15. Nonlinear dynamical model and response of avian cranial kinesis.

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    Meekangvan, Preeda; A Barhorst, Alan; Burton, Thomas D; Chatterjee, Sankar; Schovanec, Lawrence

    2006-05-01

    All modern birds have kinetic skulls in which the upper bill can move relative to the braincase, but the biomechanics and motion dynamics of cranial kinesis in birds are poorly understood. In this paper, we model the dynamics of avian cranial kinesis, such as prokinesis and proximal rhynchokinesis in which the upper jaw pivots around the nasal-frontal (N-F) hinge. The purpose of this paper is to present to the biological community an approach that demonstrates the application of sophisticated predictive mathematical modeling tools to avian kinesis. The generality of the method, however, is applicable to the advanced study of the biomechanics of other skeletal systems. The paper begins with a review of the relevant biological literature as well as the essential morphology of avian kinesis, especially the mechanical coupling of the upper and lower jaw by the postorbital ligament. A planar model of the described bird jaw morphology is then developed that maintains the closed kinematic topology of the avian jaw mechanism. We then develop the full nonlinear equations of motion with the assumption that the M. protractor pterygoideus and M. depressor mandibulae act on the quadrate as a pure torque, and the nasal frontal hinge is elastic with damping. The mechanism is shown to be a single degree of freedom device due to the holonomic constraints present in the quadrate-jugal bar-upper jaw-braincase-quadrate kinematic chain as well as the quadrate-lower jaw-postorbital ligament-braincase-quadrate kinematic chain. The full equations are verified via simulation and animation using the parameters of a Grey Heron (Ardea cinerea). Next we develop a simplified analytical model of the equations by power series expansion. We demonstrate that this model reproduces the dynamics of the full model to a high degree of fidelity. We proceed to use the harmonic balance technique to develop the frequency response characteristics of the jaw mechanism. It is shown that this avian cranial

  16. Campylobacter-induced interleukin-8 responses in human intestinal epithelial cells and primary intestinal chick cells.

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    Borrmann, Erika; Berndt, Angela; Hänel, Ingrid; Köhler, Heike

    2007-09-20

    Campylobacter (C.) jejuni and C. coli can cause gastrointestinal disorders in humans characterized by acute inflammation. Inflammatory signals are initiated during interaction between these pathogens and human intestinal cells, but nothing is known about the stimulation of avian intestinal cells by Campylobacter. Interleukin-8 (IL-8) as a proinflammatory chemokine plays an important role in mobilizing cellular defence mechanism. IL-8 mRNA expression in both human intestinal cells (INT 407) and primary intestinal chick cells (PIC) was determined by quantitative real-time RT-PCR. The secretion of IL-8 protein by INT407 was measured using ELISA. Although C. jejuni and C. coli are considered to be harmless commensals in the gut of birds, the avian Campylobacter isolates investigated were able to induce the proinflammatory IL-8 in PIC as well as in INT407. In an in vitro system, C. jejuni as well as C. coli were able to induce IL-8 mRNA in PIC. Relation between the virulence properties like toxin production, the ability to invade and to survive in Caco-2 cells and the level of IL-8 mRNA produced by INT 407 and PIC after infection with Campylobacter strains was also investigated.

  17. Modelling the Innate Immune Response against Avian Influenza Virus in Chicken

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hagenaars, T J; Fischer, E A J; Jansen, C A; Rebel, J M J; Spekreijse, D; Vervelde, L; Backer, J A; de Jong, M C M; Koets, A P

    2016-01-01

    At present there is limited understanding of the host immune response to (low pathogenic) avian influenza virus infections in poultry. Here we develop a mathematical model for the innate immune response to avian influenza virus in chicken lung, describing the dynamics of viral load, interferon-α, -β

  18. Modelling the innate immune response against avian influenza virus in chicken

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hagenaars, T.J.; Fischer, E.A.J.; Jansen, C.A.; Rebel, J.M.J.; Spekreijse, D.; Vervelde, L.; Backer, J.A.; Jong, de M.C.M.; Koets, A.P.

    2016-01-01

    At present there is limited understanding of the host immune response to (low pathogenic) avian influenza virus infections in poultry. Here we develop a mathematical model for the innate immune response to avian influenza virus in chicken lung, describing the dynamics of viral load, interferon-α,

  19. Diffferential innate responses of chickens and ducks to low pathogenic avian influenza virus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cornelissen, J.B.W.J.; Post, J.; Peeters, B.P.H.; Vervelde, L.; Rebel, J.M.J.

    2012-01-01

    Ducks and chickens are hosts of avian influenza virus, each with distinctive responses to infection. To understand these differences, we characterized the innate immune response to low pathogenicity avian influenza virus H7N1 infection in chickens and ducks. Viral RNA was detected in the lungs of ch

  20. Intestinal response to myeloablative chemotherapy in piglets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pontoppidan, Peter Erik Lotko; Shen, René Liang; Petersen, Bodil L

    2014-01-01

    Chemotherapy-induced myeloablation prior to allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) may be associated with severe toxicity. The current understanding of the pathophysiology of oral and gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity is largely derived from studies in rodents and very little...... is known from humans, especially children. We hypothesized that milk-fed piglets can be used as a clinically relevant model of GI-toxicity related to a standard conditioning chemotherapy (intravenous busulfan, Bu plus cyclophosphamide, Cy) used prior to HSCT. In study 1, dose-response relationships were....../kg) and bone marrow was collected on day 11. Histology of bone marrow samples showed total aplasia after treatment A. Using this treatment in study 2, Bu-Cy pigs showed lowered spleen and intestinal weights and variable clinical signs of dehydration, sepsis, and pneumonia at tissue collection. Oral mucositis...

  1. Modulation of Intestinal Epithelial Defense Responses by Probiotic Bacteria.

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    Wan, L Y M; Chen, Z J; Shah, N P; El-Nezami, H

    2016-12-09

    Probiotics are live microorganisms, which when administered in food confer numerous health benefits. In previous studies about beneficial effects of probiotic bacteria to health, particularly in the fields of intestinal mucosa defense responses, specific probiotics, in a strain-dependent manner, show certain degree of potential to reinforce the integrity of intestinal epithelium and/or regulate some immune components. The mechanism of probiotic action is an area of interest. Among all possible routes of modulation by probiotics of intestinal epithelial cell-mediated defense responses, modulations of intestinal barrier function, innate, and adaptive mucosal immune responses, as well as signaling pathways are considered to play important role in the intestinal defense responses against pathogenic bacteria. This review summarizes the beneficial effects of probiotic bacteria to intestinal health together with the mechanisms affected by probiotic bacteria: barrier function, innate, and adaptive defense responses such as secretion of mucins, defensins, trefoil factors, immunoglobulin A (IgA), Toll-like receptors (TLRs), cytokines, gut associated lymphoid tissues, and signaling pathways.

  2. Recent progress in host immunity to avian coccidiosis: IL-17 family cytokines as sentinels of the intestinal mucosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Wongi; Kim, Woo H; Lillehoj, Erik P; Lillehoj, Hyun S

    2013-11-01

    The molecular and cellular mechanisms leading to immune protection against coccidiosis are complex and include multiple aspects of innate and adaptive immunities. Innate immunity is mediated by various subpopulations of immune cells that recognize pathogen associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) through their pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) leading to the secretion of soluble factors with diverse functions. Adaptive immunity, which is important in conferring protection against subsequent reinfections, involves subtypes of T and B lymphocytes that mediate antigen-specific immune responses. Recently, global gene expression microarray analysis has been used in an attempt to dissect this complex network of immune cells and molecules during avian coccidiosis. These new studies emphasized the uniqueness of the innate immune response to Eimeria infection, and directly led to the discovery of previously uncharacterized host genes and proteins whose expression levels were modulated following parasite infection. Among these is the IL-17 family of cytokines. This review highlights recent progress in IL-17 research in the context of host immunity to avian coccidiosis. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. Landscape fragmentation affects responses of avian communities to climate change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarzyna, Marta A; Porter, William F; Maurer, Brian A; Zuckerberg, Benjamin; Finley, Andrew O

    2015-08-01

    Forecasting the consequences of climate change is contingent upon our understanding of the relationship between biodiversity patterns and climatic variability. While the impacts of climate change on individual species have been well-documented, there is a paucity of studies on climate-mediated changes in community dynamics. Our objectives were to investigate the relationship between temporal turnover in avian biodiversity and changes in climatic conditions and to assess the role of landscape fragmentation in affecting this relationship. We hypothesized that community turnover would be highest in regions experiencing the most pronounced changes in climate and that these patterns would be reduced in human-dominated landscapes. To test this hypothesis, we quantified temporal turnover in avian communities over a 20-year period using data from the New York State Breeding Atlases collected during 1980-1985 and 2000-2005. We applied Bayesian spatially varying intercept models to evaluate the relationship between temporal turnover and temporal trends in climatic conditions and landscape fragmentation. We found that models including interaction terms between climate change and landscape fragmentation were superior to models without the interaction terms, suggesting that the relationship between avian community turnover and changes in climatic conditions was affected by the level of landscape fragmentation. Specifically, we found weaker associations between temporal turnover and climatic change in regions with prevalent habitat fragmentation. We suggest that avian communities in fragmented landscapes are more robust to climate change than communities found in contiguous habitats because they are comprised of species with wider thermal niches and thus are less susceptible to shifts in climatic variability. We conclude that highly fragmented regions are likely to undergo less pronounced changes in composition and structure of faunal communities as a result of climate change

  4. USGS role and response to highly pathogenic avian influenza

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, M. Camille; Miles, A. Keith; Pearce, John M.; Prosser, Diann J.; Sleeman, Jonathan M.; Whalen, Mary E.

    2015-09-09

    Avian influenza viruses are naturally occurring in wild birds such as ducks, geese, swans, and gulls. These viruses generally do not cause illness in wild birds, however, when spread to poultry they can be highly pathogenic and cause illness and death in backyard and commercial farms. Outbreaks may cause devastating agricultural economic losses and some viral strains have the potential to infect people directly. Furthermore, the combination of avian influenza viruses with mammalian viruses can result in strains with the ability to transmit from person to person, possibly leading to viruses with pandemic potential. All known pandemic influenza viruses have had some genetic material of avian origin. Since 1996, a strain of highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) virus, H5N1, has caused infection in wild birds, losses to poultry farms in Eurasia and North Africa, and led to the deaths of several hundred people. Spread of the H5N1 virus and other influenza strains from China was likely facilitated by migratory birds. In December 2014, HPAI was detected in poultry in Canada and migratory birds in the United States. Since then, HPAI viruses have spread to large parts of the United States and will likely continue to spread through migratory bird flyways and other mechanisms throughout North America. In the United States, HPAI viruses have severely affected the poultry industry with millions of domestic birds dead or culled. These strains of HPAI are not known to cause disease in humans; however, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) advise caution when in close contact with infected birds. Experts agree that HPAI strains currently circulating in wild birds of North America will likely persist for the next few years. This unprecedented situation presents risks to the poultry industry, natural resource management, and potentially human health. Scientific knowledge and decision support tools are urgently needed to understand factors affecting the persistence

  5. Gene expression responses to highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N1 virus infections in ducks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Differences in host response to infection with avian influenza (AI) viruses were investigated by identifying genes differentially expressed in tissues of infected ducks. Clear differences in pathogenicity were observed among ducks inoculated with five H5N1 HPAI viruses. Virus titers in tissues cor...

  6. Transcriptomics of host-virus interactions: immune responses to avian influenza virus in chicken

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reemers, S.S.N.

    2010-01-01

    Upon entry of the respiratory tract avian influenza virus (AIV) triggers early immune responses in the host that are aimed to prevent or in case of already established infection control this infection. Although much research is performed to elucidate the course of events that follow after AIV infect

  7. Avian response to bottomland hardwood reforestation: the first 10 years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twedt, D.J.; Wilson, R.R.; Henne-Kerr, J.L.; Grosshuesch, D.A.

    2002-01-01

    Bttomland hardwood forests were planted on agricultural fields in Mississippi and Louisiana using either predominantly Quercus species (oaks) or Populus deltoides (eastern cottonwood). We assessed avian colonization of these reforested sites between 2 and 10 years after planting. Rapid vertical growth of cottonwoods (circa 2 - 3 m / yr) resulted in sites with forest structure that supported greater species richness of breeding birds, increased Shannon diversity indices, and supported greater territory densities than on sites planted with slower-growing oak species. Grassland birds (Spiza americana [Dickcissel], and Sturnella magna [Eastern Meadowlark]) were indicative of species breeding on oak-dominated reforestation # 10 years old. Agelaius phoeniceus (Red-winged Blackbird) and Colinus virginianus (Northern Bobwhite) characterized cottonwood reforestation # 4 years old, whereas 14 species of shrub-scrub birds (e.g., Passerina cyanea [Indigo Bunting]) and early-successional forest birds (e.g., Vireo gilvus [Warbling Vireo]) typified cottonwood reforestation 5 to 9 years after planting. Rates of daily nest survival did not differ between reforestation strategies. Nest parasitism increased markedly in older cottonwood stands, but was overwhelmed by predation as a cause of nest failure. Based on Partners in Flight prioritization scores and territory densities, the value of cottonwood reforestation for avian conservation was significantly greater than that of oak reforestation during their first 10 years. Because of benefits conferred on breeding birds, we recommend reforestation of bottomland hardwoods include a high proportion of fast-growing, early successional species such as cottonwood.

  8. Intestine.

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    Smith, J M; Skeans, M A; Horslen, S P; Edwards, E B; Harper, A M; Snyder, J J; Israni, A K; Kasiske, B L

    2016-01-01

    Intestine and intestine-liver transplant plays an important role in the treatment of intestinal failure, despite decreased morbidity associated with parenteral nutrition. In 2014, 210 new patients were added to the intestine transplant waiting list. Among prevalent patients on the list at the end of 2014, 65% were waiting for an intestine transplant and 35% were waiting for an intestine-liver transplant. The pretransplant mortality rate decreased dramatically over time for all age groups. Pretransplant mortality was highest for adult candidates, at 22.1 per 100 waitlist years compared with less than 3 per 100 waitlist years for pediatric candidates, and notably higher for candidates for intestine-liver transplant than for candidates for intestine transplant without a liver. Numbers of intestine transplants without a liver increased from a low of 51 in 2013 to 67 in 2014. Intestine-liver transplants increased from a low of 44 in 2012 to 72 in 2014. Short-gut syndrome (congenital and other) was the main cause of disease leading to both intestine and intestine-liver transplant. Graft survival improved over the past decade. Patient survival was lowest for adult intestine-liver recipients and highest for pediatric intestine recipients.

  9. Avian hematology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Michael P

    2015-01-01

    Avian veterinarians often rely heavily on the results of various diagnostic tests, including hematology results. As such, cellular identification and evaluation of the cellular response are invaluable tools that help veterinarians understand the health or condition of their patient, as well as to monitor severity and clinical progression of disease and response to treatment. Therefore, it is important to thoroughly understand how to identify and evaluate changes in the avian erythron and leukon, as well as to interpret normal and abnormal results.

  10. Individualized medicine using intestinal responses to CFTR potentiators and correctors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beekman, Jeffrey M

    2016-10-01

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) modulators that target the mutant CFTR protein are being introduced for treatment of cystic fibrosis. Stratification of subjects based on their CFTR genotype has been proven essential to demonstrate clinical efficacy of these novel treatments. Despite this stratification, considerable heterogeneity between subjects receiving CFTR modulators is still observed which remains largely uncharacterized. The CFTR genotype, and additional genetic and environmental factors that impact either tissue-specific CFTR protein characteristics or the pharmacokinetic properties of treatments will likely determine the individual response to therapy. The development of intestinal biomarkers for CFTR modulators may help to better quantitate individual responses to treatment, with potential to optimize treatments for subjects with limited responses, and the selection of responsive subjects that currently do not receive treatments. Here, recent advances concerning the use of intestinal biomarkers for CFTR modulator treatments are reviewed, with a focus on biomarkers of CFTR function in ex vivo rectal biopsies and in vitro cultured primary intestinal organoids. Their potential value is considered in the context of the current unmet needs for better treatments for the majority of subjects with CF, and individual biomarkers that enable the prediction of long term therapeutic responses to CFTR modulators. Pediatr Pulmonol. 2016;51:S23-S34. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Infant intestinal Enterococcus faecalis down-regulates inflammatory responses in human intestinal cell lines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shugui Wang; Lydia Hui Mei Ng; Wai Ling Chow; Yuan Kun Lee

    2008-01-01

    AIM:To investigate the ability of Lactic acid bacteria (LAB)to modulate inflammatory reaction in human intestinal celllines(Caco-2,HT-29 and HCT 116).Different strains of LAB isolatedfrom new born infants and fermented milk,together withthestrains obtained from culture collectionsweretested.METHODS:LABs were treated with human intestinal cell lines.ELISA was used to detect IL-8 and TGF-β protein secretion.Cytokines and Toll like receptors (TLRs) gene expression were assessed using RT-PCR.Conditional medium,sonicated bacteria and UV killed bacteria were used to find the effecter molecules on the bacteria.Carbohydrate oxidation and protein digestion were applied to figure out the molecules'residues.Adhesion assays were further carried out.RESULTS:It was found that Enterococcus faecalis is the main immune modulator among the LABs by downregulation of IL-8 secretion and upregulation of TGF-β.Strikingly,the effect was only observed in four strains of E.faecalis out of the 27 isolated and tested.This implies strain dependent immunomodulation in the host.In addition,E.faecalis may regulate inflammatory responses through TLR3,TLR4,TLR9 and TRAF6.Carbohydrates on the bacterial cell surface are involved in both its adhesion to intestinal cells and regulation of inflammatory responses in the host.CONCLUSION:These data provide a case for the modulation of intestinal mucosal immunity in which specific strains of E.faecalis have uniquely evolved to maintain colonic homeostasis and regulate inflammatoryresponses.

  12. A low dose of an organophosphate insecticide causes dysbiosis and sex-dependent responses in the intestinal microbiota of the Japanese quail (Coturnix japonica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Crisol-Martínez

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Organophosphate insecticides have been directly or indirectly implicated in avian populations declining worldwide. Birds in agricultural environments are commonly exposed to these insecticides, mainly through ingestion of invertebrates after insecticide application. Despite insecticide exposure in birds occurring mostly by ingestion, the impact of organophosphates on the avian digestive system has been poorly researched. In this work we used the Japanese quail (Coturnix japonica as an avian model to study short-term microbial community responses to a single dose of trichlorfon at low concentration in three sample origins of the gastrointestinal tract (GIT: caecum, large intestine and faeces. Using next-generation sequencing of 16S rRNA gene amplicons as bacterial markers, the study showed that ingestion of insecticide caused significant changes in the GIT microbiome. Specifically, microbiota composition and diversity differed between treated and untreated quail. Insecticide-associated responses in the caecum showed differences between sexes which did not occur with the other sample types. In caecal microbiota, only treated females showed significant shifts in a number of genera within the Lachnospiraceae and the Enterobacteriaceae families. The major responses in the large intestine were a significant reduction in the genus Lactobacillus and increases in abundance of a number of Proteobacteria genera. All microbial shifts in faeces occurred in phylotypes that were represented at low relative abundances. In general, changes in microbiota possibly resulted from contrasting responses towards the insecticide, either positive (e.g., biodegrading bacteria or negative (e.g., insecticide-susceptible bacteria. This study demonstrates the significant impact that organophosphate insecticides have on the avian gut microbiota; showing that a single small dose of trichlorfon caused dysbiosis in the GIT of the Japanese quail. Further research is necessary to

  13. The innate and adaptive immune response to avian influenza virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Protective immunity against viruses is mediated by the early innate immune responses and later on by the adaptive immune responses. The early innate immunity is designed to contain and limit virus replication in the host, primarily through cytokine and interferon production. Most all cells are cap...

  14. Selection for avian immune response: a commercial breeding company challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulton, J E

    2004-04-01

    Selection for immune function in the commercial breeding environment is a challenging proposition for commercial breeding companies. Immune response is only one of many traits that are under intensive selection, thus selection pressure needs to be carefully balanced across multiple traits. The selection environment (single bird cages, biosecure facilities, controlled environment) is a very different environment than the commercial production facilities (multiple bird cages, potential disease exposure, variable environment) in which birds are to produce. The testing of individual birds is difficult, time consuming, and expensive. It is essential that the results of any tests be relevant to actual disease or environmental challenge in the commercial environment. The use of genetic markers as indicators of immune function is being explored by breeding companies. Use of genetic markers would eliminate many of the limitations in enhancing immune function currently encountered by commercial breeding companies. Information on genetic markers would allow selection to proceed without subjecting breeding stock to disease conditions and could be done before production traits are measured. These markers could be candidate genes with known interaction or involvement with disease pathology or DNA markers that are closely linked to genetic regions that influence the immune response. The current major limitation to this approach is the paucity of mapped chicken immune response genes and the limited number of DNA markers mapped on the chicken genome. These limitations should be eliminated once the chicken genome is sequenced.

  15. Avian reflex and electroencephalogram responses in different states of consciousness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandercock, Dale A; Auckburally, Adam; Flaherty, Derek; Sandilands, Victoria; McKeegan, Dorothy E F

    2014-06-22

    Defining states of clinical consciousness in animals is important in veterinary anaesthesia and in studies of euthanasia and welfare assessment at slaughter. The aim of this study was to validate readily observable reflex responses in relation to different conscious states, as confirmed by EEG analysis, in two species of birds under laboratory conditions (35-week-old layer hens (n=12) and 11-week-old turkeys (n=10)). We evaluated clinical reflexes and characterised electroencephalograph (EEG) activity (as a measure of brain function) using spectral analyses in four different clinical states of consciousness: conscious (fully awake), semi-conscious (sedated), unconscious-optimal (general anaesthesia), unconscious-sub optimal (deep hypnotic state), as well as assessment immediately following euthanasia. Jaw or neck muscle tone was the most reliable reflex measure distinguishing between conscious and unconscious states. Pupillary reflex was consistently observed until respiratory arrest. Nictitating membrane reflex persisted for a short time (reflex is a conservative measure of death in poultry. Using spectral analyses of the EEG waveforms it was possible to readily distinguish between the different states of clinical consciousness. In all cases, when birds progressed from a conscious to unconscious state; total spectral power (PTOT) significantly increased, whereas median (F50) and spectral edge (F95) frequencies significantly decreased. This study demonstrates that EEG analysis can differentiate between clinical states (and loss of brain function at death) in birds and provides a unique integration of reflex responses and EEG activity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Small Intestine Early Innate Immunity Response during Intestinal Colonization by Escherichia coli Depends on Its Extra-Intestinal Virulence Status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tourret, Jérôme; Willing, Benjamin P; Croxen, Matthew A; Dufour, Nicolas; Dion, Sara; Wachtel, Sarah; Denamur, Erick; Finlay, B Brett

    2016-01-01

    Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) strains live as commensals in the digestive tract of the host, but they can also initiate urinary tract infections. The aim of this work was to determine how a host detects the presence of a new UPEC strain in the digestive tract. Mice were orally challenged with UPEC strains 536 and CFT073, non-pathogenic strain K12 MG1655, and ΔPAI-536, an isogenic mutant of strain 536 lacking all 7 pathogenicity islands whose virulence is drastically attenuated. Intestinal colonization was measured, and cytokine expression was determined in various organs recovered from mice after oral challenge. UPEC strain 536 efficiently colonized the mouse digestive tract, and prior Enterobacteriaceae colonization was found to impact strain 536 colonization efficiency. An innate immune response, detected as the production of TNFα, IL-6 and IL-10 cytokines, was activated in the ileum 48 hours after oral challenge with strain 536, and returned to baseline within 8 days, without a drop in fecal pathogen load. Although inflammation was detected in the ileum, histology was normal at the time of cytokine peak. Comparison of cytokine secretion 48h after oral gavage with E. coli strain 536, CFT073, MG1655 or ΔPAI-536 showed that inflammation was more pronounced with UPECs than with non-pathogenic or attenuated strains. Pathogenicity islands also seemed to be involved in host detection, as IL-6 intestinal secretion was increased after administration of E. coli strain 536, but not after administration of ΔPAI-536. In conclusion, UPEC colonization of the mouse digestive tract activates acute phase inflammatory cytokine secretion but does not trigger any pathological changes, illustrating the opportunistic nature of UPECs. This digestive tract colonization model will be useful for studying the factors controlling the switch from commensalism to pathogenicity.

  17. Small Intestine Early Innate Immunity Response during Intestinal Colonization by Escherichia coli Depends on Its Extra-Intestinal Virulence Status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willing, Benjamin P.; Croxen, Matthew A.; Dufour, Nicolas; Dion, Sara; Wachtel, Sarah; Denamur, Erick; Finlay, B. Brett

    2016-01-01

    Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) strains live as commensals in the digestive tract of the host, but they can also initiate urinary tract infections. The aim of this work was to determine how a host detects the presence of a new UPEC strain in the digestive tract. Mice were orally challenged with UPEC strains 536 and CFT073, non-pathogenic strain K12 MG1655, and ΔPAI-536, an isogenic mutant of strain 536 lacking all 7 pathogenicity islands whose virulence is drastically attenuated. Intestinal colonization was measured, and cytokine expression was determined in various organs recovered from mice after oral challenge. UPEC strain 536 efficiently colonized the mouse digestive tract, and prior Enterobacteriaceae colonization was found to impact strain 536 colonization efficiency. An innate immune response, detected as the production of TNFα, IL-6 and IL-10 cytokines, was activated in the ileum 48 hours after oral challenge with strain 536, and returned to baseline within 8 days, without a drop in fecal pathogen load. Although inflammation was detected in the ileum, histology was normal at the time of cytokine peak. Comparison of cytokine secretion 48h after oral gavage with E. coli strain 536, CFT073, MG1655 or ΔPAI-536 showed that inflammation was more pronounced with UPECs than with non-pathogenic or attenuated strains. Pathogenicity islands also seemed to be involved in host detection, as IL-6 intestinal secretion was increased after administration of E. coli strain 536, but not after administration of ΔPAI-536. In conclusion, UPEC colonization of the mouse digestive tract activates acute phase inflammatory cytokine secretion but does not trigger any pathological changes, illustrating the opportunistic nature of UPECs. This digestive tract colonization model will be useful for studying the factors controlling the switch from commensalism to pathogenicity. PMID:27096607

  18. Incorporating risk communication into highly pathogenic avian influenza preparedness and response efforts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voss, Shauna J; Malladi, Sasidhar; Sampedro, Fernando; Snider, Tim; Goldsmith, Timothy; Hueston, William D; Lauer, Dale C; Halvorson, David A

    2012-12-01

    A highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) outbreak in the United States will initiate a federal emergency response effort that will consist of disease control and eradication efforts, including quarantine and movement control measures. These movement control measures will not only apply to live animals but also to animal products. However, with current egg industry "just-in-time" production practices, limited storage is available to hold eggs. As a result, stop movement orders can have significant unintended negative consequences, including severe disruptions to the food supply chain. Because stakeholders' perceptions of risk vary, waiting to initiate communication efforts until an HPAI event occurs can hinder disease control efforts, including the willingness of producers to comply with the response, and also can affect consumers' demand for the product. A public-private-academic partnership was formed to assess actual risks involved in the movement of egg industry products during an HPAI event through product specific, proactive risk assessments. The risk analysis process engaged a broad representation of stakeholders and promoted effective risk management and communication strategies before an HPAI outbreak event. This multidisciplinary team used the risk assessments in the development of the United States Department of Agriculture, Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza Secure Egg Supply Plan, a comprehensive response plan that strives to maintain continuity of business. The collaborative approach that was used demonstrates how a proactive risk communication strategy that involves many different stakeholders can be valuable in the development of a foreign animal disease response plan and build working relationships, trust, and understanding.

  19. Cytokine responses in primary chicken embryo intestinal cells infected with Campylobacter jejuni strains of human and chicken origin and the expression of bacterial virulence-associated genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Yiping; Ingmer, Hanne; Madsen, Mogens

    2008-01-01

    of the bacterial genes. We have investigated the invasiveness of primary chicken embryo intestinal cells (CEICs) by C. jejuni strains of human and chicken origins and the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines as well as the expression of the bacterial virulence-associated genes during co-cultivation. Results C...... in vitro culture condition C. jejuni strains of both human and chicken origins can invade avian host cells with a pro-inflammatory response and that the virulence-associated genes of C. jejuni may play a role in this process....

  20. Avian community responses to variability in river hydrology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royan, Alexander; Hannah, David M; Reynolds, S James; Noble, David G; Sadler, Jonathan P

    2013-01-01

    River flow is a major driver of morphological structure and community dynamics in riverine-floodplain ecosystems. Flow influences in-stream communities through changes in water velocity, depth, temperature, turbidity and nutrient fluxes, and perturbations in the organisation of lower trophic levels are cascaded through the food web, resulting in shifts in food availability for consumer species. River birds are sensitive to spatial and phenological mismatches with aquatic prey following flow disturbances; however, the role of flow as a determinant of riparian ecological structure remains poorly known. This knowledge is crucial to help to predict if, and how, riparian communities will be influenced by climate-induced changes in river flow characterised by more extreme high (i.e. flood) and/or low (i.e. drought) flow events. Here, we combine national-scale datasets of river bird surveys and river flow archives to understand how hydrological disturbance has affected the distribution of riparian species at higher trophic levels. Data were analysed for 71 river locations using a Generalized Additive Model framework and a model averaging procedure. Species had complex but biologically interpretable associations with hydrological indices, with species' responses consistent with their ecology, indicating that hydrological-disturbance has implications for higher trophic levels in riparian food webs. Our quantitative analysis of river flow-bird relationships demonstrates the potential vulnerability of riparian species to the impacts of changing flow variability and represents an important contribution in helping to understand how bird communities might respond to a climate change-induced increase in the intensity of floods and droughts. Moreover, the success in relating parameters of river flow variability to species' distributions highlights the need to include river flow data in climate change impact models of species' distributions.

  1. The response of intestinal stem cells and epithelium after alemtuzumab administration

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Intestinal stem cells may have important roles in the maintenance of epithelial integrity during tissue repair. Alemtuzumab is a humanized anti-CD52 lymphocytic antibody that is increasingly being used to induce immunosuppression; intestinal barrier function is impaired during treatment with alemtuzumab. We investigated the response of intestinal stem cells to epithelial damage resulting from alemtuzumab treatment. Intestinal epithelial cell loss and abnormal Paneth cell morphology were found...

  2. Regulation of intestinal IgA responses by dietary palmitic acid and its metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunisawa, Jun; Hashimoto, Eri; Inoue, Asuka; Nagasawa, Risa; Suzuki, Yuji; Ishikawa, Izumi; Shikata, Shiori; Arita, Makoto; Aoki, Junken; Kiyono, Hiroshi

    2014-08-15

    Enhancement of intestinal IgA responses is a primary strategy in the development of oral vaccine. Dietary fatty acids are known to regulate host immune responses. In this study, we show that dietary palmitic acid (PA) and its metabolites enhance intestinal IgA responses. Intestinal IgA production was increased in mice maintained on a PA-enriched diet. These mice also showed increased intestinal IgA responses against orally immunized Ag, without any effect on serum Ab responses. We found that PA directly stimulates plasma cells to produce Ab. In addition, mice receiving a PA-enriched diet had increased numbers of IgA-producing plasma cells in the large intestine; this effect was abolished when serine palmitoyltransferase was inhibited. These findings suggest that dietary PA regulates intestinal IgA responses and has the potential to be a diet-derived mucosal adjuvant.

  3. Managing Public's Complacency and Public Preparedness in Response to 2006 Avian Influenza Crisis in Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naim Kapucu

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Public complacency is one of the problems complicating emergency preparedness and response operations for disaster managers. Effective disaster management is possible to the extent that affected communities cooperate with disaster management. Focusing on the 2006 avian influenza crisis in Turkey, this article analyzes whether the strategies and tools used by government agencies responsible for disaster management were effective in reducing public complacency, and, thus, increasing overall perceived public preparedness and response. Specifically, communication tools used for information collection, organization and dissemination were analyzed to see whether they led increased public situational awareness and immediate public reaction to the crisis. Findings suggest that government's internal preparation and use of communication tools had an impact on the level of the information the public exposed to, while reduced complacency or public reaction to the crisis had an impact on the overall perceived public preparedness.

  4. Cytokine responses in primary chicken embryo intestinal cells infected with Campylobacter jejuni strains of human and chicken origin and the expression of bacterial virulence-associated genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bang Dang D

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Campylobacter jejuni is a major cause of inflammatory diarrhoea in humans and is considered a commensal of the gastroenteric tract of the avian host. However, little is known about the interaction between C. jejuni and the avian host including the cytokine responses and the expression of the bacterial genes. We have investigated the invasiveness of primary chicken embryo intestinal cells (CEICs by C. jejuni strains of human and chicken origins and the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines as well as the expression of the bacterial virulence-associated genes during co-cultivation. Results C. jejuni strains are capable of invading the CEICs and stimulate these cells in a pro-inflammatory manner and during this interaction the expression of the bacterial virulence-associated genes ciaB, dnaJ and racR is increased. Furthermore, incubation of bacteria with conditioned cell- and bacteria-free media from another co-cultivation experiment also increased the expression of the virulence-associated genes in the C. jejuni chicken isolate, indicating that the expression of bacterial genes is regulated by component(s secreted upon co-cultivation of bacteria and CEICs. Conclusion We show that under in vitro culture condition C. jejuni strains of both human and chicken origins can invade avian host cells with a pro-inflammatory response and that the virulence-associated genes of C. jejuni may play a role in this process.

  5. Assessing Potential Vulnerability and Response of Fish to Simulated Avian Predation after Exposure to Psychotropic Pharmaceuticals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melanie L. Hedgespeth

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Psychotropic pharmaceuticals present in the environment may impact organisms both directly and via interaction strengths with other organisms, including predators; therefore, this study examined the potential effects of pharmaceuticals on behavioral responses of fish to avian predators. Wild-caught juvenile perch (Perca fluviatilis were assayed using a striking bird model after a seven-day exposure to psychotropic pharmaceuticals (the antidepressants fluoxetine or sertraline, or the β-blocker propranolol under the hypotheses that exposure would increase vulnerability to avian predation via increasing the probability of predator encounter as well as degrading evasive behaviors upon encounter. None of the substances significantly affected swimming activity of the fish, nor did they increase vulnerability by affecting encounter probability or evasive endpoints compared to control treatments. Counter to our expectations, fish exposed to 100 μg/L fluoxetine (but no other concentrations or pharmaceuticals were less likely to enter the open area of the arena, i.e., less likely to engage in risky behavior that could lead to predator encounters. Additionally, all fish exposed to environmentally relevant, low concentrations of sertraline (0.12 μg/L and propranolol (0.1 μg/L sought refuge after the simulated attack. Our unexpected results warrant further research as they have interesting implications on how these psychotropic pharmaceuticals may affect predator-prey interactions spanning the terrestrial-aquatic interface.

  6. Avian response to timber harvesting applied experimentally to manage Cerulean Warbler breeding populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheehan, James; Wood, Petra Bohall; Buehler, David A.; Keyser, Patrick D.; Larkin, Jeffrey L.; Rodewald, Amanda D.; Wigley, T. Bently; Boves, Than J.; George, Gregory A.; Bakermans, Marja H.; Beachy, Tiffany A.; Evans, Andrea; McDermott, Molly E.; Newell, Felicity L.; Perkins, Kelly A.; White, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    Timber harvesting has been proposed as a management tool to enhance breeding habitat for the Cerulean Warbler (Setophaga cerulea), a declining Neotropical–Nearctic migratory songbird that nests in the canopy of mature eastern deciduous forests. To evaluate how this single-species management focus might fit within an ecologically based management approach for multiple forest birds, we performed a manipulative experiment using four treatments (three intensities of timber harvests and an unharvested control) at each of seven study areas within the core Cerulean Warbler breeding range. We collected pre-harvest (one year) and post-harvest (four years) data on the territory density of Cerulean Warblers and six additional focal species, avian community relative abundance, and several key habitat variables. We evaluated the avian and habitat responses across the 3–32 m2 ha−1 residual basal area (RBA) range of the treatments. Cerulean Warbler territory density peaked with medium RBA (∼16 m2 ha−1). In contrast, territory densities of the other focal species were negatively related to RBA (e.g., Hooded Warbler [Setophaga citrina]), were positively related to RBA (e.g., Ovenbird [Seiurus aurocapilla]), or were not sensitive to this measure (Scarlet Tanager [Piranga olivacea]). Some species (e.g., Hooded Warbler) increased with time post-treatment and were likely tied to a developing understory, whereas declines (e.g., Ovenbird) were immediate. Relative abundance responses of additional species were consistent with the territory density responses of the focal species. Across the RBA gradient, greatest separation in the avian community was between early successional forest species (e.g., Yellow-breasted Chat [Icteria virens]) and closed-canopy mature forest species (e.g., Ovenbird), with the Cerulean Warbler and other species located intermediate to these two extremes. Overall, our results suggest that harvests within 10–20 m2 ha−1 RBA yield the largest

  7. Serological response to vaccination against avian influenza in zoo-birds using an inactivated H5N9 vaccine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertelsen, Mads F.; Klausen, Joan; Holm, Elisabeth

    2007-01-01

    Five hundred and forty birds in three zoos were vaccinated twice against avian influenza with a 6-week interval using an inactivated H5N9 vaccine. Serological response was evaluated by hemagglutination inhibition test 4-6 weeks following the second vaccine administration. 84% of the birds...

  8. Differences in highly pathogenic avian influenza viral pathogenesis and associated early inflammatory response in chickens and ducks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cornelissen, J.B.W.J.; Vervelde, L.; Post, J.; Rebel, J.M.J.

    2013-01-01

    We studied the immunological responses in the lung, brain and spleen of ducks and chickens within the first 7 days after infection with H7N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI). Infection with HPAI caused significant morbidity and mortality in chickens, while in ducks the infection was asymptom

  9. Intranasal Immunization with Pressure Inactivated Avian Influenza Elicits Cellular and Humoral Responses in Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shana P C Barroso

    Full Text Available Influenza viruses pose a serious global health threat, particularly in light of newly emerging strains, such as the avian influenza H5N1 and H7N9 viruses. Vaccination remains the primary method for preventing acquiring influenza or for avoiding developing serious complications related to the disease. Vaccinations based on inactivated split virus vaccines or on chemically inactivated whole virus have some important drawbacks, including changes in the immunogenic properties of the virus. To induce a greater mucosal immune response, intranasally administered vaccines are highly desired as they not only prevent disease but can also block the infection at its primary site. To avoid these drawbacks, hydrostatic pressure has been used as a potential method for viral inactivation and vaccine production. In this study, we show that hydrostatic pressure inactivates the avian influenza A H3N8 virus, while still maintaining hemagglutinin and neuraminidase functionalities. Challenged vaccinated animals showed no disease signs (ruffled fur, lethargy, weight loss, and huddling. Similarly, these animals showed less Evans Blue dye leakage and lower cell counts in their bronchoalveolar lavage fluid compared with the challenged non-vaccinated group. We found that the whole inactivated particles were capable of generating a neutralizing antibody response in serum, and IgA was also found in nasal mucosa and feces. After the vaccination and challenge we observed Th1/Th2 cytokine secretion with a prevalence of IFN-γ. Our data indicate that the animals present a satisfactory immune response after vaccination and are protected against infection. Our results may pave the way for the development of a novel pressure-based vaccine against influenza virus.

  10. Intranasal Immunization with Pressure Inactivated Avian Influenza Elicits Cellular and Humoral Responses in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barroso, Shana P C; Nico, Dirlei; Nascimento, Danielle; Santos, Ana Clara V; Couceiro, José Nelson S S; Bozza, Fernando A; Ferreira, Ana M A; Ferreira, Davis F; Palatnik-de-Sousa, Clarisa B; Souza, Thiago Moreno L; Gomes, Andre M O; Silva, Jerson L; Oliveira, Andréa C

    2015-01-01

    Influenza viruses pose a serious global health threat, particularly in light of newly emerging strains, such as the avian influenza H5N1 and H7N9 viruses. Vaccination remains the primary method for preventing acquiring influenza or for avoiding developing serious complications related to the disease. Vaccinations based on inactivated split virus vaccines or on chemically inactivated whole virus have some important drawbacks, including changes in the immunogenic properties of the virus. To induce a greater mucosal immune response, intranasally administered vaccines are highly desired as they not only prevent disease but can also block the infection at its primary site. To avoid these drawbacks, hydrostatic pressure has been used as a potential method for viral inactivation and vaccine production. In this study, we show that hydrostatic pressure inactivates the avian influenza A H3N8 virus, while still maintaining hemagglutinin and neuraminidase functionalities. Challenged vaccinated animals showed no disease signs (ruffled fur, lethargy, weight loss, and huddling). Similarly, these animals showed less Evans Blue dye leakage and lower cell counts in their bronchoalveolar lavage fluid compared with the challenged non-vaccinated group. We found that the whole inactivated particles were capable of generating a neutralizing antibody response in serum, and IgA was also found in nasal mucosa and feces. After the vaccination and challenge we observed Th1/Th2 cytokine secretion with a prevalence of IFN-γ. Our data indicate that the animals present a satisfactory immune response after vaccination and are protected against infection. Our results may pave the way for the development of a novel pressure-based vaccine against influenza virus.

  11. Virus-neutralizing antibody response of mice to consecutive infection with human and avian influenza A viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janulíková, J; Stropkovská, A; Bobišová, Z; Košík, I; Mucha, V; Kostolanský, F; Varečková, E

    2015-06-01

    In this work we simulated in a mouse model a naturally occurring situation of humans, who overcame an infection with epidemic strains of influenza A, and were subsequently exposed to avian influenza A viruses (IAV). The antibody response to avian IAV in mice previously infected with human IAV was analyzed. We used two avian IAV (A/Duck/Czechoslovakia/1956 (H4N6) and the attenuated virus rA/Viet Nam/1203-2004 (H5N1)) as well as two human IAV isolates (virus A/Mississippi/1/1985 (H3N2) of medium virulence and A/Puerto Rico/8/1934 (H1N1) of high virulence). Two repeated doses of IAV of H4 or of H5 virus elicited virus-specific neutralizing antibodies in mice. Exposure of animals previously infected with human IAV (of H3 or H1 subtype) to IAV of H4 subtype led to the production of antibodies neutralizing H4 virus in a level comparable with the level of antibodies against the human IAV used for primary infection. In contrast, no measurable levels of virus-neutralizing (VN) antibodies specific to H5 virus were detected in mice infected with H5 virus following a previous infection with human IAV. In both cases the secondary infection with avian IAV led to a significant increase of the titer of VN antibodies specific to the corresponding human virus used for primary infection. Moreover, cross-reactive HA2-specific antibodies were also induced by sequential infection. By virtue of these results we suggest that the differences in the ability of avian IAV to induce specific antibodies inhibiting virus replication after previous infection of mice with human viruses can have an impact on the interspecies transmission and spread of avian IAV in the human population.

  12. Avian leukosis virus subgroup J triggers caspase-1-mediated inflammatory response in chick livers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xue-lan; Shan, Wen-jie; Jia, Li-juan; Yang, Xu; Zhang, Jin-jing; Wu, Ya-rong; Xu, Fa-zhi; Li, Jin-nian

    2016-04-02

    Many pathogens trigger caspase-1-mediated innate immune responses. Avian leukosis virus subgroup J (ALV-J) causes serious immunosuppression and diverse tumors in chicks. The caspase-1 inflammasome mechanism of response to ALV-J invading remains unclear. Here we investigated the expression of caspase-1, the inflammasome adaptor NLRP3, IL-1β and IL-18 in response to ALV-J infection in the liver of chick. We found caspase-1 mRNA expression was elevated at 5 dpi and peaked at 7 dpi in ALV-J infected animals. Corresponding to this, the expressions of NLRP3 and proinflammatory cytokines IL-1β and IL-18 were significantly increased at 5 or 7 dpi. In addition, caspase-1 protein expression and inflammatory cell infiltration were induced after virus infection. These results indicated that ALV-J infection could trigger the caspase-1- mediated inflammatory response in chicks. Thus, an understanding of the inflammatory responses can provide a better insight into the pathogenicity of ALV-J and a possible anti-virus target for ALV-J infection.

  13. Gene expression profiling of chicken intestinal host responses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hemert, van S.

    2007-01-01

    Chicken lines differ in genetic disease susceptibility. The scope of the research described in this thesis was to identify genes involved in genetic disease resistance in the chicken intestine. Therefore gene expression in the jejunum was investigated using a microarray approach. An intestine specif

  14. Relationship of Salmonella infection and inflammatory intestinal response with hematological and serum biochemical values in laying hens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soria, Mario Alberto; Bonnet, María Agustina; Bueno, Dante Javier

    2015-06-15

    There are few studies about the blood serum of laying hens infected with Salmonella. The differential leukocyte count and blood chemistry values are an important aid in the diagnosis of human diseases, but blood parameters in the avian species are not well known. On the other hand, invasive forms of bacterial gastroenteritis, like Salmonella, often cause intestinal inflammation so this study was undertaken to find a biomarker of Salmonella infection and inflammatory intestinal response in the hematological or serum biochemical parameters in laying hens. Furthermore, we evaluated the association of some farm characteristics with Salmonella infection and fecal leukocytes (FL). A fecal sample with at least one fecal leukocyte per field was considered positive for inflammatory intestinal response. False positive serum reactions for Salmonella infection, by serum plate agglutination (SPA) test, were reduced by heating the sample to 56°C for 30 min and then diluting it 5-fold. The range of hematological and biochemical parameter values was very wide, in addition, there was a poor agreement between the SPA and FL results. Comparison of the positive and negative samples in SPA and FL showed that 1.3% and 79.8% of the laying hens were positive and negative in both tests, respectively. Hens with a positive SPA result showed a higher percentage of monocytes than those with a negative SPA result. Hens with a positive FL test had a higher percentage of heterophils, ratio of heterophils to lymphocytes and aspartate aminotransferase values, while the percentage of lymphocytes was significantly lower (P Salmonella infection increased when the age of laying hens and the number of hens per poultry house was greater than or equal to 18 months old and 10,000 laying hens, compared to less than 18 months old and 10,000 laying hens, respectively. On the other hand, the risk of inflammatory intestinal response was higher in laying hens ≥ 18 months old than in hens Salmonella infection

  15. Macaque Proteome Response to Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza and 1918 Reassortant Influenza Virus Infections▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Joseph N.; Palermo, Robert E.; Baskin, Carole R.; Gritsenko, Marina; Sabourin, Patrick J.; Long, James P.; Sabourin, Carol L.; Bielefeldt-Ohmann, Helle; García-Sastre, Adolfo; Albrecht, Randy; Tumpey, Terrence M.; Jacobs, Jon M.; Smith, Richard D.; Katze, Michael G.

    2010-01-01

    The host proteome response and molecular mechanisms that drive disease in vivo during infection by a human isolate of the highly pathogenic avian influenza virus (HPAI) and 1918 pandemic influenza virus remain poorly understood. This study presents a comprehensive characterization of the proteome response in cynomolgus macaque (Macaca fascicularis) lung tissue over 7 days of infection with HPAI (the most virulent), a reassortant virus containing 1918 hemagglutinin and neuraminidase surface proteins (intermediate virulence), or a human seasonal strain (least virulent). A high-sensitivity two-dimensional liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectroscopy strategy and functional network analysis were implemented to gain insight into response pathways activated in macaques during influenza virus infection. A macaque protein database was assembled and used in the identification of 35,239 unique peptide sequences corresponding to approximately 4,259 proteins. Quantitative analysis identified an increase in expression of 400 proteins during viral infection. The abundance levels of a subset of these 400 proteins produced strong correlations with disease progression observed in the macaques, distinguishing a “core” response to viral infection from a “high” response specific to severe disease. Proteome expression profiles revealed distinct temporal response kinetics between viral strains, with HPAI inducing the most rapid response. While proteins involved in the immune response, metabolism, and transport were increased rapidly in the lung by HPAI, the other viruses produced a delayed response, characterized by an increase in proteins involved in oxidative phosphorylation, RNA processing, and translation. Proteomic results were integrated with previous genomic and pathological analysis to characterize the dynamic nature of the influenza virus infection process. PMID:20844032

  16. Macaque proteome response to highly pathogenic avian influenza and 1918 reassortant influenza virus infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Joseph N; Palermo, Robert E; Baskin, Carole R; Gritsenko, Marina; Sabourin, Patrick J; Long, James P; Sabourin, Carol L; Bielefeldt-Ohmann, Helle; García-Sastre, Adolfo; Albrecht, Randy; Tumpey, Terrence M; Jacobs, Jon M; Smith, Richard D; Katze, Michael G

    2010-11-01

    The host proteome response and molecular mechanisms that drive disease in vivo during infection by a human isolate of the highly pathogenic avian influenza virus (HPAI) and 1918 pandemic influenza virus remain poorly understood. This study presents a comprehensive characterization of the proteome response in cynomolgus macaque (Macaca fascicularis) lung tissue over 7 days of infection with HPAI (the most virulent), a reassortant virus containing 1918 hemagglutinin and neuraminidase surface proteins (intermediate virulence), or a human seasonal strain (least virulent). A high-sensitivity two-dimensional liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectroscopy strategy and functional network analysis were implemented to gain insight into response pathways activated in macaques during influenza virus infection. A macaque protein database was assembled and used in the identification of 35,239 unique peptide sequences corresponding to approximately 4,259 proteins. Quantitative analysis identified an increase in expression of 400 proteins during viral infection. The abundance levels of a subset of these 400 proteins produced strong correlations with disease progression observed in the macaques, distinguishing a "core" response to viral infection from a "high" response specific to severe disease. Proteome expression profiles revealed distinct temporal response kinetics between viral strains, with HPAI inducing the most rapid response. While proteins involved in the immune response, metabolism, and transport were increased rapidly in the lung by HPAI, the other viruses produced a delayed response, characterized by an increase in proteins involved in oxidative phosphorylation, RNA processing, and translation. Proteomic results were integrated with previous genomic and pathological analysis to characterize the dynamic nature of the influenza virus infection process.

  17. Chicken dendritic cells are susceptible to highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses which induce strong cytokine responses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vervelde, L.; Reemens, S.S.; Haarlem, van D.A.; Post, J.; Claassen, E.A.W.; Rebel, J.M.J.; Jansen, C.A.

    2013-01-01

    Infection with highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) in birds and mammals is associated with severe pathology and increased mortality. We hypothesize that in contrast to low pathogenicity avian influenza (LPAI) infection, HPAI infection of chicken dendritic cells (DC) induces a cytokine deregulat

  18. Effects of dietary Fusarium mycotoxins on intestinal lymphocyte subset populations, cell proliferation and histological changes in avian lymphoid organs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girish, C K; Smith, T K; Boermans, H J; Anil Kumar, P; Girgis, G N

    2010-10-01

    An experiment was conducted to investigate the effects of dietary Fusarium mycotoxins on gut immunity, cell proliferation, and histology of avian lymphoid organs. The efficacy of a polymeric glucomannan mycotoxin adsorbent (GMA) was also determined. Seventy-two one-day-old male turkey poults were fed corn, wheat, and soybean meal-based diets for 21 days. Diets included control grains, contaminated grains and contaminated grains +0.2% GMA. The major contaminant was deoxynivalenol (3.9 μg/g) with lesser amounts of zearalenone (0.67-0.75 μg/g), 15-acetyl-deoxynivalenol (0.34 μg/g) and HT-2 toxin (0.078-0.085 μg/g). T- and B-lymphocyte populations and crypt cellular proliferation in duodenum, jejunum, ileum and cecal tonsil were measured immunohistochemically on day 14 and 21. Histological changes were recorded after 14 and 21 days of feeding. Feeding contaminated grains significantly increased the percentage of B-lymphocytes in ileum on day 14, and reduced (Pcontaminated diets also caused a reduction (Pcontaminated with Fusarium mycotoxins results in adverse effects on gut immunity and mucosal cell proliferation.

  19. Responses of Squalius cephalus intestinal mucous cells to Pomphorhynchus laevis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosi, Giampaolo; Sayyaf Dezfuli, Bahram

    2015-04-01

    Intestinal mucous cell numbers and their glycoconjugate composition were investigated by histochemical methods in uninfected chub, Squalius cephalus, and in conspecifics naturally parasitised with the acanthocephalan Pomphorhynchus laevis. A sub-population of 42 chub from the River Tiber (Perugia, Italy) were sampled and screened for ecto and endoparasites. No parasites were found in gills and in other visceral organs of chub and P. laevis appeared to be the only enteric worm encountered. In all infected chub (twenty-eight out of 42) this acanthocephalan was encountered mainly in the mid-gut. In situ, an excessive yellowish mucus or catarrh was observed around each acanthocephalan. Hyperplasia and hypertrophy of the mucous cells were only evident near the site of P. laevis attachment where the total number of mucous cells and the number of those containing acidic, particularly non-sulphated mucins, or mixed glycoconjugates were significantly higher. In intestinal regions of infected fish far away from the point of parasite attachment, there were no statistical differences in the density of mucous cells in comparison to uninfected fish. Interestingly, in parasitised chub, the length of intestinal folds was significantly larger close to the sites at which P. laevis attach when compared to the length of the intestinal folds located further away from the acanthocephalans and/or in uninfected intestines. The effect of P. laevis on intestinal mucous cells of S. cephalus was compared to other parasite-host systems and the role of enhanced mucus production in parasitized intestines was discussed.

  20. Micro array analysis of the intestinal host response in Giardia duodenalis assemblage E infected cattle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giardia duodenalis is one of the most commonly found intestinal pathogens in humans and animals. However, little is known about the host-parasite interaction in its natural hosts. The objective of this study was to investigate the intestinal response in calves following a G. duodenalis infection, us...

  1. Regulation of T-cell Responses in the Inflamed Intestine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.A. Van Leeuwen (Marieke)

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ The intestinal immune system protects the mucosal surfaces from pathogenic microorganisms. On the other hand it maintains tolerance towards dietary antigens and non-pathogenic microorganisms. The immune system continuously tailors these inflammatory and tolerogenic resp

  2. Regulation of T-cell Responses in the Inflamed Intestine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.A. Van Leeuwen (Marieke)

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ The intestinal immune system protects the mucosal surfaces from pathogenic microorganisms. On the other hand it maintains tolerance towards dietary antigens and non-pathogenic microorganisms. The immune system continuously tailors these inflammatory and tolerogenic resp

  3. The Intestinal Flora Is Required to Support Antibody Responses to Systemic Immunization in Infant and Germ Free Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Lamousé-Smith, Esi S.; Alice Tzeng; Starnbach, Michael N.

    2011-01-01

    The presence of a complex and diverse intestinal flora is functionally important for regulating intestinal mucosal immune responses. However, the extent to which a balanced intestinal flora regulates systemic immune responses is still being defined. In order to specifically examine whether the acquisition of a less complex flora influences responses to immunization in the pre-weaning stages of life, we utilize a model in which infant mice acquire an intestinal flora from their mothers that ha...

  4. Role of Metabolism by Intestinal Bacteria in Arbutin-Induced Suppression of Lymphoproliferative Response in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Mi Jeong; Ha, Hyun Woo; Kim, Ghee Hwan; Lee, Sang Kyu; Ahn, Young Tae; Kim, Dong Hyun; Jeong, Hye Gwang; Jeong, Tae Cheon

    2012-01-01

    Role of metabolism by intestinal bacteria in arbutin-induced immunotoxicity was investigated in splenocyte cultures. Following an incubation of arbutin with 5 different intestinal bacteria for 24 hr, its aglycone hydroquinone could be produced and detected in the bacterial culture media with different amounts. Toxic effects of activated arbutin by intestinal bacteria on lymphoproliferative response were tested in splenocyte cultures from normal mice. Lipopolysaccharide and concanavalin A were used as mitogens for B- and T-cells, respectively. When bacteria cultured medium with arbutin was treated into the splenocytes for 3 days, the medium cultured with bacteria producing large amounts of hydroquinone induced suppression of lymphoproliferative responses, indicating that metabolic activation by intestinal bacteria might be required in arbutin-induced toxicity. The results indicated that the present testing system might be applied for determining the possible role of metabolism by intestinal bacteria in certain chemical-induced immunotoxicity in animal cell cultures. PMID:24116295

  5. Avian cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strunk, Anneliese; Wilson, G Heather

    2003-01-01

    The field of avian cardiology is continually expanding. Although a great deal of the current knowledge base has been derived from poultry data, research and clinical reports involving companion avian species have been published. This article will present avian cardiovascular anatomy and physiology, history and physical examination considerations in the avian cardiac disease patient, specific diagnostic tools, cardiovascular disease processes, and current therapeutic modalities.

  6. Dietary sodium selenite affects host intestinal and systemic immune response and disease susceptibility to necrotic enteritis in commercial broilers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, S Z; Lee, S H; Lillehoj, H S; Bravo, D

    2015-01-01

    1. This study was to evaluate the effects of supplementary dietary selenium (Se) given as sodium selenite on host immune response against necrotic enteritis (NE) in commercial broiler chickens. 2. Chicks were fed from hatching on a non-supplemented diet or diets supplemented with different levels of Se (0.25, 0.50, and 1.00 Se mg/kg). To induce NE, broiler chickens were orally infected with Eimeria maxima at 14 d of age and then with Clostridium perfringens 4 d later using our previously established NE disease model. 3. NE-associated clinical signs and host protective immunity were determined by body weight changes, intestinal lesion scores, and serum antibodies against α-toxin and necrotic enteritis B (NetB) toxin. The effects of dietary Se on the gene expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines e.g., interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, IL-8LITAF (lipopolysaccharide-induced TNFα-factor), tumour necrosis factor (TNF) SF15, and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), glutathione peroxidase 7 (GPx7), and avian β-defensins (AvBD) 6, 8, and 13 (following NE infection) were analysed in the intestine and spleen. 4. The results showed that dietary supplementation of newly hatched broiler chicks with 0.25 Se mg/kg from hatch significantly reduced NE-induced gut lesions compared with infected birds given a non-supplemented diet. The levels of serum antibody against the NetB toxin in the chicks fed with 0.25 and 0.50 mg/kg Se were significantly higher than the non-supplemented control group. The transcripts for IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, iNOS, LITAF, and GPx7, as well as AvBD6, 8, and 13 were increased in the intestine and spleen of Se-supplemented groups, whereas transcript for TNFSF15 was decreased in the intestine. 5. It was concluded that dietary supplementation with optimum levels of Se exerted beneficial effects on host immune response to NE and reduced negative consequence of NE-induced immunopathology.

  7. Novel avian influenza A (H7N9 virus induces impaired interferon responses in human dendritic cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veera Arilahti

    Full Text Available In March 2013 a new avian influenza A(H7N9 virus emerged in China and infected humans with a case fatality rate of over 30%. Like the highly pathogenic H5N1 virus, H7N9 virus is causing severe respiratory distress syndrome in most patients. Based on genetic analysis this avian influenza A virus shows to some extent adaptation to mammalian host. In the present study, we analyzed the activation of innate immune responses by this novel H7N9 influenza A virus and compared these responses to those induced by the avian H5N1 and seasonal H3N2 viruses in human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (moDCs. We observed that in H7N9 virus-infected cells, interferon (IFN responses were weak although the virus replicated as well as the H5N1 and H3N2 viruses in moDCs. H7N9 virus-induced expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines remained at a significantly lower level as compared to H5N1 virus-induced "cytokine storm" seen in human moDCs. However, the H7N9 virus was extremely sensitive to the antiviral effects of IFN-α and IFN-β in pretreated cells. Our data indicates that different highly pathogenic avian viruses may show considerable differences in their ability to induce host antiviral responses in human primary cell models such as moDCs. The unexpected appearance of the novel H7N9 virus clearly emphasizes the importance of the global influenza surveillance system. It is, however, equally important to systematically characterize in normal human cells the replication capacity of the new viruses and their ability to induce and respond to natural antiviral substances such as IFNs.

  8. Respiratory immune responses in the chicken; Towards development of mucosal avian influenza virus vaccines

    OpenAIRE

    de Geus, E.D.

    2012-01-01

    Several important poultry pathogens, including avian influenza virus (AIV), enter the host through the mucosae of the respiratory tract (RT) and subsequently disseminate towards other organs in the body. Therefore, animal health significantly depends on the control of infection in the lung tissue by the RT immune system. There is limited knowledge of the lung-associated immune system in poultry, which might be a consequence of the unique and complex anatomy and function of the avian lung. The...

  9. Comprehensive mapping of common immunodominant epitopes in the West Nile virus nonstructural protein 1 recognized by avian antibody responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Encheng Sun

    Full Text Available West Nile virus (WNV is a mosquito-borne flavivirus that primarily infects birds but occasionally infects humans and horses. Certain species of birds, including crows, house sparrows, geese, blue jays and ravens, are considered highly susceptible hosts to WNV. The nonstructural protein 1 (NS1 of WNV can elicit protective immune responses, including NS1-reactive antibodies, during infection of animals. The antigenicity of NS1 suggests that NS1-reactive antibodies could provide a basis for serological diagnostic reagents. To further define serological reagents for diagnostic use, the antigenic sites in NS1 that are targeted by host immune responses need to be identified and the potential diagnostic value of individual antigenic sites also needs to be defined. The present study describes comprehensive mapping of common immunodominant linear B-cell epitopes in the WNV NS1 using avian WNV NS1 antisera. We screened antisera from chickens, ducks and geese immunized with purified NS1 for reactivity against 35 partially overlapping peptides covering the entire WNV NS1. This study identified twelve, nine and six peptide epitopes recognized by chicken, duck and goose antibody responses, respectively. Three epitopes (NS1-3, 14 and 24 were recognized by antibodies elicited by immunization in all three avian species tested. We also found that NS1-3 and 24 were WNV-specific epitopes, whereas the NS1-14 epitope was conserved among the Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV serocomplex viruses based on the reactivity of avian WNV NS1 antisera against polypeptides derived from the NS1 sequences of viruses of the JEV serocomplex. Further analysis showed that the three common polypeptide epitopes were not recognized by antibodies in Avian Influenza Virus (AIV, Newcastle Disease Virus (NDV, Duck Plague Virus (DPV and Goose Parvovirus (GPV antisera. The knowledge and reagents generated in this study have potential applications in differential diagnostic approaches and

  10. Genetic structure along an elevational gradient in Hawaiian honeycreepers reveals contrasting evolutionary responses to avian malaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hart Patrick J

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Hawaiian honeycreepers (Drepanidinae are one of the best-known examples of an adaptive radiation, but their persistence today is threatened by the introduction of exotic pathogens and their vector, the mosquito Culex quinquefasciatus. Historically, species such as the amakihi (Hemignathus virens, the apapane (Himatione sanguinea, and the iiwi (Vestiaria coccinea were found from the coastal lowlands to the high elevation forests, but by the late 1800's they had become extremely rare in habitats below 900 m. Recently, however, populations of amakihi and apapane have been observed in low elevation habitats. We used twelve polymorphic microsatellite loci to investigate patterns of genetic structure, and to infer responses of these species to introduced avian malaria along an elevational gradient on the eastern flanks of Mauna Loa and Kilauea volcanoes on the island of Hawaii. Results Our results indicate that amakihi have genetically distinct, spatially structured populations that correspond with altitude. We detected very few apapane and no iiwi in low-elevation habitats, and genetic results reveal only minimal differentiation between populations at different altitudes in either of these species. Conclusion Our results suggest that amakihi populations in low elevation habitats have not been recolonized by individuals from mid or high elevation refuges. After generations of strong selection for pathogen resistance, these populations have rebounded and amakihi have become common in regions in which they were previously rare or absent.

  11. Genetic structure along an elevational gradient in Hawaiian honeycreepers reveals contrasting evolutionary responses to avian malaria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eggert, L.S.; Terwilliger, L.A.; Woodworth, B.L.; Hart, P.J.; Palmer, D.; Fleischer, R.C.

    2008-01-01

    Background. The Hawaiian honeycreepers (Drepanidinae) are one of the best-known examples of an adaptive radiation, but their persistence today is threatened by the introduction of exotic pathogens and their vector, the mosquito Culex quinquefasciatus. Historically, species such as the amakihi (Hemignathus virens), the apapane (Himatione sanguinea), and the iiwi (Vestiaria coccinea) were found from the coastal lowlands to the high elevation forests, but by the late 1800's they had become extremely rare in habitats below 900 m. Recently, however, populations of amakihi and apapane have been observed in low elevation habitats. We used twelve polymorphic microsatellite loci to investigate patterns of genetic structure, and to infer responses of these species to introduced avian malaria along an elevational gradient on the eastern flanks of Mauna Loa and Kilauea volcanoes on the island of Hawaii. Results. Our results indicate that amakihi have genetically distinct, spatially structured populations that correspond with altitude. We detected very few apapane and no iiwi in low-elevation habitats, and genetic results reveal only minimal differentiation between populations at different altitudes in either of these species. Conclusion. Our results suggest that amakihi populations in low elevation habitats have not been recolonized by individuals from mid or high elevation refuges. After generations of strong selection for pathogen resistance, these populations have rebounded and amakihi have become common in regions in which they were previously rare or absent. ?? 2008 Eggert et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

  12. The role of ER stress response on ionizing radiation-induced apoptosis in intestinal epithelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Eun Sang; Kim, Kwang Seok; Woo, Sang Keun; Lee, Yong Jin; Jeong, Jae Hoon; Lee, Yoon Jin; Kang, Seong Man; Lim, Young Bin [Laboratory of Radiation Effect, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-04-15

    Apoptosis in the intestinal epithelium is the primary pathologic factor that initiates radiation-induced intestinal injury. However, mechanism involved in ionizing radiation (IR)-induced apoptosis in the intestinal epithelium is not clearly understood. The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is triggered by perturbation of the ER functions, leading to the activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR), an adaptive signaling cascade aimed at restoring ER homeostasis by facilitating the degradation of misfolded proteins and expanding the protein folding capacity of the cell. Recently, IR has also been shown to induce ER stress, thereby activating the UPR signaling pathway in intestinal epithelial cells. In this study, we report the role of ER stress responses in IR-induced intestinal epithelial cell death. We show that chemical ER stress inducers, such as tunicamycin or thapsigargin, enhance IR-induced caspase3 activation. Knockdown of xbp1 or atf6 with siRNA leads to inhibition of IR-induced caspase3 activation. Taken together, our results suggest a pro-apoptotic role of ER stress in IR-exposed intestinal epithelial cells. Our findings could contribute to the development of new strategies based on modulating ER stress responses to prevent IR-induced intestinal injury.

  13. Regulation of intestinal immune responses through TLR activation: implications for pro- and prebiotics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sander eDe Kivit

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The intestinal mucosa is constantly facing a high load of antigens including bacterial antigens derived from the microbiota and food. Despite this, the immune cells present in the gastrointestinal tract do not initiate a pro-inflammatory immune response. Toll-like receptors (TLRs are pattern recognition receptors expressed by various cells in the gastrointestinal tract, including intestinal epithelial cells (IEC and resident immune cells in the lamina propria. Many diseases, including chronic intestinal inflammation (e.g. inflammatory bowel disease, irritable bowel syndrome (IBS, allergic gastroenteritis (e.g. eosinophilic gastroenteritis and allergic IBS and infections are nowadays associated with a deregulated microbiota. The microbiota may directly interact with TLR. In addition, differences in intestinal TLR expression in health and disease may suggest that TLR play an essential role in disease pathogenesis and may be novel targets for therapy. TLR signaling in the gut is involved in either maintaining intestinal homeostasis or the induction of an inflammatory response. This mini review provides an overview of the current knowledge regarding the contribution of intestinal epithelial TLR signaling in both tolerance induction or promoting intestinal inflammation, with a focus on food allergy. We will also highlight a potential role of the microbiota in regulating gut immune responses, especially through TLR activation.

  14. Intestinal immune response to human Cryptosporidium sp. infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    intestinal tissues from AIDS patients with cryptosporidiosis, we did not detect CXCL-8 (90). Finally, CXCL-8 attracts mainly granu - locytes. However, in...cryptosporidiosis but not after reconstitution of immunity. Infect. Immun. 75:481–487. 91. Weinstock, J. V., A. Blum, J. Walder, and R. Walder. 1988. Eosinophils

  15. Plasmacytoid dendritic cells are dispensable for noninfectious intestinal IgA responses in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moro-Sibilot, Ludovic; This, Sebastien; Blanc, Pascal; Sanlaville, Amelien; Sisirak, Vanja; Bardel, Emilie; Boschetti, Gilles; Bendriss-Vermare, Nathalie; Defrance, Thierry; Dubois, Bertrand; Kaiserlian, Dominique

    2016-02-01

    Intestinal DCs orchestrate gut immune homeostasis by dampening proinflammatory T-cell responses and inducing anti-inflammatory IgA responses. Although no specific DC subset has been strictly assigned so far to govern IgA response, some candidate subsets emerge. In particular, plasmacytoid DCs (pDCs), which notoriously promote anti-viral immunity and T-cell tolerance to innocuous antigens (Ags), contribute to IgA induction in response to intestinal viral infection and promote T-cell-independent IgA responses in vitro. Here, using two transgenic mouse models, we show that neither short-term nor long-term pDC depletion alters IgA class switch recombination in Peyer's patches and frequency of IgA plasma cells in intestinal mucosa at steady state, even in the absence of T-cell help. In addition, pDCs are dispensable for induction of intestinal IgA plasma cells in response to oral immunization with T-cell-dependent or T-cell-independent Ags, and are not required for proliferation and IgA switch of Ag-specific B cells in GALT. These results show that pDCs are dispensable for noninfectious IgA responses, and suggest that various DC subsets may play redundant roles in the control of intestinal IgA responses.

  16. High beta-palmitate fat controls the intestinal inflammatory response and limits intestinal damage in mucin Muc2 deficient mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Lu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Palmitic-acid esterified to the sn-1,3 positions of the glycerol backbone (alpha, alpha'-palmitate, the predominant palmitate conformation in regular infant formula fat, is poorly absorbed and might cause abdominal discomfort. In contrast, palmitic-acid esterified to the sn-2 position (beta-palmitate, the main palmitate conformation in human milk fat, is well absorbed. The aim of the present study was to examine the influence of high alpha, alpha'-palmitate fat (HAPF diet and high beta-palmitate fat (HBPF diet on colitis development in Muc2 deficient (Muc2(-/- mice, a well-described animal model for spontaneous enterocolitis due to the lack of a protective mucus layer. METHODS: Muc2(-/- mice received AIN-93G reference diet, HAPF diet or HBPF diet for 5 weeks after weaning. Clinical symptoms, intestinal morphology and inflammation in the distal colon were analyzed. RESULTS: Both HBPF diet and AIN-93G diet limited the extent of intestinal erosions and morphological damage in Muc2(-/- mice compared with HAPF diet. In addition, the immunosuppressive regulatory T (Treg cell response as demonstrated by the up-regulation of Foxp3, Tgfb1 and Ebi3 gene expression levels was enhanced by HBPF diet compared with AIN-93G and HAPF diets. HBPF diet also increased the gene expression of Pparg and enzymatic antioxidants (Sod1, Sod3 and Gpx1, genes all reported to be involved in promoting an immunosuppressive Treg cell response and to protect against colitis. CONCLUSIONS: This study shows for the first time that HBPF diet limits the intestinal mucosal damage and controls the inflammatory response in Muc2(-/- mice by inducing an immunosuppressive Treg cell response.

  17. Avian community response to small-scale habitat disturbance in Maine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derleth, E.L.; McAuley, D.G.; Dwyer, T.J.

    1989-01-01

    The effects of small clearcuts (1 - 8 ha) on avian communities in the forest of eastern Maine were studied using point counts during spring 1978 - 1981. Surveys were conducted in uncut (control) and clear-cut (treatment) plots in three stand types: conifer, hardwood, and mixed growth. We used a mark-recapture model and its associated jackknife species richness estimator (N), as an indicator of avian community structure. Increases in estimated richness (N) and Shannon - Weaver diversity (H') were noted in the treated hardwood and mixed growth, but not in the conifer stands. Seventeen avian species increased in relative abundance, whereas two species declined. Stand treatment was associated with important changes in bird species composition. Increased habitat patchiness and the creation of forest edge are hypothesized as causes for the greater estimates of richness and diversity.

  18. Effect of glutamate on inflammatory responses of intestine and brain after focal cerebral ischemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lei Xu; Jie Sun; Ran Lu; Qing Ji; Jian-Guo Xu

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To study the modulation of glutamate on post-ischemic intestinal and cerebral inflammatory responses in a ischemic and excitotoxic rat model.METHODS: Adult male rats were subjected to bilateral carotid artery occlusion for 15 min and injection of monosodium glutamate intraperitoneally, to decapitate them at selected time points. Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) level and nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) activity were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay (ELISA) and electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA), respectively.Hemodynamic parameters were monitored continuously during the whole process of cerebral ischemia and reperfusion.RESULTS: Monosodium glutamate (MSG) treated rats displayed statistically significant high levels of TNF-α in cerebral and intestinal tissuess within the first 6 h of ischemia. The rats with cerebral ischemia showed a minor decrease of TNF-α production in cerebral and intestinal tissuess. The rats with cerebral ischemia and treated with MSG displayed statistically significant low levels of TNF-α in cerebral and intestinal tissues. These results correlated significantly with NF-κB production calculated at the same intervals. During experiment, the mean blood pressure and heart rates in all groups were stable.CONCLUSION: Glutamate is involved in the mechanism of intestinal and cerebral inflammation responses. The effects of glutamate on cerebral and intestinal inflammatory responses after ischemia are up-regulated at the transcriptional level,through the NF-κB signal transduction pathway.

  19. Avian anemia's

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raukar Jelena

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with avian anemia's classified by MCHC/MCV and with types of anemia's. Father hematological and immunological research is needed to secure information on hematological parameters in different avian species at their earliest age. Anemia is a common clinical finding in birds because the avian erythrocyte half - life is much shorter than the mammalian. Therefore anemia should be determined as soon as possible. Researchers should standardize hematological parameters for every single avian species.

  20. Modeling the effects of environmental disturbance on wildlife communities: avian responses to prescribed fire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Robin E; Royle, J Andrew; Saab, Victoria A; Lehmkuhl, John F; Block, William M; Sauer, John R

    2009-07-01

    Prescribed fire is a management tool used to reduce fuel loads on public lands in forested areas in the western United States. Identifying the impacts of prescribed fire on bird communities in ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) forests is necessary for providing land management agencies with information regarding the effects of fuel reduction on sensitive, threatened, and migratory bird species. Recent developments in occupancy modeling have established a framework for quantifying the impacts of management practices on wildlife community dynamics. We describe a Bayesian hierarchical model of multi-species occupancy accounting for detection probability, and we demonstrate the model's usefulness for identifying effects of habitat disturbances on wildlife communities. Advantages to using the model include the ability to estimate the effects of environmental impacts on rare or elusive species, the intuitive nature of the modeling, the incorporation of detection probability, the estimation of parameter uncertainty, the flexibility of the model to suit a variety of experimental designs, and the composite estimate of the response that applies to the collection of observed species as opposed to merely a small subset of common species. Our modeling of the impacts of prescribed fire on avian communities in a ponderosa pine forest in Washington indicate that prescribed fire treatments result in increased occupancy rates for several bark-insectivore, cavity-nesting species including a management species of interest, Black-backed Woodpeckers (Picoides arcticus). Three aerial insectivore species, and the ground insectivore, American Robin (Turdus migratorius), also responded positively to prescribed fire, whereas three foliage insectivores and two seed specialists, Clark's Nutcracker (Nucifraga columbiana) and the Pine Siskin (Carduelis pinus), declined following treatments. Land management agencies interested in determining the effects of habitat manipulations on wildlife

  1. Recent progress in the understanding of host immunity to avian coccidiosis: IL-17 family cytokines as the sentinels on the intestinal mucosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    The molecular and cellular mechanisms leading to immune protection against Eimeria avian coccidiosis are complex and include multiple aspects of innate and adaptive immunities. Innate immunity is mediated by various subpopulations of immune cells that recognize pathogen associated molecular patterns...

  2. Human intestinal epithelial cells produce proinflammatory cytokines in response to infection in a SCID mouse-human intestinal xenograft model of amebiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seydel, K B; Li, E; Swanson, P E; Stanley, S L

    1997-01-01

    The protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica causes amebic dysentery and amebic liver abscess, diseases associated with significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. E. histolytica infection appears to involve the initial attachment of amebic trophozoites to intestinal epithelial cells, followed by lysis of these cells and subsequent invasion into the submucosa. A recent in vitro study (L. Eckmann, S. L. Reed, J. R. Smith, and M. F. Kagnoff, J. Clin. Invest. 96:1269-1279, 1995) demonstrated that incubation of E. histolytica trophozoites with epithelial cell lines results in epithelial cell production of inflammatory cytokines, including interleukin-1 (IL-1) and IL-8, suggesting that intestinal epithelial cell production of cytokines might play a role in the inflammatory response and tissue damage seen in intestinal amebiasis. To determine whether intestinal epithelial cell production of IL-1 and IL-8 occurs in response to E. histolytica infection in vivo and as an approach to studying the specific interactions between amebic trophozoites and human intestine, we used a SCID mouse-human intestinal xenograft (SCID-HU-INT) model of disease, where human intestinal xenografts were infected with virulent E. histolytica trophozoites. Infection of xenografts with E. histolytica trophozoites resulted in extensive tissue damage, which was associated with the development of an early inflammatory response composed primarily of neutrophils. Using oligonucleotide primers that specifically amplify human IL-1beta and IL-8, we could demonstrate by reverse transcription PCR that mRNA for both IL-1beta and IL-8 is produced by human intestinal xenografts in response to amebic infection. The increase in human intestinal IL-1beta and IL-8 in response to invasive amebiasis was confirmed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays specific for human IL-1beta and IL-8. Using immunohistochemistry, we confirmed that human intestinal epithelial cells were the source of IL-8 in infected xenografts

  3. Intestinal barrier and gut microbiota: Shaping our immune responses throughout life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takiishi, Tatiana; Fenero, Camila Ideli Morales; Câmara, Niels Olsen Saraiva

    2017-09-06

    The gastrointestinal (GI) tract is considered the largest immunological organ in the body having a central role in regulating immune homeostasis. Contrary to earlier belief, the intestinal epithelial barrier is not a static physical barrier but rather strongly interacts with the gut microbiome and cells of the immune system. This intense communication between epithelial cells, immune cells and microbiome will shape specific immune responses to antigens, balancing tolerance and effector immune functions. Recent studies indicate that composition of the gut microbiome affects immune system development and modulates immune mediators, which in turn affect the intestinal barrier. Moreover, dysbiosis may favor intestinal barrier disruption and could be related to increased susceptibility to certain diseases. This review will be focused on the development of the intestinal barrier and its function in host immune defense and how gut microbiome composition throughout life can affect this role.

  4. Respiratory immune responses in the chicken; Towards development of mucosal avian influenza virus vaccines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Geus, E.D.

    2012-01-01

    Several important poultry pathogens, including avian influenza virus (AIV), enter the host through the mucosae of the respiratory tract (RT) and subsequently disseminate towards other organs in the body. Therefore, animal health significantly depends on the control of infection in the lung tissue by

  5. Gene expression response of the rat small intestine following oral salmonella infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rodenburg, G.C.H.; Bovee-Oudenhoven, I.M.J.; Kramer, E.H.M.; Meer, van der R.; Keijer, J.

    2007-01-01

    Data on the molecular response of the intestine to the food-borne pathogen Salmonella are derived from in vitro studies, whereas in vivo data are lacking. We performed an oral S. enteritidis infection study in Wistar rats to obtain insight in the in vivo response in time. Expression profiles of ilea

  6. Towards the conservation of endangered avian species: a recombinant West Nile Virus vaccine results in increased humoral and cellular immune responses in Japanese Quail (Coturnix japonica.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jay A Young

    Full Text Available West Nile Virus (WNV arrived in North America in 1999 and is now endemic. Many families of birds, especially corvids, are highly susceptible to WNV and infection often results in fatality. Avian species susceptible to WNV infection also include endangered species, such as the Greater Sage-Grouse (Centrocercus uropbasianuts and the Eastern Loggerhead Shrike (Lanius ludovicianus migrans. The virus has been shown to contribute towards the likelihood of their extinction. Although a clear and present threat, there exists no avian WNV vaccine available to combat this lethal menace. As a first step in establishing an avian model for testing candidate WNV vaccines, avian antibody based reagents were assessed for cross-reactivity with Japanese quail (Coturnix japonica T cell markers CD4 and CD8; the most reactive were found to be the anti-duck CD8 antibody, clone Du-CD8-1, and the anti-chicken/turkey CD4 antibody, clone CT4. These reagents were then used to assess vaccine performance as well as to establish T cell populations in quail, with a novel population of CD4/CD8 double positive T cells being identified in Japanese quail. Concurrently, non-replicating recombinant adenoviruses, expressing either the WNV envelope or NS3 'genes' were constructed and assessed for effectiveness as avian vaccines. Japanese Quail were selected for testing the vaccines, as they provide an avian model that parallels the population diversity of bird species in the wild. Both the level of WNV specific antibodies and the number of T cells in vaccinated birds were increased compared to unvaccinated controls. The results indicate the vaccines to be effective in increasing both humoral and cellular immune responses. These recombinant vaccines therefore may find utility as tools to protect and maintain domestic and wild avian populations. Their implementation may also arrest the progression towards extinction of endangered avian species and reduce the viral reservoir that

  7. Avian CD154 enhances humoral and cellular immune responses induced by an adenovirus vector-based vaccine in chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez Ramos, Oliberto; González Pose, Alain; Gómez-Puerta, Silvia; Noda Gomez, Julia; Vega Redondo, Armando; Águila Benites, Julio César; Suárez Amarán, Lester; Parra, Natalie C; Toledo Alonso, Jorge R

    2011-05-01

    Recombinant adenoviral vectors have emerged as an attractive system for veterinary vaccines development. However, for poultry vaccination a very important criterion for an ideal vaccine is its low cost. The objective of this study was to test the ability of chicken CD154 to enhance the immunogenicity of an adenoviral vector-based vaccine against avian influenza virus in order to reduce the amount of antigen required to induce an effective immune response in avian. Chickens were vaccinated with three different doses of adenoviral vectors encoding either HA (AdHA), or HA fused to extracellular domain chicken's CD154 (AdHACD). Hemagglutination inhibition (HI) assay and relative quantification of IFN-γ showed that the adenoviral vector encoding for the chimeric antigen is able to elicit an improved humoral and cellular immune response, which demonstrated that CD154 can be used as a molecular adjuvant allowing to reduce in about 50-fold the amount of adenoviral vector vaccine required to induce an effective immune response.

  8. The human milk oligosaccharide 2'-fucosyllactose augments the adaptive response to extensive intestinal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mezoff, Ethan A; Hawkins, Jennifer A; Ollberding, Nicholas J; Karns, Rebekah; Morrow, Ardythe L; Helmrath, Michael A

    2016-03-15

    Intestinal resection resulting in short bowel syndrome (SBS) carries a heavy burden of long-term morbidity, mortality, and cost of care, which can be attenuated with strategies that improve intestinal adaptation. SBS infants fed human milk, compared with formula, have more rapid intestinal adaptation. We tested the hypothesis that the major noncaloric human milk oligosaccharide 2'-fucosyllactose (2'-FL) contributes to the adaptive response after intestinal resection. Using a previously described murine model of intestinal adaptation, we demonstrated increased weight gain from 21 to 56 days (P < 0.001) and crypt depth at 56 days (P < 0.0095) with 2'-FL supplementation after ileocecal resection. Furthermore, 2'-FL increased small bowel luminal content microbial alpha diversity following resection (P < 0.005) and stimulated a bloom in organisms of the genus Parabacteroides (log2-fold = 4.1, P = 0.035). Finally, transcriptional analysis of the intestine revealed enriched ontologies and pathways related to antimicrobial peptides, metabolism, and energy processing. We conclude that 2'-FL supplementation following ileocecal resection increases weight gain, energy availability through microbial community modulation, and histological changes consistent with improved adaptation.

  9. Infection strategies of intestinal parasite pathogens and host cell responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Martorell Di Genova

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Giardia lamblia, Cryptosporidium spp. and Entamoeba histolytica are important pathogenic intestinal parasites and are amongst the leading cause worldwide of diarrheal illness in humans. Diseases caused by these organisms, Giardiasis, Cryptosporidiosis and Amoebiasis, respectively, are characterized by self-limited diarrhea but can evolve to long-term complications. The cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of diarrhea associated with these tree pathogens are being unraveled, with knowledge of both the strategies explored by the parasites to establish infection and the methods evolved by hosts to avoid it. Special attention is being given to molecules participating in parasite-host interaction and in the mechanisms implicated in the diseases pathophysiologic processes. This review focuses on cell mechanisms that are modulated during infection, including gene transcription, cytoskeleton rearrangements, signal transduction pathways and cell death.

  10. Primary afferent response to signals in the intestinal lumen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raybould, H

    2001-02-01

    The first recordings of vagal afferent nerve fibre activity were performed by Paintal in the early 1950s. In these experiments, he showed that phenyldiguanide (later recognized as a 5-HT3 receptor agonist) stimulated the firing of C-fibres innervating the intestine. In the following years, ample physiological and psychological studies have demonstrated the importance of afferent information arising from the gut in the regulation of gastrointestinal function and behaviour. Many stimuli are capable of eliciting these functional effects and of stimulating afferent fibre discharge, including mechanical, chemical, nutrient- and immune-derived stimuli. Studies in the last 10 years have begun to focus on the precise sensory transduction mechanisms by which these visceral primary afferent nerve terminals are activated and, like the contribution by Zhu et al. in this issue of The Journal of Physiology, are revealing some novel and exciting findings.

  11. Interleukin (IL)-21 promotes intestinal IgA response to microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, A T; Yao, S; Gong, B; Nurieva, R I; Elson, C O; Cong, Y

    2015-09-01

    Commensal microbiota-specific T helper type 17 (Th17) cells are enriched in the intestines, which can convert into T follicular helper (Tfh) in Peyer's patches, and are crucial for production of intestinal immunoglobulin A (IgA) against microbiota; however, the role of Th17 and Tfh cytokines in regulating the mucosal IgA response to enteric microbiota is still not completely known. In this study, we found that intestinal IgA was impaired in mice deficient in interleukin (IL)-17 or IL-21 signaling. IL-21, but not IL-17, is able to augment B-cell differentiation to IgA(+) cells as mediated by transforming growth factor β1 (TGFβ1) and accelerate IgA class switch recombination (CSR). IL-21 and retinoic acid (RA) induce IgA(+) B-cell development and IgA production and drives autocrine TGFβ1 production to initiate IgA CSR. Repletion of T-cell-deficient TCRβxδ(-/-) mice with Th17 cells specific for commensal bacterial antigen increased the levels of IgA(+) B cells and IgA production in the intestine, which was blocked by neutralizing IL-21. Thus IL-21 functions to strongly augment IgA production under intestinal environment. Furthermore, IL-21 promotes intestinal B-cell homing through α4β7 expression, alone or with TGFβ and RA. Together, IL-21 from microbiota-specific Th17 and/or Tfh cells contributes to robust intestinal IgA levels by enhancing IgA(+) CSR, IgA production and B-cell trafficking into the intestine.

  12. Interleukin (IL)-21 promotes intestinal IgA response to microbiota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Anthony T.; Yao, Suxia; Gong, Bin; Nurieva, Roza I.; Elson, Charles O.; Cong, Yingzi

    2014-01-01

    Commensal microbiota-specific Th17 cells are enriched in the intestines, which can convert into Tfh in Peyer’s patches, and are crucial for production of intestinal IgA against microbiota, however, the role of Th17 and Tfh cytokines in regulating the mucosal IgA response to enteric microbiota is still not completely known. In this study, we found that intestinal IgA was impaired in mice deficient in IL-17 or IL-21 signaling. IL-21, but not IL-17, is able to augment B cell differentiation to IgA+ cells as mediated by TGFβ1, and accelerate IgA class switch recombination (CSR). IL-21 and retinoic acid (RA) induce IgA+ B cell development and IgA production, and drives autocrine TGFβ1 production to initiate IgA CSR. Repletion of T cell-deficient TCRβxδ−/− mice with Th17 cells specific for commensal bacterial antigen, increased levels of IgA+ B cells and IgA production in the intestine, which was blocked by neutralizing IL-21. Thus, IL-21 functions to strongly augment IgA production under intestinal environment. Furthermore, IL-21 promotes intestinal B cell homing through α4β7 expression, alone or with TGFβ and RA. Together, IL-21 from microbiota-specific Th17 and/or Tfh cells contributes to robust intestinal IgA levels by enhancing IgA+ CSR, IgA production, and B cell trafficking into the intestine. PMID:25586558

  13. Proteomic changes of the porcine small intestine in response to chronic heat stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Yanjun; Gu, Xianhong

    2015-12-01

    Acute heat stress (HS) negatively affects intestinal integrity and barrier function. In contrast, chronic mild HS poses a distinct challenge to animals. Therefore, this study integrates biochemical, histological and proteomic approaches to investigate the effects of chronic HS on the intestine in finishing pigs. Castrated male crossbreeds (79.00 ± 1.50 kg BW) were subjected to either thermal neutral (TN, 21 °C; 55% ± 5% humidity; n=8) or HS conditions (30 °C; 55% ± 5% humidity; n=8) for 3 weeks. The pigs were sacrificed after 3 weeks of high environmental exposure and the plasma hormones, the intestinal morphology, integrity, and protein profiles of the jejunum mucosa were determined. Chronic HS reduced the free triiodothyronine (FT3) and GH levels. HS damaged intestinal morphology, increased plasma d-lactate concentrations and decreased alkaline phosphatase activity of intestinal mucosa. Proteome analysis of the jejunum mucosa was conducted by 2D gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry. Fifty-three intestinal proteins were found to be differentially abundant, 18 of which were related to cell structure and motility, and their changes in abundance could comprise intestinal integrity and function. The down-regulation of proteins involved in tricarboxylic acid cycle (TCA cycle), electron transport chain (ETC), and oxidative phosphorylation suggested that chronic HS impaired energy metabolism and thus induced oxidative stress. Moreover, the changes of ten proteins in abundance related to stress response and defense indicated pigs mediated long-term heat exposure and counteracted its negative effects of heat exposure. These findings have important implications for understanding the effect of chronic HS on intestines.

  14. Surviving the crisis: Adaptive wisdom, coping mechanisms and local responses to avian influenza threats in Haining, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Letian; Pan, Tianshu

    2008-04-01

    Based on ethnographic research conducted in the summer of 2006, this paper examines local responses to the imminent threat of avian flu in Haining County of Zhejiang Province. During our field investigation, we conducted interviews with officials from local medical institutions (including the hospitals, the animal husbandry and veterinary station, and health clinics), to bureaus of public health and agro-economy. We also visited chicken farms, restaurants and farming households. We address the following factors that commonly structured the perceptions and actions of different social actors in the area of study: The changing mode of information-sharing and communication practices in the local communities; the official drive to professionalize the emergency response management system in the county; and the coping mechanisms that helped the villagers and town residents to weather the storm of avian flu. Our field research suggests that collective survival consciousness was translated into a spirit of voluntarism during the crisis. One important practical lesson we have learned from this study is that the adaptive wisdom embedded in local memories demonstrated its operational worth as a resourceful knowledge base for ordinary farmers to deal with food shortage, famine, plague and future pandemics.

  15. Effect of intestinal colonisation by two Lactobacillus strains on the immune response of gnotobiotic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinberg, R S; Lima, M; Gomes de Oliveira, N L; Miyoshi, A; Nicoli, J R; Neumann, E; Nunes, A C

    2014-12-01

    The effect of intestinal colonisation on the immune system was investigated in germ-free mice monoassociated with Lactobacillus strains isolated from calf faeces. Single doses of Lactobacillus acidophilus L36 or Lactobacillus salivarius L38 were administered to germ-free mice by intragastric gavage. Ten days later, the mice were euthanised. Gene expression levels of interleukin 5 (IL-5), IL-6, IL-10, IL-12b, IL-17a, gamma interferon (IFN-γ), transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1), and tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) were quantified in segments of the small and large intestines by real time quantitative polymerase chain reaction. All the mice were colonised rapidly after Lactobacillus administration with intestinal counts ranging from 6.53 to 8.26 log cfu/g. L. acidophilus L36 administration increased the expression of cytokines involved with the Th2 (IL-5, IL-6 and TGF-β1) and Th17 (IL-17a, TNF-α and IL-6) inflammatory response, whereas L. salivarius L38 appeared to stimulate a pattern of less diversified cytokines in the intestine. Intragastric gavage of L. acidophilus L36 and L. salivarius L38 induced similar levels of colonisation in the digestive tracts of germ-free mice but stimulated different immune responses in the intestinal mucosa. The different immunomodulation patterns might facilitate the potential use of these lactobacilli as probiotics to treat distinct pathological conditions, for example protection against Citrobacter rodentium infection by stimulating IL-17 production.

  16. Managing Public’s Complacency and Public Preparedness in Response to 2006 Avian Influenza Crisis in Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naim Kapucu

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Public complacency is one of the problems complicating emergency preparedness and response operations for disaster managers. Effective disaster management is possible to the extent that affected communities cooperate with disaster management. Focusing on the 2006 avian influenza crisis in Turkey, this article analyzes whether the strategies and tools used by government agencies responsible for disaster management were effective in reducing public complacency, and, thus, increasing overall perceived public preparedness and response. Specifically, communication tools used for information collection, organization and dissemination were analyzed to see whether they led increased public situational awareness and immediate public reaction to the crisis. Findings suggest that government’s internal preparation and use of communication tools had an impact on the level of the information the public exposed to, while reduced complacency or public reaction to the crisis had an impact on the overall perceived public preparedness.

  17. Effects of Drinking Thyme Essence (Thymus vulgaris L. on Growth Performance, Immune Response and Intestinal Selected Bacterial Population in Broiler Chickens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saki AA

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the effects of Drinking Thyme Essence (DTE (Zero, 0.10, 0.15 and 0.20 mL/L on growth performance, immune response and changing of intestinal bacterial population in broiler chickens. A total number of 500 day old male broiler chicks (Ross 308, were randomly assigned to 4 treatments with 5 replicates and 25 chickens per each, based on a completely randomized design (CRD. Growth performances were assessed during the range of 8-21, 22-42 and 8-42 d. At 21 and 42 d blood serum titers including: Newcastle Disease (ND, Avian Influenza (AI, Infectious Bronchitis Virus (IBV and Infectious Bursal Disease (IBD were sampled. Bacterial populations in intestinal digesta were determined at the age of 21 and 42 d. DTE levels significantly (P improved total weight gain and total feed conversion ratio  as compared with the control group during 1-42 d of age. The titer of serum antibodies did not show significant differences between different treatments at the 21 or 42 d. Total count, E. coli, and Gram negative bacteria (GNB at the age of 21 and 42 days showed a significantly (P lower number compared with the control group. There was a significantly (P higher number of Lactic Acid Bacteria (LAB in DTE groups compared with control group at both ages of 21 and 42 d. In conclusion, different levels of DTE (especially at level of 0.20 mL/L could improve the growth performance, immune response and intestinal lactic acid bacteria as a health index during different growth periods.

  18. Immunological and gene expression responses to a Salmonella infection in the chicken intestine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hemert, van S.; Hoekman, A.J.W.; Smits, M.A.; Rebel, J.M.J.

    2007-01-01

    Besides infection in humans, Salmonella enteritidis can also cause serious illness in young chickens. However, the genetic and immunological parameters important for the disease in chickens are not well characterized. In this study, processes in the chicken intestine in response to a Salmonella infe

  19. A mathematical model representing cellular immune development and response to Salmonella of chicken intestinal tissue

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schokker, D.; Bannink, A.; Smits, M.A.; Rebel, J.M.J.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to create a dynamic mathematical model of the development of the cellular branch of the intestinal immune system of poultry during the first 42 days of life and of its response towards an oral infection with Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis. The system elements were

  20. Profound systemic inflammatory response syndrome following non-emergent intestinal surgery in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chawla, Bhani K; Teitelbaum, Daniel H

    2013-09-01

    Systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) is an uncommon but severe complication in surgical patients. While SIRS is well known, it is poorly described in the pediatric population. The goal of this study was to describe the incidence of profound SIRS following non-emergent intestinal surgery in children and to identify potential risk factors. A retrospective review was conducted for patients 0-19 years of age following intestinal surgery and/or lysis of adhesions from 01/01/1999-02/28/2012. Children were excluded for preoperative instability or frank bowel perforation. Patients were then placed in a post-operative SIRS or non-SIRS group as defined by the 2005 International Pediatric Sepsis Consensus Conference Guidelines (6. B. Goldstein, B. Giroir, A. Randolph, and Sepsis International Consensus Conference on Pediatric, 'International Pediatric Sepsis Consensus Conference: Definitions for Sepsis and Organ Dysfunction in Pediatrics', Pediatr Crit Care Med, 6 (2005), 2-8.). SIRS was identified in 17 of the 381 patients. Logistic regression analysis was performed and showed heart disease, kidney disease, PN dependence, and intestinal obstruction to be predictive of post-operative SIRS. This study represents one of the first reports to identify a previously poorly described process of significant SIRS after intestinal surgery in children. Both systemic organ failure and intestinal dysfunction are strong risk factors for post-operative SIRS in children. Potentially, these pre-existing conditions may lead to disruption of normal intestinal flora or barrier function, which in turn may predispose these children to dramatic SIRS episodes after intestinal surgery. Understanding how these factors lead to SIRS will be critical to developing prevention strategies. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Highly pathogenic avian influenza virus infection in chickens but not ducks is associated with elevated host immune and pro-inflammatory responses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuchipudi, Suresh V; Tellabati, Meenu; Sebastian, Sujith; Londt, Brandon Z; Jansen, Christine; Vervelde, Lonneke; Brookes, Sharon M; Brown, Ian H; Dunham, Stephen P; Chang, Kin-Chow

    2014-01-01

    Highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N1 viruses cause severe infection in chickens at near complete mortality, but corresponding infection in ducks is typically mild or asymptomatic. To understand the underlying molecular differences in host response, primary chicken and duck lung cells, infec

  2. Early host responses to avian influenza A virus are prolonged and enhanced at transcriptional level depending on maturation of the immune system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reemers, Sylvia S.; van Leenen, Dik; Koerkamp, Marian J. Groot; van Haarlem, Daphne; van de Haar, Peter; van Eden, Willem; Vervelde, Lonneke

    2010-01-01

    Newly hatched chickens are more susceptible to infectious diseases than older birds because of an immature immune system. The aim of this study was to determine to what extent host responses to avian influenza virus (AIV) inoculation are affected by age. Therefore, 1- and 4-week (wk) old birds were

  3. Different populations of CD11b+ dendritic cells drive Th2 responses in the small intestine and colon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mayer, Johannes U.; Demiri, Mimoza; Agace, William Winston

    2017-01-01

    and Schistosoma mansoni eggs do not develop in mice with IRF-4-deficient DCs (IRF-4f/f CD11c-cre). Adoptive transfer of conventional DCs, in particular CD11b-expressing DCs from the intestine, is sufficient to prime S. mansoni-specific Th2 responses. Surprisingly, transferred IRF-4-deficient DCs also effectively......T-helper 2 (Th2) cell responses defend against parasites. Although dendritic cells (DCs) are vital for the induction of T-cell responses, the DC subpopulations that induce Th2 cells in the intestine are unidentified. Here we show that intestinal Th2 responses against Trichuris muris worms...

  4. Maternal androgens in avian brood parasites and their hosts: responses to parasitism and competition?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Caldwell; Wingfield, John C.; Fox, David M.; Walker, Brian G.; Thomley, Jill E

    2017-01-01

    In the coevolutionary dynamic of avian brood parasites and their hosts, maternal (or transgenerational) effects have rarely been investigated. We examined the potential role of elevated yolk testosterone in eggs of the principal brood parasite in North America, the brown-headed cowbird, and three of its frequent host species. Elevated maternal androgens in eggs are a common maternal effect observed in many avian species when breeding conditions are unfavorable. These steroids accelerate embryo development, shorten incubation period, increase nestling growth rate, and enhance begging vigor, all traits that can increase the survival of offspring. We hypothesized that elevated maternal androgens in host eggs are a defense against brood parasitism. Our second hypothesis was that elevated maternal androgens in cowbird eggs are a defense against intra-specific competition. For host species, we found that elevated yolk testosterone was correlated with parasitized nests of small species, those whose nest success is most reduced by cowbird parasitism. For cowbirds, we found that elevated yolk testosterone was correlated with eggs in multiply-parasitized nests, which indicate intra-specific competition for nests due to high cowbird density. We propose experimental work to further examine the use of maternal effects by cowbirds and their hosts.

  5. Endoglin negatively regulates transforming growth factor beta1-induced profibrotic responses in intestinal fibroblasts.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Burke, J P

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: Fibroblasts isolated from strictures in Crohn\\'s disease (CD) exhibit reduced responsiveness to stimulation with transforming growth factor (TGF) beta1. TGF-beta1, acting through the smad pathway, is critical to fibroblast-mediated intestinal fibrosis. The membrane glycoprotein, endoglin, is a negative regulator of TGF-beta1. METHODS: Intestinal fibroblasts were cultured from seromuscular biopsies of patients undergoing intestinal resection for CD strictures or from control patients. Endoglin expression was assessed using confocal microscopy, flow cytometry and western blot. The effect of small interfering (si) RNA-mediated knockdown and plasmid-mediated overexpression of endoglin on fibroblast responsiveness to TGF-beta1 was assessed by examining smad phosphorylation, smad binding element (SBE) promoter activity, connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) expression and ability to contract collagen. RESULTS: Crohn\\'s stricture fibroblasts expressed increased constitutive cell-surface and whole-cell endoglin relative to control cells. Endoglin co-localized with filamentous actin. Fibroblasts treated with siRNA directed against endoglin exhibited enhanced TGF-beta1-mediated smad-3 phosphorylation, and collagen contraction. Cells transfected with an endoglin plasmid did not respond to TGF-beta1 by exhibiting SBE promoter activity or producing CTGF. CONCLUSION: Fibroblasts from strictures in CD express increased constitutive endoglin. Endoglin is a negative regulator of TGF-beta1 signalling in the intestinal fibroblast, modulating smad-3 phosphorylation, SBE promoter activity, CTGF production and collagen contraction.

  6. Pathobiology of Salmonella, intestinal microbiota, and the host innate immune response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renato Lima Santos

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Salmonella is a relevant pathogen under a clinical and public health perspective. Therefore, there has been a significant scientific effort to learn about pathogenic determinants of this pathogen. The clinical relevance of the disease, associated with the molecular tools available to study Salmonella as well as suitable animal models for salmonellosis, have provided optimal conditions to drive the scientific community to generate a large expansion of our knowledge about the pathogenesis of Salmonella-induced enterocolitis that took place during the past two decades. This research effort has also generated a wealth of information on the host immune mechanisms that complements gaps in the fundamental research in this area. This review focus on how the interaction between Salmonella, the microbiota and intestinal innate immunity leads to disease manifestation. As a highly successful enteropathogen, Salmonella actively elicits a robust acute intestinal inflammatory response from the host, which could theoretically lead to the pathogen demise. However, Salmonella has evolved redundant molecular machineries that renders this pathogen highly adapted to the inflamed intestinal environment, in which Salmonella is capable of outcompete resident commensal organisms. The adaptation of Salmonella to the inflamed intestinal lumen associated with the massive inflammatory response that leads to diarrhea, generate perfect conditions for transmission of the pathogen. These conditions illustrate the complexity of the co-evolution and ecology of the pathogen, commensals and the host.

  7. Intestinal fatty acid-binding protein and gut permeability responses to exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    March, Daniel S; Marchbank, Tania; Playford, Raymond J; Jones, Arwel W; Thatcher, Rhys; Davison, Glen

    2017-05-01

    Intestinal cell damage due to physiological stressors (e.g. heat, oxidative, hypoperfusion/ischaemic) may contribute to increased intestinal permeability. The aim of this study was to assess changes in plasma intestinal fatty acid-binding protein (I-FABP) in response to exercise (with bovine colostrum supplementation, Col, positive control) and compare this to intestinal barrier integrity/permeability (5 h urinary lactulose/rhamnose ratio, L/R). In a double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover design, 18 males completed two experimental arms (14 days of 20 g/day supplementation with Col or placebo, Plac). For each arm participants performed two baseline (resting) intestinal permeability assessments (L/R) pre-supplementation and one post-exercise following supplementation. Blood samples were collected pre- and post-exercise to determine I-FABP concentration. Two-way repeated measures ANOVA revealed an arm × time interaction for L/R and I-FABP (P exercise in Plac (273% of pre, P exercise values significantly lower with Col (P exercise in Plac (191% of pre-exercise, P = 0.002) but not in the Col arm (107%, P = 0.862) with post-exercise values significantly lower with Col (P = 0.013). Correlations between the increase in I-FABP and L/R were evident for visit one (P = 0.044) but not visit two (P = 0.200) although overall plots/patterns do appear similar for each. These findings suggest that exercise-induced intestinal cellular damage/injury is partly implicated in changes in permeability but other factors must also contribute.

  8. Brain caspase-3 and intestinal FABP responses in preterm and term rats submitted to birth asphyxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.L. Figueira

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Neonatal asphyxia can cause irreversible injury of multiple organs resulting in hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy and necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC. This injury is dependent on time, severity, and gestational age, once the preterm babies need ventilator support. Our aim was to assess the different brain and intestinal effects of ischemia and reperfusion in neonate rats after birth anoxia and mechanical ventilation. Preterm and term neonates were divided into 8 subgroups (n=12/group: 1 preterm control (PTC, 2 preterm ventilated (PTV, 3 preterm asphyxiated (PTA, 4 preterm asphyxiated and ventilated (PTAV, 5 term control (TC, 6 term ventilated (TV, 7 term asphyxiated (TA, and 8 term asphyxiated and ventilated (TAV. We measured body, brain, and intestine weights and respective ratios [(BW, (BrW, (IW, (BrW/BW and (IW/BW]. Histology analysis and damage grading were performed in the brain (cortex/hippocampus and intestine (jejunum/ileum tissues, as well as immunohistochemistry analysis for caspase-3 and intestinal fatty acid-binding protein (I-FABP. IW was lower in the TA than in the other terms (P<0.05, and the IW/BW ratio was lower in the TA than in the TAV (P<0.005. PTA, PTAV and TA presented high levels of brain damage. In histological intestinal analysis, PTAV and TAV had higher scores than the other groups. Caspase-3 was higher in PTAV (cortex and TA (cortex/hippocampus (P<0.005. I-FABP was higher in PTAV (P<0.005 and TA (ileum (P<0.05. I-FABP expression was increased in PTAV subgroup (P<0.0001. Brain and intestinal responses in neonatal rats caused by neonatal asphyxia, with or without mechanical ventilation, varied with gestational age, with increased expression of caspase-3 and I-FABP biomarkers.

  9. Induction of respiratory immune responses in the chicken; implications for development of mucosal avian influenza virus vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Geus, Eveline D; Rebel, Johanna M J; Vervelde, Lonneke

    2012-06-01

    The risk and the size of an outbreak of avian influenza virus (AIV) could be restricted by vaccination of poultry. A vaccine used for rapid intervention during an AIV outbreak should be safe, highly effective after a single administration and suitable for mass application. In the case of AIV, aerosol vaccination using live virus is not desirable because of its zoonotic potential and because of the risk for virus reassortment. The rational design of novel mucosal-inactivated vaccines against AIV requires a comprehensive knowledge of the structure and function of the lung-associated immune system in birds in order to target vaccines appropriately and to design efficient mucosal adjuvants. This review addresses our current understanding of the induction of respiratory immune responses in the chicken. Furthermore, possible mucosal vaccination strategies for AIV are highlighted.

  10. Conserved host response to highly pathogenic avian influenza virus infection in human cell culture, mouse and macaque model systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McDermott Jason E

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Understanding host response to influenza virus infection will facilitate development of better diagnoses and therapeutic interventions. Several different experimental models have been used as a proxy for human infection, including cell cultures derived from human cells, mice, and non-human primates. Each of these systems has been studied extensively in isolation, but little effort has been directed toward systematically characterizing the conservation of host response on a global level beyond known immune signaling cascades. Results In the present study, we employed a multivariate modeling approach to characterize and compare the transcriptional regulatory networks between these three model systems after infection with a highly pathogenic avian influenza virus of the H5N1 subtype. Using this approach we identified functions and pathways that display similar behavior and/or regulation including the well-studied impact on the interferon response and the inflammasome. Our results also suggest a primary response role for airway epithelial cells in initiating hypercytokinemia, which is thought to contribute to the pathogenesis of H5N1 viruses. We further demonstrate that we can use a transcriptional regulatory model from the human cell culture data to make highly accurate predictions about the behavior of important components of the innate immune system in tissues from whole organisms. Conclusions This is the first demonstration of a global regulatory network modeling conserved host response between in vitro and in vivo models.

  11. Predicted avian responses to bioenergy development scenarios in an intensive agricultural landscape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uden, Daniel R.; Allen, Craig R.; Mitchell, Rob B.; McCoy, Tim D.; Guan, Qingfeng

    2015-01-01

    Conversion of native prairie to agriculture has increased food and bioenergy production but decreased wildlife habitat. However, enrollment of highly erodible cropland in conservation programs has compensated for some grassland loss. In the future, climate change and production of second-generation perennial biofuel crops could further transform agricultural landscapes and increase or decrease grassland area. Switchgrass (Panicum virgatum) is an alternative biofuel feedstock that may be economically and environmentally superior to maize (Zea mays) grain for ethanol production on marginally productive lands. Switchgrass could benefit farmers economically and increase grassland area, but there is uncertainty as to how conversions between rowcrops, switchgrass monocultures and conservation grasslands might occur and affect wildlife. To explore potential impacts on grassland birds, we developed four agricultural land-use change scenarios for an intensively cultivated landscape, each driven by potential future climatic changes and ensuing irrigation limitations, ethanol demand, commodity prices, and continuation of a conservation program. For each scenario, we calculated changes in area for landcover classes and predicted changes in grassland bird abundances. Overall, birds responded positively to the replacement of rowcrops with switchgrass and negatively to the conversion of conservation grasslands to switchgrass or rowcrops. Landscape context and interactions between climate, crop water use, and irrigation availability could influence future land-use, and subsequently, avian habitat quality and quantity. Switchgrass is likely to provide higher quality avian habitat than rowcrops but lower quality habitat than conservation grasslands, and therefore, may most benefit birds in heavily cultivated, irrigation dependent landscapes under warmer and drier conditions, where economic profitability may also encourage conversions to drought tolerant bioenergy feedstocks.

  12. Avian response to microclimate in canopy gaps in a bottomland hardwood forest.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Champlin, Tracey B.; Kilgo, John C.; Gumpertz, Marcia L.; Moorman, Christopher E.

    2009-04-01

    Abstract - Microclimate may infl uence use of early successional habitat by birds. We assessed the relationships between avian habitat use and microclimate (temperature, light intensity, and relative humidity) in experimentally created canopy gaps in a bottomland hardwood forest on the Savannah River Site, SC. Gaps were 2- to 3-year-old group-selection timber harvest openings of three sizes (0.13, 0.26, 0.50 ha). Our study was conducted from spring through fall, encompassing four bird-use periods (spring migration, breeding, post-breeding, and fall migration), in 2002 and 2003. We used mist netting and simultaneously recorded microclimate variables to determine the influence of microclimate on bird habitat use. Microclimate was strongly affected by net location within canopy gaps in both years. Temperature generally was higher on the west side of gaps, light intensity was greater in gap centers, and relative humidity was higher on the east side of gaps. However, we found few relationships between bird captures and the microclimate variables. Bird captures were inversely correlated with temperature during the breeding and postbreeding periods in 2002 and positively correlated with temperature during spring 2003. Captures were high where humidity was high during post-breeding 2002, and captures were low where humidity was high during spring 2003. We conclude that variations in the local microclimate had minor infl uence on avian habitat use within gaps. Instead, habitat selection in relatively mild regions like the southeastern US is based primarily on vegetation structure, while other factors, including microclimate, are less important.

  13. Intestinal immune response of Silurus glanis and Barbus barbus naturally infected with Pomphorhynchus laevis (Acanthocephala).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dezfuli, B S; Castaldelli, G; Bo, T; Lorenzoni, M; Giari, L

    2011-02-01

    Immunopathological and ultrastructural studies were conducted on the intestine of barbel Barbus barbus and sheatfish Silurus glanis that were naturally infected with the acanthocephalan Pomphorhynchus laevis. Enteric helminths often cause inflammation of the digestive tract, inducing the recruitment of different types of immune cells at the site of infection. The results of our study clearly demonstrated that mast cells (MC) were the dominant immune cells which occur at the site of inflammation in both hosts. MC were associated with fibroblasts and were found in close proximity to, and inside, the capillaries of the intestine, thus, migration of mast cells via the bloodstream was suggested. Significant degranulation of MC was present. Immunohistochemical staining revealed met-enkephalin and serotonin (5-HT) in intestinal MC of both uninfected and infected barbel and the absence of the antimicrobial peptides piscidin 3 and piscidin 4 in both species. Data are discussed with respect to host immune response to an intestinal helminth and compared with other host-parasite systems.

  14. Evaluation of antibody response in mice against avian influenza A (H5N1) strain neuraminidase expressed in yeast Pichia pastoris

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Murugan Subathra; Ponsekaran Santhakumar; Mangamoori Lakshmi Narasu; Syed Sultan Beevi; Sunil K Lal

    2014-06-01

    Avian influenza has raised many apprehension in the recent years because of its potential transmitability to humans. With the increasing emergence of drug-resistant avian influenza strains, development of potential vaccines are imperative to manage this disease. Two structural antigens, haemagglutinin and neuraminidase, have been the target candidates for the development of subunit vaccine against influenza. In an effort to develop a faster and economically beneficial vaccine, the neuraminidase gene of a highly pathogenic avian influenza isolate was cloned and expressed in the methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris. The recombinant neuraminidase (rNA) antigen was purified, and its bioactivity was analysed. The rNA was found to be functional, as determined by the neuraminidase assay. Four groups of mice were immunized with different concentrations of purified rNA antigen, which were adjuvanted with aluminium hydroxide. The immune response against rNA was analysed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and neuraminidase inhibition assay. The mice groups immunized with 25 g and 10 g of antigen had a significant immune response against rNA. This method can be utilized for faster and cost-effective development of vaccines for a circulating and newer strain of avian influenza, and would aid in combating the disease in a pandemic situation, in which production time matters greatly.

  15. Glycans from avian influenza virus are recognized by chicken dendritic cells and are targets for the humoral immune response in chicken.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Geus, Eveline D; Tefsen, Boris; van Haarlem, Daphne A; van Eden, Willem; van Die, Irma; Vervelde, Lonneke

    2013-12-01

    To increase our understanding of the interaction between avian influenza virus and its chicken host, we identified receptors for putative avian influenza virus (AIV) glycan determinants on chicken dendritic cells. Chicken dendritic cells (DCs) were found to recognize glycan determinants containing terminal αGalNAc, Galα1-3Gal, GlcNAcβ1-4GlcNAcβ1-4GlcNAcβ (chitotriose) and Galα1-2Gal. Infection of chicken dendritic cells with either low pathogenic (LP) or highly pathogenic (HP) AIV results in elevated mRNA expression of homologs of the mouse C-type lectins DEC205 and macrophage mannose receptor (MMR), whereas expression levels of the human dendritic cell-specific intercellular adhesion molecule-3-grabbing non-integrin (DC-SIGN) homolog remained unchanged. Following uptake and subsequent presentation of avian influenza virus by DCs, adaptive immunity, including humoral immune responses are induced. We have investigated the antibody responses against virus glycan epitopes after avian influenza virus infection. Using glycan micro-array analysis we showed that chicken contained antibodies that predominantly recognize terminal Galα1-3Gal-R, chitotriose and Fucα1-2Galβ1-4GlcNAc-R (H-type 2). After influenza-infection, glycan array analysis showed that both levels and repertoire of glycan-recognizing antibodies decreased. However, analysis of the sera by ELISA indicated that the levels of different isotypes of anti-glycan Abs against specific glycan antigens was increased after influenza-infection, suggesting that the presentation of the glycan antigens and iso-type of the Abs are critical parameters to take into account when measuring anti-glycan Abs. This novel approach in avian influenza research may contribute to the development of a broad spectrum vaccine and improves our mechanistic understanding of innate and adaptive responses to glycans.

  16. Too risky to settle: avian community structure changes in response to perceived predation risk on adults and offspring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Fangyuan; Fletcher, Robert J.; Sieving, Kathryn E.; Dorazio, Robert M.

    2013-01-01

    Predation risk is widely hypothesized as an important force structuring communities, but this potential force is rarely tested experimentally, particularly in terrestrial vertebrate communities. How animals respond to predation risk is generally considered predictable from species life-history and natural-history traits, but rigorous tests of these predictions remain scarce. We report on a large-scale playback experiment with a forest bird community that addresses two questions: (i) does perceived predation risk shape the richness and composition of a breeding bird community? And (ii) can species life-history and natural-history traits predict prey community responses to different types of predation risk? On 9 ha plots, we manipulated cues of three avian predators that preferentially prey on either adult birds or offspring, or both, throughout the breeding season. We found that increased perception of predation risk led to generally negative responses in the abundance, occurrence and/or detection probability of most prey species, which in turn reduced the species richness and shifted the composition of the breeding bird community. Species-level responses were largely predicted from the key natural-history trait of body size, but we did not find support for the life-history theory prediction of the relationship between species' slow/fast life-history strategy and their response to predation risk.

  17. Avian top predator and the landscape of fear: responses of mammalian mesopredators to risk imposed by the golden eagle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyly, Mari S; Villers, Alexandre; Koivisto, Elina; Helle, Pekka; Ollila, Tuomo; Korpimäki, Erkki

    2015-01-01

    Top predators may induce extensive cascading effects on lower trophic levels, for example, through intraguild predation (IGP). The impacts of both mammalian and avian top predators on species of the same class have been extensively studied, but the effects of the latter upon mammalian mesopredators are not yet as well known. We examined the impact of the predation risk imposed by a large avian predator, the golden eagle (Aquila chrysaetos, L.), on its potential mammalian mesopredator prey, the red fox (Vulpes vulpes, L.), and the pine marten (Martes martes, L.). The study combined 23 years of countrywide data from nesting records of eagles and wildlife track counts of mesopredators in Finland, northern Europe. The predation risk of the golden eagle was modeled as a function of territory density, density of fledglings produced, and distance to nearest active eagle territory, with the expectation that a high predation risk would reduce the abundances of smaller sized pine martens in particular. Red foxes appeared not to suffer from eagle predation, being in fact most numerous close to eagle nests and in areas with more eagle territories. This is likely due to similar prey preferences of the two predators and the larger size of foxes enabling them to escape eagle predation risk. Somewhat contrary to our prediction, the abundance of pine martens increased from low to intermediate territory density and at close proximity to eagle nests, possibly because of similar habitat preferences of martens and eagles. We found a slightly decreasing trend of marten abundance at high territory density, which could indicate that the response in marten populations is dependent on eagle density. However, more research is needed to better establish whether mesopredators are intimidated or predated by golden eagles, and whether such effects could in turn cascade to lower trophic levels, benefitting herbivorous species.

  18. Avian influenza

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of avian influenza A in Asia, Africa, Europe, Indonesia, Vietnam, the Pacific, and the near East. Hundreds ... to detect abnormal breath sounds) Chest x-ray Culture from the nose or throat A method or ...

  19. Avian Influenza

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This is a letter from a professor at Clemson University about waterfowl that had been tested for avian influenza at Santee National Wildlife Refuge

  20. Avian Wings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tianshu; Kuykendoll, K.; Rhew, R.; Jones, S.

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes the avian wing geometry (Seagull, Merganser, Teal and Owl) extracted from non-contact surface measurements using a three-dimensional laser scanner. The geometric quantities, including the camber line and thickness distribution of airfoil, wing planform, chord distribution, and twist distribution, are given in convenient analytical expressions. Thus, the avian wing surfaces can be generated and the wing kinematics can be simulated. The aerodynamic characteristics of avian airfoils in steady inviscid flows are briefly discussed. The avian wing kinematics is recovered from videos of three level-flying birds (Crane, Seagull and Goose) based on a two-jointed arm model. A flapping seagull wing in the 3D physical space is re-constructed from the extracted wing geometry and kinematics.

  1. Environmental particulate matter induces murine intestinal inflammatory responses and alters the gut microbiome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Kish

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Particulate matter (PM is a key pollutant in ambient air that has been associated with negative health conditions in urban environments. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of orally administered PM on the gut microbiome and immune function under normal and inflammatory conditions. METHODS: Wild-type 129/SvEv mice were gavaged with Ottawa urban PM10 (EHC-93 for 7-14 days and mucosal gene expression analyzed using Ingenuity Pathways software. Intestinal permeability was measured by lactulose/mannitol excretion in urine. At sacrifice, segments of small and large intestine were cultured and cytokine secretion measured. Splenocytes were isolated and incubated with PM10 for measurement of proliferation. Long-term effects of exposure (35 days on intestinal cytokine expression were measured in wild-type and IL-10 deficient (IL-10(-/- mice. Microbial composition of stool samples was assessed using terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism. Short chain fatty acids were measured in caecum. RESULTS: Short-term treatment of wild-type mice with PM10 altered immune gene expression, enhanced pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion in the small intestine, increased gut permeability, and induced hyporesponsiveness in splenocytes. Long-term treatment of wild-type and IL-10(-/- mice increased pro-inflammatory cytokine expression in the colon and altered short chain fatty acid concentrations and microbial composition. IL-10(-/- mice had increased disease as evidenced by enhanced histological damage. CONCLUSIONS: Ingestion of airborne particulate matter alters the gut microbiome and induces acute and chronic inflammatory responses in the intestine.

  2. Avian Flu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eckburg, Paul

    2006-11-06

    Since 2003, a severe form of H5N1 avian influenza has rapidly spread throughout Asia and Europe, infecting over 200 humans in 10 countries. The spread of H5N1 virus from person-to-person has been rare, thus preventing the emergence of a widespread pandemic. However, this ongoing epidemic continues to pose an important public health threat. Avian flu and its pandemic potential in humans will be discussed.

  3. Avian Research

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2016-01-01

    Aims and Scope Avian Research is an open access,peer-reviewed journal publishing high quality research and review articles on all aspects of ornithology from all over the world.It aims to report the latest and most significant progress in ornithology and to encourage exchange of ideas among international ornithologists.As an Open Access journal,Avian Research provides a unique opportunity to publish

  4. Avian Research

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    <正>Aims and Scope Avian Research is an open access,peer-reviewed journal publishing high quality research and review articles on all aspects of ornithology from all over the world.It aims to report the latest and most significant progress in ornithology and to encourage exchange of ideas among international ornithologists.As an Open Access journal,Avian Research provides a unique opportunity to publish high quality contents that will be internationally accessible to any reader at no cost.

  5. Avian Research

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    Aims and Scope Avian Research is an open access,peer-reviewed journal publishing high quality research and review articles on all aspects of ornithology from all over the world.It aims to report the latest and most signi cant progress in ornithology and to encourage exchange of ideas among international ornithologists.As an Open Access journal,Avian Research provides a unique opportunity to publish

  6. Fasting induces a biphasic adaptive metabolic response in murine small intestine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evelo Chris TA

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The gut is a major energy consumer, but a comprehensive overview of the adaptive response to fasting is lacking. Gene-expression profiling, pathway analysis, and immunohistochemistry were therefore carried out on mouse small intestine after 0, 12, 24, and 72 hours of fasting. Results Intestinal weight declined to 50% of control, but this loss of tissue mass was distributed proportionally among the gut's structural components, so that the microarrays' tissue base remained unaffected. Unsupervised hierarchical clustering of the microarrays revealed that the successive time points separated into distinct branches. Pathway analysis depicted a pronounced, but transient early response that peaked at 12 hours, and a late response that became progressively more pronounced with continued fasting. Early changes in gene expression were compatible with a cellular deficiency in glutamine, and metabolic adaptations directed at glutamine conservation, inhibition of pyruvate oxidation, stimulation of glutamate catabolism via aspartate and phosphoenolpyruvate to lactate, and enhanced fatty-acid oxidation and ketone-body synthesis. In addition, the expression of key genes involved in cell cycling and apoptosis was suppressed. At 24 hours of fasting, many of the early adaptive changes abated. Major changes upon continued fasting implied the production of glucose rather than lactate from carbohydrate backbones, a downregulation of fatty-acid oxidation and a very strong downregulation of the electron-transport chain. Cell cycling and apoptosis remained suppressed. Conclusion The changes in gene expression indicate that the small intestine rapidly looses mass during fasting to generate lactate or glucose and ketone bodies. Meanwhile, intestinal architecture is maintained by downregulation of cell turnover.

  7. Effects of Cortisol on the Intestinal Mucosal Immune Response during Cohabitant Challenge with IPNV in Atlantic Salmon (Salmo salar)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niklasson, Lars; Sundh, Henrik; Olsen, Rolf-Erik;

    2014-01-01

    that the immune activation shifts in timing and response pathway during simulated stress. The present study clearly demonstrates that IPNV infection results in a differentiated epithelial immune response in the different intestinal regions of the Atlantic salmon. It also reveals that the epithelial immune...... post smolts treated with or without slow release cortisol implants were subjected to a cohabitant IPNV challenge. Analysis of genes and proteins related to the innate and acquired immune responses against virus was performed 6 days post-challenge using qPCR and immunohistochemistry. An increased m......RNA expression of anti-viral cytokine interferon type I was observed in the proximal intestine and head kidney as a response to the viral challenge and this effect was suppressed by cortisol. No effect was seen in the distal intestine. T-cell marker CD3 as well as MHC-I in both intestinal regions and in the head...

  8. Innate lymphoid cells regulate CD4+ T-cell responses to intestinal commensal bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hepworth, Matthew R; Monticelli, Laurel A; Fung, Thomas C; Ziegler, Carly G K; Grunberg, Stephanie; Sinha, Rohini; Mantegazza, Adriana R; Ma, Hak-Ling; Crawford, Alison; Angelosanto, Jill M; Wherry, E John; Koni, Pandelakis A; Bushman, Frederic D; Elson, Charles O; Eberl, Gérard; Artis, David; Sonnenberg, Gregory F

    2013-06-06

    Innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) are a recently characterized family of immune cells that have critical roles in cytokine-mediated regulation of intestinal epithelial cell barrier integrity. Alterations in ILC responses are associated with multiple chronic human diseases, including inflammatory bowel disease, implicating a role for ILCs in disease pathogenesis. Owing to an inability to target ILCs selectively, experimental studies assessing ILC function have predominantly used mice lacking adaptive immune cells. However, in lymphocyte-sufficient hosts ILCs are vastly outnumbered by CD4(+) T cells, which express similar profiles of effector cytokines. Therefore, the function of ILCs in the presence of adaptive immunity and their potential to influence adaptive immune cell responses remain unknown. To test this, we used genetic or antibody-mediated depletion strategies to target murine ILCs in the presence of an adaptive immune system. We show that loss of retinoic-acid-receptor-related orphan receptor-γt-positive (RORγt(+)) ILCs was associated with dysregulated adaptive immune cell responses against commensal bacteria and low-grade systemic inflammation. Remarkably, ILC-mediated regulation of adaptive immune cells occurred independently of interleukin (IL)-17A, IL-22 or IL-23. Genome-wide transcriptional profiling and functional analyses revealed that RORγt(+) ILCs express major histocompatibility complex class II (MHCII) and can process and present antigen. However, rather than inducing T-cell proliferation, ILCs acted to limit commensal bacteria-specific CD4(+) T-cell responses. Consistent with this, selective deletion of MHCII in murine RORγt(+) ILCs resulted in dysregulated commensal bacteria-dependent CD4(+) T-cell responses that promoted spontaneous intestinal inflammation. These data identify that ILCs maintain intestinal homeostasis through MHCII-dependent interactions with CD4(+) T cells that limit pathological adaptive immune cell responses to commensal

  9. Analysis of Gene Expression Responses to a Infection in Rugao Chicken Intestine Using GeneChips

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Q. Luan

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Poultry products are an important source of Salmonella enterica. An effective way to reduce food poisoning due to Salmonella would be to breed chickens more resistant to infection. Unfortunately host responses to Salmonella are complex with many factors involved. To learn more about responses to Salmonella in young chickens of 2 wk old, a cDNA Microarray containing 13,319 probes was performed to compare gene expression profiles between two chicken groups under control and Salmonella infected conditions. Newly hatched chickens were orally infected with S. enterica serovar Enteritidis. Since the intestine is one of the important barriers the bacteria encounter after oral inoculation, intestine gene expression was investigated at 2 wk old. There were 588 differentially expressed genes detected, of which 276 were known genes, and of the total number 266 were up-regulated and 322 were down-regulated. Differences in gene expression between the two chicken groups were found in control as well as Salmonella infected conditions indicating a difference in the intestine development between the two chicken groups which might be linked to the difference in Salmonella susceptibility. The differential expressions of 4 genes were confirmed by quantitative real-time PCR and the results indicated that the expression changes of these genes were generally consistent with the results of GeneChips. The findings in this study have lead to the identification of novel genes and possible cellular pathways, which are host dependent.

  10. The Developmental Intestinal Regulator ELT-2 Controls p38-Dependent Immune Responses in Adult C. elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Block, Dena H S; Twumasi-Boateng, Kwame; Kang, Hae Sung; Carlisle, Jolie A; Hanganu, Alexandru; Lai, Ty Yu-Jen; Shapira, Michael

    2015-05-01

    GATA transcription factors play critical roles in cellular differentiation and development. However, their roles in mature tissues are less understood. In C. elegans larvae, the transcription factor ELT-2 regulates terminal differentiation of the intestine. It is also expressed in the adult intestine, where it was suggested to maintain intestinal structure and function, and where it was additionally shown to contribute to infection resistance. To study the function of elt-2 in adults we characterized elt-2-dependent gene expression following its knock-down specifically in adults. Microarray analysis identified two ELT-2-regulated gene subsets: one, enriched for hydrolytic enzymes, pointed at regulation of constitutive digestive functions as a dominant role of adult elt-2; the second was enriched for immune genes that are induced in response to Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection. Focusing on the latter, we used genetic analyses coupled to survival assays and quantitative RT-PCR to interrogate the mechanism(s) through which elt-2 contributes to immunity. We show that elt-2 controls p38-dependent gene induction, cooperating with two p38-activated transcription factors, ATF-7 and SKN-1. This demonstrates a mechanism through which the constitutively nuclear elt-2 can impact induced responses, and play a dominant role in C. elegans immunity.

  11. The Developmental Intestinal Regulator ELT-2 Controls p38-Dependent Immune Responses in Adult C. elegans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dena H S Block

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available GATA transcription factors play critical roles in cellular differentiation and development. However, their roles in mature tissues are less understood. In C. elegans larvae, the transcription factor ELT-2 regulates terminal differentiation of the intestine. It is also expressed in the adult intestine, where it was suggested to maintain intestinal structure and function, and where it was additionally shown to contribute to infection resistance. To study the function of elt-2 in adults we characterized elt-2-dependent gene expression following its knock-down specifically in adults. Microarray analysis identified two ELT-2-regulated gene subsets: one, enriched for hydrolytic enzymes, pointed at regulation of constitutive digestive functions as a dominant role of adult elt-2; the second was enriched for immune genes that are induced in response to Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection. Focusing on the latter, we used genetic analyses coupled to survival assays and quantitative RT-PCR to interrogate the mechanism(s through which elt-2 contributes to immunity. We show that elt-2 controls p38-dependent gene induction, cooperating with two p38-activated transcription factors, ATF-7 and SKN-1. This demonstrates a mechanism through which the constitutively nuclear elt-2 can impact induced responses, and play a dominant role in C. elegans immunity.

  12. Bovine and soybean milk bioactive compounds: Effects on inflammatory response of human intestinal Caco-2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvello, Rosa; Aresta, Antonella; Trapani, Adriana; Zambonin, Carlo; Cianciulli, Antonia; Salvatore, Rosaria; Clodoveo, Maria Lisa; Corbo, Filomena; Franchini, Carlo; Panaro, Maria Antonietta

    2016-11-01

    In this study the effects of commercial bovine and soybean milks and their bioactive compounds, namely genistein, daidzein and equol, on the inflammatory responses induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) treatment of human intestinal Caco-2 cells were examined, in terms of nitric oxide (NO) release and inducible nitric oxide synthetase (iNOS) expression. Both milks and their bioactive compounds significantly inhibited, dose-dependently, the expression of iNOS mRNA and protein, resulting in a decreased NO production. The NF-κB activation in LPS-stimulated intestinal cells was also examined. In all cases we observed that cell pre-treatment before LPS activation inhibited the IkB phosphorylation. Accordingly, quantification of bioactive compounds by solid phase microextraction coupled with liquid chromatography has shown that they were absorbed, metabolized and released by Caco-2 cells in culture media. In conclusion, we demonstrated that milks and compounds tested are able to reduce LPS-induced inflammatory responses from intestinal cells, interfering with NF-kB dependent molecular mechanisms.

  13. Avian community responses to juniper woodland structure and thinning treatments on the Colorado Plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crow, Claire; van Riper, Charles

    2011-01-01

    Federal land managers are increasingly implementing fuels-reduction treatments throughout the western United States with objectives of ecological restoration and fire hazard reduction in pinyon-juniper (Pinus spp.-Juniperus spp.) woodlands. The pinyon-juniper woodland ecosystem complex is highly variable across the western landscape, as is bird community composition. We investigated relations between breeding birds and vegetation characteristics in modified pinyon-juniper woodlands at three sites (BLM, USFS, NPS) on the Colorado Plateau. During the breeding seasons of 2005 and 2006, we surveyed birds and measured vegetation in 74 study plots. These plots were each 3.1 hectares (ha; 7.6 acres), located across the range of natural variation, with 41 control sites and 33 plots in areas previously thinned by hand-cutting or chaining. We found that relations of avian pinyon-juniper specialists and priority species to vegetation characteristics were generally in agreement with the findings of previous studies and known nesting and feeding habits of those birds. Relatively high density of pinyon pines was important to species richness and abundance in 6 of 14 species. Abundance of all species was related to treatment method, and we found no difference in bird communities at chaining and hand-cut sites.

  14. Genomic selection for the improvement of antibody response to Newcastle disease and avian influenza virus in chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tianfei; Qu, Hao; Luo, Chenglong; Li, Xuewei; Shu, Dingming; Lund, Mogens Sandø; Su, Guosheng

    2014-01-01

    Newcastle disease (ND) and avian influenza (AI) are the most feared diseases in the poultry industry worldwide. They can cause flock mortality up to 100%, resulting in a catastrophic economic loss. This is the first study to investigate the feasibility of genomic selection for antibody response to Newcastle disease virus (Ab-NDV) and antibody response to Avian Influenza virus (Ab-AIV) in chickens. The data were collected from a crossbred population. Breeding values for Ab-NDV and Ab-AIV were estimated using a pedigree-based best linear unbiased prediction model (BLUP) and a genomic best linear unbiased prediction model (GBLUP). Single-trait and multiple-trait analyses were implemented. According to the analysis using the pedigree-based model, the heritability for Ab-NDV estimated from the single-trait and multiple-trait models was 0.478 and 0.487, respectively. The heritability for Ab-AIV estimated from the two models was 0.301 and 0.291, respectively. The estimated genetic correlation between the two traits was 0.438. A four-fold cross-validation was used to assess the accuracy of the estimated breeding values (EBV) in the two validation scenarios. In the family sample scenario each half-sib family is randomly allocated to one of four subsets and in the random sample scenario the individuals are randomly divided into four subsets. In the family sample scenario, compared with the pedigree-based model, the accuracy of the genomic prediction increased from 0.086 to 0.237 for Ab-NDV and from 0.080 to 0.347 for Ab-AIV. In the random sample scenario, the accuracy was improved from 0.389 to 0.427 for Ab-NDV and from 0.281 to 0.367 for Ab-AIV. The multiple-trait GBLUP model led to a slightly higher accuracy of genomic prediction for both traits. These results indicate that genomic selection for antibody response to ND and AI in chickens is promising.

  15. Genomic selection for the improvement of antibody response to Newcastle disease and avian influenza virus in chickens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tianfei Liu

    Full Text Available Newcastle disease (ND and avian influenza (AI are the most feared diseases in the poultry industry worldwide. They can cause flock mortality up to 100%, resulting in a catastrophic economic loss. This is the first study to investigate the feasibility of genomic selection for antibody response to Newcastle disease virus (Ab-NDV and antibody response to Avian Influenza virus (Ab-AIV in chickens. The data were collected from a crossbred population. Breeding values for Ab-NDV and Ab-AIV were estimated using a pedigree-based best linear unbiased prediction model (BLUP and a genomic best linear unbiased prediction model (GBLUP. Single-trait and multiple-trait analyses were implemented. According to the analysis using the pedigree-based model, the heritability for Ab-NDV estimated from the single-trait and multiple-trait models was 0.478 and 0.487, respectively. The heritability for Ab-AIV estimated from the two models was 0.301 and 0.291, respectively. The estimated genetic correlation between the two traits was 0.438. A four-fold cross-validation was used to assess the accuracy of the estimated breeding values (EBV in the two validation scenarios. In the family sample scenario each half-sib family is randomly allocated to one of four subsets and in the random sample scenario the individuals are randomly divided into four subsets. In the family sample scenario, compared with the pedigree-based model, the accuracy of the genomic prediction increased from 0.086 to 0.237 for Ab-NDV and from 0.080 to 0.347 for Ab-AIV. In the random sample scenario, the accuracy was improved from 0.389 to 0.427 for Ab-NDV and from 0.281 to 0.367 for Ab-AIV. The multiple-trait GBLUP model led to a slightly higher accuracy of genomic prediction for both traits. These results indicate that genomic selection for antibody response to ND and AI in chickens is promising.

  16. Profiles of acute cytokine and antibody responses in patients infected with avian influenza A H7N9.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui Huang

    Full Text Available The influenza A H7N9 virus outbreak in Eastern China in the spring of 2013 represented a novel, emerging avian influenza transmission to humans. While clinical and microbiological features of H7N9 infection have been reported in the literature, the current study investigated acute cytokine and antibody responses in acute H7N9 infection. Between March 27, 2013 and April 23, 2013, six patients with confirmed H7N9 influenza infection were admitted to Drum Tower Hospital, Nanjing, China. Acute phase serum cytokine profiles were determined using a high-throughput multiplex assay. Daily H7 hemagglutinin (HA-specific IgG, IgM, and IgA responses were monitored by ELISA. Neutralizing antibodies specific for H7N9 viruses were determined against a pseudotyped virus expressing the novel H7 subtype HA antigen. Five cytokines (IL-6, IP-10, IL-10, IFNγ, and TNFα were significantly elevated in H7N9-infected patients when compared to healthy volunteers. Serum H7 HA-specific IgG, as well as IgM and IgA responses, were detected within 8 days of disease onset and increased in a similar pattern during acute infection. Neutralizing antibodies developed shortly after the appearance of binding antibody responses and showed similar kinetics as a fraction of the total H7 HA-specific IgG responses. H7N9 infection resulted in hallmark serum cytokine increases, which correlated with fever and disease persistence. The novel finding of simultaneous development of IgG, IgM, and IgA responses in acute H7N9 infection points to the potential for live influenza viruses to elicit fast and potent protective antibodies to limit the infection.

  17. Intestinal Monocyte-Derived Macrophages Control Commensal-Specific Th17 Responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Casandra Panea

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Generation of different CD4 T cell responses to commensal and pathogenic bacteria is crucial for maintaining a healthy gut environment, but the associated cellular mechanisms are poorly understood. Dendritic cells (DCs and macrophages (Mfs integrate microbial signals and direct adaptive immunity. Although the role of DCs in initiating T cell responses is well appreciated, how Mfs contribute to the generation of CD4 T cell responses to intestinal microbes is unclear. Th17 cells are critical for mucosal immune protection and at steady state are induced by commensal bacteria, such as segmented filamentous bacteria (SFB. Here, we examined the roles of mucosal DCs and Mfs in Th17 induction by SFB in vivo. We show that Mfs, and not conventional CD103+ DCs, are essential for the generation of SFB-specific Th17 responses. Thus, Mfs drive mucosal T cell responses to certain commensal bacteria.

  18. Initiation of an inflammatory response in resident intestinal lamina propria cells -use of a human organ culture model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jutta Schröder-Braunstein

    Full Text Available Resident human lamina propria immune cells serve as powerful effectors in host defense. Molecular events associated with the initiation of an intestinal inflammatory response in these cells are largely unknown. Here, we aimed to characterize phenotypic and functional changes induced in these cells at the onset of intestinal inflammation using a human intestinal organ culture model. In this model, healthy human colonic mucosa was depleted of epithelial cells by EDTA treatment. Following loss of the epithelial layer, expression of the inflammatory mediators IL1B, IL6, IL8, IL23A, TNFA, CXCL2, and the surface receptors CD14, TLR2, CD86, CD54 was rapidly induced in resident lamina propria cells in situ as determined by qRT-PCR and immunohistology. Gene microarray analysis of lamina propria cells obtained by laser-capture microdissection provided an overview of global changes in gene expression occurring during the initiation of an intestinal inflammatory response in these cells. Bioinformatic analysis gave insight into signalling pathways mediating this inflammatory response. Furthermore, comparison with published microarray datasets of inflamed mucosa in vivo (ulcerative colitis revealed a significant overlap of differentially regulated genes underlining the in vivo relevance of the organ culture model. Furthermore, genes never been previously associated with intestinal inflammation were identified using this model. The organ culture model characterized may be useful to study molecular mechanisms underlying the initiation of an intestinal inflammatory response in normal mucosa as well as potential alterations of this response in inflammatory bowel disease.

  19. Effects of cortisol on the intestinal mucosal immune response during cohabitant challenge with IPNV in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar.

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    Lars Niklasson

    Full Text Available Infectious pancreatic necrosis virus (IPNV causes high incidence of disease in salmonids during the first period after SW transfer. During this period as well as during periods of stress, cortisol levels increase and indications of a relationship between IPNV susceptibility and cortisol have been suggested. The intestine is an entry route and a target tissue for IPNV displaying severe enteritis and sloughing of the mucosa in infected fish. The mechanisms behind effects of the virus on the intestinal tissue and the impact of cortisol on the effect remain unclear. In the present study, Atlantic salmon post smolts treated with or without slow release cortisol implants were subjected to a cohabitant IPNV challenge. Analysis of genes and proteins related to the innate and acquired immune responses against virus was performed 6 days post-challenge using qPCR and immunohistochemistry. An increased mRNA expression of anti-viral cytokine interferon type I was observed in the proximal intestine and head kidney as a response to the viral challenge and this effect was suppressed by cortisol. No effect was seen in the distal intestine. T-cell marker CD3 as well as MHC-I in both intestinal regions and in the head kidney was down regulated at the mRNA level. Number of CD8α lymphocytes decreased in the proximal intestine in response to cortisol. On the other hand, mRNA expression of Mx and IL-1β increased in the proximal intestine and head kidney in IPNV challenged fish in the presence of cortisol suggesting that the immune activation shifts in timing and response pathway during simulated stress. The present study clearly demonstrates that IPNV infection results in a differentiated epithelial immune response in the different intestinal regions of the Atlantic salmon. It also reveals that the epithelial immune response differs from the systemic, but that both are modulated by the stress hormone cortisol.

  20. Guild-specific responses of avian species richness to LiDAR-derived habitat heterogeneity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisberg, Peter J.; Dilts, Thomas E.; Becker, Miles E.; Young, Jock S.; Wong-Kone, Diane C.; Newton, Wesley E.; Ammon, Elisabeth M.

    2014-01-01

    Ecological niche theory implies that more heterogeneous habitats have the potential to support greater biodiversity. Positive heterogeneity-diversity relationships have been found for most studies investigating animal taxa, although negative relationships also occur and the scale dependence of heterogeneity-diversity relationships is little known. We investigated multi-scale, heterogeneity-diversity relationships for bird communities in a semi-arid riparian landscape, using airborne LiDAR data to derive key measures of structural habitat complexity. Habitat heterogeneity-diversity relationships were generally positive, although the overall strength of relationships varied across avian life history guilds (R2 range: 0.03–0.41). Best predicted were the species richness indices of cavity nesters, habitat generalists, woodland specialists, and foliage foragers. Heterogeneity-diversity relationships were also strongly scale-dependent, with strongest associations at the 200-m scale (4 ha) and weakest associations at the 50-m scale (0.25 ha). Our results underscore the value of LiDAR data for fine-grained quantification of habitat structure, as well as the need for biodiversity studies to incorporate variation among life-history guilds and to simultaneously consider multiple guild functional types (e.g. nesting, foraging, habitat). Results suggest that certain life-history guilds (foliage foragers, cavity nesters, woodland specialists) are more susceptible than others (ground foragers, ground nesters, low nesters) to experiencing declines in local species richness if functional elements of habitat heterogeneity are lost. Positive heterogeneity-diversity relationships imply that riparian conservation efforts need to not only provide high-quality riparian habitat locally, but also to provide habitat heterogeneity across multiple scales.

  1. Prostaglandin E2 promotes intestinal repair through an adaptive cellular response of the epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyoshi, Hiroyuki; VanDussen, Kelli L; Malvin, Nicole P; Ryu, Stacy H; Wang, Yi; Sonnek, Naomi M; Lai, Chin-Wen; Stappenbeck, Thaddeus S

    2017-01-04

    Adaptive cellular responses are often required during wound repair. Following disruption of the intestinal epithelium, wound-associated epithelial (WAE) cells form the initial barrier over the wound. Our goal was to determine the critical factor that promotes WAE cell differentiation. Using an adaptation of our in vitro primary epithelial cell culture system, we found that prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) signaling through one of its receptors, Ptger4, was sufficient to drive a differentiation state morphologically and transcriptionally similar to in vivo WAE cells. WAE cell differentiation was a permanent state and dominant over enterocyte differentiation in plasticity experiments. WAE cell differentiation was triggered by nuclear β-catenin signaling independent of canonical Wnt signaling. Creation of WAE cells via the PGE2-Ptger4 pathway was required in vivo, as mice with loss of Ptger4 in the intestinal epithelium did not produce WAE cells and exhibited impaired wound repair. Our results demonstrate a mechanism by which WAE cells are formed by PGE2 and suggest a process of adaptive cellular reprogramming of the intestinal epithelium that occurs to ensure proper repair to injury. © 2016 The Authors.

  2. Immune Responses of Chickens Infected with Wild Bird-Origin H5N6 Avian Influenza Virus

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Shimin Gao; Yinfeng Kang; Runyu Yuan; Haili Ma; Bin Xiang; Zhaoxiong Wang; Xu Dai; Fumin Wang; Jiajie Xiao; Ming Liao; Tao Ren

    2017-01-01

    Since April 2014, new infections of H5N6 avian influenza virus (AIV) in humans and domestic poultry have caused considerable economic losses in the poultry industry and posed an enormous threat to human health worldwide...

  3. Mangiferin ameliorates the intestinal inflammatory response and the impaired gastrointestinal motility in mouse model of postoperative ileus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morais, Talita Cavalcante; Arruda, Bruno Rodrigues; de Sousa Magalhães, Hebert; Trevisan, Maria Teresa Salles; de Araújo Viana, Daniel; Rao, Vietla Satyanarayana; Santos, Flavia Almeida

    2015-05-01

    Our previous study has shown that mangiferin (MGF), a glucosylxanthone from Mangifera indica, exerts gastrointestinal prokinetic action involving a cholinergic mechanism. Postoperative ileus (POI) is a temporary disturbance in gastrointestinal motility following surgery, and intestinal inflammatory response plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of POI. The present study investigated to know whether MGF having anti-inflammatory and prokinetic actions can ameliorate the intestinal inflammation and impaired gastrointestinal transit seen in the mouse model of POI. Experimental POI was induced in adult male Swiss mice by standardized small intestinal manipulation (IM). Twenty-four hours later, gastrointestinal transit was assessed by charcoal transport. MGF was administered orally 1 h before the measurement of GIT. To evaluate the inflammatory response, plasma levels of proinflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, and chemokine MCP-1, and the myeloperoxidase activity, nitrate/nitrite level, and histological changes of ileum were determined in mice treated or not with MGF. Experimental POI in mice was characterized by decreased gastrointestinal transit and marked intestinal and systemic inflammatory response. MGF treatment led to recovery of the delayed intestinal transit induced by IM. MGF in ileum significantly inhibited the myeloperoxidase activity, a marker of neutrophil infiltration, and nitrate/nitrite level and reduced the plasma levels of TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, and MCP-1 as well. MGF treatment ameliorates the intestinal inflammatory response and the impaired gastrointestinal motility in the mouse model of POI.

  4. In Vitro intestinal mucosal epithelial responses to wild-typeSalmonella Typhi and attenuated typhoid vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria eFiorentino

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Typhoid fever, caused by S. Typhi, is responsible for approximately 200,000 deaths per year worldwide. Little information is available regarding epithelium-bacterial interactions in S. Typhi infection. We have evaluated in vitro the effects of wild-type S. Typhi, the licensed Ty21a typhoid vaccine and the leading strains CVD 908-htrA and CVD 909 vaccine candidates on intestinal barrier function and immune response. Caco2 monolayers infected with wild-type S. Typhi exhibited alterations in the organization of tight junctions, increased paracellular permeability, and a rapid decrease in Trans-Epithelial Electrical Resistance as early as 4h post-exposure. S. Typhi triggered the secretion of interleukin (IL-8 and IL-6. Caco2 cells infected with the attenuated strains exhibited a milder pro-inflammatory response with minimal disruption of the barrier integrity. We conclude that wild-type S. Typhi causes marked transient alterations of the intestinal mucosa that are more pronounced than those observed with Ty21a or new generation attenuated typhoid vaccine candidates.

  5. A role for intestinal TLR4-driven inflammatory response during activity-based anorexia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belmonte, Liliana; Achamrah, Najate; Nobis, Séverine; Guérin, Charlène; Riou, Gaëtan; Bôle-Feysot, Christine; Boyer, Olivier; Richard, Vincent; Rego, Jean Claude Do; Déchelotte, Pierre; Goichon, Alexis; Coëffier, Moïse

    2016-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is associated with low-grade systemic inflammation and altered gut microbiota. However, the molecular origin of the inflammation remains unknown. Toll-like receptors are key regulators of innate immune response and their activation seems also to be involved in the control of food intake. We used activity-based anorexia (ABA) model to investigate the role of TLR4 and its contribution in anorexia-associated low-grade inflammation. Here, we found that ABA affected early the intestinal inflammatory status and the hypothalamic response. Indeed, TLR4 was upregulated both on colonic epithelial cells and intestinal macrophages, leading to elevated downstream mucosal cytokine production. These mucosal changes occurred earlier than hypothalamic changes driving to increased levels of IL-1β and IL-1R1 as well as increased levels of plasma corticosterone. Paradoxically, TLR4-deficient mice exhibited greater vulnerability to ABA with increased mortality rate, suggesting a major contribution of TLR4-mediated responses during ABA-induced weight loss. PMID:27779218

  6. Differential expression of immune-related cytokine genes in response to J group avian leukosis virus infection in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yanni; Liu, Yongzhen; Guan, Xiaolu; Li, Xiaofei; Yun, Bingling; Qi, Xiaole; Wang, Yongqiang; Gao, Honglei; Cui, Hongyu; Liu, Changjun; Zhang, Yanping; Wang, Xiaomei; Gao, Yulong

    2015-03-01

    Infection with J group avian leukosis virus (ALV-J) can result in immunosuppression and subsequently increased susceptibility to secondary infection. The innate immune system is the first line defense system in prevention of further bacterial and viral infections. Cytokines play key roles in the innate immune system. In this study, we used RT-qPCR technology to test the cytokine mRNA expression levels in various immune tissues, including the spleen, bursa of fabricius and cecal tonsil, in the days following ALV-J infection. The results indicated that in the infected group, the expression levels of interleukin-6 (IL-6), IL-18, interferon-α (IFN-α) and IFN-γ significantly increased in the spleen and reached peak levels that were thousandfolds higher than baselines at 9-12 days post-infection (d.p.i.). The levels in the bursa of fabricius slightly increased, and the levels in the cecal tonsil were not significantly altered. Moreover, the pattern of the expression of these three cytokines in the spleens of the infected group was similar to the pattern of viremia of this group. These results suggest that the spleen plays an important role in the interaction between ALV-J infection and the innate immune system. This study contributes to the understanding of innate immune responses to ALV-J infection and also elucidates the mechanisms of the pathogenicity of ALV-J in chickens.

  7. The pathogenicity and host immune response associated with H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza virus in quail.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uno, Yukiko; Usui, Tatsufumi; Soda, Kosuke; Fujimoto, Yoshikazu; Takeuchi, Takashi; Ito, Hiroshi; Ito, Toshihiro; Yamaguchi, Tsuyoshi

    2013-05-02

    Quail, like chickens, are susceptible to H5N1 subtype highly pathogenic avian influenza virus (HPAIV). Both birds experience high mortality, but quail usually survive a few more days than chicken. To understand why, we monitored quail and chickens after inoculation with 10(6) fifty-percent egg infectious doses of HPAIV A/whooper swan/Aomori/1/2008 (H5N1). The clinical course initiated as depression at 48 hr post inoculation (h.p.i.) in quail and at 36 h.p.i. in chicken, and all infected birds died. Mean death time of quail (91 hr) was significantly longer than that of chicken (66 hr). The virus titers of most tissue samples collected before death were not significantly different. At 24 h.p.i., interferon gamma (IFN-γ) mRNA expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) was up-regulated in the quail but down-regulated in the chicken, although TLR-7 and seven other cytokines showed no significant differences between quail and chicken. The viral load in quail PBMC was significantly lower than that in chickens. These results suggest that the induction of IFN-γ after HPAIV infection in quail is related to lower titer of HPAIV. In conclusion, the different clinical courses observed between quail and chicken infected with H5N1 HPAIV might be caused by different IFN-γ responses against the HPAIV infection.

  8. Chemokine receptor CXCR5 supports solitary intestinal lymphoid tissue formation, B cell homing, and induction of intestinal IgA responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velaga, Sarvari; Herbrand, Heike; Friedrichsen, Michaela; Jiong, Tian; Dorsch, Martina; Hoffmann, Matthias W; Förster, Reinhold; Pabst, Oliver

    2009-03-01

    Solitary intestinal lymphoid tissue (SILT) comprises a spectrum of phenotypically diverse lymphoid aggregates interspersed throughout the small intestinal mucosa. Manifestations of SILT range from tiny lymphoid aggregates almost void of mature lymphocytes to large structures dominated by B cells. Large SILT phenotypically resemble a single Peyer's patch follicle, suggesting that SILT might contribute to intestinal humoral immune responses. In this study, we track the fate of individual SILT in vivo over time and analyze SILT formation and function in chemokine receptor CXCR5-deficient mice. We show that, in analogy to Peyer's patches, formation of SILT is invariantly determined during ontogeny and depends on CXCR5. Young CXCR5-deficient mice completely lack SILT, suggesting that CXCR5 is essential for SILT formation during regular postnatal development. However, microbiota and other external stimuli can induce the formation of aberrant SILT distinguished by impaired development of B cell follicles in CXCR5-deficient mice. Small intestinal transplantation and bone marrow transplantation reveal that defect follicle formation is due to impaired B cell homing. Moreover, oral immunization with cholera toxin or infection with noninvasive Salmonella fail to induce efficient humoral immune responses in CXCR5-deficient mice. Bone marrow transplantation of CXCR5-deficient recipients with wild-type bone marrow rescued B cell follicle formation in SILT but failed to restore full humoral immune responses. These results reveal an essential role of CXCR5 in Peyer's patch and SILT development and function and indicate that SILT do not fully compensate for the lack of Peyer's patches in T cell-dependent humoral immune responses.

  9. Molecular Cloning, Characterization, and Anti-avian Pathogenic Escherichia coli Innate Immune Response of the Cherry Valley Duck CIITA Gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rong Li

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC-II transactivator (CIITA is a member of the pattern recognition receptor in cytoplasm, which is involved in host innate immune responses. In this study, the full-length cDNA of Cherry Valley duck CIITA (duCIITA was cloned from the spleen of healthy Cherry Valley ducks for the first time. The CDs of duCIITA have 3648 bp and encode 1215 amino acids. The homology analysis of CIITAs amino acid sequence showed that the duCIITA has the highest identity with the Anas platyrhynchos (94.9%, followed by Gallus gallus and Meleagris gallopavo. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis indicated that duCIITA mRNA has a broad expression level in healthy Cherry Valley duck tissues. It was highly expressed in the lung and cerebellum, and lowly expressed in the rectum and esophagus. After the avian pathogenic Escherichia coli (APEC O1K1 infection, the ducks exhibited the typical clinical symptoms, and a severe fibrinous exudate in the heart and liver surface was observed. Meanwhile, a significant up-regulation of duCIITA was detected in the infected liver. The inflammatory cytokines IL-1β, IL-6, and IL-8 have a significant up-regulation in the infected liver, spleen and brain. In addition, knockdown of the duCIITA reduces antibacterial activity and inflammatory cytokine production of the duck embryo fibroblast cells. Our research is the first study of the cloning, tissue distribution, and antibacterial immune responses of duCIITA, and these findings imply that duCIITA was an important receptor, which was involved in the early stage of the antibacterial innate immune response to APEC O1K1 infection of Cherry Valley duck.

  10. Saccharomyces boulardii modifies Salmonella typhimurium traffic and host immune responses along the intestinal tract.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodolphe Pontier-Bres

    Full Text Available Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (ST is an enteropathogenic Gram-negative bacterium that causes infection following oral ingestion. ST spreads rapidly along the gastrointestinal tract (GIT and invades the intestinal epithelium to ultimately reach internal body organs. The probiotic yeast Saccharomyces boulardii BIOCODEX (S.b-B is prescribed for prophylaxis of diarrheal infectious diseases. We previously showed that S.b-B prevents weight loss in ST-infected mice and significantly decreases bacterial translocation to the spleen and liver. This study was designed to investigate the effect of S.b-B on ST migration along the GIT and the impact of the yeast on the host's early innate immune responses. Bioluminescent imaging (BLI was used to evaluate the effect of S.b-B on the progression of luminescent Salmonella Typhimurium (ST-lux in the GIT of mice pretreated with streptomycin. Photonic emission (PE was measured in GIT extracts (stomach, small intestine, cecum and colon at various time periods post-infection (PI. PE analysis revealed that, 45 min PI, ST-lux had migrated slightly faster in the mice treated with S.b-B than in the untreated infected animals. At 90 min PI, ST-lux had reached the cecum in both groups of mice. Adhesion of ST to S.b-B was visualized in the intestines of the mice and probably accounts for (1 the faster elimination of ST-lux in the feces, and (2 reduced translocation of ST to the spleen and liver. In the early phase of infection, S.b-B also modifies the host's immune responses by (1 increasing IFN-γ gene expression and decreasing IL-10 gene expression in the small intestine, and (2 elevating both IFN-γ, and IL-10 mRNA levels in the cecum. BLI revealed that S.b-B modifies ST migration and the host immune response along the GIT. Study findings shed new light on the protective mechanisms of S.b-B during the early phase of Salmonella pathogenesis.

  11. Intestinal T-cell responses in celiac disease - impact of celiac disease associated bacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronika Sjöberg

    Full Text Available A hallmark of active celiac disease (CD, an inflammatory small-bowel enteropathy caused by permanent intolerance to gluten, is cytokine production by intestinal T lymphocytes. Prerequisites for contracting CD are that the individual carries the MHC class II alleles HLA-DQ2 and/or HLA-DQ8 and is exposed to gluten in the diet. Dysbiosis in the resident microbiota has been suggested to be another risk factor for CD. In fact, rod shaped bacteria adhering to the small intestinal mucosa were frequently seen in patients with CD during the "Swedish CD epidemic" and bacterial candidates could later be isolated from patients born during the epidemic suggesting long-lasting changes in the gut microbiota. Interleukin-17A (IL-17A plays a role in both inflammation and anti-bacterial responses. In active CD IL-17A was produced by both CD8(+ T cells (Tc17 and CD4(+ T cells (Th17, with intraepithelial Tc17 cells being the dominant producers. Gluten peptides as well as CD associated bacteria induced IL-17A responses in ex vivo challenged biopsies from patients with inactive CD. The IL-17A response was suppressed in patients born during the epidemic when a mixture of CD associated bacteria was added to gluten, while the reverse was the case in patients born after the epidemic. Under these conditions Th17 cells were the dominant producers. Thus Tc17 and Th17 responses to gluten and bacteria seem to pave the way for the chronic disease with interferon-γ-production by intraepithelial Tc1 cells and lamina propria Th1 cells. The CD associated bacteria and the dysbiosis they might cause in the resident microbiota may be a risk factor for CD either by directly influencing the immune responses in the mucosa or by enhancing inflammatory responses to gluten.

  12. Intestinal T-cell responses in celiac disease - impact of celiac disease associated bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjöberg, Veronika; Sandström, Olof; Hedberg, Maria; Hammarström, Sten; Hernell, Olle; Hammarström, Marie-Louise

    2013-01-01

    A hallmark of active celiac disease (CD), an inflammatory small-bowel enteropathy caused by permanent intolerance to gluten, is cytokine production by intestinal T lymphocytes. Prerequisites for contracting CD are that the individual carries the MHC class II alleles HLA-DQ2 and/or HLA-DQ8 and is exposed to gluten in the diet. Dysbiosis in the resident microbiota has been suggested to be another risk factor for CD. In fact, rod shaped bacteria adhering to the small intestinal mucosa were frequently seen in patients with CD during the "Swedish CD epidemic" and bacterial candidates could later be isolated from patients born during the epidemic suggesting long-lasting changes in the gut microbiota. Interleukin-17A (IL-17A) plays a role in both inflammation and anti-bacterial responses. In active CD IL-17A was produced by both CD8(+) T cells (Tc17) and CD4(+) T cells (Th17), with intraepithelial Tc17 cells being the dominant producers. Gluten peptides as well as CD associated bacteria induced IL-17A responses in ex vivo challenged biopsies from patients with inactive CD. The IL-17A response was suppressed in patients born during the epidemic when a mixture of CD associated bacteria was added to gluten, while the reverse was the case in patients born after the epidemic. Under these conditions Th17 cells were the dominant producers. Thus Tc17 and Th17 responses to gluten and bacteria seem to pave the way for the chronic disease with interferon-γ-production by intraepithelial Tc1 cells and lamina propria Th1 cells. The CD associated bacteria and the dysbiosis they might cause in the resident microbiota may be a risk factor for CD either by directly influencing the immune responses in the mucosa or by enhancing inflammatory responses to gluten.

  13. Oral administration of heat-inactivated Mycobacterium bovis reduces the response of farmed red deer to avian and bovine tuberculin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, Vladimir; González-Barrio, David; Lima-Barbero, José Francisco; Ortiz, José Antonio; Domínguez, Lucas; Juste, Ramón; Garrido, Joseba M; Sevilla, Iker A; Alberdi, Pilar; de la Fuente, José; Gortázar, Christian

    2016-04-01

    Orally delivered mycobacterial antigens may not sensitize the immunized animals causing a positive tuberculin skin test response. As the first step to address this critical issue, we characterized the response of farmed red deer (Cervus elaphus) to orally delivered heat-inactivated Mycobacterium bovis. Thirty-two adult red deer hinds from a farm known to be free of tuberculosis (TB) were randomly assigned to two different treatment groups, immunized (n=24) and control (n=8). Immunized hinds were dosed orally with 2 ml of PBS containing 6 × 10(6) heat-inactivated M. bovis. The mean skin test response of immunized deer to both avian purified protein derivative (aPPD) and bovine PPD (bPPD) was consistently lower in immunized than in control hinds. One year after immunization, immunized hinds had a significant reduction in the skin test response to aPPD and in the ELISA antibody levels against both aPPD and bPPD (24-36% reduction; P<0.05). By contrast, no significant change was observed in the skin test response to phytohaemagglutinin, or in the ELISA antibody levels against the M. bovis specific antigen MPB70. The mRNA levels for C3, IFN-γ and IL-1β and serum protein levels for IFN-γ and IL-1β did not vary between immunized and control deer. However, serum C3 protein levels were significantly higher (P=0.001) in immunized than in control deer six months after immunization. These results confirm that oral heat-inactivated M. bovis does not sensitize farmed red deer and therefore does not cause false-positive responses in the tuberculin skin test. The absence of sensitization in orally immunized deer opens the possibility of testing the vaccine in deer and possibly other ruminants without the risk of causing false-positive reactions in TB-tests. This study also provided the first evidence that orally-delivered inactivated mycobacterial antigens elicit some kind of immune response in a ruminant.

  14. Avian Research

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    Aims and Scope Avian Research is an open access,peer-reviewed journal publishing high quality research and review articles on all aspects of ornithology from all over the world.It aims to report the latest and most significant progress in ornithology and to encourage exchange of ideas among international ornithologists.As an Open Access journal,

  15. Avian Research

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2016-01-01

    Aims and Scope Avian Research is an open access,peer-reviewed journal publishing high quality research and review articles on all aspects of ornithology from all over the world.It aims to report the latest and most significant progress in ornithology and to encourage exchange of ideas among international ornithologists.As an Open Access journal,

  16. Avian Research

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    <正>Aims and Scope Avian Research is an open access,peer-reviewed journal publishing high quality research and review articles on all aspects of ornithology from all over the world.It aims to report the latest and most significant progress in ornithology and to encourage exchange of ideas among international ornithologists.As an Open Access journal,

  17. Avian Research

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2014-01-01

    <正>Aims and Scope Avian Research is an open access,peer-reviewed journal publishing high quality research and review articles on all aspects of ornithology from all over the world.It aims to report the latest and most significant progress in ornithology and to encourage exchange of ideas among international ornithologists.As an Open Access journal,

  18. The intestinal flora is required to support antibody responses to systemic immunization in infant and germ free mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamousé-Smith, Esi S; Tzeng, Alice; Starnbach, Michael N

    2011-01-01

    The presence of a complex and diverse intestinal flora is functionally important for regulating intestinal mucosal immune responses. However, the extent to which a balanced intestinal flora regulates systemic immune responses is still being defined. In order to specifically examine whether the acquisition of a less complex flora influences responses to immunization in the pre-weaning stages of life, we utilize a model in which infant mice acquire an intestinal flora from their mothers that has been altered by broad-spectrum antibiotics. In this model, pregnant dams are treated with a cocktail of antibiotics that alters both the density and microbial diversity of the intestinal flora. After challenge with a subcutaneous immunization, the antibiotic altered flora infant mice have lower antigen specific antibody titers compared to control age-matched mice. In a second model, we examined germ free (GF) mice to analyze how the complete lack of flora influences the ability to mount normal antibody responses following subcutaneous immunization. GF mice do not respond well to immunization and introduction of a normal flora into GF mice restores the capacity of these mice to respond. These results indicate that a gastrointestinal flora reduced in density and complexity at critical time points during development adversely impacts immune responses to systemic antigens.

  19. The intestinal flora is required to support antibody responses to systemic immunization in infant and germ free mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esi S Lamousé-Smith

    Full Text Available The presence of a complex and diverse intestinal flora is functionally important for regulating intestinal mucosal immune responses. However, the extent to which a balanced intestinal flora regulates systemic immune responses is still being defined. In order to specifically examine whether the acquisition of a less complex flora influences responses to immunization in the pre-weaning stages of life, we utilize a model in which infant mice acquire an intestinal flora from their mothers that has been altered by broad-spectrum antibiotics. In this model, pregnant dams are treated with a cocktail of antibiotics that alters both the density and microbial diversity of the intestinal flora. After challenge with a subcutaneous immunization, the antibiotic altered flora infant mice have lower antigen specific antibody titers compared to control age-matched mice. In a second model, we examined germ free (GF mice to analyze how the complete lack of flora influences the ability to mount normal antibody responses following subcutaneous immunization. GF mice do not respond well to immunization and introduction of a normal flora into GF mice restores the capacity of these mice to respond. These results indicate that a gastrointestinal flora reduced in density and complexity at critical time points during development adversely impacts immune responses to systemic antigens.

  20. Influence of Hesperidin on the Systemic and Intestinal Rat Immune Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariona Camps-Bossacoma

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Polyphenols, widely found in edible plants, influence the immune system. Nevertheless, the immunomodulatory properties of hesperidin, the predominant flavanone in oranges, have not been deeply studied. To establish the effect of hesperidin on in vivo immune response, two different conditions of immune system stimulations in Lewis rats were applied. In the first experimental design, rats were intraperitoneally immunized with ovalbumin (OVA plus Bordetella pertussis toxin and alum as the adjuvants, and orally given 100 or 200 mg/kg hesperidin. In the second experimental design, rats were orally sensitized with OVA together with cholera toxin and fed a diet containing 0.5% hesperidin. In the first approach, hesperidin administration changed mesenteric lymph node lymphocyte (MLNL composition, increasing the TCRαβ+ cell percentage and decreasing that of B lymphocytes. Furthermore, hesperidin enhanced the interferon (IFN-γ production in stimulated MLNL. In the second approach, hesperidin intake modified the lymphocyte composition in the intestinal epithelium (TCRγδ+ cells and the lamina propria (TCRγδ+, CD45RA+, natural killer, natural killer T, TCRαβ+CD4+, and TCRαβ+CD8+ cells. Nevertheless, hesperidin did not modify the level of serum anti-OVA antibodies in either study. In conclusion, hesperidin does possess immunoregulatory properties in the intestinal immune response, but this effect is not able to influence the synthesis of specific antibodies.

  1. Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) attenuates the inflammatory response in the in vitro intestinal Caco-2 cell model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollebeeck, Sylvie; Raas, Thomas; Piront, Neil; Schneider, Yves-Jacques; Toussaint, Olivier; Larondelle, Yvan; During, Alexandrine

    2011-10-30

    This study aimed to investigate dose effects of dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) (0.05-1%) on the intestinal inflammatory response in confluent- and differentiated-Caco-2 cells stimulated with interleukin (IL)-1β or a pro-inflammatory cocktail for 24 h. Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) activity was assayed by incubating inflamed cells with arachidonic acid and then measuring prostaglandin-E(2) (PGE(2)) produced. Soluble mediators (IL-8, IL-6, macrophage chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), and COX-2-derived PGE(2)) were quantified by enzyme immunoassays and mRNA expression of 33 proteins by high throughput TaqMan Low Density Array. Data showed that DMSO decreased induced IL-6 and MCP-1 secretions in a dose-dependent manner (PDMSO dose-dependently reduced COX-2-derived PGE(2) (PDMSO at 0.5% decreased significantly mRNA levels of 14 proteins involved in the inflammatory response (including IL-6, IL-1α, IL-1β, and COX-2). Thus, DMSO at low concentrations (0.1-0.5%) exhibits anti-inflammatory properties in the in vitro intestinal Caco-2 cell model. This point is important to be taken into account when assessing anti-inflammatory properties of bioactive compounds requiring DMSO as vehicle, such as phenolic compounds, in order to avoid miss-interpretation of the results. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Dietary nucleotides influence immune responses and intestinal morphology of red drum Sciaenops ocellatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Zhenyan; Buentello, Alejandro; Gatlin, Delbert M

    2011-01-01

    Dietary nucleotides have been shown to benefit many physiological and nutritional functions in higher vertebrates and fish. Therefore, a 6-week feeding trial was conducted to evaluate the effects of graded levels of a commercial nucleotide product on growth performance, immune responses and intestinal morphology of juvenile red drum (initial average weight of 7.1g). The basal diet was formulated to contain 40% protein, 10% lipid and a digestible energy level of 3.5 kcal g(-1). Two levels of nucleotide (Ascogen P(®), 0.5% and 1% of diet) were added to the basal diet with menhaden fishmeal and menhaden oil adjusted to provide isonitrogenous and isolipidic diets. Nucleotide supplementation tended to improve weight gain and survival of red drum, but not at a significant level. Neutrophil oxidative radical anion production and serum lysozyme activity tended to be higher for fish fed diets supplemented with nucleotide, while extracellular superoxide anion production of head kidney macrophages from fish fed diets with 1% nucleotide was significantly (Pfish fed 0.5% nucleotide diet and the basal diet. Nucleotide supplementation significantly (Pfish fed with diets supplemented with nucleotides. It is therefore possible to use dietary nucleotides supplementation to significantly enhance the intestinal structure of red drum. Likewise, nucleotides in the diet may improve some components of the non-specific immune response of this sciaenid fish.

  3. ID1 Is a Functional Marker for Intestinal Stem and Progenitor Cells Required for Normal Response to Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ning Zhang

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available LGR5 and BMI1 mark intestinal stem cells in crypt base columnar cells and +4 position cells, respectively, but characterization of functional markers in these cell populations is limited. ID1 maintains the stem cell potential of embryonic, neural, and long-term repopulating hematopoietic stem cells. Here, we show in both human and mouse intestine that ID1 is expressed in cycling columnar cells, +4 position cells, and transit-amplifying cells in the crypt. Lineage tracing revealed ID1+ cells to be self-renewing, multipotent stem/progenitor cells that are responsible for the long-term renewal of the intestinal epithelium. Single ID1+ cells can generate long-lived organoids resembling mature intestinal epithelium. Complete knockout of Id1 or selective deletion of Id1 in intestinal epithelium or in LGR5+ stem cells sensitizes mice to chemical-induced colon injury. These experiments identify ID1 as a marker for intestinal stem/progenitor cells and demonstrate a role for ID1 in maintaining the potential for repair in response to colonic injury.

  4. Avian colour perception predicts behavioural responses to experimental brood parasitism in chaffinches

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Avilés, J M; Vikan, J R; Fossøy, F; Antonov, A; Moksnes, A; Røskaft, E; Stokke, B G

    2010-01-01

    ...) actually can discriminate. Here, for the first time we apply a perceptual model of colour discrimination to study behavioural responses to natural variation in parasite egg appearance in chaffinches Fringilla coelebs...

  5. Early host gene expression responses to a Salmonella infection in the intestine of chickens with different genetic background

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hemert, van S.; Hoekman, A.J.W.; Smith, M.A.; Rebel, J.M.J.

    2006-01-01

    So far the responses of chickens to Salmonella have not been studied in vivo on a whole genome-wide scale. Furthermore, the influence of the host genetic background on gene expression responses is unknown. In this study gene expression profiles in the chicken (Gallus gallus) intestine of two genetic

  6. Identification of intestinal bacteria responsible for fermentation of gum arabic in pig model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishimoto, Akio; Ushida, Kazunari; Phillips, Glyn O; Ogasawara, Takashi; Sasaki, Yasushi

    2006-09-01

    Acacia spp. produce gum exudates, traditionally called gum arabic or gum acacia, which are widely used in the food industry such as emulsifiers, adhesives, and stabilizers. The traditional gum arabic is highly variable with average molecular weights varying from 300,000-800,000. For this reason a standardized sample was used for the present experiments, based on a specific species of gum arabic (Acacia(sen)SUPER GUMEM2). The literature indicates that gum arabic can be fermented by the intestinal bacteria to short chain fatty acid, particularly propionate. However, the bacteria responsible for the fermentation have not been determined. In this study, we used enrichment culture of pig cecal bacteria from the selected high molecular weight specific gum arabic of (M(W )1.77 x 10(6)). We found Prevotella ruminicola-like bacterium as a predominant bacterium that is most likely to be responsible for fermentation of the gum arabic used to propionate.

  7. Intestinal microbiota and immune related genes in sea cucumber (Apostichopus japonicus) response to dietary β-glucan supplementation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Gang [The Key Laboratory of Mariculture, Ministry of Education, Fisheries College, Ocean University of China (China); Xu, Zhenjiang [Biofrontiers Institute, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States); Tian, Xiangli, E-mail: xianglitian@ouc.edu.cn [The Key Laboratory of Mariculture, Ministry of Education, Fisheries College, Ocean University of China (China); Dong, Shuanglin [The Key Laboratory of Mariculture, Ministry of Education, Fisheries College, Ocean University of China (China); Peng, Mo [School of Animal Science and Technology, Jiangxi Agricultural University (China)

    2015-02-27

    β-glucan is a prebiotic well known for its beneficial outcomes on sea cucumber health through modifying the host intestinal microbiota. High-throughput sequencing techniques provide an opportunity for the identification and characterization of microbes. In this study, we investigated the intestinal microbial community composition, interaction among species, and intestinal immune genes in sea cucumber fed with diet supplemented with or without β-glucan supplementation. The results show that the intestinal dominant classes in the control group are Flavobacteriia, Gammaproteobacteria, and Alphaproteobacteria, whereas Alphaproteobacteria, Flavobacteriia, and Verrucomicrobiae are enriched in the β-glucan group. Dietary β-glucan supplementation promoted the proliferation of the family Rhodobacteraceae of the Alphaproteobacteria class and the family Verrucomicrobiaceae of the Verrucomicrobiae class and reduced the relative abundance of the family Flavobacteriaceae of Flavobacteria class. The ecological network analysis suggests that dietary β-glucan supplementation can alter the network interactions among different microbial functional groups by changing the microbial community composition and topological roles of the OTUs in the ecological network. Dietary β-glucan supplementation has a positive impact on immune responses of the intestine of sea cucumber by activating NF-κB signaling pathway, probably through modulating the balance of intestinal microbiota. - Highlights: • Dietary β-glucan supplementation increases the abundance of Rhodobacteraceae and Verrucomicrobiaceae in the intestine. • Dietary β-glucan supplementation changes the topological roles of OTUs in the ecological network. • Dietary β-glucan supplementation has a positive impact on the immune response of intestine of sea cucumber.

  8. Characterization of intestinal microbiota and response to dietary virginiamycin supplementation in the broiler chicken.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumonceaux, Tim J; Hill, Janet E; Hemmingsen, Sean M; Van Kessel, Andrew G

    2006-04-01

    The inclusion of antibiotic growth promoters, such as virginiamycin, at subtherapeutic levels in poultry feeds has a positive effect on health and growth characteristics, possibly due to beneficial effects on the host gastrointestinal microbiota. To improve our understanding of the chicken gastrointestinal microbiota and the effect of virginiamycin on its composition, we characterized the bacteria found in five different gastrointestinal tract locations (duodenal loop, mid-jejunum, proximal ileum, ileocecal junction, and cecum) in 47-day-old chickens that were fed diets excluding or including virginiamycin throughout the production cycle. Ten libraries (five gastrointestinal tract locations from two groups of birds) of approximately 555-bp chaperonin 60 PCR products were prepared, and 10,932 cloned sequences were analyzed. A total of 370 distinct cpn60 sequences were identified, which ranged in frequency of recovery from 1 to 2,872. The small intestinal libraries were dominated by sequences from the Lactobacillales (90% of sequences), while the cecum libraries were more diverse and included members of the Clostridiales (68%), Lactobacillales (25%), and Bacteroidetes (6%). To assess the effects of virginiamycin on the gastrointestinal microbiota, 15 bacterial targets were enumerated using quantitative, real-time PCR. Virginiamycin was associated with increased abundance of many of the targets in the proximal gastrointestinal tract (duodenal loop to proximal ileum), with fewer targets affected in the distal regions (ileocecal junction and cecum). These findings provide improved profiling of the composition of the chicken intestinal microbiota and indicate that microbial responses to virginiamycin are most significant in the proximal small intestine.

  9. Mucosal vaccination with a codon-optimized hemagglutinin gene expressed by attenuated Salmonella elicits a protective immune response in chickens against highly pathogenic avian influenza.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liljebjelke, Karen A; Petkov, Daniel I; Kapczynski, Darrell R

    2010-06-17

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate clinical protection from challenge conferred by two attenuated Salmonella enteria serovar typhimurium vaccine strains expressing the hemagglutinin (HA1) gene from a highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N1 (A/whooper swan/Mongolia/3/2005), under control of the anaerobically inducible nir15 promoter. Two-week-old White Leghorn chickens were immunized by oral gavage with one milliliter doses of >109 Salmonella colony-forming units once weekly for 4 weeks prior to challenge. Expression of recombinant protein was confirmed via Western blot. Serum and mucosal gavage samples were collected prior to, and following immunization and antibodies against avian influenza HA were confirmed by Western blot and hemagglutination-inhibition (HI) assay. Chickens were challenged with homologous (A/whooper swan/Mongolia/3/2005), or heterologous (A/Chicken/Queretaro/14588-19/95) HPAI virus strains. Chickens immunized with attenuated Salmonella strains containing plasmid expression vector (pTETnir15HA) demonstrated a statistically significant increase in survival compared to control groups. Results provide evidence of effectiveness of attenuated Salmonella strains for delivery of recombinant avian influenza HA antigens and induction of mucosal and systemic immune responses protective against lethal challenge with HPAI.

  10. Immunobiotic Bifidobacteria Strains Modulate Rotavirus Immune Response in Porcine Intestinal Epitheliocytes via Pattern Recognition Receptor Signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takamasa Ishizuka

    Full Text Available In this work, we aimed to characterize the antiviral response of an originally established porcine intestinal epithelial cell line (PIE cells by evaluating the molecular innate immune response to rotavirus (RVs. In addition, we aimed to select immunomodulatory bacteria with antiviral capabilities. PIE cells were inoculated with RVs isolated from different host species and the infective titers and the molecular innate immune response were evaluated. In addition, the protection against RVs infection and the modulation of immune response by different lactic acid bacteria (LAB strains was studied. The RVs strains OSU (porcine and UK (bovine effectively infected PIE cells. Our results also showed that RVs infection in PIE cells triggered TLR3-, RIG-I- and MDA-5-mediated immune responses with activation of IRF3 and NF-κB, induction of IFN-β and up-regulation of the interferon stimulated genes MxA and RNase L. Among the LAB strains tested, Bifidobacterium infantis MCC12 and B. breve MCC1274 significantly reduced RVs titers in infected PIE cells. The beneficial effects of both bifidobacteria were associated with reduction of A20 expression, and improvements of IRF-3 activation, IFN-β production, and MxA and RNase L expressions. These results indicate the value of PIE cells for studying RVs molecular innate immune response in pigs and for the selection of beneficial bacteria with antiviral capabilities.

  11. Evaluation of the Immune Responses to and Cross-Protective Efficacy of Eurasian H7 Avian Influenza Viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Hyeok-Il; Kim, Young-Il; Park, Su-Jin; Song, Min-Suk; Kim, Eun-Ha; Kim, Se Mi; Si, Young-Jae; Lee, In-Won; Song, Byung-Min; Lee, Youn-Jeong; Yun, Seok Joong; Kim, Wun-Jae; Choi, Young Ki

    2017-06-01

    China since 2013. Due to the increasing concerns regarding the global public health risk posed by H7 viruses, we evaluated the genetic relationships between Eurasian H7 avian influenza viruses and the cross-protective efficacies of three different H7 viruses: W109/06 (group I), W478/14 (group II), and Anhui1/13 (a sublineage of group I). While each vaccine induced group-specific antibody responses and cross-protective efficacy, only Anhui1/13 was able to cross-protect immunized hosts against lethal challenge across groups. In fact, the Anhui1/13 virus induced not only cross-protection but also broad serum neutralizing antibody responses against both groups of viruses. This suggests that Anhui1/13-like H7N9 viruses may be viable vaccine candidates for broad protection against Eurasian H7 viruses. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  12. Analysis of the crow lung transcriptome in response to infection with highly pathogenic H5N1 avian influenza virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayakumar, Periyasamy; Mishra, Anamika; Ranaware, Pradip B; Kolte, Atul P; Kulkarni, Diwakar D; Burt, David W; Raut, Ashwin Ashok

    2015-03-15

    The highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N1 virus, currently circulating in Asia, causes severe disease in domestic poultry as well as wild birds like crow. However, the molecular pathogenesis of HPAIV infection in crows and other wild birds is not well known. Thus, as a step to explore it, a comprehensive global gene expression analysis was performed on crow lungs, infected with HPAI H5N1 crow isolate (A/Crow/India/11TI11/2011) using high throughput next generation sequencing (NGS) (GS FLX Titanium XLR70). The reference genome of crow is not available, so RNA seq analysis was performed on the basis of a de novo assembled transcriptome. The RNA seq result shows, 4052 genes were expressed uniquely in noninfected, 6277 genes were expressed uniquely in HPAIV infected sample and of the 6814 genes expressed in both samples, 2279 genes were significantly differentially expressed. Our transcriptome profile data allows for the ability to understand the molecular mechanism behind the recent lethal HPAIV outbreak in crows which was, until recently, thought to cause lethal infections only in gallinaceous birds such as chickens, but not in wild birds. The pattern of differentially expressed genes suggest that this isolate of H5N1 virus evades the host innate immune response by attenuating interferon (IFN)-inducible signalling possibly by down regulating the signalling from type I IFN (IFNAR1 and IFNAR2) and type II IFN receptors, upregulation of the signalling inhibitors suppressor of cytokine signalling 1 (SOCS1) and SOCS3 and altering the expression of toll-like receptors (TLRs). This may be the reason for disease and mortality in crows. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. The Role of Carbohydrate Response Element Binding Protein in Intestinal and Hepatic Fructose Metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katsumi Iizuka

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Many articles have discussed the relationship between fructose consumption and the incidence of obesity and related diseases. Fructose is absorbed in the intestine and metabolized in the liver to glucose, lactate, glycogen, and, to a lesser extent, lipids. Unabsorbed fructose causes bacterial fermentation, resulting in irritable bowl syndrome. Therefore, understanding the mechanisms underlying intestinal and hepatic fructose metabolism is important for the treatment of metabolic syndrome and fructose malabsorption. Carbohydrate response element binding protein (ChREBP is a glucose-activated transcription factor that controls approximately 50% of de novo lipogenesis in the liver. ChREBP target genes are involved in glycolysis (Glut2, liver pyruvate kinase, fructolysis (Glut5, ketohexokinase, and lipogenesis (acetyl CoA carboxylase, fatty acid synthase. ChREBP gene deletion protects against high sucrose diet-induced and leptin-deficient obesity, because Chrebp−/− mice cannot consume fructose or sucrose. Moreover, ChREBP contributes to some of the physiological effects of fructose on sweet taste preference and glucose production through regulation of ChREBP target genes, such as fibroblast growth factor-21 and glucose-6-phosphatase catalytic subunits. Thus, ChREBP might play roles in fructose metabolism. Restriction of excess fructose intake will be beneficial for preventing not only metabolic syndrome but also irritable bowl syndrome.

  14. The Role of Carbohydrate Response Element Binding Protein in Intestinal and Hepatic Fructose Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iizuka, Katsumi

    2017-02-22

    Many articles have discussed the relationship between fructose consumption and the incidence of obesity and related diseases. Fructose is absorbed in the intestine and metabolized in the liver to glucose, lactate, glycogen, and, to a lesser extent, lipids. Unabsorbed fructose causes bacterial fermentation, resulting in irritable bowl syndrome. Therefore, understanding the mechanisms underlying intestinal and hepatic fructose metabolism is important for the treatment of metabolic syndrome and fructose malabsorption. Carbohydrate response element binding protein (ChREBP) is a glucose-activated transcription factor that controls approximately 50% of de novo lipogenesis in the liver. ChREBP target genes are involved in glycolysis (Glut2, liver pyruvate kinase), fructolysis (Glut5, ketohexokinase), and lipogenesis (acetyl CoA carboxylase, fatty acid synthase). ChREBP gene deletion protects against high sucrose diet-induced and leptin-deficient obesity, because Chrebp(-/-) mice cannot consume fructose or sucrose. Moreover, ChREBP contributes to some of the physiological effects of fructose on sweet taste preference and glucose production through regulation of ChREBP target genes, such as fibroblast growth factor-21 and glucose-6-phosphatase catalytic subunits. Thus, ChREBP might play roles in fructose metabolism. Restriction of excess fructose intake will be beneficial for preventing not only metabolic syndrome but also irritable bowl syndrome.

  15. Dietary glutamine supplementation effects on amino acid metabolism, intestinal nutrient absorption capacity and antioxidant response of gilthead sea bream (Sparus aurata) juveniles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coutinho, F; Castro, C; Rufino-Palomares, E; Ordóñez-Grande, B; Gallardo, M A; Oliva-Teles, A; Peres, H

    2016-01-01

    A study was undertaken to evaluate dietary glutamine supplementation effects on gilthead sea bream performance, intestinal nutrient absorption capacity, hepatic and intestinal glutamine metabolism and oxidative status. For that purpose gilthead sea bream juveniles (mean weight 13.0g) were fed four isolipidic (18% lipid) and isonitrogenous (43% protein) diets supplemented with 0, 0.5, 1 and 2% glutamine for 6weeks. Fish performance, body composition and intestinal nutrient absorption capacity were not affected by dietary glutamine levels. Hepatic and intestinal glutaminase (GlNase), glutamine synthetase (GSase), alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase and glutamate dehydrogenase activities were also unaffected by dietary glutamine supplementation. In the intestine GlNase activity was higher and GSase/GlNase ratio was two-fold lower than in the liver, suggesting a higher use of glutamine for energy production by the intestine than by the liver. The liver showed higher catalase and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activities, while the intestine presented higher glutathione peroxidase and glutathione reductase activities and oxidised glutathione content, which seems to reveal a higher glutathione dependency of the intestinal antioxidant response. Total and reduced glutathione contents in liver and intestine and superoxide dismutase activity in the intestine were enhanced by dietary glutamine, though lipid peroxidation values were not affected. Overall, differences between liver and intestine glutamine metabolism and antioxidant response were identified and the potential of dietary glutamine supplementation to gilthead sea bream's antioxidant response was elucidated.

  16. Avian Influenza.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeitlin, Gary Adam; Maslow, Melanie Jane

    2005-05-01

    The current epidemic of H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza in Southeast Asia raises serious concerns that genetic reassortment will result in the next influenza pandemic. There have been 164 confirmed cases of human infection with avian influenza since 1996. In 2004, there were 45 cases of human H5N1 in Vietnam and Thailand, with a mortality rate more than 70%. In addition to the potential public health hazard, the current zoonotic epidemic has caused severe economic losses. Efforts must be concentrated on early detection of bird outbreaks with aggressive culling, quarantining, and disinfection. To prepare for and prevent an increase in human cases, it is essential to improve detection methods and stockpile effective antivirals. Novel therapeutic modalities, including short-interfering RNAs and new vaccine strategies that use plasmid-based genetic systems, offer promise should a pandemic occur.

  17. Modulatory Effect of Gliadin Peptide 10-mer on Epithelial Intestinal CACO-2 Cell Inflammatory Response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonella Capozzi

    Full Text Available Celiac Disease (CD is a chronic inflammatory enteropathy, triggered in genetically susceptible individuals by dietary gluten. Gluten is able to elicit proliferation of specific T cells and secretion of inflammatory cytokines in the small intestine. In this study we investigated the possibility that p10-mer, a decapeptide from durum wheat (QQPQDAVQPF, which was previously shown to prevent the activation of celiac peripheral lymphocytes, may exert an inhibitory effect on peptic-tryptic digested gliadin (PT-Gly-stimulated intestinal carcinoma CACO-2 cells. In these cells, incubated with PT-Gly or p31-43 α-gliadin derived peptide in the presence or in the absence of p10-mer, IRAK1 activation and NF-kB, ERK1/2 and p38 MAPK phosphorylation were measured by immunoblotting, Cyclooxigenase 2 (COX-2 activity by PGE-2 release assay, and production of cytokines in the cell supernatants by ELISA. Our results showed that pre-treatment of CACO-2 cells with p10-mer significantly inhibited IRAK1 activation and NF-kB, ERK1/2 and p38 MAPK phosphorylation, as well as COX-2 activity (i.e. PGE-2 release and production of the IL-6 and IL-8 pro-inflammatory cytokines, induced by gliadin peptides. These findings demonstrate the inhibitory effect of the p10-mer peptide on inflammatory response in CACO-2 cells. The results of the present study show that this p10-mer peptide can modulate "in vitro" the inflammatory response induced by gliadin peptides, allowing to move towards new therapeutic strategies. Turning off the inflammatory response, may in fact represent a key target in the immunotherapy of celiac disease.

  18. Critical role of glycogen synthase kinase-3β in regulating the avian heterophil response to Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael eKogut

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available A microarray-assisted gene expression screen of chicken heterophils revealed glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β, a multifunctional Ser/Thr kinase, to be consistently up-regulated 30-180 min following stimulation with Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis. The present study was designed to delineate the role of GSK-3β in regulating the innate function of chicken heterophils in response to S. Enteritidis exposure. Using a specific GSK-3β ELISA assay, 30 min after infection with S. Enteritidis, heterophils had a significant decrease in total GSK-3β, but a significant increase in phosphorylated GSK-3 (Ser9. By 60 min post-infection, there was no difference in the amount of phosphorylated GSK-3β (Ser9 in either the uninfected and infected heterophils. S. Enteritidis interaction with heterophils alters GSK-3 activity by stimulating phosphorylation at Ser9 and that peaks by 30 min post-infection. Further, inhibition of GSK3β with lithium chloride resulted in a significant decrease in NF-κB activation and expression of IL-6, but induces a significant increase in the expression of the anti-inflammatory cytokine, IL-10. Using a phospho-specific antibody array confirmed the phosphorylation of GSK-3β (Ser9 as well as the phosphorylation of the downstream cytokine-activated intracellular signaling pathway involved in stimulating immune responses, IκB, the IκB subunit IKK-β, and the NF-κB subunits p105, p65, and c-Rel. Our data revealed that the phosphorylation of GSK-3β (Ser9 is responsible for inducing and controlling an innate response to the bacteria. Our findings suggest that the repression of GSK-3 activity is beneficial to the host cell and may act as a target for treatment in controlling intestinal colonization in chickens. Further experiments will define the in vivo modulation of GSK-3 as a potential alternative to antibiotics in salmonella and other intestinal bacterial infections.

  19. Intestinal microbiota and immune related genes in sea cucumber (Apostichopus japonicus) response to dietary β-glucan supplementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Gang; Xu, Zhenjiang; Tian, Xiangli; Dong, Shuanglin; Peng, Mo

    2015-02-27

    β-glucan is a prebiotic well known for its beneficial outcomes on sea cucumber health through modifying the host intestinal microbiota. High-throughput sequencing techniques provide an opportunity for the identification and characterization of microbes. In this study, we investigated the intestinal microbial community composition, interaction among species, and intestinal immune genes in sea cucumber fed with diet supplemented with or without β-glucan supplementation. The results show that the intestinal dominant classes in the control group are Flavobacteriia, Gammaproteobacteria, and Alphaproteobacteria, whereas Alphaproteobacteria, Flavobacteriia, and Verrucomicrobiae are enriched in the β-glucan group. Dietary β-glucan supplementation promoted the proliferation of the family Rhodobacteraceae of the Alphaproteobacteria class and the family Verrucomicrobiaceae of the Verrucomicrobiae class and reduced the relative abundance of the family Flavobacteriaceae of Flavobacteria class. The ecological network analysis suggests that dietary β-glucan supplementation can alter the network interactions among different microbial functional groups by changing the microbial community composition and topological roles of the OTUs in the ecological network. Dietary β-glucan supplementation has a positive impact on immune responses of the intestine of sea cucumber by activating NF-κB signaling pathway, probably through modulating the balance of intestinal microbiota.

  20. Activation of transcription factor AP-1 in response to thermal injury in rat small intestine and IEC-6 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yonghong; Zhao, Hong; Liu, Tao; Wan, Changrong; Liu, Xiaoxi; Gao, Zhimin; Hou, Xiaolin; Jiang, Linshu; Liu, Fenghua

    2015-07-11

    Our previous studies indicated that heat stress can cause significant damage to the intestinal epithelium and induce differential expression of many genes in rat small intestine. The transcription factors AP-1 and NF-κB, which act as important mediators by binding to specific DNA sequences within gene promoters, regulate the transcription of genes associated with immune regulation, stress response and cell fate. To determine whether AP-1 and NF-κB are involved in hyperthermia-induced injury in rat small intestine and IEC-6 cells, we investigated their activity, and the expression of related proteins, by electrophoretic mobility shift assays and western blotting, respectively. Heat stress resulted in severe damage to the epithelium of the small intestine. The cell morphology and viability were obviously altered when IEC-6 cell was exposed to hyperthermia. AP-1 was activated in the small intestine of heat-stressed rats, as was phosphorylation of the JNK signaling pathway. In IEC-6 cell line, AP-1 activation in groups exposed to 42 °C for 1 h, 2 h and 4 h was significantly increased. In contrast, NF-κB was not activated in both in vivo and in vitro models. These results reveal that AP-1 is likely to play an important role in regulating gene transcription in rat small intestine and IEC-6 cells during exposure to heat stress.

  1. Immunogenic Eimeria tenella glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored surface antigens (SAGs induce inflammatory responses in avian macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yock-Ping Chow

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: At least 19 glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI-anchored surface antigens (SAGs are expressed specifically by second-generation merozoites of Eimeria tenella, but the ability of these proteins to stimulate immune responses in the chicken is unknown. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Ten SAGs, belonging to two previously defined multigene families (A and B, were expressed as soluble recombinant (r fusion proteins in E. coli. Chicken macrophages were treated with purified rSAGs and changes in macrophage nitrite production, and in mRNA expression profiles of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS and of a panel of cytokines were measured. Treatment with rSAGs 4, 5, and 12 induced high levels of macrophage nitric oxide production and IL-1β mRNA transcription that may contribute to the inflammatory response observed during E. tenella infection. Concomitantly, treatment with rSAGs 4, 5 and 12 suppressed the expression of IL-12 and IFN-γ and elevated that of IL-10, suggesting that during infection these molecules may specifically impair the development of cellular mediated immunity. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: In summary, some E. tenella SAGs appear to differentially modulate chicken innate and humoral immune responses and those derived from multigene family A (especially rSAG 12 may be more strongly linked with E. tenella pathogenicity associated with the endogenous second generation stages.

  2. Comparative proteome analysis of tracheal tissues in response to infectious bronchitis coronavirus, Newcastle disease virus, and avian influenza virus H9 subtype virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Junfeng; Han, Zongxi; Shao, Yuhao; Cao, Zhongzan; Kong, Xiangang; Liu, Shengwang

    2014-06-01

    Infectious bronchitis coronavirus (IBV), Newcastle disease virus (NDV), and avian influenza virus (AIV) H9 subtype are major pathogens of chickens causing serious respiratory tract disease and heavy economic losses. To better understand the replication features of these viruses in their target organs and molecular pathogenesis of these different viruses, comparative proteomic analysis was performed to investigate the proteome changes of primary target organ during IBV, NDV, and AIV H9 infections, using 2D-DIGE followed MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS. In total, 44, 39, 41, 48, and 38 proteins were identified in the tracheal tissues of the chickens inoculated with IBV (ck/CH/LDL/97I, H120), NDV (La Sota), and AIV H9, and between ck/CH/LDL/97I and H120, respectively. Bioinformatics analysis showed that IBV, NDV, and AIV H9 induced similar core host responses involved in biosynthetic, catabolic, metabolic, signal transduction, transport, cytoskeleton organization, macromolecular complex assembly, cell death, response to stress, and immune system process. Comparative analysis of host response induced by different viruses indicated differences in protein expression changes induced by IBV, NDV, and AIV H9 may be responsible for the specific pathogenesis of these different viruses. Our result reveals specific host response to IBV, NDV, and AIVH9 infections and provides insights into the distinct pathogenic mechanisms of these avian respiratory viruses. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Histological damage and inflammatory response elicited by Monobothrium wageneri (Cestoda in the intestine of Tinca tinca (Cyprinidae

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    Sayyaf Dezfuli Bahram

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Among the European cyprinids, tench, Tinca tinca (L., and the pathological effects their cestodes may effect, have received very little or no attention. Most literature relating to Monobothrium wageneri Nybelin, 1922, a common intestinal cestode of tench, for example, has focused on aspects of its morphology rather than on aspects of the host-parasite interaction. Results Immunopathological and ultrastructural studies were conducted on the intestines of 28 tench, collected from Lake Piediluco, of which 16 specimens harboured tight clusters of numerous M. wageneri attached to the intestinal wall. The infection was associated with the degeneration of the mucosal layer and the formation of raised inflammatory swelling surrounding the worms. At the site of infection, the number of granulocytes in the intestine of T. tinca was significantly higher than the number determined 1 cm away from the site of infection or the number found in uninfected fish. Using transmission electron microscopy, mast cells and neutrophils were frequently observed in close proximity to, and inside, the intestinal capillaries; often these cells were in contact with the cestode tegument. At the host-parasite interface, no secretion from the parasite's tegument was observed. Intense degranulation of the mast cells was seen within the submucosa and lamina muscularis, most noticeably at sites close to the tegument of the scolex. In some instances, rodlet cells were encountered in the submucosa. In histological sections, hyperplasia of the mucous cells, notably those giving an alcian blue positive reaction, were evident in the intestinal tissues close to the swelling surrounding the worms. Enhanced mucus secretion was recorded in the intestines of infected tench. Conclusions The pathological changes and the inflammatory cellular response induced by the caryophyllidean monozoic tapeworm M. wageneri within the intestinal tract of an Italian population of wild

  4. Histological damage and inflammatory response elicited by Monobothrium wageneri (Cestoda) in the intestine of Tinca tinca (Cyprinidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Among the European cyprinids, tench, Tinca tinca (L.), and the pathological effects their cestodes may effect, have received very little or no attention. Most literature relating to Monobothrium wageneri Nybelin, 1922, a common intestinal cestode of tench, for example, has focused on aspects of its morphology rather than on aspects of the host-parasite interaction. Results Immunopathological and ultrastructural studies were conducted on the intestines of 28 tench, collected from Lake Piediluco, of which 16 specimens harboured tight clusters of numerous M. wageneri attached to the intestinal wall. The infection was associated with the degeneration of the mucosal layer and the formation of raised inflammatory swelling surrounding the worms. At the site of infection, the number of granulocytes in the intestine of T. tinca was significantly higher than the number determined 1 cm away from the site of infection or the number found in uninfected fish. Using transmission electron microscopy, mast cells and neutrophils were frequently observed in close proximity to, and inside, the intestinal capillaries; often these cells were in contact with the cestode tegument. At the host-parasite interface, no secretion from the parasite's tegument was observed. Intense degranulation of the mast cells was seen within the submucosa and lamina muscularis, most noticeably at sites close to the tegument of the scolex. In some instances, rodlet cells were encountered in the submucosa. In histological sections, hyperplasia of the mucous cells, notably those giving an alcian blue positive reaction, were evident in the intestinal tissues close to the swelling surrounding the worms. Enhanced mucus secretion was recorded in the intestines of infected tench. Conclusions The pathological changes and the inflammatory cellular response induced by the caryophyllidean monozoic tapeworm M. wageneri within the intestinal tract of an Italian population of wild tench is reported for the first

  5. Induction of respiratory immune responses in the chicken; implications for development of mucosal avian influenza virus vaccines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geus, de E.D.; Rebel, J.M.J.; Vervelde, L.

    2012-01-01

    The risk and the size of an outbreak of avian influenza virus (AIV) could be restricted by vaccination of poultry. A vaccine used for rapid intervention during an AIV outbreak should be safe, highly effective after a single administration and suitable for mass application. In the case of AIV,

  6. Induction of respiratory immune responses in the chicken; implications for development of mucosal avian influenza virus vaccines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geus, de E.D.; Rebel, J.M.J.; Vervelde, L.

    2012-01-01

    The risk and the size of an outbreak of avian influenza virus (AIV) could be restricted by vaccination of poultry. A vaccine used for rapid intervention during an AIV outbreak should be safe, highly effective after a single administration and suitable for mass application. In the case of AIV, aeroso

  7. Stimuli-responsive cylindrical hydrogels mimic intestinal peristalsis to propel a solid object.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nistor, V; Cannell, J; Gregory, J; Yeghiazarian, L

    2016-04-21

    The emerging field of soft robotics relies on soft, stimuli-responsive materials to enable load transport, manipulation, and mobility in complex unconstrained environments. These materials often need to replicate biological functionality such as muscle contractions and flexibility. Here we demonstrate a soft actuator prototype based on thermosensitive PNIPAAM hydrogels that can transport and manipulate objects. A hollow cylindrical hydrogel was selectively heated and cooled with Peltier devices to yield a traveling wave of shrinking and swelling akin to intestinal peristalsis. A 4 mm diameter bead was placed inside the cylinder and propelled 19.5 mm, equal to distance traveled by the peristaltic wave. We derived conditions that enable peristaltic transport as a function of transporter-cargo design parameters. We conclude that hydrogel-based peristaltic manipulators covering 2 orders of magnitude in stiffness (1-10(2) kPa) could transport cargo spanning 4 orders of magnitude in size (μm-m).

  8. Microbial Shifts in the Intestinal Microbiota of Salmonella Infected Chickens in Response to Enrofloxacin

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    Jun Li

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Fluoroquinolones (FQs are important antibiotics used for treatment of Salmonella infection in poultry in many countries. However, oral administration of fluoroquinolones may affect the composition and abundance of a number of bacterial taxa in the chicken intestine. Using 16S rRNA gene sequencing, the microbial shifts in the gut of Salmonella infected chickens in response to enrofloxacin treatments at different dosages (0, 0.1, 4, and 100 mg/kg b.w. were quantitatively evaluated. The results showed that the shedding levels of Salmonella were significantly reduced in the high dosage group as demonstrated by both the culturing method and 16S rRNA sequencing method. The average values of diversity indices were higher in the control group than in the three medicated groups. Non-metric multidimensional scaling (NMDS analysis results showed that the microbial community of high dosage group was clearly separated from the other three groups. In total, 25 genera were significantly enriched (including 6 abundant genera: Lactococcus, Bacillus, Burkholderia, Pseudomonas, Rhizobium, and Acinetobacter and 23 genera were significantly reduced in the medicated groups than in the control group for the treatment period, but these bacterial taxa recovered to normal levels after therapy withdrawal. Additionally, 5 genera were significantly reduced in both treatment and withdrawal periods (e.g., Blautia and Anaerotruncus and 23 genera (e.g., Enterobacter and Clostridium were significantly decreased only in the withdrawal period, indicating that these genera might be the potential targets for the fluoroquinolones antimicrobial effects. Specially, Enterococcus was significantly reduced under high dosage of enrofloxacin treatment, while significantly enriched in the withdrawal period, which was presumably due to the resistance selection. Predicted microbial functions associated with genetic information processing were significantly decreased in the high dosage group

  9. HIF-1 mediates pathogenic inflammatory responses to intestinal ischemia-reperfusion injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feinman, Rena; Deitch, Edwin A; Watkins, Anthony C; Abungu, Billy; Colorado, Iriana; Kannan, Kolenkode B; Sheth, Sharvil U; Caputo, Francis J; Lu, Qi; Ramanathan, Madhuri; Attan, Shirhan; Badami, Chirag D; Doucet, Danielle; Barlos, Dimitrios; Bosch-Marce, Marta; Semenza, Gregg L; Xu, Da-Zhong

    2010-10-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) and the development of the multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS) are major causes of death in trauma patients. Gut inflammation and loss of gut barrier function as a consequence of splanchnic ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) have been implicated as the initial triggering events that contribute to the development of the systemic inflammatory response, ALI, and MODS. Since hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF-1) is a key regulator of the physiological and pathophysiological response to hypoxia, we asked whether HIF-1 plays a proximal role in the induction of gut injury and subsequent lung injury. Utilizing partially HIF-1α-deficient mice in a global trauma hemorrhagic shock (T/HS) model, we found that HIF-1 activation was necessary for the development of gut injury and that the prevention of gut injury was associated with an abrogation of lung injury. Specifically, in vivo studies demonstrated that partial HIF-1α deficiency ameliorated T/HS-induced increases in intestinal permeability, bacterial translocation, and caspase-3 activation. Lastly, partial HIF-1α deficiency reduced TNF-α, IL-1β, cyclooxygenase-2, and inducible nitric oxide synthase levels in the ileal mucosa after T/HS whereas IL-1β mRNA levels were reduced in the lung after T/HS. This study indicates that prolonged intestinal HIF-1 activation is a proximal regulator of I/R-induced gut mucosal injury and gut-induced lung injury. Consequently, these results provide unique information on the initiating events in trauma-hemorrhagic shock-induced ALI and MODS as well as potential therapeutic insights.

  10. Analysis of the human intestinal epithelial cell transcriptional response to Lactobacillus acidophilus, Lactobacillus salivarius, Bifidobacterium lactis and Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Putaala, H; Barrangou, R; Leyer, G J

    2010-01-01

    The complex microbial population residing in the human gastrointestinal tract consists of commensal, potential pathogenic and beneficial species, which are probably perceived differently by the host and consequently could be expected to trigger specific transcriptional responses. Here, we provide...... insights into the relationship between probiotics and human intestinal epithelial cells, notably with regard to strain-specific responses, and highlight the differences between transcriptional responses to pathogenic and probiotic bacteria.......The complex microbial population residing in the human gastrointestinal tract consists of commensal, potential pathogenic and beneficial species, which are probably perceived differently by the host and consequently could be expected to trigger specific transcriptional responses. Here, we provide...... a comparative analysis of the global in vitro transcriptional response of human intestinal epithelial cells to Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM™, Lactobacillus salivarius Ls-33, Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis 420, and enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7 (EHEC). Interestingly, L. salivarius Ls-33...

  11. Microbiota metabolite short-chain fatty acid acetate promotes intestinal IgA response to microbiota which is mediated by GPR43.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, W; Sun, M; Chen, F; Cao, A T; Liu, H; Zhao, Y; Huang, X; Xiao, Y; Yao, S; Zhao, Q; Liu, Z; Cong, Y

    2016-12-14

    Intestinal IgA, which is regulated by gut microbiota, has a crucial role in maintenance of intestinal homeostasis and in protecting the intestines from inflammation. However, the means by which microbiota promotes intestinal IgA responses remain unclear. Emerging evidence suggests that the host can sense gut bacterial metabolites in addition to pathogen-associated molecular patterns and that recognition of these small molecules influences host immune response in the intestines and beyond. We reported here that microbiota metabolite short-chain fatty acid acetate promoted intestinal IgA responses, which was mediated by "metabolite-sensing" GPR43. GPR43(-/-) mice demonstrated lower levels of intestinal IgA and IgA(+) gut bacteria compared with those in wild type (WT) mice. Feeding WT but not GPR43(-/-) mice acetate but not butyrate promoted intestinal IgA response independent of T cells. Acetate promoted B-cell IgA class switching and IgA production in vitro in the presence of WT but not GPR43(-/-) dendritic cells (DCs). Mechanistically, acetate-induced DC expression of Aldh1a2, which converts Vitamin A into its metabolite retinoic acid (RA). Moreover, blockade of RA signaling inhibited the acetate induction of B-cell IgA production. Our studies thus identified a new pathway by which microbiota promotes intestinal IgA response through its metabolites.Mucosal Immunology advance online publication 14 December 2016. doi:10.1038/mi.2016.114.

  12. Nippostrongylus-induced intestinal hypercontractility requires IL-4 receptor alpha-responsiveness by T cells in mice.

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    Saskia Schmidt

    Full Text Available Gut-dwelling helminthes induce potent IL-4 and IL-13 dominated type 2 T helper cell (T(H2 immune responses, with IL-13 production being essential for Nippostrongylus brasiliensis expulsion. This T(H2 response results in intestinal inflammation associated with local infiltration by T cells and macrophages. The resulting increased IL-4/IL-13 intestinal milieu drives goblet cell hyperplasia, alternative macrophage activation and smooth muscle cell hypercontraction. In this study we investigated how IL-4-promoted T cells contributed to the parasite induced effects in the intestine. This was achieved using pan T cell-specific IL-4 receptor alpha-deficient mice (iLck(creIL-4Rα(-/lox and IL-4Rα-responsive control mice. Global IL-4Rα(-/- mice showed, as expected, impaired type 2 immunity to N. brasiliensis. Infected T cell-specific IL-4Rα-deficient mice showed comparable worm expulsion, goblet cell hyperplasia and IgE responses to control mice. However, impaired IL-4-promoted T(H2 cells in T cell-specific IL-4Rα deficient mice led to strikingly reduced IL-4 production by mesenteric lymph node CD4(+ T cells and reduced intestinal IL-4 and IL-13 levels, compared to control mice. This reduced IL-4/IL-13 response was associated with an impaired IL-4/IL-13-mediated smooth muscle cell hypercontractility, similar to that seen in global IL-4Rα(-/- mice. These results demonstrate that IL-4-promoted T cell responses are not required for the resolution of a primary N. brasiliensis infection. However, they do contribute significantly to an important physiological manifestation of helminth infection; namely intestinal smooth muscle cell-driven hypercontractility.

  13. Characterization of effector mechanisms at the host: parasite interface during the immune response to tissue-dwelling intestinal nematode parasites

    Science.gov (United States)

    The protective immune response that develops following infection with many tissue dwelling intestinal nematode parasites is characterized by elevations in IL-4 and IL-13 and increased numbers of CD4+ T cells, granulocytes, and macrophages. These cells accumulate at the site of infection, and in many...

  14. The Effect of Divergence in Feed Efficiency on the Intestinal Microbiota and the Intestinal Immune Response in Both Unchallenged and Lipopolysaccharide Challenged Ileal and Colonic Explants.

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    Stafford Vigors

    Full Text Available Feed efficiency is an important trait in pig production, with evidence to suggest that the efficiencies of a variety of biological systems contribute to variation in this trait. Little work has been conducted on the contribution of the intestinal innate immune response to divergence in feed efficiency. Hence, the objective of this study was to examine select bacterial populations and gene expression profiles of a range of targets relating to gut health and immunity in the intestine of pigs phenotypically divergent in feed efficiency in: a the basal state; and (b following an ex-vivo lipopolysaccharide (LPS challenge of ileal and colonic tissue. Male pigs (initial BW 22.4 kg (SD = 2.03 were fed a standard finishing diet for the final 43 days prior to slaughter to evaluate feed intake and growth for the purpose of calculating residual feed intake (RFI. On day 115, 16 animals (average weight 85 kg, SEM 2.8 kg, designated high RFI (HRFI and low RFI (LRFI were slaughtered. The LRFI pigs had increased lactobacillus spp. in the caecum compared to HRFI pigs (P 0.10. Interestingly, there was an interaction between RFI and LPS for the cytokines IL-8, IL-1, IL-6, TNF-α, Interferon-γ (IFN-γ and SOCS3, with the LRFI group having consistently lower gene expression in the colon following the LPS challenge, compared to the HRFI group. The lower gene expression of SOCS and cytokines following an ex vivo LPS challenge supports the theory that a possible energy saving mechanism exists in the intestinal innate immune response to an immune challenge in more feed efficient pigs.

  15. Immune Profile of Honduran Schoolchildren with Intestinal Parasites: The Skewed Response against Geohelminths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rueda, María Mercedes; Rodríguez, Carol Anahelka; Canales, Maritza

    2016-01-01

    Soil-transmitted helminth infections typically induce a type-2 immune response (Th2), but no immunoepidemiological studies have been undertaken in Honduras, an endemic country where the main control strategy is children's annual deworming. We aimed to characterize the immune profile of Honduran schoolchildren harbouring these parasitoses. Demographic and epidemiological data were obtained through a survey; nutritional status was assessed through anthropometry; intestinal parasites were diagnosed by formol-ether and Kato-Katz; and blood samples were collected to determine immunological markers including Th1/Th2 cytokines, IgE, and eosinophil levels. A total of 225 children participated in the study, all of whom had received deworming during the national campaign five months prior to the study. Trichuriasis and ascariasis prevalence were 22.2% and 20.4%, respectively. Stunting was associated with both age and trichuriasis, whereas ascariasis was associated with sex and household conditions. Helminth infections were strongly associated with eosinophilia and hyper-IgE as well as with a Th2-polarized response (increased levels of IL-13, IL-10, and IL4/IFN-γ ratios and decreased levels of IFN-γ). Pathogenic protozoa infections were associated with a Th1 response characterized by elevated levels of IFN-γ and decreased IL10/IFN-γ ratios. Even at low prevalence levels, STH infections affect children's nutrition and play a polarizing role in their immune system. PMID:27882241

  16. Immune Profile of Honduran Schoolchildren with Intestinal Parasites: The Skewed Response against Geohelminths

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Antonio Gabrie

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Soil-transmitted helminth infections typically induce a type-2 immune response (Th2, but no immunoepidemiological studies have been undertaken in Honduras, an endemic country where the main control strategy is children’s annual deworming. We aimed to characterize the immune profile of Honduran schoolchildren harbouring these parasitoses. Demographic and epidemiological data were obtained through a survey; nutritional status was assessed through anthropometry; intestinal parasites were diagnosed by formol-ether and Kato-Katz; and blood samples were collected to determine immunological markers including Th1/Th2 cytokines, IgE, and eosinophil levels. A total of 225 children participated in the study, all of whom had received deworming during the national campaign five months prior to the study. Trichuriasis and ascariasis prevalence were 22.2% and 20.4%, respectively. Stunting was associated with both age and trichuriasis, whereas ascariasis was associated with sex and household conditions. Helminth infections were strongly associated with eosinophilia and hyper-IgE as well as with a Th2-polarized response (increased levels of IL-13, IL-10, and IL4/IFN-γ ratios and decreased levels of IFN-γ. Pathogenic protozoa infections were associated with a Th1 response characterized by elevated levels of IFN-γ and decreased IL10/IFN-γ ratios. Even at low prevalence levels, STH infections affect children’s nutrition and play a polarizing role in their immune system.

  17. Avian influenza

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tjandra Y. Aditama

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Avian influenza, or “bird flu”, is a contagious disease of animals which crossed the species barrier to infect humans and gave a quite impact on public health in the world since 2004, especially due to the threat of pandemic situation. Until 1st March 2006, laboratory-confirmed human cases have been reported in seven countries: Cambodia, Indonesia, Thailand, Viet Nam, China, Iraq and Turkey with a total of 174 cases and 94 dead (54.02%. Indonesia has 27 cases, 20 were dead (74.07%. AI cases in Indonesia are more in male (62.5% and all have a symptom of fever. An influenza pandemic is a rare but recurrent event. An influenza pandemic happens when a new subtype emerges that has not previously circulated in humans. For this reason, avian H5N1 is a strain with pandemic potential, since it might ultimately adapt into a strain that is contagious among humans. Impact of the pandemic could include high rates of illness and worker absenteeism are expected, and these will contribute to social and economic disruption. Historically, the number of deaths during a pandemic has varied greatly. Death rates are largely determined by four factors: the number of people who become infected, the virulence of the virus, the underlying characteristics and vulnerability of affected populations, and the effectiveness of preventive measures. Accurate predictions of mortality cannot be made before the pandemic virus emerges and begins to spread. (Med J Indones 2006; 15:125-8Keywords: Avian Influenza, Pandemic

  18. The phase response and state space of slow wave contractions in the small intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, Sean P; Huizinga, Jan D

    2017-09-01

    What is the central question of this study? What are the dynamical rules governing interstitial cell of Cajal (ICC)-generated slow wave contractions in the small intestine, as reflected in their phase response curve and state space? What is the main finding and its importance? The phase response curve has a region of phase advance surrounding a phase delay peak. This pattern is important in generating a stable synchrony within the ICC network and is related to the state space of the ICC; in particular, the phase delay peak corresponds to the unstable equilibrium point that threads the ICC's limit cycle. Interstitial cells of Cajal (ICCs) generate electrical oscillations in the gut. Synchronization of the ICC population is required for generation of coherent electrical waves ('slow waves') that cause muscular contraction and thereby move gut content. The phase response curve (PRC) is an experimental measure of the dynamical rules governing a population of oscillators that determine their synchrony and gives an experimental window onto the state space of the oscillator, its dynamical landscape. We measured the PRC of slow wave contractions in the mouse small intestine by the novel combination of diameter mapping and single pulse electrical field stimulation. Phase change (τ) was measured as a function of old phase (ϕ) and distance from the stimulation electrode (d). Plots of τ(ϕ, d) showed an arrowhead-shaped region of phase advance enclosing at its base a phase delay peak. The phase change mirrored the perturbed pattern of contraction waves in response to a pulse. The (ϕ, d) plane is the surface of a displacement tube extending from the limit cycle through state space. To visualize the state space vector field on this tube, latent phase (ϕlat ) was calculated from τ. At the transition from advance to delay, isochrons made boomerang turns before tightening and winding around the phase delay peak corresponding to the unstable equilibrium point that threads the

  19. Cytotoxicity and genome-wide microarray analysis of intestinal smooth muscle cells in response to hexavalent chromium induction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-Fang JIN; Yuan-Yuan WANG; Zi-Dong ZHANG; Yi-Meng YUAN; Yi-Rui HU; Yang-Feng WEI; Jian NI

    2013-01-01

    Chronic ingestion of high concentrations of hexavalent chromium [Cr(Ⅵ)] in drinking water induces intestinal tumors in mice; however,information on its toxicity on intestinal smooth muscle cells is limited.The present study aimed to assess the in vitro and in vivo toxicological effects of Cr(Ⅵ) on intestinal smooth muscle cells.Human intestinal smooth muscle cells (HISM cells) were cultured with different concentrations of Cr(Ⅵ) to evaluate effects on cell proliferation ability,oxidative stress levels,and antioxidant system.Furthermore,tissue sections in Cr(Ⅵ) exposed rabbits were analyzed to evaluate toxicity on intestinal muscle cells in vivo.Gene chips were utilized to assess differential gene expression profiles at the genome-wide level in 1 μmol/L Cr(Ⅵ) treated cells.Intestinal tissue biopsy results showed that Cr(Ⅵ) increased the incidences of diffuse epithelial hyperplasia in intestinal jejunum but caused no obvious damage to the structure of the muscularis.Cell proliferation analysis revealed that high concentrations (≥64 μmol/L) but not low concentrations of Cr(Ⅵ) (≤16 μmol/L) significantly inhibited the growth of HISM cells.For oxidative stress levels,the expression of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitric oxide (NO) was elevated at high concentrations (≥64 μmol/L) but not at low concentrations of Cr(Ⅵ) (≤ 16 μmol/L).In addition,dose-dependent increases in the activity of oxidized glutathione (GSSH)/total-glutathione (T-GSH) were also observed.Gene chip screened 491 differentially expressed genes including genes associated with cell apoptosis,oxidations,and cytoskeletons.Some of these differentially expressed genes may be unique to smooth muscle cells in response to Cr(Ⅵ) induction.

  20. Large intestine (colon) (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... portion of the digestive system most responsible for absorption of water from the indigestible residue of food. The ileocecal valve of the ileum (small intestine) passes material into the large intestine at the ...

  1. Transamidation of wheat flour inhibits the response to gliadin of intestinal T cells in celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gianfrani, Carmen; Siciliano, Rosa A; Facchiano, Angelo M; Camarca, Alessandra; Mazzeo, Maria F; Costantini, Susan; Salvati, Virginia M; Maurano, Francesco; Mazzarella, Giuseppe; Iaquinto, Gaetano; Bergamo, Paolo; Rossi, Mauro

    2007-09-01

    Celiac disease is characterized by activation of HLA-DQ2/DQ8-restricted intestinal gluten-specific CD4(+) T cells. In particular, gluten becomes a better T-cell antigen following deamidation catalyzed by tissue transglutaminase. To date, the only available therapy is represented by adherence to a gluten-free diet. Here, we examined a new enzyme strategy to preventively abolish gluten activity. Enzyme modifications of the immunodominant alpha-gliadin peptide p56-68 were analyzed by mass spectrometry, and peptide binding to HLA-DQ2 was simulated by modeling studies. Wheat flour was treated with microbial transglutaminase and lysine methyl ester; gliadin was subsequently extracted, digested, and deamidated. Gliadin-specific intestinal T-cell lines (iTCLs) were generated from biopsy specimens from 12 adult patients with celiac disease and challenged in vitro with different antigen preparations. Tissue transglutaminase-mediated transamidation with lysine or lysine methyl ester of p56-68 or gliadin in alkaline conditions inhibited the interferon gamma expression in iTCLs; also, binding to DQ2 was reduced but not abolished, as suggested by in silico analysis. Lysine methyl ester was particularly effective in abrogating the activity of gliadin. Notably, a block in the response was observed when iTCLs were challenged with gliadin extracted from flour pretreated with microbial transglutaminase and lysine methyl ester. Transamidation of wheat flour with a food-grade enzyme and an appropriate amine donor can be used to block the T cell-mediated gliadin activity. Considering the crucial role of adaptive immunity in celiac disease, our findings highlight the potential of the proposed treatment to prevent cereal toxicity.

  2. Intestinal colonization by Candida albicans alters inflammatory responses in Bruton's tyrosine kinase-deficient mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karin Strijbis

    Full Text Available The commensal yeast Candida albicans is part of the human intestinal microflora and is considered a "pathobiont", a resident microbe with pathogenic potential yet harmless under normal conditions. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of C. albicans on inflammation of the intestinal tract and the role of Bruton's tyrosine kinase (Btk. Btk is an enzyme that modulates downstream signaling of multiple receptors involved in innate and adaptive immunity, including the major anti-fungal receptor Dectin-1. Colitis was induced in wild type and Btk-/- mice by treatment with dextran sodium sulfate (DSS and the gastrointestinal tract of selected treatment groups were then colonized with C. albicans. Colonization by C. albicans neither dampened nor exacerbated inflammation in wild type mice, but colon length and spleen weight were improved in Btk-deficient mice colonized with C. albicans. Neutrophil infiltration was comparable between wild type and Btk-/- mice, but the knockout mice displayed severely reduced numbers of macrophages in the colon during both DSS and DSS/Candida treatment. Smaller numbers and reduced responsiveness of Btk-/- macrophages might partially explain the improved colon length of Btk-/- mice as a result of Candida colonization. Surprisingly, DSS/Candida-treated Btk-/- animals had higher levels of certain pro-inflammatory cytokines and levels of the anti-inflammatory cytokine TGF-β were reduced compared to wild type. A clustering and correlation analysis showed that for wild type animals, spleen TGF-β and colon IL-10 and for Btk-/- spleen and colon levels of IL-17A best correlated with the inflammatory parameters. We conclude that in Btk-/- immunocompromised animals, colonization of the gastrointestinal tract by the commensal yeast C. albicans alters inflammatory symptoms associated with colitis.

  3. Lactobacillus acidophilus alleviates platelet-activating factor-induced inflammatory responses in human intestinal epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alip Borthakur

    Full Text Available Probiotics have been used as alternative prevention and therapy modalities in intestinal inflammatory disorders including inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD and necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC. Pathophysiology of IBD and NEC includes the production of diverse lipid mediators, including platelet-activating factor (PAF that mediate inflammatory responses in the disease. PAF is known to activate NF-κB, however, the mechanisms of PAF-induced inflammation are not fully defined. We have recently described a novel PAF-triggered pathway of NF-κB activation and IL-8 production in intestinal epithelial cells (IECs, requiring the pivotal role of the adaptor protein Bcl10 and its interactions with CARMA3 and MALT1. The current studies examined the potential role of the probiotic Lactobacillus acidophilus in reversing the PAF-induced, Bcl10-dependent NF-κB activation and IL-8 production in IECs. PAF treatment (5 µM×24 h of NCM460 and Caco-2 cells significantly increased nuclear p65 NF-κB levels and IL-8 secretion (2-3-fold, P<0.05, compared to control, which were blocked by pretreatment of the cells for 6 h with L. acidophilus (LA or its culture supernatant (CS, followed by continued treatments with PAF for 24 h. LA-CS also attenuated PAF-induced increase in Bcl10 mRNA and protein levels and Bcl10 promoter activity. LA-CS did not alter PAF-induced interaction of Bcl10 with CARMA3, but attenuated Bcl10 interaction with MALT1 and also PAF-induced ubiquitination of IKKγ. Efficacy of bacteria-free CS of LA in counteracting PAF-induced inflammatory cascade suggests that soluble factor(s in the CS of LA mediate these effects. These results define a novel mechanism by which probiotics counteract PAF-induced inflammation in IECs.

  4. Intestinal colonization by Candida albicans alters inflammatory responses in Bruton's tyrosine kinase-deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strijbis, Karin; Yilmaz, Omer H; Dougan, Stephanie K; Esteban, Alexandre; Gröne, Andrea; Kumamoto, Carol A; Ploegh, Hidde L

    2014-01-01

    The commensal yeast Candida albicans is part of the human intestinal microflora and is considered a "pathobiont", a resident microbe with pathogenic potential yet harmless under normal conditions. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of C. albicans on inflammation of the intestinal tract and the role of Bruton's tyrosine kinase (Btk). Btk is an enzyme that modulates downstream signaling of multiple receptors involved in innate and adaptive immunity, including the major anti-fungal receptor Dectin-1. Colitis was induced in wild type and Btk-/- mice by treatment with dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) and the gastrointestinal tract of selected treatment groups were then colonized with C. albicans. Colonization by C. albicans neither dampened nor exacerbated inflammation in wild type mice, but colon length and spleen weight were improved in Btk-deficient mice colonized with C. albicans. Neutrophil infiltration was comparable between wild type and Btk-/- mice, but the knockout mice displayed severely reduced numbers of macrophages in the colon during both DSS and DSS/Candida treatment. Smaller numbers and reduced responsiveness of Btk-/- macrophages might partially explain the improved colon length of Btk-/- mice as a result of Candida colonization. Surprisingly, DSS/Candida-treated Btk-/- animals had higher levels of certain pro-inflammatory cytokines and levels of the anti-inflammatory cytokine TGF-β were reduced compared to wild type. A clustering and correlation analysis showed that for wild type animals, spleen TGF-β and colon IL-10 and for Btk-/- spleen and colon levels of IL-17A best correlated with the inflammatory parameters. We conclude that in Btk-/- immunocompromised animals, colonization of the gastrointestinal tract by the commensal yeast C. albicans alters inflammatory symptoms associated with colitis.

  5. Associations of chicken Mx1 polymorphism with antiviral responses in avian influenza virus infected embryos and broilers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y; Brahmakshatriya, V; Lupiani, B; Reddy, S; Okimoto, R; Li, X; Chiang, H; Zhou, H

    2012-12-01

    Avian influenza virus (AIV) is a major respiratory disease of poultry that causes catastrophic losses to the poultry industry. The Mx protein has been shown to confer antiviral responses to influenza viruses in mice. One nonsynonymous substitution (S631N) in the chicken Mx protein is reported to be associated with resistance to AIV infection in vitro. The previous studies suggested controversy over whether this substitution in the Mx protein plays an important antiviral role in AIV infection in the chicken. It would be intriguing to investigate if the substitution is associated with resistance to AIV infection both in ovo and in vivo in chickens. In this study, the embryos and young chicks were generated from the cross of Mx1 heterozygous (S631N) parents with an expected segregating ratio of 1:2:1 in the progeny. A PCR length polymorphism was developed to genotype the Mx1 gene from 119 embryos and 48 chickens. The embryonated chicken eggs were inoculated with 10(6) 50% embryo infectious dose (EID(50)) H5N9 AIV on d 13. Hemagglutinating units in allantoic fluid were determined at 48 h postinoculation. For the in vivo study, twenty-four 1-wk-old broilers were inoculated with 10(6) EID(50) H5N3, and virus titers in lungs were evaluated at d 4 postinoculation. This is the first report revealing no significant association between Mx1 genotypes and low pathogenesis AIV infection both in ovo and in vivo in the chicken. Total RNA samples were isolated from chicken lung tissues in the in vivo study, and the Mx1 mRNA expression assay among 3 genotypes also suggested that only heterozygote birds had significantly greater expression with AIV infection than noninfected birds. A recombination breakpoint within Mx1 gene was also first identified, which has laid a solid foundation for further understanding biological function of the Mx1 gene in chickens. The current study provides valuable information on the effect of the Mx1 gene on the genetic resistance to AIV in chickens, and

  6. Morphological data indicate a stress response at the oral border of strangulated small intestine in horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Ceulaer, K; Delesalle, C; Van Elzen, R; Van Brantegem, L; Weyns, A; Van Ginneken, C

    2011-10-01

    Strangulation colic often leads to surgery. We aimed to document the molecular response in the non-resected intestine in these horses using quantitative Western blot analysis, and immunohistochemistry. The expression of hypoxia-inducible factor 1-alpha (HIF1α) was investigated together with two molecular pathways initiated after protein destruction: proteasome degradation via ubiquitin chain formation and protein restoration via molecular chaperones such as inducible heat shock protein 70 (HSP70). In addition, the expression of c-fos and c-jun could indicate an early proinflammatory response. Ubiquitin, HSP70, c-jun and c-fos protein levels did not differ between the control and colic samples nor were they related to the clinical outcome in case of strangulation colic. However, the immunohistochemical distribution of several of these proteins (ubiquitin, HSP70 and c-jun) differed significantly between colic and control samples. The elevated presence of ubiquitin in the enterocytes' nucleus, of HSP70 in the smooth muscle cells' nucleus and of c-jun in enteric neurons suggest protective and degenerative pathways are activated in the apparently healthy non-resected tissue in case of strangulation obstruction, perhaps providing a molecular and morphological basis for the development of complications like post-operative ileus.

  7. Characterization through a data display of the different cellular responses in X-irradiated small intestine

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    Carr, K.E.; McCullough, J.S. (Queen' s Univ., Belfast, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom). Medical Biology Centre); Nelson, A.C.; Hume, S.P.

    1992-06-01

    Previous work on small intestinal radiation injury has reported changes in epithelial and non-epithelial tissues, but with few quantitative comparisons of different responses by individual cell types. The approach used here quantifies the responses of mouse duodenum to X-irradiation with 6 Gy, 10 Gy and 20 Gy, sampled three days after treatment, and 10 Gy sampled 6 hours, 1 day and 3 days after treatment. Tissue area measurements and counts per circumference for 13 different structural elements are subjected to statistical tests. New data reported here for X-irradiation include the fact that cryptal cells do not respond uniformly, indicating that the crypt/microcolony cannot always be used as a standard unit in assessing radiation injury. Non-epithelial structures, such as submucosal arterioles, are also affected. The data display also includes control-referenced ratios, from which are calculated Tissue Indices and a final Morphological Index, which estimates total structural damage. The Indices are useful in drawing attention to unexpected changes in extent or range of data sets. In addition, the Epithelial Index appears to be a sensitive indicator of radiation damage, even at low doses and early time points. The data display includes a graph of the total Indices and summary tables of data, and encourages close study of the constituent data points. (author).

  8. Intestinal and peripheral immune response to MON810 maize ingestion in weaning and old mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finamore, Alberto; Roselli, Marianna; Britti, Serena; Monastra, Giovanni; Ambra, Roberto; Turrini, Aida; Mengheri, Elena

    2008-12-10

    This study evaluated the gut and peripheral immune response to genetically modified (GM) maize in mice in vulnerable conditions. Weaning and old mice were fed a diet containing MON810 or its parental control maize or a pellet diet containing a GM-free maize for 30 and 90 days. The immunophenotype of intestinal intraepithelial, spleen, and blood lymphocytes of control maize fed mice was similar to that of pellet fed mice. As compared to control maize, MON810 maize induced alterations in the percentage of T and B cells and of CD4(+), CD8(+), gammadeltaT, and alphabetaT subpopulations of weaning and old mice fed for 30 or 90 days, respectively, at the gut and peripheral sites. An increase of serum IL-6, IL-13, IL-12p70, and MIP-1beta after MON810 feeding was also found. These results suggest the importance of the gut and peripheral immune response to GM crop ingestion as well as the age of the consumer in the GMO safety evaluation.

  9. Intestinal Colonization by Candida albicans Alters Inflammatory Responses in Bruton's Tyrosine Kinase-Deficient Mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Strijbis, Karin; Yilmaz, Omer H; Dougan, Stephanie K; Esteban, Alexandre; Gröne, Andrea; Kumamoto, Carol A; Ploegh, Hidde L

    2014-01-01

    The commensal yeast Candida albicans is part of the human intestinal microflora and is considered a "pathobiont", a resident microbe with pathogenic potential yet harmless under normal conditions. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of C. albicans on inflammation of the intestinal tr

  10. The role of the heat shock response in the cytoprotection of the intestinal epithelium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Malago, Joshua Joseph

    2003-01-01

    Under normal conditions, the intestinal epithelial cells produce constitutive amount of heat shock proteins (Hsps) that are elevated following stressful stimuli. As the intestine is constantly exposed to variety of agents like diet, normal flora, infectious microorganisms, chemicals, and immune medi

  11. Intestinal Colonization by Candida albicans Alters Inflammatory Responses in Bruton's Tyrosine Kinase-Deficient Mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Strijbis, Karin; Yilmaz, Omer H; Dougan, Stephanie K; Esteban, Alexandre; Gröne, Andrea; Kumamoto, Carol A; Ploegh, Hidde L

    2014-01-01

    The commensal yeast Candida albicans is part of the human intestinal microflora and is considered a "pathobiont", a resident microbe with pathogenic potential yet harmless under normal conditions. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of C. albicans on inflammation of the intestinal

  12. Lipopolysaccharide binding protein and serum amyloid A secretion by human intestinal epithelial cells during the acute phase response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vreugdenhil, A C; Dentener, M A; Snoek, A M; Greve, J W; Buurman, W A

    1999-09-01

    The acute phase proteins LPS binding protein (LBP) and serum amyloid A (SAA) are produced by the liver and are present in the circulation. Both proteins have been shown to participate in the immune response to endotoxins. The intestinal mucosa forms a large surface that is continuously exposed to these microbial products. By secretion of antimicrobial and immunomodulating agents, the intestinal epithelium contributes to the defense against bacteria and their products. The aim of this study was to explore the influence of the inflammatory mediators TNF-alpha, IL-6, and IL-1beta on the release of LBP and SAA by intestinal epithelial cells (IEC). In addition, the induction of LBP and SAA release by cell lines of intestinal epithelial cells and hepatic cells was compared. The data obtained show that in addition to liver cells, IEC also expressed LBP mRNA and released bioactive LBP and SAA upon stimulation. Regulation of LBP and SAA release by IEC and hepatocytes was typical for class 1 acute phase proteins, although differences in regulation between the cell types were observed. Endotoxin did not induce LBP and SAA release. Glucocorticoids were demonstrated to strongly enhance the cytokine-induced release of LBP and SAA by IEC, corresponding to hepatocytes. The data from this study, which imply that human IEC can produce LBP and SAA, suggest a role for these proteins in the local defense mechanism of the gut to endotoxin. Furthermore, the results demonstrate that tissues other than the liver are involved in the acute phase response.

  13. Innate immune response, intestinal morphology and microbiota changes in Senegalese sole fed plant protein diets with probiotics or autolysed yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batista, S; Medina, A; Pires, M A; Moriñigo, M A; Sansuwan, K; Fernandes, J M O; Valente, L M P; Ozório, R O A

    2016-08-01

    The effects of using plant ingredients in Senegalese sole (Solea senegalensis) diet on immune competence and intestine morphology and microbial ecology are still controversial. Probiotics or immunostimulants can potentially alter the intestinal microbiota in a way that protects fish against pathogens. The current study aimed to examine the intestine histology and microbiota and humoral innate immune response in juvenile sole fed diets with low (35 %) or high (72 %) content of plant protein (PP) ingredients supplemented with a multispecies probiotic bacteria or autolysed yeast. Fish fed the probiotic diet had lower growth performance. Lysozyme and complement activities were significantly higher in fish fed PP72 diets than in their counterparts fed PP35 diets after 17 and 38 days of feeding. At 2 days of feeding, fish fed unsupplemented PP72 showed larger intestine section area and longer villus than fish fed unsupplemented PP35. At 17 days of feeding, fish fed unsupplemented PP72 showed more goblet cells than the other dietary groups, except the group fed yeast supplemented PP35 diet. High dietary PP level, acutely stimulate fish innate immune defence of the fish after 2 and 17 days of feeding. However, this effect does not occur after 73 days of feeding, suggesting a habituation to dietary treatments and/or immunosuppression, with a reduction in the number of the goblet cells. Fish fed for 38 days with diets supplemented with autolysed yeast showed longer intestinal villus. The predominant bacteria found in sole intestine were Vibrio sp. and dietary probiotic supplementation caused a reduction in Vibrio content, regardless of the PP level.

  14. Intestinal helminth coinfection is associated with mucosal lesions and poor response to therapy in American tegumentary leishmaniasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azeredo-Coutinho, Rilza Beatriz G; Pimentel, Maria Inês; Zanini, Graziela Maria; Madeira, Maria F; Cataldo, Jamyra Iglesias; Schubach, Armando O; Quintella, Leonardo Pereira; de Mello, Cintia Xavier; Mendonça, Sergio C F

    2016-02-01

    The most severe clinical form of American tegumentary leishmaniasis (ATL) due to Leishmania braziliensis is mucosal leishmaniasis (ML), characterized by destructive lesions in the facial mucosa. We performed a retrospective cohort study of 109 ATL patients from Rio de Janeiro State, Brazil, where ATL is caused by L. braziliensis, to evaluate the influence of intestinal parasite coinfections in the clinical course of ATL. Parasitological stool examination (PSE) was performed with samples from all patients by the sedimentation, Kato-Katz and Baermann-Moraes methods. The diagnosis of ATL was made from lesion biopsies by direct observation of amastigotes in Giemsa-stained imprints, isolation of Leishmania promastigotes or histopathological examination. All patients were treated with meglumine antimoniate. Patients with positive PSE had a frequency of mucosal lesions significantly higher than those with negative PSE (pAscaris lumbricoides (p<0.05), but not for protozoan infections. Patients with intestinal parasites had poor response to therapy (therapeutic failure or relapse) significantly more frequently than the patients with negative stool examination (p<0.005). A similar difference (p<0.005) was observed between patients with positive and negative results for intestinal helminths, but not for intestinal protozoa. Patients with positive PSE took significantly longer to heal than those with negative PSE (p<0.005). A similar difference was observed for intestinal helminth infections (p<0.005), but not for protozoan infections. Our results indicate a deleterious influence of intestinal helminth infections in the clinical course of ATL and evidence for the first time an association between ML and these coinfections, particularly with nematodes and A. lumbricoides.

  15. A commensal Helicobacter sp. of the rodent intestinal flora activates TLR2 and NOD1 responses in epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaouche-Drider, Nadia; Kaparakis, Maria; Karrar, Abdulgader; Fernandez, Maria-Isabel; Carneiro, Letitia A M; Viala, Jérôme; Boneca, Ivo Gomperts; Moran, Anthony P; Philpott, Dana J; Ferrero, Richard L

    2009-01-01

    Helicobacter spp. represent a proportionately small but significant component of the normal intestinal microflora of animal hosts. Several of these intestinal Helicobacter spp. are known to induce colitis in mouse models, yet the mechanisms by which these bacteria induce intestinal inflammation are poorly understood. To address this question, we performed in vitro co-culture experiments with mouse and human epithelial cell lines stimulated with a selection of Helicobacter spp., including known pathogenic species as well as ones for which the pathogenic potential is less clear. Strikingly, a member of the normal microflora of rodents, Helicobacter muridarum, was found to be a particularly strong inducer of CXC chemokine (Cxcl1/KC, Cxcl2/MIP-2) responses in a murine intestinal epithelial cell line. Time-course studies revealed a biphasic pattern of chemokine responses in these cells, with H. muridarum lipopolysaccharide (LPS) mediating early (24-48 h) responses and live bacteria seeming to provoke later (48-72 h) responses. H. muridarum LPS per se was shown to induce CXC chemokine production in HEK293 cells stably expressing Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2), but not in those expressing TLR4. In contrast, live H. muridarum bacteria were able to induce NF-kappaB reporter activity and CXC chemokine responses in TLR2-deficient HEK293 and in AGS epithelial cells. These responses were attenuated by transient transfection with a dominant negative construct to NOD1, and by stable expression of NOD1 siRNA, respectively. Thus, the data suggest that both TLR2 and NOD1 may be involved in innate immune sensing of H. muridarum by epithelial cells. This work identifies H. muridarum as a commensal bacterium with pathogenic potential and underscores the potential roles of ill-defined members of the normal flora in the initiation of inflammation in animal hosts. We suggest that H. muridarum may act as a confounding factor in colitis model studies in rodents.

  16. Default in plasma and intestinal IgA responses during acute infection by simian immunodeficiency virus

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    Chaoul Nada

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Conflicting results regarding changes in mucosal IgA production or in the proportions of IgA plasma cells in the small and large intestines during HIV-infection have been previously reported. Except in individuals repeatedly exposed to HIV-1 but yet remaining uninfected, HIV-specific IgAs are frequently absent in mucosal secretions from HIV-infected patients. However, little is known about the organization and functionality of mucosal B-cell follicles in acute HIV/SIV infection during which a T-dependent IgA response should have been initiated. In the present study, we evaluated changes in B-cell and T-cell subsets as well as the extent of apoptosis and class-specific plasma cells in Peyer’s Patches, isolated lymphoid follicles, and lamina propria. Plasma levels of IgA, BAFF and APRIL were also determined. Results Plasma IgA level was reduced by 46% by 28 days post infection (dpi, and no IgA plasma cells were found within germinal centers of Peyer’s Patches and isolated lymphoid follicles. This lack of a T-dependent IgA response occurs although germinal centers remained functional with no sign of follicular damage, while a prolonged survival of follicular CD4+ T-cells and normal generation of IgG plasma cells is observed. Whereas the average plasma BAFF level was increased by 4.5-fold and total plasma cells were 1.7 to 1.9-fold more numerous in the lamina propria, the relative proportion of IgA plasma cells in this effector site was reduced by 19% (duodemun to 35% (ileum at 28 dpi. Conclusion Our data provide evidence that SIV is unable to initiate a T-dependent IgA response during the acute phase of infection and favors the production of IgG (ileum or IgM (duodenum plasma cells at the expense of IgA plasma cells. Therefore, an early and generalized default in IgA production takes place during the acute of phase of HIV/SIV infection, which might impair not only the virus-specific antibody response but also IgA responses

  17. Intestinal barrier function in response to abundant or depleted mucosal glutathione in Salmonella-infected rats

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    Vink Carolien

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Glutathione, the main antioxidant of intestinal epithelial cells, is suggested to play an important role in gut barrier function and prevention of inflammation-related oxidative damage as induced by acute bacterial infection. Most studies on intestinal glutathione focus on oxidative stress reduction without considering functional disease outcome. Our aim was to determine whether depletion or maintenance of intestinal glutathione changes susceptibility of rats to Salmonella infection and associated inflammation. Rats were fed a control diet or the same diet supplemented with buthionine sulfoximine (BSO; glutathione depletion or cystine (glutathione maintenance. Inert chromium ethylenediamine-tetraacetic acid (CrEDTA was added to the diets to quantify intestinal permeability. At day 4 after oral gavage with Salmonella enteritidis (or saline for non-infected controls, Salmonella translocation was determined by culturing extra-intestinal organs. Liver and ileal mucosa were collected for analyses of glutathione, inflammation markers and oxidative damage. Faeces was collected to quantify diarrhoea. Results Glutathione depletion aggravated ileal inflammation after infection as indicated by increased levels of mucosal myeloperoxidase and interleukin-1β. Remarkably, intestinal permeability and Salmonella translocation were not increased. Cystine supplementation maintained glutathione in the intestinal mucosa but inflammation and oxidative damage were not diminished. Nevertheless, cystine reduced intestinal permeability and Salmonella translocation. Conclusion Despite increased infection-induced mucosal inflammation upon glutathione depletion, this tripeptide does not play a role in intestinal permeability, bacterial translocation and diarrhoea. On the other hand, cystine enhances gut barrier function by a mechanism unlikely to be related to glutathione.

  18. Partially responsive celiac disease resulting from small intestinal bacterial overgrowth and lactose intolerance

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    Misra Asha

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Celiac disease is a common cause of chronic diarrhea and malabsorption syndrome all over the world. Though it was considered uncommon in India in past, it is being described frequently recently. Some patients with celiac disease do not improve despite gluten free diet (GFD. A study described 15 cases of celiac disease unresponsive to GFD in whom small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO or lactose intolerance was the cause for unresponsiveness. Case presentation During a three-year period, 12 adult patients with celiac disease were seen in the Luminal Gastroenterology Clinic in a tertiary referral center in northern India. Two of these 12 patients (16.6%, who did not fully respond to GFD initially, are presented here. Unresponsiveness resulted from SIBO in one and lactose intolerance in the other. The former patient responded to antibiotics and the latter to lactose withdrawal in addition to standard GFD. Conclusion In patients with celiac disease partially responsive or unresponsive to GFD, SIBO and lactose intolerance should be suspected; appropriate investigations and treatment for these may result in complete recovery.

  19. Identification of UDP-glucuronosyltransferase isoforms responsible for leonurine glucuronidation in human liver and intestinal microsomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Bo; Cai, Weimin; Zhang, Jinlian; Zhou, Ning; Ma, Guo; Yang, Ping; Zhu, Qing; Zhu, Yizhun

    2014-09-01

    Leonurine is a potent component of herbal medicine Herba leonuri. The detail information on leonurine metabolism in human has not been revealed so far. Two primary metabolites, leonurine O-glucuronide and demethylated leonurine, were observed and identified in pooled human liver microsomes (HLMs) and O-glucuronide is the predominant one. Among 12 recombinant human UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs), UGT1A1, UGT1A8, UGT1A9, and UGT1A10 showed catalyzing activity toward leonurine glucuronidation. The intrinsic clearance (CLint) of UGT1A1 was approximately 15-to 20-fold higher than that of UGT1A8, UGT1A9, and UGT1A10, respectively. Both chemical inhibition study and correlation study demonstrated that leonurine glucuronidation activities in HLMs had significant relationship with UGT1A1 activities. Leonurine glucuronide was the major metabolite in human liver microsomes. UGT1A1 was principal enzyme that responsible for leonurine glucuronidation in human liver and intestine microsomes.

  20. Morphine Attenuates Apically-Directed Cytokine Secretion from Intestinal Epithelial Cells in Response to Enteric Pathogens

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    Amanda J. Brosnahan

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Epithelial cells represent the first line of host immune defense at mucosal surfaces. Although opioids appear to increase host susceptibility to infection, no studies have examined opioid effects on epithelial immune functions. We tested the hypothesis that morphine alters vectorial cytokine secretion from intestinal epithelial cell (IPEC-J2 monolayers in response to enteropathogens. Both entero-adherent Escherichia coli O157:H7 and entero-invasive Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium increased apically-directed IL-6 secretion and bi-directional IL-8 secretion from epithelial monolayers, but only IL-6 secretion evoked by E. coli was reduced by morphine acting through a naloxone-sensitive mechanism. Moreover, the respective type 4 and 5 Toll-like receptor agonists, lipopolysaccharide and flagellin, increased IL-8 secretion from monolayers, which was also attenuated by morphine pretreatment. These results suggest that morphine decreases cytokine secretion and potentially phagocyte migration and activation directed towards the mucosal surface; actions that could increase host susceptibility to some enteric infections.

  1. Antimicrobial growth promoters modulate host responses in mice with a defined intestinal microbiota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Kirsty; Zaytsoff, Sarah J. M.; Uwiera, Richard R. E.; Inglis, G. Douglas

    2016-01-01

    Antibiotics can promote growth in livestock (antimicrobial growth promoters, AGPs), however lack of knowledge regarding mechanisms has hampered the development of effective non-antibiotic alternatives. Antibiotics affect eukaryotic cells at therapeutic concentrations, yet effects of AGPs on host physiology are relatively understudied, partially due to the complexity of host-microorganism interactions within the gastrointestinal tract. To determine the direct effects of AGPs on the host, we generated Altered Schaedler Flora (ASF) mice, and administered chlortetracycline (CTC) and tylosin phosphate (TYL) in feed. Mice were challenged with Citrobacter rodentium to determine how AGPs alter host responses to physiological stress. Although CTC and TYL had inconsistent effects on the ASF taxa, AGPs protected mice from weight loss following C. rodentium inoculation. Mice treated with either CTC or TYL had lower expression of βd1 and Il17a in the intestine and had a robust induction of Il17a and Il10. Furthermore, AGP administration resulted in a lower hepatic expression of acute phase proteins (Saa1, Hp, and Cp) in liver tissue, and ameliorated C. rodentium-induced reductions in the expression of genes involved in lipogenesis (Hmgcl and Fabp1). Collectively, this indicates that AGPs directly affect host physiology, and highlights important considerations in the development of non-antibiotic alternatives. PMID:27929072

  2. Apoptosis and Proinflammatory Cytokine Responses of Primary Mouse Microglia and Astrocytes Induced by Human H1N1 and Avian H5N1 Influenza Viruses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gefei Wang; Kangsheng Li; Juan Zhang; Weizhong Li; Gang Xin; Yun Su; Yuanli Gao; Heng Zhang; Guimei Lin; Xiaoyang Jiao

    2008-01-01

    Patients with an influenza virus infection can be complicated by acute encephalopathy and encephalitis. To investigate the immune reactions involved in the neurocomplication, mouse microglia and astrocytes were isolated,infected with human H1N1 and avian H5N1 influenza viruses, and examined for their immune responses. We observed homogeneously distributed viral receptors, sialic acid (SA)-α2,3-Galactose (Gal) and SA-α2,6-Gal, on microglia and astrocytes. Both viruses were replicative and productive in microglia and astrocytes. Virus-induced apoptosis and cytopathy in infected cells were observed at 24 h post-infection (p.i.). Expression of IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α mRNA examined at 6 h and 24 h p.i. Was up-regulated, and their expression levels were considerably higher in H5N1 infection. The amounts of secreted proinflammatory IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α at 6 h and 24 h p.i. Were also induced, with greater induction by H5N1 infection. This study is the first demonstration that both human H1N1 and avian H5N1 influenza viruses can infect mouse microglia and astrocytes and induce apoptosis, cytopathy, and proinflammatory cytokine production in them in vitro. Our results suggest that the direct cellular damage and the consequences of immunopathological injury in the CNS contribute to the influenza viral pathogenesis.

  3. Altering Their Ecological Niche: Investigating the Response of Avian Migrants to Changes in Vegetation Phenology at Northern Latitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budde, M. E.; Ward, D. H.; Ely, C. R.; Handel, C. M.; Hupp, J. W.

    2009-12-01

    The impacts of global climate change are expected to be most severe at high northern latitudes. There is now strong evidence to support the hypothesis that such changes have had dramatic effects on the phenology of spring vegetative growth in these areas. One aspect of this change that has not been thoroughly investigated is how these changes vary across habitats and whether sub-Arctic and Arctic avifauna have adapted to shifts in plant phenology by modifying the timing of migration and nesting. A recent study showed that certain bird species have experienced population decline due to the varied timing of seasonal events and points to the fact that the degree of risk facing migratory birds is not well quantified. Plant phenology is especially sensitive to annual variation in temperature and precipitation and is a major determinant of plant species distribution, making it a good indicator of climate change effects. Migratory birds are considered one of the most vulnerable groups to the impacts of climate change because climate affects bird movement and distribution through species-specific physiological tolerances and changes in food and habitat resources. In this study we analyze the evidence for long-term plant phenology changes across different biomes of Alaska using satellite remote sensing techniques. We correlate this variability with ground-based measurements of avian migration and breeding. Specifically, we try to determine if the timing of spring green-up is synchronized across breeding areas or whether the process has become fractured across intervening biomes, potentially disrupting the timing of migration and breeding, putting species at risk. Using satellite-based time series of Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) data, we create spatially explicit maps of seasonal vegetation metrics and correlate those with the timing and distribution of avian migrant populations. Preliminary investigation focused on the last 10 year period (2000-2009) and

  4. Role of T cell TGF beta signaling in intestinal cytokine responses and helminthic immune modulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colonization with helminthic parasites down-regulates inflammation in murine colitis and improves activity scores in human inflammatory bowel disease. Helminths induce mucosal regulatory T cells, which are important for intestinal immunologic homeostasis. Regulatory T cell function involves cytoki...

  5. Programming of Intestinal Epithelial Differentiation by IL-33 Derived from Pericryptal Fibroblasts in Response to Systemic Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mousumi Mahapatro

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The intestinal epithelium constitutes an efficient barrier against the microbial flora. Here, we demonstrate an unexpected function of IL-33 as a regulator of epithelial barrier functions. Mice lacking IL-33 showed decreased Paneth cell numbers and lethal systemic infection in response to Salmonella typhimurium. IL-33 was produced upon microbial challenge by a distinct population of pericryptal fibroblasts neighboring the intestinal stem cell niche. IL-33 programmed the differentiation of epithelial progenitors toward secretory IEC including Paneth and goblet cells. Finally, IL-33 suppressed Notch signaling in epithelial cells and induced expression of transcription factors governing differentiation into secretory IEC. In summary, we demonstrate that gut pericryptal fibroblasts release IL-33 to translate bacterial infection into an epithelial response to promote antimicrobial defense.

  6. Strategies of the protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica to evade the innate immune responses of intestinal epithelial cells

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Ankri

    2002-11-01

    Molecules expressed by the pathogenic ameoba Entamoeba histolytica but weakly expressed or absent from the non-pathogenic ameoba Entamoeba dispar could be used by intestinal epithelial cells to discriminate between the two species and to initiate an appropriate inflammatory response. Among the possible molecules involved in this identification are the Gal/GalNac lectin and the lipophosphoglycan. Once the inflammatory response is initiated, E. histolytica trophozoites have to protect themselves against reactive nitrogen intermediates produced by intestinal epithelial cells, oxygen intermediates, and cytotoxic molecules released by activated neutrophils. By screening the E. histolytica genome, we have identified proteins that may play a role in the defence strategy of the parasite. One of these proteins, a serine proteinase inhibitor, inhibits human neutrophil cathepsin G, a key component of the host defence.

  7. Rapid and slow nitric oxide responses during conducted vasodilation in the in vivo intestine and brain cortex microvasculatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohlen, H Glenn

    2011-11-01

    Conduction of arteriolar vasodilation is initiated by activation of nitric oxide (NO) mechanisms, but dependent on conduction of hyperpolarization. Most studies have used brief (vasodilation to evaluate the fast conduction processes. However, most arteriolar mechanisms involving NO production persist for minutes. In this study, fast and slower components of arteriolar conduction in the in vivo rat brain and small intestine were compared using three-minute stimulation of NO-dependent vasodilation and measurement of [NO] at the distal sites. Within 10-15 seconds, both vasculatures had a rapidly conducted vasodilation and dilation at distance had a fast but small [NO] component. A slower but larger distal vasodilation occurred after 60-90 seconds in the intestine, but not the brain, and was associated with a substantial increase in [NO]. This slowly developed dilation appeared to be caused by flow mediated responses of larger arterioles as smaller arterioles dilated to lower downstream resistance. These results indicate while the intestinal and cerebral arterioles have a fast conducted vasodilation system, the intestinal arterioles also have a slower but larger dilation of major arterioles that is NO related and dependent on the conduction of vasodilation between small arterioles.

  8. The Effect of Lactobacillus isolates on growth performance, immune response, intestinal bacterial community composition of growing Rex Rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, C; Zhu, Y; Li, F; Huang, L

    2017-10-01

    The objective of this experiment was to investigate the effect of Lactobacillus isolates on intestinal bacterial community composition of growing Rex Rabbits. A total of 120 weaned Rex Rabbits (30 days old, 30 per group) were used for the experiment, which started after an adaptation period of 7 days. The control group was fed with basal diet only, while the treatment I, II and III groups were fed with basal diet adding antibiotics, Lactobacillus zeae (LB1) and Lactobacillus casei (L3) respectively. Growth performance, immune response and intestinal flora have been examined. The results obtained were as follows: (i) F/G of the rabbits fed with Lactobacillus isolates was significantly lower than that of the control group (p rabbits with Lactobacillus isolates. (iii) Lactobacillus isolates had no influence on the number of mast cells in duodenum and jejunum, but increased the number of mast cells in caecum significantly (p rabbit's intestinal flora can be changed by Lactobacillus isolates and antibiotics, especially for the microbial diversity and abundance in the caecum. In conclusion, the application of proper Lactobacillus isolates can improve the growth performance, enhance the immunological function and adjust the intestinal micro-ecosystem of growing Rex Rabbits. Journal of Animal Physiology and Animal Nutrition © 2017 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  9. The effect of Aquablend Avian probiotic®including Lactobacillus, Streptococcus and Bifidobacterium on systemic antibody response against Newcastle and Influenza disease vaccine in broiler chickens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Forough Talazadeh

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Finding alternatives to antibiotics for poultry production is very important because there are increasing concerns about antibiotic resistance. So, researchers have been directed to the research back to natural antimicrobial products. Some researchers stated that probiotics can stimulate the immune system and play an important role in shaping the immune system. Objectives: Theaimof this studywasto examine the effect of a commercial probiotic mixture (AquablendAvian® supplementation to the drinking water of broiler chickens on the immune response against Newcastle and influenza diseases vaccines. Materials and Methods: In this study, 180 one-day-old broiler chickens were purchased and divided randomly into 3 groups (n = 60 for each group. Chickens in groups A and B received 300 mg of the probiotic in drinking water for first 3 days and first 7 days, respectively. Chickens in group C were kept as a control group and did not receive probiotic. All groups were vaccinated with live Newcastle vaccine (B1 strain intraocularly on 8th day, and AI-ND killed vaccine (subtype H9N2 subcutaneously at the back of the neck on 8th day. Two mL of blood samples were collected before vaccination as well as on days 14, 28 and 35 postimmunization. Ten chickens of each group were bled randomly and an antibody titer against Newcastle disease vaccine and AI-ND killed vaccine(subtype H9N2 was determined by the hemagglutination-inhibition test. Results: The results of the present study showed that oral administration of the probiotic for 7 days significantly increased the specific antibody response to Newcastle vaccine compared to the control group (0.75 - 1.6 log, based on log2, while the probiotic administration had no significant effect on antibody productions against avian influenza vaccine as compared to the control group. Conclusions: Oral administration of Aquablend Avian® probiotic strains including Lactobacillus, Streptococcus and Bifidobacterium

  10. The effect of Aquablend Avian probiotic ® including Lactobacillus, Streptococcus and Bifidobacterium on systemic antibody response against Newcastle and Influenza disease vaccine in broiler chickens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Talazadeh

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background Finding alternatives to antibiotics for poultry production is very important because there are increasing concerns about antibiotic resistance. So, researchers have been directed to the research back to natural antimicrobial products. Some researchers stated that probiotics can stimulate the immune system and play an important role in shaping the immune system. Objectives The aim of this study was to examine the effect of a commercial probiotic mixture (Aquablend Avian® supplementation to the drinking water of broiler chickens on the immune response against Newcastle and influenza diseases vaccines. Materials and Methods In this study, 180 one-day-old broiler chickens were purchased and divided randomly into 3 groups (n = 60 for each group. Chickens in groups A and B received 300 mg of the probiotic in drinking water for first 3 days and first 7 days, respectively. Chickens in group C were kept as a control group and did not receive probiotic. All groups were vaccinated with live Newcastle vaccine (B1 strain intraocularly on 8th day, and AI-ND killed vaccine (subtype H9N2 subcutaneously at the back of the neck on 8th day. Two mL of blood samples were collected before vaccination as well as on days 14, 28 and 35 postimmunization. Ten chickens of each group were bled randomly and an antibody titer against Newcastle disease vaccine and AI-ND killed vaccine (subtype H9N2 was determined by the hemagglutination-inhibition test. Results The results of the present study showed that oral administration of the probiotic for 7 days significantly increased the specific antibody response to Newcastle vaccine compared to the control group (0.75 - 1.6 log, based on log2, while the probiotic administration had no significant effect on antibody productions against avian influenza vaccine as compared to the control group. Conclusions Oral administration of Aquablend Avian® probiotic strains including Lactobacillus, Streptococcus and Bifidobacterium

  11. Effects of thymol and carvacrol supplementation on intestinal integrity and immune responses of broiler chickens challenged with Clostridium perfringens

    OpenAIRE

    Du, Encun; Wang, Weiwei; Gan, Liping; Li, Zhui; Guo, Shuangshuang; Guo, Yuming

    2016-01-01

    Background Necrotic enteritis caused by Clostridium perfringens infection leads to serious economic losses in the global poultry production. In the present study, we investigated the protective effects of essential oils (EO, which contained 25 % thymol and 25 % carvacrol as active components) supplementation on growth performance, gut lesions, intestinal morphology, and immune responses of the broiler chickens infected with C. perfringens. A total of 448 1-day-old male broiler chicks were all...

  12. Avian Influenza (Bird Flu)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Address What's this? Submit What's this? Submit Button Influenza Types Seasonal Avian Swine/Variant Pandemic Other Information on Avian Influenza Language: English (US) Español Recommend on Facebook ...

  13. The effects of natural and modified clinoptilolite on intestinal barrier function and immune response to LPS in broiler chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qiu Jue; Zhou, Yan Min; Wu, Ya Nan; Zhang, Li Li; Wang, Tian

    2013-05-15

    The protection of intestinal barrier function and the anti-inflammatory effects of natural clinoptilolite (NCLI) and modified clinoptilolite (MCLI) were investigated in broilers that were repeatedly challenged with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). A total of 288 1-d-old broiler chicks were divided equally into three treatment groups: control, NCLI-treated (2%) and MCLI-treated (2%). Half of the birds from each treatment group were challenged with 0.9% NaCl solution or LPS (250μg/kg body weight, administered orally) at 16, 18 and 21d of age. The results indicated that, prior to LPS challenge, the diet had no effect on bird growth performance (P>0.05). The oral administration of LPS was also not associated with any significant changes in poultry performance (P>0.05). In LPS-challenged birds that were pretreated with NCLI (2%) or MCLI (2%), the LPS-induced increases in the plasma and intestinal mucosa concentrations of TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-2, IL-6, IL-4 and IL-10 were dramatically attenuated. Additionally, significant decreases in the plasma d-lactic acid and diamine oxidase (DAO) levels were found in birds that were pretreated with NCLI or MCLI. Furthermore, both NCLI and MCLI reduced the sICAM-1 concentration in the intestinal mucosa. In conclusion, NCLI and MCLI are able to prevent the LPS-induced intestinal mucosa damage and inflammatory response in vivo. These beneficial effects suggest that NCLI and MCLI act as anti-inflammatory agents in part by inhibiting neutrophil infiltration and hyperactivation and by suppressing the secretion of various plasma and intestinal mucosa inflammatory mediators.

  14. Avian influenza virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avian influenza virus (AIV) is type A influenza that is adapted to avian host species. Although the virus can be isolated from numerous avian species, the natural host reservoir species are dabbling ducks, shorebirds and gulls. Domestic poultry species (poultry being defined as birds that are rais...

  15. Proteomic responses of human intestinal Caco-2 cells exposed to silver nanoparticles and ionic silver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberemm, Axel; Hansen, Ulf; Böhmert, Linda; Meckert, Christine; Braeuning, Albert; Thünemann, Andreas F; Lampen, Alfonso

    2016-03-01

    Even although quite a number of studies have been performed so far to demonstrate nanoparticle-specific effects of substances in living systems, clear evidence of these effects is still under debate. The present study was designed as a comparative proteomic analysis of human intestinal cells exposed to a commercial silver nanoparticle reference material and ions from AgNO3. A two-dimensional gel electrophoresis/MALDI mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomic analysis was conducted after 24-h incubation of differentiated Caco-2 cells with non-cytotoxic and low cytotoxic silver concentrations (2.5 and 25 µg ml(-1) nanosilver, 0.5 and 5 µg ml(-1) AgNO3). Out of an overall number of 316 protein spots differentially expressed at a fold change of ≥ 1.4 or ≤ -1.4 in all treatments, 169 proteins could be identified. In total, 231 spots were specifically deregulated in particle-treated groups compared with 41 spots, which were limited to AgNO3-treatments. Forty-four spots (14 %) were commonly deregulated by both types of treatment. A considerable fraction of the proteins differentially expressed after treatment with nanoparticles is related to protein folding, synthesis or modification of proteins as well as cellular assembly and organization. Overlays of networks obtained for particulate and ionic treatments showed matches, indicating common mechanisms of combined particle and ionic silver exposure and exclusive ionic silver treatment. However, proteomic responses of Caco-2 cells treated with higher concentrations of silver species also showed some differences, for example regarding proteins related to fatty acid and energy metabolism, suggesting an induction of also some different molecular mechanisms for particle exposure and ionic treatment.

  16. Intestinal Ischemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... some generally recognized patterns. Symptoms of acute intestinal ischemia Signs and symptoms of acute intestinal ischemia typically ... confusion in older adults Symptoms of chronic intestinal ischemia Signs and symptoms of chronic intestinal ischemia can ...

  17. Immune Response and Intestinal Permeability in Children With Acute Gastroenteritis Treated With Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Trial

    OpenAIRE

    Sindhu, Kulandaipalayam N. C.; Sowmyanarayanan, Thuppal V.; Paul, Anu; Babji, Sudhir; Sitara S R Ajjampur; Priyadarshini, Sophia; Sarkar, Rajiv; Balasubramanian, K.A.; Wanke, Christine A.; Ward, Honorine D; Kang, Gagandeep

    2014-01-01

    Supplementation with the probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG) is safe, decreases repeated episodes of diarrhea, improves intestinal permeability, and increases IgG antibody response in rotavirus diarrhea in Indian children.

  18. FRET-based dual-emission and pH-responsive nanocarriers for enhanced delivery of protein across intestinal epithelial cell barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Kun-Ying; Lin, Cheng-Wei; Hsu, Chun-Hua; Ho, Yi-Cheng; Chuang, Er-Yuan; Sung, Hsing-Wen; Mi, Fwu-Long

    2014-10-22

    The oral route is a convenient and commonly employed way for drug delivery. However, therapeutic proteins have poor bioavailability upon oral administration due to the impermeable barrier from intestinal epithelial tight junction (TJ). Moreover, the pH of the small intestine varies among different regions of the intestinal tract where digestion and absorption occur at different levels. In this study, a tunable dual-emitting and pH-responsive nanocarrier that can alter the fluorescent color and emission intensity in response to pH changes and can trigger the opening of intestinal epithelial TJ at different levels were developed from chitosan-N-arginine and poly(γ-glutamic acid)-taurine conjugates. As pH increased from 6.0 to 8.0, the binding affinity of the oppositely charged polyions decreased, whereas the ratio of the intensity of the donor-to-acceptor emission intensity (ID/IA) increased by 27-fold. The fluorescent and pH-responsive nanocarrier was able to monitor the pH change of intestinal environment and to control the release of an anti-angiogenic protein in response to the pH gradient. The nanocarrier triggered the opening of intestinal epithelial TJ and consequently enhanced the permeation of the released protein through the intestinal epithelial barrier model (Caco-2 cell monolayer) to inhibit tube formation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells.

  19. The Effects of Serotonin Receptor Antagonists on Contraction and Relaxation Responses Induced by Electrical Stimulation in the Rat Small Intestine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farajian Mashhadi

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background The main source of 5-HT in body is in enterchromafin cells of intestine, different studies mentioned different roles for endogenous 5-HT and receptors involved and it is not clearified the mechanism of action of endogenous 5-HT. Objectives To study the role of endogenous 5-HT on modulation of contraction and relaxation responses induced by electrical field stimulation (EFS in different regions of the rat intestine. Materials and Methods Segments taken from the rat duodenum, jejunum, mid and terminal ileum were vertically mounted, connected to a transducer and exposed to EFS with different frequencies in the absence and presence of various inhibitors of enteric mediators i. e. specific 5-HT receptor antagonists. Results EFS-induced responses were sensitive to TTX and partly to atropine, indicating a major neuronal involvement and a cholinergic system. Pre-treatment with WAY100635 (a 5-HT1A receptor antagonist and granisetron up to 10.0 µM, GR113808 (a 5-HT4 receptor antagonist, methysergide and ritanserin up to 1.0 µM, failed to modify responses to EFS inall examined tissues. In the presence of SB258585 1.0 µM (a 5-HT6 receptor antagonist there was a trend to enhance contraction in the proximal part of the intestine and reduce contraction in the distal part. Pre-treatment with SB269970A 1.0 µM (5-HT7 receptor antagonist induced a greater contractile response to EFS at 0.4 Hz only in the duodenum. Conclusions The application of 5-HT1A, 5-HT2, 5-HT3, 5-HT4, 5-HT6 and 5-HT7 receptor antagonists, applied at concentrations lower than 1.0 µM did not modify the EFS-induced contraction and relaxation responses, whichsuggests the unlikely involvement of endogenous 5-HT in mediating responses to EFS in the described test conditions.

  20. Toll-Like Receptor Mediated Modulation of T Cell Response by Commensal Intestinal Microbiota as a Trigger for Autoimmune Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca Rogier

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In autoimmune diseases, a disturbance of the balance between T helper 17 (Th17 and regulatory T cells (Tregs is often observed. This disturbed balance is also the case in rheumatoid arthritis (RA. Genetic predisposition to RA confers the presence of several polymorphisms mainly regulating activation of T lymphocytes. However, the presence of susceptibility factors is neither necessary nor sufficient to explain the disease development, emphasizing the importance of environmental factors. Multiple studies have shown that commensal gut microbiota is of great influence on immune homeostasis and can trigger the development of autoimmune diseases by favoring induction of Th17 cells over Tregs. However the mechanism by which intestinal microbiota influences the Th cell balance is not completely understood. Here we review the current evidence supporting the involvement of commensal intestinal microbiota in rheumatoid arthritis, along with a potential role of Toll-like receptors (TLRs in modulating the relevant Th cell responses to trigger autoimmunity. A better understanding of TLR triggering by intestinal microbiota and subsequent T cell activation might offer new perspectives for manipulating the T cell response in RA patients and may lead to the discovery of new therapeutic targets or even preventive measures.

  1. Administration of a Polyphenol-Enriched Feed to Farmed Sea Bass (Dicentrarchus labrax L.) Modulates Intestinal and Spleen Immune Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magrone, Thea; Fontana, Sergio; Laforgia, Flavia; Dragone, Teresa; Jirillo, Emilio; Passantino, Letizia

    2016-01-01

    Farmed fish are exposed to a continuous antigenic pressure by microbial and environmental agents, which may lead to a condition of chronic inflammation. In view of the notion that polyphenols, largely contained in fruits and vegetables, are endowed with antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities, farmed sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax L.) have been administered with red grape polyphenol-enriched feed. Polyphenols were extracted from the seeds of Canosina Nero di Troia Vitis vinifera and mixed with conventional feed at two different concentrations (100 and 200 mg/kg, resp.). Fish samples collected at days 223 and 273, respectively, were evaluated for intestinal and spleen cytokine release as well as for spleen macrophage (MØ) and melanomacrophage center (MMC) areas and distribution. Data will show that in treated fish decrease of intestinal interleukin- (IL-) 1β and IL-6 and increase of splenic interferon- (IFN-) γ occur. On the other hand, in the spleen reduction of MØ number seems to parallel increase in MMCs. Collectively, these data suggest that polyphenol-administered sea bass generate lower levels of intestinal proinflammatory cytokines, while producing larger amounts of spleen IFN-γ, as an expression of a robust and protective adaptive immune response. Increase of MMCs corroborates the evidence for a protective spleen response induced by feed enriched with polyphenols.

  2. Low dietary iron intake restrains the intestinal inflammatory response and pathology of enteric infection by food-borne bacterial pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kortman, Guus A M; Mulder, Michelle L M; Richters, Thijs J W; Shanmugam, Nanda K N; Trebicka, Estela; Boekhorst, Jos; Timmerman, Harro M; Roelofs, Rian; Wiegerinck, Erwin T; Laarakkers, Coby M; Swinkels, Dorine W; Bolhuis, Albert; Cherayil, Bobby J; Tjalsma, Harold

    2015-09-01

    Orally administrated iron is suspected to increase susceptibility to enteric infections among children in infection endemic regions. Here we investigated the effect of dietary iron on the pathology and local immune responses in intestinal infection models. Mice were held on iron-deficient, normal iron, or high iron diets and after 2 weeks they were orally challenged with the pathogen Citrobacter rodentium. Microbiome analysis by pyrosequencing revealed profound iron- and infection-induced shifts in microbiota composition. Fecal levels of the innate defensive molecules and markers of inflammation lipocalin-2 and calprotectin were not influenced by dietary iron intervention alone, but were markedly lower in mice on the iron-deficient diet after infection. Next, mice on the iron-deficient diet tended to gain more weight and to have a lower grade of colon pathology. Furthermore, survival of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans infected with Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium was prolonged after iron deprivation. Together, these data show that iron limitation restricts disease pathology upon bacterial infection. However, our data also showed decreased intestinal inflammatory responses of mice fed on high iron diets. Thus additionally, our study indicates that the effects of iron on processes at the intestinal host-pathogen interface may highly depend on host iron status, immune status, and gut microbiota composition.

  3. Porcine lactoferrin-derived peptide LFP-20 protects intestinal barrier by maintaining tight junction complex and modulating inflammatory response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zong, Xin; Hu, Wangyang; Song, Deguang; Li, Zhi; Du, Huahua; Lu, Zeqing; Wang, Yizhen

    2016-03-15

    LFP-20, a 20-amino acid antimicrobial peptide in the N terminus of porcine lactoferrin, has antimicrobial and immunomodulatory activities. This study assessed the protective effects of LFP-20 on LPS-induced intestinal damage in a LPS-induced mouse model and in vitro, using intestinal porcine epithelial cell line 1 (IPEC-1) cells. LFP-20 prevented LPS-induced impairment in colon epithelium tissues, infiltration of macrophages or leukocytes, histological evidence of inflammation and increased levels of TNF-a, IL-6 and IFN-γ. LFP-20 increased the expression of zonula occludens-1, occludin and claudin-1 and reduced permeability as well as apoptosis of the colon in LPS-treated mice. In IPEC-1 cells, LFP-20 increased transepithelial electrical resistance and tight junction expression. Moreover, we found LFP-20 decreased the MyD88 and AKT levels to affect the NF-κB signaling pathway, to modulate inflammation response and tight junction networks in the processing of LPS stimulation. In summary, LFP-20 prevents the inflammatory response and disruption of tight junction structure induced by LPS, suggesting the potential use of LFP-20 as a prophylactic agent to protect intestinal barrier function.

  4. Immunobiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus strains differentially modulate antiviral immune response in porcine intestinal epithelial and antigen presenting cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Previous findings suggested that Lactobacillus rhamnosus CRL1505 is able to increase resistance of children to intestinal viral infections. However, the intestinal cells, cytokines and receptors involved in the immunoregulatory effect of this probiotic strain have not been fully characterized. Results We aimed to gain insight into the mechanisms involved in the immunomodulatory effect of the CRL1505 strain and therefore evaluated in vitro the crosstalk between L. rhamnosus CRL1505, porcine intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) and antigen presenting cells (APCs) from swine Peyer’s patches in order to deepen our knowledge about the mechanisms, through which this strain may help preventing viral diarrhoea episodes. L. rhamnosus CRL1505 was able to induce IFN–α and –β in IECs and improve the production of type I IFNs in response to poly(I:C) challenge independently of Toll-like receptor (TLR)-2 or TLR9 signalling. In addition, the CRL1505 strain induced mRNA expression of IL-6 and TNF-α via TLR2 in IECs. Furthermore, the strain significantly increased surface molecules expression and cytokine production in intestinal APCs. The improved Th1 response induced by L. rhamnosus CRL1505 was triggered by TLR2 signalling and included augmented expression of MHC-II and co-stimulatory molecules and expression of IL-1β, IL-6, and IFN-γ in APCs. IL-10 was also significantly up-regulated by CRL1505 in APCs. Conclusions It was recently reviewed the emergence of TLR agonists as new ways to transform antiviral treatments by introducing panviral therapeutics with less adverse effects than IFN therapies. The use of L. rhamnosus CRL1505 as modulator of innate immunity and inductor of antiviral type I IFNs, IFN-γ, and regulatory IL-10 clearly offers the potential to overcome this challenge. PMID:24886142

  5. Proteome Response of Chicken Embryo Fibroblast Cells to Recombinant H5N1 Avian Influenza Viruses with Different Neuraminidase Stalk Lengths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yongtao; Ming, Fan; Huang, Huimin; Guo, Kelei; Chen, Huanchun; Jin, Meilin; Zhou, Hongbo

    2017-01-01

    The variation on neuraminidase (NA) stalk region of highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N1 virus results in virulence change in animals. In our previous studies, the special NA stalk-motif of H5N1 viruses has been demonstrated to play a significant role in the high virulence and pathogenicity in chickens. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the pathogenicity of viruses with different NA stalk remain poorly understood. This study presents a comprehensive characterization of the proteome response of chicken cells to recombinant H5N1 virus with stalk-short NA (rNA-wt) and the stalkless NA mutant virus (rSD20). 208 proteins with differential abundance profiles were identified differentially expressed (DE), and these proteins were mainly related to stress response, transcription regulation, transport, metabolic process, cellular component and cytoskeleton. Through Ingenuity Pathways Analysis (IPA), the significant biological functions of DE proteins represented included Post-Translational Modification, Protein Folding, DNA Replication, Recombination and Repair. It was interesting to find that most DE proteins were involved in the TGF-β mediated functional network. Moreover, the specific DE proteins may play important roles in the innate immune responses and H5N1 virus replication. Our data provide important information regarding the comparable host response to H5N1 influenza virus infection with different NA stalk lengths. PMID:28079188

  6. Effect of threonine deficiency on intestinal integrity and immune response to coccidiosis in broiler chicks

    Science.gov (United States)

    For this study, threonine (Thr) deficiency was hypothesized to exacerbate the intestinal damage induced by feed withdrawal and coccidiosis infection because of its high obligatory requirement of the gut. Two dietary Thr treatments (0.49 and 0.90%) were fed to chicks from 1-21 d of age. At 13 d of a...

  7. Redistribution of calbindin-D28k in chick intestine in response to calcium transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemere, I; Leathers, V L; Thompson, B S; Luben, R A; Norman, A W

    1991-12-01

    Vitamin D and its hormonally active metabolite 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 [1,25-(OH)2D3] are known to alter several parameters associated with stimulated intestinal Ca2+ transport: levels of calbindin-D28K, tubulin, and endosomal-lysosomal organelles containing Ca2+, and calbindin-D28K. In the present study the as yet unexamined relationship among Ca2+ transport, calbindin-D28K, and microtubules was studied by immunofluorescence microscopy. In vitamin D3-treated or 1,25-(OH)2D3-treated chicks, in the absence of Ca2+ transport, immunofluorescence microscopy of intestinal tissue fixed at 25 C indicated a colocalization of calbindin-D28K and tubulin along epithelial cell brush border and basal-lateral membranes. Initiation of in situ Ca2+ absorption for 10, 20, or 30 min before tissue fixation resulted first in increased punctate calbindin-D28K staining and then in a progressive decrease in intestinal cell- and microtubule-associated calbindin-D28K, with a concomitant increase in calbindin-D28K labeling in the villus core. When intestinal tissue from 1,25-(OH)2D3-treated chicks was chilled to 4 C before fixation (a procedure shown by others to cause microtubule depolymerization), evaluation by immunofluorescence microscopy revealed diffuse cytoplasmic staining of both the immunoreactive tubulin and its associated calbindin-D28K. These results indicate the possible involvement of calbindin-D28K with tubulin during the process of Ca2+ transport and the secretion of the calbindin-D28K as a consequence of the overall transport process. Electron microscopy with immunogold labeling revealed intestinal epithelial calbindin-D28K to be localized inside of small vesicles and lysosome-like structures, with sparse cytoplasmic labeling. Subsequent electron microscopic analysis of intestinal epithelial microtubules prepared by polymerization and depolymerization revealed immunogold labeling in coprecipitated vesicular remnants, with consistently light staining of filaments traversing

  8. Different patterns of intestinal response to injury after arterial, venous or arteriovenous occlusion in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Francisco Javier Guzmán-de la Garza; Carlos Rodrigo Cámara-Lemarroy; Gabriela Alarcón-Galván; Paula Cordero-Pérez; Linda Elsa Mu(n)oz-Espinosa; Nancy Esthela Fernández-Garza

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the differences in injury patterns caused by arterial, venous or arteriovenous mesenteric occlusion.METHODS: Male Wistar rats were separated equally into four groups. Occlusion was performed by clamping the superior mesenteric artery (A), the mesenteric vein (V) or both (AV) for 30 min, followed by 60 min of reperfusion. A control group received sham surgery only. Intestinal sections were examined for histological damage and serum tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), endothelin-1 (ET-1), P-selectin, antithrombin Ⅲ (ATⅢ) and soluble intracellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) concentrations were measured.RESULTS: All groups showed significant mucosal injury compared to controls. Furthermore, mucosal injury was significantly more severe in the V and AV groups compared to the A group (3.6 ± 0.55, 3.4 ± 0.55 and 2 ± 0.71, respectively, P = 0.01). ICAM-1 was similarly elevated in all groups, with no significant differences between the groups. P-selectin levels were significantly elevated in the V and AV groups but not the A group (1.4 ± 0.5 ng/mL, 2.52 ± 0.9 ng/mL and 0.02 ± 0.01 ng/mL,respectively, P = 0.01) and ET-1 was significantly elevated in the A and V groups but not the AV group (0.32 ± 0.04 pg/mL, 0.36 ± 0.05 pg/mL and 0.29 ± 0.03 pg/mL, respectively, P = 0.01) compared to sham controls. ATⅢ levels were markedly depleted in the V and AV groups, but not in the A group (29.1 ± 5.2 pg/mL,31.4 ± 21.8 pg/mL and 55.8 ± 35.6 pg/mL ,respectively, P = 0.01), compared to controls. Serum TNF-α was significantly increased in all groups compared to sham controls (1.32 ± 0.87 ng/mL, 1.79 ± 0.20 ng/mL and 4.4 ± 0.69 ng/mL, for groups A, V and AV,respectively, P = 0.01), with higher values in the AV group.CONCLUSION: Different patterns of response to ischemia/reperfusion are associated with venous, arterial or arteriovenous occlusion. Venous and arteriovenous occlusion was associated with the most severe alterations.

  9. Differential gene-expression and host-response profiles against avian influenza virus within the chicken lung due to anatomy and airflow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reemers, Sylvia S; van Haarlem, Daphne A; Groot Koerkamp, Marian J; Vervelde, Lonneke

    2009-09-01

    Sampling the complete organ instead of defined parts might affect analysis at both the cellular and transcriptional levels. We defined host responses to H9N2 avian influenza virus (AIV) in trachea and different parts of the lung. Chickens were spray-inoculated with either saline or H9N2 AIV. Trachea and lung were sampled at 1 and 3 days post-inoculation (p.i.) for immunocytochemistry, real-time quantitative RT-PCR and gene-expression profiling. The trachea was divided into upper and lower parts and the lung into four segments, according to anatomy and airflow. Two segments contained the primary and secondary bronchi, cranial versus caudal (parts L1 and L3), and two segments contained the tertiary bronchi, cranial versus caudal (parts L2 and L4). Between the upper and lower trachea in both control and infected birds, minor differences in gene expression and host responses were found. In the lung of control birds, differences in anatomy were reflected in gene expression, and in the lung of infected birds, virus deposition enhanced the differences in gene expression. Differential gene expression in trachea and lung suggested common responses to a wide range of agents and site-specific responses. In trachea, site-specific responses were related to heat shock and lysozyme activity. In lung L1, which contained most virus, site-specific responses were related to genes involved in innate responses, interleukin activity and endocytosis. Our study indicates that the anatomy of the chicken lung must be taken into account when investigating in vivo responses to respiratory virus infections.

  10. Immunobiotic lactic acid bacteria beneficially regulate immune response triggered by poly(I:C in porcine intestinal epithelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hosoya Shoichi

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This study analyzed the functional expression of TLR3 in various gastrointestinal tissues from adult swine and shows that TLR3 is expressed preferentially in intestinal epithelial cells (IEC, CD172a+CD11R1high and CD4+ cells from ileal Peyer's patches. We characterized the inflammatory immune response triggered by TLR3 activation in a clonal porcine intestinal epitheliocyte cell line (PIE cells and in PIE-immune cell co-cultures, and demonstrated that these systems are valuable tools to study in vitro the immune response triggered by TLR3 on IEC and the interaction between IEC and immune cells. In addition, we selected an immunobiotic lactic acid bacteria strain, Lactobacillus casei MEP221106, able to beneficially regulate the anti-viral immune response triggered by poly(I:C stimulation in PIE cells. Moreover, we deepened our understanding of the possible mechanisms of immunobiotic action by demonstrating that L. casei MEP221106 modulates the interaction between IEC and immune cells during the generation of a TLR3-mediated immune response.

  11. Cytokine responses of human intestinal epithelial-like Caco-2 cells to the nonpathogenic bacterium Bacillus subtilis (natto).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosoi, Tomohiro; Hirose, Rieko; Saegusa, Shizue; Ametani, Akio; Kiuchi, Kan; Kaminogawa, Shuichi

    2003-05-15

    Intestinal epithelial cells produce cytokines in response to pathogenic bacteria. However, cellular responses of these cells to nonpathogenic strains, such as Bacillus subtilis, are yet to be determined. In this study, we investigate whether epithelial-like human colon carcinoma Caco-2 cells produce cytokines in response to B. subtilis or B. subtilis (natto). The latter strain is utilized for manufacturing the fermented soy food "natto". Live cells of nonpathogenic B. subtilis JCM 1465(T), B. subtilis (natto) and E. coli JCM 1649(T), as well as pathogenic S. enteritidis JCM 1652 and P. aeruginosa JCM 5516 strains, induced secretion of interleukin-6 (IL-6) and/or IL-8, but not IL-7, IL-15 or tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha). Transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) of Caco-2 cell monolayers cultured with E. coli, S. enteritidis or P. aeruginosa decreased more rapidly than that of cells cultured with B. subtilis or B. subtilis (natto). The amounts of cytokine induced by B. subtilis (natto) cells were strain-dependent. Moreover, B. subtilis (natto) cells subjected to hydrochloric acid treatment, but not autoclaving, induced a higher secretion of IL-6 and IL-8 than intact cells. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors, including AG126 and genistein, suppressed cytokine secretion. Our results suggest that the nonpathogenic B. subtilis (natto) bacterium induces cytokine responses in intestinal epithelial cells via activation of an intracellular signaling pathway, such as that of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-kappaB).

  12. Enterococcus faecium NCIMB 10415 Modulates Epithelial Integrity, Heat Shock Protein, and Proinflammatory Cytokine Response in Intestinal Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shanti Klingspor

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Probiotics have shown positive effects on gastrointestinal diseases; they have barrier-modulating effects and change the inflammatory response towards pathogens in studies in vitro. The aim of this investigation has been to examine the response of intestinal epithelial cells to Enterococcus faecium NCIMB 10415 (E. faecium, a probiotic positively affecting diarrhea incidence in piglets, and two pathogenic Escherichia coli (E. coli strains, with specific focus on the probiotic modulation of the response to the pathogenic challenge. Porcine (IPEC-J2 and human (Caco-2 intestinal cells were incubated without bacteria (control, with E. faecium, with enteropathogenic (EPEC or enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC each alone or in combination with E. faecium. The ETEC strain decreased transepithelial resistance (TER and increased IL-8 mRNA and protein expression in both cell lines compared with control cells, an effect that could be prevented by pre- and coincubation with E. faecium. Similar effects were observed for the increased expression of heat shock protein 70 in Caco-2 cells. When the cells were challenged by the EPEC strain, no such pattern of changes could be observed. The reduced decrease in TER and the reduction of the proinflammatory and stress response of enterocytes following pathogenic challenge indicate the protective effect of the probiotic.

  13. Discordant Correlation between Serological Assays Observed When Measuring Heterosubtypic Responses against Avian Influenza H5 and H7 Viruses in Unexposed Individuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleonora Molesti

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The human population is constantly exposed to multiple influenza A subtypes due to zoonotic spillover and rapid viral evolution driven by intrinsic error-prone replication and immunological pressure. In this context, antibody responses directed against the HA protein are of importance since they have been shown to correlate with protective immunity. Serological techniques, detecting these responses, play a critical role for influenza surveillance, vaccine development, and assessment. As the recent human pandemics and avian influenza outbreaks have demonstrated, there is an urgent need to be better prepared to assess the contribution of the antibody response to protection against newly emerged viruses and to evaluate the extent of preexisting heterosubtypic immunity in populations. In this study, 68 serum samples collected from the Italian population between 1992 and 2007 were found to be positive for antibodies against H5N1 as determined by single radial hemolysis (SRH, but most were negative when evaluated using haemagglutination inhibition (HI and microneutralisation (MN assays. As a result of these discordant serological findings, the increased sensitivity of lentiviral pseudotypes was exploited in pseudotype-based neutralisation (pp-NT assays and the results obtained provide further insight into the complex nature of humoral immunity against influenza A viruses.

  14. Targeting antigens to Dec-205 on dendritic cells induces a higher immune response in chickens: Hemagglutinin of avian influenza virus example.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jáuregui-Zúñiga, David; Pedraza-Escalona, Martha; Espino-Solís, Gerardo Pavel; Quintero-Hernández, Verónica; Olvera-Rodríguez, Alejandro; Díaz-Salinas, Marco Aurelio; López, Susana; Possani, Lourival Domingos

    2016-12-09

    It is widely known that targeting a variety of antigens to the DEC-205 receptor on dendritic cells (DCs) significantly potentiate immunity. This communication reports the development of a new murine monoclonal antibody (mAb) against the chicken DEC-205, using as immunogen the carbohydrate recognition domain-2 (CRD-2) heterologously expressed. This mAb recognizes a protein band of 250kDa by immunoprecipitation analysis and shows strong cross-reactivity with human and pig DEC-205. Furthermore, the hemagglutinin (HA) of avian influenza H5N2 virus was cloned and expressed using insect cell-baculovirus expression system. We chemically conjugated the anti-chicken DEC-205 antibody with the highly purified HA to direct the antigen to the dendritic cells and evaluate the immune response elicited in vivo by this conjugate. A single dose of chemical conjugate was sufficient to elicit a strong immune response in chickens as early as fourteen days after priming. In addition, the conjugate induced an earlier and higher response compared to unconjugated HA. These results suggest that the strategy described here has potential to be used in the future design and development of successful vaccines against different chicken infectious diseases with direct impact in biotechnology and veterinary fields.

  15. Effect of glutamine on change in early postoperative intestinal permeability and its relation to systemic inflammatory response

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhu-Fu Quan; Chong Yang; Ning Li; Jie-Shou Li

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To study the effects of glutamine (Gln) on the change of intestinal permeability and its relationship to systemic inflammatory response in early abdominal postoperative patients.METHODS: A prospective, randomized, double-blind and controlled trial was taken. Twenty patients undergoing abdominal surgery were randomized into Gln group (oral administration of glutamine, 30 g/d, for 7 d, n=10) and placebo group (oral administration of placebo, 30 g/d, for 7 d, n=10). Temperatures and heart rates of all patients were daily recorded. White blood cell counts(WBC) and biochemical variables were measured before operation and 4 and 7 d after drug administration. Serum concentrations of glutamine, endotoxin, diamine oxidase and malondialdehyde and urine lactulose/mannito (L/M) ratio were measured before and 7 d after drug administration.RESULTS: The patients in the 2 groups were comparable prior to drug administration. Serum Gln concentration was significantly decreased in the placebo group and increased in the Gln group 7 d after drug administration. Urine L/M ratio was significantly increased in the placebo group and decreased in the Gln group. The serum concentration of endotoxin, diamine oxidase and malondialdehyde was significantly decreased in the Gln group compared with those in the placebo group. Temperatures, heart rates and WBC counts were significantly lower in the Gln group than those in the placebo group.CONCLUSION: Gut is one of the sources of systemic inflammatory response in abdominal postoperative patients and glutamine can decrease intestinal permeability, maintain intestinal barrier and attenuate systemic inflammatory response in early postoperative patients.

  16. Differential response of two Pinus spp. to avian nitrogen input as revealed by nitrogen isotope analysis for tree rings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizota, Chitoshi; Lopez Caceres, Maximo Larry; Yamanaka, Toshiro; Nobori, Yoshihiro

    2011-03-01

    Temporal variations in N concentration and δ(15)N value of annual tree rings (1 year of time resolution) of two Japanese Black Pine (Pinus thunbergii) and three Japanese Red Pine (Pinus densiflora) trees under current breeding activity of the Great Cormorant (Pharacrocorax carbo) and the Black-tailed Gull (Larus crassirostris), respectively, in central and northeastern Japan were studied. Both species from control sites where no avian input occurs show negative values (δ(15)N = around -4 ‰ to -2 ‰) which are common among higher plants growing under high rainfall regimes. The δ(15)N values of P. densiflora show uniformly positive values several years before and after the breeding event, indicating N translocation that moved the absorbed N of a given growth year to tree rings of the previous year while a clear historical value of soil N dynamics was kept intact in the annual rings of P. thunbergii. Long-term N trends inferred from tree rings must take into account tree species with limited translocation rates that can retain actual N annual acquisition.

  17. Polymethoxyflavone Apigenin-Trimethylether Suppresses LPS-Induced Inflammatory Response in Nontransformed Porcine Intestinal Cell Line IPEC-J2

    OpenAIRE

    Orsolya Farkas; Orsolya Palócz; Erzsébet Pászti-Gere; Péter Gálfi

    2015-01-01

    The in vitro anti-inflammatory effect of apigenin and its trimethylated analogue (apigenin-trimethylether) has been investigated in order to evaluate whether these flavonoids could attenuate LPS-induced inflammation in IPEC-J2 non-transformed intestinal epithelial cells. Levels of IL-6, IL-8, TNF-α, and COX-2 mRNA were measured as a marker of inflammatory response. The extracellular H2O2 level in IPEC-J2 cells was also monitored by Amplex Red assay. Our data revealed that both compounds had s...

  18. Avian And Other Zoonotic Influenza

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... files Questions & answers Features Multimedia Contacts Avian and other zoonotic influenza Fact sheet Updated November 2016 Key ... A(H3) subtypes. Clinical features of avian and other zoonotic influenza infections in humans Avian and other ...

  19. Gastro-intestinal basidiobolomycosis in a 2-year-old boy: dramatic response to potassium iodide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanaei Dashti, Anahita; Nasimfar, Amir; Hosseini Khorami, Hossein; Pouladfar, Gholamreza; Kadivar, Mohammad Rahim; Geramizadeh, Bita; Khalifeh, Masoomeh

    2016-07-04

    Gastro-intestinal basidiobolomycosis (GIB) is a rare fungal infection caused by Basidiobolus ranarum. Treatment includes surgical resection and long-term antifungal therapy. A 2.5-year-old boy presented with a 10-day history of abdominal pain, fever and diarrhoea, and a palpable abdominal mass was detected. Resection was undertaken and histology confirmed basidiobolomycosis. Treatment with amphotericin B and itraconazole was commenced, but the infection progressed and spread to involve the intestines, liver, ribs and lung, and also the abdominal wall after 6 months, requiring four operative procedures. Because of unresponsiveness to amphotericin and itraconazole, oral potassium iodide was added which resulted in complete resolution of the infection. Potassium iodide is an essential component of the treatment of systemic B. ranarum.

  20. Kefir-isolated bacteria and yeasts inhibit Shigella flexneri invasion and modulate pro-inflammatory response on intestinal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolla, P A; Abraham, A G; Pérez, P F; de Los Angeles Serradell, M

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate the ability of a kefir-isolated microbial mixture containing three bacterial and two yeast strains (MM) to protect intestinal epithelial cells against Shigella flexneri invasion, as well as to analyse the effect on pro-inflammatory response elicited by this pathogen. A significant decrease in S. flexneri strain 72 invasion was observed on both HT-29 and Caco-2 cells pre-incubated with MM. Pre-incubation with the individual strains Saccharomyces cerevisiae CIDCA 8112 or Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis CIDCA 8221 also reduced the internalisation of S. flexneri into HT-29 cells although in a lesser extent than MM. Interestingly, Lactobacillus plantarum CIDCA 83114 exerted a protective effect on the invasion of Caco-2 and HT-29 cells by S. flexneri. Regarding the pro-inflammatory response on HT-29 cells, S. flexneri infection induced a significant activation of the expression of interleukin 8 (IL-8), chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 20 (CCL20) and tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) encoding genes (Pkefir, resulted in inhibition of S. flexneri internalisation into human intestinal epithelial cells, along with the inhibition of the signalling via NF-κB that in turn led to the attenuation of the inflammatory response.

  1. Effects of dietary L-tryptophan supplementation on intestinal response to chronic unpredictable stress in broilers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Yunshuang; Guo, Yuming; Yang, Ying

    2017-07-01

    Stress has been recognized as a critical risk factor for gastrointestinal diseases in both humans and animals. However, nutritional strategies to attenuate stress-induced intestinal barrier function and underlying mechanisms remain largely unknown. This study tested the hypothesis that L-tryptophan enhanced intestinal barrier function by regulating mucosal serotonin metabolism in chronic unpredictable stress-exposed broilers. One-day-old male broilers (Arbor Acres) were fed a basal diet supplemented with or without L-tryptophan in the absence or presence of chronic unpredictable stress. Feed intake, body weight gain, plasma corticosterone and 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT), intestinal permeability, mucosal secretory IgA (sIgA), and mRNA levels for tryptophan hydroxylase 1 (TPH1), IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α, IL-10, protein abundance for claudin-1, occludin, and ZO-1 were determined. Stress exposure led to elevated plasma corticosterone (P L-tryptophan supplementation. Western blot analysis showed that stress exposure resulted in decreased protein abundance for occludin, claudin-1, and ZO-1, which was attenuated by L-tryptophan. mRNA levels for IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α were increased, but those for IL-10 were decreased, in the jejunal tissue of broilers subjected to stress. This effect of stress on cytokine expression was abolished by L-tryptophan treatment. The effects of stress were associated with decreased plasma concentration of 5-HT (P L-Tryptophan supplementation markedly attenuated stress-induced alterations in 5-HT and TPH1 mRNA level in jejunal tissues of broilers. Collectively, these results indicate that L-tryptophan supplementation alleviates chronic unpredictable stress-induced intestinal barrier dysfunction by regulating 5-HT metabolism in broilers.

  2. Cytokine responses in primary chicken embryo intestinal cells infected with Campylobacter jejuni strains of human and chicken origin and the expression of bacterial virulence-associated genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Yiping; Ingmer, Hanne; Madsen, Mogens;

    2008-01-01

    Background Campylobacter jejuni is a major cause of inflammatory diarrhoea in humans and is considered a commensal of the gastroenteric tract of the avian host. However, little is known about the interaction between C. jejuni and the avian host including the cytokine responses and the expression....... jejuni strains are capable of invading the CEICs and stimulate these cells in a pro-inflammatory manner and during this interaction the expression of the bacterial virulence-associated genes ciaB, dnaJ and racR is increased. Furthermore, incubation of bacteria with conditioned cell- and bacteria......-free media from another co-cultivation experiment also increased the expression of the virulence-associated genes in the C. jejuni chicken isolate, indicating that the expression of bacterial genes is regulated by component(s) secreted upon co-cultivation of bacteria and CEICs. Conclusion We show that under...

  3. Food viscosity as determinant for adaptive growth responses in rat intestine: long-term feeding of different hydroxyethyl celluloses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsenhans, B; Caspary, W F

    2000-07-01

    Carbohydrate gelling agents can be regarded as being representative for the soluble and viscous fractions of dietary fibre. Their dietary concentration affects the consistency of the ingested food as well as the dilution of nutrients and energy. By feeding hydroxyethyl cellulose (HEC) differing in molecular mass, and thus in its viscosity properties, only the consistency of the diet was modified. Three HEC (of low (LV), medium (MV) and high viscosity (HV)) were employed in a 6-week feeding study with female rats to evaluate the effect of the viscosity on adaptive responses of intestinal growth variables. Each of the HEC was added in three increasing concentrations (8, 16, and 32%, w/w) to a fibre-free control diet to yield nine test groups besides a fibre-free and an additional, fibre-rich, cereal-based control group. Except for the highest concentration of the high viscosity product (32% HV-HEC), the dilution of the energy density of the diet was almost completely compensated by an increased food intake. With the same exception, energy utilisation was not impaired and, therefore, body-weight gains in the test groups were not significantly different from that in the control. Most other changes, e.g. increases in small intestinal length, mucosal DNA content, caecal and colonic weight, not only depended on the dietary concentration but also on the viscosity of HEC in a manner that either increasing the viscosity at a given dietary concentration or increasing the dietary concentration at a given viscosity led to the same results. These findings clearly prove the important role of the viscosity of the lumen content, as a mere physico-chemical factor, in determining adaptative growth responses in the intestinal tract of rats.

  4. Downregulation of microRNA-107 in intestinal CD11c(+) myeloid cells in response to microbiota and proinflammatory cytokines increases IL-23p19 expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Xiaochang; Cao, Anthony T; Cao, Xiaocang; Yao, Suxia; Carlsen, Eric D; Soong, Lynn; Liu, Chang-Gong; Liu, Xiuping; Liu, Zhanju; Duck, L Wayne; Elson, Charles O; Cong, Yingzi

    2014-03-01

    Commensal flora plays an important role in the development of the mucosal immune system and in maintaining intestinal homeostasis. However, the mechanisms involved in regulation of host-microbiota interaction are still not completely understood. In this study, we examined how microbiota and intestinal inflammatory conditions regulate host microRNA expression and observed lower microRNA-107 (miR-107) expression in the inflamed intestines of colitic mice, compared with that in normal control mice. miR-107 was predominantly reduced in epithelial cells and CD11c(+) myeloid cells including dendritic cells and macrophages in the inflamed intestines. We demonstrate that IL-6, IFN-γ, and TNF-α downregulated, whereas TGF-β promoted, miR-107 expression. In addition, miR-107 expression was higher in the intestines of germ-free mice than in mice housed under specific pathogen-free conditions, and the presence of microbiota downregulated miR-107 expression in DCs and macrophages in a MyD88- and NF-κB-dependent manner. We determined that the ectopic expression of miR-107 specifically repressed the expression of IL-23p19, a key molecule in innate immune responses to commensal bacteria. We concluded that regulation of miR-107 by intestinal microbiota and proinflammatory cytokine serve as an important pathway for maintaining intestinal homeostasis. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Avian response to fire in pine–oak forests of Great Smoky Mountains National Park following decades of fire suppression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Eli T.; Simons, Theodore R.

    2016-01-01

    Fire suppression in southern Appalachian pine–oak forests during the past century dramatically altered the bird community. Fire return intervals decreased, resulting in local extirpation or population declines of many bird species adapted to post-fire plant communities. Within Great Smoky Mountains National Park, declines have been strongest for birds inhabiting xeric pine–oak forests that depend on frequent fire. The buildup of fuels after decades of fire suppression led to changes in the 1996 Great Smoky Mountains Fire Management Plan. Although fire return intervals remain well below historic levels, management changes have helped increase the amount of fire within the park over the past 20 years, providing an opportunity to study patterns of fire severity, time since burn, and bird occurrence. We combined avian point counts in burned and unburned areas with remote sensing indices of fire severity to infer temporal changes in bird occurrence for up to 28 years following fire. Using hierarchical linear models that account for the possibility of a species presence at a site when no individuals are detected, we developed occurrence models for 24 species: 13 occurred more frequently in burned areas, 2 occurred less frequently, and 9 showed no significant difference between burned and unburned areas. Within burned areas, the top models for each species included fire severity, time since burn, or both, suggesting that fire influenced patterns of species occurrence for all 24 species. Our findings suggest that no single fire management strategy will suit all species. To capture peak occupancy for the entire bird community within xeric pine–oak forests, at least 3 fire regimes may be necessary; one applying frequent low severity fire, another using infrequent low severity fire, and a third using infrequently applied high severity fire.

  6. Response of white leghorn chickens to infection with avian leukosis virus subgroup J and infectious bursal disease virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Susan M; Sellers, Holly S

    2012-03-01

    The effects of viral-induced immunosuppression on the infectious status (viremia and antibody) and shedding of avian leukosis virus (ALV) were studied. Experimental white leghorn chickens were inoculated with ALV subgroup J (ALV-J) and infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) at day of hatch with the ALV-J ADOL prototype strain Hcl, the Lukert strain of IBDV, or both. Appropriate groups were exposed a second time with the Lukert strain at 2 wk of age. Serum samples were collected at 2 and 4 wk of age for IBDV antibody detection. Samples for ALV-J viremia, antibody detection, and cloacal shedding were collected at 4, 10, 18, and 30 wk of age. The experiment was terminated at 30 wk of age, and birds were necropsied and examined grossly for tumor development. Neoplasias detected included hemangiomas, bile duct carcinoma, and anaplastic sarcoma of the nerve. Control birds and IBDV-infected birds were negative for ALV-J-induced viremia, antibodies, and cloacal shedding throughout experiment. By 10 wk, ALV-J-infected groups began to develop antibodies to ALV-J. However, at 18 wk the incidence of virus isolation increased in both groups, with a simultaneous decrease in antibody levels. At 30 wk, 97% of birds in the ALV-J group were virus positive and 41% were antibody positive. In the ALV-J/IDBV group, 96% of the birds were virus positive at 30 wk, and 27% had antibodies to ALV-J. In this study, infection with a mild classic strain of IBDV did not influence ALV-J infection or antibody production.

  7. Systems-level comparison of host-responses elicited by avian H5N1 and seasonal H1N1 influenza viruses in primary human macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Suki M Y; Gardy, Jennifer L; Cheung, C Y; Cheung, Timothy K W; Hui, Kenrie P Y; Ip, Nancy Y; Guan, Y; Hancock, Robert E W; Peiris, J S Malik

    2009-12-14

    Human disease caused by highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N1 can lead to a rapidly progressive viral pneumonia leading to acute respiratory distress syndrome. There is increasing evidence from clinical, animal models and in vitro data, which suggests a role for virus-induced cytokine dysregulation in contributing to the pathogenesis of human H5N1 disease. The key target cells for the virus in the lung are the alveolar epithelium and alveolar macrophages, and we have shown that, compared to seasonal human influenza viruses, equivalent infecting doses of H5N1 viruses markedly up-regulate pro-inflammatory cytokines in both primary cell types in vitro. Whether this H5N1-induced dysregulation of host responses is driven by qualitative (i.e activation of unique host pathways in response to H5N1) or quantitative differences between seasonal influenza viruses is unclear. Here we used microarrays to analyze and compare the gene expression profiles in primary human macrophages at 1, 3, and 6 h after infection with H5N1 virus or low-pathogenic seasonal influenza A (H1N1) virus. We found that host responses to both viruses are qualitatively similar with the activation of nearly identical biological processes and pathways. However, in comparison to seasonal H1N1 virus, H5N1 infection elicits a quantitatively stronger host inflammatory response including type I interferon (IFN) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha genes. A network-based analysis suggests that the synergy between IFN-beta and TNF-alpha results in an enhanced and sustained IFN and pro-inflammatory cytokine response at the early stage of viral infection that may contribute to the viral pathogenesis and this is of relevance to the design of novel therapeutic strategies for H5N1 induced respiratory disease.

  8. Systems-level comparison of host-responses elicited by avian H5N1 and seasonal H1N1 influenza viruses in primary human macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suki M Y Lee

    Full Text Available Human disease caused by highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI H5N1 can lead to a rapidly progressive viral pneumonia leading to acute respiratory distress syndrome. There is increasing evidence from clinical, animal models and in vitro data, which suggests a role for virus-induced cytokine dysregulation in contributing to the pathogenesis of human H5N1 disease. The key target cells for the virus in the lung are the alveolar epithelium and alveolar macrophages, and we have shown that, compared to seasonal human influenza viruses, equivalent infecting doses of H5N1 viruses markedly up-regulate pro-inflammatory cytokines in both primary cell types in vitro. Whether this H5N1-induced dysregulation of host responses is driven by qualitative (i.e activation of unique host pathways in response to H5N1 or quantitative differences between seasonal influenza viruses is unclear. Here we used microarrays to analyze and compare the gene expression profiles in primary human macrophages at 1, 3, and 6 h after infection with H5N1 virus or low-pathogenic seasonal influenza A (H1N1 virus. We found that host responses to both viruses are qualitatively similar with the activation of nearly identical biological processes and pathways. However, in comparison to seasonal H1N1 virus, H5N1 infection elicits a quantitatively stronger host inflammatory response including type I interferon (IFN and tumor necrosis factor (TNF-alpha genes. A network-based analysis suggests that the synergy between IFN-beta and TNF-alpha results in an enhanced and sustained IFN and pro-inflammatory cytokine response at the early stage of viral infection that may contribute to the viral pathogenesis and this is of relevance to the design of novel therapeutic strategies for H5N1 induced respiratory disease.

  9. Intestinal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... connects your stomach to your large intestine. Intestinal cancer is rare, but eating a high-fat diet ... increase your risk. Possible signs of small intestine cancer include Abdominal pain Weight loss for no reason ...

  10. Intestinal obstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paralytic ileus; Intestinal volvulus; Bowel obstruction; Ileus; Pseudo-obstruction - intestinal; Colonic ileus ... objects that are swallowed and block the intestines) Gallstones (rare) Hernias Impacted stool Intussusception (telescoping of 1 ...

  11. Polymethoxyflavone Apigenin-Trimethylether Suppresses LPS-Induced Inflammatory Response in Nontransformed Porcine Intestinal Cell Line IPEC-J2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orsolya Farkas

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The in vitro anti-inflammatory effect of apigenin and its trimethylated analogue (apigenin-trimethylether has been investigated in order to evaluate whether these flavonoids could attenuate LPS-induced inflammation in IPEC-J2 non-transformed intestinal epithelial cells. Levels of IL-6, IL-8, TNF-α, and COX-2 mRNA were measured as a marker of inflammatory response. The extracellular H2O2 level in IPEC-J2 cells was also monitored by Amplex Red assay. Our data revealed that both compounds had significant lowering effect on the inflammatory response. Apigenin (at 25 μM significantly decreased gene expression of IL-6 in LPS-treated cells, while apigenin-trimethylether in the same concentration did not influence IL-6 mRNA level. Both apigenin and apigenin-trimethylether reduced IL-8 gene expression significantly. TNF-α mRNA level was decreased by apigenin-trimethylether, which was not influenced by apigenin. Treatment with both flavonoids caused significant reduction in the mRNA level of COX-2, but the anti-inflammatory effect of the methylated analogue was more effective than the unmethylated one. Furthermore, both flavonoids reduced significantly the level of extracellular H2O2 compared to the control cells. In conclusion, the methylated apigenin analogue could avoid LPS-induced intestinal inflammation and it could be applied in the future as an effective anti-inflammatory compound.

  12. Polymethoxyflavone Apigenin-Trimethylether Suppresses LPS-Induced Inflammatory Response in Nontransformed Porcine Intestinal Cell Line IPEC-J2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farkas, Orsolya; Palócz, Orsolya; Pászti-Gere, Erzsébet; Gálfi, Péter

    2015-01-01

    The in vitro anti-inflammatory effect of apigenin and its trimethylated analogue (apigenin-trimethylether) has been investigated in order to evaluate whether these flavonoids could attenuate LPS-induced inflammation in IPEC-J2 non-transformed intestinal epithelial cells. Levels of IL-6, IL-8, TNF-α, and COX-2 mRNA were measured as a marker of inflammatory response. The extracellular H2O2 level in IPEC-J2 cells was also monitored by Amplex Red assay. Our data revealed that both compounds had significant lowering effect on the inflammatory response. Apigenin (at 25 μM) significantly decreased gene expression of IL-6 in LPS-treated cells, while apigenin-trimethylether in the same concentration did not influence IL-6 mRNA level. Both apigenin and apigenin-trimethylether reduced IL-8 gene expression significantly. TNF-α mRNA level was decreased by apigenin-trimethylether, which was not influenced by apigenin. Treatment with both flavonoids caused significant reduction in the mRNA level of COX-2, but the anti-inflammatory effect of the methylated analogue was more effective than the unmethylated one. Furthermore, both flavonoids reduced significantly the level of extracellular H2O2 compared to the control cells. In conclusion, the methylated apigenin analogue could avoid LPS-induced intestinal inflammation and it could be applied in the future as an effective anti-inflammatory compound.

  13. Tropism and innate host responses of a novel avian influenza A H7N9 virus: an analysis of ex-vivo and in-vitro cultures of the human respiratory tract

    OpenAIRE

    Chan, LY; Fong, JHM; Tao, KP; Chan, MCW; Chan, WY; Mok, KP; Poon, LLM; Nicholls, JM; Guan, Y.; Peiris, JSM; Hui, PY

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Since March, 2013, an avian-origin influenza A H7N9 virus has caused severe pneumonia in China. The aim of this study was to investigate the pathogenesis of this new virus in human beings. METHODS: We obtained ex-vivo cultures of the human bronchus, lung, nasopharynx, and tonsil and in-vitro cultures of primary human alveolar epithelial cells and peripheral blood monocyte-derived macrophages. We compared virus tropism and induction of proinflammatory cytokine responses ...

  14. Similar Responses of Intestinal T Cells From Untreated Children and Adults With Celiac Disease to Deamidated Gluten Epitopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ráki, Melinda; Dahal-Koirala, Shiva; Yu, Hao; Korponay-Szabó, Ilma R; Gyimesi, Judit; Castillejo, Gemma; Jahnsen, Jørgen; Qiao, Shuo-Wang; Sollid, Ludvig M

    2017-09-01

    Celiac disease is a chronic small intestinal inflammatory disorder mediated by an immune response to gluten peptides in genetically susceptible individuals. Celiac disease is often diagnosed in early childhood, but some patients receive a diagnosis late in life. It is uncertain whether pediatric celiac disease is distinct from adult celiac disease. It has been proposed that gluten-reactive T cells in children recognize deamidated and native gluten epitopes, whereas T cells from adults only recognize deamidated gluten peptides. We studied the repertoire of gluten epitopes recognized by T cells from children and adults. We examined T-cell responses against gluten by generating T-cell lines and T-cell clones from intestinal biopsies of adults and children and tested proliferative response to various gluten peptides. We analyzed T cells from 14 children (2-5 years old) at high risk for celiac disease who were followed for celiac disease development. We also analyzed T cells from 6 adults (26-55 years old) with untreated celiac disease. All children and adults were positive for HLA-DQ2.5. Biopsies were incubated with gluten digested with chymotrypsin (modified or unmodified by the enzyme transglutaminase 2) or the peptic-tryptic digest of gliadin (in native and deamidated forms) before T-cell collection. Levels of T-cell responses were higher to deamidated gluten than to native gluten in children and adults. T cells from children and adults each reacted to multiple gluten epitopes. Several T-cell clones were cross-reactive, especially clones that recognized epitopes from γ-and ω-gliadin. About half of the generated T-cell clones from children and adults reacted to unknown epitopes. T-cell responses to different gluten peptides appear to be similar between adults and children at the time of diagnosis of celiac disease. Copyright © 2017 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. High-Throughput Sequencing Identifies MicroRNAs from Posterior Intestine of Loach (Misgurnus anguillicaudatus) and Their Response to Intestinal Air-Breathing Inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Songqian; Cao, Xiaojuan; Tian, Xianchang; Wang, Weimin

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) exert important roles in animal growth, immunity, and development, and regulate gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. Knowledges about the diversities of miRNAs and their roles in accessory air-breathing organs (ABOs) of fish remain unknown. In this work, we used high-throughput sequencing to identify known and novel miRNAs from the posterior intestine, an important ABO, in loach (Misgurnus anguillicaudatus) under normal and intestinal air-breathing inhibited conditions. A total of 204 known and 84 novel miRNAs were identified, while 47 miRNAs were differentially expressed between the two small RNA libraries (i.e. between the normal and intestinal air-breathing inhibited group). Potential miRNA target genes were predicted by combining our transcriptome data of the posterior intestine of the loach under the same conditions, and then annotated using COG, GO, KEGG, Swissprot and Nr databases. The regulatory networks of miRNAs and their target genes were analyzed. The abundances of nine known miRNAs were validated by qRT-PCR. The relative expression profiles of six known miRNAs and their eight corresponding target genes, and two novel potential miRNAs were also detected. Histological characteristics of the posterior intestines in both normal and air-breathing inhibited group were further analyzed. This study contributes to our understanding on the functions and molecular regulatory mechanisms of miRNAs in accessory air-breathing organs of fish.

  16. Microbe-dependent CD11b+ IgA+ plasma cells mediate robust early-phase intestinal IgA responses in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunisawa, Jun; Gohda, Masashi; Hashimoto, Eri; Ishikawa, Izumi; Higuchi, Morio; Suzuki, Yuji; Goto, Yoshiyuki; Panea, Casandra; Ivanov, Ivaylo I.; Sumiya, Risa; Aayam, Lamichhane; Wake, Taichi; Tajiri, So; Kurashima, Yosuke; Shikata, Shiori; Akira, Shizuo; Takeda, Kiyoshi; Kiyono, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    Intestinal plasma cells predominantly produce immunoglobulin (Ig) A, however, their functional diversity remains poorly characterized. Here we show that murine intestinal IgA plasma cells can be newly classified into two populations on the basis of CD11b expression, which cannot be discriminated by currently known criteria such as general plasma cell markers, B cell origin and T cell dependence. CD11b+ IgA+ plasma cells require the lymphoid structure of Peyer’s patches, produce more IgA than CD11b− IgA+ plasma cells, proliferate vigorously, and require microbial stimulation and IL-10 for their development and maintenance. These features allow CD11b+ IgA+ plasma cells to mediate early-phase antigen-specific intestinal IgA responses induced by oral immunization with protein antigen. These findings reveal the functional diversity of IgA+ plasma cells in the murine intestine. PMID:23612313

  17. The bile acid receptor GPBAR-1 (TGR5 modulates integrity of intestinal barrier and immune response to experimental colitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabrina Cipriani

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: GP-BAR1, a member G protein coupled receptor superfamily, is a cell surface bile acid-activated receptor highly expressed in the ileum and colon. In monocytes, ligation of GP-BAR1 by secondary bile acids results in a cAMP-dependent attenuation of cytokine generation. AIMS: To investigate the role GP-BAR1 in regulating intestinal homeostasis and inflammation-driven immune dysfunction in rodent models of colitis. METHODS: Colitis was induced in wild type and GP-BAR1(-/- mice by DSS and TNBS administration. Potential GP-BAR1 agonists were identified by in silico screening and computational docking studies. RESULTS: GP-BAR1(-/- mice develop an abnormal morphology of colonic mucous cells and an altered molecular architecture of epithelial tight junctions with increased expression and abnormal subcellular distribution of zonulin 1 resulting in increased intestinal permeability and susceptibility to develop severe colitis in response to DSS at early stage of life. By in silico screening and docking studies we identified ciprofloxacin as a GP-BAR1 ligand. In monocytes, ciprofloxacin increases cAMP concentrations and attenuates TNFα release induced by TLR4 ligation in a GP-BAR1 dependent manner. Treating mice rendered colitic by TNBS with ciprofloxacin and oleanolic acid, a well characterized GP-BAR1 ligand, abrogates signs and symptoms of colitis. Colonic expression of GP-BAR1 mRNA increases in rodent models of colitis and tissues from Crohn's disease patients. Flow cytometry analysis demonstrates that ≈90% of CD14+ cells isolated from the lamina propria of TNBS-treated mice stained positively for GP-BAR1. CONCLUSIONS: GP-BAR1 regulates intestinal barrier structure. Its expression increases in rodent models of colitis and Crohn's disease. Ciprofloxacin is a GP-BAR1 ligand.

  18. Localized intestinal radiation and liquid diet enhance survival and permit evaluation of long-term intestinal responses to high dose radiation in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurianne Van Landeghem

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In vivo studies of high dose radiation-induced crypt and intestinal stem cell (ISC loss and subsequent regeneration are typically restricted to 5-8 days after radiation due to high mortality and immune failure. This study aimed to develop murine radiation models of complete crypt loss that permit longer-term studies of ISC and crypt regeneration, repair and normalization of the intestinal epithelium. METHODS: In C57Bl/6J mice, a predetermined small intestinal segment was exteriorized and exposed to 14 Gy-radiation, while a lead shield protected the rest of the body from radiation. Sham controls had segment exteriorization but no radiation. Results were compared to C57Bl/6J mice given 14 Gy-abdominal radiation. Effects of elemental liquid diet feeding from the day prior to radiation until day 7 post-radiation were assessed in both models. Body weight and a custom-developed health score was assessed every day until day 21 post-radiation. Intestine was assessed histologically. RESULTS: At day 3 after segment radiation, complete loss of crypts occurred in the targeted segment, while adjacent and remaining intestine in segment-radiated mice, and entire intestine of sham controls, showed no detectable epithelial damage. Liquid diet feeding was required for survival of mice after segment radiation. Liquid diet significantly improved survival, body weight recovery and normalization of intestinal epithelium after abdominal radiation. Mice given segment radiation combined with liquid diet feeding showed minimal body weight loss, increased food intake and enhanced health score. CONCLUSIONS: The segment radiation method provides a useful model to study ISC/crypt loss and long-term crypt regeneration and epithelial repair, and may be valuable for future application to ISC transplantation or to genetic mutants that would not otherwise survive radiation doses that lead to complete crypt loss. Liquid diet is a simple intervention that improves

  19. Vaccinations, response, and controls before and after intestinal transplantation in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demir, Z; Frange, P; Lacaille, F

    2016-05-01

    Vaccination is an effective strategy to decrease infections in transplant recipients. Children after intestinal transplantation carry a high risk of infection due to increased immunosuppression. In a series of 22 children after intestinal transplantation, we studied the vaccination schedules and the antibodies against vaccine-preventable diseases before transplantation, and at one and five yr after transplantation. We reviewed whether the vaccination schedules were complete, and we analysed the factors that may influence serological immunity and the incidence of disease in patients with deficient immunity. All patients completed the recommended vaccination schedules for DTaP-IPV and HBV. After transplantation, the negative antibodies against vaccine-preventable diseases were mostly related to an antirejection therapy: for DTaP-IPV: four of four patients with no antibody had been treated for rejection, for HBV: two of five, HAV: three of four, MMR: three of seven, and VZV: three of four. A post-transplantation varicella infection was followed by acute rejection, with probability for a relationship between both events. We observed 50% of varicella cases in unvaccinated children, highlighting the importance of pretransplant vaccination. Waning immunogenicity mediated by antibodies against vaccine-preventable disease after transplantation indicated a need for boosters. The recommendations should be regularly enforced, as the reliance on routine immunizations schedules is not adequate in immunocompromised patients. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Avian Chlamydiosis Zoonotic Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szymańska-Czerwińska, Monika; Niemczuk, Krzysztof

    2016-01-01

    This review presents recent data about avian chlamydiosis. Chlamydia psittaci has been considered to be the main causative agent of chlamydiosis in birds; however, two new Chlamydia species have been detected recently-C. gallinacea in breeding birds and C. avium in wild birds. We discuss the zoonotic potential of avian Chlamydia species.

  1. Antibody and T cell responses induced in chickens immunized with avian influenza virus N1 and NP DNA vaccine with chicken IL-15 and IL-18.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Kian-Lam; Jazayeri, Seyed Davoud; Yeap, Swee Keong; Mohamed Alitheen, Noorjahan Banu; Bejo, Mohd Hair; Ideris, Aini; Omar, Abdul Rahman

    2013-12-01

    We had examined the immunogenicity of a series of plasmid DNAs which include neuraminidase (NA) and nucleoprotein (NP) genes from avian influenza virus (AIV). The interleukin-15 (IL-15) and interleukin-18 (IL-18) as genetic adjuvants were used for immunization in combination with the N1 and NP AIV genes. In the first trial, 8 groups of chickens were established with 10 specific-pathogen-free (SPF) chickens per group while, in the second trial 7 SPF chickens per group were used. The overall N1 enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) titer in chickens immunized with the pDis/N1+pDis/IL-15 was higher compared to the chickens immunized with the pDis/N1 and this suggesting that chicken IL-15 could play a role in enhancing the humoral immune response. Besides that, the chickens that were immunized at 14-day-old (Trial 2) showed a higher N1 antibody titer compared to the chickens that were immunized at 1-day-old (Trial 1). Despite the delayed in NP antibody responses, the chickens co-administrated with IL-15 were able to induce earlier and higher antibody response compared to the pDis/NP and pDis/NP+pDis/IL-18 inoculated groups. The pDis/N1+pDis/IL-15 inoculated chickens also induced higher CD8+ T cells increase than the pDis/N1 group in both trials (P0.05) in inducing CD4+ and CD8+ T cells when co-administered with the pDis/IL-18 in both trials in comparison to the pDis/NP. Our data suggest that the pDis/N1+pDis/IL-15 combination has the potential to be used as a DNA vaccine against AIV in chickens.

  2. Early host responses to avian influenza A virus are prolonged and enhanced at transcriptional level depending on maturation of the immune system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reemers, Sylvia S; van Leenen, Dik; Koerkamp, Marian J Groot; van Haarlem, Daphne; van de Haar, Peter; van Eden, Willem; Vervelde, Lonneke

    2010-05-01

    Newly hatched chickens are more susceptible to infectious diseases than older birds because of an immature immune system. The aim of this study was to determine to what extent host responses to avian influenza virus (AIV) inoculation are affected by age. Therefore, 1- and 4-week (wk) old birds were inoculated with H9N2 AIV or saline. The trachea and lung were sampled at 0, 8, 16 and 24h post-inoculation (h.p.i.) and gene expression profiles determined using microarray analysis. Firstly, saline controls of both groups were compared to analyse the changes in gene profiles related to development. In 1-wk-old birds, higher expression of genes related to development of the respiratory immune system and innate responses were found, whereas in 4-wk-old birds genes were up regulated that relate to the presence of higher numbers of leukocytes in the respiratory tract. After inoculation with H9N2, gene expression was most affected at 16 h.p.i. in 1-wk-old birds and at 16 and 24h.p.i. in 4-wk-old birds in the trachea and especially in the lung. In 1-wk-old birds less immune related genes including innate related genes were induced which might be due to age-dependent reduced functionality of antigen presenting cells (APC), T cells and NK cells. In contrast cytokine and chemokines gene expression was related to viral load in 1-wk-old birds and less in 4-wk-old birds. Expression of cellular host factors that block virus replication by interacting with viral factors was independent of age or tissue for most host factors. These data show that differences in development are reflected in gene expression and suggest that the strength of host responses at transcriptional level may be a key factor in age-dependent susceptibility to infection, and the cellular host factors involved in virus replication are not.

  3. Intestinal mucosal adaptation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Laurie Drozdowski; Alan BR Thomson

    2006-01-01

    Intestinal failure is a condition characterized by malnutrition and/or dehydration as a result of the inadequate digestion and absorption of nutrients. The most common cause of intestinal failure is short bowel syndrome, which occurs when the functional gut mass is reduced below the level necessary for adequate nutrient and water absorption. This condition may be congenital, or may be acquired as a result of a massive resection of the small bowel. Following resection, the intestine is capable of adaptation in response to enteral nutrients as well as other trophic stimuli. Identifying factors that may enhance the process of intestinal adaptation is an exciting area of research with important potential clinical applications.

  4. Cellular cross talk in the small intestinal mucosa: postnatal lymphocytic immigration elicits a specific epithelial transcriptional response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schjoldager, Katrine Ter-Borch Gram; Maltesen, Henrik R; Balmer, Sophie;

    2008-01-01

    such physiological cross talk between the immune system and the epithelium in the postnatal small intestinal mucosa is lacking. We have investigated the transcriptome changes occurring in the postnatal mouse small intestine using DNA microarray technology, immunocytochemistry, and quantitative real-time RT...... migration into the small intestinal mucosa....

  5. Intestinal M cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohno, Hiroshi

    2016-02-01

    We have an enormous number of commensal bacteria in our intestine, moreover, the foods that we ingest and the water we drink is sometimes contaminated with pathogenic microorganisms. The intestinal epithelium is always exposed to such microbes, friend or foe, so to contain them our gut is equipped with specialized gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT), literally the largest peripheral lymphoid tissue in the body. GALT is the intestinal immune inductive site composed of lymphoid follicles such as Peyer's patches. M cells are a subset of intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) residing in the region of the epithelium covering GALT lymphoid follicles. Although the vast majority of IEC function to absorb nutrients from the intestine, M cells are highly specialized to take up intestinal microbial antigens and deliver them to GALT for efficient mucosal as well as systemic immune responses. I will discuss recent advances in our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of M-cell differentiation and functions.

  6. Neuromodulation of intestinal inflammation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Costes, L.M.M.

    2015-01-01

    Interactions between the central nervous system and the immune system have been shown to exert a crucial role in the tight regulation of the immune response in the intestine. In particular, the vagus nerve was recently unraveled as an important player in this neuromodulation of intestinal inflammati

  7. Hes1 promotes the IL-22-mediated antimicrobial response by enhancing STAT3-dependent transcription in human intestinal epithelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murano, Tatsuro [Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Graduate School, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo (Japan); Okamoto, Ryuichi, E-mail: rokamoto.gast@tmd.ac.jp [Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Graduate School, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo (Japan); Department of Advanced GI Therapeutics, Graduate School, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo (Japan); Ito, Go; Nakata, Toru; Hibiya, Shuji; Shimizu, Hiromichi; Fujii, Satoru; Kano, Yoshihito; Mizutani, Tomohiro; Yui, Shiro; Akiyama-Morio, Junko; Nemoto, Yasuhiro [Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Graduate School, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo (Japan); Tsuchiya, Kiichiro; Nakamura, Tetsuya [Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Graduate School, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo (Japan); Department of Advanced GI Therapeutics, Graduate School, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo (Japan); Watanabe, Mamoru [Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Graduate School, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo (Japan)

    2014-01-17

    Highlights: •Hes1 enhances IL-22-STAT3 signaling in human intestinal epithelial cells. •Hes1 enhances REG family gene induction by IL-22-STAT3 signaling. •Protein level of Hes1 restricts the response to IL-22. •Present regulation of a cytokine signal represents a new mode of Hes1 function. -- Abstract: Notch signaling plays an essential role in the proliferation and differentiation of intestinal epithelial cells (IECs). We have previously shown that Notch signaling is up-regulated in the inflamed mucosa of ulcerative colitis (UC) and thereby plays an indispensable role in tissue regeneration. Here we show that in addition to Notch signaling, STAT3 signaling is highly activated in the inflamed mucosa of UC. Forced expression of the Notch target gene Hes1 dramatically enhanced the IL-22-mediated STAT3-dependent transcription in human IECs. This enhancement of STAT3-dependent transcription was achieved by the extended phosphorylation of STAT3 by Hes1. Microarray analysis revealed that Hes1-mediated enhancement of IL-22-STAT3 signaling significantly increased the induction of genes encoding antimicrobial peptides, such as REG1A, REG3A and REG3G, in human IECs. Conversely, the reduction of Hes1 protein levels with a γ-secretase inhibitor significantly down-regulated the induction of those genes in IECs, resulting in a markedly poor response to IL-22. Our present findings identify a new role for the molecular function of Hes1 in which the protein can interact with cytokine signals and regulate the immune response of IECs.

  8. The gut microbiome shapes intestinal immune responses during health and disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Round, June L.; Mazmanian, Sarkis K.

    2013-01-01

    Immunologic dysregulation is the cause of many non-infectious human diseases such as autoimmunity, allergy and cancer. The gastrointestinal tract is the primary site of interaction between the host immune system and microorganisms, both symbiotic and pathogenic. Here we discuss findings which indicate that developmental aspects of the adaptive immune system are influenced by intestinal bacterial colonization. We also highlight the molecular pathways that mediate host–symbiont interactions that regulate proper immune function. Finally, we present recent evidence to support an emerging concept whereby disturbances in the bacterial microbiota result in immunological dysregulation that may underlie disorders such as inflammatory bowel disease. Perhaps the mammalian immune system which appears designed to control microbes is, in fact, controlled by the microbes themselves. PMID:19343057

  9. Lactic acid bacteria and bifidobacteria attenuate the proinflammatory response in intestinal epithelial cells induced by Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, Christine M; Kostrzynska, Magdalena

    2013-01-01

    Inflammation is a physiological response to infections and tissue injury; however, abnormal immune responses can give rise to chronic inflammation and contribute to disease progression. Various dietary components, including probiotic lactic acid bacteria and prebiotics, have the potential to modulate intestinal inflammatory responses. One factor in particular, the chemokine interleukin-8 (IL-8, CXCL-8), is one of the major mediators of the inflammatory response. The purpose of this study was to investigate modulation of the inflammatory host response induced by Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium DT104 in the presence of selected probiotics and lactic acid bacteria (LAB) isolated from human sources, dairy products, and farm animals. IL-8 gene expression and protein production in HT-29 cells were evaluated by real-time PCR and ELISA, respectively. Pre-incubation of HT-29 cells with Lactobacillus kefir IM002, Bifidobacterium adolescentis FRP 61, Bifidobacterium longum FRP 68 and FRP 69, Bifidobacterium breve FRP 334, and Leuconostoc mesenteroides IM080 significantly inhibited IL-8 secretion induced by Salmonella Typhimurium DT104. Co-culture of selected probiotics and Salmonella Typhimurium DT104 reduced IL-8 production, while potential probiotics and LAB had no effect on IL-8 secretion in HT-29 cells preincubated with Salmonella Typhimurium DT104 prior to adding probiotics. Lactobacillus kefir IM002 supernatant also significantly reduced IL-8 production. In conclusion, our study suggests that probiotic bifidobacteria and LAB modulate cytokine induction and possess anti-inflammatory properties; however, the effectiveness is strain dependent.

  10. Gliadin Peptides as Triggers of the Proliferative and Stress/Innate Immune Response of the Celiac Small Intestinal Mucosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Vittoria Barone

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Celiac disease (CD is a frequent inflammatory intestinal disease, with a genetic background, caused by gliadin-containing food. Undigested gliadin peptides induce innate and adaptive T cell-mediated immune responses. The major mediator of the stress and innate immune response to gliadin peptides (i.e., peptide 31–43, P31–43 is the cytokine interleukin-15 (IL-15. The role of epithelial growth factor (EGF as a mediator of enterocyte proliferation and the innate immune response has been described. In this paper, we review the most recent literature on the mechanisms responsible for triggering the up-regulation of these mediators in CD by gliadin peptides. We will discuss the role of P31–43 in enterocyte proliferation, structural changes and the innate immune response in CD mucosa in cooperation with EGF and IL-15, and the mechanism of up-regulation of these mediators related to vesicular trafficking. We will also review the literature that focuses on constitutive alterations of the structure, signalling/proliferation and stress/innate immunity pathways of CD cells. Finally, we will discuss how these pathways can be triggered by gliadin peptide P31–43 in controls, mimicking the celiac cellular phenotype.

  11. Perilipin-2 Modulates Lipid Absorption and Microbiome Responses in the Mouse Intestine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel N Frank

    Full Text Available Obesity and its co-morbidities, such as fatty liver disease, are increasingly prevalent worldwide health problems. Intestinal microorganisms have emerged as critical factors linking diet to host physiology and metabolic function, particularly in the context of lipid homeostasis. We previously demonstrated that deletion of the cytoplasmic lipid drop (CLD protein Perilipin-2 (Plin2 in mice largely abrogates long-term deleterious effects of a high fat (HF diet. Here we test the hypotheses that Plin2 function impacts the earliest steps of HF diet-mediated pathogenesis as well as the dynamics of diet-associated changes in gut microbiome diversity and function. WT and perilipin-2 null mice raised on a standard chow diet were randomized to either low fat (LF or HF diets. After four days, animals were assessed for changes in physiological (body weight, energy balance, and fecal triglyceride levels, histochemical (enterocyte CLD content, and fecal microbiome parameters. Plin2-null mice had significantly lower respiratory exchange ratios, diminished frequencies of enterocyte CLDs, and increased fecal triglyceride levels compared with WT mice. Microbiome analyses, employing both 16S rRNA profiling and metagenomic deep sequencing, indicated that dietary fat content and Plin2 genotype were significantly and independently associated with gut microbiome composition, diversity, and functional differences. These data demonstrate that Plin2 modulates rapid effects of diet on fecal lipid levels, enterocyte CLD contents, and fuel utilization properties of mice that correlate with structural and functional differences in their gut microbial communities. Collectively, the data provide evidence of Plin2 regulated intestinal lipid uptake, which contributes to rapid changes in the gut microbial communities implicated in diet-induced obesity.

  12. INDUCTION OF ANTIVIRAL IMMUNE-RESPONSES BY IMMUNIZATION WITH RECOMBINANT-DNA ENCODED AVIAN CORONAVIRUS NUCLEOCAPSID PROTEIN

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BOOTS, AMH; BENAISSATROUW, BJ; HESSELINK, W; RIJKE, E; SCHRIER, C; HENSEN, EJ; Boots, Annemieke

    1992-01-01

    Immune responses to the infectious bronchitis virus (IBV) nucleocapsid protein were studied using a recombinant-DNA expression product. In mice, a lymphocyte proliferative response and a delayed-type hypersensitivity reaction to IBV were induced upon immunization with this nucleocapsid protein. Next

  13. Detection of antibody responses by using haemagglutination inhibiton test and the protection titer of avian influenza virus H5N1 subtype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Risa Indriani

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Study on the detection of antibody responses using haemagglutination inhibition (HI test and the protection titer to Avian influenza (AI virus H5N1 subtype local isolate has been conducted at the Research Institute for Veterinary Science (RIVS. A total number of 50 village chicken (10 chicken served as un-injected controls and 30 quail were injected intramuscularly with inactivated virus of AI H5N1 subtype local isolate. Serum samples were collected 3 weeks after injection and were tested using haemagglutination inhibition tests. The correlation between antibody titer and its protection to AI virus H5N1 local isolate were measured by challenging the birds with AI virus H5N1 local isolate The HI test was then used to determine field serum samples. A total number of 48 village chicken from three (3 Districts (Bekasi, Tangerang and Bogor and 96 quails from two (2 farms in District of Sukabumi which were all vaccinated with commercial AI adjuvant vaccine were sampled. The study revealed that village chicken and quails showed antibody responses after 3 weeks vaccination and that titer of ≥ 3 log 2 was able to protect chicken and quails when they were challenged with local isolate virus. Based on this result, village chicken field samples from Districts of Tangerang, Bekasi and Bogor showed antibody titer which will protect 50, 100 and 85% of the flocks respectively. While quail field samples from Farm I and Farm II in District of Sukabumi showed antibody titer which will protect 60-100% and 0-80% of the flocks respectively. It is concluded that the study has successfully measured antibody titer to AI virus H5N1 subtype which protect village chicken and quails from local isolate virus challenge so that the results will be used to analyze field serum samples after vaccination program to eradicate AI from Indonesia.

  14. Avian zoonoses – a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kozdruń Wojciech

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Birds are one of the most interesting and most colourful groups of animals, but they can also be a source of zoonotic factors dangerous for humans. This paper describes the threats to human health from contact with birds. The most vulnerable occupational groups associated with birds are veterinarians, owners of poultry farms, breeders of ornamental birds, zoo personnel, and poultry slaughterhouse workers. Ornithosis is the most dangerous zoonosis of the avian bacterial diseases. Among other hazardous bacterial factors, Salmonella and Campylobacter are responsible for gastrointestinal diseases. Avian influenza is the most dangerous of the viral diseases. It should be noted, however, that avian influenza is a disease of birds, not humans. The recent threat which has appeared is infection with West Nile virus. The results of serological examinations of birds and humans indicate that the virus exists in our ecosystem. Allergic alveolitis connected with the pigeon tick and the Dermanyssus gallinae mite also merits mention. In any case, where people have contact with birds or their droppings and secretions, special precautions should be taken. This way the negative effects of birds on human health can be minimised or eliminated

  15. Effect of oral administration of Lactobacillus paracasei L9 on mouse systemic immunity and the immune response in the intestine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhu Yuanbo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A probiotic strain Lactobacillus paracasei L9,which was isolated from human intestine, was investigated for its immunomodulatory activity in vivo. Results showed that L9 improved systemic immunity by enhancing the phagocytic activity of peritoneal macrophages, the proliferation ratio of splenocytes, the IgG level in the serum and the level of IgA in the mucosa. Further, L9induced theTh1-polarized immune response by elevating the IFN-γ/IL-4 ratio in the mucosa. This effect was confirmed by the enhanced IL-12-inducing activity of macrophages after in vitro stimulation of L9. Also detected was increased expression of TLR-2mRNA in the mucosa. We predict that L9 could enhance innate immunity by activating TLR-2 in the mucosa, and enhance acquired immunity by promoting Th1 polarization through induced production of IL-12 by macrophages.

  16. Protective role of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptors in chronic intestinal inflammation: TNFR1 ablation boosts systemic inflammatory response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yi; Han, Gencheng; Chen, Yu; Wang, Ke; Liu, Guijun; Wang, Renxi; Xiao, He; Li, Xinying; Hou, Chunmei; Shen, Beifen; Guo, Renfeng; Li, Yan; Chen, Guojiang

    2013-09-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) acts as a key factor for the development of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs), whose function is known to be mediated by TNF receptor 1 (TNFR1) or TNFR2. However, the precise role of the two receptors in IBD remains poorly understood. Herein, chronic colitis was established by oral administration of dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) in TNFR1 or TNFR2-/- mice. Unexpectedly, TNFR1 or TNFR2 deficiency led to exacerbation of signs of colitis compared with wild-type (WT) counterparts. Of note, TNFR1 ablation rendered significantly increased mortality compared with TNFR2 and WT mice after DSS. Aggravated pathology of colitis in TNFR1-/- or TNFR2-/- mice correlated with elevated colonic expression of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines. Importantly, ablation of TNFR1 or TNFR2 increased apoptosis of colonic epithelial cells, which might be due to the heightened ratio of Bax/Bcl-2 and increased expression of caspase-8. Intriguingly, despite comparable intensity of intestinal inflammation in TNFR-deficient mice after DSS, systemic inflammatory response (including splenomegaly and myeloid expansion) was augmented dramatically in TNFR1-/- mice, instead of TNFR2-/- mice. Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GMCSF) was identified as a key mediator in this process, as neutralization of GMCSF dampened peripheral inflammatory reaction and reduced mortality in TNFR1-/- mice. These data suggest that signaling via TNFR1 or TNFR2 has a protective role in chronic intestinal inflammation, and that lacking TNFR1 augments systemic inflammatory response in GMCSF-dependent manner.

  17. Arcobacter butzleri Induce Colonic, Extra-Intestinal and Systemic Inflammatory Responses in Gnotobiotic IL-10 Deficient Mice in a Strain-Dependent Manner.

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    Greta Gölz

    Full Text Available The immunopathological impact of human Arcobacter (A. infections is under current debate. Episodes of gastroenteritis with abdominal pain and acute or prolonged watery diarrhea were reported for A. butzleri infected patients. Whereas adhesive, invasive and cytotoxic capacities have been described for A. butzleri in vitro, only limited information is available about the immunopathogenic potential and mechanisms of infection in vivo.Gnotobiotic IL-10-/- mice were generated by broad-spectrum antibiotic treatment and perorally infected with the A. butzleri strains CCUG 30485 and C1 shown to be invasive in cell culture assays. Bacterial colonization capacities, clinical conditions, intestinal, extra-intestinal and systemic immune responses were monitored at day six and 16 postinfection (p.i.. Despite stable intestinal A. butzleri colonization at high loads, gnotobiotic IL-10-/- mice were virtually unaffected and did not display any overt symptoms at either time point. Notably, A. butzleri infection induced apoptosis of colonic epithelial cells which was paralleled by increased abundance of proliferating cells. Furthermore A. butzleri infection caused a significant increase of distinct immune cell populations such as T and B cells, regulatory T cells, macrophages and monocytes in the colon which was accompanied by elevated colonic TNF, IFN-γ, nitric oxide (NO, IL-6, IL-12p70 and MCP-1 concentrations. Strikingly, A. butzleri induced extra-intestinal and systemic immune responses as indicated by higher NO concentrations in kidney and increased TNF, IFN-γ, IL-12p70 and IL-6 levels in serum samples of infected as compared to naive mice. Overall, inflammatory responses could be observed earlier in the course of infection by the CCUG 30485 as compared to the C1 strain.Peroral A. butzleri infection induced not only intestinal but also extra-intestinal and systemic immune responses in gnotobiotic IL-10-/- mice in a strain-dependent manner. These findings

  18. Involvement of CD36 and intestinal alkaline phosphatases in fatty acid transport in enterocytes, and the response to a high-fat diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynes, Matthew D; Widmaier, Eric P

    2011-02-28

    The vertebrate intestine is notable for its plasticity in response to environmental, pathologic, reproductive, and dietary challenges. The molecular mechanisms of intestinal adaptations typically involve both morphologic and functional changes. In response to chronic ingestion of a high-fat diet, for example, the mammalian small intestine quickly adapts to efficiently accommodate increased transport of long-chain fatty acids across the mucosa. Whereas this may be adaptive in the short term, in the long term it may contribute to the pathologies associated with chronic high-fat diets in humans and other mammals. This review focuses on some of the known and putative mechanisms by which fatty acids are transported across the intestinal epithelium in addition to simple diffusion, and how these mechanisms may be regulated in part by a high-fat diet. A model is proposed in which two key proteins, CD36 and the enzyme intestinal alkaline phosphatase, work in a coordinated manner to optimize fatty acid transport across enterocytes in mice. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Vasoactive intestinal peptide induces cyclooxygenase-2 expression through nuclear factor-κB in human prostate cell lines. Differential time-dependent responses in cancer progression

    OpenAIRE

    Fernández-Martínez, Ana B.; Collado, Beatriz; Bajo, Ana M.; Sánchez-Chapado, Manuel; Prieto,Juan C.; Carmena, María J.

    2007-01-01

    Vasoactive intestinal peptide induces cyclooxygenase-2 expression through nuclear factor-?B in human prostate cell lines. Differential time-dependent responses in cancer progression SPAIN (Fernandez-Martinez, Ana B.) SPAIN Received: 2006-09-11 Revised: 2007-01-11 Accepted: 2007-01-11

  20. Co-loading and intestine-specific delivery of multiple antioxidants in pH-responsive microspheres based on TEMPO-oxidized polysaccharides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shi, Mengxuan; Bai, Jie; Zhao, Liyun; Yu, Xinrui; Liang, Jingjing; Liu, Ying; Norde, Willem; Li, Yuan

    2017-01-01

    In this study, pH-responsive microspheres loaded with multiple antioxidants were developed for intestine-specific delivery and exhibited synergistic activity. They consist of chitosan (CS)-coated microspheres made of TEMPO-oxidized Konjac glucomannan (OKGM) polymers, of which the carboxyl (COO−)

  1. Small intestine (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The small intestine is the portion of the digestive system most responsible for absorption of nutrients from food into the bloodstream. The pyloric sphincter governs the passage of partly digested food ...

  2. Brucella invasion of human intestinal epithelial cells elicits a weak proinflammatory response but a significant CCL20 secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrero, Mariana C; Fossati, Carlos A; Rumbo, Martín; Baldi, Pablo C

    2012-10-01

    In spite of the frequent acquisition of Brucella infection by the oral route in humans, the interaction of the bacterium with cells of the intestinal mucosa has been poorly studied. Here, we show that different Brucella species can invade human colonic epithelial cell lines (Caco-2 and HT-29), in which only smooth species can replicate efficiently. Infection with smooth strains did not produce a significant cytotoxicity, while the rough strain RB51 was more cytotoxic. Infection of Caco-2 cells or HT-29 cells with either smooth or rough strains of Brucella did not result in an increased secretion of TNF-α, IL-1β, MCP-1, IL-10 or TGF-β as compared with uninfected controls, whereas all the infections induced the secretion of IL-8 and CCL20 by both cell types. The MCP-1 response to flagellin from Salmonella typhimurium was similar in Brucella-infected or uninfected cells, ruling out a bacterial inhibitory mechanism as a reason for the weak proinflammatory response. Infection did not modify ICAM-1 expression levels in Caco-2 cells, but increased them in HT-29 cells. These results suggest that Brucella induces only a weak proinflammatory response in gut epithelial cells, but produces a significant CCL20 secretion. The latter may be important for bacterial dissemination given the known ability of Brucella to survive in dendritic cells.

  3. Chromosomal features of Escherichia coli serotype O2:K2, an avian pathogenic E. coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Steffen L; Kudirkiene, Egle; Li, Lili

    2017-01-01

    Escherichia coli causing infection outside the gastrointestinal system are referred to as extra-intestinal pathogenic E. coli. Avian pathogenic E. coli is a subgroup of extra-intestinal pathogenic E. coli and infections due to avian pathogenic E. coli have major impact on poultry production economy...... and welfare worldwide. An almost defining characteristic of avian pathogenic E. coli is the carriage of plasmids, which may encode virulence factors and antibiotic resistance determinates. For the same reason, plasmids of avian pathogenic E. coli have been intensively studied. However, genes encoded...... by the chromosome may also be important for disease manifestation and antimicrobial resistance. For the E. coli strain APEC_O2 the plasmids have been sequenced and analyzed in several studies, and E. coli APEC_O2 may therefore serve as a reference strain in future studies. Here we describe the chromosomal features...

  4. The preventive effects of dexmedetomidine against intestinal ischemia-reperfusion injury in Wistar rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue-kang Zhang

    2015-06-01

    Conclusions: Intraperitoneal injection of dexmedetomidine significantly protected intestine IR injury in rats by inhibiting the inflammatory response, intestinal epithelial apoptosis, and maintaining structural integrity of intestinal cells.

  5. Esophageal and Small Intestinal Mucosal Integrity in Eosinophilic Esophagitis and Response to an Elemental Diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warners, Marijn J; Vlieg-Boerstra, Berber J; Verheij, Joanne; van Hamersveld, Patricia H P; van Rhijn, Bram D; Van Ampting, Marleen T J; Harthoorn, Lucien F; de Jonge, Wouter J; Smout, Andreas J P M; Bredenoord, Albert J

    2017-07-01

    The esophageal mucosal integrity is impaired in eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) and it has been suggested that the duodenal permeability is increased. The absence of food allergens may restore the integrity. The aims of this study were to assess duodenal permeability in EoE and to evaluate the effect of an elemental diet on the esophageal and duodenal integrity. In this prospective study 17 adult EoE patients and 8 healthy controls (HC) were included. Esophageal biopsy specimens were sampled before and after 4 weeks of elemental diet to measure eosinophil counts and gene expression of tight junction and barrier integrity proteins. Esophageal and duodenal impedance were measured by electrical tissue impedance spectroscopy and Ussing chambers were used to measure transepithelial resistance (TER) and transepithelial molecule flux. Small intestinal permeability was measured using a test, measuring lactulose/mannitol (L/M) ratios. In EoE patients, the esophageal but not the duodenal integrity was impaired, compared with HC. We observed no significant difference between L/M ratios of HC and EoE patients. After diet, eosinophil counts decreased significantly, which was paralleled by normalization of esophageal impedance and transepithelial molecule flux. The esophageal TER improved significantly, but did not reach values seen in HC. Esophageal expression of genes encoding for barrier integrity proteins filaggrin and desmoglein-1 was impaired at baseline and restored after diet. An elemental diet restores esophageal integrity, suggesting that it is at least partly secondary to allergen exposure. Duodenal integrity seems not to be affected in EoE, and possibly plays a minor role in its pathophysiology.

  6. Gene expression responses to a Salmonella infection in the chicken intestine differ between lines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hemert, van S.; Hoekman, A.J.W.; Smits, M.A.; Rebel, J.M.J.

    2006-01-01

    Poultry products are an important source of Salmonella enterica. An effective way to reduce food poisoning due to Salmonella would be to breed chickens more resistant to Salmonella. Unfortunately host responses to Salmonella are complex with many factors involved. To learn more about responses to

  7. Gene expression responses to a Salmonella infection in the chicken intestine differ between lines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hemert, van S.; Hoekman, A.J.W.; Smits, M.A.; Rebel, J.M.J.

    2006-01-01

    Poultry products are an important source of Salmonella enterica. An effective way to reduce food poisoning due to Salmonella would be to breed chickens more resistant to Salmonella. Unfortunately host responses to Salmonella are complex with many factors involved. To learn more about responses to Sa

  8. Editorial: Avian Research

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yong; Wang; Guangmei; Zheng

    2014-01-01

    <正>Welcome to Avian Research!This new journal is a continuation and enhancement of Chinese Birds,which has been and continues to be sponsored by the China Ornithological Society and Beijing Forestry University.In the four years since its inception,the original journal—the only one in China focusing on avian research—has published over 130 manuscripts,with authors from all continents across the world,garnering global respect in

  9. Levamisole Enhances Cell-Mediated Immune Responses and Reduces Shedding of H9N2 Avian Influenza Virus in Japanese Quails (Coturnix coturnix japonica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tahoora Shomali

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Regarding the role of Japanese quails (Coturnix coturnix japonica in reassortment and spreading of avian influenza (AI viruses and inadequate protection of vaccination in this species, the present study aimed to evaluate the effect of levamisole as an immunomodulatory agent on cell-mediated immunity (CMI, antibody responses and shedding of H9N2 AI virus in experimentally infected quails. Approach: On day 20 of age, 100 quails randomly allocated into 4 equal groups. Birds in groups 2, 3 and 4 were inoculated with virus where group 1 kept as control. Groups 3 and 4 orally received 15 mg kg-1 levamisole for three consecutive days just before virus inoculation which was repeated 10 days post inoculation (PI only in group 4. Antibody titers and CMI of all birds were assayed by HI and delayed type hypersensitivity (DTH test respectively and virus detection in fecal and tracheal samples performed by RT-PCR method. Data analyzed by one-way ANOVA and Tukey’s test. Results: Levamisole in both regimens had no appreciable effect on antibody titers (p>0.05 while repeated regimen resulted in higher CMI response than group 2 at 48 and 72 h post DTH test (p = 0.011 and p = 0.031 respectively. Total fecal samples positive for virus from birds in group 3 and 4 were 34.4 and 40% lower than group 2 respectively. For trachea, the positive samples were 33.3% (group 3 and 46.7% (group 4 lower than group 2. Moreover; fecal and tracheal samples from levamisole treated birds (especially from group 4 became void of virus earlier than group 2. Conclusion/Recommendations: Levamisole administration in a repeated regimen enhances CMI response against H9N2 AI virus and reduces virus shedding in quails. This may pave the road for further investigations on potential positive effects of this agent on prevention and management of H9N2 AI infections in quail industry.

  10. Host cytokine responses of pigeons infected with highly pathogenic Thai avian influenza viruses of subtype H5N1 isolated from wild birds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsuyoshi Hayashi

    Full Text Available Highly pathogenic avian influenza virus (HPAIV of the H5N1 subtype has been reported to infect pigeons asymptomatically or induce mild symptoms. However, host immune responses of pigeons inoculated with HPAIVs have not been well documented. To assess host responses of pigeons against HPAIV infection, we compared lethality, viral distribution and mRNA expression of immune related genes of pigeons infected with two HPAIVs (A/Pigeon/Thailand/VSMU-7-NPT/2004; Pigeon04 and A/Tree sparrow/Ratchaburi/VSMU-16-RBR/2005; T.sparrow05 isolated from wild birds in Thailand. The survival experiment showed that 25% of pigeons died within 2 weeks after the inoculation of two HPAIVs or medium only, suggesting that these viruses did not cause lethal infection in pigeons. Pigeon04 replicated in the lungs more efficiently than T.sparrow05 and spread to multiple extrapulmonary organs such as the brain, spleen, liver, kidney and rectum on days 2, 5 and 9 post infection. No severe lesion was observed in the lungs infected with Pigeon04 as well as T.sparrow05 throughout the collection periods. Encephalitis was occasionally observed in Pigeon04- or T.sparrow05-infected brain, the severity, however was mostly mild. To analyze the expression of immune-related genes in the infected pigeons, we established a quantitative real-time PCR analysis for 14 genes of pigeons. On day 2 post infection, Pigeon04 induced mRNA expression of Mx1, PKR and OAS to a greater extent than T.sparrow05 in the lungs, however their expressions were not up-regulated concomitantly on day 5 post infection when the peak viral replication was observed. Expressions of TLR3, IFNα, IL6, IL8 and CCL5 in the lungs following infection with the two HPAIVs were low. In sum, Pigeon04 exhibited efficient replication in the lungs compared to T.sparrow05, but did not induce excessive host cytokine expressions. Our study has provided the first insight into host immune responses of pigeons against HPAIV infection.

  11. Activation-Induced TIM-4 Expression Identifies Differential Responsiveness of Intestinal CD103+ CD11b+ Dendritic Cells to a Mucosal Adjuvant.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerry L Hilligan

    Full Text Available Macrophage and dendritic cell (DC populations residing in the intestinal lamina propria (LP are highly heterogeneous and have disparate yet collaborative roles in the promotion of adaptive immune responses towards intestinal antigen. Under steady-state conditions, macrophages are efficient at acquiring antigen but are non-migratory. In comparison, intestinal DC are inefficient at antigen uptake but migrate to the mesenteric lymph nodes (mLN where they present antigen to T cells. Whether such distinction in the roles of DC and macrophages in the uptake and transport of antigen is maintained under immunostimulatory conditions is less clear. Here we show that the scavenger and phosphatidylserine receptor T cell Immunoglobulin and Mucin (TIM-4 is expressed by the majority of LP macrophages at steady-state, whereas DC are TIM-4 negative. Oral treatment with the mucosal adjuvant cholera toxin (CT induces expression of TIM-4 on a proportion of CD103+ CD11b+ DC in the LP. TIM-4+ DC selectively express high levels of co-stimulatory molecules after CT treatment and are detected in the mLN a short time after appearing in the LP. Importantly, intestinal macrophages and DC expressing TIM-4 are more efficient than their TIM-4 negative counterparts at taking up apoptotic cells and soluble antigen ex vivo. Taken together, our results show that CT induces phenotypic changes to migratory intestinal DC that may impact their ability to take up local antigens and in turn promote the priming of mucosal immunity.

  12. Intestinal microbiota and ulcerative colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohkusa, Toshifumi; Koido, Shigeo

    2015-11-01

    There is a close relationship between the human host and the intestinal microbiota, which is an assortment of microorganisms, protecting the intestine against colonization by exogenous pathogens. Moreover, the intestinal microbiota play a critical role in providing nutrition and the modulation of host immune homeostasis. Recent reports indicate that some strains of intestinal bacteria are responsible for intestinal ulceration and chronic inflammation in inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) such as ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD). Understanding the interaction of the intestinal microbiota with pathogens and the human host might provide new strategies treating patients with IBD. This review focuses on the important role that the intestinal microbiota plays in maintaining innate immunity in the pathogenesis and etiology of UC and discusses new antibiotic therapies targeting the intestinal microbiota.

  13. Avian cholera causes marine bird mortality in the Bering Sea of Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodenstein, Barbara L.; Kimberlee Beckmen,; Gay Sheffield,; Kathy Kuletz,; Van Hemert, Caroline R.; Berlowski-Zier, Brenda M.; Shearn-Bochsler, Valerie I.

    2015-01-01

    The first known avian cholera outbreak among wild birds in Alaska occurred during November 2013. Liver, intestinal, and splenic necrosis consistent with avian cholera was noted, and Pasteurella multocida serotype 1 was isolated from liver and lung or spleen in Crested Auklets (Aethia cristatella), Thick-billed Murres (Uria lomvia), Common Eider (Somateria mollissima), Northern Fulmars (Fulmarus glacialis), and Glaucous-winged Gulls (Larus glaucescens).

  14. Interleukin-7 produced by intestinal epithelial cells in response to Citrobacter rodentium infection plays a major role in innate immunity against this pathogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Du, Jiang-Yuan; Yu, Qing; Jin, Jun-O

    2015-08-01

    Interleukin-7 (IL-7) engages multiple mechanisms to overcome chronic viral infections, but the role of IL-7 in bacterial infections, especially enteric bacterial infections, remains unclear. Here we characterized the previously unexplored role of IL-7 in the innate immune response to the attaching and effacing bacterium Citrobacter rodentium. C. rodentium infection induced IL-7 production from intestinal epithelial cells (IECs). IL-7 production from IECs in response to C. rodentium was dependent on gamma interferon (IFN-γ)-producing NK1.1(+) cells and IL-12. Treatment with anti-IL-7Rα antibody during C. rodentium infection resulted in a higher bacterial burden, enhanced intestinal damage, and greater weight loss and mortality than observed with the control IgG treatment. IEC-produced IL-7 was only essential for protective immunity against C. rodentium during the first 6 days after infection. An impaired bacterial clearance upon IL-7Rα blockade was associated with a significant decrease in macrophage accumulation and activation in the colon. Moreover, C. rodentium-induced expansion and activation of intestinal CD4(+) lymphoid tissue inducer (LTi) cells was completely abrogated by IL-7Rα blockade. Collectively, these data demonstrate that IL-7 is produced by IECs in response to C. rodentium infection and plays a critical role in the protective immunity against this intestinal attaching and effacing bacterium.

  15. Vaccination with Astragalus and Ginseng Polysaccharides Improves Immune Response of Chickens against H5N1 Avian Influenza Virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Auwalu Yusuf Abdullahi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available To determine the effect of astragalus and ginseng polysaccharides (APS, GPS on immune response and improvement of H5N1 vaccine, 360-day-old broilers were randomly divided into 8 groups of 45 chicks, comprising APS groups (1–3; GPS groups (4–6; vaccine group (7; and blank control (8 (without polysaccharide and vaccine. From day 12 after hatch groups 1–3 were given APS and groups 4–6 with GPS both at 100, 200, and 400 (mg/kg, respectively. At day 15 after hatch, groups 1–7 were vaccinated with 0.3 mL H5N1 vaccine subcutaneously; daily weight gain (DWG and serum Ig antibody (by HI-test were measured on 3, 7, 14, and 28 days after vaccination. Serum antibody titers and expression of cytokines (IL-2, IL-10, I FN-γ, and TNF were determined by ELISA and RT-PCR. Results revealed that all the polysaccharide groups were numerically increased in antibody levels and the expression of cytokines was significant (P<0.05 in the APS and GPS groups compared to corresponding vaccine group and blank control. DWG was higher (P<0.05 in 400 mg/kg APS groups than control groups. Thus oral supplements of GPS and APS have shown their potential in the improvement of immune response and could be used as adjuvant in a formulation of H5N1 vaccine.

  16. Transcriptomic Analysis of the Innate Antiviral Immune Response in Porcine Intestinal Epithelial Cells: Influence of Immunobiotic Lactobacilli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albarracin, Leonardo; Kobayashi, Hisakazu; Iida, Hikaru; Sato, Nana; Nochi, Tomonori; Aso, Hisashi; Salva, Susana; Alvarez, Susana; Kitazawa, Haruki; Villena, Julio

    2017-01-01

    Lactobacillus rhamnosus CRL1505 and Lactobacillus plantarum CRL1506 are immunobiotic strains able to increase protection against viral intestinal infections as demonstrated in animal models and humans. To gain insight into the host–immunobiotic interaction, the transcriptomic response of porcine intestinal epithelial (PIE) cells to the challenge with viral molecular associated pattern poly(I:C) and the changes in the transcriptomic profile induced by the immunobiotics strains CRL1505 and CRL1506 were investigated in this work. By using microarray technology and reverse transcription PCR, we obtained a global overview of the immune genes involved in the innate antiviral immune response in PIE cells. Stimulation of PIE cells with poly(I:C) significantly increased the expression of IFN-α and IFN-β, several interferon-stimulated genes, cytokines, chemokines, adhesion molecules, and genes involved in prostaglandin biosynthesis. It was also determined that lactobacilli differently modulated immune gene expression in poly(I:C)-challenged PIE cells. Most notable changes were found in antiviral factors (IFN-α, IFN-β, NPLR3, OAS1, OASL, MX2, and RNASEL) and cytokines/chemokines (IL-1β, IL-6, CCL4, CCL5, and CXCL10) that were significantly increased in lactobacilli-treated PIE cells. Immunobiotics reduced the expression of IL-15 and RAE1 genes that mediate poly(I:C) inflammatory damage. In addition, lactobacilli treatments increased the expression PLA2G4A, PTGES, and PTGS2 that are involved in prostaglandin E2 biosynthesis. L. rhamnosus CRL1505 and L. plantarum CRL1506 showed quantitative and qualitative differences in their capacities to modulate the innate antiviral immune response in PIE cells, which would explain the higher capacity of the CRL1505 strain when compared to CRL1506 to protect against viral infection and inflammatory damage in vivo. These results provided valuable information for the deeper understanding of the host–immunobiotic interaction and their

  17. Antibody response and risk factors for seropositvity in backyard poultry following mass vaccination against highly pathogenic avian influenza and Newcastle disease in Indonesia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McLaws, M.; Priyono, W.; Bett, B.; Al-Qamar, S.; Claassen, I.J.T.M.; Widiastuti, T.; Poole, J.; Schoonman, L.; Jost, C.; Mariner, J.

    2015-01-01

    A large-scale mass vaccination campaign was carried out in Java, Indonesia in an attempt to control outbreaks of highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) in backyard flocks and commercial smallholder poultry. Sero-monitoring was conducted in mass vaccination and control areas to assess the proportio

  18. Effects of drought on avian community structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas P. Albright; Anna M. Pidgeon; Chadwick D. Rittenhouse; Murray K. Clayton; Curtis H. Flather; Patrick D. Culbert; Brian D. Wardlow; Volker C. Radeloff

    2010-01-01

    Droughts are expected to become more frequent under global climate change. Avifauna depend on precipitation for hydration, cover, and food. While there are indications that avian communities respond negatively to drought, little is known about the response of birds with differing functional and behavioural traits, what time periods and indicators of drought are most...

  19. Induced Treg Cells Augment the Th17-Mediated Intestinal Inflammatory Response in a CTLA4-Dependent Manner.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nobumasa Watanabe

    Full Text Available Th17 cells and Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs are thought to promote and suppress inflammatory responses, respectively. However, whether they counteract each other or synergize in regulating immune reactions remains controversial. To determine their interactions, we describe the results of experiments employing mouse models of intestinal inflammation by transferring antigen-specific Th cells (Th1, Th2, and Th17 differentiated in vitro followed by the administration of the cognate antigen via enema. We show that cotransfer of induced Tregs (iTregs suppressed Th1- and Th2-mediated colon inflammation. In contrast, colon inflammation induced by transfer of Th17 cells, was augmented by the cotransfer of iTregs. Furthermore, oral delivery of antigen potentiated Th17-mediated colon inflammation. Administration of a blocking antibody against cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated antigen 4 (CTLA4 abrogated the effects of cotransfer of iTregs, while the injection of a soluble recombinant immunoglobulin (Ig fusion protein, CTLA4-Ig substituted for the cotransfer of iTregs. These results suggest that antigen-specific activation of iTregs in a local environment stimulates the Th17-mediated inflammatory response in a CTLA4-dependent manner.

  20. Modelling and quantification of the thermoregulatory responses of the developing avian embryo: electrical analogies of a physiological system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youssef, Ali; Exadaktylos, Vasileios; Berckmans, Daniel

    2014-08-01

    Homeothermic animals, including birds, try to keep their body temperature at a constant level within certain boundaries by using thermoregulatory mechanisms. However, during incubation, the thermoregulatory system of the chicken embryo evolves through different stages from a poikilothermic to a homeothermic system. Hence, the thermal response of the fertile egg to changes in ambient temperature is different from one day to another during the embryonic development. The incubated egg can be considered as a physical (thermal) system, which transfers energy (heat) down a potential gradient (temperature difference). The heat flow between the micro-environment and the eggshell under a thermal driving force (temperature difference) has been studied in the past by using the analogy to the flow of electric charge under an electromotive-force. In this work, the thermal-response of incubated eggs to a step-increase in ambient-air temperature is studied and modelled. It is shown that the incubated egg is reacting as a first-order system between embryonic days ED01 and ED13, while, starting from ED14, the egg is reacting as a second-order system. This extends the existing RC (resistor-capacitor) circuit analogue to an RLC (resistor-inductor-capacitor) circuit analogue at the later stage of incubation. The concept of considering the fertile egg and its surrounding environment as an energy-handling device is introduced in this paper. It is suggested that the thermoregulation of the embryo has a thermal induction-like effect starting from ED14 and increasing gradually till hatching.

  1. Intestinal myiasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U S Udgaonkar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Intestinal myiasis is a condition when the fly larvae inhabit the gastrointestinal tract and are passed out in faeces. This type of infestation results when eggs or larvae of the fly, deposited on food are inadvertently taken by man. They survive the unfavourable conditions within the gastrointestinal tract and produce disturbances, which may vary from mild to severe. The condition is not uncommon and is often misdiagnosed as pinworm infestation. Correct diagnosis by the clinical microbiologist is important to avoid unnecessary treatment. Materials and Methods: We had 7 cases of intestinal myiasis. In 2 cases the larvae were reared to adult fly in modified meat and sand medium (developed by Udgaonkar. This medium is simple and can be easily prepared in the laboratory. Results: Of the 7 larvae, 5 were Sarcophaga haemorrhoidalis, 1 Megaselia species and 1 was identified as Muscina stabulans. Conclusions: S. haemorrhoidalis was the commonest maggot involved. A high index of suspicion is required for clinical diagnosis when the patient complains of passing wriggling worms in faeces for a long period without any response to antihelminthics. The reason for long duration of illness and recurrence of infestation is baffling. The nearest to cure was colonic wash. We feel prevention is of utmost importance, which is to avoid eating food articles with easy access to flies.

  2. Low-methoxyl lemon pectin attenuates inflammatory responses and improves intestinal barrier integrity in caerulein-induced experimental acute pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sun, Yajun; He, Yue; Wang, Fei; Zhang, Hao; de Vos, Paul; Sun, Jia

    Scope: Acute pancreatitis (AP) is a common clinical acute abdominal disease. The intestinal injury associated with AP will aggravate the condition retroactively. This study investigates whether the low-methoxyl pectin (LMP) isolated from lemon could attenuate AP and associated intestinal injury.

  3. Depressed Hypoxic and Hypercapnic Ventilatory Responses at Early Stage of Lethal Avian Influenza A Virus Infection in Mice.

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    Jianguo Zhuang

    Full Text Available H5N1 virus infection results in ~60% mortality in patients primarily due to respiratory failure, but the underlying causes of mortality are unclear. The goal of this study is to reveal respiratory disorders occurring at the early stage of infection that may be responsible for subsequent respiratory failure and death. BALB/c mice were intranasally infected with one of two H5N1 virus strains: HK483 (lethal or HK486 (non-lethal virus. Pulmonary ventilation and the responses to hypoxia (HVR; 7% O2 for 3 min and hypercapnia (HCVR; 7% CO2 for 5 min were measured daily at 2 days prior and 1, 2, and 3 days postinfection (dpi and compared to mortality typically by 8 dpi. At 1, 2, and 3 dpi, immunoreactivities (IR of substance P (SP-IR in the nodose ganglion or tyrosine hydroxylase (TH-IR in the carotid body coupled with the nucleoprotein of influenza A (NP-IR was examined in some mice, while arterial blood was collected in others. Our results showed that at 2 and 3 dpi: 1 both viral infections failed to alter body temperature and weight, [Formula: see text], or induce viremia while producing similarly high lung viral titers; 2 HK483, but not HK486, virus induced tachypnea and depressed HVR and HCVR without changes in arterial blood pH and gases; and 3 only HK483 virus led to NP-IR in vagal SP-IR neurons, but not in the carotid body, and increased density of vagal SP-IR neurons. In addition, all HK483, rather than HK486, mice died at 6 to 8 dpi and the earlier death was correlated with more severe depression of HVR and HCVR. Our data suggest that tachypnea and depressed HVR/HCVR occur at the early stage of lethal H5N1 viral infection associated with viral replication and increased SP-IR density in vagal neurons, which may contribute to the respiratory failure and death.

  4. Endometriosis intestinal Intestinal endometriosis

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    C.I. González

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available La endometriosis es un trastorno ginecológico crónico, benigno y frecuente entre las mujeres en edad fértil, estimándose que existe algún grado de endometriosis hasta en el 15% de las mujeres premenopáusicas, asociándose a historia de infertilidad, antecedente de cesárea, dismenorrea y anormalidad en el sangrado uterino. Se cree que es debida al ascenso por las trompas de Falopio de contenido menstrual (menstruación retrógrada. En la afectación intestinal, el colon es el segmento más frecuentemente afectado, sobre todo a nivel rectosigmodeo. La clínica de presentación es inespecífica, siendo lo más frecuente el dolor abdominal y/o pélvico de tipo cólico que coincide o se exacerba con la menstruación. El diagnóstico diferencial incluye la enfermedad inflamatoria intestinal, diverticulitis, colitis isquémica y procesos neoplásicos, siendo el diagnóstico definitivo anatomopatológico. En cuanto al tratamiento, éste dependerá de la clínica y de la edad de la paciente, así como de sus deseos de embarazo.Endometriosis is a chronic, benign gynaecological disorder that is frequent in women of a child-bearing age. It is estimated that there is some degree of endometriosis in as many as 15% of pre-menopausal women, associated with a history of infertility, caesarean antecedents, dysmenorrhoea and abnormality in uterine bleeding. It is believed to be due to the rise of menstrual contents through the Fallopian tubes (retrograde menstruation. In the intestinal affectation, the colon is the segment most frequently affected, above all at the rectosigmoidal level. The clinical features are unspecific, with abdominal pain the most frequent and/or pelvic pain of a cholic type that coincides with, or is exacerbated by, menstruation. Differential diagnosis includes intestinal inflammatory disease, diverticulitis, ischemic colitis and neoplastic processes, with the definitive diagnosis being anatomopathological. With respect to treatment

  5. [Systemic immunological response in children with chronic gingivitis and gastro-intestinal pathology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanenko, E G

    2014-01-01

    Study of the immune system mechanisms in chronic catarrhal gingivitis in children with gastrointestinal pathology was performed in 102 children (49 with chronic gastritis and duodenitis and 53 with no signs of gastrointestinal pathology). Forty-eight children with healthy periodontium constituted control group. Generalized chronic catarrhal gingivitis in children with gastroduodenal pathology is characterized by intense humoral response by simultaneous T-cell immunity suppression. Detection of high serum titers of circulating immune complexes in patients with chronic catarrhal gingivitis suggests a role of immune response in the pathogenesis of periodontal disease increases with concomitant diseases of the upper gastrointestinal tract.

  6. Lesions of the avian pancreas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Robert E; Reavill, Drury R

    2014-01-01

    Although not well described, occasional reports of avian exocrine and endocrine pancreatic disease are available. This article describes the lesions associated with common diseases of the avian pancreas reported in the literature and/or seen by the authors.

  7. Effects of intestinal bacteria-derived p-cresyl sulfate on Th1-type immune response in vivo and in vitro

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    Shiba, Takahiro, E-mail: takahiro-shiba@yakult.co.jp; Kawakami, Koji; Sasaki, Takashi; Makino, Ikuyo; Kato, Ikuo; Kobayashi, Toshihide; Uchida, Kazumi; Kaneko, Kimiyuki

    2014-01-15

    Protein fermentation by intestinal bacteria generates various compounds that are not synthesized by their hosts. An example is p-cresol, which is produced from tyrosine. Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) accumulate high concentrations of intestinal bacteria-derived p-cresyl sulfate (pCS), which is the major metabolite of p-cresol, in their blood, and this accumulation contributes to certain CKD-associated disorders. Immune dysfunction is a CKD-associated disorder that frequently contributes to infectious diseases among CKD patients. Although some studies imply pCS as an etiological factor, the relation between pCS and immune systems is poorly understood. In the present study, we investigated the immunological effects of pCS derived from intestinal bacteria in mice. For this purpose, we fed mice a tyrosine-rich diet that causes the accumulation of pCS in their blood. The mice were shown to exhibit decreased Th1-driven 2, 4-dinitrofluorobenzene-induced contact hypersensitivity response. The concentration of pCS in blood was negatively correlated with the degree of the contact hypersensitivity response. In contrast, the T cell-dependent antibody response was not influenced by the accumulated pCS. We also examined the in vitro cytokine responses by T cells in the presence of pCS. The production of IFN-γ was suppressed by pCS. Further, pCS decreased the percentage of IFN-γ-producing Th1 cells. Our results suggest that intestinal bacteria-derived pCS suppressesTh1-type cellular immune responses. - Highlights: • Mice fed a tyrosine-rich diet accumulated p-cresyl sulfate in their blood. • p-Cresyl sulfate negatively correlated with contact hypersensitivity response. • The in vitro production of IFN-γ was suppressed by p-cresyl sulfate. • p-Cresyl sulfate decreased the percentage of IFN-γ-producing Th1 cells in vitro.

  8. Interaction of myenteric neurons and extrinsic nerves in the intestinal inhibitory response induced by mesenteric nerve stimulation.

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    Yamasato,Teruhiro

    1991-04-01

    Full Text Available Effects of the mesenteric nerve stimulation (MNS on the twitch contraction induced by field stimulation were investigated regarding the relationship between myenteric neurons and extrinsic cholinergic nerves in the guinea-pig mesenteric nerve-ileal preparation. The twitch contraction was inhibited after MNS. The inhibition of the twitch contraction after MNS was induced twice, just after MNS (1st inhibition and 2-3 min later (2nd inhibition (type I, or once, just after MNS (1st inhibition (type II, in recovery course of twitch contraction for 6-8 min. The 1st inhibition was slightly decreased by guanethidine and hexamethonium. The inhibitory response (1st inhibition in both types I and II was recovered to the control level by pretreatment with naloxone (recovered twitch contraction, but the late inhibitory response (2nd inhibition was markedly observed after 2-3 min in types I and II. Either the 1st or the 2nd inhibition was not altered by capsaicin, desensitization to calcitonin gene-related polypeptide (CGRP, vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP, somatostatin, or galanin. The recovered twitch contraction in types I and II was decreased by CGRP-desensitization, or capsaicin. These results suggest that the first inhibitory response was induced by enteric opioid neurons connected with extrinsic cholinergic nerves, but the 2nd inhibition was induced by unknown substances other than CGRP, VIP, somatostatin, and galanin. The twitch contraction may partly be induced by endogenous neurokinin-like substances. And, some CGRP containing neurons, which connect with extrinsic cholinergic nerves, probably activate the intrinsic excitatory neurons.

  9. Effect of Nutrient Dilution and Glutamine Supplementation on Growth Performance, Small Intestine Morphology and Immune Response of Broilers

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    majid gheshlagh olyayee

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Glutamine (Gln, a semi-essential or conditionally essential amino acid, is an abundant amino acid in plasma and skeletal muscle. It is the main energy substrate for cells that undergo intense replication, such as enterocytes, lymphocytes, macrophages, neutrophils and kidney cells and plays an important role in their function and homeostasis. Apart from providing nitrogen for protein synthesis, Gln is a precursor for nucleic acids, nucleotides, hexose amines, the nitric oxide precursor arginine (Arg, and the major antioxidant-glutathione. It plays a central role in nitrogen transport between tissues, specifically from muscle to gut, kidney, and liver. In addition to its role as a gluconeogenic substrate in the liver, kidney, and intestine, Gln is involved in the renal handling of ammonia, serving as a regulator of acid base homeostasis. So the aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of nutrient dilution and L- glutamine (Gln supplementation on growth performance, intestine morphology and immune response of broilers during starter (0 to 10 days, growth (11 to 24 days and finisher (25 to 42 days periods. Materials and methods A total of 320 one-day-old male Ross 308 broiler chicks were randomly assigned to eight treatments with 4 replicates and 10 chicks per each. In this study two levels of nutrient dilution (Ross 308 broiler nutrition recommendation and 5% diluted and 4 levels of Gln supplementation (0, 0.5, 1 and 1.5% were used in a completely randomized design as factorial arrangement 2×4. Growth performance was measured periodically. In order to investigate jejenual histomorphology such as villus height, depth of crypt, villus height to depth of crypt ratio, villus width, muscle layer thickness and epithelium thickness, on day 42 after 4 h fasting, one bird per each replicate was randomly selected, slaughtered and 1 cm of middle section of jejenum was cut. Cellular immune response was assessed in 40-d-old chick using the in

  10. PI3K-dependent GSK3ß(Ser9-phosphorylation is implicated in the intestinal epithelial cell wound-healing response.

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    Thomas Karrasch

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The ability of the intestinal epithelial barrier to respond to various injurious insults is an essential component of intestinal homeostasis. However, the molecular mechanisms responsible for wound-healing and repair in the intestine are poorly understood. The glycogen synthase kinase 3ß (GSK3ß has been implicated in various biological processes such as cellular motility, cell spreading and recently inflammation. AIM: To investigate the role of GSK3ß in intestinal epithelial cell restitution. METHODS: Rat intestinal epithelial IEC18 cells were serum-starved for 16 to 24 h and wounded by multiple scraping. Akt(Ser473-, GSK3ß(Ser9- and RelA(Ser536-phosphorylation were determined by Western blot using specific phospho-antibodies. The inhibitors AG1478 (1 µM and Ly294002 (25 µM were used to block EGF-R autophosphorylation and PI3K-activation, respectively. ß-Catenin/LEF/TCF dependent transcription was determined by reporter gene assay (TOP/FOP system. C-myc gene expression was evaluated by real-time RT-PCR. GSK3ß(-/- mouse embryonic fibroblasts were used to characterize the role of GSK3ß in wounding-induced cell migration. RESULTS: Wounding induced GSK3ß(Ser9 phosphorylation in IEC-18 cells, which led to ß-catenin accumulation as well as nuclear translocation of ß-catenin. ß-Catenin stabilization/nuclear translocation led to enhanced LEF-TCF transcriptional activity and subsequent c-myc mRNA accumulation in wounded cell monolayers. Blocking PI3K/Akt signaling with Ly294002 prevented wound-induced GSK3ß(Ser9 phosphorylation as well as ß-catenin nuclear translocation and significantly attenuated restitution. Additionally, wounding induced rapid NF-kB(Ser536 phosphorylation, which was inhibited by AG1478, but not by Ly294002. GSK3ß(-/- cells demonstrated significantly attenuated wound-induced restitution compared to wild-type cells. CONCLUSION: We conclude that PI3K-mediated GSK3ß phosphorylation is involved in the

  11. Microbial ecological response of the intestinal flora of Peromyscus maniculatus and P. leucopus to heavy metal contamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coolon, Joseph D; Jones, Kenneth L; Narayanan, Sanjeev; Wisely, Samantha M

    2010-03-01

    Heavy metal contamination negatively affects natural systems including plants, birds, fish and bacteria by reducing biodiversity at contaminated sites. At the Tri-State Mining District, efforts have been made to remediate sites to mitigate the detrimental effects that contamination has caused on human health. While the remediation effort has returned the site to within federal safety standards, it is unclear if this effort is sufficient to restore floral and faunal communities. Intrinsic to ecosystem and organism health is the biodiversity and composition of microbial communities. We have taken advantage of recent advances in sequencing technology and surveyed the bacterial community of remediated and reference soils as well as the intestinal microbial community of two ubiquitous rodent species to provide insight on the impacts of residual heavy metal contamination on the ecosystem. Rodents found on the remediated site had reduced body mass, smaller body size and lower body fat than animals on reference sites. Using bar-coded, massively parallel sequencing, we found that bacterial communities in both the soil and Peromyscus spp. gastrointestinal tracts had no difference in diversity between reference and remediated sites but assemblages differed in response to contamination. These results suggest that niche voids left by microbial taxa that were unable to deal with the remnant levels of heavy metals on remediated sites were replaced by taxa that could persist in this environment. Whether this replacement provided similar ecosystem services as ancestral bacterial communities is unknown.

  12. Binding of Candida albicans to Human CEACAM1 and CEACAM6 Modulates the Inflammatory Response of Intestinal Epithelial Cells

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    Esther Klaile

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Candida albicans colonizes human mucosa, including the gastrointestinal tract, as a commensal. In immunocompromised patients, C. albicans can breach the intestinal epithelial barrier and cause fatal invasive infections. Carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule 1 (CEACAM1; CD66a, CEACAM5 (CEA, and CEACAM6 (CD66c are immunomodulatory receptors expressed on human mucosa and are recruited by bacterial and viral pathogens. Here we show for the first time that a fungal pathogen (i.e., C. albicans also binds directly to the extracellular domain of human CEACAM1, CEACAM3, CEACAM5, and CEACAM6. Binding was specific for human CEACAMs and mediated by the N-terminal IgV-like domain. In enterocytic C2BBe1 cells, C. albicans caused a transient tyrosine phosphorylation of CEACAM1 and induced higher expression of membrane-bound CEACAM1 and soluble CEACAM6. Lack of the CEACAM1 receptor after short hairpin RNA (shRNA knockdown abolished CXCL8 (interleukin-8 secretion by C2BBe1 cells in response to C. albicans. In CEACAM1-competent cells, the addition of recombinant soluble CEACAM6 reduced the C. albicans-induced CXCL8 secretion.

  13. Binding of Candida albicans to Human CEACAM1 and CEACAM6 Modulates the Inflammatory Response of Intestinal Epithelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Mario M.; Schäfer, Miriam R.; Clauder, Ann-Katrin; Feer, Sabina; Heyl, Kerstin A.; Stock, Magdalena; Klassert, Tilman E.; Zipfel, Peter F.; Singer, Bernhard B.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Candida albicans colonizes human mucosa, including the gastrointestinal tract, as a commensal. In immunocompromised patients, C. albicans can breach the intestinal epithelial barrier and cause fatal invasive infections. Carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule 1 (CEACAM1; CD66a), CEACAM5 (CEA), and CEACAM6 (CD66c) are immunomodulatory receptors expressed on human mucosa and are recruited by bacterial and viral pathogens. Here we show for the first time that a fungal pathogen (i.e., C. albicans) also binds directly to the extracellular domain of human CEACAM1, CEACAM3, CEACAM5, and CEACAM6. Binding was specific for human CEACAMs and mediated by the N-terminal IgV-like domain. In enterocytic C2BBe1 cells, C. albicans caused a transient tyrosine phosphorylation of CEACAM1 and induced higher expression of membrane-bound CEACAM1 and soluble CEACAM6. Lack of the CEACAM1 receptor after short hairpin RNA (shRNA) knockdown abolished CXCL8 (interleukin-8) secretion by C2BBe1 cells in response to C. albicans. In CEACAM1-competent cells, the addition of recombinant soluble CEACAM6 reduced the C. albicans-induced CXCL8 secretion. PMID:28292985

  14. Blood flow response in small intestinal loops at different depths during negative pressure wound therapy of the open abdomen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindstedt, Sandra; Hlebowicz, Joanna

    2013-08-01

    High closure rates of the open abdomen have been reported following negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT). However, the method has occasionally been associated with increased development of intestinal fistulae. We have previously shown that the application of NPWT to the open abdomen causes a decrease in microvascular blood flow in the small intestinal loop and the omentum adjacent to the visceral protective layer of the dressing. In this study we investigate whether the negative pressure affects only small intestinal loops lying directly below the dressing or if it also affects small intestinal loops that are not in direct contact with the dressing. Six pigs underwent midline incision and application of NPWT to the open abdomen. The microvascular blood flow was measured in four intestinal loops at different depths from the visceral protective layer, at two different locations: beneath the dressing and at the anterior abdominal wall, before and after the application of NPWT of -50, -70, -100, -120, -150 and -170 mmHg, using laser Doppler velocimetry. Negative pressures between -50 and -170 mmHg caused a significant decrease in the microvascular blood flow in the intestinal loops in direct contact with the visceral protective layer. A slight, but significant, decrease in blood flow was also seen in the intestinal loops lying beneath these loops. The decrease in microvascular blood flow increased with the amount of negative pressure applied. No difference in blood flow was seen in the intestinal loops lying deeper in the abdominal cavity. A decrease in blood flow was seen in the upper two intestinal loops located apically and anteriorly, but not in the lower two, indicating that this is a local effect and that pressure decreases with distance from the source. A long-term decrease in blood flow in the intestinal wall may induce ischaemia and secondary necrosis in the intestinal wall, which could promote the development of intestinal fistulae. We believe that NPWT of

  15. Identifying the Ion Channels Responsible for Signaling Gastro-Intestinal Based Pain

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    L. Ashley Blackshaw

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available We are normally unaware of the complex signalling events which continuously occur within our internal organs. Most of us only become cognisant when sensations of hunger, fullness, urgency or gas arise. However, for patients with organic and functional bowel disorders pain is an unpleasant and often debilitating reminder. Furthermore, chronic pain still represents a large unmet need for clinical treatment. Consequently, chronic pain has a considerable economic impact on health care systems and the afflicted individuals. In order to address this need we must understand how symptoms are generated within the gut, the molecular pathways responsible for generating these signals and how this process changes in disease states.

  16. Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) restrains intestinal inflammation by rendering leukocytes hyporesponsive and balancing colitogenic inflammatory responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Vanessa Beatriz Freitas; Basso, Paulo José; Nardini, Viviani; Silva, Angélica; Chica, Javier Emílio Lazo; Cardoso, Cristina Ribeiro de Barros

    2016-09-01

    Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) is a hormone that plays an important role in the modulation of inflammatory responses. However, the precise mechanisms that link the actions of this androgen with protection or susceptibility to inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) remain uknown. Here we showed that low dose DHEA inhibited proliferation of spleen cells and IFN-у production. The hormone was not toxic to myeloid lineage cells, although it caused necrosis of spleen cells at the intermediate and highest doses in vitro (50 and 100μM). The treatment of C57BL/6 mice with DHEA during colitis induction by dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) led to a reduction in weight loss and clinical signs of disease. There were decreased peripheral blood monocytes on day 6 of DSS exposure and treatment, besides increase in circulating neutrophils in the tissue repair phase. DHEA also led to reduced lamina propria cellularity and restoration of normal colon length. These results were accompanied by decreased expression of IL-6 and TGF-β mRNA, while IL-13 was augmented in the colon on day 6, which was probably related to attenuation of inflammation. There was retention of CD4(+) cells in the spleen after use of DHEA, along with augmented frequency of CD4(+)IL-4(+) cells, decreased CD4(+)IFN-ɣ(+) in spleen and constrained CD4(+)IL-17(+) population in the mesenteric lymph nodes. Moreover, splenocytes of mice treated with DHEA became hyporesponsive, as observed by reduced proliferation after re-stimulation ex-vivo. In conclusion, DHEA modifyies leukocyte activity and balances the exacerbated immune responses which drive local and systemic damages in IBD. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  17. Vitamin A supplementation reduces the monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 intestinal immune response of Mexican children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Kurt Z; Santos, Jose Ignacio; Estrada Garcia, Teresa; Haas, Meredith; Firestone, Mathew; Bhagwat, Jui; Dupont, Herbert L; Hertzmark, Ellen; Rosado, Jorge L; Nanthakumar, Nanda N

    2006-10-01

    The impact of vitamin A supplementation on childhood diarrhea may be determined by the regulatory effect supplementation has on the mucosal immune response in the gut. Previous studies have not addressed the impact of vitamin A supplementation on the production of monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1), an essential chemokine involved in pathogen-specific mucosal immune response. Fecal MCP-1 concentrations, determined by an enzyme-linked immuno absorption assay, were compared among 127 Mexican children 5-15 mo of age randomized to receive a vitamin A supplement ( or =12 mo, 45,000 iu) every 2 mo or a placebo as part of a larger vitamin A supplementation trial. Stools collected during the summer months were screened for MCP-1 and gastrointestinal pathogens. Values of MCP-1 were categorized into 3 levels (nondetectable, or =median). Multinomial logistic regression models were used to determine whether vitamin A-supplemented children had different categorical values of MCP-1 compared with children in the placebo group. Differences in categorical values were also analyzed stratified by gastrointestinal pathogen infections and by diarrheal symptoms. Overall, children who received the vitamin A supplement had reduced fecal concentrations of MCP-1 compared with children in the placebo group (median pg/mg protein +/- interquartile range: 284.88 +/- 885.35 vs. 403.39 +/- 913.16; odds ratio 0.64, 95% CI 0.42-97, P = 0.03). Vitamin A supplemented children infected with enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) had reduced MCP-1 levels (odds ratio = 0.38, 95% CI 0.18-0.80) compared with children in the placebo group. Among children not infected with Ascaris lumbricoides vitamin A supplemented children had reduced MCP-1 levels (OR = 0.62, 95% CI 0.41-0.94). These findings suggest that vitamin A has an anti-inflammatory effect in the gastrointestinal tract by reducing MCP-1 concentrations.

  18. Bifidobacterium breve and Streptococcus thermophilus secretion products enhance T helper 1 immune response and intestinal barrier in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ménard, Sandrine; Laharie, David; Asensio, Corinne; Vidal-Martinez, Teresita; Candalh, Céline; Rullier, Anne; Zerbib, Frank; Mégraud, Francis; Matysiak-Budnik, Tamara; Heyman, Martine

    2005-11-01

    Lactic acid bacteria or their secretion products can modulate immune responses differently in normal and inflammatory conditions. This comparative study analyzes the effect of oral administration of living lactic acid bacteria, or their conditioned media, on the epithelial and immune functions of colitis-prone C57BL/6 IL-10-deficient mice. Mice were untreated (control) or infected with Helicobacter hepaticus with or without oral treatment with living bacteria, Bifidobacterium breve C50 and Streptococcus thermophilus 065 (LB), or their culture-conditioned media (CM). Histology, cytokine mRNA, electrical resistance, and barrier capacity of colonic samples as well as cytokine secretion by mesenteric lymph node (MLN) cells were studied. Helicobacter hepaticus mice developed only mild colitis, which was not modified in LB or CM groups. In the CM (but not the LB) group, the colonic barrier was reinforced as compared to the other groups, as evidenced by decreased horseradish peroxidase (HRP) transcytosis and mannitol fluxes and increased electrical resistance. In MLN, the percentage of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells secreting IFNgamma was significantly higher in CM (2.06% and 1.98%, respectively) mice than in H. hepaticus (1.1% and 0.47%, P secretion by MLN cells was significantly higher in the CM group as compared to the other groups. In the absence of severe colitis, Bifidobacterium breve C50- and Streptococcus thermophilus 065-conditioned media can reinforce intestinal barrier capacity and stimulate Th1 immune response, highlighting the involvement of lactic acid bacteria-derived components in host defense.

  19. Specific responses in rat small intestinal epithelial mRNA expression and protein levels during chemotherapeutic damage and regeneration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Verburg (Melissa); I.B. Renes (Ingrid); D.J. van Nispen; S. Ferdinandusse; M. Jorritsma; H.A. Büller (Hans); A.W.C. Einerhand (Sandra); J. Dekker (Jan)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractThe rapidly dividing small intestinal epithelium is very sensitive to the cytostatic drug methotrexate. We investigated the regulation of epithelial gene expression in rat jejunum during methotrexate-induced damage and regeneration. Ten differentiation markers were loca

  20. Avian Interferons and Their Antiviral Effectors

    OpenAIRE

    Santhakumar, Diwakar; Rubbenstroth, Dennis; Martinez-Sobrido, Luis; Munir, Muhammad

    2017-01-01

    Interferon (IFN) responses, mediated by a myriad of IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs), are the most profound innate immune responses against viruses. Cumulatively, these IFN effectors establish a multilayered antiviral state to safeguard the host against invading viral pathogens. Considerable genetic and functional characterizations of mammalian IFNs and their effectors have been made, and our understanding on the avian IFNs has started to expand. Similar to mammalian counterparts, three types of I...

  1. Dietary fat and bile juice, but not obesity, are responsible for the increase in small intestinal permeability induced through the suppression of tight junction protein expression in LETO and OLETF rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzuki Takuya

    2010-03-01

    responsible for the increase in small intestinal permeability resulting from the suppression of TJ protein expression.

  2. Coupling of UDP-glucuronosyltransferases and multidrug resistance-associated proteins is responsible for the intestinal disposition and poor bioavailability of emodin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Wei; Feng, Qian; Li, Ye; Ye, Ling [Department of Pharmaceutics, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, Guangdong (China); Hu, Ming, E-mail: mhu@uh.edu [Department of Pharmaceutics, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, Guangdong (China); Department of Pharmacological and Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, University of Houston, 1441 Moursund Street, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Liu, Zhongqiu, E-mail: liuzq@smu.edu.cn [Department of Pharmaceutics, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, Guangdong (China)

    2012-12-15

    Emodin is a poorly bioavailable but promising plant-derived anticancer drug candidate. The low oral bioavailability of emodin is due to its extensive glucuronidation in the intestine and liver. Caco-2 cell culture model was used to investigate the interplay between UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs) and efflux transporters in the intestinal disposition of emodin. Bidirectional transport assays of emodin at different concentrations were performed in the Caco-2 monolayers with or without multidrug resistance-associated protein (MRP) and breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP) efflux transporter chemical inhibitors. The bidirectional permeability of emodin and its glucuronide in the Caco-2 monolayers was determined. Emodin was rapidly metabolized to emodin glucuronide in Caco-2 cells. LTC4, a potent inhibitor of MRP2, decreased the efflux of emodin glucuronide and also substantially increased the intracellular glucuronide level in the basolateral-to-apical (B–A) direction. MK-571, chemical inhibitor of MRP2, MRP3, and MRP4, significantly reduced the efflux of glucuronide in the apical-to-basolateral (A–B) and B–A directions in a dose-dependent manner. However, dipyridamole, a BCRP chemical inhibitor demonstrated no effect on formation and efflux of emodin glucuronide in Caco-2 cells. In conclusion, UGT is a main metabolic pathway for emodin in the intestine, and the MRP family is composed of major efflux transporters responsible for the excretion of emodin glucuronide in the intestine. The coupling of UGTs and MRP efflux transporters causes the extensive metabolism, excretion, and low bioavailability of emodin. -- Highlights: ► Glucuronidation is the main reason for the poor oral bioavailability of emodin. ► Efflux transporters are involved in the excretion of emodin glucuronide. ► The intestine is the main organ for metabolism of emodin.

  3. Vitamin A supplementation in early life enhances the intestinal immune response of rats with gestational vitamin A deficiency by increasing the number of immune cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xia Liu

    Full Text Available Vitamin A is a critical micronutrient for regulating immunity in many organisms. Our previous study demonstrated that gestational or early-life vitamin A deficiency decreases the number of immune cells in offspring. The present study aims to test whether vitamin A supplementation can restore lymphocyte pools in vitamin A-deficient rats and thereby improve the function of their intestinal mucosa; furthermore, the study aimed to identify the best time frame for vitamin A supplementation. Vitamin A-deficient pregnant rats or their offspring were administered a low-dose of vitamin A daily for 7 days starting on gestational day 14 or postnatal day 1, day 14 or day 28. Serum retinol concentrations increased significantly in all four groups that received vitamin A supplementation, as determined by high-performance liquid chromatography. The intestinal levels of secretory immunoglobulin A and polymeric immunoglobulin receptor increased significantly with lipopolysaccharide challenge in the rats that received vitamin A supplementation starting on postnatal day 1. The rats in this group had higher numbers of CD8+ intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes, CD11C+ dendritic cells in the Peyer's patches and CD4+CD25+ T cells in the spleen compared with the vitamin A-deficient rats; flow cytometric analysis also demonstrated that vitamin A supplementation decreased the number of B cells in the mesenteric lymph nodes. Additionally, vitamin A supplementation during late gestation increased the numbers of CD8+ intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes and decreased the numbers of B lymphocytes in the mesenteric lymph nodes. However, no significant differences in lymphocyte levels were found between the rats in the other two vitamin A supplement groups and the vitamin A-deficient group. In conclusion, the best recovery of a subset of lymphocytes in the offspring of gestational vitamin A-deficient rats and the greatest improvement in the intestinal mucosal immune

  4. Avian influenza virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avian influenza (AI) is caused by type A influenza virus, a member of the Orthomyxoviridae family. AI viruses are serologically categorized into 16 hemagglutinin (H1-H16) and 9 neuraminidase (N1-N9) subtypes. All subtypes have been identified in birds. Infections by AI viruses have been reported in ...

  5. Avian influenza control strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Control strategies for avian influenza in poultry vary depending on whether the goal is prevention, management, or eradication. Components used in control programs include: 1) education which includes communication, public awareness, and behavioral change, 2) changes to production and marketing sys...

  6. Avian influenza (fowl plague)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avian influenza (AI) viruses infect domestic poultry and wild birds. In domestic poultry, AI viruses are typically of low pathogenicity (LP) causing subclinical infections, respiratory disease or drops in egg production. However, a few AI viruses cause severe systemic disease with high mortality; ...

  7. Colostrum whey down-regulates the expression of early and late inflammatory response genes induced by Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica Typhimurium components in intestinal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blais, M; Fortier, M; Pouliot, Y; Gauthier, S F; Boutin, Y; Asselin, C; Lessard, M

    2015-01-28

    Pathogenic invasion by Escherichia coli and Salmonellae remains a constant threat to the integrity of the intestinal epithelium and can rapidly induce inflammatory responses. At birth, colostrum consumption exerts numerous beneficial effects on the properties of intestinal epithelial cells and protects the gastrointestinal tract of newborns from pathogenic invasion. The present study aimed to investigate the effect of colostrum on the early and late inflammatory responses induced by pathogens. The short-term (2 h) and long-term (24 h) effects of exposure to heat-killed (HK) E. coli and Salmonella enterica Typhimurium on gene expression in the porcine intestinal epithelial cell (IPEC-J2) model were first evaluated by microarray and quantitative PCR analyses. Luciferase assays were performed using a NF-κB-luc reporter construct to investigate the effect of colostrum whey treatment on the activation of NF-κB induced by HK bacteria. Luciferase assays were also performed using NF-κB-luc, IL-8-luc and IL-6-luc reporter constructs in human colon adenocarcinoma Caco-2/15 cells exposed to dose-response stimulations with HK bacteria and colostrum whey. Bovine colostrum whey treatment decreased the expression of early and late inflammatory genes induced by HK bacteria in IPEC-J2, as well as the transcriptional activation of NF-κB-luc induced by HK bacteria. Unlike that with colostrum whey, treatment with other milk fractions failed to decrease the activation of NF-κB-luc induced by HK bacteria. Lastly, the reduction of the HK bacteria-induced activation of NF-κB-luc, IL-8-luc and IL-6-luc by colostrum whey was dose dependent. The results of the present study indicate that bovine colostrum may protect and preserve the integrity of the intestinal mucosal barrier in the host by controlling the expression levels of early and late inflammatory genes following invasion by enteric pathogens.

  8. Deoxynivalenol as a new factor in the persistence of intestinal inflammatory diseases: an emerging hypothesis through possible modulation of Th17-mediated response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia M Cano

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND/AIMS: Deoxynivalenol (DON is a mycotoxin produced by Fusarium species which is commonly found in temperate regions worldwide as a natural contaminant of cereals. It is of great concern not only in terms of economic losses but also in terms of animal and public health. The digestive tract is the first and main target of this food contaminant and it represents a major site of immune tolerance. A finely tuned cross-talk between the innate and the adaptive immune systems ensures the homeostatic equilibrium between the mucosal immune system and commensal microorganisms. The aim of this study was to analyze the impact of DON on the intestinal immune response. METHODOLOGY: Non-transformed intestinal porcine epithelial cells IPEC-1 and porcine jejunal explants were used to investigate the effect of DON on the intestinal immune response and the modulation of naive T cells differentiation. Transcriptomic proteomic and flow cytometry analysis were performed. RESULTS: DON induced a pro-inflammatory response with a significant increase of expression of mRNA encoding for IL-8, IL-1α and IL-1β, TNF-α in all used models. Additionally, DON significantly induced the expression of genes involved in the differentiation of Th17 cells (STAT3, IL-17A, IL-6, IL-1β at the expenses of the pathway of regulatory T cells (Treg (FoxP3, RALDH1. DON also induced genes related to the pathogenic Th17 cells subset such as IL-23A, IL-22 and IL-21 and not genes related to the regulatory Th17 cells (rTh17 such as TGF-β and IL-10. CONCLUSION: DON triggered multiple immune modulatory effects which could be associated with an increased susceptibility to intestinal inflammatory diseases.

  9. Bifidobacterium lactis Bb12 enhances intestinal antibody response in formula-fed infants: a randomized, double-blind, controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holscher, Hannah D; Czerkies, Laura A; Cekola, Pamela; Litov, Richard; Benbow, Marshall; Santema, Sheryl; Alexander, Dominik D; Perez, Vanessa; Sun, Shumei; Saavedra, José M; Tappenden, Kelly A

    2012-01-01

    Addition of probiotics to infant formula may positively affect immune function in nonexclusively breastfed infants. This study aimed to investigate the effect of infant starter formula containing the probiotic Bifidobacterium animalis subspecies lactis (Bb12) on intestinal immunity and inflammation. Six-week-old healthy, full-term infants (n = 172) were enrolled in a prospective, randomized, double-blind, controlled clinical trial with 2 groups studied in parallel to a breastfed comparison group. Formula-fed (FF) infants were randomized to partially hydrolyzed whey formula (CON) or the same formula containing 10(6) colony-forming units (CFU) Bb12/g (PRO) for 6 weeks. Fecal secretory IgA (sIgA), calprotectin, lactate, and stool pH were assessed at baseline, 2 weeks, and 6 weeks. Anti-poliovirus-specific IgA and anti-rotavirus-specific IgA were assessed at 2 and 6 weeks. Among vaginally delivered FF infants, PRO consumption increased (P IgA concentration increased (P IgA tended to increase (P = .056) with PRO consumption in cesarean-delivered infants. Anthropometrics and tolerance did not differ significantly between FF infants. Infants consuming formula with Bb12 produced feces with detectable presence of Bb12 and augmented sIgA concentration. Furthermore, cesarean-delivered infants consuming Bb12 had heightened immune response, as evidenced by increased anti-rotavirus- and anti-poliovirus-specific IgA following immunization. These results demonstrate that negative immune-related effects of not breastfeeding and cesarean delivery can be mitigated by including Bb12 in infant formula, thereby providing infants a safe, dietary, immune-modulating bacterial introduction.

  10. The Effect of TLR9 Agonist CpG Oligodeoxynucleotides on the Intestinal Immune Response of Cobia (Rachycentron canadum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omkar Byadgi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cytosine-guanine oligodeoxynucleotide (CpG ODN motifs of bacterial DNA are recognized through toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9 and are potent activators of innate immunity. However, the interaction between TLR9 and CpG ODN in aquatic species has not been well characterized. Hence, cobia TLR9 isoform B (RCTLR9B was cloned and its expression and induction in intestine were investigated. RCTLR9B cDNA consists of 3113bp encoding 1009 amino acids containing three regions, leucine rich repeats, transmembrane domain, and toll/interleukin-1 receptor (TIR domain. Intraperitoneal injection of CpG ODN 2395 upregulated RCTLR9 A and B and MyD88 and also induced the expressions of Mx, chemokine CC, and interleukin IL-1β. Cobia intraperitoneally injected with CpG ODN 1668 and 2395 had increased survival rates after challenge with Photobacterium damselae subsp. piscicida. In addition, formulation of CpG ODN with formalin-killed bacteria (FKB and aluminum hydroxide gel significantly increased expressions of RCTLR9 A (50 folds and B (30 folds isoforms at 10 dpi (CpG ODN 1668 and MyD88 (21 folds at 6 dpv (CpG ODN 2395. Subsequently, IL-1β increased at 6 dpv in 1668 group. No histopathological damage and inflammatory responses were observed in the injected cobia. Altogether, these results facilitate CpG ODNs as an adjuvant to increase bacterial disease resistance and efficacy of vaccines in cobia.

  11. The avian fossil record in Insular Southeast Asia and its implications for avian biogeography and palaeoecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meijer, Hanneke J M

    2014-01-01

    Excavations and studies of existing collections during the last decades have significantly increased the abundance as well as the diversity of the avian fossil record for Insular Southeast Asia. The avian fossil record covers the Eocene through the Holocene, with the majority of bird fossils Pleistocene in age. Fossil bird skeletal remains represent at least 63 species in 54 genera and 27 families, and two ichnospecies are represented by fossil footprints. Birds of prey, owls and swiftlets are common elements. Extinctions seem to have been few, suggesting continuity of avian lineages since at least the Late Pleistocene, although some shifts in species ranges have occurred in response to climatic change. Similarities between the Late Pleistocene avifaunas of Flores and Java suggest a dispersal route across southern Sundaland. Late Pleistocene assemblages of Niah Cave (Borneo) and Liang Bua (Flores) support the rainforest refugium hypothesis in Southeast Asia as they indicate the persistence of forest cover, at least locally, throughout the Late Pleistocene and Holocene.

  12. Effects of two fluid resuscitations on the bacterial translocation and inflammatory response of small intestine in rats with hemorrhagic shock

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Xin-yue; REN Cong-cai; ZHOU Qiang; PANG Qing-feng; WU Chang-yi; ZENG Yin-ming

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effects of two fluid resuscitations on the bacterial translocation and the inflammatory factors of small intestine in rats with hemorrhagic shock. Methods: Fifty SD healthy male rats were randomly divided into 5 groups (n=10 per group):Group A (Sham group), Group B (Ringer's solution for 1 h), Group C (Ringer's solution for 24 h), Group D (hydroxyethyl starch for 1 h) and Group E ((hydroxyethyl starch for 24 h). A model of rats with hemorrhagic shock was established. The bacterial translocation in liver, content of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and changes of myeloperoxidase enzyme (MPO) activities in small intestine were pathologically investigated after these two fluid resuscitations, respectively. Results: The bacterial translocation and the expression of TNF-α in the small intestine were detected at 1 h and 24 h after fluid resuscitation. There were significant increase in the number of translocated bacteria, TNF-α and MPO activities in Group C compared with Group B, significant decrease in Group E compared with Group D and in Group B compared with Group D. The number of translocated bacteria and TNF-α expression significantly decreased in Group E as compared with Group C.Conclusions: The bacterial translocation and the expression of TNF-α in the small intestine exist 24 h after fluid resuscitation. 6% hydroxyethyl starch can improve the intestinal mucosa barrier function better than the Ringer's solution.

  13. Modulation of the intestinal environment, innate immune response, and barrier function by dietary threonine and purified fiber during a coccidiosis challenge in broiler chicks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wils-Plotz, E L; Jenkins, M C; Dilger, R N

    2013-03-01

    Coccidiosis is a major contributor to economic losses in the poultry industry due to its detrimental effects on growth performance and nutrient utilization. We hypothesized that the combined effects of supplemental dietary Thr and purified fiber may modulate the intestinal environment and positively affect intestinal immune responses and barrier function in broiler chicks infected with Eimeria maxima. A Thr-deficient basal diet (3.1 g of Thr/kg of diet) was supplemented with 70 g/kg of silica sand (control) or high-methoxy pectin and 1 of 2 concentrations of Thr (1.8 or 5.3 g/kg of diet; 4 diets total), and fed to chicks from hatch to d 16 posthatch. On d 10 posthatch, chicks received 0.5 mL of distilled water or an acute dose of Eimeria maxima (1.5 × 10(3) sporulated oocytes) with 6 replicate pens of 6 chicks per each of 8 treatment combinations (4 diets and 2 inoculation states). Body weight gain, feed intake, and G:F increased (P coccidiosis, Thr supplementation had the greatest effect on intestinal immune response and maintenance of near normal growth in young broiler chicks infected with E. maxima.

  14. Two novel HLA-A*0201 T-cell epitopes in avian H5N1 viral nucleoprotein induced specific immune responses in HHD mice

    OpenAIRE

    Cheung, Ying-Kit; Cheng, Samuel Chak-Sum; Ke, Yan; Xie, Yong

    2009-01-01

    International audience; The influenza A nucleoprotein (NP) is an attractive target for avian flu vaccine development because of its high conversancy in the evolutionary chain of the virus. Here we identified two novel HLA-A*0201 restricted NP epitopes, named H5N1 NP373-381 AMDSNTLEL (NP373) and NP458-466 FQGRGVFEL (NP458), using computational bioinformatic analysis. The NP peptides showed a high binding affinity to HLA-A*0201 on T2 cells, and were able to induce the activation of the cytotoxi...

  15. Campylobacter jejuni induces an anti-inflammatory response in human intestinal epithelial cells through activation of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt pathway

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Yiping; Vegge, Christina S.; Brøndsted, Lone

    2011-01-01

    Campylobacterjejuni (C. jejuni) is the most common cause of human acute bacterial gastroenteritis. Poultry is a major reservoir of C. jejuni and considered an important source of human infections, thus, it is important to understand the host response to C. jejuni from chicken origin. In this study...... to activate phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt pathway and induce pro-inflammatory interleukin-8(IL-8) as well as anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 in human intestinal epithelial cell line Colo 205. The signalling pathways PI3K/Akt and mitogen-activated protein (MAP)kinases ERK and p38 were involved in C...... for cytolethal distending toxin (CDT) deficient mutants. Moreover, we demonstrated that heat-killed bacteria were able to induce IL-8 and IL-10 expression to a lower level than live bacteria. We therefore conclude that C. jejuni activate a PI3K/Akt-dependent anti-inflammatory pathway in human intestinal...

  16. Effect of Scrophularia striata and Ferulago angulata, as alternatives to virginiamycin, on growth performance, intestinal microbial population, immune response, and blood constituents of broiler chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostami, Farhad; Ghasemi, Hossein A; Taherpour, Kamran

    2015-09-01

    An experiment was conducted to investigate the comparative effect of Scrophularia striata, Ferulago angulata, and virginiamycin (VM) on performance, intestinal microbial population, immune response, and blood constituents of broilers. A total of 300 Ross 308 male broiler chickens were randomly assigned to 5 treatments, with 5 replicates/treatment (10 chickens/pen). Birds were fed either a corn-soybean meal basal diet (control) or the basal diet supplemented with 200 mg/kg VM; 4 g/kg S. striata (SS1); 8 g/kg S. striata (SS2); 4 g/kg F. angulata (FA1); or 8 g/kg F. angulata (FA2). After 6 wk, the BW, ADG, and feed-to-gain ratio (F:G) of the VM, SS1, and FA1 groups were better (Pantibiotic growth promoter. Furthermore, a high dose of both herbs (8 g/kg diet) could beneficially affect the intestinal health and immune status of broilers.

  17. Saccharomyces cerevisiae decreases inflammatory responses induced by F4+ enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli in porcine intestinal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanello, Galliano; Meurens, François; Berri, Mustapha; Chevaleyre, Claire; Melo, Sandrine; Auclair, Eric; Salmon, Henri

    2011-05-15

    Probiotic yeasts may provide protection against intestinal inflammation induced by enteric pathogens. In piglets, infection with F4+ enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) leads to inflammation, diarrhea and intestinal damage. In this study, we investigated whether the yeast strains Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Sc, strain CNCM I-3856) and S. cerevisiae variety boulardii (Sb, strain CNCM I-3799) decreased the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines in intestinal epithelial IPI-2I cells cultured with F4+ ETEC. Results showed that viable Sc inhibited the ETEC-induced TNF-α gene expression whereas Sb did not. In contrast, killed Sc failed to inhibit the expression of pro-inflammatory genes. This inhibition was dependent on secreted soluble factors. Sc culture supernatant decreased the TNF-α, IL-1α, IL-6, IL-8, CXCL2 and CCL20 ETEC-induced mRNA. Furthermore, Sc culture supernatant filtrated fraction yeast strains onto inflammation.

  18. Intestinal Epithelial Serum Amyloid A Modulates Bacterial Growth In Vitro and Pro-Inflammatory Responses in Mouse Experimental Colitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Yu

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Serum Amyloid A (SAA is a major acute phase protein of unknown function. SAA is mostly expressed in the liver, but also in other tissues including the intestinal epithelium. SAA reportedly has anti-bacterial effects, and because inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD result from a breakdown in homeostatic interactions between intestinal epithelia and bacteria, we hypothesized that SAA is protective during experimental colitis. Methods Intestinal SAA expression was measured in mouse and human samples. Dextran sodium sulfate (DSS colitis was induced in SAA 1/2 double knockout (DKO mice and in wildtype controls. Anti-bacterial effects of SAA1/2 were tested in intestinal epithelial cell lines transduced with adenoviral vectors encoding the CE/J SAA isoform or control vectors prior to exposure to live Escherichia coli. Results Significant levels of SAA1/SAA2 RNA and SAA protein were detected by in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry in mouse colonic epithelium. SAA3 expression was weaker, but similarly distributed. SAA1/2 RNA was present in the ileum and colon of conventional mice and in the colon of germfree mice. Expression of SAA3 was strongly regulated by bacterial lipopolysaccharides in cultured epithelial cell lines, whereas SAA1/2 expression was constitutive and not LPS inducible. Overexpression of SAA1/2 in cultured epithelial cell lines reduced the viability of co-cultured E. coli. This might partially explain the observed increase in susceptibility of DKO mice to DSS colitis. SAA1/2 expression was increased in colon samples obtained from Crohn's Disease patients compared to controls. Conclusions Intestinal epithelial SAA displays bactericidal properties in vitro and could play a protective role in experimental mouse colitis. Altered expression of SAA in intestinal biopsies from Crohn's Disease patients suggests that SAA is involved in the disease process..

  19. Regulation of intestinal immune response by selective removal of the anterior, posterior, or entire pituitary gland in Trichinella spiralis infected golden hamsters.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosalía Hernández-Cervantes

    Full Text Available The influence of anterior pituitary hormones on the gastrointestinal tract of humans and animals has been previously reported. Hypophysectomy (HYPOX in the rat causes atrophy of the intestinal mucosa, and reduction of gastric secretion and intestinal absorption, as well as increased susceptibility to bacterial and viral infections. However, to our knowledge, no findings have been published concerning the immune response following HYPOX during worm infection, particularly that which is caused by the nematode Trichinella spiralis. The aim of this work was to analyze the effects of total or partial HYPOX on colonization of T. spiralis in the intestinal lumen, together with duodenal and splenic cytokine expression. Our results indicate that 5 days post infection, only neurointermediate pituitary lobectomy (NIL reduces the number of intestinally recovered T. spiralis larvae. Using semiquantitative inmunofluorescent laser confocal microscopy, we observed that the mean intensity of all tested Th1 cytokines was markedly diminished, even in the duodenum of infected controls. In contrast, a high level of expression of these cytokines was noted in the NIL infected hamsters. Likewise, a significant decrease in the fluorescence intensity of Th2 cytokines (with the exception of IL-4 was apparent in the duodenum of control and sham infected hamsters, compared to animals with NIL surgeries, which showed an increase in the expression of IL-5 and IL-13. Histology of duodenal mucosa from NIL hamsters showed an exacerbated inflammatory infiltrate located along the lamina propria, which was related to the presence of the parasite. We conclude that hormones from each pituitary lobe affect the gastrointestinal immune responses to T. spiralis through various mechanisms.

  20. Regulation of Intestinal Immune Response by Selective Removal of the Anterior, Posterior, or Entire Pituitary Gland in Trichinella spiralis Infected Golden Hamsters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Cervantes, Rosalía; Quintanar-Stephano, Andrés; Moreno-Méndoza, Norma; López-Griego, Lorena; López-Salazar, Valeria; Hernández-Bello, Romel; Carrero, Julio César; Morales-Montor, Jorge

    2013-01-01

    The influence of anterior pituitary hormones on the gastrointestinal tract of humans and animals has been previously reported. Hypophysectomy (HYPOX) in the rat causes atrophy of the intestinal mucosa, and reduction of gastric secretion and intestinal absorption, as well as increased susceptibility to bacterial and viral infections. However, to our knowledge, no findings have been published concerning the immune response following HYPOX during worm infection, particularly that which is caused by the nematode Trichinella spiralis. The aim of this work was to analyze the effects of total or partial HYPOX on colonization of T. spiralis in the intestinal lumen, together with duodenal and splenic cytokine expression. Our results indicate that 5 days post infection, only neurointermediate pituitary lobectomy (NIL) reduces the number of intestinally recovered T. spiralis larvae. Using semiquantitative inmunofluorescent laser confocal microscopy, we observed that the mean intensity of all tested Th1 cytokines was markedly diminished, even in the duodenum of infected controls. In contrast, a high level of expression of these cytokines was noted in the NIL infected hamsters. Likewise, a significant decrease in the fluorescence intensity of Th2 cytokines (with the exception of IL-4) was apparent in the duodenum of control and sham infected hamsters, compared to animals with NIL surgeries, which showed an increase in the expression of IL-5 and IL-13. Histology of duodenal mucosa from NIL hamsters showed an exacerbated inflammatory infiltrate located along the lamina propria, which was related to the presence of the parasite. We conclude that hormones from each pituitary lobe affect the gastrointestinal immune responses to T. spiralis through various mechanisms. PMID:23555042

  1. IL-21/IL-21R signaling suppresses intestinal inflammation induced by DSS through regulation of Th responses in lamina propria in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuanyuan; Jiang, Xuefeng; Zhu, Junfeng; Dan Yue; Zhang, Xiaoqing; Wang, Xiao; You, Yong; Wang, Biao; Xu, Ying; Lu, Changlong; Sun, Xun; Yoshikai, Yasunobu

    2016-08-22

    Serum level of IL-21 is increased in patients with inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), suggesting that IL-21/IL-21 receptor (IL-21R) signaling may be involved in the pathogenesis of IBD. However, the role of IL-21/IL-21 receptor signaling plays in the pathogenesis of IBD is not very clear. In this study, using IL-21R.KO mice, we tested the role of IL-21/IL-21R signaling in the regulation of T helper cell responses during intestinal inflammation. Here we found that IL-21R.KO mice were more susceptible to DSS-induced colitis as compared with C57BL/6 mice. The spontaneous inflammatory cytokines released by macrophages in LP of colon were significantly increased, and Th2, Th17 and Treg responses were down-regulated markedly. However, Th1 responses were significantly up-regulated in IL-21R.KO mice. Meanwhile, the population of CD8(+)CD44(+)IFN-γ(+) T cells was markedly elevated in LP of inflammatory intestine of IL-21RKO mice. In vivo, after disease onset, DSS-induced intestinal inflammation was ameliorated in C57BL/6 mice treated with rIL-21. Our results demonstrate that IL-21/IL-21R signaling contributes to protection against DSS-induced acute colitis through suppression of Th1 and activation of Th2, Th17 and Treg responses in mice. Therefore, therapeutic manipulation of IL-21/IL-21R activity may allow improved immunotherapy for IBD and other inflammatory diseases associated with Th cell responses.

  2. Expression analysis of cytosolic DNA-sensing pathway genes in the intestinal mucosal layer of necrotic enteritis-induced chicken.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rengaraj, Deivendran; Truong, Anh Duc; Lee, Sung-Hyen; Lillehoj, Hyun S; Hong, Yeong Ho

    2016-02-01

    Necrotic enteritis (NE) is a serious problem to the poultry farms, which report NE outbreaks more than once per year, as a result of the inappropriate use of antibiotics in the feed. The NE affected bird die rapidly as a result of various pathophysiological complications in the intestine and immune system. Also, several studies have reported that the genes exclusively related to intestine and immune functions are significantly altered in response to NE. In this study, NE was induced in two genetically disparate chicken lines that are resistant (line 6.3) and sensitive (line 7.2) to avian leukosis and Marek's disease. The intestinal mucosal layer was collected from NE-induced and control chickens, and subjected to RNA-sequencing analysis. The involvement of differentially expressed genes in the intestinal mucosal layer of line 6.3 and 7.2 with the immune system-related pathways was investigated. Among the identified immune system-related pathways, a candidate pathway known as chicken cytosolic DNA-sensing pathway (CDS pathway) was selected for further investigation. RNA-sequencing and pathway analysis identified a total of 21 genes that were involved in CDS pathway and differentially expressed in the intestinal mucosal layer of lines 6.3 and 7.2. The expression of CDS pathway genes was further confirmed by real-time qPCR. In the results, a majority of the CDS pathway genes were significantly altered in the NE-induced intestinal mucosal layer from lines 6.3 and 7.2. In conclusion, our study indicate that NE seriously affects several genes involved in innate immune defense and foreign DNA sensing mechanisms in the chicken intestinal mucosal layer. Identifying the immune genes affected by NE could be an important evidence for the protective immune response to NE-causative pathogens.

  3. Microbes, intestinal inflammation and probiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Mohammad W; Kale, Amod A; Bere, Praveen; Vajjala, Sriharsha; Gounaris, Elias; Pakanati, Krishna Chaitanya

    2012-02-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is known for causing disturbed homeostatic balance among the intestinal immune compartment, epithelium and microbiota. Owing to the emergence of IBD as a major cause of morbidity and mortality, great efforts have been put into understanding the sequence of intestinal inflammatory events. Intestinal macrophages and dendritic cells act in a synergistic fashion with intestinal epithelial cells and microbiota to initiate the triad that governs the intestinal immune responses (whether inflammatory or regulatory). In this review, we will discuss the interplay of intestinal epithelial cells, bacteria and the innate immune component. Moreover, whether or not genetic intervention of probiotic bacteria is a valid approach for attenuating/mitigating exaggerated inflammation and IBD will also be discussed.

  4. Exogenous phospholipids supplementation improves growth and modulates immune response and physical barrier referring to NF-κB, TOR, MLCK and Nrf2 signaling factors in the intestine of juvenile grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yong-Po; Jiang, Wei-Dan; Liu, Yang; Jiang, Jun; Wu, Pei; Zhao, Juan; Kuang, Sheng-Yao; Tang, Ling; Tang, Wu-Neng; Zhang, Yong-An; Zhou, Xiao-Qiu; Feng, Lin

    2015-11-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the effects of dietary phospholipids (PL) on the growth performance, intestinal enzyme activity and immune response and intestinal physical barrier of juvenile grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella). A total of 1080 juvenile grass carp with an average initial weight of 9.34 ± 0.03 g were fed six semi-purified diets containing 0.40% (unsupplemented control group), 1.43%, 2.38%, 3.29%, 4.37% and 5.42% PL for 2 months. Results indicated that 3.29% PL increased lysozyme (LZ) and acid phosphatase (ACP) activities and complement component 3 (C3) content (P intestine, suggesting that optimum PL could improve fish intestinal immunity. In addition, 3.29% PL increased the activities of anti-superoxide anion (ASA), anti-hydroxyl radical, copper/zinc superoxide dismutase (SOD1), glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and glutathione reductase (GR), the content of glutathione (P intestine, indicating that the optimum PL could improve fish intestinal physical barrier. Finally, based on the PWG, C3 content in the DI, ACP activity in the DI, intestinal PC content and intestinal ASA activity, the optimal dietary PL levels for juvenile grass carp (9.34-87.50 g) were estimated to be 3.46%, 3.79%, 3.93%, 3.72%, and 4.12%, respectively.

  5. Experimental Ascaris suum infection in the pig: protective memory response after three immunizations and effect of intestinal adult worm population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jungersen, Gregers; Eriksen, Lis; Roepstorff, Allan

    1999-01-01

    unreported 10 kDa band, specific to the L2 larval stage and egg hatch fluid, emerged in all pigs after challenge, while the major adult body fluid constituent, ABA-1, remained unrecognized. No significant effect of an intestinal adult worm burden on the larval recovery after a challenge inoculation...

  6. Activation of immune and defense responses in the intestinal mucosa by outer membrane vesicles of commensal and probiotic Escherichia coli strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria José eFábrega

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The influence of microbiota in human health is well known. Imbalances in microbiome structure have been linked to several diseases. Modulation of microbiota composition through probiotic therapy is an attempt to harness the beneficial effects of commensal microbiota. Although there is wide knowledge of the responses induced by gut microbiota, the microbial factors that mediate these effects are not well known. Gram-negative bacteria release outer membrane vesicles (OMVs as a secretion mechanism of microbial factors, which have an important role in intercellular communication. Here, we investigated whether OMVs from the probiotic Escherichia coli strain Nissle 1917 or the commensal E. coli strain ECOR12 trigger immune responses in various cellular models: (i peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs as a model of intestinal barrier disruption, (ii apical stimulation of Caco-2/PMBCs co-culture as a model of intact intestinal mucosa, and (iii colonic mucosa explants as an ex vivo model. Stimulations with bacterial lysates were also performed. Whereas both OMVs and lysates activated expression and secretion of several cytokines and chemokines in PBMCs, only OMVs induced basolateral secretion and mRNA upregulation of these mediators in the co-culture model. We provide evidence that OMVs are internalized in polarized Caco-2 cells. The activated epithelial cells elicit a response in the underlying immunocompetent cells. The OMVs effects were corroborated in the ex vivo model. This experimental study shows that OMVs are an effective strategy used by beneficial gut bacteria to communicate with and modulate host responses, activating signaling events through the intestinal epithelial barrier.

  7. High-throughput sequencing reveals differing immune responses in the intestinal mucosa of two inbred lines afflicted with necrotic enteritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truong, Anh Duc; Hong, Yeong Ho; Lillehoj, Hyun S

    2015-08-15

    We investigated the necrotic enteritis (NE)-induced transcripts of immune-related genes in the intestinal mucosa of two highly inbred White Leghorn chicken lines, line 6.3 and line 7.2, which share the same MHC haplotype and show different levels of NE susceptibility using high-throughput RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) technology. NE was induced by the previously described co-infection model using Eimeria maxima and Clostridium perfringens. The RNA-Seq generated over 38 million sequence reads for Marek's disease (MD)-resistant line 6.3 and over 40 million reads for the MD-susceptible line 7.2. Alignment of these sequences with the Gallus gallus genome database revealed the expression of over 29,900 gene transcripts induced by NE in these two lines, among which 7,841 genes were significantly upregulated and 2,919 genes were downregulated in line 6.3 chickens and 6,043 genes were significantly upregulated and 2,764 genes were downregulated in NE-induced line 7.2 compared with their uninfected controls. Analysis of 560 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) using the gene ontology database revealed annotations for 246 biological processes, 215 molecular functions, and 81 cellular components. Among the 53 cytokines and 96 cytokine receptors, 15 cytokines and 29 cytokine receptors were highly expressed in line 6.3, whereas the expression of 15 cytokines and 15 cytokine receptors was higher in line 7.2 than in line 6.3 (fold change ≥ 2, p<0.01). In a hierarchical cluster analysis of novel mRNAs, the novel mRNA transcriptome showed higher expression in line 6.3 than in line 7.2, which is consistent with the expression profile of immune-related target genes. In qRT-PCR and RNA-Seq analysis, all the genes examined showed similar responses to NE (correlation coefficient R=0.85-0.89, p<0.01) in both lines 6.3 and 7.2. This study is the first report describing NE-induced DEGs and novel transcriptomes using RNA-seq data from two inbred chicken lines showing different levels of NE

  8. BIRD FLU (AVIAN INFLUENZA)

    OpenAIRE

    Ali ACAR; Bulent BESIRBELLIOÐLU

    2005-01-01

    Avian influenza (bird flu) is a contagious disease of animals caused by influenza A viruses. These flu viruses occur naturally among birds. Actually, humans are not infected by bird flu viruses.. However, during an outbreak of bird flu among poultry, there is a possible risk to people who have contact infect birds or surface that have been contaminated with excreations from infected birds. Symptoms of bird flu in humans have ranged from typical flu-like symptoms to eye infections, pneumonia, ...

  9. Immunoselection of cDNAs to avian intestinal calcium binding protein 28K and a novel calmodulin-like protein: assessment of mRNA regulation by the Vitamin D hormone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mangelsdorf, D.J.; Komm, B.S.; McDonnell, D.P.; Pike, J.W.; Haussler, M.R.

    1987-12-15

    Calcium's role in a variety of cellular processes has been well documented. The storage, distribution, and delivery of calcium are regulated by a family of binding proteins including troponin C, calmodulin, parvalbumin, and vitamin D dependent calcium binding protein (CaBP-28), all of which have evolved from a common ancestral gene. To evaluate vitamin D regulation of gene transcription, a CaBP-28 cDNA (767 base pairs) was isolated from a chicken intestine lambdagt11 library utilizing a polyvalent CaBP-28 antibody as a probe. Coincident with the identification of the CaBP-28 cDNA, a group of cDNAs also was isolated (with the anti-CaBP-28 antibody) that demonstrated 84% nucleotide homology and 99% deduced amino acid homology with chicken brain calmodulin (CaM). This new CaM-like cDNA was named neoCaM. There is little nucleotide homology between the CaBP-28 cDNA and neoCaM. The CaBP-28 cDNA hybridizes with three transcripts of 2000, 2900, and 3300 bases which are dramatically induced by 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D/sub 3/ (1,25(OH)/sub 2/D/sub 3/), while the neoCaM cDNA recognizes three distinct (from CaBP-28) transcripts. Two of these mRNAs are 1400 and 1800 bases as described for brain CaM, but another large 4000-base transcript is detected with neoCaM. Neither the CaM nor the neoCaM transcript reveals any modulation by 1,25(OH)/sub 2/D/sub 3/. Herein, the authors discuss the possible significance of not only the isolation of both cDNAs with a single antibody but also the relation of neoCaM to other well-characterized CaM cDNAs.

  10. Avian Interferons and Their Antiviral Effectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santhakumar, Diwakar; Rubbenstroth, Dennis; Martinez-Sobrido, Luis; Munir, Muhammad

    2017-01-01

    Interferon (IFN) responses, mediated by a myriad of IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs), are the most profound innate immune responses against viruses. Cumulatively, these IFN effectors establish a multilayered antiviral state to safeguard the host against invading viral pathogens. Considerable genetic and functional characterizations of mammalian IFNs and their effectors have been made, and our understanding on the avian IFNs has started to expand. Similar to mammalian counterparts, three types of IFNs have been genetically characterized in most avian species with available annotated genomes. Intriguingly, chickens are capable of mounting potent innate immune responses upon various stimuli in the absence of essential components of IFN pathways including retinoic acid-inducible gene I, IFN regulatory factor 3 (IRF3), and possibility IRF9. Understanding these unique properties of the chicken IFN system would propose valuable targets for the development of potential therapeutics for a broader range of viruses of both veterinary and zoonotic importance. This review outlines recent developments in the roles of avian IFNs and ISGs against viruses and highlights important areas of research toward our understanding of the antiviral functions of IFN effectors against viral infections in birds.

  11. Avian Interferons and Their Antiviral Effectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santhakumar, Diwakar; Rubbenstroth, Dennis; Martinez-Sobrido, Luis; Munir, Muhammad

    2017-01-01

    Interferon (IFN) responses, mediated by a myriad of IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs), are the most profound innate immune responses against viruses. Cumulatively, these IFN effectors establish a multilayered antiviral state to safeguard the host against invading viral pathogens. Considerable genetic and functional characterizations of mammalian IFNs and their effectors have been made, and our understanding on the avian IFNs has started to expand. Similar to mammalian counterparts, three types of IFNs have been genetically characterized in most avian species with available annotated genomes. Intriguingly, chickens are capable of mounting potent innate immune responses upon various stimuli in the absence of essential components of IFN pathways including retinoic acid-inducible gene I, IFN regulatory factor 3 (IRF3), and possibility IRF9. Understanding these unique properties of the chicken IFN system would propose valuable targets for the development of potential therapeutics for a broader range of viruses of both veterinary and zoonotic importance. This review outlines recent developments in the roles of avian IFNs and ISGs against viruses and highlights important areas of research toward our understanding of the antiviral functions of IFN effectors against viral infections in birds. PMID:28197148

  12. Grid attacks avian flu

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    During April, a collaboration of Asian and European laboratories analysed 300,000 possible drug components against the avian flu virus H5N1 using the EGEE Grid infrastructure. Schematic presentation of the avian flu virus.The distribution of the EGEE sites in the world on which the avian flu scan was performed. The goal was to find potential compounds that can inhibit the activities of an enzyme on the surface of the influenza virus, the so-called neuraminidase, subtype N1. Using the Grid to identify the most promising leads for biological tests could speed up the development process for drugs against the influenza virus. Co-ordinated by CERN and funded by the European Commission, the EGEE project (Enabling Grids for E-sciencE) aims to set up a worldwide grid infrastructure for science. The challenge of the in silico drug discovery application is to identify those molecules which can dock on the active sites of the virus in order to inhibit its action. To study the impact of small scale mutations on drug r...

  13. Intestinal leiomyoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... most often found when a person has an upper gastrointestinal (GI) endoscopy or colonoscopy for another reason. Rarely, these tumors can cause bleeding, blockage or rupture of the intestines If this ...

  14. Intestinal Lymphangiectasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... source and a camera through which a small clipper can be inserted). The tissue that is removed ... can help. Malabsorption Overview of Malabsorption Bacterial Overgrowth Syndrome Celiac Disease Intestinal Lymphangiectasia Lactose Intolerance Short Bowel ...

  15. Assessment of human immune responses to H7 avian influenza virus of pandemic potential: results from a placebo-controlled, randomized double-blind phase I study of live attenuated H7N3 influenza vaccine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larisa Rudenko

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Live attenuated influenza vaccines (LAIVs are being developed to protect humans against future epidemics and pandemics. This study describes the results of a double-blinded randomized placebo-controlled phase I clinical trial of cold-adapted and temperature sensitive H7N3 live attenuated influenza vaccine candidate in healthy seronegative adults. OBJECTIVE: The goal of the study was to evaluate the safety, tolerability, immunogenicity and potential shedding and transmission of H7N3 LAIV against H7 avian influenza virus of pandemic potential. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Two doses of H7N3 LAIV or placebo were administered to 40 randomly divided subjects (30 received vaccine and 10 placebo. The presence of influenza A virus RNA in nasal swabs was detected in 60.0% and 51.7% of subjects after the first and second vaccination, respectively. In addition, vaccine virus was not detected among placebo recipients demonstrating the absence of person-to-person transmission. The H7N3 live attenuated influenza vaccine demonstrated a good safety profile and was well tolerated. The two-dose immunization resulted in measurable serum and local antibody production and in generation of antigen-specific CD4⁺ and CD8⁺ memory T cells. Composite analysis of the immune response which included hemagglutinin inhibition assay, microneutralization tests, and measures of IgG and IgA and virus-specific T cells showed that the majority (86.2% of vaccine recipients developed serum and/or local antibodies responses and generated CD4⁺ and CD8⁺ memory T cells. CONCLUSIONS: The H7N3 LAIV was safe and well tolerated, immunogenic in healthy seronegative adults and elicited production of antibodies broadly reactive against the newly emerged H7N9 avian influenza virus. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01511419.

  16. Proteomic analysis of differential expression of cellular proteins in response to avian H9N2 virus infection of A549 cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guanliu YU

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, differentially expressed proteins in A549 cells (human lung adenocarcinoma epithelial cell line infected with H9N2 avian influenza virus (AIV were investigated by two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE. Sixteen different spots between the groups (ratio>2, p<0.05 were identified with mass spectrometry identification. Proteins located in the downstream of the NF-κB and IFN transcription factor pathways were identified, e.g. ISG15. Actin and keratin were also identified, which suggesting that the cytoskeleton may plays an important role in the AIV infection of mammalian cells. These findings could provide insights into the interaction between host and influenza viruses and might provide valuable information for clarifying the pathogenesis of viral infections as well.

  17. Antibody response and risk factors for seropositivity in backyard poultry following mass vaccination against highly pathogenic avian influenza and Newcastle disease in Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLAWS, M; Priyono, W; Bett, B; Al-Qamar, S; Claassen, I; Widiastuti, T; Poole, J; Schoonman, L; Jost, C; Mariner, J

    2015-06-01

    A large-scale mass vaccination campaign was carried out in Java, Indonesia in an attempt to control outbreaks of highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) in backyard flocks and commercial smallholder poultry. Sero-monitoring was conducted in mass vaccination and control areas to assess the proportion of the target population with antibodies against HPAI and Newcastle disease (ND). There were four rounds of vaccination, and samples were collected after each round resulting in a total of 27 293 samples. Sampling was performed irrespective of vaccination status. In the mass vaccination areas, 20-45% of poultry sampled had a positive titre to H5 after each round of vaccination, compared to 2-3% in the control group. In the HPAI + ND vaccination group, 12-25% of the population had positive ND titres, compared to 5-13% in the areas without ND vaccination. The level of seropositivity varied by district, age of the bird, and species (ducks vs. chickens).

  18. Fusariotoxins in Avian Species: Toxicokinetics, Metabolism and Persistence in Tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe Guerre

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Fusariotoxins are mycotoxins produced by different species of the genus Fusarium whose occurrence and toxicity vary considerably. Despite the fact avian species are highly exposed to fusariotoxins, the avian species are considered as resistant to their toxic effects, partly because of low absorption and rapid elimination, thereby reducing the risk of persistence of residues in tissues destined for human consumption. This review focuses on the main fusariotoxins deoxynivalenol, T-2 and HT-2 toxins, zearalenone and fumonisin B1 and B2. The key parameters used in the toxicokinetic studies are presented along with the factors responsible for their variations. Then, each toxin is analyzed separately. Results of studies conducted with radiolabelled toxins are compared with the more recent data obtained with HPLC/MS-MS detection. The metabolic pathways of deoxynivalenol, T-2 toxin, and zearalenone are described, with attention paid to the differences among the avian species. Although no metabolite of fumonisins has been reported in avian species, some differences in toxicokinetics have been observed. All the data reviewed suggest that the toxicokinetics of fusariotoxins in avian species differs from those in mammals, and that variations among the avian species themselves should be assessed.

  19. Transcription factor regulation and cytokine expression following in vitro infection of primary chicken cell culture with low pathogenic avian influenza virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avian influenza virus (AIV) induced proinflammatory cytokine expression is believed to contribute to the disease pathogenesis following infection. However, there is limited information on the avian immune response to infection with low pathogenic avian influenza virus (LPAIV). To gain a better under...

  20. Intestinal epithelial cells in inflammatory bowel diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Giulia; Roda; Alessandro; Sartini; Elisabetta; Zambon; Andrea; Calafiore; Margherita; Marocchi; Alessandra; Caponi; Andrea; Belluzzi; Enrico; Roda

    2010-01-01

    The pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs) seems to involve a primary defect in one or more of the elements responsible for the maintenance of intestinal homeostasis and oral tolerance. The most important element is represented by the intestinal barrier, a complex system formed mostly by intestinal epithelial cells (IECs). IECs have an active role in producing mucus and regulating its composition; they provide a physical barrier capable of controlling antigen traff ic through the intestinal muco...

  1. Small Intestine Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... disease Crohn's disease Infections Intestinal cancer Intestinal obstruction Irritable bowel syndrome Ulcers, such as peptic ulcer Treatment of disorders of the small intestine depends on the cause.

  2. Avian cytokines in health and disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Wigley

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available Cytokines are proteins secreted by cells that play an important role in the activation and regulation of other cells and tissues during inflammation and immune responses. Although well described in several mammalian species, the role of cytokines and other related proteins is poorly understood in avian species. Recent advances in avian genetics and immunology have begun to allow the exploration of cytokines in health and disease. Cytokines may be classified in a number of ways, but may be conveniently arranged into four broad groups on the basis of their function. Proinflammatory cytokines such as interleukin-6 and interleukin-1beta play a role in mediating inflammation during disease or injury. Th1 cytokines, including interleukin-12 and interferon-gamma, are involved in the induction of cell-mediated immunity, whereas Th2 cytokines such as interleukin-4 are involved in the induction of humoral immunity. The final group Th3 or Tr cytokines play a role in regulation of immunity. The role of various cytokines in infectious and non-infectious diseases of chickens and turkeys is now being investigated. Although there are only a few reliable ELISAs or bioassays developed for avian cytokines, the use of molecular techniques, and in particular quantitative RT-PCR (Taqman has allowed investigation of cytokine responses in a number of diseases including salmonellosis, coccidiosis and autoimmune thyroiditis. In addition the use of recombinant cytokines as therapeutic agents or as vaccine adjuvants is now being explored.

  3. Avian influenza surveillance and diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapid detection and accurate identification of low (LPAI) and high pathogenicity avian influenza (HPAI) is critical to controlling infections and disease in poultry. Test selection and algorithms for the detection and diagnosis of avian influenza virus (AIV) in poultry may vary somewhat among differ...

  4. Relationship between Iron Homeostasis and Intestinal Immune Responses against Salmonella%铁稳衡调控与肠道沙门氏菌感染的关系

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    白世平; 张克英; 丁雪梅; 罗玉衡; 白洁

    2013-01-01

    沙门氏菌是危害畜禽生产和畜产品安全的主要病原菌,其最主要的感染途径是通过胃肠道入侵.铁是肠道沙门氏菌存活、繁殖的必需营养物质,过量的铁能增加小鼠肠上皮细胞上沙门氏菌的黏附和入侵数量.肠道上皮组织中铁的贮备对沙门氏菌感染引起的肠道免疫反应过程起着重要的调节作用;动物沙门氏菌感染也可引起机体铁的代谢紊乱.因此,本文就铁稳衡调控与动物肠道沙门氏菌感染二者间的关系研究作一综述,以期为通过营养手段防控沙门氏菌、保障畜产品安全性提供参考.%Salmonella enteritidis is reported to be the most common pathogen of animal salmonellosis, which is harmful to animal production and the safety of animal products. Salmonella organisms mainly infect animals by the oral route and lead to colonization of the gastrointestinal tract. Iron is an essential nutrient for intestinal Sal-monella survival and reproduction. Overload iron increases the amount of Salmonella adhered to or invaded in the small intestine. Intestinal iron status severely affects the process of intestinal immune responses against Sal-monella, and vice versa. Therefore, the relationship between iron hemeostasis and intestinal Salmonella infection was reviewed in this paper, in order to provide references for developing some nutritional stratagems to interrupt the process of Salmonella infection, and keep the safety of animal products.

  5. A hypermorphic epithelial β-catenin mutation facilitates intestinal tumorigenesis in mice in response to compounding WNT-pathway mutations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Buchert

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Activation of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway occurs in the vast majority of colorectal cancers. However, the outcome of the disease varies markedly from individual to individual, even within the same tumor stage. This heterogeneity is governed to a great extent by the genetic make-up of individual tumors and the combination of oncogenic mutations. In order to express throughout the intestinal epithelium a degradation-resistant β-catenin (Ctnnb1, which lacks the first 131 amino acids, we inserted an epitope-tagged ΔN(1-131-β-catenin-encoding cDNA as a knock-in transgene into the endogenous gpA33 gene locus in mice. The resulting gpA33ΔN-Bcat mice showed an increase in the constitutive Wnt/β-catenin pathway activation that shifts the cell fate towards the Paneth cell lineage in pre-malignant intestinal epithelium. Furthermore, 19% of all heterozygous and 37% of all homozygous gpA33ΔN-Bcat mice spontaneously developed aberrant crypt foci and adenomatous polyps, at frequencies and latencies akin to those observed in sporadic colon cancer in humans. Consistent with this, the Wnt target genes, MMP7  and Tenascin-C, which are most highly expressed in benign human adenomas and early tumor stages, were upregulated in pre-malignant tissue of gpA33ΔN-Bcat mice, but those Wnt target genes associated with excessive proliferation (i.e. Cdnn1, myc were not. We also detected diminished expression of membrane-associated α-catenin and increased intestinal permeability in gpA33ΔN-Bcat mice in challenge conditions, providing a potential explanation for the observed mild chronic intestinal inflammation and increased susceptibility to azoxymethane and mutant Apc-dependent tumorigenesis. Collectively, our data indicate that epithelial expression of ΔN(1-131-β-catenin in the intestine creates an inflammatory microenvironment and co-operates with other mutations in the Wnt/β-catenin pathway to facilitate and promote tumorigenesis.

  6. Cellular and Molecular Dynamics of Th17 Differentiation and its Developmental Plasticity in the Intestinal Immune Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhaumik, Suniti; Basu, Rajatava

    2017-01-01

    After emerging from the thymus, naive CD4 T cells circulate through secondary lymphoid tissues, including gut-associated lymphoid tissue of the intestine. The activation of naïve CD4 T cells by antigen-presenting cells offering cognate antigen initiate differentiation programs that lead to the development of highly specialized T helper (Th) cell lineages. Although initially believed that developmental programing of effector T cells such as T helper 1 (Th1) or T helper 2 (Th2) resulted in irreversible commitment to a fixed fate, subsequent studies have demonstrated greater flexibility, or plasticity, in effector T cell stability than originally conceived. This is particularly so for the Th17 subset, differentiation of which is a highly dynamic process with overlapping developmental axes with inducible regulatory T (iTreg), T helper 22 (Th22), and Th1 cells. Accordingly, intermediary stages of Th17 cells are found in various tissues, which co-express lineage-specific transcription factor(s) or cytokine(s) of developmentally related CD4 T cell subsets. A highly specialized tissue like that of the intestine, which harbors the largest immune compartment of the body, adds several layers of complexity to the intricate process of Th differentiation. Due to constant exposure to millions of commensal microbes and periodic exposure to pathogens, the intestinal mucosa maintains a delicate balance between regulatory and effector T cells. It is becoming increasingly clear that equilibrium between tolerogenic and inflammatory axes is maintained in the intestine by shuttling the flexible genetic programming of a developing CD4 T cell along the developmental axis of iTreg, Th17, Th22, and Th1 subsets. Currently, Th17 plasticity remains an unresolved concern in the field of clinical research as targeting Th17 cells to cure immune-mediated disease might also target its related subsets. In this review, we discuss the expanding sphere of Th17 plasticity through its shared

  7. Hypophysectomy and Neurointermediate Pituitary Lobectomy Reduce Serum Immunoglobulin M (IgM) and IgG and Intestinal IgA Responses to Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium Infection in Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos-Rodríguez, Rafael; Quintanar-Stephano, Andrés; Jarillo-Luna, Rosa Adriana; Oliver-Aguillón, Gabriela; Ventura-Juárez, Javier; Rivera-Aguilar, Victor; Berczi, Istvan; Kovacs, Kalman

    2006-01-01

    The influence of anterior pituitary hormones on the gastrointestinal tract of humans and animals has been reported. Hypophysectomy (HYPOX) in the rat causes atrophy of the intestinal mucosa, reduction of gastric secretion and intestinal absorption, and increased susceptibility to infections. To our knowledge, there are no studies on the humoral immune response of the gut-associated lymphoid tissue after HYPOX. We have reported that decreased secretion of vasopressin and oxytocin due to neurointermediate pituitary lobectomy (NIL) diminishes humoral and cell-mediated immune responses. However, no data have been published on whether NIL can affect intestinal immune responses. We analyzed the effects of HYPOX and NIL on bacterial colonization of the intestinal lumen, Peyer's patches, and spleen as well as the serum immunoglobulin G (IgG) and IgM and specific intestinal IgA levels in response to Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium oral infection. Results showed the following: (i) Salmonella serovar Typhimurium was eliminated from the intestinal lumen at the same rate in rats that underwent a sham operation, HYPOX, and NIL; (ii) Salmonella serovar Typhimurium colonization of Peyer's patches and spleen was significantly higher in both HYPOX and NIL rats than in sham-operated rats; (iii) serum IgG and IgM and intestinal IgA against surface proteins of Salmonella serovar Typhimurium were significantly lower in HYPOX and NIL rats than in sham-operated rats; and (iv) compared to NIL rats, higher Peyer's patch and spleen bacterial colonization and decreased IgG, IgM, and IgA production were observed in HYPOX rats. We conclude that hormones from each pituitary lobe affect the systemic and gastrointestinal humoral immune responses through different mechanisms. PMID:16495563

  8. The effects of feeding with synbiotic (Pediococcus acidilactici and fructooligosaccharide) enriched adult Artemia on skin mucus immune responses, stress resistance, intestinal microbiota and performance of angelfish (Pterophyllum scalare).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azimirad, Mahmood; Meshkini, Saeed; Ahmadifard, Nasrollah; Hoseinifar, Seyed Hossein

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of feeding on synbiotic (Pediococcus acidilactici and fructooligosaccharide) enriched adult Artemia franciscana on skin mucus immune responses, stress resistance, intestinal microbiota and growth performance of angelfish (Pterophyllum scalare). Three hundred and sixty fish with initial weight 3.2 ± 0.13 g were randomly divided into twelve aquaria (50 L) assigned to four groups in triplicates. Fish were fed for 7 weeks with dietary treatments, including treatment 1: feeding adult Artemia without enrichment (control group), treatment 2: feeding adult Artemia enriched with lyophilised probiotic P. acidilactici (700 mg L(-1)), 3: feeding adult Artemia enriched with prebiotic fructooligosaccharide (FOS) (100 mg L(-1)), group 4: feeding adult Artemia enriched with synbiotic (P. acidilactici (700 mg L(-1)) + FOS (100 mg L(-1))). Skin mucus immune responses (lysozyme activity, total Immunoglobulin and protease), stress resistance against environmental stress (acute decrease of temperature and increase salinity), intestinal microbiota as well as growth indices were measured at the end of feeding trial. Artemia enriched with synbiotic significantly improved growth performance compared to other treatments (P Artemia enriched with synbiotic (P Artemia was more effective than singular enrichment with probiotics or prebiotics.

  9. Effects of different levels of protein supplements in the diet of early-weaned yaks on growth performance, intestinal development, and immune response to tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haibo Zhang

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to determine the effects of different levels of crude protein (CP supplements to the diet of early-weaned yaks on their growth performance, intestinal development, and immune response. Forty 3-month-old weaned yaks were selected and assigned to four dietary groups (Control, 17, 19 and 21% CP. Dietary CP supplements had a significant effect on average daily gain (ADG, crypt depth (CD (duodenum, jejunum and ileum, villous height (VH (duodenum, jejunum and ileum and CD/VH (jejunum and ileum. Average daily gain, CD (duodenum, jejunum and ileum and VH (ileum showed quadratic increases as the dietary CP increased, whereas CD/VH (jejunum and ileum ratios showed quadratic decreases. Blood urea nitrogen (BUN, glucose (GLU, immunoglobulin G (IgG, IgM, interleukin-1 (IL-1, IL-2, tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α, and interferon (IFN-γ concentrations increased significantly, whereas albumin (ALB, alanine aminotransferase (ALT and aspartate aminotransferase (AST decreased significantly with dietary CP supplements. Dietary CP supplements significantly increased the concentrations of IL-6, TNF-α, IFN-γ and the nuclear factor of activated T cell transcription factor (NFAT for gene expression. As the dietary CP supplements increased, IL-6, IFN-γ and NF-AT gene expression showed quadratic increases. These results showed that the appropriate dietary CP supplementation improved the growth performance and intestinal development of earlyweaned yaks and thus that the CP supplements were beneficial and enhanced the humoral immunity response of yaks.

  10. Effect of Bovine Lactoferrin Treatment Followed by Acute Stress on the IgA-Response in Small Intestine of BALB/c Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peña-Juárez, Ma Concepción; Campos-Rodríguez, Rafael; Godínez-Victoria, Marycarmen; Cruz-Hernández, Teresita Rocío; Reyna-Garfias, Humberto; Barbosa-Cabrera, Reyna Elizabeth; Drago-Serrano, Maria Elisa

    2016-10-01

    Secretory IgA (SIgA) has a pivotal role in gut homeostasis, which can be disturbed by stress. SIgA is formed by IgA-dimers (associated by the J-chain) and the secretory component, a protein derivative of polymeric immunoglobulin receptor (pIgR). Given the gut immuno-modulatory properties of bovine lactoferrin (bLf), the aim of this study was to compare, after bLf treatment followed by acute stress, the IgA response and IgA-associated parameters in proximal versus distal small intestine. Male BALB/c mice (n = 6) were orally treated with bLf (50, 500, and 5000 μg) for 7 days, then stressed by immobilization for 1 h, and sacrificed. In proximal and distal segments, levels were determined of IgA in gut secretions (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay [ELISA]), the α-/J-chain and pIgR proteins in epithelial cells (Western-blot), and mRNA expression of the α-/J-chain, pIgR, and interleukins (ILs) in mucosa (RT-PCR). Data were compared by two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) (significance at P IgA, SIgA, and anti-bLf-IgA as well as greater mRNA expression of pIgR, IL-4, and IL-6 (500 µg) in proximal intestine, while inducing higher levels of the total IgA, α-/J-chain, and pIgR proteins as well as greater mRNA expression of the α-chain and IL-4 (5000 µg) in distal intestine. Compared to unstressed/bLf-untreated mice, plasma corticosterone (a stress biomarker, measured by ELISA) increased in stressed/bLf-treated (0, 50 and 500 µg) and unstressed/bLf-treated (5000 µg) mice. The interplay of corticosterone with gut neuroendocrine factors may have elicited signals creating anti-inflammatory conditions for an IgA-response profile in each intestinal region, according to the bLf concentration administered.

  11. Chromosomal features of Escherichia coli serotype O2:K2, an avian pathogenic E. coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jørgensen, Steffen L; Kudirkiene, Egle; Li, Lili; Christensen, Jens P; Olsen, John E; Nolan, Lisa; Olsen, Rikke H

    2017-01-01

    Escherichia coli causing infection outside the gastrointestinal system are referred to as extra-intestinal pathogenic E. coli. Avian pathogenic E. coli is a subgroup of extra-intestinal pathogenic E. coli and infections due to avian pathogenic E. coli have major impact on poultry production economy and welfare worldwide. An almost defining characteristic of avian pathogenic E. coli is the carriage of plasmids, which may encode virulence factors and antibiotic resistance determinates. For the same reason, plasmids of avian pathogenic E. coli have been intensively studied. However, genes encoded by the chromosome may also be important for disease manifestation and antimicrobial resistance. For the E. coli strain APEC_O2 the plasmids have been sequenced and analyzed in several studies, and E. coli APEC_O2 may therefore serve as a reference strain in future studies. Here we describe the chromosomal features of E. coli APEC_O2. E. coli APEC_O2 is a sequence type ST135, has a chromosome of 4,908,820 bp (plasmid removed), comprising 4672 protein-coding genes, 110 RNA genes, and 156 pseudogenes, with an average G + C content of 50.69%. We identified 82 insertion sequences as well as 4672 protein coding sequences, 12 predicated genomic islands, three prophage-related sequences, and two clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats regions on the chromosome, suggesting the possible occurrence of horizontal gene transfer in this strain. The wildtype strain of E. coli APEC_O2 is resistant towards multiple antimicrobials, however, no (complete) antibiotic resistance genes were present on the chromosome, but a number of genes associated with extra-intestinal disease were identified. Together, the information provided here on E. coli APEC_O2 will assist in future studies of avian pathogenic E. coli strains, in particular regarding strain of E. coli APEC_O2, and aid in the general understanding of the pathogenesis of avian pathogenic E. coli.

  12. Protective effects of transforming growth factor β2 in intestinal epithelial cells by regulation of proteins associated with stress and endotoxin responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duc Ninh Nguyen

    Full Text Available Transforming growth factor (TGF-β2 is an important anti-inflammatory protein in milk and colostrum. TGF-β2 supplementation appears to reduce gut inflammatory diseases in early life, such as necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC in young mice. However, the molecular mechanisms by which TGF-β2 protects immature intestinal epithelial cells (IECs remain to be more clearly elucidated before interventions in infants can be considered. Porcine IECs PsIc1 were treated with TGF-β2 and/or lipopolysaccharide (LPS, and changes in the cellular proteome were subsequently analyzed using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis-MS and LC-MS-based proteomics. TGF-β2 alone induced the differential expression of 13 proteins and the majority of the identified proteins were associated with stress responses, TGF-β and Toll-like receptor 4 signaling cascades. In particular, a series of heat shock proteins had similar differential trends as previously shown in the intestine of NEC-resistant preterm pigs and young mice. Furthermore, LC-MS-based proteomics and Western blot analyses revealed 20 differentially expressed proteins following treatment with TGF-β2 in LPS-challenged IECs. Thirteen of these proteins were associated with stress response pathways, among which five proteins were altered by LPS and restored by TGF-β2, whereas six were differentially expressed only by TGF-β2 in LPS-challenged IECs. Based on previously reported biological functions, these patterns indicate the anti-stress and anti-inflammatory effects of TGF-β2 in IECs. We conclude that TGF-β2 of dietary or endogenous origin may regulate the IEC responses against LPS stimuli, thereby supporting cellular homeostasis and innate immunity in response to bacterial colonization, and the first enteral feeding in early life.

  13. Tissue distribution, gender- and genotype-dependent expression of autophagy-related genes in avian species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alissa Piekarski

    Full Text Available As a result of the genetic selection of broiler (meat-type breeders chickens for enhanced growth rate and lower feed conversion ratio, it has become necessary to restrict feed intake. When broilers are fed ad libitum, they would become obese and suffer from several health-related problems. A vital adaptation to starvation is autophagy, a self-eating mechanism for recycling cellular constituents. The autophagy pathway has witnessed dramatic growth in the last few years and extensively studied in yeast and mammals however, there is a paucity of information in avian (non-mammalian species. Here we characterized several genes involved in autophagosome initiation and elongation in Red Jungle fowl (Gallus gallus and Japanese quail (coturnix coturnix Japonica. Both complexes are ubiquitously expressed in chicken and quail tissues (liver, leg and breast muscle, brain, gizzard, intestine, heart, lung, kidney, adipose tissue, ovary and testis. Alignment analysis showed high similarity (50.7 to 91.5% between chicken autophagy-related genes and their mammalian orthologs. Phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that the evolutionary relationship between autophagy genes is consistent with the consensus view of vertebrate evolution. Interestingly, the expression of autophagy-related genes is tissue- and gender-dependent. Furthermore, using two experimental male quail lines divergently selected over 40 generations for low (resistant, R or high (sensitive, S stress response, we found that the expression of most studied genes are higher in R compared to S line. Together our results indicate that the autophagy pathway is a key molecular signature exhibited gender specific differences and likely plays an important role in response to stress in avian species.

  14. Antigenic properties of avian hepatitis E virus capsid protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Qin; Syed, Shahid Faraz; Zhou, En-Min

    2015-10-22

    Avian hepatitis E virus (HEV) is the main causative agent of big liver and spleen disease and hepatitis-splenomegaly syndrome in chickens, and is genetically and antigenically related to mammalian HEVs. HEV capsid protein contains immunodominant epitopes and induces a protective humoral immune response. A better understanding of the antigenic composition of this protein is critically important for the development of effective vaccine and sensitive and specific serological assays. To date, six linear antigenic domains (I-VI) have been characterized in avian HEV capsid protein and analyzed for their applications in the serological diagnosis and vaccine design. Domains I and V induce strong immune response in chickens and are common to avian, human, and swine HEVs, indicating that the shared epitopes hampering differential diagnosis of avian HEV infection. Domains III and IV are not immunodominant and elicit a weak immune response. Domain VI, located in the N-terminal region of the capsid protein, can also trigger an intense immune response, but the anti-domain VI antibodies are transient. The protection analysis showed that the truncated capsid protein containing the C-terminal 268 amino acid residues expressed by the bacterial system can provide protective immunity against avian HEV infection in chickens. However, the synthetic peptides incorporating the different linear antigenic domains (I-VI) and epitopes are non-protective. The antigenic composition of avian HEV capsid protein is altogether complex. To develop an effective vaccine and accurate serological diagnostic methods, more conformational antigenic domains or epitopes are to be characterized in detail.

  15. Acid-base responses to feeding and intestinal Cl- uptake in freshwater- and seawater-acclimated killifish, Fundulus heteroclitus, an agastric euryhaline teleost.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Chris M; Bucking, Carol; Grosell, Martin

    2010-08-01

    Marine teleosts generally secrete basic equivalents (HCO(3)(-)) and take up Na(+) and Cl(-) in the intestine so as to promote absorption of H(2)O. However, neither the integration of these functions with feeding nor the potential role of the gut in ionoregulation and acid-base balance in freshwater have been well studied. The euryhaline killifish (Fundulus heteroclitus) is unusual in lacking both an acid-secreting stomach and a mechanism for Cl(-) uptake at the gills in freshwater. Responses to a satiation meal were evaluated in both freshwater- and seawater-acclimated killifish. In intact animals, there was no change in acid or base flux to the external water after the meal, in accord with the absence of any post-prandial alkaline tide in the blood. Indeed, freshwater animals exhibited a post-prandial metabolic acidosis ('acidic tide'), whereas seawater animals showed no change in blood acid-base status. In vitro gut sac experiments revealed a substantially higher rate of Cl(-) absorption by the intestine in freshwater killifish, which was greatest at 1-3 h after feeding. The Cl(-) concentration of the absorbate was higher in preparations from freshwater animals than from seawater killifish and increased with fasting. Surprisingly, net basic equivalent secretion rates were also much higher in preparations from freshwater animals, in accord with the 'acidic tide'; in seawater preparations, they were lowest after feeding and increased with fasting. Bafilomycin (1 micromol l(-1)) promoted an 80% increase in net base secretion rates, as well as in Cl(-) and fluid absorption, at 1-3 h post-feeding in seawater preparations only, explaining the difference between freshwater and seawater fish. Preparations from seawater animals at 1-3 h post-feeding also acidified the mucosal saline, and this effect was associated with a marked rise in P(CO(2)), which was attenuated by bafilomycin. Measurements of chyme pH from intact animals confirmed that intestinal fluid (chyme) pH and

  16. Evaluation of the safety of ancient strains of wheat in coeliac disease reveals heterogeneous small intestinal T cell responses suggestive of coeliac toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šuligoj, Tanja; Gregorini, Armando; Colomba, Mariastella; Ellis, H Julia; Ciclitira, Paul J

    2013-12-01

    Coeliac disease is a chronic small intestinal immune-mediated enteropathy triggered by dietary gluten in genetically predisposed individuals. Since it is unknown if all wheat varieties are equally toxic to coeliac patients seven Triticum accessions showing different origin (ancient/modern) and ploidy (di-, tetra- hexaploid) were studied. Selected strains of wheat were ancient Triticum monococcum precoce (AA genome) and Triticum speltoides (BB genome), accessions of Triticum turgidum durum (AABB genome) including two ancient (Graziella Ra and Kamut) and two modern (Senatore Cappelli and Svevo) durum strains of wheat and Triticum aestivum compactum (AABBDD genome). Small intestinal gluten-specific T-cell lines generated from 13 coeliac patients were tested with wheat accessions by proliferation assays. All strains of wheat independent of ploidy or ancient/modern origin triggered heterogeneous responses covering wide ranges of stimulation indices. Ancient strains of wheat, although previously suggested to be low or devoid of coeliac toxicity, should be tested for immunogenicity using gluten-specific T-cell lines from multiple coeliac patients rather than gluten-specific clones to assess their potential toxicity. Our findings provide further evidence for the need for a strict gluten-free diet in coeliac patients, including avoidance of ancient strains of wheat. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. All rights reserved.

  17. Effects of hydrolysed Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast and yeast cell wall components on live performance, intestinal histo-morphology and humoral immune response of broilers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muthusamy, N; Haldar, S; Ghosh, T K; Bedford, M R

    2011-12-01

    1. The effects of enzymatically hydrolysed whole Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast (HY) and the pellets of yeast cell wall (YCW) on production traits, the microbiology and histo-morphology of the small intestine, and humoral immune responses against Newcastle disease virus (NDV), of Ross 308 broilers were investigated. 2. The control group received a maize-soyabean meal based basal diet for 42 days. In the treated groups the basal diet was supplemented with 1 g/kg of HY and YCW. There were 8 replicate pens per group (n = 12 birds/pen). 3. HY and YCW supplementation improved live weight (P = 0·006) and FCR (P = 0·003) at 42-d as compared with the control group. 4. In the small intestine, Salmonella spp and Escherichia coli numbers were higher (P = 0·01) in the mucosa and lower (P = 0·01) in the digesta of the HY and the YCW fed groups at 25 d of age. Lactobacillus in the duodenal and jejunal digesta was higher (P yeast cell wall may be a better dietary tool than the hydrolysed whole yeast cell as a performance enhancer for broilers.

  18. SEKILAS TENTANG AVIAN INFLUENZA (AI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fauziah Elytha

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Fluburung atau Avian Influenza (AI adalah penyakit zoonosis fatal dan menular serta dapat menginfeksi semua jenis burung, manusia, babi, kuda dan anjing, Virus Avian Influenza tipe A (hewan dari keluarga Drthomyxoviridae telah menyerang manusia dan menyebabkan banyak korban meninggal dunia. Saat ini avian Influenza telah menjadi masalah kesehatan global yang sangat serius, termasuk di Indonesia. Sejak Juli 2005 Sampai 12 April 2006 telah ditemukan 479 kasus kumulatif dan dicurigai flu burung di Tangerang Banten adalah Penularan dari manusia ke manusia. Untuk mencegah penularan AI ke manusia memerlukan kesadaran menyeluruh terhadap flu burung H5N1 , seperti tindakan karantina untuk penderita, penyemprotan antiseptic di kebun binatang dan pemantauan kasus-kasus avians di masyarakat, meningkatkan kebersihan pribadi dan sanitasi lingkungan dengan menggunakan peralatan pelindung diri terhadap unggas karena dekatnya hubungan antara burung dan manusia.

  19. Koyukuk NWR 1985 avian checklist

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — An avian checklist survey was conducted within the boundaries of the Koyukuk National Wildlife Refuge and Kaiyuh Flats unit of the Innoko National Wildlife Refuge...

  20. Koyukuk NWR 1986 avian checklist

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — An avian checklist survey was conducted within the boundaries of the Koyukuk National Wildlife Refuge and Kaiyuh Flats unit of the Innoko National Wildlife Refuge in...

  1. Effects of exogenous glucagon-like peptide-2 and distal bowel resection on intestinal and systemic adaptive responses in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lai, Sarah W; de Heuvel, Elaine; Wallace, Laurie E

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the effects of exogenous glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2), with or without massive distal bowel resection, on adaptation of jejunal mucosa, enteric neurons, gut hormones and tissue reserves in rats. BACKGROUND: GLP-2 is a gut hormone known to be trophic for small bowel mucosa......-2 attenuated resection-induced increases in blood glucose and body fat loss. CONCLUSIONS: Exogenous GLP-2 stimulates jejunal adaptation independent of enteric neuronal VIP or nNOS changes, and has divergent effects on plasma amylin and peptide YY concentrations. The novel ability of exogenous GLP-2......, and to mimic intestinal adaptation in short bowel syndrome (SBS). However, the effects of exogenous GLP-2 and SBS on enteric neurons are unclear. METHODS: Sprague Dawley rats were randomized to four treatments: Transected Bowel (TB) (n = 8), TB + GLP-2 (2.5 nmol/kg/h, n = 8), SBS (n = 5), or SBS + GLP-2 (2...

  2. The different effects of probiotics treatment on Salmonella-induced interleukin-8 response in intestinal epithelia cells via PI3K/Akt and NOD2 expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, F-C; Huang, S-C

    2016-11-30

    Salmonella spp. remains a major public health problem for the whole world. Intestinal epithelial cells serve as an essential component of the innate mucosal immune system to defend against Salmonella infection. A substantial amount of evidence has accumulated that probiotics can regulate interleukin 8 (IL-8) involved in innate immunity. However, the exact effect of probiotics on epithelial IL-8 response to Salmonella infection is not well understood. Therefore, we investigated the action of probiotics on Salmonella-infected Caco-2 cells and its novel mechanisms. Two probiotic strains were examined for Salmonella-induced IL-8 responses and regulating proteins using Caco-2 cell cultures. We demonstrated probiotic, either Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG or Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis DSM10140, administered before Salmonella infection conferred significantly suppressive effect on Salmonella-induced IL-8 responses in Caco-2 cells, either in secreted protein or mRNA, via the PI3K/Akt signal pathway while probiotic administered after infection enhanced Salmonella-induced IL-8 responses via nucleotide-binding oligomerisation domain-containing protein 2 expression in membrane. These findings suggest that the different regulation of probiotics on Salmonella-induced IL-8 responses in Caco-2 cells according to the administered timing supports a rationale for the therapeutic use of probiotics in the treatment of Salmonella colitis and inflammatory bowel disease. This can explain the reported controversial effect of probiotics on these diseases.

  3. Differential Regulation of Proinflammatory Cytokine Expression by Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases in Macrophages in Response to Intestinal Parasite Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Mei Xing; Png, Chin Wen; Tay, Crispina Yan Bing; Teo, Joshua Ding Wei; Jiao, Huipeng; Lehming, Norbert

    2014-01-01

    Blastocystis is a common enteric protistan parasite that can cause acute, as well as chronic, infection and is associated with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). However, the pathogenic status of Blastocystis infection remains unclear. In this study, we found that Blastocystis antigens induced abundant expression of proinflammatory cytokines, including interleukin 1β (IL-1β), IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), in mouse intestinal explants, in mouse colitis colon, and in macrophages. Further investigation utilizing RAW264.7 murine macrophages showed that Blastocystis treatment in RAW264.7 macrophages induced the activation of ERK, JNK, and p38, the three major groups of mammalian mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases that play essential roles in the expression of proinflammatory cytokines. ERK inhibition in macrophages significantly suppressed both mRNA and protein expression of IL-6 and TNF-α and mRNA expression of IL-1β. On the other hand, JNK inhibition resulted in reductions in both c-Jun and ERK activation and significant suppression of all three proinflammatory cytokines at both the mRNA and protein levels. Inhibition of p38 suppressed only IL-6 protein expression with no effect on the expression of IL-1β and TNF-α. Furthermore, we found that serine proteases produced by Blastocystis play an important role in the induction of ERK activation and proinflammatory cytokine expression by macrophages. Our study thus demonstrated for the first time that Blastocystis could induce the expression of various proinflammatory cytokines via the activation of MAP kinases and that infection with Blastocystis may contribute to the pathogenesis of inflammatory intestinal diseases through the activation of inflammatory pathways in host immune cells, such as macrophages. PMID:25156742

  4. Avian host defense peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuperus, Tryntsje; Coorens, Maarten; van Dijk, Albert; Haagsman, Henk P

    2013-11-01

    Host defense peptides (HDPs) are important effector molecules of the innate immune system of vertebrates. These antimicrobial peptides are also present in invertebrates, plants and fungi. HDPs display broad-spectrum antimicrobial activities and fulfill an important role in the first line of defense of many organisms. It is becoming increasingly clear that in the animal kingdom the functions of HDPs are not confined to direct antimicrobial actions. Research in mammals has indicated that HDPs have many immunomodulatory functions and are also involved in other physiological processes ranging from development to wound healing. During the past five years our knowledge about avian HDPs has increased considerably. This review addresses our current knowledge on the evolution, regulation and biological functions of HDPs of birds.

  5. Simulating avian wingbeat kinematics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parslew, Ben; Crowther, William J

    2010-12-01

    Inverse dynamics methods are used to simulate avian wingbeats in varying flight conditions. A geometrically scalable multi-segment bird model is constructed, and optimisation techniques are employed to determine segment motions that generate desired aerodynamic force coefficients with minimal mechanical power output. The results show that wingbeat kinematics vary gradually with changes in cruise speed, which is consistent with experimental data. Optimised solutions for cruising flight of the pigeon suggest that upstroke wing retraction is used as a method of saving energy. Analysis of the aerodynamic force coefficient variation in high and low speed cruise leads to the proposal that a suitable gait metric should include both thrust and lift generation during each half-stroke.

  6. BIRD FLU (AVIAN INFLUENZA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali ACAR

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Avian influenza (bird flu is a contagious disease of animals caused by influenza A viruses. These flu viruses occur naturally among birds. Actually, humans are not infected by bird flu viruses.. However, during an outbreak of bird flu among poultry, there is a possible risk to people who have contact infect birds or surface that have been contaminated with excreations from infected birds. Symptoms of bird flu in humans have ranged from typical flu-like symptoms to eye infections, pneumonia, severe respiratory diseases and other severe and life-threatening complications. In such situation, people should avoid contact with infected birds or contaminated surface, and should be careful when handling and cooking poultry. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2005; 4(6.000: 345-353

  7. Protection of chickens against avian hepatitis E virus (avian HEV) infection by immunization with recombinant avian HEV capsid protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, H; Zhou, E M; Sun, Z F; Meng, X J

    2007-04-12

    Avian hepatitis E virus (avian HEV) is an emerging virus associated with hepatitis-splenomegaly syndrome in chickens in North America. Avian HEV is genetically and antigenically related to human HEV, the causative agent of hepatitis E in humans. In the lack of a practical animal model, avian HEV infection in chickens has been used as a model to study human HEV replication and pathogenesis. A 32 kDa recombinant ORF2 capsid protein of avian HEV expressed in Escherichia coli was found having similar antigenic structure as that of human HEV containing major neutralizing epitopes. To determine if the capsid protein of avian HEV can be used as a vaccine, 20 chickens were immunized with purified avian HEV recombinant protein with aluminum as adjuvant and another 20 chickens were mock immunized with KLH precipitated in aluminum as controls. Both groups of chickens were subsequently challenged with avian HEV. All the tested mock-immunized control chickens developed typical avian HEV infection characterized by viremia, fecal virus shedding and seroconversion to avian HEV antibodies. Gross hepatic lesions were also found in portion of these chickens. In contrast, none of the tested chickens immunized with avian HEV capsid protein had detectable viremia, fecal virus shedding or observable gross hepatitis lesions. The results from this study suggested that immunization of chickens with avian HEV recombinant ORF2 capsid protein with aluminum as adjuvant can induce protective immunity against avian HEV infection. Chickens are a useful small animal model to study anti-HEV immunity and pathogenesis.

  8. Thromboelastography in Selected Avian Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strindberg, Sophie; Nielsen, Tenna W; Ribeiro, Ângela M; Wiinberg, Bo; Kristensen, Annemarie T; Bertelsen, Mads F

    2015-12-01

    Currently available assay methods and reagents are not optimized for evaluating avian hemostasis; therefore, assessing avian coagulopathies is challenging. Recently, thromboelastography (TEG), which measures the viscoelastic properties of blood, has been used clinically in mammalian species to diagnose and characterize hemostatic disorders. To evaluate TEG in healthy individuals of 6 avian species, we modified existing mammalian TEG protocols to allow analysis of citrated, avian whole-blood samples collected from scarlet ibis (Eudocimus ruber) (n = 13), American flamingos ( Phoenicopterus ruber ) (n = 13), helmeted Guinea fowl ( Numida meleagris ) (n = 12), Amazon parrots (Amazona species) (n = 9), Humboldt penguins ( Spheniscus humboldti ) (n = 6), and domestic chickens (n = 16). Activated partial thromboplastin time, prothrombin time, and fibrinogen were measured as a means of comparison. Regardless of the mode of activation, clot formation in the species studied was markedly delayed compared with mammals. Because of prolonged reaction time (14.7-52.7 minutes) with kaolin and diluted tissue factor, undiluted human tissue factor was used in all avian samples because it provided the shortest reaction time. Species differed significantly in reaction time (P = .007), clotting rate (P < .001), rate of clot formation (α angle; P < .001), and maximum amplitude (P < .001) values, indicating that species-specific reference intervals are necessary. Based on these results, TEG with specific reference intervals could prove useful in evaluating avian hemostatic disorders.

  9. Planning and executing a vaccination campaign against avian influenza.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marangon, S; Cristalli, A; Busani, L

    2007-01-01

    Vaccination against avian influenza infection caused by H5 or H7 virus subtypes has been used on several occasions in recent years to control and in some cases eradicate the disease. In order to contain avian influenza infection effectively, immunization should be combined with a coordinated set of control and monitoring measures. The outcome of an immunization campaign depends on the territorial strategy; whereas the capacity of the veterinary services in developed countries permits enforcement of strategies aimed at eradicating avian influenza, many countries currently affected by highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N1 viruses have a limited veterinary infrastructure and a limited capacity to respond to such epidemics. In these countries, resources are still insufficient to conduct adequate surveillance for identification and reaction to avian influenza outbreaks when they occur. When properly applied in this scenario, immunization can reduce mortality and production losses. In the long term, immunization might also decrease the prevalence of infection to levels at which stamping-out and surveillance can be applied. Countries should adapt their immunization programmes to local conditions in order to guarantee their efficacy and sustainability. In the initial emergency phase, human resources can be mobilized, with reliance on personal responsibility and motivation, thus compensating for potential shortcomings in organization. A more appropriate allocation of resources must be pursued in the long term, remembering that biosecurity is the main component of an exit strategy and must always be improved.

  10. Teaching avian patients and caregivers in the examination room.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Ellen K

    2012-09-01

    Client education and patient well-being should be primary goals and responsibilities for practicing avian veterinarians. Time is limited in the normal clinical appointment setting. However, this opportunity can still be used to introduce clients to the basics of training with positive reinforcement. These methods build a healthy relationship of trust between caregivers and their birds. Within the allotted appointment time, it is possible to teach clients how to train a simple behavior. This article outlines and demonstrates how training avian patients is successfully applied in a typical clinical practice.

  11. The intestinal T cell response to alpha-gliadin in adult celiac disease is focused on a single deamidated glutamine targeted by tissue transglutaminase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arentz-Hansen, H; Körner, R; Molberg, O

    2000-01-01

    The great majority of patients that are intolerant of wheat gluten protein due to celiac disease (CD) are human histocompatibility leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DQ2(+), and the remaining few normally express HLA-DQ8. These two class II molecules are chiefly responsible for the presentation of gluten...... peptides to the gluten-specific T cells that are found only in the gut of CD patients but not of controls. Interestingly, tissue transglutaminase (tTG)-mediated deamidation of gliadin plays an important role in recognition of this food antigen by intestinal T cells. Here we have used recombinant antigens...... for T cell recognition. Gluten-specific T cell lines from 16 different adult patients all responded to one or both of these deamidated peptides, indicating that these epitopes are highly relevant to disease pathology. Binding studies showed that the deamidated peptides displayed an increased affinity...

  12. Protective effects of transforming growth factor β2 in intestinal epithelial cells by regulation of proteins associated with stress and endotoxin responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nguyen, Duc Ninh; Jiang, Pingping; Jacobsen, Susanne

    2015-01-01

    electrophoresis-MS and LC-MS-based proteomics. TGF-β2 alone induced the differential expression of 13 proteins and the majority of the identified proteins were associated with stress responses, TGF-β and Toll-like receptor 4 signaling cascades. In particular, a series of heat shock proteins had similar......Transforming growth factor (TGF)-β2 is an important anti-inflammatory protein in milk and colostrum. TGF-β2 supplementation appears to reduce gut inflammatory diseases in early life, such as necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) in young mice. However, the molecular mechanisms by which TGF-β2 protects...... differential trends as previously shown in the intestine of NEC-resistant preterm pigs and young mice. Furthermore, LC-MS-based proteomics and Western blot analyses revealed 20 differentially expressed proteins following treatment with TGF-β2 in LPS-challenged IECs. Thirteen of these proteins were associated...

  13. Interactions between the intestinal microbiota and innate lymphoid cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Vincent L; Kasper, Dennis L

    2014-01-01

    The mammalian intestine must manage to contain 100 trillion intestinal bacteria without inducing inappropriate immune responses to these microorganisms. The effects of the immune system on intestinal microorganisms are numerous and well-characterized, and recent research has determined that the microbiota influences the intestinal immune system as well. In this review, we first discuss the intestinal immune system and its role in containing and maintaining tolerance to commensal organisms. We next introduce a category of immune cells, the innate lymphoid cells, and describe their classification and function in intestinal immunology. Finally, we discuss the effects of the intestinal microbiota on innate lymphoid cells.

  14. Comparative analysis of the immune responses induced by native versus recombinant versions of the ASP-based vaccine against the bovine intestinal parasite Cooperia oncophora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Hernández, Ana; Borloo, Jimmy; Peelaers, Iris; Casaert, Stijn; Leclercq, Georges; Claerebout, Edwin; Geldhof, Peter

    2017-08-30

    The protective capacities of a native double-domain activation-associated secreted protein (ndd-ASP)-based vaccine against the cattle intestinal nematode Cooperia oncophora has previously been demonstrated. However, protection analysis upon vaccination with a recombinantly produced antigen has never been performed. Therefore, the aim of the current study was to test the protective potential of a Pichia-produced double-domain ASP (pdd-ASP)-based vaccine against C. oncophora. Additionally, we aimed to compare the cellular and humoral mechanisms underlying the vaccine-induced responses by the native (ndd-ASP) and recombinant vaccines. Immunisation of cattle with the native C. oncophora vaccine conferred significant levels of protection after an experimental challenge infection, whereas the recombinant vaccine did not. Moreover, vaccination with ndd-ASP resulted in a higher proliferation of CD4-T cells both systemically and in the small intestinal mucosa when compared with animals vaccinated with the recombinant antigen. In terms of humoral response, although both native and recombinant vaccines induced similar levels of antibodies, animals vaccinated with the native vaccine were able to raise antibodies with greater specificity towards ndd-ASP in comparison with antibodies raised by vaccination with the recombinant vaccine, suggesting a differential immune recognition towards the ndd-ASP and pdd-ASP. Finally, the observation that animals displaying antibodies with higher percentages of recognition towards ndd-ASP also exhibited the lowest egg counts suggests a potential relationship between antibody specificity and protection. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  15. Vaccines and vaccination for avian influenza in poultry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avian influenza (AI) vaccines have been developed and used to protect poultry and other birds in various countries of the world. Protection is principally mediated by an immune response to the subtype-specific hemagglutinin (HA) protein. AI vaccines prevent clinical signs of disease, death, egg pr...

  16. Use of ex vivo and in vitro cultures of the human respiratory tract to study the tropism and host responses of highly pathogenic avian influenza A (H5N1) and other influenza viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Renee W Y; Chan, Michael C W; Nicholls, John M; Malik Peiris, J S

    2013-12-05

    The tropism of influenza viruses for the human respiratory tract is a key determinant of host-range, and consequently, of pathogenesis and transmission. Insights can be obtained from clinical and autopsy studies of human disease and relevant animal models. Ex vivo cultures of the human respiratory tract and in vitro cultures of primary human cells can provide complementary information provided they are physiologically comparable in relevant characteristics to human tissues in vivo, e.g. virus receptor distribution, state of differentiation. We review different experimental models for their physiological relevance and summarize available data using these cultures in relation to highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N1, in comparison where relevant, with other influenza viruses. Transformed continuous cell-lines often differ in important ways to the corresponding tissues in vivo. The state of differentiation of primary human cells (respiratory epithelium, macrophages) can markedly affect virus tropism and host responses. Ex vivo cultures of human respiratory tissues provide a close resemblance to tissues in vivo and may be used to risk assess animal viruses for pandemic threat. Physiological factors (age, inflammation) can markedly affect virus receptor expression and virus tropism. Taken together with data from clinical studies on infected humans and relevant animal models, data from ex vivo and in vitro cultures of human tissues and cells can provide insights into virus transmission and pathogenesis and may provide understanding that leads to novel therapeutic interventions.

  17. Avian colibacillosis: still many black holes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guabiraba, Rodrigo; Schouler, Catherine

    2015-08-01

    Avian pathogenic Escherichia coli (APEC) strains cause severe respiratory and systemic diseases, threatening food security and avian welfare worldwide. Intensification of poultry production and the quick expansion of free-range production systems will increase the incidence of colibacillosis through greater exposure of birds to pathogens and stress. Therapy is mainly based on antibiotherapy and current vaccines have poor efficacy. Serotyping remains the most frequently used diagnostic method, only allowing the identification of a limited number of APEC strains. Several studies have demonstrated that the most common virulence factors studied in APEC are all rarely present in the same isolate, showing that APEC strains constitute a heterogeneous group. Different isolates may harbor different associations of virulence factors, each one able to induce colibacillosis. Despite its economical relevance, pathogenesis of colibacillosis is poorly understood. Our knowledge on the host response to APEC is based on very descriptive studies, mostly restricted to bacteriological and histopathological analysis of infected organs such as lungs. Furthermore, only a small number of APEC isolates have been used in experimental studies. In the present review, we discuss current knowledge on APEC diversity and virulence, including host response to infection and the associated inflammatory response with a focus on pulmonary colibacillosis.

  18. Differences in the pathogenicity and inflammatory responses induced by avian influenza A/H7N9 virus infection in BALB/c and C57BL/6 mouse models.

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    Guangyu Zhao

    Full Text Available Avian influenza A/H7N9 virus infection causes pneumonia in humans with a high case fatality rate. However, virus-induced modulation of immune responses is being recognized increasingly as a factor in the pathogenesis of this disease. In this study, we compared the pathogenicity of A/H7N9 infection in BALB/c and C57BL/6 mouse models, and investigated the putative involvement of proinflammatory cytokines in lung injury and viral clearance. In both mouse strains, A/Anhui/1/2013(H7N9 infection with 10(6 TCID50 resulted in viral replication in lung, severe body weight loss and acute lung injury. During the early infection stage, infected C57BL/6 mice exhibited more severe lung injury, slower recovery from lung damage, less effective viral clearance, higher levels of interlukine (IL-6, monocyte chemotactic protein (MCP-1, and IL-1β, and lower levels of tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α and interferon (IFN-γ than infected BALB/c mice. These results suggest that TNF-α and IFN-γ may help suppress viral gene expression and increase viral clearance, and that IL-6 and MCP-1 may contribute to lung injury in A/H7N9-infected individuals. In addition, lung damage and the distribution of virus antigen in tissues were similar in young and middle-aged mice. These results suggest that the more serious lung injury in middle-aged or older H7N9 cases is not mainly caused by differences in viral replication in the lung but probably by a dysregulated immune response induced by underlying comorbidities. These results indicate that the extent of dysregulation of the host immune response after H7N9 virus infection most probably determines the outcome of H7N9 virus infection.

  19. Galacto-oligosaccharides Protect the Intestinal Barrier by Maintaining the Tight Junction Network and Modulating the Inflammatory Responses after a Challenge with the Mycotoxin Deoxynivalenol in Human Caco-2 Cell Monolayers and B6C3F1 Mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akbari, Peyman; Braber, Saskia; Alizadeh, Arash; Verheijden, Kim; Schoterman, Margriet Hc; Kraneveld, Aletta D; Garssen, Johan; Fink-Gremmels, Johanna

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The integrity of the epithelial layer in the gastrointestinal tract protects organisms from exposure to luminal antigens, which are considered the primary cause of chronic intestinal inflammation and allergic responses. The common wheat-associated fungal toxin deoxynivalenol acts as a sp

  20. Intestinal Coccidia

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    MJ Ggaravi

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Intestinal Coccidia are a subclass of Apicomplexa phylum. Eucoccidida are facultative heteroxenous, but some of them are monoxenous. They have sexual and asexual life cycle. Some coccidia are human pathogens, for example: Cryptosporidium: Cryptosporidiums has many species that are mammalian intestinal parasites.C. Parvum specie is a human pathogenic protozoa. Cryptosporidum has circle or ellipse shapes and nearly 4-6 mm. It is transmitted in warm seasons. Oocyst is obtained insexual life cycle that has 20% thin layer and 80% thick layer. Oocyst with thick layer is able to live a long time in nature. They are the third or forth of gastroentritis disease that have digestive disorder like anorexia, nausea, persistent diarrhoea, malabsorption and leanness. The disease forms choronic and acute stages and it is able to kill the immunodeficiency cases. Sometimes it has HIV symptoms similar to pneumonia and respiratory track infection. Laboratory diagnosis is based on Oocyst finding in stool exam and that shitter floatation and Cr (KOH2 are the best methods. Modified zyh-lnelson and fleocroum are the best staining methods too. This parasite is transmitted by zoonotic and Antroponotic origin. Molecular studies have shown two Genotypes (I&II. Genotype I is aquatic and II is zoonotic. The prevalence rate is 3% in infants and 10% in calves. Cyclospora: This parasite is novel and is bigger than cryptosporidium.It isn't known a clear life cycle but is transmitted by water, vegetables and fruits as raspberries. and mulberries. Human is a specific host. When a parasite is in the intestine it causes inflammatory reaction in Entrocyte.The patient shows watery diarrhoea with nausea, vomitting, pain, Stomach cramp, anorexia, malabsorption and cachexia. The disease period is 3 monthes in immunodeficiency cases but it is selflimited in normal cases. Autofluorescence characteristic is differential diagnosis, prevalence rate of disease is unknown. Isospora: This

  1. Avian mycoplasmosis update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ER Nascimento

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Avian mycoplasmas occur in a variety of bird species. The most important mycoplasmas for chickens and turkeys are Mycoplasma gallisepticum (MG, M. synoviae (MS, and M. meleagridis. Besides, M. iowe (MI is an emerging pathogen in turkeys, but of little concern for chickens. Mycoplasmas are bacteria that lack cell wall and belong to the class Mollicutes. Although they have been considered extracellular agents, scientists admit nowadays that some of them are obligatory intracellular microorganisms, whereas all other mycoplasmas are considered facultative intracellular organisms. Their pathogenic mechanism for disease include adherence to host target cells, mediation of apoptosis, innocent bystander damage to host cell due to intimate membrane contact, molecular (antigen mimicry that may lead to tolerance, and mitotic effect for B and/or T lymphocytes, which could lead to suppressed T-cell function and/or production of cytotoxic T cell, besides mycoplasma by-products, such as hydrogen peroxide and superoxide radicals. Moreover, mycoplasma ability to stimulate macrophages, monocytes, T-helper cells and NK cells, results in the production of substances, such as tumor necrosing factor (TNF-alpha, interleukin (IL-1, 2, 6 and interferon (a, b, g. The major clinical signs seen in avian mycoplasmosis are coughing, sneezing, snicks, respiratory rales, ocular and nasal discharge, decreased feed intake and egg production, increased mortality, poor hatchability, and, primarily in turkeys, swelling of the infraorbital sinus(es. Nevertheless, chronic and unapparent infections are most common and more threatening. Mycoplasmas are transmitted horizontally, from bird to bird, and vertically, from dam to offspring through the eggs. Losses attributed to mycoplasmosis, mainly MG and MS infections, result from decreased egg production and egg quality, poor hatchability (high rate of embryonic mortality and culling of day-old birds, poor feed efficiency, increase in

  2. Avian influenza and pandemic influenza preparedness in Hong Kong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Ping Yan

    2008-06-01

    Avian influenza A H5N1 continues to be a major threat to global public health as it is a likely candidate for the next influenza pandemic. To protect public health and avert potential disruption to the economy, the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region Government has committed substantial effort in preparedness for avian and pandemic influenza. Public health infrastructures for emerging infectious diseases have been developed to enhance command, control and coordination of emergency response. Strategies against avian and pandemic influenza are formulated to reduce opportunities for human infection, detect pandemic influenza timely, and enhance emergency preparedness and response capacity. Key components of the pandemic response include strengthening disease surveillance systems, updating legislation on infectious disease prevention and control, enhancing traveller health measures, building surge capacity, maintaining adequate pharmaceutical stockpiles, and ensuring business continuity during crisis. Challenges from avian and pandemic influenza are not to be underestimated. Implementing quarantine and social distancing measures to contain or mitigate the spread of pandemic influenza is problematic in a highly urbanised city like Hong Kong as they involved complex operational and ethical issues. Sustaining effective risk communication campaigns during interpandemic times is another challenge. Being a member of the global village, Hong Kong is committed to contributing its share of efforts and collaborating with health authorities internationally in combating our common public health enemy.

  3. Dose-Dependent Effects of Lactobacillus rhamnosus on Serum Interleukin-17 Production and Intestinal T-Cell Responses in Pigs Challenged with Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yao-Hong; Li, Xiao-Qiong; Zhang, Wei; Zhou, Dong; Liu, Hao-Yu

    2014-01-01

    The mechanism underlying the dose effect of probiotics on ameliorating diarrhea has not been fully elucidated. Here, low (1 × 109 CFU/ml) or high (1 × 1011 CFU/ml) doses of Lactobacillus rhamnosus ATCC 7469 were administered orally to piglets for 1 week before F4 (K88)-positive enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (F4+ ETEC) challenge. Administration of a low, but not a high, dose of L. rhamnosus decreased the percentage of CD3+ CD4+ CD8− T cells in the peripheral blood. Notably, transiently increased serum concentrations of interleukin-17A (IL-17A) were observed after F4+ ETEC challenge in pigs pretreated with a high dose of L. rhamnosus. Administration of L. rhamnosus increased the percentage of the small intestinal lamina propria CD3+ CD4+ CD8− cells and Peyer's patch CD3+ CD4− CD8− and CD3− CD4− CD8+ cells. The percentage of ileal intraepithelial CD3+ CD4− CD8+ cells increased only in the high-dose piglets. Administration of L. rhamnosus downregulated expression of ileal IL-17A after F4+ ETEC challenge but had no effect on expression of gamma interferon (IFN-γ), IL-12, IL-4, and FOXP3 mRNA in the small intestine. Expression of jejunal IL-2, ileal transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1), and ileal IL-10 was upregulated in the low-dose piglets after F4+ ETEC challenge. Our findings suggest that amelioration of infectious diarrhea in piglets by L. rhamnosus is associated with the generation of lamina propria CD3+ CD4+ CD8− T cells, the expansion of Peyer's patch CD3+ CD4− CD8− and CD3− CD4− CD8+ cells, and the attenuation of F4+ ETEC-induced increase in CD3+ CD4+ CD8+ T cells in the small intestine. However, consumption of high doses of L. rhamnosus may increase levels of serum IL-17A after F4+ ETEC challenge, thus eliciting a strong proinflammatory response. PMID:24389928

  4. Microbial induction of CARD15 expression in intestinal epithelial cells via toll-like receptor 5 triggers an antibacterial response loop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begue, B; Dumant, C; Bambou, J C; Beaulieu, J F; Chamaillard, M; Hugot, J P; Goulet, O; Schmitz, J; Philpott, D J; Cerf-Bensussan, N; Ruemmele, F M

    2006-11-01

    With the discovery of CARD15 as susceptibility gene for Crohn's disease (CD) a first link to a potential defect in the innate immune system was made. In this work we aimed to analyze enterocyte NOD2/CARD15 expression and regulation in response to bacterial motifs and the consequences of the most common CD-specific CARD15 mutation on antibacterial responses of normal intestinal epithelial cells (IEC). Under normal conditions, IEC lines and ileal enterocytes did not express NOD2/CARD15 mRNA or protein, contrary to IEC derived from inflammatory CD sections. In vitro analyses revealed that the simple contact with non-pathogenic commensal E. Coli K12 was sufficient to induced NOD2/CARD15 mRNA and protein in human IEC (HIEC). We identified bacterial flagellin interacting with TLR5 as major motif in this regulation of NOD2/CARD15. E. Coli mutants not expressing flagellin (DeltaFliC) failed to induce CARD15. Similarly, in HIEC transfected with a plasmid encoding dominant negative TLR5, no CARD15 induction was observed after K12 contact. Isolated TLR2 or TLR4 stimulation had no or only a marginal effect on NOD2/CARD15 expression. NOD2/CARD15 negative HIEC were unresponsive to muramyl dipeptide (MDP), but once NOD2/CARD15 was induced, HIEC and Caco2 cells responded to intra or extracellular MDP presentation with the activation of the NFkB pathway. IEC transfected with the Crohn-specific CARD15 mutant (F3020insC, FS) failed to activate NFkB after MDP-challenge, in contrast to CARD15WT IEC. In response to MDP, IEC induced a massive antibacterial peptide (ABP) response, seen in the apical release of CCL20. This was completely abolished in IEC carrying CARD15FS. These data suggest a critical role of NOD2/CARD15 in the bacterial clearance of the intestinal epithelium while CD-specific mutated NOD2/CARD15 causes an impaired epithelial barrier.

  5. Apoptosis, Necrosis, and Necroptosis in the Gut and Intestinal Homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negroni, Anna; Cucchiara, Salvatore; Stronati, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) form a physiochemical barrier that separates the intestinal lumen from the host's internal milieu and is critical for electrolyte passage, nutrient absorption, and interaction with commensal microbiota. Moreover, IECs are strongly involved in the intestinal mucosal inflammatory response as well as in mucosal innate and adaptive immune responses. Cell death in the intestinal barrier is finely controlled, since alterations may lead to severe disorders, including inflammatory diseases. The emerging picture indicates that intestinal epithelial cell death is strictly related to the maintenance of tissue homeostasis. This review is focused on previous reports on different forms of cell death in intestinal epithelium.

  6. An intestinal Trojan horse for gene delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Haisheng; Wang, Chao; Xu, Xiaoyang; Yu, Chenxu; Wang, Qun

    2015-02-01

    The intestinal epithelium forms an essential element of the mucosal barrier and plays a critical role in the pathophysiological response to different enteric disorders and diseases. As a major enteric dysfunction of the intestinal tract, inflammatory bowel disease is a genetic disease which results from the inappropriate and exaggerated mucosal immune response to the normal constituents in the mucosal microbiota environment. An intestine targeted drug delivery system has unique advantages in the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease. As a new concept in drug delivery, the Trojan horse system with the synergy of nanotechnology and host cells can achieve better therapeutic efficacy in specific diseases. Here, we demonstrated the feasibility of encapsulating DNA-functionalized gold nanoparticles into primary isolated intestinal stem cells to form an intestinal Trojan horse for gene regulation therapy of inflammatory bowel disease. This proof-of-concept intestinal Trojan horse will have a wide variety of applications in the diagnosis and therapy of enteric disorders and diseases.

  7. Genetic deletion of Klf4 in the mouse intestinal epithelium ameliorates dextran sodium sulfate-induced colitis by modulating the NF-κB pathway inflammatory response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaleb, Amr M; Laroui, Hamed; Merlin, Didier; Yang, Vincent W

    2014-05-01

    Krüppel-like factor 4 (KLF4) is a zinc finger transcription factor expressed in the differentiated epithelial cells lining of the intestine. Under physiological conditions, KLF4 inhibits cell proliferation. Conversely, KLF4 mediates proinflammatory signaling in macrophages and its overexpression in the esophageal epithelium activates cytokines, leading to inflammation-mediated esophageal squamous cell cancer formation in mice. Here, we tested whether KLF4 has a proinflammatory activity in experimental colitis in mice. Villin-Cre;Klf4 mice with intestine-specific Klf4 deletion (Klf4) and control mice with floxed Klf4 gene (Klf4) were treated or not with 3% dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) for 7 days to induce colitis. Additionally, WT mice were administered or not, nanoparticles loaded with scrambled or Klf4-siRNA, and concomitantly given DSS. Compared with DSS-treated Klf4 mice, DSS-treated Klf4 mice were significantly less sensitive to DSS-induced colitis. DSS treatment of Klf4 mice induced Klf4 expression in the crypt zone of the colonic epithelium. DSS-treated Klf4 mice had increased proliferation relative to DSS-treated control mice. DSS treatment induced NF-κB signaling pathway in Klf4 mice colon but not Klf4 mice. Additionally, WT mice given DSS and nanoparticle/Klf4-siRNA were less sensitive to colitis and had reduced Klf4 expression and while maintaining the proliferative response in the colonic epithelium. Our results indicate that Klf4 is an important mediator of DSS-induced colonic inflammation by modulating NF-κB signaling pathway and could be involved in the pathogenesis and/or propagation of inflammatory bowel disease. Thus, Klf4 may represent a novel therapeutic target in inflammatory bowel disease.

  8. Targeted inhibition of serotonin type 7 (5-HT7) receptor function modulates immune responses and reduces the severity of intestinal inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Janice J; Bridle, Byram W; Ghia, Jean-Eric; Wang, Huaqing; Syed, Shahzad N; Manocha, Marcus M; Rengasamy, Palanivel; Shajib, Mohammad Sharif; Wan, Yonghong; Hedlund, Peter B; Khan, Waliul I

    2013-05-01

    Mucosal inflammation in conditions ranging from infective acute enteritis or colitis to inflammatory bowel disease is accompanied by alteration in serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine [5-HT]) content in the gut. Recently, we have identified an important role of 5-HT in the pathogenesis of experimental colitis. 5-HT type 7 (5-HT7) receptor is one of the most recently identified members of the 5-HT receptor family, and dendritic cells express this receptor. In this study, we investigated the effect of blocking 5-HT7 receptor signaling in experimental colitis with a view to develop an improved therapeutic strategy in intestinal inflammatory disorders. Colitis was induced with dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) or dinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (DNBS) in mice treated with selective 5-HT7 receptor antagonist SB-269970, as well as in mice lacking 5-HT7 receptor (5-HT7(-/-)) and irradiated wild-type mice reconstituted with bone marrow cells harvested from 5-HT7(-/-) mice. Inhibition of 5-HT7 receptor signaling with SB-269970 ameliorated both acute and chronic colitis induced by DSS. Treatment with SB-269970 resulted in lower clinical disease, histological damage, and proinflammatory cytokine levels compared with vehicle-treated mice post-DSS. Colitis severity was significantly lower in 5-HT7(-/-) mice and in mice reconstituted with bone marrow cells from 5-HT7(-/-) mice compared with control mice after DSS colitis. 5-HT7(-/-) mice also had significantly reduced DNBS-induced colitis. These observations provide us with novel information on the critical role of the 5-HT7 receptor in immune response and inflammation in the gut, and highlight the potential benefit of targeting this receptor to alleviate the severity of intestinal inflammatory disorders such as inflammatory bowel disease.

  9. The avian fossil record in Insular Southeast Asia and its implications for avian biogeography and palaeoecology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanneke J.M. Meijer

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Excavations and studies of existing collections during the last decades have significantly increased the abundance as well as the diversity of the avian fossil record for Insular Southeast Asia. The avian fossil record covers the Eocene through the Holocene, with the majority of bird fossils Pleistocene in age. Fossil bird skeletal remains represent at least 63 species in 54 genera and 27 families, and two ichnospecies are represented by fossil footprints. Birds of prey, owls and swiftlets are common elements. Extinctions seem to have been few, suggesting continuity of avian lineages since at least the Late Pleistocene, although some shifts in species ranges have occurred in response to climatic change. Similarities between the Late Pleistocene avifaunas of Flores and Java suggest a dispersal route across southern Sundaland. Late Pleistocene assemblages of Niah Cave (Borneo and Liang Bua (Flores support the rainforest refugium hypothesis in Southeast Asia as they indicate the persistence of forest cover, at least locally, throughout the Late Pleistocene and Holocene.

  10. 76 FR 24793 - Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-03

    ... Inspection Service 9 CFR Parts 93, 94, and 95 RIN 0579-AC36 Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza AGENCY: Animal... products from regions where any subtype of highly pathogenic avian influenza is considered to exist. The... vaccinated for certain types of avian influenza, or that have moved through regions where any subtype of...

  11. 77 FR 34783 - Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-12

    ... Avian Influenza AGENCY: Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, USDA. ACTION: Interim rule... importation of bird and poultry products from regions where any subtype of highly pathogenic avian influenza... avian influenza (HPAI). On January 24, 2011, we published in the Federal Register (76 FR 4046-4056...

  12. Markov Chain Estimation of Avian Seasonal Fecundity

    Science.gov (United States)

    To explore the consequences of modeling decisions on inference about avian seasonal fecundity we generalize previous Markov chain (MC) models of avian nest success to formulate two different MC models of avian seasonal fecundity that represent two different ways to model renestin...

  13. Avian influenza : a review article

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Yalda

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to provides general information about avian influenza (bird flu and specific information about one type of bird flu, called avian influenza A (H5N1, that has caused infections in birds in Asia and Europe and in human in Asia. The main materials in this report are based on the World Health Organization (WHO , world organization for animal health (OIE , food and agriculture organization of the united nations (FAO information and recommendations and review of the published literature about avian influenza. Since December 2003, highly pathogenic H5N1 avian influenza viruses have swept through poultry populations across Asia and parts of Europe. The outbreaks are historically unprecedented in scale and geographical spread. Their economic impact on the agricultural sector of the affected countries has been large. Human cases, with an overall fatality rate around 50%, have also been reported and almost all human infections can be linked to contact with infected poultry. Influenza viruses are genetically unstable and their behaviour cannot be predicted so the risk of further human cases persists. The human health implications have now gained importance, both for illness and fatalities that have occurred following natural infection with avian viruses, and for the potential of generating a re-assortant virus that could give rise to the next human influenza pandemic.

  14. An overview on avian influenza

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    Nelson Rodrigo da Silva Martins

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Avian influenza (AI is considered an exotic disease in the Brazilian poultry industry, according to the National Avian Health Program (PNSA, with permanent monitoring of domestic, exotic and native avian species. Brazil presents privileged environmental conditions of reduced risk. In addition, all commercial poultry and conservation holdings are registered in state or national inventories and geographically located (GPS for health control. Poultry health standards are adopted for the conformity to the international market, mostly for the intensified poultry destined for exportation, but also for companion exotic and native conservation facilities. Guidelines for monitoring and the diagnosis of AI are published by the PNSA and follow the standards proposed by the international health code (World Organization for Animal Health, Organization International des Epizooties - OIE and insure the free of status for avian influenza virus (AIV of LPAIV-low pathogenicity AIV and HPAIV-high pathogenicity AIV. In addition, the infections by mesogenic and velogenic Newcastle disease virus, Mycoplasma gallisepticum, M. synoviae and M. meleagridis, Salmonella enteric subspecies enterica serovar Gallinarum biovars Gallinarum and Pullorum are eradicated from reproduction. Controlled infections by S.enterica subspecies enterica serovars Enteritidis and Typhimurium are monitored for breeders. The vaccination of chickens in ovo or at hatch against Marek's disease is mandatory. Broiler production is an indoor activity, confinement which insures biosecurity, with safe distances from the potential AIV reservoir avian species. Worldwide HPAIV H5N1 notifications to the OIE, in March 2011, included 51 countries.

  15. Intestinal Malakoplakia in Children

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    Fatemeh Mahjoub

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Malakoplakia is a rare inflammatory disease, related to enterobacterial infection in the context of a disorder of cell-mediated immunity. Malakoplakia is exceptional in children and usually involves the gastrointestinal tract. The diagnosis is exclusively based on histological analysis.Cases Presentation: In this paper we have reported 3 children with intestinal malakoplakia which were enrolled during a period of 6 years between 2001 to 2006 at Childrens Medical Center. Two were male, and one female. The main clinical manifestations were: chronic bloody and mucosal diarrhea, abdominal pain and polypoid masses detected by diagnostic colonoscopy. Histological diagnosis proved to be definite in these cases. The response to drug treatment with trimethoprim-sulfamthoxazole in all three patients was good. Conclusion: The presence of intestinal malakoplakia must be ruled out in every child having chronic bloody mucosal diarrhea.

  16. Avian Bornaviruses in Psittacine Birds from Europe and Australia with Proventricular Dilatation Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Weissenböck, H.; Bakonyi, T.; Sekulin, K; Ehrensperger, F; Doneley, R J T; Dürrwald, R.; Hoop, R; Erdélyi, K; Gál, J.; Kolodziejek, J.; Nowotny, N.

    2009-01-01

    To determine whether avian bornaviruses (ABVs) were a factor in proventricular dilatation disease (PDD), we used immunohistochemistry, reverse transcription-PCR, and nucleotide sequence analysis to examine paraffin wax-embedded or frozen tissue samples of 31 psittacine birds with this disease. PDD is a fatal disease of psittacine birds associated with nonsuppurative encephalitis and ganglioneuritis of the upper intestinal tract. Tissue samples had been collected from 1999 through 2008 in Aust...

  17. Association of Mx1 Asn631 variant alleles with reductions in morbidity, early mortality, viral shedding, and cytokine responses in chickens infected with a highly pathogenic avian influenza virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewald, Sandra J; Kapczynski, Darrell R; Livant, Emily J; Suarez, David L; Ralph, John; McLeod, Scott; Miller, Carolyn

    2011-06-01

    Myxovirus-resistance (Mx) proteins are produced by host cells in response to type I interferons, and some members of the Mx gene family in mammals have been shown to limit replication of influenza and other viruses. According to an early report, chicken Mx1 variants encoding Asn at position 631 have antiviral activity, whereas variants with Ser at 631 lack activity in experiments evaluating Mx1 complementary DNA (cDNA) expressed ectopically in a cell line. We evaluated whether the Mx1 631 dimorphism influenced pathogenesis of highly pathogenic avian influenza virus (HPAIV) infection in chickens of two commercial broiler lines, each segregating for Asn631 and Ser631 variants. Following intranasal infection with HPAIV strain A/Chicken/Queretaro/14588-19/1995 H5N2, chickens homozygous for Asn631 allele were significantly more resistant to disease based on early mortality, morbidity, or virus shedding than Ser631 homozygotes. Higher amounts of splenic cytokine transcripts were observed in the Ser631 birds after infection, consistent with higher viral loads seen in this group and perhaps contributing to their higher morbidity. Nucleotide sequence determination of Mx1 cDNAs demonstrated that the Asn631 variants in the two chicken lines differed at several amino acid positions outside 631. In vitro experiments with a different influenza strain (low pathogenicity) failed to demonstrate an effect of Mx1 Asn631 on viral replication suggesting that in vivo responses may differ markedly from in vitro, or that choice of virus strain may be critical in demonstrating effects of chicken Mx1. Overall, these studies provide the first evidence that Mx1 has antiviral effects in chickens infected with influenza virus.

  18. Antigenic characterization of avian influenza H9 subtype isolated from desi and zoo birds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farrukh Saleem

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Avian influenza is a viral infection which affects mainly the respiratory system of birds. The H9N2 considered as low pathogenic avian influenza (LPAI virus and continuously circulating in poultry flocks causing enormous economic losses to poultry industry of Pakistan. As these viruses have RNA genome and their RNA polymerase enzyme lacks proof reading activity which resulted in spontaneous mutation in surface glycoproteins (HA and NA and reassortment of their genomic segments results in escape from host immune response produced by the vaccine. Efforts made for the isolation and identification of avian influenza virus from live desi and zoo birds of Lahore and performed antigenic characterization. The local vaccines although gives a little bit less titer when we raise the antisera against these vaccines but their antisera have more interaction with the local H9 subtype antigen so it gives better protective immune response. Infected chicken antisera are more reactive as compare to rabbit antisera. This shows that our isolates have highest similarity with the currently circulating viruses. These results guided us to devise a new control strategy against avian influenza viral infections. The antigenic characterization of these avian influenza isolates helped us to see the antigenic differences between the isolates of this study and H9 subtype avian influenza viruses used in vaccines. Therefore, this study clearly suggests that a new local H9 subtype avian influenza virus should be used as vaccinal candidate every year for the effective control of influenza viral infections of poultry.

  19. Effect of receptor binding domain mutations on receptor binding and transmissibility of avian influenza H5N1 viruses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maines, Taronna R; Chen, Li-Mei; Van Hoeven, Neal;

    2011-01-01

    Although H5N1 influenza viruses have been responsible for hundreds of human infections, these avian influenza viruses have not fully adapted to the human host. The lack of sustained transmission in humans may be due, in part, to their avian-like receptor preference. Here, we have introduced...

  20. Clostridium difficile colonization and antibiotics response in PolyFermS continuous model mimicking elderly intestinal fermentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie Fehlbaum

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Clostridium difficile (CD, a spore-forming and toxin-producing bacterium, is the main cause for antibiotic-associated diarrhea in the elderly. Here we investigated CD colonization in novel in vitro fermentation models inoculated with immobilized elderly fecal microbiota and the effects of antibiotic treatments. Methods Two continuous intestinal PolyFermS models inoculated with different immobilized elder microbiota were used to investigate selected factors of colonization of CD in proximal (PC, model 1 and transverse-distal (TDC, model 1 and 2 colon conditions. Colonization of two CD strains of different PCR ribotypes, inoculated as vegetative cells (ribotype 001, model 1 or spores (ribotypes 001 and 012, model 2, was tested. Treatments with two antibiotics, ceftriaxone (daily 150 mg L−1 known to induce CD infection in vivo or metronidazole (twice daily 333 mg L−1 commonly used to treat CD, were investigated in TDC conditions (model 2 for their effects on gut microbiota composition (qPCR, 16S pyrosequencing and activity (HPLC, CD spore germination and colonization, and cytotoxin titer (Vero cell assay. Results CD remained undetected after inoculating vegetative cells in PC reactors of model 1, but was shown to colonize TDC reactors of both models, reaching copy numbers of up to log10 8 mL−1 effluent with stable production of toxin correlating with CD cell numbers. Ceftriaxone treatment in TDC reactors showed only small effects on microbiota composition and activity and did not promote CD colonization compared to antibiotic-free control reactor. In contrast, treatment with metronidazole after colonization of CD induced large modifications in the microbiota and decreased CD numbers below the detection limit of the specific qPCR. However, a fast CD recurrence was measured only 2 days after cessation of metronidazole treatment. Conclusions Using our in vitro fermentation models, we demonstrated that stable CD

  1. Bifidobacteria inhibit the inflammatory response induced by gliadins in intestinal epithelial cells via modifications of toxic peptide generation during digestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laparra, J M; Sanz, Y

    2010-03-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is a chronic enteropathy triggered by intake of gliadin, the toxic component of gluten. This study aims at evaluating the capacity of different Bifidobacterium strains to counteract the inflammatory effects of gliadin-derived peptides in intestinal epithelial (Caco-2) cells. A commercial extract of several gliadin (Gld) types (alpha, beta, gamma, [symbol: see text] ) was subjected to in vitro gastrointestinal digestion (pepsin at pH 3, pancreatin-bile at pH 6), inoculated or not with cell suspensions (10(8) colony forming units/ml) of either B. animalis IATA-A2, B. longum IATA-ES1, or B. bifidum IATA-ES2, in a bicameral system. The generated gliadin-derived peptides were identified by reverse phase-HPLC-ESI-MS/MS. Caco-2 cell cultures were exposed to the different gliadin peptide digestions (0.25 mg protein/ml), and the mRNA expression of nuclear factor kappa-B (NF-kappaB), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), and chemokine CXCR3 receptor were analyzed by semi-quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) in stimulated cells. The production of the pro-inflammatory markers NF-kappaB p50, TNF-alpha, and IL-1beta (interleukine 1beta) by Caco-2 cells was also determined by ELISA. The peptides from gliadin digestions inoculated with bifidobacteria did not exhibit the toxic amino acid sequences identified in those noninoculated (alpha/beta-Gld [158-164] and alpha/beta-Gld [122-141]). The RT-PCR analysis evidenced a down-regulation in mRNA expression of pro-inflammatory biomarkers. Consistent with these results the production of NF-kappaB, TNF-alpha, and IL-1beta was reduced (18.2-22.4%, 28.0-64.8%, and abolished, respectively) in cell cultures exposed to gliadin digestions inoculated with bifidobacteria. Therefore, bifidobacteria change the gliadin-derived peptide pattern and, thereby, attenuate their pro-inflammatory effects on Caco-2 cells.

  2. The effect of dietary fructooligosaccharide supplementation on growth performance, intestinal morphology, and immune responses in broiler chickens challenged with Salmonella Enteritidis lipopolysaccharides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Yue; Regassa, Alemu; Kim, Ji Hyuk; Kim, Woo Kyun

    2015-12-01

    This study was conducted to examine the effects of fructooligosaccharide (FOS) supplementation on growth performance, lymphoid organ weight, intestinal morphology, and immunological status in broilers (n=180) challenged with Salmonella Enteritidis lipopolysaccharides (LPS). Birds were randomly assigned into a 3×2 factorial arrangement that included 1) 3 dietary treatments from d one to 21: positive control (PC), wheat-corn-soybean meal based diet contained antibiotics (virginiamycin and monensin); negative control (NC), as PC without antibiotics; and NC+FOS, as NC supplemented with 0.5% FOS, and 2) 2 intraperitoneal injections: 2 mg/kg Salmonella Enteritidis LPS or sterile phosphate buffered saline (PBS) on d 21. Growth performance and relative lymphoid organ weight were not significantly different among the treatments. Villus height, crypt depth, and total mucosa thickness were significantly increased (PSalmonella Enteritidis LPS challenge established significant differences in the immune responses in broiler chickens. FOS supplementation increased ileal mucosa thickness and elevated the expressions of certain cytokine genes. It also led to the alteration of leukocyte compositions and serum IgY levels in response to LPS challenge, suggesting FOS supplementation may be effective to induce protective outcomes in gut health and immunity of broiler chickens.

  3. Avian reproductive physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gee, G.F.; Gibbons, Edward F.; Durrant, Barbara S.; Demarest, Jack

    1995-01-01

    Knowledge of the many physiological factors associated with egg production , fertility, incubation, and brooding in nondomestic birds is limited. Science knows even less about reproduction in most of the 238 endangered or threatened birds. This discussion uses studies of nondomestic and, when necessary, domestic birds to describe physiological control of reproduction. Studies of the few nondomestic avian species show large variation in physiological control of reproduction. Aviculturists, in order to successfully propagate an endangered bird, must understand the bird's reproductive peculiarities. First, investigators can do studies with carefully chosen surrogate species, but eventually they need to confirm the results in the target endangered bird. Studies of reproduction in nondomestic birds increased in the last decade. Still, scientists need to do more comparative studies to understand the mechanisms that control reproduction in birds. New technologies are making it possible to study reproductive physiology of nondomestic species in less limiting ways. These technologies include telemetry to collect information without inducing stress on captives (Howey et al., 1987; Klugman, 1987), new tests for most of the humoral factors associated with reproduction, and the skill to collect small samples and manipulate birds without disrupting the physiological mechanisms (Bercovitz et al., 1985). Managers are using knowledge from these studies to improve propagation in zoological parks, private and public propagation facilities, and research institutions. Researchers need to study the control of ovulation, egg formation, and oviposition in the species of nondomestic birds that lay very few eggs in a season, hold eggs in the oviduct for longer intervals, or differ in other ways from the more thoroughly studied domestic birds. Other techniques that would enhance propagation for nondomestlc birds include tissue culture of cloned embryonic cells, cryopreservation of embryos

  4. Response of Ehrlich carcinoma and the small intestine of mouse to combined treatment with chlorpromazine and X-rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rao, K.R. (Zurich Univ. (Switzerland). Strahlenbiologisches Inst.)

    1991-05-01

    The effect of combined treatment with chlorpromazine (20 mg/kg body weight) and X-rays at different dose levels was tested on the growth of Ehrlich carcinoma tumor in solid or ascites form in mice. The radiation response of murine gut was also examined separately but under similar experimental conditions. The results obtained indicate that chlorpromazine did not influence the radiation response of all the test systems used in this study. The relevant literature, reviewed in short, shows that the interaction between chlorpromazine and X-rays can result in enhanced radiation response, non-interference or increased radiation tolerance. Therefore any combined effect of chlorpromazine and X-ray observed cannot be generalised. (orig.).

  5. Roles of the cytoskeleton and of Protein Phosphorylation Events in the Osmotic Stress Response in EEL Intestinal Epithelium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lionetto, Maria G; Pedersen, Stine F; Hoffmann, Else K;

    2002-01-01

    phase is bumetanide-insensitive, the second, sustained phase is bumetanide-sensitive, reflecting activation of the apically located Na(+)-K(+)-2Cl(-) (NKCC) cotransporter, which correlates with the cellular RVI response. Here, we investigated the involvement of the cytoskeleton and of serine...... 15%, detectable morphologically mainly as a decrease in the intensity of the apical brush border F-actin labeling.The bumetanide-sensitive response of V(te) and Isc to hypertonicity was potently inhibited by treatment with either cytochalasin, latrunculin A, colchicine, the protein kinase C (PKC...

  6. Successive immunoglobulin and cytokine expression in the small intestine of juvenile chicken

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lammers, A.; Wieland, W.H.; Kruijt, L.; Jansma, A.; Straetemans, T.; Schots, A.; Hartog, den C.G.; Parmentier, H.K.

    2010-01-01

    The intestinal mucosa is of major importance for immune development. To further study the ontogeny of avian mucosal immunity, mRNA levels of IgM, IgY and IgA, the polymeric immunoglobulin receptor (pIgR) and a number of cytokines were determined at different ages in jejunum and ileum of non-immunize

  7. Molecular characterization of Indonesia avian influenza virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.L.P.I. Dharmayanti

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Avian influenza outbreaks in poultry have been reported in Java island since August 2003. A total of 14 isolates of avian influenza virus has been isolated from October 2003 to October 2004. The viruses have been identified as HPAI H5N1 subtype. All of them were characterized further at genetic level and also for their pathogenicity. Phylogenetic analysis showed all of the avian influenza virus isolates were closely related to avian influenza virus from China (A/Duck/China/E319-2/03(H5N1. Molecular basis of pathogenicity in HA cleavage site indicated that the isolates of avian influenza virus have multiple basic amino acid (B-X-B-R indicating that all of the isolates representing virulent avian influenza virus (highly pathogenic avian influenza virus.

  8. Performance, serum biochemical responses, and gene expression of intestinal folate transporters of young and older laying hens in response to dietary folic acid supplementation and challenge with Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, M; Munyaka, P M; Tactacan, G B; Rodriguez-Lecompte, J C; O, K; House, J D

    2014-01-01

    The present study was conducted to investigate the effects of dietary folic acid (FA) supplementation on performance, serum biochemical indices, and mRNA abundance of intestinal folate transporters in young and older laying hens after acute lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge. Two experiments were conducted separately involving 48 Shaver White young laying hens (24 wk of age) in experiment 1 and 48 Shaver White older laying hens (58 wk of age) in experiment 2. Birds were fed 2 diets in a complete randomized design. The diets were wheat-soybean meal based, with or without supplemental 4 mg of FA/kg of diet. Birds were fed for 8 wk, during which time feed consumption and egg production were monitored. At the end of each feeding experiment, 6 hens from each dietary treatment were injected intravenously with 8 mg/kg of BW of either Escherichia coli LPS or sterile saline. Four hours after injection, blood and intestinal samples were collected for further analysis. Compared with the control, dietary FA supplementation increased egg weight and egg mass and decreased serum glucose levels in the young laying hens, and reduced serum uric acid in the older laying hens (P supplementation and its interaction with LPS challenge on biochemical constituents, and age played a role in the development of responses to diet and bacterial LPS infections.

  9. Genetic response and morphologic characterization of chicken bone-marrow derived dendritic cells during infection with high and low pathogenic avian influenza viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dendritic cells (DC) are professional antigen-presenting cells of the immune system that function to initiate primary immune responses. Progenitors of DCs are derived from haematopoietic stem cells in the bone marrow (BM) that migrate in non-lymphoid tissues to develop into immature DCs. Here, they ...

  10. Dietary modulation of avian coccidiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, P C; Danforth, H D; Augustine, P C

    1998-07-01

    During the past several years, our laboratory has been investigating the anticoccidial activities of various natural products that have potential use as dietary supplements for coccidiosis control. Sources of fats containing high concentrations of n-3 fatty acids such as menhaden oil and flaxseed oil and flaxseed, when added to starter rations and fed to chicks from one day of age, effectively reduce lesions caused by the caecal parasite Eimeria tenella, but not lesions caused by Eimeria maxima. Our results are consistent with reports of effects of diets high in n-3 fatty acids on other protozoan parasites which suggest that the state of oxidative stress induced by these diets in the cells of both host and parasites is responsible for their parasitic actions. Artemisinin, a naturally occurring (Artemisia annua) endoperoxide and effective antimalarial significantly lowers lesions from E. tenella when given at low levels as a feed additive. The mechanism of its action is also considered to involve induction of oxidative stress. Diets supplemented with 8 p.p.m. gamma-tocopherol (abundant in flaxseeds) or with 1% of the spice tumeric, reduce mid-small intestinal lesion scores and improve weight gains during E. maxima infections. These compounds may exert their anticoccidial activity because they are effective antioxidants. Betaine, a choline analogue found in high concentrations in sugar beets, improves nutrient utilisation by animals under stress. When provided as a dietary supplement at a level of 0.15% it has enhanced the anticoccidial activity of the ionophore, salinomycin. Betaine may act as an osmoprotectant whereby it improves the integrity and function of the infected intestinal mucosa. In in vivo studies, betaine plus salinomycin significantly inhibit invasion of both E. tenella and E. acervulina. However, subsequent development of E. acervulina is inhibited more effectively with this combination treatment than development of E. tenella.

  11. Dietary sodium selenite on host intestinal and systemic immune response and disease susceptibility to necrotic enteritis in commercial broilers

    Science.gov (United States)

    1. The present study was conducted to evaluate the supplementary effects of dietary Selenium (Se) given as sodium selenite on host immune response against necrotic enteritis (NE) in commercial broiler chickens. 2. Chickens were fed from hatch with a non-supplemented diet or diets supplemented with ...

  12. Interference of the humoral immune response against resident and non-resident intestinal commensal strains in weaning pigs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Casini, L.; Konstantinov, S.R.; Coloretti, F.; Filippi, de S.; Mazzoni, M.; Trevisi, P.; Bosi, P.

    2007-01-01

    Not nocuous bacteria are important for the maturation and the modulating activity of the gut immune system. However, the humoral immune response against commensal and probiotic bacteria is less documented, particularly in farmhouse animals. Blood serum and saliva were collected in two trials where p

  13. Rapid cooling after acute hyperthermia alters intestinal tissue morphology and increases the systemic inflammatory response in pigs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acute hyperthermia can result in mortality if recovery is not appropriately managed. The study objective was to determine the effects of heatstroke recovery methods on the physiological response in pigs. In four repetitions, 36 male pigs (88.7 ± 1.6 kg BW) were exposed to thermoneutral conditions (T...

  14. A triclade DNA vaccine designed on the basis of a comprehensive serologic study elicits neutralizing antibody responses against all clades and subclades of highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N1 viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Fan; Wang, Guiqin; Buchy, Philippe; Cai, Zhipeng; Chen, Honglin; Chen, Zhiwei; Cheng, Genhong; Wan, Xiu-Feng; Deubel, Vincent; Zhou, Paul

    2012-06-01

    Because of their rapid evolution, genetic diversity, broad host range, ongoing circulation in birds, and potential human-to-human transmission, H5N1 influenza viruses remain a major global health concern. Their high degree of genetic diversity also poses enormous burdens and uncertainties in developing effective vaccines. To overcome this, we took a new approach, i.e., the development of immunogens based on a comprehensive serologic study. We constructed DNA plasmids encoding codon-optimized hemagglutinin (HA) from 17 representative strains covering all reported clades and subclades of highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N1 viruses. Using DNA plasmids, we generated the corresponding H5N1 pseudotypes and immune sera. We performed an across-the-board pseudotype-based neutralization assay and determined antigenic clusters by cartography. We then designed a triclade DNA vaccine and evaluated its immunogenicity and protection in mice. We report here that (sub)clades 0, 1, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7.1, and 9 were grouped into antigenic cluster 1, (sub)clades 2.1.3.2, 2.3.4, 2.4, 2.5, and 8 were grouped into another antigenic cluster, with subclade 2.2.1 loosely connected to it, and each of subclades 2.3.2.1 and 7.2 was by itself. Importantly, the triclade DNA vaccine encoding HAs of (sub)clades 0, 2.3.2.1, and 7.2 elicited broadly neutralizing antibody responses against all H5 clades and subclades and protected mice against high-lethal-dose heterologous H5N1 challenge. Thus, we conclude that broadly neutralizing antibodies against all H5 clades and subclades can indeed be elicited with immunogens on the basis of a comprehensive serologic study. Further evaluation and optimization of such an approach in ferrets and in humans is warranted.

  15. Non structural protein of avian influenza A (H11N1 virus is a weaker suppressor of immune responses but capable of inducing apoptosis in host cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukherjee Sanjay

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Non-Structural (NS1 protein of Influenza A viruses is an extensively studied multifunctional protein which is commonly considered as key viral component to fight against host immune responses. Even though there has been a lot of studies on the involvement of NS1 protein in host immune responses there are still ambiguities regarding its role in apoptosis in infected cells. Interactions of NS1 protein with host factors, role of NS1 protein in regulating cellular responses and apoptosis are quite complicated and further studies are still needed to understand it completely. Results NS1 genes of influenza A/Chicken/India/WBNIV2653/2008 (H5N1 and A/Aquatic bird/India/NIV-17095/2007(H11N1 were cloned and expressed in human embryonic kidney (293T cells. Microarray based approach to study the host cellular responses to NS1 protein of the two influenza A viruses of different pathogenicity showed significant differences in the host gene expression profile. NS1 protein of H5N1 resulted in suppression of IFN-β mediated innate immune responses, leading to down-regulation of the components of JAK-STAT pathway like STAT1 which further suppressed the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines like CXCL10 and CCL5. The degree of suppression of host immune genes was found considerable with NS1 protein of H11N1 but was not as prominent as with H5N1-NS1. TUNEL assay analyses were found to be positive in both the NS1 transfected cells indicating both H5N1 as well as H11N1 NS1 proteins were able to induce apoptosis in transfected cells. Conclusions We propose that NS1 protein of both H5N1 and H11N1 subtypes of influenza viruses are capable of influencing host immune responses and possess necessary functionality to support apoptosis in host cells. H11N1, a low pathogenic virus without any proven evidence to infect mammals, contains a highly potential NS1 gene which might contribute to greater virus virulence in different gene combinations.

  16. Collapsing avian community on a Hawaiian island

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paxton, Eben; Camp, Richard J.; Gorresen, P. Marcos; Crampton, Lisa H.; Leonard, David L.; VanderWerf, Eric

    2016-01-01

    The viability of many species has been jeopardized by numerous negative factors over the centuries, but climate change is predicted to accelerate and increase the pressure of many of these threats, leading to extinctions. The Hawaiian honeycreepers, famous for their spectacular adaptive radiation, are predicted to experience negative responses to climate change, given their susceptibility to introduced disease, the strong linkage of disease distribution to climatic conditions, and their current distribution. We document the rapid collapse of the native avifauna on the island of Kaua‘i that corresponds to changes in climate and disease prevalence. Although multiple factors may be pressuring the community, we suggest that a tipping point has been crossed in which temperatures in forest habitats at high elevations have reached a threshold that facilitates the development of avian malaria and its vector throughout these species’ ranges. Continued incursion of invasive weeds and non-native avian competitors may be facilitated by climate change and could also contribute to declines. If current rates of decline continue, we predict multiple extinctions in the coming decades. Kaua‘i represents an early warning for the forest bird communities on the Maui and Hawai‘i islands, as well as other species around the world that are trapped within a climatic space that is rapidly disappearing.

  17. Exhaustive exercise increases the TNF-α production in response to flagellin via the upregulation of toll-like receptor 5 in the large intestine in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, Masataka; Oyanagi, Eri; Kawanishi, Noriaki; Iemitsu, Motoyuki; Miyachi, Motohiko; Kremenik, Michael J; Onodera, Sho; Yano, Hiromi

    2014-01-01

    Although intense exercise may induce temporary immune depression, it is unclear whether exercise stimulates tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) production in response to flagella protein flagellin (FG), which binds to toll-like receptor 5 (TLR5) and induces the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Male C3H/HeN mice were administered FG (1mg/kg, i.v.) after exhaustive exercise (EX), and the plasma TNF-α concentrations were examined. The production of TNF-α and the TLR5 expression in both RAW264 and Caco2 cells were measured under FG conditions in vitro. Although the plasma TNF-α concentrations were observed to significantly increase in both the EX and non-EX (N-EX) mice (pTNF-α levels in the EX mice were significantly higher than those observed in the N-EX mice (pTNF-α production and TLR5 expression on the Caco2, but not RAW264 cells. Interestingly, a high Ep-induced TLR5 expression was observed on the Caco2 cell surface, which was inhibited by an inhibitor of phosphoinositide3-kinase (PI3K), Ly294002, as well as a β-adrenergic blocker, propranolol. In addition, the EX-induced TNF-α production observed in response to FG was also attenuated by pretreatment with propranolol. Our findings suggest that exhaustive exercise upregulates the production of TNF-α in response to FG via a high expression of TLR5 on the intestinal cell surface following the stimulation of β-adrenergic receptors with exercise.

  18. Experimental investigation of avian malaria parasites (Plasmodium, Haemosporida): linkage of traditional and molecular data

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Avian malaria parasites are responsible for severe diseases in some domestic and wild birds. These parasites are cosmopolitan in distribution; they are widespread in Europe, including the Baltic region. A peculiarity of current studies of avian Plasmodium species is that information about ecology, distribution, prevalence and other aspects of their biology has been accumulated using free-living birds. To elucidate the significance of malaria infections and their impact on host fitness, behavi...

  19. Avian brood parasitism——a growing research area in behavioral ecology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Eivin; RSKAFT; Wei; LIANG; Brd; G.STOKKE

    2012-01-01

    正We are pleased to be responsible guest editors for the two special issues of Chinese Birds(Vol.3,No.4,2012 and Vol.4,No.1,2013),entitled "Avian Brood Parasitism — a Growing Research Area in Behavioral Ecology".The goal of the two special issues is to publish accumulated knowledge and some of the recent developments in the fascinating research occurring in avian

  20. Thromboelastography in Selected Avian Species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Sophie Susanna Strindberg; Nielsen, Tenna W; Ribeiro, Ângela M

    2015-01-01

    . Regardless of the mode of activation, clot formation in the species studied was markedly delayed compared with mammals. Because of prolonged reaction time (14.7-52.7 minutes) with kaolin and diluted tissue factor, undiluted human tissue factor was used in all avian samples because it provided the shortest...

  1. Control strategies against avian influenza

    Science.gov (United States)

    Since 1959, 40 epizootics of high pathogenicity avian influenza (HPAI) have occurred (Figure 1). Thirty-five of these epizootic HPAI viruses were geographically-limited (mostly to single countries), involved farm-to-farm spread and were eradicated from poultry by stamping-out programs; i.e. the HPAI...

  2. Evolution of Avian Tumor Viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virus-induced neoplastic diseases of poultry, namely Marek’s disease (MD), induced by a herpesvirus, and the avian leukosis and reticuloendotheliosis induced by retroviruses, can cause significant economic losses from tumor mortality as well as poor performance. Successful control of MD is and has ...

  3. Avian Paramyxovirus: A Brief Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gogoi, P; Ganar, K; Kumar, S

    2017-02-01

    Avian paramyxoviruses (APMVs) have been reported from a wide variety of avian species around the world. Avian paramyxoviruses are economically significant because of the huge mortality and morbidity associated with it. Twelve different serotypes of APMV have been reported till date. Avian paramyxoviruses belong to the family Paramyxoviridae under genus Avulavirus. Newcastle disease virus (APMV-1) is the most characterized members among the APMV serotypes. Complete genome sequence of all twelve APMV serotypes has been published recently. In recent years, APMV-1 has attracted the virologists for its oncolytic activity and its use as a vaccine vector for both animals and humans. The recombinant APMV-based vaccine offers a pertinent choice for the construction of live attenuated vaccine due to its minimum recombination frequency, modular nature of transcription and lack of DNA phase during its replication. Although insufficient data are available regarding other APMV serotypes, our understanding about the APMV biology is expanding rapidly because of the availability of modern molecular biology tools and high-throughput complete genome sequencing.

  4. Quantitative proteomics and bioinformatic analysis provide new insight into the dynamic response of porcine intestine to Salmonella Typhimurium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melania eCollado-Romero

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The enteropathogen Salmonella Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium is the most commonly nontyphoideal serotype isolated in pig worldwide. Currently, one of the main sources of human infection is by consumption of pork meat. Therefore, prevention and control of salmonellosis in pigs is crucial for minimizing risks to public health. The aim of the present study was to use isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ to explore differences in the response to Salmonella in two segment of the porcine gut (ileum and colon along a time course of 1, 2 and 6 days post infection (dpi with S. Typhimurium. A total of 298 proteins were identified in the infected ileum samples of which, 112 displayed significant expression differences due to Salmonella infection. In colon, 184 proteins were detected in the infected samples of which 46 resulted differentially expressed with respect to the controls. The higher number of changes in protein expression was quantified in ileum at 2 dpi. Further biological interpretation of proteomics data using bioinformatics tools demonstrated that the expression changes in colon were found in proteins involved in cell death and survival, tissue morphology or molecular transport at the early stages and tissue regeneration at 6 dpi. In ileum, however, changes in protein expression were mainly related to immunological and infection diseases, inflammatory response or connective tissue disorders at 1 and 2 dpi. iTRAQ has proved to be a proteomic robust approach allowing us to identify ileum as the earliest response focus upon S. Typhimurium in the porcine gut. In addition, new functions involved in the response to bacteria such as eIF2 signalling, free radical scavengers or antimicrobial peptides expression have been identified. Finally, the impairment at of the enterohepatic circulation of bile acids and lipid metabolism by means the under regulation of FABP6 protein and FXR/RXR and LXR/RXR signalling pathway in ileum has

  5. Escherichia coli strain Nissle 1917 ameliorates experimental colitis by modulating intestinal permeability, the inflammatory response and clinical signs in a faecal transplantation model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Éricka L; Elian, Samir D; Paula, Laís M; Garcia, Cristiana C; Vieira, Angélica T; Teixeira, Mauro M; Arantes, Rosa M; Nicoli, Jacques R; Martins, Flaviano S

    2016-03-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs) are a group of inflammatory conditions of the gut that include ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease. Probiotics are live micro-organisms that may be used as adjuvant therapy for patients with IBD. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of prophylactic ingestion of Escherichia coli strain Nissle 1917 (EcN) in a murine model of colitis. For induction of colitis, mice were given a 3.5% dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) solution for 7 days in drinking water. EcN administration to mice subjected to DSS-induced colitis resulted in significant reduction in clinical and histopathological signs of disease and preservation of intestinal permeability. We observed reduced inflammation, as assessed by reduced levels of neutrophils, eosinophils, chemokines and cytokines. We observed an increase in the number of regulatory T-cells in Peyer's patches. Germ-free mice received faecal content from control or EcN-treated mice and were then subjected to DSS-induced colitis. We observed protection from colitis in animals that were colonized with faecal content from EcN-treated mice. These results suggest that preventative oral administration of EcN or faecal microbiota transplantation with EcN-containing microbiota ameliorates DSS-induced colitis by modifying inflammatory responsiveness to DSS.

  6. Assessment of yeast cell wall as replacements for antibiotic growth promoters in broiler diets: effects on performance, intestinal histo-morphology and humoral immune responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, T K; Haldar, S; Bedford, M R; Muthusami, N; Samanta, I

    2012-04-01

    The study compared the effects of an antibiotic growth promoter (AGP), yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) and yeast cell wall (YCW) on performance, microbiology and histo-morphology of the small intestine and humoral immune responses in Ross 308 broilers. The treatments (eight replicates/treatment, n = 12/replicate) were negative control (NC, without AGP), positive control (PC, supplemented with bacitracin methylene disalicylate, 400 mg/kg), Y and YCW (supplemented with yeast and YCW, respectively, 1000 mg/kg). Live weight at 42 days improved (p = 0.086) in the PC, Y and YCW groups. Feed conversion ratio was better (p = 0.039) in the YCW group compared with the other groups. Antibiotic growth promoter in the PC group shortened the villi in duodenum (p = 0.044). Mucosal Escherichia coli number was higher in the PC group (p Yeast cell wall -treated birds exhibited better (p yeast and the yeast cell wall may have effects identical to BMD on performance of broilers and thus may constitute an effective replacement strategy in the dietary regimens for broiler chickens.

  7. Effect of intestinal autochthonous probiotics isolated from the gut of sea cucumber (Apostichopus japonicus) on immune response and growth of A. japonicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Cheng; Liu, Jia-Yan; Fei, Shi-Zhou; Zhang, Chao; Chang, Ya-Qing; Liu, Xiao-Lin; Wang, Gao-Xue

    2014-06-01

    The study isolated 224 bacteria from the intestine of Apostichopus japonicus, then selected and identified three of the bacteria (HS1, HS7, and HS10) which demonstrated amylase, lipase, and protease production capacity as candidate probiotics for sea cucumbers. The three potential probiotics showed no pathogenicity both in hemolytic assays on sheep blood agar plates and after immersing sea cucumbers in a suspension of the bacteria. To reveal the effects of these three potential probiotics on the innate immunity of sea cucumbers, total coelomocyte counts, respiratory burst activity, superoxide dismutase activity, lysozyme activity, acid phosphatase activity, and phagocytic activity by coelomocytes were examined after feeding with four different diets for up to 28 days. Also the specific growth rate and survival rate were investigated after a 60-day feeding trial. Sea cucumbers were fed with 4 diets: one control, three diets supplemented with 1 × 10(9) cell g(-1) of HS1, HS7, and HS10 for 28-60 days. Results showed that sea cucumbers fed diets containing HS1, HS7, and HS10 had led to an enhanced cellular and humoral immune response, notably higher total coelomocytes counts, respiratory burst activity, lysozyme activity, acid phosphatase activity, and phagocytic activity, as recorded during the four weeks of probiotics administration. On the other hand, the survival rate among dietary treatments ranged from 90.71 to 97.97% with significant improvement (P probiotics in A. japonicus.

  8. Avian influenza: the political economy of disease control in Cambodia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ear, Sophal

    2011-01-01

    Abstract In the wake of avian flu outbreaks in 2004, Cambodia received $45 million in commitments from international donors to help combat the spread of animal and human influenza, particularly avian influenza (H5N1). How countries leverage foreign aid to address the specific needs of donors and the endemic needs of the nation is a complex and nuanced issue throughout the developing world. Cambodia is a particularly compelling study in pandemic preparedness and the management of avian influenza because of its multilayered network of competing local, national, and global needs, and because the level of aid in Cambodia represents approximately $2.65 million per human case-a disproportionately high number when compared with neighbors Vietnam and Indonesia. This paper examines how the Cambodian government has made use of animal and human influenza funds to protect (or fail to protect) its citizens and the global community. It asks how effective donor and government responses were to combating avian influenza in Cambodia, and what improvements could be made at the local and international level to help prepare for and respond to future outbreaks. Based on original interviews, a field survey of policy stakeholders, and detailed examination of Cambodia's health infrastructure and policies, the findings illustrate that while pandemic preparedness has shown improvements since 2004, new outbreaks and human fatalities accelerated in 2011, and more work needs to be done to align the specific goals of funders with the endemic needs of developing nations.

  9. Cell-Based Systems Biology Analysis of Human AS03-Adjuvanted H5N1 Avian Influenza Vaccine Responses: A Phase I Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samir, Parimal; Galassie, Allison; Allos, Tara M.; Niu, Xinnan; Gordy, Laura E.; Creech, C. Buddy; Prasad, Nripesh; Jensen, Travis L.; Hill, Heather; Levy, Shawn E.; Joyce, Sebastian; Link, Andrew J.; Edwards, Kathryn M.

    2017-01-01

    Background Vaccine development for influenza A/H5N1 is an important public health priority, but H5N1 vaccines are less immunogenic than seasonal influenza vaccines. Adjuvant System 03 (AS03) markedly enhances immune responses to H5N1 vaccine antigens, but the underlying molecular mechanisms are incompletely understood. Objective and Methods We compared the safety (primary endpoint), immunogenicity (secondary), gene expression (tertiary) and cytokine responses (exploratory) between AS03-adjuvanted and unadjuvanted inactivated split-virus H5N1 influenza vaccines. In a double-blinded clinical trial, we randomized twenty adults aged 18–49 to receive two doses of either AS03-adjuvanted (n = 10) or unadjuvanted (n = 10) H5N1 vaccine 28 days apart. We used a systems biology approach to characterize and correlate changes in serum cytokines, antibody titers, and gene expression levels in six immune cell types at 1, 3, 7, and 28 days after the first vaccination. Results Both vaccines were well-tolerated. Nine of 10 subjects in the adjuvanted group and 0/10 in the unadjuvanted group exhibited seroprotection (hemagglutination inhibition antibody titer > 1:40) at day 56. Within 24 hours of AS03-adjuvanted vaccination, increased serum levels of IL-6 and IP-10 were noted. Interferon signaling and antigen processing and presentation-related gene responses were induced in dendritic cells, monocytes, and neutrophils. Upregulation of MHC class II antigen presentation-related genes was seen in neutrophils. Three days after AS03-adjuvanted vaccine, upregulation of genes involved in cell cycle and division was detected in NK cells and correlated with serum levels of IP-10. Early upregulation of interferon signaling-related genes was also found to predict seroprotection 56 days after first vaccination. Conclusions Using this cell-based systems approach, novel mechanisms of action for AS03-adjuvanted pandemic influenza vaccination were observed. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT

  10. Transcriptomic immune response of the cotton stainer Dysdercus fasciatus to experimental elimination of vitamin-supplementing intestinal symbionts.

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    Eugen Bauer

    Full Text Available The acquisition and vertical transmission of bacterial symbionts plays an important role in insect evolution and ecology. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the stable maintenance and control of mutualistic bacteria remain poorly understood. The cotton stainer Dysdercus fasciatus harbours the actinobacterial symbionts Coriobacterium glomerans and Gordonibacter sp. in its midgut. The symbionts supplement limiting B vitamins and thereby significantly contribute to the host's fitness. In this study, we experimentally disrupted the symbionts' vertical transmission route and performed comparative transcriptomic analyses of genes expressed in the gut of aposymbiotic (symbiont-free and control individuals to study the host immune response in presence and absence of the mutualists. Annotation of assembled cDNA reads identified a considerable number of genes involved in the innate immune system, including different protein isoforms of several immune effector proteins (specifically i-type lysozyme, defensin, hemiptericin, and pyrrhocoricin, suggesting the possibility for a highly differentiated response towards the complex resident microbial community. Gene expression analyses revealed a constitutive expression of transcripts involved in signal transduction of the main insect immune pathways, but differential expression of certain antimicrobial peptide genes. Specifically, qPCRs confirmed the significant down-regulation of c-type lysozyme and up-regulation of hemiptericin in aposymbiotic individuals. The high expression of c-type lysozyme in symbiont-containing bugs may serve to lyse symbiont cells and thereby harvest B-vitamins that are necessary for subsistence on the deficient diet of Malvales seeds. Our findings suggest a sophisticated host response to perturbation of the symbiotic gut microbiota, indicating that the innate immune system not only plays an important role in combating pathogens, but also serves as a communication interface

  11. Malacoplaquia intestinal

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    Jacinto José Frem Aun

    Full Text Available Malacoplakia is a chronic granulomatous disease of unknown origin. However immunodeficiency states (immunossuppressive medication, old people, renal transplantation, leukaemia, diabetes mellitus, malnutrition and others have been associated with patients with malacoplakia. An infectious cause of malakoplakia is suggested by the finding of coliform bacteria in the phagolysosomes of macrophages. The histologic study is characterized by a infiltrate of large macrophages (Hansenmann cells with pathognomonic inclusions containing siderocalcific structures (Michaelis-Gutmann bodies. Most of the cases reported in literature, involve the genitourinary tract, but other structures can be affected (brain, bone, adrenal glands, lymph nodes, intestine, and others. A 66-year-old man whith a abdominal mass, went to our hospital with a colonic tumour diagnosis. The patient was submitted to a surgery, with resection of the rigth colon. The disease was invading a portion of the retroperitoneal tissue that was removed. The histopatologic study showed the pathognomonic sign of malakoplakia (Hansenmann cells and Michaelis-Gutmann bodies. Norfloxacin have been used to the complementar treatment with total cure of the patient.

  12. Intestinal Microbiota-Derived GABA Mediates Interleukin-17 Expression during Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Wenkai; Yin, Jie; Xiao, Hao; Chen, Shuai; Liu, Gang; Tan, Bie; Li, Nengzhang; Peng, Yuanyi; Li, Tiejun; Zeng, Benhua; Li, Wenxia; Wei, Hong; Yin, Zhinan; Wu, Guoyao; Hardwidge, Philip R.; Yin, Yulong

    2017-01-01

    Intestinal microbiota has critical importance in pathogenesis of intestinal infection; however, the role of intestinal microbiota in intestinal immunity during enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) infection is poorly understood. The present study tested the hypothesis that the intestinal microbiota is associated with intestinal interleukin-17 (IL-17) expression in response to ETEC infection. Here, we found ETEC infection induced expression of intestinal IL-17 and dysbiosis of intestinal microbiota, increasing abundance of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-producing Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis. Antibiotics treatment in mice lowered the expression of intestinal IL-17 during ETEC infection, while GABA or L. lactis subsp. lactis administration restored the expression of intestinal IL-17. L. lactis subsp. lactis administration also promoted expression of intestinal IL-17 in germ-free mice during ETEC infection. GABA enhanced intestinal IL-17 expression in the context of ETEC infection through activating mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1)-ribosomal protein S6 kinase 1 (S6K1) signaling. GABA–mTORC1 signaling also affected intestinal IL-17 expression in response to Citrobacter rodentium infection and in drug-induced model of intestinal inflammation. These findings highlight the importance of intestinal GABA signaling in intestinal IL-17 expression during intestinal infection and indicate the potential of intestinal microbiota-GABA signaling in IL-17-associated intestinal diseases. PMID:28138329

  13. Antibody response to the lipopolysaccharide and protein antigens of Salmonella typhi during typhoid infection. II. Measurement of intestinal antibodies by radioimmunoassay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chau, P.Y.; Tsang, R.S.W.; Lam, S.K. (Hong Kong Univ.); La Brooy, J.T.; Rowley, D. (Adelaide Univ. (Australia))

    1981-12-01

    Antibodies to the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and protein antigens of S. typhi in secretions of small intestine obtained from 12 typhoid patients, four typhoid carriers and 16 non-typhoid control subjects were measured by a solid-phase radioimmunoassay technique using /sup 125/I labelled anti-immunoglobulin antibody. Intestinal secretions obtained from typhoid patients as a group had significantly higher anti-LPS and anti-protein antibodies than those from the control group. These antibodies were both IgM and IgA classes. There was no correlation between the IgM or IgA antibody levels in serum and those in the intestinal secretions. In the intestinal secretions obtained from typhoid carriers, on the other hand, only IgA-class antibodies to the LPS and protein antigens of S. typhi were present at high levels.

  14. Respons Antibodi terhadap Penyakit Tetelo pada Ayam yang Divaksin Tetelo dan Tetelo-Flu Burung (NEWCASTLE DISEASE/ND ANTIBODY RESPONSE OF CHICKENS VACCINATED WITH ND SINGLE AND COMBINED ND AND AVIAN INFLUENZA VACCINES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gusti Ayu Yuniati Kencana

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate antibody response of specific pathogen-free (SPF chickens vaccinatedwith single inactivated Newcastle disease (ND vaccine and combined inactive ND and avian influenza(AI vaccines and to known the efficacy of both vaccines. The vaccines used were killed ND vaccine andkilled ND-AI vaccine produced by PT. Sanbio Laboratories Bogor, West Java. SPF chickens were vaccinatedwith 3 different doses. Antibody titer of SPF chickens against ND virus were determined byhaemagglutination inhibition (HI test. As many as 130 two week old SPF chickens were used and theywere divided into 2 groups (A and B consisting of 60 chickens and 10 chickens were used as control withoutvaccine. Group A chickens were vaccinated with ND-K vaccine and group B were vaccinated with combinedkilled ND-AI vaccines. Each group was further divided into 3 subsgroups (1, 2 and 3 consisting 20 chickens.Subgroups 1, 2 and 3 were vaccinated intramuscularly respectively with intramuskular 1, 1/10 and 1/100doses of each vaccines. Antibody response of chickens against ND virus was examined before vaccinationand every three week after vaccination and was expresses as geometric mean titre (GMT HI units. Theresult showed that the titre antibody against ND increased at the second week following the vaccination.The antibody titer against ND virus of chickens vaccinated single killed ND at the second week in eachdose were 6.05 GMT HI unit, 4.05 GMT HI unit, and 0.9 GMT HI unit. The antibody titre at the third week were 7.90 GMT HI unit ,5.40 GMT HI unit and 2.20 GMT HI unit. The antibody titre against ND virus ofchickens vaccinated with combined ND-AI vaccine at the second week were 6.30 GMT HI unit , 4.15 GMTHI unit , and 2.05 GMT HI unit. At the third week, the antibody titre against ND virus of chickensvaccinated with combined ND-AI vaccine in each subgroup were 7.45 GMT HI unit, 5.60 GMT HI unit , and2.40 GMT HI unit . It showed that the antibody titers

  15. Respons Antibodi terhadap Penyakit Tetelo pada Ayam yang Divaksin Tetelo dan Tetelo-Flu Burung (NEWCASTLE DISEASE/ND ANTIBODY RESPONSE OF CHICKENS VACCINATED WITH ND SINGLE AND COMBINED ND AND AVIAN INFLUENZA VACCINES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gusti Ayu Yuniati Kencana

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate antibody response of specific pathogen-free (SPF chickens vaccinatedwith single inactivated Newcastle disease (ND vaccine and combined inactive ND and avian influenza(AI vaccines and to known the efficacy of both vaccines. The vaccines used were killed ND vaccine andkilled ND-AI vaccine produced by PT. Sanbio Laboratories Bogor, West Java. SPF chickens were vaccinatedwith 3 different doses. Antibody titer of SPF chickens against ND virus were determined byhaemagglutination inhibition (HI test. As many as 130 two week old SPF chickens were used and theywere divided into 2 groups (A and B consisting of 60 chickens and 10 chickens were used as control withoutvaccine. Group A chickens were vaccinated with ND-K vaccine and group B were vaccinated with combinedkilled ND-AI vaccines. Each group was further divided into 3 subsgroups (1, 2 and 3 consisting 20 chickens.Subgroups 1, 2 and 3 were vaccinated intramuscularly respectively with intramuskular 1, 1/10 and 1/100doses of each vaccines. Antibody response of chickens against ND virus was examined before vaccinationand every three week after vaccination and was expresses as geometric mean titre (GMT HI units. Theresult showed that the titre antibody against ND increased at the second week following the vaccination.The antibody titer against ND virus of chickens vaccinated single killed ND at the second week in eachdose were 6.05 GMT HI unit, 4.05 GMT HI unit, and 0.9 GMT HI unit. The antibody titre at the third week were 7.90 GMT HI unit ,5.40 GMT HI unit and 2.20 GMT HI unit. The antibody titre against ND virus ofchickens vaccinated with combined ND-AI vaccine at the second week were 6.30 GMT HI unit , 4.15 GMTHI unit , and 2.05 GMT HI unit. At the third week, the antibody titre against ND virus of chickensvaccinated with combined ND-AI vaccine in each subgroup were 7.45 GMT HI unit, 5.60 GMT HI unit , and2.40 GMT HI unit . It showed that the antibody titers

  16. Avian disease at the Salton Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friend, M.

    2002-01-01

    A review of existing records and the scientific literature was conducted for occurrences of avian diseases affecting free-ranging avifauna within the Salton Sea ecosystem. The period for evaluation was 1907 through 1999. Records of the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Biological Survey and the scientific literature were the data sources for the period of 1907a??1939. The narrative reports of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's Sonny Bono National Wildlife Refuge Complex and the epizootic database of the U.S. Geological Survey's National Wildlife Health Center were the primary data sources for the remainder of the evaluation. The pattern of avian disease at the Salton Sea has changed greatly over time. Relative to past decades, there was a greater frequency of major outbreaks of avian disease at the Salton Sea during the 1990s than in previous decades, a greater variety of disease agents causing epizootics, and apparent chronic increases in the attrition of birds from disease. Avian mortality was high for about a decade beginning during the mid-1920s, diminished substantially by the 1940s and was at low to moderate levels until the 1990s when it reached the highest levels reported. Avian botulism (Clostridium botulinum type C) was the only major cause of avian disease until 1979 when the first major epizootic of avian cholera (Pasteurella multocidia) was documented. Waterfowl and shorebirds were the primary species affected by avian botulism. A broader spectrum of species have been killed by avian cholera but waterfowl have suffered the greatest losses. Avian cholera reappeared in 1983 and has joined avian botulism as a recurring cause of avian mortality. In 1989, avian salmonellosis (Salmonella typhimurium) was first diagnosed as a major cause of avian disease within the Salton Sea ecosystem and has since reappeared several times, primarily among cattle egrets (Bubulcus ibis). The largest loss from a single epizootic occurred in 1992, when an estimated

  17. IL-18Rα-deficient CD4+T cells induce intestinal inflammation in the CD45RBhitransfer model of colitis despite impaired innate responsiveness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmkvist, Petra; Pool, Lieneke; Hägerbrand, Karin;

    2016-01-01

    IL-18 has been implicated in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), however its role in the regulation of intestinal CD4+ T-cell function remains unclear. Here we show that murine intestinal CD4+ T cells express high levels of IL-18Rα and provide evidence that IL-18Rα expression is induced on these ce......IL-18 has been implicated in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), however its role in the regulation of intestinal CD4+ T-cell function remains unclear. Here we show that murine intestinal CD4+ T cells express high levels of IL-18Rα and provide evidence that IL-18Rα expression is induced...... on these cells subsequent to their entry into the intestinal mucosa. Using the CD45RBhi T-cell transfer colitis model, we show that IL-18Rα is expressed on IFN-γ+, IL-17+ and IL-17+IFN-γ+ effector CD4+ T cells in the inflamed colonic lamina propria (cLP) and mesenteric lymph node (MLN) and is required...... for the optimal generation and/or maintenance of IFN-γ-producing cells in the cLP. In the steady state and during colitis, TCR-independent cytokine-induced IFN-γ and IL-17 production by intestinal CD4+ T cells was largely IL-18Rα−dependent. Despite these findings however, IL-18Rα−deficient CD4+ T cells induced...

  18. Co-administration of inactivated avian influenza virus with CpG or rIL-2 strongly enhances the local immune response after intranasal immunization in chicken.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiaowen, Zhang; Qinghua, Yu; Xiaofei, Zhang; Qian, Yang

    2009-09-18

    Intranasal delivery of vaccines is the most effective means of inducing effective immunity in the upper respiratory tract as well as other mucosal lymphoid tissues. To evaluate the effects of the H5N2 inactivated virus with adjuvant, 120 one-day-old chicks were intranasal immunized with the H5N2 inactivated virus respectively mixed with adjuvant CpG or recombinant IL-2 (rIL-2). The local immunocompetent cells on the respiratory tract were detected. The results showed that the number of intraepithelial lymphocytes (IELs), CD3(+) T lymphocytes and mast cells in respiratory tract increased significantly respectively and the number of IgA and IgG secreting cells increased significantly after immunization. However, there was no significant change in the immunocompetent cells of the animals administrated H5N2 inactivated virus alone compared to the control group. Our results indicated that intranasal administration of H5N2 inactivated virus with adjuvant CpG or rIL-2 could be beneficial to the local immune response in the respiratory tract.

  19. Interaction between Campylobacter and intestinal epithelial cells leads to a different proinflammatory response in human and porcine host.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar, Carmen; Jiménez-Marín, Ángeles; Martins, Rodrigo Prado; Garrido, Juan J

    2014-11-15

    Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli are recognized as the leading causes of human diarrheal disease throughout the development world. Unlike human beings, gastrointestinal tract of pigs are frequently colonized by Campylobacter to a high level in a commensal manner. The aim of this study was to identify the differences underlying the divergent outcome following Campylobacter challenge in porcine versus human host. In order to address this, a comparative in vitro infection model was combined with microscopy, gentamicin protection assay, ELISA and quantitative PCR techniques. Invasion assays revealed that Campylobacter invaded human cells up to 10-fold more than porcine cells (pCampylobacter in human epithelial cell at early times of infection, whereas a very reduced cytokine gene expression was detected in porcine epithelial cells. These data indicate that Campylobacter fails to invade porcine cells compared to human cells, and this leads to a lack of proinflammatory response induction, probably due to its pathogenic or commensal behavior in human and porcine host, respectively. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Global avian influenza surveillance in wild birds: a strategy to capture viral diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machalaba, Catherine C; Elwood, Sarah E; Forcella, Simona; Smith, Kristine M; Hamilton, Keith; Jebara, Karim B; Swayne, David E; Webby, Richard J; Mumford, Elizabeth; Mazet, Jonna A K; Gaidet, Nicolas; Daszak, Peter; Karesh, William B

    2015-04-01

    Wild birds play a major role in the evolution, maintenance, and spread of avian influenza viruses. However, surveillance for these viruses in wild birds is sporadic, geographically biased, and often limited to the last outbreak virus. To identify opportunities to optimize wild bird surveillance for understanding viral diversity, we reviewed responses to a World Organisation for Animal Health-administered survey, government reports to this organization, articles on Web of Knowledge, and the Influenza Research Database. At least 119 countries conducted avian influenza virus surveillance in wild birds during 2008-2013, but coordination and standardization was lacking among surveillance efforts, and most focused on limited subsets of influenza viruses. Given high financial and public health burdens of recent avian influenza outbreaks, we call for sustained, cost-effective investments in locations with high avian influenza diversity in wild birds and efforts to promote standardized sampling, testing, and reporting methods, including full-genome sequencing and sharing of isolates with the scientific community.

  1. Transient activation of mucosal effector immune responses by resident intestinal bacteria in normal hosts is regulated by interleukin-10 signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Cong; Sartor, R Balfour; Huang, Kehe; Tonkonogy, Susan L

    2016-07-01

    Interleukin-10 (IL-10) is a key regulator of mucosal homeostasis. In the current study we investigated the early events after monoassociating germ-free (GF) wild-type (WT) mice with an Escherichia coli strain that we isolated previously from the caecal contents of a normal mouse housed under specific pathogen-free conditions. Our results show that interferon-γ (IFN-γ) secreted by mesenteric lymph node (MLN) cells from both IL-10 deficient mice and WT mice, stimulated ex vivo with E. coli lysate, was dramatically higher at day 4 after monoassociation compared with IFN-γ secreted by cells from GF mice without E. coli colonization. Production of IFN-γ rapidly and progressively declined after colonization of WT but not IL-10-deficient mice. The E. coli lysate-stimulated WT MLN cells also produced IL-10 that peaked at day 4 and subsequently declined, but not as precipitously as IFN-γ. WT cells that express CD4, CD8 and NKp46 produced IFN-γ; WT CD4-positive cells and B cells produced IL-10. Recombinant IL-10 added to E. coli-stimulated MLN cell cultures inhibited IFN-γ secretion in a dose-dependent fashion. MLN cells from WT mice treated in vivo with neutralizing anti-IL-10 receptor antibody produced more IFN-γ compared with MLN cells from isotype control antibody-treated mice. These findings show that a resident E. coli that induces chronic colitis in monoassociated IL-10-deficient mice rapidly but transiently activates the effector immune system in normal hosts, in parallel with induction of protective IL-10 produced by B cells and CD4(+) cells that subsequently suppresses this response to mediate mucosal homeostasis. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Persistence of avian oncoviruses in chicken macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazzolo, L; Moscovici, C; Moscovici, M G

    1979-01-01

    Inoculation of avian oncoviruses into 1- to 2-month old chickens led to a rapid production of antiviral humoral antibodies. Under these conditions it was found that avian leukosis viruses are sequestered in macrophages of peripheral blood, in which they can persist for a long period of time (up to about 3 years). In contrast, avian sarcoma viruses were never found in macrophages from chickens during the progression of sarcomas or after regression of the tumors. PMID:217827

  3. Antimicrobial resistance of bacterial strains isolated from avian cellulitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MM Santos

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Avian cellulitis is an inflammatory process in the subcutaneous tissue, mainly located in the abdomen and thighs. This problem is commonly observed in poultry at slaughter and it is considered one of the major causes of condemnation of carcasses in Brazil. The aim of this study was to perform the microbial isolation of lesions of avian cellulitis from a processing plant located in the State of Goiás in order to analyze antimicrobial resistance by antibiogram test and to detect resistance genes by polymerase chain reaction. A total of 25 samples of avian cellulitis lesions were analyzed, from which 30 bacterial strains were isolated. There were eleven (44% strains of Escherichia coli, nine (36% strains of Staphylococcus epidermidis, seven (28% strains of Proteus mirabilis and three (12% strains of Manheimiahaemolytica. The antibiogram test showed that all strains were resistant to at least one antimicrobial. The gene of antimicrobial resistance tetB was detected in E. coli, S. epidermidis and P. mirabilis strains, and was the most frequently observed gene. The gene of antimicrobial resistance Sul1 was detected in all bacterial species, while tetA was found in E. coli and S. epidermidis strains, SHV in E. coli strains, S. epidermidis and P. mirabilis,and cat1 in one P. mirabilis strain. The results suggest a potential public health hazard due to the ability of these microorganisms to transmit antimicrobial resistancegenes to other microorganisms present in the intestinal tract of humans and animals, which may affect clinical-medical usage of these drugs.

  4. Avian Inf