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Sample records for avian cone photoreceptors

  1. Avian cone photoreceptors tile the retina as five independent, self-organizing mosaics.

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    Yoseph A Kram

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The avian retina possesses one of the most sophisticated cone photoreceptor systems among vertebrates. Birds have five types of cones including four single cones, which support tetrachromatic color vision and a double cone, which is thought to mediate achromatic motion perception. Despite this richness, very little is known about the spatial organization of avian cones and its adaptive significance. Here we show that the five cone types of the chicken independently tile the retina as highly ordered mosaics with a characteristic spacing between cones of the same type. Measures of topological order indicate that double cones are more highly ordered than single cones, possibly reflecting their posited role in motion detection. Although cones show spacing interactions that are cell type-specific, all cone types use the same density-dependent yardstick to measure intercone distance. We propose a simple developmental model that can account for these observations. We also show that a single parameter, the global regularity index, defines the regularity of all five cone mosaics. Lastly, we demonstrate similar cone distributions in three additional avian species, suggesting that these patterning principles are universal among birds. Since regular photoreceptor spacing is critical for uniform sampling of visual space, the cone mosaics of the avian retina represent an elegant example of the emergence of adaptive global patterning secondary to simple local interactions between individual photoreceptors. Our results indicate that the evolutionary pressures that gave rise to the avian retina's various adaptations for enhanced color discrimination also acted to fine-tune its spatial sampling of color and luminance.

  2. Programming Retinal Stem Cells into Cone Photoreceptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    researchers that want to reprogram stem cells for clinical applications. Lastly, we attempted to transplant cone photoreceptors derived from human retinal...AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0566 TITLE: Programming Retinal Stem Cells into Cone Photoreceptors PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Joseph A. Brzezinski IV...SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Programming Retinal Stem Cells into Cone Photoreceptors 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-14-1-0566 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6

  3. Optics of cone photoreceptors in the chicken (Gallus gallus domesticus).

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    Wilby, David; Toomey, Matthew B; Olsson, Peter; Frederiksen, Rikard; Cornwall, M Carter; Oulton, Ruth; Kelber, Almut; Corbo, Joseph C; Roberts, Nicholas W

    2015-10-06

    Vision is the primary sensory modality of birds, and its importance is evident in the sophistication of their visual systems. Coloured oil droplets in the cone photoreceptors represent an adaptation in the avian retina, acting as long-pass colour filters. However, we currently lack understanding of how the optical properties and morphology of component structures (e.g. oil droplet, mitochondrial ellipsoid and outer segment) of the cone photoreceptor influence the transmission of light into the outer segment and the ultimate effect they have on receptor sensitivity. In this study, we use data from microspectrophotometry, digital holographic microscopy and electron microscopy to inform electromagnetic models of avian cone photoreceptors to quantitatively investigate the integrated optical function of the cell. We find that pigmented oil droplets primarily function as spectral filters, not light collection devices, although the mitochondrial ellipsoid improves optical coupling between the inner segment and oil droplet. In contrast, unpigmented droplets found in violet-sensitive cones double sensitivity at its peak relative to other cone types. Oil droplets and ellipsoids both narrow the angular sensitivity of single cone photoreceptors, but not as strongly as those in human cones. © 2015 The Authors.

  4. A novel mechanism of cone photoreceptor adaptation.

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    Marcus H C Howlett

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available An animal's ability to survive depends on its sensory systems being able to adapt to a wide range of environmental conditions, by maximizing the information extracted and reducing the noise transmitted. The visual system does this by adapting to luminance and contrast. While luminance adaptation can begin at the retinal photoreceptors, contrast adaptation has been shown to start at later stages in the retina. Photoreceptors adapt to changes in luminance over multiple time scales ranging from tens of milliseconds to minutes, with the adaptive changes arising from processes within the phototransduction cascade. Here we show a new form of adaptation in cones that is independent of the phototransduction process. Rather, it is mediated by voltage-gated ion channels in the cone membrane and acts by changing the frequency response of cones such that their responses speed up as the membrane potential modulation depth increases and slow down as the membrane potential modulation depth decreases. This mechanism is effectively activated by high-contrast stimuli dominated by low frequencies such as natural stimuli. However, the more generally used Gaussian white noise stimuli were not effective since they did not modulate the cone membrane potential to the same extent. This new adaptive process had a time constant of less than a second. A critical component of the underlying mechanism is the hyperpolarization-activated current, Ih, as pharmacologically blocking it prevented the long- and mid- wavelength sensitive cone photoreceptors (L- and M-cones from adapting. Consistent with this, short- wavelength sensitive cone photoreceptors (S-cones did not show the adaptive response, and we found they also lacked a prominent Ih. The adaptive filtering mechanism identified here improves the information flow by removing higher-frequency noise during lower signal-to-noise ratio conditions, as occurs when contrast levels are low. Although this new adaptive mechanism can

  5. Loss and gain of cone types in vertebrate ciliary photoreceptor evolution.

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    Musser, Jacob M; Arendt, Detlev

    2017-11-01

    Ciliary photoreceptors are a diverse cell type family that comprises the rods and cones of the retina and other related cell types such as pineal photoreceptors. Ciliary photoreceptor evolution has been dynamic during vertebrate evolution with numerous gains and losses of opsin and phototransduction genes, and changes in their expression. For example, early mammals lost all but two cone opsins, indicating loss of cone receptor types in response to nocturnal lifestyle. Our review focuses on the comparison of specifying transcription factors and cell type-specific transcriptome data in vertebrate retinae to build and test hypotheses on ciliary photoreceptor evolution. Regarding cones, recent data reveal that a combination of factors specific for long-wavelength sensitive opsin (Lws)- cones in non-mammalian vertebrates (Thrb and Rxrg) is found across all differentiating cone photoreceptors in mice. This suggests that mammalian ancestors lost all but one ancestral cone type, the Lws-cone. We test this hypothesis by a correlation analysis of cone transcriptomes in mouse and chick, and find that, indeed, transcriptomes of all mouse cones are most highly correlated to avian Lws-cones. These findings underscore the importance of specifying transcription factors in tracking cell type evolution, and shed new light on the mechanisms of cell type loss and gain in retina evolution. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Integrity of the cone photoreceptor mosaic in oligocone trichromacy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michaelides, Michel; Rha, Jungtae; Dees, Elise W

    2011-01-01

    Oligocone trichromacy (OT) is an unusual cone dysfunction syndrome characterized by reduced visual acuity, mild photophobia, reduced amplitude of the cone electroretinogram with normal rod responses, normal fundus appearance, and normal or near-normal color vision. It has been proposed that these...... that these patients have a reduced number of normal functioning cones (oligocone). This paper has sought to evaluate the integrity of the cone photoreceptor mosaic in four patients previously described as having OT....

  7. Bat eyes have ultraviolet-sensitive cone photoreceptors.

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    Brigitte Müller

    Full Text Available Mammalian retinae have rod photoreceptors for night vision and cone photoreceptors for daylight and colour vision. For colour discrimination, most mammals possess two cone populations with two visual pigments (opsins that have absorption maxima at short wavelengths (blue or ultraviolet light and long wavelengths (green or red light. Microchiropteran bats, which use echolocation to navigate and forage in complete darkness, have long been considered to have pure rod retinae. Here we use opsin immunohistochemistry to show that two phyllostomid microbats, Glossophaga soricina and Carollia perspicillata, possess a significant population of cones and express two cone opsins, a shortwave-sensitive (S opsin and a longwave-sensitive (L opsin. A substantial population of cones expresses S opsin exclusively, whereas the other cones mostly coexpress L and S opsin. S opsin gene analysis suggests ultraviolet (UV, wavelengths <400 nm sensitivity, and corneal electroretinogram recordings reveal an elevated sensitivity to UV light which is mediated by an S cone visual pigment. Therefore bats have retained the ancestral UV tuning of the S cone pigment. We conclude that bats have the prerequisite for daylight vision, dichromatic colour vision, and UV vision. For bats, the UV-sensitive cones may be advantageous for visual orientation at twilight, predator avoidance, and detection of UV-reflecting flowers for those that feed on nectar.

  8. Mitochondria Maintain Distinct Ca2+Pools in Cone Photoreceptors.

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    Giarmarco, Michelle M; Cleghorn, Whitney M; Sloat, Stephanie R; Hurley, James B; Brockerhoff, Susan E

    2017-02-22

    Ca 2+ ions have distinct roles in the outer segment, cell body, and synaptic terminal of photoreceptors. We tested the hypothesis that distinct Ca 2+ domains are maintained by Ca 2+ uptake into mitochondria. Serial block face scanning electron microscopy of zebrafish cones revealed that nearly 100 mitochondria cluster at the apical side of the inner segment, directly below the outer segment. The endoplasmic reticulum surrounds the basal and lateral surfaces of this cluster, but does not reach the apical surface or penetrate into the cluster. Using genetically encoded Ca 2+ sensors, we found that mitochondria take up Ca 2+ when it accumulates either in the cone cell body or outer segment. Blocking mitochondrial Ca 2+ uniporter activity compromises the ability of mitochondria to maintain distinct Ca 2+ domains. Together, our findings indicate that mitochondria can modulate subcellular functional specialization in photoreceptors. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Ca 2+ homeostasis is essential for the survival and function of retinal photoreceptors. Separate pools of Ca 2+ regulate phototransduction in the outer segment, metabolism in the cell body, and neurotransmitter release at the synaptic terminal. We investigated the role of mitochondria in compartmentalization of Ca 2+ We found that mitochondria form a dense cluster that acts as a diffusion barrier between the outer segment and cell body. The cluster is surprisingly only partially surrounded by the endoplasmic reticulum, a key mediator of mitochondrial Ca 2+ uptake. Blocking the uptake of Ca 2+ by mitochondria causes redistribution of Ca 2+ throughout the cell. Our results show that mitochondrial Ca 2+ uptake in photoreceptors is complex and plays an essential role in normal function. Copyright © 2017 the authors 0270-6474/17/372061-12$15.00/0.

  9. gdf6a is required for cone photoreceptor subtype differentiation and for the actions of tbx2b in determining rod versus cone photoreceptor fate.

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    Michèle G Duval

    Full Text Available Functional vision restoration is within reach via stem cell therapy, but one of the largest obstacles is the derivation of colour-sensitive cone photoreceptors that are required for high-acuity daytime vision. To enhance progress made using nocturnal murine models, we instead utilize cone-rich zebrafish and herein investigate relationships between gdf6a and tbx2b in cone photoreceptor development. Growth/differentiation factor 6a (gdf6a, a bone morphogenetic protein family ligand, is an emerging factor in photoreceptor degenerative diseases. The T-box transcription factor tbx2b is required to specify UV cone photoreceptor fate instead of rod photoreceptor fate. Interactions between these factors in cone development would be unanticipated, considering the discrete phenotypes in their respective mutants. However, gdf6a positively modulates the abundance of tbx2b transcript during early eye morphogenesis, and we extended this conclusion to later stages of retinal development comprising the times when photoreceptors differentiate. Despite this, gdf6a-/- larvae possess a normal relative number of UV cones and instead present with a low abundance of blue cone photoreceptors, approximately half that of siblings (p<0.001, supporting a differential role for gdf6a amongst the spectral subtypes of cone photoreceptors. Further, gdf6a-/- larvae from breeding of compound heterozygous gdf6a+/-;tbx2b+/- mutants exhibit the recessive lots-of-rods phenotype (which also shows a paucity of UV cones at significantly elevated rates (44% or 48% for each of two tbx2b alleles, χ2 p≤0.007 for each compared to expected Mendelian 25%. Thus the gdf6a-/- background sensitizes fish such that the recessive lots-of-rods phenotype can appear in heterozygous tbx2b+/- fish. Overall, this work establishes a novel link between tbx2b and gdf6a in determining photoreceptor fates, defining the nexus of an intricate pathway influencing the abundance of cone spectral subtypes and

  10. Retinal cone photoreceptors of the deer mouse Peromyscus maniculatus: development, topography, opsin expression and spectral tuning.

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    Patrick Arbogast

    Full Text Available A quantitative analysis of photoreceptor properties was performed in the retina of the nocturnal deer mouse, Peromyscus maniculatus, using pigmented (wildtype and albino animals. The aim was to establish whether the deer mouse is a more suitable model species than the house mouse for photoreceptor studies, and whether oculocutaneous albinism affects its photoreceptor properties. In retinal flatmounts, cone photoreceptors were identified by opsin immunostaining, and their numbers, spectral types, and distributions across the retina were determined. Rod photoreceptors were counted using differential interference contrast microscopy. Pigmented P. maniculatus have a rod-dominated retina with rod densities of about 450.000/mm(2 and cone densities of 3000-6500/mm(2. Two cone opsins, shortwave sensitive (S and middle-to-longwave sensitive (M, are present and expressed in distinct cone types. Partial sequencing of the S opsin gene strongly supports UV sensitivity of the S cone visual pigment. The S cones constitute a 5-15% minority of the cones. Different from house mouse, S and M cone distributions do not have dorsoventral gradients, and coexpression of both opsins in single cones is exceptional (<2% of the cones. In albino P. maniculatus, rod densities are reduced by approximately 40% (270.000/mm(2. Overall, cone density and the density of cones exclusively expressing S opsin are not significantly different from pigmented P. maniculatus. However, in albino retinas S opsin is coexpressed with M opsin in 60-90% of the cones and therefore the population of cones expressing only M opsin is significantly reduced to 5-25%. In conclusion, deer mouse cone properties largely conform to the general mammalian pattern, hence the deer mouse may be better suited than the house mouse for the study of certain basic cone properties, including the effects of albinism on cone opsin expression.

  11. Analysis of macular cone photoreceptors in a case of occult macular dystrophy

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    Tojo N

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Naoki Tojo Tomoko Nakamura Hironori Ozaki Miyako Oka Toshihiko Oiwake Atsushi HayashiDepartment of Ophthalmology, University of Toyama, Toyama, JapanPurpose: To investigate changes in cone photoreceptors with adaptive optics (AO fundus imaging and spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT in a case of occult macular dystrophy (OMD.Patient and methods: Both eyes of a 42-year-old woman diagnosed with OMD were examined. We used an AO fundus camera to obtain images of cone photoreceptors in the macula of the OMD subject and five healthy control subjects. Correlations between the AO images and the SD-OCT images were examined. Cone photoreceptors in eight areas in the macula of OMD and healthy control subjects were analyzed and compared.Results: SD-OCT showed a loss of the cone outer-segment tips line outside of the fovea in both eyes of the subject with OMD. The left eye with decreased visual acuity showed a discontinuous photoreceptor inner-segment and outer-segment line and cone outer-segment tips line at the fovea in SD-OCT and loss of cone mosaics as a dark spot in the AO image. In panoramic AO images and cone-density maps, less cone density was observed in a ring-like region outside the fovea than in the peripheral retina. In most of the areas examined, the cone densities were lower in the OMD eyes than in the healthy control eyes.Conclusions: Cone densities in the macula of the OMD patient were greatly decreased. AO images were found to be useful to evaluate morphologic changes in cone photoreceptors in patients with OMD.Keywords: occult macular dystrophy, adaptive optics, cone photoreceptor, cone analysis, optical coherence tomography

  12. Phototransduction in primate cones and blowfly photoreceptors : different mechanisms, different algorithms, similar response

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hateren, J.H. van; Snippe, H.P.

    Phototransduction in primate cones is compared with phototransduction in blowfly photoreceptor cells. Phototransduction in the two cell types utilizes not only different molecular mechanisms, but also different signal processing steps, producing range compression, contrast constancy, and an

  13. Recapitulation of Human Retinal Development from Human Pluripotent Stem Cells Generates Transplantable Populations of Cone Photoreceptors

    OpenAIRE

    Anai Gonzalez-Cordero; Kamil Kruczek; Arifa Naeem; Milan Fernando; Magdalena Kloc; Joana Ribeiro; Debbie Goh; Yanai Duran; Samuel J.I. Blackford; Laura Abelleira-Hervas; Robert D. Sampson; Ian O. Shum; Matthew J. Branch; Peter J. Gardner; Jane C. Sowden

    2017-01-01

    Summary Transplantation of rod photoreceptors, derived either from neonatal retinae or pluripotent stem cells (PSCs), can restore rod-mediated visual function in murine models of inherited blindness. However, humans depend more upon cone photoreceptors that are required for daylight, color, and high-acuity vision. Indeed, macular retinopathies involving loss of cones are leading causes of blindness. An essential step for developing stem cell-based therapies for maculopathies is the ability to...

  14. Homozygosity Mapping Reveals PDE6C Mutations in Patients with Early-Onset Cone Photoreceptor Disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.A.H.J. Thiadens (Alberta); A.I. Hollander (Anneke); S. Roosing (Susanne); S.B. Nabuurs (Sander); R.C. Zekveld-Vroon (Renate); R.W.J. Collin (Rob); E. de Baere (Elfride); R.K. Koenekoop (Robert); M.J. Schooneveld (Mary); T.M. Strom (Tim); J.J.C. van Lith-Verhoeven (Janneke); A.J. Lotery (Andrew); N. van Moll-Ramirez (Norka); B.P. Leroy (Bart); L.I. van den Born (Ingeborgh); C. Hoyng (Carel); F.P.M. Cremers (Frans); C.C.W. Klaver (Caroline)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractCone photoreceptor disorders form a clinical spectrum of diseases that include progressive cone dystrophy (CD) and complete and incomplete achromatopsia (ACHM). The underlying disease mechanisms of autosomal recessive (ar)CD are largely unknown. Our aim was to identify causative genes

  15. Homozygosity mapping reveals PDE6C mutations in patients with early-onset cone photoreceptor disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thiadens, Alberta A. H. J.; den Hollander, Anneke I.; Roosing, Susanne; Nabuurs, Sander B.; Zekveld-Vroon, Renate C.; Collin, Rob W. J.; de Baere, Elfride; Koenekoop, Robert K.; van Schooneveld, Mary J.; Strom, Tim M.; van Lith-Verhoeven, Janneke J. C.; Lotery, Andrew J.; van Moll-Ramirez, Norka; Leroy, Bart P.; van den Born, L. Ingeborgh; Hoyng, Carel B.; Cremers, Frans P. M.; Klaver, Caroline C. W.

    2009-01-01

    Cone photoreceptor disorders form a clinical spectrum of diseases that include progressive cone dystrophy (CD) and complete and incomplete achromatopsia (ACHM). The underlying disease mechanisms of autosomal recessive (ar)CD are largely unknown. Our aim was to identify causative genes for these

  16. The Circadian Clock Gene Bmal1 Controls Thyroid Hormone-Mediated Spectral Identity and Cone Photoreceptor Function

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    Onkar B. Sawant

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Circadian clocks regulate various aspects of photoreceptor physiology, but their contribution to photoreceptor development and function is unclear. Cone photoreceptors are critical for color vision. Here, we define the molecular function of circadian activity within cone photoreceptors and reveal a role for the clock genes Bmal1 and Per2 in regulating cone spectral identity. ChIP analysis revealed that BMAL1 binds to the promoter region of the thyroid hormone (TH-activating enzyme type 2 iodothyronine deiodinase (Dio2 and thus regulates the expression of Dio2. TH treatment resulted in a partial rescue of the phenotype caused by the loss of Bmal1, thus revealing a functional relationship between Bmal1 and Dio2 in establishing cone photoreceptor identity. Furthermore, Bmal1 and Dio2 are required to maintain cone photoreceptor functional integrity. Overall, our results suggest a mechanism by which circadian proteins can locally regulate the availability of TH and influence tissue development and function.

  17. Adaptive optics fundus images of cone photoreceptors in the macula of patients with retinitis pigmentosa.

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    Tojo, Naoki; Nakamura, Tomoko; Fuchizawa, Chiharu; Oiwake, Toshihiko; Hayashi, Atsushi

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine cone photoreceptors in the macula of patients with retinitis pigmentosa using an adaptive optics fundus camera and to investigate any correlations between cone photoreceptor density and findings on optical coherence tomography and fundus autofluorescence. We examined two patients with typical retinitis pigmentosa who underwent ophthalmological examination, including measurement of visual acuity, and gathering of electroretinographic, optical coherence tomographic, fundus autofluorescent, and adaptive optics fundus images. The cone photoreceptors in the adaptive optics images of the two patients with retinitis pigmentosa and five healthy subjects were analyzed. An abnormal parafoveal ring of high-density fundus autofluorescence was observed in the macula in both patients. The border of the ring corresponded to the border of the external limiting membrane and the inner segment and outer segment line in the optical coherence tomographic images. Cone photoreceptors at the abnormal parafoveal ring were blurred and decreased in the adaptive optics images. The blurred area corresponded to the abnormal parafoveal ring in the fundus autofluorescence images. Cone densities were low at the blurred areas and at the nasal and temporal retina along a line from the fovea compared with those of healthy controls. The results for cone spacing and Voronoi domains in the macula corresponded with those for the cone densities. Cone densities were heavily decreased in the macula, especially at the parafoveal ring on high-density fundus autofluorescence in both patients with retinitis pigmentosa. Adaptive optics images enabled us to observe in vivo changes in the cone photoreceptors of patients with retinitis pigmentosa, which corresponded to changes in the optical coherence tomographic and fundus autofluorescence images.

  18. Photoreceptor cell death, proliferation and formation of hybrid rod/S-cone photoreceptors in the degenerating STK38L mutant retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berta, Ágnes I; Boesze-Battaglia, Kathleen; Genini, Sem; Goldstein, Orly; O'Brien, Paul J; Szél, Ágoston; Acland, Gregory M; Beltran, William A; Aguirre, Gustavo D

    2011-01-01

    A homozygous mutation in STK38L in dogs impairs the late phase of photoreceptor development, and is followed by photoreceptor cell death (TUNEL) and proliferation (PCNA, PHH3) events that occur independently in different cells between 7-14 weeks of age. During this period, the outer nuclear layer (ONL) cell number is unchanged. The dividing cells are of photoreceptor origin, have rod opsin labeling, and do not label with markers specific for macrophages/microglia (CD18) or Müller cells (glutamine synthetase, PAX6). Nestin labeling is absent from the ONL although it labels the peripheral retina and ciliary marginal zone equally in normals and mutants. Cell proliferation is associated with increased cyclin A1 and LATS1 mRNA expression, but CRX protein expression is unchanged. Coincident with photoreceptor proliferation is a change in the photoreceptor population. Prior to cell death the photoreceptor mosaic is composed of L/M- and S-cones, and rods. After proliferation, both cone types remain, but the majority of rods are now hybrid photoreceptors that express rod opsin and, to a lesser extent, cone S-opsin, and lack NR2E3 expression. The hybrid photoreceptors renew their outer segments diffusely, a characteristic of cones. The results indicate the capacity for terminally differentiated, albeit mutant, photoreceptors to divide with mutations in this novel retinal degeneration gene.

  19. Photoreceptor cell death, proliferation and formation of hybrid rod/S-cone photoreceptors in the degenerating STK38L mutant retina.

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    Ágnes I Berta

    Full Text Available A homozygous mutation in STK38L in dogs impairs the late phase of photoreceptor development, and is followed by photoreceptor cell death (TUNEL and proliferation (PCNA, PHH3 events that occur independently in different cells between 7-14 weeks of age. During this period, the outer nuclear layer (ONL cell number is unchanged. The dividing cells are of photoreceptor origin, have rod opsin labeling, and do not label with markers specific for macrophages/microglia (CD18 or Müller cells (glutamine synthetase, PAX6. Nestin labeling is absent from the ONL although it labels the peripheral retina and ciliary marginal zone equally in normals and mutants. Cell proliferation is associated with increased cyclin A1 and LATS1 mRNA expression, but CRX protein expression is unchanged. Coincident with photoreceptor proliferation is a change in the photoreceptor population. Prior to cell death the photoreceptor mosaic is composed of L/M- and S-cones, and rods. After proliferation, both cone types remain, but the majority of rods are now hybrid photoreceptors that express rod opsin and, to a lesser extent, cone S-opsin, and lack NR2E3 expression. The hybrid photoreceptors renew their outer segments diffusely, a characteristic of cones. The results indicate the capacity for terminally differentiated, albeit mutant, photoreceptors to divide with mutations in this novel retinal degeneration gene.

  20. Recapitulation of Human Retinal Development from Human Pluripotent Stem Cells Generates Transplantable Populations of Cone Photoreceptors

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    Anai Gonzalez-Cordero

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Transplantation of rod photoreceptors, derived either from neonatal retinae or pluripotent stem cells (PSCs, can restore rod-mediated visual function in murine models of inherited blindness. However, humans depend more upon cone photoreceptors that are required for daylight, color, and high-acuity vision. Indeed, macular retinopathies involving loss of cones are leading causes of blindness. An essential step for developing stem cell-based therapies for maculopathies is the ability to generate transplantable human cones from renewable sources. Here, we report a modified 2D/3D protocol for generating hPSC-derived neural retinal vesicles with well-formed ONL-like structures containing cones and rods bearing inner segments and connecting cilia, nascent outer segments, and presynaptic structures. This differentiation system recapitulates human photoreceptor development, allowing the isolation and transplantation of a pure population of stage-matched cones. Purified human long/medium cones survive and become incorporated within the adult mouse retina, supporting the potential of photoreceptor transplantation for treating retinal degeneration.

  1. Multiple rod-cone and cone-rod photoreceptor transmutations in snakes: evidence from visual opsin gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simões, Bruno F; Sampaio, Filipa L; Loew, Ellis R; Sanders, Kate L; Fisher, Robert N; Hart, Nathan S; Hunt, David M; Partridge, Julian C; Gower, David J

    2016-01-27

    In 1934, Gordon Walls forwarded his radical theory of retinal photoreceptor 'transmutation'. This proposed that rods and cones used for scotopic and photopic vision, respectively, were not fixed but could evolve into each other via a series of morphologically distinguishable intermediates. Walls' prime evidence came from series of diurnal and nocturnal geckos and snakes that appeared to have pure-cone or pure-rod retinas (in forms that Walls believed evolved from ancestors with the reverse complement) or which possessed intermediate photoreceptor cells. Walls was limited in testing his theory because the precise identity of visual pigments present in photoreceptors was then unknown. Subsequent molecular research has hitherto neglected this topic but presents new opportunities. We identify three visual opsin genes, rh1, sws1 and lws, in retinal mRNA of an ecologically and taxonomically diverse sample of snakes central to Walls' theory. We conclude that photoreceptors with superficially rod- or cone-like morphology are not limited to containing scotopic or photopic opsins, respectively. Walls' theory is essentially correct, and more research is needed to identify the patterns, processes and functional implications of transmutation. Future research will help to clarify the fundamental properties and physiology of photoreceptors adapted to function in different light levels. © 2016 The Author(s).

  2. Cone photoreceptors develop normally in the absence of functional rod photoreceptors in a transgenic swine model of retinitis pigmentosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez de Castro, Juan P; Scott, Patrick A; Fransen, James W; Demas, James; DeMarco, Paul J; Kaplan, Henry J; McCall, Maureen A

    2014-04-17

    Human and swine retinas have morphological and functional similarities. In the absence of primate models, the swine is an attractive model to study retinal function and disease, with its cone-rich visual streak, our ability to manipulate their genome, and the differences in susceptibility of rod and cone photoreceptors to disease. We characterized the normal development of cone function and its subsequent decline in a P23H rhodopsin transgenic (TgP23H) miniswine model of autosomal dominant RP. Semen from TgP23H miniswine 53-1 inseminated domestic swine and produced TgP23H and Wt hybrid littermates. Retinal function was evaluated using ERGs between postnatal days (P) 14 and 120. Retinal ganglion cell (RGC) responses were recorded to full-field stimuli at several intensities. Retinal morphology was assessed using light and electron microscopy. Scotopic retinal function matures in Wt pigs up to P60, but never develops in TgP23H pigs. Wt and TgP23H photopic vision matures similarly up to P30 and diverges at P60 where TgP23H cone vision declines. There are fewer TgP23H RGCs with visually evoked responses at all ages and their response to light is compromised. Photoreceptor morphological changes mirror these functional changes. Lack of early scotopic function in TgP23H swine suggests it as a model of an aggressive form of RP. In this mammalian model of RP, normal cone function develops independent of rod function. Therefore, its retina represents a system in which therapies to rescue cones can be developed to prolong photopic visual function in RP patients.

  3. Suppressing thyroid hormone signaling preserves cone photoreceptors in mouse models of retinal degeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Ma, Hongwei; Thapa, Arjun; Morris, Lynsie; Redmond, T. Michael; Baehr, Wolfgang; Ding, Xi-Qin

    2014-01-01

    Photoreceptors degenerate in a wide array of hereditary retinal diseases and age-related macular degeneration. There is currently no treatment available for retinal degenerations. While outnumbered roughly 20:1 by rods in the human retina, it is the cones that mediate color vision and visual acuity, and their survival is critical for vision. In this communication, we investigate whether thyroid hormone (TH) signaling affects cone viability in retinal degeneration mouse models. TH signaling is...

  4. Distinct and atypical intrinsic and extrinsic cell death pathways between photoreceptor cell types upon specific ablation of Ranbp2 in cone photoreceptors.

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    Kyoung-In Cho

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Non-autonomous cell-death is a cardinal feature of the disintegration of neural networks in neurodegenerative diseases, but the molecular bases of this process are poorly understood. The neural retina comprises a mosaic of rod and cone photoreceptors. Cone and rod photoreceptors degenerate upon rod-specific expression of heterogeneous mutations in functionally distinct genes, whereas cone-specific mutations are thought to cause only cone demise. Here we show that conditional ablation in cone photoreceptors of Ran-binding protein-2 (Ranbp2, a cell context-dependent pleiotropic protein linked to neuroprotection, familial necrotic encephalopathies, acute transverse myelitis and tumor-suppression, promotes early electrophysiological deficits, subcellular erosive destruction and non-apoptotic death of cones, whereas rod photoreceptors undergo cone-dependent non-autonomous apoptosis. Cone-specific Ranbp2 ablation causes the temporal activation of a cone-intrinsic molecular cascade highlighted by the early activation of metalloproteinase 11/stromelysin-3 and up-regulation of Crx and CoREST, followed by the down-modulation of cone-specific phototransduction genes, transient up-regulation of regulatory/survival genes and activation of caspase-7 without apoptosis. Conversely, PARP1+ -apoptotic rods develop upon sequential activation of caspase-9 and caspase-3 and loss of membrane permeability. Rod photoreceptor demise ceases upon cone degeneration. These findings reveal novel roles of Ranbp2 in the modulation of intrinsic and extrinsic cell death mechanisms and pathways. They also unveil a novel spatiotemporal paradigm of progression of neurodegeneration upon cell-specific genetic damage whereby a cone to rod non-autonomous death pathway with intrinsically distinct cell-type death manifestations is triggered by cell-specific loss of Ranbp2. Finally, this study casts new light onto cell-death mechanisms that may be shared by human dystrophies with distinct

  5. Oncostatin M protects rod and cone photoreceptors and promotes regeneration of cone outer segment in a rat model of retinal degeneration.

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    Xin Xia

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Retinitis pigmentosa (RP is a group of photoreceptor degenerative disorders that lead to loss of vision. Typically, rod photoreceptors degenerate first, resulting in loss of night and peripheral vision. Secondary cone degeneration eventually affects central vision, leading to total blindness. Previous studies have shown that photoreceptors could be protected from degeneration by exogenous neurotrophic factors, including ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF, a member of the IL-6 family of cytokines. Using a transgenic rat model of retinal degeneration (the S334-ter rat, we investigated the effects of Oncostatin M (OSM, another member of the IL-6 family of cytokines, on photoreceptor protection. We found that exogenous OSM protects both rod and cone photoreceptors. In addition, OSM promotes regeneration of cone outer segments in early stages of cone degeneration. Further investigation showed that OSM treatment induces STAT3 phosphorylation in Müller cells but not in photoreceptors, suggesting that OSM not directly acts on photoreceptors and that the protective effects of OSM on photoreceptors are mediated by Müller cells. These findings support the therapeutic strategy using members of IL-6 family of cytokines for retinal degenerative disorders. They also provide evidence that activation of the STAT3 pathway in Müller cells promotes photoreceptor survival. Our work highlights the importance of Müller cell-photoreceptor interaction in the retina, which may serve as a model of glia-neuron interaction in general.

  6. Functional Optical Coherence Tomography Enables In Vivo Physiological Assessment of Retinal Rod and Cone Photoreceptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qiuxiang; Lu, Rongwen; Wang, Benquan; Messinger, Jeffrey D.; Curcio, Christine A.; Yao, Xincheng

    2015-04-01

    Transient intrinsic optical signal (IOS) changes have been observed in retinal photoreceptors, suggesting a unique biomarker for eye disease detection. However, clinical deployment of IOS imaging is challenging due to unclear IOS sources and limited signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs). Here, by developing high spatiotemporal resolution optical coherence tomography (OCT) and applying an adaptive algorithm for IOS processing, we were able to record robust IOSs from single-pass measurements. Transient IOSs, which might reflect an early stage of light phototransduction, are consistently observed in the photoreceptor outer segment almost immediately (retinal stimulation. Comparative studies of dark- and light-adapted retinas have demonstrated the feasibility of functional OCT mapping of rod and cone photoreceptors, promising a new method for early disease detection and improved treatment of diseases such as age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and other eye diseases that can cause photoreceptor damage.

  7. Integrity of the cone photoreceptor mosaic in oligocone trichromacy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michaelides, Michel; Rha, Jungtae; Dees, Elise W

    2011-01-01

    Oligocone trichromacy (OT) is an unusual cone dysfunction syndrome characterized by reduced visual acuity, mild photophobia, reduced amplitude of the cone electroretinogram with normal rod responses, normal fundus appearance, and normal or near-normal color vision. It has been proposed that these...

  8. Optical imaging of human cone photoreceptors directly following the capture of light.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phillip Bedggood

    Full Text Available Capture of light in the photoreceptor outer segment initiates a cascade of chemical events that inhibit neurotransmitter release, ultimately resulting in vision. The massed response of the photoreceptor population can be measured non-invasively by electrical recordings, but responses from individual cells cannot be measured without dissecting the retina. Here we used optical imaging to observe individual human cones in the living eye as they underwent bleaching of photopigment and associated phototransduction. The retina was simultaneously stimulated and observed with high intensity visible light at 1 kHz, using adaptive optics. There was marked variability between individual cones in both photosensitivity and pigment optical density, challenging the conventional assumption that photoreceptors act as identical subunits (coefficient of variation in rate of photoisomerization = 23%. There was also a pronounced inverse correlation between these two parameters (p<10(-7; the temporal evolution of image statistics revealed this to be a dynamic relationship, with cone waveguiding efficiency beginning a dramatic increase within 3 ms of light onset. Beginning as early as 2 ms after light onset and including half of cells by ∼7 ms, cone intensity showed reversals characteristic of interference phenomena, with greater delays in reversal corresponding to cones with more photopigment (p<10(-3. The timing of these changes is argued to best correspond with either the cessation of dark current, or to related events such as changes in intracellular cGMP. Cone intensity also showed fluctuations of high frequency (332±25 Hz and low amplitude (3.0±0.85%. Other groups have shown similar fluctuations that were directly evoked by light; if this corresponds to the same phenomenon, we propose that the amplitude of fluctuation may be increased by the use of a bright flash followed by a brief pause, to allow recovery of cone circulating current.

  9. Unsupervised identification of cone photoreceptors in non-confocal adaptive optics scanning light ophthalmoscope images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergeles, Christos; Dubis, Adam M; Davidson, Benjamin; Kasilian, Melissa; Kalitzeos, Angelos; Carroll, Joseph; Dubra, Alfredo; Michaelides, Michel; Ourselin, Sebastien

    2017-06-01

    Precise measurements of photoreceptor numerosity and spatial arrangement are promising biomarkers for the early detection of retinal pathologies and may be valuable in the evaluation of retinal therapies. Adaptive optics scanning light ophthalmoscopy (AOSLO) is a method of imaging that corrects for aberrations of the eye to acquire high-resolution images that reveal the photoreceptor mosaic. These images are typically graded manually by experienced observers, obviating the robust, large-scale use of the technology. This paper addresses unsupervised automated detection of cones in non-confocal, split-detection AOSLO images. Our algorithm leverages the appearance of split-detection images to create a cone model that is used for classification. Results show that it compares favorably to the state-of-the-art, both for images of healthy retinas and for images from patients affected by Stargardt disease. The algorithm presented also compares well to manual annotation while excelling in speed.

  10. Tokay gecko photoreceptors achieve rod-like physiology with cone-like proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xue; Wensel, Theodore G; Yuan, Ching

    2006-01-01

    The retinal photoreceptors of the nocturnal Tokay gecko (Gekko gekko) consist exclusively of rods by the criteria of morphology and key features of their light responses. Unlike cones, they display robust photoresponses and have relatively slow recovery times. Nonetheless, the major and minor visual pigments identified in gecko rods are of the cone type by sequence and spectroscopic behavior. In the ongoing search for the molecular bases for the physiological differences between cones and rods, we have characterized the molecular biology and biochemistry of the gecko rod phototransduction cascade. We have cloned cDNAs encoding all or part of major protein components of the phototransduction cascade by RT-PCR with degenerate oligonucleotides designed to amplify cone- or rod-like sequences. For all proteins examined we obtained only cone-like and never rod-like sequences. The proteins identified include transducin alpha (Galphat), phosphodiesterase (PDE6) catalytic and inhibitory subunits, cyclic nucleotide-gated channel (CNGalpha) and arrestin. We also cloned cDNA encoding gecko RGS9-1 (Regulator of G Protein Signaling 9, splice variant 1), which is expressed in both rods and cones of all species studied but is typically found at 10-fold higher concentrations in cones, and found that gecko rods contain slightly lower RGS9-1 levels than mammalian rods. Furthermore, we found that the levels of GTPase accelerating protein (GAP) activity and cyclic GMP (cGMP) phosphodiesterase activity were similar in gecko and mammalian rods. These results place substantial constraints on the critical changes needed to convert a cone into a rod in the course of evolution: The many features of phototransduction molecules conserved between those expressed in gecko rods and those expressed in cones cannot explain the physiological differences, whereas the higher levels of RGS9-1 and GAP activity in cones are likely among the essential requirements for the rapid photoresponses of cones.

  11. Elovl4 5-bp deletion does not accelerate cone photoreceptor degeneration in an all-cone mouse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Schori

    Full Text Available Mutations in the elongation of very long chain fatty acid 4 (ELOVL4 gene cause Stargardt macular dystrophy 3 (STGD3, a rare, juvenile-onset, autosomal dominant form of macular degeneration. Although several mouse models have already been generated to investigate the link between the three identified disease-causing mutations in the ELOVL4 gene, none of these models recapitulates the early-onset cone photoreceptor cell death observed in the macula of STGD3 patients. To address this specifically, we investigated the effect of mutant ELOVL4 in a mouse model with an all-cone retina. Hence, we bred mice carrying the heterozygously mutated Elovl4 gene on the R91W;Nrl-/- all-cone background and analyzed the retinal lipid composition, morphology, and function over the course of 1 year. We observed a reduction of total phosphatidylcholine-containing very long chain-polyunsaturated fatty acids (PC-VLC-PUFAs by 39% in the R91W;Nrl-/-;Elovl4 mice already at 6 weeks of age with a pronounced decline of the longest forms of PC-VLC-PUFAs. Total levels of shorter-chain fatty acids (< C26 remained unaffected. However, this reduction in PC-VLC-PUFA content in the all-cone retina had no impact on morphology or function and did not accelerate retinal degeneration in the R91W;Nrl-/-;Elovl4 mice. Taken together, mutations in the ELOVL4 gene lead to cone degeneration in humans, whereas mouse models expressing the mutant Elovl4 show predominant rod degeneration. The lack of a phenotype in the all-cone retina expressing the mutant form of the protein supports the view that aberrant function of ELOVL4 is especially detrimental for rods in mice and suggests a more subtle role of VLC-PUFAs for cone maintenance and survival.

  12. cis Retinol oxidation regulates photoreceptor access to the retina visual cycle and cone pigment regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Shinya; Kefalov, Vladimir J

    2016-11-15

    This study explores the nature of the cis retinol that Müller cells in the retina provide to cones for the regeneration of their visual pigment. We report that the retina visual cycle provides cones exclusively with 11-cis chromophore in both salamander and mouse and show that this selectivity is dependent on the 11-cis-specific cellular retinaldehyde binding protein (CRALBP) present in Müller cells. Even though salamander blue cones and green rods share the same visual pigment, only blue cones but not green rods are able to dark-adapt in the retina following a bleach and to use exogenous 9-cis retinol for pigment regeneration, suggesting that access to the retina visual cycle is cone-specific and pigment-independent. Our results show that the retina produces 11-cis retinol that can be oxidized and used for pigment regeneration and dark adaptation selectively in cones and not in rods. Chromophore supply by the retinal Müller cells (retina visual cycle) supports the efficient pigment regeneration required for cone photoreceptor function in bright light. Surprisingly, a large fraction of the chromophore produced by dihydroceramide desaturase-1, the putative all-trans retinol isomerase in Müller cells, appears to be 9-cis retinol. In contrast, the canonical retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) visual cycle produces exclusively 11-cis retinal. Here, we used the different absorption spectra of 9-cis and 11-cis pigments to identify the isoform of the chromophore produced by the visual cycle of the intact retina. We found that the spectral sensitivity of salamander and mouse cones dark-adapted in the isolated retina (with only the retina visual cycle) was similar to that of cones dark-adapted in the intact eye (with both the RPE and retina visual cycles) and consistent with pure 11-cis pigment composition. However, in mice lacking the cellular retinaldehyde binding protein (CRALBP), cone spectral sensitivity contained a substantial 9-cis component. Thus, the retina visual

  13. Preservation of cone photoreceptors after a rapid yet transient degeneration and remodeling in cone-only Nrl−/− mouse retina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roger, Jerome E; Ranganath, Keerthi; Zhao, Lian; Cojocaru, Radu I; Brooks, Matthew; Gotoh, Norimoto; Veleri, Shobi; Hiriyanna, Avinash; Rachel, Rivka A; Campos, Maria Mercedes; Fariss, Robert N; Wong, Wai T; Swaroop, Anand

    2012-01-01

    Cone photoreceptors are the primary initiator of visual transduction in the human retina. Dysfunction or death of rod photoreceptors precedes cone loss in many retinal and macular degenerative diseases, suggesting a rod-dependent trophic support for cone survival. Rod differentiation and homeostasis are dependent on the basic motif leucine zipper transcription factor NRL. The loss of Nrl (Nrl−/−) in mice results in a retina with predominantly S-opsin containing cones that exhibit molecular and functional characteristics of WT cones. Here we report that Nrl−/− retina undergoes a rapid but transient period of degeneration in early adulthood, with cone apoptosis, retinal detachment, alterations in retinal vessel structure, and activation and translocation of retinal microglia. However, cone degeneration stabilizes by four months of age, resulting in a thinner but intact outer nuclear layer with residual cones expressing S- and M-opsins and a preserved photopic ERG. At this stage, microglia translocate back to the inner retina and reacquire a quiescent morphology. Gene profiling analysis during the period of transient degeneration reveals misregulation of genes related to stress response and inflammation, implying their involvement in cone death. The Nrl−/− mouse illustrates the long-term viability of cones in the absence of rods and RPE defects in a rodless retina. We propose that Nrl−/− retina may serve as a model for elucidating mechanisms of cone homeostasis and degeneration that would be relevant to understanding diseases of the cone-dominant human macula. PMID:22238088

  14. Vigabatrin-induced retinal toxicity is partially mediated by signaling in rod and cone photoreceptors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Yang

    Full Text Available Vigabatrin (VGB is a commonly prescribed antiepileptic drug designed to inhibit GABA-transaminase, effectively halting seizures. Unfortunately, VGB treatment is also associated with the highest frequencies of peripheral visual field constriction of any of the antiepileptic drugs and the mechanisms that lead to these visual field defects are uncertain. Recent studies have demonstrated light exposure exacerbates vigabatrin-induced retinal toxicity. We further assessed this relationship by examining the effects of vigabatrin treatment on the retinal structures of mice with genetically altered photoreception. In keeping with previous studies, we detected increased toxicity in mice exposed to continuous light. To study whether cone or rod photoreceptor function was involved in the pathway to toxicity, we tested mice with mutations in the cone-specific Gnat2 or rod-specific Pde6g genes, and found the mutations significantly reduced VGB toxicity. Our results confirm light is a significant enhancer of vigabatrin toxicity and that a portion of this is mediated, directly or indirectly, by phototransduction signaling in rod and cone photoreceptors.

  15. Quantitative and Topographical Analysis of the Losses of Cone Photoreceptors and Retinal Ganglion Cells Under Taurine Depletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadj-Saïd, Wahiba; Froger, Nicolas; Ivkovic, Ivana; Jiménez-López, Manuel; Dubus, Élisabeth; Dégardin-Chicaud, Julie; Simonutti, Manuel; Quénol, César; Neveux, Nathalie; Villegas-Pérez, María Paz; Agudo-Barriuso, Marta; Vidal-Sanz, Manuel; Sahel, Jose-Alain; Picaud, Serge; García-Ayuso, Diego

    2016-09-01

    Taurine depletion is known to induce photoreceptor degeneration and was recently found to also trigger retinal ganglion cell (RGC) loss similar to the retinal toxicity of vigabatrin. Our objective was to study the topographical loss of RGCs and cone photoreceptors, with a distinction between the two cone types (S- and L- cones) in an animal model of induced taurine depletion. We used the taurine transporter (Tau-T) inhibitor, guanidoethane sulfonate (GES), to induce taurine depletion at a concentration of 1% in the drinking water. Spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) and electroretinograms (ERG) were performed on animals after 2 months of GES treatment administered through the drinking water. Retinas were dissected as wholemounts and immunodetection of Brn3a (RGC), S-opsin (S-cones), and L-opsin (L-cones) was performed. The number of Brn3a+ RGCs, and L- and S-opsin+ cones was automatically quantified and their retinal distribution studied using isodensity maps. The treatment resulted in a significant reduction in plasma taurine levels and a profound dysfunction of visual performance as shown by ERG recordings. Optical coherence tomography analysis revealed that the retina was thinner in the taurine-depleted group. S-opsin+cones were more affected (36%) than L-opsin+cones (27%) with greater cone cell loss in the dorsal area whereas RGC loss (12%) was uniformly distributed. This study confirms that taurine depletion causes RGC and cone loss. Electroretinograms results show that taurine depletion induces retinal dysfunction in photoreceptors and in the inner retina. It establishes a gradient of cell loss depending on the cell type from S-opsin+cones, L-opsin+cones, to RGCs. The greater cell loss in the dorsal retina and of the S-cone population may underline different cellular mechanisms of cellular degeneration and suggests that S-cones may be more sensitive to light-induced retinal toxicity enhanced by the taurine depletion.

  16. ROS-GC interlocked Ca2+-sensor S100B protein signaling in cone photoreceptors: Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rameshwar K Sharma

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Photoreceptor rod outer segment membrane guanylate cyclase (ROS-GC is central to visual transduction; it generates cyclic GMP, the second messenger of the photon signal. Photoexcited rhodopsin initiates a biochemical cascade that leads to a drop in the intracellular level of cyclic GMP and closure of cyclic nucleotide gated (CNG ion channels. Recovery of the photoresponse requires resynthesis of cyclic GMP, typically by a pair of ROS-GCs, 1 and 2. In rods, ROS-GCs exist as complexes with GCAPs, which are Ca2+-sensing elements. There is a light-induced fall in intracellular Ca2+. As Ca2+ dissociates from GCAPs in the 20 to 200 nM range, ROS-GC activity rises to quicken the photoresponse recovery. GCAPs then progressively turn down ROS-GC activity as Ca2+ and cyclic GMP levels return to baseline. To date, GCAPs mediate the only known mechanism of ROS-GC regulation in the photoreceptors. However, in mammalian cone outer segments, cone synapses and ON bipolar cells, another Ca2+ sensor protein, S100B, complexes with ROS-GC1 and senses the Ca2+ signal with a K1/2 of 400 nM. Unlike GCAPs, S100B stimulates ROS-GC activity when Ca2+ is bound. Thus, the ROS-GC system in cones functions as a Ca2+ bimodal switch; with rising intracellular Ca2+, its activity is first turned down by GCAPs and then turned up by S100B. This presentation provides a historical perspective on the role of S100B in the photoreceptors, offers a pictorial model for the bimodal operation of the ROS-GC switch and projects future tasks that are needed to understand its operation. Some accounts of this review have been adopted from the original publications of these authors.

  17. Quantitative analysis of cone photoreceptor distribution and its relationship with axial length, age, and early age-related macular degeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryo Obata

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: It has not been clarified whether early age-related macular degeneration (AMD is associated with cone photoreceptor distribution. We used adaptive optics fundus camera to examine cone photoreceptors in the macular area of aged patients and quantitatively analyzed its relationship between the presence of early AMD and cone distribution. METHODS: Sixty cases aged 50 or older were studied. The eyes were examined with funduscopy and spectral-domain optical coherence tomography to exclude the eyes with any abnormalities at two sites of measurement, 2° superior and 5° temporal to the fovea. High-resolution retinal images with cone photoreceptor mosaic were obtained with adaptive optics fundus camera (rtx1, Imagine Eyes, France. After adjusting for axial length, cone packing density was calculated and the relationship with age, axial length, or severity of early AMD based on the age-related eye disease study (AREDS classification was analyzed. RESULTS: Patient's age ranged from 50 to 77, and axial length from 21.7 to 27.5 mm. Mean density in metric units and that in angular units were 24,900 cells/mm2, 2,170 cells/deg2 at 2° superior, and 18,500 cells/mm2, 1,570 cels/deg2 at 5° temporal, respectively. Axial length was significantly correlated with the density calculated in metric units, but not with that in angular units. Age was significantly correlated with the density both in metric and angular units at 2° superior. There was no significant difference in the density in metric and angular units between the eyes with AREDS category one and those with categories two or three. CONCLUSION: Axial length and age were significantly correlated with parafoveal cone photoreceptor distribution. The results do not support that early AMD might influence cone photoreceptor density in the area without drusen or pigment abnormalities.

  18. Multiple rod–cone and cone–rod photoreceptor transmutations in snakes: evidence from visual opsin gene expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampaio, Filipa L.; Loew, Ellis R.; Sanders, Kate L.; Fisher, Robert N.; Hart, Nathan S.; Hunt, David M.; Partridge, Julian C.

    2016-01-01

    In 1934, Gordon Walls forwarded his radical theory of retinal photoreceptor ‘transmutation’. This proposed that rods and cones used for scotopic and photopic vision, respectively, were not fixed but could evolve into each other via a series of morphologically distinguishable intermediates. Walls' prime evidence came from series of diurnal and nocturnal geckos and snakes that appeared to have pure-cone or pure-rod retinas (in forms that Walls believed evolved from ancestors with the reverse complement) or which possessed intermediate photoreceptor cells. Walls was limited in testing his theory because the precise identity of visual pigments present in photoreceptors was then unknown. Subsequent molecular research has hitherto neglected this topic but presents new opportunities. We identify three visual opsin genes, rh1, sws1 and lws, in retinal mRNA of an ecologically and taxonomically diverse sample of snakes central to Walls' theory. We conclude that photoreceptors with superficially rod- or cone-like morphology are not limited to containing scotopic or photopic opsins, respectively. Walls' theory is essentially correct, and more research is needed to identify the patterns, processes and functional implications of transmutation. Future research will help to clarify the fundamental properties and physiology of photoreceptors adapted to function in different light levels. PMID:26817768

  19. Multiple rod–cone and cone–rod photoreceptor transmutations in snakes: Evidence from visual opsin gene expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simoe, Bruno F; Sampaio, Filipa L.; Loew, Ellis R.; Sanders, Kate L.; Fisher, Robert N.; Hart, Nathan S.; Hunt, David M.; Partridge, Julian C.; Gower, David J.

    2016-01-01

    In 1934, Gordon Walls forwarded his radical theory of retinal photoreceptor ‘transmutation’. This proposed that rods and cones used for scotopic and photopic vision, respectively, were not fixed but could evolve into each other via a series of morphologically distinguishable intermediates. Walls' prime evidence came from series of diurnal and nocturnal geckos and snakes that appeared to have pure-cone or pure-rod retinas (in forms that Walls believed evolved from ancestors with the reverse complement) or which possessed intermediate photoreceptor cells. Walls was limited in testing his theory because the precise identity of visual pigments present in photoreceptors was then unknown. Subsequent molecular research has hitherto neglected this topic but presents new opportunities. We identify three visual opsin genes, rh1, sws1 and lws, in retinal mRNA of an ecologically and taxonomically diverse sample of snakes central to Walls' theory. We conclude that photoreceptors with superficially rod- or cone-like morphology are not limited to containing scotopic or photopic opsins, respectively. Walls' theory is essentially correct, and more research is needed to identify the patterns, processes and functional implications of transmutation. Future research will help to clarify the fundamental properties and physiology of photoreceptors adapted to function in different light levels.

  20. Prominin-1 localizes to the open rims of outer segment lamellae in Xenopus laevis rod and cone photoreceptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Zhou; Anderson, David W; Papermaster, David S

    2012-01-25

    Prominin-1 expresses in rod and cone photoreceptors. Mutations in the prominin-1 gene cause retinal degeneration in humans. In this study, the authors investigated the expression and subcellular localization of xlProminin-1 protein, the Xenopus laevis ortholog of prominin-1, in rod and cone photoreceptors of this frog. Antibodies specific for xlProminin-1 were generated. Immunoblotting was used to study the expression and posttranslational processing of xlProminin-1 protein. Immunocytochemical light and electron microscopy and transgenesis were used to study the subcellular distribution of xlProminin-1. xlProminin-1 is expressed and is subject to posttranslational proteolytic processing in the retina, brain, and kidney. xlProminin-1 is differently expressed and localized in outer segments of rod and cone photoreceptors of X. laevis. Antibodies specific for the N or C termini of xlProminin-1 labeled the open rims of lamellae of cone outer segments (COS) and the open lamellae at the base of rod outer segments (ROS). By contrast, anti-peripherin-2/rds antibody, Xper5A11, labeled the closed rims of cone lamellae adjacent to the ciliary axoneme and the rims of the closed ROS disks. The extent of labeling of the basal ROS by anti-xlProminin-1 antibodies varied with the light cycle in this frog. The entire ROS was also faintly labeled by both antibodies, a result that contrasts with the current notion that prominin-1 localizes only to the basal ROS. These findings suggest that xlProminin-1 may serve as an anti-fusogenic factor in the regulation of disk morphogenesis and may help to maintain the open lamellar structure of basal ROS and COS disks in X. laevis photoreceptors.

  1. Circulating Reactive Oxidant Causes Apoptosis of Retinal Pigment Epithelium and Cone Photoreceptors in the Mouse Central Retina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Wang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Reactive oxidants damage the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE, which is required for viability of overlying photoreceptors. Smoking which leads to chronic accumulation of reactive oxidants in the circulation is linked to age-related macular degeneration (AMD where RPE death is seen along with photoreceptor loss in the central macular region of the retina. It is unclear why this damage is concentrated in the central retina. We asked whether circulating oxidant might specifically target the central retina. Mice were administered the classic reactive oxidant iodate through tail vein injection, and visual acuity was followed by optokinetic response. Histology and apoptosis was examined by H&E and immunostaining. Iodate indeed selectively damaged the central retina, and this damage was highlighted by early apoptosis of RPE in the central retina followed by apoptosis of photoreceptors adjacent to the region of RPE loss–-cones were lost preferentially. The pattern and extent of this damage was independent of exposure to light. We then conclude that circulating oxidant is sufficient to selectively damage the central retina highlighted by sequential apoptosis of RPE and photoreceptors, with cones being the most sensitivity to this RPE loss.

  2. Transient Photoreceptor Deconstruction by CNTF Enhances rAAV-Mediated Cone Functional Rescue in Late Stage CNGB3-Achromatopsia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komáromy, András M; Rowlan, Jessica S; Corr, Amanda T Parton; Reinstein, Shelby L; Boye, Sanford L; Cooper, Ann E; Gonzalez, Amaliris; Levy, Britt; Wen, Rong; Hauswirth, William W; Beltran, William A; Aguirre, Gustavo D

    2013-01-01

    Achromatopsia is a genetic disorder of cones, and one of the most common forms is a channelopathy caused by mutations in the β-subunit, CNGB3, of the cone cyclic nucleotide-gated (CNG) channel. Recombinant adeno-associated virus of serotype 5 (rAAV5)-mediated gene transfer of human CNGB3 cDNA to mutant dog cones results in functional and structural rescue in dogs 1 year. We now test a new therapeutic concept by combining gene therapy with the administration of ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF). Intravitreal CNTF causes transient dedifferentiation of photoreceptors, a process called deconstruction, whereby visual cells become immature with short outer segments, and decreased retinal function and gene expression that subsequently return to normal. Cone function was successfully rescued in all mutant dogs treated between 14 and 42 months of age with this strategy. CNTF-mediated deconstruction and regeneration of the photoreceptor outer segments prepares the mutant cones optimally for gene augmentation therapy. PMID:23568263

  3. Rod and cone photoreceptor cells produce ROS in response to stress in a live retinal explant system.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Bhatt, Lavinia

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE: The production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) can lead to oxidative stress, which is a strong contributory factor to many ocular diseases. In this study, the removal of trophic factors is used as a model system to investigate the effects of stress in the retina. The aims were to determine if both rod and cone photoreceptor cells produce ROS when they are deprived of trophic factor support and to demonstrate if the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase (Nox) enzymes are responsible for this ROS production. METHODS: Retinas were explanted from mice aged between postnatal days 8-10 and cultured overnight. The following morning, confocal microscopy combined with various fluorescent probes was used to detect the production of ROS. Each time peanut agglutinin (PNA), a cone photoreceptor marker, was used to facilitate orientation of the retina. Dihydroethidium and dihydrorhodamine 123 (DHR123) were used to determine which cells produce ROS. Subsequently, western blots of retinal serial sections were used to detect the presence of Noxs in the different retinal layers. The Nox inhibitor apocynin was then tested to determine if it altered the production of ROS within these cells. RESULTS: Live retinal explants, viewed at high magnifications using confocal microscopy, displayed an increase in the fluorescent products of dihydroethidium and DHR123 upon serum removal when compared to controls. DHR123 fluorescence, once oxidized, localized to mitochondria and was found in the same focal plane as the PNA staining. This showed that cones and rods produced ROS when stressed. Retinal serial sectioning established that the photoreceptor layer expressed Nox4, dual oxidase (Duox) 1, and Duox2 at varying levels. Finally, the Nox inhibitor apocynin decreased the burst stimulated by the stress of serum removal. CONCLUSIONS: Confocal microscopy and PNA staining allowed differentiation of cell types within the outermost layers of the retina, demonstrating

  4. Absorption of the eye lens and macular pigment derived from the reflectance of cone photoreceptors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zagers, N.P.A.; Norren, D. van

    2004-01-01

    We measured the amplitude of the directional component of the bleached fundus reflectance, the so-called optical Stiles-Crawford effect, as a function of wavelength. The directional reflectance originates from within the outer segments of the photoreceptors. Thus only two anterior absorbers are of

  5. Cone photoreceptor structure in patients with x-linked cone dysfunction and red-green color vision deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Patterson, Emily J.; Wilk, Melissa; Langlo, Christopher S.

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE. Mutations in the coding sequence of the L and M opsin genes are often associated with X-linked cone dysfunction (such as Bornholm Eye Disease, BED), though the exact color vision phenotype associated with these disorders is variable. We examined individuals with L/ M opsin gene mutations...

  6. Retinal cone photoreceptors require phosducin-like protein 1 for G protein complex assembly and signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher M Tracy

    Full Text Available G protein β subunits (Gβ play essential roles in phototransduction as part of G protein βγ (Gβγ and regulator of G protein signaling 9 (RGS9-Gβ5 heterodimers. Both are obligate dimers that rely on the cytosolic chaperone CCT and its co-chaperone PhLP1 to form complexes from their nascent polypeptides. The importance of PhLP1 in the assembly process was recently demonstrated in vivo in a retinal rod-specific deletion of the Phlp1 gene. To test whether this is a general mechanism that also applies to other cell types, we disrupted the Phlp1 gene specifically in mouse cones and measured the effects on G protein expression and cone visual signal transduction. In PhLP1-deficient cones, expression of cone transducin (Gt2 and RGS9-Gβ5 subunits was dramatically reduced, resulting in a 27-fold decrease in sensitivity and a 38-fold delay in cone photoresponse recovery. These results demonstrate the essential role of PhLP1 in cone G protein complex formation. Our findings reveal a common mechanism of Gβγ and RGS9-Gβ5 assembly in rods and cones, highlighting the importance of PhLP1 and CCT-mediated Gβ complex formation in G protein signaling.

  7. Differentiation and Transplantation of Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Cone Photoreceptors into a Mouse Model of End-Stage Retinal Degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamil Kruczek

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The loss of cone photoreceptors that mediate daylight vision represents a leading cause of blindness, for which cell replacement by transplantation offers a promising treatment strategy. Here, we characterize cone differentiation in retinas derived from mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs. Similar to in vivo development, a temporal pattern of progenitor marker expression is followed by the differentiation of early thyroid hormone receptor β2-positive precursors and, subsequently, photoreceptors exhibiting cone-specific phototransduction-related proteins. We establish that stage-specific inhibition of the Notch pathway increases cone cell differentiation, while retinoic acid signaling regulates cone maturation, comparable with their actions in vivo. MESC-derived cones can be isolated in large numbers and transplanted into adult mouse eyes, showing capacity to survive and mature in the subretinal space of Aipl1−/− mice, a model of end-stage retinal degeneration. Together, this work identifies a robust, renewable cell source for cone replacement by purified cell suspension transplantation.

  8. Cloning and Immunocytochemical Localization of a Cyclic Nucleotide–Gated Channel α-Subunit to All Cone Photoreceptors in the Mouse Retina

    Science.gov (United States)

    HIRANO, ARLENE A.; HACK, IRIS; WÄSSLE, HEINZ; DUVOISIN, ROBERT M.

    2010-01-01

    Cyclic nucleotide–gated channels (CNGC) are ligand-gated ion channels that open and close in response to changes in the intracellular concentration of the second messengers, 3′,5′-cyclic adenosine monophosphate and 3′,5′-cyclic guanosine monophosphate. Most notably, they transduce the chemical signal produced by the absorption of light in photoreceptors into a membrane potential change, which is then transmitted to the ascending visual pathway. CNGCs have also been implicated in the signal transduction of other neurons downstream of the photoreceptors, in particular the ON-bipolar cells, as well as in other areas of the central nervous system. We therefore undertook a search for additional cyclic nucleotide–gated channels expressed in the retina. Following a degenerate reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction approach to amplify low-copy number messages, a cDNA encoding a new splice variant of CNGC α-subunit was isolated from mouse retina and classified as mCNG3. An antiserum raised against the carboxy-terminal sequence identified the retinal cell type expressing mCNG3 as cone photoreceptors. Preembedding immunoelectron microscopy demonstrated its membrane localization in the outer segments, consistent with its role in phototransduction. Double-labeling experiments with cone-specific markers indicated that all cone photoreceptors in the murid retina use the same or a highly conserved cyclic nucleotide–gated channel. Therefore, defects in this channel would be predicted to severely impair photopic vision. PMID:10813773

  9. Avian ultraviolet/violet cones identified as probable magnetoreceptors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Niessner

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The Radical-Pair-Model postulates that the reception of magnetic compass directions in birds is based on spin-chemical reactions in specialized photopigments in the eye, with cryptochromes discussed as candidate molecules. But so far, the exact subcellular characterization of these molecules in the retina remained unknown. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We here describe the localization of cryptochrome 1a (Cry1a in the retina of European robins, Erithacus rubecula, and domestic chickens, Gallus gallus, two species that have been shown to use the magnetic field for compass orientation. In both species, Cry1a is present exclusively in the ultraviolet/violet (UV/V cones that are distributed across the entire retina. Electron microscopy shows Cry1a in ordered bands along the membrane discs of the outer segment, and cell fractionation reveals Cry1a in the membrane fraction, suggesting the possibility that Cry1a is anchored along membranes. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We provide first structural evidence that Cry1a occurs within a sensory structure arranged in a way that fulfils essential requirements of the Radical-Pair-Model. Our findings, identifying the UV/V-cones as probable magnetoreceptors, support the assumption that Cry1a is indeed the receptor molecule mediating information on magnetic directions, and thus provide the Radical-Pair-Model with a profound histological background.

  10. A novel in vivo model of focal light emitting diode-induced cone-photoreceptor phototoxicity: neuroprotection afforded by brimonidine, BDNF, PEDF or bFGF.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arturo Ortín-Martínez

    Full Text Available We have investigated the effects of light-emitting diode (LED-induced phototoxicity (LIP on cone-photoreceptors and their protection with brimonidine (BMD, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF, pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF, ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF or basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF. In anesthetized, dark adapted, adult albino rats a blue (400 nm LED was placed perpendicular to the cornea (10 sec, 200 lux and the effects were investigated using Spectral Domain Optical Coherence Tomography (SD-OCT and/or analysing the retina in oriented cross-sections or wholemounts immune-labelled for L- and S-opsin and counterstained with the nuclear stain DAPI. The effects of topical BMD (1% or, intravitreally injected BDNF (5 µg, PEDF (2 µg, CNTF (0.4 µg or bFGF (1 µg after LIP were examined on wholemounts at 7 days. SD-OCT showed damage in a circular region of the superotemporal retina, whose diameter varied from 1,842.4±84.5 µm (at 24 hours to 1,407.7±52.8 µm (at 7 days. This region had a progressive thickness diminution from 183.4±5 µm (at 12 h to 114.6±6 µm (at 7 d. Oriented cross-sections showed within the light-damaged region of the retina massive loss of rods and cone-photoreceptors. Wholemounts documented a circular region containing lower numbers of L- and S-cones. Within a circular area (1 mm or 1.3 mm radius, respectively in the left and in its corresponding region of the contralateral-fellow-retina, total L- or S-cones were 7,118±842 or 661±125 for the LED exposed retinas (n = 7 and 14,040±1,860 or 2,255±193 for the fellow retinas (n = 7, respectively. BMD, BDNF, PEDF and bFGF but not CNTF showed significant neuroprotective effects on L- or S-cones. We conclude that LIP results in rod and cone-photoreceptor loss, and is a reliable, quantifiable model to study cone-photoreceptor degeneration. Intravitreal BDNF, PEDF or bFGF, or topical BMD afford significant cone neuroprotection in this model.

  11. Mouse ganglion-cell photoreceptors are driven by the most sensitive rod pathway and by both types of cones.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shijun Weng

    Full Text Available Intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (iprgcs are depolarized by light by two mechanisms: directly, through activation of their photopigment melanopsin; and indirectly through synaptic circuits driven by rods and cones. To learn more about the rod and cone circuits driving ipRGCs, we made multielectrode array (MEA and patch-clamp recordings in wildtype and genetically modified mice. Rod-driven ON inputs to ipRGCs proved to be as sensitive as any reaching the conventional ganglion cells. These signals presumably pass in part through the primary rod pathway, involving rod bipolar cells and AII amacrine cells coupled to ON cone bipolar cells through gap junctions. Consistent with this interpretation, the sensitive rod ON input to ipRGCs was eliminated by pharmacological or genetic disruption of gap junctions, as previously reported for conventional ganglion cells. A presumptive cone input was also detectable as a brisk, synaptically mediated ON response that persisted after disruption of rod ON pathways. This was roughly three log units less sensitive than the rod input. Spectral analysis revealed that both types of cones, the M- and S-cones, contribute to this response and that both cone types drive ON responses. This contrasts with the blue-OFF, yellow-ON chromatic opponency reported in primate ipRGCs. The cone-mediated response was surprisingly persistent during steady illumination, echoing the tonic nature of both the rod input to ipRGCs and their intrinsic, melanopsin-based phototransduction. These synaptic inputs greatly expand the dynamic range and spectral bandpass of the non-image-forming visual functions for which ipRGCs provide the principal retinal input.

  12. Prominin-1 Localizes to the Open Rims of Outer Segment Lamellae in Xenopus laevis Rod and Cone Photoreceptors

    OpenAIRE

    Han, Zhou; Anderson, David W.; Papermaster, David S.

    2012-01-01

    Antibodies specific for the N or C termini of xlProminin-1 labeled the open rims of lamellae of cone outer segments (COS) and the open lamellae at the base of rod outer segments (ROS). By contrast, anti-peripherin-2/rds antibody, Xper5A11, labeled the closed rims of cone lamellae adjacent to the ciliary axoneme and the rims of the closed ROS disks.

  13. Cone Photoreceptor Irregularity on Adaptive Optics Scanning Laser Ophthalmoscopy Correlates With Severity of Diabetic Retinopathy and Macular Edema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lammer, Jan; Prager, Sonja G; Cheney, Michael C; Ahmed, Amel; Radwan, Salma H; Burns, Stephen A; Silva, Paolo S; Sun, Jennifer K

    2016-12-01

    To determine whether cone density, spacing, or regularity in eyes with and without diabetes (DM) as assessed by high-resolution adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (AOSLO) correlates with presence of diabetes, diabetic retinopathy (DR) severity, or presence of diabetic macular edema (DME). Participants with type 1 or 2 DM and healthy controls underwent AOSLO imaging of four macular regions. Cone assessment was performed by independent graders for cone density, packing factor (PF), nearest neighbor distance (NND), and Voronoi tile area (VTA). Regularity indices (mean/SD) of NND (RI-NND) and VTA (RI-VTA) were calculated. Fifty-three eyes (53 subjects) were assessed. Mean ± SD age was 44 ± 12 years; 81% had DM (duration: 22 ± 13 years; glycated hemoglobin [HbA1c]: 8.0 ± 1.7%; DM type 1: 72%). No significant relationship was found between DM, HbA1c, or DR severity and cone density or spacing parameters. However, decreased regularity of cone arrangement in the macular quadrants was correlated with presence of DM (RI-NND: P = 0.04; RI-VTA: P = 0.04), increasing DR severity (RI-NND: P = 0.04), and presence of DME (RI-VTA: P = 0.04). Eyes with DME were associated with decreased density (P = 0.04), PF (P = 0.03), and RI-VTA (0.04). Although absolute cone density and spacing don't appear to change substantially in DM, decreased regularity of the cone arrangement is consistently associated with the presence of DM, increasing DR severity, and DME. Future AOSLO evaluation of cone regularity is warranted to determine whether these changes are correlated with, or predict, anatomic or functional deficits in patients with DM.

  14. Clinical characteristics of rod and cone photoreceptor dystrophies in patients with mutations in the C8orf37 gene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huet, R.A.C. van; Estrada-Cuzcano, A.; Banin, E.; Rotenstreich, Y.; Hipp, S.; Kohl, S.; Hoyng, C.B.; Hollander, A.I. den; Collin, R.W.J.; Klevering, B.J.

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE: To provide the clinical features in patients with retinal disease caused by C8orf37 gene mutations. METHODS: Eight patients--four diagnosed with retinitis pigmentosa (RP) and four with cone-rod dystrophy (CRD), carrying causal C8orf37 mutations--were clinically evaluated, including

  15. Causes and consequences of inherited cone disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roosing, S.; Thiadens, A.A.H.J.; Hoyng, C.B.; Klaver, C.C.; Hollander, A.I. den; Cremers, F.P.M.

    2014-01-01

    Hereditary cone disorders (CDs) are characterized by defects of the cone photoreceptors or retinal pigment epithelium underlying the macula, and include achromatopsia (ACHM), cone dystrophy (COD), cone-rod dystrophy (CRD), color vision impairment, Stargardt disease (STGD) and other maculopathies.

  16. Specialized photoreceptor composition in the raptor fovea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitkus, Mindaugas; Olsson, Peter; Toomey, Matthew B; Corbo, Joseph C; Kelber, Almut

    2017-06-15

    The retinae of many bird species contain a depression with high photoreceptor density known as the fovea. Many species of raptors have two foveae, a deep central fovea and a shallower temporal fovea. Birds have six types of photoreceptors: rods, active in dim light, double cones that are thought to mediate achromatic discrimination, and four types of single cones mediating color vision. To maximize visual acuity, the fovea should only contain photoreceptors contributing to high-resolution vision. Interestingly, it has been suggested that raptors might lack double cones in the fovea. We used transmission electron microscopy and immunohistochemistry to evaluate this claim in five raptor species: the common buzzard (Buteo buteo), the honey buzzard (Pernis apivorus), the Eurasian sparrowhawk (Accipiter nisus), the red kite (Milvus milvus), and the peregrine falcon (Falco peregrinus). We found that all species, except the Eurasian sparrowhawk, lack double cones in the center of the central fovea. The size of the double cone-free zone differed between species. Only the common buzzard had a double cone-free zone in the temporal fovea. In three species, we examined opsin expression in the central fovea and found evidence that rod opsin positive cells were absent and violet-sensitive cone and green-sensitive cone opsin positive cells were present. We conclude that not only double cones, but also single cones may contribute to high-resolution vision in birds, and that raptors may in fact possess high-resolution tetrachromatic vision in the central fovea. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Volumetric imaging of rod and cone photoreceptor structure with a combined adaptive optics-optical coherence tomography-scanning laser ophthalmoscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells-Gray, Elaine M; Choi, Stacey S; Zawadzki, Robert J; Finn, Susanna C; Greiner, Cherry; Werner, John S; Doble, Nathan

    2018-03-01

    We have designed and implemented a dual-mode adaptive optics (AO) imaging system that combines spectral domain optical coherence tomography (OCT) and scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (SLO) for in vivo imaging of the human retina. The system simultaneously acquires SLO frames and OCT B-scans at 60 Hz with an OCT volume acquisition time of 4.2 s. Transverse eye motion measured from the SLO is used to register the OCT B-scans to generate three-dimensional (3-D) volumes. Key optical design considerations include: minimizing system aberrations through the use of off-axis relay telescopes, conjugate pupil plane requirements, and the use of dichroic beam splitters to separate and recombine the OCT and SLO beams around the nonshared horizontal scanning mirrors. To demonstrate system performance, AO-OCT-SLO images and measurements are taken from three normal human subjects ranging in retinal eccentricity from the fovea out to 15-deg temporal and 20-deg superior. Also presented are en face OCT projections generated from the registered 3-D volumes. The ability to acquire high-resolution 3-D images of the human retina in the midperiphery and beyond has clinical importance in diseases, such as retinitis pigmentosa and cone-rod dystrophy. (2018) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE).

  18. Eyes shut homolog is required for maintaining the ciliary pocket and survival of photoreceptors in zebrafish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miao Yu

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in the extracellular matrix protein eyes shut homolog (EYS cause photoreceptor degeneration in patients with retinitis pigmentosa 25 (RP25. Functions of EYS remain poorly understood, due in part to the lack of an EYS gene in mouse. We investigated the localization of vertebrate EYS proteins and engineered loss-of-function alleles in zebrafish. Immunostaining indicated that EYS localized near the connecting cilium/transition zone in photoreceptors. EYS also strongly localized to the cone outer segments and weakly to the rod outer segments and cone terminals in primate retinas. Analysis of mutant EYS zebrafish revealed disruption of the ciliary pocket in cone photoreceptors, indicating that EYS is required for maintaining the integrity of the ciliary pocket lumen. Mutant zebrafish exhibited progressive loss of cone and rod photoreceptors. Our results indicate that EYS protein localization is species-dependent and that EYS is required for maintaining ciliary pocket morphology and survival of photoreceptors in zebrafish.

  19. A novel mechanism of cone photoreceptor adaptation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Howlett, Marcus H C; Smith, Robert G; Kamermans, M.

    2017-01-01

    An animal's ability to survive depends on its sensory systems being able to adapt to a wide range of environmental conditions, by maximizing the information extracted and reducing the noise transmitted. The visual system does this by adapting to luminance and contrast. While luminance adaptation can

  20. Mutations in PCDH21 cause autosomal recessive cone-rod dystrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Elsebet; Batbayli, M; Dunø, Morten

    2010-01-01

    Cone-rod dystrophy is a retinal dystrophy with early loss of cone photoreceptors and a parallel or subsequent loss of rod photoreceptors. It may be syndromic, but most forms are non-syndromic with autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive or X-linked recessive inheritance.......Cone-rod dystrophy is a retinal dystrophy with early loss of cone photoreceptors and a parallel or subsequent loss of rod photoreceptors. It may be syndromic, but most forms are non-syndromic with autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive or X-linked recessive inheritance....

  1. Impacts of the retinal environment and photoreceptor type on functional regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michèle G DuVal

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Retinal regeneration is a promising central nervous system (CNS target amongst the various stem cell therapy pursuits, due to its accessibility for manipulation and its disposition towards longitudinal monitoring of treatment safety and efficacy. We offer our perspective on current hurdles towards functional regeneration of cone photoreceptors. Cones are key: For patients suffering vision loss, cone photoreceptors are a required cellular component to restoring daytime vision, colour vision, and high acuity vision. The challenges of regenerating cones contrast with logistic challenges of regenerating rod photoreceptors, which underlines the importance of evaluating context in degeneration and regeneration studies. Foundational research is required to delineate the factors required to generate a diversity of cones in the human macula, and to coax both remaining and newly regenerating cones to rewire towards restoring daytime colour vision. A complex interplay between cell-intrinsic factors and the retinal environment determine both the specification of cone fates and the synaptic plasticity enabling their functional integration. Recent revelations that cellular materials are transferred amongst photoreceptor progenitors further emphasize the critical role of neighbouring cells in directing stem cell fates. From our vantage point, translation of stem cell therapies to restore the cone-rich human macula must be borne upon foundational research in cone-rich retinas. Research frameworks centered on patient outcomes should prioritize animal models and functional outputs that enable and report functional restoration of cone-mediated vision.

  2. Bipolar Cell-Photoreceptor Connectivity in the Zebrafish (Danio rerio) Retina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yong N.; Tsujimura, Taro; Kawamura, Shoji; Dowling, John E.

    2013-01-01

    Bipolar cells convey luminance, spatial and color information from photoreceptors to amacrine and ganglion cells. We studied the photoreceptor connectivity of 321 bipolar cells in the adult zebrafish retina. 1,1'-Dioctadecyl-3,3,3',3'-tetramethylindocarbocyanine perchlorate (DiI) was inserted into whole-mounted transgenic zebrafish retinas to label bipolar cells. The photoreceptors that connect to these DiI-labeled cells were identified by transgenic fluorescence or their positions relative to the fluorescent cones, as cones are arranged in a highly-ordered mosaic: rows of alternating blue- (B) and ultraviolet-sensitive (UV) single cones alternate with rows of red- (R) and green-sensitive (G) double cones. Rod terminals intersperse among cone terminals. As many as 18 connectivity subtypes were observed, 9 of which – G, GBUV, RG, RGB, RGBUV, RGRod, RGBRod, RGBUVRod and RRod bipolar cells – accounted for 96% of the population. Based on their axon terminal stratification, these bipolar cells could be further sub-divided into ON, OFF, and ON-OFF cells. The dendritic spread size, soma depth and size, and photoreceptor connections of the 308 bipolar cells within the 9 common connectivity subtypes were determined, and their dendritic tree morphologies and axonal stratification patterns compared. We found that bipolar cells with the same axonal stratification patterns could have heterogeneous photoreceptor connectivity whereas bipolar cells with the same dendritic tree morphology usually had the same photoreceptor connectivity, although their axons might stratify on different levels. PMID:22907678

  3. The zebrafish galectin Drgal1-l2 is expressed by proliferating Müller glia and photoreceptor progenitors and regulates the regeneration of rod photoreceptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, Sonya E L; Thummel, Ryan; Ahmed, Hafiz; Vasta, Gerardo R; Hyde, David R; Hitchcock, Peter F

    2010-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify secreted proteins in the retina of the adult zebrafish that are induced by the selective death of photoreceptors and to test experimentally the function of these proteins during the regeneration of photoreceptors. Induced selective death of photoreceptors in the retina of the adult zebrafish was combined with in situ hybridization and immunocytochemistry to identify the induced cellular expression of the secreted beta-galactoside binding protein Galectin 1-like 2 (Drgal1-L2). Electroporation of morpholino oligonucleotides was used to knock down protein synthesis, and regenerated photoreceptors were counted in control and experimental retinas after labeling with cell type-specific RNA probes. Expression analysis and immunocytochemistry showed that Drgal1-L2 is induced de novo by photoreceptor death and is synthesized by microglia and proliferating Müller glia and their mitotic progeny. Knockdown of Drgal1-L2 expression in Müller glia results in reduced regeneration of rod photoreceptors without affecting injury-induced proliferation or the regeneration of cone photoreceptors. Based on these data, the authors conclude that Drgal1-L2 is induced by photoreceptor cell death and secreted by stem cells and neuronal progenitors and that it regulates the regeneration of rod photoreceptors. Drgal1-L2 is the first secreted factor shown to regulate aspects of regenerative neurogenesis in the teleost retina.

  4. Retinal Thickening and Photoreceptor Loss in HIV Eyes without Retinitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheryl A Arcinue

    Full Text Available To determine the presence of structural changes in HIV retinae (i.e., photoreceptor density and retinal thickness in the macula compared with age-matched HIV-negative controls.Cohort of patients with known HIV under CART (combination Antiretroviral Therapy treatment were examined with a flood-illuminated retinal AO camera to assess the cone photoreceptor mosaic and spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT to assess retinal layers and retinal thickness.Twenty-four eyes of 12 patients (n = 6 HIV-positive and 6 HIV-negative were imaged with the adaptive optics camera. In each of the regions of interest studied (nasal, temporal, superior, inferior, the HIV group had significantly less mean cone photoreceptor density compared with age-matched controls (difference range, 4,308-6,872 cones/mm2. A different subset of forty eyes of 20 patients (n = 10 HIV-positive and 10 HIV-negative was included in the retinal thickness measurements and retinal layer segmentation with the SD-OCT. We observed significant thickening in HIV positive eyes in the total retinal thickness at the foveal center, and in each of the three horizontal B-scans (through the macular center, superior, and inferior to the fovea. We also noted that the inner retina (combined thickness from ILM through RNFL to GCL layer was also significantly thickened in all the different locations scanned compared with HIV-negative controls.Our present study shows that the cone photoreceptor density is significantly reduced in HIV retinae compared with age-matched controls. HIV retinae also have increased macular retinal thickness that may be caused by inner retinal edema secondary to retinovascular disease in HIV. The interaction of photoreceptors with the aging RPE, as well as possible low-grade ocular inflammation causing diffuse inner retinal edema, may be the key to the progressive vision changes in HIV-positive patients without overt retinitis.

  5. Bioinformatic identification of novel putative photoreceptor specific cis-elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Knox Barry E

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cell specific gene expression is largely regulated by different combinations of transcription factors that bind cis-elements in the upstream promoter sequence. However, experimental detection of cis-elements is difficult, expensive, and time-consuming. This provides a motivation for developing bioinformatic methods to identify cis-elements that could prioritize future experimental studies. Here, we use motif discovery algorithms to predict transcription factor binding sites involved in regulating the differences between murine rod and cone photoreceptor populations. Results To identify highly conserved motifs enriched in promoters that drive expression in either rod or cone photoreceptors, we assembled a set of murine rod-specific, cone-specific, and non-photoreceptor background promoter sequences. These sets were used as input to a newly devised motif discovery algorithm called Iterative Alignment/Modular Motif Selection (IAMMS. Using IAMMS, we predicted 34 motifs that may contribute to rod-specific (19 motifs or cone-specific (15 motifs expression patterns. Of these, 16 rod- and 12 cone-specific motifs were found in clusters near the transcription start site. New findings include the observation that cone promoters tend to contain TATA boxes, while rod promoters tend to be TATA-less (exempting Rho and Cnga1. Additionally, we identify putative sites for IL-6 effectors (in rods and RXR family members (in cones that can explain experimental data showing changes to cell-fate by activating these signaling pathways during rod/cone development. Two of the predicted motifs (NRE and ROP2 have been confirmed experimentally to be involved in cell-specific expression patterns. We provide a full database of predictions as additional data that may contain further valuable information. IAMMS predictions are compared with existing motif discovery algorithms, DME and BioProspector. We find that over 60% of IAMMS predictions are confirmed by

  6. Cone biopsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... biopsy; HSIL - cone biopsy; Low-grade cone biopsy; High-grade cone biopsy; Carcinoma in situ-cone biopsy; ... the cervix. In: Baggish MS, Karram MM, eds. Atlas of Pelvic Anatomy and Gynecologic Surgery . 4th ed. ...

  7. p53 selectively regulates developmental apoptosis of rod photoreceptors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda Vuong

    Full Text Available Retinal cells become post-mitotic early during post-natal development. It is likely that p53, a well-known cell cycle regulator, is involved in regulating the genesis, differentiation and death of retinal cells. Furthermore, retinal cells are under constant oxidative stress that can result in DNA damage, due to the extremely high level of metabolic activity associated with phototransduction. If not repaired, this damage may result in p53-dependent cell death and ensuing vision loss. In this study, the role of p53 during retinal development and in the post-mitotic retina is investigated. A previously described super p53 transgenic mouse that expresses an extra copy of the mouse p53 gene driven by its endogenous promoter is utilized. Another transgenic mouse (HIP that expresses the p53 gene in rod and cone photoreceptors driven by the human interphotoreceptor retinoid binding protein promoter was generated. The electroretinogram (ERG of the super p53 mouse exhibited reduced rod-driven scotopic a and b wave and cone-driven photopic b wave responses. This deficit resulted from a reduced number of rod photoreceptors and inner nuclear layer cells. However, the reduced photopic signal arose only from lost inner retinal neurons, as cone numbers did not change. Furthermore, cell loss was non-progressive and resulted from increased apoptosis during retinal developmental as determined by TUNEL staining. In contrast, the continuous and specific expression of p53 in rod and cone photoreceptors in the mature retinas of HIP mice led to the selective loss of both rods and cones. These findings strongly support a role for p53 in regulating developmental apoptosis in the retina and suggest a potential role, either direct or indirect, for p53 in the degenerative photoreceptor loss associated with human blinding disorders.

  8. Molecular basis for photoreceptor outer segment architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Andrew F X; Moritz, Orson L; Williams, David S

    2016-11-01

    To serve vision, vertebrate rod and cone photoreceptors must detect photons, convert the light stimuli into cellular signals, and then convey the encoded information to downstream neurons. Rods and cones are sensory neurons that each rely on specialized ciliary organelles to detect light. These organelles, called outer segments, possess elaborate architectures that include many hundreds of light-sensitive membranous disks arrayed one atop another in precise register. These stacked disks capture light and initiate the chain of molecular and cellular events that underlie normal vision. Outer segment organization is challenged by an inherently dynamic nature; these organelles are subject to a renewal process that replaces a significant fraction of their disks (up to ∼10%) on a daily basis. In addition, a broad range of environmental and genetic insults can disrupt outer segment morphology to impair photoreceptor function and viability. In this chapter, we survey the major progress that has been made for understanding the molecular basis of outer segment architecture. We also discuss key aspects of organelle lipid and protein composition, and highlight distributions, interactions, and potential structural functions of key OS-resident molecules, including: kinesin-2, actin, RP1, prominin-1, protocadherin 21, peripherin-2/rds, rom-1, glutamic acid-rich proteins, and rhodopsin. Finally, we identify key knowledge gaps and challenges that remain for understanding how normal outer segment architecture is established and maintained. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Color discrimination with broadband photoreceptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnaitmann, Christopher; Garbers, Christian; Wachtler, Thomas; Tanimoto, Hiromu

    2013-12-02

    Color vision is commonly assumed to rely on photoreceptors tuned to narrow spectral ranges. In the ommatidium of Drosophila, the four types of so-called inner photoreceptors express different narrow-band opsins. In contrast, the outer photoreceptors have a broadband spectral sensitivity and were thought to exclusively mediate achromatic vision. Using computational models and behavioral experiments, we demonstrate that the broadband outer photoreceptors contribute to color vision in Drosophila. The model of opponent processing that includes the opsin of the outer photoreceptors scored the best fit to wavelength discrimination data. To experimentally uncover the contribution of individual photoreceptor types, we restored phototransduction of targeted photoreceptor combinations in a blind mutant. Dichromatic flies with only broadband photoreceptors and one additional receptor type can discriminate different colors, indicating the existence of a specific output comparison of the outer and inner photoreceptors. Furthermore, blocking interneurons postsynaptic to the outer photoreceptors specifically impaired color but not intensity discrimination. Our findings show that receptors with a complex and broad spectral sensitivity can contribute to color vision and reveal that chromatic and achromatic circuits in the fly share common photoreceptors. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Mouse models for cone degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samardzija, Marijana; Grimm, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Loss of cone vision has devastating effects on everyday life. Even though much effort has been made to understand cone physiology and pathophysiology, no successful therapies are available for patients suffering from cone disorders. As complex retinal interactions cannot be studied in vitro, utilization of different animal models is inevitable. Due to recent advances in transgenesis, mice became the most popular animal model to study human diseases, also in ophthalmology. While there are similarities in retinal anatomy and pathophysiology between mice and humans, there are also differences, most importantly the lack of a cone-rich macula in mice. Instead, cones in mice are rare and distributed over the whole retina, which makes the analysis of cone pathophysiology very difficult in these animals. This hindrance is one of the reasons why our understanding of rod pathophysiological processes is much more advanced. Recently, however, the sparseness of cones was overcome by the generation of the Nrl (- / -) mouse that expresses only cone photoreceptors in the retina. This paper will give a brief overview of some of the known mouse models to study cone degeneration and discuss the current knowledge gained from the analysis of these models.

  11. CRALBP supports the mammalian retinal visual cycle and cone vision

    OpenAIRE

    Xue, Yunlu; Shen, Susan Q.; Jui, Jonathan; Rupp, Alan C.; Byrne, Leah C.; Hattar, Samer; Flannery, John G.; Corbo, Joseph C.; Kefalov, Vladimir J.

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in the cellular retinaldehyde-binding protein (CRALBP, encoded by RLBP1) can lead to severe cone photoreceptor-mediated vision loss in patients. It is not known how CRALBP supports cone function or how altered CRALBP leads to cone dysfunction. Here, we determined that deletion of Rlbp1 in mice impairs the retinal visual cycle. Mice lacking CRALBP exhibited M-opsin mislocalization, M-cone loss, and impaired cone-driven visual behavior and light responses. Additionally, M-cone dark ad...

  12. Excessive Myosin Activity in Mbs Mutants Causes Photoreceptor Movement Out of the Drosophila Eye Disc Epithelium

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Arnold; Treisman, Jessica E.

    2004-01-01

    Neuronal cells must extend a motile growth cone while maintaining the cell body in its original position. In migrating cells, myosin contraction provides the driving force that pulls the rear of the cell toward the leading edge. We have characterized the function of myosin light chain phosphatase, which down-regulates myosin activity, in Drosophila photoreceptor neurons. Mutations in the gene encoding the myosin binding subunit of this enzyme cause photoreceptors to drop out of the eye disc e...

  13. Characterization of multiple light damage paradigms reveals regional differences in photoreceptor loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Jennifer L; Nelson, Craig M; Luo, Xixia; Hyde, David R; Thummel, Ryan

    2012-04-01

    Zebrafish provide an attractive model to study the retinal response to photoreceptor apoptosis due to its remarkable ability to spontaneously regenerate retinal neurons following damage. There are currently two widely-used light-induced retinal degeneration models to damage photoreceptors in the adult zebrafish. One model uses constant bright light, whereas the other uses a short exposure to extremely intense ultraviolet light. Although both models are currently used, it is unclear whether they differ in regard to the extent of photoreceptor damage or the subsequent regeneration response. Here we report a thorough analysis of the photoreceptor damage and subsequent proliferation response elicited by each individual treatment, as well as by the concomitant use of both treatments. We show a differential loss of rod and cone photoreceptors with each treatment. Additionally, we show that the extent of proliferation observed in the retina directly correlates with the severity of photoreceptor loss. We also demonstrate that both the ventral and posterior regions of the retina are partially protected from light damage. Finally, we show that combining a short ultraviolet exposure followed by a constant bright light treatment largely eliminates the neuroprotected regions, resulting in widespread loss of rod and cone photoreceptors and a robust regenerative response throughout the retina. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Calcium channel-dependent molecular maturation of photoreceptor synapses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nawal Zabouri

    Full Text Available Several studies have shown the importance of calcium channels in the development and/or maturation of synapses. The Ca(V1.4(α(1F knockout mouse is a unique model to study the role of calcium channels in photoreceptor synapse formation. It features abnormal ribbon synapses and aberrant cone morphology. We investigated the expression and targeting of several key elements of ribbon synapses and analyzed the cone morphology in the Ca(V1.4(α(1F knockout retina. Our data demonstrate that most abnormalities occur after eye opening. Indeed, scaffolding proteins such as Bassoon and RIM2 are properly targeted at first, but their expression and localization are not maintained in adulthood. This indicates that either calcium or the Ca(V1.4 channel, or both are necessary for the maintenance of their normal expression and distribution in photoreceptors. Other proteins, such as Veli3 and PSD-95, also display abnormal expression in rods prior to eye opening. Conversely, vesicle related proteins appear normal. Our data demonstrate that the Ca(V1.4 channel is important for maintaining scaffolding proteins in the ribbon synapse but less vital for proteins related to vesicular release. This study also confirms that in adult retinae, cones show developmental features such as sprouting and synaptogenesis. Overall we present evidence that in the absence of the Ca(V1.4 channel, photoreceptor synapses remain immature and are unable to stabilize.

  15. Ciliary photoreceptors in the cerebral eyes of a protostome larva

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Passamaneck Yale J

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Eyes in bilaterian metazoans have been described as being composed of either ciliary or rhabdomeric photoreceptors. Phylogenetic distribution, as well as distinct morphologies and characteristic deployment of different photopigments (ciliary vs. rhabdomeric opsins and transduction pathways argue for the co-existence of both of these two photoreceptor types in the last common bilaterian ancestor. Both receptor types exist throughout the Bilateria, but only vertebrates are thought to use ciliary photoreceptors for directional light detection in cerebral eyes, while all other invertebrate bilaterians studied utilize rhabdomeric photoreceptors for this purpose. In protostomes, ciliary photoreceptors that express c-opsin have been described only from a non-visual deep-brain photoreceptor. Their homology with vertebrate rods and cones of the human eye has been hypothesized to represent a unique functional transition from non-visual to visual roles in the vertebrate lineage. Results To test the hypothesis that protostome cerebral eyes employ exclusively rhabdomeric photoreceptors, we investigated the ultrastructure of the larval eyes in the brachiopod Terebratalia transversa. We show that these pigment-cup eyes consist of a lens cell and a shading pigment cell, both of which are putative photoreceptors, deploying a modified, enlarged cilium for light perception, and have axonal connections to the larval brain. Our investigation of the gene expression patterns of c-opsin, Pax6 and otx in these eyes confirms that the larval eye spots of brachiopods are cerebral eyes that deploy ciliary type photoreceptors for directional light detection. Interestingly, c-opsin is also expressed during early embryogenesis in all potential apical neural cells, becoming restricted to the anterior neuroectoderm, before expression is initiated in the photoreceptor cells of the eyes. Coincident with the expression of c-opsin in the presumptive neuroectoderm

  16. Characterization of photoreceptor cell types in the little brown bat Myotis lucifugus (Vespertilionidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feller, K D; Lagerholm, S; Clubwala, R; Silver, M T; Haughey, D; Ryan, J M; Loew, E R; Deutschlander, M E; Kenyon, K L

    2009-12-01

    We report the expression of three visual opsins in the retina of the little brown bat (Myotis lucifugus, Vespertilionidae). Gene sequences for a rod-specific opsin and two cone-specific opsins were cloned from cDNA derived from bat eyes. Comparative sequence analyses indicate that the two cone opsins correspond to an ultraviolet short-wavelength opsin (SWS1) and a long-wavelength opsin (LWS). Immunocytochemistry using antisera to visual opsins revealed that the little brown bat retina contains two types of cone photoreceptors within a rod-dominated background. However, unlike other mammalian photoreceptors, M. lucifugus cones and rods are morphologically indistinguishable by light microscopy. Both photoreceptor types have a thin, elongated outer segment. Using microspectrophotometry we classified the absorption spectrum for the ubiquitous rods. Similar to other mammals, bat rhodopsin has an absorption peak near 500 nm. Although we were unable to confirm a spectral range, cellular and molecular analyses indicate that M. lucifugus expresses two types of cone visual pigments located within the photoreceptor layer. This study provides important insights into the visual capacity of a nocturnal microchiropteran species.

  17. Do male and female cowbirds see their world differently? Implications for sex differences in the sensory system of an avian brood parasite.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esteban Fernández-Juricic

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Male and female avian brood parasites are subject to different selection pressures: males compete for mates but do not provide parental care or territories and only females locate hosts to lay eggs. This sex difference may affect brain architecture in some avian brood parasites, but relatively little is known about their sensory systems and behaviors used to obtain sensory information. Our goal was to study the visual resolution and visual information gathering behavior (i.e., scanning of brown-headed cowbirds. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We measured the density of single cone photoreceptors, associated with chromatic vision, and double cone photoreceptors, associated with motion detection and achromatic vision. We also measured head movement rates, as indicators of visual information gathering behavior, when exposed to an object. We found that females had significantly lower density of single and double cones than males around the fovea and in the periphery of the retina. Additionally, females had significantly higher head-movement rates than males. CONCLUSIONS: Overall, we suggest that female cowbirds have lower chromatic and achromatic visual resolution than males (without sex differences in visual contrast perception. Females might compensate for the lower visual resolution by gazing alternatively with both foveae in quicker succession than males, increasing their head movement rates. However, other physiological factors may have influenced the behavioral differences observed. Our results bring up relevant questions about the sensory basis of sex differences in behavior. One possibility is that female and male cowbirds differentially allocate costly sensory resources, as a recent study found that females actually have greater auditory resolution than males.

  18. Do male and female cowbirds see their world differently? Implications for sex differences in the sensory system of an avian brood parasite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Juricic, Esteban; Ojeda, Agustin; Deisher, Marcella; Burry, Brianna; Baumhardt, Patrice; Stark, Amy; Elmore, Amanda G; Ensminger, Amanda L

    2013-01-01

    Male and female avian brood parasites are subject to different selection pressures: males compete for mates but do not provide parental care or territories and only females locate hosts to lay eggs. This sex difference may affect brain architecture in some avian brood parasites, but relatively little is known about their sensory systems and behaviors used to obtain sensory information. Our goal was to study the visual resolution and visual information gathering behavior (i.e., scanning) of brown-headed cowbirds. We measured the density of single cone photoreceptors, associated with chromatic vision, and double cone photoreceptors, associated with motion detection and achromatic vision. We also measured head movement rates, as indicators of visual information gathering behavior, when exposed to an object. We found that females had significantly lower density of single and double cones than males around the fovea and in the periphery of the retina. Additionally, females had significantly higher head-movement rates than males. Overall, we suggest that female cowbirds have lower chromatic and achromatic visual resolution than males (without sex differences in visual contrast perception). Females might compensate for the lower visual resolution by gazing alternatively with both foveae in quicker succession than males, increasing their head movement rates. However, other physiological factors may have influenced the behavioral differences observed. Our results bring up relevant questions about the sensory basis of sex differences in behavior. One possibility is that female and male cowbirds differentially allocate costly sensory resources, as a recent study found that females actually have greater auditory resolution than males.

  19. Kinetics of Inhibitory Feedback from Horizontal Cells to Photoreceptors: Implications for an Ephaptic Mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Ted J.; Van Hook, Matthew J.; Tranchina, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Inhibitory feedback from horizontal cells (HCs) to cones generates center-surround receptive fields and color opponency in the retina. Mechanisms of HC feedback remain unsettled, but one hypothesis proposes that an ephaptic mechanism may alter the extracellular electrical field surrounding photoreceptor synaptic terminals, thereby altering Ca2+ channel activity and photoreceptor output. An ephaptic voltage change produced by current flowing through open channels in the HC membrane should occur with no delay. To test for this mechanism, we measured kinetics of inhibitory feedback currents in Ambystoma tigrinum cones and rods evoked by hyperpolarizing steps applied to synaptically coupled HCs. Hyperpolarizing HCs stimulated inward feedback currents in cones that averaged 8–9 pA and exhibited a biexponential time course with time constants averaging 14–17 ms and 120–220 ms. Measurement of feedback-current kinetics was limited by three factors: (1) HC voltage-clamp speed, (2) cone voltage-clamp speed, and (3) kinetics of Ca2+ channel activation or deactivation in the photoreceptor terminal. These factors totaled ∼4–5 ms in cones meaning that the true fast time constants for HC-to-cone feedback currents were 9–13 ms, slower than expected for ephaptic voltage changes. We also compared speed of feedback to feedforward glutamate release measured at the same cone/HC synapses and found a latency for feedback of 11–14 ms. Inhibitory feedback from HCs to rods was also significantly slower than either measurement kinetics or feedforward release. The finding that inhibitory feedback from HCs to photoreceptors involves a significant delay indicates that it is not due to previously proposed ephaptic mechanisms. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Lateral inhibitory feedback from horizontal cells (HCs) to photoreceptors creates center-surround receptive fields and color-opponent interactions. Although underlying mechanisms remain unsettled, a longstanding hypothesis proposes that

  20. Quantifying the metabolic contribution to photoreceptor death in retinitis pigmentosa via a mathematical model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camacho, Erika T; Punzo, Claudio; Wirkus, Stephen A

    2016-11-07

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a family of inherited retinal degenerative diseases that leads to blindness. In many cases the disease-causing allele encodes for a gene exclusively expressed in the night active rod photoreceptors. However, because rod death always leads to cone death affected individuals eventually lose their sight. Many theories have been proposed to explain the secondary loss of cones in RP; however, most fail to fully explain the different pathological transition stages seen in humans. Incorporating experimental data of rod and cone death kinetics from two mouse models of RP, we use a mathematical model to investigate the interplay and role of energy consumption and uptake of the photoreceptors as well as nutrient availability supplied through the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) throughout the progression of RP. Our data driven mathematical model predicts that the system requires a total reduction of approximately 27-31% in nutrients available to result in the complete demise of all cones. Simulations utilizing retinal degeneration 1 (rd1) mouse cell count data in which cone death was delayed by altering cell metabolism in cones show that preventing a 1-2% decrease in nutrients available can permanently halt cone death even when 90% have already died. Our results also indicate that the ratio of energy consumption to uptake of cones, Dc, is mainly disrupted during the death wave of the rods with negligible changes thereafter and that the subsequent nutrient decrease is mainly responsible for the demise of the cones. The change in this ratio Dc highlights the compensation that the cones must undergo during rod death to meet the high metabolic demands of the entire photoreceptor population. Global sensitivity analysis confirms the results and suggests areas of focus for halting RP, even at later stages of the disease, through feasible therapeutic interventions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Pannexin 1 Is Critically Involved in Feedback from Horizontal Cells to Cones

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cenedese, Valentina; de Graaff, Wim; Csikós, Tamás; Poovayya, Mitali; Zoidl, Georg; Kamermans, Maarten

    2017-01-01

    Retinal horizontal cells (HCs) feed back negatively to cone photoreceptors and in that way generate the center/surround organization of bipolar cell receptive fields. The mechanism by which HCs inhibit photoreceptors is a matter of debate. General consensus exists that horizontal cell activity leads

  2. The involvement of glutamate-gated channels in negative feedback from horizontal cells to cones

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fahrenfort, I.; Klooster, J.; Sjoerdsma, T.; Kamermans, M.

    2005-01-01

    Photoreceptors are the light sensitive cells in the retina. They project to horizontal cells and bipolar cells via a glutamatergic feed forward pathway. Horizontal cells are strongly electrically coupled and integrate in that way the input from the photoreceptors. Horizontal cells feedback to cones

  3. Rod photoreceptors express GPR55 in the adult vervet monkey retina

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bouskila, Joseph; Javadi, Pasha; Casanova, Christian

    2013-01-01

    . Yet, its formal classification is still a matter of debate. CB1R and CB2R expression patterns are well described for rodent and monkey retinas. In the monkey retina, CB1R has been localized in its neural (cone photoreceptor, horizontal, bipolar, amacrine and ganglion cells) and CB2R in glial...... components (Müller cells). The aim of this study was to determine the expression pattern of GPR55 in the monkey retina by using confocal microscopy. Our results show that GPR55 is strictly localized in the photoreceptor layer of the extrafoveal portion of the retina. Co-immunolabeling of GPR55 with rhodopsin......, the photosensitive pigment in rods, revealed a clear overlap of expression throughout the rod structure with most prominent staining in the inner segments. Additionally, double-label of GPR55 with calbindin, a specific marker for cone photoreceptors in the primate retina, allowed us to exclude expression of GPR55...

  4. Cone rod dystrophies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamel Christian P

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cone rod dystrophies (CRDs (prevalence 1/40,000 are inherited retinal dystrophies that belong to the group of pigmentary retinopathies. CRDs are characterized by retinal pigment deposits visible on fundus examination, predominantly localized to the macular region. In contrast to typical retinitis pigmentosa (RP, also called the rod cone dystrophies (RCDs resulting from the primary loss in rod photoreceptors and later followed by the secondary loss in cone photoreceptors, CRDs reflect the opposite sequence of events. CRD is characterized by primary cone involvement, or, sometimes, by concomitant loss of both cones and rods that explains the predominant symptoms of CRDs: decreased visual acuity, color vision defects, photoaversion and decreased sensitivity in the central visual field, later followed by progressive loss in peripheral vision and night blindness. The clinical course of CRDs is generally more severe and rapid than that of RCDs, leading to earlier legal blindness and disability. At end stage, however, CRDs do not differ from RCDs. CRDs are most frequently non syndromic, but they may also be part of several syndromes, such as Bardet Biedl syndrome and Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 7 (SCA7. Non syndromic CRDs are genetically heterogeneous (ten cloned genes and three loci have been identified so far. The four major causative genes involved in the pathogenesis of CRDs are ABCA4 (which causes Stargardt disease and also 30 to 60% of autosomal recessive CRDs, CRX and GUCY2D (which are responsible for many reported cases of autosomal dominant CRDs, and RPGR (which causes about 2/3 of X-linked RP and also an undetermined percentage of X-linked CRDs. It is likely that highly deleterious mutations in genes that otherwise cause RP or macular dystrophy may also lead to CRDs. The diagnosis of CRDs is based on clinical history, fundus examination and electroretinogram. Molecular diagnosis can be made for some genes, genetic counseling is

  5. Fly Photoreceptors Encode Phase Congruency.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uwe Friederich

    Full Text Available More than five decades ago it was postulated that sensory neurons detect and selectively enhance behaviourally relevant features of natural signals. Although we now know that sensory neurons are tuned to efficiently encode natural stimuli, until now it was not clear what statistical features of the stimuli they encode and how. Here we reverse-engineer the neural code of Drosophila photoreceptors and show for the first time that photoreceptors exploit nonlinear dynamics to selectively enhance and encode phase-related features of temporal stimuli, such as local phase congruency, which are invariant to changes in illumination and contrast. We demonstrate that to mitigate for the inherent sensitivity to noise of the local phase congruency measure, the nonlinear coding mechanisms of the fly photoreceptors are tuned to suppress random phase signals, which explains why photoreceptor responses to naturalistic stimuli are significantly different from their responses to white noise stimuli.

  6. Fly Photoreceptors Encode Phase Congruency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friederich, Uwe; Billings, Stephen A; Hardie, Roger C; Juusola, Mikko; Coca, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    More than five decades ago it was postulated that sensory neurons detect and selectively enhance behaviourally relevant features of natural signals. Although we now know that sensory neurons are tuned to efficiently encode natural stimuli, until now it was not clear what statistical features of the stimuli they encode and how. Here we reverse-engineer the neural code of Drosophila photoreceptors and show for the first time that photoreceptors exploit nonlinear dynamics to selectively enhance and encode phase-related features of temporal stimuli, such as local phase congruency, which are invariant to changes in illumination and contrast. We demonstrate that to mitigate for the inherent sensitivity to noise of the local phase congruency measure, the nonlinear coding mechanisms of the fly photoreceptors are tuned to suppress random phase signals, which explains why photoreceptor responses to naturalistic stimuli are significantly different from their responses to white noise stimuli.

  7. Avian anemia's

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raukar Jelena

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with avian anemia's classified by MCHC/MCV and with types of anemia's. Father hematological and immunological research is needed to secure information on hematological parameters in different avian species at their earliest age. Anemia is a common clinical finding in birds because the avian erythrocyte half - life is much shorter than the mammalian. Therefore anemia should be determined as soon as possible. Researchers should standardize hematological parameters for every single avian species.

  8. CREB1/ATF1 activation in photoreceptor degeneration and protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beltran, William A; Allore, Heather G; Johnson, Elizabeth; Towle, Virginia; Tao, Weng; Acland, Gregory M; Aguirre, Gustavo D; Zeiss, Caroline J

    2009-11-01

    The cAMP response element binding protein 1 (CREB1) and activating transcription factor 1 (ATF1) are closely related members of the bZIP superfamily of transcription factors. Both are activated in response to a wide array of stimuli, including cellular stress. This study was conducted to assess the CREB1/ATF1 pathway in photoreceptor disease and protection. The expression levels of p-CREB1, CREB1, and ATF1 were examined by immunoblot and immunohistochemistry in normal canine retina and retinas of several canine models of retinal degeneration (rcd1, rcd2, erd, prcd, XLPRA1, XLPRA2, T4R RHO). Humans retinas affected with age-related macular degeneration (AMD) were also examined. p-CREB1/ATF1 immunolabeling was assessed in normal and rcd1 dogs treated with ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF), to examine the effect of a neuroprotective stimulus on activation of CREB1/ATF1. Native CREB1 and ATF1 as well as phosphorylated CREB1/ATF1 was examined in normal canine retina by immunoblot. The p-CREB1 antibody identified phosphorylated CREB1 and ATF1 and labeled the inner retina only in normal dogs. In degenerate canine and human retinas, strong immunolabeling appeared in rod and cone photoreceptors, indicating increased expression of native CREB1 and ATF1, as well as increased phosphorylation of these proteins. Retinal protection by CNTF in rcd1 dogs was accompanied by a significant increase in the number of p-CREB1/ATF1-labeled photoreceptor nuclei. Positive association of CREB1/ATF1 phosphorylation with photoreceptor protection suggests that it may contribute to an innate protective response. These data identify a signaling mechanism in rods and cones of potential importance for therapies of RP and AMD.

  9. Optical properties of photoreceptor and retinal pigment epithelium cells investigated with adaptive optics optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhuolin

    Human vision starts when photoreceptors collect and respond to light. Photoreceptors do not function in isolation though, but share close interdependence with neighboring photoreceptors and underlying retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells. These cellular interactions are essential for normal function of the photoreceptor-RPE complex, but methods to assess these in the living human eye are limited. One approach that has gained increased promise is high-resolution retinal imaging that has undergone tremendous technological advances over the last two decades to probe the living retina at the cellular level. Pivotal in these advances has been adaptive optics (AO) and optical coherence tomography (OCT) that together allow unprecedented spatial resolution of retinal structures in all three dimensions. Using these high-resolution systems, cone photoreceptor are now routinely imaged in healthy and diseased retina enabling fundamental structural properties of cones to be studied such as cell spacing, packing arrangement, and alignment. Other important cell properties, however, have remained elusive to investigation as even better imaging performance is required and thus has resulted in an incomplete understanding of how cells in the photoreceptor-RPE complex interact with light. To address this technical bottleneck, we expanded the imaging capability of AO-OCT to detect and quantify more accurately and completely the optical properties of cone photoreceptor and RPE cells at the cellular level in the living human retina. The first objective of this thesis was development of a new AO-OCT method that is more precise and sensitive, thus enabling a more detailed view of the 3D optical signature of the photoreceptor-RPE complex than was previously possible (Chapter 2). Using this new system, the second objective was quantifying the waveguide properties of individual cone photoreceptor inner and outer segments across the macula (Chapter 3). The third objective extended the AO

  10. Drosophila photoreceptor axon guidance and targeting requires the dreadlocks SH2/SH3 adapter protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrity, P A; Rao, Y; Salecker, I; McGlade, J; Pawson, T; Zipursky, S L

    1996-05-31

    Mutations in the Drosophila gene dreadlocks (dock) disrupt photoreceptor cell (R cell) axon guidance and targeting. Genetic mosaic analysis and cell-type-specific expression of dock transgenes demonstrate dock is required in R cells for proper innervation. Dock protein contains one SH2 and three SH3 domains, implicating it in tyrosine kinase signaling, and is highly related to the human proto-oncogene Nck. Dock expression is detected in R cell growth cones in the target region. We propose Dock transmits signals in the growth cone in response to guidance and targeting cues. These findings provide an important step for dissection of signaling pathways regulating growth cone motility.

  11. Epigenomic landscapes of retinal rods and cones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Alisa; Luo, Chongyuan; Davis, Fred P; Mukamel, Eran A; Henry, Gilbert L; Nery, Joseph R; Urich, Mark A; Picard, Serge; Lister, Ryan; Eddy, Sean R; Beer, Michael A; Ecker, Joseph R; Nathans, Jeremy

    2016-01-01

    Rod and cone photoreceptors are highly similar in many respects but they have important functional and molecular differences. Here, we investigate genome-wide patterns of DNA methylation and chromatin accessibility in mouse rods and cones and correlate differences in these features with gene expression, histone marks, transcription factor binding, and DNA sequence motifs. Loss of NR2E3 in rods shifts their epigenomes to a more cone-like state. The data further reveal wide differences in DNA methylation between retinal photoreceptors and brain neurons. Surprisingly, we also find a substantial fraction of DNA hypo-methylated regions in adult rods that are not in active chromatin. Many of these regions exhibit hallmarks of regulatory regions that were active earlier in neuronal development, suggesting that these regions could remain undermethylated due to the highly compact chromatin in mature rods. This work defines the epigenomic landscapes of rods and cones, revealing features relevant to photoreceptor development and function. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.11613.001 PMID:26949250

  12. Noninvasive imaging of the human rod photoreceptor mosaic using a confocal adaptive optics scanning ophthalmoscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubra, Alfredo; Sulai, Yusufu; Norris, Jennifer L.; Cooper, Robert F.; Dubis, Adam M.; Williams, David R.; Carroll, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    The rod photoreceptors are implicated in a number of devastating retinal diseases. However, routine imaging of these cells has remained elusive, even with the advent of adaptive optics imaging. Here, we present the first in vivo images of the contiguous rod photoreceptor mosaic in nine healthy human subjects. The images were collected with three different confocal adaptive optics scanning ophthalmoscopes at two different institutions, using 680 and 775 nm superluminescent diodes for illumination. Estimates of photoreceptor density and rod:cone ratios in the 5°–15° retinal eccentricity range are consistent with histological findings, confirming our ability to resolve the rod mosaic by averaging multiple registered images, without the need for additional image processing. In one subject, we were able to identify the emergence of the first rods at approximately 190 μm from the foveal center, in agreement with previous histological studies. The rod and cone photoreceptor mosaics appear in focus at different retinal depths, with the rod mosaic best focus (i.e., brightest and sharpest) being at least 10 μm shallower than the cones at retinal eccentricities larger than 8°. This study represents an important step in bringing high-resolution imaging to bear on the study of rod disorders. PMID:21750765

  13. Avian anemia's

    OpenAIRE

    Raukar Jelena

    2005-01-01

    This paper deals with avian anemia's classified by MCHC/MCV and with types of anemia's. Father hematological and immunological research is needed to secure information on hematological parameters in different avian species at their earliest age. Anemia is a common clinical finding in birds because the avian erythrocyte half - life is much shorter than the mammalian. Therefore anemia should be determined as soon as possible. Researchers should standardize hematologica...

  14. Clinical course of cone dystrophy caused by mutations in the RPGR gene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thiadens, Alberta A. H. J.; Soerjoesing, Gyan G.; Florijn, Ralph J.; Tjiam, A. G.; den Hollander, Anneke I.; van den Born, L. Ingeborgh; Riemslag, Frans C.; Bergen, Arthur A. B.; Klaver, Caroline C. W.

    2011-01-01

    Mutations in the RPGR gene predominantly cause rod photoreceptor disorders with a large variability in clinical course. In this report, we describe two families with mutations in this gene and cone involvement. We investigated an X-linked cone dystrophy family (1) with 25 affected males, 25 female

  15. Clinical course of cone dystrophy caused by mutations in the RPGR gene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thiadens, A.A.H.J.; Soerjoesing, G.G.; Florijn, R.J.; Tjiam, A.G.; Hollander, A.I. den; Born, L.I. van den; Riemslag, F.C.; Bergen, A.A.B.; Klaver, C.C.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Mutations in the RPGR gene predominantly cause rod photoreceptor disorders with a large variability in clinical course. In this report, we describe two families with mutations in this gene and cone involvement. METHODS: We investigated an X-linked cone dystrophy family (1) with 25

  16. Clinical course of cone dystrophy caused by mutations in the RPGR gene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.A.H.J. Thiadens (Alberta); G.G. Soerjoesing (Gyan); R.J. Florijn; A.G. Tjiam; A.I. Hollander (Anneke); L.I. van den Born (Ingeborgh); F.C.C. Riemslag (Frans); A.A.B. Bergen (Arthur); C.C.W. Klaver (Caroline)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Mutations in the RPGR gene predominantly cause rod photoreceptor disorders with a large variability in clinical course. In this report, we describe two families with mutations in this gene and cone involvement. Methods: We investigated an X-linked cone dystrophy family (1)

  17. Identification of circadian brain photoreceptors mediating photic entrainment of behavioural rhythms in lizards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasqualetti, Massimo; Bertolucci, Cristiano; Ori, Michela; Innocenti, Augusto; Magnone, Maria C; De Grip, Willem J; Nardi, Irma; Foà, Augusto

    2003-07-01

    We have shown previously that in ruin lizards (Podarcis sicula) the ablation of all known photoreceptive structures (lateral eyes, pineal and parietal eye) in the same individual animal does not prevent entrainment of their circadian locomotor rhythms to light. The present study was aimed at identifying the circadian brain photoreceptors mediating entrainment. For this purpose, we looked for opsin expression in the brain by means of immunocytochemistry. Using anti-cone-opsin antiserum CERN 874 we have localized photoreceptors in the periventricular area of hypothalamus, near the third cerebral ventricle. We also cloned a brain opsin cDNA that, on the basis of the deduced amino acid sequence, appears to belong to the RH2 class of cone-opsins. We named the cloned cone-opsin Ps-RH2. To examine whether brain cone-opsins mediate photic entrainment of circadian locomotor rhythms, we performed post-transcriptional inactivation experiments by injecting an expression eukaryotic vector transcribing the antisense cone-opsin Ps-RH2 mRNA in the third cerebral ventricle of pinealectomized-retinectomized lizards previously entrained to a light-dark (LD) cycle. Injections of the antisense construct abolished photic entrainment of circadian locomotor rhythms of pinealectomized-retinectomized lizards to the LD cycle for 6-9 days. CERN 874 completely failed to label cells within the periventricular area of hypothalamus of brains injected with antisense construct. Thus, abolishment of photic entrainment is due to inactivation of endogenous brain cone-opsins mRNA. The present results demonstrate for the first time in a vertebrate that brain cone-opsins are part of a true circadian brain photoreceptor participating in photic entrainment of behavioural rhythms.

  18. Ex Vivo ERG analysis of photoreceptors using an In Vivo ERG system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinberg, Frans; Kolesnikov, Alexander V.; Kefalov, Vladimir J.

    2014-01-01

    The Function of the retina and effects of drugs on it can be assessed by recording transretinal voltage across isolated retina that is perfused with physiological medium. However, building ex vivo ERG apparatus requires substantial amount of time, resources and expertise. Here we adapted a commercial in vivo ERG system for transretinal ERG recordings from rod and cone photoreceptors and compared rod and cone signalling between ex vivo and in vivo environments. We found that the rod and cone a- and b-waves recorded with the transretinal ERG adapter and a standard in vivo ERG system are comparable to those obtained from live anesthetized animals. However, ex vivo responses are somewhat slower and their oscillatory potentials are suppressed as compared to those recorded in vivo. We found that rod amplification constant (A) was comparable between ex vivo and in vivo conditions, ∼10 - 30 s-2 depending on the choice of response normalization. We estimate that the A in cones is between 3 and 6 s-2 in ex vivo conditions and by assuming equal A in vivo we arrive to light funnelling factor of 3 for cones in the mouse retina. The ex vivo ERG adapter provides a simple and affordable alternative to designing a custom-built transretinal recordings setup for the study of photoreceptors. Our results provide a roadmap to the rigorous quantitative analysis of rod and cone responses made possible with such a system. PMID:24959652

  19. Three distinct roles for notch in Drosophila R7 photoreceptor specification.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Tomlinson

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs and Notch (N proteins are different types of transmembrane receptors that transduce extracellular signals and control cell fate. Here we examine cell fate specification in the Drosophila retina and ask how N acts together with the RTKs Sevenless (Sev and the EGF receptor (DER to specify the R7 photoreceptor. The retina is composed of many hundred ommatidia, each of which grows by recruiting surrounding, undifferentiated cells and directing them to particular fates. The R7 photoreceptor derives from a cohort of three cells that are incorporated together following specification of the R2-R5 and R8 photoreceptors. Two cells of the cohort are specified as the R1/6 photoreceptor type by DER activation. These cells then activate N in the third cell (the R7 precursor. By manipulation of N and RTK signaling in diverse combinations we establish three roles for N in specifying the R7 fate. The first role is to impose a block to photoreceptor differentiation; a block that DER activation cannot overcome. The second role, paradoxically, is to negate the first; Notch activation up-regulates Sev expression, enabling the presumptive R7 cell to receive an RTK signal from R8 that can override the block. The third role is to specify the cell as an R7 rather than an R1/6 once RTK signaling has specified the cells as a photoreceptor. We speculate why N acts both to block and to facilitate photoreceptor differentiation, and provide a model for how N and RTK signaling act combinatorially to specify the R1/6 and R7 photoreceptors as well as the surrounding non-neuronal cone cells.

  20. Dynamics of turtle cones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naka, K I; Itoh, M A; Chappell, R L

    1987-02-01

    The response dynamics of turtle photoreceptors (cones) were studied by the cross-correlation method using a white-noise-modulated light stimulus. Incremental responses were characterized by the kernels. White-noise-evoked responses with a peak-to-peak excursion of greater than 5 mV were linear, with mean square errors of approximately 8%, a degree of linearity comparable to the horizontal cell responses. Both a spot (0.17 mm diam) and a large field of light produced almost identical kernels. The amplitudes of receptor kernels obtained at various mean irradiances fitted approximately the Weber-Fechner relationship and the mean levels controlled both the amplitude and the response dynamics; kernels were slow and monophasic at low mean irradiance and were fast and biphasic at high mean irradiance. This is a parametric change and is a piecewise linearization. Horizontal cell kernels evoked by the small spot of light were monophasic and slower than the receptor kernels produced by the same stimulus. Larger spots of light or a steady annular illumination transformed the slow horizontal cell kernel into a fast kernel similar to those of the receptors. The slowing down of the kernel waveform was modeled by a simple low-pass circuit and the presumed feedback from horizontal cells onto cones did not appear to play a major role.

  1. Visual coding in locust photoreceptors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivier Faivre

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Information capture by photoreceptors ultimately limits the quality of visual processing in the brain. Using conventional sharp microelectrodes, we studied how locust photoreceptors encode random (white-noise, WN and naturalistic (1/f stimuli, NS light patterns in vivo and how this coding changes with mean illumination and ambient temperature. We also examined the role of their plasma membrane in shaping voltage responses. We found that brightening or warming increase and accelerate voltage responses, but reduce noise, enabling photoreceptors to encode more information. For WN stimuli, this was accompanied by broadening of the linear frequency range. On the contrary, with NS the signaling took place within a constant bandwidth, possibly revealing a 'preference' for inputs with 1/f statistics. The faster signaling was caused by acceleration of the elementary phototransduction current--leading to bumps--and their distribution. The membrane linearly translated phototransduction currents into voltage responses without limiting the throughput of these messages. As the bumps reflected fast changes in membrane resistance, the data suggest that their shape is predominantly driven by fast changes in the light-gated conductance. On the other hand, the slower bump latency distribution is likely to represent slower enzymatic intracellular reactions. Furthermore, the Q(10s of bump duration and latency distribution depended on light intensity. Altogether, this study suggests that biochemical constraints imposed upon signaling change continuously as locust photoreceptors adapt to environmental light and temperature conditions.

  2. On Dispersion in Visual Photoreceptors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stavenga, D.G.; Barneveld, H.H. van

    1975-01-01

    An idealized visual pigment absorbance spectrum is used together with a Kramers-Kronig dispersion relation to calculate the contribution of the visual pigment to the refractive index of the fly photoreceptor. It appears that an absorption coefficient of 0.010 µm-1 results in a refractive index

  3. Avian Metapneumoviruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avian metapneumovirus (aMPV) is an economically important virus that is the primary causal agent of turkey rhinotracheitis (TRT), also known as avian rhinotracheitis (ART). The virus causes an acute highly contagious infection of the upper respiratory tract in turkeys and was first isolated from tur...

  4. Salamander blue-sensitive cones lost during metamorphosis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, Y.; Znoiko, S.; Grip, W.J. de; Crouch, R.K.; Ma, J.X.

    2008-01-01

    The tiger salamander lives in shallow water with bright light in the aquatic phase, and in dim tunnels or caves in the terrestrial phase. In the aquatic phase, there are five types of photoreceptors--two types of rods and three types of cones. Our previous studies showed that the green rods and

  5. Genetic Etiology and Clinical Consequences of Cone Disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.A.H.J. Thiadens (Alberta)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractHereditary retinal disorders constitute a large heterogeneous group of diseases in which the photoreceptors are primarily aff ected. When cone cells are aff ected, one cannot see details or perceive color. In this thesis, we focused on the three most important diseases in which the

  6. Defects in RGS9 or its anchor protein R9AP in patients with slow photoreceptor deactivation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nishiguchi, KM; Sandberg, MA; Kooijman, AC; Martemyanov, KA; Pott, JWR; Hagstrom, SA; Arshavsky, VY; Berson, EL; Dryja, TP

    2004-01-01

    The RGS proteins are GTPase activating proteins that accelerate the deactivation of G proteins in a variety of signalling pathways in eukaryotes(1-6). RGS9 deactivates the G proteins (transducins) in the rod and cone phototransduction cascades(7,8). It is anchored to photoreceptor membranes by the

  7. Gene therapy rescues cone function in congenital achromatopsia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komáromy, András M; Alexander, John J; Rowlan, Jessica S; Garcia, Monique M; Chiodo, Vince A; Kaya, Asli; Tanaka, Jacqueline C; Acland, Gregory M; Hauswirth, William W; Aguirre, Gustavo D

    2010-07-01

    The successful restoration of visual function with recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV)-mediated gene replacement therapy in animals and humans with an inherited disease of the retinal pigment epithelium has ushered in a new era of retinal therapeutics. For many retinal disorders, however, targeting of therapeutic vectors to mutant rods and/or cones will be required. In this study, the primary cone photoreceptor disorder achromatopsia served as the ideal translational model to develop gene therapy directed to cone photoreceptors. We demonstrate that rAAV-mediated gene replacement therapy with different forms of the human red cone opsin promoter led to the restoration of cone function and day vision in two canine models of CNGB3 achromatopsia, a neuronal channelopathy that is the most common form of achromatopsia in man. The robustness and stability of the observed treatment effect was mutation independent, but promoter and age dependent. Subretinal administration of rAAV5-hCNGB3 with a long version of the red cone opsin promoter in younger animals led to a stable therapeutic effect for at least 33 months. Our results hold promise for future clinical trials of cone-directed gene therapy in achromatopsia and other cone-specific disorders.

  8. Platelet-Derived Growth Factor-BB Lessens Light-Induced Rod Photoreceptor Damage in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Kei; Shimazawa, Masamitsu; Izawa, Hiroshi; Inoue, Yuki; Kuse, Yoshiki; Hara, Hideaki

    2017-12-01

    Platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-BB is known to have neuroprotective effects against various neurodegenerative disorders. The purpose of this study was to determine whether PDGF-BB can be neuroprotective against light-induced photoreceptor damage in mice. Mice were exposed to 8000-lux luminance for 3 hours to induce phototoxicity. Two hours before light exposure, the experimental mice were injected with PDGF-BB intravitreally, and the control mice were injected with phosphate-buffered saline. The light-exposed PDGF-BB-injected mice and saline-injected mice were evaluated electroretinographically and histologically. The site and expression levels of PDGFR-β and PDGF-BB were determined by immunostaining and Western blotting, respectively. The effect of PDGF-BB on light-induced cone and rod photoreceptor damage was also evaluated in vitro in 661W cells, a murine cone photoreceptor cell line, and in primary retinal cell cultures. An intravitreal injection of PDGF-BB significantly reduced the decrease in the amplitudes of the electroretinograms (ERGs) and the thinning of the outer nuclear layer (ONL) induced by the light exposure. It also reduced the number of TUNEL-positive cells in the ONL. PDGFR-β was expressed in the rod outer segments (OSs) but not the cone OSs. The levels of PDGF-BB and PDGFR-β were decreased after light irradiation. In addition, PDGF-BB had protective effects against light-induced damage to cells of rod photoreceptors but had no effect on the 661W cells in vitro. These findings indicate that PDGF-BB reduces the degree of light-induced retinal damage by activating PDGFR-β in rod photoreceptors. These findings suggest that PDGF-BB could play a role in the prevention of degeneration in eyes susceptible to phototoxicity.

  9. Retinoic Acid Protects and Rescues the Development of Zebrafish Embryonic Retinal Photoreceptor Cells from Exposure to Paclobutrazol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Der Wang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Paclobutrazol (PBZ is a widely used fungicide that shows toxicity to aquatic embryos, probably through rain-wash. Here, we specifically focus on its toxic effect on eye development in zebrafish, as well as the role of retinoic acid (RA, a metabolite of vitamin A that controls proliferation and differentiation of retinal photoreceptor cells, in this toxicity. Embryos were exposed to PBZ with or without RA from 2 to 72 h post-fertilization (hpf, and PBZ-treated embryos (2–72 hpf were exposed to RA for additional hours until 120 hpf. Eye size and histology were examined. Expression levels of gnat1 (rod photoreceptor marker, gnat2 (cone photoreceptor marker, aldehyde dehydrogenases (encoding key enzymes for RA synthesis, and phospho-histone H3 (an M-phase marker in the eyes of control and treated embryos were examined. PBZ exposure dramatically reduces photoreceptor proliferation, thus resulting in a thinning of the photoreceptor cell layer and leading to a small eye. Co-treatment of PBZ with RA, or post-treatment of PBZ-treated embryos with RA, partially rescues photoreceptor cells, revealed by expression levels of marker proteins and by retinal cell proliferation. PBZ has strong embryonic toxicity to retinal photoreceptors, probably via suppressing the production of RA, with effects including impaired retinal cell division.

  10. Short Wavelength Cone Opsin Is Not Expressed in the Retina of Arboreal African Pangolin (Manis tricuspis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adejoke J. Adekanmbi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports a study of cone photoreceptors present in the retina of Manis tricuspis. Specifically, the LWS (L- opsin expressed in longwave-sensitive cones and SWS1 (S- opsin shortwave-sensitive cones were targeted. Vertical sections revealed reactivity to a cone marker, peanut agglutinin (PNA, and to an LWS antibody, but not to an SWS1 antibody. This suggests that the Manis tricuspis visual system is not able to discriminate shorter wavelengths from longer wavelengths because the short wavelength cones are not expressed in their retina.

  11. Avian Biotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Yoshiaki

    2017-01-01

    Primordial germ cells (PGCs) generate new individuals through differentiation, maturation and fertilization. This means that the manipulation of PGCs is directly linked to the manipulation of individuals, making PGCs attractive target cells in the animal biotechnology field. A unique biological property of avian PGCs is that they circulate temporarily in the vasculature during early development, and this allows us to access and manipulate avian germ lines. Following the development of a technique for transplantation, PGCs have become central to avian biotechnology, in contrast to the use of embryo manipulation and subsequent transfer to foster mothers, as in mammalian biotechnology. Today, avian PGC transplantation combined with recent advanced manipulation techniques, including cell purification, cryopreservation, depletion, and long-term culture in vitro, have enabled the establishment of genetically modified poultry lines and ex-situ conservation of poultry genetic resources. This chapter introduces the principles, history, and procedures of producing avian germline chimeras by transplantation of PGCs, and the current status of avian germline modification as well as germplasm cryopreservation. Other fundamental avian reproductive technologies are described, including artificial insemination and embryo culture, and perspectives of industrial applications in agriculture and pharmacy are considered, including poultry productivity improvement, egg modification, disease resistance impairment and poultry gene "pharming" as well as gene banking.

  12. Visual cycle and its metabolic support in gecko photoreceptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolesnikov, A V; Ala-Laurila, P; Shukolyukov, S A; Crouch, R K; Wiggert, B; Estevez, M E; Govardovskii, V I; Cornwall, M C

    2007-02-01

    Photoreceptors of nocturnal geckos are transmuted cones that acquired rod morphological and physiological properties but retained cone-type phototransduction proteins. We have used microspectrophotometry and microfluorometry of solitary isolated green-sensitive photoreceptors of Tokay gecko to study the initial stages of the visual cycle within these cells. These stages are the photolysis of the visual pigment, the reduction of all-trans retinal to all-trans retinol, and the clearance of all-trans retinol from the outer segment (OS) into the interphotoreceptor space. We show that the rates of decay of metaproducts (all-trans retinal release) and retinal-to-retinol reduction are intermediate between those of typical rods and cones. Clearance of retinol from the OS proceeds at a rate that is typical of rods and is greatly accelerated by exposure to interphotoreceptor retinoid-binding protein, IRBP. The rate of retinal release from metaproducts is independent of the position within the OS, while its conversion to retinol is strongly spatially non-uniform, being the fastest at the OS base and slowest at the tip. This spatial gradient of retinol production is abolished by dialysis of saponin-permeabilized OSs with exogenous NADPH or substrates for its production by the hexose monophosphate pathway (NADP+glucose-6-phosphate or 6-phosphogluconate, glucose-6-phosphate alone). Following dialysis by these agents, retinol production is accelerated by several-fold compared to the fastest rates observed in intact cells in standard Ringer solution. We propose that the speed of retinol production is set by the availability of NADPH which in turn depends on ATP supply within the outer segment. We also suggest that principal source of this ATP is from mitochondria located within the ellipsoid region of the inner segment.

  13. Pushing the limits of photoreception in twilight conditions: The rod-like cone retina of the deep-sea pearlsides

    KAUST Repository

    Busserolles, Fanny de

    2017-11-09

    Most vertebrates have a duplex retina comprising two photoreceptor types, rods for dim-light (scotopic) vision and cones for bright-light (photopic) and color vision. However, deep-sea fishes are only active in dim-light conditions; hence, most species have lost their cones in favor of a simplex retina composed exclusively of rods. Although the pearlsides, Maurolicus spp., have such a pure rod retina, their behavior is at odds with this simplex visual system. Contrary to other deep-sea fishes, pearlsides are mostly active during dusk and dawn close to the surface, where light levels are intermediate (twilight or mesopic) and require the use of both rod and cone photoreceptors. This study elucidates this paradox by demonstrating that the pearlside retina does not have rod photoreceptors only; instead, it is composed almost exclusively of transmuted cone photoreceptors. These transmuted cells combine the morphological characteristics of a rod photoreceptor with a cone opsin and a cone phototransduction cascade to form a unique photoreceptor type, a rod-like cone, specifically tuned to the light conditions of the pearlsides\\' habitat (blue-shifted light at mesopic intensities). Combining properties of both rods and cones into a single cell type, instead of using two photoreceptor types that do not function at their full potential under mesopic conditions, is likely to be the most efficient and economical solution to optimize visual performance. These results challenge the standing paradigm of the function and evolution of the vertebrate duplex retina and emphasize the need for a more comprehensive evaluation of visual systems in general.

  14. CRALBP supports the mammalian retinal visual cycle and cone vision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Yunlu; Shen, Susan Q; Jui, Jonathan; Rupp, Alan C; Byrne, Leah C; Hattar, Samer; Flannery, John G; Corbo, Joseph C; Kefalov, Vladimir J

    2015-02-01

    Mutations in the cellular retinaldehyde-binding protein (CRALBP, encoded by RLBP1) can lead to severe cone photoreceptor-mediated vision loss in patients. It is not known how CRALBP supports cone function or how altered CRALBP leads to cone dysfunction. Here, we determined that deletion of Rlbp1 in mice impairs the retinal visual cycle. Mice lacking CRALBP exhibited M-opsin mislocalization, M-cone loss, and impaired cone-driven visual behavior and light responses. Additionally, M-cone dark adaptation was largely suppressed in CRALBP-deficient animals. While rearing CRALBP-deficient mice in the dark prevented the deterioration of cone function, it did not rescue cone dark adaptation. Adeno-associated virus-mediated restoration of CRALBP expression specifically in Müller cells, but not retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells, rescued the retinal visual cycle and M-cone sensitivity in knockout mice. Our results identify Müller cell CRALBP as a key component of the retinal visual cycle and demonstrate that this pathway is important for maintaining normal cone-driven vision and accelerating cone dark adaptation.

  15. The photocurrent response of human cones is fast and monophasic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lamb TD

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The precise form of the light response of human cone photoreceptors in vivo has not been established with certainty. To investigate the response shape we compare the predictions of a recent model of transduction in primate cone photoreceptors with measurements extracted from human cones using the paired-flash electroretinogram method. As a check, we also compare the predictions with previous single-cell measurements of ground squirrel cone responses. Results The predictions of the model provide a good description of the measurements, using values of parameters within the range previously determined for primate retina. The dim-flash response peaks in about 20 ms, and flash responses at all intensities are essentially monophasic. Three time constants in the model are extremely short: the two time constants for inactivation (of visual pigment and of transducin/phosphodiesterase are around 3 and 10 ms, and the time constant for calcium equilibration lies in the same range. Conclusion The close correspondence between experiment and theory, using parameters previously derived for recordings from macaque retina, supports the notion that the electroretinogram approach and the modelling approach both provide an accurate estimate of the cone photoresponse in the living human eye. For reasons that remain unclear, the responses of isolated photoreceptors from the macaque retina, recorded previously using the suction pipette method, are considerably slower than found here, and display biphasic kinetics.

  16. Avian influenza

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... develop flu-like symptoms within 10 days of handling infected birds or being in an area with ... your provider if you become sick after you return from your trip. Current information regarding avian flu ...

  17. Avian Flu

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eckburg, Paul

    2006-01-01

    Since 2003, a severe form of H5N1 avian influenza has rapidly spread throughout Asia and Europe, infecting over 200 humans in 10 countries. The spread of H5N1 virus from person-to-person has been rare, thus preventing the emergence of a widespread pandemic. However, this ongoing epidemic continues to pose an important public health threat. Avian flu and its pandemic potential in humans will be discussed.

  18. Cone visual pigments are present in gecko rod cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojima, D; Okano, T; Fukada, Y; Shichida, Y; Yoshizawa, T; Ebrey, T G

    1992-08-01

    The Tokay gecko (Gekko gekko), a nocturnal lizard, has two kinds of visual pigments, P467 and P521. In spite of the pure-rod morphology of the photoreceptor cells, the biochemical properties of P521 and P467 resemble those of iodopsin (the chicken red-sensitive cone visual pigment) and rhodopsin, respectively. We have found that the amino acid sequence of P521 deduced from the cDNA was very similar to that of iodopsin. In addition, P467 has the highest homology with the chicken green-sensitive cone visual pigment, although it also has a relatively high homology with rhodopsins. These results give additional strength to the transmutation theory of Walls [Walls, G. L. (1934) Am. J. Ophthalmol. 17, 892-915], who proposed that the rod-shaped photoreceptor cells of lizards have been derived from ancestral cone-like photoreceptors. Apparently amino acid sequences of visual pigments are less changeable than the morphology of the photoreceptor cells in the course of evolution.

  19. Damage of photoreceptor-derived cells in culture induced by light emitting diode-derived blue light

    OpenAIRE

    Kuse, Yoshiki; Ogawa, Kenjiro; Tsuruma, Kazuhiro; Shimazawa, Masamitsu; Hara, Hideaki

    2014-01-01

    Our eyes are increasingly exposed to light from the emitting diode (LED) light of video display terminals (VDT) which contain much blue light. VDTs are equipped with televisions, personal computers, and smart phones. The present study aims to clarify the mechanism underlying blue LED light-induced photoreceptor cell damage. Murine cone photoreceptor-derived cells (661 W) were exposed to blue, white, or green LED light (0.38 mW/cm2). In the present study, blue LED light increased reactive oxyg...

  20. Insights into the role of RD3 in guanylate cyclase trafficking, photoreceptor degeneration and Leber Congenital Amaurosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert S. Molday

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available RD3 is an evolutionarily conserved 23 kDa protein expressed in rod and cone photoreceptor cells. Mutations in the gene encoding RD3 resulting in unstable non-functional C-terminal truncated proteins are responsible for early onset photoreceptor degeneration in Leber Congenital Amaurosis 12 (LCA12 patients, the rd3 mice, and the rcd2 collies. Recent studies have shown that RD3 interacts with guanylate cyclases GC1 and GC2 in retinal cell extracts and HEK293 cells co-expressing GC and RD3. This interaction inhibits GC catalytic activity and promotes the exit of GC1 and GC2 from the endoplasmic reticulum and their trafficking to photoreceptor outer segments. Adeno-associated viral vector delivery of the normal RD3 gene to photoreceptors of the Rd3 mouse restores GC1 and GC2 expression and outer segment localization and leads to the long-term recovery of visual function and photoreceptor cell survival. This review focuses on the genetic and biochemical studies that have provided insight into the role of RD3 in photoreceptor function and survival.

  1. Photoreceptor cell fate specification in vertebrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brzezinski, Joseph A.; Reh, Thomas A.

    2015-01-01

    Photoreceptors – the light-sensitive cells in the vertebrate retina – have been extremely well-characterized with regards to their biochemistry, cell biology and physiology. They therefore provide an excellent model for exploring the factors and mechanisms that drive neural progenitors into a differentiated cell fate in the nervous system. As a result, great progress in understanding the transcriptional network that controls photoreceptor specification and differentiation has been made over the last 20 years. This progress has also enabled the production of photoreceptors from pluripotent stem cells, thereby aiding the development of regenerative medical approaches to eye disease. In this Review, we outline the signaling and transcription factors that drive vertebrate photoreceptor development and discuss how these function together in gene regulatory networks to control photoreceptor cell fate specification. PMID:26443631

  2. Avian influenza

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    EFSA Panel on Animal Health and Welfare; More, Simon; Bicout, Dominique

    2017-01-01

    Previous introductions of highly pathogenic avian influenza virus (HPAIV) to the EU were most likely via migratory wild birds. A mathematical model has been developed which indicated that virus amplification and spread may take place when wild bird populations of sufficient size within EU become...... infected. Low pathogenic avian influenza virus (LPAIV) may reach similar maximum prevalence levels in wild bird populations to HPAIV but the risk of LPAIV infection of a poultry holding was estimated to be lower than that of HPAIV. Only few non-wild bird pathways were identified having a non...

  3. Meaning of visualizing retinal cone mosaic on adaptive optics images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Julie; Paques, Michel; Krivosic, Valérie; Dupas, Bénédicte; Couturier, Aude; Kulcsar, Caroline; Tadayoni, Ramin; Massin, Pascale; Gaudric, Alain

    2015-01-01

    To explore the anatomic correlation of the retinal cone mosaic on adaptive optics images. Retrospective nonconsecutive observational case series. A retrospective review of the multimodal imaging charts of 6 patients with focal alteration of the cone mosaic on adaptive optics was performed. Retinal diseases included acute posterior multifocal placoid pigment epitheliopathy (n = 1), hydroxychloroquine retinopathy (n = 1), and macular telangiectasia type 2 (n = 4). High-resolution retinal images were obtained using a flood-illumination adaptive optics camera. Images were recorded using standard imaging modalities: color and red-free fundus camera photography; infrared reflectance scanning laser ophthalmoscopy, fluorescein angiography, indocyanine green angiography, and spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (OCT) images. On OCT, in the marginal zone of the lesions, a disappearance of the interdigitation zone was observed, while the ellipsoid zone was preserved. Image recording demonstrated that such attenuation of the interdigitation zone co-localized with the disappearance of the cone mosaic on adaptive optics images. In 1 case, the restoration of the interdigitation zone paralleled that of the cone mosaic after a 2-month follow-up. Our results suggest that the interdigitation zone could contribute substantially to the reflectance of the cone photoreceptor mosaic. The absence of cones on adaptive optics images does not necessarily mean photoreceptor cell death. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Images of photoreceptors in living primate eyes using adaptive optics two-photon ophthalmoscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Jennifer J.; Masella, Benjamin; Dubra, Alfredo; Sharma, Robin; Yin, Lu; Merigan, William H.; Palczewska, Grazyna; Palczewski, Krzysztof; Williams, David R.

    2011-01-01

    In vivo two-photon imaging through the pupil of the primate eye has the potential to become a useful tool for functional imaging of the retina. Two-photon excited fluorescence images of the macaque cone mosaic were obtained using a fluorescence adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope, overcoming the challenges of a low numerical aperture, imperfect optics of the eye, high required light levels, and eye motion. Although the specific fluorophores are as yet unknown, strong in vivo intrinsic fluorescence allowed images of the cone mosaic. Imaging intact ex vivo retina revealed that the strongest two-photon excited fluorescence signal comes from the cone inner segments. The fluorescence response increased following light stimulation, which could provide a functional measure of the effects of light on photoreceptors. PMID:21326644

  5. Orexin-A Suppresses Signal Transmission to Dopaminergic Amacrine Cells From Outer and Inner Retinal Photoreceptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Sheng-Nan; Zhou, Wei; Liu, Lei-Lei; Zhang, Dao-Qi; Zhong, Yong-Mei

    2017-09-01

    The neuropeptides orexin-A and orexin-B are widely expressed in the vertebrate retina; however, their role in visual function is unclear. This study investigates whether and how orexins modulate signal transmission to dopaminergic amacrine cells (DACs) from both outer retinal photoreceptors (rods and cones) and inner retinal photoreceptors (melanopsin-expressing intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells [ipRGCs]). A whole-cell voltage-clamp technique was used to record light-induced responses from genetically labeled DACs in flat-mount mouse retinas. Rod and cone signaling to DACs was confirmed pharmacologically (in wild-type retinas), whereas retrograde melanopsin signaling to DACs was isolated either pharmacologically (in wild-type retinas) or by genetic deletion of rod and cone function (in transgenic mice). Orexin-A attenuated rod/cone-mediated light responses in the majority of DACs and inhibited all DACs that exhibited melanopsin-based light responses, suggesting that exogenous orexin suppresses signal transmission from rods, cones, and ipRGCs to DACs. In addition, orexin receptor 1 antagonist SB334867 and orexin receptor 2 antagonist TCS OX229 enhanced melanopsin-based DAC responses, indicating that endogenous orexins inhibit signal transmission from ipRGCs to DACs. We further found that orexin-A inhibits melanopsin-based DAC responses via orexin receptors on DACs, whereas orexin-A may modulate signal transmission from rods and cones to DACs through activation of orexin receptors on DACs and their upstream neurons. Our results suggest that orexins could influence visual function via the dopaminergic system in the mammalian retina.

  6. Environmental enrichment extends photoreceptor survival and visual function in a mouse model of retinitis pigmentosa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilaria Barone

    Full Text Available Slow, progressive rod degeneration followed by cone death leading to blindness is the pathological signature of all forms of human retinitis pigmentosa (RP. Therapeutic schemes based on intraocular delivery of neuroprotective agents prolong the lifetime of photoreceptors and have reached the stage of clinical trial. The success of these approaches depends upon optimization of chronic supply and appropriate combination of factors. Environmental enrichment (EE, a novel neuroprotective strategy based on enhanced motor, sensory and social stimulation, has already been shown to exert beneficial effects in animal models of various disorders of the CNS, including Alzheimer and Huntington disease. Here we report the results of prolonged exposure of rd10 mice, a mutant strain undergoing progressive photoreceptor degeneration mimicking human RP, to such an enriched environment from birth. By means of microscopy of retinal tissue, electrophysiological recordings, visual behaviour assessment and molecular analysis, we show that EE considerably preserves retinal morphology and physiology as well as visual perception over time in rd10 mutant mice. We find that protective effects of EE are accompanied by increased expression of retinal mRNAs for CNTF and mTOR, both factors known as instrumental to photoreceptor survival. Compared to other rescue approaches used in similar animal models, EE is highly effective, minimally invasive and results into a long-lasting retinal protection. These results open novel perspectives of research pointing to environmental strategies as useful tools to extend photoreceptor survival.

  7. Recombinant adeno-associated virus targets passenger gene expression to cones in primate retina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancuso, Katherine; Hendrickson, Anita E.; Connor, Thomas B., Jr.; Mauck, Matthew C.; Kinsella, James J.; Hauswirth, William W.; Neitz, Jay; Neitz, Maureen

    2007-05-01

    Recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) is a promising vector for gene therapy of photoreceptor-based diseases. Previous studies have demonstrated that rAAV serotypes 2 and 5 can transduce both rod and cone photoreceptors in rodents and dogs, and it can target rods, but not cones in primates. Here we report that using a human cone-specific enhancer and promoter to regulate expression of a green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter gene in an rAAV-5 vector successfully targeted expression of the reporter gene to primate cones, and the time course of GFP expression was able to be monitored in a living animal using the RetCam II digital imaging system.

  8. Wide-field human photoreceptor morphological analysis using phase-resolved sensorless adaptive optics swept-source OCT (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Myeong Jin; Heisler, Morgan; Zawadzki, Robert J.; Bonora, Stefano; Jian, Yifan; Sarunic, Marinko V.

    2017-02-01

    Adaptive optics optical coherence tomography (AO-OCT) systems capable of 3D high resolution imaging have been applied to posterior eye imaging in order to resolve the fine morphological features in the retina. Human cone photoreceptors have been extensively imaged and studied for the investigation of retinal degeneration resulting in photoreceptor cell death. However, there are still limitations of conventional approaches to AO in the clinic, such as relatively small field-of-view (FOV) and the complexities in system design and operation. In this research, a recently developed phase-resolved Sensorless AO Swept Source based OCT (SAO-SS-OCT) system which is compact in size and easy to operate is presented. Owing to its lens-based system design, wide-field imaging can be performed up to 6° on the retina. A phase stabilization unit was integrated with the OCT system. With the phase stabilized OCT signal, we constructed retinal micro-vasculature image using a phase variance technique. The retinal vasculature image was used to align and average multiple OCT volumes acquired sequentially. The contrast-enhanced photoreceptor projection image was then extracted from the averaged volume, and analyzed based on its morphological features through a novel photoreceptor structure evaluation algorithm. The retinas of twelve human research subjects (10 normal and 2 pathological cases) were measured in vivo. Quantitative parameters used for evaluating the cone photoreceptor mosaic such as cell density, cell area, and mosaic regularity are presented and discussed. The SAO-SS-OCT system and the proposed photoreceptor evaluation method has significant potential to reveal early stage retinal diseases associated with retinal degeneration.

  9. Machine learning approaches to supporting the identification of photoreceptor-enriched genes based on expression data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simpson David

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Retinal photoreceptors are highly specialised cells, which detect light and are central to mammalian vision. Many retinal diseases occur as a result of inherited dysfunction of the rod and cone photoreceptor cells. Development and maintenance of photoreceptors requires appropriate regulation of the many genes specifically or highly expressed in these cells. Over the last decades, different experimental approaches have been developed to identify photoreceptor enriched genes. Recent progress in RNA analysis technology has generated large amounts of gene expression data relevant to retinal development. This paper assesses a machine learning methodology for supporting the identification of photoreceptor enriched genes based on expression data. Results Based on the analysis of publicly-available gene expression data from the developing mouse retina generated by serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE, this paper presents a predictive methodology comprising several in silico models for detecting key complex features and relationships encoded in the data, which may be useful to distinguish genes in terms of their functional roles. In order to understand temporal patterns of photoreceptor gene expression during retinal development, a two-way cluster analysis was firstly performed. By clustering SAGE libraries, a hierarchical tree reflecting relationships between developmental stages was obtained. By clustering SAGE tags, a more comprehensive expression profile for photoreceptor cells was revealed. To demonstrate the usefulness of machine learning-based models in predicting functional associations from the SAGE data, three supervised classification models were compared. The results indicated that a relatively simple instance-based model (KStar model performed significantly better than relatively more complex algorithms, e.g. neural networks. To deal with the problem of functional class imbalance occurring in the dataset, two data re

  10. Avian Influenza.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeitlin, Gary Adam; Maslow, Melanie Jane

    2005-05-01

    The current epidemic of H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza in Southeast Asia raises serious concerns that genetic reassortment will result in the next influenza pandemic. There have been 164 confirmed cases of human infection with avian influenza since 1996. In 2004, there were 45 cases of human H5N1 in Vietnam and Thailand, with a mortality rate more than 70%. In addition to the potential public health hazard, the current zoonotic epidemic has caused severe economic losses. Efforts must be concentrated on early detection of bird outbreaks with aggressive culling, quarantining, and disinfection. To prepare for and prevent an increase in human cases, it is essential to improve detection methods and stockpile effective antivirals. Novel therapeutic modalities, including short-interfering RNAs and new vaccine strategies that use plasmid-based genetic systems, offer promise should a pandemic occur.

  11. Avian cholera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friend, Milton

    1999-01-01

    Avian cholera is a contagious disease resulting from infection by the bacterium Pasteurella multocida. Several subspecies of bacteria have been proposed for P. multocida, and at least 16 different P. multocida serotypes or characteristics of antigens in bacterial cells that differentiate bacterial variants from each other have been recognized. The serotypes are further differentiated by other methods, including DNA fingerprinting. These evaluations are useful for studying the ecology of avian cholera (Fig. 7.1), because different serotypes are generally found in poultry and free-ranging migratory birds. These evaluations also show that different P. multocida serotypes are found in wild birds in the eastern United States than those that are found in the birds in the rest of the Nation (Fig. 7.2).

  12. Photoreceptor Sensory Cilium: Traversing the Ciliary Gate

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    Hemant Khanna

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Cilia are antenna-like extensions of the plasma membrane found in nearly all cell types. In the retina of the eye, photoreceptors develop unique sensory cilia. Not much was known about the mechanisms underlying the formation and function of photoreceptor cilia, largely because of technical limitations and the specific structural and functional modifications that cannot be modeled in vitro. With recent advances in microscopy techniques and molecular and biochemical approaches, we are now beginning to understand the molecular basis of photoreceptor ciliary architecture, ciliary function and its involvement in human diseases. Here, I will discuss the studies that have revealed new knowledge of how photoreceptor cilia regulate their identity and function while coping with high metabolic and trafficking demands associated with processing light signal.

  13. Multiphoton response of retinal rod photoreceptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasilios Alexiades

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Phototransduction is the process by which light is converted into an electrical response in retinal photoreceptors. Rod photoreceptors contain a stack of (about 1000 disc membranes packed with photopigment rhodopsin molecules, which absorb the photons. We present computational experiments which show the profound effect on the response of the distances (how many discs apart photons happen to be absorbed at. This photon-distribution effect alone can account for much of the observed variability in response.

  14. A Pro23His mutation alters prenatal rod photoreceptor morphology in a transgenic swine model of retinitis pigmentosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Patrick A; Fernandez de Castro, Juan P; Kaplan, Henry J; McCall, Maureen A

    2014-04-28

    Functional studies have detected deficits in retinal signaling in asymptomatic children from families with inherited autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (RP). Whether retinal abnormalities are present earlier during gestation or shortly after birth in a subset of children with autosomal dominant RP is unknown and no appropriate animal RP model possessing visual function at birth has been available to examine this possibility. In a recently developed transgenic P23H (TgP23H) rhodopsin swine model of RP, we tracked changes in pre- and early postnatal retinal morphology, as well as early postnatal retinal function. Domestic swine inseminated with semen from a TgP23H miniswine founder produced TgP23H hybrid and wild type (Wt) littermates. Outer retinal morphology was assessed at light and electron microscopic levels between embryonic (E) and postnatal (P) day E85 to P3. Retinal function was evaluated using the full field electroretinogram at P3. Embryonic TgP23H rod photoreceptors are malformed and their rhodopsin expression pattern is abnormal. Consistent with morphological abnormalities, rod-driven function is absent at P3. In contrast, TgP23H and Wt cone photoreceptor morphology (E85-P3) and cone-driven retinal function (P3) are similar. Prenatal expression of mutant rhodopsin alters the normal morphological and functional development of rod photoreceptors in TgP23H swine embryos. Despite this significant change, cone photoreceptors are unaffected. Human infants with similarly aggressive RP might never have rod vision, although cone vision would be unaffected. Such aggressive forms of RP in preverbal children would require early intervention to delay or prevent functional blindness.

  15. THE STRUCTURE AND CONCENTRATION OF SOLIDS IN PHOTORECEPTOR CELLS STUDIED BY REFRACTOMETRY AND INTERFERENCE MICROSCOPY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidman, Richard L.

    1957-01-01

    Fragments of freshly obtained retinas of several vertebrate species were studied by refractometry, with reference to the structure of the rods and cones. The findings allowed a reassessment of previous descriptions based mainly on fixed material. The refractometric method was used also to measure the refractice indices and to calculate the concentrations of solids and water in the various cell segments. The main quantitative data were confirmed by interference microscopy. When examined by the method of refractometry the outer segments of freshly prepared retinal rods appear homogeneous. Within a few minutes a single eccentric longitudinal fiber appears, and transverse striations may develop. These changes are attributed to imbibition of water and swelling in structures normally too small for detection by light microscopy. The central "core" of outer segments and the chromophobic disc between outer and inner segments appear to be artifacts resulting from shrinkage during dehydration. The fresh outer segments of cones, and the inner segments of rods and cones also are described and illustrated. The volumes, refractive indices, concentrations of solids, and wet and dry weights of various segments of the photoreceptor cells were tabulated. Rod outer segments of the different species vary more than 100-fold in volume and mass but all have concentrations of solids of 40 to 43 per cent. Cone outer segments contain only about 30 per cent solids. The myoids, paraboloids, and ellipsoids of the inner segments likewise have characteristic refractive indices and concentrations of solids. Some of the limitations and particular virtues of refractometry as a method for quantitative analysis of living cells are discussed in comparison with more conventional biochemical techniques. Also the shapes and refractive indices of the various segments of photoreceptor cells are considered in relation to the absorption and transmission of light. The Stiles-Crawford effect can be accounted

  16. Redistribution of insoluble interphotoreceptor matrix components during photoreceptor differentiation in the mouse retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mieziewska, K; Szél, A; Van Veen, T; Aguirre, G D; Philp, N

    1994-07-01

    The development of the nervous system is largely influenced by the extracellular matrix (ECM). In the neural retina, the photoreceptors are surrounded by a unique ECM, the interphotoreceptor matrix (IPM). The IPM plays a central and possibly crucial role in the development, maintenance and specific function of the photoreceptors. Therefore, the characterization of IPM components is necessary to understand the mechanisms regulating photoreceptor differentiation. The IPM in the mouse retina was examined during photoreceptor morphogenesis with the monoclonal antibody (MAb) F22, which recognizes a 250 kDa component of the interphotoreceptor matrix. The binding pattern of MAb F22 revealed a striking redistribution in the expression of the 250 kDa F22 antigen in late stage of postnatal photoreceptor differentiation in the mouse retina. The F22 staining was detectable in the IPM around the inner segments on the third postnatal day (P3). The MAb F22 initially labeled the region around inner segments, but as the outer segments elongated, the F22 distribution became concentrated to the matrix around the rod and cone outer segments until P16-17. At P17, the F22 label around rods began to disappear, while the label around cones became more defined. The shift in label distribution was largely completed by P20. Residual rod-associated label disappeared within a few days. In the adult animal, the F22 antibody labeled the cone-associated matrix only, and this labeling pattern remained stationary. The change in the distribution of MAb F22 demonstrated by immunolabeling was not accompanied by changes in the size of the molecule; F22 antigen isolated from the IPM of P13-15, and from adult IPM migrated with the same molecular weight on SDS gels. The distribution of MAb F22 was compared to that of chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans which are abundant in the IPM. The labeling patterns of MAbs CS-56, C6-S and C4-S were distinct from that of MAb F22. A general decrease of the label

  17. Iodoacetic acid, but not sodium iodate, creates an inducible swine model of photoreceptor damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noel, Jennifer M; Fernandez de Castro, Juan P; Demarco, Paul J; Franco, Luisa M; Wang, Wei; Vukmanic, Eric V; Peng, Xiaoyan; Sandell, Julie H; Scott, Patrick A; Kaplan, Henry J; McCall, Maureen A

    2012-04-01

    Our purpose was to find a method to create a large animal model of inducible photoreceptor damage. To this end, we tested in domestic swine the efficacy of two chemical toxins, known to create photoreceptor damage in other species: Iodoacetic Acid (IAA) and Sodium Iodate (NaIO(3)). Intravenous (IV) administration of NaIO(3) up to 90 mg/kg had no effect on retinal function and 110 mg/kg was lethal. IV administration of IAA (5-20 mg/kg) produced concentration-dependent changes in visual function as measured by full-field and multi-focal electroretinograms (ffERG and mfERG), and 30 mg/kg IAA was lethal. The IAA-induced effects measured at two weeks were stable through eight weeks post-injection, the last time point investigated. IAA at 7.5, 10, and 12 mg/kg produce a concentration-dependent reduction in both ffERG b-wave and mfERG N1-P1 amplitudes compared to baseline at all post-injection times. Comparisons of dark- and light-adapted ffERG b-wave amplitudes show a more significant loss of rod relative to cone function. The fundus of swine treated with ≥10 mg/kg IAA was abnormal with thinner retinal vessels and pale optic discs, and we found no evidence of bone spicule formation. Histological evaluations show concentration-dependent outer retinal damage that correlates with functional changes. We conclude that NaIO(3,) is not an effective toxin in swine. In contrast, IAA can be used to create a rapidly inducible, selective, stable and concentration-dependent model of photoreceptor damage in swine retina. Because of these attributes this large animal model of controlled photoreceptor damage should be useful in the investigation of treatments to replace damaged photoreceptors. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Unidirectional photoreceptor-to-Müller glia coupling and unique K+ channel expression in Caiman retina.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Astrid Zayas-Santiago

    Full Text Available Müller cells, the principal glial cells of the vertebrate retina, are fundamental for the maintenance and function of neuronal cells. In most vertebrates, including humans, Müller cells abundantly express Kir4.1 inwardly rectifying potassium channels responsible for hyperpolarized membrane potential and for various vital functions such as potassium buffering and glutamate clearance; inter-species differences in Kir4.1 expression were, however, observed. Localization and function of potassium channels in Müller cells from the retina of crocodiles remain, hitherto, unknown.We studied retinae of the Spectacled caiman (Caiman crocodilus fuscus, endowed with both diurnal and nocturnal vision, by (i immunohistochemistry, (ii whole-cell voltage-clamp, and (iii fluorescent dye tracing to investigate K+ channel distribution and glia-to-neuron communications.Immunohistochemistry revealed that caiman Müller cells, similarly to other vertebrates, express vimentin, GFAP, S100β, and glutamine synthetase. In contrast, Kir4.1 channel protein was not found in Müller cells but was localized in photoreceptor cells. Instead, 2P-domain TASK-1 channels were expressed in Müller cells. Electrophysiological properties of enzymatically dissociated Müller cells without photoreceptors and isolated Müller cells with adhering photoreceptors were significantly different. This suggests ion coupling between Müller cells and photoreceptors in the caiman retina. Sulforhodamine-B injected into cones permeated to adhering Müller cells thus revealing a uni-directional dye coupling.Our data indicate that caiman Müller glial cells are unique among vertebrates studied so far by predominantly expressing TASK-1 rather than Kir4.1 K+ channels and by bi-directional ion and uni-directional dye coupling to photoreceptor cells. This coupling may play an important role in specific glia-neuron signaling pathways and in a new type of K+ buffering.

  19. Transcriptional regulation of rod photoreceptor homeostasis revealed by in vivo NRL targetome analysis.

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    Hong Hao

    Full Text Available A stringent control of homeostasis is critical for functional maintenance and survival of neurons. In the mammalian retina, the basic motif leucine zipper transcription factor NRL determines rod versus cone photoreceptor cell fate and activates the expression of many rod-specific genes. Here, we report an integrated analysis of NRL-centered gene regulatory network by coupling chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by high-throughput sequencing (ChIP-Seq data from Illumina and ABI platforms with global expression profiling and in vivo knockdown studies. We identified approximately 300 direct NRL target genes. Of these, 22 NRL targets are associated with human retinal dystrophies, whereas 95 mapped to regions of as yet uncloned retinal disease loci. In silico analysis of NRL ChIP-Seq peak sequences revealed an enrichment of distinct sets of transcription factor binding sites. Specifically, we discovered that genes involved in photoreceptor function include binding sites for both NRL and homeodomain protein CRX. Evaluation of 26 ChIP-Seq regions validated their enhancer functions in reporter assays. In vivo knockdown of 16 NRL target genes resulted in death or abnormal morphology of rod photoreceptors, suggesting their importance in maintaining retinal function. We also identified histone demethylase Kdm5b as a novel secondary node in NRL transcriptional hierarchy. Exon array analysis of flow-sorted photoreceptors in which Kdm5b was knocked down by shRNA indicated its role in regulating rod-expressed genes. Our studies identify candidate genes for retinal dystrophies, define cis-regulatory module(s for photoreceptor-expressed genes and provide a framework for decoding transcriptional regulatory networks that dictate rod homeostasis.

  20. Avian influenza

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tjandra Y. Aditama

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Avian influenza, or “bird flu”, is a contagious disease of animals which crossed the species barrier to infect humans and gave a quite impact on public health in the world since 2004, especially due to the threat of pandemic situation. Until 1st March 2006, laboratory-confirmed human cases have been reported in seven countries: Cambodia, Indonesia, Thailand, Viet Nam, China, Iraq and Turkey with a total of 174 cases and 94 dead (54.02%. Indonesia has 27 cases, 20 were dead (74.07%. AI cases in Indonesia are more in male (62.5% and all have a symptom of fever. An influenza pandemic is a rare but recurrent event. An influenza pandemic happens when a new subtype emerges that has not previously circulated in humans. For this reason, avian H5N1 is a strain with pandemic potential, since it might ultimately adapt into a strain that is contagious among humans. Impact of the pandemic could include high rates of illness and worker absenteeism are expected, and these will contribute to social and economic disruption. Historically, the number of deaths during a pandemic has varied greatly. Death rates are largely determined by four factors: the number of people who become infected, the virulence of the virus, the underlying characteristics and vulnerability of affected populations, and the effectiveness of preventive measures. Accurate predictions of mortality cannot be made before the pandemic virus emerges and begins to spread. (Med J Indones 2006; 15:125-8Keywords: Avian Influenza, Pandemic

  1. Optical coherence tomography in progressive cone dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahlava, Jiri; Lestak, Jan; Karel, Ivan

    2014-12-01

    The aim of the study was to analyse different clinical pictures in patients with progressive cone dystrophy (PCD), to compare these with the results of optical coherence tomography (OCT) and to evaluate the benefits of this method for diagnosis. The group consisted of 16 patients (32 eyes) with PCD. All patients were examined for visual acuity, colour sense and visual field. We performed biomicroscopic examination, photo-documentation, fluorescein angiography, electrophysiological tests and OCT. Using biomicroscopy and fluorescein angiography, we found changes in the retinal pigment epithelium ranging from barely detectable changes up to the typical bull's eye appearance. In all the eyes, OCT established statistically significant reduction in the thickness and structural changes in the neuroretina of the macula. Atrophy was evident especially in the outer nuclear layer, in the photoreceptor inner segment/outer segment junction and in the retinal pigment epithelium. Visual acuity was mainly dependent on the degree to which the continuity of the photoreceptor inner segment/outer segment junction layer was maintained. Eyes with better preserved neuroretinal structure in the fovea centralis had generally less reduced thickness of the retina and a better visual acuity. OCT specifies the quantitative and qualitative changes in the macula and may contribute significantly to the diagnosis of the progressive cone dystrophy, particularly in the early stages of the disease which is difficult to diagnose.

  2. Chloride equilibrium potential in salamander cones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryson Eric J

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background GABAergic inhibition and effects of intracellular chloride ions on calcium channel activity have been proposed to regulate neurotransmission from photoreceptors. To assess the impact of these and other chloride-dependent mechanisms on release from cones, the chloride equilibrium potential (ECl was determined in red-sensitive, large single cones from the tiger salamander retinal slice. Results Whole cell recordings were done using gramicidin perforated patch techniques to maintain endogenous Cl- levels. Membrane potentials were corrected for liquid junction potentials. Cone resting potentials were found to average -46 mV. To measure ECl, we applied long depolarizing steps to activate the calcium-activated chloride current (ICl(Ca and then determined the reversal potential for the current component that was inhibited by the Cl- channel blocker, niflumic acid. With this method, ECl was found to average -46 mV. In a complementary approach, we used a Cl-sensitive dye, MEQ, to measure the Cl- flux produced by depolarization with elevated concentrations of K+. The membrane potentials produced by the various high K+ solutions were measured in separate current clamp experiments. Consistent with electrophysiological experiments, MEQ fluorescence measurements indicated that ECl was below -36 mV. Conclusions The results of this study indicate that ECl is close to the dark resting potential. This will minimize the impact of chloride-dependent presynaptic mechanisms in cone terminals involving GABAa receptors, glutamate transporters and ICl(Ca.

  3. Photoreceptor Mediated Plant Growth Responses: Implications for Photoreceptor Engineering toward Improved Performance in Crops

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    Ophilia I. L. Mawphlang

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Rising temperatures during growing seasons coupled with altered precipitation rates presents a challenging task of improving crop productivity for overcoming such altered weather patterns and cater to a growing population. Light is a critical environmental factor that exerts a powerful influence on plant growth and development ranging from seed germination to flowering and fruiting. Higher plants utilize a suite of complex photoreceptor proteins to perceive surrounding red/far-red (phytochromes, blue/UV-A (cryptochromes, phototropins, ZTL/FKF1/LKP2, and UV-B light (UVR8. While genomic studies have also shown that light induces extensive reprogramming of gene expression patterns in plants, molecular genetic studies have shown that manipulation of one or more photoreceptors can result in modification of agronomically beneficial traits. Such information can assist researchers to engineer photoreceptors via genome editing technologies to alter expression or even sensitivity thresholds of native photoreceptors for targeting aspects of plant growth that can confer superior agronomic value to the engineered crops. Here we summarize the agronomically important plant growth processes influenced by photoreceptors in crop species, alongwith the functional interactions between different photoreceptors and phytohormones in regulating these responses. We also discuss the potential utility of synthetic biology approaches in photobiology for improving agronomically beneficial traits of crop plants by engineering designer photoreceptors.

  4. An automated algorithm for photoreceptors counting in adaptive optics retinal images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xu; Zhang, Yudong; Yun, Dai

    2012-10-01

    Eyes are important organs of humans that detect light and form spatial and color vision. Knowing the exact number of cones in retinal image has great importance in helping us understand the mechanism of eyes' function and the pathology of some eye disease. In order to analyze data in real time and process large-scale data, an automated algorithm is designed to label cone photoreceptors in adaptive optics (AO) retinal images. Images acquired by the flood-illuminated AO system are taken to test the efficiency of this algorithm. We labeled these images both automatically and manually, and compared the results of the two methods. A 94.1% to 96.5% agreement rate between the two methods is achieved in this experiment, which demonstrated the reliability and efficiency of the algorithm.

  5. Photoreceptor atrophy in acute zonal occult outer retinopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zibrandtsen, N.; Munch, I.C.; Klemp, K.

    2006-01-01

    and multifocal electroretinography. Results: All three patients demonstrated partial or complete photoreceptor atrophy corresponding to partial or complete scotomata of retinal origin. Conclusion: Photoreceptor atrophy can be demonstrated early in the course of AZOOR, before ophthalmoscopically visible changes...

  6. Contribution of photoreceptor subtypes to spectral wavelength preference in Drosophila

    OpenAIRE

    Yamaguchi, Satoko; Desplan, Claude; Heisenberg, Martin

    2010-01-01

    The visual systems of most species contain photoreceptors with distinct spectral sensitivities that allow animals to distinguish lights by their spectral composition. In Drosophila, photoreceptors R1–R6 have the same spectral sensitivity throughout the eye and are responsible for motion detection. In contrast, photoreceptors R7 and R8 exhibit heterogeneity and are important for color vision. We investigated how photoreceptor types contribute to the attractiveness of light by blocking the func...

  7. Comparative study of photoreceptor and retinal ganglion cell topography and spatial resolving power in Dipsadidae snakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauzman, Einat; Bonci, Daniela M O; Grotzner, Sonia R; Mela, Maritana; Liber, André M P; Martins, Sonia L; Ventura, Dora F

    2014-01-01

    The diurnal Dipsadidae snakes Philodryas olfersii and P. patagoniensis are closely related in their phylogeny but inhabit different ecological niches. P. olfersii is arboreal, whereas P. patagoniensis is preferentially terrestrial. The goal of the present study was to compare the density and topography of neurons, photoreceptors, and cells in the ganglion cell layer in the retinas of these two species using immunohistochemistry and Nissl staining procedures and estimate the spatial resolving power of their eyes based on the ganglion cell peak density. Four morphologically distinct types of cones were observed by scanning electron microscopy, 3 of which were labeled with anti-opsin antibodies: large single cones and double cones labeled by the antibody JH492 and small single cones labeled by the antibody JH455. The average densities of photoreceptors and neurons in the ganglion cell layer were similar in both species (∼10,000 and 7,000 cells·mm(-2), respectively). The estimated spatial resolving power was also similar, ranging from 2.4 to 2.7 cycles·degree(-1). However, the distribution of neurons had different specializations. In the arboreal P. olfersii, the isodensity maps had a horizontal visual streak, with a peak density in the central region and a lower density in the dorsal retina. This organization might be relevant for locomotion and hunting behavior in the arboreal layer. In the terrestrial P. patagoniensis, a concentric pattern of decreasing cell density emanated from an area centralis located in the naso-ventral retina. Lower densities were observed in the dorsal region. The ventrally high density improves the resolution in the superior visual field and may be an important adaptation for terrestrial snakes to perceive the approach of predators from above. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  8. Localization of Usher 1 proteins to the photoreceptor calyceal processes, which are absent from mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahly, Iman; Dufour, Eric; Schietroma, Cataldo; Michel, Vincent; Bahloul, Amel; Perfettini, Isabelle; Pepermans, Elise; Estivalet, Amrit; Carette, Diane; Aghaie, Asadollah; Ebermann, Inga; Lelli, Andrea; Iribarne, Maria; Hardelin, Jean-Pierre; Weil, Dominique; Sahel, José-Alain

    2012-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying retinal dystrophy in Usher syndrome type I (USH1) remain unknown because mutant mice lacking any of the USH1 proteins—myosin VIIa, harmonin, cadherin-23, protocadherin-15, sans—do not display retinal degeneration. We found here that, in macaque photoreceptor cells, all USH1 proteins colocalized at membrane interfaces (i) between the inner and outer segments in rods and (ii) between the microvillus-like calyceal processes and the outer segment basolateral region in rods and cones. This pattern, conserved in humans and frogs, was mediated by the formation of an USH1 protein network, which was associated with the calyceal processes from the early embryonic stages of outer segment growth onwards. By contrast, mouse photoreceptors lacked calyceal processes and had no USH1 proteins at the inner–outer segment interface. We suggest that USH1 proteins form an adhesion belt around the basolateral region of the photoreceptor outer segment in humans, and that defects in this structure cause the retinal degeneration in USH1 patients. PMID:23045546

  9. Cone-like rhodopsin expressed in the all-cone retina of the colubrid pine snake as a potential adaptation to diurnality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, Nihar; Darren, Benedict; Schott, Ryan K; Tropepe, Vincent; Chang, Belinda S W

    2017-07-01

    Colubridae is the largest and most diverse family of snakes, with visual systems that reflect this diversity, encompassing a variety of retinal photoreceptor organizations. The transmutation theory proposed by Walls postulates that photoreceptors could evolutionarily transition between cell types in squamates, but few studies have tested this theory. Recently, evidence for transmutation and rod-like machinery in an all-cone retina has been identified in a diurnal garter snake ( Thamnophis ), and it appears that the rhodopsin gene at least may be widespread among colubrid snakes. However, functional evidence supporting transmutation beyond the existence of the rhodopsin gene remains rare. We examined the all-cone retina of another colubrid, Pituophis melanoleucus , thought to be more secretive/burrowing than Thamnophis We found that P. melanoleucus expresses two cone opsins (SWS1, LWS) and rhodopsin (RH1) within the eye. Immunohistochemistry localized rhodopsin to the outer segment of photoreceptors in the all-cone retina of the snake and all opsin genes produced functional visual pigments when expressed in vitro Consistent with other studies, we found that P. melanoleucus rhodopsin is extremely blue-shifted. Surprisingly, P. melanoleucus rhodopsin reacted with hydroxylamine, a typical cone opsin characteristic. These results support the idea that the rhodopsin-containing photoreceptors of P. melanoleucus are the products of evolutionary transmutation from rod ancestors, and suggest that this phenomenon may be widespread in colubrid snakes. We hypothesize that transmutation may be an adaptation for diurnal, brighter-light vision, which could result in increased spectral sensitivity and chromatic discrimination with the potential for colour vision. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  10. MAS NMR study of the photoreceptor phytochrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rohmer, Thierry

    2009-01-01

    Plants, algae and bacteria respond to light in various manners. The effect of light on the growth of plants is called photomorphogenesis and is regulated by the photoreceptor protein named phytochrome. Phytochrome is formed in the dark in its inactive red-absorbing (Pr) state and transformed upon

  11. Calcium homeostasis in fly photoreceptor cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oberwinkler, J

    2002-01-01

    In fly photoreceptor cells, two processes dominate the Ca2+ homeostasis: light-induced Ca2+ influx through members of the TRP family of ion channels, and Ca2+ extrusion by Na+/Ca2+ exchange.Ca2+ release from intracellular stores is quantitatively insignificant. Both, the light-activated channels and

  12. Avian respiratory system disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Glenn H.

    1989-01-01

    Diagnosing and treating respiratory diseases in avian species requires a basic knowledge about the anatomy and physiology of this system in birds. Differences between mammalian and avian respiratory system function, diagnosis, and treatment are highlighted.

  13. Avian Influenza (Bird Flu)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in People Spread of Bird Flu Viruses Between Animals and People Examples of Human Infections with Avian Influenza A ... Subtypes Transmission of Avian Influenza A Viruses Between Animals and People Related Links Research Glossary of Influenza (Flu) Terms ...

  14. Material Exchange in Photoreceptor Transplantation: Updating Our Understanding of Donor/Host Communication and the Future of Cell Engraftment Science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip E. B. Nickerson

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Considerable research effort has been invested into the transplantation of mammalian photoreceptors into healthy and degenerating mouse eyes. Several platforms of rod and cone fluorescent reporting have been central to refining the isolation, purification and transplantation of photoreceptors. The tracking of engrafted cells, including identifying the position, morphology and degree of donor cell integration post-transplant is highly dependent on the use of fluorescent protein reporters. Improvements in imaging and analysis of transplant recipients have revealed that donor cell fluorescent reporters can transfer into host tissue though a process termed material exchange (ME. This recent discovery has chaperoned a new era of interpretation when reviewing the field’s use of dissociated donor cell preparations, and has prompted scientists to re-examine how we use and interpret the information derived from fluorescence-based tracking tools. In this review, we describe the status of our understanding of ME in photoreceptor transplantation. In addition, we discuss the impact of this discovery on several aspects of historical rod and cone transplantation data, and provide insight into future standards and approaches to advance the field of cell engraftment.

  15. Damage of photoreceptor-derived cells in culture induced by light emitting diode-derived blue light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuse, Yoshiki; Ogawa, Kenjiro; Tsuruma, Kazuhiro; Shimazawa, Masamitsu; Hara, Hideaki

    2014-01-01

    Our eyes are increasingly exposed to light from the emitting diode (LED) light of video display terminals (VDT) which contain much blue light. VDTs are equipped with televisions, personal computers, and smart phones. The present study aims to clarify the mechanism underlying blue LED light-induced photoreceptor cell damage. Murine cone photoreceptor-derived cells (661 W) were exposed to blue, white, or green LED light (0.38 mW/cm2). In the present study, blue LED light increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, altered the protein expression level, induced the aggregation of short-wavelength opsins (S-opsin), resulting in severe cell damage. While, blue LED light damaged the primary retinal cells and the damage was photoreceptor specific. N-Acetylcysteine (NAC), an antioxidant, protected against the cellular damage induced by blue LED light. Overall, the LED light induced cell damage was wavelength-, but not energy-dependent and may cause more severe retinal photoreceptor cell damage than the other LED light. PMID:24909301

  16. Avian Influenza in Birds

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... However, some ducks can be infected without any signs of illness. Top of Page Avian Influenza in Wild Birds Avian influenza A viruses have ... hours. Some ducks can be infected without any signs of illness. Avian influenza outbreaks are of concern in domesticated birds for ...

  17. Avian influenza virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avian influenza virus (AIV) is type A influenza that is adapted to avian host species. Although the virus can be isolated from numerous avian species, the natural host reservoir species are dabbling ducks, shorebirds and gulls. Domestic poultry species (poultry being defined as birds that are rais...

  18. Quotient normed cones

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    general setting of the space CL(X, Y ) of all continuous linear mappings from a normed cone (X, p) to a normed cone (Y, q), extending several well-known results related to open continuous linear mappings between normed linear spaces. Keywords. Normed cone; extended quasi-metric; continuous linear mapping; bicom-.

  19. A neuronal circuit for colour vision based on rod-cone opponency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joesch, Maximilian; Meister, Markus

    2016-04-14

    In bright light, cone-photoreceptors are active and colour vision derives from a comparison of signals in cones with different visual pigments. This comparison begins in the retina, where certain retinal ganglion cells have 'colour-opponent' visual responses-excited by light of one colour and suppressed by another colour. In dim light, rod-photoreceptors are active, but colour vision is impossible because they all use the same visual pigment. Instead, the rod signals are thought to splice into retinal circuits at various points, in synergy with the cone signals. Here we report a new circuit for colour vision that challenges these expectations. A genetically identified type of mouse retinal ganglion cell called JAMB (J-RGC), was found to have colour-opponent responses, OFF to ultraviolet (UV) light and ON to green light. Although the mouse retina contains a green-sensitive cone, the ON response instead originates in rods. Rods and cones both contribute to the response over several decades of light intensity. Remarkably, the rod signal in this circuit is antagonistic to that from cones. For rodents, this UV-green channel may play a role in social communication, as suggested by spectral measurements from the environment. In the human retina, all of the components for this circuit exist as well, and its function can explain certain experiences of colour in dim lights, such as a 'blue shift' in twilight. The discovery of this genetically defined pathway will enable new targeted studies of colour processing in the brain.

  20. Human neural progenitor cells decrease photoreceptor degeneration, normalize opsin distribution and support synapse structure in cultured porcine retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mollick, Tanzina; Mohlin, Camilla; Johansson, Kjell

    2016-09-01

    Retinal neurodegenerative disorders like retinitis pigmentosa, age-related macular degeneration, diabetic retinopathy and retinal detachment decrease retinal functionality leading to visual impairment. The pathological events are characterized by photoreceptor degeneration, synaptic disassembly, remodeling of postsynaptic neurons and activation of glial cells. Despite intense research, no effective treatment has been found for these disorders. The current study explores the potential of human neural progenitor cell (hNPC) derived factors to slow the degenerative processes in adult porcine retinal explants. Retinas were cultured for 3 days with or without hNPCs as a feeder layer and investigated by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL), immunohistochemical, western blot and quantitative real time-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) techniques. TUNEL showed that hNPCs had the capacity to limit photoreceptor cell death. Among cone photoreceptors, hNPC coculture resulted in better maintenance of cone outer segments and reduced opsin mislocalization. Additionally, maintained synaptic structural integrity and preservation of second order calbindin positive horizontal cells was also observed. However, Müller cell gliosis only seemed to be alleviated in terms of reduced Müller cell density. Our observations indicate that at 3 days of coculture, hNPC derived factors had the capacity to protect photoreceptors, maintain synaptic integrity and support horizontal cell survival. Human neural progenitor cell applied treatment modalities may be an effective strategy to help maintain retinal functionality in neurodegenerative pathologies. Whether hNPCs can independently hinder Müller cell gliosis by utilizing higher concentrations or by combination with other pharmacological agents still needs to be determined. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Photoreceptor atrophy in acute zonal occult outer retinopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zibrandtsen, N.; Munch, I.C.; Klemp, K.

    2008-01-01

    appearance were examined using optical coherence tomography (OCT), automated perimetry and electroretinography (ERG). RESULTS: Both patients demonstrated photoreceptor atrophy corresponding to partial or complete scotomata with reduced or extinct electroretinographic responses. Attenuation or complete loss...... dysfunction. The field loss was more extensive than the area of photoreceptor loss. CONCLUSION: Photoreceptor atrophy can be demonstrated in AZOOR without ophthalmoscopically visible fundus lesions Udgivelsesdato: 2008/12...

  2. Kinesin-2 family motors in the unusual photoreceptor cilium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malicki, Jarema; Besharse, Joseph C

    2012-12-15

    This review focuses on recent advances in the understanding of kinesin-2 family motors in vertebrate photoreceptor development. Zebrafish photoreceptors develop by the 3rd day of embryogenesis, making it possible to study mutant phenotypes without the use of conditional alleles. Recent work using a zebrafish kif3b mutant allele validates the concept that the heterotrimeric kinesin II motor is generally required for ciliogenesis. In zebrafish photoreceptors, however, loss of kif3b function delays but does not block cilium formation. This is thought to occur because both kif3b or kif3c can dimerize with kif3a and function redundantly. The second ciliary kinesin thought to function in photoreceptor cells is kif17. Prior work has shown that either morpholino knockdown of this gene or the overexpression of its dominant negative form can reduce or delay photoreceptor cilium development without any evident impact on ciliogenesis in general. This has led to the idea that kif17 may play an important role only in some specialized cilium types, such the one in photoreceptor cells. In a recently identified kif17 mutant, however, photoreceptor outer segments are formed by 5 dpf and an obvious delay of outer segment formation is seen only at the earliest stage analyzed (3 dpf). This work suggests that kif17 plays a significant role mainly at an early stage of photoreceptor development. Taken together, these studies lead to an intriguing concept that as they differentiate photoreceptors alter their kinesin repertoire. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Cone and Rod Loss in Stargardt Disease Revealed by Adaptive Optics Scanning Light Ophthalmoscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Hongxin; Rossi, Ethan A.; Latchney, Lisa; Bessette, Angela; Stone, Edwin; Hunter, Jennifer J.; Williams, David R.; Chung, Mina

    2015-01-01

    Importance Stargardt disease (STGD1) is characterized by macular atrophy and flecks in the retinal pigment epithelium. The causative ABCA4 gene encodes a protein localizing to photoreceptor outer segments. The pathologic steps by which ABCA4 mutations lead to clinically detectable retinal pigment epithelium changes remain unclear. We investigated early STGD1 using adaptive optics scanning light ophthalmoscopy. Observations Adaptive optics scanning light ophthalmoscopy imaging of 2 brothers with early STGD1 and their unaffected parents was compared with conventional imaging. Cone and rod spacing were increased in both patients (P optics scanning light ophthalmoscopy reveals increased cone and rod spacing in areas that appear normal in conventional images, suggesting that photoreceptor loss precedes clinically detectable retinal pigment epithelial disease in STGD1. PMID:26247787

  4. Bornological Locally Convex Cones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davood Ayaseh

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we define bornological and b-bornological cones and investigate their properties. We give some characterization for these cones. In the special case of locally convex topological vector space both these concepts reduce to the known concept  of bornological spaces. We introduce and investigate the  convex quasiuniform   structures U_{tau}, U_{sigma}(P,P* and \\U_{beta}(P,P* on locally convex cone (P,U.

  5. Domain requirements for the Dock adapter protein in growth- cone signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Y; Zipursky, S L

    1998-03-03

    Tyrosine phosphorylation has been implicated in growth-cone guidance through genetic, biochemical, and pharmacological studies. Adapter proteins containing src homology 2 (SH2) domains and src homology 3 (SH3) domains provide a means of linking guidance signaling through phosphotyrosine to downstream effectors regulating growth-cone motility. The Drosophila adapter, Dreadlocks (Dock), the homolog of mammalian Nck containing three N-terminal SH3 domains and a single SH2 domain, is highly specialized for growth-cone guidance. In this paper, we demonstrate that Dock can couple signals in either an SH2-dependent or an SH2-independent fashion in photoreceptor (R cell) growth cones, and that Dock displays different domain requirements in different neurons.

  6. CNTF induces regeneration of cone outer segments in a rat model of retinal degeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiwen Li

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Cone photoreceptors are responsible for color and central vision. In the late stage of retinitis pigmentosa and in geographic atrophy associated with age-related macular degeneration, cone degeneration eventually causes loss of central vision. In the present work, we investigated cone degeneration secondary to rod loss in the S334ter-3 transgenic rats carrying the rhodopsin mutation S334ter.Recombinant human ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF was delivered by intravitreal injection to the left eye of an animal, and vehicle to the right eye. Eyes were harvested 10 days after injection. Cone outer segments (COS, and cell bodies were identified by staining with peanut agglutinin and cone arrestin antibodies in whole-mount retinas. For long-term treatment with CNTF, CNTF secreting microdevices were implanted into the left eyes at postnatal day (PD 20 and control devices into the right eyes. Cone ERG was recorded at PD 160 from implanted animals. Our results demonstrate that an early sign of cone degeneration is the loss of COS, which concentrated in many small areas throughout the retina and is progressive with age. Treatment with CNTF induces regeneration of COS and thus reverses the degeneration process in early stages of cone degeneration. Sustained delivery of CNTF prevents cones from degeneration and helps them to maintain COS and light-sensing function.Loss of COS is an early sign of secondary cone degeneration whereas cell death occurs much later. At early stages, degenerating cones are capable of regenerating outer segments, indicating the reversal of the degenerative process. Sustained delivery of CNTF preserves cone cells and their function. Long-term treatment with CNTF starting at early stages of degeneration could be a viable strategy for preservation of central vision for patients with retinal degenerations.

  7. Bax-induced apoptosis in Leber's congenital amaurosis: a dual role in rod and cone degeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Séverine Hamann

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Pathogenesis in the Rpe65(-/- mouse model of Leber's congenital amaurosis (LCA is characterized by a slow and progressive degeneration of the rod photoreceptors. On the opposite, cones degenerate rapidly at early ages. Retinal degeneration in Rpe65(-/- mice, showing a null mutation in the gene encoding the retinal pigment epithelium 65-kDa protein (Rpe65, was previously reported to depend on continuous activation of a residual transduction cascade by unliganded opsin. However, the mechanisms of apoptotic signals triggered by abnormal phototransduction remain elusive. We previously reported that activation of a Bcl-2-dependent pathway was associated with apoptosis of rod photoreceptors in Rpe65(-/- mice during the course of the disease. In this study we first assessed whether activation of Bcl-2-mediated apoptotic pathway was dependent on constitutive activation of the visual cascade through opsin apoprotein. We then challenged the direct role of pro-apoptotic Bax protein in triggering apoptosis of rod and cone photoreceptors.Quantitative PCR analysis showed that increased expression of pro-apoptotic Bax and decreased level of anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 were restored in Rpe65(-/-/Gnat1(-/- mice lacking the Gnat1 gene encoding rod transducin. Moreover, photoreceptor apoptosis was prevented as assessed by TUNEL assay. These data indicate that abnormal activity of opsin apoprotein induces retinal cell apoptosis through the Bcl-2-mediated pathway. Following immunohistological and real-time PCR analyses, we further observed that decreased expression of rod genes in Rpe65-deficient mice was rescued in Rpe65(-/-/Bax(-/- mice. Histological and TUNEL studies confirmed that rod cell demise and apoptosis in diseased Rpe65(-/- mice were dependent on Bax-induced pathway. Surprisingly, early loss of cones was not prevented in Rpe65(-/-/Bax(-/- mice, indicating that pro-apoptotic Bax was not involved in the pathogenesis of cone cell death in Rpe65-deficient mice

  8. Electroretinographic assessment of rod- and cone-mediated bipolar cell pathways using flicker stimuli in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanimoto, Naoyuki; Sothilingam, Vithiyanjali; Kondo, Mineo; Biel, Martin; Humphries, Peter; Seeliger, Mathias W.

    2015-01-01

    Mouse full-field electroretinograms (ERGs) are dominated by responses of photoreceptors and depolarizing (ON-) bipolar cells, but not much of hyperpolarizing (OFF-) bipolar cells under conventional recording conditions. Here we investigate a novel ERG protocol in mice for functional assessment of the major ON- and OFF-bipolar cell pathways using flicker stimuli for a high luminance with varying frequency up to 30 Hz. Wild-type (WT) and functionally specific transgenic mice (Cnga3-/-, no cone photoreceptor function; rho-/-, no rod photoreceptor function; mGluR6-/-, no ON-bipolar cell function) were examined. The Cnga3-/- flicker ERG was similar to the WT flicker ERG at very low stimulus frequencies, whereas ERGs were comparable between WT and rho-/- mice at 5 Hz and above. Between 5 and 15 Hz, ERGs in mGluR6-/- mice differed in configuration and amplitude from those in WT and rho-/- mice; in contrast, response amplitudes above 15 Hz were comparable among WT, rho-/- and mGluR6-/- mice. In summary, we found three frequency ranges with these conditions that are dominated by activity in the rod pathways (below 5 Hz), cone ON-pathway (between 5 and 15 Hz), and cone OFF-pathway (above 15 Hz) that enables a quick overview of the functionality of the major bipolar cell pathways. PMID:26029863

  9. Transplantation of photoreceptors labeled with tritiated thymidine into RCS rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gouras, P.; Du, J.; Gelanze, M.; Kwun, R.; Kjeldbye, H.; Lopez, R.

    1991-01-01

    Tritiated thymidine was administered to newborn rats to label photoreceptors, about 50% of which are still dividing. These photoreceptors were enzymatically dissociated and separated from the remainder of the retina after the infant rat matured. These labeled photoreceptors were then transplanted into a foreign host retina in the region of the outer nuclear layer. The hosts were ocular, albinotic, Royal College of Surgeons (RCS) rats, congenic to the normal donors and at least 4 months old, a time when virtually all the photoreceptors have degenerated from their retinas. The transplant site was examined at various times after transplantation by light microscope autoradiography. Labeled photoreceptor cell bodies were found in clusters in the outer nuclear layer region for as long as 3 months after transplantation surgery

  10. Pathogenesis of progressive rod-cone degeneration in miniature poodles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguirre, G.; Alligood, J.; O' Brien, P.; Buyukmihci, N.

    1982-11-01

    Visual cell pathologic changes and outer segment renewal were investigated in miniature poodles with progressive rod-cone degeneration. Early in this disease, visual cells in the posterior pole and equatorial regions show outer segment lamellar disorientation and vesicular profiles. Visual cells are normal in the periphery. Outer segment renewal determined after intravitreal injection of /sup 3/H-leucine was abnormally slower in affected animals than in controls. This renewal abnormality was similar in structurally normal and diseased photoreceptors, suggesting that the renewal defect is the earliest recognizable abnormality in the disease. The pigment epithelium was normal; the presence and density of pigment did not appear to affect the extent and severity of the disease or modify the abnormal renewal rate. As the disease progressed, photoreceptor outer segments were lost, and the remaining diminutive photoreceptors accumulated label in the inner segment and perinuclear zones. Sodium dodecyl sulfate gel electrophoresis of crude rod outer segment preparations showed no differences in opsin synthesis between normal and affected retinas early in the disease, but opsin synthesis decreased in the late stage of the disease.

  11. Retinal photoreceptor expresses toll-like receptors (TLRs and elicits innate responses following TLR ligand and bacterial challenge.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pawan Kumar Singh

    Full Text Available Toll-like receptors (TLRs play an important role in host defense against microbial pathogens. Our previous studies have shown that TLRs are expressed on various retinal cells (Microglia and Müller glia and orchestrate retinal innate responses in bacterial endophthalmitis. In this study, we used a well-characterized mouse cone photoreceptor cell line (661W; and demonstrated that these cells express all known TLRs. Although the stimulation of 661W cells with TLR ligands (Pam3Cys, PolyI:C, LPS, Flagellin, Poly DT, and ODN did not alter TLR expression, downstream TLR-signaling pathways (NF-κB, p38, and ERK are activated. Moreover, TLR-activated 661W cells secreted significant amounts of inflammatory mediators (IL-6, IL-1β, MIP-2, and KC in their culture supernatant, as assessed by ELISA. A similar trend was observed in 661W cells challenged with live bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus. Interestingly, the neutralization of TLR2, a major receptor for S. aureus recognition, did not significantly attenuate bacterial-induced inflammatory mediators, suggesting the existence of TLR2-independent mechanisms in photoreceptor cells. Together, these results indicate that photoreceptors constitutively express functional TLRs and possess the ability to initiate innate responses following pathogen challenge, implicating their role in retinal innate immunity.

  12. Chain on a cone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zubelevich Oleg

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available We consider a loop of a chain thrown like a lasso on a fixed right circular cone. The system is in the standard homogeneous gravity field. The axis of the cone is vertical. It is shown that under certain vertex angles chain’s loop has an oblique equilibrium.

  13. Technical factors influencing cone packing density estimates in adaptive optics flood illuminated retinal images.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Lombardo

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To investigate the influence of various technical factors on the variation of cone packing density estimates in adaptive optics flood illuminated retinal images. METHODS: Adaptive optics images of the photoreceptor mosaic were obtained in fifteen healthy subjects. The cone density and Voronoi diagrams were assessed in sampling windows of 320×320 µm, 160×160 µm and 64×64 µm at 1.5 degree temporal and superior eccentricity from the preferred locus of fixation (PRL. The technical factors that have been analyzed included the sampling window size, the corrected retinal magnification factor (RMFcorr, the conversion from radial to linear distance from the PRL, the displacement between the PRL and foveal center and the manual checking of cone identification algorithm. Bland-Altman analysis was used to assess the agreement between cone density estimated within the different sampling window conditions. RESULTS: The cone density declined with decreasing sampling area and data between areas of different size showed low agreement. A high agreement was found between sampling areas of the same size when comparing density calculated with or without using individual RMFcorr. The agreement between cone density measured at radial and linear distances from the PRL and between data referred to the PRL or the foveal center was moderate. The percentage of Voronoi tiles with hexagonal packing arrangement was comparable between sampling areas of different size. The boundary effect, presence of any retinal vessels, and the manual selection of cones missed by the automated identification algorithm were identified as the factors influencing variation of cone packing arrangements in Voronoi diagrams. CONCLUSIONS: The sampling window size is the main technical factor that influences variation of cone density. Clear identification of each cone in the image and the use of a large buffer zone are necessary to minimize factors influencing variation of Voronoi

  14. A Chick Model of Retinal Detachment: Cone Rich and Novel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cebulla, Colleen M.; Zelinka, Chris P.; Scott, Melissa A.; Lubow, Martin; Bingham, Amanda; Rasiah, Stephen; Mahmoud, Ashraf M.; Fischer, Andy J.

    2012-01-01

    Background Development of retinal detachment models in small animals can be difficult and expensive. Here we create and characterize a novel, cone-rich retinal detachment (RD) model in the chick. Methodology/Principal Findings Retinal detachments were created in chicks between postnatal days 7 and 21 by subretinal injections of either saline (SA) or hyaluronic acid (HA). Injections were performed through a dilated pupil with observation via surgical microscope, using the fellow eye as a control. Immunohistochemical analyses were performed at days 1, 3, 7, 10 and 14 after retinal detachment to evaluate the cellular responses of photoreceptors, Müller glia, microglia and nonastrocytic inner retinal glia (NIRG). Cell proliferation was detected with bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU)-incorporation and by the expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA). Cell death was detected with terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL). As in mammalian models of RD, there is shortening of photoreceptor outer segments and mis-trafficking of photoreceptor opsins in areas of RD. Photoreceptor cell death was maximal 1 day after RD, but continued until 14 days after RD. Müller glia up-regulated glial fibriliary acidic protein (GFAP), proliferated, showed interkinetic nuclear migration, and migrated to the subretinal space in areas of detachment. Microglia became reactive; they up-regulated CD45, acquired amoeboid morphology, and migrated toward outer retina in areas of RD. Reactive NIRG cells accumulated in detached areas. Conclusions/Significance Subretinal injections of SA or HA in the chick eye successfully produced retinal detachments and cellular responses similar to those seen in standard mammalian models. Given the relatively large eye size, and considering the low cost, the chick model of RD offers advantages for high-throughput studies. PMID:22970190

  15. Cone pigments in a North American marsupial, the opossum (Didelphis virginiana).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Gerald H; Williams, Gary A

    2010-05-01

    Only two of the four cone opsin gene families found in vertebrates are represented in contemporary eutherian and marsupial species. Recent genetic studies of two species of South American marsupial detected the presence of representatives from two of the classes of cone opsin genes and the structures of these genes predicted cone pigments with respective peaks in the ultraviolet and long-wavelength portions of the spectrum. The Virginia opossum (Didelphis virginiana), a profoundly nocturnal animal, is the only marsupial species found in North America. The prospects for cone-based vision in this species were examined through recordings of the electroretinogram (ERG), a commonly examined retinal response to photic stimulation. Recorded under flickering-light conditions that elicit signals from cone photoreceptors, the spectral sensitivity of the opossum eye is well accounted for by contributions from the presence of a single cone pigment having peak absorption at 561-562 nm. A series of additional experiments that employed various chromatic adaptation paradigms were conducted in a search for possible contributions from a second (short-wavelength sensitive) cone pigment. We found no evidence that such a mechanism contributes to the ERG in this marsupial.

  16. Axial length and cone density as assessed with adaptive optics in myopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Supriya Dabir

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To assess the variations in cone mosaic in myopia and its correlation with axial length (AL. Subjects and Methods: Twenty-five healthy myopic volunteers underwent assessment of photoreceptors using adaptive optics retinal camera at 2° and 3° from the foveal center in four quadrants superior, inferior, temporal and nasal. Data was analyzed using SPSS version 17 (IBM. Multivariable regression analysis was conducted to study the relation between cone density and AL, quadrant around the fovea and eccentricity from the fovea. Results: The mean cone density was significantly lower as the eccentricity increased from 2° from the fovea to 3° (18,560 ± 5455-16,404 ± 4494/mm 2 respectively. There was also a statistically significant difference between four quadrants around the fovea. The correlation of cone density and spacing with AL showed that there was a significant inverse relation of AL with the cone density. Conclusion: In myopic patients with good visual acuity cone density around the fovea depends on the quadrant, distance from the fovea as well as the AL. The strength of the relation of AL with cone density depends on the quadrant and distance.

  17. Vredefort shatter cones revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolaysen, L. O.; Reimold, W. U.

    1999-03-01

    Shatter cones have been described from a number of circular and polygonal structures worldwide, the origin of which has been alternatively ascribed to the impacts of large extraterrestrial projectiles or to catastrophic endogenic processes. Despite their association with enigmatic, catastrophic processes, the nature of shatter cones and the physics involved in their formation have not been comprehensively researched. Results of detailed field and laboratory studies of shatter cones from three areas in the collar of the Vredefort Dome in South Africa are presented. Vredefort shatter cones are directly related to a widely displayed fracture phenomenon, termed ``multiply striated joint sets (MSJS)''. MSJs are planar to curviplanar fractures occuring at spacings of shock event that affected horizontal strata.

  18. Cone penetrometer comparison testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    A total of 61 cone penetration tests were performed at 14 sites in the state of Wisconsin. Data : reinforced conclusions from practice in Minnesota and previously performed test programs : related to the Marquette Interchange and Mitchell interchange...

  19. Quotient normed cones

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    E-mail: o.valero@uib.es. MS received 16 December 2005. Abstract. Given a normed cone (X, p) and a subcone Y, we construct and study the quotient normed cone (X/Y, ˜p) generated by Y. In particular we characterize the bicompleteness of (X/Y, ˜p) in terms of the bicompleteness of (X, p), and prove that the dual quotient ...

  20. Efficient Xerographic Photoreceptors from Conjugated Polymers and Polymer Blends

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zhang, Xuejun, Ph.D

    1998-01-01

    Bilayer xerographic photoreceptors in which pi-conjugated polymers and binary conjugated polymer blends are used as the charge generation layer have been fabricated, evaluated, and shown to be highly efficient...

  1. Squid photoreceptor terminals synthesize calexcitin, a learning related protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyman, Maria; Crispino, Marianna; Kaplan, Barry B; Giuditta, Antonio

    2003-08-14

    Nerve endings of squid photoreceptor neurons generate large synaptosomes upon homogenization of the optic lobe. Using several independent methods, these presynaptic structures have been shown to synthesize a wealth of soluble, cytoskeletal and nuclear encoded mitochondrial proteins, and to account for essentially all the translation activity of the synaptosomal fraction. We are now presenting evidence that calexcitin, a learning related, Ca(2+)-binding protein of the B photoreceptors of Hermissenda crassicornis (a mollusk), is synthesized and subjected to post-translational modifications in the squid photoreceptor terminals. In view of the essential role of presynaptic protein synthesis in long-term memory formation in Aplysia, our data suggest that a comparable role may be played by calexcitin synthesized in the squid photoreceptor terminals.

  2. ATP-binding cassette transporter ABCA4 and chemical isomerization protect photoreceptor cells from the toxic accumulation of excess 11-cis-retinal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quazi, Faraz; Molday, Robert S.

    2014-01-01

    The visual cycle is a series of enzyme-catalyzed reactions which converts all-trans-retinal to 11-cis-retinal for the regeneration of visual pigments in rod and cone photoreceptor cells. Although essential for vision, 11-cis-retinal like all-trans-retinal is highly toxic due to its highly reactive aldehyde group and has to be detoxified by either reduction to retinol or sequestration within retinal-binding proteins. Previous studies have focused on the role of the ATP-binding cassette transporter ABCA4 associated with Stargardt macular degeneration and retinol dehydrogenases (RDH) in the clearance of all-trans-retinal from photoreceptors following photoexcitation. How rod and cone cells prevent the accumulation of 11-cis-retinal in photoreceptor disk membranes in excess of what is required for visual pigment regeneration is not known. Here we show that ABCA4 can transport N-11-cis-retinylidene-phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), the Schiff-base conjugate of 11-cis-retinal and PE, from the lumen to the cytoplasmic leaflet of disk membranes. This transport function together with chemical isomerization to its all-trans isomer and reduction to all-trans-retinol by RDH can prevent the accumulation of excess 11-cis-retinal and its Schiff-base conjugate and the formation of toxic bisretinoid compounds as found in ABCA4-deficient mice and individuals with Stargardt macular degeneration. This segment of the visual cycle in which excess 11-cis-retinal is converted to all-trans-retinol provides a rationale for the unusually high content of PE and its long-chain unsaturated docosahexaenoyl group in photoreceptor membranes and adds insight into the molecular mechanisms responsible for Stargardt macular degeneration. PMID:24707049

  3. Rod Outer Segment Development Influences AAV-Mediated Photoreceptor Transduction After Subretinal Injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petit, Lolita; Ma, Shan; Cheng, Shun-Yun; Gao, Guangping; Punzo, Claudio

    2017-06-01

    Vectors based on the adeno-associated virus (AAV) are currently the preferred tools for delivering genes to photoreceptors (PR) in small and large animals. AAVs have been applied successfully in various models of PR dystrophies. However, unknown barriers still limit AAV's efficient application in several forms of severe PR degenerations due to insufficient transgene expression and/or treated cells at the time of injection. Optimizations of PR gene therapy strategies will likely benefit from the identification of the cellular factors that influence PR transduction. Interestingly, recent studies have shown that the AAV transduction profile of PRs differs significantly between neonatal and adult mouse retinas after subretinal injection. This phenomenon may provide clues to identify host factors that influence the efficiency of AAV-mediated PR transduction. This study demonstrates that rod outer segments are critical modulators of efficient AAV-mediated rod transduction. During retinal development, rod transduction correlated temporally and spatially with the differentiation order of PRs when vectors were introduced subretinally but not when introduced intravitreally. All subretinally injected vectors had an initial preference to transduce cones in the absence of formed rod outer segments and then displayed a preference for rods as the cells matured, independently of the expression cassette or AAV serotype. Consistent with this observation, altered development of rod outer segments was associated with a strong reduction of rod transduction and an increase in the percentage of transduced cones by 2- to 2.8-fold. A similar increase of cone transduction was observed in the adult retinal degeneration 1 (rd1) retina compared to wild-type mice. These results suggest that the loss of rod outer segments in diseased retinas could markedly affect gene transfer efficiency of AAV vectors by limiting the ability of AAVs to infect dying rods efficiently. This information could be

  4. Avian And Other Zoonotic Influenza

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... outbreaks in poultry have seriously impacted livelihoods, the economy and international trade in affected countries. Other avian influenza A( ... outbreaks in poultry have seriously impacted livelihoods, the economy and international trade in affected countries. Other avian influenza A( ...

  5. Common transcriptional mechanisms for visual photoreceptor cell differentiation among Pancrustaceans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simpla Mahato

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available A hallmark of visual rhabdomeric photoreceptors is the expression of a rhabdomeric opsin and uniquely associated phototransduction molecules, which are incorporated into a specialized expanded apical membrane, the rhabdomere. Given the extensive utilization of rhabdomeric photoreceptors in the eyes of protostomes, here we address whether a common transcriptional mechanism exists for the differentiation of rhabdomeric photoreceptors. In Drosophila, the transcription factors Pph13 and Orthodenticle (Otd direct both aspects of differentiation: rhabdomeric opsin transcription and rhabdomere morphogenesis. We demonstrate that the orthologs of both proteins are expressed in the visual systems of the distantly related arthropod species Tribolium castaneum and Daphnia magna and that their functional roles are similar in these species. In particular, we establish that the Pph13 homologs have the ability to bind a subset of Rhodopsin core sequence I sites and that these sites are present in key phototransduction genes of both Tribolium and Daphnia. Furthermore, Pph13 and Otd orthologs are capable of executing deeply conserved functions of photoreceptor differentiation as evidenced by the ability to rescue their respective Drosophila mutant phenotypes. Pph13 homologs are equivalent in their ability to direct both rhabdomere morphogenesis and opsin expression within Drosophila, whereas Otd paralogs demonstrate differential abilities to regulate photoreceptor differentiation. Finally, loss-of-function analyses in Tribolium confirm the conserved requirement of Pph13 and Otd in regulating both rhabdomeric opsin transcription and rhabdomere morphogenesis. Taken together, our data identify components of a regulatory framework for rhabdomeric photoreceptor differentiation in Pancrustaceans, providing a foundation for defining ancestral regulatory modules of rhabdomeric photoreceptor differentiation.

  6. Preparation and transplantation of photoreceptor sheets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, J C; Ishida, M; Hersh, P; Sugino, I K; Zarbin, M A

    1998-06-01

    Photoreceptor (PR) transplantation may be a treatment for blindness secondary to PR degeneration. We studied different technical aspects of PR-sheet preparation. Geographic variation in the thickness of the cat PR layer (from the outer segments to the outer plexiform layer) and inner retina (width of the remainder of the retina) was studied. PR sheets (cat and human) were prepared through gelatin embedding and subsequent vibratoming or excimer laser ablation. Cat PR sheets were evaluated after transplantation. The thickness of the cat PR layer and inner retina varied in different regions. The superior central retina, including the area centralis, was thickest (PR layer: 115-123 microm, entire retina: 225-230 microm, in fixed tissue). The peripheral retina was approximately 40% thinner than the center. Fresh retina was approximately 7.9% thicker than the fixed retina. Both vibratomy and excimer laser ablation removed the inner retina, leaving a PR-layer sheet with good morphology. To produce good quality PR sheets with vibratomy, use of different gelatin concentrations (2% to 35%) at various stages of sheet preparation was crucial. To produce PR sheets of uniform thickness with excimer laser ablation, control of fluid on the retinal surface was critical. Twenty-four hours after PR transplantation surgery, donor PR cells were well oriented and in close contact with host retinal pigment epithelial cells. Gelatin supporting the transplant dissolved as early as 100 min after surgery. We confirmed and expanded the work of previous investigators and showed that cat and human PR sheets can be manufactured using vibratomy or excimer laser ablation. This preparation provides a well oriented and organized PR cell layer after transplantation.

  7. CNGB3-Achromatopsia Clinical Trial With CNTF: Diminished Rod Pathway Responses With No Evidence of Improvement in Cone Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zein, Wadih M.; Jeffrey, Brett G.; Wiley, Henry E.; Turriff, Amy E.; Tumminia, Santa J.; Tao, Weng; Bush, Ronald A.; Marangoni, Dario; Wen, Rong; Wei, Lisa L.; Sieving, Paul A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) protects rod photoreceptors from retinal degenerative disease in multiple nonhuman models. Thus far, CNTF has failed to demonstrate rod protection in trials for human retinitis pigmentosa. Recently, CNTF was found to improve cone photoreceptor function in a canine CNGB3 achromatopsia model. This study explores whether this finding translates to humans with CNGB3 achromatopsia. Methods. A five-subject, open-label Phase I/II study was initiated by implanting intraocular microcapsules releasing CNTF (nominally 20 ng/d) into one eye each of CNGB3 achromat participants. Fellow eyes served as untreated controls. Subjects were followed for 1 year. Results. Pupil constriction in treated eyes gave evidence of intraocular CNTF release. Additionally, scotopic ERG responses were reduced, and dark-adapted psychophysical absolute thresholds were increased, attributable to diminished rod or rod pathway activity. Optical coherence tomography revealed that the cone-rich fovea underwent structural changes as the foveal hyporeflective zone (HRZ) became diminished in CNTF-treated eyes. No objectively measurable enhancement of cone function was found by assessments of visual acuity, mesopic increment sensitivity threshold, or the photopic ERG. Careful measurements of color hue discrimination showed no change. Nonetheless, subjects reported beneficial changes of visual function in the treated eyes, including reduced light sensitivity and aversion to bright light, which may trace to decreased effective ambient light from the pupillary constriction; further they noted slowed adaptation to darkness, consistent with CNTF action on rod photoreceptors. Conclusions. Ciliary neurotrophic factor did not measurably enhance cone function, which reveals a species difference between human and canine CNGB3 cones in response to CNTF. (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT01648452.) PMID:25205868

  8. Ejecta evolution during cone impact

    KAUST Repository

    Marston, Jeremy

    2014-07-07

    We present findings from an experimental investigation into the impact of solid cone-shaped bodies onto liquid pools. Using a variety of cone angles and liquid physical properties, we show that the ejecta formed during the impact exhibits self-similarity for all impact speeds for very low surface tension liquids, whilst for high-surface tension liquids similarity is only achieved at high impact speeds. We find that the ejecta tip can detach from the cone and that this phenomenon can be attributed to the air entrainment phenomenon. We analyse of a range of cone angles, including some ogive cones, and impact speeds in terms of the spatiotemporal evolution of the ejecta tip. Using superhydrophobic cones, we also examine the entry of cones which entrain an air layer.

  9. PHOTORECEPTOR DEGENERATION IN A MOUNTAIN LION CUB (PUMA CONCOLOR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiSalvo, Andrew R; Reilly, Christopher M; Wiggans, K Tomo; Woods, Leslie W; Wack, Ray F; Clifford, Deana L

    2016-12-01

    An orphaned 4-mo-old female mountain lion cub ( Puma concolor ) was captured along the coastline in Montaña de Oro State Park in Los Osos, California, USA. Following suspicion that the cub was visually impaired, ophthalmic examination revealed diffuse bilateral retinal atrophy. Due to a poor prognosis, humane euthanasia was elected. Necropsy and histopathological findings were consistent with photoreceptor degeneration. Based on the cub's signalment, history, and histopathology, a genetic or nutritional etiology was suspected, with the former etiology more strongly supported. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first report of photoreceptor degeneration in a wild felid and should be considered in cases of blindness.

  10. Cone Algorithm of Spinning Vehicles under Dynamic Coning Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuang-biao Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to the fact that attitude error of vehicles has an intense trend of divergence when vehicles undergo worsening coning environment, in this paper, the model of dynamic coning environment is derived firstly. Then, through investigation of the effect on Euler attitude algorithm for the equivalency of traditional attitude algorithm, it is found that attitude error is actually the roll angle error including drifting error and oscillating error, which is induced directly by dynamic coning environment and further affects the pitch angle and yaw angle through transferring. Based on definition of the cone frame and cone attitude, a cone algorithm is proposed by rotation relationship to calculate cone attitude, and the relationship between cone attitude and Euler attitude of spinning vehicle is established. Through numerical simulations with different conditions of dynamic coning environment, it is shown that the induced error of Euler attitude fluctuates by the variation of precession and nutation, especially by that of nutation, and the oscillating frequency of roll angle error is twice that of pitch angle error and yaw angle error. In addition, the rotation angle is more competent to describe the spinning process of vehicles under coning environment than Euler angle gamma, and the real pitch angle and yaw angle are calculated finally.

  11. Light cone matrix product

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hastings, Matthew B [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    We show how to combine the light-cone and matrix product algorithms to simulate quantum systems far from equilibrium for long times. For the case of the XXZ spin chain at {Delta} = 0.5, we simulate to a time of {approx} 22.5. While part of the long simulation time is due to the use of the light-cone method, we also describe a modification of the infinite time-evolving bond decimation algorithm with improved numerical stability, and we describe how to incorporate symmetry into this algorithm. While statistical sampling error means that we are not yet able to make a definite statement, the behavior of the simulation at long times indicates the appearance of either 'revivals' in the order parameter as predicted by Hastings and Levitov (e-print arXiv:0806.4283) or of a distinct shoulder in the decay of the order parameter.

  12. An ADAM9 mutation in canine cone-rod dystrophy 3 establishes homology with human cone-rod dystrophy 9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Orly; Mezey, Jason G; Boyko, Adam R; Gao, Chuan; Wang, Wei; Bustamante, Carlos D; Anguish, Lynne J; Jordan, Julie Ann; Pearce-Kelling, Susan E; Aguirre, Gustavo D; Acland, Gregory M

    2010-08-11

    To identify the causative mutation in a canine cone-rod dystrophy (crd3) that segregates as an adult onset disorder in the Glen of Imaal Terrier breed of dog. Glen of Imaal Terriers were ascertained for crd3 phenotype by clinical ophthalmoscopic examination, and in selected cases by electroretinography. Blood samples from affected cases and non-affected controls were collected and used, after DNA extraction, to undertake a genome-wide association study using Affymetrix Version 2 Canine single nucleotide polymorphism chips and 250K Sty Assay protocol. Positional candidate gene analysis was undertaken for genes identified within the peak-association signal region. Retinal morphology of selected crd3-affected dogs was evaluated by light and electron microscopy. A peak association signal exceeding genome-wide significance was identified on canine chromosome 16. Evaluation of genes in this region suggested A Disintegrin And Metalloprotease domain, family member 9 (ADAM9), identified concurrently elsewhere as the cause of human cone-rod dystrophy 9 (CORD9), as a strong positional candidate for canine crd3. Sequence analysis identified a large genomic deletion (over 20 kb) that removed exons 15 and 16 from the ADAM9 transcript, introduced a premature stop, and would remove critical domains from the encoded protein. Light and electron microscopy established that, as in ADAM9 knockout mice, the primary lesion in crd3 appears to be a failure of the apical microvilli of the retinal pigment epithelium to appropriately invest photoreceptor outer segments. By electroretinography, retinal function appears normal in very young crd3-affected dogs, but by 15 months of age, cone dysfunction is present. Subsequently, both rod and cone function degenerate. Identification of this ADAM9 deletion in crd3-affected dogs establishes this canine disease as orthologous to CORD9 in humans, and offers opportunities for further characterization of the disease process, and potential for genetic

  13. Shatter cones: Diagnostic impact signatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mchone, J. F.; Dietz, R. S.

    1988-01-01

    Uniquely fractured target rocks known as shatter cones are associated with more than one half the world's 120 or so presently known impact structures. Shatter cones are a form of tensile rock failure in which a positive conical plug separates from a negative outer cup or mold and delicate ornaments radiating from an apex are preserved on surfaces of both portions. Although distinct, shatter cones are sometimes confused with other striated geologic features such as ventifacts, stylolites, cone-in-cone, slickensides, and artificial blast plumes. Complete cones or solitary cones are rare, occurrences are usually as swarms in thoroughly fractured rock. Shatter cones may form in a zone where an expanding shock wave propagating through a target decays to form an elastic wave. Near this transition zone, the expanding primary wave may strike a pebble or other inhomogeneity whose contrasting transmission properties produce a scattered secondary wave. Interference between primary and secondary scattered waves produce conical stress fields with axes perpendicular to the plane of an advancing shock front. This model supports mechanism capable of producing such shatter cone properties as orientation, apical clasts, lithic dependence, and shock pressure zonation. Although formational mechanics are still poorly understood, shatter cones have become the simplest geologic field criterion for recognizing astroblemes (ancient terrestrial impact structures).

  14. Shatter cones: Diagnostic impact signatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McHone, J.F.; Dietz, R.S.

    1988-01-01

    Uniquely fractured target rocks known as shatter cones are associated with more than one half the world's 120 or so presently known impact structures. Shatter cones are a form of tensile rock failure in which a positive conical plug separates from a negative outer cup or mold and delicate ornaments radiating from an apex are preserved on surfaces of both portions. Although distinct, shatter cones are sometimes confused with other striated geologic features such as ventifacts, stylolites, cone-in-cone, slickensides, and artificial blast plumes. Complete cones or solitary cones are rare, occurrences are usually as swarms in thoroughly fractured rock. Shatter cones may form in a zone where an expanding shock wave propagating through a target decays to form an elastic wave. Near this transition zone, the expanding primary wave may strike a pebble or other inhomogeneity whose contrasting transmission properties produce a scattered secondary wave. Interference between primary and secondary scattered waves produce conical stress fields with axes perpendicular to the plane of an advancing shock front. This model supports mechanism capable of producing such shatter cone properties as orientation, apical clasts, lithic dependence, and shock pressure zonation. Although formational mechanics are still poorly understood, shatter cones have become the simplest geologic field criterion for recognizing astroblemes (ancient terrestrial impact structures)

  15. Light cone thermodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Lorenzo, Tommaso; Perez, Alejandro

    2018-02-01

    We show that null surfaces defined by the outgoing and infalling wave fronts emanating from and arriving at a sphere in Minkowski spacetime have thermodynamical properties that are in strict formal correspondence with those of black hole horizons in curved spacetimes. Such null surfaces, made of pieces of light cones, are bifurcate conformal Killing horizons for suitable conformally stationary observers. They can be extremal and nonextremal depending on the radius of the shining sphere. Such conformal Killing horizons have a constant light cone (conformal) temperature, given by the standard expression in terms of the generalization of surface gravity for conformal Killing horizons. Exchanges of conformally invariant energy across the horizon are described by a first law where entropy changes are given by 1 /(4 ℓp2) of the changes of a geometric quantity with the meaning of horizon area in a suitable conformal frame. These conformal horizons satisfy the zeroth to the third laws of thermodynamics in an appropriate way. In the extremal case they become light cones associated with a single event; these have vanishing temperature as well as vanishing entropy.

  16. Extracellular electrical activity from the photoreceptors of midge

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The ontogeny of photosensitivity has been studied in a holometabolous insect, the midge Chironomus ramosus. The life cycle of midges shifts from an aquatic environment to a non-aquatic environment. Extracellular electrical activity of photoreceptor organs was recorded at larval and adult stages. We found an increase in ...

  17. How a fly photoreceptor samples light information in time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juusola, Mikko; Song, Zhuoyi

    2017-08-15

    A photoreceptor's information capture is constrained by the structure and function of its light-sensitive parts. Specifically, in a fly photoreceptor, this limit is set by the number of its photon sampling units (microvilli), constituting its light sensor (the rhabdomere), and the speed and recoverability of their phototransduction reactions. In this review, using an insightful constructionist viewpoint of a fly photoreceptor being an 'imperfect' photon counting machine, we explain how these constraints give rise to adaptive quantal information sampling in time, which maximises information in responses to salient light changes while antialiasing visual signals. Interestingly, such sampling innately determines also why photoreceptors extract more information, and more economically, from naturalistic light contrast changes than Gaussian white-noise stimuli, and we explicate why this is so. Our main message is that stochasticity in quantal information sampling is less noise and more processing, representing an 'evolutionary adaptation' to generate a reliable neural estimate of the variable world. © 2017 The Authors. Experimental Physiology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of The Physiological Society.

  18. Protein and signaling networks in vertebrate photoreceptor cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karl-Wilhelm eKoch

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Vertebrate photoreceptor cells are exquisite light detectors operating under very dim and bright illumination. The photoexcitation and adaptation machinery in photoreceptor cells consists of protein complexes that can form highly ordered supramolecular structures and control the homeostasis and mutual dependence of the secondary messengers cGMP and Ca2+. The visual pigment in rod photoreceptors, the G protein-coupled receptor rhodopsin is organized in tracks of dimers thereby providing a signaling platform for the dynamic scaffolding of the G protein transducin. Illuminated rhodopsin is turned off by phosphorylation catalyzed by rhodopsin kinase GRK1 under control of Ca2+-recoverin. The GRK1 protein complex partly assembles in lipid raft structures, where shutting off rhodopsin seems to be more effective. Re-synthesis of cGMP is another crucial step in the recovery of the photoresponse after illumination. It is catalyzed by membrane bound sensory guanylate cyclases and is regulated by specific neuronal Ca2+-sensor proteins called GCAPs. At least one guanylate cyclase (ROS-GC1 was shown to be part of a multiprotein complex having strong interactions with the cytoskeleton and being controlled in a multimodal Ca2+-dependent fashion. The final target of the cGMP signaling cascade is a cyclic nucleotide-gated channel that is a hetero-oligomeric protein located in the plasma membrane and interacting with accessory proteins in highly organized microdomains. We summarize results and interpretations of findings related to the inhomogeneous organization of signaling units in photoreceptor outer segments.

  19. Lateral interactions in the photoreceptor membrane: a NMR study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mollevanger, L.C.P.J.

    1987-01-01

    The photoreceptor membrane has an exceptionally high content of polyunsaturated fatty acyl chains combined with a high amount of phosphatidyl ethanolamine. It is situated in a cell organelle, the rod outer segment, with a high biological activity in which controlable trans-membrane currents of different ions play an important role. These characteristics make it a very interesting biological membrane to search for the existence of non-bilayer structures. Therefore in this thesis a detailed study of the polymorphic phase behaviour of the rod outer segment photoreceptor lipids was undertaken, concerning modulation of the polymorphic phase behaviour of photoreceptor membrane lipids by divalent cations and temperature, polymorphism of the individual phospholipid classes phosphatidylethanolamine and phosphatidylserine and effects of cholesterol, bilayer stabilization by (rhod)opsin. Morphologically intact rod outer segment possesses a large magnetic anisotropy. This property is used to obtain 31 P-NMR of oriented photoreceptor membranes which allows spectral analysis and identification of individual phospholipid classes, and allows to study lateral lipid diffusion in intact disk membranes. The power of high resolution solid state 13 C-NMR to study the conformation of the chromophore in rhodopsin is demonstrated. (Auth.)

  20. Photoreceptor atrophy in acute zonal occult outer retinopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zibrandtsen, N.; Munch, I.C.; Klemp, K.

    2008-01-01

    of all the segments composing the photoreceptor layer was found by OCT. Full-field ERG revealed affection of the 30 Hz flicker responses and subnormal photopic responses in both patients and subnormal scotopic responses in case 1. Multifocal electroretinography (mERG) revealed localized outer retinal...

  1. Photoreceptor atrophy in acute zonal occult outer retinopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zibrandtsen, N.; Munch, I.C.; Klemp, K.

    2008-01-01

    composing the photoreceptor layer was found by OCT. Full-field ERG revealed affection of the 30 Hz flicker responses and subnormal photopic responses in both patients and subnormal scotopic responses in case 1. Multifocal electroretinography (mERG) revealed localized outer retinal dysfunction. The field...

  2. Cubozoan genome illuminates functional diversification of opsins and photoreceptor evolution

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Liegertová, Michaela; Pergner, Jiří; Kozmiková, Iryna; Fabian, Peter; Pombinho, António R.; Strnad, Hynek; Pačes, Jan; Vlček, Čestmír; Bartůněk, Petr; Kozmik, Zbyněk

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 5, Jul 8 (2015) ISSN 2045-2322 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP305/10/2141; GA MŠk LO1220 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : Cubozoan genome * opsins * photoreceptor * evolution Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 5.228, year: 2015

  3. Angular sensitivity of blowfly photoreceptors : broadening by artificial electrical coupling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smakman, J.G.J.; Stavenga, D.G.

    1987-01-01

    1. Electrical coupling between R1-6 photoreceptors was investigated by measuring angular sensitivities and quantum bumps. 2. Recordings were made from two extreme types of cells: Type a: cells with a diffraction-like angular sensitivity profile. Only large bumps could be obtained from these cells.

  4. XIAP protection of photoreceptors in animal models of retinitis pigmentosa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin C Leonard

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Retinitis pigmentosa (RP is a blinding genetic disorder that is caused by the death of photoreceptors in the outer nuclear layer of the retina. To date, 39 different genetic loci have been associated with the disease, and 28 mutated genes have been identified. Despite the complexity of the underlying genetic basis for RP, the final common pathway is photoreceptor cell death via apoptosis. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, P23H and S334ter rhodopsin transgenic rat models of RP were used to test the neuroprotective effects of anti-apoptotic gene therapy. Adeno-associated viruses (AAV carrying the X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis (XIAP or green fluorescent protein (GFP were delivered subretinally into the eye of transgenic rat pups. Histological and functional measures were used to assess neuroprotection. XIAP is known to block apoptosis by inhibiting the action of caspases-3, -7 and -9. The results show that XIAP gene therapy provides long-term neuroprotection of photoreceptors at both structural and functional levels. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our gene therapy strategy targets the apoptotic cascade, which is the final common pathway in all forms of retinitis pigmentosa. This strategy holds great promise for the treatment of RP, as it allows for the broad protection of photoreceptors, regardless of the initial disease causing mutation.

  5. Uptake and localization of 3H-2 deoxy-D-glucose by retinal photoreceptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Witkovsky, P.; Yang, C.Y.

    1982-01-01

    Following dark incubation of isolated retinas of Xenopus laevis in Ringer solution supplemented with 3H-2-Deoxy-D-glucose (2DG), virtually all of the uptake of the label was by the inner segments and synaptic bases of the photoreceptor cells. Autoradiographs prepared from conventionally fixed tissue showed the same cellular distribution of label as those prepared from identically incubated, unfixed, freeze-dried retinas. However, fixation removed about 77% of the total counts. This fixation-labile, soluble fraction was identified as being primarily 2DG-6 phosphate by thin-layer chromatography. The remaining insoluble fraction corresponded in distribution to glycogen grains. In cones, glycogen is stored primarily in the paraboloid, whereas in rods it is distributed throughout the inner segment and synaptic base. EM autoradiographs illustrated that these were the sites over which fixation-resistant 2DG label was localized. Measurements of radioactivity associated with extracts of retinal glycogen following 2DG incubation demonstrated that a disproportionately high fraction of total counts were associated with the glycogen fraction. We conclude that in the amphibian retina 2DG may be incorporated into glycogen

  6. Grid attacks avian flu

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    During April, a collaboration of Asian and European laboratories analysed 300,000 possible drug components against the avian flu virus H5N1 using the EGEE Grid infrastructure. Schematic presentation of the avian flu virus.The distribution of the EGEE sites in the world on which the avian flu scan was performed. The goal was to find potential compounds that can inhibit the activities of an enzyme on the surface of the influenza virus, the so-called neuraminidase, subtype N1. Using the Grid to identify the most promising leads for biological tests could speed up the development process for drugs against the influenza virus. Co-ordinated by CERN and funded by the European Commission, the EGEE project (Enabling Grids for E-sciencE) aims to set up a worldwide grid infrastructure for science. The challenge of the in silico drug discovery application is to identify those molecules which can dock on the active sites of the virus in order to inhibit its action. To study the impact of small scale mutations on drug r...

  7. Characterization of the retinal proteome during rod photoreceptor genesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hecker Laura A

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The process of rod photoreceptor genesis, cell fate determination and differentiation is complex and multi-factorial. Previous studies have defined a model of photoreceptor differentiation that relies on intrinsic changes within the presumptive photoreceptor cells as well as changes in surrounding tissue that are extrinsic to the cell. We have used a proteomics approach to identify proteins that are dynamically expressed in the mouse retina during rod genesis and differentiation. Findings A series of six developmental ages from E13 to P5 were used to define changes in retinal protein expression during rod photoreceptor genesis and early differentiation. Retinal proteins were separated by isoelectric focus point and molecular weight. Gels were analyzed for changes in protein spot intensity across developmental time. Protein spots that peaked in expression at E17, P0 and P5 were picked from gels for identification. There were 239 spots that were picked for identification based on their dynamic expression during the developmental period of maximal rod photoreceptor genesis and differentiation. Of the 239 spots, 60 of them were reliably identified and represented a single protein. Ten proteins were represented by multiple spots, suggesting they were post-translationally modified. Of the 42 unique dynamically expressed proteins identified, 16 had been previously reported to be associated with the developing retina. Conclusions Our results represent the first proteomics study of the developing mouse retina that includes prenatal development. We identified 26 dynamically expressed proteins in the developing mouse retina whose expression had not been previously associated with retinal development.

  8. Steroids do not prevent photoreceptor degeneration in the light-exposed T4R rhodopsin mutant dog retina irrespective of AP-1 inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Danian; Beltran, William A; Pearce-Kelling, Sue; Li, Zexiao; Acland, Gregory M; Aguirre, Gustavo D

    2009-07-01

    AP-1 has been proposed as a key intermediate linking exposure to light and photoreceptor cell death in rodent light-damage models. Inhibition of AP-1 associated with steroid administration also prevents light damage. In this study the role of steroids in inhibiting AP-1 activation and/or in preventing photoreceptor degeneration was examined in the rhodopsin mutant dog model. The dogs were dark adapted overnight, eyes dilated with mydriatics; the right eye was light occluded and the fundus of the left eye photographed ( approximately 15-17 overlapping frames) with a fundus camera. For biochemical studies, the dogs remained in the dark for 1 to 3 hours after exposure. Twenty-four hours before exposure to light, some dogs were treated with systemic dexamethasone or intravitreal/subconjunctival triamcinolone. AP-1 DNA-binding activity was determined by electrophoresis mobility shift assay (EMSA) and phosphorylation of c-Fos and activation of ERK1/2 were determined by immunoblot analyses. The eyes were collected 1 hour and 2 weeks after exposure to light, for histopathology and immunocytochemistry. Inhibition of AP-1 activation, and phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and c-Fos were found after dexamethasone treatment in light-exposed T4R RHO mutant dog retinas. In contrast, increased AP-1 activity and phosphorylation of c-Fos and ERK1/2 were found in triamcinolone-treated mutant retinas. Similar extensive rod degeneration was found after exposure to light with or without treatment, and areas with surviving photoreceptor nuclei consisted primarily of cones. Only with systemic dexamethasone did the RPE cell layer remain. Intraocular or systemic steroids fail to prevent light-induced photoreceptor degeneration in the T4R RHO dog retina. Finding that systemic dexamethasone prevents AP-1 activation, yet does not prevent retinal light damage, further supports the hypothesis that AP-1 is not the critical player in the cell-death signal that occurs in rods.

  9. The role of mislocalized phototransduction in photoreceptor cell death of retinitis pigmentosa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeshi Nakao

    Full Text Available Most of inherited retinal diseases such as retinitis pigmentosa (RP cause photoreceptor cell death resulting in blindness. RP is a large family of diseases in which the photoreceptor cell death can be caused by a number of pathways. Among them, light exposure has been reported to induce photoreceptor cell death. However, the detailed mechanism by which photoreceptor cell death is caused by light exposure is unclear. In this study, we have shown that even a mild light exposure can induce ectopic phototransduction and result in the acceleration of rod photoreceptor cell death in some vertebrate models. In ovl, a zebrafish model of outer segment deficiency, photoreceptor cell death is associated with light exposure. The ovl larvae show ectopic accumulation of rhodopsin and knockdown of ectopic rhodopsin and transducin rescue rod photoreceptor cell death. However, knockdown of phosphodiesterase, the enzyme that mediates the next step of phototransduction, does not. So, ectopic phototransduction activated by light exposure, which leads to rod photoreceptor cell death, is through the action of transducin. Furthermore, we have demonstrated that forced activation of adenylyl cyclase in the inner segment leads to rod photoreceptor cell death. For further confirmation, we have also generated a transgenic fish which possesses a human rhodopsin mutation, Q344X. This fish and rd10 model mice show photoreceptor cell death caused by adenylyl cyclase. In short, our study indicates that in some RP, adenylyl cyclase is involved in photoreceptor cell death pathway; its inhibition is potentially a logical approach for a novel RP therapy.

  10. Avian influenza surveillance and diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapid detection and accurate identification of low (LPAI) and high pathogenicity avian influenza (HPAI) is critical to controlling infections and disease in poultry. Test selection and algorithms for the detection and diagnosis of avian influenza virus (AIV) in poultry may vary somewhat among differ...

  11. Null cone superspace supergravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Downes-Martin, S.G.

    1980-03-01

    The null cone formalism is used to derive a 2(N-1) parameter family of constraints for O(N) extended superspace supergravity. The invariance groups of these constraints is analysed and is found to be [subgroup U submanifold] contains GL(4,R) for N = 1, the submanifold being eliminated for N > 1. The invariance group defines non-Weyl rotations on the superbein which combine to form Weyl transformations on the supertangent space metric. The invariance of the supergravity Lagrangian under these transformations is discussed. (Auth.)

  12. Lentiviral expression of retinal guanylate cyclase-1 (RetGC1 restores vision in an avian model of childhood blindness.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa L Williams

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA is a genetically heterogeneous group of retinal diseases that cause congenital blindness in infants and children. Mutations in the GUCY2D gene that encodes retinal guanylate cyclase-1 (retGC1 were the first to be linked to this disease group (LCA type 1 [LCA1] and account for 10%-20% of LCA cases. These mutations disrupt synthesis of cGMP in photoreceptor cells, a key second messenger required for function of these cells. The GUCY1*B chicken, which carries a null mutation in the retGC1 gene, is blind at hatching and serves as an animal model for the study of LCA1 pathology and potential treatments in humans.A lentivirus-based gene transfer vector carrying the GUCY2D gene was developed and injected into early-stage GUCY1*B embryos to determine if photoreceptor function and sight could be restored to these animals. Like human LCA1, the avian disease shows early-onset blindness, but there is a window of opportunity for intervention. In both diseases there is a period of photoreceptor cell dysfunction that precedes retinal degeneration. Of seven treated animals, six exhibited sight as evidenced by robust optokinetic and volitional visual behaviors. Electroretinographic responses, absent in untreated animals, were partially restored in treated animals. Morphological analyses indicated there was slowing of the retinal degeneration.Blindness associated with loss of function of retGC1 in the GUCY1*B avian model of LCA1 can be reversed using viral vector-mediated gene transfer. Furthermore, this reversal can be achieved by restoring function to a relatively low percentage of retinal photoreceptors. These results represent a first step toward development of gene therapies for one of the more common forms of childhood blindness.

  13. Avian and human metapneumovirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broor, Shobha; Bharaj, Preeti

    2007-04-01

    Pneumovirus infection remains a significant problem for both human and veterinary medicine. Both avian pneumovirus (aMPV, Turkey rhinotracheitis virus) and human metapneumovirus (hMPV) are pathogens of birds and humans, which are associated with respiratory tract infections. Based on their different genomic organization and low level of nucleotide (nt) and amino acid (aa) identity with paramyxoviruses in the genus Pneumovirus, aMPV and hMPV have been classified into a new genus referred to as Metapneumovirus. The advancement of our understanding of pneumovirus biology and pathogenesis of pneumovirus disease in specific natural hosts can provide us with strategies for vaccine formulations and combined antiviral and immunomodulatory therapies.

  14. Review on resonance cone fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohnuma, Toshiro.

    1980-02-01

    Resonance cone fields and lower hybrid heating are reviewed in this report. The resonance cone fields were reported by Fisher and Gould, and they proposed the use of the measurement of resonance cones and structure as a diagnostic tool to determine the plasma density and electron temperature in magnetoplasma. After the resonance cone, a wave-like disturbance persists. Ohnuma et al. have measured bending, reflection and ducting of resonance cones in detail. The thermal modes in inhomogeneous magnetoplasma were seen. The reflection of thermal mode near an electron plasma frequency layer and an insulating plate has been observed. The non-linear effects of resonance cones is reported. Monochromatic electron beam produces the noise of broad band whistler mode. Lower hybrid waves have been the subject of propagation from the edge of plasma to the lower hybrid layer. Linear lower hybrid waves were studied. The lower hybrid and ion acoustic waves radiated from a point source were observed. The parametric decay of finite-extent, cold electron plasma waves was studied. The lower hybrid cone radiated from a point source going along magnetic field lines was observed. Several experimental data on the lower hybrid heating in tokamak devices have been reported. The theories on resonance cones and lower hybrid waves are introduced in this report. (Kato, T.)

  15. Making An Impact: Shatter Cones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blank, Lisa M.; Plautz, Michael R.; Crews, Jeffrey W.

    2004-01-01

    In 1990, a group of geologists discovered a large number of shatter cones in southwestern Montana. Shatter cones are a type of metamorphosed rock often found in impact structures (the remains of a crater after a meteor impact and years of Earth activity). Scientists have discovered only 168 impact craters around the world. If rocks could talk,…

  16. The holographic entropy cone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bao, Ning; Nezami, Sepehr; Ooguri, Hirosi; Stoica, Bogdan; Sully, James; Walter, Michael

    2015-01-01

    We initiate a systematic enumeration and classification of entropy inequalities satisfied by the Ryu-Takayanagi formula for conformal field theory states with smooth holographic dual geometries. For 2, 3, and 4 regions, we prove that the strong subadditivity and the monogamy of mutual information give the complete set of inequalities. This is in contrast to the situation for generic quantum systems, where a complete set of entropy inequalities is not known for 4 or more regions. We also find an infinite new family of inequalities applicable to 5 or more regions. The set of all holographic entropy inequalities bounds the phase space of Ryu-Takayanagi entropies, defining the holographic entropy cone. We characterize this entropy cone by reducing geometries to minimal graph models that encode the possible cutting and gluing relations of minimal surfaces. We find that, for a fixed number of regions, there are only finitely many independent entropy inequalities. To establish new holographic entropy inequalities, we introduce a combinatorial proof technique that may also be of independent interest in Riemannian geometry and graph theory.

  17. Performance of blue- and green-sensitive photoreceptors of the cricket Gryllus bimaculatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frolov, Roman V; Immonen, Esa-Ville; Weckström, Matti

    2014-03-01

    The compound eye of the cricket Gryllus bimaculatus contains a specialized dorsal rim area (DRA) populated by distinct blue-sensitive photoreceptors responsible for perception of polarized light. The rest of the eye is dominated by green-sensitive photoreceptors. Using patch clamp we studied dissociated ommatidia of nocturnal adults and diurnal eight-instar nymphs with the goals (1) of characterizing the biophysical properties of cricket photoreceptors in general and (2) describing the functionally dissimilar blue- and green-sensitive photoreceptors in terms of voltage-gated channel composition and signal coding. Despite different lifestyles, adult and nymph photoreceptors were indistinguishable. No significant circadian changes were observed in K⁺ currents. In contrast, prominent differences were seen between blue- and green-sensitive photoreceptors. The former were characterized by relatively low absolute sensitivity, high input resistance, slow quantum bumps with long latencies, small light-induced and K⁺ currents and low steady-state depolarization. Information rate, a measure of photoreceptor performance calculated from voltage responses to bandwidth-limited white noise-modulated light contrast, was 87 ± 8 bits s⁻¹ in green-sensitive photoreceptors vs. 59 ± 14 bits s⁻¹ in blue-sensitive photoreceptors, implying a limited role of DRA in the perception of visual contrasts. In addition, evidence of electrical coupling between photoreceptors is presented.

  18. The Retinal Pigment Epithelium: a Convenient Source of New Photoreceptor cells?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-Zhen Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent success in restoring visual function through photoreceptor replacement in mouse models of photoreceptor degeneration intensifies the need to generate or regenerate photoreceptor cells for the ultimate goal of using cell replacement therapy for blindness caused by photoreceptor degeneration. Current research on deriving new photoreceptors for replacement, as regenerative medicine in general, focuses on the use of embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem (iPS cells to generate transplantable cells. Nonetheless, naturally occurring regeneration, such as wound healing, involves awakening cells at or near a wound site to produce new cells needed to heal the wound. Here we discuss the possibility of tweaking an ocular tissue, the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE, to produce photoreceptor cells in situ in the eye. Unlike the neural retina, the RPE in adult mammals maintains cell proliferation capability. Furthermore, progeny cells from RPE proliferation may differentiate into cells other than RPE. The combination of proliferation and plasticity opens a question of whether they could be channeled by a regulatory gene with pro-photoreceptor activity towards photoreceptor production. Studies using embryonic chick and transgenic mouse showed that indeed photoreceptor-like cells were produced in culture and in vivo in the eye using genedirected reprogramming of RPE cells, supporting the feasibility of using the RPE as a convenient source of new photoreceptor cells for in situ retinal repair without involving cell transplantation.

  19. QCD on the light cone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brodsky, S.J.

    1992-09-01

    The quantization of gauge theory at fixed light-cone time τ = t - z/c provides new perspectives for solving non-perturbative problems in quantum chromodynamics. The light-cone Fock state expansion provides both a precise definition of the relativistic wavefunctions of hadrons as bound-states of quarks and gluons and a general calculus for predicting QCD processes at the amplitude level. Applications to exclusive processes and weak decay amplitudes are discussed. The problem of computing the hadronic spectrum and the corresponding light-cone wavefunctions of QCD in one space and one time dimension has been successfully reduced to the diagonalization of a discrete representation of the light-cone Hamiltonian. The problems confronting the solution of gauge theories in 3 + 1 dimensions in the light-cone quantization formalism,, including zero modes and non-perturbative renormalization, are reviewed

  20. Optical combing to align photoreceptors in detached retinas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Shizhuo; Gardner, Thomas W.; Wu, Fei; Cholker, Milind S.

    2004-07-01

    In this paper, we presented a novel micro-manipulating method, called 'optical combing', that could improve the retina reattachment surgery results. Optical combing adopts the working principle of optical tweezers (i.e., focused Gaussian beam produces a trapping force when it incidents onto a micro-object. The trapping force can pull the micro-object to the central point of focused laser beam. Optical combing is implemented by scanning a focused laser beam on the misaligned micro objects (such as misaligned photoreceptors). In our preliminary experiment, a set of misaligned micro glass rods was re-aligned by applying this optical combing technology, which verified our theory. In the future, this technique will be used to re-align misaligned photoreceptors in real retina.

  1. Retinal Photoreceptors and Microvascular Changes in Prediabetes Measured with Adaptive Optics (rtx1™: A Case-Control Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Zaleska-Żmijewska

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Patients with prediabetes are at risk for diabetes, cardiovascular events, and microvascular complications. The rtx1 (Imagine Eyes, France permits early detection of changes in the retinal photoreceptors and vessels. Objective. Cone parameters and retinal microvasculature were analyzed with the rtx1 in 12 prediabetic patients and 22 healthy subjects. The analysis was based on cone density (DM, interphotoreceptor distance (SM, cone packing regularity, and retinal vessel parameters: wall thickness, lumen diameter (LD, wall-to-lumen ratio (WLR, and cross-sectional area of the vascular wall. Results. DM in the prediabetic group was not significantly lower than that in the control group (18,935 ± 1713 cells/mm2 and 19,900 ± 2375 cells/mm2, respectively; p=0.0928. The LD and WLR means differed significantly between the prediabetic and the control groups (LD 94.3 ± 10.9 versus 101.2 ± 15, p=0.022; WLR 0.29 ± 0.05 versus 0.22 ± 0.03, p<0.05. A multivariate regression analysis showed that the WLR was significantly correlated with BMI and total cholesterol. Conclusions. Abnormalities found in rtx1 examinations indicated early signs of arteriolar dysfunction, prior to impaired glucose tolerance progressing to diabetes. The rtx1 retinal image analysis offers noninvasive measurement of early changes in the vasculature that routine clinical examination cannot detect.

  2. Avian Primordial Germ Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagami, Takahiro; Miyahara, Daichi; Nakamura, Yoshiaki

    2017-01-01

    Germ cells transmit genetic information to the next generation through gametogenesis. Primordial germ cells (PGCs) are the first germ-cell population established during development, and are the common origins of both oocytes and spermatogonia. Unlike in other species, PGCs in birds undergo blood circulation to migrate toward the genital ridge, and are one of the major biological properties of avian PGCs. Germ cells enter meiosis and arrest at prophase I during embryogenesis in females, whereas in males they enter mitotic arrest during embryogenesis and enter meiosis only after birth. In chicken, gonadal sex differentiation occurs as early as embryonic day 6, but meiotic initiation of female germ cells starts from a relatively late stage (embryonic day 15.5). Retinoic acid controls meiotic entry in developing chicken gonads through the expressions of retinaldehyde dehydrogenase 2, a major retinoic acid synthesizing enzyme, and cytochrome P450 family 26, subfamily B member 1, a major retinoic acid-degrading enzyme. The other major biological property of avian PGCs is that they can be propagated in vitro for the long term, and this technique is useful for investigating proliferation mechanisms. The main factor involved in chicken PGC proliferation is fibroblast growth factor 2, which activates the signaling of MEK/ERK and thus promotes the cell cycle and anti-apoptosis. Furthermore, the activation of PI3K/Akt signaling is indispensable for the proliferation and survival of chicken PGCs.

  3. Human Visual Cortex Responses to Rapid Cone and Melanopsin-Directed Flicker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spitschan, Manuel; Datta, Ritobrato; Stern, Andrew M; Brainard, David H; Aguirre, Geoffrey K

    2016-02-03

    Signals from cones are recombined in postreceptoral channels [luminance, L + M; red-green, L - M; blue-yellow, S - (L + M)]. The melanopsin-containing retinal ganglion cells are also active at daytime light levels and recent psychophysical results suggest that melanopsin contributes to conscious vision in humans. Here, we measured BOLD fMRI responses to spectral modulations that separately targeted the postreceptoral cone channels and melanopsin. Responses to spatially uniform (27.5° field size, central 5° obscured) flicker at 0.5, 1, 2, 4, 8, 16, 32, and 64 Hz were recorded from areas V1, V2/V3, motion-sensitive area MT, and the lateral occipital complex. In V1 and V2/V3, higher temporal sensitivity was observed to L + M + S (16 Hz) compared with L - M flicker (8 Hz), consistent with psychophysical findings. Area MT was most sensitive to rapid (32 Hz) flicker of either L + M + S or L - M. We found S cone responses only in areas V1 and V2/V3 (peak frequency: 4-8 Hz). In addition, we studied an L + M modulation and found responses that were effectively identical at all temporal frequencies to those recorded for the L + M + S modulation. Finally, we measured the cortical response to melanopsin-directed flicker and compared this response with control modulations that addressed stimulus imprecision and the possibility of stimulation of cones in the shadow of retinal blood vessels (penumbral cones). For our stimulus conditions, melanopsin flicker did not elicit a cortical response exceeding that of the control modulations. We note that failure to control for penumbral cone stimulation could be mistaken for a melanopsin response. The retina contains cone photoreceptors and ganglion cells that contain the photopigment melanopsin. Cones provide brightness and color signals to visual cortex. Melanopsin influences circadian rhythm and the pupil, but its contribution to cortex and perception is less clear. We measured the response of human visual cortex with fMRI using

  4. Photoreceptor cells display a daily rhythm in the orphan receptor Esrrβ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunst, Stefanie; Wolloscheck, Tanja; Grether, Markus; Trunsch, Patricia; Wolfrum, Uwe; Spessert, Rainer

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear orphan receptors are critical for the development and long-term survival of photoreceptor cells. In the present study, the expression of the nuclear orphan receptor Esrrβ--a transcriptional regulator of energy metabolism that protects rod photoreceptors from dystrophy--was tested under daily regulation in the retina and photoreceptor cells. The daily transcript and protein amount profiles were recorded in preparations of the whole retina and microdissected photoreceptor cells using quantitative PCR (qPCR) and western blot analysis. Esrrβ displayed a daily rhythm with elevated values at night in the whole retina and enriched photoreceptor cells. Daily regulation of Esrrβ mRNA depended on light input but not on melatonin, and evoked a corresponding rhythm in the Esrrβ protein. The data presented in this study indicate that daily regulation of Esrrβ in photoreceptor cells may contribute to their adaptation to 24-h changes in metabolic demands.

  5. In vivo absorption spectra of the two stable states of the Euglena photoreceptor photocycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barsanti, Laura; Coltelli, Primo; Evangelista, Valtere; Passarelli, Vincenzo; Frassanito, Anna Maria; Vesentini, Nicoletta; Santoro, Fabrizio; Gualtieri, Paolo

    2009-01-01

    Euglena gracilis possesses a simple but sophisticated light detecting system, consisting of an eyespot formed by carotenoids globules and a photoreceptor. The photoreceptor of Euglena is characterized by optical bistability, with two stable states. In order to provide important and discriminating information on the series of structural changes that Euglena photoreceptive protein(s) undergoes inside the photoreceptor in response to light, we measured the in vivo absorption spectra of the two stable states A and B of photoreceptor photocycle. Data were collected using two different devices, i.e. a microspectrophotometer and a digital microscope. Our results show that the photocycle and the absorption spectra of the photoreceptor possess strong spectroscopic similarities with a rhodopsin-like protein. Moreover, the analysis of the absorption spectra of the two stable states of the photoreceptor and the absorption spectrum of the eyespot suggests an intriguing hypothesis for the orientation of microalgae toward light.

  6. Cone and Seed Maturation of Southern Pines

    Science.gov (United States)

    James P. Barnett

    1976-01-01

    If slightly reduced yields and viability are acceptable, loblolly and slash cone collections can begin 2 to 3 weeks before maturity if the cones are stored before processing. Longleaf(P. palestris Mill.) pine cones should be collected only when mature, as storage decreased germination of seeds from immature cones. Biochemical analyses to determine reducing sugar...

  7. Avian And Other Zoonotic Influenza

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... consultations Fact sheets Fact files Questions & answers Features Multimedia Contacts Influenza (Avian and other zoonotic) Fact sheet ... respiratory tract infection (fever and cough), early sputum production and rapid progression to severe pneumonia, sepsis with ...

  8. Transduction of Photoreceptors With Equine Infectious Anemia Virus Lentiviral Vectors: Safety and Biodistribution of StarGen for Stargardt Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binley, Katie; Widdowson, Peter; Loader, Julie; Kelleher, Michelle; Iqball, Sharifah; Ferrige, Georgina; de Belin, Jackie; Carlucci, Marie; Angell-Manning, Diana; Hurst, Felicity; Ellis, Scott; Miskin, James; Fernandes, Alcides; Wong, Paul; Allikmets, Rando; Bergstrom, Christopher; Aaberg, Thomas; Yan, Jiong; Kong, Jian; Gouras, Peter; Prefontaine, Annick; Vezina, Mark; Bussieres, Martin; Naylor, Stuart; Mitrophanous, Kyriacos A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. StarGen is an equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV)-based lentiviral vector that expresses the photoreceptor-specific adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-binding cassette transporter (ABCA4) protein that is mutated in Stargardt disease (STGD1), a juvenile macular dystrophy. EIAV vectors are able to efficiently transduce rod and cone photoreceptors in addition to retinal pigment epithelium in the adult macaque and rabbit retina following subretinal delivery. The safety and biodistribution of StarGen following subretinal delivery in macaques and rabbits was assessed. Methods. Regular ophthalmic examinations, IOP measurements, ERG responses, and histopathology were carried out in both species to compare control and vector-treated eyes. Tissue and fluid samples were obtained to evaluate the persistence, biodistribution, and shedding of the vector following subretinal delivery. Results. Ophthalmic examinations revealed a slightly higher level of inflammation in StarGen compared with control treated eyes in both species. However, inflammation was transient and no overt toxicity was observed in StarGen treated eyes and there were no abnormal clinical findings. There was no StarGen-associated rise in IOP or abnormal ERG response in either rabbits or macaques. Histopathologic examination of the eyes did not reveal any detrimental changes resulting from subretinal administration of StarGen. Although antibodies to StarGen vector components were detected in rabbit but not macaque serum, this immunologic response did not result in any long-term toxicity. Biodistribution analysis demonstrated that the StarGen vector was restricted to the ocular compartment. Conclusions. In summary, these studies demonstrate StarGen to be well tolerated and localized following subretinal administration. PMID:23620430

  9. UV-sensitive photoreceptor protein OPN5 in humans and mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojima, Daisuke; Mori, Suguru; Torii, Masaki; Wada, Akimori; Morishita, Rika; Fukada, Yoshitaka

    2011-01-01

    A variety of animal species utilize the ultraviolet (UV) component of sunlight as their environmental cues, whereas physiological roles of UV photoreception in mammals, especially in human beings, remain open questions. Here we report that mouse neuropsin (OPN5) encoded by the Opn5 gene exhibited an absorption maximum (λmax) at 380 nm when reconstituted with 11-cis-retinal. Upon UV-light illumination, OPN5 was converted to a blue-absorbing photoproduct (λmax 470 nm), which was stable in the dark and reverted to the UV-absorbing state by the subsequent orange light illumination, indicating its bistable nature. Human OPN5 also had an absorption maximum at 380 nm with spectral properties similar to mouse OPN5, revealing that OPN5 is the first and hitherto unknown human opsin with peak sensitivity in the UV region. OPN5 was capable of activating heterotrimeric G protein Gi in a UV-dependent manner. Immuno-blotting analyses of mouse tissue extracts identified the retina, the brain and, unexpectedly, the outer ears as the major sites of OPN5 expression. In the tissue sections of mice, OPN5 immuno-reactivities were detected in a subset of non-rod/non-cone retinal neurons as well as in the epidermal and muscle cells of the outer ears. Most of these OPN5-immuno-reactivities in mice were co-localized with positive signals for the alpha-subunit of Gi. These results demonstrate the first example of UV photoreceptor in human beings and strongly suggest that OPN5 triggers a UV-sensitive Gi-mediated signaling pathway in the mammalian tissues.

  10. Blue cone monochromacy: visual function and efficacy outcome measures for clinical trials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xunda Luo

    Full Text Available Blue Cone Monochromacy (BCM is an X-linked retinopathy caused by mutations in the OPN1LW / OPN1MW gene cluster, encoding long (L- and middle (M-wavelength sensitive cone opsins. Recent evidence shows sufficient structural integrity of cone photoreceptors in BCM to warrant consideration of a gene therapy approach to the disease. In the present study, the vision in BCM is examined, specifically seeking clinically-feasible outcomes for a future clinical trial.BCM patients (n = 25, ages 5-72 were studied with kinetic and static chromatic perimetry, full-field sensitivity testing, and eye movement recordings. Vision at the fovea and parafovea was probed with chromatic microperimetry.Kinetic fields with a Goldmann size V target were generally full. Short-wavelength (S- sensitive cone function was normal or near normal in most patients. Light-adapted perimetry results on conventional background lights were abnormally reduced; 600-nm stimuli were seen by rods whereas white stimuli were seen by both rods and S-cones. Under dark-adapted conditions, 500-nm stimuli were seen by rods in both BCM and normals. Spectral sensitivity functions in the superior retina showed retained rod and S-cone functions in BCM under dark-adapted and light-adapted conditions. In the fovea, normal subjects showed L/M-cone mediation using a 650-nm stimulus under dark-adapted conditions, whereas BCM patients had reduced sensitivity driven by rod vision. Full-field red stimuli on bright blue backgrounds were seen by L/M-cones in normal subjects whereas BCM patients had abnormally reduced and rod-mediated sensitivities. Fixation location could vary from fovea to parafovea. Chromatic microperimetry demonstrated a large loss of sensitivity to red stimuli presented on a cyan adapting background at the anatomical fovea and surrounding parafovea.BCM rods continue to signal vision under conditions normally associated with daylight vision. Localized and retina-wide outcome measures were

  11. Role of kinesin heavy chain in Crumbs localization along the rhabdomere elongation in Drosophila photoreceptor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garrett P League

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Crumbs (Crb, a cell polarity gene, has been shown to provide a positional cue for the extension of the apical membrane domain, adherens junction (AJ, and rhabdomere along the growing proximal-distal axis during Drosophila photoreceptor morphogenesis. In developing Drosophila photoreceptors, a stabilized microtubule structure was discovered and its presence was linked to polarity protein localization. It was therefore hypothesized that the microtubules may provide trafficking routes for the polarity proteins during photoreceptor morphogenesis. This study has examined whether Kinesin heavy chain (Khc, a subunit of the microtubule-based motor Kinesin-1, is essential in polarity protein localization in developing photoreceptors. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Because a genetic interaction was found between crb and khc, Crb localization was examined in the developing photoreceptors of khc mutants. khc was dispensable during early eye differentiation and development. However, khc mutant photoreceptors showed a range of abnormalities in the apical membrane domain depending on the position along the proximal-distal axis in pupal photoreceptors. The khc mutant showed a progressive mislocalization in the apical domain along the distal-proximal axis during rhabdomere elongation. The khc mutation also led to a similar progressive defect in the stabilized microtubule structures, strongly suggesting that Khc is essential for microtubule structure and Crb localization during distal to proximal rhabdomere elongation in pupal morphogenesis. This role of Khc in apical domain control was further supported by khc's gain-of-function phenotype. Khc overexpression in photoreceptors caused disruption of the apical membrane domain and the stabilized microtubules in the developing photoreceptors. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: In summary, we examined the role of khc in the regulation of the apical Crb domain in developing photoreceptors. Since the rhabdomeres in

  12. Light cone approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brodsky, Stan

    1993-01-01

    One of the most challenging problems in theoretical high energy physics is to compute the bound state structure of the proton and other hadrons from quantum chromodynamics (QCD), the field theory of quarks and gluons. The goal is not only to calculate the spectrum of hadrons masses from first principles, but also to derive the momentum and spin distributions of the quarks and gluons which control high energy hadron interactions. One approach to these difficult calculations is to simulate QCD on an artificial lattice. Recently, several new methods based on ''light-cone'' quantization have been proposed as alternatives to lattice theory for solving non-perturbative problems in QCD and other field theories. The basic idea is a generalization of Heisenberg's pioneer matrix formulation of quantum mechanics: if one could numerically diagonalize the matrix of the Hamiltonian representing the underlying QCD interaction, then the resulting eigenvalues would give the hadron spectrum, while the corresponding eigenstates would describe each hadron in terms of its quark and gluon degrees of freedom

  13. Conjunctivally Applied BDNF Protects Photoreceptors from Light-Induced Damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerri, Elisa; Origlia, Nicola; Falsini, Benedetto; Barloscio, Davide; Fabiani, Carlotta; Sansò, Marco; Ottino, Sara; Giovannini, Luca; Domenici, Luciano

    2015-11-01

    To test whether the topical eye treatment with BDNF prevents the effects of continuous light exposure (LE) in the albino rat retina. Two groups of albino rats were used. The first group of rats received an intraocular injection of BDNF (2 μL, 1 μg/μL) before LE, while the second group was treated with one single drop of BDNF (10 μL, 12 μg/μL) dissolved in different types of solutions (physiological solution, the polysaccharide fraction of Tamarind gum, TSP, and sodium carboxy methyl cellulose), at the level of conjunctival fornix before LE. The level of BDNF in the retina and optic nerve was determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. We recorded the flash electroretinogram (fERG) in dark adapted rats 1 week after LE. At the end of the recording session, the retinas were removed and labeled so that the number of photoreceptors nuclear rows and thickness of the outer nuclear layer was analyzed. Intravitreal injection of BDNF before LE prevented fERG impairment. Different ophthalmic preparations were used for topical eye application; the TSP resulted the most suitable vehicle to increase BDNF level in the retina and optic nerve. Topical eye application with BDNF/TSP before LE partially preserved both fERG response and photoreceptors. Topical eye treatment with BDNF represents a suitable, noninvasive tool to increase the retinal content of BDNF up to a level capable of exerting neuroprotection toward photoreceptors injured by prolonged LE. A collyrium containing BDNF may serve as an effective, clinically translational treatment against retinal degeneration.

  14. Electrophysiological measurements on the ventral nerve photoreceptor of Limulus polyphemus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ClaBen-Linke, I.

    1982-03-01

    A set-up for intra- and extracellular electrophysiological measurements on the Limulus ventral nerve photoreceptor was built up. The time course of dark adaptation following light adaptation by a bright 1 or 5 s illumination was measured. The time course of dark adaptation was characterized by two different phases, a fast and a slow one. The influence of the extracellular Ca/sup 2 +/-concentration on the dark adaptation process was investigated. Only the first phase of dark adaptation was strongly dependent on the changed extracellular Ca/sup 2 +/-concentration while the second phase of dark adaptation was nearly Ca/sup 2 +/-independent. Calcium can only control the sensitivity of the cell when the intracellular concentration of Ca/sup 2 +/-ions exceeds a certain threshold. This is only true in the first relatively light-adapted phase (strong light intensity, short dark adaptation time). In the second relatively dark-adapted phase (weak light intensity, long dark adaptation time) other mechanisms such as the metabolism of the cell or action of enzymes control the sensitivity of the photoreceptor cell. The two adaptation processes are correlated to the appearance of the two components C/sub 1/ and C/sub 2/ of the receptor potential, which are influenced differently by the state of adaptation. Spike-like, regenerative signals were observed during the depolarization following the hyperpolarization which was caused by the strong light adaptation. A similar dependence of changed extracellular calcium concentration on the dark adaptation process could also be observed in those cells with regenerative events. Using the suction electrode, localization effects were investigated. Positive or negative signals could be recorded depending on the position of the suction electrode on the photoreceptor. This effect indicates that there are different membrane areas with different electrical properties.

  15. Retinal Hypercholesterolemia Triggers Cholesterol Accumulation and Esterification in Photoreceptor Cells*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saadane, Aicha; Mast, Natalia; Dao, Tung; Ahmad, Baseer; Pikuleva, Irina A.

    2016-01-01

    The process of vision is impossible without the photoreceptor cells, which have a unique structure and specific maintenance of cholesterol. Herein we report on the previously unrecognized cholesterol-related pathway in the retina discovered during follow-up characterizations of Cyp27a1−/−Cyp46a1−/− mice. These animals have retinal hypercholesterolemia and convert excess retinal cholesterol into cholesterol esters, normally present in the retina in very small amounts. We established that in the Cyp27a1−/−Cyp46a1−/− retina, cholesterol esters are generated by and accumulate in the photoreceptor outer segments (OS), which is the retinal layer with the lowest cholesterol content. Mouse OS were also found to express the cholesterol-esterifying enzyme acyl-coenzyme A:cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT1), but not lecithin-cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT), and to differ from humans in retinal expression of ACAT1. Nevertheless, cholesterol esters were discovered to be abundant in human OS. We suggest a mechanism for cholesterol ester accumulation in the OS and that activity impairment of ACAT1 in humans may underlie the development of subretinal drusenoid deposits, a hallmark of age-related macular degeneration, which is a common blinding disease. We generated Cyp27a1−/−Cyp46a1−/−Acat1−/− mice, characterized their retina by different imaging modalities, and confirmed that unesterified cholesterol does accumulate in their OS and that there is photoreceptor apoptosis and OS degeneration in this line. Our results provide insights into the retinal response to local hypercholesterolemia and the retinal significance of cholesterol esterification, which could be cell-specific and both beneficial and detrimental for retinal structure and function. PMID:27514747

  16. Rhodopsin plays an essential structural role in Drosophila photoreceptor development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, J P; Ready, D F

    1995-12-01

    Null mutations of the Drosophila Rh1 rhodopsin gene, ninaE, result in developmental defects in the photosensitive membranes, the rhabdomeres, of compound eye photoreceptors R1-R6. In normal flies, Rh1 expression begins at about 78% of pupal life. At approximately 90% of pupal life, a specialized catacomb-like membrane architecture develops at the base of normal rhabdomeres. In ninaE null mutants, these catacombs do not form and developing rhabdomere membrane involutes into the cell as curtains of apposed plasma membrane. A filamentous cytoskeletal complex that includes F-actin and the unconventional myosin, NINAC, decorates the cytoplasmic surface of these curtains.

  17. The brain as a photoreceptor: intracerebral ocelli in the firefly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hariyama, T.

    This paper deals with the structure and function of the intracerebral ocelli in the caudal area of the brain of the Japanese firefly. A pair of epilaterally placed specialized pigmented organs was found at the caudal ends of the brains of the fireflies Luciola cruciata and L. lateralis. On the basis of light and transmission electron micrographs of both male and female individuals these organs seemed photoreceptive in nature. Intracellular and extracellular recordings were obtained from the intracerebral ocelli of the fireflies with microelectrodes. The physiological evidence revealed that the cells found in the brain were, indeed, photoreceptors.

  18. Adeno-associated virus-mediated neuroglobin overexpression ameliorates the N-methyl-N-nitrosourea-induced retinal impairments: a novel therapeutic strategy against photoreceptor degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Y

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Ye Tao,1,* Zhen Yang,2,* Wei Fang,2 Zhao Ma,3 Yi Fei Huang,1 Zhengwei Li4 1Department of Ophthalmology, Key Lab of Ophthalmology and Visual Science, Chinese PLA General Hospital, Beijing, 2Department of Neurosurgery, Institute for Functional Brain Disorders, Tangdu Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi’an, 3Department of Neurosurgery, Central Hospital of Wuhan, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, 4Department of Neurosurgery, Zhongnan Hospital of Wuhan University, Wuhan, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Retinal degeneration (RD is a heterogeneous group of inherited dystrophies leading to blindness. The N-methyl-N-nitrosourea (MNU-administered mouse is used as a pharmacologically induced RD animal model in various therapeutic investigations. The present study found the retinal neuroglobin (NGB expression in the MNU-administered mice was significantly lower than in normal controls, suggesting NGB was correlated with RD. Subsequently, an adeno-associated virus (AAV-2-mCMV-NGB vector was delivered into the subretinal space of the MNU-administered mice. The retinal NGB expression of the treated eye was upregulated significantly in both protein and mRNA levels. Further, we found NGB overexpression could alleviate visual impairments and morphological devastations in MNU-administered mice. NGB overexpression could rectify apoptotic abnormalities and ameliorate oxidative stress in MNU-administered mice, thereby promoting photoreceptor survival. The cone photoreceptors in MNU-administered mice were also sensitive to AAV-mediated NGB overexpression. Taken together, our findings suggest that manipulating NGB bioactivity via gene therapy may represent a novel therapeutic strategy against RD. Future elucidation of the exact role of NGB would advance our knowledge about the pathological mechanisms underlying RD. Keywords: neuroglobin, retinal degeneration

  19. Avian mycoplasmosis update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ER Nascimento

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Avian mycoplasmas occur in a variety of bird species. The most important mycoplasmas for chickens and turkeys are Mycoplasma gallisepticum (MG, M. synoviae (MS, and M. meleagridis. Besides, M. iowe (MI is an emerging pathogen in turkeys, but of little concern for chickens. Mycoplasmas are bacteria that lack cell wall and belong to the class Mollicutes. Although they have been considered extracellular agents, scientists admit nowadays that some of them are obligatory intracellular microorganisms, whereas all other mycoplasmas are considered facultative intracellular organisms. Their pathogenic mechanism for disease include adherence to host target cells, mediation of apoptosis, innocent bystander damage to host cell due to intimate membrane contact, molecular (antigen mimicry that may lead to tolerance, and mitotic effect for B and/or T lymphocytes, which could lead to suppressed T-cell function and/or production of cytotoxic T cell, besides mycoplasma by-products, such as hydrogen peroxide and superoxide radicals. Moreover, mycoplasma ability to stimulate macrophages, monocytes, T-helper cells and NK cells, results in the production of substances, such as tumor necrosing factor (TNF-alpha, interleukin (IL-1, 2, 6 and interferon (a, b, g. The major clinical signs seen in avian mycoplasmosis are coughing, sneezing, snicks, respiratory rales, ocular and nasal discharge, decreased feed intake and egg production, increased mortality, poor hatchability, and, primarily in turkeys, swelling of the infraorbital sinus(es. Nevertheless, chronic and unapparent infections are most common and more threatening. Mycoplasmas are transmitted horizontally, from bird to bird, and vertically, from dam to offspring through the eggs. Losses attributed to mycoplasmosis, mainly MG and MS infections, result from decreased egg production and egg quality, poor hatchability (high rate of embryonic mortality and culling of day-old birds, poor feed efficiency, increase in

  20. Evidence for dynamic network regulation of Drosophila photoreceptor function from mutants lacking the neurotransmitter histamine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    An eDau

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Synaptic feedback from interneurons to photoreceptors can help to optimize visual information flow by balancing its allocation on retinal pathways under changing light conditions. But little is known about how this critical network operation is regulated dynamically. Here, we investigate this question by comparing signaling properties and performance of wild-type Drosophila R1-R6 photoreceptors to those of the hdcJK910 mutant, which lacks the neurotransmitter histamine and therefore cannot transmit information to interneurons. Recordings show that hdcJK910 photoreceptors sample similar amounts of information from naturalistic stimulation to wild-type photoreceptors, but this information is packaged in smaller responses, especially under bright illumination. Analyses reveal how these altered dynamics primarily resulted from network overload that affected hdcJK910 photoreceptors in two ways. First, the missing inhibitory histamine input to interneurons almost certainly depolarized them irrevocably, which in turn increased their excitatory feedback to hdcJK910 R1-R6s. This tonic excitation depolarized the photoreceptors to artificially high potentials, reducing their operational range. Second, rescuing histamine input to interneurons in hdcJK910 mutant also restored their normal phasic feedback modulation to R1-R6s, causing photoreceptor output to accentuate dynamic intensity differences at bright illumination, similar to the wild-type. These results provide mechanistic explanations of how synaptic feedback connections optimize information packaging in photoreceptor output and novel insight into the operation and design of dynamic network regulation of sensory neurons.

  1. Cellular elements for seeing in the dark: voltage-dependent conductances in cockroach photoreceptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salmela Iikka

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The importance of voltage-dependent conductances in sensory information processing is well-established in insect photoreceptors. Here we present the characterization of electrical properties in photoreceptors of the cockroach (Periplaneta americana, a nocturnal insect with a visual system adapted for dim light. Results Whole-cell patch-clamped photoreceptors had high capacitances and input resistances, indicating large photosensitive rhabdomeres suitable for efficient photon capture and amplification of small photocurrents at low light levels. Two voltage-dependent potassium conductances were found in the photoreceptors: a delayed rectifier type (KDR and a fast transient inactivating type (KA. Activation of KDR occurred during physiological voltage responses induced by light stimulation, whereas KA was nearly fully inactivated already at the dark resting potential. In addition, hyperpolarization of photoreceptors activated a small-amplitude inward-rectifying (IR current mediated at least partially by chloride. Computer simulations showed that KDR shapes light responses by opposing the light-induced depolarization and speeding up the membrane time constant, whereas KA and IR have a negligible role in the majority of cells. However, larger KA conductances were found in smaller and rapidly adapting photoreceptors, where KA could have a functional role. Conclusions The relative expression of KA and KDR in cockroach photoreceptors was opposite to the previously hypothesized framework for dark-active insects, necessitating further comparative work on the conductances. In general, the varying deployment of stereotypical K+ conductances in insect photoreceptors highlights their functional flexibility in neural coding.

  2. Knock-in strategy at 3'-end of Crx gene by CRISPR/Cas9 system shows the gene expression profiles during human photoreceptor differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homma, Kohei; Usui, Sumiko; Kaneda, Makoto

    2017-03-01

    Fluorescent reporter gene knock-in induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) lines have been used to evaluate the efficiency of differentiation into specific cell lineages. Here, we report a knock-in strategy for the generation of human iPSC reporter lines in which a 2A peptide sequence and a red fluorescent protein (E2-Crimson) gene were inserted at the termination codon of the cone-rod homeobox (Crx) gene, a photoreceptor-specific transcriptional factor gene. The knock-in iPSC lines were differentiated into fluorescence-expressing cells in 3D retinal differentiation culture, and the fluorescent cells also expressed Crx specifically in the nucleus. We found that the fluorescence intensity was positively correlated with the expression levels of Crx mRNA and that fluorescent cells expressed rod photoreceptor-specific genes in the later stage of differentiation. Finally, we treated the fluorescent cells with DAPT, a Notch inhibitor, and found that DAPT-enhanced retinal differentiation was associated with up-regulation of Crx, Otx2 and NeuroD1, and down-regulation of Hes5 and Ngn2. These suggest that this knock-in strategy at the 3'-end of the target gene, combined with the 2A peptide linked to fluorescent proteins, offers a useful tool for labeling specific cell lineages or monitoring expression of any marker genes without affecting the function of the target gene. © 2017 Molecular Biology Society of Japan and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  3. Photoreceptor processing speed and input resistance changes during light adaptation correlate with spectral class in the bumblebee, Bombus impatiens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Skorupski

    Full Text Available Colour vision depends on comparison of signals from photoreceptors with different spectral sensitivities. However, response properties of photoreceptor cells may differ in ways other than spectral tuning. In insects, for example, broadband photoreceptors, with a major sensitivity peak in the green region of the spectrum (>500 nm, drive fast visual processes, which are largely blind to chromatic signals from more narrowly-tuned photoreceptors with peak sensitivities in the blue and UV regions of the spectrum. In addition, electrophysiological properties of the photoreceptor membrane may result in differences in response dynamics of photoreceptors of similar spectral class between species, and different spectral classes within a species. We used intracellular electrophysiological techniques to investigate response dynamics of the three spectral classes of photoreceptor underlying trichromatic colour vision in the bumblebee, Bombus impatiens, and we compare these with previously published data from a related species, Bombus terrestris. In both species, we found significantly faster responses in green, compared with blue- or UV-sensitive photoreceptors, although all 3 photoreceptor types are slower in B. impatiens than in B. terrestris. Integration times for light-adapted B. impatiens photoreceptors (estimated from impulse response half-width were 11.3 ± 1.6 ms for green photoreceptors compared with 18.6 ± 4.4 ms and 15.6 ± 4.4 for blue and UV, respectively. We also measured photoreceptor input resistance in dark- and light-adapted conditions. All photoreceptors showed a decrease in input resistance during light adaptation, but this decrease was considerably larger (declining to about 22% of the dark value in green photoreceptors, compared to blue and UV (41% and 49%, respectively. Our results suggest that the conductances associated with light adaptation are largest in green photoreceptors, contributing to their greater temporal processing speed

  4. Non-image Forming Light Detection by Melanopsin, Rhodopsin, and Long-Middlewave (L/W) Cone Opsin in the Subterranean Blind Mole Rat, Spalax Ehrenbergi: Immunohistochemical Characterization, Distribution, and Connectivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Esquiva, Gema; Avivi, Aaron; Hannibal, Jens

    2016-01-01

    in the GCL with projections forming two dendritic plexuses located in the inner part of the IPL and in the OPL. Few melanopsin dendrites were also found in the ONL. The Spalax retina is rich in rhodopsin and long/middle wave (L/M) cone opsin bearing photoreceptor cells. By using Ctbp2 as a marker for ribbon......, and provides evidence for both melanopsin and non-melanopsin projecting pathways to the brain....

  5. Spectral consequences of photoreceptor sampling in the rhesus retina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yellott, J. I., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    Optical transforms were used to compute the power spectra of rhesus cones treated as arrays of image sampling points. Spectra were obtained for the central fovea, parafovea, periphery, and far periphery. All were consistent with a novel spatial sampling principle that introduces minimal noise for spatial frequencies below the Nyquist limits implied by local receptor densities, while frequencies above the nominal Nyquist limits are not converted into conspicuous moiree patterns, but instead are scattered into broadband noise. This sampling scheme allows the visual system to escape aliasing distortion despite a large mismatch between retinal image bandwidth and the Nyquist limits implied by extrafoveal cone densities.

  6. Avian influenza : a review article

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Yalda

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to provides general information about avian influenza (bird flu and specific information about one type of bird flu, called avian influenza A (H5N1, that has caused infections in birds in Asia and Europe and in human in Asia. The main materials in this report are based on the World Health Organization (WHO , world organization for animal health (OIE , food and agriculture organization of the united nations (FAO information and recommendations and review of the published literature about avian influenza. Since December 2003, highly pathogenic H5N1 avian influenza viruses have swept through poultry populations across Asia and parts of Europe. The outbreaks are historically unprecedented in scale and geographical spread. Their economic impact on the agricultural sector of the affected countries has been large. Human cases, with an overall fatality rate around 50%, have also been reported and almost all human infections can be linked to contact with infected poultry. Influenza viruses are genetically unstable and their behaviour cannot be predicted so the risk of further human cases persists. The human health implications have now gained importance, both for illness and fatalities that have occurred following natural infection with avian viruses, and for the potential of generating a re-assortant virus that could give rise to the next human influenza pandemic.

  7. An overview on avian influenza

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelson Rodrigo da Silva Martins

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Avian influenza (AI is considered an exotic disease in the Brazilian poultry industry, according to the National Avian Health Program (PNSA, with permanent monitoring of domestic, exotic and native avian species. Brazil presents privileged environmental conditions of reduced risk. In addition, all commercial poultry and conservation holdings are registered in state or national inventories and geographically located (GPS for health control. Poultry health standards are adopted for the conformity to the international market, mostly for the intensified poultry destined for exportation, but also for companion exotic and native conservation facilities. Guidelines for monitoring and the diagnosis of AI are published by the PNSA and follow the standards proposed by the international health code (World Organization for Animal Health, Organization International des Epizooties - OIE and insure the free of status for avian influenza virus (AIV of LPAIV-low pathogenicity AIV and HPAIV-high pathogenicity AIV. In addition, the infections by mesogenic and velogenic Newcastle disease virus, Mycoplasma gallisepticum, M. synoviae and M. meleagridis, Salmonella enteric subspecies enterica serovar Gallinarum biovars Gallinarum and Pullorum are eradicated from reproduction. Controlled infections by S.enterica subspecies enterica serovars Enteritidis and Typhimurium are monitored for breeders. The vaccination of chickens in ovo or at hatch against Marek's disease is mandatory. Broiler production is an indoor activity, confinement which insures biosecurity, with safe distances from the potential AIV reservoir avian species. Worldwide HPAIV H5N1 notifications to the OIE, in March 2011, included 51 countries.

  8. 77 FR 34783 - Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-12

    ... Avian Influenza AGENCY: Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, USDA. ACTION: Interim rule... importation of bird and poultry products from regions where any subtype of highly pathogenic avian influenza... avian influenza (HPAI). On January 24, 2011, we published in the Federal Register (76 FR 4046-4056...

  9. 76 FR 24793 - Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-03

    ... Inspection Service 9 CFR Parts 93, 94, and 95 RIN 0579-AC36 Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza AGENCY: Animal... products from regions where any subtype of highly pathogenic avian influenza is considered to exist. The... vaccinated for certain types of avian influenza, or that have moved through regions where any subtype of...

  10. Multimodal Approach to Monitoring and Investigating Cone Structure and Function in an Inherited Macular Dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziccardi, Lucia; Giannini, Daniela; Lombardo, Giuseppe; Serrao, Sebastiano; Dell'Omo, Roberto; Nicoletti, Annalisa; Bertelli, Matteo; Lombardo, Marco

    2015-08-01

    To examine a female subject, her father, and a brother harboring a missense mutation of the retinitis pigmentosa 1-like 1 (RP1L1) gene, over 2 years of follow-up. Observational case series. setting: Fondazione G.B. Bietti IRCCS, Rome, Italy. RP1L1 family members and controls. Images of the cone mosaic acquired with an adaptive optics retinal camera, spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD OCT), and full-field and multifocal electroretinography (mfERG). In the proband, best-corrected visual acuity (≤0.7 logMAR) was stable in both eyes during follow-up, though analysis of adaptive optics images showed decreased cone density in the central 9 degrees from the fovea with respect to controls (P < .05) and cone density loss in the parafoveal area (2 degrees; <12%-16%) during follow-up. Texture analysis of SD OCT images identified abnormalities of the ellipsoid zone in the central 7 degrees, while mfERG response amplitudes were reduced only in the central 5 degrees relative to controls. In the proband's father, who had 0.0 logMAR visual acuity, significant cone loss was found in the central 7 degrees from the fovea (P < .05); abnormal SD OCT and mfERG values with respect to controls were found in corresponding retinal areas. No defects in the cone structure and function were found in the proband's brother, who had 0.0 logMAR visual acuity. Occult macular dystrophy was diagnosed based on genetic and multimodal ophthalmic findings. The quantitative assessment of photoreceptor survival or loss, based on analysis of adaptive optics retinal images, was valuable to monitor disease progression at a cellular level. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Response Function of the Crayfish Caudal Photoreceptor to Hydrodynamic Stimuli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breite, Sally; Bahar, Sonya; Neiman, Alexander; Moss, Frank

    2002-03-01

    In its abdominal 6th ganglion the crayfish houses 2 light-sensitive neurons (caudal photoreceptors, or CPRs). It is known that these neurons work in tandem with a mechanosensory system of tiny hairs spread across the tailfan, which make synaptic contact with the photoreceptors. A stochastic resonance effect has been shown in this system in which light enhances the transduction of a weak, periodic mechanosensory (hydrodynamic) stimulus. It is not known, however, whether an optimal response from the CPR is induced by a single sine wave cycle or some other waveform. We have experimentally investigated this favorable waveform by driving a tailfan preparation with mechanical 10 Hz correlated Ornstein-Uhlenbeck noise and calculating the response function from the spike-triggered average of the applied noise waveform. We will discuss differences in the shape of the optimal waveform under dark and light conditions, as well as what seems to be a noticeable difference in the magnitude of the animals' response to a noisy stimulus in comparison with a periodic stimulus.

  12. Photoreceptor Differentiation following Transplantation of Allogeneic Retinal Progenitor Cells to the Dystrophic Rhodopsin Pro347Leu Transgenic Pig

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klassen, H; Kiilgaard, Jens Folke; Warfvinge, K

    2012-01-01

    of allogeneic porcine RPCs without immune suppression in the setting of photoreceptor dystrophy. The expression of multiple photoreceptor markers by grafted cells included the rod outer segment-specific marker ROM-1. Further evidence of photoreceptor differentiation included the presence of numerous...... be obtained from cultured RPCs following transplantation. Strategies for further progress in this area, together with possible functional implications, are discussed....

  13. Seasonal and post-trauma remodeling in cone-dominant ground squirrel retina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merriman, Dana K.; Sajdak, Benjamin S.; Li, Wei; Jones, Bryan W.

    2016-01-01

    With a photoreceptor mosaic containing ~85% cones, the ground squirrel is one of the richest known mammalian sources of these important retinal cells. It also has a visual ecology much like the human’s. While the ground squirrel retina is understandably prominent in the cone biochemistry, physiology, and circuitry literature, far less is known about the remodeling potential of its retinal pigment epithelium, neurons, macroglia, or microglia. This review aims to summarize the data from ground squirrel retina to this point in time, and to relate them to data from other brain areas where appropriate. We begin with a survey of the ground squirrel visual system, making comparisons with traditional rodent models and with human. Because this animal’s status as a hibernator often goes unnoticed in the vision literature, we then present a brief primer on hibernation biology. Next we review what is known about ground squirrel retinal remodeling concurrent with deep torpor and with rapid recovery upon re-warming. Notable here is rapidly-reversible, temperature-dependent structural plasticity of cone ribbon synapses, as well as pre- and post-synaptic plasticity throughout diverse brain regions. It is not yet clear if retinal cell types other than cones engage in torpor-associated synaptic remodeling. We end with the small but intriguing literature on the ground squirrel retina’s remodeling responses to insult by retinal detachment. Notable for widespread loss of (cone) photoreceptors, there is surprisingly little remodeling of the RPE or Müller cells. Microglial activation appears minimal, and remodeling of surviving second- and third-order neurons seems absent, but both require further study. In contrast, traumatic brain injury in the ground squirrel elicits typical macroglial and microglial responses. Overall, the data to date strongly suggest a heretofore unrecognized, natural checkpoint between retinal deafferentiation and RPE and Müller cell remodeling events. As

  14. Synthesis of docosahexaenoic acid from eicosapentaenoic acid in retina neurons protects photoreceptors from oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simón, María Victoria; Agnolazza, Daniela L; German, Olga Lorena; Garelli, Andrés; Politi, Luis E; Agbaga, Martin-Paul; Anderson, Robert E; Rotstein, Nora P

    2016-03-01

    Oxidative stress is involved in activating photoreceptor death in several retinal degenerations. Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), the major polyunsaturated fatty acid in the retina, protects cultured retina photoreceptors from apoptosis induced by oxidative stress and promotes photoreceptor differentiation. Here, we investigated whether eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), a metabolic precursor to DHA, had similar effects and whether retinal neurons could metabolize EPA to DHA. Adding EPA to rat retina neuronal cultures increased opsin expression and protected photoreceptors from apoptosis induced by the oxidants paraquat and hydrogen peroxide (H2 O2 ). Palmitic, oleic, and arachidonic acids had no protective effect, showing the specificity for DHA. We found that EPA supplementation significantly increased DHA percentage in retinal neurons, but not EPA percentage. Photoreceptors and glial cells expressed Δ6 desaturase (FADS2), which introduces the last double bond in DHA biosynthetic pathway. Pre-treatment of neuronal cultures with CP-24879 hydrochloride, a Δ5/Δ6 desaturase inhibitor, prevented EPA-induced increase in DHA percentage and completely blocked EPA protection and its effect on photoreceptor differentiation. These results suggest that EPA promoted photoreceptor differentiation and rescued photoreceptors from oxidative stress-induced apoptosis through its elongation and desaturation to DHA. Our data show, for the first time, that isolated retinal neurons can synthesize DHA in culture. Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), the major polyunsaturated fatty acid in retina photoreceptors, and its precursor, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) have multiple beneficial effects. Here, we show that retina neurons in vitro express the desaturase FADS2 and can synthesize DHA from EPA. Moreover, addition of EPA to these cultures protects photoreceptors from oxidative stress and promotes their differentiation through its metabolization to DHA. © 2015 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  15. Gravitons and light cone fluctuations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ford, L.H.

    1995-01-01

    Gravitons in a squeezed vacuum state, the natural result of quantum creation in the early Universe or by black holes, will introduce metric fluctuations. These metric fluctuations will introduce fluctuations of the light cone. It is shown that when the various two-point functions of a quantized field are averaged over the metric fluctuations, the light cone singularity disappears for distinct points. The metric-averaged functions remain singular in the limit of coincident points. The metric-averaged retarded Green's function for a massless field becomes a Gaussian which is nonzero both inside and outside of the classical light cone. This implies some photons propagate faster than the classical light speed, whereas others propagate slower. The possible effects of metric fluctuations upon one-loop quantum processes are discussed and illustrated by the calculation of the one-loop electron self-energy

  16. High-Resolution Imaging of Parafoveal Cones in Different Stages of Diabetic Retinopathy Using Adaptive Optics Fundus Camera.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Kamel Soliman

    Full Text Available To assess cone density as a marker of early signs of retinopathy in patients with type II diabetes mellitus.An adaptive optics (AO retinal camera (rtx1™; Imagine Eyes, Orsay, France was used to acquire images of parafoveal cones from patients with type II diabetes mellitus with or without retinopathy and from healthy controls with no known systemic or ocular disease. Cone mosaic was captured at 0° and 2°eccentricities along the horizontal and vertical meridians. The density of the parafoveal cones was calculated within 100×100-μm squares located at 500-μm from the foveal center along the orthogonal meridians. Manual corrections of the automated counting were then performed by 2 masked graders. Cone density measurements were evaluated with ANOVA that consisted of one between-subjects factor, stage of retinopathy and the within-subject factors. The ANOVA model included a complex covariance structure to account for correlations between the levels of the within-subject factors.Ten healthy participants (20 eyes and 25 patients (29 eyes with type II diabetes mellitus were recruited in the study. The mean (± standard deviation [SD] age of the healthy participants (Control group, patients with diabetes without retinopathy (No DR group, and patients with diabetic retinopathy (DR group was 55 ± 8, 53 ± 8, and 52 ± 9 years, respectively. The cone density was significantly lower in the moderate nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy (NPDR and severe NPDR/proliferative DR groups compared to the Control, No DR, and mild NPDR groups (P < 0.05. No correlation was found between cone density and the level of hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c or the duration of diabetes.The extent of photoreceptor loss on AO imaging may correlate positively with severity of DR in patients with type II diabetes mellitus. Photoreceptor loss may be more pronounced among patients with advanced stages of DR due to higher risk of macular edema and its sequelae.

  17. Avian reproductive physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gee, G.F.; Gibbons, Edward F.; Durrant, Barbara S.; Demarest, Jack

    1995-01-01

    Knowledge of the many physiological factors associated with egg production , fertility, incubation, and brooding in nondomestic birds is limited. Science knows even less about reproduction in most of the 238 endangered or threatened birds. This discussion uses studies of nondomestic and, when necessary, domestic birds to describe physiological control of reproduction. Studies of the few nondomestic avian species show large variation in physiological control of reproduction. Aviculturists, in order to successfully propagate an endangered bird, must understand the bird's reproductive peculiarities. First, investigators can do studies with carefully chosen surrogate species, but eventually they need to confirm the results in the target endangered bird. Studies of reproduction in nondomestic birds increased in the last decade. Still, scientists need to do more comparative studies to understand the mechanisms that control reproduction in birds. New technologies are making it possible to study reproductive physiology of nondomestic species in less limiting ways. These technologies include telemetry to collect information without inducing stress on captives (Howey et al., 1987; Klugman, 1987), new tests for most of the humoral factors associated with reproduction, and the skill to collect small samples and manipulate birds without disrupting the physiological mechanisms (Bercovitz et al., 1985). Managers are using knowledge from these studies to improve propagation in zoological parks, private and public propagation facilities, and research institutions. Researchers need to study the control of ovulation, egg formation, and oviposition in the species of nondomestic birds that lay very few eggs in a season, hold eggs in the oviduct for longer intervals, or differ in other ways from the more thoroughly studied domestic birds. Other techniques that would enhance propagation for nondomestlc birds include tissue culture of cloned embryonic cells, cryopreservation of embryos

  18. Mach Cones in Viscous Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouras, I.; El, A.; Fochler, O.; Lauciello, F.; Reining, F.; Uphoff, J.; Wesp, C.; Molnar, E.; Niemi, H.; Xu, Z.; Greiner, C.

    2011-01-01

    Employing a microscopic transport model we investigate the evolution of high energetic jets moving through a viscous medium. For the scenario of an unstoppable jet we observe a clearly strong collective behavior for a low dissipative system η/s approx 0.005, leading to the observation of cone-like structures. Increasing the dissipation of the system to η/s approx 0.32 the Mach Cone structure vanishes. Furthermore, we investigate jet-associated particle correlations. A double-peak structure, as observed in experimental data, is even for low-dissipative systems not supported, because of the large influence of the head shock.

  19. Mach Cones in Viscous Matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouras, I; El, A; Fochler, O; Lauciello, F; Reining, F; Uphoff, J; Wesp, C; Xu, Z; Greiner, C [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Johann Wolfgang Goethe-Universitat, Max-von-Laue-Str. 1, D-60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Molnar, E; Niemi, H, E-mail: bouras@th.physik.uni-frankfurt.de [Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies, Ruth-Moufang-Str. 1, D-60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany)

    2011-01-01

    Employing a microscopic transport model we investigate the evolution of high energetic jets moving through a viscous medium. For the scenario of an unstoppable jet we observe a clearly strong collective behavior for a low dissipative system {eta}/s {approx} 0.005, leading to the observation of cone-like structures. Increasing the dissipation of the system to {eta}/s {approx} 0.32 the Mach Cone structure vanishes. Furthermore, we investigate jet-associated particle correlations. A double-peak structure, as observed in experimental data, is even for low-dissipative systems not supported, because of the large influence of the head shock.

  20. Mach Cones in Viscous Matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouras, I; El, A; Fochler, O; Lauciello, F; Reining, F; Uphoff, J; Wesp, C; Xu, Z; Greiner, C; Molnar, E; Niemi, H

    2011-01-01

    Employing a microscopic transport model we investigate the evolution of high energetic jets moving through a viscous medium. For the scenario of an unstoppable jet we observe a clearly strong collective behavior for a low dissipative system η/s ∼ 0.005, leading to the observation of cone-like structures. Increasing the dissipation of the system to η/s ∼ 0.32 the Mach Cone structure vanishes. Furthermore, we investigate jet-associated particle correlations. A double-peak structure, as observed in experimental data, is even for low-dissipative systems not supported, because of the large influence of the head shock.

  1. Bases for Cones and Reflexivity | Polyrakis | Quaestiones ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It is proved that a Banach space E is non-reflexive if and only if E has a closed cone with an unbounded, closed, dentable base. If E is a Banach lattice, the same characterization holds with the extra assumption that the cone is contained in E+. This article is also a survey of the geometry (dentability) of bases for cones.

  2. Adiponectin receptor 1 conserves docosahexaenoic acid and promotes photoreceptor cell survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Dennis S; Calandria, Jorgelina M; Gordon, William C; Jun, Bokkyoo; Zhou, Yongdong; Gelfman, Claire M; Li, Songhua; Jin, Minghao; Knott, Eric J; Chang, Bo; Abuin, Alex; Issa, Tawfik; Potter, David; Platt, Kenneth A; Bazan, Nicolas G

    2015-03-04

    The identification of pathways necessary for photoreceptor and retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) function is critical to uncover therapies for blindness. Here we report the discovery of adiponectin receptor 1 (AdipoR1) as a regulator of these cells' functions. Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) is avidly retained in photoreceptors, while mechanisms controlling DHA uptake and retention are unknown. Thus, we demonstrate that AdipoR1 ablation results in DHA reduction. In situ hybridization reveals photoreceptor and RPE cell AdipoR1 expression, blunted in AdipoR1(-/-) mice. We also find decreased photoreceptor-specific phosphatidylcholine containing very long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids and severely attenuated electroretinograms. These changes precede progressive photoreceptor degeneration in AdipoR1(-/-) mice. RPE-rich eyecup cultures from AdipoR1(-/-) reveal impaired DHA uptake. AdipoR1 overexpression in RPE cells enhances DHA uptake, whereas AdipoR1 silencing has the opposite effect. These results establish AdipoR1 as a regulatory switch of DHA uptake, retention, conservation and elongation in photoreceptors and RPE, thus preserving photoreceptor cell integrity.

  3. Histamine Recycling Is Mediated by CarT, a Carcinine Transporter in Drosophila Photoreceptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ying; An, Futing; Borycz, Jolanta A.; Borycz, Janusz; Meinertzhagen, Ian A.; Wang, Tao

    2015-01-01

    Histamine is an important chemical messenger that regulates multiple physiological processes in both vertebrate and invertebrate animals. Even so, how glial cells and neurons recycle histamine remains to be elucidated. Drosophila photoreceptor neurons use histamine as a neurotransmitter, and the released histamine is recycled through neighboring glia, where it is conjugated to β-alanine to form carcinine. However, how carcinine is then returned to the photoreceptor remains unclear. In an mRNA-seq screen for photoreceptor cell-enriched transporters, we identified CG9317, an SLC22 transporter family protein, and named it CarT (Carcinine Transporter). S2 cells that express CarT are able to take up carcinine in vitro. In the compound eye, CarT is exclusively localized to photoreceptor terminals. Null mutations of cart alter the content of histamine and its metabolites. Moreover, null cart mutants are defective in photoreceptor synaptic transmission and lack phototaxis. These findings reveal that CarT is required for histamine recycling at histaminergic photoreceptors and provide evidence for a CarT-dependent neurotransmitter trafficking pathway between glial cells and photoreceptor terminals. PMID:26713872

  4. CHARACTERIZING PHOTORECEPTOR CHANGES IN ACUTE POSTERIOR MULTIFOCAL PLACOID PIGMENT EPITHELIOPATHY USING ADAPTIVE OPTICS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Philipp K; Nesper, Peter L; Onishi, Alex C; Skondra, Dimitra; Jampol, Lee M; Fawzi, Amani A

    2018-01-01

    To characterize lesions of acute posterior multifocal placoid pigment epitheliopathy (APMPPE) by multimodal imaging including adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (AOSLO). We included patients with APMPPE at different stages of evolution of the placoid lesions. Color fundus photography, spectral domain optical coherence tomography, infrared reflectance, fundus autofluorescence, and AOSLO images were obtained and registered to correlate microstructural changes. Eight eyes of four patients (two women) were included and analyzed by multimodal imaging. Photoreceptor reflectivity within APMPPE lesions was more heterogeneous than in adjacent healthy areas. Hyperpigmentation on color fundus photography appeared hyperreflective on infrared reflectance and on AOSLO. Irregularity of the interdigitation zone and the photoreceptor inner and outer segment junctions (IS/OS) on spectral domain optical coherence tomography was associated with photoreceptor hyporeflectivity on AOSLO. Interruption of the interdigitation zone or IS/OS was associated with loss of photoreceptor reflectivity on AOSLO. Irregularities in the reflectivity of the photoreceptor mosaic are visible on AOSLO even in inactive APMPPE lesions, where the photoreceptor bands on spectral domain optical coherence tomography have recovered. Adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscopy combined with multimodal imaging has the potential to enhance our understanding of photoreceptor involvement in APMPPE.

  5. Control of the Nucleotide Cycle in Photoreceptor Cell Extracts by Retinal Degeneration Protein 3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanna Wimberg

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Retinal degeneration protein 3 (RD3 is crucial for photoreceptor cell survival and linked to Leber Congenital Amaurosis type 12 (LCA12, a hereditary retinal disease in humans. RD3 inhibits photoreceptor guanylate cyclases GC-E and GC-F and is involved in transport of GCs from the inner to the outer segments. Otherwise, its role in photoreceptor physiology is poorly understood. Here, we describe a new function of RD3. Purified RD3 evoked an increase in guanylate kinase activity, an enzyme that is involved in the nucleotide cycle in photoreceptors. We demonstrate a direct interaction between guanylate kinase and RD3 using back-scattering interferometry and show by immunohistochemistry of mouse retina sections that RD3 and guanylate kinase co-localize in photoreceptor inner segments and to a lesser extent in the outer plexiform layer. Our findings point toward a more complex function of RD3 in photoreceptors. The RD3 – guanylate kinase interaction may also play a role in other cellular systems, while the GC – RD3 interaction is exclusive to photoreceptors.

  6. A new photosensory function for simple photoreceptors, the intrinsically photoresponsive neurons of the sea slug Onchidium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsukasa Gotow

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Simple photoreceptors, namely intrinsically light-sensitive neurons without microvilli and/or cilia, have long been known to exist in the central ganglia of crayfish, Aplysia, Onchidium, and Helix. These simple photoreceptors are not only first-order photosensory cells, but also second-order neurons (interneurons, relaying several kinds of sensory synaptic inputs. Another important issue is that the photoresponses of these simple photoreceptors show very slow kinetics and little adaptation. These characteristics suggest that the simple photoreceptors of the Onchidium have a function in non-image-forming vision, different from classical eye photoreceptors used for cording dynamic images of vision. The cited literature provides evidence that the depolarizing and hyperpolarizing photoresponses of simple photoreceptors play a role in the long-lasting potentiation of synaptic transmission of excitatory and inhibitory sensory inputs, and as well as in the potentiation and the suppression of the subsequent behavioral outputs. In short, we suggest that simple photoreceptors operate in the general potentiation of synaptic transmission and subsequent motor output; i.e., they perform a new photosensory function.

  7. Generation of a genetically encoded marker of rod photoreceptor outer segment growth and renewal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John J. Willoughby

    2011-10-01

    Vertebrate photoreceptors are specialized light sensing neurons. The photoreceptor outer segment is a highly modified cilium where photons of light are transduced into a chemical and electrical signal. The outer segment has the typical cilary axoneme but, in addition, it has a large number of densely packed, stacked, intramembranous discs. The molecular and cellular mechanisms that contribute to vertebrate photoreceptor outer segment morphogenesis are still largely unknown. Unlike typical cilia, the outer segment is continuously regenerated or renewed throughout the life of the animal through the combined process of distal outer segment shedding and proximal outer segment growth. The process of outer segment renewal was discovered over forty years ago, but we still lack an understanding of how photoreceptors renew their outer segments and few, if any, molecular mechanisms that regulate outer segment growth or shedding have been described. Our lack of progress in understanding how photoreceptors renew their outer segments has been hampered by the difficulty in measuring rates of renewal. We have created a new method that uses heat-shock induction of a fluorescent protein that can be used to rapidly measure outer segment growth rates. We describe this method, the stable transgenic line we created, and the growth rates observed in larval and adult rod photoreceptors using this new method. This new method will allow us to begin to define the genetic and molecular mechanisms that regulate rod outer segment renewal, a crucial aspect of photoreceptor function and, possibly, viability.

  8. Transcriptome profiling of aging Drosophila photoreceptors reveals gene expression trends that correlate with visual senescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Hana; Medina, Patrick; Cooper, Daphne A; Escobedo, Spencer E; Rounds, Jeremiah; Brennan, Kaelan J; Vincent, Christopher; Miura, Pedro; Doerge, Rebecca; Weake, Vikki M

    2017-11-21

    Aging is associated with functional decline of neurons and increased incidence of both neurodegenerative and ocular disease. Photoreceptor neurons in Drosophila melanogaster provide a powerful model for studying the molecular changes involved in functional senescence of neurons since decreased visual behavior precedes retinal degeneration. Here, we sought to identify gene expression changes and the genomic features of differentially regulated genes in photoreceptors that contribute to visual senescence. To identify gene expression changes that could lead to visual senescence, we characterized the aging transcriptome of Drosophila sensory neurons highly enriched for photoreceptors. We profiled the nuclear transcriptome of genetically-labeled photoreceptors over a 40 day time course and identified increased expression of genes involved in stress and DNA damage response, and decreased expression of genes required for neuronal function. We further show that combinations of promoter motifs robustly identify age-regulated genes, suggesting that transcription factors are important in driving expression changes in aging photoreceptors. However, long, highly expressed and heavily spliced genes are also more likely to be downregulated with age, indicating that other mechanisms could contribute to expression changes at these genes. Lastly, we identify that circular RNAs (circRNAs) strongly increase during aging in photoreceptors. Overall, we identified changes in gene expression in aging Drosophila photoreceptors that could account for visual senescence. Further, we show that genomic features predict these age-related changes, suggesting potential mechanisms that could be targeted to slow the rate of age-associated visual decline.

  9. Amyloid precursor protein is required for normal function of the rod and cone pathways in the mouse retina.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tracy Ho

    Full Text Available Amyloid precursor protein (APP is a transmembrane glycoprotein frequently studied for its role in Alzheimer's disease. Our recent study in APP knockout (KO mice identified an important role for APP in modulating normal neuronal development in the retina. However the role APP plays in the adult retina and whether it is required for vision is unknown. In this study we evaluated the role of APP in retinal function and morphology comparing adult wildtype (WT and APP-KO mice. APP was expressed on neuronal cells of the inner retina, including horizontal, cone bipolar, amacrine and ganglion cells in WT mice. The function of the retina was assessed using the electroretinogram and although the rod photoreceptor responses were similar in APP-KO and WT mice, the post-photoreceptor, inner retinal responses of both the rod and cone pathways were reduced in APP-KO mice. These changes in inner retinal function did not translate to a substantial change in visual acuity as assessed using the optokinetic response or to changes in the gross cellular structure of the retina. These findings indicate that APP is not required for basic visual function, but that it is involved in modulating inner retinal circuitry.

  10. The cis-regulatory logic of the mammalian photoreceptor transcriptional network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiau, Timothy H-C; Diaconu, Claudiu; Myers, Connie A; Lee, Jongwoo; Cepko, Constance L; Corbo, Joseph C

    2007-07-25

    The photoreceptor cells of the retina are subject to a greater number of genetic diseases than any other cell type in the human body. The majority of more than 120 cloned human blindness genes are highly expressed in photoreceptors. In order to establish an integrative framework in which to understand these diseases, we have undertaken an experimental and computational analysis of the network controlled by the mammalian photoreceptor transcription factors, Crx, Nrl, and Nr2e3. Using microarray and in situ hybridization datasets we have produced a model of this network which contains over 600 genes, including numerous retinal disease loci as well as previously uncharacterized photoreceptor transcription factors. To elucidate the connectivity of this network, we devised a computational algorithm to identify the photoreceptor-specific cis-regulatory elements (CREs) mediating the interactions between these transcription factors and their target genes. In vivo validation of our computational predictions resulted in the discovery of 19 novel photoreceptor-specific CREs near retinal disease genes. Examination of these CREs permitted the definition of a simple cis-regulatory grammar rule associated with high-level expression. To test the generality of this rule, we used an expanded form of it as a selection filter to evolve photoreceptor CREs from random DNA sequences in silico. When fused to fluorescent reporters, these evolved CREs drove strong, photoreceptor-specific expression in vivo. This study represents the first systematic identification and in vivo validation of CREs in a mammalian neuronal cell type and lays the groundwork for a systems biology of photoreceptor transcriptional regulation.

  11. The cis-regulatory logic of the mammalian photoreceptor transcriptional network.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy H-C Hsiau

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available The photoreceptor cells of the retina are subject to a greater number of genetic diseases than any other cell type in the human body. The majority of more than 120 cloned human blindness genes are highly expressed in photoreceptors. In order to establish an integrative framework in which to understand these diseases, we have undertaken an experimental and computational analysis of the network controlled by the mammalian photoreceptor transcription factors, Crx, Nrl, and Nr2e3. Using microarray and in situ hybridization datasets we have produced a model of this network which contains over 600 genes, including numerous retinal disease loci as well as previously uncharacterized photoreceptor transcription factors. To elucidate the connectivity of this network, we devised a computational algorithm to identify the photoreceptor-specific cis-regulatory elements (CREs mediating the interactions between these transcription factors and their target genes. In vivo validation of our computational predictions resulted in the discovery of 19 novel photoreceptor-specific CREs near retinal disease genes. Examination of these CREs permitted the definition of a simple cis-regulatory grammar rule associated with high-level expression. To test the generality of this rule, we used an expanded form of it as a selection filter to evolve photoreceptor CREs from random DNA sequences in silico. When fused to fluorescent reporters, these evolved CREs drove strong, photoreceptor-specific expression in vivo. This study represents the first systematic identification and in vivo validation of CREs in a mammalian neuronal cell type and lays the groundwork for a systems biology of photoreceptor transcriptional regulation.

  12. Influenza vaccines for avian species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beginning in Southeast Asia, in 2003, a multi-national epizootic outbreak of H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) was identified in commercial poultry and wild bird species. This lineage, originally identified in Southern China in 1996 and then Hong Kong in 1997, caused severe morbidity an...

  13. Control strategies against avian influenza

    Science.gov (United States)

    Since 1959, 40 epizootics of high pathogenicity avian influenza (HPAI) have occurred (Figure 1). Thirty-five of these epizootic HPAI viruses were geographically-limited (mostly to single countries), involved farm-to-farm spread and were eradicated from poultry by stamping-out programs; i.e. the HPAI...

  14. Avian metapneumovirus in the USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    In the United States of America (USA), avian metapneumovirus (aMPV) causes an upper respiratory tract infection in turkeys; no outbreaks have been reported in commercial chicken flocks. Typical clinical signs of the disease in turkey poults include coughing, sneezing, nasal discharge, tracheal rale...

  15. Reverse genetics of avian metapneumoviruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    An overview of avian metapneumovirus (aMPV) infection in turkeys and development of a reverse genetics system for aMPV subgroup C (aMPV-C) virus will be presented. By using reverse genetics technology, we generated recombinant aMPV-C viruses containing a different length of glycoprotein (G) gene or...

  16. Coping with 'Dark Sides of the Sun' through Photoreceptor Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demarsy, Emilie; Goldschmidt-Clermont, Michel; Ulm, Roman

    2018-03-01

    Plants grow in constantly changing environments, including highly variable light intensities. Sunlight provides the energy that drives photosynthesis and is thus of the utmost importance for plant growth and the generation of oxygen, which the majority of life on Earth depends on. However, exposure to either insufficient or excess levels of light can have detrimental effects and cause light stress. Whereas exposure to insufficient light limits photosynthetic activity, resulting in 'energy starvation', exposure to excess light can damage the photosynthetic apparatus. Furthermore, strong sunlight is associated with high levels of potentially damaging UV-B radiation. Different classes of photoreceptors play important roles in coping with the negative aspects of sunlight, for which specific mechanisms are emerging that are reviewed here. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Blue and ultraviolet-B light photoreceptors in parsley cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ensminger, P.A.; Schaefer, E. (Albert-Ludwigs-Univ., Freiburg (Germany). Inst. fuer Biologie II)

    1992-03-01

    The authors studied UV-B photoreception in parsley cell cultures with physiological experiments involving temperature shifts and examined the possible role of flavin in blue and UV-B light photo-reception. Cells irradiated with UV-B light (0.5-15 min) at 2{sup o}C have the same fluence requirement for chalcone synthase and flavonoid induction as controls irradiated at 25{sup o}C. This is indicative of a purely photochemical reaction. Cells fed with riboflavin and irradiated with 6 h of UV-containing white light synthesize higher levels of chalcone synthase and flavonoid than unfed controls. This effect did not occur with blue light. These results indicate that flavin-sensitization requires excitation of flavin and the UV-B light photoreceptor. (author).

  18. Intrinsic volumes of symmetric cones

    OpenAIRE

    Amelunxen, Dennis; Bürgisser, Peter

    2012-01-01

    We compute the intrinsic volumes of the cone of positive semidefinite matrices over the real numbers, over the complex numbers, and over the quaternions, in terms of integrals related to Mehta's integral. Several applications for the probabilistic analysis of semidefinite programming are given.

  19. DOS cones along atomic chains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwapiński, Tomasz

    2017-01-01

    The electron transport properties of a linear atomic chain are studied theoretically within the tight-binding Hamiltonian and the Green’s function method. Variations of the local density of states (DOS) along the chain are investigated. They are crucial in scanning tunnelling experiments and give important insight into the electron transport mechanism and charge distribution inside chains. It is found that depending on the chain parity the local DOS at the Fermi level can form cone-like structures (DOS cones) along the chain. The general condition for the local DOS oscillations is obtained and the linear behaviour of the local density function is confirmed analytically. DOS cones are characterized by a linear decay towards the chain which is in contrast to the propagation properties of charge density waves, end states and Friedel oscillations in one-dimensional systems. We find that DOS cones can appear due to non-resonant electron transport, the spin–orbit scattering or for chains fabricated on a substrate with localized electrons. It is also shown that for imperfect chains (e.g. with a reduced coupling strength between two neighboring sites) a diamond-like structure of the local DOS along the chain appears. (paper)

  20. Seawave Slot-Cone Generator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vicinanza, Diego; Margheritini, Lucia; Contestabile, Pasquale

    2009-01-01

    This paper discusses a new type of Wave Energy Converter (WEC) named Seawave Slot-Cone Generator (SSG). The SSG is a WEC of the overtopping type. The structure consists of a number of reservoirs one on the top of each others above the mean water level in which the water of incoming waves is store...

  1. Mechanisms underlying stage-1 TRPL channel translocation in Drosophila photoreceptors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minh-Ha Lieu

    Full Text Available TRP channels function as key mediators of sensory transduction and other cellular signaling pathways. In Drosophila, TRP and TRPL are the light-activated channels in photoreceptors. While TRP is statically localized in the signaling compartment of the cell (the rhabdomere, TRPL localization is regulated by light. TRPL channels translocate out of the rhabdomere in two distinct stages, returning to the rhabdomere with dark-incubation. Translocation of TRPL channels regulates their availability, and thereby the gain of the signal. Little, however, is known about the mechanisms underlying this trafficking of TRPL channels.We first examine the involvement of de novo protein synthesis in TRPL translocation. We feed flies cycloheximide, verify inhibition of protein synthesis, and test for TRPL translocation in photoreceptors. We find that protein synthesis is not involved in either stage of TRPL translocation out of the rhabdomere, but that re-localization to the rhabdomere from stage-1, but not stage-2, depends on protein synthesis. We also characterize an ex vivo eye preparation that is amenable to biochemical and genetic manipulation. We use this preparation to examine mechanisms of stage-1 TRPL translocation. We find that stage-1 translocation is: induced with ATP depletion, unaltered with perturbation of the actin cytoskeleton or inhibition of endocytosis, and slowed with increased membrane sterol content.Our results indicate that translocation of TRPL out of the rhabdomere is likely due to protein transport, and not degradation/re-synthesis. Re-localization from each stage to the rhabdomere likely involves different strategies. Since TRPL channels can translocate to stage-1 in the absence of ATP, with no major requirement of the cytoskeleton, we suggest that stage-1 translocation involves simple diffusion through the apical membrane, which may be regulated by release of a light-dependent anchor in the rhabdomere.

  2. Unique system of photoreceptors in sea urchin tube feet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullrich-Lüter, Esther M; Dupont, Sam; Arboleda, Enrique; Hausen, Harald; Arnone, Maria Ina

    2011-01-01

    Different sea urchin species show a vast variety of responses to variations in light intensity; however, despite this behavioral evidence for photosensitivity, light sensing in these animals has remained an enigma. Genome information of the recently sequenced purple sea urchin (Strongylocentrotus purpuratus) allowed us to address this question from a previously unexplored molecular perspective by localizing expression of the rhabdomeric opsin Sp-opsin4 and Sp-pax6, two genes essential for photoreceptor function and development, respectively. Using a specifically designed antibody against Sp-Opsin4 and in situ hybridization for both genes, we detected expression in two distinct groups of photoreceptor cells (PRCs) located in the animal's numerous tube feet. Specific reactivity of the Sp-Opsin4 antibody with sea star optic cushions, which regulate phototaxis, suggests a similar visual function in sea urchins. Ultrastructural characterization of the sea urchin PRCs revealed them to be of a microvillar receptor type. Our data suggest that echinoderms, in contrast to chordates, deploy a microvillar, r-opsin–expressing PRC type for vision, a feature that has been so far documented only in protostome animals. Surprisingly, sea urchin PRCs lack any associated screening pigment. Indeed, one of the tube foot PRC clusters may account for directional vision by being shaded through the opaque calcite skeleton. The PRC axons connect to the animal internal nervous system, suggesting an integrative function beyond local short circuits. Because juveniles display no phototaxis until skeleton completion, we suggest a model in which the entire sea urchin, deploying its skeleton as PRC screening device, functions as a huge compound eye. PMID:21536888

  3. Knockdown of ttc26 disrupts ciliogenesis of the photoreceptor cells and the pronephros in zebrafish

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Qi; Liu, Qin; Austin, Chrissy; Drummond, Iain; Pierce, Eric A.

    2012-01-01

    In our effort to understand genetic disorders of the photoreceptor cells of the retina, we have focused on intraflagellar transport in photoreceptor sensory cilia. From previous mouse proteomic data we identified a cilia protein Ttc26, orthologue of dyf-13 in Caenorhabditis elegans, as a target. We localized Ttc26 to the transition zone of photoreceptor and to the transition zone of cilia in cultured murine inner medullary collecting duct 3 (mIMCD3) renal cells. Knockdown of Ttc26 in mIMCD3 c...

  4. Diurnal expression of proteins in the retina of the blind cone-rod homeobox (Crx-/- ) mouse and the 129/Sv mouse: a proteomic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Møller, Morten; Rath, Martin Fredensborg; Ludvigsen, Maja; Honoré, Bent; Vorum, Henrik

    2017-11-01

    The vertebrate retina contains a circadian clock participating in adaptations to day and night vision. This peripheral clock is independent of the master clock in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). The retinal clock is located in several cell types, including the photoreceptors. To investigate the role of the circadian clock of the photoreceptor cells in regulation of retinal protein rhythms, we analysed diurnal protein expression in the photoreceptor-deficient cone-rod homeobox knockout mouse (Crx -/- ) and the 129/Sv mouse. 2D gels were made from retinal homogenates of 129/Sv and Crx -/- mice killed at midday and midnight. Stained gels were analysed by use of PDQuest 2D gel analysis software. After trypsin digestion of differential expressed spots, the proteins were identified by LC-MS/MS using a nano-liquid chromatograph connected to a Q-TOF Premier mass spectrometer. These data were used to search the SWISS-PROT database. Both the retinae of the control and the Crx -/- mice exhibited diurnal proteins rhythms. As expected, proteins involved in phototransduction were not detected in the Crx -/- mouse; in this phenotype, however, proteins from spots showing diurnal rhythms were specifically identified as enzymes involved in glucose metabolism, Krebs cycle, and mitochondrial enzymes. Data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD005556. We show diurnal protein rhythms in the retina of a mouse lacking the rods and cones. The diurnal protein rhythms in this genotype, lacking the circadian clock of the photoreceptors, might be caused by a circadian clock in other retinal cell types or a direct light input to the retina. © 2017 Acta Ophthalmologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Contributions of Rod and Cone Pathways to Retinal Direction Selectivity Through Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa, Juliana M; Morrie, Ryan D; Baertsch, Hans C; Feller, Marla B

    2016-09-14

    Direction selectivity is a robust computation across a broad stimulus space that is mediated by activity of both rod and cone photoreceptors through the ON and OFF pathways. However, rods, S-cones, and M-cones activate the ON and OFF circuits via distinct pathways and the relative contribution of each to direction selectivity is unknown. Using a variety of stimulation paradigms, pharmacological agents, and knockout mice that lack rod transduction, we found that inputs from the ON pathway were critical for strong direction-selective (DS) tuning in the OFF pathway. For UV light stimulation, the ON pathway inputs to the OFF pathway originated with rod signaling, whereas for visible stimulation, the ON pathway inputs to the OFF pathway originated with both rod and M-cone signaling. Whole-cell voltage-clamp recordings revealed that blocking the ON pathway reduced directional tuning in the OFF pathway via a reduction in null-side inhibition, which is provided by OFF starburst amacrine cells (SACs). Consistent with this, our recordings from OFF SACs confirmed that signals originating in the ON pathway contribute to their excitation. Finally, we observed that, for UV stimulation, ON contributions to OFF DS tuning matured earlier than direct signaling via the OFF pathway. These data indicate that the retina uses multiple strategies for computing DS responses across different colors and stages of development. The retina uses parallel pathways to encode different features of the visual scene. In some cases, these distinct pathways converge on circuits that mediate a distinct computation. For example, rod and cone pathways enable direction-selective (DS) ganglion cells to encode motion over a wide range of light intensities. Here, we show that although direction selectivity is robust across light intensities, motion discrimination for OFF signals is dependent upon ON signaling. At eye opening, ON directional tuning is mature, whereas OFF DS tuning is significantly reduced due

  6. Ultrastructural and ERG findings in progressive rod-cone dystrophy in a litter of Labrador retrievers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raitta, C; Kommonen, B; Ulshafer, R; Karhunen, U

    1991-02-01

    Early ultrastructural findings of a progressive photoreceptor dystrophy and corresponding ERG findings are reported in 3 Labrador Retrievers from a litter of 7 pups bred from 2 dogs clinically and electroretinographically affected with generalized progressive retinal dystrophy. The pups were euthanized at 5, 11 and 15 months post partum. The most prominent ultrastructural finding was photoreceptor dystrophy. At 5 months the outer nuclear layer (ONL) consisted of 8-10 layers and seemed reduced in thickness, pyknotic nuclei were seen in this layer. The receptor outer segments (OS) were short and swollen. Some disorientation of OS discs occurred. In the 11-months specimen 7-8 ONL layers were identified. Overall thinning of the neuro-retina had occurred and fewer receptors compared to the 5-months specimen were present. By 15 months the ONL was further reduced to about 4 layers. Enlarged internuclear spaces were present in the ONL as well as around inner segments (IS). Phagocytic cells were frequent among remains of OS. The pigment epithelium appeared normal. The dark adapted ERG b-wave amplitudes and photopic 30 Hz flicker responses were low in comparison to controls of the same breed, and decreased with age. The condition represents a progressive rod-cone dystrophy which shares similarities with primary receptor dystrophy in man such as retinitis pigmentosa.

  7. EYS Is a Protein Associated with the Ciliary Axoneme in Rods and Cones.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanna Alfano

    Full Text Available Mutations in the EYS gene are a common cause of autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa (arRP, yet the role of the EYS protein in humans is presently unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate the isoform structure, expression and potential function of EYS in the mammalian retina in order to better understand its involvement in the pathogenesis of arRP.To achieve the objective, we examined the expression of mRNA transcripts of EYS isoforms in human tissues and cell lines by RT-PCR. We also investigated the localisation of EYS in cultured cells and retinal cryo-sections by confocal fluorescence microscopy and Western blot analysis.RT-PCR analysis confirmed that EYS has at least four isoforms. In addition to the previously reported EYS isoforms 1 and 4, we present the experimental validation of two smaller variants referred to as EYS isoforms 2 and 3. All four isoforms are expressed in the human retina and Y79 cells and the short variants were additionally detected in the testis. Immunofluorescent confocal microscopy and Western blot analysis revealed that all EYS isoforms preferentially localise to the cytoplasm of Y79 and HeLa cells. Moreover, an enrichment of the endogenous protein was observed near the centrosomes in Y79 cells. Interestingly, EYS was observed at the ciliary axoneme in Y79 ciliated cells. In macaque retinal cryosections, EYS was found to localise in the region of the photoreceptor ciliary axoneme in both rods and cones as well as in the cytoplasm of the ganglion cells.The results obtained in this study lead us to speculate that, in photoreceptor cells, EYS could be a protein involved in maintaining the stability of the ciliary axoneme in both rods and cones. The variability of its isoform structure suggests that other roles are also possible and yet to be established.

  8. Spectral sensitivity of light induced respiratory activity of photoreceptor mitochondria in the intact fly

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tinbergen, J.; Stavenga, D.G.

    1987-01-01

    Fly Calliphora erythrocephala (white eyed) photoreceptors were investigated in intact, living animals by microspectrofluorometry in vivo. The fluorescence of mitochondrial flavoproteins was used to monitor transient changes in oxidative metabolism, which were induced by a test light following a

  9. The Influence of Photoreceptor Size and Distribution on Optical Sensitivity in the Eyes of Lanternfishes (Myctophidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Busserolles, Fanny; Fitzpatrick, John L.; Marshall, N. Justin; Collin, Shaun P.

    2014-01-01

    The mesopelagic zone of the deep-sea (200-1000 m) is characterised by exponentially diminishing levels of downwelling sunlight and by the predominance of bioluminescence emissions. The ability of mesopelagic organisms to detect and behaviourally react to downwelling sunlight and/or bioluminescence will depend on the visual task and ultimately on the eyes and their capacity for detecting low levels of illumination and intermittent point sources of bioluminescent light. In this study, we investigate the diversity of the visual system of the lanternfish (Myctophidae). We focus specifically on the photoreceptor cells by examining their size, arrangement, topographic distribution and contribution to optical sensitivity in 53 different species from 18 genera. We also examine the influence(s) of both phylogeny and ecology on these photoreceptor variables using phylogenetic comparative analyses in order to understand the constraints placed on the visual systems of this large group of mesopelagic fishes at the first stage of retinal processing. We report great diversity in the visual system of the Myctophidae at the level of the photoreceptors. Photoreceptor distribution reveals clear interspecific differences in visual specialisations (areas of high rod photoreceptor density), indicating potential interspecific differences in interactions with prey, predators and/or mates. A great diversity in photoreceptor design (length and diameter) and density is also present. Overall, the myctophid eye is very sensitive compared to other teleosts and each species seems to be specialised for the detection of a specific signal (downwelling light or bioluminescence), potentially reflecting different visual demands for survival. Phylogenetic comparative analyses highlight several relationships between photoreceptor characteristics and the ecological variables tested (depth distribution and luminous tissue patterns). Depth distribution at night was a significant factor in most of the

  10. LONGITUDINAL QUANTITATIVE EVALUATION OF PHOTORECEPTOR VOLUME FOLLOWING REPAIR OF MACULA-OFF RETINAL DETACHMENT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narala, Ramsudha; Scarinci, Fabio; Shaarawy, Amr; Simonett, Joseph M; Flaxel, Christina J; Fawzi, Amani A

    2016-08-01

    To quantify photoreceptor volume changes after successful surgical repair of macula-off retinal detachment and to correlate these volumetric changes to postoperative best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA). Retrospective study of 15 eyes of 15 patients with macula-off retinal detachment who underwent successful surgical repair. A minimum of 4 optical coherence tomography scans that straddled the foveal center was used to quantify the central photoreceptor volume (central 1 mm). Mean photoreceptor volume at the first postoperative visit was 0.451 mm, increasing to 0.523 mm at the final postoperative visit (P = 0.004). Mean BCVA improved from 1.13 ± 0.59 logarithm of the minimum angle of resolution units (∼20/270) preoperatively to 0.52 ± 0.42 logarithm of the minimum angle of resolution units (∼20/66) at the final postoperative visit (P = 0.001). Mean photoreceptor volume at either the initial or final visit demonstrated significant correlations with final postoperative BCVA (r = -0.670, P = 0.017 and r = -0.753, P = 0.005, respectively). Shorter time interval from diagnosis to surgery was significantly associated with greater mean final postoperative photoreceptor volume (r = -0.588, P = 0.021) and better mean final postoperative BCVA (r = 0.709, P = 0.003). We observed a significant increase in photoreceptor volume after successful retinal detachment repair; photoreceptor volume was positively associated with BCVA and time to surgery. Our series emphasizes the importance of prompt surgical repair and shows that photoreceptor recovery and volumetric improvement correlate significantly with BCVA.

  11. Characterization of Multiple Light Damage Paradigms Reveals Regional Differences in Photoreceptor Loss

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas, Jennifer L.; Nelson, Craig M.; Luo, Xixia; Hyde, David R.; Thummel, Ryan

    2012-01-01

    Zebrafish provide an attractive model to study the retinal response to photoreceptor apoptosis due to its remarkable ability to spontaneously regenerate retinal neurons following damage. There are currently two widely used light-induced retinal degeneration models to damage photoreceptors in the adult zebrafish. One model uses constant bright light, whereas the other uses a short exposure to extremely intense ultraviolet light. Although both models are currently used, it is unclear whether th...

  12. The influence of photoreceptor size and distribution on optical sensitivity in the eyes of lanternfishes (Myctophidae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fanny de Busserolles

    Full Text Available The mesopelagic zone of the deep-sea (200-1000 m is characterised by exponentially diminishing levels of downwelling sunlight and by the predominance of bioluminescence emissions. The ability of mesopelagic organisms to detect and behaviourally react to downwelling sunlight and/or bioluminescence will depend on the visual task and ultimately on the eyes and their capacity for detecting low levels of illumination and intermittent point sources of bioluminescent light. In this study, we investigate the diversity of the visual system of the lanternfish (Myctophidae. We focus specifically on the photoreceptor cells by examining their size, arrangement, topographic distribution and contribution to optical sensitivity in 53 different species from 18 genera. We also examine the influence(s of both phylogeny and ecology on these photoreceptor variables using phylogenetic comparative analyses in order to understand the constraints placed on the visual systems of this large group of mesopelagic fishes at the first stage of retinal processing. We report great diversity in the visual system of the Myctophidae at the level of the photoreceptors. Photoreceptor distribution reveals clear interspecific differences in visual specialisations (areas of high rod photoreceptor density, indicating potential interspecific differences in interactions with prey, predators and/or mates. A great diversity in photoreceptor design (length and diameter and density is also present. Overall, the myctophid eye is very sensitive compared to other teleosts and each species seems to be specialised for the detection of a specific signal (downwelling light or bioluminescence, potentially reflecting different visual demands for survival. Phylogenetic comparative analyses highlight several relationships between photoreceptor characteristics and the ecological variables tested (depth distribution and luminous tissue patterns. Depth distribution at night was a significant factor in most

  13. The influence of photoreceptor size and distribution on optical sensitivity in the eyes of lanternfishes (Myctophidae)

    KAUST Repository

    Busserolles, Fanny de

    2014-06-13

    The mesopelagic zone of the deep-sea (200-1000 m) is characterised by exponentially diminishing levels of downwelling sunlight and by the predominance of bioluminescence emissions. The ability of mesopelagic organisms to detect and behaviourally react to downwelling sunlight and/or bioluminescence will depend on the visual task and ultimately on the eyes and their capacity for detecting low levels of illumination and intermittent point sources of bioluminescent light. In this study, we investigate the diversity of the visual system of the lanternfish (Myctophidae). We focus specifically on the photoreceptor cells by examining their size, arrangement, topographic distribution and contribution to optical sensitivity in 53 different species from 18 genera. We also examine the influence(s) of both phylogeny and ecology on these photoreceptor variables using phylogenetic comparative analyses in order to understand the constraints placed on the visual systems of this large group of mesopelagic fishes at the first stage of retinal processing. We report great diversity in the visual system of the Myctophidae at the level of the photoreceptors. Photoreceptor distribution reveals clear interspecific differences in visual specialisations (areas of high rod photoreceptor density), indicating potential interspecific differences in interactions with prey, predators and/or mates. A great diversity in photoreceptor design (length and diameter) and density is also present. Overall, the myctophid eye is very sensitive compared to other teleosts and each species seems to be specialised for the detection of a specific signal (downwelling light or bioluminescence), potentially reflecting different visual demands for survival. Phylogenetic comparative analyses highlight several relationships between photoreceptor characteristics and the ecological variables tested (depth distribution and luminous tissue patterns). Depth distribution at night was a significant factor in most of the

  14. Rescue and repair during photoreceptor cell renewal mediated by docosahexaenoic acid-derived neuroprotectin D1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazan, Nicolas G; Calandria, Jorgelina M; Serhan, Charles N

    2010-08-01

    Retinal degenerative diseases result in retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) and photoreceptor cell loss. These cells are continuously exposed to the environment (light) and to potentially pro-oxidative conditions, as the retina's oxygen consumption is very high. There is also a high flux of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), a PUFA that moves through the blood stream toward photoreceptors and between them and RPE cells. Photoreceptor outer segment shedding and phagocytosis intermittently renews photoreceptor membranes. DHA is converted through 15-lipoxygenase-1 into neuroprotectin D1 (NPD1), a potent mediator that evokes counteracting cell-protective, anti-inflammatory, pro-survival repair signaling, including the induction of anti-apoptotic proteins and inhibition of pro-apoptotic proteins. Thus, NPD1 triggers activation of signaling pathway/s that modulate/s pro-apoptotic signals, promoting cell survival. This review provides an overview of DHA in photoreceptors and describes the ability of RPE cells to synthesize NPD1 from DHA. It also describes the role of neurotrophins as agonists of NPD1 synthesis and how photoreceptor phagocytosis induces refractoriness to oxidative stress in RPE cells, with concomitant NPD1 synthesis.

  15. The Musashi 1 Controls the Splicing of Photoreceptor-Specific Exons in the Vertebrate Retina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Daniel; Carstens, Russ

    2016-01-01

    Alternative pre-mRNA splicing expands the coding capacity of eukaryotic genomes, potentially enabling a limited number of genes to govern the development of complex anatomical structures. Alternative splicing is particularly prevalent in the vertebrate nervous system, where it is required for neuronal development and function. Here, we show that photoreceptor cells, a type of sensory neuron, express a characteristic splicing program that affects a broad set of transcripts and is initiated prior to the development of the light sensing outer segments. Surprisingly, photoreceptors lack prototypical neuronal splicing factors and their splicing profile is driven to a significant degree by the Musashi 1 (MSI1) protein. A striking feature of the photoreceptor splicing program are exons that display a "switch-like" pattern of high inclusion levels in photoreceptors and near complete exclusion outside of the retina. Several ubiquitously expressed genes that are involved in the biogenesis and function of primary cilia produce highly photoreceptor specific isoforms through use of such “switch-like” exons. Our results suggest a potential role for alternative splicing in the development of photoreceptors and the conversion of their primary cilia to the light sensing outer segments. PMID:27541351

  16. The roles of Syx5 in Golgi morphology and Rhodopsin transport in Drosophila photoreceptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takunori Satoh

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available SNAREs (SNAP receptors are the key components of protein complexes that drive membrane fusion. Here, we report the function of a SNARE, Syntaxin 5 (Syx5, in the development of photoreceptors in Drosophila. In wild-type photoreceptors, Syx5 localizes to cis-Golgi, along with cis-Golgi markers: Rab1 and GM130. We observed that Syx5-deficient photoreceptors show notable accumulation of these cis-Golgi markers accompanying drastic accumulation of vesicles between endoplasmic reticulum (ER and Golgi cisternae. Extensive analysis of Rh1 (rhodopsin 1 trafficking revealed that in Syx5-deficient photoreceptors, Rh1 is exported from the ER with normal kinetics, retained in the cis-Golgi region along with GM130 for a prolonged period, and then subsequently degraded presumably by endoplasmic reticulum-associated protein degradation (ERAD after retrieval to the ER. Unlike our previous report of Rab6-deficient photoreceptors – where two apical transport pathways are specifically inhibited – vesicle transport pathways to all plasma membrane domains are inhibited in Syx5-deficient photoreceptors, implying that Rab6 and Syx5 are acting in different steps of intra-Golgi transport. These results indicate that Syx5 is crucial for membrane protein transport, presumably during ER-derived vesicle fusion to form cis-Golgi cisternae.

  17. Efficient photoreceptor-targeted gene expression in vivo by recombinant adeno-associated virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flannery, J G; Zolotukhin, S; Vaquero, M I; LaVail, M M; Muzyczka, N; Hauswirth, W W

    1997-06-24

    We describe a general approach for achieving efficient and cell type-specific expression of exogenous genes in photoreceptor cells of the mammalian retina. Recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vectors were used to transfer the bacterial lacZ gene or a synthetic green fluorescent protein gene (gfp) to mouse or rat retinas after injection into the subretinal space. Using a proximal murine rod opsin promoter (+86 to -385) to drive expression, reporter gene product was found exclusively in photoreceptors, not in any other retinal cell type or in the adjacent retinal pigment epithelium. GFP-expressing photoreceptors typically encompassed 10-20% of the total retinal area after a single 2-microl injection. Photoreceptors were transduced with nearly 100% efficiency in the region directly surrounding the injection site. We estimate approximately 2.5 million photoreceptors were transduced as a result of the single subretinal inoculation. This level of gene transfer and expression suggests the feasibility of genetic therapy for retinal disease. The gfp-containing rAAV stock was substantially free of both adenovirus and wild-type AAV, as judged by plaque assay and infectious center assay, respectively. Thus, highly purified, helper virus-free rAAV vectors can achieve high-frequency tissue-specific transduction of terminally differentiated, postmitotic photoreceptor cells.

  18. Evidence-Based Advances in Avian Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summa, Noémie M; Guzman, David Sanchez-Migallon

    2017-09-01

    This article presents relevant advances in avian medicine and surgery over the past 5 years. New information has been published to improve clinical diagnosis in avian diseases. This article also describes new pharmacokinetic studies. Advances in the understanding and treatment of common avian disorders are presented in this article, as well. Although important progress has been made over the past years, there is still much research that needs to be done regarding the etiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment of avian diseases and evidence-based information is still sparse in the literature. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Cardiac cone-beam CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manzke, Robert

    2005-01-01

    This doctoral thesis addresses imaging of the heart with retrospectively gated helical cone-beam computed tomography (CT). A thorough review of the CT reconstruction literature is presented in combination with a historic overview of cardiac CT imaging and a brief introduction to other cardiac imaging modalities. The thesis includes a comprehensive chapter about the theory of CT reconstruction, familiarizing the reader with the problem of cone-beam reconstruction. The anatomic and dynamic properties of the heart are outlined and techniques to derive the gating information are reviewed. With the extended cardiac reconstruction (ECR) framework, a new approach is presented for the heart-rate-adaptive gated helical cardiac cone-beam CT reconstruction. Reconstruction assessment criteria such as the temporal resolution, the homogeneity in terms of the cardiac phase, and the smoothness at cycle-to-cycle transitions are developed. Several reconstruction optimization approaches are described: An approach for the heart-rate-adaptive optimization of the temporal resolution is presented. Streak artifacts at cycle-to-cycle transitions can be minimized by using an improved cardiac weighting scheme. The optimal quiescent cardiac phase for the reconstruction can be determined automatically with the motion map technique. Results for all optimization procedures applied to ECR are presented and discussed based on patient and phantom data. The ECR algorithm is analyzed for larger detector arrays of future cone-beam systems throughout an extensive simulation study based on a four-dimensional cardiac CT phantom. The results of the scientific work are summarized and an outlook proposing future directions is given. The presented thesis is available for public download at www.cardiac-ct.net

  20. Avian Influenza infection in Human

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohan. M

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Outbreaks caused by the H5N1 strain are presently of the greatest concern for human health. In assessing risks to human health, it is important to know exactly which avian virus strains are causing the outbreaks in birds.All available evidence points to an increased risk of transmission to humans when outbreaks of highly pathogenic avian H5N1 influenza are widespread in poultry. There is mounting evidence that this strain has a unique capacity to jump the species barrier and cause severe disease, with high mortality, in humans. There is no evidence, to date that efficient human to human transmission of H5N1 strain has occurred and very often. Efficient transmission among humans is a key property of pandemic strains and a property that the avian H5N1 and H9N2 viruses apparently lacked. The biological and molecular basis for effective aerosol transmission among humans is not known. The virus can improve its transmissibility among humans via two principal mechanisms. The first is a “reassortment” event, in which genetic material is exchanged between human and avian viruses during co-infection of a human or pig.Reassortment could result in a fully transmissible pandemic virus, announced by a sudden surge of cases with explosive spread. The second mechanism is a more gradual process of adaptive mutation, whereby the capability of the virus to bind to human cells increases during subsequent infections of humans. Adaptive mutation, expressed initially as small clusters of human cases with some evidence of human-to-human transmission, would probably give the world some time to take defensive action, if detected sufficiently early. As the number of human infections grows, the risk increases that a new virus subtype could emerge, triggering an influenza pandemic. Humans as well as swine must now be considered a potential mixing vessel for the generation of such a virus. This link between widespread infection in poultry and increased risk of human

  1. Testicular atrophy and reproductive quiescence in photorefractory and scotosensitive quail: Involvement of hypothalamic deep brain photoreceptors and GnRH-GnIH system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Somanshu; Chaturvedi, Chandra Mohini

    2017-10-01

    Birds time their daily and seasonal activities in synchronization with circadian and annual periodicities in the environment, which is mainly provided by changes in photoperiod/day length conditions. Photoperiod appears to act at the level of eye, pineal and encephalic/deep brain photoperception and thus entrain the hypothalamic clock as well as reproductive circuitry in different avian species. In this article our focus of study is to elucidate out the underlying molecular mechanism of modulation of the hypothalamic reproductive circuitry following the photoperception through the hypothalamic photoreceptor cells and the subsequent alteration in the reproductive responses in quail, kept under different simulated photoperiodic conditions. Present study investigated the different simulated photoperiodic conditions induced hypothalamic DBP-GnRH-GnIH system mediated translation of photoperiodic information and subsequent exhibition of differential photosexual responses (scoto-/photo-sensitivity and refractoriness) in Japanese quail, Coturnix coturnix japonica. Paired testes weight and paired testicular volume increased 15.9 and 22.6-fold respectively in scotorefractory quail compare to that of scotosensitive phase and 12.8 and 24.3-fold in photosensitive quail compare to that of photorefractory phase. The pineal/eye melatonin (through melatonin receptor subtype Mel 1c R) and hypothalamic deep brain photoreceptor (DBPs) cells directly modulate the hypothalamic GnRH-I/II and GnIH system and thus exhibit testicular stimulation or regression in response to different photoperiodic conditions (PS, PR, SS and SR). The hypothalamic alteration of DBP(s) and GnRH-GnIH system thus may induce the testicular stimulation in PS and SR quail and testicular regression in SS and PR quail. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Prescriptionless light-cone integrals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, A.T.; Schmidt, A.G.M.

    2000-01-01

    Perturbative quantum gauge field theory as seen within the perspective of physical gauge choices such as the light-cone gauge entails the emergence of troublesome poles of the type (k.n) -α in the Feynman integrals. These come from the boson field propagator, where α=1,2,.. and n μ is the external arbitrary four-vector that defines the gauge properly. This becomes an additional hurdle in the computation of Feynman diagrams, since any graph containing internal boson lines will inevitably produce integrands with denominators bearing the characteristic gauge-fixing factor. How one deals with them has been the subject of research over decades, and several prescriptions have been suggested and tried in the course of time, with failures and successes. However, a more recent development at this fronteer which applies the negative dimensional technique to compute light-cone Feynman integrals shows that we can altogether dispense with prescriptions to perform the calculations. An additional bonus comes to us attached to this new technique, in that not only it renders the light-cone prescriptionless but, by the very nature of it, it can also dispense with decomposition formulas or partial fractioning tricks used in the standard approach to separate pole products of the type (k.n) -α [(k-p).n] -β (β=1,2,..). In this work we demonstrate how all this can be done. (orig.)

  3. Using EGEE against avian flu

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    During April 2006 avian flu was spreading across the world with the potential of turning into a pandemic, a drug to treat the deadly H5N1 strain was needed. Such a task required the huge processing power provided by EGEE, which analysed 300 000 possible drug components for their suitability. This map shows the network of computer centres and their activity during this time.

  4. Gender determination of avian embryo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daum, Keith A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Atkinson, David A. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2002-01-01

    Disclosed is a method for gender determination of avian embryos. During the embryo incubation process, the outer hard shells of eggs are drilled and samples of allantoic fluid are removed. The allantoic fluids are directly introduced into an ion mobility spectrometer (IMS) for analysis. The resulting spectra contain the relevant marker peaks in the positive or negative mode which correlate with unique mobilities which are sex-specific. This way, the gender of the embryo can be determined.

  5. An alternative pathway for signal flow from rod photoreceptors to ganglion cells in mammalian retina.

    OpenAIRE

    DeVries, S H; Baylor, D A

    1995-01-01

    Rod signals in the mammalian retina are thought to reach ganglion cells over the circuit rod-->rod depolarizing bipolar cell-->AII amacrine cell-->cone bipolar cells-->ganglion cells. A possible alternative pathway involves gap junctions linking the rods and cones, the circuit being rod-->cone-->cone bipolar cells-->ganglion cells. It is not clear whether this second pathway indeed relays rod signals to ganglion cells. We studied signal flow in the isolated rabbit retina with a multielectrode...

  6. Fatty acid composition of Drosophila photoreceptor light-sensitive microvilli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yorka Muñoz

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Phototransduction, the mechanism underlying the electrical response to light in photoreceptor cells, has been thoroughly investigated in Drosophila melanogaster, an essential model in signal transduction research. These cells present a highly specialized photosensitive membrane consisting of thousands of microvilli forming a prominent structure termed a rhabdomere. These microvilli encompass the phototransduction proteins, most of which are transmembrane and exclusively rhabdomeric. Rhabdomere membrane lipids play a crucial role in the activation of the transient receptor potential ionic channels (TRP and TRPL responsible for initiating the photoresponse. Despite its importance, rhabdomere lipid composition has not been established. We developed a novel preparation enriched in rhabdomere membranes to perform a thorough characterization of the lipidomics of Drosophila rhabdomeres. Isolated eyes (500 were homogenized and subjected to a differential centrifugation protocol that generates a fraction enriched in rhabdomere membrane. Lipids extracted from this preparation were identified and quantified by gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry. We found an abundance of low sterol esters (C16:0, C18:0, highly abundant and diverse triglycerides, free fatty acids, a moderate variety of mono and diacyglycerols (C:16:0, 18:0, C18:1 and abundant phospholipids (principally C18:2. This preparation opens a new avenue for investigating essential aspects of phototransduction.

  7. Non-directional photoreceptors in the pluteus of Strongylocentrotus purpuratus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Valero-Gracia

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available In comparison to complex visual systems, non-directional photoreception – the most primitive form of biological photodetection – has been poorly investigated, although it is essential to many biological processes such as circadian and seasonal rhythms. Here we describe the spatiotemporal expression pattern of the major molecular actors mediating light reception – opsins – localized in the Strongylocentrotus purpuratus larva. In contrast to other zooplanktonic larvae, the echinopluteus lacks photoreceptor cells with observable shading pigments involved in directional visual tasks. Nonetheless, the echinopluteus expresses two distinct classes of opsins: a Go-opsin and a rhabdomeric opsin. The Go-opsin, Sp-opsin3.2, is detectable at early (3 days post fertilization and four armed pluteus stages (4 days post fertilization in two cells that flank the apical organ. To rule out the presence of shading pigments involved in directional photoreception, we used electron microscopy to explore the expression domain of Go-opsin Sp-opsin3.2 positive cells. The rhabdomeric opsin Sp-Opsin4 expression is detectable in clusters of cells located around the primary podia at the five-fold ectoderm pentagonal disc stage (day 18-21 and thereafter, thus indicating that Sp-Opsin4 may not be involved in the photoreception mechanism of the larva, but only of the juvenile. We discuss the putative function of the relevant cells in their neural context, and propose a model for understanding simple photodetection in marine larvae.

  8. Case of Unilateral Peripheral Cone Dysfunction

    OpenAIRE

    Yujin Mochizuki; Kei Shinoda; Celso Soiti Matsumoto; Gerd Klose; Emiko Watanabe; Keisuke Seki; Itaru Kimura; Atsushi Mizota

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Peripheral cone dystrophy is a subgroup of cone dystrophy, and only 4 cases have been reported. We present a patient with unilateral peripheral cone dysfunction and report the functional changes determined by electrophysiological tests and ultrastructural changes determined by spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). Case: A 34-year-old woman complained of blurred vision in both eyes. Our examination showed that her visual acuity was 0.05 OD and 0.2 OS. A relative affer...

  9. Vacuum Compatible Percussive Dynamic Cone Penetrometer Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Honeybee Robotics proposes to develop a vacuum compatible percussive dynamic cone penetrometer (PDCP), for establishing soil bin characteristics, with the ultimate...

  10. Light-cones, almost light-cones and almost-complex light-cones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Ezra T.

    2017-08-01

    We point out (and then apply to a general situation) an unusual relationship among a variety of null geodesic congruences; (a) the generators of ordinary light-cones and (b) certain (related) shear-free but twisting congruences in Minkowski space-time as well as (c) asymptotically shear-free null geodesic congruences that exist in the neighborhood of Penrose's I^{ +} in Einstein or Einstein-Maxwell asymptotically flat-space-times. We refer to these geodesic congruences respectively as: Lignt-Cones (LCs), as "Almost-Complex"-Light-Cones (ACLCs), [though they are real they resemble complex light-cones in complex Minkowski space] and finally to a family of congruences in asymptotically flat-spaces as ` Almost Light-Cones' (ALC). The two essential points of resemblance among the three families are: (1) they are all either shear-free or asymptotically shear-free and (2) in each family the individual members of the family can be labeled by the points in a real or complex four-dimensional manifold. As an example, the Minkowski space LCs are labeled by the (real) coordinate value of their apex. In the case of (ACLCs) (complex coordinate values), the congruences will have non-vanishing twist whose magnitude is determined by the imaginary part of the complex coordinate values. In studies of gravitational radiation, Bondi-type of null surfaces and their associated Bondi coordinates have been almost exclusively used for calculations. It turns out that some surprising relations arise if, instead of the Bondi coordinates, one uses ALCs and their associated coordinate systems in the analysis of the Einstein-Maxwell equations in the neighborhood of I+. More explicitly and surprisingly, the asymptotic Bianchi Identities (arising directly from the Einstein equations), expressed in the coordinates of the ALCs, turn directly into many of the standard definitions and equations and relations of classical mechanics coupled with Maxwell's equations. These results extend and generalize the

  11. Presynaptic [Ca2+] and GCAPs: aspects on the structure and function of photoreceptor ribbon synapses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank eSchmitz

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Changes in intracellular calcium ions [Ca2+] play important roles in photoreceptor signalling. Consequently, intracellular [Ca2+] levels need to be tightly controlled. In the light-sensitive outer segments (OS of photoreceptors, Ca2+ regulates the activity of retinal guanylate cyclases (ret-GCs thus playing a central role in phototransduction and light-adaptation by restoring light-induced decreases in cGMP. In the synaptic terminals, changes of intracellular Ca2+ trigger various aspects of neurotransmission. Photoreceptors employ tonically active ribbon synapses that encode light-induced, graded changes of membrane potential into different rates of synaptic vesicle exocytosis. The active zones of ribbon synapses contain large electron-dense structures, synaptic ribbons, that are associated with large numbers of synaptic vesicles. Synaptic coding at ribbon synapses differs from synaptic coding at conventional (phasic synapses. Recent studies revealed new insights how synaptic ribbons are involved in this process. This review focuses on the regulation of [Ca2+] in presynaptic photoreceptor terminals and on the function of a particular Ca2+-regulated protein, the neuronal calcium sensor protein GCAP2 (guanylate cyclase-activating protein-2 in the photoreceptor ribbon synapse. GCAP2, an EF hand-containing protein plays multiple roles in the OS and in the photoreceptor synapse. In the OS, GCAP2 works as a Ca2+-sensor within a Ca2+-regulated feedback loop that adjusts cGMP levels. In the photoreceptor synapse, GCAP2 binds to RIBEYE, a component of synaptic ribbons, and mediates Ca2+-dependent plasticity at that site. Possible mechanisms are discussed.

  12. Nrf2 protects photoreceptor cells from photo-oxidative stress induced by blue light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wan-Ju; Wu, Caiying; Xu, Zhenhua; Kuse, Yoshiki; Hara, Hideaki; Duh, Elia J

    2017-01-01

    Oxidative stress plays a key role in age-related macular degeneration and hereditary retinal degenerations. Light damage in rodents has been used extensively to model oxidative stress-induced photoreceptor degeneration, and photo-oxidative injury from blue light is particularly damaging to photoreceptors. The endogenous factors protecting photoreceptors from oxidative stress, including photo-oxidative stress, are continuing to be elucidated. In this study, we evaluated the effect of blue light exposure on photoreceptors and its relationship to Nrf2 using cultured murine photoreceptor (661W) cells. 661W cells were exposed to blue light at 2500 lux. Exposure to blue light for 6-24 h resulted in a significant increase in intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and death of 661W cells in a time-dependent fashion. Blue light exposure resulted in activation of Nrf2, as indicated by an increase in nuclear translocation of Nrf2. This was associated with a significant induction of expression of Nrf2 as well as an array of Nrf2 target genes, including antioxidant genes, as indicated by quantitative reverse transcription PCR (qRT-PCR). In order to determine the functional role of Nrf2, siRNA-mediated knockdown studies were performed. Nrf2-knockdown in 661W cells resulted in significant exacerbation of blue light-induced reactive oxygen species levels as well as cell death. Taken together, these findings indicate that Nrf2 is an important endogenous protective factor against oxidative stress in photoreceptor cells. This suggests that drugs targeting Nrf2 could be considered as a neuroprotective strategy for photoreceptors in AMD and other retinal conditions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Tauroursodeoxycholic Acid (TUDCA) Protects Photoreceptors from Cell Death after Experimental Retinal Detachment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantopoulos, Dimosthenis; Murakami, Yusuke; Comander, Jason; Thanos, Aristomenis; Roh, Miin; Miller, Joan W.; Vavvas, Demetrios G.

    2011-01-01

    Background Detachment of photoreceptors from the underlying retinal pigment epithelium is seen in various retinal disorders such as retinal detachment and age-related macular degeneration and leads to loss of photoreceptors and vision. Pharmacologic inhibition of photoreceptor cell death may prevent this outcome. This study tests whether systemic administration of tauroursodeoxycholic acid (TUDCA) can protect photoreceptors from cell death after experimental retinal detachment in rodents. Methodology/Principal Findings Retinal detachment was created in rats by subretinal injection of hyaluronic acid. The animals were treated daily with vehicle or TUDCA (500 mg/kg). TUNEL staining was used to evaluate cell death. Photoreceptor loss was evaluated by measuring the relative thickness of the outer nuclear layer (ONL). Macrophage recruitment, oxidative stress, cytokine levels, and caspase levels were also quantified. Three days after detachment, TUDCA decreased the number of TUNEL-positive cells compared to vehicle (651±68/mm2 vs. 1314±68/mm2, P = 0.001) and prevented the reduction of ONL thickness ratio (0.84±0.03 vs. 0.65±0.03, P = 0.002). Similar results were obtained after 5 days of retinal detachment. Macrophage recruitment and expression levels of TNF-a and MCP-1 after retinal detachment were not affected by TUDCA treatment, whereas increases in activity of caspases 3 and 9 as well as carbonyl-protein adducts were almost completely inhibited by TUDCA treatment. Conclusions/Significance Systemic administration of TUDCA preserved photoreceptors after retinal detachment, and was associated with decreased oxidative stress and caspase activity. TUDCA may be used as a novel therapeutic agent for preventing vision loss in diseases that are characterized by photoreceptor detachment. PMID:21961034

  14. Strain Difference in Photoreceptor Cell Death After Retinal Detachment in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Hidetaka; Kataoka, Keiko; Tsoka, Pavlina; Connor, Kip M.; Miller, Joan W.; Vavvas, Demetrios G.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate the potential for mouse genetic background to effect photoreceptor cell death in response to experimental retinal detachment (RD). Methods. Retinal detachment was induced in three inbred mouse strains (C57BL/6, BALB/c, and B6129SF2) by subretinal injection of sodium hyaluronate. A time course of photoreceptor cell death was assessed by TUNEL assay. Total photoreceptor cell death was analyzed through comparing the outer nuclear layer (ONL)/inner nuclear layer (INL) ratio 7 days post RD. Western blot analysis or quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) were performed to assess cell death signaling, expression of endogenous neurotrophin, and levels of apoptosis inhibitors 24 hours after RD. Inflammatory cytokine secretion and inflammatory cell infiltration were quantified by ELISA and immunostaining, respectively. Results. The peak of photoreceptor cell death after RD was at 24 hours in all strains. Photoreceptor cell death as well as monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 and interleukin 6 secretion at 24 hours after RD was the highest in BALB/c, followed in order of magnitude by C57BL/6 and B6129SF2. Conversely, nerve growth factor expression and ONL/INL ratio were the lowest in BALB/c. Apoptosis signaling was higher in C57BL/6, whereas necroptosis signaling was higher in C57BL/6 and BALB/c. Autophagic signaling was higher in BALB/c. X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis (XIAP) and survivin protein levels were lower in C57BL/6 and BALB/c, respectively. Macrophage/microglia infiltration was higher in C57BL/6 and BALB/c at 24 hours after RD. Conclusions. Photoreceptor cell death after RD was significantly different among the three strains, suggesting the presence of genetic factors that affect photoreceptor cell death after RD. PMID:24854853

  15. Seasonality, distribution and taxonomic status of avian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Description of a new species is based upon morphology of gametocyte development in the peripheral blood of the avian host. This does not distinguish between morphologically identical gametocytes from different avian host families, nor is species or family level a valid taxonomic character. Thus, Haemoproteus and ...

  16. Mechanisms of avian songs and calls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Ole Næsbye

    2008-01-01

    The avian vocal organ, the syrinx, is a specialized structure located rather inaccessibly in an air sac close to the heart where the trachea bifurcates into the two primary bronchi. The syrinx of different avian taxa varies so much in position and morphology that it has been used for taxonomy. It...

  17. Avian Influenza A Virus Infections in Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in People Spread of Bird Flu Viruses Between Animals and People Examples of Human Infections with Avian Influenza A ... Influenza A (H5N1) H5N1 in Birds and Other Animals H5N1 in People Public Health Threat of Highly Pathogenic Asian Avian ...

  18. Avian Influenza Policy Analysis | IDRC - International Development ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Governments in Southeast Asia have adopted a range of policies aimed at controlling the disease in animals, preventing its spread to humans and strengthening national preparedness for an avian influenza pandemic. The Asia Partnership for Avian Influenza Research (APAIR) brings together national research agencies ...

  19. MANAGING AVIAN FLU, CARCASS MANAGEMENT & BIOSOLIDS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The avian influenza virus is discussed with emphasis on the impact to poultry and possible movement of the highly pathogenic H5N 1 virus to humans. A review is made of the worldwide effects to date of the avian influenza viruses; methods for the viruses to enter recreational wate...

  20. Mapping of the human cone transducin {alpha} subunit (GNAT2) gene to 1p13 and mutation analysis in patients with Stargardt`s disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magovcevic, I.; Weremowicz, S.; Morton, C.C. [Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Transducin {alpha} subunits are members of a large family of G-proteins and play an important role in phototransduction in rod and cone photoreceptors. We report the localization of the human cone {alpha} transducin (GNAT2) gene using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) on chromosome 1 in band p13. The recent assignment of a gene for Stargardt`s disease to the same chromosomal region by linkage analysis prompted us to investigate the possible role of GNAT2 in the pathogenesis of this disease. Stargardt`s disease is characterized by degeneration in late childhood or early adulthood of the macula of the retina, a region rich in cones. We screened patients with Stargardt`s disease, with or without peripheral cone involvement as monitored by the full-field ERG, for mutations in this gene. We investigated 66 unrelated patients including 22 with peripheral cone dysfunction for mutations in the coding region of the GNAT2 gene using polymerase chain reaction-single strand conformation polymorphism analysis (SSCP) and direct sequencing. One patient (034-16) was heterozygous for a silent change in exon VI, Asp238Asp (GAT to GAC). Two patients, one (035-005) with peripheral cone involvement and one (071-001) without peripheral cone involvement, were heterozygous for the missense change Val124Met (GTG to ATG) in exon IV. A subsequent screen of 96 unrelated, unaffected controls revealed one individual (N10) who was also heterozygous for the Val124Met alteration. We concluded that Asp238Asp and Val124Met are rare variants not causing Stargardt`s disease. Hence, no disease-specific mutations were found indicating that GNAT2 is probably not involved in the pathogenesis of most cases of Stargardt`s disease.

  1. Cone Storage and Seed Quality in Longleaf Pine

    Science.gov (United States)

    F.T. Bonner

    1987-01-01

    Immature cones of longleaf pine (Pinus palustris Mill.) can be stored for at least 5 weeks without adversely affecting extraction or seed quality. Cone moisture should be below 50 percent before using heat to open cones.

  2. Energy integration in south cone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ribeiro, M.A.K.

    1990-01-01

    The economic development of a geo-political region is directly related to the energy resources available to its productive system. The analysis carried out in this paper focus a region limited by Paraguay, Uruguay, the Argentina north and the Brazilian south, the core of the so called South Cone. The region has a diversified energy matrix that assures strong connections between the countries. The main resources available are hydroelectric but the approach gives a strong emphasis in coal and natural gas. The outlined model of a self sustained development of the region can be used as the foundation of the independent economic development of South America. (author)

  3. Rod and cone function in patients with KCNV2 retinopathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ditta Zobor

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: To investigate rod and cone function and disease mechanisms in patients with KCNV2 retinopathy. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Psychophysical examinations as well as detailed electrophysiological examinations with Ganzfeld and multifocal electroretinogram (ERG were performed to study response dynamics. Additionally, fundus photography, autofluorescence imaging and spectral domain OCTs were carried out for morphological characterization. Molecular genetic analysis revealed compound heterozygosity in five patients and homozygosity for the KCNV2 gene in one patient. The mutations resulted in complete absence of Kv8.2 subunits in three patients (no protein group, NOP, while the other three patients expressed mutant Kv8.2 subunits resulting in altered Kv2.1/Kv8.2 heteromeric or residual Kv2.1 homomeric potassium channel function (altered protein group, ALP. Although more advanced morphological changes were visible in the NOP group, a clear functional difference between the two groups could not be observed. All patients showed characteristic dynamics of the b-wave intensity-response function, however, scotopic b-wave response amplitudes were within normal limits. We also observed severely reduced oscillatory potentials. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: A specific genotype-phenotype correlation in retinal function could not be demonstrated. KCNV2 mutations cause a unique form of retinal disorder illustrating the importance of K(+-channels for the resting potential, activation and deactivation of photoreceptors, while phototransduction remains unchanged. The reduced oscillatory potentials further suggest an altered function of the inner retina. Besides the characteristically steep amplitude-versus-intensity relationship, flicker responses at intermediate frequencies (5-15 Hz are significantly reduced and shifted in phase.

  4. Intravitreal injection of ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) causes peripheral remodeling and does not prevent photoreceptor loss in canine RPGR mutant retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beltran, William A; Wen, Rong; Acland, Gregory M; Aguirre, Gustavo D

    2007-04-01

    Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) rescues photoreceptors in several animal models of retinal degeneration and is currently being evaluated as a potential treatment for retinitis pigmentosa in humans. This study was conducted to test whether CNTF prevents photoreceptor cell loss in XLPRA2, an early onset canine model of X-linked retinitis pigmentosa caused by a frameshift mutation in RPGR exon ORF15. Four different treatment regimens of CNTF were tested in XLPRA2 dogs. Under anesthesia, the animals received at different ages an intravitreal injection of 12 microg of CNTF in the left eye. The right eye served as a control and was injected with a similar volume of phosphate buffered saline (PBS). Ocular examinations were performed regularly during the treatment periods. At termination, the dogs were euthanatized, eyes collected and the retinas were processed for embedding in optimal cutting temperature (OCT) medium. The outer nuclear layer (ONL) thickness was evaluated on H&E sections and values in both CNTF- and PBS-treated eyes were compared. Morphologic alterations in the peripheral retina were characterized by immunohistochemistry using cell-specific markers. Cell proliferation in the retinas was examined on semi-thin plastic sections, and by BrdU pulse-labeling and Ki67 immunohistochemistry on cryosections. All CNTF-treated eyes showed early clinical signs of corneal epitheliopathy, subcapsular cataracts and uveitis. No statistically significant difference in ONL thickness was seen between the CNTF- and PBS-injected eyes. Prominent retinal remodeling that consisted in an abnormal increase in the number of rods, and in misplacement of some rods, cones, bipolar and Müller cells, was observed in the peripheral retina of CNTF-treated eyes. This was only seen when CNTF was in injected before the age at which the canine retina reaches full maturation. In XLPRA2 dogs, intravitreal injections of CNTF failed to prevent photoreceptors from undergoing cell death in the

  5. Intravitreal injection of ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) causes peripheral remodeling and does not prevent photoreceptor loss in canine RPGR mutant retina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beltran, William A.; Wen, Rong; Acland, Gregory M.; Aguirre, Gustavo D.

    2009-01-01

    Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) rescues photoreceptors in several animal models of retinal degeneration and is currently being evaluated as a potential treatment for retinitis pigmentosa in humans. This study was conducted to test whether CNTF prevents photoreceptor cell loss in XLPRA2, an early onset canine model of X-linked retinitis pigmentosa caused by a frameshift mutation in RPGR exon ORF15. Four different treatment regimens of CNTF were tested in XLPRA2 dogs. Under anesthesia, the animals received at different ages an intravitreal injection of 12 μg of CNTF in the left eye. The right eye served as a control and was injected with a similar volume of phosphate buffered saline (PBS). Ocular examinations were performed regularly during the treatment periods. At termination, the dogs were euthanatized, eyes collected and the retinas were processed for embedding in optimal cutting temperature (OCT) medium. The outer nuclear layer (ONL) thickness was evaluated on H&E sections and values in both CNTF- and PBS-treated eyes were compared. Morphologic alterations in the peripheral retina were characterized by immunohistochemistry using cell-specific markers. Cell proliferation in the retinas was examined on semi-thin plastic sections, and by BrdU pulse-labeling and Ki67 immunohistochemistry on cryosections. All CNTF-treated eyes showed early clinical signs of corneal epitheliopathy, subcapsular cataracts and uveitis. No statistically significant difference in ONL thickness was seen between the CNTF- and PBS-injected eyes. Prominent retinal remodeling that consisted in an abnormal increase in the number of rods, and in misplacement of some rods, cones, bipolar and Müller cells, was observed in the peripheral retina of CNTF-treated eyes. This was only seen when CNTF was in injected before the age at which the canine retina reaches full maturation. In XLPRA2 dogs, intravitreal injections of CNTF failed to prevent photoreceptors from undergoing cell death in the

  6. Correlation Between Cone Penetration Rate And Measured Cone Penetration Parameters In Silty Soils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Rikke; Nielsen, Benjaminn Nordahl; Ibsen, Lars Bo

    2013-01-01

    This paper shows, how a change in cone penetration rate affects the cone penetration measurements, hence the cone resistance, pore pressure, and sleeve friction in silty soil. The standard rate of penetration is 20 mm/s, and it is generally accepted that undrained penetration occurs in clay while...... penetration tests with varying penetration rates conducted at a test site where the subsoil primary consists of sandy silt. It is shown how a reduced penetration rate influences the cone penetration measurements e.g. the cone resistance, pore pressure, and sleeve friction....

  7. Weighted vaginal cones for urinary incontinence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbison, G Peter; Dean, Nicola

    2013-07-08

    For a long time pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT) has been the most common form of conservative (non-surgical) treatment for stress urinary incontinence (SUI). Weighted vaginal cones can be used to help women to train their pelvic floor muscles. Cones are inserted into the vagina and the pelvic floor is contracted to prevent them from slipping out. The objective of this review is to determine the effectiveness of vaginal cones in the management of female urinary stress incontinence (SUI).We wished to test the following comparisons in the management of stress incontinence: 1. vaginal cones versus no treatment; 2. vaginal cones versus other conservative therapies, such as PFMT and electrostimulation; 3. combining vaginal cones and another conservative therapy versus another conservative therapy alone or cones alone; 4. vaginal cones versus non-conservative methods, for example surgery or injectables.Secondary issues which were considered included whether:1. it takes less time to teach women to use cones than it does to teach the pelvic floor exercise; 2. self-taught use is effective;3. the change in weight of the heaviest cone that can be retained is related to the level of improvement;4. subgroups of women for whom cone use may be particularly effective can be identified. We searched the Cochrane Incontinence Group Specialised Trials Register (searched 19 September 2012), MEDLINE (January 1966 to March 2013), EMBASE (January 1988 to March 2013) and reference lists of relevant articles. Randomised or quasi-randomised controlled trials comparing weighted vaginal cones with alternative treatments or no treatment. Two reviewers independently assessed studies for inclusion and trial quality. Data were extracted by one reviewer and cross-checked by the other. Study authors were contacted for extra information. We included 23 trials involving 1806 women, of whom 717 received cones. All of the trials were small, and in many the quality was hard to judge. Outcome measures

  8. Mammalian STE20-like kinase 2, not kinase 1, mediates photoreceptor cell death during retinal detachment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, H; Murakami, Y; Kataoka, K; Lin, H; Connor, K M; Miller, J W; Zhou, D; Avruch, J; Vavvas, D G

    2014-01-01

    Photoreceptor cell death is the definitive cause of vision loss in retinal detachment (RD). Mammalian STE20-like kinase (MST) is a master regulator of both cell death and proliferation and a critical factor in development and tumorigenesis. However, to date the role of MST in neurodegeneration has not been fully explored. Utilizing MST1−/− and MST2−/− mice we identified MST2, but not MST1, as a regulator of photoreceptor cell death in a mouse model of RD. MST2−/− mice demonstrated significantly decreased photoreceptor cell death and outer nuclear layer (ONL) thinning after RD. Additionally, caspase-3 activation was attenuated in MST2−/− mice compared to control mice after RD. The transcription of p53 upregulated modulator of apoptosis (PUMA) and Fas was also reduced in MST2−/− mice post-RD. Retinas of MST2−/− mice displayed suppressed nuclear relocalization of phosphorylated YAP after RD. Consistent with the reduction of photoreceptor cell death, MST2−/− mice showed decreased levels of proinflammatory cytokines such as monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 and interleukin 6 as well as attenuated inflammatory CD11b cell infiltration during the early phase of RD. These results identify MST2, not MST1, as a critical regulator of caspase-mediated photoreceptor cell death in the detached retina and indicate its potential as a future neuroprotection target. PMID:24874741

  9. PAR-Complex and Crumbs Function During Photoreceptor Morphogenesis and Retinal Degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pichaud, Franck

    2018-01-01

    The fly photoreceptor has long been used as a model to study sensory neuron morphogenesis and retinal degeneration. In particular, elucidating how these cells are built continues to help further our understanding of the mechanisms of polarized cell morphogenesis, intracellular trafficking and the causes of human retinal pathologies. The conserved PAR complex, which in flies consists of Cdc42-PAR6-aPKC-Bazooka, and the transmembrane protein Crumbs (Crb) are key players during photoreceptor morphogenesis. While the PAR complex regulates polarity in many cell types, Crb function in polarity is relatively specific to epithelial cells. Together Cdc42-PAR6-aPKC-Bazooka and Crb orchestrate the differentiation of the photoreceptor apical membrane (AM) and zonula adherens (ZA) , thus allowing these cells to assemble into a neuro-epithelial lattice. In addition to its function in epithelial polarity, Crb has also been shown to protect fly photoreceptors from light-induced degeneration, a process linked to Rhodopsin expression and trafficking. Remarkably, mutations in the human Crumbs1 (CRB1) gene lead to retinal degeneration, making the fly photoreceptor a powerful disease model system.

  10. PAR-Complex and Crumbs Function During Photoreceptor Morphogenesis and Retinal Degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franck Pichaud

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The fly photoreceptor has long been used as a model to study sensory neuron morphogenesis and retinal degeneration. In particular, elucidating how these cells are built continues to help further our understanding of the mechanisms of polarized cell morphogenesis, intracellular trafficking and the causes of human retinal pathologies. The conserved PAR complex, which in flies consists of Cdc42-PAR6-aPKC-Bazooka, and the transmembrane protein Crumbs (Crb are key players during photoreceptor morphogenesis. While the PAR complex regulates polarity in many cell types, Crb function in polarity is relatively specific to epithelial cells. Together Cdc42-PAR6-aPKC-Bazooka and Crb orchestrate the differentiation of the photoreceptor apical membrane (AM and zonula adherens (ZA, thus allowing these cells to assemble into a neuro-epithelial lattice. In addition to its function in epithelial polarity, Crb has also been shown to protect fly photoreceptors from light-induced degeneration, a process linked to Rhodopsin expression and trafficking. Remarkably, mutations in the human Crumbs1 (CRB1 gene lead to retinal degeneration, making the fly photoreceptor a powerful disease model system.

  11. Cone Penetrometer N Factor Determination Testing Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Follett, Jordan R.

    2014-03-05

    This document contains the results of testing activities to determine the empirical 'N Factor' for the cone penetrometer in kaolin clay simulant. The N Factor is used to releate resistance measurements taken with the cone penetrometer to shear strength.

  12. A Hydraulically Operated Pine Cone Cutter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carl W. Fatzinger; M.T. Proveaux

    1971-01-01

    Mature cones of slash pine (Pinus elliottii Engelm. var. elliottii) and longleaf pine (P. palustris Mill.) can be easily bisected along their longitudinal axes with the hydraulic pine cone cutter described. This cutter eliminates the two major problems of earlier models--undue operator fatigue and the...

  13. Cones and foci for protocol verification revisited

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.J. Fokkink (Wan); J. Pang

    2002-01-01

    textabstractWe define a cones and foci proof method, which rephrases the question whether two system specifications are branching bisimilar in terms of proof obligations on relations between data objects. Compared to the original cones and foci method from Groote and Springintveld cite{GroSpr01},

  14. Cone calorimeter tests of wood composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert H. White; Kuma Sumathipala

    2013-01-01

    The cone calorimeter is widely used for the determination of the heat release rate (HRR) of building products and other materials. As part of an effort to increase the availability of cone calorimeter data on wood products, the U.S. Forest Products Laboratory and the American Wood Council conducted this study on composite wood products in cooperation with the Composite...

  15. Double Dirac cones in phononic crystals

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Yan

    2014-07-07

    A double Dirac cone is realized at the center of the Brillouin zone of a two-dimensional phononic crystal (PC) consisting of a triangular array of core-shell-structure cylinders in water. The double Dirac cone is induced by the accidental degeneracy of two double-degenerate Bloch states. Using a perturbation method, we demonstrate that the double Dirac cone is composed of two identical and overlapping Dirac cones whose linear slopes can also be accurately predicted from the method. Because the double Dirac cone occurs at a relatively low frequency, a slab of the PC can be mapped onto a slab of zero refractive index material by using a standard retrieval method. Total transmission without phase change and energy tunneling at the double Dirac point frequency are unambiguously demonstrated by two examples. Potential applications can be expected in diverse fields such as acoustic wave manipulations and energy flow control.

  16. Phenotypic diversity in autosomal-dominant cone-rod dystrophy elucidated by adaptive optics retinal imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Hongxin; Rossi, Ethan A; Stone, Edwin; Latchney, Lisa; Williams, David; Dubra, Alfredo; Chung, Mina

    2018-01-01

    Several genes causing autosomal-dominant cone-rod dystrophy (AD-CRD) have been identified. However, the mechanisms by which genetic mutations lead to cellular loss in human disease remain poorly understood. Here we combine genotyping with high-resolution adaptive optics retinal imaging to elucidate the retinal phenotype at a cellular level in patients with AD-CRD harbouring a defect in the GUCA1A gene. Nine affected members of a four-generation AD-CRD pedigree and three unaffected first-degree relatives underwent clinical examinations including visual acuity, fundus examination, Goldmann perimetry, spectral domain optical coherence tomography and electroretinography. Genome-wide scan followed by bidirectional sequencing was performed on all affected participants. High-resolution imaging using a custom adaptive optics scanning light ophthalmoscope (AOSLO) was performed for selected participants. Clinical evaluations showed a range of disease severity from normal fundus appearance in teenaged patients to pronounced macular atrophy in older patients. Molecular genetic testing showed a mutation in in GUCA1A segregating with disease. AOSLO imaging revealed that of the two teenage patients with mild disease, one had severe disruption of the photoreceptor mosaic while the other had a normal cone mosaic. AOSLO imaging demonstrated variability in the pattern of cone and rod cell loss between two teenage cousins with early AD-CRD, who had similar clinical features and had the identical disease-causing mutation in GUCA1A . This finding suggests that a mutation in GUCA1A does not lead to the same degree of AD-CRD in all patients. Modifying factors may mitigate or augment disease severity, leading to different retinal cellular phenotypes. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  17. Genetic applications in avian conservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haig, Susan M.; Bronaugh, Whitcomb M.; Crowhurst, Rachel S.; D'Elia, Jesse; Eagles-Smith, Collin A.; Epps, Clinton W.; Knaus, Brian; Miller, Mark P.; Moses, Michael L.; Oyler-McCance, Sara; Robinson, W. Douglas; Sidlauskas, Brian

    2011-01-01

    A fundamental need in conserving species and their habitats is defining distinct entities that range from individuals to species to ecosystems and beyond (Table 1; Ryder 1986, Moritz 1994, Mayden and Wood 1995, Haig and Avise 1996, Hazevoet 1996, Palumbi and Cipriano 1998, Hebert et al. 2004, Mace 2004, Wheeler et al. 2004, Armstrong and Ball 2005, Baker 2008, Ellis et al. 2010, Winker and Haig 2010). Rapid progression in this interdisciplinary field continues at an exponential rate; thus, periodic updates on theory, techniques, and applications are important for informing practitioners and consumers of genetic information. Here, we outline conservation topics for which genetic information can be helpful, provide examples of where genetic techniques have been used best in avian conservation, and point to current technical bottlenecks that prevent better use of genomics to resolve conservation issues related to birds. We hope this review will provide geneticists and avian ecologists with a mutually beneficial dialogue on how this integrated field can solve current and future problems.

  18. Avian Respiratory Coinfection and Impact on Avian Influenza Pathogenicity in Domestic Poultry: Field and Experimental Findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samy, Ahmed; Naguib, Mahmoud M

    2018-02-24

    The avian respiratory system hosts a wide range of commensal and potential pathogenic bacteria and/or viruses that interact with each other. Such interactions could be either synergistic or antagonistic, which subsequently determines the severity of the disease complex. The intensive rearing methods of poultry are responsible for the marked increase in avian respiratory diseases worldwide. The interaction between avian influenza with other pathogens can guarantee the continuous existence of other avian pathogens, which represents a global concern. A better understanding of the impact of the interaction between avian influenza virus and other avian respiratory pathogens provides a better insight into the respiratory disease complex in poultry and can lead to improved intervention strategies aimed at controlling virus spread.

  19. UV-B detected by the UVR8 photoreceptor antagonizes auxin signaling and plant shade avoidance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Scott; Velanis, Christos N; Jenkins, Gareth I; Franklin, Keara A

    2014-08-12

    Plants detect different facets of their radiation environment via specific photoreceptors to modulate growth and development. UV-B is perceived by the photoreceptor UV RESISTANCE LOCUS 8 (UVR8). The molecular mechanisms linking UVR8 activation to plant growth are not fully understood, however. When grown in close proximity to neighboring vegetation, shade-intolerant plants initiate dramatic stem elongation to overtop competitors. Here we show that UV-B, detected by UVR8, provides an unambiguous sunlight signal that inhibits shade avoidance responses in Arabidopsis thaliana by antagonizing the phytohormones auxin and gibberellin. UV-B triggers degradation of the transcription factors PHYTOCHROME INTERACTING FACTOR 4 and PHYTOCHROME INTERACTING FACTOR 5 and stabilizes growth-repressing DELLA proteins, inhibiting auxin biosynthesis via a dual mechanism. Our findings show that UVR8 signaling is closely integrated with other photoreceptor pathways to regulate auxin signaling and plant growth in sunlight.

  20. Shaggy Photoreceptors with Subfoveal Fluid Associated with a Distant Choroidal Melanoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ann Q. Tran

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To describe the enhanced depth imaging optical coherence tomography (EDI-OCT findings in a patient with an extra macula choroidal melanoma before and after treatment. Methods. Observational case report. Results. A 45 year-old Caucasian male patient was referred to retina clinic for management of choroidal melanoma. Examination revealed a nasal choroidal melanoma while EDI-OCT illustrated subfoveal fluid pocket with elongated shaggy photoreceptors distant and separate from the tumor. The patient was treated with plaque brachytherapy and intravitreal bevacizumab. One week after plaque removal, there was a dramatic reduction in the shaggy photoreceptors. Conclusion. Choroidal melanomas have effects that are not localized to the area of the tumor. This loculated pocket of subretinal fluid and coinciding changes to photoreceptor morphology may be related to global changes in choroidal function or release of tumor related cytokines.

  1. Long-term restoration of rod and cone vision by single dose rAAV-mediated gene transfer to the retina in a canine model of childhood blindness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acland, Gregory M; Aguirre, Gustavo D; Bennett, Jean; Aleman, Tomas S; Cideciyan, Artur V; Bennicelli, Jeannette; Dejneka, Nadine S; Pearce-Kelling, Susan E; Maguire, Albert M; Palczewski, Krzysztof; Hauswirth, William W; Jacobson, Samuel G

    2005-12-01

    The short- and long-term effects of gene therapy using AAV-mediated RPE65 transfer to canine retinal pigment epithelium were investigated in dogs affected with disease caused by RPE65 deficiency. Results with AAV 2/2, 2/1, and 2/5 vector pseudotypes, human or canine RPE65 cDNA, and constitutive or tissue-specific promoters were similar. Subretinally administered vectors restored retinal function in 23 of 26 eyes, but intravitreal injections consistently did not. Photoreceptoral and postreceptoral function in both rod and cone systems improved with therapy. In dogs followed electroretinographically for 3 years, responses remained stable. Biochemical analysis of retinal retinoids indicates that mutant dogs have no detectable 11-cis-retinal, but markedly elevated retinyl esters. Subretinal AAV-RPE65 treatment resulted in detectable 11-cis-retinal expression, limited to treated areas. RPE65 protein expression was limited to retinal pigment epithelium of treated areas. Subretinal AAV-RPE65 vector is well tolerated and does not elicit high antibody levels to the vector or the protein in ocular fluids or serum. In long-term studies, wild-type cDNA is expressed only in target cells. Successful, stable restoration of rod and cone photoreceptor function in these dogs has important implications for treatment of human patients affected with Leber congenital amaurosis caused by RPE65 mutations.

  2. Avian influenza in shorebirds: experimental infection of ruddy turnstones (Arenaria interpres) with avian influenza virus

    OpenAIRE

    Hall, Jeffrey S.; Krauss, Scott; Franson, J. Christian; TeSlaa, Joshua L.; Nashold, Sean W.; Stallknecht, David E.; Webby, Richard J.; Webster, Robert G.

    2012-01-01

    Please cite this paper as: Hall et al. (2012) Avian influenza in shorebirds: experimental infection of ruddy turnstones (Arenaria interpres) with avian influenza virus. Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses DOI: 10.1111/j.1750‐2659.2012.00358.x. Background  Low pathogenic avian influenza viruses (LPAIV) have been reported in shorebirds, especially at Delaware Bay, USA, during spring migration. However, data on patterns of virus excretion, minimal infectious doses, and clinical outcome are l...

  3. Calcium homeostasis in photoreceptor cells of Drosophila mutants inaC and trp studied with the pupil mechanism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofstee, CA; Stavenga, DG

    1996-01-01

    The light-driven pupil mechanism, consisting of an assembly of mobile pigment granules inside the photoreceptor cells, has been investigated by in vivo reflection microspectrophotometry in wild type (WT) Drosophila and in the photoreceptor mutants inaC and trp. The pupillary response of a

  4. Edaravone, an ROS Scavenger, Ameliorates Photoreceptor Cell Death after Experimental Retinal Detachment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roh, Mi In; Murakami, Yusuke; Thanos, Aristomenis; Miller, Joan W.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. To investigate whether edaravone (3-methyl-1-phenyl-2-pyrazolin-5-one), a free radical scavenger, would be neuroprotective against photoreceptor cell death in a rat model of retinal detachment (RD). Methods. RD was induced in adult Brown Norway rats by subretinal injection of sodium hyaluronate. Edaravone (3, 5, or 10 mg/kg) or physiologic saline was administered intraperitoneally once a day until death on day 3 or 5. Oxidative stress in the retina was assessed by 4-hydroxynonenal staining or ELISA for protein carbonyl content. Photoreceptor death was assessed by TUNEL and measurement of the outer nuclear layer thickness. Western blot analysis and caspase activity assays were performed. Inflammatory cytokine secretion and inflammatory cell infiltration were evaluated by ELISA and immunostaining, respectively. Results. RD resulted in increased generation of ROS. Treatment with 5 mg/kg edaravone significantly reduced the ROS level, along with a decrease in TUNEL-positive cells in the photoreceptor layer. A caspase assay also confirmed decreased activation of caspase-3, -8, and -9 in RD treated with edaravone. The level of the antiapoptotic Bcl-2 was increased in detached retinas after edaravone treatment, whereas the levels of the stress-activated p-ERK1/2 were decreased. In addition, edaravone treatment resulted in a significant decrease in the levels of TNF-α, MCP-1, and macrophage infiltration. Conclusions. Oxidative stress plays an important role in photoreceptor cell death after RD. Edaravone treatment may aid in preventing photoreceptor cell death after RD by suppressing ROS-induced photoreceptor damage. PMID:21310909

  5. Circadian plasticity in photoreceptor cells controls visual coding efficiency in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Barth

    Full Text Available In the fly Drosophila melanogaster, neuronal plasticity of synaptic terminals in the first optic neuropil, or lamina, depends on early visual experience within a critical period after eclosion. The current study revealed two additional and parallel mechanisms involved in this type of synaptic terminal plasticity. First, an endogenous circadian rhythm causes daily oscillations in the volume of photoreceptor cell terminals. Second, daily visual experience precisely modulates the circadian time course and amplitude of the volume oscillations that the photoreceptor-cell terminals undergo. Both mechanisms are separable in their molecular basis. We suggest that the described neuronal plasticity in Drosophila ensures continuous optimal performance of the visual system over the course of a 24 h-day. Moreover, the sensory system of Drosophila cannot only account for predictable, but also for acute, environmental changes. The volumetric changes in the synaptic terminals of photoreceptor cells are accompanied by circadian and light-induced changes of presynaptic ribbons as well as extensions of epithelial glial cells into the photoreceptor terminals, suggesting that the architecture of the lamina is altered by both visual exposure and the circadian clock. Clock-mutant analysis and the rescue of PER protein rhythmicity exclusively in all R1-6 cells revealed that photoreceptor-cell plasticity is autonomous and sufficient to control visual behavior. The strength of a visually guided behavior, the optomotor turning response, co-varies with synaptic-terminal volume oscillations of photoreceptor cells when elicited at low light levels. Our results show that behaviorally relevant adaptive processing of visual information is performed, in part, at the level of visual input level.

  6. No evidence for a genetic blueprint: The case of the "complex" mammalian photoreceptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G Kumaramanickavel

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite the intensity of the search for genes causing inherited retinal degenerations over the past 3 decades, of the approximately 200 disease genes identified to date, all appear to be ordinary housekeeping genes specifying proteins playing basic structural and functional roles in the mature photoreceptor cells. No genes or genetic elements have been identified which can be construed as having a specific morphogenic role, directing the development of the cytoarchitecture of any particular retinal cell. The evidence suggests that the cytoarchitecture of the retinal photoreceptors, although enormously complex, arises from the self-organization of the cells constituents without any regulation or direction from an external genetic blueprint.

  7. Parafoveal retinal cone mosaic imaging in children with ultra-compact switchable SLO/OCT handheld probe (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaRocca, Francesco; Nankivil, Derek; DuBose, Theodore B.; Toth, Cynthia A.; Farsiu, Sina; Izatt, Joseph A.

    2016-03-01

    In vivo photoreceptor imaging has enhanced the way vision scientists and ophthalmologists understand the retinal structure, function, and etiology of numerous retinal pathologies. However, the complexity and large footprint of current systems capable of resolving photoreceptors has limited imaging to patients who are able to sit in an upright position and fixate for several minutes. Unfortunately, this excludes an important fraction of patients including bedridden patients, small children, and infants. Here, we show that our dual-modality, high-resolution handheld probe with a weight of only 94 g is capable of visualizing photoreceptors in supine children. Our device utilizes a microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) scanner and a novel telescope design to achieve over an order of magnitude reduction in size compared to similar systems. The probe has a 7° field of view and a lateral resolution of 8 µm. The optical coherence tomography (OCT) system has an axial resolution of 7 µm and a sensitivity of 101 dB. High definition scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (SLO) and OCT images were acquired from children ranging from 14 months to 12 years of age with and without pathology during examination under anesthesia in the operating room. Parafoveal cone imaging was shown using the SLO arm of this device without adaptive optics using a 3° FOV for the first time in children under 4 years old. This work lays the foundation for pediatric research, which will improve understanding of retinal development, maldevelopment and early onset of diseases at the cellular level during the beginning stages of human growth.

  8. Chemically-induced photoreceptor degeneration and protection in mouse iPSC-derived three-dimensional retinal organoids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shin-ichiro Ito

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs, which can be differentiated into various tissues and cell types, have been used for clinical research and disease modeling. Self-organizing three-dimensional (3D tissue engineering has been established within the past decade and enables researchers to obtain tissues and cells that almost mimic in vivo development. However, there are no reports of practical experimental procedures that reproduce photoreceptor degeneration. In this study, we induced photoreceptor cell death in mouse iPSC-derived 3D retinal organoids (3D-retinas by 4-hydroxytamoxifen (4-OHT, which induces photoreceptor degeneration in mouse retinal explants, and then established a live-cell imaging system to measure degeneration-related properties. Furthermore, we quantified the protective effects of representative ophthalmic supplements for treating the photoreceptor degeneration. This drug evaluation system enables us to monitor drug effects in photoreceptor cells and could be useful for drug screening.

  9. The southern cone petroleum market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pisani, W.

    1992-01-01

    The Argentine oil sector has been moving strongly toward complete deregulation since 1989. Price controls on byproducts has been lifted, old petroleum contracts became into concessions, and the state oil company, YPF, is under process of privatization. In this context, the international companies scouting for opportunities can find an important menu of potential investments But here remain some problems connected with this deregulation, too. The lack of a reference crude and product market price is one of them. This paper focuses how to overcome this trouble with the establishment of an institutional market for crude and products, not only for Argentina but also for the entire Southern Cone Region (Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Paraguay and Uruguay), inquiring into the benefits of its creation

  10. Lyapunov Functions and Cone Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barreira, Luis; Dragičević, Davor; Valls, Claudia

    2012-07-01

    We describe systematically the relation between Lyapunov functions and nonvanishing Lyapunov exponents, both for maps and flows. This includes a brief survey of the existing results in the area. In particular, we consider separately the cases of nonpositive and arbitrary Lyapunov functions, thus yielding optimal criteria for negativity and positivity of the Lyapunov exponents of linear cocycles over measure-preserving transformations. Moreover, we describe converse results of these criteria with the explicit construction of eventually strict Lyapunov functions for any map or flow with nonzero Lyapunov exponents. We also construct examples showing that in general the existence of an eventually strict invariant cone family does not imply the existence of an eventually strict Lyapunov function.

  11. Dirac cones in isogonal hexagonal metallic structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kang

    2018-03-01

    A honeycomb hexagonal metallic lattice is equivalent to a triangular atomic one and cannot create Dirac cones in its electromagnetic wave spectrum. We study in this work the low-frequency electromagnetic band structures in isogonal hexagonal metallic lattices that are directly related to the honeycomb one and show that such structures can create Dirac cones. The band formation can be described by a tight-binding model that allows investigating, in terms of correlations between local resonance modes, the condition for the Dirac cones and the consequence of the third structure tile sustaining an extra resonance mode in the unit cell that induces band shifts and thus nonlinear deformation of the Dirac cones following the wave vectors departing from the Dirac points. We show further that, under structure deformation, the deformations of the Dirac cones result from two different correlation mechanisms, both reinforced by the lattice's metallic nature, which directly affects the resonance mode correlations. The isogonal structures provide new degrees of freedom for tuning the Dirac cones, allowing adjustment of the cone shape by modulating the structure tiles at the local scale without modifying the lattice periodicity and symmetry.

  12. Avian Habitat Data; Seward Peninsula, Alaska, 2012

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of the Interior — This data product contains avian habitat data collected on the Seward Peninsula, Alaska, USA, during 21 May – 10 June 2012. We conducted replicated 10-min surveys...

  13. Cone penetrometer moisture probe acceptance test report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnes, G.A.

    1996-04-23

    This Acceptance Test Report (ATR) documents the results of WHC-SD-WM-ATP-146 (Prototype Cone Penetrometer Moisture Probe Acceptance Test Procedure) and WHC-SD-WM-ATP-145 (Cone Penetrometer Moisture Probe Acceptance Test Procedure). The master copy of WHC-SD-WM-ATP-145 can be found in Appendix A and the master copy of WHC-SD-WM-ATP-146 can be found in Appendix B. Also included with this report is a matrix showing design criteria of the cone penetrometer moisture probe and the verification method used (Appendix C).

  14. Isolation of avian influenza virus in Texas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, S E; Naqi, S A; Grumbles, L C

    1981-01-01

    An avian influenza virus with surface antigens similar to those of fowl plague virus (Hav 1 Nav 2) was isolated in 1979 from 2 commercial turkey flocks in Central Texas. Two flocks in contact with these infected flocks developed clinical signs, gross lesions, and seroconversion but yielded no virus. This was the first recorded incidence of clinical avian influenza in Texas turkeys and only the second time that an agent with these surface antigens was isolated from turkeys in U.S.

  15. Ecology and conservation biology of avian malaria

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaPointe, Dennis A.; Atkinson, Carter T.; Samuel, Michael D.

    2012-01-01

    Avian malaria is a worldwide mosquito-borne disease caused by Plasmodium parasites. These parasites occur in many avian species but primarily affect passerine birds that have not evolved with the parasite. Host pathogenicity, fitness, and population impacts are poorly understood. In contrast to continental species, introduced avian malaria poses a substantial threat to naive birds on Hawaii, the Galapagos, and other archipelagoes. In Hawaii, transmission is maintained by susceptible native birds, competence and abundance of mosquitoes, and a disease reservoir of chronically infected native birds. Although vector habitat and avian communities determine the geographic distribution of disease, climate drives transmission patterns ranging from continuous high infection in warm lowland forests, seasonal infection in midelevation forests, and disease-free refugia in cool high-elevation forests. Global warming is expected to increase the occurrence, distribution, and intensity of avian malaria across this elevational gradient and threaten high-elevation refugia, which is the key to survival of many susceptible Hawaiian birds. Increased temperatures may have already increased global avian malaria prevalence and contributed to an emergence of disease in New Zealand.

  16. Hypoxic preconditioning protects photoreceptors against light damage independently of hypoxia inducible transcription factors in rods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kast, Brigitte; Schori, Christian; Grimm, Christian

    2016-05-01

    Hypoxic preconditioning protects photoreceptors against light-induced degeneration preserving retinal morphology and function. Although hypoxia inducible transcription factors 1 and 2 (HIF1, HIF2) are the main regulators of the hypoxic response, photoreceptor protection does not depend on HIF1 in rods. Here we used rod-specific Hif2a single and Hif1a;Hif2a double knockout mice to investigate the potential involvement of HIF2 in rods for protection after hypoxic preconditioning. To identify potential HIF2 target genes in rods we determined the retinal transcriptome of hypoxic control and rod-specific Hif2a knockouts by RNA sequencing. We show that rods do not need HIF2 for hypoxia-induced increased survival after light exposure. The transcriptomic analysis revealed a number of genes that are potentially regulated by HIF2 in rods; among those were Htra1, Timp3 and Hmox1, candidates that are interesting due to their connection to human degenerative diseases of the retina. We conclude that neither HIF1 nor HIF2 are required in photoreceptors for protection by hypoxic preconditioning. We hypothesize that HIF transcription factors may be needed in other cells to produce protective factors acting in a paracrine fashion on photoreceptor cells. Alternatively, hypoxic preconditioning induces a rod-intrinsic response that is independent of HIF transcription factors. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Rhodopsin coexpression in UV photoreceptors of Aedes aegypti and Anopheles gambiae mosquitoes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xiaobang; Leming, Matthew T; Whaley, Michelle A; O'Tousa, Joseph E

    2014-03-15

    Differential rhodopsin gene expression within specialized R7 photoreceptor cells divides the retinas of Aedes aegypti and Anopheles gambiae mosquitoes into distinct domains. The two species express the rhodopsin orthologs Aaop8 and Agop8, respectively, in a large subset of these R7 photoreceptors that function as ultraviolet receptors. We show here that a divergent subfamily of mosquito rhodopsins, Aaop10 and Agop10, is coexpressed in these R7 photoreceptors. The properties of the A. aegypti Aaop8 and Aaop10 rhodopsins were analyzed by creating transgenic Drosophila expressing these rhodopsins. Electroretinogram recordings, and spectral analysis of head extracts, obtained from the Aaop8 strain confirmed that Aaop8 is an ultraviolet-sensitive rhodopsin. Aaop10 was poorly expressed and capable of eliciting only small and slow light responses in Drosophila photoreceptors, and electroretinogram analysis suggested that it is a long-wavelength rhodopsin with a maximal sensitivity near 500 nm. Thus, coexpression of Aaop10 rhodopsin with Aaop8 rhodopsin has the potential to modify the spectral properties of mosquito ultraviolet receptors. Retention of Op10 rhodopsin family members in the genomes of Drosophila species suggests that this rhodopsin family may play a conserved role in insect vision.

  18. Photoactivation mechanisms of flavin-binding photoreceptors revealed through ultrafast spectroscopy and global analysis methods.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mathes, T.; van Stokkum, I.H.M.; Kennis, J.T.M.

    2014-01-01

    Flavin-binding photoreceptor proteins use the isoalloxazine moiety of flavin cofactors to absorb light in the blue/UV-A wavelength region and subsequently translate it into biological information. The underlying photochemical reactions and protein structural dynamics are delicately tuned by the

  19. Whole-body photoreceptor networks are independent of 'lenses' in brittle stars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumner-Rooney, Lauren; Rahman, Imran A; Sigwart, Julia D; Ullrich-Lüter, Esther

    2018-01-31

    Photoreception and vision are fundamental aspects of animal sensory biology and ecology, but important gaps remain in our understanding of these processes in many species. The colour-changing brittle star Ophiocoma wendtii is iconic in vision research, speculatively possessing a unique whole-body visual system that incorporates information from nerve bundles underlying thousands of crystalline 'microlenses'. The hypothesis that these might form a sophisticated compound eye-like system regulated by chromatophores has been extensively reiterated, with investigations into biomimetic optics and similar supposedly 'visual' structures in living and fossil taxa. However, no photoreceptors or visual behaviours have ever been identified. We present the first evidence of photoreceptor networks in three Ophiocoma species, both with and without microlenses and colour-changing behaviour. High-resolution microscopy, immunohistochemistry and synchrotron tomography demonstrate that putative photoreceptors cover the animals' oral, lateral and aboral surfaces, but are absent at the hypothesized focal points of the microlenses. The structural optics of these crystal 'lenses' are an exaptation and do not fulfil any apparent visual role. This contradicts previous studies, yet the photoreceptor network in Ophiocoma appears even more widespread than previously anticipated, both taxonomically and anatomically. © 2018 The Author(s).

  20. Disruption of intraflagellar protein transport in photoreceptor cilia causes Leber congenital amaurosis in humans and mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boldt, K.; Mans, D.A.; Won, J.; Reeuwijk, J. van; Vogt, A.; Kinkl, N.; Letteboer, S.J.F.; Hicks, W.L.; Hurd, R.E.; Naggert, J.K.; Texier, Y.; Hollander, A.I. den; Koenekoop, R.K.; Bennett, J.; Cremers, F.P.M.; Gloeckner, C.J.; Nishina, P.M.; Roepman, R.; Ueffing, M.

    2011-01-01

    The mutations that cause Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA) lead to photoreceptor cell death at an early age, causing childhood blindness. To unravel the molecular basis of LCA, we analyzed how mutations in LCA5 affect the connectivity of the encoded protein lebercilin at the interactome level. In

  1. Photoreceptor spectral sensitivities of the Small White butterfly Pieris rapae crucivora interpreted with optical modeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stavenga, Doekele G.; Arikawa, Kentaro

    The compound eye of the Small White butterfly, Pieris rapae crucivora, has four classes of visual pigments, with peak absorption in the ultraviolet, violet, blue and green, but electrophysiological recordings yielded eight photoreceptors classes: an ultraviolet, violet, blue, double-peaked blue,

  2. Light dependence of calcium and membrane potential measured in blowfly photoreceptors in vivo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oberwinkler, J; Stavenga, DG

    Light adaptation in insect photoreceptors is caused by an increase in the cytosolic Ca2+ concentration. To better understand this process, we measured the cytosolic Ca2+ concentration in vivo as a function of adapting light intensity in the white-eyed blowfly mutant chalky. We developed a technique

  3. Light-dependent pigment migration in blowfly photoreceptors studied by in vivo CLSM

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stavenga, DG; Leertouwer, HL; Smits, RP

    The light-dependent migration of pigment granules in the soma of fly photoreceptors has been studied in vivo with a fast confocal laser scanning microscope. Images as well as photometric measurements were obtained in the reflection and fluorescence modes. Measurements at the single cell level were

  4. Melanopsin-expressing amphioxus photoreceptors transduce light via a phospholipase C signaling cascade.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Manuel Angueyra

    Full Text Available Melanopsin, the receptor molecule that underlies light sensitivity in mammalian 'circadian' receptors, is homologous to invertebrate rhodopsins and has been proposed to operate via a similar signaling pathway. Its downstream effectors, however, remain elusive. Melanopsin also expresses in two distinct light-sensitive cell types in the neural tube of amphioxus. This organism is the most basal extant chordate and can help outline the evolutionary history of different photoreceptor lineages and their transduction mechanisms; moreover, isolated amphioxus photoreceptors offer unique advantages, because they are unambiguously identifiable and amenable to single-cell physiological assays. In the present study whole-cell patch clamp recording, pharmacological manipulations, and immunodetection were utilized to investigate light transduction in amphioxus photoreceptors. A G(q was identified and selectively localized to the photosensitive microvillar membrane, while the pivotal role of phospholipase C was established pharmacologically. The photocurrent was profoundly depressed by IP₃ receptor antagonists, highlighting the importance of IP₃ receptors in light signaling. By contrast, surrogates of diacylglycerol (DAG, as well as poly-unsaturated fatty acids failed to activate a membrane conductance or to alter the light response. The results strengthen the notion that calcium released from the ER via IP₃-sensitive channels may fulfill a key role in conveying--directly or indirectly--the melanopsin-initiated light signal to the photoconductance; moreover, they challenge the dogma that microvillar photoreceptors and phoshoinositide-based light transduction are a prerogative of invertebrate eyes.

  5. Impaired Mitochondrial Energy Production Causes Light-Induced Photoreceptor Degeneration Independent of Oxidative Stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manish Jaiswal

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Two insults often underlie a variety of eye diseases including glaucoma, optic atrophy, and retinal degeneration--defects in mitochondrial function and aberrant Rhodopsin trafficking. Although mitochondrial defects are often associated with oxidative stress, they have not been linked to Rhodopsin trafficking. In an unbiased forward genetic screen designed to isolate mutations that cause photoreceptor degeneration, we identified mutations in a nuclear-encoded mitochondrial gene, ppr, a homolog of human LRPPRC. We found that ppr is required for protection against light-induced degeneration. Its function is essential to maintain membrane depolarization of the photoreceptors upon repetitive light exposure, and an impaired phototransduction cascade in ppr mutants results in excessive Rhodopsin1 endocytosis. Moreover, loss of ppr results in a reduction in mitochondrial RNAs, reduced electron transport chain activity, and reduced ATP levels. Oxidative stress, however, is not induced. We propose that the reduced ATP level in ppr mutants underlies the phototransduction defect, leading to increased Rhodopsin1 endocytosis during light exposure, causing photoreceptor degeneration independent of oxidative stress. This hypothesis is bolstered by characterization of two other genes isolated in the screen, pyruvate dehydrogenase and citrate synthase. Their loss also causes a light-induced degeneration, excessive Rhodopsin1 endocytosis and reduced ATP without concurrent oxidative stress, unlike many other mutations in mitochondrial genes that are associated with elevated oxidative stress and light-independent photoreceptor demise.

  6. Calcium transients in the rhabdomeres of dark- and light-adapted fly photoreceptor cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oberwinkler, J; Stavenga, DG

    2000-01-01

    The light response of fly photoreceptor cells is modulated by changes in free Ca2+ concentration. Fly phototransduction and most processes regulating it take place in or very close to the rhabdomere. We therefore measured the kinetics and the absolute values of the free Ca2+ concentration in the

  7. Effective delivery of recombinant proteins to rod photoreceptors via lipid nanovesicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asteriti, Sabrina [Dept. of Translational Research, University of Pisa, Pisa (Italy); Dal Cortivo, Giuditta [Dept. of Life Sciences and Reproduction, University of Verona, Strada Le Grazie 8, Verona (Italy); Pontelli, Valeria [Dept. of Neurological and Movement Sciences, University of Verona, Strada Le Grazie 8, Verona (Italy); Cangiano, Lorenzo [Dept. of Translational Research, University of Pisa, Pisa (Italy); Buffelli, Mario, E-mail: mario.buffelli@univr.it [Dept. of Neurological and Movement Sciences, University of Verona, Strada Le Grazie 8, Verona (Italy); Center for Biomedical Computing, University of Verona, Strada le Grazie 8, 37134 Verona (Italy); Dell’Orco, Daniele, E-mail: daniele.dellorco@univr.it [Dept. of Life Sciences and Reproduction, University of Verona, Strada Le Grazie 8, Verona (Italy); Center for Biomedical Computing, University of Verona, Strada le Grazie 8, 37134 Verona (Italy)

    2015-06-12

    The potential of liposomes to deliver functional proteins in retinal photoreceptors and modulate their physiological response was investigated by two experimental approaches. First, we treated isolated mouse retinas with liposomes encapsulating either recoverin, an important endogenous protein operating in visual phototransduction, or antibodies against recoverin. We then intravitrally injected in vivo liposomes encapsulating either rhodamin B or recoverin and we investigated the distribution in retina sections by confocal microscopy. The content of liposomes was found to be released in higher amount in the photoreceptor layer than in the other regions of the retina and the functional effects of the release were in line with the current model of phototransduction. Our study sets the basis for quantitative investigations aimed at assessing the potential of intraocular protein delivery via biocompatible nanovesicles, with promising implications for the treatment of retinal diseases affecting the photoreceptor layer. - Highlights: • Recombinant proteins encapsulated in nano-sized liposomes injected intravitreally reach retinal photoreceptors. • The phototransduction cascade in rods is modulated by the liposome content. • Mathematical modeling predicts the alteration of the photoresponses following liposome fusion.

  8. Spectral and directional reflectance of the fovea in diabetes mellitus: Photoreceptor integrity, macular pigment and lens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zagers, N.P.A.; Pot, M.C.A.; Norren, D. van

    2005-01-01

    Our aim was to assess the integrity of the photoreceptors in the fovea, and to measure the optical density of the macular pigment and the eye lens in patients with diabetes mellitus, and to compare the results with those of a group of healthy subjects. The directional and spectral properties of the

  9. Spectral Sensitivity of Blowfly Photoreceptors : Dependence on Waveguide Effects and Pigment Concentration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smakman, J.G.J.; Stavenga, D.G.

    1986-01-01

    Spectral and polarization sensitivities of blowfly R1-6 photoreceptor cells were measured by intracellular recordings in cells which differed in visual pigment content. The spectral sensitivity in the visible wavelength range can be quantitatively explained from the absorption spectrum of blowfly

  10. The genetics of some planthormones and photoreceptors in Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koornneef, M.

    1982-01-01

    This thesis describes the isolation and characterization in Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. of induced mutants, deficient for gibberellins (GA's), abscisic acid (ABA) and photoreceptors.

    These compounds are known to regulate various facets of plant growth and

  11. AA/12-lipoxygenase signaling contributes to inhibitory learning in Hermissenda Type B photoreceptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tony L Walker

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Conditioned inhibition (CI is a major category of associative learning that occurs when an organism learns that one stimulus predicts the absence of another. In addition to being important in its own right, CI is interesting because its occurrence implies that the organism has formed an association between stimuli that are non-coincident. In contrast to other categories of associative learning that are dependent upon temporal contiguity (pairings of stimuli, the neurobiology of CI is virtually unexplored. We have previously described a simple form of CI learning in Hermissenda, whereby animals’ phototactic behavior is increased by repeated exposures to explicitly unpaired (EU presentations of light and rotation. EU conditioning also produces characteristic reductions in the excitability and light response, and increases several somatic K+ currents in Type B photoreceptors. Type B photoreceptors are a major site of plasticity for classical conditioning in Hermissenda. Because arachidonic acid (AA and/or its metabolites open diverse K+ channels in many cell types, we examined the potential contribution of AA to CI. Our results indicate that AA contributes to one of the major effects of EU-conditioning on Type B photoreceptors: decreases in light-evoked spike activity. We find that AA increases the transient (IA somatic K+ current in Type B photoreceptors, further mimicking CI training. In addition, our results indicate that metabolism of AA by a 12-lipoxygenase enzyme is critical for these effects of AA, and further that 12-lipoxygenase metabolites are apparently generated during CI training.

  12. Angular and spectral sensitivity of fly photoreceptors. I. Integrated facet lens and rhabdomere optics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stavenga, D.G.

    Three optical components of a fly’s eye determine the angular sensitivity of the photoreceptors: the light diffracting facet lens, the wave-guiding rhabdomere and the light-absorbing visual pigment in the rhabdomere. How the integrated optical system of the fly eye shapes the angular sensitivity

  13. Genetics Home Reference: cone-rod dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... common cause of autosomal recessive cone-rod dystrophy , accounting for 30 to 60 percent of cases. At ... Patient Support and Advocacy Resources (4 links) American Foundation for the Blind Foundation Fighting Blindness Retina International ...

  14. Work plan for cone penetrometer comparison testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    The work plan and experimental design are developed around aiding engineers and geologists within the : Wisconsin Department of Transportation to understand the mechanisms controlling cone penetration test : results so that they can decide when the t...

  15. The Auxiliary Calcium Channel Subunit α2δ4 Is Required for Axonal Elaboration, Synaptic Transmission, and Wiring of Rod Photoreceptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuchen; Fehlhaber, Katherine E; Sarria, Ignacio; Cao, Yan; Ingram, Norianne T; Guerrero-Given, Debbie; Throesch, Ben; Baldwin, Kristin; Kamasawa, Naomi; Ohtsuka, Toshihisa; Sampath, Alapakkam P; Martemyanov, Kirill A

    2017-03-22

    Neural circuit wiring relies on selective synapse formation whereby a presynaptic release apparatus is matched with its cognate postsynaptic machinery. At metabotropic synapses, the molecular mechanisms underlying this process are poorly understood. In the mammalian retina, rod photoreceptors form selective contacts with rod ON-bipolar cells by aligning the presynaptic voltage-gated Ca 2+ channel directing glutamate release (Ca V 1.4) with postsynaptic mGluR6 receptors. We show this coordination requires an extracellular protein, α2δ4, which complexes with Ca V 1.4 and the rod synaptogenic mediator, ELFN1, for trans-synaptic alignment with mGluR6. Eliminating α2δ4 in mice abolishes rod synaptogenesis and synaptic transmission to rod ON-bipolar cells, and disrupts postsynaptic mGluR6 clustering. We further find that in rods, α2δ4 is crucial for organizing synaptic ribbons and setting Ca V 1.4 voltage sensitivity. In cones, α2δ4 is essential for Ca V 1.4 function, but is not required for ribbon organization, synaptogenesis, or synaptic transmission. These findings offer insights into retinal pathologies associated with α2δ4 dysfunction. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. On the Kleiman-Mori cone

    OpenAIRE

    Fujino, Osamu

    2005-01-01

    The Kleiman-Mori cone plays important roles in the birational geometry. In this paper, we construct complete varieties whose Kleiman-Mori cones have interesting properties. First, we construct a simple and explicit example of complete non-projective singular varieties for which Kleiman's ampleness criterion does not hold. More precisely, we construct a complete non-projective toric variety $X$ and a line bundle $L$ on $X$ such that $L$ is positive on $\\overline{\\mathit{NE...

  17. Light-cone superspace BPS theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hearin, Patrick

    2011-05-01

    The BPS bound is formulated in light-cone superspace for the N=4 super-Yang-Mills theory. As a consequence of the superalgebra all momenta are shown to be expressed as a quadratic form in the relevant supertransformations, and these forms are used to derive the light-cone superspace BPS equations. Finally, the superfield expressions are expanded out to component form, and the Wu-Yang monopole boosted to the infinite momentum frame is shown to be a solution.

  18. Modified superstring in light cone gauge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamimura, Kiyoshi; Tatewaki, Machiko.

    1988-01-01

    We analyze the covariant superstring theory proposed by Siegel in light cone gauge. The physical states are the direct product of those of Green-Schwarz Superstring and the additional internal space spanned by light cone spinors. At clasical level, there is no difference among observables in Siegel's modified Superstring theory (SMST) and Green-Schwarz's one (GSST). However SMST can not be quantized with additional constraints as the physical state conditions. (author)

  19. Design of a trichromatic cone array.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Garrigan

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Cones with peak sensitivity to light at long (L, medium (M and short (S wavelengths are unequal in number on the human retina: S cones are rare (<10% while increasing in fraction from center to periphery, and the L/M cone proportions are highly variable between individuals. What optical properties of the eye, and statistical properties of natural scenes, might drive this organization? We found that the spatial-chromatic structure of natural scenes was largely symmetric between the L, M and S sensitivity bands. Given this symmetry, short wavelength attenuation by ocular media gave L/M cones a modest signal-to-noise advantage, which was amplified, especially in the denser central retina, by long-wavelength accommodation of the lens. Meanwhile, total information represented by the cone mosaic remained relatively insensitive to L/M proportions. Thus, the observed cone array design along with a long-wavelength accommodated lens provides a selective advantage: it is maximally informative.

  20. Stress Reaction in Outer Segments of Photoreceptors after Blue Light Irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ader, Marius; Brunssen, Coy; Bramke, Silvia; Morawietz, Henning; Funk, Richard H. W.

    2013-01-01

    The retina is prone to oxidative stress from many factors which are also involved in the pathogenesis of degenerative diseases. In this study, we used the application of blue light as a physiological stress factor. The aim of this study was to identify the major source of intracellular ROS that mediates blue light-induced detrimental effects on cells which may lead to cytotoxicity. We hypothesized that outer segments are the major source of blue light induced ROS generation. In photoreceptors, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase (Nox) enzymes and the recently found respiratory chain complexes may represent a major source for reactive oxygen species (ROS), beside mitochondria and chromophores. Therefore, we investigated this hypothesis and analysed the exact localization of the ROS source in photoreceptors in an organotypic culture system for mouse retinas. Whole eyeball cultures were irradiated with visible blue light (405 nm) with an output power of 1 mW/cm2. Blue light impingement lead to an increase of ROS production (detected by H2DCFDA in live retinal explants), which was particularly strong in the photoreceptor outer segments. Nox-2 and Nox-4 proteins are sources of ROS in blue light irradiated photoreceptors; the Nox inhibitor apocynin decreased ROS stimulated by blue light. Concomitantly, enzyme SOD-1, a member of the antioxidant defense system, indicator molecules of protein oxidation (CML) and lipid oxidation (MDA and 4-HNE) were also increased in the outer segments. Interestingly, outer segments showed a mitochondrial-like membrane potential which was demonstrated using two dyes (JC-1 and TMRE) normally exclusively associated with mitochondria. As in mitochondria, these dyes indicated a decrease of the membrane potential in hypoxic states or cell stress situations. The present study demonstrates that ROS generation and oxidative stress occurs directly in the outer segments of photoreceptors after blue light irradiation. PMID

  1. Structure and cellular physiology of Ca2+ stores in invertebrate photoreceptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walz, B; Baumann, O

    1995-10-01

    Invertebrate microvillar photoreceptors contain an extensive, morphologically continuous endoplasmic reticulum (ER) that comprises several distinct subregions. Most prominent is the smooth submicrovillar ER, a sponge-like cisternal network underneath the photoreceptive microvillar membrane. The submicrovillar ER spatially separates the microvilli and a narrow space of submicrovillar cytoplasm from the remaining cell body, and, thus, defines a transduction compartment. In bee and locust photoreceptors, the shape and position of these submicrovillar ER cisternae is maintained by interaction with actin filaments. The structural layout of the ER is either rather static, or, in some invertebrate species, the ER undergoes dramatic rearrangements during illumination. The submicrovillar ER has a high Ca content in dark-adapted cells (47.5 mmol/kg dry weight in bee photoreceptors), and acts as a source and sink for Ca2+ mobilized by illumination. About 50% of the Ca content is released by a 3 s, non-saturating light stimulus, and an almost equimolar amount of Mg is taken up to maintain electroneutrality within the ER. Ca2+ release is initiated by Ins(1,4,5)P3. In addition, the submicrovillar ER contains a heparin-insensitive, caffeine- and ryanodine-sensitive Ca2+ release pathway in bee photoreceptors. Both the Ins(1,4,5)P3-dependent and the ryanodine-sensitive Ca2+ release mechanism are modulated by cytosolic Ca2+, but at different Ca2+ concentrations. The presence of two release pathways with different Ca2+ sensitivities may be a prerequisite for highly localized, exceptionally fast and large Ca2+ elevations during the illumination of invertebrate photoreceptors.

  2. Using avian radar to examine relationships among avian activity, bird strikes, and meteorological factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coates, Peter S.; Casazza, Michael L.; Halstead, Brian J.; Fleskes, Joseph P.; Laughlin, James A.

    2011-01-01

    Radar systems designed to detect avian activity at airfields are useful in understanding factors that influence the risk of bird and aircraft collisions (bird strikes). We used an avian radar system to measure avian activity at Beale Air Force Base, California, USA, during 2008 and 2009. We conducted a 2-part analysis to examine relationships among avian activity, bird strikes, and meteorological and time-dependent factors. We found that avian activity around the airfield was greater at times when bird strikes occurred than on average using a permutation resampling technique. Second, we developed generalized linear mixed models of an avian activity index (AAI). Variation in AAI was first explained by seasons that were based on average migration dates of birds at the study area. We then modeled AAI by those seasons to further explain variation by meteorological factors and daily light levels within a 24-hour period. In general, avian activity increased with decreased temperature, wind, visibility, precipitation, and increased humidity and cloud cover. These effects differed by season. For example, during the spring bird migration period, most avian activity occurred before sunrise at twilight hours on clear days with low winds, whereas during fall migration, substantial activity occurred after sunrise, and birds generally were more active at lower temperatures. We report parameter estimates (i.e., constants and coefficients) averaged across models and a relatively simple calculation for safety officers and wildlife managers to predict AAI and the relative risk of bird strike based on time, date, and meteorological values. We validated model predictability and assessed model fit. These analyses will be useful for general inference of avian activity and risk assessment efforts. Further investigation and ongoing data collection will refine these inference models and improve our understanding of factors that influence avian activity, which is necessary to inform

  3. Avian cholera in Nebraska's Rainwater Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Windingstad, R.M.; Hurt, J.J.; Trout, A.K.; Cary, J.

    1984-01-01

    The first report of avian cholera in North America occurred in northwestern Texas in winter 1944 (Quortrup et al. 1946). In 1975, mortality from avian cholera occurred for the first time in waterfowl in the Rainwater Basin of Nebraska when an estimated 25,000 birds died (Zinkl et al. 1977). Avian cholera has continued to cause mortality in wild birds in specific areas of the Basin each spring since. Losses of waterfowl from avian cholera continue to be much greater in some of the wetlands in the western part of the Basin than in the east. Several wetlands in the west have consistently higher mortality and are most often the wetlands where initial mortality is noticed each spring (Figure 1). The establishment of this disease in Nebraska is of considerable concern because of the importance of the Rainwater Basin as a spring staging area for waterfowl migrating to their breeding grounds. The wetlands in this area are on a major migration route used by an estimated 5 to 9 million ducks and several hundred thousand geese. A large portion of the western mid-continental greater white-fronted goose (Anser albifrons) population stage in the Basin each spring. Occasionally, whooping cranes (Grus americana) use these wetlands during migration, and lesser sandhill cranes (Grus canadensis) staging on the nearby Platte River sometimes use wetlands where avian cholera occurs (Anonymous 1981). Our objectives were to determine whether certain water quality variables in the Rainwater Basin differed between areas of high and low avian cholera incidence. These results would then be used for laboratory studies involving the survivability of Pasteurella multocida, the causative bacterium of avian cholera. Those studies will be reported elsewhere.

  4. Yang-Mills instantons on cones and sine-cones over nearly Kähler manifolds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gemmer, Karl-Philip; Lechtenfeld, Olaf; Nölle, Christoph; Popov, Alexander D.

    2011-09-01

    We present a unified eight-dimensional approach to instanton equations on several seven-dimensional manifolds associated to a six-dimensional homogeneous nearly Kähler manifold. The cone over the sine-cone on a nearly Kähler manifold has holonomy group Spin(7) and can befoliated by submanifolds with either holonomy group G 2, a nearly parallel G 2-structure or a cocalibrated G 2-structure. We show that there is a G 2-instanton on each of these seven-dimensional manifolds which gives rise to a Spin(7)-instanton in eight dimensions. The well-known octonionic instantons on {mathbb{R}^7} and {mathbb{R}^8} are contained in our construction as the special cases of an instanton on the cone and on the cone over the sine-cone, both over the six-sphere, respectively.

  5. DIVA vaccination strategies for avian influenza virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suarez, David L

    2012-12-01

    Vaccination for both low pathogenicity avian influenza and highly pathogenic avian influenza is commonly used by countries that have become endemic for avian influenza virus, but stamping-out policies are still common for countries with recently introduced disease. Stamping-out policies of euthanatizing infected and at-risk flocks has been an effective control tool, but it comes at a high social and economic cost. Efforts to identify alternative ways to respond to outbreaks without widespread stamping out has become a goal for organizations like the World Organisation for Animal Health. A major issue with vaccination for avian influenza is trade considerations because countries that vaccinate are often considered to be endemic for the disease and they typically lose their export markets. Primarily as a tool to promote trade, the concept of DIVA (differentiate infected from vaccinated animals) has been considered for avian influenza, but the goal for trade is to differentiate vaccinated and not-infected from vaccinated and infected animals because trading partners are unwilling to accept infected birds. Several different strategies have been investigated for a DIVA strategy, but each has advantages and disadvantages. A review of current knowledge on the research and implementation of the DIVA strategy will be discussed with possible ways to implement this strategy in the field. The increased desire for a workable DIVA strategy may lead to one of these ideas moving from the experimental to the practical.

  6. Avian Flu Epidemic 2003: Public health consequences. Executive summary

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosman A; Mulder YM; Leeuw JRJ de; Meijer A; Du Ry van Beest Holle M; Kamst RA; Velden PG van der; Conyn-van Spaendonck MAE; Koopmans MPG; Ruijten MWMM; Instituut voor Psychotrauma; CIE; MGO; LIS

    2004-01-01

    Executive summary Avian flu epidemic 2003: public health consequences.Risk factors, health, well-being, health care needs and preventive measures during the H7N7 avian flu outbreak control in the Netherlands.An estimated thousand people, possibly more have been infected with avian flu during the

  7. Proceedings of National Avian-Wind Power Planning Meeting IV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NWCC Avian Subcommittee

    2001-05-01

    OAK-B135 The purpose of the fourth meeting was to (1) share research and update research conducted on avian wind interactions (2) identify questions and issues related to the research results, (3) develop conclusions about some avian/wind power issues, and (4) identify questions and issues for future avian research.

  8. Avian metapneumovirus subgroup C infection in chickens, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Li; Zhu, Shanshan; Yan, Xv; Wang, Jing; Zhang, Chunyan; Liu, Shuhang; She, Ruiping; Hu, Fengjiao; Quan, Rong; Liu, Jue

    2013-07-01

    Avian metapneumovirus causes acute respiratory tract infection and reductions in egg production in various avian species. We isolated and characterized an increasingly prevalent avian metapneumovirus subgroup C strain from meat-type commercial chickens with severe respiratory signs in China. Culling of infected flocks could lead to economic consequences.

  9. Avian Metapneumovirus Subgroup C Infection in Chickens, China

    OpenAIRE

    Wei, Li; Zhu, Shanshan; Yan, Xv; Wang, Jing; Zhang, Chunyan; Liu, Shuhang; She, Ruiping; Hu, Fengjiao; Quan, Rong; Liu, Jue

    2013-01-01

    Avian metapneumovirus causes acute respiratory tract infection and reductions in egg production in various avian species. We isolated and characterized an increasingly prevalent avian metapneumovirus subgroup C strain from meat-type commercial chickens with severe respiratory signs in China. Culling of infected flocks could lead to economic consequences.

  10. Deforestation and avian infectious diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sehgal, R. N. M.

    2010-01-01

    In this time of unprecedented global change, infectious diseases will impact humans and wildlife in novel and unknown ways. Climate change, the introduction of invasive species, urbanization, agricultural practices and the loss of biodiversity have all been implicated in increasing the spread of infectious pathogens. In many regards, deforestation supersedes these other global events in terms of its immediate potential global effects in both tropical and temperate regions. The effects of deforestation on the spread of pathogens in birds are largely unknown. Birds harbor many of the same types of pathogens as humans and in addition can spread infectious agents to humans and other wildlife. It is thought that avifauna have gone extinct due to infectious diseases and many are presently threatened, especially endemic island birds. It is clear that habitat degradation can pose a direct threat to many bird species but it is uncertain how these alterations will affect disease transmission and susceptibility to disease. The migration and dispersal of birds can also change with habitat degradation, and thus expose populations to novel pathogens. Some recent work has shown that the results of landscape transformation can have confounding effects on avian malaria, other haemosporidian parasites and viruses. Now with advances in many technologies, including mathematical and computer modeling, genomics and satellite tracking, scientists have tools to further research the disease ecology of deforestation. This research will be imperative to help predict and prevent outbreaks that could affect avifauna, humans and other wildlife worldwide. PMID:20190120

  11. Deforestation and avian infectious diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sehgal, R N M

    2010-03-15

    In this time of unprecedented global change, infectious diseases will impact humans and wildlife in novel and unknown ways. Climate change, the introduction of invasive species, urbanization, agricultural practices and the loss of biodiversity have all been implicated in increasing the spread of infectious pathogens. In many regards, deforestation supersedes these other global events in terms of its immediate potential global effects in both tropical and temperate regions. The effects of deforestation on the spread of pathogens in birds are largely unknown. Birds harbor many of the same types of pathogens as humans and in addition can spread infectious agents to humans and other wildlife. It is thought that avifauna have gone extinct due to infectious diseases and many are presently threatened, especially endemic island birds. It is clear that habitat degradation can pose a direct threat to many bird species but it is uncertain how these alterations will affect disease transmission and susceptibility to disease. The migration and dispersal of birds can also change with habitat degradation, and thus expose populations to novel pathogens. Some recent work has shown that the results of landscape transformation can have confounding effects on avian malaria, other haemosporidian parasites and viruses. Now with advances in many technologies, including mathematical and computer modeling, genomics and satellite tracking, scientists have tools to further research the disease ecology of deforestation. This research will be imperative to help predict and prevent outbreaks that could affect avifauna, humans and other wildlife worldwide.

  12. OFD1, as a Ciliary Protein, Exhibits Neuroprotective Function in Photoreceptor Degeneration Models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Wang

    Full Text Available Ofd1 is a newly identified causative gene for Retinitis pigmentosa (RP, a photoreceptor degenerative disease. This study aimed to examine Ofd1 localization in retina and further to investigate its function in photoreceptor degeneration models. Ofd1 localization in rat retina was examined using immunofluorescence. N-methyl-N-nitrosourea (MNU-induced rats and Royal College of Surgeons (RCS rats were used as photoreceptor degeneration models. The expression pattern of Ofd1, other ciliary associated genes and Wnt signaling pathway genes were examined in rat models. Furthermore, pEGFP-Ofd1-CDS and pSUPER-Ofd1-shRNA were constructed to overexpress and knockdown the expression level in 661W and R28 cells. MNU was also used to induce cell death. Cilia formation was observed using immunocytochemistry (ICC. Reactive oxygen species (ROS were detected using the 2', 7'-Dichlorofluorescin diacetate (DCFH-DA assay. Apoptosis genes expression was examined using qRT-PCR, Western blotting and fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS. Ofd1 localized to outer segments of rat retina photoreceptors. Ofd1 and other ciliary proteins expression levels increased from the 1st and 4th postnatal weeks and decreased until the 6th week in the RCS rats, while their expression consistently decreased from the 1st and 7th day in the MNU rats. Moreover, Wnt signaling pathway proteins expression was significantly up-regulated in both rat models. Knockdown of Ofd1 expression resulted in a smaller population, shorter length of cell cilia, and lower cell viability. Ofd1 overexpression partially attenuated MNU toxic effects by reducing ROS levels and mitigating apoptosis. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study demonstrating Ofd1 localization and its function in rat retina and in retinal degeneration rat models. Ofd1 plays a role in controlling photoreceptor cilium length and number. Importantly, it demonstrates a neuroprotective function by protecting the photoreceptor

  13. RNA interference gene therapy in dominant retinitis pigmentosa and cone-rod dystrophy mouse models caused by GCAP1 mutations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li eJiang

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available RNA interference (RNAi knockdown is an efficacious therapeutic strategy for silencing genes causative for dominant retinal dystrophies. To test this, we used self-complementary (sc AAV2/8 vector to develop an RNAi-based therapy in two dominant retinal degeneration mouse models. The allele-specific model expresses transgenic bovine GCAP1(Y99C establishing a rapid RP-like phenotype, whereas the nonallele-specific model expresses mouse GCAP1(L151F producing a slowly progressing cone/rod dystrophy (CORD. The late onset GCAP1(L151F-CORD mimics the dystrophy observed in human GCAP1-CORD patients. Subretinal injection of scAAV2/8 carrying shRNA expression cassettes specific for bovine or mouse GCAP1 showed strong expression at one week post-injection. In both allele-specific (GCAP1(Y99C-RP and nonallele-specific (GCAP1(L151F-CORD models of dominant retinal dystrophy, RNAi-mediated gene silencing enhanced photoreceptor survival, delayed onset of degeneration and improved visual function. Such results provide a proof of concept toward effective RNAi-based gene therapy mediated by scAAV2/8 for dominant retinal disease based on GCAP1 mutation. Further, nonallele-specific RNAi knockdown of GCAP1 may prove generally applicable toward the rescue of any human GCAP1-based dominant cone-rod dystrophy.

  14. Dystrophin Is Required for Proper Functioning of Luminance and Red-Green Cone Opponent Mechanisms in the Human Retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barboni, Mirella Telles Salgueiro; Martins, Cristiane Maria Gomes; Nagy, Balázs Vince; Tsai, Tina; Damico, Francisco Max; da Costa, Marcelo Fernandes; de Cassia, Rita; Pavanello, M; Lourenço, Naila Cristina Vilaça; de Cerqueira, Antonia Maria Pereira; Zatz, Mayana; Kremers, Jan; Ventura, Dora Fix

    2016-07-01

    Visual information is processed in parallel pathways in the visual system. Parallel processing begins at the synapse between the photoreceptors and their postreceptoral neurons in the human retina. The integrity of this first neural connection is vital for normal visual processing downstream. Of the numerous elements necessary for proper functioning of this synaptic contact, dystrophin proteins in the eye play an important role. Deficiency of muscle dystrophin causes Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), an X-linked disease that affects muscle function and leads to decreased life expectancy. In DMD patients, postreceptoral retinal mechanisms underlying scotopic and photopic vision and ON- and OFF-pathway responses are also altered. In this study, we recorded the electroretinogram (ERG) while preferentially activating the (red-green) opponent or the luminance pathway, and compared data from healthy participants (n = 16) with those of DMD patients (n = 10). The stimuli were heterochromatic sinusoidal modulations at a mean luminance of 200 cd/m2. The recordings allowed us also to analyze ON and OFF cone-driven retinal responses. We found significant differences in 12-Hz response amplitudes and phases between controls and DMD patients, with conditions with large luminance content resulting in larger response amplitudes in DMD patients compared to controls, whereas responses of DMD patients were smaller when pure chromatic modulation was given. The results suggest that dystrophin is required for the proper function of luminance and red-green cone opponent mechanisms in the human retina.

  15. Compound pollen cone in a Paleozoic conifer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez-Castillo, G R; Rothwell, G W; Mapes, G

    2001-06-01

    A rich fossil biota from a Pennsylvanian age deposit of eastern North America contains numerous vegetative and fertile specimens that conform to a single species of primitive walchian conifers. Among the specimens is a compound pollen cone that comprises closely spaced, helically arranged, leaf-like bracts with axillary dwarf shoots. The specimen looks superficially similar to an ultimate vegetative conifer shoot, but there are small appendages in the axil of each bract that represent the fertile dwarf shoots. Dwarf shoots consist of an axis that bears sterile scales and sporophylls with erect pollen sacs. Pollen found in the sacs is monosaccate and conforms to the sporae dispersae genus Potonieisporites Bhardwaj. This cone is a compound shoot system that is morphologically equivalent to the ovulate cones of conifers and to the pollen cones of Paleozoic cordaitaleans and modern gnetophytes. Therefore, it is fundamentally different from the simple pollen cones of other fossil and modern conifers. Discovery of this specimen unexpectedly supports molecular studies that predict a close relationship between Coniferales and Gnetales, and provides fossil evidence to help reconcile the discordant phylogenetic hypotheses of seed plant systematics that have been developed from morphological and molecular data.

  16. Resonance cones in non-Maxwellian plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oelerich-Hill, G.; Piel, A.

    1989-01-01

    Resonance cones are studied experimentally in hot drifting plasmas and in various beam--plasma situations. In a drifting plasma the upstream--downstream asymmetry of the main cone is suitable for diagnostics of plasma drifts. The evaluation of electron temperature from the interference pattern is discussed in terms of the low-temperature--low-drift approximation (LTLDA) and by comparing with numerical kinetic theory calculations. In this way the range of applicability of this method is extended above the LTLDA. In a beam--plasma situation, the downstream resonance cone exhibits a new interference pattern, which can be attributed to resonant particle effects. The upstream resonance cone is only slightly affected and is found still applicable for T/sub e/ and n/sub e/ diagnostics. As a result of comparison with numerical calculations, in which the actual distribution function is used, the downstream interference pattern is proposed to be useful as a diagnostic method for obtaining the mean beam energy. The waves generated by the beam--plasma interaction are analyzed by digital cross-correlation techniques, and found to propagate obliquely to the magnetic field direction at the resonance cone angle

  17. Resonance cones in non-Maxwellian plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oelerich-Hill, G.; Piel, A.

    1988-05-01

    Resonance cones are studied experimentally in hot drifting plasmas and in various beam-plasma situations. In a drifting plasma the upstream-downstream asymmetry of the main cone is suitable for diagnostics of plasma drifts. The evaluation of electron temperature from the interference pattern is discussed in terms of the low-temperature-low-drift-approximation (LTLDA) and by comparing with numerical kinetic theory calculations. In this way the range of applicability of this method is extended above the LTLDA. In a beam-plasma situation, the downstream resonance cone exhibits a new interference pattern, which can be attributed to resonant particle effects. The upstream resonance cone is only slightly affected and is found still applicable for T e and n e diagnostics. As a result of the comparison with numerical calculations, in which the actual distribution function is used, the downstream interference pattern is proposed to be useful as a diagnostic method for obtaining the mean beam energy. The waves generated by the beam plasma interaction are analyzed by digital cross-correlation techniques. They are found to be Whistler waves propagating obliquely to the magnetic field direction at the resonance cone angle. (orig.)

  18. An Automated Reference Frame Selection (ARFS) Algorithm for Cone Imaging with Adaptive Optics Scanning Light Ophthalmoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmon, Alexander E; Cooper, Robert F; Langlo, Christopher S; Baghaie, Ahmadreza; Dubra, Alfredo; Carroll, Joseph

    2017-04-01

    To develop an automated reference frame selection (ARFS) algorithm to replace the subjective approach of manually selecting reference frames for processing adaptive optics scanning light ophthalmoscope (AOSLO) videos of cone photoreceptors. Relative distortion was measured within individual frames before conducting image-based motion tracking and sorting of frames into distinct spatial clusters. AOSLO images from nine healthy subjects were processed using ARFS and human-derived reference frames, then aligned to undistorted AO-flood images by nonlinear registration and the registration transformations were compared. The frequency at which humans selected reference frames that were rejected by ARFS was calculated in 35 datasets from healthy subjects, and subjects with achromatopsia, albinism, or retinitis pigmentosa. The level of distortion in this set of human-derived reference frames was assessed. The average transformation vector magnitude required for registration of AOSLO images to AO-flood images was significantly reduced from 3.33 ± 1.61 pixels when using manual reference frame selection to 2.75 ± 1.60 pixels (mean ± SD) when using ARFS ( P = 0.0016). Between 5.16% and 39.22% of human-derived frames were rejected by ARFS. Only 2.71% to 7.73% of human-derived frames were ranked in the top 5% of least distorted frames. ARFS outperforms expert observers in selecting minimally distorted reference frames in AOSLO image sequences. The low success rate in human frame choice illustrates the difficulty in subjectively assessing image distortion. Manual reference frame selection represented a significant barrier to a fully automated image-processing pipeline (including montaging, cone identification, and metric extraction). The approach presented here will aid in the clinical translation of AOSLO imaging.

  19. Origin and evolution of avian microchromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burt, D W

    2002-01-01

    The origin of avian microchromosomes has long been the subject of much speculation and debate. Microchromosomes are a universal characteristic of all avian species and many reptilian karyotypes. The typical avian karyotype contains about 40 pairs of chromosomes and usually 30 pairs of small to tiny microchromosomes. This characteristic karyotype probably evolved 100-250 million years ago. Once the microchromosomes were thought to be a non-essential component of the avian genome. Recent work has shown that even though these chromosomes represent only 25% of the genome; they encode 50% of the genes. Contrary to popular belief, microchromosomes are present in a wide range of vertebrate classes, spanning 400-450 million years of evolutionary history. In this paper, comparative gene mapping between the genomes of chicken, human, mouse and zebrafish, has been used to investigate the origin and evolution of avian microchromosomes during this period. This analysis reveals evidence for four ancient syntenies conserved in fish, birds and mammals for over 400 million years. More than half, if not all, microchromosomes may represent ancestral syntenies and at least ten avian microchromosomes are the product of chromosome fission. Birds have one of the smallest genomes of any terrestrial vertebrate. This is likely to be the product of an evolutionary process that minimizes the DNA content (mostly through the number of repeats) and maximizes the recombination rate of microchromosomes. Through this process the properties (GC content, DNA and repeat content, gene density and recombination rate) of microchromosomes and macrochromosomes have diverged to create distinct chromosome types. An ancestral genome for birds likely had a small genome, low in repeats and a karyotype with microchromosomes. A "Fission-Fusion Model" of microchromosome evolution based on chromosome rearrangement and minimization of repeat content is discussed. Copyright 2002 S. Karger AG, Basel

  20. Retinal neuroprotection by hypoxic preconditioning is independent of hypoxia-inducible factor-1 alpha expression in photoreceptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiersch, Markus; Lange, Christina; Joly, Sandrine; Heynen, Severin; Le, Yun Zheng; Samardzija, Marijana; Grimm, Christian

    2009-06-01

    Hypoxic preconditioning stabilizes hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) 1 alpha in the retina and protects photoreceptors against light-induced cell death. HIF-1 alpha is one of the major transcription factors responding to low oxygen tension and can differentially regulate a large number of target genes. To analyse whether photoreceptor-specific expression of HIF-1 alpha is essential to protect photoreceptors by hypoxic preconditioning, we knocked down expression of HIF-1 alpha specifically in photoreceptor cells, using the cyclization recombinase (Cre)-lox system. The Cre-mediated knockdown caused a 20-fold reduced expression of Hif-1 alpha in the photoreceptor cell layer. In the total retina, RNA expression was reduced by 65%, and hypoxic preconditioning led to only a small increase in HIF-1 alpha protein levels. Accordingly, HIF-1 target gene expression after hypoxia was significantly diminished. Retinas of Hif-1 alpha knockdown animals did not show any pathological alterations, and tolerated hypoxic exposure in a comparable way to wild-type retinas. Importantly, the strong neuroprotective effect of hypoxic preconditioning against light-induced photoreceptor degeneration persisted in knockdown mice, suggesting that hypoxia-mediated survival of light exposure does not depend on an autocrine action of HIF-1 alpha in photoreceptor cells. Hypoxia-mediated stabilization of HIF-2 alpha and phosphorylation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT 3) were not affected in the retinas of Hif-1 alpha knockdown mice. Thus, these factors are candidates for regulating the resistance of photoreceptors to light damage after hypoxic preconditioning, along with several potentially neuroprotective genes that were similarly induced in hypoxic knockdown and control mice.

  1. Caffeine- and ryanodine-sensitive Ca(2+)-induced Ca2+ release from the endoplasmic reticulum in honeybee photoreceptors

    OpenAIRE

    1995-01-01

    Light stimulation of invertebrate microvillar photoreceptors causes a large rapid elevation in Cai, shown previously to modulate the adaptational state of the cells. Cai rises, at least in part, as a result of Ins(1,4,5)P3-induced Ca2+ release from the submicrovillar endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Here, we provide evidence for Ca(2+)- induced Ca2+ release (CICR) in an insect photoreceptor. In situ microphotometric measurements of Ca2+ fluxes across the ER membrane in permeabilized slices of dron...

  2. Ribosomal RNA gene functioning in avian oogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koshel, Elena; Galkina, Svetlana; Saifitdinova, Alsu; Dyomin, Alexandr; Deryusheva, Svetlana; Gaginskaya, Elena

    2016-12-01

    Despite long-term exploration into ribosomal RNA gene functioning during the oogenesis of various organisms, many intriguing problems remain unsolved. In this review, we describe nucleolus organizer region (NOR) activity in avian oocytes. Whereas oocytes from an adult avian ovary never reveal the formation of the nucleolus in the germinal vesicle (GV), an ovary from juvenile birds possesses both nucleolus-containing and non-nucleolus-containing oocytes. The evolutionary diversity of oocyte NOR functioning and the potential non-rRNA-related functions of the nucleolus in oocytes are also discussed.

  3. Mechanism of light-induced translocation of arrestin and transducin in photoreceptors: interaction-restricted diffusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slepak, Vladlen Z; Hurley, James B

    2008-01-01

    Many signaling proteins change their location within cells in response to external stimuli. In photoreceptors, this phenomenon is remarkably robust. The G protein of rod photoreceptors and rod transducin concentrates in the outer segments (OS) of these neurons in darkness. Within approximately 30 minutes after illumination, rod transducin redistributes throughout all of the outer and inner compartments of the cell. Visual arrestin concurrently relocalises from the inner compartments to become sequestered primarily within the OS. In the past several years, the question of whether these proteins are actively moved by molecular motors or whether they are redistributed by simple diffusion has been extensively debated. This review focuses on the most essential works in the area and concludes that the basic principle driving this protein movement is diffusion. The directionality and light dependence of this movement is achieved by the interactions of arrestin and transducin with their spatially restricted binding partners.

  4. Derivation of human differential photoreceptor-like cells from the iris by defined combinations of CRX, RX and NEUROD.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuko Seko

    Full Text Available Examples of direct differentiation by defined transcription factors have been provided for beta-cells, cardiomyocytes and neurons. In the human visual system, there are four kinds of photoreceptors in the retina. Neural retina and iris-pigmented epithelium (IPE share a common developmental origin, leading us to test whether human iris cells could differentiate to retinal neurons. We here define the transcription factor combinations that can determine human photoreceptor cell fate. Expression of rhodopsin, blue opsin and green/red opsin in induced photoreceptor cells were dependent on combinations of transcription factors: A combination of CRX and NEUROD induced rhodopsin and blue opsin, but did not induce green opsin; a combination of CRX and RX induced blue opsin and green/red opsin, but did not induce rhodopsin. Phototransduction-related genes as well as opsin genes were up-regulated in those cells. Functional analysis; i.e. patch clamp recordings, clearly revealed that generated photoreceptor cells, induced by CRX, RX and NEUROD, responded to light. The response was an inward current instead of the typical outward current. These data suggest that photosensitive photoreceptor cells can be generated by combinations of transcription factors. The combination of CRX and RX generate immature photoreceptors: and additional NEUROD promotes maturation. These findings contribute substantially to a major advance toward eventual cell-based therapy for retinal degenerative diseases.

  5. Asymmetric properties of the Chlamydomonas reinhardtii cytoskeleton direct rhodopsin photoreceptor localization

    OpenAIRE

    Mittelmeier, Telsa M.; Boyd, Joseph S.; Lamb, Mary Rose; Dieckmann, Carol L.

    2011-01-01

    The eyespot of the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is a photoreceptive organelle required for phototaxis. Relative to the anterior flagella, the eyespot is asymmetrically positioned adjacent to the daughter four-membered rootlet (D4), a unique bundle of acetylated microtubules extending from the daughter basal body toward the posterior of the cell. Here, we detail the relationship between the rhodopsin eyespot photoreceptor Channelrhodopsin 1 (ChR1) and acetylated microtubule...

  6. NADPH Oxidase Contributes to Photoreceptor Degeneration in Constitutively Active RAC1 Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Hongman; Vijayasarathy, Camasamudram; Zeng, Yong; Marangoni, Dario; Bush, Ronald A.; Wu, Zhijian; Sieving, Paul A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The active form of small GTPase RAC1 is required for activation of NADPH oxidase (NOX), which in turn generates reactive oxygen species (ROS) in nonphagocytic cells. We explored whether NOX-induced oxidative stress contributes to rod degeneration in retinas expressing constitutively active (CA) RAC1. Methods Transgenic (Tg)–CA-RAC1 mice were given apocynin (10 mg/kg, intraperitoneal), a NOX inhibitor, or vehicle daily for up to 13 weeks. Superoxide production and oxidative damage were assessed by dihydroethidium staining and by protein carbonyls and malondialdehyde levels, respectively. Outer nuclear layer (ONL) cells were counted and electroretinogram (ERG) amplitudes measured in Tg-CA-RAC1 mice. Outer nuclear layer cells were counted in wild-type (WT) mice after transfer of CA-Rac1 gene by subretinal injection of AAV8-pOpsin-CA Rac1-GFP. Results Transgenic-CA-RAC1 retinas had significantly fewer photoreceptor cells and more apoptotic ONL cells than WT controls from postnatal week (Pw) 3 to Pw13. Superoxide accumulation and protein and lipid oxidation were increased in Tg-CA-RAC1 retinas and were reduced in mice treated with apocynin. Apocynin reduced the loss of photoreceptors and increased the rod ERG a- and b-wave amplitudes when compared with vehicle-injected transgenic controls. Photoreceptor loss was also observed in regions of adult WT retina transduced with AAV8-pOpsin-CA Rac1-GFP but not in neighboring regions that were not transduced or in AAV8-pOpsin-GFP–transduced retinas. Conclusions Constitutively active RAC1 promotes photoreceptor cell death by oxidative damage that occurs, at least partially, through NOX-induced ROS. Reactive oxygen species are likely involved in multiple forms of retinal degenerations, and our results support investigating RAC1 inhibition as a therapeutic approach that targets this disease pathway. PMID:27233035

  7. Are two photoreceptors involved in the flowering of a long-day plant?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanada, T.

    1984-01-01

    The effect of day length extension with narrow spectral bands on the flowering of a long-day plant, Brassica campestris L. cv. Ceres, was investigated to obtain clues to the identity of the photoreceptor involved. Extension of a 9 h photoperiod with 5 h of light pulses at various wavelengths resulted in maximal flowering occurring after irradiation at 710 nm, less at 730 nm, and none at 550, 660 and 750 nm. Flowering at 710 and 730 nm was negated by simultaneous exposures at 550 nm, but not at 660 nm. A short preirradiation at 660 nm enabled a following irradiation at 750 nm to induce flowering. This latter induction was prevented by 550 nm irradiation. Short flashes of light at 710 nm induced flowering that was negated by a following flash at 550 nm but not at 660 nm. The negation by 550 nm radiation was prevented by subsequent flashes at 710 nm, indicating photo reversibility. A flash at 660 nm enabled subsequent light flashes at 750 nm to initiate flowering that was reversed by a following 550 nm flash. From the results showing the necessity of red and far-red lights, it is proposed that flowering in this long-day plant is due to two photoreceptors - one is phytochrome and the other an unknown pigment with far-red, green photo reversible properties. By using fluence response data, it is deduced that the unidentified photoreceptor has weak absorption bands in the far-red, but has a strong absorption band in the green. Flowering is induced when effects of red light absorbed by phytochrome interact with effects of far-red light absorbed by the unidentified photoreceptor

  8. The role of carcinine in signaling at the Drosophila photoreceptor synapse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brendan A Gavin

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The Drosophila melanogaster photoreceptor cell has long served as a model system for researchers focusing on how animal sensory neurons receive information from their surroundings and translate this information into chemical and electrical messages. Electroretinograph (ERG analysis of Drosophila mutants has helped to elucidate some of the genes involved in the visual transduction pathway downstream of the photoreceptor cell, and it is now clear that photoreceptor cell signaling is dependent upon the proper release and recycling of the neurotransmitter histamine. While the neurotransmitter transporters responsible for clearing histamine, and its metabolite carcinine, from the synaptic cleft have remained unknown, a strong candidate for a transporter of either substrate is the uncharacterized inebriated protein. The inebriated gene (ine encodes a putative neurotransmitter transporter that has been localized to photoreceptor cells in Drosophila and mutations in ine result in an abnormal ERG phenotype in Drosophila. Loss-of-function mutations in ebony, a gene required for the synthesis of carcinine in Drosophila, suppress components of the mutant ine ERG phenotype, while loss-of-function mutations in tan, a gene necessary for the hydrolysis of carcinine in Drosophila, have no effect on the ERG phenotype in ine mutants. We also show that by feeding wild-type flies carcinine, we can duplicate components of mutant ine ERGs. Finally, we demonstrate that treatment with H(3 receptor agonists or inverse agonists rescue several components of the mutant ine ERG phenotype. Here, we provide pharmacological and genetic epistatic evidence that ine encodes a carcinine neurotransmitter transporter. We also speculate that the oscillations observed in mutant ine ERG traces are the result of the aberrant activity of a putative H(3 receptor.

  9. Random Photon Absorption Model Elucidates How Early Gain Control in Fly Photoreceptors Arises from Quantal Sampling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Zhuoyi; Zhou, Yu; Juusola, Mikko

    2016-01-01

    Many diurnal photoreceptors encode vast real-world light changes effectively, but how this performance originates from photon sampling is unclear. A 4-module biophysically-realistic fly photoreceptor model, in which information capture is limited by the number of its sampling units (microvilli) and their photon-hit recovery time (refractoriness), can accurately simulate real recordings and their information content. However, sublinear summation in quantum bump production (quantum-gain-nonlinearity) may also cause adaptation by reducing the bump/photon gain when multiple photons hit the same microvillus simultaneously. Here, we use a Random Photon Absorption Model (RandPAM), which is the 1st module of the 4-module fly photoreceptor model, to quantify the contribution of quantum-gain-nonlinearity in light adaptation. We show how quantum-gain-nonlinearity already results from photon sampling alone. In the extreme case, when two or more simultaneous photon-hits reduce to a single sublinear value, quantum-gain-nonlinearity is preset before the phototransduction reactions adapt the quantum bump waveform. However, the contribution of quantum-gain-nonlinearity in light adaptation depends upon the likelihood of multi-photon-hits, which is strictly determined by the number of microvilli and light intensity. Specifically, its contribution to light-adaptation is marginal (≤ 1%) in fly photoreceptors with many thousands of microvilli, because the probability of simultaneous multi-photon-hits on any one microvillus is low even during daylight conditions. However, in cells with fewer sampling units, the impact of quantum-gain-nonlinearity increases with brightening light.

  10. TRP, TRPL and cacophony channels mediate Ca2+ influx and exocytosis in photoreceptors axons in Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guadalupe Astorga

    Full Text Available In Drosophila photoreceptors Ca(2+-permeable channels TRP and TRPL are the targets of phototransduction, occurring in photosensitive microvilli and mediated by a phospholipase C (PLC pathway. Using a novel Drosophila brain slice preparation, we studied the distribution and physiological properties of TRP and TRPL in the lamina of the visual system. Immunohistochemical images revealed considerable expression in photoreceptors axons at the lamina. Other phototransduction proteins are also present, mainly PLC and protein kinase C, while rhodopsin is absent. The voltage-dependent Ca(2+ channel cacophony is also present there. Measurements in the lamina with the Ca(2+ fluorescent protein G-CaMP ectopically expressed in photoreceptors, revealed depolarization-induced Ca(2+ increments mediated by cacophony. Additional Ca(2+ influx depends on TRP and TRPL, apparently functioning as store-operated channels. Single synaptic boutons resolved in the lamina by FM4-64 fluorescence revealed that vesicle exocytosis depends on cacophony, TRP and TRPL. In the PLC mutant norpA bouton labeling was also impaired, implicating an additional modulation by this enzyme. Internal Ca(2+ also contributes to exocytosis, since this process was reduced after Ca(2+-store depletion. Therefore, several Ca(2+ pathways participate in photoreceptor neurotransmitter release: one is activated by depolarization and involves cacophony; this is complemented by internal Ca(2+ release and the activation of TRP and TRPL coupled to Ca(2+ depletion of internal reservoirs. PLC may regulate the last two processes. TRP and TRPL would participate in two different functions in distant cellular regions, where they are opened by different mechanisms. This work sheds new light on the mechanism of neurotransmitter release in tonic synapses of non-spiking neurons.

  11. Amphioxus photoreceptors insights into the evolution of vertebrate opsins, vision and circadian rhythmicity

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pergner, Jiří; Kozmik, Zbyněk

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 61, č. 10-12 (2017), s. 665-681 ISSN 0214-6282 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA17-15374S; GA MŠk(CZ) LM2015062; GA MŠk LO1419 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : chordate * opsin evolution * photoreceptor * eye evolution * phototransduction Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology OBOR OECD: Biology (theoretical, mathematical, thermal, cryobiology, biological rhythm), Evolutionary biology Impact factor: 1.981, year: 2016

  12. NADPH Oxidase Contributes to Photoreceptor Degeneration in Constitutively Active RAC1 Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Hongman; Vijayasarathy, Camasamudram; Zeng, Yong; Marangoni, Dario; Bush, Ronald A; Wu, Zhijian; Sieving, Paul A

    2016-05-01

    The active form of small GTPase RAC1 is required for activation of NADPH oxidase (NOX), which in turn generates reactive oxygen species (ROS) in nonphagocytic cells. We explored whether NOX-induced oxidative stress contributes to rod degeneration in retinas expressing constitutively active (CA) RAC1. Transgenic (Tg)-CA-RAC1 mice were given apocynin (10 mg/kg, intraperitoneal), a NOX inhibitor, or vehicle daily for up to 13 weeks. Superoxide production and oxidative damage were assessed by dihydroethidium staining and by protein carbonyls and malondialdehyde levels, respectively. Outer nuclear layer (ONL) cells were counted and electroretinogram (ERG) amplitudes measured in Tg-CA-RAC1 mice. Outer nuclear layer cells were counted in wild-type (WT) mice after transfer of CA-Rac1 gene by subretinal injection of AAV8-pOpsin-CA Rac1-GFP. Transgenic-CA-RAC1 retinas had significantly fewer photoreceptor cells and more apoptotic ONL cells than WT controls from postnatal week (Pw) 3 to Pw13. Superoxide accumulation and protein and lipid oxidation were increased in Tg-CA-RAC1 retinas and were reduced in mice treated with apocynin. Apocynin reduced the loss of photoreceptors and increased the rod ERG a- and b-wave amplitudes when compared with vehicle-injected transgenic controls. Photoreceptor loss was also observed in regions of adult WT retina transduced with AAV8-pOpsin-CA Rac1-GFP but not in neighboring regions that were not transduced or in AAV8-pOpsin-GFP-transduced retinas. Constitutively active RAC1 promotes photoreceptor cell death by oxidative damage that occurs, at least partially, through NOX-induced ROS. Reactive oxygen species are likely involved in multiple forms of retinal degenerations, and our results support investigating RAC1 inhibition as a therapeutic approach that targets this disease pathway.

  13. Expression characteristics of dual-promoter lentiviral vectors targeting retinal photoreceptors and M?ller cells

    OpenAIRE

    Semple-Rowland, Susan L.; Coggin, William E.; Geesey, Mero; Eccles, Kristofer S.; Abraham, Leah; Pachigar, Krunal; Ludlow, Rachel; Khani, Shahrokh C.; Smith, W. Clay

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Growing evidence suggests that successful treatment of many inherited photoreceptor diseases will require multi-protein therapies that not only correct the genetic defects linked to these diseases but also slow or halt the related degenerative phenotypes. To be effective, it is likely that therapeutic protein expression will need to be targeted to specific cell types. The purpose of this study was to develop dual-promoter lentiviral vectors that target expression of two proteins to re...

  14. The Role of Carcinine in Signaling at the Drosophila Photoreceptor Synapse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavin, Brendan A; Arruda, Susan E; Dolph, Patrick J

    2007-01-01

    The Drosophila melanogaster photoreceptor cell has long served as a model system for researchers focusing on how animal sensory neurons receive information from their surroundings and translate this information into chemical and electrical messages. Electroretinograph (ERG) analysis of Drosophila mutants has helped to elucidate some of the genes involved in the visual transduction pathway downstream of the photoreceptor cell, and it is now clear that photoreceptor cell signaling is dependent upon the proper release and recycling of the neurotransmitter histamine. While the neurotransmitter transporters responsible for clearing histamine, and its metabolite carcinine, from the synaptic cleft have remained unknown, a strong candidate for a transporter of either substrate is the uncharacterized inebriated protein. The inebriated gene (ine) encodes a putative neurotransmitter transporter that has been localized to photoreceptor cells in Drosophila and mutations in ine result in an abnormal ERG phenotype in Drosophila. Loss-of-function mutations in ebony, a gene required for the synthesis of carcinine in Drosophila, suppress components of the mutant ine ERG phenotype, while loss-of-function mutations in tan, a gene necessary for the hydrolysis of carcinine in Drosophila, have no effect on the ERG phenotype in ine mutants. We also show that by feeding wild-type flies carcinine, we can duplicate components of mutant ine ERGs. Finally, we demonstrate that treatment with H3 receptor agonists or inverse agonists rescue several components of the mutant ine ERG phenotype. Here, we provide pharmacological and genetic epistatic evidence that ine encodes a carcinine neurotransmitter transporter. We also speculate that the oscillations observed in mutant ine ERG traces are the result of the aberrant activity of a putative H3 receptor. PMID:18069895

  15. The genetics of some planthormones and photoreceptors in Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh.

    OpenAIRE

    Koornneef, M.

    1982-01-01

    This thesis describes the isolation and characterization in Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. of induced mutants, deficient for gibberellins (GA's), abscisic acid (ABA) and photoreceptors.

    These compounds are known to regulate various facets of plant growth and differentiation, so mutants lacking one of these substances are expected to be affected in several aspects of their physiology. It is shown in this thesis that the earliest expression of these mutants occur...

  16. Resonance in a Cone-Topped Tube

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angus Cheng-Huan Chia

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between ratio of the upper opening diameter of a cone-topped cylinder to the cylinder diameter,and the ratio of the length of the air column to resonant period was examined. Plastic cones with upper openings ranging from 1.3 cm to 3.6 cm and tuning forks with frequencies ranging from 261.6 Hz to 523.3 Hz were used. The transition from a standing wave in a cylindrical column to a Helmholtz-type resonance in a resonant cavity with a narrow opening was observed.

  17. RPGR: Its role in photoreceptor physiology, human disease, and future therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Megaw, Roly D; Soares, Dinesh C; Wright, Alan F

    2015-09-01

    Mammalian photoreceptors contain specialised connecting cilia that connect the inner (IS) to the outer segments (OS). Dysfunction of the connecting cilia due to mutations in ciliary proteins are a common cause of the inherited retinal dystrophy retinitis pigmentosa (RP). Mutations affecting the Retinitis Pigmentosa GTPase Regulator (RPGR) protein is one such cause, affecting 10-20% of all people with RP and the majority of those with X-linked RP. RPGR is located in photoreceptor connecting cilia. It interacts with a wide variety of ciliary proteins, but its exact function is unknown. Recently, there have been important advances both in our understanding of RPGR function and towards the development of a therapy. This review summarises the existing literature on human RPGR function and dysfunction, and suggests that RPGR plays a role in the function of the ciliary gate, which controls access of both membrane and soluble proteins to the photoreceptor outer segment. We discuss key models used to investigate and treat RPGR disease and suggest that gene augmentation therapy offers a realistic therapeutic approach, although important questions still remain to be answered, while cell replacement therapy based on retinal progenitor cells represents a more distant prospect. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  18. Gnaz couples the circadian and dopaminergic system to G protein-mediated signaling in mouse photoreceptors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Vancura

    Full Text Available The mammalian retina harbors a circadian clockwork that regulates vision and promotes healthiness of retinal neurons, mainly through directing the rhythmic release of the neurohormones dopamine-acting on dopamine D4 receptors-and melatonin-acting on MT1 and MT2 receptors. The gene Gnaz-a unique Gi/o subfamily member-was seen in the present study to be expressed in photoreceptors where its protein product Gαz shows a daily rhythm in its subcellular localization. Apart from subcellular localization, Gnaz displays a daily rhythm in expression-with peak values at night-in preparations of the whole retina, microdissected photoreceptors and photoreceptor-related pinealocytes. In retina, Gnaz rhythmicity was observed to persist under constant darkness and to be abolished in retina deficient for Clock or dopamine D4 receptors. Furthermore, circadian regulation of Gnaz was disturbed in the db/db mouse, a model of diabetic retinopathy. The data of the present study suggest that Gnaz links the circadian clockwork-via dopamine acting on D4 receptors-to G protein-mediated signaling in intact but not diabetic retina.

  19. An Unexpected Diversity of Photoreceptor Classes in the Longfin Squid, Doryteuthis pealeii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kingston, Alexandra C N; Wardill, Trevor J; Hanlon, Roger T; Cronin, Thomas W

    2015-01-01

    Cephalopods are famous for their ability to change color and pattern rapidly for signaling and camouflage. They have keen eyes and remarkable vision, made possible by photoreceptors in their retinas. External to the eyes, photoreceptors also exist in parolfactory vesicles and some light organs, where they function using a rhodopsin protein that is identical to that expressed in the retina. Furthermore, dermal chromatophore organs contain rhodopsin and other components of phototransduction (including retinochrome, a photoisomerase first found in the retina), suggesting that they are photoreceptive. In this study, we used a modified whole-mount immunohistochemical technique to explore rhodopsin and retinochrome expression in a number of tissues and organs in the longfin squid, Doryteuthis pealeii. We found that fin central muscles, hair cells (epithelial primary sensory neurons), arm axial ganglia, and sucker peduncle nerves all express rhodopsin and retinochrome proteins. Our findings indicate that these animals possess an unexpected diversity of extraocular photoreceptors and suggest that extraocular photoreception using visual opsins and visual phototransduction machinery is far more widespread throughout cephalopod tissues than previously recognized.

  20. An Unexpected Diversity of Photoreceptor Classes in the Longfin Squid, Doryteuthis pealeii.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra C N Kingston

    Full Text Available Cephalopods are famous for their ability to change color and pattern rapidly for signaling and camouflage. They have keen eyes and remarkable vision, made possible by photoreceptors in their retinas. External to the eyes, photoreceptors also exist in parolfactory vesicles and some light organs, where they function using a rhodopsin protein that is identical to that expressed in the retina. Furthermore, dermal chromatophore organs contain rhodopsin and other components of phototransduction (including retinochrome, a photoisomerase first found in the retina, suggesting that they are photoreceptive. In this study, we used a modified whole-mount immunohistochemical technique to explore rhodopsin and retinochrome expression in a number of tissues and organs in the longfin squid, Doryteuthis pealeii. We found that fin central muscles, hair cells (epithelial primary sensory neurons, arm axial ganglia, and sucker peduncle nerves all express rhodopsin and retinochrome proteins. Our findings indicate that these animals possess an unexpected diversity of extraocular photoreceptors and suggest that extraocular photoreception using visual opsins and visual phototransduction machinery is far more widespread throughout cephalopod tissues than previously recognized.

  1. argos Is required for projection of photoreceptor axons during optic lobe development in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawamoto, K; Okabe, M; Tanimura, T; Hayashi, S; Mikoshiba, K; Okano, H

    1996-02-01

    The Drosophila argos gene encodes a secreted protein with an epidermal growth factor (EGF) motif, which acts as an inhibitor of cell recruitment in the developing eye and wing. Here, we have analyzed the role of argos during optic lobe development. argos expression was observed in the optic lobes throughout the developmental stages. In argos mutants, neuropiles failed to develop normally during embryonic and larval stages, and photoreceptor axons did not project properly into the lamina. Ubiquitous expression of argos, under control of the hsp70 promoter, rescued the defects in optic lobes. We have found that glial cells failed to differentiate in the larval optic lobes of argos mutants. Correspondingly, in loss-of-function repo mutants, whose glial cells also fail to differentiate, photoreceptor axons showed the impaired projection pattern similar to the argos phenotype. These results suggest that glial cells play a role for guidance of photoreceptor axons. The loss-of-function Star mutation (StarX155) dominantly suppressed the defects in the argos optic lobes, suggesting that these two genes act in an antagonistic fashion during optic lobe development.

  2. Static and dynamic adaptation of insect photoreceptor responses to naturalistic stimuli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Stanton French

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available We describe a new nonlinear dynamic model of insect phototransduction using a NLN (nonlinear, linear, nonlinear block structure. The first nonlinear stage provides a single exponential decline in gain and mean following the start of light stimulation. The linear stage uses a two-parameter log-normal convolution model previously applied alone to insect photoreceptors. The final stage is a static quadratic function. The model fitted current and voltage responses of isolated single photoreceptors from three different insect species with reasonable fidelity when they were stimulated by naturalistic time series having wide bandwidth and contrast, over a light intensity range of greater than 1:104. Mean squared error values for receptor current and receptor potential varied over approximately 2-60%, with many values below 10%. Linear log-normal filter parameters did not vary strongly with species or light intensity. Initial gain reduction was only large for the highest light levels, while the time constant of gain and mean reduction decreased with light intensity. The final nonlinearity changed from positively to negatively quadratic with increasing light intensity, indicating a change from threshold, or expansion to saturating compression with greater signal strength. Photoreceptor information transmission was estimated by linear information capacity and signal entropy measurements of both experimental data and predicted outputs of the model for identical stimuli at each light level. Comparison of actual and predicted data indicated significant added noise during phototransduction, with information being progressively lost by nonlinear behavior with increasing light intensity.

  3. Variation in LOV Photoreceptor Activation Dynamics Probed by Time Resolved Infrared Spectroscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Iuliano, James N.

    2017-12-14

    The light, oxygen, voltage (LOV) domain proteins are blue light photoreceptors that utilize a non-covalently bound flavin mononucleotide (FMN) cofactor as the chromophore. The modular nature of these proteins has led to their wide adoption in the emerging fields of optogenetics and optobiology, where the LOV domain has been fused to a variety of output domains leading to novel light-controlled applications. In the present work, we extend our studies of the sub-picosecond to several hundred microsecond transient infrared spectroscopy of the isolated LOV domain AsLOV2 to three full-length photoreceptors in which the LOV domain is fused to an output domain: the LOV-STAS protein, YtvA, the LOV-HTH transcription factor, EL222, and the LOV-histidine kinase, LovK. Despite differences in tertiary structure, the overall pathway leading to cysteine adduct formation from the FMN triplet state is highly conserved, although there are slight variations in rate. However significant differences are observed in the vibrational spectra and kinetics after adduct formation, which are directly linked to the specific output function of the LOV domain. While the rate of adduct formation varies by only 3.6-fold amongst the proteins, the subsequent large-scale structural changes in the full-length LOV photoreceptors occur over the micro- to sub-millisecond timescales and vary by orders of magnitude depending on the different output function of each LOV domain.

  4. Lack of protein-tyrosine sulfation disrupts photoreceptor outer segment morphogenesis, retinal function and retinal anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherry, David M; Murray, Anne R; Kanan, Yogita; Arbogast, Kelsey L; Hamilton, Robert A; Fliesler, Steven J; Burns, Marie E; Moore, Kevin L; Al-Ubaidi, Muayyad R

    2010-11-01

    To investigate the role(s) of protein-tyrosine sulfation in the retina, we examined retinal function and structure in mice lacking tyrosylprotein sulfotransferases (TPST) 1 and 2. Tpst double knockout (DKO; Tpst1(-/-) /Tpst2 (-/-) ) retinas had drastically reduced electroretinographic responses, although their photoreceptors exhibited normal responses in single cell recordings. These retinas appeared normal histologically; however, the rod photoreceptors had ultrastructurally abnormal outer segments, with membrane evulsions into the extracellular space, irregular disc membrane spacing and expanded intradiscal space. Photoreceptor synaptic terminals were disorganized in Tpst DKO retinas, but established ultrastructurally normal synapses, as did bipolar and amacrine cells; however, the morphology and organization of neuronal processes in the inner retina were abnormal. These results indicate that protein-tyrosine sulfation is essential for proper outer segment morphogenesis and synaptic function, but is not critical for overall retinal structure or synapse formation, and may serve broader functions in neuronal development and maintenance. © 2010 The Authors. European Journal of Neuroscience © 2010 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  5. Oblique cone formation in Ge by Ar+ sputtering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chini, T.K.; Bhattaracharyya, S.R.; Ghose, D.; Basu, D.

    1992-01-01

    Sharp oblique cones are only formed on polished germanium surfaces by 30 keV Ar + bombardment, in the presence of tungsten seed atoms; substantiating Wehner's hypothesis that higher melting point seed material is the crucial factor for cone formation. The morphology of the cone is characterized by the formation of a sloped ridge, consistent with the observations of earlier workers. Moreover, some strange wing-like structures are associated with these cones. (author)

  6. Cones and craters on Mount Pavagadh, Deccan Traps: Rootless ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Rootless cones, also (erroneously) called pseudocraters, form due to explosions that ensue when a lava flow enters a surface water body, ice, or wet ground. They do not represent primary vents connected by vertical conduits to a subsurface magma source. Rootless cones in Iceland are well studied. Cones on Mars ...

  7. Cones and craters on Mount Pavagadh, Deccan Traps: Rootless ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    Rootless cones, also (erroneously) called pseudocraters, form due to explosions that ensue when a lava flow enters a surface water body, ice, or wet ground. They do not represent primary vents connected by vertical conduits to a subsurface magma source. Rootless cones in Iceland are well studied. Cones on Mars ...

  8. Distribution of the cone insect, Dioryctria disclusa, in red pine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    William J. Mattson

    1976-01-01

    Within the crowns of red pine, Pinus resinosa Ait., trees, larvae of the cone insect, Dioryctria disclusa Heinrich, tended to follow the distributions of their foods. Between-tree distributions of larvae, however, were relatable to food distributions in only two of five years. Cone damage/tree by D. disclusa increased linearly with cone abundance per tree when insect...

  9. Funnel cone for focusing intense ion beams on a target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bieniosek, F.M.; Henestroza, E.; Ni, P.

    2009-01-01

    We describe a funnel cone for concentrating an ion beam on a target. The cone utilizes the reflection characteristic of ion beams on solid walls to focus the incident beam andincrease beam intensity on target. The cone has been modeled with the TRIM code. A prototype has been tested and installed for use in the 350-keV K+ NDCX target chamber.

  10. Effects of drought on avian community structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas P. Albright; Anna M. Pidgeon; Chadwick D. Rittenhouse; Murray K. Clayton; Curtis H. Flather; Patrick D. Culbert; Brian D. Wardlow; Volker C. Radeloff

    2010-01-01

    Droughts are expected to become more frequent under global climate change. Avifauna depend on precipitation for hydration, cover, and food. While there are indications that avian communities respond negatively to drought, little is known about the response of birds with differing functional and behavioural traits, what time periods and indicators of drought are most...

  11. Serological diagnosis of avian influenza in poultry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Comin, Arianna; Toft, Nils; Stegeman, Arjan

    2013-01-01

    Background The serological diagnosis of avian influenza (AI) can be performed using different methods, yet the haemagglutination inhibition (HI) test is considered the gold standard' for AI antibody subtyping. Although alternative diagnostic assays have been developed, in most cases, their accuracy...

  12. New Avian Hepadnavirus in Palaeognathous Bird, Germany

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jo, Wendy K; Pfankuche, Vanessa M; Petersen, Henning; Frei, Samuel; Kummrow, Maya; Lorenzen, Stephan; Ludlow, Martin; Metzger, Julia; Baumgärtner, Wolfgang; Osterhaus, Albert; van der Vries, Erhard

    2017-01-01

    In 2015, we identified an avian hepatitis B virus associated with hepatitis in a group of captive elegant-crested tinamous (Eudromia elegans) in Germany. The full-length genome of this virus shares <76% sequence identity with other avihepadnaviruses. The virus may therefore be considered a new

  13. Avian Disease & Oncology Lab (ADOL) Research Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Employing Genomics, Epigenetics, and Immunogenetics to Control Diseases Induced by Avian Tumor Viruses - Gene expression is a major factor accounting for phenotypic variation. Taking advantage of allele-specific expression (ASE) screens, we found the use of genetic markers was superior to traditiona...

  14. Viral vectors for avian influenza vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prior to 2003, vaccines against avian influenza (AI) had limited, individual country or regional use in poultry. In late 2003, H5N1 high pathogenicity (HP) AI spread from China to multiple Southeast Asian countries, and to Europe during 2005 and Africa during 2006, challenging governments and all p...

  15. the Avian Park Service Learning Centre story

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Ukwanda Centre for Rural Health (UCRH) opened in 2001, followed 10 years later by the establishment of the Ukwanda Rural Clinical School in one of the rural health districts of the Western Cape. This paper relates the journey of the Faculty with the underserviced community of Avian Park through the provision of ...

  16. Presumptive diagnosis of Avian encephalomyelitis in Japanese ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A report of Avian encephalomyelitis outbreak in two flocks of adult Japanese quail is presented. High mortalities, tremor, ataxia and lateral recumbency were the prominent clinical signs observed. Absence of gross pathology and microscopic lesions of gliosis, neuronal degeneration, meningitis, congested blood vessel with ...

  17. The genetics and evolution of avian migration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pulido, F.

    2007-01-01

    One of the characteristics of avian migration is its variability within and among species. Variation in migratory behavior, and in physiological and morphological adaptations to migration, is to a large extent due to genetic differences. Comparative studies suggest that migratory behavior has

  18. Solar activity affects avian timing of reproduction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, M.E.; Sanz, J.J.

    2009-01-01

    Avian timing of reproduction is strongly affected by ambient temperature. Here we show that there is an additional effect of sunspots on laying date, from five long-term population studies of great and blue tits (Parus major and Cyanistes caeruleus), demonstrating for the first time that solar

  19. Vocal communication in an avian hybrid zone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartog, Paula Maria den

    2008-01-01

    Avian vocalizations function in mate attraction and territorial defence. Vocalizations can act as behavioural barriers and play an important role in speciation processes. Hybrid zones illustrate behavioural barriers are not always impermeable and provide a natural laboratory to examine the role of

  20. Fossil avian eggshell preserves ancient DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oskam, Charlotte L; Haile, James Seymour; McLay, Emma

    2010-01-01

    Owing to exceptional biomolecule preservation, fossil avian eggshell has been used extensively in geochronology and palaeodietary studies. Here, we show, to our knowledge, for the first time that fossil eggshell is a previously unrecognized source of ancient DNA (aDNA). We describe the successful...

  1. Measuring Steroid Hormones in Avian Eggs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engelhardt, Nikolaus von; Groothuis, Ton G.G.

    2005-01-01

    Avian eggs contain substantial levels of various hormones of maternal origin and have recently received a lot of interest, mainly from behavioral ecologists. These studies strongly depend on the measurement of egg hormone levels, but the method of measuring these levels has received little

  2. Measuring steroid hormones in avian eggs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Von Engelhardt, Nikolaus; Groothuis, Ton G. G.; Bauchinger, U; Goymann, W; JenniEiermann, S

    2005-01-01

    Avian eggs contain substantial levels of various hormones of maternal origin and have recently received a lot of interest, mainly from behavioral ecologists. These studies strongly depend on the measurement of egg hormone levels, but the method of measuring these levels has received little

  3. Loss of photoreceptorness and gain of genomic alterations in retinoblastoma reveal tumor progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kooi, Irsan E.; Mol, Berber M.; Moll, Annette C.; van der Valk, Paul; de Jong, Marcus C.; de Graaf, Pim; van Mil, Saskia E.; Schouten-van Meeteren, Antoinette Y.N.; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne; Kaspers, Gertjan L.; te Riele, Hein; Cloos, Jacqueline; Dorsman, Josephine C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Retinoblastoma is a pediatric eye cancer associated with RB1 loss or MYCN amplification (RB1+/+MYCNA). There are controversies concerning the existence of molecular subtypes within RB1−/− retinoblastoma. To test whether these molecular subtypes exist, we performed molecular profiling. Methods Genome-wide mRNA expression profiling was performed on 76 primary human retinoblastomas. Expression profiling was complemented by genome-wide DNA profiling and clinical, histopathological, and ex vivo drug sensitivity data. Findings RNA and DNA profiling identified major variability between retinoblastomas. While gene expression differences between RB1+/+MYCNA and RB1−/− tumors seemed more dichotomous, differences within the RB1−/− tumors were gradual. Tumors with high expression of a photoreceptor gene signature were highly differentiated, smaller in volume and diagnosed at younger age compared with tumors with low photoreceptor signature expression. Tumors with lower photoreceptor expression showed increased expression of genes involved in M-phase and mRNA and ribosome synthesis and increased frequencies of somatic copy number alterations. Interpretation Molecular, clinical and histopathological differences between RB1−/− tumors are best explained by tumor progression, reflected by a gradual loss of differentiation and photoreceptor expression signature. Since copy number alterations were more frequent in tumors with less photoreceptorness, genomic alterations might be drivers of tumor progression. Research in context Retinoblastoma is an ocular childhood cancer commonly caused by mutations in the RB1 gene. In order to determine optimal treatment, tumor subtyping is considered critically important. However, except for very rare retinoblastomas without an RB1 mutation, there are controversies as to whether subtypes of retinoblastoma do exist. Our study shows that retinoblastomas are highly diverse but rather than reflecting distinct tumor types with

  4. Supersonic Laminar Viscous Flow Past a Cone at Angle of Attack in Spinning and Coning Motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Ramesh; Rakich, John V.

    1982-01-01

    Computational results obtained with a parabolic Navier-Stokes marching code are presented for supersonic viscous flow past a pointed cone at angle of attack undergoing a combined spinning and coning motion. The code takes into account the asymmetries in the flowfield resulting from the motion and computes the asymmetric shock shape, crossflow and streamwise shear, heat transfer, crossflow separation and vortex structure. The side force and moment are also computed. Reasonably good agreement is obtained with the side force measurements of Schiff and Tobak. Comparison is also made with the only available numerical inviscid analysis. It is found that the asymmetric pressure loads due lo coning motion are much larger than all other viscous forces due lo spin and coning, making viscous forces negligible in the combined motion.

  5. Still in Light-Cone Superspace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramond, P.

    2010-01-01

    The recently formulated Bagger-Lambert-Gustavsson (BLG) theory in three dimensions is described in terms of a constrained chiral superfield in light-cone superspace. We discuss the use of Superconformal symmetry to determine the form of its interactions, in complete analogy with N = 4 Super Yang-Mills in four dimensions.

  6. Analog Experiment for rootless cone eruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noguchi, R.; Hamada, A.; Suzuki, A.; Kurita, K.

    2017-09-01

    Rootless cone is a unique geomorphological landmark to specify igneous origin of investigated terrane, which is formed by magma-water interaction. To understand its formation mechanism we conducted analog experiment for heat-induced vesiculation by using hot syrup and sodium bicarbonate solution.

  7. Cone beam computed tomography in veterinary dentistry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Thielen, B.; Siguenza, F.; Hassan, B.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the feasibility of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) in imaging dogs and cats for diagnostic dental veterinary applications. CBCT scans of heads of six dogs and two cats were made. Dental panoramic and multi-planar reformatted (MPR) para-sagittal

  8. Characterization of a cone beam optical scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ravindran, P B; Thomas, H M

    2013-01-01

    The use of radiochromic FX gel for mapping 3D dose distribution is hampered by the diffusion of gel and the slow scanning techniques. The development of fast optical cone beam scanning has improved the chances of using radiochromic gel as a feasible dosimeter for radiotherapy applications. In this work an optical cone beam scanner has been developed in-house and its performance characteristics have been studied. The reconstructed image of the optical scanner was analyzed by studying the resolution, signal-to-noise ratio and contrast to noise ratio (CNR). The resolution of the optical cone beam CT scanner was studied by scanning a catheter of 1 mm outer diameter and the scanner was able to detect the catheter. The geometrical accuracy of the reconstruction was studied by placing catheters in spiral geometry in the gel phantom and measuring the distances. It has been observed that the in-house Optical Cone beam scanner is suitable for scanning radiochromic gels for radiotherapy applications.

  9. Cone beam CT, wat moet ik ermee?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogeveen, R.

    2013-01-01

    De cone beam-ct-scan (cbct-scan) maakt een opmars in de tandheelkunde vanwege de toegevoegde waarde van de derde dimensie in de diagnostiek. Deze extra informatie wordt verkregen ten koste van een hogere stralenbelasting en een daarmee gepaard gaand hoger risico voor de patiënt. Om de clinicus te

  10. Perturbation theory in light-cone quantization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langnau, Alex [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

    1992-01-01

    A thorough investigation of light-cone properties which are characteristic for higher dimensions is very important. The easiest way of addressing these issues is by analyzing the perturbative structure of light-cone field theories first. Perturbative studies cannot be substituted for an analysis of problems related to a nonperturbative approach. However, in order to lay down groundwork for upcoming nonperturbative studies, it is indispensable to validate the renormalization methods at the perturbative level, i.e., to gain control over the perturbative treatment first. A clear understanding of divergences in perturbation theory, as well as their numerical treatment, is a necessary first step towards formulating such a program. The first objective of this dissertation is to clarify this issue, at least in second and fourth-order in perturbation theory. The work in this dissertation can provide guidance for the choice of counterterms in Discrete Light-Cone Quantization or the Tamm-Dancoff approach. A second objective of this work is the study of light-cone perturbation theory as a competitive tool for conducting perturbative Feynman diagram calculations. Feynman perturbation theory has become the most practical tool for computing cross sections in high energy physics and other physical properties of field theory. Although this standard covariant method has been applied to a great range of problems, computations beyond one-loop corrections are very difficult. Because of the algebraic complexity of the Feynman calculations in higher-order perturbation theory, it is desirable to automatize Feynman diagram calculations so that algebraic manipulation programs can carry out almost the entire calculation. This thesis presents a step in this direction. The technique we are elaborating on here is known as light-cone perturbation theory.

  11. A 40-foot static cone penetrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beard, R.M.; Lee, H.J.

    1982-01-01

    The Navy needs a lightweight device for testing seafloor soils to sub bottom depths of 12 meters in water depths to 60 meters. To meet this need a quasistatic cone penetration device that uses water jetting to reduce friction on the cone rod has been developed. This device is called the XSP-40. The 5-ton XSP-40 stands 15 meters tall and pushes a standard 5-ton cone into the seafloor. It is remotely controlled with an electronic unit on the deck of the support vessel. All cone outputs are recorded directly as a function of penetration depth with a strip chart recorder. A full suite of gauges is provided. on the electronic unit for monitoring the XSP-40's performance during a test .. About 40 penetration tests have been performed with very good success. The XSP-40 was field tested in Norton Sound, off the west coast of Alaska. The general objective, in addition to evaluation of the device, was to gather geotechnical information on sediments that may be involved in processes potentially hazardous to offshore development. Four example penetration records are presented from gas charged sediment zones and areas near the Yukon River delta. In general it was determined that soil classification from cone data agreed well with classifications from core samples. Relative densities of the silt-sand to sandy-silt soils were usually very high. The significance of these results are discussed with respect to storm wave, liquefaction. It is concluded that the XSP-40 is a durable and reliable piece of equipment capable of achieving penetration beyond that possible when not using the water jet system.

  12. Micro focusing of fast electrons with opened cone targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Feng; Liu Xiaoxuan; Ding Wenjun; Du Fei; Li Yutong; Ma Jinglong; Liu Xiaolong; Chen Liming; Lu Xin; Dong Quanli; Wang Weimin; Wang Zhaohua; Wei Zhiyi; Liu Bicheng; Sheng Zhengming; Zhang Jie

    2012-01-01

    Using opened reentrant cone silicon targets, we have demonstrated the effect of micro focusing of fast electrons generated in intense laser-plasma interactions. When an intense femtosecond laser pulse is focused tightly onto one of the side walls of the cone, fast electron beam emitted along the side wall is observed. When a line focus spot, which is long enough to irradiate both of the side walls of the cone simultaneously, is used, two electron beams emitted along each side wall, respectively, are observed. The two beams should cross each other near the open tip of the cone, resulting in micro focusing. We use a two-dimensional Particle-In-Cell code to simulate the electron emission both in opened and closed cone targets. The simulation results of the opened cone targets are in agreement with the experimental observation while the results of the closed cone targets do not show the micro focusing effect.

  13. Functional exchange of components between light-activated photoreceptor phosphodiesterase and hormone-activated adenylate cyclase systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bitensky, M.W.; Wheeler, M.A.; Rasenick, M.M.; Yamazaki, A.; Stein, P.J.; Halliday, K.R.; Wheeler, G.L.

    1982-06-01

    Previous studies have noted profound similarities between the regulation of light-activated (3',5'-cyclic-nucleotide 5'-nucleotidohydrolase, EC 3.1.4.17) in retinal rods and hormone-activated adenylate cyclase (ATP pyrophosphate-lyase (cyclizing), EC 4.6.1.1) in a variety of tissues. We report ere the functional exchange of components isolated from the photoreceptor system, which displayed predicted functional characteristics when incubated with recipient adenylate cyclase systems from rat cerebral cortical and hypothalamic synaptic membranes and frog erythrocyte ghosts. We demonstrate functional exchange of photoreceptor components at each of three loci: the hormone receptor, the GTP-binding protein (GBP), and the catalytic moiety of adenylate cyclase. Illuminated (but not unilluminated) rhodopsin was found to mimic the hormone-receptor complex, causing GTP-dependent activation of adenylate cyclase. The photoreceptor GBP complexed with guanosine 5'-(..beta..,..gamma..)imidotriphosphate (p(NH)ppG) produced a marked activation of recipient adenylate cyclase systems. Much smaller activation was observed when GBP was not complexed with p(NH)ppG. A heat-stable photoreceptor phosphodiesterase inhibitor reduced both basal and Mn/sup 2 +/-activated adenylate cyclase activites and this inhibition was reversed by photoreceptor GBPp(NH)ppG. These data demonstrate a remarkable functional compatibility between subunits of both systems and furthermore imply that specialized peptide domains responsible for protein-protein interactions are highly conserved.

  14. The involvement of ATF4 and S-opsin in retinal photoreceptor cell damage induced by blue LED light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ooe, Emi; Tsuruma, Kazuhiro; Kuse, Yoshiki; Kobayashi, Saori; Shimazawa, Masamitsu; Hara, Hideaki

    2017-01-01

    Blue light is a high-energy emitting light with a short wavelength in the visible light spectrum. Blue light induces photoreceptor apoptosis and causes age-related macular degeneration or retinitis pigmentosa. In the present study, we investigated the roles of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress induced by blue light-emitting diode (LED) light exposure in murine photoreceptor cells. The murine photoreceptor cell line was incubated and exposed to blue LED light (464 nm blue LED light, 450 lx, 3 to 24 h). The expression of the factors involved in the unfolded protein response pathway was examined using quantitative real-time reverse transcription (RT)-PCR and immunoblot analysis. The aggregation of short-wavelength opsin (S-opsin) in the murine photoreceptor cells was observed with immunostaining. The effect of S-opsin knockdown on ATF4 expression in the murine photoreceptor cell line was also investigated. Exposure to blue LED light increased the bip , atf4 , and grp94 mRNA levels, induced the expression of ATF4 protein, and increased the levels of ubiquitinated proteins. Exposure to blue LED light in combination with ER stress inducers (tunicamycin and dithiothreitol) induced the aggregation of S-opsin. S-opsin mRNA knockdown prevented the induction of ATF4 expression in response to exposure to blue LED light. These findings indicate that the aggregation of S-opsin induced by exposure to blue LED light causes ER stress, and ATF4 activation in particular.

  15. Depleting Rac1 in mouse rod photoreceptors protects them from photo-oxidative stress without affecting their structure or function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haruta, Masatoshi; Bush, Ronald A.; Kjellstrom, Sten; Vijayasarathy, Camasamudram; Zeng, Yong; Le, Yun-Zheng; Sieving, Paul A.

    2009-01-01

    In nonphagocytic cells, Rac1 is a component of NADPH oxidase that produces reactive oxygen species [Ushio-Fukai M (2006) Sci STKE 2006:re8]. Rac1 is expressed abundantly in mammalian retinal photoreceptors, where it is activated in response to light stimuli [Balasubramanian N, Slepak VZ (2003) Curr Biol 13:1306–1310]. We used Cre-LoxP conditional gene targeting to knock down Rac1 expression in mouse rod photoreceptors and found protection against light-induced photoreceptor death compared with WT litter-mates. We also found a similar protective effect on rods using apocynin, which inhibits NADPH oxidase activity. These results implicate both neuronal Rac1 and NADPH oxidase in cell death in this model of CNS degeneration. Studies in which dominant-mutants of Rac1 were expressed in transgenic Drosophila species demonstrated that Rac1 is a key regulator of photoreceptor morphogenesis and polarity [Chang HY, Ready DF (2000) Science 290:1978–1980]. However, we found that diminished Rac1 expression in mouse rods had no effect on retinal structure or function examined by light microscopy, electron microscopy, rhodopsin measurement, electroretinogram activity, and visual acuity, indicating rod outer segment morphogenesis proceeded normally in Rac1 conditional knockout mice. The lack of structural or functional effect of Rac1 depletion on photoreceptors, but protection under conditions of stress, indicate that the Rac1 pathway warrants exploration as a target for therapy in retinal neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:19470639

  16. Overexpression of retinal degeneration slow (RDS protein adversely affects rods in the rd7 model of enhanced S-cone syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dibyendu Chakraborty

    Full Text Available The nuclear receptor NR2E3 promotes expression of rod photoreceptor genes while repressing cone genes. Mice lacking NR2E3 (Nr2e3(rd7/rd7 referred to here as rd7 are a model for enhanced S-cone syndrome, a disease associated with increased sensitivity to blue light and night blindness. Rd7 retinas have reduced levels of the outer segment (OS structural protein retinal degeneration slow (RDS. We test the hypothesis that increasing RDS levels would improve the Rd7 phenotype. Transgenic mice over-expressing normal mouse peripherin/RDS (NMP in rods and cones were crossed onto the rd7 background. Disease phenotypes were assessed in NMP/rd7 eyes and compared to wild-type (WT and rd7 eyes at postnatal day 30. NMP/rd7 retinas expressed total RDS (transgenic and endogenous message at WT levels, and NMP protein was correctly localized to the OS. NMP/rd7 retinas have shorter OSs compared to rd7 and WT and significantly reduced number of rosettes. NMP/rd7 mice also exhibited significant deficits in scotopic ERG amplitudes compared to rd7 while photopic amplitudes remained unaffected. Protein levels of rhodopsin, RDS, and the RDS homologue ROM-1 were significantly reduced in the NMP/rd7 retinas compared to rd7. We show that correcting the levels of RDS gene expression does not improve the phenotype of the rd7 suggesting that RDS deficiency is not responsible for the defect in this model. We suggest that the specific rod defect in the NMP/rd7 is likely associated with ongoing problems in the rd7 that are related to the expression of cone genes in rod cells, a characteristic of the model.

  17. Exploring the active site structure of photoreceptor proteins by Raman optical activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unno, Masashi

    2015-03-01

    Understanding protein function at the atomic level is a major challenge in a field of biophysics and requires the combined efforts of structural and functional methods. We use photoreceptor proteins as a model system to understand in atomic detail how a chromophore and a protein interact to sense light and send a biological signal. A potential technique for investigating molecular structures is Raman optical activity (ROA), which is a spectroscopic method with a high sensitivity to the structural details of chiral molecules. However, its application to photoreceptor proteins has not been reported. Thus we have constructed ROA spectrometer using near-infrared (NIR) laser excitation at 785 nm. The NIR excitation enables us to measure ROA spectra for a variety of biological samples, including photoreceptor proteins, without fluorescence from the samples. In the present study, we have applied the NIR-ROA to bacteriorhodopsin (BR) and photoactive yellow protein (PYP). BR is a light-driven proton pump and contains a protonated Schiff base of retinal as a chromophore. PYP is a blue light receptor, and this protein has the 4-hydroxycinnamyl chromophore, which is covalently linked to Cys69 through a thiolester bond. We have successfully obtained the ROA spectra of the chromophore within a protein environment. Furthermore, calculations of the ROA spectra utilizing density functional theory provide detailed structural information, such as data on out-of-plane distortions of the chromophore. The structural information obtained from the ROA spectra includes the positions of hydrogen atoms, which are usually not detected in the crystal structures of biological samples.

  18. Gogo receptor contributes to retinotopic map formation and prevents R1-6 photoreceptor axon bundling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina Hein

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Topographic maps form the basis of neural processing in sensory systems of both vertebrate and invertebrate species. In the Drosophila visual system, neighboring R1-R6 photoreceptor axons innervate adjacent positions in the first optic ganglion, the lamina, and thereby represent visual space as a continuous map in the brain. The mechanisms responsible for the establishment of retinotopic maps remain incompletely understood. RESULTS: Here, we show that the receptor Golden goal (Gogo is required for R axon lamina targeting and cartridge elongation in a partially redundant fashion with local guidance cues provided by neighboring axons. Loss of function of Gogo in large clones of R axons results in aberrant R1-R6 fascicle spacing. Gogo affects target cartridge selection only indirectly as a consequence of the disordered lamina map. Interestingly, small clones of gogo deficient R axons perfectly integrate into a proper retinotopic map suggesting that surrounding R axons of the same or neighboring fascicles provide complementary spatial guidance. Using single photoreceptor type rescue, we show that Gogo expression exclusively in R8 cells is sufficient to mediate targeting of all photoreceptor types in the lamina. Upon lamina targeting and cartridge selection, R axons elongate within their individual cartridges. Interestingly, here Gogo prevents bundling of extending R1-6 axons. CONCLUSION: Taken together, we propose that Gogo contributes to retinotopic map formation in the Drosophila lamina by controlling the distribution of R1-R6 axon fascicles. In a later developmental step, the regular position of R1-R6 axons along the lamina plexus is crucial for target cartridge selection. During cartridge elongation, Gogo allows R1-R6 axons to extend centrally in the lamina cartridge.

  19. Inhibitory Smads and bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) modulate anterior photoreceptor cell number during planarian eye regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Sastre, Alejandro; Molina, Ma Dolores; Saló, Emili

    2012-01-01

    Planarians represent an excellent model to study the processes of body axis and organ re-specification during regeneration. Previous studies have revealed a conserved role for the bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) pathway and its intracellular mediators Smad1/5/8 and Smad4 in planarian dorsoventral (DV) axis re-establishment. In an attempt to gain further insight into the role of this signalling pathway in planarians, we have isolated and functionally characte-rized the inhibitory Smads (I-Smads) in Schmidtea mediterranea. Two I-Smad homologues have been identified: Smed-smad6/7-1 and Smed-smad6/7-2. Expression of smad6/7-1 was detected in the parenchyma, while smad6/7-2 was found to be ex-pressed in the central nervous system and the eyes. Neither single smad6/7-1 and smad6/7-2 nor double smad6/7-1,-2 silencing gave rise to any apparent disruption of the DV axis. However, both regenerating and intact smad6/7-2 (RNAi) planarians showed defects in eye morphogenesis and displayed small, rounded eyes that lacked the anterior subpopulation of photoreceptor cells. The number of pigment cells was also reduced in these animals at later stages of regeneration. In contrast, after low doses of Smed-bmp(RNAi), planarians regenerated larger eyes in which the anterior subpopulation of photoreceptor cells was expanded. Our results suggest that Smed-smad6/7-2 and Smed-bmp control the re-specification and maintenance of anterior photoreceptor cell number in S. mediterranea.

  20. Freeze-fracture studies of photoreceptor membranes: new observations bearing upon the distribution of cholesterol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, L D; Cohen, A I

    1983-09-01

    We performed electron microscopy of replicas from freeze-fractured retinas exposed during or after fixation to the cholesterol-binding antibiotic, filipin. We observed characteristic filipin-induced perturbations throughout the disk and plasma membranes of retinal rod outer segments of various species. It is evident that a prolonged exposure to filipin in fixative enhances rather than reduces presumptive cholesterol detection in the vertebrate photoreceptor cell. In agreement with the pattern seen in our previous study (Andrews, L.D., and A. I. Cohen, 1979, J. Cell Biol., 81:215-228), filipin-binding in membranes exhibiting particle-free patches seemed largely confined to these patches. Favorably fractured photoreceptors exhibited marked filipin-binding in apical inner segment plasma membrane topologically confluent with and proximate to the outer segment plasma membrane, which was comparatively free of filipin binding. A possible boundary between these differing membrane domains was suggested in a number of replicas exhibiting lower filipin binding to the apical plasma membrane of the inner segment in the area surrounding the cilium. This area contains a structure (Andrews, L. D., 1982, Freeze-fracture studies of vertebrate photoreceptors, In Structure of the Eye, J. G. Hollyfield and E. Acosta Vidrio, editors, Elsevier/North-Holland, New York, 11-23) that resembles the active zones of the nerve terminals for the frog neuromuscular junction. These observations lead us to hypothesize that these structures may function to direct vesicle fusion to occur near them, in a domain of membrane more closely resembling outer than inner segment plasma membrane. The above evidence supports the views that (a) all disk membranes contain cholesterol, but the particle-free patches present in some disks trap cholesterol from contiguous particulate membrane regions; (b) contiguous inner and outer segment membranes may greatly differ in cholesterol content; and (c) the suggested

  1. Transcriptomic analysis of human retinal detachment reveals both inflammatory response and photoreceptor death.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie-Noëlle Delyfer

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Retinal detachment often leads to a severe and permanent loss of vision and its therapeutic management remains to this day exclusively surgical. We have used surgical specimens to perform a differential analysis of the transcriptome of human retinal tissues following detachment in order to identify new potential pharmacological targets that could be used in combination with surgery to further improve final outcome. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Statistical analysis reveals major involvement of the immune response in the disease. Interestingly, using a novel approach relying on coordinated expression, the interindividual variation was monitored to unravel a second crucial aspect of the pathological process: the death of photoreceptor cells. Within the genes identified, the expression of the major histocompatibility complex I gene HLA-C enables diagnosis of the disease, while PKD2L1 and SLCO4A1 -which are both down-regulated- act synergistically to provide an estimate of the duration of the retinal detachment process. Our analysis thus reveals the two complementary cellular and molecular aspects linked to retinal detachment: an immune response and the degeneration of photoreceptor cells. We also reveal that the human specimens have a higher clinical value as compared to artificial models that point to IL6 and oxidative stress, not implicated in the surgical specimens studied here. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This systematic analysis confirmed the occurrence of both neurodegeneration and inflammation during retinal detachment, and further identifies precisely the modification of expression of the different genes implicated in these two phenomena. Our data henceforth give a new insight into the disease process and provide a rationale for therapeutic strategies aimed at limiting inflammation and photoreceptor damage associated with retinal detachment and, in turn, improving visual prognosis after retinal surgery.

  2. Diurnal and circadian rhythms in the tomato transcriptome and their modulation by cryptochrome photoreceptors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Facella

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Circadian clocks are internal molecular time-keeping mechanisms that provide living organisms with the ability to adjust their growth and physiology and to anticipate diurnal environmental changes. Circadian clocks, without exception, respond to light and, in plants, light is the most potent and best characterized entraining stimulus. The capacity of plants to respond to light is achieved through a number of photo-perceptive proteins including cryptochromes and phytochromes. There is considerable experimental evidence demonstrating the roles of photoreceptors in providing light input to the clock. METHODOLOGY: In order to identify genes regulated by diurnal and circadian rhythms, and to establish possible functional relations between photoreceptors and the circadian clock in tomato, we monitored the temporal transcription pattern in plants entrained to long-day conditions, either by large scale comparative profiling, or using a focused approach over a number of photosensory and clock-related genes by QRT-PCR. In parallel, focused transcription analyses were performed in cry1a- and in CRY2-OX tomato genotypes. CONCLUSIONS: We report a large series of transcript oscillations that shed light on the complex network of interactions among tomato photoreceptors and clock-related genes. Alteration of cryptochrome gene expression induced major changes in the rhythmic oscillations of several other gene transcripts. In particular, over-expression of CRY2 had an impact not only on day/night fluctuations but also on rhythmicity under constant light conditions. Evidence was found for widespread diurnal oscillations of transcripts encoding specific enzyme classes (e.g. carotenoid biosynthesis enzymes as well as for post-transcriptional diurnal and circadian regulation of the CRY2 transcript.

  3. Avian brains: Insights from development, behaviors and evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, Tadashi; Izawa, Ei-Ichi

    2017-05-01

    Birds are an extensively specialized animal group with unique anatomical, physiological and ecological characteristics. Sophisticated social behaviors and remarkable cognitive abilities are present in several avian lineages, driven by their enlarged brains and intricate neural networks. These unique traits could be a result of adaptive evolution under the wide range of environmental constraints; however, the intrinsic mechanisms of avian brain development and evolution remain unclear. Here, we introduce recent findings regarding developmental aspects of avian brain organization and neuronal networks for specific avian behaviors, which provide an insight into the link between the evolution of brain development and complex cognitive functions. © 2017 Japanese Society of Developmental Biologists.

  4. Avian use of Norris Hill Wind Resource Area, Montana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harmata, A.; Podruzny, K.; Zelenak, J. [Montana State Univ., Bozeman, MT (United States). Biology Dept.

    1998-07-01

    This document presents results of a study of avian use and mortality in and near a proposed wind resource area in southwestern Montana. Data collected in autumn 1995 through summer 1996 represented preconstruction condition; it was compiled, analyzed, and presented in a format such that comparison with post-construction data would be possible. The primary emphasis of the study was recording avian migration in and near the wind resource area using state-of-the-art marine surveillance radar. Avian use and mortality were investigated during the breeding season by employing traditional avian sampling methods, radiotelemetry, radar, and direct visual observation. 61 figs., 34 tabs.

  5. Avian Circadian Organization: A Chorus of Clocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassone, Vincent M

    2013-01-01

    In birds, biological clock function pervades all aspects of biology, controlling daily changes in sleep: wake, visual function, song, migratory patterns and orientation, as well as seasonal patterns of reproduction, song and migration. The molecular bases for circadian clocks are highly conserved, and it is likely the avian molecular mechanisms are similar to those expressed in mammals, including humans. The central pacemakers in the avian pineal gland, retinae and SCN dynamically interact to maintain stable phase relationships and then influence downstream rhythms through entrainment of peripheral oscillators in the brain controlling behavior and peripheral tissues. Birds represent an excellent model for the role played by biological clocks in human neurobiology; unlike most rodent models, they are diurnal, they exhibit cognitively complex social interactions, and their circadian clocks are more sensitive to the hormone melatonin than are those of nocturnal rodents. PMID:24157655

  6. The evolution of flavin-binding photoreceptors: an ancient chromophore serving trendy blue-light sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Losi, Aba; Gärtner, Wolfgang

    2012-01-01

    Photoreceptor flavoproteins of the LOV, BLUF, and cryptochrome families are ubiquitous among the three domains of life and are configured as UVA/blue-light systems not only in plants-their original arena-but also in prokaryotes and microscopic algae. Here, we review these proteins' structure and function, their biological roles, and their evolution and impact in the living world, and underline their growing application in biotechnologies. We present novel developments such as the interplay of light and redox stimuli, emerging enzymatic and biological functions, lessons on evolution from picoalgae, metagenomics analysis, and optogenetics applications.

  7. Multiple photoreceptor systems control the swim pacemaker activity in box jellyfish

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garm, Anders Lydik; Mori, S.

    2009-01-01

    Like all other cnidarian medusae, box jellyfish propel themselves through the water by contracting their bell-shaped body in discrete swim pulses. These pulses are controlled by a swim pacemaker system situated in their sensory structures, the rhopalia. Each medusa has four rhopalia each...... with a similar set of six eyes of four morphologically different types. We have examined how each of the four eye types influences the swim pacemaker. Multiple photoreceptor systems, three of the four eye types, plus the rhopalial neuropil, affect the swim pacemaker. The lower lens eye inhibits the pacemaker...

  8. On Krasnoselskii's Cone Fixed Point Theorem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Man Kam Kwong

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, the Krasnoselskii fixed point theorem for cone maps and its many generalizations have been successfully applied to establish the existence of multiple solutions in the study of boundary value problems of various types. In the first part of this paper, we revisit the Krasnoselskii theorem, in a more topological perspective, and show that it can be deduced in an elementary way from the classical Brouwer-Schauder theorem. This viewpoint also leads to a topology-theoretic generalization of the theorem. In the second part of the paper, we extend the cone theorem in a different direction using the notion of retraction and show that a stronger form of the often cited Leggett-Williams theorem is a special case of this extension.

  9. Dirac cones in two-dimensional borane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Canales, Miguel; Galeev, Timur R.; Boldyrev, Alexander I.; Pickard, Chris J.

    2017-11-01

    We introduce two-dimensional borane, a single-layered material of BH stoichiometry, with promising electronic properties. We show that, according to density functional theory calculations, two-dimensional borane is semimetallic, with two symmetry-related Dirac cones meeting right at the Fermi energy Ef. The curvature of the cones is lower than in graphene, thus closer to the ideal linear dispersion. Its structure, formed by a puckered trigonal boron network with hydrogen atoms connected to each boron atom, can be understood as distorted, hydrogenated borophene [Mannix et al., Science 350, 1513 (2015), 10.1126/science.aad1080]. Chemical bonding analysis reveals the boron layer in the network being bound by delocalized four-center two-electron σ bonds. Finally, we suggest high pressure could be a feasible route to synthesize two-dimensional borane.

  10. Basic principle of cone beam computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Yong Suk; Kim, Gyu Tae; Hwang, Eui Hwan

    2006-01-01

    The use of computed tomography for dental procedures has increased recently. Cone beam computed tomography(CBCT) systems have been designed for imaging hard tissues of the dentomaxillofacial region. CBCT is capable of providing high resolution in images of high diagnostic quality. This technology allows for 3-dimensional representation of the dentomaxillofacial skeleton with minimal distortion, but at lower equipment cost, simpler image acquisition and lower patient dose. Because this technology produces images with isotropic sub-millimeter spatial resolution, it is ideally suited for dedicated dentomaxillofacial imaging. In this paper, we provide a brief overview of cone beam scanning technology and compare it with the fan beam scanning used in conventional CT and the basic principles of currently available CBCT systems

  11. Avian Radar - Is It Worth the Cost?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-01

    DC: The Federal Aviation Administration, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service , Wildlife...Agriculture Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service Wildlife Services. York, D. L., Engeman, R. M., Cummings, J. L., Rossi, C. L., & Sinnett, D. R... Health Inspection Service , Wildlife Services. DOT/FAA/AR-09/61. (2010). Deployments of Avian Radars at Civil Airports. Springfield: National

  12. Common Avian Infection Plagued the Tyrant Dinosaurs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, Ewan D. S.; Salisbury, Steven W.; Horner, John R.; Varricchio, David J.

    2009-01-01

    Background Tyrannosaurus rex and other tyrannosaurid fossils often display multiple, smooth-edged full-thickness erosive lesions on the mandible, either unilaterally or bilaterally. The cause of these lesions in the Tyrannosaurus rex specimen FMNH PR2081 (known informally by the name ‘Sue’) has previously been attributed to actinomycosis, a bacterial bone infection, or bite wounds from other tyrannosaurids. Methodology/Principal Findings We conducted an extensive survey of tyrannosaurid specimens and identified ten individuals with full-thickness erosive lesions. These lesions were described, measured and photographed for comparison with one another. We also conducted an extensive survey of related archosaurs for similar lesions. We show here that these lesions are consistent with those caused by an avian parasitic infection called trichomonosis, which causes similar abnormalities on the mandible of modern birds, in particular raptors. Conclusions/Significance This finding represents the first evidence for the ancient evolutionary origin of an avian transmissible disease in non-avian theropod dinosaurs. It also provides a valuable insight into the palaeobiology of these now extinct animals. Based on the frequency with which these lesions occur, we hypothesize that tyrannosaurids were commonly infected by a Trichomonas gallinae-like protozoan. For tyrannosaurid populations, the only non-avian dinosaur group that show trichomonosis-type lesions, it is likely that the disease became endemic and spread as a result of antagonistic intraspecific behavior, consumption of prey infected by a Trichomonas gallinae-like protozoan and possibly even cannibalism. The severity of trichomonosis-related lesions in specimens such as Tyrannosaurus rex FMNH PR2081 and Tyrannosaurus rex MOR 980, strongly suggests that these animals died as a direct result of this disease, mostly likely through starvation. PMID:19789646

  13. Common avian infection plagued the tyrant dinosaurs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewan D S Wolff

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Tyrannosaurus rex and other tyrannosaurid fossils often display multiple, smooth-edged full-thickness erosive lesions on the mandible, either unilaterally or bilaterally. The cause of these lesions in the Tyrannosaurus rex specimen FMNH PR2081 (known informally by the name 'Sue' has previously been attributed to actinomycosis, a bacterial bone infection, or bite wounds from other tyrannosaurids. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We conducted an extensive survey of tyrannosaurid specimens and identified ten individuals with full-thickness erosive lesions. These lesions were described, measured and photographed for comparison with one another. We also conducted an extensive survey of related archosaurs for similar lesions. We show here that these lesions are consistent with those caused by an avian parasitic infection called trichomonosis, which causes similar abnormalities on the mandible of modern birds, in particular raptors. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This finding represents the first evidence for the ancient evolutionary origin of an avian transmissible disease in non-avian theropod dinosaurs. It also provides a valuable insight into the palaeobiology of these now extinct animals. Based on the frequency with which these lesions occur, we hypothesize that tyrannosaurids were commonly infected by a Trichomonas gallinae-like protozoan. For tyrannosaurid populations, the only non-avian dinosaur group that show trichomonosis-type lesions, it is likely that the disease became endemic and spread as a result of antagonistic intraspecific behavior, consumption of prey infected by a Trichomonas gallinae-like protozoan and possibly even cannibalism. The severity of trichomonosis-related lesions in specimens such as Tyrannosaurus rex FMNH PR2081 and Tyrannosaurus rex MOR 980, strongly suggests that these animals died as a direct result of this disease, mostly likely through starvation.

  14. Avian influenza in birds and mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardona, Carol J; Xing, Zheng; Sandrock, Christian E; Davis, Cristina E

    2009-07-01

    The disease syndromes caused by avian influenza viruses are highly variable depending on the host species infected, its susceptibility and response to infection and the virulence of the infecting viral strain. Although avian influenza viruses have a broad host range in general, it is rare for an individual strain or subtype to infect more than one species. The H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza virus (HPAIV) lineages of viruses that descended from A/goose/Guandong/96 (H5N1 HPAIV) are unusual in the diversity of species they have infected worldwide. Although the species affected by H5N1 HPAI in the field and those that have been experimentally studied are diverse, their associated disease syndromes are remarkably similar across species. In some species, multi-organ failure and death are rapid and no signs of the disease are observed. Most prominently in this category are chickens and other avian species of the order Galliformes. In other species, neurologic signs develop resulting in the death of the host. This is what has been reported in domestic cats (Carnivora), geese (Anseriformes), ratites (Struthioniformes), pigeons inoculated with high doses (Columbiformes) and ducks infected with H5N1 HPAIV isolated since 2002 (Anseriformes). In some other species, the disease is more prolonged and although multi-organ failure and death are the eventual outcomes, the signs of disease are more extensive. Predominantly, these species include humans (Primates) and the laboratory models of human disease, the ferret (Carnivora), mouse (Rodentia) and cynamologous macaques (Primates). Finally, some species are more resistant to infection with H5N1 HPAIV and show few or no signs of disease. These species include pigeons in some studies (Columbiformes), ducks inoculated with pre-2002 isolates (Anseriformes), and pigs (Artiodactyla).

  15. Common avian infection plagued the tyrant dinosaurs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, Ewan D S; Salisbury, Steven W; Horner, John R; Varricchio, David J

    2009-09-30

    Tyrannosaurus rex and other tyrannosaurid fossils often display multiple, smooth-edged full-thickness erosive lesions on the mandible, either unilaterally or bilaterally. The cause of these lesions in the Tyrannosaurus rex specimen FMNH PR2081 (known informally by the name 'Sue') has previously been attributed to actinomycosis, a bacterial bone infection, or bite wounds from other tyrannosaurids. We conducted an extensive survey of tyrannosaurid specimens and identified ten individuals with full-thickness erosive lesions. These lesions were described, measured and photographed for comparison with one another. We also conducted an extensive survey of related archosaurs for similar lesions. We show here that these lesions are consistent with those caused by an avian parasitic infection called trichomonosis, which causes similar abnormalities on the mandible of modern birds, in particular raptors. This finding represents the first evidence for the ancient evolutionary origin of an avian transmissible disease in non-avian theropod dinosaurs. It also provides a valuable insight into the palaeobiology of these now extinct animals. Based on the frequency with which these lesions occur, we hypothesize that tyrannosaurids were commonly infected by a Trichomonas gallinae-like protozoan. For tyrannosaurid populations, the only non-avian dinosaur group that show trichomonosis-type lesions, it is likely that the disease became endemic and spread as a result of antagonistic intraspecific behavior, consumption of prey infected by a Trichomonas gallinae-like protozoan and possibly even cannibalism. The severity of trichomonosis-related lesions in specimens such as Tyrannosaurus rex FMNH PR2081 and Tyrannosaurus rex MOR 980, strongly suggests that these animals died as a direct result of this disease, mostly likely through starvation.

  16. The Avian Transcriptome Response to Malaria Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Videvall, Elin; Cornwallis, Charlie K.; Palinauskas, Vaidas; Valki?nas, Gediminas; Hellgren, Olof

    2015-01-01

    Malaria parasites are highly virulent pathogens which infect a wide range of vertebrates. Despite their importance, the way different hosts control and suppress malaria infections remains poorly understood. With recent developments in next-generation sequencing techniques, however, it is now possible to quantify the response of the entire transcriptome to infections. We experimentally infected Eurasian siskins (Carduelis spinus) with avian malaria parasites (Plasmodium ashfordi), and used hig...

  17. Integration and Validation of Avian Radars (IVAR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-01

    shape, density, gender ) is problematic; • Not suited to high-clutter environments (e.g., in forests, near buildings); • Health & safety issues...Fuca and the Saratoga Passage and within the rain shadow of the Olympic Mountains, NAS Whidbey Island offers high quality year round training...was to demonstrate that the digital avian radars being evaluated by the IVAR project can automatically discriminate the echoes of moving targets

  18. Applications of thermal imaging in avian science

    OpenAIRE

    McCafferty, D.J.

    2013-01-01

    Thermal imaging, or infrared thermography, has been used in avian science since the 1960s. More than 30 species of birds, ranging in size from passerines to ratites, have been studied using this technology. The main strength of this technique is that it is a non-invasive and non-contact method of measuring surface temperature. Its limitations and measurement errors are well understood and suitable protocols have been developed for a variety of experimental settings. Thermal imaging has been u...

  19. Variability of silver fir (Abies alba Mill. cones – variability of cone parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aniszewska Monika

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed at determining the shape of closed silver fir cones from the Jawor Forest District (Wroclaw, based purely on measurements of their length and thickness. Using these two parameters, the most accurate estimations were achieved with a fourth-degree polynomial fitting function. We then calculated the cones’ surface area and volume in three different ways: 1 Using the fourth-degree polynomial shape estimation, 2 Introducing indicators of compliance (k1, k2, k3 to calculate the volume and then comparing it to its actual value as measured in a pitcher filled with water, 3 Comparing the surface area of the cones as calculated with the polynomial function to the value obtained from ratios of indicators of compliance (ratios k4 and k5. We found that the calculated surface area and volume were substantially higher than the corresponding measured values. Test values of cone volume and surface area as calculated by our model were 8% and 5% lower, respectively, compared to direct measurements. We also determined the fir cones apparent density to be 0.8 g·cm-3on average. The gathered data on cone surface area, volume and bulk density is a valuable tool for optimizing the thermal peeling process in mill cabinets to acquire high quality seeds.

  20. The NLO jet vertex in the small-cone approximation for kt and cone algorithms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colferai, D.; Niccoli, A. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Firenze and INFN, Sezione di Firenze, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy)

    2015-04-15

    We determine the jet vertex for Mueller-Navelet jets and forward jets in the small-cone approximation for two particular choices of jet algoritms: the kt algorithm and the cone algorithm. These choices are motivated by the extensive use of such algorithms in the phenomenology of jets. The differences with the original calculations of the small-cone jet vertex by Ivanov and Papa, which is found to be equivalent to a formerly algorithm proposed by Furman, are shown at both analytic and numerical level, and turn out to be sizeable. A detailed numerical study of the error introduced by the small-cone approximation is also presented, for various observables of phenomenological interest. For values of the jet “radius” R=0.5, the use of the small-cone approximation amounts to an error of about 5% at the level of cross section, while it reduces to less than 2% for ratios of distributions such as those involved in the measure of the azimuthal decorrelation of dijets.

  1. The NLO jet vertex in the small-cone approximation for kt and cone algorithms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colferai, D.; Niccoli, A.

    2015-01-01

    We determine the jet vertex for Mueller-Navelet jets and forward jets in the small-cone approximation for two particular choices of jet algoritms: the kt algorithm and the cone algorithm. These choices are motivated by the extensive use of such algorithms in the phenomenology of jets. The differences with the original calculations of the small-cone jet vertex by Ivanov and Papa, which is found to be equivalent to a formerly algorithm proposed by Furman, are shown at both analytic and numerical level, and turn out to be sizeable. A detailed numerical study of the error introduced by the small-cone approximation is also presented, for various observables of phenomenological interest. For values of the jet “radius” R=0.5, the use of the small-cone approximation amounts to an error of about 5% at the level of cross section, while it reduces to less than 2% for ratios of distributions such as those involved in the measure of the azimuthal decorrelation of dijets.

  2. Hadronic wavefunctions in light-cone quantization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hyer, T.

    1994-05-01

    The analysis of light-cone wavefunctions seems the most promising theoretical approach to a detailed understanding of the structure of relativistic bound states, particularly hadrons. However, there are numerous complications in this approach. Most importantly, the light-cone approach sacrifices manifest rotational invariance in exchange for the elimination of negative-energy states. The requirement of rotational invariance of the full theory places important constraints on proposed light-cone wavefunctions, whether they are modelled or extracted from some numerical procedure. A formulation of the consequences of the hidden rotational symmetry has been sought for some time; it is presented in Chapter 2. In lattice gauge theory or heavy-quark effective theory, much of the focus is on the extraction of numerical values of operators which are related to the hadronic wavefunction. These operators are to some extent interdependent, with relations induced by fundamental constraints on the underlying wavefunction. The consequences of the requirement of unitarity are explored in Chapter 3, and are found to have startling phenomenological relevance. To test model light-cone wavefunctions, experimental predictions must be made. The reliability of perturbative QCD as a tool for making such predictions has been questioned. In Chapter 4, the author presents a computation of the rates for nucleon-antinucleon annihilation, improving the reliability of the perturbative computation by taking into account the Sudakov suppression of exclusive processes at large transverse impact parameter. In Chapter 5, he develops the analysis of semiexclusive production. This work focuses on processes in which a single isolated meson is produced perturbatively and recoils against a wide hadronizing system. At energies above about 10 GeV, semiexclusive processes are shown to be the most sensitive experimental probes of hadronic structure

  3. Lessons from the light-cone box

    CERN Document Server

    Leibbrandt, G

    2000-01-01

    Working in the noncovariant light-cone gauge, we discuss the explicit computation of the 1PI four-point function ("box diagram") in Yang- Mills theory. The complete box diagram which consists of 16 box subdiagrams, 8 lynx subdiagrams and 4 fish subdiagrams, yields both local and nonlocal UV divergent terms. The nonlocal terms are consistent with gauge symmetry and correspond to a nonlocal renormalization of the wave function. (14 refs).

  4. Instantons on Calabi-Yau cones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sperling, Marcus

    2015-12-01

    The Hermitian Yang-Mills equations on certain vector bundles over Calabi-Yau cones can be reduced to a set of matrix equations; in fact, these are Nahm-type equations. The latter can be analysed further by generalising arguments of Donaldson and Kronheimer used in the study of the original Nahm equations. Starting from certain equivariant connections, we show that the full set of instanton equations reduce, with a unique gauge transformation, to the holomorphicity condition alone.

  5. Variation among individuals in cone production in Pinus palustris (Pinaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haymes, Kelly L; Fox, Gordon A

    2012-04-01

    Reproductive output varies considerably among individuals within plant populations, and this is especially so in cone production of conifers. While this variation can have substantial effects on populations, little is known about its magnitude or causes. We studied variation in cone production for 2 years within a population of Pinus palustris Mill. (longleaf pine; Pinaceae). Using hurdle models, we evaluated the importance of burn treatments, tree size (dbh), canopy status (open, dominant, subordinate), and number of conspecific neighbors within 4 m (N(4)). Cone production of individuals-even after accounting for other variables-was strongly correlated between years. Trees in plots burned every 1, 2, or 5 years produced more cones than those burned every 7 years, or unburned. Larger trees tend to produce more cones, but the large effects of the other factors studied caused substantial scatter in the dbh-cone number relationship. Among trees in the open, dbh had little explanatory power. Subordinate trees with three neighbors produced no cones. Tree size alone was a weak predictor of cone production. Interactions with neighbors play an important role in generating reproductive heterogeneity, and must be accounted for when relating cone production to size. The strong between-year correlation, together with the large variance in cone production among trees without neighbors, suggests that still more of the variance may be explainable, but requires factors outside of our study.

  6. Diversity of the Photoreceptors and Spectral Opponency in the Compound Eye of the Golden Birdwing, Troides aeacus formosanus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Pei-Ju; Arikawa, Kentaro; Yang, En-Cheng

    2013-01-01

    The compound eye of the Golden Birdwing, Troides aeacus formosanus (Papilionidae, Lepidoptera), is furnished with three types of ommatidia, which are clearly different in pigmentation around the rhabdom. Each ommatidium contains nine photoreceptors, whose spectral sensitivities were analyzed electrophysiologically. We identified nine spectral types of photoreceptor with sensitivities peaking at 360 nm (UV), 390 nm (V), 440 nm (B), 510 nm (BG), 540 nm (sG), 550 nm (dG), 580 nm (O), 610 nm (R), and 630 nm (dR) respectively. The spectral sensitivities of the V, O, R and dR receptors did not match the predicted spectra of any visual pigments, but with the filtering effects of the pigments around the rhabdom, they can be reasonably explained. In some of the receptors, negative-going responses were observed when they were stimulated at certain wavelengths, indicating antagonistic interactions between photoreceptors. PMID:23614043

  7. Diversity of the photoreceptors and spectral opponency in the compound eye of the Golden Birdwing, Troides aeacus formosanus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei-Ju Chen

    Full Text Available The compound eye of the Golden Birdwing, Troides aeacus formosanus (Papilionidae, Lepidoptera, is furnished with three types of ommatidia, which are clearly different in pigmentation around the rhabdom. Each ommatidium contains nine photoreceptors, whose spectral sensitivities were analyzed electrophysiologically. We identified nine spectral types of photoreceptor with sensitivities peaking at 360 nm (UV, 390 nm (V, 440 nm (B, 510 nm (BG, 540 nm (sG, 550 nm (dG, 580 nm (O, 610 nm (R, and 630 nm (dR respectively. The spectral sensitivities of the V, O, R and dR receptors did not match the predicted spectra of any visual pigments, but with the filtering effects of the pigments around the rhabdom, they can be reasonably explained. In some of the receptors, negative-going responses were observed when they were stimulated at certain wavelengths, indicating antagonistic interactions between photoreceptors.

  8. Tracing the evolution of avian wing digits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xing; Mackem, Susan

    2013-06-17

    It is widely accepted that birds are a subgroup of dinosaurs, but there is an apparent conflict: modern birds have been thought to possess only the middle three fingers (digits II-III-IV) of an idealized five-digit tetrapod hand based on embryological data, but their Mesozoic tetanuran dinosaur ancestors are considered to have the first three digits (I-II-III) based on fossil evidence. How could such an evolutionary quirk arise? Various hypotheses have been proposed to resolve this paradox. Adding to the confusion, some recent developmental studies support a I-II-III designation for avian wing digits whereas some recent paleontological data are consistent with a II-III-IV identification of the Mesozoic tetanuran digits. A comprehensive analysis of both paleontological and developmental data suggests that the evolution of the avian wing digits may have been driven by homeotic transformations of digit identity, which are more likely to have occurred in a partial and piecemeal manner. Additionally, recent genetic studies in mouse models showing plausible mechanisms for central digit loss invite consideration of new alternative possibilities (I-II-IV or I-III-IV) for the homologies of avian wing digits. While much progress has been made, some advances point to the complexity of the problem and a final resolution to this ongoing debate demands additional work from both paleontological and developmental perspectives, which will surely yield new insights on mechanisms of evolutionary adaptation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Avian cytokines in health and disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wigley P

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Cytokines are proteins secreted by cells that play an important role in the activation and regulation of other cells and tissues during inflammation and immune responses. Although well described in several mammalian species, the role of cytokines and other related proteins is poorly understood in avian species. Recent advances in avian genetics and immunology have begun to allow the exploration of cytokines in health and disease. Cytokines may be classified in a number of ways, but may be conveniently arranged into four broad groups on the basis of their function. Proinflammatory cytokines such as interleukin-6 and interleukin-1beta play a role in mediating inflammation during disease or injury. Th1 cytokines, including interleukin-12 and interferon-gamma, are involved in the induction of cell-mediated immunity, whereas Th2 cytokines such as interleukin-4 are involved in the induction of humoral immunity. The final group Th3 or Tr cytokines play a role in regulation of immunity. The role of various cytokines in infectious and non-infectious diseases of chickens and turkeys is now being investigated. Although there are only a few reliable ELISAs or bioassays developed for avian cytokines, the use of molecular techniques, and in particular quantitative RT-PCR (Taqman has allowed investigation of cytokine responses in a number of diseases including salmonellosis, coccidiosis and autoimmune thyroiditis. In addition the use of recombinant cytokines as therapeutic agents or as vaccine adjuvants is now being explored.

  10. Global phylogeographic limits of Hawaii's avian malaria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beadell, J.S.; Ishtiaq, F.; Covas, R.; Melo, M.; Warren, B.H.; Atkinson, C.T.; Bensch, S.; Graves, G.R.; Jhala, Y.V.; Peirce, M.A.; Rahmani, A.R.; Fonseca, D.M.; Fleischer, R.C.

    2006-01-01

    The introduction of avian malaria (Plasmodium relictum) to Hawaii has provided a model system for studying the influence of exotic disease on naive host populations. Little is known, however, about the origin or the genetic variation of Hawaii's malaria and traditional classification methods have confounded attempts to place the parasite within a global ecological and evolutionary context. Using fragments of the parasite mitochondrial gene cytochrome b and the nuclear gene dihydrofolate reductase-thymidylate synthase obtained from a global survey of greater than 13 000 avian samples, we show that Hawaii's avian malaria, which can cause high mortality and is a major limiting factor for many species of native passerines, represents just one of the numerous lineages composing the morphological parasite species. The single parasite lineage detected in Hawaii exhibits a broad host distribution worldwide and is dominant on several other remote oceanic islands, including Bermuda and Moorea, French Polynesia. The rarity of this lineage in the continental New World and the restriction of closely related lineages to the Old World suggest limitations to the transmission of reproductively isolated parasite groups within the morphological species. ?? 2006 The Royal Society.

  11. Pax6-positive Müller glia cells express cell cycle markers but do not proliferate after photoreceptor injury in the mouse retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joly, Sandrine; Pernet, Vincent; Samardzija, Marijana; Grimm, Christian

    2011-07-01

    In lower vertebrates, such as fish, Müller glia plays an essential role in the restoration of visual function after retinal degeneration by transdifferentiating into photoreceptors and other retinal neurons. During this process, Müller cells re-enter the cell cycle, proliferate, and migrate from the inner nuclear layer (INL) to the photoreceptor layer where they express photoreceptor-specific markers. This process of Müller cell transdifferentiation is absent in mammals, and the loss of photoreceptors leads to permanent vision deficits.The mechanisms underlying the failure of mammalian Müller cells to behave as stem cells after photoreceptor degeneration are poorly understood. In the present study, we show that photoreceptor injury induces migration of PAX6-positive Müller cell nuclei toward the outer part of the INL and into the inner part of the outer nuclear layer. These cells express markers of the cell cycle, suggesting an attempt to re-enter the cell cycle similarly to lower vertebrates.However, mouse Müller cells do not proliferate in response to photoreceptor injury implying a blockade of the S-phase transition. Our results suggest that a release of the S-phase blockade may be crucial for Müller cells to successfully transdifferentiate and replace injured photoreceptors in mammals. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  12. MutT homolog-1 attenuates oxidative DNA damage and delays photoreceptor cell death in inherited retinal degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Yusuke; Ikeda, Yasuhiro; Yoshida, Noriko; Notomi, Shoji; Hisatomi, Toshio; Oka, Sugako; De Luca, Gabriele; Yonemitsu, Yoshikazu; Bignami, Margherita; Nakabeppu, Yusaku; Ishibashi, Tatsuro

    2012-10-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a genetically heterogenous group of inherited retinal degenerative diseases resulting from photoreceptor cell death and affecting >1 million persons globally. Although oxidative stress has been implicated in the pathogenesis of RP, the mechanisms by which oxidative stress mediates photoreceptor cell death are largely unknown. Here, we show that oxidation of nucleic acids is a key component in the initiation of death-signaling pathways in rd10 mice, a model of RP. Accumulation of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxo-dG) increased in photoreceptor cells, and especially within their nuclei, in rd10 mice as well as in Royal College of Surgeons rats, another model of RP caused by different genetic mutations. Vitreous samples from humans with RP contained higher levels of 8-oxo-dG excreted than samples from nondegenerative controls. Transgenic overexpression of human MutT homolog-1, which hydrolyzes oxidized purine nucleoside triphosphates in the nucleotide pool, significantly attenuated 8-oxo-dG accumulation in nuclear DNA and photoreceptor cell death in rd10 mice, in addition to suppressing DNA single-strand break formation, poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase activation, and nuclear translocation of apoptosis-inducing factor. These findings indicate that oxidative DNA damage is an important process for the triggering of photoreceptor cell death in rd10 mice and suggest that stimulation of DNA repair enzymes may be a novel therapeutic approach to attenuate photoreceptor cell loss in RP. Copyright © 2012 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. The Hippo pathway controls a switch between retinal progenitor cell proliferation and photoreceptor cell differentiation in zebrafish.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoichi Asaoka

    Full Text Available The precise regulation of numbers and types of neurons through control of cell cycle exit and terminal differentiation is an essential aspect of neurogenesis. The Hippo signaling pathway has recently been identified as playing a crucial role in promoting cell cycle exit and terminal differentiation in multiple types of stem cells, including in retinal progenitor cells. When Hippo signaling is activated, the core Mst1/2 kinases activate the Lats1/2 kinases, which in turn phosphorylate and inhibit the transcriptional cofactor Yap. During mouse retinogenesis, overexpression of Yap prolongs progenitor cell proliferation, whereas inhibition of Yap decreases this proliferation and promotes retinal cell differentiation. However, to date, it remains unknown how the Hippo pathway affects the differentiation of distinct neuronal cell types such as photoreceptor cells. In this study, we investigated whether Hippo signaling regulates retinogenesis during early zebrafish development. Knockdown of zebrafish mst2 induced early embryonic defects, including altered retinal pigmentation and morphogenesis. Similar abnormal retinal phenotypes were observed in zebrafish embryos injected with a constitutively active form of yap [(yap (5SA]. Loss of Yap's TEAD-binding domain, two WW domains, or transcription activation domain attenuated the retinal abnormalities induced by yap (5SA, indicating that all of these domains contribute to normal retinal development. Remarkably, yap (5SA-expressing zebrafish embryos displayed decreased expression of transcription factors such as otx5 and crx, which orchestrate photoreceptor cell differentiation by activating the expression of rhodopsin and other photoreceptor cell genes. Co-immunoprecipitation experiments revealed that Rx1 is a novel interacting partner of Yap that regulates photoreceptor cell differentiation. Our results suggest that Yap suppresses the differentiation of photoreceptor cells from retinal progenitor cells by

  14. Different effects of valproic acid on photoreceptor loss in Rd1 and Rd10 retinal degeneration mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitton, Kenneth P; Guzman, Alvaro E; Deshpande, Mrinalini; Byrd, David; DeLooff, Camryn; Mkoyan, Kristina; Zlojutro, Paul; Wallace, Adrianne; Metcalf, Brandon; Laux, Kirsten; Sotzen, Jason; Tran, Trung

    2014-01-01

    The histone-deacetylase inhibitor activity of valproic acid (VPA) was discovered after VPA's adoption as an anticonvulsant. This generated speculation for VPA's potential to increase the expression of neuroprotective genes. Clinical trials for retinitis pigmentosa (RP) are currently active, testing VPA's potential to reduce photoreceptor loss; however, we lack information regarding the effects of VPA on available mammalian models of retinal degeneration, nor do we know if retinal gene expression is perturbed by VPA in a predictable way. Thus, we examined the effects of systemic VPA on neurotrophic factor and Nrl-related gene expression in the mouse retina and compared VPA's effects on the rate of photoreceptor loss in two strains of mice, Pde6b(rd1/rd1) and Pde6b(rd10/rd10) . The expression of Bdnf, Gdnf, Cntf, and Fgf2 was measured by quantitative PCR after single and multiple doses of VPA (intraperitoneal) in wild-type and Pde6b(rd1/rd1) mice. Pde6b(rd1/rd1) mice were treated with daily doses of VPA during the period of rapid photoreceptor loss. Pde6b(rd10/rd10) mice were also treated with systemic VPA to compare in a partial loss-of-function model. Retinal morphology was assessed by virtual microscopy or spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). Full-field and focal electroretinography (ERG) analysis were employed with Pde6b(rd10/rd10) mice to measure retinal function. In wild-type postnatal mice, a single VPA dose increased the expression of Bdnf and Gdnf in the neural retina after 18 h, while the expression of Cntf was reduced by 70%. Daily dosing of wild-type mice from postnatal day P17 to P28 resulted in smaller increases in Bdnf and Gdnf expression, normal Cntf expression, and reduced Fgf2 expression (25%). Nrl gene expression was decreased by 50%, while Crx gene expression was not affected. Rod-specific expression of Mef2c and Nr2e3 was decreased substantially by VPA treatment, while Rhodopsin and Pde6b gene expression was normal at P28. Daily

  15. Characterisation and Identification of Avian Influenza Virus (AI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dyah Ayu Hewajuli

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Avian Influenza is caused by Influenza A virus which is a member of Orthomyxoviridae family. Influenza A virus is enveloped single stranded RNA with eight-segmented, negative polarity and filament or oval form, 50 – 120 by 200 – 300 nm diameters. Influenza A viruses have been found to infect birds, human, pig, horse and sometimes in the other mammalian such as seal and whale. The viruses are divided into different subtypes based on the antigenic protein which covers the virus surface i.e. Haemaglutinin (HA and Neuraminidase (NA. In addition, the nomenclature of subtype virus is based on HA and NA i.e HxNx, for example H5N1, H9N2 and the others. According to pathogenic, it could be divided into two distinct groups, they are Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza (HPAI and Low Pathogenic Avian Influenza (LPAI. The Avian Influenza viruses have been continuously occurred and spread out in some continents such us America, Europe, Africa and Asian countries. The outbreak of Avian Influenza caused high mortality on birds and it has been reported that in human case Avian Influenza subtype H5N1 virus has caused several deaths. To anticipate this condition, an effort to prevent the transmission of Avian Influenza is needed. These strategic attempts include biosecurity, depopulation, vaccination, control of virus movement, monitoring and evaluation. Laboratory diagnostic plays an important role for successful prevention, control and eradication programs of Avian Influenza. Recently, there are two diagnostic methods for Avian Influenza. They are conventional (virological diagnosis and molecular methods. The conventional method is usually used for initial diagnostic of Avian Influenza. The conventional method takes more time and more costly, whereas the molecular method is more effective than conventional method. Based on the available diagnostic technique, basically diagnostic of Avian Influenza is done by serology test, isolation and identification as well

  16. Pulsar average waveforms and hollow cone beam models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backer, D. C.

    1975-01-01

    An analysis of pulsar average waveforms at radio frequencies from 40 MHz to 15 GHz is presented. The analysis is based on the hypothesis that the observer sees one cut of a hollow-cone beam pattern and that stationary properties of the emission vary over the cone. The distributions of apparent cone widths for different observed forms of the average pulse profiles (single, double/unresolved, double/resolved, triple and multiple) are in modest agreement with a model of a circular hollow-cone beam with random observer-spin axis orientation, a random cone axis-spin axis alignment, and a small range of physical hollow-cone parameters for all objects.

  17. Techniques for optimizing nanotips derived from frozen taylor cones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirsch, Gregory

    2017-12-05

    Optimization techniques are disclosed for producing sharp and stable tips/nanotips relying on liquid Taylor cones created from electrically conductive materials with high melting points. A wire substrate of such a material with a preform end in the shape of a regular or concave cone, is first melted with a focused laser beam. Under the influence of a high positive potential, a Taylor cone in a liquid/molten state is formed at that end. The cone is then quenched upon cessation of the laser power, thus freezing the Taylor cone. The tip of the frozen Taylor cone is reheated by the laser to allow its precise localized melting and shaping. Tips thus obtained yield desirable end-forms suitable as electron field emission sources for a variety of applications. In-situ regeneration of the tip is readily accomplished. These tips can also be employed as regenerable bright ion sources using field ionization/desorption of introduced chemical species.

  18. In vivo imaging of human photoreceptor mosaic with wavefront sensorless adaptive optics optical coherence tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Kevin S K; Jian, Yifan; Cua, Michelle; Bonora, Stefano; Zawadzki, Robert J; Sarunic, Marinko V

    2015-02-01

    Wavefront sensorless adaptive optics optical coherence tomography (WSAO-OCT) is a novel imaging technique for in vivo high-resolution depth-resolved imaging that mitigates some of the challenges encountered with the use of sensor-based adaptive optics designs. This technique replaces the Hartmann Shack wavefront sensor used to measure aberrations with a depth-resolved image-driven optimization algorithm, with the metric based on the OCT volumes acquired in real-time. The custom-built ultrahigh-speed GPU processing platform and fast modal optimization algorithm presented in this paper was essential in enabling real-time, in vivo imaging of human retinas with wavefront sensorless AO correction. WSAO-OCT is especially advantageous for developing a clinical high-resolution retinal imaging system as it enables the use of a compact, low-cost and robust lens-based adaptive optics design. In this report, we describe our WSAO-OCT system for imaging the human photoreceptor mosaic in vivo. We validated our system performance by imaging the retina at several eccentricities, and demonstrated the improvement in photoreceptor visibility with WSAO compensation.

  19. Morphological analyses of the retinal photoreceptor cells in the nocturnally adapted owl monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuniyoshi, Nobue; Yoshida, Yuji; Itoh, Yoshiki; Yokota, Shin-Ichi; Kuraishi, Takeshi; Hattori, Shosaku; Kondo, Tomohiro; Yoshizawa, Midori; Kai, Chieko; Kiso, Yasuo; Kusakabe, Ken Takeshi

    2018-01-26

    Owl monkeys are the only one species possessing the nocturnal lifestyles among the simian monkeys. Their eyes and retinas have been interested associating with the nocturnal adaptation. We examined the cellular specificity and electroretinogram (ERG) reactivity in the retina of the owl monkeys by comparison with the squirrel monkeys, taxonomically close-species and expressing diurnal behavior. Owl monkeys did not have clear structure of the foveal pit by the funduscope, whereas the retinal wholemount specimens indicated a small-condensed spot of the ganglion cells. There were abundant numbers of the rod photoreceptor cells in owl monkeys than those of the squirrel monkeys. However, the owl monkeys' retina did not possess superiority for rod cell-reactivity in the scotopic ERG responses. Scanning electron microscopic observation revealed that the rod cells in owl monkeys' retina had very small-sized inner and outer segments as compared with squirrel monkeys. Owl monkeys showed typical nocturnal traits such as rod-cell dominance. However, the individual photoreceptor cells seemed to be functionally weak for visual capacity, caused from the morphological immaturity at the inner and outer segments.

  20. Molecular mechanisms for mediating light-dependent nucleo/cytoplasmic partitioning of phytochrome photoreceptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klose, Cornelia; Viczián, András; Kircher, Stefan; Schäfer, Eberhard; Nagy, Ferenc

    2015-05-01

    The photoreceptors phytochromes monitor the red/far-red part of the spectrum, exist in the biologically active Pfr (far-red absorbing) or inactive Pr (red absorbing) forms, and function as red/far-red light-regulated molecular switches to modulate plant development and growth. Phytochromes are synthesized in the cytoplasm, and light induces translocation of the Pfr conformer into the nucleus. Nuclear import of phytochromes is a highly regulated process and is fine-tuned by the quality and quantity of light. It appears that phytochrome A (phyA) and phytochrome B (phyB) do not possess active endogenous nuclear import signals (NLSs), thus light-induced translocation of these photoreceptors into the nucleus requires direct protein–protein interactions with their NLS-containing signaling partners. Sub-cellular partitioning of the various phytochrome species is mediated by different molecular machineries. Translocation of phyA into the nucleus is promoted by FAR-RED ELONGATED HYPOCOTYL 1 (FHY1) and FHY1-LIKE (FHL), but the identity of nuclear transport facilitators mediating the import of phyB-E into the nucleus remains elusive. Phytochromes localized in the nucleus are associated with specific protein complexes, termed photobodies. The size and distribution of these structures are regulated by the intensity and duration of irradiation, and circumstantial evidence indicates that they are involved in fine-tuning phytochrome signaling.