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Sample records for average neck flexion

  1. Extraction of average neck flexion angle during swallowing in neutral and chin-tuck positions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sejdić Ervin

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A common but debated technique in the management of swallowing difficulties is the chin tuck swallow, where the neck is flexed forward prior to swallowing. Natural variations in chin tuck angles across individuals may contribute to the differential effectiveness of the technique. Methodology To facilitate the study of chin tuck angle variations, we present a template tracking algorithm that automatically extracts neck angles from sagittal videos of individuals performing chin tuck swallows. Three yellow markers geometrically arranged on a pair of dark visors were used as tracking cues. Results The algorithm was applied to data collected from 178 healthy participants during neutral and chin tuck position swallows. Our analyses revealed no major influences of body mass index and age on neck flexion angles during swallowing, while gender influenced the average neck angle only during wet swallows in the neutral position. Chin tuck angles seem to be independent of anthropometry and gender in healthy adults, but deserve further study in pathological populations. Conclusion The proposed neck flexion angle extraction algorithm may be useful in future studies where strict participant compliance to swallowing task protocol can be assured.

  2. Femoral neck radiography: effect of flexion on visualization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To determine whether flexion improves radiographic visualization of the femoral neck when the femur is externally rotated. Five human femora, with varying neck-shaft and anteversion angles, were measured and immobilized. Degree of flexion required to bring the femoral neck horizontal was measured, varying the rotation. Next, one bone was radiographed in 16 positions, varying rotation in 15o and flexion in 10o increments. Radiographs were presented in randomized blinded fashion to 15 staff radiologists for scoring of femoral neck visualization. Following this, all 5 bones were radiographed in 4 positions of rotation and at 0o and 20o flexion, and blinded randomized review of radiographs was repeated. Comparisons between angles and rotations were made using the Mann-Whitney test. The flexion angle required to bring the long axis of the femoral neck horizontal correlated directly with the degree of external rotation (ρ o internal rotation to 30o external rotation (ρ o flexion was applied to bones in external rotation, visualization significantly improved at 15o (ρ o (ρ o) of flexion can significantly improve radiographic visualization. This manoeuvre could be useful for radiography of the femoral neck when initial radiographs are inadequate because of external rotation of the leg. (author)

  3. Femoral neck radiography: effect of flexion on visualization

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    Garry, S.C. [Univ. of Alberta, Dept. of Radiology and Diagnostic Imaging, Walter C Mackenzie Health Sciences Centre, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada); Jhangri, G.S. [Univ. of Alberta, Dept. Public Health Sciences, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada); Lambert, R.G.W. [Univ. of Alberta, Dept.of Radiology and Diagnostic Imaging, Walter C Mackenzie Health Sciences Centre, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada)]. E-mail: rglamber@cha.ab.ca

    2005-06-15

    To determine whether flexion improves radiographic visualization of the femoral neck when the femur is externally rotated. Five human femora, with varying neck-shaft and anteversion angles, were measured and immobilized. Degree of flexion required to bring the femoral neck horizontal was measured, varying the rotation. Next, one bone was radiographed in 16 positions, varying rotation in 15{sup o} and flexion in 10{sup o} increments. Radiographs were presented in randomized blinded fashion to 15 staff radiologists for scoring of femoral neck visualization. Following this, all 5 bones were radiographed in 4 positions of rotation and at 0{sup o} and 20{sup o} flexion, and blinded randomized review of radiographs was repeated. Comparisons between angles and rotations were made using the Mann-Whitney test. The flexion angle required to bring the long axis of the femoral neck horizontal correlated directly with the degree of external rotation ({rho} < 0.05). Visualization of the femoral neck in the extended position progressively deteriorated from 15{sup o} internal rotation to 30{sup o} external rotation ({rho} <0.01). However, when 20{sup o} flexion was applied to bones in external rotation, visualization significantly improved at 15{sup o} ({rho} <0.05) and 30{sup o} ({rho} <0.01). Flexion of the externally rotated femur can bring the femoral neck into horizontal alignment, and a relatively small amount (20{sup o}) of flexion can significantly improve radiographic visualization. This manoeuvre could be useful for radiography of the femoral neck when initial radiographs are inadequate because of external rotation of the leg. (author)

  4. Are neck flexion, neck rotation, and sitting at work risk factors for neck pain? Results of a prospective cohort study

    OpenAIRE

    Ariens, G.A.M.; Bongers, P M; Douwes, M; Miedema, M.C.; Hoogendoorn, W.E.; Van der Wal; Bouter, L M; Mechelen, van, J.B.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To study the relation between neck pain and work related neck flexion, neck rotation, and sitting.
METHODS—A prospective cohort study was performed with a follow up of 3 years among 1334 workers from 34 companies. Work related physical load was assessed by analysing objectively measured exposure data (video recordings) of neck flexion, neck rotation, and sitting posture. Neck pain was assessed by a questionnaire. Adjustments were made for various physical factors that were related o...

  5. Effect of neck flexion restriction on sternocleidomastoid and abdominal muscle activity during curl-up exercises

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Dong-Kyu; Moon, Dong-chul; Hong, Ki-Hoon

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of neck flexion restriction on sternocleidomastoid (SCM), rectus abdominis (RA), and external oblique (EO) muscle activity during a traditional curl-up exercise and a curl-up with neck flexion restriction. [Subjects] In total, 13 healthy male subjects volunteered for this study. [Methods] All subjects performed a traditional curl-up exercise and a curl-up exercise in which neck flexion was restricted by the subject’s hand. Surf...

  6. Influence of head-down and lateral decubitus neck flexion on heart rate variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, C M; Wood, R H; Welsch, M A

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the response of heart rate variability (HRV), a noninvasive index of autonomic control, to head-down neck flexion (HDNF), which engages both otoliths and neck muscle afferents, and to lateral decubitus neck flexion (LNF), in which neck afferents are activated, whereas otolith afferent input is not. HRV and forearm blood flow were evaluated in participants lying prone, during HDNF, lying in the lateral decubitus position, and during LNF. Compared with the prone position, HDNF resulted in lower high-frequency (46.9 +/- 7.1 vs. 62.3 +/- 6.2) and higher low-frequency (53.1 +/- 7.1 vs. 37.7 +/- 6.2) power, expressed as normalized units, along with higher low-frequency-to-high-frequency ratio (1.65 +/- 0.3 vs. 0.78 +/- 0.2), whereas LNF resulted in no alterations in HRV indexes. Furthermore, there were no significant differences in forearm blood flow or vascular resistance among any of the positions. Our data suggest that otolith organs influence autonomic modulation of the heart, supporting previous studies reporting that HDNF elicits increased sympathetic outflow. These data further suggest that HDNF results in a parasympathetic withdrawal from the heart in addition to sympathetic activation. PMID:11133902

  7. Skin sympathetic outflow during head-down neck flexion in humans.

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    Ray, C A; Hume, K M; Shortt, T L

    1997-09-01

    We have previously demonstrated increases in muscle sympathetic nerve activity during head-down neck flexion (HDNF). The purpose of the present study was to determine if HDNF also activates skin sympathetic nerve activity (SSNA). SSNA, heart rate, arterial pressure, skin blood flow, calf blood flow, and calculated calf vascular resistance (mean arterial pressure/calf blood flow) were determined in 12 subjects during 3 min of baseline (lying prone with chin supported) and 3 min of HDNF. There were no significant changes in heart rate and arterial pressures during HDNF; however, diastolic and mean arterial pressure tended to increase slightly. Calf blood flow decreased 22% and calf vascular resistance increased 46% during HDNF. SSNA did not significantly change during HDNF. In three subjects we measured both muscle and skin sympathetic nerve activity during HDNF. In these trials, muscle sympathetic nerve activity consistently increased, but SSNA did not. The results indicate that HDNF in humans activates muscle sympathetic nerve activity, but does not activate SSNA. Thus vestibular stimulation may elicit differential activation of sympathetic outflow in humans. PMID:9321897

  8. Sympathetic and vascular responses to head-down neck flexion in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shortt, T L; Ray, C A

    1997-04-01

    Animal studies have demonstrated increases in sympathetic nerve outflow with vestibular stimulation. The purpose of the present study was to determine whether vestibulosympathetic reflexes are engaged in humans. Muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA), heart rate, arterial pressure, calf blood flow (CBF), and calculated calf vascular resistance (CVR; mean arterial pressure/CBF) were determined during 10 min of baseline (laying prone with chin supported) and 10 min of head-down neck flexion (HDNF). MSNA responses were measured in nine subjects, and calf vascular responses were determined in seven of these subjects. Heart rate increased during the first minute of HDNF (71 +/- 2 to 76 +/- 3 beats/min; P HDNF. Diastolic and mean arterial pressures also increased slightly with HDNF (80 +/- 3 to 82 +/- 3 and 96 +/- 3 to 98 +/- 3 mmHg, respectively; P HDNF. CBF decreased 14% (4.63 +/- 0.78 to 3.97 +/- 0.60 ml x min(-1) x 100 ml(-1); P HDNF. These changes corresponded with significant increases in MSNA during HDNF. MSNA, expressed as burst frequency, increased from 14 +/- 2 to 20 +/- 2 bursts/min (P HDNF (19.6 +/- 1.2 to 19.7 +/- 1.5 omega), suggesting no major change in central blood volume. The results indicate that HDNF elicits increases in CVR that are mediated by the augmentation of MSNA. Arterial pressure responses and thoracic impedance data suggest that high and low pressure baroreflexes were not the mechanism for sympathetic activation. The immediate increase in MSNA with HDNF suggests a role for vestibulosympathetic reflexes. PMID:9139962

  9. Radioanatomy of upper airways in flexion and retroflexion of the neck

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ten flexion-retroflexion radiographs of the cervical spine (in lateral projection) were utilized to study anatomical configuration and topography of the upper airpassages in these two positions. Measurements of AP diameters revealed narrowing in flexion and widening in retroflexion, being maximal at the region of the epiglottis, and minimal at the regions of larynx and trachea. The distance from the pharyngeal attachment of the skull-base, to the upper chest aperture proved to be markedly greater in retroflexion than in flexion. As the pharynx virtually does not change its length during these movements, it is drawn up (with respect to the upper chest aperture) in retroflexion, and pushed down in flexion, over a mean distance of 42 mm. The up and down movement of the upper part of the trachea is slightly less: 38 mm. (orig.)

  10. The Effect of Dry Needling on Range of Motion of Neck Lateral Flexion in Subjects With Active Trigger Point in Upper Trapezius Muscle

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    Ziaeifar

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background Myofascial trigger point is one of the most common causes of musculoskeletal disorders. Myofascial trigger point in upper trapezius has been reported as a symptom in patients with neck and upper thoracic pain. Objectives The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of dry needling compared with ischemic pressure on trigger point in upper trapezius muscle. Materials and Methods 28 subjects with myofascial trigger point in upper trapezius participated in this study. The subjects were randomly assigned to two groups: dry needling (n = 13 and ischemic pressure (n = 15. The neck lateral flexion range of motion was measured before and after treatment in both groups using a standard goniometer. Paired t-test was used to determine any significant difference in range of motion after treatment sessions compared with pre-treatment score in control and experimental group. Analysis of Covariance (ANCOVA was calculated to determine the significance of differences between the control and experimental groups in post-test scores, with pre-treatment scores used as covariates in the analysis. Results Statistical analysis (paired t-test revealed significant increase in neck lateral flexion range of motion in contra-lateral side after treatment sessions in control and experimental group compared with pre-treatment score (P < 0.05. However, only dry needling was effective in increase of range of motion in Ipsi-lateral side (P = 0.001. In the ANCOVA, controlling for pre-test scores, no significant difference was found between the two groups in the after treatment sessions (P = 0.06 and (P = 0.15. Conclusions The application of DN produces an improvement in ILF and CLF can be prescribed for subjects with MTP in UT muscles.

  11. Average arterial input function for quantitative dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of neck nodal metastases

    OpenAIRE

    Shukla-Dave, Amita; Lee, Nancy; Stambuk, Hilda; Wang, YA; Huang, Wei; Howard T Thaler; Patel, Snehal G.; Shah, Jatin P.; Koutcher, Jason A

    2009-01-01

    Background The present study determines the feasibility of generating an average arterial input function (Avg-AIF) from a limited population of patients with neck nodal metastases to be used for pharmacokinetic modeling of dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) data in clinical trials of larger populations. Methods Twenty patients (mean age 50 years [range 27–77 years]) with neck nodal metastases underwent pretreatment DCE-MRI studies with a temporal resolution of 3.75 to 7.5 sec on a 1.5T c...

  12. Average arterial input function for quantitative dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of neck nodal metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present study determines the feasibility of generating an average arterial input function (Avg-AIF) from a limited population of patients with neck nodal metastases to be used for pharmacokinetic modeling of dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) data in clinical trials of larger populations. Twenty patients (mean age 50 years [range 27–77 years]) with neck nodal metastases underwent pretreatment DCE-MRI studies with a temporal resolution of 3.75 to 7.5 sec on a 1.5T clinical MRI scanner. Eleven individual AIFs (Ind-AIFs) met the criteria of expected enhancement pattern and were used to generate Avg-AIF. Tofts model was used to calculate pharmacokinetic DCE-MRI parameters. Bland-Altman plots and paired Student t-tests were used to describe significant differences between the pharmacokinetic parameters obtained from individual and average AIFs. Ind-AIFs obtained from eleven patients were used to calculate the Avg-AIF. No overall significant difference (bias) was observed for the transfer constant (Ktrans) measured with Ind-AIFs compared to Avg-AIF (p = 0.20 for region-of-interest (ROI) analysis and p = 0.18 for histogram median analysis). Similarly, no overall significant difference was observed for interstitial fluid space volume fraction (ve) measured with Ind-AIFs compared to Avg-AIF (p = 0.48 for ROI analysis and p = 0.93 for histogram median analysis). However, the Bland-Altman plot suggests that as Ktrans increases, the Ind-AIF estimates tend to become proportionally higher than the Avg-AIF estimates. We found no statistically significant overall bias in Ktrans or ve estimates derived from Avg-AIF, generated from a limited population, as compared with Ind-AIFs. However, further study is needed to determine whether calibration is needed across the range of Ktrans. The Avg-AIF obtained from a limited population may be used for pharmacokinetic modeling of DCE-MRI data in larger population studies with neck nodal metastases. Further validation of the Avg

  13. The effect of three different head-neck positions on the average EMG activity of three important neck muscles in the horse.

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    Kienapfel, K

    2015-02-01

    The Knowledge of muscle activity in common head-neck positions (HNPs) is a necessary precondition for making judgements on HNPs. The aim of the study was to record the surface electromyography activities of important muscles of the horse's neck in various HNPs. The electrical activities of the m. splenius, brachiocephalicus and trapezius were recorded on both sides. Five horses, both with and without a rider, were examined in all three gaits on both hands in three different HNPs: a 'free' position, a 'gathered' (head higher, neck more flexed) position with the noseline in front of the vertical and a 'hyperflexed' position. Averages of ten consecutive gait cycles in each HNP were evaluated and compared by standard statistical methods. No difference between ridden and unridden horses could be detected. The m. brachiocephalicus was in the hyperflexed position in all gaits significantly (p free position, which were not significantly different. By contrast, the m. splenius was in the hyperflexed position less active than in the free position (p free and gathered positions deviated significantly (p free (p free position. Again, the free and gathered positions differed significantly (p < 0.01). In trot, the same pattern occured, although the gathered and hyperflexed positions did not differ significantly. In the canter, the activities of the m. trapezius showed no differences between HNPs. In HNPs with the noseline in front of the vertical, the muscles of the topline (m. splenius, m. trapezius) are activated and trained. In the hyperflexed position, however, a major muscle of the lower topline (m. brachiocephalicus) is activated and trained. PMID:24954642

  14. Neck

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1996-01-01

    3.1 Neck960630 Surgical treatment for occipito-cervical deformities. Jia Lianshun (贾连顺), etal. Dept Orthopaed Surg Changzheng Hosp,2nd Mil Med Univ, Shanghai 200030.Chin Or-thopaed 1996, 16(7): 451-454 Fifty-six patients with developmental mal-formation of the occipital-atlanto-axis regionwere treated with resection of the posterior archof the atlas, enlargement of the foramen mag-num and bridge grafting of the occipital andaxis. There were 35 males and 21 females with

  15. Improving Pre-Operative Flexion in Primary TKA: A Surgical Technique Emphasizing Knee Flexion with 5-Year Follow-Up

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    Edward McPherson

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This study prospectively reviews a consecutive series of 228 primary total knee arthroplasty (TKA procedures utilizing a technique to optimize knee flexion. The main features include: (1the use of a “patellar friendly” femoral component and reduced thickness patellar components, (2 patient individualized adjustment of the femoral component rotation set strictly to the anterior-posterior femoral axis, (3a rigorous flexion compartment debridement to remove non-essential posterior femoral bone with a Z-osteotome, and (4incorporation of a rapid recovery protocol with features to promote knee flexion. Results were categorized into three groups: low pre-op flexion (90 degrees and below, regular pre-op flexion (91-125 degrees, and high pre-op flexion (126 degrees and above. Average flexion in the low flexion group improved by 20 degrees at 6 weeks, 28 degrees at 3 months, 31 degrees at 1 year, and 30 degrees at 5 years. In the regular flexion group, average flexion improved by 2 degrees at 6 weeks, 10 degrees at 3 months, 12 degrees at 1 year, and 13 degrees at 5 years. Finally, in the high flexion group, average flexion decreased by 7 degrees at 6 weeks, regained preoperative levels at 3 months, and increased by 3 degrees at 1 year and 4 degrees at 5 years. In summary, a technique that emphasizes patellofemoral kinematics can consistently improve flexion in TKA in short and long-term follow-up.

  16. Comprehensive Population-Averaged Arterial Input Function for Dynamic Contrast–Enhanced vMagnetic Resonance Imaging of Head and Neck Cancer

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    Onxley, Jennifer D.; Yoo, David S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Muradyan, Naira [iCAD Inc., Nashua, New Hampshire (United States); MacFall, James R. [Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Brizel, David M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Department of Surgery, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Craciunescu, Oana I., E-mail: Oana.Craciunescu@duke.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States)

    2014-07-01

    Purpose: To generate a population-averaged arterial input function (PA-AIF) for quantitative analysis of dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI data in head and neck cancer patients. Methods and Materials: Twenty patients underwent dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI during concurrent chemoradiation therapy. Imaging consisted of 2 baseline scans 1 week apart (B1/B2) and 1 scan after 1 week of chemoradiation therapy (Wk1). Regions of interest (ROIs) in the right and left carotid arteries were drawn on coronal images. Plasma concentration curves of all ROIs were averaged and fit to a biexponential decay function to obtain the final PA-AIF (AvgAll). Right-sided and left-sided ROI plasma concentration curves were averaged separately to obtain side-specific AIFs (AvgRight/AvgLeft). Regions of interest were divided by time point to obtain time-point-specific AIFs (AvgB1/AvgB2/AvgWk1). The vascular transfer constant (K{sub trans}) and the fractional extravascular, extracellular space volume (V{sub e}) for primaries and nodes were calculated using the AvgAll AIF, the appropriate side-specific AIF, and the appropriate time-point-specific AIF. Median K{sub trans} and V{sub e} values derived from AvgAll were compared with those obtained from the side-specific and time-point-specific AIFs. The effect of using individual AIFs was also investigated. Results: The plasma parameters for AvgAll were a{sub 1,2} = 27.11/17.65 kg/L, m{sub 1,2} = 11.75/0.21 min{sup −1}. The coefficients of repeatability (CRs) for AvgAll versus AvgLeft were 0.04 min{sup −1} for K{sub trans} and 0.02 for V{sub e}. For AvgAll versus AvgRight, the CRs were 0.08 min{sup −1} for K{sub trans} and 0.02 for V{sub e}. When AvgAll was compared with AvgB1/AvgB2/AvgWk1, the CRs were slightly higher: 0.32/0.19/0.78 min{sup −1}, respectively, for K{sub trans}; and 0.07/0.08/0.09 for V{sub e}. Use of a PA-AIF was not significantly different from use of individual AIFs. Conclusion: A PA-AIF for head and neck cancer

  17. Superconducting tape characterization under flexion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez, A.; Suárez, P.; Cáceres, D.; Pérez, B.; Cordero, E.; Castaño, A.

    2002-08-01

    Electrotechnical applications of high temperature superconducting materials are limited by the difficulty of constructing classical windings with ceramic materials. While Bi-2223 tape may be a solution, it cannot be bent to radii less than a certain value since its superconducting capacity disappears. We describe an automated measurement system of the characteristics of this tape under flexion. It consists of a device that coils the tape over cylinders with different radii. At the same time, the parameters of its superconducting behaviour (e.g. resistance) are taken and processed. This system was developed at the “Benito Mahedero Laboratory of Superconducting Electrical Applications” in the University of Extremadura.

  18. Facilitating Cervical Flexion Using a Feldenkrais Method: Awareness through Movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruth, S; Kegerreis, S

    1992-01-01

    Feldenkrais methods appear to be gaining popularity and utilization by physical therapists. The need for scientific justification of their usage is indicated. The purpose of this study was to quantify the results of a Feldenkrais method-Awareness Through Movement-involving a neck flexion task. The study examined 30 normal subjects to determine if a Feldenkrais Awareness Through Movement sequence would result in an increase in neck flexion range of motion and if the subjects would indicate a significantly lower level of perceived effort posttest. Measurements of range of motion were taken using a gravity-based cervical range of motion goniometer. The subjects recorded their perceived efforts on a visual analogue scale. The range of motion data were analyzed using a one-way ANOVA. The visual analogue scale data were analyzed with a Mann-Whitney U test. The data supported both hypotheses. Based on these findings, further investigation of Feldenkrais methods in the treatment of patients appears warranted. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 1992;16(1):25-29. PMID:18796776

  19. MRI findings in Hirayama's disease: flexion-induced cervical myelopathy or intrinsic motor neuron disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schröder, R; Keller, E; Flacke, S; Schmidt, S; Pohl, C; Klockgether, T; Schlegel, U

    1999-11-01

    Hirayama's disease is a benign juvenile form of focal amyotrophy affecting the upper limbs. Previous studies have suggested that the disorder is a neck flexion induced cervical myelopathy. We report clinical and magnetic resonance imaging findings in nine patients with Hirayama's disease. Cervical imaging of seven patients revealed spinal cord changes consisting of focal atrophy and foci of signal alterations. On neck flexion a forward movement and mild reduction in the anteroposterior diameter of the lower cervical cord against the vertebral bodies was noted in affected individuals as well as in five normal controls. In contrast to earlier reports, none of our patients showed complete obliteration of the posterior subarachnoid space. Measurement of the anteroposterior spinal cord diameter in each vertebral segment (C4-C7) revealed no significant differences in the degree of spinal cord flattening between the two groups. Furthermore, two of our patients had significant degenerative changes in the cervical spine (disc herniation, retrospondylosis) contralateral to the clinically affected side. These degenerative changes resulted in a marked cord compression on neck flexion but were not associated with ipsilateral clinical abnormalities or spinal cord alterations. Our results argue against a flexion-induced cervical myelopathy and support the view that Hirayama's disease is an intrinsic motor neuron disease. PMID:10631640

  20. Load and speed effects on the cervical flexion relaxation phenomenon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Descarreaux Martin

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The flexion relaxation phenomenon (FRP represents a well-studied neuromuscular response that occurs in the lumbar and cervical spine. However, the cervical spine FRP has not been investigated extensively, and the speed of movement and loading effects remains to be characterized. The objectives of the present study were to evaluate the influence of load and speed on cervical FRP electromyographic (EMG and kinematic parameters and to assess the measurement of cervical FRP kinematic and EMG parameter repeatability. Methods Eighteen healthy adults (6 women and 12 men, aged 20 to 39 years, participated in this study. They undertook 2 sessions in which they had to perform a standardized cervical flexion/extension movement in 3 phases: complete cervical flexion; the static period in complete cervical flexion; and extension with return to the initial position. Two different rhythm conditions and 3 different loading conditions were applied to assess load and speed effects. Kinematic and EMG data were collected, and dependent variables included angles corresponding to the onset and cessation of myoelectric silence as well as the root mean square (RMS values of EMG signals. Repeatability was examined in the first session and between the 2 sessions. Results Statistical analyses revealed a significant load effect (P Conclusions The load increase evoked augmented FRP onset and cessation angles as well as heightened muscle activation. Such increments may reflect the need to enhance spinal stability under loading conditions. The kinematic and EMG parameters showed promising repeatability. Further studies are needed to assess kinematic and EMG differences between healthy subjects and patients with neck pain.

  1. Neck injury response to direct head impact.

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    Ivancic, Paul C

    2013-01-01

    Previous in vivo studies have observed flexion of the upper or upper/middle cervical spine and extension at inferior spinal levels due to direct head impacts. These studies hypothesized that hyperflexion may contribute to injury of the upper or middle cervical spine during real-life head impact. Our objectives were to determine the cervical spine injury response to direct head impact, document injuries, and compare our results with previously reported in vivo data. Our model consisted of a human cadaver neck (n=6) mounted to the torso of a rear impact dummy and carrying a surrogate head. Rearward force was applied to the model's forehead using a cable and pulley system and free-falling mass of 3.6kg followed by 16.7kg. High-speed digital cameras tracked head, vertebral, and pelvic motions. Average peak spinal rotations observed during impact were statistically compared (P<0.05) to physiological ranges obtained from intact flexibility tests. Peak head impact force was 249 and 504N for the 3.6 and 16.7kg free-falling masses, respectively. Occipital condyle loads reached 205.3N posterior shear, 331.4N compression, and 7.4Nm extension moment. We observed significant increases in intervertebral extension peaks above physiologic at C6/7 (26.3° vs. 5.7°) and C7/T1 (29.7° vs. 4.6°) and macroscopic ligamentous and osseous injuries at C6 through T1 due to the 504N impacts. Our results indicate that a rearward head shear force causes complex neck loads of posterior shear, compression, and extension moment sufficient to injure the lower cervical spine. Real-life neck injuries due to motor vehicle crashes, sports impacts, or falls are likely due to combined loads transferred to the neck by direct head impact and torso inertial loads. PMID:22613632

  2. Analytic PSF Correction for Gravitational Flexion Studies

    CERN Document Server

    Levinson, Rebecca Sobel

    2013-01-01

    Given a galaxy image, one cannot simply measure its flexion. An image's spin one and three shape properties, typically associated with F- and G-flexion, are actually complicated functions of the galaxy's intrinsic shape and the telescope's PSF, in addition to the lensing properties. The same is true for shear. In this work we create a completely analytic mapping from apparent measured galaxy flexions to gravitational flexions by (1) creating simple models for a lensed galaxy and for a PSF whose distortions are dominated by atmospheric smearing and optical aberrations, (2) convolving the two models, and (3) comparing the pre- and post-convolved flexion-like shape variations of the final image. For completeness, we do the same for shear. As expected, telescope astigmatism, coma, and trefoil can corrupt measurements of shear, F- flexion, and G-flexion, especially for small galaxies. We additionally find that PSF size dilutes the flexion signal more rapidly than the shear signal. Moreover, mixing between shears, ...

  3. Effects of Strength and Endurance Training of Superficial and Deep Neck Muscles on Muscle Activities and Pain Levels of Females with Chronic Neck Pain

    OpenAIRE

    Borisut, Sudarat; Vongsirinavarat, Mantana; Vachalathiti, Roongtiwa; Sakulsriprasert, Prasert

    2013-01-01

    [Purpose] To compare muscle activities and pain levels of females with chronic neck pain receiving different exercise programs. [Subjects and Methods] One hundred females with chronic neck pain participated in this study. They were randomly allocated into 4 groups (n = 25) on the basis of the exercises performed as follows: strength-endurance exercise, craniocervical flexion exercise, combination of strength-endurance and craniocervical flexion exercise and control groups. Pain, disability le...

  4. Neck afferents and muscle sympathetic activity in humans: implications for the vestibulosympathetic reflex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, C A; Hume, K M

    1998-02-01

    We have shown previously that head-down neck flexion (HDNF) in humans elicits increases in muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA). The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of neck muscle afferents on MSNA. We studied this question by measuring MSNA before and after head rotation that would activate neck muscle afferents but not the vestibular system (i.e., no stimulation of the otolith organs or semicircular canals). After a 3-min baseline period with the head in the normal erect position, subjects rotated their head to the side (approximately 90%) and maintained this position for 3 min. Head rotation was performed by the subjects in both the prone (n = 5) and sitting (n = 6) positions. Head rotation did not elicit changes in MSNA. Average MSNA, expressed as burst frequency and total activity, was 13 +/- 1 and 13 +/- 1 bursts/min and 146 +/-34 and 132 +/- 27 units/min during baseline and head rotation, respectively. There were no significant changes in calf blood flow (2.6 +/- 0.3 to 2.5 +/- 0.3 ml.100 ml-1.min-1, n = 8) and calf vascular resistance (39 +/- 4 to 41 +/- 4 units; n = 8). Heart rate (64 +/- 3 to 66 +/- 3 beats/min; P = 0.058) and mean arterial pressure (90 +/- 3 to 93 +/- 3; P HDNF was tested in 9 of the 13 subjects. MSNA was significantly increased by 79 +/- 12% (P HDNF. These findings indicate that neck afferents activated by horizontal neck rotation or flexion in the absence of significant force development do not elicit changes in MSNA. These findings support the concept that HDNF increases MSNA by the activation of the vestibular system. PMID:9475851

  5. Plantar-flexion of the ankle joint complex in terminal stance is initiated by subtalar plantar-flexion: A bi-planar fluoroscopy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, Seungbum; Lee, Kyoung Min; Cha, Young Joo

    2015-10-01

    Gross motion of the ankle joint complex (AJC) is a summation of the ankle and subtalar joints. Although AJC kinematics have been widely used to evaluate the function of the AJC, the coordinated movements of the ankle and subtalar joints are not well understood. The purpose of this study was to accurately quantify the individual kinematics of the ankle and subtalar joints in the intact foot during ground walking by using a bi-planar fluoroscopic system. Bi-planar fluoroscopic images of the foot and ankle during walking and standing were acquired from 10 healthy subjects. The three-dimensional movements of the tibia, talus, and calcaneus were calculated with a three-dimensional/two-dimensional registration method. The skeletal kinematics were quantified from 9% to 86% of the full stance phase because of the limited camera speed of the X-ray system. At the beginning of terminal stance, plantar-flexion of the AJC was initiated in the subtalar joint on average at 75% ranging from 62% to 76% of the stance phase, and plantar-flexion of the ankle joint did not start until 86% of the stance phase. The earlier change to plantar-flexion in the AJC than the ankle joint due to the early plantar-flexion in the subtalar joint was observed in 8 of the 10 subjects. This phenomenon could be explained by the absence of direct muscle insertion on the talus. Preceding subtalar plantar-flexion could contribute to efficient and stable ankle plantar-flexion by locking the midtarsal joint, but this explanation needs further investigation. PMID:26238571

  6. Airway Management of Post-burn Neck Contracture with Microstomia: Age Old Technique Revisited

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vrinda Oza

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This case report describes airway management of a patient of post burn neck contracture with fixed flexion deformity and restricted mouth opening. Attempt to intubate the patient with fiberoptic bronchoscope failed so the neck contracture was released under tumescent anaesthesia. The patient was then intubated with the help of stylet.

  7. MR imaging of the knee extension and flexion. Diagnostic value for reconstructed anterior cruciate ligament

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study is to determine the value of extended and flexed knee positions in MR imaging of the surgically reconstructed anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). With a mobile knee brace and a flexible surface coil, knee joint was enabled to extend to a full-extension and bend vertically to a semi-flexion (average 45deg of flexion) within the confines of the magnet bore. Sets of 3-mm-thick oblique sagittal proton-weighted turbo spin echo MR images were obtained at both extended and flexed positions. Twenty-five knees with intact ACL grafts and three knees with arthroscopically proved graft tears were evaluated. Compared to the extended position, MR images of flexed knee provided better delineation of the intact and complicated ACL grafts with statistical significance. The intact graft appeared relaxed at the semi-flexion and taut at the extension. Overall lengths of the intact grafts were readily identified at the flexion. Stretched along the intercondylar roof, the grafts were poorly outlined at the extension. MR images with knee flexion delineated the disrupted site from the impingement more clearly than that with knee extension. (author)

  8. MR imaging of the knee extension and flexion. Diagnostic value for reconstructed anterior cruciate ligament

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niitsu, Mamoru; Ikeda, Kotaroh; Fukubayashi, Tohru [Tsukuba Univ., Ibaraki (Japan). Inst. of Clinical Medicine] [and others

    1995-09-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the value of extended and flexed knee positions in MR imaging of the surgically reconstructed anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). With a mobile knee brace and a flexible surface coil, knee joint was enabled to extend to a full-extension and bend vertically to a semi-flexion (average 45deg of flexion) within the confines of the magnet bore. Sets of 3-mm-thick oblique sagittal proton-weighted turbo spin echo MR images were obtained at both extended and flexed positions. Twenty-five knees with intact ACL grafts and three knees with arthroscopically proved graft tears were evaluated. Compared to the extended position, MR images of flexed knee provided better delineation of the intact and complicated ACL grafts with statistical significance. The intact graft appeared relaxed at the semi-flexion and taut at the extension. Overall lengths of the intact grafts were readily identified at the flexion. Stretched along the intercondylar roof, the grafts were poorly outlined at the extension. MR images with knee flexion delineated the disrupted site from the impingement more clearly than that with knee extension. (author).

  9. Improving lensing cluster mass estimate with flexion

    CERN Document Server

    Cardone, Vincenzo F; Er, Xinzhong; Maoli, Roberto; Scaramella, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Gravitational lensing has long been considered as a valuable tool to determine the total mass of galaxy clusters. The shear profile as inferred from the statistics of ellipticity of background galaxies allows to probe the cluster intermediate and outer regions thus determining the virial mass estimate. However, the mass sheet degeneracy and the need for a large number of background galaxies motivate the search for alternative tracers which can break the degeneracy among model parameters and hence improve the accuracy of the mass estimate. Lensing flexion, i.e. the third derivative of the lensing potential, has been suggested as a good answer to the above quest since it probes the details of the mass profile. We investigate here whether this is indeed the case considering jointly using weak lensing, magnification and flexion. We use a Fisher matrix analysis to forecast the relative improvement in the mass accuracy for different assumptions on the shear and flexion signal - to - noise (S/N) ratio also varying t...

  10. Neck muscle function in violinists/violists with and without neck pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinmetz, Anke; Claus, Andrew; Hodges, Paul W; Jull, Gwendolen A

    2016-04-01

    Neck pain is associated with changes in neuromuscular control of cervical muscles. Violin and viola playing requires good function of the flexor muscles to stabilize the instrument. This study investigated the flexor muscle behaviour in violin/viola players with and without neck pain using the craniocervical flexion test (CCFT). In total, 12 violin/viola players with neck pain, 21 violin/viola players without neck pain in the preceding 12 weeks and 21 pain-free non-musicians were included. Activity of the sternocleidomastoid muscles (SCM) was measured with surface electromyography (EMG) during the CCFT. Violin/viola players with neck pain displayed greater normalised SCM EMG amplitudes during CCFT than the pain-free musicians and non-musicians (P Playing-related neck pain in violinists/violists is associated with altered behaviour of the superficial neck flexor muscles consistent with neck pain, despite the specific use of the deep and superficial neck flexors during violin playing. PMID:26175099

  11. In Vivo Healthy Knee Kinematics during Dynamic Full Flexion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Hamai

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Healthy knee kinematics during dynamic full flexion were evaluated using 3D-to-2D model registration techniques. Continuous knee motions were recorded during full flexion in a lunge from 85° to 150°. Medial and lateral tibiofemoral contacts and femoral internal-external and varus-valgus rotations were analyzed as a function of knee flexion angle. The medial tibiofemoral contact translated anteroposteriorly, but remained on the center of the medial compartment. On the other hand, the lateral tibiofemoral contact translated posteriorly to the edge of the tibial surface at 150° flexion. The femur exhibited external and valgus rotation relative to the tibia over the entire activity and reached 30° external and 5° valgus rotations at 150° flexion. Kinematics’ data during dynamic full flexion may provide important insight as to the designing of high-flexion total knee prostheses.

  12. Knee extension and flexion: MR delineation of normal and torn anterior cruciate ligaments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niitsu, Mamoru; Ikeda, Kotaroh; Fukubayashi, Tohru; Anno, Izumi; Itai, Yuji [Univ. of Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1996-03-01

    Our goal was to assess the effect of joint position of semiflexed and extended knees in MR delineation of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). With a mobile knee brace and a flexible surface coil, the knee joint was either fully extended or bent to a semiflexed position (average 45{degrees} of flexion) within the magnet bore. Sets of oblique sagittal MR images were obtained for both extended and flexed knee positions. Thirty-two knees with intact ACLs and 43 knees with arthroscopically proven ACL tears were evaluated. Two observers compared paired MR images of both extended and flexed positions and rated them by a relative three point scale. Anatomic correlation in MR images was obtained by a cadaveric knee with incremental flexion. The MR images of flexed knees were more useful than of extended knees in 53% of the case reviews of femoral attachments and 36% of reviews of midportions of normal ACLs. Compared with knee extensions, the MR images for knee flexion provided better clarity in 48% of reviews of disrupted sites and 52% of residual bundles of torn ACLs. Normal ACL appeared taut in the knee extension and lax in semiflexion. Compared with MR images of knees in extension, MR images of knees in flexion more clearly delineate the femoral side of the ligament with wider space under the intercondylar roof and with decreased volume-averaging artifacts, providing superior visualization of normal and torn ACLs. 13 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Neck pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... falls can cause severe neck injuries, such as vertebral fractures, whiplash, blood vessel injury, and even paralysis. Other ... fibromyalgia Cervical arthritis or spondylosis Ruptured disk ... spine from osteoporosis Spinal stenosis (narrowing of the spinal ...

  14. Weak lensing goes bananas: What flexion really measures

    CERN Document Server

    Schneider, Peter

    2007-01-01

    In weak gravitational lensing, the image distortion caused by shear measures the projected tidal gravitational field of the deflecting mass distribution. To lowest order, the shear is proportional to the mean image ellipticity. If the image sizes are not small compared to the scale over which the shear varies, higher-order distortions occur, called flexion. For ordinary weak lensing, the observable quantity is not the shear, but the reduced shear, owing to the mass-sheet degeneracy. Likewise, the flexion itself is unobservable. Rather, higher-order image distortions measure the reduced flexion, i.e., derivatives of the reduced shear. We derive the corresponding lens equation in terms of the reduced flexion and calculate the resulting relation between brightness moments of source and image. Assuming an isotropic distribution of source orientations, estimates for the reduced shear and flexion are obtained; these are then tested with simulations. In particular, the presence of flexion affects the determination o...

  15. Effect of the cervical flexion angle during smart phone use on muscle fatigue of the cervical erector spinae and upper trapezius

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Sangyong; Lee, Daehee; Park, Jungseo

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to examine the influence of the cervical flexion angle when using a smart phone on muscle fatigue of the cervical erector spinae (CES) and upper trapezius (UT). [Subjects] This study recruited 12 healthy adults. [Methods] Each subject sat on a chair, with his/her back against the wall and held a smart phone with both hands. Fatigue of the neck and shoulder muscles at different cervical flexion angles (0°, 30°, and 50°) was measured by electromyography. ...

  16. Neck and shoulder muscle strength in patients with tension-type headache

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Bjarne K; Søgaard, Karen; Andersen, Lars L;

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Tension-type headache (TTH) is highly prevalent in the general population, and it is characterized by increased muscle tenderness with increasing headache frequency and intensity. AIM: The aim of this case-control study was to compare muscle strength in neck and shoulder muscles in...... TTH patients and healthy controls by examining maximal voluntary isometric contraction (MVC) during shoulder abduction, neck flexion and extension as well as the extension/flexion strength ratio of the neck. METHODS: Sixty TTH patients and 30 sex- and age-matched healthy controls were included....... Patients were included if they had TTH ≥8 days per month. The MVC neck extensor and flexor muscles were tested with the participant seated upright. MVC shoulder abduction was tested with the individual lying supine. RESULTS: Compared to controls TTH patients had significantly weaker muscle strength in neck...

  17. INFLUENCE OF FLEXION POSITION OF THE KNEE ON LIMB ALIGNMENT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蒋雷生

    2003-01-01

    Objective To verify the influence of flexion position of the knee on limb alignment,the change of the standing femorotibial angle(FTA)with knee flexion was radiologically investigated. MethodsRadiographs were taken on each left knee of 47 volunteers with seldom complaints in a one-leg standing position,The standing femorotibial angles(FTA)in full knee extension were compared with the corresponding ones in different angles of knee flexion,and the relationship between the FTA and the flexion angle was investigated. Results Standing FTAs in knee flexion were always smaller than the corresponding ones in full knee extension.With the increment of the flexion angle,the FTA decreased.Positive correlation was found between the difference(△FTA)of the standing FTA in full extension and in flexion and the flexion angle of the knee.Conclusion In the preoperative planning of knee surgeries such as high tibial osteotomy and arthroplasty,the influence of flexion contracture on limb alignment should be taken into consideration to avoid overcorrection or undercorrection.

  18. In vivo flexion/extension of the normal cervical spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dvorak, J; Panjabi, M M; Novotny, J E; Antinnes, J A

    1991-11-01

    Twenty-two women (age range 25-49 years, average 30.9 years) and twenty-two men (age range 23-42 years, average 31.6 years), all healthy and asymptomatic, underwent passive flexion/extension examinations of the cervical spine. Functional x-rays were taken and analyzed using a computer-assisted method that quantified intervertebral rotations, translations, and locations of the centers of rotation for each level C1-C2-C6-C7. The aim of the study was to establish values for these parameters for a normal population as related to age and gender. In the process, a statistically significant difference was found in the average value of rotation between male and female groups at the C5-C6 level. A new parameter, the ratio between translation and rotation, was also established and may prove useful for clinical diagnoses. This parameter has a smaller error associated with it than do pure translations and may aid the clinician by helping to account for the large variation in rotatory ranges of motion within the population. This translation/rotation ratio indicated highly significant differences in the lower segments of the cervical spine between gender groups. PMID:1919845

  19. Dynamic Compression of the Spinal Cord by Paraspinal Muscles following Cervical Laminectomy: Diagnosis Using Flexion-Extension MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Linton T; Lollis, S Scott

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Flexion-extension, or kinematic, MRI has been used to identify dynamic spondylotic spinal cord compression not seen with traditional static MRI. The use of kinematic MRI to diagnose postoperative complications, specifically dynamic compression, is not as well documented. The authors describe a case of dynamic spinal cord compression by the paraspinal muscles causing worsening myelopathy following cervical laminectomy. This was only diagnosed with flexion-extension MRI. Methods. The patient was a 90-year-old male presenting to the neurosurgery clinic with functional decline and cervical spondylotic myelopathy. Results. A multilevel laminectomy was performed. Following surgery the patient had progressive weakness and worsening myelopathy. No active cord compression was seen on multiple MRIs obtained in a neutral position, and flexion-extension X-rays did not show instability. A kinematic MRI demonstrated dynamic compression of the spinal cord only during neck extension, by the paraspinal muscles. To relieve the compression, the patient underwent an instrumented fusion, with cross-links used to buttress the paraspinal muscles away from the cord. This resulted in neurologic improvement. Conclusions. We describe a novel case of spinal cord compression by paraspinal muscles following cervical laminectomy. In individuals with persistent myelopathy or delayed neurologic decline following posterior decompression, flexion-extension MRI may prove useful in diagnosing this potential complication. PMID:25984378

  20. Dynamic Compression of the Spinal Cord by Paraspinal Muscles following Cervical Laminectomy: Diagnosis Using Flexion-Extension MRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linton T. Evans

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Flexion-extension, or kinematic, MRI has been used to identify dynamic spondylotic spinal cord compression not seen with traditional static MRI. The use of kinematic MRI to diagnose postoperative complications, specifically dynamic compression, is not as well documented. The authors describe a case of dynamic spinal cord compression by the paraspinal muscles causing worsening myelopathy following cervical laminectomy. This was only diagnosed with flexion-extension MRI. Methods. The patient was a 90-year-old male presenting to the neurosurgery clinic with functional decline and cervical spondylotic myelopathy. Results. A multilevel laminectomy was performed. Following surgery the patient had progressive weakness and worsening myelopathy. No active cord compression was seen on multiple MRIs obtained in a neutral position, and flexion-extension X-rays did not show instability. A kinematic MRI demonstrated dynamic compression of the spinal cord only during neck extension, by the paraspinal muscles. To relieve the compression, the patient underwent an instrumented fusion, with cross-links used to buttress the paraspinal muscles away from the cord. This resulted in neurologic improvement. Conclusions. We describe a novel case of spinal cord compression by paraspinal muscles following cervical laminectomy. In individuals with persistent myelopathy or delayed neurologic decline following posterior decompression, flexion-extension MRI may prove useful in diagnosing this potential complication.

  1. State Averages

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — A list of a variety of averages for each state or territory as well as the national average, including each quality measure, staffing, fine amount and number of...

  2. Thigh-calf contact force measurements in deep knee flexion.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zelle, J.G.; Barink, M.; Loeffen, R.; Waal Malefijt, M.C. de; Verdonschot, N.J.J.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Knee models often do not contain thigh-calf contact which occurs in deep knee flexion. Thigh-calf contact is expected to reduce muscle forces and thereby affects internal stresses in the knee joint. The purpose of this study was to measure thigh-calf contact forces. Two deep knee flexion

  3. Prediction of three dimensional maximum isometric neck strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fice, Jason B; Siegmund, Gunter P; Blouin, Jean-Sébastien

    2014-09-01

    We measured maximum isometric neck strength under combinations of flexion/extension, lateral bending and axial rotation to determine whether neck strength in three dimensions (3D) can be predicted from principal axes strength. This would allow biomechanical modelers to validate their neck models across many directions using only principal axis strength data. Maximum isometric neck moments were measured in 9 male volunteers (29±9 years) for 17 directions. The 3D moments were normalized by the principal axis moments, and compared to unity for all directions tested. Finally, each subject's maximum principal axis moments were used to predict their resultant moment in the off-axis directions. Maximum moments were 30±6 N m in flexion, 32±9 N m in lateral bending, 51±11 N m in extension, and 13±5 N m in axial rotation. The normalized 3D moments were not significantly different from unity (95% confidence interval contained one), except for three directions that combined ipsilateral axial rotation and lateral bending; in these directions the normalized moments exceeded one. Predicted resultant moments compared well to the actual measured values (r2=0.88). Despite exceeding unity, the normalized moments were consistent across subjects to allow prediction of maximum 3D neck strength using principal axes neck strength. PMID:24893597

  4. Quaternion Averaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markley, F. Landis; Cheng, Yang; Crassidis, John L.; Oshman, Yaakov

    2007-01-01

    Many applications require an algorithm that averages quaternions in an optimal manner. For example, when combining the quaternion outputs of multiple star trackers having this output capability, it is desirable to properly average the quaternions without recomputing the attitude from the the raw star tracker data. Other applications requiring some sort of optimal quaternion averaging include particle filtering and multiple-model adaptive estimation, where weighted quaternions are used to determine the quaternion estimate. For spacecraft attitude estimation applications, derives an optimal averaging scheme to compute the average of a set of weighted attitude matrices using the singular value decomposition method. Focusing on a 4-dimensional quaternion Gaussian distribution on the unit hypersphere, provides an approach to computing the average quaternion by minimizing a quaternion cost function that is equivalent to the attitude matrix cost function Motivated by and extending its results, this Note derives an algorithm that deterniines an optimal average quaternion from a set of scalar- or matrix-weighted quaternions. Rirthermore, a sufficient condition for the uniqueness of the average quaternion, and the equivalence of the mininiization problem, stated herein, to maximum likelihood estimation, are shown.

  5. Growth changes in internal and craniofacial flexion measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, R; Sheffer, D B

    1999-09-01

    Growth changes in both internal and craniofacial flexion angles are presented for Pan troglodytes, Gorilla gorilla, and modern humans. The internal flexion angle (IFA) was measured from lateral radiographs, and the craniofacial flexion angle (CFA) was calculated from coordinate data. Stage of dental development is used as a baseline for examination of growth changes and nonparametric correlations between flexion angles and dental development stage are tested for significance. In Gorilla, the IFA increases during growth. The IFA is relatively stable in Pan and modern humans. Pan and Gorilla display an increase in the CFA. However, this angle decreases during growth in modern humans. Flexion angles were derived from coordinate data collected for several early hominid crania. Measurements for two robust australopithecine crania indicate strong internal flexion. It has been suggested that cerebellar expansion in this group may relate to derived features of the posterior cranial base. In general, australopithecine crania exhibit craniofacial flexion intermediate between great apes and modern humans. The "archaic" Homo sapiens specimen from Kabwe is most similar to modern humans. PMID:10490467

  6. The neck

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The cervical soft tissue structures are clearly visible in roentgenograms because of radiographic contrast with the air in the pharynx, larynx, and trachea. The organs of the neck are not subjected to roentgen investigation as frequently as some other parts of the body because direct endoscopy and clinical methods of examination are often adequate for diagnosis, particularly in the case of the acute and chronic inflammatory lesions that are the most frequent cervical diseases during infancy and childhood. The roentgen method has proved helpful in the identification and localization of foreign bodies, in the study of retropharyngeal and retroesophageal abscesses, and in the estimation of the size of the pharyngeal tonsils (adenoids). It can also be extremely useful in the evaluation of infants and children with stridor, neck masses, and various malformations. Detail of the anatomical structures of the neck is enhanced by the edge-enhancing capabilities of xerography at the expense of increased radiation exposure compared with conventional and, especially, with high-kilovoltage - filtered-beam technique

  7. The equine neck and its function during movement and locomotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zsoldos, Rebeka R; Licka, Theresia F

    2015-10-01

    During both locomotion and body movements at stance, the head and neck of the horse are a major craniocaudal and lateral balancing mechanism employing input from the visual, vestibular and proprioceptive systems. The function of the equine neck has recently become the focus of several research groups; this is probably also feeding on an increase of interest in the equine neck in equestrian sports, with a controversial discussion of specific neck positions such as maximum head and neck flexion. The aim of this review is to offer an overview of new findings on the structures and functions of the equine neck, illustrating their interplay. The movement of the neck is based on intervertebral motion, but it is also an integral part of locomotion; this is illustrated by the different neck conformations in the breeds of horses used for various types of work. The considerable effect of the neck movement and posture onto the whole trunk and even the limbs is transmitted via bony, ligamentous and muscular structures. Also, the fact that the neck position can easily be influenced by the rider and/or by the employment of training aids makes it an important avenue for training of new movements of the neck as well as the whole horse. Additionally, the neck position also affects the cervical spinal cord as well as the roots of the spinal nerves; besides the commonly encountered long-term neurological effects of cervical vertebral disorders, short-term changes of neural and muscular function have also been identified in the maximum flexion of the cranial neck and head position. During locomotion, the neck stores elastic energy within the passive tissues such as ligaments, joint capsules and fasciae. For adequate stabilisation, additional muscle activity is necessary; this is learned and requires constant muscle training as it is essential to prevent excessive wear and tear on the vertebral joints and also repetitive or single trauma to the spinal nerves and the spinal cord. The

  8. Lateral Neck Injury Assessments in Side Impact Using Post Mortem Human Subject Tests

    OpenAIRE

    Yoganandan, Narayan; Humm, John; Pintar, Frank A.; Wolfla, Christopher E.; Maiman, Dennis J.

    2011-01-01

    Current neck injury criteria are based on matching upper cervical spine injuries from piglet tests to airbag deployment loads and pairing kinematics from child dummies. These “child-based” scaled data together with adult human cadaver tolerances in axial loading are used to specify neck injury thresholds in axial compression and tension, and flexion and extension moment about the occipital condyles; no thresholds are specified for any other force or moment including lateral bending. The objec...

  9. The diagnosis of a fully flexed neck position MRI diagnosis in juvenile muscular atrophy of the distal upper extremity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To investigate the value of the diagnosis of MRI during neck flexion in juvenile muscular atrophy of the distal upper extremity. Methods: Five young male patients (mean age 21 years old) with clinical and electrophysiological alterations were performed MR examination with routine neck position and a fully flexed neck position. Eight age-match young men were examined as control subjects. SE T1WI, T2WI, Fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) sequences were scanned. Results: A distinctive finding in the disorder was forward displacement of the cervical dural sac, compressive flattening of the lower cervical cord during neck flexion and flow void in the posterior epidural space. The forward displacement was significantly greater in patients than in age-matched control subjects. Conclusion: Flexed neck position MRI is helpful to find radiological abnormalities of the lower cervical dural sac and spinal cord, which were combined with clinical disorder to diagnose juvenile muscular atrophy of the distal upper extremity. (authors)

  10. Does dragonfly's abdomen flexion help with fast turning maneuvers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Geng; Li, Chengyu; Dong, Haibo; Flow Simulation Research Group Team

    2013-11-01

    Dragonflies are able to achieve fast turning maneuvers during take-off flights. Both asymmetric wing flapping and abdomen flexion have been observed during the fast turning. It's widely thought that the asymmetric wing beats are responsible of producing the aerodynamic moment needed for the body rotation. However, the dynamic effect of the abdomen flexion is not clear yet. In this study, an integrated experimental and computational approach is used to study the underlying dynamic effect of dragonfly abdomen flexion. It's found that dragonfly abdomen tended to bend towards the same side as the body reorienting to. Quantitative analysis have shown that during take-off turning maneuver the abdomen flexion can modulate the arm of force by changing the position of the center of mass relative to the thorax. As a result, roll and yaw moments produced by the wing flapping can be enhanced. This work is supported by NSF CBET-1313217. This work is supported by NSF CBET-1313217.

  11. A Review of Direct Neck Measurement in Occupational Settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helenice J. C. Gil Coury

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available No guidelines are available to orient researchers on the availability and applications of equipment and sensors for recording precise neck movements in occupational settings. In this study reports on direct measurements of neck movements in the workplace were reviewed. Using relevant keywords two independent reviewers searched for eligible studies in the following databases: Cinahal, Cochrane, Embase, Lilacs, PubMed, MEDLINE, PEDro, Scopus and Web of Science. After applying the inclusion criteria, 13 articles on direct neck measurements in occupational settings were retrieved from among 33,666 initial titles. These studies were then methodologically evaluated according to their design characteristics, exposure and outcome assessment, and statistical analysis. The results showed that in most of the studies the three axes of neck movement (flexion-extension, lateral flexion and rotation were not simultaneously recorded. Deficiencies in available equipment explain this flaw, demonstrating that sensors and systems need to be improved so that a true understanding of real occupational exposure can be achieved. Further studies are also needed to assess neck movement in those who perform heavy-duty work, such as nurses and electricians, since no report about such jobs was identified.

  12. Micromechanics of the Human Vertebral Body for Forward Flexion

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Haisheng; Nawathe, Shashank; Fields, Aaron J.; Keaveny, Tony M

    2012-01-01

    To provide mechanistic insight into the etiology of osteoporotic wedge fractures, we investigated the spatial distribution of tissue at the highest risk of initial failure within the human vertebral body for both forward flexion and uniform compression loading conditions. Micro-CT-based linear elastic finite element analysis was used to virtually load 22 human T9 vertebral bodies in either 5° of forward flexion or uniform compression; we also ran analyses replacing the simulated compliant dis...

  13. Average Interest

    OpenAIRE

    George Chacko; Sanjiv Ranjan Das

    1997-01-01

    We develop analytic pricing models for options on averages by means of a state-space expansion method. These models augment the class of Asian options to markets where the underlying traded variable follows a mean-reverting process. The approach builds from the digital Asian option on the average and enables pricing of standard Asian calls and puts, caps and floors, as well as other exotica. The models may be used (i) to hedge long period interest rate risk cheaply, (ii) to hedge event risk (...

  14. High resolution weak lensing mass mapping combining shear and flexion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanusse, F.; Starck, J.-L.; Leonard, A.; Pires, S.

    2016-06-01

    Aims: We propose a new mass mapping algorithm, specifically designed to recover small-scale information from a combination of gravitational shear and flexion. Including flexion allows us to supplement the shear on small scales in order to increase the sensitivity to substructures and the overall resolution of the convergence map without relying on strong lensing constraints. Methods: To preserve all available small scale information, we avoid any binning of the irregularly sampled input shear and flexion fields and treat the mass mapping problem as a general ill-posed inverse problem, which is regularised using a robust multi-scale wavelet sparsity prior. The resulting algorithm incorporates redshift, reduced shear, and reduced flexion measurements for individual galaxies and is made highly efficient by the use of fast Fourier estimators. Results: We tested our reconstruction method on a set of realistic weak lensing simulations corresponding to typical HST/ACS cluster observations and demonstrate our ability to recover substructures with the inclusion of flexion, which are otherwise lost if only shear information is used. In particular, we can detect substructures on the 15'' scale well outside of the critical region of the clusters. In addition, flexion also helps to constrain the shape of the central regions of the main dark matter halos. Our mass mapping software, called Glimpse2D, is made freely available at http://www.cosmostat.org/software/glimpse

  15. Fixed-flexion radiography of the knee provides reproducible joint space width measurements in osteoarthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The validity of a non-fluoroscopic fixed-flexion radiographic acquisition and analysis protocol for measurement of joint space width (JSW) in knee osteoarthritis is determined. A cross-sectional study of 165 patients with documented knee osteoarthritis participating in a multicenter, prospective study of chondroprotective agents was performed. All patients had posteroanterior, weight-bearing, fixed-flexion radiography with 10 caudal beam angulation. A specially designed frame (SynaFlexer) was used to standardize the positioning. Minimum medial and lateral JSW were measured manually and twice by an automated analysis system to determine inter-technique and intra-reader concordance and reliability. A random subsample of 30 patients had repeat knee radiographs 2 weeks apart to estimate short-term reproducibility using automated analysis. Concordance between manual and automated medial JSW measurements was high (ICC=0.90); lateral compartment measurements showed somewhat less concordance (ICC=0.72). There was excellent concordance between repeated automated JSW measurements performed 6 months apart for the medial (ICC=0.94) and lateral (ICC=0.86) compartments. Short-term reproducibility for the subsample of 30 cases with repeat acquisitions demonstrated an average SD of 0.14 mm for medial JSW (CV=4.3%) and 0.23 mm for lateral JSW (CV=4.0%). Fixed-flexion radiography of the knee using a positioning device provides consistent, reliable and reproducible measurement of minimum JSW in knee osteoarthritis without the need for concurrent fluoroscopic guidance. (orig.)

  16. Relationship between retention of the posterior cruciate ligament and postoperative flexion in total knee arthroplasty.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yokoyama,Yoshiki

    1995-12-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to retrospectively analyzed the outcome of 192 total knee arthroplasties in 132 patients with rheumatoid arthritis (118 women, 14 men. The Okayama Mark II prosthesis, which requires the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL to be resected, was used in 83 knees (group I, the Mark II prosthesis, which allows the PCL to be retained, was used in 68 knees (group II, and the new Okayama PCL-R prosthesis, which also allows the PCL to be retained, was used in 41 (group III. According to the Japanese Orthopaedic Association knee scoring system, the clinical outcome of groups I, II and III at 1 year after the operation were 64.9, 71.2 and 72.3 points, respectively, and the average flexion angles in each group at 1 year were 78.4, 92.6 and 101.3 degrees. Postoperative flexion in groups III was significantly greater than in groups I and II. These results suggest that postoperative flexion is greater when the posterior cruciate ligament is retained.

  17. Analysis of the variation in OCT measurements of a structural bottle neck for eye-brain transfer of visual information from 3D-volumes of the optic nerve head, PIMD-Average [02π

    Science.gov (United States)

    Söderberg, Per G.; Malmberg, Filip; Sandberg-Melin, Camilla

    2016-03-01

    The present study aimed to analyze the clinical usefulness of the thinnest cross section of the nerve fibers in the optic nerve head averaged over the circumference of the optic nerve head. 3D volumes of the optic nerve head of the same eye was captured at two different visits spaced in time by 1-4 weeks, in 13 subjects diagnosed with early to moderate glaucoma. At each visit 3 volumes containing the optic nerve head were captured independently with a Topcon OCT- 2000 system. In each volume, the average shortest distance between the inner surface of the retina and the central limit of the pigment epithelium around the optic nerve head circumference, PIMD-Average [02π], was determined semiautomatically. The measurements were analyzed with an analysis of variance for estimation of the variance components for subjects, visits, volumes and semi-automatic measurements of PIMD-Average [0;2π]. It was found that the variance for subjects was on the order of five times the variance for visits, and the variance for visits was on the order of 5 times higher than the variance for volumes. The variance for semi-automatic measurements of PIMD-Average [02π] was 3 orders of magnitude lower than the variance for volumes. A 95 % confidence interval for mean PIMD-Average [02π] was estimated to 1.00 +/-0.13 mm (D.f. = 12). The variance estimates indicate that PIMD-Average [02π] is not suitable for comparison between a onetime estimate in a subject and a population reference interval. Cross-sectional independent group comparisons of PIMD-Average [02π] averaged over subjects will require inconveniently large sample sizes. However, cross-sectional independent group comparison of averages of within subject difference between baseline and follow-up can be made with reasonable sample sizes. Assuming a loss rate of 0.1 PIMD-Average [02π] per year and 4 visits per year it was found that approximately 18 months follow up is required before a significant change of PIMDAverage [02π] can

  18. Reproducibility of cervical range of motion in patients with neck pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Vet Henrica CW

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Reproducibility measurements of the range of motion are an important prerequisite for the interpretation of study results. The aim of the study is to assess the intra-rater and inter-rater reproducibility of the measurement of active Range of Motion (ROM in patients with neck pain using the Cybex Electronic Digital Inclinometer-320 (EDI-320. Methods In an outpatient clinic in a primary care setting 32 patients with at least 2 weeks of pain and/or stiffness in the neck were randomly assessed, in a test- retest design with blinded raters using a standardized measurement protocol. Cervical flexion-extension, lateral flexion and rotation were assessed. Results Reliability expressed by the Intraclass Correlation Coefficient (ICC was 0.93 (lateral flexion or higher for intra-rater reliability and 0.89 (lateral flexion or higher for inter-rater reliability. The 95% limits of agreement for intra-rater agreement, expressing the range of the differences between two ratings were -2.5 ± 11.1° for flexion-extension, -0.1 ± 10.4° for lateral flexion and -5.9 ± 13.5° for rotation. For inter-rater agreement the limits of agreement were 3.3 ± 17.0° for flexion-extension, 0.5 ± 17.0° for lateral flexion and -1.3 ± 24.6° for rotation. Conclusion In general, the intra-rater reproducibility and the inter-rater reproducibility were good. We recommend to compare the reproducibility and clinical applicability of the EDI-320 inclinometer with other cervical ROM measures in symptomatic patients.

  19. Proximity of arteries to the anterior ulna with changing flexion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enad, Jerome G; Douglas, Thomas J; Ruland, Robert T

    2015-04-01

    During surgery for elbow fracture, wires and screws crossing the elbow from posterior to anterior place the brachial and ulnar arteries at risk for inadvertent penetration. The authors' goal was to define the sagittal proximity of the brachial and ulnar arteries to the proximal ulna throughout an arc of elbow motion using dynamic fluoroscopy. The brachial artery was injected with barium in 10 fresh-frozen cadaveric elbows. Sagittal fluoroscopic images were obtained at elbow flexion angles of 0°, 30°, 60°, 90°, and 120°. Two measurements were obtained at each flexion angle: (1) the distance between the coronoid tip and the brachial artery and (2) the distance between the coronoid base and the ulnar artery. One-way analysis of variance was used to compare mean distances for each flexion angle within each measurement group. A coronal image identified the mediolateral course of the brachial artery. The distance from the coronoid tip to the brachial artery significantly increased with increasing flexion from 0° to 60° (P120° (P<.002). The brachial artery traversed lateral to the coronoid in 9 of 10 specimens. The brachial and ulnar arteries are located further from the coronoid with increasing elbow flexion to at least 60°, and the brachial artery is typically located lateral to the coronoid in the coronal plane. These measurements can be used as surgical guides to reduce the risk of arterial injury during olecranon fracture surgery. PMID:25901616

  20. Extrinsic versus intrinsic hand muscle dominance in finger flexion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Sukaini, A; Singh, H P; Dias, J J

    2016-05-01

    This study aims to identify the patterns of dominance of extrinsic or intrinsic muscles in finger flexion during initiation of finger curl and mid-finger flexion. We recorded 82 hands of healthy individuals (18-74 years) while flexing their fingers and tracked the finger joint angles of the little finger using video motion tracking. A total of 57 hands (69.5%) were classified as extrinsic dominant, where the finger flexion was initiated and maintained at proximal interphalangeal and distal interphalangeal joints. A total of 25 (30.5%) were classified as intrinsic dominant, where the finger flexion was initiated and maintained at the metacarpophalangeal joint. The distribution of age, sex, dominance, handedness and body mass index was similar in the two groups. This knowledge may allow clinicians to develop more efficient rehabilitation regimes, since intrinsic dominant individuals would not initiate extrinsic muscle contraction till later in finger flexion, and might therefore be allowed limited early active motion. For extrinsic dominant individuals, by contrast, initial contraction of extrinsic muscles would place increased stress on the tendon repair site if early motion were permitted. PMID:26744509

  1. Fixed Lunate Flexion Deformity in Distal Radius Fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sanglim; Yu, Jae-Ha; Jeon, Suk Ha

    2016-06-01

    Carpal malalignments in malunion of distal radius fracture are considered as an adaptive response of the carpus to loss of normal architecture of the distal radius. This condition leads to mechanical overload, ligament attenuation and progressive dynamic instability around the wrist joint. Radial corrective osteotomy is suggested as a treatment option of carpal malalignment after distal radius malunion. In radiocarpal malalignment, the lunate is usually observed in flexion in contrast to its extension posture in the more common midcarpal malalignment. We report two cases of fixed lunate flexion deformity after a distal radius fracture, in which reduction and fixation of fresh fracture or corrective osteotomy of malunion were not successful. Arthritic changes were observed in the radiolunate joint on arthroscopy. Thus, fixed flexion deformity of the lunate might be associated with posttraumatic arthritic change in the radiolunate joint. PMID:27247752

  2. Adult Hip Flexion Contracture due to Neurological Disease: A New Treatment Protocol—Surgical Treatment of Neurological Hip Flexion Contracture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Nicodemo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Congenital, traumatic, or extrinsic causes can lead people to paraplegia; some of these are potentially; reversible and others are not. Paraplegia can couse hip flexion contracture and, consequently, pressure sores, scoliosis, and hyperlordosis; lumbar and groin pain are strictly correlated. Scientific literature contains many studies about children hip flexion related to neurological diseases, mainly caused by cerebral palsy; only few papers focus on this complication in adults. In this study we report our experience on surgical treatment of adult hip flexion contracture due to neurological diseases; we have tried to outline an algorithm to choose the best treatment avoiding useless or too aggressive therapies. We present 5 cases of adult hips flexion due to neurological conditions treated following our algorithm. At 1-year-follow-up all patients had a good clinical outcome in terms of hip range of motion, pain and recovery of walking if possible. In conclusion we think that this algorithm could be a good guideline to treat these complex cases even if we need to treat more patients to confirm this theory. We believe also that postoperation physiotherapy it is useful in hip motility preservation, improvement of muscular function, and walking ability recovery when possible.

  3. MR assessment of movement and morphologic change in the menisci during knee flexion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To examine movement and morphologic alteration in the menisci during knee flexion. Twenty healthy knees were imaged at 0 degrees, 45 degrees, and 90 degrees of passive non-weight-bearing flexion in the sagittal plane with MR. In each meniscus, posterior movement distance during knee flexion and the ratio of anteroposterior (a.p.) diameter at flexion to that at extension were calculated. Each meniscus moved posteriorly during knee flexion. Movement was greater in the anterior horn than in the posterior horn, and greater in the medial meniscus than in the lateral meniscus (p<0.05). The a.p. diameter of each meniscus was reduced at flexion (p<0.05). Knee flexion normally leads to posterior movement and shortening of the a.p. diameter of the menisci, which may be related to the positioning and curvature of femoral condyles at the femorotibial contact point at knee flexion

  4. MR assessment of movement and morphologic change in the menisci during knee flexion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To examine movement and morphologic alteration in the menisci during knee flexion. Material and Methods: Twenty healthy knees were imaged at 0 , 45 , and 90 of passive non-weight-bearing flexion in the sagittal plane with MR. In each meniscus, posterior movement distance during knee flexion and the ratio of anteroposterior (a.p.) diameter at flexion to that at extension were calculated. Results: Each meniscus moved posteriorly during knee flexion. Movement was greater in the anterior horn than in the posterior horn, and greater in the medial meniscus than in the lateral meniscus (p<0.05). The a.p. diameter of each meniscus was reduced at flexion (p<0.05). Conclusion: Knee flexion normally leads to posterior movement and shortening of the a.p. diameter of the menisci, which may be related to the positioning and curvature of femoral condyles at the femorotibial contact point at knee flexion. (orig.)

  5. Is referencing the posterior condyles sufficient to achieve a rectangular flexion gap in total knee arthroplasty?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnurr, Christoph; Nessler, Jochen; König, Dietmar Pierre

    2009-12-01

    Femoral malrotation in total knee arthroplasty causes flexion gap instability. Conventional instruments mostly reference the posterior condylar angle (PCA). The aim of this study was to verify whether the computer-navigated flexion gap (GAP) method produces a rectangular flexion gap and if a balanced flexion gap could also be achieved by referencing the PCA. A total of 100 knee prostheses were analysed using the navigated GAP method, and flexion gap symmetry along with femoral rotation were recorded. The GAP technique resulted in a rectangular flexion gap with adequate femoral rotational alignment. If the PCA technique had been used, only 51% of the femoral components would have been implanted in correct femoral rotation; the remaining 49% would have implanted with flexion gap instability. The GAP technique produces a rectangular flexion gap. The referencing of the PCA was shown to be less reliable. Thus, modern knee prosthesis instrumentation should not base femoral rotation solely on the PCA. PMID:18956189

  6. Modulation of flexion reflex induced by hip angle changes in human spinal cord injury

    OpenAIRE

    Knikou, Maria; KAY, ELIZABETH; Rymer, William Zev

    2005-01-01

    The flexion reflex can be elicited via stimulation of skin, muscle, and high-threshold afferents inducing a generalized flexion of the limb. In spinalized animal models this reflex is quite prominent and is strongly modulated by actions of hip proprioceptors. However, analogous actions on the flexion reflex in spinal cord injured (SCI) humans have not yet been examined. In this study, we investigated the effects of imposed static hip angle changes on the flexion reflex in ten motor incomplete...

  7. Effects of the Sustained Computer Work on Upper Cervical Flexion Motion

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Se-yeon; Yoo, Won-gyu

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of sustained computer work on cervical flexion, especially the upper cervical region. [Subjects] We recruited 11 sedentary workers who used a computer for at least 4 hours a day. [Methods] Total range of cervical flexion, upper cervical flexion, and their ratio were measured before and after 1 hour of computer work. [Results] The total range of cervical flexion was not significantly different between pre-and post-measurement. Howe...

  8. Obstetrical brachial plexus palsy: Can excision of upper trunk neuroma and nerve grafting improve function in babies with adequate elbow flexion at nine months of age?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argenta, Anne E; Brooker, Jack; MacIssac, Zoe; Natali, Megan; Greene, Stephanie; Stanger, Meg; Grunwaldt, Lorelei

    2016-05-01

    Accepted indications for exploration in obstetrical brachial plexus palsy (OBPP) vary by center. Most agree that full elbow flexion against gravity at nine months of age implies high chance of spontaneous recovery and thus excludes a baby from surgical intervention. However, there are certain movements of the shoulder and forearm that may not be used frequently by the infant, but are extremely important functionally as they grow. These movements are difficult to assess in a baby and may lead to some clinicians to recommend conservative treatment, when this cohort of infants may in fact benefit substantially from surgery. A retrospective review was conducted on all infants managed surgically at the Brachial Plexus Center of a major children's hospital from 2009 to 2014. Further analysis identified five patients who had near-normal AMS scores for elbow flexion but who had weakness of shoulder abduction, flexion, external rotation, and/or forearm supination. In contrast to standard conservative management, this cohort underwent exploration, C5-6 neuroma excision, and sural nerve grafting. Data analysis was performed on this group to look for overall improvement in function. During an average follow-up period of 29 months, all patients made substantial gains in motor function of the shoulder and forearm, without loss of elbow flexion or extension, or worsening of overall outcome. In select infants with brachial plexus injuries but near-normal AMS scores for elbow flexion, surgical intervention may be indicated to achieve the best functional outcome. PMID:26806089

  9. [Deep neck infections].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowak, Katarzyna; Szyfter, Witold

    2006-01-01

    Deep neck infection is relatively rare but potentially life threatening complication of common oropharyngeal infections. This retrospective study was aimed at analyzing the occurrence of complications, diagnostic methods and proper management of deep neck infection. A review was conducted in 32 cases who were diagnosed as having deep neck infection from 1995 to 2005. The causes of deep neck infections were tonsillitis (16 cases), tooth diseases (6 cases), paratonsillar abscess (4 cases), parotitis (1 case), pussy lymphonodes after tonsillectomy (2 cases), pussy congenital neck cyst (1 case), chronic otitis media (1 case), parotitis (1 case), foreign body of the esophagus (1 case). All the puss bacterial cultivation were positive. All the patients were treated by different ways of chirurgical drainage and use of large dosage of antibiotics. Deep neck infection should be suspected in patients with long lasting fever and painful swelling of the neck and treatment should begin quick as possible. PMID:17152800

  10. Load and speed effects on the cervical flexion relaxation phenomenon

    OpenAIRE

    Descarreaux Martin; Cantin Vincent; Lafond Danik; Pialasse Jean-Philippe

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background The flexion relaxation phenomenon (FRP) represents a well-studied neuromuscular response that occurs in the lumbar and cervical spine. However, the cervical spine FRP has not been investigated extensively, and the speed of movement and loading effects remains to be characterized. The objectives of the present study were to evaluate the influence of load and speed on cervical FRP electromyographic (EMG) and kinematic parameters and to assess the measurement of cervical FRP ...

  11. Lumbopelvic flexibility modulates neuromuscular responses during trunk flexion-extension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Zuriaga, Daniel; Artacho-Pérez, Carla; Biviá-Roig, Gemma

    2016-06-01

    Various stimuli such as the flexibility of lumbopelvic structures influence the neuromuscular responses of the trunk musculature, leading to different load sharing strategies and reflex muscle responses from the afferents of lumbopelvic mechanoreceptors. This link between flexibility and neuromuscular response has been poorly studied. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between lumbopelvic flexibility and neuromuscular responses of the erector spinae, hamstring and abdominal muscles during trunk flexion-extension. Lumbopelvic movement patterns were measured in 29 healthy women, who were separated into two groups according to their flexibility during trunk flexion-extension. The electromyographic responses of erector spinae, rectus abdominis and biceps femoris were also recorded. Subjects with greater lumbar flexibility had significantly less pelvic flexibility and vice versa. Subjects with greater pelvic flexibility had a higher rate of relaxation and lower levels of hamstring activation during maximal trunk flexion. The neuromuscular response patterns of the hamstrings seem partially modulated by pelvic flexibility. Not so with the lumbar erector spinae and lumbar flexibility, despite the assertions of some previous studies. The results of this study improve our knowledge of the relationships between trunk joint flexibility and neuromuscular responses, a relationship which may play a role in low back pain. PMID:27155332

  12. Viscoelastic Response of the Human Lower Back to Passive Flexion: The Effects of Age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shojaei, Iman; Allen-Bryant, Kacy; Bazrgari, Babak

    2016-09-01

    Low back pain is a leading cause of disability in the elderly. The potential role of spinal instability in increasing risk of low back pain with aging was indirectly investigated via assessment of age-related differences in viscoelastic response of lower back to passive deformation. The passive deformation tests were conducted in upright standing posture to account for the effects of gravity load and corresponding internal tissues responses on the lower back viscoelastic response. Average bending stiffness, viscoelastic relaxation, and dissipated energy were quantified to characterize viscoelastic response of the lower back. Larger average bending stiffness, viscoelastic relaxation and dissipated energy were observed among older vs. younger participants. Furthermore, average bending stiffness of the lower back was found to be the highest around the neutral standing posture and to decrease with increasing the lower back flexion angle. Larger bending stiffness of the lower back at flexion angles where passive contribution of lower back tissues to its bending stiffness was minimal (i.e., around neutral standing posture) highlighted the important role of active vs. passive contribution of tissues to lower back bending stiffness and spinal stability. As a whole our results suggested that a diminishing contribution of passive and volitional active subsystems to spinal stability may not be a reason for higher severity of low back pain in older population. The role of other contributing elements to spinal stability (e.g., active reflexive) as well as equilibrium-based parameters (e.g., compression and shear forces under various activities) in increasing severity of low back pain with aging should be investigated in future. PMID:26883956

  13. American Head and Neck Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Head & Neck Society Head and Neck Cancer Research & Education American Head & Neck Society | AHNS Head and Neck Cancer Research & Education About AHNS ... and Announcements Copyright ©2016 · American Head and Neck Society · Privacy and Return Policy Managed by BSC Management, ...

  14. Influence of neck pain on cervical movement in the sagittal plane during smartphone use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Man-Sig

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] Smartphone use reportedly changes posture. However, how neck posture is altered in smartphone users with neck pain is unknown. This study examined changes in the posture of young adults with and without mild neck pain (MNP) when using a smartphone. [Subjects] Thirteen control subjects and 14 subjects with MNP who used smartphones were recruited. [Methods] The upper cervical (UC) and lower cervical (LC) angles in the sagittal plane were measured using an ultrasound-based motion analysis system while the seated subjects used a smartphone for 5 min. [Results] During smartphone use, the MNP group exhibited greater UC and LC flexion angles than the control group. [Conclusion] These findings suggest that young adults with MNP are more careful and more frequently utilize a neutral neck posture than young adults without MNP when using a smartphone while sitting. PMID:25642027

  15. A New Brace for Maintaining the Neck in a Suitable Position Following Tracheal Reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bizhan Ziaian

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Segmental resection and end-to-end anastomosis is the treatment of choice for patients suffering from tracheal stenosis for whom conservative management is not planned. A complication of this procedure is tension-induced anastomotic failure. To prevent this complication, maintaining the neck in full flexion by means of a suture between the chin and upper chest is a traditional approach. We have designed a new brace (Shiraz brace that securely supports the neck in this position and decreases the bothersome use of the suture alone.

  16. A new brace for maintaining the neck in a suitable position following tracheal reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziaian, Bizhan; Foroutan, Ali; Tahamtan, Maryam; Moslemi, Sam

    2014-05-01

    Segmental resection and end-to-end anastomosis is the treatment of choice for patients suffering from tracheal stenosis for whom conservative management is not planned. A complication of this procedure is tension-induced anastomotic failure. To prevent this complication, maintaining the neck in full flexion by means of a suture between the chin and upper chest is a traditional approach. We have designed a new brace (Shiraz brace) that securely supports the neck in this position and decreases the bothersome use of the suture alone. PMID:24850991

  17. Mechanisms of improved knee flexion after rectus femoris transfer surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Fox, Melanie D.; Reinbolt, Jeffrey A.; Õunpuu, Sylvia; Delp, Scott L.

    2009-01-01

    Rectus femoris transfer is frequently performed to treat stiff-knee gait in subjects with cerebral palsy. In this surgery, the distal tendon is released from the patella and re-attached to one of several sites, such as the sartorius or the iliotibial band. Surgical outcomes vary, and the mechanisms by which the surgery improves knee motion are unclear. The purpose of this study was to clarify the mechanism by which the transferred muscle improves knee flexion by examining three types of trans...

  18. [Arthur Simons on tonic neck reflexes in persons with hemiplegia. From the years 1916 to 1919].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holdorff, B

    2012-04-01

    Tonic neck reflexes described in 1921 by Magnus and deKlejn in animals and men were studied in hemiplegic patients who were mainly victims of WWI by Arthur Simons, a neurologist in Berlin and coworker of Hermann Oppenheim. The effect of the asymmetric neck reflexes after head rotation was restricted to the paralyzed side: tonus (spasms) of extension and adduction during mid-position of the head or head version to the paralyzed side; flexion tonus and abduction during head version to the non-paralyzed side; and flexion tonus (spasms) of the paralyzed limbs during flexion of the head and extension spasms by head extension. More than this, hemiplegic "Mitbewegungen" or associated reactions (Walshe) were observed. They are elicited by conscious innervations of the unaffected side, e.g. by fist closure, and are increased or varied by head rotation, the tonic neck reflexes. They occurred in 25%. A film with Arthur Simons as examiner from the years 1916-1919 shows these nearly forgotten phenomena. Their everyday significance was already stressed in 1920, long before the rules of antispastic positions were defined by Bobath. PMID:21845452

  19. A mountain among molehills: removing an impinging large femoral neck osteochondroma in a man with hereditary multiple exostoses.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Fitzgerald, Conall W R

    2014-01-01

    A 31-year-old man with a history of hereditary multiple exostoses (HME) presented with persistent right groin pain and reduced hip range of movement. Examination demonstrated a positive FADIR (flexion, adduction and internal rotation) test suggesting femoroacetabular impingement (FAI). Investigations showed multiple sessile osteochondromata of the right femur with a dominant anterolateral femoral neck osteochondroma causing flexion block. The patient underwent an uncomplicated proximal femoral exostectomy. Six-week postoperative pain, range of movement and daily activity had greatly improved. This case highlights that even in the setting of multiple osteochondromata, excellent impingement relief can be achieved following selective proximal femoral exostectomy.

  20. NECK PAIN: AN ANCIENT VIEW

    OpenAIRE

    Yogitha Bali

    2012-01-01

    Neck pain is one of the very common complaints across the globe. Common neck pain occurs due to problems in the neck muscles, ligaments and discs due to faulty neck postures and daily neck misadventures accounting for more than 80% of neck pains around the globe. Conventional treatment methods which include drugs, physiotherapy, exercises & operative care have their own limitations and are not entirely effective. Alternative therapeutic approach could complement or supplement the existing tre...

  1. Head and Neck

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højgaard, Liselotte; Berthelsen, Anne Kiil; Loft, Annika

    2014-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography with FDG of the head and neck region is mainly used for the diagnosis of head and neck cancer, for staging, treatment evaluation, relapse, and planning of surgery and radio therapy. This article is a practical guide of imaging techniques...

  2. Higher-order Statistics of Weak Lensing Shear and Flexion

    CERN Document Server

    Munshi, Dipak; Heavens, Alan; Coles, Peter; Cooray, Asantha

    2010-01-01

    Owing to their more extensive sky coverage and tighter control on systematic errors, future deep weak lensing surveys should provide a better statistical picture of the dark matter clustering beyond the level of the power spectrum. In this context, the study of non-Gaussianity induced by gravity can help tighten constraints on the background cosmology by breaking parameter degeneracies, as well as throwing light on the nature of dark matter, dark energy or alternative gravity theories. Analysis of the shear or flexion properties of such maps is more complicated than the simpler case of the convergence due to the spinorial nature of the fields involved. Here we develop analytical tools for the study of higher-order statistics such as the bispectrum (or trispectrum) directly using such maps at different source redshift. The statistics we introduce can be constructed from cumulants of the shear or flexions, involving the cross-correlation of squared and cubic maps at different redshifts. Typically, the low signa...

  3. Changes in the flexion-relaxation response induced by hip extensor and erector spinae muscle fatigue

    OpenAIRE

    Cantin Vincent; Lafond Danik; Descarreaux Martin

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background The flexion-relaxation phenomenon (FRP) is defined by reduced lumbar erector spinae (ES) muscle myoelectric activity during full trunk flexion. The objectives of this study were to quantify the effect of hip and back extensor muscle fatigue on FRP parameters and lumbopelvic kinematics. Methods Twenty-seven healthy adults performed flexion-extension tasks under 4 different experimental conditions: no fatigue/no load, no fatigue/load, fatigue/no load, and fatigue/load. Total...

  4. Neck pain and headaches in a patient after a fall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Brian A; Ross, Michael D

    2009-05-01

    The patient was a 64-year-old woman who reported a sudden onset of neck pain and headaches following a fall 2.5 months prior to her initial physical therapy visit. Cervical spine radiographs, which were ordered by the referring physician, revealed extensive degenerative disc disease of the lower cervical spine. At her initial physical therapy evaluation, cervical spine range of motion was within functional limits except for bilateral rotation, which was limited to 45 degrees due to pain and stiffness. The patient's headache symptoms were abolished with the Sharp-Purser test. Although assessment of symptoms was not the intent of the Sharp-Purser test, a reduction of symptoms during the test would warrant further evaluation. Therefore, the physical therapist ordered cervical spine flexion-extension radiographic views to assess for atlantoaxial instability. The radiologist's report noted a stable atlantodens interval that did not change with cervical flexion and extension and a course of physical therapy was initiated. At the time of discharge from physical therapy, the patient reported no neck pain and only very mild occasional headaches, which she believed she could manage on her own. PMID:19411772

  5. Quantitative Ultrasonic Nakagami Imaging of Neck Fibrosis After Head and Neck Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of ultrasound Nakagami imaging to quantitatively assess radiation-induced neck fibrosis, a common sequela of radiation therapy (RT) to the head and neck. Methods and Materials: In a pilot study, 40 study participants were enrolled and classified into 3 subgroups: (1) a control group of 12 healthy volunteers; (2) an asymptomatic group of 11 patients who had received intensity modulated RT for head and neck cancer and had experienced no neck fibrosis; and (3) a symptomatic group of 17 post-RT patients with neck fibrosis. Each study participant underwent 1 ultrasound study in which scans were performed in the longitudinal orientation of the bilateral neck. Three Nakagami parameters were calculated to quantify radiation-induced tissue injury: Nakagami probability distribution function, shape, and scaling parameters. Physician-based assessments of the neck fibrosis were performed according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group late morbidity scoring scheme, and patient-based fibrosis assessments were rated based on symptoms such as pain and stiffness. Results: Major discrepancies existed between physician-based and patient-based assessments of radiation-induced fibrosis. Significant differences in all Nakagami parameters were observed between the control group and 2 post-RT groups. Moreover, significant differences in Nakagami shape and scaling parameters were observed among asymptomatic and symptomatic groups. Compared with the control group, the average Nakagami shape parameter value increased by 32.1% (P<.001), and the average Nakagami scaling parameter increased by 55.7% (P<.001) for the asymptomatic group, whereas the Nakagami shape parameter increased by 74.1% (P<.001) and the Nakagami scaling parameter increased by 83.5% (P<.001) for the symptomatic group. Conclusions: Ultrasonic Nakagami imaging is a potential quantitative tool to characterize radiation-induced asymptomatic and symptomatic neck fibrosis

  6. Quantitative Ultrasonic Nakagami Imaging of Neck Fibrosis After Head and Neck Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Xiaofeng [Department of Radiation Oncology and Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Yoshida, Emi [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, California (United States); Cassidy, Richard J.; Beitler, Jonathan J.; Yu, David S.; Curran, Walter J. [Department of Radiation Oncology and Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Liu, Tian, E-mail: tliu34@emory.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology and Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States)

    2015-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of ultrasound Nakagami imaging to quantitatively assess radiation-induced neck fibrosis, a common sequela of radiation therapy (RT) to the head and neck. Methods and Materials: In a pilot study, 40 study participants were enrolled and classified into 3 subgroups: (1) a control group of 12 healthy volunteers; (2) an asymptomatic group of 11 patients who had received intensity modulated RT for head and neck cancer and had experienced no neck fibrosis; and (3) a symptomatic group of 17 post-RT patients with neck fibrosis. Each study participant underwent 1 ultrasound study in which scans were performed in the longitudinal orientation of the bilateral neck. Three Nakagami parameters were calculated to quantify radiation-induced tissue injury: Nakagami probability distribution function, shape, and scaling parameters. Physician-based assessments of the neck fibrosis were performed according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group late morbidity scoring scheme, and patient-based fibrosis assessments were rated based on symptoms such as pain and stiffness. Results: Major discrepancies existed between physician-based and patient-based assessments of radiation-induced fibrosis. Significant differences in all Nakagami parameters were observed between the control group and 2 post-RT groups. Moreover, significant differences in Nakagami shape and scaling parameters were observed among asymptomatic and symptomatic groups. Compared with the control group, the average Nakagami shape parameter value increased by 32.1% (P<.001), and the average Nakagami scaling parameter increased by 55.7% (P<.001) for the asymptomatic group, whereas the Nakagami shape parameter increased by 74.1% (P<.001) and the Nakagami scaling parameter increased by 83.5% (P<.001) for the symptomatic group. Conclusions: Ultrasonic Nakagami imaging is a potential quantitative tool to characterize radiation-induced asymptomatic and symptomatic neck fibrosis.

  7. Single molecule mechanics of the kinesin neck

    OpenAIRE

    Bornschlögl, Thomas; Woehlke, Günther; Rief, Matthias

    2009-01-01

    Structural integrity as well as mechanical stability of the parts of a molecular motor are crucial for its function. In this study, we used high-resolution force spectroscopy by atomic force microscopy to investigate the force-dependent opening kinetics of the neck coiled coil of Kinesin-1 from Drosophila melanogaster. We find that even though the overall thermodynamic stability of the neck is low, the average opening force of the coiled coil is >11 pN when stretched with pulling velocities >...

  8. flexions sur la nomination des juges

    OpenAIRE

    Masson, Louis; Champagne, Sylvie

    2011-01-01

    Au printemps 2010, le Barreau du Québec a décidé de participer à la réflexion menée par la Commission publique d’enquête sur le processus de nomination des juges du Québec. Il était nécessaire de revoir, après une trentaine d’années, le système québécois, qui a fait ses preuves et donné une magistrature de haute qualité. Pourquoi ? Afin de s’assurer, entre autres, d’augmenter la transparence du processus et de préserver la confiance des citoyens dans notre système de justice. Les auteurs prés...

  9. The Arterial Folding Point During Flexion of the Hip Joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Endovascular stents placed in periarticular vessels may be at a greater risk of neointimal hyperplasia and eventual occlusion than those placed in non-periarticular vessels. The purpose of this study was to investigate the location of maximal conformational change along the iliac and femoral artery, the folding point, during flexion of the hip joint and its location relative to the hip joint and the inguinal ligament. Methods: Seventy patients undergoing femoral artery catheterization were evaluated. The patients were 47 men and 23 women and ranged in age from 26 to 75 years (mean 54 years). The arteries (right:left = 34:36) were measured using a marked catheter for sizing vessels. Fluoroscopic images were obtained in anteroposterior and lateral projections in neutral position, and in the lateral projection in flexed position of the hip joint. The folding point was determined by comparing the lateral projection images in the neutral and flexed positions. The distance from the acetabular roof to the folding point and the distance from the inguinal ligament to the folding point was evaluated. Results: : The folding point was located 42.8 ± 28.6 mm cranial to the acetabular roof and 35.1 ± 30.1 mm cranial to the inguinal ligament. As the patient’s age increased, the folding point was located more cranially (p < 0.001). Conclusions: The folding point during flexion of the hip joint was located 42.8 ± 28.6 mm cranial to the acetabular roof and 35.1 ± 30.1 mm cranial to the inguinal ligament. As the patient's age increased, the folding point was located more cranially. When a stent is inserted over this region, more attention may be needed during follow-up to monitor possible occlusion and stent failure.

  10. SHORT TERM EFFICACY OF KINESIOTAPING AND EXERCISES ON CHRONIC MECHANICAL NECK PAIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kulkarni Prachi Sanjay 1 , 2 , 3 ,

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and introduction:The purpose of study is to determine the short term effectiveness of Kinesiotapingcombined with Exercises in reducing pain and improving Cervical range of motion and functional ability forsubjects with Chronic Mechanical Neck pain.Method::Pre to post test experimental study design randomised thirty Chronic Mechanical Neck pain patientseach 15 into KT and control group. KT group received kinesiotaping with exercises and Control groupreceivedonly exercises for 3 times a week for 4 weeks.Pain, active cervical range of motion and functional ability weremeasured before and after 4 weeks of intervention.Results:Comparative analysis using Independent‘t’ test and Mann Whitney U test found that there is a statisticallysignificant difference (p<0.05 in means of NPRS, active Flexion, Extension, Rotation to right, Rotation to LeftROM, Neck Disability Index (NDI in percentage when compared post intervention means between the groups.Pre to post test within the group analysis in both the groups using Paired‘t’ test and Wilcoxon signed rank testfound that there is a statistically significant change in means of NPRS, Flexion, Extension, Rotation to right,Rotation to Left ROM, NDI.Conclusion:Kinesiotaping combined with exercises for 4 weeks found short term effect in improving pain,active cervical ROM and functional ability than exercises alone in treatment of chronic Mechanical neck pain

  11. Melanoma - neck (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    This melanoma on the neck is variously colored with a very darkly pigmented area found centrally. It has irregular ... be larger than 0.5 cm. Prognosis in melanoma is best defined by its depth on resection.

  12. Neck-Tongue Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Nancy; Dougherty, Carrie

    2016-04-01

    Neck-tongue syndrome (NTS) is a headache disorder often initiated by rapid axial rotation of the neck resulting in unilateral neck and/or occipital pain and transient ipsilateral tongue sensory disturbance. In this review, we examine reported cases of NTS since its initial description in 1980 to highlight the significance of this condition in the differential diagnosis of headache in patients presenting with neck pain and altered tongue sensation. The anatomical basis of NTS centers on the C1-C2 facet joint, C2 ventral ramus, and inferior oblique muscle in the atlanto-axial space. NTS may be categorized as complicated (secondary to another disease process) or uncomplicated (hereditary, related to trauma, or idiopathic). Diagnosis is based on clinical suspicion after a thorough history and physical without a pathognomonic radiologic finding. It is typically treated conservatively with medications, local injections, immobilization with cervical collars, or physical therapy; rarely is surgical intervention pursued. PMID:26984539

  13. J incision in neck dissections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acar, A; Dursun, G; Aydin, O; Akbaş, Y

    1998-01-01

    Metastasis in the neck lymph system of primary tumours of the head and neck is frequently seen. In order to prevent this metastasis, neck dissection is carried out by various types of skin incisions. In this study, types of skin incision used in neck dissections were defined, and the advantages, disadvantages and results of J incisions, which have been performed on 320 radical neck dissection patients in our clinic between 1985-1996, were compared with those of other incision types. PMID:9538447

  14. The Effects of Psoas Major and Lumbar Lordosis on Hip Flexion and Sprint Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copaver, Karine; Hertogh, Claude; Hue, Olivier

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we analyzed the correlations between hip flexion power, sprint performance, lumbar lordosis (LL) and the cross-sectional area (CSA) of the psoas muscle (PM). Ten young adults performed two sprint tests and isokinetic tests to determine hip flexion power. Magnetic resonance imaging was used to determine LL and PM CSA. There were…

  15. Head and neck teratomas

    OpenAIRE

    Shah, Ajaz; Latoo, Suhail; Ahmed, Irshad; Malik, Altaf H

    2009-01-01

    Teratomas are complex lesions composed of diverse tissues from all 3 germinal cell layers and may exhibit variable levels of maturity. Head and neck teratomas are most commonly cervical with the oropharynx (epignathus) being the second commonest location. In this article, clinical presentation, behaviour and associated significance of head and neck teratomas have been highlightened. Because of their obscure origin, bizarre microscopic appearance, unpredictable behaviour and often dramatic cli...

  16. Effects of tailored neck-shoulder pain treatment based on a decision model guided by clinical assessments and standardized functional tests. A study protocol of a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Björklund Martin

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A major problem with rehabilitation interventions for neck pain is that the condition may have multiple causes, thus a single treatment approach is seldom efficient. The present study protocol outlines a single blinded randomised controlled trial evaluating the effect of tailored treatment for neck-shoulder pain. The treatment is based on a decision model guided by standardized clinical assessment and functional tests with cut-off values. Our main hypothesis is that the tailored treatment has better short, intermediate and long-term effects than either non-tailored treatment or treatment-as-usual (TAU on pain and function. We sub-sequentially hypothesize that tailored and non-tailored treatment both have better effect than TAU. Methods/Design 120 working women with minimum six weeks of nonspecific neck-shoulder pain aged 20–65, are allocated by minimisation with the factors age, duration of pain, pain intensity and disability in to the groups tailored treatment (T, non-tailored treatment (NT or treatment-as-usual (TAU. Treatment is given to the groups T and NT for 11 weeks (27 sessions evenly distributed. An extensive presentation of the tests and treatment decision model is provided. The main treatment components are manual therapy, cranio-cervical flexion exercise and strength training, EMG-biofeedback training, treatment for cervicogenic headache, neck motor control training. A decision algorithm based on the baseline assessment determines the treatment components given to each participant of T- and NT-groups. Primary outcome measures are physical functioning (Neck Disability Index and average pain intensity last week (Numeric Rating Scale. Secondary outcomes are general improvement (Patient Global Impression of Change scale, symptoms (Profile Fitness Mapping neck questionnaire, capacity to work in the last 6 weeks (quality and quantity and pressure pain threshold of m. trapezius. Primary and secondary outcomes will

  17. Posterior-anterior weight-bearing radiograph in 15 knee flexion in medial osteoarthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamanaka, Norio [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Kochi Medical School, Oko-cho, Nankoku, Kochi, 783-8505 (Japan); Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Kochi Prefectural Aki Hospita1, Hoei-cho 1-32, Aki, Kochi, 784-0027 (Japan); Takahashi, Toshiaki; Yamamoto, Hiroshi [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Kochi Medical School, Oko-cho, Nankoku, Kochi, 783-8505 (Japan); Ichikawa, Norikazu [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Kochi Prefectural Aki Hospita1, Hoei-cho 1-32, Aki, Kochi, 784-0027 (Japan)

    2003-01-01

    To evaluate the degree of knee flexion at which: (1) degenerative joint space narrowing is best seen, (2) the tibial plateau is best visualized and (3) the tibiofemoral angle is most correct, in order to assess the degree of flexion in the anteroposterior radiographic view that is most useful for assessing medial compartment osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee.Design and patients. We compared the conventional extended view of the knee and views at 15 , 30 , and 45 of flexion with respect to joint space narrowing, alignment of the medial tibial plateau (MTP), and tibiofemoral angles in 113 knees of 95 patients with medial osteoarthritis of the knee (22 men, 73 women; mean age 67 years).Results. At the midpoint and the narrowest point of the medial compartment, joint space narrowing values at 15 , 30 , and 45 of flexion of the knee were smaller than that of the conventional extended view. Superimposition of the margins of the tibial plateau was satisfactory in 12% of patients in the conventional extended view, in 36% at 15 of flexion, in 20% at 30 of flexion, and in 19% at 45 of flexion of the knee. When the knee was at 15 of flexion there was a smaller difference in the tibiofemoral angle, in comparison with the knee extended, than was the case at 30 and 45 of flexion in patients with medial OA.Conclusion. A posteroanterior view with 15 of flexion of the knee was able to detect joint space narrowing accurately, to achieve good alignment of the MTP in the medial compartment, and to reduce the difference in tibiofemoral angle compared with a view of the knee in conventional extension, and may be an alternative view in cases of medial OA of the knee. (orig.)

  18. Posterior-anterior weight-bearing radiograph in 15 knee flexion in medial osteoarthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate the degree of knee flexion at which: (1) degenerative joint space narrowing is best seen, (2) the tibial plateau is best visualized and (3) the tibiofemoral angle is most correct, in order to assess the degree of flexion in the anteroposterior radiographic view that is most useful for assessing medial compartment osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee.Design and patients. We compared the conventional extended view of the knee and views at 15 , 30 , and 45 of flexion with respect to joint space narrowing, alignment of the medial tibial plateau (MTP), and tibiofemoral angles in 113 knees of 95 patients with medial osteoarthritis of the knee (22 men, 73 women; mean age 67 years).Results. At the midpoint and the narrowest point of the medial compartment, joint space narrowing values at 15 , 30 , and 45 of flexion of the knee were smaller than that of the conventional extended view. Superimposition of the margins of the tibial plateau was satisfactory in 12% of patients in the conventional extended view, in 36% at 15 of flexion, in 20% at 30 of flexion, and in 19% at 45 of flexion of the knee. When the knee was at 15 of flexion there was a smaller difference in the tibiofemoral angle, in comparison with the knee extended, than was the case at 30 and 45 of flexion in patients with medial OA.Conclusion. A posteroanterior view with 15 of flexion of the knee was able to detect joint space narrowing accurately, to achieve good alignment of the MTP in the medial compartment, and to reduce the difference in tibiofemoral angle compared with a view of the knee in conventional extension, and may be an alternative view in cases of medial OA of the knee. (orig.)

  19. Reliability, construct and discriminative validity of clinical testing in subjects with and without chronic neck pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, René; Ris Hansen, Inge; Falla, Deborah; Juul-Kristensen, Birgit

    2014-01-01

    -retest reliability in people with and without chronic neck pain. Moreover, construct and between-group discriminative validity of the tests were examined. METHODS: Twenty-one participants with chronic neck pain and 21 asymptomatic participants were included. Intra- and inter-reliability were evaluated for the Cranio......-Cervical Flexion Test (CCFT), Range of Movement (ROM), Joint Position Error (JPE), Gaze Stability (GS), Smooth Pursuit Neck Torsion Test (SPNTT), and neuromuscular control of the Deep Cervical Extensors (DCE). Test-retest reliability was assessed for Postural Control (SWAY) and Pressure Pain Threshold (PPT) over...... validity was found for CCFT, ROM, GS, SPNTT and PPT, however, differences were within the limits of the minimal detectable change. CONCLUSIONS: The majority of the tests evaluated showed satisfactory reliability and construct validity supporting their use in the clinical evaluation of patients with chronic...

  20. A Sloped Seat Wedge Can Change the Kinematics of the Lumbar Spine of Seated Workers with Limited Hip Flexion

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Ji-Won; Kang, Min-Hyeok; Noh, Kyung-Hee; Kim, Jun-Seok; Oh, Jae-Seop

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to determine whether a wedge type seat decreases the lumbar flexion angle of seated workers with limited hip flexion. [Subjects] Twelve sedentary workers with limited hip flexion were recruited. [Methods] Three seat surfaces were used: a level surface, a forward-inclining wedge, and a backward-reclining wedge. The angles of lumbar flexion and pelvic tilt were measured using a three-dimensional motion analysis system. Differences in kinematic data of the...

  1. Evaluation of dried salted pork ham and neck quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simona Kunová

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was analysed chemical and physical parameters of dried salted pork ham and neck. Dry-cured meat is a traditional dry-cured product obtained after 12 - 24 months of ripening under controlled environmental conditions.  Ham and neck was salted by nitrite salt mixture during 1 week. Salted meat products were dried at 4 °C and relative humidity 85% 1 week after salting. The quality of dry-cured meat is influenced by the processing technology, for example length of drying and ripening period. The average moisture of dried salted pork ham was 63.77% and dried salted pork neck was 59.26%. The protein content was 24.87% in dried salted pork ham and significantly lower (20.51% in dried salted pork neck. The value of intramuscular fat in dried salted pork ham was 4.97% and 14.40% in dried salted pork neck. The salt content was 5.39% in dried salted pork ham and 4.83% in dried salted pork neck. The cholesterol content was 1.36 g.kg-1 in dried salted pork ham and significant lower in dried salted pork neck (0.60 g.kg-1. The value of lightness was 44.36 CIE L* in dried salted pork ham and significantly lower in dried salted pork neck (40.74 CIE L*. The pH value was 5.84 in dried salted pork ham and 5.80 in dried salted pork neck. The shear work was 9.99 kg.s-1 in dried salted pork ham and 6.34 in dried salted pork neck. The value of water activity (aw was 0.929 in dried salted pork ham and similar 0.921 in dried salted pork neck

  2. Biomechanical Considerations in the Design of High-Flexion Total Knee Replacements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Kung Cheng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Typically, joint arthroplasty is performed to relieve pain and improve functionality in a diseased or damaged joint. Total knee arthroplasty (TKA involves replacing the entire knee joint, both femoral and tibial surfaces, with anatomically shaped artificial components in the hope of regaining normal joint function and permitting a full range of knee flexion. In spite of the design of the prosthesis itself, the degree of flexion attainable following TKA depends on a variety of factors, such as the joint’s preoperative condition/flexion, muscle strength, and surgical technique. High-flexion knee prostheses have been developed to accommodate movements that require greater flexion than typically achievable with conventional TKA; such high flexion is especially prevalent in Asian cultures. Recently, computational techniques have been widely used for evaluating the functionality of knee prostheses and for improving biomechanical performance. To offer a better understanding of the development and evaluation techniques currently available, this paper aims to review some of the latest trends in the simulation of high-flexion knee prostheses.

  3. Wing Flexion and Aerodynamics Performance of Insect Free Flights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Haibo; Liang, Zongxian; Ren, Yan

    2010-11-01

    Wing flexion in flapping flight is a hallmark of insect flight. It is widely thought that wing flexibility and wing deformation would potentially provide new aerodynamic mechanisms of aerodynamic force productions over completely rigid wings. However, there are lack of literatures on studying fluid dynamics of freely flying insects due to the presence of complex shaped moving boundaries in the flow domain. In this work, a computational study of freely flying insects is being conducted. High resolution, high speed videos of freely flying dragonflies and damselflies is obtained and used as a basis for developing high fidelity geometrical models of the dragonfly body and wings. 3D surface reconstruction technologies are used to obtain wing topologies and kinematics. The wing motions are highly complex and a number of different strategies including singular vector decomposition of the wing kinematics are used to examine the various kinematical features and their impact on the wing performance. Simulations are carried out to examine the aerodynamic performance of all four wings and understand the wake structures of such wings.

  4. Wrist flexion as an adjunct to the diagnosis of carpal tunnel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunnan, J B; Waylonis, G W

    1991-03-01

    The effects of five minutes of wrist flexion on median motor and sensory evoked potential latencies in 87 individuals were studied. Nineteen subjects had carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) as diagnosed by increased median nerve latencies across the wrist, and 68 had values in the normal range and were assigned to the control group. A slight prolongation of up to 0.5m sec of evoked potential latencies was observed in both groups after flexion, but the differences between the two groups were not significant to establish the value of adding wrist flexion to conventional screening methods. PMID:1998456

  5. Bilateral neck paragangliomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mumoli, N; Cei, M; Pauletti, M; Ferrito, G; Scazzeri, F

    2009-10-01

    Paragangliomas of the head and neck are rare neoplasms presented as cervical mass, generally bilateral, that arise from chemoreceptors located at the carotid bifurcation (carotid body tumors), along the vagus nerve (vagal paragangliomas), and in the jugular fossa and tympanic cavity (jugulotympanic paragangliomas). They are typically asymptomatic at the beginning, highly vascular, slow-growing and compressing the surrounding anatomic structures. Only radical surgery is the curative treatment for paragangliomas. We present a case of a 62- year-old woman with a diagnosis of bilateral neck paragangliomas where surgical removal was judged burdened by excessive risk because of the size of the tumor. PMID:19622673

  6. The range of excursion of flexor tendons in Zone V: a comparison of active vs passive flexion mobilisation regimes.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Panchal, J

    1997-10-01

    A number of early postoperative mobilisation regimes have been developed in an attempt to increase tendon excursion and gliding and thereby reduce formation of adhesions following repair of flexor tendons. Early active flexion mobilisation regimes are becoming more popular, and have replaced early passive flexion regimes in many centres. The aim of the present study was: (a) to determine the range of excursion of flexor tendons in Zone V, and (b) to compare the excursion ranges between active (Belfast) and passive (modified Duran) flexion mobilisation regimes postoperatively. This was done (a) in two cadavers, and (b) in two patients intraoperatively, and postoperatively at 10 days, 3 weeks and 6 weeks. With passive flexion, the mean tendon excursion in Zone V in cadavers was 1 mm for flexor digitorum superficialis (FDS), flexor digitorum profundus (FDP) and flexor pollicis longus (FPL) tendons respectively. With simulated active flexion, the mean tendon excursion was 14 mm, 10 mm and 11 mm respectively. The mean tendon excursion in clinical cases intraoperatively following passive flexion was 2 mm for FDS, FDP and FPL respectively; following simulated active flexion it was 10 mm, 11 mm and 11 mm for FDS, FDP and FPL respectively. On the tenth day following repair, the mean excursions of FDS, FDP and FPL were 1 mm, 4 mm and 4 mm on passive flexion as compared to 3 mm, 10 mm and 12 mm on active flexion respectively. Three weeks postoperatively, the mean excursions of FDS, FDP and FPL tendons were 1 mm, 2 mm and 1 mm on passive flexion as compared to 5 mm, 15 mm on active flexion respectively. Six weeks postoperatively, the mean excursions of FDS, FDP and FPL tendons were 9 mm, 7 mm and 4 mm on passive flexion as compared to 12 mm, 33 mm and 20 mm on active flexion respectively. These results demonstrate an increased excursion of repaired flexor tendons in Zone V following an active flexion mobilisation regime as compared to a passive flexion mobilisation regime.

  7. Restraining and neck cutting or stunning and neck cutting of veal calves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambooij, E; van der Werf, J T N; Reimert, H G M; Hindle, V A

    2012-05-01

    Brain and heart activities were measured in 31 veal calves during restraining and rotating followed by neck cutting with or without stunning to evaluate welfare. After neck cutting correlation dimension analyses and %power of EEG beta wave fraction decreased gradually to lower values resulting in an induction of unconsciousness lasting on average 80s. Corneal reflex response ceased 135±57s after neck cutting. The CD scores and the %power of beta waves fell immediately after post-cut captive bolt and pre-cut electrical stunning to levels indicating unconsciousness. Heart rate in lairage increased upon entrance to the restrainer and again after rotation, heart rate variability decreased. Rotating the restrainer 90°, 120° or 180° compromised veal calf welfare and should be avoided. It is recommended to use post-cut captive bolt stunning or pre-cut electrical stunning inducing immediate unconsciousness. PMID:22209298

  8. Performing high flexion activities does not seem to be crucial in developing early femoral component loosening after high-flexion TKA

    OpenAIRE

    Ha, Chul-Won; Ravichandran, Chandramohan; Lee, Choong-Hee; Kim, Jun-Ho; Park, Yong-Beom

    2015-01-01

    Background It is still unclear whether high flexion (HF) activities correlated with the early loosening of the femoral component and whether HF activities are possible. We investigated what is the capability for performing various HF activities, and whether high flexion activities increase the chance of aseptic loosening after HF-TKA. Methods We retrospectively analysed 260 patients who underwent HF-TKA using the NexGen LPS Flex between 2001 and 2009. The mean follow-up was 6.7 years (range, ...

  9. High Resolution Weak Lensing Mass-Mapping Combining Shear and Flexion

    CERN Document Server

    Lanusse, Francois; Leonard, Adrienne; Pires, Sandrine

    2016-01-01

    We propose a new mass-mapping algorithm, specifically designed to recover small-scale information from a combination of gravitational shear and flexion. Including flexion allows us to supplement the shear on small scales in order to increase the sensitivity to substructures and the overall resolution of the convergence map without relying on strong lensing constraints. In order to preserve all available small scale information, we avoid any binning of the irregularly sampled input shear and flexion fields and treat the mass-mapping problem as a general ill-posed inverse problem, regularised using a robust multi-scale wavelet sparsity prior. The resulting algorithm incorporates redshift, reduced shear, and reduced flexion measurements for individual galaxies and is made highly efficient by the use of fast Fourier estimators. We test our reconstruction method on a set of realistic weak lensing simulations corresponding to typical HST/ACS cluster observations and demonstrate our ability to recover substructures ...

  10. New Constraints on the Complex Mass Substructure in Abell 1689 from Gravitational Flexion

    CERN Document Server

    Leonard, Adrienne; Goldberg, David M

    2010-01-01

    In a recent publication, the flexion aperture mass statistic was found to provide a robust and effective method by which substructure in galaxy clusters might be mapped. Moreover, we suggested that constraints on the masses and mass profile of structures might be constrained using this method. In this paper, we apply the flexion aperture mass technique to HST ACS images of Abell 1689. We compare this measure to the weak lensing shear aperture mass statistic, and demonstrate that the flexion aperture mass statistic is more sensitive to structures on the scales considered, dramatically outperforming the shear aperture mass statistic on this dataset, which suffers from persistent systematic noise. While the central potential is not constrained by our method, due largely to missing data in the central 0.5$^\\prime$ of the cluster, we are able to place constraints on the masses and mass profiles of prominent substructures. Considering 16 flexion aperture mass reconstructions, we identify 4 separate mass peaks, and ...

  11. Lipoblastoma of the neck

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lorenzen, Jacob C; Godballe, Christian; Kerndrup, Gitte B

    2005-01-01

    with lipoblastomatous tumours in the neck is presented. A 6-year-old boy with complains of stridorous respiration and significant reduction in physical capacity was referred to the ENT Department, Odense University Hospital, Denmark. He was treated with total surgical resection of a soft and slowly...

  12. TC pathological Neck

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This presentation is about different imaging techniques such as ultrasound, CT, RNM, PET-CT. These techniques permit to detect head and neck tumors, breast and digestive pathologies as well as congenital diseases and glandular tumor in the thyroid, parathyroid, muscles, lymphatic, nerves and vessels

  13. A sloped seat wedge can change the kinematics of the lumbar spine of seated workers with limited hip flexion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ji-Won; Kang, Min-Hyeok; Noh, Kyung-Hee; Kim, Jun-Seok; Oh, Jae-Seop

    2014-08-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to determine whether a wedge type seat decreases the lumbar flexion angle of seated workers with limited hip flexion. [Subjects] Twelve sedentary workers with limited hip flexion were recruited. [Methods] Three seat surfaces were used: a level surface, a forward-inclining wedge, and a backward-reclining wedge. The angles of lumbar flexion and pelvic tilt were measured using a three-dimensional motion analysis system. Differences in kinematic data of the subjects seated on the three seat surfaces were analyzed using repeated one-way analysis of variance. [Results] The degree of lumbar flexion decreased significantly when using the forward-inclining wedge compared with the level surface and backward-reclining wedge. [Conclusion] These findings suggest that sitting on a forward-inclining wedge may be useful for minimizing the compensatory lumbar flexion of individuals with limited hip flexion who work in a seated position. PMID:25202175

  14. Neutron resonance averaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The principles of resonance averaging as applied to neutron capture reactions are described. Several illustrations of resonance averaging to problems of nuclear structure and the distribution of radiative strength in nuclei are provided. 30 refs., 12 figs

  15. THE RELATION BETWEEN PAIN EXTENT AND QUALITY-OF-LIFE, PSYCHOLOGICAL FACTORS AND NECK FUNCTION IN PATIENTS WITH CHRONIC NECK PAIN

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ris Hansen, Inge; Barbero, Marco; Falla, Deborah;

    factors and/or decreased function of the involved body parts. Purpose: To study the relation between pain extent with 1) quality of life, 2) kinesiophobia, depression, 3) cervical muscle function and mobility and additionally the relation of pain extent with the origin of pain being traumatic or non...... Scale of Kinesiophobia (TSK), Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-ll), Neck Disability Index (NDI) and clinical tests: Craniocervical Flexion Test (CCFT), Cervical Extension Test (CE), and Cervical Range of Motion (CROM). Results: Significant positive correlations were observed between pain extent and NDI...... extent related to the origin being traumatic or non-traumatic. Conclusion: Pain extent extracted from pain drawings are moderately correlated with patient-reported neck function, and weakly correlated with depression, kinesiophobia and cervical clinical tests. In clinical decision-making, pain extent may...

  16. Averaging anisotropic cosmologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We examine the effects of spatial inhomogeneities on irrotational anisotropic cosmologies by looking at the average properties of anisotropic pressure-free models. Adopting the Buchert scheme, we recast the averaged scalar equations in Bianchi-type form and close the standard system by introducing a propagation formula for the average shear magnitude. We then investigate the evolution of anisotropic average vacuum models and those filled with pressureless matter. In the latter case we show that the backreaction effects can modify the familiar Kasner-like singularity and potentially remove Mixmaster-type oscillations. The presence of nonzero average shear in our equations also allows us to examine the constraints that a phase of backreaction-driven accelerated expansion might put on the anisotropy of the averaged domain. We close by assessing the status of these and other attempts to define and calculate 'average' spacetime behaviour in general relativity

  17. Change in neck circumference after shoulder arthroscopy: An observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shrividya Chellam

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Shoulder arthroscopy requires fluid irrigation, which causes soft-tissue oedema around chest, neck, and arm intraoperatively, leading to postoperative airway complications. We decided to study the incidence of increase in the neck circumference in shoulder arthroscopy and its effects on the airway. Methods: We studied 32 cases of shoulder arthroscopies over a period of 1-year, performed under general anaesthesia with interscalene block. The neck circumference of patients before and after the procedure was measured along with other parameters. The endotracheal tube cuff was deflated at the end of surgery to determine air leak around the tube. The negative leak test suggested airway oedema. Results: Thirty out of 32 patients showed positive air leak test. The average change in neck circumference was 1.17 ± 1.16 cm and all could be extubated uneventfully. Two showed negative leak test with an increase in neck circumference by 4.5 and 6.4 cm and were not extubated. Multiple regression analysis for risk factors showed intraoperative hypertension as a single predictor for an increase in neck circumference. Conclusion: Change in the neck circumference beyond 4 cm may suggest airway compromise and below 4 cm, airway compromise is unlikely even in the presence of extensive soft-tissue oedema around the shoulder, upper arm and chest.

  18. Elongation of the collateral ligaments after cruciate retaining total knee arthroplasty and the maximum flexion of the knee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Kwan Kyu; Hosseini, Ali; Tsai, Tsung-Yuan; Kwon, Young-Min; Li, Guoan

    2015-02-01

    The mechanisms that affect knee flexion after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) are still debatable. This study investigated the elongation of the superficial medial (sMCL) and lateral collateral ligaments (LCL) before and after a posterior cruciate retaining (CR) TKA. We hypothesized that overstretching of the collateral ligaments in high flexion after TKA could reduce maximal flexion of the knee. Three-dimensional models of 11 osteoarthritic knees of 11 patients including the insertions of the collateral ligaments were created using MR images. Each ligament was divided into three equal portions: anterior, middle and posterior portions. The shortest 3D wrapping length of each ligament portion was determined before and after the TKA surgery along a weight-bearing, single leg flexion path. The relationship between the changes of ligament elongation and the changes of the maximal knee flexion after TKAs was quantitatively analyzed. The sMCL showed significant increases in length only at low flexion after TKA; the LCL showed decreases in length at full extension, but increases with further flexion after TKA. The amount of increases of the maximum flexion angle after TKA was negatively correlated with the increases of the elongations of the anterior portion (p=0.010, r=0.733) and middle portion (p=0.049, r=0.604) of the sMCL as well as the anterior portion (p=0.010, r=0.733) of the LCL at maximal flexion of the knee. The results indicated that the increases of the length of the collateral ligaments at maximal flexion after TKA were associated with the decreases of the maximal flexion of the knee. Our data suggest that collateral ligament management should also be evaluated at higher knee flexion angles in order to optimize maximal flexion of the knee after TKAs. PMID:25555307

  19. Bladder neck contracture

    OpenAIRE

    Simhan, Jay; Ramirez, Daniel; Hudak, Steven J.; Morey, Allen F.

    2014-01-01

    Bladder neck contracture (BNC) is a well-described complication of the surgical treatment of benign and malignant prostate conditions. Nevertheless, etiologies of BNC development are highly dependent on the primary treatment modality undertaken with BNC also occurring after pelvic radiation. The treatment options for BNC can range from simple, office-based dilation procedures to more invasive, complex abdomino-perineal reconstructive surgery. Although numerous strategies have been described, ...

  20. Aggressive Fibromatosis in Neck.

    OpenAIRE

    Namita Kabdwal; Sanjeev Bhagat; Saurabh Varshney; Sampan Singh Bist; Sarita Mishra; Bhavna Singh

    2013-01-01

    Aggressive fibromatosis (AF) is a locally aggressive infiltrative low-grade benign tumor that accounts for approximately less than 3% of all soft tissue tumors. In the head and neck region this tumor tends to be more aggressive and associated with significant morbidity. Aggressive surgery is a viable management option and may be successfully used as a single modality treatment, or in combination with radiotherapy. We report a rare case of AF in a 38 year old female, who presented with a painl...

  1. Gun shot wound neck

    OpenAIRE

    Kochhar, L K; Shukul, V. K.; Sharma, Rahul

    2004-01-01

    All penetrating neck wounds are potentially very dangerous and require emergency treatment. The choice of treatment for the stable patient remains controversial, a number of studies encouraging mandatory surgical exploration and a similar number encourage selective surgical exploration. Knowledge of the physical properties of the penetrating object or weapon can help to determine a treatment plan and predict the risk of injury- All tracheal and esophageal injuries with structural damage shoul...

  2. Changes in the flexion relaxation response induced by lumbar muscle fatigue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cantin Vincent

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The flexion relaxation phenomenon (FRP is an interesting model to study the modulation of lumbar stability. Previous investigations have explored the effect of load, angular velocity and posture on this particular response. However, the influence of muscular fatigue on FRP parameters has not been thoroughly examined. The objective of the study is to identify the effect of erector spinae (ES muscle fatigue and spine loading on myoelectric silence onset and cessation in healthy individuals during a flexion-extension task. Methods Twenty healthy subjects participated in this study and performed blocks of 3 complete trunk flexions under 4 different experimental conditions: no fatigue/no load (1, no fatigue/load (2, fatigue/no load(3, and fatigue/load (4. Fatigue was induced according to the Sorenson protocol, and electromyographic (EMG power spectral analysis confirmed that muscular fatigue was adequate in each subject. Trunk and pelvis angles and surface EMG of the ES L2 and L5 were recorded during a flexion-extension task. Trunk flexion angle corresponding to the onset and cessation of myoelectric silence was then compared across the different experimental conditions using 2 × 2 repeated-measures ANOVA. Results Onset of myoelectric silence during the flexion motion appeared earlier after the fatigue task. Additionally, the cessation of myoelectric silence was observed later during the extension after the fatigue task. Statistical analysis also yielded a main effect of load, indicating a persistence of ES myoelectric activity in flexion during the load condition. Conclusion The results of this study suggest that the presence of fatigue of the ES muscles modifies the FRP. Superficial back muscle fatigue seems to induce a shift in load-sharing towards passive stabilizing structures. The loss of muscle contribution together with or without laxity in the viscoelastic tissues may have a substantial impact on post fatigue stability.

  3. PEMBERIAN TEKNIK MULLIGAN DAN SOFT TISSUE MOBILIZATION LEBIH BAIK DARIPADA HANYA SOFT TISSUE MOBILIZATION DALAM MENINGKATKAN LINGKUP GERAK SENDI EKSTENSI, ROTASI, LATERAL FLEKSI CERVICAL PADA MECHANICAL NECK PAIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    sudaryanto -

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Mechanical neck pain has the same high prevalence with low back pain, and commonly found in many of physiotherapy practice. Combination of Mulligan technique and Soft Tissue Mobilization are one of manual therapy technique highly effective and efficient to care the case of mechanical neck pain but still very rarely used by physiotherapist in fields of practice. This study aimed to know the effectiveness between Mulligan technique – Soft Tissue Mobilization and only Soft Tissue Mobilization to the increasing range of motion extension, rotation and side flexion cervical on the mechanical neck pain. The study design was a pre test – post test control group design using two group of samples are control groups that given intervention Soft Tissue Mobilization and treatment groups that given a combination of Mulligan technique and Soft Tissue Mobilization. Measuring instrument used for data collection was goniometer, that the goniometer was used to measure the range of motion extension, rotation and lateral flexion of the cervical either before the intervention and after the intervention. Sample of this study was 32 people who divided into 2 groups of samples were 16 people in the control group and 16 people in the treatment group. Samples in the control group had a mean age of 35,69 with male of 7 people (43,8% and female of 9 people (56,2% as well as limitations of the right direction were 12 people (75% and left direction were 4 people (25%. Whereas in the treatment group had e mean age of 35,94 with male of 10 people (62,5% and female of 6 people (37,5% as well as limitations of the right direction were 11 people (62,5% and left direction were 5 people (31,2%. The results of hypothesis testing using independent sampel t-test showed a significant difference between the mean post-intervention ROM extension, rotation, lateral flexion of the control groups and the mean post-intervention ROM extension, rotation, lateral flexion of the treatment

  4. Use of embedded strain gages for the in-vitro study of proximal tibial cancellous bone deformation during knee flexion-extension movement: development, reproducibility and preliminary results of feasibility after frontal low femoral osteotomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Van Sint Jan Serge

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This paper reports the development of an in-vitro technique allowing quantification of relative (not absolute deformations measured at the level of the cancellous bone of the tibial proximal epiphysis (CBTPE during knee flexion-extension. This method has been developed to allow a future study of the effects of low femoral osteotomies consequence on the CBTPE. Methods Six strain gages were encapsulated in an epoxy resin solution to form, after resin polymerisation, six measurement elements (ME. The latter were inserted into the CBTPE of six unembalmed specimens, just below the tibial plateau. Knee motion data were collected by three-dimensional (3D electrogoniometry during several cycles of knee flexion-extension. Intra- and inter-observer reproducibility was estimated on one specimen for all MEs. Intra-specimen repeatability was calculated to determine specimen's variability and the error of measurement. A varum and valgum chirurgical procedure was realised on another specimen to observed CBTPE deformation after these kind of procedure. Results Average intra-observer variation of the deformation ranged from 8% to 9% (mean coefficient of variation, MCV respectively for extension and flexion movement. The coefficient of multiple correlations (CMC ranged from 0.93 to 0.96 for flexion and extension. No phase shift of maximum strain peaks was observed. Inter-observer MCV averaged 23% and 28% for flexion and extension. The CMC were 0.82 and 0.87 respectively for extension and flexion. For the intra-specimen repeatability, the average of mean RMS difference and the mean ICC were calculated only for flexion movement. The mean RMS variability ranged from 7 to 10% and the mean ICC was 0.98 (0.95 - 0.99. A Pearson's correlation coefficient was calculated showing that RMS was independent of signal intensity. For the chirurgical procedure, valgum and varum deviation seems be in agree with the frontal misalignment theory. Conclusions

  5. Medial deviation of the first metatarsal head as a result of flexion forces in hallux valgus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, A P; Snijders, C J; van Linge, B

    1992-01-01

    Several questions with regard to the hallux valgus complex, which includes metatarsus primus varus, give rise to discussion. How do bunions develop? Is disturbed muscle balance at the first metatarsophalangeal joint important in the pathogenesis of the hallux valgus complex? What is the relation between dynamic plantar load distribution and pain in the ball of the foot? What is the cause of recurrences of deformity after surgery? To answer these questions, we started with the biomechanical model of Snijders et al., which states that contraction of flexor muscles of the hallux worsens its valgus angle and causes medial deviation of the first metatarsal head. The present study was designed to validate the model on patients. When pressing the hallux downward, simultaneously the force under the toe and the medial deviation of the first metatarsal head were measured on preoperative patients and on controls (35 subjects in all). We could demonstrate with statistical significance that (1) when the subjects with hallux valgus push the great toe on the ground, the first metatarsal head moved in medial direction; in other words the foot widened. In the controls, as an average, the foot became narrower. (2) The greater the valgus deviation of the hallux, the greater the effect of the toe flexors, and (3) the greater the valgus deviation of the hallux, the less maximal flexion force it can apply. Implications of these findings on conservative and surgical therapy are discussed. The recurrences of deformity after first metatarsal osteotomies are explained by the action of the hallux flexors.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1478581

  6. Arthrometric evaluation of stabilizing effect of knee functional bracing at different flexion angles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seyed Mohseni, Saeedeh; Moss, Farzam; Karimi, Hossein; Kamali, Mohammad

    2009-01-01

    Previous in-vivo investigations on the stabilizing efficacy of knee bracing for ACL reconstructed patients have been often limited to 20-30 degrees of knee flexion. In this study, the effectiveness of a uniaxial hinged functional brace to improve the knee stability was assessed at 30, 60 and 90 degrees of knee flexion. Arthrometry tests were conducted on 15 healthy subjects before and following wearing the brace and the tibial displacements were measured at up to 150 N anterior forces. Results indicated that functional bracing has a significant stabilizing effect throughout the range of knee flexion examined (p polycentric joint a more significant improvement of the overall brace performance and efficacy might be obtained. Key pointsFunctional bracing improves the knee joint stability mostly in extension posture.Unlike the non-braced condition, the least knee joint stability appears in mid and deep flexion angles when using a hinged brace.Accurate sizing and fitting and attention to correct hinge placement relative to the femoral condyles can limit brace migration and improve its effectiveness in mid and deep knee flexion.The overall brace performance and efficacy might be improved significantly using adaptive limb fittings through flexible pads and/or polycentric joints. PMID:24149533

  7. Average-energy games

    OpenAIRE

    Bouyer, Patricia; Markey, Nicolas; Randour, Mickael; Larsen, Kim G.; Laursen, Simon

    2015-01-01

    Two-player quantitative zero-sum games provide a natural framework to synthesize controllers with performance guarantees for reactive systems within an uncontrollable environment. Classical settings include mean-payoff games, where the objective is to optimize the long-run average gain per action, and energy games, where the system has to avoid running out of energy. We study average-energy games, where the goal is to optimize the long-run average of the accumulated energy. We show that this ...

  8. Hip-phase-dependent flexion reflex modulation and expression of spasms in patients with spinal cord injury

    OpenAIRE

    Knikou, Maria

    2006-01-01

    The flexion reflex in human spinal cord injury (SCI) is believed to incorporate interneuronal circuits that consist elements of the stepping generator while ample evidence suggest that hip proprioceptive input is a controlling signal of locomotor output. In this study, we examined the expression of the non-nociceptive flexion reflex in response to imposed sinusoidal passive movements of the ipsilateral hip in human SCI. The flexion reflex was elicited by low-intensity stimulation (300 Hz, 30 ...

  9. Effects of flexion-distraction manipulation therapy on pain and disability in patients with lumbar spinal stenosis

    OpenAIRE

    Choi, Jioun; Lee, Sangyong; Jeon, Chunbae

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study examined the effects of flexion-distraction manipulation therapy on pain and disability in patients with lumbar spinal stenosis. [Subjects] Thirty patients with lumbar spinal stenosis were divided into two groups: a conservative treatment group (n=15) and a flexion-distraction manipulation group (n=15). [Methods] The conservative treatment group received conservative physical therapy, and the flexion-distraction group received both conservative physical therapy and flexio...

  10. Neck pain in different cephalalgias

    OpenAIRE

    E. A. Chechet; G. R. Tabeeva

    2014-01-01

    The paper reviews the literature related to the investigations of neck pain (cervicalgia) in patients with headache (cephalalgia). Neck pain is second to lower back pain as a reason for considerable socioeconomic damage to society. The prevalence of cervicalgia in the population ranges from 5.9 to 38%; the annual incidence is 10.4–21.3%; 14.2 to 71% of people report to have neck pain at some time in their lifetime. Neck pain is concurrent with cephalalgia in 70% of cases. In patients with cer...

  11. On Averaging Rotations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gramkow, Claus

    In this article two common approaches to averaging rotations are compared to a more advanced approach based on a Riemannian metric. Very offten the barycenter of the quaternions or matrices that represent the rotations are used as an estimate of the mean. These methods neglect that rotations belong...... natural approximations to the Riemannian metric, and that the subsequent corrections are inherient in the least squares estimation. Keywords: averaging rotations, Riemannian metric, matrix, quaternion...

  12. Average Angular Velocity

    OpenAIRE

    Van Essen, H.

    2004-01-01

    This paper addresses the problem of the separation of rotational and internal motion. It introduces the concept of average angular velocity as the moment of inertia weighted average of particle angular velocities. It extends and elucidates the concept of Jellinek and Li (1989) of separation of the energy of overall rotation in an arbitrary (non-linear) $N$-particle system. It generalizes the so called Koenig's theorem on the two parts of the kinetic energy (center of mass plus internal) to th...

  13. On the Averaging Principle

    OpenAIRE

    Fibich, Gadi; Gavious, Arieh; Solan, Eilon

    2012-01-01

    Typically, models with a heterogeneous property are considerably harder to analyze than the corresponding homogeneous models, in which the heterogeneous property is replaced with its average value. In this study we show that any outcome of a heterogeneous model that satisfies the two properties of differentiability and interchangibility is O(\\epsilon^2) equivalent to the outcome of the corresponding homogeneous model, where \\epsilon is the level of heterogeneity. We then use this averaging pr...

  14. On Averaging Rotations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gramkow, Claus

    1999-01-01

    In this article two common approaches to averaging rotations are compared to a more advanced approach based on a Riemannian metric. Very offten the barycenter of the quaternions or matrices that represent the rotations are used as an estimate of the mean. These methods neglect that rotations belong...... natural approximations to the Riemannian metric, and that the subsequent corrections are inherient in the least squares estimation. Keywords: averaging rotations, Riemannian metric, matrix, quaternion...

  15. Averaged extreme regression quantile

    OpenAIRE

    Jureckova, Jana

    2015-01-01

    Various events in the nature, economics and in other areas force us to combine the study of extremes with regression and other methods. A useful tool for reducing the role of nuisance regression, while we are interested in the shape or tails of the basic distribution, is provided by the averaged regression quantile and namely by the average extreme regression quantile. Both are weighted means of regression quantile components, with weights depending on the regressors. Our primary interest is ...

  16. A Textile-Based Wearable Sensing Device Designed for Monitoring the Flexion Angle of Elbow and Knee Movements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tien-Wei Shyr

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In this work a wearable gesture sensing device consisting of a textile strain sensor, using elastic conductive webbing, was designed for monitoring the flexion angle of elbow and knee movements. The elastic conductive webbing shows a linear response of resistance to the flexion angle. The wearable gesture sensing device was calibrated and then the flexion angle-resistance equation was established using an assembled gesture sensing apparatus with a variable resistor and a protractor. The proposed device successfully monitored the flexion angle during elbow and knee movements.

  17. Deformation analysis of Hoffa's fat pad from CT images of knee flexion and extension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamarneh, Ghassan; Chu, Vincent; Bordalo-Rodrigues, Marcelo; Schweitzer, Mark

    2005-04-01

    Recent advances in medicine conjecture that certain body fat may have mechanical function in addition to its classical role of energy storage. In particular we aim to analyze if the intra-articular fat pad of Hoffa is merely a space holder or if it changes shape to provide cushioning for the knee bones. Towards this goal, 3D CT images of real knees, as well as a skeletal knee model with fat simulating Hoffa's pad, were acquired in both extension and flexion. Image segmentation was performed to automatically extract the real and simulated fat regions from the extension and flexion images. Utilizing the segmentation results as binary masks, we performed automatic multi-resolution image registration of the fat pad between flexed and extended knee positions. The resulting displacement fields from flexion-extension registration are examined and used to calculate local fat volume changes thus providing insight into shape changes that may have a mechanical component.

  18. Averaging anisotropic cosmologies

    CERN Document Server

    Barrow, J D; Barrow, John D.; Tsagas, Christos G.

    2006-01-01

    We examine the effects of spatial inhomogeneities on irrotational anisotropic cosmologies by looking at the average properties of pressure-free Bianchi-type models. Adopting the Buchert averaging scheme, we identify the kinematic backreaction effects by focussing on spacetimes with zero or isotropic spatial curvature. This allows us to close the system of the standard scalar formulae with a propagation equation for the shear magnitude. We find no change in the already known conditions for accelerated expansion. The backreaction terms are expressed as algebraic relations between the mean-square fluctuations of the models' irreducible kinematical variables. Based on these we investigate the early evolution of averaged vacuum Bianchi type $I$ universes and those filled with pressureless matter. In the latter case we show that the backreaction effects can modify the familiar Kasner-like singularity and potentially remove Mixmaster-type oscillations. We also discuss the possibility of accelerated expansion due to ...

  19. Biogeometry of femoral neck for implant placement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patwa J

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : Treatment of fracture neck femur with three cannulated cancellous screws in an apex proximal configuration is practised in many parts of the world. Methods : Dimensions of femoral neck at the middle of transcervical neck using CT scan (live neck and vernier caliper (dry cadeveric neck in 20 subjects respectively were measured. Results : Inferior half of the neck is narrower than superior half. Conclusion : Biogeometry of the neck of femur does not accomodate two inferior screws and thus fixation of fracture neck femur with three canulated cancellous screws in an apex distal configuration is recommended.

  20. Average Angular Velocity

    CERN Document Server

    Essén, H

    2003-01-01

    This paper addresses the problem of the separation of rotational and internal motion. It introduces the concept of average angular velocity as the moment of inertia weighted average of particle angular velocities. It extends and elucidates the concept of Jellinek and Li (1989) of separation of the energy of overall rotation in an arbitrary (non-linear) $N$-particle system. It generalizes the so called Koenig's theorem on the two parts of the kinetic energy (center of mass plus internal) to three parts: center of mass, rotational, plus the remaining internal energy relative to an optimally translating and rotating frame.

  1. On sparsity averaging

    CERN Document Server

    Carrillo, Rafael E; Wiaux, Yves

    2013-01-01

    Recent developments in Carrillo et al. (2012) and Carrillo et al. (2013) introduced a novel regularization method for compressive imaging in the context of compressed sensing with coherent redundant dictionaries. The approach relies on the observation that natural images exhibit strong average sparsity over multiple coherent frames. The associated reconstruction algorithm, based on an analysis prior and a reweighted $\\ell_1$ scheme, is dubbed Sparsity Averaging Reweighted Analysis (SARA). We review these advances and extend associated simulations establishing the superiority of SARA to regularization methods based on sparsity in a single frame, for a generic spread spectrum acquisition and for a Fourier acquisition of particular interest in radio astronomy.

  2. On Averaging Rotations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gramkow, Claus

    2001-01-01

    In this paper two common approaches to averaging rotations are compared to a more advanced approach based on a Riemannian metric. Very often the barycenter of the quaternions or matrices that represent the rotations are used as an estimate of the mean. These methods neglect that rotations belong to...

  3. Pilot study of impedance-controlled microcurrent therapy for managing radiation-induced fibrosis in head-and-neck cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate the effectiveness of impedance-controlled microcurrent therapy for managing treatment sequelae in head-and-neck cancer patients. Methods and Materials: Between January 1998 and June 1999, 26 patients who were experiencing late effects of radiotherapy were treated b.i.d. with impedance-controlled microcurrent therapy for 1 week. Objective range-of-motion measurements were made for cervical rotation, extension/flexion, and lateral flexion before therapy, at the end of each treatment day, and monthly for 3 months. In addition, each patient's subjective complaints were tabulated before treatment and reevaluated at the last follow-up visit. No additional physical therapy or electrical stimulation was permitted during the follow-up period. Results: At the end of the course of microcurrent therapy, 92% of the 26 patients exhibited improved cervical rotation, 85% had improved cervical extension/flexion, and 81% had improved cervical lateral flexion. Twenty-two patients returned for the 3-month follow-up visit. Of these, 91% had maintained a cervical rotation range of motion greater than their pretherapy measurements. Eighty-two percent maintained improved cervical extension/flexion and 77% maintained improved lateral flexion. When the range-of-motion measurements were stratified by pretreatment severity (severe, moderate, mild, or asymptomatic), the degree of improvement directly correlated with the severity. Thus, patients who had more severe initial symptoms experienced a higher percentage of improvement than did those with milder symptoms. For these patients, the cervical rotation range of motion changed from a baseline of 59 deg. ± 12 deg. to 83 deg. ± 14 deg. at 3 months; flexion/extension improved from 47 deg. ± 10 deg. to 73 deg. ± 13 deg.; and lateral flexion went from 31 deg. ± 7 deg. to 48 deg. ± 9 deg. Some patients also reported symptom improvement for tongue mobility, facial asymmetry, xerostomia, cervical/facial muscle spasms

  4. Reposition osteotomy for fracture neck of femur - A simplified technique of surgery and assessment of results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nath Rajendra

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : Delayed presentation of femoral neck fracture poses problem of management. Methods: Sixteen patients of fracture neck femur were treated with repositioning osteotomy and osteosynthesis with a 120 o double angle blade plate. Ten patients had Pauwel′s type II and 6 had type III fracture. Results : The average period for fracture healing was 14.87 weeks. No patient developed avascular necrosis. The average duration of follow up was 25 months. A new scoring system has been described. The results were excellent in four; good in nine; satisfactory in two and poor in one case. Conclusion : Reposition osteotomy provides stability and union in femoral neck fractures.

  5. Between-day reliability of electromechanical delay of selected neck muscles during performance of maximal isometric efforts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Almosnino Sivan

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The purpose of this study was to assess the between-day reliability of the electromechanical delay (EMD of selected neck muscles during the performance of maximal isometric contractions in five different directions. Methods Twenty-one physically active males participated in two testing sessions separated by seven to eight days. Using a custom-made fixed frame dynamometer, cervical force and surface electromyography (EMG were recorded bilaterally from the splenius capitis, upper trapezius and sternocleidomastoid muscles during the performance of efforts in extension, flexion, left and right lateral bending, and protraction. The EMD was extracted using the Teager-Kaiser Energy Operator. Reliability indices calculated for each muscle in each testing direction were: the difference in scores between the two testing sessions and corresponding 95% confidence intervals, the standard error of measurement (SEM and intra-class correlation coefficients (ICC. Results EMD values showed no evidence of systematic difference between the two testing sessions across all muscles and testing directions. The SEM for extension, flexion and lateral bending efforts ranged between 2.5 ms to 4.8 ms, indicating a good level of measurement precision. For protraction, SEM values were higher and considered to be imprecise for research and clinical purposes. ICC values for all muscles across all testing directions ranged from 0.23 to 0.79. Conclusion EMD of selected neck muscles can be measured with sufficient precision for the assessment of neck muscle function in an athletic population in the majority of directions tested.

  6. Muscular coordination of biceps brachii and brachioradialis in elbow flexion with respect to hand position

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim eKleiber

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Contribution of synergistic muscles towards specific movements over multi joint systems may change with varying position of distal or proximal joints. Purpose of this study is to reveal the relationship of muscular coordination of brachioradialis and biceps brachii during elbow flexion with respect to hand position and biomechanical advantages and disadvantages of biceps brachii. A group of 16 healthy subjects has been advised to perform 20 repetitions of single elbow flexion movements in different hand positions (pronated, neutral and supinated. With a speed of 20°/s, simultaneously sEMG of biceps brachii and brachioradialis and kinematics of the movement were recorded in a motion analysis laboratory. Normalized to MVC the sEMG amplitudes of both muscles contributing to elbow flexion movements were compared in pronated, supinated and neutral hand position over elbow joint angle. Significant differences in the contribution of brachioradialis were found in pronated hand position compared to supinated and neutral hand position while the muscular activity of biceps brachii shows no significant changes in any hand position.In conclusion, a statistical significant dependency of the inter-muscular coordination between biceps brachii and brachioradialis during elbow flexion with respect to hand position has been observed depending on a biomechanical disadvantage of biceps brachii.

  7. Evaluation of movements of lower limbs in non-professional ballet dancers: hip abduction and flexion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valenti Erica E

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The literature indicated that the majority of professional ballet dancers present static and active dynamic range of motion difference between left and right lower limbs, however, no previous study focused this difference in non-professional ballet dancers. In this study we aimed to evaluate active movements of the hip in non-professional classical dancers. Methods We evaluated 10 non professional ballet dancers (16-23 years old. We measured the active range of motion and flexibility through Well Banks. We compared active range of motion between left and right sides (hip flexion and abduction and performed correlation between active movements and flexibility. Results There was a small difference between the right and left sides of the hip in relation to the movements of flexion and abduction, which suggest the dominant side of the subjects, however, there was no statistical significance. Bank of Wells test revealed statistical difference only between the 1st and the 3rd measurement. There was no correlation between the movements of the hip (abduction and flexion, right and left sides with the three test measurements of the bank of Wells. Conclusion There is no imbalance between the sides of the hip with respect to active abduction and flexion movements in non-professional ballet dancers.

  8. Ankle Bracing, Plantar-Flexion Angle, and Ankle Muscle Latencies During Inversion Stress in Healthy Participants

    OpenAIRE

    Kernozek, Thomas; Durall, Christopher J; Friske, Allison; Mussallem, Matthew

    2008-01-01

    Context: Ankle braces may enhance ankle joint proprioception, which in turn may affect reflexive ankle muscle activity during a perturbation. Despite the common occurrence of plantar-flexion inversion ankle injuries, authors of previous studies of ankle muscle latencies have focused on inversion stresses only.

  9. Covariant approximation averaging

    CERN Document Server

    Shintani, Eigo; Blum, Thomas; Izubuchi, Taku; Jung, Chulwoo; Lehner, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    We present a new class of statistical error reduction techniques for Monte-Carlo simulations. Using covariant symmetries, we show that correlation functions can be constructed from inexpensive approximations without introducing any systematic bias in the final result. We introduce a new class of covariant approximation averaging techniques, known as all-mode averaging (AMA), in which the approximation takes account of contributions of all eigenmodes through the inverse of the Dirac operator computed from the conjugate gradient method with a relaxed stopping condition. In this paper we compare the performance and computational cost of our new method with traditional methods using correlation functions and masses of the pion, nucleon, and vector meson in $N_f=2+1$ lattice QCD using domain-wall fermions. This comparison indicates that AMA significantly reduces statistical errors in Monte-Carlo calculations over conventional methods for the same cost.

  10. Acute femoral neck fracture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ten patients with traumatic femoral neck fracture were studied with MR imaging (0.5 T, Magnetom, Siemens): unenhanced (multiecho, TR/TE = 1,600/30--240 [repetition time/echo time, msec]; gradient echo, TR/TE = 315/14, θ = 90 degrees) and Gd-DTPA enhanced (0.1 mM/kg body weight, Magnevist, Schering; gradient echo, TR/TE = 315/14, θ = 90 degrees). MR images were compared with clinical-radiographic findings. Digital subtraction angiography of the femoral head (FH) in five patients showed complete interruption of blood supply to the FH in three patients (signal intensity of FH did not increase on postcontrast images) and intact FH arteries in two patients (FH signal increased on postcontrast images, as did the healthy-side signal)

  11. The averaging principle

    OpenAIRE

    Fibich, Gadi; Gavious, Arieh; Solan, Eilon

    2012-01-01

    Typically, models with a heterogeneous property are considerably harder to analyze than the corresponding homogeneous models, in which the heterogeneous property is replaced with its average value. In this study we show that any outcome of a heterogeneous model that satisfies the two properties of \\emph{differentiability} and \\emph{interchangibility}, is $O(\\epsilon^2)$ equivalent to the outcome of the corresponding homogeneous model, where $\\epsilon$ is the level of heterogeneity. We then us...

  12. CAN A SPECIFIC NECK STRENGTHENING PROGRAM DECREASE CERVICAL SPINE INJURIES IN A MEN'S PROFESSIONAL RUGBY UNION TEAM? A RETROSPECTIVE ANALYSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Naish

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Cervical spine injuries in Rugby Union are a concerning issue at all levels of the game. The primary aim of this retrospective analysis conducted in a professional Rugby Union squad was to determine whether a 26-week isometric neck strengthening intervention program (13-week strengthening phase and 13-week maintenance phase was effective in reducing the number and severity of cervical spine injuries. The secondary aim was to determine whether at week five, where the program had been the similar for all players, there was increased isometric neck strength. All 27 players who were common to both the 2007-2008 and 2008-2009 seasons were included in this analysis and data was extracted from a Sports Medicine/Sports Science database which included the squad's injury records. Primary outcome variables included; the number of cervical spine injuries and the severity of these injuries as determined by the total number of days lost from training and competition. Secondary outcome variables included isometric neck strength in flexion, extension and left and right lateral flexion. Using non-parametric statistical methods, no significant differences were evident for the total number of cervical spine injuries (n = 8 in 2007-2008, n = 6 in 2008-2009 or time loss due to these injuries (100 days in 2007-2008, 40 days in 2008-2009. However, a significant (p = 0.03 reduction in the number of match injuries was evident from 2007-2008 (n = 11 to 2008-09 (n = 2. Non-significant increases in isometric neck strength were found in all directions examined. A significant reduction in the number of match injuries was evident in this study. However, no other significant changes to primary outcome variables were achieved. Further, no significant increases in isometric neck strength were found in this well-trained group of professional athletes

  13. Postnatal temporal, spatial and modality tuning of nociceptive cutaneous flexion reflexes in human infants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Cornelissen

    Full Text Available Cutaneous flexion reflexes are amongst the first behavioural responses to develop and are essential for the protection and survival of the newborn organism. Despite this, there has been no detailed, quantitative study of their maturation in human neonates. Here we use surface electromyographic (EMG recording of biceps femoris activity in preterm (4 seconds to a single noxious skin lance which decreases significantly with gestational age. This reflex is not restricted to the stimulated limb: heel lance evokes equal ipsilateral and contralateral reflexes in preterm and term infants. We further show that infant flexion withdrawal reflexes are not always nociceptive specific: in 29% of preterm infants, tactile stimulation evokes EMG activity that is indistinguishable from noxious stimulation. In 40% of term infants, tactile responses are also present but significantly smaller than nociceptive reflexes. Infant flexion reflexes are also evoked by application of calibrated punctate von Frey hairs (vFh, 0.8-17.2 g, to the heel. Von Frey hair thresholds increase significantly with gestational age and the magnitude of vFh evoked reflexes are significantly greater in preterm than term infants. Furthermore flexion reflexes in both groups are sensitized by repeated vFh stimulation. Thus human infant flexion reflexes differ in temporal, modality and spatial characteristics from those in adults. Reflex magnitude and tactile sensitivity decreases and nociceptive specificity and spatial organisation increases with gestational age. Strong, relatively non-specific, reflex sensitivity in early life may be important for driving postnatal activity dependent maturation of targeted spinal cord sensory circuits.

  14. 49 CFR 572.113 - Neck assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Neck assembly. 572.113 Section 572.113... 50th Percentile Male § 572.113 Neck assembly. The head/neck assembly consists of the parts 78051-61X...) Test procedure. (1) Soak the head and neck assembly in a test environment at any temperature between...

  15. Comparison of Dry Needling versus Orthopedic Manual Therapy in Patients with Myofascial Chronic Neck Pain: A Single-Blind, Randomized Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene Campa-Moran

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of three interventions for the treatment of myofascial chronic neck pain. Methods. Thirty-six patients were randomly assigned to one of three intervention groups: orthopedic manual therapy (OMT, dry needling and stretching (DN-S, and soft tissue techniques (STT. All groups received two treatment sessions with a 48 h time interval. Outcome measures included neck pain intensity measured using a visual analogue scale, cervical range of motion (ROM, pressure pain threshold for measuring mechanical hyperalgesia, and two self-reported questionnaires (neck disability index and pain catastrophizing scale. Results. The ANOVA revealed significant differences for the group × time interaction for neck disability, neck pain intensity, and pain catastrophizing. The DN-S and OMT groups reduced neck disability. Only the OMT group showed decreases in mechanical hyperalgesia and pain catastrophizing. The cervical ROM increased in OMT (i.e., flexion, side-bending, and rotation and DN-S (i.e., side-bending and rotation groups. Conclusions. The three interventions are all effective in reducing pain intensity. Reduction in mechanical hyperalgesia and pain catastrophizing was only observed in the OMT group. Cervical ROM improved in the DN-S and OMT groups and also neck disability being only clinically relevant for OMT group.

  16. Comparison of Dry Needling versus Orthopedic Manual Therapy in Patients with Myofascial Chronic Neck Pain: A Single-Blind, Randomized Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campa-Moran, Irene; Rey-Gudin, Etelvina; Fernández-Carnero, Josué; Paris-Alemany, Alba; Gil-Martinez, Alfonso; Lerma Lara, Sergio; Prieto-Baquero, Almudena; Alonso-Perez, José Luis; La Touche, Roy

    2015-01-01

    Objective. The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of three interventions for the treatment of myofascial chronic neck pain. Methods. Thirty-six patients were randomly assigned to one of three intervention groups: orthopedic manual therapy (OMT), dry needling and stretching (DN-S), and soft tissue techniques (STT). All groups received two treatment sessions with a 48 h time interval. Outcome measures included neck pain intensity measured using a visual analogue scale, cervical range of motion (ROM), pressure pain threshold for measuring mechanical hyperalgesia, and two self-reported questionnaires (neck disability index and pain catastrophizing scale). Results. The ANOVA revealed significant differences for the group × time interaction for neck disability, neck pain intensity, and pain catastrophizing. The DN-S and OMT groups reduced neck disability. Only the OMT group showed decreases in mechanical hyperalgesia and pain catastrophizing. The cervical ROM increased in OMT (i.e., flexion, side-bending, and rotation) and DN-S (i.e., side-bending and rotation) groups. Conclusions. The three interventions are all effective in reducing pain intensity. Reduction in mechanical hyperalgesia and pain catastrophizing was only observed in the OMT group. Cervical ROM improved in the DN-S and OMT groups and also neck disability being only clinically relevant for OMT group. PMID:26640708

  17. Cervicocephalic kinesthetic sensibility and postural balance in patients with nontraumatic chronic neck pain – a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eriksson Magnus

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although cervical pain is widespread, most victims are only mildly and occasionally affected. A minority, however, suffer chronic pain and/or functional impairments. Although there is abundant literature regarding nontraumatic neck pain, little focuses on diagnostic criteria. During the last decade, research on neck pain has been designed to evaluate underlying pathophysiological mechanisms, without noteworthy success. Independent researchers have investigated postural balance and cervicocephalic kinesthetic sensibility among patients with chronic neck pain, and have (in most cases concluded the source of the problem is a reduced ability in the neck's proprioceptive system. Here, we investigated cervicocephalic kinesthetic sensibility and postural balance among patients with nontraumatic chronic neck pain. Methods Ours was a two-group, observational pilot study of patients with complaints of continuous neck pain during the 3 months prior to recruitment. Thirteen patients with chronic neck pain of nontraumatic origin were recruited from an institutional outpatient clinic. Sixteen healthy persons were recruited as a control group. Cervicocephalic kinesthetic sensibility was assessed by exploring head repositioning accuracy and postural balance was measured with computerized static posturography. Results Parameters of cervicocephalic kinesthetic sensibility were not reduced. However, in one of six test movements (flexion, global repositioning errors were significantly larger in the experimental group than in the control group (p Conclusion In patients with nontraumatic chronic neck pain, we found statistically significant global repositioning errors in only one of six test movements. In this cohort, we found no evidence of impaired postural balance. Head repositioning accuracy and computerized static posturography are imperfect measures of functional proprioceptive impairments. Validity of (and procedures for using these

  18. A pain in the neck-Imaging in neck sepsis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lyle, N.J., E-mail: nickylyle@doctors.org.uk [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Southampton General Hospital, Southampton (United Kingdom); Rutherford, E.E.; Batty, V.B. [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Southampton General Hospital, Southampton (United Kingdom)

    2011-09-15

    Deep neck infection has a high morbidity and mortality and the extent of infection is often difficult to estimate clinically. The complex anatomy and the communication between neck spaces means that infection can spread along fascial planes leading to life-threatening complications such as airway compromise, vascular erosion/thrombosis, neural dysfunction, and ultimately descending necrotizing mediastinitis. Imaging has an important role to play in identifying the extent of infection and the presence of complications.

  19. A pain in the neck-Imaging in neck sepsis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deep neck infection has a high morbidity and mortality and the extent of infection is often difficult to estimate clinically. The complex anatomy and the communication between neck spaces means that infection can spread along fascial planes leading to life-threatening complications such as airway compromise, vascular erosion/thrombosis, neural dysfunction, and ultimately descending necrotizing mediastinitis. Imaging has an important role to play in identifying the extent of infection and the presence of complications.

  20. Robust Averaging Level Control

    OpenAIRE

    Rosander, Peter; Isaksson, Alf; Löfberg, Johan; Forsman, Krister

    2011-01-01

    Frequent inlet flow changes typically cause problems for averaging level controllers. For a frequently changing inlet flow the upsets do not occur when the system is in steady state and the tank level at its set-point. For this reason the tuning of the level controller gets quite complicated, since not only the size of the upsets but also the time in between them relative to the hold up of the tank have to be considered. One way to obtain optimal flow filtering while directly accounting for futur...

  1. Negative Average Preference Utilitarianism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger Chao

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available For many philosophers working in the area of Population Ethics, it seems that either they have to confront the Repugnant Conclusion (where they are forced to the conclusion of creating massive amounts of lives barely worth living, or they have to confront the Non-Identity Problem (where no one is seemingly harmed as their existence is dependent on the “harmful” event that took place. To them it seems there is no escape, they either have to face one problem or the other. However, there is a way around this, allowing us to escape the Repugnant Conclusion, by using what I will call Negative Average Preference Utilitarianism (NAPU – which though similar to anti-frustrationism, has some important differences in practice. Current “positive” forms of utilitarianism have struggled to deal with the Repugnant Conclusion, as their theory actually entails this conclusion; however, it seems that a form of Negative Average Preference Utilitarianism (NAPU easily escapes this dilemma (it never even arises within it.

  2. Head and neck cancer imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hermans, R. (ed.) [University Hospitals, Leuven (Belgium). Dept. of Radiology

    2006-07-01

    This book provides a comprehensive review of state-of-the-art imaging in head and neck cancer. Precise determination of tumor extent is of the utmost importance in these neoplasms, as it has important consequences for staging of disease, prediction of outcome and choice of treatment. Only the radiologist can fully appreciate submucosal, perineural, and perivascular tumor spread and detect metastatic disease at an early stage. Imaging is also of considerable benefit for patient surveillance after treatment. All imaging modalities currently used in the management of head and neck neoplasms are considered in depth, and in addition newer techniques such as PET-CT and diffusion-weighted MRI are discussed. This book will help the reader to recommend, execute and report head and neck imaging studies at a high level of sophistication and thereby to become a respected member of the team managing head and neck cancer. (orig.)

  3. Relative Contribution of Upper and Lower Lumbar Spinal Segments to Flexion/Extension: Comparison between Normal Spines and Spines with Disc Disease in Asian Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Bali, Tarun; Kumar, Malhar N.

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Prospective cohort study. Purpose To evaluate the contribution of upper and lower lumbar segments to flexion and extension of the lumbar spine in normal and diseased spines. Overview of Literature The specific contributions of upper and lower lumbar segments during flexion/extension have rarely been reported. Furthermore, no comparisons between the flexion/extension behaviors of normal and diseased spines have been reported until now. Methods Flexion and extension lateral radiogr...

  4. Neck pain in different cephalalgias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. A. Chechet

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper reviews the literature related to the investigations of neck pain (cervicalgia in patients with headache (cephalalgia. Neck pain is second to lower back pain as a reason for considerable socioeconomic damage to society. The prevalence of cervicalgia in the population ranges from 5.9 to 38%; the annual incidence is 10.4–21.3%; 14.2 to 71% of people report to have neck pain at some time in their lifetime. Neck pain is concurrent with cephalalgia in 70% of cases. In patients with cervicalgia, the prevalence of headache is 20–40% higher than in those with musculoskeletal pain at another site. Neck pain is as a major risk factor for migraine and tension headache (TH. Neck pain in TH progresses with the increased intensity, frequency, and strength of headache. There is a direct relationship of the quality of life worsening associated withcervicalgia to the frequency of migraine attacks and the risk of its chronization. Neck pain is noted in cervicogenic headache belonging to secondary headaches. The identification of mixed headache in a patient with cervicalgia allows the prescription of a treatment option that may be effective in relieving both headache and neck pain. The paper discusses the causes and pathogenesis of cervicalgia in patients with headache, examination methods, and main approaches to drug and nondrug therapies in relation to the leading pathophysiological mechanism, as well as new possibilities for the effective and safe relief of pain syndrome in this category of patients. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, myorelaxants,and their combination are observed to be effective in treating patients with cervicalgia and cephalalgia.

  5. Average nuclear surface properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The definition of the nuclear surface energy is discussed for semi-infinite matter. This definition is extended also for the case that there is a neutron gas instead of vacuum on the one side of the plane surface. The calculations were performed with the Thomas-Fermi Model of Syler and Blanchard. The parameters of the interaction of this model were determined by a least squares fit to experimental masses. The quality of this fit is discussed with respect to nuclear masses and density distributions. The average surface properties were calculated for different particle asymmetry of the nucleon-matter ranging from symmetry beyond the neutron-drip line until the system no longer can maintain the surface boundary and becomes homogeneous. The results of the calculations are incorporated in the nuclear Droplet Model which then was fitted to experimental masses. (orig.)

  6. Influence of Head and Neck Position on Oropharyngeal Leak Pressure and Cuff Position with the ProSeal Laryngeal Mask Airway and the I-Gel: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeep Kumar Mishra

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. This study was designed to assess and compare the effect of head and neck position on the oropharyngeal leak pressures and cuff position (employing fibreoptic view of the glottis and ventilation scores between ProSeal LMA and the I-gel. Material and Methods. After induction of anesthesia, the supraglottic device was inserted and ventilation confirmed. The position of the head was randomly changed from neutral to flexion, extension, and lateral rotation (left. The oropharyngeal leak pressures, fibreoptic view of glottis, ventilation scores, and delivered tidal volumes and end tidal CO2 were noted in all positions. Results. In both groups compared with neutral position, oropharyngeal leak pressures were significantly higher with flexion and lower with extension but similar with rotation of head and neck. However the oropharyngeal leak pressure was significantly higher for ProSeal LMA compared with the I-gel in all positions. Peak airway pressures were significantly higher with flexion in both groups (however this did not affect ventilation, lower with extension in ProSeal group, and comparable in I-gel group but did not change significantly with rotation of head and neck in both groups. Conclusion. Effective ventilation can be done with both ProSeal LMA and I-gel with head in all the above positions. ProSeal LMA has a better margin of safety than I-gel due to better sealing pressures except in flexion where the increase in airway pressure is more with the former. Extreme precaution should be taken in flexion position in ProSeal LMA.

  7. The effect of forearm posture on wrist flexion in computer workers with chronic upper extremity musculoskeletal disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thompson R Terry

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Occupational computer use has been associated with upper extremity musculoskeletal disorders (UEMSDs, but the etiology and pathophysiology of some of these disorders are poorly understood. Various theories attribute the symptoms to biomechanical and/or psychosocial stressors. The results of several clinical studies suggest that elevated antagonist muscle tension may be a biomechanical stress factor. Affected computer users often exhibit limited wrist range of motion, particularly wrist flexion, which has been attributed to increased extensor muscle tension, rather than to pain symptoms. Recreational or domestic activities requiring extremes of wrist flexion may produce injurious stress on the wrist joint and muscles, the symptoms of which are then exacerbated by computer use. As these activities may involve a variety of forearm postures, we examined whether changes in forearm posture have an effect on pain reports during wrist flexion, or whether pain would have a limiting effect on flexion angle. Methods We measured maximum active wrist flexion using a goniometer with the forearm supported in the prone, neutral, and supine postures. Data was obtained from 5 subjects with UEMSDs attributed to computer use and from 13 control subjects. Results The UEMSD group exhibited significantly restricted wrist flexion compared to the control group in both wrists at all forearm postures with the exception of the non-dominant wrist with the forearm prone. In both groups, maximum active wrist flexion decreased at the supine forearm posture compared to the prone posture. No UEMSD subjects reported an increase in pain symptoms during testing. Conclusion The UEMSD group exhibited reduced wrist flexion compared to controls that did not appear to be pain related. A supine forearm posture reduced wrist flexion in both groups, but the reduction was approximately 100% greater in the UEMSD group. The effect of a supine forearm posture on wrist

  8. Decoding Finger Flexion using amplitude modulation from band-specific ECoG

    CERN Document Server

    Liang, Nanying

    2009-01-01

    EEG-BCIs have been well studied in the past decades and implemented into several famous applications, like P300 speller and wheelchair controller. However, these interfaces are indirect due to low spatial resolution of EEG. Recently, direct ECoG-BCIs attract intensive attention because ECoG provides a higher spatial resolution and signal quality. This makes possible localization of the source of neural signals with respect to certain brain functions. In this article, we present a realization of ECoG-BCIs for finger flexion prediction provided by BCI competition IV. Methods for finger flexion prediction including feature extraction and selection are provided in this article. Results show that the predicted finger movement is highly correlated with the true movement when we use band-specific amplitude modulation.

  9. Influence of Stimulation Location and Posture on the Reliability and Comfort of the Nociceptive Flexion Reflex

    OpenAIRE

    Lewis, Gwyn N.; David A Rice; Kathryn Jourdain; McNair, Peter J

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The lower limb nociceptive flexion reflex (NFR) is commonly used to assess the function of the nociceptive system. Currently, there is a lack of standardized stimulation procedures to determine the NFR threshold, making comparisons of thresholds across studies difficult.OBJECTIVES: To assess and compare the within- and between-session reliability of NFR threshold when elicited from two common stimulation locations: the medial arch of the foot (while standing) and the sural nerve (...

  10. Changes in the flexion relaxation response induced by lumbar muscle fatigue

    OpenAIRE

    Cantin Vincent; Centomo Hugo; Jeffrey-Gauthier Renaud; Lafond Danik; Descarreaux Martin

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background The flexion relaxation phenomenon (FRP) is an interesting model to study the modulation of lumbar stability. Previous investigations have explored the effect of load, angular velocity and posture on this particular response. However, the influence of muscular fatigue on FRP parameters has not been thoroughly examined. The objective of the study is to identify the effect of erector spinae (ES) muscle fatigue and spine loading on myoelectric silence onset and cessation in he...

  11. Ultrasound evaluation of fluid in knee recesses at varying degrees of flexion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mandl, P; Brossard, M; Aegerter, P; Backhaus, M; Bruyn, G A; Chary-Valckenaere, I; Iagnocco, A; Filippucci, E; Freeston, J; Gandjbakhch, F; Jousse-Joulin, S; Möller, I; Naredo, E; Schmidt, W A; Szkudlarek, M.; Terslev, L; Wakefield, R J; Zayat, A; D'Agostino, M A; Balint, P V

    2012-01-01

    Various methods are utilized in daily practice to obtain optimal information on effusion in the knee. Our aim is to investigate which scanning position provides the best information about synovial fluid in the knee by using ultrasound and to evaluate the magnitude of difference for measuring syno...... synovial fluid in 3 major recesses (suprapatellar, medial parapatellar, and lateral parapatellar) of the knee according to various degrees of flexion....

  12. Postnatal Temporal, Spatial and Modality Tuning of Nociceptive Cutaneous Flexion Reflexes in Human Infants

    OpenAIRE

    Laura Cornelissen; Lorenzo Fabrizi; Deborah Patten; Alan Worley; Judith Meek; Stewart Boyd; Rebeccah Slater; Maria Fitzgerald

    2013-01-01

    Cutaneous flexion reflexes are amongst the first behavioural responses to develop and are essential for the protection and survival of the newborn organism. Despite this, there has been no detailed, quantitative study of their maturation in human neonates. Here we use surface electromyographic (EMG) recording of biceps femoris activity in preterm (4 seconds) to a single noxious skin lance which decreases significantly with gestational age. This reflex is not restricted to the stimulated limb:...

  13. Posterior Vertebral Injury; Is This a Burst Fracture or a Flexion-Distraction Injury?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farzad Omidi-Kashani

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In thoracolumbar spinal fractures with posterior column injury for applying proper management, it is important to distinguish a flexion-distraction injury (FDI from a three column burst fracture (BF as in clinical examination, both may have a similar significant tenderness on direct spinal palpation. Careful attention to the comprehensive clinical examination and detailed imaging features are essential in making an accurate diagnosis and thus appropriate treatment.    

  14. Guided growth for correction of knee flexion deformity: a series of four cases

    OpenAIRE

    MacWilliams, B. A.; Harjinder, B.; Stevens, P M

    2011-01-01

    Fixed knee flexion deformity can present as an insidious and significant problem in diverse etiologies, most commonly in cerebral palsy. Traditional surgical intervention has included posterior capsulotomy and supracondylar femoral osteotomy, both of which carry significant associated morbidity and risks. In the skeletally immature patient, guided growth may be used to correct or substantially diminish the deformity. We are presenting our early experience encompassing four subjects who comple...

  15. Slow Expiration Reduces External Oblique Muscle Activity during Maximum Trunk Flexion

    OpenAIRE

    Ishida, Hiroshi; Tajima, Saya; Masuno, Riyo; Kogame, Yoshiko; Ando, Suguru; Yokohata, Katsuhiko; Watanabe, Susumu

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the effects of expiration on abdominal muscle activity during maximum trunk flexion. [Subjects] Twenty-one healthy university students (10 men, 11 women) participated in this study. [Methods] Electromyography (EMG) was used to quantify the activity of the right rectus abdominis, external oblique, and internal oblique muscles. The paired t-test was used to examine the significance of differences in the abdominal muscles between maximum tru...

  16. Soft tissue distraction using pentagonal frame for long-standing traumatic flexion deformity of interphalangeal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazerani Shahram

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available 【Abstract】Objective: Interphalangeal joint con-tracture is a challenging complication of hand trauma, which reduces the functional capacity of the entire hand. In this study we evaluated the results of soft tissue distraction with no collateral ligament transection or volar plate removal in comparison with traditional operation of contracture re-lease and partial ligament transection and volar plate removal. Methods: In this prospective study, a total of 40 pa-tients in two equal groups (A and B were studied. Patients suffering from chronic flexion contracture of abrasive trau-matic nature were included. Group A were treated by soft tissue distraction using pentagonal frame technique and in Group B the contracture release was followed by finger splinting. Results: Analyzed data revealed a significant differ-ence between the two groups for range of motion in the proximal interphalangeal joints (P<0.05, while it was not meaningful in the distal interphalangeal joints (P>0.05. There was not a significant difference in the degrees of flexion contracture between groups (P>0.05. Regression analysis showed that using pentagonal frame technique significantly increased the mean improvement in range of motion of proxi-mal interphalangeal joints (P<0.001, while the higher the preoperative flexion contracture was observed in proximal interphalangeal joints, the lower improvement was achieved in range of motion of proximal interphalangeal joints after intervention (P<0.001. Conclusion: Soft tissue distraction using pentagonal frame technique with gradual and continuous collateral liga-ment and surrounding joint tissues distraction combined with skin Z-plasty significantly improves the range of mo-tion in patients with chronic traumatic flexion deformity of proximal and/or distal interphalangeal joints. Key words: Osteogenesis, distraction; Finger joint; Hand deformities

  17. Influence of Head and Neck Position on Oropharyngeal Leak Pressure and Cuff Position with the ProSeal Laryngeal Mask Airway and the I-Gel: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    OpenAIRE

    Sandeep Kumar Mishra; Mohammad Nawaz; Satyapraksh, M. V. S.; Satyen Parida; Prasanna Udupi Bidkar; Balachander Hemavathy; Pankaj Kundra

    2015-01-01

    Background. This study was designed to assess and compare the effect of head and neck position on the oropharyngeal leak pressures and cuff position (employing fibreoptic view of the glottis) and ventilation scores between ProSeal LMA and the I-gel. Material and Methods. After induction of anesthesia, the supraglottic device was inserted and ventilation confirmed. The position of the head was randomly changed from neutral to flexion, extension, and lateral rotation (left). The oropharyngeal l...

  18. A Method for Weak Lensing Flexion Analysis by the HOLICs Moment Approach

    CERN Document Server

    Okura, Yuki; Futamase, Toshifumi

    2007-01-01

    We have developed a method for measuring higher-order weak lensing distortions of faint background galaxies, namely the weak gravitational flexion, by fully extending the Kaiser, Squires & Broadhurst method to include higher-order lensing image characteristics (HOLICs) introduced by Okura, Umetsu, & Futamase. We take into account explicitly the weight function in calculations of noisy shape moments and the effect of higher-order PSF anisotropy, as well as isotropic PSF smearing. Our HOLICs formalism allows accurate measurements of flexion from practical observational data in the presence of non-circular, anisotropic PSF. We test our method using mock observations of simulated galaxy images and actual, ground-based Subaru observations of the massive galaxy cluster A1689 ($z=0.183$). From the high-precision measurements of spin-1 first flexion, we obtain a high-resolution mass map in the central region of A1689. The reconstructed mass map shows a bimodal feature in the central $4'\\times 4'$ region of th...

  19. Segmental lumbar spine instability at flexion-extension radiography can be predicted by conventional radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pitkaenen, M.T.; Manninen, H.I.; Lindgren, K.-A.J.; Sihvonen, T.A.; Airaksinen, O.; Soimakallio, S

    2002-07-01

    AIM: To identify plain radiographic findings that predict segmental lumbar spine instability as shown by functional flexion-extension radiography. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Plain radiographs and flexion-extension radiographs of 215 patients with clinically suspected lumbar spine instability were analysed. Instability was classified into anterior or posterior sliding instability. The registered plain radiographic findings were traction spur, spondylarthrosis, arthrosis of facet joints, disc degeneration, retrolisthesis, degenerative spondylolisthesis, spondylolytic spondylolisthesis and vacuum phenomena. Factors reaching statistical significance in univariate analyses (P < 0.05) were included in stepwise multiple logistic regression analysis. RESULTS: Degenerative spondylolisthesis (P = 0.004 at L3-4 level and P = 0.017 at L4-5 level in univariate analysis and odds ratio 16.92 at L4-5 level in multiple logistic regression analyses) and spondylolytic spondylolisthesis (P = 0.003 at L5-S1 level in univariate analyses) were the strongest independent determinants of anterior sliding instability. Retrolisthesis (odds ratio 10.97), traction spur (odds ratio 4.45) and spondylarthrosis (odds ratio 3.20) at L3-4 level were statistically significant determinants of posterior sliding instability in multivariate analysis. CONCLUSION: Sliding instability is strongly associated with various plain radiographic findings. In mechanical back pain, functional flexion-extension radiographs should be limited to situations when symptoms are not explained by findings of plain radiographs and/or when they are likely to alter therapy. Pitkaenen, M.T. et al. (2002)

  20. Segmental lumbar spine instability at flexion-extension radiography can be predicted by conventional radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AIM: To identify plain radiographic findings that predict segmental lumbar spine instability as shown by functional flexion-extension radiography. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Plain radiographs and flexion-extension radiographs of 215 patients with clinically suspected lumbar spine instability were analysed. Instability was classified into anterior or posterior sliding instability. The registered plain radiographic findings were traction spur, spondylarthrosis, arthrosis of facet joints, disc degeneration, retrolisthesis, degenerative spondylolisthesis, spondylolytic spondylolisthesis and vacuum phenomena. Factors reaching statistical significance in univariate analyses (P < 0.05) were included in stepwise multiple logistic regression analysis. RESULTS: Degenerative spondylolisthesis (P = 0.004 at L3-4 level and P = 0.017 at L4-5 level in univariate analysis and odds ratio 16.92 at L4-5 level in multiple logistic regression analyses) and spondylolytic spondylolisthesis (P = 0.003 at L5-S1 level in univariate analyses) were the strongest independent determinants of anterior sliding instability. Retrolisthesis (odds ratio 10.97), traction spur (odds ratio 4.45) and spondylarthrosis (odds ratio 3.20) at L3-4 level were statistically significant determinants of posterior sliding instability in multivariate analysis. CONCLUSION: Sliding instability is strongly associated with various plain radiographic findings. In mechanical back pain, functional flexion-extension radiographs should be limited to situations when symptoms are not explained by findings of plain radiographs and/or when they are likely to alter therapy. Pitkaenen, M.T. et al. (2002)

  1. Muscle changes in brachial plexus birth injury with elbow flexion contracture: an MRI study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poeyhiae, Tiina H.; Koivikko, Mika P.; Lamminen, Antti E. [University of Helsinki, Helsinki Medical Imaging Center, Helsinki (Finland); Peltonen, Jari I.; Nietosvaara, A.Y. [Helsinki University Central Hospital, Hospital for Children and Adolescents, Helsinki (Finland); Kirjavainen, Mikko O. [Helsinki University Central Hospital, Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, Helsinki (Finland)

    2007-02-15

    Muscle pathology of the arm and forearm in brachial plexus birth injury (BPBI) with elbow flexion contracture has not been evaluated with MRI. To determine whether limited range of motion of the elbow in BPBI is correlated with specific patterns of muscular pathology. For 15 BPBI patients, total active motion (TAM) of the elbow (extension-flexion) and the forearm (pronation-supination) were measured. MRI of the elbow joints and musculature allowed assessment of elbow congruency. Fatty infiltration and size reduction of the muscles were graded semiquantitatively. Mean TAM of the elbow was 113 (50 -140 ) and that of the forearm 91 (10 -165 ). The greater the size reduction of the brachioradialis muscle, the more diminished was elbow TAM. The more extensive the BPBI and muscle pathology of the pronator teres muscle, the more limited was the TAM of the forearm. Pathology of the supinator and brachialis muscles was evident in every patient. Extensive BPBI may result in marked limitation of TAM. Elbow flexion contracture seems to be caused mainly by brachialis muscle pathology. Prosupination of the forearm is better preserved when the pronator teres is not severely affected. MRI can reliably show the extent of muscle pathology in BPBI. (orig.)

  2. Muscle changes in brachial plexus birth injury with elbow flexion contracture: an MRI study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muscle pathology of the arm and forearm in brachial plexus birth injury (BPBI) with elbow flexion contracture has not been evaluated with MRI. To determine whether limited range of motion of the elbow in BPBI is correlated with specific patterns of muscular pathology. For 15 BPBI patients, total active motion (TAM) of the elbow (extension-flexion) and the forearm (pronation-supination) were measured. MRI of the elbow joints and musculature allowed assessment of elbow congruency. Fatty infiltration and size reduction of the muscles were graded semiquantitatively. Mean TAM of the elbow was 113 (50 -140 ) and that of the forearm 91 (10 -165 ). The greater the size reduction of the brachioradialis muscle, the more diminished was elbow TAM. The more extensive the BPBI and muscle pathology of the pronator teres muscle, the more limited was the TAM of the forearm. Pathology of the supinator and brachialis muscles was evident in every patient. Extensive BPBI may result in marked limitation of TAM. Elbow flexion contracture seems to be caused mainly by brachialis muscle pathology. Prosupination of the forearm is better preserved when the pronator teres is not severely affected. MRI can reliably show the extent of muscle pathology in BPBI. (orig.)

  3. Decoding Finger Flexion From Band-specific ECoG Signals in Humans

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    LaurentBougrain

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This article presents the method that won the BCI competition IV addressed to the pre- diction of the finger flexion from ECoG signals. ECoG-based BCIs have recently drawn the attention from the community. Indeed, ECoG can provide a higher spatial resolution, a higher signal quality and is more suitable for long-term use than classical EEG recordings. These characteristics allow to decode precise brain activities and to realize efficient ECoG-based neu- roprostheses. Signal processing is a very important task in BCIs research for translating brain signals into commands. Here, we present a linear regression method based on the amplitude modulation of band-specific ECoG including a short term memory for individual finger flexion prediction. The effectiveness of the method was proven by achieving the highest value of corre- lation coefficient between the predicted and recorded finger flexion values on data set 4 during the BCI competition IV.

  4. Antennae in the hawkmoth Manduca sexta (Lepidoptera, Sphingidae) mediate abdominal flexion in response to mechanical stimuli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinterwirth, Armin J; Daniel, Thomas L

    2010-12-01

    Flying insects rely on the integration of feedback signals from multiple sensory modalities. Thus, in addition to the visual input, mechanosensory information from antennae is crucial for stable flight in the hawkmoth Manduca sexta. However, the nature of compensatory reflexes mediated by mechanoreceptors on the antennae is unknown. In this study we describe an abdominal flexion response mediated by the antennal mechanosensory input during mechanical body rotations. Such reflexive abdominal motions lead to shifts in the animal's center of mass, and therefore changes in flight trajectory. Moths respond with abdominal flexion both to visual and mechanical rotations, but the mechanical response depends on the presence of the mass of the flagellum. In addition, the mechanically mediated flexion response is about 200° out of phase with the visual response and adds linearly to it. Phase-shifting feedback signals in such a manner can lead to a more stable behavioral output response when the animal is faced with turbulent perturbations to the flight path. PMID:20820787

  5. Long head of the triceps muscle transfer for active elbow flexion in arthrogryposis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gogola, Gloria R; Ezaki, Marybeth; Oishi, Scott N; Gharbaoui, Idris; Bennett, James B

    2010-06-01

    Arthrogryposis is a condition characterized by symmetric, nonprogressive joint contractures and weak or absent musculature that is present at birth. The amyoplasia form is the most common, and in this group, the elbow is frequently involved, typically in an extension contracture bilaterally. Active elbow flexion is weak or absent, but active extension is spared. This elbow dysfunction poses a significant disability for affected children. Sensation and cognitive development is normal in children with arthrogryposis, and as a group they demonstrate a remarkable degree of adaptability to their deformities. The goal of any treatment is to facilitate the child's functional independence. This article describes the surgical technique of transfer of the long head of the triceps into the proximal ulna to provide active elbow flexion in children with arthrogryposis. The goal of the procedure is to reliably achieve antigravity active flexion while preserving active extension. It has the advantages of technical simplicity and minimal donor site morbidity. By adding this procedure to the existing options for treating this challenging condition, a surgeon is better able to tailor intervention to an individual child's strength and available donor muscles. PMID:20526167

  6. Detection method of flexion relaxation phenomenon based on wavelets for patients with low back pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nougarou, François; Massicotte, Daniel; Descarreaux, Martin

    2012-12-01

    The flexion relaxation phenomenon (FRP) can be defined as a reduction or silence of myoelectric activity of the lumbar erector spinae muscle during full trunk flexion. It is typically absent in patients with chronic low back pain (LBP). Before any broad clinical utilization of this neuromuscular response can be made, effective, standardized, and accurate methods of identifying FRP limits are needed. However, this phenomenon is clearly more difficult to detect for LBP patients than for healthy patients. The main goal of this study is to develop an automated method based on wavelet transformation that would improve time point limits detection of surface electromyography signals of the FRP in case of LBP patients. Conventional visual identification and proposed automated methods of time point limits detection of relaxation phase were compared on experimental data using criteria of accuracy and repeatability based on physiological properties. The evaluation demonstrates that the use of wavelet transform (WT) yields better results than methods without wavelet decomposition. Furthermore, methods based on wavelet per packet transform are more effective than algorithms employing discrete WT. Compared to visual detection, in addition to demonstrating an obvious saving of time, the use of wavelet per packet transform improves the accuracy and repeatability in the detection of the FRP limits. These results clearly highlight the value of the proposed technique in identifying onset and offset of the flexion relaxation response in LBP subjects.

  7. DOES RECTUS FEMORIS TRANSFER INCREASE KNEE FLEXION DURING STANCE PHASE IN CEREBRAL PALSY?

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Morais, Mauro César; Blumetti, Francesco Camara; Kawamura, Cátia Miyuki; Lopes, José Augusto Fernandes; Neves, Daniella Lins; Cardoso, Michelle de Oliveira

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To evaluate whether distal rectus femoris transfer (DRFT) is related to postoperative increase of knee flexion during the stance phase in cerebral palsy (CP). Methods: The inclusion criteria were Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS) levels I-III, kinematic criteria for stiff-knee gait at baseline, and individuals who underwent orthopaedic surgery and had gait analyses performed before and after intervention. The patients included were divided into the following two groups: NO-DRFT (133 patients), which included patients who underwent orthopaedic surgery without DRFT, and DRFT (83 patients), which included patients who underwent orthopaedic surgery that included DRFT. The primary outcome was to evaluate in each group if minimum knee flexion in stance phase (FMJFA) changed after treatment. Results: The mean FMJFA increased from 13.19° to 16.74° (p=0.003) and from 10.60° to 14.80° (p=0.001) in Groups NO-DRFT and DRFT, respectively. The post-operative FMJFA was similar between groups NO-DRFT and DRFT (p=0.534). The increase of FMJFA during the second exam (from 13.01° to 22.51°) was higher among the GMFCS III patients in the DRFT group (p<0.001). Conclusion: In this study, DRFT did not generate additional increase of knee flexion during stance phase when compared to the control group. Level of Evidence III, Retrospective Comparative Study. PMID:26997910

  8. Elective neck dissection versus "wait and watch" policy in tongue carcinoma

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    Satish Kumaran Pugazhendi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To evaluate the efficacy of elective neck dissection versus the "wait and watch" policy in the treatment of early squamous cell carcinoma of tongue. Materials and Methods: This is a retrospective study of 21 patients with surgical treatment between April 2009 and July 2011. The patients were divided into two groups, with Group 1 consisting of patients who underwent wide excision glossectomy with elective neck dissection and Group 2 consisting of patients who underwent glossectomy without the neck being surgically addressed. The selection of patients was done by the random double-blinded method and the review was done by a single reviewer. All patients were examined for an average period of 1 year postoperatively. Results: Twenty-one cases were treated, among which there were 17 T1 and 4 T2 carcinomas. All the patients had primary carcinoma involving only the tongue with no clinical neck palpable neck nodes. Eleven patients underwent wide excision of primary tumor with elective neck dissection (Group 1 and 10 patients underwent only resection of primary tumor without the neck being surgically addressed (Group 2. In Group 1, there were no recurrences, and in Group 2, there were two patients who developed subsequent cervical node metastasis with one patient undergoing further surgery to address the positive neck and the other patient was lost to follow-up. Conclusions: Regional recurrence was the most common cause of failure after surgical treatment of oral tongue carcinoma. Elective neck dissection significantly reduced mortality due to regional recurrence and also increased the overall survival. Our study suggests that elective neck dissection is a treatment strategy of choice for stages I and II carcinoma of the oral tongue. A prospective, randomized study is worthwhile to further evaluate the benefit of elective neck dissection in the treatment of early carcinoma of the tongue with a larger pool of patients and a lengthier follow-up period.

  9. Radiological Assessment of the Sacrofemoral Angle: A Novel Method to Measure the Range of Hip Joint Flexion

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    Xian-Zhao Wei

    2015-01-01

    Conclusions: Using the SFA, to evaluate RHF could prevent compromised measurements due to the movements of pelvis and lumbar spine during hip flexion, and is, therefore, a more accurate and objective method with reasonable reliability and validity.

  10. Relationship between navicular drop and measuring position of maximal plantar flexion torque of the first and second-fifth metatarsophalangeal joints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeki, Junya; Tojima, Michio; Torii, Suguru

    2015-06-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between navicular drop and plantar flexion torque of the first and second-fifth metatarsophalangeal joints. [Subjects] Ten healthy young men participated in this study. [Methods] The Pearson product-moment correlation coefficient was calculated to determine the relationship between navicular drop and plantar flexion torque of the first and second-fifth metatarsophalangeal joints. [Results] Significant negative correlations were observed between navicular drop and plantar flexion torques in the lengthened position of the intrinsic toe plantar flexion muscles, but no correlations were found between navicular drop and plantar flexion torques in the neutral position of the ankle and metatarsophalangeal joints. Moreover, the intrinsic toe plantar flexion muscles were found to contribute to the formation of the medial longitudinal arch. [Conclusion] Navicular drop correlates with metatarsophalangeal joint muscle strength in plantar flexion where the intrinsic toe muscles are capable of exerting force. PMID:26180323

  11. Partition of voluntary command to antagonist muscles during cyclic flexion-extension of the hand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposti, Roberto; Cavallari, Paolo; Baldissera, Fausto

    2005-05-01

    Activity distribution between wrist movers during rhythmic flexion-extension of the wrist has been analysed in three different mechanical conditions. Wrist angular position and surface EMG from Extensor Carpi Radialis (ECR) and Flexor Carpi Radialis (FCR) were recorded. In the first condition (hand prone, flexion-extension in a vertical parasagittal plane) the hand passive equilibrium position was approximately 50 degrees in flexion. During hand oscillations FCR and ECR were alternatively recruited to move the hand symmetrically away from the equilibrium and de-recruited to allow conservative forces to restore the equilibrium. Switching between antagonists occurred at the centre of the oscillation (equilibrium crossing). In the second condition (hand semi-prone, flexion-extension in a horizontal transversal plane) the hand equilibrium was attained over an angle of about 26 degrees . When the hand was oscillated symmetrically around this equilibrium range, each muscle was recruited when the hand entered the equilibrium range and switching between antagonists therefore occurred in advance of the oscillation centre. Both vertical and horizontal oscillations were also performed all externally to the equilibrium position or range: in these cases only one muscle was recruited over the entire cycle, the EMG burst starting at the onset of the related movement. In the third condition (hand semi-prone, flexion-extension in a horizontal transversal plane) a frictional load added to the platform pivot expanded the equilibrium range to encompass the entire hand oscillation. Now concentric muscle contraction was needed throughout each phase of the movement and switching between antagonists occurred at the movement reversal, i.e. ~90 degrees in advance of the oscillation centre. The above descriptions held for oscillation frequencies from 0.2 Hz to 3.0 Hz, once the frequency-dependent effects of viscosity and inertia were accounted for. In all the three conditions, contractile

  12. Dynamic Compression of the Spinal Cord by Paraspinal Muscles following Cervical Laminectomy: Diagnosis Using Flexion-Extension MRI

    OpenAIRE

    Evans, Linton T.; S. Scott Lollis

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Flexion-extension, or kinematic, MRI has been used to identify dynamic spondylotic spinal cord compression not seen with traditional static MRI. The use of kinematic MRI to diagnose postoperative complications, specifically dynamic compression, is not as well documented. The authors describe a case of dynamic spinal cord compression by the paraspinal muscles causing worsening myelopathy following cervical laminectomy. This was only diagnosed with flexion-extension MRI. Methods....

  13. Effect of shoulder flexion angle and exercise resistance on the serratus anterior muscle activity during dynamic hug exercise

    OpenAIRE

    Yoo, Won-Gyu

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The primary aim of this study was to determine the effect of shoulder flexion angle and exercise resistance on the serratus anterior muscle during dynamic hug exercise. [Subjects] Ten men aged 22–32 years were recruited. [Methods] The subjects performed dynamic hug exercise at different shoulder flexion angles and under resistance weight conditions. Serratus anterior muscle activities were measured by using the surface electromyographic system during the dynamic hug exercises. After...

  14. Virtual Averaging Making Nonframe-Averaged Optical Coherence Tomography Images Comparable to Frame-Averaged Images

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Chieh-Li; Ishikawa, Hiroshi; Wollstein, Gadi; Bilonick, Richard A.; Kagemann, Larry; Schuman, Joel S.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Developing a novel image enhancement method so that nonframe-averaged optical coherence tomography (OCT) images become comparable to active eye-tracking frame-averaged OCT images. Methods Twenty-one eyes of 21 healthy volunteers were scanned with noneye-tracking nonframe-averaged OCT device and active eye-tracking frame-averaged OCT device. Virtual averaging was applied to nonframe-averaged images with voxel resampling and adding amplitude deviation with 15-time repetitions. Signal-to...

  15. Pseudopathologic fracture of the femoral neck

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have seen two cases of traumatic subcapital fractures of the femoral neck which resembled pathologic fractures on plain radiography. We have named this entity pseudopathologic fracture of the femoral neck and offer suggestions for why it occurs. (orig.)

  16. Synovial sarcoma of the neck associated with previous head and neck radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Synovial sarcoma is a rare neoplasm that uncommonly arises in the neck. Fourteen years after facial and neck radiation therapy for acne, synovial sarcoma of the neck developed in a young man. Possible radiation-induced benign and malignant neoplasms that arise in the head and neck region, either of thyroid or extrathyroid origin, remain a continuing medical problem

  17. Femoral neck shortening after internal fixation

    OpenAIRE

    LIU, YUE; AI, Zi Sheng; Shao, Jin; Yang, Tieyi

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to assess the factors affecting femoral neck shortening after internal fixation of femoral neck fractures. Methods: Eighty-six patients with femoral neck fractures were treated using three parallel cannulated screws between May 2004 and January 2011. The shortening of the femoral neck in the horizontal (X), vertical (Y), and along the resultant along the (Z) vector (XÆ, YÆ, ZÆ) was measured on anteroposterior radiographs corrected by screw diameter and ...

  18. Respiratory Dysfunction in Chronic Neck Pain

    OpenAIRE

    Dimitriadis, Zacharias

    2011-01-01

    Background: Patients with chronic neck pain have a number of factors that could constitute a predisposition for respiratory dysfunction. However, the existing evidence is limited and not well established, and many questions such as the association of neck pain deficits with respiratory function remain unanswered. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate whether patients with chronic neck have accompanying respiratory dysfunction and which are the neck pain deficits which principally pre...

  19. Thyroid doses and risk to paediatric patients undergoing neck CT examinations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spampinato, Maria Vittoria; Tipnis, Sameer; Huda, Walter [Medical University of South Carolina, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Charleston, SC (United States); Tavernier, Joshua [Medical University of South Carolina, College of Medicine, Charleston, SC (United States)

    2015-07-15

    To estimate thyroid doses and cancer risk for paediatric patients undergoing neck computed tomography (CT). We used average CTDI{sub vol} (mGy) values from 75 paediatric neck CT examinations to estimate thyroid dose in a mathematical anthropomorphic phantom (ImPACT Patient CT Dosimetry Calculator). Patient dose was estimated by modelling the neck as mass equivalent water cylinder. A patient size correction factor was obtained using published relative dose data as a function of water cylinder size. Additional correction factors included scan length and radiation intensity variation secondary to tube-current modulation. The mean water cylinder diameter that modelled the neck was 14 ± 3.5 cm. The mathematical anthropomorphic phantom has a 16.5-cm neck, and for a constant CT exposure, would have thyroid doses that are 13-17 % lower than the average paediatric patient. CTDI{sub vol} was independent of age and sex. The average thyroid doses were 31 ± 18 mGy (males) and 34 ± 15 mGy (females). Thyroid cancer incidence risk was highest for infant females (0.2 %), lowest for teenage males (0.01 %). Estimated absorbed thyroid doses in paediatric neck CT did not significantly vary with age and gender. However, the corresponding thyroid cancer risk is determined by gender and age. (orig.)

  20. Thyroid doses and risk to paediatric patients undergoing neck CT examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To estimate thyroid doses and cancer risk for paediatric patients undergoing neck computed tomography (CT). We used average CTDIvol (mGy) values from 75 paediatric neck CT examinations to estimate thyroid dose in a mathematical anthropomorphic phantom (ImPACT Patient CT Dosimetry Calculator). Patient dose was estimated by modelling the neck as mass equivalent water cylinder. A patient size correction factor was obtained using published relative dose data as a function of water cylinder size. Additional correction factors included scan length and radiation intensity variation secondary to tube-current modulation. The mean water cylinder diameter that modelled the neck was 14 ± 3.5 cm. The mathematical anthropomorphic phantom has a 16.5-cm neck, and for a constant CT exposure, would have thyroid doses that are 13-17 % lower than the average paediatric patient. CTDIvol was independent of age and sex. The average thyroid doses were 31 ± 18 mGy (males) and 34 ± 15 mGy (females). Thyroid cancer incidence risk was highest for infant females (0.2 %), lowest for teenage males (0.01 %). Estimated absorbed thyroid doses in paediatric neck CT did not significantly vary with age and gender. However, the corresponding thyroid cancer risk is determined by gender and age. (orig.)

  1. 49 CFR 572.183 - Neck assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... CFR 572.33) at the time the pendulum makes contact with the decelerating mechanism. The velocity-time... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Neck assembly. 572.183 Section 572.183... Dummy, 50th Percentile Adult Male § 572.183 Neck assembly. (a) The neck assembly consists of parts...

  2. X-Ray Exam: Neck (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Tropical Delight: Melon Smoothie Pregnant? Your Baby's Growth X-Ray Exam: Neck KidsHealth > For Parents > X-Ray Exam: Neck Print A A A Text Size ... español Radiografía: cuello What It Is A neck X-ray is a safe and painless test that uses ...

  3. Arthur Simons (1877-1942) and Tonic Neck Reflexes With Hemiplegic "Mitbewegungen" (Associated Reactions): Cinematography From 1916-1919.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holdorff, Bernd

    2016-01-01

    Tonic neck reflexes were investigated by Rudolf Magnus and Adriaan de Kleijn in animals and men in 1912 and eventually by Arthur Simons, a neurologist in Berlin and coworker of Hermann Oppenheim. Simons studied these reflexes in hemiplegic patients, who were mainly victims of World War I. This work became his most important contribution and remained unsurpassed for many years. The film (Filmarchiv, Bundesarchiv [Film Archive, National Archive] Berlin) with Simons as an examiner shows 11 war casualties with brain lesions that occurred between 1916 and 1919. The injuries reveal asymmetric neck reflexes with "Mitbewegungen," that is, flexion or extension on the hemiplegic side. Mitbewegungen is identical with Francis Walshe's "associated reactions" caused by neck rotation and/or by cocontraction of the nonaffected extremities, for example, by closing of the fist (Walshe). The knowledge of the neck reflexes is important in acute neurology and in rehabilitation therapy of hemiplegics for antispastic positions. Simons' investigations were conducted in the early era of increasing use of cinematography in medical studies. The film had been nearly forgotten until its rediscovery in 2010. PMID:26684424

  4. The fourth suture in MACS facelifting – adressing the neck

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    Kaye, Kai O.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The MACS facelift alone shows poor results on the medial neck in cases of pronounced, rigid platysmabands (McKinney III–IV°. The original MACS (“Minimal Access Cranial Suspension” facelift delirs excellent results on the midface and leads to sustainably improved outcome on the neck by adding a fourth suture on the platysma. McKinney type I–II platysmabands can be treated only by lateral approach of the ‘fourth suture’, type III–IV should be treated with closed platysma myotomy before.Methods: Between October 2007 and November 2013 a number of 219 patients were treated with the MACS facelift technique accomplished by a fourth suture on the platysma and liposuction or optional lipectomy on the neck. On 47 patients closed transcutaneous platysma myotomy was performed.Results: Surgery time lasted on average 2.5 hours and was performed under sedation with local anesthesia in 85%. Recovery time ranged between 14 to 16 days until the patients were back to work. Due to their health status 54% of our patients had an inpatient arrangement for one night and 46% an outpatient arrangement.Conclusion: The modification of the MACS lift with the ‘fourth suture’ on the platysma keeps the benefits of the original technique but improves the aesthetic outcome on the neck.

  5. Neck control after definitive radiochemotherapy without planned neck dissection in node-positive head and neck cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate neck control outcomes after definitive radiochemotherapy without planned neck dissection in node-positive head and neck cancer. We retrospectively reviewed medical records of fifty patients with node-positive head and neck cancer who received definitive radiochemotherapy. Twelve patients subsequently underwent neck dissection for suspicious recurrent or persistent disease. A median dose of 70 Gy (range 60-70.6) was delivered to involved nodes. Response evaluation was performed at a median of 5 weeks after completion of radiotherapy. Neck failure was observed in 11 patients and the 3-year regional control (RC) rate was 77.1%. Neck dissection was performed in 10 of the 11 patients; seven of these cases were successfully salvaged, and the ultimate rate of neck control was 92%. The remaining two patients who received neck dissection had negative pathologic results. On univariate analysis, initial nodal size > 2 cm, a less-than-complete response at the primary site, post-radiotherapy nodal size > 1.5 cm, and post-radiotherapy nodal necrosis were associated with RC. On multivariate analysis, less-than-complete primary site response and post-radiotherapy nodal necrosis were identified as independent prognostic factors for RC. The neck failure rate after definitive radiochemotherapy without planned neck dissection was 22%. Two-thirds of these were successfully salvaged with neck dissection and the ultimate neck control rate was 92%. Our results suggest that planned neck dissection might not be necessary in patients with complete response of primary site, no evidence of residual lesion > 1.5 cm, or no necrotic lymph nodes at the 1-2 months follow-up evaluation after radiotherapy

  6. The Correlation between Posterior Tibial Slope and Maximal Angle of Flexion after Total Knee Arthroplasty

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Keong-Hwan; Bin, Seong-Il; Kim, Jong-Min

    2012-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to evaluate the correlation between the posterior tibial slope and the maximal angle of flexion after total knee arthroplasty. Materials and Methods Seventy nine cases (63 patients, 60 females and 3 males), which received total knee arthroplasty with the Nexgen LPS system from Jan 2001 to Jan 2004, were enrolled. We divided all cases into two subsets in two ways. Firstly, group A (up to 10°, 44 cases) and group B (over 10°, 35 cases) were divided accordin...

  7. Correlation of non-traumatic neck pain with cervical angle and shoulder retractor power in adult clerical population

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    Isha Avadhut Godbole

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: A forward head posture (or chin poking is perhaps the most common abnormality associated with NP and is commonly defined as the protrusion of the head in the sagittal plane so that the head is placed anterior to the trunk. Forward head posture can occur because of an anterior translation of the head, lower cervical flexion, or both, and it is claimed to be associated with an increase in upper-cervical extension. It is suggested that forward head posture leads to an increase in the compressive forces on the cervical apophyseal joints and posterior part of the vertebra and to changes in connective tissue length and strength (because of stretching of the anterior structures of the neck and shortening of the posterior muscles resulting in pain. The objective of the study was to correlate neck pain with cervical angle and shoulder retractor power in non-traumatic neck pain patients. Methods: 50 clerical workers having non traumatic neck pain were included. Neck pain was measured on VAS, cervical angle was measured using photometric method and shoulder retractor power was measured. Results: VAS showed moderate positive correlation with cervical angles (0.63 and 0.72 and moderate negative correlation with shoulder retractor power (-0.59 and -0.71. A moderate positive correlation of craniocervical angle to VAS seen (0.66 whereas there was negative correlation with shoulder retractors I and II (-0.59 and -0.61 A positive correlation was seen between VAS and craniocervical angle but is moderately negative with shoulder retractors I (Rhomboids and II (Middle trapezius (0.78, 0.04, -0.69 and -0.64. Conclusion: A moderate increase in cranio vertebral and craniocervical angle showed plausible weakness in lower Trapezius and rhomboids among clerks` having Non-traumatic neck pain. [Int J Res Med Sci 2015; 3(4.000: 859-862

  8. Reduced Neck Muscle Strength and Altered Muscle Mechanical Properties in Cervical Dystonia Following Botulinum Neurotoxin Injections: A Prospective Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sirpa Mustalampi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective To evaluate changes in the strength and mechanical properties of neck muscles and disability in patients with cervical dystonia (CD during a 12-week period following botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT injections. Methods Eight patients with CD volunteered for this prospective clinical cohort study. Patients had received BoNT injections regularly in neck muscles at three-month intervals for several years. Maximal isometric neck strength was measured by a dynamometer, and the mechanical properties of the splenius capitis were evaluated using two myotonometers. Clinical assessment was performed using the Toronto Western Spasmodic Torticollis Rating Scale (TWSTRS before and at 2, 4, 8, and 12 weeks after the BoNT injections. Results Mean maximal isometric neck strength at two weeks after the BoNT injections decreased by 28% in extension, 25% in rotation of the affected side and 17% in flexion. At four weeks, muscle stiffness of the affected side decreased by 17% and tension decreased by 6%. At eight weeks, the muscle elasticity on the affected side increased by 12%. At two weeks after the BoNT injections, the TWSTRS-severity and TWSTRS-total scores decreased by 4.3 and 6.4, respectively. The strength, muscle mechanical properties and TWSTRS scores returned to baseline values at 12 weeks. Conclusions Although maximal neck strength and muscle tone decreased after BoNT injections, the disability improved. The changes observed after BoNT injections were temporary and returned to pre-injection levels within twelve weeks. Despite having a possible negative effect on function and decreasing neck strength, the BoNT injections improved the patients reported disability.

  9. Comportement en flexion des bétons fibrés sous chargement cyclique

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    Boulekbache Bensaid

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Ce papier présente les résultats d’une étude expérimentale sur le comportement en flexion des bétons de fibres métalliques. On étudie l’effet de la rhéologie du béton sur l’orientation des fibres et l’influence de l’orientation sur les propriétés mécaniques. La rigidité de l’ancrage des fibres étudiée par les essais cycliques est liée aux caractéristiques rhéologiques et mécaniques de la matrice. Les résultats montrent que la fluidité des bétons est un paramètre essentiel de l’orientation des fibres. Dès lors que l’on obtient une orientation dans le sens de l’efficacité mécanique, la résistance à la flexion est nettement améliorée.

  10. The role of biceps brachii and brachioradialis for the control of elbow flexion and extension movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Werder, Sylvie Charlotte Frieda Anneliese; Disselhorst-Klug, Catherine

    2016-06-01

    How do synergistic muscles interact, when their contraction aims at stabilizing and fine-tuning a movement, which is induced by the antagonistic muscle? The aim of the study was to analyze the interaction of biceps and brachioradialis during fine-tuning control tasks in comparison to load bearing ones. The surface electromyogram of biceps, brachioradialis and triceps were examined in 15 healthy subjects in dynamic flexion and extension movements with different combinations of contraction levels, joint angles and angular velocities. The measurements were conducted in two configurations, where the torque due to an external load opposes the rotational direction of the elbow flexion (load bearing tasks) or the elbow extension (fine-tuning tasks). Whereas during load bearing control tasks, similar muscular activation of biceps and brachioradialis was observed for all joint angles, angular velocities and external loads, during fine-tuning control tasks a significant difference of the muscular activation of both flexors was observed for 1kg, F(3.639,47.305)=2.864, p=0.037, and 5kg of external load, F(1.570,21.976)=6.834, p=0.008. The results confirm the synergistic muscular activation of both flexors during load bearing tasks, but suggest different control strategies for both flexors when they comprise a fine-tuning control task. PMID:27061680

  11. The effect of active recovery, cold water immersion and passive recovery on subsequent knee extension and flexion strength

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbora Strejcová

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Recovery is an important aspect of every physical activity. Many athletes train hard without giving their body time to recover which can lead to overreaching, burnout or poor performance. Currently cold-water immersion recovery and active recovery have emerged as some of the most popular interventions enabling faster recovery. OBJECTIVE: To assess the effect of three kinds of recovery (active recovery, cold water immersion, passive recovery on medium-term knee strength in the extension and flexion. METHODS: Fourteen athletes at the age of 26.6 ± 4.4 years performed, in a random cross-over design, 3 sessions with 3 repeated medium-term isokinetic tests. The effect of active recovery, passive rest and cold water immersion were assessed by 3 × 3 (time × recovery repeated-measure ANOVA, respectively. The dependent variables were – peak torque, total work and average power. RESULTS: We found significantly lower absolute differences between the first and third trial in knee extension for peak torque after the active recovery (↑ 0.9 N × m than after the cold water immersion (↓ 14.6 N × m or the passive recovery (↓ 13.9 N × m. The decrease of the average power was significantly lower differences after the active recovery (↓ 5 W than after the cold water immersion (↓ 23.7 W or passive recovery (↓ 25.9 W. The changes in total work were not significant. We did not found any changes in the isokinetic strength for the knee flexors after different kinds of recovery. Maximal heart rate (HRmax was significantly higher during the active recovery than during the cold water immersion and the passive recovery (173 ± 14, 166 ± 14 and 167 ± 14 rpm. We have found significant differences in the average heart rates (HRavg during active recovery, cold water immersion and passive recovery (124 ± 8, 97 ± 9 and 107 ± 12 rpm. CONCLUSION: We found the positive effect of the active recovery on the subsequent medium-term performance for

  12. Bladder neck obstruction in women

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Primary bladder nech obstruction in women is quite rare and its symptoms - dysuria, frequency and urgency - are equivocal. Routine radiological investigations alone do not allow a diagnosis to be made, due to the lack of simultaneous measurements of detrusorial pressure and uroflow. A precise diagnosis is thus to be obtained by synchronous video-urodynamic studies which allow the depiction of nonfunneling or tight bladder neck during the entire phase of detrusor contraction, of bladder trabeculations and diverticula, vesico-ureteral reflux, long micturition time and incomplete voiding. When these radiological signs are associated with a rise in detrusorial voiding pressure over 60 cm of water and with peak urine flow lower than 15 ml/s, the diagnosis of bladder neck obstruction is unquestionable and the appropriate farmacologic/endoscopic treatment can be administered

  13. Déficit bilateral nos movimentos de flexão e extensão de perna e flexão do cotovelo Déficit bilateral en los movimientos de flexion y extension de la pierna y flexion del codo Bilateral deficit in leg flexion and extension and elbow flexion movements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christianne Pereira Giesbrecht Chaves

    2004-12-01

    áxima (CM en la flexión y extensión de pierna e flexión del de codo aisladamente y entre la suma de esos dos resultados con aquel desarrollado simultaneamente por las dos piernas y los dos brazos, respectivamente. Sometemos a 60 indivíduos al ejercicio de flexión y extensión de pierna y a flexión de codo a un test de 1RM. Los resultados para los movimientos de flexión y extensión de pierna y flexión de codo izquierdos y derechos en la CM fueron de 31,6 (± 7,9, 32,0 (± 8,0, 20,2 (± 9,2, 20,2 (± 9,8, 29,3 (± 13,9 e 29,8 (± 14,1 kg respectivamente, y se mostraron similares (p > 0,05 y fuertemente asociados (r = 0,96, 0,96 e 0,98. Comparando la suma de los valores unilaterales con los de ejecución bilateral, la CM presentó una diferencia significativa para los movimientos de extensión de pierna (p = 0,04 y flexión de codo (p = 0,03, el mismo no fué observado en el movimiento de flexión de pierna (p = 0,75. Este resultado puede ser explicado por el menor incremento de carga - dos kilos y medio en este último movimiento en relación a los dos movimientos anteriores - cinco kilos. A pesar de la mayoría de los sujetos sean diestros, no hubo diferencias unilaterales en la CM a pesar de no todos estar entrenados. La suma de los resultados unilaterales fué mayor en 9,8% y 4,0% para los movimientos de extensión de la pierna y flexión del codo, respectivamente, de aquel obtenido bilateralmente, mostrando, probablemente una limitación central en la coordenación motora de un movimiento complejo hecho en máxima velocidad y con carga elevada. Por otro lado, en el movimiento de flexión de pierna, la suma de los resultados unilaterales fué inferior a la bilateral (-0,6%, presentando un posible aprendizage del movimiento y adaptación al entrenamiento con pesos a partir de las doce semanas.Endurance exercises (EE may be performed unilaterally and bilaterally. The objective was to compare the maximum load (ML in leg flexion and extension and elbow flexion alone

  14. Neck tongue syndrome: operative management.

    OpenAIRE

    Elisevich, K; Stratford, J; Bray, G; Finlayson, M.

    1984-01-01

    A 53-year-old woman with assimilation of the atlas to the occiput presented with paraesthesiae in the right half of her tongue and ipsilateral neck pain aggravated by head turning. After being intermittent for several years, the symptoms eventually became persistent and increasingly incapacitating. At operation, the C2 spinal nerves were found to be compressed by protuberant atlanto-axial joints, particularly on the right side. The superficial parts of the resected C2 spinal nerves showed a l...

  15. Spiral CT in the evaluation of the neck

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper evaluates prospectively the clinical utility of spiral CT when studying lesions of the neck. Twenty-one patients with suspected neck lesions were evaluated by using spiral studies in 18 intravenous contrast material was administered with an automatic power injector. Patients performed a puffed-cheek maneuver during the studies and were instructed not to swallow. Two readers evaluated the studies for soft-tissue detail, vascular opacification, pharyngeal distention, and swallowing-respiratory artifact. Scores of 1(poor) to 3 (excellent) were assigned to each examination in each category. Scanning times ranged from 24 to 36 seconds. Though the image quality was slightly less than that obtained with conventional CT techniques, the soft-tissue detail scores averaged 2.7. The rapid scanning times minimized respiratory-swallowing artifacts permitted pharyngeal distention, optimizing evaluation of the valleculae and pyriform sinuses; and allowed adequate vascular opacification by using contrast material volumes of 50-100mL

  16. Systemic chemotherapy of advanced head and neck malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowell, K E; Armstrong, D M; Aust, J B; Cruz, A B

    1975-04-01

    Several Phase II chemotherapy protocols were evaluated in patients with advanced malignancies; 158 were evaluable head and neck cases. The protocols were as follows: five-drug combination (COMFP), four-drug (COMF), (CCNU, Adriamycin, DTIC, and cytosine arabinoside. Insufficient numbers and data were received to adequately evaluate Yoshi 864, 5 Azacytidine, porfiromycin, BCNU, and Azaserine. Significant responses to therapy were noted in the four and five-drug combinations in which 30-44% of the patients had 50% or greater regression, with an average duration of 2.2 months. Adriamycin and CCNU demonstrated lesser antitumor effects, while DTIC and cytosine arabinoside did not demonstrate significant antitumor activity in the head and neck areas. Usual toxicity consisted largely of nausea and vomiting, leukopenia, and thrombocytopenia. Alopecia was not pronouced in Adriamycin-treated patients. It appears that combination chemotherapy had a higher response rate compared to single agents used in the different cooperative protocols. PMID:1116105

  17. Average Range and Network Synchronizability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The influence of structural properties of a network on the network synchronizability is studied by introducing a new concept of average range of edges. For both small-world and scale-free networks, the effect of average range on the synchronizability of networks with bounded or unbounded synchronization regions is illustrated through numerical simulations. The relations between average range, range distribution, average distance, and maximum betweenness are also explored, revealing the effects of these factors on the network synchronizability of the small-world and scale-free networks, respectively. (general)

  18. Physical Theories with Average Symmetry

    CERN Document Server

    Alamino, Roberto C

    2013-01-01

    This Letter probes the existence of physical laws invariant only in average when subjected to some transformation. The concept of a symmetry transformation is broadened to include corruption by random noise and average symmetry is introduced by considering functions which are invariant only in average under these transformations. It is then shown that actions with average symmetry obey a modified version of Noether's Theorem with dissipative currents. The relation of this with possible violations of physical symmetries, as for instance Lorentz invariance in some quantum gravity theories, is briefly commented.

  19. Characterization of three different sensory fibers by use of neonatal capsaicin treatment, spinal antagonism and a novel electrical stimulation-induced paw flexion test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yamaguchi Asuka

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In the present study, we first report an in vivo characterization of flexor responses induced by three distinct sine-wave stimuli in the electrical stimulation-induced paw flexion (EPF test in mice. The fixed sine-wave electric stimulations of 5 Hz (C-fiber, 250 Hz (Aδ-fiber and 2000 Hz (Aβ-fiber to the hind paw of mice induced a paw-flexion response and vocalization. The average threshold for paw flexor responses by sine-wave stimulations was much lower than that for vocalization. Neonatally (P3 pretreatment with capsaicin to degenerate polymodal substance P-ergic C-fiber neurons increased the threshold to 5 Hz (C-fiber stimuli, but not to 250 Hz (Aδ-fiber and 2000 Hz (Aβ-fiber. The flexor responses to 5 Hz stimuli were significantly blocked by intrathecal (i.t. pretreatment with both CP-99994 and MK-801, an NK1 and NMDA receptor antagonist, respectively, but not by CNQX, an AMPA/kainate receptor antagonist. On the other hand, the flexor responses induced by 250 Hz stimuli were blocked by MK-801 (i.t. but not by CP-99994 or CNQX. In contrast, flexor responses induced by 2000 Hz stimuli were only blocked by CNQX treatment. These data suggest that we have identified three pharmacologically different categories of responses mediated through different primary afferent fibers. Furthermore, we also carried out characterization of the in vivo functional sensitivity of each of the sensory fiber types in nerve-injured mice using the EPF test, and found that the threshold to both 250 Hz and 2000 Hz stimulations were markedly decreased, whereas the threshold to 5 Hz stimulations was significantly increased. Thus we found opposing effects on specific sensory fiber-mediated responses as a result of nerve injury in mice. These results also suggest that the EPF analysis is useful for the evaluation of plasticity in sensory functions in animal disease models.

  20. IN VIVO MOTION OF FEMORAL CONDYLES DURING WEIGHT-BEARING FLEXION AFTER ANTERIOR CRUCIATE LIGAMENT RUPTURE USING BIPLANE RADIOGRAPHY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaining Chen

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate in vivo three- dimensional tibiofemoral kinematics and femoral condylar motion in knees with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL deficiency during a knee bend activity. Ten patients with unilateral ACL rupture were enrolled. Both the injured and contralateral normal knees were imaged using biplane radiography at extension and at 15°, 30°, 60°, 90°, and 120° of flexion. Bilateral knees were next scanned by computed tomography, from which bilateral three-dimensional knee models were created. The in vivo tibiofemoral motion at each flexion position was reproduced through image registration using the knee models and biplane radiographs. A joint coordinate system containing the geometric center axis of the femur was used to measure the tibiofemoral motion. In ACL deficiency, the lateral femoral condyle was located significantly more posteriorly at extension and at 15° (p < 0.05, whereas the medial condylar position was changed only slightly. This constituted greater posterior translation and external rotation of the femur relative to the tibia at extension and at 15° (p < 0.05. Furthermore, ACL deficiency led to a significantly reduced extent of posterior movement of the lateral condyle during flexion from 15° to 60° (p < 0.05. Coupled with an insignificant change in the motion of the medial condyle, the femur moved less posteriorly with reduced extent of external rotation during flexion from 15° to 60° in ACL deficiency (p < 0.05. The medial- lateral and proximal-distal translations of the medial and lateral condyles and the femoral adduction-abduction rotation were insignificantly changed after ACL deficiency. The results demonstrated that ACL deficiency primarily changed the anterior-posterior motion of the lateral condyle, producing not only posterior subluxation at low flexion positions but also reduced extent of posterior movement during flexion from 15° to 60°

  1. Flexion relaxation and its relation to pain and function over the duration of a back pain episode.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raymond W McGorry

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Relaxation of the erector spinae often occurs in healthy individuals as full trunk flexion is achieved when bending forward from standing. This phenomenon, referred to as flexion relaxation is often absent or disrupted (EMG activity persists in individuals reporting low back pain (LBP. METHODS AND RESULTS: Self-reported pain and disability scores were compared to EMG measures related to the flexion relaxation (FR phenomenon by 33 participants with LBP at up to eight sessions over a study period of up to eight weeks. Fourteen participants served as a control group. In the protocol, starting from standing participants bent forward to a fully flexed posture, and then extended the trunk to return to standing position. A thoracic inclinometer was used to measure trunk posture. Surface electrodes located at the L2 and L5 levels recorded EMG amplitudes of the erector spinae. Ratios of EMG amplitudes recorded during forward bending to amplitudes at full flexion, and ratios of extension to full flexion were calculated. EMG amplitudes and their ratios were compared between control and LBP groups at the initial visit. No significant differences between groups were found except at the L5 location at full flexion. Correlations of the ratios to pain and function scores recorded in repeated sessions over the LBP episode also were compared between LBP group participants classified as having transient, recurrent or chronic symptoms. In another analysis participants were grouped by whether their symptoms resolved over the study period. CONCLUSIONS: The transient LBP group had significantly stronger correlations between pain and function to both ratios, than did those with more chronic LBP symptoms. Participants who experienced symptom resolution generally had stronger correlations of ratios to both pain and function than those with partial or no resolution. Improved understanding of these relationships may provide insight in clinical management of LBP.

  2. Head and neck position sense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Bridget; McNair, Peter; Taylor, Denise

    2008-01-01

    Traumatic minor cervical strains are common place in high-impact sports (e.g. tackling) and premature degenerative changes have been documented in sports people exposed to recurrent impact trauma (e.g. scrummaging in rugby) or repetitive forces (e.g. Formula 1 racing drivers, jockeys). While proprioceptive exercises have been an integral part of rehabilitation of injuries in the lower limb, they have not featured as prominently in the treatment of cervical injuries. However, head and neck position sense (HNPS) testing and re-training may have relevance in the management of minor sports-related neck injuries, and play a role in reducing the incidence of ongoing pain and problems with function. For efficacious programmes to be developed and tested, fundamental principles associated with proprioception in the cervical spine should be considered. Hence, this article highlights the importance of anatomical structures in the cervical spine responsible for position sense, and how their interaction with the CNS affects our ability to plan and execute effective purposeful movements. This article includes a review of studies examining position sense in subjects with and without pathology and describes the effects of rehabilitation programmes that have sought to improve position sense. In respect to the receptors providing proprioceptive information for the CNS, the high densities and complex arrays of spindles found in cervical muscles suggest that these receptors play a key role. There is some evidence suggesting that ensemble encoding of discharge patterns from muscle spindles is relayed to the CNS and that a pattern recognition system is used to establish joint position and movement. Sensory information from neck proprioceptive receptors is processed in tandem with information from the vestibular system. There are extensive anatomical connections between neck proprioceptive inputs and vestibular inputs. If positional information from the vestibular system is inaccurate or

  3. Pour une réflexion disciplinaire sur l’éthique professionnelle des enseignants de langue-culture

    OpenAIRE

    Antier, Emmanuel

    2013-01-01

    Si la réflexion sur l’éthique professionnelle des enseignants est actuellement en plein essor en sciences de l’éducation, elle apparaît en revanche peu développée en didactique des langues-cultures. À travers la mise en évidence de certaines particularités éthiques inhérentes à l’enseignement-apprentissage des langues-cultures, nous plaidons ici pour la mise en place d’une réflexion disciplinaire sur l’éthique professionnelle des enseignants de langue-culture.

  4. Steindler flexorplasty to restore elbow flexion in C5-C6-C7 brachial plexus palsy type

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monreal Ricardo

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Loss of elbow flexion due to traumatic palsy of the brachial plexus represents a major functional handicap. Then, the first goal in the treatment of the flail arm is to restore the elbow flexion by primary direct nerve surgery or secondary reconstructive surgery. There are various methods to restore elbow flexion which are well documented in the medical literature but the most known and used is Steindler flexorplasty. This review is intended to detail the author's experience with Steindler flexorplasty to restore elbow flexion in patients with brachial plexus palsy C5-C6-C7 where wrist extensors are paralyzed or weakened. Methods We conducted a retrospective follow-up study of 12 patients with absent or extremely weak elbow flexion (motor grade 2 or less, wrist/finger extensor and triceps palsy associated; who had undergone surgical reconstruction of the flail upper limb by tendon transfer (Steindler flexorplasty and wrist arthrodesis to restore elbow flexion. The aetiology of elbow weakness was in all patients brachial plexus palsy (C5-C6-C7 deficit. Data were collected from medical records and from the information obtained during follow-up visits. Age, sex, preoperative strength (rated on a 0 to 5 scale for the flexors of the elbow, wrist flexors, pronator and triceps, previous surgery, length of follow-up, other associated operative procedures, results and complications were recorded. Results The results are the follows: Eleven patients were found to have very good or good function of the transferred muscles. One patient had mild active flexion of the elbow despite the reconstructive procedure. There were no major intraoperative complications. Two patients experienced transient, intermittent nocturnal ulnar paresthesias postoperatively. In both patients these symptoms subsided without further surgery. Conclusion Our study suggests that in patients with C5-C6-C7 palsy where the wrist and finger extensors are paralyzed or

  5. "Pricing Average Options on Commodities"

    OpenAIRE

    Kenichiro Shiraya; Akihiko Takahashi

    2010-01-01

    This paper proposes a new approximation formula for pricing average options on commodities under a stochastic volatility environment. In particular, it derives an option pricing formula under Heston and an extended lambda-SABR stochastic volatility models (which includes an extended SABR model as a special case). Moreover, numerical examples support the accuracy of the proposed average option pricing formula.

  6. Increased neck muscle activity and impaired balance among females with whiplash-related chronic neck pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul-Kristensen, Birgit; Clausen, Brian; Ris Hansen, Inge; Jensen, Rikke Vikær; Steffensen, Rasmus Fischer; Chreiteh, Shadi Samir; Jørgensen, Marie Birk; Søgaard, Karen

    2013-01-01

    To investigate neck muscle activity and postural control in patients with whiplash-associated disorder compared with healthy controls.......To investigate neck muscle activity and postural control in patients with whiplash-associated disorder compared with healthy controls....

  7. Thyroid Emphysema Following Penetrating Neck Trauma

    OpenAIRE

    Karadağ, Demet; Doner, Egemen; Adapınar, Baki

    2011-01-01

    Although traumatic thyroid gland rupture or hemorrhage is usually seen in goitrous glands, injuries of the normal thyroid gland after neck trauma have rarely been described in the literature. We describe a 44-year-old man who presented with thyroid emphysema and subcutaneous emphysema (SCE) that occurred after penetrating neck trauma. CT images showed complete resolution of thyroid emphysema and subcutaneous emphysema at follow-up examination. Neck injuries can be life threatening. After pene...

  8. Fusobacterial head and neck infections in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brook, Itzhak

    2015-07-01

    Fusobacterium species are increasingly recognized as a cause of head and neck infections in children. These infections include acute and chronic otitis, sinusitis, mastoiditis, and tonsillitis; peritonsillar and retropharyngeal abscesses; Lemierre syndrome; post-anginal cervical lymphadenitis; and periodontitis. They can also be involved in brain abscess and bacteremia associated with head and neck infections. This review describes the clinical spectrum of head and neck fusobacterial infection in children and their management. PMID:25980688

  9. Subcutaneous fibrosis after whole neck irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To identify the risk factors for moderate to severe subcutaneous fibrosis after whole neck irradiation. Methods and Materials: We analyzed 233 cases of patients who had undergone whole neck irradiation with 4-MV X-ray or 8-10-MeV electrons, or both, and had been followed with regard to their skin condition for at least 1 year. The prescribed dose to the whole neck ranged from 19.2 to 72.4 Gy (median 50). The skin-absorbed dose was specified as that at a depth of 4.1 mm (d4.1-mmdepth), and a biologically equivalent dose (BED) of d4.1-mmdepth was also estimated (BED1.8 4.1-mmdepth). Results: Univariate analysis revealed that previous neck dissection, concurrent chemotherapy, corticosteroid administration as a part of chemotherapy, fractionation, and BED1.8 4.1-mmdepth were significant prognostic variables. Multivariate analysis showed that BED1.8 4.1-mmdepth and previous neck dissection were the only prognostic variables for moderate to severe subcutaneous fibrosis. Conclusion: A high dose to a 4.1-mm depth of the skin and a history of neck dissection were identified as the predominant risk factors for moderate to severe subcutaneous fibrosis after whole neck irradiation. A subcutaneous dose should be considered in radiotherapy treatment planning involving the whole neck, especially in cases in which patients have undergone previous neck dissection

  10. Informatique et formation : réflexion à partir d'HyperCard de Apple

    OpenAIRE

    Gautier, Gérard

    1988-01-01

    La sortie du nouveau logiciel Hypercard d'Apple pour ordinateur Macintosh est pour l'auteur l'occasion d'une réflexion sur les utilisations didactiques de l'informatique. L'auteur réintroduit certains éléments du débat qui a opposé, aux débuts de l'informatique pédagogique, les tenants de l'Enseignement assisté par ordinateur et ceux des logiciels ouverts comme le langage Logo, débat qui sous-tend celui de la psychologie de l'apprentissage. Les possibilités techniques des nouveaux outils, la ...

  11. flexions préparatoires pour l’articulation des savoirs

    OpenAIRE

    Vallejo-Gomez, Nelson

    2014-01-01

    Note portant sur l’auteur FOTOCRAPHIE N° 6 : DÉFILÉ À EL COTUY (RÉPUBLIQUE DOMINICAINE). POUR LES PAYS DE LA CARAÏBE, L’ÉDUCATION EST À LA FOIS UN DÉFI ET UNE PRIORITÉ QUI ENGAGE LA SOCIÉTÉ DANS SON ENSEMBLE (CLICHE : ALAIN MUSSET). Une vaste réflexion sur les savoirs à enseigner dans les lycées a été entreprise en France en 1998, à l’occasion d’une consultation nationale sur ce thème et d’un Conseil scientifique présidé par Edgar Morin. Ce Conseil, composé de personnalités éminentes, tint ...

  12. flexion autour de la dimension spatiale des processus normatifs

    OpenAIRE

    Banos, Vincent

    2013-01-01

    Cet article propose une réflexion sur le rôle de l’espace dans la redéfinition des modalités du vivre-ensemble entre les agriculteurs et les autres usagers d’un département rural soumis à une intense diversification sociale et fonctionnelle. Après avoir justifié pourquoi l’urbanité rurale ne saurait se résumer à une culture de territoires, on présente deux idéaux types (l’espace ouvert et le lieu) permettant d’évaluer l’inventivité normative des situations de coprésence entre agriculteurs et ...

  13. flexion sur l’origine du processus de segmentation du marche du travail

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Attia Nicole

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available (francuski Ce travail propose une réflexion sur l'origine du processus de segmentation du marché du travail par rapport à l'entreprise. Se situe-t-elle au sein même de l'entreprise ou en amont, c'est à dire entre les entreprises? Cela revient à se demander si on peut avoir une approche microéconomique ou macroéconomique de la segmentation et, à s'interroger sur le rôle réel tenu par les firmes dans le processus. Déterminant pour la théorie, ce rôle est à repenser selon la réponse apportée à notre question.

  14. Comportement en flexion des bétons fibrés sous chargement cyclique

    OpenAIRE

    Boulekbache Bensaid; Hamrat Mostefa; Chemrouk Mohamed; Amziane Sofiane

    2014-01-01

    Ce papier présente les résultats d’une étude expérimentale sur le comportement en flexion des bétons de fibres métalliques. On étudie l’effet de la rhéologie du béton sur l’orientation des fibres et l’influence de l’orientation sur les propriétés mécaniques. La rigidité de l’ancrage des fibres étudiée par les essais cycliques est liée aux caractéristiques rhéologiques et mécaniques de la matrice. Les résultats montrent que la fluidité des bétons est un paramètre essentiel de l’orientation des...

  15. Quasi-stiffness of the knee joint in flexion and extension during the golf swing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Ahnryul; Sim, Taeyong; Mun, Joung Hwan

    2015-01-01

    Biomechanical understanding of the knee joint during a golf swing is essential to improve performance and prevent injury. In this study, we quantified the flexion/extension angle and moment as the primary knee movement, and evaluated quasi-stiffness represented by moment-angle coupling in the knee joint. Eighteen skilled and 23 unskilled golfers participated in this study. Six infrared cameras and two force platforms were used to record a swing motion. The anatomical angle and moment were calculated from kinematic and kinetic models, and quasi-stiffness of the knee joint was determined as an instantaneous slope of moment-angle curves. The lead knee of the skilled group had decreased resistance duration compared with the unskilled group (P golf swing and developing rehabilitation strategies following surgery. PMID:25651162

  16. Bethlem myopathy: An autosomal dominant myopathy with flexion contractures, keloids, and follicular hyperkeratosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saroja, Aralikatte Onkarappa; Naik, Karkal Ravishankar; Nalini, Atcharayam; Gayathri, Narayanappa

    2013-10-01

    Bethlem myopathy and Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy form a spectrum of collagenopathies caused by genetic mutations encoding for any of the three subunits of collagen VI. Bethlem phenotype is relatively benign and is characterized by proximal dominant myopathy, keloids, contractures, distal hyperextensibility, and follicular hyperkeratosis. Three patients from a single family were diagnosed to have Bethlem myopathy based on European Neuromuscular Centre Bethlem Consortium criteria. Affected father and his both sons had slowly progressive proximal dominant weakness and recurrent falls from the first decade. Both children aged 18 and 20 years were ambulant at presentation. All had flexion contractures, keloids, and follicular hyperkeratosis without muscle hypertrophy. Creatinine kinase was mildly elevated and electromyography revealed myopathic features. Muscle imaging revealed severe involvement of glutei and vasti with "central shadow" in rectus femoris. Muscle biopsy in the father showed dystrophic changes with normal immmunostaining for collagen VI, sarcoglycans, and dysferlin. PMID:24339618

  17. A restrained-torque-based motion instructor: forearm flexion/extension-driving exoskeleton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, Takuya; Nomura, Yoshihiko; Sakamoto, Ryota

    2013-01-01

    When learning complicated movements by ourselves, we encounter such problems as a self-rightness. The self-rightness results in a lack of detail and objectivity, and it may cause to miss essences and even twist the essences. Thus, we sometimes fall into the habits of doing inappropriate motions. To solve these problems or to alleviate the problems as could as possible, we have been developed mechanical man-machine human interfaces to support us learning such motions as cultural gestures and sports form. One of the promising interfaces is a wearable exoskeleton mechanical system. As of the first try, we have made a prototype of a 2-link 1-DOF rotational elbow joint interface that is applied for teaching extension-flexion operations with forearms and have found its potential abilities for teaching the initiating and continuing flection motion of the elbow.

  18. Dynamic Finite Element Analysis of Mobile Bearing Type Knee Prosthesis under Deep Flexional Motion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Afzan Mohd Anuar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The primary objective of this study is to distinguish between mobile bearing and fixed bearing posterior stabilized knee prostheses in the mechanics performance using the finite element simulation. Quantifying the relative mechanics attributes and survivorship between the mobile bearing and the fixed bearing prosthesis remains in investigation among researchers. In the present study, 3-dimensional computational model of a clinically used mobile bearing PS type knee prosthesis was utilized to develop a finite element and dynamic simulation model. Combination of displacement and force driven knee motion was adapted to simulate a flexion motion from 0° to 135° with neutral, 10°, and 20° internal tibial rotation to represent deep knee bending. Introduction of the secondary moving articulation in the mobile bearing knee prosthesis has been found to maintain relatively low shear stress during deep knee motion with tibial rotation.

  19. Reduced neck-shoulder muscle strength and aerobic power together with increased pericranial tenderness are associated with tension-type headache in girls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tornoe, Birte; Andersen, Lars L; Skotte, Jørgen H; Jensen, Rigmor; Gard, Gunvor; Skov, Liselotte; Hallström, Inger

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Tension-type headaches (TTH) are common among children worldwide and mean a potential risk of disability and medication overuse headache. The associated mechanisms, however, remain unsolved. Our study investigated muscle strength in the neck-shoulder region, aerobic power and pericran...... educational programmes on enhanced physical exercising. Much more exact and detailed research in young girls and boys are needed....... pericranial tenderness in girls with TTH compared with healthy controls. METHODS: A blinded case-control study comprising 41 girls with TTH and 41 age-matched healthy controls. Standardised testing of isometric maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) and force steadiness of neck flexion and extension, as well as...... MVC and rate-of-force development of dominant shoulder, was conducted. VO2 max was recorded by a submaximal ergometer test and pericranial tenderness by standardised manual palpation. Logistic regression analyses were applied. RESULTS: Girls with TTH demonstrated significantly higher pericranial...

  20. Grip-force modulation in multi-finger prehension during wrist flexion and extension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambike, Satyajit S.; Paclet, Florent; Latash, Mark L.; Zatsiorsky, Vladimir M.

    2013-01-01

    Extrinsic digit muscles contribute to both fingertip forces and wrist movements (FDP and FPL – flexion, EDC - extension). Hence it is expected that finger forces depend on the wrist movement and position. We investigated the relation between grip force and wrist kinematics to examine whether and how the force: (1) scales with wrist flexion-extension (FE) angle; (2) can be predicted from accelerations induced during FE movement. In one experiment subjects naturally held an instrumented handle using a prismatic grasp and performed very slow FE movements. In another experiment, the same movement was performed cyclically at three prescribed frequencies. In quasistatic conditions, the grip force remained constant over the majority of the wrist range of motion. During the cyclic movements, the grip force changed. The changes were described with a linear regression model that represents the thumb and virtual finger (VF = four fingers combined) normal forces as the sum of the effects of the object’s tangential and radial accelerations and an object-weight-dependent constant term. The model explained 99% of the variability in the data. The independence of the grip force from wrist position agrees with the theory that that the thumb and VF forces are controlled with two neural variables that encode referent coordinates for each digit while accounting for changes in the position dependence of muscle forces, rather than a single neural variable like referent aperture. The results of the cyclical movement study extend the principle of superposition (some complex actions can be decomposed into independently controlled elemental actions) for a motor task involving simultaneous grip force exertion and wrist motion with significant length changes of the grip-force producing muscles. PMID:23625077

  1. The flexion synergy, mother of all synergies and father of new models of gait

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacques eDuysens

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Recently there has been a growing interest in the modular organization of leg movements, in particular those related to locomotion. One of the basic modules involves the flexion of the leg during swing and it was shown that this module is already present in neonates (Dominici, et al. 2011. In this paper, we question how these finding build upon the original work by Sherrington, who proposed that the flexor reflex is the basic building block of the flexion during swing phase. Similarly, the relation between the flexor reflex and the withdrawal reflex modules of Schouenborg et al. (1994 will be discussed. It will be argued that there is large overlap between these notions on modules and the older concepts of reflexes. In addition, it will be shown that there is a great flexibility in the expression of some of these modules during gait, thereby allowing for a phase-dependent modulation of the appropriate responses. In particular, the end of the stance phase is a period when the flexor synergy is facilitated. It is proposed that this is linked to the activation of circuitry that is responsible for the generation of locomotor patterns (CPG, central pattern generator. More specifically, it is suggested that the responses in that period relate to the activation of a flexor burst generator. The latter structure forms the core of a new asymmetric model of the CPG. This activation is controlled by afferent input (facilitation by a broad range of afferents, suppression by load afferent input. Meanwhile, many of these physiologic features have found their way in the control of very flexible walking bipedal robots.

  2. Head and Neck Radiation Treatment and Your Mouth

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Mouth Head and Neck Radiation Treatment and Your Mouth Main Content Are You Being Treated With Radiation ... How Does Head and Neck Radiation Affect the Mouth? Doctors use head and neck radiation to treat ...

  3. Power convergence of Abel averages

    OpenAIRE

    Kozitsky, Yuri; Shoikhet, David; Zemanek, Jaroslav

    2012-01-01

    Necessary and sufficient conditions are presented for the Abel averages of discrete and strongly continuous semigroups, $T^k$ and $T_t$, to be power convergent in the operator norm in a complex Banach space. These results cover also the case where $T$ is unbounded and the corresponding Abel average is defined by means of the resolvent of $T$. They complement the classical results by Michael Lin establishing sufficient conditions for the corresponding convergence for a bounded $T$.

  4. High-average-power lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The goals of the High-Average-Power Laser Program at LLNL are to develop a broad technology base for solid state lasers and to demonstrate high-average-power laser operation with more efficiency and higher beam quality than has been possible with current technology. Major activities are the zig-zag laser testbed and the gas-cooled-slab laser test bed. This section describes these activities as well as discussion of material development; nonlinear optics; laser materials, and applications

  5. Knee MRI study of normal cruciate ligaments comparing the flexion images with the extension images : preliminary study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As a baseline study for clinical application, we investigated MRI findings of normal cruciate ligaments in the knee being flexed as compared to those in the knee being extended. Seven asymptomatic volunteers were studied. Knee MRI was performed with a 1.5 Tesla unit using a dual 3 inch coil. In the decubitus position, sagittal scanning was performed with the knee in extension, and subsequently, in flexion. We observed the shape and signal intensity of both cruciate ligaments, and measered the angles between the long axis of the femur and ligaments, and the ligament dimensions in extension and flexion images. As flexion and extension images were compared, cruciate ligaments differed both in their apppearance and dimensions. With flexion, joint space was widened, PCL became straightened and the signal intensity of ACL became homogeneously low; both curciate ligaments became longer and thinner. These MRI findings were statistically signifacant except for thinning of PCL. MRI appearance and the dimensions of cruciate ligaments were different in the fiexed knee as compared to those in the extended knee

  6. Metal concentrations in hair of patients with various head and neck cancers as a diagnostic aid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wozniak, Anna; Napierala, Marta; Golasik, Magdalena; Herman, Małgorzata; Walas, Stanisław; Piekoszewski, Wojciech; Szyfter, Witold; Szyfter, Krzysztof; Golusinski, Wojciech; Baralkiewicz, Danuta; Florek, Ewa

    2016-02-01

    Head and neck cancers are one of the most frequent cancers worldwide. This paper attempts to evaluate disturbances of homeostasis of the necessary elements (calcium, magnesium, zinc, copper, iron, manganese) and changes in the levels of toxic metals (lead, cadmium, cobalt, chromium VI) in hair of patients with head and neck cancers, as well as people without a diagnosed neoplastic disease. In order to quantify the necessary elements and toxic metals, a method using ICP-MS and ICP-OES techniques had been developed and validated. The studies have shown that patients with head and neck cancer used to drink alcohol and smoked much more frequently than healthy individuals, both in the past and presently. Statistically significant differences in concentrations of average metal content in the group of patients with head and neck cancers compared to the control group were confirmed. Significant differences in metal content between the group of patients with head and neck cancers and healthy individuals were found which enabled distinguishing between the study groups. To this end, a more advanced statistical tool, i.e. chemometrics, was used. The conducted research analyses and the use of advanced statistical techniques confirm the benefits of using alternative material to distinguish the patients with head and neck cancers from the healthy individuals. PMID:26660304

  7. Robot-Assisted Free Flap in Head and Neck Reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han Gyeol Song

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Background  Robots have allowed head and neck surgeons to extirpate oropharyngealtumors safely without the need for lip-split incision or mandibulotomy. Using robots inoropharyngealreconstruction is newbut essentialfor oropharyngeal defectsthatresultfromrobotic tumor excision. We report our experience with robotic free-flap reconstruction ofhead and neck defectsto exemplify the necessity forrobotic reconstruction.Methods  We investigated head and neck cancer patients who underwent ablation surgeryand free-flap reconstruction by robot. Between July 1, 2011 andMarch 31, 2012, 5 caseswereperformed and patient demographics, location of tumor, pathologic stage, reconstructionmethods, flap size, recipient vessel, necessary pedicle length, and operation time wereinvestigated.Results  Among five free-flap reconstructions, four were radial forearm free flaps and onewas an anterolateral thigh free-flap. Four flaps used the superior thyroid artery and oneflap used a facial artery as the recipient vessel. The average pedicle length was 8.8 cm. Flapinsetting and microanastomosis were achieved using a specially manufactured roboticinstrument. The total operation timewas 1,041.0 minutes(range, 814 to 1,132 minutes, andcomplicationsincluding flap necrosis, hematoma, andwound dehiscence did not occur.Conclusions  Thisstudy demonstratesthe clinically applicable use ofrobotsin oropharyngealreconstruction, especially using a free flap. A robot can assist the operator in insettingthe flap at a deep portion of the oropharynx without the need to perform a traditionalmandibulotomy. Robot-assisted reconstruction may substitute for existing surgical methodsand is accepted asthemost up-to-datemethod.

  8. Treatment of the benign bone tumors including femoral neck lesion using compression hip screw and synthetic bone graft

    OpenAIRE

    Nakamura Tomoki; Matsumine Akihiko; Asanuma Kunihiro; Matsubara Takao; Sudo Akihiro

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The proximal femur is one of the most common locations for benign bone tumors and tumor like conditions. We describe the clinical outcomes of the surgical treatment of benign lesions of the proximal femur including femoral neck using compression hip screw and synthetic bone graft. Methods: Thirteen patients with benign bone tumors or tumor like conditions of the proximal femur including femoral neck were surgically treated. Their average age at the time of presentatio...

  9. A three-dimensional axis for the study of femoral neck orientation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonneau, Noémie; Libourel, Paul-Antoine; Simonis, Caroline; Puymerail, Laurent; Baylac, Michel; Tardieu, Christine; Gagey, Olivier

    2012-01-01

    A common problem in the quantification of the orientation of the femoral neck is the difficulty to determine its true axis; however, this axis is typically estimated visually only. Moreover, the orientation of the femoral neck is commonly analysed using angles that are dependent on anatomical planes of reference and only quantify the orientation in two dimensions. The purpose of this study is to establish a method to determine the three-dimensional orientation of the femoral neck using a three-dimensional model. An accurate determination of the femoral neck axis requires a reconsideration of the complex architecture of the proximal femur. The morphology of the femoral neck results from both the medial and arcuate trabecular systems, and the asymmetry of the cortical bone. Given these considerations, two alternative models, in addition to the cylindrical one frequently assumed, were tested. The surface geometry of the femoral neck was subsequently used to fit one cylinder, two cylinders and successive cross-sectional ellipses. The model based on successive ellipses provided a significantly smaller average deviation than the two other models (P < 0.001) and reduced the observer-induced measurement error. Comparisons with traditional measurements and analyses on a sample of 91 femora were also performed to assess the validity of the model based on successive ellipses. This study provides a semi-automatic and accurate method for the determination of the functional three-dimensional femoral neck orientation avoiding the use of a reference plane. This innovative method has important implications for future studies that aim to document and understand the change in the orientation of the femoral neck associated with the acquisition of a bipedal gait in humans. Moreover, the precise determination of the three-dimensional orientation has implications in current research involved in developing clinical applications in diagnosis, hip surgery and rehabilitation. PMID:22967192

  10. Radiology trainer. Head and neck. 2. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radiology training textbook is based on case studies of the clinical experience, including radiological imaging and differential diagnostic discussion. The scope of this volume is head - neck. The following issues are covered: tumor diseases, vascular diseases, infectious and inflammatory diseases and white matter diseases, congenital malformations, traumatic diseases, cranium and basis of the skull, eye socket, facial bones, neck, spinal canal.

  11. Nodal yield in selective neck dissection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norling, Rikke; Therkildsen, Marianne H; Bradley, Patrick J; Nielsen, Michael B; von Buchwald, Christian

    2013-01-01

    The total lymph node yield in neck dissection is highly variable and depends on anatomical, surgical and pathological parameters. A minimum yield of six lymph nodes for a selective neck dissection (SND) as recommended in guidelines lies in the lower range of the reported clinical nodal yields. A...

  12. Initial conformation of kinesin's neck linker

    CERN Document Server

    Geng, Yi-Zhao; Liu, Shu-Xia; Yan, Shiwei

    2013-01-01

    How ATP binding initiates the docking process of kinesin's neck linker is a key question in understanding kinesin mechanism. It is believed that the formation of an extra turn structure by the first three amino acids of neck linker (LYS325, THR326, ILE327 in 2KIN) is crucial for initiating the docking process. But the initial conformation of neck linker (specially the three amino acids of the extra turn) and the neck linker docking initiation mechanism remain unclear. By using molecular dynamics method, we investigate the initial conformation of kinesin's neck linker in the docking process. We find that, in the initial state of NL docking process, NL still has interactions with {\\beta}0 and forms a conformation similar to the "cover-neck bundle" structure proposed by Hwang et al. [Structure 2008, 16(1): 62-71]. From this initial structure, the docking of the "cover-neck bundle" structure can be achieved. The motor head provides a forward force on the initial cover-neck bundle structure through ATP-induced rot...

  13. Measuring neck collar loss of Pink-footed Geese Anser brachyrhynchus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Kevin Kuhlmann; Frederiksen, Morten; Madsen, Jesper

    2015-01-01

    The ability to estimate mark loss of ringed animals is important to assess demographic parameters from mark-recapture studies correctly. Based on 23 years of neck collar recovery data from the Svalbard breeding population of Pink-footed Geese, we estimate an overall average annual loss rate of 3...

  14. Vocal attractiveness increases by averaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruckert, Laetitia; Bestelmeyer, Patricia; Latinus, Marianne; Rouger, Julien; Charest, Ian; Rousselet, Guillaume A; Kawahara, Hideki; Belin, Pascal

    2010-01-26

    Vocal attractiveness has a profound influence on listeners-a bias known as the "what sounds beautiful is good" vocal attractiveness stereotype [1]-with tangible impact on a voice owner's success at mating, job applications, and/or elections. The prevailing view holds that attractive voices are those that signal desirable attributes in a potential mate [2-4]-e.g., lower pitch in male voices. However, this account does not explain our preferences in more general social contexts in which voices of both genders are evaluated. Here we show that averaging voices via auditory morphing [5] results in more attractive voices, irrespective of the speaker's or listener's gender. Moreover, we show that this phenomenon is largely explained by two independent by-products of averaging: a smoother voice texture (reduced aperiodicities) and a greater similarity in pitch and timbre with the average of all voices (reduced "distance to mean"). These results provide the first evidence for a phenomenon of vocal attractiveness increases by averaging, analogous to a well-established effect of facial averaging [6, 7]. They highlight prototype-based coding [8] as a central feature of voice perception, emphasizing the similarity in the mechanisms of face and voice perception. PMID:20129047

  15. MR spectrsocopy of head and neck cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdel Razek, Ahmed Abdel Khalek, E-mail: arazek@mans.edu.eg [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Mansoura Faculty of Medicine, Mansoura 13557 (Egypt); Poptani, Harish, E-mail: Harish.Poptani@uphs.upenn.edu [Department of Radiology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia (United States)

    2013-06-15

    The aim of this review is to discuss the technique and potential applications of magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) in head and neck cancer. We illustrate the technical issues related to data acquisition, post processing and interpretation of MRS of head and neck lesions. MRS has been used for differentiation of squamous cell carcinoma from normal tissue. The main potential clinical application of proton MRS ({sup 1}H-MRS) is monitoring patients with head and neck cancer undergoing therapy. Pretreatment prediction of response to therapy can be done with phosphorus MRS ({sup 31}P-MRS). Although performance of MRS of head and neck is challenging, technological advances in both software and hardware has the potential to impact on the clinical management of patients with head and neck cancer.

  16. MR spectrsocopy of head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this review is to discuss the technique and potential applications of magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) in head and neck cancer. We illustrate the technical issues related to data acquisition, post processing and interpretation of MRS of head and neck lesions. MRS has been used for differentiation of squamous cell carcinoma from normal tissue. The main potential clinical application of proton MRS (1H-MRS) is monitoring patients with head and neck cancer undergoing therapy. Pretreatment prediction of response to therapy can be done with phosphorus MRS (31P-MRS). Although performance of MRS of head and neck is challenging, technological advances in both software and hardware has the potential to impact on the clinical management of patients with head and neck cancer

  17. Public knowledge of head and neck cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Connor, T E

    2010-04-01

    Studies show 60% of patients with newly diagnosed Head & Neck Squamous Cell Cancer in Ireland, present with advanced disease. A poor level of knowledge and awareness among the public of Head & Neck Cancer, is an important consideration in the often delayed presentation for medical attention in many of these cases. Our study surveyed 200 members of the public to assess their knowledge and awareness of Head & Neck Cancer. One hundred and forty (70%) of respondents had never encountered the term "Head & Neck Cancer". One hundred and forty six (73%) failed to identify excessive alcohol consumption as a risk factor. Less than 100 (50%) would have concern about persisting hoarseness or a prolonged oral ulcer. An urgent need exists to raise awareness of Head & Neck Cancer among the public in Ireland.

  18. Sparsity Averaging for Compressive Imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Carrillo, Rafael E; Van De Ville, Dimitri; Thiran, Jean-Philippe; Wiaux, Yves

    2012-01-01

    We propose a novel regularization method for sparse image reconstruction from compressive measurements. The approach relies on the conjecture that natural images exhibit strong average sparsity over multiple coherent frames. The associated reconstruction algorithm, based on an analysis prior and a reweighted $\\ell_1$ scheme, is dubbed Sparsity Averaging Reweighted Analysis (SARA). We test our prior and the associated algorithm through extensive numerical simulations for spread spectrum and Gaussian acquisition schemes suggested by the recent theory of compressed sensing with coherent and redundant dictionaries. Our results show that average sparsity outperforms state-of-the-art priors that promote sparsity in a single orthonormal basis or redundant frame, or that promote gradient sparsity. We also illustrate the performance of SARA in the context of Fourier imaging, for particular applications in astronomy and medicine.

  19. On generalized averaged Gaussian formulas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spalevic, Miodrag M.

    2007-09-01

    We present a simple numerical method for constructing the optimal (generalized) averaged Gaussian quadrature formulas which are the optimal stratified extensions of Gauss quadrature formulas. These extensions exist in many cases in which real positive Kronrod formulas do not exist. For the Jacobi weight functions w(x)equiv w^{(alpha,beta)}(x)D(1-x)^alpha(1+x)^beta ( alpha,beta>-1 ) we give a necessary and sufficient condition on the parameters alpha and beta such that the optimal averaged Gaussian quadrature formulas are internal.

  20. On T-matrix averaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The T-matrix averaging procedure advocated by Burke, Berrington and Sukumar [1981, J. Phys. B. At. Mol. Phys. 14, 289] is demonstrated to hold in a class of soluble models for two different L2 basis expansions. The convergence rates as the bases are extended to completeness are determined. (author)

  1. Neck ligament strength is decreased following whiplash trauma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tominaga, Yasuhiro; Ndu, Anthony B; Coe, Marcus P; Valenson, Arnold J; Ivancic, Paul C; Ito, Shigeki; Rubin, Wolfgang; Panjabi, Manohar M

    2006-01-01

    Background Previous clinical studies have documented successful neck pain relief in whiplash patients using nerve block and radiofrequency ablation of facet joint afferents, including capsular ligament nerves. No previous study has documented injuries to the neck ligaments as determined by altered dynamic mechanical properties due to whiplash. The goal of the present study was to determine the dynamic mechanical properties of whiplash-exposed human cervical spine ligaments. Additionally, the present data were compared to previously reported control data. The ligaments included the anterior and posterior longitudinal, capsular, and interspinous and supraspinous ligaments, middle-third disc, and ligamentum flavum. Methods A total of 98 bone-ligament-bone specimens (C2–C3 to C7-T1) were prepared from six cervical spines following 3.5, 5, 6.5, and 8 g rear impacts and pre- and post-impact flexibility testing. The specimens were elongated to failure at a peak rate of 725 (SD 95) mm/s. Failure force, elongation, and energy absorbed, as well as stiffness were determined. The mechanical properties were statistically compared among ligaments, and to the control data (significance level: P < 0.05; trend: P < 0.1). The average physiological ligament elongation was determined using a mathematical model. Results For all whiplash-exposed ligaments, the average failure elongation exceeded the average physiological elongation. The highest average failure force of 204.6 N was observed in the ligamentum flavum, significantly greater than in middle-third disc and interspinous and supraspinous ligaments. The highest average failure elongation of 4.9 mm was observed in the interspinous and supraspinous ligaments, significantly greater than in the anterior longitudinal ligament, middle-third disc, and ligamentum flavum. The average energy absorbed ranged from 0.04 J by the middle-third disc to 0.44 J by the capsular ligament. The ligamentum flavum was the stiffest ligament, while the

  2. MALLASEZIA FOLLICULITIS ON THE NECK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brzeziński Piotr

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Folliculitis caused by Malassezia spp. classified as yeasts in our climate (Poland is fairly rare disease . MF is most commonly found on the chest, back, upper arms, and less frequently on the face. Permanent symptom is persistent itching. The favorable external conditions, which are largely due to high temperature and humidity, and endogenous factors, such as immunosuppression, there is a lipophilic yeast multiplication in the hair follicles. The aim of this article is presentation of the patient with Malassezia Folliculitis on the neck. Patient age 33 with 1- to 2-mm monomorphic papules and pustules on chest. Skin lesions accompanied by itching. In the treatment used topical: ketoconazole containing shampoo, 1% clindamycin cream, 0,5% hydrocortisonum cream, fluconazole 400 mg once p.o.

  3. Rupture of the neck in nuclear fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We introduce a degree of freedom to describe the rupture of the neck in nuclear fission and calculate the point at which the neck ruptures as the nucleus descends dynamically from its fission saddle point. This is done by mentally slicing the system into two portions at its minimum neck radius and calculating the force required to separate the two portions while keeping their shapes fixed. This force is obtained by differentiating with respect to separation the sum of the Coulomb and nuclear interaction energies between the two portions. For nuclei throughout the Periodic Table we calculate this force along dynamical paths leading from the fission saddle point. The force is initially attractive but becomes repulsive when the neck reaches a critical size. For actinide nuclei the neck radius at which rupture occurs is about 2 fm. This increases the calculated translational kinetic energy of the fission fragments at infinity relative to that calculated for scission occurring at zero neck radius. With the effect of neck rupture taken into account, we calculate and compare with experimental results fission-fragment kinetic energies for two types of nuclear dissipation: ordinary two-body viscosity and one-body dissipation

  4. Reliable four-point flexion test and model for die-to-wafer direct bonding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For many years, wafer-to-wafer (W2W) direct bonding has been very developed particularly in terms of bonding energy measurement and bonding mechanism comprehension. Nowadays, die-to-wafer (D2W) direct bonding has gained significant attention, for instance, in photonics and microelectro-mechanics, which supposes controlled and reliable fabrication processes. So, whatever the stuck materials may be, it is not obvious whether bonded D2W structures have the same bonding strength as bonded W2W ones, because of possible edge effects of dies. For that reason, it has been strongly required to develop a bonding energy measurement technique which is suitable for D2W structures. In this paper, both D2W- and W2W-type standard SiO2-to-SiO2 direct bonding samples are fabricated from the same full-wafer bonding. Modifications of the four-point flexion test (4PT) technique and applications for measuring D2W direct bonding energies are reported. Thus, the comparison between the modified 4PT and the double-cantilever beam techniques is drawn, also considering possible impacts of the conditions of measures such as the water stress corrosion at the debonding interface and the friction error at the loading contact points. Finally, reliability of a modified technique and a new model established for measuring D2W direct bonding energies is demonstrated

  5. Reliable four-point flexion test and model for die-to-wafer direct bonding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tabata, T., E-mail: toshiyuki.tabata@cea.fr; Sanchez, L.; Fournel, F.; Moriceau, H. [Univ. Grenoble Alpes, F-38000 Grenoble, France and CEA, LETI, MINATEC Campus, F-38054 Grenoble (France)

    2015-07-07

    For many years, wafer-to-wafer (W2W) direct bonding has been very developed particularly in terms of bonding energy measurement and bonding mechanism comprehension. Nowadays, die-to-wafer (D2W) direct bonding has gained significant attention, for instance, in photonics and microelectro-mechanics, which supposes controlled and reliable fabrication processes. So, whatever the stuck materials may be, it is not obvious whether bonded D2W structures have the same bonding strength as bonded W2W ones, because of possible edge effects of dies. For that reason, it has been strongly required to develop a bonding energy measurement technique which is suitable for D2W structures. In this paper, both D2W- and W2W-type standard SiO{sub 2}-to-SiO{sub 2} direct bonding samples are fabricated from the same full-wafer bonding. Modifications of the four-point flexion test (4PT) technique and applications for measuring D2W direct bonding energies are reported. Thus, the comparison between the modified 4PT and the double-cantilever beam techniques is drawn, also considering possible impacts of the conditions of measures such as the water stress corrosion at the debonding interface and the friction error at the loading contact points. Finally, reliability of a modified technique and a new model established for measuring D2W direct bonding energies is demonstrated.

  6. Systematic review of flexion/extension radiography of the cervical spine in trauma patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sierink, J.C., E-mail: j.c.sierink@amc.nl [Trauma Unit, Department of Surgery, Academic Medical Center, Meibergdreef 9, 1105 AZ Amsterdam (Netherlands); Lieshout, W.A.M. van, E-mail: w.a.vanlieshout@amc.nl [Trauma Unit, Department of Surgery, Academic Medical Center, Meibergdreef 9, 1105 AZ Amsterdam (Netherlands); Beenen, L.F.M., E-mail: l.f.beenen@amc.nl [Department of Radiology, Academic Medical Center, Meibergdreef 9, 1105 AZ Amsterdam (Netherlands); Schep, N.W.L., E-mail: n.w.schep@amc.nl [Trauma Unit, Department of Surgery, Academic Medical Center, Meibergdreef 9, 1105 AZ Amsterdam (Netherlands); Vandertop, W.P., E-mail: w.p.vandertop@amc.nl [Neurosurgical Center Amsterdam, Academic Medical Center, Meibergdreef 9, 1105 AZ Amsterdam (Netherlands); Goslings, J.C., E-mail: j.c.goslings@amc.nl [Trauma Unit, Department of Surgery, Academic Medical Center, Meibergdreef 9, 1105 AZ Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2013-06-15

    Introduction: The aim of this review was to investigate whether Flexion/Extension (F/E) radiography adds diagnostic value to CT or MRI in the detection of cervical spine ligamentous injury and/or clinically significant cervical spine instability of blunt trauma patients. Methods: A systematic search of literature was done in Pubmed, Embase and Cochrane Library databases. Primary outcome was sensitivity and specificity of F/E radiography. Secondary outcomes were the positive predicting value (PPV) and negative predicting value (NPV) (with CT or MRI as reference tests due to the heterogeneity of the included studies) of each modality and the quality of F/E radiography. Results: F/E radiography was overall regarded to be inferior to CT or MRI in the detection of ligamentous injury. This was reflected by the high specificity and NPV for CT with F/E as reference test (ranging from 97 to 100% and 99 to 100% respectively) and the ambiguous results for F/E radiography with MRI as its reference test (0–98% and 0–83% for specificity and NPV respectively). Image quality of F/E radiography was reported to have 31 to 70% adequacy, except in two studies which reported an adequacy of respectively 4 and 97%. Conclusion: This systematic review of the literature shows that F/E radiography adds little diagnostic value to the evaluation of blunt trauma patients compared to CT and MRI, especially in those cases where CT or MRI show no indication of ligamentous injury.

  7. Hybrid diffuse optical techniques for continuous hemodynamic measurement in gastrocnemius during plantar flexion exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Brad; Zhao, Mingjun; Shang, Yu; Uhl, Timothy; Thomas, D. Travis; Xenos, Eleftherios S.; Saha, Sibu P.; Yu, Guoqiang

    2015-12-01

    Occlusion calibrations and gating techniques have been recently applied by our laboratory for continuous and absolute diffuse optical measurements of forearm muscle hemodynamics during handgrip exercises. The translation of these techniques from the forearm to the lower limb is the goal of this study as various diseases preferentially affect muscles in the lower extremity. This study adapted a hybrid near-infrared spectroscopy and diffuse correlation spectroscopy system with a gating algorithm to continuously quantify hemodynamic responses of medial gastrocnemius during plantar flexion exercises in 10 healthy subjects. The outcomes from optical measurement include oxy-, deoxy-, and total hemoglobin concentrations, blood oxygen saturation, and relative changes in blood flow (rBF) and oxygen consumption rate (rV˙O2). We calibrated rBF and rV˙O2 profiles with absolute baseline values of BF and V˙O2 obtained by venous and arterial occlusions, respectively. Results from this investigation were comparable to values from similar studies. Additionally, significant correlation was observed between resting local muscle BF measured by the optical technique and whole limb BF measured concurrently by a strain gauge venous plethysmography. The extensive hemodynamic and metabolic profiles during exercise will allow for future comparison studies to investigate the diagnostic value of hybrid technologies in muscles affected by disease.

  8. Effects of lumbar stabilization exercises on the flexion-relaxation phenomenon of the erector spinae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, San-Seong; Choi, Bo-Ram

    2016-06-01

    [Purpose] This study evaluated the differences in the flexion-relaxation phenomenon (FRP) of the right and left erector spinae muscles in asymptomatic subjects and the effect of lumbar stabilization exercises on these differences. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-six participants (12 in the exercise group and 14 in the control group) with a difference in the FRP in the right and left erector spinae muscles were recruited from among healthy students attending Silla University. The exercise group performed two lumbar stabilization exercises (back bridge exercise and hand-knee exercise) for 4 weeks. The control group did not exercise. [Results] No significant group-by-exercise interaction was found. The right and left erector spinae muscles did show a difference in FRP between the control and exercise groups (119.2 ± 69.2 and 131.1 ± 85.2 ms, respectively). In addition, the exercise group showed a significant decrease in post-exercise (50.0 ± 27.0 ms) compared to pre-exercise (112.3 ± 41.5 ms) differences in the right and left FRP. [Conclusion] These results suggest that lumbar stabilization exercises may counter asymmetry of the FRP in the erector spinae muscles, possibly preventing low back pain in the general population. PMID:27390399

  9. MR imaging evaluation of the temporomandibular joint following cervical extension-flexion injury (whiplash)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To determine abnormalities of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) associated with cervical extension-flexion injury (whiplash) with use of MR imaging. Sixteen patients (32 joints) with TMJ syndrome-related symptoms after whiplash injuries from automobile accidents were evaluated by MR imaging. None of the patients had direct trauma to the jaw, mouth, or face. T1-weighted closed- and opened-mouth views were obtained in the sagittal plane, and closed-mouth views were obtained in the coronal plane. T2-weighted closed-mouth views obtained in the sagittal plane were also obtained to optimize identification of fluid/edema. Fourteen (87%) of 16 patients had one or more of the following TMJ abnormalities: 11 (34%) had anterior displacement of the disk with reduction and 2 (6%) had anterior displacement of the disk without reduction. On T2-weighted images, 17 TMJs (53%) had joint fluid and 5 (16%) had fluid localized to the capsule and/or pterygoid muscle. These data demonstrated a high incidence of TMJ abnormalities related to whiplash injury. The predominant finding was associated fluid/edema, suggesting that T2-weighted images are particularly useful for the evaluation of patients who present with whiplash injury

  10. Systematic review of flexion/extension radiography of the cervical spine in trauma patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction: The aim of this review was to investigate whether Flexion/Extension (F/E) radiography adds diagnostic value to CT or MRI in the detection of cervical spine ligamentous injury and/or clinically significant cervical spine instability of blunt trauma patients. Methods: A systematic search of literature was done in Pubmed, Embase and Cochrane Library databases. Primary outcome was sensitivity and specificity of F/E radiography. Secondary outcomes were the positive predicting value (PPV) and negative predicting value (NPV) (with CT or MRI as reference tests due to the heterogeneity of the included studies) of each modality and the quality of F/E radiography. Results: F/E radiography was overall regarded to be inferior to CT or MRI in the detection of ligamentous injury. This was reflected by the high specificity and NPV for CT with F/E as reference test (ranging from 97 to 100% and 99 to 100% respectively) and the ambiguous results for F/E radiography with MRI as its reference test (0–98% and 0–83% for specificity and NPV respectively). Image quality of F/E radiography was reported to have 31 to 70% adequacy, except in two studies which reported an adequacy of respectively 4 and 97%. Conclusion: This systematic review of the literature shows that F/E radiography adds little diagnostic value to the evaluation of blunt trauma patients compared to CT and MRI, especially in those cases where CT or MRI show no indication of ligamentous injury

  11. Analysis of right anterolateral impacts: the effect of trunk flexion on the cervical muscle whiplash response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narayan Yogesh

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The cervical muscles are considered a potential site of whiplash injury, and there is a need to understand the cervical muscle response under non-conventional whiplash impact scenarios, including variable body position and impact direction. There is no data, however, on the effect of occupant position on the muscle response to frontal impacts. Therefore, the objective of the study was to measure cervical muscle response to graded right anterolateral impacts. Methods Twenty volunteers were subjected to right anterolateral impacts of 4.3, 7.8, 10.6, and 12.8 m/s2 acceleration with their trunk flexed forward 45 degrees and laterally flexed right or left by 45 degrees. Bilateral EMG of the sternocleidomastoids, trapezii, and splenii capitis and acceleration of the sled, torso, and head were measured. Results and discussion With either direction of trunk flexion at impact, the trapezius EMGs increased with increasing acceleration (p Conclusion When the subject sits with trunk flexed out of neutral posture at the time of anterolateral impact, the cervical muscle response is dramatically reduced compared to frontal impacts with the trunk in neutral posture. In the absence of bodily impact, the flexed trunk posture appears to produce a biomechanical response that would decrease the likelihood of cervical muscle injury in low velocity impacts.

  12. Stochastic Approximation with Averaging Innovation

    CERN Document Server

    Laruelle, Sophie

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the paper is to establish a convergence theorem for multi-dimensional stochastic approximation in a setting with innovations satisfying some averaging properties and to study some applications. The averaging assumptions allow us to unify the framework where the innovations are generated (to solve problems from Numerical Probability) and the one with exogenous innovations (market data, output of "device" $e.g.$ an Euler scheme) with stationary or ergodic properties. We propose several fields of applications with random innovations or quasi-random numbers. In particular we provide in both setting a rule to tune the step of the algorithm. At last we illustrate our results on five examples notably in Finance.

  13. High average power supercontinuum sources

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    J C Travers

    2010-11-01

    The physical mechanisms and basic experimental techniques for the creation of high average spectral power supercontinuum sources is briefly reviewed. We focus on the use of high-power ytterbium-doped fibre lasers as pump sources, and the use of highly nonlinear photonic crystal fibres as the nonlinear medium. The most common experimental arrangements are described, including both continuous wave fibre laser systems with over 100 W pump power, and picosecond mode-locked, master oscillator power fibre amplifier systems, with over 10 kW peak pump power. These systems can produce broadband supercontinua with over 50 and 1 mW/nm average spectral power, respectively. Techniques for numerical modelling of the supercontinuum sources are presented and used to illustrate some supercontinuum dynamics. Some recent experimental results are presented.

  14. Management of patients with neck pain

    OpenAIRE

    E. A. Chechet; V. A. Parfenov

    2016-01-01

    Neck pain (cervicalgia) occupies one of the leading places among the reasons for outpatient visits, 75% of people have experienced neck pain at least once in their lives. In most cases, neck pain regresses; however, it recurs in almost one half of patients. The paper gives data on the risk factors, mechanisms, course, and prognosis of cervicalgia. It discusses the issues of differential diagnosis, examination, and approaches to treating this condition in these patients. Nonsteroidal anti-infl...

  15. MR of head and neck hemangiomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper defines the MR characteristics of head and neck hemangiomas and to evaluate the role of MR in their diagnosis and management. Eighteen pediatric and young adult patients with head and neck hemangiomas (six neck, six face, three eyelid, two scalp, and one parotid) underwent high-field-strength 1.5-T MR imaging. Conventional spin-echo sequences with T1 and T2 weighting were performed. In addition, one-third of patients underwent MR angiography and gadolinium enhancement. The hemangiomas were isointense to muscle on T1-weighted images and hyperintense on proton-density and T2-weighted images

  16. Effect of wearing tight pants on the trunk flexion and pelvic tilting angles in the stand-to-sit movement and a seated posture

    OpenAIRE

    Yoo, Won-gyu

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of wearing the tight pants on the trunk flexion and pelvic tilting angles in the stand-to-sit movement and a seated posture. [Subjects] Nine male subjects were recruited. [Methods] The trunk flexion angle and pelvic posterior tilting angle were measured using a motion-capture system during the stand-to-sit movement and in a seated posture. [Results] The trunk flexion and the posterior pelvic tilting angles during the stand-to-sit ...

  17. Neck ligament strength is decreased following whiplash trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rubin Wolfgang

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous clinical studies have documented successful neck pain relief in whiplash patients using nerve block and radiofrequency ablation of facet joint afferents, including capsular ligament nerves. No previous study has documented injuries to the neck ligaments as determined by altered dynamic mechanical properties due to whiplash. The goal of the present study was to determine the dynamic mechanical properties of whiplash-exposed human cervical spine ligaments. Additionally, the present data were compared to previously reported control data. The ligaments included the anterior and posterior longitudinal, capsular, and interspinous and supraspinous ligaments, middle-third disc, and ligamentum flavum. Methods A total of 98 bone-ligament-bone specimens (C2–C3 to C7-T1 were prepared from six cervical spines following 3.5, 5, 6.5, and 8 g rear impacts and pre- and post-impact flexibility testing. The specimens were elongated to failure at a peak rate of 725 (SD 95 mm/s. Failure force, elongation, and energy absorbed, as well as stiffness were determined. The mechanical properties were statistically compared among ligaments, and to the control data (significance level: P Results For all whiplash-exposed ligaments, the average failure elongation exceeded the average physiological elongation. The highest average failure force of 204.6 N was observed in the ligamentum flavum, significantly greater than in middle-third disc and interspinous and supraspinous ligaments. The highest average failure elongation of 4.9 mm was observed in the interspinous and supraspinous ligaments, significantly greater than in the anterior longitudinal ligament, middle-third disc, and ligamentum flavum. The average energy absorbed ranged from 0.04 J by the middle-third disc to 0.44 J by the capsular ligament. The ligamentum flavum was the stiffest ligament, while the interspinous and supraspinous ligaments were most flexible. The whiplash

  18. Software for determining lower extremity muscle-tendon kinematics and moment arm lengths during flexion/extension movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, D

    1992-01-01

    A computer program was developed to calculate lower extremity muscle-tendon (MT) kinematics and flexion/extension moment arm (MA) lengths for any subject performing movements constrained to occur in the sagittal plane. The program requires as input subject anthropometric and time series ankle, knee, and hip angle data. Using these data a lower extremity link-segment model is constructed for each time element. Muscle-tendon attachment data and a straight line muscle model are used to calculate MT and flexion/extension moment arm lengths. A finite difference technique is used to determine MT shortening velocity. The utility of this program is demonstrated by calculating MT kinematics and MA lengths for six muscles of a single subject both as a function of joint angles and during gait. PMID:1572164

  19. Trois réflexions sur les ambiguïtés du personnage tragique Aristote-Racine-Strehler

    OpenAIRE

    Cavaillé, Fabien

    2015-01-01

    À partir d’une analyse des rapports contradictoires entre les différents éléments qui la composent, l’article propose une réflexion théorique sur la notion de « personnage tragique », afin de mettre en évidence le fondement problématique, paradoxal, du statut de ce dernier. Défini comme une « mystérieuse identité », le personnage tragique est ici envisagé par le biais de la comparaison entre trois réflexions majeures sur ce sujet : celle d’un philosophe – Aristote –, celle d’un dramaturge – R...

  20. Position of arm and forearm, and elbow flexion during performance of the sculling technique: Technical recommendation versus actual performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lara Elena Gomes

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Sculling motion is a swimming technique executed in a vertical position with the head above the water's surface and, based on the technical recommendation, should be performed maintaining an elbow flexion angle of 90°, arms kept stationary while the forearms move. In order to verify if this recommendation is indeed realistic, the aim of this study was to describe the elbow flexion angle ant its angular velocity, linear speed and range of motion of the shoulder, elbow and wrist during the sculling motion. Data were calculated using three-dimensional kinematic process from underwater video images of ten athletes of synchronized swimming. The results indicate that the arm is relatively stationary and the forearm moves, which agrees with the technical recommendation. However, the elbow flexes and extends, which contradicts the technical recommendation. These findings should be considered when this action is practiced, especially in synchronized swimming, in which sculling motion is a fundamental technique.

  1. A Multibody Knee Model Corroborates Subject-Specific Experimental Measurements of Low Ligament Forces and Kinematic Coupling During Passive Flexion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kia, Mohammad; Schafer, Kevin; Lipman, Joseph; Cross, Michael; Mayman, David; Pearle, Andrew; Wickiewicz, Thomas; Imhauser, Carl

    2016-05-01

    A multibody model of the knee was developed and the predicted ligament forces and kinematics during passive flexion corroborated subject-specific measurements obtained from a human cadaveric knee that was tested using a robotic manipulator. The model incorporated a novel strategy to estimate the slack length of ligament fibers based on experimentally measured ligament forces at full extension and included multifiber representations for the cruciates. The model captured experimentally measured ligament forces (≤ 5.7 N root mean square (RMS) difference), coupled internal rotation (≤ 1.6 deg RMS difference), and coupled anterior translation (≤ 0.4 mm RMS difference) through 130 deg of passive flexion. This integrated framework of model and experiment improves our understanding of how passive structures, such as ligaments and articular geometries, interact to generate knee kinematics and ligament forces. PMID:26926010

  2. Assessing the Level of Disability, Deep Cervical Flexor Endurance and Fear Avoidance Beliefs in Bankers with Neck Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deptee Warikoo

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess the level of disability, the deep cervical flexor endurance and fear avoidance beliefs (FAB in bankers with neck pain and to find a correlation between disability and deep cervical muscle endurance, FAB and disability, FAB and deep flexor muscle endurance. Methods: It ws an observational study. The Subjects who had neck pain and minimum 5 years’ experience as a Banker participated in the study. Total 100 subjects were selected. All the subjects were assessed for their disability by the neck pain and disability score (NPDI, their deep cervical flexor endurance using Pressure Biofeedback using Cranio-Cervical flexion test (CCFT and Fear Avoidance Belief by using questionnaire( FABQ. Results: It was found that bankers have a moderate level of disability. The results showed an elevated fear avoidance belief with a mean value of FABQ-PA 21.61±4.42 and FABQ-W 37.81± 5.69. The results indicated that a negative correlation was found between NPDI and CCFT (r=0.855. A positive correlation was found between NPDI and FABQ-PA(r=0.337, FABQ-W(r=0.500. In the present study a negative correlation was found between CCFT and FABQ-W(r=0.553, FABQ-PA (0.348 and positive correlation (r=0.540 was found between FABQ-PA and FABQ-W. Conclusion: The present study concluded that there was a significant level of disability and significantly decreased endurance level and increased fear avoidance beliefs (both work and physical activity related among bankers with neck pain. In addition to that there was a significant correlation found between NPDI and CCFT, NPDI and FABQ, CCFT and FABQ, FABQ-W and FABQ-PA.

  3. Can neck exercises enhance the activation of the semispinalis cervicis relative to the splenius capitis at specific spinal levels?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schomacher, Jochen; Erlenwein, Joachim; Dieterich, Angela; Petzke, Frank; Falla, Deborah

    2015-10-01

    The deep cervical extensor, semispinalis cervicis, displays changes in behaviour and structure in people with chronic neck pain yet there is limited knowledge on how activation of this muscle can be emphasized during training. Using intramuscular electromyography (EMG), this study investigated the activity of the deep semispinalis cervicis and the superficial splenius capitis muscle at two spinal levels (C2 and C5) in ten healthy volunteers during a series of neck exercises: 1. Traction and compression, 2. Resistance applied in either flexion or extension at the occiput, at the level of the vertebral arch of C1 and of C4, and 3. Maintaining the neck in neutral while inclined on the elbows, with and without resistance at C4. The ratio between semispinalis cervicis and the splenius capitis EMG amplitude was quantified as an indication of whether the exercise could emphasize the activation of the semispinalis cervicis muscle relative to the splenius capitis. Manual resistance applied in extension over the vertebral arch emphasized the activation of the semispinalis cervicis relative to the splenius capitis at the spinal level directly caudal to the site of resistance (ratio: 2.0 ± 1.1 measured at C5 with resistance at C4 and 2.1 ± 1.2 measured at C2 with resistance at C1). This study confirmed the possibility of emphasizing the activation of the semispinalis cervicis relative to the splenius capitis which may be relevant for targeted exercise interventions for this deep extensor muscle. Further studies are required to investigate the clinical efficacy of these exercises for people with neck pain. PMID:25935795

  4. A conservation approach to pharyngeal carcinoma with advanced neck disease: optimizing neck management

    OpenAIRE

    Allal, Abdelkarim Said; Dulguerov, Pavel; Bieri, Sabine; Lehmann, Willy; Kurtz, John

    1999-01-01

    Surgical management of advanced neck disease remains controversial when a conservative approach based on radiotherapy is retained for primary tumors. The objective of this study was to evaluate retrospectively treatment results in pharyngeal cancers presenting with N2-N3 neck disease, using neck dissection followed by radical locoregional radiotherapy (RT) and to compare these results with those obtained in patients treated by radical RT alone.

  5. The treatment of metastasis to the femoral neck using percutaneous hollow perforated screws with cement augmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, H G; Roh, Y W; Kim, H S

    2009-08-01

    We have developed a hollow perforated cannulated screw. One or more of these was implanted percutaneously in 11 patients with an osteolytic metastasis in the femoral neck and multiple metastases elsewhere. They were supplemented by one or two additional standard 6.5 mm cannulated screws in nine patients. Polymethylmethacrylate bone cement was injected through the screw into the neck of the femur using small syringes, as in vertebroplasty. The mean amount of cement injected was 23.2 ml (17 to 30). Radiotherapy was started on the fourth post-operative day and chemotherapy, on average, was resumed a day later. Good structural stability and satisfactory relief from pain were achieved in all the patients. This technique may be useful in the palliation of metastases in the femoral neck. PMID:19651838

  6. Effect of the Intrinsic Foot Muscle Exercise Combined with Interphalangeal Flexion Exercise on Metatarsalgia with Morton’s Toe

    OpenAIRE

    Yoo, Won-gyu

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] This study examined the effects of the intrinsic foot muscle exercise combined with interphalangeal flexion exercise on metatarsalgia with Morton’s toe. [Subject] A 38-year-old male with Morton’s toe, who complained of pain in his left metatarsophalangeal joints was the subject. [Methods] The pressure pain threshold, peak contact pressure of the metatarsophalangeal region during gait, and the navicular drop were measured before and after the intrinsic foot muscles exercises combined...

  7. Subject-Specific Inverse Dynamics of the Head and Cervical Spine During in Vivo Dynamic Flexion-Extension

    OpenAIRE

    Anderst, William J.; Donaldson, William F; Lee, Joon Y; Kang, James D.

    2013-01-01

    The effects of degeneration and surgery on cervical spine mechanics are commonly evaluated through in vitro testing and finite element models derived from these tests. The objectives of the current study were to estimate the load applied to the C2 vertebra during in vivo functional flexion-extension and to evaluate the effects of anterior cervical arthrodesis on spine kinetics. Spine and head kinematics from 16 subjects (six arthrodesis patients and ten asymptomatic controls) were determined ...

  8. Radiological Assessment of the Sacrofemoral Angle: A Novel Method to Measure the Range of Hip Joint Flexion

    OpenAIRE

    Xian-Zhao Wei; Xi-Ming Xu; Fei Wang; Ming Li; Zi-Min Wang

    2015-01-01

    Background: A quantitative and accurate measurement of the range of hip joint flexion (RHF) is necessarily required in the evaluation of disordered or artificial hip joint function. This study aimed to assess a novel method to measure RHF more accurately and objectively. Methods: Lateral radiographs were taken of 31 supine men with hip joints extended or flexed. Relevant angles were measured directly from the radiographs. The change in the sacrofemoral angle (SFA) (the angle formed between th...

  9. Radiological Assessment of the Sacrofemoral Angle: A Novel Method to Measure the Range of Hip Joint Flexion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xian-Zhao Wei; Xi-Ming Xu; Fei Wang; Ming Li; Zi-Min Wang

    2015-01-01

    Background:A quantitative and accurate measurement of the range of hip joint flexion (RHF) is necessarily required in the evaluation of disordered or artificial hip joint function.This study aimed to assess a novel method to measure RHF more accurately and objectively.Methods:Lateral radiographs were taken of 31 supine men with hip joints extended or flexed.Relevant angles were measured directly from the radiographs.The change in the sacrofemoral angle (SFA) (the angle formed between the axis of the femur and the line tangent to the upper endplate of S1) from hip joint extension to hip joint flexion,was proposed as the RHF.The validity of this method was assessed via concomitant measurements of changes in the femur-horizontal angle (between the axis of the femur and the horizontal line) and the sacrum-horizontal angle (SHA) (between the line tangent to the upper endplate of S l and the horizontal line),the difference of which should equal the change in the SFA.Results:The mean change in the SFA was 112.5 ± 7.4°,and was independent of participant age,height,weight,or body mass index.The mean changes in the femur-horizontal and SHAs were 123.0 ± 6.4° and 11.4 ±-3.0°,respectively.This confirmed that the change of SFA between hip joint extension and hip joint flexion was equal to the difference between the changes in the femur-horizontal and SHAs.Conclusions:Using the SFA,to evaluate RHF could prevent compromised measurements due to the movements of pelvis and lumbar spine during hip flexion,and is,therefore,a more accurate and objective method with reasonable reliability and validity.

  10. Change in lumbar lordosis during prone lying knee flexion test in subjects with and without low back pain

    OpenAIRE

    Arab, Amir M.; Talimkhani, Ailin; Karimi, Noureddin; Ehsani, Fetemeh

    2015-01-01

    Background Prone lying knee flexion (PLKF) is one of the clinical tests used for assessment of the lumbo-pelvic movement pattern. Considerable increase in lumbar lordosis during this test has been considered as impairment of movement patterns in lumbar-pelvic region. However, no study has directly evaluated the change in lordosis during active PLKF test in subjects with low back pain (LBP). The purpose of this study was to investigate the change of lumbar lordosis in PLKF test in subjects wit...

  11. Amount of health care and self-care following a randomized clinical trial comparing flexion-distraction with exercise program for chronic low back pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keenum Michael

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous clinical trials have assessed the percentage of participants who utilized further health care after a period of conservative care for low back pain, however no chiropractic clinical trial has determined the total amount of care during this time and any differences based on assigned treatment group. The objective of this clinical trial follow-up was to assess if there was a difference in the total number of office visits for low back pain over one year after a four week clinical trial of either a form of physical therapy (Exercise Program or a form of chiropractic care (Flexion Distraction for chronic low back pain. Methods In this randomized clinical trial follow up study, 195 participants were followed for one year after a four-week period of either a form of chiropractic care (FD or a form of physical therapy (EP. Weekly structured telephone interview questions regarded visitation of various health care practitioners and the practice of self-care for low back pain. Results Participants in the physical therapy group demonstrated on average significantly more visits to any health care provider and to a general practitioner during the year after trial care (p Conclusion During a one-year follow-up, participants previously randomized to physical therapy attended significantly more health care visits than those participants who received chiropractic care.

  12. A correlation between femoral neck shaft angle to femoral neck length

    OpenAIRE

    gujar, subhash moolchand; Vikani, Sanjay; Parmar, Jigna; Bondre, K V

    2013-01-01

    Knowledge of the anatomy of proximal end of femur is a prerequisite for a complete understanding of the mechanics of the hip joint and serves as a basis for the treatment of pathological condition of the hip and femur. A total of 250 adult femora were used to  measure femoral neck shaft angle, femoral neck length & femoral total length at S.B.K.S Medical institute, Vadodara. The neck shaft angle range from 116o to 150o with means of 136.3o & no significant side difference. The neck le...

  13. Head and neck cancer imaging. 2. ed.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hermans, Robert (ed.) [University Hospital Leuven (Belgium). Dept. of Radiology

    2008-07-01

    This book provides a comprehensive review of state-of-the-art imaging in head and neck cancer. Precise determination of tumor extent is of the utmost importance in these neoplasms, as it has important consequences for staging of disease, prediction of outcome and choice of treatment. Only the radiologist can fully appreciate submucosal, perineural, and perivascular tumor spread and detect metastatic disease at an early stage. Imaging is also of considerable benefit for patient surveillance after treatment. All imaging modalities currently used in the management of head and neck neoplasms are considered in depth, and in addition newer techniques such as PET-CT and diffusion-weighted MRI are discussed. This book will help the reader to recommend, execute and report head and neck imaging studies at a high level of sophistication and thereby to become a respected member of the team managing head and neck cancer. (orig.)

  14. FIBROMATOSIS COLLI: A RARE NECK DISORDER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkatram Reddy

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Fibromatosis colli or pseudotumor of infancy of the sternocleidomastoid muscle is a rare benign cause of neck swelling or mass in neonate and infants . Optimal time of presentation is 1 st few weeks of life . Though the exact etiology is not known , it is most likely due to birth trauma or malposition in uterus . It is one of the causes of congenital torticollis and usually recognized by mother as neck swelling with or without restricted neck movement . Ultrasonography of neck is the imaging modality of choice an d sometimes MRI scan may be required to further characterize the disease and extent of involvement . Real time ultrasonography demonstrates synchronous motion of the mass with the sternocleidomastoid muscle , thus confirming the diagnosis .

  15. Isolated Enteric Cyst in the Neck

    OpenAIRE

    Amit Mahore; Raghvendra Ramdasi; Palak Popat; Shilpa Sankhe; Vishakha Tikeykar

    2014-01-01

    We report an extremely rare case of isolated enteric cyst in the neck region which was diagnosed on the histopathological examination. It was suspected to be duplication cyst on radiology. We have also evaluated the differential diagnosis and management issues.

  16. Drugs Approved for Head and Neck Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for head and neck cancer. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI’s Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  17. A customized head and neck support system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To describe a customized head and neck immobilization system for patients receiving radiotherapy including a head support that conforms to the posterior contour of the head and neck. Methods: The system includes a customized headrest to support the posterior head and neck. This is fixed to a thermoplastic face mask that molds to the anterior head/face contours. The shape of these customized head and neck supports were compared to 'standard' supports. Results: This system is comfortable for the patients and appears to be effective in reproducing the setup of the treatment. Conclusions: The variability in the size and shape of the customized posterior supports exceeded that of 'standard' headrests. It is our clinical impression that the customized supports improve reproducibility and are now a standard part of our immobilization system. The quantitative analysis of the customized headrests and some commonly used 'standard' headrests suggests that the customized supports are better able to address variabilities in patient shape

  18. Michel Parameters averages and interpretation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The new measurements of Michel parameters in τ decays are combined to world averages. From these measurements model independent limits on non-standard model couplings are derived and interpretations in the framework of specific models are given. A lower limit of 2.5 tan β GeV on the mass of a charged Higgs boson in models with two Higgs doublets can be set and a 229 GeV limit on a right-handed W-boson in left-right symmetric models (95 % c.l.)

  19. Flexion bonding transfer of multilayered graphene as a top electrode in transparent organic light-emitting diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tae Lim, Jong; Lee, Hyunkoo; Cho, Hyunsu; Kwon, Byoung-Hwa; Sung Cho, Nam; Kuk Lee, Bong; Park, Jonghyurk; Kim, Jaesu; Han, Jun-Han; Yang, Jong-Heon; Yu, Byoung-Gon; Hwang, Chi-Sun; Chu Lim, Seong; Lee, Jeong-Ik

    2015-12-01

    Graphene has attracted considerable attention as a next-generation transparent conducting electrode, because of its high electrical conductivity and optical transparency. Various optoelectronic devices comprising graphene as a bottom electrode, such as organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs), organic photovoltaics, quantum-dot LEDs, and light-emitting electrochemical cells, have recently been reported. However, performance of optoelectronic devices using graphene as top electrodes is limited, because the lamination process through which graphene is positioned as the top layer of these conventional OLEDs is a lack of control in the surface roughness, the gapless contact, and the flexion bonding between graphene and organic layer of the device. Here, a multilayered graphene (MLG) as a top electrode is successfully implanted, via dry bonding, onto the top organic layer of transparent OLED (TOLED) with flexion patterns. The performance of the TOLED with MLG electrode is comparable to that of a conventional TOLED with a semi-transparent thin-Ag top electrode, because the MLG electrode makes a contact with the TOLED with no residue. In addition, we successfully fabricate a large-size transparent segment panel using the developed MLG electrode. Therefore, we believe that the flexion bonding technology presented in this work is applicable to various optoelectronic devices.

  20. Infrapatellar plica of the knee: Revisited with MR arthrographies undertaken in the knee flexion position mimicking operative arthroscopic posture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To describe the appearance of the infrapatellar plica (IPP) on magnetic resonance arthrography (MRA) taken in 70° knee flexion, corresponding to the arthroscopic posture. Materials and methods: Twenty-two patients (23 knee joints) who underwent MRA with 70° knee flexion were enrolled. All patients underwent MRA with 70° knee flexion to simulate operative arthroscopy. The images included fat-suppressed T1-weighted spin echo axial, sagittal, and coronal images. The visualization and morphology of the IPP were retrospectively assessed by two musculoskeletal radiologists. Results: The IPP was demonstrated in 78.3% (n = 18/23) and was best visualized on the sagittal section through the intercondylar notch. The IPP manifested as a linear hypointense structure with variable thicknesses. The intercondylar component was delineated clearly, arising from the anterior intercondylar notch in parallel with the ACL and curving gently downward to attach to the infrapatellar fat pad. On the other hand, the Hoffa's fat pad component was not depicted clearly. The morphology of the IPP was either a separate type (60.9%) or a split type (17.4%). Conclusion: The IPPs can be visualized with a high rate of detection and various morphologic appearances must be appreciated under the review of a flexed knee MRA

  1. Head and Neck Cancer Stem Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Krishnamurthy, S.; Nör, J.E.

    2012-01-01

    Most cancers contain a small sub-population of cells that are endowed with self-renewal, multipotency, and a unique potential for tumor initiation. These properties are considered hallmarks of cancer stem cells. Here, we provide an overview of the field of cancer stem cells with a focus on head and neck cancers. Cancer stem cells are located in the invasive fronts of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC) close to blood vessels (perivascular niche). Endothelial cell-initiated signalin...

  2. Civilian firearm injuries in head and neck

    OpenAIRE

    Sonkhya, Nishi; Singhal, Pawan; Srivastava, Subodh P.

    2005-01-01

    Firearm injuries to the head and neck contribute to substantial medical, medicolegal, economic as well as social problems. Internal wounds in the head and neck by firearms are usually complicated and are diagnostically and therapeutically challenging cases. Based on four cases of non-fatal firearm injuries, we discuss problems related to firearm wounds, their irregular path, final lodgment of the bullet and their diagnostic and therapeutic consequences. In the present study it was observed th...

  3. Multidisciplinary Treatment of Head and Neck Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Varkey, Prashanth; Liu, Yi-Tien; Tan, Ngian Chye

    2010-01-01

    Head and neck cancer remains a significant cause of morbidity worldwide. Multimodality treatment is often the only way to achieve improved function, quality of life, and survival, calling for a multidisciplinary team approach, particularly in view of the rapid advances being made in various fields. The roles of the head and neck surgeon and reconstructive surgeon are discussed, together with the input afforded by specialists in areas such as diagnostic imaging, radiation therapy, medical onco...

  4. Rational radical neck dissection for oral cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李龙江; 温玉明; 王昌美; 王莉娟

    2003-01-01

    Lymphatic metastasis is the most commonly seen route for the spread of malignant epithelial tumors. Oral cancers derived from epithelial tissue occur more often in the head and neck regions with a high lymphatic metastasis rate. According to reports from Chinese researchers, the lymphatic metastasis rate of oral cancer could be as high as 40%, and clearing those involved lymph nodes in neck is one of the most important methods to treat the disease.

  5. Modular titanium alloy neck adapter failures in hip replacement - failure mode analysis and influence of implant material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bloemer Wilhelm

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Modular neck adapters for hip arthroplasty stems allow the surgeon to modify CCD angle, offset and femoral anteversion intraoperatively. Fretting or crevice corrosion may lead to failure of such a modular device due to high loads or surface contamination inside the modular coupling. Unfortunately we have experienced such a failure of implants and now report our clinical experience with the failures in order to advance orthopaedic material research and joint replacement surgery. The failed neck adapters were implanted between August 2004 and November 2006 a total of about 5000 devices. After this period, the titanium neck adapters were replaced by adapters out of cobalt-chromium. Until the end of 2008 in total 1.4% (n = 68 of the implanted titanium alloy neck adapters failed with an average time of 2.0 years (0.7 to 4.0 years postoperatively. All, but one, patients were male, their average age being 57.4 years (36 to 75 years and the average weight 102.3 kg (75 to 130 kg. The failures of neck adapters were divided into 66% with small CCD of 130° and 60% with head lengths of L or larger. Assuming an average time to failure of 2.8 years, the cumulative failure rate was calculated with 2.4%. Methods A series of adapter failures of titanium alloy modular neck adapters in combination with a titanium alloy modular short hip stem was investigated. For patients having received this particular implant combination risk factors were identified which were associated with the occurence of implant failure. A Kaplan-Meier survival-failure-analysis was conducted. The retrieved implants were analysed using microscopic and chemical methods. Modes of failure were simulated in biomechanical tests. Comparative tests included modular neck adapters made of titanium alloy and cobalt chrome alloy material. Results Retrieval examinations and biomechanical simulation revealed that primary micromotions initiated fretting within the modular tapered neck

  6. Bilateral femoral neck fractures following pelvic irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Over 300 cases of femoral neck fractures following radiotherapy for intrapelvic malignant tumor have been reported in various countries since Baensch reported this disease in 1927. In Japan, 40 cases or so have been reported, and cases of bilateral femoral neck fractures have not reached to ten cases. The authors experienced a case of 75 year-old female who received radiotherapy for cancer of the uterus, and suffered from right femoral neck fracture 3 months after and left femoral neck fracture one year and half after. As clinical symptoms, she had not previous history of trauma in bilateral femurs, but she complained of a pain in a hip joint and of gait disturbance. The pain in left femoral neck continued for about one month before fracture was recognized with roentgenogram. As histopathological findings, increase of fat marrow, decrease of bone trabeculae, and its marked degeneration were recognized. Proliferation of some blood vessels was found out, but thickness of the internal membrane and thrombogenesis were not recognized. Treatment should be performed according to degree of displacement of fractures. In this case, artificial joint replacement surgery was performed to the side of fracture of this time, because this case was bilateral femoral neck fractures and the patient had received artificial head replacement surgery in the other side of fracture formerly. (Tsunoda, M.)

  7. Variability in Flexion Extension Radiographs of the Lumbar Spine: A Comparison of Uncontrolled and Controlled Bending

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Boyle; Castellvi, Anthony E.; Davis, Reginald J.; Lee, David C.; Lorio, Morgan P.; Prostko, Richard E.

    2016-01-01

    Background While low back pain is one of the most prevalent, if not the most prevalent reasons for visits to physicians, a majority of patients with low back pain cannot be given a definitive diagnosis. While there have been substantial advances in imaging technologies over the past 30 years, relatively little has changed in the methodologies for evaluating functionality of the lumbar spine. The current standard of care for function assessment of the lumbar spine focuses on uncontrolled patient directed motion which results in increased inter-patient variability. Recent advancements in functional lumbar spine testing utilize controlled bending and computerized imaging evaluation. Purpose To compare the measurement variability of lumbar spine motion when diagnosed using measurements of intervertebral motion taken from standard bending flexion/extension radiographs (FE) between uncontrolled and controlled motion. Study Design One-hundred nine patients (57 asymptomatic, 52 symptomatic) were consented in the prospective investigation. The research was designed to compare studies involving FE to controlled motion bending radiographs using the Vertebral Motion Analysis (VMA), (Ortho Kinematics, Inc) within the same patient. Each patient agreed to undergo fluoroscopic still imaging to capture FE data and to undergo cine fluoroscopic imaging to capture VMA data. Outcome Measures Measurement variability was determined by the mean and standard deviation of intervertebral rotation when evaluated by 5 independent observers evaluating each of the 109 patients FE and VMA. The resulting standard deviation of the intervertebral rotation determinations was used as the measure of variability. Methods The VMA measurements for assessing intervertebral motion were characterized by the use of: (1) a handling device that assists patients through a standard arc of lumbar bending in both an upright and recumbent posture (70 degree flexion/extension arcs; 60 degree left/right bending arcs

  8. Albert Camus et la réflexion sur le terrorisme aujourd’hui

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inmaculada Cuquerella Madoz

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Albert Camus aurait fêté ses cent ans le 7 Novembre 2013. Or, ce « Français d’Algérie » -écrivain, penseur engagé et chroniqueur - n’a pas reculé devant la question, ô combien douloureuse pour lui, du terrorisme. Jacqueline Lévi-Valensi a réuni ses écrits dans Réflexions sur le terrorisme nous permettant de constater que la pensée de Camus reste toujours pertinente pour interroger l’actualité, non seulement celle des « Printemps arabes » mais aussi celle d’une Europe frappée par le désespoir social et politique. À la violence terroriste (violence de l’individu désespéré face à la puissance dévastatrice de l’État décrite par l’auteur de L’Homme révolté fait écho celle de notre présent… Néanmoins, Camus ne cesse de rappeler que la révolte, lorsqu’elle est porteuse de valeurs et non simple ivresse fanatique, exprime la foi dans la vie : « La révolution, bien sûr ! Mais la révolution pour la vie, pour donner une chance à la vie… » (Les Justes. Relire l’oeuvre de Camus permet de mieux comprendre les enjeux et les dérives de notre monde.

  9. The use of forced flexion/extension views in the obtunded trauma patient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griffiths, Harry J.; Wagner, Jason; Anglen, Jeff; Bunn, Paul; Metzler, Michael [Department of Radiology, Departments of Radiology/Orthopaedics and Surgery, University of Missouri-Columbia, One Hospital Drive - DC069.10, Columbia, MO 65212 (United States)

    2002-10-01

    To determine whether forced flexion/extension (F/E) films for ''clearing'' the cervical spine in unconscious or semiconscious patients are useful or actually dangerous.Design and patients. Of 810 patients admitted for blunt trauma over a 5-year period, 479 patients whose films and charts were available received passive F/E film views of the cervical spine. Of these, 447 were reviewed retrospectively in masked fashion for any exacerbation of neurological changes subsequent to the procedure and with respect to the final neurological status at discharge.Results. Twenty-nine patients (6%) had various abnormalities including fractures and ligamentous injuries seen on the initial films. Following forced F/E films no change was made in the diagnosis of 23 patients. Of the remaining six patients, two required no treatment, two only required the use of a collar but two did have surgical intervention, this decision being based on the findings seen in the initial films. However, 285 films (59%) were judged inadequate due either to inadequate F/E (150 patients, 31%) or poor visualization (194 patients, 40%). There were three false positives all subsequently cleared by other studies and there were no false negatives. From the chart review, there were no complications or deaths attributable to the procedure.Conclusion. Although we were unable to find any complication or deaths directly attributable to the procedure, the clinicians abandoned passive F/E views in obtunded patients on the grounds of expense. Our present method of ''clearing'' a cervical spine in an obtunded patient is a cross-table lateral radiograph followed by a high-resolution thin-slice CT scan with sagittal and coronal reconstruction. We are against the use of routine MRI studies and of a forced F/E view in these patients. (orig.)

  10. Effect of Posterior Femoral Condylar Offset and Posterior Tibial Slope on Maximal Flexion Angle of the Knee in Posterior Cruciate Ligament Sacrificing Total Knee Arthroplasty

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Jong-Heon

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the effect of femoral condylar offset and posterior tibial slope on maximal flexion angle of the knee in posterior cruciate ligament (PCL)-sacrificing total knee arthroplasty (TKA, Medial-Pivot Knee System). Materials and Methods Forty-five knees in 35 patients who could be followed up more than 1 year after PCL-sacrificing TKA were evaluated retrospectively. We measured and analyzed the preoperative and postoperative maximal flexion angle, posterior femoral condylar offse...

  11. Comparison of the Forward Head Angle and the Lumbar Flexion and Rotation Angles of Computer Workers Using Routine and Individually Fixed Computer Workstations

    OpenAIRE

    Yoo, Won-gyu

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] This study compared the forward head angle and the lumbar flexion and rotation angles of computer workers using routine and fixed computer workstations. [Subjects] Ten male workers voluntarily consented to participate in the study. [Methods] A 3-D motion analysis system was used to measure the angles of the forward head and lumbar flexion. All subjects performed computer work for 30 minutes using both types of workstation. [Results] When working at the fixed workstation, the forward...

  12. Relationship between navicular drop and measuring position of maximal plantar flexion torque of the first and second-fifth metatarsophalangeal joints

    OpenAIRE

    Saeki, Junya; Tojima, Michio; Torii, Suguru

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between navicular drop and plantar flexion torque of the first and second-fifth metatarsophalangeal joints. [Subjects] Ten healthy young men participated in this study. [Methods] The Pearson product-moment correlation coefficient was calculated to determine the relationship between navicular drop and plantar flexion torque of the first and second-fifth metatarsophalangeal joints. [Results] Significant negative correlations ...

  13. A RARE PRESENTATION OF A CONCOMITANT LUMBAR SPINE BURST FRACTURE WITH A DISTAL CORPUS STERNI FRACTURE DUE TO A FLEXION DISTRACTION INJURY

    OpenAIRE

    Ravi Kumar TV, GadiDaksh, Jain Vinay, Rangaswamy BT

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Sternum fractures are a rare entity and occur either due to direct trauma or indirectly associated to a flexion compression injury. Earlier literatures used to describe the association of sternum fractures with upper thoracic vertebral fractures. To the best of our knowledge very few cases have been described in literature with concomitant lumbar vertebral fracture with associated sternum fracture. We hereby report a rare presentation of a flexion distraction injury leading to a ...

  14. Flexible time domain averaging technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ming; Lin, Jing; Lei, Yaguo; Wang, Xiufeng

    2013-09-01

    Time domain averaging(TDA) is essentially a comb filter, it cannot extract the specified harmonics which may be caused by some faults, such as gear eccentric. Meanwhile, TDA always suffers from period cutting error(PCE) to different extent. Several improved TDA methods have been proposed, however they cannot completely eliminate the waveform reconstruction error caused by PCE. In order to overcome the shortcomings of conventional methods, a flexible time domain averaging(FTDA) technique is established, which adapts to the analyzed signal through adjusting each harmonic of the comb filter. In this technique, the explicit form of FTDA is first constructed by frequency domain sampling. Subsequently, chirp Z-transform(CZT) is employed in the algorithm of FTDA, which can improve the calculating efficiency significantly. Since the signal is reconstructed in the continuous time domain, there is no PCE in the FTDA. To validate the effectiveness of FTDA in the signal de-noising, interpolation and harmonic reconstruction, a simulated multi-components periodic signal that corrupted by noise is processed by FTDA. The simulation results show that the FTDA is capable of recovering the periodic components from the background noise effectively. Moreover, it can improve the signal-to-noise ratio by 7.9 dB compared with conventional ones. Experiments are also carried out on gearbox test rigs with chipped tooth and eccentricity gear, respectively. It is shown that the FTDA can identify the direction and severity of the eccentricity gear, and further enhances the amplitudes of impulses by 35%. The proposed technique not only solves the problem of PCE, but also provides a useful tool for the fault symptom extraction of rotating machinery.

  15. Elective Neck Dissection in Patients With Head and Neck Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amit, Moran; Na'ara, Shorook; Sharma, Kanika; Ramer, Naomi; Ramer, Ilana; Agbetoba, Abib; Glick, Joelle; Yang, Xinjie; Lei, Delin; Bjoerndal, Kristine; Godballe, Christian; Mücke, Thomas; Klaus-Dietrich, Wolff; Eckardt, André M; Copelli, Chiara; Sesenna, Enrico; Palmer, Frank; Ganly, Ian; Gil, Ziv

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Adenoid cystic carcinoma (ACC) accounts for 3-5 % of all head and neck malignancies. Investigations of outcomes from elective neck dissection (END) for patients with ACC are sparse. This study aimed to assess the impact of END on the survival of patients with ACC. METHODS: This...

  16. PET/MRI in head and neck cancer: initial experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Platzek, Ivan; Laniado, Michael [Dresden University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Dresden (Germany); Beuthien-Baumann, Bettina [Dresden University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Dresden (Germany); Schneider, Matthias [Dresden University Hospital, Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Dresden (Germany); Gudziol, Volker [Dresden University Hospital, Department of Otolaryngology, Dresden (Germany); Langner, Jens; Schramm, Georg; Hoff, Joerg van den [Institute of Bioinorganic and Radiopharmaceutical Chemistry, Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Dresden (Germany); Kotzerke, Joerg [Dresden University Hospital, Nuclear Medicine, Dresden (Germany)

    2013-01-15

    To evaluate the feasibility of PET/MRI (positron emission tomography/magnetic resonance imaging) with FDG ({sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose) for initial staging of head and neck cancer. The study group comprised 20 patients (16 men, 4 women) aged between 52 and 81 years (median 64 years) with histologically proven squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck region. The patients underwent a PET scan on a conventional scanner and a subsequent PET/MRI examination on a whole-body hybrid system. FDG was administered intravenously prior to the conventional PET scan (267-395 MBq FDG, 348 MBq on average). The maximum standardized uptake values (SUV{sub max}) of the tumour and of both cerebellar hemispheres were determined for both PET datasets. The numbers of lymph nodes with increased FDG uptake were compared between the two PET datasets. No MRI-induced artefacts where observed in the PET images. The tumour was detected by PET/MRI in 17 of the 20 patients, by PET in 16 and by MRI in 14. The PET/MRI examination yielded significantly higher SUV{sub max} than the conventional PET scanner for both the tumour (p < 0.0001) and the cerebellum (p = 0.0009). The number of lymph nodes with increased FDG uptake detected using the PET dataset from the PET/MRI system was significantly higher the number detected by the stand-alone PET system (64 vs. 39, p = 0.001). The current study demonstrated that PET/MRI of the whole head and neck region is feasible with a whole-body PET/MRI system without impairment of PET or MR image quality. (orig.)

  17. Transfracture abduction osteotomy: A solution for nonunion of femoral neck fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jairamchander Pingle

    2014-01-01

    femur with or without bone graft, valgus osteotomy or hip arthroplasty. We conducted a retrospective analysis of cases of nonunion of femoral neck fracture treated by transfracture abduction osteotomy (TFAO. Materials and Methods: Over a period of 35 years (1974-2008, 30 patients with nonunion of femoral neck fractures were treated with TFAO over a period of 35 years (1974-2008, All patients were less than 50 years of age. Absence of clinical and radiological signs of union after four months was considered as nonunion. Patients more than 50 years of age were excluded from the study. Union was assessed at 6 months radiologically. Limb length was measured at six months. The mean duration of femoral neck fracture was 19 months (range 4 months 10 years. Results were analyzed in terms of radiological union at six months. Average followup was five years and six months. Results: Consistent union was noted at the followup after six months in 29 cases. One case was lost to followup after five and one-half months postoperatively. However, the fracture had united in this case at the last followup. Average shortening of the limb at six months was 1.9 cm. Average neck shaft angle was 127° (range 120-145°. Five cases went into AVN but were asymptomatic. Two cases required reoperation due to back out of Moore′s pins. These were reopened and cancellous screws were inserted in the same tracks. Conclusions: Consistent union of nonunion femoral neck fracture was noted at the followup after six months in 29 cases. The major drawback of the procedure is immobilization of the patient in the hip spica for eight weeks.

  18. Averaging along Uniform Random Integers

    CERN Document Server

    Janvresse, Élise

    2011-01-01

    Motivated by giving a meaning to "The probability that a random integer has initial digit d", we define a URI-set as a random set E of natural integers such that each n>0 belongs to E with probability 1/n, independently of other integers. This enables us to introduce two notions of densities on natural numbers: The URI-density, obtained by averaging along the elements of E, and the local URI-density, which we get by considering the k-th element of E and letting k go to infinity. We prove that the elements of E satisfy Benford's law, both in the sense of URI-density and in the sense of local URI-density. Moreover, if b_1 and b_2 are two multiplicatively independent integers, then the mantissae of a natural number in base b_1 and in base b_2 are independent. Connections of URI-density and local URI-density with other well-known notions of densities are established: Both are stronger than the natural density, and URI-density is equivalent to log-density. We also give a stochastic interpretation, in terms of URI-...

  19. Head and neck tumors after energetic proton irradiation in rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, D.; Cox, A.; Hardy, K.; Salmon, Y.; Trotter, R.

    1994-10-01

    This is a two-year progress report on a life span dose-response study of brain tumor risk at moderate to high doses of energetic protons. It was initiated because a joint NASA/USAF life span study of rhesus monkeys that were irradiated with 55-MeV protons (average surface dose, 3.5 Gy) indicated that the incidence of brain tumors per unit surface absorbed dose was over 19 times that of the human tinea capitis patients whose heads were exposed to 100 kv x-rays. Examination of those rats that died in the two-year interval after irradiation of the head revealed a linear dose-response for total head and neck tumor incidence in the dose range of 0-8.5 Gy. The exposed rats had a greater incidence of pituitary chromophobe adenomas, epithelial and mesothelial cell tumors than the unexposed controls but the excessive occurrence of malignant gliomas that was observed in the monkeys was absent in the rats. The estimated dose required to double the number of all types of head and neck tumors was 5.2 Gy. The highest dose, 18 Gy, resulted in high mortality due to obstructive squamous metaplasia at less than 50 weeks, prompting a new study of the relative bological effectiveness of high energy protons in producing this lesion.

  20. Prevalence of neck pain in computer operators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S A Shah

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction: Persisting neck pain is common in society, especially in office-workers. Although, neck pain is common source of disability, little is known about its prevalence and course. The bulk of literature available on this problem is in west with few studies done in an Indian setup. India is a middle-income developing country. The importance of this kind of studies becomes more obvious when it is considered that some reports indicate that the greatest increase in the prevalence of musculo-skeletal disorders in the next decade will be in middle-/low-income countries. Aims & objectives: The Primary aim of this research was to study the prevalence of neck pain in computer operators. Methodology: Study design: Cross Sectional Study. Sampling technique: Simple Random Sampling. Study subject: They should be working on computer for at least 3 hours / day or 15 hours/week, in current job for at least past 6 months & should be willing to participate in the study. Technique: Study was approved from the Institutional Ethics Committee. Informed consent was taken prior to data collection. Data were collected from 700 subjects via structured mailed questionnaire which included individual variables & work related variables. Conclusions: Prevalence of neck pain was found to be 47%. The study shows that neck pain is affected by individual variables and work related variables.

  1. SU-C-BRF-03: PCA Modeling of Anatomical Changes During Head and Neck Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chetvertkov, M; Kim, J; Siddiqui, F; Kumarasiri, A; Chetty, I; Gordon, J [Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, MI (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To develop principal component analysis (PCA) models from daily cone beam CTs (CBCTs) of head and neck (H and N) patients that could be used prospectively in adaptive radiation therapy (ART). Methods: : For 7 H and N patients, Pinnacle Treatment Planning System (Philips Healthcare) was used to retrospectively deformably register daily CBCTs to the planning CT. The number N of CBCTs per treatment course ranged from 14 to 22. For each patient a PCA model was built from the deformation vector fields (DVFs), after first subtracting the mean DVF, producing N eigen-DVFs (EDVFs). It was hypothesized that EDVFs with large eigenvalues represent the major anatomical deformations during the course of treatment, and that it is feasible to relate each EDVF to a clinically meaningful systematic or random change in anatomy, such as weight loss, neck flexion, etc. Results: DVFs contained on the order of 3×87×87×58=1.3 million scalar values (3 times the number of voxels in the registered volume). The top 3 eigenvalues accounted for ∼90% of variance. Anatomical changes corresponding to an EDVF were evaluated by generating a synthetic DVF, and applying that DVF to the CT to produce a synthetic CBCT. For all patients, the EDVF for the largest eigenvalue was interpreted to model weight loss. The EDVF for other eigenvalues appeared to represented quasi-random fraction-to-fraction changes. Conclusion: The leading EDVFs from single-patient PCA models have tentatively been identified with weight loss changes during treatment. Other EDVFs are tentatively identified as quasi-random inter-fraction changes. Clean separation of systematic and random components may require further work. This work is expected to facilitate development of population-based PCA models that can be used to prospectively identify significant anatomical changes, such as weight loss, early in treatment, triggering replanning where beneficial.

  2. SU-C-BRF-03: PCA Modeling of Anatomical Changes During Head and Neck Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To develop principal component analysis (PCA) models from daily cone beam CTs (CBCTs) of head and neck (H and N) patients that could be used prospectively in adaptive radiation therapy (ART). Methods: : For 7 H and N patients, Pinnacle Treatment Planning System (Philips Healthcare) was used to retrospectively deformably register daily CBCTs to the planning CT. The number N of CBCTs per treatment course ranged from 14 to 22. For each patient a PCA model was built from the deformation vector fields (DVFs), after first subtracting the mean DVF, producing N eigen-DVFs (EDVFs). It was hypothesized that EDVFs with large eigenvalues represent the major anatomical deformations during the course of treatment, and that it is feasible to relate each EDVF to a clinically meaningful systematic or random change in anatomy, such as weight loss, neck flexion, etc. Results: DVFs contained on the order of 3×87×87×58=1.3 million scalar values (3 times the number of voxels in the registered volume). The top 3 eigenvalues accounted for ∼90% of variance. Anatomical changes corresponding to an EDVF were evaluated by generating a synthetic DVF, and applying that DVF to the CT to produce a synthetic CBCT. For all patients, the EDVF for the largest eigenvalue was interpreted to model weight loss. The EDVF for other eigenvalues appeared to represented quasi-random fraction-to-fraction changes. Conclusion: The leading EDVFs from single-patient PCA models have tentatively been identified with weight loss changes during treatment. Other EDVFs are tentatively identified as quasi-random inter-fraction changes. Clean separation of systematic and random components may require further work. This work is expected to facilitate development of population-based PCA models that can be used to prospectively identify significant anatomical changes, such as weight loss, early in treatment, triggering replanning where beneficial

  3. TO COMPARE THE EFFECTS OF DEEP NECK FLEXORS STRENGHTNING EXERCISE AND McKENZIE NECK EXERCISE IN SUBJECTS WITH FORWARD NECK POSTURE: A RANDOMISED CLINICAL TRIAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijay Kage

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Forward Neck Posture also called as Protracted neck, is one in which the head is positioned anteriorly and the normal anterior cervical convexity is increased with the apex of the lordotic cervical curve at a considerable distance from the LOG in comparison with optimal posture.Nowadays texting may play a significant role in forward neck posture. According to Wellness Centre “It is the repetition of forward head movements combined with poor ergonomic postures and/or trauma that causes the body to adapt to forward head posture. Purpose: To compare effects of deep flexor strengthening exercises and McKenzie neck exercises in subjects with forward neck posture. Materials and Methods: 30 Subjects clinically diagnosed with FNP meeting the inclusion criteria were randomly assigned into three groups. Group A received McKenzie neck exercises, Group B received Deep Neck Flexor Strengthening Exercises and both the groups commonly went for pectoralis minor stretching respectively for once daily for a total of 6 sessions. Results: The results suggested that all the outcome measure i.e Forward Neck Posture, flexibility of pectoralis minor and CROM values showed significant differences among both the groups. Conclusion: The present study concluded that the comparison of McKenzie neck Exercises and Deep Neck Flexor Strengthening Exercises revealed no statistically significant differences, However each group showed improvement in cervical range of motion and forward neck posture with increase in the pectoralis minor flexibility.

  4. Optimizing Stability in Femoral Neck Fracture Fixation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Ye; Hao, Jiandong; Mauffrey, Cyril; Hammerberg, E Mark; Stahel, Philip F; Hak, David J

    2015-10-01

    Optimizing stability of femoral neck fracture fixation is important in obtaining a successful outcome. The mechanical problems and strategies for achieving optimal stability differ depending on patients' age and degree of osteoporosis. Femoral neck fractures in younger adults usually result from high-energy trauma and have a vertical fracture pattern. Strategies for optimizing fixation stability in this group include placing additional screws at right angles to the fracture plane and medial buttress plate augmentation. In elderly patients, screw position relative to the intact cortical femoral neck bone is of critical importance. Additional strategies for optimizing fixation stability in this group include the concept of length stable fixation, use of adjunctive calcium phosphate cement, and use of novel fixed angle fixation implants. PMID:26488776

  5. Participation of osteoporosis in femoral neck fracture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quantitative computed tomography (QCT) was used to measure bone mineral contents of the proximal femur. First, 62 specimens of cancellous bones of the proximal femur obtained at operation were burnt for mineral determination after preoperative QCT measurement to evaluate the relationship between QCT values and ash weight. The findings indicated that QCT measurement of proximal femur was as useful as that of the lumbar spine. Next, 10 groups of 50 men and 50 women ranging in age from the 5th to the 9th decade were tested to define the control mean and range of QCT mineral content of proximal femur, to compare with 32 cases of femoral neck fracture. In women with femoral neck fracture, QCT values of the femoral neck were less than those of the same normal age group except for cases of medial fracture in the 9th decade. This measurement might provide an index for fracture risk. (author)

  6. Management of patients with neck pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. A. Chechet

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Neck pain (cervicalgia occupies one of the leading places among the reasons for outpatient visits, 75% of people have experienced neck pain at least once in their lives. In most cases, neck pain regresses; however, it recurs in almost one half of patients. The paper gives data on the risk factors, mechanisms, course, and prognosis of cervicalgia. It discusses the issues of differential diagnosis, examination, and approaches to treating this condition in these patients. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are most effective in treating patients with acute cervicalgia. Therapeutic exercises and manual therapy are indicated in patients with chronic cervicalgia. There is evidence on the efficacy and safety of meloxicam for the management of acute and chronic cervicalgia.

  7. Work-related chronic neck impairment. Neck motion analysis in female traverse crane operators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alund, M; Larsson, S E; Lewin, T

    1992-09-01

    Twenty-one female steel industry traverse crane operators with long-term sick-leave (3 (1-8) years) due to chronic neck disability underwent careful analysis of case history, physical status and electrogoniometric three-dimensional recordings of active neck motion. Results were compared with those from working female crane operators having identical work posture and tasks and, further, with a group of working female clerks. The sick-listed crane operators had previous frequent contacts with the primary health care because of complaints from the neck and back. In comparison with the reference groups, the sick-listed crane operators showed tenderness of the trapezius and levator scapulae muscles and a short neck stature in combination with impaired active neck motion range with reduced motion speed. The motion pattern was however unchanged. The findings are consistent with the clinical picture of chronic neck myalgia that persisted despite long-term absence from the previous exposure to high static work load upon the neck-shoulders. PMID:1411359

  8. Regional myocutaneous flaps for head and neck reconstruction: Experience of a head and neck cancer unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eyituoyo Okoturo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pectoralis major myocutaneous pedicle flap and other regional myocutaneous pedicle flaps (RMF, despite the superiority shown by free flaps, have remained relevant in the reconstruction of major head and neck oncologic defects. It has continued to find relevance as the preferred reconstruction of choice in some general head and neck reconstructive applications. While its role has been defined in developed environment, the same cannot be said for developing environment. The aim thus, was to review our experiences with RMFs in head and neck reconstructions, with a view to evaluating the indications and outcomes in a limited opportunity environment with some free flaps expertise. Materials and Methods: This was a retrospective cohort study from records of RMF cases performed for head and neck reconstruction, at the study institution. Eligibility for study inclusion comprised case cohorts with advanced head and neck diseases requiring ablative surgery and reconstruction with pectoralis major flaps and other RMFs. Results: A total of 17 cases were treated with RMFs. 10 were pectoralis major flaps while 7 were other RMFs. The main indications were failed free flaps and financial constraints. No regional pedicle flap failure was recorded; however, complication rate was 35.5% (6/17. Conclusion: Pectoralis major flaps and other RMFs were very reliable option for head and neck reconstruction. Free flap failure and financial constraints were the main indications for RMF reconstruction indications in head and neck reconstruction in a developing environment with some free flap expertise.

  9. Evaluation of elbow flexion following free muscle transfer from the medial gastrocnemius or transfer from the latissimus dorsi, in cases of traumatic injury of the brachial plexus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederico Barra de Moraes

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE: To compare the gain in elbow flexion in patients with traumatic injury of the brachial plexus following muscle transfer from latissimus dorsi with the gain following free muscle transfer from the medial belly of the gastrocnemius. METHODS: This was a retrospective study in which the medical files of a convenience sample of 13 patients operated between 2000 and 2010 were reviewed. Group 1 comprised seven patients who underwent transfers from the gastrocnemius and group 2 (controls comprised six patients who underwent transfers from the latissimus dorsi. The following functions were evaluated: (1 range of motion (ROM of elbow flexion, in degrees, using manual goniometry and (2 grade of elbow flexion strength, using a muscle strength scale. Satisfactory results were defined as: (1 elbow flexion ROM ≥ 80° and (2 elbow flexion strength ≥ M3. The Fisher exact and Kruskal-Wallis tests were used (p < 0.05. RESULTS: The patients' mean age was 32 years (range: 17-56 and 72% had been involved in motorcycle accidents. Elbow flexion strength ≥ M3 was observed in seven patients (100% in group 1 and in five patients (83.3% in group 2 (p = 0.462. None of the patients presented M5, and one patient (16.7% in group 2 had a poor result (M2. Elbow flexion ROM with a gain ≥ 80° (daily functions was found in six patients (86% in group 1 and in three patients (50% in group 2 ( p = 0.1. CONCLUSION: The patients in group 1 had greater gains in strength and ROM than did those in group 2, but without statistical significance. Thus, transfers from the gastrocnemius become a new surgical option, if other techniques cannot be used.

  10. Evaluation of elbow flexion following free muscle transfer from the medial gastrocnemius or transfer from the latissimus dorsi, in cases of traumatic injury of the brachial plexus☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Moraes, Frederico Barra; Kwae, Mário Yoshihide; da Silva, Ricardo Pereira; Porto, Celmo Celeno; de Paiva Magalhães, Daniel; Paulino, Matheus Veloso

    2015-01-01

    Objective To compare the gain in elbow flexion in patients with traumatic injury of the brachial plexus following muscle transfer from latissimus dorsi with the gain following free muscle transfer from the medial belly of the gastrocnemius. Methods This was a retrospective study in which the medical files of a convenience sample of 13 patients operated between 2000 and 2010 were reviewed. Group 1 comprised seven patients who underwent transfers from the gastrocnemius and group 2 (controls) comprised six patients who underwent transfers from the latissimus dorsi. The following functions were evaluated: (1) range of motion (ROM) of elbow flexion, in degrees, using manual goniometry and (2) grade of elbow flexion strength, using a muscle strength scale. Satisfactory results were defined as: (1) elbow flexion ROM ≥ 80° and (2) elbow flexion strength ≥ M3. The Fisher exact and Kruskal–Wallis tests were used (p Elbow flexion strength ≥ M3 was observed in seven patients (100%) in group 1 and in five patients (83.3%) in group 2 (p = 0.462). None of the patients presented M5, and one patient (16.7%) in group 2 had a poor result (M2). Elbow flexion ROM with a gain ≥ 80° (daily functions) was found in six patients (86%) in group 1 and in three patients (50%) in group 2 (p = 0.1). Conclusion The patients in group 1 had greater gains in strength and ROM than did those in group 2, but without statistical significance. Thus, transfers from the gastrocnemius become a new surgical option, if other techniques cannot be used.

  11. Vicious Cycle of Multiple Invasive Treatments in a Hemophilic Inhibitor Positive Child with Resistant Knee Flexion Contracture, A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Reza Kachooei

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Uncontrolled recurrent hemarthrosis can end to contracture, deformity, pain, joint destruction and gait disorders which are disabling. We are going to report a challenge, a unilateral knee flexion contracture in a child with severe hemophilia A and inhibitor who underwent different treatment options with unsatisfactory improvement of knee range of motion. Mismanaging postoperatively, patient and parents irresponsibility in managing self-care, lack of access and affordability to treatment and unavailability of proper treatment can be the reasons of recurrence in addition to the tough nature of a patient with inhibitor.

  12. Prediction of Neck Dissection Requirement After Definitive Radiotherapy for Head-and-Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: This analysis was undertaken to assess the need for planned neck dissection in patients with a complete response (CR) of involved nodes after irradiation and to determine the benefit of a neck dissection in those with less than CR by tumor site. Methods: Our cohort included 880 patients with T1-4, N1-3M0 squamous cell carcinoma of the oropharynx, larynx, or hypopharynx who received treatment between 1994 and 2004. Survival curves were calculated by the Kaplan-Meier Method, comparisons of rates with the log–rank test and prognostic factors by Cox's proportional hazard model. Results: Nodal CR occurred in 377 (43%) patients, of whom 365 patients did not undergo nodal dissection. The 5-year actuarial regional control rate of patients with CR was 92%. Two hundred sixty-eight of the remaining patients (53%) underwent neck dissections. The 5-year actuarial regional control rate for patients without a CR was 84%. Those who had a neck dissection fared better with 5-year actuarial regional control rates of 90% and 76% for those operated and those not operated (p < 0.001). Variables associated with poorer regional control rates included higher T and N stage, non-oropharynx cancers, non-CR, both clinical and pathological. Conclusions: With 92% 5-year neck control rate without neck dissection after CR, there is little justification for systematic neck dissection. The addition of a neck dissection resulted in higher neck control after partial response though patients with viable tumor on pathology specimens had poorer outcomes. The identification of that subgroup that benefits from additional treatment remains a challenge.

  13. [Photodynamic therapy for head and neck cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lajer, C.B.; Specht, Lena; Kirkegaard, J.;

    2006-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a new treatment for head and neck cancer. The principle of the treatment is a photochemical reaction initiated by light activation of a photosensitizer, which causes the death of the exposed tissue. This article presents the modes of action of PDT and the techniques as...... well as the clinical procedure. A critical review of the literature is also presented, regarding treatment results of the different techniques and indications for treatments. The possibilities for PDT for head and neck cancer in Denmark are mentioned Udgivelsesdato: 2006/6/5...

  14. Congenital neck masses: embryological and anatomical perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahida Rasool

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Neck masses are a common problem in paediatric age group. They tend to occur frequently and pose a diagnostic dilemma to the ENT surgeons. Although the midline and lateral neck masses differ considerably in their texture and presentation but the embryological perspective of these masses is not mostly understood along with the fundamental anatomical knowledge. The article tries to correlate the embryological, anatomical and clinical perspectives for the same. [Int J Res Med Sci 2013; 1(4.000: 329-332

  15. Nonunion of paediatric talar neck fracture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jindal Nipun

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available 【Abstract】Fractures of the paediatric talus are infrequent injuries, most complicated by posttraumatic arthrosis and avascular necrosis in the course of treatment. Non- union in children has not been reported before in literature. We report a case of a 12-year-old boy who had a nonunion of Hawkins type II fracture of talar neck. The nonunion was treated surgically with a good clinical outcome. The goals of management in nonunion of paediatric talar neck fracture are different from those in fresh fractures. A suboptimal reduction should be acceptable without trying a radical surgery which may cause further impairment.

  16. MRI of the hypopharynx, larynx and neck

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the area of the neck, hypopharynx, and larynx, there is an extraordinarily high density of soft tissue structures which are vital to the survival of the organism. These include in particular vascular, neural, respiratory, and deglutitive structures. The advent of MRI was a milestone in the diagnostic evaluation of this region, allowing greatly increased contrast among these soft tissues as well as the possibility of obtaining multiplanar views in any desired orientation. MRI has decisive advantages over conventional imaging modalities, such as plain film imaging, computed tomography, and sonography. This article gives a short review of the diagnostic application of MRI in the neck, hypopharynx, and larynx. (orig.)

  17. INTRAOPERATIVE NEUROMONITORING DURING HEAD AND NECK SURGERY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. O. Rumyantsev

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This clinical trial comparatively analyzed the frequency of postoperative neurological complications due to damage to motor (facial, recurrent, laryngeal, and accessory nerves after head and neck operations using the traditional procedure or intraoperative neuromonitoring. Neuromonitoring made during operations on the thyroid and level VI central neck could reduce the rate of recurrent laryngeal nerve paralysis by more than twice (OR = 0.32; 95 % CI 0.11–0.86; p = 0.028. The author considers the absolute indication for intraoperative neuromonitoring to be high-risk surgery for nondeliberate damage to the motor nerves and impossibility of their visual detection.

  18. The treatment of cancer in the head and neck

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1,438 cases of head and neck tumors were seen in our clinic during the period from 1965 - 1978. Under our multidisciplinary treatment, average dosage of radiation for nasal-paranasal tumors was 200 rad, for oral-mesopharyngeal tumors 1,800 rad, for nasopharyngeal tumors 2,400 rad, for laryngeal tumors 3,400 rad and for hypopharyngeal tumors 4,400 rad. After reduction of tumor mass and topical cleaning procedure, 1) a dosage of radiation-number of patients curve shifted to lower left, 2) repeated surgeries for recurrences became less frequent, 3) extended surgeries were unnecessary and 4) social rehabilitation of patients was obtained much easier even in aged. Principles of our treatment were simple: short hospitalization and careful long term follow-up. Treatment plan should be decided according to clinical finding and course of illness in each cases. (author)

  19. Prostaglandin inhibitor and radiotherapy in advanced head and neck cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiotherapy is the usual mode of treatment for unresectable head and neck cancer. To improve cure rates, extend survival, and reduce morbidity, we use accelerated hyperfractionation radiotherapy and an adjuvant drug to inhibit prostaglandin synthesis. In this study, 19 patients received 300 rad/day of radiotherapy in two equally divided doses to a total dose averaging 6,200 rad. Either indomethacin, 25 mg, or placebo was given four times a day in a double-blind fashion during therapy. Radiation mucositis was graded as 0 to 4+; pain, nutritional status, and tumor status were monitored daily and recorded biweekly. Evaluation of the data showed delayed mucositis in the experimental group for grades 1 to 3, with a significant difference at grade 3 compared with controls. The significance of a long-term comparison of cure rates would be doubtful considering the heterogeneity of the primary sites and regional disease in this group coupled with the small size of our study

  20. PET-CT–Guided Surveillance of Head and Neck Cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patients with advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck who underwent PET-CT–guided surveillance had fewer operations but similar overall survival rates to those of patients who underwent planned neck dissection.

  1. 50 Facts about Oral, Head and Neck Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... You 50 Facts about Oral, Head and Neck Cancer 50 Facts about Oral, Head and Neck Cancer Patient Health Information News ... particular strain of HPV. 66% of the time, oral cancers will be found as late stage three and ...

  2. PREVALENCE OF NECK DISABILITY AMONG DENTAL PROFESSIONALS IN NORTH INDIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anshul

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: AIM: (The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence and severity of neck pain in dentists of north India [h1]. MATERIALS AND METHODS : Following ethical approval, a cross sectional study was conducted on 74 randomly selected dentists. Questionnaires were used to collect personal and occupational characteristics as well as the prevalence and risk factors of neck pain. Subjects were assessed by visual analogue scale and neck disability questionnaires for pain intensity and functional disability of neck, respectively. RESULTS : Point and last 12 months prevalence of neck pain were 27% and 76%, respect ively. Mean VAS for neck pain is 2.48. CONCLUSION : Results indicated that the prevalence of neck pain and neck disability in dentists appears to be high

  3. Variability of the thymidine labeling index in squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tritiated thymidine (3HTdR) labeling is the standard technique for determining the kinetic activity of tumors. This method has been used to label multiple sections of tumor specimens obtained from seven patients with advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck. Considerable variability was observed in the labeling index in different sites from the same specimen. To reduce the large sampling error due to heterogeneity, we recommend that an average value be determined from multiple sections when employing this technique

  4. Intramedullary nailing of surgical neck fractures of tiıe humerus

    OpenAIRE

    Aktuglu, Kemal; Oncag, Hakki

    2004-01-01

    Between August 1990 and August 1991, in Department of Orthopaedic Surgey and Traumotology Clinic in Ege University, l3 (8 women, 5 men) Two-part displaced humeral neck fractures were treated with the closed intramedullary technique of using staced medullary pins for fixation. This technique was performed over 1 year period.All patients started phsiotherapy two wekks after immobilization. The average age was 47 (min. 30, max.78) years, follow-up manthly evaluation included physical and radiog...

  5. ASSESSMENT OF RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN NECK SHAFT ANGLE AND NECK LENGTH WITH INTEREPICONDYLAR DISTANCE IN FEMUR

    OpenAIRE

    Ishita Ghosh; Gairik Sengupta; Pallab Basu; Alpana De

    2015-01-01

    Background: Femur is the longest and strongest bone of the body. It transmits body weight from hip bone to tibia in standing position. Femoral neck is a constricted part connecting head with shaft at an angle of about 125°-known as angle of inclination or neck shaft angle (NSA); this facilitates the movement of hip joint enabling the limb to swing clear of pelvis. Abnormal femoral neck angle (FNA) may be associated with various clinical problems ranging from harmless in toeing gait in childho...

  6. 弹性髓内针治疗儿童桡骨颈骨折的临床应用研究%Clinical application of elastic stable intramedullary nail in treatment of radial neck fractures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李兵; 张军; 张亚军

    2014-01-01

    目的探讨弹性髓内针治疗桡骨颈骨折疗效。方法我院于2006年5月至2009年9月应用弹性髓内针治疗23例桡骨颈骨折患者,其中男性17例,女性6例,年龄6~13岁,平均9.3岁。摔伤21例,绞伤2例。按 Judet 分型,其中Ⅱ型3例、Ⅲ型16例、Ⅳ型4例。合并肘关节其他部位损伤3例,其中肘关节内侧副韧带损伤2例,肱骨内上髁骨折1例。结果术后随访6~38个月,平均17.5个月。根据 Métaizeau 术后 X 线片评价标准,优18例、良3例、中2例,优良率达91%。功能评价采用 Métaizeau 功能评价标准,优16例、良6例、一般1例,优良率达96%。其中2例桡骨头骺变形膨大,1例出现关节周围异常钙化。结论弹性髓内针治疗桡骨颈骨折操作简便,效果满意。%Background Radial neck fractures account for 5%-10% in elbow joint fractures and most of them are slightly displaced or non-displaced types.Satisfactory therapeutic results can be achieved by conservative treatment.As to severe displaced radial neck fractures,it is controversial in selection of therapeutic methods and curative effect clinically.To explore clinical therapeutic effect of radial neck fractures with elastic intramedullary nail and accumulate experience for diagnosis and treatment,23 cases of radial neck fracture were treated with elastic intramedullary nail from May 2006 to September 2009 in our hospital.Methods From May 2006 to September 2009,23 cases of radial neck fracture were admitted into our hospital and treated with elastic intramedullary nail,including 1 7 male and 6 female,aged from 6 to 13,and the average age was 9.3 years.Traumatic mechanisms were classified as fallen injuries with 21 cases and wringer injuries with 2 cases.Twenty cases were in right elbow and 3 cases were in left elbow.Operation time from injury ranged from 1 to 5 days,and averaged in 2.3 days.There were 3 cases of associated injuries on other parts of the elbow joint,including 2 cases of medial

  7. Head and neck paragangliomas: clinical and molecular genetic classification

    OpenAIRE

    Christian Offergeld; Christoph Brase; Svetlana Yaremchuk; Irina Mader; Hans Christian Rischke; Sven Gläsker; Kurt W Schmid; Thorsten Wiech; Preuss, Simon F.; Carlos Suárez; Tomasz Kopć; Attila Patocs; Nelson Wohllk; Mahdi Malekpour; Boedeker, Carsten C.

    2012-01-01

    Head and neck paragangliomas are tumors arising from specialized neural crest cells. Prominent locations are the carotid body along with the vagal, jugular, and tympanic glomus. Head and neck paragangliomas are slowly growing tumors, with some carotid body tumors being reported to exist for many years as a painless lateral mass on the neck. Symptoms depend on the specific locations. In contrast to paraganglial tumors of the adrenals, abdomen and thorax, head and neck paragangliomas seldom rel...

  8. EFFECT OF CME-1 NECK MUSCLE TRAINING MACHINE ON NECK MUSCLE STRENGTH IN TRAINER PILOTS%CME-1颈肌训练器对教练机飞行员颈肌强度的训练效果

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈琼; 朱超; 李交杰; 徐建华; 夏凌; 陈小萍; 陈晓健

    2012-01-01

    of extension,flexion,left and right lateral flexion of the neck muscles showed no difference between the primary trainer pilots and the advanced trainer pilots after the 9th time training (P >0.05). (2) The neck muscle strength and the peak impulse in 10 seconds of all directions of the neck muscles in all military pilots at the 6 and 9' time of training were higher than those at the 1st time ( P < 0. 05) ;The ncek muscle strength of the four mentioned directions after the 9th time training was 38.9% ,35.5%,60.6%,and 48. 8% more respectively than the first time (P < 0. 05). The peak pulse in 10 seconds was 46.1% ,40.0% ,47.9% and 48.9% more than the first time too. Conclusion CME-1 Neck Muscle Training Machine is effective and safe to improve neck muscle strength of trainer pilots.

  9. 49 CFR 572.123 - Neck assembly and test procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Neck assembly and test procedure. 572.123 Section...-year-old Child Test Dummy, Beta Version § 572.123 Neck assembly and test procedure. (a) The neck... extension tests, measured by an accelerometer mounted on the pendulum as shown in Figure 22 of 49 CFR 572...

  10. Stress changes of lateral collateral ligament at different knee flexion with or without displaced movements: a 3-dimensional finite element analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHONG Yan-lin; WANG You; WANG Hai-peng; RONG Ke; XIE Le

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To create a 3-dimensional finite element model of knee ligaments and to analyse the stress changes of lateral collateral ligament (LCL) with or without displaced movements at different knee flexion conditions.Methods: A four-major-ligament contained knee specimen from an adult died of skull injury was prepared for CT scanning with the detectable ligament insertion footprints,locations and orientations precisely marked in advance. The CT scanning images were converted to a 3-dimensional model of the knee with the 3-dimensional reconstruction technique and transformed into finite element model by the software of ANSYS. The model was validated using experimental and numerical results obtained by other scientists.The natural stress changes of LCL at five different knee flexion angles (0°, 30°, 60°, 90°, 120°) and under various motions of anterior-posterior tibial translation, tibial varus rotation and internal-external tibial rotation were measured.Results: The maximum stress reached to 87%-113%versus natural stress in varus motion at early 30° of knee flexions. The stress values were smaller than the peak value of natural stress at 0° (knee full extension) when knee bending was over 60° of flexion in anterior-posterior tibial translation and internal-external rotation.Conclusion: LCL is vulnerable to varus motion in almost all knee bending positions and susceptible to anterlor-posterior tibial translation or internal-external rotation at early 30° of knee flexions.

  11. Soft tissue artifact evaluation of the cervical spine in motion patterns of flexion and lateral bending: a preliminary study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jiajia; Lui, Zhongwen; Ren, Luquan

    2016-01-01

    Background. Soft tissue artifact (STA) is increasingly becoming a focus of research as the skin marker method is widely employed in motion capture technique. At present, medical imaging methods provide reliable ways to investigate the cervical STA. Among these approaches, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a highly preferred tool because of its low radiation. Methods. In the study, the 3D spatial location of vertebral landmarks and corresponding skin markers of the spinous processes of the second (C2), fifth (C5), and sixth (C6) cervical levels during flexion and lateral bending were investigated. A series of static postures were scanned using MRI. Skin deformation was obtained by the Mimics software. Results. Results shows that during flexion, the maximum skin deformation occurs at C6, in the superior–inferior (Z) direction. Upon lateral bending, the maximum skin displacement occurs at C2 level, in the left–right (Y) direction. The result presents variability of soft tissue in the terms of direction and magnitude, which is consistent with the prevailing opinion. Discussion. The results testified variability of cervical STA. Future studies involving large ranges of subject classification, such as age, sex, height, gravity, and etc. should be performed to completely verify the existing hypothesis on human cervical skin deformation. PMID:27069821

  12. MR arthrographic assessment of suspected posteroinferior labral lesions using flexion, adduction, and internal rotation positioning of the arm: preliminary experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imaging the shoulder in the position of flexion, adduction, and internal rotation (FADIR) may be useful in characterizing lesions of the posteroinferior labrum. The purpose of this preliminary study is to illustrate the diagnostic utility of FADIR positioning in the assessment and characterization of posteroinferior labral tears. In the FADIR position, the arm is placed across the chest, with the hand on the contralateral shoulder and palm facing outwards. FADIR positioning was performed if there was a subtle or equivocal abnormality of the posteroinferior labrum on conventional MR arthrography sequences. A retrospective review of the charts of 9 people who were imaged using FADIR positioning in addition to routine MR arthrographic sequences of the shoulder was performed. The review included the indication for the study, documentation of presence of clinical posterior instability, and surgical correlation, where available. In all 9 patients, FADIR positioning helped confirm, exclude, or better characterize a posteroinferior labral abnormality by increasing the diagnostic confidence. Flexion, adduction, and internal rotation positioning appears to be a useful adjunct in evaluating patients with equivocal or subtle posteroinferior labral abnormalities on conventional MR arthrography sequences. (orig.)

  13. Role of stenosis of spinal canal in L4-L5 nerve root compression assessed by flexion-extension myelography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myelographic flexion-extension studies were performed in four groups of 10 patients each, with (A) normal myelogram; (B) bilateral nerve root compression at L4-L5; (C) unilateral nerve root compression at L4-L5 and (D) nerve root compression at L5-S1. The aim of the investigation was to assess the role of spinal stenosis in contributing to nerve root compression. The results indicate that a form of stenosis of the spinal canal plays an important role in bilateral nerve root compression at L4-L5, and to a lesser extent in unilateral nerve root compression at L4-L5. It does not appear to play a role in L5-S1 nerve root compression (stenosis of the lateral recess left aside). It is advocated that in myelographic L4-L5 nerve root compression additional flexion-extension studies should be performed in order to evaluate the possible role of stenosis of the spinal canal contributing to this compression. Even in nerve root compression by disc extrusion, concomitant spinal stenosis may necessitate additional decompressive laminectomy. (orig.)

  14. Does Semi-Rigid Instrumentation Using Both Flexion and Extension Dampening Spacers Truly Provide an Intermediate Level of Stabilization?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dilip Sengupta

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Conventional posterior dynamic stabilization devices demonstrated a tendency towards highly rigid stabilization approximating that of titanium rods in flexion. In extension, they excessively offload the index segment, making the device as the sole load-bearing structure, with concerns of device failure. The goal of this study was to compare the kinematics and intradiscal pressure of monosegmental stabilization utilizing a new device that incorporates both a flexion and extension dampening spacer to that of rigid internal fixation and a conventional posterior dynamic stabilization device. The hypothesis was the new device would minimize the overloading of adjacent levels compared to rigid and conventional devices which can only bend but not stretch. The biomechanics were compared following injury in a human cadaveric lumbosacral spine under simulated physiological loading conditions. The stabilization with the new posterior dynamic stabilization device significantly reduced motion uniformly in all loading directions, but less so than rigid fixation. The evaluation of adjacent level motion and pressure showed some benefit of the new device when compared to rigid fixation. Posterior dynamic stabilization designs which both bend and stretch showed improved kinematic and load-sharing properties when compared to rigid fixation and when indirectly compared to existing conventional devices without a bumper.

  15. A possible etiology for the dilaceration and flexion of permanent tooth roots relative to bone remodeling gradients in alveolar bone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard G Standerwick

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Trauma, altered tooth germ position and delayed tooth eruption have been hypothesized as possible causes of tooth root dilacerations and flexion, however these anatomical variations appear more commonly associated with posterior teeth and absence of traumatic history. The Hypothesis: Postulated is that tooth root dilaceration or flexion may be a result of tooth root sheath displacement due to gradients of bone remodeling present within alveolar bone. Evaluation of the Hypothesis: Alveolar bone displays bone remodeling gradients between coronal, apical and basal sections which affect bone plasticity. As a tooth is erupting or experiences delayed eruption, there are other relative dento-skeletal alterations occurring, such as the mesial drift of the dentition and transverse growth of the maxilla. It is plausible that during the physiologic and growth related alteration of the alveolar and basal bones, portions of developing tooth could be found within one or more of the plasticity zones, contributing to alteration of the root sheath and tooth root dilaceration.

  16. Comparison of wear behaviors for an artificial cervical disc under flexion/extension and axial rotation motions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Song; Song, Jian; Liao, Zhenhua; Feng, Pingfa; Liu, Weiqiang

    2016-06-01

    The wear behaviors of a ball-on-socket (UHMWPE-on-Ti6Al4V) artificial cervical disc were studied with 1.5MC (million cycles) wear simulation under single flexion/extension and axial rotation motion and their composite motion. The wear rates, wear traces, and contact stress were analyzed and contrasted based on mass loss, optical microscopy and SEM as well as 3D profilometer, and ANSYS software, respectively. A much higher wear rate and more severe wear scars appeared under multi-directional motion. Flexion/extension motion of 7.5° lead to more severe wear than that under axial rotation motion of 4°. The above results were closely related to the contact compression stress and shear stress. The wear surface in FE motion showed typical linear wear scratches while revealing obvious arc-shaped wear tracks in AR motion. However, the central zone of both ball and socket components revealed more severe wear tracks than that in the edge zone under these two different motions. The dominant wear mechanism was plowing/scratching and abrasive wear as well as a little oxidation wear for the titanium socket while it was scratching damage with adhesive wear and fatigue wear due to plastic deformation under cyclic load and motion profiles for the UHMWPE ball. PMID:27040218

  17. Atlas of head and neck imaging. The extracranial head and neck

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Designed for easy use at the PACS station or viewbox, here is your right-hand tool and pictorial guide for locating, identifying, and accurately diagnosing lesions of the extracranial head and neck. This beautifully produced atlas employs the 'spaces' concept of analysis, which helps radiologists directly visualize complex head and neck anatomy and pathology. With hundreds of high-quality illustrations, this book makes the difficult identification and localization of complex neck masses relatively simple. This book provides CT and MR examples for more than 200 different diseases of the suprahyoid and infrahyoid neck, as well as clear and concise information on the epidemiology, clinical findings, pathology, and treatment guidelines for each disease. (orig.)

  18. The effect of cocontraction of the masticatory muscles during neck stabilization exercises on thickness of the neck flexors

    OpenAIRE

    Moon, Hyun-Ju; Goo, Bong-Oh; Cho, Sung-Hak

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of the cocontraction of masticatory muscles during neck stabilization exercises on changes in the thickness of the neck flexors. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty subjects performed neck stabilization only exercise and neck stabilization exercise with simultaneous contraction of the masticatory muscles. Changes in the thickness of the longus colli and sternocleidomastoid were then measured by ultrasound. [Results] The thickness of th...

  19. Sex differences in heritability of neck Pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fejer, René; Hartvigsen, Jan; Kyvik, Kirsten Ohm

    2006-01-01

    Experimental studies have suggested biological factors as a possible explanation for gender disparities in perception of pain. Recently, heritability of liability to neck pain (NP) has been found to be statistically significantly larger in women compared to men. However, no studies have been...

  20. 49 CFR 572.193 - Neck assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... environment as specified in 49 CFR 572.200(j); (2) Attach the neck-headform assembly, as shown in Figure V2-A or V2-B in appendix A to this subpart, to the 49 CFR Part 572 pendulum test fixture (Figure 22, 49 CFR 572.33) in either the left or right lateral impact orientations, respectively, so that...

  1. Head and neck cancer stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnamurthy, S; Nör, J E

    2012-04-01

    Most cancers contain a small sub-population of cells that are endowed with self-renewal, multipotency, and a unique potential for tumor initiation. These properties are considered hallmarks of cancer stem cells. Here, we provide an overview of the field of cancer stem cells with a focus on head and neck cancers. Cancer stem cells are located in the invasive fronts of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC) close to blood vessels (perivascular niche). Endothelial cell-initiated signaling events are critical for the survival and self-renewal of these stem cells. Markers such as aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH), CD133, and CD44 have been successfully used to identify highly tumorigenic cancer stem cells in HNSCC. This review briefly describes the orosphere assay, a method for in vitro culture of undifferentiated head and neck cancer stem cells under low attachment conditions. Notably, recent evidence suggests that cancer stem cells are exquisitely resistant to conventional therapy and are the "drivers" of local recurrence and metastatic spread. The emerging understanding of the role of cancer stem cells in the pathobiology of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas might have a profound impact on the treatment paradigms for this malignancy. PMID:21933937

  2. Chronic calcific tendinitis of the neck

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors present the first three cases of chronic calcific tendinits of the neck. This condition is diagnosed radiologically by the presence of calcification located just inferior to the anterior tubercle of C1. The calcification is at the insertion of the longus colli muscle. No soft tissue swelling is present and the patients are asymptomatic. (orig.)

  3. Chronic calcific tendinitis of the neck

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newmark, H.; Zee, C.S.; Frankel, P.; Robinson, A.; Blau, L.; Gans, D.C.

    1981-12-01

    The authors present the first three cases of chronic calcific tendinits of the neck. This condition is diagnosed radiologically by the presence of calcification located just inferior to the anterior tubercle of C1. The calcification is at the insertion of the longus colli muscle. No soft tissue swelling is present and the patients are asymptomatic.

  4. Anatomy of neck configuration in fission decay

    CERN Document Server

    Patra, S K; Satpathy, L

    2010-01-01

    The anatomy of neck configuration in the fission decay of Uranium and Thorium isotopes is investigated in a microscopic study using Relativistic mean field theory. The study includes $^{236}U$ and $^{232}Th$ in the valley of stability and exotic neutron rich isotopes $^{250}U$, $^{256}U$, $^{260}U$, $^{240}Th$, $^{250}Th$, $^{256}Th$ likely to play important role in the r-process nucleosynthesis in stellar evolution. Following the static fission path, the neck configurations are generated and their composition in terms of the number of neutrons and protons are obtained showing the progressive rise in the neutron component with the increase of mass number. Strong correlation between the neutron multiplicity in the fission decay and the number of neutrons in the neck is seen. The maximum neutron-proton ratio is about 5 for $^{260}$U and $^{256}$Th suggestive of the break down of liquid-drop picture and inhibition of the fission decay in still heavier isotopes. Neck as precursor of a new mode of fission decay li...

  5. 49 CFR 572.17 - Neck.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 30 21 2.2 60 36 4.3 Maximum 62 5.8 60 91 4.3 30 108 2.2 0 123 0 (c) Test procedure. (1) Mount the... OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) ANTHROPOMORPHIC TEST DEVICES 3-Year-Old Child § 572.17 Neck. (a)(1)...

  6. Long-Term Follow-Up Results of Delayed Fixation of Femoral Neck Fractures in Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asghar Elmi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Femoral neck fractures are urgent injuries that require precise reduction and stable fixation. In some cases, however, early treatment is not possible.Objectives: The present study aimed to evaluate long-term results of delayed fixation of femoral neck fractures using cannulated screws.Patients and Methods: This retrospective descriptive-analytical study was conducted on 26 patients with femoral neck fractures. The patients were treated through a closed reduction and fixation method using cannulated screws. Patients were followed up for at least five years and the rate of complications was determined.Results: In this study, 26 patients with mean age of 34.3 years were assessed. Average time interval from injury to surgery was 46.4 ± 12.2 hours; 18 patients (69% were operated on with more than 36 hours of delay. Incidence of AVN and nonunion was reported in 10 (38.4% and 3 (11.5% patients, respectively.Conclusions: Time plays an important role in treatment results of femoral neck fractures. To treat the fractures, closed reduction and fixation using cannulated screws may still be the best option.

  7. Treatment of clinically negative neck of squamous cell carcinoma in floor of mouth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To determine how surgical treatment of the neck for N0 cases of squamous cell carcinoma in the floor of the mouth should be done, the pattern of occult cervical lymph node metastases was evaluated. The number of N0 cases without local failure from 1970 to 1999 was 53 (48 males and 5 females, average age 60.3 years old). T classification was as follows: T1: 14 patients, T2: 35 patients, T3: 4 patients. Initial treatment consisted of surgery only (29 patients), radiation therapy only (7 patients), surgery and radiation therapy (14 patients), surgery and chemotherapy (3 patients). Elective neck dissection (ENT) was performed in 16 patients. Histological cervical lymph node metastasis was detected in 18.9%, 2 of 16 patients who underwent ENT and 8 of 37 patients who underwent therapeutic neck dissection (TND). Frequency of secondary cervical lymph node metastasis by initial treatment and T classification distinction was not different. The sites of metastasis were level III except one case. The 5-year survival rate was 73.1% in the ENT group and 66.9% in the TND group. The results suggest that surgical treatment of the neck is not necessary for initial treatment for N0 cases of squamous cell carcinoma in the floor of the mouth. (author)

  8. Clinical impact of radiographic carotid artery involvement in neck metastases from head and neck cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teymoortash, A; Rassow, S; Bohne, F; Wilhelm, T; Hoch, S

    2016-04-01

    The treatment of lymph node metastases involving the carotid artery is controversial. The aim of the present study was to determine the outcomes of head and neck cancer patients with radiographic carotid artery involvement in neck metastases. A total of 27 patients with head and neck cancer and radiologically diagnosed advanced metastases involving the common carotid artery or internal carotid artery were enrolled. All patients underwent a primary or salvage neck dissection and surgical carotid peeling. The oncological outcome and survival of all patients were analyzed. Loco-regional control was observed in 13 of the 27 patients (48.1%). During follow-up, five patients (18.5%) developed second primaries and 11 (40.7%) developed distant metastases. The survival time was poor independent of regional control. The median overall survival was 1.55 years and disease-free survival was 0.71 year. Radiographic carotid artery involvement in neck metastases in head and neck cancer appears to correlate with a poor long-term prognosis, with a high rate of distant metastases despite loco-regional control. PMID:26723499

  9. Investigation of the skatole content in fat tissue and sensory acceptability of smoked neck from young boars

    OpenAIRE

    Parunović Nenad; Kočovski T.; Radović Č.; Radojković D.

    2007-01-01

    In this paper content of skatole equivalent in samples of fat tissue from young boars was determined, also the dependance between sensory evaluation of the acceptability of smoked neck meat from young boars and skatole content in fat tissue, as well as differences in acceptability of samples with different content of skatole in fat tissue (from 0,117mg/g to 1,067mg/g). Total average evaluation of sensory analysis of smoked neck meat was 4,12, and variation measures show significant difference...

  10. [Rare giant salivary gland pleomorphic adenoma on the neck].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Dongling; Li, Qinghuai

    2013-12-01

    The patient has found his neck mass for more than 30 years, and the neck mass has slowly growed into giant tumor. Five days ago, the neck giant mass suddenly burst, hemorrhage and overflow liquid. The giant mass with irregular in shape, surface uneven, skin highly tension and superficial venous engorgement, was seen in left lateral neck. CT scan demonstrates a mixture of solid, cystic and lobulated mass shadow within subcutaneous fat spaces of left lateral neck. Postoperative pathological examination proved that it is salivary gland pleomorphic adenoma. PMID:24620671

  11. The effect of resistance level and stability demands on recruitment patterns and internal loading of spine in dynamic flexion and extension using a simple trunk model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeinali-Davarani, Shahrokh; Shirazi-Adl, Aboulfazl; Dariush, Behzad; Hemami, Hooshang; Parnianpour, Mohamad

    2011-07-01

    The effects of external resistance on the recruitment of trunk muscles in sagittal movements and the coactivation mechanism to maintain spinal stability were investigated using a simple computational model of iso-resistive spine sagittal movements. Neural excitation of muscles was attained based on inverse dynamics approach along with a stability-based optimisation. The trunk flexion and extension movements between 60° flexion and the upright posture against various resistance levels were simulated. Incorporation of the stability constraint in the optimisation algorithm required higher antagonistic activities for all resistance levels mostly close to the upright position. Extension movements showed higher coactivation with higher resistance, whereas flexion movements demonstrated lower coactivation indicating a greater stability demand in backward extension movements against higher resistance at the neighbourhood of the upright posture. Optimal extension profiles based on minimum jerk, work and power had distinct kinematics profiles which led to recruitment patterns with different timing and amplitude of activation. PMID:21246424

  12. A RARE PRESENTATION OF A CONCOMITANT LUMBAR SPINE BURST FRACTURE WITH A DISTAL CORPUS STERNI FRACTURE DUE TO A FLEXION DISTRACTION INJURY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravi Kumar TV, GadiDaksh, Jain Vinay, Rangaswamy BT

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Sternum fractures are a rare entity and occur either due to direct trauma or indirectly associated to a flexion compression injury. Earlier literatures used to describe the association of sternum fractures with upper thoracic vertebral fractures. To the best of our knowledge very few cases have been described in literature with concomitant lumbar vertebral fracture with associated sternum fracture. We hereby report a rare presentation of a flexion distraction injury leading to a concomitant sternum fracture with a L1 vertebral burst fracture.

  13. Effect of elbow flexion angles on stress distribution of the proximal ulnar and radius bones under a vertical load: measurement using resistance strain gauges

    OpenAIRE

    Rao, Zhi-Tao; Yuan, Feng; Li, Bing; Ma, Ning

    2014-01-01

    Objectives This study aimed to explore the surface stress at the proximal ends of the ulna and radius at different elbow flexion angles using the resistance strain method. Methods Eight fresh adult cadaveric elbows were tested. The forearms were fixed in a neutral position. Axial load increment experiments were conducted at four different elbow flexion angles (0°, 15°, 30°, and 45°). Surface stain was measured at six sites (tip, middle, and base of the coronoid process; back ulnar notch; olec...

  14. Psychometric properties of the Neck OutcOme Score (NOOS), Neck Disability Index (NDI) and Short form-36 (SF-36) were evaluated in patients with neck pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Tina Juul; Søgaard, Karen; Davis, Aileen M;

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess reliability, construct validity, responsiveness and interpretability for Neck OutcOme Score (NOOS), Neck Disability Index (NDI) and Short-form-36 (SF-36) in neck pain patients. STUDY DESIGN AND SETTING: Internal consistency was assessed by Cronbach's alpha. Test...... correlating subscale scores from NOOS and SF-36 and NDI items. RESULTS: At baseline 196 neck pain patients were included. Cronbach's α was adequate for most NOOS subscales, NDI and SF-36 with few exceptions. Good to excellent reliability was found for NOOS subscales (ICC 0.88-0.95), for NDI and for SF-36 with...

  15. Averages of Values of L-Series

    OpenAIRE

    Alkan, Emre; Ono, Ken

    2013-01-01

    We obtain an exact formula for the average of values of L-series over two independent odd characters. The average of any positive moment of values at s = 1 is then expressed in terms of finite cotangent sums subject to congruence conditions. As consequences, bounds on such cotangent sums, limit points for the average of first moment of L-series at s = 1 and the average size of positive moments of character sums related to the class number are deduced.

  16. Effect of interfractional shoulder motion on low neck nodal targets for patients treated using volume modulated arc therapy (VMAT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin Casey

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To quantify the dosimetric impact of interfractional shoulder motion on targets in the low neck for head and neck patients treated with volume modulated arc therapy (VMAT.Methods: Three patients with head and neck cancer were selected. All three required treatment to nodal regions in the low neck in addition to the primary tumor site. The patients were immobilized during simulation and treatment with a custom thermoplastic mask covering the head and shoulders. One VMAT plan was created for each patient utilizing two full 360° arcs and a second plan was created consisting of two superior VMAT arcs matched to an inferior static AP supraclavicular field. A CT-on-rails alignment verification was performed weekly during each patient’s treatment course. The weekly CT images were registered to the simulation CT and the target contours were deformed and applied to the weekly CT. The two VMAT plans were copied to the weekly CT datasets and recalculated to obtain the dose to the deformed low neck contours.Results: The average observed shoulder position shift in any single dimension relative to simulation was 2.5 mm. The maximum shoulder shift observed in a single dimension was 25.7 mm. Low neck target mean doses, normalized to simulation and averaged across all weekly recalculations were 0.996, 0.991, and 1.033 (Full VMAT plan and 0.986, 0.995, and 0.990 (Half-Beam VMAT plan for the three patients, respectively. The maximum observed deviation in target mean dose for any individual weekly recalculation was 6.5%, occurring with the Full VMAT plan for Patient 3.Conclusion: Interfractional variation in dose to low neck nodal regions was quantified for three head and neck patients treated with VMAT. Mean dose was 3.3% higher than planned for one patient using a Full VMAT plan. A Half-Beam technique is likely a safer choice when treating the supraclavicular region with VMAT.-------------------------------------------Cite this article as: Casey K

  17. Spectral averaging techniques for Jacobi matrices

    CERN Document Server

    del Rio, Rafael; Schulz-Baldes, Hermann

    2008-01-01

    Spectral averaging techniques for one-dimensional discrete Schroedinger operators are revisited and extended. In particular, simultaneous averaging over several parameters is discussed. Special focus is put on proving lower bounds on the density of the averaged spectral measures. These Wegner type estimates are used to analyze stability properties for the spectral types of Jacobi matrices under local perturbations.

  18. How common is hypothyroidism after external radiotherapy to neck in head and neck cancer patients?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nirmala Srikantia

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To identify the occurrence of clinical and subclinical hypothyroidism among head and neck cancer patients receiving radiation to the neck and to justify routine performing of thyroid function tests during follow-up. Materials and Methods: This is a prospective nonrandomized study of 45 patients of head and neck cancer, receiving radiotherapy (RT. Thyroid stimulating hormone and T4 estimations were done at baseline and at 4 months and 9 months following RT. Results: Of the 45 patients, 37(82.2 % were males and eight (17.8 % were females. All patients received radiation to the neck to a dose of >40Gy. 35.6% received concurrent chemotherapy. Two patients underwent prior neck dissection. Fourteen patients (31.1% were found to have clinical hypothyroidism (P value of 0.01. Five (11.1% patients were found to have subclinical hypothyroidism with a total 19 of 45 (42.2% patients developing radiation-induced hypothyroidism. Nine of 14 patients with clinical hypothyroidism were in the age group of 51 to 60 years (P=0.0522. Five of 16 patients who received chemoradiation and nine of 29 who received RT alone developed clinical hypothyroidism. Above 40 Gy radiation dose was not a relevant risk factor for hypothyroidism. Conclusion: Hypothyroidism (clinical or subclinical is an under-recognized morbidity of external radiation to the neck which is seen following a minimum dose of 40 Gy to neck. Recognizing hypothyroidism (clinical or subclinical early and treating it prevents associated complications. Hence, thyroid function tests should be made routine during follow-up.

  19. Experimental issues and interpretation of the necking phenomena in the dynamic characterization via Hopkinson bar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirone Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The usual procedures for processing experimental data from Hopkinson bars (HB are based on modeling hypotheses which, in some cases, may lead to considerable approximations. The effects of the specimen geometry and of the necking are analysed, both experimentally and by FE analyses, for assessing how much the conventional values of strain rate, strain and stress, based on strain gauges readings along the HB, are affected by approximations in different testing conditions. Also, from the way the necking affects the load/area ratio, useful considerations arise about the hardening response of metal alloys under high strain rates. The sensitivity of stress-strain curves to the time-translations of strain waves along the bars is assessed by comparing the above curves to others where the strain, the strain rate and the current cross section come from speed camera image analyses. This clearly shows that the effective strain rate in the most strained areas of the specimens is many times higher than the nominal value, and also allows to explore how much the engineering curve is poorly representative of the material response, due to strain localization in the post-necking phase. The necking-affected length compared to the total gauge length is also found to significantly influence the strain response of the specimens, in a way that can easily mislead the experimenters in the derivation of the material ductility. An empirical relationship, already found to be valid in the post-necking quasi-static regime for transforming the true stress (load / current area into an estimation of the cross section-averaged equivalent stress, is also found to apply at high strain rates if only the appropriate considerations are done on the way the equivalent stress is considered.

  20. Experimental issues and interpretation of the necking phenomena in the dynamic characterization via Hopkinson bar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirone, Giuseppe; Corallo, Domenico

    2015-09-01

    The usual procedures for processing experimental data from Hopkinson bars (HB) are based on modeling hypotheses which, in some cases, may lead to considerable approximations. The effects of the specimen geometry and of the necking are analysed, both experimentally and by FE analyses, for assessing how much the conventional values of strain rate, strain and stress, based on strain gauges readings along the HB, are affected by approximations in different testing conditions. Also, from the way the necking affects the load/area ratio, useful considerations arise about the hardening response of metal alloys under high strain rates. The sensitivity of stress-strain curves to the time-translations of strain waves along the bars is assessed by comparing the above curves to others where the strain, the strain rate and the current cross section come from speed camera image analyses. This clearly shows that the effective strain rate in the most strained areas of the specimens is many times higher than the nominal value, and also allows to explore how much the engineering curve is poorly representative of the material response, due to strain localization in the post-necking phase. The necking-affected length compared to the total gauge length is also found to significantly influence the strain response of the specimens, in a way that can easily mislead the experimenters in the derivation of the material ductility. An empirical relationship, already found to be valid in the post-necking quasi-static regime for transforming the true stress (load / current area) into an estimation of the cross section-averaged equivalent stress, is also found to apply at high strain rates if only the appropriate considerations are done on the way the equivalent stress is considered.

  1. Optimizing multimodality treatment for head and neck cancer in rural India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N P Trivedi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Multimodality treatment of head and neck cancer in rural India is not always feasible due to lack of infrastructure and logistics. Aim: To demonstrate the feasibility of multimodality treatment for head and neck cancer in a community setting in rural India. Setting and Design: Community cancer center, retrospective review. Materials and Methods: This article focuses on practice environment in a cancer clinic in rural India. We evaluated patient profile, treatment protocols, infrastructure availability, factors impacting treatment decisions, cost estimations, completion of treatment, and major treatment-related complications for the patient population treated in our clinic for a 2-year period. Results: A total of 230 head and neck cancer patients were treated with curative intent. Infrastructure support included basic operating room facility (cautery machine, suction, drill system, microscope, and anesthesia machine without ventilator support, blood bank, histopathology laboratory, and computerized tomography machine. Radiation therapy (RT facility was available in a nearby city, about 75 km away. One hundred and fifty-four (67% patients presented at an advanced stage, with 138 (60% receiving multimodality treatment. One hundred and eighty-four (80% patients underwent primary surgery and 167 (73% received radiotherapy. Two hundred and twelve (92% patients completed the treatment, 60 (26% were lost to follow-up at 18-month median follow-up (range 12-26 months, with 112 patients (66% being alive, disease free. Totally 142 were major head neck surgeries with 25 free flap reconstructions and 41 regional flaps. There were 15 (6% major post-op complications and two perioperative mortalities. Average cost of treatment for single modality treatment was approximately 40,000 INR and for multimodality treatment was 80,000 INR. Conclusions: This study demonstrates that it is feasible to provide basic multimodality treatment to head and neck

  2. Endovascular treatment of head and neck arteriovenous malformations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dmytriw, A.A. [University Health Network, Joint Department of Medical Imaging, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Ter Brugge, K.G.; Krings, T.; Agid, R. [Toronto Western Hospital, Division of Neuroradiology, Department of Medical Imaging, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2014-03-15

    Head and neck arteriovenous malformations (H and N AVM) are associated with considerable clinical and psychosocial burden and present a significant treatment challenge. We evaluated the presentation, response to treatment, and outcome of patients with H and N AVMs treated by endovascular means at our institution. Patients with H and N AVMs treated by endovascular means from 1984 to 2012 were evaluated retrospectively. These included AVMs involving the scalp, orbit, maxillofacial, and upper neck localizations. Patient's clinical files, radiological images, catheter angiograms, and surgical reports were reviewed. Eighty-nine patients with H and N AVMs (46 females, 43 males; 48 small, 41 large) received endovascular therapy. The goals of treatment were curative (n = 30), palliative (n = 34), or presurgical (n = 25). The total number of endovascular treatment sessions was 244 (average of 1.5 per patient). The goal of treatment was met in 92.1 % of cases. Eventual cure was achieved in 42 patients accounting for 58.4 % (52/89) of all patients who underwent treatment for any goal. Twenty-eight of these patients were cured by embolization alone (28/89, 31.4 %) of which 18 were single-hole AVFs. Twenty-four were cured by planned surgical excision after presurgical embolization (24/89, 27 %). Seven patients (7/89, 7.2 %) suffered transient and two (2/89, 2.2 %) permanent endovascular treatment complications. Endovascular treatment is effective for H and N AVMs and relatively safe. It is particularly effective for symptom palliation and presurgical aid. Embolization is curative mostly in small lesions and single-hole fistulas. In patients with large non-curable H and N AVMs, endovascular therapy is often the only palliative option. (orig.)

  3. flexions sur l’optimisation thermodynamique des générateurs thermoélectriques

    OpenAIRE

    Apertet, Yann

    2013-01-01

    Les phénomènes thermoélectriques sont un moyen de convertir directement l’énergie thermique en énergie électrique ; ils sont à ce titre au cœur de nombreuses recherches dans le domaine de l’énergétique. Au-delà de l’optimisation des matériaux constituants les générateurs thermoélectriques, il est également nécessaire de mener une réflexion sur la manière dont ces générateurs sont utilisés. La contribution des contacts thermiques entre le générateur et les réservoirs thermiques est un facteur ...

  4. Les religieuses au cinéma : quelques pistes de réflexion Nuns at cinema

    OpenAIRE

    Laura Pettinaroli

    2012-01-01

    Si les films consacrés aux religieuses sont souvent l’occasion de polémiques, l’approche scientifique -notamment historienne- de ces œuvres reste rare. Cet article se propose donc de définir un corpus de films consacrés aux religieuses. Pour illustrer l’intérêt de ce corpus (une cinquantaine de films réalisés dans la seconde moitié du XXe siècle à travers le monde), nous proposons d’ouvrir une réflexion autour de deux questions : la dimension historique et la figuration du cloître.The films d...

  5. Quelques sites pour poursuivre la réflexion autour des événements du 11 septembre

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Nous proposons ici quelques liens vers des pages « universitaires » qui permettent de prolonger la réflexion américaniste sur les événements du 11 septembre.Pages de la Library of Congress : http://150.156.112.3Il s’agit d’un projet archivistique conjoint LC, webArchivist.org et Pew Internet & American Life Project. Son objectif est, comme l’archive web dédiée aux élections de 2000, d’archiver des pages web rendant compte de l’impact des événements du 11 septembre et de conserver ainsi des do...

  6. Le terroir, essai d'une réflexion géographique à travers la viticulture, volume 2

    OpenAIRE

    Rouvellac, Éric

    2013-01-01

    Depuis les débuts de nos recherches nous travaillons sur le concept de terroir, sur un essai d'une réflexion géographique à travers la viticulture. Voilà pourquoi nous nous sommes intéressés à l'évolution de ce concept, à la fois dans les domaines de la recherche concernés et dans notre parcours de géographe, pour essayer de cerner un concept bicéphale entre nature et culture. Nous avons insisté à propos de la confusion qui est souvent entretenue avec le sol ou le substrat dans l'application ...

  7. Le terroir, essai d'une réflexion géographique à travers la viticulture

    OpenAIRE

    Rouvellac, Éric

    2013-01-01

    Depuis les débuts de nos recherches nous travaillons sur le concept de terroir, sur un essai d'une réflexion géographique à travers la viticulture. Voilà pourquoi nous nous sommes intéressés à l'évolution de ce concept, à la fois dans les domaines de la recherche concernés et dans notre parcours de géographe, pour essayer de cerner un concept bicéphale entre nature et culture. Nous avons insisté à propos de la confusion qui est souvent entretenue avec le sol ou le substrat dans l'application ...

  8. Avoiding complications in radical neck dissection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As reported previously, it remains our conclusion that the radical neck dissection can be performed expediently in a reasonable period of time, usually without the need of blood replacement, and is not characterized by major physiologic disability or wound complications secondary to the neck dissection alone. The presence of preoperative radiation, composite resections entering the oral cavity or pharynx, and systemic disease or debilitation, however, vastly enhance the risk of significant life threatening complications and prolong hospitalization; therefore, the use of post-operative radiation therapy in combined treatment, the use of planned fistulas and generally accepted reconstructive techniques, and a careful evaluation of the methods and technique for protection of the carotid artery are recommended

  9. Clinical and radiological profile of Hirayama disease: A flexion myelopathy due to tight cervical dural canal amenable to collar therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K M Hassan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hirayama disease (HD is benign focal amyotrophy of the distal upper limbs, often misdiagnosed as motor neuron disease. Routine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI is often reported normal. Objective: To study the clinicoradiological profile of hand wasting in young males. Materials and Methods: Patients presenting with insidious-onset hand wasting from March 2008 to May 2011 were evaluated electrophysiologically. Cervical MRI in neutral position was done in 11 patients and flexion contrast imaging was done in 10 patients. Results: All patients were males less than 25 years of age, with median age 23 years, except one patient who was 50 years old. Duration of illness was 3 months to 3 years. All (100% had oblique amyotrophy, four (36% cold paresis, 10 (91% minipolymyoclonus and three (27% had fasciculations. Regional reflexes were variably absent. Two patients (18% had brisk reflexes of lower limbs with flexor plantars. Electromyography (EMG showed chronic denervation in the C7-T1 myotomes. Neutral position MRI showed loss of cervical lordosis in 10/11 (91%, localized lower cervical cord atrophy in 9/11 (82%, asymmetric cord flattening in 11/11 (100% and intramedullary hyperintensity in 2/11 (18%; flexion study showed loss of dural attachment, anterior displacement of dorsal dura, epidural flow voids in 9/10 (90% and enhancing epidural crescent in 10/10 (100%. Clinical profile, imaging and electrophysiological findings of the patient aged 50 years will be described in detail as presentation at this age is exceptional. Collar therapy slowed progression in most cases. Conclusion: Clinical features of HD corroborated well with electrophysiological diagnosis of anterior horn cell disease of lower cervical cord. While dynamic contrast MRI is characteristic, routine studies have a high predictive value for diagnosis. Prompt diagnosis is important to institute early collar therapy.

  10. Ring apophysis fractures induced by low-load low-angle repetitive flexion in an ex-vivo cervine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbiere, Nicole C; Zeigler, Stacey L; Issen, Kathleen A; Michalek, Arthur J; Kuxhaus, Laurel

    2016-06-14

    Ring apophysis fractures of the spine occur in physically-active adolescents causing low back pain and the potential for chronic pain. Many of these fractures occur without memorable trauma, suggesting that the fractures occur during everyday movements and activities. The benign nature of this poorly understood potential mechanism of injury hampers appropriate diagnosis and early treatment. The purpose of this study was to establish an ex-vivo model of ring apophysis fracture and demonstrate that these fractures can be initiated by repetitive non-traumatic loading. Six 5-vertebra cervine lumbar (L1-L5) motion segments were cyclically loaded in low-angle low-load flexion (to 15° flexion, with peak load of 230±50N), a representative movement component of daily activities for both human and deer lumbar spines. Pinned end conditions replicated physiologically realistic loading. Ring apophysis fractures were created under low-load low-angle conditions in healthy vertebrae of similar bone mineral density and a similar degree of skeletal maturity to adolescent humans. All specimens developed ring apophysis fractures, some as early as 1400 cycles. The load-displacement data, and hysteresis loops during the cyclic loading, suggest that the fractures occurred gradually, i.e., without trauma. The ease at which these fractures were created suggests that ring apophysis fractures may be more prevalent than current diagnosis rates. Therefore, clinically, healthcare providers should include the potential for ring apophysis fracture in the differential diagnosis of all physically-active adolescents who present with back pain. PMID:27036072

  11. Outcome Analysis of Hemiarthroplasty vs. Total Hip Replacement in Displaced Femoral Neck Fractures in the Elderly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awasthi, Bhanu; Kumar, Krishna; Kohli, Navneet; Katoch, Punit

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Management of displaced fracture neck femur in the elderly population is frequently done by Hemiarthroplasty or Total Hip Replacement (THR). It avoids high rates of nonunion and avascular necrosis which usually occur after internal fixation of neck femur fractures in this age group. Aim The present study aimed to evaluate patient function and complications following hemiarthroplasty and total hip replacement in elderly population with displaced femoral neck fractures. Materials and Methods Patients above 60 years of age with displaced fracture neck femur were studied over the period of four years. All the clinical parameters and co-morbid conditions were noted at the time of presentation. The patients associated with co-morbid conditions and underlying pathology were excluded from study. Garden’s classification was used for classification of neck femur fractures. After due informed consent patients of displaced fracture neck femur were randomized by simple randomization and allocated for hemiarthroplasty or THR. Antibiotics were given preoperatively at the time of induction and postoperatively for 5-7 days. Surgery was carried out by Modified Gibson approach. Any complications during pre and postoperative period were noted. Follow-up of patients was done 1 month, 3 months, 6 months and 1 year interval with the help of Harris hip score. Results Total 80 patients were enrolled in the study group, with 40 patients in each group. The mean age of patients was 73 years in hemiarthroplasty group and 78 years in THR group. Female to male ratio was 55:45. Mean operative time was 35 minutes in hemiarthroplasty group and 45 minutes in THR. Average intraoperative blood loss was 200cc and 300cc in hemiarthroplasty and THR respectively. The mean hospital stay was 14 days in both the groups. Superficial wound infection was noted in hemiarthroplasty group while in THR group deep wound infection (n=1) and prolonged ICU stay (n=1) were noted. The mean Harris hip score

  12. A CALCULUS CHOLECYSTITIS PERFORATING AT THE NECK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayashri

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Gallbladder perforation is a rare complication of cholecystitis and cholelithiasis. The high morbidity and mortality rates associated with this condition are due to delays in diagnosis and treatment since signs and symptoms of perforation do not differ significantly from those of uncomplicated cholecystitis. We report a case of 17 year old boy who presented with perforation at the neck of gall bladder with extrusion of a stone. It was associated with bile infected with S. typhi.

  13. [Deep neck infections: a retrospective study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagnati, Tania; Olina, Massimo; Guglielmetti, Chiara; Borello, Giovanni; Valletti, Paolo Aluffi; Pia, Francesco; Garavelli, Pietro Luigi

    2007-09-01

    A retrospective study was carried out on 79 patients with deep neck infections (DNI) admitted to our Department between 1990 and 2005 in order to review our experience with DNI and verify if diabetic and immunocompromised patients have more aggressive infections and poorer prognosis. Demographics, clinical presentation, etiology, site of infection, associated systemic diseases (26.6%-21/79), microbiology, treatment and complications were considered. PMID:17902568

  14. Femoral neck fracture following groin irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The incidence and risk factors are evaluated for femoral neck fracture following groin irradiation for gynecologic malignancies. Methods and Materials: The radiation therapy records of 1313 patients with advanced and recurrent cancer of the vagina, vulva, cervix, and endometrium, treated at the Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology from 1954 to 1992, were reviewed. Median follow-up was 12.7 years. From this group, 207 patients were identified who received irradiation to the pelvis and groins with anterposterior-posterior anterior (AP-PA), 18 MV photons. Data were reviewed regarding irradiation dose to the femoral neck and other presumed risk factors including age, primary site, stage, groin node status, menopausal status, estrogen use, cigarette use, alcohol consumption, and osteoporosis. Results: The per-patient incidence of femoral neck fracture was 4.8% (10 out of 207). Four patients developed bilateral fractures. However, the cumulative actuarial incidence of fracture was 11% at 5 years and 15% at 10 years. Cox multivariate analysis of age, weight, and irradiation dose showed that only irradiation dose may be important to developing fracture. Step-wise logistic regression of presumed prognostic factors revealed that only cigarette use and x-ray evidence of osteoporosis prior to irradiation treatment were predictive of fracture. Conclusion: Femoral head fracture is a common complication of groin irradiation for gynecologic malignancies. Fracture in our database appears to be related to irradiation dose, cigarette use, and x-ray evidence of osteoporosis. Special attention should be given in treatment planning (i.e., shielding of femoral head/neck and use of appropriate electron beam energies for a portion of treatment) to reduce the incidence of this complication

  15. Pain in the Neck Following Colonoscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Cubas

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Colonoscopy remains a widely used diagnostic and therapeutic procedure. However, like any invasive investigation it has the potential of complications; extraperitoneal perforation with pneumoretroperitoneum and subcutaneous emphysema being an extremely rare example. We report such a case in a57 year old woman who presented to the emergency department with abdominal pain and diffuse chest, neck and facial surgical emphysema following a routine colonoscopy with hot snarepolypectomy.

  16. Femoral Neck Version Affects Medial Femorotibial Loading

    OpenAIRE

    T. A. Papaioannou; Georgios Digas; Ch. Bikos; Karamoulas, V.; E. A. Magnissalis

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to provide a preliminary evaluation of the possible effect that femoral version may have on the bearing equilibrium conditions developed on the medial tibiofemoral compartment. A digital 3D solid model of the left physiological adult femur was used to create morphological variations of different neck-shaft angles (varus 115, normal 125, and valgus 135 degrees) and version angles (−10, 0, and +10 degrees). By means of finite element modeling and analysis techniques (F...

  17. Hidden Beauty in Twisted Viking Neck Rings

    OpenAIRE

    Olsen, Kasper; Bohr, Jakob

    2010-01-01

    Many hoards found in Ireland, Scotland, Orkney Islands, and Scandinavia demonstrate the vikings ability to fabricate beautiful arm and neck rings of twisted silver and gold rods. Characteristic for such rings is the uniform appearance of the twisted pattern along the length of the arm ring, as well as from one arm ring to another, also when found at distant geographical locations. How can the appearance of the twisted wires be so perfectly repetitive? We demonstrate that the answer is that th...

  18. Skin Cancer of the Head and Neck

    OpenAIRE

    Ouyang, Yun-Hsuan

    2010-01-01

    The majority of skin cancers of the head and neck are nonmelanoma skin cancers (NMSC). Basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma are the most frequent types of NMSC. Malignant melanoma is an aggressive neoplasm of skin, and the ideal adjuvant therapy has not yet been found, although various options for treatment of skin cancer are available to the patient and physician, allowing high cure rate and excellent functional and cosmetic outcomes. Sunscreen protection and early evaluation of ...

  19. Review of patients with dysphasia after a neck dissection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The most useful modality for treating neck metastasis is a neck dissection. A neck dissection was previously performed as a radical neck dissection. However, disabilities in shoulder movement and swallowing function often occur after this procedure. Recently, a functional neck dissection has therefore been performed in order to avoid such postoperative complications. The current study for dysphasia after a neck dissection investigates patients with primary unknown neck metastasis and neck recurrence after chemoradiation. Eleven cases of dysphasia occurred after a neck dissection between 2003 and 2006. These cases resected the lower cranial nerves (IX, X, XII), or paralysis of these nerves occurred despite their preservation after surgery. Patients with dysphasia underwent rehabilitation to regain their swallowing function. However, rehabilitation was unsuccessful and the patients were thus required to undergo further surgery. A neck dissection with resection of the lower cranial nerves (IX, X, XII) may sometimes result in dysphasia. Consequently, surgery to prevent dysphasia should be performed simultaneously so that timely postoperative therapy can be carried out. (author)

  20. One trial treatment for postoperative fistulas of irradiated malignant tumors in the head and neck

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is very difficult to treat postoperative fistulas of irradiated malignant tumors in the head and neck. These fistulas generally require either surgical or conservative therapy, but the poor healing induced by irradiation means that a long time is required to obtain a complete cure. As one of the conservative therapies for these wounds, we first applied alcloxa powder which had been used as the treatment of either decubitis or ulcers, and we thus were able to obtain a complete cure in 8 patients without the need for any reconstructive surgery. The number of days required to obtain a complete cure of the fistulas ranged from 9 to 84 days, with an average of 39.8 days. These results indicated that this powder had an excellent efficacy on wound healing, and it should thus be used frequently on incurable postoperative fistulas after irradiation in head and neck malignancies. (author)

  1. Fibular grafting with cannulated hip screw fixation in late femoral neck fracture in young adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goyal R

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: We reviewed the operative results of fibular bone graft with cannulated hip screw fixation in femoral neck fracture in young adults. Method: Sixteen young adults with femoral neck fracture were treated by fibular bone graft with cannulated hip screw fixation. All the fractures were more than 3 weeks old. Results: Results were assessed in 15 patients while one patient died due to complications not related to surgery. Union occurred in all 15 patients. One patient had intra-operative complication in the form of screw cut out with graft in the joint space. The average fallow up was 24.4 months. Out of 15 patients assessed clinico-radiologically 11 showed good results, 3 had fair while 1 had poor result. Conclusion: We conclude that this is a simple and cost effective procedure for late femoral fleck fracture in young adults with good results.

  2. A modified face mask device for radiotherapy of head and neck tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The reproducibility during radiotherapy of head and neck tumors has been significantly improved by special devices like individual masks. However, the temporary fixation of head and neck region to the irradiation berth induces in many patients anxiety state and reduces this way the compliance. By means of modification of the device used till now a new model in which the set up mask is only coupled to the berth, could be developed. The clinical evaluation showed that this form of fixation device is much better tolerated by the patients and can be adapted without any problems to all equipment pieces in a radiotherapy department. The estimated reproducibility was comparable to that obtained with mounted device. The average translation of the central beam during 21 days observation period was 2.6±1.4 mm (0 to 9 mm) in the sagittal plane and 3.4±1.0 mm (1 to 8 mm) in the frontal plane. (orig.)

  3. Head and neck malignancies in younger patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We treated 23 (1.4% of all our primary cases) younger patients who are from 15 years old to 29 years old with head and neck malignancies at the Department of Head and Neck Surgery of the Miyagi Cancer Center Hospital for the past 12 years. There were 12 male and 11 female, and the sex ratio was approximately 1:1. There were 12 oral cancer patients, 6 epipharyngeal cancer patients and so on. There were 14 squamous cell carcinomas, 3 nasopharyngeal carcinomas and so on. 60% of all cases were squamous cell carcinomas. Clinically, advanced stage (stage III and IV) was diagnosed in 70% of patients at presentation. Although 19 patients had no past history, 2 patients had bronchial asthma, one had schizophrenia, and one had psychological disorder. Radical treatment was performed in 20 of 23 examples. The estimated Kaplan-Meier 5-year cause-specific survival rates for all patients were 76% and the 10-year cause-specific survival rates were 63%, respectively. It was thought that survival consequence was excellent in the whole. The problems of head and neck tumor treatment in a younger patient were thought about with late effect by radioactive rays and genital disorder by cancer chemotherapy. (author)

  4. SU-E-T-389: Effect of Interfractional Shoulder Motion On Low Neck Nodal Targets for Patients Treated Using Volume Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casey, K; Wong, P; Tung, S [MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To quantify the dosimetric impact of interfractional shoulder motion on targets in the low neck for head and neck patients treated with volume modulated arc therapy (VMAT). Methods: Three patients with head and neck cancer were selected. All three required treatment to nodal regions in the low neck in addition to the primary tumor. The patients were immobilized during simulation and treatment with a custom thermoplastic mask covering the head and shoulders. One VMAT plan was created for each patient utilizing two full 360° arcs. A second plan was created consisting of two superior VMAT arcs matched to an inferior static AP supraclavicular field. A CT-on-rails alignment verification was performed weekly during each patient's treatment course. The weekly CT images were registered to the simulation CT and the target contours were deformed and applied to the weekly CT. The two VMAT plans were copied to the weekly CT datasets and recalculated to obtain the dose to the low neck contours. Results: The average observed shoulder position shift in any single dimension relative to simulation was 2.5 mm. The maximum shoulder shift observed in a single dimension was 25.7 mm. Low neck target mean doses, normalized to simulation and averaged across all weekly recalculations were 0.996, 0.991, and 1.033 (Full VMAT plan) and 0.986, 0.995, and 0.990 (Half-Beam VMAT plan) for the three patients, respectively. The maximum observed deviation in target mean dose for any individual weekly recalculation was 6.5%, occurring with the Full VMAT plan for Patient 3. Conclusion: Interfractional variation in dose to low neck nodal regions was quantified for three head and neck patients treated with VMAT. Mean dose was 3.3% higher than planned for one patient using a Full VMAT plan. A Half-Beam technique is likely a safer choice when treating the supraclavicular region with VMAT.

  5. SU-E-T-389: Effect of Interfractional Shoulder Motion On Low Neck Nodal Targets for Patients Treated Using Volume Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To quantify the dosimetric impact of interfractional shoulder motion on targets in the low neck for head and neck patients treated with volume modulated arc therapy (VMAT). Methods: Three patients with head and neck cancer were selected. All three required treatment to nodal regions in the low neck in addition to the primary tumor. The patients were immobilized during simulation and treatment with a custom thermoplastic mask covering the head and shoulders. One VMAT plan was created for each patient utilizing two full 360° arcs. A second plan was created consisting of two superior VMAT arcs matched to an inferior static AP supraclavicular field. A CT-on-rails alignment verification was performed weekly during each patient's treatment course. The weekly CT images were registered to the simulation CT and the target contours were deformed and applied to the weekly CT. The two VMAT plans were copied to the weekly CT datasets and recalculated to obtain the dose to the low neck contours. Results: The average observed shoulder position shift in any single dimension relative to simulation was 2.5 mm. The maximum shoulder shift observed in a single dimension was 25.7 mm. Low neck target mean doses, normalized to simulation and averaged across all weekly recalculations were 0.996, 0.991, and 1.033 (Full VMAT plan) and 0.986, 0.995, and 0.990 (Half-Beam VMAT plan) for the three patients, respectively. The maximum observed deviation in target mean dose for any individual weekly recalculation was 6.5%, occurring with the Full VMAT plan for Patient 3. Conclusion: Interfractional variation in dose to low neck nodal regions was quantified for three head and neck patients treated with VMAT. Mean dose was 3.3% higher than planned for one patient using a Full VMAT plan. A Half-Beam technique is likely a safer choice when treating the supraclavicular region with VMAT

  6. SU-E-J-12: An Image-Guided Soft Robotic Patient Positioning System for Maskless Head-And-Neck Cancer Radiotherapy: A Proof-Of-Concept Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogunmolu, O; Gans, N [The University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, TX (United States); Jiang, S; Gu, X [UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: We propose a surface-image-guided soft robotic patient positioning system for maskless head-and-neck radiotherapy. The ultimate goal of this project is to utilize a soft robot to realize non-rigid patient positioning and real-time motion compensation. In this proof-of-concept study, we design a position-based visual servoing control system for an air-bladder-based soft robot and investigate its performance in controlling the flexion/extension cranial motion on a mannequin head phantom. Methods: The current system consists of Microsoft Kinect depth camera, an inflatable air bladder (IAB), pressured air source, pneumatic valve actuators, custom-built current regulators, and a National Instruments myRIO microcontroller. The performance of the designed system was evaluated on a mannequin head, with a ball joint fixed below its neck to simulate torso-induced head motion along flexion/extension direction. The IAB is placed beneath the mannequin head. The Kinect camera captures images of the mannequin head, extracts the face, and measures the position of the head relative to the camera. This distance is sent to the myRIO, which runs control algorithms and sends actuation commands to the valves, inflating and deflating the IAB to induce head motion. Results: For a step input, i.e. regulation of the head to a constant displacement, the maximum error was a 6% overshoot, which the system then reduces to 0% steady-state error. In this initial investigation, the settling time to reach the regulated position was approximately 8 seconds, with 2 seconds of delay between the command start of motion due to capacitance of the pneumatics, for a total of 10 seconds to regulate the error. Conclusion: The surface image-guided soft robotic patient positioning system can achieve accurate mannequin head flexion/extension motion. Given this promising initial Result, the extension of the current one-dimensional soft robot control to multiple IABs for non-rigid positioning control

  7. SU-E-J-12: An Image-Guided Soft Robotic Patient Positioning System for Maskless Head-And-Neck Cancer Radiotherapy: A Proof-Of-Concept Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: We propose a surface-image-guided soft robotic patient positioning system for maskless head-and-neck radiotherapy. The ultimate goal of this project is to utilize a soft robot to realize non-rigid patient positioning and real-time motion compensation. In this proof-of-concept study, we design a position-based visual servoing control system for an air-bladder-based soft robot and investigate its performance in controlling the flexion/extension cranial motion on a mannequin head phantom. Methods: The current system consists of Microsoft Kinect depth camera, an inflatable air bladder (IAB), pressured air source, pneumatic valve actuators, custom-built current regulators, and a National Instruments myRIO microcontroller. The performance of the designed system was evaluated on a mannequin head, with a ball joint fixed below its neck to simulate torso-induced head motion along flexion/extension direction. The IAB is placed beneath the mannequin head. The Kinect camera captures images of the mannequin head, extracts the face, and measures the position of the head relative to the camera. This distance is sent to the myRIO, which runs control algorithms and sends actuation commands to the valves, inflating and deflating the IAB to induce head motion. Results: For a step input, i.e. regulation of the head to a constant displacement, the maximum error was a 6% overshoot, which the system then reduces to 0% steady-state error. In this initial investigation, the settling time to reach the regulated position was approximately 8 seconds, with 2 seconds of delay between the command start of motion due to capacitance of the pneumatics, for a total of 10 seconds to regulate the error. Conclusion: The surface image-guided soft robotic patient positioning system can achieve accurate mannequin head flexion/extension motion. Given this promising initial Result, the extension of the current one-dimensional soft robot control to multiple IABs for non-rigid positioning control

  8. Effect of short-term application of kinesio tape on the flexion-relaxation phenomenon, trunk postural control and trunk repositioning in healthy females.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruggiero, Sara A; Frost, Lydia R; Vallis, Lori Ann; Brown, Stephen H M

    2016-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the potential effects of kinesio tape on the flexion-relaxation phenomenon, trunk postural control and trunk position sense when applied for a short period (30 min) to the low back of healthy female participants. Twenty-four participants were assigned to one of two groups: kinesio tape applied in either the recommended stretched or non-stretched (control) manner over the low back. Tests were performed at three time points (pre-tape, with tape, post-tape) to assess low-back muscle flexion-relaxation, position sense during active trunk repositioning and trunk postural control during seated balance. Results demonstrated that wearing kinesio tape did not affect the angle at which the erector spinae muscles became silent during trunk flexion (flexion-relaxation). Trunk repositioning error increased when wearing kinesio tape in both the stretched and non-stretched manner, and this increased error persisted after the tape was removed. Seated balance control improved when wearing kinesio tape in both the stretched and non-stretched manner, and these improvements persisted after the tape was removed. In conclusion, these findings do not support the general suggestions that short-term use of kinesio tape on the low-back region alter low-back muscle activation and enhance tasks related to proprioception, at least under these taping conditions in a group of healthy females. PMID:26252507

  9. UNILATERAL BIG HOCKEY STICK INCISION FOR NECK DISSECTION IN HEAD AND NECK CARCINOMA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘宝国; 赵振生; 李明强; 陈荣鋭; 王建军; 张乃嵩

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To investigate for the feasibility and advantages performed by the unilateral big hockey stick incision (BHSI) in head and neck carcinoma. Methods: Neck dissection by using the unilateral big hockey stick incision (BHSI) was performed on 93 patients with head and neck carcinoma. Results: The big hockey stick incision has a cosmetic scar and not scar contraction and is barely visible and easily covered in hair and clothing; sufficient exposure of the operation field; a small area of marginal necrosis was occasionally seen at the apex of the skin flap due to having preoperative radiotherapy. Conclusion: The unilateral big hockey stick incision has adequate surgical access, good healing of skin flaps, and a good cosmetic result.

  10. Effect of training with neuromuscular electrical stimulation on elbow flexion strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    R Holcomb, William

    2006-01-01

    Neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) may be used to prevent strength loss associated with post-surgical immobilization. Most studies testing the effectiveness of NMES have trained the knee extensors. The purpose of this investigation was to test the effectiveness of NMES when training the elbow flexors. Twenty-four students were randomly assigned to one of three groups: NMES training, isometric training or control. Testing and training were completed using a Biodex™ dynamometer. After a standard warm-up, subjects were positioned on the Biodex™ with left shoulder in anatomical neutral, elbow flexed to 90(o) and forearm supinated. Subjects performed three maximum isometric contractions of 5 seconds duration, with 1 min rest between repetitions. Average peak torque during three repetitions was calculated. Subjects trained on three days per week for four weeks. Training included 15 maximum contractions of 15 seconds duration with 45 seconds recovery between repetitions. Russian current was delivered by a Forte™ 400 Combo via electrodes placed over ends of biceps brachii. A maximum tolerable ramped intensity was delivered with frequency of 90 bps and duty cycle of 15:45. After training, subjects were post-tested in a manner identical to pretest. Mean normalized strength data were analyzed using a 3 (Group) x 2 (Test) ANOVA. The Group x Test interaction was significant. Post-hoc analyses revealed that the voluntary training group (normalized means of 0.49 to 0.71 for the pretest and post-test, respectively) had a significantly greater increase than the other two groups, which were not significantly different from each other. The lack of significant strength gains with NMES was likely due to low average training intensity, which was only 20.4% of MVIC. Based on these results, NMES training may not be an effective alternative to voluntary training in healthy subjects. Key PointsTraining the elbow flexors with voluntary isometric contractions produced

  11. An Average Body Circumference Can Be a Substitute for Body Mass Index in Women

    OpenAIRE

    Antonis Polymeris; Peter D. Papapetrou; Georgios Katsoulis

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Significant correlations between BMI and some body circumferences have been previously reported. In this study we investigated if the average of the sum of eight body circumferences can be a substitute for BMI. Patients and Methods. BMI and eight body circumferences (neck, waist, hip, arm, forearm, wrist, thigh, and ankle) were measured in 193 apparently healthy women aged 20–83, and within a wide range of BMI. Women with BMI ≤ 24.9 were designated as normal, with BMI 25–29.9 as...

  12. Comparison of fixed-flexion positioning with fluoroscopic semi-flexed positioning for quantifying radiographic joint-space width in the knee: test-retest reproducibility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To compare fixed-flexion radiography of the knee with fluoroscopic semi-flexed radiography in terms of the reproducibility of measurements of minimum joint-space width (JSW) in the medial femorotibial joint. Posteroanterior radiographs of the right knees of 18 normal volunteers were acquired with the patients standing on an upright fluoroscopy table, the feet externally rotated 10 and the toes touching the vertical table. Knees were positioned and radiographed with two different techniques: (1) semi-flexed positioning under fluoroscopic guidance using a horizontal X-ray beam; and (2) fixed-flexion positioning, with the knees and thighs touching the vertical table, using 10 caudal beam angulation without fluoroscopy. Foot maps were drawn in each case. Subjects were repositioned and radiographed twice using each technique. The posteroanterior beam angle that optimally projected the medial tibia plateau with the patient in the fixed-flexion position was also determined for each subject in a separate examination using fluoroscopy. Ten patients with osteoarthritis were also examined with the fixed-flexion technique using a conventional radiographic unit. Minimum medial joint-space width (JSW) in the medial femorotibial joint was measured manually with a graduated lens and also with a semi-automated computer algorithm. Reproducibility errors (root-mean-square SD) for manual and automated JSW measurement were 0.2 mm and 0.1 mm, respectively, for fluoroscopic semi-flexed positioning in volunteers; 0.3 mm and 0.1 mm, respectively, for fixed-flexion positioning in volunteers; and 0.2 mm and 0.1 mm, respectively, for fixed-flexion positioning in osteoarthritic patients. The optimal beam angle for visualizing the joint space was 9.0 ±3.6 . Fixed-flexion, non-fluoroscopic radiography of the knee can provide reproducible JSW measurement using widely available X-ray equipment. This technique is more feasible for multicenter clinical studies and routine clinical use than are

  13. Average-cost based robust structural control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagood, Nesbitt W.

    1993-01-01

    A method is presented for the synthesis of robust controllers for linear time invariant structural systems with parameterized uncertainty. The method involves minimizing quantities related to the quadratic cost (H2-norm) averaged over a set of systems described by real parameters such as natural frequencies and modal residues. Bounded average cost is shown to imply stability over the set of systems. Approximations for the exact average are derived and proposed as cost functionals. The properties of these approximate average cost functionals are established. The exact average and approximate average cost functionals are used to derive dynamic controllers which can provide stability robustness. The robustness properties of these controllers are demonstrated in illustrative numerical examples and tested in a simple SISO experiment on the MIT multi-point alignment testbed.

  14. Coherent ensemble averaging techniques for impedance cardiography

    OpenAIRE

    Hurwitz, Barry E.; Shyu, Liang-Yu; Reddy, Sridhar P; Schneiderman, Neil; Nagel, Joachim H.

    1990-01-01

    EKG synchronized ensemble averaging of the impedance cardiogram tends to blur or suppress signal events due to signal jitter or event latency variability. Although ensemble averaging provides some improvement in the stability of the signal and signal to noise ratio under conditions of nonperiodic influences of respiration and motion, coherent averaging techniques were developed to determine whether further enhancement of the impedance cardiogram could be obtained. Physiological signals were o...

  15. MEASUREMENT AND MODELLING AVERAGE PHOTOSYNTHESIS OF MAIZE

    OpenAIRE

    ZS LÕKE

    2005-01-01

    The photosynthesis of fully developed maize was investigated in the Agrometeorological Research Station Keszthely, in 2000. We used LI-6400 type measurement equipment to locate measurement points where the intensity of photosynthesis mostly nears the average. So later we could obtain average photosynthetic activities featuring the crop, with only one measurement. To check average photosynthesis of maize we used Goudriaan’s simulation model (CMSM) as well to calculate values on cloudless sampl...

  16. EFFECT OF TRAINING WITH NEUROMUSCULAR ELECTRICAL STIMULATION ON ELBOW FLEXION STRENGTH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William R. Holcomb

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES may be used to prevent strength loss associated with post-surgical immobilization. Most studies testing the effectiveness of NMES have trained the knee extensors. The purpose of this investigation was to test the effectiveness of NMES when training the elbow flexors. Twenty-four students were randomly assigned to one of three groups: NMES training, isometric training or control. Testing and training were completed using a Biodex™ dynamometer. After a standard warm-up, subjects were positioned on the Biodex™ with left shoulder in anatomical neutral, elbow flexed to 90o and forearm supinated. Subjects performed three maximum isometric contractions of 5 seconds duration, with 1 min rest between repetitions. Average peak torque during three repetitions was calculated. Subjects trained on three days per week for four weeks. Training included 15 maximum contractions of 15 seconds duration with 45 seconds recovery between repetitions. Russian current was delivered by a Forte™ 400 Combo via electrodes placed over ends of biceps brachii. A maximum tolerable ramped intensity was delivered with frequency of 90 bps and duty cycle of 15:45. After training, subjects were post-tested in a manner identical to pretest. Mean normalized strength data were analyzed using a 3 (Group x 2 (Test ANOVA. The Group x Test interaction was significant. Post-hoc analyses revealed that the voluntary training group (normalized means of 0.49 to 0.71 for the pretest and post-test, respectively had a significantly greater increase than the other two groups, which were not significantly different from each other. The lack of significant strength gains with NMES was likely due to low average training intensity, which was only 20.4% of MVIC. Based on these results, NMES training may not be an effective alternative to voluntary training in healthy subjects

  17. [Effect of recognition of head and neck malignancies on patients' psychosomatic condition and personality].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamagiwa, M; Sakakura, Y; Ukai, K; Majima, Y; Hamaguchi, Y; Harada, T; Kubo, M

    1991-09-01

    In order to elucidate the effect of recognition of head and neck malignancies on patients' psychosomatic condition and personality, we applied the Cornell Medical Index Health Questionnaire (CMI) and the Maudsley Personality Inventory (MPI) and collected medical and psychological data from 35 male (42-78 years of age; average 62.5) and 15 female (20-76 years of age; average 54.7) patients with malignant head and neck tumors (10 nose and paranasal, 8 oral, 8 pharyngeal, 14 laryngeal, 6 thyroid gland and 4 others). The two tests were done twice for each patients; at first immediately before hospitalization for treatment of the tumors at Mie University Hospital and secondly just before discharge from the hospital. The period of hospitalization ranged 1 to 13 months, average 3.3 months. At the end of hospitalization doctors and nurses who had mainly taken care of the patients estimated the patients' recognition of their malignancy by analyzing behavior and information mainly from their family and classified patients into three groups; Group R (Patients who recognized that they were patients with head and neck malignancies) comprised 22 patients, Group N (who did not recognize the condition) comprised 15 and Group U (who could not be classified into Groups R or N) comprised 13. Comparison among the three groups revealed the followings. 1) Patients in Group R were relatively young (average 56.3 years) and extrovert (estimated by MPI) and their somatic and psychological complaints registered on the CMI were less than those in other 2 groups. Psychosomatic condition after recognition that they had been patients with malignant tumors was better than before.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1744792

  18. NOAA Average Annual Salinity (3-Zone)

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — The 3-Zone Average Annual Salinity Digital Geography is a digital spatial framework developed using geographic information system (GIS) technology. These salinity...

  19. ASSESSMENT OF RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN NECK SHAFT ANGLE AND NECK LENGTH WITH INTEREPICONDYLAR DISTANCE IN FEMUR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ishita Ghosh

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Femur is the longest and strongest bone of the body. It transmits body weight from hip bone to tibia in standing position. Femoral neck is a constricted part connecting head with shaft at an angle of about 125°-known as angle of inclination or neck shaft angle (NSA; this facilitates the movement of hip joint enabling the limb to swing clear of pelvis. Abnormal femoral neck angle (FNA may be associated with various clinical problems ranging from harmless in toeing gait in childhood to disabling osteoarthritis in adults. The current study attempted to find out if a co-relation exists between those parameters and other clinically measurable variables like inter-epicondylar distance or distance between greater trochanter to lateral epicondyle. This may help to predict the risk of fracture neck femur without any risk of radiation exposure and proper prophylactic measures can be undertaken (Vit-D, calcium to decrease risk of fracture. Results: Measurements were taken in dry femora mostly in East Indian population. Variables that were measured in 158 dry femora (85 femora from left side and 73 from the right side are: - a Neck shaft angle of femur, b Neck length of femur, c Neck circumference of femur, d Inter-epicondylar distance of femur, e Distance between lateral epicondyle and greater trochanter of femur. No significant difference was found between the right and left sided femoral groups regarding any of the study variables. From the analysis it was revealed that no positive or negative correlation exists between the study variables. Therefore, it is not possible to predict the value of one or more of them from the magnitude of the other variable(s. Conclusions: Our study attempted to find out if it was possible to predict the risk of fracture neck femur by simple clinical procedure without exposing the subjects to radiation hazards associated with a radiological imaging. A screening test and subsequent prophylactic measures could

  20. An individual approach for optimizing ankle-foot orthoses to improve mobility in children with spastic cerebral palsy walking with excessive knee flexion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerkum, Yvette L; Harlaar, Jaap; Buizer, Annemieke I; van den Noort, Josien C; Becher, Jules G; Brehm, Merel-Anne

    2016-05-01

    Ankle-Foot Orthoses (AFOs) are commonly prescribed to promote gait in children with cerebral palsy (CP). The AFO prescription process is however largely dependent on clinical experience, resulting in confusing results regarding treatment efficacy. To maximize efficacy, the AFO's mechanical properties should be tuned to the patient's underlying impairments. This study aimed to investigate whether the efficacy of a ventral shell AFO (vAFO) to reduce knee flexion and walking energy cost could be improved by individually optimizing AFO stiffness in children with CP walking with excessive knee flexion. Secondarily, the effect of the optimized vAFO on daily walking activity was investigated. Fifteen children with spastic CP were prescribed with a hinged vAFO with adjustable stiffness. Effects of a rigid, stiff, and flexible setting on knee angle and the net energy cost (EC) [Jkg(-1)m(-1)] were assessed to individually select the optimal stiffness. After three months, net EC, daily walking activity [stridesmin(-1)] and knee angle [deg] while walking with the optimized vAFO were compared to walking with shoes-only. A near significant 9% (p=0.077) decrease in net EC (-0.5Jkg(-1)m(-1)) was found for walking with the optimized vAFO compared to shoes-only. Daily activity remained unchanged. Knee flexion in stance was reduced by 2.4° (p=0.006). These results show that children with CP who walk with excessive knee flexion show a small, but significant reduction of knee flexion in stance as a result of wearing individually optimized vAFOs. Data suggest that this also improves gait efficiency for which an individual approach to AFO prescription is emphasized. PMID:27131186

  1. Head and neck paragangliomas: clinical and molecular genetic classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Offergeld, Christian; Brase, Christoph; Yaremchuk, Svetlana; Mader, Irina; Rischke, Hans Christian; Gläsker, Sven; Schmid, Kurt W; Wiech, Thorsten; Preuss, Simon F; Suárez, Carlos; Kopeć, Tomasz; Patocs, Attila; Wohllk, Nelson; Malekpour, Mahdi; Boedeker, Carsten C; Neumann, Hartmut P H

    2012-01-01

    Head and neck paragangliomas are tumors arising from specialized neural crest cells. Prominent locations are the carotid body along with the vagal, jugular, and tympanic glomus. Head and neck paragangliomas are slowly growing tumors, with some carotid body tumors being reported to exist for many years as a painless lateral mass on the neck. Symptoms depend on the specific locations. In contrast to paraganglial tumors of the adrenals, abdomen and thorax, head and neck paragangliomas seldom release catecholamines and are hence rarely vasoactive. Petrous bone, jugular, and tympanic head and neck paragangliomas may cause hearing loss. The internationally accepted clinical classifications for carotid body tumors are based on the Shamblin Class I-III stages, which correspond to postoperative permanent side effects. For petrous-bone paragangliomas in the head and neck, the Fisch classification is used. Regarding the molecular genetics, head and neck paragangliomas have been associated with nine susceptibility genes: NF1, RET, VHL, SDHA, SDHB, SDHC, SDHD, SDHAF2 (SDH5), and TMEM127. Hereditary HNPs are mostly caused by mutations of the SDHD gene, but SDHB and SDHC mutations are not uncommon in such patients. Head and neck paragangliomas are rarely associated with mutations of VHL, RET, or NF1. The research on SDHA, SDHAF2 and TMEM127 is ongoing. Multiple head and neck paragangliomas are common in patients with SDHD mutations, while malignant head and neck paraganglioma is mostly seen in patients with SDHB mutations. The treatment of choice is surgical resection. Good postoperative results can be expected in carotid body tumors of Shamblin Class I and II, whereas operations on other carotid body tumors and other head and neck paragangliomas frequently result in deficits of the cranial nerves adjacent to the tumors. Slow growth and the tendency of hereditary head and neck paragangliomas to be multifocal may justify less aggressive treatment strategies. PMID:22584701

  2. Head and neck paragangliomas: clinical and molecular genetic classification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Offergeld

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Head and neck paragangliomas are tumors arising from specialized neural crest cells. Prominent locations are the carotid body along with the vagal, jugular, and tympanic glomus. Head and neck paragangliomas are slowly growing tumors, with some carotid body tumors being reported to exist for many years as a painless lateral mass on the neck. Symptoms depend on the specific locations. In contrast to paraganglial tumors of the adrenals, abdomen and thorax, head and neck paragangliomas seldom release catecholamines and are hence rarely vasoactive. Petrous bone, jugular, and tympanic head and neck paragangliomas may cause hearing loss. The internationally accepted clinical classifications for carotid body tumors are based on the Shamblin Class I-III stages, which correspond to postoperative permanent side effects. For petrous-bone paragangliomas in the head and neck, the Fisch classification is used. Regarding the molecular genetics, head and neck paragangliomas have been associated with nine susceptibility genes: NF1, RET, VHL, SDHA, SDHB, SDHC, SDHD, SDHAF2 (SDH5, and TMEM127. Hereditary HNPs are mostly caused by mutations of the SDHD gene, but SDHB and SDHC mutations are not uncommon in such patients. Head and neck paragangliomas are rarely associated with mutations of VHL, RET, or NF1. The research on SDHA, SDHAF2 and TMEM127 is ongoing. Multiple head and neck paragangliomas are common in patients with SDHD mutations, while malignant head and neck paraganglioma is mostly seen in patients with SDHB mutations. The treatment of choice is surgical resection. Good postoperative results can be expected in carotid body tumors of Shamblin Class I and II, whereas operations on other carotid body tumors and other head and neck paragangliomas frequently result in deficits of the cranial nerves adjacent to the tumors. Slow growth and the tendency of hereditary head and neck paragangliomas to be multifocal may justify less aggressive treatment strategies.

  3. A CLINICORADIOLOGICAL STUDY OF NECK INJURIES AND THEIR MANAGEMENT

    OpenAIRE

    Avinash; Sangma

    2014-01-01

    AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: 1. To study the incidence of various neck injuries in patients attending ENT OPD/admitted in ENT ward. 2. To evaluate the distribution in age, sex, modes of presentation and nature of injury (suicidal, homicidal or accidental) 3. To categorize neck injuries according to zones of involvement. 4. To study cases of neck injuries where tracheostomy was needed/blood transfusion was required. TYPE OF STUDY: A prospective clinical study. MATERIALS AND METHODS...

  4. PREVALENCE OF NECK DISABILITY AMONG DENTAL PROFESSIONALS IN NORTH INDIA

    OpenAIRE

    Anshul; Parul; Sandeep; Akanksha

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT: AIM: (The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence and severity of neck pain in dentists of north India) [h1]. MATERIALS AND METHODS : Following ethical approval, a cross sectional study was conducted on 74 randomly selected dentists. Questionnaires were used to collect personal and occupational characteristics as well as the prevalence and risk factors of neck pain. Subjects were assessed by visual analogue scale and neck disability questionnaire...

  5. Neck Proprioception Shapes Body Orientation and Perception of Motion

    OpenAIRE

    Vito Enrico Pettorossi; Marco Schieppati

    2014-01-01

    This review article deals with some effects of neck muscle proprioception on human balance, gait trajectory, subjective straight-ahead, and self-motion perception. These effects are easily observed during neck muscle vibration, a strong stimulus for the spindle primary afferent fibers. We first remind the early findings on human balance, gait trajectory, subjective straight-ahead, induced by limb and neck muscle vibration. Then, more recent findings on self-motion perception of vestibular...

  6. Cortical bone distribution in the femoral neck of strepsirhine primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demes, B; Jungers, W L; Walker, C

    2000-10-01

    The thickness of the inferior and superior cortices of the femoral neck was measured on X-rays of 181 strepsirhine primate femora representing 24 species. Neck length, neck depth and neck-shaft angle were also measured. The strength of the femoral neck in frontal bending was estimated by modeling the neck as a hollow cylinder, with neck depth as the outer diameter and cortical thickness representing the superior and inferior shell dimensions. Results indicate that the inferior cortex is always thicker than the superior cortex. The ratio of superior to inferior cortical thickness is highly variable but distinguishes two of the three locomotor groups in the sample. Vertical clingers and leapers have higher ratios (i.e., a more even distribution of cortical bone) than quadrupeds. The slow climbers tend to have the lowest ratios, although they do not differ significantly from the leapers and quadrupeds. These results do not confirm prior theoretical expectations and reported data for anthropoid primates that link greater asymmetry of the cortical shell to more stereotypical hip excursions. The ratio of superior to inferior cortical thickness is unrelated to body mass, femoral neck length, and neck-shaft angle, calling into question whether the short neck of strepsirhine primates acts as a cantilever beam in bending. On the other hand, the estimated section moduli are highly correlated with body mass and neck length, a correlation that is driven primarily by body mass. In conclusion, we believe that an alternative interpretation to the cantilever beam model is needed to explain the asymmetry in bone distribution in the femoral neck, at least in strepsirhine primates (e.g., a thicker inferior cortex is required to reinforce the strongly curved inferior surface). As in prior studies of cross-sectional geometry of long bones, we found slightly positive allometry of cortical dimensions with body mass. PMID:11006046

  7. Improving consensus structure by eliminating averaging artifacts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KC Dukka B

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Common structural biology methods (i.e., NMR and molecular dynamics often produce ensembles of molecular structures. Consequently, averaging of 3D coordinates of molecular structures (proteins and RNA is a frequent approach to obtain a consensus structure that is representative of the ensemble. However, when the structures are averaged, artifacts can result in unrealistic local geometries, including unphysical bond lengths and angles. Results Herein, we describe a method to derive representative structures while limiting the number of artifacts. Our approach is based on a Monte Carlo simulation technique that drives a starting structure (an extended or a 'close-by' structure towards the 'averaged structure' using a harmonic pseudo energy function. To assess the performance of the algorithm, we applied our approach to Cα models of 1364 proteins generated by the TASSER structure prediction algorithm. The average RMSD of the refined model from the native structure for the set becomes worse by a mere 0.08 Å compared to the average RMSD of the averaged structures from the native structure (3.28 Å for refined structures and 3.36 A for the averaged structures. However, the percentage of atoms involved in clashes is greatly reduced (from 63% to 1%; in fact, the majority of the refined proteins had zero clashes. Moreover, a small number (38 of refined structures resulted in lower RMSD to the native protein versus the averaged structure. Finally, compared to PULCHRA 1, our approach produces representative structure of similar RMSD quality, but with much fewer clashes. Conclusion The benchmarking results demonstrate that our approach for removing averaging artifacts can be very beneficial for the structural biology community. Furthermore, the same approach can be applied to almost any problem where averaging of 3D coordinates is performed. Namely, structure averaging is also commonly performed in RNA secondary prediction 2, which

  8. Predicting Neck Abscess with Contrast-Enhanced Computed Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melisa Lim Seer Yee

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Neck abscesses are difficult to diagnose and treat. Currently, contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CECT is the imaging modality of choice. The study aims to determine the predictive value of CECT findings in diagnosing neck abscess, causes of neck abscess and the most common neck space involved in the local population. 84 consecutive patients clinically suspected to have neck abscess who underwent CECT and surgical confirmation of pus were included. Demographic and clinical data were recorded. 75 patients were diagnosed as having neck abscess on CECT; out of those 71 patients were found to have pus. Overall CECT findings were found to have a high sensitivity (98.6% and positive predictive value (PPV (94.7% but lower specificity (67.2% in diagnosing neck abscess. The CECT diagnostic criterion with the highest PPV is the presence of rim irregularity (96%. The most common deep neck space involved is the submandibular compartment, which correlates with the finding that odontogenic cause was the most common identifiable cause of abscess in the study population. Thus, in a patient clinically suspected of having neck abscess, CECT findings of a hypodense mass with rim irregularity are helpful in confirming the diagnosis and guiding clinical management.

  9. Femoral neck buttressing: a radiographic and histologic analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective. To examine the incidence, radiographic and histologic findings of medial femoral neck buttressing in a consecutive group of patients undergoing total hip arthroplasty.Design. Biomechanical parameters were evaluated on standard anteroposterior pelvic radiographs of 113 patients prior to hip replacement surgery. Demographic information on all patients was reviewed and histologic evaluation was performed on specimens obtained at the time of surgery.Results. The incidence of medial femoral neck buttressing was found to be 50% in a consecutive series of patients undergoing total hip arthroplasty. The incidence was slightly higher in women (56% vs 41%). Patients with buttressing had increased neck-shaft angles and smaller femoral neck diameters than were seen in patients without buttressing. Histologic evaluation demonstrated that the buttress resulted from deposition bone by the periosteum on the femoral neck in the absence of any evidence of femoral neck fracture.Conclusion. It would appear that femoral neck buttressing occurs in response to increased joint reactive forces seen at the hip being transmitted through the femoral neck. The increased joint reactive force can be related to the increased neck shaft angle seen in patients with buttressing. (orig.)

  10. Digital subtraction angiography in head and neck radiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carmody, R.F.; Seeger, J.F.; Smith, R.L.; Horsley, W.W.; Miller, R.W.

    1984-07-01

    Intravenous digital subtraction angiography (IVDSA) was used to evaluate 44 patients with suspected otolaryngologic abnormalities. Sixteen had IVDSA for pulsatile tinnitus or suspected glomus tumor of the petrous bone. Nine patients were evaluated because of pulsatile neck masses, and 12 others had suspected tumors of the neck, face, and paranasal sinuses. Seven had IVDSA following head and neck trauma. The technique of examination is described. The current indications of IVDSA in head and neck radiology are discussed. It is concluded that IVDSA is a suitable substitute for conventional angiography for many otolaryngologic conditions and, because of its safety, can be used more liberally.

  11. Cervicopectoral flap in head and neck cancer surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sivrioglu Nazan S

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Reconstruction of the head and neck after adequate resection of primary tumor and neck dissection is a challenge. It should be performed at one sitting in advanced tumors. Defects caused by the resection should be closed with flaps which match in color, texture and hair bearing characteristics with the face. Cervicopectoral flap is a one such flap from chest and neck skin mainly used to cover the cheek defects. Methods This study included twelve patients presenting with cancer of the head and neck to Izmir Ataturk Training Hospital and Adnan Menderes University Hospital. Tumor resection and neck dissection was performed in one session by the same surgeon. A single incision was made and a medially based cervicopectoral fascio-cutaneous flap was used for surgical exposure in neck dissection and for closure of defects after tumor resection. Results There was no major complication. Two flaps had partial superficial epidermolysis at the suture line. Good aesthetic and functional results were achieved. Conclusion The cervicopectoral flap is an excellent alternative for the reconstruction of head and neck. Harvesting and application of the flap is rapid and safe. Only a single incision is sufficient for dissection and flap elevation. This flap achieves perfect surgical exposure, makes neck dissection easy and allows one to perform both tumor resection and neck dissection in one session.

  12. Corrosion behavior of tantalum-coated cobalt-chromium modular necks compared to titanium modular necks in a simulator test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorn, Ulrich; Neumann, Daniel; Frank, Mario

    2014-04-01

    This study compared the corrosion behavior of tantalum-coated cobalt-chromium modular necks with that of titanium alloy modular necks at their junction to titanium-alloy femoral stem. Tests were performed in a dry assembly and two wet assemblies, one contaminated with calf serum and the other contaminated with calf serum and bone particles. Whereas the titanium modular neck tested in the dry assembly showed no signs of corrosion, the titanium modular necks tested in both wet assemblies showed marked depositions and corrosive attacks. By contrast, the tantalum-coated cobalt-chromium modular necks showed no traces of corrosion or chemical attack in any of the three assemblies. This study confirms the protective effect of tantalum coating the taper region of cobalt-chromium modular neck components, suggesting that the use of tantalum may reduce the risk of implant failure due to corrosion. PMID:24099841

  13. A note on generalized averaged Gaussian formulas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spalevic, Miodrag

    2007-11-01

    We have recently proposed a very simple numerical method for constructing the averaged Gaussian quadrature formulas. These formulas exist in many more cases than the real positive Gauss?Kronrod formulas. In this note we try to answer whether the averaged Gaussian formulas are an adequate alternative to the corresponding Gauss?Kronrod quadrature formulas, to estimate the remainder term of a Gaussian rule.

  14. Average Transmission Probability of a Random Stack

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yin; Miniatura, Christian; Englert, Berthold-Georg

    2010-01-01

    The transmission through a stack of identical slabs that are separated by gaps with random widths is usually treated by calculating the average of the logarithm of the transmission probability. We show how to calculate the average of the transmission probability itself with the aid of a recurrence relation and derive analytical upper and lower…

  15. Labour Turnover Costs and Average Labour Demand

    OpenAIRE

    Bertola, Giuseppe

    1991-01-01

    The effect of labour turnover costs on average employment in a partial equilibrium model of labour demand, depends on the form of the revenue function, on the rates of discount and labour attrition, and on the relative size of hiring and firing costs. If discount and attrition rates are strictly positive, firing costs may well increase average employment even when hiring costs reduce it.

  16. 40 CFR 76.11 - Emissions averaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Emissions averaging. 76.11 Section 76...) ACID RAIN NITROGEN OXIDES EMISSION REDUCTION PROGRAM § 76.11 Emissions averaging. (a) General provisions. In lieu of complying with the applicable emission limitation in § 76.5, 76.6, or 76.7,...

  17. New results on averaging theory and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cândido, Murilo R.; Llibre, Jaume

    2016-08-01

    The usual averaging theory reduces the computation of some periodic solutions of a system of ordinary differential equations, to find the simple zeros of an associated averaged function. When one of these zeros is not simple, i.e., the Jacobian of the averaged function in it is zero, the classical averaging theory does not provide information about the periodic solution associated to a non-simple zero. Here we provide sufficient conditions in order that the averaging theory can be applied also to non-simple zeros for studying their associated periodic solutions. Additionally, we do two applications of this new result for studying the zero-Hopf bifurcation in the Lorenz system and in the Fitzhugh-Nagumo system.

  18. The Hubble rate in averaged cosmology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The calculation of the averaged Hubble expansion rate in an averaged perturbed Friedmann-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker cosmology leads to small corrections to the background value of the expansion rate, which could be important for measuring the Hubble constant from local observations. It also predicts an intrinsic variance associated with the finite scale of any measurement of H0, the Hubble rate today. Both the mean Hubble rate and its variance depend on both the definition of the Hubble rate and the spatial surface on which the average is performed. We quantitatively study different definitions of the averaged Hubble rate encountered in the literature by consistently calculating the backreaction effect at second order in perturbation theory, and compare the results. We employ for the first time a recently developed gauge-invariant definition of an averaged scalar. We also discuss the variance of the Hubble rate for the different definitions

  19. Average luminosity distance in inhomogeneous universes

    CERN Document Server

    Kostov, Valentin

    2010-01-01

    Using numerical ray tracing, the paper studies how the average distance modulus in an inhomogeneous universe differs from its homogeneous counterpart. The averaging is over all directions from a fixed observer not over all possible observers (cosmic), thus it is more directly applicable to our observations. Unlike previous studies, the averaging is exact, non-perturbative, and includes all possible non-linear effects. The inhomogeneous universes are represented by Sweese-cheese models containing random and simple cubic lattices of mass-compensated voids. The Earth observer is in the homogeneous cheese which has an Einstein - de Sitter metric. For the first time, the averaging is widened to include the supernovas inside the voids by assuming the probability for supernova emission from any comoving volume is proportional to the rest mass in it. Despite the well known argument for photon flux conservation, the average distance modulus correction at low redshifts is not zero due to the peculiar velocities. A form...

  20. Short-Term Auditory Memory of Above-Average and Below-Average Grade Three Readers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caruk, Joan Marie

    To determine if performance on short term auditory memory tasks is influenced by reading ability or sex differences, 62 third grade reading students (16 above average boys, 16 above average girls, 16 below average boys, and 14 below average girls) were administered four memory tests--memory for consonant names, memory for words, memory for…

  1. The burden of neck pain: its meaning for persons with neck pain and healthcare providers, explored by concept mapping

    OpenAIRE

    van Randeraad-van der Zee, Carlijn H.; Beurskens, Anna J. H. M.; Swinkels, Raymond A. H. M.; Pool, Jan J. M.; Batterham, Roy W.; Osborne, Richard H; de Vet, Henrica C. W.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To empirically define the concept of burden of neck pain. The lack of a clear understanding of this construct from the perspective of persons with neck pain and care providers hampers adequate measurement of this burden. An additional aim was to compare the conceptual model obtained with the frequently used Neck Disability Index (NDI). Methods Concept mapping, combining qualitative (nominal group technique and group consensus) and quantitative research methods (cluster analysis and mu...

  2. Time averaging of instantaneous quantities in HYDRA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCallen, R.C.

    1996-09-01

    For turbulent flow the evaluation of direct numerical simulations (DNS) where all scales are resolved and large-eddy simulation (LES) where only large-scales are resolved is difficult because the results are three-dimensional and transient. To simplify the analysis, the instantaneous flow field can be averaged in time for evaluation and comparison to experimental results. The incompressible Navier-Stokes flow code HYDRA has been modified for calculation of time-average quantities for both DNS and LES. This report describes how time averages of instantaneous quantities are generated during program execution (i.e., while generating the instantaneous quantities, instead of as a postprocessing operation). The calculations are performed during program execution to avoid storing values at each time step and thus to reduce storage requirements. The method used in calculating the time-average velocities, turbulent intensities, <{ital u}{sup ``}{sup 2}>, <{ital va}{sup ``}{sup 2}>, and <{ital w}{sup ``}{sup 2}>, and turbulent shear, <{ital u}{sup ``}{ital v}{sup ``}> are outlined. The brackets <> used here represent a time average. the described averaging methods were implemented in the HYDRA code for three-dimensional problem solutions. Also presented is a method for taking the time averages for a number of consecutive intervals and calculating the time average for the sum of the intervals. This method could be used for code restarts or further postprocessing of the timer averages from consecutive intervals. This method was not used in the HYDRA implementation, but is included here for completeness. In HYDRA, the running sums needed fro time averaging are simply written to the restart dump.

  3. Clarifying the Relationship between Average Excesses and Average Effects of Allele Substitutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Castro, José M; Yang, Rong-Cai

    2012-01-01

    Fisher's concepts of average effects and average excesses are at the core of the quantitative genetics theory. Their meaning and relationship have regularly been discussed and clarified. Here we develop a generalized set of one locus two-allele orthogonal contrasts for average excesses and average effects, based on the concept of the effective gene content of alleles. Our developments help understand the average excesses of alleles for the biallelic case. We dissect how average excesses relate to the average effects and to the decomposition of the genetic variance. PMID:22509178

  4. Clarifying the relationship between average excesses and average effects of allele substitutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose M eÁlvarez-Castro

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Fisher’s concepts of average effects and average excesses are at the core of the quantitative genetics theory. Their meaning and relationship have regularly been discussed and clarified. Here we develop a generalized set of one-locus two-allele orthogonal contrasts for average excesses and average effects, based on the concept of the effective gene content of alleles. Our developments help understand the average excesses of alleles for the biallelic case. We dissect how average excesses relate to the average effects and to the decomposition of the genetic variance.

  5. Radius neck-to-humerus trochlea transposition elbow reconstruction after proximal ulnar metastatic tumor resection: case and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen FeiYan

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Wide en bloc excision of proximal ulna sections is used to treat traumatic and pathological fractures of the ulna, though poor standardization of clinical treatment often results in long-term failure of such reconstructed biomechanical structures. In order to provide insight into effective ulnar reconstructive treatments, the case of an 80-year-old Chinese Han male presenting with pathological fracture caused by a proximal ulnar metastatic tumor concurrent with metastatic renal cancer complicated by occurrence in the brain and lungs is reported and contrasted with alternative treatment techniques. Wide resectioning of the proximal ulna and reconstruction with local radius neck-to-humerus trochlea transposition resulted in preservation of functionality, sensitivity, and biomechanical integrity after postsurgical immobilization, 6 weeks of passive- and active-assisted flexion, and extension with a hinged brace. The resultant Musculoskeletal Tumor Society rating score was 25 of 30 (83 %. Full sensitivity and mobility of the left hand and elbow (10° to 90° with minimally impaired supination and pronation was restored with minimal discomfort. No evidence of local recurrence or other pathological complications were observed within a 1-year follow-up period. Efficient reconstruction of osseous and capsuloligamentous structures in the elbow is often accomplished by allografts, prosthesis, and soft tissue reconstruction, though wide variations in risk and prognosis associated with these techniques has resulted in disagreements regarding the most effective standards for clinical treatment. Current findings suggest that radius neck-to-humerus trochlea transposition offers a superior range of elbow movement and fewer complications than similar allograft and prosthetic techniques for patients with multiple metastatic cancers.

  6. Radical Radiotherapy of Head and Neck Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sixty patients with head and neck carcinoma were studied retrospectively to assess the impact of treatment on survival and local control rate by stage in the Dept of Radiation Therapy, Korea University Had Wha Hospital between March 1981 and March 1986. Prior to definite radiotherapy, patients were evaluated by physical examination and radiologic studies including heart, paryngogram and CT scan and then these patients were grouped according to the American Joint Committee(AJC) staging system. They were Treated with RT alone or postoperative irradiation to the dose of 7,200 cGy/8 weeks and 6,000 cGy/7 weeks respectively. The results were obtained and as follows; 1. overall male to female sex ratio was 3.6:1. The peak age of patients with head and neck cancer was 6th decade. 2. In all patients treated by RT, the ratio of squamous cell carcinoma to non-squamous cell carcinoma was 3.5:1 (60/77 patients). 3. The incidence according to the anatomic site of primary tumor was 22 cases in the larynx, 12 cases in PNS, 7 cases in nasopharynx, 6 cases in oropharynx, and 3 cases in hypopharynx. 4. According to AJC staging system, 4 cases were Stage I, 7 in Stage II, 19 in Stage III and 27 in Stage IV. 5. The overall incidence of cervical lymph node metastases was 43% and subdigatric and submaxillary triangle lymph nodes were the most frequent site of metastases. 6. Local control was achieved in 48% of patients treated by radio-therapy. 7. The lung was the most common site for distant metastases, comprising 4 cases among 7 cases in which distant metastases occurred. 8. The overall estimated 5-year survival rate was 43% in the head and neck cancer treated with radiotherapy by life-table analysis

  7. Current philosophy in the surgical management of neck metastases for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coskun, H.H.; Medina, J.E.; Robbins, K.T.; Silver, C.E.; Strojan, P.; Teymoortash, A.; Pellitteri, P.K.; Rodrigo, J.P.; Stoeckli, S.J.; Shaha, A.R.; Suarez, C.; Hartl, D.M.; Bree, R. de; Takes, R.P.; Hamoir, M.; Pitman, K.T.; Rinaldo, A.; Ferlito, A.

    2015-01-01

    Neck dissection is an important treatment for metastases from upper aerodigestive carcinoma; an event that markedly reduces survival. Since its inception, the philosophy of the procedure has undergone significant change from one of radicalism to the current conservative approach. Furthermore, nonsur

  8. Neck Strength, Position Sense, and Motion in Military Helicopter Crew With and Without Neck Pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.H.A.H. van den Oord; V. de Loose; J.K. Sluiter; M.H.W. Frings-Dresen

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Neck pain in military helicopter pilots and rear aircrew is an occupational health problem that may interfere with flying performance. The aim of the present study was to investigate possible differences in the physical abilities of the cervical spines of helicopter pilots and rear air

  9. The role of FDG PET in management of neck metastasis from head-and-neck cancer after definitive radiation treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The role of neck dissection after definitive radiation for head-and-neck cancer is controversial. We select patients for neck dissection based on postradiation therapy (post-RT), computed tomography (CT), and [18F] fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG PET). We summarize the clinical outcomes of patients treated with this policy to further elucidate the role of FDG PET in decision making for neck dissection after primary radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Between December 1999 and February 2004, 53 eligible patients were identified. These patients had stage N2A or higher head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma and had complete response of the primary tumor after definitive radiation with or without chemotherapy. PET or computed tomography (CT) scans were performed within 6 months after treatment. Neck dissection was performed in patients with residual lymphadenopathy (identified by clinical examination or CT) and a positive PET scan. Those without residual lymph nodes and a negative PET were observed without neck dissection. For patients with residual lymphadenopathy, but a negative PET scan, neck dissection was performed at the discretion of the attending surgeon and decision of the patient. There was a total of 70 heminecks available for analysis (17 patients had bilateral neck disease). Results: There were 21 heminecks with residual lymphadenopathy identified on CT imaging or clinical examination and negative PET. Of these, 4 had neck dissection and were pathologically negative. The remaining 17 were observed without neck dissection. There was a total of 42 heminecks without residual lymph nodes on post-RT CT imaging or clinical examination with a negative PET. They were also observed without neck dissection. Seven heminecks had a positive PET scan and residual lymphadenopathy. Six of them had neck dissection and 1 had fine-needle aspiration of a residual node; 3 contained residual viable cancer and 4 were pathologically negative. At

  10. Stereotactic irradiation for head and neck cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yokouchi, Junichi; Satani, Kenichiro; Kanesaka, Naoto; Abe, Kimihiko [Tokyo Medical Coll. (Japan); Tsumuraya, Akio; Saitoh, Kazuhiro; Kotake, Fumio [Tokyo Medical Coll., Ami, Ibaraki (Japan). Kasumigaura Hospital

    2003-03-01

    We performed stereotactic irradiation (STI) for head and neck cancer. Numbers of patients with nasopharyngeal cancer, oral/oropharyngeal cancer, malignant melanoma of sinus, orbital metastasis, choroidal metastasis were 10, 4, 1, 1, 1 respectively. STI was performed as an initial treatment in 5 patients. Local control was achieved in 4 of them. SRT (stereotactic radiotherapy) was given to 10 patients with local recurrent tumors. Local control could be achieved in 8 of them, but 2 patients died because of the underlying disease. SRS (stereotactic radiosurgery) was performed in two patients with distant metastasis and they were controlled. (author)

  11. [HPV associated head and neck cancers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vourexakis, Zacharias; Dulguerov, Pavel

    2011-10-01

    The incidence of oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma is rising and this increase is linked to sexual behaviors. Viral and epidemiological studies have linked tonsillar and base of tongue carcinoma with a human papilloma virus (HPV) infection. The patients involved are usually younger and do not exhibit other risk factors such as smoking and alcohol abuse. HPV positive squamous cell carcinoma are associated with a better prognosis than other head and neck carcinoma. Differences in the carcinogenesis mechanisms open options for different and specific oncologic treatments and the potential for prevention of these HPV-related carcinoma by vaccination. PMID:22046680

  12. Malignant triton tumor (MTT) of the neck

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Kristine Bjørndal; Godballe, Christian; Krogdahl, Annelise

    2006-01-01

    Malignant Triton Tumor (MTT) is a rare, malignant periphere nerve sheath tumor with rhabdomyoblastic differentiation. One third of described MTT's were located at the head and neck region. One third of these are associated with neurofibromatosis type 1. MTT most often appears in the third decade....... MTT's are very aggressive tumors with early metastases and the overall survival is poor (26%). Therefore, early diagnosis and correct treatment is of utmost importance. We report a case of MTT of the left supraclavicular region in a 41-year-old man. We present the pathological findings, both light and...

  13. Computer tomographic anatomy of the neck

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koenig, R.

    1984-01-01

    The structures in the neck which can be recognised by computer tomography, and their course, is described. The cartilagenous larynx and trachea, the oesophagus, thyroid, sternocleidomastoid muscle, common carotid arteries and internal jugular veins can be recognised regularly. In addition, one can identify smaller muscles, vessels and nerves, such as the sterno-hyoid, omo-hyoid, anterior and medial scalenus muscles, the superior and inferior thyroid arteries and the suprascapular, internal thoracic and vertebral arteries, the thyro-cervical trunk and the vagus and phrenic nerves. An accurate knowledge of the anatomy is essential for the recognition of enlarged parathyroid glands.

  14. Small scale magnetic flux-averaged magnetohydrodynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    By relaxing exact magnetic flux conservation below a scale λ a system of flux-averaged magnetohydrodynamic equations are derived from Hamilton's principle with modified constraints. An energy principle can be derived from the linearized averaged system because the total system energy is conserved. This energy principle is employed to treat the resistive tearing instability and the exact growth rate is recovered when λ is identified with the resistive skin depth. A necessary and sufficient stability criteria of the tearing instability with line tying at the ends for solar coronal loops is also obtained. The method is extended to both spatial and temporal averaging in Hamilton's principle. The resulting system of equations not only allows flux reconnection but introduces irreversibility for appropriate choice of the averaging function. Except for boundary contributions which are modified by the time averaging process total energy and momentum are conserved over times much longer than the averaging time τ but not for less than τ. These modified boundary contributions correspond to the existence, also, of damped waves and shock waves in this theory. Time and space averaging is applied to electron magnetohydrodynamics and in one-dimensional geometry predicts solitons and shocks in different limits

  15. Test-retest repeatability of strength capacity, aerobic power and pericranial tenderness of neck and shoulder muscles in children - relevant for tension-type headache

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tornøe B

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Birte Tornøe,1,2,5,6 Lars L Andersen,3 Jørgen H Skotte,3 Rigmor Jensen,4 Gunvor Gard,1 Liselotte Skov,2 Inger Hallström1 1Department of Health Sciences, Lund University, Scania, Sweden; 2Children's Headache Clinic, Department of Pediatrics, University of Copenhagen, Herlev Hospital, Herlev, Denmark; 3National Research Centre for the Working Environment, Copenhagen, Denmark; 4Danish Headache Center, Department of Neurology, University of Copenhagen, Glostrup Hospital, Glostrup, Denmark; 5Department of Physiotherapy and Occupational Therapy, University of Copenhagen, Glostrup Hospital, Glostrup, Denmark; 6Department of Physiotherapy, Medical Department, University of Copenhagen, Herlev Hospital, Herlev, Denmark Background: Frequent or chronic tension-type headache in children is a prevalent and debilitating condition for the child, often leading to medication overuse. To explore the relationship between physical factors and tension-type headache in children, the quality of repeated measures was examined. The aim of the present study was to determine the test-retest repeatability of parameters determining isometric neck and shoulder strength and stability, aerobic power, and pericranial tenderness in children. Methods: Twenty-five healthy children, 9 to 18 years of age, participated in test-retest procedures within a 1-week interval. A computerized padded force transducer was used for testing. The tests included the isometric maximal voluntary contraction and force steadiness of neck flexion and extension, and the isometric maximal voluntary contraction and rate of force of the dominant shoulder. Pericranial tenderness was recorded by means of standardized manual palpation, and a submaximal cycle ergometer test predicted maximal oxygen uptake (VO2 max. The measurements were evaluated in steps, using the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC; changes in the mean between the two test occasions; the levels of agreement, visualized in Bland

  16. Neck Pain Occurrence and Characteristics in Nigerian University Undergraduates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olufunke Patience Iroko

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available AIM: University students seem to be a high risk group for neck pain which often leads to diminished concentration and academic performance among them. This study examined the occurrence and characteristics of neck pain in undergraduate students from the University of Ibadan, Nigeria. METHOD: One thousand and sixty nine (512 male and 557 female undergraduate students with the mean age of 23.49 ± 2.54 years responded in this cross-sectional survey. An adapted questionnaire that sought information on demographics, occurrence, characteristics and the consequence of neck pain on activities of daily living served as the survey instrument. Data were summarized using descriptive statistics. RESULTS: Lifetime prevalence and current frequency of neck pain among the respondents was 34.9% and 9.8% respectively. Female students had a higher preponderance of lifetime neck pain prevalence than their male counterparts (52.8 vs. 47.2%. There was higher frequency of neck pain after admission into the university than before (68.6 vs. 28.7%. Neck pain increased according to level of study and commoner among clinical students. 20% of the respondents reported chronic neck pain and was commoner in males than females (13% vs. 7% females. Seats without back supports used during lectures (48.0%, long reading hours (31.4%, poor self perpetuating posture (16.6%, and types of pillow used when sleeping (14.2% were the most implicated predisposing factors to neck pain. Reading (49.7% and concentration on school work (27.9% were the most limited activities of daily living. CONCLUSION: Neck pain is common among Nigerian university undergraduate students and affects females than males. The prevalence increased with higher level of study and commoner among clinical students. Neck pain mostly affects reading and concentration on school work among university undergraduate students. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2010; 9(3.000: 167-174

  17. Self-averaging characteristics of spectral fluctuations

    OpenAIRE

    Braun, Petr; Haake, Fritz

    2014-01-01

    The spectral form factor as well as the two-point correlator of the density of (quasi-)energy levels of individual quantum dynamics are not self-averaging. Only suitable smoothing turns them into useful characteristics of spectra. We present numerical data for a fully chaotic kicked top, employing two types of smoothing: one involves primitives of the spectral correlator, the second a small imaginary part of the quasi-energy. Self-averaging universal (like the CUE average) behavior is found f...

  18. Averaged Lema\\^itre-Tolman-Bondi dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Isidro, Eddy G Chirinos; Piattella, Oliver F; Zimdahl, Winfried

    2016-01-01

    We consider cosmological backreaction effects in Buchert's averaging formalism on the basis of an explicit solution of the Lema\\^itre-Tolman-Bondi (LTB) dynamics which is linear in the LTB curvature parameter and has an inhomogeneous bang time. The volume Hubble rate is found in terms of the volume scale factor which represents a derivation of the simplest phenomenological solution of Buchert's equations in which the fractional densities corresponding to average curvature and kinematic backreaction are explicitly determined by the parameters of the underlying LTB solution at the boundary of the averaging volume. This configuration represents an exactly solvable toy model but it does not adequately describe our "real" Universe.

  19. Experimental Demonstration of Squeezed State Quantum Averaging

    CERN Document Server

    Lassen, Mikael; Sabuncu, Metin; Filip, Radim; Andersen, Ulrik L

    2010-01-01

    We propose and experimentally demonstrate a universal quantum averaging process implementing the harmonic mean of quadrature variances. The harmonic mean protocol can be used to efficiently stabilize a set of fragile squeezed light sources with statistically fluctuating noise levels. The averaged variances are prepared probabilistically by means of linear optical interference and measurement induced conditioning. We verify that the implemented harmonic mean outperforms the standard arithmetic mean strategy. The effect of quantum averaging is experimentally tested both for uncorrelated and partially correlated noise sources with sub-Poissonian shot noise or super-Poissonian shot noise characteristics.

  20. Average Shape of Transport-Limited Aggregates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidovitch, Benny; Choi, Jaehyuk; Bazant, Martin Z.

    2005-08-01

    We study the relation between stochastic and continuous transport-limited growth models. We derive a nonlinear integro-differential equation for the average shape of stochastic aggregates, whose mean-field approximation is the corresponding continuous equation. Focusing on the advection-diffusion-limited aggregation (ADLA) model, we show that the average shape of the stochastic growth is similar, but not identical, to the corresponding continuous dynamics. Similar results should apply to DLA, thus explaining the known discrepancies between average DLA shapes and viscous fingers in a channel geometry.

  1. Dual fibular grafting - A new technique of fixation of the femoral neck fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yadav S

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: To achieve osteosynthesis of femoral neck fractures is a challenge to the treating surgeon. Plethora of devices and methods has been described. Method: A new technique of achieving union of femoral neck fractures by dual-fibular fixation has been reported in 150 patients. The age of the patients ranged from 6-75 years. Results: Nearly two-third of these were Garden type II and III with an average follow-up of 120 months. In this series 67% had good to excellent long term results. Conclusion: Two fibular struts provide autologous bone, filling the whole of the osteopenic femoral neck and prevent the rotational forces. Since the total fixation is biologically active, the technique has proved advantageous even when stable / desirable reduction is not possible and adequate fixation is not achieved, because of posterior communition at the fracture site or due to osteoporosis. Being autologous bone, the twin-fibular graft is advantageous even when there is ′subsequent loss of reduction′ of the fracture. It is, therefore, suggested that this simple, inexpensive and biological technique has many advantages over the existing methods of fixation of these fractures.

  2. The velocity encoded phase contrast MRI study of normal calf muscle contractile function of vivo during ankle flexion and extension movement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To explore the characteristics of calf muscle movement of the normal volunteer in vivo by velocity encoded phase contrast MRI (VE-PC MRI). Methods: Twenty four healthy subjects were divided into the young group (30-40 years) and the elderly group (60-78 years). All subjects were positioned on the scanner table and did ankles flexion-extension voluntary movement, the moving images of tibialis anterior muscles (TA), medial gastrocnemius (MG) and soleus muscle (SOL) on the left were scanned with VE-PC MRI. The calf muscles contraction velocity were analyzed by software. The Mann-Whitney U test was used for comparison of calf muscles contraction velocity in vivo between the young group and the elderly group. Results: During cyclic ankle flexion-extension, dorsiflexion phase (1-10 phases)in the two groups, TA showed concentric contraction, plantar flexion phase (11-20 phases), MG and SOL did concentric contraction. At 3-6 phases during dorsiflexion, velocity of TA (M value: -37.66, -53.00, -60.66, -56.00 mm/s) in the young group is higher than in the elderly group (M-value: -30.33, -42.49, -53.00, -48.67 mm/s), at 13-15 phases during plantar flexion, velocity of MG (M-value: -47.66, -60.00, -66.33 mm/s) in the young group showed higher velocity than in the elderly group (M-value: -25.17, -37.99, -50.98 mm/s), at 12-14 phases during plantar flexion, SOL showed higher velocity in the young group (M-value: -27.21, -40.10, -49.13 mm/s) than in the elderly group (M-value: -20.66, -29.61, -37.16 mm/s) (all P <0.05). Conclusions: During active ankle cyclic flexion-extension movement, velocity of TA, MG and SOL in the elderly group are decreased as compared to the young group. VE-PC MRI can reflect biomechanical characteristics of calf muscle in vivo, and provide a new kind of measurement for lower extremities. (authors)

  3. Average Vegetation Growth 1992 - Direct Download

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This map layer is a grid map of 1992 average vegetation growth for Alaska and the conterminous United States. The nominal spatial resolution is 1 kilometer and the...

  4. Average Vegetation Growth 1994 - Direct Download

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This map layer is a grid map of 1994 average vegetation growth for Alaska and the conterminous United States. The nominal spatial resolution is 1 kilometer and the...

  5. Average Vegetation Growth 1991 - Direct Download

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This map layer is a grid map of 1991 average vegetation growth for Alaska and the conterminous United States. The nominal spatial resolution is 1 kilometer and the...

  6. Average Vegetation Growth 1993 - Direct Download

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This map layer is a grid map of 1993 average vegetation growth for Alaska and the conterminous United States. The nominal spatial resolution is 1 kilometer and the...

  7. Average Vegetation Growth 1998 - Direct Download

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This map layer is a grid map of 1998 average vegetation growth for Alaska and the conterminous United States. The nominal spatial resolution is 1 kilometer and the...

  8. Average Vegetation Growth 1999 - Direct Download

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This map layer is a grid map of 1999 average vegetation growth for Alaska and the conterminous United States. The nominal spatial resolution is 1 kilometer and the...

  9. Average Vegetation Growth 1990 - Direct Download

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This map layer is a grid map of 1990 average vegetation growth for Alaska and the conterminous United States. The nominal spatial resolution is 1 kilometer and the...

  10. Average Vegetation Growth 2003 - Direct Download

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This map layer is a grid map of 2003 average vegetation growth for Alaska and the conterminous United States. The nominal spatial resolution is 1 kilometer and the...

  11. A practical guide to averaging functions

    CERN Document Server

    Beliakov, Gleb; Calvo Sánchez, Tomasa

    2016-01-01

    This book offers an easy-to-use and practice-oriented reference guide to mathematical averages. It presents different ways of aggregating input values given on a numerical scale, and of choosing and/or constructing aggregating functions for specific applications. Building on a previous monograph by Beliakov et al. published by Springer in 2007, it outlines new aggregation methods developed in the interim, with a special focus on the topic of averaging aggregation functions. It examines recent advances in the field, such as aggregation on lattices, penalty-based aggregation and weakly monotone averaging, and extends many of the already existing methods, such as: ordered weighted averaging (OWA), fuzzy integrals and mixture functions. A substantial mathematical background is not called for, as all the relevant mathematical notions are explained here and reported on together with a wealth of graphical illustrations of distinct families of aggregation functions. The authors mainly focus on practical applications ...

  12. Sea Surface Temperature Average_SST_Master

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Sea surface temperature collected via satellite imagery from http://www.esrl.noaa.gov/psd/data/gridded/data.noaa.ersst.html and averaged for each region using...

  13. Averaging procedure in variable-G cosmologies

    CERN Document Server

    Cardone, Vincenzo F

    2008-01-01

    Previous work in the literature had built a formalism for spatially averaged equations for the scale factor, giving rise to an averaged Raychaudhuri equation and averaged Hamiltonian constraint, which involve a backreaction source term. The present paper extends these equations to include models with variable Newton parameter and variable cosmological term, motivated by the non-perturbative renormalization program for quantum gravity based upon the Einstein--Hilbert action. The coupling between backreaction and spatially averaged three-dimensional scalar curvature is found to survive, and all equations involving contributions of a variable Newton parameter are worked out in detail. Interestingly, under suitable assumptions, an approximate solution can be found where the universe tends to a FLRW model, while keeping track of the original inhomogeneities through two effective fluids.

  14. MN Temperature Average (1961-1990) - Line

    Data.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — This data set depicts 30-year averages (1961-1990) of monthly and annual temperatures for Minnesota. Isolines and regions were created using kriging and...

  15. Monthly snow/ice averages (ISCCP)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — September Arctic sea ice is now declining at a rate of 11.5 percent per decade, relative to the 1979 to 2000 average. Data from NASA show that the land ice sheets...

  16. Average Vegetation Growth 1997 - Direct Download

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This map layer is a grid map of 1997 average vegetation growth for Alaska and the conterminous United States. The nominal spatial resolution is 1 kilometer and the...

  17. Average Vegetation Growth 2001 - Direct Download

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This map layer is a grid map of 2001 average vegetation growth for Alaska and the conterminous United States. The nominal spatial resolution is 1 kilometer and the...

  18. MN Temperature Average (1961-1990) - Polygon

    Data.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — This data set depicts 30-year averages (1961-1990) of monthly and annual temperatures for Minnesota. Isolines and regions were created using kriging and...

  19. Average Bandwidth Allocation Model of WFQ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomáš Balogh

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a new iterative method for the calculation of average bandwidth assignment to traffic flows using a WFQ scheduler in IP based NGN networks. The bandwidth assignment calculation is based on the link speed, assigned weights, arrival rate, and average packet length or input rate of the traffic flows. We prove the model outcome with examples and simulation results using NS2 simulator.

  20. Development of average wages in CR regions

    OpenAIRE

    Bejvlová, Jana

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to analyse trends in average gross monthly earnings of employees – individuals - in particular regions of the Czech Republic. The analysed time series begin in 2000 as the regions were decisively established on 1st January 2000. Moreover the self-governing competencies were introduced by the Act No. 129/2000 Coll., on Regions (Establishment of Regions). The researched period ends in 2010. Based on model construction of referential sets, the study predicts average ...

  1. Grassmann Averages for Scalable Robust PCA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hauberg, Søren; Feragen, Aasa; Black, Michael J.

    vectors (subspaces) or elements of vectors; we focus on the latter and use a trimmed average. The resulting Trimmed Grassmann Average (TGA) is particularly appropriate for computer vision because it is robust to pixel outliers. The algorithm has low computational complexity and minimal memory requirements......, making it scalable to “big noisy data.” We demonstrate TGA for background modeling, video restoration, and shadow removal. We show scalability by performing robust PCA on the entire Star Wars IV movie....

  2. Hyperplane Arrangements with Large Average Diameter

    OpenAIRE

    Deza, Antoine; Xie, Feng

    2007-01-01

    The largest possible average diameter of a bounded cell of a simple hyperplane arrangement is conjectured to be not greater than the dimension. We prove that this conjecture holds in dimension 2, and is asymptotically tight in fixed dimension. We give the exact value of the largest possible average diameter for all simple arrangements in dimension 2, for arrangements having at most the dimension plus 2 hyperplanes, and for arrangements having 6 hyperplanes in dimension 3. In dimension 3, we g...

  3. The Hubble rate in averaged cosmology

    OpenAIRE

    Umeh, Obinna; Larena, Julien; Clarkson, Chris

    2010-01-01

    The calculation of the averaged Hubble expansion rate in an averaged perturbed Friedmann-Lemaitre-Robertson-Walker cosmology leads to small corrections to the background value of the expansion rate, which could be important for measuring the Hubble constant from local observations. It also predicts an intrinsic variance associated with the finite scale of any measurement of H_0, the Hubble rate today. Both the mean Hubble rate and its variance depend on both the definition of the Hubble rate ...

  4. Nonequilibrium statistical averages and thermo field dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An extension of thermo field dynamics is proposed, which permits the computation of nonequilibrium statistical averages. The Brownian motion of a quantum oscillator is treated as an example. In conclusion it is pointed out that the procedure proposed to computation of time-dependent statistical average gives the correct two-point Green function for the damped oscillator. A simple extension can be used to compute two-point Green functions of free particles

  5. Averaging Problem in Cosmology and Macroscopic Gravity

    OpenAIRE

    Zalaletdinov, Roustam

    2007-01-01

    The Averaging problem in general relativity and cosmology is discussed. The approach of macroscopic gravity to resolve the problem is presented. An exact cosmological solution to the equations of macroscopic gravity is given and its properties are discussed. Contents: 1. Introduction to General Relativity 2. General Relativity -> Relativistic Cosmology 3. Introduction to Relativistic Cosmology 4. Relativistic Cosmology -> Mathematical Cosmology 5. Averaging Problem in Relativistic Cosmology 6...

  6. Method of averaging in Clifford algebras

    OpenAIRE

    Shirokov, D. S.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we consider different operators acting on Clifford algebras. We consider Reynolds operator of Salingaros' vee group. This operator average" an action of Salingaros' vee group on Clifford algebra. We consider conjugate action on Clifford algebra. We present a relation between these operators and projection operators onto fixed subspaces of Clifford algebras. Using method of averaging we present solutions of system of commutator equations.

  7. Modeling and Instability of Average Current Control

    OpenAIRE

    Fang, Chung-Chieh

    2012-01-01

    Dynamics and stability of average current control of DC-DC converters are analyzed by sampled-data modeling. Orbital stability is studied and it is found unrelated to the ripple size of the orbit. Compared with the averaged modeling, the sampled-data modeling is more accurate and systematic. An unstable range of compensator pole is found by simulations, and is predicted by sampled-data modeling and harmonic balance modeling.

  8. Disk-averaged synthetic spectra of Mars

    OpenAIRE

    Tinetti, Giovanna; Meadows, Victoria S.; Crisp, David; Fong, William; Velusamy, Thangasamy; Snively, Heather

    2004-01-01

    The principal goal of the NASA Terrestrial Planet Finder (TPF) and ESA Darwin mission concepts is to directly detect and characterize extrasolar terrestrial (Earth-sized) planets. This first generation of instruments is expected to provide disk-averaged spectra with modest spectral resolution and signal-to-noise. Here we use a spatially and spectrally resolved model of the planet Mars to study the detectability of a planet's surface and atmospheric properties from disk-averaged spectra as a f...

  9. Extracranial Head and Neck Schwannomas: Our Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrikrishna, B H; Jyothi, A C; Kulkarni, N H; Mazhar, Md Shafiuddin

    2016-06-01

    Schwannomas are benign neoplasms of the peripheral nerves originating in the Schwann cells. They are rare and usually solitary, with clearly delimited capsules. They occur in the head and neck region in only 25 % of the cases, and may be associated with Von Recklinghausen's disease. Schwannomas are always a diagnostic dilemma as they are asymptomatic for long time and histopathology is the gold standard for diagnosis. The present study retrospectively analysed data of 4 patients with schwannomas and reviewed the literature on the subject. Retrospective study at ENT & Head and Neck Surgery Department of Navodaya Medical College, Raichur. Data of 4 patients between 2008 and 2014 were reviewed. The sites of cervical schwannomas and the intraoperative, histopathological and postoperative clinical status of these cases were studied. Diagnostic methods, type of surgery and associated nerve of origin (NOO) were evaluated. The patients' age ranged from 18 to 50 years. None of them had type I neurofibromatosis or Von Recklinghausen's disease. The nerves affected included the brachial plexus, vagus nerve, sympathetic chain and lingual nerve. The nerve of origin was identified based on intra-operative findings and post-operative neurological deficits. Tumour was removed by debulk operation with the preservation of NOO method. Schwannomas are generally benign, and rarely recur. An accurate preoperative workup with the identification of NOO is very important not only for a correct diagnosis, but also for surgical planning and informing the patient about the possible complications. PMID:27340644

  10. Revisiting radiotherapy in head and neck cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Head and neck cancers form 20% of the total cancers in India. It comprise of soft tissue neoplasms of oral/nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses/pharynx/larynx and salivary glands. Majority of them are squamous cell carcinomas, which shows a higher prevalence among rural population in the 4th decade of life with an equal male-female ratio. Buccal mucosa is the commonest site followed by tongue. Tobacco/related products and alcohol are its major causative factors. Though surgical resection is the main treatment modality; patients in the advanced stages of disease or those with multiple/extensive lymph node involvement are done through a multi-disciplinary approach involving radiation therapy. Typical doses of 60Cobalt irradiation are from 30-72 Grays (Gy). Overall treatment is from 15 to 80 days with a dose per fraction ranging from 1.8-6 Gy. High doses cause mouth sores/dry mouth/dysphagia/dysgeusia/jaw stiffness. However, modern radiation protocols considerably minimize exposure to healthy tissues. This paper evaluates the radiotherapy systems for head and neck cancers in the contemporary and future domains. (author)

  11. [Imaging of the head and neck region].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lell, M; Mantsopoulos, K; Uder, M; Wuest, W

    2016-03-01

    Tumors of the head and neck are predominantly squamous cell carcinomas and those of the salivary glands are predominantly adenocarcinomas, adenoid cystic carcinomas and mucoepidermoid carcinomas. In 2011 the incidence of tumors of the oral cavity and pharynx in Germany was 6839 (5026 male and 1813 female) and of the larynx 1878 (1642 male and 236 female). The incidence of tumors of the nose and paranasal sinuses (467) and salivary glands (470) were much lower ( www.krebsdaten.de/abfrage ). The primary aim of imaging in head and neck cancer is staging of the disease and a precise assessment of tumor invasion. This information is essential for therapy decision-making (i. e. surgery or radiochemotherapy), planning of the extent of resection and subsequent reconstructive measures and also estimation of functional deficits after therapy. Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are the imaging modalities of choice but both have specific advantages and disadvantages. In certain cases both CT and MRI need to be performed for accurate treatment planning. PMID:26923486

  12. Giant Arteriovenous Malformation of the Neck

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. A. Dieng

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Arteriovenous malformations (AVM have a wide range of clinical presentations. Operative bleeding is one of the most hazardous complications in the surgical management of high-flow vascular malformations. In the cervical region, the presence of vital vascular structures, such as the carotid artery and jugular vein, may increase this risk. This is a case of massive arteriovenous malformation deforming the neck and the face aspect of this aged lady and growing for several years. A giant mass of the left neck occupied the carotid region and the subclavian region. The AVM was developed between the carotid arteries, jugular veins, and vertebral and subclavian vessels, with arterial and venous flux. The patient underwent surgery twice for the cure of that AVM. The first step was the ligation of the external carotid. Seven days later, the excision of the mass was done. In postoperative period the patient presented a peripheral facial paralysis which completely decreased within 10 days. The first ligation of the external carotid reduces significantly the blood flow into the AVM. It permitted secondarily the complete ablation of the AVM without major bleeding even though multiple ligations were done.

  13. Femoral neck version affects medial femorotibial loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papaioannou, T A; Digas, Georgios; Bikos, Ch; Karamoulas, V; Magnissalis, E A

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to provide a preliminary evaluation of the possible effect that femoral version may have on the bearing equilibrium conditions developed on the medial tibiofemoral compartment. A digital 3D solid model of the left physiological adult femur was used to create morphological variations of different neck-shaft angles (varus 115, normal 125, and valgus 135 degrees) and version angles (-10, 0, and +10 degrees). By means of finite element modeling and analysis techniques (FEM-FEA), a virtual experiment was executed with the femoral models aligned in a neutral upright position, distally supported on a fully congruent tibial tray and proximally loaded with a vertical only hip joint load of 2800 N. Equivalent stresses and their distribution on the medial compartment were computed and comparatively evaluated. Within our context, the neck-shaft angle proved to be of rather indifferent influence. Reduction of femoral version, however, appeared as the most influencing parameter regarding the tendency of the medial compartment to establish its bearing equilibrium towards posteromedial directions, as a consequence of the corresponding anteroposterior changes of the hip centre over the horizontal tibiofemoral plane. We found a correlation between femoral anteversion and medial tibiofemoral compartment contact pressure. Our findings will be further elucidated by more sophisticated FEM-FEA and by clinical studies that are currently planned. PMID:24959355

  14. Manual of head and neck imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raghavan, Prashant [Maryland University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States). Div. of Neuroradiology; Mukherjee, Sugoto [Virginia University Health System, Charlottesville, VA (United States). Div. of Neuroradiology; Jameson, Mark J. [Virginia University Health System, Charlottesville, VA (United States). Div. of Head and Neck Surgical Oncology; Wintermark, Max [Virginia University Health System, Charlottesville, VA (United States). Dept. of Radiology and Medical Imaging

    2014-06-01

    Easy-to-read short chapters. Tables, checklists, and algorithms to assist in arriving at a quick diagnosis. Clinical pearls that will enable the radiologist to issue a relevant report. One-stop resource when preparing for radiology and otolaryngology exams. Line diagrams to illustrate key concepts. This book is designed as an easily readable manual that will be of great practical value for radiology and otolaryngology residents during their clinical rotations. Key facts on head and neck imaging are presented in short chapters written in an easily readable style. Line drawings are used to illustrate key concepts, and tables, checklists, and algorithms will enable the readers to arrive at a quick diagnosis. In addition, emphasis is placed on clinical pearls that will assist them in preparing suitable reports. The Manual of Head and Neck Imaging is sized to allow residents to read it completely within a matter of days, and it will also serve as an ideal quick reference guide as different clinical situations arise.

  15. Nutritional consequences of the radiotherapy of head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nutrition-related complications of radiotherapy were evaluated in 74 head and neck cancer patients. Subjective changes of mouth dryness, taste, dysphagia, appetite, and food preferences were determined by questionnaire before and at weekly intervals during curative radiotherapy. Changes in body weight during therapy were also recorded. In addition, 24-hour dietary histories were taken from eight patients at the beginning and end of treatment. Results of the study indicate that patients were subjectively aware of nutritional problems prior to therapy and that therapy exacerbated these problems. As many as 25% of the patients experienced oral complications such as taste loss and/or dry mouth prior to initiation of radiotherapy. By the end of radiotherapy, over 80% of the patients were aware of oral and nutritional problems. Patients had an average weight loss of 5 kg prior to therapy; this loss of weight did not change during therapy. Diet histories of eight patients indicate significant caloric deficiencies early and late in radiotherapy. The oral and nutritional problems experienced by patients, even prior to therapy, support the idea that nutritional evaluation and maintenance are important not only during therapy, but prior to radiotherapy as well. Nutritional evaluation should be made a routine, integral part of therapy for every cancer patient

  16. Les religieuses au cinéma : quelques pistes de réflexion Nuns at cinema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Pettinaroli

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Si les films consacrés aux religieuses sont souvent l’occasion de polémiques, l’approche scientifique -notamment historienne- de ces œuvres reste rare. Cet article se propose donc de définir un corpus de films consacrés aux religieuses. Pour illustrer l’intérêt de ce corpus (une cinquantaine de films réalisés dans la seconde moitié du XXe siècle à travers le monde, nous proposons d’ouvrir une réflexion autour de deux questions : la dimension historique et la figuration du cloître.The films dedicated to the Catholic nuns usually provoke a lot of debates and few historical studies. This article aims above all to define a corpus of films dedicated to Catholic nuns. This corpus is about 50 films, produced during the second half of the XXth century all across the world. Beyond this global approach, we focus on two questions: the historical dimension and the representation of the cloister.

  17. De l’apprentissage à la mesure du caring: réflexion épistémo-ontologique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PAWEL KROL

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Cet article, inspiré d’une perspective postmoderne, pose un regard critique sur le progrès et expose comment le développement frénétique et l’emploi peu questionné des technologies, ont concouru à l’objectivation de la personne, la déshumanisation des services de santé, la main mise sur la formation infirmière ainsi qu’ à l’instrumentalisation des pratiques de soins modernes. Cette réflexion épistémo-ontologique questionne l’étude de l’apprentissage du caring et problématise sa mesure où le postpositivisme semble s’imposer empiriquement, soulevant ainsi des interrogations quant à la cohérence épistémologique entre la théorie du caring et sa mesure. Enfin, nous avançons que la mesure la mesure du caring constitue une difficulté substantielle renfermant des incohérences épistémo-ontologiques qui demeurent incommensurables.

  18. Motor-related cortical activity after cervical spinal cord injury: multifaceted EEG analysis of isometric elbow flexion contractions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cremoux, Sylvain; Tallet, Jessica; Berton, Eric; Dal Maso, Fabien; Amarantini, David

    2013-10-01

    Electroencephalographic (EEG) studies have well established that motor cortex (M1) activity ~20 Hz decreases during muscular contraction and increases as soon as contraction stops, which are known as event-related desynchronization (ERD) and event-related synchronization (ERS), respectively. ERD is supposed to reflect M1 activation, sending information to recruited muscles, while the process underlying ERS is interpreted either as active cortical inhibition or as processing of sensory inputs. Investigation of the process behind ERD/ERS in people with spinal cord injury (SCI) would be particularly relevant since their M1 remains effective despite decreased sensorimotor abilities. In this study, we recorded net joint torque and EEG in 6 participants with cervical SCI and 8 healthy participants who performed isometric elbow flexion at 3 force levels. Multifaceted EEG analysis was introduced to assess ERD/ERS according to their amplitude, frequency range and duration. The results revealed that net joint torque increased with the required force level for all participants and time to contraction inhibition was longer in the SCI group. At the cortical level, ERD/ERS frequency ranges increased with the required force level in all participants, indicating that the modulation of cortical activity with force level is preserved after SCI. However, ERS amplitude decreased only in SCI participants, which may be linked to delayed contraction inhibition. All in all, cortical modulation of frequency range and amplitude could reflect two different kinds of neural communication. PMID:23939224

  19. The Blue Neck Syndrome : Nematode Larvae in Skin Scrapings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sugathan P

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel non-inflammatory type of pigmentation of the neck associated with nematode larvae on affected skin is described. The name ′Blue neck syndrome′ is suggested for this condition because of the characteristic clinical appearance. Antinematode agents such as albendazole and neem oil have been found to be effective in the treatment.

  20. Surgery versus conservative care for neck pain: A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. van Middelkoop (Marienke); S.M. Rubinstein (Sidney); R.W.J.G. Ostelo (Raymond); M.W. van Tulder (Maurits); W.C. Peul (Wilco); B.W. Koes (Bart); A.P. Verhagen (Arianne)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractObjective: General practitioners refer patients with continued neck pain that do not respond well to conservative care frequently to secondary care for further assessment. Are surgical interventions to the cervical spine effective when compared to conservative care for patients with neck