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Sample records for average friction coefficient

  1. FRICTION COEFFICIENT OF DIAMOND WIRE SAW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siniša Dunda

    1998-12-01

    Full Text Available In order to estimate the diamond wire saw upon quarrying of dimension stone, it is necessary to know the value of a friction coefficient on the driving pulley of the saw. Therefore the numerical value of the friction coefficient between diamond wire and coating of a driving pulley was determined in experimental way. The experiments were conducted under different working conditions. The resulting average value of the friction coefficient upon working in wet and muddy conditions amounted to µ = 0,32.

  2. Energy Balance of Friction and Friction Coefficient in Energetical Interpretation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.V. Fedorov

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Sliding friction energy model is proposed. In this model, generalized mechanism of transformation and dissipation of energy under friction the model of elastic-plastic deformation and fracture contact volumes is considered. Energy model of the process of plastic deformation and destruction of solid bodies is based on the concept of ergodynamic of deformable bodies. Equations of energy balance of friction within the structural and energetic interpretation of deformation are proposed. The energy interpretation of the coefficient of friction is showed. From this position the friction coefficient is the most informative characteristic of the process. Experimental friction curves have been generalized. As a result of the energy analysis of friction, the energy diagram of the structural evolution of the friction surfaces is suggested.

  3. Graphite friction coefficient for various conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The friction coefficient the graphite used in the Tsinghua University 10MW High Tem-perature Gas-Cooled Reactor was analyzed for various conditions. The variation of the graphitefriction coefficient was measured for various sliding velocities, sliding distances, normal loads, en-vironments and temperatures. A scanning elector microscope (SEM) was used to analyze the fric-tion surfaces.

  4. Friction Coefficient for Quarks in Supergravity Duals

    OpenAIRE

    Antonyan, E.

    2006-01-01

    We study quarks moving in strongly-coupled plasmas that have supergravity duals. We compute the friction coefficient of strings dual to such quarks for general static supergravity backgrounds near the horizon. Our results also show that a previous conjecture on the bound has to be modified and higher friction coefficients can be achieved.

  5. Wet Friction-Elements Boundary Friction Mechanism and Friction Coefficient Prediction

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Yanzhong; Wu, Xiangyu; Wei, Bin

    2012-01-01

    The friction mechanism for the boundary friction course of friction elements engagement was explicitly expressed. The boundary friction model was built up by the surface topography. The model contained the effect of boundary film, adhesion, plough and lubrication. Based on the model, a coefficient for weakening plough for the lubrication was proposed. The modified model could fit for the working condition of wet friction elements. The friction coefficient as a function curve of rotating speed...

  6. High Speed Friction Microscopy and Nanoscale Friction Coefficient Mapping

    OpenAIRE

    Bosse, James L.; Lee, Sungjun; Huey, Bryan D.; Andersen, Andreas Sø; Sutherland, Duncan S.

    2014-01-01

    As mechanical devices in the nano/micro length scale are increasingly employed, it is crucial to understand nanoscale friction and wear especially at technically relevant sliding velocities. Accordingly, a novel technique has been developed for Friction Coefficient Mapping (FCM), leveraging recent advances in high speed AFM. The technique efficiently acquires friction versus force curves based on a sequence of images at a single location, each with incrementally lower loads. As a result, true...

  7. Friction analysis of kinetic schemes: the friction coefficient

    OpenAIRE

    Lolkema, Juke S.

    1995-01-01

    Friction analysis is proposed as the application of general control analysis to single enzymes to describe the control of elementary kinetic steps on the overall catalytic rate. For each transition, a friction coefficient is defined that measures the sensitivity of the turnover rate to the free energy of the transition state complex of the transition. The latter is captured in a single property of the transition, termed friction, as the geometrical mean of the inverse of the forward and backw...

  8. Friction analysis of kinetic schemes : the friction coefficient

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lolkema, Juke S.

    1995-01-01

    Friction analysis is proposed as the application of general control analysis to single enzymes to describe the control of elementary kinetic steps on the overall catalytic rate. For each transition, a friction coefficient is defined that measures the sensitivity of the turnover rate to the free ener

  9. FRICTION ANALYSIS OF KINETIC SCHEMES - THE FRICTION COEFFICIENT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    LOLKEMA, JS

    1995-01-01

    Friction analysis is proposed as the application of general control analysis to single enzymes to describe the control of elementary kinetic steps on the overall catalytic rate. For each transition, a friction coefficient is defined that measures the sensitivity of the turnover rate to the free ener

  10. Wet Friction-Elements Boundary Friction Mechanism and Friction Coefficient Prediction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WANG Yanzhong

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The friction mechanism for the boundary friction course of friction elements engagement was explicitly expressed. The boundary friction model was built up by the surface topography. The model contained the effect of boundary film, adhesion, plough and lubrication. Based on the model, a coefficient for weakening plough for the lubrication was proposed. The modified model could fit for the working condition of wet friction elements. The friction coefficient as a function curve of rotating speed could be finally obtained by the data k and s/sm. The method provides a well interpretation of friction condition and friction coefficient prediction and the agreement between theoretical and experimental friction coefficients is reasonably good.

  11. Study on the Friction Coefficient in Grinding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The friction between the abrasive grains and workpi ec e is a crutial factor determining the main grinding output. Few studies have bee n carried out investigating the values of the friction coefficient in grinding, due to the difficulty of direct measurement. In this paper, a mathematical model of the friction coefficient in grinding has been established with the aid of a new grinding parameter C ge, which has close relations to wheel wear rate Z s, metal removal rate Z w, specific energy u and gr...

  12. High speed friction microscopy and nanoscale friction coefficient mapping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As mechanical devices in the nano/micro length scale are increasingly employed, it is crucial to understand nanoscale friction and wear especially at technically relevant sliding velocities. Accordingly, a novel technique has been developed for friction coefficient mapping (FCM), leveraging recent advances in high speed AFM. The technique efficiently acquires friction versus force curves based on a sequence of images at a single location, each with incrementally lower loads. As a result, true maps of the coefficient of friction can be uniquely calculated for heterogeneous surfaces. These parameters are determined at a scan velocity as fast as 2 mm s−1 for microfabricated SiO2 mesas and Au coated pits, yielding results that are identical to traditional speed measurements despite being ∼1000 times faster. To demonstrate the upper limit of sliding velocity for the custom setup, the friction properties of mica are reported from 200 µm s−1 up to 2 cm s−1. While FCM is applicable to any AFM and scanning speed, quantitative nanotribology investigations of heterogeneous sliding or rolling components are therefore uniquely possible, even at realistic velocities for devices such as MEMS, biological implants, or data storage systems. (paper)

  13. Friction Experiments for Dynamical Coefficient Measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. J. Arnoux

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available An experimental study, including three experimental devices, is presented in order to investigate dry friction phenomena in a wide range of sliding speeds for the steel on steel contact. A ballistic setup, with an air gun launch, allows to estimate the friction coefficient between 20 m/s and 80 m/s. Tests are completed by an adaptation of the sensor on a hydraulic tensile machine (0.01 m/s to 3 m/s and a pin-on-disk tribometer mounted on a CNC lathe (1 to 30 m/s. The interactions at the asperity scale are characterized by a white light interferometer surface analysis.

  14. Measurement of friction coefficient in aluminum sheet warm forming

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Zheng-hua; LI Zhi-gang; HUANG Chong-jiu; DONG Xiang-huai

    2005-01-01

    Aluminum alloy sheets are used more and more to manufacture auto panels. Because the friction behavior is very complicated, it is necessary to study the friction during the aluminum sheet warm forming process. The author has designed a new probe sensor based on an online tribotest method which directly measures friction coefficient in the forming process. Experiments of cup drawing have been conducted and the friction coefficients under different forming conditions have been measured. The results indicate that the forming parameters, such as forming temperature, blankholding force and lubrication status have great effect upon the friction coefficient.

  15. The Frictional Coefficient of Bovine Knee Articular Cartilage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qian Shan-hua; Ge Shi-rong; Wang Qing-liang

    2006-01-01

    The normal displacement of articular cartilage was measured under load and in sliding, and the coefficient of friction during sliding was measured using a UMT-2 Multi-Specimen Test System. The maximum normal displacement under load and the start-up frictional coefficient have similar tendency of variation with loading time. The sliding speed does not significantly influence the frictional coefficient of articular cartilage.

  16. Energy Balance of Friction and Friction Coefficient in Energetical Interpretation

    OpenAIRE

    S.V. Fedorov

    2015-01-01

    Sliding friction energy model is proposed. In this model, generalized mechanism of transformation and dissipation of energy under friction the model of elastic-plastic deformation and fracture contact volumes is considered. Energy model of the process of plastic deformation and destruction of solid bodies is based on the concept of ergodynamic of deformable bodies. Equations of energy balance of friction within the structural and energetic interpretation of deformation are proposed. The energ...

  17. Friction Coefficient of UHMWPE During Dry Reciprocating Sliding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Zivic

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the friction coefficient behaviour during dry reciprocating sliding of UHMWPE in contact with alumina (Al2O3, within a range of velocities typical for hip implants. Five values of normal force (100 - 1000 mN and three values of sliding speed (4 - 12 mm/s have been observed. Real time diagrams of the friction coefficient as a function of the sliding cycles were recorded for each test. Dynamic friction coefficient curves exhibited rather uniform behavior for all test conditions. Somewhat larger values of friction coefficient could be observed during the running-in period in case of low loads (100 - 250 mN and the lowest velocity (4 mm/s. In case of high loads and speeds, friction coefficient reached steady state values shortly after the beginning of the test.

  18. The Relationship between the Friction Coefficient and the Asperities Original Inclination Angle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guan Cheng-yao

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Because of the contact deformation, the inclination angle of the contact face is decreased gradually when contact and deformation. Base on the change of inclination angle of the contact surface, the concept “friction repose angle” set out. The tangent of the initial inclination angle of two asperities is three time of the tangent of the “friction repose angle”. The relationship set up a bridge between the initial surface geometric configuration (can be detect and the configuration which after the deformation (can not be detect. Static Friction Coefficient is the max value of Kinetic Friction Coefficient before the deformation process of instantaneous contact surface. The Ratio of Kinetic and Static Friction Coefficient distribute from 0.771 to 0.9117 and were inversely proportional to the inclination angle of the contact face .Kinetic Friction Coefficient is the average friction coefficient of the deformation process of instantaneous contact surface. In the sandstone, the value of Kinetic Friction Coefficient which more than 0.5546 is because of the coupling of different classes zigzag-shape surface asperities mostly. The study puts forward the new ideas “dynamic deformation tribology” which will promote the development of the Tribology.

  19. Using Plasticine (TM) to Measure the Rolling Friction Coefficient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellvi, Francesc; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Presents an experiment that makes manifest the energy lost to friction of an iron ball moving along an inclined iron rail, which allows students to compute the rolling friction coefficient. Uses a method based on measurement of deformation produced in a piece of Plasticine by an inelastic collision with the ball and combines mechanical concepts…

  20. Sustained frictional instabilities on nanodomed surfaces: Stick-slip amplitude coefficient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Quignon, Benoit; Pilkington, Georgia A.; Thormann, Esben;

    2013-01-01

    to sustained frictional instabilities, effectively with no contact frictional sliding. The amplitude of the stick-slip oscillations, σf, was found to correlate with the topographic properties of the surfaces and scale linearly with the applied load. In line with the friction coefficient, we define the slope......-defined nanodomes comprising densely packed prolate spheroids, of diameters ranging from tens to hundreds of nanometers. Our results show that the average lateral force varied linearly with applied load, as described by Amontons' first law of friction, although no direct correlation between the sample topographic...... properties and their measured friction coefficients was identified. Furthermore, all the nanodomed textures exhibited pronounced oscillations in the shear traces, similar to the classic stick-slip behavior, under all the shear velocities and load regimes studied. That is, the nanotextured topography led...

  1. Coefficient of friction of a starved lubricated spur gear pair

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Huaiju; Zhu, Caichao; Sun, Zhangdong; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Song, Chaosheng [Chongqing University, Chongqing (China)

    2016-05-15

    The frictional power loss issue of gear pairs becomes an important concern in both industry and academia due to the requirement of the energy saving and the improvement of power density of gear drives. A thermal starved elastohydrodynamic lubrication model is developed to study the tribological performance of a spur gear pair under starved lubrication conditions. The contact pressure, the film thickness, the temperature rise, the frictional power loss, as well as the coefficient of friction are evaluated by considering the variation of the curvature radius, the sliding/rolling motion, and the load distribution of gear tooth within the meshing period. Effects of lubrication starvation condition, load and speed on the coefficient of friction are studied.

  2. Wobble friction coefficient in post-stressed concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Ernesto Dueñas Puentes

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available This work was aimed at establishing a wobble friction coefficient (K from records regarding some post-stressed bridges built in Colombia. Such records were arranged and analysed together with stress diagrams resulting from the corres-ponding plans, calculations and reports. Suitable records were produced from this review to make the analysis. Once the records had been selected, the probable wobble friction coefficient (K was then calculated for each case and this coefficient was related to the length of the cable and the total area of the strands composing the cable. These records and their results were subsequently grouped according to the type of bridge to produce a wobble friction coefficient (K for each specific structure. The study indicated that the wobble friction coefficient was lower than that indicated by the Colombian Seismic Bridge Design Code, Instituto Nacional De Vías, 1995]. The influence of tensioning equipment, materials and labour suggested a format for recording tensioning to reduce inaccuracy when readings are being taken. A reduction in the costs of tensioning would arise from taking the forgoing into account.

  3. Effect of electrostatic field on dynamic friction coefficient of pistachio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. H Aghkhani

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Separation and grading of agricultural products from the production to supply, has notable importance. The separation can be done based on physical, electrical, magnetic, optical properties and etc. It is necessary for any development of new systems to study enough on the properties and behavior of agricultural products. Some characteristics for separation are size (length, width and thickness, hardness, shape, density, surface roughness, color, speed limit, aerodynamic properties, electrical conductivity, elasticity and coefficient of static friction point. So far, the friction properties of agricultural products used in the separating process, but the effect of electrostatic charging on static and dynamic coefficients of friction for separation had little attention. The aim of this study was to find out the interactions between electrostatic and friction properties to find a way to separate products that separation is not possible with conventional methods or not sufficiently accurate. In this paper, the separation of close and smiley pistachios by electrostatic charging was investigated. Materials and Methods: Kallehghoochi pistachio cultivar has the top rank in production in Iran. Therefore, it was used as a sample. The experimental design that used in this study, had moisture content at three levels (24.2, 14.5 and 8.1 percent, electric field intensity at three levels (zero, 4000 and 7000 V, speed of movement on the surface at three levels (1300, 2500 and 3300 mm per minute, friction surface (galvanized sheet iron, aluminum and flat rubber and pistachio type at two levels (filled splits and closed that was measured and analyzed in completely randomized factorial design. A friction measuring device (built in Ferdowsi University of Mashhad used to measure the friction force. It has a removable table that can move in two directions with adjustable speed. The test sample put into the vessel with internal dimensions of 300 × 150

  4. Determination of the Static Friction Coefficient from Circular Motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina-Bolívar, J. A.; Cabrerizo-Vílchez, M. A.

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes a physics laboratory exercise for determining the coefficient of static friction between two surfaces. The circular motion of a coin placed on the surface of a rotating turntable has been studied. For this purpose, the motion is recorded with a high-speed digital video camera recording at 240 frames s[superscript-1], and the…

  5. Road Friction Coefficient Real-Time Identification Based on the Tire Dynamic Friction Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FAN Xiao-bin; DENG Pan; JIANG Yu; FAN Bing-xu

    2013-01-01

    Road friction coefficient real-time estimation methods is an important issue and problem in automotive active safety con-trol system development. First a fixed feedback gain sliding mode observer of road adhesion coefficient is designed through the es-tablishment of tire/road dynamic friction model in this article. The simulation results shows that the observer can well real-time iden-tify the current road adhesion characteristics. And more importantly, the observer only need wheel speed signal and the braking torque (brake pressure) signal, so the system is low cost, and its adaptability is good. There is no doubt this estimation method has a good application prospect.

  6. Interpretation of the Friction Coefficient During Reciprocating Sliding of Ti6Al4V Alloy Against Al2O3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Mitrovic

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Tribological behaviour of Ti6Al4V alloy, during linear reciprocating sliding against alumina, at nanotribometer (ball-on-flat type of contact was investigated. Experiments were carried out for sliding in Ringer's solution, over a range of loads (100 - 1000 mN and speeds (4 - 12 mm/s. Friction behaviour of the contact pairs was investigated by analysis of the dynamic friction coefficient plots and effective root mean square (rms coefficient of friction, COFrms. Presented mathematical envelopes of dynamic coefficient of friction curves and averaged envelope signals provided additional explanation of one calculated COFrms value. Envelopes of dynamic coefficient of friction enabled easier determination of different periods during sliding, which were further related to wear mechanisms.

  7. Numerical study of vertical pneumatic conveying: Effect of friction coefficient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, K.; Kuang, S. B.; Zou, R. P.; Pan, R. H.; Yu, A. B.

    2013-06-01

    This paper presents a numerical study of vertical pneumatic conveying by a combined approach of computational fluid dynamics for gas phase and discrete element method for solid phase. The effects of friction coefficient on the flows in regard with particle flow patterns and their transition, reverse flow, and gas pressure behavior are qualified. The forces acting on particles are analyzed in detail to understand the underlying mechanisms.

  8. Determination of Friction Coefficient in Unconfined Compression of Brain Tissue

    CERN Document Server

    Rashid, Badar; Gilchrist, Michael; 10.1016/j.jmbbm.2012.05.001

    2013-01-01

    Unconfined compression tests are more convenient to perform on cylindrical samples of brain tissue than tensile tests in order to estimate mechanical properties of the brain tissue because they allow for homogeneous deformations. The reliability of these tests depends significantly on the amount of friction generated at the specimen/platen interface. Thus, there is a crucial need to find an approximate value of the friction coefficient in order to predict a possible overestimation of stresses during unconfined compression tests. In this study, a combined experimental-computational approach was adopted to estimate the dynamic friction coefficient mu of porcine brain matter against metal platens in compressive tests. Cylindrical samples of porcine brain tissue were tested up to 30% strain at variable strain rates, both under bonded and lubricated conditions in the same controlled environment. It was established that mu was equal to 0.09 +/- 0.03, 0.18 +/- 0.04, 0.18 +/- 0.04 and 0.20 +/- 0.02 at strain rates of...

  9. Pendulum mass affects the measurement of articular friction coefficient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akelman, Matthew R; Teeple, Erin; Machan, Jason T; Crisco, Joseph J; Jay, Gregory D; Fleming, Braden C

    2013-02-01

    Friction measurements of articular cartilage are important to determine the relative tribologic contributions made by synovial fluid or cartilage, and to assess the efficacy of therapies for preventing the development of post-traumatic osteoarthritis. Stanton's equation is the most frequently used formula for estimating the whole joint friction coefficient (μ) of an articular pendulum, and assumes pendulum energy loss through a mass-independent mechanism. This study examines if articular pendulum energy loss is indeed mass independent, and compares Stanton's model to an alternative model, which incorporates viscous damping, for calculating μ. Ten loads (25-100% body weight) were applied in a random order to an articular pendulum using the knees of adult male Hartley guinea pigs (n=4) as the fulcrum. Motion of the decaying pendulum was recorded and μ was estimated using two models: Stanton's equation, and an exponential decay function incorporating a viscous damping coefficient. μ estimates decreased as mass increased for both models. Exponential decay model fit error values were 82% less than the Stanton model. These results indicate that μ decreases with increasing mass, and that an exponential decay model provides a better fit for articular pendulum data at all mass values. In conclusion, inter-study comparisons of articular pendulum μ values should not be made without recognizing the loads used, as μ values are mass dependent. PMID:23122223

  10. Experimental Study on Friction Coefficient Between Concrete and the Top Surface of Rubble Mound Foundation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Yan-bao; JIANG Xue-lian; GUO Hong-yi

    2005-01-01

    Experimental studies on the friction coefficient between concrete and the top surface of a rubble mound foundation in China are reviewed. Through comparison of different test results, the development of this research is comprehensively analyzed. An experiment is carried out in the condition similar to prototype. The process curve of friction coefficient with the test block sliding is analyzed and a standard for determination of the friction coefficient is defined. The variation features of the friction coefficient are analyzed on the basis of the present experimental results and other studies in China. It is shown that the friction coefficient between concrete and the top surface of a rubble mound foundation decreases with the increase of the foundation pressure, and the friction coefficient for a very fine leveling bed is smaller than that for a fine leveling bed.

  11. Identification of Maximum Road Friction Coefficient and Optimal Slip Ratio Based on Road Type Recognition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUAN Hsin; WANG Bo; LU Pingping; XU Liang

    2014-01-01

    The identification of maximum road friction coefficient and optimal slip ratio is crucial to vehicle dynamics and control. However, it is always not easy to identify the maximum road friction coefficient with high robustness and good adaptability to various vehicle operating conditions. The existing investigations on robust identification of maximum road friction coefficient are unsatisfactory. In this paper, an identification approach based on road type recognition is proposed for the robust identification of maximum road friction coefficient and optimal slip ratio. The instantaneous road friction coefficient is estimated through the recursive least square with a forgetting factor method based on the single wheel model, and the estimated road friction coefficient and slip ratio are grouped in a set of samples in a small time interval before the current time, which are updated with time progressing. The current road type is recognized by comparing the samples of the estimated road friction coefficient with the standard road friction coefficient of each typical road, and the minimum statistical error is used as the recognition principle to improve identification robustness. Once the road type is recognized, the maximum road friction coefficient and optimal slip ratio are determined. The numerical simulation tests are conducted on two typical road friction conditions(single-friction and joint-friction) by using CarSim software. The test results show that there is little identification error between the identified maximum road friction coefficient and the pre-set value in CarSim. The proposed identification method has good robustness performance to external disturbances and good adaptability to various vehicle operating conditions and road variations, and the identification results can be used for the adjustment of vehicle active safety control strategies.

  12. Wave Attenuation and Friction Coefficient on the Coral-Reef Flat

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱良生; 黎满球; 张洪生; 隋世峰

    2004-01-01

    Several sets of S4 direction-wave-current-tide meters have been deployed on the coral-reef flat of Yongshu Reef in the sea area of Nansha Islands. Based on the observational sea wave data, the attenuation characteristics of the waves propagating on the coral reef flat, the bottom friction coefficients and the transfer of wave energy are discussed in the paper. The results show that, in the relative depths of 0. 0613 ~ 0. 0867, the wave height attenuation per unit distance of wave propagation is 22.09 % ~ 46.56 %, with an average of 31.35 %; the wave energy attenuation coefficient, 33.74%~ 53.22%, with an average of 43.61%. The average of the bottom friction coefficients on the coral-reef flat is 0. 1346,which is about 10 times that on the sand or silt bottom. In the course of propagation on the reef flat, the waves sustain more loss in high frequency than in low frequency and the spectral energy transfers to the low frequency. These resuhs may be used for reference in island and reef engineering.

  13. Enhanced surface friction coefficient and hydrophobicity of TPE substrates using an APPJ system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sainz-García, Elisa, E-mail: elisa.sainzg@unirioja.es; Alba-Elías, Fernando, E-mail: fernando.alba@unirioja.es; Múgica-Vidal, Rodolfo, E-mail: rodolfo.mugica@alum.unirioja.es; González-Marcos, Ana, E-mail: ana.gonzalez@unirioja.es

    2015-02-15

    Highlights: • Coatings on thermoplastic elastomers by atmospheric pressure plasma jet. • Study of influence of APTES and FLUSI percentage on the coating's properties. • The best sample (AF{sub 75}) used 75% of APTES and 25% of FLUSI as precursor mixture. • Sample AF{sub 75} reduced a 51.5% the FC and increased a 4.4% the WCA. - Abstract: An APPJ system was used to deposit a coating that combines a low friction coefficient with a high water contact angle (WCA) on a thermoplastic elastomer substrate (TPE) that is used in automotive profiling. The main drawback of this research is that groups that improve the hydrophobicity of the surface worsen its tribological properties. To overcome this, this study explored the use of various mixtures of differing proportions of two precursors. They were a siloxane, aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES) that was used to reduce the friction coefficient by its content of SiO{sub x} and a fluorinated compound, (heptadecafluoro-1,1,2,2-tetrahydrodecyl)trimethoxysilane (FLUSI) that was used to improve the water-repellency characteristics, due to the presence of CF{sub 2} long chains. The coatings were characterized by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM), Attenuated Total Reflectance Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR), X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS), dynamic Water Contact Angle (WCA), stability tests and tribological tests. It was found that an increase of the absorbance area under the SiOSi peak and inorganic groups is related to lower friction coefficients. On the other hand, the higher the CF{sub 2} percentage is, the higher the WCA is. The sample that was coated with 25% of FLUSI and 75% of APTES combined the improvements of both functional properties, the friction coefficient and the WCA. It has an average friction coefficient that is (0.530 ± 0.050) 51.5% lower and a WCA that is (θ{sub adv} = 119.8° ± 4.75) 4.4% higher than the uncoated TPE sample. A satisfactory

  14. Enhanced surface friction coefficient and hydrophobicity of TPE substrates using an APPJ system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Coatings on thermoplastic elastomers by atmospheric pressure plasma jet. • Study of influence of APTES and FLUSI percentage on the coating's properties. • The best sample (AF75) used 75% of APTES and 25% of FLUSI as precursor mixture. • Sample AF75 reduced a 51.5% the FC and increased a 4.4% the WCA. - Abstract: An APPJ system was used to deposit a coating that combines a low friction coefficient with a high water contact angle (WCA) on a thermoplastic elastomer substrate (TPE) that is used in automotive profiling. The main drawback of this research is that groups that improve the hydrophobicity of the surface worsen its tribological properties. To overcome this, this study explored the use of various mixtures of differing proportions of two precursors. They were a siloxane, aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES) that was used to reduce the friction coefficient by its content of SiOx and a fluorinated compound, (heptadecafluoro-1,1,2,2-tetrahydrodecyl)trimethoxysilane (FLUSI) that was used to improve the water-repellency characteristics, due to the presence of CF2 long chains. The coatings were characterized by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM), Attenuated Total Reflectance Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR), X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS), dynamic Water Contact Angle (WCA), stability tests and tribological tests. It was found that an increase of the absorbance area under the SiOSi peak and inorganic groups is related to lower friction coefficients. On the other hand, the higher the CF2 percentage is, the higher the WCA is. The sample that was coated with 25% of FLUSI and 75% of APTES combined the improvements of both functional properties, the friction coefficient and the WCA. It has an average friction coefficient that is (0.530 ± 0.050) 51.5% lower and a WCA that is (θadv = 119.8° ± 4.75) 4.4% higher than the uncoated TPE sample. A satisfactory stability in humid ambient for

  15. Dependence of the friction coefficient between two rough surfaces on their reciprocal correlation function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The friction coefficient between surfaces depends not only on their roughness but also on their relative speed. The aim of this work is to show how the friction coefficient would vary with the relative speed of the two rough surfaces provided accounting affects of their reciprocal correlation. The reciprocal spectral density of the two surfaces is studied in addition to their structure function. It is shown that the reciprocal spectral density has important impacts on the friction coefficient of the surfaces, in a sense that a positive or a negative reciprocal correlation would cause a decrease or an increase in the friction coefficient. In addition, the friction is studied in the context of the relaxation time. It is shown that there is a threshold for the relative velocity of the two surfaces, where by exceeding the threshold velocity the friction coefficient would not increase, but decrease

  16. Dependence of the friction coefficient between two rough surfaces on their reciprocal correlation function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikoofard, H. [Department of Physics, Shahid Beheshti University, G.C., Evin, Tehran 19839 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Vasheghani Farahani, S. [Department of Physics, Tafresh University, P.O. Box 39518-79611, Tafresh (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Jafari, G.R., E-mail: g_jafari@sbu.ac.ir [Department of Physics, Shahid Beheshti University, G.C., Evin, Tehran 19839 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); School of Nano-Science, Institute for Research in Fundamental Sciences (IPM), P.O. Box 19395-5531 Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-11-01

    The friction coefficient between surfaces depends not only on their roughness but also on their relative speed. The aim of this work is to show how the friction coefficient would vary with the relative speed of the two rough surfaces provided accounting affects of their reciprocal correlation. The reciprocal spectral density of the two surfaces is studied in addition to their structure function. It is shown that the reciprocal spectral density has important impacts on the friction coefficient of the surfaces, in a sense that a positive or a negative reciprocal correlation would cause a decrease or an increase in the friction coefficient. In addition, the friction is studied in the context of the relaxation time. It is shown that there is a threshold for the relative velocity of the two surfaces, where by exceeding the threshold velocity the friction coefficient would not increase, but decrease.

  17. Influence of self-affine roughness on the friction coefficient of rubber at high sliding velocity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Palasantzas, G

    2004-01-01

    In this work we investigate the influence of self-affine roughness on the friction coefficient of a rubber body onto a solid surface at high speeds. The roughness is characterized by the rms amplitude w, the correlation length xi, and the roughness exponent H. It is shown that the friction coefficie

  18. Dependence of the osmotic coefficients and average ionic activity coefficients on hydrophobic hydration in solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sergievskii, V. V.; Rudakov, A. M.

    2016-08-01

    The model that considers the nonideality of aqueous solutions of electrolytes with allowance for independent contributions of hydration of ions of various types and electrostatic interactions was substantiated using the cluster ion model. The empirical parameters in the model equations were found to be the hydrophilic and hydrophobic hydration numbers of ions in the standard state and the dispersion of their distribution over the stoichiometric coefficients. A mathematically adequate description of the concentration dependences of the osmotic coefficients and average ion activity coefficients of electrolytes was given for several systems. The difference in the rate of the decrease in the hydrophilic and hydrophobic hydration numbers of ions leads to extremum concentration dependences of the osmotic coefficients, which were determined by other authors from isopiestic data for many electrolytes and did not find explanation.

  19. Optimal estimation of the diffusion coefficient from non-averaged and averaged noisy magnitude data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristoffersen, Anders

    2007-08-01

    The magnitude operation changes the signal distribution in MRI images from Gaussian to Rician. This introduces a bias that must be taken into account when estimating the apparent diffusion coefficient. Several estimators are known in the literature. In the present paper, two novel schemes are proposed. Both are based on simple least squares fitting of the measured signal, either to the median (MD) or to the maximum probability (MP) value of the Probability Density Function (PDF). Fitting to the mean (MN) or a high signal-to-noise ratio approximation to the mean (HS) is also possible. Special attention is paid to the case of averaged magnitude images. The PDF, which cannot be expressed in closed form, is analyzed numerically. A scheme for performing maximum likelihood (ML) estimation from averaged magnitude images is proposed. The performance of several estimators is evaluated by Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. We focus on typical clinical situations, where the number of acquisitions is limited. For non-averaged data the optimal choice is found to be MP or HS, whereas uncorrected schemes and the power image (PI) method should be avoided. For averaged data MD and ML perform equally well, whereas uncorrected schemes and HS are inadequate. MD provides easier implementation and higher computational efficiency than ML. Unbiased estimation of the diffusion coefficient allows high resolution diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and may therefore help solving the problem of crossing fibers encountered in white matter tractography.

  20. A coefficient average approximation towards Gutzwiller wavefunction formalism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jun; Yao, Yongxin; Wang, Cai-Zhuang; Ho, Kai-Ming

    2015-06-01

    Gutzwiller wavefunction is a physically well-motivated trial wavefunction for describing correlated electron systems. In this work, a new approximation is introduced to facilitate the evaluation of the expectation value of any operator within the Gutzwiller wavefunction formalism. The basic idea is to make use of a specially designed average over Gutzwiller wavefunction coefficients expanded in the many-body Fock space to approximate the ratio of expectation values between a Gutzwiller wavefunction and its underlying noninteracting wavefunction. To check with the standard Gutzwiller approximation (GA), we test its performance on single band systems and find quite interesting properties. On finite systems, we noticed that it gives superior performance over GA, while on infinite systems it asymptotically approaches GA. Analytic analysis together with numerical tests are provided to support this claimed asymptotical behavior. Finally, possible improvements on the approximation and its generalization towards multiband systems are illustrated and discussed.

  1. Adhesion energy between mica surfaces: Implications for the frictional coefficient under dry and wet conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakuma, Hiroshi

    2013-12-01

    frictional strength of faults is a critical factor that contributes to continuous fault slip and earthquake occurrence. Frictional strength can be reduced by the presence of sheet-structured clay minerals. In this study, two important factors influencing the frictional coefficient of minerals were quantitatively analyzed by a newly developed computational method based on a combination of first-principles study and thermodynamics. One factor that helps reduce the frictional coefficient is the low adhesion energy between the layers under dry conditions. Potassium ions on mica surfaces are easily exchanged with sodium ions when brought into contact with highly concentrated sodium-halide solutions. We found that the surface ion exchange with sodium ions reduces the adhesion energy, indicating that the frictional coefficient can be reduced under dry conditions. Another factor is the lubrication caused by adsorbed water films on mineral surfaces under wet conditions. Potassium and sodium ions on mica surfaces have a strong affinity for water molecules. In order to remove the adsorbed water molecules confined between mica surfaces, a differential compressive stress of the order of tens of gigapascals was necessary at room temperature. These water molecules inhibit direct contact between mineral surfaces and reduce the frictional coefficient. Our results imply that the frictional coefficient can be modified through contact with fluids depending on their salt composition. The low adhesion energy between fault-forming minerals and the presence of an adsorbed water film is a possible reason for the low frictional coefficient observed at continuous fault slip zones.

  2. THE EFFECTS OF PERFORMANCE CHARACTERISTICS TO THE COEFFICIENT OF FRICTION IN SINTERED BRONZE BEARINGS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gültekin KARADERE

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the effects of performance characteristics of self-lubricating, sintered bronze journal bearings to the coefficient of friction is investigated via an experimental test rig. In the experiments, the variation of the coefficient of friction for different velocities and pressures has been investigated for the cases in which an additional oil mass is fed and not fed into the bearing. Furthermore, in the cases where the other parameters are kept constant, the effects of velocity, pressure and temperature to the coefficient of friction are separately investigated, and the results are plotted.

  3. Prediction and determination of both friction coefficient and forming force on sheet metal deep—drawing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Junxiang; YonglinKang; 等

    2002-01-01

    On the basis of the criterion of no-wrinkle,the principle and method of prediction and determination of both friction coefficient and forming force on sheet metal deep-drawing are put forward,and proved it's expedience and practicability.They are suitable for as sessment of lubricant properties.Friction coefficient and forming force are a function of material parameter,design parameter and process parameter,especially relative prevent wrinkle blank-holder force.Product of both friction coefficient and prevent wrinkle blank-holder force is only function of process parameter η after determining material parameter and design parameter.

  4. The effect of shoe sole tread groove depth on the friction coefficient with different tread groove widths, floors and contaminants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kai Way; Wu, Horng Huei; Lin, Yu-Chang

    2006-11-01

    Slipping and falling are common phenomena in both workplaces and our daily activities. The risks associated with slipping and falling are related to the materials of footwear/floor, contamination condition, and geometric design of the sole. Shoe soles of various tread design are very common. Tread pattern of the shoe affects friction especially under liquid-contaminated conditions. Verification of the effects of tread groove depth is significant in assisting designers in designing proper footwear for workers exposed to slippery floor conditions. In this study, we measured the friction coefficients using the Neolite footwear pads on the terrazzo, steel, and vinyl floors under three liquid-contaminated conditions. A Brungraber Mark II slipmeter was used. The footwear pads had tread grooves with a width of either 3 or 9mm. The depth of the tread grooves ranged from 1 to 5mm. The results showed that tread groove depth affected the friction coefficients significantly. Higher friction values were recorded for footwear pads with deeper tread grooves on wet and water-detergent-contaminated floors. The averaged coefficient of friction (COF) gain per tread groove depth increase in millimeter under these two surface conditions ranged from 0.018 to 0.108, depending on the tread groove width, floor, and contaminant. PMID:16427022

  5. Surface roughness and friction coefficient in peened friction stir welded 2195 aluminum alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The tribological properties of friction stir welded 2195 aluminum alloy joints were investigated for several laser- and shot-peened specimens. The first portion of this study assessed the surface roughness changes at different regions of the weld resulting from the various peening processes and included an atomic force microscopy (AFM) study to reveal fine structures. The second portion investigated the friction characteristics for various conditions when slid against a 440C ball slider. Shot peening resulted in significant surface roughness when compared to the unpeened and laser-peened samples. The initial friction for all types of specimens was highly variable. However, long-term friction was shown to be lowest for samples with no peening treatment. Laser peening caused the friction to increase slightly. The shot peening process on the other hand resulted in an increase of the long-term friction effects on both sides of the weld.

  6. Coefficient of Friction Measurements for Thermoplastics and Fibre Composites Under Low Sliding Velocity and High Pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulios, Konstantinos; Svendsen, Gustav Winther; Hiller, Jochen;

    2013-01-01

    that friction materials which are untypical for brake applications, like thermoplastics and fibre composites, can offer superior performance in terms of braking torque, wear resistance and cost than typical brake linings. In this paper coefficient of friction measurements for various thermoplastic and fibre...

  7. Study on the testing methods of friction coefficient in metal sheet deep drawing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    A more suitable method is introduced about testing friction coefficient on deep drawingcondition. It is pointed out that many ways to mesture friction coefficient. However, if a study of thefriction and lubrication in sheet metal deep drawing process is made, the testing method recom-mended in this paper should be used. As it is identical with the actual working condition accordingto its testing principle and state of stress.

  8. Estimating the workpiece-backingplate heat transfer coefficient in friction stirwelding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Anders; Stolpe, Mathias; Hattel, Jesper Henri

    2012-01-01

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to determine the magnitude and spatial distribution of the heat transfer coefficient between the workpiece and the backingplate in a friction stir welding process using inverse modelling. Design/methodology/approach - The magnitude and distribution of the heat...... in an inverse modeling approach to determine the heat transfer coefficient in friction stir welding. © Emerald Group Publishing Limited....... yields optimal values for the magnitude and distribution of the heat transfer coefficient. Findings - It is found that the heat transfer coefficient between the workpiece and the backingplate is non-uniform and takes its maximum value in a region below the welding tool. Four different parameterisations...

  9. The measurement of friction coefficient down to 1.8 K for LHC Magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Artoos, K; Poncet, Alain; Savary, F; Veness, R J M

    1994-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) proposed for construction at CERN consists of a series of high field superconducting dipole magnet operating at 1.8K. The mechanical structure of these magnets contains many components in close contact. A knowledge of the friction coefficient between these components is required. Indeed, during assembly and cool down of the magnets, prestresses must be transferred to the superconducting coils. During operation, frictional heating may provoke loss of superconductivity. A machine has been built at CERN to measure the coefficient of friction from room temperature down to 1.8K. This paper describes the cryogenic tribometer and the results collected to date.

  10. Prediction and determination of both friction coefficient and forming force on sheet metal deep-drawing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    On the basis of the criterion of no-wrinkle, the principle and method of prediction and determination of both friction coefficientand forming force on sheet metal deep-drawing are put forward, and proved it's expedience and practicability. They are suitable for assessment of lubricant properties. Friction coefficient and forming force are a function of material parameter, design parameter and process parameter, especially relative prevent wrinkle blank-holder force. Product of both friction coefficient and prevent wrinkle blank-holder force isonly function of process parameter after determining material parameter and design parameter.

  11. Evaluation of the friction coefficient, the radial stress, and the damage work during needle insertions into agarose gels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urrea, Fabián A; Casanova, Fernando; Orozco, Gustavo A; García, José J

    2016-03-01

    Agarose hydrogels have been extensively used as a phantom material to mimic the mechanical behavior of soft biological tissues, e.g. in studies aimed to analyze needle insertions into the organs producing tissue damage. To better predict the radial stress and damage during needle insertions, this study was aimed to determine the friction coefficient between the material of commercial catheters and hydrogels. The friction coefficient, the tissue damage and the radial stress were evaluated at 0.2, 1.8, and 10mm/s velocities for 28, 30, and 32 gauge needles of outer diameters equal to 0.36, 0.31, and 0.23mm, respectively. Force measurements during needle insertions and retractions on agarose gel samples were used to analyze damage and radial stress. The static friction coefficient (0.295±0.056) was significantly higher than the dynamic (0.255±0.086). The static and dynamic friction coefficients were significantly smaller for the 0.2mm/s velocity compared to those for the other two velocities, and there was no significant difference between the friction coefficients for 1.8 and 10mm/s. Radial stress averages were 131.2±54.1, 248.3±64.2, and 804.9±164.3Pa for the insertion velocity of 0.2, 1.8, and 10mm/s, respectively. The radial stress presented a tendency to increase at higher insertion velocities and needle size, which is consistent with other studies. However, the damage work did not show to be a good predictor of tissue damage, which appears to be due to simplifications in the analytical model. Differently to other approaches, the method proposed here based on radial stress may be extended in future studies to quantity tissue damage in vivo along the entire needle track. PMID:26700572

  12. A computerized method to estimate friction coefficient from orientation distribution of meso-scale faults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Katsushi

    2016-08-01

    The friction coefficient controls the brittle strength of the Earth's crust for deformation recorded by faults. This study proposes a computerized method to determine the friction coefficient of meso-scale faults. The method is based on the analysis of orientation distribution of faults, and the principal stress axes and the stress ratio calculated by a stress tensor inversion technique. The method assumes that faults are activated according to the cohesionless Coulomb's failure criterion, where the fluctuations of fluid pressure and the magnitude of differential stress are assumed to induce faulting. In this case, the orientation distribution of fault planes is described by a probability density function that is visualized as linear contours on a Mohr diagram. The parametric optimization of the function for an observed fault population yields the friction coefficient. A test using an artificial fault-slip dataset successfully determines the internal friction angle (the arctangent of the friction coefficient) with its confidence interval of several degrees estimated by the bootstrap resampling technique. An application to natural faults cutting a Pleistocene forearc basin fill yields a friction coefficient around 0.7 which is experimentally predicted by the Byerlee's law.

  13. Development and assessment of atomistic models for predicting static friction coefficients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahangiri, Soran; Heverly-Coulson, Gavin S.; Mosey, Nicholas J.

    2016-08-01

    The friction coefficient relates friction forces to normal loads and plays a key role in fundamental and applied areas of science and technology. Despite its importance, the relationship between the friction coefficient and the properties of the materials forming a sliding contact is poorly understood. We illustrate how simple relationships regarding the changes in energy that occur during slip can be used to develop a quantitative model relating the friction coefficient to atomic-level features of the contact. The slip event is considered as an activated process and the load dependence of the slip energy barrier is approximated with a Taylor series expansion of the corresponding energies with respect to load. The resulting expression for the load-dependent slip energy barrier is incorporated in the Prandtl-Tomlinson (PT) model and a shear-based model to obtain expressions for friction coefficient. The results indicate that the shear-based model reproduces the static friction coefficients μs obtained from first-principles molecular dynamics simulations more accurately than the PT model. The ability of the model to provide atomistic explanations for differences in μs amongst different contacts is also illustrated. As a whole, the model is able to account for fundamental atomic-level features of μs, explain the differences in μs for different materials based on their properties, and might be also used in guiding the development of contacts with desired values of μs.

  14. Interpreting Bivariate Regression Coefficients: Going beyond the Average

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halcoussis, Dennis; Phillips, G. Michael

    2010-01-01

    Statistics, econometrics, investment analysis, and data analysis classes often review the calculation of several types of averages, including the arithmetic mean, geometric mean, harmonic mean, and various weighted averages. This note shows how each of these can be computed using a basic regression framework. By recognizing when a regression model…

  15. A Tactile Sensor Using Piezoresistive Beams for Detection of the Coefficient of Static Friction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okatani, Taiyu; Takahashi, Hidetoshi; Noda, Kentaro; Takahata, Tomoyuki; Matsumoto, Kiyoshi; Shimoyama, Isao

    2016-05-18

    This paper reports on a tactile sensor using piezoresistive beams for detection of the coefficient of static friction merely by pressing the sensor against an object. The sensor chip is composed of three pairs of piezoresistive beams arranged in parallel and embedded in an elastomer; this sensor is able to measure the vertical and lateral strains of the elastomer. The coefficient of static friction is estimated from the ratio of the fractional resistance changes corresponding to the sensing elements of vertical and lateral strains when the sensor is in contact with an object surface. We applied a normal force on the sensor surface through objects with coefficients of static friction ranging from 0.2 to 1.1. The fractional resistance changes corresponding to vertical and lateral strains were proportional to the applied force. Furthermore, the relationship between these responses changed according to the coefficients of static friction. The experimental result indicated the proposed sensor could determine the coefficient of static friction before a global slip occurs.

  16. A Tactile Sensor Using Piezoresistive Beams for Detection of the Coefficient of Static Friction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okatani, Taiyu; Takahashi, Hidetoshi; Noda, Kentaro; Takahata, Tomoyuki; Matsumoto, Kiyoshi; Shimoyama, Isao

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports on a tactile sensor using piezoresistive beams for detection of the coefficient of static friction merely by pressing the sensor against an object. The sensor chip is composed of three pairs of piezoresistive beams arranged in parallel and embedded in an elastomer; this sensor is able to measure the vertical and lateral strains of the elastomer. The coefficient of static friction is estimated from the ratio of the fractional resistance changes corresponding to the sensing elements of vertical and lateral strains when the sensor is in contact with an object surface. We applied a normal force on the sensor surface through objects with coefficients of static friction ranging from 0.2 to 1.1. The fractional resistance changes corresponding to vertical and lateral strains were proportional to the applied force. Furthermore, the relationship between these responses changed according to the coefficients of static friction. The experimental result indicated the proposed sensor could determine the coefficient of static friction before a global slip occurs. PMID:27213374

  17. A Tactile Sensor Using Piezoresistive Beams for Detection of the Coefficient of Static Friction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okatani, Taiyu; Takahashi, Hidetoshi; Noda, Kentaro; Takahata, Tomoyuki; Matsumoto, Kiyoshi; Shimoyama, Isao

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports on a tactile sensor using piezoresistive beams for detection of the coefficient of static friction merely by pressing the sensor against an object. The sensor chip is composed of three pairs of piezoresistive beams arranged in parallel and embedded in an elastomer; this sensor is able to measure the vertical and lateral strains of the elastomer. The coefficient of static friction is estimated from the ratio of the fractional resistance changes corresponding to the sensing elements of vertical and lateral strains when the sensor is in contact with an object surface. We applied a normal force on the sensor surface through objects with coefficients of static friction ranging from 0.2 to 1.1. The fractional resistance changes corresponding to vertical and lateral strains were proportional to the applied force. Furthermore, the relationship between these responses changed according to the coefficients of static friction. The experimental result indicated the proposed sensor could determine the coefficient of static friction before a global slip occurs. PMID:27213374

  18. Investigation on tribology behavior of lubricants using the coefficient of friction test method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    This test method is used to determine the property of lubricants by measure the pa-rameters such as the coefficient of friction, wear value and seizure load on the Four Ball Wear TestMachine. Experiments were conducted using ASTM D5183-95 Standard Test Method (StandardTest Method For Determination Of The Coefficient of Friction of Lubricants Using the Four BallWear Test Machine) to measure the friction reducing ability , antiwear property and ex-treme-pressure property of different type of lubricants, the additives are also been studied at thesame time. From the test result, this test method can distinguish not only the property of differenttype of lubricants rapidly, sensitively and effectively but also can reflect the friction reducingability , antiwear property and extreme-pressure property of various additive formula.

  19. Effect of inclusions on friction coefficient of highly filled composite materials

    OpenAIRE

    Lemarchand, E; Ulm, FJ; DORMIEUX, L

    2002-01-01

    Highly filled composite material systems exhibit, in triaxial compression, a composite strength that is greater than either the weaker particulate or matrix strength. This is due to an amplification of the local confinement in the matrix activating frictional mechanism. The paper quantitatively addresses this increase of the friction coefficient of a matrix reinforced by rigid inclusions using assorted means of nonlinear micromechanics. The approach is based on a nonlinear elastic representat...

  20. Minimum Ballistic Factor Missile Shapes For Variable Skin Friction Coefficient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. C. Jain

    1973-10-01

    Full Text Available Minimum ballistic factor for slender axisymmetric power law bodies have been obtained by taking a variable skinfriction coefficient for the cases when any two of the three quantities length, diameter and surface area have been pre-prescribed.

  1. Deformation of SS 304 LN during Scratch Test and Influence on Evolution of Coefficient of Friction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satender Kataria

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available An AISI 304 LN nuclear grade forged, metallographically polished specimen was subjected to progressive load scratch tests using a spheroconical indenter at three different scratch speeds 1, 3, and 27 mm/min. The present study attempts to address the evolution of coefficient of friction with scratch speed invoking its correlation with scratch induced deformation in the specimen. At higher scratch speeds, plastic deformation rates were higher which caused friction coefficient to be of higher magnitude. This was correlated with dynamically obtained high resolution optical images that revealed deformation driven microstructural alterations. These alterations significantly influenced the evolution of friction coefficient which was intimately related to plasticity of the surface.

  2. Study for reasonable value of friction coefficient between main cable and saddle

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Deng Ting; Luo Xiheng

    2012-01-01

    The value of friction coefficient between the main cable and saddle, relates to not only the anti-slippage stability of three-tower suspension bridge, but also the reasonable stiffness of the middle tower and the magnitude of rigidity of the whole bridge. First, the paper does some comparative studies about the relevant provisions of international norms, and then, summarizes the relevant load test results both at home and abroad. Finally, the paper draws the appropriate anti-slippage safety factor for the most unfavorable load in accordance with international load standards, and discusses the rationality and feasibility of the friction coefficient of 0.2 between main cable and saddle.

  3. Effective assessment of tyre-road friction coefficient using a hybrid estimator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Hongbin; Chen, Sizhong; Shim, Taehyun; Wu, Zhicheng

    2014-08-01

    Vehicle stability and active safety control depend heavily on tyre forces available on each wheel of a vehicle. Since tyre forces are strongly affected by the tyre-road friction coefficient, it is crucial to optimise the use of the adhesion limits of the tyres. This study presents a hybrid method to identify the road friction limitation; it contributes significantly to active vehicle safety. A hybrid estimator is developed based on the three degrees-of-freedom vehicle model, which considers longitudinal, lateral and yaw motions. The proposed hybrid estimator includes two sub-estimators: one is the vehicle state information estimator using the unscented Kalman filter and another is the integrated road friction estimator. By connecting two sub-estimators simultaneously, the proposed algorithm can effectively estimate the road friction coefficient. The performance of the proposed estimation algorithm is validated in CarSim/Matlab co-simulation environment under three different road conditions (high-μ, low-μ and mixed-μ). Simulation results show that the proposed estimator can assess vehicle states and road friction coefficient with good accuracy.

  4. Friction Coefficient Between Rolling Tube and Mandrel of Full Floating Mandrel Mill

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Zhi-yi; XIE Jian-xin; HE Xiao-ming; DONG Kai; YU Yong; PAN Feng

    2009-01-01

    In the process of steel tube production, continuous tube rolling is the foremost forming procedure and the critical step that decides the dimension precision and the surface quality. In the actual production of the φ140 mm full floating mandrel mill in Steel Tube Branch in Baosteel, steel T91 was chosen to be the typical sample, self-made roll-ing force transducer and mandrel velocity testing equipment were used, and a series of comprehensive tests on rolling parameters including the rolling force and mandrel velocity were carried out. After the experiment, the friction state between rolling tube and mandrel was analyzed. The friction coefficient was calculated and the values of 0.033-0.074 in each mill were obtained. The friction coefficient increases obviously along the rolling direction.

  5. Self-affine roughness influence on the friction coefficient for rubbers onto solid surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Palasantzas, G

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we investigate the influence of self-affine roughness on the friction coefficient mu(f) of a rubber body under incomplete contact onto a solid surface. The roughness is characterized by the rms amplitude w, the correlation length xi, and the roughness exponent H. It is shown that with

  6. Coefficient of friction between carbon steel and perlite concrete surfaces. Test report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of coefficient of friction, μ, tests conducted on perlite blocks and carbon steel plates under various conditions are discussed. Variables included in the test entailed the use of lubricants (i.e. water and simulated radioactive waste solution) abrasives (120 grit, 60 grit, 40 grit sand paper) applied to the surfaces of the perlite block and carbon steel plates

  7. Accurate measurement of the kinetic coefficient of friction between a surface and a granular mass

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rademacher, F.J.C.

    1978-01-01

    A device has been developed for correct measurement of the kinematic coefficient of friction between a cohesionless granular material and a surface. Particle size may range from 0.5 up to about 9 mm, depending somewhat on the desired accuracy. Sliding velocity of the granules with respect to the sur

  8. The stochastic distribution of available coefficient of friction on quarry tiles for human locomotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Wen-Ruey; Matz, Simon; Chang, Chien-Chi

    2012-01-01

    The available coefficient of friction (ACOF) for human locomotion is the maximum coefficient of friction that can be supported without a slip at the shoe and floor interface. A statistical model was introduced to estimate the probability of slip by comparing the ACOF with the required coefficient of friction, assuming that both coefficients have stochastic distributions. This paper presents an investigation of the stochastic distributions of the ACOF of quarry tiles under dry, water and glycerol conditions. One hundred friction measurements were performed on a walkway under the surface conditions of dry, water and 45% glycerol concentration. The Kolmogorov-Smirnov goodness-of-fit test was used to determine if the distribution of the ACOF was a good fit with the normal, log-normal and Weibull distributions. The results indicated that the ACOF appears to fit the normal and log-normal distributions better than the Weibull distribution for the water and glycerol conditions. However, no match was found between the distribution of ACOF under the dry condition and any of the three continuous distributions evaluated. Based on limited data, a normal distribution might be more appropriate due to its simplicity, practicality and familiarity among the three distributions evaluated.

  9. Coefficient of Friction Measurements for Thermoplastics and Fiber Composites under Low Sliding Velocity and High Pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulios, Konstantinos; Svendsen, G.; Hiller, Jochen;

    2012-01-01

    materials which are untypical for brake applications, like thermoplastics and fiber composites, can offer superior performance in terms of braking torque, wear resistance and cost than typical brake linings. In this paper coefficient of friction measurements for various thermoplastic and fiber composite...

  10. Adhesion-dependent negative friction coefficient on chemically modified graphite at the nanoscale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Zhao; Smolyanitsky, Alex; Li, Qunyang; Feng, Xi-Qiao; Cannara, Rachel J.

    2012-12-01

    From the early tribological studies of Leonardo da Vinci to Amontons’ law, friction has been shown to increase with increasing normal load. This trend continues to hold at the nanoscale, where friction can vary nonlinearly with normal load. Here we present nanoscale friction force microscopy (FFM) experiments for a nanoscale probe tip sliding on a chemically modified graphite surface in an atomic force microscope (AFM). Our results demonstrate that, when adhesion between the AFM tip and surface is enhanced relative to the exfoliation energy of graphite, friction can increase as the load decreases under tip retraction. This leads to the emergence of an effectively negative coefficient of friction in the low-load regime. We show that the magnitude of this coefficient depends on the ratio of tip-sample adhesion to the exfoliation energy of graphite. Through both atomistic- and continuum-based simulations, we attribute this unusual phenomenon to a reversible partial delamination of the topmost atomic layers, which then mimic few- to single-layer graphene. Lifting of these layers with the AFM tip leads to greater deformability of the surface with decreasing applied load. This discovery suggests that the lamellar nature of graphite yields nanoscale tribological properties outside the predictive capacity of existing continuum mechanical models.

  11. Diffusion Coefficient of Helium in Mo-Assessed by the Internal Friction Technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Weiguo; YANG Junfeng; WANG Xianping; XIE Chunyi; LI Renhong; CHEN Junling; FANG Qianfeng

    2009-01-01

    Diffusion behavior of helium in molybdenum was investigated by means of the in-ternal friction method. An apparent relaxation internal friction peak associated with helium long-range diffusion was observed around 475 K at a resonant frequency of 56 Hz. In terms of the Gorsky relaxation model and the shift of the peak position with the measurement frequency, the activation energy and pre-exponential factor of the diffusion coefficient of the helium atoms in molybdenum were deduced as 0.63 eV and 6.5 cm2/s, respectively.

  12. Improve Simulation of Plain Bearings in Dry and Mixed Lubrication Regime by Defining Locally Resolved Dry Friction Coefficients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Schneider

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Asperity friction is a main indicator for wear and heat conduction [1]. It occurs when thickness of oil film shrinks due to high load or slow speed. Friction is scientifically well known as long as it is dominated by laminar oil film effects. If film thickness shrinks, the friction coefficient depends mainly on surface properties. This inaccuracy is normally preceded in simulation by using friction coefficients defined by Coulomb’s law [2]. To improve simulation results, the simulated friction moment was compared to measurement on a component test rig. Friction moment is produced on every square millimetre of the bearing surface, but can only be measured as an integral. Research findings show that measured results can’t be met by using one global dry friction coefficient for the whole bearing surface, even though it is material dependent. By introducing locally resolved and asperity pressure dependent dry friction coefficients, it was possible to adapt the simulated friction moment to measure one with a deviation of less than 5 percent. By means of simulation it was possible to develop locally resolved results based on integral measurements; and improve modelling the frictional state of mixed lubrication.

  13. Studies in molecular dynamics of the friction coefficient and the Lorentz gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alley, W.E.

    1979-06-01

    The thesis consists of three hard-sphere molecular dynamics studies. The first describes a modification of Fick's diffusion law, required whenever long-time correlations are present. The second study concerns the mass and size dependence of the friction coefficient as well as its dependence on boundary conditions. The study presents a molecular dynamics method which calculates the infinite-mass friction coefficient of finite size hard-sphere particles. The third study presents the applicability of hydrodynamics to describe fluctuations in fluids on the molecular level. This study shows that the fluctuations present in a system of hard spheres when placed between closely spaced parallel hard walls lead to an acoustical resonance for those wavelengths which correspond to the spacing, or integer fractions thereof.

  14. Studies in molecular dynamics of the friction coefficient and the Lorentz gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The thesis consists of three hard-sphere molecular dynamics studies. The first describes a modification of Fick's diffusion law, required whenever long-time correlations are present. The second study concerns the mass and size dependence of the friction coefficient as well as its dependence on boundary conditions. The study presents a molecular dynamics method which calculates the infinite-mass friction coefficient of finite size hard-sphere particles. The third study presents the applicability of hydrodynamics to describe fluctuations in fluids on the molecular level. This study shows that the fluctuations present in a system of hard spheres when placed between closely spaced parallel hard walls lead to an acoustical resonance for those wavelengths which correspond to the spacing, or integer fractions thereof

  15. Influence of self-affine roughness on the adhesive friction coefficient of a rubber body sliding on a solid substrate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Palasantzas, G

    2004-01-01

    In this work we investigate characteristics of the adhesive friction during sliding of a rubber body on a rough self-affined surface. The latter is characterized by the rms roughness amplitude w, the in-plane correlation length, and the roughness exponent H (0 friction coefficient is sho

  16. Numerical simulation on friction coefficient effect of pebble flow dynamics in two-dimensional pebble-bed reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to investigate the pebble flow dynamics in the high-temperature reactor core and based on the two-dimensional experiments of pebble flow dynamics, discrete element method (DEM) was used to simulate the pebble flow dynamics. The mean flow stream lines, standard deviation and the mean residence time of the pebble flow zone generated by markers were compared and analyzed. The results show that ball friction coefficient has little effect on the pebble flow field. With the pebble friction coefficient increasing, the horizontal diffusion of pebbles decreases and the pebble flow seems to be more uniform. The wall friction coefficient has little effect on the horizontal diffusion. While the wall friction coefficient increases, the flow tends to be more uneven. (authors)

  17. NGA-West 2 GMPE average site coefficients for use in earthquake-resistant design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borcherdt, Roger D.

    2015-01-01

    Site coefficients corresponding to those in tables 11.4–1 and 11.4–2 of Minimum Design Loads for Buildings and Other Structures published by the American Society of Civil Engineers (Standard ASCE/SEI 7-10) are derived from four of the Next Generation Attenuation West2 (NGA-W2) Ground-Motion Prediction Equations (GMPEs). The resulting coefficients are compared with those derived by other researchers and those derived from the NGA-West1 database. The derivation of the NGA-W2 average site coefficients provides a simple procedure to update site coefficients with each update in the Maximum Considered Earthquake Response MCER maps. The simple procedure yields average site coefficients consistent with those derived for site-specific design purposes. The NGA-W2 GMPEs provide simple scale factors to reduce conservatism in current simplified design procedures.

  18. Determination of Friction Coefficient at Journal Bearings by Experimental and by Means of Artificial Neural Networks Method

    OpenAIRE

    Ünlü, Bekir; Durmuş, Hülya; Meriç, Cevdet; Atik, Enver

    2004-01-01

    Knowing friction coefficient is important for determination of wear loss conditions at journal bearings. Tribological events that influence wear and its variations affect experimental results. In this study, friction coefficient at CuSn10 Bronze radial bearings has been determined by a new approach as experimental and artificial neural networks method. In experiments, effects of bearings have been examined at dry and lubricated conditions and at different loads and velocities.

  19. STRESS ANALYSIS IN CUTTING TOOLS COATED TiN AND EFFECT OF THE FRICTION COEFFICIENT IN TOOL-CHIP INTERFACE

    OpenAIRE

    ASLANTAŞ, Kubilay

    2003-01-01

    The coated tools are regularly used in today's metal cutting industry. Because, it is well known that thin and hard coatings can reduce tool wear, improve tool life and productivity. Such coatings have significantly contributed to the improvements cutting economies and cutting tool performance through lower tool wear and reduced cutting forces. TiN coatings have especially high strength and low friction coefficients. During the cutting process, low friction coefficient reduce damage in cutt...

  20. Exploring factors affecting measurements of the static coefficient of friction: An application of fractional factorial experiment design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folkerts, Timothy J.

    2004-10-01

    The common undergraduate experiment for determining the static coefficient of friction between a wooden block and a horizontal tabletop often produces inconsistent results. We show how several factors influence the measured magnitude and consistency of the coefficient of friction. We utilize a fractional factorial experimental design, which is a method that has been specifically developed to effectively and efficiently uncover key factors that most strongly influence experimental results.

  1. Description of new dry granular materials of variable cohesion and friction coefficient: Implications for laboratory modeling of the brittle crust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelmalak, M. M.; Bulois, C.; Mourgues, R.; Galland, O.; Legland, J.-B.; Gruber, C.

    2016-08-01

    Cohesion and friction coefficient are fundamental parameters for scaling brittle deformation in laboratory models of geological processes. However, they are commonly not experimental variable, whereas (1) rocks range from cohesion-less to strongly cohesive and from low friction to high friction and (2) strata exhibit substantial cohesion and friction contrasts. This brittle paradox implies that the effects of brittle properties on processes involving brittle deformation cannot be tested in laboratory models. Solving this paradox requires the use of dry granular materials of tunable and controllable brittle properties. In this paper, we describe dry mixtures of fine-grained cohesive, high friction silica powder (SP) and low-cohesion, low friction glass microspheres (GM) that fulfill this requirement. We systematically estimated the cohesions and friction coefficients of mixtures of variable proportions using two independent methods: (1) a classic Hubbert-type shear box to determine the extrapolated cohesion (C) and friction coefficient (μ), and (2) direct measurements of the tensile strength (T0) and the height (H) of open fractures to calculate the true cohesion (C0). The measured values of cohesion increase from 100 Pa for pure GM to 600 Pa for pure SP, with a sub-linear trend of the cohesion with the mixture GM content. The two independent cohesion measurement methods, from shear tests and tension/extensional tests, yield very similar results of extrapolated cohesion (C) and show that both are robust and can be used independently. The measured values of friction coefficients increase from 0.5 for pure GM to 1.05 for pure SP. The use of these granular material mixtures now allows testing (1) the effects of cohesion and friction coefficient in homogeneous laboratory models and (2) testing the effect of brittle layering on brittle deformation, as demonstrated by preliminary experiments. Therefore, the brittle properties become, at last, experimental variables.

  2. The test device for heat friction coefficient of high strength steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sun Zhifu; Ma Mingtu; Ma Fangwu; Guo Yihui; Song Leifeng; Yao Zaiqi

    2012-01-01

    Using high strength steel and ultra-high strength steel in hot stamping and automobile parts is one of the most important ways of the automobile lightweight, which is the development trend of automobiles currently. In this paper, the development of test device for heat friction coefficient by high strength steel can provide important technical parame- ters for hot stamping process, making the right selection of equipment types, mold design, technology optimization, and research and development of lubrication medium of press forming. At the same time, the experiments indicate that the instrument has not only accurate test result but also good repeatability.

  3. Relationship Between Measured Friction Coefficients and Two Tread Groove Design Parameters for Footwear Pads

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Kai Way; CHEN Chin Jung; LIN Ching-Hua; HSU Yao Wen

    2006-01-01

    The shoe sole geometrical design parameters are believed to be important factors affecting the coefficient of friction (COF) between the shoe/floor interface. This study is concerned with the relationship between the measured COF and the tread groove orientation and width on the footwear pad. Friction measurements using the Brungraber Mark Ⅱ slipmeter were conducted. Six tread groove width/orientations designs on the footwear pads under 27 footwear material/floor/contamination conditions were tested. The results show that tread orientation and width affect the measured COF significantly. Wider grooved footwear pads result in higher COF values and footwear pads with tread grooves perpendicular to the friction measurement direction have higher COF values. A regression model using measured COF as the dependent variable and tread groove width, groove orientation, footwear material, floor, and contamination conditions as independent variables was established. The models are significant at p<0.0001 with R2 of 0.97, which may be used in predicting the COF at the shoe-floor interface.

  4. Estimation of sediment friction coefficient from heating upon APC penetration during the IODP NanTroSEIZE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinoshita, M.; Kawamura, K.; Lin, W.

    2015-12-01

    During the Nankai Trough Seismogenic Zone Experiments (NanTroSEIZE) of the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP), the advanced piston corer temperature (APC-T) tool was used to determine in situ formation temperatures while piston coring down to ~200 m below sea floor. When the corer is fired into the formation, temperature around the shoe abruptly increases due to the frictional heating. The temperature rise due to the frictional heat at the time of penetration is 10 K or larger. We found that the frictional temperature rise (=maximum temperature) increases with increasing depth, and that its intersection at the seafloor seems non-zero. Frictional heat energy is proportional to the maximum temperature rise, which is confirmed by a FEM numerical simulation of 2D cylindrical system. Here we use the result of numerical simulation to convert the observed temperature rise into the frictional heat energy. The frictional heat energy is represented as the product of the shooting length D and the shear stress (τ) between the pipe and the sediment. Assuming a coulomb slip regime, the shear stress is shows as: τ= τ0 + μ*(Sv-Pp), where τ0 is the cohesive stress, μ the dynamic frictional coefficient between the pipe and the sediment, Sv the normal stress at the pipe, and Pp the pore pressure. This can explain the non-zero intersection as well as depth-dependent increase for the frictional heating observed in the APC-T data. Assuming a hydrostatic state and by using the downhole bulk density data, we estimated the friction coefficient for each APC-T measurement. For comparison, we used the vane-shear strength measured on core samples to estimate the friction coefficients. The frictional coefficients μ were estimated as ranging 0.01 - 0.06, anomalously lower than expected for shallow marine sediments. They were lower than those estimated from vane-shear data, which range 0.05 to 0.2. Still, both estimates exhibit a significant increase in the friction coefficient at

  5. On the Effect of Counterface Materials on Interface Temperature and Friction Coefficient of GFRE Composite Under Dry Sliding Contact

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. S.M. El-Tayeb

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, there is an increase interest in polymeric composite materials for high-performance in many industrial applications. In other words, the tribo-studies on polymeric materials are growing fast to enhance the polymeric products such as bearings, seals, ring and bushes. The current work presents an attempt to study the correlation between the type of counterface material and frictional heating at the interface surfaces for different, normal loads (23N, 49N and 72N, sliding velocities (0.18, 1.3 and 5.2 m sˉ1 and interval time (0-720 sec. Sliding friction experiments are performed on a pin-on-ring (POR tribometer under dry contact condition. Interface temperature and friction force were measured simultaneously during sliding of glass fiber reinforced epoxy (GFRE composite against three different counter face materials, hardened steel (HS, cast iron (CI and Aluminum alloy (Al. Experimental results showed that the type of counterface material greatly influences both interface temperature and friction coefficient. Higher temperature and friction coefficient were evident when sliding took place against HS surface, compared to sliding against CI and Al under same condition. When sliding took place against HS, the friction coefficient of GFRE composite was about an order of magnitude higher than sliding the GFRE composite against the other counter face materials. Based on the optical microscope graphs, the friction and induced temperature results of GFRE composite are analyzed and discussed.

  6. Effect of the coefficient of friction of a running surface on sprint time in a sled-towing exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linthorne, Nicholas P; Cooper, James E

    2013-06-01

    This study investigated the effect of the coefficient of friction of a running surface on an athlete's sprint time in a sled-towing exercise. The coefficients of friction of four common sports surfaces (a synthetic athletics track, a natural grass rugby pitch, a 3G football pitch, and an artificial grass hockey pitch) were determined from the force required to tow a weighted sled across the surface. Timing gates were then used to measure the 30-m sprint time for six rugby players when towing a sled of varied weight across the surfaces. There were substantial differences between the coefficients of friction for the four surfaces (micro = 0.21-0.58), and in the sled-towing exercise the athlete's 30-m sprint time increased linearly with increasing sled weight. The hockey pitch (which had the lowest coefficient of friction) produced a substantially lower rate of increase in 30-m sprint time, but there were no significant differences between the other surfaces. The results indicate that although an athlete's sprint time in a sled-towing exercise is affected by the coefficient offriction of the surface, the relationship relationship between the athlete's rate of increase in 30-m sprint time and the coefficient of friction is more complex than expected. PMID:23898689

  7. AN INEQUALITY BETWEEN THE WEIGHTED AVERAGE AND THE ROWWISE CORRELATION-COEFFICIENT FOR PROXIMITY MATRICES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    KRIJNEN, WP

    1994-01-01

    De Vries (1993) discusses Pearson's product-moment correlation, Spearman's rank correlation, and Kendall's rank-correlation coefficient for assessing the association between the rows of two proximity matrices. For each of these he introduces a weighted average variant and a rowwise variant. In this

  8. PROPERTIES OF CP: COEFFICIENT OF THERMAL EXPANSION, DECOMPOSITION KINETICS, AND REACTION TO SPARK, FRICTION AND IMPACT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weese, R K; Burnham, A K

    2005-09-28

    The properties of pentaamine (5-cyano-2H-tetrazolato-N2) cobalt (III) perchlorate (CP), which was first synthesized in 1968, continues to be of interest for predicting behavior in handling, shipping, aging, and thermal cook-off situations. We report coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) values over four specific temperature ranges, decomposition kinetics using linear and isothermal heating, and the reaction to three different types of stimuli: impact, spark, and friction. The CTE was measured using a Thermal Mechanical Analyzer (TMA) for samples that were uniaxially compressed at 10,000 psi and analyzed over a dynamic temperature range of -20 C to 70 C. Differential scanning calorimetry, DSC, was used to monitor CP decomposition at linear heating rates of 1-7 C min{sup -1} in perforated pans and of 0.1-1.0 C min{sup -1} in sealed pans. The kinetic triplet was calculated using the LLNL code Kinetics05, and predictions for 210 and 240 C are compared to isothermal thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) experiments. Values are also reported for spark, friction, and impact sensitivity.

  9. Intelligent tires for identifying coefficient of friction of tire/road contact surfaces using three-axis accelerometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Intelligent tires equipped with sensors as well as the monitoring of the tire/road contact conditions are in demand for improving vehicle control and safety. With the aim of identifying the coefficient of friction of tire/road contact surfaces during driving, including during cornering, we develop an identification scheme for the coefficient of friction that involves estimation of the slip angle and applied force by using a single lightweight three-axis accelerometer attached on the inner surface of the tire. To validate the developed scheme, we conduct tire-rolling tests using an accelerometer-equipped tire with various slip angles on various types of road surfaces, including dry and wet surfaces. The results of these tests confirm that the estimated slip angle and applied force are reasonable. Furthermore, the identified coefficient of friction by the developed scheme agreed with that measured by standardized tests. (paper)

  10. EFFECTS OF TIN ON HARDNESS, WEAR RATE AND COEFFICIENT OF FRICTION OF CAST CU-NI-SN ALLOYS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. ILANGOVAN

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available An investigation was carried out to understand the effects of Sn on hardness, wear rate and the coefficient of friction of spinodal Cu-Ni-Sn alloys. Alloys of appropriate compositions were melted in a crucible furnace under argon atmosphere and cast into sand moulds. Solution heat treated and aged specimens were tested for hardness, wear rate and the coefficient of friction. It was found that the hardness increases when the Sn content increases from 4% to 8% in the solution heat treated conditions. The peak aging time is found to decrease with an increase in the Sn content. Further, the coefficient of friction is independent of hardness whereas the wear rate decreases linearly with hardness irrespective of Sn content.

  11. A Study on Bottom Friction Coefficient in the Bohai, Yellow, and East China Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daosheng Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The adjoint tidal model based on the theory of inverse problem has been applied to investigate the effect of bottom friction coefficient (BFC on the tidal simulation. Using different schemes of BFC containing the constant, different constant in different subdomain, depth-dependent form, and spatial distribution obtained from data assimilation, the M2 constituent in the Bohai, Yellow, and East China Sea (BYECS is simulated by assimilating TOPEX/Poseidon altimeter data, respectively. The simulated result with spatially varying BFC obtained from data assimilation is better than others. Results and analysis of BFC in BYECS indicate that spatially varying BFC obtained from data assimilation is the best fitted one; meanwhile it could improve the accuracy in the simulation of M2 constituent. Through the analysis of the best fitted one, new empirical formulas of BFC in BYECS are developed with which the commendable simulated results of M2 constituent in BYECS are obtained.

  12. Comparative study of vehicle tyre-road friction coefficient estimation with a novel cost-effective method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Boyuan; Du, Haiping; Li, Weihua

    2014-08-01

    This paper qualitatively and quantitatively reviews and compares three typical tyre-road friction coefficient estimation methods, which are the slip slope method, individual tyre force estimation method and extended Kalman filter method, and then presents a new cost-effective tyre-road friction coefficient estimation method. Based on the qualitative analysis and the numerical comparisons, it is found that all of the three typical methods can successfully estimate the tyre force and friction coefficient in most of the test conditions, but the estimation performance is compromised for some of the methods during different simulation scenarios. In addition, all of these three methods need global positioning system (GPS) to measure the absolute velocity of a vehicle. To overcome the above-mentioned problem, a novel cost-effective estimation method is proposed in this paper. This method requires only the inputs of wheel angular velocity, traction/brake torque and longitudinal acceleration, which are all easy to be measured using available sensors installed in passenger vehicles. By using this method, the vehicle absolute velocity and slip ratio can be estimated by an improved nonlinear observer without using GPS, and the friction force and tyre-road friction coefficient can be obtained from the estimated vehicle velocity and slip ratio. Simulations are used to validate the effectiveness of the proposed estimation method.

  13. EFFECT OF SUBSTRATE BIAS ON FRICTION COEFFICIENT, ADHESION STRENGTH AND HARDNESS OF TiN-COATED TOOL STEEL

    OpenAIRE

    ESAH HAMZAH; MUBARAK ALI; MOHD RADZI HJ. MOHD TOFF

    2006-01-01

    In the present study, TiN coatings have been deposited on D2 tool steel substrates by using cathodic arc physical vapor deposition technique. The objective of this research work is to determine the usefulness of TiN coatings in order to improve the micro-Vickers hardness and friction coefficient of TiN coating deposited on D2 tool steel, which is widely used in tooling applications. A Pin-on-Disc test was carried out to study the coefficient of friction versus sliding distance of TiN coating ...

  14. The influence of heel height on utilized coefficient of friction during walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchette, Mark G; Brault, John R; Powers, Christopher M

    2011-05-01

    Wearing high heel shoes has been associated with an increased potential for slips and falls. The association between wearing high heels and the increased potential for slipping suggests that the friction demand while wearing high heels may be greater when compared to wearing low heel shoes. The purpose of this study was to determine if heel height affects utilized friction (uCOF) during walking. A secondary purpose of this study was to compare kinematics at the ankle, knee, and hip that may explain uCOF differences among shoes with varied heel heights. Fifteen healthy women (mean age 24.5±2.5yrs) participated. Subjects walked at self-selected velocity under 3 different shoe conditions that varied in heel height (low: 1.27cm, medium: 6.35cm, and high: 9.53cm). Ground reaction forces (GRFs) were recorded using a force platform (1560Hz). Kinematic data were obtained using an 8 camera motion analysis system (120Hz). Utilized friction was calculated as the ratio of resultant shear force to vertical force. One-way repeated measures ANOVAs were performed to test for differences in peak uCOF, GRFs at peak uCOF and lower extremity joint angles at peak uCOF. On average, peak uCOF was found to increase with heel height. The increased uCOF observed in high heel shoes was related to an increase in the resultant shear force and decrease in the vertical force. Our results signify the need for proper public education and increased footwear industry awareness of how high heel shoes affect slip risk. PMID:21536444

  15. The friction coefficient evolution of a MoS2/WC multi-layer coating system during sliding wear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, T. Y.; Hu, Y.; Gharbi, Mohammad M.; Politis, D. J.; Wang, L.

    2016-08-01

    This paper discusses the evolution of friction coefficient for the multi-layered Molybdenum Disulphide (MoS2) and WC coated substrate during sliding against Aluminium AA 6082 material. A soft MoS2 coating was prepared over a hard WC coated G3500 cast iron tool substrate and underwent friction test using a pin-on-disc tribometer. The lifetime of the coating was reduced with increasing load while the Aluminium debris accumulated on the WC hard coating surfaces, accelerated the breakdown of the coatings. The lifetime of the coating was represented by the friction coefficient and the sliding distance before MoS2 coating breakdown and was found to be affected by the load applied and the wear mechanism.

  16. Estimation of coefficient of friction for a mechanical system with combined rolling-sliding contact using vibration measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundar, Sriram; Dreyer, Jason T.; Singh, Rajendra

    2015-06-01

    A new dynamic experiment is proposed to estimate the coefficient of friction for a mechanical system with a combined rolling-sliding contact under a mixed lubrication regime. The experiment is designed and instrumented based on an analogous contact mechanics model, taking into consideration the constraints to ensure no impact and no sliding velocity reversal. The system consists of a cam (rotating with a constant speed) having a point contact with a follower that oscillates about a frictionless pivot, while maintaining contact with the cam with the help of a well-designed translational spring. The viscous damping elements for contact are identified for two different lubricants from an impulse test using the half-power bandwidth method. Dynamic responses (with the cam providing an input to the system) are measured in terms of the follower acceleration and the reaction forces at the follower pivot. A frequency domain based signal processing technique is proposed to estimate the coefficient of friction using the complex-valued Fourier amplitudes of the measured forces and acceleration. The coefficient of friction is estimated for the mechanical system with different surface roughnesses using two lubricants; these are also compared with similar values for both dry and lubricated cases as reported in the literature. An empirical relationship for the coefficient of friction is suggested based on a prior model under a mixed lubrication regime. Possible sources of errors in the estimation procedure are identified and quantified.

  17. STRESS ANALYSIS IN CUTTING TOOLS COATED TiN AND EFFECT OF THE FRICTION COEFFICIENT IN TOOL-CHIP INTERFACE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kubilay ASLANTAŞ

    2003-02-01

    Full Text Available The coated tools are regularly used in today's metal cutting industry. Because, it is well known that thin and hard coatings can reduce tool wear, improve tool life and productivity. Such coatings have significantly contributed to the improvements cutting economies and cutting tool performance through lower tool wear and reduced cutting forces. TiN coatings have especially high strength and low friction coefficients. During the cutting process, low friction coefficient reduce damage in cutting tool. In addition, maximum stress values between coating and substrate also decrease as the friction coefficient decreases. In the present study, stress analysis is carried out for HSS (High Speed Steel cutting tool coated with TiN. The effect of the friction coefficient between tool and chip on the stresses developed at the cutting tool surface and interface of coating and HSS is investigated. Damage zones during cutting process was also attempted to determine. Finite elements method is used for the solution of the problem and FRANC2D finite element program is selected for numerical solutions.

  18. Friction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuo, Yoshihiro; Clarke, Daryl D.; Ozeki, Shinichi

    Friction materials such as disk pads, brake linings, and clutch facings are widely used for automotive applications. Friction materials function during braking due to frictional resistance that transforms kinetic energy into thermal energy. There has been a rudimentary evolution, from materials like leather or wood to asbestos fabric or asbestos fabric saturated with various resins such as asphalt or resin combined with pitch. These efforts were further developed by the use of woven asbestos material saturated by either rubber solution or liquid resin binder and functioned as an internal expanding brake, similar to brake lining system. The role of asbestos continued through the use of chopped asbestos saturated by rubber, but none was entirely successful due to the poor rubber heat resistance required for increased speeds and heavy gearing demands of the automobile industry. The use of phenolic resins as binder for asbestos friction materials provided the necessary thermal resistance and performance characteristics. Thus, the utility of asbestos as the main friction component, for over 100 years, has been significantly reduced in friction materials due to asbestos identity as a carcinogen. Steel and other fibrous components have displaced asbestos in disk pads. Currently, non-asbestos organics are the predominate friction material. Phenolic resins continue to be the preferred binder, and increased amounts are necessary to meet the requirements of highly functional asbestos-free disk pads for the automotive industry. With annual automobile production exceeding 70 million vehicles and additional automobile production occurring in developing countries worldwide and increasing yearly, the amount of phenolic resin for friction material is also increasing (Fig. 14.1). Fig. 14.1 Worldwide commercial vehicle production In recent years, increased fuel efficiency of passenger car is required due to the CO2 emission issue. One of the solutions to improve fuel efficiency is to

  19. Efficiencies and coefficients of performance of heat engines, refrigerators, and heat pumps with friction: a universal limiting behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bizarro, João P S; Rodrigues, Paulo

    2012-11-01

    For work-producing heat engines, or work-consuming refrigerators and heat pumps, the percentage decrease caused by friction in their efficiencies, or coefficients of performance (COP's), is approximately given by the ratio W(fric)/W between the work spent against friction forces and the work performed by, or delivered to, the working fluid. This universal scaling, which applies in the limit of small friction (W(fric)/W heat-engine efficiencies), allows a simple and quick estimate of the impact that friction losses can have on the FOM's of thermal engines and plants, or of the level of those losses from the observed and predicted FOM's. In the case of refrigerators and heat pumps, if W(fric)/W heat engines), the COP percentage decrease due to friction approaches asymptotically (W(fric)/W)/(1+W(fric)/W) instead of W(fric)/W. Estimates for the level of frictional losses using the Carnot (or, for heat engines and power plants only, the Curzon-Ahlborn) predictions and observed FOM's of real power plants, heat engines, refrigerators, and heat pumps show that they usually operate in domains where these behaviors are valid.

  20. Laser texturing of Hastelloy C276 alloy surface for improved hydrophobicity and friction coefficient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilbas, B. S.; Ali, H.

    2016-03-01

    Laser treatment of Hastelloy C276 alloy is carried out under the high pressure nitrogen assisting gas environment. Morphological and metallurgical changes in the laser treated layer are examined using the analytical tools including, scanning electron and atomic force microscopes, X-ray diffraction, energy dispersive spectroscopy, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Microhardness is measured and the residual stress formed in the laser treated surface is determined from the X-ray data. The hydrophibicity of the laser treated surface is assessed using the sessile drop method. Friction coefficient of the laser treated layer is obtained incorporating the micro-tribometer. It is found that closely spaced laser canning tracks create a self-annealing effect in the laser treated layer and lowers the thermal stress levels through modifying the cooling rates at the surface. A dense structure, consisting of fine size grains, enhances the microhardness of the surface. The residual stress formed at the surface is compressive and it is in the order of -800 MPa. Laser treatment improves the surface hydrophobicity significantly because of the formation of surface texture composing of micro/nano-pillars.

  1. Low friction coefficient coatings Ni-Cr by magnetron sputtering, DC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morales-Hernandez, J.; Mandujano-Ruiz, A.; Torres-Gonzalez, J.; Espinosa-Beltran, F. J.; Herrera-Hernandez, H.

    2015-07-01

    Magnetron Sputter Deposition technique with DC was used for the deposition of Ni-Cr coatings on AISI 316 SS like substrate. The cathode with a nominal composition Ni-22 at% Cr was prepared by Mechanical Alloying (MA) technique, with a maximum milling time of 16 hours and, with a high energy SPEX 8000 mill. The coatings were made under Argon atmosphere at room temperature with a power of 100 W at different times of growth. Chemical composition, microstructure, topography, nano hardness and wear of the coatings were evaluated using the techniques of microanalysis by energy dispersive X-ray analyzer (EDAX), X-Ray Diffraction (XRD), Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM), Nano-indentation and pin-on-Disk, respectively. After milling, was not detected contamination in the mixtures. XRD analysis revealed that the microstructure of the Ni-Cr alloy was maintained in the coatings with respect to MA powders, with some degree of recrystallization. Nano hardness values were in the order of 8.8 GPa with a Youngs modulus of 195 GPa. The adhesion of the films was evaluated according to their resistance to fracture when these were indented at different loads using Vickers microhardness. The wear test results showed a decrease in the friction coefficient with respect to the increase of thickness films, getting a minimum value of 0.08 with a thickness of 1 μm and which correspond with the maximum growing time. (Author)

  2. Micromachined strain gauges for the determination of liquid flow friction coefficients in microchannels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baviere, R.; Ayela, F.

    2004-02-01

    In this research program, we have performed and tested cupro-nickel (Cu-Ni) strain gauges micromachined on different sorts of silicon nitride (Si3N4) membranes. The design of the gauges obeys an electrical Wheatstone bridge configuration. We have found a good agreement between the expected electromechanical response of the bridge and the experimental signals. The results have displayed sensitivity to static pressure ranging from 50 to 100 µV V-1 bar-1 as a function of the thickness and of the diameter of the membranes. This is part of a study devoted to determining liquid flow friction coefficients in silicon-Pyrex microchannels. Preliminary attempts (Reynolds number up to 300) made using global pressure measurements and with very simple local pressure probes are discussed. Further experiments using Cu-Ni strain gauges are described. Their micromachining, characterization and integration along silicon microchannels are presented. These sensors permitted us to perform the first local and reliable pressure drop measurements in a 7.5 µm deep microchannel. The results are in good agreement with the classical laminar theory for a Reynolds number ranging from 0.2 to 3.

  3. Marble Waste Using Produced of Automotive Brake Pad of Friction Coefficient Different Pad Brake Pads With Comprasion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Timur

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Brake linings used in automotive disks are usually composed of various components. Expected properties from a brake lining are appropriate standard value of wear resist, friction coefficient. Brake lining extremely warms up during braking due to friction. The braking performance of brake lining changes and braking lining is subject to mechanical deformation due to excessive temperature. In this study, it is aimed to revaluate the waste of marble dust in marble processing in Turkey. For this purpose, marble wastes are grinded to produce marble dust. The brake lining, which has new formulation, is produced by using various additive materials. The friction performances of the brake pads produced were compared with those of other firms and the results were show in graphics. Therefore, the effect of marble dust on braking performance is investigated. It is observed that a favorable result in braking performance is obtained using of marble dust.

  4. A Method to Estimate Friction Coefficient from Orientation Distribution of Meso-scale Faults: Applications to Faults in Forearc Sediment and Underplated Tectonic Mélange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, K.

    2015-12-01

    Friction coefficients along faults control the brittle strength of the earth's upper crust, although it is difficult to estimate them especially of ancient geological faults. Several previous studies tried to determine the friction coefficient of meso-scale faults from their orientation distribution as follows. Fault-slip analysis through stress tensor inversion techniques gives principal stress axes and a stress ratio, which allows us to draw a normalized Mohr's circle. Assuming that a faulting occurs when the ratio of shear stress to normal stress on it, i.e., the slip tendency, exceeds the friction coefficient, one can find a linear boundary of distribution of points corresponding to faults on Mohr diagram. The slope of the boundary (friction envelope) provides the friction coefficient. This method has a difficulty in graphically and manually recognizing the linear boundary of distribution on the Mohr diagram. This study automated the determination of friction coefficient by considering the fluctuations of fluid pressure and differential stress. These unknown factors are expected to make difference in density of points representing faults on the Mohr diagram. Since the density is controlled by the friction coefficient, we can optimize the friction coefficient so as to explain the density distribution. The method was applied to two examples of natural meso-scale faults. The first example is from the Pleistocene Kazusa Group, central Japan, which filled a forearc basin of the Sagami Trough. Stress inversion analysis showed WNW-ENE trending tensional stress with a low stress ratio. The friction coefficient was determined to be around 0.66, which is typical value for sandstone. The Second example is from an underplated tectonic mélange in the Cretaceous to Paleogene Shimanto accretionary complex in southwest Japan along the Nankai Trough. The stress condition was determined to be an axial compression perpendicular to the foliation of shale matrix. The friction

  5. Effect of normal load and roughness on the nanoscale friction coefficient in the elastic and plastic contact regime

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aditya Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The influence of applied normal load and roughness on the tribological behavior between the indenter and sample surface during nanoindentation-based scratching has been experimentally investigated by using different surfaces (fused silica and diamond-like carbon featuring various degrees of roughness. At a sufficiently low applied normal load, wherein the contact is elastic, the friction coefficient is constant. However, at increased normal loads the contact involves plastic deformation and the friction coefficient increases with increasing normal load. The critical load range for a transition from predominantly elastic to plastic contact, between the indenter and sample surface, increases with increasing size of indenter and decreases with roughness. Distinct differences between the present experimental results and the existing theoretical models/predictions are discussed.

  6. HEAT TRANSFER COEFFICIENT AND FRICTION FACTOR CHARACTERISTICS OF A GRAVITY ASSISTED BAFFLED SHELL AND HEAT-PIPE HEAT EXCHANGER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Raveendiran

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The heat transfer coefficients and friction factors of a baffled shell and heat pipe heat exchanger with various inclination angles were determined experimentally; using methanol as working fluid and water as heat transport fluid were reported. Heat pipe heat exchanger reported in this investigation have inclination angles varied between 15o and 60o for different mass flow rates and temperature at the shell side of the heat exchanger. All the required parameters like outlet temperature of both hot and cold side of heat exchanger and mass flow rate of fluids were measured using an appropriate instrument. Different tests were performed from which condenser side heat transfer coefficient and friction factor were calculated. In all operating conditions it has been found that the heat transfer coefficient increases by increasing the mass flow rate and angle of inclination. The reduction in friction factor occurs when the Reynolds number is increased. The overall optimum experimental effectiveness of GABSHPHE has found to be 42% in all operating conditioning at ψ = 45o.

  7. Measurement of the friction coefficient of a fluctuating contact line using an AFM-based dual-mode mechanical resonator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A dual-mode mechanical resonator using an atomic force microscope (AFM) as a force sensor is developed. The resonator consists of a long vertical glass fiber with one end glued onto a rectangular cantilever beam and the other end immersed through a liquid—air interface. By measuring the resonant spectrum of the modified AFM cantilever, one is able to accurately determine the longitudinal friction coefficient ζv along the fiber axis associated with the vertical oscillation of the hanging fiber and the traversal friction coefficient ζh perpendicular to the fiber axis associated with the horizontal swing of the fiber around its joint with the cantilever. The technique is tested by measurement of the friction coefficient of a fluctuating (and slipping) contact line between the glass fiber and the liquid interface. The experiment verifies the theory and demonstrates its applications. The dual-mode mechanical resonator provides a powerful tool for the study of the contact line dynamics and the rheological property of anisotropic fluids. (special topic — non-equilibrium phenomena in soft matters)

  8. Correlation between Mechanical Properties with Specific Wear Rate and the Coefficient of Friction of Graphite/Epoxy Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahdi Alajmi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The correlation between the mechanical properties of Fillers/Epoxy composites and their tribological behavior was investigated. Tensile, hardness, wear, and friction tests were conducted for Neat Epoxy (NE, Graphite/Epoxy composites (GE, and Data Palm Fiber/Epoxy with or without Graphite composites (GFE and FE. The correlation was made between the tensile strength, the modulus of elasticity, elongation at the break, and the hardness, as an individual or a combined factor, with the specific wear rate (SWR and coefficient of friction (COF of composites. In general, graphite as an additive to polymeric composite has had an eclectic effect on mechanical properties, whereas it has led to a positive effect on tribological properties, whilst date palm fibers (DPFs, as reinforcement for polymeric composite, promoted a mechanical performance with a slight improvement to the tribological performance. Statistically, this study reveals that there is no strong confirmation of any marked correlation between the mechanical and the specific wear rate of filler/Epoxy composites. There is, however, a remarkable correlation between the mechanical properties and the friction coefficient of filler/Epoxy composites.

  9. A STUDY OF THE PROPERTIES OF CP: COEFFICIENT OF THERMAL EXPANSION, DECOMPOSITION KINETICS AND REACTION TO SPARK, FRICTION AND IMPACT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weese, R K; Burnham, A K; Fontes, A T

    2005-03-30

    The properties of pentaamine (5-cyano-2H-tetrazolato-N2) cobalt (III) perchlorate (CP), which was first synthesized in 1968, continues to be of interest for predicting behavior in handling, shipping, aging, and thermal cook-off situations. We report coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) values over four specific temperature ranges, decomposition kinetics using linear heating rates, and the reaction to three different types of stimuli: impact, spark, and friction. The CTE was measured using a Thermal Mechanical Analyzer (TMA) for samples that were uniaxially compressed at 10,000 psi and analyzed over a dynamic temperature range of -20 C to 70 C. Using differential scanning calorimetry, DSC, CP was decomposed at linear heating rates of 1, 3, and 7 C/min and the kinetic triplet calculated using the LLNL code Kinetics05. Values are also reported for spark, friction, and impact sensitivity.

  10. Impact of higher-order flows in the moment equations on Pfirsch-Schlüter friction coefficients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Honda, M., E-mail: honda.mitsuru@jaea.go.jp [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Naka, Ibaraki 311-0193 (Japan)

    2014-09-15

    The impact of the higher-order flows in the moment approach on an estimate of the friction coefficients is numerically examined. The higher-order flows are described by the lower-order hydrodynamic flows using the collisional plasma assumption. Their effects have not been consistently taken into account thus far in the widely used neoclassical transport codes based on the moment equations in terms of the Pfirsch-Schlüter flux. Due to numerically solving the friction-flow matrix without using the small-mass ratio expansion, it is clearly revealed that incorporating the higher-order flow effects is of importance especially for plasmas including multiple hydrogenic ions and other lighter species with similar masses.

  11. Adsorption Behavior of Heat Modified Soybean Oil via Boundary Lubrication Coefficient of Friction Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    The frictional behaviors of soybean oil and heat modified soybean oils with different Gardner scale viscosities as additives in hexadecane have been examined in a boundary lubrication test regime (steel contacts) using Langmuir adsorption model. The free energy of adsorption (delta-Gads) of various...

  12. The effects of silver coating on friction coefficient and shear bond strength of steel orthodontic brackets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arash, Valiollah; Anoush, Keivan; Rabiee, Sayed Mahmood; Rahmatei, Manuchehr; Tavanafar, Saeid

    2015-01-01

    Aims of the present study was to measure frictional resistance between silver coated brackets and different types of arch wires, and shear bond strength of these brackets to the tooth. In an experimental clinical research 28 orthodontic brackets (standard, 22 slots) were coated with silver ions using electroplate method. Six brackets (coated: 3, uncoated: 3) were evaluated with Scanning Electron Microscopy and Atomic Force Microscopy. The amount of friction in 15 coated brackets was measured with three different kinds of arch wires (0.019 × 0.025-in stainless steel [SS], 0.018-in stainless steel [SS], 0.018-in Nickel-Titanium [Ni-Ti]) and compared with 15 uncoated steel brackets. In addition, shear bond strength values were compared between 10 brackets with silver coating and 10 regular brackets. Universal testing machine was used to measure shear bond strength and the amount of friction between the wires and brackets. SPSS 18 was used for data analysis with t-test. SEM and AFM results showed deposition of a uniform layer of silver, measuring 8-10 μm in thickness on bracket surfaces. Silver coating led to higher frictional forces in all the three types of arch wires, which was statistically significant in 0.019 × 0.025-in SS and 0.018-in Ni-Ti, but it did not change the shear bond strength significantly. Silver coating with electroplating method did not affect the bond strength of the bracket to enamel; in addition, it was not an effective method for decreasing friction in sliding mechanics. PMID:25997114

  13. Low friction coefficient coatings Ni-Cr by magnetron sputtering, DC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morales-Hernández, Jorge

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Magnetron Sputter Deposition technique with DC was used for the deposition of Ni-Cr coatings on AISI 316 SS like substrate. The cathode with a nominal composition Ni-22 at% Cr was prepared by Mechanical Alloying (MA technique, with a maximum milling time of 16 hours and, with a high energy SPEX 8000 mill. The coatings were made under Argon atmosphere at room temperature with a power of 100 W at different times of growth. Chemical composition, microstructure, topography, nanohardness and wear of the coatings were evaluated using the techniques of microanalysis by energy dispersive X-ray analyzer (EDAX, X-Ray Diffraction (XRD, Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM, Nano-indentation and pin-on-Disk, respectively. After milling, was not detected contamination in the mixtures. XRD analysis revealed that the microstructure of the Ni-Cr alloy was maintained in the coatings with respect to MA powders, with some degree of recrystallization. Nanohardness values were in the order of 8.8 GPa with a Young’s modulus of 195 GPa. The adhesion of the films was evaluated according to their resistance to fracture when these were indented at different loads using Vickers microhardness. The wear test results showed a decrease in the friction coefficient with respect to the increase of thickness’ films, getting a minimum value of 0.08 with a thickness of 1 μm and which correspond with the maximum growing time.La técnica de Deposición por Chisporroteo Magnético (Magnetron Sputtering con el proceso DC, fue usado para la deposición de los recubrimientos de Ni-Cr sobre acero inoxidable AISI 316 como sustrato. El cátodo con una composición nominal Ni-22 at% Cr fue preparado por la técnica de Aleado Mecánico (AM, con un tiempo máximo de molienda de 16 horas y con un molino de alta energía tipo SPEX 8000. Las películas se realizaron bajo una atmósfera de argón a temperatura ambiente con una potencia de 100 W a diferentes tiempos de crecimiento. La composición qu

  14. Estimation of the tyre-road maximum friction coefficient and slip slope based on a novel tyre model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Zhiquan; Taheri, Saied; Wang, Baofeng; Yu, Hongxiao

    2015-04-01

    In this article, a new approach to estimate the vehicle tyre forces, tyre-road maximum friction coefficient, and slip slope is presented. Contrary to the majority of the previous work on this subject, a new tyre model for the estimation of the tyre-road interface characterisation is proposed. First, the tyre model is built and compared with those of Pacejka, Dugoff, and one other tyre model. Then, based on a vehicle model that uses four degrees of freedom, an extended Kalman filter (EKF) method is designed to estimate the vehicle motion and tyre forces. The shortcomings of force estimation are discussed in this article. Based on the proposed tyre model and the improved force measurements, another EKF is implemented to estimate the tyre model parameters, including the maximum friction coefficient, slip slope, etc. The tyre forces are accurately obtained simultaneously. Finally, very promising results have been achieved for pure acceleration/braking for varying road conditions, both in pure steering and combined manoeuvre simulations.

  15. The Determinants of Gini Coefficient in Iran Based on Bayesian Model Averaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohsen Mehrara

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper has tried to apply BMA approach in order to investigate important influential variables on Gini coefficient in Iran over the period 1976-2010. The results indicate that the GDP growth is the most important variable affecting the Gini coefficient and has a positive influence on it. Also the second and third effective variables on Gini coefficient are respectively the ratio of government current expenditure to GDP and the ratio of oil revenue to GDP which lead to an increase in inequality. This result is corresponding with rentier state theory in Iran economy. Injection of massive oil revenue to Iran's economy and its high share of the state budget leads to inefficient government spending and an increase in rent-seeking activities in the country. Economic growth is possibly a result of oil revenue in Iran economy which has caused inequality in distribution of income.

  16. The average ion model. Computation of the absorption and emission coefficients in hot plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauthier, Jean-Claude; Geindre, Jean-Paul

    1988-06-01

    A program was developed to evaluate the emission and absorption plasma coefficient variations as a function of the density, temperature and the atomic number of the specimen. The treatment is simplified because of the reduced number of characteristic frequencies which are necessary for the hydrodynamic code. The approach is less efficient when applied to high Z atoms.

  17. Determination of friction factors and heat transfer coefficients for flow past artifically roughened surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A critical review of the assumptions, theoretical foundations, and supporting experimental evidence for the analytical procedures in current use for evaluation of the effects of artificial surface roughening on friction factor and Stanton number is provided. Recommendations are given concerning the application of these procedures to rough rod bundles. A new method is demonstrated for determination of the slope and intercept of the universal logarithmic dimensionless velocity distribution law for fully rough flow past roughened surfaces without the need for experimental measurement of the velocity profile. The slope is shown to vary with the nature of the roughened surface and to deviate significantly from the slope for turbulent flow past smooth walls in some cases. It is further shown that the intercept, which is a boundary condition equivalent to the roughness parameter for friction, is independent of the width of the velocity profile. A similar method is developed for determination of the slope and intercept of the temperature distribution law, but additional experimental investigation is required before the efficacy of this application can be conclusively established

  18. Gradient-based estimation of Manning's friction coefficient from noisy data

    KAUST Repository

    Calo, Victor M.

    2013-01-01

    We study the numerical recovery of Manning\\'s roughness coefficient for the diffusive wave approximation of the shallow water equation. We describe a conjugate gradient method for the numerical inversion. Numerical results for one-dimensional models are presented to illustrate the feasibility of the approach. Also we provide a proof of the differentiability of the weak form with respect to the coefficient as well as the continuity and boundedness of the linearized operator under reasonable assumptions using the maximal parabolic regularity theory. © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. The Small-Mass Limit for Langevin Dynamics with Unbounded Coefficients and Positive Friction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herzog, David P.; Hottovy, Scott; Volpe, Giovanni

    2016-05-01

    A class of Langevin stochastic differential equations is shown to converge in the small-mass limit under very weak assumptions on the coefficients defining the equation. The convergence result is applied to three physically realizable examples where the coefficients defining the Langevin equation for these examples grow unboundedly either at a boundary, such as a wall, and/or at the point at infinity. This unboundedness violates the assumptions of previous limit theorems in the literature. The main result of this paper proves convergence for such examples.

  20. Data assimilation within the Advanced Circulation (ADCIRC) modeling framework for the estimation of Manning's friction coefficient

    KAUST Repository

    Mayo, Talea

    2014-04-01

    Coastal ocean models play a major role in forecasting coastal inundation due to extreme events such as hurricanes and tsunamis. Additionally, they are used to model tides and currents under more moderate conditions. The models numerically solve the shallow water equations, which describe conservation of mass and momentum for processes with large horizontal length scales relative to the vertical length scales. The bottom stress terms that arise in the momentum equations can be defined through the Manning\\'s n formulation, utilizing the Manning\\'s n coefficient. The Manning\\'s n coefficient is an empirically derived, spatially varying parameter, and depends on many factors such as the bottom surface roughness. It is critical to the accuracy of coastal ocean models, however, the coefficient is often unknown or highly uncertain. In this work we reformulate a statistical data assimilation method generally used in the estimation of model state variables to estimate this model parameter. We show that low-dimensional representations of Manning\\'s n coefficients can be recovered by assimilating water elevation data. This is a promising approach to parameter estimation in coastal ocean modeling. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd.

  1. Effects of flooring on required coefficient of friction: Elderly adult vs. middle-aged adult barefoot gait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozin Kleiner, Ana Francisca; Galli, Manuela; Araujo do Carmo, Aline; Barros, Ricardo M L

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of flooring on barefoot gait according to age and gender. Two groups of healthy subjects were analyzed: the elderly adult group (EA; 10 healthy subjects) and the middle-aged group (MA; 10 healthy subjects). Each participant was asked to walk at his or her preferred speed over two force plates on the following surfaces: 1) homogeneous vinyl (HOV), 2) carpet, 3) heterogeneous vinyl (HTV) and 4) mixed (in which the first half of the pathway was covered by HOV and the second by HTV). Two force plates (Kistler 9286BA) embedded in the data collection room floor measured the ground reaction forces and friction. The required coefficient of friction (RCOF) was analyzed. For the statistical analysis, a linear mixed-effects model for repeated measures was performed. During barefoot gait, there were differences in the RCOF among the flooring types during the heel contact and toe-off phases. Due to better plantar proprioception during barefoot gait, the EA and MA subjects were able to distinguish differences among the flooring types. Moreover, when the EA were compared with the MA subjects, differences could be observed in the RCOF during the toe-off phase, and gender differences in the RCOF could also be observed during the heel contact phase in barefoot gait.

  2. Effects of flooring on required coefficient of friction: Elderly adult vs. middle-aged adult barefoot gait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozin Kleiner, Ana Francisca; Galli, Manuela; Araujo do Carmo, Aline; Barros, Ricardo M L

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of flooring on barefoot gait according to age and gender. Two groups of healthy subjects were analyzed: the elderly adult group (EA; 10 healthy subjects) and the middle-aged group (MA; 10 healthy subjects). Each participant was asked to walk at his or her preferred speed over two force plates on the following surfaces: 1) homogeneous vinyl (HOV), 2) carpet, 3) heterogeneous vinyl (HTV) and 4) mixed (in which the first half of the pathway was covered by HOV and the second by HTV). Two force plates (Kistler 9286BA) embedded in the data collection room floor measured the ground reaction forces and friction. The required coefficient of friction (RCOF) was analyzed. For the statistical analysis, a linear mixed-effects model for repeated measures was performed. During barefoot gait, there were differences in the RCOF among the flooring types during the heel contact and toe-off phases. Due to better plantar proprioception during barefoot gait, the EA and MA subjects were able to distinguish differences among the flooring types. Moreover, when the EA were compared with the MA subjects, differences could be observed in the RCOF during the toe-off phase, and gender differences in the RCOF could also be observed during the heel contact phase in barefoot gait. PMID:25959329

  3. The Modified Friction and Diffusion Coefficients of Fokker-Planck Equation and Relaxation Rates for Non-Maxwellian Scattering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIANG Jiang; LI Ding; CAI Huishan

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, a new method to derive the Fokker-Planck coefficients defined by a non-Maxwellian velocity distribution function for the field particles is presented. The three-fold integral and the new Debye cutoff parameter, which were introduced by CHANG and LI, are applied. Therefore, divergence difficulties and the customary replacement of relative velocity g by thermal velocity νth are naturally avoided. The probability function P(ν, △ν) for non-Maxwellian scattering is derived by the method of choosing velocity transfer △ν, which is a true measure of collision intensity, as an independent variable. The method enables the difference between small-angle scattering and small-momentum-transfer collisions of the inverse-square force to be well clarified. With the help of the probability function, the Fokker-Planck coefficients are obtained by a normal original Fokker-Planck approach. The friction and diffusion coefficients of the Fokker-Planck equation are modified for non-Maxwellian scattering and are used to investigate the relaxation processes for the weakly coupled plasma. The profiles of the relaxation rates show that the slowing down and deflection processes are weakened in the conditions of non-Maxwellian scattering.

  4. Uncertainty quantification and inference of Manning's friction coefficients using DART buoy data during the Tōhoku tsunami

    KAUST Repository

    Sraj, Ihab

    2014-11-01

    Tsunami computational models are employed to explore multiple flooding scenarios and to predict water elevations. However, accurate estimation of water elevations requires accurate estimation of many model parameters including the Manning\\'s n friction parameterization. Our objective is to develop an efficient approach for the uncertainty quantification and inference of the Manning\\'s n coefficient which we characterize here by three different parameters set to be constant in the on-shore, near-shore and deep-water regions as defined using iso-baths. We use Polynomial Chaos (PC) to build an inexpensive surrogate for the G. eoC. law model and employ Bayesian inference to estimate and quantify uncertainties related to relevant parameters using the DART buoy data collected during the Tōhoku tsunami. The surrogate model significantly reduces the computational burden of the Markov Chain Monte-Carlo (MCMC) sampling of the Bayesian inference. The PC surrogate is also used to perform a sensitivity analysis.

  5. Partial friction fault diagnosis of electric submersible pump based on power spectra of wavelet coefficients%基于小波系数功率谱的潜油电泵偏磨故障诊断

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姚诚; 刘广孚; 李忠国; 陶凤阳

    2011-01-01

    潜油电泵偏磨故障的诊断对于油田的安全生产具有重要意义.根据潜油电泵碰磨的理论分析,观察了振动信号小波系数的特点,提出了采用小波分解系数功率谱的层内最大值作为特征参数进行偏磨诊断的思想.通过交叉验证,以5次测试的平均识别率作为评价指标,使用改进粒子群算法对支持向量机的参数进行了优化.在径向基宽度为-0.310 9,惩罚参数C为429.127 8时,平均识别率最高为90%.研究结果表明,在潜油电泵偏磨故障的诊断中,小波系数功率谱优于小波分解后层内系数的傅里叶变换最大值和层内系数的方差.使用小波系数功率谱参数可以成功地实现潜油电泵偏磨诊断.%Diagnosing the partial friction fault of Electric Submersible Pump (ESP) is very important in oil field. Ac-cording to the theoretic analysis of ESP collision and friction, after observing the wavelet coefficient characters of vi-bration signal, a diagnosis idea is proposed, which uses the maximums of wavelet coefficient power spectra in every layer as the features to diagnose the partial friction of ESP. With cross-validation, the average recognition rate of five tests is taken as the evaluation indicator, and improved particle swarm optimization algorithm is used to optimize the parameters of support vector machine (SVM). The highest average recognition rate is as high as 90% when radial basis function width is -0. 310 9 and penalty parameter is 429. 127 8. Research results indicate that the wavelet co-efficient power spectra are more competent for partial friction diagnosis than the maximums of wavelet coefficient Fast Fourier Transform ( FFT) and the variances of wavelet coefficients in every layer. Wavelet coefficient power spectrum parameters can achieve good performance in partial friction fault diagnosis of ESP.

  6. CONSTRUCTION OF POLYNOMIAL MATRIX USING BLOCK COEFFICIENT MATRIX REPRESENTATION AUTO-REGRESSIVE MOVING AVERAGE MODEL FOR ACTIVELY CONTROLLED STRUCTURES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Chunxiang; ZHOU Dai

    2004-01-01

    The polynomial matrix using the block coefficient matrix representation auto-regressive moving average (referred to as the PM-ARMA) model is constructed in this paper for actively controlled multi-degree-of-freedom (MDOF) structures with time-delay through equivalently transforming the preliminary state space realization into the new state space realization. The PM-ARMA model is a more general formulation with respect to the polynomial using the coefficient representation auto-regressive moving average (ARMA) model due to its capability to cope with actively controlled structures with any given structural degrees of freedom and any chosen number of sensors and actuators. (The sensors and actuators are required to maintain the identical number.) under any dimensional stationary stochastic excitation.

  7. Experimental determination of average turbulent heat transfer and friction factor in stator internal rib-roughened cooling channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battisti, L; Baggio, P

    2001-05-01

    In gas turbine cooling design, techniques for heat extraction from the surfaces exposed to the hot stream are based on the increase of the inner heat transfer areas and on the promotion of the turbulence of the cooling flow. This is currently obtained by casting periodic ribs on one or more sides of the serpentine passages into the core of the blade. Fluid dynamic and thermal behaviour of the cooling flow have been extensively investigated by means of experimental facilities and many papers dealing with this subject have appeared in the latest years. The evaluation of the average value of the heat transfer coefficient most of the time is inferred from local measurements obtained by various experimental techniques. Moreover the great majority of these studies are not concerned with the overall average heat transfer coefficient for the combined ribs and region between them, but do focus just on one of them. This paper presents an attempt to collect information about the average Nusselt number inside a straight ribbed duct. Series of measurements have been performed in steady state eliminating the error sources inherently connected with transient methods. A low speed wind tunnel, operating in steady state flow, has been built to simulate the actual flow condition occurring in a rectilinear blade cooling channel. A straight square channel with 20 transverse ribs on two sides has been tested for Re of about 3 x 10(4), 4.5 x 10(4) and 6 x 10(4). The ribbed wall test section is electrically heated and the heat removed by a stationary flow of known thermal and fluid dynamic characteristics.

  8. The Effect of Antagonistic Pleiotropy on the Estimation of the Average Coefficient of Dominance of Deleterious Mutations

    OpenAIRE

    Fernández, B.; García-Dorado, A; Caballero, A.

    2005-01-01

    We investigate the impact of antagonistic pleiotropy on the most widely used methods of estimation of the average coefficient of dominance of deleterious mutations from segregating populations. A proportion of the deleterious mutations affecting a given studied fitness component are assumed to have an advantageous effect on another one, generating overdominance on global fitness. Using diffusion approximations and transition matrix methods, we obtain the distribution of gene frequencies for n...

  9. A vehicle ABS adaptive sliding-mode control algorithm based on the vehicle velocity estimation and tyre/road friction coefficient estimations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiangwen; Xu, Yong; Pan, Ming; Ren, Fenghua

    2014-04-01

    A sliding-mode observer is designed to estimate the vehicle velocity with the measured vehicle acceleration, the wheel speeds and the braking torques. Based on the Burckhardt tyre model, the extended Kalman filter is designed to estimate the parameters of the Burckhardt model with the estimated vehicle velocity, the measured wheel speeds and the vehicle acceleration. According to the estimated parameters of the Burckhardt tyre model, the tyre/road friction coefficients and the optimal slip ratios are calculated. A vehicle adaptive sliding-mode control (SMC) algorithm is presented with the estimated vehicle velocity, the tyre/road friction coefficients and the optimal slip ratios. And the adjustment method of the sliding-mode gain factors is discussed. Based on the adaptive SMC algorithm, a vehicle's antilock braking system (ABS) control system model is built with the Simulink Toolbox. Under the single-road condition as well as the different road conditions, the performance of the vehicle ABS system is simulated with the vehicle velocity observer, the tyre/road friction coefficient estimator and the adaptive SMC algorithm. The results indicate that the estimated errors of the vehicle velocity and the tyre/road friction coefficients are acceptable and the vehicle ABS adaptive SMC algorithm is effective. So the proposed adaptive SMC algorithm can be used to control the vehicle ABS without the information of the vehicle velocity and the road conditions.

  10. Assuming exponential decay by incorporating viscous damping improves the prediction of the coefficient of friction in pendulum tests of whole articular joints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crisco, J J; Blume, J; Teeple, E; Fleming, B C; Jay, G D

    2007-04-01

    A pendulum test with a whole articular joint serving as the fulcrum is commonly used to measure the bulk coefficient of friction (COF). In such tests it is universally assumed that energy loss is due to frictional damping only, and accordingly the decay of pendulum amplitude is linear with time. The purpose of this work was to determine whether the measurement of the COF is improved when viscous damping and exponential decay of pendulum amplitude are incorporated into a lumped-parameter model. Various pendulum models with a range of values for COF and for viscous damping were constructed. The resulting decay was fitted with an exponential function (including both frictional and viscous damping) and with a linear decay function (frictional damping only). The values predicted from the fit of each function were then compared to the known values. It was found that the exponential decay function was able to predict the COF values within 2 per cent error. This error increased for models in which the damping coefficient was relatively small and the COF was relatively large. On the other hand, the linear decay function resulted in large errors in the prediction of the COF, even for small values of viscous damping. The exponential decay function including both frictional and constant viscous damping presented herein dramatically increased the accuracy of measuring the COF in a pendulum test of modelled whole articular joints. PMID:17539587

  11. Analytical solutions for the coefficient of variation of the volume-averaged solute concentration in heterogeneous aquifers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabala, Z. J.

    1997-08-01

    Under the assumption that local solute dispersion is negligible, a new general formula (in the form of a convolution integral) is found for the arbitrary k-point ensemble moment of the local concentration of a solute convected in arbitrary m spatial dimensions with general sure initial conditions. From this general formula new closed-form solutions in m=2 spatial dimensions are derived for 2-point ensemble moments of the local solute concentration for the impulse (Dirac delta) and Gaussian initial conditions. When integrated over an averaging window, these solutions lead to new closed-form expressions for the first two ensemble moments of the volume-averaged solute concentration and to the corresponding concentration coefficients of variation (CV). Also, for the impulse (Dirac delta) solute concentration initial condition, the second ensemble moment of the solute point concentration in two spatial dimensions and the corresponding CV are demonstrated to be unbound. For impulse initial conditions the CVs for volume-averaged concentrations axe compared with each other for a tracer from the Borden aquifer experiment. The point-concentration CV is unacceptably large in the whole domain, implying that the ensemble mean concentration is inappropriate for predicting the actual concentration values. The volume-averaged concentration CV decreases significantly with an increasing averaging volume. Since local dispersion is neglected, the new solutions should be interpreted as upper limits for the yet to be derived solutions that account for local dispersion; and so should the presented CVs for Borden tracers. The new analytical solutions may be used to test the accuracy of Monte Carlo simulations or other numerical algorithms that deal with the stochastic solute transport. They may also be used to determine the size of the averaging volume needed to make a quasi-sure statement about the solute mass contained in it.

  12. The effect of antagonistic pleiotropy on the estimation of the average coefficient of dominance of deleterious mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, B; García-Dorado, A; Caballero, A

    2005-12-01

    We investigate the impact of antagonistic pleiotropy on the most widely used methods of estimation of the average coefficient of dominance of deleterious mutations from segregating populations. A proportion of the deleterious mutations affecting a given studied fitness component are assumed to have an advantageous effect on another one, generating overdominance on global fitness. Using diffusion approximations and transition matrix methods, we obtain the distribution of gene frequencies for nonpleiotropic and pleiotropic mutations in populations at the mutation-selection-drift balance. From these distributions we build homozygous and heterozygous chromosomes and assess the behavior of the estimators of dominance. A very small number of deleterious mutations with antagonistic pleiotropy produces substantial increases on the estimate of the average degree of dominance of mutations affecting the fitness component under study. For example, estimates are increased three- to fivefold when 2% of segregating loci are over-dominant for fitness. In contrast, strengthening pleiotropy, where pleiotropic effects are assumed to be also deleterious, has little effect on the estimates of the average degree of dominance, supporting previous results. The antagonistic pleiotropy model considered, applied under mutational parameters described in the literature, produces patterns for the distribution of chromosomal viabilities, levels of genetic variance, and homozygous mutation load generally consistent with those observed empirically for viability in Drosophila melanogaster. PMID:16118193

  13. Material properties of commonly-used interface materials and their static coefficients of friction with skin and socks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, J E; Greve, J M; Mitchell, S B; Zachariah, S G

    1998-06-01

    Compressive stiffness (CS) of different supporting materials used in prosthetics and orthotics and their static coefficients of friction (COF) with skin and socks were characterized. Materials tested included Spenco, Poron, nylon-reinforced silicone, Soft Pelite, Medium Pelite, Firm Plastazote, Regular Plastazote, and Nickelplast. A displacement-controlled testing device was constructed to assess the CS of 11.1 mm diameter material specimens under cyclic loading (1 Hz) to 220 kPa over 10- and 60-min periods. Results demonstrated local CS ranging from 687 kPa (Poron) to 3,990 kPa (Soft Pelite). To fit the cyclic stress-strain (S-S) data within an error of 4.0 percent full-scale output, the minimum order of fit required for Spenco, Poron, and nylon-reinforced silicone was a third-order polynomial; for Soft Pelite, Medium Pelite, Firm Plastazote, and Regular Plastazote, a second-order polynomial; and for Nickelplast, a linear fit. For all materials, the nonrecovered strains were related to loading time using an exponential fit. A biaxial force-controlled load applicator device was used to assess COF at skin-material, sock-material, and skin-sock interfaces for shear forces of 1 to 4 N applied to a 10.2 x 7.8 mm loading pad. COFs ranged from 0.48 (+/- 0.05) to 0.89 (+/- 0.09). COFs at skin-material interfaces were significantly (p < 0.05) higher than those at skin-sock interfaces. There was a trend of a higher COF at sock-material interfaces than at skin-sock interfaces. These data are of potential utility in finite element modeling sensitivity analysis of residual limb-prosthetic socket systems or body-orthosis systems to characterize effects of material features on interface pressure and shear stress distributions. PMID:9651888

  14. Numerical study on spatially varying bottom friction coefficient of a 2D tidal model with adjoint method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xianqing; Zhang, Jicai

    2006-10-01

    Based on the simulation of M2 tide in the Bohai Sea, the Yellow Sea and the East China Sea, TOPEX/Poseidon altimeter data are assimilated into a 2D tidal model to study the spatially varying bottom friction coefficient (BFC) by using the adjoint method. In this study, the BFC at some grid points are selected as the independent BFC, while the BFC at other grid points can be obtained through linear interpolation with the independent BFC. Two strategies for selecting the independent BFC are discussed. In the first strategy, one independent BFC is uniformly selected from each 1°×1° area. In the second one, the independent BFC are selected based on the spatial distribution of water depth. Twin and practical experiments are carried out to compare the two strategies. In the twin experiments, the adjoint method has a strong ability of inverting the prescribed BFC distributions combined with the spatially varying BFC. In the practical experiments, reasonable simulation results can be obtained by optimizing the spatially varying independent BFC. In both twin and practical experiments, the simulation results with the second strategy are better than those with the first one. The BFC distribution obtained from the practical experiment indicates that the BFC in shallow water are larger than those in deep water in the Bohai Sea, the North Yellow Sea, the South Yellow Sea and the East China Sea individually. However, the BFC in the East China Sea are larger than those in the other areas perhaps because of the large difference of water depth or bottom roughness. The sensitivity analysis indicates that the model results are more sensitive to the independent BFC near the land.

  15. Coefficients of Friction, Lubricin, and Cartilage Damage in the Anterior Cruciate Ligament-Deficient Guinea Pig Knee

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teeple, Erin; Elsaid, Khaled A.; Fleming, Braden C.; Jay, Gregory D.; Aslani, Koosha; Crisco, Joseph J.; Mechrefe, Anthony P.

    2009-01-01

    The coefficient of friction (COF) of articular cartilage is thought to increase with osteoarthritis (OA) progression, and this increase may occur due to a decrease in lubricin concentration. The objectives of this study were to measure the COF of guinea pig tibiofemoral joints with different stages of OA, and to establish relationships between COF, lubricin concentrations in synovial fluid, and degradation status using the Hartley guinea pig model. Both hind limbs from 24 animals were harvested: seven 3-month-old (no OA), seven 12-month-old (mild OA), and ten that were euthanized at 12-months of age after undergoing unilateral anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) transection at 3-months of age (moderate OA). Contralateral knees served as age matched controls. COFs of the tibiofemoral joints were measured using a pendulum apparatus. Synovial fluid lavages were analyzed to determine the concentration and integrity of lubricin using ELISA and western blot, and the overall articular cartilage status was evaluated by histology. The results showed that the mean COF in the ACL-deficient knees was significantly greater than that of the 3-month knees (p<0.01) and the 12-month knees (p<0.01). Lubricin concentrations in the ACL-deficient knees were significantly lower than that of the 3-month knees (p<0.01) and 12-month knees (p<0.01). No significant differences in COF or lubricin concentration were found between the 3-month and the 12-month knees. Histology verified the extent of cartilage damage in each group. Conclusion COF values increased and lubricin levels decreased with cartilage damage following ACL transection. PMID:17868097

  16. Micromechanical study of macroscopic friction and dissipation in idealised granular materials: the effect of interparticle friction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kruyt, N.P.; Rothenburg, L.; Gutkowski, Witold; Kowalewski, Tomasz A.

    2004-01-01

    Using Discrete Element Method (DEM) simulations with varying interparticle friction coefficient, the relation between interparticle friction coefficient and macroscopic continuum friction and dissipation is investigated. As expected, macroscopic friction and dilatancy increase with interparticle fri

  17. Experimental Investigation on Cutting Forces, Specific Cutting Pressure, Co-Efficient of Friction and Shear Energy in Turning of HSLA Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singaravel Balasubramaniyan

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Machinability study of a material is used to find the ease and difficulty during machining operation. High Strength Low Alloy (HSLA medium carbon steel (EN25 steel is considered to possess better mechanical properties than carbon steel. In this work, an attempt is made to experimentally investigate and realize the machinability of EN25 steel during turning with coated carbide tools. The effects of machining parameters on cutting force components, Specific Cutting Pressure (SCP, co-efficient of friction and shear energy are analysed during the investigation. The results of the investigation revealed that the mentioned machinability characteristics are necessary and essential to evaluate the machinability of HSLA steel effectively.

  18. 鞋底摩擦系数测控系统的设计%Design of Monitoring and Controlling System of Footwear Sole Coefficient of Friction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨永杰; 林贤贤; 吕冬华; 张小美

    2012-01-01

    Slip resistance of footwear sole affects the comfort and safety of shoes directly, and slip resistance is mainly expressed by the coefficient of friction. Within a certain range, the greater the coefficient of friction, the better the slip resistance. In order to determine the safety performance of shoes, the system will obtain the coefficient of friction by measuring the tension and pressure put on shoes, so it's very important to do the measurement precisely. Monitoring — controlling System of footwear sole friction will transmit the tension and pressure via serial communication to the software, which execute real—time processing, displaying, drawing and saving, finally on the basis of the system test, the coefficient of several kinds of material is corresponding to international standard, which verify the correctness of the software and measurement accuracy.%鞋底的止滑性直接影响着鞋子穿用时的舒适性和安全性,止滑性主要由摩擦系数来表示,在一定范围内,摩擦系数越大,止滑性越好;系统通过测量作用于鞋的拉力和压力,求得摩擦系数,从而来判断各种鞋子的安全性能,因此对拉力压力的测量显得十分重要;鞋底摩擦系数测控系统通过串口将采集到的拉力和压力数据发送给上位机实时处理、显示、绘图并保存;最后对系统进行了测试,所测得的各种材质的摩擦系数符合国际标准,验证了它的正确性且测量精度高.

  19. Averaging methods of the gap heat transfer coefficients and the loss form coefficients of nuclear reactor cores loaded with different fuel bundles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When performing transient analysis in heterogeneous nuclear reactors loaded with different types of fuel bundles is necessary to model the reactor core by a few representative fuel elements with average properties of a region containing a large number of fuel elements. The properties of these representative fuel bundles are obtained by averaging the thermal-hydraulic properties of the fuel elements contained in each region. In this paper we study the different ways to perform the averaging of the thermal-hydraulic properties that can have an influence on the transient results for licence purposes. Also we study the influence of the different averaging methods on the peak clad temperature (PCT) evolution for a LOCA, and on the critical power ratio (CPR) in the hot channels for a turbine trip transient without bypass credit.

  20. 球型支座转动摩擦系数测试研究与分析%Test of Pivoting Friction Coefficient of Spherical Bearings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    安平生

    2014-01-01

    The article elaborates on the phenomenon of relatively large deviation between the measured coefficient of pivoting friction and that of flat friction of spherical bearings as well as summarizes common explanations of the phenomenon. Drawing upon the experimental methods for the test of pivoting perfor⁃mance of current spherical bearings and in-depth analysis of the kinestate of the various parts within the bearing as well as the relation of relative motion between them while pivoting the spherical bearing, the ar⁃ticle puts forward a new theory of the coefficient of pivoting friction of spherical bearings by combing the principle of mechanical structure and a new theoretical formula different from present ones used to calcu⁃late the coefficient of pivoting friction of spherical bearings. Additionally, a two-factor authentication of simulating calculation and practical testing is conducted. The new theory is of great significance for thor⁃ough comprehension of the elements of the pivoting structure, the accurate examination and sound applica⁃tion of spherical bearings.%论述了球型支座实测转动摩擦系数与平面摩擦系数出现较大偏移的现象,总结了以往对该现象的常见解释。基于现行球型支座转动性能测试试验方法,通过深入分析转动球型支座时支座内部各个零件的运动状态与相对运动关系,结合机械结构原理提出了球型支座转动摩擦系数的新理论,给出了不同于现行通用球型支座转动摩擦系数测算的新理论公式,并进行了仿真计算与实体试验的双重验证。该新理论对深入理解球型支座转动结构原理,球型支座准确的检验及良好的应用都具有非常重要的意义。

  1. Synthetic modeling of a fluid injection-induced fault rupture with slip-rate dependent friction coefficient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urpi, Luca; Rinaldi, Antonio Pio; Rutqvist, Jonny; Cappa, Frédéric; Spiers, Christopher J.

    2016-04-01

    Poro-elastic stress and effective stress reduction associated with deep underground fluid injection can potentially trigger shear rupture along pre-existing faults. We modeled an idealized CO2 injection scenario, to assess the effects on faults of the first phase of a generic CO2 aquifer storage operation. We used coupled multiphase fluid flow and geomechanical numerical modeling to evaluate the stress and pressure perturbations induced by fluid injection and the response of a nearby normal fault. Slip-rate dependent friction and inertial effects have been aken into account during rupture. Contact elements have been used to take into account the frictional behavior of the rupture plane. We investigated different scenarios of injection rate to induce rupture on the fault, employing various fault rheologies. Published laboratory data on CO2-saturated intact and crushed rock samples, representative of a potential target aquifer, sealing formation and fault gouge, have been used to define a scenario where different fault rheologies apply at different depths. Nucleation of fault rupture takes place at the bottom of the reservoir, in agreement with analytical poro-elastic stress calculations, considering injection-induced reservoir inflation and the tectonic scenario. For the stress state here considered, the first triggered rupture always produces the largest rupture length and slip magnitude, correlated with the fault rheology. Velocity weakening produces larger ruptures and generates larger magnitude seismic events. Heterogeneous faults have been considered including velocity-weakening or velocity strengthening sections inside and below the aquifer, while upper sections being velocity-neutral. Nucleation of rupture in a velocity strengthening section results in a limited rupture extension, both in terms of maximum slip and rupture length. For a heterogeneous fault with nucleation in a velocity-weakening section, the rupture may propagate into the overlying velocity

  2. Guide for the estimation of the α and β coefficients in the Average enrichment equation as burnt function by fuel type

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of the report is to determine manually or by means of a calculation sheet, the coefficients α and β of the average enrichment equation as function of the fuel burnt (B) using the Lineal Reactivity Pattern, with information generated by the RECORD code of the FMS package. (Author)

  3. Experimental Validation of Strategy for the Inverse Estimation of Mechanical Properties and Coefficient of Friction in Flat Rolling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Vinod; Singh, Arbind Kumar; Dixit, Uday Shanker

    2016-06-01

    Flat rolling is one of the most widely used metal forming processes. For proper control and optimization of the process, modelling of the process is essential. Modelling of the process requires input data about material properties and friction. In batch production mode of rolling with newer materials, it may be difficult to determine the input parameters offline. In view of it, in the present work, a methodology to determine these parameters online by the measurement of exit temperature and slip is verified experimentally. It is observed that the inverse prediction of input parameters could be done with a reasonable accuracy. It was also assessed experimentally that there is a correlation between micro-hardness and flow stress of the material; however the correlation between surface roughness and reduction is not that obvious.

  4. Dry Friction Coefficient of Oil Pumping Polished Rod%抽油机光杆干摩擦系数的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    雷改丽; 李飞舟; 韩玉强

    2012-01-01

    The wear resistance of pumping polished rod is comparatively low, for those reasons cause the technical bottleneck to used pumping unit. The wear properties of 40MnVB were studied by mating with TC4 alloy, GCr15 steel and Si4N3 cramic. The change relation between velocity and mass loss rate of wear or friction coefficient or morphology pography of wear mark were studied. The wear mechanism of 40MnVB alloy was discussed by SEM and EDS. The results show that the friction coefficient of the alloy experiences two phases which are advancing wear stage and stable wear stage. The wear mark of 40MnVB alloy is furrow morphology. The wear mechanism of GCr15 steel and Si4N3 ceramic are delamination abrasion, adhesive abrasion and oxidation abrasion at room temperature. But mating with TC4 alloy, the friction coefficient changes little, and the wear mark of 40MnVB alloy is furrow, and the wear machanism is fatigue abrasion and delamination abrasion.%抽油机光杆材质的耐磨性已成为制约抽油机的技术瓶颈.采用SEM和EDS等手段对抽油机光杆40MnVB在不同压力和速度下,与TC4、GCr15和Si4N3配副对磨的摩擦磨损性能进行研究,分析了摩擦系数和磨痕形貌、摩擦速度和压力变化的规律,探讨了磨损机理.结果表明:在室温范围内,40MnVB与对磨材料GCr15和Si4N3陶瓷的摩擦系数较高,磨痕主要呈氧化磨损、犁沟形貌,磨损经历了预磨损和稳定磨损两个阶段,磨损机理为剥层磨损、粘着磨损和氧化磨损.与对磨材料TC4对磨的摩擦系数较低,磨痕主要呈犁沟形貌,磨损机理为剥层磨损、疲劳磨损.

  5. Friction phenomena and their impact on the shear behaviour of granular material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suhr, Bettina; Six, Klaus

    2016-06-01

    In the discrete element simulation of granular materials, the modelling of contacts is crucial for the prediction of the macroscopic material behaviour. From the tribological point of view, friction at contacts needs to be modelled carefully, as it depends on several factors, e.g. contact normal load or temperature to name only two. In discrete element method (DEM) simulations the usage of Coulomb's law of friction is state of the art in modelling particle-particle contacts. Usually in Coulomb's law, for all contacts only one constant coefficient of friction is used, which needs to reflect all tribological effects. Thus, whenever one of the influence factors of friction varies over a wide range, it can be expected that the usage of only one constant coefficient of friction in Coulomb's law is an oversimplification of reality. For certain materials, e.g. steel, it is known that a dependency of the coefficient of friction on the contact normal load exists. A more tribological tangential contact law is implemented in DEM, where the interparticle friction coefficient depends on the averaged normal stress in the contact. Simulations of direct shear tests are conducted, using steel spheres of different size distributions. The strong influence of interparticle friction on the bulk friction is shown via a variation of the constant interparticle friction coefficient. Simulations with constant and stress-dependent interparticle friction are compared. For the stress-dependent interparticle friction, a normal stress dependency of the bulk friction is seen. In the literature, measurements of different granular materials and small normal loads also show a stress dependency of the bulk friction coefficient. With increasing applied normal stress, the bulk friction coefficient reduces both in the experiments and in the simulations.

  6. Experimental and Numerical Studies on Tire Tread Block Friction Characteristics Based on a New Test Device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Wu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A new device was developed for tire tread block slip friction tests. Then the friction characteristics were investigated under different loads and contact roads. Based on this, a friction model for contact between tire tread block and different road surfaces was developed. A finite element slip friction model of rubber block was developed for studying the tread contact stress, stiffness under different pattern slope angles, and ditch radius. Results indicate that friction coefficient between tread and ice road increases when the temperature decreases; different tread patterns have a certain influence on the friction coefficient; its average difference was less than 10%. Different roads impact the coefficient of friction more significantly; the greater the pattern slope, the greater the radial stiffness.

  7. The study on the bottom friction and the breaking coefficient for typhoon waves in radial sand ridges--the Lanshayang Channel as an example

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Zhuo; ZHANG Wei; LU Peidong; CHEN Kefeng

    2015-01-01

    Owing to the interactions among the complex terrain, bottom materials, and the complicate hydrodynam-ics, typhoon waves show special characteristics as big waves appeared at the high water level (HWL) and small waves emerged at low and middle water levels (LWL and MWL) in radial sand ridges (RSR). It is as-sumed that the mud damping, sandy bed friction and wave breaking effects have a great influence on the typhoon wave propagation in this area. Under the low wave energy, a mud layer will form and transport into the shallow area, thus the mud damping effects dominate at the LWL and the MWL. And high Collins coef-ficient (c around 1) can be applied to computing the damping effects at the LWL and the MWL. But under the high wave energy, the bottom sediment will be stirred and suspended, and then the damping effects disappear at the HWL. Thus the varying Collins coefficient with the water level method (VCWL) is imple-mented into the SWAN to model the typhoon wave process in the Lanshayang Channel (LSYC) of the RSR, the observed wave data under “Winnie” (“9711”) typhoon was used as validation. The results show that the typhoon wave in the RSR area is able to be simulated by the VCWL method concisely, and a constant wave breaking coefficient (γ) equaling 0.78 is better for the RSR where wide tidal flats and gentle bed slopes exist.

  8. Evaluation of existing EPRI and INEL test data to determine the worm to worm gear coefficient of friction in Limitorque actuators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garza, I.A.

    1996-12-01

    About the last sizing parameter for motor operated valves which has not been determined by utility or NRC sponsored testing is actuator efficiency. A by-product of EPRI testing for valve factors is the measurement of the actuator efficiencies. Motor sizing in this testing provides efficiency testing for motors running near synchronous speed. INEL testing, sponsored by the NRC, for stem factors and rate of loading provides complimentary data for motors loaded down to zero speed. This paper analyzes the data from these two test programs to determine the coefficient of friction for the worm to worm gear interface. This allowed the development of an algorithm for determining the efficiency of actuators which have not been tested. This paper compares the results of this algorithm to the test data to provide a measure of the accuracy of this method for calculating actuator efficiency.

  9. Friction in total hip joint prosthesis measured in vivo during walking.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philipp Damm

    Full Text Available Friction-induced moments and subsequent cup loosening can be the reason for total hip joint replacement failure. The aim of this study was to measure the in vivo contact forces and friction moments during walking. Instrumented hip implants with Al2O3 ceramic head and an XPE inlay were used. In vivo measurements were taken 3 months post operatively in 8 subjects. The coefficient of friction was calculated in 3D throughout the whole gait cycle, and average values of the friction-induced power dissipation in the joint were determined. On average, peak contact forces of 248% of the bodyweight and peak friction moments of 0.26% bodyweight times meter were determined. However, contact forces and friction moments varied greatly between individuals. The friction moment increased during the extension phase of the joint. The average coefficient of friction also increased during this period, from 0.04 (0.03 to 0.06 at contralateral toe off to 0.06 (0.04 to 0.08 at contralateral heel strike. During the flexion phase, the coefficient of friction increased further to 0.14 (0.09 to 0.23 at toe off. The average friction-induced power throughout the whole gait cycle was 2.3 W (1.4 W to 3.8 W. Although more parameters than only the synovia determine the friction, the wide ranges of friction coefficients and power dissipation indicate that the lubricating properties of synovia are individually very different. However, such differences may also exist in natural joints and may influence the progression of arthrosis. Furthermore, subjects with very high power dissipation may be at risk of thermally induced implant loosening. The large increase of the friction coefficient during each step could be caused by the synovia being squeezed out under load.

  10. Predictability of tracer dilution in large open channel flows: Analytical solution for the coefficient of variation of the depth-averaged concentration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pannone, Marilena

    2014-03-01

    A large-time analytical solution is proposed for the spatial variance and coefficient of variation of the depth-averaged concentration due to instantaneous, cross sectionally uniform solute sources in pseudorectangular open channel flows. The mathematical approach is based on the use of the Green functions and on the Fourier decomposition of the depth-averaged velocities, coupled with the method of the images. The variance spatial trend is characterized by a minimum at the center of the mass and two mobile, decaying symmetrical peaks which, at very large times, are located at the inflexion points of the average Gaussian distribution. The coefficient of variation, which provides an estimate of the expected percentage deviation of the depth-averaged point concentrations about the section-average, exhibits a minimum at the center which decays like t-1 and only depends on the river diffusive time scale. The defect of cross-sectional mixing quickly increases with the distance from the center, and almost linearly at large times. Accurate numerical Lagrangian simulations were performed to validate the analytical results in preasymptotic and asymptotic conditions, referring to a particularly representative sample case for which cross-sectional depth and velocity measurements were known from a field survey. In addition, in order to discuss the practical usefulness of computing large-time concentration spatial moments in river flows, and resorting to directly measured input data, the order of magnitude of section-averaged concentrations and corresponding coefficients of variation was estimated in field conditions and for hypothetical contamination scenarios, considering a unit normalized mass impulsively injected across the transverse section of 81 U.S. rivers.

  11. Bounce- and MLT-averaged diffusion coefficients in a physics-based magnetic field geometry obtained from RAM-SCB for the 17 March 2013 storm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Lei; Yu, Yiqun; Delzanno, Gian Luca; Jordanova, Vania K.

    2015-04-01

    Local acceleration via whistler wave and particle interaction plays a significant role in particle dynamics in the radiation belt. In this work we explore gyroresonant wave-particle interaction and quasi-linear diffusion in different magnetic field configurations related to the 17 March 2013 storm. We consider the Earth's magnetic dipole field as a reference and compare the results against nondipole field configurations corresponding to quiet and stormy conditions. The latter are obtained with the ring current-atmosphere interactions model with a self-consistent magnetic field (RAM-SCB), a code that models the Earth's ring current and provides a realistic modeling of the Earth's magnetic field. By applying quasi-linear theory, the bounce- and Magnetic Local Time (MLT)-averaged electron pitch angle, mixed-term, and energy diffusion coefficients are calculated for each magnetic field configuration. For radiation belt (˜1 MeV) and ring current (˜100 keV) electrons, it is shown that at some MLTs the bounce-averaged diffusion coefficients become rather insensitive to the details of the magnetic field configuration, while at other MLTs storm conditions can expand the range of equatorial pitch angles where gyroresonant diffusion occurs and significantly enhance the diffusion rates. When MLT average is performed at drift shell L=4.25 (a good approximation to drift average), the diffusion coefficients become quite independent of the magnetic field configuration for relativistic electrons, while the opposite is true for lower energy electrons. These results suggest that, at least for the 17 March 2013 storm and for L≲4.25, the commonly adopted dipole approximation of the Earth's magnetic field can be safely used for radiation belt electrons, while a realistic modeling of the magnetic field configuration is necessary to describe adequately the diffusion rates of ring current electrons.

  12. Experimental study on the factors affecting the friction coefficient of threaded fasteners%螺纹紧固件摩擦系数的影响因素试验研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    倪晋挺

    2016-01-01

    螺纹紧固件在汽车上的应用极为广泛,螺纹联接的可靠性主要取决于螺栓的轴向预紧力,而且螺纹副之间的摩擦系数对装配扭矩的大小也起到关键的作用,在螺纹联接中,影响紧固件摩擦系数的因素比较多。主要从垫片硬度、润滑条件、装配工艺、配合螺母的表面处理方式4个方面分析对紧固件摩擦系数的影响。%Threaded fasteners are widely used in automobiles .Screw connection reliability depends on the axial bolt preload .Friction coefficient between vice thread plays a key role in the size of the assembly torque .There are many factors that affect the friction coefficient of fasteners .This paper analyzes the impact of the fastener friction coefficient from four aspects ,mainly including gasket hardness ,lubrication , assembly process and the treatments of nut surface .

  13. Quantum friction

    OpenAIRE

    Tsekov, R.

    2012-01-01

    The Brownian motion of a light quantum particle in a heavy classical gas is theoretically described and a new expression for the friction coefficient is obtained for arbitrary temperature. At zero temperature it equals to the de Broglie momentum of the mean free path divided by the mean free path. Alternatively, the corresponding mobility of the quantum particle in the classical gas is equal to the square of the mean free path divided by the Planck constant. The Brownian motion of a quantum p...

  14. Friction Properties of Bio-mimetic Nano-fibrillar Arrays

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Shao-Hua; MI Chun-Hui

    2009-01-01

    Nano-fibrillar arrays are fabricated using polystyrene materials. The average diameter of each fiber is about 300 nm.Experiments show that such a fibrillar surface possesses a relatively hydrophobic feature with a water contact angle of 142°.Nanoscale friction properties are mainly focused on.It is found that the friction force of polystyrene nano-fibrillar surfaces is obviously enhanced in contrast to polystyrene smooth surfaces.The apparent coefficient of friction increases with the applied load, but is independent of the scanning speed.An interesting observation is that the friction force increases almost linearly with the real contact area, which abides by the fundamental Bowden-Tabor law of nano-scale friction.

  15. 转换波AVO反演速度比各横波反射系数%Converted wave AVO inversion for average velocity ratio and shear wave reflection coefficient

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    魏修成; 陈天胜; 季玉新

    2008-01-01

    Based on the empirical Gardner equation describing the relationship between density and compressional wave velocity, the converted wave reflection coefficient extrema attributes for AVO analysis are proposed and the relations between the extrema position and amplitude, average velocity ratio across the interface, and shear wave reflection coefficient are derived. The extrema position is a monotonically decreasing function of average velocity ratio, and the extrema amplitude is a function of average velocity ratio and shear wave reflection coefficient. For theoretical models, the average velocity ratio and shear wave reflection coefficient are inverted from the extrema position and amplitude obtained from fitting a power function to converted wave AVO curves. Shear wave reflection coefficient sections have clearer physical meaning than conventional converted wave stacked sections and establish the theoretical foundation for geological structural interpretation and event correlation. 'The method of inverting average velocity ratio and shear wave reflection coefficient from the extrema position and amplitude obtained from fitting a power function is applied to real CCP gathers. The inverted average velocity ratios are consistent with those computed from compressional and shear wave well logs.

  16. Three-dimensional finite-element models on the deformation of forearcs caused by aseismic ridge subduction: The role of ridge shape, friction coefficient of the plate interface and mechanical properties of the forearc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeumann, Stefanie; Hampel, Andrea

    2016-08-01

    Geological and geophysical data show that the forearc of subduction zones experiences strong deformation during the subduction of aseismic oceanic ridges. In order to better understand ridge-related forearc deformation patterns, we performed a series of three-dimensional finite-element models, in which we varied the ridge shape, the friction coefficient of the plate interface and the mechanical strength of the forearc. Experiments were carried out for migrating/non-migrating ridges and accretive/erosive margins, respectively. Our results show that the subducting ridge uplifts the forearc and induces horizontal displacements that alter the strain regime of both erosive and accretive forearcs. Generally, shortening prevails in front of the ridge, while domains of shortening and extension exist above the ridge. Models with stationary ridges show high uplift rates only above the ridge tip, whereas the forearc above migrating ridges experiences uplift above the leading ridge flank and subsequent subsidence above the trailing flank. The height and width of the ridge as well as the friction coefficient of the plate interface have the largest effect on the forearc deformation patterns, whereas the mechanical strength of the forearc plays a lesser role. Forearc indentation at the trench is largest for high and broad ridges, high friction coefficients and/or weak forearc material. Shortening and extension of the forearc above the ridge are more intense for high and narrow ridges. Our model results provide information about the distribution of ridge-induced displacements and strain fields and hence help to identify deformation patterns caused by subducting aseismic ridges in nature.

  17. Predicting vibration-induced displacement for a resonant friction slider

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fidlin, A.; Thomsen, Jon Juel

    2001-01-01

    A mathematical model is set up to quantify vibration-induced motions of a slider, sandwiched between friction layers with different coefficients of friction, and equipped with an imbedded resonator that oscillates at high frequency and small amplitude. This model is highly nonlinear, involving non......-smooth functions with strong harmonic excitation terms. The method of averaging is extended to hold for systems of this class, and used to derive approximate expressions for predicting average velocities of the slider. These expressions are shown to produce results that agree very well with numerical integration...... of the full equations of motion. The expressions are used to estimate and explain the influence of system parameters....

  18. Influence of snow properties on dense avalanche friction parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Naaim

    2013-04-01

    The values of the Voellmy friction parameters of 735 historical avalanches that occurred along 26 paths in the Chamonix valley since 1958 are back-analysed with a depth-averaged hydraulic model including sub models for erosion, entrainment and deposition. For each path, the longitudinal and crosswise topographic profiles were derived from a high resolution digital elevation model acquired by laser scanning. The initial snow depth and snow cohesion, as well as various physical properties of snow, were computed from numerical simulations of the detailed snowpack model Crocus fed by the SAFRAN meteorological analysis. For each event, the full ranges of the two friction parameters were scanned and the pairs of friction parameters for which the run-out altitude is found close enough to the observed one (with an uncertainty of 5m), were retained. Statistical class analysis was used to investigate the correlation between the obtained friction coefficients and the snow physical properties. Concerning the inertial friction coefficient, no evident trend with the snow parameters was found. For the static friction coefficient, an increasing trend with the temperature and the density was observed, as well as a decreasing trend with the liquid water content and the initial snow depth.

  19. Influence of Heat Flux and Friction Coefficient on Thermal Stresses in Risers of Drum Boilers under Dynamic Conditions of Steam Demand

    OpenAIRE

    Habib, M.A; Alzaharnah, I.; El-Shafei, M.; N. Merah; S. Al-Anizi; Al-Awwad, M. Y.; M. Hajji

    2013-01-01

    Boiler swing rate, which is the rate at which the boiler load is changed, has significant influence on the parameters of the boiler operating conditions such as drum water pressure and level, steam quality in the riser tubes, wall temperatures of riser tubes, and the associated thermal stresses. In this paper, the thermal stresses developed in boiler tubes due to elevated rates of heat transfer and friction are presented versus thermal stresses developed in tubes operated under normal conditi...

  20. Quantum friction

    OpenAIRE

    Volokitin, A. I.; Persson, B.N.J.

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the van der Waals friction between graphene and an amorphous SiO$_2$ substrate. We find that due to this friction the electric current is saturated at a high electric field, in agreement with experiment. The saturation current depends weakly on the temperature, which we attribute to the quantum friction between the graphene carriers and the substrate optical phonons. We calculate also the frictional drag between two graphene sheets caused by van der Waals friction, and find tha...

  1. Quantum Friction

    OpenAIRE

    Volokitin, A. I.; Persson, B.N.J.

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the van der Waals friction between graphene and an amorphous SiO2 substrate. We find that due to this friction the electric current is saturated at a high electric field, in agreement with experiment. The saturation current depends weakly on the temperature, which we attribute to the quantum friction between the graphene carriers and the substrate optical phonons. We calculate also the frictional drag between two graphene sheets caused by van der Waals friction, and find that t...

  2. 水分对猪牙表面硬度和摩擦系数的影响%Effect of Water Content on the Hardness and Friction Coefficient of Swine Teeth Enamel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    华李成; 郑靖; 周仲荣

    2013-01-01

    本文采用猪牙为研究对象,通过干燥和浸泡处理来控制猪牙釉质中的水分含量,利用维氏硬度仪和纳米压痕/划痕仪,研究了水分对离体生物硬组织力学性能和摩擦学特性的影响.结果表明:水含量能引起猪牙釉质表层硬度和摩擦系数的恢复性变化.猪牙表层硬度会随着水分的减少而升高,在水分再次增加后回落.猪牙表面摩擦系数随着水分的减少而降低,在水分再次增加后回升.%The mechanical properties and micro-friction behavior of swine tooth were investigated after various drying treatments,using Vicker's indentation test machine and nano-hardness/scratch tester.Moreover,the recovery of swine tooth's mechanical properties in water was investigated by immersing the dried enamel specimens in deionized water.The objective of this study is to explore the effect of water on biological hard tissue.The results show that the hardness and friction coefficient of swine tooth enamel were associated with its water content.The surface hardness of swine tooth enamel increased with the reduction of water,but the friction coefficient of swine tooth enamel decreased,and they were recovered significantly after water-immersing treatment.

  3. Friction behavior of a microstructured polymer surface inspired by snake skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heepe, Lars; Gorb, Stanislav N

    2014-01-01

    Summary The aim of this study was to understand the influence of microstructures found on ventral scales of the biological model, Lampropeltis getula californiae, the California King Snake, on the friction behavior. For this purpose, we compared snake-inspired anisotropic microstructured surfaces to other microstructured surfaces with isotropic and anisotropic geometry. To exclude that the friction measurements were influenced by physico-chemical variations, all friction measurements were performed on the same epoxy polymer. For frictional measurements a microtribometer was used. Original data were processed by fast Fourier transformation (FFT) with a zero frequency related to the average friction and other peaks resulting from periodic stick-slip behavior. The data showed that the specific ventral surface ornamentation of snakes does not only reduce the frictional coefficient and generate anisotropic frictional properties, but also reduces stick-slip vibrations during sliding, which might be an adaptation to reduce wear. Based on this extensive comparative study of different microstructured polymer samples, it was experimentally demonstrated that the friction-induced stick-slip behavior does not solely depend on the frictional coefficient of the contact pair. PMID:24611129

  4. Evaluación de Coeficientes de Fricción en el Transporte de Fluidos No-Newtonianos Evaluation of Friction Coefficients for the Transport of Non-Newtonian Fluids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.R. Bandala-Rocha

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo del presente trabajo fue medir las caídas de presión para obtener los coeficientes de fricción de fluidos no-newtonianos. Se empleó un sistema de transporte con varios accesorios en los que se hicieron pasar los fluidos de prueba, midiendo el flujo volumétrico y las pérdidas de presión. Los coeficientes de fricción que se obtuvieron para el agua como fluido de referencia fueron entre 0.42 y 25.7, y para las soluciones de sal de sodio de carboximetil celulosa (NaCMC entre 0.43 y 38.1. Los coeficientes de fricción obtenidos aumentaron con la concentración, lo que permitió obtener una relación potencial entre dicho coeficiente y la concentración de sal para la mayoría de los accesorios y tuberías en que fueron empleados. Las diferencias encontradas al comparar los valores determinados experimentalmente con otros informados en la literatura, se atribuyen al comportamiento reológico del fluido, al circuito de flujo empleado, y al llamado "efecto de influencia mutua" de los accesorios.The objective of the present study was to measure pressure drops to obtain friction coefficients of non-Newtonian fluids. A transport system was employed using various piping transport systems through which test fluids were passed while measuring volumetric flows and pressure drops. The friction coefficients obtained for water as a reference fluid ranged from 0.42 to 25.7, and for solutions containing the sodium salt of carboxymethyl cellulose (NaCMC were from 0.43 to 38.1. The friction coefficients increased with increases in the concentration, which allowed determination of a potential relation between this coefficient and the concentration of the salt for most of the fittings and type of pipes tested. The differences found when comparing the experimentally obtained values with those reported in the literature were attributed to the rheological behavior of the fluid, the circuit employed in transporting the fluid, and the so-called "mutual

  5. Experimental Study on Friction Characteristics of Caragana korshinskii Kom

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao LlU; Yuming GUO

    2015-01-01

    Caragana korshinski Kom, which is a kind of excel ent shrubs, has strong resistance to windstorms, and it is also a kind of forage that is of high nutritional value as wel as a forming fuel conversion resource that is of high caloric. Cara-gana korshinski Kom is of high lignifications after growing for a few years and the toughness of it is considerably high. Currently in China, equipments of harvesting and processing for ripe crops can hardly finish the mechanized production for Cara-gana korshinski Kom. Friction characteristics of woody material for Caragana kor-shinski Kom under different conditions should be given when the relevant operation machinery is designed, which can provide physical parameters for transportation of Caragana korshinski Kom as wel as the designing of relevant machinery. The pa-per bases on the research of friction characteristics between Caragana korshinski Kom whose diameter of 7, 10, and 13 mm under sampling directions of 0° , 45° , and 90° and machinery materials that are commonly used such as steel plate, rub-ber sheet and so on, and meanwhile the test considers factors such as different conditions of Caragana korshinski Kom, different materials of machines, different angles and so on. The data strongly suggests that the average static, dynamic fric-tion coefficient between Caragana korshinski Kom and steel plate is 0.399 711 and 0.353 022, respectively; The average static and dynamic friction coefficient between Caragana korshinski Kom and rubber sheet is 0.965 178 and 0.883 667, respec-tively. The maximum of static and dynamic friction coefficients is when the angle between the direction of sampling and the direction of movement is vertical. As the angle increased, the dynamic and static friction coefficient decreased. The friction coefficient between Caragana korshinski Kom and steel plate were increased with the increase of the diameter of Caragana korshinski Kom, but the diameter have no effect on the dynamic friction

  6. Advanced friction simulation of standardized friction tests: a numerical and experimental demonstrator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hol, J.; Wiebenga, J. H.; Hörning, M.; Dietrich, F.; Dane, C.

    2016-08-01

    For the characterization of friction conditions under sheet metal forming process conditions, different friction test set-ups are being used in industry. However, different friction tests and test set-ups are known to result in scattering friction results. In this work, the TriboForm software is utilized to numerically model the frictional behavior. The simulated coefficients of friction are experimentally validated using friction results from a standardized strip drawing friction test set-up. The experimental and simulation results of the friction behavior show a good overall agreement. This demonstrates that the TriboForm software enables simulating friction conditions for varying tribology conditions, i.e. resulting in a generally applicable approach for friction characterization under industrial sheet metal forming process conditions.

  7. Friction measurements on carbon fibre tows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cornelissen, B.; Warnet, L.; Akkerman, R.

    2010-01-01

    Friction plays an important role in the production of fibre reinforced composite products. The fibrous tows deform during the forming phase. Friction is regarded as a dominant phenomenon in tow deformation mechanisms. The coefficient of friction is a material-interface characteristic which gives a r

  8. A thermodynamic model of sliding friction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lasse Makkonen

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available A first principles thermodynamic model of sliding friction is derived. The model predictions are in agreement with the observed friction laws both in macro- and nanoscale. When applied to calculating the friction coefficient the model provides a quantitative agreement with recent atomic force microscopy measurements on a number of materials.

  9. Friction behavior of coupling motion for natural articular cartilage by reciprocating rotation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIAN ShanHua; GE ShiRong

    2009-01-01

    Based on the irregular surface of natural cartilage configurations, the tribological characteristics of coupling motion between natural cartilage pairs were investigated by the variation of rotated offset and velocity. Contact displacement, contact load, friction force and coefficient of friction from natural cartilage pairs were measured by a UMT-2 testing machine. In order to obtain the steady part and wavy part, the contact load and contact displacement were decompounded by the five-point sliding average method. These results showed that the contact load was composed of steady load and wavy load. And the contact displacement was composed of cartilage deformation and surface outline. The steady load was similar to exterior load while natural cartilage deformation increased nonlinearly with the sliding time. Wavy load had the correlative coefficient 0.235 with surface outline due to the irregular surface of fric-tion configurations. The coefficient of friction from cartilage friction configurations was less influenced by smaller magnitude in rotated parameters. A few strange summits were obtained in the area of coef-ficient of friction, and significantly related with local minimal values corresponding to the contact loads. The rotated offsets had clear impact on contact load and a slight impact on contact displacement. Larger offset produced higher wavy magnitude of the contact load. The rotated velocities played an evident role in cartilage deformation, but had a less influence on contact load. Lower velocity brought larger cartilage deformation.

  10. Postoperative changes in in vivo measured friction in total hip joint prosthesis during walking.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philipp Damm

    Full Text Available Loosening of the artificial cup and inlay is the most common reasons for total hip replacement failures. Polyethylene wear and aseptic loosening are frequent reasons. Furthermore, over the past few decades, the population of patients receiving total hip replacements has become younger and more active. Hence, a higher level of activity may include an increased risk of implant loosening as a result of friction-induced wear. In this study, an instrumented hip implant was used to measure the contact forces and friction moments in vivo during walking. Subsequently, the three-dimensional coefficient of friction in vivo was calculated over the whole gait cycle. Measurements were collected from ten subjects at several time points between three and twelve months postoperative. No significant change in the average resultant contact force was observed between three and twelve months postoperative. In contrast, a significant decrease of up to 47% was observed in the friction moment. The coefficient of friction also decreased over postoperative time on average. These changes may be caused by 'running-in' effects of the gliding components or by the improved lubricating properties of the synovia. Because the walking velocity and contact forces were found to be nearly constant during the observed period, the decrease in friction moment suggests an increase in fluid viscosity. The peak values of the contact force individually varied by 32%-44%. The friction moment individually differed much more, by 110%-129% at three and up to 451% at twelve months postoperative. The maximum coefficient of friction showed the highest individual variability, about 100% at three and up to 914% at twelve months after surgery. These individual variations in the friction parameters were most likely due to different 'running-in' effects that were influenced by the individual activity levels and synovia properties.

  11. Friction laws for lubricated nanocontacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzio, R.; Boragno, C.; Valbusa, U.

    2006-09-01

    We have used friction force microscopy to probe friction laws for nanoasperities sliding on atomically flat substrates under controlled atmosphere and liquid environment, respectively. A power law relates friction force and normal load in dry air, whereas a linear relationship, i.e., Amontons' law, is observed for junctions fully immersed in model lubricants, namely, octamethylciclotetrasiloxane and squalane. Lubricated contacts display a remarkable friction reduction, with liquid and substrate specific friction coefficients. Comparison with molecular dynamics simulations suggests that load-bearing boundary layers at junction entrance cause the appearance of Amontons' law and impart atomic-scale character to the sliding process; continuum friction models are on the contrary of limited predictive power when applied to lubrication effects. An attempt is done to define general working conditions leading to the manifestation of nanoscale lubricity due to adsorbed boundary layers.

  12. Mass energy-absorption coefficients and average atomic energy-absorption cross-sections for amino acids in the energy range 0.122-1.330 MeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    More, Chaitali V.; Lokhande, Rajkumar M.; Pawar, Pravina. P.

    2016-05-01

    Mass attenuation coefficients of amino acids such as n-acetyl-l-tryptophan, n-acetyl-l-tyrosine and d-tryptophan were measured in the energy range 0.122-1.330 MeV. NaI (Tl) scintillation detection system was used to detect gamma rays with a resolution of 8.2% at 0.662 MeV. The measured attenuation coefficient values were then used to determine the mass energy-absorption coefficients (σa,en) and average atomic energy-absorption cross sections (μen/ρ) of the amino acids. Theoretical values were calculated based on XCOM data. Theoretical and experimental values are found to be in good agreement.

  13. Showing Area Matters: A Work of Friction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Domelen, David

    2010-01-01

    Typically, we teach the simplified friction equation of the form F[subscript s] = [mu][subscript s]N for static friction, where F[subscript s] is the maximum static friction, [mu][subscript s] is the coefficient of static friction, and "N" is the normal force pressing the surfaces together. However, this is a bit too simplified, and doesn't work…

  14. Measurement of Gear Tooth Dynamic Friction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebbechi, Brian; Oswald, Fred B.; Townsend, Dennis P.

    1996-01-01

    Measurements of dynamic friction forces at the gear tooth contact were undertaken using strain gages at the root fillets of two successive teeth. Results are presented from two gear sets over a range of speeds and loads. The results demonstrate that the friction coefficient does not appear to be significantly influenced by the sliding reversal at the pitch point, and that the friction coefficient values found are in accord with those in general use. The friction coefficient was found to increase at low sliding speeds. This agrees with the results of disc machine testing.

  15. Temperature Dependent Molecular Dynamic Simulation of Friction

    CERN Document Server

    Dias, R A; Coura, P Z; Costa, B V

    2006-01-01

    In this work we present a molecular dynamics simulation of a FFM experiment. The tip-sample interaction is studied by varying the normal force in the tip and the temperature of the surface. The friction force, cA, at zero load and the friction coefficient, $\\mu$, were obtained. Our results strongly support the idea that the effective contact area, A, decreases with increasing temperature and the friction coefficient presents a clear signature of the premelting process of the surface.

  16. Skin Friction Gage for Measurements in Hypersonic Flow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Francois Falempin; Marat Goldfeld; Roman Nestoulia

    2003-01-01

    A description and results of tests of a new small-scale gage for direct measurement of skin friction force are presented in the paper. The gage design provides separated measurement of longitudinal and transversal component of friction force. Application of this scheme provides high sensitivity and necessary high-frequency response of the gage. The tests of the gage were carried out in a blow down wind tunnel at Mach numbers of 2 and 4 within the range of Reynolds numbers Rex from 0.8 to 5 million and in the hot-shot wind tunnel at Mach number 6 and Reynolds numbers Rex= 2.5-10 million. The measurements of skin friction were carried out on a flat plate and on a ramp beyond the shock wave. Simultaneously with the direct measurement of friction in the blow down wind tunnel, the measurements of profiles of average velocities and mass flow rate pulsations were realised. Analysis of measurement errors has shown that the friction gage permits to measure skin friction coefficient on a flat plate with mistake not more than 10%.

  17. Friction coefficient and microhardness of anodized aluminum alloys under different elaboration conditions%不同加工条件下阳极化铝合金的摩擦因数和显微硬度

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M GUEZMIL; W BENSALAH; A KHALLADI; K ELLEUCH; M DEPETRIS-WERY; HF AYEDI

    2015-01-01

    研究电解液、电流密度和温度等阳极化条件对在Al 5745和Al 1050A基质上形成的氧化膜层摩擦因数和维氏硬度的影响。采用DELTALAB HVS−1000维氏硬度计和旋转销盘摩擦试验机测量样品的硬度和摩擦性能。结果表明:当草酸浓度为10 g/L、电流密度为3 A/dm2及温度为5°C时,样品获得最高的维氏硬度(>HV 400)和最低的摩擦因数(HV 400) and the lowest friction coefficient (<0.4) were obtained with the oxalic acid addition of 10 g/L at high current density of 3 A/dm2 and low temperature of 5 °C. The presence of oxidized Mg through the anodic oxide layer formed on Al 5754 was examined using glow-discharge optical emission spectroscopy (GDOES). The MgO was found to act negatively on the mechanical property of the layer. Finally, the scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), and atomic force microscopy (AFM) were used to characterize the anodic layer before and after friction tests. It is found that the wear mechanism is related to many aspects of the initial morphology, chemical composition of the layer (C, S and Mg), porosity and internal stress.

  18. 渤黄东海底摩擦系数数值研究%Numerical Study on the Bottom Friction Coefficient of the Bohai, Yellow and East China Seas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张继才; 祝建国; 吕咸青

    2006-01-01

    使用伴随同化方法探讨了四种底摩擦系数处理方法并模拟了渤黄东海的M2分潮.理想实验表明:伴随同化方法有很强的反演底摩擦系数的能力;为了得到较好的反演结果,反演策略必须与给定的分布一致;如果给定分布很复杂,则需要复杂的反演策略.实际实验表明,底摩擦效应与地形密切相关,而海洋地形十分复杂,故需要较多的独立的底摩擦系数才能得到较好的模拟结果.本文的第四种方法将每一点均作为独立的底摩擦系数,在实验中获得了成功,验证了这种方法的合理性和有效性.%Based on the simulation of the M2 tide in the Bohai, Yellow and East China Seas, numerical experiments are made to study 4 strategies on the bottom friction coefficient (BFC) in a numerical adjoint model. In order to make a better simulation, the strategy must be consistent with the given BFC distribution. The real bottom friction decided by ocean topography is very complicated and an independent BFC is required. The fourth method which takes the BFC in each grid point as an independent BFC simulates practical experiments best and demonstrates the reasonability and efficiency of this method.

  19. Frictional torque numbers for ball cup and journal bearings

    OpenAIRE

    Ligterink, D.J.

    1982-01-01

    Plastic bearing material wears in ball cup and journal bearings. Contact areas in the ball cup and the journal bearing increase. The frictional torque needed to rotate the ball or journal also increases. When the coefficient of friction is assumed to be constant during wearing out, the frictional torque increases to a maximum of 1.273 times the frictional torque at zero wear.

  20. Internal rotor friction instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, J.; Artiles, A.; Lund, J.; Dill, J.; Zorzi, E.

    1990-01-01

    The analytical developments and experimental investigations performed in assessing the effect of internal friction on rotor systems dynamic performance are documented. Analytical component models for axial splines, Curvic splines, and interference fit joints commonly found in modern high speed turbomachinery were developed. Rotor systems operating above a bending critical speed were shown to exhibit unstable subsynchronous vibrations at the first natural frequency. The effect of speed, bearing stiffness, joint stiffness, external damping, torque, and coefficient of friction, was evaluated. Testing included material coefficient of friction evaluations, component joint quantity and form of damping determinations, and rotordynamic stability assessments. Under conditions similar to those in the SSME turbopumps, material interfaces experienced a coefficient of friction of approx. 0.2 for lubricated and 0.8 for unlubricated conditions. The damping observed in the component joints displayed nearly linear behavior with increasing amplitude. Thus, the measured damping, as a function of amplitude, is not represented by either linear or Coulomb friction damper models. Rotordynamic testing of an axial spline joint under 5000 in.-lb of static torque, demonstrated the presence of an extremely severe instability when the rotor was operated above its first flexible natural frequency. The presence of this instability was predicted by nonlinear rotordynamic time-transient analysis using the nonlinear component model developed under this program. Corresponding rotordynamic testing of a shaft with an interference fit joint demonstrated the presence of subsynchronous vibrations at the first natural frequency. While subsynchronous vibrations were observed, they were bounded and significantly lower in amplitude than the synchronous vibrations.

  1. 温挤压下钛白粉对铝合金摩擦系数影响研究%Effect of Titanium Dioxide on Friction Coefficient of Aluminum Alloy Under Warm Extrusion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘胜濠; 张星

    2012-01-01

    On the basis of analyzing the lubricant for warm extrusion of aluminum alloy, the lubricating impact of titanium dioxide under different temperature was experimentally studied. The results show that titanium dioxide has lubricating impact in aluminum alloy warm extrusion. The minimum friction coefficient of titanium dioxide is at 350°C . However, its lubricating effect is still not more ideal than graphite. The idea of using titanium dioxide instead of graphite as the lubricant of aluminum alloy is temporarily not feasible.%在分析铝合金温挤压用润滑剂的基础上,实验研究了不同温度下钛白粉的润滑效果.结果表明,钛白粉在铝合金温挤压成形中具有一定的润滑作用.在350℃下摩擦系数最小,可是润滑效果仍然没有石墨的理想.使用钛白粉代替石墨作为铝合金的润滑剂的设想暂时行不通.

  2. Increasing ‘ease of sliding’ also increases friction: when is a lubricant effective?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigate experimentally the effective Coulomb friction exerted by a granular medium on a shearing plate, varying the medium depth. The plate is driven by a spring connected to a motor turning at a constant speed and, depending on the system configuration, performs continuous sliding or stick and slip in different proportions. We introduce an order parameter which discriminates between the different regimes expressing the fraction of time spent in slipping. At low driving speed, starting from zero layers of interstitial granular material, the average friction coefficient decreases when a few layers are added, while the order parameter stays close to zero. By further increasing the granular depth, the friction undergoes a sudden increase but the order parameter does not change notably. At an intermediate driving speed, however, both the friction and the order parameter undergo a sudden increase, which for the order parameter amounts to several orders of magnitude, indicating that the plate is more braked but nevertheless keeps sliding more easily. For medium-high driving speeds, full sliding is obtained for only one layer of interstitial matter, where friction has a minimum, and is maintained for all increasing depths while friction increases. These observations show that the ease of slipping is not determined by friction alone, rather by the highly complex interplay between driving velocity, friction, and the depth of the medium. (paper)

  3. Experimental investigation on friction and squeezing of roof structure key blocks corner upon long-wall face

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qingxiang Huang

    2005-01-01

    The coefficients of friction and squeezing of the key blocks corner in the roof structure of underground coalface are key factors to roof structure stability quantitative analysis. In this paper, through the special test of three-type corner friction and squeezing of real rock specimens, and physical simulation test on the roof key blocks of roof structure as well as the finite element calculation of the corner stress distribution and failure mechanism, the characteristics of friction and squeezing of the roof key blocks corner are revealed. It is found that the friction angle of the roof key blocks corner is the residual friction angle, and the frictional angle of the roof key blocks is 22-32° (average 27°), so the friction coefficient is determined as 0.5. It also found the squeezing strength is less than the uniaxial strength, and the squeezing coefficient of the roof blocks corner is determined as 0.4. Based on the results, the ground control theory can be updated from qualitative analysis to quantitative analysis.

  4. Fluctuating-friction molecular motors

    OpenAIRE

    Marrucci, Lorenzo; Paparo, Domenico; Kreuzer, Markus

    2001-01-01

    We show that the correlated stochastic fluctuation of the friction coefficient can give rise to long-range directional motion of a particle undergoing Brownian random walk in a constant periodic energy potential landscape. The occurrence of this motion requires the presence of two additional independent bodies interacting with the particle via friction and via the energy potential, respectively, which can move relative to each other. Such three-body system generalizes the classical Brownian r...

  5. General theory of frictional heating with application to rubber friction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortunato, G.; Ciaravola, V.; Furno, A.; Lorenz, B.; Persson, B. N. J.

    2015-05-01

    The energy dissipation in the contact regions between solids in sliding contact can result in high local temperatures which may strongly effect friction and wear. This is the case for rubber sliding on road surfaces at speeds above 1 mm s-1. We derive equations which describe the frictional heating for solids with arbitrary thermal properties. The theory is applied to rubber friction on road surfaces and we take into account that the frictional energy is partly produced inside the rubber due to the internal friction of rubber and in a thin (nanometer) interfacial layer at the rubber-road contact region. The heat transfer between the rubber and the road surface is described by a heat transfer coefficient which depends on the sliding speed. Numerical results are presented and compared to experimental data. We find that frictional heating results in a kinetic friction force which depends on the orientation of the sliding block, thus violating one of the two basic Leonardo da Vinci ‘laws’ of friction.

  6. General theory of frictional heating with application to rubber friction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The energy dissipation in the contact regions between solids in sliding contact can result in high local temperatures which may strongly effect friction and wear. This is the case for rubber sliding on road surfaces at speeds above 1 mm s−1. We derive equations which describe the frictional heating for solids with arbitrary thermal properties. The theory is applied to rubber friction on road surfaces and we take into account that the frictional energy is partly produced inside the rubber due to the internal friction of rubber and in a thin (nanometer) interfacial layer at the rubber-road contact region. The heat transfer between the rubber and the road surface is described by a heat transfer coefficient which depends on the sliding speed. Numerical results are presented and compared to experimental data. We find that frictional heating results in a kinetic friction force which depends on the orientation of the sliding block, thus violating one of the two basic Leonardo da Vinci ‘laws’ of friction. (paper)

  7. Transport coefficients for shape degrees in terms of Cassini ovaloids

    OpenAIRE

    Ivanyuk, F. A.; Hofmann, H.; Pashkevich, V. V.; Yamaji, S.

    1997-01-01

    Previous computations of the potential landscape with the shapes parameterized in terms of Cassini ovaloids are extended to collective dynamics at finite excitations. Taking fission as the most demanding example of large scale collective motion, transport coefficients are evaluated along a fission path. We concentrate on those for average motion, namely stiffness C, friction \\gamma and inertia M. Their expressions are formulated within a locally harmonic approximation and the help of linear r...

  8. Friction Effects in Pedestrian Headform Impacts with Engine Hoods

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Qi; XIA Yong; ZHOU Qing

    2009-01-01

    In the pedestrian headform impact test mandated by the European pedestrian safety requirements, the contact friction between the headform and the engine hood affects the headform kinematics and head injury criterion (HIC) to some extent. This study shows that the friction effect is more significant with child headform impact than with adult headform impact and the relative angle between the headform impact di-rection and the hood surface greatly affects the headform impact sensitivity to the friction coefficient. The sensitivity of the headform kinematics to the friction coefficient is also analyzed. The results show that ac-curate friction coefficients are needed to improve predictions of pedestrian headform impacts with hoods.

  9. 滑动摩擦系数随速度变化振子随机激励%Study on the Method of Response Computation of a Vibration System with Velocity-dependent Variable Coefficient of Sliding Friction under Random Excitation Using Krylov-Bogoliubov Approximate Technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    白鸿柏; 张培林; 黄协清

    2001-01-01

    研究了单自由度滑动摩擦系数随相对速度变化的干摩擦振动系统随机激励响应计算问题,提出了Krylov-Bogoliubov近似方法,并推导了相应的均方响应迭代方程。通过一个数值例分析,考察了简化为理想干摩擦模型时带来的均方响应计算误差。%By using Krylov-Bogoliubov approximate technique, the response computation of a single-degree-of-freedom dry friction damped system with velocity-dependent variable coefficient of sliding friction under random excitation was discussed, and the mean square response equation was also derived. At the same time, the error between Coulomb friction system with a system with velocity-dependent variable coefficient of sliding friction was obtained.

  10. Interfacial friction based quasi-continuum hydrodynamical model for nanofluidic transport of water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhadauria, Ravi; Sanghi, Tarun; Aluru, N. R.

    2015-11-01

    In this work, we formulate a one-dimensional isothermal hydrodynamic transport model for water, which is an extension to our recently proposed hydrodynamic model for Lennard-Jones type fluid [R. Bhadauria and N. R. Aluru, J. Chem. Phys. 139, 074109 (2013)]. Viscosity variations in confinement are incorporated by the local average density method. Dirichlet boundary conditions are provided in the form of slip velocity that depends upon the macroscopic interfacial friction coefficient. The value of this friction coefficient is computed using a novel generalized Langevin equation formulation that eliminates the use of equilibrium molecular dynamics simulation. Gravity driven flows of SPC/E water confined between graphene and silicon slit shaped nanochannels are considered as examples for low and high friction cases. The proposed model yields good quantitative agreement with the velocity profiles obtained from non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations.

  11. Rolling Friction on a Wheeled Laboratory Cart

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mungan, Carl E.

    2012-01-01

    A simple model is developed that predicts the coefficient of rolling friction for an undriven laboratory cart on a track that is approximately independent of the mass loaded onto the cart and of the angle of inclination of the track. The model includes both deformation of the wheels/track and frictional torque at the axles/bearings. The concept of…

  12. HYSTERETIC INTERNAL FRICTION

    OpenAIRE

    Roberts, J.; Barnett, D

    1985-01-01

    It is emphasized that a distribution function in both the dislocation loop lengths and obstacle strengths must be considered to develop a quantitative theory for the hysteretic dissipation of energy. That is when dislocation surmounts and undulating internal stress field and the break-away is restricted by a restoring force considered to be that of dislocation line tension. The significance of the average friction stress resisting dislocation motion being related to the dislocation structure ...

  13. Radiation friction vs ponderomotive effect

    CERN Document Server

    Fedotov, A M; Gelfer, E G; Narozhny, N B; Ruhl, H

    2014-01-01

    The concept of ponderomotive potential is upgraded to a regime in which radiation friction becomes dominant. The radiation friction manifests itself in novel features of long-term capturing of the particles released at the focus and impenetrability of the focus from the exterior. We apply time scales separation to the Landau-Lifshitz equation splitting the particle motion into quivering and slow drift of a guiding center. The drift equation is deduced by averaging over fast motion.

  14. Linearization of friction effects in vibration of two rotating blades

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hajžman M.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper is aimed at modelling of friction effects in blade shrouding which are realized by means of friction elements placed between blades. In order to develop a methodology of modelling, two blades with one friction element in between are considered only. Flexible blades fixed to a rotating disc are discretized by FEM using 1D Rayleigh beam elements derived in rotating space as well as the friction element modelled as a rigid body. The blades and the friction element are connected through two concurrent friction planes, where the friction forces arise on the basis of centrifugal force acting on the friction element. The linearization of friction is performed using the harmonic balance method to determine equivalent damping coefficients in dependence on the amplitudes of relative slip motion between the blades and the friction element. The methodology is applied to a model of two real blades and will be extended for the whole bladed disc with shrouding.

  15. State Averages

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — A list of a variety of averages for each state or territory as well as the national average, including each quality measure, staffing, fine amount and number of...

  16. Investigation of Friction-induced Damage to the Pig Cornea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    da Cruz Barros, Raquel; Van Kooten, Theo G.; Veeregowda, Deepak Halenahally

    2015-01-01

    Mechanical friction causes damage to the cornea. A friction measurement device with minimal intervention with the pig cornea tear film revealed a low friction coefficient of 0.011 in glycerine solution. Glycerine molecules presumably bind to water, mucins, and epithelial cells and therewith improve

  17. Milled Die Steel Surface Roughness Correlation with Steel Sheet Friction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berglund, J.; Brown, C.A.; Rosén, B.-G.;

    2010-01-01

    This work investigates correlations between the surface topography ofmilled steel dies and friction with steel sheet. Several die surfaces were prepared by milling. Friction was measured in bending under tension testing. Linear regression coefficients (R2) between the friction and texture...

  18. Frictional torque numbers for ball cup and journal bearings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ligterink, D.J.

    1982-01-01

    Plastic bearing material wears in ball cup and journal bearings. Contact areas in the ball cup and the journal bearing increase. The frictional torque needed to rotate the ball or journal also increases. When the coefficient of friction is assumed to be constant during wearing out, the frictional t

  19. Influence on natural circulation nuclear thermal coupling average power under rolling motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    By performing simulation computations of single-phase flow natural circulation considering nuclear thermal coupling under rolling motion conditions, the influence factors which have great effect on the average heating power of this circulation system were studied. The analysis results indicate that under rolling motion conditions, the average heating power which considers the nuclear thermal coupling effect is in direct proportion to the average flow rate and average heat transfer coefficient, while it has an inverse relationship with the ratio between temperature-feedback coefficient of moderator and that of fuel. The effect of rolling parameters on the average heating power is related with the ratio between temperature-feedback coefficient of moderator and that of fuel. When the effect of the variation of the average heat transfer coefficient on the reactivity plays a leading role in the process, the stronger the rolling motion is, the higher the average heating power is. However, when the effect of the variation for the average friction coefficient on the reactivity takes the lead, the stronger the rolling motion is, the lower the average heating power is. (authors)

  20. Controlling friction

    OpenAIRE

    Elmer, Franz-Josef

    1997-01-01

    Two different controlling methods are proposed to stabilize unstable continuous-sliding states of a dry-friction oscillator. Both methods are based on a delayed-feedback mechanism well-known for stabilizing periodic orbits in deterministic chaos. The feedback variable is the elastic deformation. The control parameter is either the sliding velocity or the normal force. We calculate analytically stability boundaries in the space of control parameter and delay time. Furthermore, we show that our...

  1. Frictional microscopy of polymers and nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotomin, S. V.; Ezhov, A. A.; Sollogoub, C.; Yarikov, D.

    2014-05-01

    The mechanical and frictional properties of polystyrene, polymethylmethacrylate and nanocomposites with montmorillonite were studied by using the microindentation technique and frictional microscopy. The micromechanical tests revealed a decrease in the modulus and microhardness of the composite compared with those of a neat polystyrene, with a minimum of their values at 1-3 wt.% of the filler, but a local maximum of the tensile modulus of the filled polymer arose and increased at the same filler concentration. The frictional microscopy revealed anisotropy of the friction coefficient of the nanocomposite and to its noticeable dependence on the content of the filler. The maximum value of the friction coefficient was also reached at 1-3 wt.% of the filler and corresponds to the greatest degree of interplanar distance in the layered silicate and to minimum microhardness and elastic modulus of the composite surface.

  2. The effect of friction on simulated dynamic fracturing of rocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During underground nuclear tests, rocks may fail by plastic yielding, which limits shear strength, or by tensile fracture, wherever maximum principal stress exceeds tensile strength. A third mode of failure exists due to friction along closed fractured surfaces. There, friction affects slipping and can thus limit stress. In this paper, we study the effect of friction on the simulated dynamic response of rocks to underground nuclear explosions. The coefficient of friction is the ratio of total shear stress applied to a closed fracture surface to normal applied compressive total stress. At low coefficients of friction, the evolving stress field tends to be weakened by frictional slip, which also eases closing of fractures. At high coefficients of friction, the stress field tends to be strengthened, where fractures have closed, but remains weak, where fractures are left open. 4 refs., 4 figs

  3. Novel Friction Law for the Static Friction Force based on Local Precursor Slipping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katano, Yu; Nakano, Ken; Otsuki, Michio; Matsukawa, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    The sliding of a solid object on a solid substrate requires a shear force that is larger than the maximum static friction force. It is commonly believed that the maximum static friction force is proportional to the loading force and does not depend on the apparent contact area. The ratio of the maximum static friction force to the loading force is called the static friction coefficient µM, which is considered to be a constant. Here, we conduct experiments demonstrating that the static friction force of a slider on a substrate follows a novel friction law under certain conditions. The magnitude of µM decreases as the loading force increases or as the apparent contact area decreases. This behavior is caused by the slip of local precursors before the onset of bulk sliding and is consistent with recent theory. The results of this study will develop novel methods for static friction control. PMID:25205283

  4. Friction anisotropy in boronated graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, N., E-mail: niranjan@igcar.gov.in [Materials Science Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India); Radhika, R. [Crystal Growth Centre, Anna University, Chennai (India); Kozakov, A.T. [Research Institute of Physics, Southern Federal University, Rostov-on-Don (Russian Federation); Pandian, R. [Materials Science Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India); Chakravarty, S. [UGC-DAE CSR, Kalpakkam (India); Ravindran, T.R.; Dash, S.; Tyagi, A.K. [Materials Science Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India)

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Friction anisotropy in boronated graphite is observed in macroscopic sliding condition. • Low friction coefficient is observed in basal plane and becomes high in prismatic direction. • 3D phase of boronated graphite transformed into 2D structure after friction test. • Chemical activity is high in prismatic plane forming strong bonds between the sliding interfaces. - Abstract: Anisotropic friction behavior in macroscopic scale was observed in boronated graphite. Depending upon sliding speed and normal loads, this value was found to be in the range 0.1–0.35 in the direction of basal plane and becomes high 0.2–0.8 in prismatic face. Grazing-incidence X-ray diffraction analysis shows prominent reflection of (0 0 2) plane at basal and prismatic directions of boronated graphite. However, in both the wear tracks (1 1 0) plane become prominent and this transformation is induced by frictional energy. The structural transformation in wear tracks is supported by micro-Raman analysis which revealed that 3D phase of boronated graphite converted into a disordered 2D lattice structure. Thus, the structural aspect of disorder is similar in both the wear tracks and graphite transfer layers. Therefore, the crystallographic aspect is not adequate to explain anisotropic friction behavior. Results of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy shows weak signature of oxygen complexes and functional groups in wear track of basal plane while these species dominate in prismatic direction. Abundance of these functional groups in prismatic plane indicates availability of chemically active sites tends to forming strong bonds between the sliding interfaces which eventually increases friction coefficient.

  5. Friction anisotropy in boronated graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Friction anisotropy in boronated graphite is observed in macroscopic sliding condition. • Low friction coefficient is observed in basal plane and becomes high in prismatic direction. • 3D phase of boronated graphite transformed into 2D structure after friction test. • Chemical activity is high in prismatic plane forming strong bonds between the sliding interfaces. - Abstract: Anisotropic friction behavior in macroscopic scale was observed in boronated graphite. Depending upon sliding speed and normal loads, this value was found to be in the range 0.1–0.35 in the direction of basal plane and becomes high 0.2–0.8 in prismatic face. Grazing-incidence X-ray diffraction analysis shows prominent reflection of (0 0 2) plane at basal and prismatic directions of boronated graphite. However, in both the wear tracks (1 1 0) plane become prominent and this transformation is induced by frictional energy. The structural transformation in wear tracks is supported by micro-Raman analysis which revealed that 3D phase of boronated graphite converted into a disordered 2D lattice structure. Thus, the structural aspect of disorder is similar in both the wear tracks and graphite transfer layers. Therefore, the crystallographic aspect is not adequate to explain anisotropic friction behavior. Results of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy shows weak signature of oxygen complexes and functional groups in wear track of basal plane while these species dominate in prismatic direction. Abundance of these functional groups in prismatic plane indicates availability of chemically active sites tends to forming strong bonds between the sliding interfaces which eventually increases friction coefficient

  6. Comparative Frictional Analysis of Automobile Drum and Disc Brakes

    OpenAIRE

    H.P. Khairnar; V.M. Phalle; S. S. Mantha

    2016-01-01

    In the present work, a comparative frictional behaviour of drum brakes and disc brakes in automobiles has been investigated. The influential factors; contact force and friction radius were modeled for the estimation of the friction coefficient for drum as well as disc brakes. The effect of contact force and friction radius is studied with varying conditions of parameters; longitudinal force, caliper force and torque on piston side as well as non-piston side. The numerical results obtained hav...

  7. Quaternion Averaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markley, F. Landis; Cheng, Yang; Crassidis, John L.; Oshman, Yaakov

    2007-01-01

    Many applications require an algorithm that averages quaternions in an optimal manner. For example, when combining the quaternion outputs of multiple star trackers having this output capability, it is desirable to properly average the quaternions without recomputing the attitude from the the raw star tracker data. Other applications requiring some sort of optimal quaternion averaging include particle filtering and multiple-model adaptive estimation, where weighted quaternions are used to determine the quaternion estimate. For spacecraft attitude estimation applications, derives an optimal averaging scheme to compute the average of a set of weighted attitude matrices using the singular value decomposition method. Focusing on a 4-dimensional quaternion Gaussian distribution on the unit hypersphere, provides an approach to computing the average quaternion by minimizing a quaternion cost function that is equivalent to the attitude matrix cost function Motivated by and extending its results, this Note derives an algorithm that deterniines an optimal average quaternion from a set of scalar- or matrix-weighted quaternions. Rirthermore, a sufficient condition for the uniqueness of the average quaternion, and the equivalence of the mininiization problem, stated herein, to maximum likelihood estimation, are shown.

  8. Friction-and-wear characteristics of materials used in dry friction units designed for low-temperature applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friction-and-wear characteristics have been tabulated for a widi range of structural materials (metals, alloys, polymers, composites, solid lubricant coatings etc.), which are used in dry friction units designed for low-temperature application. The temperature interval of 4,2-293 K has been chosen for analyzing the effect of load, contact geometry, pressure and environment on the friction coefficient, wear rate and life of various combinations of materials in model friction units. 8 refs.; 5 figs.; 29 tabs

  9. Friction and stick-slip in a telescope construction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hammerschlag, R.H.

    1986-01-01

    Stick-slip in high resolution telescopes should be avoided. The contact places where stick-slip can occur are described. Some contact places require a high friction coefficient, others a low friction coefficient. Some experiments have been carried out to find lubricants for contact places which comb

  10. Optimizing snake locomotion in the plane. II. Large transverse friction

    CERN Document Server

    Alben, Silas

    2013-01-01

    We determine analytically the form of optimal snake locomotion when the coefficient of transverse friction is large, the typical regime for biological and robotic snakes. We find that the optimal snake motion is a retrograde traveling wave, with a wave amplitude that decays as the -1/4 power of the coefficient of transverse friction. This result agrees well with our numerical computations.

  11. Frictional Forces Required for unrestrained locomotion in dairy cattle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tol, van der P.P.J.; Metz, J.H.M.; Noordhuizen-Stassen, E.N.; Back, W.; Braam, C.R.

    2005-01-01

    Most free-stall housing systems in the Netherlands are equipped with slatted or solid concrete floors with manure scrapers. A slipping incident occurs when the required coefficient of friction (RCOF) exceeds the coefficient of friction (COF) at the claw–floor interface. An experiment was conducted t

  12. Comparative Frictional Analysis of Automobile Drum and Disc Brakes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.P. Khairnar

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, a comparative frictional behaviour of drum brakes and disc brakes in automobiles has been investigated. The influential factors; contact force and friction radius were modeled for the estimation of the friction coefficient for drum as well as disc brakes. The effect of contact force and friction radius is studied with varying conditions of parameters; longitudinal force, caliper force and torque on piston side as well as non-piston side. The numerical results obtained have been compared with the similar obtained from virtual Matlab/Simulink models for drum and disc brakes. The results evidenced that friction radius predominantly affects brake pressure and thus the friction coefficient, also the increase in contact force resulted with decrease in friction coefficient both for drum and disc brakes. Further it has been found that disc brakes exhibit gradual decrease of friction coefficient due to the equitable distribution of braking effort while drum brake presents sudden variations in friction coefficient. It can be revealed that frictional behaviour of disc brake is more consistent than drum brake.

  13. Investigation on microstructure and internal friction for low density TiB2/ZL114 composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wenmao HUANG; Haihong ZHAN; Lingyan XU; Zhengbing XU; Jianmin ZENG

    2009-01-01

    TiB2/ZL114 composites with the density of 2.733 g/cm3 were fabricated through reaction of K2TiF4 and KBF4 (LSM method). The composites were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscope (SEM). The internal friction measurements were performed on DTM-Ⅱ-J dynamic modulus damping an-alyzer and the mechanisms were investigated. Experimental results indicate that reinforced particles are well-distributed in the matrix and the internal friction value of TiB2/ZL114 composites is up to a maximum of 9.04x10-3, almost twice that of ZL114. The internal friction results form dislocation vibration within the material,the sliding of grain boundary and phase interface, and together with the micro-plastic deformation caused by difference in coefficients of thermal expansion and elasticity modulus of various phases. The average internal friction values of samples with the sizes of 40 min×4 mm×2 mm, 40 mm×8 mm×2 mm and 40 mm×25 mm×2 mm are 8.83x 10-3, 8.89x 10-3, and 8.93×10-3, respectively. Thus, the developed composites are of low density, high internal friction, and the sizes of samples have no relation to the internal friction behavior.

  14. Avaliação do coeficiente de atrito de braquetes metálicos e estéticos com fios de aço inoxidável e beta-titânio Evaluation of the friction coefficient of metal and esthetic brackets with stainless steel and beta-titanium wires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristine Pritsch Braga

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Um fator importante que define a eficácia dos aparelhos ortodônticos fixos é o atrito existente entre as superfícies de fios e braquetes. Assim, este estudo teve como objetivo investigar o coeficiente de atrito estático entre fios de aço inoxidável e beta-titânio (TP Orthodontics e braquetes de aço inoxidável (Dynalock® - Unitek, braquetes estéticos com slot de aço inoxidável (Clarity® - Unitek e estéticos convencionais (Allure® - GAC. Para tanto, construiu-se um equipamento no Departamento de Engenharia Mecânica e Mecatrônica da PUCRS. Antes de serem iniciados os testes, foi quantificado o erro de método e constatou-se que não houve interferência significante (p>0,05 do fator operador nas medições. Então, pôde-se calcular o valor do coeficiente de atrito, obtido pela divisão da força de atrito pela carga normal. O método estatístico utilizado neste estudo foi Análise de Variância (ANOVA e teste de Comparações Múltiplas (Tukey. Constatou-se que: 1 a combinação com menor coeficiente de atrito foi composta pelo fio de aço inoxidável e braquete Dynalock® e a que apresentou maior coeficiente foi a do braquete Allure® com o fio de beta-titânio; 2 o fio de beta-titânio apresentou coeficiente de atrito significativamente maior do que o fio de aço inoxidável; 3 o braquete Dynalock® não apresentou diferenças significativas em relação ao coeficiente de atrito do braquete Clarity® quando o fio utilizado foi de beta-titânio. No entanto, quando o fio testado foi de aço inoxidável, apresentou coeficiente de atrito significativamente menor. O braquete Clarity® apresentou coeficiente de atrito significativamente menor do que o braquete Allure®.An important factor that defines the effectiveness of the appliances is the friction between the surfaces of wires and brackets. Thus, that study was developed in order to investigate the static friction coefficient between stainless steel and beta-titanium wires (TP

  15. Sliding without slipping under Coulomb friction: opening waves and inversion of frictional force

    CERN Document Server

    Yastrebov, Vladislav A

    2015-01-01

    An elastic layer slides on a rigid flat governed by Coulomb's friction law. We demonstrate that if the coefficient of friction is high enough, the sliding localizes within stick-slip pulses, which transform into opening waves propagating at intersonic speed in the direction of sliding or, for high Poisson's ratios, at supersonic speed in the opposite one. This sliding mode, characterized by small frictional dissipation, rapidly relaxes the shear elastic energy via stress waves and enables the contact surface slide ahead of the top one, resulting in inversion of the frictional force direction.

  16. Friction Characteristics of Nitrided Layers on AISI 430 Ferritic Stainless Steel Obtained by Various Nitriding Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hakan AYDIN

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The influence of plasma, gas and salt-bath nitriding techniques on the friction coefficient of AISI 430 ferritic stainless steel was studied in this paper. Samples were plasma nitrided in 80 % N2 + 20 % H2 atmosphere at 450 °C and 520 °C for 8 h at a pressure of 2 mbar, gas nitrided in NH3 and CO2 atmosphere at 570 °C for 13 h and salt-bath nitrided in a cyanide-cyanate salt-bath at 570 °C for 1.5 h. Characterisation of nitrided layers on the ferritic stainless steel was carried out by means of microstructure, microhardness, surface roughness and friction coefficient measurements. Friction characteristics of the nitrided layers on the 430 steel were investigated using a ball-on-disc friction-wear tester with a WC-Co ball as the counter-body under dry sliding conditions. Analysis of wear tracks was carried out by scanning electron microscopy. Maximum hardness and maximum case depth were achieved on the plasma nitrided sample at 520 ºC for 8 h. The plasma and salt-bath nitriding techniques significantly decreased the average surface roughness of the 430 ferritic stainless steel. The friction test results showed that the salt-bath nitrided layer had better friction-reducing ability than the other nitrided layers under dry sliding conditions. Furthermore, the friction characteristic of the plasma nitrided layer at 520 ºC was better than that of the plasma nitrided layer at 450 °C.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.19.1.3819

  17. Multi-scale friction modelling for rough contacts under sliding conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karupannasamy, D.K.; Rooij, de M.B.; Schipper, D.J.

    2013-01-01

    In Finite Element (FE) simulations of sheet metal forming (SMF), the coefficient of friction is generally expressed as a constant Coulomb friction. However in reality, the coefficient of friction at the local contact spot varies with the varying operational, deformation and contact conditions. There

  18. Frictional forces between hydrophilic and hydrophobic particle coated nanostructured surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansson, Petra M; Claesson, Per M.; Swerin, Agne;

    2013-01-01

    by utilizing the atomic force microscope (AFM). The chemistry of the surfaces and the probe was varied between hydrophilic silica and hydrophobized silica. For hydrophilic silica surfaces, the friction coefficient was significantly higher for the particle coated surfaces than on the flat reference surface. All...... the particle coated surfaces exhibited similar friction coefficients, from which it may be concluded that the surface geometry, and not the roughness amplitude per se, influenced the measured friction. During measurements with hydrophobic surfaces, strong adhesive forces related to the formation of a bridging...... air cavity were evident from both normal force and friction force measurements. In contrast to the frictional forces between the hydrophilic surfaces, the friction coefficient for hydrophobic surfaces was found to depend on the surface structure and we believe that this dependence is related...

  19. Integrated friction measurements in hip wear simulations: short-term results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spinelli, M; Affatato, S; Tiberi, L; Carmignato, S; Viceconti, M

    2010-01-01

    Hip joint wear simulators are used extensively to simulate the dynamic behaviour of the human hip joint and, through the wear rate, gain a concrete indicator about the overall wear performance of different coupled bearings. Present knowledge of the dynamic behaviour of important concurrent indicators, such as the coefficient of friction, could prove helpful for the continuing improvement in applied biomaterials. A limited number of commercial or custom-made simulators have been designed specifically for friction studies but always separately from wear tests; thus, analysis of these two important parameters has remained unconnected. As a result, a new friction sensor has been designed, built, and integrated in a commercial biaxial rocking motion hip simulator. The aim of this study is to verify the feasibility of an experimental set-up in which the dynamic measurement of the friction factor could effectively be implemented in a standard wear test without compromising its general accuracy and repeatability. A short wear test was run with the new set-up for 1 x 10(6) cycles. In particular, three soft-bearings (metal-on-polyethylene, phi = 28 mm) were tested; during the whole test, axial load and frictional torque about the vertical loading axis were synchronously recorded in order to calculate the friction factor. Additional analyses were performed on the specimens, before and after the test, in order to verify the accuracy of the wear test. The average friction factor was 0.110 +/- 0.025. The friction sensors showed good accuracy and repeatability throughout. This innovative set-up was able to reproduce stable and reliable measurements. The results obtained encourage further investigations of this set-up for long-term assessment and using different combinations of materials.

  20. Fractal Model of Static Frictional Coefficient on Joint Surface Considering Elastic-plastic Deformation%考虑弹塑性变形机制的结合面静摩擦因数模型

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张颖; 张学良; 姜来; 温淑花; 陈永会; 兰国生; 刘丽琴

    2014-01-01

    A three-dimensional fractal model of static frictional factor on joint interfaces was presented based on three-dimensional contact fractal theory with consideration of elastic,elastic-plastic and plastic deformation. The model reflected the influence of normal load,fractal dimension and fractal characteristics scaling parameters on stat-ic frictional factor of joint interfaces. The simulation results showed that the static frictional factor increased firstly, and then decreased with the increase of D,namely fractal dimension;increased with the increase of P*,namely di-mensionless normal total load;and decreased with the increase of G*,namely fractal characteristics scaling parame-ters. Considering elastic-plastic deformation mechanism of joint surface static friction factor is less than without con-sidering elastic-plastic deformation mechanism of joint surface static friction factor.%在三维接触分形理论的基础上,从理论上建立了一种考虑微凸体的完全弹性、弹-塑性和完全塑性三种变形机制的结合面静摩擦因数三维分形模型。该模型反映了结合面法向载荷、分形维数以及分形特征尺度参数对结合面静摩擦因数的影响。仿真结果表明,静摩擦因数f随着无量纲法向接触总载荷P*的增大而增大;分形维数D的增大,先增大后减小;无量纲分形特征尺度参数G*的增大而减小;考虑弹-塑性变形机制的结合面静摩擦因数小于不考虑弹-塑性变形机制的结合面静摩擦因数。

  1. Evolutions of friction properties and acoustic emission source parameters associated with large sliding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yabe, Y.; Tsuda, H.; Iida, T.

    2015-12-01

    It was demonstrated by Yabe (2002) that friction properties and AE (acoustic emission) activities evolve with accumulation of sliding. However, large sliding distances of ~65 mm in his experiments were achieved by recurring ~10 mm sliding on the same fault. The evolution of friction coefficient was discontinuous, when rock samples were reset. Further, normal stress was not kept constant. To overcome these problems and to reexamine the evolutions of friction properties and AE activities with continuous large sliding under a constant normal stress, we developed a rotary shear apparatus. The evolutions of friction and AE up to ~80 mm sliding under a normal stress of 5 MPa were investigated. Rate dependence of friction was the velocity strengthening (a-b>0 in rate and state friction law) at the beginning. The value of a-b gradually decreased with sliding to negative (velocity weakening). Then, it took a constant negative value, when the sliding reached a critical distance. The m-value of Ishimoto-Iida's relation of AE activity increased with sliding at the beginning and converged to a constant value at the critical sliding distance. The m-value showed a negative rate dependence at the beginning, but became neutral after sliding of the critical distance. The sliding distances required to converge the a-b value, the m-value and the rate dependence of the m-value are almost identical to one another. These results are the same as those by Yabe (2002), suggesting the intermission of sliding little affected the evolutions. We, then, examined evolutions of AE source parameters such as source radii and stress drops. The average source radius was constant over the whole sliding distance, while the average stress drop decreased at the beginning of sliding, and converged to a constant value. The sliding distance required to the conversion was the same as that for the above mentioned evolutions of friction property or AE activity.

  2. Solvent friction effects propagate over the entire protein molecule through low-frequency collective modes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moritsugu, Kei; Kidera, Akinori; Smith, Jeremy C

    2014-07-24

    Protein solvation dynamics has been investigated using atom-dependent Langevin friction coefficients derived directly from molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. To determine the effect of solvation on the atomic friction coefficients, solution and vacuum MD simulations were performed for lysozyme and staphylococcal nuclease and analyzed by Langevin mode analysis. The coefficients thus derived are roughly correlated with the atomic solvent-accessible surface area (ASA), as expected from the fact that friction occurs as the result of collisions with solvent molecules. However, a considerable number of atoms with higher friction coefficients are found inside the core region. Hence, the influence of solvent friction propagates into the protein core. The internal coefficients have large contributions from the low-frequency modes, yielding a simple picture of the surface-to-core long-range damping via solvation governed by collective low-frequency modes. To make use of these findings in implicit-solvent modeling, we compare the all-atom friction results with those obtained using Langevin dynamics (LD) with two empirical representations: the constant-friction and the ASA-dependent (Pastor-Karplus) friction models. The constant-friction model overestimates the core and underestimates the surface damping whereas the ASA-dependent friction model, which damps protein atoms only on the solvent-accessible surface, reproduces well the friction coefficients for both the surface and core regions observed in the explicit-solvent MD simulations. Therefore, in LD simulation, the solvent friction coefficients should be imposed only on the protein surface. PMID:24999844

  3. The Friction Factor in the Forchheimer Equation for Rock Fractures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jia-Qing; Hu, Shao-Hua; Chen, Yi-Feng; Wang, Min; Zhou, Chuang-Bing

    2016-08-01

    The friction factor is an important dimensionless parameter for fluid flow through rock fractures that relates pressure head loss to average flow velocity; it can be affected by both fracture geometry and flow regime. In this study, a theoretical formula form of the friction factor containing both viscous and inertial terms is formulated by incorporating the Forchheimer equation, and a new friction factor model is proposed based on a recent phenomenological relation for the Forchheimer coefficient. The viscous term in the proposed formula is inversely proportional to Reynolds number and represents the limiting case in Darcy flow regime when the inertial effects diminish, whereas the inertial term is a power function of the relative roughness and represents a limiting case in fully turbulent flow regime when the fracture roughness plays a dominant role. The proposed model is compared with existing friction factor models for fractures through parametric sensitivity analyses and using experimental data on granite fractures, showing that the proposed model has not only clearer physical significance, but also better predictive performance. By accepting proper percentages of nonlinear pressure drop to quantify the onset of Forchheimer flow and fully turbulent flow, a Moody-type diagram with explicitly defined flow regimes is created for rock fractures of varying roughness, indicating that rougher fractures have a large friction factor and are more prone to the Forchheimer flow and fully turbulent flow. These findings may prove useful in better understanding of the flow behaviors in rock fractures and improving the numerical modeling of non-Darcy flow in fractured aquifers.

  4. Thermodynamic aspects of rock friction

    CERN Document Server

    Mitsui, Noa

    2013-01-01

    Rate- and state-dependent friction law for velocity-step tests is analyzed from a thermodynamic point of view. A simple macroscopic non-equilibrium thermodynamic model with a single internal variable reproduces instantaneous jump and relaxation. Velocity weakening appears as a consequence of a plasticity related nonlinear coefficient. Permanent part of displacement corresponds to plastic strain, and relaxation effects are analogous to creep in thermodynamic rheology.

  5. On Sliding Friction of PEEK Based Composite Coatings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    H.Liao; G.Zhang; C.Mateus; H.Li; C.Coddet

    2004-01-01

    Polyetheretherketone (PEEK) based composite materials become of great interest to applications as bearing and slider materials due to their excellent tribological performance. In present work, graphite and MoS2(7%,wt) filled PEEK coatings were prepared using serigraph technique. Employing a uniform design experiment, the friction behavior of the composite coatings was systematically investigated under dry sliding conditions on a ball-on-disc arrangement. The evolution mechanism of coating friction coefficient was discussed. Correlation of coatings friction coefficient with sliding velocity and applied load was accomplished using stepwise regression method. The results indicate that friction coefficients of PEEK+MoS2 and PEEK+graphite coating decrease while increasing applied load. Moreover, friction coefficient of PEEK+MoS2 coating increases with increasing sliding velocity.

  6. Viscosity Prediction of Natural Gas Using the Friction Theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zeberg-Mikkelsen, Claus Kjær; Cisneros, Sergio; Stenby, Erling Halfdan

    2002-01-01

    rules based on the values of the pure component friction coefficients. Since natural gases contain mainly methane, two f-theory models are combined, where the friction coefficients of methane are estimated by a seven-constant f-theory model directly fitted to methane viscosities, and the friction......Based on the concepts of the friction theory (f-theory) for viscosity modeling, a procedure is introduced for predicting the viscosity of hydrocarbon mixtures rich in one component, which is the case for natural gases. In this procedure, the mixture friction coefficients are estimated with mixing...... coefficients of the other components are estimated by the one-parameter general f-theory model. The viscosity predictions are performed with the SRK, the PR, and the PRSV equations of state, respectively. For recently measured viscosities of natural gases, the resultant AAD (0.5 to 0.8%) is in excellent...

  7. Seismic performance of isolation system of rolling friction with springs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    魏标; 戴公连; 文颖; 夏烨

    2014-01-01

    In order to study an isolation system of rolling friction with springs, computer programs were compiled to evaluate the seismic performance based on its movement characteristics. Through the programs, the influences of various seismic performance factors, e.g., rolling friction coefficient, spring constant, were systematically investigated. Results show that by increasing the rolling friction coefficient, the structural relative displacement due to seismic load effectively decreases, while the structural response magnitude varies mainly depending on the correlations between the following factors:the spring constant, the earthquake intensity, and the rolling friction coefficient. Furthermore, increasing the spring constant can decrease the structural relative displacement, as well as residual displacement, however, it increases the structural response magnitude. Finally, based on the analyses of various seismic performance factors subjected to the scenario earthquakes, optimized theoretical seismic performance can be achieved by reasonably combining the spring constant and the rolling friction coefficient.

  8. On Sliding Friction of PEEK Based Composite Coatings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    H. Liao; G. Zhang; C. Mateus; H. Li; C. Coddet

    2004-01-01

    Polyetheretherketone (PEEK) based composite materials become of great interest to applications as bearing and slider materials due to their excellent tribological performance. In present work, graphite and MoS2 (7%, wt) filled PEEK coatings were prepared using serigraph technique. Employing a uniform design experiment, the friction behavior of the composite coatings was systematically investigated under dry sliding conditions on a ball-on-disc arrangement. The evolution mechanism of coating friction coefficient was discussed. Correlation of coatings friction coefficient with sliding velocity and applied load was accomplished usingstepwise regression method. The results indicate that friction coefficients of PEEK + MoS2 and PEEK + graphite coating decrease while increasing applied load. Moreover, friction coefficient of PEEK + MoS2 coating increases with increasing sliding velocity.

  9. 小冲杆试验中摩擦系数及试样厚度对载荷-位移曲线及断裂位置的影响%Effect of friction coefficient and specimen thickness on L-D curve and fracture position in small punch test

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张广哲; 徐一飞; 关凯书

    2012-01-01

    ABAQUS was adopted to establish SPT model. The test process was simulated based on the ductile elasto-plastic damage theory of Gurson. A comparison of L-D curve between simulation and test with the specimen thickness 0. 5mm has been done to ensure the validity of parameters. The results show that both the friction coefficient and the specimen thickness have some effect on the L-D curve and fracture position, the friction coefficient also influences the final stage of the L-D curve.%基于Gurson弹塑性损伤理论,应用大型有限元软件ABAQUS对小冲杆试验全过程进行模拟,通过0.5mm厚试样载荷-位移曲线的模拟值与试验值对比,确保有限元模型参数的准确性,进而得出钢珠与试样间的摩擦作用对载荷位移曲线及断裂位置的影响,以及试样厚度对断裂位置的影响.

  10. Anisotropy in cohesive, frictional granular media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The modelling of cohesive, frictional granular materials with a discrete particle molecular dynamics is reviewed. From the structure of the quasi-static granular solid, the fabric, stress, and stiffness tensors are determined, including both normal and tangential forces. The influence of the material properties on the flow behaviour is also reported, including relations between the microscopic attractive force and the macroscopic cohesion as well as the dependence of the macroscopic friction on the microscopic contact friction coefficient. Related to the dynamics, the anisotropy of both structure and stress are exponentially approaching the maximum

  11. Quantized friction across ionic liquid thin films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Alexander M; Lovelock, Kevin R J; Gosvami, Nitya Nand; Welton, Tom; Perkin, Susan

    2013-10-01

    Ionic liquids - salts in the liquid state under ambient conditions - are of great interest as precision lubricants. Ionic liquids form layered structures at surfaces, yet it is not clear how this nano-structure relates to their lubrication properties. We measured the friction force between atomically smooth solid surfaces across ionic liquid films of controlled thickness in terms of the number of ion layers. Multiple friction-load regimes emerge, each corresponding to a different number of ion layers in the film. In contrast to molecular liquids, the friction coefficients differ for each layer due to their varying composition. PMID:23942943

  12. A novel friction law

    OpenAIRE

    Kong Hai-Yan; He Ji-Huan

    2012-01-01

    Frictional force is a vitally important factor in the application of engineering either in macroscopic contacts or in micro/nanoscale contacts. Understanding of the influencing factors about frictional force is essential for the design of miniaturized devices and the use of minimal friction force. In the paper, dimensional analysis is used to analysis factors relative to frictional force. We show that the frictional force scales with where A is the contact area and N is the normal conta...

  13. Fundamentals of Friction Modeling

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Bender, Farid

    2010-01-01

    This communication presents an overview of friction model-building, which starts from the generic mechanisms behind friction to construct models that simulate observed macroscopic friction behavior. First, basic friction properties are presented. Then, the generic friction model is outlined. Hereafter, simple heuristic/empirical models are discussed, which are suitable for quick simulation and control purposes. An example of these is the Generalized Maxwell-Slip model.

  14. Role of Friction in Cold Ring Rolling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    He YANG; Lianggang GUO; Mei ZHAN

    2005-01-01

    Cold ring rolling is an advanced but complex metal forming process under coupled effects with multi-factors, such as geometry sizes of rolls and ring blank, material, forming process parameters and friction, etc. Among these factors,friction between rolls and ring blank plays animportant role in keeping the stable forming of cold ring rolling. An analytical method was firstly presented for proximately determining the critical friction coefficient of stable forming and then a method was proposed to determine thecritical friction coefficient by combining analytical method with numerical simulation. And the influence of friction coefficient on the quality of end-plane and side spread of ring,rolling force, rolling moment and metal flow characteristic in the cold ring rolling process have been explored using the three dimensional (3D) numerical simulation based on the elastic-plastic dynamic finite element method (FEM)under the ABAQUS software environment, and the results show that increasing the friction on the contact surfaces between rolls and ring blank is useful not only for improving the stability of cold ring rolling but also for improving the geometry and dimension precision of deformed ring.

  15. Structural Damping with Friction Beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Gaul

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available In the last several years, there has been increasing interest in the use of friction joints for enhancing damping in structures. The joints themselves are responsible for the major part of the energy dissipation in assembled structures. The dissipated work in a joint depends on both the applied normal force and the excitation force. For the case of a constant amplitude excitation force, there is an optimal normal force which maximizes the damping. A ‘passive’ approach would be employed in this instance. In most cases however, the excitation force, as well as the interface parameters such as the friction coefficient, normal pressure distribution, etc., are not constant. In these cases, a ‘semi-active’ approach, which implements an active varying normal force, is necessary. For the ‘passive’ and ‘semi-active’ approaches, the normal force has to be measured. Interestingly, since the normal force in a friction joint influences the local stiffness, the natural frequencies of the assembled structure can be tuned by adjusting the normal force. Experiments and simulations are performed for a simple laboratory structure consisting of two superposed beams with friction in the interface. Numerical simulation of the friction interface requires non-linear models. The response of the double beam system is simulated using a numerical algorithm programmed in MATLAB which models point-to-point friction with the Masing friction model. Numerical predictions and measurements of the double beam free vibration response are compared. A practical application is then described, in which a friction beam is used to damp the vibrations of the work piece table on a milling machine. The increased damping of the table reduces vibration amplitudes, which in turn results in enhanced surface quality of the machined parts, reduction in machine tool wear, and potentially higher feed rates. Optimal positioning of the friction beams is based on knowledge of the mode

  16. Gas desorption during friction of amorphous carbon films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusanov, A.; Fontaine, J.; Martin, J.-M.; Mogne, T. L.; Nevshupa, R.

    2008-03-01

    Gas desorption induced by friction of solids, i.e. tribodesorption, is one of the numerous physical and chemical phenomena, which arise during friction as result of thermal and structural activation of material in a friction zone. Tribodesorption of carbon oxides, hydrocarbons, and water vapours may lead to significant deterioration of ultra high vacuum conditions in modern technological equipment in electronic, optoelectronic industries. Therefore, knowledge of tribodesorption is crucial for the performance and lifetime of vacuum tribosystems. Diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings are interesting materials for vacuum tribological systems due to their high wear resistance and low friction. Highly hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C:H) films are known to exhibit extremely low friction coefficient under high vacuum or inert environment, known as 'superlubricity' or 'superlow friction'. However, the superlow friction period is not always stable and then tends to spontaneous transition to high friction. It is supposed that hydrogen supply from the bulk to the surface is crucial for establishing and maintaining superlow friction. Thus, tribodesorption can serve also as a new technique to determine the role of gases in superlow friction mechanisms. Desorption of various a-C:H films, deposited by PECVD, ion-beam deposition and deposition using diode system, has been studied by means of ultra-high vacuum tribometer equipped with a mass spectrometer. It was found that in superlow friction period desorption rate was below the detection limit in the 0-85 mass range. However, transition from superlow friction to high friction was accompanied by desorption of various gases, mainly of H2 and CH4. During friction transition, surfaces were heavily damaged. In experiments with DLC films with low hydrogen content tribodesorption was significant during the whole experiment, while low friction was not observed. From estimation of maximum surface temperature during sliding contact it was

  17. Estimation of Dynamic Friction Process of the Akatani Landslide Based on the Waveform Inversion and Numerical Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, M.; Mangeney, A.; Moretti, L.; Matsushi, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Understanding physical parameters, such as frictional coefficients, velocity change, and dynamic history, is important issue for assessing and managing the risks posed by deep-seated catastrophic landslides. Previously, landslide motion has been inferred qualitatively from topographic changes caused by the event, and occasionally from eyewitness reports. However, these conventional approaches are unable to evaluate source processes and dynamic parameters. In this study, we use broadband seismic recordings to trace the dynamic process of the deep-seated Akatani landslide that occurred on the Kii Peninsula, Japan, which is one of the best recorded large slope failures. Based on the previous results of waveform inversions and precise topographic surveys done before and after the event, we applied numerical simulations using the SHALTOP numerical model (Mangeney et al., 2007). This model describes homogeneous continuous granular flows on a 3D topography based on a depth averaged thin layer approximation. We assume a Coulomb's friction law with a constant friction coefficient, i. e. the friction is independent of the sliding velocity. We varied the friction coefficients in the simulation so that the resulting force acting on the surface agrees with the single force estimated from the seismic waveform inversion. Figure shows the force history of the east-west components after the band-pass filtering between 10-100 seconds. The force history of the simulation with frictional coefficient 0.27 (thin red line) the best agrees with the result of seismic waveform inversion (thick gray line). Although the amplitude is slightly different, phases are coherent for the main three pulses. This is an evidence that the point-source approximation works reasonably well for this particular event. The friction coefficient during the sliding was estimated to be 0.38 based on the seismic waveform inversion performed by the previous study and on the sliding block model (Yamada et al., 2013

  18. EFFECT OF FRICTIONAL FORCE ON GEARING CONTACT FATIGUE STRENGTH

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ql Xiumei; GAO Chuangkuan

    2007-01-01

    The model for computing frictional coefficient between two teeth faces at the state of mixed elastohydrodynamic lubrication is established. And then more than 80 sets of numerical calculations and six sets of disc fatigue tests are completed. The results show that when the film thickness ratio λ<1.6, frictional coefficient μ is drastically decreased as λ rises; Thereafter it decreases smoothly until λ=4.5. When λ>4.5, however, it goes up again with λ, which indicates that the excessive film thickness ratio will deteriorate gearing contact fatigue strength. At the end, the formulae for determining the frictional coefficients are formed.

  19. Friction laws from dimensional-analysis point of view

    CERN Document Server

    Hatano, Takahiro

    2015-01-01

    Friction laws, which are a key to the understanding of the diversity of earthquakes, are considered theoretically. Using dimensional analysis, the logarithmic dependence of the friction coefficient on the slip velocity and the state variable is derived without any knowledge of the underlying physical processes on the frictional surface. This is based on a simple assumption that the friction coefficient is expressed as the difference from a reference state. Therefore, the functional form of the rate and state dependent friction law itself does not necessarily mean that thermal activation processes dominate friction. It is also shown that, if there are two (or more) state variables having the same dimension, we need not assume the logarithmic dependence on the state variables.

  20. Turbine blade friction damping study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominic, R. J.

    1985-01-01

    A lumped parameter method, implemented on a VAX 11/780 computer shows that the primary parameters affecting the performance of the friction damper of the first stage turbine of the SSME high pressure fuel pump are: the damper-blade coefficient of friction; the normal force applied to the friction interface; the amplitude of the periodic forcing function; the relative phase angle of the forcing functions for adjacent blades bridged by a damper (effectively, the engine order of the forcing function); and the amount of hysteretic damping that acts to limit the vibration amplitude of the blade in its resonance modes. The low order flexural resonance vibration modes of HPFTP blades without dampers, with production dampers, and with two types of lightweight experimental dampers were evaluated in high speed spin pit tests. Results agree with those of the analytical study in that blades fitted with production friction dampers experienced the airfoil-alone flexural resonance mode, while those without dampers or with lighter weight dampers did not. No blades fitted with dampers experienced the whole blade flexural resonance mode during high speed tests, while those without dampers did.

  1. Measuring anisotropic friction on WTe2 using atomic force microscopy in the force-distance and friction modes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Gregory S; Myhra, Sverre; Watson, Jolanta A

    2010-04-01

    Layered materials which can be easily cleaved have proved to be excellent samples for the study of atomic scale friction. The layered transition metal dichalcogenides have been particularly popular. These materials exhibit a number of interesting properties ranging from superconductivity to low frictional coefficients. In this paper we have investigated the tribology of the dichalcogenide-WTe2. The coefficient of friction is less than 0.040 along the Te rows and increases to over 0.045 across the rows. The frictional forces almost doubled at normal loads of 5000 nN when scanning in the [010] direction in comparison to the [100] direction. The frictional responses of the AFM probe have been monitored in the frictional force and force-versus-distance (f-d) mode. A comparison between the outcomes using the two different modes demonstrates the factors which need to be considered for accurate measurements. PMID:20355449

  2. Modeling and Calculation of Impact Friction Caused by Corner Contact in Gear Transmission

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Changjiang; CHEN Siyu

    2014-01-01

    Corner contact in gear pair causes vibration and noise, which has attracted many attentions. However, teeth errors and deformation make it difficulty to determine the point situated at corner contact and study the mechanism of teeth impact friction in the current researches. Based on the mechanism of corner contact, the process of corner contact is divided into two stages of impact and scratch, and the calculation model including gear equivalent error-combined deformation is established along the line of action. According to the distributive law, gear equivalent error is synthesized by base pitch error, normal backlash and tooth profile modification on the line of action. The combined tooth compliance of the first point lying in corner contact before the normal path is inversed along the line of action, on basis of the theory of engagement and the curve of tooth synthetic compliance & load-history. Combined secondarily the equivalent error with the combined deflection, the position standard of the point situated at corner contact is probed. Then the impact positions and forces, from the beginning to the end during corner contact before the normal path, are calculated accurately. Due to the above results, the lash model during corner contact is founded, and the impact force and frictional coefficient are quantified. A numerical example is performed and the averaged impact friction coefficient based on the presented calculation method is validated. This research obtains the results which could be referenced to understand the complex mechanism of teeth impact friction and quantitative calculation of the friction force and coefficient, and to gear exact design for tribology.

  3. Self-Organization during Friction of Slide Bearing Antifriction Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iosif S. Gershman

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses the peculiarities of self-organization behavior and formation of dissipative structures during friction of antifriction alloys for slide bearings against a steel counterbody. It shows that during self-organization, the moment of friction in a tribosystem may be decreasing with the load growth and in the bifurcations of the coefficient of friction with respect to load. Self-organization and the formation of dissipative structures lead to an increase in the seizure load.

  4. On Surface Structure and Friction Regulation in Reptilian Limbless Locomotion

    CERN Document Server

    Abdel-Aal, Hisham A

    2012-01-01

    One way of controlling friction and associated energy losses is to engineer a deterministic structural pattern on the surface of the rubbing parts (i.e., texture engineering). Custom texturing enhances the quality of lubrication, reduces friction, and allows the use of lubricants of lower viscosity. To date, a standardized procedure to generate deterministic texture constructs is virtually non-existent. Many engineers, therefore, study natural species to explore surface construction and to probe the role surface topography assumes in friction control. Snakes offer rich examples of surfaces where topological features allow the optimization and control of frictional behavior. In this paper, we investigate the frictional behavior of a constrictor type reptile, Python regius. The study employed a specially designed tribo-acoustic probe capable of measuring the coefficient of friction and detecting the acoustical behavior of the skin in vivo. The results confirm the anisotropy of the frictional response of snakesk...

  5. Interfacial potential barrier theory of friction and wear

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhongming XU; Lingyun DING; Ping HUANG

    2008-01-01

    An interfacial potential barrier theory to cal-culate friction and wear is proposed by considering the micro interaction of frictional surfaces. The theory sug-gests that the performance of friction and wear depends on the magnitude and distribution of the interfacial poten-tial barrier on contact surfaces. The calculation methods of the interfacial potential barrier and standard interfacial potential barrier are then studied and the formulas to cal-culate the friction force, friction coefficient, and quantity of adhesion wear are derived based on the theory. With its independence and stability, the standard interfacial poten-tial barrier can be used as an index to describe the fric-tional performance of materials. The calculation results of the friction force with some existing experimental data are consistent with the experimental results performed with an ultra high vacuum atomic-force microscope, which proves that the theory and method are feasible.

  6. Friction and Friction Compensation in the Furuta Pendulum

    OpenAIRE

    Svensson, Joakim; Åström, Karl Johan; Gäfvert, Magnus

    1999-01-01

    Inverted pendulums are very well suited to investigate friction phenomena and friction compensation because the effects of friction are so clearly noticeable. This paper analyses the effect of friction on the Furuta pendulum. It is shown that friction in the arm drive may cause limit cycles. The limit cycles are well predicted by common friction models. It is also shown that the amplitudes of the limit cycles can be reduced by friction compens ation. Compensators based on the Coulomb friction...

  7. Microscopic Friction Emulators

    OpenAIRE

    Mandelli, Davide; Tosatti, Erio

    2016-01-01

    Cold ions sliding across periodic potential patterns formed by lasers elucidate the physics of dry friction between crystals. Experiments with no more than six ions suffice to explore a vast domain of frictional forces.

  8. A Damping Characteristics Calculation Method of Metal Dry Friction Isolators

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Hong-yuan; HAO De-gang; XIA Yu-hong; ULANOV A M; PONOMAREV Yu K

    2008-01-01

    The dry friction ring-type vibration isolator is considered as an isotropic continuous medium. A method of dry friction hysteresis loop calculation is proposed based on friction force analysis of contact beam. The friction force is modeled as an equivalent distributed moment to use the finite element method (FEM) to calculate the dry friction vibration isolator hysteresis loop, so the damping characteristics can be obtained. A comparison of the hysteresis loop calculation results and the experimental results shows the average relative error is 2.7%, it proves the calculation method is feasible.

  9. Quantum friction and graphene

    OpenAIRE

    Volokitin, Aleksandr

    2011-01-01

    Friction is usually a very complicated process. It appears in its most elementary form when two flat surfaces separated by vacuum gap are sliding relative to each other at zero Kelvin and the friction is generated by the relative movement of quantum fluctuations. For several decades physicists have been intrigued by the idea of quantum friction. It has recently been shown that two non-contacting bodies moving relative to each other experience a friction due to quantum fluctuations inside the ...

  10. Rotational Quantum Friction

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Rongkuo; Manjavacas, Alejandro; de Abajo, F. Javier García; Pendry, J. B.

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the frictional forces due to quantum fluctuations acting on a small sphere rotating near a surface. At zero temperature, we find the frictional force near a surface to be several orders of magnitude larger than that for the sphere rotating in vacuum. For metallic materials with typical conductivity, quantum friction is maximized by matching the frequency of rotation with the conductivity. Materials with poor conductivity are favored to obtain large quantum frictions. For semico...

  11. Control Systems with Friction

    OpenAIRE

    Olsson, Henrik

    1996-01-01

    Friction-related problems are frequently encountered in control systems. This thesis treats three aspects of such problems: modeling, analysis, and friction compensation. A new dynamic friction model is presented and investigated. The model is described by a first order nonlinear differential equation with a reasonable number of parameters, yet it captures most of the experimentally observed friction phenomena. The model is suitable both for simulation purposes and control design. Analysis of...

  12. Frictional characteristics of granular system under high pressure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹秒艳; 彭雅新; 赵长财; 董国疆; 杜冰

    2016-01-01

    In order to reveal the force transmission features of the granules in the solid granule medium forming (SGMF) technology, the frictional characteristics of the non-metallic granule medium (NGM) under high pressure were investigated by tests and simulations. And the relevant changing curves of the internal friction coefficient of the granular system under different normal pressures were obtained by self-designed shear test. By the granule volume compression test, the accurate discrete element simulation parameters were obtained, based on this, the discrete element method (DEM) was adopted to reveal the evolution law of the NGM granules movement in the sample shear process from the microscopic view. Based on the DEM, the influence of granule diameter, surface friction coefficient, normal pressure and shear velocity on the internal friction coefficient of the granular system were studied. And the parameters were conducted to be dimensionless by introducing the inertia coefficient. Finally, the expression showing power-law relationship of inertia coefficient, surface friction coefficient and internal friction coefficient is obtained.

  13. Comparative evaluation of frictional characteristics of coated low friction ligatures - Super Slick Ties™ with conventional uncoated ligatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepu Leander

    2011-01-01

    Conclusions: SST produced lower levels of friction (11% for all archwire materials when compared to conventional uncoated ligatures (Dispense-A-Stix and both conventional uncoated ligatures and coated ligatures gave a rank order of coefficient of kinetic friction (μkf among archwires, with stainless steel archwires exhibiting the least and TMA TM showing the highest.

  14. Determination Permeability Coefficient from Piezocone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiang Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The permeability coefficient of soil profile is one of the problems concerned by engineers, and the determination of permeability coefficient method mainly relies on the laboratory permeability test and field pumping test, but these tests are time-consuming and inefficient, and especially the permeability coefficient of soil under the condition of partial drainage was difficult to determine; in this paper, the modern digital CPTU technology was used. Dimensional permeability KT was defined by using the dimensionless normalized cone tip resistance Qt, friction factor Fr, and pore pressure ratio Bq, these parameters enable plots of Bq-Qt, Fr-Qt, Bq-Fr to be contoured KT and hence for permeability coefficient. The relationship has been applied to Nanjing 4th Yangtze river bridge, and compared with laboratory penetration test. The results indicate that the method can accurately determine the permeability coefficient of soil under partial drainage condition and provide the theoretical basis for engineering application.

  15. Molecular origin of friction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG; Hui; ZHANG; Tao; HU; Yuanzhong

    2004-01-01

    The wearless friction originating from molecular interactions has been discussed in this paper. We find that the frictional properties are closely related to the structural match of two surfaces in relative motion. For the surfaces with incommensurate structure and week inter-surface interaction, zero static and kinetic friction can be achieved. In a sliding considered as in a quasi-static state, the energy dissipation initiates when interfacial particles move in a discontinuous fashion, which gives rise to a finite kinetic friction. The state of superlubricity is a result of computer simulations, but the prediction will encourage people to look for a technical approach to realizing the state of super low friction.

  16. Frictional Characteristics of graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Changgu; Carpick, Robert; Hone, James

    2009-03-01

    The frictional characteristics of graphene were characterized using friction force microscopy (FFM). The frictional force for monolayer graphene is more than twice that of bulk graphite, with 2,3, and 4 layer samples showing a monotonic decrease in friction with increasing sample thickness. Measurements on suspended graphene membranes show identical results, ruling out substrate effects as the cause of the observed variation. Likewise, the adhesion force is identical for all samples. The frictional force is independent of load within experimental uncertainty, consistent with previous measurements on graphite. We consider several possible explanations for the origin of the observed thickness dependence.

  17. Friction characteristics of a brake friction material under different braking conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • The tribological behavior of the brake material is well depending on interfacial temperature and friction conditions. • The friction performance is influenced by the material heterogeneity and its anisotropy. • The friction performance depended on the nature, morphology and orientation of constituents. - Abstract: As the evaluation of the tribological properties of the brake lining material is important for the braking performance identification, a pad-on-disc friction and wear tests of a commercial brake pad material against cast iron disc were conducted under low, middle and severe conditions. Three experiments via (t1), (t2) and (t3) with different sliding speeds and nominal contact pressure were conducted. Tests were performed with the pad in periodic sliding contact for 30 cycles. The scanning electronic microscopic (SEM) analysis with energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) was used to characterize the rubbed surface. The results showed that during the run-in period, the coefficient of friction increases steadily. For the friction mechanism: (i) at lower conditions, a stable friction film was generated on the surface of the brake pad, providing excellent friction stability with less wear, (ii) at middle conditions, fibers were agglomerated and were not contributed more, and (iii) at higher conditions, contact plates were identified which were accommodated the speed and the load

  18. 动态摩擦因数对蝶式制动器温度场影响的试验和模拟研究%Experimental and Simulation Research on the Influence of Dynamic Friction Coefficient to the Temperature Field of Disc Brake

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周俊峰; 王伟; 张晨; 刘焜

    2016-01-01

    To research into temperature field of disc brake, as needed, a constant speed braking bench is developed to simulate the braking condition of motorcycle under long slope by similarity principle. The disc fixed on rotating shaft, which is clamped by three jaw chuck of lathe, rotate with constant speed. The disc is clamped by inner pad and outward pad though hydraulic pressure. Temperature evolution of certain point on outward pad, braking torque evolution, mean value of braking pressure, temperature evolution on the frictional area of disc are measured by thermal couple, pressure sensor, piezometer, thermal imager respectively. The braking bench could realize the dynamic test of all variables under different rational speed and different braking pressure. The maximum temperature is chosen as variable to research the evolution of friction coefficient with temperature increasing. Based on experiment, simulation and analysis are did by ABAQUS. Simulation models are made from actual model by the ratio 1:1, load and boundary conditions are the same as reality, the evolution of friction coefficient with increasing temperature is put into contact condition, finally, the evolutions of the temperature fields of disc and pad are obtained. Compare to the simulation result and experimental result, it shows that the contact model with dynamic friction coefficient is better fit into the actual braking condition.%针对蝶式制动器制动过程中温度场研究的需要,利用相似原理研制定速制动试验台,用以模拟摩托车匀速下长坡时的制动工况。制动试验台用车床的三爪卡盘控制固定在旋转轴上的制动盘做定速旋转运动,内外摩擦片通过液压力夹紧制动盘,使制动盘与摩擦片发生摩擦运动,通过热电偶、拉压力传感器、压力表、热成像仪分别测出定速制动50 s的摩擦片上固定点的温度变化、制动扭矩(经计算得出)的动态变化、制动力的均值、制动盘摩

  19. MODIFICATION OF FLAKE REINFORCED FRICTION BRAKE COMPOSITE MATERIAL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    According to the recent development trend and need of the friction brake material, the flake reinforced friction brake material has been made out by adjusting the recipe and techniques. The two-dimensional flake vermiculite is selected as the reinforced stuffing of the material; the modified resin is used as the basal bed of the material. The tests manifest that the properties of mechanics are high, the friction coefficients are suitable and stable,and especially in high temperatures the wear is low. It is an excellent friction brake material.

  20. Transport properties under the influence of finite friction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    展永; 赵同军; 于慧; 宋艳丽

    2002-01-01

    Using the Langevin Monte Carlo method, the influence of friction on the directed motion of a Brownian particle driven by an external noise source is investigated. The results show that the existence and change of the environment friction influence the establishment and development of the steady motion of a Brownian particle derived by non- equilibrium fluctuation. The most probable correlation time, which corresponds to the maximum current, is inversely proportional to the friction coefficient. The abnormal transition of the current with different friction appears because of the coupling between the effective ratchet potential and coloured noise intensity.

  1. Frictional properties of single crystals HMX, RDX and PETN explosives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The frictional properties of single crystals of cyclotetramethylene tetranitramine (HMX), cyclotrimethylene trinitramine (RDX) and pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN) secondary explosives are examined using a sensitive friction machine. The explosive crystals used for the measurements are at least 3.5 mm wide. The friction coefficients between crystals of the same explosive (i.e., HMX on HMX, etc.), crystals of different explosives (i.e., HMX on RDX, etc.), and each explosive and a well-polished gauge steel surface are determined. The frictional surfaces are also studied under an environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM) to analyze surface microstructural changes under increasing loading forces. The friction coefficients vary considerably with increasing normal loading forces and are particularly sensitive to slider shapes, crystal roughness and the mechanical properties of both the slider and the sample. With increasing loading forces, most friction experiments show surface damage, consisting of grooves, debris, and nano-particles, on both the slider and sample. In some cases, a strong evidence of a localized molten state is found in the central region of the friction track. Possible mechanisms that affect the friction coefficient are discussed based on microscopic observations.

  2. Sliding Friction of Al-Cu-Fe-B Quasicrystals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiying ZHOU; Peiyao LI; Junming LUO; Shiqiang QIAN; Jianhua TONG

    2004-01-01

    Dry sliding friction between the Al59Cu25.5Fe12.5B3 quasicrystals (QCs)/coating of the diamond-like carbon (DLC) was carried out by self-made tribometer under different conditions. The influences of four parameters (temperature, sliding velocity, applied load, atmosphere) on friction and wear of quasicrystal surface were studied. Microstructure of quasicrystal, morphology of worn surface, and wear debris were observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM).The results showed that for QCs, the friction coefficient and roughness of worn surface were influenced by the parameters, especially greatly by the temperature. With rise of the applied load and sliding velocity, the friction coefficient decreased. The dominant wear mechanism at 350℃ was delamination for QCs. The cracks formed on the worn surface during the friction. Moreover, phase transformation was not observed on worn surface of QCs at 350℃. All the results are discussed and explained.

  3. Study of lubrication behavior of pure water for hydrophobic friction pair

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    The perfluorooctyltrichlorosilane molecular layer was self-assembled on glass plate. The tribological properties of the molecular layer in water were studied with the method of ball on disk. An interesting phenomenon was found that low friction coefficients of 0.02―0.08 were obtained when the friction pair was lubricated with only a water droplet. Whereas, when the friction pair was encircled with large amount of water or fully immersed in water, the friction coefficient was higher than that under a droplet lubrication. A mechanism of water droplet lubrication was proposed that the surface tension caused by the solid-liquid-air three-phase interface makes water molecules enter into the contact zone, which separates the two friction surfaces and provides a low friction coefficient. However, water film can hardly form when more water encircles the friction pair, due to the attraction between water molecules.

  4. Study of lubrication behavior of pure water for hydrophobic friction pair

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA ZhiZuo; ZHANG ChenHui; LIU ShuHai; LUO JianBin; LU XinChun; WEN ShiZhu

    2009-01-01

    The perfluorooctyltrichlorosilane molecular layer was self-assembled on glass plate.The tribological properties of the molecular layer in water were studied with the method of ball on disk.An interesting phenomenon was found that low friction coefficients of 0.02-0.08 were obtained when the friction pair was lubricated with only a water droplet.Whereas, when the friction pair was encircled with large amount of water or fully immersed in water, the friction coefficient was higher than that under a droplet lubrication.A mechanism of water droplet lubrication was proposed that the surface tension caused by the solid-liquid-air three-phase interface makes water molecules enter into the contact zone, which separates the two friction surfaces and provides a low friction coefficient.However, water film can hardly form when more water encircles the friction pair, due to the attraction between water molecules.

  5. Friction characteristics of floppy disks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    This note presents the principle and structure of a tribological measure for floppy disks.The precision of the force measuring system is 1 mN in loading and 3×10-6 N in friction.The resolution of the film thickness between head and floppy disk is 0.5 nm in the vertical and 1.5 nm in the horizontal direction.In order to investigate the tribological characteristics of floppy disks,six types of floppy disks have been tested and the floating properties of these disks are also studied with film measuring system.The experimental results of the surface morphology and friction coefficient of these floppy disks using the atomic force microscope/friction force mcroscope (AFM/FFM) are in accordance with the conclusion made by our own measuring system.The experimental results show that the air film thickness between head and disk is of the same order as the surface roughness of floppy disks.

  6. Variables influencing the frictional behaviour of in vivo human skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veijgen, N K; Masen, M A; van der Heide, E

    2013-12-01

    In the past decades, skin friction research has focused on determining which variables are important to affect the frictional behaviour of in vivo human skin. Until now, there is still limited knowledge on these variables. This study has used a large dataset to identify the effect of variables on the human skin, subject characteristics and environmental conditions on skin friction. The data are obtained on 50 subjects (34 males and 16 females). Friction measurements represent the friction between in vivo human skin and an aluminium sample, assessed on three anatomical locations. The coefficient of friction increased significantly (pskin and the height of the subject. Other outcome variables in this study were the hydration of the skin and the skin temperature.

  7. Theory of noncontact friction for atom-surface interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jentschura, U. D.; Janke, M.; DeKieviet, M.

    2016-08-01

    The noncontact (van der Waals) friction is an interesting physical effect, which has been the subject of controversial scientific discussion. The direct friction term due to the thermal fluctuations of the electromagnetic field leads to a friction force proportional to 1 /Z5 (where Z is the atom-wall distance). The backaction friction term takes into account the feedback of thermal fluctuations of the atomic dipole moment onto the motion of the atom and scales as 1 /Z8 . We investigate noncontact friction effects for the interactions of hydrogen, ground-state helium, and metastable helium atoms with α -quartz (SiO2), gold (Au), and calcium difluorite (CaF2). We find that the backaction term dominates over the direct term induced by the thermal electromagnetic fluctuations inside the material, over wide distance ranges. The friction coefficients obtained for gold are smaller than those for SiO2 and CaF2 by several orders of magnitude.

  8. The diversity of friction behavior between bi-layer graphenes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For relative sliding between two rigid graphene sheets that are interacted on by a van der Waals force, we show that the friction behavior is significantly dependent on the interlayer separation distance h. Around the equilibrium interlayer distance he, the friction behavior exactly obeys a linear law. When h is far smaller than he, the linear friction behavior transforms to over-linear behavior. On the other hand, when h is larger than he, there is another critical value of the interlayer distance, hc; when h is larger than he and smaller than hc, the friction behavior transforms from linear to sub-linear behavior; however, when h is larger than hc, the coefficient of friction becomes negative. Further, the different friction behaviors are found to be well described by a universal power law, τ = μ∗(σ + σ0)n. (paper)

  9. Surface defects and temperature on atomic friction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fajardo, O Y; Mazo, J J

    2011-09-01

    We present a theoretical study of the effect of surface defects on atomic friction in the stick-slip dynamical regime of a minimalistic model. We focus on how the presence of defects and temperature change the average properties of the system. We have identified two main mechanisms which modify the mean friction force of the system when defects are considered. As expected, defects change the potential profile locally and thus affect the friction force. But the presence of defects also changes the probability distribution function of the tip slip length and thus the mean friction force. We corroborated both effects for different values of temperature, external load, dragging velocity and damping. We also show a comparison of the effects of surface defects and surface disorder on the dynamics of the system. PMID:21846940

  10. Study of Composite Hardcoat Anodizing of Aluminum Alloy 6063 and Its Friction Behaviors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Shi-yong; ZHANG Hui-chen; GAO Xue-min; LIU Wei; SHI Ya-qin

    2004-01-01

    A composite hard-anodized coating containing micro PTFE (polytetrafluoroethylene) particles on aluminum alloy 6063 was produced by adding micro PTFE particles into the traditional hardcoat anodizing solution. The size of the PTFE particles is around 2 μ m in diameter and the content of the PTFE particles in the composite coating is within 2%-3% by area percentage. Thickness of the composite coating can reach up to 70 μ m after one hour's anodizing. Surface hardness of the composite coating is between 400-480 HV0.1. The average friction coefficient of the composite coating against steel under dry friction test is 0.11, which is 17% lower than that obtained by traditional hardcoat anodizing.

  11. Study of Composite Hardcoat Anodizing of Aluminum Alloy 6063 and Its Friction Behaviors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIUShi-yong; ZHANGHui-chen; GAOXue-min; LIUWei; SHIYa-qin

    2004-01-01

    A composite hard-anodized coating containing micro PTFE (polytetrafluoroethylene) particles on aluminum alloy 6063 was produced by adding micro PTFE particles into the traditional hardcoat anodizing solution. The size of the PTFE particles is around 2μm in diameter and the content of the PTFE particles in the composite coating is within 2%-3% by area percentage. Thickness of the composite coating cart reach up to 70μm after one hour's anodizing. Surface hardness of the composite coating is between 4(RI-480 HV0.1, The average friction coefficient of the composite coating against steel under dry friction tost is 0.11, which is 17% lower than that obtained by traditional hardcoat anodizing.

  12. Intelligent flow friction estimation

    OpenAIRE

    Dejan Brkić; Žarko Ćojbašić

    2016-01-01

    Nowadays, the Colebrook equation is used as a mostly accepted relation for the calculation of fluid flow friction factor. However, the Colebrook equation is implicit with respect to the friction factor (λ). In the present study, a noniterative approach using Artificial Neural Network (ANN) was developed to calculate the friction factor. To configure the ANN model, the input parameters of the Reynolds Number (Re) and the relative roughness of pipe (ε/D) were transformed to logarithmic scales. ...

  13. Friction in orthodontics

    OpenAIRE

    Prashant, P. S.; Nandan, Hemant; Gopalakrishnan, Meera

    2015-01-01

    Conventional wisdom suggests that resistance to sliding (RS) generated at the wire-bracket interface has a bearing on the force transmitted to the teeth. The relative importance of static and kinetic friction and also the effect of friction on anchorage has been a topic of debate. Lot of research work has been done to evaluate the various factors that affect friction and thus purportedly retards the rate of tooth movement. However, relevancy of these studies is questionable as the methodology...

  14. Friction force microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Roland Bennewitz

    2005-01-01

    Friction force microscopy (FFM) can detect lateral force variations on the atomic scale when sliding a sharp tip over a flat surface. The sliding often takes the form of a stick-slip movement with the same periodicity as the atomic lattice. Here, I discuss how the occurrence of stick-slip instabilities is related to the onset of dissipation. The velocity and load dependence of atomic friction on various materials are discussed in the light of simple classical laws of friction.

  15. Untying molecular friction knots

    OpenAIRE

    Kirmizialtin, Serdal; Makarov, Dmitrii E.

    2006-01-01

    Motivated by recent advances in single molecule manipulation techniques that enabled several groups to tie knots in individual polymer strands and to monitor their dynamics, we have used computer simulations to study "friction knots" joining a pair of polymer strands. The key property of a friction knot splicing two ropes is that it becomes jammed when the ropes are pulled apart. In contrast, molecular friction knots eventually become undone by thermal motion. We show that depending on the kn...

  16. Theory of Quantum Friction

    OpenAIRE

    Silveirinha, Mario G.

    2013-01-01

    Here, we develop a comprehensive quantum theory for the phenomenon of quantum friction. Based on a theory of macroscopic quantum electrodynamics for unstable systems, we calculate the quantum expectation of the friction force, and link the friction effect to the emergence of system instabilities related to the Cherenkov effect. These instabilities may occur due to the hybridization of particular guided modes supported by the individual moving bodies, and selection rules for the interacting mo...

  17. Noncontact Dielectric Friction

    OpenAIRE

    Kuehn, Seppe; Marohn, John A.; Loring, Roger F.

    2006-01-01

    Dielectric fluctuations are shown to be the dominant source of noncontact friction in high-sensitivity scanning probe microscopy of dielectric materials. Recent measurements have directly determined the friction acting on custom-fabricated single-crystal silicon cantilevers whose capacitively charged tips are located 3–200 nm above thin films of poly(methyl methacrylate), poly(vinyl acetate), and polystyrene. Differences in measured friction among these polymers are explained here by relating...

  18. Modeling of the voltage-controlled friction effect

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孟永钢; 蒋洪军; 常秋英; 黄柏林

    2002-01-01

    A phenomenological model of the dependence of friction coefficient on external voltage is proposed based on experimental results of friction and electric current of three different trbopairs, Si3N4-ball/steel-disc, Si3N4-ball/brass-disc and SiO2-ball/steel-disc, lubricated with zinc strearate suspension. It was found that the variation of friction coefficient correlates with the variation of electric current for all of the three tribopairs. The change in electric current is considered to be caused by the rate of electrochemical reactions occurring on the rubbing surface. By taking the electrochemical reaction into account in the total energy consumption, an expression for describing the relationship between the rates of friction coefficient and electric current is derived, and the constants included in the expression are determined through curve fitting of experimental data.

  19. Theory of quantum friction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Here, we develop a comprehensive quantum theory for the phenomenon of quantum friction. Based on a theory of macroscopic quantum electrodynamics for unstable systems, we calculate the quantum expectation of the friction force at zero temperature, and link the friction effect to the emergence of system instabilities related to the Cherenkov effect. These instabilities may occur due to the hybridization of particular guided modes supported by the individual moving bodies, and selection rules for the interacting modes are derived. It is proven that the quantum friction effect can take place even when the interacting bodies are lossless and made of nondispersive dielectrics. (paper)

  20. The Influence of Normal Load and Sliding Speed on Frictional Properties of Skin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Tang; Shi-rong Ge; Hua Zhu; Xi-chuan Cao; Ning Li

    2008-01-01

    The study of frictional properties of human skin is important for medical research, skin care products and textile exploitation. In order to investigate the influence of normal load and sliding speed on the frictional properties of skin and its possible mechanism, tests were carried out on a multi-specimen friction tester. When the normal load increases from 0.1 N to 0.9 N,normal displacement and the friction coefficient of skin increase. The friction coefficient is dependent on the load, indicating that both adhesion and deformation contribute to the friction behaviour. The deformation friction was interpreted using the plough model of fiiction. When sliding speed increases from 0.5 mm·s-1 to 4 mm·s-1,the friction coefficient increases and "stick-slip" phenomena increase, indicating that hysteretic friction contributes to the friction. The hysteretic friction was interpreted using schematic of energy translation during the rigid spherical probe sliding on the soft skin surface, which provides an explanation for the influence of the sliding speed on the frictional characteristics of the skin.

  1. Determining drag coefficients and their application in modelling of turbulent flow with submerged vegetation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Hongwu; Tian, Zhijun; Yan, Jing; Yuan, Saiyu

    2014-07-01

    Vegetation is a key aspect of water resources and ecology in natural rivers, floodplains and irrigation channels. The hydraulic resistance of the water flow is greatly changed when submerged vegetation is present. Three kinds of drag coefficients, i.e., the drag coefficient for an isolated cylinder, the bulk drag coefficient of an array of cylinders and the vertically distributed or local drag coefficient, have been commonly used as parameters to represent the vegetation drag force. In this paper, a comprehensive experimental study of submerged stems in an open channel flow is presented. Empirical formulae for the three drag coefficients were obtained based on our experimental results and on data from previous studies. A two-layer model was developed to solve the mean momentum equation, which was used to evaluate the vertical mean velocity profile with each of the drag coefficients. By comparing the velocity distribution model predictions and the measurement results, we found that the model with the drag coefficient for an isolated cylinder and the local drag coefficient was good fit. In addition, the model with the bulk drag coefficient gave much larger velocity values than measurements, but it could be improved by adding the bed friction effect and making choice of the depth-averaged velocity within the canopy layer.

  2. Effect of ZrSiO4 on the Friction Performance of Automotive Brake Friction Materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Friction-wear properties of the ZrSiO4 reinforced samples were measured and compared with those of plain bronze based ones. For this purpose, density, hardness, friction coefficient wear behaviour of the samples were tested. Microstructures of samples before and after sintering and worn surfaces were also investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and the wear types were determined. The optimum friction-wear behaviour was obtained in the sample compacted at 500 MPa and sintered at 820℃. Density of the final samples decreased with increasing the amount of reinforcing elements (ZrSiO4) before pre-sintering. However after sintering, there is no change in density of the samples including reinforcing elements (ZrSiO4). With increasing friction surface temperature, a reduction in the friction coefficient of the samples was observed.However, the highest reductions in the friction coefficients were observed in the as-received samples containing 0,5% reinforced ZrSiO4. The SEM images of the sample indicated that while bronze-based break lining material without ZrSiO4 showed abrasive wear behaviour, increasing the amount of ZrSiO4 resulted a change in abrasive to adhesive wear mechanism. All samples exhibited friction-wear values, which were within the values shown in SAE-J661 standard. With increasing the amount of reinforcing ZrSiO4, wear resistance of the samples was increased. However samples reinforced with 5% and 6% ZrSiO4 showed the best results.

  3. FEM simulation of a friction testing method based on combined forward conical can-backward straight can extrusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nakamura, T; Bay, Niels

    1998-01-01

    A new friction testing method based on combined forward conical can-backward straight can extrusion is proposed in order to evaluate friction characteristics in severe metal forming operations. By this method the friction coefficient along the conical punch surface is determined knowing the frict......A new friction testing method based on combined forward conical can-backward straight can extrusion is proposed in order to evaluate friction characteristics in severe metal forming operations. By this method the friction coefficient along the conical punch surface is determined knowing...... analysis. Experimental friction tests are carried out in a mechanical press with aluminium alloy A6061 as the workpiece material and different kinds of lubricants. They confirm that the theoretical analysis results irt reasonable values for the friction coefficient....

  4. Friction and Nonlinear Dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Manini, N.; Braun, O. M.; E. Tosatti; Guerra, R.; Vanossi, A.

    2016-01-01

    The nonlinear dynamics associated with sliding friction forms a broad interdisciplinary research field that involves complex dynamical processes and patterns covering a broad range of time and length scales. Progress in experimental techniques and computational resources has stimulated the development of more refined and accurate mathematical and numerical models, capable of capturing many of the essentially nonlinear phenomena involved in friction.

  5. Friction and nonlinear dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manini, N.; Braun, O. M.; Tosatti, E.; Guerra, R.; Vanossi, A.

    2016-07-01

    The nonlinear dynamics associated with sliding friction forms a broad interdisciplinary research field that involves complex dynamical processes and patterns covering a broad range of time and length scales. Progress in experimental techniques and computational resources has stimulated the development of more refined and accurate mathematical and numerical models, capable of capturing many of the essentially nonlinear phenomena involved in friction.

  6. Approximate equations at breaking for nearshore wave transformation coefficients

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Chandramohan, P.; Nayak, B.U.; SanilKumar, V.

    Based on small amplitude wave theory approximate equations are evaluated for determining the coefficients of shoaling, refraction, bottom friction, bottom percolation and viscous dissipation at breaking. The results obtainEd. by these equations...

  7. Friction and wear behavior of carbon fiber reinforced brake materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Du-qing CHENG; Xue-tao WANG; Jian ZHU; Dong-bua QIU; Xiu-wei CHENG; Qing-feng GUAN

    2009-01-01

    A new composite brake material was fabri-cated with metallic powders, barium sulphate and modified phenolic resin as the matrix and carbon fiber as the reinforced material. The friction, wear and fade character-istics of this composite were determined using a D-MS friction material testing machine. The surface structure of carbon fiber reinforced friction materials was analyzed by scanning electronic microscopy (SEM). Glass fiber-reinforced and asbestos fiber-reinforced composites with the same matrix were also fabricated for comparison. The carbon fiber-reinforced friction materials (CFRFM) shows lower wear rate than those of glass fiber- and asbestos fiber-reinforced composites in the temperature range of 100℃-300℃. It is interesting that the frictional coefficient of the carbon fiber-reinforced friction materials increases as frictional temperature increases from 100℃ to 300℃, while the frictional coefficients of the other two composites decrease during the increasing temperatures. Based on the SEM observation, the wear mechanism of CFRFM at low temperatures included fiber thinning and pull-out. At high temperature, the phenolic matrix was degraded and more pull-out enhanced fiber was demonstrated. The properties of carbon fiber may be the main reason that the CFRFM possess excellent tribological performances.

  8. Frictional sliding of biotite gouge under hydrothermal conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Z.; He, C.

    2012-12-01

    In order to understand the origin of compositionally-weak fault and the mechanical behavior of fault zone composed of biotite-rich rocks in general, this work investigated the frictional sliding behavior of biotite gouge under hydrothermal conditions by shearing 1-mm-thick biotite gouge layers sandwiched between saw-cut driver blocks, using a triaxial testing system with argon gas as confining medium. Experiments were conducted under effective normal stress of 200MPa, with pore pressure of 30MPa, temperatures from room temperature to 600°C, and shear displacement rate were stepped with our standard (0.0001-0.001mm/s) and slow velocity steps (0.00004-0.0002mm/s). The results show that the coefficient of friction of biotite is on the order of 0.29 in the low temperature range (25 to 100°C), and varies around 0.35 for temperatures over 200°C. The overall average of friction coefficient from room temperature up to 600°C is ca. 0.33, evidently weaker than framework minerals such as quartz and feldspar and also weaker than muscovite in the mica group. Within the sliding displacement up to 4mm in our experiments, velocity strengthening occurred at temperatures of 25-200°C, with steady-state rate dependence ranging from 0.001 to 0.006. Weak velocity weakening was found at 300°C, with steady-state rate dependence similar to neutral. At 400°C, the deformation behavior changed radically and very strong velocity strengthening occurred, with steady-state rate dependence ranging from 0.012 to 0.112. At 500 and 600°C, the experiments show strong velocity dependence in the early stage of sliding, but the sliding behavior gradually evolves to stick-slip as the shearing deformation proceeds, indicating strong velocity-weakening behavior. The strongest velocity dependence occurred at 400°C in the early stage of sliding, with stress exponent similar to that of power-law creep, but the confining pressure dependence of shear strength suggests that such a behavior is semi

  9. Friction enhancement in concertina locomotion of snakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marvi, Hamidreza; Hu, David L

    2012-11-01

    Narrow crevices are challenging terrain for most organisms and biomimetic robots. Snakes move through crevices using sequential folding and unfolding of their bodies in the manner of an accordion or concertina. In this combined experimental and theoretical investigation, we elucidate this effective means of moving through channels. We measure the frictional properties of corn snakes, their body kinematics and the transverse forces they apply to channels of varying width and inclination. To climb channels inclined at 60°, we find snakes use a combination of ingenious friction-enhancing techniques, including digging their ventral scales to double their frictional coefficient and pushing channel walls transversely with up to nine times body weight. Theoretical modelling of a one-dimensional n-linked crawler is used to calculate the transverse force factor of safety: we find snakes push up to four times more than required to prevent sliding backwards, presumably trading metabolic energy for an assurance of wall stability.

  10. Hyperstaticity and loops in frictional granular packings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tordesillas, Antoinette; Lam, Edward; Metzger, Philip T.

    2009-06-01

    The hyperstatic nature of granular packings of perfectly rigid disks is analyzed algebraically and through numerical simulation. The elementary loops of grains emerge as a fundamental element in addressing hyperstaticity. Loops consisting of an odd number of grains behave differently than those with an even number. For odd loops, the latent stresses are exterior and are characterized by the sum of frictional forces around each loop. For even loops, the latent stresses are interior and are characterized by the alternating sum of frictional forces around each loop. The statistics of these two types of loop sums are found to be Gibbsian with a "temperature" that is linear with the friction coefficient μ when μ<1.

  11. Frictional strength of wet- and dry- talc gouge in high-velocity shear experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, X.; Reches, Z.; Elwood Madden, A. S.

    2015-12-01

    The strength of the creeping segment of the San Andres fault may be controlled by the distinct weakness and stability of talc (Moore & Rymer, 2007). We analyze talc frictional strength at high slip-velocity of 0.002 - 0.66 m/s, long slip-distances of 0.01 m to 33 m, and normal stresses up to 4.1 MPa. This analysis bridges the gap between nucleation stage of low velocity/distance, and the frictional behavior during large earthquakes. We tested wet and dry samples of pure talc gouge in a confined rotary cell, and continuously monitored the slip-velocity, stresses, dilation and temperature. We run 29 experiments of single and stepped velocities to obtain 243 values of quasi-static frictional coefficients. Dry talc gouge showed distinct slip-strengthening: friction coefficient of µ ~0.4 at short slip-distances of D 1 m, the frictional strength saturated at µ= 0.8 - 1 level. Wet talc gouge (16-20% water) displayed low frictional strength of µ= 0.1-0.3, in agreement with published triaxial tests. The stepped-velocity runs revealed a consistent velocity-strengthening trend. For a velocity jump from V1 to V2, we used VD = (µ2 -µ1)/ln (V2/V1), and found that on average VD = 0.06 and 0.03 for dry and wet talc, respectively, and for slip distances shorter than 1 m. Microstructural analysis of post-shearing wet talc gouge revealed extreme slip localization to a principal-slip-zone of a few microns, and significant shear compaction of 10-30%. In contrast, dry talc gouge exhibited distributed shear in a wide zone and systematic shear dilation (10-50%). We propose slip along weak interlayer talc plates and thermal-pressurization as the possible weakening mechanisms for wet talc. The development of distributed secondary fault network along with substantial grain crushing is responsible for slip-strengthening in dry condition. Fig. 1. Friction maps of talc gouge as function of slip-distance (left) and slip-velocity (right). Resuslts of both stepped-velocity and constant

  12. Fractional trajectories: Decorrelation versus friction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svenkeson, A.; Beig, M. T.; Turalska, M.; West, B. J.; Grigolini, P.

    2013-11-01

    The fundamental connection between fractional calculus and subordination processes is explored and affords a physical interpretation of a fractional trajectory, that being an average over an ensemble of stochastic trajectories. Heretofore what has been interpreted as intrinsic friction, a form of non-Markovian dissipation that automatically arises from adopting the fractional calculus, is shown to be a manifestation of decorrelations between trajectories. We apply the general theory developed herein to the Lotka-Volterra ecological model, providing new insight into the final equilibrium state. The relaxation time to achieve this state is also considered.

  13. Bulk-friction modeling of afterslip and the modified Omori law

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wennerberg, L.; Sharp, R.V.

    1997-01-01

    Afterslip data from the Superstition Hills fault in southern California, a creep event on the same fault, the modified Omori law, and cumulative moments from aftershocks of the 1957 Aleutian Islands earthquake all indicate that the original formulation by Dieterich (1981) [Constitutive properties of faults with simulated gouge. AGU, Geophys. Monogr. 24, 103-120] for friction evolution is more appropriate for systems far from instability than the commonly used approximation developed by Ruina (1983) [Slip instability and state variable friction laws. J. Geophys. Res. 88, 10359-10370] to study instability. The mathematical framework we use to test the friction models is a one-dimensional, massless spring-slider under the simplifying assumption, proposed by Scholz (1990) [The Mechanics of Earthquakes and Faulting. Cambridge University Press] and used by Marone et al. (1991) [On the mechanics of earthquake afterslip. J. Geophys. Res., 96: 8441-8452], that the state variable takes on its velocity-dependent steady-state value throughout motion in response to a step in stress. This assumption removes explicit state-variable dependence from the model, obviating the need to consider state-variable evolution equations. Anti-derivatives of the modified Omori law fit our data very well and are very good approximate solutions to our model equations. A plausible friction model with Omori-law solutions used by Wesson (1988) [Dynamics of fault creep. J. Geophys. Res. 93, 8929-8951] to model fault creep and generalized by Rice (1983) [Constitutive relations for fault slip and earthquake instabilities. Pure Appl. Geophys. 121, 443-475] to a rate-and-state-variable friction model yields exactly Omori's law with exponents greater than 1, but yields unstable solutions for Omori exponents less than 1. We estimate from the Dieterich formulation the dimensionless parameter a* which is equal to the product of the nominal coefficient of friction and the more commonly reported friction

  14. Association between friction and wear in diarthrodial joints lacking lubricin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jay, Gregory D; Torres, Jahn R; Rhee, David K; Helminen, Heikki J; Hytinnen, Mika M; Cha, Chung-Ja; Elsaid, Khaled; Kim, Kyung-Suk; Cui, Yajun; Warman, Matthew L

    2007-01-01

    Objective The glycoprotein lubricin (encoded by the gene Prg4) is secreted by surface chondrocytes and synovial cells, and has been shown to reduce friction in vitro. In contrast to man-made bearings, mammalian diarthrodial joints must endogenously produce friction-reducing agents. This study was undertaken to investigate whether friction is associated with wear. Methods The lubricating ability of synovial fluid (SF) samples from humans with genetic lubricin deficiency was tested in vitro. The coefficient of friction in the knee joints of normal and lubricin-null mice was measured ex vivo; these joints were also studied by light and electron microscopy. Atomic force microscopy was used to image and measure how lubricin reduces friction in vitro. Results SF lacking lubricin failed to reduce friction in the boundary mode. Joints of lubricin-null mice showed early wear and higher friction than joints from their wild-type counterparts. Lubricin self-organized and reduced the work of adhesion between apposing asperities. Conclusion These data show that friction is coupled with wear at the cartilage surface in vivo. They imply that acquired lubricin degradation occurring in inflammatory joint diseases predisposes the cartilage to damage. Lastly, they suggest that lubricin, or similar biomolecules, will have applications in man-made devices in which reducing friction is essential. PMID:17968947

  15. The effects of porosity in friction performance of brake pad using waste tire dust

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    İbrahim Mutlu

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This research is focused on the effect of porosity on the friction-wear properties of automotive brake pads. Waste Tire Dust (WTD was used as a new friction material in brake pads. Newly formulated brake pad materials with five different components have been produced by conventional techniques. In the experimental studies, the change of the friction coefficient, the temperature of the friction surface, the specific wear rate, and the hardness, density and porosity were measured. In addition, the micro-structural characterizations of brake pads are determined using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM. The mean coefficient of friction, porosity and specific wear are increased due to a WTD rate increases, on the other hand, hardness and density are decreased. As a result, WTD can be considered as an alternative to revalorize this kind of waste products in the brake pads and the amount of porosity of the brake pad affected the friction coefficient and wear behavior of the pad.

  16. Confinement-dependent friction in peptide bundles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erbaş, Aykut; Netz, Roland R

    2013-03-19

    Friction within globular proteins or between adhering macromolecules crucially determines the kinetics of protein folding, the formation, and the relaxation of self-assembled molecular systems. One fundamental question is how these friction effects depend on the local environment and in particular on the presence of water. In this model study, we use fully atomistic MD simulations with explicit water to obtain friction forces as a single polyglycine peptide chain is pulled out of a bundle of k adhering parallel polyglycine peptide chains. The whole system is periodically replicated along the peptide axes, so a stationary state at prescribed mean sliding velocity V is achieved. The aggregation number is varied between k = 2 (two peptide chains adhering to each other with plenty of water present at the adhesion sites) and k = 7 (one peptide chain pulled out from a close-packed cylindrical array of six neighboring peptide chains with no water inside the bundle). The friction coefficient per hydrogen bond, extrapolated to the viscous limit of vanishing pulling velocity V → 0, exhibits an increase by five orders of magnitude when going from k = 2 to k = 7. This dramatic confinement-induced friction enhancement we argue to be due to a combination of water depletion and increased hydrogen-bond cooperativity. PMID:23528088

  17. Pressure-viscosity coefficient of biobased lubricants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Film thickness is an important tribological property that is dependent on the combined effect of lubricant properties, material property of friction surfaces, and the operating conditions of the tribological process. Pressure-viscosity coefficient (PVC) is one of the lubricant properties that influe...

  18. Iliotibial band friction syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavine, Ronald

    2010-07-20

    Published articles on iliotibial band friction syndrome have been reviewed. These articles cover the epidemiology, etiology, anatomy, pathology, prevention, and treatment of the condition. This article describes (1) the various etiological models that have been proposed to explain iliotibial band friction syndrome; (2) some of the imaging methods, research studies, and clinical experiences that support or call into question these various models; (3) commonly proposed treatment methods for iliotibial band friction syndrome; and (4) the rationale behind these methods and the clinical outcome studies that support their efficacy.

  19. Quantum vacuum friction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The quantum vacuum may in certain circumstances be regarded as a type of fluid medium, or aether, exhibiting energy density, pressure, stress and friction. Vacuum friction may be thought of as being responsible for the spontaneous creation of particles from the vacuum state when the system is non-stationary. Examples include the expanding universe, rotating black holes, moving mirrors, atoms passing close to surfaces, and the activities of sub-cellular biosystems. The concept of vacuum friction will be reviewed and illustrated, and some suggestions for future experiments made

  20. Friction Causing Unpredictability

    OpenAIRE

    Oldham, Joshua; Weigert, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    The periodic motion of a classical point particle in a one-dimensional double-well potential acquires a surprising degree of complexity if friction is added. Finite uncertainty in the initial state can make it impossible to predict in which of the two wells the particle will finally settle. For two models of friction, we exhibit the structure of the basins of attraction in phase space which causes the final-state sensitivity. Adding friction to an integrable system with more than one stable e...

  1. Polymer friction Molecular Dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sivebæk, Ion Marius; Samoilov, Vladimir N.; Persson, Bo N. J.

    We present molecular dynamics friction calculations for confined hydrocarbon solids with molecular lengths from 20 to 1400 carbon atoms. Two cases are considered: a) polymer sliding against a hard substrate, and b) polymer sliding on polymer. In the first setup the shear stresses are relatively...... independent of molecular length. For polymer sliding on polymer the friction is significantly larger, and dependent on the molecular chain length. In both cases, the shear stresses are proportional to the squeezing pressure and finite at zero load, indicating an adhesional contribution to the friction force....

  2. Friction force microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roland Bennewitz

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Friction force microscopy (FFM can detect lateral force variations on the atomic scale when sliding a sharp tip over a flat surface. The sliding often takes the form of a stick-slip movement with the same periodicity as the atomic lattice. Here, I discuss how the occurrence of stick-slip instabilities is related to the onset of dissipation. The velocity and load dependence of atomic friction on various materials are discussed in the light of simple classical laws of friction.

  3. The behaviour of molybdenum dialkyldithiocarbamate friction modifier additives

    CERN Document Server

    Graham, J C H

    2001-01-01

    In recent years there has been growing concern to produce energy-efficient lubricated components and modem engine oil specifications require lubricants to demonstrate fuel efficiency in standardised engine tests. One important method of producing low friction and thus fuel-efficient lubricants is to use oil-soluble, molybdenum-containing, friction modifier additives. In optimal conditions these additives are able to produce very low friction coefficients, in the range 0.045 to 0.075 in boundary lubrication conditions. Very little is known about the chemical and physical mechanisms by which oil soluble molybdenum additives form low friction films in tribological contacts. Information about their activity could lead to optimal use of these additives in lubricants and, therefore, more efficient engine running. The work outlined in this thesis investigated the behaviour of oil-soluble molybdenum additives and showed that these additives were able to effectively reduce friction in the absence of other additives su...

  4. Ice friction: The effects of surface roughness, structure, and hydrophobicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kietzig, Anne-Marie; Hatzikiriakos, Savvas G.; Englezos, Peter

    2009-07-01

    The effect of surface roughness, structure, and hydrophobicity on ice friction is studied systematically over a wide range of temperature and sliding speeds using several metallic interfaces. Hydrophobicity in combination with controlled roughness at the nanoscale is achieved by femtosecond laser irradiation to mimic the lotus effect on the slider's surface. The controlled roughness significantly increases the coefficient of friction at low sliding speeds and temperatures well below the ice melting point. However, at temperatures close to the melting point and relatively higher speeds, roughness and hydrophobicity significantly decrease ice friction. This decrease in friction is mainly due to the suppression of capillary bridges in spite of the presence of surface asperities that facilitate their formation. Finally, grooves oriented in the sliding direction also significantly decrease friction in the low velocity range compared to scratches and grooves randomly distributed over a surface.

  5. Nanoscale friction and adhesion of tree frog toe pads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kappl, Michael; Kaveh, Farzaneh; Barnes, W Jon P

    2016-01-01

    Tree frogs have become an object of interest in biomimetics due to their ability to cling to wet and slippery surfaces. In this study, we have investigated the adhesion and friction behavior of toe pads of White's tree frog (Litoria caerulea) using atomic force microscopy (AFM) in an aqueous medium. Facilitating special types of AFM probes with radii of ∼400 nm and ∼13 μm, we were able to sense the frictional response without damaging the delicate nanopillar structures of the epithelial cells. While we observed no significant adhesion between both types of probes and toe pads in wet conditions, frictional forces under such conditions were very pronounced and friction coefficients amounted between 0.3 and 1.1 for the sliding friction between probes and the epithelial cell surfaces. PMID:27165465

  6. Study on the cutting plane friction law of sandstone

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAI Ying-da (翟英达); KANG Li-xun(康立勋)

    2003-01-01

    The friction characteristics of rock damage plane have important impact on the stability of block structure formed after the stratum is broken. The mechanics properties of rock damage plane are described by parameters such as roughness coefficient, wall compress strength and basic friction angle. These three coefficients for fine grain sandstone and medium-granular sandstone and grit sandstone are test. The friction stress is researched at the condition of different normal compressive stress acting on the tension damage plane. The friction law of tension damage plane of sandstone abided by is summed up. This law will provide scientific basis for block structure stability judging in basic roof stratum and roof pressure intensity calculating.

  7. Friction- and wear-reducing coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dong; Milner, Robert; Elmoursi, Alaa AbdelAzim

    2011-10-18

    A coating includes a first layer of a ceramic alloy and a second layer disposed on the first layer and including carbon. The coating has a hardness of from 10 to 20 GPa and a coefficient of friction of less than or equal to 0.12. A method of coating a substrate includes cleaning the substrate, forming the first layer on the substrate, and depositing the second layer onto the first layer to thereby coat the substrate.

  8. Science 101: What Causes Friction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Bill

    2014-01-01

    Defining friction and asking what causes it might seem like a trivial question. Friction seems simple enough to understand. Friction is a force between surfaces that pushes against things that are moving or tending to move, and the rougher the surfaces, the greater the friction. Bill Robertson answers this by saying, "Well, not exactly".…

  9. Friction stir welding tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolle; Charles R. , Clark; Denis E. , Barnes; Timothy A.

    2008-04-15

    A friction stir welding tool is described and which includes a shank portion; a shoulder portion which is releasably engageable with the shank portion; and a pin which is releasably engageable with the shoulder portion.

  10. Toward a Universal Model of Damping--Modified Coulomb Friction

    OpenAIRE

    Peters, Randall D.

    2002-01-01

    A modification of Coulomb's law of friction uses a variable coefficient of friction that depends on a power law in the energy of mechanical oscillation. Through the use of three different exponents: 0, 1/2 and 1; all commonly encountered non-viscous forms of damping are accommodated. The nonlinear model appears to yield good agreement with experiment in cases of surface, internal, and amplitude dependent damping.

  11. Suitable Friction Sliding Materials for Base Isolation of Masonry Buildings

    OpenAIRE

    Radhikesh P. Nanda; Pankaj Agarwal; Manish Shrikhande

    2012-01-01

    A feasibility study of friction base isolation system for seismic protection has been performed. Four different sliding interfaces, namely, green marble/High Density Poly Ethylene (HDPE), green marble/green marble, green marble/geosynthetic, and green marble/ rubber layers have been studied through experimental and analytical investigations. The experimental investigations show that the coefficient of friction values of these interfaces lies in the desirable range for seismic protection, i.e....

  12. Iliotibial band friction syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Lavine, Ronald

    2010-01-01

    Published articles on iliotibial band friction syndrome have been reviewed. These articles cover the epidemiology, etiology, anatomy, pathology, prevention, and treatment of the condition. This article describes (1) the various etiological models that have been proposed to explain iliotibial band friction syndrome; (2) some of the imaging methods, research studies, and clinical experiences that support or call into question these various models; (3) commonly proposed treatment methods for ili...

  13. Rotor internal friction instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bently, D. E.; Muszynska, A.

    1985-01-01

    Two aspects of internal friction affecting stability of rotating machines are discussed. The first role of internal friction consists of decreasing the level of effective damping during rotor subsynchronous and backward precessional vibrations caused by some other instability mechanisms. The second role of internal frication consists of creating rotor instability, i.e., causing self-excited subsynchronous vibrations. Experimental test results document both of these aspects.

  14. Skin tribology: Science friction?

    OpenAIRE

    Heide, van der, M.; X. Zeng; Masen, M.A.

    2013-01-01

    The application of tribological knowledge is not just restricted to optimizing mechanical and chemical engineering problems. In fact, effective solutions to friction and wear related questions can be found in our everyday life. An important part is related to skin tribology, as the human skin is frequently one of the interacting surfaces in relative motion. People seem to solve these problems related to skin friction based upon a trial-and-error strategy and based upon on our sense for touch....

  15. Polymer friction Molecular Dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Sivebæk, Ion Marius; Samoilov, Vladimir N.; Persson, Bo N. J.

    2010-01-01

    We present molecular dynamics friction calculations for confined hydrocarbon solids with molecular lengths from 20 to 1400 carbon atoms. Two cases are considered: a) polymer sliding against a hard substrate, and b) polymer sliding on polymer. In the first setup the shear stresses are relatively independent of molecular length. For polymer sliding on polymer the friction is significantly larger, and dependent on the molecular chain length. In both cases, the shear stresses are proportional to ...

  16. Friction between Polymer Brushes

    OpenAIRE

    Sokoloff, J. B.

    2006-01-01

    By solving the equilibrium equations for a polymer in a neutral polymer brush, the degree of interpenetration of two polymer brushes in contact and near contact is calculated. These results are used to calculate values of the force of static friction in agreement with recent friction measurements for polymer brush lubricated surfaces. It is shown that at sufficiently light loads polymer brush coated surfaces can slide, with the load supported entirely by osmotic pressure, at a sufficiently la...

  17. Friction Stir Weld Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Robert W. (Inventor); Payton, Lewis N. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A friction stir weld tool sleeve is supported by an underlying support pin. The pin material is preferably selected for toughness and fracture characteristics. The pin sleeve preferably has a geometry which employs the use of an interrupted thread, a plurality of flutes and/or eccentric path to provide greater flow through. Paddles have been found to assist in imparting friction and directing plastic metal during the welding process.

  18. Tire Road Friction Estimation

    OpenAIRE

    DELANNE, Y; DO, MT; M'SIRDI, NK

    2005-01-01

    Two main approaches for tire road friction estimation : the "cause based" and the "effect based" are generally dealt with in the literature. The slip-based method seems to be the most promising and is, consequently, a very popular current subject. LCPC, a french research body in civil engineering has been working for several years on the relationship between road texture parameters and road surface condition (dry, damp, wet) and tire friction performance. In this framework, the two methods ha...

  19. Friction and Wear Property of Cu-Cr Alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Jianhua; Wang Yuhui; Gao Hong; Zhang Ruijun

    2007-01-01

    The friction and wear behaviors of the Cu-Cr alloy sliding against GCr15 steel at different loads and rotate speed conditions were evaluated, and the worn surface morphologies were observed on a scanning electron microscope. Results show that as loads and rotate speed increase, the wear loss weight increases, by comparison, the biggest friction coefficient of Cu-Cr alloy was obtained at load 100N and rotate speed at 100 r·min-1 friction condition. Moreover, the dominant wear forms was plough wear.

  20. Effect of Al2O3 on the friction performance of P/M composite materials for friction applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivǎnuş, R. C.; ǎnuş, D., IV; Cǎlmuc, F.

    2010-06-01

    Bronze bearings are one of most used friction materials. In those applications where higher mechanical properties are needed, iron base bearings can be an alternative to bronze base materials, or other alloying elements added to bronze. The paper presents the results obtained in metal matrix composites field with friction characteristics, for automotive brakes, by P/M. The scope of these researches was the improvement of wear resistance and friction properties of metal matrix composites. Friction-wear properties of the Al2O3 reinforced samples were measured and compared with those of plain bronze based ones. For this purpose, density, hardness, friction coefficient wear behaviour of the samples were tested.Microstructures of samples before and after sintering and worn surfaces were also investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and the wear types were determined. The optimum friction-wear behaviour was obtained in the sample compacted at 500 MPa and sintered at 820°C. Density of the final samples decreased with increasing the amount of reinforcing elements (Al2O3) before presintering. However after sintering, there is no change in density of the samples including reinforcing elements (Al2O3). With increasing friction surface temperature, a reduction in the friction coefficient of the samples was observed. However, the highest reductions in the friction coefficients were observed in the as-received samples containing 0,5% reinforced Al2O3. The SEM images of the sample indicated that while bronze-based break lining material without Al2O3 showed abrasive wear behaviour, increasing the amount of Al2O3 resulted in a change of abrasive to adhesive wear mechanism. With increasing the amount of reinforcing Al2O3, wear resistance of the samples was increased. However samples reinforced with 5% and 6% Al2O3 showed the best results.

  1. Adhesion and size dependent friction anisotropy in boron nitride nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The frictional properties of individual multiwalled boron nitride nanotubes (BN-NTs) synthesized by chemical vapour deposition (CVD) and deposited on a silicon substrate are investigated using an atomic force microscope tip sliding along (longitudinal sliding) and across (transverse sliding) the tube’s principal axis. Because of the tube’s transverse deformations during the tip sliding, a larger friction coefficient is found for the transverse sliding as compared to the longitudinal sliding. Here, we show that the friction anisotropy in BN-NTs, defined as the ratio between transverse and longitudinal friction forces per unit area, increases with the nanotube–substrate contact area, estimated to be proportional to (LNTRNT)1/2, where LNT and RNT are the length and the radius of the nanotube, respectively. Larger contact area denotes stronger surface adhesion, resulting in a longitudinal friction coefficient closer to the value expected in the absence of transverse deformations. Compared to carbon nanotubes (C-NTs), BN-NTs display a friction coefficient in each sliding direction with intermediate values between CVD and arc discharge C-NTs. CVD BN-NTs with improved tribological properties and higher oxidation temperature might be a better candidate than CVD C-NTs for applications in extreme environments. (paper)

  2. Dry friction of microstructured polymer surfaces inspired by snake skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heepe, Lars; Fadeeva, Elena; Gorb, Stanislav N

    2014-01-01

    Summary The microstructure investigated in this study was inspired by the anisotropic microornamentation of scales from the ventral body side of the California King Snake (Lampropeltis getula californiae). Frictional properties of snake-inspired microstructured polymer surface (SIMPS) made of epoxy resin were characterised in contact with a smooth glass ball by a microtribometer in two perpendicular directions. The SIMPS exhibited a considerable frictional anisotropy: Frictional coefficients measured along the microstructure were about 33% lower than those measured in the opposite direction. Frictional coefficients were compared to those obtained on other types of surface microstructure: (i) smooth ones, (ii) rough ones, and (iii) ones with periodic groove-like microstructures of different dimensions. The results demonstrate the existence of a common pattern of interaction between two general effects that influence friction: (1) molecular interaction depending on real contact area and (2) the mechanical interlocking of both contacting surfaces. The strongest reduction of the frictional coefficient, compared to the smooth reference surface, was observed at a medium range of surface structure dimensions suggesting a trade-off between these two effects. PMID:25161844

  3. Friction forces on atoms after acceleration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this paper is to revisit the calculation of atom–surface quantum friction in the quantum field theory formulation put forward by Barton (2010 New J. Phys. 12 113045). We show that the power dissipated into field excitations and the associated friction force depend on how the atom is boosted from being initially at rest to a configuration in which it is moving at constant velocity (v) parallel to the planar interface. In addition, we point out that there is a subtle cancellation between the one-photon and part of the two-photon dissipating power, resulting in a leading order contribution to the frictional power which goes as v4. These results are also confirmed by an alternative calculation of the average radiation force, which scales as v3. (paper)

  4. The wheel-rail contact friction influence on high speed vehicle model stability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirosław DUSZA

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Right estimating of the coefficient of friction between the wheel and rail is essential in modelling rail vehicle dynamics. Constant value of coefficient of friction is the typical assumption in theoretical studies. But it is obvious that in real circumstances a few factors may have significant influence on the rails surface condition and this way on the coefficient of friction value. For example the weather condition, the railway location etc. Influence of the coefficient of friction changes on high speed rail vehicle model dynamics is presented in this paper. Four axle rail vehicle model were built. The FASTSIM code is employed for calculation of the tangential contact forces between wheel and rail. One coefficient of friction value is adopted in the particular simulation process. To check the vehicle model properties under the influence of wheel-rail coefficient of friction changes, twenty four series of simulations were performed. For three curved tracks of radii R = 3000m, 6000m and  (straight track, the coefficient of friction was changed from 0.1 to 0.8. The results are presented in form of bifurcation diagrams.

  5. Friction in volcanic environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendrick, Jackie E.; Lavallée, Yan

    2016-04-01

    Volcanic landscapes are amongst the most dynamic on Earth and, as such, are particularly susceptible to failure and frictional processes. In rocks, damage accumulation is frequently accompanied by the release of seismic energy, which has been shown to accelerate in the approach to failure on both a field and laboratory scale. The point at which failure occurs is highly dependent upon strain-rate, which also dictates the slip-zone properties that pertain beyond failure, in scenarios such as sector collapse and pyroclastic flows as well as the ascent of viscous magma. High-velocity rotary shear (HVR) experiments have provided new opportunities to overcome the grand challenge of understanding faulting processes during volcanic phenomena. Work on granular ash material demonstrates that at ambient temperatures, ash gouge behaves according to Byerlee's rule at low slip velocities, but is slip-weakening, becoming increasingly lubricating as slip ensues. In absence of ash along a slip plane, rock-rock friction induces cataclasis and heating which, if sufficient, may induce melting (producing pseudotachylyte) and importantly, vesiculation. The viscosity of the melt, so generated, controls the subsequent lubrication or resistance to slip along the fault plane thanks to non-Newtonian suspension rheology. The shear-thinning behaviour and viscoelasticity of frictional melts yield a tendency for extremely unstable slip, and occurrence of frictional melt fragmentation. This velocity-dependence acts as an important feedback mechanism on the slip plane, in addition to the bulk composition, mineralogy and glass content of the magma, that all influence frictional behaviour. During sector collapse events and in pyroclastic density currents it is the frictional properties of the rocks and ash that, in-part, control the run-out distance and associated risk. In addition, friction plays an important role in the eruption of viscous magmas: In the conduit, the rheology of magma is integral

  6. Road Friction Estimation under Complicated Maneuver Conditions for Active Yaw Control

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Liang; LI Hongzhi; SONG Jian; YANG Cai; WU Hao

    2009-01-01

    Road friction coefficient is a key factor for the stability control of the vehicle dynamics in the critical conditions. Obviously the vehicle dynamics stability control systems, including the anti-lock brake system(ABS), the traction control system(TCS), and the active yaw control(AYC) system, need the accurate tire and road friction information. However, the simplified method based on the linear tire and vehicle model could not obtain the accurate road friction coefficient for the complicated maneuver of the vehicle. Because the active braking control mode of AYC is different from that of ABS, the road friction coefficient cannot be estimated only with the dynamics states of the tire. With the related dynamics states measured by the sensors of AYC, a comprehensive strategy of the road friction estimation for the active yaw control is brought forward with the sensor fusion technique. Firstly, the variations of the dynamics characteristics of vehicle and tire, and the stability control mode in the steering process are considered, and then the proper road friction estimation methods are brought forward according to the vehicle maneuver process. In the steering maneuver without braking, the comprehensive road friction from the four wheels may be estimated based on the multi-sensor signal fusion method. The estimated values of the road friction reflect the road friction characteristic. When the active brake involved, the road friction coefficient of the braked wheel may be estimated based on the brake pressure and tire forces, the estimated values reflect the road friction between the braked wheel and the road. So the optimal control of the wheel slip rate may be obtained according to the road friction coefficient. The methods proposed in the paper are integrated into the real time controller of AYC, which is matched onto the test vehicle. The ground tests validate the accuracy of the proposed method under the complicated maneuver conditions.

  7. Reflections on Friction in Quantum Mechanics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yair Rezek

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Distinctly quantum friction effects of three types are surveyed: internalfriction, measurement-induced friction, and quantum-fluctuation-induced friction. We demonstrate that external driving will lead to quantum internal friction, and critique the measurement-based interpretation of friction. We conclude that in general systems will experience internal and external quantum friction over and beyond the classical frictional contributions.

  8. Numerical simulation of heat transfer and friction in non-uniform wall roughness lattice with different roughness element shapes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • The non-uniform wall roughness lattices with different roughness element shapes are studied. • The maximum heat transfer enhancement increases about 2.6–6 times. • The friction loss increases 4.5–10 times in the same lattice. • The non-uniform wall roughness lattice with the hemisphere particle roughness is recommended. - Abstract: The heat transfer and friction characteristics in non-uniform wall roughness lattice are simulated using unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier–Stokes (URANS) method with the Reynolds stress model (RSM). The influences of four different roughness element shapes on the performance of new lattice are researched. It is revealed that the quasi-periodic large scale vortex structure (QPLSVS) is enhanced after the roughness elements are introduced. In the range of Re studied in this work (5000 < Re < 85,000), the lattice with the square rib roughness has the maximum friction factors and heat transfer coefficients. The order of heat transfer enhancement in the new lattice is about 2.6–6 times larger than that in the traditional lattice. However, the increase of the friction loss in the new lattice is 4.5–10 times larger than that in the traditional lattice. Considering the effects of flow resistance and heat transfer, a new non-uniform wall roughness lattice with the hemisphere particle roughness is recommended

  9. Surface modification of Monel K-500 as a means of reducing friction and wear in high-pressure oxygen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunaji, Mohan; Stoltzfus, Joel M.; Schoenman, Leonard; Kazaroff, John

    1989-01-01

    A study is conducted of the tribological characteristics of Monel K-500 during rubbing in a high pressure oxygen atmosphere, upon surface treatment by ion-implanted oxygen, chromium, lead, and silver, as well as electrolyzed chromium and an electroless nickel/SiC composite. The electrolyzed chromium dramatically increased total sample wear, while other surface treatments affected sample wear only moderately. Although the ion-implant treatments reduced the average coefficient of friction at low contact pressure, higher contact pressures eliminated this improvement.

  10. Study of relationship between performance of emulsion and friction coefficient and its practical model in cold tandem mill%乳化液性能对摩擦系数影响机理及工程实用模型的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    白振华; 陈浩; 王瑞; 高明磊; 崔亚亚; 吴首民

    2014-01-01

    以往现场对冷连轧过程中摩擦系数的研究主要偏重于带钢特性、轧制工艺以及工艺润滑制度,乳化液的 pH 值、铁粉含量、皂化值等性能参数对摩擦系数的影响以定性研究为主且不能定量分析,本文以某冷轧薄板厂1220五机架冷连轧机组为研究对象,在大量的现场实验与理论研究的基础上,充分结合冷连轧机组的设备与工艺特点,定量研究了乳化液性能对摩擦系数的影响,建立了相应的工程实用模型,并将其应用到生产实践,使得轧制压力的预报精度控制在15%以内。%In the past, the research on friction coefficient in the process of cold tandem rolling mainly focused on strip steel character, rolling technology and technological lubrication system to pH value of emulsion, iron powder content, saponification value and other performance parameters, which have been mainly studied qualitative but not quantitatively. Taking the 1220 five-rack cold tandem mills of some cold sheet rolling plant as example, after a large number of field experiments and theoretical studies, fully integrated with equipment and process features of cold tandem mills, the influence mechanic of emulsion performance on fiction coefficient are studied quantitatively and an practical engineering model is established. What's more, the model is applied to pro-duction and the forecasting accuracy of rolling force is controlled within 15%.

  11. A study on the frictional response of reptilian shed skin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deterministic surfaces are constructs of which profile, topography and textures are integral to the function of the system they enclose. They are designed to yield a predetermined tribological response. Developing such entities relies on controlling the structure of the rubbing interface so that, not only the surface is of optimized topography, but also is able to self-adjust its tribological behaviour according to the evolution of sliding conditions. In seeking inspirations for such designs, many engineers are turning toward the biological world to study the construction and behaviour of bio-analogues, and to probe the role surface topography assumes in conditioning of frictional response. That is how a bio-analogue can self-adjust its tribological response to adapt to habitat constraints. From a tribological point of view, Squamate Reptiles, offer diverse examples where surface texturing, submicron and nano-scale features, achieves frictional regulation. In this paper, we study the frictional response of shed skin obtained from a snake (Python regius). The study employed a specially designed tribo-acoustic probe capable of measuring the coefficient of friction and detecting the acoustical behavior of the skin in vivo. The results confirm the anisotropy of the frictional response of snakes. The coefficient of friction depends on the direction of sliding: the value in forward motion is lower than that in the backward direction. Diagonal and side winding motion induces a different value of the friction coefficient. We discuss the origin of such a phenomenon in relation to surface texturing and study the energy constraints, implied by anisotropic friction, on the motion of the reptile.

  12. Characterization and friction performance of Zn/Mg/Al-CO{sub 3} layered double hydroxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Shuo; Bai, Zhimin, E-mail: zhimibai@cugb.edu.cn; Zhao, Dong

    2013-11-01

    Zn/Mg/Al-CO{sub 3} layered double hydroxides (LDHs) were synthesized by coprecipitation method and the products were surface modified by oleic acid. The materials were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, wavelength dispersive X-ray fluorescence, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, thermogravimetry and differential scanning calorimetry. The tribological property of LDHs in base oil was studied by using a four-ball friction test machine. The results showed that Zn/Mg/Al-CO{sub 3}{sup 2−}-LDHs had high crystallinity and hexagonal lamellar structure with average disk diameter of about 150 nm and the chemical formula was Zn{sub 0.40}Mg{sub 0.28}Al{sub 0.32}(OH){sub 2}(CO{sub 3}){sub 0.16}·0.28H{sub 2}O. The interaction between LDHs and oleic acid molecules was based on chemisorption with a monomolecular layer on the surface of laminate. The friction test results indicated that base oil with 0.5 wt% LDHs performed optimal antifriction property and the friction coefficient and wear scar diameter reduced by 68.6% and 24.6% respectively.

  13. Finger pad friction and its role in grip and touch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Michael J.; Johnson, Simon A.; Lefèvre, Philippe; Lévesque, Vincent; Hayward, Vincent; André, Thibaut; Thonnard, Jean-Louis

    2013-01-01

    Many aspects of both grip function and tactile perception depend on complex frictional interactions occurring in the contact zone of the finger pad, which is the subject of the current review. While it is well established that friction plays a crucial role in grip function, its exact contribution for discriminatory touch involving the sliding of a finger pad is more elusive. For texture discrimination, it is clear that vibrotaction plays an important role in the discriminatory mechanisms. Among other factors, friction impacts the nature of the vibrations generated by the relative movement of the fingertip skin against a probed object. Friction also has a major influence on the perceived tactile pleasantness of a surface. The contact mechanics of a finger pad is governed by the fingerprint ridges and the sweat that is exuded from pores located on these ridges. Counterintuitively, the coefficient of friction can increase by an order of magnitude in a period of tens of seconds when in contact with an impermeably smooth surface, such as glass. In contrast, the value will decrease for a porous surface, such as paper. The increase in friction is attributed to an occlusion mechanism and can be described by first-order kinetics. Surprisingly, the sensitivity of the coefficient of friction to the normal load and sliding velocity is comparatively of second order, yet these dependencies provide the main basis of theoretical models which, to-date, largely ignore the time evolution of the frictional dynamics. One well-known effect on taction is the possibility of inducing stick–slip if the friction decreases with increasing sliding velocity. Moreover, the initial slip of a finger pad occurs by the propagation of an annulus of failure from the perimeter of the contact zone and this phenomenon could be important in tactile perception and grip function. PMID:23256185

  14. Friction and Wear Behavior of GCr15 Under Multiple Movement Condition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Friction and wear of GCr15 under cross-sliding condition is tested on a ball-on-disc wear test machine. This result shows that the cross-sliding of friction pair leads to different friction and wear behavior. For the condition described in this paper, the friction coefficients with ball reciprocating are smaller than that without ball reciprocating. The friction coefficients increase with the increase of reciprocating frequency.. The wear weight loss of the ball subjected reciprocating sliding decreases, however, the wear weight loss of disc against the reciprocating ball increases. In cross-sliding friction, the worn surfaces of the ball show crinkle appearance along the circumferential sliding traces. Delaminating of small strip debris is formed along the plowing traces on the disc worn surface. The plowing furrow on the disc surfaces looks deeper and wider than that without reciprocating sliding. The size of wear particles from cross-sliding wear is larger than those without reciprocating sliding.

  15. Friction between footwear and floor covered with solid particles under dry and wet conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kai Way; Meng, Fanxing; Zhang, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Solid particles on the floor, both dry and wet, are common but their effects on the friction on the floor were seldom discussed in the literature. In this study, friction measurements were conducted to test the effects of particle size of solid contaminants on the friction coefficient on the floor under footwear, floor, and surface conditions. The results supported the hypothesis that particle size of solids affected the friction coefficient and the effects depended on footwear, floor, and surface conditions. On dry surfaces, solid particles resulted in friction loss when the Neolite footwear pad was used. On the other hand, solid particles provided additional friction when measured with the ethylene vinyl acetate (EVA) footwear pad. On wet surfaces, introducing solid particles made the floors more slip-resistant and such effects depended on particle size. This study provides information for better understanding of the mechanism of slipping when solid contaminants are present. PMID:24629869

  16. Effects of Stone-Wales and vacancy defects in atomic-scale friction on defective graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Xiao-Yu [Department of Engineering Mechanics, School of Civil Engineering, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Key Laboratory of Hubei Province for Water Jet Theory and New Technology, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Wu, RunNi; Xia, Re [Key Laboratory of Hubei Province for Water Jet Theory and New Technology, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Chu, Xi-Hua; Xu, Yuan-Jie, E-mail: yj-xu@whu.edu.cn [Department of Engineering Mechanics, School of Civil Engineering, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China)

    2014-05-05

    Graphite is an excellent solid lubricant for surface coating, but its performance is significantly weakened by the vacancy or Stone-Wales (SW) defect. This study uses molecular dynamics simulations to explore the frictional behavior of a diamond tip sliding over a graphite which contains a single defect or stacked defects. Our results suggest that the friction on defective graphite shows a strong dependence on defect location and type. The 5-7-7-5 structure of SW defect results in an effectively negative slope of friction. For defective graphite containing a defect in the surface, adding a single vacancy in the interior layer will decrease the friction coefficients, while setting a SW defect in the interior layer may increase the friction coefficients. Our obtained results may provide useful information for understanding the atomic-scale friction properties of defective graphite.

  17. Interfacial Friction and Adhesion of Polymer Brushes

    KAUST Repository

    Landherr, Lucas J. T.

    2011-08-02

    A bead-probe lateral force microscopy (LFM) technique is used to characterize the interfacial friction and adhesion properties of polymer brushes. Our measurements attempt to relate the physical structure and chemical characteristics of the brush to their properties as thin-film, tethered lubricants. Brushes are synthesized at several chain lengths and surface coverages from polymer chains of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), polystyrene (PS), and a poly(propylene glycol)-poly(ethylene glycol) block copolymer (PPG/PEG). At high surface coverage, PDMS brushes manifest friction coefficients (COFs) that are among the lowest recorded for a dry lubricant film (μ ≈ 0.0024) and close to 1 order of magnitude lower than the COF of a bare silicon surface. Brushes synthesized from higher molar mass chains exhibit higher friction forces than those created using lower molar mass polymers. Increased grafting density of chains in the brush significantly reduces the COF by creating a uniform surface of stretched chains with a decreased surface viscosity. Brushes with lower surface tension and interfacial shear stresses manifest the lowest COF. In particular, PDMS chains exhibit COFs lower than PS by a factor of 3.7 and lower than PPG/PEG by a factor of 4.7. A scaling analysis conducted on the surface coverage (δ) in relation to the fraction (ε) of the friction force developing from adhesion predicts a universal relation ε ∼ δ4/3, which is supported by our experimental data. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  18. Effect of Polishing on the Friction Behaviors and Cutting Performance of Boron-Doped Diamond Films on WC-Co Inserts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liang; Shen, Bin; Sun, Fanghong; Zhang, Zhiming

    2014-04-01

    Boron doped (B-doped) diamond films are deposited onto WC-Co inserts by HFCVD with the mixture of acetone, trimethyl borate (C3H9BO3) and H2. The as-deposited B-doped diamond films are characterized with scanning electron microscope (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, 3D surface topography based on white-light interferometry and Rockwell hardness tester. The effects of mechanical polishing on the friction behavior and cutting performance of B-doped diamond are evaluated by ball-on-plate type reciprocating tribometer and turning of aluminum alloy 7075 materials, respectively. For comparison, the same tests are also conducted for the bare WC-Co inserts with smooth surface. Friction tests suggest that the unpolished and polished B-doped diamond films possess relatively low fluctuation of friction coefficient than as-received bare WC-Co samples. The average stable friction coefficient for B-doped diamond films decreases apparently after mechanical polishing. The values for WC-Co sample, unpolished and polished B-doped diamond films are approximately 0.38, 0.25 and 0.11, respectively. The cutting results demonstrate that the low friction coefficient and high adhesive strength of B-doped diamond films play an essential role in the cutting performance enhancement of the WC-Co inserts. However, the mechanical polishing process may lower the adhesive strength of B-doped diamond films. Consequently, the polished B-doped diamond coated inserts show premature wear in the machining of adhesive aluminum alloy materials.

  19. High fidelity frictional models for MEMS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carpick, Robert W. (University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI); Reedy, Earl David, Jr.; Bitsie, Fernando; de Boer, Maarten Pieter; Corwin, Alex David; Ashurst, William Robert (Auburn University, Auburn, AL); Jones, Reese E.; Subhash, Ghatu S. (Michigan Technological Institute, Houghton, MI); Street, Mark D. (University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI); Sumali, Anton Hartono; Antoun, Bonnie R.; Starr, Michael James; Redmond, James Michael; Flater, Erin E. (University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI)

    2004-10-01

    The primary goals of the present study are to: (1) determine how and why MEMS-scale friction differs from friction on the macro-scale, and (2) to begin to develop a capability to perform finite element simulations of MEMS materials and components that accurately predicts response in the presence of adhesion and friction. Regarding the first goal, a newly developed nanotractor actuator was used to measure friction between molecular monolayer-coated, polysilicon surfaces. Amontons law does indeed apply over a wide range of forces. However, at low loads, which are of relevance to MEMS, there is an important adhesive contribution to the normal load that cannot be neglected. More importantly, we found that at short sliding distances, the concept of a coefficient of friction is not relevant; rather, one must invoke the notion of 'pre-sliding tangential deflections' (PSTD). Results of a simple 2-D model suggests that PSTD is a cascade of small-scale slips with a roughly constant number of contacts equilibrating the applied normal load. Regarding the second goal, an Adhesion Model and a Junction Model have been implemented in PRESTO, Sandia's transient dynamics, finite element code to enable asperity-level simulations. The Junction Model includes a tangential shear traction that opposes the relative tangential motion of contacting surfaces. An atomic force microscope (AFM)-based method was used to measure nano-scale, single asperity friction forces as a function of normal force. This data is used to determine Junction Model parameters. An illustrative simulation demonstrates the use of the Junction Model in conjunction with a mesh generated directly from an atomic force microscope (AFM) image to directly predict frictional response of a sliding asperity. Also with regards to the second goal, grid-level, homogenized models were studied. One would like to perform a finite element analysis of a MEMS component assuming nominally flat surfaces and to include the

  20. Research on friction law in deep drawing process of rectangular parts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Friction law is researched in rectangular parts deep drawing using simulation test ma-chine that is used to assess lubricants performance in deep drawing process. Friction coefficientsin different positions on die surface in deep drawing process are measured through probe sensors.Friction coefficients of flange corner, near straight border and far straight border are verified anddescribed quantitatively. It plays an important role in using appropriate lubricants in auto-bodypanel deep drawing process.

  1. On the Formation of Low-Friction Tribofilms in Me-DLC – Steel Sliding Contacts

    OpenAIRE

    Stavlid, Nils

    2006-01-01

    The present thesis thoroughly treats a special friction reduction phenomenon that may appear in boundary lubricated tribological contacts, of the type encountered in numerous mechanical components made of steel. The phenomenon involves the formation of a special type of tribofilm that offers very low coefficients of friction. Typically the friction level becomes halved when the film is formed, compared to when it is not formed. Since boundary lubricated mechanical components are so common in ...

  2. Friction Wear Property of Brake Materials by Copper-based Powder Metallurgy With Various Brake Speeds

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Jian-xiu; GAO Hong-xia; WEI Xiu-lan

    2004-01-01

    The experiment is conducted on MM-1000 friction test machine, which tests friction wear property of copper-based brake materials by powder metallurgy at different brake speeds. It shows that the coefficient of friction and wear volume are greatly influenced by brake speed. When the brake speed is 4000 r/min, which is a bit higher, the material still has a higher coefficient of friction with 0.47. When the brake speed is over 4000r/min, the coefficient of friction decreased rapidly. When the brake speed is 3000r/min, the material's wear is in its minimum. That is to say no matter how higher or lower the brake speed is the wear volume is bigger relatively. With the brake speed of the lower one it mainly refers to fatigue wear; while of higher one it mainly refers to abradant and oxidation wear.

  3. Friction between incommensurate crystals

    OpenAIRE

    Friedel, Jacques; De Gennes, Pierre-Gilles

    2006-01-01

    Abstract We present an overview of friction processes expected between two ideal crystals of strong layers (graphite, MoS?u...) when one crystal is rotated with respect to the other by a certain angle Ye. We assume perfect conditions: no impurities; no preexisting dislocations in the bulk of the crystals; slow gliding velocities. Two regimes show up: a) weak coupling when Ye>U?u/U_{L}, where U?u (U_{L}) are typical intra (inter) layer interactions. Here we expect weak friction, con...

  4. Nanoscale Friction of Ice

    OpenAIRE

    Samadashvili, Nino

    2013-01-01

    Friction between macroscopic surfaces sliding relative to each other has been long investigated, nevertheless it still remains one of the most complex and least understood processes in nature. In connection with the success in both experimental and theoretical fields, through the development of nanotribology offering the possibility of understanding atomic-level origins of friction, the subject continues to be re-examined. In this work we use molecular dynamics simulations to study fricti...

  5. Calculating frictional force with considering material microstructure and potential on contact surfaces

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Zhongming; HUANG Ping

    2007-01-01

    A method based on the energy dissipation mechanism of an Independent Oscillator model is used to calculate the frictional force and the friction coefficient of interfacial friction. The friction work is calculated with considering the potential change of contact surfaces during sliding. The potential change can be gained by a universal adhesive energy function. The relationships between frictional force and parameters of a tribo-system, such as surface energy and microstructure of interfacial material, are set up. The calculation results of the known experimental data denote that the frictional force is nearly proportional to the surface energy of the material, nearly inversely proportional to the scaling length, and independent of the lattice constant. The results agree with that of adhesion friction equations. They also agree with the experimental results performed with an atomic-force microscope under the ultra high vacuum condition.

  6. Friction and wear properties of Ti6Al4V/WC-Co in cold atmospheric plasma jet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Cold plasma jet can effectively reduce the friction coefficients of Ti6Al4V/WC-Co friction pairs. ► Cold plasma jet can easily form nitrides on the surface of Ti6Al4V and on new surfaces generated by tool wear. ► The nitrides can reduce the friction coefficients and protect the friction surface. - Abstract: The friction and wear properties of Ti6Al4V/WC-Co friction pair were studied using an autonomous atmospheric pressure bare electrode cold plasma jet generating device and block-on-ring friction/wear tester, respectively. The study was conducted under air, air jet, nitrogen jet, air cold plasma jet, and nitrogen cold plasma jet atmospheres. Both nitrogen cold and air cold plasma jets effectively reduced the friction coefficients of the friction pairs and decreased friction temperature. The friction coefficient in the nitrogen cold plasma jet decreased to almost 60% compared with that in the air. The scanning electron microscope, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscope, and X-ray diffraction analyses illustrated that adhesive wear was relieved and the friction surfaces of Ti6Al4V were smoother, both in the nitrogen cold and air cold plasma jets. The roughness value Ra of the Ti6Al4V friction surfaces can reach 1.107 μm. A large number of nitrogen particles in the ionic and excited states contained by cold plasma jets reacts easily on the friction surface to produce a large amount of nitrides, which can excellently reduce the wear of Ti6Al4V/WC-Co friction pairs in real-time.

  7. Friction and wear of human hair fibres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, James; Johnson, Simon A.; Avery, Andrew R.; Adams, Michael J.

    2016-06-01

    An experimental study of the tribological properties of hair fibres is reported, and the effect of surface treatment on the evolution of friction and wear during sliding. Specifically, orthogonally crossed fibre/fibre contacts under a compressive normal load over a series of 10 000 cycle studies are investigated. Reciprocating sliding at a velocity of 0.4 mm s‑1, over a track length of 0.8 mm, was performed at 18 °C and 40%–50% relative humidity. Hair fibres retaining their natural sebum were studied, as well as those stripped of their sebum via hexane cleaning, and hair fibres conditioned using a commercially available product. Surface topography modifications resulting from wear were imaged using scanning electron microscopy and quantified using white light interferometry. Hair fibres that presented sebum or conditioned product at the fibre/fibre junction exhibited initial coefficients of friction at least 25% lower than those that were cleaned with hexane. Coefficients of friction were observed to depend on the directionality of sliding for hexane cleaned hair fibres after sufficient wear cycles that cuticle lifting was present, typically on the order 1000 cycles. Cuticle flattening was observed for fibre/fibre junctions exposed to 10 mN compressive normal loads, whereas loads of 100 mN introduced substantial cuticle wear and fibre damage.

  8. Friction and wear of human hair fibres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, James; Johnson, Simon A.; Avery, Andrew R.; Adams, Michael J.

    2016-06-01

    An experimental study of the tribological properties of hair fibres is reported, and the effect of surface treatment on the evolution of friction and wear during sliding. Specifically, orthogonally crossed fibre/fibre contacts under a compressive normal load over a series of 10 000 cycle studies are investigated. Reciprocating sliding at a velocity of 0.4 mm s-1, over a track length of 0.8 mm, was performed at 18 °C and 40%-50% relative humidity. Hair fibres retaining their natural sebum were studied, as well as those stripped of their sebum via hexane cleaning, and hair fibres conditioned using a commercially available product. Surface topography modifications resulting from wear were imaged using scanning electron microscopy and quantified using white light interferometry. Hair fibres that presented sebum or conditioned product at the fibre/fibre junction exhibited initial coefficients of friction at least 25% lower than those that were cleaned with hexane. Coefficients of friction were observed to depend on the directionality of sliding for hexane cleaned hair fibres after sufficient wear cycles that cuticle lifting was present, typically on the order 1000 cycles. Cuticle flattening was observed for fibre/fibre junctions exposed to 10 mN compressive normal loads, whereas loads of 100 mN introduced substantial cuticle wear and fibre damage.

  9. Labour market frictions and migration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cremers, Jan

    2016-01-01

    The 4th contribution to the series INT-AR papers is dedicated to the methods of assessing labour market frictions. The paper provides a (brief) international comparison of the role of labour migration in solving these frictions.

  10. Biomechanics of iliotibial band friction syndrome in runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orchard, J W; Fricker, P A; Abud, A T; Mason, B R

    1996-01-01

    We propose a biomechanical model to explain the pathogenesis of iliotibial band friction syndrome in distance runners. The model is based on a kinematic study of nine runners with iliotibial band friction syndrome, a cadaveric study of 11 normal knees, and a literature review. Friction (or impingement) occurs near footstrike, predominantly in the foot contact phase, between the posterior edge of the iliotibial band and the underlying lateral femoral epicondyle. The study subjects had an average knee flexion angle of 21.4 degrees +/- 4.3 degrees at footstrike, with friction occurring at, or slightly below, the 30 degrees of flexion traditionally described in the literature. In the cadavers we examined, there was substantial variation in the width of the iliotibial bands. This variation may affect individual predisposition to iliotibial band friction syndrome. Downhill running predisposes the runner to iliotibial band friction syndrome because the knee flexion angle at footstrike is reduced. Sprinting and faster running on level ground are less likely to cause or aggravate iliotibial band friction syndrome because, at footstrike, the knee is flexed beyond the angles at which friction occurs.

  11. What causes frictional behavior in fluid-mediated sediment transport?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pähtz, Thomas; Duran, Orencio

    2016-04-01

    Bagnoldian analytical models of sediment transport in Newtonian fluid (e.g., air or water) are based on Bagnold's assumption of a constant friction coefficient (particle-shear-pressure ratio, μ) at the interface (z = zb) between sediment bed and transport layer. In fact, this assumption is the main reason why these models predict the sediment load (which is the ratio between sediment transport rate and average particle velocity) to be proportional to the excess shear stress (τ ‑ τt), a scaling that has been confirmed in many wind-tunnel and flume experiments. Here, using numerical simulations with the coupled DEM/RANS model of sediment transport in Newtonian fluid by Duran et al. (POF, 103306, 2012), we investigate the physical reasons for this frictional behavior. In the case of subaqueous transport, we find that a local rheology μ(I), where I is the viscous number, can explain most of the simulation data. However, this rheology breaks down for aeolian transport. In an attempt to unify these transport regimes, we propose a novel characterization of frictional behavior through the dimensionless parameter ζ = ⟨Fxcvx ‑ Fzcvz⟩/⟨Fzcvx ‑ Fxcvz⟩, where Fc is the contact force, v the particle velocity, and ⟨ṡ⟩ a local ensemble average. We analytically derive ζ ≈√3 ‑ 1 for locations within the transport layer and slightly within the particle bed, where each derivation step and the final result are consistent with our numerical simulations throughout all simulated conditions. Our derivation is mainly based on the assumption that the conversion of horizontal kinetic particle energy into vertical kinetic particle energy in low-angle particle-bed impacts is the predominant collisional energy transformation process occurring in sediment transport. We then show that ζ(zs) ≈ μ(zs), where zs is the location at which the local production rate of particle fluctuation energy is maximal, and thus μ(zs) ≈√3- ‑ 1. This final result, which

  12. Nonlinear Dynamics of Dry Friction

    OpenAIRE

    Elmer, Franz-Josef

    1997-01-01

    The dynamical behavior caused by dry friction is studied for a spring-block system pulled with constant velocity over a surface. The dynamical consequences of a general type of phenomenological friction law (stick-time dependent static friction, velocity dependent kinetic friction) are investigated. Three types of motion are possible: Stick-slip motion, continuous sliding, and oscillations without sticking events. A rather complete discussion of local and global bifurcation scenarios of these...

  13. Friction testing of thermoplastic composites

    OpenAIRE

    Sachs, Ulrich; Haanappel, Sebastiaan; Rietman, Bert; Akkerman, Remko

    2011-01-01

    Friction phenomena play a major role in thermoplastic composite forming processes. In order to make use of the large potential these materials have, accurate CAE tools are needed that as a consequence incorporate temperature, pressure and velocity dependent friction behavior. To obtain a sound understanding of friction behavior a large number of friction measurement set-ups have been described in literature. A benchmark to compare different testing methods was proposed during the Esaform2010 ...

  14. Friction between Ring Polymer Brushes

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Friction between ring-polymer brushes at melt densities sliding past each other are studied using extensive course-grained molecular dynamics simulations and scaling arguments, and the results are compared to the friction between linear-polymer brushes. We show that for a velocity range spanning over three decades, the frictional forces measured for ring-polymer brushes are half the corresponding friction in case of linear brushes. In the linear-force regime, the weak inter-digitation of two ...

  15. Jamming, Friction and Unsteady Rheology

    OpenAIRE

    Robbins, Mark O.

    1999-01-01

    The connection between friction and jamming in granular media, molecular glasses, and complex fluids is explored. The paper first reviews the way friction is measured, the types of results that are observed, and what is known about the geometry of contacts between macroscopic surfaces. Then simple models for the origin of static friction are described. These are unable to explain the universal observation of static friction between macroscopic objects. The effects of surface roughness and che...

  16. Nanoparticle friction and contact ageing

    OpenAIRE

    Feldmann, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The phenomenon of friction permeates the vast majority of mechanical systems, but despite its ubiquity, the basic mechanisms leading to friction are currently not very well understood. Instead, the characterization of friction is mostly limited to phenomenological descriptions. A promising way to improve on the comprehension of friction on a fundamental level is guided by the fact that macroscopic contacts in general can be broken down into many smaller sub-contacts. It thus is imperative...

  17. Friction and Wear of Carbonate Rocks Under High Velocity Sliding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boneh, Y.; Sagy, A.; Reches, Z.

    2012-12-01

    We experimentally investigated the relations between friction and wear-rate during steady-state, high-velocity slip along carbonate faults. Our observations demonstrate a systematic reduction of both friction coefficient and wear-rate with increase of both slip-velocity and normal stress. The experiments were conducted with a rotary shear apparatus on solid, ring-shaped rock samples that slipped for displacements up to tens of meters, with continuous monitoring of stresses, wear and temperature. We performed 107 experiments on experimental faults made of Kasota dolomite, Dover limestone and a fault made of rock-pair Kasota dolomite and Blue quartzite. The friction/wear analysis is focused on the steady-state stage under slip velocity range of 0.002 to 0.96 m/s, and normal stress from 0.25 to 6.9 MPa. The experiments reveal a combined effect of slip-velocity and normal stress on the wear-rate. Under relatively low velocities (V wear-rate is proportional to the normal stress, in agreement with Archard (1953) model. On the other hand, in the higher velocity range of V ~ 0.5 - 1 m/s, the wear-rate is not proportional to the normal stress and it reduces with increasing slip-velocity. Further, the velocity effect on the wear-rate becomes stronger with increasing normal stress approaching negligible wear production. The experiments indicate that the steady-state frictional strength of these carbonate samples is best correlated with the power-density (= shear stress * slip-velocity, MW/m2). The observed friction/power-density relation show three regimes: (1) high (μ ~ 0.9), quasi-constant friction coefficient under low power-density of 0.4 MW/m2; and (3) transition zone of friction coefficient dropping from ~ 0.9 to ~ 0.3 for intermediated power density ranging 0.05 - 0.4 MW/m2. During experiments with high power-density, the carbonate fault surface underwent thermal decomposition of the carbonate (Han et al., 2007; Green et al., 2010) that generate a smooth, shiny

  18. Functional ceramics for reducing friction in metal-metal system of tribopairs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper reports the preliminary results of laboratory-industrial tests of active ceramic additives (ACAs) to lubricant in metal-metal friction pairs in order to elucidate the extent of the decrease in the friction coefficient and the restoration of electromechanical equipment, as well as the extension of its service life and energy saving. (author)

  19. Influence of various base oils on friction and power loss in gears; Einfluss verschiedener Grundoele auf Reibung und Verlustleistung in Zahnradgetrieben

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doleschel, A.; Michaelis, K.; Hoehn, B.R.

    2001-03-01

    The frictional behaviour of synthetic lubricants was systematically investigated in a twin disc test rig and a back-to-back gear test rig. For 22 lubricants (mineral oil, polyalfaolefin (PAO), polyglycol (PG), ester and mixtures) the coefficient of friction was measured in the twin disc test rig, dependant on pressure, oil temperature, rolling and sliding velocity. In the gear test rig pressure and velocity was varied for 9 lubricants. The mineral oil shows an estimated coefficient of friction of about {mu} >> 0.045, the synthetic lubricants have a lower coefficient of friction. In the twin disc test rig the lowest coefficient of friction with PG as low as 20% of the coefficient of mineral oil was measured, depending on the mixture of EO:PO. In the gear test rig such low coefficients of friction were not measured, but still values of 60% compared to mineral oil were obtained. Esters show in the twin disc test rig a coefficient of friction in the range of 30% to 100% of the coefficient of friction of mineral oil, in the gear test rig in the range of 60% to 100%. From these investigations a calculation method for the coefficient of friction in disc and gear contacts was derived. With these equations the power loss and efficiency of transmissions in practice, lubricated with synthetic gear oils can be evaluated. (orig.)

  20. Gravitomagnetic dynamical friction

    CERN Document Server

    Cashen, Benjamin; Kesden, Michael

    2016-01-01

    A supermassive black hole moving through a field of stars will gravitationally scatter the stars, inducing a backreaction force on the black hole known as dynamical friction. In Newtonian gravity, the axisymmetry of the system about the black hole's velocity $\\mathbf{v}$ implies that the dynamical friction must be anti-parallel to $\\mathbf{v}$. However, in general relativity the black hole's spin $\\mathbf{S}$ need not be parallel to $\\mathbf{v}$, breaking the axisymmetry of the system and generating a new component of dynamical friction similar to the Lorentz force $\\mathbf{F} = q\\mathbf{v} \\times \\mathbf{B}$ experienced by a particle with charge $q$ moving in a magnetic field $\\mathbf{B}$. We call this new force gravitomagnetic dynamical friction and calculate its magnitude for a spinning black hole moving through a field of stars with Maxwellian velocity dispersion $\\sigma$, assuming that both $v$ and $\\sigma$ are much less than the speed of light $c$. We use post-Newtonian equations of motion accurate to $...

  1. Intelligent Flow Friction Estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brkić, Dejan; Ćojbašić, Žarko

    2016-01-01

    Nowadays, the Colebrook equation is used as a mostly accepted relation for the calculation of fluid flow friction factor. However, the Colebrook equation is implicit with respect to the friction factor (λ). In the present study, a noniterative approach using Artificial Neural Network (ANN) was developed to calculate the friction factor. To configure the ANN model, the input parameters of the Reynolds Number (Re) and the relative roughness of pipe (ε/D) were transformed to logarithmic scales. The 90,000 sets of data were fed to the ANN model involving three layers: input, hidden, and output layers with, 2, 50, and 1 neurons, respectively. This configuration was capable of predicting the values of friction factor in the Colebrook equation for any given values of the Reynolds number (Re) and the relative roughness (ε/D) ranging between 5000 and 10(8) and between 10(-7) and 0.1, respectively. The proposed ANN demonstrates the relative error up to 0.07% which had the high accuracy compared with the vast majority of the precise explicit approximations of the Colebrook equation.

  2. Intelligent Flow Friction Estimation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dejan Brkić

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, the Colebrook equation is used as a mostly accepted relation for the calculation of fluid flow friction factor. However, the Colebrook equation is implicit with respect to the friction factor (λ. In the present study, a noniterative approach using Artificial Neural Network (ANN was developed to calculate the friction factor. To configure the ANN model, the input parameters of the Reynolds Number (Re and the relative roughness of pipe (ε/D were transformed to logarithmic scales. The 90,000 sets of data were fed to the ANN model involving three layers: input, hidden, and output layers with, 2, 50, and 1 neurons, respectively. This configuration was capable of predicting the values of friction factor in the Colebrook equation for any given values of the Reynolds number (Re and the relative roughness (ε/D ranging between 5000 and 108 and between 10−7 and 0.1, respectively. The proposed ANN demonstrates the relative error up to 0.07% which had the high accuracy compared with the vast majority of the precise explicit approximations of the Colebrook equation.

  3. Intelligent Flow Friction Estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brkić, Dejan; Ćojbašić, Žarko

    2016-01-01

    Nowadays, the Colebrook equation is used as a mostly accepted relation for the calculation of fluid flow friction factor. However, the Colebrook equation is implicit with respect to the friction factor (λ). In the present study, a noniterative approach using Artificial Neural Network (ANN) was developed to calculate the friction factor. To configure the ANN model, the input parameters of the Reynolds Number (Re) and the relative roughness of pipe (ε/D) were transformed to logarithmic scales. The 90,000 sets of data were fed to the ANN model involving three layers: input, hidden, and output layers with, 2, 50, and 1 neurons, respectively. This configuration was capable of predicting the values of friction factor in the Colebrook equation for any given values of the Reynolds number (Re) and the relative roughness (ε/D) ranging between 5000 and 10(8) and between 10(-7) and 0.1, respectively. The proposed ANN demonstrates the relative error up to 0.07% which had the high accuracy compared with the vast majority of the precise explicit approximations of the Colebrook equation. PMID:27127498

  4. Dry friction damping couple at high frequencies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Půst L.

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The contribution deals with the application of dry friction couples for noise and vibration damping at high frequency of several kHz what brings new problems connected with the small amplitudes of relative slipping motion of contact surfaces. The most important information from the experimental results is knowledge that the value of evaluated friction coefficient can have different physical sense according to the magnitude of excitation force and to the frequency of applied vibrations. If amplitudes of motion are very small, then the external harmonic force produces only elastic micro-deformations of contacting bodies, where no slip occurs and then the traction contact force is proportional only to elastic deformation of the sample.

  5. Network Theory, Cracking and Frictional Sliding

    CERN Document Server

    Ghaffari, H O

    2012-01-01

    We have developed different network approaches to complex patterns of frictional interfaces (contact areas developments). Here, we analyze the dynamics of static friction. We found, under the correlation measure, the fraction of triangles correlates with the detachment fronts. Also, for all types of the loops (such as triangles), there is a universal power law between nodes' degree and motifs where motifs frequency follow a power law. This shows high energy localization is characterized by fast variation of the loops fraction. Also, this proves that the congestion of loops occurs around hubs. Furthermore, the motif distributions and modularity space of networks -in terms of within-module degree and participation coefficient- show universal trends, indicating an in common aspect of energy flow in shear ruptures. Moreover, we confirmed that slow ruptures generally hold small localization, while regular ruptures carry a high level of energy localization. We proposed that assortativity, as an index to correlation...

  6. Automotive Friction Materials: from Experience to Science

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yafei Lu

    2000-01-01

    An optimizing friction material formulation technique based on Golden Section and Relational Grade Analysis was developed. Approach 2 of this technique was tested by using 7 ingredients including 2 fibers, 4 fillers and 1 binder as raw materials. By doing 19 formulations, an optimizing one (BU18)was obtained with stableμ and averageμ = 0.451 and wear = 3.46 wt %.

  7. Frictional action at lower limb/prosthetic socket interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, M; Turner-Smith, A R; Roberts, V C; Tanner, A

    1996-04-01

    The frictional action at stump/socket interface is discussed by a simplified model and finite element model analyses and clinical pressure measurements. The friction applied to the stump skin produces stresses within tissue and these stresses may damage the tissues and affect their normal functions. The combination of normal and shear stresses is considered to be a critical factor leading to amputee's discomfort and tissue damage. However, friction at the stump/socket interface has a beneficial action. A simplified residual limb model and a finite element model using real geometry have been developed to analyse the support action of friction. Both results show that the friction plays a critical role both in supporting the load of the amputee's body during the support phase of the gait cycle and in preventing the prosthesis from slipping off the limb during swing phase. Pressure at the below-knee socket during walking were measured with conditions of different friction. The results reveal that a larger pressures was produced at the lubricated interface than at the normal interface. A proper choice of coefficient of friction will balance the requirements of relief of load stress and reduction of slip with the general ability to support loads.

  8. Dependence of friction on roughness, velocity, and temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sang, Yi; Dubé, Martin; Grant, Martin

    2008-03-01

    We study the dependence of friction on surface roughness, sliding velocity, and temperature. Expanding on the classic treatment of Greenwood and Williamson, we show that the fractal nature of a surface has little influence on the real area of contact and the static friction coefficient. A simple scaling argument shows that the static friction exhibits a weak anomaly μ˜A0-χ/4 , where A0 is the apparent area and χ is the roughness exponent of the surface. We then develop a method to calculate atomic-scale friction between a microscopic asperity, such as the tip of a friction force microscope (FFM) and a solid substrate. This method, based on the thermal activation of the FFM tip, allows a quantitative extraction of all the relevant microscopic parameters and reveals a universal scaling behavior of atomic friction on velocity and temperature. This method is extended to include a soft atomic substrate in order to simulate FFM scans more realistically. The tip is connected with the support of the cantilever by an ideal spring and the substrate is simulated with a ball-spring model. The tip and substrate are coupled with repulsive potentials. Simulations are done at different temperatures and scanning velocities on substrates with different elastic moduli. Stick-slip motion of the tip is observed, and the numerical results of the friction force and distribution of force maxima match the theoretical framework.

  9. Friction and wear properties of diamonds and diamond coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The recent development of chemical vapor deposition techniques for diamond growth enables bearings to be designed which exploit diamond's low friction and extreme resistance to wear. However, currently produced diamond coatings differ from natural diamond surfaces in that they are polycrystalline and faceted, and often contain appreciable amounts of non-diamond material (i.e. graphitic or amorphous carbon). Roughness, in particular, influences the friction and wear properties; rough coatings severely abrade softer materials, and can even wear natural diamond sliders. Nevertheless, the best available coatings exhibit friction coefficients as low as those of natural diamond and are highly resistant to wear. This paper reviews the tribological properties of natural diamond, and compares them with those of chemical vapor deposited diamond coatings. Emphasis is placed on the roles played by roughness and material transfer in controlling frictional behavior. (orig.)

  10. Direct, Robust Technique for the Measurement of Friction between Microspheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Nicolas; Cayer-Barrioz, Juliette; Isa, Lucio; Spencer, Nicholas D

    2015-08-18

    Friction between microscopic objects controls many macroscopic phenomena. For instance, the friction between microasperities determines the tribology of rough surfaces in contact and in relative motion. Additionally, the friction between microparticles is responsible for many aspects of the rheological response of granular media, ranging from microscale contacts at the single-particle level to macroscopic flow properties of sheared, dry granular systems and non-Brownian suspensions. We propose a new, precise, and robust method, based on lateral force microscopy, to measure the coefficient of friction between microspheres quantitatively and without complex data processing. We have successfully applied this method to the contact between silica spheres in liquid with and without a polymer coating. PMID:26196157

  11. Friction Properties of Surface-Fluorinated Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wal, R. L. Vander; Miyoshi, K.; Street, K. W.; Tomasek, A. J.; Peng, H.; Liu, Y.; Margrave, J. L.; Khabashesku, V. N.

    2005-01-01

    Surface modification of the tubular or sphere-shaped carbon nanoparticles through chemical treatment, e.g., fluorination, is expected to significantly affect their friction properties. In this study, a direct fluorination of the graphene-built tubular (single-walled carbon nanotubes) structures has been carried out to obtain a series of fluorinated nanotubes (fluoronanotubes) with variable C(n)F (n =2-20) stoichiometries. The friction coefficients for fluoronanotubes, as well as pristine and chemically cut nanotubes, were found to reach values as low as 0.002-0.07, according to evaluation tests run in contact with sapphire in air of about 40% relative humidity on a ball-on-disk tribometer which provided an unidirectional sliding friction motion. These preliminary results demonstrate ultra-low friction properties and show a promise in applications of surface modified nanocarbons as a solid lubricant.

  12. Fault Wear and Friction Evolution: Experimental Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boneh, Y.; Chang, J. C.; Lockner, D. A.; Reches, Z.

    2011-12-01

    Wear is an inevitable product of frictional sliding of brittle rocks as evidenced by the ubiquitous occurrence of fault gouge and slickenside striations. We present here experimental observations designed to demonstrate the relationship between wear and friction and their governing mechanisms. The experiments were conducted with a rotary shear apparatus on solid, ring-shaped rock samples that slipped for displacements up to tens of meters. Stresses, wear and temperature were continuously monitored. We analyzed 86 experiments of Kasota dolomite, Sierra White granite, Pennsylvania quartzite, Karoo gabbro, and Tennessee sandstone at slip velocities ranging from 0.002 to 0.97 m/s, and normal stress from 0.25 to 6.9 MPa. We conducted two types of runs: short slip experiments (slip distance wear mechanisms; and long slip experiments (slip distance > 3 m) designed to achieve mature wear conditions and to observe the evolution of wear and friction as the fault surfaces evolved. The experiments reveal three wear stages: initial, running-in, and steady-state. The initial stage is characterized by (1) discrete damage striations, the length of which is comparable to total slip , and local pits or plow features; (2) timing and magnitude of fault-normal dilation corresponds to transient changes of normal and shear stresses; and (3) surface roughness increasing with the applied normal stress. We interpret these observations as wear mechanisms of (a) plowing into the fresh rock surfaces; (b) asperity breakage; and (c) asperity climb. The running-in stage is characterized by (1) intense wear-rate over a critical wear distance of Rd = 0.3-2 m; (2) drop of friction coefficient over a weakening distance of Dc = 0.2-4 m; (3) Rd and Dc display positive, quasi-linear relation with each other. We interpret these observations as indicating the organizing of newly-created wear particles into a 'three-body' structure that acts to lubricate the fault (Reches & Lockner, 2010). The steady

  13. PAMPS-PAAM凝胶的启动摩擦学性能%Start-up friction properties of PAMPS-PAAM hydrogel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    鲍磊; 张有忱

    2013-01-01

    目的 PAMPS-PAAM凝胶是应用前景较好的关节软骨替代物.前期试验表明,其压缩强度已达到关节软骨的平均压缩强度,但对其摩擦学性能的研究还较少.方法 本文选用2-丙烯酰胺-2-甲基丙磺酸(2-acrylamide-2-methylpro panesulfonic acid,AMPS)凝胶和丙烯酰胺(acrylamide,AAM)溶液制备PAMPS-PAAM互穿网络凝胶,在自制销-盘式摩擦试验机上通过PAMPS-PAAM凝胶与不锈钢试样的对磨,测试加载时间和滑行速率对材料的启动摩擦因数的影响.结果 影响PAMPS-PAAM互穿网络凝胶的启动摩擦因数的主要因素为加载时间,加载时间越长,启动摩擦因数越大.加载时间在15 min以内,启动摩擦因数随加载时间的增长急剧变化,加载时间超过15 min,启动摩擦因数的变化趋势变缓.滑行速率的变化与启动摩擦因数的大小无明显关联,且在不同的滑行速率下,启动摩擦因数的数值相差不大.结论 PAMPS-PAAM凝胶具有与软骨相近的启动摩擦性能.%Objective PAMPS-PAAM hydrogel is a substitute of articular cartilage with a good prospect of application.The compression strength of hydrogel reaches the average compression strength of articular cartilage in the former test.However,the research on the friction properties of hydrogel is in need.Methods This article adopts PAMPS-PAAM interpenetrating polymer network hydrogel which is made by AMPS hydrogel and AAM solution to launch the friction between PAMPS-PAAM hydrogel and stainless steel model with a home-made pin-plate testing machine.In the tests,the influence of loading duration and sliding velocity on the start-up friction properties are measured.Results The major factor that can influence the start-up friction coefficient of PAMPS-PAAM hydrogel is loading duration.The longer the loading duration is,the larger the start-up friction coefficient is.When the loading duration is within 15 mins,the start-up friction coefficient changes rapidly versus loading

  14. Study Friction Distribution during the Cold Rolling of Material by Matroll Software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdollahi, H.; Dehghani, K.

    2007-04-01

    Rolling process is one of the most important ways of metal forming. Since the results of this process are almost finished product, therefore controlling the parameters affecting this process is very important in order to have cold rolling products with high quality. Among the parameters knowing the coefficient of friction within the roll gap is known as the most significant one. That is because other rolling parameters such as rolling force, pressure in the roll gap, forward slip, surface quality of sheet, and the life of work rolls are directly influenced by friction. On the other hand, in rolling calculation due to lake of a true amount for coefficient of friction a supposed value is considered for it. In this study, a new software (Matroll), is introduced which can determine the coefficient of friction (COF) and plot the friction hills for an industrial mill. Besides, based on rolling equations, it offers about 30 rolling parameters as outputs. Having the rolling characteristics as inputs, the software is able to calculate the coefficient of friction. Many rolling passes were performed on real industrial aluminum mill. The coefficient of friction was obtained for all passes. The results are in good agreement with the findings of the other researchers.

  15. AFM friction and adhesion mapping of the substructures of human hair cuticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, James R., E-mail: james.smith@port.ac.uk [School of Pharmacy and Biomedical Sciences, University of Portsmouth, St Michael' s Building, White Swan Road, Portsmouth, PO1 2DT (United Kingdom); Tsibouklis, John; Nevell, Thomas G. [School of Pharmacy and Biomedical Sciences, University of Portsmouth, St Michael' s Building, White Swan Road, Portsmouth, PO1 2DT (United Kingdom); Breakspear, Steven [School of Pharmacy and Biomedical Sciences, University of Portsmouth, St Michael' s Building, White Swan Road, Portsmouth, PO1 2DT (United Kingdom); Global R and D–Hair Beauty Laboratory, Kao Corporation, 2-1-3, Bunka Sumida-ku, Tokyo, 131-8501 (Japan)

    2013-11-15

    Using atomic force microscopy, values of the microscale friction coefficient, the tip (silicon nitride) - surface adhesion force and the corresponding adhesion energy, for the substructures that constitute the surface of human hair (European brown hair) have been determined from Amonton plots. The values, mapped for comparison with surface topography, corresponded qualitatively with the substructures’ plane surface characteristics. Localised maps and values of the frictional coefficient, extracted avoiding scale edge effects, are likely to inform the formulation of hair-care products and treatments.

  16. Heat transfer and fluid friction in bundles of twisted tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzyubenko, B. V.; Dreitser, G. A.

    1986-06-01

    The results of heat-transfer and friction studies in bundles of twisted tubes and rods with spiral wire-wrap spacers are analyzed, and recommendations are given for calculating the heat-transfer coefficient in heat exchangers using twisted tubes.

  17. Contribution of velocity-vorticity correlations to the frictional drag in wall-bounded turbulent flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Min; Ahn, Junsun; Hwang, Jinyul; Sung, Hyung Jin

    2016-08-01

    The relationship between the frictional drag and the velocity-vorticity correlations in wall-bounded turbulent flows is derived from the mean vorticity equation. A formula for the skin friction coefficient is proposed and evaluated with regards to three canonical wall-bounded flows: turbulent boundary layer, turbulent channel flow, and turbulent pipe flow. The frictional drag encompasses four terms: advective vorticity transport, vortex stretching, viscous, and inhomogeneous terms. Drag-reduced channel flow with the slip condition is used to test the reliability of the formula. The advective vorticity transport and vortex stretching terms are found to dominate the contributions to the frictional drag.

  18. Parametric study of turbine blade platform friction damping using the lumped parameter analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominic, R. J.

    1984-01-01

    The hardware configuration used in the present study of turbine blade planform friction damping, by means of the lumped parameter analysis, is the first turbine stage of the Space Shuttle Main Engine's High Pressure Fuel Turbopump. The analysis procedure solves the nonlinear equations of motion for a turbine blade that is acted on by a platform friction damper, using an iterative matrix method. Attention is given to the effects on blade deflection response of variations in friction coefficient, the normal force on the friction surface interface, blade hysteretic damping, the blade-to-blade phase angle of the harmonic forcing function, and the amplitude of the forcing function.

  19. The effect of nuclear rotation on the collective transport coefficients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have examined the influence of rotation on the potential energy and the transport coefficients of the collective motion (friction and mass coefficients). For axially symmetric deformation of nucleus 224Th we found that at excitations corresponding to temperatures T≥1 MeV the shell correction to the liquid-drop energy practically does not depend on the angular rotation. The friction and mass coefficients obtained within the linear response theory for the same nucleus at temperatures larger than 2 MeV are rather stable with respect to rotation provided that the contributions from spurious states arising due to the violation of rotation symmetry are removed. At smaller excitations both friction and mass parameters corresponding to the elongation mode are growing functions of rotational frequency ωrot

  20. Neutron resonance averaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The principles of resonance averaging as applied to neutron capture reactions are described. Several illustrations of resonance averaging to problems of nuclear structure and the distribution of radiative strength in nuclei are provided. 30 refs., 12 figs

  1. Friction Generated Limit Cycles

    OpenAIRE

    Ohlsson, Henrik; Åström, Karl Johan

    2001-01-01

    This paper treats limit cycles caused by friction. The goal has been to explain phenomena that have been observed experimentally in mechatronic systems. Experiments have shown that oscillations of qualitatively different types can be obtained simply by changing controller specifications. Stiction is important in some cases but not in others. Necessary conditions for limit cycle are given for the case where stiction is important. Conditions for local stability of the limit cycles are also pres...

  2. Segregation by friction

    OpenAIRE

    Kondic, L.; Hartley, R. R.; Tennakoon, S. G. K.; Painter, B; Behringer, R. P.

    2002-01-01

    Granular materials are known to separate by size under a variety of circumstances. Experiments presented here and elucidated by modeling and MD simulation document a new segregation mechanism, namely segregation by friction. The experiments are carried out by placing steel spheres on a horizontal plane enclosed by rectangular sidewalls, and subjecting them to horizontal shaking. Half the spheres are highly smooth; the remainder are identical to the first half, except that their surfaces have ...

  3. PECULIARITIES OF DRY FRICTION

    OpenAIRE

    Каgаn Mikhail Lazarevich; Antonov Viktor Ivanovich; Belov Viktor Anatolevich

    2012-01-01

    Some peculiarities of dry friction that represent the outcomes of several well-known physical phenomena but that are insufficiently accurately and simply explained in the scientific literature, are analyzed in this paper. The authors research into the reasons for the oscillation of strings of bowed string instruments in furtherance of the laws of mechanics; they also explain differences in the sound produced by strings of bowed and plucked instruments; they study the reasons for t...

  4. Four great challenges confronting our understanding and modeling of sliding friction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blau, P.J.

    1997-08-01

    This paper addresses four challenges whose solutions may together enable significant progress in the predication and control of friction for energy conservation. Posed as questions these are: (1) how can materials with greatly different properties and compositions produce similar kinetic friction coefficients when tested under comparable conditions; (2) how is it possible that the kinetic friction coefficient for the same materials pair can differ greatly when it is slid in different tribosystems; (3) how can frictional phenomena at different size scales be reconciled; and (4) how can the effects of the machine, the materials (including lubricants) and the environment be successfully incorporated into quantitative and predictive friction models? Examples related to these four challenges are provided, as are possible approaches for attacking them in future research efforts.

  5. An atomistic investigation of the effect of strain on frictional properties of suspended graphene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qingshun Bai

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available We performed molecular dynamics (MD simulations of a diamond probe scanned on a suspended graphene to reveal the effect of strain on the frictional properties of suspended graphene. The graphene was subjected to some certain strain along the scanning direction. We compared the friction coefficient obtained from different normal loads and strain. The results show that the friction coefficient can be decreased about one order of magnitude with the increase of the strain. And that can be a result of the decreased asymmetry of the contact region which is caused by strain. The synthetic effect of potential energy and the fluctuation of contact region were found to be the main reason accounting for the fluctuation of the friction force. The strain can reduce the fluctuation of the contact region and improve the stability of friction.

  6. Electronic friction at the atomic scale: Conduction, electrostatic and magnetic effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krim, Jacqueline; Altfeder, Igor

    2013-03-01

    We have performed a magnetic probe microscopy study of levitation and atomic-scale friction for Fe on YBCO (Tc = 92.5K) in the temperature range 65 - 293 K, to explore electronic contributions to friction at the atomic scale. The samples were prepared with oxygen-depleted surfaces, with thin semiconducting surface layers present atop the bulk. Below Tc, the friction coefficient was observed to be constant at 0.19 and exhibited no correlation with the strength of superconducting levitation forces observed below Tc. The friction coefficient exhibited a change in slope within experimental error of Tc that increased progressively above Tc and reached 0.33 by room temperature. The results were analyzed within the context of underlying atomic-scale electronic and phononic mechanisms that give rise to friction we conclude that contact electrification and static electricity play a significant role above Tc. Supported by NSF and AFOSR.

  7. Averaging anisotropic cosmologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We examine the effects of spatial inhomogeneities on irrotational anisotropic cosmologies by looking at the average properties of anisotropic pressure-free models. Adopting the Buchert scheme, we recast the averaged scalar equations in Bianchi-type form and close the standard system by introducing a propagation formula for the average shear magnitude. We then investigate the evolution of anisotropic average vacuum models and those filled with pressureless matter. In the latter case we show that the backreaction effects can modify the familiar Kasner-like singularity and potentially remove Mixmaster-type oscillations. The presence of nonzero average shear in our equations also allows us to examine the constraints that a phase of backreaction-driven accelerated expansion might put on the anisotropy of the averaged domain. We close by assessing the status of these and other attempts to define and calculate 'average' spacetime behaviour in general relativity

  8. Comparison of tribological properties of industrial low friction coatings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    MX2 (M=Mo, W; X=S, Se) and DLC (a-C: H and WC/C) are the two kinds of typical low friction coatings widely used in industry. The friction and wear properties of these two kinds of coatings marked as MOVIC, MOST, MoSe2/Ni, WSe2, a-C: H and WC/C coatings were determined by fretting tests in ambient air of different humidity. The results show that the coefficient of friction of MX2 coatings increases when the relative humidity of air increases whereas the coefficient of friction DLC coatings decreases with the increasing of relative humidity. MOVIC and WSe2 coatings have a poor friction and wear resistance because of non-basal planes (100) and (101) parallel to the surface in the MOVIC coating, or the rough and porous surface of WSe2 coatings. Among these six coatings, MoSe2/Ni and WC/C coatings have the highest wear resistance which seems to be unaffected by the relative humidity.

  9. Sliding friction and wear behaviors of surface-coated natural serpentine mineral powders as lubricant additive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Baosen; Xu, Yi; Gao, Fei; Shi, Peijing; Xu, Binshi; Wu, Yixiong

    2011-01-01

    This work aims to investigate the friction and wear properties of surface-coated natural serpentine powders (SP) suspended in diesel engine oil using an Optimal SRV oscillating friction and wear tester. The worn surface was characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) equipped with energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). Results indicated that the additives can improve the wear resistance and decrease friction coefficient of carbon steel friction couples. The 0.5 wt% content of serpentine powders is found most efficient in reducing friction and wear at the load of 50 N. The SEM and XPS analysis results demonstrate that a tribofilm forms on the worn surface, which is responsible for the decrease in friction and wear, mainly with iron oxides, silicon oxides, graphite and organic compounds.

  10. Identification of GMS friction model without friction force measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper deals with an online identification of the Generalized Maxwell Slip (GMS) friction model for both presliding and sliding regime at the same time. This identification is based on robust adaptive observer without friction force measurement. To apply the observer, a new approach of calculating the filtered friction force from the measurable signals is introduced. Moreover, two approximations are proposed to get the friction model linear over the unknown parameters and an approach of suitable filtering is introduced to guarantee the continuity of the model. Simulation results are presented to prove the efficiency of the approach of identification.

  11. Theory of noncontact friction for atom-surface interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Jentschura, U D; DeKieviet, M

    2016-01-01

    The noncontact (van der Waals) friction is an interesting physical effect which has been the subject of controversial scientific discussion. The "direct" friction term due to the thermal fluctuations of the electromagnetic field leads to a friction force proportional to 1/Z^5 where Z is the atom-wall distance). The "backaction" friction term takes into account the feedback of thermal fluctuations of the atomic dipole moment onto the motion of the atom and scales as 1/Z^8. We investigate noncontact friction effects for the interactions of hydrogen, ground-state helium and metastable helium atoms with alpha-quartz (SiO_2), gold (Au) and calcium difluorite (CaF_2). We find that the backaction term dominates over the direct term induced by the thermal electromagnetic fluctuations inside the material, over wide distance ranges. The friction coefficients obtained for gold are smaller than those for SiO_2 and CaF_2 by several orders of magnitude.

  12. Frictional flow characteristics of microconvective flow for variable fluid properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Rajan; Mahulikar, Shripad P.

    2015-12-01

    The present work investigates the frictional flow characteristics of water flowing through a circular microchannel with variable fluid properties. The computational analysis reveals the importance of physical mechanisms due to variations in thermophysical fluid properties such as viscosity μ(T), thermal conductivity k(T) and density ρ(T) and also their contribution in the characteristics of frictional flow. Various combinations of thermophysical fluid properties have been used to find their effects on fluid friction. It is observed that the fluid friction attains the maximum value in the vicinity of the inlet and diminishes along the flow. The main reasons are attributed to this, (1) near the inlet, there is a flow undevelopment (the reverse process of flow development) due to μ(T) variation. (2) The viscosity of the water decreases with increasing temperature, which reduces fluid friction along the flow. It is noted that the skin friction coefficient (cf) reduces with increasing fluid mean velocity for a same value of constant wall heat flux ({q}{{w}}\\prime\\prime ). In the vicinity of the inlet, the deviation of Poiseuille number (Po) from 64 (constant properties solution) is also investigated in this paper. Additionally, the relationship between Reynolds number (Re) and cf, Po and Re have been proposed for different combinations of thermophysical fluid properties. This investigation also shows that the effect of fluid property variations on pressure drop is highly significant for microconvective water flow.

  13. Adhesion and friction characteristics of carbon nanotube arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There has been a great deal of interest in understanding, design and fabrication of bio-mimetic and bio-inspired adhesives in recent years. In this paper we present theoretical investigations on adhesion, friction behaviors and characteristics of fibrillar arrays composed of noninteracting carbon nanotubes for bio-inspired dry adhesives. Contact, compression, subsequent pulling off and dry sliding friction simulations were performed. It is demonstrated that there are two different adhesion forces during pull off. Static friction force values are in between 40 and 60 N cm−2 at different loads and they are significantly larger than the normal adhesion forces. Dynamic friction force and load are anisotropic and they depend on the direction of the motion. It is also found that friction force values and friction coefficients decrease although contact length and contact area increase when the loads are high. This is due to the arms of the nanotubes which bend significantly and act as stiffer springs at high loads. (paper)

  14. Friction and wear properties of Ti6Al4V/WC-Co in cold atmospheric plasma jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wenji; Liu, Xin; Song, Jinlong; Wu, Libo; Sun, Jing

    2012-10-01

    The friction and wear properties of Ti6Al4V/WC-Co friction pair were studied using an autonomous atmospheric pressure bare electrode cold plasma jet generating device and block-on-ring friction/wear tester, respectively. The study was conducted under air, air jet, nitrogen jet, air cold plasma jet, and nitrogen cold plasma jet atmospheres. Both nitrogen cold and air cold plasma jets effectively reduced the friction coefficients of the friction pairs and decreased friction temperature. The friction coefficient in the nitrogen cold plasma jet decreased to almost 60% compared with that in the air. The scanning electron microscope, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscope, and X-ray diffraction analyses illustrated that adhesive wear was relieved and the friction surfaces of Ti6Al4V were smoother, both in the nitrogen cold and air cold plasma jets. The roughness value Ra of the Ti6Al4V friction surfaces can reach 1.107 μm. A large number of nitrogen particles in the ionic and excited states contained by cold plasma jets reacts easily on the friction surface to produce a large amount of nitrides, which can excellently reduce the wear of Ti6Al4V/WC-Co friction pairs in real-time.

  15. Solid friction between soft filaments

    CERN Document Server

    Ward, Andrew; Schwenger, Walter; Welch, David; Lau, A W C; Vitelli, Vincenzo; Mahadevan, L; Dogic, Zvonimir

    2015-01-01

    Any macroscopic deformation of a filamentous bundle is necessarily accompanied by local sliding and/or stretching of the constituent filaments. Yet the nature of the sliding friction between two aligned filaments interacting through multiple contacts remains largely unexplored. Here, by directly measuring the sliding forces between two bundled F-actin filaments, we show that these frictional forces are unexpectedly large, scale logarithmically with sliding velocity as in solid-like friction, and exhibit complex dependence on the filaments' overlap length. We also show that a reduction of the frictional force by orders of magnitude, associated with a transition from solid-like friction to Stokes' drag, can be induced by coating F-actin with polymeric brushes. Furthermore, we observe similar transitions in filamentous microtubules and bacterial flagella. Our findings demonstrate how altering a filament's elasticity, structure and interactions can be used to engineer interfilament friction and thus tune the prop...

  16. Friction surfaced Stellite6 coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rao, K. Prasad; Damodaram, R. [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering - Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600 036 (India); Rafi, H. Khalid, E-mail: khalidrafi@gmail.com [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600 036 (India); Ram, G.D. Janaki [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600 036 (India); Reddy, G. Madhusudhan [Metal Joining Group, Defence Metallurgical Research Laboratory (DMRL) Kanchanbagh, Hyderabad 500 058 (India); Nagalakshmi, R. [Welding Research Institute, Bharat Heavy Electricals Limited, Tiruchirappalli 620 014 (India)

    2012-08-15

    Solid state Stellite6 coatings were deposited on steel substrate by friction surfacing and compared with Stellite6 cast rod and coatings deposited by gas tungsten arc and plasma transferred arc welding processes. Friction surfaced coatings exhibited finer and uniformly distributed carbides and were characterized by the absence of solidification structure and compositional homogeneity compared to cast rod, gas tungsten arc and plasma transferred coatings. Friction surfaced coating showed relatively higher hardness. X-ray diffraction of samples showed only face centered cubic Co peaks while cold worked coating showed hexagonally close packed Co also. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Stellite6 used as coating material for friction surfacing. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Friction surfaced (FS) coatings compared with casting, GTA and PTA processes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Finer and uniformly distributed carbides in friction surfaced coatings. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Absence of melting results compositional homogeneity in FS Stellite6 coatings.

  17. Stiction, friction, and wear reduction in silicon microelectromechanical systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantiziba, Fadziso Mabel

    Current reliability issues in silicon based microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) pose a challenge in the advancement of this pervasive technology. Silicon Microsystems are encumbered with adhesion induced catastrophic failures (stiction) during the final fabrication step where a wet chemical etch release is often conducted to produce functional, suspended microstructures. Irreversible adhesion of active device layer components to the substrate can drastically reduce yields of fully functional devices. Potential in-use problems of a tribological nature also limit the reliability and device lifetimes of these microstructures, particularly where intermittent or continuous contacting of surfaces occurs during a device's normal operation. Understanding the fundamental tribological properties such as friction coefficients and wear mechanisms that occur in the normal operation of these devices is a necessity in providing potential long term solutions to such reliability issues. A unique, simple, yet inexpensive solution to release related adhesion failures that utilizes a temporary physical barrier during the final rinsing stage of a typical silicon wet etch release process is presented. This temporary barrier is accomplished using polystyrene microspheres that prevent contact between the substrate and the components of the suspended device layer during drying. The microspheres are subsequently removed using a plasma etching process. Improvement of yields of stiction-free, functional devices >90% in comparison to testing devices are utilized to measure the friction coefficients of silicon. Thin ceramic coatings of oxides of aluminum, zirconium, or titanium are applied to the silicon MEMS devices using the atomic layer deposition technique and tested for comparison to non-coated silicon surfaces. Testing conducted under controlled humidity shows stable friction properties for the coated devices. The friction coefficients for all tested coatings are consistently lower than

  18. The Friction between Paper Surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Garoff, Niklas

    2002-01-01

    The main objective for the work described in this PhD thesiswas to formulate a friction model to characterize thefrictional behavior of paper. More specifically, the modelshould explain a phenomenon that is typical for paper grades,viz.: that the level of paper-to-paper friction is dependent onthe direction and the number of previous slides. The modelshould also explain the lubricating effect oflow-molecular-mass lipophilic compounds (LLC) that occur inpaper on paper-to-paper friction. Furthe...

  19. Quantum friction and fluctuation theorems

    OpenAIRE

    Intravaia, F.; Behunin, R. O.; Dalvit, D. A. R.

    2013-01-01

    We use general concepts of statistical mechanics to compute the quantum frictional force on an atom moving at constant velocity above a planar surface. We derive the zero-temperature frictional force using a non-equilibrium fluctuation-dissipation relation, and show that in the large-time, steady-state regime quantum friction scales as the cubic power of the atom's velocity. We also discuss how approaches based on Wigner-Weisskopf and quantum regression approximations fail to predict the corr...

  20. Size scaling of static friction

    OpenAIRE

    Braun, O. M.; Manini, Nicola; Tosatti, Erio

    2013-01-01

    Sliding friction across a thin soft lubricant film typically occurs by stick-slip, the lubricant fully solidifying at stick, yielding and flowing at slip. The static friction force per unit area preceding slip is known from molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to decrease with increasing contact area. That makes the large-size fate of stick-slip unclear and unknown; its possible vanishing is important as it would herald smooth sliding with a dramatic drop of kinetic friction at large size. Her...

  1. Anomalous friction in suspended graphene

    OpenAIRE

    Smolyanitsky, A.; Killgore, J. P.

    2012-01-01

    Since the discovery of the Amonton's law and with support of modern tribological models, friction between surfaces of three-dimensional materials is known to generally increase when the surfaces are in closer contact. Here, using molecular dynamics simulations of friction force microscopy on suspended graphene, we demonstrate an increase of friction when the scanning tip is retracted away from the sample. We explain the observed behavior and address why this phenomenon has not been observed f...

  2. Friction Burns: Epidemiology and Prevention

    OpenAIRE

    Agrawal, A; Raibagkar, S.C.; Vora, H.J.

    2008-01-01

    This epidemiological study deals with 60 patients with friction burns between January 2004 and January 2006. The age group most affected was that between 21 and 30 years, with male predominance. Road traffic accidents were the commonest cause of friction burns (56 patients), and the lower limb was the most frequently affected part of the body. Patient management was performed according to the degree of the burn injury. It is suggested that most friction burn injuries are neglected on admissio...

  3. Determination of basic friction angle using various laboratory tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Bo-An

    2016-04-01

    The basic friction angle of rock is an important factor of joint shear strength and is included within most shear strength criteria. It can be measured by direct shear test, triaxial compression test and tilt test. Tilt test is mostly used because it is the simplest method. However, basic friction angles measured using tilt test for same rock type or for one sample are widely distributed and often do not show normal distribution. In this research, the basic friction angles for the Hangdeung granite form Korea and Berea sandstone from USA are measured accurately using direct shear test and triaxial compression test. Then basic friction angles are again measured using tilt tests with various conditions and are compared with those measured using direct shear test and triaxial compression test to determine the optimum condition of tilt test. Three types of sliding planes, such as planes cut by saw and planes polished by #100 and #600 grinding powders, are prepared. When planes are polished by #100 grinding powder, the basic friction angles measured using direct shear test and triaxial compression test are very consistent and show narrow ranges. However, basic friction angles show wide ranges when planes are cut by saw and are polished by #600 grinding powder. The basic friction angle measured using tilt test are very close to those measured using direct shear test and triaxial compression test when plane is polished by #100 grinding powder. When planes are cut by saw and are polished by #600 grinding powder, basic friction angles measured using tilt test are slightly different. This indicates that tilt test with plane polished by #100 grinding powder can yield an accurate basic friction angle. In addition, the accurate values are obtained not only when planes are polished again after 10 times of tilt test, but values are averaged by more 30 times of tests.

  4. Argo packing friction research update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper focuses on the issue of valve packing friction and its affect on the operability of motor- and air-operated valves (MOVs and AOVs). At this time, most nuclear power plants are required to perform postmaintenance testing following a packing adjustment or replacement. In many cases, the friction generated by the packing does not impact the operability window of a valve. However, to date there has not been a concerted effort to substantiate this claim. To quantify the effects of packing friction, it has become necessary to develop a formula to predict the friction effects accurately. This formula provides a much more accurate method of predicting packing friction than previously used factors based strictly on stem diameter. Over the past 5 years, Argo Packing Company has been developing and testing improved graphite packing systems at research facilities, such as AECL Chalk River and Wyle Laboratories. Much of this testing has centered around reducing and predicting friction that is related to packing. In addition, diagnostic testing for Generic Letter 89-10 MOVs and AOVs has created a significant data base. In July 1992 Argo asked several utilities to provide running load data that could be used to quantify packing friction repeatability and predictability. This technical paper provides the basis to predict packing friction, which will improve calculations for thrust requirements for Generic Leter 89-10 and future AOV programs. In addition, having an accurate packing friction formula will improve packing performance when low running loads are identified that would indicate insufficient sealing force

  5. Friction and wear calculation methods

    CERN Document Server

    Kragelsky, I V; Kombalov, V S

    1981-01-01

    Friction and Wear: Calculation Methods provides an introduction to the main theories of a new branch of mechanics known as """"contact interaction of solids in relative motion."""" This branch is closely bound up with other sciences, especially physics and chemistry. The book analyzes the nature of friction and wear, and some theoretical relationships that link the characteristics of the processes and the properties of the contacting bodies essential for practical application of the theories in calculating friction forces and wear values. The effect of the environment on friction and wear is a

  6. Time-dependent angularly averaged inverse transport

    OpenAIRE

    Bal, Guillaume; Jollivet, Alexandre

    2009-01-01

    This paper concerns the reconstruction of the absorption and scattering parameters in a time-dependent linear transport equation from knowledge of angularly averaged measurements performed at the boundary of a domain of interest. We show that the absorption coefficient and the spatial component of the scattering coefficient are uniquely determined by such measurements. We obtain stability results on the reconstruction of the absorption and scattering parameters with respect to the measured al...

  7. NORMAL PRESSURE AND FRICTION STRESS MEASUREMENT IN ROLLING PROCESSES

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henningsen, Poul; Arentoft, Mogens; Lagergren, Jonas;

    2005-01-01

    the output from the transducer, the friction stress and normal pressure in the contact zone can be determined. The new concept differs from existing pin designs by a lower disturbance of lubricant film and material flow and limited penetration of material between transducer and roll. Aluminum, cupper...... and steel strips with a width of 40 mm was rolled with reduction varying from 2.7% to 29%, in a pilot mill. For evaluating the transducer, the measured contact forces are compared with external measurements of roll separating forces and torque. The determined friction coefficients are compared with values...

  8. Model coupling friction and adhesion for steel-concrete interfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Raous, Michel

    2010-01-01

    The interface behaviour between steel and concrete, during pull-out tests, is numerically investigated using an interface model coupling adhesion and Coulomb friction. This model, first developed by Raous, Cang\\'emi, Cocou and Monerie (RCCM), is based on the adhesion intensity variable, introduced by Fr\\'emond, which is a surface damage variable. The RCCM model is here completed by taking a variable friction coefficient to simulate the slip weakening of the interface when sliding occurs. Identification of the parameters and validation of the model are carried on pull out experiments conducted at the INSA of Toulouse on steel-concrete interface of reinforced concrete.

  9. Low friction in mixed-mu superconducting bearings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hull, J. R.; Hilton, E. F.; Mulcahy, T. M.; Yang, Z. J.; Lockwood, A.; Strasik, M.

    1995-12-01

    Individual magnetic steel rotors were levitated by combining the attractive force between permanent magnets and the steel with the repulsive force between high-temperature superconductors and the steel. The free spindown of several rotors was observed, and the effective coefficient of friction for the bearing was calculated as a function of geometry. Low-speed coefficients of <10-8 were observed, and the velocity dependence of MnZn ferrite rotors suggest that coefficients of <10-6 are attainable at bearing rim velocities of 100 m/s.

  10. String Evolution with Friction

    OpenAIRE

    Martins, C.J.A.P.(Centro de Astrofísica, Universidade do Porto, Rua das Estrelas, Porto, 4150-762, Portugal); Shellard, E. P. S.

    1995-01-01

    We study the effects of friction on the scaling evolution of string networks in condensed matter and cosmological contexts. We derive a generalized `one-scale' model with the string correlation length $L$ and velocity $v$ as dynamical variables. In non-relativistic systems, we obtain a well-known $L\\propto t^{1/2}$ law, showing that loop production is important. For electroweak cosmic strings, we show transient damped epoch scaling with $L\\propto t^{5/4}$ (or, in the matter era, $L\\propto t^{...

  11. Stick-Slip Friction

    OpenAIRE

    2003-01-01

    The primary goal of the work in this thesis was to investigate the macroscopic and microscopic nature of dry contact friction at very low velocities. Experiments were carried out using a sandpaper and carpet as contacting surfaces. The force required to pull the sandpaper across the carpet was recorded and analyzed on a computer. The very low speed at which the sandpaper was pulled (10-100 microns per second) gave rise to a so called stick-slip motion. That is, the mot...

  12. Influence of the electrical sliding speed on friction and wear processes in an electrical contact copper stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchoucha, A.; Chekroud, S.; Paulmier, D.

    2004-02-01

    Among the various parameters that influence the friction and wear behaviour of a copper-stainless steel couple crossed by an electrical current and in a dry contact is the sliding speed. The tests were carried out under ambient environment and the sliding speed was in the range of 0.2-8 ms -1. The electrical current intensity was varied from 0 to 40 A and held constant during each experiment. The normal load was maintained constant corresponding to an average Hertzian stress of 10 7 Pa. It appears that the friction coefficient and the wear rate increase at first with the speed, reach their maximums, then slowly decrease and tend to constant values. Over the entire range of sliding speeds two types of wear are observed. These latters are essentially mild wear as long as hard debris do not appear at the interface and severe wear when debris consisting of oxides or oxide metal mixture become big enough, they are removed from the surface and have abrasive effect. The results are discussed in terms of observations of wear debris size and composition, wear track study, metallographic study of worn surfaces and friction and electrical contact resistance records.

  13. Friction Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Arthur C., Jr.

    2008-01-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) is a solid state welding process invented in 1991 at The Welding Institute in the United Kingdom. A weld is made in the FSW process by translating a rotating pin along a weld seam so as to stir the sides of the seam together. FSW avoids deleterious effects inherent in melting and promises to be an important welding process for any industries where welds of optimal quality are demanded. This article provides an introduction to the FSW process. The chief concern is the physical effect of the tool on the weld metal: how weld seam bonding takes place, what kind of weld structure is generated, potential problems, possible defects for example, and implications for process parameters and tool design. Weld properties are determined by structure, and the structure of friction stir welds is determined by the weld metal flow field in the vicinity of the weld tool. Metal flow in the vicinity of the weld tool is explained through a simple kinematic flow model that decomposes the flow field into three basic component flows: a uniform translation, a rotating solid cylinder, and a ring vortex encircling the tool. The flow components, superposed to construct the flow model, can be related to particular aspects of weld process parameters and tool design; they provide a bridge to an understanding of a complex-at-first-glance weld structure. Torques and forces are also discussed. Some simple mathematical models of structural aspects, torques, and forces are included.

  14. Optimization of Electroless Ni-P-W Coatings for Minimum Friction and Wear Using Grey-Taguchi Method

    OpenAIRE

    Supriyo Roy; Prasanta Sahoo

    2013-01-01

    The present experimental investigation deals with the deposition of electroless Ni-P-W coating on mild steel substrate and optimization of tribological parameters for better tribological behaviour like minimization of wear depth and coefficient of friction. Three tribological test parameters, namely, load, speed, and time, are optimized for minimum friction and wear of the coating. Friction and wear tests are carried out in a multitribotester using block on roller configuration under dry cond...

  15. The influence of high temperatures on the tribological properties of automotive friction materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savage, Luke

    Temperatures of over 800C can be generated at the frictional interface within the brake systems of large vehicles, such high temperatures result in severe wear at the frictional interface, and can also lead to a very dangerous condition known as brake fade, characterised by a sharp fall in the coefficient of friction between the pad and disc, resulting in a catastrophic loss of braking efficiency. Common friction materials are very specialised composites often containing up to 15 components bound together within a phenolic resin matrix. The high temperature behaviour of the various constituents of friction materials were investigated using thermogravimetric analysis, focusing in particular on the thermal decomposition of the phenolic resin matrix material, where it has been firmly established that the thermal decomposition products of phenolic resin are the primary cause of brake fade. This has lead to the development of a novel approach for reducing fade in conventional resin based friction materials, involving a partial carbonisation to 400C. The high temperature wear characteristics of both modified and conventional friction materials were examined using standard dynamometer tests, as well as a 'continuous drag' type test machine, equipped with a heating facility. During this study a number of factors were identified as the main influences on the overall wear behaviour of friction materials. These included test temperature, sample test history, and the various effects of friction films, which were the subject of a detailed analysis. The formation of friction films was found to be an important facet of a successful friction material, producing a reduction in wear at the frictional interface. Films were examined and analysed using EDX, SEM, and X-ray diffraction techniques, which revealed the presence of a high proportion of magnetite (Fe3O4), containing iron which originated from the disc surface. It was established that the incorporation of iron in friction

  16. Average-energy games

    OpenAIRE

    Bouyer, Patricia; Markey, Nicolas; Randour, Mickael; Larsen, Kim G.; Laursen, Simon

    2015-01-01

    Two-player quantitative zero-sum games provide a natural framework to synthesize controllers with performance guarantees for reactive systems within an uncontrollable environment. Classical settings include mean-payoff games, where the objective is to optimize the long-run average gain per action, and energy games, where the system has to avoid running out of energy. We study average-energy games, where the goal is to optimize the long-run average of the accumulated energy. We show that this ...

  17. Corrosion effects on friction factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magleby, H.L.; Shaffer, S.J.

    1996-03-01

    This paper presents the results of NRC-sponsored material specimen tests that were performed to determine if corrosion increases the friction factors of sliding surfaces of motor-operated gate valves, which could require higher forces to close and open safety-related valves when subjected to their design basis differential pressures. Friction tests were performed with uncorroded specimens and specimens subjected to accelerated corrosion. Preliminary tests at ambient conditions showed that corrosion increased the friction factors, indicating the need for additional tests duplicating valve operating parameters at hot conditions. The additional tests showed friction factors of corroded specimens were 0.1 to 0.2 higher than for uncorroded specimens, and that the friction factors of the corroded specimens were not very dependent on contact stress or corrosion film thickness. The measured values of friction factors for the three corrosion films tested (simulating three operating times) were in the range of 0.3 to 0.4. The friction factor for even the shortest simulated operating time was essentially the same as the others, indicating that the friction factors appear to reach a plateau and that the plateau is reached quickly.

  18. Estimation of dynamic friction of the Akatani landslide from seismic waveform inversion and numerical simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Masumi; Mangeney, Anne; Matsushi, Yuki; Moretti, Laurent

    2016-06-01

    We performed numerical simulations of the 2011 deep-seated Akatani landslide in central Japan to understand the dynamic evolution of friction of the landslide. By comparing the forces obtained from numerical simulation to those resolved from seismic waveform inversion, the coefficient of the friction during sliding was investigated in the range of 0.1 to 0.4. The simulation assuming standard Coulomb friction shows that the forces obtained by the seismic waveform inversion are well explained using a constant friction of μ = 0.3. A small difference between the residuals of Coulomb simulation and a velocity-dependent simulation suggests that the coefficient of friction over the volume is well constrained as 0.3 most of time during sliding. It suggests the sudden loss of shearing resistance at the onset of sliding, i.e., sudden drop of the initial coefficient of friction in our model, which accelerates the deep-seated landslide. Our numerical simulation calibrated by seismic data provides the evolution of dynamic friction with a reasonable resolution in time, which is difficult to obtain from a conventional runout simulation, or seismic waveform inversion alone.

  19. Partial squeeze film levitation modulates fingertip friction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiertlewski, Michaël; Fenton Friesen, Rebecca; Colgate, J Edward

    2016-08-16

    When touched, a glass plate excited with ultrasonic transverse waves feels notably more slippery than it does at rest. To study this phenomenon, we use frustrated total internal reflection to image the asperities of the skin that are in intimate contact with a glass plate. We observed that the load at the interface is shared between the elastic compression of the asperities of the skin and a squeeze film of air. Stroboscopic investigation reveals that the time evolution of the interfacial gap is partially out of phase with the plate vibration. Taken together, these results suggest that the skin bounces against the vibrating plate but that the bounces are cushioned by a squeeze film of air that does not have time to escape the interfacial separation. This behavior results in dynamic levitation, in which the average number of asperities in intimate contact is reduced, thereby reducing friction. This improved understanding of the physics of friction reduction provides key guidelines for designing interfaces that can dynamically modulate friction with soft materials and biological tissues, such as human fingertips. PMID:27482117

  20. Averaged extreme regression quantile

    OpenAIRE

    Jureckova, Jana

    2015-01-01

    Various events in the nature, economics and in other areas force us to combine the study of extremes with regression and other methods. A useful tool for reducing the role of nuisance regression, while we are interested in the shape or tails of the basic distribution, is provided by the averaged regression quantile and namely by the average extreme regression quantile. Both are weighted means of regression quantile components, with weights depending on the regressors. Our primary interest is ...

  1. On the Averaging Principle

    OpenAIRE

    Fibich, Gadi; Gavious, Arieh; Solan, Eilon

    2012-01-01

    Typically, models with a heterogeneous property are considerably harder to analyze than the corresponding homogeneous models, in which the heterogeneous property is replaced with its average value. In this study we show that any outcome of a heterogeneous model that satisfies the two properties of differentiability and interchangibility is O(\\epsilon^2) equivalent to the outcome of the corresponding homogeneous model, where \\epsilon is the level of heterogeneity. We then use this averaging pr...

  2. Average Angular Velocity

    OpenAIRE

    Van Essen, H.

    2004-01-01

    This paper addresses the problem of the separation of rotational and internal motion. It introduces the concept of average angular velocity as the moment of inertia weighted average of particle angular velocities. It extends and elucidates the concept of Jellinek and Li (1989) of separation of the energy of overall rotation in an arbitrary (non-linear) $N$-particle system. It generalizes the so called Koenig's theorem on the two parts of the kinetic energy (center of mass plus internal) to th...

  3. On Averaging Rotations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gramkow, Claus

    1999-01-01

    In this article two common approaches to averaging rotations are compared to a more advanced approach based on a Riemannian metric. Very offten the barycenter of the quaternions or matrices that represent the rotations are used as an estimate of the mean. These methods neglect that rotations belong...... approximations to the Riemannian metric, and that the subsequent corrections are inherient in the least squares estimation. Keywords: averaging rotations, Riemannian metric, matrix, quaternion...

  4. Functional-Friction Networks: New Insights on the Laboratory Earthquakes

    CERN Document Server

    Ghaffari, H O

    2013-01-01

    We formulate the universality of regular precursor rupture fronts in functional network parameter space, in light of recent analysis of acoustics emissions-coupled friction experimental results. Furthermore, using a phenomenological approach based on friction networks, we propose that the energy of the ruptures can be extended in terms of networks motifs and the transition from regular rupture to slow deformation can have a third production from the critical rupture class, comparable with the direct observations of this phenomena in the transparent samples . Based on this model, the transition from slow ruptures (i.e., creep pulse) to the critical speeds of ruptures is possible. In addition, the evolution of arrested rupture fronts is inspected through a statistical-network modelling which sheds light on the communities evolution. We propose a phase diagram for the friction networks which depends on the scaling coefficients of scalar parameters and can show a transition towards the capturing of the links by a...

  5. Fault Frictional Stability in a Nuclear Waste Repository

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orellana, Felipe; Violay, Marie; Scuderi, Marco; Collettini, Cristiano

    2016-04-01

    Exploitation of underground resources induces hydro-mechanical and chemical perturbations in the rock mass. In response to such disturbances, seismic events might occur, affecting the safety of the whole engineering system. The Mont Terri Rock Laboratory is an underground infrastructure devoted to the study of geological disposal of nuclear waste in Switzerland. At the site, it is intersected by large fault zones of about 0.8 - 3 m in thickness and the host rock formation is a shale rock named Opalinus Clay (OPA). The mineralogy of OPA includes a high content of phyllosilicates (50%), quartz (25%), calcite (15%), and smaller proportions of siderite and pyrite. OPA is a stiff, low permeable rock (2×10-18 m2), and its mechanical behaviour is strongly affected by the anisotropy induced by bedding planes. The evaluation of fault stability and associated fault slip behaviour (i.e. seismic vs. aseismic) is a major issue in order to ensure the long-term safety and operation of the repository. Consequently, experiments devoted to understand the frictional behaviour of OPA have been performed in the biaxial apparatus "BRAVA", recently developed at INGV. Simulated fault gouge obtained from intact OPA samples, were deformed at different normal stresses (from 4 to 30 MPa), under dry and fluid-saturated conditions. To estimate the frictional stability, the velocity-dependence of friction was evaluated during velocity steps tests (1-300 μm/s). Slide-hold-slide tests were performed (1-3000 s) to measure the amount of frictional healing. The collected data were subsequently modelled with the Ruina's slip dependent formulation of the rate and state friction constitutive equations. To understand the deformation mechanism, the microstructures of the sheared gouge were analysed. At 7 MPa normal stress and under dry conditions, the friction coefficient decreased from a peak value of μpeak,dry = 0.57 to μss,dry = 0.50. Under fluid-saturated conditions and same normal stress, the

  6. Transport coefficients for driven granular mixtures at low-density

    OpenAIRE

    Khalil, Nagi; Garzó, Vicente

    2013-01-01

    The transport coefficients of a granular binary mixture driven by a stochastic bath with friction are determined from the inelastic Boltzmann kinetic equation. A normal solution is obtained via the Chapman-Enskog method for states near homogeneous steady states. The mass, momentum, and heat fluxes are determined to first order in the spatial gradients of the hydrodynamic fields, and the associated transport coefficients are identified. They are given in terms of the solutions of a set of coup...

  7. Friction properties of amorphous carbon ultrathin films deposited by filtered cathodic vacuum arc and radio-frequency sputtering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The friction properties of ultrathin films of amorphous carbon (a-C) deposited on Si(100) substrates by filtered cathodic vacuum arc and radio-frequency sputtering were investigated by surface force microscopy. Deposition parameters yielding a-C films with high sp3 content were used to deposit films of thickness between 5 and 35 nm. The coefficient of friction of both types of a-C films was measured with a 1-μm-radius conical diamond tip and normal loads in the range of 20–640 μN. The results show a strong dependence of the friction properties on the surface roughness, thickness, and structure of the a-C films, which are influenced by the intricacies of the deposition method. The dependence of the coefficient of friction on normal load and the dominance of adhesion and plowing friction mechanisms are interpreted in terms of the through-thickness variation of carbon atom hybridization of the a-C films. - Highlights: • Comparison of nanoscale friction properties of ultrathin amorphous carbon films. • Friction dependence on film roughness, thickness, and structure (hybridization). • Effect of through-thickness changes in carbon atom hybridization on film friction. • Explanation of film friction trends in terms of competing friction mechanisms

  8. Friction properties of amorphous carbon ultrathin films deposited by filtered cathodic vacuum arc and radio-frequency sputtering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matlak, J.; Komvopoulos, K., E-mail: kyriakos@me.berkeley.edu

    2015-03-31

    The friction properties of ultrathin films of amorphous carbon (a-C) deposited on Si(100) substrates by filtered cathodic vacuum arc and radio-frequency sputtering were investigated by surface force microscopy. Deposition parameters yielding a-C films with high sp{sup 3} content were used to deposit films of thickness between 5 and 35 nm. The coefficient of friction of both types of a-C films was measured with a 1-μm-radius conical diamond tip and normal loads in the range of 20–640 μN. The results show a strong dependence of the friction properties on the surface roughness, thickness, and structure of the a-C films, which are influenced by the intricacies of the deposition method. The dependence of the coefficient of friction on normal load and the dominance of adhesion and plowing friction mechanisms are interpreted in terms of the through-thickness variation of carbon atom hybridization of the a-C films. - Highlights: • Comparison of nanoscale friction properties of ultrathin amorphous carbon films. • Friction dependence on film roughness, thickness, and structure (hybridization). • Effect of through-thickness changes in carbon atom hybridization on film friction. • Explanation of film friction trends in terms of competing friction mechanisms.

  9. Anti-wear and friction performance of ZrO2 nanoparticles as lubricant additive

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shiyu Ma; Shaohua Zheng; Duxia Cao; Hongna Guo

    2010-01-01

    The surface of ZrO2 nanoparticles was modified with silane coupling agent KH-560 by dispersing the nanoparticles in 20# machine oil.The tribological performance of the 20# machine oil with ZrO2 nanoparticles was evaluated by a four-ball tester and a thrust-ring machine.The loss of the thrust-ring weight was measured by an electronic balance with a precision of 0.0001 g.The worn surface was examined under a metallographic microscope with 400-times magnification.The results showed that the average friction coefficient decreased by 27.34%,and that the weight loss of the thrust-ring indicated no wear or nega-tive wear,the wear loss after six loads tests being-0.0163 g.The anti-wear(AW)and reducing friction(RF)abilities of the oil with ZrO2 nanoparticles addition were considerably improved,maximizing at an additive concentration of 0.5 wt%.

  10. Structure and Friction Behavior of CrNx/a-C:H Nanocomposite Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lunlin Shang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available CrN and CrNx/a-C:H nanocomposite films were deposited on Si substrates by the magnetron sputtering technique. The structure, chemical state, and friction behavior of the CrNx/a-C:H films prepared at various CH4 content were studied systematically. The CrN film shows strong (111 and (220 orientation, while the CrNx/a-C:H films consist of the nanocrystalline CrNx or Cr particles embedded in an amorphous hydrocarbon (a-C:H matrix and show weak diffraction peaks, which is in accordance with the XPS analysis results. The typical Raman D and G peaks are observed, indicating that the separated amorphous carbon or CNx phase appears in the CrNx/a-C:H films. However, no chromium carbide was observed in all the as-deposited samples. From the SEM graphs, all the deposited films depicted a dense and compact microstructure with well-attached interface with the substrate. The average friction coefficient of the CrNx/a-C:H films largely decreased with increasing CH4 content.

  11. Quantum Drude friction for time-dependent density functional theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuhauser, Daniel; Lopata, Kenneth

    2008-10-01

    Friction is a desired property in quantum dynamics as it allows for localization, prevents backscattering, and is essential in the description of multistage transfer. Practical approaches for friction generally involve memory functionals or interactions with system baths. Here, we start by requiring that a friction term will always reduce the energy of the system; we show that this is automatically true once the Hamiltonian is augmented by a term of the form integral a(q;n(0)) x [partial differential j(q,t)/partial differential t] x J(q)dq, which includes the current operator times the derivative of its expectation value with respect to time, times a local coefficient; the local coefficient will be fitted to experiment, to more sophisticated theories of electron-electron interaction and interaction with nuclear vibrations and the nuclear background, or alternately, will be artificially constructed to prevent backscattering of energy. We relate this term to previous results and to optimal control studies, and generalize it to further operators, i.e., any operator of the form integral a(q;n(0))[partial differential c(q,t)/partial differential t] x C(q)dq (or a discrete sum) will yield friction. Simulations of a small jellium cluster, both in the linear and highly nonlinear excitation regime, demonstrate that the friction always reduces energy. The energy damping is essentially double exponential; the long-time decay is almost an order of magnitude slower than the rapid short-time decay. The friction term stabilizes the propagation (split-operator propagator here), therefore increasing the time-step needed for convergence, i.e., reducing the overall computational cost. The local friction also allows the simulation of a metal cluster in a uniform jellium as the energy loss in the excitation due to the underlying corrugation is accounted for by the friction. We also relate the friction to models of coupling to damped harmonic oscillators, which can be used for a more

  12. Inertial Lévy Flight with Nonlinear Friction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    L(U) Yan; BAO Jing-Dong

    2011-01-01

    Lévy Bight with nonlinear friction is studied. Due to the occurrence of extremely long jumps Levy flights often possess infinite variance and are physically problematic if describing the dynamics of a particle of finite mass. However, by introducing nonlinear friction, we show that the stochastic process subject to Levy noise exhibits finite variance, leading to a well-defined .kinetic energy. In the force-free fiIeld, normal diffusion behavior is observed and the diffusion coefficient decreases with Levy index μ. Furthermore, we find a kinetic resonance of the particle in the harmonic potential to the external oscillating field in the generally underdamped region and the value of the linear friction γo determines whether resonance occurs or not.%Lévy flight with nonlinear friction is studied.Due to the occurrence of extremely long jumps Lévy flights often possess infinite variance and are physically problematic if describing the dynamics of a particle of finite mass.However,by introducing nonlinear friction,we show that the stochastic process subject to Lévy noise exhibits finite variance,leading to a well-defined kinetic energy.In the force-free field,normal diffusion behavior is observed and the diffusion coefficient decreases with Lévy index μ.Furthermore,we find a kinetic resonance of the particle in the harmonic potential to the external oscillating field in the generally underdamped region and the value of the linear friction γ0 determines whether resonance occurs or not.The stable Lévy process,often called the Lévy flight,is used to model various phenomena such as self-diffusion in micelle systems,[1] special problems in reaction dynamics,[2] and even the flight of an albatross.

  13. Student figures in friction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Gritt B.

      This thesis analyses how ‘the student', as a contested figure, is negotiated and enacted in a period of extensive university reform in Denmark. Through a combination of historical and anthropological research, it focuses on students' changing participation in the shaping of Danish society......, the university and their own education. Detailed studies explore, first, politically active students' various attempts to influence national educational policies; second, student participation in the development of the university, especially regarding debates over consumer conduct versus co-ownership; and third......, students' room for participation in their own learning, influenced by demands for efficiency, flexibility and student-centred education. The thesis recasts the anthropological endeavour as one of ‘figuration work'. That is, ‘frictional events' are explored as moments when conflicting figures...

  14. Friction and Wear Properties of Selected Solid Lubricating Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa; Iwaki, Masanori; Gotoh, Kenichi; Obara, Shingo; Imagawa, Kichiro

    1999-01-01

    To evaluate commercially developed solid film lubricants for aerospace bearing applications, we investigated the friction and wear behavior of bonded molybdenum disulfide (MoS2), magnetron-sputtered MoS2 and ion-plated silver films in sliding contact with 6-mm-diameter American Iron and Steel Institute (AISI) 440 C stainless steel balls. Unidirectional sliding friction experiments were conducted with a load of 5.9 N (600 g), a mean Herizian contact pressure of 0.79 GPa maximum 1.19 GPa), and a sliding velocity of 0.2 m/s at room temperature in three environments: ultrahigh vacuum (7x10 (exp -7Pa)), humid air (approx. 20 percent humidity), and dry nitrogen (less than 1 percent humidity). The resultant films were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, and surface profilometry. Marked differences in friction and wear resulted front the environmental conditions and the film materials. The main criteria for judging the performance were coefficient of friction and wear rate, which had to be less than 0.3 and on the order of 10 (exp -6mm exp 3/Nm or less), respectively. The bonded MoS2 and magnetron-sputtered MoS2 films met the criteria in all three environments. Also, the wear rates of the counterpart AISI 440 C stainless steel balls met that criterion in all three environments. The ion-plated silver films met the criteria only in ultrahigh vacuum. In ultrahigh vacuum the bonded MoS2 films were superior. In humid air the bonded MoS2 films had higher coefficient of friction and shorter wear life than did the magnetron-sputtered MoS2 films. The ion-plated silver films had a high coefficient of friction in humid air but relatively low coefficients of friction in the nonoxidative environments. Adhesion and plastic deformation played important roles in all three environments. All sliding involved adhesive transfer of materials.

  15. The Research on Friction Characteristics of Non Smooth Bionic Mesoscopic Surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su Chunjian

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The application of using friction to transmit power and prevent slippage is very widely used, many animals have very strong adhesion climbing ability, and it has important theoretical significance and wide application prospect to research and the prepare bionic surface to increase transmission friction using the bionic technology. In recent years, the research of foot structure of climbing animals shows that their surface morphology has both macro and micro scale features, and only study from the macro to the micro scale surface structure can be better elucidate the mechanism of increasing-friction of climbing animal. This paper will study bionic surface structure on mesoscopic scale from micron to millimeter level, research the influence of foot structure of climbing animal under mesoscopic scale on characteristics of increasing friction using bionic technology, prepare the bionic non-smooth surface of convex or concave using bionic manufacturing technology, establish the friction model of non-smooth surface, investigate the increasing-friction mechanism of the bionic surface morphology on mesoscopic scales, reveals the influence of surface morphology, layout, size and material properties on the friction characteristics, provide the design of bionic friction surface and calculation method of friction coefficient and provide reliable theoretical basis for engineering application.

  16. Averaging anisotropic cosmologies

    CERN Document Server

    Barrow, J D; Barrow, John D.; Tsagas, Christos G.

    2006-01-01

    We examine the effects of spatial inhomogeneities on irrotational anisotropic cosmologies by looking at the average properties of pressure-free Bianchi-type models. Adopting the Buchert averaging scheme, we identify the kinematic backreaction effects by focussing on spacetimes with zero or isotropic spatial curvature. This allows us to close the system of the standard scalar formulae with a propagation equation for the shear magnitude. We find no change in the already known conditions for accelerated expansion. The backreaction terms are expressed as algebraic relations between the mean-square fluctuations of the models' irreducible kinematical variables. Based on these we investigate the early evolution of averaged vacuum Bianchi type $I$ universes and those filled with pressureless matter. In the latter case we show that the backreaction effects can modify the familiar Kasner-like singularity and potentially remove Mixmaster-type oscillations. We also discuss the possibility of accelerated expansion due to ...

  17. Friction of diamond-like carbon films in different atmospheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diamond-like carbon (DLC) films constitute a class of new materials with a wide range of compositions, properties, and performance. In particular, the tribological properties of these films are rather intriguing and can be strongly influenced by the test conditions and environment. In this paper, we performed a series of model experiments in high vacuum and with various added gases to elucidate the influence of different test environments on the tribological behavior of three DLC films. Specifically, we studied the behavior of a hydrogen-free film produced by a cathodic arc process and two highly hydrogenated films produced by plasma-enhanced chemical-vapor deposition. Flats and balls used in our experiments were coated with DLC and tested in a pin-on-disc machine under a load of 1 N and at constant rotational frequency. With a low background pressure, in the 10(sup -6) Pa range, the highly hydrogenated films exhibited a friction coefficient of less than 0.01, whereas the hydrogen-free film gave a friction coefficient of approximately 0.6. Adding oxygen or hydrogen to the experimental environment changed the friction to some extent. However, admission of water vapor into the test chamber caused large changes: the friction coefficient decreased drastically for the hydrogen-free DLC film whereas it increased a bit for one of the highly hydrogenated films. These results indicate that water molecules play a prominent role in the frictional behavior of DLC films-most notably for hydrogen-free films but also for highly hydrogenated films

  18. Average Angular Velocity

    CERN Document Server

    Essén, H

    2003-01-01

    This paper addresses the problem of the separation of rotational and internal motion. It introduces the concept of average angular velocity as the moment of inertia weighted average of particle angular velocities. It extends and elucidates the concept of Jellinek and Li (1989) of separation of the energy of overall rotation in an arbitrary (non-linear) $N$-particle system. It generalizes the so called Koenig's theorem on the two parts of the kinetic energy (center of mass plus internal) to three parts: center of mass, rotational, plus the remaining internal energy relative to an optimally translating and rotating frame.

  19. On sparsity averaging

    CERN Document Server

    Carrillo, Rafael E; Wiaux, Yves

    2013-01-01

    Recent developments in Carrillo et al. (2012) and Carrillo et al. (2013) introduced a novel regularization method for compressive imaging in the context of compressed sensing with coherent redundant dictionaries. The approach relies on the observation that natural images exhibit strong average sparsity over multiple coherent frames. The associated reconstruction algorithm, based on an analysis prior and a reweighted $\\ell_1$ scheme, is dubbed Sparsity Averaging Reweighted Analysis (SARA). We review these advances and extend associated simulations establishing the superiority of SARA to regularization methods based on sparsity in a single frame, for a generic spread spectrum acquisition and for a Fourier acquisition of particular interest in radio astronomy.

  20. Heterogeneity in friction strength of an active fault by incorporation of fragments of the surrounding host rock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Naoki; Hirono, Tetsuro

    2016-07-01

    To understand the correlation between the mesoscale structure and the frictional strength of an active fault, we performed a field investigation of the Atera fault at Tase, central Japan, and made laboratory-based determinations of its mineral assemblages and friction coefficients. The fault zone contains a light gray fault gouge, a brown fault gouge, and a black fault breccia. Samples of the two gouges contained large amounts of clay minerals such as smectite and had low friction coefficients of approximately 0.2-0.4 under the condition of 0.01 m s-1 slip velocity and 0.5-2.5 MP confining pressure, whereas the breccia contained large amounts of angular quartz and feldspar and had a friction coefficient of 0.7 under the same condition. Because the fault breccia closely resembles the granitic rock of the hangingwall in composition, texture, and friction coefficient, we interpret the breccia as having originated from this protolith. If the mechanical incorporation of wall rocks of high friction coefficient into fault zones is widespread at the mesoscale, it causes the heterogeneity in friction strength of fault zones and might contribute to the evolution of fault-zone architectures.

  1. Noncontact friction and relaxational dynamics of surface defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    She, Jian-Huang; Balatsky, Alexander V

    2012-03-30

    The motion of a cantilever near sample surfaces exhibits additional friction even before two bodies come into mechanical contact. Called noncontact friction (NCF), this friction is of great practical importance to the ultrasensitive force detection measurements. The observed large NCF of a micron-scale cantilever found an anomalously large damping that exceeds theoretical predictions by 8-11 orders of magnitude. This finding points to a contribution beyond fluctuating electromagnetic fields within the van der Waals approach. Recent experiments reported by Saitoh et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 105, 236103 (2010)] also found a nontrivial distance dependence of NCF. Motivated by these observations, we propose a mechanism based on the coupling of a cantilever to the relaxation dynamics of surface defects. We assume that the surface defects couple to the cantilever tip via spin-spin coupling and their spin relaxation dynamics gives rise to the backaction terms and modifies both the friction coefficient and the spring constant. We explain the magnitude, as well as the distance dependence of the friction due to these backaction terms. Reasonable agreement is found with the experiments. PMID:22540716

  2. Frictional work in double-sided tablet compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Ruiz, A; Wihervaara, M; Hakkinen, M; Juslin, M; Paronen, P

    1997-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the friction during double-sided tablet compression. Dicalcium phosphate dihydrate and lactose were tabletted with a compaction simulator with symmetrical and asymmetrical double-sided sawtooth punch displacement profiles. The estimation of force transmission in a powder column was based on an exponential equation, including the material parameter consisting of both the friction coefficient and Poisson's ratio. This parameter was predetermined from a single-sided compression. A novel equation was derived from a previously presented equation for friction work in single-sided tablet compression. The basic assumption was drawn from the linearly decreasing movement of infinitely thin particle layers, which are produced as the compressing punch surface approaches the other punch. This calculation was also based on the assumption that the equilibrium point, where the particles do not move, is halfway between the punches in the symmetrical profile and at a distance proportional to the amplitudes of the asymmetrical upper and lower sawtooth profiles. The tensile strength of tablets compressed with single-double-sided profiles was identical, and thus the behavior of the materials studied under compression was independent of the compression profiles. The friction work values that were calculated with the proposed expression for double-sided profiles were close to the theoretical values, as estimated by calculations based on compressions with single-sided profiles. In conclusion, the novel mathematical expression opens new possibilities for the evaluation of friction in double-sided compression; for example, in rotary press tabletting. PMID:9109053

  3. Friction and Shear Strength at the Nanowire–Substrate Interfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gu Yi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The friction and shear strength of nanowire (NW–substrate interfaces critically influences the electrical/mechanical performance and life time of NW-based nanodevices. Yet, very few reports on this subject are available in the literature because of the experimental challenges involved and, more specifically no studies have been reported to investigate the configuration of individual NW tip in contact with a substrate. In this letter, using a new experimental method, we report the friction measurement between a NW tip and a substrate for the first time. The measurement was based on NW buckling in situ inside a scanning electron microscope. The coefficients of friction between silver NW and gold substrate and between ZnO NW and gold substrate were found to be 0.09–0.12 and 0.10–0.15, respectively. The adhesion between a NW and the substrate modified the true contact area, which affected the interfacial shear strength. Continuum mechanics calculation found that interfacial shear strengths between silver NW and gold substrate and between ZnO NW and gold substrate were 134–139 MPa and 78.9–95.3 MPa, respectively. This method can be applied to measure friction parameters of other NW–substrate systems. Our results on interfacial friction and shear strength could have implication on the AFM three-point bending tests used for nanomechanical characterisation.

  4. Evolution of wear and friction along experimental faults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boneh, Yeval; Chang, Jefferson C.; Lockner, David A.; Reches, Zeev

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the evolution of wear and friction along experimental faults composed of solid rock blocks. This evolution is analyzed through shear experiments along five rock types, and the experiments were conducted in a rotary apparatus at slip velocities of 0.002–0.97 m/s, slip distances from a few millimeters to tens of meters, and normal stress of 0.25–6.9 MPa. The wear and friction measurements and fault surface observations revealed three evolution phases: A) An initial stage (slip distances failure of isolated asperities associated with roughening of the fault surface; B) a running-in stage of slip distances of 1–3 m with intense wear-rate, failure of many asperities, and simultaneous reduction of the friction coefficient and wear-rate; and C) a steady-state stage that initiates when the fault surface is covered by a gouge layer, and during which both wear-rate and friction coefficient maintain quasi-constant, low levels. While these evolution stages are clearly recognizable for experimental faults made from bare rock blocks, our analysis suggests that natural faults “bypass” the first two stages and slip at gouge-controlled steady-state conditions.

  5. Circuit racing, track texture, temperature and rubber friction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, R. S.; Gruber, P.; Fina, E.

    2016-04-01

    Some general observations relating to tyre shear forces and road surfaces are followed by more specific considerations from circuit racing. The discussion then focuses on the mechanics of rubber friction. The classical experiments of Grosch are outlined and the interpretations that can be put on them are discussed. The interpretations involve rubber viscoelasticity, so that the vibration properties of rubber need to be considered. Adhesion and deformation mechanisms for energy dissipation at the interface between rubber and road and in the rubber itself are highlighted. The enquiry is concentrated on energy loss by deformation or hysteresis subsequently. Persson's deformation theory is outlined and the material properties necessary to apply the theory to Grosch's experiments are discussed. Predictions of the friction coefficient relating to one particular rubber compound and a rough surface are made using the theory and these are compared with the appropriate results from Grosch. Predictions from Persson's theory of the influence of nominal contact pressure on the friction coefficient are also examined. The extent of the agreement between theory and experiment is discussed. It is concluded that there is value in the theory but that it is far from complete. There is considerable scope for further research on the mechanics of rubber friction.

  6. On the Friction and Wear Behaviors of Dental Machinable Porcelain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Hai-yang; ZHOU Zhong-rong; CAI Zhen-Bing

    2004-01-01

    In order to well design tribosystems of dental CAD-CAM restorations, an understanding of the tribological mechanisms of dental machinable porcelain are essential. The friction and wear behavior of new generation industrially prefabricated Cerec Vitablocs Mark Ⅱ against uniform Si3N4 ball has been performed using a small amplitude reciprocating apparatus under simulating oral conditions. The loads of 10-40 N, reciprocating amplitudes of 100-500 μm, frequencies of 1-4 Hz and two lubrications (no / artificial saliva lubrication) were selected. Tests lasting up to 10 000 cycles were conducted. The results show that Cerec Vitablocs Mark Ⅱ record a friction coefficient of 0.55-0.84. Artificial saliva plays a lubricant effect during wear process. Among three parameters of the test on friction coefficient and wear depth of dental machinable porcelains, the load effect is prominent. Abrasive wear is the main wear mechanism, but brittle cracks and delamination are more popular especially under unlubricated friction.

  7. On the Friction and Wear Behaviors of Dental Machinable Porcelain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YUHai-yang; ZHOUZhong-rong; CAIZhen-Bing

    2004-01-01

    In order to well design tribosystems of dental CAD-CAM restorations, an understanding of the tribological mechanisms of dental machinable porcelain are essential. The friction and wear behavior of new generation industrially prefabricated Cerec Vitablocs Mark II against uniform Si3N4ball has been performed using a small amplitude reciprocating apparatus under simulating oral conditions. The loads of 10-40N, reciprocating amplitudes of 100-500μm, frequencies of 1-4Hz and two lubrications (no / artificial saliva lubrication) were selected. Tests lasting up to 10 000 cycles were conducted. The results show that Cerec Vitablocs Mark Ⅱ record a friction coefficient of 0.55-0.84. Artificial saliva plays a lubricant effect during wear process. Among three parameters of the test on friction coefficient and wear depth of dental machinable porcelains, the load effect is prominent. Abrasive wear is the main wear mechanism, but brittle cracks and delamination are more popular especially under unlubricated friction.

  8. 纤维种类对C/C复合材料摩擦磨损性能的影响%Effect of Fiber Type on the Friction and Wear Properties of C/C Composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴世国; 罗瑞盈

    2016-01-01

    friction test machine, and the morphology analysis of the friction surface was conducted using SEM. Results The re-sults showed that:with the increase of load, the friction coefficient between pre oxygen basal C/C composites and metal remained at about 0. 22, with an average wear loss of 0. 82 mg/min;The carbon fiber basal C/C composites and metal had a relatively low coef-ficient of friction (0. 15~0. 20), and the friction coefficient changed with the load fluctuation because of the occurrence of abrasive wear behavior in the process. The average wear amount was 1. 17 mg/min. For a pair of C/C composites, the friction coefficient between pre oxygen basal C/C and pre oxygen basal C/C composites ranged 0. 28~0. 33, which was relatively stable, with an av-erage wear of 1. 76 mg/min; With the increase of load, the friction coefficient of carbon fiber basal composite and carbon fiber composite varied in a relatively large range (0. 15~0. 33), besides the average amount of wear was 2. 35 mg/min;The wear be-tween pre oxygen basal composite and carbon fiber basal composite was the biggest, with an average wear amount of 2. 95 mg/min. Conclusion The friction and wear properties of C/C composites were greatly related to the fiber type, and the C/C composites pre-pared by the pre oxygen fiber were easy to form a stable lubricating film. With the increase of load, the fluctuation range of the fric-tion coefficient was relatively small, and the wear and friction work was also the lowest. The friction properties of carbon fiber based C/C composites were more excellent. The friction properties of pre oxygen basal C/C composites were superior to those of the car-bon fiber based C/C composites.

  9. On Averaging Rotations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gramkow, Claus

    2001-01-01

    In this paper two common approaches to averaging rotations are compared to a more advanced approach based on a Riemannian metric. Very often the barycenter of the quaternions or matrices that represent the rotations are used as an estimate of the mean. These methods neglect that rotations belong...

  10. On Aperture-Friction Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Ghaffari, H O

    2012-01-01

    A model based on self-organizing nature of the surfaces is represented to capture the evolution of friction networks. Also, the curvatures of displacement fields are determined and critical curvature profiles are connected through links to form ridge-networks. To generate the ridge-networks, we consider the interactions of pairs though a directed network framework, namely, dilatancy (divergence) and deviotric components (vorticity) of local maxima of curvature profiles. The correlation of the characteristics of generated networks with synthetic acoustic signatures of frictional interface is postulated while the interactions of critical pairs before and after frictional sliding highlighted.

  11. Frictional properties of confined polymers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sivebæk, Ion Marius; Samoilov, Vladimir N; Persson, Bo N J

    2008-01-01

    We present molecular dynamics friction calculations for confined hydrocarbon solids with molecular lengths from 20 to 1400 carbon atoms. Two cases are considered: a) polymer sliding against a hard substrate, and b) polymer sliding on polymer. In the first setup the shear stresses are relatively...... independent of molecular length. For polymer sliding on polymer the friction is significantly larger, and dependent on the molecular chain length. In both cases, the shear stresses are proportional to the squeezing pressure and finite at zero load, indicating an adhesional contribution to the friction force...

  12. Flow Friction or Spontaneous Ignition?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoltzfus, Joel M.; Gallus, Timothy D.; Sparks, Kyle

    2012-01-01

    "Flow friction," a proposed ignition mechanism in oxygen systems, has proved elusive in attempts at experimental verification. In this paper, the literature regarding flow friction is reviewed and the experimental verification attempts are briefly discussed. Another ignition mechanism, a form of spontaneous combustion, is proposed as an explanation for at least some of the fire events that have been attributed to flow friction in the literature. In addition, the results of a failure analysis performed at NASA Johnson Space Center White Sands Test Facility are presented, and the observations indicate that spontaneous combustion was the most likely cause of the fire in this 2000 psig (14 MPa) oxygen-enriched system.

  13. Texture friction relationship: from texture empirical decomposition to pavement friction

    OpenAIRE

    Kane, Malal; RADO, Zoltan; CEREZO, Véronique; TIMMONS, Andrew; DO, Minh Tan

    2014-01-01

    This work investigates the friction-texture relationship: starting from a decomposition method of the pavement texture that is part of a new signal processing so called “Huang Hilbert Transformation” to texture parameters-friction relation. This method allows empirical decomposition of the texture profile to a set of basic profiles in a limited number, so called “Intrinsic Mode Functions” or IMF. From the obtained IMFs, a set of four new functions so called “Base...

  14. Evaluation of International Friction Index and High-Friction Surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Roa, Julio Alberto

    2008-01-01

    State highway agencies have an obligation to provide users with optimal surface conditions under various weather conditions throughout the year. A satisfactory pavement surface should exhibit good friction and texture depth to reduce roadway highway accidents. This is why friction is starting to receive increased attention in the pavement management process. There have been numerous research efforts by different countries and agencies to better understand the behavior of different fricti...

  15. Friction and Material Modelling in Finite Element Simulation of Orthogonal Cutting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.P. Markopoulos

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In the present paper the influence of the friction and material modelling on the results of the Finite Element simulations of machining is investigated. An orthogonal cutting model is proposed, which incorporates Coulomb’s friction law. The validity of this model is tested against similar experimental and numerical results from the relevant literature and the influence of the friction coefficient is investigated. Then, a second model, with a friction model based on Zorev’s stick-slip theory, is prepared and compared to the first one. Furthermore, simulations with Johnson-Cook material model for both kinds of friction modelling are presented and compared to the other models. The results of the different kinds of models although exhibit small discrepancies between models’ results such us cutting forces, affect temperatures and chip morphology.

  16. Upset Prediction in Friction Welding Using Radial Basis Function Neural Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Liu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses the upset prediction problem of friction welded joints. Based on finite element simulations of inertia friction welding (IFW, a radial basis function (RBF neural network was developed initially to predict the final upset for a number of welding parameters. The predicted joint upset by the RBF neural network was compared to validated finite element simulations, producing an error of less than 8.16% which is reasonable. Furthermore, the effects of initial rotational speed and axial pressure on the upset were investigated in relation to energy conversion with the RBF neural network. The developed RBF neural network was also applied to linear friction welding (LFW and continuous drive friction welding (CDFW. The correlation coefficients of RBF prediction for LFW and CDFW were 0.963 and 0.998, respectively, which further suggest that an RBF neural network is an effective method for upset prediction of friction welded joints.

  17. Friction and wear of tin and tin alloys from minus 100 C to 150 C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, D. H.

    1975-01-01

    Sliding friction experiments were conducted with an iron (110) single-crystal pin sliding on single and polycrystalline tin and tin alloys. Specimens were examined at various ambient temperatures from -100 to 150 C. Applied loads varied from 1 to 50 grams, and sliding velocity was constant at 0.7 mm/min. Results indicate that the crystal transformation of tin influences the friction coefficient. Friction was higher for the diamond structure (gray tin) than it was for the body-centered tetragonal structure (white tin). Bismuth arrested the crystal transformation, which resulted in constant friction over the temperature range -100 to 150 C. Both copper and aluminum enhanced the kinetics of transformation, with aluminum producing a nearly twofold change in friction with the crystal transformation.

  18. Some Aspects Concerning the Behaviour of Friction Materials at Low and Very Low Sliding Speeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.A. Stoica

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The tribological aspects concerning the behaviour of friction materials in the range of low and very low sliding speeds (0.2 – 200 mm/min are essentially different of those in the high sliding speeds range. This paper aims to study the stick-slip phenomenon which occurs in the range of low and very low speeds. Typically, for the stick-slip phenomenon to occur, the static friction coefficient between the two contact surfaces of the friction materials must be larger than the kinetic friction coefficient. For disc brakes, the stick-slip phenomenon is mentioned in many specialized scientific papers. The phenomenon is manifested through self-induced vibrations. The experimental results were obtained on a dedicated testing machine where the parasite stick-slip motion is reduced through the use of bearings.

  19. Transition from static to kinetic friction: Insights from a 2D model

    CERN Document Server

    Trømborg, Jørgen; Amundsen, David Skålid; Thøgersen, Kjetil; Malthe-Sørenssen, Anders

    2013-01-01

    We describe a 2D spring-block model for the transition from static to kinetic friction at an elastic slider/rigid substrate interface obeying a minimalistic friction law (Amontons-Coulomb). By using realistic boundary conditions, a number of previously unexplained experimental results on precursory micro-slip fronts are successfully reproduced. From the analysis of the interfacial stresses, we derive a prediction for the evolution of the precursor length as a function of the applied loads, as well as an approximate relationship between microscopic and macroscopic friction coefficients. We show that the stress build-up due to both elastic loading and micro-slip-related relaxations depend only weakly on the underlying shear crack propagation dynamics. Conversely, crack speed depends strongly on both the instantaneous stresses and the friction coefficients, through a non-trivial scaling parameter.

  20. Investigation of Friction Behaviors of Brake Shoe Materials using Metallic Filler

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Surojo

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Some vehicles use brake shoe made from semi-metallic materials. Semi-metallic brake shoes are made from a combination of metallic and non-metallic materials. Metallic particles are added in the formulation of brake shoe material to improve composites characteristics. In this paper, friction behaviors of brake shoe material using metallic filler were investigated. Machining chips of cast iron and copper wire of electric motor used were incorporated in composite as metallic fillers with amount 0, 2, and 4 vol. %. Friction testing was performed to measure coefficient of friction by pressing surface specimen against the surface of rotating disc. The results show that cast iron chip and Cu short wire have effect on increasing coefficient of friction of brake shoe material. They form contact plateau at contact surface. At contact surface, the Cu short wires which have parallel orientation to the sliding contact were susceptible to detach from the matrix.

  1. Simulation of granular packing of frictional cohesive particles with Gaussian size distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Tao; Gao, Di

    2016-09-01

    The granular packing of frictional cohesive particles with Gaussian distribution is investigated based on distinct element method. Different sliding frictional coefficients are considered in the simulation. Due to the inelastic collision between the particles, the agglomeration of the particles occurs and the packing structure is formed finally. The range of the diameter of the particle is between 50 and 100 μm, and the distribution of the particle diameter is Gaussian. The inelastic interaction is caused by the viscoelastic force and the frictional force. The internal structure of the granular matter is quantified by the coordination number, packing density, and the force distribution. It is found that the increase in the sliding frictional coefficient looses the packing structure, and the distribution range of the contact force is larger than that of the van der Waals force.

  2. Simulation of rolling friction in the working stands of wide-strip mills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garber, E. A.; Samarin, S. N.; Traino, A. I.; Ermilov, V. V.

    2007-04-01

    The energy consumed for rolling friction in the interroll contact area in the working stands of cold-rolling and pinch-pass mils intended for the production of wide steel strips has been analyzed. The coefficients and power of rolling friction are obtained for the first time using the databases of the process control systems of operating mills and simulating these quantities. A statistically reliable regression relation is obtained between the coefficient of rolling friction and the significant parameters of rolling and skin rolling (i.e., the interroll force, the roll speed, and the roll body roughness). The power fraction consumed for rolling friction is found to reach 60 80% of the total power of the main drive of working stands for skin rolling and 30 50% for cold rolling. Therefore, it is necessary to take into account these power losses in designing mills and developing technological cold-rolling conditions.

  3. Multimodal Friction Ignition Tester

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Eddie; Howard, Bill; Herald, Stephen

    2009-01-01

    The multimodal friction ignition tester (MFIT) is a testbed for experiments on the thermal and mechanical effects of friction on material specimens in pressurized, oxygen-rich atmospheres. In simplest terms, a test involves recording sensory data while rubbing two specimens against each other at a controlled normal force, with either a random stroke or a sinusoidal stroke having controlled amplitude and frequency. The term multimodal in the full name of the apparatus refers to a capability for imposing any combination of widely ranging values of the atmospheric pressure, atmospheric oxygen content, stroke length, stroke frequency, and normal force. The MFIT was designed especially for studying the tendency toward heating and combustion of nonmetallic composite materials and the fretting of metals subjected to dynamic (vibrational) friction forces in the presence of liquid oxygen or pressurized gaseous oxygen test conditions approximating conditions expected to be encountered in proposed composite material oxygen tanks aboard aircraft and spacecraft in flight. The MFIT includes a stainless-steel pressure vessel capable of retaining the required test atmosphere. Mounted atop the vessel is a pneumatic cylinder containing a piston for exerting the specified normal force between the two specimens. Through a shaft seal, the piston shaft extends downward into the vessel. One of the specimens is mounted on a block, denoted the pressure block, at the lower end of the piston shaft. This specimen is pressed down against the other specimen, which is mounted in a recess in another block, denoted the slip block, that can be moved horizontally but not vertically. The slip block is driven in reciprocating horizontal motion by an electrodynamic vibration exciter outside the pressure vessel. The armature of the electrodynamic exciter is connected to the slip block via a horizontal shaft that extends into the pressure vessel via a second shaft seal. The reciprocating horizontal

  4. The Friction of Vehicle Brake Tandem Master Cylinder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, M. J.; Chang, H.; Tsung, T. T.; Lin, H. M.

    2006-10-01

    The behaviour of an elastomeric seal for vehicle brake Tandem master cylinder is measured and analyzed in temperature and brake fluids changed. Working conditions are simulated for different piston rod velocity and cylinder supply pressure, in temperature rising, brakefluid boundary and Nanoaluminum oxide brakefluid oxide brakefluid lubrication. The result shows that Nanoaluminum oxide brakefluid with its ball shape can highly reduce friction coefficient to avoid seal excessive wear and reduce slick slip in brake applications.

  5. Low friction coatings prepared by high performance type spray gun

    OpenAIRE

    Fukumasa, O.; Osaki, K.; Fujimoto, S; Lungu, C. P.; Lungu, Ana Mihaela

    2003-01-01

    To produce low friction coatings to be used as overlays for automobile journal bearings and to perform depositions with high rate, we prepared composite coatings of Ag and graphite by using the new-type spray gun based on the forced constricted type plasma jet generator (i.e. the high performance type spray gun). Characterization of the films showed the graphite phase dispersed into the Ag matrix, analyzed by optical microscopy, electron probe microanalysis and X-ray diffraction. The coeffici...

  6. The temperature dependence of the friction in the fission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamaji, Shuhei [Institute of Physical and Chemical Research, Wako, Saitama (Japan)

    1996-03-01

    We study the slow collective motion at finite excitation on the basis of the linear response theory. The transport coefficients such as friction {gamma}, inertia M and local stiffness C formulated within a locally harmonic approximation are computed along the fission path of {sup 224}Th. It is found that the effective damping rate {eta} = {gamma}/=2{radical}(M|C|)= increases with the temperature T in accord with the fission experiment with the emission of {gamma}-rays. (author)

  7. A Pedagogical Model of Static Friction

    CERN Document Server

    Pickett, Galen T

    2015-01-01

    While dry Coulombic friction is an elementary topic in any standard introductory course in mechanics, the critical distinction between the kinetic and static friction forces is something that is both hard to teach and to learn. In this paper, I describe a geometric model of static friction that may help introductory students to both understand and apply the Coulomb static friction approximation.

  8. The averaging principle

    OpenAIRE

    Fibich, Gadi; Gavious, Arieh; Solan, Eilon

    2012-01-01

    Typically, models with a heterogeneous property are considerably harder to analyze than the corresponding homogeneous models, in which the heterogeneous property is replaced with its average value. In this study we show that any outcome of a heterogeneous model that satisfies the two properties of \\emph{differentiability} and \\emph{interchangibility}, is $O(\\epsilon^2)$ equivalent to the outcome of the corresponding homogeneous model, where $\\epsilon$ is the level of heterogeneity. We then us...

  9. Friction Material Composites Materials Perspective

    CERN Document Server

    Sundarkrishnaa, K L

    2012-01-01

    Friction Material Composites is the first of the five volumes which strongly educates and updates engineers and other professionals in braking industries, research and test labs. It explains besides the formulation of design processes and its complete manufacturing input. This book gives an idea of mechanisms of friction and how to control them by designing .The book is  useful for designers  of automotive, rail and aero industries for designing the brake systems effectively with the integration of friction material composite design which is critical. It clearly  emphasizes the driving  safety and how serious designers should  select the design input. The significance of friction material component like brake pad or a liner as an integral part of the brake system of vehicles is explained. AFM pictures at nanolevel illustrate broadly the explanations given.

  10. Labor Supply and Optimization Frictions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søgaard, Jakob Egholt

    2015-01-01

    In this paper I investigate the nature of optimization frictions by studying the labor market of Danish students. This particular labor market is an interesting case study as it features a range of special institutional settings that affect students’ incentive to earn income and comparing outcomes...... across these setting effectively allow you to distinguish between different types of frictions. I find that the considered labor market is significantly affected by optimizations frictions, which masks the bunching at kink points normally associated with a positive labor supply elasticity under standard...... theory. More concretely I find the dominate optimization friction to be individuals’ inattention about their earnings during the year, while real adjustment cost and gradual learning appears to be of less importance....

  11. Evaluation and Description of Friction between an Electro-Deposited Coating and a Ceramic Ball under Fretting Condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyungmok Kim

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This article describes fretting behavior of zirconia and silicon nitride balls on an electro-deposited coating. Fretting tests are performed using a ball-on-flat configuration. The evolution of the kinetic friction coefficient is determined, along with slip ratio. Experimental results show that the steady-state friction coefficient between ceramic balls (Si3N4 and ZrO2 and an electro-deposited coating is about 0.06, lower than the value between AISI 52100 ball and the coating. After a steady-state sliding, the transition of the friction coefficient is varied with a ball. The friction coefficient for ZrO2 balls became a critical value after higher fretting cycles than those for Si3N4 and AISI 52100 balls. In addition, it is identified that two parameters can describe the transition of the friction coefficient. Finally, the evolution of the friction coefficient is expressed as an exponential or a power-law form.

  12. The Effect of Cashew to The Friction Performance Of Automotive Brake Linings

    OpenAIRE

    Timur, Mustafa; Kılıç, Halil; Sugözü, İlker

    2013-01-01

    Brake linings used in automotive disks are usually composed of various components. Expected properties from a brake lining are appropriate standart value of wear resist, friction coefficient and also economical value. Brake lining extremely warms up during braking due to friction. The braking performance of brake lining changes and braking lining is subject to mecanical deformation due to excessive temperature. In recent twenty years in consequence of fast development in automotive technology...

  13. NON-FRICTIONAL DAMPING IN THE CONTACT OF TWO FIBERS SUBJECT TO SMALL OSCILLATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikhail Popov

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Structural damping is discussed for the contact of two fibers in a woven material. In the presence of both normal and tangential oscillations, structural (relaxation damping takes place even with perfect sticking in the contact, where slip-related frictional damping disappears. For the case of an infinite coefficient of friction and small amplitudes a closed-form solution for energy lost during one oscillation cycle is obtained.

  14. FEM simulation of friction testing method based on combined forward rod-backward can extrusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nakamura, T; Bay, Niels; Zhang, Z. L

    1997-01-01

    die surface in the forward rod extrusion using theoretical calibration diagrams representing the relationship between the punch travel, the forward rod extrusion length and mu or m without requirements of measuring the forming forces and the paw stress of the workpiece. The theoretical calibration...... in a mechanical press with aluminium alloy A6061 as the workpiece material and different kinds of lubricants. They confirm the analysis resulting in reasonable values for the friction coefficient and the friction factor....

  15. Adhesion wear mechanisms under dry friction of titanium alloys in vacuum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lebedeva, I.L.; Presnyakova, G.N. (Physico-Technical Inst. for Low Temperature Physics and Engineering, Ukrainian Academy of Sciences, Kharkov (Ukrainian SSR))

    1991-08-15

    Physicochemical processes taking place in the surface layers of titanium alloys were studied. For vacuum conditions, a range of external parameters was proved to exist where the alloys have high wear resistance and a low coefficient of friction. The transition from seizure, with tearing of the material at a large depth, to fatigue wear is related to surface hardening due to {alpha} {r reversible} {beta} transitions under friction. Thermodynamic parameters were calculated and the criteria of protective secondary structure formation defined. (orig.).

  16. Hard and low friction nitride coatings and methods for forming the same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdemir, Ali; Urgen, Mustafa; Cakir, Ali Fuat; Eryilmaz, Osman Levent; Kazmanli, Kursat; Keles, Ozgul

    2007-05-01

    An improved coating material possessing super-hard and low friction properties and a method for forming the same. The improved coating material includes the use of a noble metal or soft metal homogeneously distributed within a hard nitride material. The addition of small amounts of such metals into nitrides such as molybdenum nitride, titanium nitride, and chromium nitride results in as much as increasing of the hardness of the material as well as decreasing the friction coefficient and increasing the oxidation resistance.

  17. Tire/runway friction interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yager, Thomas J.

    1990-01-01

    An overview is given of NASA Langley's tire/runway pavement interface studies. The National Tire Modeling Program, evaluation of new tire and landing gear designs, tire wear and friction tests, and tire hydroplaning studies are examined. The Aircraft Landing Dynamics Facility is described along with some ground friction measuring vehicles. The major goals and scope of several joint FAA/NASA programs are identified together with current status and plans.

  18. Qualitative theory of rubber friction

    OpenAIRE

    Persson, B.N.J.; E. Tosatti

    2000-01-01

    When rubber is slid on a hard, rough substrate, the surface asperities of the substrate exert oscillating forces on the rubber surface leading to energy "dissipation" via the internal friction of the rubber. We present a qualitative discussion of how the resulting friction force depends on the nature of the surface roughness and comment on the origin of the wear of sliding rubber surfaces. (C) 2000 American Institute of Physics. [S0021-9606(00)51404-4].

  19. Friction modeling, identification and compensation

    OpenAIRE

    Altpeter, Friedhelm; Longchamp, Roland

    2007-01-01

    High-precision tracking requires excellent control of slow motion and positioning. Recent advances have provided dynamic friction models that represent almost all experimentally observed properties of friction. The state space formulation of these new mathematical descriptions has the property that the state derivatives are continuous functions. This enables the application of established theories for nonlinear systems. The existence of locally stable fixed points does not imply for nonlinear...

  20. Dynamical Friction in Cuspidal Galaxies

    OpenAIRE

    Arca-Sedda, M.; Capuzzo-Dolcetta, R.

    2013-01-01

    Dynamical friction is the process responsible for matter transport toward the inner regions of galaxies in form of massive objects, like intermediate mass black holes, globular clusters and small satellite galaxies. While very bright galaxies show an almost flat luminosity profile in the inner region, fainter ones have, usually, a peaked, cuspidal, profile toward the center. This makes unreliable, in these cases, the use of the classic Chandrasekhar's formula for dynamical friction in its loc...

  1. Friction Stir Welding: A Review

    OpenAIRE

    Jain, Sumit; Gupta, Rajat; Singh, Arvinder; Sharma, Neeraj

    2013-01-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) is a solid state joining process in which a rotating tool is used to join the two metal parts. The rotating tool is inserted in between two metal parts and the frictional energy is used to join the metal. In this research paper a review has been presented on FSW. The previous literature has been discussed along with the future aspects included in the field of FSW.

  2. Looking at friction through "shearons"

    OpenAIRE

    Porto, Markus; Urbakh, Michael; Klafter, Joseph

    1999-01-01

    We study the response to shear of a one-dimensional monolayer embedded between two rigid plates, where the upper one is externally driven. The shear is shown to excite ``shearons'', which are collective modes of the embedded system with well defined spatial and temporal pattern, and which dominate the frictional properties of the driven system. We demonstrate that static friction, stick-slip events, and memory effects are well described in terms of the creation and/or annihilation of a shearo...

  3. Friction surfacing of aluminium alloys

    OpenAIRE

    Pereira, Diogo Jorge O. A.

    2012-01-01

    Friction surfacing is a solid state joining process that has attracted much interest in the past decades. This technology allows joining dissimilar metallic materials while avoiding the brittle intermetallic formations, involving temperatures bellow melting point and producing like forged metal structures. Much research using different steels has been made but the same does not happen with aluminium alloys, specially using different aluminium alloys. Friction surface coatings using cons...

  4. Dry Friction Discontinuous Computational Algorithms

    OpenAIRE

    Dalla Vedova, Matteo Davide Lorenzo; Borello, Lorenzo

    2014-01-01

    The design of high position accuracy servo mechanisms (such as an aircraft primary command EHA), involves the deep knowledge of their behaviour, markedly affected by the Coulomb friction. The proper evaluation of the friction forces and torques is usually necessary when an accurate simulation of the servomechanisms dynamic behaviour is requested in order to perform a suitable design of the system itself. To the purpose, the authors consider a servomechanism consisting of a hydraulic motor ele...

  5. TIre/road friction estimation

    OpenAIRE

    DELANNE, Y; VANDANJON, PO

    2006-01-01

    In board tire/road friction estimation is of current interest in two different framework : - optimization of driver assistance systems efficiency : antilock braking system, electronic stability program, adaptive cruise control, lane departure control, advanced automatic driving, etc., - driver instantaneous warning about the available friction and limits for his possible driving actions. This subject has been the objective of many research programs throughout the world. Four main methods have...

  6. Friction Domination with Superconducting Strings

    OpenAIRE

    Dimopoulos, Konstantinos; Davis, Anne-Christine

    1997-01-01

    We investigate the evolution of a superconducting string network with arbitrary, constant string current in the friction dominated regime. In the absence of an external magnetic field the network always reaches a scaling solution. However, for string current stronger than a critical value, it is different than the usual, horizon-scaling of the non-superconducting string case. In this case the friction domination era never ends. Whilst the superconducting string network can be much denser than...

  7. Study of Bed Friction Factor for the Wu River Estuary

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chin-Wu LAN; Cyuan-Chen LEE

    2006-01-01

    In this research the bed friction effect is estimated of a river estuary by use of hydrodynamic analysis. The on-site sampled data of the Wu River estuary is applied to the analysis. There are many dynamic factors that affect the flow characteristics in the estuary. The effect of tide on the generation of tidal current, bottom friction and geometry effect is the focus of this paper. The Wu River estuary is about 15 km in length, with a small bottom slope and no physical obstruction; thus the incident wave at the estuary is considered a progressive wave with damping effect. The amplitude reduction and phase shift of the incident wave are analyzed. By the analysis of celerity reduction factor of the estuary, the estimated value of mean resistance coefficient M(μ,κ), damping modulus μ, and wave number κ for the sections at observation stations can be determined. Furthermore, data gathered from on-site observations are applied for validation. Finally, Manning's coefficient for each section of the observation stations can be determined. It is found that the value of Manning's coefficient is small downstream and increases towards upstream, and that the bed friction effect of an estuary varies largely. The estimated results of the paper are compared with the empirical formulas and the modified solution for practical application is discussed.

  8. Departure of microscopic friction from macroscopic drag in molecular fluid dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanasaki, Itsuo; Fujiwara, Daiki; Kawano, Satoyuki

    2016-03-01

    Friction coefficient of the Langevin equation and drag of spherical macroscopic objects in steady flow at low Reynolds numbers are usually regarded as equivalent. We show that the microscopic friction can be different from the macroscopic drag when the mass is taken into account for particles with comparable scale to the surrounding fluid molecules. We illustrate it numerically by molecular dynamics simulation of chloride ion in water. Friction variation by the atomistic mass effect beyond the Langevin regime can be of use in the drag reduction technology as well as the electro or thermophoresis. PMID:26957167

  9. A new visco-elastic contact model of traveling wave ultrasonic motor with stator frictional layer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    A new contact model of traveling wave ultrasonic motor (TWUSM) with a visco-elastic stator frictional layer was presented. In this model, the initial boundaries were revised, and the rotor revolution speed could be calculated iteratively. This model was compared with compliant slider and rigid stator model. The results of motor characteristics simulations showed that the motors based on this model would gain bigger stall torque. Then the friction and wear characteristics of two models were analyzed. The motors based on this model had lower coefficient of friction and better wear resistance.

  10. Improving the Friction Durability of Magnetic Head-Disk Interfaces by Thin Lubricant Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shojiro Miyake

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanowear and viscoelasticity were evaluated to study the nanotribological properties of lubricant films of Z-tetraol, D-4OH, and A20H, including their retention and replenishment properties. For A20H and thick Z-tetraol-coated disks, the disk surface partially protrudes, and the phase lag (tan⁡δ increases with friction. This result is consistent with replenishment of the lubricant upon tip sliding. For the D-4OH-coated disk, the tan⁡δ value decreases with tip sliding, similar to the case for the unlubricated disk. The durability of the lubricant-coated magnetic disks was then evaluated by load increase and decrease friction tests. The friction force of the unlubricated disk rapidly increases after approximately 30 reciprocating cycles, regardless of the load. The lubrication state can be estimated by mapping the dependence of friction coefficient on the reciprocating cycle number and load. The friction coefficient can be classified into one of four areas. The lowest friction area constitutes fluid lubrication. The second area constitutes the transition to mixed lubrication. The third area constitutes boundary lubrication. The highest friction of the fourth area results from surface fracture. The boundary lubricating area of the A20H lubricant was wide, because of its good retention and replenishment properties.

  11. Wear of Polished Steel Surfaces in Dry Friction Linear Contact on Polimer Composites with Glass Fibres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Rus

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available It is generally known that the friction and wear between polymers and polished steel surfaces has a special character, the behaviour to friction and wear of a certain polymer might not be valid for a different polymer, moreover in dry friction conditions. In this paper, we study the reaction to wear of certain polymers with short glass fibres on different steel surfaces, considering the linear friction contact, observing the friction influence over the metallic surfaces wear. The paper includes also its analysis over the steel’s wear from different points of view: the reinforcement content influence and tribological parameters (load, contact pressure, sliding speed, contact temperature, etc.. Thus, we present our findings related to the fact that the abrasive component of the friction force is more significant than the adhesive component, which generally is specific to the polymers’ friction. Our detections also state that, in the case of the polyamide with 30% glass fibres, the steel surface linear wear rate order are of 10-4 mm/h, respectively the order of volumetric wear rate is of 10-6 cm3 /h. The resulting volumetric wear coefficients are of the order (10-11 – 10-12 cm3/cm and respectively linear wear coefficients of 10-9 mm/cm.

  12. Wave Reflection Coefficient Spectrum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    俞聿修; 邵利民; 柳淑学

    2003-01-01

    The wave reflection coefficient frequency spectrum and directional spectrum for concrete face slope breakwaters and rubble mound breakwaters are investigated through physical model tests in the present study. The reflection coefficients of oblique irregular waves are analyzed by the Modified Two-Point Method (MTPM) proposed by the authors. The results show that the wave reflection coefficient decreases with increasing wave frequency and incident angle or decreasing structure slope. The reflection coefficient frequency spectrum and its variation with Iribarren number are given in this paper. The paper also suggests an empirical 3-dimensional reflection coefficient spectrum, i.e. reflection coefficient directional spectrum, which can be used to illustrate quantitatively the variation of reflection coefficient with the incident angle and the Iribarren number for oblique irregular waves.

  13. Influence of normal loads and sliding velocities on friction properties of engineering plastics sliding against rough counterfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuruzzaman, D. M.; Chowdhury, M. A.; Rahaman, M. L.; Oumer, A. N.

    2016-02-01

    Friction properties of plastic materials are very important under dry sliding contact conditions for bearing applications. In the present research, friction properties of engineering plastics such as polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) and nylon are investigated under dry sliding contact conditions. In the experiments, PTFE and nylon slide against different rough counterfaces such as mild steel and stainless steel 316 (SS 316). Frictional tests are carried out at low loads 5, 7.5 and 10 N, low sliding velocities 0.5, 0.75 and 1 m/s and relative humidity 70%. The obtained results reveal that friction coefficient of PTFE increases with the increase in normal loads and sliding velocities within the observed range. On the other hand, frictional values of nylon decrease with the increase in normal loads and sliding velocities. It is observed that in general, these polymers show higher frictional values when sliding against SS 316 rather than mild steel. During running-in process, friction coefficient of PTFE and nylon steadily increases with the increase in rubbing time and after certain duration of rubbing, it remains at steady level. At identical operating conditions, the frictional values are significantly different depending on normal load, sliding velocity and material pair. It is also observed that in general, the influence of normal load on the friction properties of PTFE and nylon is greater than that of sliding velocity.

  14. Research on torsional friction behavior and fluid load support of PVA/HA composite hydrogel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kai; Zhang, Dekun; Yang, Xuehui; Cui, Xiaotong; Zhang, Xin; Wang, Qingliang

    2016-09-01

    Hydrogels have been extensively studied for use as synthetic articular cartilage. This study aimed to investigate (1) the torsional friction contact state and the transformation mechanism of PVA/HA composite hydrogel against CoCrMo femoral head and (2) effects of load and torsional angle on torsional friction behavior. The finite element method was used to study fluid load support of PVA/HA composite hydrogel. Results show fluid loss increases gradually of PVA/HA composite hydrogel with torsional friction time, leading to fluid load support decreases. The contact state changes from full slip state to stick-slip mixed state. As the load increases, friction coefficient and adhesion zone increase gradually. As the torsional angle increases, friction coefficient and slip trend of the contact interface increase, resulting in the increase of the slip zone and the reduction of the adhesion zone. Fluid loss increases of PVA/HA composite hydrogel as the load and the torsional angle increase, which causes the decrease of fluid load support and the increase of friction coefficient. PMID:27209115

  15. Molecular dynamics simulations of metallic friction and of its dependence on electric currents - development and first results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meintanis, Evangelos Anastasios

    We have extended the HOLA molecular dynamics (MD) code to run slider-on-block friction experiments for Al and Cu. Both objects are allowed to evolve freely and show marked deformation despite the hardness difference. We recover realistic coefficients of friction and verify the importance of cold-welding and plastic deformations in dry sliding friction. Our first data also show a mechanism for decoupling between load and friction at high velocities. Such a mechanism can explain an increase in the coefficient of friction of metals with velocity. The study of the effects of currents on our system required the development of a suitable electrodynamic (ED) solver, as the disparity of MD and ED time scales threatened the efficiency of our code. Our first simulations combining ED and MD are presented.

  16. Time-dependent angularly averaged inverse transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper concerns the reconstruction of the absorption and scattering parameters in a time-dependent linear transport equation from knowledge of angularly averaged measurements performed at the boundary of a domain of interest. Such measurement settings find applications in medical and geophysical imaging. We show that the absorption coefficient and the spatial component of the scattering coefficient are uniquely determined by such measurements. We obtain stability results on the reconstruction of the absorption and scattering parameters with respect to the measured albedo operator. The stability results are obtained by a precise decomposition of the measurements into components with different singular behavior in the time domain

  17. Time-dependent angularly averaged inverse transport

    CERN Document Server

    Bal, Guillaume

    2009-01-01

    This paper concerns the reconstruction of the absorption and scattering parameters in a time-dependent linear transport equation from knowledge of angularly averaged measurements performed at the boundary of a domain of interest. We show that the absorption coefficient and the spatial component of the scattering coefficient are uniquely determined by such measurements. We obtain stability results on the reconstruction of the absorption and scattering parameters with respect to the measured albedo operator. The stability results are obtained by a precise decomposition of the measurements into components with different singular behavior in the time domain.

  18. Negative Average Preference Utilitarianism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger Chao

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available For many philosophers working in the area of Population Ethics, it seems that either they have to confront the Repugnant Conclusion (where they are forced to the conclusion of creating massive amounts of lives barely worth living, or they have to confront the Non-Identity Problem (where no one is seemingly harmed as their existence is dependent on the “harmful” event that took place. To them it seems there is no escape, they either have to face one problem or the other. However, there is a way around this, allowing us to escape the Repugnant Conclusion, by using what I will call Negative Average Preference Utilitarianism (NAPU – which though similar to anti-frustrationism, has some important differences in practice. Current “positive” forms of utilitarianism have struggled to deal with the Repugnant Conclusion, as their theory actually entails this conclusion; however, it seems that a form of Negative Average Preference Utilitarianism (NAPU easily escapes this dilemma (it never even arises within it.

  19. The role of frictional strength on plate coupling at the subduction interface

    KAUST Repository

    Tan, Eh

    2012-10-01

    At a subduction zone the amount of friction between the incoming plate and the forearc is an important factor in controlling the dip angle of subduction and the structure of the forearc. In this paper, we investigate the role of the frictional strength of sediments and of the serpentinized peridotite on the evolution of convergent margins. In numerical models, we vary thickness of a serpentinized layer in the mantle wedge (15 to 25km) and the frictional strength of both the sediments and serpentinized mantle (friction angle 1 to 15, or static friction coefficient 0.017 to 0.27) to control the amount of frictional coupling between the plates. With plastic strain weakening in the lithosphere, our numerical models can attain stable subduction geometry over millions of years. We find that the frictional strength of the sediments and serpentinized peridotite exerts the largest control on the dip angle of the subduction interface at seismogenic depths. In the case of low sediment and serpentinite friction, the subduction interface has a shallow dip, while the subduction zone develops an accretionary prism, a broad forearc high, a deep forearc basin, and a shallow trench. In the high friction case, the subduction interface is steep, the trench is deeper, and the accretionary prism, forearc high and basin are all absent. The resultant free-air gravity and topographic signature of these subduction zone models are consistent with observations. We believe that the low-friction model produces a geometry and forearc structure similar to that of accretionary margins. Conversely, models with high friction angles in sediments and serpentinite develop characteristics of an erosional convergent margin. We find that the strength of the subduction interface is critical in controlling the amount of coupling at the seismogenic zone and perhaps ultimately the size of the largest earthquakes at subduction zones. © 2012. American Geophysical Union. All Rights Reserved.

  20. THE THEORETICAL FOUNDATIONS OF VIBRATION DAMPERS BY ROLLING FRICTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. M. Bondarenko

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. There are some unresolved issues in vibration damping – the lack of engineering calculations for the vibration dampers by rolling friction; the absence of evidence of their application appropriateness. Considering this fact, the authors suggest to prove that the dampers based on rolling friction, are similar in rate of oscillation damping by hydraulic shock absorbers. At the same time, they are easier for the hydraulic design, and easily amenable to manual adjustment, both in automatic and manual mode. Methodology. Fixed techniques of practice in order to determine amplitudes of the oscillations of a shock absorber led to a predetermined result and will apply this theory in the calculation of other vibration dampers. Findings. Analysis of the formulas and graphs leads to the following conclusions and recommendations: 1 the nature of the oscillation damping at vibration dampers by rolling friction is close to their decay in the viscous resistance; 2 when conducting the necessary experiments the shock absorber rolling can be recommended as alternatives to hydraulic ones. The research results of this task will help implement the new trend in reduction of dynamic loads in vehicles. Originality. With the help of theoretical curves to determine the coefficients of rolling friction the dependences for determining the amplitudes of the oscillations in the vertical movement of cargo were obtained. At the same time, the previously proposed analytical dependence for determining the coefficient of rolling friction contains only conventional mechanical constants of the contacting bodies and there geometrical dimensions. Practical value. Due to the existing well-known disadvantages of hydraulic shock absorbers it would be logical to apply shock absorbers that are technologically convenient in manufacturing and easy to adjust the damping rate. The proposed theory can be used in the design of shock absorbers rolling as an alternative to the hydraulic